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Full text of "Savannah State College Bulletin--Special Issues"

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223 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/savannahstatv8n1v12n4sava 



S AVA] 



Summer School Edition 




Vol. 8 No. 1 
August, 1954 






SEVENTY-SECOND 

COMMENCEMENT 

SPEAKER 

(See Page 3) 



A Year of Progress 



by Johnnie Paul Jones 

Last year as the Summer School Bul- 
letin went to press several projects were 
under consideration or getting under 
way. This summer, a year later, travel- 
ing around the compus of Savannah 
State, one can see a dream come true, 
the dream of Dr. W. K. Payne and the 
Savannah State College family. 

Eight projects are in progress or have 
been completed during the past year. 
These projects represent a year of prog- 
ress for Savannah State. 

The new half-million dollar men's 
dormitory which has been completed, 
is a three-story edifice constructed on an 
L-shape plan. There are 105 rooms, 
each housing two students. 

An apartment unit to house the dor- 
mitory director is located on the first 
floor; adjacent to the apartment is a 
spacious lounge in which students may 



relax and in which social gatherings 
may be held. There is also a kitchen 
on the first floor to provide such food 
as may be necessary for social gather- 
ings. 

The 55,000-gallon capacity water tank 
which has been installed on the campus 
gives adequate water pressure to all 
parts of the campus and makes the 
buildings safer because it will supply 
ample water to the sprinkler system in- 
stalled in all buildings as a fire pre- 
vention precaution. 

An annex to Hammond Hall (the 
Home Economics Building) was con- 
structed by the Department of Buildings 
and Grounds under the supervision of 
Mr. Felix J. Alexis, and the entire 
building was renovated. The building 
now contains dressing rooms and rest J 
rooms for men and women, modern 
(Continued on Page 8) 



THIRD ANNUAL 

MINISTERS INSTITUTE 

(See Page 12) 



IN I 



THE SAVANNAH STATE 
COLLEGE BULLETIN 

President 
DR. WILLIAM K. PAYNE 

Director of Public Relations 
:: WILTON C. SCOTT 

Copy Editor 
:: MRS. GWENDOLYN L. BASS 

Layout Editor 
JOHNNIE PAUL JONES 

Photo Editor 
WILLIAM H. M. BOWENS 

*On leave for Summer 
** Editor for Summer Session 



s 



From the President's Desk 



Vol. 8 



1954 



No. 1 



CONTENTS 

A Year of Progress 1 

From the President's Desk 2 

Enrollment, 1st and 2nd Session 2 

Commencement Speaker 3 

Message from Director of Summer School 3 

71st Baccalaureate Speaker 4 

Sixty-five Graduates Hear Dr. Sproull . . 5 

Faculty Notes 5 

Secondary Education Workshop 6 

SSC Wins Certificate 6 

Art and Crafts Workshop 7 

School Lunch Workshop 8 

Elementary Education Workshop 9 

Ministers Institute Held 10 

Lyceum Series 11 

College Calendar 12 

OUR COVER THIS ISSUE: The New 
Half-Million Dollar Men's Dormitory, 
completed and ready for occupation in 
September. 

534 Enrollment 
In 2nd Session 

Five Hundred and Thirty-four Enrolled 
in Second Summer Session 

According to the figures received from 
the office of Ben Ingersoll, Registrar, 
there was a total of 534 enrolled during 
the Second Summer Session, 349 women 
and 142 men. 

This figure includes the 62 Evening 
School students and the 30 Trade Spec- 
ial men, who were registered during 
the first session on a ten-week basis. 
Each regular session lasts five weeks. 




The school year 1953-1954 which 
just ended was significant in the growth 
of Savannah State College. Noticeable 
areas in which this development took 
place were physical plant, faculty, and 
alumni activity. Other areas such as 
the library, instruction, student person- 
nel services, and institutional tone 
showed definite signs of progress. 

The physical plant has been expanded 
and improved at a cost of $1,250,000.00. 
Most of the projects were authorized 
by the Board of Regents in 1950 and 
1951. The limitations which war-time 
conditions placed on building construc- 
tion and materials delayed the actual 
construction in several instances. The 
first of the projects to be completed was 
that of sanitary sewerage. Conditions 
affecting health and sanitation have 
been brought up to modern standards. 
The connection of the college system 
with that of the City of Savannah pro- 
vides an effective system for the ex- 
panding college physical plant. 

In the summer of 1953 construction 
started on the new dormitory for men, 
the central heating plant and system, 
the gymnasium annex, and the tennis 
courts. All of these projects were ap- 
proximately completed, except the gym- 
nasium during the past year. All are 
expected to be user! during the 1954- 
1955 year. 

The rehabilitation, safety, and fire 
prevention program of the Board of 
Regents has had excellent effects on the 
entire campus. The electrical rewiring 
projects in Hill Hall, Herty Hall, Mor- 



gan Hall, Meldrim Hall. Powell Labor- 
atory School, and Willcox Gymnasium 
have provided safety and adequate light- 
ing for the uses designed for those re- 
spective structures. The sprinkler sys- 
tem in the residence halls and the high 
level water tank which has increased 
water pressure over the entire campus 
provide added protection and service. 

Significant renovations have been 
made in Hammond and Meldrim Halls. 
The interior remodeling of Hammond 
Hall and the addition of lavoratories 
and dressing rooms make that building 
a modern place for home economics in- 
struction. New equipment has been 
provided for the specialized program in 
home economics as well as the new pro- 
gram in general education. In Meldrim 
Hall renovations provided for the re- 
arrangement of space for administrative 
offices in proper location in respect to 
their function. Fire proof vaults for 
the protection of financial and academic 
records have been constructed. 

The activity of the alumni of the 
College has been unusual during the 
past year. The alumni have shown in- 
terest in all phases of the college pro- 
gram. New chapters have been or- 
ganized, special programs in recognition 
of alumni achievement have been initi- 
ated, and a scholarship aid fund of over 
$2,200 has been raised. The high in- 
terest of the alumni and friends of the 
college has brought encouragement to 
everyone associated with the college. 

William K. Payne, President 



1st Session 
Enrollment Tops 
700 Mark 

The total enrollment for the first ses- 
sion of Summer School at Savannah 
State College passed the 700 mark, ac- 
cording to figures from the Office of 
the Registrar. The enrollment, broken 
down, is as follows: Regular Classes — 
men, 158 — woman, 451 ; Special trades 
— men, 30; Evening Classes — men, 59 — 
women, 3; Ministers' Institute (one 
week)— 20; Workshops— 84. The Ele- 
mentary Education Workshop had the 
largest enrollment, with 48 men and 
women enrolled and 25 children reg- 
istered, to enable the in-service teachers 
to get actual classroom participation. 



Page 2 



THE BULLETIN 



3 



J. A. Bacoats 

Commencement 
Speaker 

The Rev. J. A. Bacoats, A.B., B.D., 

M.A., D.D. LL.D., president of Benedict 

College, Columbia, S. C, will be the 

principal speaker at the seventy-second 

Commencement Exercises at Savannah 

\ College, which will be held in 

rim Auditorium Wednesday, Au- 

!l8, 1954, at 4 p.m. 

v. Bacoats received the A.B. de- 
ifrom Bishop College in Marshall, 
b; the B.D. degree from Virginia 
n, Richmond, Virginia; the M.A. 
f e from Oberlin College, Oberlin, 
l f the D.D. degree from Virginia 
i in Richmond, Virginia: the LL.D. 
f e from Bishop College, Marshall, 
J;; he has also done additional 
at the University of Chicago, Co- 
la University, and the University 
Iwa. 



Institutions of Higher Learning of South 
Carolina; and is listed in Who's Who 
in America. 



Positions 

: began his extensive career as prin- 
|of the Fredericksburg Normal and 
strial Institute in Fredricksburg. 
nia, from 1920-1929. During this 
j he also served as pastor of the 
(it Hope and the Mount Garland 
[St Churches, a position he held 
| 1919 to 1929. In 1929 he was 
inted president of Leland College 
£ton Rouge, Louisiana. In 1931. 
Jdition to his duties as president of 
id, he was also minister of the 
it Zion First African Baptist 
Jsh in Baton Rouge. He held both 
ions until 1942. In the meantime, 
is elected president of Florida Nor- 
jmd Industrial Institute, St. Augus- 
Florida, but declined the offer. In 
i he was made vice-president of 
jlict College in Columbia, S. C. 
in 1944 he was elected president. 
Position he now holds. 

Sessional and Civic Affiliations 

y. Bacoats is not only an educator. 
js an active professional and civic 
ir as well. As such, he is a member 
ie South Carob^a Board of Direc- 
Jof Alcoholic Education; Executive 
mittee of the State Southern Re- 
1 Council; Educational Board of 
^nal Baptist Convention, Inc. ; Exec- 
Board of the Educational and Mis- 
ry State Baptist Convention of 
— \ Carolina; Executive Board of the 
State Sunday School and B. T. U. 
Congress; Board of Directors of the 
United Negro College Fund, Inc.; Com- 
mittee on Standards and Approval of 



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Morgan State Professor to Deliver 
Baccalaureate Address 

Dr. Richard I. McKinney, professor 
of philosophy and college minister at 
Morgan State College, Baltimore, Mary- 
land, will deliver the seventy-second 
Baccalaureate Address at Savannah 
State College, Sunday, August 15. Ex- 
ercises will be held in Meldrim Audi- 
torium at 4 p.m. 



Message from 
Director of 
Summer School 

The major aim of the summer school 
program at Savannah State College is 
to help prepare teachers and other lead- 
ers to meet successfully the problems 
they face in their schools and commun- 
ities. In addition, the purposes of the 
program are: ( 1 ) to assist teachers in 
meeting requirements for degrees and 
certificates; (2) to provide general edu- 
cational background for students on the 
freshman and sophomore level; (3) to 
provide opportunities for regular ses- 
sion students to continue their educa- 
tion; (4) to provide opportunities for 
veterans to resume or continue their 
formal education or to take refresher 
courses; and, (5) to enrich the recrea- 
tional, social, and religious experiences 
for all who attend. 

One of the main features of the sum- 
mer school program is the provision of 
workshops for teachers and community 
leaders. In this respect, the following 
workshops are provided: 

1. Education 391. Arts and Crafts 
Workshop (5 qtr. hours) 

2. Education 461. Workshop in Meth- 
ods and Materials of the Elemen- 
tary School Curriculum ( 10 qtr. 
hours) 

3. Education 462. Workshop in Meth- 
ods and Materials of the Secondary 
School Curriculum ( offered first 
session only) (10 qtr. hours) 

4. Health Ed. 475. Workshop in Nar- 
cotics Education (5 qtr. hours) 

5. Home Ec. 434. Workshop in the 
School Lunch (5 qtr. hours). 

The Arts and Crafts Workshop pro- 
gram attempts to coordinate the phil- 
osophies and techniques of elementary 
and secondary school art programs. 
Emphasis is placed upon presenting and 
solving problems that have arisen and 
may arise in a teaching situation. Fur- 



ther, emphasis is placed upon laboratory 
experiences and creative art. 

The Workshop in Secondary Educa- 
tion, in conjunction with the Workshop 
in Elementary Education, is centered 
primarily on the interests and needs of 
the participants. 

Special effort is made to sensitize the 
groups to the urgency of the problems 
posed by the exceptional child. Plans 
are made for securing the services of 
recognized consultants in the field for 
a two- or three-day special feature. In 
the conducting of the Elementary Work- 
shop, emphasis is placed on teacher 
participation in discovering and defin- 
ing educational problems; in the forma- 
tion of instructional plans and policies 
in curriculum making; in the choice of 
instructional materials and in the de- 
velopment of criteria by which educa- 
tional products may be evaluated. 

Special Features of the Summer 
School Program 
The course content of the School 
Lunch Workshop is designed to help 
provide home economics persons with 
experience that will better qualify them 
as managers, to offer training in the 




George S. Chatters, graduate of Sa- 
vannah State College, class of 1905, who 
travelled from Seattle, Washington to 
attend the Annual Alumni Banquet on 
June 1. Mr. Chatters operates a laundry 
establishment in Seattle. 

lunchroom records and accounts, in 
getting acquainted with new ways of 
utilizing milk and bread in the school 
lunch program. 

Narcotics Education Workshop is de- 
signed to help students to acquire a 
(Continued on Page 7) 



THE BULLETIN 



(" a 



dbikU 



Page 3 



THE SAVANNAH STATE 
COLLEGE BULLETIN 

President 
DR. WILLIAM K. PAYNE 

Director of Public Relations 
:: WILTON C. SCOTT 

Copy Editor 
:: : MRS. GWENDOLYN L. BASS 

Layout Editor 
JOHNNIE PAUL JONES 

Photo Editor 
WILLIAM H. M. BOWENS 

*On leave for Summer 
** Editor for Summer Session 



s 



\*b 



From the President's Desk 



Vol. 8 



1954 



No. 1 



CONTENTS 

A Year of Progress 1 

From the President's Desk 2 

Enrollment, 1st and 2nd Session 2 

Commencement Speaker 3 

Message from Director of Summer School 3 

71st Baccalaureate Speaker 4 

Sixty-five Graduates Hear Dr. Sproull . . . 5 

Faculty Notes 5 

Secondary Education Workshop 6 

SSC Wins Certificate 6 

Art and Crafts Workshop 7 

School Lunch Workshop 8 

Elementary Education Workshop 9 

Ministers Institute Held 10 

Lyceum Series 11 

College Calendar 12 

OUR COVER THIS ISSUE: The New 
Half-Million Dollar Men's Dormitory, 
completed and ready for occupation in 
September. 

534 Enrollment 
In 2nd Session 

Five Hundred and Thirty-four Enrolled 
in Second Summer Session 

According to the figures received from 
the office of Ben Ingersoll, Registrar, 
there was a total of 534 enrolled during 
the Second Summer Session, 349 women 
and 142 men. 

This figure includes the 62 Evening 
School students and the 30 Trade Spec- 
ial men, who were registered during 
the first session on a ten-week basis. 
Each regular session lasts five weeks. 




The school year 1953-1954 which 
just ended was significant in the growth 
of Savannah State College. Noticeable 
areas in which this development took 
place were physical plant, faculty, and 
alumni activity. Other areas such as 
the library, instruction, student person- 
nel services, and institutional tone 
showed definite signs of progress. 

The physical plant has been expanded 
and improved at a cost of SI. 250,000.00. 
Most of the projects were authorized 
by the Board of Regents in 1950 and 
1951. The limitations which war-time 
conditions placed on building construc- 
tion and materials delayed the actual 
construction in several instances. The 
first of the projects to be completed was 
that of sanitary sewerage. Conditions 
affecting health and sanitation have 
been brought up to modern standards. 
The connection of the college system 
with that of the City of Savannah pro- 
vides an effective system for the ex- 
panding college physical plant. 

In the summer of 1953 construction 
started on the new dormitory for men. 
the central heating plant and system, 
the gymnasium annex, and the tennis 
courts. All of these projects were ap- 
proximately completed, except the gym- 
nasium during the past year. All are 
expected to be used during the 1954- 
1955 year. 

The rehabilitation, safety, and fire 
prevention program of the Board of 
Regents has had excellent effects on the 
entire campus. The electrical rewiring 
projects in Hill Hall, Herty Hall. Mor- 



gan Hall, Meldrim Hall, Powell Labor- 
atory School, and Willcox Gymnasium 
have provided safety and adequate light- 
ing for the uses designed for those re- 
spective structures. The sprinkler sys- 
tem in the residence halls and the high 
level water tank which has increased 
water pressure over the entire campus 
provide added protection and service. 

Significant renovations have 
made in Hammond and Meldrim 1 
The interior remodeling of Ham; 
Hall and the addition of lavora' 
and dressing rooms make that bui 
a modern place for home economi. 
struction. New equipment has 
provided for the specialized progn 
home economics as well as the new, 
gram in general education. In Me 
Hall renovations provided for th 
arrangement of space for administ; 
offices in proper location in respf 
their function. Fire proof vaull 
the protection of financial and aca* 
records have been constructed. 

The activity of the alumni o 
College has been unusual during 
past year. The alumni have shov 
terest in all phases of the college 
gram. New chapters have bed 
ganized, special programs in recog> 
of alumni achievement have been 
ated, and a scholarship aid fund ol 
$2,200 has been raised. The hig 
terest of the alumni and friends < 
college has brought encourageme 
everyone associated with the collej 
William K. Payne, Pre; 



1st Session 
Enrollment Tops 
700 Mark 

The total enrollment for the firs 
sion of Summer School at Sav; 
State College passed the 700 mar 
cording to figures from the Offi 
the Registrar. The enrollment, b 
down, is as follows: Regular Cla; 
men, 158 — woman, 451; Special 
— men, 30; Evening Classes — men. 
women, 3; Ministers' Institute 
week)— 20; Workshops— 84. Th 
mentary Education Workshop ha 
largest enrollment, with 48 men ana 
women enrolled and 25 children reg- 
istered, to enable the in-service teachers 
to get actual classroom participation. 



THE BULLETIN 



3 



J. A. Bacoats 

Commencement 
Speaker 

The Rev. J. A. Bacoats, A.B., B.D., 
M.A., D.D. LL.D., president of Benedict 
College, Columbia, S. C, will be the 
principal speaker at the seventy-second 
Commencement Exercises at Savannah 
State College, which will be held in 
Meldrim Auditorium Wednesday, Au- 
gust 18, 1954, at 4 p.m. 

Rev. Bacoats received the A.B. de- 
gree from Bishop College in Marshall, 
Texas; the B.D. degree from Virginia 
Union, Richmond, Virginia; the M.A. 
degree from Oberlin College, Oberlin, 
Ohio; the D.D. degree from Virginia 
Union in Richmond, Virginia; the LL.D. 
degree from Bishop College, Marshall, 
Texas; he has also done additional 
study at the University of Chicago, Co- 
lumbia L'niversity, and the University 
of Iowa. 

Positions 

He began his extensive career as prin- 
cipal of the Fredericksburg Normal and 
Industrial Institute in Fredricksburg. 
Virginia, from 1920-1929. During this 
time he also served as pastor of the 
Mount Hope and the Mount Garland 
Baptist Churches, a position he held 
from 1919 to 1929. In 1929 he was 
appointed president of Leland College 
in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. In 1931, 
in addition to his duties as president of 
Leland. he was also minister of the 
Mount Zion First African Baptist 
Church in Baton Rouge. He held both 
positions until 1942. In the meantime, 
he was elected president of Florida Nor- 
mal and Industrial Institute, St. Augus- 
tine, Florida, but declined the offer. In 
1942 he was made vice-president of 
Benedict College in Columbia, S. C. 
and in 1944 he was elected president, 
the position he now holds. 

Professional and Civic Affiliations 

Rev. Bacoats is not only an educator, 
but is an active professional and civic 
leader as well. As such, he is a member 
of the South Carolina Board of Direc- 
tors of Alcoholic Education; Executive 
Committee of the State Southern Re- 
gional Council; Educational Board of 
National Baptist Convention, Inc.; Exec- 
utive Board of the Educational and Mis- 
sionary State Baptist Convention of 
South Carolina; Executive Board of the 
State Sunday School and B. T. U. 
Congress; Board of Directors of the 
United Negro College Fund, Inc.; Com- 
mittee on Standards and Approval of 



Institutions of Higher Learning of South 
Carolina; and is listed in Who's Who 
in America. 



Morgan State Professor to Deliver 
Baccalaureate Address 

Dr. Richard I. McKinney, professor 
of philosophy and college minister at 
Morgan State College, Baltimore, Mary- 
land, will deliver the seventy-second 
Baccalaureate Address at Savannah 
State College, Sunday, August 15. Ex- 
ercises will be held in Meldrim Audi- 
torium at 4 p.m. 



Message from 
Director of 
Summer School 

The major aim of the summer school 
program at Savannah State College is 
to help prepare teachers and other lead- 
ers to meet successfully the problems 
they face in their schools and commun- 
ities. In addition, the purposes of the 
program are: ( 1 ) to assist teachers in 
meeting requirements for degrees and 
certificates; (2) to provide general edu- 
cational background for students on the 
freshman and sophomore level; (3) to 
provide opportunities for regular ses- 
sion students to continue their educa- 
tion; (4) to provide opportunities for 
veterans to resume or continue their 
formal education or to take refresher 
courses; and, (5) to enrich the recrea- 
tional, social, and religious experiences 
for all who attend. 

One of the main features of the sum- 
mer school program is the provision of 
workshops for teachers and community 
leaders. In this respect, the following 
workshops are provided: 

1. Education 391. Arts and Crafts 
Workshop (5 qtr. hours) 

2. Education 461. Workshop in Meth- 
ods and Materials of the Elemen- 
tary School Curriculum ( 10 qtr. 
hours) 

3. Education 462. Workshop in Meth- 
ods and Materials of the Secondary 
School Curriculum ( offered first 
session only) (10 qtr. hours) 

4. Health Ed. 475. Workshop in Nar- 
cotics Education (5 qtr. hours) 

5. Home Ec. 434. Workshop in the 
School Lunch (5 qtr. hours). 

The Arts and Crafts Workshop pro- 
gram attempts to coordinate the phil- 
osophies and techniques of elementary 
and secondary school art programs. 
Emphasis is placed upon presenting and 
solving problems that have arisen and 
may arise in a teaching situation. Fur- 



ther, emphasis is placed upon laboratory 
experiences and creative art. 

The Workshop in Secondary Educa- 
tion, in conjunction with the Workshop 
in Elementary Education, is centered 
primarily on the interests and needs of 
the participants. 

Special effort is made to sensitize the 
groups to the urgency of the problems 
posed by the exceptional child. Plans 
are made for securing the services of 
recognized consultants in the field for 
a two- or three-day special feature. In 
the conducting of the Elementary Work- 
shop, emphasis is placed on teacher 
participation in discovering and defin- 
ing educational problems; in the forma- 
tion of instructional plans and policies 
in curriculum making; in the choice of 
instructional materials and in the de- 
velopment of criteria by which educa- 
tional products may be evaluated. 

Special Features of the Summer 
School Program 
The course content of the School 
Lunch Workshop is designed to help 
provide home economics persons with 
experience that will better qualify them 
as managers, to offer training in the 




George S. Chatters, graduate of Sa- 
vannah State College, class of 1905, who 
travelled from Seattle, Washington to 
attend the Annual Alumni Banquet on 
June 1. Mr. Chatters operates a laundry 
establishment in Seattle. 

lunchroom records and accounts, in 
getting acquainted with new ways of 
utilizing milk and bread in the school 
lunch program. 

Narcotics Education Workshop is de- 
signed to help students to acquire a 
[Continued on Page 7) 



THE BULLETIN 



3G1C3 



Page 3 




71st Baccalaureate 
Speaker 

"Young people of America are victims 
of half-truths." Thus spoke Rev. J. Pius 
Barbour. A.B.. B.D., Th.M., D.D., Pas- 
tor of Calvary Baptist Church. Chester. 
Pennsylvania, as he addressed the grad- 
uating class, their parents and friends, 
the student body and faculty at the 
Seventy-first Baccalaureate Services at 
Savannah State College on May 28. in 
Meldrim Auditorium. 

Speaking from the theme. "Return to 
Nazareth," Rev. Borbour said that the 
people of America and victims of half- 
truths in education and particularly in 
religion. When a child tears up the 
school's property they tell us not to 
discipline him because we will hinder 
free development of his ideas. He 
stated that this is one of the many 
half-truths. 

Dr. Barbour said that the religious- 
minded tell us that if you are poor, God 
loves you; if you ride in a Cadillac you 
are a servant of the devil. This is also 
a half-truth. Science has made the col- 
lege student's ideals get out of propor- 
tion; the material things of this world 
dominate man's thinking. 

He concluded by saying ". . . The 
spirit of America has made America 
great and there are three things that 
she must do to return to the truth: 

(1) Turn against unChristian ideals. 

(2) Say nothing until the time comes 



(Top) C. V. CLAY, CHAIRMAN OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY, HEADS 
THE PROCESSION FOR THE SEVENTY-FIRST BACCALAUREATE. Immediately behind 
him are Dr. W. K. Payne, president; Dr. J. Pius Barbour, pastor, Calvary Baptist Church, 
Pennsylvania, who delivered the Seventy-First Baccalaureate Sermon in Meldrim Audi- 
torium Sunday, May 30. Also shown in the photo are: Rev. A. J. Hargrett, College 
Minister and Mr. T. C. Myers, Dean of Faculty. 

(Bottom) MEMBERS OF THE RECEIVING LINE AT THE SEVENTY-FIRST BACCA- 
LAUREATE RECEPTION chat between hand-shakes. The reception was given in honor 
of the Alumni, Graduating Class, Faculty, Student Body and friends in attendance 
at the Seventy-First Baccalaureate Exercises. They are from left to right: Dr. William 
K. Payne, president; Dr. J. Pius Barbour, Mrs. W. K. Payne, Mr. T. C. Meyers, Dean 
of Faculty and Mrs. T. C. Meyers. 



to speak against the spreaders of 

half-truths. 
13) Preach good-will and equalitv to 

all men of all races. 
'. . . America has forgotten God. 
. , The hot-rod drivers, the dope- 



fiends, and other juvenile delinquents 
are God's punishment on America for 
turning away from Him. . . . America 
must face the 'Return to Nazareth' . . . 
Return to God. and you will see the 
complex spirit of God today." 




BUILDING FOR BETTER INTERSCHOLASTIC COMPETITION, the Annex to Wilcox 
Gymnasium takes shape on the Savannah State campus. 



Page 4 



THE BULLETIN 



3 



1 -t l 



;•': ,A» hK 



** :: <<£r ■/*> 



Sixty-five Graduates 
Hear Dr. Sproull 

Sixty-five graduates and their friends 
and relatives heard Dr. Reavis Clayton 
Sproull, Ph.D., director of Herty Foun- 
dation, Savannah, Georgia, deliver the 
71st commencement address at Savan- 
nah State College on June 2. 

Dr. Sproull chose as his theme, "Edu- 
cation and Opportunity". Said Dr. 
Sproull, "Education opens the door to 
opportunity and responsibility but it 
not in itself a cure-all or a path to easy 
living. Too often the educated man 
expects special privileges and an easy 
existence because of his education. The 
reverse should be true. The one who 
has received from society the most edu- 
cation owes back to society the greatest 
service. . . ." 

In closing, Dr. Sproull said, "No 
place under the sun is a more desirable 
dwelling place than the United States. 
Here it is, it is ours. It is worth fight- 
ing for, living for, working for. The 
greater part of opportunity is the recog- 
nition of it in one's own community. 
George Washington Carver recognized 
this and became a great Southern bene- 
factor. Grasp the opportunity that is 
yours". 



Faculty Notes 

The following staff members are or 
have been away studying for the sum 
mer: 

Mrs. Eldora Marks, Columbia Uni- 
versity; Miss Jane Enty, Pittsburgh Art 
Institute; Miss Loreese Davis, Columbia 
University; Wilton C. Scott, New York 
University; Dean T. C. Meyers, Colum- 
bia University; Rutherford E. Lockette, 
University of Illinois; Frank D. Tharpe, 
Iowa State College; Mrs. M. Curtwright. 
Cornell University; Mrs. Beulah J. 



%> <£ W -v 



Farmer, New York University; Miss 
Zelia E. Owens, Columbia University; 
Mrs. Virginia S. Bush. Columbia Uni- 
versity 

J. Randolph Fisher, instructor in Eng- 
list at Savannah State College, is in 
Oslo, Norway studying at the Oslo Sum- 
mer School. Fisher is scheduled to at- 
tend the Sixth Triennial Congress of 
Modern Languages and Literature at 
Worchester College, Oxford University. 
England, on September 9-16. The Eng- 
lish professor is specializing in Scandi- 
navian Literature. 



Births 

The faculty and student body of Sa- 
vannah State College would like to con- 
gratulate the following faculty members 
upon the arrival of additions to their 
families: 

Rev. and Mrs. Blanton E. Black, whose 
son, Blanton E., Jr., was born on March 
13; 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. M. Bowens, whose 
daughter, Charlotte Yvonne, was born 
on March 20; 

Mr. and Mrs. William Wallace ( Mrs. 
Marjorie Wallace), whose daughter, 
Marcy Lynn, was born on April 6; 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Harmond (Mrs. 
Thelma Harmond), whose daughter, 
Fern Eetelle, was born on June 4; 

Mr. and Mrs. L. Allen Pyke, whose 
daughter. Laurel Antoinette, was born 
June 30. 



Public Relations Director on Leave 
Wilton C. Scott, director of Public 
Relations at Savannah State College and 
editor-in-chief of the Savannah State 
Bulletin, is on leave at New York Uni- 
versity working toward his doctorate 
degree in Leadership. 

He is the organizer and coordinator 
of the state-wide Press Institute which 
met here in April for the third year 
and was also general chairman of the 
Negro division of the Christmas Seals 
program for 1953 ( which realized a 
$1200 increase over 1952) as well as 



general chairman of the 1954 YMCA 
membership drive. 

Mr. Scott, wholeheartedly endorsing 
the slogan of the Georgia Principals 
Conference, agrees that Public Relations 
is a must in Georgia's public schools. 



Faculty Research Bulletin Published 
We are proud to announce that the 
first issue of the Faculty Research Bul- 
letin of Savannah State College has gone 
lo press. Its contents include reports 
of interesting and beneficial research 
conducted by member of the faculty, 
such as: "The Socio-Economic Back- 
ground of the 1951-52 Freshmen at Sa- 
vannah State College" by Dr. E. K. 
Williams; "The Rise and Expansion of 
Plantation Agriculture in Coastal Geor- 
gia, 1752-1860" by Rev. Blanton E. 
Black; "A Consideration of Selected 
Principles of Leadership in School and 
Community Relations" by Wilton C. 
Scott; "A Survey of Prevailing Grading 
Practices in Representative Colleges and 
Universities" by Dr. R. Grann Lloyd: 
"Barriers Against the Entrance of Ne- 
groes into Certain Business Ventures in 
Harlem" by Robert C. Long; "Social 
Types on a Negro Main Street" by Wil- 
liam H. M. Bowens; and "Factors As- 
sociated with the Attitudes of Prospec- 
tive Male Graduates of Negro Colleges 
in 1954 Toward Entering a Seminary" 
by Rev. Andrew Hargrett. 

The Research Bulletin was developed 
by an editorial committee. The com- 
mittee was guided by the belief that one 
of the aims of education is the develop- 
ment of an adventuresome spirit of in- 
quiry. The present anticipation is that 
publication of the Research Bulletin will 
be an annual event. Members of the 
editorial committee include: Dr. E. K. 
Williams, Mrs. Joan L. Gordon, Dr. 
Calvin Kiah, Miss Madeline Harrison, 
and Dr. R. Grann Lloyd, Chairman. 



Rev. Andrew J. Hargrett, College 
minister, is attending the Second World 
Council of Churches which is meeting 
August 15-31 at Northwestern Univer- 
sity. This is the second meeting of the 
World Council of Churches since 1517. 

Dr. Calvin L. Kiah, chairman of the 
Department of Education and director 
of the teacher-education program at Sa- 
vannah State College, is serving as visit- 
ing professor at Atlanta University. He 
is teaching a class in supervision of 
student-teacher trainees, which was set 
up at the request of the Inter-Collegiate 
Committee on Cooperative Teacher Edu- 
cation in the state of Georgia. 



THE BULLETIN 



Page 5 




Secondary Education Workshop 



In keeping with some of the modern 
practices in education, the members of 
the Secondary Workshop at Savannah 
State College agreed that the following 
principles can be injected into the 
schools of today: 

1. The recognition of individual dif- 
ferences 

2. Proper selection of materials 

3. Immediate appeal 

4. Proper use of community resources 

5. Allowance for maximum student 
participation 

6. Provide for social cooperation 

7. Problems growing out of every- 
day needs. 

In implementing these aims the Sec- 
ondary Education Workshop, under the 
direction of Dr. Calvin L. Kiah, Pro- 
fessor of Education and Chairman of 
the Department of Education at Savan- 
nah State, chose as its theme "Making 
the Curricula of the Secondary Schools 
Dynamic", with special emphasis on De- 
veloping the Core-Curriculum. 

Methods Employed 
A variety of methods was used in 
studying the development of the core- 
curriculum. Among them were the use 
of movies, recordings, textbooks, indi- 
vidual reports, group reports, committee 
reports and consultants. A study was 
made into the background of secondary 
education in America and the changes in 
methods and principles of teaching to 
keep pace with the changes in the Amer- 
ican cultural traditions during the last 
half century. 

Consultants 
Consultants for the Summer Session 
were Mr. C. V. Clay, Chairman of the 
Department of Chemistry; Mr. Robert 
C. Long, Sr.. Associate Professor of 
Business Administration; Miss Althea B. 
Morton, Instructor in French and Eng- 
lish; Dr. E. K. Williams, Director of 
the Division of Arts and Sciences and 

Paae 6 



Director of the Summer School; Dr. B. 
T. Griffith, Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Biology; Mrs. E. R. Terrell, 
Director of the Division of Home Eco- 
nomics; and Mrs. Joseph Pacifici. 
Chairman of the Chatham County Com- 
mittee for the Education of the Excep- 
tional Child. 

Each consultant spoke on the func- 
tions, development, status, and curricu- 
lum of his particular area. Each speaker 
also gave his ideas and evaluations on 
the pattern that high schools should fol- 
low. All consultants except Mrs. Pacifici 
are members of the Savannah State 
College faculty. 

Officers and Committees 
Special committees set up to aid in 
the research and presentation of reports 
and securing consultants were: Core- 
Curriculum, Natural Science, Language 
Arts, Social Studies, and Business Edu- 
cation. Officers and members of these 
committees were as follows: Natural 
Science — M. Arnold, Chairman, J. Bell, 
N. Blackwell, S. Martin, S. Spaulding; 
Business Education — Gracie M. Joyce, 
Chairman; Core-Curriculum — Georgia 
H. Gordon, Chairman, Evelyn E. Mays; 
Language Arts — Miss Vaughn, Chair- 
man, Rev. Thomas Harris; Social Stud- 
ies — W. J. Griffin. Chairman; Herbert 
A. Stone. 

The various committees worked and 
secured consultants for discussions in 
five areas. The topics covered were: 
"How Do All Living Things Maintain 
Their Kind?", "Will My Typing Expe- 
rience Help Me Get a Job?", "Making 
a Living in Savannah", "What Influ- 
ence Do Newspapers, Radio and Tele- 
vision Have on the People?", and "Has 
America Come of Age?" 

The Workshop was highlighted by a 
panel discussion during assembly on 
June 30, in which all members partici- 
pated. The subject of the panel was, 
"The Core Curriculum". 



SSC Wins 
Certificate 

On Wednesday, June 30, during the 
regular assembly program, Savannah 
State College was awarded a certificate 
of Participation and Appreciation for 
its activity in connection with the Co- 
lumbia University Scholastic Press As- 
sociation-Columbia Bicentennial Pro- 
gram. 

The award was made by Attorney 
Leon L. Polstein, an area representative 
of the Columbia Bicentennial Program, 
to President W. K. Payne, who then pre- 
sented it to Wilton C. Scott, Director of 
Public Relations at Savannah State Col- 
lege. 

This certificate was awarded on the 
basis of the school's use of the Columbia 
University Bicentennial theme, "Man's 
Right to Knowledge and the Free Use 
Thereof". This theme was used 
throughout the Third Annual Press In- 
stitute which was held recently at Sa- 
vannah State College, at which time, 
Attorney Malberry Smith, Regional 
chairman for the Bicentennial Commit- 
tee, was one of the guest speakers. The 
theme was also used throughout the 
March issue of the official student pub- 
lication, The Tiger's Roar, and was the 
subject of the editorial for that issue, 
as well as being featured in the May 
issue of The Savannah State Bulletin. 

Said Attorney Polstein, "I am proud 
to say that Savannah State College is 
one educational institution that went 
all-out for joining with us in bringing 
this stimulating and thought-provoking 
theme to many people within the sphere 
of its influence. It is my understanding 
that the certificate .... is the very first 
(Continued on Page 7) 




7 




Art and Crafts Workshop 



The Arts and Crafts Workshop for the 
Summer of 1954 launched itself with a 
tremendous amount of esthetic success. 
The theme for this summer is, "Esthetic 
Exploration for Mental Growth". To be 
more explicit, the group is finding that 
desirable ends in teaching can be found 
through the media of art, namely: self- 
reliance, more acute perceptive powers, 
democratic ideals, and additional means 
of communicating with society, and, that 
art can be instrumental in formulating 
a philosophy of life. 

One of the major projects was to 
make a circus; the whole circus was 
made from paper and cardboard. Be- 
cause the group was more concerned 
with the spiritual effects of a circus 
rather than the realistic duplication, they 
painted the animals green, blue, pink, 
red, orange and black. This gave the 
effects of a circus, and yet, creative 
pleasure was not destroyed with inhibit- 
ing authenticity. To mention a few 
of the circus creatures, there were the 
orange kangaroo by Dorothy Drayton, 
the pink elephant by Larcena Loadholt, 
and the black, green, red and blue 
clown by Ayrie Robinson — the only 
thing that was not approached was a 
plaid zebra. 

Projects in the Arts and Crafts Work- 
shop have been varied; with participants 
working with paper, metal, glass, wood, 
stone and many more materials. The 
course of study included paper mache, 
metal craft, jewelry, ceramics, sculptur- 
ing, weaving, puppets stenciling, color 
perspective, fabric painting, and explo- 
ration of the modern trends and tech- 
niques in art. 

Special activities included movies 
such as, "Stacking and Firing a Kiln", 
"Glazing", "Masterpieces from the Ber- 
lin Museum", "Art Treasures from the 



Vienna Collection", as well as the view- 
ing of color slides on many of the great 
masters. 

On July 20, the group was honored 
with a lecture and display of dolls by 
Mrs. Sloan who was introduced by Mrs. 
Broberg, both being prominent in civic 
work throughout the city. Mrs. Sloan 
has been viewed on Television and has 
an exceptional collection of imported 
dolls. 

Although the group had such activ- 
ities as a visit to an art gallery and a 
picnic on the agenda, most of the second 
session was taken up with plans for the 
assembly program on July 28 and the 
art exhibit on August 16-17. 

The committee members for the as- 
sembly program were: Alma Mullino, 
Paul Howard, Eddye Jones, Rosa Wil- 
son, Eula Hicks. 

SSC WINS CERTIFICATE 
{Continued from Page 6) 
one to be presented to an educational 
institution in our region, which com- 
prises Georgia, Florida, and Alabama." 

Attorney Polstein paid special tribute 
to Wilton C. Scott, who was coordinator 
for the Press Institute, editor of The 
Savannah State Bulletin, and assisted 
with the publication of The Tiger s 
Roar; and to Miss Juanita Sellers, who 
was director of the Press Institute and 
faculty advisor for The Tiger's Roar, 
as well as to President Payne for his 
cooperation and support in helping to 
make the entire program possible. 

The certificate contains five gold stars 
representing five of the six methods of 
participation suggested by the Columbia 
Scholastic Press Association. The stars 
are for Special Editions, Feature Stories, 
Forums, Editorials, and Broadcasts. 




DR. LIVINGSTON N. MZIMBA (center), 
69-year-old past moderator of the Pres- 
byterian Church of Africa, is congratu- 
lated following his address at Savannah 
State College. His subject: "What Afri- 
cans Expect of Their American Colored 
Brothers". Dr. Mzimba was graduated 
from Lincoln University, Pa., in 1906. 
With him are Dean T. C. Meyers, Dean of 
Faculty; and Rev. A. J. Hargrett, College 
Minister. 

MESSAGE FROM DIRECTOR 

(Continued from Page 3) 
fundamental understanding of the knowl- 
edge, attitudes, and habits that are as- 
sociated with Narcotics Education. Ulti- 
mately the course is designed to pro- 
mote health and desirable character 
traits for all. 

In addition, some of the special fea- 
tures of the summer school program of 
Savannah State College include: 

1. Outstanding specialists and con- 
sultants are added to the summer 
school faculty. 

2. A three-week short course is of- 
fered for trade teachers who are 
unable to attend the regular sum- 
mer session. 

3. An evening session is provided for 
students who are not able to at- 
tend classes during the day. 

4. A rich program of concerts, reci- 
tals, lectures, plays and educational 
tours is being planned for the stu- 
dents who enroll at this college for 
the summer quarter. 

5. A supervised child-care service is 
provided for elementary children, 
whose parents are enrolled in the 
summer school. A small service 
charge will be attached to cover 
supervisors service. 

6. Upon sufficient demand, the Col- 
lege will offer any course that is 
listed in the several curricula in 
the regular bulletin. 

7. The Annual Institute for Ministers 
and Laymen was held June 14-19. 
1954. 

E. K. Williams, Director 
Summer School 



THE BULLETIN 



Page 7 




MRS. LOUISE R. PROTHRO, HOME ECONOMIST FOR THE PET MILK COMPANY, 
demonstrates the latest meal planning techniques to the members of the Home 
Economics Workshop during the first Summer Session. Mrs. E. R. Terrell, Director 
of the Division of Home Economics, sits at extreme left. 

Portion of participants at Third Annual Ministers' Institute held at Savannah 
State College, June 14-19. 

School Lunch Workshop 



Eight persons representing five coun- 
ties in Georgia and one in South Caro- 
lina were enrolled in the School Lunch 
Workshop during the first session of 
Summer School. The group was under 
the direction of Mrs. Evanel R. Terrell, 
director of the Division of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Plan of Activities 
The general plan of procedure to 
cover the selected problems in school 
lunch administrations included: 

1. The development and solving of 
a school lunch experience in the 
school where the student in em- 
ployed. 

2. The actual planning, preparation 
and serving of four types of meals 
to a selected group of Elementary 
Workshop children. 

3. Actual record-keeping required by 
Georgia School Lunch Division. 

4. Group and individual experiences 
in working out common problems 
growing out of a daily progress 
report. 

5. Individual contributions of an 
original health song, jingle or 
poem. This activity was taught to 
the children after the lunch hour. 

Consultants 

Four consultants visited the Work- 
shop, covering periods of one day to 
an entire week. These specialists worked 
with individuals and the group to clarify 
problems and to amplify understanding 
and knowledge about specific problems. 

Miss Nell Wood, School lunch super- 
visor for Chatham County and Savan- 
nah, spent an entire week explaining, 
demonstrating, and giving trial experi- 



ences with the various approved forms 
for school lunch record-keeping in 
Georgia. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Pryor, State School 
Lunch Supervisor, discussed the Geor- 
gia plan of school lunch supervision 
and operation and acquainted Work- 
shoppers with the state personnel and 
their functions. 

Mrs. Louise Prothro, nutritionist for 
Pet Milk Company, St. Louis, Mo., 
spent three days demonstrating wider 
uses of non-fat milk and evaporated 
milk in breads, meats, vegetables and 
desserts. These demonstrations were of 
double importance for they not only 
showed how added nutrition is given 
to foods, but also showed how the Fed- 
eral government subsidizes the agricul- 
tural program by making many products 
available for school lunch use. 

Mr. C. L. Golden, Sanitary Engineer 
for the State Department of Health, 
showed color films and discussed ap- 
proved healthful practices in food hand- 
ling. A new note was observed in the 
method of teaching through these spec- 
ial pictures. Teaching was done by 
showing only proper methods of kitchen 
and dining room operation. No nega- 
tive and positive contrasts were simul- 
taneously made. 

Balanced Life 
Workshoppers enjoyed social and edu- 
cational relaxation through a field trip 
to a Beaufort, S. C. cannery to observe 
canning operations; a fish fry in the 
Savannah State College Park; and a 
field trip to the Moore Street School 
and Beach High to observe physical 
plant facilities. Delightful refreshments 
were served the group on the latter trip. 



Open House and Evaluation 
The class' "Open House" was center- 
ed around the presentation of class prob- 
lems and their solutions. Individual 
skill was exhibited in making posters 
and charts, making food models, pre- 
paring and arranging surplus commo- 
dity dishes that children will eat, and in 
getting out the "Kinks" in school lunch 
operation. Of special significance was 
the exhibit showing Tellmore Commun- 
ity School with 200 pupils arriving with 
no breakfast and physical plant solution 
to provide a "nutritional starter" for 
the day. 

{Continued on Page 9) 



A YEAR OF PROGRESS 

{Continued from Page 1) 
kitchen and laundry equipment, as well 
as an assembly room, and offices. This 
newly renovated building will enable 
the Home Economics department to in- 
itiate a program designed to meet the 
new and varied fields of employment 
offered to men and women who are 
interested in Home Economics. 

The central heating plant, located 
between Hubert Hall and Meldrim Au- 
ditorium, is designed to supply ade- 
quate heat to all buildings on the cam- 
pus. Pipes have been laid connecting 
all buildings of the campus with the 
heating plant. 

The renovation of Meldrim Hall to 
meet the new and more efficient opera- 
tional methods installed at the college 
has been completed. The President's 
office, the business office, the registrar's 
office, personnel office, and the office of 
general extension are all situated in new 
locations. 

The annex to Willcox Gymnasium is 
in progress and the completion of this 
project will make it possible to offer 
a larger and better Health and Physical 
Education program. 

The new sewerage disposal plant at 
the college is connected with the sewer- 
age system of the City of Savannah 
and gives the college a better waste dis- 
posal system. 

The athletic field at Savannah State 
is changing; under the supervision of 
the Buildings and Grounds Dept., a base- 
ball field has been laid out with gal- 
vanized steel wire backstops installed, 
and two all-weather sealed asphalt tennis 
courts are under construction. And, in 
keeping with the efforts of the president 
to keep the college campus beautiful, 
the Buildings and Grounds Department 
has installed a permanent irrigation 
system to water the lawns and the main 
campus. 

This year has truly been a "Year of 
Progress." 



Page 8 



THE BULLETIN 



3 




SKINNY AND DINNY, "A problem in MONEY WE USE", centered around foods. 

Elementary Education Workshop 



Introduction 
Under the capable leadership of Mrs. 
Donella C. Seabrooks, Mrs. Dorothy C. 
Hamilton, and Mrs. Thelma Brown, 48 
in-service teachers representing 26 coun- 
ties in Georgia formed an enthusiastic 
group of newer-trend researchers for 
the first summer session of the Elemen- 
tary Education Workshop. 

Organization 

At the initial meeting the members 
of the Workshop assembled at the Powell 
Laboratory School and were organized 
into get-acquainted groups. The num- 
bers one, two and three were placed in 
a box and each member took a number 
from the box, which determined his get- 
acquainted group. After each group 
organized there was another drawing 
which determined the day on which each 
group would be presented. 

Following an introductory program. 
"Know Your People", the general Work- 
shop was organized as follows: Chair- 
man, Mrs. Georgia Johnson; Co-Chair- 
man, Mrs. Edna Haygood; Secretarial 
Staff, Mrs. Gladys Williams, Mrs. Edith 
Jones, Mrs. Willie B. Johnson. Next. 
the following committees were appoint- 
ed: Demonstrations, Receptionists, Pro- 
gram, Audio-Visual Aids, Bulletin 
Board, Library, and Recreational. 

The theme of the Workshop, "Mak- 
ing Adequate Provisions Essential to 
Effective Learning, Through Effective 
Teaching", was quite appropriately ob- 
served throughout the entire Workshop 
period. 

Procedure 
The teachers voted demonstrations as 
being the most interesting part of a 
Workshop day. In this activity various 



methods and techniques of teaching 
were seen in practice with children. The 
Workshop participants became aware 
that the methods being viewed were nor 
necessarily the correct ones to take for 
any given situation, but were perhaps, 
better or more satisfactory depending 
upon the desired outcome. 

Demonstrations given by Workshop 
participants were preceded by demon- 
strations in all areas of the elementary 
school curriculum given by a Workshop 
consultant. The pupils were divided 
into three groups. Pupils in first and 
second grades formed group No. 1. 
Pupils in third and fourth grades form- 
ed group No. 2 and pupils in fifth and 
sixth grades made up group No. 3. 
Three groups were taught each day; 
demonstrations were given with a dif- 
ferent teacher for each group. It was 
the teacher's responsibility to make her 
teaching aids and provide the pupils 
with appropriate seat work to accom- 
pany the lesson taught, in the effort to 
make the lesson meaningful and enjoy- 
able for the pupils and the Workshop 
participants. 

Teachers for the day placed their 
lesson plans on the bulletin board so 
that everyone would know the purposes 
the teacher had in mind and be better 
able to understand the procedure that 
was practiced. Following the demon- 
strations, there was a period of evalua- 
tion wherein the lesson was critically 
discussed and rcommendations and sug- 
gestions were offered. A coordinator 
served at each evaluation to summarize 
and tie up the discussion into various 
teaching principles. 

Each demonstration centered around 
the Unit, "Money We Use". The cul- 



minating activities also followed the 
Unit theme. They were in the form of 
a chapel program and open house. On 
the chapel program various denomina- 
tions of money were portrayed. The 
narrator explained the differences in 
each and told many interesting facts 
concerning the minting of money, the 
pictures found on money, and the mean- 
ings of the Latin words that are written 
on each. At open house, each teacher 
had on display one chart, one teaching 
aid, a piece of art work, paper mache, 
and her unit and sample lesson plans. 
Projects 

Workshop group projects consisted of 
panels, symposiums, round-table discus- 
sions, role playing, seasonal activities, 
chapel programs and open house. Indi- 
vidual projects included chart work, 
demonstrations, art work, teaching aids, 
units, and lesson plans. 
Consultants 

Assisting in making the Workshop 
experiences dynamic were: 

Mrs. Ella W. Fisher, teaching appro- 
priate games and rhythmical activities 
for children; 

Miss Juanita Sellers, emphasizing 
causes of reading problems, as well as 
approaches, findings and recognitions 
in reading; 

Mrs. Joseph Pacifici. discussing the 
program for exceptional children; 

Mr. Elmer J. Dean, sharing with the 
group many interesting ideas to be con- 
sidered in planning social studies ac- 
tivities; 

Mrs. Sylvia Bowen, giving practical 
experiences with numbers; 

Mr. C. V. Clay, making scientific 
demonstrations — aquariums, terrariums, 
vi-variums. 

SCHOOL LUNCH WORKSHOP 

(Continued from Page 8) 
Workshop Participants and Problems 
Ann Boatright, Wheeler County, 
Methods of Providing Some Form of 
Milk in the School Lunch; Harriett 
Brown, Chatham, Making Surplus Com- 
modity Dishes More Palatable; Julia 
Butler, Richmond County, Methods of 
Providing Indigent Children With a Hot 
Lunch; Annie B. Graham, Ware Coun- 
ty, Providing a Needed Hot Lunch for 
Children Coming to School Without 
Breakfast; Larcena Loadholt, Chatham 
County, Improving Physical Facilities in 
East Broad Street School; Florida Little, 
Jasper, S. C, Making Surplus Com- 
modity Dishes Attractive and Palatable ; 
Odessa Lucas, McDuffie County, Smooth- 
ing All Phases of School Lunch Opera- 
tion When There is No Home Econo- 
mist; Alice D. Williams, Richmond 
County, Learning How to Plan Palatable 
and Interesting School Lunches. 



THE BULLETIN 



Page 9 




"% 



Dr. Frank Cunningham, professor of 
Philosophy, Turner Theological Seminary, 
Atlanta, Georgia, delivers address at 
first assembly program during first ses- 
sion of Summer School at Savannah 
State College. Dr. Cunningham was co- 
consultant at Third Annual Ministers' In- 
stitute held at SSC June 14-19. 

Ministers Institute 
Held on June 14-19 

Stressing the fact that religion is an 
important aspect of community living 
and American democracy, President W. 
K. Payne endorsed the Third Annual 
Ministers' Institute which was held at 
Savannah State College on June 14-19. 

This Institute was open to all min- 
isters, Sunday School workers, mission 
workers, church officers, etc.. who were 
interested in participating. 

The chief consultants for the Insti- 
tute were Dr. George Kelsey, A.B., B.D., 
Ph.D.. Drew University, Madison, N. J.; 
and Dr. Frank Cunningham, A.B.. A.M.. 



S.T.B., Ph.D., Morris Brown College. 
Atlanta. 

Dr. Cunningham, who is professor 
of philosophy at Morris Brown, was 
the guest speaker at the first assembly 
of the first summer session. He used 
for his subject, "The Relation of For- 
mal and Informal Education". Facing 
an audience of an estimated 400 people, 
he said that the formal education of 
the school must be of such quality as 
to guide minds into a discriminating 
and intelligent use of the instruments 
of mass communication. 

He continued by saying, "The multi- 
plication of the means of mass com- 
munication has created channels through 
which opinions and sentiments are car- 
ried to listening ears and watchful eyes 
of vast multitudes. . . . The man who 
can make the news, the public or pri- 
vate agencies which control the instru- 
ments of publicity, the man at the mi- 
crophone or before the camera, or the 
man who sits at his editorial desk, can 
eclipse the teacher in the classroom and 
can command the attention of the pub- 
lic that now embraces all the nations of 
the earth." 

He claimed that the means of mass 
communication for the most part are 
under commercial sponsorship and are 
not used primarily for educational pur- 
poses, but for economic profit. 

Dr. Cunningham concluded his talk 
by saying that since these producers 
give the consumers what they want, the 
challenge which faces teachers at educa- 
tional institutions is to look to the char- 
acter and quality of what the people 
want; the people must learn to want 
what is good for their minds and souls. 
Every rise in the demand will lead to 
an improvement of the product. 

Dr. Kelsey, who is professor of Ethics 
at Drew University, led several lectures 
and discussions. First acquainting his 
listeners with revolutionary nationalism 
of the foreign mission fields, he chose 




Portion of Participates at Third Annual Ministers' Institute held at Savannah 
State College, June 14-19. 

Page 10 



for the subject of his main address, 
"Christian Mission and Revolutionary 
Nationalism". He said, "We have 
thought of the foreign mission fields 
(Asia, Africa and the Islands) as for- 
eign or strange lands because of their 
cultural strangeness from Euro-Amer- 
ican environments. . . . The foreign 
mission fields today constitute strange 
lands because they are estranged, and 
have been estranged by the very people 
who call themselves Christians. It is 
precisely the Christians who are politi- 
cal leaders, the military leaders, the 
businessmen, the government officials, 
and the soldiers who have dealt with 
these people and have created this es- 
trangement." 

Dr. Kelsey asserted that the mission- 
aries must understand the differences 
in languages and cultures to better un- 
derstand these people — that it is no 
longer a matter of funds to keep the 
missions going, but that the missionaries 
and persons involved must be concerned 
with better relations, and that the Amer- 
ican Negroes should understand why 
Asians and Africans behave as they do. 

". . . . There are definite traits of 
colonialism such as color line, superior- 
ity and inferiority of race, as well as 
economic dependence on the mother 
country," he said. 

"The missionary enterprise is, and 
can no longer be, an isolated ecclesias- 
tical phenomena which must be carried 
on in a social and political medium in 
which Christian nations and individuals 
function. Christians, above all, must 
see to it that there is a new mutuality 
of respect engendered among the peoples 
of the world across all racial, national 
and other lines." 



Alumni Association 
Financial Statements 

THE GENERAL DUES ACCOUNT 
AS OF JUNE 26, 1954 

1. Balance on deposit in Carver 
Savings Bank as of June 3, 

1954 $38.71 

2. Received on account of gen- 
eral dues and banquet, on 

June 23, 1954 5.00 

Mr. George S. Chatters $ 2.00 
Mrs. M. V. Hannar 2.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth Herbin . 1.00 



.71 



$ 5.00 

3. Balance on deposit in Carver 

Savings Bank as of June 26, 

1954 

Respectfully submitted, 
T. C. Meyers, 

General Treasurer 
June 26, 1954 



THE BULLETIN 



II 



Lyceum Series 

The Lyceum Committee presented two 
features to the Savannah State College 
Summer School student body — one each 
session. 

The Dance, Drums, and Piano Trio, 
which appeared as the first of the Sum- 
mer Lyceum Series is a unique ensemble 
combining the visual appeal of a vital 
and exciting dancer with a virtuoso per- 
cussionist (playing on twenty-two dif- 
ferent percussion instruments) and the 
colors of a brilliant pianist. These three 
thrilling artists presented in solo, duet, 
and trio, a rich variety of original 
dance portrayals, rarely heard French 
compositions for percussion and piano, 
and several full ensemble works espec- 
ially created for this tour. 

The entire program moved at a swift 
pace, full of surprises and mounting 
excitements. This is probably the only 
ensemble of its kind. 

Daniel Nagrin who danced with the 
Dance-Drums-Piano Trio is one of those 
rare people who seem to have a talent 
for every entertainment medium; films. 
TV, stage, night club and concert. 

Dance magazine said, "Daniel Nagrin 
has a marvelous sense of theatre magic. 
His broad-shouldered, lean-hipped bod) 
extends into long free gestures punctu- 
ated by sudden quick shifts of weight, 
direction and equilibrium. He is ex- 
citing when he stands still; he is excit- 
ing when he whiplashes into a turn or 
arches his back into a paroxysm of 
emotion." 

Ronald Gould, tympanist and head 
percussionist of the Little Orchestra 
Society of New York, started his career 
with the National Symphony Orchestra 
of Washington. D. C. at the age of 
seventeen. He has been a member of 
the North Carolina Symphony, the New 




FIRST LYCEUM FEATURE: L-R, David Shapiro, pianist; Dr. Braithwaite, Chairman 
of the SSC Music Dept.; Ronald Gould, tympanist; and Daniel Nagrin, dancer. 



Orleans Symphony, Victor Borge and 
his Orchestra, and Billy Rose's spectac- 
ular production, "Violins on Broad- 
way". 

He is at present also percussionist 
with the New York City Center Ballet 
Company Orchestra. 

David Shapiro, Pianist, with the 
Dance-Drums-Piano Trio, will be re- 
membered as the producer and musical 
director of the Comic Opera Players 
which presented in the summer of 1953 
Gian Carlo Menotti's "The Old Maid 
and the Thief" on a fabulous twelve and 
one-half thousand mile tour. 

Mr. Shapiro is a brilliant and ver- 
satile pianist and it at present the as- 
sistant conductor of the Little Orchestra 
Society of New York for which organi- 
zation he has also arranged and orches- 
trated special material. 

As official pianist of the Little Or- 
chestra Society he has been heard in 



concerts and in recordings under the 
Columbia and Decca labels. 



Miss Betty Allen, receives bouquet from Miss Savannah State 1954-55 (Deloris 
Perry). Miss Allen was featured by the Lyceum Committee of Savannah State College. 




Mezzo-Soprano Presented 

Betty Allen, a young mezzo-soprano 
who appeared as the second Lyceum 
feature on Tuesday, July 20, is clearly 
and quickly on the way up. Starting 
on her professional concert career two 
short years ago she has already ap- 
peared in Europe as well as throughout 
her native United States, on the Champs 
Elysees and on Broadway, in Carnegie 
Hall as well as in Hartford's Bushnell 
Hall. She has sung prominently in op- 
eras, with leading symphony orchestras, 
in solo recitals, in oratorios, and over 
the radio. The work of this extraor- 
dinary young artist (she is only in her 
early twenties) has won her the Marian 
Anderson Scholarship Fund Award, 
given to exceptionally talented singers, 
and a John Hay Whitney Fellowship 
.... just as her work has won raves 
from the critics. 

Betty Allen has appeared several 
times with the Boston Symphony, under 
conductors Charles Munch, Fritz Mahler, 
Virgil Thomson and Hugh Ross; in 
such divergent works as Honegeer's 
"King David" in New England audi- 
toriums, and "La Danse des Morts" on 
Carnegie Hall, Handel's "Messiah" and 
Monteverdi's "Vespers and Magnificat", 
also in Carnegie Hall with the famed 
Dessoff Choirs under Paul Boepple. 

A wealth of natural talents and a keen 
intelligence to develop them to the full 
have brought to Betty Allen the kind 
of success which shows she is clearly 
on her way up. 

During the summer of 1954, Miss 
Allen plans to make a tour of the South, 
after which she will go on a tour of 
France and North Africa as exchange 
artist in the 4th annual series of inter- 
change planned between our country 
and France. 



&£& 



College Calendar 1954-55 



September 

20 Monday 

23 Thursday 

24 Friday 



FALL QUARTER. 1954 



25 


Saturday 




27 


Monday 




27 


Monday 




27 


Monday 




28 


Tuesday 




28 


Tuesday 




28 


Tuesday 




Octc 


ber 




2 


Saturday 




November 




13 


Saturday 




25-28 Thursday-S 


imday 


December 




4 


Saturday 




11 


Saturday 




11 


Saturday 




13 


Monday 




14-1 


8 Tuesday-Sal 


urday 


18 


Saturday 





18 Saturday 



Orientation week begins 

High school validation examina- 
tion 

Registration for entering and 
continuing students 

Registration for Saturday classes 

Registration with payment of late 
fee 

Regular classes begin 

Registration for evening classes 
at 7:00 p.m. 

Last day for registration with 
payment of late fee 

Last day for changes in program 

Evening classes begin at 7 p.m. 

Saturday classes begin 

English qualifying examination 
Thanksgiving recess 

Comprehensive examinations 

Constitutional examination 

High school validation examina- 
tion 

Classes end 

Final examinations 

Fall quarter ends; Christmas va- 
cation begins at 12:50 p.m. 

Registration for winter Saturday 
classes 



January 
3 Monday 



WINTER QUARTER. 1955 



3 Monday 

4 Tuesday 

4 Tuesday 

5 Wednesday 

5 Wednesday 

8 Saturday 
February 
19 Saturday 
26 Saturday 
March 

5 Saturday 

5 Saturday 
10 Thursday 
11-16 Friday- Wednesday 
16 Wednesday 

16 Wednesday 

SPRING 
March 

17-18 Thursday-Friday 
19 Saturday 
21 Monday 



Registration for entering and 

continuing students 
Registration for evening classes 

at 7:00 p.m. 
Day and evening classes begin 
Registration with payment of late 

fee 
Last day for registration with 

payment of late fee 
Last day for changes in program 
Saturday classes begin 

Constitutions examination 
Comprehensive examinations 

High school validation examina- 
tion 

English qualifying examination 

Classes end 

Final examinations 

Last day for filing applications 
for June graduation 

Winter quarter ends 

QUARTER, 1955 

Spring recess 

Registration for Saturday classes 
Registration for entering and 
continuing students 



21 Monday 



22 


Tuesday 


22 


Tuesday 


23 


Wednesday 


23 


Wednesday 


26 


Saturday 


April 




2 


Saturday 


May 




7 


Saturday 


14 


Saturday 


25 


Wednesday 


26-31 


Thursday-Tuesday 


28 


Saturday 


29 


Sunday 


June 




1 


Wednesday 


1 


Wednesday 



Registration for evening classes 

at 7:00 p.m. 
Day and evening classes begin 
Registration with payment of late 

fee 
Last day for registration with 

payment of late fee 
Last day for changes in program 
Saturday classes begin 

Comprehensive examinations 

English qualifying examination 
Constitutions examination 
Classes end 
Final examinations 
High school validation examina- 
tion 
Baccalaureate sermon 

Commencement 
Spring quarter ends 



June 



SUMMER QUARTER, 1955 
First Session, June 8-July 13 



8 Wednesday 



9 


Thursday 


9 


Thursday 


10 


Friday 


10 


Friday 


11 


Saturday 


11 

18 


Saturday 
Saturday 


25 


Saturday 


July 

4 

9 
12 
13 


Monday 
Saturday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 


13 


Wednesday 




Secon 


July 
14 


Thursday 


15 
15 


Friday 
Friday 



Registration for day and evening 
classes 

All classes begin 

Registration with payment of late 
fee 

Registration with payment of late 
fee 

High school validation examina- 
tion 

Last day for registration with 
payment of late fee 

Last day for changes in program 

English qualifying examination 

Constitutions examination 

Independence Day 

Comprehensive examinations 

Classes end 

Final examinations 

First session ends 



Second Session, July 14-August 18 



16 Saturday 
16 Saturday 



Registration 

Classes begin 

Registration with payment of late 

fee 
Last day for registration with 

payment of late fee 
High school validation exam, at 

2:00 p.m. 



18 


Monday 


Last day for changes in program 


23 


Saturday 


English qualifying examination 


30 


Saturday 


Constitutions examination 


August 




14 


Sunday 


Baccalaureate sermon 


16 


Tuesday 


Commencement 


17 


Wednesday 


Classes end 


18 


Thursday 


Final examinations 


18 


Thursday 


Summer quarter ends 



Pase 12 



THE BULLETIN 




Homecoming Edition 

GARDEN OF ROSES 



Miss Savannah State 
and Attendants 



Alabama State Grid 
Stars 



OCTOBER, 1954 





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■*'*■»*,,.,**'* ■ 



*-,** ****** 




These three lovely sisters, all students at Savannah State College, pose in 
front of the new boys' dormitory. They are from left to right: Fay, Blanche, and 

Barbara Flipper, of Savannah. 



