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Full text of "Savannah State University Bulletin: General Catalog Issue, 2005-2007"

SAVANNAH STATE 
UNIVERSITY 

A Senior Unit of The University System of Georgia 




2005-2007 CATALOG 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/savannahstateun200507sava 




SAVANNAH 
STATE UNIVERSITY 



A SENIOR, RESIDENTIAL UNIT OF 
THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA 

GENERAL CATALOG 2005-2007 

Savannah, Georgia 31404 
Civil Rights Compliance 

ACCREDITATION 

Savannah State University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern 
Association of Colleges and Schools (1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097: 
Telephone number 404-679-4501) to award the associate and baccalaureate, and master's 
degree. 

Savannah State University has also earned the following specialized accreditations: 

Civil Engineering Technology — by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 

Electronics Engineering Technology — by the Technology Accreditation Commission 
of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology and by the National As- 
sociation of Radio and Telecommunications Engineers, Inc. (NARTE) 

Mechanical Engineering Technology — by the Technology Accreditation Commission 
of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 

BSW and MSW Social Work — by the Council on Social Work Education 

MPA by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration 

College of Business Administration - by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools 
of Business (AACSB) International 



SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

FALL SEMESTER 2005 
(15-Week Term) 



August 



4-5 


Thur-Fri 


Fall Faculty Institute 


8-12 


Mon-Wed 


Freshman Orientation 


11-12 


Thur-Fri 


Advisement and registration 
8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 


15 


Monday 


First day of classes 


15-16 


Mon-Tues 


Late registration (Late Fee Charged) 
Drop/Add 



September 


5 


Monday 


HOLIDAY-Labor Day 


October 


5 

24-28 
29 


Wednesday 

Mon-Fri 
Saturday 


Mid Term 

Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 

academic penalty 

Early registration for Spring 2006 

HOMECOMING 


November 


23 
24-25 


Wednesday 
Thur-Fri 


HOLIDAY-Thanksgiving (Students) 
HOLIDAY-Thanksgiving (Students, 
Faculty, Staff) 


December 


2 

3-9 

6 

10 
12 


Friday 

Fri-Thur 

Tuesday 

Saturday 
Monday 


Last day of classes 

Final Exams 

Deadline for submitting Appeal for Reinstat 

ment of Financial Aid for Spring 2006 

COMMENCEMENT 

Final grades due in Registrar's Office 9:00 a.m. 



Donated to SSU Archives 

by Sheri Saleem Scott 

upon her Retirement on July 1, 2011 



SPRING SEMESTER 2006 
(15-Week Term) 



January 



3-4 


Tues-Wed 


Advisement and registration 
8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 


5 


Thursday 


First day of classes 


5-6 


Thur-Fri 


Late registration (Late Fee Charged) 
Drop/Add 


16 


Monday 


HOLIDAY-Martin Luther King, Jr. 



February 



N/A 



March 



13-18 
27-31 



Wednesday 



Mon-Sat 
Mon-Fri 



Mid Term 

Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 

academic penalty 

SPRING BREAK 

Early registration for Fall and Summer 2006 



April 



14 
28 
29 



Friday 
Friday 
Saturday 



HOLIDAY-Good Friday 
Last day of classes 
Final Exams 



May 



1-5 
5 

6 

8 

29 



Mon-Fri 
Friday 

Saturday 
Monday 

Monday 



Final Exams 

Final grades due in the Registrar's office 

9:00 a.m. (Graduating Seniors) 

COMMENCEMENT 

Final grades due in the Registrar's office 

9:00 a.m. 

HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2006 
(8-Week Term) 

Session I 



May 



15-16 
16 

29 



Mon-Tues 
Tuesday 

Monday 



Advisement and registration 

8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

First day of classes 

Late registration (Late Fee Charged) 

Drop/Add 

HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 



June 



15 



Thursday 



Mid-Term 

Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 

academic penalty 



July 



4 
6 
10-11 


Tuesday 

Thursday 

Mon-Tues 


HOLIDAY-Independence Day 
Last day of classes 
Final Exams 


13 


Thursday 


Final grades due in the Registrar's Office 
9:00 a.m. 


14 


Friday 


Deadline for submitting Appeal for 
Reinstatement of Financial Aid for Fall 2006 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2006 

(5-Week Term) 

Session II 



May 


15-16 


Mon-Tues 


Advisement and registration 
8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 


16 


Tuesday 


First day of classes 

Late registration (Late Fee Charged) 

Drop/Add 


29 


Monday 


HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 


5 


Monday 


Mid-Term 

Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 

academic penalty 


22-23 


Thur-Fri 


Final Exams 


26 


Monday 


Final grades due in the Registrar's Office 
9:00 a.m. 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2006 

(5-Week Term) 

Session III 



June 


26 

27 
28 


Monday 

Tuesday 
Wednesday 


Advisement and registration 
8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 
First day of classes 
Late registration 
Drop/Add 


July 


4 
14 


Tuesday 
Friday 


HOLIDAY-Independence Day 
Deadline for submitting Appeal for 
Reinstatement of Financial Aid for Fall 2005 


August 


1 

2-3 

4 


Tuesday 

Wed-Thur 

Friday 


Last day of classes 

Final Exams 

Final grades due in the Registrar's Office 

9:00 a.m. 



FALL SEMESTER 2006 
(15-Week Term) 



August 


7 

9-12 

14-15 

16 
16-18 


Monday 
Wed-Sat 
Mon-Tues 

Wednesday 
Wed-Fri 


Fall Faculty Institute 

Freshman Orientation 

Advisement and registration 

8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

First day of classes 

Late registration (Late Fee Charged) 

Drop/Add 


September 


4 


Monday 


HOLIDAY-Labor Day 


October 


6 

28 


Friday 
Saturday 


Mid Term 

Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 

academic penalty 

Early registration for Spring 2006 

HOMECOMING 


November 


22 
23-24 


Wednesday 
Thur-Fri 


HOLIDAY-Thanksgiving (Students) 
HOLIDAY-Thanksgiving (Students, 
Faculty, Staff) 


December 







4 
5-11 



9 
14 



Monday 
Tues-Mon 



Saturday 
Thursday 



Last day of classes 

Final Exams 

Deadline for submitting Appeal for Reinstat 

ment of Financial Aid for Spring 2007 

COMMENCEMENT 

Final grades due in Registrar's Office 9:00 a.m. 



SPRING SEMESTER 2007 
(15-Week Term) 



January 



4-5 


Thur-Fri 


Advisement and registration 8:30 a.m 


8 


Monday 


First day of classes 


9-10 


Tues-Wed 


Late registration (Late Fee Charged) 
Drop/Add 


15 


Monday 


HOLIDAY-Martin Luther King, Jr. 



7:00 p.m. 



February 



N/A 



March 



1 


Thursday 


Mid Term 

Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 

academic penalty 


12-16 


Mon-Fri 


SPRING BREAK 


19-23 


Mon-Fri 


Early registration for Fall and Summer 2007 



April 



Friday 



HOLIDAY-Good Friday 



May 



1 


Tuesday 


Last day of classes 


2-8 


Wed-Tues 


Final Exams 


11 


Friday 


Final grades due in the Registrar's office 
9:00 a.m. (Graduating Seniors) 


12 


Saturday 


COMMENCEMENT 


11 


Friday 


Final grades due in the Registrar's office 
9:00 a.m. 


28 


Monday 


HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2007 

(8-Week Term) 

Session I 



May 




14-15 


Mon-Tues 


Advisement and registration 
8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 




15 


Tuesday 


First day of classes 

Late registration (Late Fee Charged) 

Drop/Add 




28 


Monday 


HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 


June 




TBA 




Mid-Term 




TBA 




Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 
academic penalty 


July 



4 


Wednesday 


HOLIDAY-Independence Day 


TBA 




Last day of classes 


TBA 




Final Exams 


TBA 




Final grades due in the Registrar's Office 
9:00 a.m. 


TBA 




Deadline for submitting Appeal for 
Reinstatement of Financial Aid for Fall 2006 



10 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2007 

(5-Week Term) 

Session II 



May 


14-15 


Mon-Tues 


Advisement and registration 
8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 


15 


Tuesday 


First day of classes/registration 
Late registration (Late Fee Charged) 
Drop/Add 


28 


Monday 


HOLIDAY-Memorial Day 


June 



4 
TBA 

21-22 
25 



Monday 



Thur-Fri 
Monday 



Mid-Term 

Last day to withdraw/drop a course without 

academic penalty 

Final Exams 

Final grades due in the Registrar's Office 

9:00 a.m. 



11 



SUMMER SEMESTER 2007 

(5-Week Term) 

Session III 



June 




25 

26 

27 


Monday 

Tuesday 
Wednesday 


Advisement and registration 
8:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. 
First day of classes 
Late registration 
Drop/Add 


July 




4 
TBA 

31 


Wednesday 
Tuesday 


HOLIDAY-Independence Day 
Deadline for submitting Appeal for 
Reinstatement of Financial Aid for Fall 2006 
Last day of classes 


August 




1-2 
3 


Wed-Thur 
Friday 


Final Exams 

Final grades due in the Registrar's Office 

9:00 a.m. 



12 




Unversity Villege 



13 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



I. INTRODUCTION 

II. ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

III. STUDENT AFFAIRS 

IV BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

V CORE CURRICULUM 

VI. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

VII. COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

VIII. COLLEGE OF SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY 

IX. CENTER FOR TEACHING LEARNING AND ACADEMIC SUPPORT 

X. DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

XI. UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA 

XII. UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL 

XIII. APPENDIXES 

XIV APPLICATION AND IMMUNIZATION 

XV WHERE TO WRITE OR CALL 



14 



INTRODUCTION 



PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

PURPOSE AND GOALS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

AN OVERVIEW OF SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 

LOCATION 



PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 



15 



Savannah State University has proudly served the edu- 
cational, cultural, and community development needs of 
Southeastern Georgia since 1890. For much of this his- 
torical period it served as the only institution of higher 
education in the region. Today, Savannah State Univer- 
sity combines a student-centered tradition of service with 
cutting-edge instruction, technological innovations and a 
substantially enhanced living-and-learning environment 
to assure a bright future for today's graduates. The best 
education involves deep commitment by faculty and staff in 
and out of the classroom to direct students to greater levels 

of achievement and understanding in diverse settings. A quality education is not just the 
accumulation of knowledge, information and skill, but it is the totality of the university 
experience. As a small comprehensive institution, our dedicated faculty and staff molds 
students into globally-minded individuals prepared to excel in their endeavors and become 
the next generation of trailblazers and leaders. Our community and service structures 
are designed to address the needs of traditional and nontraditional students both inside 
and outside the classroom. 




Finally Savannah State University seeks to play an increasingly meaningful role in the 
economic and social development of southeastern Georgia. All persons interested in fur- 
thering their education are invited to become part of one of the most spirited, historically 
rich, and progressive institutions in America! 



16 



PURPOSE AND GOALS OF THE 
UNIVERSITY 

MISSION STATEMENT: 

Chartered by the State of Georgia in 1890, as a department of the State University for the 
education and training of Negro students, Savannah State University now serves a diverse 
student population as a senior university of the University System of Georgia. The Uni- 
versity serves a primarily African-American student population, enriched by a diversity of 
traditional and nontraditional students from other countries, cultures, and races. 

The University's mission is to graduate students prepared to perform at higher levels of 
economic productivity, social responsibility, and excellence in their chosen fields of en- 
deavor in a changing global community. The educational goal is realized through program 
offerings in the College of Business Administration, the College of Liberal Arts and Social 
Sciences, and the College of Sciences and Technology, which lead to baccalaureate, and 
master's degrees. 

Savannah State University, located in a coastal, urban, port city setting, serves residential 
and commuter students from diverse educational, geographical, and racial backgrounds. 
In a beautiful and unique setting of a live oak forest next to a salt marsh estuary, the 
University is well situated for the study of commercial, technological, environmental and 
urban issues. The University's mission is consistent with the core missions of the Univer- 
sity System of Georgia and the senior universities in the System. 

Savannah State University shares with the University System of Georgia the following 
characteristics: 

• a supportive campus climate, necessary services, and leadership development oppor- 
tunities, all to educate the whole person and meet the needs of students, faculty, and 
staff; cultural, ethnic, racial, and gender diversity in faculty, staff, and student body, 
supported by practices and programs that embody the ideals of an open, democratic, 
and global society; 

• technology to advance educational purposes, including instructional technology, stu- 
dent support services, and distance education; collaborative relationships with other 
System institutions, state agencies, local schools and technical institutes, and busi- 
nesses and industries, sharing physical, human, information and other resources to 
expand and enhance programs and services available to the citizens of Georgia. 

Savannah State University shares with senior universities in the University System of 
Georgia these characteristics: 

• a commitment to excellence and responsiveness within the scope of influence defined 
by the needs of an area of the state, and by particularly outstanding programs or dis- 
tinctive characteristics that have a magnet effect throughout the region or state; 

• a commitment to the teaching/learning environment, both inside and outside the 
classroom, that sustains instructional excellence, serves a diverse and college pre- 
pared student body, promotes high levels of student achievement, offers academic 
assistance, and provides Student Academic Support programs for a limited student 
cohort; 

• a commitment to a high quality general education program supporting a variety of 
disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and professional programming at the baccalaureate 
level, with selected master's, and selected associate degree programs based on area 
need and/or inter-institutional collaborations; 



17 



• a commitment to public service, continuing education, technical assistance, and eco- 
nomic development activities that address the needs, improve the quality of life, and 
raise the educational level within the University's scope of influence; and 

• a commitment to scholarly and creative work to enhance instructional effectiveness 
and to encourage faculty scholarly pursuits; and a commitment to applied research 
in selected areas of institutional strength and area need. 

The continuing commitment of Savannah State University to academic excellence is ex- 
pressed through the following characteristics: 

• tradition of serving the educational needs of African- American students as well as 
those of all other students, regardless of race, ethnicity, or culture; the historical tra- 
dition as an African-American institution which defines the University as a unique 
cultural and educational resource for the interpretation and transmission of the Af- 
rican-American legacy; the guiding principle of the faculty and staff which is service 
to students expressed by quality, student-centered instruction, scholarship, research 
and effective support services that nurture the intellect and value honesty and hu- 
man sensitivity; a high quality general education offered through the core curriculum 
in humanities, mathematics, natural sciences, and social and behavioral sciences; 

• baccalaureate degree offerings with a dynamic mix of liberal arts programs that ad- 
dress the study of the humanities, social sciences and the sciences; professional pro- 
grams that address the study of commerce, entrepreneurship, communications, so- 
cial services, technology and environmental sustainability; master's degree offerings 
that address the study of the social and behavioral sciences, and natural sciences; and 
initiatives to provide new programs and levels of service to meet the ever changing 
needs of a coastal urban area; 

• a commitment to excellence in the area of engineering technology; 

• Student Academic Support services that provide educational access and opportunity 
for students, and service programs, offered singly and collaboratively, to enhance 
student satisfaction and academic success; and 

• an active community service function that is carried out through collaborative part- 
nerships with business, private and governmental agencies, public schools, and other 
institutions in the University System. 

Savannah State University intends to increase the scope and quality of service to diverse 
populations by focusing and developing an array of excellent programs, supported and 
delivered through instructional technology and distance education to all who seek its pro- 
grams and services. 



18 



AN OVERVIEW OF 
SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 

Savannah State University was founded when enabling legislation was passed by the 
Georgia General Assembly on November 26, 1890, creating a normal school for the train- 
ing of Black citizens. The fledgling institution, known as the Georgia State Industrial Col- 
lege (GSIC) for Colored Youths, began its first session in June 1891, in the Baxter Street 
School Building in Athens, Georgia, with Richard R. Wright, Sr., as principal, and was 
considered a part of the University of Georgia. Religious and educational leaders such as 
Professor John Mcintosh, Reverend E. K. Love, James Simms, Alexander Harris, and oth- 
ers met in March 1891, in the basement of the First African Baptist Church and developed 
a proposal that convinced Judge Peter W Meld rim, chair, and the other white members 
of the Georgia State Industrial College Board of Commissioners to locate the new Black 
institution in Savannah. 

The College was established as a result of the Second Morrill Land Grant Act of August 
30, 1890, which had specific wording mandating the development of Black land grant col- 
leges in the southern and border states. The early educational paradigm of the College was 
based on the Talented Tenth philosophy of W. E. B. DuBois, the vocationalism of Booker 
T. Washington, and the model of the New England College espoused by Richard R. Wright, 
Sr, as a result of his education under the American Missionary Association at Atlanta 
University. The early curriculum had normal, agricultural, and college programs. The 
College opened in Savannah on October 7, 1891, with Richard R. Wright, Sr, as principal, 
five students from Ware High School in Augusta, and a foreman for the farm. Richard R. 
Wright, Jr., received the first baccalaureate degree from the College in June 1898. During 
Wright's presidency, Presidents William McKinley (December 1898) and William Howard 
Taft (May 1, 1912) visited the campus. During Cyrus G. Wiley's (GSIC Class of 1899) 
tenure (1921-26), women were admitted as boarders, and the College was established as a 
federal agricultural extension center. 

Under President Benjamin F. Hubert (1926-1947), the entire academic program was reor- 
ganized. The high school and normal departments were discontinued and the school be- 
came a four-year college. In 1931, when the University System was placed under a Board 
of Regents, the College began to offer additional bachelor's degree programs with majors 
in English, the natural sciences, social sciences, and business administration, as well as in 
agriculture and home economics. 

President James A. Colston (1947-49) modernized the campus of Georgia State College. 
He built the first student center, established the first office of public relations, initiated 
the Campus Chest Program, and installed a campus-wide telephone system. In 1949, the 
College's land-grant status was transferred to Fort Valley State College. It was during 
Colston's administration that Savannah State became accredited by the Southern As- 
sociation of Colleges and Schools (SACS). After President Colston resigned in 1949, Wil- 
liam Kenneth Payne, who was serving as dean of the College, became acting president. 
By 1950, Payne was named president. In September 1950, the Institution's name was 
changed to Savannah State College. The first major building program of the modern era 
began during President Payne's tenure when Richard R. Wright Hall, Colston Hall, Wiley 
Gymnasium, and B. F. Hubert Technical Sciences Center were constructed. Payne died 
during his term of office in August 1963, and was succeeded by Dr. Howard Jordan, Jr., in 
September 1963. 

President Jordan spearheaded a major building program at the College, which resulted 
in the construction of a modern student union, new football stadium, fine arts building, 



19 



Payne Hall, and new dormitories for men and women. White students were admitted to 
the College after the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed, and the first white faculty was 
hired during this time. In 1968, Savannah State College founded Savannah's first gradu- 
ate program in education. The program soon received NCATE accreditation. Dr. Jordan 
resigned from the College in 1971 to become the first Black vice chancellor for the central 
office of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. 

In 1971, Dr. Prince A. Jackson, Jr., became the second Savannah State College graduate to 
become president of the Institution. His administration was responsible for the develop- 
ment of the Naval Reserve Officers Training Program, the establishment of WHCJ-FM 
Radio Station, and the institutionalization of the Title III program, SACS accreditation, 
and construction of new buildings. Dr. Jackson was succeeded by Dr. Clyde W. Hall (1978- 
80), a Savannah State graduate and professor of technical sciences. As acting president, 
Dr. Hall developed plans for a new administration building and health center, and initiated 
improvements to the infrastructure of the College. 

Dr. Wendell G. Rayburn (1980-1988), eighth president of Savannah State College, led 
the institution through its first major building program since the 1970s. His administra- 
tion worked through the Desegregation Plan of the Board of Regents and completed the 
building of the marine biology facilities, Jordan College of Business Administration, the 
president's house (later named William E. Gardner Hall), and Harris-McDew Health Ser- 
vices Center. In 1988, Dr. Rayburn resigned to become president of Lincoln University in 
Jefferson City, Missouri. He was succeeded by Dr. Wiley S. Bolden who served as acting 
president from 1988-1989. Dr. Bolden was instrumental in leading the College to continue 
its existence as a historically Black institution. 

Dr. William E. Gardner, Jr., (1989-1991) was selected as the ninth president of the College 
in September 1989, and presided over a period of unprecedented enrollment growth for 
the Institution. He successfully led the College to SACS accreditation for a ten-year period 
(1990-2000). Dr. Gardner was responsible for the replica of the Navy jet flown by Com- 
mander Donnie L. Cochran, U.S. Navy "Blue Angels" demonstration flying team, being 
placed in front of the McGlockton NROTC Building. He also spearheaded the Centennial 
Celebration of Savannah State and the restoration of Adams Hall as the College's archives 
building and established the Advanced Water Technology Center. Dr. Gardner died sud- 
denly in office in 1991, and was succeeded by Dr. Annette K. Brock, a Savannah State 
College graduate, and professor and chair, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences. 
Dr. Brock served as acting president from 1991 until 1993. As the College's first woman 
president, she continued the successful work of the previous administration and was in- 
strumental in locating the Olympic track at Theodore Wright Stadium and institutional- 
izing the College's archives with the support of Title III funding. 

Dr. John T. Wolfe (1993-1997) became the tenth president of Savannah State College. 
During his tenure, graduate programs in Public Administration and Social Work were 
returned to the institution. During his administration, the Board of Regents of the Uni- 
versity System of Georgia elevated Savannah State College, along with twelve other re- 
gional state colleges, to the status of state universities (1996). Dr. Carlton E. Brown was 
appointed to replace John T. Wolfe and became SSU's eleventh president on July 1, 1997. 
Dr. Brown has embarked on a mission to foster academic and organizational excellence for 
this historic institution. 

Dr. Carlton E. Brown became SSU's eleventh president on July 1, 1997. Dr. Brown has 
embarked on a mission to foster academic and organizational excellence for this historic 
institution. 



20 



LOCATION 

Savannah State University is located approximately five miles east southeast from the 
center of beautiful, historic Savannah, the original European settlement in Southeast 
Georgia, founded by James Oglethorpe in 1733. Savannah today is an extraordinarily at- 
tractive and busy port city with nearly 200,000 inhabitants. Close by are the historic and 
contemporary sea resort islands of St. Simons, Jekyll, and Hilton Head, South Carolina. 
Daufuskie, home of the famed Gullah culture, a blend of early African and American ways 
of life, language, and music, is nearby. Tybee Island lies to the east and is noted for its 
easy-going life style and sport fishing. The general environment is replete with abundant 
historic and contemporary tourist and outdoor attractions, including wildlife refuges, mu- 
seums, heritage preserves, and numerous other attractions. Historically, the region was 
noted for its rich rice and cotton production as well as its lively pirate trade. Many believe 
Savannah, with its exemplary urban renewal and historic preservation record, is the ulti- 
mate Southern hostess city. 

The campus itself lies on a stunning site adjacent to the inland waterway near the estuary 
of the Savannah River and proximate to the Atlantic coast. Several of the University's 
major buildings overlook the open marsh and peaceful tidewater flood plain while others 
center on the two beautifully landscaped quads of native foliage. A temperate climate 
encourages year-round outdoor activities with mean high temperatures ranging from the 
low 50s for December/January to the 80s for July/August. 

Savannah State University is accessed from north/south Interstate 95 and east/west In- 
terstate 16. A beautiful, modern and convenient Savannah/Hilton Head International 
Airport makes the region accessible from anywhere in the USA. Nearby cities include 
Atlanta, Georgia; Jacksonville, Florida; Charleston, South Carolina; and Charlotte, North 
Carolina. 



21 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 



VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES 

UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY 

INTERNATIONAL ADMISSIONS 

GRADUATE ADMISSIONS 

DEFINITION OF LEGAL RESIDENCE 

ACADEMIC POLICY AND REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

REGENTS TESTING PROGRAM 

VETERANS' AFFAIRS 

FINANCIAL AID 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 



22 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

As the chief academic officer of Savannah State University, the Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs is responsible for all functions and matters relating directly to academic 
programs and their support services. The Vice President serves also as the senior officer 
of the University in the absence of the President. 

The Vice President coordinates the work of the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Social Sci- 
ences, Business Administration, Continuing Education, and Sciences and Technology; the 
Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research; and the Center for Teaching, Learning, and 
Academic Support, and the unit of Enrollment Management. Similarly, the Vice President 
oversees the functions of the library, and the Access programs. Long range academic plan- 
ning, overall academic effectiveness, and curriculum and staff development are the prin- 
cipal concerns of the Office. Accordingly, the Vice President also serves as senior liaison 
officer for Savannah State University with the University System of Georgia academic 
officers and staff of the Board of Regents. 

ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT 

The Office of Enrollment Management is a unit where the appropriate departments, Ad- 
missions, Registrar, Financial Aid, Retention, Freshmen Year program and Testing ser- 
vices are organized in a way that facilitates coordination of staff, flow of information, and 
integration of decisions. Headed by the Dean of Enrollment Management, the scope of 
the office is to advance the recruitment and retention activities of the institution, while 
improving the overall mix of high achieving students, students with limited student aca- 
demic assistance, and international students. The office is also charged with creating an 
enrollment profile that will reflect the changing demographics of the State of Georgia and 
in particular, the metropolitan areas of Savannah and the Coastal Georgia region. 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

The Asa H. Gordon Library houses 187,916 volumes, including 29,139 bound periodicals, 
and approximately 547,522 microforms. Current subscriptions include 782 periodicals and 
30 newspapers. There is an extensive collection of materials by and about African- Ameri- 
cans. The library houses a multiplicity of educational media materials including records, 
audio tapes, film units, video units, kits, television monitors, projectors, and distance 
learning facilities. 

The services of the Asa H. Gordon Library include library instruction, audio- visual servic- 
es, bibliographic services, xerographic and microfilm copying, database searching, interli- 
brary loans, fax services, Galileo and CD Rom services (SharePac). The library presently 
operates a Data Research Association turnkey automated system. 

Conference and individual study rooms are located throughout the building. There are ele- 
vators and facilities for the disables. Periodical subscriptions and reference and circulation 
areas are located on the first floor. The educational media, African-American Collection, 
and two distance learning classrooms are located on the second floor. Typing facilities are 
available on both floors. A well-trained staff is available to assist the campus community 
at all times during the hours of operation 



23 



SPECIAL ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 
AND SERVICES 

ACCESS PROGRAMS 
What is ACCESS? 

TRIO Programs were created by the Higher Education Act of 1965. This social legisla- 
tion was driven by the democracy and aspirations of the civil rights movement and by 
President Lyndon B. Johnson's conviction that education was one of the most efficient 
approaches to providing opportunities for America's poor. Originally just three programs, 
Upward Bound, Talent Search, and Special Services/Student Support Services, TRIO has 
evolved into a network of seven programs and services that support students from middle 
school through graduate study. Additional programs include, Ronald E. McNair Post-bac- 
calaureate Achievement Program, Educational Opportunity Centers, Veterans Upward 
Bound, and the Math/Science program. Savannah State University has sponsored TRIO 
Programs for 35 years, beginning with Upward Bound in 1966, followed by Talent Search 
in 1989 and Student Support Services in 1992. TRIO Programs are funded by the United 
States Department of Education. 

The Postsecondary Readiness Enrichment Program (PREP) was created by the University 
System of Georgia in cooperation with the Department of Education and the Department 
of Technical and Adult Education. PREP was launched in 1996 as a result of the Board's 
1995 decision to implement higher admission requirements for Georgia students- require- 
ments were implemented throughout the system this fall. The program started at Savan- 
nah State University in 1996. 

Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs (GEAR UP) enact- 
ed in 1998, is modeled in part after President Clinton's High Hopes for College program 
to create a national goal that every college should partner with at least one middle school 
in a low-income community to help raise expectations and ensure that students are well 
prepared for college. Savannah State University competed for the grant and was funded 
for the program in 2000 by the United States Department of Education. GEAR UP cur- 
rently serves seventh and eighth grade students at Tompkins Middle School. 



24 



EDUCATIONAL TALENT SEARCH 

Description 

Educational Talent Search identifies qualified youth with potential for education at the 
postsecondary level and encourages them to complete secondary school and undertake a 
program of postsecondary education. ETS serves students in grades six through twelve. 

Eligibility 

Students enrolled in targeted middle or high schools who have a need for one or more 
services provided by the program. Also, according to established guidelines, two-thirds of 
the participants must be low-income, potential first generation college students. 



Services Offered 

Academic Advisement Financial Aid Assistance 

Parent/Student Workshops Tutoring 

Career Fairs Conflict Resolution 

Career Exploration/Research Probe Fair 

Academic Bowl Goal Setting 

GEAR UP 



Study Skills Development 
Scholarship Information 
Leadership Workshops 
Field Trips 



Description 

GEAR UP prepares economically disadvantaged middle school students to enroll in higher 
education. It is a national initiative to encourage more students to have high expecta- 
tions, stay in school, study hard, and take the right courses to enter college. 

Eligibility 

All seventh and eighth grade students who attend Tompkins Middle School 

Services Offered 

Personal/Social Counseling Mentoring Academic Advisement 

Tutoring Educational/Career Field Trips 

Study Skills Postsecondary School Visits Test Taking Skills 

Community Outreach Summer Programs Financial Aid Assistance 

Academic Support Cultural Enrichment 



PREP 

Description 

PREP is an academic enrichment and outreach initiative created by the University Sys- 
tem of Georgia in cooperation with the Department of Education and the Department of 
Technical and Adult Education. It's designed to help students and their parents make 
timely, informed decisions that will adequately prepare young people for their higher edu- 
cation careers. 

Eligibility 

Seventh-grade students who are at risk academically and have a need for one or more 
services offered by the program. 

Services Offered 

Tutoring Mentoring 

Career Exploration Cultural Enrichment 

Technology Instruction Summer Program 

Field Trips 



Readiness Sessions 
Self-Esteem Skills 
Leadership Development 



25 

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 

Description 

Student Support Services is a federally funded college academic support and retention 
program, designed to identify 175 low-income, first-generation, disabled students at Sa- 
vannah State University. The program provides various services designed to retain stu- 
dents to graduation. 

Eligibility 

Students enrolled at SSU, who have a need for academic support. Also, according to es- 
tablished guidelines, participants must be low-income, first-generation college students, 
or have disabilities. 

Services Offered 

Information Workshops Peer Group Tutoring Professional Group Tutoring 

Professional Tutoring Supplemental instructions Computer Assistance 

Study Skills Workshops Personal Advising Academic Advising 

Financial Aid Advising Career Advising Transfer Advising 

Graduate School Advising Campus Visitations 

UPWARD BOUND 

Description 

Upward Bound is the first TRIO -based program to come into existence. The Upward 
Bound Program was enacted by the 1965 Higher Education Act, which President Lyndon 
B. Johnson signed to address the nation's war on poverty. The Upward Bound Program 
is designed to address the academic, cultural and psycho-social needs of low-income, first 
generation and/or high school students who are physically challenged, so that they will 
successfully complete their high school requirements and prepare to gain access into the 
higher education arena. 

Eligibility 

Students between the ages of 13 and 19 who attend targeted Chatham County high schools 
where they are enrolled in the college-prep curriculum and plan to pursue a college degree. 
Also, according to established guidelines, two-thirds of the students must be first-genera- 
tion college students, low-income while one-third may be first generation or low income 

Services Offered 

Educational/Cultural Field TripsTutoring Academic Counseling 

Career Options College Placement Financial Aid 

Discussion Group Sessions Study Skills Work Study Experience 

Weekly Films Supervised RecreationPersonal Counseling 

Monthly Assemblies College Visits 



Contact Information: 

Doreatha S. Tyson, Executive Director, ACCESS Programs 

Educational Talent Search (912) 356-2799/2800 

GEAR UP (912) 966-7906 

PREP (912) 691-6250 

Student Support Services (912) 353-3235 

Upward Bound (912) 356-2196 



26 



ROTC 

Through the University's Army and Naval ROTC Programs, Savannah State University 
students can prepare for commissioned service as regular or reserve officers in the Army, 
Army National Guard, Navy, or Marine Corps, commensurate with earning their degree. 
The Army and Naval ROTC Programs constitute an academic minor in military and naval 
science, respectively. 

TEACHER EDUCATION 

While Savannah State University does not offer degrees in teacher education, the Univer- 
sity maintains its century-old tradition of training teachers through innovative, alterna- 
tive programs offered in collaboration with Armstrong Atlantic State University Current 
teacher preparation programs are listed below 

The Cooperative Teacher Certification Program enables Savannah State students 
to earn degrees in one of eight disciplines — biology, business, chemistry, English, history, 
mathematics, music or political science — and also take professional education courses. 
In some departments, students are able to complete a minor, or the equivalent thereof, 
in education. Through the Cooperative Teacher Certification Program, students earn 
degrees in the field of their choice and generally are able to complete four-to-six of the 
education courses required for teacher certification. The program places students on the 
cutting edge of teacher preparation reform. National commissions on teacher education 
have recommended that teachers hold degrees in the disciplines they teach, supplemented 
by a professional education curriculum, rather than degrees in education. Students should 
contact the appropriate academic departments for more information. 

The Collaborative Program in Middle School Teacher Education affords Savan- 
nah State students the opportunity to earn a degree in middle school education. The pro- 
gram addresses Georgia's critical need for middle school teachers and has the goal of 
helping to increase the number of African- American teachers in mathematics and science, 
areas where African-Americans are extremely underrepresented. Students should contact 
their academic advisors for more information on this program. 

GEORGIA INTERN PROGRAM 

Students who are enrolled full-time at Savannah State University are eligible to partici- 
pate in the Georgia Legislative Internship Program. Students selected to participate in 
the Program are assigned to a legislative office or to legislative committees in either the 
House or Senate, and work directly under and are responsible to the office head or com- 
mittee chair. The first hand experience of observing and participating in the legislative 
process is considered as part of the students' academic program and the students may 
receive academic credit for such participation. The program at Savannah State University 
is under the general direction of the chair of the Department of Social and Behavioral 
Sciences. 

MINORITY ADVISING PROGRAM 

The Minority Advising Program (MAP), established in 1983, seeks to enhance the aca- 
demic welfare of minority students in the University System of Georgia. Its goals include 
promoting academic success, developing human potential, and creating an environment 
that fosters success and retention of minority students. MAP is continuously striving to 
be a proactive and attentive service to the students of Savannah State University. To this 
end, MAP encourages all of the students at the University to contribute to it and utilize 
the services it provides. 



27 



INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION CENTER 

Savannah State University provides students with a multitude of opportunities to study 
abroad while earning academic credit toward completion of degree requirements. The 
University's International Education Center (IEC) offers students access to study abroad 
in several countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, North America, and South 
America. 

Some of the study abroad programs are offered by other University System of Georgia 
institutions. System institutions generally open their programs to all undergraduate stu- 
dents with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5; however, certain programs may require a 
higher GPA and completion of prerequisites. Students in the University System of Georgia 
who are eligible for financial aid may use that aid toward study abroad. A limited number 
of study abroad scholarships are available. For further information contact the (IEC) at 
(912-353-4942, located at King-Frazier Student Center, Room 246. 

Studying abroad enables students to increase their knowledge of a foreign language, pro- 
vides the opportunity to gain insights into the appreciation for the cultures and institu- 
tions of other peoples, facilitates the development of relevant career skills, and contrib- 
utes to personal maturity, independence, self knowledge, and confidence. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION, OUTREACH 
AND SERVICE PROGRAMS 

Savannah State University aims to serve the community through various diverse, life-long 
educational programs. The University's Continuing Education activities make it possible 
for learning and recreational opportunities to become available to the general public. 

A wide variety of programs are offered at various intervals throughout the academic year; 
and, when it is appropriate these may occur at job sites, schools, community centers and 
other locations in Savannah. Instructors are drawn from the faculty of the University, 
from qualified experts in the Savannah community, and from consultants throughout the 
region. 

On the Savannah State campus, the Continuing Education Coordinator is responsible 
for the coordination of all community service/continuing education, outreach and service 
activities. Since these activities are viewed as a university-wide function, responsibility 
for the program development is shared with the various academic units on campus. The 
major community service/continuing education, outreach and service component of the 
University is the short-course/conference program. For further information, contact the 
Coordinator for Continuing Education (912) 691-5557, located in King-Frazier Student 
Center, Room 228. 

SHORT-COURSE/CONFERENCE PROGRAM 

The short-course/conference program offers non-credit courses; conferences, seminars and 
workshops for the general public. Formal admission to the University is not required. 

Classes meet once or twice weekly during the University's regular semesters. The length 
of a class meeting ranges from one hour to two hours. No A, B, C, grades are given, but the 
S or U mark is given denoting a participant's satisfactory or unsatisfactory completion of 
a course. Continuing Education Units are awarded to participants who successfully com- 
plete a course, and a record of enrollment is maintained. 



28 



UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION TO THE 

UNIVERSITY 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Persons who wish to enroll at Savannah State University must file an application, which can 
be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Applicants who are high school students should 
file an application as early as possible during their senior year. All applications must be filed 
and completed by the application deadline for the semester in which applicants plan to en- 
roll. Applicants must furnish evidence indicating ability to do university level work. 

All new students (freshmen, transfers, and others) attending regularly scheduled class- 
es or receiving resident credit will be required to submit a Certificate of Immunization 
(measles, mumps, and rubella) prior to attending such classes. This certificate will be 
kept on file in the Office of the Registrar and will be valid throughout enrollment. Stu- 
dents without this certification of immunization may be denied permission to enroll at 
the University. Exceptions may be made for students who have religious objections and 
students whose physicians have certified that the students cannot be immunized because 
of medical reasons. 

Savannah State University reserves the right to employ appropriate assessment mecha- 
nisms to ascertain the suitability of applicants to enroll in the University and to deny 
enrollment or admission to individuals based upon the results of this assessment. 
The University reserves the right to withdraw admission prior to or following enrollment 
if students become ineligible as determined by the standards of the University or Board 
of Regents. These standards may be revised and new policies initiated upon the discretion 
and consensus of the University and Board of Regents. 

ADMISSION PROCEDURES 

Applicants are responsible for requesting that official documents required for admission 
be sent directly from their previous institutions to the Office of Admissions. Documents 
that have been in the hands of applicants, such as student copies of transcripts or letters, 
grade reports, diplomas, or graduation lists, are not official. Official documents must be is- 
sued and mailed directly by the registrar of the previous institution(s) in a sealed envelope 
to the Office of Admissions at Savannah State University. These documents becompart of 
the applicants' permanent records and will not be returned. 

The following are specific items required for admission: 

1. APPLICATION FORM. Applicants seeking admission must file an applica- 
tion for admission prior to the specified deadline as indicated in the aca- 
demic calendar. An application may be obtained from the Office of Admissions or 
on-line at www.admissions.savstate.edu. Care should be taken to read the directions 
accompanying the application and provide all information requested. An incomplete 
application will cause delay and may be returned. 

2. CERTIFICATE OF IMMUNIZATION. All applicants must submit a University Sys- 
tem of Georgia Certificate of Immunization, verifying immunity against measles, 
mumps, and rubella. This form must be on file before registration. 

3. APPLICATION FEE. A non refundable processing fee of $20.00 is required with 
applications. 

4. OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPT(s) OF COURSES COMPLETED. All documents must be 
on file in the Office of Admissions prior to the specified document deadline. Fresh- 
men applicants should request their high school guidance department to send an offi- 



29 



rial copy of their transcript. Nontraditional adult candidates must submit an official 
high school transcript and official college transcript(s), if applicable. Transfer can- 
didates with fewer than 45 transferable quarter hours or 30 transferable semester 
hours (must have completed two college level English courses and one college level 
math course) should submit official transcripts from their high schools and from all 
colleges previously attended. 

5. COPIES OF TEST SCORES. The Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT I) or The American 
College Testing Program (ACT) tests are required for all freshmen applicants and 
transfer students not meeting transfer requirements. Applications and information 
for the college entrance exams can be found in high school guidance offices or may be 
obtained from College Board (Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08640), or the Ameri- 
can College Testing Program (3355 Lennox Road, N.E., Suite 320, Atlanta, Georgia 
33026 1332). The SAT college code assigned to Savannah State University is 5609, 
and the ACT college code number is 0858. An Institutional Scholastic Aptitude Test 
(ISAT) is offered each semester by the Office of Testing for students who apply for 
admission to Savannah State University only. SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 
applicants who were unable to schedule for the SAT I during the regularly sched- 
uled administration with the National SAT Program offered October through June of 
each year may take the ISAT. SCORES EARNED AT AN ISAT ADMINISTRATION 
ARE FOR USE AT SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY ONLY AND CANNOT BE 
REPORTED TO OTHER COLLEGES OR UNIVERSITIES. Holders of the GED 
certificate are also required to submit SAT I or ACT scores and SAT II Subject Test 
scores as required to satisfy admission criteria. Transfer candidates who have at- 
tempted fewer than 45 transferable core quarter hours or 30 transferable semester 
hours must also submit SAT I or ACT scores and submit an official copy of their high 
school transcript. 

6. OTHER REQUIREMENTS. The University may require applicants to appear for a 
personal interview and to take any achievement, aptitude, and psychological tests it 
deems appropriate in order to make a decision regarding the qualification for admis- 
sion to the University. Once admitted, all students are required to take a Writing 
Assessment. Some students may also be required to take placement tests in English, 
reading, and/or mathematics. 

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS 

Freshman Applicant/Regular Admission 

Acceptance to the University is determined on the basis of a Freshman Index, which is 
calculated by using a numerical formula, (see Freshmen Index below) The required Fresh- 
men Index for Fall 2002 is 1940. The high school curriculum, ACT or SAT scores, and the 
high school college prep. Grade point average is used to determine admissions. Applicants 
must be a graduate of an accredited high school (regional accrediting association or a public 
school regulated by a school system and state department of education) with a diploma (a 
certificate of attendance is not acceptable). The University requires the students' final high 
school transcripts before they are allowed to attend classes. Applicants graduating from 
high school less than 5 years or earlier, must complete requirements of the College Prepara- 
tory Curriculum (CPC) of the Board of Regents (see College Preparatory Curriculum). 

Regular Admissions Requirements: 

— Freshman Index of 1940 

— SAT Verbal score of 430 SAT Math score of 400 

— Or ACT English 17, ACT Math 17, and ACT Composite 17 

— 2.2 GPA 

— 16 CPC Units 



30 



Freshman Index 

The Freshman Index is calculated by adding a weighted high school GPA (500 x HSGPA) 
to sum of the verbal and mathematics scores on the SATI. If ACT scores are submitted, a 
comparable formula is used. 

Formula for SAT I (Freshman Index = 500 x HSGPA+SAT I verbal + SAT I Math) 
Formula for ACT (Freshman Index = 500 x HSGPA +(ACT Composite score x 42) 
+ 88 

The required index score for regular admission to Savannah State University is subject to 
increase. Contact the Office of Admissions for current index scores for application term. 

Test Scores 

The highest scores submitted by the applicant will be used for admissions purposes. The 
minimum scores for regular admissions are as listed: 

SAT I 430 Verbal, and 400 Math 

ACT 17 English, 17 Math, and 17 Composite 

Applicants who score below the minimum score requirements must sit for the COMPASS 
(see testing section) test. 

High School Grade Point Average 

A minimum of a 2.2 grade point average is required for Regular Admissions. The high 
school grade point average is calculated by using only college preparatory curriculum 
courses in the formula. All courses attempted will be calculated into the grade point av- 
erage (failures and repeat grades). Courses will not be weighted unless designated by a 
grade legend printed on the applicant's high school transcript indicating additional points 
should be added. A preliminary GPA is calculated for admissions and is re-calculated when 
the final high school transcript is received by the Office of Admissions. 
College Preparatory Curriculum 

College Preparatory Curriculum 

Listed are the requirements for completion of a College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC). A 
preliminary evaluation is processed using the current high school transcript to determine 
if the applicant is on tract to complete the required number of units. A final evaluation is 
processed when the final high school transcript is received. The applicant must complete a 
minimum number or CPC units when the preliminary evaluation is processed for admis- 
sions. 

Units Instructional Emphasis/Courses 

English (4) *Grammar and usage 

* Literature (American and World) 

* Advanced composition skills 
Science (3) *Physical Science 

*At least two laboratory courses from biology, chemistry or physics 
Mathematics (4) *Two courses in algebra, one in geometry, and one other math 
Social Science (3) * American History 

*World History 

* Economics and Government 

Foreign *Two courses in one language emphasizing speaking 

Language (2) (must be listening, reading, and writing) 



31 



Limited Admission/Conditional Freshman Applicant 

Freshmen applicants that do not meet the regular requirements for admissions may 
qualify for limited admissions if a minimum set of requirements are met. Only a small 
percentage of the total freshmen class may be admitted as Limited admits. Students will 
be evaluated and granted Limited admissions on a space availability basis if the minimum 
requirements are met. 

Applicants that are admitted as Limited must sit for all parts of the COMPASS (The Com- 
puter Adaptive Placement Assessment and Support Exam), and the Writing Assessment 
Test. 

Minimum Requirements Limited Admissions Fall 2002 

— 1800 

— 1.9 grade point average 

— SAT Verbal 430 and SAT Math 400 or ACT of 17 Verbal, 17 Math, and 
Composite 17 

— A minimum of 16 units 

Satisfying College Preparatory Curriculum (CPC) Deficiencies 

Students who have not completed the CPC requirements in high school, students that 
graduate from high schools that are not accredited, home school students and applicants 
earning a GED must satisfy the minimum number of units to satisfy requirements for 
admissions. Students that are admitted via limited admissions must satisfy the require- 
ments during the first term(s) of enrollment. 

English. Students earning a GED, earning a home school diploma and or graduating from 
a non-accredited high school may take SAT II subject tests to earn CPC units. A score of 
520 on the English Writing SAT II subject test and a score of 530 on the Litera- 
ture test are passing scores. Students with a passing score on only one test would have 
two deficiencies at admission and, therefore, must be tested for placement into a Student 
Academic Assistance or Learning Support English course (institutional credit only). Satis- 
factory scores on either test will provide credit for two years of CPC English while satisfac- 
tory scores on both tests will provide credit for four years or CPC English. 
Limited admit applicants graduating with fewer than the four required units of English 
are required to take the Computer Adaptive Assessment and Support System exam (COM- 
PASS) in English, the Writing Assessment and the COMPASS in reading. Based upon the 
score earned, students will either be exempt from or required to enroll in the Student 
Academic Support English and/or reading course. 

Mathematics. Students earning a GED, earning a home school diploma and or graduat- 
ing from a non-accredited high school may take SAT II subject tests to earn CPC units. To 
satisfy the math CPC course requirements a score of 500 on the Math IC and a 
score of 550 Math IIC must be earned on the test. Students not passing either test 
would have three deficiencies. 

Limited admit students that are admitted with a deficiency in Math are required to take 
the COMPASS Mathematics test. Students that are placed in the Student Academic Sup- 
port mathematics course will receive institutional credit only and must pass the exit exam 
to satisfy CPC requirements. Applicants graduating with fewer than the four required 
units of mathematics must sit for the exam. 

Science. Students earning a GED, earning a home school diploma and or graduating 
from a non-accredited high school may take SAT II subject tests to earn CPC units. To 
satisfy the science CPC course requirements an applicant must achieve a score 
of 520 on the Biology subject test and a 540 on the Chemistry subject test or 590 



32 



on the Physics subject test. Students passing only one of the two required tests would 
have two deficiencies at admission. 

Limited admit students that are admitted with fewer than the three required units of sci- 
ence are required to take a laboratory science course (institutional credit only) and pass it 
with a grade of "C" or better. Students must enroll in a laboratory science course and pass 
the course with a "C" or better. This CPC deficiency course cannot be used for graduation 
requirements. 

Social Science. Students earning a GED, earning a home school diploma and or graduat- 
ing from a non-accredited high school may take SAT II subject tests to earn CPC units. 
To satisfy the social science CPC requirements an applicant must achieve a 560 
on the SAT II subject tests in American History and Social Science and achieve 
a 540 on the World History. Students passing only one of the two required tests would 
have two deficiencies at admission and, therefore, will be required to enroll in a social 
science course. 

Limited admit students that are admitted with fewer than the three required units of 
social science are required to take a three semester hour course (for institutional credit 
only) chosen from approved social science courses and pass it with a grade of "C" or better. 
This course cannot be used for graduation requirements. 

Foreign Language. Students earning a GED, earning a home school diploma and or 
graduating from a non-accredited high school may take SAT II subject tests to earn CPC 
units. To satisfy the foreign language CPC requirements an applicant must pass 
a SAT II test for language or qualify for exemption. Alternatively, the CLEI^ AP, 
or a departmental exam may be taken, and, if the score earned is adequate, credit will be 
granted for meeting the foreign language requirements. 

Limited admit students that are admitted with fewer than the two required units of for- 
eign language are required to take a three semester hour course (for institutional credit 
only) chosen from approved social science courses and pass it with a grade of "C" or better. 
This course cannot be used for graduation requirements. 
Policies Regarding CPC Deficiencies 

Policies Regarding CPC Deficiencies 

All course work required to overcome deficiencies must be completed prior to accumu- 
lating 30 semester hours of university level course work. In social science, and foreign 
language courses, it is necessary to complete the course with a grade of "C" or better. 
Although credit is received for courses used to satisfy College Preparatory Curriculum 
deficiencies, such credit may not be used to satisfy either core curriculum or degree re- 
quirements. 

Students should register for courses to satisfy deficiencies in science, social science, or 
foreign language during their first and each subsequent semester of enrollment until the 
deficiencies are satisfied. 

Students who are readmitted to Savannah State University and students who transfer 
from within the University System of Georgia who have earned 30 or more semester hours 
of college level credit and who have not satisfied College Preparatory Curriculum defi- 
ciencies in science, social science, or foreign language may not register for other courses 
(except required Student Academic Assistance courses) unless they also register for the 
appropriate deficiency course or courses. 

Students transferring from outside the University System with fewer than 30 transferable 
credit hours of accepted transfer credits which do not include completion of area A of the 



33 



core curriculum credits, or from a program not requiring the College Preparatory Curricu- 
lum are required to submit a high school transcript and appropriate test scores for evalu- 
ation. Applicants not meeting regular freshman requirements (see "Regular Admission") 
are required to test for placement and should register for any deficiencies immediately 
upon entering Savannah State University. Such students who earn 30 or more hours of 
university credit at the institution and who have not satisfied College Preparatory Curric- 
ulum deficiencies in science, social science, or foreign language may not register for other 
courses (except required Student Academic Assistance courses unless they also register 
for the appropriate deficiency course or courses). 

Students whose native language is not English may be considered to have met the CPC 
foreign language requirements if they are proficient in their native language. A formal 
examination is not necessary if other evidence of proficiency (for example, attendance at a 
school in the native language) is available. 

Exceptions to the CPC Requirements 

Applicants who have not attended high school within the previous five years are exempt 
from College Preparatory Requirements. Qualified transfer applicants and International 
students are exempt. 

Non-traditional applicants who are admitted with CPC exemptions are required to sit 
for the COMPASS placement examination and the Writing Assessment (see "Center for 
Teaching and Learning and Academic Support"). 
Presidential Exceptions 

In very special and rare circumstances, the President of Savannah State University may 
grant exceptions to the CPC and FI requirements for limited admissions if students show 
exceptional promise for success. Only a few students can be admitted under this category. 

Admission of Students with Disabilities 

Applicants with disabilities are expected to have completed the CPC with the appropri- 
ate instructional accommodations. The Core Curriculum of Savannah State University 
requires students to complete university level courses in English, mathematics, social sci- 
ence, and science. No exemptions or substitutions are permitted for these required college 
courses. Students who are not successful in the high school courses will not be provided 
with CPC exceptions in the admissions process. 

Foreign language fluency is not required for all majors at Savannah State University. 
Therefore, students with learning disabilities that preclude the acquisition of a foreign 
language may petition for admission without completing this CPC requirement. 

For admission to Savannah State University, students must receive approval from a Re- 
gents' Center for Learning Disorders (RCLD) prior to acceptance. To ensure consideration 
under this provision, students should apply for admission and request a RCLD review no 
later than six months before the admissions decision is to be made. Students applying 
should also apply and request approval at least six months in advance, but may be admit- 
ted in the "limited" category if they meet other requirements. Those admitted without ap- 
proval must request a RCLD review and submit all requested materials during their first 
semester of enrollment. Students who receive approval from the RCLD may then satisfy 
the CPC foreign language deficiency by substituting another type of course determined 
by the Institution. 

Students are expected to achieve the University's minimum SAT scores with the appropri- 
ate SAT accommodations from the College Board. 



34 



Students may apply and be admitted without regard to disability. However, students who 
do not meet the regular admissions requirements and who would like to be considered 
for accommodations in the admissions process must notify the Office of Counseling and 
provide documentation of their disability. In particular, students with learning disorders 
who are requesting an accommodation that requires approval from a RCLD review should 
apply at least six months in advance of the time the admissions decision is needed. 

Students should be aware that certain programs and degrees require the ability to per- 
form specific critical skills. Students should, prior to applying for or beginning a program 
of study, review all requirements that are necessary for completion of the program. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Transfer students who have been out of high school fewer than five years are requested to 
submit high school transcripts as part of their application package unless they have com- 
pleted 30 transferable hours and have earned the equivalent of 6 semester hours of college 
level English and 3 semester hours of college level math. This requirement also applies 
to students enrolled in University System of Georgia institutions that do not require the 
College Preparatory Curriculum for admission. 

Transfer students completing high school less than 5 years ago and transfer- 
ring from University System of Georgia institutions maintain their CPC status as deter- 
mined by the first University System institution making the original CPC evaluation. 

Transfer applicants should request the registrar of institutions they formerly attended to 
remit an official transcript of their records to the Office of Admissions at Savannah State 
University, regardless of the transferability of the credits. 

Transfer applicants are not considered for admission unless they are academically eligible 
to return to the colleges or universities they last attended. 

Transfer applicants will be considered for admission to Savannah State University if their 
grade point average is equivalent to 2.0 on all work attempted at other institutions. Ap- 
plicants with a GPA of less than 2.0 will be denied routine admission, but may appeal to 
the University's Admissions Committee. 

Credit will be given for transfer course work in which a grade of "C" or better has been 

earned. Credit is not granted for any course in which a "D" grade has been earned. 

The total credits that Savannah State University will allow for work completed at other 

institutions during a given period may not exceed the normal number of credits that could 

have been earned at Savannah State University during that same period. 

Credit allowed for extension, correspondence, CLEP examination, or military service 

schools shall not exceed a total of 30 semester hours. 

Transfer students who have earned excessive credit in freshman and sophomore courses 
may not be granted credit in excess of 67 semester hours below the junior class level. 
Transfer credit may be accepted from degree granting institutions that are accredited at 
the collegiate level by their appropriate regional accrediting agencies. Provisions may be 
considered when an institution appeals the policy. Students may be required to validate 
credit by examination. In computing cumulative grade point averages, only the work at- 
tempted at Savannah State University will be considered. 

If the Core Curriculum requirements in Area A (Essential Skills), Area B (Institutional 
Options), Area C (Humanities/Fine Arts), Area D (Science, Math, and Technology), Area 
E (Social Sciences), freshman experience, and/or health and wellness have been completed 
at a University System of Georgia institution, each completed area will be accepted as hav- 
ing met the respective area requirement at Savannah State University. 



35 



An official evaluation of applicants' previous college credit hours earned will be completed 
prior to their first semester of attendance, provided that all transcripts are on file. Trans- 
fer credit will be awarded from institutions listed in the American Association of College 
Admission Officers and Registrars Handbook as being regionally accredited. 
Students who complete course work and exit any area of Student Academic Assistance or 
Learning Support at a University System institution shall not be required to re enroll in 
that area of Student Academic Assistance or Learning Support upon transfer to Savannah 
State University. 

All transfer students from within the System shall be subject to all provisions of this 
policy. Students from institutions outside the System who transfer to Savannah State 
University with thirty (30) or more earned degree semester credit hours shall take the Re- 
gents' Test during their initial semester of enrollment if Student Academic Assistance or 
Learning Support and core curricular English requirements are met. During subsequent 
semesters, these students shall be subject to all provisions of this policy. Provisionally 
admitted transfer students must meet the same regular admission requirements as indi- 
viduals admitted to the University for the first time. A complete record of past remedial 
course work and CPE or COMPASS scores must be on file in the Savannah State Univer- 
sity Office of Admissions before admission. 

EARLY ADMISSION 

Students who have completed the eleventh grade in high school and who have demon- 
strated outstanding ability to achieve will be considered for early admission. The Univer- 
sity will consider students for early admission only upon written recommendation from 
their high school principals or counselors. To be admitted early, students must satisfy all 
of the following criteria: 

1. Have a minimum Scholastic Aptitude Teat (SAT I) score of 970(with not less than 430 
Verbal SAT/17 ACT English and 400 Math SAT/17 ACT Math), combined verbal and 
mathematics sections, or the ACT composite score no less than 21; 

2. Have at least a minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 3.0 or nu- 
merical average of 80 or higher in academic subjects; 

3. Be exempt from all Student Academic Assistance or Learning Support require- 
ments; 

4. Submit written recommendation from their high school principal or counselor; 

5. Present written consent of parents or guardian (if students are minors); and 

6. Have completed the University System of Georgia College Preparatory Curriculum 
requirements with the following exceptions: 

Students with SAT I verbal scores of at least 630 (or ACT English of at least 23), 
who have not completed the final unit of high school English and/or social sci- 
ence, may be permitted to fulfill these high school requirements with the appro- 
priate university course taken through the joint enrollment or early admissions 
program. 

Students who have not completed the College Preparatory Curriculum require- 
ments may be admitted through the joint enrollment program if they are enrolled 
in the necessary high school courses and are scheduled to complete the require- 
ments by the end of their senior year. 

With the exception of English and social studies courses taken by students with a 
SAT I verbal score of at least 530 (or ACT English of at least 23), college courses 
may not be used to fulfill both high school College Preparatory Curriculum re- 
quirements and college degree requirements. 



36 



COLLEGE ENROLLMENT AS A HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT 
Joint Enrollment of High School Students 

If you're a high school student who desires to get a head start on your college education, 
Savannah State University offers several options. 

JOINT ENROLLMENT 

The joint enrollment program is designed for high school juniors and seniors who wish to 
enter college on a part-time basis and earn college credit while they complete their junior 
and/or senior year of high school. You must have prior approval from your parents and 
high school counselor or principal. The student must earn a minimum of 970 total on the 
SAT or 23 ACT composite. The requirements for enrollment in college level English and 
Math is a minimum of 530 Verbal/Critical Reading SAT or 23 ACT English and 530 Math 
SAT or 22 Math ACT. 

ACCEL- HOPE Program 

The Accel Program is for students classified as high school juniors and seniors at accred- 
ited public or private high schools in the state of Georgia, and is operated in all school 
terms except summer. The program allows students to pursue postsecondary study at 
Savannah State University, while receiving dual high school and college credit for courses 
successfully completed. 

Courses pursued by students under this program must come from the approved course 
directory (found at www.gsfc.org ) which is supplied to high school counselors in the state. 
Courses are available only in the areas of the core graduation requirements for college 
preparatory students: English; Mathematics; Social Studies; Science; Foreign Language. 
At Savannah State University the program pays for tuition, mandatory fees and provides 
participating students with a book allowance, in keeping with the benefits provided by the 
HOPE Program. Transportation and other expenses are the responsibility of the student, 
including tuition and other expenses for non-core courses, if any are taken. 
Credit hours paid by the Accel Program for the student will count towards the limit of 
postsecondary hours paid for by the HOPE (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally) 
Program. Additional requirements or restrictions for participating in this program may 
be imposed by the high school. 

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR 

EARLY ENROLLED STUDENTS & ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS 

FOR JOINT ENROLLMENT/POST-SECONDARY OPTION 

This program is a joint program with participation high schools in which academically 
talented high school students may enroll at Savannah State University after their sopho- 
more year. The high school retains complete authority over the student's participation 
and advisement. 

To be considered for joint enrollment/post-secondary option, an applicant must have a 
combined SAT I score of 970 with minimum scores of 430 Verbal (17 ACT-English) and 400 
Math (17 ACT-math), students who wish to use college level math and English courses to 
satisfy their high school College Preparatory Curriculum Requirements must have mini- 
mum SAT I scores of 530 Verbal (23 ACT-English) and 530 Math (22 ACT-math) have a 
minimum grade point average of 3.0, be on track for completion of CPC requirements by . 
the end of their senior year in high school and, have written recommendation from their 
high school counselor, and have written consent from parents. 



37 



ADMISSION OF STUDENTS WITH OUTSTANDING SCORES 

Although successful completion of designated high school coursework is necessary for 
student success in college, those few students who score at the upper five percent of all 
students nationally on the SAT I have demonstrated potential for success in college. 

Students who demonstrate very high academic ability by achieving a composite SAT 
I Total (Verbal + Math) score in the upper five percent of national college-bound 
seniors according to the most recent report from the College Board and who show 
other evidence of college readiness may be admitted under this section. (An ACT 
score which is equivalent to this SAT I score may also be used.) Institutions must 
carefully evaluate such students to determine their ability to benefit from college 
coursework. Students must satisfy any CPC deficiencies in areas other than English 
or mathematics. For 1999-2000 admissions the SAT score at the 95th percentile is 
1370 and the comparable ACT Composite score is 31. 

Students who do not necessarily meet all of the above criteria but who demonstrate very 
high academic abilities through their SAT or ACT performance may be permitted to enroll 
in college courses at the discretion of the Savannah State University, after documentation 
of academic maturity and minimum score requirements of at least: 

• 700 on the SAT I Mathematics test (or 31 on ACT Mathematics) to enroll in college 
courses that require advanced mathematical ability; 

• 700 on the SAT I Verbal test (or 31 on ACT English) to enroll in college courses that 
require advanced verbal ability; and 

• in addition, students with extremely high total SAT I or ACT Composite scores may 
be admitted through the provision for Students with Outstanding Scores. 

APPLICATION PROCESS/ 
APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

The student must complete an application for admissions and pay a $20.00 non-refund- 
able application fee. Request your high school to send an official copy of your transcript to 
be sent directly to the Admissions Office. Submit official test scores from either the 
College Board Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT I) or The American College Testing Program 
(ACT). We will accept scores posted on high school transcripts. Submit recommendations 
from your guidance counselor and parents or a signed joint enrollment form or the AC- 
CEL application from your high school signed by your high school guidance counselor and 
your parents. 

ADMISSION OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

Savannah State University subscribes to the principles of international education and to 
the basic concept that only through education and understanding can mutual respect, ap- 
preciation, and tolerance of others be accomplished. 

Students from a country other than the United States who are interested in attending 
Savannah State University should write to the Office of Admissions, Savannah State Uni- 
versity, Savannah, Georgia 31404, USA, and submit a completed application along with a 
$20.00 application fee in the form of a money order or certified check. Applications must 
be submitted at least ninety days prior to the beginning of the anticipated semester of 
enrollment. 

Applicants must have the equivalent of a USA high school diploma and the equivalent of a 
2.0 minimum grade point average on academic work only (on a 4.0 scale). 
Official transcript(s) of all academic records along with an official translation must be 
mailed to the Office of Admissions. 



38 



Applicants must provide evidence of English language proficiency through the TOEFL, 
ELS schools, or other institutionally approved programs. Language school records and 
scores from all tests must be sent to the Office of Admissions. The minimum acceptable 
TOEFL on the paper version is 523 the score on the computerized version is 193. Appli- 
cants must also take the SAT I or ACT. 

Applicants may be required to take the COMPASS and the Placement Writing Sample 
prior to registration. 

Applicants must submit evidence of financial ability to pursue a full time education in 
this country since no financial aid is available for international students. All international 
students are required to pay out of state tuition. 

After all of the above conditions have been met, the Immigration Form I 20 (Certificate of 
Eligibility) needed to obtain a student VISA will be issued to applicants. Refund of tuition 
and fees will be in accordance with the policies and procedures outlined in the University 
Catalog. 

International students with a student visa are required to carry a full course of study in 
every semester, except summer. A minimum course load at Savannah State University is 
twelve semester hours for undergraduate students and nine semester hours for graduate 
students. 

Resident aliens must present their Alien Registration card as proof of their official status 
to the Director of Admissions. 

All international students must be prepared to obtain adequate health and accident insur- 
ance while they are attending Savannah State University. Prior to registration, they must 
provide proof of insurance and a local street address. 

International students must take a proficiency test in both reading and writing (Michigan 
Test of English Language and a writing test) during their sophomore year. Students who 
fail either or both tests will be required to enroll in remedial courses. 
The University's international student advisor assists international students on campus 
and in the community. There is an active International Students Association. 

ADMISSION TO ENGINEERING DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Students admitted to engineering degree programs will be able to qualify for the Georgia 
Tech engineering degree by completing the equivalent courses included in freshman and 
sophomore years of the engineering discipline in which the student intends to major at 
Georgia Tech with a 2.7 (3.0 for the out of state student) or higher GPA. 

The freshman admission criteria for the Engineering Degree Programs as well as Dual 
Degree Program are the same as regular freshman admission criteria. 

The freshman admission criteria for direct admission in the Regents' Engineering Trans- 
fer Program (RETP) and Georgia Tech Regional Engineering Program (GTREP) 
are as follows: 

• A combined SAT score of at least 1090 (including a minimum of 560 on the math and 
440 on the verbal portion) 

• A high school GPA of at least 3.0 or 

• Have been admitted to an engineering program at Georgia Tech. 

Student must be a resident of Georgia to be eligible for the RETP 



39 



SPECIAL ADMISSION CATEGORIES 
Nontraditional Students 

Applicants who have not attended high school or college within the previous five years and 
who have earned fewer than 30 transferable semester hours of college credit are not re- 
quired to take the SAT of ACT However, these applicants will be required to take the Col- 
legiate Placement Examination or COMPASS and the Writing Assessment and complete 
any Student Academic Assistance requirement(s). Students admitted under this category 
must complete 30 hours of college credit with a minimum 2.0 grade point average and 
fulfill Student Academic Assistance requirements in order to be granted regular admis- 
sion status. 

Post-Baccalaureate/Non-Degree Students 

Applicants who desire to enroll in courses that do not require Student Academic Assis- 
tance prerequisites may be admitted to enroll in no more than 9 semester hours with 
permission of the Director of Admissions to enroll as non degree students. Applicants who 
possess a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university may enroll as post 
baccalaureate students after submitting an official college transcript showing completion 
of a baccalaureate degree. There is no limitation on the number of hours of undergraduate 
credit these students can earn. 

This category is temporary, and applicants must complete an application each semester 
of enrollment. To enter a degree program, fulfillment of all beginning freshman require- 
ments are necessary. Non degree students must satisfy all prerequisites before enrolling 
in a course. 

Transient Students 

Students enrolled in another college may apply for the privilege of temporary registration 
at Savannah State University. These students will ordinarily be expected to return to their 
home institution. 

Transient students are admitted for only a specified time, normally one semester. These 
students must file a regular application form, submit a statement of good standing from 
their institution, and have permission to take specific courses at Savannah State Univer- 
sity. An application fee of $20.00 is also required. Since transient students are not admit- 
ted as regular students, transcripts of college work completed elsewhere is not usually 
required. Transient students who wish to enroll at Savannah State University for a sub- 
sequent term must submit additional statements from their institutions each semester. 
First time applicants are required to submit a University System of Georgia Certificate 
of Immunization. Applicants in this admissions category who wish to apply, as a transfer 
student must meet all transfer applicant requirements. 

Georgia Resident Senior Citizens/Persons 62 or Older 

Persons who are 62 or older may enroll as regular students in credit courses on a space 
available basis without payment of fees. Students must pay for their supplies and labora- 
tory or special course fees. They must be residents of the State of Georgia and must pres- 
ent a birth certificate or comparable written documentation of age to enable the Office 
of Admissions to determine eligibility. They must meet all admission and degree require- 
ments. 

Special Students 

All students in classifications not otherwise covered in the University's admissions catego- 
ries shall be required to meet all requirements prescribed for admission to undergraduate 



40 



or graduate programs and to meet any additional requirements prescribed by the Univer- 
sity. Exceptions may be made only with written approval of the Chancellor of the Univer- 
sity System of Georgia. 

Auditors 

Students who submit evidence of graduation from an accredited high school or a GED 
certificate which satisfies the minimum score requirement of the State of Georgia may 
register as auditors. Under extraordinary circumstances, the President may waive the 
requirement of a high school diploma or equivalent. Students registered as auditors shall 
be required to pay the regular fees for enrollment and shall be prohibited from receiving 
credit at any later time for course work that they completed as auditors. Prior to regis- 
tration, students must complete a request for Audit of Course Form and indicate this 
category on the course schedule planning and registration form. 

Faculty members of Savannah State University may attend classes offered by other fac- 
ulty members without registering as auditors, but they may not receive credit. 

University System Employee 
Enrollment/Tuition Reimbursement 

Savannah State University and the University System of Georgia encourage full time 
faculty, staff, and administrators to participate in professional development study by re- 
mitting or reimbursing tuition for those courses that have been authorized. These courses 
should be clearly related to employment consistent with the current Savannah State Uni- 
versity guidelines regarding tuition reimbursement. Detailed information and forms are 
available in the Office of Human Resources. 

Full time employees who meet admission requirements and who receive prior authoriza- 
tion from their supervisor and the Director of Human Resources may register for up to six 
semester credit hours per term on a space available basis at Savannah State University. 

Full time employees who meet admission requirements and who receive prior authoriza- 
tion from Savannah State University may register for up to six semester credit hours per 
term at any other University System institution. Upon successful completion of the course 
with a grade of "C" or better, Savannah State University will reimburse its employees for 
tuition and fees. 

Full time employees from other institutions must meet Savannah State University admis- 
sion requirements and receive prior approval from their institution. Any reimbursement 
of tuition and fees is the responsibility of the home institution of these employees. 

Armstrong Atlantic State University 
Student Exchange Program 

Students who are enrolled at Savannah State University or Armstrong Atlantic State Uni- 
versity and who are taking at least 12 semester hours at one institution have the privilege 
of taking courses at the other institution without paying more than the maximum fee for a 
full time enrollment as long as the total number of hours does not exceed 18. For students 
who qualify to take an overload, the total hours can exceed 18. After successful comple- 
tion of the exchange courses and appropriate documentation by transcript, the credit will 
transfer to the home institution. 

Student Exchange Form Instructions 

Students must complete the application and the exchange form at their home institution 
when they register for the succeeding semester, have the form signed by the registrar at 
the home institution, and have the forms stamped paid by the cashier's office of the home 
institution when fees are paid. A printout of classes must be shown. 



41 



Students should then take the completed form to the other institution's offices of admis- 
sions, registrar, and cashier to complete registration there. The form will serve as proof 
of fee payment. 

Students must complete an application for each semester of enrollment. Immunization 
forms must be on file at both institutions, and students must pay the appropriate applica- 
tion fee. 

Upon successful completion of the course, students should request that the office of the 
registrar, at the exchange institution, send a transcript to their home institution. 

College Credit by Examination and Experiences 

On the basis of scores on the College Board Advanced Placement Examination program, 
Savannah State University gives advanced placement or in some cases college credit, for 
college level, high school courses upon approval by the appropriate department chair at 
Savannah State University. 

College credit may be granted for satisfactory scores on selected tests of the College Level 
Examination Program (CLEP), for satisfactory completion of appropriate courses and 
tests offered through the United States Armed Forces Institute (USAFI), and for military 
service schools and experience as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of 
Service Experiences of the American Council on Education. Credit by examination and 
correspondence or extension study may not exceed one fourth of the work counted toward 
a degree. 

College Credit for Military Experience and Training 

Students who wish to have their military experience and training evaluated for college 
credit should submit a copy of appropriate form to the Office of Admissions. Veterans 
should submit DD Form 214, and active duty military personnel should submit DD Form 
295. Active duty Army personnel and soldiers discharged since October 1, 1986, should 
also provide a copy of their Army/American Council on Education Registry Transcript. 

RIGHT OF APPEAL OF ADMISSIONS DENIAL 

In all matters concerning admissions, the students may appeal by writing to the Director 
of Admissions and clearly stating the basis for an appeal. The request will be considered 
by the Admissions Committee. 

A written appeal must be received in the Office of Admissions prior to 5 p.m. of the first 
day of registration for classes for the semester students are seeking admission or readmis- 
sion to Savannah State University. Individuals failing to satisfy the deadline may submit 
their appeal for the following semester. 

RE-ADMISSIONS TO SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 

Students who have remained out of the University for two or more semesters must apply 
for readmission by completing the readmission form and returning it to the Office of the 
Registrar by the established application deadline. Students who have attended other col- 
leges in the interim are considered transfer students and must submit official transcripts 
of all colleges attended and must complete an application in the Office of the Registrar. 
Former Savannah State University students are not required to pay an application-pro- 
cessing fee when they apply. 

Former students who leave the University prior to completing Student Academic Assis- 
tance requirements and/or satisfying College Preparatory Curriculum deficiencies will not 
be allowed to return to the University as transient students from other institutions with- 
out transcripts from those schools. Students who are readmitted after an absence from 



42 



the University for more than two years must meet degree requirements in effect in the 
current catalog at the time of their return (see Academic Regulations). 

Academic Renewal 

Academic Renewal allows Savannah State University degree seeking undergraduate stu- 
dents who have experienced academic difficulty to have one opportunity to make a fresh 
start at Savannah State University after an absence of five consecutive calendar years. 
Former Academic Assistance or Learning Support students may apply for academic re- 
newal only if they have successfully completed all Student Academic Assistance or Learn- 
ing Support requirements before the commencement of the five year period of absence. 

All previously attempted course work continues to be recorded on the official transcript. 
For a complete statement of this policy, see "Academic Renewal for Returning Students" 
under "Academic Regulations" of this catalog or the policy statement in the Office of the 
Registrar. 

ACADEMIC RENEWAL FOR 
RETURNING STUDENTS 

Academic Renewal Policy: 

Academic Renewal allows re-calculating GPA and credit hours toward graduation, based 
exclusively on work completed after returning to the University. This policy is for un- 
dergraduate students who have acquired maturity through extended experience outside 
course enrollment in higher education institutions. Students who qualify for academic 
renewal must 

• Not have enrolled for credit in any courses, offered by academic/postsecondary insti- 
tutions (accredited by one of the organizations recognized by Council on Postsecond- 
ary Education Association) for at least five years after the enrollment period subject 
to academic renewal; 

• Be undergraduates who have not been awarded an associate or bachelor's degree; 
and 

• Request academic renewal status within two academic semesters of re-enrollment or 
within one calendar year, whichever comes first. 