OUR COVER 

Miss Savannah State 1954-55 and her Attendants, 
see page 3. 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 

October- 1954 

Vol. 8 No. 2 

President 
Dr. William K. Payne 

Editor-in-Chief 
Wilton C. Scott 

Copy Editor 
Mrs. Gwendolyn L. Bass 

Photographer 
William H. Bowens 

THE SAVANNAH STATE BULLETIN is published in 
October, December, February, March, April and May by 
Savannah State College. Entered as second-class matter, 
December 16, 1947, at the post office at Savannah, Georgia, 
under the Act of August 24s 1912. 

CONTENTS 

Cover Picture of Miss Savannah 
State and Attendants 

Greetings from Savannah State 

College's President 1 

Greetings from Alabama State 

College's President 2 

Miss Savannah State and 

Attendants 3 

Savannah State College Tigers 

and Coach 4-5 

Alabama State College Hornets 

and Coach 6 

Sports Events at Savannah State 

College 7 

Old and New Buildings at 

Savannah State College 8-9 

S.S.C. on Parade 

10 Through Back Cover 



New Boys Dormitory 




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Page 1 



Greetings from the President 



of 



Alabama State College 



Alabama State College appreciates the honor of being 
the guest opponent for the Homecoming game of Savannah 
State College. We also appreciate the several connections 
between these two institutions. Your President is a former staff 
member of Alabama State College. Your First Lady, the wife 
of the President, is both a graduate and former staff member 
of Alabama State College. Our relations are both pleasant 
and cherished. 



We wish for you a most satisfying occasion. May the 
best team win. 




Henry Council Trenholm, 
President 



Page 2 




The Savannah State College student body has chosen Miss Dolores Perry, attractive senior 
from Savannah, to represent them as "Miss Savannah State" for the year 1954-55. Miss Perry, 
a chemistry major, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Perry, 1210 East Gwinnett Street. Her 
attendants will be Miss Elizabeth Jordan, (left) senior from Barnesville, and Miss Frances Baker, 
(right) senior from Darien. Both attendants are elementary education majors. "Miss Savannah 
State" and her attendants will be crowned during the half-time period of the homecoming game be- 
tween the Savannah State Tigers and Alabama State College on November 13. 



Page 3 




Savannah State College linemen as they 
work out for their coming tilts, with Alabama 
State College on November 13 (Homecom- 
ing) and with Paine College on November 
25 (Thanksgiving Classic). 



Backfield, from left to right, Q. B., LeRoy 
Dupree; L. H. B., Jerry Turner; R. H. B., 
Robert Butler; F. B., Anderson Kelly. 




Head Coach Ross Pearley, as he explains techniques to his 

players. 




SSC "sparkplays," kneeling, left to right: James Ashe, 
center; Ivory Jefferson, guard; James Collier, end; standing, 
left to right, Albert Scrutchins, center; James Willis, guard, 
and William Weatherspoon, left halfback. 





Savannah State College ends as they work out for their coming tilts, with Alabama State College on No- 
vember 13 (Homecoming) and with Paine College on November 25 (Thanksgiving Classic). They are, left to right, 
L. J. McDaniel, Louis Ford, Hurbert Tyler, and Willie James Telfair. 



Savannah State "Fighting Tigers" pose with their coaches, head-coach, Ross Pearley, extreme left, and assistant 

coach, Henry Bowman, extreme right. 




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1954 Alabama State College Football Squad. 



Coach Arthur Simmons, of 
the Alabama State "Hornets". 
Coach Simmons is a graduate 
of Tennessee State University. 




"Miss Alabama State" (center) Celeste Brooks, 
junior, and attendants, Viola Hawze, (left) sopho- 
more, and Mary F. Foy (right) freshman. 



William Stokes, junior, Ala- 
bama State quarterback. 



Page 6 






Left, Miss Eugenia English, Freshman, from Coving- 
ton, Ga., preparing for Physical Education class. 

Far left, Georgia Peaches at Savannah State: Left 
to right, Doris Moore, freshman, Savannah; Anne 
Pierce, sophomore, Halycondale, and Clara Lewis, 
junior, Brunswick. 

Girls basketball team, National and SEAC Cham- 
pions— 1953-54, receive SEAC trophy from President 
Payne. 





Side View of the New Boys Dormitory 



Annex to Willcox Gymnasium 




Hill Hall 



Old and I 







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Herty Hall 



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Buildings 



Mg^^r JMPS 



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Hall 



Adams Hall 



Meldrim Auditorium 





ABOVE— Miss Betty Allen receives bouquet from Miss 
Savannah State 1954-55 (Dolores Perry). Miss Allen 
was featured by the Lyceum Committee of Savannah 
State College. 



Attractive Mrs. Ottle Daniels, 

Senior from Savannah poses 

for this lovely picture on the 

campus of Savannah State 

College. 



Paee 10 





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X 




Miss Marie Barnwell, attractive 1954 graduate as she receives the Journal of Business Education Certificate 

Award from President Payne. * c 

Savannah State College Co-eds relax. Left to right: Miss 

Sadie Hall, Sr., Macon, Georgia; Miss Josie Glenn, Freshman, 

Hogansville, Georgia; Miss Mollie Sams, Sr., Savannah; .. _ _ .. .. ... - . -^ , 

zc j \ kk- /- • r* c u c • u Mrs. Rose Gartrell Vann, Miss Savannah State or 

(Second row) Miss Cane Green, Sophomore, Swainsboro, ,«.-« i . r , . -i 

~ . j ... D I A 11 „■ c . r. . 1952, relaxes in front of Library. 

Georgia; and Miss Barbara Ann Matthews, Sr., Jesup, Georgia. ' 





BL**^ "i.*^* &~*v 



Page 11 





UPPER LEFT— Portion of relatives and friends as they congratulate June 

graduates. 
ABOVE— Rachel Baldwin, highest ranking senior in August convocation, 

receives degree. 

BELOW— Jean Leon Destine ensemble, Haitian dance group, as they perform 

for SSC students and friends. 




Georgia Peaches view Savannah State 

College campus from the steps of the New 

Boys' dormitory. Bottom step up, Miss 

Barbara Flipper, Miss Florine Cobb, Miss 

Eugenia English. 



Miss Henrice Thomas, "Miss Savannah 
State College" for 1953-54. 



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Southwest Georgia Chapter of SSC Alumni Association. 



Miss Rubye King (center) "Miss General Alumni" and her attendants, Miss Ruth Mullino, left and Mrs. Loretta 

Harris, right. 




Savannah Chapter of SSC Alumni Association 



Page 13 



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A.M.E. Bishops and Wives at Savannah State College President's Reception, with Dr. and Mrs. W. K. Payne in center. 




Officers of Savannah chapter of SSC Alumni Association. 



"Miss Savannah State" 1953, Henrice Thomas, center, and 
attendants left to right, Evelyn James and Beatrice Doe. 




Officials at Homecoming game— 1953. Left to right: 
Mrs. Rosa A. Crosse, Attendant; John McGlockton, Presi- 
dent; Mrs. L. Orene Hall, "Miss General Alumni"; President 
W. K. Payne; Henrice Thomas, "Miss Savannah State" 
1953; William Weatherspoon, captain of SSC football 
team; Beatrice Doe, and Evelyn James, attendants to 
"Miss Savannah State". 

Some Alumni at recent President's Banquet for Alumni. 




1954 Football Squad Roster 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



ALABAMA STATE COLLEGE 




TED WRIGHT, SR., Athletic Director 



CITY 

Thunderbolt, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Woodbine, Ga. 



No. NAME POS. 

22 Miles Oliver T 

47 Willie Reynolds T 

24 Robert Butler B 

48 Ivory Jefferson G 

25 Eugene Hubbard G 

49 Harry Roberts B 

26 Joe Louis Lott B 

50 Hubert Tyler E 

30 James Collier E 

51 David Richardson G 

31 Mat Mag wood T 

52 William Weatherspoon, Jr. B 

32 Robert Dulaney B 

53 Eugene Miller B 

33 E. Z. McDaniels B 

54 Cyrus McKiver T 

34 Charles Johnson B 

54 John Johnson T 

35 Anderson Kelly B 

55 L. J. McDaniels E 
37 Louis Ford E 

56 Albert Scrutchin G 

39 Price Oliver B 

57 Samuel Cooper T 

40 Jerry Turner B 

58 Willie Telfair E 

41 LeRoy DuPree B 

59 Joseph Cox E 

42 James Willis G 

60 George Parker B 

43 Daniel Burns B 

61 James Johnson T 

44 James Ashe C 
63 Thomas Smith B 

45 Willie Morris C 

46 Johnny Dixon B 

TIGERS' STAFF 
Ross Pearley, Head Football Coach; Alfred Frazier and 
Henry Bowman, Assistant Coaches; Frank Tharpe, General 
Chairman of Homecoming Festivities; Elmer Dean, Athletic 

Committee Chairman; Ellis "Trap" Trappio, Athletic Re- 
porter. 

School Colors: Blue and Orange 



Ridgeland, S. C. 
Savannah, Ga. 

Savannah, Ga. 
Cario, Ga. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Calhoun, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Vidalia, Ga. 
Jesup, Ga. 
Calhoun, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Jesup, Ga. 
Marietta, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Jesup, Ga. 

Savannah, Ga. 
Cairo, Ga. 
Cairo, Ga. 
Ridgeland, S. C. 
Savannah, Ga. 

Columbus, Ga. 
Dublin, Ga. 

Savannah, Ga. 



NO. 


NAME 


POS. 


HOMETOWN 


10 


Wallace Hall 


G 


Talladega 


11 


Lonnie Scott 


T 


Tallassee 


12 


Edward Steiner 


T 


Greenville 


13 


Edward Patterson 


G 


Montgomery 


14 


Herbert Ellis 


E 


Daphne 


15 


Hoover White 


B 


Courtland 


16 


Maurice Williams 


G 


Mobile 


17 


Jimmy Green 


B 


Tuscumbia 


18 


Charles Carter 


C 


Town Creek 


19 


Nathaniel Reed 


E 


Camden 


20 


Charles Williams 


E 


Memphis, Tenn 


21 


Otis Leftwich 


B 


East Mulga 


22 


Fred Jackson 


B 


Montgomery 


23 


Andrew Loper 


T 


Mobile 


24 


Clinton Johnson 


C 


Demopolis 


25 


Cornell Torrence 


B 


Auburn 


26 


James Brisker 


B 


Montgomery 


27 


Robert Hogan 


E 


Tuscumbia 


28 


George Ward 


B 


Dothan 


29 


Henry Carnegie 


B 


Collinsville 


30 


William McCou 


E 


Memphis, Tenn 


31 


Ulysses Williams 


E 


Gadsden 


32 


Sylvester Moseley 


B 


Inkster, Mich. 


33 


Luther Jordan 


E 


Sebring, Fla. 


34 


Theodore Ward 


G 


Ashford 


35 


Oliver Faulk 


E 


Montgomery 


36 


William Gary 


G 


Gadsden 


37 


Dave Baker 


B 


Port Huron, Mich 


38 


William Stokes 


B 


Birmingham 


39 


Jeppie Carnegie 


B 


Collinsville 


40 


Felton Blackburn 


E 


Tuscaloosa 


41 


Frank Brown 


C 


Demopolis 


42 


Alfred Peavy 


E 


Salitpa 


43 


Virgie Hodges 


B 


Atlanta, Ga. 


44 


Reginald Dozier 


T 


Uniontown 


45 


Robert Baxter 


T 


Mobile 


46 


Eugene Hudson 


G 


Montgomery 


47 


Ervin Thompson 


T 


Cleveland, Ohio 


48 


Richard James 


B 


Bessemer 


49 


James Davis 


G 


Gadsden 


50 


Clarence Hightower 


G 


Coffeville 


51 


Joseph Brooks 


E 


Montgomery 


52 


James McKinney 


B 


Tuscaloosa 


54 


Lamar Lee 


B 


Elba 


57 


William Parker 


B 


Montgomery 



HORNET STAFF 

Arthur Simmons (Tenn. State), Coach; C. Earl Anderson 
(Hampton), Assistant; William Lewis (Tuskegee), As- 
sistant; Howard Green, Student Asst. Coach; Walker Alex- 
ander, Student Asst. Coach. 

H. Councill Trenholm, President 

C. Johnson Dunn, Athletic Director 

James M. Reynolds, Director of Athletic Publicity 

School Colors: Old Gold and Black 

Team Nickname: Hornets 



Page 16 



I 



t tyo^ - ^ si 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



Savannah State College is an accredited senior college, located in Chatham County, just one mile from 
Savannah, the oldest city in the state. Its campus, surrounded by beautiful moss laden oak trees, is one of 
the most naturally beautiful campuses to be found anywhere. One hundred and thirty-six acres of land with 
more than thirty modern buildings, fully equipped, comprises the campus of "Georgia's largest institution for 
the higher education of Negroes." 

For catalog, information and registration blank — • write: 

Registrar, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia 

Students who are graduates of accredited high schools will be admitted without examinations. Students 
who are graduates of non-accredited high schools may qualify for admission to the freshman class through 
examination. All freshmen must file application not later than August 15, 1955. 

Program „ 

Veterans will get all benefits allotted under the law. Contact the Veteran's Secretary, Savannah State 
College, Savannah, Georgia for details. 

A WIDE VARIETY OF COURSES DESIGNED FOR: 

* Men and women who desire to prepare for teaching positions in elementary schools and secondary 
schools. 

* Normal school graduates and high school graduates who desire to earn a Bachelor's degree in 
Humanities, Social Science, Natural Science, Education, Business Administration, Engineering and 
Technical Sciences, and Vocational Training. 

Eight Divisions 

The Board of Regents has approved the formation of seven Instructional Divisions and the division 
of General Extension at Savannah State College. 

The new divisions will be: HUMANITIES, SOCIAL SCIENCE, NATURAL SCIENCE, EDUCATION, 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, ENGINEERING AND TECHNICAL SCIENCES, and VOCATIONAL 
TRAINING. 

These Instructional Divisions with General Extension, will comprise the Savannah State College Pro- 
gram, totaling eight divisions. 

The departments of Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry will compose the NATURAL SCIENCE 
DIVISION. The EDUCATION DIVISION will be composed of the departments of Elementary and Secondary 
Education. The Secondary Education majors will specialize in SOCIAL SCIENCE, General Science, Mathe- 
matics, ENGLISH AND LITERATURE, COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS, DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION, INDUS- 
TRIAL EDUCATION, AND GENERAL AND SPECIAL SHOP SUBJECTS. In the DIVISION OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION, the students can specialize in Industrial Management, Office Practice, Accounting, and 
Business and Financial Economics. 

A Bachelor of Science degree in Home Economics is being offered in the following fields, institutional 
management, foods and nutrition, textile and clothing, arts and crafts, and nursery school and family life edu- 
cation. There will also be terminal courses in dressmaking and tailoring, food production and cooking. 




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Savannah State College is located near the 
southeast corner of the city of Savannah, Geor- 
gia's largest seaport, and "Empire City" of the 
South. There are over 30 modern buildings on 
the Campus scattered over 133 acres of land, 
covered with moss laden trees which add splendor 
and beauty to campus life. 

Savannah State College is a senior college 
offering the Bachelor of Science degree with 
majors in each of the following areas of concen- 
tration: 

Biology, Building Construction, Business Ad- 
ministration, Chemistry, Child Development, In- 
dustrial Arts, Industrial Education, Mathematics, 
Clothing and Textiles, Economics, Elementary Ed- 
ucation, English, Foods, Nutrition, and Institution 



Management, General Science, Secretarial Science, 
Social Science, Trade and Industrial Education. 

The college is fully accredited by the South- 
ern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. t Under the leadership of Dr. Harmon 
Caldwell, Chancellor and Dr. W. K. Payne, Presi- 
dent, it has initiated its first permanent building 
program in over 20 years. The December edition 
is featuring the President's Annual Message so 
that alumni and friends might be fully informed 
of the aims, programs and objectives of the Col- 
lege, which is Georgia's largest institution for the 
higher education of Negroes. 

Wilton C. Scott, Director 
Public Relations 



The Savannah State College Bulletin — December. 1954 — Volume 8. No. 3. President. Dr. William 
K. Payne; Editor in Chief. Wilton C. Seott: Photographer. William H. Bowens. THE SAVANNAH STATE 
BULLETIN is published in October. December, February. March, April and May by Savannah State College. 
Entered as second-class matter. December 16. 1947. at the post office at Savannah. Georgia, under the Act 
of August 24, 1912. 



O-v 



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President W. K. Payne discusses proposed names of new build- 
ings with special administrative committee in President's newly 
renovated conference room. 

President's Annual Message- 
institutions like individuals develop habits and 
customs which become a part of their existence. 
Savannah State College enters the Christmas sea- 
son along with the students, faculty and others 
who reside in the immediate community. At this 
time of year, the College feels the urge to express 
itself in terms of the year through which it has 
passed. The background upon which it draws, 
however, is cumulative from year to year. All 
of the celebration and activities associated with 
Christmas and the New Year bear evidences of 
experiences. 

Savannah State College in extending greet- 
ings to members of the alumni, faculty, students, 
patrons, and friends, notes recognition of the prog- 
ress which has been made and extends its appre- 
ciation to all who have helped to make the College 
what it is today. In order that you may see the 
Savannah State College of today, several phases 
of the College will be discussed briefly. 

One of the most frequent questions raised 
concerning an educational institution is centered 
about enrollment. Savannah State College, like 
many other institutions, has been attracting large 
numbers of students. The enrollment of the 1954 
fall quarter, which is 1042, represents an increase 
of approximately 20% over that of the previous 
year. The trend toward increased enrollment has 
been obvious since the decrease after the peak 
enrollment of 1950. The tendency of the College 
to attract larger numbers of students indicates the 
types of problems which are associated with hous- 
ing, classrooms, libraries, and other basic needs 
of a growing institution. It appears definite that 
this trend towards an increase in enrollment will 
bring larger numbers of young people and adults 
here to continue their education and preparation 
for living. It is interesting to note that several 
groups of adults have come to the College for 
special short courses which assist them in doing 
better some of the things that they enjoy. The 
College is glad to be of service to the citizens of 



Main entrance to new boys' dormitory which helps to relieve 
acute student housing problem. 




Pictures of the annex to Willcox Gymnasium. Picture No. 1 shows 
entrance leading from old gym. Picture No,. 2 shows east en- 
trance, and picture No. 3 shows interior. 



Newly erected central heating plant provides adequate heat 
for buildings and rooms. 




ar*. *?* 



An Interior View of Power Plant 




%^^ 





Adams Hall — Recently renovated to provide wholesome dining 

facilities. 



Living quarters are ideal for study in new boys' dormitory. 



the community and to make available the resources 
which have been provided by the State. 

The educational program of the College has 
continued to grow in terms of present-day de- 
mands and needs. Constant effort has been made 
to revise, reorganize, and extend the courses of 
study. The College is now in its second year of 
the General Education Program. It is expected 
that this new program will provide an improved 
basic program of education for all students during 
the freshman and sophomore years. The program 
has required additional facilities and staff. Special 
assistance for the increased facilities and expendi- 
tures for this program has been made available 
by the Chancellor and the Board of Regents. Al- 
though the program is in its infancy, there are 
evidences that it is meeting the needs of the 
student body in a manner superior to that of the 
traditional program of the freshman and sopho- 
more years. The areas of concentration developed 
beyond the sophomore year are beginning to 
show definite development. !t is expected that 
students completing the general education pro- 
gram will be better prepared to do the concentra- 
tion programs outlined for the senior divisions. 
Students in the senior division have a variety of 
areas in which to study and work. The special 
areas allocated to the Savannah State College 
for training in the fields of business, industry, ele- 
mentary and secondary education, and the physi- 
cal sciences provide programs for students to enter 
the increasingly industrialized society. 

A good educational program includes many 
kinds of activities. The formal and the less formal. 
Student activities constitute an important aspect 
of the learning offered in American undergraduate 
colleges. Savannah State College has made ad- 
vances in this area through definite programs of 
the departments of student personnel, health and 
physical education, public relations, and fine arts. 
The enrichment of this phase of the College pro- 
gram has contributed toward the well-rounded 
growth of students. In the past year many local 
and national honors have come to the institution 
because of student performances in athletics, news- 




Best in equipment and supplies explains the recently installed facilities in Home Economics. 



paper production, music, dramatics, and confer- 
ence leadership. Institutes and conferences under 
the sponsorship of instructional departments have 
extended the areas of learning. 

In another aspect the College observes its 
growth and improvement. The faculty of the Col- 
lege has increased in numbers commensurate with 
the increase in enrollment. The proportion of the 
faculty holding the doctor's degree has been con- 
siderably expanded during the past two or three 
years. At the present time, five staff members 
are expected to complete their programs for the 
doctor's degree before the end of the present 
academic year. Three of these have only to await 
the next convocations at their respective univer- 
sities. The rapid increase in years of training of 
the faculty has been made possible through the 
Board of Regents which has permitted 23 staff 
members to study on leaves with pay during the 
past few years. This program has been excep- 
tionally valuable in developing staff members who 
conducted their study with a view to returning to 
the institution for better service. The provision for 
attendance at meetings of learned societies has 
made it possible for the majority of the staff mem- 
bers to hold memberships in those organizations. 
Many have served on important committees and 
some on boards of directors. The policies affecting 
the above aspects of faculty and staff have con- 
tributed to a growing and loyal staff. 

Another view of the College which heightens 
our joy at Christmas time comes when we look at 
the alumni. The product of every educational in- 
stitution represents evidence of the type of educa- 
tion it is providing. The large number of graduates 
of recent years who have continued their work 
for advanced degrees has been an index of the 
training which they received at Savannah State 
College. Many of them have earned advanced 
degrees at some of the country's most outstanding 
educational universities. In several instances, the 
graduates have been invited to serve on faculties 
of those institutions. Five have earned the doctor's 
degree recently. The ability and the desire to 




Students View Clothing Exhibit 




A Home Economics Major Explains Display to Students 




Savannah State College alumni and faculty take active role at 
state meetings. Usual college exhibit typifies growth of student 

body. 




Student registration is rapid under recently revised registration 

procedures. 





Students pay fees promptly in modern and pleasant atmosphere. 



Savannah State College Alumni begin 1954-55 Scholarship Drive 
at recent State Principals' Conference in Macon, Georgia. 



extend their training are evidences of a program 
which is moving in the right direction. 

The College has been elated over the grow- 
ing interest of the alumni in the institution. During 
the past year alumni activity has been at an all- 
time high. Chapters have been organized in a 
number of areas in the State and several cities 
beyond the State boundaries. Many of the alumni 
have attended general meetings and committee 
meetings which were concerned with the scholar- 
ship program for worthy students. The alumni 
have provided over $2,300.00 for such purpose 
during the 1954-55 academic year. This is evi- 
dence that this is the beginning of a new day of 
interest and loyalty to the College. Special efforts 
have been made to compile an alumni directory 
which will carry accurate information on the loca- 
tion of the alumni of the College. This directory 
will include pertinent information on the status of 
each alumnus and the work in which he is en- 
gaged. It is believed that this directory will reveal 
that alumni growth and expansion are keeping 
pace with other aspects of the College. 

Although some individuals have stated that 
buildings do not constitute a college, one must con- 
cede that they greatly influence the effectiveness 
of any educational institution. The physical plant 
at Savannah State College is beginning to show 
changes. It has been encouraging to note that 
the improvements and new facilities provided in the 
past two years have moved this phase of the col- 
lege forward a long way. The College is glad to 
mention at this time that the new projects— sew- 
erage system, men's dormitory, the central heating 
plant, and the annex to Willcox Gymnasium- 
have been practically completed. Within the next 
month or two the College hopes to sign the papers 
of the acceptance for the last of these projects— 
the annex to Willcox Gymnasium. 

It is difficult to imagine what the Savannah 
State College would look like if the fire prevention 
and rehabilitation program had not been pro- 
vided along with the new projects. The renova- 
tions, provisions for safety, and equipment neces- 
sary to keep the facilities up to date have played 




ivannah State College provides good scholarship. Group of high 
inking science students recently initiated into scientific hono society 
pose with college president and several professors. 

an important part in the development of the 
physical plant. The development in this area has 
been most significant in improving the usefulness, 
appearance, and habitability of the facilities. 
These developments are very important in meeting 
the requirements of increased enrollment and a 
more effective program of education. 

Today, there is definite need for a rapid ex- 
pansion of the physical plant. Among the most 
pressing demands are a classroom building, a 
library, a dormitory for women, a science building, 
a student union, and a building and facilities for 
a technical program. The progress made on this 
aspect of the College offers encouragement for a 
continued program of experience the joy and the 
gladness which such development warrants. As 
one looks toward the New Year, one should look 
forward to a continuation of all of the aspects of 
developments mentioned here as well as many 
others which could not be presented in this brief 
overview. 

William K. Payne 

President, Savannah State College 
Savannah, Georgia 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF DR. PAYNE 

WILLIAM K. PAYNE was born in Calhoun, Alabama, the son 
of Rev. and Mrs. Robert Turner Payne. He received the A.B. degree 
from Morehouse College in 1923, and the A.M. degree from Columbia 
University in 1927. He was a General Education Board Fellow at 
Columbia University, 1926-27. His graduate work has included the 
following: study at the University of Minnesota, 1936-39; study as 
an American Council on Education Fellow, at the Collaboration Center 
on Child Development, University of Chicago, 1940 41. The Litt.D. 
degree was conferred upon him by Allen University, Columbia, S. C, 
in 1952. 

He is married to the former Miss Mattie C. Beverly, and has 
two children — William Kenneth, Jr., and Roselyn. 

He served as dean of Alabama State Teachers College, Mont- 
gomery, 1927-29; organized Dunbar Junior College, Little Rock, Ark., 
1929; and served as dean, 1929-37. He was dean of Georgia State 
College (now Savannah State College), 1940-49. He has been presi- 
dent of Savannah State since 1949. 

His membership includes the following: the Board of Boy and 
Girl Scouts of Savannah; the National Education Association; the 
Society for the Advancement of Education; the National Society for 
the Study of Education; the Academy of Political Science; the American 
Association of School Administrators; the American Teachers Associa- 
tion; The Georgia Teachers and Education Association; the Georgia 
Committee on Cooperation in Teacher Education (which he has served 
as treasurer since 1948); the Board of United Community Services of 
Savannah; and The Board of the Frank Callen Boys Club; Sigma Pi 
Phi; and Omega Psi Phi. 

He is a Congregationalist and a Mason (Shriner). 



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Youthful leaders train for good citizenship as Savannah State 
College becomes better equipped to serve America. 



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Savannah State College prexy discusses railroad employment 

opportunities wilh officials of Association of American Railroads 

during their visit to the campus. 




Well organized campus fraternities and sororities provide op- 
portunity for wholesome social and cultural relations. 



New bleachers provid 
comfort in viewing spor 
events on spacious atl 
letic field. 




Co-eds relax on modern tennis courts rated as tops in Georgia. 



Campus Charms greet friends and visitors. 



New emphasis in music 
provides an outlet for 
music lovers at Savan- 
nah State College. 




BUILDINGS 



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Side View of Boys' Dormitory 



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Exterior View of Gym 

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Interior View of Gym 




PRESIDENT'S 
MESSAGE 



The United States is a country affording many 
wonderful opportunities in the field of higher educa- 
tion. There are many colleges which present a variety 
of offerings and programs. It has been said often that 
there is a college for every individual who has the de- 
sire to find the one that suits his needs. American 
youth have a distinct privilege in selecting their in- 
stitutions of higher learning. 

In making such a selection the student should 
consider many items. Among these would be his in- 
terests, abilities, aims, and needs, as well as the stand- 
ing of the college, its location, and facilities. Many 
colleges will offer similar programs of instruction, but 
each varies in the opportunities provided for individual 
growth. A college which affords students opportunities 
for actual participation in the institution's life and 
the larger community in which the college is located 
will provide unlimited educational values for students. 
A stimulating atmosphere, opportunities to take an 
active part in the life of the community and a feeling 
of belonging constitute factors making for a superior 
educational program. In selecting a college, a student 
should choose one in which he can construct rich full 
stimulating school career. In most instances, the col- 
lege chosen should be one where the student feels 
that he can be eminently successful, his standards of 
living will be raised, his ideals will be elevated, his ini- 
tiative stimulated, and his abilities challenged. 



W. )(. pau^ju 



THE SAVANNAH STATE 

COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Vol. 8 February, 1955 No. 4 



President 

Dr. William K. Payne 

Editor-in-Chief 

Wilton C. Scott 

Contributing Editor 

Dr. E. K. Williams 

Photographer 
William H. Bowens 



THE SAVANNAH STATE BULLETIN is published in October, December, 
February. March, April and May by Savannah Stale College. Entered as second- 
class matter, December 16, 1947. at the post office at Savannah, Georgia, under 
the Act of August 24, 1912. 







Herty Hall 




Morgan Hall 




Camellia Hubert Hal 



Prospective Student 
Information 

Savannah State College, a unit of the University 
System of Georgia, located in Chatham County in the 
southeast corner of Savannah, Georgia's oldest city 
and chief seaport. 

It is a college of applied arts and sciences, teacher 
education, business, and vocational technology, ac- 
credited by the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools and by the Department of Educa- 
tion of the State of Georgia. 

The college offers courses leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science with a major in each of these areas 
of concentration: 

Biology, Building Construction, Business Adminis- 
tration, Business Education, Chemistry, Child Develop- 
ment, Clothing and Textiles, Economics, Elementary 
Education, English, Foods, Nutrition and Institution 
Management, General Science, Industrial Arts, Indus- 
trial Education, Mathematics, Secretarial Science, So- 
cial Science, Trade and Industrial Education. 

To meet the needs of persons who are already 
gainfully employed, but who desire immediate, special- 
ized training, and for others whose opportunity for 
formal education is limited, the College offers two- 
year terminal courses in dressmaking and tailoring, 
food production and cooking, and secretarial science. 
Upon satisfactory completion of a terminal course, a 
student is given a certificate. 

ADMISSION 

Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and 
who present evidence of good moral character, ade- 
quate ability, sound health, and interest in a specific 
course of study are eligible to apply for admission to 
the several departments of the college. 

Each candidate for admission is required to make 
formal application and thereafter submit such cre- 
dentials as may be needed to support the application. 
Admissions correspondence should be addressed to the 

Director of Admissions 
Savannah State College 
State College Branch 
Savannah, Georgia 





INSTRUCTION 



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Office Machines 




Admission to the Freshman Class: 

1. An applicant may be admitted to the freshman 
class by certificate under the following conditions: 

(a) He must have graduated from an accredited 
secondary school with rank in the upper half 
of his class. 

(b) The official transcript, mailed directly from 
the principal to the Director of Admissions, 
must present a distribution of at least fifteen 
entrance units. 

(c) He must be recommended by his principal. 

2. An applicant who, though graduated from an ac- 
credited secondary school, has not maintained 
rank in the upper half of his class; or who has 
graduated from a non-accredited secondary school; 
or who has not completed the secondary school 
course, may qualify for admission to the freshman 
class through examinations. 

(a) Such applicant must have earned a score at 
or above the median (by Georgia Norms) 
either in the Statewide Senior Scholastic 
Aptitude Tests or in entrance examinations 
administered at this college. 

(b) He must be recommended by his principal. 

Final Action on the Application: 

When all necessary credentials have been re- 
ceived, the Director and Committee on Admissions will 
consider in detail the candidate's qualifications for 
admission. Each applicant will then be notified as to 
the action of the Committee. If all available evidence 
indicates that the candidate is duly qualified, he will 
be mailed a Notice of Admission. 

Final decision on applications for admission in 
September will be rendered on August 15th, and for 
other quarters not later than one month before the 
beginning of the quarter. 

Only persons who present the Notice of 
Admission may participate in activities of 
Freshman Week and register for courses. 



ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 

*Per Quarter *Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $ 30.00 $ 90.00 

Health Fee 3.00 9.00 

Student Activity Fee 7.50 22.50 

General Deposit **10.00 **10.00 

Total Charges, Day Student $ 50.50 $131.50 

Room, Board & Laundry 138.50 $545.50 

Totfil ChjirsfGs 

Boarding Student $188.50 $545.50 

All charges are subject to change at the end of 
each quarter. Normal costs for books and supplies 
approximate $20.00 per quarter. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of regis- 
tration. Students are required to meet their financial 
obligations promptly as a condition of their remaining 
in college. Students granted scholarships or work-aid 
will be notified in writing and credit will be made to 
their accounts. 

Self Help Opportunities: 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet 
college expenses through part-time employment, pro- 
vided they maintain satisfactory scholastic averages. 
These work opportunities, limited in number, include 
such jobs as clerical and stenographic work, library 
work, waiting tables, washing dishes, pantry and kitch- 
en work, skilled and unskilled work in the several 
trades and in maintenance. 

Students who plan to apply for part-time work 
should note carefully: 

1. No student should attempt to enter Savannah 
State College unless he is prepared to pay the 
major part of his total college expenses. 

2. All students are required to pay all entrance 
expenses when they register. Money earned 
through part-time work may thereafter be 
credited to the monthly account. 



* Resident students only. Out-of-state students pay, in addition to above, Non- 

Resident Tuition of $50.00 per quarter. 
**Payable upon initial registration; retained by institution as assessment against 

lost keys, library books not returned, unpaid fees, laboratory breakage, etc.; 

refundable upon student's withdrawal from the in9':itution. 



45 m 


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Mathematics 



Radio Repairing 



Biological Experiments 



ACTIVITIES 







Religious Service 



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3. Students are assigned to work only after they 
have been admitted and have arrived on the 
campus. Work assignments are made in the 
offices of the Dean of Men and the Dean of 
Women. Students interested in securing work- 
aid should write to 

Office of Student Personnel 

Savannah State College 

State College Branch 

Savannah, Georgia 

Scholarships: 

A limited number of special scholarships are avail- 
able to selected students who meet the required stand- 
ards of scholastic merit, high character, general prom- 
ise, and superior achievement in certain specific areas 
of the college program. 

Students interested in securing scholarships or 
grants-in-aid should write to: 

Office of the Dean of Faculty 
Savannah State College 
State College Branch 
Savannah, Georgia 



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Greek Letter Organizations 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Savannah State College contributes to the attain- 
ment of a well-rounded education by providing many 
opportunities for students to participate in a wide 
range of significant activities. Through the efforts 
of organized groups, programs are planned for the so- 
cial, religious, and cultural advancement of the college | 
community. 

In addition to the Student Council, the following 
organizations also provide media for expression of 
student interests: 

Clubs: 

Art Club, Business Club, Collegiate Counsellors, 
Dormitory Councils, Home Economics Club, Newman 
Club, French Club, Pan-Hellenic Council, Savannah 
State College Student Loan Association, Tiger's Roar 
(student publication), Ushers Club, Veterans Club, 
YMCA, YWCA, Campus 4-H Club, and the Women's 
Council. 



2tn 



Fraternities, Sororities, and Honor Societies: 

The following national social faternities are or- 
ganized on the campus: Alpha Phi Alpha, Omega Psi 
Phi, and Kappa Alpha Psi. 

The following national social sororities are organ- 
ized on the campus: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Sigma Gam- 
ma Rho, Zeta Phi Beta, and Delta Sigma Theta. 

The national honor society, Alpha Kappa Mu, has 
a chapter on the campus. 

Music : 

The choir, band, and glee clubs, are open for 
membership to all students interested in music. These 
groups perform not only locally, but are in constant 
demand for special programs throughout the state. 

Recreation and Sports: 

The Department of Health and Physical Education 
conducts a well-rounded intramural athletic program 
of seasonal activities for men and for women. Utilizing 
group games and various sports for their full educa- 
tional and health values, the following sports are 
featured: football, basketball, track and field, tennis, 
baseball, softball, volleyball, field hockey, and bad- 
minton. 

Savannah State College holds membership in the 
Southeastern Athletic Conference, as well as in two 
national athletic associations, the NAAC and the NIAA. 

Cultural Opportunities: 

In order to supplement formal education on the 
campus, many activities are presented for cultural 
enrichment. Student assemblies, institutes, motion pic- 
tures, lectures, art exhibitions, dramatics, forums, 
athletic contests, hobby groups, and tours contribute 
to the general welfare of the community. 

The Committee on Campus Cultural Activities 
brings to the campus each year renowned artists of the 
concert world. Yearly programs of the College Artists 
Series usually include a vocalist, a pianist, a small 
group of singers, a large group of singers, dancers, 
and a dramatic group. 



ACTIVITIES 





The general curriculum at Savannah State College 
is designed to afford an opportunity for every student 
to acquire the fundamental skills, attitudes, habits, 
appreciations, knowledge and understanding, and com- 
petency in thinking and communication that are 
necessary for effective living in a dynamic society. 
It proposes to sensitize every student to the manifold 
problems and responsibilities involved in personal and 
social adjustment. It aims to instill in each student 
the respect for the rights and dignity of all mankind. 

At Savannah State College, general education is 
concerned with all the major disciplines that: (1) en- 
rich the lives of students; (2) that acquaint them 
with the broad areas of human experience; (3) that 
cultivate indiscriminately an appreciation for the best 
that has been transmitted to our society; and, (4) 
to provide an intellectual and social foundation upon 
which to build a profession or a vocation. 

The program rests on the assumption that an indi- 
vidual trained only in his vocation or specialization 
is obsolete in a dynamic society. He may even be 
perilous to human progress. Our general curriculum 
aims to circumvent this. It is a complement of vo- 
cational and professional education. It provides a 
basis for intelligent thinking and action for each 
citizen irrespective of his life's work. 



General Education Committee: Maisie Bell, Alice 
Bevins, J. H. Camper, Theodore Collins, B. J. Farmer, 
B. T. Griffith, R. C. Long, Sr., F. H. Lumpkin, E. A. 
Peacock, F. D. Tharpe, W. V. Winters. 









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THE BULLETIN 

Savannah State College — Savannah, Ga 



Vol. 8, No. 7 




May, 




The Bulletin 

Alumni Issue 

President 
Wm. K. Payne 

Director of Public Relations 
Wilton C. Scott 

Editor 
Mrs. Gwendolyn L. Bass 

Photographer 
Wm. H. Bowens 



Vol. 8 



May, 1955 



No. 7 



The Savannah State College Bulletin 
is published in October, December, Feb- 
ruary, March, April, and May by Sa- 
vannah State College. Entered as second- 
class matter. December 16, 1947, at the 
Post Office at Savannah. Georgia, un- 
der the Act of August 24. 1912. 

INDEX 

President Payne Message 

to the Alumni 2 

John W. McGlockton speaks 

to the Alumni 3 

School-Lunch Workshop 3 

Alumni Banquet Speaker 3 

Commencement Calendar 4 

Alumni Banquet Program 4 

Baccalaureate Speaker 4 

Commencement Speaker 4 

Alumni on SSC Faculty 5 

New Building Named at SSC 6 

Officers and Committee of 

General Alumni Assn. 7 

Faculty Achievements at Savannah 

State 8 

Headlines from Periodicals 9 

Achievements of SSC Alumni 10 

Trades and Industry Plays Vital 

Role at SSC ' 11 

News — The Alumni 12 

New Techniques at Press Institute .13 
Financial Statement of Scholarship 

Fund 14 



OUR COVER SHOWN is the Chat- 
ham County-Savannah-In-Service teach- 
er group utilizing institutional facilities 
at Savannah State College. The vast 
majority of teachers in this county, are 
graduates of Savannah State College. 



President Pavne's 
Alumni on Their 

Savannah State College is delighted 
to welcome alumni to the college for the 
annual meeting. It is always a pleasure 
to look forward to the return of gradu- 
ates and former students. Just as the 
alumni are interested to see what the 
college has done and is doing, so the 
college is interested to know about the 
alumni achievements, and their present 
activities. The year 1954-55 has found 
the college moving definitely toward 
some of the things which it has needed 
most. The new buildings and projects 
under construction for the past two or 
three years have all been completed and 
turned over to the college. The two new 
buildings occupied during the preesnt 
academic year have been named in 
honor of two former presidents. The 
dormitory for men has been named for 




KENNETH PAYNE 
President 
Savannah State College 

President R. R. Wright, the first presi- 
dent of Savannah State College, and the 
new gymnasium facility has been named 
for President Cyrus G. Wiley, the second 
president. They are to be formally dedi- 
cated at a later date. 

The college has maintained growth 
in both students and faculty. The en- 
rollment of 1057 for fall quarter indi- 
cates a definite trend toward a much 
larger enrollment. When one considers 
that the plant now occupied is adequate 
for half the present enrollment, one can 
appreciate the pressing need for space 



Message to 
Annual Meeting 

and facilities. The faculty has increased 
in numbers, but not in proportion. The 
training of faculty and staff, however, 
has been considerably improved. At the 
present time nine members of the in- 
structional staff hold the doctor's de- 
gree. Many of the other members are 
nearing the completion of the doctor's 
degree program. Each year members of 
the faculty publish the Faculty Research 
Bulletin which contains contributions 
made by members of the staff. Many of 
the faculty members hold membership 
in learned societies. 

Graduates of the college in recent 
years have continued work for their de- 
grees in many outstanding universities 
of the United States. Some have been 
awarded the doctor's degree in their 
fields of major interest, and many others 
have earned the master's degree. The 
successes which they have had in 
graduate program's of study indicate the 
high quality of work being done at the 
college. The college has been proud of 
the interest shown by members of the 
alumni in the growth of the institution 
and the welfare of the students. The ef- 
forts of the alumni to provide scholar- 
ship aid for worthy students have been 
commendable. This program now under- 
way for 1954-55 is looked forward to as 
a vital factor in our educational pro- 
gram. The college is anxious to have 
complete information on every alumnus 
of this institution. It has from time to 
time requested information on the ad- 
dress, position, and status of each 
alumnus. It is hoped that an alumni 
office can be started at an early date. 
Such a position would provide both 
alumni and the college with many ser- 
vices vital to the welfare of each. The 
cooperation of the alumni is needed in 
providing information and the facts to 
develop this office and position. 
W. K. Payne 



Pledge 



Today 
For Your 
Alumni Fund 



Page 2 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



r' 



John W. McGlockton Speaks for 
General Alumni Association 



The "Commencement Season is Here". 
As we see ourselves in the line of pro- 
cession during our graduations, may 
we think seriously of our association. 

Many a potential graduate is hunger- 
ing for a word of encouragement from 
j ou. This is your opportunity to show 
loyalty to dear Savannah State College. 

Saturday, May 28, 1955, has been 
declared Alumni Day for your con- 
venience. At 6 p.m. The General Alumni 
meeting will be held in the auditorium; 
and at 8 p.m. the annual banquet takes 
place in Adams Hall. The speaker will 
be the Rev. David C. Grant, class of 
1935, prominent pastor in Columbus, 
Georgia. 

Accommodations may be made in the 
New Men's dormitory by contacting Dr. 
W. K. Payne before May 25th. 

On recommendation of Coach Ross 
Pearly the following athletes have re- 
ceived scholarships: Robert Butler, 
$50.00; Eugene Miller, $40.50; Cyrus 
Mclver, $40.50; Freddie Ford, $50.00; 
Charles Johnson, $80.00; Floyd Walk- 
er, $150.00; Samuel Cooper, $75.00; 
Johnny Dixon, $40.50; Charles Cam- 
eron, $200.00; Louis Ford, $200.00; 
E. L. McDaniel, $200.00; Joseph Cox, 
$200.00; John Johnson, $200.00; Jerry 
Turner, $150.00; L. J. McDaniels, 
$2 0.00; William Weatherspoon. 
$200.00; Albert Scruthchin, $200.00; 
James Willis, $50.00 and Anderson 
Kelly, $50.00. 

Realizing that the demands are much 
greater than ever before and our do- 
nations so far below those of last year's 
we are soliciting your cooperation in 
contributing at least $10.00 toward the 
grant-in-aid fund. Payments may be 
made to any of the following members 
of the Alumni Scholarship Committee: 

E. S. Spikes, Chairman, P. O. Box 
563, Griffin, Georgia. 

M. G. Thomas, Springfield Terrace 
School, Savannah, Georgia. 

Dean T. C. Myers, Savannah State 
College, Savannah, Georgia. 

With your donations a better foot- 
ball field will be secured. Remember 
Saturday, May 28, as Alumni Day. 
Make it a "MUST" on your calendar. 

The association reporting the largest 
sum of money will sponsor Miss Alumni 
for 1956. 

Yours for better service, 

John W. McGlockton, President, 
General Alumni Association 




john w. McGlockton 

President 
General Alumni Association 



Mrs. Thelina Flanagan 
Directs School-Lunch 
Workshop 

For the summer 1955, the school 
lunch workshop will make an effort to 
meet the needs of various administra- 
tive personnel connected with school 
lunch operation. Those persons con- 
cerned would include elementary teach- 
ers who are needed to assist with the 
promotion of the program, control of 
funds and supervision of limited per- 
sonnel; and home economics teachers 
who are eligible for managerships and 
wish training in the over-all phase of 
the school-lunch programs. Separate 
courses will be available for those who 
need to fulfill requirements in quantity 
cooking, accounting or other phases of 
school lunch service. The school lunch 
workshop is indeed fortunate to secure 
the special services of Mrs. Thelma 
Flanagan, program for Florida and 
past president, of the National School 
Lunch Association. Also assisting will be 
Miss Nell Wood, School Lunch Super- 
visor for Chatham County Schools and 
Savannah, Georgia. Other consultants 
will be in attendance. 



Rev. David C. Grant 
Alumni Banquet 
Speaker 

Rev. David C. Grant, class of '35, 
Pastor of St. John AME Church, Co- 
lumbus, Georgia, will deliver the address 
at the Alumni Banquet on May 28, at 
which time the classes of 5's ( 1895. 
1905, 1915, 1925, 1935, 1945) will be 
honored. 

Rev. Grant was educated at the Allen 
Normal School, Thomasville, Georgia. 
Brooks High School, Quitman. Georgia, 
and Georgia State College. After four 
years of study he received a B.S. de- 
gree in 1935. 

For six years he served as Principal 
and teacher of Agriculture in the State. 
In 1942 he was assigned to the position 




REV. DAVID C. GRANT 

of Negro County Agent. While in the 
service he was called to the ministry. 

Rev. Grant did his theological work 
at Turner Theological Seminary Morris 
Brown College. He did further study 
for two summers toward a Master's De- 
gree in Education at Florida A. & M. 
University, Tallahassee, Florida. 

He has pastored successfully in the 
Augusta, Georgia, Conference; South 
Georgia Conference, and now the South- 
west Georgia Conference, stationed at 
historic Saint John AME Church, Co- 
lumbus, Georgia, the first church on 
the East Columbus District. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 3 



Commencement Calendar 

Saturday. May 21. 7:00 — 9:00 p.m. President's Party for Seniors. President's 
Residence. 

Wednesday. May 25, 8:00 p.m. — Senior Women's Party, Camilla Hubert Hall: 
Senior Men's Smoker, College Inn. 

Thursday, May 26, 12:00 noon-Senior Chapel Exercises, Meldrim Auditorium. 

Saturday, May 28, 6:00—8:00 p.m.— Alumni Meeting, Meldrim Hall. 8:00 p.m. 
Alumni Banquet. Adams Hall. 

Sunday. May 29. 4:00 p.m. — Baccalaureate Exercises, Meldrim Auditorium. 
5:30 p.m. — Reception. President's Residence. President and Mrs. W. K. Payne at 
home to the alumni, faculty, members of the graduating class, their parents and 
friends. 

Monday, May 30, 8:00 p.m. — Senior Class Night Exercises. Meldrim Audi- 
torium. 

Wednesday. June 2. 11:00 a.m. — Commencement Exercises. Meldrim Audi- 
torium. 

Alumni Banquet Program 

May 28. 1955 
Dr. Henry M. Collier Jr.. Master of Ceremonies 

School Hymn Audience 

Invocation Rev. J. S. Lampkin 

Greetings Dr. W. K. Payne 

Instrumental Solo Mrs. Johnnie Lockette Fluker 

Address Rev. D. C. Grant; Bethel A.M.E. Church 

Vocal Solo Miss Jeanette Nichols 

Presentation of Classes 

John S. Deleware 1915 

1925 

Mrs. Dorothy Ury Adams 1935 

1945 

Class President 1955 

Music Dr. C. A. Braithwaite 

Remarks John W. McGlockton 

COMMITTEES 
USHERS DECORATION 

Mrs. Elsie Brewton, Chairman Mr. A. C. Carter, Chairman 

Misses: Eunice Primus Mrs. Louise Owens 

Ruby King Miss Eunice Wright 

Colleen Edwards Mr. John Myles 

Catherine Hunt Frank Thorpe 

Christine Wright Fred Owens 

Ruth Mullino REFRESHMENT 

Eunice Wright Mrs. Eldore Marks 

Mesdames: Frances Coe 

Loretta Harris nary, and has done further study at 

Kathleen Scruggs the University of Chicago. 

Lillian Scott He served as assistant pastor and la- 

Eldora Marks ter as acting pastor of Lincoln Me- 
morial Congregational Church of Chi- 

Rev. Homer C. McEweil ca S°- He later organized and served 

„ -. o i as pastor of St. Luke's Congregational 

Baccalaureate Speaker Church in Brooklyni N . Y ., before be- 

The Reverend Homer Clyde McEwen. coming pastor of First Congregational 

B.S., B.D., pastor of First Congrega- Church in 1947. 

tional Church, Atlanta, Georgia, will Since coming to Atlanta, Rev. Mc- 

deliver the Baccalaureate Address on Ewen has served as: Chairman of the 

May 29 at 4 p.m. Board, Metropolitan Atlanta Associa- 

Rev. McEwen received the B.S. de- tion for the Colored Blind; member of 

gree, summa cum laude, from Straight the Board, Carrie Steele-Pitts, Children's 

College (now Dillard University), New Home; member of the Board, Happy 

Orleans, La., and the B.D. degree, cum Haven Home for the aged and conva- 

laude, from Chicago Theological Semi- lescent; member of the North Office 

■Pa&e : 4 



D.Ed. 

LL.D 

He 



Advisory Committee. Family Service 
Society; member of the Board, Atlanta 
Tuberculosis Association : Moderator. 
Georgia-South Carolina Conference of 
Congregational Churches; member of 
the Commission on the Ministry, Gen- 
tral Council of Congregational Christian 
Churches; visiting professor in the So- 
ciology of Religion. Gammon Theo- 
logical Seminary, Atlanta. Georgia, 
1951-52. 

J. Curtis Dixon 
Commencement Speaker 

J. Curtis Dixon, Vice President and 
Executive Director of the Southern Edu- 
cation Foundation, Atlanta. Georgia, 
will deliver the 73rd Commencement ad- 
dress at Savannah State College on 
Wednesday. June 1. 

Dr. Dixon, who was born in Rich- 
land, Georgia, received the A.B. degree 
from Mercer University; M.A. and 
from Columbia and an honorary 
from Mercer. 

has served as a Fellow on the 
General Education Board of Teachers 
College, Columbia University; Instruc- 
tor, Georgia Military Academy; Princi- 
pal. Dawson, Georgia. High School; 
Superintendent of Schools, Richland, 
Georgia; Assistant Educational Admin- 
istrator. Teachers College, Columbia 
University; Superintendent of Schools. 
Dawson. Georgia: Vice President of 
University System of Georgia; Vice 
President, Mercer University: Dr. Dixon 
became connected with the Southern 
Education Foundation in 1946. 

He is a member of the N.E.A. Asso- 
ciation of School Administrators; Geor- 
gia Education Association. Southern 
Education Association; Kappa Phi Kap- 
pa. Phi Delta Kappa: Kappa Alpha, 
and the Rotary Club. 

Alumni Journal of Savannah 
State Wins First Prize 

First prize for having the most color- 
ful and newsworthy alumni publication 
in the National Alumni Association of 
Colleges was awarded to Savannah State 
College during the 10th convention of 
the association just concluded in Balti- 
more. Wilton C. Scott, public relations 
director for Savannah State College, was 
elected vice president of the association, 
which includes the alumni of 52 col- 
leges. In addition, he serves as area 
president, representing 13 colleges in 
Georgia, Florida and South Carolina. 
There were only four colleges in this 
area in the association when Scott be- 
came area president three years ago. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Alumni on Faculty 
At Savannah State 

Johnnie Smith Hill, 617 West 35th 
Street, Savannah, Ga., is Budget As- 
sistant, the Business Office at Savan- 
State College, Savannah, Ga. (1947) 

Elma Joyce Chapman, 718 E. Ander- 
son, St., Savannah, Ga., is a Clerk in 
Registrar's Office at Savannah State 
College. (1951) 

Marjorie Frazier Wallace, P. 0. Box 
178, Savannah State College, Savannah, 
Ga., is a Clerk in Registrar's Office at 
Savannah State College. (1949) 

Theresa Finch Mention, Box 173, Isle 
of Hope. Savannah, Ga., is a Transcript 
Clerk in Registrar's Office at Savannah 
State College. (1948) 

Eunice M. Wright, 5601 Waters Av- 
enue, Savannah, Ga., is a Secretary in 
Personnel Department at Savannah State 
College. (1950) 

Ann Elizabeth Stevens, 803 Bowden 
St., Savannah, Ga., is Switchboard Op- 
erator at Savannah State College. 

Arthur Colquet Carter, 626 W. 40th 
St., Savannah, Ga., is Masonry Instruc- 
tor at Savannah State College. (1930) 

Alexander Hurse, Savannah State Col- 
lege, Savannah, Ga., is Negro State Club 
Agent, Savannah, Ga. (1934) 

Vera Dowell Brown. Savannah State 
College, Savannah, Ga., is Clerk in the 
Georgia Agricultural Extension Service 
at Savannah State College. (1941) 

Bernice E. Hall, 1013 Cubbedge St.. 
Savannah. Ga., is Secretary in the De- 
partment of Buildings and Grounds at 
Savannah State College. (1951) 

John H. Camper, 512 E. Park Avenue. 
Savannah, Ga.. is Assistant Professor of 
Education at Savannah State College. 
(1947) 

Nelson R. Freeman. 626 W. 45th St., 
Savannah, Ga., is Counsellor of Men 
at Savannah State College. (1948) 

Louise Lautier Owens. Savannah. Ga., 
is Assistant Professor of English at Sa- 
vannah State College. 

(Continued on Page 8) 



TOP PICTURE: Officers of Savannah Chapter, 
SSC Alumni Association. Left lo right, seated. 
Miss Lula Smith, Robert Young (president of local 
chapter), Miss Ruby King,- standing, John Mc- 
Glocklon (president of General Alumni Associa- 
tion), Leonard Law, Miss Eunice Wright, Norman 
Elmore, Mrs. Lucille Andrews, Edward Greene. 

CENTER: Mrs. Doris Taylor Owes and Miss 
Douse are both graduates of Savannah State Col- 
lege. Mrs. Owes is Assistant State Agent and 
Miss Douse is Director of Alfred E. Beach Child 
Care Center in Savannah. 

"MISS GENERAL ALUMNI", Miss Ruby King 
in center with her attendants; left, Miss Ruth 
Mullino and right, Mrs. Loretia Harris. 





ECONOMISTS IN BUSINE 



AND OTHER PROFESSIONS 









MRiS 8 WES 
STATE KMONSTRXTttN km 






Adams Hall is shown in upper piciure. Richard R. Wrighl Hall, new men's dormilory, a new 
building on the campus. Below, a familiar campus scene. 



New Building 
Named at SSC 

The Board of Regents of the Univer- 
sity System of Georgia has approved the 
names for the two new buildings on 
the Savannah State College Campus. 
The buildings are both to be named for 
former presidents of the college. 

The new annex to the gymnasium is 
to be called Cyrus G. Wiley Hall after 
the second president of Savannah State 
College. Mr. Wiley was president for 
five years, after having graduated from 
the High School and College depart- 
ment of the Institution from the gradu- 
ate school of Columbia University. 

The new boys' dormitory is to be 
named Richard R. Wright Hall after 
the first president of Savannah State 
College. 

Richard R. Wright was designated 
President of "Georgia State Industrial 
College for Colored Youth" in 1882. A 
native of Cuthbert, Georgia. Mr. Wright 
graduated from the Old Atlanta Univer- 
sity in 1876. Before becoming presi- 
dent of Georgia State he was principal 
of Ware High School, Augusta, Georgia. 

During his thirty years tenure, the 
enrollment increased from 8 to 585: 
the curriculum was built up to four 
years of high school training and a nor- 
mal division of college work. The first 
mixed class of men and women to finish 
in the Normal department graduated in 
1901 during Major Wright's time. 
Training was offered in Agriculture and 
the Mechanical Arts. Starting the school 
with 86 acres of land on which were 
Boggs Hall, Parsons Hall, and a farm 
house, Major Wright added four frame 
trade buildings, Hill Hall (1901), a 
dairy barn and creamery (1904), a shoe 
repair shop, a laundry and a Home Eco- 
nomics building ( 1915 ) . Since then 
the college has grown to include 136 
acres of land and 33 buildings. 

Homecoming 1955 

Homecoming for 1955 will be on No- 
vember 19 at which time Savannah 
State College will play Claflin College. 
Orangeburg State College. 

The theme for this year will be 
"Cavalcade of Savannah State College." 

Persons or organizations desiring to 
participate should start making plans 
now. Contact Mr. Frank Tharpe, Sa- 
vannah State College, for further in- 
formation. 



Paaie 6 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



55 



Officers and Committees 

of the 

General Alumni Association 

of 

Savannah State College 
1954-1955 

OFFICERS: 

President Mr. J. W. McGlockton 

901 West Broad Street, Savannah, Ga. 

Vice President Mr. L. S. Young 

P. 0. Box, Collins, Ga. 

Recording Secretary Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms 

740 West 45th Street, Savannah, Ga. 

Corresponding Secretary Mrs. Sadie Cartledge 

714 East Anderson Street, Savannah, Ga. 

Treasurer Dean T. C. Meyers 

Savannah State College 

Reporter Mr. Norman Elmore 

2191/2 West 56th Street, Savannah, Ga. 

Committees 

Executive: Committees on Resolutions: 

.„ fr . . , ~ . . {Bereavements) 
a. All officers 01 the General Asso- 
ciation; b. All Chapter Presidents and Mr - R - P - Pinckney, Chairman, West 
Committee Chairmen; c. Key Repre- Victory Drive, Savannah, Ga.; Miss 
sentatives (to be added or deleted as Pauline Stoney, Savannah, Ga.; Mr. 
conditions demand). Geor Sf R° beso »> 92 9 W. 37th St., Sa- 

vannah, Ga. 

Mr. L. D. Law, 1603 Vine St., Savan- Committee on Alumni Office and 

nah, Ga.; Miss Lula Smith, 518 E. Hen- Scrapbook: 

ry St., Savannah, Ga.; Mr. Alexander Mr. Leonard Law, Mr. L. S. Young, 

Hurse, Savannah State College; Mrs. Miss Pauline Stoney, Mrs. Louise 

L. Orene Hall, Albany State College; Owens, Savannah State College; Mrs. 

Mr. C. W. Duvaul, Spencer High School, J. B. Sessoms. 

Columbus, Georgia. Mumni Scholarship and Grant-in-Aid 

Scholarship and Grant-in-Aid Drive: 
Committee: Mr. Ernest Spikes, Chairman; Mr. 

Dean T. C. Myers, Chairman; Mrs. P / inc « J r ack *°"; Assistant Chairman; 

T - • r» • c * r> n x> M r - *-• *-• nail. Assistant Chairman: 

Jimmie Dennis, secretary, r. U. box ,, ,-,, . „ wr 

mr nr n ■ /- • »t t- Mrs. Elsie Jorewton, secretary, West 

105, Woodbine, Georgia; Mr. Emerson 3, , g Savannah Ga • Mrs losie 

r> n l l f\ Tt 1 tt* 1 c 1 i iJ^lii 01., OdVd.iiiia.11, ud.. ivn s. J Dale 

Bynes Ralph 0. Bunche, High School, Sessoms, Assistant Secretary; Mr. M. G. 
Woodbine, Ga.;Mr John W. Myles, Sa- Thomas. Treasurer, 724 W. Victory 
vannah, Ga.; Mr. Prince Jackson, Wil- Dri ve, Savannah, Ga.; Mr. Emerson 
ham James High School, Statesboro, Bynes; Mr. Robert Young, Haven Home 
Ga.; Mr. C. C. Hall, Valdosta, Ga.; Mr. School, Savannah, Ga.; Mrs. Helen 
Howard Seay, 1101% Newton Road, Mayes; Miss Ruth Mullino. Others to 
Albany, Ga.; Mr. Walter Boles, Cuth- be added. Mrs. Bernice Macon, 116 
bert, Ga.; Mr. E. S. Spikes, P. 0. Box Church St., Claxton, Ga.; Mr. Leon 
563, Griffin, Ga.; Mr. J. M. Hill, County Dingle, Pembroke, Ga. 
Agent, Macon, Ga.; Mr. Leonard Law, oxta™™-™ 
1603 Vine St., Savannah, Ga.; Mr. CHAPTERS: 
James Luten, Sandfly, Savannah, Ga. ; Albany Alumni Chapter, Mr. Howard 
Mr. Norman Elmore, 219% W. 56th Seay; Brunswick Alumni Chapter, Miss 
St., Savannah, Ga.; Mr. Frank Tharpe, Wright; Camden County Alumni Chap- 
Savannah State College; Mr. J. E. Clark, ter, E. 0. Bynes; Chatham Coun- 
P. O. Box 165, Glennville, Ga. ty Alumni Chapter, Mr. Robert A. 

THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 




R. R. WRIGHT 
First President of Savannah State 

Young, Darien Alumni Chapter, Chester 
Devillars; Bryan County Alumni Chap- 
ter, Mr. L. Dingle; Evans County Alum- 
ni Chapter, E. R. Gay; Macon 
Alumni Chapter. Mr. Greer: Screven 
County Alumni Chapter, Mr. Willie 
Owens; Tattnall County Alumni Chap- 
ter, Mr. Harold Fields. 

Notice: COMMITTEE on College 
Welfare and Development: Dr. Wra. 
Reese, C. C. Hall, E. Bynes, B. J. James, 
R. A. Young. 




! 





DR. CYRUS GILBERT WILE1 



Page 7 




la»l 





Faculty Achievements 
At Savannah State 

The Ph.D. degree in sociology was 
awarded to Mrs. Joan L. Gordon at the 
University of Pennsylvania in February. 
Dr. Gordon is associate professor of So- 
ciology at Savannah State College. 

The disseration for her doctorate was 
a study of "Some Socio-Economic As- 
pects of Selected Negro Families in Sa- 
vannah: With Special Reference to the 
Effects of Occupational Stratification on 
Child Rearing." 

Dr. Gordon is a member of the Ameri- 
can Sociological Society, American 
Academy of Political and Social Sci- 
ences, National Council for the Social 
Studies. 

Phillip J. Hampton 

Phillip J. Hampton, art instructor at 
Savannah State College, was elected 
president of the National Conference of 
College Art Teachers during the recent 
National Convention held on the campus 
of Florida A. M. University, Talla- 
hassee. Fla. Mr. Hampton participated 
in a panel, "Professional Growth 
Through Productivity." 

The National Conference of College 
Art Teachers met at Florida A. & M. 
University, Tallahassee, Florida, April 
28-30, 1955. The art department under 
the direction of Dr. Samella Lewis, 
Chairman and Mr. Robert Daniels, 
chairman of the program committee put 
into effect a very successful program. 

Mr. Hale Woodruff, one of the lead- 
ing artists of the nation, was guest of 
the conference. Mr. Phillip J. Hampton 
served on a panel discussion with Mr. 
Woodruff, who presided, and Mr. Ran- 
dolph Edmonds, Chairman of the De- 
partment of Speech and Drama at Flor- 
ida A. & M. University. Mr. Woodruff 
is a member of the faculty of New York 
University and was formerly with the 
faculty of Atlanta University. 

(Continued on Page 9) 



HOMECOMING SCENES, 1955: Top picture is 
of Miss Savannah State and her attendants and 
below shows the official reviewing stand in 
front of Central of Georgia Railway Station. 
The third picture shows the Honorable Frank 
Jacocks, City Manager, greeting Dr. and Mrs. 
W. K. Payne with civic leaders and representa- 
tives looking on. Last scene is a portion of 
the huge crowd at the football game. 



57 



Savannah State College News 
Headlines From Periodicals 



Savannah State College Alumni 
Have Xmas Party 

The Savannah State College Alumni 
(Savannah Chapter) enjoyed a wonder- 
ful night of fun at the Christmas party 
on December 27 at the home of R. P. 
Pinckney. 

Leonard D. Law past president was 
presented an inscribed fountain pen in 
recognition of his eight years of service 
as president of the Savannah Chapter. 
Also acknowledgements were given Mrs. 
Margaret Law for the splendid coopera- 
tion she has given the through the years. 

THE HERALD 

Thursday, Jan. 6, 1955 

December Bride and Groom 
Juanita Garnetta Sellers, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Sellers, was wed 
to Dr. Vernon Stone on December 26th. 
The ceremony was solemnized by the 
Rev. A. Franklin Fisher at the home of 
the bride's parents, 1337 Hunter Road, 
Atlanta, Georgia, in the presence of 
friends and relatives. 
THE SAVANNAH TRIBUNE— Jan 4, 
1955 

Dr. Allen Tarish to Speak at College 
Dr. Allen Tarish of the Temple Beth 
Elohin in Charleston, will represent the 
Jewish Chautauqua Society as lecturer 
at Savannah State College. On Jan. 3, 
he will speak at the chapel, 6 p.m. on 
"The Ceremonies and Customs of 
Judaism", and on Jan. 24, he will de- 
liver several classroom lectures. 

The National Federation of Temple 
Brotherhoods sponsors the Jewish 
Chautauqua Society, which sends rabbis 
to colleges as part of an educational 
program to disseminate authentic infor- 
mation concerning Judaism — SAVAN- 
NAH MORNING NEWS— Friday, Jan. 
7, 1955 

Savannah State Students To Study 
job Placements 

A senior job placement conference 
will be held at Savannah State College 
on Saturday beginning at 9 a.m. Per- 
tinent information concerning the pro- 
cess of getting jobs will be given. 

One of the highlights of the con- 
ference will be a panel discussion on 
"Competences and Behavior Employes 
Expect of Employes". Dr. Calvin Kiah, 
chairman of the department of educa- 
tion will serve as coordinator. Others 



taking part include: W. W. McCune. 
assistant superintendent of Chatham 
County Schools; Sidney A. Jones, 
owner, Sidney A. Jones Funeral Home; 
Mrs. Sophonia Thompkins. Principal. 
Woodville High School, and W. B. Nel- 
son, director of the Savannah State 
College Trade and Industries.— SAVAN- 
NAH MORNING NEWS— Friday Jan. 
7, 1955 

Henry Bowman, Savannah State Col- 
lege second assistant coach, died here 
(Orangeburg) Thursday night at 
Orangeburg Regional Hospital, accord- 
ing to an announcement by Dr. W. K. 
Payne, president of the institution where 
he worked. 

In addition to his coaching duties. 
Mr. Bowman was an instructor in In- 
dustrial Education at Savannah State 
College. 

Mr. Bowman succombed in the same 
hospital where John H. Martin, former 
head coach at Savannah State College 
and South Carolina State College passed 
a week ago. He had worked with Martin 
when the former was coaching at Sa- 
vannah State. — ATLANTA DAILY 
WORLD— Jan. 16, 1955 

College Again Included in Chemistry 

The Chemical Rubber Company of 
Cleveland, Ohio has again included Sa- 
vannah State College along with several 
other colleges and universities in the 
United States, to participate in the 
"freshman chemistry achievement 
award". This was announced by C. 
Vernon Clay chairman of the depart- 
ment of chemistry. This award is given 
annually to the student who was the 
most outstanding in the first year of 
chemistry. —SAVANNAH MORNING 
NEWS— Feb. 6, 1955 

Negro Colleges will Sponsor Players, Inc. 
Savannah State College will present 
Players Incorporated of Washington, D. 
C, In Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" in 
Meldrim Auditorium at 8:30 p.m.. 
Thursday, Feb. 10, it was announced 
yesterday by Dr. C. A. Braitwaite, 
chairman of the Lyceum Committee, 
which is sponsoring the event. Admis- 
sion will be free. —SAVANNAH 
MORNING NEWS— Feb. 6, 1955. 

(Continued on Page 17) 



FACULTY ACHIEVEMENTS 

(Continued from Page 8) 

William J. Holloivay 

William J. Holloway, Director of Stu- 
dent Personnel and Dean of Men at Sa- 
vannah State College, was one of 14 
persons selected by the distinguished 
National Awards Jury to receive the 
George Washington Honor Medal 
Award. 

Dean Holloway was selected on the 
basis of his public address, "Clear and 
Present Dangers", in which he stated 
. . . Only by a continuous re-examina- 
tion of old ideas and a healthy flow of 
new ideas will we find the solutions to 
the present problems facing free men 
in a free society . . ." 

Dean Holloway's address was cited as 
an outstanding achievement in helping 
to bring about a better understanding 
of the American Way of Life dyring 
1954. 

The awards were announced on Feb- 
ruary 22 by the Trustees, Directors and 
Officers of Freedoms Foundation at 
Valley Forge. Among the other win- 
ners were: Hon. Ezra Taft Benson, 
Washington, D. C; Herbert Brownell, 
Jr., Washington, D.C. ; Charles A. Lind- 
bergh, Darien, Conn.; John Howland 
Snow, New York, N. Y.; Francis Cardi- 
nal Spellman, New York, N. Y. 



Elmer J. Dean 
The Ed.D. degree in History was 
awarded to Elmer J. Dean at Columbia 
University recently. Dr. Dean is chair- 
man of the department of Social Science 
at Savannah State College, Savannah, 
Georgia. He received the Bachelor of 
Arts degree from Kentucky State Col- 
lege and the Master of Arts degree from 
Columbia University. The subject of 
his doctoral disseration is "Social 
Studies in the Negro High Schools of 
Georgia, 1952." 

Dr. Dean holds membership in the 
National Council for the Social Studies, 
Board of Derectors of the National 
Council for the Social Studies, Co-Chair- 
man for the State of Georgia on the 
Professional Relations Committee of 
the National Council for the Social 
Studies, Phi Delta Kappa Honorary So- 
ciety, American Academy of Political 
and Social Science, American Associa- 
tion of University Professors, Associa- 
tion of Social Studies Teachers, and the 
Georgia Teachers and Education Asso- 
ciation. He has been affiliated with Sa- 
vannah State College since 1948. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 9 



Achievements of 
SS Alumni 

In 1907, there came to the Georgia 
State Industrial College, now Savannah 
State College, a youth from Lumpkin, 
Georgia, R.F.D., Stewart County, deter- 
mined to fight his way up the ladder 
to educational, professional and business 
attainments. 

Strong of body, and mentally deter- 
mined, the inconveniences of financial 
difficulties were swept aside by Joseph 
Griffin's ambition to learn and to be. 
He graduated with honors, being the 
valedictorian of his class. 

He matriculated at Meharry Medi- 
cal College, Nashville, Tennessee, with 
the same determination and industrious- 
ness. He received his M.D. degree, and 
was honored with the Presidency and 
Valedictory of the medical class, which 
graduated ninety-six. 

Dr. Griffin came to Bainbridge, lo- 
cated in Southwest Georgia, where the 
people were in great need of surgical 
assistance and hospitalization. 

The young medic was determined to 
bring improvement to this major health 
problem, and to better prepare for this 
service, he did graduate study in the 
eastern and northern medical centers, 
and affiliated himself in all clinical and 
medical associations in the South which 
were open to members of his race. 

Because of his efficiency in the pro- 
fession, and loyalty to organized medi- 
cine, he has been honored with offices 
in all of the major clinical and medical 
societies of his racial group. 

He organized the Southeastern Medi- 
cal Society, an organization which has 
brought to this section some of the most 
outstanding specialists in the Surgical, 
Medical and Pharmaceutical fields. 

In June 1954, he was honored by- 
Morris Brown College, Atlanta, Geor- 
gia, in a special ceremony and received 
the degree of Doctor of Humanities. 

Dr. Griffin married Miss Elain L. 
Johnson, graduate of Fisk University. 
Nashville, Tennessee. 



Taken From Southwest Georgian, 
February 25, 1955 

Mr. 0. J. Watson holds the distinction 
of being Albany's first Negro bonded 
real estate agent. Mr. Watson recently 

{Continued on Page 12) 



Scenes from Talent Sh 



Sponsored By th 







Edward law singing, "Count Your Blessings.' 



Sol Harden 




Mrs. Robert Young singing while Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Lewis renew old love. 



Pag* 10 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



53 



"Stars Among Stars" 

iiniah Chapter 





'Big" John Myles and Mrs. Virginia R. Blalock in a 
creative dance. 




Trades, Industry, 
Plays Roll at SSC 

Another milestone was reached and a 
beacon light installed pointing the direc- 
tion in which Savannah State College 
was promoting a program to aid in meet- 
ing the needs of the citizenry of Georgia 
and America. The installation of this 
beacon was started on Thursday, March 
24, and closed on Saturday, March 26. 

The Division of Trades and Industries 
of Savannah State College under the di- 
rection of William B. Nelson, support- 
ed by A. Z. Traylor, Itinerant Teacher 
Trainer in Trades and Industries Edu- 
cation for the State and Staff members 
in the Division, other faculty members, 
and approved by President William K. 
Payne, conducted the fifth state-wide 
trade contest for high school boys and 
girls taking any type of Vocational or 
Industrial Arts work in the State of 
Georgia. Mr. Nelson was assisted in this 
venture by the following staff members: 
Leroy W. Brown, Frank D. Tharpe. 
Arthur C. Carter, Charles Philson, Eu- 
gene Isaac, Sol Harden, Mrs. Martha 
Avery, Nurses A. L. Taylor and Holmes 
and the following students: Homer 
Bryson, Walter McCall, Perry Holmes. 
Prince F. Wynn, James Ashe, Eddie 
McKissick, Avella Farmer. James O'Neal 
and Clarence Lofton, Wanza Appling. 
Charles Pugh. and William Fletcher. 

Participants from the following 
schools took part in some phases of the 
contest: Ballard-Hudson, Macon; Black- 
well Memorial, Elberton; Booker T. 
Washington. Atlanta; Dasher High 
School. Vidalia; Monroe High, Albany; 
Monitor High School, Fitzgerald; Moul- 
trie High School, Moultrie; Risley High 
School. Brunswick; Spencer High 
School, Columbus; and Thomaston 
Training School. Thomaston. 



s. Ruby Keye sings "April Showers" with Demonsiraiion by Mrs. Elsie A. Brewion, 
Miss Christine Wright and Mrs. Nadine Lewis. 



Summer Schedule 

The first Session of Summer School 
will begin June 8 and last through July 
13. with the short session being held 
June 27 — July 13. 

The Second Session will be held July 
14 — August 18, and the short session 
August 2-18. 

For more information concerning 
Summer School, please contact Dr. E. 
K. Williams, Director of Summer School 
or Ben Ingersoll, Registrar. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 11 




CLASS 1902 
BENJAMIN F. LAWTON, 2062. Ma- 
son Street. Columbus. Georgia, is a 
teacher at the Spencer High School, Co- 
lumbus. Georgia. He has done ad- 
vanced study at the Tuskegee Instiitute. 

CLASS 1925 

CHARLES WESLEY DUVAUL. 501A 
18th Street, Columbus, Georgia, is the 
Principal at Spencer High School, Co- 
lumbus. Georgia. He has done ad- 
vanced study at Atlanta University, New 
York University. Columbia University 
and Michigan State. 




DR. HENRY COLLIER, JR. 
Master of Ceremonies for Alumni Banquet 

CLASS 1930 

MRS. NANCY THOMAS COLLIER, 
was married to the late Dr. N. H. Col- 
lier, also an alumnus of Savannah State 
College. She is the daughter of Donald 
Thomas, the only negro glazier in Sa- 
vannah. 

Mrs. Collier is a member of the Sig- 
ma Gamma Rho Sorority. Big Gift Com- 
munity Chest. Y.M.C.A., and T.B. As- 
sociation. 

CLASS 1932 

VERNON L. RHANEY, 516 West 
39th Street. Savannah, Georgia, is in 
the Math Department at the Alfred E. 
Beach High School, Savannah, Georgia. 
He received the Master's Degree from 
New York University. 



Class 1933 

JOHN H. SMITH. 2939 Hood Street. 
Columbus. Georgia, is teaching at the 
Spencer High School. Columbus. Geor- 
gia. He has done advanced study at 
the University of Pittsburgh and N. C. 
College in Durham. 

CLASS 1935 

VIRGINIA S. WYNN, 1312 Bur- 
roughs Street. Savannah. Georgia, is 
teaching at the Beach High School, Sa- 
vannah. Georgia. She received the Mas- 
ter's Degree from Atlanta University in 
1950. She is the former Miss Virginia 
Smith. 

OLA BASS DINGLE, 634 West 34th 
Street. Savannah. Georgia, in the ele- 
mentary department of the Springfield 
Terrace School. Savannah. Georgia. She 
has done advanced study at Atlanta Uni- 
versity. She is the former Miss Ola B. 
Bass. 

DOROTHY ADAMS. 2413 Florence 
Street, Savannah, Georgia, is teaching 
at Woodville High School, Savannah. 
Georgia. 

ELMER 0. BYNES. P. O. Box 101, 
Woodbine. Georgia, is principal at the 
Ralph J. Bunche High School, Wood- 
bine, Georgia. He has done advanced 
study at Atlanta University. 

JOSEPH B. MAXWELL, P. O. Box 
12, Hahira. Georgia, is teaching in Ha- 
hira. Georgia. 

CLASS 1936 
ROBERT YOUNG, R.F.D. 3, Box 
351, Savannah. Georgia, is teaching 
at the Haven Home School, Savannah. 
Georgia. He received the Master's De- 
gree from Cornell University. 

CLASS 1937 
DOROTHY B. FULLER, 513 West 
40th Street, Savannah, Georgia, is the 
Mathematics Teacher at the Cuyler Jr. 
High School, Savannah, Georgia. She 
has done advanced study at Atlanta Uni- 
versity. 

CLASS 1938 
RUFUS R. BUTLER,. Box 141 States- 
boro, Georgia, is the Vocational Agri- 
culture Instructor at William James 
High School, Statesboro, Georgia. He 
has done advanced study at Tuskegee 
Institute. 

{Continued on Page 13) 



ALUMNI ACHIEVEMENTS 
{Continued from Page 10) 

completed his apprenticeship and passed 
the Board of Realtors examination. He 
is now operating the Watson Realty Ex- 
change. Energetic Mr. Watson is active 
in both religious and civic affairs in 
the city. 

He is president of the choir at Mt. 
Zion Baptist Church in Albany where 
he teaches a Sunday School Class, and 
serves on the Trustee Board. He is a 
member of the Omega Psi Phi Fra- 
ternity and numerous social and civic 
organizations. 

Mr. Watson graduated from Savan- 
nah State College in June. 1938. 



Walter J. Leonard is a Federal Cor- 
rection Officer in Atlanta, Georgia. He 
spoke recently to the students at Savan- 
nah State College on the opportunities 
open in the federal government for 
qualified persons. 

He is married to the former Bettye 
Singleton, class of '51, also an alumnus 
of Savannah State College. 



Dr. Henry M. Collier 
Dr. Henry M. Collier, Jr., Physician 
and Surgeon, Savannah, Georgia, re- 
ceived the A.B. degree from Savannah 
State College in 1935. M.D., MeHarry 
Medical College; A.M.E.. F.S., School 
of Aviation Medicine. 

He has served as Science Teacher, 
Dickerson County Training School, 
1935-36. Supervisor, Savannah Boys 
Club, 1936-37. Flight Surgeon USAF 
and Unit Commander 35th Tactical Hos- 
pital, Yokota Air Base, Japan. 1953-55. 

Dr. Collier holds membership in the 
Medical Association, Georgia State 
Medical Association of Physicians and 
Pharmacists. South Atlantic Medical So- 
ciety, First African Baptist Church, Al- 
pha Phi Alpha Fraternity and President, 
Hub Civic Club. Dr. Collier is married 
to the former Mozelle Gaithers, also an 
alumnus of Savannah State College, 
class of 1947. 



Dr. Stephen M. McDew 
Dr. S. M. McDew was born September 
22. 1912, in Ocilla, Georgia. His family 
moved to Savannah where he attended 
the public schools, finished Georgia 
State High School in 1929 and later re- 
ceived his B.S. degree in science from 
Georgia State College in 1934. 

{Continued on Page 13) 



Pape 12 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



(o 



Young Journalists Study 

New Techniques at Press Institute 



By William Gordon, 
Man-aging Editor, Atlanta Daily World 

Students and advisors, representing 16 
Georgia elementary and high schools 
spent four days at Savannah State 
College last week-end getting new tech- 
niques on how to edit and publish a 
"good newspaper". 

Wilton Scott, public relations director 
at Savannah State College and coordi- 
nator of the Institute said. "It was one 
of the best and most enthusiastic we 
have had." 

Mr. Scott also said he was amazed 
at the interest on the part of schools all 
over the state in this year's program 
and added that many schools not pre- 
sent at the Institute, expressed a desire 
to attend meetings there. 

The purpose of the Institute, Mr. 
Scott said, "Is to help elementary and 
high schools advisors and editors under- 
stand the fundamentals and principals 
of mass communications as well as learn- 
ing to develop techniques correct re- 
porting and editing the news." 

The program was under the direction 
of Walter Leftwich. Mr. Leftwich also 
took part in several of the discussion 
groups and served as a consultant in 
seminars. 

Under the leadership of President W. 
K. Payne, the Press Institute actually 
got started five years ago. The initial 
meeting was for members of Savannah 
State College newspaper only. At this 
meeting the groundwork was laid for the 
establishing of a statewide program. 

At the previous meeting over a 150 
delegates were in attendance as well as 
30 faculty advisors and 60 observers. 
The Institute has grown to include a 
radio announcers program. 

In order to establish greater interest 
and participation, various schools have 
been given trophies for the best edited 
and best planned newspaper. The 
trophies given in the recent Institute 
were given by the Atlanta Daily World 
staff members, including C. A. Scott. 
editor and general manager, have taken 
an interest in the Press Institute, at Sa- 
vannah State College. Mr. Scott made it 
possible for six trophies to be presented 
at the recent Institute. 




Beautiful home of Mrs. Nancy Collier on 
Vic*o;y Drive in Savannah, Ga. 

ALUMNI NEWS 

(Continued from Page 12) 

CLAUDE W. CARPENTER, 300 5th 

Street, Columbus, Georgia, is the Trades 

and Industries Teacher at Spencer High 

School, Columbus, Georgia. 

CLASS 1938 
LOUISE DAVIS EDWARDS, Log 
Cabin Centre, Mayfield, Georgia, is the 
Home Economics Teacher at the Spring- 
field H&I School, Mayfield, Georgia. 
She has done advanced study at Atlanta 
University. 

(Continued on Page 14) 




MRS. NANCY COLLIER 
An alumna of Savannah Slate 



ALUMNI ACHIEVEMENT 

(Continued from Page 12 j 

He began matriculation in MeHarrv 
Medical College's School of Dentistry, 
later changing to the School of Medi- 
cine, and received his M.D. degree in 
medicine in 1939. He was selected as 
one of the top ten men of his class, and 
did his interneship as well as his resi- 
dency at MeHarry, with Gynecology 
and obstetrics as a specialty. 

In 1941 he returned to Savannah to 
begin practice of medicine, specializing 
in Women's Diseases. 

He is a member of the South Atlantic 
Medical Society, Georgia State Asso- 
ciation of Physicians and Pharmicists, 
National Medical Association, member 
of staff of Charity Hospital, and of 
Memorial Hospital of Chatham County. 
MeHarry Alumni. Homer G. Phillips 
Interne Council. 

He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha 
Fraternity, St. Stevens Episcopal 
Church, The Hub Civic Organization of 
Savannah, YMCA, NAACP, and is col- 
lege physician of Savannah State Col- 
lege. Dr. McDew is married to the for- 
mer Mary Bradley of South Bend, In- 
diana, has two children. Frieda Pauline 
and Stephanie Maria. 

Albert S. Bacon 
New State Agriculture Agent 

Albert S. Bacon was born in Brooks 
County, where he received his early ed- 
ucation. He later came to Savannah 
State College where he received the B.S. 
degree in agriculture in 1938. 

While in high school he won first 
prize in a State-wide Cotton Contest as 
well as in a Corn Contest and later was 
voted Highest-Ranking Student in the 
Senior Class. 

In college, he wrote the best essay 
on Soil Conservation and in his senior 
year was the Highest Ranking Senior 
and was voted best albround student at 
Georgia State College. 

In 1951, he received a grant from the 
Farm Foundation to study for a year at 
the University of Minnesota, where he 
received the M.S. degree in 1952. 

Mr. Bacon is a member of St. Mat- 
thew's Episcopal Church, American 
Farm Economic Association and Adult 
Education Association. 

He is married and has one child. 

(Continued On Page 14) 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 13 



A Financial Statement of 

The Savannah State College Alumni 

Scholarship Fund 

AS OF NOVEMBER 12, 1954 

1. Balance on deposit in Carver Savings Bank 

as of June 1, 1954 $2,335.68 

2. Contributions received from June 26 

through November 10, 1954 94.50 

Mr. L. Allen $ -50 

Mrs. L. Atkinson 3.00 

Mr. B. Brown 1-00 

Mrs. M. Council 10.00 

Mrs. F. Golden 10.00 

Mrs. N. Hopkins 5.00 

Miss Lemons 5.00 

Mrs. L. Mabry 5.00 

Mrs. M. Roberts 10.00 

Mrs. L. Rucker 10.00 

St. Matthews Episcopal Church Men's Club 15.00 

Mr. P. Smalls 2.00 

Mr. D. Thomas 10.00 

Mr. A. Waters 5.00 

Mrs. M. Weatherspoon 1.00 

Mr. A. Williams 1.00 

Mr. I. Williams 1.00 

$94.50 

3. Interest credited to the account as of July 1, 1954 12.76 

4. Total money received, as of November 10, 1954 2.442.94 

5. Expenditures 2,381.96 

To Savannah State College for grant-in-aid 

assistance $2,376.50 

To College Center 2.06 

To. Mrs. Dennis & Mr. W. Anderson 2.50 

Stamps -90 

$2,381.96 

6. Balance on deposit in Carver Savings Bank 

as of November 10, 1954 60.98 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. C. Meyers, General Treasurer 

November 12, 1954 



ALUMNI NEWS 
{Continued from Page 13) 
ROSALYN DAVIS, 514 West 34th 
Street, Savannah, Georgia, is teaching 
at The Haven Home School, Savannah, 
Georgia. She received the Master's De- 
gree from Columbia University. She is 
the former Miss Rosalyn Jackson. 

CLASS 1939 
MARY B. PEARSON, 534 East 32nd 
Street, Savannah, Georgia, is Secretary 
to the Division of General Extension. 
Savannah State College, Savannah, 
Georgia. She is the former Miss Mary 
Beaton. 



JOHN T. O'NEAL, Box 391, Madi- 
son, Georgia, teaches Vocational Agri- 
culture at the Pearl High School, Madi- 
son, Georgia. He has done advanced 
study at Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee. 
Alabama. 

MRS. MATTIE THARPE COPE- 
LAND, P. 0. Box 350, Madison, Geor- 
gia, is Home Demonstration Agent in 
Madison. Georgia. Mrs. Copeland was 
formerly Miss Mattie Tharpe. 

CLASS 1940 

ELSIE ADAMS BREWTON, Hardee- 
ville, South Carolina, is the Girls' Bas- 
ketball Coach and Girls' Counsellor. She 



ALUMNI ACHIEVEMENT 

{Continued from Page 13 I 
T. J. HOPKINS 
Lieutenant Colonel T. J. Hopkins was 
educated in the public schools of Sa- 
vannah, graduated from the High School 
Department of Georgia State College 
and from Howard University in Elec- 
trical Engineering. He has been an 
electrical Engineer and Contractor in 
Savannah since 1928 except for three 
years and eight months when he was in 
the Army and served as Operations Of- 
ficer and Intelligence Officer for the 
369th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Group 
guarding Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, Com- 
mander of the 1st Battalion 1322 En- 
gineer G. S. Regiment, and Operations 
Officer for the 1312 Engineer G. S. 
Regiment in Luzon in the Philippine 
Islands. He has served as the Chairman 
of the Board of Managers for the Car- 
negie Library, Past District Commander 
of District A, American Legion Post, 
Past Commander of the Vance Allison 
Post No. 2933, V.F.W., Past President 
of the Mutual Benevolent Society, Past 
President of the Savannah Chapter of 
the Howard University Alumni, Vice 
President of the Electrical Contractors' 
Association of Savannah, Basileus of Mu 
Phi Chapter, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, 
a member of the Hub, Omar Temple 
Order of Mystic Shrine. President of 
the Pan Hellenic Council, Assistant Di- 
rector of Civil Defense, Chairman of the 
Building and Property Committee of the 
Board of Managers for the West Broad 
Street Y.M.C.A.. a member of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee for the Profect Sabre 
and a member of St. Matthew's Episco- 
pal Church. 



is the former Miss Elsie Adams. 

ROGER B. JONES, 811 Googe Street, 
Savannah. Georgia, is teaching in the 
High School Department at the Wood- 
ville High School, Savannah. Georgia. 
He has done advanced study at Atlanta 
University. 

CLASS 1941 

MRS. PANSY LEE BROWN, 912 
Waters Avenue, Savannah, Georgia, is 
the Home Economics instructor at Lib- 
erty County High School, Mcintosh, 
Georgia. She has done additional study 
at Savannah State College. 

{Continued on Page 15) 



Page 14 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



(o^j 



ALUMNI NEWS 
(Continued from Page 14) 

MISS MIRIAM FRANCES GRANT, 
2006 Harden Street, Savannah, Georgia, 
is the Home Economics instructor at 
A. E. Beach High School. She has 
done additional study at Columhia Uni- 
versity. 

CLASS 1941 

ODESSA A. HALL. 21 Blitch Street. 
Statesboro, Georgia, is an Elementary 
Teacher at William James High School, 
Statesboro. Georgia. She has done ad- 
vance study at Columbia University. 
Mrs. Hall was formerly Miss Odessa 
M. Allen. 




MAECO DAVID WATERS 
Class of 1915 

JOHN CAESAR KING, 8 Boozer 

Street. Hogansville, Georgia, is a teach- 
er at West End High School. Hogans- 
ville. Georgia. He has done advanced 
study at Tuskegee Institute. Tuskegee. 
Alabama. 

MRS. ANNE TALLEY HUDSON, 

430 2nd Avenue, Columbus, Georgia, is 
a Clothing Instructor at Spencer High 
School, Columbus. Georgia. She has 
done advanced study at Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

CLASS 1942 

SAMUEL C. WILLIAMS, R.F.D. No. 
1, Box 18, Culverton, Georgia, is the 
teacher of Vocational Agriculture, at 
the Springfield A&I School, Mayfield, 
Georgia. 

MARY 0. JACKSON, 724 East 38th 
Street, Savannah, Georgia, is teaching 



at the Paulsen Street School, Savannah. 
Georgia. She has done advanced study 
at Atlanta University and Tuskegee In- 
stitute. 

VIRGINIA R. BLALOCK. 1021 West 
41st Street, Savannah, Georgia, is teach- 
ing at Springfield Terrace, Savannah, 
Georgia. She has done advanced study 
at Columbia University, New York City. 
She has also received the Master's De- 
gree. She was the former Miss Vir- 
ginia Robinson. 

JOHN H. MYLES, 612 East 34th 
Street, Savannah, Georgia, is the teach- 
er of Physical Education at the Haven 
Home School, Savannah, Georgia. He 
received the Master's Degree in 1951, 
and has done advanced study toward 
the Doctor of Education Degree. 

PERCY HUNTER STONE, JR.. is 
principal of the Patrick Central High 
School in Stuart, Virginia. Mr. Stone 
graduated with the B.S. degree in Agri- 
culture, and in 1952 received the M.S. 
degree from the University of Connecti- 
cut. 

CLASS 1944 

BENJAMIN GORDON, attended the 
public schools of Washington County, 
graduating from T. J. Elder High 
School. Sandersville, Georgia, in June 
1940. He entered Savannah State Col- 
lege in September of the same year, hav- 
ing to leave to join the armed services. 
After a tour of military duty, he re- 
turned to this college, graduating in 
1944 with the B.S. degree in Biology. 

He was enrolled in Howard Univer- 
sity's graduate school for one year, leav- 
ing to become a statistical clerk at the 
Census Bureau, Washington. D. C, and 
later a postal clerk in the Washington 
Post Office. He remained there until he 
entered the Howard University Dental 
School in 1950, graduating in 1954. 

While at Howard, he was a member 
of the student division of the American 
Dental Association and the Chi Delta 
Nu Fraternity. 

Dr. Gordon is licensed by both the 
Georgia State Board of Dental exam- 
iners and the National Board of Dental 
Examiners. He practices in the city of 
Savannah at 901 West Broad Street. 

He is a member of the Chatham 
Dental Society, Savannah Alumni Chap- 
ter of Howard University and Savannah 
State Alumni Association. 

CLASS 1944 
ESTHER MAE SHERMAN, 26 Sun- 
set Avenue, N.E., Atlanta, Georgia, is a 
(Continued on Page 16) 



ALUMNI ON FACULTY 
{Continued from Page. 5) 

Doris Harris, Savannah State College. 
Savannah, Ga., is Cashier, Business Of- 
fice at Savannah State College. (1949) 

George Miller, Savannah, Ga., is 
Bookkeeper, Business Office at Savan- 
nah State College. (1951) 

Varnetta Frazier, Savannah State Col- 
lege, is Dietitian at Savannah State Col- 
lege. 

Josephine France Hubert, Savannah. 
Ga., is Secretary and Assistant in the 
Division of Arts and Sciences at Sa- 
vannah State College. (1951) 

Dorothy Boston Wilson, Savannah. 
Ga., is Secretary in the Office of Geor- 
gia Agricultural Extension Service. 

Ruth Dobson, Savannah, Ga., is Critic- 
Teacher, Powell Laboratory School, Sa- 
vannah State College. (1950) 

Eldora Dixon Marks, Savannah, Ga.. 
is Critic Teacher, Powell Laboratory 
School. Savannah State College. ( 1949 ) 

Roberta Glover Webb Savannah, Ga.. 
Secretary to Dean of Faculty, Savannah 
State College. ( 1954) 

Mary Sullivan. Secretary in Library 
at Savannah State College. (1954) 

Gwendolyn Lester Bass, Savannah 
State College. Secretary to Director of 
Public Relations. Savannah State Col- 
lege. 

Collis S. Florence. Savannah State 
College, Manager of College Center, Sa- 
vannah State College. 




MRS. LUCILE DIXON WILEY was the wife of 
the lale Cyrus C. Wiley, second president oi 
Savannah Slate College. She was educated in 
the public schools of Savannah and at Georgia 
State College. Mrs. Wiley has taught in the 
Valdosia public school system, served as House 
Counselor at Morris Brown, College and for 15 
years, until her retirement in 1950, she worked 
at Albany State College. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 15 



ALUMNI NEWS 

[Continued from Page 15) 

teacher at Fair Street High School. 
Gainesville. Georgia. She has clone ad- 
vanced study at Atlanta University, At- 
lanta. Georgia. 

VIRGINIA C. FLOYD, 705 West 
Gwinnett Street, Savannah, Georgia, is 
a teacher at the East Broad Street 
School, Savannah, Georgia. She was the 
former Miss Virginia Cory. 

HATTIE V. OVERSTREET. 1505 
Reynolds Street. Savannah, Georgia, 
teaches Social Science at Screven Coun- 
ty Training School. Sylvania, Georgia. 
Mrs. Overstreet was formerly Miss Hat- 
tie V. Smith. 




H. M. Collier's Home on Mills B. Lane Avenue 
in Savannah, Ga. 

DOROTHY 0. THOMPSON, 4154 
Swann Street. Columbus. Georgia, 
teaches at Spencer High School. Colum 
bus. Georgia. She has done advanced 
study at Florida A. and M. College and 
Atlanta University. Mrs. Thompson was 
formerly Miss Dorothy 0. Jackson. 

CLASS 1945 

BESSIE McLENDON GILLIS. Vi- 
dalia, Georgia, is the Jeanes Supervisor 
at the Risley High School, Brunswick, 
Georgia. She received the Master of 
Education Degree from New York Uni- 
versity. She was the former Miss Bessie 
J. Gillis. 

MARY SHAW HARPE. P. 0. Box 

292, Arlington, Georgia, is a Home Eco- 
nomics Teacher at Arlington High 



School, Arlington. Georgia. She has 
done advanced study at Tuskegee Insti- 
tute. Tuskegee. Alabama. Mrs. Harpe 
was formerly Miss Mary Allen Shaw. 

FRANCIS McBRIDE. 1420 West 
Hancock Street, Athens, Georgia, is an 
elementary teacher at the East Athens 
School. Athens, Georgia. 

Mrs. McBride is the former Frances 
Eberhart and is a native of Athens, 
Georgia. She received her Master's 
Degree in Education from Atlanta Uni- 
versity in 1953 and since that time has 
done further graduate study there in 
the field of elementary education. 

Mrs. McBride is married to Willie 
Howard McBride who graduated in 
1949. Mr. McBride is principal of the 
Pinson Street School, Newman, Georgia. 

LOUISE BING ROBERTS, 95 
Wheaton Street, Savannah. Georgia, is 
teaching at the Haven Home School, 
Savannah. Georgia. She has done ad- 
vanced study at Atlanta University, At- 
lanta, Georgia. She is the former Miss 
Louise Bing. 

MAIZIE BELL WELSON. 619 West 
37th Street, Savannah, Georgia, is the 
Home Economics Teacher at the Wood- 
ville High School. Savannah. Georgia. 
She has done advanced study at At- 
lanta University. 

LEAH S. GREENE. 212 East Park 
Avenue, Savannah. Georgia, is teaching 
at Florence Street School. Savannah, 
Georgia. She received the Master's De- 
gree from the Teachers College. Colum- 
bia University. New York City. She 
is the former Miss Leah Skipper. 

CLASS 1946 

WILLIAM E. McMULLEN, P. 0. Box 
312, Sparta. Georgia, is a teacher at 
Old Beulah High School. Devereux. 
Georgia. He has done advanced study 
at Atlanta University. 

CARLTON MORSE, P. 0. Box 297. 
Sparta, Georgia, is the Princinal at the 
L. S. Ingraham High School, Sparta, 
Georgia. He received his Master's De- 
gree from Atlanta University in 1951. 

JOHN EDWARD ROBINSON. P. 0. 
Box 317. Hogansville, Georgia, is the 
Principal at the West End High School, 
Hogansville. Georgia. Fie received the 
Master's Degree from Atlanta Univer- 
sity. 

MARIE B. MARTIN. Box 410 Madi- 
son, Georgia, is the Jeanes Supervising 
Teacher. Madison. Georgia. She re- 



ceived the Master's Degree from Atlanta 
University and has done additional 
study at Columbia LIniversity, New York 
City. Mrs. Martin was the former Miss 
Emma Marie Bass. 

SAMUEL L. LESTER, Savannah 
State College. Savannah, Georgia, is the 
assistant principal and mathematics 
teacher at the Patrick Central High 
School, Stuart, Virginia. He has done 
advanced s'udy at Atlanta University. 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

CLASS 1947 

JAMES E. McMULLEN. P. O. Box 
357, Sparta, Georgia, is a principal in 
Hancock County, Sparta, Georgia. He 
has done advanced study at the Uni- 
versity of Indiana. 

MARY L. JORDAN, 644 N. Main 
Street, Madison, Georgia, is a teacher 
at Ebenezer School, Madison Georgia. 
She has done advanced study at Atlanta, 
Georgia. 

ARYE ELIZABETH ROBINSON, Box 

414, Cairo. Georgia, is a teacher at 
West End High School, Hogansville, 
Georgia. Mrs Robinson was formerly 
Arye Elizabeth Rakestraw. 

MRS. OLA B. JOHNSON 32 Poplar 
Street. Hogansville. Georgia, is a teach 
cr at West End High School, Hogans- 




DR. ALFRED J. ELKINS 
Class of 1905, Cincinnati, Ohio 

ville, Georgia. She has done advanced 
study at Atlanta University. She was 
formerly Miss Ola Mae Byrd. 

(Continued on Page 17) 



Page 16 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



65 



ALUMNI NEWS 

{Continued from Page 16) 

CLASS 1947 

SULA G. HAYNES, 1108 East 61st 
Street, Savannah. Georgia, is teaching 
in the Elementary Department at the 
East Broad Street School, Savannah. 
Georgia. She is the former Miss Sula 
Gamble. 

WILMA B. HOPKINS, 618 West 41st 
Street, Savannah. Georgia, is the Home 
Economics Teacher at the Woodville 




'W«»;' 




Odest Watson (sealed). Realtor in Albany, Ga. 

Walson is ex-presideni of S.S.C's Alumni 

at Albany. 

High School, Savannah, Georgia. She 
is the former Miss Wilma Bailey. 

MARGARET M. WILLIAMS, 1104 
Byrd Street, Savannah, Georgia. She is 
the Jeanes Supervisor in Jesup, Geor- 
gia. She has done advanced study at 
Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia. 
She is the former Miss Margaret May- 
nor. 

CLASS 1948 

EVA C. HUBERT, Route 2, Box 78, 
Mayfield, Georgia, is teaching at the 
Beulah Elementary School. Culverton, 
Georgia. 

MARIE SCANTLING McMULLEN, 
P. 0. Box 357. Sparta, Georgia, is a 
teacher at the Warren Elementary 
School, Sparta, Georgia. She has done 
advanced study at Indiana University. 
She was formerly Miss Marie Scantling. 



IDA RUTH DOWERS, Box 61, 

Waynesboro. Georgia, is a Home Eco- 
nomics Teacher at Waynesboro H&I 
School. Waynesboro, Georgia. 

ELISE JOYCE KENT. 222 Bulloch 
Street. Statesboro, Georgia, is a teacher 
at the William James High School. 
Statesboro. Georgia. She has done ad- 
vanced study at Columbia University. 

LILLA ASHE JONES, Box 2 01. 
Greensboro, Georgia, she is a teacher at 
Mount Zion School. Buckhead, Georgia. 
She was formerly Miss Lilla Ashe. 

CARRIE B. POWELL, Savannah 
State College, Savannah. Georgia, is the 
assistant Negro State 4-H Club Agent 
in Savannah, Georgia. 

CLASS 1949 

WILLIAM B. JACKSON, 1432 Au- 
gusta Avenue, is a Mathematics instruc- 
tor at Paulsen School. 

MRS. ELOSIE HOLMES HARKER, 
655 W. 42nd Street, Savannah. Georgia, 
is teaching at the Culver Jr. High 
School. 

ARTHUR WILLIAM. 587 Pine 
Street. Jesup. Georgia, is the Mathe- 
matics instructor at Wayne County 
Training School. 

MISS EDNA CYNTHIA ARM- 
STRONG, Route 1, Box 68, Woodbine. 
Georgia, is an instructor at Ralph J. 
Bunche School. Woodbine. Georgia. She 
has done advanced study at Atlanta Uni- 
versity and Pennsylvania State Llniver- 
sity. 

MISS DORRIS D. WILLIAMS. 1021 
Terrace Street, Savannah. Georeria, is 
teaching at Maple Street School. Savan- 
nah. Georgia. She has done additional 
study at Savannah State College. 

MRS. LETL/V R. BUTLER. 1829 W. 
56th Street. Savannah. Georgia, is the 
Mathematics instructor at West Broad 
Stree f School. Savannah. Georgia. She 
was formerly Miss Leila R. Hill. 

RICHARD WILSON. 2125 College 
Circle. North. Waverlv. Georg : a. is Prin- 
cipal and instructor at Waverlv Elemen- 
tary School, Waverly, Georgia. He has 
done additional study at Florida A. & M. 
University. 

MERWIL P. JACKSON, 744 Yama- 
craw Village. Savannah. Georgia, is 
teaching at Haven Home School, Savan- 
nah, Georgia. 

MRS. MAMIE PLEASANT CAMP- 
BELL. 914 W. Victory Drive, Savan- 

( Continued on Page 18) 



HEADLINES FROM PERIODICALS 

(Continued from Page 9) 

The enrollment of the winter quarter 
1955 at Savannah State College is as 
follows: Regular students, 840; evening 
students, 95; state area trade school 90; 
informal adult courses in home econo- 
mics. 80. —SAVANNAH MORNING 
NEWS. 



Representative Visits 

Wendell P. Alston, national represen- 
tative for Esso Standard Oil Company 
held a series of conferences with stu- 
dents and faculty members relative to 
employment of Negroes in various fields. 
These conferences were a major part of 
the Leadership Institute sponsored at 
Savannah State College. —SAVANNAH 
MORNING NEWS. 



Noted Author Visits 

J. Saunders Redding, noted author 
and professor of English at Hampton 
Institute, Virginia, is scheduled to visit 
Savannah State College during the com- 
ing week. He is to be consultant during 
the Statewide High School Language 
Arts Festival, March 9-11. 

Students from high schools through- 
out the state will show their talents in 
verse and prose writing, oratory, spell- 
ing, drama/tics, poetic interpretation, 
choral reading, and discussion techni- 
ques. Redding and members of the Eng- 
lish department of Savannah State 
College vill hold seminars for the 
benefit of high school English teachers. 
The festival is sponsored by the college 
in conjunction with the Savannah Morn- 
ing News and Evening Press. — SA- 
VANNAH MORNING NEWS— March 
6, 1955. 



National Alpha Kappa Mu 

Thirty-five Negro colleges were repre- 
sented at the 17th National Convention 
of Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society 
which met at Savannah State College 
March 31-April 2. Membership in the 
society consists of highest ranking stu- 
dents in their respective colleges. 

Among the nationally known figures 
addressing the delegates were Dr. Martin 
Jenkins, president of Morgan State 
College, Baltimore; Dr. T. C. Cothran. 
of A.M.&N. College, Pine Bluff. Arkan- 
sas: Mrs. Theresa Wilkins, U. S. Office 
of Education, Washington, D. C; and 
Dr. Margaret Just Butcher, professor of 
English at Howard University, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Paae 17 



ALUMNI NEWS 

[Continued from Page 17) 

nah. Georgia, is an instructor at West 
Savannah School, Savannah. Georgia. 
She has done additional study at At- 
lanta University, Savannah. Georgia, 
and Beach High Work Shop. She was 
formerly Miss Mamie Pleasant. 

MISS NEUQUETTA LOWE, 608 E. 

34th Street, Savannah, Georgia, is teach- 
ing at Maple Street School, Savannah, 
Georgia. She has done additional study 
at Atlanta. University. 

MRS. JULIA L. SKRINE, Box 181. 
Savannah State College, Savannah. 
Georgia, is an instructor at Harris Street 
School. She has done additional study 
at Atlanta University. She was former- 
ly Miss Julia L. King. 

SARAH W. HUNT, Route 2, Box 
205, Devereaux. Georgia, is teaching at 
the L. S. Ingraham High School. Sparta. 
Georgia. 

GERALDINE JORDAN. 515 39th 

Statesboro. Georgia, is the Vocational 
Home Economics Teacher at the Wil- 
liam James High School at Statesboro, 
Georgia. She has done advanced study 
at Columbia University. 

PRINCE A. JACKSON, 124 Reynolds 
Street. Savannah, Georgia, is teaching 
at the William James High School, 
Statesboro, Georgia. He received the 
M.S. Degree in Mathematics from New 
York University. 

NELLIE STANGLIN BRITTAIN, 210 

Peachtree Street, Washington, Georgia. 
is teaching at the Washington High 
School, Washington, Georgia. 

RALPH BARNHART, 412 19th 

Street, Columbus, Georgia, is teaching 
at the Spencer High School, Columbus. 
Georgia. 

LILLIAN J. MOORE, 307 Pearl 

Street, Madison. Georgia, is teaching 
at Bethel School, Madison, Georgia. She 
has done advanced study at Atlanta Uni- 
versity. 

ROLIN BASS 637 North M. Street, is 
teaching at the Flat Rock School, Madi- 
son, Georgia. She received the Master's 
Degree from Atlanta University. 

MARTHA F. STINSON, Route 2. 
Madison, Georgia, is teaching at Spring- 
field School in Madison, Georgia. She 



has done advanced study at Atlanta Uni- 
versity. Atlanta, Georgia. 

IDA REBECCA BOOKER. Route 4. 
Madison, Georgia, is teaching at Buck- 
head School in Madison. Georgia. She 
has done advanced study at Atlanta Uni- 
versity, Atlanta. Georgia. 

MARIE NOLAN. 252 Magnolia Av- 
enue. Athens, Georgia, is teaching at 
Burney School, Madison. Georgia. She 
has done advanced study at Tuskegee 
Institute, Tuskegee, Alabama. 

MYRA WILLIAMS. 252 Magnolia 
Avenue. Athens. Georgia, is teaching at 
the Burney Street School. Madison, 
Georgia. She has done advanced study 
at Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee, Ala- 
bama. Mrs. Williams is the former 
Myra Nolan. 

CLASS 1950 

ROBERT DeLOACH. JR., 621 E. 
Duff Street. Folkston. Georgia, is the 
Principal of Folkston Colored School. 
Folkston, Georgia. He has done addi- 
tional study at Atlanta University and 
New York University. 

JESSE A. STEVENS. R.F.D. 1. Mcin- 
tosh, Georgia, is Principal and Social 
Science instructor at Hineshaw Elemen- 
tary School. Mcintosh, Georgia. He 
has done additional study at New York 
UJniversity. 

MRS. MAMIE A. SEVENS, Mcin- 
tosh, Georgia, is teaching at Liberty 
County High School. 

SAMUEL T. SPAULDING, P. O. Box 
59, McRae. Georgia, is the instructor of 
Biology at Peabody High School. East- 
man, Georgia. 

CARL LOGAN, 623 Kline Street, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia, is the Industrial Arts 
teacher at Cuyler Junior High School 
in Savannah. Georgia. 

MISS LEOLA RUTH SANDERS. 
1202 Love Street, Savannah, Georgia, 
is an instructor at West Savannah Ele- 
mentary School, Savannah. Georgia. 

MISS MILDRED M. BUTLER, Route 
1. Box 65, Mcintosh. Georgia, is teach- 
ing at Retreat Elementary School. Mc- 
intosh, Georgia. 

BRIDGES W. EDWARDS. Box 253, 
is the Social Science instructor at Eu- 
lonia Consolidated School. He has done 
additional study at Atlanta University, 
Atlanta, Georgia. 




RT. REV. DAVID K. SIMS, Bishop 

Born ai Talledega, Ala. EckicaJ?d a! Oberlin 
College, Oberlin Diviniiy School, The University 
of Chicago, Yale Diviniiy School; receiving the 
degrees of A.B., B.D., A.M., Honorary degrees: 
D.D., LL.D. from Wilberforce Morris Brown Col- 
lege, Livingston College and Allen University. 

Was vice president of Morris Brown, president 
of Allen University, Bishop of the A.M.E. Church, 
serving in Africa and the United States, Execu- 
tive Com. of the Federal Council of Churches 
of Christ in America. Listed in The Encyclopedia 
"WHO IS WHO IN THE EAST." During his col- 
lege days was on the varsity football and tract 
teams at Oberlin and the Georgia SJaie College. 
Now the Presiding Bishop of the Eastern Area of 
the United Peoples Melhodisf Church, of which 
he is the Founder. Served as Director and Vice 
President of The Citizens and Southern Bank and 
Trust Co., Philadelphia, Pa. A world traveler 
and lectcrer. Identified with the Republican 
party on a national scale. 



BENJAMIN SIMON. P. O. Box 304, 
Pooler, Georgia, is teaching at Pooler, 
Georgia. 

MRS. BEULAH L. THOMPSON, P. 
O. Box 535, Moultrie. Georgia, is an 
instructor at Homerville Elementary 
and High School, Homerville, Georgia. 
She has done additional study at Florida 
A. & M. UJniversity, Tallahassee. 

EMMIE M. HARPER. General De- 
livery, Sparta. Georgia, is a teacher at 
the L. S. Ingraham High School, Sparta, 
Georgia. 

GERTRUDE EVERETT. 227 Bulloch 
Street, Statesboro. Georgia is a teacher 
at the William James High School, 
Statesboro, Georgia. 

SARAH J. MARSH, 121 Whitehall 
Street Washington, Georgia, is teaching 
at the Washington High School, Wash- 
ington, Georgia. 

{Continued on Page 19) 



Page 18 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



On 



ALUMNI NEWS 
[Continued from Page 18) 

ESSIE TAYLOR BELL. 505 White- 
hall Street. Washington, Georgia is 
teaching at the Washington High School, 
Washington. Georgia. 

ROSA GRANT WARTHEN. 121 
Whitehall Street, Washington, Georgia. 
is teaching at the Washington High 
School, Washington, Georgia. 

HENRY D. MOORE, P. 0. Box 61. 

Arlington, Georgia Is the Veteran Farm 
Instructor at the Arlington Vocational 
High School Arlington. Georgia. 

BENJAMIN J. COLLINS, P. 0. Box 

122 Edison. Georgia is the Vocational 
Agriculture Teacher at the Arlington 
Vocational High School. Arlington. 
Georgia. He has done additional study 
at Fort Valley Star College. 

HIRAM L. McGEE, 504 East Ander- 
son Street, Savannah, Georgia is teach- 
ing at the Jefferson County Training 
School. He has done advanced study at 
Atlanta. Georgia, at Atlanta. Univer- 
sity. 

CLASS 1951 

CHRISTINE ROBINSON. 2904y 2 
Hopkins Street, Savannah, Georgia is 
Teaching at the Woodville High School. 
Savannah, Georgia. She is the former 
Miss Christine Williams. 

LIZZIE HARDEE LEWIS, Rt. 3 

Ludowici. Georgia is teaching at the 
Walker High School, Ludowici, Georgia. 
She is the former Miss Lizzie Hardee. 

MARY W. MOORE, 929 Wheaton 
Street. Savannah, Georgia, is teaching 
at the Maple Street School, Savannah. 
Georgia. She is the former Miss Mary 
Williams. 

ADDIE S. BRANTLEY, is an elemen- 
tary teacher at the East Athens School, 
Athens, Georgia. 

Mrs. Brantley did advanced work at 
Atlanta University. 

HERMAN BAKER. Rt. 1. Steven 
Street. Wadely, Georgia has completed 
requirements for entering Pennsylvania 
State University on July 5, 1955. He will 
begin his work toward a Masters De- 
gree in Industrial Education. He is now 
a member of the faculty of the Booker 
T. Washington Junior High School, 
Jefferson, Georgia. 

LUVENIA WATKINS. R.F.D. 1. 
Devereux, Geirgia is teaching at the 
Elementary School in Devereaux, Geor- 
gia. 



CARRIE MAE WATKINS JACK- 
SON, P. 0. Box 27, is teaching at the 
Elementary School in Devereux, Geor- 
gia. She is the former Miss Carrie Mae 
Wakins. 

WILLIE J. CONYERS, 709 Foundry 
Street, Bainbridge, Georgia is teaching 
at the Arlington Vocational High 
School, Arlington, Georgia. 

PRISCILLA COLEMAN TREMBLE. 

210 Roundtree Street, Statesboro. 
Georgia is teaching at the William 
James High School. Statesboro, Georgia. 

MARILYN JACKSON, 124 Reynolds 
Street, Savannah, Georgia is teaching at 
the William James High School. States- 
boro, Georgia. 

FRANKIE STEVENS, 903 Elliott 
Avenue, Savannah. Georgia is teaching 
at the William James High School. 
Statesboro, Georgia. She has completed 
study for the Masters degree at North 
Western University. Mrs. Stevens is the 
former Frankie Gross. 

ROSA CHAPPEL. R.F.D., Box 79 

Culverton, Georgia is teaching at the 
Thankful School, Sparta, Georgia. 

CLASS 1952 

PEARL LEE SCANTLING, P. O. Box 

156, Sylvania, Georgia, is a Home Eco- 
nomics Teacher at L. S. Ingraham High 
School, Sparta, Georgia. She has done 
advanced study at Atlanta University, 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

GUYRIE BRYANT, 825 Athens 
Street, Gainesville, Georgia, is a teacher 
at Fair Street School, Gainesville, Geor- 
gia. She has done advanced study at 
Atlanta University. Atlanta, Georgia. 

MILDRED WALKER 421 2nd Av- 
enue, N. E., Cario, Georgia, is a Home 
Economics Teacher at West End High 
School, Hogansville, Georgia. She has 
done advanced study at Tuskegee In- 
stitute. Tuskegee, Alabama. 

SUSIE MORGAN JACKSON, 1707 
Vine Street, Savannah. Georgia, is 
teaching in the West Savannah School, 
Savannah, Georgia. She has done ad- 
vanced study at New York University. 
She is the former Miss Susie Morgan. 

MISS GUSSIE LOUISE PERSON, is 
teaching at Harris Grove School, De- 
vereaux, Georgia. 

MRS. ALETHIA MARIE EDWARDS. 

formerly Miss Alethia Marie Sheriff, 




DR. I. B. BRUTON 
BDwling Green, Ky- 



922 Jones Street, Sparta, Georgia, is an 
instructor at Springfield A & I High 
School. Mayfield, Georgia. 

MRS. ZADIE L. REEVES, Route 3 
Box 84, Mitchell, Georgia, is teaching 
in Mitchell. Georgia. 

MRS. ANTEE ALLEN LAWSON, 
Route 2, Box 77, Culverton, Georgia, is 
an instructor at Hickory Grove School 
in Culverton, Georgia. 

MISS MAZIE E. BURTON, R.F.D. 2. 
Box 42, Sparta. Georgia, is teaching 
in Hancock County, Sparta. Georgia. 

MISS ROSA MAE STRONG, 309 S. 
2nd Street, Madison, Georgia, is teach- 
ing at Bethel School, Madison. Georgia. 
She has done additional study at the 
Atlanta University. 

WESLEY B. GLOVER, Hardeeville, 
S. C. is the instructor of Mathematics 
at Walker Street High School, Ludowici. 
Georgia. 

WILLIE JAMES REID, 710 W. 
Gwinnett Street, Savannah, Georgia is 
teaching at Paulsen School, Savannah, 
Georgia. 

MISS JEANNETTE F. JONES, Rt. 
1, Box 122, Richmond Hill, Georgia 
is the Social Science instructor at 
Holmestown School, Richmond Hill. 
Georgia. 

DORETHA K. WELLS, 808 Carter 
Street, Savannah, Georgia is teaching 
at the West Savannah School, Savannah, 
Georgia. She is doing additional study 
now at A.U. Workshop. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 19 




Portion of participants at Second Annual Adult Education Seminar held at Savannah State College. 




MR. NORMAN ELMORE, 
principal of Maple Street School in Savannah 





MRS. MARY SHAW HARPE, 

class of 1944, Home Economics teacher in 

Arlington, Georgia 




MRS. CARETA LOTSON RUSSELL, 

graduate cl Savannah State. Mrs. Russel is living 

in Baghdad, Iraq, where her husband is 

employed as a teacher. 




MISS LULA SMITH, 
class of 1904, retired teacher of Savannah. 




MRS. ELSIE ADAMS BREWTON, 
class of 1940, teacher in Hardeeville, S. C. 



''':■*:■ 





ALB£RT S. BACON, 

class of 1938, State Agriculture Agent in Georgia. 

His headquarters are in Savannah, Georgia, 

at Savannah State College. 



Savannah State College Salutes Its Alumni — Georgia's Best 








■ ■■ : ■■:"■::■:■■■:■::■ :■■: ..■ ...■ ; . .'..■■■■ ..'..■ '.:: . 

■ . ■ .■■■■■ 

■ ■■■■'■.■ . 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 

Special News Edition 
SEPTEMBER, 1955 











One of the newer buildings on Savannah State's campus is 

Cyrus G. Wiley Hall, the new Gymnasium. This building- will 
be dedicated during the fall or winter quarter. 



Richard R. Wright Hall, another one of the newer buildings 
on the campus. This is the men's dormitory which will be 
dedicated during the fall or winter quarter also. 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 

President 
DR. WILLIAM K. PAYNE 

Editor in Chief 
WILTON C. SCOTT 

Copy Editor 
MRS. GWENDOLYN L. BASS 

Photographer 
WILLIAM H. M. BOWENS 

Secretary 
MRS. JUANITA T. WILLIAMS 



COLLEGE CALENDAR, 1955-1956 



Vol. 9 



1955 



No. 1 



About our cover: The cover for this 
edition features one of our in-service 
teachers, Mrs. Rosa Mae Burke of Au- 
gusta, Georgia. 

In addition to her job as teacher at the 
Silas X. Floyd Elementary School in 
Augusta, Mrs. Burke serves as Secretary 
to the Board of Managers of the Phyllis 
Wheatley Y.W.C.A.; Chairman of the 
school Athletic Committee; member of 
the Les Mademoiselles Business and Pro- 
fessional Women's Club and the Alpha 
Gamma Chi Sorority. She is a member 
of the Harmony Baptist Church, sings 
in the choir, and serves as assistant 
church clerk. Mrs. Burke earned 2 A's 
during first summer session. 

Mrs. Burke, whose hobby is collecting 
bird figurines, is married to Harry L. 
Burke, employee at the Veterans' Hospi- 
tal in Augusta. 



Enrollment in 2nd Session 

According to the figures received from 
the office of Ben Ingersoll, Registrar, 
there was a total of 445 students enrolled 
during the Second Summer Session, 300 
women and 145 men. 

This figure includes the 76 Evening 
School students who were registered dur- 
ing the first session on a ten-week basis 
Each regular session lasts five weeks. 



September 




19 


Monday 


20 


Tuesday 


23 


Friday 


24 


Saturday 


26 


Monday 


26 


Monday 


27 


Tuesday 


27 


Tuesday 


28 


Wednesday 


28 


Wednesday 


October 




1 


Saturday 


November 




3-5 


Thursday-Saturday 


19 


Saturday 


24-27 


Thursday-Sunday 


December 




3 


Saturday 


10 


Saturday 


10 


Saturday 


12 


Monday 


13-17 


Tuesday-Saturday 


17 


Saturday 


17 


Saturday 


January 


W 


3 


Tuesday 


3 


Tuesday 


4 


Wednesday 


4 


Wednesday 


5 


Thursday 


5 


Thursday 


7 


Saturday 


February 




1 


Wednesday 


6-7 


Monday-Tuesday 


18 


Saturday 


25 


Saturday 


March 




3 


Saturday 


10 


Saturday 


12 


Monday 


13-17 


Tuesday-Saturday 


17 


Saturday 


17 


Saturday 


17 


Saturday 



FALL QUARTER, 1955 

Orientation week begins 

High Schol validation examination 

Registration for continuing students 

Registration for Saturday classes 

Registration for entering students 

Registration for evening classes at 7:00 P.M. 

Registration with payment of late fee 

Day and evening classes begin 

Last day for registration with payment of late fee 

Last day for changes in program 

Saturday classes begin 

Mid-quarter examinations 

Comprehensive examinations 

Thanksgiving recess 

Constitutions examination 

English qualifying examination 

High School validation examination 

Classes end 

Final examinations 

Fall quarter ends; Christmas vacation begins at 

12:50 P.M. 
Registration for winter Saturday classes 

WINTER QUARTER, 1956 

Registration for entering and continuing students 

Registration for evening classes at 7:00 P.M. 

Day and evening classes begin 

Registration with payment of late fee 

Last day for registration with payment of late fee 

Last day for changes in program 

Saturday classes begin 

Last day for filing applications for June graduation 
Mid-Quarter examinations 
Constitutions examination 
Comprehensive examinations 

High School validation examination 

English qualifying examination 

Classes end 

Final examinations 

Winter quarter ends 

Registration for spring quarter Saturday classes 

Spring Quarter begins at 12:50 P.M. 

(Continued on Inside Back Cover) 



I ' 




The Chief Executive in conference with two of his top building lieutenants. They 
are L. to R.: Dr. William K. Payne, President of the College; Feliz J. Alexis, Super- 
intendent of Buildings and Grounds; and Emmanuel A. Bertrand, Comptroller. 



The Elementary Education 
Workshop 

The Elementary Education Workshop 
class was organized under the leadership 
of Mrs. Donella Seabrook, Mrs. Dorothy 
Hamilton and Mr. Phillip J. Hampton. 

"Implementing the Curriculum Frame- 
work to Promote Optimum Pupil Growth" 
was chosen as the theme for the work- 
shop. 

The officers of the workshop were as 
follows: Chairman, Mrs. E . T. Maddox; 
Co-chairman, Mrs. Willie M. Jenkins; 
Secretarial staff, Misses Jean Miller, Lil- 
lie Jackson, Eddye L. Jones, Mary Evans, 
and Mrs. Clara Bryan; Program Com- 
mittee, Mrs. Lelia Braithwaite, Mrs. 
Sarah Jaudon, Mrs. Merdis Lyons, Mrs. 
L. Crawley, Miss Evelyn James, Mrs. 
Freddis Bush, Mrs. Alfredia Burkett, 
Mrs. Ethel Hunter; Demonstration Com- 
mittee: Mrs. Julia Walton, Mrs. Viola 
Boles, Miss Pennie Hill, Mrs. Amey L. 
Reddick, Mrs. Mary Roberts, Mr. John 
Brown, Mr. G. Golden, Mrs. Nancy Hol- 
land, Mrs. Willie B. McLendon, Mrs. J. 
Saggers, Mrs. Olivia "Wright, Miss Ber- 
nice Jones, Mrs. Geneva Trimm, Mrs. 
Lucinda Patterson, Mrs. Alma Griffin; 
Audio-Visual Aids Committee: Miss Lo- 
retta VanEllison, Mrs. Frinella Dyson, 
Mrs. Tthel Greene, Mrs. Thelma Stribl- 
ing, Miss Magdalene Beasley; Education- 
al and Recreational Committee: Mrs. 
Beulah Ramsey, Mrs. Evelyn Reeves, 
Mrs. Henrietta Johnson, Mrs. Clara Ran- 
dolph. 

Assembly days were Tuesday and 
Thursday of each week during the hours 
of 10:10 A.M. and 11:50 A.M. 

The workshop was divided into four 
major groups to accomodate the needs 
of the people enrolled. These groups were 
language Arts, Science, Social Science, 
Arithmetic and Fine Arts. Each group 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Arts and Crafts Workshop 

The Arts and Crafts Workshop, under 
the direction of Mr. Phillip J. Hampton, 
was designed to foster "Intellectual 
growth thorugh creative experiences." 
To accomplish this purpose it was or- 
ganized around specific interests based 
on individual problems. All experiences 
were planned with the following in mind, 
"an exchange of ideas, experimentation 
and the formulation of a sound element- 
ary program." Extensive references were 
used in order to gain a broad concept of 
activities. 

The culminating activity, an exhibit 
held in the Fine Arts Building, July 11 - 
12, was planned cooperatively by the in- 
structor and the workshop participants. 

In addition to serpentine and papier 
rnache figures, the following articles 
were exhibited: papier mache dogs, paper 
bag mask, Dutch shoe, aluminum bowl, 
toy rattlers, clay bowl, drawings and 
paintings, Mrs. Miriam J. Brown; 
poster, design, stenciling — Mr. 
Alfred Phillips; tray, design, stencil- 
ing metal tray — Mrs. Ella D. Smith; 
puppet, clay bowl — Miss Eldeen W. 
Roberts; wall plaques, bottle lamp — 
Mrs. Mae B. Frazier; metal tray — Mr. 
Archibald Williams; lamp, metal tray, 
block printing — Mrs. Ida M. Johnson; 
metal tray, metal bowl — Mrs. Anna L. 
Cribbs; toy, metal tray — Miss Simpson; 
mask, metal tray — Mrs. Jewel Freeman; 
mask stenciling, clay and metal bowl — - 
Mrs. Johnnie Fluker. 

A very profitable period was spent. 
Many helpful ideas were gained which 
will enable all participants to organize, 
reorganize or augment classroom Art 
programs in accord with individual needs. 



Summer School at Savannah 
State College 

Our summer school is designed to af- 
ford many opportunities for intellectual, 
cultural, and social enrichment of the 
experiences of all who attend during the 
summer quarter. It proposes: to deepen 
and broaden our students' knowledge and 
understanding of human affairs: to ori- 
ent their attitude toward critical think- 
ing; and, to cultivate in them a respect 
for humanity. 