Academic Renewal Procedures and Implementation Issues 

Course work and grades earned prior to a five-year (or longer) separation period will re- 
main on the transcript. 

In consideration of any course work completed after the period of separation, only Sa- 
vannah State University course work and subsequent transfer work will be used in the 
calculation of the overall GPA. This GPA (overall GPA) will be used for admission to pro- 
grams/majors requiring a minimum grade point average. 

Academic credit for previously completed course work, including transfer course work, 
will be retained only for all courses in which an A, B, C, or S grade has been earned. Re- 
tained grades are not calculated in the academic renewal GPA. The course credit hours 
will count in the academic renewal hours earned. 

Former Academic Assistance or Learning Support students may apply for academic re- 
newal only if they successfully complete all Student Academic Assistance or Learning 
Support requirements before the commencement of the five years of absence. 

Students who transfer from Savannah State University should recognize that the receiv- 
ing institution is under no obligation to acknowledge the adjusted GPA. The receiving 
institution is expected to recognize only the cumulative GPA. 



43 



The academic renewal GPA will be used for determining academic standing and eligibility 
for graduation. 

All courses will be considered in the implementation of the Board of Regents' Examina- 
tion and College Preparatory Curriculum policy requirements. 

Academic renewal can be approved only once. Once academic renewal is requested and 
approved, it cannot be reversed. 

All courses will be considered for the determination of financial aid and/or veterans ben- 
efits. 

To earn a degree, students must meet Savannah State University's residency require- 
ments. 

Past scholastic suspensions shall remain recorded on permanent records. 

Graduate Admissions 

Prospective graduate students should request an application from the Office of Gradu- 
ate Studies and Sponsored Research. For admissions information and details on program 
requirements contact the office of the prospective program (see "Master of Public Ad- 
ministration, Master of Urban Studies, Master of Social Work, and Master of Marine Sci- 
ence"). 

Applicants for graduate study are expected to meet general admission requirements for 
graduate programs. Applicants should submit to the Office of Graduate Studies, two of- 
ficial transcripts of all courses attempted at the undergraduate level and all other docu- 
ments requested for program admissions. 

The Dean of the Graduate Studies is responsible for coordinating the admissions process 
for the graduate programs. The program coordinators are responsible for establishing 
admissions committees and facilitating the application process. Review the Academic Pro- 
gram section of the catalog for details on admissions requirements. 



44 



ACADEMIC POLICY AND REGISTRATION 

DEFINITION OF LEGAL RESIDENCE 

REGENTS' POLICIES GOVERNING THE CLASSIFICATION OF STU- 
DENTS FOR TUITION PURPOSES 

The following policies have been adopted by the Board of Regents for the purposes of de- 
termining the tuition status of students: 

403.02 CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS FOR TUITION PURPOSES 

A. (1) If a person is 18 years of age or older, he or she may register as an in-state student 
only upon showing that he or she has been a legal resident of Georgia for a period of 
at least 12 months immediately preceding the date of registration. 
Exceptions: 

i. A student whose parent, spouse, or court-appointed guardian is a legal 

resident of the State of Georgia may register as a resident providing the par- 
ent, spouse, or guardian can provide proof of legal residency in the State of 
Georgia for at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the date of 
registration. 

ii. A student who previously held residency status in the State of Georgia but 
moved from the state then returned to the state in 12 or fewer months. 

iii. Students who are transferred to Georgia by an employer are not subject to 
the durational residency requirement. 

(2) No emancipated minor or other person 18 years of age or older shall be deemed 
to have gained or acquired in-state status for tuition purposes while attending any 
educational institution in this state, in the absence of a clear demonstration that he 
or she has in fact established legal residence in this state. 

A. If a parent or legal guardian of a student changes his or her legal residence to another 
state following a period of legal residence in Georgia, the student may retain his or 
her classification as an in-state student as long as he or she remains continuously 
enrolled in the University System of Georgia, regardless of the status of his or her 
parent or legal guardian. 

B. In the event that a legal resident of Georgia is appointed by a court as guardian of a 
nonresident minor, such minor will be permitted to register as in-state student pro- 
viding the guardian can provide proof that he or she has been a resident of Georgia 
for the period of 12 months immediately preceding the date of the court appoint- 
ment. 

C. Aliens shall be classified as nonresident students, provided, however, that an alien 
who is living in this country under an immigration document permitting indefinite 
or permanent residence shall have the same privilege of qualifying for in-state tuition 
as a citizen of the United States. 

Waivers: An institution may waive out-of-state tuition for: 

An institution may waive out-of-state tuition and assess in-state tuition for: 

A Academic Common Market. Students selected to participate in a program offered 
through the Academic Common Market. 

B. International and Superior Out-of-State Students. International students and su- 



45 



perior out-of-state students selected by the institutional president or an authorized 
representative, provided that the number of such waivers in effect does not exceed 2 
percent of the equivalent full-time students enrolled at the institution in the fall term 
immediately preceding the term for which the out-of-state tuition is to be waived. 

C. University System Employees and Dependents. Full-time employees of the Univer- 
sity System, their spouses, and their dependent children; 

D. Medical/Dental Students and Interns. Medical and dental residents and medical and 
dental interns at the Medical College of Georgia (BR Minutes, 1986-87, p. 340); 

E. Full-Time School Employees. Full-time employees in the public schools of Georgia 
or of the Department of Technical and Adult Education, their spouses, and their 
dependent children. Teachers employed full-time on military bases in Georgia shall 
also qualify for this waiver (BR Minutes, 1988-89, p. 43); 

F. Career Consular Officials. Career consular officers, their spouses, and their depen- 
dent children who are citizens of the foreign nation that their consular office repre- 
sents and who are stationed and living in Georgia under orders of their respective 
governments. 

G. Military Personnel. Military personnel, their spouses, and their dependent children 
stationed in Georgia and on active duty, unless such military personnel are assigned 
as students to System institutions for educational purposes; 

H. Research University Graduate Students. Graduate Students attending the Univer- 
sity of Georgia, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia State University, and 
the Medical College of Georgia, which shall be authorized to waive the out-of-state 
tuition differential for a limited number of graduate students each year, with the 
understanding that the number of students at each of these institutions to whom 
such waivers are granted shall not exceed the number assigned below at any one 
point in time: 

University of Georgia 80 

Georgia Institute of Technology 60 

Georgia State University 80 

Medical College of Georgia 20 

I. Border County Residents. Residents of an out-of-state county bordering a Georgia 
county in which the reporting institution or a Board-approved external center of the 
University System is located. 

J. National Guard Members. Full-time members of the Georgia National Guard, their 
spouses, and their dependent children. (BR Minutes, April, 1998, pp. 16-17); 

K. Students enrolled in University System institutions as part of Competitive Economic 
Development Projects. Students who are certified by the Commissioner of the Geor- 
gia Department of Industry, Tourism and Trade as being part of a competitive eco- 
nomic development project; 

L. Students in Georgia-Based Corporations. Students who are employees of Georgia- 
based corporations or organizations that have contracted with the Board of Regents 
through University System institutions to provide out-of-state tuition differential 
waivers; 

M. Students in Pilot Programs. Students enrolled in special pilot programs approved 
by the Chancellor. The Chancellor shall evaluate institutional requests for such 
programs in light of good public policy and the best interests of students. If a pilot 
program is successful, the tuition program shall be presented to the Board for con- 
sideration; 

N. Students in ICAPP® Advantage programs. Any student participating in an ICAPP® 
Advantage program; and 



46 



O. Direct Exchange Program Students. Any international student who enrolls in a Uni- 
versity System institution as a participant in a direct exchange program that pro- 
vides reciprocal benefits to University System students. 

E Families Moving to Georgia. A dependent student who, as of the first day of term of 
enrollment, can provide documentation supporting that his or her supporting par- 
ent or court-appointed guardian has accepted full-time, self-sustaining employment 
and established domicile in the State of Georgia for reasons other than gaining the 
benefit of favorable tuition rates may qualify immediately for an out -of-state tuition 
differential waiver which will expire 12 months from the date the waiver was grant- 
ed. An affected student may petition for residency status according to established 
procedures at the institution. 

Q. Recently Separated Military Service Personnel. Members of a uniformed military 
service of the United States who, within 12 months of separation from such service, 
enroll in a program for teacher certification and demonstrate an intent to become a 
permanent resident of Georgia. This waiver may be granted for not more than one 
year. 

Additional Resident Information 

Individuals who enter Savannah State University as nonresident students but who wish 
later to qualify as legal residents must submit a Petition for Georgia Resident Classifica- 
tion, which can be obtained in the Office of the Registrar. Residence status is not changed 
automatically, and the burden of proof rests with students. Students are responsible for 
registering under the proper residence classification. Students classified as nonresidents 
who believe they are entitled to be reclassified as legal residents may petition the Regis- 
trar for a change in status. To avoid delay and inconvenience at registration, the petition 
must be filed no later than 60 working days prior to registration for the semester students 
are petitioning for in-state residence status. 

Items to be included with Petition for Residency 

A notarized statement verifying employment during the last 12 months should indicate 
dates of employment. Statements on company letterhead do not have to be notarized. 
A copy of lease or deed showing residence during the last 12 months should be included. 
Leases or deeds in a name other than that of the student require a notarized statement of 
residence from the person holding the lease or deed. 

ADVISEMENT 

All students at Savannah State University are assigned advisors who have the responsibil- 
ity to assist students in planning and completing an appropriate academic program. 

The Academic Advisement/Mentoring Program, a component of the Center for Teaching, 
Learning and Academic Support, serves Basic Studies Academy students, Student Aca- 
demic Assistance (Learning Support) students, limited admit students, undecided majors, 
nontraditional students with Student Academic Assistance requirements, transfer stu- 
dents with Student Academic Assistance requirements, and students with 50 credit hours 
or fewer returning from academic suspension. The advisement continues until they have 
completed their core curriculum courses (up to 60 hours), with the exception of (1) regu- 
larly admitted, undecided majors whose advisement through AAMP is terminated as soon 
as they declare their majors and (2) Basic Studies Academy and nontraditional students 
who are advised through AAMP until they have satisfactorily completed 30 hours in the 
core curriculum. 



47 



The Academic Advisement/Mentoring Program provides services to help students assess 
their interests and aptitudes. It provides students with a wide variety of support services, 
including an academic orientation to the University, an understanding of University poli- 
cies and procedures, academic advisement, assistance in determining educational goals 
and career directions, and assistance in using University resources to fulfill their goals. 
In addition, every effort is made to pair students in the AAMP with a mentor during their 
freshman and sophomore years. 

Academic deans provide general direction to the advising programs within the colleges, 
with department chairs coordinating activities within their respective areas and assigning 
advisors to regularly admitted students who have declared a major. Students are required 
to plan their academic program with their advisors' assistance and to obtain the advisors' 
approval of class loads each semester. Advisors provide counsel regarding the appropriate- 
ness of course selections and class loads as well as monitor student progress toward timely 
completion of a degree. In addition, advisors monitor the academic progress of advisees by 
making referrals to campus resources and academic labs, if needed, and assisting advisees 
in evaluating their progress. Advisors also help advisees make decisions about their aca- 
demic careers based upon that evaluation. 

Advisors of junior and senior students concern themselves specifically with the students' 
progress toward graduation and maintain a continually updated record of courses taken 
and grades received. Advisors also assist advisees in completing the application for gradu- 
ation and certify, to the Registrar, that all requirements have been met prior to the prepa- 
ration of the application. 

COURSES AT OTHER COLLEGES 

Savannah State University students who are concurrently enrolled in courses for credit at 
another institution may not transfer such credit to Savannah State unless the appropriate 
dean or his designated representative gives written authorization. 

CLASS ATTENDANCE 

Savannah State University endeavors to provide optimum conditions for student learning. 
Class attendance is, therefore, required of students to ensure that they will be exposed to 
the many classes, laboratories, and related experiences provided for their benefit. Extenu- 
ating circumstances may at times make it difficult for students to attend every class meet- 
ing. Students who are unable to attend a class should notify the professor in a timely man- 
ner and arrange the conditions under which any required work may be made up. Credit 
may or may not be awarded for any course if the number of absences exceeds the number of 
times that the class meets per week. Students who exceed the allowed number of absences 
in any course may receive a grade of "F" or be administratively withdrawn. Students who 
are withdrawn at or before mid-semester will receive a grade of "W"; students withdrawn 
after mid-semester will receive a grade of "WF" unless extenuating circumstances occur 
(see "Grading System"). Students may not withdraw from Academic Assistance (Learning 
Support) courses. Withdrawal from these courses results in an automatic cancellation of 
registration and withdrawal from the University. During the first week of each semester, 
professors will notify each class of the attendance policy, emphasizing what constitutes 
excessive absences and the penalty, therefore. Students may appeal any absence-related 
decision of a professor to the department chair, to the dean of the professor's college or 
director of the division, and ultimately to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 



48 



SPECIAL POLICY FOR LIMITED 
SEATING CLASSES 

Certain classes, such as computer lab classes, with limited seating are governed by a more 
stringent attendance policy. These classes are identified in the catalog and/or registra- 
tion schedules as "limited seating classes." In these cases, students must attend the first 
class session or notify the instructor immediately that they will be absent. Failure to com- 
ply with these requirements may result in the immediate removal (withdrawal) from the 
class. The seat may be reassigned. When circumstances prevent their attending the first 
session, students are responsible for notifying instructors or the administrative unit head 
(department chair or dean of the professor's college). Withdrawals may also impact finan- 
cial aid classification if students' academic load then falls below the required minimum. 

THE REGENTS' TESTING PROGRAM 

The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia requires each institution of the 
University System to ensure that students earning a degree from that institution possess 
minimal skills in reading and writing. The Regents' Testing Program has been developed 
to provide this assurance. Currently, the objectives of the Testing Program are to provide 
system-wide information on the status of student competence in reading and writing and 
to provide a uniform means of identifying students who fail to attain minimum levels of 
competence in reading and writing. Students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs 
leading to the baccalaureate degree must pass the Regents' Test as a requirement for 
graduation. 

Specific Policies 

Students must take the test no later than the first semester of their sophomore year. 

Students who have not previously taken the test must do so in their first semester en- 
rolled after accumulating 30 credit hours. 

Students transferring into the University with 30 or more credit hours from outside the 
university system (or from a system program that does not require the Regents' Test) 
should take the test during their first semester enrolled. 

Students who have not successfully completed both the reading and writing portions of 
the test by the time they earn 45 credit hours are required to enroll in appropriate reme- 
dial course(s) during the next semester enrolled and take the test. 

Exceptions 

Students holding a baccalaureate or higher degree from a regionally accredited institution 
of higher education are not required to complete the Regents' Test to receive a degree. 

Students whose native language is other than English must take the Savannah State Uni- 
versity English Competency Test for International Students in lieu of the Regents' Test. 
(Such students are subject to the other provisions of the Regents' Test policy regarding 
eligibility and remediation.) 

First semester-students meeting specific criteria (outlined in the Regents' Examination 
Policy Manual) may sit for the test during their first semester enrolled. 

Remedial Program for the Regents' Test 

"Appropriate remedial program" for the Regents' Test is defined as successfully complet- 
ing English 0092 (Writing) and/or English 0093 (Reading) - depending on which portion of 
the test students have failed. Students must successfully complete the appropriate course 
before again sitting for the test. 



49 



Students sit for the test during the semester in which they complete the remedial course. 
Students who fail to do so will be re-enrolled in the remedial classes during the next se- 
mester enrolled. They must sit for the test that same semester. 

All students whose unexcused absences exceed the number of credit hours for 
the course(s) will be administratively withdrawn from the University. In other 
words, their entire registration will be canceled for the semester. 

Students who wish to appeal the policy of withdrawal should contact the office 
of Academic Advisement and Mentoring Program or their respective Deans' 
office for procedural information. 

Students enrolled in one remedial course may register for no more than nine 
additional credit hours. 

Students enrolled in two remedial courses may register for no more than six 
additional credit hours. 

Students who fail to exercise these options are required to enroll in the appro- 
priate remedial course in the next semester enrolled and are limited to register 
for no more than three additional credit hours (if one remedial course is re- 
quired) or zero additional credit hours (if two remedial courses are required). 

Savannah State University students who may be jointly enrolled at other System schools 
are required to take their Regents' test remedial courses at Savannah State University 
unless permission is otherwise granted by the Office of the Registrar with approval from 
the Coordinator of the Regents' Remedial Program in the Department of Humanities. 

Student Responsibility 

Students are responsible for complying with all policies regarding the Regents' Test. Fail- 
ure to take the test at the designated time will result in disciplinary action ranging from 
reprimand to cancellation of registration or suspension, depending upon the severity of 
the noncompliance. 

Essay Test Review Policy 

The Regents' Test itself and the scoring criteria are not subject for review. Students may 
have their essays reviewed, but under review, scoring will follow the normal holistic pro- 
cedure where three qualified readers review the essay and report their independent find- 
ings. 

1. Students may request a formal review of failure on the essay component of the Re- 
gents' Test if that essay received at least one passing score among the three scores 
awarded and if they have completed English 1101 and 1102. 

2. Students must initiate the review procedure by mid-term of their first semester of 
enrollment after the semester in which the essay was failed. The review must be 
initiated, however, within one calendar year from the semester in which the failure 
occurred. 

3. The review will be initiated at Savannah State University. Students complete the 
"Request for Review" form available at the Office of the Regents' Test Coordinator. 
The Regents' Coordinator will determine the eligibility based upon the criteria in 
paragraphs 1 and 2 above. The review, if warranted, will be conducted by a three- 
member panel appointed by the Vice President for Academic Affairs or his designee 
and designated as the on-campus review panel. 

4. The on-campus review panel may (1) sustain, by majority opinion, the essay's failing 



50 



score, thus terminating the review process, or (2) recommend, by majority opinion, 
the re-scoring of the essay by the Regents' Testing Program central office. The Re- 
gents' Test Coordinator will notify students of the results of the on-campus review. 

5. If the on-campus review panel recommends re-scoring of the essay, the Regents' Test 
Coordinator will transmit that recommendation in writing along with a copy of the 
essay, to the Office of the System's Director of the Regent' Testing Program. 

The System's Director will utilize the services of three (3) professors experienced in 
scoring Regents' essays. These will be persons not involved in the original scoring. 
The decision of this panel on the merits of the essay will be final, thus terminating 
the review process. The Regents' Test Coordinator will notify the student of the re- 
sults of the review. 

6. All the applicable regulations of the Regents' Test Policy remain in effect for those 
students who essays are under review, including those regulations relating to reme- 
diation and to retaking the test. 

Registration Procedures for the Regents' Exam 

The Coordinator of Testing, whose office is located in Whiting Hall, will post the dates and 
times for administration of the Regents' Test each semester. Students should register for 
the Regents' test during the advisement and Registration period each semester. The Re- 
gents' Test schedule is included on the course schedule. Failure to take the test at the pre- 
scribed time will result in disciplinary action ranging from a reprimand to a suspension. 

Score reporting for the Regents' Test 

All student scores will be mailed to the address on file in the Registrar's Office. 

UNIVERSITYWIDE TESTING PROGRAM 

Tests administered at the University include Graduate Management Admissions Test 
(GMAT). Law School Admission Test (LSAT). Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT I and II), 
American College Test (ACT), the College Level Examination Program (CLEP), the Col- 
legiate Placement Examination (CPE), and COMPASS (Computer- Adaptive Placement 
Assessment and Support System). 

Applications are available for the tests previously mentioned in addition to the Graduate 
Record Examinations (GRE), Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), the PRAXIS Series 
(Professional Assessments for Beginning Teachers), and the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL). 

The Office of Testing at Savannah State University administers the required testing pro- 
grams both to students who apply for admissions and those who are enrolled. Tests as 
required by the University System of Georgia which are administered by the Office of 
Testing include the COMPASS (The Computer- Adaptive Placement Assessment and Sup- 
port System) as well as the Regents' Test, which is required for graduation. Savannah 
State University also serves as a national testing center for Educational Testing Services 
and the American College Testing program. 

GRADES 
GRADING SYSTEM 

The University uses letters to indicate quality of academic work. "A" is the highest grade; 
"D" is the lowest passing grade, except when a "C" is required. Grade distinctions and 
quality points values are 



51 



Grade 


Meaning Point Value Per Credit Hour 


A 


Excellent 


4 


B 


Good 


3 


C 


Average 


2 


D 


Poor 


1 


F 


Failure 





W 


Withdrew 





WF 


Withdrew, Failing 





I 


Incomplete 





P 


Passing 





S 


Satisfactory 





u 


Unsatisfactory 





IP 


In Progress 





V 


Audit 





K 


Credit 





NR 


Not Reported 






The grade "F" indicates a failure to meet the minimum requirements of a course. 

Students who earn the grades of "D" or "F" in courses in Areas A and F of the core cur- 
riculum or in Student Academic Assistance courses must repeat these courses. Addition- 
ally, students who earn grades of "D" or "F" in major, minor, or professional education 
courses must repeat these courses. 

The following grades are not included in determining the grade point average. 

W (Withdrawal) — This symbol indicates permission to withdraw without penalty. 
Such withdrawals will not be permitted after the mid-semester point of the grading 
period (including final examinations), except when students in good standing are 
experiencing hardships as determined by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 
I (Incomplete) — This symbol indicates that students were doing satisfactory 
work, but, for non-academic reasons beyond their control, were unable to meet the 
requirements of the course. Students may remove the "I" by completing the remain- 
ing requirements within two semesters of residence; otherwise, the Registrar will 
change the grade of "I" to the grade of "F." Students are responsible for initiating the 
completion of requirements with the instructor. 

S (Satisfactory) — This symbol indicates completion of requirements in Student 
Academic Assistance or the Regents' remediation course(s). 

U (Unsatisfactory) — This symbol indicates failure to pass the Regents' Test and 
continued required enrollment in the Regents' remediation course(s). 
IP (In Progress) — This symbol indicates satisfaction of Student Academic Assis- 
tance or Learning Support class work requirements but not of the Student Academic 
Assistance or Learning Support exit examination (CPE/COMPASS). 
V (Audit) — This symbol indicates permission to sit for a course without receiving 
quality points or a grade other than "V" Students may not transfer from audit to 
credit or vice versa. Students may register on a credit basis for a course that has 
previously been audited. 

K (Credit) — This symbol indicates credit for the course via a credit by examination 
program approved by the faculty of the University. A "K" may be assigned for courses 
that have previously been audited if institutional procedures for credit by examina- 
tion are followed. 
NR (Not Reported) — This symbol indicates no grade reported by the instructor. 

REPORTING OF GRADES 

At mid-semester and at the end of the semester, faculty submit to the Office of the Reg- 
istrar the grade reports for each class. At the end of each semester, students receive a 



52 



grade report noting the grades and credit hours earned in each course in which they were 
enrolled, grade-point average for the semester, cumulative grade point average, and aca- 
demic standing. 

Mid-semester grade reports indicate deficiencies for students whose current work in a 
course is below the "C" level. 

Students can access grade information on the Web "PAWS" www.savstate.edu. Informa- 
tion and directions to access the system can be obtained from the Registrar's office or 
Office of Enrollment Management. 

CALCULATING THE CUMULATIVE AVERAGE 

Determinations of scholastic standing are generally based upon a cumulative grade point 
average, which appears on each student's permanent record. The cumulative grade point 
average is calculated by dividing the total number of grade points earned in academic 
courses at Savannah State University by the total number of academic credit hours at- 
tempted at Savannah State University. Credits earned at other institutions, credits by 
examination, credits that carry S/U grades, institutional credits, and credits specifically 
excluded by University policy are not used in computing the cumulative grade point aver- 
age. The University counts the last course grade, hours, and quality points if a course is 
repeated. All grades remain on the transcript. Adjusted grade point averages are com- 
puted each semester. 

CLASSIFICATION 

Students are classified on the basis of earned academic credit hours as follows: 

Freshman - fewer than 30 
Sophomore - 31-60 
Junior - 61-90 
Senior - 91 or more 

Throughout the semester, students remain in their classification. 

GRADE CHALLENGES BY STUDENTS 

Students who feel that they have received an unfair grade in any course should meet with 
the instructor within 7 calendar days of the first day of class of the next semester (exclud- 
ing summer) in an effort to reach a resolution. If no satisfactory resolution is reached, 
students may, within 7 days after meeting with the instructor, challenge the grade by 
writing a letter of appeal to the chair of the department in which the course was offered. 
If the instructor is also the chair of the department, the appeal letter should be addressed 
to the dean of the College in which the course was offered. This procedure must be ac- 
complished within 14 days of the first day of classes of that semester. If a resolution sat- 
isfactory to the student is not reached, the department chair or college dean may appoint 
a review committee (exclusive of the dean, department chair, and the instructor). The 
review committee, after hearing both the instructor and the student, submits its report 
and recommendation(s) to the chair, dean, or director of division, who then submits the 
report and recommendation to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Upon accepting a 
recommendation to change a grade or upon reversing a recommendation not to change a 
grade, the Vice President directs the Registrar to make the appropriate change. The Vice 
President or his designee shall communicate final decisions to students. In order for the 
department chair, dean, or director of division to grant a hearing, students must present 
adequate evidence of unfair grading. 



53 



CHANGES IN GRADES 

Once a grade has been reported to the Registrar, it can be changed only under either of 
the following conditions: 

• The instructor presents to the dean of the college conclusive, documentary evidence 
that the grade was reported in error; 

• The instructor follows the procedure of removal of an I (Incomplete) grade; or 

• A committee appointed to conduct a hearing of a student's challenge of a grade recom- 
mends a change, and the Vice President Academic Affairs accepts that recommenda- 
tion. 

TRANSCRIPTS 

The transcript is considered the official document of record of student's grade while in 
attendance at the institution. In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and 
Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (FERPA), transcripts normally are issued only at the 
request of the student. This request must be in person or in writing, and accompanied by 
the appropriate fee of $4.00 per transcript, and verified by some type of I.D. card and/or 
driver's license. 

The institution has a legal right to deny transcripts if a student has an indebtedness to 
the institution. The amount of indebtedness leading to this sanction will be dependent on 
the office of Student Accounts. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SUSPENSION 

Savannah State University is designed for serious-minded students who can profit from 
an institution of higher learning. Students who fail to fulfill the scholarship requirements 
of the Institution are subject to scholastic discipline. At the end of each semester, the Of- 
fice of the Registrar computes cumulative grade point averages in order to determine the 
academic standing of all students. 

1. Students who earn a "D" or "F" in English 1101, English 1102, Math 1111, or Math 
1113, or in any required major or minor course must repeat the course during the 
next semester they are enrolled. 

2. Stages of Progress Minimum Cumulative 
Semester Hours Attempted Grade Point Average 

1-30 1.5 

31-60 1.7 

61+ 2.0 

Students whose cumulative grade average at the end of any semester is at or above 
the minimum grade point average for their appropriate stage of progress will be con- 
sidered in good standing. 

Students will be placed on academic warning when their cumulative grade point av- 
erage falls below the minimum grade point average for their stage of progress. 

Students on academic warning will be placed on academic probation if their grade 
point average is not raised to the satisfactory level for their stage of progress at the 
end of the semester following the semester of academic warning. 

Students who do not achieve the cumulative grade point average for their stage of 
progress, but who do maintain a 2.0 grade point average during their probationary 
semester will remain on probation for the next semester of attendance. 



54 



Students who do not raise their grade point average to the minimum level for their 
stage of progress or who do not achieve a 2.0 grade point average during their pro- 
bationary semester will be suspended from the University and must reapply for 
admission. 

3. Students on probation can not register for more than twelve hours which is still 
considered a full load; (2) must repeat all courses in which they earned the grade of 
"F" if these courses are prescribed in their curriculum; (3) must repeat all courses in 
their major and minor concentration in which they earned a grade of "D" or "F"; (4) 
must repeat English 1101, English 1102, Math 1111, and Math 1113 if they earned 
the grade of "D" or "F" in these courses; (5) must report to their academic advisor 
for counseling immediately after being notified of probationary status, and (6) will 
not be permitted to represent the University or hold office in any university organi- 
zation. 

4. Students who do not remove probationary status within two semesters will be sus- 
pended for one semester unless they achieve a 2.00 average during the second semes- 
ter of the probation period. Thereafter, these students will remain on probation as 
long as they continue to earn a 2.00 average for each semester of enrollment. 

5. Students who fail all of their classes during a given semester or who with- 
draw from all of their classes without an approved withdrawal from the 
University will not be permitted to enroll for the succeeding semester. 

6. Students will be considered for re-admission after (1) semester off following 
suspension. 

7. Students will be required to submit an application to the Registrar's office to indicate 
their interest in returning to the institution. 

8. Students who are interested in receiving Financial Aid, must submit an Appeal for 
Reinstatement of Financial Aid Form. 

9. Students who have been readmitted will be required to enroll in the College Study 
Skills course (STUD 0198). They will also be required to maintain a 2.00 GPA at 
the end of their first semester back; however, those who maintain a minimum grade 
point average of 2.00 each semester may continue on probation. Failure to fulfill 
these conditions will result in dismissal. 

After one year of suspension, those students who can convincingly demonstrate a 
change of attitude toward academic responsibilities may petition the Academic 
Committee of the University for readmission. 

DEGREE AND GRADUATION 
REQUIREMENTS 

APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION 

All candidates for a degree must file a formal application for graduation with the Office 
of the Registrar. Candidates should apply two semesters preceding their expected gradu- 
ation date that is January for December graduation, or September for May graduation. 
The Registrar will inform the academic departments when the application is filed. The 
department will conduct an audit and inform students of any remaining requirements. 
The Registrar conducts an independent audit to ensure that all degree requirements have 
been satisfied. 

DUAL MAJORS 

Students seeking a second major within the same degree program must complete the 



55 



specific requirements for both majors. An application for the second major must be sub- 
mitted to the Registrar's Office at least one year prior to graduation. Both majors will be 
noted on the transcript. 

SECOND DEGREE 

Students who have earned a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution 
may obtain a second baccalaureate degree from Savannah State University by completing 
the following requirements: 

• Complete all major requirements listed for the chosen program of study. 

• Earn at least 30 semester hours in residence at Savannah State University. 

• If the first baccalaureate degree was earned at Savannah State University, the re- 
quired 30 hours must be in excess of any hours used towards the first baccalaureate 
degree. 

A minor area of study requires a minimum of 15 semester credit hours. At least 9 of these 
credit hours must be at the 3000 level or higher. To be noted on the transcript, a minor 
must be declared at least one year prior to graduation. 

GRADUATION 

Degrees will be awarded only to students who meet academic standards and residency 
requirements of an academic college. Degrees are conferred formally at commencement 
exercises at the end of the Fall and Spring Semesters. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Graduation with honors requires a minimum attendance period of four semesters and 
completion of at least sixty hours at Savannah State University. In addition, students who 
graduate with honors must attain the following grade-point averages the entire period of 
attendance: 

Cum Laude 3.00 

Magna Cum Laude 3.40 

Summa Cum Laude 3.75 

Due to processing and final evaluation time constraints, Spring Semester grades for May 
graduation and Fall Semester grades for December graduation will not be used in comput- 
ing the GPA for honors. After May and December graduations, the GPA is rechecked for 
honors qualifications; the honors designation will then be added to the record of students 
who qualify 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
BACCALAUREATE DEGREE 

1. A minimum of 120 semester hours, exclusive of the required health, physical educa- 
tion, and freshman orientation courses; 

2. A scholastic average of 2.0 or higher; 

3. Satisfactory completion of the minimum requirements of the Core Curriculum as 
outlined for Area A, B, C, D and E; 

4. Satisfactory completion of core courses (POLS 1101 and HIST 2111 or HIST 2112) 
designed to give students proficiency in United States and Georgia history and gov- 
ernment; 



56 



5. Satisfactory completion of the University System of Georgia Regents' Examination; 

6. A prescribed college or departmental major (such as business administration, chemis- 
try, or engineering technology) or a major of at least 30 semester hours in one depart- 
ment and a minor of 15-21 hours, with no grade below "C" in major, minor, or special 
subject requirements. (15-30 hours of major courses must be taken in residence at 
this university); 

7. Residence of at least one year at Savannah State University (During their senior year, 
students are required to spend a minimum of 30 semester hours in residence); and 

8. Completion of all the aforementioned requirements within eight calendar years. The 
University reserves the right to allow exceptions to the requirements when recom- 
mended by the chair of the department in which the student is majoring. 

NOTE: Graduation requirements include a 2.00 minimum grade point average 
for undergraduate degrees. The computation of this graduation grade point 
average will include only the final attempt in courses that have been repeat- 
ed. With the preceding exception, the grade point average will be computed in 
the manner prescribed in the Grading System and Calculating the Cumulative 
Grade Point Average sections of the general catalog. Credits earned at other 
institutions or by examination and courses with S or U grade are not used to 
compute the grade point average. 

All incomplete grades for previous semesters must be received in the Office of the Regis- 
trar in writing thirty (30) days prior to graduation date or completion of academic require- 
ments. Students are responsible for seeing that incomplete grades are properly recorded. 
Students exempted from taking required credit hours of physical education courses must 
take the same number of credit hours of electives to replace graduation requirements for 
physical education. 

EXIT EXAMINATIONS 

As conditions of graduation, the University and academic departments may require stu- 
dents to take additional competency tests appropriate to their programs of study Informa- 
tion relative to these tests is available in the academic departments. 

Students failing to demonstrate required proficiency on any competency test may be re- 
quired to complete additional courses to correct the deficiency. Courses required and com- 
pleted under this provision may be with or without academic credit and may be required 
without regard to prior course credits in these disciplines. 

SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 
HONORS PROGRAM 

Purpose and Goals 

The Savannah State University Honors Program maintains a community of academically 
talented students. It provides the students with opportunities for intellectual growth and 
for high achievement. The advantages of participation in the honors program are numer- 
ous, for the program is highly competitive and multi-faceted. The general education hon- 
ors core is the same as the University's general education core; however, honors students 
study at an accelerated pace and have a myriad of activities on and off campus. Honors 
students are able to network with other students who are highly motivated. The program 
is designed to assist students in their preparation for graduate and professional study and 
ultimately to assume leadership roles. 



57 



Admission Requirements 

Freshmen applicants for admission to the Savannah State University Honors Program 
must meet the following requirements: 

- Rank in the upper 25 percent of their high school class and/or 

- Achieve a minimum SAT I score of 900/GPA 3.5 or SAT I score of 1200+/GPA 3.30; 

- Meet the general admission requirements of the University; and 

- Have a strong college preparatory background in English, mathematics, and/or 
science. 

Transfer students who wish to enter the Savannah State University Honors Program 
should apply to the director of the program. They should also present transcripts of their 
previous college work and any SAT I, ACT, and Advanced Placement Scores. However, 
since the core of the honors curriculum is offered in the freshman and sophomore years, 
transfer students should seek admission to the University as soon as possible. 

Academic Requirements and Credit 

Honors students are required to enroll in and successfully complete a minimum of 15 
credit hours each semester. Students who do not maintain a cumulative grade point av- 
erage of 3.50 or above will be placed on honors probation the following semester. If the 
standard is not met at the close of the probation period, the students will be suspended 
from the honors program, but they may appeal the decision through proper administra- 
tive channels and apply for readmission. 

General Education Honors Core 

Students in the honors program must complete a minimum of 10 hours in each honors 
core area — humanities, mathematics and science, and social science. 

CAMPUS HONOR SOCIETIES 

SOCIETY ACADEMIC AREAS 

Alpha Kappa Mu All Areas 

Beta Beta Beta Biology 

Beta Kappa Chi Sciences 

Pi Gamma Mu Social Sciences 

Sigma Tau Delta English 

Tau Alpha Pi Engineering Technologies 

Phi Alpha Social Work 

RECOGNITION OF EXCELLENCE IN SCHOLARSHIP 

Persons who have not been subject to disciplinary action while earning superior grades 
and who have not incurred any academic deficiencies are eligible for honors status as 
indicated: 

Students who maintain an average of "B" in a full program (12 hours) during a semester 
are eligible for listing on the Honor Roll. 

Students who maintain an average of 3.50 or higher in a full program (12 hours) during a 
semester will have their names placed on the Dean's List. 

Students who maintain a 4.0 average in a full program (12 hours) are designated Presi- 
dential Scholars. 

Students who maintain an average of 3.00 during any semester may obtain permission to 
take an overload during the following semester, the total not to exceed twenty hours. 



58 



CLASS REGULATIONS 

Student Load — Undergraduate 

The University policy governing semester academic course load for full-time status is as 
follows: freshmen (12 credit hours, minimum; 16 credit hours, normal; 17 credit hours, 
maximum), and sophomore, juniors, and seniors (12 credit hours, minimum; 16 credit 
hours, normal; 18 credit hours, maximum). Students are generally expected to enroll in at 
least 15 hours per semester. 

Under ordinary circumstances students may enroll in courses up to but not in excess of 
fifteen (15) semester hours. Students who maintain an average 3.00 during any semester 
may secure permission to take additional hours during the following semester, the total 
not to exceed twenty (20) semester hours. Exceptions to the 3.00 average may be 
made for students who are within two semesters of graduation. For these stu- 
dents, the total hours carried for credit may not exceed twenty (20). Advisors 
must recommend this overload to the dean. 

Student Load — Graduate 

Full time load for graduate students is 9 credit hours; maximum load for graduate stu- 
dents is 12 credit hours. Students in the MSW Program are approved to take a maximum 
of 15 credit hours. 

Overloads 

Permission to enroll for more than 18 semester hours will be granted by the appropriate 
Dean to a student: 

1. with an average grade of "B" for full-time enrollment in the 
preceding semester, or 

2. with an overall grade-point average of 3.0 or 

3. requiring an extra course in one of the two semesters prior to graduation 

No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 hours. A student who is on aca- 
demic probation will not be permitted to register for more than 13 semester hours. Excep- 
tions to these limitations may only be made by the appropriate Dean. 

Adjustment of Classes (Dropping) 

Students desiring to adjust class schedules should secure the drop/add form from their 
academic department, obtain the signatures of instructors for the class(s) they are adding 
and/or dropping, and take the form to the Office of the Registrar. The last day to withdraw 
without penalty (W grade) is at mid-term of each semester. After that time, students who 
withdraw will be assigned a penalty grade (WF). The penalty grade is included in the cal- 
culation of semester grade point averages. 

Withdrawing from the University 

Students who feel that the circumstances require their withdrawal from the University 
may do so by filing the appropriate forms in the Office of the Vice President for Academic 
Affairs. 

Students who withdraw after the mid-term of each semester (see Academic Calendar and 
the Semester Schedule of Classes) will receive the grade of "WF" except in cases of hard- 
ship as approved by the academic dean in consultation with the Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs. Students should initially petition the Vice President for Academic Affairs 
for relief due to extenuating circumstances resulting in undue hardship. 



59 



Counselors, and advisors will counsel with the student in an effort to determine whether 
the circumstances are such that the University can provide a remedy, which will make it 
possible for the student to remain in school. If such remedy cannot be afforded, the Vice 
President of Academic Affairs will forward the appropriate forms to the offices of Finan- 
cial Aid, Cashier, and Registrar. 

Students who withdraw without giving formal notice will forfeit claims for any refunds. 

The last day to withdraw from all classes for the semester will be the last day of scheduled 
classes. 

STUDENT INFORMATION 
ACCESS TO STUDENT RECORDS 

Savannah State University is covered by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 
1974, as amended (FERPA), which are designed to protect the students' rights with regard 
to education records maintained by the institution. Under the Act, students may inspect 
and review their own education records maintained by the institution that challenge the 
content of records (except grades which can only be challenged through the academic 
appeal procedure) on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading or in violation 
of privacy or other rights; and control disclosures from educational records with certain 
exceptions. 

Savannah State University's policy on "Access to Student Records" complies with the pro- 
visions of FERPA. A copy of this policy and a copy of a summary of the FERPA regulations 
may be obtained in the Office of the Registrar. Students also have the right to file com- 
plaints with the FERPA Office of the Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20201. 

RELEASE OF DIRECTORY INFORMATION 

Directory information will be treated as public information and generally will be available 
on all students and former students at the discretion of the University. 

Directory information includes the students', date and place of birth, major field of study; 
height, weight, age, hometown, hobbies, participation in officially recognized activities 
and sports, general interest items of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, de- 
gree applied for or received, honors and awards received, and previous educational institu- 
tions attended. 

Students or parents of students who are under eighteen (18), may refuse to permit the 
release of any or all of the categories of directory information until the end of Spring Se- 
mester by submitting a written request to the office of the Registrar within ten (10) days 
of the beginning of any academic semester during which the students are enrolled. This 
time requirement is necessary to insure that directory information, which is withheld, is 
not included in the various university publications during the year. Of course, requests 
to withhold the release of directory information will be honored at any time, but the uni- 
versity cannot be reasonably certain that some directory information will not be released 
if the aforementioned time limits are not met. The student directory is usually published 
during the Fall Semester. Requests received after press time cannot be honored. Informa- 
tion from this and similar publications cannot be deleted after printing, and previously 
released information cannot be recalled. 

Inquiries from news media about students or former students should be made to the 
Director of Communications. Due to the unpredictable nature and immediacy of media 
inquiries, notice cannot be given of media releases (non-athletic). Students or former stu- 
dents who wish to have directory information withheld should notify the Director of Com- 
munications prior to the anticipated date of any media inquiry. 



60 



Change of Address 

Students are responsible for notifying the Office of the Registrar of any change in address. 
The mailing of notices to the last address on record constitutes official notification. 

STUDENT ACADEMIC GRIEVANCE 

APPELLATE PROCEDURES 

(DISCIPLINARY) 

Original Jurisdiction 

All student grievances of an academic nature in the University shall rest with the indi- 
vidual departments for a decision. Students may accept this decision or make an appeal. 
This step is handled by the Educational Policy Committee. 

Right of Appeal 

Appeals shall be available to every student in an academic grievance proceeding against 
the University. Within forty-five (45) working days, students must file the appeal with the 
department chair. 

Appellate Procedure 

When a decision of original jurisdiction has been rendered, the grievant shall have seven 
(7) working days to appeal this decision. All appeals shall be in writing and supporting 
documents presented to the dean of the college. 

Within three (3) days, appellants shall be given, in writing, all charges upon which the 
original decision was based as well as all necessary information for the appellate hearing 
procedures. Appellants shall be guaranteed a speedy hearing, yet given adequate time to 
prepare their defense. 

Jurisdiction of Appeal 

The Vice President for Academic Affairs shall make the decision regarding all appeals. The 
Vice President shall have the prerogative of either creating a special committee or using 
an independent officer to assist in hearing the case. 

Rights of Appellant 

Grievants shall have the right to be present when all evidence is presented against them 
and all witnesses appear, have an advisor (non lawyer) present to assist throughout the 
proceedings, cross-examine witnesses, present evidence by witness or affidavit, and pres- 
ent evidence by deposition when a witness is unable to appear. 

Hearing Procedures 

A record shall be kept of the entire proceedings, either by tape or stenographer. The hear- 
ing will commence by a reading of the charges and the decision of the department of origi- 
nal jurisdiction. Evidence will be presented to sustain the decision. 

Disciplinary Interim Suspension 

A student who has been summarily suspended after mid-term of the semester pursuant 
to the Savannah State University Student Conduct Code pending the outcome of a dis- 
ciplinary hearing will not be eligible for withdrawal from the University until the final 
disposition of the case. Should the student be found guilty of violating the Student Con- 
duct Code or plead "no contest," the student will receive failing grades from the date of 
the summary suspension and forfeit the semester. Should the student be found not guilty, 



61 



the Vice President for Student Affairs will provide written notification to the Vice Presi- 
dent for Academic Affairs of the disposition. Should the student desire to withdraw, the 
Vice President for Academic Affairs will accept a petition from the student and grant an 
automatic withdrawal without penalty and forward the withdrawal approval to the ap- 
propriate offices. 

VETERANS, DISABILITY, AND WAR ORPHANS' BENEFIT 

Savannah State University maintains a veterans coordinator in the Office of the Regis- 
trar to certify and assist students who are eligible for veterans benefits and to coordinate 
veterans affairs. 

Veterans who wish to attend Savannah State University under any of the veteran's bene- 
fits programs provided by public law should apply to the Savannah State University Office 
of Admissions in the normal manner. It is advisable for veterans who have not previously 
used any educational benefits to apply to the Veterans Affairs (VA) Regional Office for 
those benefits, and for veterans who will be transferring to Savannah State from another 
institution where educational benefits were received to process a "Request for Change of 
Program or Place of Training" form with the VA Regional Office concurrently with their 
application to Savannah State University. As soon as the Savannah State University Of- 
fice of Admissions notifies applications of their acceptance to the University, applicants 
should contact the SSU veteran's coordinator for further instructions. 

Although additional information is contained on the application for benefits and the infor- 
mational sheet, which must be completed in the Office of the Registrar, veteran students 
should pay particular attention to the following: 

1. Veterans may be certified for benefits only after having been accepted to and while at- 
tending in a designated degree program (except for students enrolled in Student Aca- 
demic Assistance or Learning Support) in certain certification programs. Students 
classified as non-degree (ND), post-graduate (PG) or post-baccalaureate (PB) will not 
be certified for benefits while attending in those classifications, unless enrolled in an 
approved certification program. 

2. Students may be certified for only those courses that apply to their formal and des- 
ignated degree objective. Certain required remediation and/or prerequisite courses 
may be certified for benefits, but only if those courses are specifically required of 
the student, and the requirement is appropriately documented in the Office of the 
Registrar. 

3. Students receiving benefits are required to notify the veterans coordinator whenever 
their attendance in a course or program is interrupted, or whenever the students 
formally change degree objectives. Failure to do so may result in an overpayment of 
benefits. Students are liable for overpayments. 

4. Students may not be certified for repeated courses unless the repetition is required 
by academic policy which is specified in the University catalog. 

5. Savannah State University defines a normal full-time load for undergraduate stu- 
dents as 12 semester hours. Undergraduate students who carry fewer than 12 semes- 
ter hours will not be certified as full-time. 

6. Continuing students who wish to continue to receive benefits must renew their certi- 
fications through the veteran's coordinator each Fall and Spring Semester. Students 
whose attendance was interrupted must renew their certifications at the beginning 
of the next semester of attendance in which they wish to receive benefits. Student 
Academic Assistance or Learning Support students, active duty military personnel, 
and students attending on a less-than-half-time basis must renew their certifications 



62 



each semester. These students who are certified on a semester basis will routinely 
experience a break in benefit payments between terms and should contact the Vet- 
erans Administration Regional Office to ascertain the amount and schedule of their 
checks. 

Veterans with discharges (DD-214) are exempted from taking physical education 
(PE.) courses. They can provide copies of their DD-214 and receive up to 4 credit 
hours of EE. Veterans should be prepared to pay their own tuition and fees if they 
have not applied for advance pay at least 40 days prior to the beginning of the se- 
mester. 



63 



FINANCIAL AID 

APPLICATION FOR FINANCIAL AID 

Students applying for financial aid must complete the Free Application for Federal Stu- 
dent Aid (FAFSA) or the renewal FAFSA if they have received aid before from the Federal 
Student Aid Programs. They must answer all questions on the form and list Savannah 
State University as one of the institutions they plan to attend. In approximately four 
weeks, they will be mailed a Student Aid Report (SAR). FAFSA on the web is available at 
www.fafsa.ed.gov 

Students are expected to provide documents, records, and materials promptly. Their files 
must be complete by April 15 to get priority consideration for financial assistance, and 
they must be admitted to the University. 

Deadlines for processing financial aid applicants are as follows: 

Fall Semester - June 1 
Spring Semester - November 1 
Summer Semester - April 1 

Students who fail to submit paperwork by the deadline will not be awarded financial aid 
for the particular semester and may become ineligible to receive certain funds from a 
particular program. 

FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS 
(TITLE IV PROGRAMS) 

The Office of Financial Aid administers the following U.S. Department of Education stu- 
dent financial aid programs: Federal Pell Grants, Federal Direct Loans, Federal Supple- 
mental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG), Federal Work Study (FWS), and Fed- 
eral Perkins Loans. State of Georgia programs administered by the Office of Financial Aid 
include the Student Incentive Grant Program and the HOPE Scholarship Program. 

In order to be eligible, students must have financial need, have earned a high school di- 
ploma or a GED certificate, be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen, have a valid Social 
Security Number, make satisfactory academic progress, register with Selective Service if 
applicable, not be in default on a student loan, and not owe a refund on a previous federal 
student grant. 

Federal Pell Grant 

Undergraduate students who have not earned an undergraduate or professional degree 
are eligible for Pell Grants. These grants provide a foundation of financial aid to which 
other aid may be added. Savannah State University's Office of Financial Aid requires that 
all students seeking financial aid apply for the federal Pell Grant. 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants 

The Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) is for undergraduates who 
have exceptional financial needs. These include students with the lowest Excepted Family 
Contributions (EFCs), and gives priority to students who receive federal Pell Grants. The 
average yearly award ranges from $300 to $1,500. 

Federal Work- Study 

The Federal Work-Study Program provides jobs for undergraduate and graduate students 
with financial needs. The program encourages community service work and work related 
to the students' course of study. 



64 



Federal Perkins Loan 

A Perkins Loan is a low-interest (5%) loan for both undergraduate and graduate students 
with exceptional financial needs. Repayment for this loan begins six months after enroll- 
ment at the University ends. 

Federal Direct Loan 

Low-interest loans for students and parents (PLUS) are available through the Federal 
Direct Student Loan Program. Under this program, the federal government makes loans 
directly to students and parents through schools. 

First-time borrowers in the student loan program at Savannah State must attend a loan 
counseling session before any loan funds can be credited to their account or disbursed to 
them. Loan counseling sessions are held each Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. All 
borrowers are required to show proof that they attended a loan counseling session before 
the cashier's office will release loan funds. 

HOPE Scholarship Program (Helping Outstanding Pupils Educationally) 

The HOPE Scholarship is a reward for scholastic achievement and an incentive to con- 
tinue working hard in school. Students eligible to receive a HOPE scholarship must have 
graduated from high school with a grade point average of 3.0, continue to maintain a 3.0 
at a Georgia college or university, apply for a federal Pell Grant, meet Georgia residency 
requirements, be a U.S. citizen, meet selective service registration requirements, not be in 
default or owe on federal or state financial aid, and maintain satisfactory academic prog- 
ress. Also, they must have a completed file in the Office of Financial Aid by mid semester 
of the term in which they expect to receive payment; otherwise, payment will not be made 
for that particular semester. 

If, after attempting 30 semester or 45 quarter hours, or at the end of Spring term, or at 
the end of the first three enrolled terms as a less-than-full-time student, you fall below a 
3.0 cumulative grade point average, you may continue your college studies at your own 
expense. If you then earn a 3.0 cumulative grade point average at the completion of 
your sophomore year (60 semester or 90 quarter hours attempted) or your junior year 
(90 semester or 135 quarter hours attempted), you may reenter the HOPE scholarship 
program. 

Institutional Work Program 

The Savannah State University student employment program helps students locate part- 
time employment within various departments on campus. 

Scholarships 

Savannah State University offers scholarships to students from private, federal state and 
university-funded sources. 

Approximately 75 funds and their award criteria are summarized in a scholarship bro- 
chure, which students may obtain from the Office of Admissions, the Office of Institu- 
tional Advancement, or their respective colleges. In addition, students may visit the 
Office of Institutional Advancement, to inquire about other special scholarship programs 
such as the Presidential Scholarship, which is based on grades, test scores, citizenship, 
and exemplary leadership qualities. 

While scholarship applications are accepted throughout the year, December 1 is the official 
application deadline to be considered for an award during the following academic year. 
The SSU Scholarship Committee reviews applications and announces scholarship awards 
in February. 



65 



Applications are available in the offices of Admissions and Institutional Advancement. For 
more information, call (912) 356-2286. 

Athletic scholarship information is available through the Athletic Department at (912) 
353-5181 

ROTC Scholarships 

Army and Navy ROTC Scholarships are available. The Captain of the Army ROTC Pro- 
gram at (912) 356-2440 and/or the Commander of the Navy ROTC Program (912) 356- 
2206 can provide information regarding these scholarships. 

Savannah State University's Policy 
for Determining Student Withdrawals 

In compliance with the Higher Education Amendments of 1998, Public law 105 244, Sa- 
vannah State University will begin implementing these new provisions effective October 
7, 2000. The current provisions require all schools participating in the SFA Programs to 
use specific refund policies when a student who receives SFA Program funds ceases at- 
tendance. In addition, the current provisions specify an order of return of unearned funds 
from all sources of aid, not just the SFA Programs. 

Unofficial Withdrawals: If a student does not begin the withdrawal process or otherwise 
notify the university of the intent to withdraw, the withdrawal date will be the midpoint 
of the payment period for which SFA Program assistance was disbursed or a later date 
documented by the university. 

Official Withdrawals: A calculation will be made on all financial aid recipients to de- 
termine whether a student who completely withdraws during a term has "earned" the 
monies disbursed. A student "earns" his/her aid based on the period of time they remain 
enrolled. During the first 60% of the term a student earns financial aid funds in direct 
proportion to the length of time the student remained enrolled. Beyond the 60% point 
all aid is considered earned. The responsibility to repay "unearned" aid is shared by the 
Institution and the student in proportion to the aid each is assumed to possess. For more 
details concerning withdrawals by students with financial aid, please contact the Office of 
Student Financial Aid. 

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) 
GUIDELINES FOR STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

Savannah State University is required by the U.S. Department of Education to establish 
minimum standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) to include quantitative and 
qualitative measurements. The Office of Financial Aid will measure students' SAP once 
each year at the end of the Spring Semester. The following policy is effective for semesters 
beginning on or after Summer Session 1999. An academic year consists of a Fall/Spring 
combination - i.e., Fall Semester 1999 and Spring Semester 2000. 

Satisfactory Academic Progress standards will be measured at the completion of each 
Spring Semester and the new status is effective with the following Summer Session. 

Requirements 

Part-time and Full-time Undergraduate Students 

1. Must successfully complete at least the percentage of hours attempted according 
to the scale below. Hours attempted include courses with a grade of "W", "F" and all 
accepted transfer hours. 



66 



2. Must maintain the minimum cumulative grade point average according to the 
scale below. 



Attempted Hours 


% Earned Hours 


Minimum Cumulative GPA 


1-30 


10% 


1.50 


31-59 


30% 


1.75 


60-90 


50% 


2.00 


91-180 


70% 


2.00 


Graduate 1-54 


70% 


3.00 



Financial Aid Suspension 

Failure to meet or exceed the SAP standards will result in suspension from financial aid 
eligibility until such time as the student fulfills the requirement listed in items 1 and 2. 
During a period of suspension, the student is not eligible to receive Title IV aid. 

Time Frame 

Undergraduate financial aid applicants (including transfer students) enrolled in a four- 
year degree program have a maximum of 180 credit hours attempted of undergraduate 
work to complete their bachelor's degree requirement. 

Students pursuing a second bachelor's degree will have an extension of 66 credit hours 
attempted beyond the maximum 180 credit hour limit to complete their second bachelor's 
degree. 

Graduate financial aid applicants enrolled in a Master's program have a maximum of 54 
credit hours attempted to complete their degree requirements. 

Eligible Student Academic Assistance or Learning Support students may receive aid for 
one academic year's worth of credit hours. 

Appeal of Financial Aid Suspension 

A student wishing to appeal financial aid suspension must do so in writing with appropri- 
ate documentation. 

CLASSIFICATION OF COURSES 

Courses are numbered as follows: 

Student Status Number Range 

Institutional 0001-0199 

Freshman 1000-1999 

Sophomore 2000-2999 

Junior 3000-3999 

Senior 4000-4999 

Graduate 5000 or higher 

CREDIT COURSE DESCRIPTION 

Under each course title, there are three numbers, such as 3-0-3. The first number listed, 
is the number of hours of lecture; the second number indicates the number of hours of 
laboratory; and the third number indicates the number of credit hours awarded for suc- 
cessful completion of the course. 



67 



COURSES USING THE WEB 

Online courses are taken exclusively over the Internet. There are no required on-campus 
meetings. Hybrid courses are held both on campus and online. They are traditional face- 
to-face courses in which some of the on-campus class meetings are replaced with online as- 
signments. Web-enhanced courses are traditional face-to-face courses that are augmented 
by course websites. Unlike the class meetings for hybrid courses, the class meetings for 
web-enhanced courses are all scheduled on campus unless classes are redirected for spe- 
cial activities. Writing-enhanced courses are those in which the instructor uses writing 
substantially in the class, and at least 20% of the grade is based on writing assignments. 



68 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 



STUDENT AFFAIRS AND STUDENT SERVICES 

CENTER FOR STUDENT DEVELOPMENT 

CENTER FOR LEADERSHIP AND CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES 

CENTER FOR RESIDENTIAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS 

CENTER FOR STUDENT PROGRAMS AND ORGANIZATIONS 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES AND ORGANIZATIONS 



STUDENT CONDUCT 

Violation of Student Conduct 

Policy on Drugs and Weapons 

Disciplinary Procedures 

Rights of Accused 

Basis for Review (Appeal to President) 

Appeals to Board of Regents 



69 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 

DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Central to the Division of Student Affairs is enhancing the holistic educational experience 
of students by providing educationally purposeful services and programs that bridge class- 
room learning with out-of-class experiences. As such, the primary focus of the Division of 
Student Affairs is to provide opportunities (e.g., activities, programs, resources, and well- 
maintained facilities) and to create environments that support the achievement of the 
university's educational goals. The quality of student life, however, depends on the extent 
to which students take advantage of what the university offers for their personal learning 
and social enrichment. Students can be assisted in this important task through the units 
that comprise the Division of Student Affairs. 

CENTER FOR STUDENT DEVELOPMENT 

The Center for Student Development offers counseling to enrolled students at the univer- 
sity. These services include, but are not limited to, personal, career, and social counseling 
in an individual or group basis. In some cases, the center makes referrals to other local 
services. Additionally, the center provides services to students seeking full and part-time 
employment, experiential learning opportunities, and graduate school information. Fi- 
nally, cooperative education, which is a partnership program that provides opportunities 
for students to supplement classroom learning with work experience in order to be better 
prepared for meaningful careers, is administered by the center. Other programs adminis- 
tered through the center include: 

• Career Fairs and Seminars; 

• Web Job Listings; 

• Resume Critiques; and 

• Disabled Student Services. 

CENTER FOR LEADERSHIP & CHARACTER 
DEVELOPMENT 

The development of leadership skills is a desired educational outcome at the university. As 
such, the university, through the Office of Student Affairs, has established the Center for 
Leadership & Character Development. The Center, which is sponsored by Title III funds, 
focuses primarily on developing student leadership, character development, and service 
through seminars, institutes, retreats, and workshops. The Center itself is located in the 
Office of Student Affairs suite; it houses dozens of books and audio tapes on leadership, 
personal development, career development, and service learning. Typically, the Center 
engages in three major leadership programs, specifically in the fall, winter, and spring. 
Previous programs included: (1) the Fall Character- and Values-Based Leadership Retreat, 
(2) the Diversity Education & Exchange Project, and (3) the Rites of Passage Leadership 
Program. All students are encouraged to utilize the Center. Students should be mindful 
that the major leadership programs are limited to small numbers of students. 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES 

All full-time undergraduate and graduate students pay a student health fee that covers 
the unlimited use of student health center services without additional cost. The Harris- 
McDew Student Health Center is conveniently located on the SSU campus on Jasmine 
Avenue adjacent to Payne Hall. It seeks to maintain, improve, and safeguard the health 
of students. Services provided include: 

• Medical and nursing examination and care; 



70 



• Alcohol and Drug Awareness Resource Center; 

• Limited pharmacy services; 

• Information, consultation and referrals; 

• Wellness and wholesome mental and physical health habits programs; 

• Day beds for temporary observation and care; and 

• Personal counseling. 

The center, which is staffed by nurses, is open Monday through Friday. Additionally, a 
physician is available Monday through Fridays. A resident student suffering from an 
injury or sudden illness during hours when the health center is closed should contact the 
resident hall staff, resident assistant, or campus police. An ambulance or paramedic unit 
may be dispatched to campus for an immediate evaluation or transportation to the hospi- 
tal as needed. Students are responsible for the cost of all services provided by any other 
community health care provider. 

All students are encouraged to be covered by an adequate health insurance plan and 
should follow its directions for emergency or crisis care. Information on a current student 
health insurance plan is maintained in the student health center. Participation in the stu- 
dent health insurance plan is voluntary and the student is responsible for the cost. 

CENTER FOR RESIDENTIAL SERVICES & PROGRAMS 

The Center for Residential Services and Programs provides comfortable, affordable, and 
secure residential communities located throughout campus. In particular, the university 
has traditional residence hall facilities and an apartment-style facility, which is for upper- 
class-level students. Residence life programs promote academic success, student devel- 
opment, and leadership. For a greater understanding of residence life at the university, 
students are encouraged to read the Residence Hall Student Handbook, which is available 
in the Office of Housing & Residence Life. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

There are five residence halls at Savannah State University. Assignment to living areas is 
based on sex and classification. 

Residence on campus complements classroom instruction. There are certain regulations 
in place to ensure that the living/learning processes of students are maintained. Such 
regulations can be found in this catalog and publications distributed by the Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs and the Office of Residence Life. 

Freshmen from outside the Chatham County area are expected to reside in the residence 
halls of Savannah State University. Students are required to apply for housing at the 
beginning of the academic year, summer school, and any semester that is proceeded by a 
break in continued residence. Room assignments are made for the academic year. Students 
in double occupancy, who have not contracted for single occupancy and who do not have 
a roommate, or change rooms. Students who had assigned roommates and the roommate 
did not occupy their assigned space or withdrew from campus housing within a month 
of the end of registration for a term must also adhere to the room consolidation require- 
ments. Any room changes must be approved in writing by the Office of Residence Life 
and be completed within five days after notification to consolidate. Individual students 
remaining in a double occupancy room will be automatically charged and legally obligated 
to pay a prorated single room rate. These students may contract for a double occupancy 
room as a single for the remainder of the current semester only. 

Students are expected to clear housing at the end of spring and summer semesters, if 
they do not plan to return, or if they graduate. Before vacating their assigned rooms, all 
students must complete a clearance form and must obtain the signature of the Resident 
Hall Director or the Resident Assistant (RA). 



71 



Students who live in residence halls are required to purchase a 20-meal per week meal 
plan. Students who have a diet prescribed by a physician may be exempted only if the Uni- 
versity cafeteria is unable to prepare the diet meals. Hot plates and other cooking devices 
are prohibited in the residence halls. Prohibited items found in rooms will be confiscated; 
students who violate cooking policies will be charged a fine. 

Room Reservation/Damage Deposit 

A student who falls under the University Campus Housing Policy cannot be assigned or 
occupy a room until the Office of Residence Life receives his/her Residence Hall Contract 
and Room Reservation/Damage Deposit. These regulations are applicable to all students 
insofar as space is available in the University's residence halls. An application for campus 
housing is to be submitted AFTER the student receives an official acceptance to Savan- 
nah State University from the Office of Admissions. Submission of a Residence Hall Ap- 
plication does not guarantee housing. A $100.00 Room Reservation/Damage Deposit must 
accompany each housing application before an application can be processed and a room 
assigned. The Room Reservation/Damage Deposit is a damage fee and a guarantee of con- 
tract fulfillment. It is not applied towards room and board payments. 

Housing Application Deadlines: 
Deadlines are prior to the beginning of the term) 

Fall Semester July 1 

Spring Semester December 1 
Summer Semester May 1 

Full refund of room reservation/damage deposit is granted UPON WRITTEN 
REQUEST if room cancellation is postmarked thirty (30) days prior to the start 
of any semester. 

CENTER FOR STUDENT PROGRAMS & ORGANIZATIONS 

The Center for Student Programs and Organizations is responsible for enhancing student 
life through co-curricular activities, which are an integral part of the physical, social, emo- 
tional, spiritual, and intellectual growth of students. Student activities at Savannah State 
University consist of: 

• Clubs and Organizations 

• Game Room and Recreational Activities 

• Movies 

• Campus-wide and Informal Activities 

• Departmental Activities 

Student organizations provide opportunities for students, faculty, and staff to interact 
with one another during cultural, recreational, spiritual and social activities either in 
formal or informal settings. 

The Student Government Association (SGA), which is the official representative of the 
student body, works closely with the university administration on matters related to stu- 
dent life. Other organizations that are recognized at the university include: 

• Honor Societies 

• Professional and Departmental Organizations 

• Fraternities and Sororities 

• Service Clubs and Organizations 

• Student Leadership Development 



72 



Organizations 

Achievers of Today and Tomorrow 

African Student Association 

All Walks of Life (AWOL) 

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. 

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. 

American Chemical Society 

American Society of Civil Engineers 

Art Club 

Beta Beta Honor Society 

Beta Kappa Chi Scientific Society 

Black Men With A Mission 

Blue and Gold Society 

Bowen-Smith Hall Council 

Cheerleading Squad 

Choral Music Society 

Christian Student Union 

Criminal Justice Club 

DC and Beyond 

Dance Ensemble 

Delta Sigma Pi 

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. 

Environmental Science Club 

Freshman Class 

Graduation Association of Public 

Administration (GAPA) 
History Club 

Institute of Management Accountants 
International Students Association 
Junior Class 
Kappa Alpha Psi 
Marine Science Club 
Master of Social Work (MSW) 
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. 
Mass Communication Club 
Mathematicians In Training 
Minority Student Association 



NAACP 

National Association of Black Accountants 

Nontraditional Student Association 

NROTC 

Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. 

Pan-Hellenic Council 

Peer Counselors 

Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity 

Phi Beta Lambda 

Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. 

Players by the Sea 

Pre-Law Club 

Pre-Med Club 

Resident Assistants 

Science Student Alliance 

Semper FIDelis 

Senior Class 

Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc. 

Social Workers Association 

Social Workers of Tomorrow 

Sociology Club 

Sophomore Class 

SSU Dance Ensemble 

SSU Marching Tiger Band 

SSU Quiz Bowl Team 
Student Government Association 
Tiger's Roar Newspaper 
Tiger Yearbook Staff 
University Queen Coalition 
Wesleyan Gospel Choir 
Student Organization 



Please refer to the Student Handbook for an update on student clubs and organizations. 

STUDENT ORIENTATION 

The Director of Student Programs and Activities supervises the orientation program 
which is designed to assist new students in becoming acquainted with other students, 
University regulations, routine procedures, campus traditions, opportunities for training, 
and specialized vocational guidance. The program concentrates on all freshmen and new 
students entering the University. Orientation includes placement testing, academic ad- 
visement and pre-registration. Activities typically include a dance, dinner cabaret, break- 
fast singing contest, and get acquainted luncheon and picnic on the campus circle. New 
students who are over the age of twenty-five have the option to attend a mini-orientation 
generally held in mid-August. 

Two follow-up courses dealing with the psychology of human relationships, required of 
freshmen and transfer students, are designed to facilitate the process of total adjustment 
to university life and to guide students' thinking in reference to the social forces that af- 



73 



feet them daily. These courses are designated Freshman Year Experience I and Freshman 
Year Experience II. 

Fraternities and Sororities 

The national fraternities organized on the campus include Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Phi 
Gamma (journalism), Alpha Phi Omega (service), Kappa Alpha Psi,Phi Beta Sigma, and 
Omega Psi Phi. 

The national sororities organized on the campus are Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma 
Theta, Sigma Gamma Rho, and Zeta Phi Beta. 

These organizations sponsor rich and varied programs designed for intellectual and social 
development. 

Honor Societies 

A number of national honor societies are active on campus, also (see Savannah State Uni- 
versity Honors Program). 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

Savannah State University holds membership in the National Collegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion (NCAA) Division I and participates in the following sports: football, baseball, bas- 
ketball (men and women), cross-country (men and women), tennis (men and women), 
track and field (men and women), and volleyball (women only), golf (men), and softball 
(women). 

Qualified instructors in health, physical education, and recreation provide training in the 
several aspects of the required activity program. Recreational activities, social dancing, 
swimming, and free exercise activities are encouraged and centered in this area. The area 
makes every effort to provide wholesome recreational activities for all students. 

INTRAMURAL SPORTS & WELLNESS PROGRAMS 

The Intramural Sports and Wellness Program (ISWP) is designed to foster both competi- 
tive and leisure sports and fitness activities for both men and women. Activities usually 
include, but are not limited to, basketball, volleyball, softball, and flag football. The goals 
of the ISWP Office are to: 

1. Provide students, faculty, and staff the opportunity to participate in a variety of 
structured sports and recreational activities and 

2. Provide all participants with a safe and enjoyable environment in which to partici- 
pate in activities. 

Participants are required to fill out a Student Waiver Form with the ISWP Office. Activi- 
ties may be facilitated by the accessibility of campus facilities and equipment. 

CULTURAL ACTIVITIES 

To complement formal education on the campus, the University provides many activities 
for cultural enrichment. Student assemblies, motion pictures, lectures, art exhibitions, 
drama productions, forums, hobby groups, and tours contribute to the general enrichment 
of the University community. 

The Lyceum Committee brings to the campus renowned lecturers and concert artists. The 
Office of the President sponsors the President Enhancement Lecture Series and the Office 
of the Vice President for Academic Affairs sponsors the Academic Affairs Lecture Series. 
All students are encouraged to attend these formal activities, which afford inspiring as- 
sociation with outstanding personalities. 



74 



The Department of Liberal Arts and Humanities sponsors several drama presentations, 
musical programs and art exhibitions during the school year. The Christmas and spring 
concerts are significant events in the cultural program of the University. 
The University sponsors an annual Black Heritage festival in conjunction with the City of 
Savannah, Department of Cultural Affairs. 

STUDENT CONDUCT 

Students enrolled at Savannah State University are expected at all times to exemplify 
due respect for order, morality, and the rights of others. The University reserves the right 
to exclude at any time students whose conduct is deemed improper or prejudicial to the 
welfare of the University community. 

Disruptive Behavior 

The following statement is the policy of the Board of Regents regarding disruptive behav- 
ior at any institution of the University System. The rights, responsibilities, and prohibi- 
tions described in this statement are incorporated as a part of these regulations. 

The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia reaffirms its policies to fully 
support freedom of expression by each member of the academic community and to pre- 
serve and protect the rights and freedoms of its faculty and student members to engage 
in debate, discussion, and peaceful and non-disruptive protest and dissent. The following 
statement relates specifically to the problem described herein. It does not change or in 
any way infringe upon the Board's existing policies and practices in support of freedom 
of expression and action. Rather it is considered necessary to combat the ultimate effect 
of irresponsible, disruptive, and obstructive actions by students and faculty who tend to 
destroy academic freedom and the institutional structures through which it operates. 

In recent years a new and serious problem has appeared on many college campuses in the 
nation. Some students, faculty members, and others have on occasion engaged in demon- 
strations, sit-ins, and other activities that have clearly and deliberately interfered with the 
regular orderly operation of the institution concerned. Typically, these actions have been 
the physical occupation of a building or campus area for a protracted period of time or the 
use of verbal or written obscenities involving indecent or disorderly conduct. 

These actions have gone beyond all heretofore recognized bounds of meetings for discus- 
sions, persuasion, or even protest in that (1) acquiescence to demands of the demonstra- 
tions is the condition for dispersal, and (2) the reasonable and written directions of insti- 
tutional officials to disperse have been clearly ignored. Such activities thus have become 
clearly recognizable as an action of force, operating outside all established channels on 
the campus, including that of intellectual debate and persuasion, which are at the heart 
of education. 

The Board of Regents is deeply concerned about this problem. Under the Constitution of 
the State of Georgia, under all applicable court rulings, and in keeping with the tradition 
of higher education in the United States, the Board is ultimately responsible for the or- 
derly operation of the several institutions of the University System and the preservation 
of academic freedom in these institutions. The Board cannot and will not divest itself of 
this responsibility. 

Of equal or even greater importance, such action of force as previously described destroys , 
the very essence of higher learning. The essence is found in the unhampered freedom to 
study, investigate, write, speak, and debate on any aspect or issue of life. This freedom, 
which reaches its full flowering on college and university campuses, is an essential part of 
American democracy, comparable to the jury system or the electoral process. 

For these reasons and in order to respond directly and specifically to this new problem, the 



75 



Board of Regents stipulates that any student, faculty member, administrator, or employee, 
acting individually or in concert with others, who clearly obstructs or disrupts, or at- 
tempts to obstruct or disrupt any teaching, research, administrative, disciplinary or public 
service activity, or any other activity authorized to be discharged or held on any campus of 
the University System of Georgia, is considered by the Board to have committed an act of 
gross irresponsibility and shall be subject to disciplinary procedures, possibly resulting in 
dismissal or termination of employment. 

The Board reaffirms its belief that all segments of the academic community are under a 
strong obligation and have a mutual responsibility to protect the campus community from 
disorderly, disruptive, or obstructive actions, which interfere with academic pursuits or 
teaching, learning, and other campus activities. 

Violations of the Student Conduct Code 

While the intentional commission of an act is an important consideration in determining 
guilt or innocence and appropriate sanction, students are also responsible in some cases 
for their actions due to negligence. Students may receive disciplinary action, including 
suspension and dismissal for a number of acts of misconduct committed on or away from 
University property. (For additional details, see the Savannah State University Code of 
Student Ethics) as listed in the Student Handbook Examples of these actions are listed 
below. 