In regard to intellectual or profession- 
al growth, a variety of experiences are 
provided through a number of courses 
that are carefully selected to meet the 
demands of our inservice teachers and 
students. These courses are chosen from 
the curricula of every division and de- 
partment. In addition many workshops 
and special courses are offered to help 
our inservice teachers cope with some 
cf their particular needs. They include: 
(1) Workshop in Methods and Materials 
of the Elementary Schools; (2) Work- 
shop in Methods and Materials of the 
Secondary Schools; (3) Arts and Crafts 
Workshop; (4) Workshop in the School 
Lunch; (5) Creative Design; and (6) 
several short courses that are designed 
for teachers of industrial arts. 

The cultural enrichment of our sum- 
mer school activities culminate in a 
number of special attractions. Some of 
these include: regular and special as- 
sembly programs; lectures and lyceum 
series, concerts, student publications, 
and organizations. These experiences com- 
prise an integral part of the curricula 
for our summer quarter. 

The social lives of those who study 
here are enriched through a number of 
planned activities. A program of re- 
ligious devotion (formal worship and 
Sunday School Service) aims to provide 
a friendly climate for the cultivation of 
the human spirit. Informal socials are 
held frequently for all students. Boat 
rides, picnics and athletic activities offer 
unlimited opportunities for recreational 
and social growth. 

In addition to the opportunities that 
are provided by the faculty and staff 
at the college, the city of Savannah, the 
second largest in the state, affords many 
conveniences, entertainments, recrea- 
tions, and a number of settings for 
wholesome growth. 

On the back of our summer school 
bulletin, the following inscription epito- 
mizes the setting of the college: "Ideal 
Location," "Moderate Expenses," "Mod- 
ern" Equipment," "Faculty Well-train- 
ed," "Graduates Placed," "Student Wel- 
fare Stressed." 

The settling of the College together 
with the institutional objectives com- 
prise the end for which we dedicate 
our service. 

—DR. E. K. WILLIAMS, 
Director 



Editorial Note 

The Summer Session at Savannah 
State College, which has as its major aim 
the preparation of principals and teach- 
ers for elementary and secondary schools, 
and ether leaders to meet successfully 
the problems they fac in their schools 
and communities, got under way on 
Wednesday, June 8. The First Session 
ended July 13, with the Second Session 
beginning on July 14 and lasting through 
August 18. 

The college also offered two-three 
week short courses for those Trades and 
Industrial Education teachers who were 
unable to attend the regular summer 
session. The short courses were held from 
June 27 - July 13 for the First Session 
and August 2 - August 18 for the Second 
Session. 



Elementary Educational Workshop 

(Continued from Page 3) 
selected officers and additional com- 
mittees. It was the responsibility of the 
group to give demonstrations on the 
grade levels of interest, present panel 
discussions, forums, or symposiums, and 
plan seasional parties. The major interest 
groups were divided into three levels, 
namely, primary, intermediate and up- 
per-elementary. 

The Interest groups officers were as 
fellows: Social Studies: Chairman, Miss 
Loretta VanEllison, Co? chairman, Miss 
Jean Z. Miller, Secretary, Miss Evelyn 
James. Science: Chairman, Miss Maga- 
lene Beasley; Co?chairman, Miss Amey 
L. Reddics, Secretary, Mrs. Thelma 
Stribling. Arithmetic: Chairman, Mr. 
John Brown; Co-chairman, Mrs. Evelyn 
Reeves; Secretary, Mrs. Alma Griffin. 
Language Arts: Mrs. Lelia Braithwaite, 
Chairman; Mrs. Sarah Jaudon, Co-chair- 
man, Miss Mary Evans, Secretary. 

Other special areas fir study were: 
Lettering (Manuscripting), Choral Read- 
ing, Creative Dancing, and Dramatics. To 
meet the individual needs of the work- 
shop, the class secured consultants for 
these special areas to assist the various 
problems. Miss Euris Smith, Commercial 
Instructor at Beach High School in Sa- 
vannah, assisted by Miss Kay Francis 
Butler, a sophomore at Spellman College, 
demonstrated how the creative dance 
might be used in the elementary school, 
and Mr. William J. Holloway, dean of 
men, and director of Student Personnel 
Services at Savannah State served as 
consultant in the area of social studies. 

There were 25 counties represented in 
the workshop. They were: Appling, 
Baldwin, Beaufort, Ben Hill, Burke, 
Candler, Camden, Columbia, Elbert, Ful- 
ton, Green, Jess Davis, Liberty, Lowndes, 
Mcintosh, Montgomery, Morgan, Oconee, 
Screven, Tattnal, Wheeler, Wilkes, Wil- 
kinson. 




R. L. Smith, class of 1905, is a lawyer in Macon, Georgia and represented his class 
at the Annual Alumni Banquet. Mr. Smith has been engaged in the general practice 
of law in Macon for the past 33 years. 




Louise Lautier Owens, assistant professor in English at Savannah State College, leads 
the students at 73rd Commencement Exercise at the College. 



Alumni Notes 

Miss Christine Whitaker, of Pelham, 
Georgia, a 1944 graduate of Savannah 
State College has been informed by the 
Exposition Press of New York City that 
her book of Original Poems, entitled 
"Poems for Children" was accepted by 
them and will be published in 1956. 

Miss Whitaker received her early 
school training at Mitchell County Train- 
ing School of Pelham, Georgia and re- 
ceived a B. S. degree in Elementary 
education form Savannah State College 
in 1944. While attending Savannah State 
College she made a very impressive re- 
cord. She has attended Temple Univer- 
sity, but received the M. A. degree from 
Columbia University where she made an 
excellent record. She plans to return to 
Columbia and study toward "Teaching 
Mentally Retarded Children". At present 



she is teaching the eight grade at Li- 
berty County High School, Mcintosh, Ga. 



Charles C. Bass, Sr., 1951 graduate of 
Savannah State College and former 
teacher at Hubbard Training School, 
Forsyth, Georgia, has been appointed 
Field Scout Executive with the Boy 
Scouts of America. Bass spent a 45 day 
training period at Mortimer Schiff Scout 
Reservation, Mendham, N. J., after which 
he assumed his duties, with headquarters 
in Macon, Georgia. He is married to 
Gwendoly Lester Bass, secretary to the 
director of Public Relations at Savannah 
State College and has two children, 
Charles Jr., and Patricia. 



President W. K. Payne announced two 
new scholarships to Savannah State Col- 

( Continued on Next Page) 







Luten Takes Over 
Principalship at 
Woodville High 

James E. Luten, former ninth grade 
and vocational agriculture teacher at 
Woodville High School has been named 
principal of the school to replace Mrs. 
S. M. Tompkins, who retired. 

Luten, the new Woodville principal, re- 
ceivad his B. S. degree from Savannah 
State College in 1939 and earned his 
master's degree in education from Tuske- 
gee Institute in 1953. He has been em- 
ployed by the local system since com- 
pleting Savannah State and in addition 
to his duties as vocational agriculture 
teacher, has taught mathematics and 
science. During this summer he has been 
in charge of the Negro phase of the vo- 
cational canning plant in Woodville. 

His wife, Mrs. Edna Kemp Luten, is 
also a graduate of Savannah State Col- 
lege and is instructor at Cuyler Junior 
High School, Savannah. 

ALUMNI NOTES (Continued) 

lege which are being made available to 
high school students. The first is the 
Livingstone Scholarship, established 
established this year by the First Fed- 
eral Savings and Loan Association of 
Statesboro, Georgia in memory of Pinck- 
ney Livingstone, former janitor of the 
Statesboro School. The Scholarship pro- 
vides tuition for one year and will be 
awarded annually to a worthy high 
school student from the counties of Bul- 
loch, Bryan, Candler, Emanuel, Evans, 
Jenkins, or Screven. 

The second scholarship was awarded 
by the Board of Directors of H. Minko- 
vitz and Sons stores located in States- 
boro, Sylvania, and Douglas. This scho- 
larship is also fo rone year and will be 
awarded to a high school grduate from 







Georgia Peaches enjoy campus life at Savannah State College. 




College athletic poses with co-eds between classes during summer session. Shown 
from L to R are: Ethel Mack, Agusta; Richard Washington, star basketball player, 
Nefw Orleans; Doris Moore, Savannah. 



Bulloch, Screven, or Coffee County for 
the first year, beginning with the school 
year in September 1955. and will be ro- 
tated among the counties in succeeding 
years. 



A book, "The Columbia Encyclopedia", 
was presented to the Savannah State 
College Library in honor of the late 

(Continued on Next Page) 



ALUMNI NOTES (Continued) 

Lieut. Charles Moultrie, 1952 graduate of 
the College. The gift was made possible 
through the donation of the friends and 
associates of Lieut. Moultrie at Levy's 
department store, where he was formerly 
employed. 

Lieut. Moultrie was killed in an air- 
plane crash on June 27, 1954. 



Two Savannah State College faculty 
members received grants-in-aid to study 
during this summer. They were Mrs. 
Louise Owens, English instructor and 
Mrs. Martha Avery, Home Economics 
instructor. The grants were given by 
the Southern Fellowship Funds, an ex- 
perimental program of grants-in-aid for 
summer school study. Mrs. Owens ma- 
triculated at New York University and 
Mrs. Avery at Ohio State University. 

Among the other Savannah State Col- 
lege faculty members who were away 
studying this summer are. Miss Mary 
Herd, University of Southern California; 
Mrs. Luetta Upshur, Breadloaf School, 
Middlebury, Vt.; Frank Tharpe, Iowa 
State College, and Mr. Nelson Freeman, 
Columbia University. 



Gladys M. Burney, 1951 graduate of 
Savannah State College, received the 
M.S. degree in Home Economics from 
North Carolina College at Durham, re- 
cently. She is now teaching in Waynes- 
boro, Georgia. 



The Rev. Joseph Bertrand, C.S.S.R., 
brother of Mr. E. A. Bertrand, comp- 
troller at Savannah State College, was 
ordained to the Holy Priesthood recently 
at Mount Saint Alphonsus Seminary at 
Esopus, N.Y. The Ordination was con- 
ferred by His Eminence Francis Cardinal 
Spellman. 




Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Baker following 
their recent marriage in Darien, Georgia, 
vannah State College and a 1954 attend- 
Mrs. Baker is a June graduate of Sa- 
ent to "Miss Savannah State". 






Group of students seen leaving the library. Top step, L to R: Miss Leona Bolden, 
senior majoring in Mathematics; Thomas Johnson, Junior, Biology major. Bottom 
step, L to R: Alexander Garner, Junior, General Science, major; Delores Miller, 
Senior, Social Science major. 




College Students Learn Physicial Education Stunt. 



6 



o 




Dr. and Mrs. Charles Epps are shown here with their wed^ng attendants, following the rites which took place in Savannah 
recently. Left to Right: Miss Minnie Rose James, Atlanta; Mi s Lois Wilson, Savannah; Missess June and Majorie Epps 
(sisters of the groom) Baltimore; Mrs. Blanche Stevens, Wash lgton; Dr. and Mrs. Charles Epps, Dr. William K. P^ayne, Jr., 
(brother of the bride), St. Louis, Missouri; Frank Baldwin, Sa/annah; Paul Johnson, Baltimore and Medicus Simmons, Savan- 
nah. Front row, Left to right: Sybil Long, Flower Girl; Ann Scott and Shelia Clemmons, Junior Attendants; and Micheal 
Myers, Ring Bearer, all of Savannah. 

The Bride is the former Dr. Roselyn E. Payne, daughter of President and Mrs. W. K. Payne of Savannah State College. 







August Graduates: ELEMENTARY EDUCATION — Nena M. Beasley, Wrens; Ann Boatwright, Glenwood; Mary E. Ford 
Braddy. Sandersville; Marie Jean Carswell, Bartow; Roslyn Cheely, Mitchell; Nadene Cooper, Leslie; Frinella Pullin Dyson, 
Augusta; Virginia Catherine Frazier, Savannah; Celia Bell Hall, Savannah; Dorothy Louise Hannah, Savannah; Ethel Johnson 
Harris, Ludowici; Fannie Pope Hayes, Rayle; Eula Virginia Hicks, Cairo; Etta Belle Johnson, Mayfield; Irene Jeanette Johnson, 
Savannah; Eddye Lee Jones, East Point; Elizabeth L. Jordan, Barnesville; Ada Mae Lawrence, Sparta; Annie Ruth Martin, 
Gainesville; Mattie Lee McBride, Waynesboro; Maggie Johnson McCoy, Lyons; Lezeter Terry Parker, Screven; Ruby Dean Phil- 
lips, Fitzerald; Lucille Howell Powell, Mcintosh; Gertha Stafford Raysor, Woodbine; Amey Louise Reddick, Savannah; Evelyn 
Reeves, Milledgeville; Dorothy Jane Scott, Hazlehurst; Thomas Scott, Woodbine; Almaritta Shatten, Statesboro; Willie Louise 
Spencer, Savannah; Thelma Stribling, Douglas; Eva Witherspoon, Pearson; Pearlie Mae Gray Williams, Sylvania; Jessie V. 
Harris, Fitzgerald. GENERAL SCIENCE — George Johnson, Thunderbolt; Alexander Spencer Luten, Savannah; Lois Reeves, 
Milledgeville. LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE — Geneva Mae Young, Savannah. MATHEMATICS — Jimmie Dorge 
Habersham, Stapleton; Carl Raymond Hart, Savannah; Sarah Francine Ivey, Waycross; Lillie Ruth Massey, Savannah; SOCIAL 
SCIENCE — Charles Lawrence Brannen, Savannah; Earle Berksteiner, Savannah; James Clifford Murray, Jacksonville; Earl 
Lawrence Matthews, Jesup; Charles Wilhute, Savannah. DIVISION OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES — Pies James Bruce, 
Savannah. 




Savannah State College graduates and former students work as public health nurses for Chatham County and city of Savan- 
nah. L. to R. top row: Miss Laura King, Mrs. Roberta Spenser, Mrs. Thelma Ackinson; L. to R. bottom row: Miss Charlotte Wilcox, 
Mrs. Mildred Y. Martin, Miss Alfreda Brown. 



H» B H — — 
up Ml bkSB Kll 




■ 





Savannah State College School of Practical Nursing. Front Row L. to R.: Mrs. 
Cloreta Byers, Mrs. Ruby Holman, Miss Emma C. Tig-gs, Miss Ossie L. Stewart, Miss 
Mary D. Smith, Mrs. Ruth Blyer, Miss Evelyn Jones, Mrs. Evelena W. Jackson. 
Back Row L. to R.: Mrs. C. Edna Robinson, Miss Katherine Hinson, Mrs. Arabelle 
Coleman, Mrs. Ellen C. Crawford, Mrs. Dorothy Cannon, Mrs. A. L. Taylor, Instructor; 
Mrs. Ethel F. Cooper, Mrs. Carrie B. Swinson, Mrs. Louise J. Bryant, Mrs. Evelyn 
Mincey, Mrs. Gertrude Johnson, Mrs. Gertrude Hall. Those not shown on photo are: 
Mrs. Virginia Pelote, Miss Marjorie Weston, Miss Willie Lee Tyler, Mrs. Vernice 
Green. 




A group of in-service teachers pulling 
a Lithograph in the Public School Art 
Class. Shown from L. to R. are: (back- 
ground) Mrs. Laura Martin, Mrs. Thelma 
Robinson, Robert Mobley. Front Row: 
Mary J. Jackson, Mrs. Martha Johnson, 
Thomas Milledge. 




Mr. John B. Clemmons giving last minute instructions to portion of cast of the production "The Spider and the Fly" which 
was presented to the summer school student body. 




Scene taken from "See How They Run" presented at Savannah State College by 
the Tennessee Repertory players. 




Alumnae received many valuable gifts 

upon her retirement as principal of 
Woodville High School, Savannah, Ga. 
Mrs. Sophonia Tompkins graduated from 
Savannah State College in 1947 and 
retired after serving the public schools 
for more than 40 years. 




Highest ranking Seniors at Savannah 
State College. L. to R. Mrs. Ardelma 
Isaac, Savannah; and Miss Doris Sand- 
ers, Columbus. 




Cecilio J. Williams, Savannah State Col- 
lege basketball star from Colon Republic 
of Panama, as he receives his diploma 
from Dr. W. K. Payne. 

The following is a list of contributions 
made by the Savannah Alumni Chapter 
toward the Savannah State College 
Alumni Association Scholarship Drive: 

WEST SAVANNAH SCHOOL: Mrs. 
Mamie P. Campbell, $2.00; Miss Carolyn 
Lewis, $10.00; Mrs. Alma Wade, $1.00; 
Mrs. Marguerite Long, $2.00; Miss Myr- 
tice James, $3.00; Miss Leola Sanders, 
$5.00; Miss Collean Edwards, $5.00; Mrs. 
Susie Jackson, $5.00; Mrs. Mattie Fon- 
vielle, $3.00; Mrs. Geraldine S. Zeigler, 
$5.00; Miss Melinda O. Smith, $5.00; Mrs. 
Lelia R. Butler, $1.00; Mrs. Erma R. 
Williams, $1.00; Mrs. Sarah H. Dixon, 
$1.00; Mrs. Mattie M. Leftwich, $1.00; 
Mrs. Editta H. Gill, $1.00; Mrs. Mary 




Rev. H. McEwen as he delives the seventy-third Baccalaureate address at Savannah 

State College. 




Clarance Lofton, Blackshear, Georgia, "Man of the Year" and Editor of Student 
Newspaper at Savannah State College, as he receives his June diploma from Presi- 
dent W. K. Payne. 



C. Sexton, $1.00; Mrs. Genevieve Clark, 
$1.00; Mrs. Rose Ann Ellison, $1.00; 
Mrs. Mamie B. Haynes, $1.00; Mrs. 
Katye W. Bolden, $1.00; 

EAST BROAD SCHOOL: Mrs. Gert- 
rude D. Thomas, $10.00; Miss Ruby L. 



King, $10.00; Mrs. Maggie B. Goins, 
$5.00; Mrs. Virginia C. Floyd, $5.00; Mrs. 
Esther S. Warrick, $10.00. 

MAPLE SCHOOL: Mr. Norman B. El- 
(Continued on Next Page) 



10 



\y 




In-service teacher cools off at Savan- 
nah State College. Mrs. Ethel Hunter of 
Valdosta, Georgia relaxes after a game 
of tennis on Savannah State College ten- 
nis court. 

Mrs. Hunter, who teaches at the Mag- 
nolia Elementary School in Valdosta, is 
one of the many in-service teachers at- 
tending Savannah State College this 
summer. 

more, $10.00; Mrs. Lottie V. Crane, $3.00; 
Mrs. Gladys P. Broughton, $3.00; Mrs. 
Clyneta F. Marcus, $1.00; Mrs. Mattie 
H. Branch, $2.00; Mrs. Inez B. McNeal, 
$5.00; Mr. James D. Jackson, $5.00; Miss 
Annie M. Early, $2.00; Mrs. Dorothy B. 
Drayton, $3.00; Miss Ethel E. Terrell, 
$1.50; Mrs. Mary W. Moore, $2.00; Mrs. 
Ruth B. Williams, .50; Mrs. Doris D. 
Williams, $1.00; Miss Neuzetta G. Lowe, 
$3.00; Mrs. Dorothy L. DeVilliars, $1.00. 

A. E. BEACH SCHOOL: Mrs. Esther 
B. Harden, $5.00; Mr. Alphonso F. Mc- 
Lean, $10.00; Mrs. Marguarite K. Law, 
$5.00. 

MONIETH SCHOOL: Mrs. Eunice 
Clay, $5.00; Mrs. Albertha Smith, $5.00. 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE: Mr. 
Arthur C. Carter, $10.00; Mrs. A. C. 
Stevens, $1.00; Mrs. R. L. Webb, $2.00; 
Miss Eunice M. Wright, $5.00; Mr. Frank 
D. Thorpe, $10.00; Mr. Timothy C. 
Meyers, $5.00; Mr. John W. McGlockton, 
$10.00; Mr. Raymon P. Pinckney, $10.00. 

WOODVILLE SCHOOL: Mrs. S. M. 
Tompkins, $5.00; Mr. James T. Tuten, 
Jr., $10.00; Mrs. Rosalie W. May, $10.00; 
Mrs. Ursaline Ingersoll, $10.00; Miss 
Mazie B. Wilson, $5.00; Mrs. Wilma B. 
Hopkins, $5.00; Mr. Roger B. Jones, 
$5.00; Mrs. Hattie C. Scott, $5.00; Mrs. 
Matilda D. Rivers, $5.00; Mrs. Wilma M. 
Sampson, $5.00; Mrs. Mattie Collins, 
$5.00; Mr. Crawford Bryant, $3.00; Mrs. 
Elsie G. Hooks, $3.00; Mrs. Dorothy U. 
Adams, $3.00; Mrs. Christine Robinson, 




Class in Elementary Mass Activity under the direction of Mrs. Ella Fisher 
(in white gym suit). 




Augusta teachers attend Savannah State College during Summer Session and pose 
before the library immediately after final examinations. 



$3.00; Mrs. Lula M. Davis, $2.00; Mrs. 
Beatrice Doe, $2.00; Mrs. Eunice H. 
Burton, $2.00; Miss Margaret Lewis, 
$2.00; Mrs. Frances Bazemore, $2.00; 
Mrs. Lillie Blount, $2.00; Miss Neta 
Staley, $2.00; Mrs. Oliva J. Alexander, 
$2.00; Mr. Samuel Gill, $1.50; Miss 



Thelma Johnson, $1.00; Mrs. Loretta 
Harris, $1.00; Mrs. Mary F. Simmons, 
$1.00; Mrs. Edith James, $1.00; Mrs. 
Daisy D. Bing, $1.00; Mrs. Mamie Far- 
ley, $1.00; Mrs. Lena Bauknight, $1.00; 

(Continued on Page 12 



11 




Savannah Area Trade School showing 
classes in Brick Masonry and Auto 
Mechanics. 



Mrs. Lizzie Hendrickson, $5.00; 

CUYLER JR. HIGH SCHOOL: Mr. 
Arthur Dwight, $10.00; Mr. Willie Wad- 
dell, $1.00; Mrs. Edna K. Lutein, $5.00; 
Rev. Willie Gwyn, $5.00; Mrs. Dorothy 
B. Fuller, $2.00; Mrs. Katherine Manzo, 
$1.00; Mrs. Tallulah K. Cogswell, $1.00; 
Mrs. Eloise H. Harper, $5.00; Mrs. Lil- 
lian S. Ccott, $5.00; Mrs. Dorothy R. 
Raines, $5.00; Mrs. Addie B. Hamlet, 
$2.00; Mr. Carl Logan, $5.00; Mrs. Mase- 
line G. Seabrooks, $3.00. 

HAVEN HOME SCHOOL: Mrs. Ophe- 
lia L. Mclver, $10.00; Mrs. Saddie D. 
Steele, $10.00; Mr. John H. Myles, $10.00; 
Mrs. Margaret G. Caution, $5.00; Mrs. 
Rosalyn J. Davis, $5.00; Mrs. Louise B. 
Roberts, $4.00; Mr. Robert A. Young, 

$10.00; Mrs. Wilsie M. Calfee, $5.00. 

DERENNE SCHOOL' Mrs. Sadie Cart- 
ledge, $5.00. 

WEST BROAD SCHOOL: Mrs. Rosa- 
more Y. Perrin, $2.00; Miss Lula Smith, 
$5.00. 

WOODVILLE SCHOOL: Mrs. Thelma 
Lee, $5.00; Mr. Arthur Roberts, $5.00; 
Mr. Leonard D. Law, $10.00; Mr. George 
M. Robeson, $10.00; this makes a total 
of $484.50 for the Savannah Chapter. 




W. H. M. Bowens, director of Audio-visual Center gives demonstration for class 
in Audio Visual Aids. 



Alumni News 

EDWARD H. SMYRL, class of 1915, 
is a Real staEte Broker in Philadelphia, 
Pa. He received the Normal Diploma 
from Savannah State College in 1915 
and the A. B. degree, Lincoln University, 
Pennsylvania and has done advanced 
study at the University of Pennsylvania 
Law School. 

At present, in addition to his work as 
real estate broker, he serves as Referee's 
Clerk in Workmens' Compensation for 
the Pennsylvania Department of Labor 
and Industry. 

REV. J. FRANK ROGERS, A.B., D.D., 
class of 1915, is Presiding Elder of the 
Columbus District of the Southwest 
Georgia Conference of A.M.E. Churches. 

He has served as Principal of the Jr. 
High Schol in Quitman, Georgia; Head 
of English Department at Savannah 
State College, and has pastored at St. 
Luke and St. James Churches in Savan- 
nah, Georgia; St. James in Blackshear; 
Bethel Church in Augusta and Bethel in 
Albany and St. James in Columbus. 

Rev. Rogers is also a Trustee of Mor- 
ris Brown College in Atlanta. 



Class of 1948 

LILLIAN SCOTT, 13 Sixth Street, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia is teaching at the Cuy- 
ler High School, Savannah, Georgia. She 
received the Masters degree from New 
York University in 1953. She is the 



Miss Lillian Shank. 

EDITTA GILL, 922 West 37th Street, 
Savannah, Georgia is teaching at the 
West Broad Street School. 

LAURA DENSLER, 602 West Victory 
Drive, Savannah, Georgia is teaching at 
the DeRenne Elementary School, Savan- 
nah, Georgia. 

NADINE G. LEWIS, 949 West 38th 
Street, Savannah, Georgia is teaching at 
the Paulsen School, Savannah, Georgia. 
She is the former Miss Nadine Cleveland. 

IDA B. WRIGHT, 909 Porter Street, 
Savannah, Georgia is teaching at the 
West Broad Street School, Savannah, Ga. 
She is the former Miss Ida D. Anderson. 

JEANETTE G. JENKINS, 509 % West 
Victory Drive, Savannah, Georgia is 
teaching at the West Savannah School, 
Savannah, Georgia. 

WINIFRED VERONICA LAWE, 620 

West 40th Street, Savannah, Georgia is 
teaching at the DeRenne Elementary 
School, Savannah, Georgia. She received 
the Masters Degree from New York 
University in 1954. She is the former 
Miss Winifred V. Taylor. 

LEON DINGLE, 514 East Anderson 
Street, Savannah, Georgia is principal 
at the Pembroke High School, Pembroke, 
Georgia. He has done advanced study 
at Atlanta University and New York 
University. 

(Continued on Next Page) 



12 



a \ 




Two in-service teachers at Savannah 
State College. Mrs. Rosa Mae Burke 
and Mrs. Carrie Campbell Walden. Mrs. 
Burke is featured on our cover. 

Mrs. Walden taught for six years in 
Decatur County before leaving to join 
her husband, SFC Harvey B. Walden in 
Tokyo, Japan. 

During her 3% years in Tokyo, she 
served as a volunteer YMCA and USO 
worker. 

After returning to the States in 1954, 
she resumed her duties as teacher in De- 
catur County. As a member of the Nelson 
Chapel A.M.E. Church, she participates 
in the choir and in the Victory Club. Her 
hobbies are table tennis and cards. 



Class of 1949 

RUTH BURSE, 912 Reynolds Street, 
Waycross, Georgia is an elementary 
teacher at the Moniac Elementary School, 
Moniac, Georgia. She is the former Miss 
Ruth Paulin. 

CHRISTER LEE EADDY, 112 Youman 
Street, Blackshear, Georgia is teaching 
at the Pierce County Training School, 
Patterson, Georgia. She has done ad- 
vanced study at North Carolina College. 

BENJAMIN DENSLER, 803 W. 44th 
Street, Savannah, Georgia is teaching 
at the George W. DeRenne School, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia. He has done advanced 
study at Tuskegee Institute, Tuskegee, 
Alabama. 

HAROLD M. BILLUPS, 441 Harper 
Street, Detroit, Michigan, is a Stock 
Chaser in Detroit, A.B.D. 

GEORGE H. WHITE, 304 West Henry 
Street, Metter, Georgia is teaching at 
the Candler County Teaching School, 
Metter, Georgia. 



Class of 1955 




John S. Delaware, graduate of class of 1915, after receiving Alumni Association Award 
during Alumni Banquet at Savannah State College. 




John Delaware, class of 1915 as he receives Alumni Achievement Award from Robert 
Young, president of Savannah Chapter, during Annual Alumni Banquet. 



MRS. ROMIE A. TURNER, P. 0. Lin- 
ton, Georgia, is an instructor at Old 



Beulah Elementary School, Hancock 
County. 

MRS. MARIAN ASHLEY REEVES, 
formerly Miss Marian Ashley, P. 0. Box 
416, Sparta, Georgia is teaching at East 
End Elementary School, Sparta, Georgia. 
She has done additional study at Atlanta 
University. 

MRS. RACHEL CAROLYN RUT- 
LEDGE, 403 Hamilton Street, LaGrange, 
Georgia, is an instructor at E. Depot 
Elementary School. 



Mr. G. W. Conoly, president of the 
National Alumni Association, has an- 
nounced that Mrs. Dorothy Johnson Har- 
ris, a graduate of Savannah State Col- 
lege has received the Master of Science 
degree from Florida A. and M. Univer- 
sity at its commencement Exercises on 
May 30, 1955. Mrs Johnson received the 
Bachelor of Science degree from Savan- 
nah State College during the summer of 
1948 in Elementary Education. 



13 




Former students of Savannah State College employed as social welfare workers for Chatham County and the city of 
Savannah. Seated, L. to R.: Mrs. Marguerite Simmons, Mrs. Mable Tolbert; Standing, L. to R.: Mrs. Mamie Williams, Mrs. 
Annie Lee Beaton, Miss Gertrude Lark, Supervisor. 




Savannah State College School Lunch 
Workshop. Picture shows in-service 
teachers during baking demonstration 
with consultant from Savannah Electric 
and Power Company. 




Chairmen of Elementary Workshop interest groups from L. to R. are: Mrs. 
Dorothy Hamilton, Co-director, Chatham County. Savannah, Georgia; Mrs. Ida Bell 
White, Floyd County, Rome, Georgia; Mrs. Gertha Stafford Raysor, Camden County, 
Woodbine, Georgia; Mrs. Elvira Bailey, Chatham County, Savannah, Georgia; Mrs. 
Ruby McNatt Scott, Richmond County, Augusta, Georgia; Mrs. Margaret Owens, 
Screven County, Sylvania, Georgia; Mrs. Donella G. Seabrook, Co-director, Chatham 
County, Savannah, Georgia; Mrs. Gertrude Johnson, Liberty County, Mcintosh, Geor- 
gia; Mr. Robert Mobley, Burke County, Sardis, Georgia. 



14 



o^> 



20 


Tuesday 


20 


Tuesday 


21 


Wednesday 


21 


Wednesday 


22 


Thursday 


22 


Thursday 


24 


Saturday 


April 




7 


Saturday 


May 




5 


Saturday 


12 


Saturday 


28 


Monday 


29-June 7 


Tuesday-Saturday 


June 




2 


Saturday 


3 


Sunday 


4 


Monday 


4 


Monday 



11 


Monday 


12 


Tuesday 


12 


Tuesday 


13 


Wednesday 


13 


Wednesday 


14 


Thursday 


16 


Saturday 


23 


Saturday 


30 


Saturday 


July 




4 


Wednesday 


13 


Friday 


14 


Saturday 


14 


Saturday 


16 


Monday 


17 


Tuesday 


18 


Wednesday 


18 


Wednesday 


18 


Wednesday 


21 


Saturday 


28 


Saturday 


August 




12 


Sunday 


15 


Wednesday 


17 


Friday 


18 


Saturday 


18 


Saturday 



COLLEGE CALENDAR, 1955-1956 (Continued) 
SPRING QUARTER, 1956 

Spring recess ends at 8:20 A.M. 

Registration for day and evening classes 

Day and evening classes begin 

Registration with payment of late fee 

Last day for registration with payment of late fee 

Last day for changes in program 

Saturday classes begin 

Comprehensive examinations 

English qualifying examination 
Constitution examination 
Classes end 
Final Examinations 

High School validation examination 
Baccalaureate sermon 
Commencement 
Spring quarter ends 

SUMMER QUARTER, 1956 

First Session, June 11 — July 14 

Registration for day and evening classes 

All classes begin 

Registration with payment of late fees 

High Schol validation examination 

Last day for registration with payment of late fees 

Last day for changes in program 

English qualifying examination 

Constitutions examination 

Comprehensive examinations 

Independence Day 

Classes end 

Final examinations 

First session ends 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day for registration with late fees 

High School validation examination 

Last day for changes in program 

English qualifying examination 

Constitutions examination 

Baccalaureate sermon 

Commencement 

Classes end 

Final examinations 

Summer quarter ends 



School Lunch Workshop 

The school lunch workshop participants 
chose as their guiding theme: "Aids To- 
wards Promoting Maximum Participa- 
tion in the School Lunch Room." This 
theme grew out of the present over-all 
national problems which concern them- 
selves with: 

(1) Increasing school lunch participa- 
tion in every school to 100%. 

(2) Developing better and more ef- 
fective nutrition education methods. 

(3) The maintenance and wise use 
of all equipment and facilities. 

(4) Methods to facilitate smooth 



operation. 

(5) Up-grading on - the 
sonnel. 



job per- 



(6) Consistently give cause to request 
more funds for operation. 

Each student developed and presented 
an exhibit on some phase of the program 
which needed attention in their respect- 
ive community in school. 

Mrs. Nena Beasley — Johnson County 
— an integrated Nutrition unit for the 
1st and 2nd grade. 

Mrs. Arneta Campbell — Camden 
county — Ways of Utilizing more milk 
in the school menu by using government 



subsidy non-fat dry milk. 

Miss Marie J. Carswell — Johnson 
County — Around the Clock with Vita- 
mins — emphasising vitamins obtained in 
three adequate meals. 

Miss Etta Davenport — Fulton County 

— Simplified Nutrition Education Leaf- 
lets and a display of mobile equipment 
for schools which have little or no 
serving space. 

Mrs. Ethel Lizama — Glynn County 

— The Packed Lunch — regardless of 
the type of lunch center, it embodies the 
characteristics of being, nutritious, pleas- 
ing, attractive, and adequate. 

Mrs. Georgetta Pinkney — Screven 
County — Refresher Unit for pre-plann- 
ing conference, Motivate principals and 
teachers on methods to promote maxi- 
mum school lunch participation. 

Mrs. Sarah Rogers — Wayne County 

— More vegetables in the school lunch 
Program. 

Mrs. Aurelia Williams — The Basic 7 
Foods and the School Age Child — Point- 
ing up the nutritional significance of all 
foods. 

Actual food or models were used in 
all displays. 

Recognizing the fact that the federal 
government has appropriated $48,000,000 
for school lunch equipment for the 1955- 
1956 year the workshop spent consider- 
able time on this emphasis. The group 
was greatly assisted in the study by Mr. 
Philip Jacabson, equipment specialist for 
Bob Frankenfield, Inc. Mr. Jacobson con- 
ducted a tour and explained all types of 
large quantity school equipment, its com- 
position, care, prices, and best uses. He 
also stressed what might be done to 
serve the hot lunch in the school with 
limited facilities. 

Miss Nell Wood, school lunch super- 
visor for Chatham County and Savannah 
graciously opened the DeRenne Element- 
ary School and Alfred E. Beach High 
School lunch rooms for observation and 
use. 

Miss Julia Roberts, home economist for 
the Savannah Electric and Power Com- 
pany directed the class discussion and 
food preparation demonstrations on the 
use of electric kitchen equipment at the 
DeRenne School. 

Additional school lunch operation prac- 
tice was experienced in the Powell Lab- 
oratory Lunch Room. A browsing study 
area was set up to acquaint all work- 
shoppers with the latest trends, litera- 
ture and other pertinent information on 
the school lunch program. 

Consultants visiting from the State 
Department of Education were Mrs. 
Electa Shaw, Assistant School Lunch 
Supervisor for Negro Schools and Mrs. 
Margaret Lewis, Assistant School Lunch 
Supervisor for Georgia. 




(1) Mr. John Clemmons as he gives final instructions to members of production staff of "Spider and the Fly". Shown 
with him are Florence Bodison, script girl, and William Weston, student director. (2) Platform guests at the 74th Baccal- 
aureate Exercies held at Savannah State College. L. to R. Dr. E. K. William director of Summer School; the Rev. Percel Alston, 
speaker, pastor of Midway Congregational Church, Mcintosh, Ga.; Dr. W. K. Payne, President; Rev. Andrew Hargrett, College 
Minister; and B. Intersoll, Registrar. (3) Savannah State College Summer Theatre presented a three act drama, "The Spider 
and the Fly" on Wednsday, August 3, at 8:15 P.M. — Ida Bell White, David Jones, and Jewel Grant enact a scene from "The 
Spiifer jQyd the Fly". Mr. Jones (center) plays the part of Mr. Cummings, "The Spider"; Mrs. White (left) plays the part of 
his wife* Mihs Grant (right) plays the part of his secretary, "The Fly." (4) The Rev. Percel Alston, pastor of Midway 
Congregational Church, Mcintosh, Ga., as he delivers the 74th Baccalaureate address to the August 1955 graduating class at 
Savannah State College. (5) Lt. General Alvan C. Gillem, USA (ret.) delivering a stirring Commencement address to the 
August 1955 graduating class at Savannah State College. 



r,- 



SAVANNAH STATE BULLETIN 

HOMECOMING EDITION 

"Cavalcade of SSC" 

December, 1955 








Our cover for this issue features Miss 
Theda Rooks, Sophomore from Savannah, Ga. 
Miss Rooks, an elementary education major, 
has served with the SSC marching band for 
two years and spent five years with the Cuyler 
Junior High and Beach Senior High School 
bands. She is the daughter of Birde Rooks 
Wheeler of Savannah. 



Page 2 



V'l 





Savannah State College enjoys having the students and 
graduates of former years, the patrons and friends of 
the college, and those who in general believe in education 
visit the institution on various occasions. At homecoming 
time every year thousands return to the college in per- 
son. A much larger group finding it impossible to be 
present, depends upon learning the facts and information 
from others and from the materials which are prepared 
by the college for regular and special occasions. In ev- 
ery instance the people want to know how the institution 
has changed and how it has been able to maintain those 
basic elements which give the college character and dis- 
tinction. 

When one considers that the two points of view, in a 
way, appear to be contradictory, he must recognize that 
the proper balance of these provides consistency and per- 
manence. All colleges are expected to show changes indi- 
cating that they are alive and in tune with the best there 
is in education today. In a like manner, the basic aims 
and objectives of the institution are expected to be the 
same and to show consistency from age to age. One 
wishes to feel that his college can provide in ever in- 
creasing amounts those special things which have made 
his life happy and worthwhile. More often than n*ot, one 
finds it unusually difficult to point these out in clear 
speech or definite written discourse, but one can know 
when they exist. As one returns to the college at this 
time, one is expected to see the college in his own way. 
Every view will be unique and rewarding if it is made 
known. 

Savannah State College continues to show rapid im- 
provement in physical facilities. The plant is being mod- 
ernized, expanded, and adapted to the program of educa- 
tion offered. Of the five major projects authorized by the 
Board of Regents prior to this year, four have been com- 
pleted — the sewage system, a central heating system, 
Wright Hall, and Wiley Hall. The fifth project — fire pro- 
tection and deferred maintenance — far from complete, 
has been a major factor in changes of the physical plant 
for a more effective educational program. Expenditures 
on this project to date have amounted to more- than 



MESSAGE FOR 



HOMECOMING 



November 19, 1955 



$200,000. The plan is to have this project continue as 
more funds become available each year. Recently, two 
new buildings have been approved for the college — a 
library and technical building. These two structures are 
much needed in the program of the college. It is ex- 
pected that they will cost approximately $1,400,000. 

Other changes and areas of consistency have been par- 
ticularly striking in the faculty and instructional pro- 
gram. Through increased state support, the College has 
been able to attract more of the highly, trained staff mem- 
bers. At the present time, twelve of the faculty members 
hold the doctor's degree. Three others expect to complete 
all requirements for that degree before the end of the 
present year. Many of the other members of the staff 
have completed one and two years beyond the master's 
degree. New equipment and service programs have been 
provided. Standards of teaching and instructional meth- 
ods continue to show improvement. 

In general it may be assumed that good facilities for 
education — physical plant, faculty, libraries and labora- 
tories — will attract the better students in larger numbers. 
Today many students of superior abilities are selecting 
Savannah State College for their education and training. 
Scholarship standards have been on an upward trend for 
several years. The students graduating from Savannah 
State College are making good records in professional 
and graduate schools. It is expected that they, too, will 
join the ranks of alumni who have distinguished them- 
selves through outstanding and unselfish service in their 
respective communities. 

As in the college, one expects to discover both change 
and consistency in the alumni. A college fares well when 
the graduates and former students have a desire to see it 
extend its services to the oncoming youth. Enrollments 
increase with better students because the institution's 
values have been properly interpreted. Scholarship funds 
and increased public interest and support are closely 
related to alumni achievements. The College continues to 
show definite growth in these areas. Alumni interest, 
loyalty, and support represent vital factors in the growth 
of the institution today. 



W. K. Payne 



Page 3 





ssc 

Miss Savannah Stale and Attendants 




The Savannah State College student body has chosen Miss Mamie Da- 
vis, (center) attractive senior from Columbus, to represent them as "Miss 
Savannah State" for the year 1955-56. Miss Davis, an elementary education 
major, is the daughter of Mrs. Burrel Davis. Her attendants will be Miss 
Willie Lee Hopkins, (left) senior from Brunswick, and Miss Josie Troutman, 
(right) senior from Macon. Miss Hopkins is majoring in elementary educa- 
tion, and Miss Troutman is majoring in business education. "Miss Savan- 
nah State" and her attendants will be crowned during the half-time period 
of the homecoming game between the Savannah State Tigers and Claflin 
College on November 19. 



Page 4 



JSSC 

MISS SAVANNAH STATE 

. 



83 



. 




Miss Savannah State — 
1955-56" 

Miss Mamie Davis 
from Columbus, Ga. 



Page 5 







Scene taken in front of review 
stand during 1954 Homecom- 
ing parade 



Home Economics float, winning float in 
1954 Homecoming Parade. 





ssc 

Miss Savannah State 1954 and Attendants 




Miss Delores Perry (center), "1954 
Miss Savannah State," and attendants, 
Miss Elizabeth Jordan (left) and Miss 
Frances Baker (right). 



Page 7 




BUILDINGS 



Entrance to newly renovat- 
ed Camilla Hubert Hall, 
girls dormitory 





Hammond Hall — Home Economics 



Building. 



Parson's Hall — top floors: Teacher's 
residence; main floor — General Edu- 
cation and Research Offices; ground 
floor — Public Relations and Alumni 
Affairs Office. 



i 



I 



President's residence. 







\ 




■£ 






Rear view of Wiley Gymnasium as seen from a boat 
passing at high tide through the marsh. 







Hill Hall — Library and Nurse 
School. 



College Center and Post Office. 




Entrance to Wright Hall, new boys dormitory 




y 



• ■ 



if 



, 



\ 









IPage loB; 






Sisters, seniors, take time out to pose J 
— (L to R) Laura and Minnie Korne- 
gay of Hazlehurst, Ga 



Georgia Peaches review lessons for 

mid-quarter exams. L. to R., Julia 

Johnson, Henrietta Collier, Dorothy 

Davis, and Willie Mae Myers. 



Peola Wright, Sophomore of Savan- 
nah, Ga.; Mildred Lindsay, Freshman 
of Savannah. 





"Peaches" pose pretty for photographer. L to R, Eu- 
genia English, Sophomore of Covington, Ga. ; Ann 
Pierce, Junior of Halycondale, Ga. ; Peola Wright, 
Sophomore of Savannah, Ga.; Mildred Lindsay, Fresh- 
man of Savannah, Ga. 



Page 11 









Emma G. Bush and Eloise Saxby, Freshmen 

from Savannah, Ga. pose for photographer in 

front of Wright Hall. 

Henrietta Collier, Freshman, Savan- 
nah, takes time out from tennis to 
watch football team at practice. 



Emma Lou Jordan and Hen 
Savannah, Ga. as they loo 
which Walt Campbell, spor 

ing News, says is "one of tl 

seel 



\J 



Young ladies pose on his- 
toric SSC landmark. L 
to R, Arlene Anderson, 
Sophomore, Madison, 
Ga., Jacqueline Smith, 
Freshman, Cordele, Ga., 
and Minnie Kornegay, 
Senior, Hazlehurst, Ga. 





Cameraman catches 
ma Lou Jordan, Fr I 
Ga. ; Ethel Jones, S 
Delores Williams, F 
Gee 




oilier, Freshmen from 
iroimd SSC football field 
ditor for Savannah Mom- 
inest playing fields in this 




L to R, Jacqueline Vaughn, Freshman, Sa 
vannah; Lois Parrish, Sophomore, States 

boro. 

Attractive Senior poses for the cam- 
eraman, Miss Dorothy Moore, Busi- 
ness major, English minor from 
Augusta, Ga. 



ties — (L to R) Em- 
niiaii of Savannah, 
lor of Miami, Fla. ; 
hman of Savannah, 



ia> 





"Eyes right" for these 
lovely SSC coeds. L to R, 
Julia Johnson, Fresh- 
man, Savannah; Willie 
Mae Myers, Junior, Jack- 
sonville, Ga. ; Dorothy 
D. Davis, Sophomore of 
Savannah, Ga. ; Ernes- 
tine Pelot, Junior of Har- 
deeville, S. C. ; Louise 
Dariene, Sophomore; 
Delores Williams, Fresh- 
man of Savannah, Ga. 




jSSC 

FOOTBALL 









— «B-^pr*»w< 




' **»•":-*■ v, 



A.-D<&t^ 



1955 SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE TIGERS SQUAD 



Page 14 





SSC "spark plugs," L to R, Holly Stephens, Freshman, End, Burlington, N. C; Fred Ed- 
wards, End, Freshman of Savannah, Ga. ; Charles Cameron, Tackle, Junior, LaGrange, 
Ga. ; William Johnson, Tackle, Sophomore, Savannah, Ga. ; Willie Middleton, Center, 
Freshman, Savannah, Ga. ; Willie Dudes, Guard, Freshman, Savannah, Ga; Harrison 
Whipple, Guard, Freshman, Savannah, Ga. ; Jessie Carter, Fullback, Freshman, Macon, 
Ga. ; and Frank Chappel, Guard, Freshman, Quitman, Ga. 



Savannah State College backs as they work out for their coining tilts, with Alabama State 
College on November 12, and with Claflin College on November 19 (Homecoming). 
They are, left to right, W. Batchelor, Freshman, Savannah, Ga.; J. Reynolds, Freshman, 
Savannah, Ga. ; R. James, Freshman, Savannah, Ga. ; and M. King, Freshman, Savannah, 
Ga. 








, r 








Robert Butler, Sophomore, 
Savannah, Ga.; Fullback 




Melvin Jones, Junior, Jack- 
sonville, Fla. ; Fullback 



James Collier, Senior, Savannah, 
Georgia; End 



Page 16 



CLAFLIN COLLEGE 



GREETINGS TO THE ADMINISTRATION, FACULTY. STUDENTS. ALUMNI AND 
FRIENDS OF SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE ! ! 
We extend to you our best wishes during your Homecoming festivities. We cherish the fine rela- 
tionships that have existed between these two institutions of learning through the years and we 
pledge anew our loyalty to the cause of education for which they stand. 
It is our hope that the high level of collegiate rivalry will continue. May the best team win! 

H. D. SMITH, Chairman 
Administrative Committee 



MESSAGE FROM CLAFLIN COLLEGE — ATHLETIC COMMITTEE 
On behalf of the Athletic Committee I extend to you our best wishes on your Homecoming activities. 
The high competitive spirit that exists between Claflin and Savannah State has always made our 
encounters with you exciting. Yet, we are always grateful for the kind hospitality shown us upon 
our visits. 

P. PALMER WORTHY 
Director of Athletics 



MISS HOMECOMING OF CLAFLIN COLLEGE — Miss Alma Juanita 
Davis of Hampton, South Carolina. 





L to R, Selene Manning, Junior of Dillon, S. C. 
Fullback, scored 25 touchdowns in first two 
years; Joseph Washington, Senior of Jackson- 
ville, Fla., Halfback; Milvin Wright, Junior of 
Camden, S. C, Halfback. 





JOSEPH WASHINGTON— Senior from Jacksonville, Florida. Three- 
time all-conference halfback. Holds Conference record for kick-off return — 
105 yards against Morris College - 1954. 



L to R, Ted Browne, Head Coach; Page P. Saunders, Line Coach. 
Coach Brown received B.S. in Health and Physical Education, Wilber- 
forde University, further study, Wayne University and Columbia Uni- 
versity; previous experience: Ass't. Coach of Bethune Cookman Col- 
lege, 1949-52, Head Coach at Edward Waters College, 1947-49. 

Coach Saunders received his B.S. in Health and Physical Education, 
Bluefield College, M.S. University of West Virginia. Previous Exper- 
ience: Head Coach of Morristown College, 1949-52. 




Page 17 




ssc 



CHEERING SQUAD AND MAJORETTES 



The Savannah State Hi-Steppers, left to right, 
Theda Rooks, Sophomore, Savannah, Ga.; 
Juanita Brentson, Freshman, Savannah, Ga. ; 
Pearl Watson, Freshman, Savannah, Ga. ; and 
Betty Butler, Freshman, Glennville, Ga. 






SSC students and faculty 
| and friends cheer Tigers to 
victory. 



Savannah State College marching 
band poses with Director James Ever- 
ett (in white) and majorettes. 






■ 



SSC 1955 Cheering Squad 



ftf 



Class in Physical Education takes time out 
from Volley Ball practice. 




ssc 



Mrs. Helen M. Hayes, secretary o£ 
the Southwest Georgia Chapter of 
Savannah Alumni Association. 
Mrs. Hayes is Assistant to the 
Dean of Instruction at Albany 
State College. 






MISS GENERAL ALUMNI 1955-56 
Miss Eunice M. Wrgiht, daughter of Mrs. E. C. Wright 
and the late Charlie Wright, 5601 Waters Avenue, Savan- 
nah, Georgia. Graduated from Beach High School, 1946; 
Savannah State College, 1950. Reigned as "Miss Savan- 
nah State Chapter Alumni" 1952-53. Position: Secretary, 
Department of Student Personnel Services, Savannah 
State College; Member, St. Paul CME Church. 



MISS GENERAL ALUMNI ATTENDANT 
Mrs. Nadine C. Lewis, a native Savannahian, is a product 
of the local school system. She received her B. S. degree 
from Savannah State College in 1948. She has done fur- 
ther study toward a Masters degree at New York Uni- 
versity, where she did special performances in creative 
dancing. Present position: Fourth Grade teacher at the 
Frank W. Spencer school in Savannah, Georgia. 

She is married to Benjamin F. Lewis, also a graduate 
of Savannah State College 



MISS GENERAL ALUMNI ATTENDANT 
Miss Martha E. Ford, daughter of Mrs. Estalla Ford. 512 
West York Street. Graduated from Beach High School, 
1947; Savannah State College, 1951. Present position: 
First grade teacher at Collins Elementary School, Col- 
lins, Georgia, Tattnall County. 



Page 19 




*^' ■** ,-.*'':£ 



> 









^ 8 



^r * 



4 ^ $• 



Graduating Class, August 1955. 



Robert Jordan, graduate of Savannah State College, elass of 1946, appointed principal of 
*rank W. Spencer Elementary School in Savannah, Georgia. He received his M.S. degree in 
Administration during the summer of 1950, and a six-year Professional Diploma during the 
summer of 1954. 

Before coming to Spencer, Mr. Jordan served as principal of William James High School in 
Statesboro, Georgia for five years, and prior to that he was principal of Carver High School in 
Wadley, Georgia for four years. 







Three Savannah State College Alumni pose 
with Poultry Show winner : L to R, Wood- 
row Wilson, Agricultural Extension Agent, 
Emanuel County; Doris Brown, Prize Win- 
ner from Emanuel County; Mrs. Jonnye 
Moye, Home Economic Extension Agent, 
Emanuel County; and Miss Carrie Powell, 
State Home Economic Extension Agent. 



Alexander Hurse, State Agricultural Exten- 
sion Agent, congratulates Leroy Stanley, 
Laurens County, whose hirds were reserve 
champions at Poultry Chain Show in Macon 
recently. Shown holding bird is Luther Cole- 
man, Laurens County Extension Agent. Both 
4-H Club agents are SSC graduates. 




Homecoming Committee of Savannah State College Alumni Asso- 
ciation. L to R, E. Jones, Benjamin Lewis, Miss Louise Milton, Mrs. 
Elsie Admans Brewton, Mrs. Madeline V. Hunnor, John McGlock- 
ton, President of General Alumni Association, Miss Eunice Wright, 
Miss Martha Ford, Mrs. Jane M. Dingle, and Ed Greene. 



Page 21 




ssc 

PEOPLE AND EVENTS 



L to R: Carter Peek, senior, Athens, Ga. 
and William Weston, senior, Savannah, 
Vice President and President of SSC 
Student Council. 




Miss Gloria Gamble 



Dr. and Mrs. W. K. Payne, Savannah State Col- 
lege and Dr. and Mrs. J. J. Seabrooks, former 
President of Claf lin, pose with all-conference boys 
team at the annual Southeastern Athletic Confer- 
ence basketball tournament held at Savannah 
State College in the new Gymnasium. 



Dr. W. K. Payne presents SEAC championship 
trophy to Savannah State College 1955 boys 
champion aggregation. 



f ' f ' f 



l*sp» 



N 
1 


1 






05 



I SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

Savannah State College is an accredited senior college, located in Chatham County, just one mile from 
Savannah, the oldest city in the state. Its campus, surrounded by beautiful moss laden oak trees, is one of 
the most naturally beautiful campuses to be found anywhere. One hundred and thirty-six acres of land with 
more than thirty modern buildings, fully equipped, comprises the campus of "Georgia's largest institution for 
the higher education of Negroes." 

For catalog, information and registration blank — write: 

Registrar, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia 

Students who are graduates of accredited high schools will be admitted without, examinations. Students 
who are graduates of non-accredited high schools may qualify for admission to the freshman class through 
examination. All freshmen must file application not later than August 15, 1955. 

Program 

Veterans will get all benefits allotted under the law. Contact the Veteran's Secretary, Savannah State 
College, Savannah, Georgia for details. 

A WIDE VARIETY OF COURSES DESIGNED FOR: 

* Men and women who desire to prepare for teaching positions in elementary schools and secondary 
schools. 

* Normal school graduates and high school graduates who desire to earn a Bachelor's degree in 
Humanities, Social Science, Natural Science, Education, Business Administration, Engineering and 
Technical Sciences, and Vocational Training. 

Eight Divisions 

The Board of Regents has approved the formation of seven Instructional Divisions and the division 
of General Extension at Savannah State College. 

The new divisions will be: HUMANITIES, SOCIAL SCIENCE, NATURAL SCIENCE, EDUCATION, 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, ENGINEERING AND TECHNICAL SCIENCES, and VOCATIONAL 
TRAINING. 

These Instructional Divisions with General Extension, will comprise the Savannah State College Pro- 
gram, totaling eight divisions. 

The departments of Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry will compose the NATURAL SCIENCE 
DIVISION. The EDUCATION DIVISION will be composed of the departments of Elementary and Secondary 
Education. The Secondary Education majors will specialize in SOCIAL SCIENCE, General Science, Mathe- 
matics, Health and Physical Education, ENGLISH AND LITERATURE, COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS, DISTRIB- 
UTIVE EDUCATION, INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION, AND GENERAL AND SPECIAL SHOP SUBJECTS. In 
the DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, the students can specialize in Industrial Management, Office 
practice, Accounting, and Business and Financial Economics. 

A Bachelor of Science degree in Home Economics is being offered in the following fields, institutional 
management, foods and nutrition, textile and clothing, arts and crafts, and nursery school and family life edu- 
cation. There will also be terminal courses in dressmaking and tailoring, food production and cooking. 






Page 23 







y 




SAVANNAH 

STATE 

COLLEGE 



fHE BULLETIN 



VOLUME 9 -NO. 3 



FEBRUARY, 1956 



loj 








INFORMATION TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 





INSTRUCTION 




'PietideHt't TKeteOft 



Each year larger numbers of Americar 
are being enrolled in colleges and institutior 
of higher learning. Opportunities for makin 
a desirable life and advancement abound fc 
students who have earned a college degrei 
The majority of American youth can acquire an educatio 
if they have the determination and ability. There are man 
colleges which present a variety of offerings and program 
It has been said often that there is a college for every ind 
vidual who has the desire to find the one that suits his need 
American youth have a distinct privilege in selecting thei 
institutions of higher learning. 

In making a selection the student should consider man 
items. Among these would be his abilities, aims, and need: 
as well as the standing of the college, its location, and facil 
ties. Many colleges will offer similar programs of instruc 
tion, but each varies in the opportunities provided fc 
individual growth. A college which affords students or 
portunities for actual participation in the institution's lii 
and the larger community in which the college is locate 
will provide unlimited educational values for students, 
stimulating atmosphere, opportunities to take an active pai 
in the life of the community and a feeling of belongin 
constitute factors for making for a superior educational pr( 
gram. In selecting a college, a student should choose one i 
which he can construct a rich, full, stimulating school a 
reer. In most instances, the college chosen should be on 
where the student feels that he can be eminently successfu 
his standards of living will be raised, his ideals will be eh 
vated, his initiative stimulated, and his abilities challengec 

William K. Payne 



THE SAVANNAH STATE 

COLLEGE BULLETIN 

December 1955 

President 

Dr. William K. Payne 

Editor-in-Chief 

Wilton C. Scott 



Vol. 9 



No. 



THE SAVANNAH STATE BULLETIN is published in October, Decembe 

February, March, April and May by Savannah State College. Entered as secon 

class matter, December 16, 1947, at the post office at Savannah, Georgia, undi 

the Act of August 24, 1912. 



Campus view. 






l# . 9W 






SJJ8JB ', 




This bulletin has been prepared primarily for the information 
of the high school graduate who has already decided to attend some 
college, but who has not made up his mind which college to attend. 
However, the institution also hopes to reach the graduate who has 
not yet decided to attend college or who, for some reason, has de- 
cided against going to college. 

People go to college for different reasons. Some go for the pur- 
pose of learning how and what to teach others; some seek cultural 
development and a broader understanding of man and his history 
through an education in the liberal arts; some go in order to learn a 
trade so that they may enter into business for themselves; still others 
go to gain skills for financial advancement, or for some service in 
specialized fields or the professions. No matter what the individ- 
ual reason may be, most of them go because they know that typically 
a college graduate is better informed and better able to make his 
way in life. 

Savannah State College can offer you all of these opportunities. 
Are you willing to accept them? 

Some Brief Facts 

Savannah State College is located in Chatham County near the 
town of Thunderbolt, five miles from Savannah, Georgia's oldest 
city and chief seaport. 

The campus, comprising one hundred and thirty six acres, pre- 
sents a setting of matchless natural beauty. There are thirty five 
buildings. Among the more outstanding are the attractively de- 
signed and modernly constructed Wright Hall, housing 210 men; 
Wiley Hall, the annex to Willcox Gymnasium; Camilla Hubert Hall, 
housing 175 women; Adams Hall, the dining hall, serving 500 stu. 
dents at a time; Herty Hall, the science building- Hammond Hall, 
the newly renovated and modernly equipped Home Economics Build- 
ing; Morgan Hall, the Trades and Industrial Building; Hill Hall, 
which houses the Library; and Meldrim Hall, consisting of admin- 
istrative offices, the auditorium and some classrooms. 

Academic Rating 

Savannah State College is fully accredited by the Southern As- 
sociation of Colleges and Secondary Schools and by the Department 
of Education of the State of Georgia. 

Admission 

Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who present 
evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound health, 
and interest in a specific course of study are eligible to apply for ad- 
mission to the several departments of the college. 

Each candidate for admission is required to make formal appli- 
cation and there after submit such credentials as may be needed to 
support the application. Admissions correspondence should be ad- 
dressed to the 

Director of Admissions 

Savannah State College 

State College Branch 

Savannah, Georgia 

Certificates of Residence Required: 

1. Residents of Georgia 

Any applicant for admission who is a resident of Georgia is re. 
quired to submit certificates of residence from two alumni of 
Savannah State College. 

Each applicant for admission shall also submit a certificate 
from the ordinary or clerk of the superior court in the county 
in which he resides. 

2. Non-residents 

Any applicant for admission who is not a resident of Georgia 
shall submit similar certificates of residence from two alumni 
of Savannah State College or from two reputable citizens of the 
community in which he resides. 

Each such applicant for admission shall also submit a certifi- 
cate from a judge of the court of record of the county, parish 
or other political sub-division of the state in which he resides 
that he is a bona fide resident of such county. 

Admission to the Freshman Class: 

1. An applicant may be admitted to the freshman class by cer- 
terficate under the following conditions: 

(a) He must have graduated from an accredited secondary 
school with rank in the upper half of his class. 

(b) The official transcript, mailed directly from the principal 
to the Director of Admissions, must present a distribution 
of at least fifteen entrance units. 





BUILDINGS 



(c) He must be recommended by his principal. 
2. An applicant who, though graduated from an accredited sec- 
ondary school, has not maintained rank in the upper half of 
his class; or who has graduated from a non-accredited second- 
ary school; or who has not completed the secondary school 
course, may qualify for admission to the freshman class 
through examinations. 

(a) Such an applicant must have earned a score at or above 
the median (by Georgia Norms) either in the Statewide 
Senior Scholastic Aptitude Tests or in entrance exam- 
inations administered at this college. 

(b) He must be recommended by his principal. 

Final Action on the Application: 

When all necessary credentials have been received, the Director 
and Committee on Admissions will consider in detail the candidate's 
qualifications for admission. Each applicant will then be notified 
as to the action of the Committee. If all available evidence indicates 
that the candidate is duly qualified, he will be mailed a Notice of 
Admission. 

Final decision on applications for admission in September will 
be rendered on August 15th, and for other quarters not later than 
one month before the beginning of the quarter. 

Only persons who present the Notice of Admission may partici- 
pate in activities of Freshman Week and register for courses. 

ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 

*Per Quarter *Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $ 30.00 $ 90.00 

Health Fee 3.00 9.00 

Student Activity Fee 7.50 22.50 

General Deposit *» 10.00 ** 10.00 

Total Charges, Day Student $ 50.50 $131.50 

Room, Board & Laundry 153.00 459.00 

Total Charges, Boarding Student $203.50 $590.50 

All charges are subject to change at the end of each quarter. 
Normal costs for books and supplies approximate $20.00 per quar- 
ter. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. Stu- 
dents are required to meet their financial obligations promptly as a 
condition of their remaining in college. Students granted scholar- 
ships or work-aid will be notified in writing and credit will be made 
to their accounts. 

Self Help Opportunities: 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet college ex- 
penses through part. time employment, provided they maintain satis- 
factory scholastic averages. These work opportunities, limited in 
number, include such jobs as clerical and stenographic work, li- 
brary work, waiting tables, pantry and kitchen work, skilled and un- 
skilled work in the several trades and in maintenance. 

Students who plan to apply for part-time work should note care- 
fully: 

1. No student should attempt to enter Savannah State College 
unless he is prepared to pay the major part of his total college 
expenses. 



\ I 



2. All students are required to pay all entrance expenses when 
they register. 

Money earned through part-time work may thereafter be cred- 
ited to the monthly account. 

3. Students are assigned to work only after they have been ad- 
mitted and have arrived on the campus. Work assignments are 
made in the offices of the Dean of Men and the Dean of 
Women. Students interested in securing work-aid should 
write to: 

Office of Student Personnel 
Savannah State College 
State College Branch 
Savannah, Georgia 

Scholarships: 

A limited number of special scholarships are available to selected 
students who meet the required standards of scholastic merit, high 
character, general promise, and superior achievement in certain spe- 
cific areas of the college program. 

Students interested in securing scholarships or grants-in-aid 
should write to: 

Office of the Dean of Faculty 
Savannah State College 
State College Branch 
Savannah, Georgia 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Savannah State College contributes to the attainment of a well- 
rounded education by providing many opportunities for students to 
participate in a wide range of significant activities. Through the 
efforts of organized groups, programs are planned for the social, 
religious, and cultural advancement of the college community. 