Academic irregularity Possession of drugs and alcoholic beverages 

Damage to public and Disorderly assembly 

private property Falsification of records 

Disorderly conduct Misuse of student 

identification cards Theft 

Gambling Unauthorized entry or use of University facilities 

Possessing explosives Violation of dormitory visitation rules and regul 
Disregard of fire safety regulations tions 

Possession of weapons Joint responsibility for violations 
Hazing and/or harassment 
Violation of outside law 

Academic Irregularity 

Academic irregularity includes academic dishonesty, such as cheating and plagiarism; 
knowingly furnishing false information; forgery, alternations, or unauthorized use of Uni- 
versity documents, records, identification, or property to gain an un-entitled advantage; 
taking or attempting to take, steal or otherwise procure in an unauthorized manner any 
material pertaining to the conduct of a class, including, but not limited to, tests, exami- 
nations, laboratory equipment and roll books; and selling, giving, lending or otherwise 
furnishing to any unauthorized person, material containing questions or answers to any 
examination scheduled to be given at a subsequent date in any course of study offered by 
the University. 

Plagiarism is prohibited. Themes, essays, term papers, tests and other similar require- 
ments must be the work of the individuals submitting them. Direct quotations, para- 
phrased material, summaries of ideas of others must be appropriately acknowledged and 
attributed to their sources. 

Disciplinary Procedures 

A charge of misconduct originates with the accuser filing a written charge with the Office 
of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Any person may refer a student suspected of 
violating the student conduct code. 



76 



Upon receipt of the charge, the Vice President's designee conducts an informal investiga- 
tion to determine whether to drop the case or send a letter of notification to the accused 
student. 

If a formal charge is made to the accused, either by certified letter or in person, the Vice 
President's designee will instruct the accused to contact the Office of Student Affairs to 
arrange an administrative interview to discuss the complaint. Copies of all pertinent docu- 
ments known at that time will be attached to the letter. The Vice President's designee will 
request a meeting with other necessary relevant parties on an individual basis. However, 
the Vice President's designee or the accused may ask to have more than one relevant party 
present at the interview. The purposes of the administrative interview are two-fold: first, 
to determine whether probable cause exists to believe the accused may have committed 
the charged offenses; and second, to determine whether to have the case heard by the Vice 
President's designee or the University's Discipline Committee. 

The Vice President for Student Affairs will notify all persons of the time and place when 
they are to appear before the Committee. The Vice President will also notify students 
about the specific charges against them. 

Rights of the Accused During Hearings 

Accused students have specific rights, including 

The right to a non-legal advisor of their choice. (An attorney may be present only 
when it appears that the hearing also relates to a potential, or actual, criminal charge 
against the accused); 

The right to question the accuser (s); 

The right to present evidence; 

The right to call witnesses; 

The right to remain silent and have no inference of guilt drawn from such silence; 

The right of cross-examination; 

The right to appeal an adverse decision to the President; and 

The right to attend classes and required University functions until a hearing is held 
and a decision is rendered against the accused by the Vice President or Discipline 
Committee. (The accused may remain at the Institution pending an appeal to the 
President, if his or her presence is judged not to be a clear and present danger to 
the normal operation of the University. If the President upholds the suspension or 
expulsion, the student must depart, not withstanding the student's subsequent ap- 
plication for review to the Board of Regents.) 

The Discipline Committee 

Unless the accused elects to have the case decided by the Vice President for Student Af- 
fairs' designee, the Discipline Committee (comprised of the chief justice, faculty, staff, 
and students) will adjudicate the case. If the accused chooses a hearing by the Discipline 
Committee, the Vice President shall select a member of the staff to present the case on 
behalf of the person bringing charges, including cases where the Office of Student Affairs 
files the charges. 

Basis for Review (Appeals to the President) 

All appeals to the President must be made in writing within seven calendar days of the 
original decision. The original decision is final on the day it is rendered by the Vice Presi- 
dent for Student Affairs and the Discipline Committee. The filing of an appeal to the 
President will not postpone punishments imposed there under, by the Vice President for 
Student Affairs or the Discipline Committee. 

The accused may appeal to the President from a decision of the Vice President for Student 



77 



Affairs or the Discipline Committee on the grounds listed below. Additional grounds may 
be asserted by the appellant, as appropriate. 

The proceeding failed to follow procedures; including observing the rights of the accused, 
but only if such failure actually resulted in preventing the accused from adequately de- 
fending against the charge. 

The findings are not supported by substantial evidence, or the recommendations are not 
supported by the findings. 

One or more members of the adjudicating body demonstrated bias. "Bias" requires more 
than merely knowing the accused or knowing something about the case. Disqualification 
occurs only where it can be established that the Vice President or a Discipline Committee 
member was incapable of rendering a fair decision. 

In light of the nature of the offense and the student's disciplinary record, the sanctions 
imposed by the adjudicating body were excessive. 

Article IX Appeal to Board of Regents 

A student dissatisfied with the President's decision has the right to appeal to the Board of 
Regents. The appeal to the Board shall be submitted in writing to the executive secretary 
of the Board through the Chancellor, within twenty calendar days after the President's 
decision and shall cite all the reasons for dissatisfaction with the previous decision. 

Drugs and Weapons 

Possession or use (without valid medical or dental prescription), manufacture, transporta- 
tion, storage, furnishing, or sale of any narcotic or dangerous drug controlled by federal or 
Georgia law is prohibited. Violators will be subject to arrest and prosecution by University 
and/or local, state, and federal courts. It is against University rules and regulations for 
students to possess, use, or store weapons such as knives, guns, blackjacks, etc. Persons 
found in possession of weapons will be subject to disciplinary action by the University 
and/or local courts. Students convicted of violating Section II (Drugs and Alcohol) of the 
student conduct code may lose academic credit and/or federal financial aid and/or be sus- 
pended from the University. 



78 



BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



FEES AND EXPENSES 

CAMPUS RESIDENCY POLICY 

ROOM DEPOSITS AND APARTMENTS 

REFUND POLICY 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

REFUND POLICY 

BOOKSTORE 



79 



BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

The Vice President for Business and Finance directs the operations of Auxiliary Enter- 
prises, Budget and Financial Analysis, Business Services, Computer Services, Financial 
Services, Grants and Contracts, Human Resources, Plant Operations, and Public Safety 
As chief business officer for Savannah State University, the Vice President is responsible 
for the day-to-day business and financial operations of the institution. Principle areas of 
concern to this office include: 

• Providing good stewardship of University funds and securities, 

• Promoting best business practices which incorporate effectiveness, quality outcomes, 
and customer service, 

• Maintaining a safe, clean environment with quality facilities for Savannah State stu- 
dents, faculty, and staff to learn and thrive in, and 

• Creating an atmosphere for all employees in which they feel supported, appreciated, 
and equipped with the tools needed to be successful in their work. 



80 



SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 

UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

UNDERGRADUATE FEE SCHEDULE 
FALL, 2005 - SPRING, 2006 





DAY STUDENTS 




Fees Per Semester 


In- State Tuition 


Out-Of-State Tuition 


Tuition (12 or more 


$ 1,219.00 


$ 4,877.00 


credit hours) 






Health Fee 


$ 60.00 


$ 60.00 


Student Activity Fee 


$ 41.00 


$ 41.00 


Athletic Fee 


$ 173.00 


$ 173.00 


Technology Fee 


$ 35.00 


$ 35.00 


Total 


$ 1,528.00 


$ 5,186.00 



Fees Per Semester 



BOARDING STUDENTS 



In- State Tuition 



Out-Of-State Tuition 



Tuition (12 or more 


$ 1,219.00 


$ 4,877.00 


credit hours) 






Health Fee 


$ 60.00 


$ 60.00 


Student Activity Fee 


$ 41.00 


$ 41.00 


Athletic Fee 


$ 173.00 


$ 173.00 


Technology Fee 


$ 35.00 


$ 35.00 


Board 


$ 1,290.00 


$ 1,290.00 


Room 


$ 1,068.00 


$ 1,068.00 


Total 


$ 3,886.00 


$7,544.00 



Fees Are Due And Payable At Registration. Please Make A Cashier's Check, Bank Or 
Postal Money Order Payable To Savannah State University. Separate Checks Should Be 
Made For Cash Allowances, Books and Supplies. Books and Supplies Cost Approximately 
$350.00 Per Semester. Late Fee is $50.00. 



Other Fees: 

Key Replacement 
Meal Card Replacement 
Post Office Box Rental 
Parking - Day 
Parking - Boarding 
Room Deposit 
Transcript Fees 

Housing Rates 

Single Occupancy Room 
Double Occupancy Room 



$20.00 Per Occurrence 

$20.00 Per Occurrence 

$8.00 Per Year (No Charge For Boarding Students) 

$10.00 Per Year 

$18.00 Per Year 

$200.00 (Refundable Upon Vacating Room Without Damages) 

$4.00 Each 



$1,268.00 (Per Semester) 
$1,068.00 (Per Semester) 



Freshman Living Learning Center Clusters 

Two Person $1,900.00 (Per Semester) 

Four Person (Double) $1,800.00 (Per Semester) 



81 



Four Person (Double as Single) $2,000.00 (Per Semester) 
Eight Person (Single) $1,700.00 (Per Semester) 

Eight Person (Double) $1,600.00 (Per Semester) 

Eight Person (Double as Single) $1,800.00 (Per Semester) 

American Campus Community - University Village 



One Bedroom Apartment 
Two Bedroom Apartment 
Four Bedroom Apartment 
Four Bedroom Apartment 
(With Range) 



$2,350.00 (Per Semester) 
$2,090.00 (Per Semester) 
$1,865.00 (Per Semester) 
$1,965.00 (Per Semester) 



Food Services 




Boarding Students 




5 meals per week 


$451.00 


14 meals per week 


$902.00 


20 meals per week 


$1,290.00 


Commuter Plans 




10 meals per semester 


$49.00 


25 meals per semester 


$121.00 


50 meals per semester 


$240.00 


100 meals per semester 


$355.00 



The University Reserves The Right To Make Changes In Its Fees At The Beginning Of 
Any Semester And Without Prior Notice. Credit Cards (Visa and MasterCard) May Be 
Used To Pay For Tuition, Fees And Books. 

OTHER RATES AND FEES 

DISTANCE LEARNING TUITION RATES 
FALL, 2005 - SPRING, 2006 

DAY STUDENTS 



Fees Per Semester 


In- State Tuition 


Out-Of-State Tuition 


eCore-per credit hour 


$ 131.00 


N/A 


WebBSIT-per credit hour 


$ 265.00 


N/A 


WebMBA-per credit hour 


$ 500.00 


N/A 


GRADUATE TEACHING/ 


$ 25.00 





RESEARCH ASSISTANTS 



COMMUTER MEAL PLANS 



Rates Per Semester 

10 meals 
25 meals 
50 meals 
100 meals 



49.00 
122.00 
240.00 
355.00 



NOTE: There Is No Refund For Missed Meals Or Carry-over Meals To Another Semester 
During The Meal Contract Period. 

Fees Are Due And Payable At Registration. Please Make A Personal Check, Cashier's 
Check, Bank Or Postal Money Order Payable To Savannah State University. Separate 
Checks Should Be Made For Cash Allowances, Books and Supplies. Books and Supplies 



82 



Cost Approximately $350.00 Per Semester. Late Fee is $50.00. 

The University Reserves The Right To Make Changes In Its Fees At The Beginning Of 
Any Semester And Without Prior Notice. Credit Cards (Visa and MasterCard) May Be 
Used To Pay For Tuition, Fees And Books. 

(All Rates and Fees Are Subject To Change Without Notice) 



SAVANNAH STATE UNIVERSITY 

UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

GRADUATE FEE SCHEDULE 
FALL, 2005 - SPRING, 2006 

DAY STUDENTS 



Fees Per Semester 


In-State Tuition 


Out-Of-State Tuition 


Tuition (12 or more 


$ 1,463.00 


$ 5,852.00 


credit hours) 






Health Fee 


$ 60.00 


$ 60.00 


Student Activity Fee 


$ 41.00 


$ 41.00 


Athletic Fee 


$ 173.00 


$ 173.00 


Technology Fee 


$ 35.00 


$ 35.00 


Total 


$ 1,772.00 


$6,161.00 




BOARDING STUDENTS 


Fees Per Semester 


In- State Tuition 


Out-Of-State Tuition 


Tuition (12 or more 


$ 1,463.00 


$ 5,852.00 


credit hours) 






Health Fee 


$ 60.00 


$ 60.00 


Student Activity Fee 


$41.00 


$ 41.00 


Athletic Fee 


$ 173.00 


$ 173.00 


Technology Fee 


$ 35.00 


$ 35.00 


Board 


$ 1,290.00 


$ 1,290.00 


Room 


$ 1,068.00 


$ 1,068.00 


Total 


$ 4,130.00 


$ 8,519.00 



Fees Are Due And Payable At Registration. Please Make A Personal Check, Cashier's 
Check, Bank Or Postal Money Order Payable To Savannah State University. Separate 
Checks Should Be Made For Cash Allowances, Books and Supplies. Books and Supplies 
Cost Approximately $350.00 Per Semester. Late Fee is $50.00. 



Other Fees: 

Key Replacement 
Meal Card Replacement 
Post Office Box Rental 
Parking - Day 
Parking - Boarding 
Room Deposit 
Transcript Fees 

Housing Rates 

Single Occupancy Room 



$20.00 Per Occurrence 

$20.00 Per Occurrence 

$8.00 Per Year (No Charge For Boarding Students) 

$10.00 Per Year 

$18.00 Per Year 

$200.00 (Refundable Upon Vacating Room Without Damages) 

$4.00 Each 



$1,268.00 (Per Semester) 



83 



Double Occupancy Room $1,068.00 (Per Semester) 
Freshman Living Learning Center Clusters 
Two Person $1,900.00 (Per Semester) 

Four Person (Double) $1,800.00 (Per Semester) 

Four Person (Double as Single) $2,000.00 (Per Semester) 
Eight Person (Single) $1,700.00 (Per Semester) 

Eight Person (Double) $1,600.00 (Per Semester) 

Eight Person (Double as Single) $1,800.00 (Per Semester) 

American Campus Community - University Village 
One Bedroom Apartment $2,350.00 (Per Semester) 
Two Bedroom Apartment $2,090.00 (Per Semester) 
Four Bedroom Apartment $1,865.00 (Per Semester) 
Four Bedroom Apartment $1,965.00 (Per Semester) 
(With Range) 

Food Services 

Boarding Students 
5 meals per week $451.00 
14 meals per week $902.00 
20 meals per week $1,290.00 

Commuter Plans 

10 meals per semester $49.00 

25 meals per semester $121.00 

50 meals per semester $240.00 

100 meals per semester $355.00 

The University Reserves The Right To Make Changes In Its Fees At The Beginning Of 
Any Semester And Without Prior Notice. Credit Cards (Visa and MasterCard) May Be 
Used To Pay For Tuition, Fees And Books. 

REFUND POLICY 

Formal withdrawal must begin with a written request in the Office of Academic Affairs. 
Failure to officially withdraw from the institution will result in the forfeiture or loss of 
any refund due. No refunds for reduction in academic loads or student services are allowed 
unless such reductions are necessitated by schedule changes initiated by the University. 
Students suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons are not entitled to a refund of any 
deposits or fees paid. 

Students who are members of the Georgia National Guard or other reserve components of 
the armed forces who receive emergency orders to active duty are entitled to a full refund 
of matriculation fees paid for that semester, in accordance with guidelines promulgated by 
the chancellor. Military personnel on active duty in the armed forces who, before the end 
of their present station assignment, receive emergency orders for a temporary or perma- 
nent change of duty location are entitled to a full refund of tuition paid for that semester, 
in accordance with guidelines promulgated by the chancellor. 

The refund amount for students withdrawing from the institution shall be based on a pro 
rata percentage determined by dividing the number of calendar days in the semester that 
the student has completed by the total calendar days in the semester. The total calendar 
days in a semester includes weekends, but excludes scheduled breaks of five or more days 
and any days that a student was on an approved leave of absence. The unearned portion 
shall be refunded up to the point in time that the amount earned equals 60%. 

Students that withdraw from the institution when the calculated percentage of completion 
is greater than 60%, are not entitled to a refund of any portion of institutional charges. 



84 



A refund of all non-resident fees, matriculation fees, and other mandatory fees shall be 
made in the event of the death of a student at any time during the academic session. 

A student who wishes to withdraw from the Meal Plan Program and the Residence Hall 
must secure written permission from the Auxiliary Services Director. This permission, 
when submitted with the ID, will entitle the student to a refund. 

Refund of elective charges (room and board) for withdrawing from the institution during a 
semester will be made on a prorated basis determined by the date of withdrawal. 

Refunds to students who are recipients of Title IV funds will be made in accordance with 
federal laws and regulations in effect at that time. 

The refund amount returned to SFA Programs will be distributed in the following order: 
Unsubsidized Direct Stafford Loan, Subsidized Direct Stafford Loan, PLUS Loan, Perkins 
Loan, Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG, Other Federal, State, Private, Institutional Aid and 
the Student. 

COMPUTER SERVICES 

Computers and technology are integral parts of the University. They facilitate academics, 
learning (both distance and local) and administrative functions. The University has devel- 
oped a state of the arts technological campus through private, state and federal funding. 

To support its infrastructure, the University has installed a wireless network and a fi- 
ber optics backbone, which supports speeds up to 1 gigabit (GB), that runs throughout 
the campus and to every academic and administrative building. The University also has 
full-time PeachNet/Internet/Intranet access, student, staff and faculty electronic mail, a 
campus-wide distributed messaging system, a University web site (http://www.savstate. 
edu) computer access for student, faculty, staff and administrators, faculty and staff devel- 
opment classes, communications support (phone) and remote access services. 

Academics are supported through the establishment of multiple general purpose and spe- 
cialized computer labs, in both PC and MAC formats, throughout the campus and in the 
dormitories. The University has three distance education/GSAMS (Georgia Statewide 
Academic and Medical System) sites, WebCT for web-based course delivery, audio visual 
aids, the Center for Teaching, Learning and Academic Support (CTLAS) to support tech- 
nology course development as well as faculty and staff development. The University's 
library is automated, there is access to GIL (Galileo Interconnected Libraries )- a Board 
of Regents supported World Wide Web-based virtual library, wireless networking, satellite 
down links, a SSU/GaTech Regional Engineering Program (GTREP) and local centralized 
application support. 

The University is administratively supported through SCT's BANNER electronic inte- 
grated student information system, PeopleSoft Financial and Human Resources systems, 
an automated work order system, electronic building security and an alumni financial 
system. 

The University strives to stay in the forefront of technology to better facilitate the services 
to and education of its student body. 

AUXILIARY SERVICES 

The Division of Auxiliary Services is an organization with the Office of Business and Fi- 
nance, responsible for providing services both directly and indirectly to students, faculty, 
staff, and the University's community. By Polices of the Board of Regents, the Division 
must be totally self-supporting; no state funds are allocated to the Division in any way. 
Based upon these Board of Regents Polices, Auxiliary Services pays a percentage, based 
upon square footage occupied, of the plant operations and maintenance cost and other 
indirect operating costs of the University. The Division is subject to rules and regulations 



85 



of the University System of Georgia. Auxiliary Services, through careful purchasing and 
management and services is committed to providing the best possible services at the low- 
est cost possible, while maintaining quality, value, and courteous service. 

The kinds and number of auxiliary services may vary according to of the University. Cur- 
rently the Savannah State's Auxiliary services encompass the following: Bookstore, Uni- 
versity Post Office, Food Services (operated by THOMPSON HOSPATILITY Inc), vending 
(operated by Rawls Distributing (snacks) Company, Pepsi Cola (soft drinks) Company), 
Intercollegiate athletics, and Transportation services. 

BOOKSTORE 

SSU Bookstore is an integral part of the academic and social life of the university. It is a 
social focal point on campus offering many goods and services required by a multifaceted 
university community. The campus bookstore is currently owned and operated by Follett 
Publishing Company. 

The bookstore provides a book-buy-back at the end of each semester. Please refer to Fol- 
lett Publishing for policy on book-buy-back and refund policy. 

HOURS OF OPERATION 

Monday - Friday 8:15am - 4:45pm 

Saturday (special occasions such as the beginning the semester and home football 

games.) 

The bookstore is located in the King Frazier Student Union Building on the first floor. 
Our mailing address is State University Bookstore, SSU, PO. Box 20569, Savannah, Geor- 
gia 31404. The telephone number is (912 356-2263 and our fax number is (912) 353- 
3072. 

FOOD SERVICE 

Savannah State University has been defined by the Board of Regents of the University 
System of Georgia as a residential institution. This definition means that the University 
must provide on-campus facilities for room and board. All students who live in the tra- 
ditional residence halls are required to purchase a twenty-meal plan. ALL University 
Village four-bedroom, 2-bath apartment units will be required to purchase a twenty-meal 
plan or a fourteen-meal plan. Students assigned to these spaces will be automatically 
billed via the Banner Student Information System accordingly. There is no refund for 
missed or carry-overs to another semester during the meal contract period. 

UNIVERSITY MAIL CENTER 

The University Post Office is a combination on-campus post office and U.S. Postal Ser- 
vice Contract substation located in the King Frazier Complex (across from the University 
Bookstore). Money orders may be purchased Monday through Friday from 8:30 AM to 
4:00 PM. The window schedule is Monday through Friday from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM. The 
Campus Postal Service must comply with all UPS rules and regulations. This service is 
provided by the University in order to more efficiently distribute incoming mail and to 
effect postage savings in outgoing mail. 

The University Post Office is located on the first floor of the King Frazier Complex, across 
from the University Bookstore. The University Postal Staff will assign all students who 
live in Bowen-Smith Hall, Bostic Hall, Peacock Hall, University Village or the new 350-bed 
residence hall a mailbox. If student is returning the subsequent semester and living in 
a residence hall, he/she will not be required to clear box with the University Postal Staff. 
Student will keep the same mailbox. 



86 



CORE CURRICULUM 

All students, regardless of major, who are enrolled for the first time in the Fall Semester of 
1998 or later, must complete the University's core curriculum. The core curriculum con- 
sists of sets of specific courses drawn from across the University's curriculum which are 
usually completed prior to undertaking major field preparation. Students who enrolled 
prior to the Fall of 1998, and who have not completed the quarter hour core curriculum 
must complete the new core curriculum. Quarter hour courses completed will be con- 
verted to semester hours and credited to the students' total requirements were reasonably 
equivalent. Students will then complete the remaining hours in the new core curriculum. 

CORE CURRICULUM GRID 

All students should complete the sixty hours of core curriculum requirements during their 
first two years of enrollment and prior to their enrollment in their major classes, exclusive 
of those specified in Area F (courses appropriate to the program of study) of the core. 

In addition to the sixty hours in Areas A, B, C, D, E, and F, students will also complete five 
additional hours of required courses. 

Area A — Essential Skills .9 hours 

ENGL 1101 English Composition 1 3 

ENGL 1102 English Composition 2 3 

MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 

(for non-science majors) 
MATH 1113 Pre-calculus 3 

(for science majors) 

(Because these are "essential skills," all courses in this area must be completed with a 
grade of "C" or higher.) 

Area B — Institutional Options 4-5 hours 

(Students majoring in the sciences must complete four hours; others will 
complete five hours.) 

HIST 1501 African American History and Contemporary Issues 2 

(SPEH 1101 Principles of Speech) (.1) 

(not required after Fall 2005) 

(HUMN 1201 Critical Thinking) (.2) 

or non-science majors (notrequired after Fall 2005) 

HUMN 1102 Critical Thinking in Science 1 

for science majors 

HUMN 1201 Critical Thinking & Communication 3 

(effective Spring 2005) 

Area C — Humanities/Fine Arts 6 hours 

HUMN 2011 Humanities 3 

Choose one of the following: 

ARTS 1101 Introduction to Visual Arts 3 

MUSC 1101 Introduction to Music 3 

THEA 2101 Introduction to Theater. 3 

ENGL 2111 World Literature 1 3 

ENGL 2112 World Literature II 3 

Area D — Science, Math and Technology. 10-11 hours 

Students will choose Option I or Option II, depending on their major: 

Option I — Non-science Majors (10 hours) 

CISM/CSCI 1130 Computer Applications 3(3-0-3) 



87 



Choose one of the following: 

Biology 1103 and 1103L General Biology. 4 (3-2-4) 

Biology 1104 and 1104L Human Biology 4 (3-2-4) 

ISCI 1101 Integrated Science 1 3 (3-0-3) 

Choose one (3 hours) & one-lab (4 hours) science course from the following: 

ISCI 1101 Integrated Science 1 3 (3-0-3) 

ISCI 1111K Integrated Science II 4(3-2-4) 

BIOL 1103 and 1103L General Biology 1 4 (3-2-4) 

BIOL 1104 and 1104L Human Biology II 4 (3-2-4) 

CHEM HOIK Introduction to Chemistry 4 (3-3-4) 

PHSC1011K Physical Science 1 4(3-2-4) 

PHYS 1111K Introductory Physics 1 4 (3-2-4) 

Option II — Science Majors (11 hours) 

CISM/CSCI 1130 Computer Applications 3 

Choose one of the following sequences: 

BIOL 1107 and 1107L Principles of Biology 1 4 (3-2-4) 

BIOL 1108 and 1108L Principles of Biology II 4 (3-2-4) 

CHEM 1211 and 1211L Principles of Chemistry I (3-2-4) 

CHEM 1212 and 1212L Principles of Chemistry II 4 (3-2-4) 

PHSC1011K Physical Science 1 4 (3-2-4) and 

PHSC1012K Physical Science II 4(3-2-4) 

PHYS 1111K Introductory Physics 1 4 (3-2-4) and 

PHYS 1112K Introductory Physics II 4(3-2-4) 

PHYS 2211K Principles of Physics 1 4 (3-2-4) and 

PHYS 2212K Principles of Physics II 4(3-2-4) 

AreaE — Social Sciences 12 hours 

POLS 1101 American Government 3 

POLS 2401 Global Issues 3 

Choose one of the following United States history courses: 

HIST 2111 A Survey of U.S. History to the Post-Civil War Period or 3 

HIST 2112 A Survey of U.S. History from 
Post-Civil War Period to the Present 3 

Choose one of the following: 

HIST 1 1 1 1 A Survey of World History to Early Modern Times 3 

HIST 1112 A Survey of World History from 

Early Modern Times to the Present 3 

PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology 3 

ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology 3 

GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography 3 

SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 

ECON 2105 Principles of Macro-Economics 3 

Area F — Courses Appropriate 

to the Program of Study. 18 hours 

These requirements vary according to which major program a student selects. 
See listings for major programs of study for these requirements. 

Additional Requirements 5 hours 

FRES 1101 Freshman Year Experience 1 1 

FRES 1102 Freshman Year Experience II 1 

One of the following two-hour courses: 2 hours 

HEDU 1101 Concepts in Healthful Living. 2 

HEDU 1111 Physical Fitness for Life 2 

HEDU 1201 Physical Activity and Stress Management 2 

HEDU 1211 Physical Activity and Body Composition 2 



88 



One of the following one-hour courses: 1 hour 

HEDU 1301 Weight Training. 1 

HEDU 1401 Physical Conditioning. 1 

HEDU 1501 Modern Dance Techniques 1 

HEDU 1511 Modern Dance Performance 1 

HEDU 1521 Aerobic Dancing. 1 

HEDU 1601 Swimming 1 1 

HEDU 1611 Swimming II 1 

HEDU 1621 Aqua Dynamics 1 

Total Hours Required in the Core Curriculum 65 hours 

STATE REQUIREMENT IN HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT 

By State law, students who receive a diploma or certificate from a school supported by the 
State of Georgia must demonstrate proficiency in United States history and government 
and in Georgia history and government. Students at Savannah State University may dem- 
onstrate such proficiency by receiving credit in certain courses: United States and Georgia 
government POLS 1101 for United States and Georgia government; HIST 2111 or 2112 
for United State and Georgia history. 

MAJOR CURRICULUM 

In addition to the required core curriculum, which is usually completed in the first two 
years of college attendance, students will select a major field of study that focuses atten- 
tion during the second two years of study. Area F of the core curriculum (courses appro- 
priate to the field of study) provides a foundation for the major field of study and should 
be completed prior to students' undertaking major courses. Plans and requirements for 
the various major programs are detailed in the sections of this catalog, which describe the 
University's three colleges. 

MINOR CURRICULUM 

While students are all required to complete the core and a major curriculum, completing 
a minor program is an additional option. A minor consists of a set of 15-17 credit hours 
in a specific field of study. Some major programs require students to complete formal 
minor programs while others do not. Formal minor programs are established in a variety 
of fields. Requirements are listed in this catalog along with the departments sponsoring 
them. Informal minors may be developed by acquiring any set of 18 credit hours of up- 
per-division course work in any field for which such work is offered. Students often find 
that completing a minor curriculum is a valuable professional asset for use in the highly 
competitive world following graduation. 

Savannah State University students may pursue a minor in education in conjunction with 
the following academic fields: English, mathematics, political science, history, criminal 
justice, sociology, biology, and chemistry. 

Also, students whose major departments offer no minor or do not allow the minor in 
education may take courses that constitute the equivalent of a minor through additional 
course work. An education minor does not satisfy the requirements for teacher certifica- 
tion in Georgia, but enables students to complete 18 hours of the professional education 
courses required for certification. Teacher certification programs also are offered at Sa- 
vannah State University. Students should contact their academic departments with spe- 
cific questions regarding education minors or certification. Savannah State University 
offers education courses in collaboration with Armstrong Atlantic State University. 



89 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



ACCOUNTING (ACCT) 

General Accounting Option 
Accounting Information Systems Option 

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (BCIS) 

Application Development Option 

Computer Networking Option 

Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Option 

MANAGEMENT (BMN) 

General Management 
MARKETING (BMKT) 

General Marketing Option 

Professional Selling Option 



90 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

PURPOSE AND MISSION 

The College of Business Administration at Savannah State University is dedicated to de- 
livering quality undergraduate business education programs to a diverse student popula- 
tion. Through innovative instruction, applied research, and community involvement, the 
College will fully develop business graduates who can compete effectively in academic, 
civic, business, global, government and not-for-profit arenas. 

The College of Business Administration offers a four-year professional program that com- 
bines a general education with broad based programs of education in business. This pro- 
gram is predicated on the philosophy that the best education for business leaders is one 
which combines professional studies and studies in the liberal arts. 

The emphasis on the liberal arts is most significant during the freshman and sophomore 
years. The major focus during the remaining years of study is on the basic business core, 
which serves as the foundation upon which students develop a major. This education pro- 
vides graduates with the necessary background for initiating careers in one of the func- 
tional areas of business and an appropriate introduction to the tools of management that 
are necessary for success. 

The College of Business Administration offers programs of study leading to the Bachelor 
of Business Administration degree (B.B.A). Major programs include accounting, computer 
information systems, management, and marketing. In response to current business needs, 
the College offers several emphases within the accounting, computer information sys- 
tems, and management and marketing majors. Teacher certification for business majors 
is offered in a cooperative program with the Armstrong Atlantic State University College 
of Teacher Education. 

ACADEMIC COUNSELING 

Students in the College of Business Administration are assigned academic advisors in 
their major area of specialization. Since the advisement process is essential to ensure all 
prerequisites have been successfully completed prior to enrollment in a particular course, 
students must consult with their advisors before registering. Students should also work 
with their advisors to develop a plan of academic progress. This plan must be approved by 
the Associate Dean of the College of Business Administration and will be recorded in the 
College of Business Administration. 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

1. "42 Hour Rule": Business students may enroll in 3000 level courses in the College of 
Business Administration after successful completion of 42 semester hours including 
the courses listed in Area F, provided all course-specific prerequisites have been satis- 
fied. Business students will not be eligible to take 3000 level courses, prior to having 
completed 60 credit hours (junior standing), until all Area F courses are completed. 

2. To graduate, Business majors must complete Areas A through F of the core curricu- 
lum with a minimum adjusted grade point average of 2.0 and with a grade of "C" or 
better in each of the following courses: 

ENGL 1101, ENGL 1102, CISM/CSCI 1130, MATH 1111 and all Area F courses 

3. To graduate, business majors must complete, with a grade of "C" or better, all courses 
in Area F (Business Core), Area G (Foundation Knowledge of Business) and the Ma- 
jor Area of Specialization (concentration). 



91 



4. At least 30 semester hours of business courses must be taken in residence, at the 
College of Business Administration, in order for a student to earn a (B.B.A.) degree 
from the institution. 

5. Transfer students should follow the program of study outlined for (B.B.A.) candi- 
dates at the College during the freshman and sophomore years. 

a. The Dean of the College of Business Administration determines eligibility for 
transfer of credit for business course work, which will apply toward business de- 
grees. 

b. Business courses completed at the lower division level at other institutions, if these 
courses are offered at the junior and senior levels at Savannah State University, 
will not ordinarily be awarded transfer credit. Business courses taken at system 
universities and senior colleges will transfer, if the prerequisites at Savannah State 
have been satisfied. 

6. Students who enroll as special students (as defined in this catalog), and who subse- 
quently change their status to degree-seeking, may transfer for credit a maximum of 
seven semester hours earned while in special student status. 

The Coastal Georgia Center for Economic Education is a joint program between the Col- 
lege of Business Administration at Savannah State University and the College of Educa- 
tion at Armstrong Atlantic State University. Drs. Tsehai Alemayehu and Stephen Agye- 
kum are the co-directors of the Center. The Center is housed in Room 223, University 
Hall at Armstrong Atlantic State University. The purpose of the Center is to promote the 
basic economic ideas considered essential for good citizenship. This aim is accomplished 
through programs conducted in teacher workshops and the dissemination of materials. 
The center cooperates with the Georgia Council on Economic Education in providing 
workshops for area teachers to help meet the economic standards, which are mandated 
for students by the State of Georgia. The Center also cooperates with teachers from the 
Economics America Program of the Savannah-Chatham school system. 

College of Business Administration 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E and additional requirements) 47 hours 

Area F — Business Core 18 hours 

ACCT 2101 Principles of Financial Accounting. 3 hours 

ACCT 2 102 Principles of Managerial Accounting. 3 hours 

BUSA 1105 Introduction to Business 3 hours 

BUSA 2 105 Communicating in the Business Environment 3 hours 

ECON 2105 Principles of Macro-Economics 3 hours 

ECON 2106 Principles of Micro-Economics 3 hours 

FREE ELECTIVES (Non-Business) 3 hours 

Major Courses (57 hours) 

Area G - Foundation Knowledge of Business (Required of all majors) 30 hours 

BUSA 2106 The Environment of Business 3 hours 

BUSA 4126 Business Policy 3 hours 

CISM 2130 Business Information Systems 3 hours 

ECON 3145 Global Business Issues 3 hours 

FINC 3155 Business Finance 3 hours 

MGNT 3165 Management of Organizations 3 hours 

MKTG 3175 Principles of Marketing. 3 hours 

MATH 2181 Quantitative Analysis for Business (formerly QUAN 2181) 3 hours 

BUSA 2182 Introduction to Business Statistics (formerly QUAN 2182) 3 hours 

MGNT 3185 Operations Management (formerly QUAN 3185) 3 hours 



92 



Major Area of Specialization 
(Choose one of the following 
concentrations) 27 hours 

ACCOUNTING MAJOR 27 hours 

(The following courses are required of 

all accounting majors) 15 hours 

ACCT 3111 Intermediate Financial Accounting 1 3 hours 

ACCT 3112 Intermediate Financial Accounting II 3 hours 

ACCT 3113 Federal Income Taxation of Individuals 3 hours 

ACCT 3115 Cost/Managerial Accounting. 3 hours 

ACCT 3117 Accounting Information Systems 3 hours 

TRACK I - GENERAL ACCOUNTING 12 hours 

[Required Courses (9 hours)] 

ACCT 4115 Advanced Financial Accounting. 3 hours 

ACCT 4116 Accounting for Not-For-Profit Institutions 3 hours 

ACCT4117Auditing 3 hours 

[Choose one (1) from the following (3 hours)] 

ACCT 3114 Federal Income Taxation of 

Corporations & Partnerships 3 hours 

ACCT 4118 Advanced Managerial Accounting. 3 hours 

BUSA 4229 Administrative Practice & Internship 3 hours 

TRACK II - ACCOUNTING 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 12 hours 

[Required Courses (6 hours)] 

ACCT 4118 Advanced Managerial Accounting. 3 hours 

CISM 4137 Database Design & Implementation 3 hours 

[Choose two (2) from the following (6 hours)] 

CISM 3140 Introduction to Programming: Visual Basic 3 hours 

CISM 4135 Data Communications 3 hours 

CISM 4150 Network Administration 3 hours 

CISM 4160 Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) in Theory 3 hours 

CISM 4161 Enterprise resource Planning (ERP) with Cases 3 hours 

BUSA 4229 Administrative Practice and Internship 
or 
CISM 4900 Occupational Internship 3 hours 

COMPUTER INFORMATION 

SYSTEMS MAJOR. (27 hours) 

(The following courses are required 

of all CIS majors) 12 hours 

CISM 3137 Systems Analysis and Design 3 hours 

CISM 3140 Introduction to Programming: Visual Basic 3 hours 

CISM 4135 Data Communications 3 hours 

CISM 4137 Database Design and 
Implementation 3 hours 

TRACK I - APPLICATION 

DEVELOPMENT 15 hours 

[Required Courses (6 hours)] 

CISM 4140 Programming in JAVA 3 hours 

CISM 4141 Advanced Visual Basic 3 hours 



93 



TRACK II - COMPUTER NETWORKING 15 hours 

[Required Courses (6 hours)] 

CISM 4150 Network Administration 3 hours 

CISM 4151 Network Installation & Configuration 3 hours 

TRACK III - ENTERPRISE RESOURCE 

PLANNING (ERP) 15 hours 

("SAP" certification preparation) 

Required Courses (6 hours) 

CISM 4160 Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) in Theory 3 hours 

CISM 4161 Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) with Cases 3 hours 

CISM Emphasis Courses for each Track 

Choose three (3) from the following. 9 hours 

CISM 3232 Web Design and Development 3 hours 

CISM 4138 Contemporary Topics in CIS 3 hours 

CISM 4900 Occupational Internship 
or 

BUSA4229 3 hours 

MKTG 3179 E-Commerce 3 hours 

Either or Both CISM 4140 & 4141 if not part of student's declared track 

MANAGEMENT MAJOR. (27 hours) 

(The following courses are required of all 

Management majors) 15 hours 

MGNT 3000 Personal Finance 3 hours 

MGNT 3 196 Small Business Management and Ownership 3 hours 

MGNT 3300 Organizational Behavior and Theory (formerly MGNT 4500.)... 3 hours 

MGNT 4165 Human Resource Management 3 hours 

MGNT 4200 Management of Diversity (formerly MGNT 4500) 3 hours 

GENERAL MANAGEMENT 12 hours 

[Choose four (4) from the following] 

BUSA 4116 Business Research 3 hours 

BUSA 4229 Administrative Practice & Internship 3 hours 

MGNT 3195 Introduction to Management Science 3 hours 

MGNT 4168 International Businesses Management 3 hours 

MGNT 4169 Quality Management 3 hours 

MGNT 4800 Contemporary Topics in Management 3 hours 

MKTG 3179 E-Commerce 3 hours 

Any one (1) other 3000 or 4000 level business course 3 hours 

MARKETING MAJOR (27 hours) 
(The following courses are required of all Marketing majors) 15 hours 

BUSA 4116 Business Research 3 hours 

MKTG 3176 Professional Selling. 3 hours 

MKTG 3178 Buyer Behavior 3 hours 

MKTG 3179 E-Commerce 3 hours 

MKTG 4185 Strategic Marketing. 3 hours 

TRACK I - GENERAL MARKETING 12 hours 

[Required Courses (9 hours)] 

MKTG 3177 Retail Management 3 hours 

MKTG 4175 Advertising & Promotion 3 hours 

MKTG 4179 International Bus. Marketing & Export Management 3 hours 



94 



[Choose one (1) from the following (3 hours) 

ACCT 3115 Cost/Managerial Accounting. 3 hours 

BUSA 4229 Administrative Practice & Internship 3 hours 

CISM 3232 Web Design and Development 3 hours 

MKTG 4176 Contemporary Topics in Marketing 3 hours 

TRACK II - PROFESSIONAL SELLING 12 hours 

[Required Courses (6 hours)] 

MKTG 4182 Advanced Professional Selling. 3 hours 

MKTG 4183 Sales Management. 3 hours 

[Choose two (2) from the following. (6 hours)] 

ACCT 3115 Cost/Managerial Accounting. 3 hours 

BUSA 4229 Administrative Practice & Internship 3 hours 

CISM 3232 Web Design and Development 3 hours 

MKTG 4176 Contemporary Topics in Marketing. 3 hours 

MINOR IN BUSINESS 

FINC 3000 Personal Finance 3 hours 

ACCT 2101 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 hours 

(Prerequisites: CISM/CSCI 1130 and MATH 1111) 
ECON 2106 Principles of Micro-Economics* 3 hours 

(Prerequisite: MATH 1111) 
MGNT 3165 Management of Organizations 3 hours 

(Junior standing-61 plus hours) 
MKTG 3175 Principles of Marketing 3 hours 

(Prerequisite: ECON 2106) 
Total Hours Required for the Minor in Business 15 hours 



95 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 



DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS (LIBA) 

English Language and Literature 

English Language and Literature (Teacher Certification) 

Foreign Languages 

Critical Thinking and Humanities 

Health Education and Physical Education 

Religious and Philosophical Studies 

Visual and Performing Arts 

Art 

Dance 

Music 

Theatre 

DEPARTMENT OF MASS COMMUNICATIONS (MCOM) 

Print 

Radio, Television and Film 

Public Relations and Advertising 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (SOCI) 

Africana Studies 

Behavior Analysis 

Criminal Justice 

History 

History (Teacher Certification) 

Sociology 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK (SWKD) 

Bachelor of Social Work 
Master of Social Work 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND 
URBAN STUDIES (DSPA) 

Political Science 

Political Science (Teacher Certification) 

Master of Public Administration 

Master of Science in Urban Studies Program 



96 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences is comprises five departments — Liberal 
Arts, Mass Communications, Political Science, Public Administration, and Urban Stud- 
ies; Social and Behavioral Sciences and Social Work. The College offers majors in English, 
mass communications, behavior analysis, history, criminal justice, social work, sociology, 
political science, and Africana Studies. The following areas of concentration are offered: 
Africana Studies, applied forensic analysis, behavior analysis, criminal behavior analy- 
sis, mass communications, English, art, music, religion and philosophy, history, sociology, 
criminal justice, gerontology, political science, voice, theatre, and dance. The College also 
offers three Master's degree programs, the Master of Public Administration, the Master 
of Social Work, and the Master of Science in Urban Studies. 

The College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences is committed to the mission of Savannah 
State University. The College strives to assure an academic milieu that fosters excellent 
teaching, scholarly activities, service to Students and meaningful community outreach. 
The College recognizes its rich cultural history as central to the ethos of the University. 

The goals of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences are as follows: 

To promote the belief that demography is not destiny: all students have a potential 
to graduate, and all students should be held to a high level of expectation; 

To provide students with a body of knowledge in the humanities, social sciences, 
arts, and wellness that empowers critical, visionary scholarship; 

To promote an inclusive environment that encourages students to develop intel- 
lectually, physically, ethically, emotionally and aesthetically; 

Provide an overarching culture that supports and nurtures students through rela- 
tionships cultivated between faculty and students; 

Provide learning experience that promotes critical and analytical thinking and ef- 
fective communications skills; 

Promote applied research and creative and scholarly activity among faculty and 
students. 

Serve as an educational resource for cultural enrichment and economic growth 
throughout southeast georgia; 

Foster cultural diversity; 

Emphasize tradition of african-american and african cultural and serve as a reposi- 
tory of knowledge about african-american experience; and 

Promote a desire for learning, a concern for humanity, human rights and the ideals 
of equality, citizenship and social justice. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS 

The programs of Fine Arts, Languages and Humanities, as well as Physical and Health 
Education comprise the Department of Liberal Arts. These programs encompass the var- 
ied disciplines of English language and literature, foreign languages (Arabic, Chinese, 
French, and Spanish), religious and philosophical studies, humanities, music, art, speech,, 
theatre, dance, and recreation and health education. The department offers courses lead- 
ing to the baccalaureate degree (B.A.) in English language and literature, and to a bac- 
calaureate degree in Fine Arts (B.F.A.) in the Visual and Performing Arts; additionally, it 
contributes significantly to the interdisciplinary program of Africana Studies. A minor in 
English language and literature is available as well as areas of concentration (15 credit 
hours) in religious and philosophical studies, music, art, theatre, French and Spanish. 
The department serves a crucial need of the University by offering courses to satisfy the 



97 



core curriculum requirements in Area A-Essential Skills, Area B-Institutional Options, 
Area C-Humanities/Fine Arts, and university mandated "Additional Requirements." Ad- 
ditionally, a teacher certification program in English language and literature is offered in 
conjunction with Armstrong Atlantic State University. 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of the Department of Liberal Arts is consistent with that of the College of 
Liberal Arts and Social Sciences as well as that of Savannah State University. Specifically, 
we are in concert with the following ideals: 

To graduate students prepared to perform at higher levels of economic productivity, 
social responsibility, and excellence in their chosen fields of endeavor in a changing 
global community; 

To embrace cultural, ethnic, racial and gender diversity supported by practices and 
programs that embody the ideal of an open, democratic, and global society; 

To develop high quality programs that utilize appropriate technology and support a 
variety of disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and professional programming; 

To commit to a high level of scholarly and creative work; 

To serve the needs of African American students as well as those of all other stu- 
dents, regardless of race, ethnicity, or culture; 

To embrace health and wellness as lifelong pursuits; 

To use student-centered instruction, scholarship, research, and effective support ser- 
vices that nurture the intellect and value honesty and human sensitivity; 

To provide effective programs and levels of service to meet the ever-changing needs 
of a coastal urban area; 

To serve as an educational resource for cultural enrichment and economic growth 
through southeast Georgia; and 

To promote a desire for learning, a concern for humanity, and the ideals of equality, 
citizenship, and social justice. 

Aims and Objectives 

The department's programs aim to develop the following essential interdisciplinary skills: 

Creative skills: skillful and thoughtful self-expression in varied genres and media; 

Analytical skills: the ability to think rigorously and critically about ideas and proposi- 
tions and to assess the validity of arguments; 

Synthesis skills: the ability to draw interdisciplinary relationships and to reach valid 
conclusions; 

Reading and interpretative skills: the ability to understand, with sensitivity to nu- 
ance and effect, the complexities and varieties of the ways in which oral, written 
and artistic texts communicate meaning; 

Oral, written, and artistic skills: the ability to formulate a point of view and to pres- 
ent, develop, illustrate, and defend it; 

Research skills: the ability to distinguish relevant data, to locate and gather it from a 
variety of sources, and to record it in an accessible fashion, using acceptable biblio- 
graphical and typographical conventions; 

Time management skills: the ability to plan work ahead, to structure time purpose- 
fully, and to carry out what is planned to meet deadlines; 

Independent learning and study skills: the ability to work alone, to locate useful in- 
formation, and to record and deploy it pertinently; 

Interpersonal skills: the ability to collaborate, to participate in joint projects, and to 
accept criticism. 



98 



THE FINE ARTS PROGRAM IN THE 
DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS 

The Fine Arts Program offers courses leading to the baccalaureate degree (B.A.) in the 
Visual and Performing Arts. The program also delivers fine arts courses as fulfillment of 
core requirements, as electives, and as advanced courses leading to an area of concentra- 
tion (15 credit hours) in music, art, dance, and theatre. The program also provides oppor- 
tunities for student engagement in the performing arts through concerts, plays, exhibits, 
and displays. 

The program seeks to develop student appreciation of culture and aesthetics; to develop 
individual ability and intellectual curiosity through performance, research, and other 
scholarly activity; to develop an awareness of social and civil responsibility; to provide 
special training in art, music, dance, and theatre; and to develop cultural transmitters in 
our increasingly technological society. 



MAJOR IN THE VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS 

In addition to completing the Core Curriculum II, students seeking a major in the Visual 
and Performing Arts must select a major field of study (area of concentration) and a field 
of emphasis. The areas of concentration with the corresponding fields of emphasis are as 
follows: a Concentration in Visual Art with an emphasis in either Art History or Studio 
Art; a Concentration in Music with an emphasis in either Voice Performance/Choral In- 
struments or Keyboard Performance, and a Concentration in Theatre and Dance with an 
emphasis in either Dance Performance or Theatre Performance. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE IN 
THE VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS 

Admission Requirements: 

Visual Arts 

1. Portfolio submission, at least 75 per cent 

2. Previous related experience 

Music 

1. Passing audition, at least 75 per cent 

2. Previous related experience 

3. Grades in music: B 

Dance 

1. Passing Audition, 75 per cent and above 

2. Previous related experience 

Theatre 

1 . Audition reading, at least 75 per cent 

2. Previous related experience 

Additional program requirements: 

1. Recitals 4. Portfolios 

2. Critiques 5. Performance lab work 

3. Written Exit Exams 6. Internships 



99 



PROGRAM OF STUDY 
MAJOR IN THE VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS 

Core Curriculum: Areas A, B, C, D, E, and Additional Requirements ...47 hours 

A. Essential Skills 9 hours 

B. Institutional Options 5 hours 

C. Humanities/Fine Arts 6 hours 

D. Sciences, Math, Technology 10 hours 

E. Social Sciences 12 hours 

Area F courses appropriate to the program of study 18 hours 

Major Concentration 39 hours 

Field of Emphasis 15 hours 

Electives (Chosen in consultation with advisor) 6 hours 

TOTAL 125 hours 

(A departmental Exit Exam is required of all students applying for graduation from con- 
centrations in Art, Music, Theatre and Dance. A score of no less than 80 percent must be 
attained. Area F is prerequisite to all areas of concentration.) 

AREA F Courses appropriate to the BFA program 18 hours 

Selected from 

FINE 2104 Portfolio/Career Marketing 3 hours 

FINE 2909 Business Management Through the Arts 3 hours 

FINE 2999 Legal Aspects of the Arts 3 hours 

FINE 2601 Technical Theatre 3 hours 

Foreign Languages* 0-6 hours 

Muse Voice ** 0-6 hours 

Muse 1201 Fundamentals of Music 3 hours 

Muse Applied Instrumental *** 0-6 hours 

Arts/Hedu Dance Techniques & Perform**** 0-2 hours 

* Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Spanish (1000-2000 levels) 
** Muse 1641, 1642, 1644, 1645, 1651, 1652 
*** Muse 2421, 2422, 2423, 2431, 2534, 2535 
****Arts/Hedu 1501, 1511 

Concentration in Visual Art (39 hours) 

ARTS 3201 Drawing 1 3 hours 

ARTS 3301 Printmaking 3 hours 

ARTS 3302 Art Photography 3 hours 

ARTS 3400 Color Theory and Design 3 hours 

ARTS 3401 Basic Design 1 3 hours 

ARTS 3600 Understanding the Arts 3 hours 

ARTS 3602 Stage Painting 3 hours 

ARTS 3603 Art History Survey I 3 hours 

ARTS 3604 Art History Survey II 3 hours 

ARTS 4301 Painting 3 hours 

ARTS 4711 Sculpture 3 hours 

THEA 3004 Scenery/Design 3 hours 

FINE 4999 Seminar/Practicum/Internship 3 hours 

TOTAL 39 hours 



100 



Fields of Emphasis: Art History or Studio Art (15 hours) 

Art History 

ARTS 3601 African American Art History 3 hours 

ARTS 4600 African Art History 3 hours 

ARTS 4601 Western Art History 1 3 hours 

ARTS 4602 Western Art History II 3 hours 

ARTS 4604 Contemporary Art History 3 hours 

TOTAL 15 hours 

Studio Art 

ARTS 3211 Drawing II 3 hours 

ARTS 3410 Basic Computer Drawing and Design 3 hours 

ARTS 4102 Life Drawing and Painting 3 hours 

ARTS 4311 African American Genre Painting 3 hours 

ARTS 4701 Ceramics 3 hours 

TOTAL 15 hours 

Elective Courses (6 hours) 

ARTS 3411 Basic Design II 3 hours 

ARTS 3501 Crafts 3 hours 

ARTS 4811 Weaving 3 hours 

(Students are reminded that ARTS 1101 must be taken as part of the Core and prior to 
the Concentration Area. Students choosing to minor in art may use the above electives as 
a minor, but are reminded that a minor in art consists of 6 hours in Art history and any 3 
arts courses above the 3000 level.) 

Major Concentration in Music (39 hours) 

MUSC 1311 Theory 1 3 hours 

MUSC 1312 Theory I (continued) 3 hours 

MUSC 2101 Theory II 3 hours 

MUSC 2102 Theory II (continued) 3 hours 

MUSC 2121 History and Literature of Music 1 3 hours 

MUSC 2122 History and Literature of Music II 3 hours 

MUSC 2408 Band Repertory 3 hours 

MUSC 3011 African American Music 3 hours 

MUSC 3111 Theory III (Form/Analysis/counterpoint/comp.) 3 hours 

MUSC 4010 Conducting and Directing 3 hours 

FINE 4999 Seminar/Practicum/internship 3 hours 

MUSC 4645 Music Theatre 3 hours 

THEA 3004 Scenery Design 3 hours 

TOTAL 39 hours 

Fields of Emphasis: Voice Performance/Choral Instruments 
or Keyboard Performance (15 hours) 

Emphasis on Voice Performance/Choral Instruments 

MUSC 2645 Voice Performance 1 3 hours 

MUSC 3645 Voice Performance II 3 hours 

MUSC 4642 Gospel & Spiritual Performance 1 3 hours 

MUSC 4643 Gospel & Spiritual Performance II 3 hours 

MUSC 4645 Senior Voice Performance ...3 hours 

TOTAL 15 hours 



101 



Emphasis on Keyboard Performance 

MUSC 1542 Basic Keyboard 3 hours 

MUSC 2522 Keyboard 1 3 hours 

MUSC 3101 Gospel & Spiritual Keyboarding 1 3 hours 

MUSC 4535 Intermediate Keyboard II 3 hours 

MUSC 4536 Advanced Keyboard Performance II 3 hours 

MUSC 4532 Gospel & Spiritual Keyboard II 3 hours 

TOTAL 15 hours 

Elective Courses in Music (6 hours) 

MUSC 2121 History and Literature of Music 1 3 hours 

MUSC 2122 History and Literature of Music II 3 hours 

MUSC 3751 Conducting 3 hours 

TOTAL 15 hours 

(Any student in consultation with his advisor may minor in music. A minor in music re- 
quires 6 credits in Music History (MUSC 2121, 2122) and 9 credits in any MUSC courses 
above the 3000 level.) 

Concentration in Theatre and Dance (39 hours) 

THEA 2601 Stagecraft 3 hours 

THEA 3004 Scene Design 3 hours 

THEA 3122 Movement I 3 hours 

THEA 3123 Movement II 3 hours 

THEA 3125 Stage Make Up & Costuming 3 hours 

THEA 4051 Black American Theatre and Performance 3 hours 

THEA 4055 Theatre History 1 3 hours 

THEA 4056 Theatre History II 3 hours 

THEA 3101 Acting 1 3 hours 

MUSC 4645 Musical Theatre 3 hours 

THEA 4111 Performance/Production and Management 3 hours 

DNCE 4201 Theatre Dance 3 hours 

THEA 4645 Musical Theatre 3 hours 

FINE 4999 Seminar/Practicum/Internship 3 hours 

TOTAL 39 hours 

Fields of Emphasis: Dance Performance or Theatre Performance (15 hours) 

Emphasis on Dance Performance 

DNCE 2501 Modern Techniques & Performance 3 hours 

DNCE 3501 Dance Appreciation & History 3 hours 

DNCE 3503 African-Caribbean Dance 3 hours 

DNCE 4501 Dance Theory 3 hours 

DNCE 4504 Interpretative Dance and Performance 3 hours 

TOTAL 15 hours 

Emphasis on Theatre Performance 

THEA 3101 Acting 1 3 hours 

THEA 4101 Acting II 3 hours 

THEA 4103 Advanced Acting/TV/Cinema 3 hours 

THEA 4104 Acting III 3 hours 

THEA 4105 Play Writing 3 hours 

TOTAL 15 hours 



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Additional Courses in Dance and Theatre 6 hours 

THEA 2101 Voice and Diction 3 hours 

THEA 2111 Oral Interpretation 3 hours 

(Any student in consultation with his advisor may minor in Theatre or Dance. A minor 
requires 6 hours of Theatre History (THEA 4055, 4056) and 9 hours in any THEA or 
DNCE courses above the 3000 level.) 

FINE ARTS PROGRAM IN THE 
DEPARMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS 

Ensemble Courses: 

Students can elect to participate in band and choral organization for elective credit. 

MUSC 1408 Band Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 1409 Band Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 2408 Band Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 2409 Band Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 3408 Band Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 3409 Band Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 4408 Band Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 4409 Band Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 1608 Choral Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 1609 Choral Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 2608 Choral Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 2609 Choral Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 3608 Choral Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 3609 Choral Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 4608 Choral Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 4609 Choral Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 1808 Chamber Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 1809 Chamber Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 2808 Chamber Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 2809 Chamber Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 3808 Chamber Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 3809 Chamber Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 4808 Chamber Organization (1st Semester) 1 hour 

MUSC 4809 Chamber Organization (2nd Semester) 1 hour 

THE LANGUAGES AND HUMANITIES 

PROGRAM IN THE 

DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS 

The Languages and Humanities Program offers courses leading to the baccalaureate de- 
gree (BA.) in English language and literature. A minor is available in English, and areas 
of concentration (15 credit hours) are available in religious and philosophical studies, in 
Spanish, and in French. The program also offers courses in Arabic, German, Portuguese, 
Chinese, Africana Studies, critical thinking, and interdisciplinary humanities. A teacher 
certification program in English language and literature is offered in conjunction with 
Armstrong Atlantic State University. 

The program seeks to provide a liberal arts education in which students may develop com- 
petence in communication skills: reading, writing, speaking, listening, analysis, and criti- 
cal thinking; achieve competence in one or more foreign languages; increase knowledge 



103 



and appreciation of art, literature, music, philosophy, and religion; explore the interdisci- 
plinary approach in Africana Studies; and prepare for graduate study in English language 
and literature as well as pre-professional areas such as law, library science, medicine, and 
education. 

FRESHMAN ENGLISH 

Entering freshmen that meet the requirements of regular admission are placed in English 
1101. Applicants for admission who do not meet the requirements for regular admission 
must take the Collegiate Placement Examination (CPE). On the basis of their perfor- 
mance on the English section of this test (including a writing sample), these students are 
assigned to English 1101 or to English 0099 in the Student Academic Assistance Program 
(SAAP). 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT AND CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Students who earned the grade of 3 or above on the Advanced Placement Test or 47 on the 
Freshman English CLEP may be exempted from English 1101 with credit. 

Students who earned the grade of B or above in advanced placement language (French, 
German, Spanish, Arabic or Chinese) or 4 or above on the Advanced Placement Test may 
be exempted from the first course in language (1001). 

MAJOR IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Students majoring in English language and literature should complete at least thirty-nine 
semester hours in language, writing, and literature, beyond Area F requirements. English 
courses taken in the core curriculum Areas A, B, C, and F may not be counted as a part of 
the thirty-nine hours required for the major. 

As sophomores, students should prepare to major in English by taking ENGL 2104 and 
2105. English 2105 is recommended as a prerequisite to all other English courses. 

Courses required for the major are the advanced speech course (ENGL/ SPEH 4101), the 
two introductory courses in English literature (ENGL 2121-2122), the two introductory 
courses in American literature (ENGL 2131-2132), one course in language (ENGL 3321- 
3322), one course in creative writing ENGL 3915 the course in Shakespeare (ENGL 4011), 
one advanced course in American literature (ENGL 4121, 4311, 4321, 4331, 4332, or 4335), 
one advanced course in African-American literature (ENGL 3212, 3216, 4211, 4217, or 
4218), and the senior seminar (ENGL 4700). Other English courses are electives. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
BACCALAUREATE DEGREE IN ENGLISH 

Candidates for the baccalaureate degree in English Language and Literature must pass 
the reading and essay writing components of the Regents' Testing Program (RTP). 

Senior English majors must take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). 

Senior English majors must also take the departmental exit examination. 

Students enrolled in the English degree program will be assigned an academic advisor by 
the chair of the department. Students are required to be advised by an advisor prior to 
registering for a course. 

Students must complete all Areas A-F courses prior to enrolling in upper level courses. 



104 



Students must earn a minimum grade of "C" in all prerequisite courses prior to register- 
ing for an upper level course. 

Students must earn a minimum grade of "C" in all major courses and all courses that are 
appropriate to the major. The courses that are "appropriate to the major" are listed under 
Area F courses. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 
MAJOR IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E, and additional requirements) .... 47 hours 

Area F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 18 hours 

ENGL 2104 Advanced Composition 3 hours 

ENGL 2105 Practical Criticism 3 hours 

One of the following courses: 

ENGL 2111 World Literature 1 3 hours 

ENGL 2112 World Literature II 3 hours 

SPEH 4101 Advanced Speech 3 hours 

Foreign language sequence 6 hours 

(To fulfill this sequence, students are encouraged to complete the second elementary level 
course and the first intermediate level course of the same language or two intermediate 
level courses in the same level courses in the same language.). 

Major Requirements: 41 hours 

ENGL 2121 British Literature 1 3 hours 

ENGL 2122 British Literature II 3 hours 

ENGL 2131 American Literature 1 3 hours 

ENGL 2132 American Literature II 3 hours 

ENGL 3321 Introduction to Language Study 3 hours 

ENGL 3322 History of the English Language 3 hours 

ENGL 4011 Shakespeare 3 hours 

Choose one of the following courses in creative writing: 

ENGL 3411 Creative Writing: Fiction 2 hours 

ENGL 3412 Creative Writing: Drama 2 hours 

ENGL 3413 Creative Writing: Poetry 2 hours 

Choose one of the following courses in British literature: 

ENGL 3011 Medieval English Literature 3 hours 

ENGL 3012 Renaissance English Literature 3 hours 

ENGL 3013 Neoclassic English Literature 3 hours 

ENGL 3014 Romantic English Literature 3 hours 

ENGL 3015 Victorian English Literature 3 hours 

ENGL 3016 Modern English Literature 3 hours 

ENGL 4021 The English Novel 3 hours 

Choose one of the following courses in American literature: 

ENGL 4121 American Women's Writing 3 hours 

ENGL 4311 Romantic American Literature 3 hours 

ENGL 4321 American Literary Realism 3 hours 

ENGL 4331 Modern American Novel 3 hours 

ENGL 4332 American Short Story 3 hours 

ENGL 4335 Modern American Poetry 3 hours 



105 



Choose one of the following courses in African-American literature: 

ENGL 3212 African-American Oral Tradition 3 hours 

ENGL 3216 African-American Poetry 3 hours 

ENGL 4211 African-American Drama 3 hours 

ENGL 4217 African-American Fiction 3 hours 

ENGL 4218 African-American Nonflction 3 hours 

ENGL Electives 6 hours 

ENGL 4700 Senior Seminar 3 hours 

Minor Field or Area of Concentration 15 hours 

Open Electives 4 hours 

Total Hours Required for Major in English Language and Literature .. 125 hours 

MINOR IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

A minor in English consists of a minimum of fifteen hours beyond ENGL 1102. Students 
minoring in English are required to take English 2105 as a prerequisite to all other Eng- 
lish courses except ENGL/SPEH 4101 and ENGL 2104. Other courses required for the 
minor are one course in English literature, one course in American literature, and one 
course in African-American literature. Additional English courses needed to complete the 
minor are electives (excluding the honors thesis, ENGL 4800, which only English majors 
may take). 

Areas of Concentration in the Department of Liberal Arts 

Religious and Philosophical Studies 

Religious and Philosophical Studies courses are designed to provide students with a broad 
humanistic background in religion and philosophy and to offer students expanded op- 
portunities to pursue liberal studies. An area of concentration consists of 15 hours (mini- 
mum) in religious and philosophical studies, including RPHS 2101. 

French and Spanish 

The aims of the French and Spanish areas of concentration are (1) to develop the ability to 
communicate in a foreign language; (2) instill respect for other people and other cultures; 
(3) to develop an appreciation for the artistic expressions which are found in other lan- 
guages, and (4) to bring about a greater awareness of our cultural heritage. The French 
or Spanish minor consists of the second intermediate course in the language and twelve 
additional hours at the junior or senior level. 

Prior to enrolling in a foreign language course, student may take a placement test. De- 
pending on the results of that test, students are placed in either an elementary level 
course (1001 or 1002) or in the first intermediate course (2001). Students should take 
note of the language requirements in their majors since some majors do not permit credit 
for 1001 or 1002. 

THE RECREATION AND HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAM 
IN THE DEPARTMENT OF LIBERAL ARTS 

The Recreation and Health Education Program is committed to the development of stu- 
dents' intellectual, social, and professional competency. The program provides a wellness- 
based core curriculum academic service program for all students and seeks to develop 
students' intellectual competency regarding lifestyle habits and issues that affect health, 



106 



quality of life, and well being as a life-time process^ The objectives of the department are 
as follows: 

To prepare students for careers as recreation programmers, leaders, or supervisors 
in leisure service delivery systems that are public, private, commercial, or com- 
munity-based. 
To train students to provide recreation services to special populations as an inter- 
vention methodology in schools, hospitals, clinics, and rehabilitation centers. 
To develop students' intellectual competency on lifestyle habits issues that effect 
health, quality of life, and well being as a life-time process. 

THE WELLNESS REQUIREMENTS 

All students entering Savannah State University are required to satisfactorily complete 
three hours of health education courses as a prerequisite for graduation. Students with 
disabling conditions are encouraged to consult with the coordinator of the department 
for an individualized program based on their needs. Some of the courses in the wellness 
curriculum have a required dress code. 



DEPARTMENT OF MASS COMMUNICATIONS 

The department of mass communications offers courses leading to the baccalaureate 
degree (B.A.) with a concentration in one of three areas: print, radio/film/television, and 
public relations and advertising. Minor programs are available in English and several 
other disciplines in the University. The department also offers courses in desktop pub- 
lishing, photojournalism, radio/film/television production, public relations, and advertis- 
ing copywriting. 

The objectives of the department are: 

1. To prepare students for graduate study in mass communications, film, and other 
areas of endeavor. 

2. To offer students state-of-the-art equipment and instruction in print, broadcast, 
and public relations/advertising to prepare them for jobs in professional media. 

3. To aid students in developing critical thinking/analytical skills, writing skills, 
computer/software usage skills in print, broadcast, and public relations/advertis- 
ing. 

4. To orient students to the importance of minority contributions to the areas stud- 
ied in mass communications to enhance their global view of the world. 

5. To assist students in developing a broad interdisciplinary liberal arts perspective 
inclusive of literature, art, film, philosophy, African American studies, music. 

6. To involve students in applied experiences in the program to enhance their em- 
ployability in a modern workforce. 

7. To offer interdisciplinary courses that enhance the African and Africana Studies 
major. 

MAJOR IN MASS COMMUNICATIONS 

The mass communications degree program is an interdisciplinary program which offers 
students who are interested in a professional communications career an opportunity to 
be flexible. 

The program, which leads to the B.A. degree, allows students the option of concentrating 
in print journalism, radio and television, or public relations and advertising. 



£• 



107 



Enriched knowledge and understanding of the nature, circumstances, and aspirations of 
people are derived from historical, literary, social, philosophical, and theological studies, 
which are traditionally called humanistic. Therefore, the mass communications program 
utilizes these disciplines to assist students to develop basic insights into human nature 
and to acquire humanistic principles upon which the media must rest. 

Students in CLASS participate in internships on campus and in the community. WHCJ 
90.3 FM, the campus radio station serves as a learning laboratory for students inter- 
ested in learning, radio, production skills, and the university archives provide similar 
opportunities for history majors. CLASS provides students with a variety of opportuni- 
ties including the concert choirs, the marching band, the Model United Nations, Jazz 
Ensemble, and The Tiger's Roar, SSU's on-line student newspaper. 

ACADEMIC REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
i BACCALAUREATE DEGREE IN 

.. MASS COMMUNICATIONS 

"Candidates for the baccalaureate degree in the Department of Humanities must pass the 
reading and essay components of the Regents' Testing Program (RTP). 

Students enrolled in the mass communications degree program will be assigned an aca- 
demic advisor by the chair of the department. Students are required to be counseled by 
an advisor prior to registering for a course. 

Students must complete all Areas A-F courses prior to enrolling in upper level courses. 

Students must earn a minimum grade of "C" in all prerequisite courses prior to register- 
ing for an upper level course. 

Students must earn a minimum grade of "C" in all major courses and all courses that 
are appropriate to the major. Generally, the courses appropriate to the major are listed 
under Area F courses. 

Senior mass communications majors must pass the departmental exit examination. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 
MASS COMMUNICATIONS MAJOR 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E, and additional requirements) .... 47 hours 

Area F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 18 hours 

COMM 2101 Writing for the Media 3 hours 

COMM 2105 Mass Media and Society 3 hours 

COMM 2106 African-Americans in the Media 3 hours 

ENGL 2104 Advanced Composition 3 hours 

Foreign language sequence 6 hours 

(These may include the second elementary level course and the first intermediate 

level course of the same language, or two intermediate level courses in the same 

language.) 

Recommended: SPAN 1002, and SPAN 2001 or SPAN 2001 and SPAN 2002 

PRINT CONCENTRATION 36 hours 

COMM 3105 Writing for Newspapers and Magazines 3 hours 

COMM 3110 Desktop Publishing 3 hours 

COMM 3120 Introduction to Communications Theory 3 hours 



108 



COMM 3201 Feature Writing 3 hours 

COMM 4106 Communications Practicum 3 hours 

COMM 4170 Advanced Newspaper Writing and Reporting 3 hours 

COMM 4201 Copy Editing 3 hours 

COMM 4705 Communications Law and Ethics 3 hours 

COMM 4902 Professional Media Internship 3 hours 

Choose one of the following courses: 

COMM 3101 Media Arts and Design 3 hours 

COMM 3102 Photo-Journalism 3 hours 

COMM 3130 History of Journalism 3 hours 

COMM 4105 Editorial Writing 3 hours 

COMM 4211 Newspaper Production 3 hours 

COMM 4402 Public Relations and Advertising Campaigns 3 hours 

Other Requirements 

SPEH 4101 Advanced Speech 3 hours 

GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography 3 hours 

Minor Field 15 hours 

Electives 9 hours 

Total hours required for the major in Mass Communications 
with Print Concentration 125 hours 

FILM, RADIO AND TELEVISION CONCENTRATION 36 hours 

COMM 3120 Introduction to Communications Theory 3 hours 

COMM 3301 Introduction to Radio and T.V Production 3 hours 

COMM 3303 Writing for Radio and T.V 3 hours 

COMM 4106 Communications Practicum 3 hours 

COMM 4107 Advanced Television Production 3 hours 

COMM 4110 Advanced Radio Production 3 hours 

COMM 4705 Communications Law and Ethics 3 hours 

COMM 4815 The Documentary 3 hours 

COMM 4902 Professional Media Internship 3 hours 

Choose one of the following courses: 

COMM 3101 Media Arts and Design 3 hours 

COMM 3102 Photo-Journalism 3 hours 

COMM 3110 Desktop Publishing 3 hours 

COMM 3130 History of Journalism 3 hours 

COMM 3302 Speech for Radio and Television 3 hours 

COMM 4406 Public Relations and Advertising Workshop 3 hours 

COMM 4810 Introduction to Communications Research 3 hours 

Other Requirements 6 hours 

SPEH 4101 Advanced Speech 3 hours 

GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography 3 hours 

Minor Field 5 hours 

Electives 9 hours 

Total Hours Required for the Major in Mass Communications 

with Radio and Television Concentration 125 hours 



109 



PUBLIC RELATIONS AND ADVERTISING CONCENTRATION 36 hours 

COMM 3110 Desktop Publishing 3 hours 

COMM 3120 Introduction to Communications Theory 3 hours 

COMM 3401 Introduction to Public Relations and Advertising 3 hours 

COMM 4101 Advertising Copy Writing 3 hours 

COMM 4106 Communications Practicum .....3 hours 

COMM 4402 Public Relations and Advertising Campaigns 3 hours 

COMM 4406 Public Relations and Advertising Workshop 3 hours 

COMM 4705 Communications Law and Ethics 3 hours 

COMM 4902 Professional Media Internship 3 hours 

Choose one of the following courses: 

COMM 3102 Photo-Journalism 3 hours 

COMM 3101 Media Arts and Design 3 hours 

COMM 3130 History of Journalism 3 hours 

COMM 3301 Introduction to Radio and Television Production 3 hours 

COMM 4810 Introduction to Communications Research 3 hours 

Other Requirements 6 hours 

SPEH 4101 Advanced Speech 3 hours 

GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography 3 hours 

Minor Field 15 hours 

Electives 9 hours 

Total Hours Required for the Major in Mass Communications 

with Public Relations Concentration 125 hours 

MINOR IN MASS COMMUNICATIONS 

All students completing a minor in mass communications are required to take and sat- 
isfactorily complete fifteen semester hours which must include COMM 2101 and other 
communications courses at 3000 or higher levels; however, COMM 2106 (African-Ameri- 
cans in the Media) may be taken with permission of the mass communications coordina- 
tor or the chair of the department. Suggested courses include, but are not limited to: 

COMM 2101 Writing for the Media (required) 3 hours 

COMM 3110 Desktop Publishing 3 hours 

COMM 3120 Introduction to Communications Theory 

(Prerequisite: Junior standing) 3 hours 

COMM 3302 Speech for Radio and Television 3 hours 

COMM 3401 Introduction to Public Relations and Advertising 

(Prerequisite: COMM 2101 3 hours 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND 
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

The Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers academic programs in behavior 
analysis, criminal justice, history, political science, and sociology to prepare students for 
graduate studies and career goals. These programs include scholarly activities designed 
to develop historical consciousness, awareness of civic responsibilities, appreciation 
of cultural diversity, and understanding of both human behavior and interpersonal 
relationships. The department promotes learning experiences that examine the issues, 
problems resources, and opportunities of Georgia's coastal region, the state, the nation, 
and the world. 



110 



The Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences offers courses leading to the Bachelor 
of Arts degree in history and Africana Studies. It offers the Bachelor of Science degree 
in behavior analysis, criminal justice, and sociology. The Africana Studies major provides 
an option to concentrate in the humanities or the social sciences. 