In addition to the Student Council, the following student inter- 
ests are : 

CLUBS: 

Art Club, Business Club, Collegiate Counsellors, Dormitory Coun- 
cils, Home Economics Club, Newman Club, French Club, Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council, Savannah State College Student Loan Association, 
Tiger's Roar (student publication), Ushers' Club, Veterans' Club, 
YMCA, YWCA, Campus 4-H Club, and the Women's Council. 

FRATERNITIES, SORORITIES, AND HONOR SOCIETIES: 

The following national social fraternities are organized on the 

campus: Alpha Phi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, and Kappa Alpha Psi. 
The following national social sororities are organized on the 

campus: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Sigma Gamma Rho, Zeta Phi Beta, 

and Delta Sigma Theta. 

The national honor society, Alpha Kappa Mu, has a chapter on 

the campus, as well as the Scientific Honor Society, Beta Kappa Chi. 

MUSIC: 

The choir, band, and glee clubs, are open for membership to all 
students interested in music. These groups perform not only locally, 
but are in constant demand for special programs throughout the 
state. 

RECREATION AND SPORTS: 

The Department of Health and Physical Education conducts a 
well-rounded intramural athletic program of seasonal activities for 
men and for women. Utilizing group games and various sports for 
their full educational and health values, the following sports are 
featured: football, basketball, track and field, tennis, baseball, soft- 
ball, volleyball, field hockey and badminton. 

Savannah Statt College holds membership in the Southeastern 
Athletic Conference as well as in two national athletic associations, 
the NCAA and the NIAA. 

CULTURAL OPPORTUNITIES: 

In order to supplement formal education on the campus, many 
activities are presented for cultural enrichment. Student assemblies, 
institutes, motion pictures, lectures, art exhibitions, dramatics, for- 
ums, athletic contests, hobby groups and tours contribute to the 
general welfare of the community. 

The Committee on Campus Cultural Activities brings to the 
campus each year renowned artists of the concert world. Yearly 
programs of the College Artists Series usually include a vocalist, a 
pianist, a small group of singers, a large group of singers, dancers 
and a dramatic group. 

GENERAL CURRICULUM 

The general curriculum at Savannah State College is designed 
to afford an opportunity for every student to acquire the fundamental 
skills, attitudes, habits, appreciations, knowledge and understanding, 
and competency in thinking and communication that are necessary 
for effective living in a dynamic society. It proposes to sensitize 
every student to the manifold problems and responsibilities involved 






ACTIVITIES 



in personal and social adjustment. It aims to instill in each student 
the respect for the rights and dignity of all mankind. 

At Savannah State College, general education is concerned with 
all the major disciplines that: (1) enrich the lives of students; 

(2) that acquaint them with the broad areas of human experience; 

(3) that cultivate indiscrim : nately an appreciation for the best that 
has been transmitted to our society; and, (4) to provide an intellec- 
tual and social foundation upon which to build a profession or a 
vocation. 

The program rests on the assumption that an individual trained 
only in his vocation or specialization is obsolete in a dynamic so. 
ciety. He may even be perilous to human progress. Our general 
curriculum aims to circumvent this. It is a complement of vocational 
and professional education. It provides a basis for intelligent thinking 
and action for each citizen irrespective of his life's work. 

GENERAL EDUCATION COMMITTEE: 

Dr. E. K. Williams, Chairman, Mr. J. H. Camper, Mrs. B. J. 
Farmer, Mrs. Florence F. Harrington, Mr. R. C. Long, Mr. A. E. 
Peacock, Mr. F. D. Tharpe, Mr. W. V. Winters, Miss Alice Bevens, 
Miss Henrietta Collier, Miss Mamie Davis, Mr. William N. Weston. 

Some Departmental Curricula 
BIOLOGY: 

The aims of the Department of Biology are: (1) to provide for 
all students that knowledge which is essential to an understanding 
of the biological basis of living; (2) to train persons adequately 
through the media of advanced courses for entry into the profession- 
al study of dentistry, medicine, and nursing; (3) to prepare persons 
to teach the biological sciences in the secondary school or to con- 
tinue study on the graduate level. 

BUSINESS: 

The Department of Business has as its primary function the 
preparation of all students for gainful participation in the business 
world. The department aims, therefore, through its curricular offer- 
ings and through counselling of individual students, to approach 
the following goals: (1) Preparation of students for employment in 
business enterprises as bookkeepers, accountants, secretaries, sten- 
ographers, and salespeople, and (2) preparation of students for es- 
tablishment, operation, management, and ownership of business en- 
terprises; and (3) preparation of teachers of business and distribu- 
tive education subjects in the secondary schools. 

To realize these aims this department offers a degree program 
as well as a terminal program which consists of a two-year secre- 
tarial science course offered for students who, at present, do not find 
it convenient to remain in college for four years; and/or for those 
who wish to pursue a junior college or special business program. 

CHEMISTRY: 

The work in the Department of Chemistry is intended to serve 
four purposes. (1) It provides a thorough foundation in the general 
courses for students who seek an understanding of the methods and 
achievements of the chemist. (2) It provides the needed semi-spe- 
cialized preparation for students who are majoring in home economics 
and trades and industries. (3) It affords training for persons who 
plan to teach science in secondary school. (4) It provides pre-pro- 
fessional training for students who intend to study dentistry, medi- 
cine, etc., and for those who plan to enter graduate school. 

EDUCATION: 

The Department of Education serves three major purposes. (1) 
In cooperation with the College-wide Teacher Education Committee 
and the State Committee on Cooperation in Teacher Education, it 
spearheads the process of continuous planning, experimentation, and 
evaluation of the total teacher training program. (2) It assumes 
chief responsibility in the selection, guidance, and training of stu- 
dents for the work of teaching in the elementary and secondary 
schools — mainly in the schools of Georgia. (3) For persons who 
plan to become principals and supervisors, it provides an adequate 
foundation for advanced study on the graduate level. 

ENGLISH: 

The aim of the Department of Languages and Literature is to 
help the student become proficient in oral and written language, and 
to help him develop an appreciation for good literature. 

A student who has successfully pursued English as his major 
subject should have some power to discriminate between that which 
is genuinely great and that which is less great in literature. He 



Coeds— On Field Trip 



iii 



should have an intelligent acquaintance with a fair number of Eng- 
lish masterpieces. He should have some facility, taste, and under- 
standing in expression, and some idea of the main trends of Eng- 
lish and American thought. 

As to French and Spanish, objectives are: (1) to develop a 
working knowledge so that the student will be fairly proficient in 
the mechanics of writing and speaking the language, and (2) to 
enable the student to read the language with reasonable compre- 
hension and ease. 



MATHEMATICS: 

The aims of the Department of Mathematics and Physics are: 
(1) to offer all students an opportunity for acquiring those basic 
skills which are needed for successful living, together with an ap- 
preciation of the contributions of these sciences to the cultural her- 
itage; (2) to equip students in the trades, home economics, et 
cetera, with the means of developing logical thought procedures 
and insight into physical laws — all of which constitute essential 
tools in the several fields; (3) to provide training through ad- 
vanced courses for students preparing to undertake the study of 
medicine and those planning to ienter graduate school; (4) to as- 
sure adequate preparation in both content and instructional skills for 
prospective teachers in the secondary school. 

FINE ARTS: 

The Department of Fine Arts provides opportunity for work in 
music and the graphic arts for students who seek an intelligent 
understanding of the arts as a vital element in general education, 
and for those who have special interests and abilities in these fields. 

Specifically, the aims of the offerings in music are: (1) to pro- 
vide opportunities for all students to develop an appreciation of 
music and musical productions, and though participation in general 
music students who show interest and aptitude to the point of compe- 
tence needed for participation in the college band and in the choir. 

The courses in graphic arts are intended: (1) to provide the 
general student an understanding and appreciation of art which 
are essential to rounded living; (2) to enable students of elementary 
education and home economics to develop facility and skills in adapt- 
ing art materials to functional ends in the school and home. 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 

The essential aim of the Department of Health and Physical 
Education is to afford professional training for pre-service and in- 
service teachers of health and physical education in the elementary 
and secondary school. A parallel aim is advisement. On the basis 
of clearly defined criteria, the department encourages potentially 
qualified students to undertake professional training in this field. 
Those who appear less well qualified are guided away from the field. 
A third aim is to provide for all students instruction in the basic 
principles of health and recreational activity needed for wholesome 
living. 

In pursuance of the foregoing aims this department offers in- 
struction in basic concepts and activities of health and physical 
education as an essential phase of the general curriculum. The de- 
partment offers also a minor sequence which provides limited prep- 
aration for prospective teachers and workers in public and private 
recreational facilities. 



HOME ECONOMICS: 

Curricula in the Division of Home Economics afford training 
leading to the professional degree in the areas of clothing and tex- 
tiles, foods, nutrition, and institution management; and child de- 
velopment. 

The program is directed toward two major objectives. The first 
of these is to enhance the general education of the student through 
a sequence of courses required by all as the core curriculum for com- 
mon learning. The core curriculum has three aims: (1) development 
of the student as a person, (2) preparation for family life, and 
(3) preparation for the responsibilities of citizenship in its broadest 
sense. The second major objective is preparation of the student to 
enter and advance with assurance and competence in one of the 
various professions in home economics. 

In cooperation with the Department of Business, this division 
offers, also, two-year terminal courses in dressmaking and tailoring 
and food production and cookery. These courses are of particular in- 
terest for persons who are already engaged in business, or planning 
to enter business, but who cannot now plan to remain four years 
in college. A person completing the terminal course is granted a 
certificate of proficiency. 





Refreshments at College Center 



SPECIAL 
ALUMNI ISSUE 



3 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



BULLETIN 




The Bulletin 

Alumni Issue 

President 
Win. K. Payne 



Editor in Chief 
Wilton C. Scott 

Associate Editor 
Prince Jackson 

Photo Editor 
Wm. H. Bowens 



President Payne's Message to 
Alumni and Friends of SSC 



Vol. 9 



May. 1956 



No. 7 



The Savannah State College Bulletin 
is published in October. December. 
February. March, April, and May by 
Savannah State College. Entered as 
second class matter, December 16. 1947. 
at the Post Office at Savannah. Georgia, 
under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



Index 

Page 
President W. K. Payne's Message 

to the Alumni 2 

College Seeks to Increase Services in 

Trades and Industries 3 

Men's Day Festival 7. . 3 

Message from Alumni Secretary 4 

Thirteen Students Chosen Who's Who 

In American Colleges 5 

Headlines from Periodicals 6 

Alumni Scholarship Account 8 

Trade Contest and Conference 9 

News . . . The Alumni 13 

Calendar of Commencement Events 19 



OUR COVER: President W. K. 
Payne addressing a group of alumni 
of Savannah State College. 



It is a pleasure to extend greetings 
to the Alumni and friends of Savannah 
State College. This is a special privilege 
since the alumni are increasing so rap- 
idly. Today the College is in active 
touch with more alumni and former 
students than in any other period of 
its existence. The establishment of con- 
tact with graduates over the sixtv-year 
period has heen inspiring and enjoy- 
able. During the past academic yeai 
increased effort has heen made to lo- 
cate and establish connections with the 
alumni and former students. For the 
first time, the College has found it 
possible to employ a staff member who 
could serve as Alumni Secretary. The 
appointment of Mr. Prince A. Jackson 
of the Class of 1949. has already indi- 
cated to us the tremendous importance 
of the position. Through the Office of 
the Alumni Secretary, the College is es- 
tablishing direct connection between the 
growing institution and the achieving 
alumni. It is the plan of the College to 
expand the services of this office each 
year. 

It is interesting to note the relation- 
ship that exists between an alumnus and 
the college. Ones undergraduate col- 
lege continues to be referred to as his 
alma mater. In this respect, the stand- 
ing of his college will always have per- 
tinent meaning. Probably that is the 
reason why alumni strive very hard to 
increase the status and prestige of the in- 
stitution from which they graduate. 
When one's college receives new status 
and prestige, the degree or training 
which one received there becomes en- 
hanced. Many of the alumni who have 
returned to the College have expressed 
satisfaction over the progress being 
made at the College today. 

Savannah State College has found op- 
portunity to be proud of the alumni on 
many occasions. During the current 
year many of the alumni have visited the 
College on special occasions and at odd 
times. In their visitations they have 
brought encouragement and inspiration. 
On two occasions financial contribu- 
tions have been made to the institution 
for the purpose of providing scholar- 
ship aid. In the fall of 1955 the Col- 
lege received $960. and this spring an- 
other contribution of $2,721 was re- 
ceived. This brought the total financial 
contribution for scholarship aid to $3,- 
681 by April 30. The assistance given 



in this area represents a beginning in 
one of the most undeveloped areas of 
the College. The program of the Col- 
lege to provide opportunities for able 
and promising students can be best 
developed through a system of scholar- 
ship aid. When promising young stu- 
dents are provided opportunity to learn 
and to grow, the future alumni, the 
citizens of the state, and the nation will 
all enjoy the benefits. It is my opinion 
that the movement now in progress will 
continue to gain momentum and to ex- 
tend itself. 

During the current academic year Sa- 
vannah State College has had the privi- 
lege of dedicating two new buildings. 
The occasion was the first of its kind in 
a period of almost twenty years. The 
two buildings were named in honor of 
Major R. R. Wright, the first president 
of the College, and Dr. C. G. Wiley, the 
second president of the College. These 
two buildings, a new men's dormitory 
and a gymnasium, have contributed 
much to the development of the College 
program. When the other two facilities, 
already authorized for Savannah State 
College, a library and a technical build- 
ing, are constructed, the College will be 
in even more favorable position to offer 
superior educational training. It is 
anticipated that these latter facilities will 
be ready for use by 1958. 

The outstanding improvement in 
these two areas are closely related to 
improvement of the quality of educa- 
tional training. For some time now 
many Americans have wondered how 
educational opportunities can be pro- 
vided for the promising and gifted who 
do not have sufficient financial support. 
Contributions from alumni and friends 
for such students make it possible for 
a few more to go through college. Good 
educational facilities help the faculty 
and the students to do better work. A 
growing institution creates an atmos- 
phere that encourages growth in all 
who touch it. 

W. K. Payne 

President 



THEODORE P. McLEAN, P. 0. Box 
664, Macon. Georgia, is a Landscape 
Architect. Mr. McLean majored in Vo- 
cational Agriculture while attending Sa- 
vannah State. He has done additional 
study at Tuskegee Institute. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



\n 



COLLEGE SEEKS TO INCREASE 
SERVICES IN TRADES AND INDUSTRIES 



The Division of Trades and Industries 
at Savannah State seeks to aid the col- 
lege in rendering a greater service to 
the State of Georgia and the nation as 
a whole in preparing people in the va- 
rious phases of industrial work. 

The division has the following pro- 
gram in operations to prepare students 
in marketable skills, technical know- 
ledge and competent and efficient teach- 
ers. In the preparation of teachers, cur- 
riculum is offered to: (a) Train Indus- 
trial Arts Teachers; (b) Teachers of 
General Shop; (c) Vocational Trade 
Teachers and Building: and (d) Build- 
ing and Construction. 

Students are trained to acquire mar- 
ketable skills and technical knowledge, 
to enter employment as a semi-skilled 
or skilled worker in the following 
Trades: 1. Automobile Mechanics (a) 
Repairs (b) Body and Fender; 2. Gen- 
eral Woodwork and Carpentry (a) Cab- 
inetmaking ( b ) Carpentry, repairs, con- 
struction; 3. Electrical Maintenance (a) 
Commercial Wiring (b) House Wiring 
(c) Electrical Appliances (d) Electrical 
Motor Repairing and Installation; 4. 
Radio Service and Repair; 5. Television 
Servicing and Repair; 6. Machine Shop 
Practice; 7. Masonry (a) Bricklaying 
(b) Cement Finishing (c) Plastering 
Id) Tile Setting: 8. Practical Nursing: 
9. Shoe Repairing and Leathercraft; 10. 
Drawing (a) Mechanical (b) Archi- 
tectural. 

The Division is expanding its pro- 
gram to train engineering technicians. 
That is, a person who can carry out in a 
responsible manner either proven tech- 
niques which are common knowledge 
among those who are technically ex- 
perts in his branch of engineering. The 
person is trained to work on designs, 
to do draftsmanship; estimating, ser- 
vicing, and testing materials etc. 

Curricula will be offered in the fol- 
folwing Technical fields: 

a. Electrical and Electronics Technol- 
ogy 

b. Automotive Technology 

c. Building Construction Technology 

d. Heating Refrigeration and Air 
Conditioning Technology 

e. Mechanical Technology 

f. Sheet Metal and Body Fender 
Technology 

g. Civil Engineer Technology 
h. Architectural Technology 

To stimulate, motivate, develop, ex- 
pand and promote interest in the va- 
rious phases of this work among stu- 



dents and teachers throughout the State 
of Georgia, several activities are con- 
ducted here at the college each year. 

The State Trade Contest for high 
School students are conducted each year 
for boys and girls. In a period of five 
years the number of students who come 
and take part in this activity have in- 
creased from 25 to 275. Trophies and 
certificates are awarded to the first 
place winner and then each team is sent 
to represent the whole State in a Na- 
lional Contest. Georgia Contestants won 
six National first place trophies out of 
ten areas during the contest for 1955, 
held at Arkansas A&M College. 

The other annual activity is a trade 
conference for coordinators of DCT pro- 
grams and Vocational Trade teachers. 
Also short courses of three weeks dura- 
tion are held each summer for State 
Trade Teachers, all of this is for the pur- 
pose of improving instruction among 
shop teachers in the State of Georgia. 
Experts from other states are called in 
to assist in this program. 

Thus through these services the divi- 
sion at the college is aiding in the pro- 
motion of a good educational program 
for Georgia. 

Air. Prince Jackson Jr., Alumni Sec- 
retary of the college, requests that any 
alumna or alumnus who is not getting 
any regular correspondence from the 
college, to contact the Office of Public 
Relations. Savannah State College im- 
mediately and leave the necessary in- 
formation. 



Ninth Annual 
Men's Day Festival 

The Ninth Annual Men's Day festival 
was held recently with the men of Sa- 
vannah State College conducting Sun- 
day School in Meldrim Auditorium. 
Following Sunday School, a Vesper 
program was presented. Doctor Alonza 
T. Stephens who is serving as associate 
professor of history at Savannah State 
College delivered the address. Follow 
ing the address the "Man of the Year" 
awards were presented to two students 
who have excelled in many areas while 
attending Savannah State College. The 
recipients this year were Carter Peek, 
Athens, and William Weston, Savannah. 

When the first "Man of the Year"' 
awards were given in 1952. Hosea Lof- 
ton, Darnell Jackson, Frank Prince and 
Joseph Turner were the recipients. In 
1953, Lee Mark Daniel. Ray m ond 
Knight and Charles W. Smith received 
these coveted medals and honors. 

Timothy Ulysses Ryals was named the 
"Man of the Year" in 1954 and he 
was the first person to receive tbis 
honor alone. 

Three students were named "Man of 
ihe Year" in 1955, they were: Curtis 
Victor Cooper, George Johnson and 
Clarence Lofton, who was the second 
of the Lofton Brothers to be named 
"Man of the Year". 





President W. K. Payne (left) and Mr. 
"Men of the Year" for 1955-56- They are 
right center. 



N« R. Freeman (right) are shown with the 
Carter Peek, left center and William Weston, 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Pasre 3 




John McGlockton, President of the General Alumni Association, 
presents a check for $2,721.00 to Dr. W. K- Payne for Alumni Scholarships. 




unmi Proud at 
Achievements 

The alumni of Savannah State Col- 
lege can be very proud of their man) 
contributions to the college this school 
year. They have participated in many 
of the schools functions and through 
their acheivements, have added prestige 
and honor to the college. 

The homecoming game and meeting 
gave notice of an alumni "banner" 
year. There were more graduates pres- 
ent that day than in many years. The 
meeting after the game had more than 
LOO graduates present. 

The Student Recruitment program 
this year put most of the emphasis on 
the alumni. It is believed that the alumni 
can send more students to the college 
than any other source. The alumni re- 
sponded to this new role and has 
pledged to send more students to Savan- 
nah State. 

The largest amount of money ever 
raised for scholarships was given to the 
President by the Savannah Chapter this 
year, which was a total of $2,721.00. 
Included in this amount were donations 
of $1,000.00 from the Savannah Sugar 
Refining Corporation and $500.00 was 
given by the Union Bag and Paper Cor- 
poration. These amounts represents the 
largest contributions ever given tin- 
college by any industry. 

During the past year, this office sent 
out more than 22,000 letters, newslet- 
ters, papers and bulletins to our gradu- 
ates. We visited more than 25 cities 
and counties helping to organize and re- 
organize chapters. If we have not 
reached you yet, please let us know. 

We hope that during the coming year, 
we will be able to work closer with our 
graduates and organize more chapters. 

Please help us to make our school the 
best ! 

Prince Jackson, Jr. 
Alumni Secretary 



Savannah State College graduates are identified with Numerous Greek Letter 
Organizations. The above picture of the Zeta Phi Beta Sorority is composed largely 
of graduates from Savannah State College. 



Homecoming for 1956 will be on 
November 10 at which time Savan- 
nah State College will play Clark 
College. Atlanta, Georgia. 

The theme for this year will be 
"Holidays of the Year". 

Persons or organizations desiring 
to participate should start making 
plans now. Contact Mr. Frank 
Tharpe, Savannah State College, for 
further information. 



Page 4 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



I 



Thirteen Students Chosen 
Who's |Who--American Colleges 



Thirteen Savannah State College stu- 
dents were chosen to appear in the 
1955-56 edition of Who's Who Among 
Students in American Colleges and Uni- 
versities. Eight seniors, three juniors 
and two sophomores were picked by a 
student-faculty committee on the basis 
of several well-defined criteria. The 13 
were selected from a possible 20 names 
submitted. In addition to classification 
(sophomore and above) the criteria in 
eluded excellence in scholarship, lead 
ership, citizenship and character, in 
connection with the shool as well as 
the community. They must also show 
promise of future usefulness in their 
fields of endeavor to the school, busi- 
ness and society. 

Those students selected were: Reu- 
ben Cooper, junior, Americus, member 
of Tiger's Roar staff (student publi- 
cation I . Marshal Board. Veterans Club. 
YMCA. President - - Camera Club: 
Mamie Davis, "Miss Savannah State" 
1955-56. President, AKA Sorority; 
George Faison, sophomore, Savannah. 
President. Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity. 
Social Science Club. Vice President — 
Collegiate Counselors: Henry N. John- 
son, senior, Savannah, members — Alpha 
Kappa Mu Honor Society; Isaiah Mc- 
Iver, sophomore, Darien, Editor - 
Tiger's Roar, President - Economics 



Club. Chairman — Religious Emphasis 
Week, President - - Marshal Board, 
member — Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, 
Coach — YMCA Basketball team, Statis- 
tician — Varsity Basketball team. Secre- 
tary — Veterans Club; Gloria Ann Moul- 
trie, junior, Savannah. President — 4-H 
Club, member — Social Science Club. 
Spanish Club. Tiger's Roar Staff Stu- 
dent Council; Carolyn Patterson, jun- 
ior, Savannah, member — Newnan Club. 
Art Club, won second place in State Art 
Contest; Daniel Pelot. senior, Hardee- 
ville. South Carolina. President — Senior 
Class. Beta Kappa Chi Honor Society; 
Carter Peek, senior, Athens, President — 
Art Club, Savannah State College Chor- 
al Society. Vice President - - Student 
Council. Superintendent — Sunday 
School. Cartoonist — Tiger's Roar, won 
First Prize in State Art Contest; Doris 
Singleton Robinson, senior. Savannah: 
Gloria E. Spaulding, senior, Savannah. 
State President — Future Teachers of 
America. President — Delta Sigma Theta 
Sorority, member — Alpha Kappa Mu 
donor Society; James 0. Thomas, Jr., 
senior, Eulonia. Editor. The Tiger 
(Yearbook), President — YMCA. Kap- 
pa Alpha Psi Fraternity, member — Vet- 
erans Club. Collegiate Council. Tiger's 
Roar Staff; William N. Weston, senior. 
Savannah. President — Student Council. 
Vice President — Beta Kappa Chi Hon- 
or Society, Business Manager — Tiger's 
Roar, member — Alpha Kappa Mu 
Honor Society. Dramatics Guild. 



Prince Jackson, Jr. 
Alumni's Secretary 

In September. 1955. PRINCE JACK- 
SON. JR., was appointed as Alumni 
secretary at Savannah State College and 
also as an instructor in the Department 
of Mathematics and Physics. He re- 
ceived his B.S. in Mathematics from Sa- 
vannah State in 1949, which time he 
was valedictorian of the class. Mr. 
Jackson received his M.S. in Mathe- 
matics in October of 1950, from New 
York University Graduate School of 
Ar!s and Science and has also done ad- 
vanced study at New York University. 
Prior to coming to Savannah State Col- 
lege, he worked at William James High 
School in Statesboro. Georgia. ( 1950- 
55 ) as teacher of mathematics and sci- 
ence and as basketball, football, track 
and baseball coach. 



Dr. R. Grann Lloyd, director of Re- 
search and chairman of the department 
of Economics at Savannah State Col- 
lege, has received information that ex- 
cerpts from his article. "Parent-Youth 
Conflicts of College Students", appeared 
in the recently published book. "Educa- 
tion for Marriage" by James A. Peter- 
son. Mr. Peterson is associate profes- 
sor of Sociology and Marriage Coun- 
selor for the University of California. 

Dr. Lloyd made a study in 1952 of 
the background of 1,000 students of 
five college campuses in South Carolina. 
The article appeared in the 1952 edition 
of "Sociology and Social Research." 




The Annual State Agriculture Extension Workers Conference was held at Fort Valley State College in October, 1955. Most of 
the Persons shown above are graduates of Savannah State College. Mr. A. S. Bacon, a graduate with headquarters at Savannah 
State College, is the state director. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 



Savannah State College News 
Headlines From Periodicals 



Dr. Payne Founder's Day 
Speaker at Albany State 

Developing his address from the 
theme "An Emporium of Faith," Dr. 
W. K. Payne. President of Savannah 
State College told the Founder's Day 
Audience at Albany State College to 
"'maintain a steadfast faith, but never 
leave it dangling — always attach it to 
something with meaning and signifi- 
cance." The Georgia Educator addition- 
ally stated that people, for the most part 
"have far more ability than they give 
themselves credit for." and that all 
people "can be successful in some given 
area." The 53rd Founder's Day Pro- 
gram, presided over by President W. H. 
Dennis. Jr. had the added honor of 
having its Founder and President 
Emeritus. Dr. J. W. Holley present. Dr. 
Holley was arrestingly interesting as he 
related many of the problems encoun- 
tered in beginning the now named Al- 
bany State College. Numerous Alumni 
and guests were on hand for this well- 
presented program and for the recep- 
tion immediately following. 

—ATLANTA DAILY WORLD 



Summer Plans Announced 
At Savannah State College 

According to an announcement by 
Dr. E. K. Williams, director of sum- 
mer school for Savannah State College, 
the 1956 Summer School will be held 
June 11 - July 14 for the first session 
and July 16 - August 18 for the second 
session. 

The summer session program pro- 
vides offerings in the following depart- 
ments: biology, business, chemistry, eco- 
nomics, education, fine arts, health and 
physical education, language and liter- 
ature, mathematics and physics, social 
science, trade and industrial education 
and home economics. 

Some of the special offerings for the 
summer school include the following 
workshops: Education 391 (Arts and 
Crafts Workshop) ; Education 461 
( Workshop in Methods and Materials 
of the Elementary School Curricu- 
lum) ; Education 462 (Workshop in 
Methods and Materials of the Secon- 
dary School Curriculum — offered first 
session only) : Health and Physical Edu- 
cation 300s (Workshop in B School 
Health Program) ; Home Economics 
434 (Workshop in the School Lunch) ; 
Music 424 (Workshop in Band Tech- 



niques I . Some of the new and special 
courses that will be offered are: Health 
Education 305 (The Total School 
Health Program) ; Health Education 
425 (Synthesis in Basic Health Infor- 
mation): Industrial Education 4 16 
(Modern Techniques of Evaluation); 
Art 402 (Creative Craft Design). 

The first two courses are designed 
primarily for the purpose of meeting the 
needs of in-service teachers with respect 
to the new emphasis and requirements 
of the State Department as they relate 
to health in the public school program. 
The 3rd course is designed to meet the 
new emphasis and demand that are as- 
sociated with the recent development? 
of the testing program in the public 
school. The 4th course is aimed to pro- 
vide experiences in original designs in 
the different weaving techniques and 
patterns, and the operation of foot- 
powder looms, to develop the apprecia- 
tion of designs to textiles including the 
techniques of block printing, stenciling, 
silk-screening and other crafts; and to 
teach the application of art to everyday 
living. — THE SAVANNAH TRIBUNE 



Savannah State Alumni 
Fund Gets $1,000 Grant 

Dr. William K. Payne, president of 
Savannah State College announced 
Thursday that the Savannah Sugar Re- 
fining Corporation has donated $1,000 
to the Alumni Scholarship Fund headed 
by Prince Jackson, College Alumni Sec- 
retary. The Alumni Scholarship Fund 
has been personally endorsed by the 
Honorable Andrew J. Ryan, Jr., Solici- 
tor general Eastern judicial circuit of 
Georgia,, the right Rev. T. James Mc- 
Namara. rector at the Cathedral of Saint 
John the Baptist and other prominent 
citizens. 
March— THE PITTSBURGH COURIER 



Union Bag Gives $500 
To Savannah State College 

A check for $500 was sent to the Sa- 
vannah State College Alumni Scholar- 
ship Fund by the Union Bag and Paper 
Corporation. A letter accompanying 
the gift announced its purpose. Judge 
Kirk Sutlive, public relations director 
of the firm, sent the contribution to the 
college Alumni Fund. 

The fund is directed by the alumni 
secretary, Prince Jackson. All persons 



interested in helping an unfortunate 
young man or woman attend college 
may send checks to Alumni Scholarship 
Fund. Savannah State College. April 
17, 1956 

—SAVANNAH EVENING PRESS 



Savannah State 
Captures Four Firsts 

Savannah Sta'e College was the only 
institution to win four different awards 
at the Columbia University Scholastic 
Press Association annual meeting that 
attracted 5.000 high school and college 
editors from all over the United States. 

The Savannah State College Enter- 
priser, the Business Department Jour- 
nal, won first place in the departmental 
department. The Tiger's Roar won sec- 
ond prize in senior college student news- 
paper division. The Savannah State 
College Bulletin won second prize in 
the senior college and university news 
magazine division. The Savannah State 
College weekly newspaper column won 
second prize in the college page divi- 
sion. 

Savannah State College was repre- 
sented by Wilton C. Scott, director of 
Public Relations, who served as a con- 
sultant. 




Wilton C. Scott, director of public re- 
lations at Savannah State College, re- 
ceives an award for his work in the field 
of educational publicity. This award was 
given by the 100 Per Cent Wrong Club 
which is composed of a group of Atlanta 
businessmen. Mr. Scott is the third re- 
cipient of this award in its 21 -year his- 
tory. Scott is executive secretary of the 
National Alumni Association of Colleges 
and serves as public relations officer 
for the Georgia Teachers and Education 
Association. Marion Jackson of the At- 
lanta Daily World is making the presen- 
tation- 



Page 6 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



at 



Dr. Payne Named 
Convention Recorder 

Dr. W. K. Payne, president of Savan- 
nah State College, has been appointed a 
recorder for the American College Pub- 
lic Relations Assn. convention in Chi- 
cago June 29 - Jul) 2. 

Dr. Payne will assist in recording the 
proceedings of the conference for pub- 
lication purposes, according to conven- 
tion reports chairman Russell V. Kohr. 
More than 800 public relations staff 
members from throughout the nation 
are expected to attend the annual con- 
vention to seek ways to improve their 
public relations programs. 

—SAVANNAH MORNING NEWS 
Friday, May 20, 1955 



Savannah State Needs 

As commencement day approaches 
for Savannah State College, a special 
campaign is being conducted to raise 
scholarships for the Negro institution. 
Saturday, May 28. is Alumni Day and 
will be observed at the Thunderbolt 
campus, and Negroes and others of the 
community, interested in Savannah 
State will then have an opportunity to 
contribute to a scholarship fund. A 
meeting will be held at 6 p.m. at Mel- 
drim Auditorium, to be followed by a 
banquet. The Rev. David C. Grant of 
the class of 1935. a minister now serv- 
ing in Columbus, will deliver the prin- 
cipal address. 

Last year the alumni of the school 
gave scholarships totaling $2,376.50. 
part of which was on a grant-in-aid 
basis. To meet the expanding needs of 
college students, it is hoped that even 
larger contributions will be made this 
year. The 1955 demand is expected to 
be much greater for scholarship funds 
and all alumni are urged to contribute 
liberally. Savannah State College is 
one of the leading Negro colleges in the 
making rapid strides towards becoming 
South. It deserves generous support. 
-SAVANNAH MORNING NEWS 
(excerpt from editorial I 
May 23, 1955 



Charm Week At 
Savannah State College 

Savannah State College recently ob- 
served its annual Charm Week spon 
sored by the women of the Savannah 
State College faculty and student body. 
Featured speakers for the week of cele- 
brations were Mrs. Esther Warrick, 
principal, East Broad Street School, and 
Mrs. Freddye Henderson, assistant pro- 



fessor of Art at Spelman College. 
Among other outstanding features and 
events highlighting the Charm Week 
celebration were Lois Towles, piano re 
cital; mother-daughter banquet. Mrs. 
Ella Law. speaker: the Rev. S. C. 
Thornton, church speaker: a fashion 
show and exhibit. 

-PITTSBURGH COURIER 
May 28. 1955 



The grants were given by the South- 
tin Fellowships Fund and experimental 
program of grants in aid for summer 
school study. Mrs. Owens will study at 
New York University and Mrs. Avery 
at Ohio State University. 

-AFRO-AMERICAN 
June 4. 1955 



Two SSC Seniors Get 
Graduate Scholarships 

Graduate Scholarships have been of- 
fered to two Savannah State College 
Seniors this year. Miss Barbara Brun- 
son and Thomas Evans. 

Miss Brunson received the Zeta Phi 
Beta Sorority scholarship, while Evans 
received the graduate scholarship to 
Howard University awarded by the 
graduate council of the Washington. I). 
C. School. 

-PITTSBURGH COURIER 
May 28. 1955 



Secondary Workshop 
Opens At SSC 

Operating on the philosophy thai 
"our students of today, under the guid- 
ance of professionally trained person- 
nel, make our citizens of tomorrow," 
the Savannah State College Secondary 
Workshop opened Thursday, June 9. 
with its ultimate aim that of making a 
very practical approach toward the real- 
ization of this goal. 

-PITTSBURGH COURIER 
July 2. 1955 



Savannah State College 
Teachers Get Study Grants 

Dr. William K. Payne, president of 
Savannah State College, announced that 
two faculty members. Mrs. Louise 
Owens. English Instructor and Mrs. 
Martha Avery. Home Economics in- 
structor, received grants-in-aid to stud\ 
this summer. 



Savannah State To Offer 
B.S. In Physical Education 

The Board of Regents. University 
System of Georgia, has approved the 
request of Savannah State College to 
offer the bachelor of science degree in 
health and physical education beginning 
in September, it was announced yester- 
day by Dr. William K. Payne, president 
of the College. 

—SAVANNAH MORNING NEWS 
August. 1955 




Miss Eunice Wright, ("Miss Alumni," center) reigns supreme with her attendants, 
Mrs. Nadine Lewis (left) and Mrs. Martha Johnson (right). Their escorts, Mr. Benjamin 
Lewis, Mr. John McGlockton and Mr. Robert Young are proud of their jobs. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 7 



SSC Sponsors 
Language Arts 

More than 300 students from high 
schools in Savannah and south Georgia 
participated in the state-wide high 
school Language Arts Festival spon- 
sored by Savannah State College and 
the Morning News and Evening Press 
using the theme, "Creature Expression 
through Choral Speaking and Poetic 
Interpretations." 

Schools receiving the highest ratings 
in group activities were: radio skits: 
Beach High. Edison - - good; choral 
speaking; Beach High, excellent, and 
Cuyler Junior High. Savannah, very 
good: one-act plays: Candler Count > 
High. Metter. very good, and Liberty 
County High, Mcintosh, excellent. 

Students receiving the highest ratings 
in individual activities were: poetic 
interpretation: Antoinette Cox. Beach 
High, excellent: Christine Bowles, Cuv- 
ler Junior High, good: Thelma Rogers. 
Plans Junior High, Planin, good; Clau- 
dell Johnson, Candler County High. 
Mcintosh, good. Round Table discus- 
sion: Julia Danzy, Beach, very good: 
Carolyn Campbell. Woodville. good: 
Delbert Glover. Beach, good: David 
Roddy. Liberty County High, Mcintosh, 
good: and Thurman Sanders, Beach, 
good. Verse Writings: Virginia Stew- 
art. Cuyler Junior School, very good; 
and Alma Stewart. Woodville High, 
very good. Oratory: Yvette Hodge. 
Cuyler Junior High School, very good: 
and James Shipman. Liberty Countv 
High School. Mcintosh, very good: 
Spelling: Bertha Johnson, Plains Junior 
High. Plains, good; Juanita Moon. 
Beach High, excellent; William Gor- 
don, Cuyler Junior High, excellent: 
Cynthia Freeman, Liberty County High, 
Mcintosh; and Todd-Grant High, Da- 
rien. good; Creative Prose Writing: 
John Gaynus, Beach, good; Jolene 
Washington, good; Mary Neavins. 
good; Caleb Western, good; Arnett Car- 
roll, good; Dorothy Evans, good (all of 
Beach) ; Charles Frazier and Annette 
Norman, Liberty County High, Mcin- 
tosh, good; and Nellie Zachery, Edison 
High, Edison, good. 



Charm Week Held 
Week of May 13 

Mrs. Mattie B. Payne, Counsellor 
and Instructor in Language Arts at 
Alfred E. Beach High School delivered 
the Mother's Day address at Savannah 
State College during a Special Vesper 
Service opening Charm Week. Im- 
mediately following Vesper, Mrs. Lauru 
Bradshaw. 209 Millen Street. Savan- 
nah, was honored as "Mother of the 
Year" at a Mother-Daughter Tea in 
Adams Hall. 



These two programs marked the be- 
ginning of the Charm Week activities 
at the College which ended on Satur- 
day, May 19. 

Among the activities held during 
Charm Week were: Film and Buzz Ses- 
sion; "Co-ed Capers," Talent Show; 
"Mating and Dating." — Gabfest and 
"Koke Klatsch;" Fashion Show; and a 
Junior-Senior Lantern Service. 

An All-College Assembly held in Mel- 
drim Auditorium on Thursday, May 17, 
concluded the activities of the week. 

Mrs. Mamie Downer, of Atlanta. 
Georgia served as guest consultant and 
model. 



_'. 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP ACCOUNT 

Savannah State College 
Savannah, Georgia 

Balance on deposit in Carver Savings Bank 

as of August 20, 1955 . . $962. 

Expenditures on September 24. 1955 960 

To Savannah State College for scholarship 

and grant-in-aid assistance $960.00 

Balance on deposit as of September 24, 1955 2. 

Contributions and miscellaneous proceeds 

from Sept. 24. 1955 to March 3. 1956 ... 279. 

Mrs. D. B. Armstrong $ 5.00 

Mrs. Frankie Brown 5.00 

Mrs. Lucile Atkinson 10.00 

Mr. W. H. Grier 10.00 

Mr. Hewitt Lundy ... 10.00 

Mrs. Sarah Mollette 5.00 

Mr. C. Riley 10.00 

Mrs. Ruth Seals 5.00 

Miss Savannah Webb 5.00 

Mr. Prince Jackson ( Proceeds from basketball 

game) 176.50 

Miss Ruth Mullino 

(Sale of homecoming souvenirs, etc!. 37.95 



;;, 
00 

87 
45 



$279.45 

5. Expenditures on March 27, 1956 

(To The Herald, for tickets) 

6. Balance on deposit as of March 27, 1956 

7. Contributions, etc., from March 3 through 

May 3, 1956 

From Mr. B. J. James $ 25.00 

Proceeds from Mr. Prince Jackson 32.00 

Refund from The Herald 8.91 

$ 65.91 

8. Expenditures on May 3, 1956 

To Savannah Chapter $176.50 

9. Balance on deposit in Carver Savings Bank 

as of May 3. 1956 

Respectfully submitted : 
T. C. Meyers, Treasurer 
General Alumni Association 



39 

243. 

65 



30 
02 
91 



176.51) 



132.43 



May 16, 1956 



Pase 8 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



£3 



Over 350 Attends State 
Trades Contest and Conference 



Savannah State College sponsored the 
Sixth Georgia Youth Industrial Educa- 
tion Association Trades Contest and 
Conference last with approximately 300 
boys and girls and 50 instructors and 
advisors from schools throughout the 
state of Georgia participating in the 
various contests and activities. 

For the first time, the Conference 
presented an Oratorical Contest, using 
as a theme. "Advantages Offered in 
Vocational Training Through the Di- 
versified Cooperative Training Pro- 
gram". The contestants and schools 
participating were: Jeraldine Miggs. 
Dasher High. Valdosta; Essie Crosby. 
Risley High. Brunswick; and Richard 
Frazier. Monroe High, Albany, with the 
latter receiving first place. 

Officers for the coming year were al- 
so elected as follows: President, Arthur 
R. Gardner, Moniter High School: Vice 
President. Harry Lindsey. Spencer High 
School: Secretary, Eleanor Minor. 
Spencer High School; Ass't Secretary. 
Selenia Robinson, Ballard Hudson High 
School, Macon; Treasurer. Pauline Jor- 
dan. Lucy-Laney High School. Augusta: 
Chaplin. Bessie R. Duncan, Carver Vo- 
cational: Reporter, Josephine Lyons, 
Lucy Laney High School; State Editor, 
Roosevelt Crawford. Monitor High 
School. 

On the last day of the conference over 
200 visitors gathered at various points 
around and in the Trades and Indus- 
trial Building to witness the trades Con- 
tests which were carried on throughout 
the entire afternoon. The winners of 
these contests will represent the state of 
Georgia at the National Trades Contests 
to be held at Tuskegee Institute.- The 
Georgia organization was outstanding 
last year by being the only state to 
bring back six first place winners from 
the national contests. 

The conference was closed with a 
social which was held in Willcox Gym- 
nasium on Friday night. During the 
intermission. W. B. Nelson gave a brief 
talk on the progress of the organiza- 
tion, officers were installed, and Dr. 
Payne awarded the prizes to the win- 
ners, who were as follows: WOOD- 
WORK EXHIBIT: George Sullivan. 
Ralph Bunche High School, Woodbine: 
Willie Lampkin, Risley High School, 
Brunswick; James Lawson, Risley High 
School, Brunswick; TAILORING: Ro- 
bert Evans, Ballard-Hudson Sr. High 



School. Macon : MECHANICAL 
DRAWING: Willie T. Stewart and 
Jasper McGahee. Lucy Laney High 
School. Augusta: Jerry Lattimore. Bal- 
lard-Hudson Sr. High School: UP- 
HOLSTERY EXHIBIT: Win slow 
Heard. Blackwell Memorial High 
School. Elberton; WOODWORK: Tom 
Newman. Fairmont High School. Grif- 
fin; Willie Lampkin. Risley High 
School: George Sullivan. Jr. Ralph 
Bunche High School; Roosevelt Stewart, 
Dasher High School; GENERAL 
WOODWORK: Ralph Bowman. Black- 
well Memorial High School: George 
Sullivan, Ralph Bunch High School: 
Tom Newman. Fairmont High School: 
LEATHERCRAFT: Wilhelmina Harris, 
Lucy Laney High School; Benjamin 
Sims. Ballard-Hudson Sr. High School: 
RADIO REPAIR: Lloyd Calhoun. Car- 
ver Vocational High School. Atlanta: 
BARBERING: Tommie Calloway. 
Blackwell Memorial High School; Em- 
ma J. Melvin. Risley High School: 
BRICKLAYING: John H. Curry, Lucy 
Laney High School; James Banks, Fair- 
mont High School; James Buckner. 
Spencer High School; WEAVING EX- 
HIBIT: Tommie Hampton. Dasher 
High School. Valdosta; LEATHER- 
CRAFT EXHIBIT: William Golden. 



Lucy Laney High School; Charles Jack- 
son. Monroe High School; Charles 
Gaines. Monroe High School; COSME- 
TOLOGY: Johnnie Moore, Carver Vo- 
cational High School; Mary Smith. 
Spencer Sr. High School; Calvin E. 
Toomer, Ballard Sr. High School; Leola 
Hopkins. Risley High School; PLAS- 
TERING: William Wiggins, Carver 
Vocational High School; CARPEN- 
TRY: Phelix James, Spencer Sr. High 
School: Charles Hall, Henry Reese. 
Monroe High School: Willie Evans; 
SHOE REPAIR: Berman Clyatt, Bal- 
lard-Hudson Sr. High School; Charlie 
Freeman, Lucy Laney High School; 
Charles Gaines, Monroe High School; 
AUTOMOBILE MECHANICS: Adron 
Marshall. Monroe High School; Johnny 
Black. Clavin Chester, Carver Voca- 
tional High School; Isaiah Jackson, 
Spencer Sr. High School; Ralph Car- 
son; ORATORICAL CONTEST: Rid- 
hard Frazier, Monroe High School; Es- 
sie Marie Crosby, Risley High School: 
Jeraldine Miggs. Dasher High School. 

A. Z. Taylor is Itinerant Trades 
Teacher for the State, W. B. Nelson is 
Director of Trades and Industrial Edu- 
cation at Savannah State and Dr. Ru- 
therford Lockette, of the Department of 
Education at Savannah State College 
was coordinator, assisted by Dr. Alonzo 
Stephens. Mrs. Louise Owens, J. R. 
Fisher, Mrs. Martha Avery and mem- 
bers of the Division of Trades and In- 
dustries. 




Former students of Savannah State College return to the campus to enjoy a concert 
featuring William James High School Choral Society, directed by Mr. Tharon Stevens, 
a graduate of the college. They are shown above chatting with college officials and 
Mrs. Beatrice Stevens, mother of Mr. Stevens. Left to Right: Miss Madeline R. Shivery, 
Miss Loreese Davis, Miss Lula Smith, Miss Anne Jordan, Mrs- Stevens and Mrs. Veronica 
Arnold. Miss Davis and Miss Jordan are members of the faculty at Savannah State 
College. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 9 



OLLEGE ALUMNI 
ual Meeting of the 



nation Association 



a, Georgia 




Robert C. Long, Sr. 
Receives Invite 

Robert C. Long, Sr., Associate Profes- 
sor of Business Administration at Sa- 
vannah State College, has been included 
among the 15 participants in the Foun- 
dation for Economic Education Inc., 
Seminar which will be held this sum- 
mer at Irvington-on-Hudson in New 
York, June II through 22. 

Long received the B.S. degree in Busi- 
ness Education from Hampton Institute, 
the B.A. degree in Retail Merchandising 
and Distributive Education; and a Spe- 
cialist in Business Education Certificate 
with a major in Administration and 
Supervision - Business Education. He 
has been affiliated with the Department 
of Business at Savannah State College 
since 1947 and has served as Acting 
Chairman of the department since 1948. 
In addition to his duties at Savannah 
State College, he is part-time instructor 
in distributive education-adult education 
program for the Alfred E. Beach Adult 
Education Center. 

Among his affiliations are the Alpha 
Chapter. Delta Pi Upsilon Fraternity; 
United Business Education Association; 
National Business Teachers Association ; 
National Business Teacher-Training In- 
stitution representative; Georgia Negro 
Chamber of Commerce; The Hub of 
Savannah ; the Academy of Political 
Science; the National Business Educa- 
tion League; and the Alpha Phi Alpha 
Fraternity. Inc. He also serves as Minis- 
ter of Music for the Butler Presbyterian 
Church of Savannah. 

The Foundation is dedicated to the 
search for solutions for basic problems 
in human relations. Colleges and uni- 
versities participating in this first of a 
series of seminars are: Illinois Insti- 
tute of Technology; Univ. of S. C. 
Lakycliff College, N. Y.; St. Joseph's 
College for Women, Brooklyn; San 
Jose State College, Calif.; McPherson 
College, Kansas; St. Mary's Univ., Tex.; 
Purdue University; Park College, Mis- 
souri; Boston College; University of 
Wyoming; Fordham University, N. Y. : 
College of the Pacific, California; Ohio 
State University; Prarie View A & M 
College, Texas; and Savannah State 
College. 



J. Randolph Fisher 
Receives Award 

J. Randolph Fisher, associate profes- 
sor of English at Savannah State Col- 
lege was awarded a George Washington 
Honor Medal by the Freedom's Founda 
tion at Valley Forge for his essay, 
"What the American Credo Means to 
Me." 

The Foundation was established at 
Valley Forge, Pennsylvania in 1949 as 
a non-profit, non-sectarian, and non- 
political organization whose aim is to 
pay tribute to the Father of the Nation. 
George Washington; to the United 
States of America; and to the American 
Credo. It offers awards to individuals, 
organizations, and schools for their 
work in bringing about a better under- 
standing of the American Way of Life, 
or to Americans who help bring about a 
better understanding of the American 
structure by the things they do, write, 
or say. 

Mr. Fisher is the second member of 
the Savannah State faculty to have won 



such an award. Mr. William J. Hollo- 
way, former personnel dean at the col- 
lege won the award in 1954 for an ad- 
dress given during Vesper services. 



Dr. Braithwaite 
Makes Good Will Tour 

The Savannah State College Choral 
Society, under the direction of Dr. Col- 
eridge A. Braithwaite, accompanied by 
Miss Minnie Rose James, made a good- 
will tour during the spring, giving con- 
certs in various schools and communi- 
ties in Georgia. 

Among the schools visited were 
Risley High School. Brunswick; Center 
High School, Waycross; Carver High 
School. Douglas; Cook County Training 
School. Adel; Moultrie Colored High 
School. Moultrie; Gillespie-Selden High 
School. Cordele; Dasher High School, 
Valdosta; Washington Street High 
School, Quitman. 




Dr. and Mrs. M. P. Sessoms are shown as they celebrated their 25th Wedding 
Anniversary recently. Mrs. Sessoms is a 1936 graduate of Savannah State College 
and is teaching in Tattnall County. She serves as Recording Secretary for the Savannah 
Chapter of the Savannah State College Alumni Association. Dr. Sessoms died on 
May 15, 1956. 



Pajre 12 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



\%1 



MEW 



The Alumni 



1903 

JULIUS C. FEW. 515 S. Madison 
Street, Albany. Georgia, is a retired fed- 
eral employee. 

1904 

THEODORE BUTLER GORDON. 
Jr.. 4213— 20th Street, N.E., Washing- 
ton. D. C. is a retired Railway Postal 

C '" k 1917 

FOSTER R. LAMPKIN. 2331 For 
syth Street. P. 0. Box 1096. Columbus. 
Georgia, is the owner of the Personal 
Real Estate and Rentals Firm in Colum- 
bus. Mr. Lampkin is married to the for- 
mer Maurice Cobb, who also attended 
Savannah State. Mr. and Mrs. Lamp- 
kin have traveled extensively in the 
United States, Canada and Europe. 
While in Europe they visited the fol- 
lowing countries: England, Scotland. 
Wales, Ireland. Holland, Belgium. Lux- 
embourg. Germany. Switzerland and 
France. ,-*,«,-, 

1930 

ARTHUR C. CARTER. 626 West 
40th Street, Savannah, Georgia, teaches 
Masonry at Savannah State College. He 
has done additional work at Atlanta 
University. 

HOMER T. EDWARDS. 1249 West 
Broad Street, Athens, Georgia, is Prin- 
cipal of Athens High and Industrial 
School. Mr. Edwards has done Gradu- 
ate work at Atlanta University, Uni- 
versity of Mighigan and New York 
University and received the M. Ed. at 
Atlanta University in 1947. He is mar- 
ried to the former Chlora Binford who 
graduated from Savannah State in 1952. 

1933 

DeWITT FERGUSON MORRISON. 
Box 53. Mcintosh. Georgia, is teaching 
at the Baconton Elementary School. He 
has done Graduate work at New York 
University. ^^ 

ALEXANDER HURSE, Savannah 
State College. Savannah. Georgia. i^ 
Negro State Club Agent for 4-H Clubs 
in Georgia. He has done additional 
study at Prairie View A&M College and 
South Carolina A&M College, receiving 
the M.S. Degree from the latter. Mr. 
Hurse is married to Mrs. Hattie C. 
Hurse, who is also an alumnus of Sa- 
vannah State and who teaches at Tatt- 



nall County High School. 

1936 

METTELLA W. MAREE, 910 East 
37th Street, Savannah. Georgia, is the 
Principal at the Paulsen Street School. 
She received the M.A. Degree from 
Columbia University, and has done fur- 
ther study at Columbia University, Uni- 
versity of Southern California, and 
University of Chicago. 

JOHN E. BRIGGS. Jr.. 328 Win- 
thrope Avenue, Millen, Georgia, teaches 
Agriculture at Jenkins County Training 
School, Millen, Ga. He has done addi- 
tional study at Michigan State Univer- 
sity. He received the Master's Degree 
from Michigan State also. 

1937 

J. L. WATSON, Post Office Box 223, 
Greensboro. Georgia, is the mathematics 
instructor at Pike County Consolidated 
High School in Zebulon, Ga. He has 
done advanced study at Tuskegee In- 
stitute. 



1938 



CORTEZ LEAKE C O W A R T, 211 
Church Street. Statesboro, Georgia, is 
the Home Economics teacher at Wil- 
liam James High School. Additional 
study was done at Atlanta University. 

R. W. CAMPBELL. 207 Roundtree 
Street, Statesboro, Georgia, is the Prin- 
cipal of Edward Johnson School, Brook- 
let, Georgia. He received the M.Ed. De- 
gree from Temple University. Mr. 
Campbell is the Executive Secretary of 
the Bulloch Countv Negro Chamber of 
Commerce; he also won the title of 
"Man of Year" for Bulloch County in 
1955, which was sponsored by the same 
organization. 

R. R. BUTLER. Jr., Box 141, States- 
boro, Georgia, teaches agriculture at 
William James High School. He has 
done advanced study at Tuskegee Insti 

1939 

ROSAMAE YOUNG PERRIN, 920 
East 38th Street, Savannah, Georgia, is 
leaching at the West Broad Street 
School. Mrs. Perrin has done advanced 
study at the University of Southern Cali- 
fornia Workshop and at Atlanta Uni- 
versity. 

RUBY LEE KING, 210 East Park 
Avenue. Savannah. Georgia, is a teacher 
at East Broad Street School, Savannah. 
She received her M.Ed. Degree from 
Atlanta University in 1951 and has 
done additional study at Columbia Uni- 



versity. Miss King was elected "Teacher 
of the year" at East Broad Street 
School, 1956. 

RUTHERFORD E. LOCKETTE, Sa- 
vannah State College, Savannah Ga., is 
the Assistant Professor in the Depart- 
ment of Industrial Education at Savan- 
nah State. Dr. Lockette holds the M.A. 
and Ed. D. Degrees from New York Uni- 
versity and University of Illinois re- 
spectively. While at the University of 
Illinois he was Teaching and Research 
Assistant and Research Associate. 



1940 



ELSIE ADAMS B R E W T N, 648 
West 34th Street, Savannah, Georgia, 
is teaching at the Hardeeville Elemen- 
tary School. Hardeeville. South Caro- 
lina. Mrs. Brewton is doing special 
work at South Carolina State College. 

PEARLIE C. LAY. 303 S. Tennessee 
St.. Cartersville, Georgia, is teaching at 
Summer Hill Elementary School. She 
has done advanced study at Tuskegee 
Institute. 

FLORINE JONES ABEL, 1101— 2nd 
Street. W.. Bradenton. Florida, is the 
Principal of the Bradenton Elementary 
School. She has done additional study 
at Atlanta University and Tuskegee In- 
stitute. She holds the M. Ed. Degree. 



1941 



LOUISE ORENE HALL. 635 West 
37th Street, Savannah, Georgia, is a 
teacher of commercial subjects at Al- 
bany State College. Albany, Georgia. 
Mrs. Hall received the M.Ed, degree 
from Atlanta LJniversity in 1947, and 
is now enrolled at New York Univer- 
sity in the School of Business Educa- 
tion working toward the Ed.D. Degree. 
She has been promoted to the rank of 
Assistant Professor at Albany State. 



1942 



GLADYS ORETHIA INGRAM. 606 
Hester Drive, Dublin, Georgia, teaches 
homemaking at the Oconee High School 
in Dublin. She has done additional 
study at Hampton Institute and New 
York University. 

BERNICE BRAVES MACON. 116 
Church Street. Claxton. Georgia, is 
Jeanes Supervisor of Bryan and Effing- 
ham Counties. She has done advanced 
study at Atlanta University and New 
York University. On February 18, 
1956, she was elected president of the 
Statesboro District of the Georgia Con- 
gress of Colored Parents and Teachers. 

DAISY MOSELLE DAVIS, 524 East 
Park Avenue. Savannah. Georgia, is 
teaching at Collins Elementary School 
in Collins, Georgia. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 13 




1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 

6. 



Mrs. Rutha Mae Glover 
Mrs. Mary L. Dawson McCoy 
Mrs. Sadie L. Cartledge 
Mrs. Eula Mae S. Jones 
Mary Sullivan 
Nslson R. Freeman 



7. Gladys M. Burney 



8. C. Allen Wiggins 

9. Geraldine Ziegler 

10. John E. Briggs, Jr. 

11. Theodore Butler Gordon 

12. Geraldyne M. Campbell 

13. Pauline A. Stoney 

14. Mrs. M. T. McFarland 



15. Fannie Lue Strange 






GERALD1NE MOODY CAMPBELL. 

207 Roundtree Street, Statesboro, Geor- 
gia, is the Third grade teacher at the 
William James High School, Statesboro. 
She has done additional study at Tem- 
ple University. 



1943 



MATTIE EMMA HARVEY, 437 - 

2nd Avenue. Columbus. Georgia, is 
teaching at the Claflin Elementary 
School. She received her M.A. Degree 
in Education in 1952, from New York 
University. She studied also at the John 
Carrol University in Cleveland. Ohio.] 

1944 

THERESA SIMMONS HARRIS, 330 
26th Street. Columbus, Georgia, teaches 
at the Carver Junior High, Columbus, 
where she is head of the English De- 
partment. She received the M.Ed. De- 
gree from Tuskegee Institute in 1954. 
She also studied at Temple University. 
Mrs. Harris was elected "Teacher of the 
Year" at Carver Junior High School 
for 1956. 

EUNICE N. WATSON. Box 223. 
Greensboro. Georgia, is the Home Eco- 
nomics teacher at Lemon Street High 
School. Marietta, Georgia. She received 
her M. S. Degree from Hampton Insti- 
tute. 



1945 



SARAH W. THOMPSON MO- 
LETTE. 1807 Ellis Street. Brunswick, 
Georgia, is a retired teacher. 

ALBERTA D. MANZO. is an English 
teacher at Pembroke High School. Mrs. 
Manzo received the M.A. Degree from 
Columbia University in 1951. 

1946 

PAULINE REESE R A N S B Y, 117 
Boyd Road. Hogansville, Georgia, 
teaches at Mary Johnson Consolidated 
School, Franklin, Georgia: and is a 
candidate for the M.A. Degree this sum- 
mer at New York University. Mrs. 
Ransby is married to Mr. Felton J. 
Ransby who is also a graduate of SSC. 
He holds the M.A. Degree from New 
York University, and is the principal 
of Mary Johnson Consolidated School. 

FLOSSIE D. JONES, 1103 West 40th 
Street, Savannah, Georgia, is a special 



education teacher for handicapped chil- 
dren. Mrs. Jones received the M.A. 
Degree from New York University in 
1955. 

LURETHA DAVIS PRINCE. 620 

West 45th Street. Savannah. Georgia, is 
teaching at East Broad Street School, 
Savannah. She received her M.A. De- 
gree from Columbia University. 

JOHN E. ROBINSON, P. O. Box 317. 
Hogansville. Georgia, is Principal of the 
West End High School in Hogansville. 
Mr. Robinson received the M.Ed. De- 
gree from Atlanta University in 1950. 
Mrs. Robinson is the former Miss Ayre 
E. Rakestraw. who is also a Savannah 
State alumnus. Mr. Robinson is the 
recipient of the Southern Education 
Foundation Scholarship. 1955 at Tuske- 
gee Institute and 1956 at George Pea- 
body College. Nashville. Tenn. 

1947 

CLIFTON ALLEN WIGGINS. 1112 
West 42nd Street. Savannah, Georgia, 
is the Principal of Springfield High 
School, Springfield. Georgia. He re- 
ceived the M.A. Degree from Atlanta 
University. Mr. Wiggins has been 
named principal of Effingham County 
(new) Central High School; he was also 
chosen "Teacher of the Year" for Clyo 
High School. Mrs. Wiggins is a Sa- 
vannah State graduate also. 

JESSIE DUNN. Route 4. Box 43. 
Crawfordville. Georgia, is a teacher at 
Murden High School. She has done 
advanced study at Atlanta University. 

ELOUISE A. P. JONES, 2102 Cle- 
burne Street, Brunswick, Georgia, is 
teaching at Risley High School in 
Brunswick. Mrs. Jones received the 
Master's Degree from Boston Univer- 
sity. She has also studied at Temple 
University. 

FLOREINE L. BATES, 1017 Love 
Street, Savannah, Georgia, is the Prin- 
cipal of the William James Primary 
School. Statesboro, Georgia. She has 
done additional work at New York 
University. 

MARY TAYLOR McFARLAND. P. 
O. Box 573, Darien, Georgia, is teach- 
ing at the Todd-Grant High School in 
Darien. She has done advanced study 
at New York University. Mrs. McFar- 
land was voted "Teacher of the Year" 
by the Mcintosh County teachers. 

BERTHA LONA WITCHER, 1110 — 
6th Avenue. Augusta, Georgia, teaches 



at Ursula Collins Elementary School in 
Augusta. She has done additional study 
at Atlanta University. Mrs. Witcher 
holds a Student Teachers Training Cer- 
tificate and is now an Associate member 
of the Paine College Staff in their Stu- 
dent Teaching program. 

DOROTHY J. HARRIS. Route 2, Box 
309, Cairo. Georgia, is a Fourth Grade 
Teacher in the Boston High School in 
Boston. Georgia. Miss Harris has done 
advanced study at Temple University 
and Fla. A&M UJniversity. She holds 
the Master's Degree. 

CLAUDIA R. BRIGGS. 328 Win- 
thrope Avenue, Millen, G eo r g i a, is 
teaching at the Jenkins County Training 
School, Millen. 

PAULINE A. STONEY. 2121 Harden 
Street, Savannah, Georgia, is a teacher 
and Registered Professional nurse. She 
has studied at Hampton Institute, At- 
lanta University and the Catholic Uni- 
versity. Washington, D. C. 

MILLA NEASE HALL, Route 2, 
Claxton, Georgia, is the Home Eco- 
nomics teacher at Monitor High School, 
Fitzgerald, Georgia. She has done ad- 
vanced study at Tuskegee Institute. 
Mrs. Hall is the wife of Mr. Charles C. 
Hall, Principal of Magnolia Street 
School, Valdosta, Georgia, who is also 
an alumnus of Savannah State. 

KENNIE E. SESSOMS. 177 Chica- 
mauga PL, S. W., Atlanta 14, Georgia, 
is a Postal Transportation Clerk. He 
has done advanced study at Atlanta Uni- 
versity. Mrs. Sessoms graduated from 
Savannah State also. She is the former 
Elaine Elliott. 

LILLA ASHE JONES, Post Office 
Box 201, Greensboro, Georgia, is the 
principal of Mt. Zion School in Greens- 
boro, Georgia. She has done additional 
work at Atlanta University. 

LULA BATTLE DILLARD, Post Of- 
fice Box 464, Forsyth, Georgia, teaches 
at the Hubbard Training School, For- 
syth. She has done advanced work at 
Tuskegee Institute, Atlanta University 
and New York University. 

1949 

JAMES WILLIAM FISHER, 518 
West Henry Street, Savannah, Georgia, 
is the Assistant Manager of the Fell- 
wood Homes Project (Housing Author- 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Pase 15 




6 



1. Arthur Dwight 

2. Edna Kemp Luten 

3. Mrs. Lizzie M. Tate Griffeth 

4. Pauline Reese Ransby 



5. Mr. Rutherford E. Lockette 

6. Mrs. Jannie W. Baker 

7. Herman Baker 

8. Foster R. Lampkin 



W^ 



9. Mrs. Jessie Dunn 



itv of Savannah). Mr. Fisher has done 
additional work at Atlanta University. 
CONERLIOUS W. McIVER, SR.. 
112 Third Avenue. Thomasville. Geor- 
gia, is a Negro County Agent in Thom- 
asville. Georgia. He has done advanced 
studv at Prairie View A&M College. 