Minor programs are available in African-American studies, behavior analysis, criminal 
justice, history, sociology and gerontology. In conjunction with Armstrong Atlantic State 
College, the department offers teacher certification program in secondary education for 
history majors. 

The objectives of the department are as follows: 

To provide introductory courses in behavior analysis, history, geography, and sociol- 
ogy, for both general knowledge and a foundation for advanced classes; 

To develop students' abilities and skills through critical thinking, logical and quan- 
titative reasoning, effective writing and speaking, and computer literacy; 

To prepare students for graduate work in behavior analysis, criminal justice, sociol- 
ogy, psychology, public administration, and other related fields; and 

To prepare students for successful careers in the behavior analysis/psychology, 
criminal justice system, education, public, and other related fields; and 

To prepare students for successful careers in the behavior analysis/psychology, 
criminal justice system, education, public administration, foreign service, and 
other traditional and nontraditional careers in the public and private sectors. 

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL AND 
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

MAJOR IN AFRICANA STUDIES 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E, and additional requirements).. 47 hours 

AREA F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 18 hours 

HIST 1111 Survey of World History to Early Modern Times 

OR HIST 1112 Survey of World History from Early Modern Times-Pres 3 hours 

HIST 2111 Survey of U.S. History to the Post Civil War Period 

OR HIST 2112 Survey of U.S. History from Post Civil War-Pres 3 hours 

GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography 

OR ANTH 1101 Introduction to Anthropology 3 hours 

AFRS 2000-Intro to Africana Studies 3 hours 

Foreign Language Sequence (any two languages in sequence) 6 hours 

Hours Required for Major 30 hours 

Major Requirements 18 hours 

AFRS 3301-African America History to 1900 3 hours 

AFRS 314 1-African Politics 3 hours 

AFRS 3501-Survey of African Culture 3 hours 

AFRS 4501-African Americans and Pan Africanism 3 hours 

AFRS 4701-African History since 1885 3 hours 

AFRS 4601-Senior Seminar 3 hours 

Major Electives 12 hours 

Choose two courses from Category I and II 



Ill 



Category I: Social Sciences 

AFRS 3000-Africana Political Ideology and Philosophy 3 hours 

AFRS 3102- African /African Amer. Family 3 hours 

AFRS 3111- Africana Woman 3 hours 

AFRS 3120-African American Aging 3 hours 

AFRS 3312-African Americans in the Twentieth Century 3 hours 

AFRS 3601- African American Politics 3 hours 

AFRS 3961- Internship 3 hours 

AFRS 4000 Selected Topics in Africana Studies 3 hours 

AFRS 43 11 -Psychology of African American Experience 3 hours 

AFRS 4701-Africa since 1885 3 hours 

Category II: Liberal Arts 

AFRS/COMM 2601- African. Americans in the Media 3 hours 

AFRS/MUSC 3011-African Music 3 hours 

AFRS/RPHS 3211-Religion and African Thought Systems 3 hours 

AFRS/ENGL 32 12-African American Oral Tradition 3 hours 

AFRS/ENGL 3216-African. American Poetry 3 hours 

AFRS 3301-African American History to 1900 3 hours 

AFRS/ENGL 3311- African Caribbean Lit 3 hours 

AFRS 3501- Survey of African Culture 3 hours 

AFRS/ART 3601 African American Art 3 hours 

AFRS/ENGL 4400-Specific Topics-Gullah Tribe 3 hours 

AFRS/FREN 4100-Survey of African and Caribbean-Francophone Lit 3 hours 

AFRS/ ENGL 4211-African American Drama 3 hours 

General Electives .v». 15 hours 

(See advisor for Double Major in HIST concentration: Elective 2000 and above) 

Minor 15 hours 

Total Hours Required for the Major in Africana Studies 125 hours 

Total Hours Required for a Double Major in Africana Studies & History.. 140 hours 



MAJOR IN BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D. E, and additional requirements 47 hours 

Area F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 

BEHV 1101 Introduction to Behavior Analysis 3 hours 

PSYC 1101 Introduction to Psychology 3 hours 

SOCI 2101 Social Statistics 3 hours 

BEHV 2101 History of Behavior Analysis 3 hours 

Foreign Language Sequence 6 hours 

Hours Required for Major 34 hours 

Major Requirements 19 hours 

BEHV 3000 Behavior Analysis II 3 hours 

BEHV 3102 Experimental Analysis 3 hours 

BEHV 3103 Behavior Principles I 3 hours 

BEHV 3104 Behavior Principles II 3 hours 

BEHV 3117 Counseling and Behavior Change 3 hours 

BEHV 4000 Selected Topics in Behavior Analysis 3 hours 

BEHV 4213 Research Seminar 4 hours 



112 



Major Electives (Select any 5 courses) 15 hours 

BEHV 3101 Descriptive Analysis 3 hours 

BEHV 3118 Counseling and Minority Behavior 3 hours 

BEHV 3301 Social Psychology 3 hours 

BEHV 3311 Group Process 3 hours 

BEHV/ CRJU 3361 Human Behavior 3 hours 

BEHV 4110 Theories of Personality 3 hours 

BEHV 4111 Health Behavior 3 hours 

BEHV 4112 Behavior of African American 3 hours 

BEHV 4212 Internship 3 hours 

BEHV/ PSYC 4105 Abnormal Psychology 3 hours 

BEHV/ PSYC 4601 Diagnostic Psychology 3 hours 

University Electives (Upper level courses) 6 hours 

Minor 15 hours 

Total Hours Required for the Major in Behavior Analysis 125 hours 

MAJOR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E, and additional requirements) .... 47 hours 

Area F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 18 hours 

CRJU 1101- Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 hours 

CRJU 2102-Police and Society 3 hours 

CRJU 3401-Social Research Methods 3 hours 

SOCI 210 1-Social Statistics 3 hours 

Foreign Language Sequence 

Two courses at any level 6 hours 

Hours Required for Major 36 hours 

Major Requirements 18 hours 

CRJU 3111-American Courts 3 hours 

CRJU 312 1-Corrections 3 hours 

CRJU 3510-Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 hours 

CRJU 4000 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice 3 hours 

CRJU 4301 -Jurisprudence of Criminal Law 3 hours 

CRJU 4311-Juvenile Justice 3 hours 

CRJU 490 1-Senior Seminar 3 hours 

Major Electives 18 hours 

(Any combination of 3000 and 4000 level courses) 

CRJU 3301-Constitutional Law 3 hours 

CRJU 3321-Race, Gender, Class and Crime 3 hours 

CRJU 3510-Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 hours 

CRJU 3361-Human Behavior 3 hours 

CRJU 3432-Community Policing 3 hours 

CRJU 3502-Violence, Crime and Justice 3 hours 

CRJU 3521-Drugs, Alcohol and Crime 3 hours 

CRJU 3901-Internship 3 hours 

CRJU 4101-Independent Study 3 hours 

CRJU 4311-Juvenile Justice ....3 hours 

CRJU 4331-Comparative Criminal Justice System 3 hours 



113 



CRJU 4411-Criminal Investigations 3 hours 

CRJU 4420-Crime Analysis 3 hours 

CRJU 4521-Criminal Justice Management 3 hours 

CRJU 460 1-Special Topics 3 hours 

SOCI 4135-Sociology of Law 3 hours 

General Electives (Upper level courses) 9 hours 

Minor Field 15 hours 

Total Hours Required for the Major in Criminal Justice 125 hours 

MAJOR IN HISTORY 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E, and additional requirements) .... 47 hours 

Area F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 18 hours 

HIST 1111 or History 1112...... 3 hours 

HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 3 hours 

GEOG 1101 Intro to Geography 3 hours 

AFRS 2000 Intro to Africana Studies 3 hours 

Foreign Language (Sequence) 6 hours 

Hours Required for Major 30 hours 

Major Requirements 18 hours 

HIST 3101 Historical Research 3 hours 

HIST 3312 The African American in the 20th Century 3 hours 

HIST 3412 History of Modern Europe 3 hours 

HIST 3502 American Revolution and New Nation 3 hours 

HIST 4000 Selected 1 Topics in History 3 hours 

HIST 4601 Latin America in the Modern World 3 hours 

HIST 4901 Senior Seminar 3 hours 

Electives: Choose four courses with at least one from Category I, II, III, 
and IV (Optional) 

Category I: Africa and African American History 

HIST 3301 Africana-American History before 1900 3 hours 

HIST 4301 History of Africana Thought 3 hours 

HIST 4701 African History Before 1800 3 hours 

HIST 4702 African History Since 1800 3 hours 

Category II: Asian and Latin American History 

HIST 3601 Colonial and Early National Latin American History 3 hours 

HIST 3801 Modern Asian History 3 hours 

HIST 4801 History of China Since 1600 3 hours 

HIST 4805 Twentieth Century East Asian Economic History 3 hours 

Category III: Western History 

HIST 3411 History of Early Modern Europe 3 hours 

HIST 3501 Colonial America 3 hours 

HIST 3503 American Civil and Reconstruction 3 hours 

HIST 3504 Recent American History 3 hours 

HIST 4411 History of Modern Britain 3 hours 

HIST 4511 Topics in American History 3 hours 



114 



Category IV: OTHER (OPTIONAL) 

HIST 3901 Internship 6 hours 

HIST 3909 Readings in History 3 hours 

University Electives 15 hours 

(See your advisor for the Double Major or AFRS Concentration) 
(Electives 2000 and above courses) 

Minor 15 hours 

Total Hours Required for the Major in History 125 hours 

Total Hours Required for a Double Major in History/Africana Studies ... 140 hours 

MAJOR IN SOCIOLOGY 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E, and additional requirements) .... 47 hours 

Area F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 18 hours 

SOCI 1101 Introductory Sociology 3 hours 

SOCI 2101 Social Statistics 3 hours 

PSYC 1101 Introduction to Psychology 3 hours 

Foreign Language sequence 

Choose one of the following courses: 

GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography 3 hours 

ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology 3 hours 

Hours Required for Major 33 hours 

Major Requirements 15 hours 

SOCI 3611 Minorities in the Social Environment 3 hours 

SOCI 3036 Social Stratification 3 hours 

SOCI 3201 Classical Theory 3 hours 

or 

SOCI 3312 Contemporary Theory 3 hours 

SOCI 3401 -Social Research 3 hours 

SOCI 490 1-Senior Seminar 3 hours 

Four SOCI 3000 courses 12 hours 

Two SOCI 4000 courses 6 hours 

Major Electives 18 hours 

SOCI 2209 Deviance and Conformity 3 hours 

SOCI 2122 Sociology of Poverty 3 hours 

SOCI 3101 Sociology of Family 3 hours 

SOCI 3360 Sociology of Aging 3 hours 

SOCI 3425 Sex, Roles and Gender 3 hours 

SOCI 3611 Minorities and the Social Environment 3 hours 

SOCI 3501 Criminology 3 hours 

SOCI 3322 Juvenile Delinquency 3 hours 

SOCI 3621 Demography 3 hours 

SOCI 3631 Urban Sociology 3 hours 

SOCI 3651 Sociology of Religion ,..3 hours 

SOCI 3901 Internship 6 hours 

SOCI 4000 Selected Topics in Sociology 3 hours 



115 



SOCI 4135 Sociology of Law 3 hours 

SOCI 4421 Seminar on the African American Experience 3 hours 

SOCI 4101 Independent Study 3 hours 

SOCI 4601 Special Topics 3 hours 

Electives (Upper level courses) 12 hours 

Minor Field 15 hours 

Total Hours Required for the Major in Sociology 125 hours 

MINORS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL 
AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

MINOR IN AFRICANA STUDIES 

AFRS 2000 Introduction to Africana Studies 3 hours 

AFRS/HIST 3301 Africana American History to 1900 3 hours 

(Three upper Level courses) 9 hours 

Total Hours 15 hours 

MINOR IN BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS 

BEHV 1101 Introduction to Behavior Analysis 3 hours 

BEHV2101 History of Behavior Analysis 3 hours 

Three BEHA upper level courses 9 hours 

Total Hours 15 hours 

MINOR IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CRJU 1101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 hours 

CRJU 3301 Constitutional Law in the Criminal Process or 

CRJU 4301 Criminal Law 3 hours 

Three CRJU Upper level courses (except CRJU 3901 or 4901) 9 hours 

Total Hours 15 hours 

MINOR IN HISTORY 

HIST 1111 or HIST 1112 or HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 3 hours 

One course from Category I, II, and III 9 hours 

One course from Major Requirements 3 hours 

Total Hours 15 hours 

MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY 

SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology or SOCI 1160 Social Problems 3 hours 

SOCI 3202 Classical Theory or SOCI 3312 Contemporary Theory 3 hours 

One 4000 level course 3 hours 

Two additional 3000 level courses ( except SOCI 3901 or 4901) 6 hours 

Total Hours 15 hours 

MINOR IN GERONTOLOGY 

GRNY 2101 Introduction to Gerontology 3 hours 

Four other GRNY courses 12 hours 

Total Hours 15 hours 



116 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK 

Center of Excellence 

Mission Statement 

The mission of the Department of Social Work is to prepare students to excel in social 
work practice. The BSW programs prepares students for generalist practice and the MSW 
program builds on the generalist foundation and prepares student for advance practice in 
Clinical and Social Administration. The Department promotes student focused learning, 
incorporates an Afrocentric perspective and graduates students who are culturally compe- 
tent to practice social work in rural, urban, and global settings. 

BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM 

Program 

The Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree is a carefully articulated program that provides 
a generalist academic and experiential foundation for students seeking a career in the var- 
ied and expanding profession of social work. The BSW program is accredited by the Coun- 
cil on Social Work Education. The major requires a selective liberal arts base of knowledge 
from social, behavioral, and natural sciences (e.g. psychology, sociology, biology) together 
with social work skills, values, and methodologies of intervention at the individual, fam- 
ily, group, institution, and community levels, BSW graduates are educated to respond in 
an informed way to identifiable social work needs in a variety of settings, including rural, 
urban, and international. The social work major is structured around four interrelated 
components: theoretical foundations/intervention strategies; client population/cultural 
diversity; research/evaluation; and skills development/fleldwork. Students admitted to 
the major are expected to maintain academic excellence and demonstrate professional and 
ethical behavior. 

BSW Admission Requirements 

Students interested in declaring social work as a major are required to complete the Ap- 
plication for Admission to the BSW Program. Completed applications are evaluated by the 
BSW Admissions Committee and recommendations are forwarded to the BSW Program 
Coordinator. Typically, application is made spring semester of the sophomore year. See the 
Department of Social Work webpage (bswmsw@savstate.edu) for the BSW application. 
Admission to the BSW program is based on the following criteria: 

• Completion of the University Core Curriculum 

• Minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.3 

• Completion of SOWK 2200 Human Needs and Human Services (gateway course) 
with a grade of B 

• Completed Application for Admission to the BSW Program including: 

1. Two Letters of Reference: One from a Savannah State University professor 
or (for transfer applicants) a professor from a previous university or college 
attended; and one from an employer or supervisor (you may substitute a 
supervisor for a volunteer experience.) 

2. Current official transcript 

3. An interview may be requested by the committee 

Applications are due on or before July 1st for fall semester and should be submitted: 

BSW Program Coordinator 

P O. Box 20553 

Savannah State University 

Savannah, GA 31404 



117 



Academic credit for life or previous work experience is not considered in whole or in part 
in lieu of admission requirements or in lieu of any social work course including field 
practicum requirements (CSWE Accreditation Standard 5.2, 2003). 

Requirements for Graduation 

In addition to completing 47 hours of Savannah State University's core curriculum re- 
quirements (Areas A, B, C, D, E, and additional requirements), social work majors must 
also complete 18 hours in Area F (courses appropriate to the program of study); and 60 
hours of social work major (SOWK) courses. 

MAJOR IN SOCIAL WORK 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E, and additional requirements) .... 47 hours 

Area F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 18 hours 

SOCI 1101 Introductory Sociology 3 hours 

SOWK 2101/SOWK 2101 Social Statistics 3 hours 

SOWK 2200 Human Needs and Human Services 3 hours 

Foreign Language sequence (two courses at any level) 6 hours 

One of the following courses: 

ANTH1102 3 hours 

PSYC1101 3 hours 

POLS 2101 3 hours 

Major Requirements: 48 hours 

SOWK 2205 History of Social Welfare and Social Policy 3 hours 

SOWK 3101 Research Methods 3 hours 

SOWK 3201 Human Behavior and the Social Environment 1 3 hours 

SOWK 3202 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 3 hours 

SOWK 3220 Human Diversity and Social Work Practice 3 hours 

SOWK 3305 Introduction to Social Work Practice 3 hours 

SOWK 3340 Interventive Methods I 3 hours 

SOWK 3341 Interventive Methods II 3 hours 

SOWK 3342 Interventive Methods III 3 hours 

SOWK 4410 Implementation of Social Welfare Policies 3 hours 

SOWK 4701 Field Experience 1 6 hours 

SOWK 4702 Field Experience II 6 hours 

SOWK 4901 Senior Seminar 1 3 hours 

SOWK 4902 Senior Seminar II 3 hours 

Choose two of the following courses: 6 hours 

SOWK 4106 Social Work with Families and Children 3 hours 

SOWK 4201 Gerontological Social Work 3 hours 

SOWK 4301 Substance Abuse Intervention Strategies 3 hours 

SOWK 4510 Crisis Intervention 3 hours 

SOWK 5501 Law, Race and Poverty in the Welfare of Children 3 hours 

SOWK 6000 Special Topics 3 hours 

SOWK 6100 Independent Study 3 hours 

Choose two General Electives 6 hours 

Total Hours Required for the Major in Social Work 125 hours 



118 



MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK PROGRAM 

The Master of Social Work (MSW) Program is accredited by the Council on Social Work 
Education. The MSW program is designed to prepare students for entry into advanced so- 
cial work practice. The two year (60 credit hours) degree program consists of a foundation 
curriculum which provides knowledge, values, and skills common to generalist social work 
practice; a set of concentration courses in either clinical or social administration practice; 
and two field practicum courses which are designed to enhance the competencies in the 
foundation and concentration areas. (See Graduate Programs for Details) 

DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, PUBLIC 
ADMINISTRATION AND URBAN STUDIES 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The Department of Political Science, Public Administration, and Urban Studies offers 
the Bachelor of Science degree in political science. Students majoring in political science 
may elect to concentrate in pre-law, public administration, or international (comparative) 
politics. The program in conjunction with Armstrong Atlantic State University offers 
students the opportunity to pursue teacher certification in political science. 

The Political Science program seeks to prepare leaders for greatness in public service to 
Georgia and beyond, and who are able to 

1. Demonstrate an understanding of American governmental structures, as well as 
comparative political systems; 

2. Exhibit knowledge of the political science literature and have the ability to re- 
trieve information and acquire knowledge on their own; 

3. Communicate effectively about the impact of political science in society and the 
significance of the discipline in the social sciences; 

4. Pursue graduate and professional schools; 

5. Compete successfully for entry-level jobs in the domestic and international are- 
nas in Georgia and beyond; and 

6. Perform at higher levels of economic productivity, social responsibility, and moral 
excellence in their chosen field. 

MAJOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E, and additional requirements) .... 47 hours 
Area F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 18 hours 

POLS 2101 Introduction to Political Science 3 hours 

Choose one of the following courses: 

HIST 2111 A Survey of U.S. History to the Post Civil War Period 3 hours 

HIST 2112 A Survey of U.S. History from the 

Post Civil War Period to the Present 3 hours 

SOCI 2101 Social Statistics 3 hours 

Foreign Language sequence (two courses at any level) 6 hours 

Choose one of the following courses: 

GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography 3 hours 

ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology 3 hours 



119 



Major Requirements 36 hours 

POLS 3301 Research Methods in Political Science 3 hours 

POLS 3601 African-American Politics 3 hours 

POLS 4201 Political Theory 3 hours 

POLS 4901 Senior Seminar 3 hours 

Six upper division POLS courses (see list below) 18 hours 

POLS 2201 State and Local Government 3 hours 

POLS 2601 Introduction to Public Administration 3 hours 

POLS 3101 International Politics 3 hours 

POLS 3102 Comparative Government 3 hours 

POLS 3211 Constitutional Law 3 hours 

POLS 4221 American Political Thought 3 hours 

Political Science Electives: 6 hours 

These courses do not have to be from the same concentration. 

Pre-law Concentration 

POLS 3201 American Judicial Process 3 hours 

POLS 3121 International Law 3 hours 

POLS 3221 Civil Rights and Liberties 3 hours 

POLS 3401 Administrative Law 3 hours 

POLS 4511 Public Policy 3 hours 

Public Administration/Policy Concentration 

POLS 3401 Administrative Law 3 hours 

POLS 3501 Public Personnel Administration 3 hours 

POLS 3511 Organization Theory and Behavior 3 hours 

POLS 3811 Gender and Politics 3 hours 

POLS 4511 Public Policy 3 hours 

International/Comparative Politics Concentration 

POLS 3101 International Politics 3 hours 

POLS 3121 International Law 3 hours 

POLS 3131 International Organization 3 hours 

POLS 3141 African Government and Politics 3 hours 

POLS 4401 Politics of Less Developed Countries 3 hours 

POLS 4601 American Foreign Policy 3 hours 

Minor Field 15 hours 

Electives 9 hours 

Total Hours Required for the Major in Political Science 125 hours 

MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

POLS 2101 Introduction to Political Science 3 hours 

Four other POLS courses 12 hours 

(Note: Students who take POLS 2101 in the core curriculum will need 

an additional POLS elective in the minor.) 

Total Hours 15 hours 



120 



MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM 

Consistent with Savannah State University's unique and historic mission as one of three 
historically black colleges and universities in the University System of Georgia, the Mas- 
ter of Public Administration program seeks to be the program of choice for non-tradi- 
tional managers in our region, while offering traditional managers an environment that 
enhances cultural competency. (See Graduate Programs for Details) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN 
URBAN STUDIES PROGRAM 

The Masters of Science in Urban Studies (MSUS) is an interdisciplinary, collaborative 
graduate program between the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (CLASS) at Sa- 
vannah State University (SSU) and the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) at Armstrong 
Atlantic State University (AASU). The program seeks to enhance the development of each 
student's analytical and research skills, strengthen their intellectual resources necessary 
for the generation of new knowledge of urban areas in Georgia and worldwide; and to add 
to the general public's awareness of the problems and strengths of Georgia's urban areas 
through community activity. (See Graduate Programs for Details) 



121 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY 

DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS (NSMA) 
Biology 
Chemistry 

Environmental Science 
Marine Science 
Mathematics 
Master of Marine Science 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY (EGRT) 
Civil Engineering Technology 
Computer Science Technology 
Electronic Engineering Technology 
Engineering Degree Programs 
Georgia Tech Regional Engineering Program 
Regents Engineering Transfer Program 
Dual Degree Programs 

DEPARTMENT OF NAVAL SCIENCE (NSCI) 
Navy ROTC 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE (MILD 
Army ROTC 



122 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY 

The College of Sciences and Technology comprises of four departments: the Department 
of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, the Department of Engineering Technology, the 
Department of Naval Science and the Department of Military Science. It offers Bachelor 
of Science degree programs with majors in Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Sciences, 
Marine Science, Mathematics, Civil Engineering Technology, Computer Science Technol- 
ogy, and Electronics Engineering Technology. 

The College offers Master of Science degree in Marine Science. In collaboration with Geor- 
gia Tech, it also offers engineering degree programs under Georgia Tech Regional Engi- 
neering Program (GTREP), Regents Engineering Transfer Program (RETP) and Dual 
degree program. 

The Naval Reserve Officers Training Program gives young men and women the choice of 
attending college in an academic discipline of their choice while at the same time receiving 
military training that culminates at being commissioned as military officers in the Navy 
or Marine corps upon completion of the baccalaureate degree. 

The Army Reserve Officers Training Program enhances a student's education by provid- 
ing unique leadership and management training along with practical experience. It helps 
a student develop many of the qualities basic to success in the Army, or in a civilian career. 
ROTC gives students a valuable opportunity to build for the future by enabling them to 
earn a college degree and an officer's commission at the same time. 

Core Curriculum 

All students enrolled for the first time in the fall of 1998 must complete the core curricu- 
lum, which consists of six areas and includes sixty five semester hours of course work. 
Students enrolled prior to the fall of 1998 and who have not completed the quarter hour 
core curriculum must complete the new core curriculum. Quarter hour courses completed 
will be converted to semester hours and the total hours in the old core curriculum will be 
subtracted from sixty. Students will then complete that number of hours in the new core 
curriculum. 

Numbers in parentheses following course description indicate, in subsequent order, the 
number of hours of lecture each week, the number of laboratory hours each week and the 
semester hour credit the course carries. 

Students seeking degrees with any major through the College of Sciences and Technology 
are required to complete the University's "Core Curriculum". 

Students then select and complete the requirements for a specific major curriculum de- 
scribed in the appropriate sections of this catalog. 



123 



THE DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL 
SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

MISSION 

The two-fold mission of the Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics is: 

• To graduate students prepared to perform at high levels of excellence and produc- 
tivity in their chosen fields of endeavors in a changing technological society and 
the global community. 

• To provide academic course offerings that include teaching and research op- 
portunities that prepare students for careers or graduate studies in medical, 
marine science, environmental science, biological, chemistry, physical science and 
mathematical fields. 

The mission is realized through its goals: 

• To offer foundation courses in biology, chemistry, marine science, environmental 
science, physical science and mathematics that enhance a liberal arts education 
and serve as a basis for advanced studies. 

• To develop courses which develop competencies in critical thinking, oral and 
written communication, creative thinking, and problem solving. 

• To offer a variety of courses which prepare and enhance the professional growth 
of traditional and nontraditional students. 

• To offer scholarly and research activities which enhance the continued educa- 
tional and professional growth of faculty members. 

• To develop structured web-based courses. 

The philosophy and purposes of the Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
are, in general, consistent with the overall philosophy of the university. Specifically, the 
Department accepts the responsibility of preparing students for job opportunities in the 
professional arena: 

• To gain basic preparation, knowledge and skills necessary to the satisfaction of 
their general needs of home and society. 

• To acquire specialized training in one of the natural sciences or mathematics, to 
develop individual talents and intellectual curiosity that is essential to further 
study and progress. 

• To develop an understanding of mental, emotional, and physical health, and to 
practice habits that are conducive to sound personal and community health. 

The Department of Natural Sciences offers a graduate degree in Marine Sciences; un- 
dergraduate degrees in Biology, Chemistry, Marine Science, Environmental Science and 
Mathematics; and minors in Biology, Chemistry, Marine Science, and Mathematics. 



124 



Biology 

The Program in Biology within the Department of Natural Science and Mathematics of- 
fers curricula leading towards B.S. degrees in Biology or Secondary Education in Biology. 
Additional courses are offered for students with a general interest in the life sciences, but 
these courses are not counted toward the above-mentioned degree programs. 

The options within the program emphasize distinct training to pursue careers in research, 
education, biomedicine, biotechnology, or unique paths selected by the students in con- 
sultation with their faculty advisors. Related Programs in Environmental Science and 
Marine Science are coordinated with the Program in Biology, primarily concerning joint 
enrollment in the Principles of Biology I & II classes. Specific upper level courses from the 
Marine Science and Environmental Science Programs may be counted toward the degrees 
in Biology. Students will need to discuss specific options with their advisors. 

Students will have the option to specialize in areas ranging from molecular mechanisms 
to ecological analysis. A broad range of course materials emphasizing critical thinking will 
be cultivated by involvement in investigative techniques ranging from laboratory experi- 
ments to individual research projects. Students will be encouraged to think beyond the 
classroom and participate in activities on and off campus. 

A departmental Exit Exam is required of all students applying for graduation with a de- 
gree from the program. The Exit Exam will be a summary test of the biology core course 
material specific to the program of study, and it will be administered within a senior level 
course specific to the program of study. The Exit Exam will be graded on a pass-fail basis, 
and a passing grade is required for graduation. Biology majors will take the Exit Exam 
while enrolled in Biology 4930. Biology Education majors will take the Exit Exam while 
enrolled in Biology 4901. 

All students must pass both parts of the Regents' Test and must earn a minimum grade of 
"C" in all courses specified as major/minor requirements. 

Programs of Study 

Bachelor of Science in Biology 

The Bachelor of Science in Biology can be earned by the completion of different courses, 
all centered on common core courses. The university Core Curriculum is followed by the 
core courses in biology, and includes required courses in chemistry, mathematics, and 
physics. 

Electives within the department allow for training to focus on specific career objectives. 
Electives will be selected following consultation with the faculty advisor. For example, 
the health-science or biomedical option can be used as the foundation for careers as a 
medical doctor, dentist, veterinarian, or many other related professions. 

Majors are reminded to be aware of the non-degree courses offered by the department 
(see below). These courses will not earn credit toward the degrees within the program. A 
grade of 'C or better is required in all courses required for the degree. 

University Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E and additional requirements) 

{Area D includes natural science electives, and biology majors will enroll in 

Principles of Chemistry I & II, Chem. 1211, 1211L, 1212, 1212L) 65 hours 



125 



AreaF of Core Curriculum 18 hours 

Principles of Biology I, Biol. 1107 3 hours 

Principles of Biology I Lab, Biol. 1107L 1 hour 

Principles of Biology II, Biol. 1108 3 hours 

Principles of Biology II Lab, Biol. 1108L 1 hour 

Calculus, Math 2101 (or approved math course) 4 hours 

Additional math/science computer or approved electives 6 hours 

within University Core Curriculum, specific to the major course of study 18 hours 

Major in Biology 60 hours 

Molecular and Cellular Biology, with lab, Biol. 2201, 2201L 4 hours 

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, with lab, Biol. 2401, 2401L 4 hours 

Botany, with lab, Biol. 3101, 3101L 4 hours 

Genetics, with lab, Biol. 3301, 3301L 4 hours 

Microbiology, with lab, Biol. 3321, 3321L 4 hours 

Physiology, with lab, Biol. 3801, 3801L 4 hours 

Introductory Physics I, Phys 1111K 4 hours 

Introductory Physics II, Phys 1112K 4 hours 

Organic Chemistry I, with lab, Chem. 2501, 2501L 4 hours 

Organic Chemistry II, with lab, Chem. 2511, 2511L 4 hours 

Senior Seminar, Biol. 4901 1 hour 

Research or Internship, Biol. 4920 2 hours 

Senior Synthesis (includes Exit Exam), Biol. 4930 2 hours 

Electives 15 hours 

Suggested Biology Elective Options (at least 15 credit hours of courses will be selected 
from options in consultation with advisor): 

Premedical-Health Science - Vertebrate Anatomy w/lab (Biol. 3511, 351 1L required), 
Developmental Biology wllab (Biol. 4611, 461 1L required), and seven hours from: Physi- 
ological Chemistry (Biol. 4651, 4651L), Biochemistry (Chem. 4101, 4101L), Neuroscience 
(Biol. 4601, 4601L), Endocrinology (Biol. 4631, 4631L), Immunology (Biol. 4681, 4681L), 
or Parasitology (Biol. 4641, 4641L) 

Biotechnology Track - Biotechnology - an Overview (Biol. 4301, 4301L), Genetic En- 
gineering Technology I (4411, 4411L), Gen. Eng. Tech. II (4412), Biochemistry (Chem. 
4101, 4101L), or other relevant courses approved by the advisor 



Bachelor of Science in Biology with 
Certification in Secondary Education 

The Program in Biology works in conjunction with the College of Education at Armstrong 
Atlantic State University to provide a coordinated program in teacher education. The stu- 
dent will complete courses for the university core curriculum, the biology core curriculum, 
and will take additional courses through the College of Education that can be used to ap- 
ply for certification as a licensed secondary school teacher. 

Additional requirements for teacher certification include completion of standardized tests 
(Praxis I & II), CPR training, and student teaching under the supervision of licensed 
teachers. Students are strongly encouraged to work closely with their advisors for this 
degree option. A grade of 'C or better is required in Area F and all major courses. 



126 



University Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E and additional requirements) 

{Area D includes natural science electives, and biology education majors will enroll in 
Principles of Chemistry I & II, Chem. 1211, 1211L, 1212, 1212L} 47 hours 

Area F (within Core Curriculum, specific to the major course of study) ... 18 hours 

Principles of Biology I, Biol. 1107 3 hours 

Principles of Biology I Lab, Biol. 1107L 1 hour 

Principles of Biology II, Biol. 1108 3 hours 

Principles of Biology II Lab, Biol. 1108L 1 hour 

Calculus, Math. 2101 (or approved math course) 4 hours 

Vertebrate Anatomy, Biol. 3511 3 hours 

Additional math/science/computer approved electives 3 hours 

Major Requirements in Biology 45 hours 

Molecular and Cellular Biology, with lab, Biol. 2201, 220 1L 4 hours 

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, with lab, Biol. 2401, 240 1L 4 hours 

Botany, with lab, Biol. 3101, 3101L 4 hours 

Genetics, with lab, Biol. 3301, 3301L 4 hours 

Microbiology, with lab, Biol. 3321, 3321L 4 hours 

Invertebrate Zoology, with lab, MSCI 3401, 3401L 4 hours 

Physiology, with lab, Biol. 3801, 3801L 4 hours 

Introductory Physics I, Phys 1111K 4 hours 

Introductory Physics II, Phys 1112K 4 hours 

Organic Chemistry I, with lab, Chem. 2501, 2501L 4 hours 

Organic Chemistry II, with lab, Chem. 2511, 2511L 4 hours 

Senior Seminar, Biol. 4901 1 hour 

Major Requirements in Education* 15 hours 

Adolescent Growth & Development, MGSE 2150 3 hours 

Educ. Stud. W/ Disabilities in Gen. Ed. Classes, EEXE 5100U 3 hours 

Secondary Curriculum & Methods, MGSE 3050 3 hours 

Secondary Curriculum & Methods: Science, MGSE 4472 3 hours 

Classroom Management: 7-12, MGSE 4090 3 hours 

Student Teaching* 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching: 7-12 9 hours 

*These courses will be completed through AASU (Armstrong Atlantic State University) 
Non-Degree Options 

Certain courses are only offered for students who do not intend to earn the degree in 
biology or biology education. These courses are intended to provide electives for majors in 
other departments, or as preliminary courses for students planning to move on to other 
programs. 

General Biology, Biol. 1103 3 hours (can be used for area D) 

General Biology Lab, Biol. 1103L 1 hour (can be used for area D) 

Human Biology, Biol. 1104 3 hours (can be used for area D) , 

Human Biology Lab, Biol. 1104L 1 hour (can be used for area D) 

Human Anatomy and Physiology I, Biol. 2515K 4 hours 

Human Anatomy and Physiology II, Biol. 2516K....4 hours 

[2515K & 2516K meet requirements for many health-related career programs (e.g. 

nursing, physical therapy - check with the program of interest)] 



127 



Chemistry 

The Chemistry programs are designed to provide strong and innovative instruction in the 
theory and practice of the chemical sciences. Our graduates are expected to be proficient 
in the methods of scientific inquiry. The programs are designed to accommodate a range 
of career goals such as research scientists in varied research laboratories and industrial 
settings, associated professions such as the health sciences and public policy. 

The Program in Chemistry offers courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science with 
majors in Chemistry, Chemistry with Pre-Professional Option and Chemistry with Teach- 
ers Certificate Option. Minor concentrations is offered in Chemistry 

The Bachelor of Science in Chemistry degree program is designed to give a strong founda- 
tion in physical, inorganic, organic and analytical chemistry and the program provides 
flexibility to satisfy a range of career goals. The Chemistry with Pre-Professional Option 
enables majors to meet the admission requirements for medical, dental, pharmacy, veteri- 
nary and graduate schools. The Teacher Certificate Option is available to students who 
are interested in teaching. 

The Program in Chemistry requires majors to earn a minimum grade of "C" in each of 
the courses required for the degree. A pass in the exit examination is a requirement for 
graduation. The exit examination is a test in all the major areas of chemistry: analytical, 
biochemistry, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. 

Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E and additional requirements) 47 hours 

Area F 18 hours 

MATH 2101 Calculus 1 4 hours 

MATH 2111 Calculus II 4 hours 

CHEM 1211, 1211L Principles of Chemistry 1 4 hours 

CHEM 1212, 1212L Principles of Chemistry II 4 hours 

CHEM 2101 Laboratory Synthesis 2 hours 

OR 

CHEM 1211HK Honors Principles of Chemistry 1 4 hours 

CHEM 1212HK Honors Principles of Chemistry II 4 hours 

CHEM 2101 Quantitative Analysis 2 hours 

Major requirements 60 hours 

Chemistry Foundation Requirements 35 hours 

CHEM 2501, 2501L Organic Chemistry I and Lab 1 4 hours 

CHEM 2511, 2511L Organic Chemistry II and Lab II 4 hours 

CHEM 3101, 3101L Analytical Chemistry and Lab 4 hours 

CHEM 3201, 3201L Instrumental Analysis and Lab : 4 hours 

CHEM 3302, Research or Internship 2 hours 

CHEM 3401, 3401L Physical Chemistry I and Lab I 4 hours 

CHEM 3411, 3411L Physical Chemistry II and Lab II 4 hours 

CHEM 3522 Advanced Laboratory Synthesis 2 hours 

CHEM 4101 Biochemistry 3 hours 

CHEM 4121 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 hours 

CHEM 4901 Chemical Seminar 1 hour 



128 



Chemistry electives 8 hours 

(These courses are to be selected by the student in consultation with his/her advisor, and 
approved by the coordinator of the Chemistry Program.) 

Additional Requirements 11 hours 

PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics 1 4 hours 

PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics II 4 hours 

OR 

PHYS 2211 Principles of Physics 1 4 hours 

PHYS 2212 Principles of Physics II 4 hours 

CSCI 1301 Computer Science 1 3 hours 

Foreign Language Sequence 6 hours 

Choose one sequence from the following: 

FREN 1001 Elementary French 1 3 hours 

FREN 1002 Elementary French II 3 hours 

GRMN 1001 Elementary German 1 3 hours 

GRMN 1002 Elementary German II 3 hours 

SPAN 1001 Elementary Spanish 1 3 hours 

SPAN 1002 Elementary Spanish II 3 hours 

Total Hours Required for the Major in Chemistry 125 hours 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY - 
PRE-PROFESSIONAL OPTION 

Students who are interested in careers in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, phar- 
macy, and biomedical research may choose this option. 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E and additional requirements) 47 hours 

Area F 18 hours 

MATH 2101 Calculus 1 4 hours 

MATH 2111 Calculus II 4 hours 

CHEM 1211, 1211L Principles of Chemistry 1 4 hours 

CHEM 1212, 1212L Principles of Chemistry II 4 hours 

CHEM 2101 Quantitative Analysis 2 hours 

Major Requirements 60 hours 

Chemistry Foundation Requirements 33 hours 

CHEM 2501, 2501L Organic Chemistry 1 4 hours 

CHEM 2511, 2511L Organic Chemistry II 4 hours 

CHEM 3101, 3101L Analytical Chemistry 4 hours 

CHEM 3201, 3201L Instrumental and Data Analysis 4 hours 

CHEM 3401, 3401L Physical Chemistry I 4 hours 

CHEM 3411, 3411L Physical Chemistry II 4 hours 

CHEM 3522 Advanced Laboratory Synthesis 2 hours 

CHEM 4101 3 hours 

CHEM 4111 Advanced Biochemistry 3 hours 

Major Requirements in Education* 26 hours 

MGSE 2150 Adolescent Growth & Development .....3 hours 

EEXE 5100U Educ. Stud. W/ Disabilities in Gen. Ed. Classes 3 hours 

MGSE 3050 Secondary Curriculum & Methods 3 hours 



* 



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MGSE 4472 Secondary Curriculum & Methods: Science 3 hours 

MGSE 4090 Classroom Management: 7-12 3 hours 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching: 7-12 9 hours 

These courses will be completed through AASU (Armstrong Atlantic State University) 



Additional Related Courses 27 hours 

BIOL 1107K Principles of Biology 1 4 hours 

BIOL 1108K Principles of Biology II 4 hours 

*Biology Electives: At least one course must be taken from each of the following 
groups: 

Group A: BIOL 2515K, 2516K (Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II); BIOL 
3801/3801L (Physiology), BIOL 3511/3511L (Vertebrate Anatomy). 

Group B: BIOL 3321/3321L (Microbiology), BIOL 3201/3201L (Cellular and Molecu- 
lar Biology), BIOL 3301/3301L (Genetics), BIOL 4221/4221L (Microbial Physiology) 
BIOL 421 1/42 11L (Reproductive Biology). 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY - 
TEACHER CERTIFICATE OPTION 

This program option is designed to provide students with the appropriate combination of 
chemistry and education courses so that they will be prepared to teach chemistry at the 
high school level. 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E and additional requirements) 47 hours 

Area F 18 hours 

MATH 2101 Calculus 1 4 hours 

MATH 2111 Calculus II 4 hours 

CHEM 1211, 1211L Principles of Chemistry 1 4 hours 

CHEM 1212, 1212L Principles of Chemistry II 4 hours 

CHEM 2101 Quantitative Analysis 2 hours 

Major Requirements 60 hours 

Chemistry Foundation Requirements 26 hours 

CHEM 2501, 2501L Organic Chemistry 1 4 hours 

CHEM 2511, 2511L Organic Chemistry II 4 hours 

CHEM 3101, 3101L Analytical Chemistry 4 hours 

CHEM 3401, 3401L Physical Chemistry I 4 hours 

CHEM 3411, 3411L Physical Chemistry II 4 hours 

CHEM 3522 Techniques of Organic Chemistry 2 hours 

CHEM 4101 3 hours 

Major Requirements in Education* 26 hours 

MGSE 2150 Adolescent Growth & Development 3 hours 

EEXE 5100U Educ. Stud. W/ Disabilities in Gen. Ed. Classes 3 hours 

MGSE 3050 Secondary Curriculum & Methods 3 hours 

MGSE 4472 Secondary Curriculum & Methods: Science 3 hours 

MGSE 4090 Classroom Management: 7-12 3 hours 

MGSE 4750 - Student Teaching: 7-12 9 hours 



* 



These courses will be completed through AASU (Armstrong Atlantic State University) 



130 



Additional Related Course 34 hours 

BIOL 1107K Principles of Biology 1 4 hours 

BIOL 1108K Principles of Biology II 4 hours 

m . CHEMISTRY PROGRAM MINORS 
i 

Chemistry Minor 16-18 hours 

CHEM 3101, 310L Analytical Chemistry 4 hours 

CHEM 3201, 3201L Instrumental & Data Analysis 4 hours 

CHEM 3401, 3401L Physical Chemistry 4 hours 

CHEM 3421, 3421L Biophysical Chemistry 4 hours 

CHEM 4101 Biochemistry 4 hours 

CHEM 4121 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 hours 

CHEM 4531 Advanced Organic University 3 hours 

Forensic Science Minor 15 hours 

FSCI 3201 Forensic Evidence in Law Enforcement 3 hours 

FSCI 3301, 3301L Principles of Forensic Science 4 hours 

FSCI 4101, 410 1L Personal Identification and DNA Finger Print Analysis 4 hours 

FSCI 4201, 4201L Drug Abuse & Drug Analysis 4 hours 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

The Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics offers courses leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science with a major in Environmental Science. In addition, the program 
also offers courses leading to a minor option in environmental science for science and non- 
science majors. The objectives of the program are as follows: 

1. To provide a broad-based curriculum and specialization involving integration of 
information from different disciplines such as 

natural and social science and leading to a degree in environmental science. 

2. To offer courses that satisfy the environmental science curriculum requirements 
for persons planning to pursue careers in the 

environmental sciences and related disciplines as well as preparation for ad- 
vanced study in environmental related disciplines. 

3. To offer core courses in environmental science for science and non-science majors 
for completion of a minor option. 

// 

4. To participate in community outreach activities as professional scientists, educa- 
tors and representatives of the University. 

5. To encourage student and faculty from all disciplines to participate in environ- 
mental research and to be active in pursuit of the knowledge of sustainable devel- 
opment. Critical thinking, data analysis and interpretation; computer application 
and instrumentation usage skills are to be developed. 

* 

The Environmental Science Program requires majors to earn a minimum grade of "C" in 
each course required for the degree as well as for the minor option. 



131 



Program of Study 

The Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science can be earned by the completion of 
different courses, all centered on common core courses. The university Core Curriculum 
is followed by the core courses in environmental science, and includes required courses in 
biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Electives or course options will be selected 
following consultation with the faculty advisor. 

Comprehensive Examination 

A departmental Exit Exam is required of all students applying for graduation with a de- 
gree from the program. The Exit Exam will be a summary test of core course material 
specific to the program of study, and will be administered within a senior level course 
specific to the program of study. The Exit Exam will be graded on a pass-fail basis; a pass 
is required for graduation. 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E and additional requirements) 47 hours 

AreaF 18 hours 

Approved Science/Mathematics course(s) 3 hours 

BIOL 1107 -Principles of Biology 1 3 hours 

BIOL 1107L - Principles of Biology 1 1 hour 

BIOL 1108 - Principles of Biology II 3 hours 

BIOL 1108L - Principles of Biology II Lab 1 hour 

Calculus, Math 2101 (or approved math course) 4 hours 

Computer/Foreign Language course $ hours 

CORE COURSES 65 Hours 

MAJOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 60 hours 

PHYS 1111K Introductory Physics I 4 hours 

PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics II 4 hours 

GEOL 1121 Physical Geology 4 hours 

CHEM 2501, 2501L Organic Chemistry I 4 hours 

ENSC 2401, 240 1L Introduction to Environmental Science 4 hours 

ENSC 3121 Environmental Ethics 3 hours 

ENSC 3201, 3201L Limnology 4 hours 

ENSC 3203, 3203L Environmental Chemistry 4 hours 

ENSC 3205, 3205L Environmental Microbiology 4 hours 

ENSC 3301 Environmental Radiation 3 hours 

ENSC 3621 Environmental Health and Hygiene 3 hours 

ENSC 4101, 4101L Hydrology 4 hours 

ENSC 4121 Environmental Law 3 hours 

ENSC 4202 Principles of Ecotoxicology 3 hours 

ENSC 4301 Hazardous Waste Management 3 hours 

ENSC 4401 Environmental Impact Assessment 3 hours 

ENSC 4801 Internship 2 hours 

ENSC 4901 Environmental Synthesis Seminar 1 hour 

ENSC 4910 Special Topics 2 hours 

Total Hours Required for the Major in Environmental Science 125 hours 



132 



MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

ENSC 2401 ENSC 240 1L Introduction to Environmental Science 4 hours 

ENSC 4121 Environmental Law 3 hours 

ENSC 4401 Environmental Impact Assessment 3 hours 

Choose 5 or more hours from the following: 

ENSC 3121 Environmental Ethics 3 hours 

ENSC 3201 3201L Limnology 4 hours 

ENSC 4101 ENSC 4101L Hydrology 4 hours 

ENSC 4301 Hazardous Waste Management 3 hours 

ENSC 4801 Internship 2 hours 

Total Hours required for the Minor in Environmental Science 15 hours 



MARINE SCIENCE 
Bachelor of Science in Marine Science 

The Bachelor of Science in Marine Science degree program provides coursework and a 
curriculum designed to meet the needs of individuals who desire an undergraduate degree 
in order to address marine resource and coastal environmental issues through research, 
education, and outreach. The program takes advantage of its campus location - the only 
instructional unit in the University System of Georgia with direct ocean access and ma- 
rine science facilities. 

Program of Study 

The following courses will satisfy the University Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E 
and F) requirements, and the major course requirements for the degree. 

AFRS 1501 African American History 2 hours 

See Options BIOL 1107 Principles of Biology I 6 hours 

BIOL 1107L Principles of Biology I Lab 1 hour 

BIOL 1108 Principles of Biology II 3 hours 

BIOL 1108L Principles of Biology II Lab 1 hour 

CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry 1 3 hours 

CHEM 1211L Principles of Chemistry I Lab 1 hour 

CHEM 1212 Principles of Chemistry II 3 hours 

CHEM 1212L Principle of Chemistry Lab II 1 hour 

CHEM 2501 Organic Chemistry 1 3 hours 

CHEM 2501L Organic Chemistry I Lab 1 hour 

CSCI 1130 -Computer and its Applications 3 hours 

CSCI/FREN1001/GRMN1001/ SPAN1001/MATH 2111 3 hours 

ENGL 1101 English Composition I 3 hours 

ENGL 1102 English Composition II 3 hours 

FRES 1101 Freshman Year Experience 1 1 hour 

FRES 1102 Freshman Year Experience II 1 hour 

HEDU Health Education 1 hour 

HEDU Health Education 2 hours 

HIST 1111/1112/PSYC 1101/GEOG 1101/ANTH 1102/SOCI 1101/Econ 2105 3 hours 

HIST 2111 or HIST 2112 - U.S. History 3 hours 

HUMN 1102 Critical Thinking 1 hour) 

MATH 1113 Pre-Calculus ....3 hours 

MATH 2101 Calculus 1 4 hours 

MATH 2201 Intro. To Probability and Statistics 3 hours 



133 



MSCI 3101 Marine Science 1 4 hours 

MSCI 3102K Marine Science II 4 hours 

MSCI 330 IK Marine Envir. Chem. & Analysis 4 hours 

MSCI 340 IK Invertebrate Zoology 4 hours 

MSCI 3501K Ichthyology 4 hours 

MSCI 3901 Tech Writing & Seminar 3 hours 

MSCI 4101 Research 1 hour 

MSCI 4101L Research Internship 2 hours 

MSCI 4201K Marine Ecology 4 hours 

MSCI 4301K Biological Oceanography 4 hours 

PHYS 1111K Physics I 4 hours 

PHYS 1112K Physics II 4 hours 

POLS 1101 American Government 3 hours 

POLS 2401 Global Issues 3 hours 

MSCI 3401L Invertebrate Zoology Lab 1 hour 

ELECTIVES (Sciences, Mathematics, and Technology) 15 hours 

Total 125 hours 

Minor in Marine Science 15 hours 

Required 8 hours 

Marine Science I MSCI 3101 4 hours 

Marine Science II MSCI 3102 4 hours 

Additional Marine Science (MSCI) courses (3000 and/or 4000 level): .... 7 hours 

MATHEMATICS 

The Program in Mathematics and Physical Sciences within the Department of Natural 
Science and Mathematics offers courses leading towards a degree in mathematics and a 
double major in mathematics and any area of technical sciences. Minor programs in math- 
ematics, physics, and computer science are available. The program promotes an extensive 
interdisciplinary approach to provide students a sound educational background, one that 
will make the students quite remarkable and thus prepared for gainful employment, or 
prepared to pursue graduate study. Course offerings include pure mathematics, applied 
mathematics, and statistics. 

The main objectives of the Program of Mathematics and Physical Sciences are (1) to pro- 
vide a program of study in mathematics, physical sciences, and environmental science 
which will enable students to achieve computational and problem-solving skills, an under- 
standing of basic physical principles, and will enable them to apply these skills to their 
respective areas of study; and (2) to provide students in mathematics with the theory and 
applications necessary for use in post-baccalaureate study and/or in their work force, 
insight into physical and natural laws, and the analytical and logical thinking necessary 
for the application of these tools in the various fields as measured by the program and 
standard national level examinations 



FRESHMAN MATHEMATICS 

Entering freshmen whose scores on the combined verbal and mathematics sections of the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test ( SAT) meet the requirements for regular admission are placed 
in college algebra, precalculus, or calculus courses. 



134 



Applicants for admission whose SAT score do not meet the requirements for the regular 
admission must take the collegiate Placement Examination( CPE) or COMPASS. Place- 
ment test in English, reading and mathematics. On the basis of their achievement on 
the Mathematics test, these students are assigned to college algebra or to a mathematics 
course in the Division of Learning Support. 

REQUIRED EXAMINATIONS 

Candidates for the baccalaureate degree in the program of Mathematics and Physical Sci- 
ences are required to pass the reading and essay writing components of the Regents' Test 
Program (RTP). 

Seniors Mathematics majors are required to take the departmental assessment examina- 
tion and the Graduate Record Examination (Aptitude Tests) to graduate from the pro- 
gram. 

EXEMPTION EXAMINATIONS 

Students may be exempted with credit hours from college algebra, precalculus, or calculus 
courses by passing the requisite examinations. Examinations should be taken before the 
end of the first semester of enrollment at Savannah State University and must be taken in 
sequential order. The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests are administered 
by the University's Director of Testing. 

Examinations Required for Exemption with Credit 

Course Test Minimum Passing score 

College Algebra CLEP- College Algebra 70% 

Precalculus CLEP- Trigonometry 70% 

Calculus I Advanced Placement (AP) - Calculus AB 3% 

Calculus II Advanced Placement (AP) - Calculus BC 3% 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION 

Students who have passed either Calculus I, Calculus II, or Calculus III with a minimum 
grade of "C" will not receive credit hours for the precalculus course taken subsequently. 

All students must pass both parts of the Regents' Test and must earn a minimum grade of 
"C" in all courses specified as major/or minor requirements. 

Students enrolled in the Program of Mathematics and Physical Sciences who earned less 
than the grade "C" in any English, mathematics, science, engineering, or major or minor 
course required in their curriculum must repeat the course during the next semester that 
the course is offered. 

Students whose score on mathematics section of the SAT is less than 475 must take col- 
lege algebra, the prerequisite course for precalculus. 

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics 

The curriculum in mathematics is designed for those students who are interested in ca- 
reers in mathematics or related fields (after graduation) in industry/government or pursu- 
ing an advanced degree in mathematics, pure or applied. 



135 



Dual Degree Program 

In cooperation with the Georgia Institute, a dual degree program is offered, whereby un- 
dergraduate students can attend Savannah State for approximately three years and then 
attend the Georgia Institute of Technology for approximately two years. Upon completion 
of the program, students will receive baccalaureate degrees from both institutions. More 
details on this program are listed in the engineering technology section of this catalog. 

Programs of Study 

MAJOR IN MATHEMATICS 

University Core Curriculum 

(Areas A, B, C, D, E and Additional requirements) 47 hours 

Area F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 18 hours 

MATH 2101 Calculus 1 4 hours 

MATH21111 Calculus II 4 hours 

MATH 2121 Calculus III 4 hours 

Choose one of the following: 

CSCI 1301 Computer Science 1 3 hours 

CSCI 1601 Programming in Java 4 hours 

Choose one of the following: 

MATH 2201 Elementary Statistics 3 hours 

MATH 2301 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics 3 hours 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS 

(Required courses and specified elective courses) 30 hours 

Required Courses 15 hours 

MATH 3101 Linear Algebra 3 hours 

MATH 3201 Probability and Statistics 1 3 hours 

MATH 3211 Foundation of Higher Math 3 hours 

MATH 4101 Abstract Algebra 1 3 hours 

MATH 4201 Analysis I 3 hours 

Specified Elective Choices 15 hours 

Choose one of the following: 

MATH 4111 Abstract Algebra II 3 hours 

MATH 4211 Analysis II 3 hours 

MATH 4311 Probability and Statistics II 3 hours 

Choose four of the following: 

MATH 3301 Differential Equations 4 hours 

MATH 3401 Modern Geometry 3 hours 

MATH 3501 Numerical Analysis 3 hours 

MATH 4111 Abstract II 3 hours 

MATH 4211 Analysis II 3 hours 

MATH 4221 Complex Analysis 3 hours 

MATH 4311 Probability and Statistics II 3 hours 



136 



MATH 4401 Number Theory 3 hours 

MATH 4411 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

MATH 4421 Regression Analysis 3 hours 

MATH 4501 Introduction to Topology 3 hours 

MATH 4701 History of Math 3 hours 

MATH 4901 Senior Seminar 3 hours 

Note: Students who plan to attend graduate school should take Math 4111, 4211, 4221, 
and 4501. 

Elective 12-15 hours 

(3000 and 4000 level courses excluding foreign language course) 

All majors are encouraged to take mathematics electives to fulfill their remaining 12-15 
hours of course of work. To this effect, the program has devised three cognate areas, and 
students are advised to choose one. 

Analysis Cognate: 

MATH 3301 Differential Equations 4 hours 

MATH 4211 Analysis II 3 hours 

MATH 4221 Complex Analysis 3 hours 

Statistics Cognate: 

MATH 4211 Analysis II 3 hours 

MATH 4311 Probability and Statistics II 3 hours 

MATH 4411 Statistical Methods 3 hours 

MATH 4421 Regression Analysis 3 hours 

Pure Mathematics and Secondary Education: 

MATH 3401 Modern Geometry 3 hours 

MATH 4111 Abstract Algebra II 3 hours 

MATH 4401 Number Theory 3 hours 

MATH 4501 Introduction to Topology 3 hours 

Note: Students who plan to attend graduate school should take 6 hrs of foreign lan- 
guages (French or German) as part of their electives. 

Note: Students opting for the analysis cognate should take 8 hours of physics (calculus 
based) in the area B of the core curriculum. 

Minor field 15-18 hours 

Total Hours Required for Major in Mathematics 125 hours 

PROGRAM OF MATHEMATICS AND 
PHYSICAL SCIENCES MINORS 

MINOR IN MATHEMATICS 15-18 hours 

MATH 2101 Calculus 1 4 hours 

MATH 2111 Calculus II 4 hours 

MATH 3101 Linear Algebra 3 hours 

MATH 3201 Probability and Statistics 1 3 hours 

Mathematics Electives - Upper Division course 3 hours 

(Students who will take MATH 2101 and/or 2111 in major program 
will take MATH 2111 and/or 2121 and nine to twelve hours of upper 
division courses to have a minimum of sixteen semester hours) 



137 



MINOR IN PHYSICS 17 hours 

PHYS 3111 Heat and Thermodynamic 3 hours 

PHYS 3121 Optics 3 hours 

PHYS 3131 Magnetism and Electricity 3 hours 

PHYS 3211 Mathematical Physics 3 hours 

PHYS 4111 Modern physics 3 hours 

PHYS 4951 Introduction to Research in Physics 2 hours 

Master of Science in Marine Sciences 

The Master of Science in Marine Sciences degree program provides a curriculum designed 
to meet the needs of individuals who desire a graduate degree to prepare them for a career 
to address marine resource and coastal environmental issues through research, educa- 
tion, and outreach. The program takes advantage of its campus location adjacent to a salt 
marsh and is the only instructional unit in the University System of Georgia with direct 
ocean access and on-campus marine laboratory facilities. A collaborative agreement with 
the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA) and on-going collaborative programs and contracts with univer- 
sities, state agencies and federal agencies also contribute to a framework of quality and 
excellence. (See Graduate Programs for Details). 



SSU/NIH MARC Honor's Undergraduate Research Training Program 

The MARC (Minority Access to Research Careers) Honor's Undergraduate Research 
Training Program prepares high caliber students to enter and successfully complete 
graduate studies culminating in a research doctorate at a major research institution. The 
program provides a substantial scholarship amount and covers most of the tuition. Funds 
for attending professional meetings are also available. One of the major objectives of the 
Program is to increase the number of underrepresented minority biomedical scientists at 
the national level. The Program is interdisciplinary and is open to undergraduate majors 
in Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, and Social Sciences. The MARC trainees are 
required to take the following specified courses during the pre-junior summer and certain 
other specified electives during the academic year. The MARC students are also expected to 
participate in intramural and extramural research. For further details, contact the MARC 
Program Director, Dr. H. Singh, Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. 

The following MARC core courses are required of MARC trainees during the 
Pre-Junior summer: 

NASM 3000 Research Methods (3-0-3) An introduction to theoretical and practical ex- 
perience in biomedical research techniques in molecular biology biotechnology, molecular 
toxicology, physiology and analytical chemistry. Research techniques will involve the use 
of HPLC, gamma and liquid counters, ultracentrifuge, spectrophotometers, gel electro- 
phoresis and other related biocore instruments. Trainees will also receive experience in 
scientific technical writing, manuscript and abstract preparation, statistical handling of 
data, as well as computer assisted graphic presentations using Power Point. Trainees will 
be required to conduct a small experiment and prepare a manuscript as well as make an 
oral presentation in the department (Prerequisite Junior standing). 

NASM 3100 Basic and Applied Statistics (3-0-3) This course deals with the ap- 
plication of statistics in biological, health and clinical sciences. The course will examine 
different statistical methods and the use of various software such as SPSS/SPS for data 
analysis. Trainees will learn and become familiar with available computer software pack- 
ages for statistical analysis and graphic presentation. (Prerequisite Junior standing). 



138 



NASM 3200 Research Rotation (0-3-1): MARC students to rotate during the sum- 
mer and academic year in any three of the following labs of their choice: Hemolytic 
Anemia, Biotechnology, Neurotoxicology, SKIO Marine Developmental Biology, Environ- 
mental Health, or Computer Biocomputation 
Prerequisite Junior standing 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

The Department of Engineering Technology offers courses leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science, with majors in Civil Engineering Technology, Computer Science Technol- 
ogy, Electronics Engineering Technology, and Electronics Engineering Technology (com- 
puter option). The civil and electronics engineering technology programs are accredited 
by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology. The Electronics Engineering Technology program is accredited by the 
National Association of Radio and Telecommunications Engineers, Inc, (NARTE) and the 
University is a certified NARTE Testing Center. 

Engineering technology embraces the physical sciences, mathematics, and the practices 
and materials of modern industry, which are utilized in the design, and construction of the 
machines, structures, highways, power sources, process systems, communication systems, 
and products needed to maintain a highly technological society. The activities of engineer- 
ing technology are concerned with translating the concepts and theories of professional 
engineers and scientists into actual devices and products by using tests to provide data 
for rational solutions and designs. These tests are followed by interpretations of data and 
preparation of appropriate plans for use by skilled craftsmen who produce the devices 
and/or products. 

The objectives of the engineering technology and computer science technology programs 
are to prepare their students for successful careers, and this process requires the depart- 
ment to provide opportunities for students to acquire the essential educational experi- 
ences for applying their knowledge and methods coupled with skills in support of techni- 
cal activities. 

REGISTRATION FOR PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER 

To protect public safety, each state establishes laws to license engineers involved in proj- 
ects affecting public health, safety and life. The registration process involves written ex- 
amination, professional work experience and professional recommendations. 

Although it is not the goal of Savannah State University to prepare an individual for 
professional engineering registration, it is possible for an engineering technology gradu- 
ate of Savannah State University to become registered in Georgia and some other states. 
Students considering registration as a professional engineer should contact the Depart- 
ment of Engineering Technology for further information. 

Engineering Technology graduates from TAC of ABET accredited programs are qualified 
for professional licensing by the National Institute for Certification in Engineering Tech- 
nologies (NICET). Students interested in this certification may contact the department 
chair for more information. 

TECHNICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Students are encouraged to join appropriate engineering societies to stimulate their inter- 
est in professional activities, to promote their pursuit for life-long learning, and to expose 



139 



them to professional conduct and ethics. The department has, at present, the following 
student organizations: 

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) 

American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers (AMSE) 

National Society of Black Engineers (NBSE) 

American Computing Machinery (ACM) 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Cooperative Education Program enables engineering technology students to gain 
work experience in industry as paid employees during their college tenure. The program 
is coordinated through the Office of Cooperative Education. The program is available to 
students who have acquired at least 30 semester hours, including at least five courses in 
the major; who are proficient in a computer language; who have a satisfactory academic 
record; and who meet the job specifications of the employer. 

Students work in industry and attend college during alternate semesters or as arranged. 
To remain in the program, they must maintain creditable records at both places. Stu- 
dents must register for the appropriate cooperative education course each semester they 
are employed and must observe all applicable regulations of the cooperating company. 

Students pursuing the coop program should expect their matriculation to extend beyond 
four years. The University does not guarantee the availability of coop stations, duties, 
or compensation. At the conclusion of the coop experience, students are not obligated to 
accept employment with the cooperating companies nor are the companies obligated to 
offer them employment. 

Students interested in this program should consult with their advisors. 

BACCALAUREATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 
SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 

Students enrolled in the Department of Engineering Technology who earn less than a 
"C" in any English, mathematics, sciences or major course required in their curriculum 
must repeat the course during the next semester that it is offered. Major courses are 
those courses offered by the Department of Engineering Technology. 

MAJOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

To satisfy the institutional requirements for a comprehensive examination, all students 
in engineering technology are required to take an exit examination administered by the 
department. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

Accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 

The curriculum in civil engineering technology is designed to provide ample instruction in 
those areas of knowledge required for successful performance in the following capacities 
as well as in other construction-related positions. 

Architectural and structural draftsman and designer - plans, designs, and super- 
vises construction of frame, steel, and concrete structures; makes architectural inspec- 
tions and appraisals for architects and builders. 



140 



Highway engineering technologist - collects and tests soil samples, concrete and oth- 
er materials to ascertain their physical characteristics for use in highway construction; 
establishes the location and measurements of points, elevations, lines, areas and contours 
of land needed for highway construction and prepares hard copy, draft or computer gener- 
ated drawings of land. 

Estimator - determines quantities and costs of materials and labor required to erect 
structures. 

Materials tester - determines mechanical properties of materials used in the erection of 
structures and highways. 

Surveyor - supervises, directs, and is responsible for the accuracy of the work of an en- 
gineering survey party engaged in determining the location and measurements of points, 
elevations, lines, areas, and contours on the earth's surface for purposes of securing data 
for building and highway construction, map-making, land valuation, mining, or other pur- 
poses. 

Environmental technologist - Plans, designs, and monitors water, wastewater, and 
other environmental pollution control systems. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

The curriculum in computer science technology is designed for those students who are 
interested in careers in computer science. This program is flexible so that students may 
orient the major emphasis toward software aspect of computer science or to be the hard- 
ware realm of computer science. This program promotes an extensive interdisciplinary 
approach to provide students a sound educational background, one that will make the stu- 
dents quite marketable and thus be prepared for gainful employment in following areas: 

Website developing and programming - information on web page design tips, Java 
scripting guide, shareware HTML editor, and web server software and setup 

Programming/Software development - consider how software can, will, and should 
be developed 

Install Software/End user support - computer applications in word processing, 
spreadsheet, database programs and printer operations 

Network setup and administration - Install, tests, maintain the networks using, ba- 
sic configuration, configuring the interface, using TCP/If? configuring routing, network 
security, involve in operations, policies, procedures, functions, principles and practices 
of network and telecommunications support services 

ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

Accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 

The electronics engineering technology curriculum provides instruction in the fundamen- 
tals of modern electronics theory, with emphasis on the application of theoretical prin- 
ciples to actual electronic devices, circuits, systems, design and fabrication. Graduates 
of the electronics engineering technology program are prepared to function effectively in 
several capabilities, including: 



141 



Research and development technologist - engages in the development, building and 
testing of new equipment in the areas of digital electronics, communication electronics 
and microelectronics. 

Process control technologist - supervises the operation of automatic control equip- 
ment for industrial processes. 

Field engineering specialist - installs, tests, and maintains equipment such as data 
processing machines and other electronic systems. 

High frequency technologist - maintains and/or operates radar, sonar, and other warn- 
ing detection and navigation devices. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

Note: All programs in Engineering Technology require 128 semester hours (and five ad- 
ditional hours). 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E, and additional hours) 47 hours 

Area F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 18 hours 

CHEM 1211 and 1211L 4 hours 

MATH 2101 Calculus 1 4 hours 

MATH 2111 Calculus II 4 hours 

ENGT 2101 Computer Graphics 3 hours 

ENGT 2111 CAD Applications 1 hour 

ENGT 2201 Technical Writing 2 hours 

MAJOR IN CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

ENGT 3101 Statics 3 hours 

ENGT 3501 Dynamics 2 hours 

ENGT 3601 Strength of Materials 3 hours 

ENGT 3701 Engineering Economy 3 hours 

ENGT 3201 Applied Mathematics for Engineering Technology 1 hour 

ELET 3701K Data Acquisition System 2 hours 

MECT 3 10 IK Engineering Materials 3 hours 

ELET 3101K Electrical Circuit I 3 hours 

CSCI 1301 Computer Science 1 3 hours 

CIVT 3101K Surveying 5 hours 

CIVT 3201K Civil Engineering Materials 2 hours 

CIVT 3211 Construction Estimating and Management 3 hours 

CIVT 3301K Hydraulics and Engineering Hydrology 4 hours 

CIVT 3401K Highway and Transportation Engineering 4 hours 

CIVT 3701 Structural Analysis 4 hours 

CIVT 3601K Soil Mechanics and Foundation Design 5 hours 

CIVT 4101K Structural Design 1 3 hours 

CIVT 4111K Structural Design II 3 hours 

CIVT 4201K Environmental Engineering 4 hours 

CIVT 4211 Environmental Pollution Control 3 hours 

CIVT 4301 Urban Planning 2 hours 

Technical Elective 3 hours 

Total hours for Civil Engineering Technology 133 hours 



142 

MAJOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

Core Curriculum (Areas A, B, C, D, E, and additional requirements) .... 47 hours 

Area F Courses Appropriate to the Program of Study 18 hours 

CSCI 1301 Computer Science 1 3 hours 

CSCI 1302 Computer Science II 4 hours 

MATH 2101 Calculus 1 4 hours 

MATH 2301 Discrete Mathematics 3 hours 

Choose one of the followings: 

CSCI 1610 Programming in Java 4 hours 

CSCI 2215 Perl Scripting 4 hours 

Major Courses 60 hours 

Computer Science Technology 

CSCI 3000 Data Structure ,....3 hours 

CSCI 3385 Computer Network & Design 3 hours 

CSCI 2231 Introduction to UNIX 3 hours 

CSCI 2235 Comparative Programming language 3 hours 

CSCI 4210 Database and File Processing 3 hours 

CSCI 3201/CSCI 4410 Advance Java/Web Based Programming 3 hours 

CSCI 4801 Project Design 1 hour 

Choose two of the following: 

CSCI 4310 Compiler 3 hours 

CSCI 3414 Software Engineering 3 hours 

CSCI 4110 Operating Systems 3 hours 

CSCI 3102 Visual Basic 3 hours 

CSCI 3800 Computer Architecture 3 hours 

Mathematics 

MATH 2112 Calculus II 4 hours 

MATH 2121 Calculus III 4 hours 

Mathematics Elective 3 hours 

Engineering Technology 

ENGT 2101K Computer Graphics 3 hours 

ELET 3103K Circuit 1 3 hours 

ELET 3111K Circuit II 3 hours 

ELET 3301K Digital Systems 1 3 hours 

ELET 3311K Digital Systems II 3 hours 

ELET 4411K Computer Electronics 3 hours 

ELET 3401K Microcomputer Interfacing 3 hours 

Choose one of the following: 

ELET 4201K VLSI Design 3 hours 

ELET 3411K Microcontroller 3 hours 

Total Hours Required for 

the Major in Computer Science Technology 125 hours 



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MAJOR IN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 
(COMPUTER OPTION) 

ELET 3101K Electrical Circuit I 3 hours 

ELET 3111K Electrical Circuit II 3 hours 

ELET 3201K Electronics 1 3 hours 

ELET 3211K Electronics II 3 hours 

ELET 3301K Digital Systems 1 3 hours 

ELET 3311K Digital Systems II 3 hours 

ELET 3401K Microcomputer Interfacing 3 hours 

ELET 4611K Fiber Optics 3 hours 

CSCI 2231 UNIX 3 hours 

ELET 3411K Microcontroller 3 hours 

ELET 3501K Control Systems 3 hours 

ELET 4621K Digital Communications 3 hours 

ELET 4101K Programmable Logic Controller 3 hours 

ELET 4411K Computer Electronics 3 hours 

MECT 3 10 IK Engineering Materials 3 hours 

ELET 3701K Data Acquisition System 2 hours 

ENGT 3701 Engineering Economy 3 hours 

ENGT 3301 Quality Control 3 hours 

ENGT 3201 Applied Mathematics 1 hour 

ENGT 3101 Statics 3 hours 

CSCI Computer Science 1 3 hours 

Electives 8 hours 

Total hours for Electronics Engineering Technology 

(Computer Option) 133 hours 

MAJOR IN ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

ELET 3101K Electrical Circuit I 3 hours 

ELET 3111K Electrical Circuit II 3 hours 

ELET 3201K Electronics 1 3 hours 

ELET 3211K Electronics II 3 hours 

ELET 3301K Digital Systems 1 3 hours 

ELET 3311K Digital Systems II 3 hours 

ELET 340 IK Microcomputer Interfacing 3 hours 

ELET 34 UK Microcontrollers 3 hours 

ELET 3501K Control Systems 3 hours 

ELET 3511K Electrical Machinery 3 hours 

ELET 3701K Data Acquisition System 2 hours 

ELET 4101K Programmable Logic Controllers 3 hours 

ELET 4401K Industrial Electronics 3 hours 

ELET 4411K Computer Electronics 3 hours 

ELET 4621K Digital Communications 3 hours 

MECT 3101K Engineering Materials 3 hours 

ENGT 3201 Applied Mathematics 1 hour 

ENGT 3301 Quality Control 3 hours 

ENGT 3101 Statics 3 hours 

ENGT 3701 Engineering Economy 3 hours 

CSCI 1301Computer Science 1 3 hours 

Electives 8 hours 

Total hours for Electronics Engineering Technology 133 hours 



144 



MINORS IN ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

MINOR IN CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY 

(Not available to CIVT students) 17 hours 

CIVT 3101K Surveying 5 hours 

MECT 3 10 IK Engineering Materials 3 hours 

CIVT 3201K Civil Engineering Materials 2 hours 

CIVT 3211 Construction Estimating and Management 3 hours 

CIVT 3401K Highway & Transportation Engineering 4 hours 

MINOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY: 18 hours 

Select 9 hours from the following courses: 

CSCI 1301 Computer Science I 3 hours 

CSCI 1302 Computer Science 4 hours 

CSCI 1610 Programming in Java 3 hours 

CSCI 2215 PERL Scripting 4 hours 

CSCI 2231 Introduction to UNIX 3 hours 

Select 9 Hours: 

Upper Division Computer Science Technology Courses 9 hours 

MINOR IN GENERAL TECHNOLOGY 

(Not available to CIVT or ELET students) 17 hours 

ENGT 2101K Computer Graphics 3 hours 

ENGT 21 UK CAD Applications 1 hour 

MECT 3 10 IK Engineering Materials 3 hours 

ENGT 3101 Statics 3 hours 

ELET 3101K Electrical Circuit I 3 hours 

ENGT 3501 Dynamics 2 hours 

ENGT 2201 Technical Writing 2 hours 

MINOR IN ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY 

(Not available to ELET, MECT (computer emphasis), and 

Computer Science Technology majors) 18 hours 

ELET 3101K Electrical Circuit I 3 hours 

ELET 3111K Electrical Circuit II 3 hours 

ELET 4101K Programmable Logic Controllers 3 hours 

ELET 3301K Digital System I 3 hours 

ELET 3311K Digital System II 3 hours 

ELET 3401K Microprocessor Interfacing 3 hours 

MINOR IN INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT 17 hours 

INTM 3101 Motion and Time Study 3 hours 

INTM 3201 Cost Estimating 3 hours 

INTM 3301 Production and Inventory Control 3 hours 

ENGT 2201 Technical Writing 2 hours 

ENGT 3701 Engineering Economy 3 hours 

ENGT 3301 Quality Control 3 hours 

ENGINEERING DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Georgia Tech Regional Engineering Program (GTREP) 

GTREP offers undergraduate degree programs in Civil, Computer, Electrical and Mechan- 
ical Engineering that are similar in content and equal in quality to programs offered on 



145 



the Atlanta campus of Georgia Tech. During the freshman and sophomore years of the 
undergraduate program, students are enrolled at Savannah State University offers all of 
the mathematics and science courses and some of the engineering courses required in the 
first two years of the Georgia Tech engineering curricula. 

Prior to their junior year, students apply for transfer admission to Georgia Tech and 
complete their degree program as a Georgia Tech student. Students remain physically 
located in Savannah, but are taught by local Georgia Tech faculty supplemented by dis- 
tance learning connections. Students graduating from GTREP receive a Georgia Tech 
- Regional Engineering Program degree. 

Regent's Engineering Transfer Program (RETP) 

Qualified students seeking a bachelor of engineering degree may begin their college stud- 
ies at Savannah State University through the Regents' Engineering Transfer Program. 
Upon successful completion of the pre-engineering curriculum, students may transfer to 
Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta campus) to complete their degree requirements. 
Specific times each year have been established for students to visit Georgia Tech cam- 
pus and meet with representatives of their anticipated major. Aerospace, Chemical, Civil, 
Computer, Electrical, Industrial, Materials, Mechanical, Nuclear and Textile Engineering 
majors are available to RETP students. Please note the RETP is only open to students 
who are residents of Georgia. 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

Savannah State University has entered into an agreement with Georgia Institute of Tech- 
nology to offer a dual degree program whereby undergraduate students can attend this 
institution for approximately three academic years and then transfer to an engineering 
program at Georgia Institute of Technology. After completing the academic requirements 
of both institutions, students shall be awarded a baccalaureate degree from both institu- 
tions. This program is open to majors in chemistry, mathematics, computer science tech- 
nology, and chemical, civil, electronics, and mechanical engineering technology. 

Bachelor's degrees offered at Georgia Institute of Technology as a part of this program are 
in aerospace engineering, ceramic engineering, chemical engineering, civil engineering, 
computer engineering, electrical engineering, engineering science and mechanics, indus- 
trial engineering, materials engineering, mechanical engineering, nuclear and radiological 
engineering, textile chemistry, textile engineering, and textiles. 

Program of Study: 

Students participating in the dual degree program shall complete the following at Savan- 
nah State University: 

Approximately three-fourths of the number of hours required for the degree at Savannah 
State University. 

All courses required for admission of engineering transfer students to Georgia Tech. 

The equivalent mathematics and science courses included in the freshman and sophomore 
years of the engineering discipline in which the student intends to major at Georgia Tech. 

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS 

To be admitted to Georgia Tech in the dual degree program, students must: 

• Complete the program of study as indicated above and obtain a positive recom- 
mendation from the dual degree coordinator. 

• Meet the minimum grade point average requirements for admission of transfer 
students to Georgia Tech (those in effect at the time the student matriculates at 
Savannah State University). 



146 



• Submit application materials for evaluation by the Office of Undergraduate 
Admissions at Georgia Tech. 

• Be citizens or permanent residents of the United States. 

DEPARTMENT OF NAVAL SCIENCE 
(Naval ROTC) 

GENERAL 

The department offers a minor in naval science. The program is designed to prepare 
the student for a commission in the U. S. Navy or Marine Corps and is required of those 
NROTC students who will obtain a commission. All course work must be completed with 
a grade of C or better. 

NAVAL SCIENCE COURSES 
PROGRAM OF STUDY 

ALL MIDSHIPMEN: 

NSCI 1001 Introduction to Naval Science 2 hours 

NSCI 1002 Seapower and Maritime Affairs 3 hours 

NSCI 1003 Sailing 3 hours 

NSCI 2102 Naval Ship Systems I (Engineering) 3 hours 

NSCI 2002 Leadership and Management 3 hours 

NSCI 4001 Naval Ship Systems II (Weapons) 3 hours 

NSCI 4104 Leadership and Ethics 3 hours 

Advanced Program - Navy Option: 

NSCI 3003 Navigation 3 hours 

NSCI 3004 Naval Operations and Steamship 3 hours 

Advanced Program - Marine Corps Option: 

NSCI 3101 Evolution of Warfare 5 hours 

NSCI 4102 Amphibious Warfare 5 hours 

Additional and Substitute Requirements: 

NSCI 4050, Naval Drill (0-2-0), is required each academic term of all midshipmen. 
NSCI 1003 AND 4050 satisfy the university physical education requirement. 

Navy Scholarship Midshipmen (additional requirements): 

One year of calculus (completed before junior year) 6 hours 

One year of calculus -based physics (completed before senior year) 6 hours 

Computer science 3 hours 

Military history and political science 6 hours 

(Professor of naval science will promulgate courses that satisfy the above requirements) 

Non-Scholarship Navy College Program Midshipmen (non-scholarship) 

These students must complete on year of math, college algebra or higher, by the end of the 
junior year and one year of physical science by the end of the senior year as a prerequisite 
for commissioning. The physical science requirement can be met by completing a one- 
year sequence or two courses in any area of physical science. One mathematics course 
may be selected from the field of computer science or statistics. 



147 



Marine Corps Option 

All Marine Corps option students shall take, during the junior or senior year, one course 
in military history and one in political science (6 hours total) from a list approved by the 
Professor of Naval Science. 

NROTC Uniforms, Books and Instructional Materials 

NROTC uniforms, books and special instructional materials will be issued at no charge 
to naval scholarship and college program students. Uniforms must be returned upon exit 
from the NROTC program. Books and other instructional material must be returned at 
the completion of each academic term. 

Scholarships 

Nationally awarded Navy ROTC scholarships are available to qualified students for tu- 
ition, fees and laboratory expenses. The scholarships can pay for up to four years of 
expenses and includes a $350 book stipend per semester. Additionally, the Professor of 
Naval Science has several Historically Black College and University NROTC Scholarships 
that may be awarded to qualified high school seniors and graduates. 

Financial Assistance 

All Midshipmen in the NROTC program who qualify for the college program advanced 
standing or the scholarship program are paid a monthly tax-free stipend. The monthly 
amount is $250 for freshmen, $300 for sophomores, $350 for juniors and $400 for se- 
niors. 

Summer Training Cruises 

Scholarship midshipmen will go on summer training cruises during three of their summer 
inter- term periods. Other midshipmen will attend summer training cruises based on their 
scholarship programs. 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE 

(ARMY ROTC) 

GENERAL 

The Reserve Officer Training Corps program is designed as a four-year course of study lead- 
ing to a commission in the United States Army. In addition to a major, students must satisfy, 
requirements in written communications skills, oral communications skills, military his- 
tory, and computer literacy and complete the appropriate military science courses. Students 
interested in this program should consult with the professor of military science. 

MILITARY SCIENCE COURSES 
BASIC COURSE 

MILS 1101 Introduction to Military Science and Skills Development 2 hours 

MILS 1102 Basic Military Leadership 2 hours 

MILS 2201 Basic Military Skills 2 hours 

MILS 2202 Basic Military Tactics 2 hours 

MILS 2250 Basic Field Internship Ft. Knox, KY 5 hours 

MILS 5000K Basic Leadership Lab hours 

MILS 2001 Evolution of Warfare 2 hours 

Basic military science courses involve four (4) semesters during the freshman and sopho- 
more years. Students learn leadership and management and acquire essential background 
knowledge of customs and traditions, weapons, map reading, tactics and survival. Equally 
important, these courses have the objective of developing the students' leadership, self- 
discipline, integrity and sense of responsibility. Those students who successfully complete 



148 



the Basic Course, meet the Army physical standards, and demonstrate officer potential, 
will be considered for contracting and enrolling in the Advanced Course. 

ADVANCED COURSE 

MILS 3301 Advanced Tactics and Applied Leadership 1 3 hours 

MILS 3302 Advanced Tactics and Applied Leadership II 3 hours 

MILS 3350 Advanced Military Skills Practicum, Ft. Lewis, WA 5 hours 

MILS 4401 Military Leadership and Management Seminar 3 hours 

MILS 4402 Transition to Lieutenant 3 hours 

MILS 6000K Advanced Leadership Lab hours 

Veterans who have at least two years of active duty service and who have completed 60 
semester hours, and junior ROTC cadets who have completed 60 semester hours and 3 
years of junior ROTC may receive placement credit and authorization to enroll in the 
advanced course when approved by the professor of military science (PMS). Also, qualities 
of positive potential for becoming an officer must be demonstrated. Leadership potential 
is emphasized as a very important single factor to be considered for enrollment and con- 
tinuance in the program. 

Advanced Military Science 

The general objective of this course of instruction is to produce junior officers who, by edu- 
cation, training, attitude and inherent qualities, are suitable for continued development 
as officers in the Army. There are two avenues available for the student to be eligible for 
entry into the advanced program and obtain a commission as a second lieutenant: 

(a) Satisfactory completion of, or placement credit for, the basic program basic ROTC 
and meeting the entrance and retention requirements established by the Army. 

(b) To be an honorably discharged active duty veteran or junior ROTC cadet gradu- 
ate eligible for placement credit. 

Placement 

Veterans entering the military science programs will receive appropriate placement credit 
for their active military service. Students who have completed military science courses in 
military preparatory schools or junior colleges may be given appropriate credit. Students 
with at least three years of high school ROTC may also be granted placement credit. 
Placement credit or four (4) semesters of basic military science, or equivalent thereof, is a 
prerequisite to admission into the advanced program. 

Alternate Programs for Admittance 

Students who have two years of course work remaining, but who have not completed 
basic military science are eligible to be considered for selection into the advanced military 
science program. Those selected under the provisions of the two-year advanced program 
must satisfactorily complete a Leaders' Training Course (LTC) of four weeks duration 
prior to entering the advance program. Students attending the (LTC) at Fort Knox, Ken- 
tucky, are paid active army rates and given a travel allowance from their home to camp 
and return. Attendance at (LTC) is voluntary and incurs no military obligation until the 
student returns and decides to sign a contract to pursue a commission. 

Leadership Diagnostic and Assessment Course (LDAC) 

Students that are contracted and in the advance course are required to attend (LDAC) at 
Fort Lewis, Washington, normally between their junior and senior academic years. Stu- 
dents attending this course are paid active army rates and given travel allowance from 
their home to camp and return. 



149 



Financial Assistance 

All contracted advanced cadets are paid a subsistence allowance of $150.00 per month and 
$450.00 per year for books while enrolled in the advanced course. 

Scholarship Program 

Each year the U.S. Army awards two and three-year on-campus scholarships to outstand- 
ing young men and women participating in the Army ROTC program who desire careers 
as commissioned officers in the U.S. Army. The Army pays tuition fees, books, and labora- 
tory expenses incurred by these students. In addition, each student receives $250.00 to 
$400.00 per month stipend for the academic year. Individuals desiring to compete for these 
scholarships should apply at the Department of Military Science. 

Army ROTC Uniforms, Books and Supplies 

Students enrolling in the Army ROTC program will be issued U.S. Army uniforms, books, 
and supplies by the Department of Military Science. No fees or deposits of any kind will 
be required. Uniforms must be returned before commissioning or upon non-enrollment 
from the ROTC program. 

MIL Courses 

The basic course of four (4) semesters consists of one hour of lecture with one hour of 
leadership lab per week for freshmen and two hours of lecture and one hour of leadership 
lab per week for sophomores. In the classroom, students acquire knowledge of military 
leadership, weapons, tactics, basic military skills, and physical fitness. In field training 
exercises, potential for leadership is progressively developed. 

The advanced course consists of three hours of classroom work and one hour of leader- 
ship laboratory per week. During the second semester prior to advanced camp, students 
enroll in MILS 3302 to prepare for attendance at advanced camp. History 2361 (American 
Military History) is normally taken the second semester of the senior year. The course 
work during the advanced course emphasizes techniques of management and leadership 
and the fundamentals and dynamics of the military team. Field training exercises provide 
students with applied leadership experiences. 

Professional Military Education (PME) Requirements 

The Army's Professional Military Education requirements are established to provide ca- 
dets with the training and enrichment necessary to successfully compete in the Army. In 
addition to completing a baccalaureate degree, the cadet must complete an undergraduate 
course from each of the five designated fields of study. The five PME designated fields of 
study are listed below and the courses that meet the cadet command PME requirements. 

A. Written Communication Skills: ENGL 1101, 1102. 

B. Human Behavior: SOCI 1101, PSYC 1101, HIST 1101, 1102. 

C. Military History: HIST 2361, MILS 2001. 

D. Math Reasoning: MATH 1101. 

E. Computer Literacy: CSCI 1135, CLSM 2201. 

Minor Concentration 

The department offers a minor in military science. The program is designed to prepare 
students for commission in the United States Army. Whatever the major, a military sci- 
ence minor will strengthen students' management, leadership, and interpersonal com- 
munication skills. The minor requires fifteen credit hours with minimum grades of "B" in 
the following upper division military science courses: MILS 3301, 3302, 4401, and 4402, 
HIST 2361, and five additional credit hours of course work approved by the department 
chair. Students earning a minor in military science must be contracted. This contract will 
lead to being commissioned in the U.S. Army. 



150 



Physical Training 

Physical Training (PT) is an important part of the Army ROTC program. Its purpose is 
to ensure each cadet is physically fit. The Army Physical Fitness Test (APFT) is used to 
determine the level of fitness by measuring cadets' endurance and stamina in three differ- 
ent events: push-ups, sit-ups, and a 2-mile run. 

Basic course students who are freshmen are required to participate in one PT session per 
week. This session is part of their regular military science class and is normally held on 
Monday. Students who are sophomores are required to participate in physical training two 
times per week, normally on Mondays and Wednesdays. 

Advanced course cadets are required to participate in PT as part of their regular military 
science class. PT is conducted 3 days a week for one hour on Mondays, Wednesdays, and 
Fridays. Six hours of PE credit are given to those cadets who successfully complete the 
Army ROTC advanced course (1 credit hour per course). 



151 



CENTER FOR TEACHING, LEARNING 
AND ACADEMIC SUPPORT 

The Center for Teaching, Learning and Academic Support (CTLAS) provides opportuni- 
ties to improve the academic environment of the university community. Funded by Title 
III, the Center's focus is to advance the mission of the University through provisions for 
faculty to develop new and more effective teaching practices and for students to have ad- 
ditional opportunities to become successful learners. 

The Center serves as the nucleus to develop and maintain excellence in the academic 
community by: 

(1) Encouraging improved teaching practices and classroom techniques through 
professional skill development and faculty development activities, and maintain- 
ing an essential resource library (books, journals, videos, etc.) for faculty use; 

(2) Providing assistance to the academic community's technology and multimedia 
needs through technology instruction and assistance (e.g., WebCT course develop- 
ment and software training, for faculty and staff, and multimedia instructional 
support); 

(3) Providing assistance through the ReWrite Connection to meet the professional 
needs of faculty and staff and the academic and developmental needs of under- 
graduate and graduate students; 

(4) Delivering alternative instructional paradigms and learning lab experiences for 
students needing additional assistance to achieve and to maintain academic suc- 
cess; and 

(5) Providing holistic academic advisement to nontraditional developmental stu- 
dents, limited admit students Basic Studies students, undecided majors, and 
students readmitted from academic suspension until they transfer to their major 
programs. 

A comprehensive description of the scope of services offered through the Center is located 
on the CTLAS website (www.savstate.edu/adm/aa/ctl/default.htm). A summary of the Stu- 
dent Academic Assistance Program its services and courses) follows. 

Student Academic Assistance Program 

Student Academic Assistance Program (SAAP) is composed of a developmental education 
component and an enrichment component. Both are designed to help students attain aca- 
demic success. 

Developmental Education Component 

The developmental education component is based on the life-long learning philosophy. It of- 
fers Learning Support courses and academic support services to help developmental learners 
fill-in uneven gaps in their learning. [Moreover, the component offers special courses in read- 
ing and writing skills development for students needing to pass the Regents' Test.] 

Learning Support 

The purpose of the Learning Support curriculum is to serve developmental learners who 
have been provisionally admitted to the University. The curriculum is designed to help 
developmental learners adapt to the academic challenges of the college classroom. In or- 
der to facilitate this growth and development, each of the three discipline areas (English, 
reading, and mathematics) has created objectives designed to promote the overall mission 
of the Program and the University. They are to strengthen the reading skills, the math- 
ematical skills, and the oral and written communicative skills of provisionally admitted 
students. These objectives are based on the desire of Student Academic Assistance faculty 
and staff to support the students' pursuit of academic excellence and life survival skills. 



152 



The Learning Support curriculum serves continuing students who were admitted in the 
Division of Learning Support before its phase-out and entering students who have dem- 
onstrated marked deficiencies in English, reading, and mathematics as indicated by their 
performance on the University's placement examinations. Entering students who fall into 
this category are nontraditional students, limited admit students, and presidential ex- 
ceptions. Non- traditional students are students who graduated from high school at least 
five years ago and who may have completed up to 15 college credits. These students are 
exempt from the SAT/ACT admission criteria. Instead, they must sit for the University's 
placement examinations. Limited admit students are students who did not meet regular 
admissions requirements. Presidential exceptions are recent high school graduates who, 
in very special and rare circumstances, the President of the University may grant excep- 
tions to the CPC and FI requirements. Similarly, these students must sit for the Univer- 
sity's placement examinations, which include the Computer Assisted Adaptive Assess- 
ment (COMPASS) and the Placement Writing Sample. Placement scores on COMPASS 
sub-tests that determine placement in Learning Support courses are 36 and below on the 
math test, 73 and below on the reading test, and 59 and below on the English test and/or 
a failing assessment on the Placement Writing Sample. Students who fail to satisfy either 
portion of the University's placement examinations must enroll in corresponding Learn- 
ing Support courses in mathematics, reading and English. Students who fail the place- 
ment COMPASS subtests, are placed in the entry level course Math 0097. Students who 
score above 22 and below 37 are placed in the exit level course Math 0099. (See "Student 
Academic Assistance" under "Course Descriptions"). 

All students enrolled in Learning Support courses are advised by the Academic Advisement/ 
Mentoring Program (AAMP). Non-traditional students are advised by the AAMP until they 
accumulate 30 hours of college credit and a minimum 2.0 grade point average. At such time, 
they transfer to the college that offers their major. All other students who place in Learning 
Support courses remain with AAMP until they complete the general core. 

Policies and Requirements 

Students shall have three semesters or three attempts per area to develop requisite skills, 
provided that they consistently demonstrate satisfactory academic progress. Any devel- 
opmental student whose academic standing is less than that which is accepted by the 
University is subject to academic suspension even though they may not have exhausted all 
three attempts. Developmental students who are enrolled in credit courses are governed 
by the University's policy on academic standing. Moreover, any developmental students 
who fail to exit any one or more courses within the time allotted shall be suspended for 
three years from Savannah State University and any other unit of the University System 
of Georgia. However, students may appeal the suspension, provided they have only one 
Learning Support area to complete (which must be an exit level course), have a class 
average of at least 80 or above, and obtain a letter of recommendation from their recent 
instructor of the course that needs to be completed. If the students fail to pass the course 
after the appeal, the students may submit a second appeal provided they again meet the 
criteria for an appeal. If the students appeal is approved for the second time, they must 
re-enroll in their Learning Support course. They are not allowed to enroll in any degree 
credit hour courses. If the students fail to exit their Learning Support course after the sec- 
ond appeal, they will be suspended for three years. After a three-year suspension, students 
may reapply for admission, subject to meeting the institution's requirements for readmis- 
sion. (For further details on appeals and suspension, see the Advisement Manual in the 
Office of the Academic Advisement/Mentoring Program, located in Whiting Hall 203.) 

Students may not accumulate more than 20 hours of degree credit before completing their 
Learning Support requirements. Any students who have accumulated 20 credit hours or 
more and who have not successfully completed the required Learning ^Support courses 
may enroll only in those said courses until the Learning Support requirements are suc- 
cessfully completed. 

No degree credit will be awarded for SAAP (Learning Support) course work. Institutional 
credit only will be awarded. 



153 



Developmental students in an exit level (0099) course who maintain a C average or better 
throughout the semester are eligible to sit for the exit examination(s). To exit the math- 
ematics program, students must earn a scaled score of 37 or higher on the post-COMPASS. 
To exit the reading program, students must earn a scaled score of 78 or higher on the post- 
COMPASS. To exit the English program, students must pass the Writing Assessment as 
well as earn a scaled score of 71 or higher on the post-COMPASS. 

Once students earn a passing score on any part of the English placement examination 
(the COMPASS and Writing Assessment), they need not retake that part during the post- 
examination. Similarly, students who earn a passing score on any part of the English post- 
examination need not retake that part during subsequent semesters. 

No students will rewrite the Final Writing Assessment unless documentation supports 
that the test environment was not conducive to testing. However, students may appeal 
the Final Writing Assessment, provided that the students' writing sample received at least 
one passing rating out of three and that the students maintained an overall class average 
of 80 or above. 

No students will retake the placement COMPASS unless substantiated technical problems 
occurred that might impact student performance. Neither will students rewrite the place- 
ment Writing Assessment unless documentation supports that the test environment was 
not conducive to testing. However, students may appeal their assessment provided their 
writing sample received at least one passing rating out of the three ratings and the stu- 
dents passed the COMPASS English subtest. Passing the English subtest is required for 
another reading since students must pass both parts to impact their placement. Students 
must pass both parts to exempt developmental English. (For further details on appeals 
and the deadline to request an appeal in writing, see the Advisement Manual in the Office 
of Academic Advisement/Mentoring Program, located in Whiting Hall 203.) 

The following final grades will be issued: 

A, B, C. Satisfied class work in Math 0097 and recommended for 

Math 0099. 

S (Satisfactory) Met all requirements of an exit level course (a course 

numbered 0099) and may enroll in a corresponding uni- 
versity level course or a course which has no restrictions 
for developmental students. 

IP (In Progress) Sat for exit examination(s) (COMPASS and/or Writing 

Assessment), but demonstrated insufficient progress. 
Must enroll in remediation again. 

F (Failure) Failed class work and must enroll in remediation again. 

If an exit level course, did not qualify to sit for exit 
examination(s). 

W (Withdrew) Withdrew or was administratively withdrawn from the 

University without penalty before the deadline. 

WF (Withdrew, Failing) Withdrew from the University after the deadline for 

penalty and was failing at time of withdrawal. 

V (Auditing) Receive no quality points or a grade. 

A grade of "W" does not count as an attempt in a course. However, no developmental stu- 
dents will receive a "W" unless the students withdraw or are administratively withdrawn 
from the University before the penalty period. Any students with excessive absences in 
any Learning Support course prior to mid-semester may be administratively withdrawn 



154 



from the University. Because Learning Support classes are laboratory-oriented and lab 
space limited, any students who miss the first day of class may be administratively with- 
drawn and their entire registration cancelled. 

A grade of "WF" counts as an attempt in a Learning Support course. Students receive a 
WF if they withdraw from the University after the penalty period. 

Any students needing Reading 0099 cannot enroll in college level social science, natural 
science, or college-level English until remedial reading requirements have been satisfied. 
However, presidential exception students must enroll in appropriate courses in social sci- 
ence and natural science to satisfy CPC deficiencies. Courses used for CPC deficiencies 
do not count as part of the core curriculum. If students enrolled in Reading 0099 do not 
have a Learning Support) English requirement, they may enroll in English 0199, an en- 
richment course that prepares students for college English. (For course description, see 
"Student Academic Assistance" listed under "Course Descriptions.") A complete list of 
courses in which students with reading restrictions can enroll is posted on the CTLAS 
website (www.savstate.edu/adm/a/ctl/default.htm) under "Student Academic Assistance 
Program/Basic Studies Academy." 

Any students needing Mathematics 0097 cannot enroll in Mathematics 0099 or any course 
for which Mathematics 0099 is a prerequisite. 

Any students needing Mathematics 0099 cannot enroll in college level mathematics, phys- 
ics, chemistry, or any science courses with a prerequisite of college-level mathematics until 
remedial mathematics requirements have been satisfied. 

Any students enrolled in 0099 English cannot enroll in college-level English. 

These restrictions mean that limited admit students are not guaranteed a full class load 
as may be required to qualify for some forms of financial aid. 

Regents' Preparation 

The Student Academic Assistance Program also provides a Regents' preparation curricu- 
lum, which is designed to hone students reading and writing skills in preparation for the 
Regents' Test. The Curriculum includes RTPE 0198 (reading) and RTPE 0199 (writing). 
For information about the Regents' Test, see "University- wide Testing Program." For a de- 
scription of these courses, see Student Academic Assistance" under "Course Descriptions." 

Enrichment Component 

The Student Academic Assistance Program offers an enrichment component for students 
who want to improve their academic performance and who need assistance to help them 
achieve their personal academic goals. The enrichment component offers three enrich- 
ment courses to enhance students' academic development. The first course is Basic Com- 
position (ENGL 0199), which is designed primarily to provide writing skills development 
and reinforcement for students with a reading restriction that precludes their immediate 
enrollment in college English. The second course is College Study Skills (STUD 0198), 
which is designed to assist all students who want to improve their meta-cognitive (how- 
to-study) skills, which are requisite to survive the academic rigors of the University. This 
course is ideal for students on grants who want a full class load, but not the added rigor of 
another core course. This course is highly recommended for students on academic proba- 
tion and students returning from academic suspension who need to improve their GPA 
with guided assistance. The third course is the Regents Success Preparation Seminar 
(RTSS 0198), which is designed to give first-time Regents' test-takers reinforcement of 
reading and writing skills and test simulations. (For more details, see "Student Academic 
Assistance" under "Course Description.") 



155 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 
ACCOUNTING 

ACCT 2101 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 Credits 

A study of the underlying theory and application of financial accounting concepts. 
Prerequisites: MATH 1111 or equivalent and CISM 1130 or CSCI 1130 

ACCT 2102 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 Credits 

A study of the underlying theory and application of managerial accounting concepts. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 2101 

ACCT 3111 Intermediate Financial Accounting 1 3 Credits 

An introduction to accounting theory underlying financial statements. There is an emphasis 
on the study of accounting principles and ethics relating to the recording and presentation of 
cash, receivables, and the investment in productive resources such as inventories, property, 
plant and equipment. Computer aided instruction will be utilized wherever applicable. 
Prerequisites: ACCT 2102 

ACCT 3112 Intermediate Financial Accounting II 3 Credits 

A course that is a continuation of ACCT 3111. The topics covered include liabilities, 
contingencies, stockholders' equity, dilutive securities, earnings per share, investments, 
revenue recognition, income taxes, pensions, post-retirement benefits, leases, accounting 
changes, error correction, cash flows, financial statement analysis, and full disclosure. 
Computer assisted instruction will be utilized wherever applicable. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 3111 

ACCT 3113 Federal Income Taxation of Individuals 3 Credits 

An analysis of the federal income tax law and its application to individuals. The course 
includes extensive practical problems, including the preparation of returns. Computer 
assisted instruction will be utilized. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 2102 

ACCT 3114 Federal Income Taxation of Corporations and Partnerships .3 Credits 

A continuation of the study of the Internal Revenue Code begun in Federal Income Taxation 
of Individuals and a survey of the income tax treatment of corporations and shareholder, 
partnerships and partners, S corporations, and other taxable entities. The course includes 
a limited coverage of tax research techniques. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 3113 

ACCT 3115 Cost/Managerial Accounting 3 Credits 

A course that furthers the knowledge gained in the fundamental managerial accounting 
course. This course emphasizes the use of basic cost accounting theory and concepts for 
cost accumulation and usage under job order, process, and activity-based costing systems, 
as well as budgeting and standard costing in a manufacturing environment. It also covers 
control and analysis of materials, labor and manufacturing overheads, and well as cost 
control and accumulation in a service environment. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 2102 

ACCT 3117 Accounting Information Systems 3 Credits 

The course introduces systems concepts and the role of the accountant in the Systems 
Development Life Cycle (SDLC). It covers areas such as documentation of systems, database 
management tools and strategies, and aspects of information systems controls. The impact 



156 



of emerging technologies on accounting is also addressed. Additionally, specific accounting 
systems (Purchasing, Production, etc), with relevant systems applications in current use 
are also covered. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 3111 

ACCT 3180 International Taxation 3 Credits 

The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth study of the tax problems incurred by 
individuals and corporations investing and operating business across national boundaries. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 2102 

ACCT 3185 International Accounting 3 Credits 

This course covers the topics of currency translation and subsidiary or divisional accounting, 
including the history of foreign currency translation, methods, foreign currency gains and 
losses, and accounting for multinational and international accounting organizations. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 2102 

ACCT 4115 Advanced Financial Accounting 3 Credits 

A comprehensive study of business combinations, the equity and cost of accounting for 

investments in common stock, and consolidated financial statement preparation. Also, 

accounting for partnerships, corporate reorganizations, foreign currency transactions, and 

foreign currency financial statement translation and preparation are introduced in this 

course. 

Prerequisite: ACCT 3112 

ACCT 4116 Accounting for Not-For-Profit Institutions 3 Credits 

A course focusing on the basic concepts and techniques of fund accounting, including 
budgeting and management accounting problems for governmental, educational, religious, 
and charitable organizations. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 2102 

ACCT 4117 Auditing 3 Credits 

A comprehensive study of the philosophy, concepts, and techniques used by independent 
auditors. Topical coverage includes professional ethics, standards, audit programs, study 
and evaluation of internal control, auditors' opinions, statistical sampling techniques, and 
EDP auditing. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 3112 

ACCT 4118 Advanced Managerial Accounting 3 Credits 

This course uses the case approach to emphasize transition of costing systems from 
traditional systems to the development of Activity Based Costing systems and the use of 
ABC tools in management (Activity Based Management). Additionally, case studies in 
such areas as transfer pricing, target costing, management compensation and incentives, 
and the Balanced Scorecard are included. The relevance of technology in these areas is 
highlighted. 
Prerequisite: ACCT 3115 

ACCT 4130 CPALaw Review 3 Credits 

A course that prepares students for the law portion of the CPA exam. The course includes 
a review of the following business law subjects which are traditionally emphasized on the 
CPA exam and not covered in BUSA 2106: accountant liability and malpractice, forms of 
business organizations (agencies, partnerships, corporations, estates, and trusts), contract 
law and the Uniform Commercial Code (sales and leases; commercial paper, bank deposits 
and collections and funds transfers; letters of credit; bulk transfers; warehouse receipts, 
bills of lading and other documents of title; secured translations). 
Prerequisites: BUSA 2106 



157 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



BUSA 1105 Introduction to Business 3 Credits 

An integrative study of the functional areas of business (finance, operations, 
marketing, human resources, etc.) This course is to be taking by students in their 
freshman year, or in the first semester following the declaration of a major in business 
administration. " 

BUSA 2105 Communicating in the Business Environment 3 Credits 

An emphasis on both interpersonal, and organizational communication through written 
and oral exercises appropriate to business practice. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101, 1102, and CISM 1130 or CSCI 1130 

BUSA 2106 The Environment of Business 3 Credits 

An introduction to the legal, regulatory, political, social, ethical, cultural, environmental, 
and technological issues which form the context for business and an overview of the impact 
of demographic diversity on organizations. 

BUSA 2182 Introduction to Business Statistics (formerly QUAN 2182) ....3 Credits 

An introduction to the methods of scientific inquiry and statistical inference. Subjects 
covered are sampling, parameter estimating, hypothesis testing, determination of the 
nature and strength of relationships among variables, decision theory, time series analysis, 
and non- parametric methods. The course develops proficiency in the use of statistical 
software. Spreadsheets and statistical packages are used extensively. 
Prerequisites: MATH 1111 or equivalent and MATH 2181 (formerly QUAN 2181) 

BUSA 4116 Business Research 3 Credits 

A course that examines the scientific method as applied to business research problems. The 
use of primary and secondary information for management decision- making is examined. 
Survey design, questionnaire construction, sampling processes, and data analysis are 
studied in-depth. The course requires the extensive use of the computer for word processing 
and statistical analysis. 
Prerequisites: MGNT 3165, MKTG 3175 and BUSA 2182 (formerly QUAN 2182) 

BUSA 4126 Business Policy 3 Credits 

A capstone course in the College of Business Administration required of all seniors. The 
course integrates subject matter from the business core courses and other disciplines. This 
course focuses on integrated approaches to medium and long-term organizational challenges 
in a dynamic environment. Students develop managerial skills and learn to appreciate the 
role of all managers in the formulation and implementation of organizational strategies. 
Prerequisites: All Area F courses, MATH 2181 (formerly QUAN 2181), BUSA 2182 
(formerly QUAN 2182), FINC 3155, and MGNT 3165 (All other Area G courses can 
be taken with BUSA 4126 if it's your final semester.) 

BUSA 4229 Administrative Practice and Internship 3 Credits 

This course provides experiential learning in an employment setting, which is appropriate 
to the business student's academic program and career objectives. A minimum of 
100 hours of relevant and practical work experience are required in a public or private 
organization, which has entered into a formal internship agreement with the College of 
Business Administration. The student intern will perform duties and services as assigned 
by the organization's supervisor and the COBA internship coordinator. In addition, the 
student intern may be required to attend seminars dealing with human relations, business 
etiquette, and professional and ethical responsibilities appropriate to the intern's major. 
Business students will be awarded 3 semester credit hours for successful completion of 
the internship. (A student can not receive credit for both BUSA 4229 and CISM 4900). 



158 



(Grading: Pass/Fail) Prerequisite: MGNT 3165, at least a 2.5 GPA, the completion of 
seventy-five (75) semester hours, and permission of advisor and approval of the Office of 
the Dean of COBA. 

BUSA 4800 Current Issues in International Business 3 Credits 

This course will cover a variety of topics of current interest in the area of International 
Business. The course is designed to build a degree of responsiveness in the International 
Business program and will provide opportunities to study emerging issues. Depending 
upon student and faculty interests, the course may focus oh the economic and business 
environment of selected regions of the world, contemporary issue such as developments 
in regional trading blocks, and/or developments in the global trading and financial system. 
Prerequisite: MGNT 4168 



COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS 



CISM 1130 Computer and Its Applications (same course as CSCI 1130)... 3 Credits 

An introductory course specially designed to help students become computer literate. The 
course covers the history of computers, hardware, software, and use of the state-of-the- 
art technology. Another unique feature of this course is that student use internet, MS 
OFFICE applications using word processing, spread sheets, and HTML language to create 
homepages. 

CISM 2130 Business Information Systems 3 Credits 

This course will introduce the business student to the management information system 
theory, the hardware and software systems available for meeting the information systems 
requirements, and the use of application software (spreadsheets and databases) to solve 
information problems and meet requirements. The emphasis is primarily on using a 
microcomputer through practical, hands-on operation thereby providing experience in the 
use of computers in higher-level college courses and a business environment. 
Prerequisite: CISM 1130 or CSCI 1130 

CISM 3137 System Analysis and Design 3 Credits 

An introduction to concept of the system development life cycle (SDLC). Systems 
development techniques, methodologies, and CASE tools are introduced. 
Prerequisite: CISM 1130 or CSCI 1130 

CISM 3140 Introduction to Programming: Visual Basic 3 Credits 

Topics include the visual programming environment, event-driven programming, file 
processing, database processing, error handling, objects and class libraries. 
Prerequisite: CISM 1130 or CSCI 1130 

CISM 3232 Web Design and Development (formerly CISM 4232) 3 Credits 

A course that focuses on planning, designing, and creating Web sites using Web authoring 
software and HTML to enhance information for more effective communication, with 
emphasis on quality, efficiency, and effectiveness. 
Prerequisite: CISM 1130 or CSCI 1130 

CISM 3300 Information Security and Assurance 3 Credits 

Detailed examination of a systems-wide perspective of information security, beginning 
with a strategic planning process for security. Includes an examination of the policies, 
procedures, and staffing functions necessary to organize and administrate ongoing security 
functions in the organization. Subjects include security practices, security architecture and 
models, continuity planning and disaster recovery planning. 
Prerequisite: CISM 2130 



159 



CISM 4135 Data Communication 3 Credits 

An introduction to the principles and techniques of data communications. The course 
covers the topics of transmission media and modes, communication protocols, and network 
architecture. LAN's, WAN's and the OSI model will be discussed 
Prerequisite: CISM 1130 or CSCI 1130 

CISM 4137 Database Design and Implementation 3 Credits 

An introduction to the concept of database processing. The topics covered in this course are 
the components of database systems (DBMS), the entity/relationship diagrams, semantic 
object models as well as normalization and the relational model. 
Prerequisite: CISM 1130 or CSCI 1130 

CISM 4138 Contemporary Topics in CIS 3 Credits 

A course that examines current issues in CIS. Topics may include visual programming, RAD 
techniques, building Internet applications, and advanced networking techniques. 
Prerequisite: CISM 1130 or CSCI 1130 and permission of instructor 

CISM 4140 Programming in JAVA 3 Credits 

Development of computer information systems using model based tools, various application 
development methodologies e.g. rapid application development (RAD), prototyping, 
information engineering, object-oriented programming, and CASE tools. 
Prerequisite: CISM 3140 

CISM 4141 Advanced Visual Basic 3 Credits 

Advanced topics in application development methodologies for client/server applications and 
distributed systems including graphical user interface (GUI) design, event driven systems, 
and common used access (CUA). Integration of knowledge gained from prior computer- 
related course work to develop a comprehensive system project in a visual development 
environment. 
Prerequisite: CISM 3140 

CISM 4150 Network Administration 3 Credits 

The course covers the day-to-day administrative tasks necessary to maintain a business 
computer network. Creating user and group accounts, profiles, and setting permissions are 
covered. Setting up and administering a network printer will be demonstrated. Resource 
auditing, backup and recovery, and monitoring resources will also be covered. Microsoft 
Windows NT will be the software tool used in this course. 
Prerequisite: CISM 4135 

CISM 4151 Network Installation and Configuration 3 Credits 

This course will focus on the installation and configuration of a network using Windows 
NT. Planning, installing, configuring, optimizing, and managing resources are covered. 
Connectivity issues (DHCP, IIS, DNS, and IP) will also be discussed. 
Prerequisite: CISM 4135 

CISM 4160 Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) in Theory 3 Credits 

This course is an introduction to SAP R/3 System concepts, framework and practical 

implementation of ERP for effective deployment of information and communications 

technology resources. The course aims to provide working knowledge of theory and practice 

of ERP for evaluation, planning, development, and implementation of enterprise resources. 

The course will include a review of current tools such as SAP R/3, BAAN, Oracle, and 

PeopleSoft. 

Prerequisite: CISM 1130 or CSCI 1130 

CISM 4161 Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) with Cases 3 Credits 

Topics include structured programming design and processing, language fundamentals, 
and applications involving business problems using ABAP/4. 
Prerequisites: CISM 4160 



160 



CISM 4900 Occupational Internship 3 Credits 

This course is expected to serve as a supplemental source of learning and also to enhance 
the student's academic program and career objectives. A minimum of 100 hours of relevant 
and practical experience are required in a public or private organization, which has entered 
into a formal internship agreement with the College of Business Administration. The 
student will perform duties and services as assigned by the work supervisor and internship 
coordinator. Reports and assignments are required to be completed by the students. 
General tasks include PC maintenance, software/hardware installation and upgrades, Web 
Page creation/maintenance, and Database creation and maintenance. CIS majors will be 
awarded 3 semester credit hours for successful completion of the internship. A grade of 
C or better is required. (A student can not receive credit for both BUSA 4229 and 
CISM 4900).Prerequisite: CISM 1130 or CSCI 1130 and Permission of Instructor, 
and approval of the Office of the Dean of COBA. 



ECONOMICS 



ECON 2105 Principles of Macro-Economics 3 Credits 

An introduction to concepts that enable students to understand and analyze economics 
aggregates and evaluate economic policies. For non-business majors, this course is now an 
option in AREA E (recommended option for those seeking the business minor). 
Prerequisites: MATH 1111 or equivalent 

ECON 2106 Principles of Micro-Economics 3 Credits 

An introduction to concepts that enable students to understand and analyze the structure 
and performance of the market economy. 
Prerequisites: MATH 1111 or equivalent 

ECON 3145 Global Business Issues 3 Credits 

A survey of environmental factors, such as culture, economics, law, and politics, affecting 
international business decision- making. The impact of the globalization of markets and 
competition as well as the increasing role of multinational corporations is emphasized. 

Prerequisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 

ECON 3167 International Trade and Investments (formerly ECON 4145)3 Credits 

An introduction to the modern theory of international trade, payments mechanism, 
commercial policy, and economic integration. 
Prerequisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 

ECON 3175 Money, Credit and Banking 3 Credits 

A course that examines the principles of money and banking with special reference to their 
functions, credit, the banking process, the banking system, foreign and domestic exchange, 
the business cycle, and the history of banking. 
Prerequisite: ECON 2105 

FINANCE 



FINC 3000 Personal Finance 3 Credits 

A course designed to acquaint non-business students with the tools and constructs necessary 
for economic survival. This course focuses on consumer credit, savings and investment, 
insurance, home ownership, and estate planning. 

Prerequisite: "42 hour rule" for business majors: (See Academic Regulation #1 
above) junior standing (60 semester hours) for others. 



161 



FINC 3155 Business Finance 3 Credits 

Financial management of non-financial corporations and the role of interest rates and 
capital markets in the economy. Topics will include the structure and analysis of financial 
statements, time value of money calculations (using financial calculators), stock and 
bond valuation, financial forecasting, valuation of income-producing physical assets, 
determination of the cost of capital, the profitability of proposed investments in fixed assets, 
risk-return tradeoffs that must be considered in using financial leverage, and methods used 
in obtaining funds from the various capital markets. This course is taught mainly through 
lectures and class discussions of textual materials and problems. 
Prerequisites: ECOB 2105, ECON 2106, ACCT 2101 and BUSA 2182 (formerly 
QUAN 2182) 

FINC 3157 Investments 3 Credits 

The construction and management of optimal investment portfolios, utilizing primary 
investment instruments, such as common stocks and fixed income securities. The main 
topics covered include the organization and operation of securities markets (both domestic 
and international), the notion of risk and return and strategies for optimal diversification of 
risk. Other important topics covered include models for determining the value of different 
securities, theories of interest rates, and the measurement of portfolio performance. The 
course is taught mainly through lectures and class discussions of textual materials. 
Prerequisite: FINC 3155 

FINC 4155 International Finance 3 Credits 

An introduction to foreign exchange risk. This course develops students' understanding 
of institutional realities encountered by the financial manager in a global economic 
environment. Activities of currency arbitrage, hedging, and speculation are examined in 
light of exchange rate regimes, Eurocurrency markets, balance of payments, mechanics 
of foreign exchange markets, currency futures and options, the parity conditions in 
international finance, and international trade activities. 
Prerequisite: FINC 3155 

MANAGEMENT 



MGNT 3165 Management of Organizations (formerly "Organizational Behavior & 
Theory") 3 Credits 

The study of fundamental management principles and their applications in managing 
organizations. Topics will include planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, as well as 
management ethics and basic financial management techniques. 

Prerequisite: "42 hours rule" for business majors: (See Academic Regulation #1 
above) junior standing (60 semester hours) for others. 

MGNT 3185 Operations Management (formerly QUAN 3185) 3 Credits 

This course focuses on the issues and techniques relevant to the management of the 
operations function within an organization, emphasizing its strategic significance. 
Operations Management is an introductory level course designed to expose students to the 
dynamic forces, which are responsible for shaping the business environment. The subject 
matter represents a blend of concepts from industrial engineering, cost accounting, general 
management, quantitative methods, and statistics. Students will learn about operations 
activities such as forecasting, scheduling, product and design service, capacity planning and 
project management to name a few. As with many core courses in business, the foundation 
of this course relies on teaching students sound decision-making principles. The basic 
quantitative techniques presented are essential to developing and nurturing students' 
decision-making skills. 

Prerequisites: ACCT 2102, MATH 2181 (formerly QUAN 2181), BUSA 2182 
(formerly QUAN 2182), and MGNT 3165 



162 



MGNT 3195 Introduction to Management Science 3 Credits 

This course focuses on the problem-solving and decision- making processes that use 
quantitative management science concepts and techniques. Some of these concepts include: 
Linear Programming, Sensitivity Analysis, Integer Programming, Network Flow Models, 
Project Management, Multi-criteria Decision Making, Non-linear Programming, Decision 
Analysis, Queuing Analysis and Simulation. Using a hands-on-approach, students are 
expected to apply these concepts and techniques to solve real-world business problems 
using specialized computer algorithms. In some cases, students will be required to use a 
dedicated spreadsheet platform. 
Prerequisite: MGNT 3185 (formerly QUAN 3185) 

MGNT 3196 Small Business Management and Ownership 3 Credits 

Management of newly created or newly acquired small businesses. Beginning with traits 
commonly found in successful entrepreneurs, students cover the various topics necessary to 
develop and run a profitable business. The topics include business entity forms, marketing 
for small/fledgling businesses, advertising, elements of business plan, risk management, 
and staffing decisions. 
Prerequisite: MGNT 3165 

MGNT 3198 Entrepreneurship (formerly MGNT 4198) 3 Credits 

This course is an exploration of the personal qualities of successful entrepreneurs. This 
course provides students with information required in order to establish a new business 
venture and presents the unique management problems that face entrepreneurs when 
starting and operating new ventures. The course provides the student with an opportunity 
to research the idea of starting or taking over a business. 
Prerequisite: MGNT 3196 

MGNT 3300 Organizational Behavior and Theory (formerly MGNT 4500)3 Credits 

This course is designed to provide the management major with in-dept knowledge of the 
key issues in organizational behavior and theory facing managers today. Topics include 
organizational behavior of individuals and groups, and modern organizational design 
concepts. Experiential learning tools and videos will be utilized as well as the traditional 
methods of teaching via lecture and case analysis. 
Prerequisite: MGNT 3165 

MGNT 4165 Human Resource Management 3 Credits 

A course focusing on the principles, practices, and scientific techniques and methods involved 
in the development and operation of an effective personnel and industrial relations program. 
The topics covered include the methods and procedures used by business management in 
recruiting, selecting, and mamtaining an efficient work force. 
Prerequisite: MGNT 3165 

MGNT 4166 Labor-Management Relations ..3 Credits 

The development of organized labor, the theory and practice of collective bargaining, and 
the legal and economic aspects of employer-employee relations. 
Prerequisite: MGNT 3165 

MGNT 4167 Training and Development for Human Resources 3 Credits 

A focus on developing a philosophy of teaching and the development of skills for delivery of 
instructional systems, analysis, design, development, delivery, and evaluation of instruction. 
Curriculum development, learning theories, instructional strategies, and professional 
development for professional trainers are emphasized (90 semester hours of field experience 
required for education majors enrolled in the teaching certification cooperative program 
with Armstrong Atlantic State University). (3-6-3) 
Prerequisite: MGNT 3165 



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MGNT 4168 International Business Management 3 Credits 

A course divided into three major parts. Part one covers the various dimensions of the 
international business field, including brief coverage of the major theories of international 
trade and investment. Part two deals with the environment in which international business 
operates, the financial variables, including balance of payment, exchange rates, and capital 
markets, along with the cultural, legal, political, and economic institutions with which 
international business firms may come in contact. Part three concentrates on the operation 
aspects of international business; the firm-specific variables including marketing, finance, 
management, accounting; and attempts to integrate the environmental with the firm- 
specific variables into a meaningful, conceptual framework. 
Prerequisite: MGNT 3165 

MGNT 4169 Quality Management 3 Credits 

An introduction to the topic of quality in the management of modern organizations. 

Approaches of the major contributors such as Deming, Juran, and others are examined. 

This course provides business students with a set of skills for achieving and maintaining 

quality and process or service control. The course emphasizes the strategic importance of 

quality, statistical process control methods, problem-solving tools, and the management of 

quality. 

Prerequisite: MGNT 3165 

MGNT 4199 Small Business Entrepreneurial Strategy 3 Credits 

A course that uses a case study approach. This course is designed to allow students to 
perform in-depth case analysis of small/entrepreneurial businesses. The course culminates 
with students developing a comprehensive strategic plan for an entrepreneurial venture. 
Prerequisite: MGNT 3198 (formerly MGNT 4198) 

MGNT 4200 Management of Diversity (formerly MGNT 3500) 3 Credits 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the complexities of managing workforce 
diversity. Topics include resistance to diversity, discrimination and fairness, diversity and 
organizational effectiveness, cultural diversity and multiculturalism, diversity in decision- 
making teams, and diversity training. 
Prerequisite: MGNT 4165 

MGNT 4800 Contemporary Topics in Management 3 Credits 

An elective for management majors, this course will address management topics of special 
interest. The topics may include, but are not limited to, crisis management, organizational 
communications and data management, compensation management, business ethics, 
organizational change, leadership, managing non-profits, management of risk, or case 
studies in management. 
Prerequisite: MGNT 3300 (formerly MGNT 4500) 



MARKETING 

MKTG 3175 Principles of Marketing 3 Credits 

A comprehensive overview of the marketing process for goods, services and ideas. The 
course is taught from a marketing management and decision-making perspective. Topics 
such as the organization's environment, marketing research, and buyer behavior are 
discussed as the context in which marketing plans and strategy are formulated. In addition, 
the marketing decision elements, product, distribution, promotion, and price are examined. 
Finally, topics such as international marketing, service marketing, and nonprofit marketing 
are explored. 
Prerequisite: ECON 2106 



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MKTG 3176 Professional Selling 3 Credits 

Course designed to introduce the basic principles and techniques of professional selling. 
Students build strategies for effective selling and practice approaches to presenting 
products, handling objections, and closing sales. The economic and psychological motives of 
the buyer are examined in both industrial and consumer goods and services markets. Some 
special topics such as telemarketing and sales technologies are also introduced. 
Prerequisite: MKTG 3175 

MKTG 3177 Retail Management 3 Credits 

A course that deals with broad aspects of contemporary retailing. It covers the principles 
of retail store management, including strategic planning, location decisions, merchandise 
planning, budgeting decisions, inventory, pricing, advertising, and selling strategies. Legal 
and ethical constraints are also examined. 
Prerequisites: ACCT 2102 and MKTG 3175 

MKTG 3178 Buyer Behavior 3 Credits 

An examination of the basic concepts and research results from marketing and the social 
sciences with the goal of enabling marketers to better understand customers and meet their 
needs. The decision process of buyers, factors affecting purchasing decisions, and customer 
satisfaction are major conceptual areas of the course. Implications for marketing strategies 
(e.g., market segmentation and product design and promotion) are discussed. 
Prerequisite: MKTG 3175 

MKTG 3179 E-Commerce 3 Credits 

This course focuses on the role of marketing in electronic commerce. The technologies 
of electronic commerce, web-based marketing strategies, and the use of the Internet to 
improve management and marketing operations are discussed. Students will learn about 
the exciting possibilities that the Internet provides to sales and marketing managers as 
they strive to achieve promotion, service, and distribution efficiencies. Students will be 
asked to design a web site for a business or nonprofit organization. A team approach is 
used. Computer competence is a prerequisite. 
Prerequisites: MKTG 3175 and CISM 2130 

MKTG 4175 Advertising and Promotion 3 Credits 

A course that examines advertising as a business and as a multidisciplinary subject that 
draws from both the arts and sciences. The first half of the course takes an analytical 
perspective, focusing on the history of advertising, as well as the social, legal, ethical, 
and economic issues. The second half of the course assumes a managerial perspective as 
students learn about the advertising process and create an advertising campaign. 
Prerequisite: MKTG 3175 

MKTG 4176 Contemporary Topics in Marketing 3 Credits 

An elective for marketing majors. The course contains a variety of topics that are offered 
annually on a rotating basis. These topics may include, but are not limited to, buyer 
behavior, database marketing, channels of distribution, transportation and logistics, or 
case studies in marketing. 
Prerequisite: MKTG 3175 

MKTG 4179 International Marketing and Export Management 3 Credits 

A course that focuses on the marketing mix issues that are faced by large and small 
multinational organizations. Marketing decisions related to product line, branding, 
communications, distribution, and pricing are addressed. 
Prerequisites: MGNT 3165 and MKTG 3175 

MKTG 4182 Advanced Professional Selling 3 Credits 

An in-dept study of advanced selling and sales management issues including negotiation 



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strategies, international sales strategies, national account management, and sales force 
ethics. Communications skills are refined through experiential exercises and videotaped 
role-playing. Analytical skills are developed through the research, design, and production 
of a case study and selling scenario. Networking with local sales professionals will be a 
required component of the course. 
Prerequisite: MKTG 3176 

MKTG 4183 Sales Management 3 Credits 

This course addresses the unique aspects of business-to-business selling as well as sales 
management issues and responsibilities. Topics include organizing, staffing, and training 
a sales force, directing sales force operations, sales forecasting, and evaluating and 
compensating salespeople. 
Prerequisite: MKTG 3176 

MKTG 4185 Strategic Marketing 3 Credits 

This course is designed as the capstone course in the marketing curriculum. Students will 
integrate materials learned in previous marketing course and apply marketing principles 
to solve actual business problems. The emphasis will be on planning, operation, and control 
of marketing activities. Case studies and stimulation games where students market one 
or more products are used to present "real life" situations. The emphasis will be on the 
analysis of marketing information and on the skills involved when making marketing 
decisions. Students will be required to prepare a marketing plan for a local business or 
nonprofit organization. 
Prerequisites: MKTG 3175 and nine (9) hours of additional marketing courses 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

AFRICANA STUDIES 



AFRS 2000 Introduction to Africana Studies 3 Credits 

This course is a broad based survey course designed to give the student and understanding 
of the general history of the development of the discipline and to define its scope. The 
conceptual parameters of study will be established and distinguished from other fields of 
academic inquiry. 

AFRS 3000 Africana Political Ideology and Philosophy 3 Credits 

This course is designed to study the relevant ideas that have served as the intellectual and 
philosophical foundations of mass movements throughout Africa and the diaspora. Classical 
Pan Africanism, Negritude, the ideology of selected Black Millenarian Movements, Black 
nationalism, Black Cultural Nationalism, Ujamaa Socialism, Kawaida Nationalism, Black 
Marxism, and contemporary Pan African and Afrocentric thought will be considered. 

AFRS 3102 The African and African American Family 3 Credits 

This is an upper division course, which focuses upon the unique development of the African 
and African-American family within the traditional and modern context both within 
continental Africa and the Americas. Relevant topics concerning the African American 
family will be studied. Particular attention will be given to the survival role the family has 
served for African peoples. 
Prerequisite: AFRS 2000 

AFRS 3111 The Africana Woman 3 Credits 

This course specifically addresses the role of African women in the development of modern 
and post modern society in Africa and the diaspora. The unique continuing contribution of 
Africana women in the ongoing transformation of social relations is the central theme and 



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topical focus of this course. The course will exam the various political tendencies within 
the African women's movement. It will also explore the underlying social causes of male 
chauvinism, gender violence, and gender role transformation within the context of race and 
class oppression. 
Prerequisites: AFRS 2000 OR AFRS 1501 



AFRS/POLS 3141 African Government and Politics 3 Credits 

An introductory survey of political patterns, political processes, and political ideologies in 
Africa; an examination of the legacy of colonialism and the processes of modernization, and 
development: problems of political instability 

AFRS 3211/RPHS 3211 Religion and African Thought Systems 3 Credits 

An extensive examination of the various cosmologies, basic ethical systems, and spirituality 
of selected traditional African societies and the extent of their impact and influence on the 
development of the African American religious tradition. 

AFRS 3212 African-American Oral Literature 3 Credits 

Studies African-American folklore, preaching and speaking, and the lyrics of spirituals, 
blues, and rap in relation to African roots, historical conditions, and literary practice. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

AFRS 3213 (Also ENGL 3213) African Literature 3 Credits 

An introduction to the "orature" and literatures (anglophone and, in translation, vernacular, 
francophone, Swahili, and Arabic) of sub-Saharan Africa. Includes such writers as Achebe, 
Soyinka, Armab, Okri, Ngugi, Senghor, Beti, Oyono, Fagunwa, and Salih. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

AFRS 3216 (Also ENGL 3216) African-American Poetry 3 Credits 

A survey of African- American poetry from the nineteenth century through the Harlem 
Renaissance to contemporary poetry, examining its relationships to the oral tradition and to 
literary, social, and political influences. Includes such writers as Claude McKay, Langston 
Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Nikki Giovanni, Sonia Sanchez, and Rita Dove. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

AFRS 3218 (Also ENGL 3218) African-Caribbean Literature 3 Credits 

An introduction to the literature of the Caribbean produced by writers of African descent. 
Includes such writers as Walcott, Braithwaite, Lamming, Marshall, Kincaid, Cesaire, and 
Guillen. 

AFRS 3501 Survey of African Cultures and Societies 3 Credits 

A survey of the cultural patterns and institutions foundations and structure of selected 
African societies that presents and examines both traditional and contemporary aspects 
of the African culture as well as examining the impact of culture on the various areas of 
societal, institutional, and national development will be discussed as well. 

AFRS 4000 Selected Topics in Africana Studies 3 Credits 

An in depth study of current topics, which are selected, developed and taught by a member 
of the faculty. 

AFRS 4211 (Also ENGL 4211) African American Drama 3 Credits 

A study of the development of African American theater from minstrels to modern theater 
workshops and the plays of such writers as Langston Hughes, Lorraine Hansberry, Amira 
Baraka, Ntozake Shange, and August Wilson. 



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AFRS 4217 (Also ENGL 4217) African American Fiction 3 Credits 

A critical survey focusing on leading themes and techniques in the short stories and novels 
of such authors as Charles Chestnut, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, 
James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ishmeal Reed, Alice Walker and Gloria Naylor. 

AFRS 4218 (Also ENGL 4218) African-American Nonfiction 3 Credits 

A survey of African-American nonfiction from the early slave narratives to the present, 
including W.E.B. DuBois, Alex Haley, Alice Walker, and others. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

AFRS 4501 African Americans, Africa, and Pan-Africanism 3 Credits 

An interdisciplinary examination of the concept of Pan Africanism as a realistic, authentic, 
effective and multidimensional mechanism by which people of African descent in the United 
States have related historically and culturally to the African dimension of their identity. 
The course employs methods germane to the disciplines of History, Sociology, Political 
Science and Anthropology. 
Prerequisites: AFRS 1501 

AFRS 4601 Senior Seminar 3 Credits 

A comprehensive review and analysis of topics and issues, theories, and interpretations, 
and research in African and African-American Studies 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

ANTH 1101 Introduction to Anthropology 3 Credits 

An introduction to the study of primitive and traditional societies with focus on cross- 
cultural comparisons of pre-literate and modern social institutions. 

ART 

ARTS 1101 Introduction to Art 3 Credits 

An exploration of the basic elements and principles of two- and three-dimensional art. A 
look at how artists apply the elements, principles, materials, and techniques to create their 
own style. The works of contemporary African-American artists are highlighted. 

ARTS 3201 Drawing 1 3 Credits 

Basic drawing materials and techniques. Elements and principles of art are studied through 
still life and nature subject matter. Introduction to computer drawing is optional. 

ARTS 3211 Drawing II 3 Credits 

An introduction to the study of landscape and the human figure. Elements and principles 
of design will be reviewed. The course explores various materials and techniques. Basic 
introduction to computer drawing is optional. 

ARTS 3301 Printmaking 1 3 Credits 

An exploration of line, texture, pattern, and shape combined with the basic techniques of 
relief printmaking in the production of woodcuts and linoleum cuts. 

ARTS 3311 Printmaking II 3 Credits 

Basic elements of design, composition, and drawing applied to the techniques of relief 
printmaking in the production of woodcuts and linoleum cuts. 

ARTS 3401 Basic Design I 3 Credits 

Basic elements, principles, materials, and techniques of two-dimensional visual art. 
Students are expected to research and write. 



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ARTS 3411 Basic Design II 3 Credits 

Basic elements, principles, materials, and techniques of three-dimensional visual art. 
Students are expected to research and write. 

ARTS 3501 Crafts 1 3 Credits 

Experiences in significant craft materials: wood, fabrics, fibers, and metals. Students learn 
elementary loom weaving techniques, fabric printing and painting, jewelry and metal work, 
macrame, and techniques of wood crafts. 

ARTS 3502 Crafts II 3 Credits 

Continuation of Crafts I. Emphasis on jewelry and metal work. 

ARTS 3601 African-American Art History 3 Credits 

Study of African-American Art of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth century. 

ARTS 4101 Illustration 1 3 Credits 

Exploration of illustration as a means of communicating ideas in nonverbal/pictorial 
ways. A variety of drawing styles, techniques, and materials will be explored in creation of 
drawings and illustrations for this class. 

ARTS 4111 Illustration II 3 Credits 

Exploration of basic design, composition, style, and techniques and the development of 
problem solving skills in the creation of finished illustrations. A variety of drawing styles, 
techniques, and materials will be explored. 

ARTS 4301 Painting 1 3 Credits 

Painting media and techniques of oil, acrylic, or watercolor. 

ARTS 4311 African American Genre Painting 3 Credits 

Continuation of Painting I. Emphasis on advanced techniques and easel and mural 
designs. 

ARTS 4601 Western Art History (required) 3 Credits 

Chronological review of art of the ancient world in prehistoric times to the study of the 
visual arts during the twentieth century. Field visits to city, county, and state museums 

and galleries. 

• 

ARTS 4701 Ceramics 3 Credits 

Study of ceramics materials and processes such as modeling, hand building, and basic 
wheel techniques. Emphasis on designing, constructing, glazing, and firing earthenware 
and stoneware clays. 

ARTS 4711 Sculpture 3 Credits 

Study of three-dimensional forms and the limitations of sculptural media. Experiences 
include work in clay, wood, stone, metal, and plastic. 

ARTS 4811 Weaving 3 Credits 

Techniques of weaving on four harness table of floor looms. Recent trends and developments 
are studied for creative drafting and pattern weaving. The course also covers concepts of 
design, color, and texture as used in textile construct 

BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS 

BEHV 1101 Introduction to Behavior Analysis 3 Credits 

An introduction to the science which studies the behavior and experiences of living 
organisms and, specifically human behavior and experiences 






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BEHV 2101 Behavior Analysis II 3 Credits 

This course is designed to provide the basic tools of behavior analysis. These tools will 
enable students to better understand and change their own behavior as well as the behavior 
of others in their environment 

BEHV 3000 History of Behavior Analysis 3 Credits 

This course is a study of the work of those psychologists who have made the most significant 
contributions to the development of behavior analysis with emphasis on the various systems 
of psychology, research and experimentation. 

BEHV 3102 Experimental Analysis 3 Credits 

The course is designed to provide the student with insight into the ways that psychologists 
go about answering questions about behavior and skills in conducting scientific research. 
The course will provide opportunities for hands-on experience related directly to the 
theories and ideas of psychologists explored theoretically in General Psychology and the 
History of Psychology. Special emphasis is placed on direct student oriented experience 
with the research methodologies and statistical applications used to support or refute the 
findings of researchers. 

BEHV 3103 Behavior Principles I 3 Credits 

This course surveys the principle of Skinnerian psychological research. The course will 
explore the scientific study of behavior modification in physiology, motivation, personality 
development, psychopathology, psychotherapy and social change. 

BEHV 3104 Behavior Principles II 3 Credits 

This course explores principles underlying behavior change in all fields; experimental 
underpinnings of science of behavior; focus on the relations among events that account for 
the acquisition and maintenance of individual behavior. 

BEHV 3117 Counseling and Behavior Change 3 Credits 

This course is designed as a survey of contemporary theories and techniques of counseling. 

BEHV 3118 Counseling and Minority Behavior 3 Credits 

The course is designed to identify and explore issues, strategies and successes with minority 
clientele. Special emphasis will be placed on behavior change strategies and techniques for 
working with dysfunctional patterns moving toward effective change in the work, family 
and community settings. 

BEHV 3301-Social Psychology 3 Credits 

A study of individuals and their social context, beginning with the study of the social 
behavior of animals and including human functions in small groups, in societies, and in 
cross-cultural perspectives; attitudes, motives, and social perception will be emphasized. 

BEHV 3311-Group Process 3 Credits 

A utilization of group dynamics and counseling techniques to develop self-awareness and 
team-awareness in managing the problems, stresses, and challenges of life. The course is 
designed to identify dysfunctional patterns and to move toward more effective and creative 
modes of functioning in the work, family, and community settings. 

BEHV 3401-Tests and Measurements 3 Credits 

An introduction to measurement, which covers statistical methods, research designs and 
research problems and the administration and evaluation of psychological tests. 



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BEHV 4000 Selected Topics in Behavior Analysis 3 Credits 

An in depth study of current topics, which are selected, developed and taught by a member 
of the faculty. 

BEHV 4101-Theories of Personality 3 Credits 

An exploration of the theoretical basis of personality with emphasis on structure, dynamics, 
personality, development, normal and deviant behavior, attitudes, beliefs, and opinions. 

BEHV 4112/ AFRS 4311 Behavior of the African American 3 Credits 

This course is an overview of contemporary topics in the area of Black Psychology, including 
the emergence of contemporary Black psychology, the Black family, self concept and 
motivation, theoretical background and others. 

BEHV 4110 Theories of Personality 3 Credits 

This course will familiarize the student with eight different theories of personality 
representing four different approaches or paradigms. Assessment techniques, methods of 
behavioral change (psychotherapy) and representative research issues associated with each 
theory will also be studied. 

BEHV 4111 Health Behavior 3 Credits 

This course involves an examination of theories, issues and research findings regarding 
health psychology, the healthy personality and healthy mental functioning. 

BEHV 4112/ AFRS 4311 Behavior of the African American 3 Credits 

An overview of contemporary topics in the area of Black Psychology, including the emergence 
of contemporary Black psychology, the Black family, self concept and motivation, theoretical 
background and others. Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 or consent of the instructor. 

BEHV 4212 Internship 3 Credits 

An individual designed project involving off-campus study, research, and where applicable, 
work in a public or private agency; supervised by the sponsoring agency and faculty 
advisor. 

BEHV 4213 Research Seminar 4 Credits 

The study and application of qualitative and quantitative research methods used in the 
social sciences for measurement, analysis and inferences of data. Emphasis on computer 
applications for analysis of and presentation of research data. Students will have 
opportunities to conduct action-oriented research projects and to prepare written reports 
in appropriate formats. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

CRJU 1101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 Credits 

A study of the history, theory, and structure of the criminal justice system; introduction to 
substantive and procedural criminal law, police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice. 

CRJU 2102 Police and Society 3 Credits 

A study of the role of the police in American society and an overview of police organization 
and administration. 
Prerequisite: CRJU 1101 

CRJU 3121 American Corrections 3 Credits 

A study of the historical and philosophical development of the correctional system; the 
organization and functions of correctional agencies; and the role and responsibilities of 
personnel in the correctional setting. 
Prerequisite: CRJU 1101 



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CRJU 3121 American Corrections 3 Credits 

A study of the historical and philosophical development of the correctional system; the 
organization and functions of correctional agencies; and the role and responsibilities of 
personnel in the correctional setting. 
Prerequisite: CRJU 1101 

CRJU 3301 Constitutional Law in the Criminal Process 3 Credits 

A case study approach to theoretical and applied knowledge of constitutional issues affecting 
the criminal justice system. 

CRJU 3311 American Court Systems 3 Credits 

An examination of the history, philosophy, and basic concepts of the legal system: the 
organization and jurisdiction of federal, state, and local courts: and the legal process 
from inception to appeal. 
Prerequisite: CRJU 1101 

CRJU 3321 Race, Gender, Class and Crime 3 Credits 

A comprehensive study of the role of crime in the lives of various minorities within American 

society. 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1101 

CRJU 3361 Human Behavior 3 Credits 

The study of the origins of human and deviant behavior from a multidisciplinary approach 
(biological, psychological, sociological, criminological); addresses major theories and 
research including case studies illustrative of deviant behavior such as drug abuse, suicide, 
mental illness, and sexual deviance. 

CRJU 3432 Community Policing 3 Credits 

Community policing philosophy, applications and issues and contemporary research of 
policing methods. 

CRJU 3521 Drugs, Alcohol, and Crime 3 Credits 

History of pharmacology, health consequences, and crime-related aspects of mind-affecting 
drugs. Emphasis on effects on criminal behavior, the legal response to the problem and on 
treatment and prevention of abuse. 

CRJU 3610 Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 Credits 

Provides a basic understanding of the complex factors related to crime, with concentration 
on principal theoretical approaches to the explanation of crime. 

CRJU 3901 Internship 12 Credits 

Participation on staff of a criminal justice agency under co-supervision of faculty and agency 
personnel. This course requires field experience, periodic conferences and seminars, and 
compositions and readings designed to combine theory and professional practice. A forty- 
hour week, full-time internship is required. 
Prerequisites: CRJU 4901 or instructor's approval. 

CRJU 4000 Selected Topics in Criminal Justice 3 Credits 

An in depth study of current topics, which are selected, developed and taught by a member 
of the faculty 

CRJU 4111 Criminology 3 Credits 

A study of criminal behavior and its impact on society, overview of major theories and 
crime causation and empirical findings about numbers of crimes and the characteristics of 
offenders and victims. 
Prerequisite: CRJU 1101 



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CRJU 4301 Jurisprudence of Criminal Law 3 Credits 

An examination of the nature and scope of criminal law; the classification and analysis of 
crimes and the examination of specific offenses, justifications, excuses, and other defenses. 
Prerequisite: CRJU 1101 

CRJU 4311 Juvenile Justice 3 Credits 

A study of children in the legal system, including issues and problems concerned with the 
social control and protection of young persons; the role and responsibilities of the juvenile 
court, law enforcement, and corrections. 
Prerequisite: CJUR 1101 

CRJU 4331 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems 3 Credits 

An analysis of the design, operation, and legal basis for systems of justice in other countries, 

governmental, political, demographic, and economic factors in past and current trends in 

the adjudication of offenders; cross-cultural analysis of causes of crime and systems of 

justice. 

Prerequisite: CRJU 1101 

CRJU 4411 Criminal Investigations 3 Credits 

An explanation of the history, theories, and procedures for investigating crimes. 
Prerequisite: CRJU 1101 

CRJU 4420 Crime Analysis 3 Credits 

Examination of various approaches to crime analysis and its effect on planning for criminal 
justice and related programs. 
Prerequisite: CRJU 1101 

CRJU 4501 Violence, Crime and Justice 3 Credits 

An examination of violence, criminal responses to violence, and the role of non-criminal 
justice agencies in the area of violence prevention; a review of theories, statistical data, 
and case studies from other disciplines, such as: law, psychology, sociology, history, and, of 
course, criminology and criminal justice. 
Prerequisite: CRJU 1101 

CRJU 4521 Criminal Justice Management 3 Credits 

A focus on issues in the organization and management of criminal justice agencies, including 
police departments, prosecutors' offices, courts, jails, prisons, and community corrections. 
Prerequisites: CRUJ 1101 or CRJU 2102 

CRJU 4701 Criminal Law Practicum 3 Credits 

A demonstration of knowledge acquired in previous law courses by engaging in a practical 

exercise (mock trial); requires thorough knowledge of all aspects of criminal law and trial 

procedures. 

Prerequisite: CRJU 3301, CRJU 4301 

CRJU 4901 Senior Seminar.... 3 Credits 

Selected topics of current interest. Critical analysis of current research literature and 
development of action projects by seminar members. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 



DANCE 

ARTS/HEDU 1501 Modern Dance .1 Credit 

This course teaches the fundamentals of modern dance as well as introduces students to the 
history and techniques of the modern dance tradition. Students will study basic modern 



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dance principles and aesthetics and learn modern movement to develop and improve 
strength, flexibility, balance, coordination and creative expression. 

ARTS/HEDU 1511 Modern Dance Performance 1 Credit 

This course builds upon the techniques of dance learned in ARTS/HEDU 1501. It is 
designed to help students enhance skills in a variety of modern dance techniques for 
performances. Students will gain intellectual and kinesthetic understanding of different 
modern styles. Performance qualities and creative movement explorations are an 
important aspect of the class. 
Prerequisite 1501 

DNCE 2501 Modern Dance Technique & Performance 3 Credits 

This course is designed to teach students with basic to advanced skills techniques of 
modern dance that lead to performances. This course introduces students with beginner 
level to advance levels elements of dance that are necessary in order to improve their dance 
skills. This will then lead to dance performance. The student will be evaluated through 
class participation, written work, and demonstration of dance skills taught in class. This 
evaluation is based solely on the student's ability and not on the ability of others in the 
class, but the studio performance will be based on how well the class organizes a dance 
recital as well as individual choreography. By learning more about the art of dance, it is 
the hope of the instructor upon exiting this class, that each student will develop a better 
appreciation for this art form. It is helpful if students who take this class already have some 
dance training. 

DNCE 3501 Appreciation and History of Dance 3 Credits 

This course surveys dance cultures in America and the relationship of dance to the identity 
and expression of different groups in the United States. Jazz, modern, ballet, and multi- 
cultural dance forms will be the focus of the class. The course includes guest lectures, film, 
videos, performing artists, reading, discussions, research papers and attending a dance 
performance. 