J AN IE W. BAKER, 906 West 48th 
Street. Savannah, Georgia, is an ele- 
mentary teacher at the Glennville Col- 
ored School. Glennville. Mrs. Baker has 
done additional work at the University 
of Pittsburgh. 

MARY L. DAWSON McCOY, 711 
Corn Avenue, Albany. Georgia, holds 
the position of Librarian at Carver 
Junior High School. Albany. Mrs. Mc- 
Coy has completed most of the work 
for her Masters Degree. 

JULIA K. LESLIE. Route 1. Box 1. 
Greensboro, Georgia, is teaching at the 
Greensboro Colored High School. 
Greensboro. Georgia. 

EULA MAE S. JONES. Poplar Street. 
Hartwell. Georgia, teaches at the Hart 
County Training School. Hartwell. She 
has done additional work at Alabama 
State College. 

JUNE AUSTIN HART. P. 0. Box 
722, Millen. Georgia, is teaching at the 
Perkins School in Jenkins County. He 
has done additional study at South 
Carolina State College. 

VIVIAN FRANCIS DAVIS, 20 
North Park Street, Carrollton. Georgia, 
teaches the 7th Grade at Carver High 
School. Carrollton. She has done addi- 
tional study at New York University. 
She holds the M.A. Degree in Educa- 
tion. 

OREDA J. BAKER, 865 Doyle Street, 
Waynesboro. Georgia, is teaching at the 
Waynesboro High and Industrial 
School. 

JOHN PAUL JONES, 113 Pearl 
Street, Madison. Georgia, is a Funeral 
Director in Madison. He received a cer- 
tificate in Mortuary Science from the 
Atlanta College of Mortuary Science. 

KATHLEEN BOLES SCRUGGS. 

Clyo, Georgia, is Teacher-Librarian at 
Springfield High School. She has done 
advanced study at Fisk University and 
Simmons College. Mrs. Scruggs has 
been chairman of the Negro Division 
of March of Dimes in her home town for 
four years. 

IDA OPHELIA REEVES, Route 2. 
Box 311, Americus, Georgia, is a mem- 
ber of the faculty at Staley High School, 
Americus. Miss Reeves has studied at 
Columbia University where she received 
her M.A, Degree in mathematics. 



1950 



WILLIE MAY HENDLEY JACK- 
SON. 507 Second Avenue, McRae. 
Georgia, is teaching at Twin City High 
School. McRae Georgia. 

SAVANNAH WEBB, 234 N. Peters 
Street. Athens, Georgia, is teaching at 
Southside High School, Comer, Georgia. 
She has done additional study at At- 
lanta University. 

JESSIE FULGEON THOMAS, 1332 
Jackson Street, Macon, Georgia, is 
teaching at Henry A. Hunt Elementary 
School. Macon. Georgia. She has done 
advanced study at Florida A&M Univer- 
sity and Ohio State University. 

ROBERT FULTON DELOACH, JR.. 
is principal at Mary McLeod Bethune 
Elementary and High School, Folkston. 
Georgia. P. O. Box 117. Folkston, Geor- 
gia. He has done advanced study at 
Atlanta University and New York Uni- 
versity. 

MILDRED M. BUTLER. Rt. 1, Box 
65, Mcintosh. Georgia, is teaching at 
Retreat Elementary School. Mcintosh. 
Georgia. 

PEARL BELLINGER, 209 Johnson 
Street, Statesboro, Georgia, is teaching 
at William James High School, States- 
boro, Georgia. 

ESSIE TAYLOR BELL. 505 White 
Hall Street. Washington. Georgia, is 
teaching at Washington High School, 
Washington. Georgia. 



1951 



WILLIE C. BOWDEN, 1131 Peterson 
Avenue, Douglas, Georgia, is teaching 
at Risley High School, Brunswick, Geor- 
gia. He has done additional study at 
the University of Minnesota. 

WILLIE FRED PUGH, 408 E. Can 

Street. Donalsonville, Georgia, is teach- 
ing at Bethel High School, Colquitt, 
Georgia. Has done additional study at 
Columbia University. 

GEORGIA SCOTT AKERS. 220 Fan- 
nin Street, LaGrange, Georgia, is teach- 
ing at Kelley Grammar School, La- 
Grange, Georgia. 

GLADYS M. BURNEY, 618 Neshity 
Street. Waynesboro, Georgia, is teach- 
ing at Waynesboro High and Industrial 
School, Waynesboro, Georgia. She re- 
ceived the M.S. Degree in Home Eco- 
nomics from North Carolina College at 
Durham. 

KATIE B. HOOD, Rt. 2. Box 205, 
Sandersville. Georgia, is teaching at 
Jordan Junior High School, Sanders- 
ville. 



VESTER B. OLIVER. 233 Church 
Street. Statesboro, Georgia, is teaching 
at William James High School, States- 
boro. 

HERMAN BAKER, Steven Street, 
Wadley, Georgia, is teaching at B. T. W. 
Junior High School, Bartow, Georgia. 
He has done additional study at Penn- 
sylvania State University. 

ADDIE S. BRANTLEY. 510 Reese 
Street, Athens, Georgia, is teaching at 
E. Athens School, Athens, Georgia. She 
has done additional study at Atlanta. 
University. 

BETTY SINGLETON LEONARD. 
408 Bowen Circle, S.W.. Apt. 2. Atlanta 
15, Georgia, is Secretary to the Dean. 
School of Library Service, Atlanta Uni- 
versity. 

LUEVENIA W ATKINS, RFD 1. 
Box 124. Devereux. Georgia, is teach- 
ing at Warren Elementary School. She 
has done additional study at Atlanta 
University. 



1952 



ALFRED JACKSON, 4338 Langley 
Avenue. Chicago 15, 111., is self em- 
ployed as Real Estate. He has done ad- 
ditional study at UCLA LIniversity. 

EDDIE T. LINDSEY, JR., 2825 
Hood Street, Columbus. Georgia, is 
teaching at Spencer High School, Co- 
lumbus. Georgia. He has done addi- 
tional study at the University of Mich- 
igan. 

CAROLYN MARIE JACKSON 
M A N I G O. 639 West Forty-Second 
Street, Savannah, Georgia, is a house- 
wife. She has done additional study at 
A. U. University. 

BENJAMIN J. MOSLEY. Route 1. 
Box 90. Summerville, Georgia, is teach- 
ing at Chattanooga County Training 
School. He has done additional study 
at Fort Valley State College. 

CARETHA ROSE LOTSON RUS- 
SELL. 1952 Savannah State College 
graduate, has returned to work at Flor- 
ida A&M University after spending a 
year in Baghdad, India, with her hus- 
band, who was an instructor there. Mrs. 
Russell is now serving as secretary for 
Mrs. Genevieve Wheeler Thomas, head 
of the Division of Home Economics at 
Florida A&M University. 

1953 

ARMY PFC. LEROY P. WESBY, son 
of Sylvester Wesby, 148 Bradhurst Ave- 
nue, New York City, recently was gradu- 
ated from the I Corps Non-Commis- 
sioned Officer Academy in Korea. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 17 



A cannoneer in Battery C of the 
52nd Field Artillery Battalion, Wesby 
received instruction in leadership of 
units, map reading and other military 
subjects. 

Wesby entered the Army in July 1954 
and completed basic training at Camp 
Gordon. Ga. He arrived in the Far East 
last January. 

A member of Omega Psi Phi fratern- 
ity, Wesby was graduated in 1953 from 
Savannah State College. 

FANNIE LUE STRANGE, Post Of- 
fice, Hartwell. Georgia, is teaching at 
the Bowman High School in Hartwell. 

JOSIE L. BROOKS. 204 Roundtree 

Street, Statesboro. Georgia, is teaching 
at the Mary Jackson Elementary School, 
Statesboro. 

LILLIE B. McCLINTON, 2355 Pion- 
ono Avenue, Macon, Georgia, is the 
First Grade teacher at the Bradley-Wa\ - 
side School in Macon. 

LIZZIE M. TATE GRIFFETH, 426 

N. Billups Street, Athens, Georgia, 
teaches at Newtown Elementary School 
in Athens. 

SADIE TAYLOR HALL, Box 256. 
Darien, Georgia, teaches at Todd-Grant 
High School in Darien. Georgia. 



1954 



ALMA B. HUNTER, Route 1, Box 
34, Stephens, Georgia, is teaching at 
Oglethorpe County Training School in 
Lexington. Georgia. 

ROSA LEE PENN, 707 Grusul Ave- 



nue, Rome, Georgia, is a teacher at the 
Emery Street School in Dalton, Georgia. 
Miss Penn plans to begin work on her 
Master's Degree this summer at Tennes- 
see State University. 

EULA MAE JACKSON, Post Office 
Box 75, Mt. Vernon, Georgia, is a 5th 
Grade instructor at the Mt. Vernon 
School. 

RUTHA MAE GLOVER, 710 Paulsen 
Street, Savannah. Georgia, is a substi- 
tute teacher. 

DAISY B. PORTER, 520 West 33rd 
Street, Savannah, Georgia, is teaching 
at Woodbury High School, Woodbury, 
Georgia. 

BEAUTY FINCH. 318 Dubose Ave- 
nue. Athens. Georgia, is teaching at the 
Oglethorpe County Training School in 
Lexington, Georgia. 

JEFFERSON SCRUGGS, 1954 Indus 
trial Education graduate was recently 
certified by the Certification Depart- 
ment of the State of Indiana to teach 
Industrial Arts, Mathematics. English 
and Social Sciences. He is now em- 
ployed as Industrial Arts teacher at the 
Wallace Foster School No. 32 in In- 
dianapolis. 

MARY SULLIVAN, 46 Dooley Ave- 
nue, Savannah, Georgia, is presently 
studying at Pratt Institute Graduate 
School of Library Science, Brooklyn, 
New York. She formerly served as sec- 
retary in the Savannah State College 
Library. 

VIRGINIA E. JAMES, 1948 Amos 
Street, Macon, Georgia, is teaching at 
Margaret Califf High School. 




ABBIE LOUISE CHATMAN. 431 

Cobb Street, Milledgeville, Georgia, is 
teaching the 4th grade at Carver High 
School in Milledgeville. 

ARMY PVT. JAMES E. HILL, son 
of Mrs. Onie B. Hill. Route No. 1. 
Hazlehurst, Georgia, is a member of the 
25th Infantry Division in Hawaii. 

Hill is a rifleman with Company L 
of the division's 35th Regiment. He 
entered the Army in March 1955 and re- 
ceived his basic training at Fort Dix. 
N.J. 

He is a 1955 graduate of Savannah 
State College and is a member of the 
Omega Psi Phi fraternity. He was a 
teacher before entering the Army. 

ANNETTA JAMES GAMBLE, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. B. J. James 
of Savannah State College, and a 1955 
graduate of SSC, has been appointed as 
a Nursery School Teacher by the Board 
of Education in Los Angeles, California. 

Mrs. Gamble is a member of the Al- 
pha Kappa Mu Honor Society and the 
Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority. 



1955 



Evening class learns how to prepare delicacies. 



EVELYN T. SMALLS, 720 Waters 
Avenue, Savannah. Georgia, is now 
employed as Secretary to the Dean of 
Women at Albany State College, Al- 
bany, Georgia. 

JAMES HUEY CURTIS, 1021 Thom- 
son Road. Wrens, Georgia, is now em- 
ployed as Research Technician at Herty 
Foundation in Savannah. 

MATTIE LEE McBRIDE. 513— 8th 
Street, Waynesboro, Georgia, is teach- 
ing at Waynesboro High and Industrial 
School, Waynesboro. Georgia. 

BERTHA LANKFORD TINSLEY. 
503 Brown Street, Covington, Georgia. 
is teaching at the Dixie Elementary 
School, Covington, Georgia. 

JAMES WILLIS, 612 Seventh Ave- 
nue. Northwest. Cairo. Georgia, is do- 
ing advanced study at Florida A&M 
University, Tallahassee, Florida. 

ADA MAE LAWRENCE, Rt. 2, Box 
135 A, Sparta, Georgia, is now teach- 
ing at Greenspring School. Sparta, Geor- 
gia. She is doing additional study at 
Atlanta University, Atlanta, Georgia. 

ANDELEMA G. ISAAC, P. O. Box 

203, Savannah State College, Savannah. 
Georgia, has done advanced studying at 
Northwestern University, Evanston, Il- 
linois. 

EDDYE LEE JONES, P. O. Box 21. 
East Point, Georgia, is First Grade 
Teacher at East Point Elementary 
School. East Point, Georgia. 



Page 18 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 






Ahmmi Achievements 



just been received thai 
Harris. Savannah State 



Word ha: 
Curtis "C.P 
College graduate and former football, 
basketball, and track star at the college, 
has signed a contract to play with the 
New York Giants professional football 
team. 

Harris, who volunteered for the U. S. 
Air Force immediately after his gradua- 
tion in 1952. is stationed at Mitchell Air 
Force Base in Hempstead, New York, 
where he has made a name for himself 
as a football player. 

On December 16. the Mitchell "Com- 
manders" held the first football banquet 
ever to be held at the Field. It was dur- 
ing this banquet that the SSC graduate 
was voted "most valuable player", hav- 
ing a total of 203 votes, with the runner 
up. Bob DeStefano collecting 55 votes. 
"C. P." was a regular end on the Com- 
manders' team, standing six feet, two 
inches in height and weighing 206 
pounds, and excellent pass receiver and 
kicker and the regular kickoff man for 
the Commanders. He was the favorite 
target of the passer; he caught 13 touch- 
down passes and kicked 13 extra points 
for a grand total of 91 points. The total 
of his set a new Air Force scoring rec- 
ord for Air Force ends. 

Colonel Milton Fisher awarded Harris 
a 17 jewel Benrus wrist alarm watch. 
He is currently playing on the Mitchell 
Field Basketball team, which has al- 
ready won nine straight games. 

Harris' home is in Columbus, Geor- 
gia, where he graduated from the Spen- 
cer High School. His college sports ac- 
tivities were under the direction of 
Coach Theodore A. Wright at Savan- 
nah State College. 

Miss Ida Girven, graduate of Savan- 
nah State College, former captain of it? 
championship girls' basketball team and 
all-around student, is the cadet in charge 
of the Library School at Syracuse Uni- 
versity, Syracuse, N. Y. There are four 
assistants working with her. Miss Gir- 
ven's major was social science. She is 
a native of Amsterdam. Georgia and 
had a three year basketball scholarship 
at Savannah State College. 

The cadetships are the most popular 
in the field of library service. In co- 
operation with the Syracuse University 
Library. The School of Library Science 
is enabled to appoint six graduate stu- 
dents each year to post on the library 
staff for a period of two years. The ca- 
dets are permitted to undertake studies 
in the school to the amount of two 
courses each in the fall and spring term 
and one in the summer free of tuition 



CALENDAR OF COMMENCEMENT EVENTS 

1956 
SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE, SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

Saturday, May 26 
7-9:00 p.m. President's Party for Seniors — President's Residence 

Tuesday. May 29 
12:00 Noon Senior Class Day Exercises — Meldrim Auditorium 

Thursday. May 31 

Meldrim Auditorium 



:()() p.m. Senior Class 



Night Exercises 



Hall: Men— College 



6:00 
8:00 



4:00 



p.m. 
p.m. 



p.m. 



Saturday. June 2 
10:00 a.m. Senior Buffet Brunch: Women — Adams 
Center 
Alumni Meeting — Meldrim Auditorium 
Alumni Banquet — Adams Hall 
Speaker. Mr. Ellis Whitaker. Class of 1936 

Sunday. June 3 
Baccalaureate Exercises — Meldrim Auditorium 
Sermon. Reverend S. C. Thornton, B.A.. B.D., D.D.. 
Pastor, St. James A.M.E. Church. Savannah. Georgia 
5:30 p.m. Reception — Presidents Residence. President and Mrs. 
W. K. Payne at home to alumni, faculty, members of 
the graduating class, their parents and friends. 

Monday. June 4 
12:00 Noon Commencement Exercises — Meldrim Auditorium 
Address by Mr. T. M. Alexander, A.B., President 
and Founder. Alexander and Company. Atlanta. Georgia 



charge. They are engaged on a 30 hour 
basis with a basic salary. 

The Panamanian track star. Frank 
"The Rockett" Prince. 1953 graduate 
of Savannah Sta^e College, has been ap- 
pointed director of Health Education at 
Public School 60 in Bronx, New York. 



Since his graduation. Prince has par- 
ticipated in several National Track 
Meets, being the only Panamanian to 
win two gold medals for individual per- 
formance at the Central American and 
Caribbean Olympic games held in 
Mexico in 1954. 




Alumni and community group attending adult evening classes at Savannah State 
College. 



THE ALUMNI BULLETIN 



Page 19 



SPECIAL 
NEWS ISSUE 







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SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 



Vol. 9 August, 1956 Number 8 









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18 



1 






M- 







THE SAVANNAH STATE 
BULLETIN 

Special News Issue 

President 
DR. WILLIAM K. PAYNE 

Editor 
WILTON C. SCOTT 

Guest Editor 
LUETTE C. UPSHUR 

Photography 
WILLIAM H. BOWENS 

Volume 9 August 1956 Number 8 

Entered as second-class matter, Decem- 
ber 16, 1947, at the Post Office at Sa- 
vannah, Georgia, under the Act of 
August 24, 1912. 

About The Cover 

The front cover is designed to illus- 
trate the theme for this issue, "The Way 
to Opportunity." Students are shown en- 
tering the College Library. 

The back cover is symbolic of the 
quest for self-realization that is an integ- 
ral part of the opportunities offered at 
Savannah State College. 

Cover photographs by Robert Mobley 



1956 Summer School Program 
At Savannah State College 



The Commencemend Card 

Baccalaureate Exercises, Sunday, Au- 
gust 12; Speaker, The Reverend Robert 
M. Pugh, Twelfth Street YMCA, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Commencement Exercises. Wednes- 
day, August 15; Speaker, President Wil- 
liam H. Dennis, Albany State College, 
Albany, Georgia. 



Charm Week was observed, May 
13-19. The theme, "A Woman's World," 
was carried out via teas, talent day exer- 
cises, film fest, health day, panel dis- 
cussions, and a charm clinic. 

The ninth Annual Men's Festival was 
held April 22-28. Dr. Alonzo Stephens, 
associate professor of social science, was 
the Inspiration Day speaker on April 
22. 



By E. K. Williams 

Director of Summer School 

Savannah State College aims to pro- 
vide the quality of experience for sum- 
mer study that will enable our students 
to apply the maximal objectivity and ra- 
tionality to all phases of social living. 
Specifically, the summer program is de- 
signed to: (1) assist teachers in meeting 
requirements for degrees and certifi- 
cates, thus qualifying them for better 
positions and higher salary compensa- 
tion; (2) to provide general education 
background for students on the fresh- 
man and sophomore level; (3) to pro- 
vide opportunities for regular session 
students to continue their education; 
(4) to provide opportunities for vet- 
erans to resume or continue their for- 
mal education or to take refresher 
courses; and (5) to enrich recreational, 
musical, dramatic, and religious experi- 
ences for all who attend. 

The varieties of courses in the sum- 
mer quarter consist of offerings in the 
fields of: biology, business, chemistry, 
economics, education, fine arts, health 
and physical education, language and 
literature, mathematics and physics, so- 
cial science, trade and industrial educa- 
tion and home economics. 

One of the main features of the sum- 
mer quarter includes several workshops 
that are particularly designed for in- 
service teachers. These courses com- 
prise: 

Education 391 — Arts and Crafts 
Workshop. 

Education 461 — Workshop in Meth- 
ods and Materials of the Elementary 
School Curriculum. 

Education 462 — Workshop in Meth- 
ods and Materials of the Secondary 
School Curriculum ( offered first session 
only) . 

Music 424 — Workshop in Band Tech- 
niques. 

English 420 — Reading Workshop. In 
addition, the following new and special 
courses are offered during the 1956 sum- 
mer session: 

Health Education 305 — The Total 
School Health Program. 

Health Education 425 — Synthesis in 
Basic Health Information. 

Industrial Education 416 — Modern 
Techniques of Evaluation. 

Art 402 — Creative Craft Design. 



The first two courses are designed pri- 
marily for the purpose of meeting the 
needs of in-service teachers with respect 
to the new emphasis and requirements 
of the State Department as they relate 
to health in the public school program. 
The third course is designed to meet the 
new emphasis and demand that are as- 
sociated with the recent developments of 
the testing program in the public 
schools. The fourth course is aimed to 
provide experiences in original designs 
in the different weaving techniques and 
patterns, and the operation of foot- 
power looms; to develop the apprecia- 
tion of designs to textiles including the 
techniques of block printing, stenciling, 
silk-screening and other crafts; and to 
teach the application of art to everyday 
living. 

The intellectual and social lives of our 
students are further enriched by many 
extra-class experiences that are purpos- 
ively planned as integral facets of the 
summer curriculum. Some of these ex- 
periences culcminate in a number of 
media which include: concerts, assembly 
programs, excursions, publications, re- 
ligious services, picnics, and many other 
recreational and social activities. 

The climate that gives direction to our 
summer school program has been suc- 
cinctly stated in the 1955 Summer 
School Edition of the Savannah State 
Bulletin: "Summer School at Savannah 
State College/' On the back cover of 
our summer school bulletin, the follow- 
ing inscription epitomizes the setting of 
the college: "Ideal Location," "Moderate 
Expenses," "Modern Equipment," "Fac- 
ulty Well-trained," "Graduates Placed," 
"Student Welfare Stressed." 

The setting of the College and the in- 
stitutional objectives comprise the end 
for which we dedicate our service. 



Rev. Hargrett Awarded 

Reverend Andrew J. Hargrett, Chap- 
lain at Savannah State College, has been 
awarded the honorary degree of Doctor 
of Divinity by the American Divinity 
School. 

Chaplain Hargrett has been minister 
for Savannah State College for seven 
years and is listed in Who's Who in 
the South and Southwest. His book, 
Time Out to Pray, should be ready for 
publication during the coming academic 
year. His other writings include sev- 
eral articles in professional journals. 



Page 2 



THE BULLETIN 



■bl 



THE 1956 ELEMENTARY WORKSHOP 



A Teacher Builds 
A Temple 

The 1956 Elementary Education 
Workshop was organized to meet the 
needs and interests of the participants, 
in-service teachers representing 18 
counties in Georgia and two South Caro- 
lina. "Broadening Our Concepts of 
Teaching and Learning Through Mean- 
ingful Experiences" was the general 
theme of this years Workshop. In keep- 
ing with recent emphasis on health by 
the State Department of Education, the 
workshop used as a sub-theme, "En- 
riching and Extending Our Environ- 
ment Through Emphasis on Health." All 
teaching and planning, irrespective of 
area, had a health emphasis. 

Techniques used in the Workshop this 
year emphasized learning by doing. The 
participants were asked to establish their 
problems and to indicate the special 
areas in which they felt help was needed 
most. Research, lectures, formal and 
informal talks from the staff followed. 

The Workshop staff consisted of Mrs. 
Thelma Harmond. assistant professor of 
education, Mrs. Dorothy C. Hamilton, 
principal. Powell Laboratory School; 
and R. J. Martin, principal, Ballard- 
Hudson High School, Macon. 

Learning experiences were enriched 
by means of a demonstration school 
which enrolled 33 children during the 
first session. The purpose of the school 
was to provide realistic experience with 
children and to show improved methods 
of instruction. 

To further round out the Workshop 
experience, resource persons in various 
areas were invited to serve as consult- 
ants. Special consultants included Miss 
Althea Williams, librarian; Dr. W. K. 
director of the Reading Workshop; Dr. 
W. Metz, department of special educa- 
tion, Chatham County Board of Educa- 
tion, Savannah; Phillip J. Hampton, 
instructor of fine arts; Mrs. Geraldine 
Abernathy, assistant professor of health 
and physical education; William H. 
Bowens, director of the Audio-Visual 
Aids Center; Eugene Isaac and Dr. 
Rutherford E. Lockette. division of 
trades and industries. 

Other features of the Workshop that 
contributed greatly to its effectiveness 
were the weekly assemblies, chapel pro- 
grams, lyceum features, group socials 
and educational tours. 

The tours were carefully planned and 
proved to be extremely helpful in broad- 
ening the participants' professional 
knowledge of the state's resources gener- 




"ENRICHING THE ENVIRONMENT . . ."—This was what the Elementary 
Workshop personnel emphasized during the first session. Mrs. Thelma M. Har- 
mond, Mrs. Dorothy C. Hamilton, and R. J. Martin, Workshop directors, are 
standing in the last row, left to right. 



ally and the water resources in particu- 
lar. The boat ride planned for viewing 
the Savannah harbor industries and the 
trip to Hilton Head, South Carolina, 
were experiences both meaningful and 
enjoyable. 

Workshop members were: Mattie 
P. Mathis Hicks. Liberty County; 
M. T. Crawford, Chatham; Kathryn 
B. Morton, Richmond; Ann Allen 
Guryer, Richmond; Geraldine Jordan, 
Chatham; Prophet Dean Whitehead. 
Beaufort County, South Carolina; Elise 
Kent, Bulloch; Juanita Wells. Chatham: 
Wilhelmina Hardeman, Clarke; Wylo- 
dine Drain, Calhoun; Helen Stringer. 
Tattnall; Velma R. Adams, Morgan; 
Mary W. White, Ware; Alberta V. Ball. 
Evans; Emma D. Johnson, Morgan; 
Gwendolyn Strickland, Evans; Emma 
Love Browning, Oconee; Gloria Ran- 
dall, Jasper County, South Carolina: 
Arzelma Burton, Burke; Dorothy Bur- 
ton, Burke; Mary D. King, Burke; Ar- 
neta Campbell, Camden; Pennie Swin- 
son, Bulloch; Willie Mae Rhodes. Wash- 
ington; Gertrude Atwater, Glynn; Vic- 
toria Baker, Berrien; Elizabeth Ward. 
Chatham; Agnes Stevens, Chatham; 
Dytha A. Dotson, Warren; Ethel White 
Daniel, Washington: Pauline Cainion. 
Washington; Ruth Heyward, Chatham: 
Willie Lee Harrell. Coffee; Laurine Wil- 
liams, Ware; and Anne Luten Richard- 
son. Chatham. 



Dr. Calvin L. Kiah, chairman of the 
department of education, served as a 
member of the staff of the Workshop 
for the training of supervising teachers 
of student teachers, held at Atlanta Uni- 
versity, July 13-August 10. 



Workshoppers Give 
Reactions to Activities 

A poll of the Workshoppers with re- 
gard to the most significant contribu- 
tion of the Workshop to their personal 
professional growth turned up some in- 
teresting findings. 

The demonstrations proved to be most 
effective to a number of Workshoppers. 
Mary D. King, Gloria Randall, Juanita 
Wells. Willie Mae Rhodes, Pennie Swin- 
son, Ann Guryer, Mattie Hicks, and Em- 
ma Johnson described the demonstra- 
tions in grouping as superior in verisi- 
militude. 

Asked what the Workshop contributed 
most to her professional development, 
Geraldine Jordan said: "The most sig- 
nificant experience I had was gathering 
materials to formulate my teaching unit 
on 'The Food We Eat.' This was most 
significant for me, for I had an oppor- 
tunity to study, recall, and review meth- 
ods and techniques used in teaching on 
the lower elementary level." 

Unit planning also interested Dytha 
Dotson and Elise Kent. Inez Baker 
noted the usefulness of teacher-pupil 
planning and daily lesson planning in 
the solution of many discipline prob- 
lems in the classroom. 

Dorothy and Arzelma Burton were 
particularly impressed with the give- 
and-take of informal discussion periods 
that were a part of the Workshop tech- 
nique. 

The area of health education ps 
studied in the Workshop greatly aided 
Arneta Campbell and Kathryn Morton. 
(Continued on Page 10,) 



THE BULLETIN 



Page 3 



THE SECONDARY EDUCATION WORKSHOP 



Education for Life In A 
Democratic Society 

"In the Secondary Workshop we 
strive to help in-service teachers organ- 
ize learning experiences in such manner 
that their pupils will develop into citi- 
zens capable of participating in a demo- 
cratic society. We believe that in order 
to develop citizens capable of partici- 
pating in a democratic society, a pupil 
needs to participate in democratic situa- 
tions in the classroom/ 1 

Thus Drs. Calvin L. Kiah and An- 
drew J. Hargrett, members of the edu- 
cation department and directors of the 
Secondary Workshop, summarized the 
primary objectives of the Workshop. 

A first session enrollment analysis 
showed 18 persons from 13 different 
counties. Those enrolled were: Ella 
Alen, Burke; Martha B. Luten, Screven; 
Arthur L. Smith, Chatham; David Scott, 
Screven: Alexander Wilkerson, Coffee; 
William T. Shifflette. Wayne; Sadie J. 
Nix, Muscogee; Julius Stevens, Chat- 
ham; William Bloodworth, Mcintosh; 
Elmer J. Warren. Glascock; Andrew M. 
Francis, Burke: Jesse R. Gray, Burke: 
Wayne J. Hawes, Lincoln; Obieton 
Hughes, Hart; Hosea J. Lofton. Pierce: 
and Earl Williams, Early. 

The theme, "Preparing to Meet Mod- 
ern School Problems." was displayed 
in the classroom with art work being 
done by Earl Williams. 

The following officers were elected: 
general chairman, Hosea J. Lofton; sec- 
retary. Martha B. Luten ; treasurer. Wil- 
liam Shifflette: reporter, Earl Williams: 
librarian, Arthur L. Smith: assistant li- 
brarian. Obieton Hughes. 

Committees and committee members 
chosen by the Workshop were: steering 
and budgeting; Hosea J. Lofton, chair- 
man ; Martha B. Luten and William 
Shifflette; audio-visual materials: Thom- 
as Locke, chairman; William Shifflette, 
Johnnie Wilkerson, and Hosea J. Lof- 
ton; Public Relations: Alexander Speed, 
chairman; Jesse Gray, Ella Allen. Julius 
Stevens, David Scott, Sadie J. Nix. Wil- 
liam Bloodworth, and Elmer Warren; 
Social: Jesse Gray, chairman; Elmer 
Warren. Obieton Hughes, Wayne 
Hawes, and Alexander Speed. 

Among the consultants the Workshop- 
pers heard were: Dr. W. I. Murray, di- 
rector of the Reading Workshop; Walter 
W. Leftwich, director of the health edu- 
cation courses; Werner Metts, psycholo- 




■ .. ■ . ■ ■...:■■. ■■ ■:. 



SECONDARY WORKSHOP— Members of the Secondary Workshop pose after 
their panel discussion on July 11. Andrew J. Hargrett and Calvin L. Kiah, direc- 
tors, are seated at extreme left and right, respectively. 



gist for the Savannah-Chatham Count) 
Board of Education; R. J. Martin, sum- 
mer session consultant; William H. 
Bowens, director of the Audio-Visual 
Aids Center. 

The Workshop members made tours 
of the Union Bag and Paper Corpora- 
tion, the Savannah Morning News and 
Evening Press plant, the Savannah Har- 
bor, and Hilton Head, South Carolina. 

Instructional interest groups were 
formed to work out some instructional 
materials in keeping with the basic 
principles of learning. The groups were 
as follows: social studies: Hosea J. Lof- 
ton, chairman; Andrew M. Francis, as- 
sistant chairman; Wayne Hawes, Obie- 
ton Hughes, Elmer Waren, Sadie J. 
Nix. William Bloodworth, and Arthur 
L. Smith; Sciences: Jesse Gray, chair- 
man: Thomas Locke. William Shifflette. 
Ella Allen, David Scott, Alexander 
Speed, and Julius Stevens; mathematics: 
Earl Williams, chairman; Johnnie Wil- 
kerson. and Martha B. Luten. 

On July 11. the Workshop presented a 
panel discussion and illustrated demon- 
strations on "Better Teaching in the 
Secondary School." Participants were 
Julius Stevens. Obieton Hughes. Jesse 
Gray, and Hosea J. Lofton. 

(Continued on Page 10 j 



Arts and Crafts Workshop 

The Arts and Crafts Workshop has as 
its theme "Learning Art as a Sensory 
Experience and as a New Path to Intel- 
lect". This theme follows essentially the 
theory of Plato and of many contempo- 
rary philosophers who feel that art in 
childhood is a stimulus to reasoning. 



Research indicates that art is an aid 
in problem-solving, that it helps to 
counteract inhibitions, and that it pro- 
duces coordination between mind and 
the receptive faculties. 

In correlation with the foregoing 
theory, the Workshop completed an as- 
signed group problem dealing with the 
creative process that is essentially, 
though not entirely, related to graphic 
and plastic arts. 

The Workshop members wrote a story 
that required research for factual ma- 
terials. These "actual facts" were con- 
verted into an esthetic interpretation, 
combining music, art, and literature. 
The result of this approach was a short 
story, titled "Marie and Anthony." Ma- 
rie and Anthony, children approximately 
ten years old, lived in Italy. Looking for 
something exciting to do, they wander 
into a beautiful olive grove and there- 
upon decide to paint the wonderful view 
in the manner that they feel the scene 
affects them. When their paintings are 
finished, they show them to everyone. 

The story was written by Maggie De- 
Lottie Wilkerson. and Eleanor Randall, 
mere, Sarah Greene, Priscilla Tremble, 
"Marie and Anthony" was made visual 
through the many media of art. Charts 
and posters were made. A mural exe- 
cuted by Birdieddoward and Gussie Doe 
depicted an imaginative scene in Italy. 
Music and words were written by Freda 
Whitaker. Mamie Srevens, and Mamie 
L. Eason. 

Alma James used the papier mache 
process to make Italian mountains. Nel- 
lie Thomas used paper sculpture to 
show Anthony wandering through the 
olive grove. 



Pace 4 



THE BULLETIN 



THE READING AND BAND WORKSHOPS 



"Reading Maketh A 
Full Man" 

In his preface to the booklet compiled 
and published by members of the Read- 
ing Workshop for the first session. Dr. 
Walter I. Murray, director of the Work- 
shop, stated: 

"The Reading Workshop provides the 
in-service or pre-service teacher an op- 
portunity to make an intensive study of 
an interest or reading problem which 
has arisen out of her experience as a 
teacher. The participant in this Work- 
shop is afforded easy access to the ser- 
vices of the various faculty members of 
Savannah State College representing a 
variey of kinds of assistance." 

Resource persons who lent their as- 
sistance to the Workshop included the 
following: 

William H. Bowens. instructor of 
audio-visual aids, gave a demonstration 
on the use of the projector. A film, 
"How You See It," was shown, and the 
class worked in groups on learning to 
operate the projector. 

Mrs. Dorothy Hamilton, principal of 
Powell Laboratory School, demonstrated 
the teaching of language arts and social 
studies in grades 1 through 6. with em- 
phasis on food and nutrition. 

Dr. C. A. Braithwaite lectured on 
reading and music in the elementary 
school. 

Mrs. G. H. Abernathy was guest 
speaker on the topic, "Creative Expres- 



sion." She gave a demonstration using 
children from her dance group. 

Miss Madeline Harrison, assistant li- 
brarian, spoke to the Workshop on 
"Setting Up a Library in the Class- 
room." She gave also a list of suitable 
books to be used on different grade lev- 
els. 

Other Workshop activities included a 
tour of the Union Bag and Paper Cor- 
poration, and the playing of a record, 
"Improving Reading at All Levels," by 
Dr. Marian Monroe. 

Workshop members during the first 
session were: Ethel R. Andrews, Tattnall 
County Industrial High School, Reids- 
ville; Carolyn Arnold. Frank Spencer, 
Savannah; Julia S. Bacon, George W. 
Carver, Richmond Hill; Alberta S. 
Bowens, Spencer; Alfreida B u r k e t t, 
Surrency Elementary School, Surrency; 
Edith Carter, Haven Home, Savannah; 
Janie Z. Clark, Tattnall County Indus- 
trial; Louise H. Collier, Cuyler Junior 
High, Savannah; Bertha Dillard. senior. 
Savannah State College; Rita Dunmore. 
Springfield Terrace, Savannah; Grace 
Golden, supply teacher, Chatham Coun- 
ty: Frances Willard Graham. Glenwood 
High School. Glenwood; Mamie B. 
Haynes, West Broad Street School, Sa- 
vannah; Lizzie Huff. Rosen wald High 
School, Tattnall; Velma G. Jones. Paul- 
sen Street School, Savannah ; Addie L. 
Kelly, Central High School, Sylvania; 
Essie Mae Lovett, Arnett Elementary 
School, Screven County; Edith S. Ma- 
con, Springfield Terace School. Savan- 
nah; Inez M. McNeal, R. W. Gadsen 



School, Savannah; Viola T. McKinney. 
Florance Street School, Savannah; 
Louise Milton, East Broad Street 
School; Ruth Borgan, Frank W. Spen- 
cer; Ruby S. Reeves, Edward Johnson 
Elementary. Brooklet; Carrye C. Rob- 
erts, Frank W. Spencer; Eldeen W. Rob- 
erts, Hancock Elementary School, 
Sparta ; Louise B. Roberts, Haven 
Home; Hazel Williams Smith, Savan- 
nah; Virginia Stripling, Harris Street 
School, Savannah; Ruby Simmons, Ro- 
bertville Elementary School, Pineland. 
South Carolina; Pinkie J. Ware, Pem- 
broke High School. Pembroke; Isabel D. 
Waters, Haven Home; and Ruth B. Wil- 
liams. Robert W. Gadsden School. 



Palestrina ami Percussion 

According to James H. Everett, in- 
structor of band music, the purposes of 
the Band Workshop are: 1) to acquaint 
present and prospective band directors 
of the elementary and high schools with 
the latest in band music techniques; to 
help directors become better acquainted 
with the instruments of the band; to dis- 
cuss problems faced by band directors: 
and to acquaint directors with the latest 
teaching aids. 

The portion of the television program 
featuring the Band Workshop consisted 
of a demonstration of the musical in- 
struments, a discussion of Palestrina's 
music, and an instrumental duet. 
(Continued on Page 10 J 



"READING MAKETH A FULL MAN . . ."—Dr. Walter 
I. Murray, director of the Reading Workshop, standing, 
second row right, poses with the Workshop members dur- 
ing the first session. 



WE LEARN ABOUT BRASS INSTRUMENTS, WOOD- 
WINDS, ETC. — The Band Workshoppers pause in their 
busy schedule to present a camera story of their studies. 
James H. Everett, director, is standing at extreme left. 







THE BULLETIN 



Page 5 




THE END, YET THE BEGINNING— Platform partici- 
pants in the Commencement exercises muse over the 
significance of this occasion to the ninety graduates. 
Left to right: T. C. Meyers, dean of faculty; John Mc- 
Glockton, president, the General Alumni Association; 
T. M. Alexander, Commencement speaker; and Dr. W. K. 
Payne, president. 



". . . God made the world glorious . . ." Theodore M. 
Alexander is shown as he delivered the Commencement 
address 



THE COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES: The Stream of Opportunity 



The graduation of 90 seniors high- 
lighted the seventy-fifth Commencement 
exercises at Savannah State College on 
June 4. Other features of the exercises 
included the baccalaureate address, de- 
livered on Sunday, June 3, by the Rev- 
erend S. C. Thornton, pastor of the St. 
James A.M.E. Church in Savannah; the 
Senior Class Day Exercises, Thursday, 
May 31; the President's party for sen- 
iors, Tuesday, May 29; and the Alumni 
Banquet, June 2, with Ellis Whitaker. 
36, as speaker. 

The Commencement address was de- 
livered by Theodore M. Alexander, 
president and founder of Alexander and 
Company, Atlanta. Mr. Alexander re- 
minded the graduates that they are 
"standing on the threshold of a new 
frontier." Referring to the turbulent 
days ahead, the speaker used the figure 
of an airplane safety belt to point up the 
industry, resourcefulness, and watchful- 
ness that will be needed. 

"We are a part and parcel of the great- 
est period in the history of the human 
race," the speaker continued. "We are 
caught in the stream of time. We are 
living in a world's crisis. Every social 
change is marked by disturbance. Nev- 
er before have you and I been so chal- 
lenged." 

Making a further reference to the 
changing social order of the day, Mr. 
Alexander said: "From time immemo- 
rial, when transitions or catastrophes 
occur, men either rise to greater heights 
of character and valor or sink to un- 
precedented depths of brutality and 
cowardice. In such a time there is a 



sharp sifting of the goat and the sheep. 
Sooner or later you and I must sit down 
to the banquet of consequences." 

The speaker urged the graduates to 
obtain a sense of direction, one that 
has the assent of reason and the approv- 
al of conscience, and one that can sur- 
vive the sober judgment of intellect. 

In a burst of poetic eloquence, the 
speaker continued: "This is a bad world, 
a sad world, and a mad world. But it 
is a world of unrivaled interest and 
fascination — forever tragic, yet forever 
triumphant; forever doomed, yet for- 
ever on the march." 

"God made the world glorious," the 
speaker said. The magnitude and sub- 
limity of the world assure us that life is 
for a purpose, he asserted. 

Mr. Alexander assured the graduates 
that there is no formula for achieving 
the glorious life, but he urged them to 
"be a thermostat. Don't be a thermom- 
eter . . . Don't just register and reflect. 
Regulate and control what's going on in 
your community." 

Charging the graduates to "dream big 
dreams," to know the limitations of pure 
intellect, and to search for a faith to 
sustain life, Mr. Alexander offered the 
following prayer in conclusion : 

"God give me courage to change the 
things that can and ought to be changed. 
Patience with things that cannot be 
changed, and Wisdom to know one from 
the other." 

Those receiving degrees are as fol- 
lows : 

Biology — Rudolph Valentine Hard- 
wick, Savannah; William Oscar Mitchel, 



Savannah; Business — Delora Dean, Cor- 
dele; Carter Peek, Athens; Dorothy 
Celestine Moore, Augusta; Oliver Vin- 
cent Swaby, Colon, Republic of Pana- 
ma; *Josie M. Troutman; Chemistry — 
Daniel Burns, Savannah: * Daniel Pe- 
lote, Savannah; James Otis Thomas. 
Eulonia; Elementary Education — Jettie 
Mae Adams. Savannah; '"'Malsenia Inez 
Armstrong, Hazlehurst; Lilian Middle- 
ton Battiste, Savannah; Ella Virginia 
Brunson, Savannah; Lula Mae Canady, 
Macon; "Annie Julia Culbreth, Ochlo- 
chnee; "Mary Lois Daniels, Orange 
Park, Florida; Etta Christine Davenport. 
Atlanta; "Mamie Davis, Columbus; 
Doretga Roberts Dryer, Mcintosh; Nan- 
cy Ellis, Savannah; Faye Maureen Flip- 
per, Savannah; Faye Margrezelle Gar- 
dener, Fitzgerald; Marva Gooden, Pel- 
ham; Sarah Elizabeth Greene, Savan- 
nah; Alma Futch Griffin, Savannah; 
Richardine Hagan, Savannah; Ruby 
Dean Harrington, Sanford, Florida; 
*Hazey Laverne Harris, Richmond Hill; 
Ernest Eugene Hicks, Savannah; 
Thelma Hines, Savannah; Willie Lee 
Hopkins, Brunswick; Vera Mae Jack- 
son, Savannah; Ivory Brown Jefferson, 
New Orleans, Louisiana; "Corrie Capers 
Johnson, Savannah; Bernice Evonia 
Jones, Millhaven; Helen Milton Jones, 
Savannah; Gwendolyn Keith, Augusta; 
Dora Sutton Luke, Savannah; Barbara 
Ann Matthews, Jesup; Jewel Mae Miller, 
Barney; Rosa Lee Moore, Macon; 
Jackie Mae Oliver, Athens; Jeanette 
Estella Pusha, Savannah; Lucille Bow- 
ens Releford, Savannah; Mary Roberts, 
Savannah; Anna Thelma Robinson, 
Guyton; Clarence Nathaniel Robinson, 



Page 6 



THE BULLETIN 



41 




The Reverend S. C. Thornton, pastor of St. James 
A.M.E. Church, Savannah, is shown as he delivered the 
seventy-fifth Baccalaureate address. 



Dr. William K. Payne awards the bachelor's degree to 
James Thomas, editor-in-chief of the 1956 TIGER, during 
the Commencement exercises. Registrar Ben Ingersoll 
looks on. 



Savannah; ""'Doris Theresa Singleton 
Robinson, Savannah; Hilda June Shae. 
Fort Gaines; Lizzie Julia Smith, Sparta; 
'^'Gloria Elizabeth Spaulding, Savan- 
nah; Essie Lee Stokes, Twin City; Viv- 
ian Eugenia Wise Terrell, Savannah: 
*Marie Chaplin Watts, Savannah; Mil- 
dred Bernell Wilkerson, Glennville; 
General Science — Sadie Belle Car- 
ter Savannah; James Dilworth, Savan- 
nah; James English, Savannah; *Geor- 
gia Mae Brown Huling, Savannah; Mel- 
vin Herman Marion, Savannah; Wal- 
ter Bruce Simmons, Savannah; Louis 
Young, Savannah; 

Languages and Literature — Willie 
Mae Jackson, Waycross; Juliette John- 
son, Savannah; B e r n i c e Thompkins 
Nichols, Savannah; Evelyn Yvonne 
Royal Scarborough, Savannah; Mathe- 
matics — Leone Celestine Bolden, Savan- 
nah; *Earl Rubin Greene, Savannah; 
Ernestine Moon, Savannah; Daniel Go- 
liath Nichols, Savannah; Johnny Rufus 
Ponder, Barnesville; ** William Nathan 
Weston, Savannah; Social Science — 
Georgia Lee Bartley, Marlow; Otis Je- 
rome Brock, Montezuma; James Clinton 
Cooper, Bainbridge; Eulon Marie Bass 
Frazier, Madison; Rebecca Edwards 
Jones, Savannah; Levi Moore, Savan- 
nah; Willie C. Reed, Valdosta; Jesse 
Jones Smith, Rayle; Division of Home 
Economics — Evelyn Solomon Johnson, 
Savannah; Margaret Stephens Knox. 
Egypt, Ga.; Georgia Ann Price, Wood- 
stock; Division of Trades and Indus- 
tries — John Wesley Arnold, Newman; 
Henry Driessen, Hilton Head, S. C; 
Arvella Levi Farmer, Savannah; *Henry 
Nelson Johnson, Savannah; William 
Toney Lumpkin, Waycross; Eddie Mc- 
Kissick, Macon. 

*Cum Laude 
**Magna Cum Laude 



Adele Addison, soprano star of opera, 
concert staff, radio, and television, gave 
a concert here on March 26. 

The most recent in the rich lyceum of- 
ferings was the highly original Musical 
Portraits, who appeared here July 5. 
Featuring a baritone, soprano, and pia- 
nist, the Musical Portraits was the brain- 
child of pianist-arranger Dana Lordly, 
whose aim was to combine opera in 
English, concert and musical comedy, 
and present them in a new and enter- 
taining fashion. 

Anniversary tributes to both opera 
and comedy — scenes from "The Mar- 
riage of Figaro" in celebration of Mo- 
zart, and a special adaption of the first 
great technicolor film musical, "The 
Wizard of Oz" were highlights of the 
sparkling program. 

Arts Festival Meeting 

The Language Arts Festival was held 
March 7-9. Mrs. Eloise Usher Belcher, 
instructor in dramatics, South Carolina 
State College, was consultant. Demon- 
strations of the arena-theatre technique 
highlighted the Festival. Mrs. Belcher's 
drama group presented scenes from Noel 
Coward's "Blithe Spirit." 

The theme of the Festival was "Cre- 
ative Expression through Choral Speak- 
ing and Interpretation." Mrs. Louise 
Owens, assistant professor of languages 
and literature, was chairman of the fes- 
tival. Mrs. Luetta C. Upshur, assistant 
professor of languages and literature, 
and Leroy Bolden, instructor in speech 
at Beach High School, Savannah, served 
as consultants in poetic interpretation 
and choral reading, respectively. 

Noel Coward's "Hay Fever," was pre- 
sented by the Savannah State College 
Drama Guild, February 29. Peola 
Wright, Alonza Perry, James Meeks, 
and Ethel Jones appeared in the title 



roles. John B. Clemmons, chairman of 
the mathematics department, is director 
of the players. 

An exhibition of Young American 
Printmakers was shown in the College 
Library February 12-26. Included in the 
exhibit were works of the well-known 
artists Antonio Frasconi, Seong Moy, 
and Leonard Baskin. The collection 
numbered seventy artists whose original 
works include all of the print media — 
lithography, wood cuts, serigraphs, etch- 
ings, dryprints, aquatints, linoleum cuts, 
engravings. Many of the prints were in 
color and for purchase. 

Nelson and Neal, famous Australian- 
American piano team, appeared at the 
College, January 24. 

Conference Held Julv 22-25 

The annual conference of the Nation- 
al Negro County Agents Association was 
held at the College, July 22-25. Demon- 
strations, tours of local industries, a 
"Farmer's Day Barbecue," and a panel 
were Conference features. 

The executive officers of the Associa- 
tion are L. D. Kennedy, president; B. D. 
Harrison, vice-president; M. E. Dean, 
secretary; D. P. Lilly, corresponding 
secretary; H. B. Jackson, treasurer; L. 
C. Johnson, parliamentarian; G. A. New- 
born, chaplain; T. H. Black, historian; 
J. C. Dunbar, public relations; and W. 
Q. Scott, sergeant-at-arms. 

Members of the Planning committee 
were Augustus Hill, assistant supervisor, 
Negro work; A. S. Bacon, State Agent, 
Negro Work; J. W. Home, County 
Agent and State Reporter; E. H. Har- 
mond, County Agent, and Chairman of 
the entertainment committee; J. B. Stev- 
ens, County Agent, and president of the 
State Association; and L. D. Kennedy, 
County Agent, and president of the Na- 
tional County Agents Association. 



THE BULLETIN 



Page 7 



Ill Belles Lettres of a 
Passing Way of Life 

TEN NORTH FREDERICK. By 
John O'Hara. New York: Random 
House. 1955. $3.95. Reviewed by Miss 
Madeline Harrison, Assistant Librarian. 

Ten North Frederick is a novel 
abounding in secrets which the charac- 
ters have gone to great trouble to con- 
ceal or deny. It covers many decades 
and includes many lives. Here is the 
story of the marriage of Joe and Edith 
Chapin, Joe's parents, children, and a 
number of friends and fellow townsmen 
whose lives touch that of Joe Chapin. 

The novel opens with a public oc- 
casion, as did A Rage to Live. In this 
case the occasion is a funeral — the fun- 
eral of Joe Chapin — and from there the 
story makes its perspective that of the 
community over the years. All the city s 
leaders are present at this funeral — as 
well as the governor of the state and oth- 
er representatives of the great world 
outside. 

What has Joe's life really been like? 
Few of the persons at the funeral really 
knew him. There were those who did, 
however. These included the family 
physician. Dr. English; Joe's partner 
and devoted friend. Arthur McHenry; 
his political maker and breaker, Mike 
Slattery; his talented disappointing son, 
Joe Jr.; his beautiful unhappy daughter, 
Anne, and his widow Edith, who was ad- 
mired by almost everyone except her 
children. 

In the first portion of the narrative 
Joe is seen through the eyes of some 
of the people at the funeral. Then the 
author flashes back to Joe's parents who 
established the home at Ten North 
Frederick Street where Joe lived all of 
his life. Joe's story is then told from the 
beginning — his childhood and young 
manhood, the friends he made, the 
school he attended, his vocation, his 
wife, his serving on the home front dur- 
ing the war, his political aspirations, his 
late romantic escapade. The most im- 
portant revelation about him does not 
become apparent until the end. 

There is some minor sociology in- 
cluded, also. We know how the people 
in Joe's social circle feel about schools, 
clothes, clubs, automobiles, making 
money, the marriage of their children, 
and even where they live. We learn that 
the so-called established first families 
consider themselves as having arrived, 
while some other of their neighbors, 
whose bank accounts may be much larg- 
er, are considered as those who are 
climbing. 



One reviewer has summed up the ef- 
fect of the story well. "It is not the plot. 
it is the people who matter here, and the 
author's attitude toward them might be 
called more fascinated and more curious 
than it is sympathetic. These characters 
credibly affect each other in the smallish 
frame of their lives. They are complex, 
significant, full-bodied. One comes 
away from their story with the impres- 
sion that a gifted paragrapher, not a 
long-view novelist, has ticked them off, 
for in contrast with the electrifying 
exactness of its short profiles, exposi- 
tions, and controversial exchanges, the 
novel's total effect is that of a densely 
populated glacier moving well within 
glacier speed." 



The Magical Time 
Of Childhood 

THE SINGING TEAKETTLE. By 

Christine D. Whitaker. New York: Ex- 
position Press. 1956. $2.50. 

The Singing Teakettle is a book of 
poems for children. In her preface, the 
author states: "The poems appearing in 
this volume stem from a desire to cap- 
ture the child's interest by incorporating 
into verses the child's conception of the 
world in which he lives." 

Alumna Whitaker admirably executes 
her purpose. A child's world is the 
province of these verses. The wonder, 
magic, and enchantment of childhood 
are here. The pathos and the often 
haunting qualities of the child's heart 
are here also, skillfully etched in the 
child's own terms. 

A glance of some of the titles will suf- 
fice to point up the author's extreme 
care to keep her verses within the child's 
world. Take "A Thanksgiving Prayer," 
"Who Moved the Quail's Nest?", 
"Where is Joy," "Music in the Rain," 
"My Mother," "Fishing," or "My Dog 
Ball," to name a few. 

The title poem, 'The Singing Tea- 
kettle," is a captivating piece, abounding 
in the images that surround us in our 
youth. Note the following lines: 

My mother had a singing teakettle 
Ever since she was a child . . . 
It was a gift from her mother 
When she was only one, 
So she kept it shinging as bright 
As gold shines in the sun. 

The sometimes startling perceptive- 
ness of a child's mind is distilled in the 
following poem: 

I searched for joy 

North, South, East, and West, 

But I did not find it. 



Faculty Items 

R. J. Martin. A.B., M.A., principal 
of Ballard-Hudson High School, Macon, 
served as consultant for the Workshops 
in secondary and elementary education. 
Mr. Martin received the A.B. degree 
from Talladega College and the M.A. 
from Fisk University. Before becoming 
principal of Ballard-Hudson, he was 
principal of Center High School, Way- 
cross, and has served as principal of 
Avery Institute, Charleston, S. C. ; as- 
sistant principal of Lincoln Academy, 
Kings Mountain, N. C, principal of 
Henry County Training School, Way- 
cross; and as visiting instructor at Al- 
bany State College. 



Dr. Walter I. Murray served as direc- 
tor of the Reading Workshop. He re- 
ceived the B.S. degree from Indiana 
University. Terre Haute, Indiana; the 
M.S. degree from Indiana University, 
Bloomington; and the Ph.D degree from 
the University of Chicago. 

Late of A&T College, Greensboro, N. 
C, Dr. Murray will join the faculty of 
Brooklyn College in the fall. Before 
joining the faculty at A&T College, he 
served as principal of the Dunbar School 
in Phoenix. He has also served as an 
elementary teacher in Lincoln School. 
Robbins, 111., and as an elementary and 
a high school teacher at Roosevelt High 
School. Gary, Indiana. Dr. Murray has 
worked during the summer months at 
the University of Chicago, Arizona 
State College, Florida A&M University, 
and the Southern University. 

Dr. Beulah J. Farmer was named act- 
ing chairman of the department of lan- 
guages and literature for the Summer 
Session. Mrs. Farmer, associate profes- 
sor of languages and literature, received 
the Ph.D. degree from New York Uni- 
versity last fall. 



When I returned home, 

There I found it — where I left it 

Before I began to roam. 

Anyone who has listened patiently and 
sometimes mutely to the seemingly end- 
less interrogations of a child will find 
the comfort in the following: 

Who knows what makes the wind 

blow, 
Who knows what makes the grass 

grow, 
Who knows what makes the sun rise, 
Who knows what makes the sun shine, 
Who knows, who knows, who knows? 

So Miss Whitaker achieves her stated 
purpose of "capturing the child's in- 
terest" by using the "child's conception 
of the world in which he lives." 



Page It 



THE BULLETIN 



I-4* 7 



w> 



The Stream of 
Opportuity 

The Alumni 

Mr. and Mrs. B. J. James celebrated 
the twenty-fifth anniversary of their 
marriage on July 21. Mrs. James, class 
of 1930, is a native of Savannah; Mr. 
James, class of 1932. was born in Nay- 
lor. Georgia. 

They are the parents of two daughters. 
Myrtice Alveta, 23, and Annetta Marie. 
21. Myrtice. a graduate of Palmer Me- 
morial Institute, received her B.S. degree 
in social science from Savannah State 
College in 1953. Very active in the so- 
cial and religious life of Savannah, Myr- 
tice is a member of the Alpha Kappa 
Alpha sorority and is a Sunday School 
teacher at St. Matthew's Episcopal 
Church. She teaches at the West Savan- 
nah Elementary School. 

Annetta, also a Palmer graduate, won 
the B.S. degree in elementary educa- 
tion from the College in 1955. Now Mrs. 
Reuben Gamble. Annetta is employed 
at the Pioneer Elementary School in 
Los Angeles. Her husband is a labora- 
tory technician at the Veterans Hospital 
there. A member of Alpha Kappa Alpha 
sorority, Annetta was inducted into 
Alpha Kappa Mu National Honor So- 
ciety while a student at the College. 

There is something immortal about 
the marriage of true hearts. Asked to 
comment on the institution of marriage. 
the Jameses said. ''Love is the founda- 
tion for a lasting marriage. With love go 




". . . LOVE IS THE FOUNDATION . . ."—Mr. and Mrs. B. J. James share the 
memories of twenty-five years of marriage. 



respect, tolerance, loyalty, and under- 
standing." 

These bons mots, flowing from two 
devoted hearts, are refreshing to ponder 
in these fevered days of transitory al- 
liances and severed dreams. To the 
Jameses go our best wishes for many, 
many more years of wedded bliss. 




Maceo Scott, '52 and Earle Green. 
56 were recently appointed as mathe- 
matical technicians at the United States 
Proving-Ground Experimental Station in 
New Mexico. Both men received a rat- 
ing which gave them a beginning salary 
of $5700 per year. In addition, they 
will have the privilege to continue their 
education at the University of Mexico. 



Jefferson Scruggs. 54, teaches at the 
Wallace Foster School Number 32 in 
Indianapolis. Scruggs majored in in- 
dustrial education. 



"THIS IS YOUR LIFE, LULA SMITH."— Signal Honors came to Miss Smith 
when highlights of her life were reviewed during the annual Alumni Banquet in 
June. Benjamin Lewis was master of ceremonies. To the right of Mr. Lewis is 
Miss Madeline Shivery. Dr. and Mrs. W. K. Payne are in the foreground. 



In Memoriam 

Culan Jackson, '41 

In summer, the rejuvenescence of 
the rose reminds us of His glorious 
and eternal promise that there is 
really no death . . . 



THE BULLETIN 



Page 9 



Courses in Education 
Popular-Effective 

The courses in Health Education, of- 
fered for the first time during the Sum- 
mer Session, proved to be popular and 
effective. Offered were Health Educa- 
tion 425: Synthesis of Basic Health In- 
formation, and Health Education 305: 
The Total School Health Program. 

Under the direction of Walter Left- 
wich, instructor in health education, 
these courses fulfilled the need of in- 
service and prospective teachers to meet 
the increased emphasis on health educa- 
tion in the state schools. 

Twenty-eight students were enrolled 
in Health Education 305. They were: 
Ruby Reeves. Brooklet; Jeanette Cole- 
man, Savannah; Daisy Waye, Bruns- 
wick: Columbus Brinkley, Fort Myers, 
Fla.; Priscilla Tremble, Statesboro; Al- 
berta Roberts. Savannah; Julia Butler, 
Augusta; Jeanette Elliott, Mcintosh; 
Harold Ray. Savannah; Mildred Gra- 
ham, Savannah; Reubin Cooper, Les- 
lie; Audrey Taylor, Savannah; Hattie 
Rivers, Patterson; Lillie Ann Sutton, Sa- 
vannah: L. V. Ross Currie, Nashville; 
Lillian Rucker. Elberton; Sallie Wood- 
ard, Gay; Mary Pharr, Washington, Bes- 
sie Hannah, Savannah; Clara Session, 
Fort Myers, Fla.; Phoebe Driessen, Hil- 
ton Head, S. C. ; Addie Kelly, Savannah: 
Cena Best, Mcintosh; Mildred Gaskin, 
Valdosta; Harriett Polite, Savannah; 
Ann Frazier. Ludowici; Ora Holmes, 
Waynesboro; and Lucille Hudson, May- 
field. 

An opinion survey of class members 
revealed that all students felt the course 
to be invaluable to them in their pres- 
ent or projected work. Many felt that 
the course has broadened and enriched 
their knowledge of basic health concepts. 
The use of resource persons, audio- 
visual aids, field trips to various health 
agencies and duplicated materials on 
health were listed as features that en- 
hanced the effectiveness of the course. 

A sampling of opinion taken from 
members of the class in Health Educa- 
tion 425 pointed up some of the future 
uses knowledge obtained from the 
course will be put to by the students. 
Several responded that this course will 
aid them in preparing health talks for 
the PTA and other community groups. 
In addition to the practical knowledge 
concerning good health practices 
gleaned from the course, a majority felt 
that the course also offered concrete in- 
formation designed to help schools have 
a better health program. Some empha- 
sized the fact that the wealth of infor- 
mation gained from the course will be of 
use in the homemaker's work. 



Two students indicated that the course 
has given them methods of applying in- 
formation learned to various school situ- 
ations. One person stated that informa- 
tion gained from the course has helped 
him to eradicate misconceptions about 
certain diseases. 

Perhaps the most provocative re- 
sponse came from the student who said 
the course will affect her life indefinitely. 
Certainly, because of the impingement of 
health on all areas of the school curricu- 
lum and of life, these courses in health 
education are mandatory, both from the 
vantage point of the academy and of life 
itself. 



Elementary Work 

(Continued from Page 3) 

Mary White indicated that the Workshop 
contributed to her professional growth 
in the "Correlation of all subject-matter 
in centering the interest around the need 
for bettering of health conditions of the 
home, school and community." 

Teaching demonstrations and charts 
were singled out by Ruth Heyward as 
important features of the Workshop. 
Gwendolyn Strickland was impressed by 
the wealth of information and guidance 
brought in by special consultants. 

The provision of opportunities for de- 
veloping one's leadership abilities was 
pointed out by Anne Richardson. She 
said serving as chairman of one of the 
interesting groups helped her "gain a 
better knowledge of being a leader." 

Special features and activities were 
especially meaningful experiences to 
Helen Stringer and Ethel Lee White 
Daniel. 

Following each demonstration, an 
evaluation period was held. These evalu- 
ations proved to be of special worth to 
Gertrude Atwater and Pauline Cainion. 

Thus the Elementary Workshop, 
geared to the needs and interests of its 
constituency, provided experiences that 
stimulated the professional growth of the 
enrollees. In the words of the mem- 
bers, the Workshop provided "many ap- 
plicable ideas, skills, and techniques" 
that will certainly be of use in the class- 
rooms when these teachers re-enter this 
fall. 



The antiphonal effects inherent in 
Palestina's hymns, the restrained har- 
monic language of his music, and the 
contrasting tone colors and textures of 
his chorales were explained in word 
and music. 

Samuel Gill, band director at Wood- 
ville High School, Savannah; and Benja- 
min Brown, consultant in music for the 
elementary schools in Savannah, played 
a cornet-trumpet duet, "Because," ar- 
ranged by Gertrude Golden, music in- 
structor at Jefferson County Training 
School. They were accompanied by Mr. 
Everett. 

Others enrolled in the first session 
Workshop were Robert Dilworth, regu- 
lar student; William Forest, principal, 
elementary school, Collins; Matthew Mc- 
Millan, regular student; Robert Vaughn, 
regular student; Lillie Sutton, regular 
student; Celestine Weston, regular stu- 
dent; Benjamin Williams, music direc- 
tor, Burke County; and Marie F. Le- 
Count. music instructor, Evans County. 