DNCE 3501 Appreciation & History of Dance 3 Credits 

This course surveys dance cultures in America and abroad and the relationship of dance to 
culture. Jazz, modern, ballet, and multi-cultural dance forms will be the focus of the course. 
Videos, research, readings and discussions will be essential components of the course. 

DNCE 3503 African-Caribbean Dance 3 Credits 

Beginning with Dunham Techniques, the course introduces the rich dance cultures of the 
Caribbean. Students will learn the different dances of Haiti, Cuba, Jamaica, and Trinidad 
as they relate to their function in secular and religious culture. Students will also study the 
Dunham Dance Techniques as codified by distinguished dancer Katherine Dunham. 
Prerequisite ARTS 1501, 1511 

DNCE 4201 Theatre Dance (Prerequisites: DNCE 2501, THEA 3101) 3 Credits 

The course is designed to expose the student to the dynamic styles used when dancing in and 
choreographing for theatrical presentations. This course will involve learning theatre dance 
styles, but also acting, costuming, and singing. The student will be required to participate 
in the theatre department musical production in the spring semester. 

DNCE 4501 Dance Theory 3 Credits 

This course is an exploration of contemporary theories of movement as they relate to dance 
and how those theories shaped that development of different dance technique. The course 
also looks at the impact ballet had on dance and the development of different dance forms 
that were derived from ballet. Students study the theory behind Horton Technique, Graham 
Technique, Dunham Technique, as well as other techniques. This class will consist mainly 
of lecture, with some laboratory. 
Prerequisite 2501, 3501 



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DNCE 4504 Interpretive Dance Performance 3 Credits 

This class is designed for the advanced, skilled performer. Students will learn the basic 
principles of choreography, and the theory and practice of interpretive dance. 
Prerequisite DNCE 2501 



ENGLISH 



ENGL 1101 English Composition 1 3 Credits 

A course designed to develop college-level reading and writing skills. Focuses on vocabulary, 
analysis of readings, grammar, mechanics, and the steps of the writing process. Introduces 
documented research and various patterns of organization and development. Minimum 
passing grade is "C." 

Prerequisites: Regular admission or exit from ENGL 0099 or ENG 098 and READ 
0099 or RDG 098 

ENGL 1102 English Composition II 3 Credits 

A course designed to further develop college-level reading and writing skills. Includes 
analysis of literary texts and specialized application of the research and writing skills 
learned in ENGL 1101. Minimum passing grade is "C." 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 

ENGL 2104 Advanced Composition 3 Credits 

Extensive practice in composition forms and stylistic techniques. This course requires peer 
and self evaluation and frequent conferences with the instructor to guide extensive revision 
of compositions. Students develop a final portfolio illustrating their expertise in writing. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 2105 Introduction to Literary Criticism 3 Credits 

An introduction to theories and techniques of literary analysis, with practice in reading 
literary and critical texts, in writing critical essays, and in doing literary research. 
Includes a survey of critical approaches to literature. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 2110 World Literature 1 3 Credits 

Survey of important works of world literature from ancient times through the mid- 
seventeenth century. The emphasis will be on examining works for their value both as 
artistic achievements and as cultural artifacts. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 2121 British Literature I 3 Credits 

A survey of important works of British literature from the Old English period through the 
eighteenth century. 

ENGL 2122 British Literature II 3 Credits 

A survey of important works of British Literature from the Romantic period to the 
present. 

ENGL 2131 American Literature 1 3 Credits 

A study of the main currents of literary thought and expression in America from the colonial 
period to 1865. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 



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ENGL 2132 American Literature II 3 Credits 

A study of the main currents of literary thought and expression in America from 1865 to 
the present. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 3012 Renaissance British Literature 3 Credits 

Literature primarily of the Elizabethan and Jacobean eras, with emphasis on the transition 
from medieval to modern ideas, the rise and flowering of English drama, and the emergence 
of contrasting prose styles and schools of poetry. Includes such writers as Marlowe, Spenser, 
Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Bacon, and Milton. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2121 or ENG 210 or consent of the instructor 

ENGL 3014 Romantic British Literature 3 Credits 

The genesis of Romantic theory and the beginning of the Romantic revolt in English; 
significant literary aspects of the movement as shown in the works of Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats; in the prose writing of Hazlitt, DeQuincey, Hunt, 
Lamb, and Scott. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2122 or consent of the instructor 

ENGL 3015 Victorian British Literature 3 Credits 

Literature during the reign of Queen Victoria, showing the merging of the Romantic tradition 
into the era of modern doubt. Includes such writers as Carlyle, Tennyson, the Brownings, 
Arnold, Ruskin, Meredith, the Rossettis, Swinburne, Pater, Hopkins, and Wilde. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2122 or consent of the instructor 

ENGL 3016 Modern British Literature 3 Credits 

Literature from the Edwardian period through the two world wars and decolonization to 
the present. Includes such writers as Hardy, Shaw, Conrad, Yeats, Joyce, Woolf, Lawrence, 
Eliot, Graves, Auden, Thomas, Beckett, Osborne, Pinter, and Stoppard. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2122 or consent of the instructor 

ENGL 3111 Major Authors Since 1950 3 Credits 

A survey of major trends and recent works in world literature, including American. Covers 
such topics as drama of the absurd, magical realism, and feminism. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 3121 (Also RPHS 3121) The Bible as Literature 3 Credits 

Critical survey of the various forms of literature found in the Old and New Testaments. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 3212 (Also AFRS 3212) African-American Oral Literature 3 Credits 

Studies African-American folklore, preaching and speaking, and the lyrics of spirituals, 
blues, and rap in relation to African roots, historical conditions, and literary practice. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 3213 (Also AFRS 3213) African Literature 3 Credits 

An introduction to the "orature" and literatures (anglophone and, in translation, vernacular, 
francophone, Swahili, and Arabic) of sub-Saharan Africa. Includes such writers as Achebe, 
Soyinka, Armab, Okri, Ngugi, Senghor, Beti, Oyono, Fagunwa, and Salih. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 3216 (Also AFRS 3216) African-American Poetry 3 Credits 

A survey of African-American poetry from the nineteenth century through the Harlem 
Renaissance to contemporary poetry, examining its relationships to the oral tradition and to 
literary, social, and political influences. Includes such writers as Claude McKay, Langston 
Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Nikki Giovanni, Sonia Sanchez, and Rita Dove. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 



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ENGL 3218 (Also AFRS 3218) African-Caribbean Literature 3 Credits 

An introduction to the literature of the Caribbean produced by writers of African descent. 

Includes such writers as Walcott, Braithwaite, Lamming, Marshall, Kincaid, Cesaire, and 

Guillen. 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 3321 Introduction to Language Study 3 Credits 

A general survey of linguistics, with emphasis on sociolinguistics, the historical 
development of the English language, and the structure of contemporary English. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 3415 Creative Writing 3 Credits 

Guided practice in writing fiction and poetry, with readings in theory and technique, 
analysis of sample works, peer and instructor responses to original works, and submission 
of works for publication. 

ENGL 3416 Creative Nonfiction 3 Credits 

Guided practice in the writing of various forms of nonfiction (memoir or autobiography, 
personal essays, travel writing, cultural criticism) that are distinguished by the use of 
personal perspectives and literary techniques. Students will study and discuss examples 
by professional writers and other students, submit frequent writing projects, and hold 
frequent conferences with the instructor. 

ENGL 3515 World Drama 3 Credits 

A survey of important dramatic works from the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa. 

ENGL 3521 Introduction to Film 3 Credits 

Introduction to techniques for critically analyzing films and survey of major developments 
and achievements in the history of cinema. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 4011 Shakespeare 3 Credits 

Reading and critical discussion of the great tragedies, comedies, and historical plays of 
Shakespeare with attention to Shakespeare's life and to Elizabethan theater. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2121 

ENGL 4021 The British Novel 3 Credits 

An evaluative study of works of great English novelists. Rise and development of the 
English novel, together with an analytical appraisal of four elements — setting, character, 
plot and philosophy. Readings and discussion of various types, with emphasis upon the 
variety of methods by which the novel interprets life. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2122 or consent of the instructor 

ENGL 4101 (Also SPEH 4101) Advanced Speech 3 Credits 

A course emphasizing self-improvement in all phases of diction and delivery and providing 
experience in various speaking situations. 
Prerequisite: SPEH 1101 

ENGL 4112 History of Literary Criticism 3 Credits 

A survey of literary criticism from Plato, Aristotle, Longinus, and the Sophists through 
the modern and early contemporary period (including formalism, ethical criticism, 
structuralism, and the Black Arts movement). Emphasis on classic texts. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2104 and ENGL 2105 

ENGL 4121 American Women's Writing 3 Credits 

A study of writing by American women, from the colonial period to the present, with 



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particular attention to issues of identity and literary authority. The course will consider 
writers such as Bradstreet, Wheatley, Rowlandson, Fuller, Jacobs, Dickinson, Chopin, 
Gilman, Wharton, Hurston, Moore, Stein, H.D., Morrison, Walker, and Angelou. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2131 and ENGL 2132 or consent of the instructor 

ENGL 4211 (Also AAAS 4211) African-American Drama 3 Credits 

A study of the development of African-American theater from minstrels to modern theater 
workshops and the plays of such writers as Langston Hughes, Lorraine Hansberry, Amiri 
Baraka, Ntozake Shange, and August Wilson. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 4217 (Also AAAS 4217) African-American Fiction 3 Credits 

A critical survey focusing on leading themes and techniques in the short stories and novels 
of such authors as Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, 
James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, Alice Walker, and Gloria Naylor. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 4218 (Also AFRS 4218) African-American Nonfiction 3 Credits 

A survey of African-American nonfiction from the early slave narratives to the present, 
including W.E.B. DuBois, Alex Haley, Alice Walker, and others. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 4311 Nineteenth Century American Literature 3 Credits 

A study of fiction and poetry of the Romantic and Realist periods in the United States. 

ENGL 4321 American Literary Realism 3 Credits 

A focus on the Realist and Naturalist movements in the United States, including local 
color writers. Includes such writers as Twain, Crane, James, Norris, Chesnutt, Chopin, 
and Dreiser. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2131 and ENGL 2132 

ENGL 4332 American Short Story 3 Credits 

A survey of the development of the short story as a literary form from Poe to the present. 
Includes such writers as Harte, Henry, Anderson, Faulkner, Hemingway, O'Connor, 
Updike, Carver, and Barthelme. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 4335 American Poetry 3 Credits 

A study of poetry written in America, with an emphasis on significant themes, techniques, 

and movements. 

Prerequisites: ENGL 2131 or consent of the instructor 

ENGL 4400 Special Topic 3 Credits 

An in-depth exploration of a literary topic. The topic changes each time the course is offered. 
Examples of topics include The Gullah Culture, Contemporary Multiethnic American 
Literature, Islamic Literature (in translation), Latin American Fiction (in translation), and 
Japanese Literature (in translation). Can be repeated for credit with different topics. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2104 and ENGL 2105 or consent of instructor 

ENGL 4551 Postcolonial Studies 3 Credits 

An exploration of such concerns as race, gender, nationality, and postcolonial subjectivity. 
Texts studied will include such writers as Jean Rhys, V. S. Naipaul, Salman Rushdie, 
Grace Nichols, and Okot p'Bitek, along with such theorists and critics as Homi Bhabha and 
Frantz Fanon. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2104 and ENGL 2105 or consent of instructor 



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ENGL 4621 Popular Culture Studies 3 Credits 

An examination of American pop culture, with an emphasis on developments since World 
War II. Studies current trends in pop culture and cultural theory. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 

ENGL 4631 Literary and Cultural Theory 3 Credits 

Focuses on current trends in literary and cultural theory. Introduction to major schools/ 
tendencies, including Marxist materialism, dialogic and semiotic analysis, deconstruction, 
reader-response criticism, psychoanalytic criticism, new historicism, materialist feminism, 
and African-American feminism. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 2104 and ENGL 2105 or consent of the instructor 

ENGL 4700 Senior Seminar 3 Credits 

A capstone course in which students will be guided to synthesize previous coursework 
through intensive study of literary movements, genres, and authors. Methods include 
small group discussion, formal and informal oral presentations, and conferences with the 
professor. Each student will prepare a major paper demonstrating skill in research, writing, 
and critical thinking. 
Prerequisites: Senior standing 



FINE ARTS 



FINE 2104 Portfolio/Career Marketing 3 Credits 

This course is designed to advise students on their chosen career and the variety of 
possible job opportunities. Students will learn how to audition professionally and develop 
a portfolio for presentation in their area of concentration. 

FINE 2601 Stagecraft 3 Credits 

This is a course on how to use backstage equipment with safety, speed, and efficiency. The 
course will focus on the practical aspects of lighting and production. Students will practice 
with a variety of equipment available to meet the lighting demands of a production. 

FINE 2909 Business Management Through the Arts 3 Credits 

This course is an introductory management course for the student seeking a career in 
the visual and performing arts. Students will be introduced to the various aspects of 
entertainment law. 

FINE 2999 Legal Aspects of the Arts 3 Credits 

This course studies the copyright issues and laws affecting artists, their impact on the mass 
media, entertainment media, fine arts, and academia. The course encourages creativity 
and discovery of knowledge, studies how unfair competition law protects the personal 
talents of media and entertainment figures, examines contract and agency law as it relates 
to professionals and artists in media industries, and assesses the adequacy of laws in the 
arts in an era of dynamic technological change. 

FINE 4999 Seminar/Practicum/Internship 3 Credits 

This is a senior level course with two components: 1. Students will be involved in off- 
campus, on-the-job observation and training in which the student pursues professional 
work in a variety of traditional and non-traditional careers appropriate to their academic 
program. An internship must be completed at 100 clock hours. 2. Students must have 
an understanding of the various kinds of research as well as knowledge in their field of 



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concentration in preparation for graduate schools and professional entry positions. Students 
must show competence skills in their field of study, prepare for successful completion of 
departmental exit examinations, and prepare a marketable project in the field of study. 
Prerequisite: completion of 30 credit hours in BFA major. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
ARABIC 



ARAB 1001 Elementary Arabic 1 3 Credits 

An introduction to elementary modern standard Arabic. The course will focus on the 
phonology and writing system. Lectures in Arabic civilization and culture will be integrated 
into the language study. Not open to students who have more than one year of high school 
Arabic or who are native speakers of Arabic. 

ARAB 1002 Elementary Arabic II 3 Credits 

A continuation of Elementary Arabic I. The emphasis will be on speaking and writing skills. 
Intensive practice of sentence structure and basic vocabulary will be required. Various 
aspects of Arabic culture will be examined. Not open to students who have more than one 
year of high school Arabic or who are native speakers of Arabic. 
Prerequisite: ARAB 1001 

ARAB 2001 Intermediate Arabic 1 3 Credits 

An intensive review of grammar and sentence structure, along with drills in reading, 
speaking and writing. Language instruction will be supplemented with lectures and audio- 
video presentations. 
Prerequisite: ARAB 1002 or two years of high school Arabic 

ARAB 2002 Intermediate Arabic II 3 Credits 

Continuation of Intermediate Arabic I. 
Prerequisite: ARAB 2001 

CHINESE 



CHIN 1001 Elementary Chinese 1 3 Credits 

An introduction to elementary Chinese. This course focuses on listening to, speaking, 
writing, and reading everyday Chinese. Lectures on Chinese civilization will be integrated 
into the language study. Not open to students who have more than one year of high school 
Chinese or who are natives of Chinese. 

CHIN 1002 Elementary Chinese II 3 Credits 

A continuation of Elementary Chinese I with more emphasis on writing. Intensive practice 
in grammar and composition will be required. Continuing study of Chinese culture. Not 
open to students who have more than one year of high school Chinese or who are natives 
of Chinese. 
Prerequisite: CHIN 1001 

CHIN 2001 Intermediate Chinese 1 3 Credits 

Intensive review of grammar and sentence structure, with emphasis on writing, speaking, 
and reading. Some cultural aspects will also be studied. 
Prerequisite: CHIN 1002 or two years of high school Chinese. 

CHIN 2002 Intermediate Chinese II 3 Credits 

Continuation of Chinese 2001 
Prerequisite: CHIN 2001 



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FRENCH 

FREN 1001 Elementary French 1 3 Credits 

A beginning French course which focuses on practice in hearing, speaking, reading, and 
writing everyday French. The culture and civilization of France are also stressed. Not open 
to students who have more than one year of high school French or who are native speakers 
of French. 

FREN 1002 Elementary French II 3 Credits 

A continuation of French 1001 with emphasis on hearing, speaking, reading and writing. 
Prerequisite: FREN 1001 

FREN 2001 Intermediate French 1 3 Credits 

An intensive review of basic French with more emphasis on speaking, reading, and writing. 
Various cultural aspects of France and Francophone countries are examined. 
Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or two years of high school French. 

FREN 2002 Intermediate French II 3 Credits 

A continuation of intermediate French I. Intensive review in writing, speaking, and 

reading. 

Prerequisite: FREN 2001 

FREN 3101 Advanced Conversation and Composition 3 Credits 

Intensive practice in conversational French based upon written texts and audio-visual 
documents. Development of writing and stylistic skills in addition to advanced review of 
grammatical structure. 
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 

FREN 3201 French Civilization 3 Credits 

Acquaintance of the student with major contributions of France to Western civilization. The 
notion of Francophones will also be studied. 
Prerequisite: FREN 3101 

FREN 3203 Survey of French Literature 3 Credits 

Diachronic study of French literature from the middle ages to modern times, with emphasis 
on major authors and/or works. 
Prerequisite: FREN 3101 

FREN 3401 Introduction of Business French 3 Credits 

Basic notions of management, market studies, insurance, corporate laws, export-import, 
telecommunications and commercial correspondence will be introduced. 
Prerequisite: FREN 3101 

FREN 3402 Intermediate Business French 3 Credits 

Same emphasis as FREN 3401 in addition to the usage of French Minitel through the 

Internet. 

Prerequisite: FREN 3401 

FREN 4100 Survey of African and Caribbean 

Francophone Literature 3 Credits 

Study of selected writings in prose, poetry, and drama by major French-speaking African, 
North African, and Caribbean writers. 
Prerequisite: FREN 3101 

FREN 4500 Study in France 3-12 Credits 

Summer study in France with the Study Abroad Program of the University System of 
Georgia. Topics and levels of study may vary. 
Prerequisite: Recommendation of instructor 



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GERMAN 

GRMN 1001 Elementary German I 3 Credits 

A beginning course using a practical approach with emphasis on speaking, listening to, 
and reading everyday German. Not open to students who have more than one year of high 
school German or who are native speakers of German. 

GRMN 1002 Elementary German II 3 Credits 

Continuation of German 1001 with more emphasis on writing. 
Prerequisite: GRMN 1001 

GRMN 2001 Intermediate German 1 3 Credits 

Intensive review of grammar and structures. Practice in speaking and writing based on 

textual readings. 

Prerequisite: GRMN 1002 or two years of high school German. 

GRMN 2002 Intermediate German II 3 Credits 

Continuation of German 2001. 
Prerequisite: GRMN 2001 



SPANISH 

SPAN 1001 Elementary Spanish I 3 Credits 

A course for students with little or no previous language study. Practice in listening to, 
speaking, reading, and writing everyday Spanish. Introduction to Spanish culture. Not 
open to students who have more than one year of high school Spanish or who are native 
speakers of Spanish. 

SPAN 1002 Elementary Spanish II 3 Credits 

Practice in listening to, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish. Continuation of Spanish 

1001. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 1001 

SPAN 2001 Intermediate Spanish 1 3 Credits 

An intensive review of basic principles of the language; continued practice in listening, 

speaking, reading, and writing. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 1002 or two years of high school Spanish. 

SPAN 2002 Intermediate Spanish II 3 Credits 

Intensive review of basic principles of Spanish; continued practice in listening, speaking, 
reading, and writing. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 2001 

SPAN 3101 Advanced Conversation and Composition 3 Credits 

A course focusing on understanding, speaking, and writing. Students will give oral 
presentations and write compositions on assigned topics. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 

SPAN 3201 Civilization and Culture of Spain 3 Credits 

An historical survey of the culture of Spain from the Pre-Roman era to the present. Classes 
will be conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 3101 

SPAN 3202 Civilization and Culture of Latin America 3 Credits 

An historical survey of the culture of Latin American from the Pre-Columbian era to the 
present. Classes will be conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 3101 



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SPAN 3204 Survey of Literature 3 Credits 

Introduction to some of the principal authors, works, and ideas in the literatures of Spanish- 
speaking countries. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 3101 

SPAN 3401 Introduction to Business Spanish 3 Credits 

A study of business terminology, including letter writing, insurance, banking, situations 
dealing with export and import companies, and job interviews. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 1002 or two years of high school Spanish 

SPAN 3402 Intermediate Business Spanish 3 Credits 

A continuation of SPAN 3401 with further emphasis on terminology relating to banking, 
insurance, letter-writing, job interviews, and exporting and importing. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 3401 

SPAN 4101 Beginning Medical Spanish 3 Credits 

A study of terminology vital to medical personnel, nursing students, and anyone in any 

health-related field. 

Prerequisite: SPAN 1002 or two years of high school Spanish 

SPAN 4102 Intermediate Medical Spanish 3 Credits 

A continuation of SPAN 4101. Students will continue to learn vocabulary useful to anyone 
in any medical or health-related field. 
Prerequisite: SPAN 4101 

SPAN 4500 Study Aboard 3-12 Credits 

Students spend one summer in the Study Abroad Program of the University System of 
Georgia. They take language, literature, and civilization courses and participate in extra- 
curricular activities, including cultural tours. 
Prerequisite: Recommendation of instructor 



GEOGRAPHY 

GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography 3 Credits 

A study of man's relationship to the natural, physical, and cultural environment, world 
patterns of population, climate and industrial development; problems of agricultural, 
commerce, trade, transportation, and communication, and conservation of natural 
resources. 



GERONTOLOGY 

GRNY 2101 Introduction to Gerontology 3 Credits 

A general introduction to social issues in gerontology with emphasis on the normal activities 
of aging, review of current studies on the roles, activities, and status in the later years, 
including income status and needs as worker, retiree, and users of leisure services. 

GRNY/PSYC 3102 Psychology of Aging 3 Credits 

An exploration of the general psychological effects of aging on the populace of the United Sates 
of America; a comparison of aging and its effects on the populace of several other nations; a 
comparison of accepted and/or often used terms to describe chronological, physiological, and 
psychological aging as well as the concept of ageism and some of it effects. 
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 or PSY 201 

GRNY 3104 Biological and Physiological Aspects of Aging 3 Credits 

A study of the general biology of aging, physiological changes with age, theories of biological 
and physiological aging, factors affecting longevity, and genetic aspects of aging. 



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GRNY 3120/AAAS African-American Aging 3 Credits 

An examination of the historical, demographic, and socio-economic profiles of Blacks; an 
analysis of major problems encountered by Black elderly persons; review of issues such as 
income, health, housing, and transportation; emphasis on unique aspects of Black religion, 
family ties, language habits, coping behaviors, and population distribution. 

GRNY 4101 Consumer Economics and Law for the Aging 3 Credits 

An examination of age-related consumer and legal concerns. This will be a practical course 
including exploration of such topics as wills and other legal matters, generic drugs, health 
care costs, food and nutrition, budget management, fraud, and consumer protection laws. 

GRNY/SOWK 4110 Services to the Elderly 3 Credits 

An emphasis on the social, economic, and health needs of the elderly with attention to 
delivery systems that work; focus on knowledge, research, and actual projects; designed for 
students planning to work in public or private agencies serving the elderly. 

GRNY 4201 Death and Dying 3 Credits 

A study of the literature expressing historical, social, and cross-cultural attitudes towards 
death and dying; designed to help students understand death in its social context. 

GRNY 4301 Physical Fitness and Recreation for the Elderly 3 Credits 

A focus on the physiological, psychological, and sociological values of physical exercise and 
recreations for the older adult; an opportunity to develop physical fitness and recreational 
programs for healthy adults; and less vigorous ones. 

GRNY 4501 Field Experience Credits Varies 

A field experience for students to work under professional supervision in a facility for 
older people, such as a home for the aged, senior citizens activity center, or housing 
development. 

GRNY 4705 Seminar in Gerontology 3 Credits 

An integration of theoretical classroom learning with practical experience gained by the 
students in the field. 



HISTORY 

HIST 1111 Survey of World History to Early Modern Times 3 Credits 

A survey of the major civilizations of the world from the earliest time to approximately 
1500. 

HIST 1112 Survey of World History From 
Early Modern Times to the Present 3 Credits 

A survey of the major civilization of the world from about 1500 to the present. 

HIST 1501 African-American History 2 Credits 

A survey and understanding of the political, economic, social, and psychological development 
of African- Americans. 

HIST 2111 A Survey of U.S. History to the Post-Civil War Period 3 Credits 

An introductory survey of the formative years of the history of the United States. 

HIST 2112 A Survey of U.S. History from the 

Post-Civil War Period to the Present 3 Credits 

A survey of African-American and American History from the Civil War to the present. 



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HIST 2301 History of American Military Affairs 3 Credits 

An introductory survey of military affairs in the United States from the Revolution to 
the present; designed to acquaint the student with the American military experience, to 
emphasize the problems involved in waging war, and to examine the effects of war on 
society. 

HIST 3101 Historical Research 3 Credits 

An analysis of sources and critical methods for evaluating, organizing, and using these 
materials; a focus on selected historians and distinctive type of historical writing. 
Prerequisites: HIST 2111 or HIS 202 and HIST 2112 or HIS 203 

HIST 3207 Georgia History 2 Credits 

A survey of the history of Georgia from pre-colonial times to present. 

HIST 330 1/AAAS African-American History Before 1900 3 Credits 

A survey of the history of African-Americans beginning with the African background to 
1900 with an overview of the twentieth century. 

HIST 3312/AAAS The African-American in the 20th Century 3 Credits 

An analysis of the modern African-American experiences such as African-American 
participation in the World Wars, the Depression, and the struggles for civil rights, identity, 
and self-determination. 

HIST 3411 History of Early Modern Europe 3 Credits 

A study of the history of Europe from about 1500 until the French Revolution covering the 
Reformation, Scientific Revolution, absolutism, family and demographic developments, and 
the Enlightenment. 

HIST 3412 History of Modern Europe = 3 Credits 

A detailed study of the political, social, economic, and intellectual development in Europe 
since 1789. Emphasis is on western Europe. 

HIST 3501 Colonial America 3 Credits 

An examination of cultures and institutions of colonial America before 1776. 

HIST 3502 American Revolution and New Nation 3 Credits 

An examination of American cultures and institutions from the outbreak of the revolution 
through the early years of the New Republic. 

HIST 3503 American Civil War and Reconstruction 3 Credits 

An intensive examination and analysis of the forces at work in American life during the 
crucial period from 1840 through 1877. 

HIST 3504 Resent American History 3 Credits 

An intensive study of the political, social, and economic history of the United States from 
the First World War to the present. 

HIST 3601 Colonial and Early National Latin American History 3 Credits 

An appraisal of the origins and development of social, political, economic, and intellectual 
characteristics of Latin America from the pre-Colonial era through the wars for 
independence. 

HIST 3801 Modern Asian History 3 Credits 

An introduction to the origins and developments of the economic, political, social, and 
cultural characteristics of Asian nations with special emphasis on the roles of China, Japan, 
and India during the past four centuries. 



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HIST 3901 Internship Credit Varies 

An individually designed course-project involving research in a government or private 
agency. Students will be under the joint supervision of the sponsoring agency and their 
faculty advisor. This internship will be arranged by the faculty advisor and department 
chair. 

HIST 3909 Readings in History Credit Varies 

Directed readings and other activities related to particular topic in the discipline. 

HIST 4000 Selected 1 Topics in History 3 Credits 

An in depth study of current topics, which are selected, developed and taught by a member 
of the faculty. 

HIST/AAAS 4301 History of African-American Thought 3 Credits 

A study of the ideas, institutional practices, values, and ideologies embraced by African- 
Americans. The course incorporates the philosophies and tactics of accommodation, 
integration, and separation. 
Prerequisite: HIST 3301 or HIS 308, or permission of the instructor 

HIST 4411 History of Modern Britain 3 Credits 

A survey of British history since the revolution of the seventeenth century, including its 
economic growth, its rise as a world power, and its role in the world today. 

HIST 4601 Latin America in the Modern World 3 Credits 

An appraisal of the social, political, economic, and intellectual development of Latin America 
since independence with emphasis on the 20th Century. 

HIST/AAAS 4701 African History Before 1800 3 Credits 

A study of major themes in the history of Africa prior to 1800: the African physical 
environment, early civilizations and state formation, the spread of Islam, the slave trade, 
the beginning of European colonization, and significant cultural developments. 

HIST/AAAS 4702 African History Since 1800 3 Credits 

A study of major themes in the history of Africa since 1800: major cultural developments, 
colonial rule, African nationalism and independence, and global Africa. 

HIST 4801 History of China Since 1600 3 Credits 

An examination of the major issues, revolutions, and personalities in the history of China 
from 1600 to the present; a comprehensive presentation of China's economics, politics, 
society, and culture during the past four centuries. 

HIST 4805 Twentieth Century East Asian Economic History 3 Credits 

An examination of the themes, patterns, and problems of economic development in China, 
Japan, Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong since 1900. This course provides an historical 
background to the relations between economics and non-economic affairs. 

HIST 4901 Senior Seminar 3 Credits 

A review of general historical time-lines of United States and world history with reference 
to trends in historiography and historical interpretations as well as a review of library 
research skills. 



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HUMANITIES 

HUMN 1201 Critical Thinking and Communication 3 Credits 

This course is designed to assist in the development of skills in critical reading, critical 
thinking, and interpersonal communication in the context of contemporary issues. This 
course focuses not only on improving reading comprehension and analytical skills, but 
also on identifying problems with logic found in one's own communication and in that 
of others, on developing an awareness of techniques commonly used in advertising and 
political language, on understanding principles of interpersonal communication and public 
speaking, and on organizing, developing, and presenting audience-centered material. 

HUMN 2011 Humanities 3 Credits 

Designed as a multicultural, cross-disciplinary course to enable students to discover, 
interpret, and assess critically the intellectual and aesthetic expressions of cultures of 
America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 or ENG 109 



MASS COMMUNICATIONS 

COMM 1000 Mass Communications Colloquium 1 Credit 

This course is for entering freshmen. The one hour a week course will provide the students 
with similar content to the course in Freshman Experience. The course will also provide 
the faculty in the mass communications department opportunities to engage majors at an 
earlier time in their matriculation and provide guidance to freshman majors on curriculum 
and concentration areas. 

COMM 2101 Writing for the Media 3 Credits 

Lecture and laboratory course introducing students to the fundamentals of writing news 
stories for print and broadcast media including public relations. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 

COMM 2105 Mass Media and Society 3 Credits 

General examination of the foundations, organization, control, and current status of the 
media. Economic and social impact of the media (radio, television, newspapers, books, 
magazines, and comics) are surveyed. Broad comparisons of the American with foreign 
media systems are included. 

COMM 2106 African-Americans in the Media 3 Credits 

A survey of the history, the contributions, representation, and portrayal of African- 
Americans and other minorities in the media. Assessment of the impact of such portrayal 
on social, political, and cultural interactions. 

COMM 3101 Media Arts and Design 3 Credits 

The development of basic skills in graphics for print and television. The course introduces 
students to the practice of image making and new technologies. It includes layout, 
page design, and other graphic elements necessary for public relations and advertising 
campaigns. 

COMM 3102 Photo-Journalism 3 Credits 

Instruction in taking, developing, and printing pictures for news purposes. Digital camera 
required. 

COMM 3105 Writing for Newspapers and Magazines 3 Credits 

A continuation of COMM 2101 with emphasis on writing for the print media. 
Prerequisite: COMM 2101 



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COMM 3110 Desktop Publishing 3 Credits 

An in-depth, hands-on application of at least two desktop publishing software packages 
(Pagemaker and Quark Express) as writing tools. 
Prerequisite: COMM 3102 

COMM 3120 Introduction to Communications Theory 3 Credits 

An overview of the major concepts and applications of human mass communications theories. 
While interpersonal and intercultural communications will be examined, applications of 
the theories and concepts in the mass media will be emphasized. 

COMM 3130 History of Journalism 3 Credits 

An historical survey of the principal developments in journalism from the eighteenth 
through the twentieth centuries. 

COMM 3201 Feature Writing 3 Credits 

A course designed to further develop a student's skill in researching, organizing, and writing 
news features and human interest stories. 
Prerequisite: COMM 3105 

COMM 3301 Introduction to Television Production 3 Credits 

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the disciplines 
and techniques involved in television production. The course will also give students a basic 
operating knowledge of the terminology used in the television industry. 
Prerequisite: COMM 3303 

COMM 3302 Speech for Radio and Television 3 Credits 

A course designed to teach the basic techniques of radio and television broadcasting. 
Emphasis on newscasting, advertising, sportscasting, and announcing formats. 
Prerequisite: SPEH 1101 

COMM 3303 Scriptwriting for Radio and Television 3 Credits 

The purpose of Scriptwriting for Radio and Television is to provide general practical 
experience at writing the various forms used in broadcast and film media, and to provide 
students with the exposure to professional audio, video, production equipment and techniques 
in using this with regard to the various scripting requirements for each medium. 
Prerequisite: COMM 2101 

COMM 3305 Introduction to Film Production 3 Credits 

This course is designed to give students a working knowledge of the disciplines and 
techniques involved in film production, and will give students a basic operating knowledge 
of the terminology and equipment used in the film industry. 
Prerequisite: COMM 3901 

COMM 3306 Introduction to Audio Production 3 Credits 

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of the disciplines and 
techniques involved in radio and other professional audio production systems. The course 
will also give students a basic operating knowledge of professional audio equipment and 
technology and appropriate terminology. 

COMM 3401 Introduction to Public Relations and Advertising 3 Credits 

An introduction to the role of public relations and advertising in our society, how "publics" 
and markets are determined and targeted, the different types of public relations fields, 
the use of public relations in image packaging, the use of advertising in selling goods and 
services, and the relationship of advertising agencies to advertisers and media. 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102 and COMM 2101 and COMM 3110 



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COMM 3402 Advertising Media Sales and Purchases 3 Credits 

Analysis of major media sales practices, including organization and preparation of radio, 
newspaper, television, or magazine presentations for advertising clients. Introduction to 
common media sales terminologies, data collection, and calculations and tools, including 
ratings and rate cards. 

COMM 3901 History of Film 3 Credits 

Class sessions are informal. The instruction process is lecture by the instructor, guest 
lecturers, out of class procedural demonstrations, examination and viewing of various film 
genres, and exercises by the class in various production situations. Student and group 
projects will be conducted in and outside of the regular class period. 

COMM 4000 Special Topics 3 Credits 

Special Topics course will allow for different courses to be offered based on various topics 
chosen by faculty members or resulting from students requests. This will allow for current 
issues to be addressed, as well as courses by visiting and adjunct faculty. The course 
will be taught as a regular course with several students attending the same classes and 
laboratories (if offered). 

If a given special topic is offered more than once per two-year period, it will be submitted for 
formal approval through regular university procedures. A course outline and syllabus will 
be submitted to and approved by the department chair prior to scheduling a course. 

COMM 4101 Advertising Copy Writing 3 Credits 

Principles and practices of planning, preparing, and writing effective advertising messages 
for newspapers, magazines, industrial publications, the trade press, radio, television, mail 
order, and billboards. Analysis and critique of current advertisements. Copy and product 
tests in relation to markets. 

COMM 4105 Editorial Writing 3 Credits 

Conceptualizing, researching, and writing effective editorials for the mass media. 
Prerequisite: COMM 3105 

COMM 4106 Communications Practicum 3 Credits 

Intensive field and laboratory practice on video, audio, or print projects under faculty 

supervision. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and COMM 4107 or COMM 4170 or COMM 3401 

COMM 4107 Advanced Television Production 3 Credits 

Advanced instruction and practice in television production, including directing, 
programming, and equipment. 
Prerequisite: COMM 3301 

COMM 4108 Film and Television Directing 3 Credits 

This course is designed to provide students with a working knowledge off the disciplines and 

techniques involved in the directing process for film and television, and will give students 

a basic operating knowledge of the terminology used in directing film and television 

production. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3305 or COMM 3301 

COMM 4109 Radio Production and Programming 3 Credits 

This course will provide students with experience in how radio stations operate and the 
various programming functions involved in the radio and music industries. 

COMM 4110 Advanced Radio Production 3 Credits 

Advanced instruction and practice in radio production, including directing, programming, 
and equipment. 
Prerequisite: COMM 3301 



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COMM 4111 Film and Television Editing 3 Credits 

This course will provide students with an introduction to linear and non-linear editing 
processes for film and television 
Prerequisite: COMM 3301 or COMM 3305 

COMM 4112 Commercial Recording 3 Credits 

This course will provide students with experiences in recording for the broadcast and music 
industries. Commercials, music video production, music production, and public service 
announcements will be examined. New approaches to digital music production and software 
usage in the music industry will also be covered. 
Prerequisite: COMM 3306 

COMM 4113 Advanced Post-Production Techniques 3 Credits 

This course will provide students with advanced techniques for the non-linear editing 
processes for film and television. This course will give students expert operating knowledge 
of the terminology used in the post-production process of film and television productions. 
Prerequisite: COMM 4111 or COMM 4112 

COMM 4115 Independent Study 3 Credits 

Directed individual work under the guidance of various faculty members. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

COMM 4170 Advanced Newspaper Writing and Reporting 3 Credits 

Instruction and practice in reporting all areas of public affairs. Includes ethics of journalism, 

law of libel, right of privacy, fair comment and criticism, privileged matter, and other 

issues. 

Prerequisite: COMM 3105 

COMM 4201 Copy Editing 3 Credits 

Designed to give students training in the theory and practice of copy editing and headline 
writing. Simulated local news copy and wire service stories are used. 
Prerequisite: COMM 3105 

COMM 4211 Newspaper Production 3 Credits 

Copy editing, headline writing and newspaper layout. Emphasis upon the principles and 
skills involved in producing a newspaper by the off-set of cold type method. 
Prerequisite: Prior approval of instructor 

COMM 4402 Public Relations and Advertising Campaigns 3 Credits 

Analysis of contemporary public relations and advertising issues. Development of public 
relations and advertising campaigns involving research, planning, and preparation/ 
presentation for various types of public relations and advertising organizations. Problem- 
solving and decision- making techniques. 
Prerequisites: COMM 3401 and COMM 4101 

COMM 4406 Public Relations and Advertising Workshop 3 Credits 

An intensive, hands-on course that stresses the production of professional quality public 
relations and/or advertising materials pre-approved or specified by the instructor. Students 
work in groups but meet as a class with instructor for critiques. Focuses on products that 
meet professional standards in content, style, and quality. 

Prerequisites: COMM 3401 and COMM 4101 (This prerequisite has been revised 
by adding COMM 4101). 

COMM 4705 Communication Law and Ethics 3 Credits 

Study of the laws affecting American media, including the concept of freedom of speech and 
press, federal regulatory agencies, libel, slander, copyright, and invasion of privacy. 
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing (This is a revised format for the 
prerequisite of an existing course). 



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COMM 4810 Introduction of Communications Research 3 Credits 

An introduction to social science research concepts and techniques in the study of the mass 

media. Survey of quantitative research methods in the media situations and media rating 

services. 

Prerequisites: COMM 2105 ENGL 1102, MATH 1101 

COMM 4815 The Documentary 3 Credits 

A survey and analysis of the documentary format employed in film productions, 1945- 
1970's, and preparation and production of a mini-documentary. 
Prerequisites: COMM 4107 and COMM 3303 

COMM 4902 Professional Media Internship 3 Credits 

A course open only to juniors and seniors majoring in mass communications; Students work 
with various professional media in Savannah and other areas. Junior or senior standing. 
Prerequisites: COMM 2101 and permission of instructor 

COMM 4904 Independent Study 

Independent study, on-line and print based, is designed to offer the individual student an 
opportunity to explore subjects outside of the traditional classroom setting. The specific 
course requirement will be formulated by the student under the direction of a selected 
instructor who possesses expertise in the subject matter. A grade point average of 3.00 
is required. Exceptions to the 3.00 average may be made for students under extenuating 
circumstances. 

An independent study form must be signed by the instructor of record and the department 
chairperson prior to a student 's enrollment in the course. A statement regarding the conditions 
and credit / semester limits under which the course may be repeated must be clearly stated in 
the DESCRIPTION (may not be enrolled for more than 9 credits). 

MUSIC 

MUSC 1101 Music Appreciation 3 Credits 

An introductory music course which emphasizes the repertoire most frequently heard in 
concert halls today — music from the baroque period to the present. Course content includes 
jazz, American popular idioms, and music from a wide span of cultures, including Indian, 
Arabic, Indonesian, African, Japanese, and Chinese. 

MUSC 1201 Fundamentals of Music 3 Credits 

Course in rudiments of music designed for non-music majors. 

MUSC 1311 Theory 1 3 Credits 

Course in notation, time signatures, major and minor scales, intervals, melodic and 
rhythmic problems, sight-reading and musical dictation. 

MUSC 1312 Theory 1 3 Credits 

A continuation of MUSC 1312. Course in notation, time signatures, major and minor scales, 
intervals, melodic and rhythmic problems, sight-reading and musical dictation. 

MUSC 1408, 2408, 3408 and 4408 are courses directly related to the official band 
of Savannah State University and run concurrently during the first semester 
according to student rank. A continuation of the course takes place during the, 
second semester. 

MUSC 1408 Band Organization (1st Semester) 1 Credit 

A course that focuses on band performance and technique development. Freshman level. 

MUSC 1409 Band Organization (2nd Semester) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 1408. 



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MUSC 1422 Applied Major Area— Band Instruments 

(Music Majors Only) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 1421. 

MUSC 1542 Basic Keyboard 3 Credits 

A basic course in the elements of piano playing. The course will cover practical playing 
skills, technical study, ensemble playing, sight-reading, harmonization and study of solo 
repertoire. 

MUSC 1608, 2608, 3608, AND 4608 are courses directly related to the official choir 
of Savannah State University and run concurrently during the first semester 
according to student rank. A continuation of the course takes place during the 
second semester. 

MUSC 1608 Choral Organization (1st Semester) 1 Credit 

The official choir of Savannah State University. The choir studies and performs standard 
choral literature encompassing music from the pre-Baroque style to 20th century music 
and beyond. The choir makes appearances in support of the University. Freshman level. 

MUSC 1609 Choral Organization (2nd Semester) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 1608. 

MUSC 1808, 2808, 3808 and 4808 are courses directly related to the official string 
ensemble of Savannah State University and run concurrently during the first 
semester according to student rank. A continuation of the course takes place 
during the second semester. 

MUSC 1808 Chamber Organization (1st Semester) 1 Credit 

A course that involves the official string ensemble of Savannah State University which 
studies and performs chamber and ensemble music. The group performs at various functions 
on and off campus in support of the university. Freshman level. 

MUSC 1809 Chamber Organization (2nd Semester) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 1808. 

MUSC 2101 Theory II 3 Credits 

A continuation of MUSC 1311 and MUSC 1312. Diatonic harmony, modulation, chromatic 
chords, modes, harmonizations from melody and bass, analysis of examples. 

MUSC 2102 Theory II 3 Credits 

A continuation of MUSC 2101. Diatonic harmony, modulation, chromatic chords, modes, 
harmonizations from melody and bass, analysis of examples. 

MUSC 2121 History and Literature of Music 1 3 Credits 

A survey of the history of music from the beginning of the Christian era to the Baroque 
period. Emphasis placed upon a study of representative works by major composers, together 
with a comprehensive analysis of style and musical development. 

MUSC 2122 History and Literature of Music II 3 Credits 

A continuation of MUSC 2121 beginning with the Baroque period to the present. 

MUSC 2408 Band Organization (1st Semester) 1 Credit 

A course that focuses on band performance and technique development. Sophomore Level. 

MUSC 2409 Band Organization (2nd Semester) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 2408. 



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MUSC 2522 Keyboard I 3 Credits 

A continuation of MUSC 1542. The course will further develop student skills in practical 
playing skills, technical study, ensemble playing, sight-reading, harmonization and study 
of solo repertoire. Prerequisite 1542 

MUSC 2608 Choral Organization (1st Semester) 1 Credit 

The choir studies and performs standard choral literature encompassing music from the 
pre-Baroque style to 20th century music and beyond. The choir makes appearances in 
support of the University. Sophomore level. 

MUSC 2609 Choral Organization (2nd Semester) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 2608. 

MUSC 3011 African-American Music 3 Credits 

A cultural analysis of African folk music and its influence upon the development of 
spirituals, work songs, and jazz. Contributions of African-American music to both popular 
and classical traditions studied. 

MUSC 3101 Gospel & Spiritual keyboarding I 3 Credits 

A course that is an intermediate course for the study in religious keyboarding. The course 
will survey piano repertoires in gospel spirituals music. This is a two-semester course 
required of all students interning in the religious sector. Prerequisite MUSC 2522. 

MUSC 3102 Jazz Ensemble 3 Credits 

A course designed to expose students to composers and arrangers of jazz, rock, and soul 
music. Improvisation also included. 

MUSC 3111 Theory III (Form and Analysis) 3 Credits 

A study of the construction of music from the eighteenth century to the present, including 
melodic and harmonic analysis of selections by major composers. 

MUSC 3454 Band Methods 2 Credits 

A course designed to present ideas, suggestions, and various methods involved in operating 
a band program. 

MUSC 3455 Band Repertory 2 Credits 

A course designed to expose and present works for band with regards to style, difficulty, 
scoring, rhythm and melodic lines, and other critical aspects of playing, interpreting, and 
performing band literature. 

MUSC 3608 Choral Organization (1st Semester) 1 Credit 

The choir studies and performs standard choral literature encompassing music from the 
pre-Baroque style to 20th century music and beyond. The choir makes appearances in 
support of the University. Junior level. 

MUSC 3609 Choral Organization (2nd Semester) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 3608. 

MUSC 3645 Voice Performance II 3 Credits 

A course that is a study of vocal repertory, including art songs, arias from opera/oratorio/ 
cantata, and musical theater, appropriate for first year students. Laboratory required. 
Prerequisite 2645 

MUSC 3601 Choral Literature ;.3 Credits 

The study of the literature and performance practices of various periods, the history of 
choral music, study of representative works of English, Italian, German and American 
composers. 






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MUSC 3620 Choral Techniques 3 Credits 

Course designed to develop basic techniques for choral musicians. Discussions include 
meter pattern, preparatory beats, cluing, diction, blend, balance, and intonation. 

MUSC 3641 Advanced Voice (Non-music Majors Only) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 2641-2642. Further advanced techniques studied through selected 
musical literature. 

MUSC 3642 Advanced Voice 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 3641. 

MUSC 3644 Applied Major Area— Voice (Music Majors Only) 1 Credit 

A course devoted to the development of proficiency in a specific area of applied music 
selected by the student with the consent of advisor. Regular lessons scheduled and periodic 
performances expected. 

MUSC 3645 Applied Major Area— Voice (Music Majors Only) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 3644. 

MUSC 3651 English and Italian/German/French Diction 1 Credit 

A course to assist students with the pronunciation and sounds of English, Italian, French, 
and German for good vocal performance. 

MUSC 3652 English and Italian/German/French Diction 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 3651. 

MUSC 3653 Vocal Pedagogy 1 Credit 

Methods and materials for the studio. 

MUSC 3751 Conducting 2 Credits 

A study of the techniques of conducting and interpretation of instrumental and choral 
literature. 

MUSC 3752 Advanced Choral Conducting II 2 Credits 

A continuation of MUSC 3751, with choral music concentration. 
Prerequisite: MUSC 3751 or MUS 351 

MUSC 3753 Advanced Instrument Conducting II 2 Credits 

A continuation of MUSC 3751, with instrumental music concentration. 
Prerequisite: MUSC 3751 or MUS 351 

MUSC 3808 Chamber Organization (1st Semester) 1 Credit 

A course that involves the official string ensemble of Savannah State University which 
studies and performs chamber and ensemble music. The group performs at various 
functions on and off campus in support of the university. Junior level. 

MUSC 3809 Chamber Organization (2nd Semester) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 3808. 

MUSC 4010 Conducting and Directing 3 Credits 

This course seeks to prepare the student to meet both the musical and non-musical 
challenges of conducting. A special emphasis will be given to learning material that will 
be valuable to professionals in the field of music education. This course is designed to 
introduce the student to the basics of conducting. It provides the basis for instrumental and 
choral conducting, and, as such, is intended for students in both areas. (The course is for 
music concentration majors). Students who apply themselves will gain the fundamental 
psychomotor techniques and score-reading skills necessary for clear and expressive 



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conducting. The course will begin with choral work, the majority of the semester will focus 
on instrumental conducting, and acquiring the body of knowledge necessary for success in 
that realm. 

MUSC 4011 Theory IV Counterpoint and Composition 2 Credits 

Consonance and dissonance, species counterpoint in several parts, simple fuges, twentieth 

century linear techniques. 

Prerequisites: MUSC 2101, 2102 or MUS 211 

MUSC 4012 Theory IV Counterpoint and Composition 2 Credits 

A continuation of MUSC 4011. 

MUSC 4408 Band Organization (1st Semester) 1 Credit 

A course that focuses on band performance and technique development. Senior level. 

MUSC 4409 Band Organization (2nd Semester) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 4408. 

MUSC 4420 Seminar: Instrumental Pedagogy and Techniques 1 Credit 

A course designed to use comprehensive methods and materials in understanding the 
repertoire of instrumental music. 

MUSC 4536 Intermediate Keyboard II 3 Credits 

Offered fall semesters only, this course surveys piano repertoire from Baroque through 
the Romantics (Baroque, Classical, Romantic). Students are expected to take 2 semesters 
of the course in order to cover all of the periods of piano repertoire. Classroom instruction 
is largely devoted to directed listening to the music. Reading assignments are given for 
outside work. 
Prerequisite: MUSC 2522. 

MUSC 4608 Choral Organization (1st Semester) 1 Credit 

The choir studies and performs standard choral literature encompassing music from the 
pre-Baroque style to 20th century music and beyond. The choir makes appearances in 
support of the University. Senior level. 

MUSC 4609 Choral Organization (2nd Semester) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 4608. 

MUSC 4611 Opera and Art Song Literature 2 Credits 

A course in which students listen with scores to representative opera and art song selections 
from various historical periods. Alternate years. 
Prerequisites: French and German 

MUSC 4632 Advanced Keyboard Performance II 3 Credits 

A continuation of Music 4536, Intermediate performance, and surveys of the piano repertoire 
from Romantics through 20th century (Romantic, Impressionistic and 20th Century). 
Classroom instruction is largely devoted to directed listening to the music. Reading 
assignments are given for outside work. This course is required prior to internship. 
Prerequisite 4536. 

MUSC 4641 Senior Voice (Non-music Majors Only) 3 Credits 

A continuation of MUSC 3641-3642. Concert repertoire and public performance required. 

MUSC 4642 Gospel and Spiritual Performance I 

A two semester advanced course in religious music. The applied course will concentrate 
on familiar Negro gospel and spiritual songs. This course is prerequisite for all students 



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expecting to intern in Sunday schools, Churches, or other institutions needing religious 
songs. (4642 and 4643 required before religious internship and passing jury examination). 

MUSC 4643 Gospel & Spiritual Performance II 3 Credits 

is the second part to gospel spiritual choral music. The course will concentrate on a 
collection of the "Standard" old songs, popular works of best known composers, of sacred 
songs, collection of Jubilee songs known as Spirituals, the rarest and prime favorites songs. 
This course is required for all students expecting to intern in Sunday schools, Churches, or 
other institutions needing religious songs. 
Prerequisite MUSC 4642 

MUSC 4644 Applied Major Area— Voice (Music Majors Only) 1 Credit 

A course devoted to the development of proficiency in a specific area of applied music 
selected by the student with the consent of advisor. 

MUSC 4645 Musical Theatre 3 Credits 

This course explores the origins of the Musical Theatre in the United States and the African 
American Contribution to the American Musical. Students will learn the different forms of 
musical theatre and develop a full production, with orchestra, scenery, choreography and 
choral 

MUSC 4690 Senior Voice Performance 3 Credits 

An advanced applied voice course requiring major performance in SSU productions. The 
course reinforces what as previously been taught. The course is designed to provide 
students with an understanding of the difference aspect of vocal performance. 
Prerequisite: 3645 and 4643. 100 hours of practicum. 

MUSC 4808 Chamber Organization (1st Semester) 1 Credit 

A course that involves the official string ensemble of Savannah State University which 
studies and performs chamber and ensemble music. The group performs at various 
functions on and off campus in support of the university. Senior level. 

MUSC 4809 Chamber Organization (2nd Semester) 1 Credit 

A continuation of MUSC 4808. 

MUSC 4999 Seminar/Practicum/Internship 3 Credits 

A senior level course with two components: 1) Off-campus, on-the-job observation and 
training with the students pursuing professional work in a variety of traditional and 
non-traditional careers appropriate to their academic program. An internship must be 
completed at 100 clock hours for 3 credits. 2). Students must have an understanding of the 
various kinds of research as well as knowledge in their field of concentration in preparation 
for graduate schools and vocational entry positions. Students must show competence and 
skills in their field of study, prepare for successful completion of the departmental exit 
examination, and prepare a marketable project in the field of study. 
Prerequisite: completion of 30 credit hours in BFA major. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

POLS 1101 American Government 3 Credits 

A comprehensive study of the origins, principles, structures, processes, and practices of 
American government, emphasis on various perspectives on democratic theory and practice 
of governmental institutions. 

POLS 2101 Introduction to Political Science 3 Credits 

An introduction to the concepts, issues, and methods of the field of political science; 



196 



emphasis on basic analytical skills, including research methods that will be important in 

subsequent course work. 

Prerequisite for upper level POLS courses for majors/minors 

POLS 2201 State and Local Government 3 Credits 

A study of the structure, powers, functions, and problems of state and local governments 
and their roles in the federal government system. 

POLS 2401 Global Issues 3 Credits 

An interdisciplinary approach to selected topics in contemporary societies, using the 
sociological, economic, geographic, and political perspectives; an opportunity to equip 
students to understand and meet the challenges of a rapidly changing world community. 

POLS 2601 Introduction to Public Administration 3 Credits 

An introduction to the field of management in the public, non-profit, and international 
sectors; an investigation of the growth and patterns of modern bureaucracies with a focus 
on the federal, state, and local governments in the United States; theories and practices 
with emphasis on administration processes, including organizational behavior, leadership, 
decision- making, budgeting, personnel administration, and policy development and 
implementations. 

POLS 3101 International Politics 3 Credits 

A survey of the basic factors that motivate international relations; an examination of the 
causes of war and the institutions and processes of conflict resolution. 

POLS 3102 Comparative Government and Politics 3 Credits 

A study of the methods, political environment, political structures, participation and 
socialization, public policy processes of selected political systems. 

POLS 3121 International Law 3 Credits 

A survey of the principles of international law relative to functions of states and other 
international entities, diplomatic relations, and laws of warfare, with special emphasis on 
the relationship between international law and politics. 
Prerequisite: POLS 3101 or PSC 303 

POLS 3131 International Organizations 3 Credits 

A study of the origins and evolution of international organizations, with emphasis on the 
United Nations and specialized agencies; factors favoring and impeding their development 
and their effect on political, economic, and social issues. 
Prerequisites: POLS 2101 or PSC 201, POLS 3101 or PSC 303 

POLS/AFRS 3141 African Government and Politics 3 Credits 

Introductory survey of political patterns, political processes, and political ideologies in 
Africa; an examination of the legacy of colonialism, process of modernization, and the 
problems of political instability. 
Prerequisite: POLS 2101 or PSC 201 

POLS 3201 American Judicial Process 3 Credits 

An examination of the institutions and operations of the American judicial system, with 
emphasis on the national, state and local judiciaries. 

POLS 3211 American Constitutional Law 3 Credits 

A study of the basic principles of the United States Constitution and powers of the national 
and state governments, examined through Supreme Court decisions. The course also 
examines constitutional protections of individual civil liberties and rights. 
Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or PSC 200 



197 



POLS/AAAS 3221 Civil Rights and Liberties 3 Credits 

An examination- of personal liberties guaranteed by the United States Constitution, 
including freedom of speech, religion, assembly, petition, the rights of privacy, and the right 
against age, sex, race, or economic discrimination. 

POLS 3231 American Presidency 3 Credits 

An introduction to the structure and behavior of the presidency; an examination of 
presidential elections, the organization of the office, and its relations to the other national 
political institutions. 

POLS 3301 Research Methods in Political Science 3 Credits 

An introduction to the quantitative and qualitative techniques for measurement, analysis, 

and inference of political data. 

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or PSC 200 and POLS 2101 or PSC 201 

POLS 3401 Administrative Law 3 Credits 

A study of cases illustrating how the conduct of public officials is regulated. 
Prerequisite: POLS 3211 or PSC 311 

POLS 3501 Public Personnel Administration 3 Credits 

An analysis of the methods and theories in personnel administration, including selection, 
training, promotion, performance evaluation, and disciplinary actions. Critical issues such 
as merit, affirmative action, organization, and employee strikes are examined. 
Prerequisite: POLS 2601 or PSC 202 

POLS 3511 Organization Theory and Behavior 3 Credits 

An investigation into contemporary organization theory and problems, including the 
determinants of organization design, structure, and process; performance; and the 
interrelationship between organization and individuals within the organization. 
Prerequisite: POLS 2601 or PSC 202 

POLS/AAAS 3601 African-American Politics 3 Credits 

An examination of black political movements, participation of African-Americans in the 
American political system, particularly the electoral process, the power structure in African- 
American communities. 
Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or PSC 200 

POLS 3701 Georgia Government and Politics 2 Credits 

A survey of Georgia state and local governmental institutions, functions, and processes, 
including the behavior of political leaders. 
Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or PSC 200 

POLS 3801 Gender and Politics 3 Credits 

An analysis of the interactions between gender roles and the political systems; emphasis 
on the impact of gender politics on socialization, leadership recruitment and political 
participation, policy-making, and health care research. 

POLS 3811 Urban Politics 3 Credits 

An examination of political patterns, political processes, political conflict in metropolitan 
areas; interrelationship between urban growth and change in political institutions, 
processes, and solutions to problems of large cities. 

POLS 3901 Internship Credit Varies 

An individually designed course/project involving off-campus study and research in a 
government or private agency; designed to require the full semester for completion; joint 



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supervision of the sponsoring organization and the faculty advisor; credit arranged by the 

faculty advisor. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

POLS 4000 Special Topics ,. 3 Credits 

Special topics course will allow for different courses to be offered based on various topics 
chosen by faculty members or resulting from student requests. This will allow for current 
issues to be addressed, as well as courses by visiting and adjunct faculty. The course 
will be taught as a regular course with several students attending the same classes and 
laboratories (if offered). 

If a given special topic is offered more than once per two-year period, it will be submitted for 
formal approval through regular university procedures. A course outline and syllabus will 
be submitted to and approved by the department chair prior to scheduling of course. 

POLS 4001 Directed Independent Study 3 Credits 

Independent study, on-line and print-based, is designed to offer the individual 

student an opportunity to explore subjects outside of the traditional classroom setting. The 

specific course requirements will be formulated by the student under the direction of a 

selected instructor who possesses expertise in the subject matter. A grade point average 

of 3.00 is required. Exceptions to the 3.00 average may be made for students under 

extenuating-circumstances. 

An independent study form must be signed by the instructor of record and the department 
chairperson prior to a students enrollment in the course. A statement regarding the conditions 
and credit /semester limits under which the course may be repeated must be clearly stated in 
the DESCRIPTION (may not be enrolled for more than 9 credits). 

POLS 4101/ENSC 4121 Environmental Law 3 Credits 

A study of the legal processes relating to resource conservation, utilization, and the 
monitoring, control, and abatement of pollution of air, land, and water. 

POLS 4201 Political Theory 3 Credits 

An examination of the theoretical approaches to the basic political concepts in their 
historical context. 

Prerequisites: HIST 1101 or HIS 101, HIST 1102 or HIS 102; and POLS 2101 or 
PSC 201, permission of the instructor 

POLS 4211 Contemporary Political Theory 3 Credits 

An analytical review of the writing of great thinkers from the end of the Middle Ages to the 

present; emphasis on recent political ideologies. 

Prerequisites: POLS 2101 or PSC 201, POLS 4201 or PSC 403 

POLS 4221 American Political Thought 3 Credits 

A study of origins and development of American political thought from the colonial period to 
the present, emphasis on black political thought and current liberal-conservative debate. 

POLS 4311 Legislative Process 3 Credits 

An examination of the machinery and function of law making in the United States with 
emphasis on the United States Congress. 
Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or PSC 200 

POLS 4401 Politics of Less Developed Countries 3 Credits 

An introduction and examination of the political systems of selected countries in Africa, 
Asia, Caribbean, and Latin America. 
Prerequisite: POLS 3102 or PSC 304 



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POLS 4501 The Media and Politics 3 Credits 

An examination of the role of the media in American politics; includes the media's impact on 
the electoral process and its role as a check on the president and other elected officials. 

POLS 4511 Public Policy 3 Credits 

A study of how the federal government perceives public issues, processes them, and executes 

public policies; an examination of the various decision-making theories; emphasis on case 

studies. 

Prerequisites: POLS 1101 or PSC 200 and POLS 2601 or PSC 202 

POLS 4521 Party Politics and Voting Behavior 3 Credits 

An analysis of the evolution, nature, and role of American political parties; an examination 
of each of the major party systems and the literature on voting behavior with emphasis on 
the problems and methods of studying voting. 

POLS 4601 American Foreign Policy 3 Credits 

A survey of the objectives and the formulation of American foreign policy. 
Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or PSC 200 

POLS 4611 American National Security Policy 3 Credits 

A study of organizations and processes involved in the formulation and execution of 
American national security policy; topics on nuclear strategy bureaucratic politics, and the 
programming and budgeting process. 
Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or PSC 200 or permission of instructor 

POLS 4901 Senior Seminar 3 Credits 

An examination of selected topics in political science. Open only to senior majors. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology 3 Credit 

This introductory survey course explores the scientific study of human nature, behavior, 
and cognitive processes. The major areas of psychological study will be reviewed including 
history, biology, memory, learning, development, personality, abnormal and social 
psychology. Emphasis will be placed on applying psychological principles and data to life 
experiences. 

PSYC 2103 Human Growth and Development 3 Credits 

An introductory, non-laboratory based examination of human development across the life 
span with an emphasis on normal patterns of physical, cognitive and social development. 

RECREATION AND HEALTH EDUCATION 

HEDU 1101 Concepts in Healthful Living 2 Credits 

An introduction to concepts related to healthful living. These concepts are physical 
activity, stress management, nutrition, environmental sensitivity, sexuality, and weight 
management. (0-2-2) 

HEDU 1111 Physical Fitness for Life 2 Credits 

An introduction to the role of physical fitness in a healthful lifestyle. This course involves 
developing exercise programs for each component of physical fitness. Students spend 
two hours each week on physical fitness activities and one hour each week exploring the 
relationship of physical fitness activities to a healthy lifestyle. (1-2-2) 



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HEDU 1201 Physical Activity and Stress Management 2 Credits 

A course focusing on the development of physical activity and relaxation programs that 
help students to manage and cope with stress in their lives. The course consists of two hours 
each week of physical activity and relaxation application and one hour each week exploring 
the nature of the human stress response. (1-2-2) 

HEDU 1211 Physical Activity and Body Composition 2 Credits 

A course designed to help students develop and execute exercise programs that will develop 
a healthy body composition and achieve and maintain a desirable body weight. Students 
spend two hours each week participating in exercise programs. The course also explores 
theories regarding the relationship of exercise and body composition. (1-2-2) 

HEDU 1301 Weight Training 1 Credit 

Participation in weight training exercise programs and weight resistance activities to 
achieve desired level of strength and a healthy level of body composition. (0-2-1) 

HEDU 1401 Physical Conditioning 1 Credit 

Participation in weight training exercise programs that develop the five components of 
physical fitness. The major emphasis in the course is on the development of cardiovascular 
fitness. (0-2-1) 

HEDU 1601 Swimming 1 Credit 

A beginning course in swimming. Students learn basic techniques and drown-proofing 
skills. (0-2-1) 

HEDU 1611 Swimming II 1 Credit 

A course designed for development of advanced swimming fundamentals and techniques to 
be used for acquiring and maintaining a desirable quality of life and cardiovascular fitness. 
(0-2-1) 

HEDU 1621 Aqua Dynamics 1 Credit 

A water aerobics class that focuses on all the components of physical fitness. (0-2-1) 

RELIGIOUS AND PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES 

RPHS 2101 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Credits 

The basic survey course of the field of philosophy. An introduction to logic, ethics, ontology, 
and religion, etc., as a basis for additional study in philosophy. Required for minors. 

RPHS 3101 Philosophy and Psychology of Religion 3 Credits 

A study of philosophical concepts associated with religion and the psychology of the religious 

experience. Team-taught with a member of the Department of Social and Behavioral 

Sciences. 

Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor. 

RPHS 3102 Philosophy and Psychology of Love 3 Credits 

A study of the nature of love, using philosophical as well as psychological sources. 
Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor. 

RPHS 3103 Philosophy of Film 3 Credits 

This course is a study of major theoretical issues relating to film and the cinematic 
experience. We will focus our study on four central issues in film theory. 1) The relationship 
between the camera, the object filmed, and the object projected on the screen. What is it 
we see when we watch a film? To what extent is film realistic or expressionistic? 2) The 
voyeuristic character of the cinema. What has Freudian psychoanalysis contributed to 



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the knowledge of the cinema? 3) The boundaries of time and space created by the film's 
image. Where does the film event occur? What is the context for the film event? 4) The film 
industry's relation to social conditions in America, through the depiction of men, women, 
minorities, and economic classes in the United States and around the world. How also does 
the economics of Hollywood affect the American aesthetic? 
Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor 

RPHS 3111 Principles of Logic 3 Credits 

An introduction to the systematic study of reasoning from the time of Aristotle and Plato 
through such modern thinkers as Boole and Toulmin. 
Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor. 

RPHS 3121 (Also ENGL 3121) The Bible as Literature 3 Credits 

A critical survey of the various forms of literature in the Old and New Testaments. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 or permission of the instructor. 

RPHS 3211 (Also AFRS 3211) Religion and the Africana Thought Systems.. 3 Credits 

An exploration of the historic roles of religion in the life of African- Americans. 
Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor 

RPHS 3231 Introduction to Eastern Religions 3 Credits 

A study of the teachings of Taoism, Confucianism, Hinduism, and the various sects of 

Buddhism. 

Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor. 

RPHS 4211 Philosophies of the African-American Experience 3 Credits 

A study of philosophical analyses and reflections relevant to the experiences of African- 
Americans. Will consider works and ideas of such historical figures as W.E.B. Du Bois and 
Alain Locke and contemporary thinkers such as bell hooks. 
Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor 

RPHS 4221 The Jewish and Islamic Traditions 3 Credits 

A study of religious thought as it has influenced the Old Testament, the New Testament, 

and the Koran. 

Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor. 

RPHS 4241 Ethics 3 Credits 

A survey of the various systems of ethics found in the world's religions and in the writings 

of the world's great philosophers, such as Confucius, Aristotle, Socrates, Mill, James, and 

Santayana. 

Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor 

RPHS 4311 Mysticism 3 Credits 

A survey of the common threads of mysticism found in Hinduism, Buddhism, the Sufi 

sect of Islam, Christianity, and the literature of Persia, China, Japan, India, and western 

civilization. 

Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor. 

RPHS 4411 Philosophical Issues 3 Credits 

An exploration of such topics as the nature of being, freedom and determinism, language 
and meaning, the concept of beauty, and the mystery of death. 
Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor 

RPHS 4601 Special Topics in Religion 3 Credits 

A study of topics of special interest to students and instructors. Subjects could include types 
of religious belief (such as indigenous religions of Africa and the Americas), approaches to 



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religious thought or experience (such as feminist theology, mysticism, or transcendentalism), 
or topics that stimulate religious thinking (such as love, friendship, death, the nature of the 
soul, the nature of evil). 
Prerequisite: RPHS 2101 or permission of the instructor. 



SOCIAL WORK 



SOWK 2200 Human Needs and Human Services 3 Credits 

The gateway course to the undergraduate Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) degree. An 
introduction to the profession of social work, including opportunities and career choices 
available to human service professionals, and the inherent values that guide the actions of 
social workers. Students are exposed to the range of problems and social issues that require 
individuals and groups to seek help. This course clarifies perceptions of the profession and 
its organizational response to these needs. Students are afforded opportunities to interact 
with professional social workers. Required for the social work major. Open to all majors. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

SOWK 2101/SOCI 2101 Social Statistics 3 Credits 

An introduction to statistical methods relevant to social work theory and practice in 
particular and the social sciences in general. Students gain knowledge and skills in the 
application of data processing techniques useful for social work and the integration of user 
friendly statistical software packages in the social sciences (SPSS). 
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or MAT 107 

SOWK 2205 History of Social Welfare and Social Policy 3 Credits 

A This first course in the policy sequence is a study of the historical significance of social 
values on the development of social welfare policies and programs. Concepts relative to 
social welfare developments are introduced along with beginning assessment skills of social 
problems, social programs, and policy analysis. Students also engage in an intensive study 
is made of the social problems that accompany socio-political developments and the efforts 
made to solve these problems. 
Prerequisite: SOWK 2200, SOCI 1101 or SOC 201, Admission to the major. 

SOWK/SOCI 3101 Research Methods II 3 Credits 

A This course that enables students to understand and apply scientific thought and 
procedures to social work practice. Emphasis is on the research process and its relevance 
for social work practice (i.e., conducting a thorough literature review, conceptualizing and 
operationalizing variables, formulating hypotheses, developing tools of data collection, 
selecting techniques of data collection, conducting an analysis, and preparing a research 
report to enhance social work practice). Restricted to social work major. 
Prerequisites: MATH 1111 or MAT 107; SOWK 2101 or /SOCI 2101; Corequisites: 
SOWK 2205 or SWK 250, 3202, 3340 

SOWK 3201 Human Behavior and the Social Environment 1 3 Credits 

This first course in the human behavior sequence studies the bio-psycho-social, cultural and 
spiritual influences on the life cycle from pre-birth through adolescence. Emphasis is on 
understanding the interactions between individuals, groups, institutions and communities 
and their environments from various perspectives including a systems, ecological, strengths, 
diversity, and human development. Restricted to social work major. 
Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOC 201, PSYC 1101 or PSY 201, and SOWK 2205 or 
SWK 250; Corequisites: SOWK 2205, 3201, 3220 

SOWK 3202 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 3 Credits 

The second course in the human behavior sequence continues the examination of the bio- 



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psycho-social, cultural and spiritual influences on the life cycle from late adolescence/early 
adulthood through old age and death. Emphasis is on understanding the interactions 
between individuals, groups, institutions and communities and their environments from 
various perspectives including a systems, ecological, strengths, diversity, and human 
development. Restricted to social work major. 

Prerequisites: SOWK 3201 2205 or SWK 250, SOWK 3201 or SWK 310; PSYC 1101 
or PSY 201; Corequisites: SOWK 3101, 3340 

SOWK 3220 Human Diversity and Social Work Practice 3 Credits 

A critical analysis and understanding of social work practice with clients populations 
from diverse backgrounds (i.e., social class, culture, geography, disability, gender, age, 
sexual orientation, among others). Self-awareness is a tool used to enhance students 
understanding of their role in working with diverse populations. Emphasis is on developing 
cultural competencey skills for generalist practice. Restricted to social work major. 
Prerequisite: SOWK 2205 or SWK 250; SOWK 3201; Corequisites: SOWK 2205, 
3201, 3305 

SOWK 3305 Introduction to Social Work Practice 3 Credits 

This course, the first of four methods courses in the practice sequence, introduces students 
to the professional practice of social work. Course content includes the history of the 
development of social work as a profession including social upheavals and the influence 
of social movements on service delivery; provides a survey of different approaches to the 
delivery of social services especially from a medical to a participatory empowerment model; 
and development of new concepts — assessment, empowerment, process, contract, generalist, 
human services. The problem-solving method, various field settings in which social work 
is practiced, and interviewing as a skill are introduced. Students are expected to complete 
twenty hours of volunteer service in an approved human service agency. Restricted to 
social work major. 
Prerequisite: SOWK 2205 or SWK 250; Corequisites: SOWK 2205, 3201, 3220 

SOWK 3340 Interventive Methods 1 3 Credits 

This course is designed to assist students in developing interpersonal skills in the beginning 
engagement process with clients at the micro and mezzo levels of generalist practice. 
Students develop personal skills and enhance their self- awareness using various methods 
of interventions applied via case studies, role plays, logs and other forms of demonstrations. 
Restricted to social work major. 

Prerequisites: SOWK 2205 or SWK 250, SOWK 3201 or SWK 310, SOWK 3305 or 
SWK 305; Corequisites: SOWK 3305, 3201, 3220 

SOWK 3341 Interventive Methods II 3 Credits 

This third course in the practice sequence, is taken in conjunction with the first field 
practicum sequence course SOWK 4701. The course focuses on practice approaches, 
problem solving, and intervention modalities using the systems perspective at the mezzo 
level of generalist practice. Restricted to social work major. 
Prerequisites: SOWK 3340 or SWK 332; Corequisites: SOWK 4410, 4701, 4901 

SOWK 3342 Interventive Methods III 3 Credits 

The final course in the practice sequence emphasizes macro level-interventions with large 
entities such as institutions, organizations, communities, and neighborhoods, rural and 
urban, nationally and internationally. Utilizing multiple roles of the generalist worker 
and integrating knowledge from social policy, students learn to be data gatherers, analysts, 
consultants, mobilizers, advocates, activists, leaders, and promoters of social justice as they 
implement corrective methods to system dysfunctions and attendant problems on people's 
lives. Methods III is taken in conjunction with the final field practicuem course SOWK 
4702. Restricted to social work major. 