Band Work 

(Continued from Page 5) 

All musical instruments are divided 
into four classes: the stringed instru- 
ments, the woodwind instruments, the 
brass instruments, and the percussion 
instruments. Demonstrations of instru- 
ments in each division were given. 



Secondary Work 

(Continued from Page 4) 

Wayne J. Hawes. Lincoln County Train- 
ing School, stated that the "efficient 
guidance given by the instructors in the 
study of the background and evolution 
of the secondary school and in the or- 
ganization of teaching materials to do a 
better job of teaching" comprised the 
most significant contribution of the Sec- 
ondary Workshop to his professional 
growth. 

Unit planning and construction, mod- 
ern concepts, techniques, and method of 
teaching were listed by a majority of the 
Workshoppers as areas in which vital 
help was given. Obieton Hughes said: 
"I have been thoroughly convinced that 
in a curriculum that does not translate 
objectives into content, statements of 
purpose are nothing more than expres- 
sions of aspirations." 

Hosea J. Lofton. Pierce County Train- 
ing School, stated that the Workshop 
experiences will have a tremendous ef- 
fect on his teaching service in the future. 
He has gained, he stated, "a broader 
and more precise concept of the school 
and its purpose, the newest trends in 
techniques, a development of an in- 
quiring mind as to proper procedures, 
and some basic principles to apply to 
organization of instructional materials." 

In addition, Lofton asserted that he 
has been inspired to "think critically of 
my approach and to strive to accomplish 
the great task of the modern school — to 
educate for a useful life." 



Page 10 



THE BULLETIN 



K5 



The President's Message 



Educational opportunities in America have been declared 
abundant and varied. This idea has been considered by many 
to mean that the opportunities are universally available for all 
youths. An examination of these opportunities and the ability 
to make use of them will reveal that many limitations exist. 

The limitations for education on the college level do not 
coincide with the ability of students to succeed in and profit 
by college education. There is no college or university which 
students may attend and pay no fees. Even where fees are 
lowest, many students find it impossible to pay the fees re- 
quired and to provide the books, clothing, and other items nec- 
essary for college attendance. As a result of this limitation 
many promising high school graduates are denied college 
education. The denial of education to such individuals means 
that society will not be able to utilize the abilities and poten- 
tial contributions of such individuals. 

In many instances students with meager means would be 
able to attend college with partial support from outside 
sources. The wealth which individuals, businesses, and other 
organized groups possess might be invested in programs which 
would bring greater happiness, security, and achievement to 
the nation and to the individuals. It is not a matter which 
should be considered only by corporations and large organ- 
ized groups, but one which should receive the attention of 
individuals in all areas of our culture. 

Definite plans should be developed to extend the oppor- 
tunities for individuals who can profit by the education to 
attend college. College alumni, public spirited individuals, 
organized religious groups, and various other types of groups 
have made some beginnings in the field of scholarship aid. 



It is time for individuals and groups to consider seriously how 
much such a program is worth. One has no doubt that schol- 
arship aid will be appreciated by the individuals who are the 
recipients. There are reasons to believe that people who are 
provided educational opportunities by others will feel obli- 
gated to extend and increase this generosity. But beyond these 
two aspects of appreciation one will find that educational 
institutions and students who are financially able to provide 
their own educational expenses show deep appreciation. It 
is very encouraging to institutions and student bodies to know 
that individuals and groups beyond the college walls feel that 
a college education is desirable and worthwhile for those who 
can profit by it. The dividends which accrue from scholar- 
ships provided worthy and promising students are high and 
they continue to increase year by year. Recently students in 
the graduating class of this institution have left modest sums 
to assist worthy students who will follow them. 

Savannah State College has enrolled today and will en- 
roll in the fall some very promising students. Some of these 
will find it impossible to continue their education without 
financial assistance. The scholarship aid program which 
reached its highest point during the past academic year is 
looked upon as a potential factor in this area. During the 
past academic year the College received the largest amount 
of funds for scholarship purposes in its history. Funds came 
from more alumni, business establishments, organizations, and 
individuals than ever before. The total amounted to a little 
more than $4,500.00. At least five times that amount is need- 
ed annually. 

W. K. Payne 



Dr. W. K. Payne, President 
Savannah State College 
Savannah, Georgia 

Dear Dr. Payne: 



I herewith pledge/contribute $ to the Scholarship Fund. 

This pledge will be paid as follows: 

Very truly yours, 



, Class of 



Address 



THE BULLETIN 



Page 11 












Campus at Mid-Summer 

Now is the softly enchanting time of 
the day ... If I turn around, 1 can see 
the majestic buildings that are the physi- 
cal SSC as they reach toward the sky . . . 
If I turn around, I can see the students 
hurrying toward the library and the lec- 
tures, occupied with the serious business 
of the academic life . . . 

But I do not turn around and the 
magic of the balmy ocean breeze touches 
me ... I like to think that this self-same 
breeze has caressed the cheek of some- 
one thousands of miles away before it 
came to me. . .And I am dwarfed by the 
surging realization of the grandeur of 
Nature and of the organic cycle of life 
... In such a time as this one can 
range unhampered . . . The very milieu 
— the oaks ancient and knowing and 
laced with airy moss, the quiet mystery 
of the marshla: ds, the limitless expanse 
of sky and brilliance of sun — is perfect 
for communion with one's self, for in- 
spection, for introspection ... I know 
that this is the end of the library and 
the lectures . . . The image of the cave is 
real to me now, for I have been into the 
radiance of the sun ... | 

Truly there is something wondrous I 
about the Campus at Mid-Summer . . . ! 



ALUMNI 
ISSUE 






r 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



BULLETIN 



Vol. 10 No. 7 



May, 1957 




MAN AND A DREAM 
The Story of Chester DeVillars and Todd-Grant School 

(Page 3) 




A one-woman art exhibition hung in Hill Hall during the Fine Arts Festival featured 
work of Carolyn Patterson Bell, senior chemistry major and current "Miss Savannah 
State". Above is her "PLOT AGAINST DEATH," a charcoal representation of Dylan 
Thomas poem, "Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night." The work was a highlight 
of a recent television program in the humanities. Another painting, "COMPOSITION," 
in mixed media, won third prize in the First National Bank of Atlanta's 90th Anni- 
versary Competition. 



The Cover Picture 

The front page cover features a portrait of the Chester A. DeVillars family of 
Todd-Grant High School. Darien. Seated, left to right, are Mrs. Selena C. DeVillars. 
Deanna, 14; and C. A. DeVillars, Sr. Standing are Donald Edward, 11; and 
Chester. Jr.. 17. 

A picture of the 4-H Club Center in Dublin is the highlight of the back cover. 
Inset are photographs of A. S. Bacon, left, state agent for Negro work, and Alex- 
ander Hurse. Negro Club agent, both graduates of Savannah State. 



About This Issue 

This year of the NEA's centen- 
nial seems a particularly approp- 
riate time to feature the many 
Savannah State College alumni 
who are engaged in the noble pro- 
fession of teaching. Highlights of 
this issue include pictures and ar- 
ticles on principals and teachers 
of several Georgia schools, many 
<>f which have entire teaching 
staffs comprised of SSC alumni. 

The pictorial essays on the 
GTEA annual conference also 
point up the alumni who have 
chosen the dedicated life of the 
teacher as their leit motiv. 

Another kind of teaching, the 
promulgation of the Way and the 
Word, is shown in the feature 
story on the Reverend Richard M. 
Williams and his church, the First 
Bryan Baptist Church of Savannah. 

Photographs of the GTEA con- 
ference used in this issue were 
made by William H. M. Bowens, 
director of the audio-visual cen- 
ter. Robert Mobley. industrial edu- 
cation major, assisted in lay-out. 



The Bulletin 

Dr. William K. Payne 
President 

Wilton C. Scott 

Editor 
Luetta C. Upshur 

Issue Editor 

Phillip J. Hampton 

Art and Lay-out 



Vol. 10 No. 7 



May. 1957 



Four Awards Made To 
College at JSAA Meet 

Savannah State College has won four 
awards at the 12th annual meeting of 
the National Alumni Association for 
Colleges and Universities at Austin, 
Texas. 

Three first place trophies were won 
for alumni publicity, alumni pictures 
and alumni office management. 

Wilton C. Scott, director of public 
relations at Savannah State College and 



executive secretary of the National 
Alumni Association, won a distinguished 
service award for making the greatest 
contribution to the association. 

Scott was also re-elected executive 
secretary of the association, and Prince 
Jackson Jr.. alumni secretary of the 
college, was elected area president for 
Georgia. Florida and Alabama. 

Jackson will be convention chairman 
for the 1958 annual meeting which will 
be held at Savannah State College. 



CONTENTS 

Todd-Grant School Page 3 

West Savannah Page 4 

Gadsden Page 16 

Spenser Page 6 

Paulsen Page 12 

Commencement Events Page 5 

President's Message Page 20 



The Savannah State College Bulletin is pub- 
lished in October, December, February. March, 
April, and May by Savannah State College. 
Entered as second-class matter. December 16, 
1947, at the Post Office at Savannah. Geor- 
gia, under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



Page 2 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 






A MAN AND A DREAM: 

The Story of Chester A. DeVillars and Todd-Grant High School 



{Editor's Nate: Material used in this 
story was taken from a news story and 
an editorial which appeared in The 
Darien News, Frulay, January 4, 1957.) 

A $12,750 contribution to the Todd- 
Grant High School by R. J. Reynolds 
provided especial Christmas joy for 
Principal Chester A. DeVillars because 
it enabled him to see a dream rendered 
tangible. 

The gift, $10,000 of which was ear- 
marked for the gymnasium building 
fund and $2,750 for band uniforms, 
brings nearer to fruition a project which 
has long been close to Mr. DeVillars' 
heart. 

Shortly before Christmas. Mr. De- 
Villars had extended Mr. Reynolds an 
invitation to use the Todd-Grant chorus 
and band for his program of enter- 
tainment on Sapelo Island at Christmas. 
The letter also told of the current drives 
on at the school, one to raise money for 
band uniforms; the other to build a 
gymnasium. 

The letter read in part: 

"We have in progress two projects 
which we think are vital to our total 
school program. One is a drive to raise 
$3,750 with which to purchase uniforms 
for the 65 members of the band and the 
other is a drive for $45,000 for the 
construction of a gymnasium." 

Of the gymnasium, Mr. DeVillars 
wrote: 

"We are without this much-needed 
facility at the present time, and are 
playing all home games in Brunswick, 
a distance of 18 miles from our home, 
through the courtesy of the Glynn Coun- 
ty Commissioners." 

The letter further indicated that up 
to that time, $1,000 had been raised for 
uniforms, and $5,111 for the gym. Of 
the $5,111 on hand for the gym, $5,000 
had been set aside by the Mcintosh 
County Board of Education. The Board 
had voted to set aside 5,000 per year 
toward the building fund. The remain- 
ing $111 had been collected via indi- 
vidual contributions. 

The $1,000 already in the uniform 
fund had come much harder. Much of 
it had come through contributions of 
the Band Parents Club; the remainder 
had been raised through efforts such as 
fish-frys and donations. 

The end seemed a far dream to Mr. 
DeVillars in December, 1956, when he 
wrote to Mr. Reynolds. However, be- 
fore the letter was written, Mr. De- 
Villars had taken steps to make the 



uniforms a reality. A tentative contract 
calling for $1,000 when the uniforms 
were ready to be shipped and the bal- 
ance in a year had already been drawn 
up and Mr. DeVillars' signature had 
been affixed thereto. This, of course, 
held him personally responsible for the 
debt. 

"That's a lot of money, but I was 
going through with it," Mr. DeVillars 
said. "We've got a fine band. They 
have worked hard. They deserve uni- 
forms and I was ready to do all I 
could to get them." 

On Christmas Eve, Mr. DeVillars re- 
ceived the following letter: 

"Dear Mr. DeVillars: As per Mr. 
Reynolds' instructions, we are enclos- 
ing two checks, payable to the Mcin- 
tosh County Board of Education, one 
for $2,750 as a contribution to your 
school band, and one for $10,000 as a 
contribution to your new gymnasium 
building fund. With the season's best 
wishes, 

"Sincerely yours. 

"Stratton Coyner. Attorney" 

An editorial in The Darien News 
states: 

"In dollars and cents, the gymnasium 
contribution far outweighs the other, 
and perhaps the gymnasium even more 
outweighs the uniforms in importance. 
But to (Mr. DeVillars), whose appeal 
to Mr. Reynolds was responsible for 
the gift, the order of importance may 
be reversed. 

"The band has been close to the 



heart of the principal ever since its or- 
ganization. He once made the state- 
ment that he regarded it as his great- 
est contribution to Todd-Grant. Mainly 
through his efforts a thousand dollars 
had been raised, dimes and quarters at 
a time, toward uniforms. The fulfill- 
ment of his dream must have brought 
deep satisfaction." 



SSC Faculty Members 
Attend Meetings 

Dr. C. L. Kiah, Mr. J. H. Camper 
and Mrs. I. J. Gadsden of the Depart- 
ment of Education. Savannah State Col- 
lege, attended the fall meeting of the 
Georgia Committee on Cooperation in 
Teacher Education. Atlanta University, 
which met November 5. 1956. Dr. Kiah 
is serving as chairman for this school 
year. 

Dr. C. L. Kiah was a member of the 
Committee for the evaluation of Central 
High School, Sylvania. Georgia, which 
met from Wednesday afternoon Novem- 
ber 7 through Friday, November 9. 

The State Future Teachers of Amer- 
ica of which John H. Camper is spon- 
sor will meet at Albany State College, 
Albany, Georgia, November 16-17. Mr. 
Camper and delegates of the local Chap- 
ter will attend. 

Dr. E. K. Williams will attend a 
meeting of the Program Committee of 
the Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society in 
Atlanta, November 10. The purpose of 
the meeting, which will be held on the 
Atlanta University campus, is to make 
plans for the 19th Annual Conference 
to be held at Tuskegee Institute on 
March 28-30. 




Mrs. Rebecca Mitchell, '56, serves as Girls' Work Secretary, YMCA, Savannah. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 3 



The West Savannah 
Elementary School 

West Savannah Elementary School 
comprises grades 1 through 7. and has 
an enrollment of 986. a teaching staff 
of 28. a supervising principal, a secre- 
tary, and a librarian. The school has a 
modern lunchroom, and all facilities 
that make up a modern, progressive 
school. 

Realizing the uniqueness of each in- 
dividual. West Savannah School has 
made special efforts to meet its pupils' 
individual needs and interests through 
systematic and scientific grouping. With 
this teachable situation the achievement 
spreads are reduced, and teachers are 
better able to offer suitable materials 
and instruction for the various levels. 



The Principal 

Mrs. Ayler Mae Lovett, principal of 
West Savannah School, was educated in 
the public schools of Savannah, and 
the graduate teacher training depart- 
ment. Tuskegee Institute. Alabama. She 
holds the B.S. degree from Savannah 
State College: the M.A. degree from 
Columbia University. N. Y.. and has 
done post-graduate study in Atlanta 
University and Columbia University. 

Mrs. Lovett is a past president of the 
Chatham County Teachers Association, 
and a member of Board of Managers 
of the West Broad Street Y.M.C.A. 

She received Y.M.C.A/s highest 
award. "Service to Youth" Plaque, in 
1956. In addition. Mrs. Lovett is a 
member of the Board of Directors of 
the Frank Callen Boys Club, a com- 
municant of St. Matthews Episcopal 
Church, a member of Sigma Gamma 
Rho Sorority. Gamma Theta Upsilon. 
National Geography Fraternity. She is 
chairman of the Negro Division of 
"Keep Beautiful Savannah Clean" 
project, which was originated by civic- 
minded citizens, and is being sponsored 
by the Savannah Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Mrs. Lovetts most recent achieve- 
ments include the organization of the 
Savannah Chapter of the Georgia As- 
sociation for Retarded Children, and 
the establishment of "Happy House Dav 
School." the local school for the re- 
tarded. 



........ . 




. THE WEST SAVANNAH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 




Mrs. Ayler Mae Lovett, principal, goes over the day's correspondence with 
school secretary. 







Savannah State graduates at West Savannah School. Seated, left to right, Mrs. Doretha Wells, 
Miss Leola Sanders, Mesdames Susie Floyd (M.A. N.Y.U.), Pearlie Singleton, Mary Bailey, and Colleen 
Nichols. Standing left to right, Mesdames Gloria Spaulding Brown, Julia Jones Hamilton , Melissa Lewis 
(M.A. N.Y.U.), Jeannette Jenkins, Carolyn Kirkland, Mabel Hanshaw (M.A. N.Y.U.), Ayler M. Lovett, 
Principal (M.A. Columbia University); Gwendolyn Brown, Marie Watts, Geraldine Zeigler, "Teacher 
of the Year" 1956 (M.A. N.Y.U.); Mattie Fonvielle, Alma Wade (M.A. N.Y.U.) "Teacher of the Year" 
1957; and Walter Simmons. 



Page 4 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



15 \ 



Robert E. Blakeney 
A Living Example of Suecess 

Robert E. Blakeney, Sr.. principal of 
the Waynesboro High and Industrial 
School. Waynesboro. Georgia, is one 
of the outstanding principals in the 
state of Georgia. 

For more than twenty years. Mr. Blak- 
eney has been associated with education, 
mostly within the state of Georgia. His 
influence, however, has been nation- 
wide. He is well known for the years 
of inspired leadership that he has given 
to education: for his sympathetic and 
inspirational guidance to students: and 
for his personal sincerity and devotion 
to education. 




A graduate of Savannah State Col- 
lege (B.S. Ag. I . and Atlanta University 
( M.Ed. ) , Mr. Blakeney was appointed 
teacher of agriculture and principal of 
the Waynesboro High and Industrial 
School in 1936. In 1941 he relinquished 
his agricultural duties and devoted him- 
self entirely to the principalship. a po- 
sition which he still holds. During his 
administration the school has grown 
from a fifteen-teacher school with 500 
students to a sixty-three teacher school 
with 2,000 students. Prior to his ap- 
pointment at Waynesboro, he served as 
teacher of agriculture at the William 
James High School. Statesboro. Geor- 
gia, and principal and teacher of agri- 
culture at the Screven County Training 
School. Sylvania. Georgia. 

Mr. Blakeney, who was an outstand- 
ing leader in his field for agriculture, 
was awarded the coveted prize of Mas- 
ter Teacher of Agriculture in the state 
of Georgia in 1936. 

Mr. Blakeney has done advanced 
study towards the Ph.D. degree at the 



University of Michigan. He has served 
as a Regional Director for Region V 
of the G. T. E. A. He has served as a 
consultant and a panelist on many dis- 
cussion groups throughout the State. 
He is now serving as the president of the 
Alpha Chi Lambda Chapter of the Al- 
pha Phi Alpha, Inc.. Augusta. Georgia. 

His active participation in civic and 
religious affairs, his personal sincerity 
and devotion to his profession, and his 
extraordinary achievements have evoked 
the admiration of his associates and all 
who have known him. 

Mr. Blakeney is married to the for- 
mer Miss Anne T. Walker of Dublin. 
Georgia. They have one son, Robert E. 
Blakeney. Jr.. of Washington. D. C. 



Gala Homecoming 
At Savannah State 

In a celebration which was consid- 
ered one of the best in the history of 
the school, Savannah State College held 
its homecoming festivities Saturday, 
starting with a street parade followed 
by a football game and an alumni din- 
ner at night. 

The parade which was viewed by 
thousands as it wended its way through 



the city, was spectacular and received 
a big hand from the spectators. 

In the procession were numerous 
floats representing the various depart- 
ments of the college and many beautiful- 
ly decorated convertibles conveying key 
students. 

There were five bands, two of them 
from out-of-town schools, and a drum 
and bugle corps. The musical aggrega- 
tions were the college band, which led 
the procession, Beach and Woodville 
High bands and bands from Tift Coun- 
ty High School of Tifton. Ga.. and the 
William James High School of States- 
boro. The drum and bugle corps was 
that of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. 

The committee which judged the floats 
chose the one representing "Cinderella" 
as being the best. 

The football game following the pa- 
rade was a hectic contest and resulted 
in a victory for Clark College over the 
College Tigers, 16 to 13. The game was 
witnessed by about 3.000. The final 
event of the observance was the alumni 
banquet which was held at night. 

Unfortunately, the timing between the 
parade and the game was bad The 
parade ended only 25 minutes before 
the scheduled time for the game. 



COMMENCEMENT EVENTS — 1957 

Saturday, May 25 
7:30-9:00 P.M. President's Reception for Seniors 

President's Residence 
Thursday. May 30 
12:00 Noon Senior Class Day Exercises Meldrim Auditorium 

8:00 P.M. Senior Class Night Exercises Meldrim 

Auditorium 
Friday, May 31 

8:30 P.M. Junior-Senior Prom Willcox Gymnasium 

Saturday. June 1 
10:00 A.M. Senior Breakfast for Women Adams Hall 

10:00 A.M. Senior Breakfast for Men College Center 

5:00 P.M. Alumni Meeting Meldrim Auditorium 

8:00 P.M. Alumni Banquet Adams Hall 

Speaker: Reverend J. S. Bryan. Pastor 

St. Philip A. M. E. Church, Savannah, Georgia 

Sunday, June 2 
4:00 P.M. Baccalaureate Exercises . . Meldrim Auditorium 
Sermon : Reverend P. A. Patterson, Pastor 
Butler Presbyterian Church, Savannah. Georgia 
5:30 P.M. President and Mrs. W. K. Payne President's 

Residence 
At home to alumni, faculty, members of the grad- 
uating class, their parents and friends. 

Monday, June 3 

11:00 A.M. Commencement Exercises Meldrim 

Auditorium 
Address: Doctor W. Montague Cobb, Head 
Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine 
Howard University, Washington, D. C. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 5 




Leonard D. Law, President 
General Alumni Association 

By Prince E. Jackson, 
Alumni Secretary 

All of the presidents of the General 
Alumni Association have been grad- 
uates of the highest caliber and dis- 
tinction. They have fought an uphill 
battle in trying to organize our alumni 
into a highly efficient and effective or- 
ganization. Although this battle has not 
been won. victory is in the forseeable 
future. Savannah State has been very- 
fortunate in the kind of leadership she 
has received from these alumni. 

Our incumbent president, Mr. Leon- 
ard D. Law is a typical example of the 
kind of graduate who has occupied this 
key position in alumni leadership. Mr. 
Law is a native of Savannah and re- 
ceived his elementary and high school 
education in the public schools of Sa- 
vannah. Graduated from Savannah State 
College in 1931, he is married to the 
former Marguerite Wilson '31. This 
successful and happy union has pro- 
duced two children, Leonard and Vir- 
ginia Louise. As of all of our presi- 
dents, Mr. Law has dedicated himself 
to the betterment of his Alma Mater. 

He is a member of St. Matthew's 
Episcopal Church, Savannah, Georgia. 
He holds the positions of Superintend- 
ent of Sunday School, Treasurer of the 
Vestry, and Lay Reader. 

His civic obligations are many. He 
is on the Board of Directors of Frank 
Callen Boys' Club, Advisory Board of 
the West Broad Street Y.M.C.A., As- 
sociate Board Chatham-Savannah Tuber- 



The faculty of Frank W. Spencer School is composed largely of Savannah State 
College alumni. Seated, left to right: Mrs. Mildred G. Young, B.S. Savannah State 
College, advanced study, Atlanta University; Mrs. Nadine C. Lewis, B. S. Savannah 
State College, advanced study, New York University; Mrs. Retha G. Delaware, B. S. 
Savannah State College, advanced study, New York University; Mrs. Ernestine Harris, 
B. S. Savannah State College; Mrs. Ruth H. Morgan, B. S. Spelman College, advanced 
study, Atlanta University; Mrs. Juanita P. Myers, B. S. Allen University, Mrs. Lucille 
K. Bryant, B. S. West Virginia State College, advanced study, Atlanta University; Miss 
Carrie M. Anderson, B. S. Savannah State College. 

Standing left to right are: Daniel Wright, Jr., B. S. Savannah State College; 
Miss Augusta L. Pettie, B. S. Savannah State College, advanced work, Atlanta Uni- 
versity; Mrs. Alberta S. Bowens, B. S. Morris Brown College; Mrs. Mae Champen, B. S. 
Fayetteville Teachers' College, advanced study, Tuskegee Institute; Mrs. Evelyn Hicks, 
B. S. Savannah State College; Mrs. Annie Y. Kilroy, B. S. Savannah State College, 
advanced study, New York University; Mrs. Geneva Mitchell, B. S. Savannah State 
College; Mrs. Carolyn Arnold, B. S. Savannah State College; Mrs. Beulah W. Polite, 
B. S. Savannah State College; Mrs. Mary O. Jackson, B. S. Savannah State College, 
advanced study, Atlanta University; Miss Barbara L. Burke, B. S. Savannah State Col- 
lege, advanced study, Atlanta University. 

Not shown: Miss Lois A. Dotson, B. S. Savannah State College; Mrs. Margaret 
H. Stewart, B. S. Savannah State College; Mrs. Carrye C. Roberts, B. S. Savannah 
State College; Mrs. Mary F. Simmons, B. S. Savannah State College; Mrs. Lucy G. 
Solomon, B. S. Savannah State College; Mrs. Ann E. Stevens, B. S., Savannah State 
College. 



culosis and Health Association ( 1954 
Seal Sale Chairman ) , Public at Large 
member on the Delegate Assembly of 
Linked Community Services, and past 
president of the Savannah Chapter of 
the Savannah State College Alumni As- 
sociation (1946-1954). 

Mr. Law's social and fraternal mem- 
berships include the Frogs, Inc. and 
Mu Phi Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fra- 
ternity. 

Mr. Law served as principal of Han- 
cock County Training School, July 1931- 
June 1937. He served as District Man- 
ager of Guaranty Life Insurance Com- 
pany in Brunswick, July 1937 — June 
1943. In July of 1943, he was appointed 
Personnel Assistant, Union Bag-Camp 



Paper Corporation. Savannah. Georgia, 
the largest paper Corporation in the 
world. This appointment certainly served 
to distinguish our school because there 
are very few Negroes holding such a 
position with a firm comparable to 
Union Bag-Camp Paper Corporation. 

In spite of these heavy responsibili- 
ties, Mr. Law works constantly in alum- 
ni affairs of our Alma Mater. He is 
always ready to go beyond the ordinary 
call to push Savannah State higher and 
is an active worker in the local chapter. 

Savannah State College is grateful for 
this good son and wishes him all the 
success in the world in his future and 
in the uphill battle of bringing her other 
sons and daughters back to her. 






Page 6 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 






Alumni Neivs 



1896 

RICHARD ROBERT WRIGHT. JR., 

554 N. 58th Street. Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, is Bishop of the African Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. Bishop Wright 
is the son of the first president of 
Savannah State College. Major Richard 
R. Wright. Bishop Wright received his 
B.D. and A.M. Degrees from the Uni- 
versity of Chicago and the Ph.D. De- 
gree from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. He has done additional work at 
University of Berlin, and the University 
of Leipzig. Germany. For a number of 
years. Bishop Wright served as presi- 
dent of Wilberforce University, Wilber- 
force. Ohio. 

1907 

I. J. YANCY, 1643 Forest Street. 
Augusta. Georgia, is pastor of the Anti- 
och Baptist Church in Augusta. Yancy 
was the president of the 1907 class. 

1917 

FOSTER R. LAMPKIN. 2331 For- 
syth Street. P. 0. Box 1096. Columbus. 
Georgia, is the owner of the Personal 
Real Estate and Rentals Firm in Colum- 
bus. Lampkin is married to the former 
Maurice Cobb, who also attended Sa- 
vannah State. He has done additional 
study at Boston. Harvard and New York 
Universities. He was past vice president 
and president of the Georgia State 
Teachers Association, Rosenwald Field 
Agent for Georgia. Special Assistant to 
the Supreme Grand Master — Modern 
Free & Accepted Masons. Alpha Phi 
Alpha. Deacon Baptist Church, Chair- 
man Committee on Vocational Guidance 
& Education for Negroes in Secondary 
Schools held at Atlanta University, 1935. 

1931 

LEONARD D. LAW. 1603 Vine 
Street. Savannah, Georgia, is Personnel 
Assistant at the Union Bag Corpora- 
tion, Savannah. Law is now serving as 
president of the General Alumni As- 
sociation. 

MARGUERITE K. LAW. 1603 Vine 
Street. Savannah. Georgia, is teaching 
at the Alfred E. Beach High School. 
She has done additional work at Co- 
lumbia University where she received 
her M.A. degree. Mrs. Law, the former 
Miss Marguerite K. Wilson, is married 
to Leonard D. Law. 

CHRISTOPHER GREENE, 1003 
Glenmore Avenue, Waycross, Georgia. 
is principal at the Screven Elementary 
School, Screven, Georgia. He has done 
graduate work at South Carolina State 
College. 




NAA Regional Meeting 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 7 



1935 

OLA B. DINGLE. 634 West 35th 
Street. Savannah. Georgia, is teaching 
at the Springfield Terrace School. Sa- 
vannah. Georgia. She received her M.A. 
degree from New York University. Mrs. 
Dingle is the editor-in-chief of the Chat- 
ham County publication. "The Reflec- 
tor." She also received an award for 
outstanding work in Girl Scouting. 

ABERDEEN KENNEDY. 3403 Hop- 
kin Street. Savannah. Georgia, is work- 
ing as an insurance agent. She has done 
additional study at Florida A. & M. 
University. 

WILLIE MAE JACKSON. 507 Sec- 
ond Avenue, McRae. Georgia, is teach- 
ing at the Twin City High School. She 
was elected as "Teacher of the Year" 
in Telfair County. 1957. 

AUGUSTUS McARTHUR. Post Of- 
fice Box 886. Soperton. Georgia, is the 
principal of Treutlen County Training 
School. Soperton. McArthur has done 
additional work at the University of 
Pittsburgh where he received his Mas- 
ter of Education degree. Aside from his 
administrative duties. McArthur serves 
as Coach, and Organizer of clubs. 

1936 

RALEIGH MACON. 116 Church 

Street. Claxton. Georgia, is principal 
at the Evans County High School. He 
has done additional study at New York 
University and Atlanta University, and 
received the M.Ed, degree from the 
latter. 

DOROTHY FURLOWE SMITH. 1809 
Fourth Street. Savannah. Georgia, is 
teaching at the George W. Carver 
School. Richmond Hill. Georgia. She 
has done additional study at Indiana 
University. 

ELLIS WHITAKER. 515 Washing- 
ton Street. Metter. Georgia, is principal 
and teacher at the Homerville High and 
Elementary School. Homerville. Whita- 
ker has done additional study at the 
University of Minnesota. 

1937 

C. A. DeVILLARS. native of Mcin- 
tosh County, is the principal at the 
Todd-Grant High School in Darien. De- 
Villars has done additional study at 
Columbia University. He has served as 
director of Region Eleven of G.T.E.A.. 
president of District II GIA. vice-presi- 
dent Region Eleven Principals" Council. 
DeVillars was recently elected to the 
Board of Trustees GTEA. Mrs. DeVil- 
lars is a native of Chatham County and 
is also a graduate of Savannah State 
College. She teaches reading at Todd- 
Grant. 



ESTHER B. HARDEN. 1003 W. 40th 
Street. Savannah. Georgia, is teaching 
at the Alfred E. Beach High School. 
She has done additional work at How- 
ard University and University of Min- 
nesota. 

CHARLES L. RAWLS. 914 Memo- 
rial Drive. Waycross, Georgia, is prin- 
cipal of the Bailey Street Elementary 
School. He has done additional work 
at Atlanta University- Hampton Insti- 
tute and New York University. He is 
married to Mrs. Louise K. Rawls. also 
a graduate of Savannah State. 

1938 

JOHN W. LAWTON. P. O. Box 411. 
Statesboro. Georgia, is principal at the 
Willow Hill Elementary School. He has 
done additional study at Atlanta Uni- 
versity. Tuskegee Institute, and Co- 
lumbia University. 

CORTEZ LEAKE COWART. 211 
Church Street. Statesboro, Georgia, is 
the Home Economics teacher at Wil- 
liam James High School. She has done 
further study at Atlanta University and 
Columbia University. 

R. W. CAMPBELL. 207 Roundtree 
Street. Statesboro, Georgia, is the prin- 
cipal of Edward Johnson School. Brook- 
let, Georgia. He received the M.Ed, de- 
gree from Temple UJniversity. Mr. Camp- 
bell is the Executive Secretary of the 



Bulloch County Negro Chamber of 
Commere. A member of Kappa Alpha 
Psi Fraternity, he holds a life member- 
ship in the N. E. A. and he was elected 
"Man of the Year" for Bulloch County 
in 1956. 

1939 

RUBY LEE KING. 210 Park Avenue, 
Savannah. Georgia, teaches at the East 
Broad Street School. She has done fur- 
ther study at Columbia University and 
Atlanta University, receiving the M.Ed. 
degree from the latter. Miss King was 
elected "Teacher of the Year" at East 
Broad Street School. 1957. She is secre- 
tary of the Savannah Chapter of Sa- 
vannah State College Alumni Associa- 
tion and Chairman of Public Relations 
Committee of Greenbriar Children's 
Center. Inc. 

1 941 

WILBUR JOHNSON. 706 North Sims 
Street. Bainbridge. Georgia, is Special 
Adult Teacher of Vocational Agricul- 
ture in Bainbridge. Georgia. He received 
the M.S. degree from Iowa State Col- 
lege. 

LOUISE ORENE HALL. 635 West 
37th Street. Savannah. Georgia, is a 
teacher of Commercial subjects at Al- 
bany State College. Albany. Georgia. 
Mrs. Hall received the M.Ed, degree 

(Continued on page 13) 




Florence Street School faculty is composed totally of SSC grads. Seated, left to right: Mrs. 
Margaret Rhaney, A.B. and M.A.: Mrs. Lorene Pressley, A.B. and M.A.; Mrs. Willie Grant Edwards, 
Principal, A.B. and MA.; Miss Julia Lcwe, A.B.; Mrs. Mamie Hart, A.B.; Mrs. Daisy Grant Fraser, B.S.; 
Mrs. Laura Martin, B.S.; and Miss Christine Wright, A.B.. Back row, standing: Robert Washington, 
B.S.; Mrs. Nona M. Hopkins, A.B., M.A.; Mrs. Phoebe Robinson Brooks, B.S.; Miss Corine T. Williams, 
B.S.; Mrs. Frances B. Thompson, A.B.; Wilie James Reid, B.S.; Mrs. Zelma Owens, B.S.; Mrs. Leah S. 
Greene, B.S. and M.A.; Miss Mildred Graham, B.S.; Mrs. Dorothy Freeman, B.S.; Mrs. Sara D. Herring, 
B.S., and Mrs. Hilda Williams, B.S. Not shown: Mrs. Viola T. McKinney, B.S.; Mrs. Mildred B. Johnson, 
A.B., and Mrs. Mae M. Frazier, B.S. 



Page 8 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



155 



NEWS CLIPPINGS 



6 Percent Gain In 
Enrollment At SSC 

According to figures released by 
Registrar Ben Ingersoll. Savannah State 
College has 992 regular fulltime col- 
lege students which represent 363 men, 
542 women in the day classes and 69 
men and 18 women in the evening 
classes. 

This is a six per cent increase over 
last year in the regular college. In ad- 
dition, there are 128 in special trade 
classes. 87 in general extension and 60 
enrolled in informal adult classes. There 
is an over-all total of 1.267 students 
using the facilities at Savannah State. 

Timothy C. Meyers, dean of faculty, 
will deliver the principal address at the 
general assembly Thursday. The annual 
career conference will be held on the 
college campus. October 20-31. 

Several alumni leaders met in the 
office of public relations and alumni 
affairs last night under the leadership 
of Leonard Law. president of the Gen- 
eral Alumni Association and made plans 
for organizing new and re-establishing 
old alumni clubs. Prince Jackson. Jr.. 
college alumni secretary, acted as host 
and served as chairman of the meeting. 
All alumni are being urged to contribute 
freely to the alumni scholarship fund. 

Tiger's Roar, Economic 
Review, Wins Top 
C.S.P.A. Awards 

Dr. Joseph Murphy, director of Co- 
lumbia LJniversity's Scholastic Press As- 
sociation announced that the TIGERS 
ROAR, the ECONOMIC REVIEW and 
the College Page wo nfirst place among 
senior colleges in the United States at 
the 33rd Columbia Scholastic Press As- 
sociation Convention and placed second 
in the special magazine sectios. 

In winning these awards. Savannah 
State competed with 18,000 college and 
university publications from all over the 
United States and its territories. This 
is the first time that the TIGER'S 
ROAR has won first place in CSPA 
competition. 

Last year the TIGER'S ROAR placed 
second in the college newspaper divis- 
ion and the ENTERPRISES, official 
organ of the Business Department, the 
college page and the college bulletin 
placed second. 

Mr. William C. Scott, Director of 
Public Relations at Savannah State, was 
among the more than 5,000 delegates 
who attended the convention. 



325 Attend Youth 
Conference At SSC 

The Georgia Youth Industrial Edu- 
cation Association Conference and 
Trades Contest was held on the cam- 
pus of Savannah State College. March 
28-29. The 325 Students and faculty 
members in attendance indicated a con- 
stant growth in the areas of industrial 
arts and trades in the high schools. 

Among the many varied activities of 
the Conference was a sight-seeing tour 
aboard the "Visitor" down the Savan- 
nah River, to view the industrial sights 
of the city. A capacity audience was also 
in attendance at the Assembly Talent 
Show and Oratorical Contest on Fri- 
dayp. The Thursday Assembly program 
featured the Savannah State College 
Choral Society under the direction of 
Coleridge A. Braithwaite. Prince Wynn, 
President, Student Council. Savannah 
State, presided. 

The conference featured for the first 
time a "Miss Industrial Education" con- 
test. Many queens, representing their 
respective schools, displayed talent, 
beauty and personality in their bid for 
the crown. Eleanor Milnor. Spencer 
High School, Columbus. Georgia was 
crowned queen. Vivian Asher, Booker 
T. Washington High School, was sec- 
ond place winner, and Marian Yaeman. 
Lucy Laney High. Augusta, placed 
third. 



Robert Joffrey Dancers 

The Lyceum Committee of Savannah 
State announces the coming nevt Thurs- 
day evening of the newest dance com- 
pany on the American musical stage. 
the Robert Joffrey Theater Dancers. 
With accent on entertainment, the pro- 
duction will bring a new idea in dance 
programs and promises a combination 
of romantic ballet, dramatic dance in 
the Spanish style and musical comedy 
dance in the best American tradition — 
plus a liberal sprinkling of song. The 
program will be seen in Meldrim Audi- 
torium beginning at 8:15 p.m. and will 
be open to the public without charge. 

Three leading American dancers head 
the company of seven: Glen Tetley, Be- 
atrice Thompkins, and Gerald Arpino. 

Beatrice Thompkins has toured the 
U. S. and Europe as soloist with the 
Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and with 
the New York City Ballet. The dark- 
haired dancer was also prima ballerina 
of the San Francisco Opera. 

Gerald Arpino is another young vet- 




L. D. Law, President of the General Alumni 
Association, addresses the alumni at the annual 
Homecoming Dinner Meeting. In the background, 
Raleigh Macon, Principal of Evans County High 
School and dynamic vice-president of the General 
Alumni Association, prepares to extend his greet- 
ings to the group. 




Clifford Hardv/ck, '50, science teacher at Beach 
High School, gives a few words of advice to 
Alphonso Smith, sophomore, Woodbine, Georgia. 
Mr. Hardwick was principal speaker during the 
regular assembly. 



eran of TV, who has also been featured 
on Broadway in "Annie Get Your Gun" 
and "Bless You AH" and with the May 
Donnell Modern Dance Co. Latin 
America has also seen him as soloist 
with the Nana Collner-Pau! Petroff Bal- 
let. 

A triple threat supporting performer 
in the company is a young man named 
John Wilson. He is due to demonstrate 
his gifts as a dancer, as a baritone, and 
as a pianist. 

Everyone is invited to attend this 
opening event of the Lyceum Series. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 9 







m ' : 






:■ 



V 








SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE FACULTY ANI 
ALUMNI AT THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THI 
GEORGIA TEACHERS AND EDUCATION ASSOCI 
ATtON, MACON, WITH OTHER OUTSTANDINC 

EDUCATIONAL LEADERS. 





THE UNKNOWN 
TEACHER 



aiss lilliliS5^^ 



I sing the praise of the unknown 
teacher. Famous educators plan new 
systems of pedagogy, but it is the un- 
known teacher who delivers and guides 
the young. He lives in obscurity and 
contends with hardship. He keeps the 
watch along the borders of darkness 
and makes the attack on the trenches 
of ignorance and folly. Patient in his 
daily duty he strives to conquer the 
evil powers which are the enemies of 
youth. He awakens sleeping spirits. He 
quickens the indolent, encourages the 
eager, and steadies the unstable. He 
communicates his own joy in learning 
and shares with boys and girls the best 

treasures of his mind. He lights many candles which, in later 
years, will shine back to cheer him. This is his reward. 
Knowledge may be gained from books: but the love of knowl- 
edge is transmitted only by personal contact. No one has 
deserved better of the republic than the unknown teacher. 

—Henry Van Dyke in NEA Personal Growth 
Leaflet, Number 161 




A Challenge To The Alnniiii 



By Prince Jackson, Jr., 
Alumni Secretary 

There are many ingredients in the 
composition of a good college or uni- 
versity. Alumni have many varied con- 
cepts of these ingredients and it would 
be extremely difficult to find any two 
alumni with the same conception of 
just what it takes to make a great col- 
lege. 

There are several ingredients how- 
ever, that you would find on any list. 
Among these are an alert alumni and a 
good student body. Without a doubt, 
these are two of the most important 
parts of any great college. The alumni 
is the product on display and must be 
good in order for the manufacturer 
(college I to gain a reputation as an 
excellent producer. The student body is 
the future alumni and must be of the 
caliber to be made into a better product 
than the previous student body. 

Our Savannah State Alumni Associa- 
tion is one of the best in our state. 
Our student body is one of the best 
in the history of the College. However, 
some questions that have to be an- 
swered today are. What about our fu- 
ture student body? Is it the total re- 
sponsibility of the College? 

Every college in America today is 
faced with these two perplexing ques- 
tions and we cannot afford to bypass 
them. Recruitment of topnotch students 
is a business today and colleges are 
spending big money to attract these stu- 
dents. One of the big attractions and 
perhaps the most effective means of 
spending money is in the area of schol- 
arships. It is no secret that top-notch 
students usually go to the college where 
they can get aid because most of our 
students today must have aid to go to 
college. It is also no secret that the 
college with a good scholarship program 
usually has the best student body. Con- 
sequently, a good scholarship program 
is a "must' at any college that desires 
to maintain its superiority. 

Scholarship aid at Savannah State 
College has become a very serious prob- 
lem. Our college is one of the most out- 
standing in our state because of the 
achievements and contributions of our 
alumni. However, we may lose our lead- 
ership because of our inadequate and 
meager scholarship program. The only 
source of funds for this program is our 
alumni and in the past two years, con- 
tributions to this fund have dwindled. 
Perhaps the most apparent reason for 
this is the so very few organized func 
tioning alumni chapters we have among 



our illustrious alumni. Many alumni 
would contribute to this fund if they 
were connected with chapters. At pres- 
ent, we have fewer than eight function- 
ing chapters in our state that is well 
functioning chapters in our state that 
is well populated with alumni who hold 
many key positions in every county. We 
have organized three chapters this year 
and are hoping that more alumni groups 
will invite us to do the same in the 
near future. Somehow, we must show 
our alumni the importance of this pro- 
gram. This is not a job for our Col- 
lege. It is our job. Everyone of us must 
get to work on that alumnus who has 
somehow wandered away from his re- 
sponsibilities. To do this will not be an 
easy job. The President, at present, is 
spending more money in the area of 
Alumni affairs than at anytime in the 
history of the Institution. We must re- 
spond to this by organizing ourselves 
into efficent and effective alumni or- 
ganizations so that we can combine our 
efforts to build a great Savannah State 
College into a greater Savannah State 
College. 

This is our challenge fellow alumni. 
Let us accept it today. 



Alumni On Paulsen 
School Faculty 

Lillian Shank Scott graduated from 
Savannah State College in 1948 with a 
B.S. degree in secondary education. 
Mrs. Scott obtained a M.A. degree from 
New York University in 1953. She has 
matriculated for a sixth-year profession- 
al diploma at New York University, 
and is presently employed as a health 
teacher at Paulsen Jr. High. 

In 1951. Mrs. Scott was a recipient 
of a health education scholarship and 
studied at North Carolina College. Dur- 
ham. 

She has served as an attendant to 
"Miss Alumni". She was a national 
delegate to the National Alumni Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Universities in 
Baltimore. 

She received a certificate of recogni- 
tion for services to veterans in the eve- 
ning school. 

William B. Jackson was graduated 
from Savannah State in the summer of 
1949, with a Bachelor of Science De- 
gree in mathematics. His first position, 
which he held for three years, was at 
Arlington Institute. Annemanie. Ala- 
bama, as an instructor in Science and 
mathematics. Since that time he has 
been a teacher at Paulsen School in Sa- 
vannah. 

Jackson served as treasurer of the 



Chatham County Teachers Association, 
and has rendered outstanding services 
to boys and girls through several ad- 
visory capacities. He was honored in 
1956 by being elected as "Teacher of 
the Year" from his school. 1955-56. 

Gertrude L. Golden is a 1955 gradu- 
ate of Savannah State College. Since her 
graduation she has held the following 
positions: instructor of music, at Jef- 
ferson County Training School. Louis- 
ville, Georgia: and instructor of music, 
Paulsen Jr. High School. Savannah, 
Georgia. 

Melvin Herman Marion received the 
B.S. in General Science from Savannah 
State College in 1956. 

Presently employed at Paulsen Junior 
High School as an instructor in mathe- 
matics, he holds membership in the 
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. Y.M.C.A., 
C.C.T.A.. G.T.E.A. and N.E.A.: and is 
a member of the First Congregational 
Church. 

Mrs. Melissa Lewis Miller* B.S. in 
Home Economics. Savannah State Col- 
lege; has done graduate work in home 
economics at Columbia University and 
in Educational Psychology at Atlanta 
University, and the University of Min- 
nesota. She has held the following po- 
sitions: homemaking instructor, Ballard- 
Hudson. Macon. Georgia: Holsey Insti- 
tute. Cordele. Georgia: Cuyler Junior 
High. Savannah. Georgia: and Paulsen 
Junior High. Savannah. Ga. 

Her memberships include St. Paul 
C. M. E. Church: Iota Phi Lambda 
Sorority: Jonquil Garden Club: Holsey 
Reading Circle: A.Y.A.. C.C.T.A., 
G.T.E.A., and N.E.A. 

There are several outstanding candi- 
dates for the title. "The Greatest Ath- 
lete in the History of Savannah State." 
If you nominate John Myles or Robert 
Slocum or Curtis P. Harris or others, 
you would have plenty of support. How- 
ever, any list of our great athletes would 
have to include Joseph Turner. '51. Mr. 
Turner qualifies for this list because of 
his many contributions to football, track 
and baseball. He has proved himself 
equally adept in these sports, and if he 
had concentrated in any one of them, 
probably would have made any All- 
American List. 

Since leaving State. Mr. Turner has 
performed virtually a miracle in build- 
ing Sophronia Tompkins High School 
( formerly Woodville I into one of the 
powerhouses of the state in sports. His 
teams have played well and have dem- 
onstated good sportsmanship in all of 
their endeavors. Coaches in the Geor- 
gia Interscholastic Association consider 
him one of their best coaches. 

Savannah State College considers him 
one of her most outstanding athletes. 



Page 12 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



I 



Alumni News (Cont.) 

(Continued from page 8) 

from Atlanta L Diversity in 1947. and is 
now enrolled at New York University 
in the School of Business Education 
working toward the Ed.D. degree. She 
has been promoted to the rank of As- 
sistant Professor at Albany State. 

1942 

SADIE B. GRIFFIN. 820 East 38th 
Street. Savannah. Georgia, teaches at 
the West Broad Elementary School. She 
has done further study at New York 
University where she received the M.A. 
degree. 

TINY SEAY DAVIS. 503 Forsyth 
Street. Americus. Georgia, is Jeanes 
Supervisor for Marion. Schley and Web- 
ster Counties. She has done further 
study at Atlanta University and North 
Carolina College. 

ERMA ROBERTS WILLIAMS. 836V> 
West 39th Street. Savannah. Georgia, 
teaches at the West Broad Street School. 
Mrs. Williams has done further study 
at Illinois Central State College and 
Atlanta University. 

GLADYS ORETHIA INGRAM. 606 
Hester Drive. Dublin. Georgia, teaches 
homemaking at the Oconee High School 
in Dublin. She has done additional 
study at Hampton Institute and New 
York University, receiving the M.A. de- 
gree in Home Economics from the lat- 
ter. 

GERALDYNE M. CAMPBELL. 207 
Roundtree Street. Statesboro. Georgia, 
is the Third grade teacher at the Wil- 
liam James High School. Statesboro. 
She has done additional study at Tem- 
ple UJniversitv. 

1945 

RUTH BELLE MULLINO, 725 East 
38th Street. Savannah. Georgia, is teach- 
ing at the Risley Elementary School in 
Brunswick. Georgia. She has done fur- 
ther study at Pennsylvania State College. 

1945 

LOUISE B. ROBERTS. 950 Wheaton 
Street, Savannah. Georgia, is an ele- 
mentary teacher at the Haven Home 
School. Savannah. Mrs. Roberts has 
done additional study at the Atlanta 
University. She is the former Miss 
Louise Bing. 

1946 

IRENE McLEAN. Route 1. Box 210. 
Swainsboro. Georgia, teacher at the 
Summertown Elementary School. Mrs. 
McLean has done additional study at 
Wayne University. She was elected as 
"Teacher of the Year" for Emanuel 
County. 



1947 

GLADYS W. ANDERSON, 823 Flan- 
ders Street. Swainsboro, Georgia is 
teaching at the Twin City Elementary 
School. She has done further study at 
Tuskegee Institute. 

WILLIAM H. SEABROOK. III. 611 
West 39th Street. Savannah. Georgia, 
is a Substitute Teacher in the Chatham 
County Schools. Seabrook received his 
M.A. degree from Atlanta University 
and Columbia University. He received 
the L.L.D. degree from Union Baptist 
College in Birmingham. Alabama. 

RUTH L. SEALES. Route 2. Box 
124. Sparta. Georgia, is a teacher at 
the Old Beulah School in Linton. Geor- 
gia. She has done further study at At- 
lanta University and Howard Univer- 
sity. 

FLOREINE L. BATES. 1017 Love 
Street. Savannah. Georgia, is the Prin- 
cipal of the William James Primary 
School. Statesboro. Georgia. She has 
done additional work at New York 
University. 

JUANTTA S. ASHFORD. 20 Jones 
Homes, Glennville. Georgia, is the Sixth 
Grade Teacher at the Glennville Col- 
ored Elementary School. She has done 
advanced study at Atlanta University. 

C. ALLEN WIGGINS. 1112 W. 42nd 
Street. Savannah. Georgia, is Principal 
of the Springfield Central High School 
in Springfield. Georgia. Wiggins re- 
ceived his M.A. degree from Atlanta 
University in 1955. He also received 
a scholarship to attend the Southern 
Regional Principals' Workshop at Tus- 
kegee Institute. 

DAVID BATTLE. Culloden Road, 
Forsyth. Georgia, is teacher and As- 
sistant Principal at the Grav High 
School in Gray. Georgia. He received 
the M.Ed, degree from Tuskegee Insti- 
tute in 1956. 

WILHELMINA I. HARDEMAN. 230 
Burney Street. Athens. Georgia, is a 
teacher at the East Athens School. She 
has done additional study at Atlanta 
University. 

1948 

ALBERTHA MOORE SMITH. 1023 
East Gwinnett Street. Savannah. Geor- 
gia, is a teacher at the Monteith School 
She has done additional work at John 
Carolle UJniversity and New York Uni- 
versity, receiving the M.A. degree from 
the latter. She was elected as "Teacher 
of the Year". 

LEON DINGLE. 514 East Anderson 
Street. Savannah. Georgia, is the Prin- 
cipal at the Pembroke High School. He 
received his M.A. degree from New 
York University. 

E. M. DERRY. Ludowici, Georgia, is 




Hulan Jack, left, president of the borough of 
Manhattan, New York City, discusses business 
affairs with Tommie Smalls, titular "mayor of 
Harlem," and Savannah State College alumnus. 



a teacher at the Walker High School 
in Ludowici. Georgia. 

MAUDE E. HARRIS. 11910th Ave- 
nue. Brodenton. Florida, is the Kinder- 
garten Teacher at the Brodenton Ele- 
mentary School. 

LULA B. DILLARD. P. O. Box 464, 
Forsyth. Georgia is a teacher at the 
Hubbard Elementary & High School. 
Forsyth. Georgia. She has done ad- 
vanced study at Fort Valley State Col- 
lege, Tuskegee Institute, Atlanta Uni- 
versity and New York University. She 
holds the M.A. degree from New York 
University in LIpper Elementary Edu- 
cation. 

ELLEN COGDELL. 618 W. Pine 
Street. Jesup. Georgia, is teacher and 
Librarian at the Screven Elementary 
School in Screven, Georgia. She has 
done additional work at Alabama State 
College. Mrs. Cogdell has served as 
Principal. Supervisor and Assistant 
Principal. She is now Reporter for Re- 
gion II of Librarians. 

SALLIE J. HARRIS. 850 State Street. 
Waycross. Georgia, is teaching at the 
Bailey Street Elementary School. 

WILLIE B. WILLIAMS. 235 John- 
son Street. Statesboro. Georgia, is a 
teacher at the William James High 
School. She has done additional work 
at Tuskee Institute. 

LILLIAN E. SMTH. P. 0. Box 746, 
Soperton. Georgia, is an Elementary 
Teacher at the Treutlen County Train- 
ing School. She received the M. A. De- 
gree from Atlanta University. She was 
also elected "Teacher of the Year" in 
Treutlen County. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Paae 13 



AGNES GRIFFIN MOSELEY, 536 
E. Jelferson Street. Americus, Georgia, 
is an Elementary Teacher at the East 
View Elementary School. She has done 
additional study at Atlanta University 
and University of Maine. Mrs. Moseley 
has traveled in Maine and Canada. 

1 950 

SAVANNAH WEBB, 234 N. Peters 
Street. Athens. Georgia, teaches at the 
Southside High School, in Comer. Geor- 
gia. She has done additional work at 
Atlanta University. Miss Webb was 
elected "Teacher of the Year" for Madi- 
son County. She also received The Gold 
State Certificate from Carver Bible In- 
stitute in 1956. 

EMMA P. LONG. P. 0. Box 128, 
Bowman. Georgia, is a teacher at the 
Bowman Colored High School. She has 
done additional work at the Tuskegee 
Institute. 

PEARL BELLINGER, 209 Johnson 
Street, Statesboro. Georgia, is the Fourth 
at William James High School. States- 
boro. Georgia. She has done further 
study at Tuskegee Institute. 

DORIS TAYLOR OWES. Savannah 
State College. Savannah. Georgia, is 
Assistant State Agent for Negro Work. 
She has done additional study at Prairie 
View A & M College. 

LEOLA R. SANDERS. 1202 Love 
Street. Savannah. Georgia, is an Ele- 
mentary Teacher at the West Savannah 
School. She has done further study at 
Columbia University. 

GERTRUDE EVERETT. 227 Bulloch 

Street. Statesboro. Georgia is the Fourth 
Grade Teacher at the William James 
High School in Statesboro, Georgia. 

JULIAN WRIGHT BELL. P. 0. Box 

295. Alexander. Georgia, teaches Science 
and Mathematics in Sardis. Georgia. 
Mr. Bell has done additional study at 
Tuskegee Institute. 

EARLINE W. CURRY. Route 2, Hi- 
ram, Georgia, is a teacher at the Mat- 
thews Consolidated School in Dallas. 
Georgia. 

LILLIAN M. BODISON. 1228 East 
Bolton. Street. Savannah. Georgia, is 
the Mathematics Teacher at the Moul- 
trie Negro High School, Moultrie, Geor- 
gia. She has done additional study at 
Western Reserve University. She is also 
a Recipient of a Phelps-Stokes Fellow- 
ship at Howard LJniversity. 

1951 

DONALD E. ADAMS. 4116 Vernon 
Blvd.. New York City, New York, a 
physical education major who graduated 
in 1951, is now working as a recreation 



leader in the city of New York. Mr. 
Adams received the M.S. Degree from 
New York University. June 1955. In 
19954. he received the U. S. Army ci- 
tation for work done in recreation as 
recreation supervisor. 23 Regt. 2nd Div. 
He also received the 1957 "Coach of 
Year' award (Bobby Forbes Memorial 
Committee ) for coaching the only bas- 
ketball team in New York City ever to 
win both Amateur City Championships 
within one season. 

JAMES DAVID JACKSON. 626 W. 

32nd Street. Savannah. Georgia, is teach- 
ing at the Robert W. Gadsden Elemen- 
tary School. He has done additional 
study at New York University. 

VESTER B. OLIVER. 233 Church 
Street, Statesboro, Georgia, is teaching 
at William James Elementary School. 
Statesboro. She has done additional 
study at Tuskegee Institute. She was 
elected as "Teacher of the Year" for 
1957. 

GLADYS M. BURNEY. 618 Neshity 
Street. Waynesboro. Georgia, is teaching 
at Waynesboro High and Industrial 
School. Waynesboro. Georgia. She re- 
ceived the M.S. Degree in Home Eco- 
nomics from North Carolina College at 
Durham and has done additional study 
at New York University. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Bristow are teach- 
ing in the public school of North Da- 
kota. They are the only Negro teachers 
in the State. Mrs. Bristow. the former 
Miss Joelene Belin. is an English teach- 
er in Burke County. Flaxton. North Da- 
kota, and Bristow, '50, works in Ward 
County. Donnybrook, North Dakota. He 
is the only Negro Coach in the State. 

ROSA M. R. CHAPPEL, Route 1. 
Box 279. Sparta, is a teacher at the 
Thankful Elementary School in Sparta. 
She has done additional study at Atlanta 
University. 

LUEVENIA WATKINS. RFD 1, Box 
124, Devereux, is teaching at Warren 
Elementary School. She has done addi- 
tional study at Atlanta University. 

MARY TELFAIR WHITSETTE, 516 
N. Dooley Street. Hawkinsville. is teach- 
ing at the Lee County Training School 
in Leesburg. Georgia. 

RUTH E. DERRY JOHNSON. P. 0. 
Box 233, Ludowici, is teaching at the 
Walker High School in Ludowici. 

LULA LOCKWOOD. 223 Blitch 
Street. Statesboro. is a retired teacher. 

GEORGIA SCOTT AKERS. 220 Fan- 
nin Street, LaGrange. is the third grade 
teacher at the Kelley Grammar School 
in LaGrange. She has done additional 
study at Atlanta LJniversity. 

ADDIE STARKS BRANTLEY, 519 




LEONARD D. LAW, President, 

General Alumni Association 

(Story Page 6) 

Reese Street, Athens, is teaching at the 
West Broad Street School in Athens. 
She has done additional study at At- 
lanta University. 

1953 

OLLIE MAE WASHINGTON. N. 
Broad Street, Claxton, is Home Demon- 
stration Agent in Claxton. 

1954 

WILLIE BELLE HALL JOHNSON, 
No. 5 Linder Street. Dasher Heights, 
Dublin, is the Music Teacher at the 
Laurens County Schools. Dublin. 

LILLIE B. LINDER SCANDRICK, 
9191/. W. 37th Street. Savannah, is a 
First Grade Teacher at the George De- 
Renne School in Savannah. Mrs. Scan- 
drick has served as Supervising Teacher 
for Savannah State College for student 
teachers. She is the recent bride of Mr. 
H. T. Scandrick. formerly youth sec- 
retary for the Y.M.C.A. At present he 
is Supervisor of Recreation for Chatham 
County and the City of Savannah. 

BEAUTY FINCH. 318 Dubose Ave- 
nue. Athens. Georgia is teaching at the 
Oglethorpe County Training School in 
Lexington. Georgia. 

ARDELIUS G. ISAAC. P. 0. Box 
203. Savannah State College, is a teacher 
at the East Broad Street School. She 
has done additional study at North- 
western University, Evanston. Illinois. 

1955 

EARL MATTHEWS. 312 N. 4th 
Street. Jesup. is a teacher at the Wayne 
County Training School in Jesup. 
(Continued on page 18) 



Page 14 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 







THE EDUCATIONAL ANNEX 
The Reverend Richard M. Williams, Pastor (inset) 



Salute To 

First Bryan Church 

First Bryan Baptist Church was or- 
ganized January 20, 1788, and is Amer- 
ica's oldest Negro Baptist Church. In 
the one hundred sixty-nine years of its 
continuous operation, this church has 
been served by fourteen pastors, the 
latest of which is the Reverend Richard 
M. Williams. 

Located on lot 7, middle Oglethorpe 
Ward, it has a frontage of ninety-five 
feet and a depth of 132i/> feet. This 
location is on the south side of Bryan 
Street, in the heart of Yamacraw Vil- 
lage. The main church building is sev- 
enty-five by fiftysix feet in size and was 
completed at a cost of $30,000 in 1888. 
According to historical records, "The 
work was done exclusively by colored 
mechanics and laborers." 

This church has a membership of 
approximately 750 and a weekly Sunday 
attendance of 350, with the number ris- 
ing to 500 and above on communion 
Sunday ( fourth Sunday in each month ) . 
The Educational Annex, dedicated in 
July, 1956, is a long-dreamed-of project 
brought to reality under the leadership 
of Mr. Williams. This annex is valued 
at approximately $50,000. It consists 
of an assembly hall with a capacity of 
300, ten classrooms, a modern kitchen, 
and lavatories. A 16 mm. sound projec- 
tor with screen, a television set and a 
piano are a part of the educational 
equipment. Aside from Church School, 
Baptist Training Union, prayer services 
and youth activities of the church it- 
self, the building is being used during 
the week as a community kindergarten 



and on Wednesday nights from 7 to 9 
o'clock as an adult school for ministers, 
an extension of the American Baptist 
Seminary. 

The Reverend Richard M. Williams 
was called as pastor to First Bryan in 
July. 1949. In May, 1948. he was called 
a> pastor to South Valley Baptist Church 
in Pooler, Georgia. He is a native Sa- 
vannahian and a product of the local 
schools and Savannah State College, 
from which lie was graduated cum 
laude. A member of Alpha Kappa Mu 
Honor Society, Mr. Williams has done 
further study at Atlanta University, 
American Baptist Theological Seminary 
and the University of Wisconsin. He 
also saw active duty in the United States 
Armed Services, having spent two and 
one-half years in the Navy. He is mar- 
ried to the former Miss Erma Bernita 
Roberts, active member of long stand- 
ing in the congregation. 

Mr. Williams has continued to serve 
both First Bryan and South Valley suc- 
cessfully and is doing an exceptional job 
as pastor, civic leader and educational 
leader, in the community. 



Alpha Nu Merits Awards 
At Honor Society Meet 

During the 19th Annual Convention 
of Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society held 
at Tuskegee Institute. Alabama. Alpha 
Nu Chapter, Savannah State College, 
was singled out in the report of the 
regional director, T. E. McKinney, as 
doing outstanding work — the quality of 
work overshadowed that which has 
been done by the other chapters of this 
region. Dr. McKinney referred to the 
Honors Day Program held here as be- 



THE FIRST BRYAN BAPTIST CHURCH 



ing worthy of emulation by all chap- 
ters. Alpha Nu was listed on the Honor 
Roll for 1957 and was awarded the 
Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society Award. 
This plaque was awarded the chapter 
which had the best program of activi- 
ties for 1955-56 presented at the 1957 
convention. 

Alpha Nu Chapter was represented 
by two Savannah State students; Dor- 
othey D. Davis and Yvonne C. Wil- 
liams: Dr. B. J. Farmer, Associate Pro- 
fessor of English, and Dr. E. K. Wil- 
liams. Director of general education, 
were also in attendance, the latter being 
advisor to Alpha Nu Chapter. 



SSC Chosen To Take 
Part In Testing 

Savannah State College is one of the 
educational institutions in this area cho- 
sen by the education testing service to 
participate in the establishment of na- 
tional norms for a new series of tests. 

The name of the tests are coopera- 
tive school and college ability tests 
forms 1A and IB and cooperative se- 
quential tests of educational progress 
forms 1A and IB. 