Prerequisites: SOWK 2205, 3201, 3202, 3305, 3340, 3341 or SWK 250, 305, 310, 311, 
332, 334; Corequisites: SOWK 4702, 4902 



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SOWK 4106 Social Work with Families and Children 3 Credits 

A course designed to give social work majors comprehensive exposure and a historical 
perspective to the concept of family and child welfare (FCW) as a societal concern and as 
an area of practice in social work. The course analyzes social policies and service delivery 
relevant for families and children. This is the first of two courses required for BSW Title 
IV-E Child Welfare recipients. Elective course for non IV- E social work students and other 
interested majors. 
Prerequisites: Junior Standing or Consent of Instructor 

SOWK 4201 Gerontological Social Work 3 Credits 

This course offers an overview of social work theory and practice on aging and older adult 
populations. Emphasis is placed on the bio-psycho-social, cultural, spitirual, economic and 
health needs of the elderly with particular attention to policies, programs, and intervention 
strategies of intervention that meet the needs of the older adult population. Elective course 
open to all majors at Junior level and above. 
Prerequisites: Junior or Consent of Instructor 

SOWK 4301 Substance Abuse Intervention Strategies 3 Credits 

A survey of issues, personality factors, physiological and psychological effects, and 
treatment processes associated with substance abuse. Emphasis is on the specific effects 
of different drug classifications; understanding drug cultures; women, children, elderly and 
ethnic group addiction; and co-dependency and enabling. Open to all majors at Junior level 
and above. 

Prerequisites: SOWK 2205, 3201, 3305, 3340 or SWK 250, 305, 310, 332 Junior or 
Consent of Instructor 

SOWK 4410 Implementation of Social Welfare Policies 3 Credits 

The second course in the policy sequence provides students with critical analytical and 
assessment skills essential to understanding the purpose and function of social policy. 
Students are required to analyze several policies. Restricted to social work major. 
Prerequisites: SOWK 2205, 3201, 3202, 3340 3342 or SWK 250, 310, 311, 332; 
Corequisites: SOWK 3341, 4701, 4901 

SOWK 4510 Crisis Intervention 3 Credits 

An examination of the theories and techniques of short-term intervention and subsequent 
referral procedures. Topics include suicide, battering, HIV/AIDS, rape, death, dying, and 
communities experiencing disasters such as hurricanes, flood, and air crashes. Elective 
course open to all interested majors. 
Prerequisites: Junior standing or Consent of Instructor 

SOWK 4701 Field Experience 1 6 Credits 

The first of a two-part semester sequence Senior Social Work field practicum where majors 
are assigned to social service agencies to observe and engage in generalist social work 
practice. Under structured supervision with a professional social worker, students are 
provided opportunities to apply social work knowledge, values, and skills acquired in the 
classroom to social service delivery systems. Student interns wiU work must complete 20 
hours per week for a total of 300 clock hours. Restricted to social work major 
Prerequisite: SOWK 2205, 3305, 3240, 3241, 3101, Senior Standing. 

Corequisites: SOWK 3341, 4410, 4901 

SOWK 4702 Field Experience II 6 Credits 

The second sequence of the field practicum for Senior Social Work majors. Students 
generally continue in the same agency as in SOWK 4701, and are expected to apply 
advanced generalist techniques. Students must complete 20 hours per week for a total of 
300 clock hours. Restricted to social work major. 
Prerequisite: SOWK 4701, 4901, Senior Standing. Corequisites: SOWK 3342, 4902 



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SOWK 4901 Senior Seminar I 3 Credits 

Part one of a two-semester capstone course for the BSW major. This course is designed 
as an integrative reflective experience for students as they approach the end of their BSW 
studies. Students will be utilize value dimension of social work as the central theme 
to guided discussions, group exercises, and written assignments designed to facilitate 
and insure the integration of social work methods, knowledge, and skills for effective 
generalist practice. Students prepare for final senior exit requirement as determined by the 
department. Restricted to social work majors enrolled in SOWK 4701. 
Prerequisite: Senior Standing; Corequisite: SOWK 3341, 4410, 4901.; 

SOWK 4902 Senior Seminar II 3 Credits 

Part two of the sequence capstone course for the BSW major. Students complete final 
senior exit requirement began in SOWK 4901. Students are required to present a major 
paper, which they will orally defend, integrating a generalist understanding of social work. 
This requires the student to reflect on their background and culture, as well as the total 
BSW experience including social work core courses, electives, volunteer experiences, field 
internship, class discussions, professional meetings attended, and other interactions. 
Restricted to social work majors enrolled in SOWK 4702. 
Prerequisite: SOWK 4901; Corequisites: SOWK 3342, 4702 

SOWK 5501 Law, Race and Poverty in the Welfare of Children 3 Credits 

This course is required for BSW senior social work majors and MSW 1st Year Students who 
are Title IV-E Child Welfare recipients. The course focuses on differential application of law 
on child welfare issues and the interventions of human service workers. Emphasis is on 
child abuse and neglect, separation and loss, foster care, kinship care, the courts and legal 
issues related to decision-making. 
Prerequisites: BSW Senior, MSW 1 st Year , Consent of Instructor 

SOWK 6000 Special Topics 3 Credits 

Special topics course will allow for different courses to be offered based on various topics 
chosen by fculty members or resulting from student requests. This will allow for current 
issues to be addressed, as well as courses by visiting and adjunct faculty. The course 
will be taught as a regular course with several students attending the same classes and 
laboratories (if offered). 

If a special topic is offered more than once per two-year period, it will be submitted for 
formal approval through regular university procedures. A course outline and syllabus will 
be submitted to and approved by the department chair prior to scheduling of course. 
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor 

SOWK 6100 Independent Study 3 Credits 

Independent Study, on-line and print-based, is designed to offer the individual student an 
opportunity to explore subjects outside of the traditional classroom setting. The specific 
course requirements will be formulated by the student under the direction of a selected 
instructor who possesses expertise in the subject matter. A grade point average of 3.00 
is required. Exceptions to the 3.00 average may be made for students under extenuating 
circumstances. 

An independent study form must be signed by the instructor of record and the department 
chairperson to a student's enrollment in the course. A statement regarding the conditions 
and credit/semester limits under which the course may be repeated must be clearly stated 
in the DESCRIPTION (may not be enrolled for more than 9 credits). 
Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor with approval of Department Chair 



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SOCIOLOGY 

SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 Credits 

An analysis of contemporary society and North American culture and its major institutional 
forms (the family, religion, education, economic and political systems). 

SOCI 1160 Social Problems 3 Credits 

A survey and analysis of social problems, their interrelationships and linkage to social 
institutions in contemporary North American society. 

SOCI/SOWK 2101 Social Statistics 3 Credits 

An introduction to statistical methods relevant to sociological research, social work theory 
and practice, and the social sciences in general; the integration of user-friendly statistical 
software packages in the social sciences (e.g. CHIPPENDALE SHOWCASE). 

SOCI 2122 Sociology of Poverty 3 Credits 

This course examines theories on the causes of poverty and provides an examination of 
empirical studies concerning the trends and determinants of poverty. 

SOCI 2209 Deviance and Conformity 3 Credits 

This course will introduce students to the various theories, concepts and forms of deviant 
behavior . 

SOCI 3101 The Family 3 Credits 

A study of the role of the family in the development of the individual family formation 
and disintegration, cross-cultural and sub-cultural variations in family structure and 
experience, and the future of the family. 
Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 

SOCI 3201 Classical Theory 3 Credits 

This course will focus on the pivotal theories contributed not only to the development of the 
field of sociology but also to the evolution of ideas concerning social life. 
Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 

SOCI 3301 Sociology of Aging 3 Credits 

This course examines aging, including ageism, the changing roles and relationships of 
elders in society as well as theories and concepts of aging. 

SOCI 3312 Contemporary Sociological Thought 3 Credits 

An examination of the contemporary and classical theoretical models in sociology; an 
investigation of the development of social thought from the Afro centric and the Euro 
centric perspectives. 
Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 

SOCI 3322 Juvenile Delinquency 3 Credits 

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the social dimensions of 
juvenile delinquency, its nature, extent, distribution, prevention and control. 

SOCI/SOWK 3401 Social Research Methods 3 Credits 

The methods and techniques of social science research, research design, methods of data 
gathering and analysis, sampling and survey research techniques, and interpretation and 
presentation of research findings. 
Prerequisite: SOCI 2101 

SOCI 3425 Sex, Roles and Gender 3 Credits 

This cross examines the evolutionary and cross-cultural analysis of sex roles in human 
societies with a special focus on the relative status of women. 
Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 



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SOCI 3501 Criminology 3 Credits 

An investigation of crime and the criminal in modern, especially, urban society; a sociological 
examination of the causes of crime, its impact on major social institutions, methods of 
treatment, and preventive programs. 

SOCI/AFRS 3611 Minorities and the Social Environment 3 Credits 

An examination of the problems faced by minority groups in American society, especially 
where skin color and language pose social, cultural, and economic barriers; an examination 
of conflicts between dominant public attitudes and minorities, and among minority groups 
such as Black Americans, Puerto Ricans, Native Americans, Chicanos, and other sizable 
ethnic groups. 
Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1150 

SOCI 3621 Demography 3 Credits 

An examination of social, economic, political, and environmental factors as they relate to 
population growth, composition, and distribution. The course considers how population 
change affects the structure and organization of societal institutions and focuses on basic 
demographics analysis as well as on past and current population trends and issues. 
Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 

SOCI 3631 Urban Sociology 3 Credits 

A sociological study of the city, its growth, characteristics, and problems in the United 
States and elsewhere; an introduction to the literature, empirical data, and research on the 
urban phenomenon. The course provides conceptual clarity and understanding of the urban 
and urbanization process. 

SOCI 3651 Sociology of Religion 3 Credits 

The analysis of religion as a social institution and cultural phenomenon; cross-cultural 
studies of religious belief; symbol and ritual; the role and future of religion in secular 
society. 

SOCI 3901 Internship Credit Varies 

An individual-designed project involving off-campus study, research, and where applicable, 
work in a public or private agency; supervised by the sponsoring agency and faculty advisor; 
a stipend may be arranged for some work-related projects. 

SOCI 4000 Selected Topics in Sociology 3 Credits 

An in depth study of current topics, which are selected, developed and taught by a member 
of the faculty 

SOCI 4101 Individual study and Independent Research 3 Credits 

Independent reading or research in selected areas of sociological interest; supervised by a 
department member. 

SOCI 4135 Sociology of Law 3 Credits 

This course will also examine work of theorists who proposed and popularized various 
concepts, theories, and paradigms relevant to the study of law and society. 

SOCI 4421/AFRS 4421 Seminar on the African-American Experience 3 Credits 

A study of historic and current trends in selected sociological frames of reference of 
experiences encountered by Black people in the United States; emphasis on social movement 
and social change, urban life, institutional forms (family, religion, education), and political 
and economic struggles and achievements. 

SOCI 4901 Senior Seminar 3 Credits 

A comprehensive review of sociological concepts, theories, and topics, including research 



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methodology and statistical concepts. Students interested in pursuing graduate study in 
sociology are encouraged to enroll in this course. 
Prerequisites: SOCI 3401 or permission of the instructor 

SPEECH 

SPEH 1101 Principles of Speech 1 Credits 

Study and practice in speech preparation and delivery. Elements of speech production, 
types of speeches, and oral interpretation are emphasized Fall and Spring (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

*SPEH 2101 Voice and Diction 3 Credits 

Study and practice in effective voice production, with emphasis upon breath control, posture, 
articulation and pronunciation. Fall. (3-0-3) 

*SPEH 2111 Oral Interpretation 3 Credits 

Intensive study and practice in the oral interpretation of poetry, prose, and drama. 
Individual activity primarily emphasized. Fall. (3-0-3) 

SPEH 4101 Advanced Speech 3 Credits 

Emphasizes self-improvement in all phases of diction and delivery and provides experience 
in various speaking situations. 
Prerequisite: SPEH 1101 or SPEH 201 

THEATRE 

THEA 2101 Introduction to Theatre 3 Credits 

Focus on the components of theatre, its past and present history, its major shapers and 
movers, and how to develop an appreciation of the theatre experience. For non-theatre 
minors. Fall and Spring. (3-0-3) 

THEA 2601 Stagecraft is a course on backstage equipment, how to use it to maximum 
effort with safety, speech, and efficiency, THEA 2601 will focus on the practical aspects of 
lighting and production. Students will word with a variety of equipment available to meet 
the lighting demands of a production 

THEA 3004 Scene Design is an exploration and investigation of scenic design. The course 
will explore and analyze modern scenic elements used in the various play genres. The art 
and skills required in designing scenery are explored in detail. This includes the developing 
models, plans, and color schemes for student productions. 

THEA 3101 Acting I is designed to teach performers the basic fundamentals and techniques 
of acting. Students learn to control the body's creative energy by participating in exercises as 
solo acting, duo acting and basic audition. 

THEA 3122 Movement I is an introduction course to stage movement and kinetic practice 
and intentions. 

THEA 3123 Movement II is a continuation of Movement I covering the basic principles 
for developing fitness and examines the means by which one becomes an actress through 
improvisation, scene study and improvising play. 
Prerequisite: THEA 3122 Movement I 

THEA 3125 Stage Make Up & Costumes is a systematic study of form, line, balance, 
tone, shade, value and pattern with reference to the human form and its costume. The basic 
principles and practice in make-up, stage, screen, and television are used. Students will 
practice in using cosmetics, wigs, hairpieces, and facial prosthetics and masks. 



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THEA 4051 Black American Theatre and Performance will cover significant 
development in the American Black Theatre since 1900 as reflected through the major 
playwrights and theatre organizations. 

THEA 4055 Theatre History I covers theatre history, dramatic literature and theory from 
Italian to the Pre-Algdern era. The physical theatre and culture of the period will be studied 
as they affect the theatre of each period. 

THEA 4101 Acting II is a laboratory class providing practical experiences within the 
area of acting as demonstrated in Acting I. Students enrolled in this class are required to 
complete one modern scene study assignment for production and one complete audition that 
entails two contrasting monologues. This course works toward a culminating activity, which 
is a one-act modern play to be performed for jury. 
Prerequisite: Thea 3101 

THEA 4103 Advanced Acting/TV/Cinema offers advanced work in special problems 
of applying acting techniques to the demands of modern media. Practicum experience is 
designed for television and cinema. The course leads the actor/student to a finished mini- 
production of either a television or film project. 

THEA 4104 Acting III studies the problems and techniques in periods and styles through 
intensive scene study and performance of Greek, Shakespearean and Romantic works. 
Prerequisites: Thea 4101, 4103 

THEA 4105 Play writing is a laboratory course that explores dramatic writing including 
study and practice in writing for the modern stage. This course will be conducted upon the 
principles of critical readings, script analysis, and dramatic genres. 

THEA 4111 Performance/Production/Management permits the student to learn 
through theatre production, marketing strategies, front of house duties, fundraising and 
proposal writing, and the roles and responsibilities of a producer. 

THEA 4211 Auditioning and Directing explores elementary principles of stage plays, 

practice work in directing and auditioning, and one-act plays; attention is given to the 

principles of selecting, casting, and rehearsing of plays through exercises, lectures, and 

demonstrations. 

Prerequisite: completion of 18 credits hours in Concentration area 

FINE 4999 Seminar/Practicum/Internship is a senior level course with two 
components: 1) Off-campus on-the-job observation and training the student pursuing 
professional work in variety of traditional and non-traditional careers appropriate to their 
academic program. An internship must be completed at 100 clock hours for 3 credits. 2). 
Student must have an understanding of the various kinds of research as well as knowledge 
in their field of concentration in preparation for graduate schools and vocational entry 
positions. Students must show competence, skills in their field of study , prepare for 
successful completion of departmental exit examination and prepare a marketable project 
in the field of study. 
Prerequisite: completion of 30 credit hours in BFA major. 



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COLLEGE OF SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY 

BIOLOGY 



BIOL 1001 Introduction to Life Science 1 Credit 

Introduction to the biological sciences, career exploration, and the responsibilities of 
professionals in these careers. (1-0-1) Freshman elective course for Biology Majors.) 

BIOL 1103 General Biology 3 Credits 

Chemistry of life cell structure and function, metabolism, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, 
plant and animal organization and growth, origin and evolution of life, ecosystems, and the 
biosphere. (3-0-3) 

BIOL 1103L General Biology Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 1103. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 1104 Human Biology 3 Credit 

Human organization, functions of various organ systems in humans, development, the 
biosphere and inheritance; human population concerns. (3-0-3) 

BIOL 1104L Human Biology Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 1 104. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 1107 Principles of Biology 1 4 Credits 

Introduction to broad themes in biology, with emphasis on chemistry and origin and evolution 
of life, metabolic diversity and regulation, cell structure and function, classical genetics, 
macromolecular synthesis (including proteins), recombinant DNA, and biotechnology. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1211 (For biology, marine science and environmental 
science majors) 

BIOL 1107L Principles of Biology I 1 Credits 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 1107. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 1108 Principles of Biology II 4 Credits 

Introduction to organismal and developmental biology; structure and physiology of 
plants and animals relative to their evolution and adaptation to different environments, 
classification, comparative and diverse adaptations in the biological kingdoms, neural and 
endocrine control processes, and immunology. (3-03) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1212; BIOL 1107 

BIOL 1108L Principles of Biology II 1 Credits 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 1108. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 1401 Introduction to Biological Chemistry 2 Credits 

Basic principles and concepts of biology, life and living organisms, basic and applied biology, 
and an overview of the interface between biology and chemistry. (2-0-2)) 

BIOL 2401 Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 3 Credits 

Mechanisms of evolution in relation to the genetics of plants, animals, and man; speciation 
and natural selection; ecological processes in the development, structure, and organization 
of biomes; biogeography; population ecology; communities, and ecosystems; species 
interactions; and the evolution of behavior. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

BIOL 2401L Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 2401 



211 



BIOL 2515K Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 4 Credits 

Gross anatomy, histology and physiology of human organ systems (Not for biology majors; 

Non-majors course intended for health profession students). (3-3-4) 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1103 or BIOL 1104 or CHEM 1211 or consent of instructor 

BIOL 2516K Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 Credits 

A comprehensive study of the structure, location and functions of the organs and systems 
of the human body. Gross anatomy, histology, micro and macroscopic study of organs 
especially nervous, musculo-skeletal, endocrine and reproductive systems. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 2515K 

BIOL 3000 Laboratory Techniques for Medical Science 3 Credits 

Procedures involved in urinalysis, hematology, blood-banking, parasitology, and tissue 
examination. (1-4-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

BIOL 3101 General Botany 3 Credits 

An introduction to general principles of plant life with special emphasis given to cellular 
organization, anatomy, physiology, inheritance, taxonomy, and modern aspects of plant 
science, such as plant biotechnology and genetic engineering. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

BIOL 3101L General Botany 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 3101. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 3201 Cell Biology 3 Credits 

An overview of eukaryotic cells, with an emphasis on animal cells. Analysis of the anatomy 
and physiology of cells and subcellular components, including molecular biochemical and 
evolutionary perspectives. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1212 and BIOL 1108) 

BIOL 3201 Cell Biology Laboratory 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 3201 (0-2-1) 

BIOL 3211 Zoology 3 Credits 

A study of major phyla of invertebrate animals, morphology, physiology, life histories, and 
taxonomic relationships of selected representatives of groups and an intense survey of the 
morphology, taxonomy, physiology, behavior, and ecology of the chordates, with attention 
given to basic principles and theories. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

BIOL 3211L Zoology 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 3211. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 3301 Genetics 3 Credits 

The principles of genetic analysis and the nature of genes. Discussion of the chromosomal 
and the molecular basis of transmission, replication, mutation, and expression of heritable 
characteristics. Includes modern developments in genetics, such as the physical nature 
and fine structure of the gene, its relationship to proteins, protein synthesis, growth, and 
differentiation and regulation of gene function. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

BIOL 330 1L Genetics 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 3301. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 3321 Microbiology 3 Credits 

Introduction to origin, diversity, anatomy, and physiology of microorganisms; principles of 
immunology; environmental and applied microbiology. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 



212 



BIOL 3321L Microbiology 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 3321. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 3501 Animal Behavior 3 Credits 

Ethological approach to animal behavior; physiological, ontogenetic, and phylogenetic 

causes and adaptive significance of behavior are examined. Principles of animal behavior 

are studied, emphasizing social organization, communication, and genetic development. 

(3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

BIOL 3501L Animal Behavior Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 3501. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 3511 Vertebrate Anatomy 3 Credits 

Comparative studies of structures, across the vertebrate phylum. Includes analysis of 
evolutionary changes in vertebrates. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

BIOL 3511L Vertebrate Anatomy 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 3511. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 3601K Biocomputing 4 Credits 

An introduction to a broad range of computational tools and methods, which can be used 
to solve biological and statistical problems. Emphasis on computational analysis of nucleic 
acid and protein structure, and structure-function relationships. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisites: CSCI 1130; BIOL 1108) 

BIOL 3621 Urban Health and Hygiene 3 Credits 

An introduction to a variety of environmental and occupational health hazards of an 

urbanized society. Covers biological and health effects of environmental pollutants, disease 

vectors, food and housing sanitation, and principles of industrial hygiene. Social and 

psychological stresses environmental health planning and management are also discussed. 

(3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

BIOL 3701 Bioethics 1 Credit 

A course designed to promote responsible conduct of science. Topics covered include 
scientific integrity, misconduct in science, conflict of interest, plagiarism, informed consent, 
data management, animal welfare, laboratory safety, responsible authorship, intellectual 
property, copy rights and patents. (1-0-1) 
Prerequisite: Instructor's approval 

BIOL 3801 Animal Physiology 3 Credits 

A study of vertebrate systemic physiological processes. Topics covered are bioenergetics, 
temperature regulation, endocrine control mechanisms; digestive, urinary, cardiac, 
respiratory, excretory, and reproductive systems; membranes; and neurophysiology. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 3201 

BIOL 3801L Animal Physiology 1 Credit 

Lab may be taken concurrently with BIOL 3801. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 4201 Toxicology 3 Credits 

General principles of toxicology, testing procedures, target organs, toxic substances, and 
risk assessment. Emphasis is on the mechanisms involved in chemical carcinogenesis, 
mutagenesis, and teratogenesis. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108; CHEM 3511 



213 



BIOL 4211 Reproductive Biology 3 Credits 

Comparative anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology of male and female reproductive 
systems with emphasis on gametogenesis, early embryonic development, and mechanisms 
of birth control in humans. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 3201 

BIOL 4211L Reproductive Biology 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 4211. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 4270 Mycology 3 Credits 

Ecology, physiology systematics, development of microfungi and organisms of general, 
industrial, and economic importance. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 3321 

BIOL 4270L Mycology 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 4270. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 4301 Biotechnology-An Overview 3 Credits 

An overview of principles and techniques involved in biotechnology. The impact of 
biotechnology on mankind, with reference to its applications in agriculture, medicine, 
horticulture, forestry, fisheries, and environmental protection is discussed. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: Any one of the following or its equivalent-BIOL 2201, 3301, CHEM 
4101 

BIOL 4301L Biotechnology-An Overview 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 4301. (0-3-1) 

BIOL 4411 Genetic Engineering Technology 1 3 Credits 

A basic understanding of molecular biology and its applications. Concepts and principles 
of recombinant DNA technology, its relevance to generic engineering, and its uses in basic 
and applied biology. Molecular mechanisms of gene transfer, integration and expression of 
foreign gene(s) in target tissues/organisms. (3-0-3) 

Prerequisite: Any one of the following or its equivalent-BIOL 2201, 3301, 4301, 
CHEM 4101 

BIOL 441 1L Genetic Engineering Technology 1 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 4411. (0-3-1) 

BIOL 4412 Genetic Engineering Technology II 4 Credits 

Principles and applications of biotechnology/molecular biology laboratory methods. Use 

recombinant DNA technology, gene transfer, regeneration of transgencies, analysis of 

transgene expression and other related techniques in biotechnology/molecular biology 

research. (1-5-4) 

Prerequisites: BIOL 4301 or 4411, junior standing and the consent of the 

instructor. 

BIOL 4601 Neuroscience 3 Credits 

A study of neural function from the cellular through the behavioral levels. Analysis of neural 
structures and functions from the perspectives of electrophysiology, neurotransmitter 
mechanisms and pharmacology, neural networks, and comparative neuroanatomy. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: BIOL 3201; 3511 

BIOL 4601L Neuroscience Lab , 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 4601. (0-2-1) 



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BIOL 4611 Developmental Biology 3 Credits 

The study of organismal development, with an emphasis on animal systems. Course will 
include an analysis of genetic and hormonal factors during embryonic differentiation, with 
a perspective on phylogenetic relationships. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: BIOL 3201; 3301; 3511 

BIOL 4611L Developmental Biology Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 4611. (0-3-1) 

BIOL 4631 Endocrinology 3 Credits 

Physiology of the endocrine glands and their control of metabolism and reproductive cycles. 

(3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: BIOL 3201 and 3801 

BIOL 4631L Endocrinology Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 4631. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 4641 Parasitology 3 Credits 

General principles of parasitism; classification, morphology, and life cycle of parasites of 
vertebrates, and immunoparasitology. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 

BIOL 4641L Parasitology Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 4641. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 4651 Physiological Chemistry 3 Credits 

Advanced biological chemistry, emphasizing intermediary metabolism, and regulation 
of metabolic pathways. New developments in metabolism, role of enzymes and enzyme 
kinetics involving chemistry of liver, kidney, respiratory functions will be stressed. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 3201 

BIOL 4651L Physiological Chemistry Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 4651. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 4681 Immunology 3 Credits 

Introduction to the study of infection and immunity in disease, cell- mediated and humoral 
immunity, immunological methods, and immunochemistry. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: BIOL 3201 and 3321 

BIOL 4681L Immunology Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 4681. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 4701 Molecular Genetics 3 Credits 

A study of molecular basis of inheritance with emphasis on the chemical nature of the gene, 
DNA replication, transcription, translation, and regulation of gene expression. The practical 
aspects include gene cloning, sequencing, and other recombinant techniques. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 3301 

BIOL 4701L Molecular Genetics Lab 1 Credit 

Practical laboratory exercises in gene cloning, sequencing and other recombinant DNA 
techniques. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 4711 Molecular Biology 3 Credits 

Detailed analysis of structure and ultrastructure of the cell; biochemistry, biophysics, 
physiology, and molecular genetics. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 3501, BIOL 2201 and 3301 



215 



BIOL 4711L Molecular Biology Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with BIOL 4711. (0-2-1) 

BIOL 4901 Senior Seminar 1 Credit 

This course will provide instruction on researching and presenting a review of an area of 
specialized knowledge relevant to the students program of study. Students will produce 
written and oral reports that summarize the material. If the student is also required to 
complete Senior Research/Internship (4902), then the research work should be planned as 
part of the reports. (1-0-1) 
Prerequisite: Completion of 3000 level of core curriculum) 

BIOL 4902 Senior Research/Internship 1-3 Credits 

A research project under faculty supervision, that includes researching the background 
on a given problem, defining an hypothesis, and planning and executing experiments. A 
written report/manuscript and oral presentation are required. ((1-2-2)) 
Prerequisite: Completion of 3000 level of core curriculum, BIOL 4901 (may be 
concurrent enrollment), and consent of faculty advisor.) 

BIOL 4903 Senior Research II 1-3 Credits 

This class is intended as a continuation of research or internship activities from 4902. 
Consent of instructor and the faculty advisor are required. 

Prerequuisite: Completion of 300 level core curriculum, 4901 and 4902 (may be 
concurrently enrolled in 4902 and consent of faculty advisor) 

BIOL 4930 Senior Synbthesis 2 Credits 

A review of academic training in preparation for transition to the next professional level. 
Students will enroll in this course within 2 semesters of degree completion. Students will 
review degree material and complete the department Exit Exam. A passing grade on the 
Exit Exam is required to pass the class. Graduate training and career options will also be 
explored. (2-0-2) 
Prerequisite: Completion of 3000 level of core curriculum 



CHEMISTRY 

Note: Unless otherwise noted, lecture courses meet three hours each week 

and carry three semesters hours credit. Laboratory courses meet 

four hours each week and carry one semester hour credit. 

CHEM HOIK* Introductory Chemistry 4 Credits 

Introduction to chemistry for non-science majors. Topics to be covered include atomic 
structure, periodicity, and chemical processes in the natural world. Laboratory exercises 
will supplement lecture material.. (3-3-4) 

CHEM 1115* Chemical Calculations 3 Credits 

Introduction to the use of mathematics to solve chemical problems encountered in CHEM 
1211 and 1212. (3-0-3) 

CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry 1 3 Credits 

First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and 
applications of chemistry for science majors. This course covers composition of matter, 
stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. 
Prerequisites: All students are required to take a Chemistry Placement Test. (3-0-3) 

CHEM 1211L Principles of Chemistry I Laboratory 1 1 Credit 

Laboratory exercises to supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1211. (0-4-1) 
Prerequisite or corequisite: CHEM 1211 



216 



CHEM 1211HK Honors Principles of Chemistry 1 4 Credits 

Fundamental laws and theories of chemical reactions. Topics include atomic structure, 
bonding theory, reactions and reaction Stoichiometry acids and bases, gases, solution 
equilibria, thermodynamics and kinetics. Material will be treated in greater details and 
higher mathematical rigor than CHEM 1211 and 1212. (3-4-4) 
Prerequisite: A score of 90% or greater on the Chemistry Placement Test 

CHEM 1212 Principles of Chemistry II 3 Credits 

Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and 
applications of chemistry for science majors. (3-03) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 1211 

CHEM 1212HK Honors Principle of Chemistry II 4 Credits 

Continuation of CHEM 1211HK. Topics include descriptive inorganic chemistry and 
materials, introduction to organic chemistry. (3-4-4) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 1211HK 

CHEM 1212L Principles of Chemistry II Laboratory 1 Credit 

Laboratory exercises to supplement the lecture material of CHEM 1212. (0-4-1) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 1211L (corequisite: CHEM 1212) 

CHEM 2101: Synthesis Laboratory 2 Credits 

This laboratory course is designed to prepare chemistry majors for upper level laboratory 
courses. The laboratory experiments will include quantitative analysis, inorganic synthesis 
and computational methods. The course will be 1 hour of lecture and 4 hours laboratory per 
week. (1-4-2)) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 1212HK, or 1212L 

CHEM 2501: Organic Chemistry I 3 Credits 

The first of two semester introductory courses covering the principles of organic chemistry. 
The properties, preparation, reactions, and interrelationships of the important classes of 
organic chemistry. (3-0-3)) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 1212, or 1212HK 

CHEM 2501L: Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 1 Credit 

Laboratory techniques in organic chemistry; synthesis and reactions of organic compounds 

and spectroscopic analysis. 

Lab taken concurrently with CHEM 2501 

Prerequisite: CHEM 1212L; corequisite: CHEM 2501 (0-4-1) 

CHEM 2511: Organic Chemistry II 3 Credits 

A Continuation of Organic Chemistry I. (3-0-3)) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 2501 

CHEM 2511L: Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 1 Credit 

A Continuation of Chemistry Organic Chemistry Laboratory I. (0-4-1) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 2501L; corequisite: CHEM 2511 

CHEM 3101 Analytical Chemistry 3 Credits 

Principles and techniques in volumetric and gravimetric determinations. Principles 
of chemical equilibria using chromatographic, spectrophotometric, and potentiometric 
methods of analysis. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 1212 

CHEM 3 10 1L Analytical Chemistry Laboratory 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with CHEM 3101. (0-4-1) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 1212L (corequisite: CHEM 3101) 



217 



CHEM 3201 Instrumental and Data Analysis 3 Credits 

Instrumental techniques used in chemical analysis with emphasis on accuracy and 
precision. Statistical and regression methods for the interpretation of data. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 3101 

CHEM 3201L Instrumental Analysis Laboratory 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with CHEM 3201. (0-4-1) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 3101L (;corequisite: CHEM 3201) 

CHEM 3302 Research 2 Credits 

Supervised research including literature search, laboratory experimentation, and 
interpretation and presentation of results. (0-6-2) 
Prerequisite: Junior standing 

CHEM 3401 Physical Chemistry I 3 Credits 

Properties of gases, thermodynamics, thermo-chemistry, physical transformation and 
equilibrium, phase diagrams, chemical equilibrium (3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: MATH 2111 PHYS 1112 or 2212 Lab taken concurrently with 
CHEM 3401. (0-4-1); Corequisite: CHEM 3401 

CHEM 3411 Physical Chemistry II 3 Credits 

Equilibrium electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, reaction dynamics, quantum theory, 
atomic and molecular structure, modern spectroscopy. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 3401 

CHEM 341 1L Physical Chemistry Laboratory II 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with CHEM 3411. (0-4-1) 
Corequisite CHEM 3411, Prerequisite CHEM 3401L 

CHEM 3522 Advanced Synthesis Lab 2 Credits 

The focus of this laboratory course will be on advanced synthetic methods in organic, inorganic 
chemistry and biochemistry. A wide range of compounds will be synthesized and characterized 
using appropriate separation and spectroscopic techniques. The interpretation of spectroscopic 
spectra will be emphasized. There will be two three-hour labs per week. (0-6-2) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 2101, CHEM 2511 and CHEM 2511L 

CHEM 4101 Biochemistry 3 Credits 

Structure and function of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and lipids. Emphasis on 
mechanistic analysis of metabolic pathways and enzymes activity. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 2511 

CHEM 4111 Advanced Biochemistry 3 Credits 

Recent advances in medical biochemistry with clinical correlations. Biochemistry of 
metabolic diseases, neuroendocrine and reproductive biochemistry, signal transduction, 
receptor chemistry, transcriptional regulation, cancer biochemistry, and oncogenes and 
oncoproteins. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 4101 

CHEM 4121 Adnanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 Credits 

Principles of inorganic chemistry with emphasis on atomic structure, chemical bonding, 
solid state, coordination chemistry, organic metallic chemistry, and acid-base theories. 
Chemistry of selected elements. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1211, 3401, and 3411 

CHEM 4201 Medicinal Chemistry 3 Credits 

Synthesis, structure, and mode of action of therapeutically active compounds. Design of 
pharmaceutical agents based on enzyme mechanism, structure activity relationships, and 
computer modeling. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 2511, 4101 



218 



CHEM 4301 Chemistry of the Environment 3 Credits 

Chemical processes important in the environment from naturally occurring and man-induced 
systems. Thermodynamic and chemical considerations of fuels; the thermodynamics of the 
atmosphere; atmospheric photochemistry; chemistry of natural water systems; chemistry 
of pesticides, fertilizers, and other important environmental contaminants; aspects of the 
carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles. 
Prerequisite: CHEM 3101 

CHEM 4301L Chemistry of the Environment Laboratory 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with CHEM 4301. (0-4-1) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 3101L 

CHEM 4531: Advanced Organic Chemistry 3 Credits 

Survey of modern organic synthesis with emphasis on mechanism of reactions. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 2511 

CHEM 4601: Polymer Chemistry 3 Credits 

Chemistry of polymers and the chemical and physical properties of polymers are discussed. 

Molecular weight characterization, structure and morphology and fabrication of polymer. 

(3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: CHEM 2511, 3401 

CHEM 4601L Polymer Chemistry Laboratory .....1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with CHEM 4601. (0-4-1) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 2511L 

CHEM 4801 Special Topics 3 Credits 

Discussion of current topics in organic, analytical, physical chemistry, biochemistry, or 
polymer chemistry. (3-0-3) 

CHEM 4901 Chemical Seminar 1 Credit 

Modern development in specific subdivisions of the field of chemistry. (1-0-1) 
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 

(*These courses cannot be used to satisfy the requirements for major in chemistry.) 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 



CHET 3201 Material/Energy Balances 4 Credits 

Quantity measurement of chemical engineering systems. A study of conservation equations, 
stoichiometry, equilibrium relations, and phase change analysis. Recycle and multiple 
bypass analysis will be presented. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2101 

CHET 3221K Mass Transfer 3 Credits 

Principles and designs of equilibrium stage operations. Distillation will be covered in detail 
for separation and purification of material. Humidification will also be presented. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: CHET 3201 

CHET 3301K Transport Phenomena 3 Credits 

Introduction to fundamentals of heat, mass and momentum transfer. Multiple effect 
evaporators will be studied in detail using the principles of transport phenomenon. 
Scrubbers and packed beds will also be addressed. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisites: CHET 3201 



219 



CHET 3401 Instrumentation 2 Credits 

Laboratory experiences in typical chemical engineering systems. Experiments are designed 
to integrate the subject matter from several subject areas. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2101 

CHET 4101 Chemical Reaction Engineering 3 Credits 

Design of chemical reactors using the principle of Chemical Equilibrium Relations and 
Kinetic principles. Chemical reactions in gases and liquids, homogeneous, and heterogeneous 
catalysis, catalyst effectiveness, and roll of transport in kinetics. Factors affecting chemical 
reaction rates. 
Prerequisites: CHET 3301K; CHEM 3401 

CHET 4201 Process Control 3 Credits 

Application and study of modern control theory to chemical engineering processes. 
Multivariable control, estimation adaptive control in optimal controls. 
Prerequisites: PHY 1112K; ENGT 3701; MECT 3411 

CHET 4211 Process Design 3 Credits 

Implementation of transport phenomena, process operations, chemical thermodynamics, 
unit operations, process contractor design, and chemical engineering economics into a 
comprehensive chemical process plant design project. 
Prerequisites: CHEM 3401, 3402, CHET 4201; ENGT 2101K 

CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 



CIVT 3101K Surveying 5 Credits 

A comprehensive study of taping, leveling, angle, and direction measurements, theodolites, 
traverse measurements computation of coordinates, areas, and volumes; topographic 
surveying, contouring; techeometry, EDMIs, and Total Stations route surveying; simple 
and transition horizontal and vertical curves; triangulation; introduction to aerial surveying 
and photogrammetric methods; introduction to GPS and GIS; use and care of instruments; 
computer applications. (3-4-5) 
Prerequisites: MATH 1113, Co-requisite ENGT 2101K 

CIVT 3201K Civil Engineering Materials 2 Credits 

A comprehensive study of the physical, mechanical, and other important properties of 
materials; fabrication of method of manufacturer; durability and long-term performance, 
specifications and standards; laboratory testing procedures; applications or methods of use 
of various civil construction materials which include aggregates, concrete, cementitious 
materials, masonry, wood, bituminous, iron, and steel. (1-2-2) 
Prerequisite: MATH 1113 

CIVT 3211 Construction Estimating and Management 3 Credits 

Construction planning and management; contracting (types, methods, documents); 
specifications, mathematical techniques of construction cost estimating; preparation 
and submission of bid; construction scheduling (CPM); project administration (financial, 
personnel, claims and disputes, change orders, safety); computer applications. 
Prerequisite: CIVT 3201K 

CIVT 3301K Hydraulics and Engineering Hydrology 4 Credits 

Elements of fluid mechanics; pressure measurement; hydrostatics; forces on submerged 
plane and curved surfaces, buoyancy; fluids in motion; hydraulic and energy gradients; 
forces exerted by jets on flat plates and curved vanes; orifices, notches and weirs; flow in 
pipes; simple pipe networks; open channel flow; pumps. Hydrologic cycle; precipitation 
data analysis; hydraulics of groundwater flow; equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions; 



220 



groundwater exploration; surface runoff; hydrographs; reservoir storage; flood routing; 
hydrological forecasting; computer applications. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisite: ENGT 3101 

CIVT 3401K Highway & Transportation Engineering 4 Credits 

A study of several transportation modes. Emphasis will be placed on the linkage of these 

modes for the effective and economic movement of people, materials, and equipment. It will 

also include the fundamentals of highway design, layout, foundations, and pavements; grade 

intersections and separations; highway cross-sections, traffic and safety requirements. (3- 

2-4) 

Prerequisites: CIVT 3101K, 3201K; MATH 2111; ENGT 2101K 

CIVT 3601K Soil Mechanics & Foundation Design 5 Credits 

A study of engineering properties of soil as a construction material and foundations 
for buildings. Topics include the soil classifications, Atterberg limits, shear strength, 
consolidations and settlement. This knowledge is then applied to the design of various types 
of foundations such as spread footings, piles, earth retaining structures and substructure 
elements. (4-2-5) 
Prerequisites: CIVT 3201K; ENGT 3601 

CIVT 3701 Structural Analysis 4 Credits 

A comprehensive study of the behavior response of various structural forms that are 
employed, and an enumeration of the various loading conditions that a structure must 
support. Emphasis will be placed on the fundamentals and matrix method of structural 
analysis of simple and complex structural systems including trusses, beams, frames, 
arches, cable structures, and influence lines. It will also cover an introduction to the theory 
of statically indeterminate structures. 
Prerequisites: ENGT 3601; ENGT 3201 

CIVT 4101K Structural Design I (Steel) 3 Credits 

A study of structural design procedures of structural elements utilizing latest design 
methods according to building and design codes. Emphasis will be on the integration of 
designing steel structures from conception to working drawings. Course content includes 
identification and calculation of various loads, structural framing, designing of trusses, 
joists, beams, columns, and simple connections. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisites: CIVT 3201K; 3701; ENGT 2101K 

CIVT 4111K Structural Design II (Reinforced Concrete) 3 Credits 

A study of the fundamentals of reinforced concrete design. Emphasis will be on the principles 
and practices involved in the structural components and the design of reinforced concrete 
utilizing latest design methods in accordance with the ACI-codes. Course content includes 
designing of rectangular and T beams, one-way slabs, columns, footings, and retaining 
walls. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisites: CIVT 3201K; 3701; ENGT 2101K 

CIVT 4201K Environmental Engineering 4 Credits 

Basic concepts of environmental interrelationships; principles of environmental chemistry, 
microbiology, ecology and health; water quality parameters; water treatment processes; 
wastewater treatment processes; sludge treatment and disposal; industrial waste waters; 
design of water, wastewater and sludge treatment units; water distribution and wastewater 
collection systems; design principles; and computer applications. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1211, 1211L; CIVT 3301K 

CIVT 4211 Environmental Pollution Control 3 Credits 

Water pollution; point and diffuse sources; river pollution and oxygen sag curve analysis; 
groundwater pollution analysis; eutrophication of lakes; coastal pollution; solid wastes 
management (collection, storage and transport); processing and transformation; 
incineration, composting, sanitary land filling; recycling; hazardous waste management 



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types; RCRA, CERCLA and others; treatment and disposal methods; air pollution (air 
pollutants and interaction products); and preventive and control measures. 
Prerequisite: CIVT 4201K 

CIVT 4301 Urban Planning 2 Credits 

Historical development of urban centers and planning practices; theories, policies and 
quantitative techniques used; statistical methods; forecasting techniques; decision- making 
analysis; planning management; functional planning physical, land use, transportation, 
housing and real estate; historical preservation; environmental planning and monitoring, 
computer applications. 
Prerequisites: CIVT 3211; 3401K; 4201K 

COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

CSCI 1130 Computer and its Applications 3 Credits 

An introductory course specially designed to help students become computer literate. The 
course covers the history of computers, hardware, software, and use of the state-of-the- 
art technology. Another unique feature of this course is that students use internet, MS 
OFFICE applications using word processing, spreadsheets, and HTML language to create 
home pages. 

CSCI 1301 Computer Science 1 3 Credits 

An introduction to the principles of computer programming with emphasis on problem 
solving methods. The topics include an introduction to data representation, data type and 
control structures, procedures and functions, and programming methodology. 
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

CSCI 1302 Computer Science II 4 Credits 

An introduction to object-oriented programming language using abstract data type. 
Emphasis will be placed on encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism, recursive 
programming, pointers, linked lists, stacks, strings, and trees. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 1301 

CSCI 1371 Computing for Engineers and Scientists 3 Credit 

Foundations of computing with an emphasis on design and implementation of algorithms 
that complement and support engineering and scientific problem solving. 

CSCI 1501K Computing for Engineers 1 3 Credits 

This course presents the conceptual foundations and limitations of computing with design 
construction analysis of algorithms, and data structures. The course prepares students 
wherein they will be able to show evidence of adequate performance with respect to design 
and construct algorithms, and data structures, to solve problems in a high level (pseudo) 
language. Emphasis will be given on the manipulation of complex data structures, recursive 
and iterative algorithms, and designs of algorithm with high levels of modularity and object- 
oriented approaches. (2-3-3) 

CSCI 1502K Computer for Engineering II 3 Credits 

Introduction to techniques and practices for implementing algorithms. Emphasis on 
professional software practices. Projects focus on interactive and computationally intensive 
programs, including large program management. (2-3-3) 
Prerequisite: CSI 1501K 

CSCI 1610 Programming in Java 4 Credits 

An introduction to Java, which is a simple, object-oriented, distributed, interpreted, robust, 
secure, architecture-neutral, portable, high-performance, multithreaded and dynamic 
language. The course includes extensive use of classes, support of networking, basic data 
structures, abstract data type, recursion, and searching and sorting. 
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 



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CSCI 2215 Perl Scripting 4 Credits 

Designed to teach students how to use PERL (Practical Extraction and Reporting Language) 
for Web/CGI scripting. 
Prerequisite: CSCII1301 

CSCI 2216 Programming in Pascal 4 Credits 

An introduction to data representation and computer system organization, use of algorithms 
to develop data types and control structures, and use of functions, procedures, and data 
type. Further emphasis is placed on advanced structured programming and an introduction 
to data structures. 
Prerequisite: MATH 1113 

CSCI 2231 Introduction to UNIX 3 Credits 

An introduction to UNIX operating system, which will provide a convenient and consistent 
interface to the wide variety of peripheral devices that are connected to the computer. 
Students learn history and fundamentals of SUN Operating System, by entering commands 
using Shell, the UNIX file systems; text file utilities. Vi editor, Shell scripts, AWK (Aho, 
Weingerger, Kernighan) programming language, and Local Area Networking Utilities. 
Prerequisites: CSCI 1301 

CSCI 2233 Programming in Ada 3 Credits 

An introduction to the powerful high-order programming language for software design. 
Emphasis is on Ada program structure, type of variables, Ada control statements, Ada 
fundamentals, procedures and function, packages, generics, and Ada resources. 
Prerequisites: CSCI 2216 

CSCI 2235 Comparative Programming Language 3 Credits 

A comparative study of programming languages. Topics included are recursion, passing 
parameters in structured programs, control structures, and storage allocation techniques. 
UNIX compilers for these languages will be used. 
Prerequisites: CSCI 1301, 1302, 1610 

CSCI 3000 Data Structure and Algorithm Design 3 Credits 

Introduction to computation complexities, object-oriented programming, basic data 
structures; lists, stacks, trees, recursion, and graphs. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 1610 

CSCI 3102 Visual Basic 3 Credits 

An introduction to Visual Basic and Windows 95 applications. Topics include Form, List 
Box, Text Box, Scroll Bars, Menu and other windows resources. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI 3210 Advanced Java 3 Credits 

An introduction to Java and Web page programming. Students write basic Java applets. 
Prerequisites: CSCI 3000, CSCI 1610 

CSCI 3385 Computer Network and Design 3 Credits 

Introduction of distributed system architecture, data transmission, protocol levels, types 
of network layers, terminal based networks, modems, and multiplexers. A unique feature 
of this course is that students set up a LAN using Solaris, Novell and Windows NT. The 
course provides hands-on experience for students. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 1301 

CSCI 3414 Software Engineering 3 Credits 

A course designed to introduce basic principles of software engineering, the process of 
producing a software product, project planning, development, and management. Each 



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student is expected to walk through the complete process by implementing a software 

project. 

Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI 3910 Internship in Computer Science VARIES 

Work and study experience in various areas of computer science. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI 3920 Internship in Computer Science VARIES 

Work and study experience in various areas of computer science. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI 3930 Internship in Computer Science VARIES 

Work and study experiences in various areas of computer science. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI 4110 Operating Systems 3 Credits 

Study of process control, CPU scheduling, primary memory management, and secondary 
memory management. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI 4210 Data Base Management 3 Credits 

Introduction to database application design. Topics include problem analysis, various 
data models, implementation, using Microsoft access, forms, reports, SQI, and database 
programming. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI 4310 Compiler Construction 3 Credits 

Introduction to compiling process, language elements, finite automata, grammar, parsing 
methods, top-down parsing, bottom-up parsing, and code generation. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI 4410 Web Based Programming 3 Credits 

Introduction to web server programming, internet information server object: Request, 
Response, Application, Server session. Programming skills via using basic server objects, 
including working with data source like Access, SQL server. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI 4510 Artificial Intelligence 3 Credits 

Introduction of basic concepts in artificial intelligence. Topics include optimal search, 
learning algorithms, various neural network architecture and various software. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI 4801 Project Design 1 Credit 

A course requiring students to read technical papers, implement a software project, and 
write a report of the research project. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI 4810 Research Project 3 Credits 

A course requiring students to read technical papers, implement a software project, and 
write a report of the research project. 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3000 

CSCI (YAMA) 4901 Search Engine Design 3 Credits 

Introduction to develop a simple Internet search engine. Yamacraw project classified 5 
categories: Vision and Design, Implementation, Extension, Installer, and Maintainers, 
Users. Students will implement a test version of a search engine. Software layers include: 
NT server, SQL Server, Internet Information Server, ASP Web Interfact 



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ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

ELET 3101K Electric Circuit 1 3 Credits 

The concept of current, voltage, power, and resistance. The course deals with units, basic 
electrical laws, series and parallel circuits, network theorems, and instruments. AC 
sources, capacitance, inductance, and magnetism are introduced. Circuits are analyzed 
using PSPICE Laboratory work parallels class work and includes the use of various AC 
and DC instruments. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisites: MATH 1113 

ELET 3111K Electric Circuit II Credits 

The second part of the electric circuit sequence. The course deals with impedance and 
admittance in sinusoidal circuits. Resonant circuits, three-phase circuits, harmonics and 
transformer theory are also studied. Circuits are analyzed using PSPICE. Laboratory work 
parallels class work. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ELET 3101K 

ELET 3201K Electronics 1 3 Credits 

A study of discrete electronic devices. Semiconductor diodes, BJTs and FETs are studied 
with emphasis on characteristic curves. BJT and FET amplifiers are studied indepth 
and various configurations of small and large signal amplifiers are studied. Circuits are 
analyzed using PSPICE. Laboratory work parallels class work. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ELET 3101K; Corequisite: ELET 3111K 

ELET 3211K Electronics II 3 Credits 

A study of the characteristics, performance, and application of the most common linear 
integrated circuits. The emphasis of this course is on operational amplifiers, comparators, 
multipliers, oscillators, voltage regulation, oscillators, phase-locked loops and data converters. 
Applications will illustrate use, and laboratory exercises will enhance learning. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ELET 3201K 

ELET 3301K Digital Systems 1 3 Credits 

A comprehensive study of binary and hexadecimal numbers, Boolean algebra, truth tables, 
Karnaugh maps, and combination logic using basic gates. Flip-flops, counters, registers, 
encoders, and decoders are also presented. Circuit simulation software is used in both 
classroom and laboratory work. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ELET 3101K 

ELET 331 IK Digital Systems II 3 Credits 

A thorough study of sequential design. Techniques and issues relevant to design will be 
covered indepth and project work will emphasize the use of LSI, MSI, and SSI circuits in 
the application and design of complex digital systems. Analog-to-digital converters (ADC), 
digital-to-analog converters (DAC), programmable logic devices (PLDs), and introduction to 
microprocessors are also studied. Circuit simulation software used in both classroom and 
laboratory. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ELET 3301K 

ELET 3401K Microcomputer Interfacing 3 Credits 

A study of microprocessors and microcomputer systems. Related hardware and software 
issues of X86 will be covered. The course also covers memory systems, input/output devices 
and interfacing mechanisms. Classroom instruction is enhanced by laboratory work. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ELET 3301K 

ELET 341 IK Microcontrollers 3 Credits 

A comprehensive study of micro controller hardware and software. System architecture 
includes the CPU, timer, serial, and parallel I/O ports, RAM and ROM. The software 



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portion of the course covers assembly language. Classroom instruction will be enhanced by 
laboratory work. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ELET 3301K 

ELET 3501K Control Systems 3 Credits 

Analysis and design of linear feedback control systems are studied. Nyquist's and Routh's 
stability criteria, Bode plots, transient behavior, static error coefficients, and the steady- 
state behavior of various system types are presented. The root-locus method and block 
diagram representation and simplification are also included. Classroom instruction will be 
enhanced by laboratory work. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisites: ELET 31 UK; MATH 2111 

ELET 3511K Electrical Machinery 3 Credits 

An introductory course in the characteristics and application of basic electric machinery. 
Three phase distribution systems, transformers, DC generators, AC generators, DC motors, 
and AC motors are studied. Laboratory work parallels classroom instruction. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ELET 31 UK 

ELET 3701K Data Acquisition System 2 Credits 

An introduction to the techniques for interfacing the basic measurement and instrumentation 
circuitry and systems to monitor physical characteristics such as temperature, pressure, 
strain, and distance by using data acquisition system. Typical instrumentation and 
measuring problems will be solved in the laboratory. (1-2-2) 
Prerequisite: ELET 3101K 

ELET 4101K Programmable Logic Controllers 3 Credits 

PLC, ladder logic, programming, installation, and troubleshooting of PLC systems. Sensors 
and their wring, I/O modules and wiring, and fundamentals of plant communications are 
studied. Laboratory work parallels classroom instruction. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ELET 3301K 

ELET 4401K Industrial Electronics 3 Credits 

A study of the necessary background for understanding the concept and utilization of 
various electronics devices, circuits and systems which are essential in industrial control 
and automation. Recent development and practices in industry are presented. Students 
apply the knowledge from Electronics II and Digital Systems II to develop application- 
oriented systems. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisites: ELET 32 UK; 33 UK 

ELET 4411K Computer Electronics 3 Credits 

A study of the theory of operations of the various electronic devices and components of 
the microcomputer. The installation, maintenance, and troubleshooting of microcomputer 
peripheral is also studied. Laboratory work parallels classroom instruction. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ELET 3301K 

ELET 4611K Fiber Optics 3 Credits 

A study of the basic understanding of optics systems, fiber optics, types, and characteristics 
related to computer communication. Additional coverage includes fiber optic couplers, 
multiplexes, demultiplexes, and distribution system. Laboratory work parallels classroom 
instruction. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: CSCI 3385 

ELET 4621K Digital Communications 3 Credits 

Sampling, coding, decoding, and digital multiplexing. The course will also cover the 
networking essential concepts, with emphasis on Microsoft Networking system. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ELET 3311K 



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ELET 4901K Senior Project 1 Credit 

The selection of an appropriate engineering project for design and development. The 
majority of work is spent in the laboratory researching, designing, prototyping, debugging, 
and fabricating the project. Engineering note book is required. Course requirements include 
oral and written reports on the project. (0-2-1) 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 



ENGINEERING 

ENGR 1101 Introduction To Engineering 1 Credit 

The course consists of material and learning activities that would build and sustain the 
interest of the student in engineering and that would produce behavioral modification in the 
student to adequately prepare him/her for a successful academic career in engineering.) 

ENGR 1161K Computing for Engineers and Scientists 3 Credits 

Foundations of computing with an emphasis on design and implementation of algorithms 
that complement and support engineering problem solving . (2-3-3) 
Prerequisite: ENGR 1113K or equivalent 

ENGR 2010 Computational modeling for Engineers 3 Credits 

This course is Fundamental and numerical methods and development of programming 
techniques for implementing them to solve engineering problems via computers. 
Prerequisite: Math 2511, PHYS 2211, and CSCI 1371 

ENGR 2025 Introduction to Signal Processing 4 Credits 

Introduction to signal processing for discrete-time and continuous -time signals. Filtering. 
Frequency Response. Fourier Transform. Z Transform. Laboratory emphasizes computer- 
based signal processing. (3-3-4) 
Prerequisites: Math 2511 and CSCI 1502 

ENGR 2030 Introduction to Computer Engineering 3 Credits 

Computer system and digital design principles. Architectural concepts, software, Boolean 
algebra, number systems, combinational datapath elements, sequential logic, and storage 
elements. Design of DRAM control and I/O bus. 
Prerequisites: CSCI 1371 

ENGR 2031 Digital Design Laboratory 2 Credits 

Design and implementation of digital systems, including a team design project. CAD tools, 
project design methodologies, logic synthesis, and assembly language programming.(l-3-2) 
Prerequisites: ENGR 2030 and CSCI 1502 and ENGT 2201 

ENGR 2040 Circuit Analysis 3 Credits 

Basic concepts of DC and AC circuit theory and analysis. 
Prerequisites: : ENGR 2025 and Phys 2212 and Math 3301 

ENGR 2110 Creative Decisions and Design 3 Credits 

To learn fundamental techniques for creating, analyzing, synthesizing, and implementing 
design solutions to open ended problems with flexibility, adaptability, and creativity 
through team and individual efforts. (2-3-3). 
Prerequisite: ENGR 2770,and 1371 

ENGR 2201 Statics for Engineers 2 Credits 

Elements of statics in two and three dimensions, centroids, and friction. 
Prerequisites: Math 2511 and PHYS 2211 



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ENGR 2202 Dynamics of Rigid Bodies 3 Credits 

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies in one, two, and three dimensions. 
Work-energy and impulse-momentum concepts. 
Prerequisites: ENGR 2201, and CSCI 1371 

ENGR 2770 Introduction to Engineering Graphics and Visualization 3 Credits 

Engineering graphics and visualization including sketching, line drawing, simple wire 
frame, and solid modeling. Development and interpretation of drawings and specifications 
for the product realization. (2-3-3)) 

ENGR 3001 Mechanics of deformable bodies 3 Credits 

Stress and strain, axially loaded members, torsion of circular members, bending of beams, 
transformation of stress and strain and column buckling. 
Prerequisites: ENGR 2201 and Math 3301 

ENGR 3322 Engineering Thermodynamics 3 Credits 

Introduction to thermodynamics. Thermodynamic properties, energy and mass conservation, 
entropy and the second law. Second-law analysis of thermodynamic systems, gas cycles, 
vapor cycles. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 2211 General Physics II, MATH 3301, and CSCI 1371 

ENGR 3770 Statistics and Applications 3 Credits 

Introduction to probability, probability distributions, point estimation, confidence intervals, 
hypothesis testing, linear regression, and analysis of variance. Also applications in the 
engineering planning and Design are discussed. 
Prerequisite- Math 2511 

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

ENGT 2101K Computer Graphics 3 Credits 

An introduction to computer graphics hardware and software with emphasis on hands-on 
experience using one or more CAD systems. (1-4-3) 
Prerequisite: MATH 1113 

ENGT 2111K CAD Applications 1 Credit 

Covers architectural, chemical, civil, electronics and mechanical CAD applications. (0-2-1) 
Prerequisite: ENGT 2101K 

ENGT 2201 Technical Writing 2 Credits 

Covers fundamentals of writing technical reports and research papers; illustrating technical 
data; making oral presentations; and participating in group communications. 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

ENGT 3101 Statics 3 Credits 

A study of applied engineering mechanics of rigid bodies in equilibrium. Analysis of forces, 
reactions and moments in various force systems for both two and three dimensional 
systems. Determination of centroids of composite area and the moment of inertia will also 
be studied. 
Prerequisites: MATH 2101; PHYS 1111K or PHYS 2211K 

ENGT 3201 Applied Mathematics for Engineering Technology 1 Credit 

Application of mathematics in the practice of engineering. The course consists of selected 
topics in matrix algebra, vectors, calculus, and statistics with emphasis on their application 
in engineering technology disciplines. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2111 



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ENGT 3301 Quality Control 3 Credits 

A study of statistics, probability, control charts for variables and attributes, and acceptance 
sampling plans. 
Prerequisite: ENGT 3201 

ENGT 3501 Dynamics 2 Credits 

The study of kinematics, the motion and movement of a body in terms of displacement, 

velocity acceleration and time; and kinetics, the relations between motion of a body and 

the forces that caused the motion. Topics include rectilinear motion as well as curvilinear 

motion. 

Prerequisite: ENGT 3101 

ENGT 3601 Strength of Materials 3 Credits 

A comprehensive study of the concept of the stress-strain relationship and how this relates 

to the design of structural members. Emphasis will be on the stress distribution due to axial 

tension and compression, thermal, torsion, and transverse loading and their combinations. 

Course content will also include pure bending, transformations of stress, shear and bending 

moment diagrams, slope and deflection of beams by integration, and Euler's formula for 

columns. 

Prerequisites: ENGT 3101; MATH 2111; MECT 3101K 

ENGT 3701 Engineering Economy 3 Credits 

A study of the fundamental concept and analytical tools of engineering economy. The 

elements of engineering decision- making process, compound interest and equivalence are 

examined. This course also covers present worth, uniform annual cost, rate of return and 

depreciation method as well as income taxes to help make the correct engineering business 

decision. 

Prerequisites: MATH 1113; Permission of the instructor 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

ENSC 2040 Environmental Issues 3 Credits 

Survey of global environmental issues facing man from philosophical, sociological, historical, 
ecological, and technological perspectives. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: With Instructor's permission. 

ENSC 2401 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 Credits 

Mechanism of evolution in relation to plants, animals and man, population dynamics, 
ecological processes, population ecology, species interactions, evolution of behavior, biomes, 
biogeography, pollution, and ecosystem sustainability. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: With the Instructor's permission. 

ENSC 2401L Introduction to Environmental Science Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with ENSC 2401. (0-2-1) 

ENSC 3121 Environmental Ethics 3 Credits 

The basics in philosophical and ethical thought, especially as related to the development in 
mankind of a new ecological ethic. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: HUMN 2011, ENSC 2401 

ENSC 3201 Limnology 3 Credits 

Evolution and morphology of ponds, lakes, and streams; physical and chemical characteristics 
of inland water, aquatic biota, their taxonomy and ecology. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: ENSC 2401, BIOL 2401, CHEM 1211, CHEM 1212 



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ENSC 3201L Limnology Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with ENSC 3201. (0-2-1) 

ENSC 3203 Environmental Chemistry 3 Credits 

The chemistry of the Earth's natural processes in air water and soil, toxic pollutants, soil, 
water, air, and sediment chemistry in relation to pollutants, natural waters and acid base 
chemistry of the carbonate system, redox, solid phase-solution equilibria, ion adsorption 
and desorption phenomenon. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: ENSC 2401, CHEM 1211, CHEM 1212 

ENSC 3203L Environmental Chemistry Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with ENSC 3203. (0-2-1) 

ENSC 3205 Environmental Microbiology 3 Credits 

Relationships of microorganisms to their environment and to other organisms, symbiotic, 
soil and aquatic microorganisms are considered, genetically engineered microorganisms as 
well as principles of bioremediation. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: BIOL 1107K, BIOL 1108K 

ENSC 3205L Environmental Microbiology Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with ENSC 3205. (0-2-1) 

ENSC 3301 Environmental Radiation 3 Credits 

Atomic structure, nuclear radiation, radioactive decay, interaction of charged particles and 
electron with matter, methods of radiation detection, radiation dosimetry and, radiation 
protection. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1211, CHEM 1212, PHYS 1111K, 1112K 

ENSC 3301L Environmental Radiation Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with ENSC 3301. (0-2-1) 

ENSC 3621 Environmental Health and Hygiene 3 Credits 

Human exposure and health effects of chemicals, occupational health hazards, regulatory 
safety procedures, management requirements, disease vectors, food and housing sanitation 
risk assessment, principles of industrial hygiene. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: ENSC 2401, BIOL 1107K, BIOL 1108K 

ENSC 4101 Hydrology 3 Credits 

Topics dealing with the fundamentals of the hydrologic cycle, budget and aquatic; 
precipitation, evapo-transpiration, stream flow; containment transport; ground water flow 
and urban vs. watershed models (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: MATH 1113, MATH 2101 

ENSC 4101L Hydrology Lab 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with ENSC 4101. (0-2-1) 

ENSC 4121 Environmental Law 3 Credits 

Overview of the historic development and evolution of legal principles, the legal processes 
relating to resource conservation, environmental regulations and statutory laws. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: ENSC 2401, ENSC 3121 

ENSC 4202 Principles of Ecotoxicology 3 Credits 

Toxic chemicals and their fate and distribution in various ecosystems, toxicity of chemicals 
on the individual, populations and communities, relationship of dose and response, and 
biomarkers in population studies. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: ENSC 2401, CHEM 2501 



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ENSC 4301 Hazardous Waste Management 3 Credits 

Hazardous wastes disposal techniques, problems associated with current waste disposal 
techniques, major pathways of pollutant migration from disposal sites, emphasis on critical 
issues facing industry, government, and the public. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: ENSC 3203, CHEM 2501 

ENSC 4401 Environmental Impact Assessment 3 Credits 

Land use planning, zoning, subdivision and community organization, human growth, 
control, local, state and federal regulations, multi disciplinary terms are organized to 
produce actual EIS's, geology, soils, topography, hydrology, meterology, biology, sociology 
and economics are all involved. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: ENSC 2401, ENSC 3121 

ENSC 4801 Internship 2 Credits 

Supervised training, apprenticeship, and experience with an appropriate agency, written 

internship report, and report presentation. 

(1-0-1) 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing 

ENSC 4901 Environmental Synthesis Seminar 1 Credit 

Most updated environmental literature search, research methodology, synthesis, manuscript 

preparation, and seminar presentation. 

(1-0-1) 

Prerequisite: Senior Standing 

ENSC 4910 Special Topics 2 Credits 

In depth discussion and review of most critical environmental issues, toxic chemicals, soil, 
water and air pollution, and new remedial methodologies. (2-0-2) 
Prerequisite: Senior standing 

FORENSIC SCIENCE 

FSCI 3201 Forensic Evidence in Law Enforcement 3 Credits 

Principles of criminal law and procedure, preparation and presentation of evidence; 
examination of witnesses, and methods of legal research. Emphasis will be placed on court 
opinions denning the rules of search and seizure and advisability of evidence. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: CHEM 1211, 1211HK or 1151K 

FSCI 3301 Principles of Forensic Sciences 3 Credits 

Application of chemical and instrumental techniques that are currently used in crime 
laboratories to examine firearms, tool marks, documents, arson accelerants, drugs, hairs, 
plastics, paints, glass, soil, and textile fibers. 
Prerequisite: FSCI 3201 

FSCI 3301L Principles of Forensic Science Laboratory 1 Credit 

Lab to supplement FSCI 3301 (0-3-1) 

FSCI 4101 Personal Identification & DNA Fingerprinting Analysis 3 Credits 

Modern techniques in personal identification with various methods in DNA fingerprint, 
analysis, DNA profiling, DNA typing in rape and murder cases and in cases of paternity 
testing. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1151K FSCI 3301 

FSCI 4102: Personal Identification & DNA Fingerprint Analysis Lab (0-3-1).... 1 Credit 

Lab taken concurrently with FSCI 3301 

*These courses cannot be used to satisfy the requirements for major in chemistry. 



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INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT 

INTM 3101 Motion and Time Study 3 Credits 

A comprehensive study of cost analysis, production and inventory control, balancing 
of production lines, incentive pay and motion studies. Topics include problem solving 
techniques, operation and process charts, motion economy, work measurement, and 
motivational concepts. 

INTM 3201 Cost Estimating 3 Credits 

A study of preparing detailed cost estimates for new and existing products. The course 
content is divided into the following areas: labor costs, materials cost, accounting principles, 
forecasting, operation and product estimating, and engineering economics. 

INTM 3301 Production and Inventory Control 3 Credits 

A study of selecting and installing a computerized inventory control system such as 
Material Requirements Planning (MRP). The following topics are included: forecasting, 
master production scheduling, material requirements planning, inventory management, 
production activity control, and critical path scheduling. 

INTEGRATED SCIENCE 

ISCI 1101 Integrated Science 1 3 Credits 

Nature, physical properties, structure and evolution of the physical universe, nuclear 
energy and the atom, cosmology, the nature of energy and its conservation. (3-0-3) 

ISCI 1111K Integrated Science II 4 Credits 

The physical earth, biological evolution, ecological processes, and human development. (3-2-4) 
Note: This is a 4-credit physical science course with laboratory. 

MARINE SCIENCE 

MSCI 3101K Marine Science 1 4 Credits 

Survey of basic concepts and interrelationships of physical, geological, chemical, and 
biological oceanographic and inshore ecosystems. Introduction to function and application 
of oceanographic equipment. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108K; CHEM 1212 

MSCI 3102K Marine Science II 4 Credits 

Introduction to the physiology, morphology, taxonomy, and ecology of marine organisms 
and their role in oceanographic processes. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108K; CHEM 1212 

MSCI 3301K Marine Environmental Chemistry and Analysis 4 Credits 

Chemical composition and processes of seawater and coastal waters; methods and 
techniques employed in analyzing environmental parameters; carbonate buffering system 
of seawater, biogeochemical cycles. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1212; MSCI 3101 

MSCI 3401K Invertebrate Zoology 4 Credits 

Survey of the major invertebrate taxa emphasizing function and special adaptations to 
coastal and marine environments. Practical emphasis on collection, preserving, sorting, 
and classifying, especially local species. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108K 



232 



MSCI 3501K Ichthyology 4 Credits 

Evolution, classification, anatomy, physiology, and ecology of fishes. Includes methods for 
the collection, identification, maintenance, and study of southeastern coastal marine and 
estuarine species. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108K; MSCI 3102 

MSCI 3901 Technical Writing and Seminar 3 Credits 

The practical study of organizing and presenting scientific and technical information through 
writing and oral presentation. Covers the key elements of effective oral communication 
and written communication in memoranda, letters, questionnaires, reports, articles, 
and abstracts. Introduces the application and practical capabilities of computers, word 
processing, and integrated software. (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 

MSCI 4201K Marine Ecology 4 Credits 

Principles of ecology related to marine and estuarine ecosystems. Theoretical population 
dynamics, age distributions, competition, predation, ecology are studied using computer 
modeling. Results of practical experimental approach to the study of marine ecosystems are 
analyzed using computer simulation, modeling, and analysis. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisites: MSCI 3101, 3102, 3301 

MSCI 4301K Biological Oceanography . 4 Credits 

Global-scale considerations of biological features and processes within oceanic environments 
including: marine biogeography, oceanographic nutrient cycles, food webs and energy flow, 
pelagic and abyssal zone community dynamics, oceanic food resources, plankton biology, 
mathematical modeling. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisites: MSCI 3101, 3301, 3401 

MSCI 4501 Current Issues in Oceanography 3 Credits 

This course provides background information, letters, milestone journal articles, and 

guidance in literature searches for discussion/debate on current issues in oceanography. 

(3-0-3) 

Prerequisites: BIOL 1108K; CHEM 3501 or BIO 124; CHE 307 

MSCI 4901 Research 1 Credit 

Provides background information and assistance for students to engage in original 
independent scientific research. By describing how to find pertinent scientific literature on 
a topic, problem, or question, explaining how to apply for summer research internships at 
marine laboratories and oceanographic institutions, and describing the organizational need 
and elements of the research report, the student should be able to design an independent 
research project, write the background or introduction of the report from library research 
and interviews. (1-0-1) 
Prerequisites: Junior standing; MSCI 3101 

MSCI 4902 Senior Research/Internship 1-3 Credits 

A research project under faculty supervision, that includes researching the background 
on a given problem, defining an hypothesis, and planning and executing experiments. A 
written report/manuscript and oral presentation are required. 

Prerequisite: Completion of 3000 level of core curriculum, MSCI 4901 (may be 
concurrent enrollment), and consent of faculty advisor.) 

MSCI 4903 Senior Research/Internship II 1-3 Credits 

This class is intended as a continuation of research or internship activities from 4902. 

Consent of Instructor and the faculty advisor are required. 

Prerequisite: Completion of 3000 level of core curriculum, MSCI 4901, and 

MSCI 4902 (may be concurrently enrolled in MSCI 4902) and consent of faculty 

advisor.) 



233 

MATHEMATICS 

MATH 1111 College Algebra 4 Credits 

A course presenting topics in algebra in a manner that will prepare students to study 
trigonometry and to manage their present and future daily mathematical needs. Topics 
included are the real number system, functions and polynomials, inequalities (first and 
second degree), systems of equations, and operations with exponential numbers (including 
radicals). 

MATH 1113 Precalculus 4 Credits 

A course designed to prepare students for a successful study of calculus. Topics include 
functions and their graphs, inverse functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, 
trigonometric functions and their inverses, analytic trigonometry, application of 
trigonometric functions, fundamentals of analytic geometry, and polar coordinates. 
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or a minimum score of 475 on the SAT-MAT 

MATH 1501 Precalculus for Engineers 4 Credits 

Analytical geometry, the function concept, polynomials, exponential, logarithms, 
trigonometric functions, mathematical induction, and the theory of equations .(3-2-4) 

MATH 2101 Calculus 1 4 Credits 

An integrated approach to differential calculus and an introduction to integral calculus. 
Topics include functions, graphs, the derivative, applications of the derivative, maxima and 
minima, velocity and acceleration, rates of change, antidifferentiation, the fundamental 
theorem of calculus, and basic integration techniques. 
Prerequisite: MATH 1113 

MATH 2111 Calculus II 4 Credits 

A continuation of MATH 2101. Topics include logarithmic, exponential, and other 
transcendental functions, applications of integration, integration techniques. L'Hopital's 
rule, improper integrals, and infinite series. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2101 

MATH 2121 Calculus III 4 Credits 

A continuation of MATH 2111. Topics include plane curves, parametric equations, polar 
coordinates, vectors and geometry of space, vector-valued functions, functions of several 
variables, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2111 

MATH 2201 Elementary Statistics 3 Credits 

Topics include mean, median, range, variance and standard deviation of raw and grouped 
data, probabilities, correlation, the normal distribution, the t- distribution, statistical 
inference, including the pooled t-test, the analysis of variance, chi-square test, and 
regression analysis. 
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 

MATH 2301 Introduction to Discrete Math 3 Credits 

The study of the logical and algebraic relationships between discrete objects. The roots of 
discrete math lie deep in set theory, directed graphs and relations, functions, combinatorics, 
logic, Boolean algebra, graph theory, and recurrence relations. 
Prerequisite: MATH 1113 (MATH 2101 or MAT 212 is recommended also) 

MATH 2501 Calculus I for Engineers 4 Credits 

This course is designed to present an integrated approach to differential calculus and 
integral calculus. Topics include functions, derivatives, product and chain rules, graphs, 



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Newtons method, maxima and minima, and other applications of differentiation, 
Fundamental theorem of calculus, integration techniques, definite integrals, infinite series 
and convergence tests. 
Prerequisite: MATH 1113 or ENGR 1113K 

MATH 2511 Calculus II for Engineers 4 Credits 

This course is a continuation of MATH 2501 - Calculus I for Engineers. Topics include 
L'Hopital's Rule, Improper Integrals, Taylor Approximation, Infinite Series and Power 
Series, Numeric Integration, Linear Algebra, the Theory of Linear Functions and Equations 
in Several Varibles. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2501 

MATH 2521 Callculus HI for Engineers 4 Credits 

This course is a continuation of MATH 2511, Calculus II for Engineers. Topics included 
are vector calculus, parametric curves and motion, functions of several variable, Newton's 
method in several variables, optimization, differentials, double and triple integrals, vector 
analysis, line integrals, surface integrals, and the theorems of Green, Gauss, and Stokes. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2511 

MATH 3101 Linear Algebra 3 Credits 

Topics include matrix algebra, solutions of linear systems, vectors and vector spaces, 
linear independence, spanning sets, bases, ranks, determinants, matrix inversion, linear 
transformations, null space, range, and eigenvalues. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2111 or MAT 213 

MATH 3201 Probability and Statistics 1 3 Credits 

Topics include sample spaces, elementary theorems of probability, permutations and 
combinations, random variables, discrete and continuous distributions and density 
functions, mathematical expectation, and moment generating functions of probability 
distributions. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2111 

MATH 3211 Foundations of Higher Mathematics 3 Credits 

Topics include sets, prepositional calculus, truth tables, predicate calculus, universal and 
existential quantifiers, proofs about sets, basic methods of proof, mathematical induction, 
relations and functions, and cardinality. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2121 

MATH 3301 Differential Equations 4 Credits 

Topics include differential equations of the first order and first degree, linear equations, 
variation of parameters, method of undetermined coefficients, inverse operators, Laplace 
transforms, systems of differential equations, and applications. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2111 

MATH 3401 Modern Geometry 3 Credits 

A course designed to give a modern view of geometry, including advanced treatment of 
standard topics in Euclidean geometry, as well as the study of non- Euclidean systems. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2111 

MATH 3501 Numerical Analysis 3 Credits 

Topics include solving of linear equations, Gauss-Seidel and Jacobi methods, error analysis, 
approximating functions by infinite series, iteration techniques, techniques of integration, 
to include trapezoidal and Simpson's rules. 
Prerequisites: MATH 2111 and CSCI 1302 

MATH 3602 Linear and Discrete Mathematics 4 Credits 

Basics of sequences and rates of growth, counting methods, graph theory and graph 
algorithms, linear algebra, linear programming, and combinatorial optimization. (3-2-4)) 



235 



MATH 4101 Abstract Algebra 1 3 Credits 

An introduction to groups, subgroups, homomorphisms, isomorphisms, cyclic groups, 
permutation groups, direct products, Abelian groups, and Sylow's theorem. 
Prerequisite: MATH 3211 

MATH 4111 Abstract Algebra II 3 Credits 

A course exploring the theory of rings, fields, integral domains, and vector spaces. 
Prerequisite: MATH 4101 

MATH 4201 Analysis 1 3 Credits 

Topics include sets and functions, the real number system, elementary topology of the 

real line, limits of sequence, space of continuous functions, differentiation, and Riemann 

integration. 

Prerequisites: MATH 2121 and 3211 

MATH 4211 Analysis II 3 Credits 

A course presenting further topics in integration, Stokes theorem, Gauss divergence 
theorem, infinite series, sequences and series of functions, functions of several variables, 
and basic measure theory. 
Prerequisite: MATH 4201 

MATH 4221 Complex Analysis 3 Credits 

Topics include complex numbers, elementary functions, analytic functions, complex 
integration, Laurant and Taylor series, residues, conformal mapping, and applications. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2121 

MATH 4311 Probability and Statistics II 3 Credits 

Topics include sampling theory, statistical inferences, estimation and tests of hypotheses, 
multivariate distribution, transformation of random variables, conditional and marginal 
distributions, and Bayesian estimation. 
Prerequisites: MATH 2121 and 3201 

MATH 4401 Number Theory 3 Credits 

Topics include the theory of mathematical induction, divisibility theory in the integers, 
prime numbers and their distribution, the theory of congruences and modular arithmetic, 
Fermat's theorem, and number theoretic functions. 
Prerequisite: MATH 3211 

MATH 4411 Statistical Methods 3 Credits 

Topics include statistical concepts and methods basic to experimental research in natural 
and social sciences, methods of estimation and tests of hypotheses, categorical data 
analysis (only to two-dimensional contingency tables), introduction to analysis of variance, 
correlation, regression, and experimental design. 
Prerequisite: MATH 3201 

MATH 4421 Regression Analysis 3 Credits 

Topics include matrix algebra, simple linear regression, residual analysis techniques, 
multiple regression, nonlinear regression, dummy variables, and influence statistics. 
Prerequisites: MATH 3101 or MAT 319, 3201 or MAT 217 

MATH 4501 Introduction to Topology 3 Credits 

Topics include fundamental concepts of topology: set theory, the real number line, continuity, 
compactness, connectedness, separations axioms, the axioms of choice, and metric spaces. 
Prerequisite: MATH 3211 



236 



MATH 4601 Mathematical Research 1-3 Credits 

A course designed for students who wish to participate in mathematics seminars and 
independent research. Credit varies from 1 to 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

MATH 4701 History of Mathematics 3 Credits 

The origin and development of mathematical ideas, beginning with geometry and algebra 
and continuing through selected topics in modern mathematics. 
Prerequisite: MATH 2111 

MATH 4901 Senior Seminar 1-3 Credits 

A course to develop students' use of mathematical skills and a chance to explore a 
mathematical concept indepth. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 

MECT 3101K Engineering Materials 3 Credits 

An overview of structures, properties, and applications of metals, polymers, ceramics, and 
composites commonly used in industry. Problem-solving skills are developed in the areas of 
materials selection, evaluation, measurement, and testing. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisites: CHEM 1211, 121 1L 

MECT 3201K Manufacturing Processes 3 Credits 

A survey of the manufacturing processes and tools commonly used to convert raw materials 
into finished products. The course includes basic casting and forming process; the basic 
mechanisms of material removal; measurement; assembly processes. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: MECT 3101K 

MECT 3301K Fluid Mechanics 3 Credits 

A study of hydrostatics, viscosity, dimensional constraints and the fluid flow in pipes. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: ENGT 3101 

MECT 3401 Dynamics of Machines 3 Credits 

The analysis of motion, velocity, acceleration, and forces in mechanisms and machines. 
Emphasis is placed on analytical methods suitable for computerized analysis as well as 
graphical methods for visualization and preliminary design studies. 
Prerequisite: ENGT 3501 

MECT 3411 Thermodynamics 3 Credits 

The fundamentals of thermodynamics. Use of gas tables is introduced. Property relations for 
ideal gasses and incompressible liquid are introduced. Application of first and second laws 
to closed and open systems is studied. Heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps, availability, 
and irreversibility are studied. 
Prerequisite: PHYS 1111K or PHYS 221 IK 

MECT 4101 Machine Design 1 3 Credits 

The design of machines and machine elements. The course focuses on power transmission 
in machines, including gears, belts, pulleys, bearings, lubrication, clutches, brakes, chains, 
power screws, and gear trains. Stress calculations and material selections are discussed. 
Prerequisites: MECT 3101K; ENGT 2101K, 3601 

MECT 4111 Machine Design II 3 Credits 

Further topics on the design of machine elements of structural integrity, reliability, and 
economy. Applications of advanced topics in strength of materials to machine design. The 
course includes a major design project. 
Prerequisites: MECT 4101 



237 



MECT 4201K Robotic Applications 3 Credits 

A study of robotic applications in industry. This course is designed to provide students with 
practical experience on an IBM industrial robot and with its work cells. (1-4-3) 
Prerequisites: CSCI 1301 

MECT 4301K Heat Transfer 3 Credits 

An introduction to heat conduction, convection, and radiation and its applications to 
engines, heat exchanges, air conditioning, and refrigeration systems. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisites: MECT 3301K, MECT 3411 

MECT 4401K Applied Thermodynamics 3 Credits 

Continuation of MECT 3411 with emphasis on applications. Combustion, internal and 
external combustion cycles, gas turbines, compressors, refrigeration and air conditioning 
processes are studied. (2-2-3) 
Prerequisite: MECT 3411 

MECT 4701K Heating, Ventilating and Air Conditioning 5 Credits 

The application of the principles of MECT 3301K, MECT 3411, and MECT 4301K to the 
design and analysis of commercial and residential climate control systems. (3-4-5) 
Prerequisite: MECT 4301K 



MILITARY SCIENCE 



MILS 1101 Introduction to Military Science and 

Skills Development 2 Credits 

Instruction providing a basic understanding of the U.S. military. The course includes the 
following subjects: the role of the U.S. Army in national defense, organization and branches 
of the U.S. Army, ROTC and its role, customs and traditions of the service, military writing, 
implementing a personal physical fitness program, role of the ARNG and USAR, and roles 
of the commissioned and noncommissioned officer. Skills development includes instruction 
and practical exercises in basic mountaineering skills as well as knot tying, belaying, and 
rappelling. This course is acceptable as a PE requirement. MILS 5000 should be taken 
concurrently. (1-1-2) 

MILS 1102 Basic Military Leadership 2 Credits 

This course continues the development of critical military skills, leadership, and management 
techniques. It provides basic leadership techniques and principles, professional ethics, and 
senior subordinate relationships. One weekend field trip is required. (2-1-2) 

MILS 2001 Evolution of Warfare 2 Credits 

Science and art of warfare as practiced by American military leaders from the French and 
Indian Wars through present times. The role of the US Army is also examined in its social, 
economic, and political contexts. 

MILS 2201 Basic Military Skills 2 Credits 

Introduction and practical exercises covering basic skills necessary as a future leader in the 
U.S. Army. The course includes the following subjects: land navigation and map reading, 
basic first aid, survival, and communications. (2-1-2) 

MILS 2202 Basic Military Tactic 2 Credits 

Instruction introduces students to the fundamentals of Army leadership and management 
techniques. Focus is placed on the mission, organization, and composition of small unit 
teams; principles of offensive and defensive operations stressing firepower, movement, and 
communications techniques, and introduction to troop leading procedures. (2-1-2) 



238 



MILS 2250 Basic Field Internship Ft. Knox, KY 5 Credits 

An intense summer program conducted at Ft. Knox, Kentucky, for six weeks. Designed as 
an alternative method to meet the prerequisites of the advanced course for students who 
have no basic course military science instruction. (V-V-5) 

MILS 3301 Advanced Tactics and Applied Leadership 1 3 Credits 

Instruction on the principles of leadership and the leader's role in directing small units 
in a variety of tactical scenarios. Emphasis is placed on developing and executing orders, 
troop leading procedures, and squad tactical reaction procedures. Land navigation and 
communication subjects are also included in the course. (3-2-3) 
Prerequisite: Completion of or placement credit for the Basic Course 

MILS 3302 Advanced Tactics and Applied Leadership II 3 Credits 

Continued instruction on the principles of leadership and the leader's role in direction of 
small units in a tactical environment. Emphasis is placed on offensive and defensive tactics, 
patrolling techniques, and conducting after-action reviews. Instruction in management and 
leadership techniques emphasizes Green Tab Leadership and leadership assessment. (3-2-3) 
Prerequisite: MILS 3301 

MILS 3350 Advanced Military Skills Practicum Ft. Lewis, WA 5 Credits 

The study and practical application of military skills and leadership ability during a six- 
week encampment experience. Encampment and training are conducted at Ft. Bragg, N.C. 
Instruction and evaluations are done by U.S. Army ROTC Cadet Command. (V-V-5) 
Prerequisites: MILS 3301 and MILS 3302 

MILS 4401 Military Leadership and Management Seminar 3 Credits 

Instruction covers U.S. Army Command and Staff functions. Military and professional 
knowledge topics include writing in the Army style, oral communications, conducting 
briefings, preparing to conduct training, and evaluating training. (V-l-5) 
Prerequisites: MILS 3301, MILS 3302, and MILS 3350 

MILS 4402 Transition to Lieutenant 3 Credits 

Instruction prepares MS IV cadets in their transition from cadet/student to commissioned 
officer. The course also covers military law, the law of land warfare, and additional basic 
knowledge and individual needs to become a professional officer. (V-l-3) 
Prerequisite: MILS 4401 



NAVAL SCIENCE 

NSCI 1001 - INTRODUCTION TO NAVAL SCIENCE 3 Credits 

Introduce midshipmen to NROTC program mission, organization, regulations and broad 
warfare components of the naval service. Included is an overview of officer and enlisted 
rank and rating structure, training and education, promotion and advancement and 
retirement policies. This course also covers naval courtesy and customs, as well as a study 
of the organization of the naval service. Students are familiarized with the major challenges 
facing today's naval officers, especially, in the areas of leadership and human resources 
management. 
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 

NSCI 1002 - SEAPOWER AND MARITIME AFFAIRS 3 Credits 

A survey of American Naval and Maritime history from the American Revolution to the 
present with emphasis on major developments. Attention will be focused on Mahan's 
geopolitical theory; economic and maritime forces; U.S. military and maritime strategy; 
and a comparative analysis of American and foreign maritime strategies. 
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 



239 



NSCI 1003 - SAILING 3 Credits 

A foundation course that provides students with fundamental knowledge and skills to be 
a competent crew member. The course covers the basic theory of sailing, nomenclature, 
seamanship, boat equipment and safety, and application inland waters navigation rules 
for sailing craft. Upon completion of this course, students will be Skipper "B" qualified. 
Practical skills to be mastered consist of rigging and sailing from a pier; sail to weather; sail 
two figure eight courses with two tacks and two jibes; man overboard maneuver; a capsize; 
return to dock and secure. 
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 1.00 

NSCI 2101 - NAVAL SHIPS SYSTEMS I ENGINEERING 3 Credits 

A detailed study of ship characteristics and types, including ship design, hydrodynamics 
forces, stability, compartmentalization, propulsion, electrical and auxiliary systems, 
interior communications, ship control and damage control. Basic concepts or the theory and 
design of steam, gas turbine and nuclear propulsion, shipboard safety and nrefighting are 
also covered. 
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 

NSCI 2102 - LEADERSHIP & MANAGEMENT 3 Credits 

An introduction of management functions as they apply to routine daily military activities. 
The concepts of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, controlling and coordination are 
introduced and examined using lecture, seminar and case study methods. The course includes 
discussions on responsibility and accountability, power and influence, managerial theories, 
decision making, personnel appraisal, organizational structure and communications. 
Emphasis is placed on management of personnel and physical resources. 
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 

NSCI 3101 - EVOLUTION OF WARFARE 3 Credits 

This course traces the historical development of warfare from the dawn of recorded history 
to the present, focusing on the impact of major military theorists, strategist, tacticians, 
and technological developments. Students acquire a basic sense of strategy, development 
and understanding of military alternatives, and become aware of the impact of historical 
precedent on military thought and actions. 
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 

NSCI 3003 - NAVIGATION 3 Credits 

An in-depth study of piloting and celestial navigation theory, principles, and procedures, 
as well as the rules of the nautical road, ship employment and relative motion analysis. 
Students learn piloting navigation: the use of charts, visual and electronic aids, and the 
theory and operation of compasses. Celestial navigation is covered in depth. Students 
develop practical skills in piloting, celestial navigation, and relative motion analysis. Other 
topics include tides, currents, effects of wind and weather, use of navigational instruments, 
ship employment, types and characteristics of electronic navigation systems, naval 
command and control, and afloat naval communications. 
Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 1.00 

NSCI 3004 - NAVAL OPERATIONS AND SEAMANSHIP 3 Credits 

A study of basic naval command and control, forms of naval communications to include 
visual, radiotelephone and satellite systems. Students will know basic terms, equipment 
procedures and safety precautions used for replenishment at sea (UNREP). A study of 
controllable and non-controllable forces in ship handling, and comprehend relative motion 
and demonstrate capability to solve problems associated with relative motion. Students will 
also know the principle rules for maneuvering ships in formations and the use of tactical 
publications. Understand inport and at sea watch organization and procedures 
Prerequisite: NSCI 3003 Navigation; Lecture: 2.00 Lab: 1.00 



240 



NSCI 4001 - NAVAL SHIPS SYSTEMS II WEAPONS 3 Credits 

This course outlines the theory and employment of naval RADAR, SONAR, and weapons 
systems. Students explore the processes of detection, evaluation, threat analysis, weapon 
selection, delivery, guidance and naval ordnance. Fire control systems, major weapons types, 
and military platforms are discussed. The concept of command-control- communications 
and intelligence is explored as a means of weapons systems integration as are space and 
electronic warfare. 
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 

NSCI 4102 -AMPHIBIOUS WARFARE 3 Credits 

A historical survey of the development of amphibious doctrine and the conduct of amphibious 
operations. Emphasis is placed on the evolution of amphibious warfare in the 20th century, 
especially, during World War II. Present day, potential, amphibious operations and their 
limitations, including the rapid deployment force concept, will be discussed. 
Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00; Restrictions: Must be a Junior or Senior 

NSCI 4104 - LEADERSHIP & ETHICS 3 Credits 

A study of military leadership and management which investigates techniques and 
concepts of task accomplishment in the absence of a normative business environment. The 
course includes an examination of military law, ethical leadership, personal responsibility, 
authority and bureaucracy. The focus of discussion is on those aspects of leadership and 
management not normally present in civilian enterprise such as operation in the presence 
of hostility and morale management 
Prerequisite: NSCI 2102; Lecture: 3.00 Lab: .00 

NSCI 4050 - NAVAL DRILL 3 Credits 

Introduces the student to basic military formations, movements, commands, courtesies and 
honors, and provides practice in unit leadership and management. Physical conditioning 
and training are provided to ensure students meet Navy/Marine Corps physical fitness 
standards. NSCI 4050 is required each semester for all NROTC students. 
Lecture: .00 Lab: 0.00 



PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

ENVR 3101K Environmental Radiation 4 Credits 

A study of radioisotops and radiation energy in the environment. Topics to be discussed 
are atomic structure and nuclear radiation, radioactive decay, interaction of charged 
particles and electrons with matter, methods of radiation detection, radiation dosimetry 
and radiation protection. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisites: PHYS 111 IK, PHYS 1112K, and General Inorganic Chemistry 

GEOL 1121K Physical Geology 4 Credits 

A course designed for students majoring in environmental science. The course is also useful 
for students majoring in civil engineering, marine science, and naval science who may take 
it as an elective. Topics include composition of the earth and its minerals, volcanoes, and 
earthquakes and their causes. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisites: MATH 1111 and basic knowledge of chemistry and physics 

PHSC 101 IK Physical Science I 4 Credits 

A course examining scientific facts and scientific laws pertaining to the physical universe. 
(3-2-4) 

PHSC 1012K Physical Science II 4 Credits 

A study of the earth in space, its form on the geographic grid, and map projections, atmosphere; 
oceans, ocean tides, and the eclipses; climate; soils and vegetation; temperature; latitude; 
heat budget of the earth. The earth's crust and its relief forms are discussed. (3-2-4) 



241 



PHYSICS 



PHYS 111 IK Introductory Physics 1 4 Credits 

An introductory course, which includes material from mechanics, thermodynamics, and 
waves. Elementary algebra and trigonometry are examined. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisite: MATH 1113 

PHYS 1112K Introductory Physics II 4 Credits 

An introductory course, which includes material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern 
physics. Elementary algebra and trigonometry are examined. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisite: PHYS 1111K 

PHYS 2211K Principles of Physics 1 4 Credits 

An introductory course, which includes material from mechanics, thermodynamics, and 
waves. Elementary differential calculus is used. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisite: MATH 2101 or MAT 2501 

PHYS 2212K Principles of Physics II 4 Credits 

An introductory course, which includes material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern 
physics. Elementary differential and integral calculus are examined. (3-2-4) 
Prerequisite: PHYS 22 UK 

PHYS 3111 Heat and Thermodynamics 3 Credits 

Mathematical background and preparation, equations of state, ideal and real gases, kinetic 
theory of gases (temperature and temperature scales, heat capacity and calorimetry, work, 
Laws of Thermodynamics), the enthalpy function and thermo-chemistry, Joule-Thomas 
experiment, entropy functions, free energy, phase rule. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 221 IK 

PHYS 3121 Optics 3 Credits 

Advanced topics in optics; a continuation of PHYS 2212K. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 2212K 

PHYS 3131 Magnetism and Electricity 3 Credits 

Advanced topics in electricity and magnetism; a continuation of PHYS 2212K. 
Prerequisites: PHYS 2212K 

PHYS 3211 Mathematical Physics 3 Credits 

A course designed to develop an understanding of the concrete relationship between 
mathematical factors that contribute to various physical phenomena; qualitative and 
quantitative relationships. 
Prerequisites: MATH 2111 and PHYS 2212K 

PHYS 4111 Modern Physics 3 Credits 

Recent advances in atomic and nuclear physics. 

Prerequisites: MATH 2111/PHYS 2212K and at least one upper-level physics 

course 

PHYS 4951 Introduction to Research in Physics 2 Credits 

An introduction to the techniques and procedures used in physics research problems. 

(1-2-2) 

Prerequisites: Junior standing in mathematics and physics; the consent of the 

instructor; completion of at least one 3100 or 4100 level physics course 



242 



THE REWRITE CONNECTION 

ENGL 0199 Basic Composition 3 Credits 

A co-requisite for Reading 0099. This course is designed for students who have exited 
English 0099, but are still attempting to exit Reading 0099 and for new students whose 
placement writing score exempted them from English 0099, but whose reading score 
required Reading 0099. The course integrates reading, writing, and critical thinking by 
looking at writing as both product and process. Students will compose essays inside and 
outside of the classroom, using expository and rhetorical writing methods. Institutional 
credit only. (3-0-3) 

RTSS 0198 Regents' Success Seminar 3 Credits 

A team-taught seven-week course integrating reading and writing. This course is 
designed to give first time Regents' test-takers reinforcement and enrichment prior to 
taking the Regents' Test. The course offers intensive instruction on reading and writing 
skills, focusing on reading comprehension and vocabulary and essay composition. A unit 
on improving test-taking strategies and building self esteem is also included. Practice 
tests will be given throughout the semester. The course will be conducted in a class/lab 
setting of no more than 25 students. Institutional credit only. (3-0-3) 

STUD 0198 College Study Skills 3 Credits 

A course designed to develop study skills. It will focus on study skills such as time 
management, stress management, good note taking, goal setting and other factors that 
impact effective studying. It will also include survival strategies for test taking and 
many other practical related skills that are essential to students' success in college. 
A mini-research paper will be required to teach organizational and analytical skills. 
Institutional credit only. (3-0-3) 

REGENTS' REMEDIATION 

RTPR 0198 Reading 3 Credits 

Intensive practice in the development of reading skills. Required each semester for students 
who have not passed the reading section of the Regents' Testing Program by the time they 
earn 45 semester hours. Passing contingent upon passing the RTP. Institutional credit 
only. (3-0-3) 

RTPE 0199 Essay 3 Credits 

Intensive practice in the development of writing skills. Required each semester for students 
who have not passed the essay section of the Regents' Testing Program by the time they 
earn 45 semester hours. Passing contingent upon passing the RTP. Institutional credit 
only. (3-0-3) 

STUDENT ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE 
DEVELOPMENTAL (LEARNING SUPPORT) 

ENGL 0099 Fundamentals of English 4 Credits 

An exit level course in standard English, providing instruction in basic grammar, sentence 
mechanics, paragraph and essay composition, and test-taking skills. Laboratory-oriented, 
the course provides learning situations in both the classroom and the learning laboratories. 
A diagnostic examination at the beginning of the course will identify specific areas needing 
improvement. Institutional credit only. (3-1-4) 



243 



MATH 0097 Fundamental Mathematics 1 4 Credits 

A laboratory-oriented, entry level course designed to satisfy the needs of students whose 
knowledge of Introductory Algebra falls below the established cut-off COMPASS score 
for Math 0097. In this course, students will review concepts related to real numbers and 
variables, solving linear equations and inequalities, as well as systems of linear equations 
and inequalities, operations with exponential and polynomial expressions. Prerequisite: 
Appropriate cut-off placement score on COMPASS. Institutional credit only. (3-1-4) 

MATH 0099 Fundamental Mathematics II 4 Credits 

A laboratory-oriented, exit level course designed to satisfy the needs of students whose 
knowledge of Intermediate Algebra falls below the established COMPASS cut-off score 
for Math 0099. In this course, students will review concepts related to factoring quadratic 
polynomials, operations of rational expressions, operations of roots and radicals, solving 
quadratic equations and inequalities, graphing nonlinear functions and conic sections, and 
exponential and logarithmic functions and their properties. Prerequisite: Math 0097 or 
appropriate cut-off placement score on COMPASS. Institutional credit only. (3-1-4) 

READ 0099 Foundations of Reading 4 Credits 

A course designed to expand students' reading skills for creative, critical, and interpretive 
reading, and to prepare students to pass the post CPE/COMPASS. It is 25% lab and 75% 
classroom-directed. The course is designed for pre-college level reading reinforcement, 
focusing on three major areas: word recognition, advanced literal and inferential 
comprehension, and study skills. Reinforcing Writing Across the Curriculum, this course 
encourages students to use current events to develop multi-paragraph essays and other 
writing activities both in and out of class. Institutional credit only. (3-1-4) 

REGENTS' PREPARATION 

RGTR 0198 Reading 3 Credits 

The Regents' Reading Skills course is intended to ensure that all graduates of USG 
institutions possess certain minimum skills in reading comprehension. Students work on 
improving their comprehension of material drawn from a variety of subject areas (social 
science, natural science and humanities) with various modes of discourse (exposition, 
narration and argumentation). Critical thinking and the following four major aspects of 
reading are emphasized: vocabulary in context, inferential and literal comprehension, and 
analysis. Institutional credit only. (3-0-3) 

RGTE 0199 Essay 3 Credits 

The Regents' Writing Skills course is intended to ensure that all graduates of USG 
institutions possess certain minimum skills in writing. Students learn to evaluate their 
own writing strengths and weaknesses and work on improving their writing skills so that 
they are able to write an essay meeting the Regents' criteria. Institutional credit only. (3- 
0-3) 

ENRICHMENT 

ENGL 0199 Basic Composition 3 Credits 

A co-requisite for Reading 0099. This course is designed for students who have exited English 
0099, but are still attempting to exit Reading 0099 and for new students whose placement 
writing score exempted them from English 0099, but whose reading score required Reading 
0099. The course integrates reading, writing, and critical thinking by looking at writing as 
both product and process. Students will compose essays inside and outside of the classroom, 
using expository and rhetorical writing methods. Institutional credit only. (3-0-3) 



244 



RTSS 0198 Regents' Success Seminar 3 Credits 

A team-taught course integrating reading and writing. This course is designed to give first 
time Regents' test-takers reinforcement and enrichment prior to taking the Regents' Test. 
The course offers intensive instruction on reading and writing skills, focusing on reading 
comprehension and vocabulary and essay composition. A unit on improving test-taking 
strategies and building self esteem is also included. Practice tests will be given throughout 
the semester. The course will be conducted in a class/lab setting-Institutional credit only. 
(3-0-3) 

STUD 0198 College Study Skills 3 Credits 

A course designed to develop study skills. It will focus on study skills such as time 
management, stress management, good note taking, goal setting and other factors that 
impact effective studying. It will also include survival strategies for test taking and many 
other practical related skills that are essential to students' success in college. A mini- 
research paper will be required to teach organizational and analytical skills. Institutional 
credit only. (3-0-3) 



245 



UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA 



BOARD OF REGENTS 
Officers 
Administrative Staff 

UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL 

Savannah State University Administrative Officers 

Savannah State University Support Services 

College of Business Administration 

College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences 

College of Sciences and Technology 

Graduate Studies 

Faculty 



246 



UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF GEORGIA 



The University System of Georgia includes all state -operated institutions of higher education 
in Georgia — 19 universities, 2 four-year colleges, and 13 two-year colleges. These 34 public 
institutions are located throughout the state. 

A 16-member constitutional Board of Regents governs the University System, which has 
been in operation since 1932. Appointment of board members - five from the state-at-large 
and one from each of the state's eleven congressional districts - are made by the governor, 
subject to confirmation by the State Senate. Regular terms of board members are seven 
years. 

The chairman, the vice chairman, and other officers of the Board are elected by the members 
of the Board. The chancellor, who is not a member of the Board, is the chief executive officer 
of the Board and the chief administrative officer of the University System. 

The overall programs and services of the university system are offered through three major 
components: instruction, public service/continuing education, and research. 

Instruction consists of programs of study leading toward degrees, ranging from the 
associate (two-year) level to the doctoral level, and certificates. 

Requirements for admission of students to instructional programs at each institution are 
determined, pursuant to policies to the Board of Regents, by the institution. The Board 
establishes minimum academic standards and leaves to each institution the prerogative to 
establish higher standards. Applications for admission should be addressed in all cases to 
the institutions. 

A core curriculum, consisting of freshman and sophomore years of study for students whose 
educational goal is a degree beyond the associate level, is in effect at the universities, four- 
year colleges, and two-year colleges. This curriculum requires 60 semester credit hours, 
including 48 in general education — humanities, mathematics and natural sciences, and 
social sciences — and 18 in the student's chosen major area of study. It facilitates the 
transfer of freshman and sophomore degree credits within the University System. 

Public service/continuing education consists of non-degree activities, primarily, and 
special types of college-degree-credit courses. The non-degree activities are of several types, 
including short courses, seminars, conferences, lectures, and consultative and advisory 
services, in a large number of areas of interest. Typical college degree-credit public service/ 
continuing education courses are those offered through extension center programs and 
teacher education consortiums. 

Research encompasses investigations conducted primarily for discovery and application 
of knowledge. These investigations include clearly defined projects in some cases, non- 
programmatic activities in other cases. They are conducted on campuses at many off- 
campus locations. 

The research investigations cover a large number and a large variety of matters related to 
the educational objectives of the institutions and to general societal needs. 

Most of the research is conducted through the universities; however, some of it is conducted 
through several of the four-year and two-year colleges. 

The policies of the Board of Regents for the government, management, and control of 
the University System and the administrative actions of the chancellor provide autonomy 
of high degree for each institution. The executive head of each institution is the president, 
whose election is recommended by the chancellor and approved by the Board. 



247 



The University System Advisory Council, with 34 committees, engenders continual system 
wide dialogue on major academic and administrative matters of all types. It also makes 
recommendations to the chancellor for transmittal to the Board of Regents as appropriate, 
regarding academic and administrative aspects of operation of the system. 

The advisory council consists of the chancellor, the vice chancellor, and all presidents as 
voting members, and it includes other officials and staff members of the institutions as 
nonvoting members. The advisory council's 21 academic committees and 13 administrative 
committees are made up of representatives from the institutions. The committees dealing 
with matters of university-system-wide application include, typically, at least one member 
from each institution. 



UNIVERSITY PERSONNEL 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

Term Expires 

Hugh A. Carter, Jr State at Large, 2009 

(Mr.) Connie Cater Eighth District, 2006 

William H. Cleveland State at Large, 2009 

Michael J. Coles Sixth District, 2008 

Joe Frank Harris Eleventh District, 2006 

John Hunt, Tifton Second District, 2011 

W. Mansfield Jennings, Jr First District, 2010 

James R. Jolly Tenth District, 2008 

Donald M. Leebern, Jr., Atlanta State-at-Large, 2012 

Elridge W. McMillan, Atlanta Fifth District, 2010 

Martin W. NeSmith Third District, 2006 

Patrick S. Pittard (VICE CHAIR) Ninth District, 2008 

Doreen Stiles Poitevint State at Large, 2011 

Wanda Yancey Rodwell Fourth District, 2008 

Timothy J. Shelnut (CHAIR) Twelfth District, 2007 

Richard L. Tucker Seventh District, 2012 

Allan Vigil Thirteenth District, 2010 

Joel D. Wooten, Jr State-at-Large, 2006 

UNIVERSITY SYSTEM ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

(ATLANTA) 

Chancellor Vacant 

Sr. Vice Chancellor Office of Support Services Corlis Cummings 

Sr. Vice Chancellor of External Activities & Facilities Mr. Thomas E. Daniel 

Sr. Vice Chancellor Academics and Fiscal Affairs Dr. Daniel S. Papp 

Vice Chancellor Academics, Faculty and Student Affairs Dr. Frank A. Butler 

Vice Chancellor-Information/Instructional Technology/CIO Mr. Randall Thursby 

Vice Chancellor Office of Fiscal Affairs Mr. William Bowes 

Associate Vice Chancellor-Strategic Research & Analysis Dr. Cathie M. Hudson 

Associate Vice Chancellor of Legal Affairs Elizabeth E. Neely 

Secretary to Board/Executive Administrative Assistant Ms. Gail Weber 



248 



SAVANNAH STATE 
UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

President Carlton E. Brown 

B.A., Ed.D., University of Massachusetts 

Vice President for Academic Affairs Joseph H. Silver, Sr. 

B.S., St. Augustine College, MA., Ph.D., Atlanta University 

Vice President for Business and Finance Arthur L. Moncrief 

B.S., Alabama State University; M.B.A., Troy State University; 

Vice President for Institutional Advancement Larion Williams 

B.S., Savannah State University; M.A., Duke University; 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

Vice President for Student Affairs Randy Gunter 

B.A., Central College of Iowa 
B.A., Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University 

Executive Assistant to the President J. Allen Zow 

B.A., Bethune-Cookman; J.D., University of Florida 

Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs Beverly Watkins 

B.A., California State University, LA; M.S.W., Social Work 
Wayne State University; Ph.D. Social Work, Ohio State University 

Dean, Enrollment Management Judith W. Edwin 

B.A., Michigan State University; M.Ed., University of Miami; 

Ed.D, University of San Diego 

Director of Administrative Affairs Cynthia M. Buskey 

B.S., South Carolina State University; MPA, Savannah State University 

SAVANNAH STATE 
UNIVERSITY SUPPORT SERVICES 

Associate Director, Admissions Gwen Moore 

Associate Director, Financial Aid Mark Adkins 

Athletic Director Robert O'Neal 

Auxiliary Services Director Bernard Conyers 

Bookstore Manager Vacant 

Asst. VP Residential Services & Programs Irvin Clark 

Student Leadership & Development Director Karla Harper 

Student Leadership & Development Counseling Professional Jacqueline Awe 

Student Programs & Organizations Gary Oliver 

Center for Teaching, Learning & Academic Support Director Joan Maynor 

Chief of Police (Interim) Lt. Leroy Groover, Sr. 

Communications/Community Relations Director Loretta Hey ward 

Comptroller Elaine Campbell 

Computer Services & Information Technology Director Naomi Singleton 

Continuing Education Coordinator Vacant 

Director of Student Accounts and Special Projects Janice Johnson 

Executive Director, Access Programs Doreatha Tyson 



249 



Health Services Director Betty Bennett, R.N. 

Human Resources Director Sandra McCord Best 

Institutional Research & Planning Director Michael G. Crow 

International Center Director Cornelius St. Mark 

Intramural Sports & Wellness Director Richard Basil 

Library Director Mary Jo Fayoyin 

Physical Plant Director (Interim) Arnold Jackson 

Registrar David M. Booze 

Student Support Services Director Lawrence Simmons 

Title III Director Thomas H. Hines 

University Wide Testing Tara W. Aikens 

WHCJ Radio Station Manager Theron "Ike" Carter 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Dean Mostafa H. Sarhan 

B.S., University of Cairo; M.B.A., Texas A&M University; 

Ph.D., The University of Arkansas 

Associate Dean Lydia McKinley-Floyd 

B.A., MBA, University of Illinois, Chicago Circle 

Ph.D., Emory University 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Dean Jane Gates 

B.A. Political Science, Arkansas State University 

MPA, Public Administration, University of Arkansas-Fayetteville 

Ph.D. Political Science, Southern Illinois University 

Liberal Arts Department Chair Vacant 

Social Work Department Chair Bernita Berry 

B.A. Sociology, Morris Brown College 
MSW, Social Work, Atlanta University 
Ph.D., Sociology, Kent State University 

Mass Communications Department Chair Charles J. Elmore 

B.S., Biology, Savannah State College 

M.A., Journalism, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor 

Ph.D. Higher Education, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor 

Political Sciences/Public Administration 

and Urban Studies Department Chair Geiger, Shirley M. 

Master of Public Administration Program, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences 
B.A., Howard University; M.P.A., Ph.D., Political Science, University of South Carolina 

Social and Behavioral Sciences Department Chair Larry Stokes 

B.S. and M.S.C. J., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga 

Ph.D., Howard University 



250 



COLLEGE OF SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY 

Dean Babajide Familoni 

B.Sc. (Honors), Electrical Engineering; University of Lagos, Nigeria; Ph.D., 
Electrical Engineering; University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. 

Department Chair Kuppuswamy Jayaraman 

B.E., Civil Engineering, Sri Venkateswara University; M.sc, Public Health 

Engineering, University of Madras 
Ph.D., Environmental Engineering, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University 

Natural Sciences & Mathematics Department Chair Harpal Singh 

B.S., M.S., Punjab University, M.P.H, Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

Engineering Technology Department Chair Kuppuswamy Jayaraman 

B.E., Civil Engineering, Sri Venkateswara University; M.sc, Public Health Engineering, 

University of Madras 
Ph.D., Environmental Engineering, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University 

Naval Science (NROTC) Department Chair CAPT Leonard B. Jones, USN 

B.S., Chemistry, Savannah State University 
M.S., System Technology /Applied Science, Navy Post Graduate School 

M.S., Foreign Affairs, National War College) 

Military Science (AROTC) Department Chair COL James E. Handley, USAR 

B.S. Sociology, North Georgia College 

GRADUATE STUDIES 

Dean of Graduate Studies and Sponsored Research George N. Williams 

B.S., Savannah State College, M.S., 
Tuskegee Institute, Ph.D., Howard University 

Director of Survey Research Center Malik Watkins 

B.A. DeVry Institute 

M.B.A. University of Notre Dame 

Ph.D. Ohio State University 

Assistant Director Althea Adams-Sutton 

B.S., Biology, Savannah State University 
M.P. A., Savannah State University 

Graduate Admissions Coordinator Dara Crawford 

B.A., Savannah State University 
M.T. , Georgia Southern University 



251 

FACULTY 

ADEYEMO, Adegboye; Professor, Natural Science & Mathematics, College of Sciences & 
Technology (1991). B.S., Virginia Union; Ph.D., Inorganic Chemistry, Howard University 

AFOLABI, Julius; Associate Professor, Natural Science & Mathematics; College of 
Sciences & Technology (1994). B.S., Southern Nazarene University; M.P.H., Epidemiology, 
University of Oklahoma; Ph.D., Parasitology, Oklahoma State University 

AGUERO, Clara; Associate Professor, Fine Arts; College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences 
(1983). B.A., ISDAL. Colombia; B.A., Hampton University; M.A., Printmaking, Rosary 
College, Italy; M.F.A., Photography, Savannah College of Art & Design 

ALEMAYEHU, Tsehai; Professor, Economics; College of Business Administration (1985). 
B.A., Berea College; M.A., Economics, Ph.D., Economics, University of Kentucky 

AWAN, Abida, Assistant Professor, Department of Natural Science & Mathematics, 
College of Sciences & Technology) (1990); B.S. (Physics & Chemistry; M.S. Economics/ 
Statistics, University of Punjab Department of Engineering and Computer Technology 
(1990) B.S. Natural Science & Mathematics/Physics; B.S. Math/Statistics; M.S. Economics/ 
Statistics, University of Punjab 

AWAN, Ijaz A.; Associate Professor, Engineering Technology; College of Sciences & 
Technology (1984). B.A., M.A., Economics/Statistics, Punjab University Lahore; M.S., 
Computer Science, Alabama A & M University 

BAKER, Janie; Assistant Professor, and Chemistry Lab Coordinator, Natural Science 
& Mathematics, College of Sciences & Technology (2001) B.S. Savannah State College; 
Chemistry, M.S., Organic Chemistry, Atlanta University 

BELLAIS, Albert W.; Lecturer, Fine Arts; College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (2002). 
M.F.A., George Washington University; B.A., New Mexico State University 

BERRY, Bernita C; Associate Professor, Chair, Social Work, College of Liberal Arts and 
Social Sciences (2003), B.A. Sociology; M.S.W. Clinical Social Work, Atlanta University; 
Ph.D. Sociology, Kent State University 

BIGGS, Travis; Artist-in-Residence, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (2005). B.S., 
Music Performance, Education, Composition and Theory, Easter Michigan University. 

BLALOCK, Angela; Assistant Professor, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (2005). B.A., 
Music -Voice Performance, Savannah State College; M.A., Music-Voice Pedagogy, Ohio 
State University; D.M.A., Vocal Performance, Florida State University 

BLOOD, Peggy; Associate Professor, College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (1998). 
B.S., Art Education, Univ. of Arkansas, Pine Bluff; M.F.A., Painting/Drawing, Univ. of 
Arkansas, Fayetteville; M.A., Administration, Holy Names College; Ph.D. Administration, 
Union Institute 

BONGANG, Bernard L.; Assistant Professor, Political Science, Public Administration 
and Urban Studies; College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences; B.A. Ecole Superieure 
Internationale De Journaalisme De Yaounde, Cameroon. M.S. Boston University; M.A. , 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 

BROFFT, Jennifer; Adjunct Professor, Natural Science and Mathematics, College 
of Sciences and Technology (2002) B.S., Biology, James Madison University; Ph.D. 
Microbiology, University of Georgia 

BROWN, Carlton; Professor, President; Savannah State University (1997). B.A. 
English, University of Massachusetts; Ed.D., Multi-Culture Education, University of 
Massachusetts 

BROWN, Ulysses, J. Ill; Assistant Professor, Management, College of Business 
Administration (2004). B.S. General Studies; MS, Industrial- Organizational Psychology, 
Valdosta State University; Ph.D., Management, Jackson State University, 



252 



CHAMBERS, Russell; Associate Professor, English; College of Liberal Arts & Social 
Sciences (1989). A.B., A.M., Ph.D., English, University of Michigan 

CHETTY, Chellu S.; Professor, Natural Science & Mathematics; College of Sciences & 
Technology (1993). B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Zoology, S.V., University 

CHOI, Hae Y.; Associate Professor, Computer Information Systems; College of Business 
Administration (2000). MBA, Management, Southeastern Louisiana University; DBA, 
Management Information Systems, Mississippi State University 

CHUKWUKERE, Sylvester A.; Associate Professor, Engineering Technology; College 
of Sciences & Technology (1985). B.S., Electrical Engineering, Southern University; M.S., 
Electrical Engineering, Tuskegee Institute 

CRAWFORD, Emily; Professor, Marketing; College of Business Administration (1992). 
B.S., Marketing, Savannah State University; M.B.A., Atlanta University; D.B.A., 
International Marketing, International Graduate School; Ph.D., Marketing, University of 
Cincinnati 

CROSS-HOLMES, Novella; Associate Professor, Mass Communications; College of 
Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (1979). B.A., Journalism, Clark College; M.A., Journalism, 
Ohio State University 

CURRAN, Mary Carla; Assistant Professor, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, College 
of Sciences and Technology, (2002). B.S. Marine Science, University of South Carolina, 
Ph.D., Biological Oceanography, MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. 

DELOACH, Darrell M.; Assistant Professor, Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science 
Technology; College of Sciences & Technology (1992). B.S. Mathematics, Savannah State 
University; M.S., Mathematics, Ohio State University 

DELOACH, Roenia J.; Assistant Professor, (Full-time Temporary), Social Work; College 
of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (2002). B.S.W., Jackson State University; M.S.W., Ohio 
State University; Ph.D. Social Work, Ohio State University 

DHILLON, Tarlochan; Assistant Professor, Physics, Department of Natural Sciences 
and Mathematics, College of Sciences and Technology, (2005), B.S., Physics, Chemistry 
and Mathematics, Punjab University, Chandigarh, India; M.S., Physics Physics, Meerut 
University, Meerut India; Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas 
at El Paso, TX.) 

DILLON, Tisha; Instructor. BA. English, Armstrong Atlantic State University; M.L.I.S. 
San Jose State University. 

DOWLING, William A.; Professor, Finance; College of Business Administration (1995). 
B.B.A., M.B.A., Valdosta State University; D.B.A., Finance, University of Tennessee 

DYSON, Rebecca; Lecturer, College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (2003). M.S.M., 
B.A., Armstrong Atlantic State University 

ELMORE, Charles J.; Professor, Head, Department of Mass Communications; College 
of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (1972). B.S., Biology, Savannah State University; M.A., 
Journalism, Ph.D., Higher Education Administration, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 

EMRICH, James I., Lieutenant, USN, Assistant Professor, Naval Science; College of 
Sciences & Technology (2005), B.S., Earth-Space Science, University of Indianapolis 

FAMILONI, Babajide; Professor, Dean, College of Sciences & Technology, (2004), 
B.Sc. (Honors), Electrical Engineering; University of Lagos, Nigeria; Ph.D., Electrical 
Engineering; University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. 

FAYOYIN, Mary Jo; Assistant Professor, Director of Library and Media Services, Library 
(2001). BA. Education, Fairmont State; M.S.L.S. University of North Carolina. 

FLEMMING, Charmaine A. ; Instructor, College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (2004). 
B.S. Biology. BA. History, MA. History, University of South Carolina. 

FONTENEAU, Deborah Y.; Assistant Professor, College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences 
(2004). Ph.D., University of Illinois; M.A., Purdue University; M.A.T., B.A., Jackson State 
University 



253 



FOSTER, Josephine Booth; Assistant Coordinator, The Re Write Connection; Assistant 
Professor, English; Center for Teaching, Learning and Academic Support (2001). B.A., Mass 
Media/English Literature, Hampton University; M.A., English Literature, North Carolina 
Central University; Ph.D., English with specialization in Rhetoric and Composition and 
Minor in Technical Writing, Bowling Green State University 

FRANKLIN, Chandra I.; Professor, Natural Science & Mathematics; College of Sciences 
& Technology (1995). B.Sc, M.Sc, University of Madras; M.S., Biology, University of 
Michigan; Ph.D., Botany, North Carolina State University 

FRANKLIN, Reginald; Associate Professor, Mass Communications; College of Liberal 
Arts and Social Sciences (1998). B.S., Mass Communications, Jackson State University; 
M.A., Telecommunications, University of Michigan 

FRISCHER, Marc E.; Adjunct Associate Professor, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography 
(1996).A.B. Biology and Microbial Genetics Washington University in St. Louis, Ph.D. 
Marine Science and Marine Microbiology University of South Florida. 

GATES, Jane; Associate Professor, Political Science, Dean, College of Liberal Arts and 
Social Sciences (2002), B.A. Political Science, Arkansas State University; MPA, Public 
Administration, University of Arkansas; Ph.D. Political Science, Southern Illinois 
University at Carbondale 

GEIGER, Shirley M.; Associate Professor, Master of Public Administration Program, 
College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (1996). B.A., Howard University; M.P.A., Ph.D., 
Political Science, University of South Carolina 

GENTRY, April D.; Assistant Professor, College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (2003). 
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University; M.A., Ohio University; B.A., MacMurray College 

GILLIGAN, Matthew; Professor, and Coordinator Marine Sciences Program, Natural 
Science and Mathematics; College of Sciences & Technology (1980). B.A., Biology, Hartwick 
College; Ph.D., Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona 

GOLDEN, Louise L.; Coordinator, The Re Write Connection; Associate Professor, English; 
College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (1987). B.A., M.A., Speech Communication, 
University of Georgia; Ph.D., English with specialization in Rhetoric and Composition, 
Bowling Green State University; Post Doctorate, Writing Program Administration, Bowling 
Green State University 

GOUGIS, Regi; Associate Professor, Behavior Analysis/Psychology, Social and Behavioral 
Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (2005), B.S., Psychology, Ph.D., 
Experimental Social Psychology, Xavier University 

GREENE-JONES. Cynthia; Instructor, Social Work, College of Liberal Arts and Social 
Sciences (2004). B.S.W., Social Work, Savannah State University; M.S.W. Social Work, 
University of Georgia 

HAHN, William G.; Professor, Management, College of Business Administration (1981). 
B.A. Psychology, Emory University; M.Ed., Ph.D., Educational Psychology, Georgia State 
University 

HAIRE, Travis W.; Lieutenant, USN, Assistant Professor of Naval Science, Naval Science; 
College of Sciences & Technology (2005), B.S., Marine Engineering, United States Naval 
Academy 

HAN, Ying; Associate Professor, Spanish; College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (1994). 
B.A., Spanish, Beijing Foreign Language University; M.A., Speech, Language, Literature, 
Washington University; Ph.D. Spanish, State University of New York, Stony Brook 

HANDLEY, James E., Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army; Assistant Professor of Military 
Science; College of Sciences & Technology (2001). B.S. Sociology, North Georgia College 

HONG, Phat Q.; Lead Mathematics Program Instructor, Mathematics Lab; Assistant 
Professor, Mathematics; Center for Teaching, Learning and Academic Support (1990). B.S., 
Management; M.P.A., Public Administration, Savannah State University 



254 



HOSKINS, Dionne L.; Fishery Biologist (DOC/NOAA/NMFS) Assistant Research 
Professor, Marine Science Program, Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics 
(1999). B.S. Marine Biology, Savannah State College; Ph.D. Marine Science, University 
of South Carolina. 

IDE, Christopher; Associate Professor, Political Science, Public Administration and 
Urban Studies; College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (1992). B.S., Marine Biology, 
University of North Carolina; M.P.A., Public Administration, Auburn University; Ph.D., 
Political Science, Atlanta University 

JAHANNES, JaArthur; Professor, Social and Behavioral Sciences; College of Liberal 
Arts & Social Sciences (1981). B.S., Psychology, Lincoln University; M.A., Educational 
Administration and Supervision, Hampton University; M.A., Guidance and Counseling, 
Hampton University; Ph.D. Psychology, University of Delaware 

JAMISON, Irma B.; Assistant Professor, Political Science/Public Administration and 
Urban Studies, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (2001). B.A. Florida A & M 
University; M.S., Urban Planning, University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., Public Administration, 
Florida State University 

JAYARAMAN, Kuppuswamy; Associate Professor, Chair, Engineering Technology; 
College of Sciences & Technology (1996). B.E., Civil Engineering, Sri Venkateswara 
University; M.Sc, Public Health Engineering, University of Madras; Ph.D., Environmental 
Engineering, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University 

JINDANI, Shinaz G.; Associate Professor, Social Work; College of Liberal Arts & Social 
Sciences (1996). B.S.W., M.S.W., Social Work, Bombay University; D.S.W., Social Work, 
Tulane University 

JOHNSON, Sharon W.; Assistant Professor, Management; College of Business 
Administration (2005). B.S., Science Education, University of Louisiana; M.B.A., Computer 
Information Systems, Grambling State University; Ph.D., Business Administration, 
Jackson State University 

JOHNSON, Willie E.; Professor, Public Administration; College of Liberal Arts & Social 
Sciences (1986). B.A., California State Polytechnic University; M.S., M.S.P.A., Public 
Administration; Ph.D., Political Science, Florida State University 

JONES, Hetty B.; Professor, Natural Science & Mathematics, College of Sciences & 
Technology (1978). B.S., Biology Education M.Ed., Science Education, Tuskegee Institute; 
Ph.D., Zoology, Iowa State University 

JONES, Leonard B.; Captain, USN, Professor of Naval Science; Naval Science; College of 
Sciences & Technology (2004) B.S., Chemistry, Savannah State University; M.S., System 
Technology/Applied Science, Navy Post Graduate School; M.S., Foreign Affairs, National 
War College 

JORDAN, Kenneth; Professor, Social and Behavioral Sciences; College of Liberal Arts 
& Social Sciences (1989). B.S., North Carolina Central University; M.A., Ph.D., Urban 
Geography, University of California, Berkeley 

KALANTARI, Behrooz; Associate Professor, Public Administration; College of Liberal 
Arts & Social Sciences (1997). B.S., Administration, Tehran Business College; B.S., Public 
Management, Avila College; M.P.A., Public Administration; Southern Illinois University; 
Ph.D. Political Science, Southern Illinois University 

KALU, Alex; Professor, Engineering Technology; College of Sciences & Technology 
(1986). NCE, University of Nigeria; B.S., University of Texas at Arlington; M.S., Electrical 
Engineering, Louisiana Tech University; Ph.D., Industrial/Electrical Engineering, 
Louisiana State University 

KATZAN, Harry, Jr.; Lecturer, Computer Information Systems; College of Business 
Administration (2005). B.S., Mathematics; MA, Human Relations, The Ohio University 

KAWASHA, Boniface; Assistant Professor, College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences 
(2004). Ph.D., M.A., Linguistics, M.A., French Literature, University of Oregon; B.A., 
University of Zambia 



255 



LAMBRIGHT, Jonathan; Assistant Professor, Georgia Tech Regional Engineering 
Program; College of Sciences and Technology (2002). B.S.; M.S., Mechanical Engineering, 
North Carolina A&T; M.S., Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of 
Technology 

KENT, Rosalind M.; Coordinator, Academic Advisement/Mentoring Program; Assistant 
Professor, Reading; Center for Teaching, Learning and Academic Support (1990). B.S., 
Education, Savannah State College; M.Ed., Reading Specialist, Georgia Southern 
University 

LEMMA, Mulatu; Professor, and Coordinator Mathematics Program Natural Sciences 
& Mathematics, College of Sciences & Technology (1994). B.Sc, M.Sc, Addis Ababa 
University; M.A., Mathematics, Ph.D., Mathematics, Kent State University 

LESEANE, Reginald; Assistant Professor, Computer Information Systems; College of 
Business Administration (1996). B.B.A., Computer Information Systems, Savannah State 
University; M.B.A., Georgia Southern University 

LIN, Shinemin; Professor, Natural Sciences & Mathematics, College of Sciences & 
Technology (1994). B.S., National Taiwan Normal University, M.S., Mathematics, 
Pittsburgh State University; Ph.D., Mathematics, University of Kansas 

LIU, Ying; Associate Professor, Mathematics, Physics & CSC Technology; College of 
Sciences & Technology (1990). B.S., Lanzou University; M.S., Carnegie-Mellon University, 
M.S., Computer Science, University of South Carolina; Ph.D., Physics, Carnegie-Mellon 
University 

LOCKWOOD, Daniel; Associate Professor, Social and Behavioral Sciences; College of 
Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (1996). B.A., History, The City College of New York; M.A., 
History, Stanford University; Ph.D., Criminal Justice, State University of New York, 
Albany 

MA, Rex C; Associate Professor, Engineering Technology; College of Sciences & Technology 
(1977). B.S., Civil Engineering Technology, Taiwan National University; M.E., Civil 
Engineering Technology, University of South Carolina 

MARTIN, Charlesworth R.; Professor; College of Sciences & Technology (1996). B.A., 
Mathematics, Hampton University; M.S., Electrical Engineering, Ph.D., Civil Engineering 
& Applied Mechanics, State University of New York at Buffalo 

MARTIN-GARDNER, Dorothy; Professor Psychology; College of Liberal Arts & Social 
Sciences (1989). B.S., Medical Technology, Central State University; M.A., Reading, 
Michigan State University; Ph.D., Reading, Temple University 

MARTIN, Joey S; Captain, USMC, Assistant Professor of Naval Science, Naval Science; 
College of Sciences & Technology (2005), B.S. Business Management, Savannah State 
University 

MAYNOR, Joan D. S.; Director; Professor, English; Center for Teaching, Learning and 
Academic Support (1974). B.S., English, Savannah State College; M.A., English, Atlanta 
University; Ed.D., Administration in Higher Education, Grambling State University 

MCCARTY, Joan; Assistant Professor, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (2005). 
B.A., Speech and Theater, Education Minor, University of Illinois at Chicago; M.A., 
Performing Arts (Theater) University of Illinois at Chicago 

MCKINLEY-FLOYD, Lydia: Associate Professor, Marketing; Associate Dean; College of 
Business Administration (2005). B.A., Political Science, MBA, Marketing, University of 
Illinois; Ph.D, Interdisciplinary Studies, Emory University 

MESCO, Eugene; Associate Professor, , Biology Program Coordinator, Natural Science & 
Mathematics, College of Sciences & Technology (1996). B.S., Biological Science, University 
of South Carolina; Ph.D., Physiology, University of California Berkeley 

METTS, Rose M; Assistant Professor, English; College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences 
(2000). B.S., Elementary Education, Morgan State University; M.S. Elementary Education, 
Kansas State University; Ph.D., English, University of South Carolina 



256 



MILLER, Percy; Associate Professor, English; College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences 
(1990). A.B., Education, University of Kentucky; M.S., English, Illinois State University; 
Ph.D., English, Vanderbilt University 

MOORE, Omega; Assistant Professor, College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (2003). 
Ph.D., Wayne State University; M.A., Atlanta University; B.S., Savannah State College 

MORGAN, Constance B.; Lead Reading Program Instructor Coordinator, The ReWrite 
Connection; Associate Professor, Reading; Center for Teaching, Learning and Academic 
Support (1988). B.S., English Literature, Savannah State University; M.S., Reading 
Education, Armstrong/Atlantic State University; M.A., Middle Education/Administration; 
Ed.S., Reading Administration, Georgia Southern University 

MUKHTAR Mohamad H.; Professor, Social and Behavioral Sciences; College of Liberal 
Arts & Social Sciences (1991). PCL, Translation Diploma, PCL London; B.A., M.A., and 
Ph.D., History, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt 

MUSTAFA, Mohammed A.; Associate Professor, Engineering Technology; College 
of Sciences & Technology (1994). B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Civil Engineering, Wayne State 
University 

NANIUZEYI, Emmanuel; Associate Professor, Political Science, Public Administration, 
Urban Studies; College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; B.A. National University of Zaire, 
M.A., Ohio University, Ph.D., Atlanta University 

O'BRIEN, Kevin; Assistant Professor, Spanish; College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences 
(1992). B. A., Spanish, Marist College; M. A., Spanish, Fordham University 

OGAZ, Charla; Assistant Professor, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (2005). 
B.A., University of Colorado, Philosophy; M.A., History of Consciousness, University of 
California, Santa Cruz; Ph.D., History of Consciousness, Santa Cruz 

OLUBAJO, Olarongbe; Professor of Chemistry and Coordinator Chemistry Program; 
College of Sciences & Technology (1992 B.S., Chemistry and Biology,) Northern Kentucky 
University; Ph.D., Organic Chemistry, Howard University 

OUANDLOUS, Arav S.; Associate Professor, International Business; College of Business 
Administration (1995). B.S.C., University of Algiers; M.B.A., M.A., Applied & Quantitative 
Analysis, The American University; M.A., Ph.D., International Business & Finance, The 
Catholic University 

PARK, Yonpae; Assistant Professor, Accounting; College of Business Administration 
(2005). B.A., Economics, Yonsei University; MBA, Business Administration, Seoul National 
University; MPA, Accounting, Georgia State University; Ph.D, Accounting, University of 
Nebraska. 

PHILBRICK, Jane H.; Professor, Management; College of Business Administration 
(1986). B.A., Mathematics, Clemson University; M.B.A., Ph.D., Business Administration, 
University of South Carolina 

PIERRE-PIERRE, Martine; Assistant Professor, Social Work; College of Liberal Arts 
and Social Sciences (1999). B.S., Biology, Florida A & M University; MSW, Social Work, 
Florida State University 

PRIDE, Carol J.; Assistant Professor, Department of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, 
College of Sciences and Technology (2002). B.A., Environmental Science, Wesleyan 
University; Ph.D.; Marine Science, University of South Carolina 

PURNELL, Elissa T.; Assistant Professor, Natural Sciences and Mathematics; College 
of Sciences & Technology (2004), B.S., Biology, Savannah State University; M.S., Biology, 
West Georgia College; Ph.D., Molecular Cellular Biology and Pathobiology, Medical 
University of South Carolina. 

RAUT, Pravin; Professor, Engineering Technology; College of Sciences & Technology 
(1981). B.E., University of Bombay; M.S., Mechanical Engineering, Ph.D., Mechanical 
Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology 



257 



REAVES, Joel C, Commander, USN, Associate Professor of Naval Science; College of 
Sciences & Technology (2004), B.S., Electrical Engineering, United States Naval Academy; 
M.S., Electrical Engineering, Naval Post Graduate School 

REDDICK, Lillian J.; Associate Professor, Social Work; College of Liberal Arts and Social 
Sciences (1982). B.S., North Carolina A & T University; M.S.W., Virginia Commonwealth 
University; D.S.W., Social Work, Howard University 

RICHARDSON, Joseph P.; Professor, Natural Science and Mathematics; College 
of Sciences & Technology (1979). B.A., Biology, University of Tennessee; Ph.D., Marine 
Science, University of North Carolina 

RICKS, Edward; Lecturer/Assistant Band Director, Fine Arts; College of Liberal Arts 
& Social Sciences (2005). M.M., Emphasis in Education, Norfolk State University; B.S., 
Music, Norfolk State University 

ROGERS, Catherine A.; Assistant Professor, English; College of Liberal Arts and Social 
Sciences (1996). B.A., English, Middlebury College; M. Div., Theology, Western Jesuit 
School of Theology; Ph.D., English, University of Georgia. 

ST. MARK, Cornelius; Associate Professor of Africana Studies and History, B.A. History, 
South Carolina State University, M.Ed, History Education South Carolina State University, 
Ph.D. African Studies, Howard University 

SAJWAN, Kenneth S.; Professor, and Coordinator Environmental Sciences Program 
Natural Science & Mathematics; College of Sciences & Technology (1992). B.S., G.B. Pant 
University of Agriculture and Technology; M.S., Jawaharlal Nehru Agricultural University; 
Ph.D., Science, Indian Institute of Technology, Ph.D., Agronomy and Environmental 
Quality, Colorado State University Soil Natural Science & Mathematics, Colorado State 
University 

SARHAN, Mostafa H.; Professor, Dean; College of Business Administration (1998). 
B.C., Cairo University; M.B.A., Accounting & Finance, Texas A & M University; Ph.D., 
Accounting, The University of Arkansas 

SCHROEDER, Michael; Professor, English, B.A, English, College of Liberal Arts & 
Social Sciences (1991): B.A, English, Washburn University; M.A., Ph.D., English, Kent 
State University 

SEMSAR, Mehdi; Associate Professor, Engineering Technology; College of Sciences & 
Technology (1990). B.S., Chemical Engineering, Tennessee Technological University; M.S., 
Chemical Engineering, University of Tennessee 

SHEARIN, Gloria; Associate Professor, English; College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences 
(1984). B.S., M.S., English, Florida State University, Ph.D, English, University of South 
Carolina. 

SHIM, Chungsub; Assistant Professor, Computer Information Systems; College of 
Business Administration (2002). MBA, Management, Southeastern Louisiana University; 
DBA, Management Information Systems, Mississippi State University 

SILVER, Joseph H.; Professor, Vice President for Academic Affairs (1997). B.S., History/ 
Government, St. Augustine College; M.A., Ph.D, Political Science, Atlanta University 

SIMS, Ella H.; Professor, Social and Behavioral Sciences; College of Liberal Arts and 
Social Sciences (1974). B.A., Sociology, South Carolina State University; M.A., Sociology, 
Atlanta University 

SINGH, Harpal; Professor, Chair; Natural Science & Mathematics, College of Sciences 
& Technology (1974). B.S., M.S., Punjab University; Ph.D., Entomology-Radiation 
Biology Emphasis; M.P.H., Environmental & Occupational Health Option, University of 
Tennessee 

SNYDER, Robin M..; Associate Professor, Computer Information Systems; College of 
Business Administration; (2003). B.S., Science, United States Military Academy (West 
Point) Ph.D; Computer Science, The Pennsylvania State University 



258 



SONG, Zhiyan; Assistant Professor, Natural Science & Mathematics, College of Sciences 
& Technology (2000), B.S. Nankai University, China; Ph.D., Physical Chemistry, Physical 
Natural Science & Mathematics, Stockholm University, Sweden 

SPICER, Nan; Assistant Professor, Fine Arts; College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences 
(2003). M.F.A., Auburn University 

STEWART, Katherine; Assistant Professor, Behavior Analysis/Psychology, Social and 
Behavioral Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (2005). B.S., Psychology, 
M.A., Psychology, University of North Carolina at Wilmington; Ph.D., University of Kansas, 
Lawrence 

STOKES, Larry D.; Associate Professor, Chair, Department of Social and Behavioral 
Sciences, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (2001). B.S. and M.S.C. J., University 
of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Ph.D. Howard University 

TAYLOR, Henry, A., Jr.; Associate Professor, Engineering Technology; College of Sciences 
& Technology (1990). B.S., Chemical Engineering, M.S., Mechanical Engineering, Tuskegee 
University 

TESSEMA, George; Coordinator, Mathematics Lab; Associate Professor, Mathematics; 
Center for Teaching, Learning and Academic Support (1994). B.S., Haile Sellassie 
University; M.S., Mathematics Education, Florida State University; Ph.D., Mathematics 
Education, State University of New York at Albany 

TORRES, Paul D.; Professor, Accounting; College of Business Administration (2003). B.S., 
Accounting, Spring Hill College, M.B.A., Ph.D., Accounting, University of Alabama 

TURAY, Mohamed; Associate Professor, Social and Behavioral Sciences; College of Liberal 
Arts & Social Sciences (1990). B.A., English, University of Sierra Leone; M.A., Sociology, 
Howard University; Ph.D., Sociology, Howard University 

VEAK, Tyler; Assistant Professor, College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (2004). Ph.D., 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University; M.A., University of North Texas; B.A., 
University of Texas at Austin 

VERITY, Peter G;. Adjunct Professor, Skidaway Institute of Oceanography (1986), B.A. 
Biology Dartmouth College, M.S., and Ph.D. Biological Oceanography University of Rhode 
Island. 

WALKER, Alzie; Assistant Professor of Music, Director of Band, Norfolk State University 
(1977), University of Nebraska-Lincoln 

WALKER, Kai C . ; Assistant Professor, Mass Communications (2003), B.S., Communications 
and Theater Arts, Eastern Michigan University; M.F.A. Video and Film, Savannah College 
of Art and Design 

WARE, Robert: Assistant Professor, Marketing; College of Business Administration 
(2005). A.B., Economics, Harvard University; SM, International Business, Marketing & 
Finance, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Int'l Business & Management, 
University of South Carolina; JD, Business, Cyber & Int'l Law, University of Florida 

WARREN, Yvonne Abner; Lead English Program Instructor, The Re Write Connection; 
Assistant Professor, English; Center for Teaching, Learning and Academic Support (1978). 
B.A., English and Literature, Savannah State College; M.Ed., Cambridge College 

WATERS, Carver; Assistant Professor, English; College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences 
(1998). B.A., English, Dillard University; M.A., English, McNeese State University; Ph.D., 
English, University of Southwestern Louisiana 

WATKINS, Beverly; Associate Professor, B.A., California State University, LA; M.S.W., 
Social Work, Wayne State University; Ph.D., Social Work, Ohio State University 

WHATLEY, Maliece S.; Instructor, Accounting; College of Business Administration 
(2003). B.S., MAcc, Accounting, University of Georgia 



259 



WATKINS, Malik; Assistant Professor Political Science and Public Administration and 
Urban Studies Department, College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (2002). BA., DeVry 
Institute; MBA, The University of Notre Dame; Ph.D. Urban Studies and Planning, Ohio 
State University 

WILLIAMS, George N.; Professor, Chemistry, Dean of Graduate Studies and Sponsored 
Research, (1972). B.S., Savannah State College; M.S., Organic Chemistry, Tuskegee 
Institute; Ph.D., Inorganic Chemistry, Howard University 

WILLIAMS, James H.; Assistant Professor, Social Work, College of Liberal Arts and 
Social Sciences (2004). B.A., University of Louisville; M.S.W., Social Work, Jane Adams 
School of Social Work, University of Illinois Chicago; Ph.D., Social Work, University of 
Illinois Chicago 

WYCE, Louise; Instructor. BA. English, Barber-Scotia College; M. S. L. S. Atlanta 
University. 

YOUSUF, Asad; Professor, Engineering Technology; College of Sciences & Technology 
(1983). B.S., Electronics Engineering, N.E.D. University; M.S., Electrical and Computer 
Engineering, University of Cincinnati; Ed.D. University of Georgia 

ZHANG, Xiaorong S.; Associate Professor, Natural Science and Mathematics; College 
of Sciences & Technology (1999). B.S., Beijing Normal University; M.S., Botany, Chinese 
Academy of Science, Ph.D., Biotechnology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 
University 

ZHAO, Charles X.; Associate Professor, Natural Science and Mathematics; College 
of Sciences & Technology (1999) B.S.; Shanghai Normal University; M.Ed., Edinboro 
University of Pennsylvania; (M.S. &) Ph.D., University of Iowa 

ZHAO, Hua; Assistant Professor, Natural Science and Mathematics; College of Sciences 
& Technology (2004), B.S. & M.S., Tianjin University; Ph.D. New Jersey Institute of 
Technology; Post-doc, Rutgers University 

ZOW, J. Allen, Sr.; Associate Professor, Public Administration; College of Liberal Arts 
& Social Sciences (1990). Executive Assistant to the President. B.A., Political Science, 
Bethune Cookman; J.D., University of Florida 



260 






261 



INDEX 

Academic Policy and Registration 44 

Academic Renewal Policy 42 

Academic Probation and Suspension 53 

Academic Suspension, Learning Support 152 

Academic Calendar, 2005-2007 2 

Academic Advisement 46 

Access to Student Records 59 

Accounting 92 

Accreditation 1 

Address Changes 60 

Adjustment of Classes 58 

Admission, Senior Citizens 39 

Admission, Undergraduate (General) 29 

Admission, Conditional/Limited 31 

Admission, Non-traditional 39 

Admissions, Graduate 43 

Armstrong Exchange 40 

Army ROTC Program 147 

Attendance 47 

Auditors 40 

Board of Regents, Members and Officers 247 

Calculating the Cumulative Average 52 

Career Services and Cooperative Education 69 

Center for Teaching, Learning & Academic Support 151 

Classification 52 

College Credit by Examination and Experience 41 

College Credit for Military Experience/Training 41 

College Preparatory Curriculum 30 

College of Business Administration 90 

College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences 96 

College of Sciences and Technology 122 

Computer Information Systems 92 

Continuing Education 27 

Core Curriculum, Colleges, Degrees, and Programs 86 

Counseling Service 69 

Course Load 58 

Degree Requirement 54 

Department of Liberal Arts 96 

Department of Mass Communications 106 

Department of Social & Behavioral Sciences 109 

Department of Social Work 116 

Description of Courses 155 

Disabled Student Services 69 

Dual Majors 54 

Early Admission Programs 35 

Engineering Degree Program (GTREP) 144 

Engineering Technology Department 141 

Faculty and Staff. 251 

Fees, Schedule 80 

Fees, Refund of 83 



262 



Financial Aid 63 

Georgia Intern Program 26 

Grade Challenges by Students 52 

Grade Changes 53 

Grading System 50 

Graduation Requirements 54 

Graduation Honors 55 

Grievance Appellate Procedures, Students 60 

Health Service 69 

History of the University 18 

Honor Societies 57 

Honors Program 56 

Housing 70 

International Students 37 

Joint Enrollment 36 

Library 22 

Management 93 

Marketing 93 

Natural Science & Mathematics Department 123 

Naval ROTC Program 113 

Non-degree Seeking Students 25 

Orientation 72 

Policy on Drugs and Weapons 77 

Political Science & Public Administration/Urban Studies 118 

Purpose and Goals of the University 16 

Readmission 41 

Recognition of Excellence in Scholarship 57 

Regents Test 48 

Regents' Statement of Disruptive Behavior 52 

Registration 44 

Release of Directory Information 59 

Reporting of Grades 51 

Residency Requirements, University System 44 

Schedule Adjustment (Add/Drop) 39 

Second Degree 55 

Social and Behavioral Sciences Department 109 

Social Work Department 116 

Special Students 39 

Standard of Satisfactory Academic Progress 65 

State Requirement in History and Government 46 

Student Conduct 74 

Student Activities 71 

Student Affairs 69 

Study Abroad 27 

Teacher Education 26 

Testing Program 50 

Transfer Students 34 

Transient Students 39 

Veterans' Services 61 

Withdrawal from the University 58 



263 



WHERE TO WRITE OR CALL 

There is a central mailroom on campus. Specific information may be obtained by writing 
to the offices listed below and adding: 

Savannah State University 

State University Branch 

Savannah, GA 31404 



ADMISSION 

Office of Admissions 
(912) 356-2181 

ALUMNI 

Alumni Affairs 
356-2427 



GIFTS, GRANTS & BEQUESTS 

Vice President for Institutional 

Advancement 

356-2286 

GRADUATE STUDY 

Dean for Graduate Studies and Research 

356-2244 



ATHLETICS 

Director of Athletics 
353-5181 



HOUSING 

Student Housing Office 
356-2324 



CAREER SERVICES & 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

356-2285 

CATALOG 

Registrar 
356-2212 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

691-5557 

COUNSELING 

356-2202 

FINANCIAL AID, 
GRANTS LOANS 
WORK-STUDY ELIGIBILITY 

Office of Financial Aid 
356-2253 

GENERAL ACADEMIC AND 
FACULTY MATTERS 

Vice President for Academic Affairs 
356-2204 



MINORITY STUDENTS 

Minority Recruitment Office 

356-2181 

356-2448 

NAVAL ROTC 

Program & Scholarship Information 
356-2206 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

Director of University Communications 
356-2448 

REGISTRATION/RECORDS 

Registrar 
356-2212 

SECURITY 

Public Safety 
356-2186 

TUITION, PAYMENT OF BILLS, 
REFUNDS 

Cashier Office 
356-2304 



264 



NOTES 



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