These tests are being developed by 
the educational testing service of Prince- 
ton, N. J., and are designed to measure 
the student's ability to do college level 
work and to measure to a degree his 
progress in the performance of this 
level tasks. 

The Testing committee at Savannah 
State consists of the following faculty 
members: Dr. T. E. Brooks, director; 
Dr. E. K. Williams, John Camper, Mrs. 
Martha Wilson. Miss Loreese Davis. 
Walter Mercer, and Ben Ingersoll. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 15 



Norman B. Elmore, 
Alumnus, Principal 
Of Gadsden School 

Norman B. Elmore, a graduate of 
Savannah State College, has served as 
principal of Gadsden School for four 
years. He was principal in Jenkins Coun- 
ty at Birdsville Herdon Elementary and 
Junior High School, at Aaron Indus- 
trial School. He later became a mem- 
ber of the Alfred E. Beach High School 
faculty. In this capacity, he served as 
chairman of the Biology Department. 
At that time, he was appointed by Super- 
intendent A. T. Vick as a member of an 
original "Screening Committee". 

In 1953. he was appointed by Super- 
intendent W. A. Early as principal of 
Maple Street School, now named Gads- 
den School. Gadsden School was named 
for Mr. Robert Washington Gadsden. 
one of the leading educators in Georgia, 
and a native Savannahian. 

Mr. Elmore is a leader in many or- 
ganizations. He is basileus of Mu Phi 
Chapter of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. 
Inc. He is a member of the board of 
Management of the West Broad Street 
Y.M.C.A.. vice chairman of the Chat- 
ham Division of the Boy Scouts of 
America, a member of the Advisory 
Council, past president of the Jenkins 
County Teachers Association for two 
terms, three terms as treasurer of C. C. 
T. A., and past president of the Chat- 
ham County Teachers Association, re- 
porter of the Savannah State General 
Alumni Association. Recently he was 
elected as Regional Director of Region 





Norman B. Elmore, principal of Robert W. 
Miss Elaine V. Wi'liams. 



Gadsden School, dictates to the school's secretary, 



II of the Georgia Teachers Educational 
Association. Currently, he is serving as 
Chairman of the National Education 
Association Centennial Celebration Com- 
mittee of the Chatham County Teachers 
Educational Association. He holds a 
Master of Education Degree in Admin- 
istration and Supervision from Atlanta 
University, and did advanced study in 
Administration and Supervision at New 
York University. 

Under the leadership of Mr. Elmore. 
Gadsden School has a faculty of 28 
teachers of which 26 are alumni of Sa- 
vannah State College, and student body 
of 1037. 

Some of Gadsden's 26 alumni of Sa- 
vannah State are: Ernest E. Hicks. Mes- 
dames Viola C. Holbrooks. Hazel Smith. 
Gladys Broughton. Florence Denny, Bet- 
tye S. Pope, Inez Mack McNeal, Cly- 



neta Marcus. Janie Dais. Isabelle Skip- 
per Sykes, Bessie McCullough Fleming, 
Ruth Brown Williams. Sadie Wright, 
Lucile Alston, Lottie Crane. Misses Ethel 
R. Terrell and Dorris Williams. 

Under the leadership given by Mr. 
Elmore, Gadsden School has received 
many awards and certificates of merits. 
The school has been a two-time winner 
of the Systemwide Annual Field Day 
Events. It has received certificates of 
awards from the Red Cross in First Aid, 
Public Relations and the Community 
Service (2 Minute Club I. etc. 

The alumni of Savannah State at 
Gadsden not only serve as experts in 
teaching the basic subject matter, but 
also direct various activities such as 
Music. Dramatics. Arts and Crafts. Bal- 
let and Creative Dancing, and Physical 
Education. 




Faculty Meeting at Robert W. Gadsden School. Principal Norman B. 
Elmore discusses means of evaluating and improving Gadsden's Health and 
physical education program with the faculty. First row, left to right: Mrs. 
Mattie H. Branch, Mrs. Doris D. Williams, Mrs. Inez M. McNeal, Mrs. Dorothy 
B. Drayton, Mrs. Gladys Broughton, Miss Ethel R. Terrell, Mrs. Viola C. 
Holbrooks, Miss Cassie M. Holmes, Mrs. Isabella S. Sykes, Mrs. Clyneta 
Marcus, and Mrs. Neuzetta G. Lowe. Second row, left to right: Mrs. Lucille 



Alston, Mrs. Sadie Wright, Mrs. Clara West (Consultant), Mrs. Ruth Williams, 
Ernest E. Hicks, Mrs. Betty S. Pope, Mrs. Florence C. Denny, Mrs. Larcenia 
E. Myles, Miss Dorothy L. DeVillars, Mrs. Janie S. Dais, Miss Bernice M. Bell 
(substitute teacher), Mrs. Anita M. Stripling, Mrs. Mary W. Moore, Miss 
Elaine B. Williams (secretary), Mrs. Cornelia A. Walker, Miss Mercedes Kelsey, 
James D. Jackson, Mrs. Hazel W. Smith, and Mrs. Bessye M. Fleming. Norman 
B. Elmore, Principal, is presiding over the meeting. 



Page 16 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



\63 



Many Awards Given 
At Press Institute 

Approximately 400 representatives 
from elementary, high school and col- 
lege publications from Georgia, Ala- 
bama and the Carolinas attended the 
two-day Sixth Annual Press Institute 
at Savannah State College. December 
6 and 7. 

Nathan Miller, educational consultant 
of Reader's Digest of Miami. Florida, 
and a native of Jefferson City. Tennes- 
see, headed the list of well-known speak- 
ers. 

Miller's address challenged today's 
crop of budding journalists and their 
faculty advisors to take up the precepts 
of Benjamin Franklin, who practiced 
and trained himself to write by taking 
good pieces of literature, reading them, 
closing the book and writing and re- 
writing the examples. In spite of the 
many incentives promoting leisurely 
and easy living today, he said, "work 
is still necessary." 

"There is a need to come back to 
the common sense approach, and writers 
should strive not so much to be literary 
but to say something with guts and to 
tell the truth about it." he declared. 

He urged students to use the accumu- 
lated wisdom of the race and declared 
that no one need fear to be afraid, il- 
lustrating his remarks with references 
to the Olympic athletes. The person on 
the other side of the competition is also 
afraid, he pointed out. 




New School Plant 

Athens High & Industrial School 

H. T. Edwards, Principal 



Dean T. C. Meyers presided over the 
assembly, with Dr. W. K. Payne, presi- 
dent of the college, bringing greetings. 

A letter from Dr. Harmon W. Cald- 
well. Chancellor of the University Sys- 
tem of Georgia, Board of Regents, At- 
lanta, commending Savannah State Col- 
lege in organizing the Institute was 
read at the general assembly by Pro- 
fessor J. Randolph Fisher, chairman 
of the Department of Languages and 
Literature. 

The theme of the Institute was 
Thomas Jefferson's famous statement. 
"Where the press is free and every man 
can read and write, all is safe." Work- 
shops and evaluation sessions were the 
main features of the Institute. 

Presentations of trophies donated by 
the Atlanta Daily World for the best 
s'udent publications in elementary, high 
school, and college categories were an- 



nounced by J. R. Jenkins, chairman of 
the student publications judging com- 
mittee as follows: Winners in the col- 
lege yearbook class were: Clark Col- 
lege. Atlanta. 96 points: South Caro- 
lina State College. Orangeburg. 92.5 
points: and Carver College. Charlotte, 
N. C. 67.5 points. 

College newspapers awarded were: 
Morris College. Atlanta. 78 points; 
Clark College. Atlanta. 90 points: Dela- 
ware State College. Dover. Delaware. 
81 points. 

Outstanding high school yearbooks 
were designated as those of Todd-Grant 
School. Darien. 72.5 points: Oconee 
School. Dublin. 68.7 points: Washing- 
ton School. Atlanta. 93.7 points: Al- 
fred E. Beach High School. Savannah, 
77.5 points; Woodville School. Savan- 
nah, 71.2 points; C. A. Johnson School, 
Atlanta. 58.7 points. 




Homer T. Edwards, principal of Athens High & Industrial School, is pictured above with his family. Left to right: 
Homer T. Edwards II, Mrs. Edwards, Mr. Edwards and Barbara Jean. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Pas-e 17 



Alumni News (Cont.) 

(Continued from page 14) 

MAGGIE JOHNSON. 522 East Lib- 
erty Street. Lyons, is the First Grade 
Teacher at the Lyons Industrial High 
School. 

LOIS O. REEVES. 431 West 162nd 
Street. New York City 32. New York, 
is a 1955 graduate of Savannah State 
College and a native of Milledgeville. 
Georgia, is now a resident of New 
York City working in the accounting 
department of the Investors Planning 
Corporation of America which is lo- 
cated on 42nd off Madison. Miss Reeves 
majored in Mathematics. 

JAMES C. MURRAY, 733 West 
Monroe Street, Jacksonville, Florida, is 
now serving in United States Army with 
the 103rd Military Police Detachment, 
at Ft. Polk. Louisiana. 

CECILIO WILLIAMS is a student in 
the Mathematics Department at the UJni- 
versity of Notre Dame. South Bend, In- 
diana. 

ADA MAE LAWRENCE. Route 2. 
Box 151, Sparta, is teaching at Green- 
spring. She has done additional study 
at South Carolina State Teachers Col- 
lege. 

ETTA B. JOHNSON. Route 2. Box 
77, Mayfield, is a teacher in the Spring- 
field Elementary School. 

ROBERT FRANCIS JACKSON. P. 0. 

Box 367. Madison, is a teacher at the 
Pearl High School in Madison. 

SHIRLEY J. GREEN, 1420 Price 
Street. Savannah, is a substitute teacher 
in the Chatham County Schools. 

PRISCILLA DELORES R. THOMAS, 

Route 1. Box 488. Savannah, is the 
Second Grade Teacher at the Sophronia 
Tompkins Elementary and High School. 

EVELYN 0. CULPEPPER GRAY, 

1611 "F" Street. Brunswick, is a substi- 
tute teacher in the Glynn County Pub- 
lic Schools. 

^ SOLOMON GREEN is a student at 
Gammon Theological Seminary working 
toward the B.D. Degree. 

1956 

HAZEL LAVERNE HARRIS, P. 0. 
Box 172, Richmond Hill, is teaching 
at the G. W. Carver School in Richmond 
Hill. 

JENCY VIOLA SAGGERS, Route 4. 
Box 222. Madison, is a teacher in the 
public schools in Madison. 

MARY L. PHARR, 215 Peachtree 
Street, Washington, is a teacher at the 
Wilkes County Training High School 
in Washington, Georgia. 

ESSIE L. STOKES, Route 3, Box 4, 



Twin City, is the Seventh Grade Teacher 
at the Twin City Elementary School. 

MARY ROBERTS. 205 West 31st 
Street. Savannah, is a substitute teacher 
in the Chatham County Public Schools. 

JAMES 0. THOMAS. JR., 3518 21st 
Street. Washington, D. C. is a Patent 
Examiner in Washington. He has also 
attended George Washington University 
School of Law. 

PECOLA O'DELL MOORE, Route 4, 
Box 95. Washington, is a teacher at the 
Wilkes County Training School, in 
Washington. Georgia. 

REBECCA EDWARDS MITCHELL, 
529 W. Charles Street. Savannah, is the 
Youth Secretary of the Y.M.C.A. 

L. V. ROSS CURRIE, 103 S. Mathis 
Street, Nashville, is an in-service teacher 
in the public schools in Nashville. She 
plans to graduate in August. 1957. 

GERTIE LIZZAMORE. Box 6. St. 
Marys. Georgia, is a teacher at the 
Camden County Training School, St. 
Marys. Mrs. Lizzamore was named 
"Teacher of the Year" for the school 
terms 1955-56 and 1956-57. She was 
also named "Teacher of the Year" for 
Camden County. 

MAGGIE JOHNSON. 522 East Lib- 
erty Street, Lyons. Georgia, is a teacher 
of the first grade at the Lyons Indus- 
trial High School where she has served 
in the following capacities as Majorette 
Director. Girl Scout Leader. Secretary 
of the P.T.A., Chairman of the Elemen- 
tary Evaluation Committee at the Lyons 
Industrial High School (for Southern 
Accreditation ) . Planning Committee for 
Regional Meeting 1957. Chairman of 
Founders Day Program Committee for 
P.T.A. During the "Home Coming 
Parade" Miss Johnson's class float won 
second place. 



1957 Yearbook To Be 
Released May 15 

Mr. Bowens. coordinating advisor of 
the yearbook staff, announces that the 
"Annuals" will be released on May 15 
and will go on sale on May 25. The 
price is $3.50 per copy. 

The book will consist of one-hundred 
(100) pages with the first sixteen (16) 
pages in color as an added feature. 

The percentage of pictures and news 
from various classes and organizations 
has shown an improvement. 

The Yearbook is financed by ads, re- 
freshments sold at the games and sub- 
scriptions. This year the staff and the 
Senior Class sponsored a Jazz Fash- 
ionetta which contributed also to the 
publication. 

The staff looks forward to having 
each student, or a great percentage of 
the students, purchase the Yearbook. 




•-Mm. 




Joseph Turner, Class of '51 

Summer School 
Starts June 10 

Summer School will open on June 10 
for the 1957 Summer School Sessions 
and will close August 24 for eight week 
workshops and July 5 for four-weeks- 
short courses. Dr. E. K. Williams has 
been appointed to serve as director of 
the summer school. 

President Payne stated that high 
school graduates can enter college dur- 
ing the summer quarter and have an 
opportunity to complete college by at- 
tending three quarters and three com- 
plete college terms. 

High School Validation and freshman 
entrance examinations will be held on 
Monday. June 10th for students who 
have graduated from non-accredited 
high schools. Students from accredited 
high schools will not have to take the 
examination. 

Classes for the summer quarter will 
begin on June 11 for day and evening 
students. 

According to the President, there will 
be outstanding specialists and consult- 
ants added to the summer school fac- 
ulty; workshops and short courses will 
be provided to meet the special needs 
and interest of in-service teachers; eve- 
ning classes will be offered for special 
trade students who are primarily con- 
cerned with vocations and an adult edu- 
cation program will be provided for 
qualified persons not interested in com- 
pleting degree requirements. A rich pro- 
gram of concerts and educational tours 
are planned for those who enroll dur- 
ing the summer and any course that is 
listed in regular bulletin will be offered 
during the summer upon sufficient de- 
mand. 



Page 18 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



I 




L ,*J*L 




bBH 



mi$& 



One of the thirty cottages projected for the 4-H Club Center at Dublin 



The 4-H Club Center 



Early in 1940 the Lions Club of Dub- 
lin, along with a group of public-spir- 
ited citizens of Laurens County, donated 
a tract of thirty acres of land to the 
Negro 4-H Club members of Georgia 
for the purpose of erecting a 4-H Club 
Center. Shortly thereafter, the 50,000 
Negro club members began raising funds 
themselves. They agreed to pay at least 
ten cents per year to be used for de- 
veloping the Center. From this very 
humble beginning, interest has con- 
tinued to grow. With these first contri- 
butions, materials were purchased, and 
the Negro County Agents used a kind 
of shuttle-system of coming to the Cen- 
ter in work groups. They erected the 
first eight permanent buildings which 
we have on the site. 

In 1954, the developing plan for the 
Center was re-evaluated. The plans 
called for building thirty cottages that 
will accommodate sixteen youths and 
two adult leaders each, the construc- 
tion of a 500-capacity auditorium, the 
converting of the present assembly 



At Dublin, Georgia 

building into a cafeteria which will 
serve 500 persons, the installation of 
the proper water, lights, gas and sewage 
disposal system, and the converting of 
two dormitories into six conference 
rooms. 

Since these plans were revamped, 
some definite progress has been made 
toward the completion of them. Due to 
the fine start and the amount of en- 
thusiasm shown by 4-H clubbers, other 
interested individuals and business firms 
have made contributions for use in the 
development of this project. The Martin 
Theatres, Inc., have given 142 acres of 
land. The Mills Bee Lane Foundation 
gave the first cottage; Mrs. Parker B. 
Poe gave the second and $6,000 to com- 
plete the swimming pool. Many other 
individuals and business firms have 
contributed liberally to complete and 
equip with furniture three of the thirty 
cottages. 

Last year in April, Governor Griffin, 
after learning about the progress that 
the Negro 4-H Club members and their 



friends were making toward develop- 
ing this very vital youth Center, made 
a grant of state funds amounting to 
$200,000. This allocation is being used 
to erect some of the basic facilities at 
the Center. Governor Griffin had agreed 
to match all funds raised from private 
sources for the completion of this Cen- 
ter. 

This Center is badly in need of funds 
to erect the other 24 cottages. In view 
of the very liberal challenge of Gov- 
ernor Griffin, the support of individ- 
uals and business concerns is being 
solicited and donations will be greatly 
appreciated. The cost of constructing a 
cottage is $11,000. Any individual or 
firm contributing this total amount will 
be granted the privilege of naming the 
cottage. Of course, contributions of 
any amount will be greatly appreciated. 
All contributors are asked to send con- 
tributions made to the Four-H Club 
Foundation for the Dublin Center to 
Alexander Hurse, Savannah State Col- 
lege, Savannah, Georgia. These contri- 
butions will be tax-exempt. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 19 



PRESIDENT PAYNE EXTENDS GREETINGS TO ALUMNI 



To extend greetings to the alumni of a growing col- 
lege is always a privilege and an honor. Savannah State 
College alumni have been fortunate in this respect. The 
institution which provided their basic undergraduate train- 
ing shows growth and improvement in a number of signifi- 
cant aspects. Colleges in the United States today are ex- 
pecting unusual increases in student enrollment. On the 
one hand, there is a feeling that the openings in college 
should be awarded to those most able to profit by college 
education; while on the other hand, there is the idea that 
all who meet basic entrance requirements should be ad- 
mitted. Savannah State College has not found it necessary 
to limit its enrollment: but it has been necessary to restrict 
the number of women students admitted to the dormitory. 

Since the end of World War II, the enrollment of the 
Coillege has been in excess of the number normally pro- 
vided for by the facilities. During the past five years the 
facilities have been increasing at a more rapid rate than 
the student body. The College is proud of the efforts which 
the Board of Regents has been making and continues to 
make toward the building of a first-rate college. Dur ng the 
past year, two new essential buildings have been planned. 
Funds have been made available for the construction of a 
new college library which will provide for 60,000 volumes 
immediately and 100,000 as the need increases. The new 
library costing $540,000 will be air conditioned and it will 
provide for an adequate Audio-Visual Aids Laboratory. The 
second group of buildings will provide for the program of 
technical education approved for the College. This unit 
will include laboratories and facilities for chemistry and 
physics in addition to the program in automotive engineer- 
ing, building construction, electronics. The cost of this 
center will be approximately $1,000,000.00. Plans and 
specifications for both projects, the library and the tech- 
nical center, have been completed. It is expected that actual 
construction will begin during the 1957 summer. In addi- 
tion to new facilities the Board has continued its program 
of repairs and alterations which has modernized and in- 
creased the usefulness of existing buildings. Equipment and 
supplies have been provided on a more adequate basis. 

Two new programs of instruction have been added. 



The first year of the program for majors in the field of 
health and physical education has just been completed. A 
second degree program, the A.B. degree in Music, has been 
approved to begin this fall. Great strides have been made 
in the improvement of instruction and scholarship. The 
College possesses a strong faculty and fine caliber of stu- 
dent. After the examination of the College, by a special 
committee of the Southern Association of Colleges and Sec- 
ondary Schools, the College was continued on the fully 
accredited list of that association — a highly significant fact 
in this day of rising standards and rigorous evaluation. Ef- 
fort has been made by the diversity System to improve 
the effectiveness of all units through a system of entrance 
examinations. The first of these examinations was admin- 
istered to high school seniors during the 1956-57 academic 
year. All candidates entering the colleges will have taken 
these tests before they are admitted next fall. No students 
will be refused admission on the basis of test scores this 
year or next year. The program aims to determine what 
students may succeed in each institution. After a number 
of years of trial, data and information will be available 
to provide educational opportunities for those who can 
profit by college instruction. The program is destined to 
be of great value in the improvement of scholarship, in- 
struction, and the tone of the college. More information 
w 11 be available to assist the college staff in providing 
better and more effective education. 

During the past year alumni of the College through 
their achievements have continued to reflect credit on their 
alma mater. Many new names have been added to the 
growing list of alumni who have been placed in positions of 
responsibility and leadership. The Alumni Secretary has 
been active in the organization of alumni chapters and the 
development of adequate alumni files. The work of the 
General Alumni through the national president and the 
local chapter heads has been encouraging and inspiring. 
The active interest of the alumni in the development of a 
first-rate college has done much to upgrade the whole pro- 
gram. The scholarship fund for worthy, needy students has 
continued to make it possible for a number of students to 
continue their education at the College. 



Plans For $1,000,000 Technical Building 




\J 



<yu 



±> 



STATE 
% 1 1^ 




INFORMATION TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 



^hMid&ttb 1 ^\euaqe 




Office of the President 

Greetings to the Prospective Student 

My dear High School Graduates 

In America a college education is considered a sound investment for 
all who seek an unlimited future. There are many colleges which present 
a variety of offerings and programs. It has been said often that there is 
a college for every individual who has the desire to find the one that suits 
his needs. American youth have a distinct privilege in selecting their insti- 
tutions of higher learning. 

In making such a selection the student should consider many items. 
Among these would be his interests, abilities, aims, and needs, as well as the standing of the college, its location, 
and facilities. Many colleges will offer similar programs of instruction, but each varies in the opportunities 
provided for individual growth. A college which affords students opportunities for actual participation in the 
institution's life and the larger community in which the college is located will provide unlimited educational 
values for students. A stimulating atmosphere, opportunities to take an active part in the life of the community 
and a feeling of belonging constitute factors making for a superior educational program. In selecting a college, 
a student should choose one in which he can construct a rich full stimulating school career. In most instances, 
the college chosen should be one where the student fee's that he can be eminently successful, his standards of 
living will be raised, his ideals will be elevated, his initiative stimulated, and his abilities challenged. 

Savannah State College, operated by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia, has made 
rapid progress in expanding and upgrading its facilities, program of instruction, and quality of educational pro- 
gram. A modern library and a technical education center now under way represent the most recent additions 
to the physical plant. New facilities, along with the strong faculty and staff, make Savannah State College a 
desirable place in which to study, learn and grow. 

W. K. PAYNE 




^ The new proposed Technical and Trades building 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE BULLETIN 

Vol- XI March 1958 No. 5 

President Dr. W. K. Payne 

Editor Wilton C. Scott 

Photography Robert Mobley 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published in October, 
December, February, March, April, and May by Savannah State 
College. Entered as second-class matter, December 16, 1947, at the 
post office at Savannah, Georgia, under the Act of August 24, 1912. 




President's home in snow seen 




Georgia's Great Institution in the 
Empire City of the South 

Savannah State College, one of the largest units 
of the University System of Georgia, is in Savannah, 
Georgia's oldest city and chief seaport. The campus is 
a scenic wonder, rich in the natural beauty indigenous 
to this coastal area. Filigree tendrils of smoky moss 
wind themeslves about massive, ancient oaks, graceful 
pines yearn toward the sky — in Spring these form a 
backdrop for lavender azaleas, crimson wild roses, and 
flaming jasmine. The weather is moderate. Ocean 
breezes are wafted to the Campus, bringing with them 
the hint of the exotic that characterizes the waterways. 

Not only is the College noted for its natural beauty, 
but its location also provides opportunities for tours of 
Savannah, and its environs, intrinsically woven into 
the historic tapestry of America. 

The physical plant, consisting of 136 acres and 
more than 33 buildings, is imposing. Wright, a modern, 
spacious men's dormitory and Wiley Gymnasium, a 
well-equipped physical education center, are the newest 
additions to the plant. Plans for a half-million dollar 
library and million dollar technical and science building 
have been completed and will be under construction 
this summer. Additional features of the physical cam- 
pus include adequate playing fields and tennis courts. 

Certainly, Savannah State College is prepared to 
serve the state and nation during this scientific and 
technical age. 



SSC's scenic campus facing Rich- 
ard R. Wright and Hill Halls. 




\n&toM£ticm, 



Savannah State Offers 
Three Types 



of Technical Programs 



The College offers three types of technical pro- 
grams. A College curriculum which leads to a 
B. S. degree in Industrial Education and/or In- 
dustrial Arts; a special trade program which leads 
to a certificate in one of the following specialties: 
Auto-Mechanics, Body and Fender, General Wood- 
work, Carpentry, Radio and Television, Electricity, 
Shoe Repair and Masonry. A third program of 
this Division has been approved and students may 
register now; this is a curriculum leading to a 
B. S. degree in each of the following: Automotive 
Technology, Building Construction Technology and 
Electronic Technology. 

Our American society is becoming increasing- 
ly technological and complex. Savannah State Col- 
lege in its efforts to prepare its students to meet 
such a challenge successfully, is expanding its pro- 
gram in technical education. 



Students in Radio-Television class. L to R: Nathaniel 
Chaplin and Wilmer Groover. 




!! * *• Trade D ep artmen , 



i Students m c 



Sweet T? Con ^cti 0l 
' ,rv| n White, an 




vw 



Savannah State College Will Be 

Considered By The Qualified 

Student Who Seeks Such 



Advantages As: 



A four-year college of applied arts and sciences, 
teacher education, business and vocational technology. 

Terminal courses in dressmaking, tailoring, food 
production and cooking, and secretarial sciences. 

The College is fully accredited by the Department 
of Education of the State of Georgia and by the 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools. 

A well-trained, dedicated faculty. 

A well-organized program of general education. 

Planned programs of extra-class activities. 

A campus rich in natural beauty and historical 
associations. 

Moderate fees with opportunities for self-help. 

Proximity to points of national interest. 

Rich cultural opportunities. 

Detailed information may be secured from the 
Savannah State College catalog. Address requests for 
catalog to: 

THE REGISTRAR 

Savannah State College 

State College Branch 

Savannah, Georgia 



Mechanics at work in the Trade Department. 





Students in Mechanical 
Drawing: seated — William 
Brown; standing — L to R: 
David Brown and Edwin Der- 



ci 




ass i n Che 

of Mr 



3"*» «"W -he , mtruc(orsh . p 








r 



""*" R Joe Davis, Carl 
S»n ^^Vbe" «nd«r. instruct". 
Williams and W- 





The Curriculum 

Savannah State College confers the degree of Bachelor 
of Science with a^major in one of the f ollowing areas of 
concentration/ Biology, building construction, business ad- 
ministration, business education, chemistry, child develop- 
ment, clothing and textiles, economics, elementary educa- 
tion. English, foods, nutrition and institution management, , 
general science, industrial arts, industrial education, mathe- 
matics, music, secretarial sciences, social sciences, technical 
sciences, trades and industries- 
Music, "ifocl 



To meet the needs of persons who are already gain- 
fully employed but who desire immediate, specialized train- 
ing, and of others whose opportunity for formal education 
is limited, the College offers two-year terminal courses in 
dressmaking and tailoring, food production and cooking, 
and secretarial science. Certificates are awarded upon a 
student's satisfactory completion of a terminal course. 

THE GENERAL CURRICULUM at Savannah State 
College is followed during the first two years by candidates 
for all degrees. At the end of the sophomore year, the 
student chooses a field of special interest in which he 
selects courses which will occupy his major attention in 
the junior and senior years. 

The general curriculum is designed to afford an op- 
portunity for every student to acquire the fundamental 
skills, attitudes, habits, appreciations, knowledge and un- 
derstanding, and competency in thinking and communica- 
tion that are necessary for effective living in a dynamic 
society. It proposes to sensitize every stduent to the mani- 
fold problems and responsibilities involved in personal and 
social adjustment. It aims to instill in each student the 
respect for the rights and dignity of mankind. 



Students at wor 



k in Trade Department. 




Miss Gwendolyn Proctor performs a Physical Science project. 



The qualifications of the Savannah State College fac- 
ulty member are three-fold and demonstrable. These are: 
( 1) Scholarship; (2) Teaching ability; and (3) interest 
in aiding the student to achieve a well-rounded maturity. 

The Savannah State College teacher continually seeks 
professional development. Evidence of this is the pervasive 
interest in advanced study and research. The teaching staff 
holds degrees from institutions in all sections of the country. 

The exemplum set by the faculty member in the 
development of citizenship through participation in the 
civic, community, and church life of the community but- 
tresses the precepts of classroom instruction. 

ADMISSION 

Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and 
who present evidence of good moral character, adequate 
ability, sound health, and interest in a specific course of 
study are eligible to apply for admission to the several de- 
partments of the college. 

Each candidate for admission is required to make 
formal application and thereafter submit such credentials 
as may be needed to support the application. Admissions 
correspondence should be addressed to: Director of Ad- 
missions, Savannah State College, State College Branch, 
Savannah, Georgia. 

In the Fall Quarter, 1956, Savannah State College 
adopted the College Entrance Examination Board Exami- 
nations as a requirement for admission. During the year 
1956-57, the examinations were administered at Savannah 
State College. 

Beginning with the Fall Quarter, 1957, and subse- 
quently, the examinations will not be administered at the 
College, but will be held at designated intervals and at 
regular centers throughout the State. 

Prospective students would read the Bulletin of Infor- 
mation carefully in order to note the time and place of 
examinations to be held in their vicinity. 



t-y 




*^^Pl 





Mrs. Ida J. Gadsden, Chairman of Health Education Com- 
mittee, prepares health project. She is potege of her Alma 
Mater (SSC). 




Community leaders from various President Payne featured over 
counties register for Cancer Clinic WSAV, NBC in Savannah area, 
at Savannah State. 




Reverend Robert F. Harrington, Pastor of Trinity Methodist 
Church (New Orleans, Louisiana) and area Administrative As- 
sistant to the Bishop of the Area, discusses "World Peace 
Through Christian Fellowship" with members of the faculty 
at Savannah State College. The discussion was recorded for 
broadcast over WSAV, the leading NBC station in the area. 

Left to right: Dr. R. Grann Lloyd, Professor and Chair- 
man of the Department of Economics who moderated the dis- 
cussion, Reverend Harrington, Dr. Calvin L. Kiah, Professor and 
Chairman of the Department of Education, and Reverend Blan- 
ton E. Black, Assistant Professor of Social Science. 




Miss Albertha Boston, Assistant Professor of Business and 
Faculty Adviser for prize winning "Enterprise" checks publica- 
tion formats. She is a graduate of Savannah State College. 



President Wm. K. Payne was 
host to Regional Conference of 
Georgia Cancer Society. 





Officials of (GIA) Georgia 
Interscholastic Association with 
Frank Tharpe (extreme right) 
Assistant Professor of Technical 
Sciences. Mr. Tharpe is an 
alumnus. 



^^^u*^ 








Miss Emma Lou Jordan, Junior, relaxes on SSC Athletic Field. 

1 I 






Savannah State College Playhouse practice for Pride and m'q | Thelma Griffin, Lois Walker, and Maralyn Freeman revies 

Prejudice. -.mm the latest styles. 



<Sr Jf ,Mf w' 



r 








Miss Thomas and Mr. McClain pose as Mr. and Mrs. 
Sweetheart for 1957-58. 




15 



Life at Savannah State College 



The College recognizes that its primary function is to 
train individuals for effective participation in society. Thus, 
the student is not only trained in his academic field but is 
also encouraged to engage in one or more of the numer- 
ous activities and organizations available on the Campus. 
The College has an expanding program of services in 
counseling and advisement. 

Opportunities for development in the area of repre- 
sentative government are provided through the Student 
Council and through student representation on College 
Committees. 

Organizations include The Art Club. The Business Club, 
Collegiate Counsellors, Dormitory Councils, The Home Eco- 
nomics Club, The Newman Club, French Club, The Tiger's 
Roar ( student newspaper ) , YWCA, YMCA, The Tiger 
(College annual), the College Playhouse (dramatics group), 
The Creative Dance Group, and various other departmental 
clubs. 

National social fraternities and sororities organized 
on the campus are Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, 
Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, Sigma Gamma 
Rho, Zeta Phi Beta. Omega Psi Phi and Phi Beta Sigma. 

Alpha Kappa Mu National Honor Society and Beta 
Kappa Chi, Scientific Society have chapters on the Campus. 

The student who selects Savannah State College has 
excellent opportunity for development in expression through 
participation in the College Radio and Television Series. 

The College Choir, the bands, and glee clubs are open 
to all students interested in music. These groups perform 
frequently for special programs throughout the State. 

The maintenance of sound physical health is empha- 
sized. The Department of' Health and Physical Education 
conducts a well-rounded program of intramural athletics for 
men and women. Featured sports are football, basketball, 
track and field, tennis, baseball, softball, volleyball, field 
hockey, and badminton. 

Cultural opportunities also supplement the formal edu- 
cation at Savannah State College. Student assemblies, 
various Institutes, Seminars, Religious Emphasis Week, 
Fine Arts Festival, Church, Vespers, Sunday School, films, 
lectures, art exhibitions, forums, etc., contribute much to 
the development of the student who chooses to matriculate 
at Savannah State College. The College Artists Series brings 
to the Campus yearly outstanding performers in the areas 
of music, dramatics, and the dance. 



Miss Raverta Wed- 
dington, freshman, 
Dallas, Georgia, re- 
laxes on Savannah 
State College cam- 
pus. 





"Miss Western Culture 
of Mr. A. E. Peacock's Sec- 
tion", Gladys Lambert, 
freshman, Savannah, Ga. 



Student Council Presi- 
dent, Robert Tindal, pre- 
sides over the Student 
Body. 



Students leaving 
Chapel-L to R: Kay 
Frances Stripling, 
Dorothy Davis, and 
Yvonne Hooks. 





Dr. W. K. Payne, Presi- 
dent of Savannah State 
College, presents Miss Lula 
B. Chance, freshman, from 
Sardis, Georgia, "Miss 
Omega" for SSC. 




ociat 














Dr. Bradford 
■ former p r e s i d 
lACPRA, greets 
"family and partic' 
! Press Institute. 


Ansley, j 
e n t of 
students, 
pants in 




ph State College Radio Roundtable 
WSAV, NBC in Savannah. 





Charles Devillars, retiring regional director of 
GTEA, greets Norman Elmore, newly elected di- 
rector. Both are graduates of Savannah State 
College. 



Guest speaker on as- 
sembly program, William 
Worthy, CBS correspond- 
ent. 



Receiving line during Religious Emphasis 
Week 1958. L to R: Mrs. W. K. Payne, Grover 
Thornton, James Austin, Rev. Robert Harrington, 
Mrs. Andrew Hargrett, Rev. Andrew Hargrett, 
and Andrew, Jr. 



m \- i 

Noted alumnus, Heyward Anderson, returns 
and addresses students during Honors Day cere- 
monies. 



ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 

NOTE: Fees remitted by mail should be sent by money order, cashier's check, or certified check payable to 
SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE. 

Per Quarter Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $45.00 $135.00 

Health Fee 3.00 9.00 

Student Activity Fee 8.00 24.00 

Student Group Insurance 5.00 15.00 

Total Charges— Day Student $ 61.00 $183.00 

Room, Board and Laundry 161.00 483.00 

Total Charges— Boarding Student $222.00 $666.00 

Each entering student is required to make a deposit of $10.00 which is refunded upon grad- 
uation or whenever the student officially withdraws from the college. 






Student Work Aid, Scholarship 

And 
Grant-in-Aid 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet 
their college expenses through part-time employment, pro- 
vided they maintain satisfactory scholastic averages. These 
work opportunities, limited in number, include such jobs 
as clerical and stenographic work, library work, waiting 
tables, washing dishes, pantry and kitchen work, skilled 
and unskilled work in the several trades and in maintenance. 

Students who plan to apply for part-time work should 
note the following carefully: 

1. No student should attempt to enter Savannah State 
College unless he is prepared to pay the major 
part of his total college expenses. 

2. All students are required to pay all entrance ex- 
penses when they enter. Money earned through 
part-time work may thereafter be credited to the 
monthly account. 

3. Students are assigned to work only after they have 
been admitted and have arrived on the campus. 

Detailed information about work opportunities may 
be secured from the Office of Student Personnel. 



William Harman Black Loan 
Fund 

A Student Loan fund was established under the Will 
of the late Mr. William Harman Black for the benefit of 
students enrolled in institutions of the University System. 
This fund will be administered by the Regents' Central Of- 
fice under rules and regulations established by the Board 
of Regents as provided in the Will of Mr. Black. 

The rules and regulations which have been adopted for 
the administration of this fund are as follows: 

1. Applications for loans will be considered for stu- 
dents enrolled in any institution of the University 
System which does not have institutional loan funds 
available. 

2. Loans may be approved in amounts not to exceed 
the amount the student is required to pay to the 
institution for fees, room and board. 

3. The rate of interest to be charged on the loans will 
be 3% per annum with interest to begin on June 
1 next following the date of the note. 



4. The accrued interest on the loan will be paid an- 
nually during the period the student is attending 
college. 

5. A separate note will be executed for each quarter 
during which a loan is received and the principal 
of the loan will be repaid in twelve equal install- 
ments beginning four months following the date 
on which the maker of the note withdraws from or 
completes his course of study in an institution of 
the University System. Should there be more than 
one note, they shall be repaid in the order of date 
of signing in the same monthly installments be- 
ginning thirty days after the payment of the older 
note or notes. 

6. The notes to be executed by the students will carry 
two acceptable endorsers. 

Any student interested in applying for a loan may do 
so by contacting the Comptroller's Office of the institution 
he or she may be attending. The Comptrollers may receive 
application blanks from the Treasurer of the Board of 
Regents. After the application blank together with other 
required information is completed, the application will be 
recommended by the Comptroller and forwarded to the 
Treasurer of the Board of Regents for action on the ap- 
plication. If the application is approved, the check cover- 
ing the loan for that particular quarter will be forwarded 
to the comptroller for delivery to the student. 

The application should be made for the amount re- 
quested for an academic year. However, loans will be 
granted and notes executed for each quarter. The note 
covering the amount approved for each quarter will be 
forwarded to the Comptroller at the time the check is for- 
warded. It will be the responsibility of the Comptroller to 
have the note executed and returned to the Treasurer of 
the Board of Regents before the check is delivered to the 
student. 



Student Group Insurance 

The Savannah State College student group insurance 
plan has been designed to protect all full time students of 
the school. The premium of $15.00 per year is payable in 
installments of $5.00 each quarter and the student is covered 
for twelve (12) months — including recess and vacation 
periods. The insuring company will pay up to $250.00 for 
each accident — regardless of what other coverages the 
student has. Payment is unallocated; the plan will pay for 
any or all of the following: medical and surgical treatment 
by a physician, hospital confinement and nurses services, 
miscellaneous hospital expenses, and dental treatment made 
necessary by injury to natural teeth. 



f$ov?tcUe& cwrt^/ictiennUie& 




1. Dorothy Davis receives gift from Irene Derry, Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, as "Woman of the Year" 1957-58. 
2. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's Worms. Juanita Baker, Gerald Dearing, Almenia Stevenson, Barbara Edders, 
Justine Thomas, and Iris Parrish. 3. Delta Sigma Theta Sorority's Ducks— L to R: Gwendolyn Davis, Rose Ann Lanier, 
Frankie Ganaway, and Elise Saxby. 4. Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Dogs. 



12 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 



VOL XI NO. 6 



MAY, 1958 







i 







aLumm issue 




"This Is Your Life," Savannah State College Alumni Day Program. Left to right: Mrs. Leanna 
Wilcox, co-chairman; Norman B. Elmore, president of Savannah Chapter of Savannah State College 
Alumni Association,- Dr. W. K. Payne, college president, presents plaque to John McGlockion, former 
alumni president; Miss Ruby King, local alumni secretary, and Leonard Law, president, Savannah 
State College National Alumni Association. 




-wwr ' 



Savannah State College -One of the Largest 
Units of University System of Georgia 



Savannah State College, one of the 
largest units of the University System 
of Georgia, is in Savannah, Georgia's 
oldest city and chief seaport. The cam- 
pus is a scenic wonder, rich in the 
natural beauty indigenous to this coastal 
area. Filigree tendrils of smoky moss 
wind themselves about massive, ancient 
oaks, graceful pines yearn toward the 
sky — in Spring these form a backdrop 
for lavender azaleas, crimson wild roses, 
and flaming jasmine. The weather is 
moderate. Ocean breezes are wafted to 
the Campus, bringing with them the 
hint of the exotic that characterizes the 
waterways. 

Not only is the College noted for its 
natural beauty, but its location also pro- 
vides opportunities for tours of Savan- 
nah, and its environs, intrinsically 
woven into the historic tapestry of 
America. 

The physical plant, consisting of 136 
acres and more than 33 buildings, is 
imposing. Wright, a modern, spacious 
men's dormitory and Wiley Gymnasium, 
a well-equipped physical education cen- 
ter, are the newest additions to the 
plant. Plans for a half-million dollar 
library and million dollar technical 
and science building have been com- 
pleted and will be under construction 
this summer. Additional features of the 



physical campus include adequate play- 
ing fields and tennis courts. 

Certainly, Savannah State College is 
prepared to serve the State and nation 
during this scientific and technical age. 

Savannah State College confers the 
degree of Bachelor of Science with a 
major in one of the following areas of 
concentration: Biology, building con- 
struction, business administration, busi- 
ness education, chemistry, child devel- 
opment, clothing and textiles, econom- 
ics, elementary education, English, 
foods, nutrition and institution manage- 
ment, general science, industrial, arts, 
industrial education, mathematics, mu- 
sic, secretarial sciences, social sciences, 
technical sciences, trades and industries. 
Also confers Bachelor of Art in music. 
Bachelor of Science degrees can be con- 
ferred in Health and Physical Educa- 
tion. 

To meet the neds of persons who are 
already gainfully employed but who 
desire immediate, specialized training, 
and of others whose opportunity for 
formal education is limited, the College 
offers two-year terminal courses in 
dressmaking and tailoring, food produc- 
tion and cooking, and secretarial 
science. Certificates are awarded upon 
a student's satisfactory completion of a 
terminal course. 



The general curriculum is designed 
to afford an opportunity for every stu- 
dent to acquire the fundamental skills, 
attitudes, habits, appreciations, knowl- 
edge and understanding, and compe- 
tency in thinking and communication 
that are necessary for effective living in 
a dynamic society. It proposes to sensi- 
tize every student to the manifold prob- 
lems and responsibilities involved in 
personal and social adjustment. It aims 
to instill in each student the respect for 
the rights and dignity of mankind. 

Cover Picture: The Leonard Laws of 
Savannah, Georgia. Mr. Law is presi- 
dent of the Alumni Association at Sa- 
vannah State College. 

The Bulletin 

Dr. William K. Payne 

President 

Wilton C. Scott 

Editor 

Vol. 11 No. 6 May, 1958 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is pub- 
lished in October, December, February, Mareh, 
April and May by Savannah State College. 
Entered as second-class matter, December 16, 
1947, at the Post Office at Savannah, Georgia, 
under the Act of August 24, 1912. 



m t 



Annual Charm Week 
Celebrated May 10 

The Association of Women Students 
at Savannah State College began their 
annual observance of Charm Week May 
10, with a Mother-Daughter Banquet in 
Adams Hall. Mrs. Eliza Lee Butts was 
honored as "Mother of the Year". The 
speaker for the Banquet was Mrs. Doris 
Roberts, director, Greenbiar Center, In- 
corporated. 

Other activities for the celebration in- 
cluded: Vesper. May 11, 6:00 P.M.. 
Meldrim Auditorium. The speaker for 
this service was Mrs. Sadie Cartledge, 
Principal. Springfield Terrace School. 
A reception in Camilla-Hubert Hall, 
7:00 p.m. 

Mrs. Cartledge earned the B.S. degree 
at Savannah State College, and the M.A. 
Degree, New York University. She re- 
serves membership in the following or- 
ganizations: Alpha Theta Zeta Chapter 
of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.; N.E.A. 
G.T.E.A.; A.T.A.; Youth Museum; West 
Broad Street YMCA; U.C.S.; and the 
Mental Retarded Association for Chil- 
dren of Georgia. 

On Monday, May 12, a Flower Show 
was held in the College Library. A 
demonstration was given by Mrs. 
Charles Flournoy, President of the 
Georgia Association of Garden Clubs, 
Inc., between 2 and 4 p.m. 

"Phoenix", a dance-drama written by 
Mrs. Luetta Colvin Upshur, assistant 
professor, Languages and Literature 
Department, and choreographed by Mrs. 
Ella W. Fisher, assistant professor, 
Health & Phy. Ed., was presented dur- 
ing the Charm Week Assembly, Thurs- 
day, May 15, 12:00 p.m., Meldrim Au- 
ditorium. 

Miss Annie B. Moore is President of 
the Association. Miss Loreese Davis, 
acting dean of women, chairman. 



SSC Completes 5 Years 
Roundtable Broadcast 

The Savannah State College Round- 
table which is broadcast regularly on 
the first Saturday of each month over 
WSAV-NBC, completed five consecutive 
years of broadcasting without missing 
a single program last week. It is an un- 
rehearsed, spontaneous thirty-minute 
discussion of timely topics of educa- 
tional and general interest by the fac- 
ulty, students, and guests of Savannah 
State College. 



* 




j ur 



Two Prexies meet. John W. McGlockion, former President of Savannah State College Alumni and j 
his wife, chat with the President and 1st Lady of Savannah State College. 

m ' ?t m — ' MMHLM s 









James E. Lulen, Vice President of the Savannah Chapter congratulates William B. Jackson, Paulsen 
Jr. High School's Teacher of the Year as Mrs. Oltlee Daniels looks on. 




Prince Jackson, Jr., Savannah State College Alumni Secretary presents Charier to Raymond Knight, 
President of Washington, D. C. Chapter as (left to right) William Weston, Treasurer; Miss Hartie M. 
Napier, Secretary; James O. Thomas, Public Relations Director; Dr. Julious H. Goodman, Parliamen- 
tarian; Mrs. Constance W. Mitchell, Assistant Secretary and William Mitchell, Chaplain, look on. 



SSC President's Annual Alumni Message 



During the past year schools at all 
levels have received an extra amount 
of consideration. This attention has 
been in the form of criticism, evalua- 
tion, and increased determination to 
provide more adequately for their im- 
provement and development. The col- 
leges and universities are beginning to 
be classed as an integral part of na- 
tional defense and progress. The dawn 
of the space age 'has emphasized the 
need for scholars, as well as for facili- 
ties. Both teachers and students have 
attained higher status in our social or- 
der. The new role of the scholar and 
the stimulating and encouraging atmos- 
phere are destined to' produce marked 
influences on the colleges and their pro- 
grams. Savannah State College is al- 
ready experiencing the impact of the 
changes. 

It is heartening to report that three 
major additions to the facilities of Sa- 
vannah State College which have been 
in preparation for the last two years 
are becoming a reality. The Sol C. John- 
son High and Elementary Laboratory 
School Building costing approximately 
$650,000, already under construction, 
will be ready for occupancy during 
1959. This facility, accommodating 
1,200 children and grades one through 
twelve, will provide excellent oppor- 
tunities for laboratory experiences for 
students preparing to teach. Recently 
the contract for construction of a new 
college library has been awarded. Ac- 
tual construction of the $500,000 build- 
ing will be started within a few weeks. 
Plans and specifications nearing com- 
pletion for the $1,000,000 technical 
building will make it possible for con- 



struction to be started on that building 
within the next two months. These two 
new structures will provide minimum 
basic facilities for expansion and 
strengthening of the program of instruc- 
tion. In planning for new facilities, the 
Regents and the College have made pro- 
vision also for modernization and im- 
provement of existing buildings and 
equipment. Extensive renovation and re- 
pairs have been completed in Hubert 
Hall for women, Willcox Gymnasium, 
Morgan Hall, Powell Hall, and Meldrim 
Hall, including the auditorium. Included 
in the provision for physical facilities 
will be a modern warehouse and storage 
building costing approximately $40,000. 
The construction of projects in the var- 
ious areas will enable the College to 
make its contribution toward the in- 
creasing demands for better trained cit- 
izens. 

The new emphasis placed on scholar- 
ship is directly related to learning and 
teaching. There has been considerable 
urgency for more scholarship in the 
fields of mathematics, physics, chemis- 
try, and engineering. While everybody 
recognizes that there are unusual short- 
ages of trained individuals in those 
areas, it is equally important to realize 
that commensurate shortages exist also 
in the humanities, the social sciences, 
and the biological sciences. One cannot 
conceive of emphasizing the need for 
survival without at the same time con- 
sidering the necessity for a culture and 
civilization in which man can live with 
a degree of harmony and peace. The 
social problems in national and inter- 
national life have reached proportions 
that are alarming. Scholars must be 



recruited and developed for all areas if 
there is to be continued progress and 
better living. 

As alumni have been interested in 
fund raising, physical plant expansion, 
intercollegiate athletics, they must be- 
come interested in scholarship. In every 
community there will be found many 
boys and girls who are potential schol- 
ars. These individuals who have long 
been neglected should be discovered and 
guided to our institutions of higher 
learning where their talents can be de- 
veloped and improved for the good of 
society. It is now realized that equal 
education opportunity will mean most 
in the development of our democratic 
way of life when the abilities of every- 
one can be developed. The process of 
discovering, the manner of encouraging, 
and providing the financial means for 
the individual cases represents one of 
the most baffling problems of our time. 

The alumni who are located in var- 
ious areas can extend and contribute to 
society by helping individuals of this 
type attend college. The number of aca- 
demically talented youth in our Col- 
lege can be doubled even with the pres- 
ent facilities. The alumni of Savannah 
State College have encouraged both stu- 
dents and faculty by their growing in- 
terest in the institution. The increase in 
the number of alumni chapters and spec- 
ial activities undertaken by them in var- 
ious parts of the state and the country 
have stimulated scholarship. Graduates 
of the college during the past few years 
have continued their studies in grad- 
uate schools in many parts of the coun- 
try. More than a dozen have earned the 
doctor's degree and many have gone 
into research and fields of specializa- 
tion. The contribution of the college will 
{Continued on Page 5) 





Athens Alumni Chapter gave First Annual Banquet with Dr. William K. Payne, President of 
Savannah State College as speaker. 







Annual Alumni Banquet Program 

May 31, 1958 

Mr. Leon Dingle 

Master of Ceremonies 

Introduction Mr. L. D. Law, President 

S.S.C. National Alumni Association 

Song America 

Invocation Rev. J. E. Bailey, Pastor 

New Moon Baptist Church 

Banquet and Fellowship 

Introduction of Speaker Mr. John Lawton, Vice President 

Georgia Teachers and Education Assn. 

Annual Alumni Address Mr. Samuel Smith, Principal 

Liberty High School, Mcintosh, Ga. 

Introduction of Miss National Alumni, 

Chapter Queens and Attendants Mr. Norman B. Elmore, President 

Savannah Chapter 

Presentation of Classes Prince Jackson, Sr., Alumni Secretary 

1898 

1908 

1918 Mr. George M. Roberson 

1928 

1938 Mr. R. W. Campbell 

1948 Mr. Benjamin Crawford 

1958 Mr. James E. Johnson 

Report of the Treasurer Mr. T. C. Myers, Treasurer 

S.S.C. National Alumni Association 

Remarks Dr. W. K. Payne, President 

Savannah State College 

Remarks from National Alumni Association of Colleges and Universities 

Wilton C. Scott, Executive Secretary 

Remarks Mr. L. D. Law, President 

S.S.C. National Alumni Association 
We Hail Thee S. S. C. 



Debating Club Organized 

The Savannah State College Debating 
Club has been organized under the ad- 
visorship of Blanton E. Black, assistant 
professor of social science and Howard 
M. Jason, associate professor of lan- 
guages and literature. With the ever- 
increasing problems that confront Amer- 
ican societies today, Tnany students were 
prompt to participate in the organiza- 
tion of the Club. 

The Club has as its three-fold pur- 
pose: (1) to give the students an op- 
portunity to develop their ability as 
public speakers; (2) to give the stu- 
dents an opportunity to discuss ques- 
tions of current interest; and (3) to 
give the students an opportunity to 
match their intellectual powers with stu- 
dents of other institutions. 

With these purposes in mind it is 
hoped that the students will become 
more interested in public and national 
affairs which will enable them to deal 
with problems in this society. 

At present the debate question being 
studied is: "Be it resolved that the 
requirement of membership in a labor 
organization as a condition of the em- 
ployment should be illegal." 

The following persons were elected 
to office: President, Grover Thornton; 
Vice President, Eugene J. Johnson ; Sec- 
retary, Yvonne Williams; Assistant Sec- 
retary, Kay Frances Stripling; Publicity 
Director, Daniel Washington; Assist- 
ants to the Publicity Director, Thurnell 
Johnson, Benjamin Harris. 



(Continued from Page 4) 
be evaluated in terms of the participa- 
tion of the alumni in the solution of 
both scientific and social problems in 
the broadcast meaning of the terms. 



^mimjjjl^ 





Prince Jackson, Alumni Secretary greets newly elected officers of the Nation Capital Alumni 
| Chapter at Savannah State College Alumni Meeting. 



I 







*M d 







5* 

5 « 






1 A - 

Mrs. Martha Avery serves as a hostess for many college affairs. She is serving Mrs. Prince 
Jackson, Jr., at a president's reception. r 



Noah Lester, Principal, Blackbranch Elementary 




I 







Mr. and Mrs. Larry Young and sister at G.T.A. Meeting. 






IV g 

Mr. and Mrs. L. D. Kennedy and niece, Miss Ethel Jones. 

y v - -m y 

.*m**Jr W 7 



Forty Students Make 
College Dean's List 

According to Dean T. C. Myers, forty 
students at Savannah State College have 
acquired an average of 2.50 or better 
than "B" average for the Winter Quar- 
ter; and therefore qualify to have their 
names placed on the Dean's List. The 
Deans List and the Honor Roll are 
posted quarterly, distinguishing those 
students who make better than average 
grades during a given Quarter. 

Listed are those students who made 
the Dean's List on a full program dur- 
ing the Winter Quarter: Benjamin Al- 
len, freshman, Mathematics major, 
Brunswick, 2.56; Alfonso Arnold, sen- 
ior, Chemistry, Americus, 2.66; James 
H. Austin, sophomore, Business Admin- 
istration, Whitfield, 2.70; Alice D. Bev- 
ens, senior, English, Savannah, 2.66; 
Margaret Bing, senior, Business Ad- 
ministration, Yemassee, S. C, 3.00; 
Rosa L. Boles, senior, Business Admin- 
istration, Savannah, 2.56; Frances J. 
Carter, senior. English, Marietta, 2.66; 
Lois Dodd, senior, Elementary Educa- 
tion, Marietta, 2.50; Mildred Ellison, 
senior, Elementary Education. Savan- 
nah, 2.66; Barbara Flipper, senior. Eng- 
lish, Savannah, 2.66; Juanita Gilbert, 
senior, Elementary Education. Savan- 
nah, 2.66; Juanita Howard, junior. 
Business Education, Stephens, Georgia, 
2.66; Ceola Hubbard, senior, Chemis- 
try, Woodbine, 3.00; Oscar Jackson, 
senior, Mathematics, Savannah, 2.63; 
Julia Johnson, junior, Elementary Edu- 
cation, Savannah, 2.63; Maudestine 
Jones, senior, Social Science, Savannah, 
2.50; Emma L. Jordan, junior, Elemen- 
tary Education, Savannah, 2.72; Doro- 
thy Kendall, senior, Elementary Educa- 
tion, Zebulon, Georgia, 2.66; Gladys 
Lambert, freshman. Social Science, Sa- 
vannah, 2.50; Rosa A. Lanier, sopho- 
more, Mathematics, Savannah, 2.66; 
Ruth A. Lee, senior, Elementary Educa- 
tion, Savannah, 2.66; Geraldine Lind- 
sey, freshman, Mathematics, Bainbridge, 
2.50; Virginia Mayfield, senior, Elemen- 
tary Education, Savannah, 2.66; Wilbert 
Maynor, senior, Industrial Education, 
Sylvania, 3.00; Yvonne McGlockton, 
freshman, English, Savannah, 2.77; Vir- 
ginia Mercer, freshman, Business Ad- 
ministration, Pulaski, Georgia, 2.58; 
John Morris, senior, Social Science, Sa- 
vannah, 2.57; Eugenia Nevels, senior, 
Elementary Education, Savannah, 2.66; 
Gladys Norwood, senior, Secretarial 
Science, Atlanta, 2.55; Gordie Pugh, 
senior, Health and Physical Education, 
Waynesboro, Georgia, 2.66; Rosalyn 
Scurdy, freshman, Social Science, Sa- 
vannah, 3.00; Sadie Smith, senior, Eng- 



lish, Statesboro. 2.66; Carolyn Stafford, 
sophomore. Elementary Education, Sa- 
vannah. 2.89; Shirley Thomas, senior, 
Business Education. Savannah. 2.66; 
Grover Thornton, junior, Social Science, 
Savannah. 3.00; Leon Walker, fresh- 
man, Social Science, Savannah, 2.62; 
Delores J. Washington, senior. Elemen- 
tary Education. Savannah, 2.72; Bettye 
A. West, senior. Social Science, Savan- 
nah, 2.66; Mattie C. Williams, senior, 
Social Science, Savannah, 2.66; Peola 
C. Wright, senior. Elementary Educa- 
tion, Savannah, 2.55; Willie N. Wright, 
senior, Industrial Education, Dublin, 
3.00. 



Recognition To The 
"Teacher of the Year" 

The Savannah Chapter of the Savan- 
nah State College National Association 
awarded Certificates of Recognition to 
the "Teachers of the Year" at the West 
Broad Street YMCA. 

The program included greetings from 
Leonard D. Law. president. SSC Na- 
tional Alumni Association; a reading 
by Mrs. Sadie Steele; awarding of the 
certificates by James E. Luten, vice 
president of the chapter; musical se- 
lection by Sol Harden; and response by 
Mrs. Hattie C. Scott. 

The teachers who were honored in- 
clude: Mrs. Tallulah K. Cogswell, Cuy- 
ler Junior High School; Mrs. Lottie V. 
Crane, Gadsden Elementary School; 
Mrs. Ruth S. Dobson, Powell Labora- 
tory School; Miss Rita Dunmore, 
Springfield Terrace; Mrs. Nellie Free- 
man, Antioch Elementary School; Jos- 
eph M. Greene, Alfred E. Beach High 
School; Mrs. Nona M. Hopkins, Flor- 
ence Street Elementary School; Wil- 
liam S. Jackson, Paulsen Junior High 
School; Mrs. Melissa J. B. Lewis, West 
Savannah Elementary School; Mrs. Bet- 
tye S. Pope, Sarah Mills Hodge Ele- 
mentary School; Mrs. Hattie C. Scott, 
Tompkins High School; Wade M. Sim- 
mons, George DeRenne Elementary 
School; Mrs. Albertha Smith, Monteith 
Elementary School; Mrs. Albert P. 
Thweatt, East Broad Street School; Mrs. 
Erma R. Williams, West Broad Street 
Elementary School; Mrs. Catherine Tor- 
rence, Harris Street School; Mrs. Mil- 
dred G. Young, Spencer Elementary 
School; and Robert Young, Haven 
Home Junior High School. 

Mr. and Mrs. Young represent the 
first couple to be selected as "Teacher 
of the Year" in the same school year. 
Mr. Young was also District Teacher of 
the Year for Georgia Teacher and Edu- 
cational Association. 








% 



• ■\ 



John McGlockton, former president of Savannah State College Alumni Association, displays lrophy 
received during Annual Alumni Day program held at the College. Left to right: Mrs. McGlockton, 
Miss Yvonne McGlockton, John McGlockton. 



iX\X\ 





Dr. William K. Payne, President of Savannah State College greets Alumni. 



■■■-. 





Tommy Smalls ''Dr. Jive," announcer radio station WWRL, New York City, greets Alumni 
homecoming. 

i ; ssasmmi 



■I 11 



at 





Alumni in Social Administration, Mrs. Rebecca Mitchel, Girl's Work Secretary, George William, 
Boys' Work Secretary prepare YWCA Program with J. R. Jenkins, Executive Secretary, West Broad 
Branch. 



Dr. William K. Payne Launched SSC 
On Sixth Year of Roundtable Broadcast 



Dr. William Kenneth Payne, Presi- 
dent of Savannah State College, 
launched the sixth year of the Savannah 
State College Roundtahle with its regu- 
lar February broadcast. The Savannah 
State College Roundtable, which is pre- 
sented regularly as a public service fea- 
ture on the first Saturday of each month 
by radio station WSAV-NBC (Savan- 
nah, Georgia) completed five (5) con- 
secutive years of broadcasting without 
missing a single program last January. 
President Payne thanked the President 
of the radio station for featuring the 
program and for many helpful sugges- 
tions and kindness given to the moder- 
ator and participants. He expressed con- 
fidence in the value of the Roundtable 
as an instrument of public enlighten- 
ment. He termed public discussion a 
necessary condition of free society. 

The subject of the February (1958) 
Savannah State College Roundtable dis- 
cussion was "Negro History: A Factor 
in Internationalism." The participants 
were, Dr. E. J. Dean, Chairman, De- 
partment of Social Science and Dr. C. 
L. Kiah, Chairman, Department of Edu- 
cation. The program was moderated by 
Dr. R. Grann Lloyd. During this thirty 
minute program the discussants delved 
into several aspects of their topic, in- 
cluding ( 1 ) the use of qualified Negroes 
as emissaries, agents, and official rep- 



resentatives by the State Department of 
the United States, (2) the impact of the 
domestic problems and progress of 
American Negroes on America's inter- 
national relations, ( 3 ) the international 
implications of the Negro question in 
the drafting of the Declaration of In- 
dependence, (4) internationally famous 
Negro artists, and so forth. 

The Savannah State College Round- 
table is shifted by WSAV-NBC twice 
during the year — from the first Satur- 
day in the month to the Saturday prior 
to Negro History Week and American 
Education Week. WSAV has a cover- 
age of 79 counties in three states, Geor- 
g ; a. Florida and South Carolina. The 
stations programs reach more than one 
million potential listeners and it has 
the widest coverage of any station on 
the South Atlantic Seaboard. Believed 
to be the only program of its kind fea- 
turing a Negro College regularly, the 
Savannah State College Roundtable has 
established a new pattern of educational 
and public relations activity in Negro 
higher education institutions. 

The Savannah State CMege Round- 
table is moderated by Dr. R. Grann 
Lloyd, professor and Chairman of the 
Department of Economics, who has di- 
rected the program throughout its ex- 
istence. Incidentally, both Dr. Lloyd 
and the President of WSAV (Harben 
Daniel) were born and reared in Nash- 



ville, Tennessee. Both attended the pub- 
lic schools of Tennessee, with Dr. Lloyd 
earning the Bachelor of Science degree 
at Tennessee A & I State University 
and Harben Daniel attending Vander- 
bilt University and Watkins Institute. 
Mr. Daniel be^an his career in radio 
at station WSM, (Nashville, Tennessee) . 

As a medium of adult education, the 
Savannah State College Roundtable has 
continuously sought to bring the best 
thought and most penetrating analyses 
available to the great issues facing our 
nation. It is possibly only through the 
Roundtable that the College's adult edu- 
cation efforts can reach so many per- 
sons, as economically, effectively, fre- 
quently, personally and quickly. Hence, 
a major objective of this program has 
been so fortunate, to clarify, and to 
vitalize the ideals which should animate 
mankind in an age like ours. To this 
end the wisdom, expartise and special 
insights of scholars, teachers, and pro- 
fessional people have been utilized on 
the Savannah State College Roundtable. 



Savannah State College has won four 
awards at the 12th annual meeting of 
the National Alumni Assn.. for Colleges 
and Universities at Austin, Texas. 

Three first place trophies were won 
for alumni publicity, alumni pictures 
and alumni office management. 



President Norman B. Elmore an- 
nounces that the initial meeting for the 
1957-58 year of the local chapter of the 
Savannah State College National Alum- 
ni Association will be held on Sunday. 




* T" *-*» 



Shown are delegates attending the 13th Annual National Alumni Association Meeting held at 
Savannah State College, April 25-26. 



^*%*m±c 



.£' 



Savannah State College Offers Three 
Types of Technical Program 



In an interview William B. Nelson, 
Director. Technical Sciences at Savan- 
nah State College, stated that the Col- 
lege offers three types of technical pro- 
gram. A college curriculum which leads 
to a B.S. degree in Industrial Educa- 
tion and/or Industrial Arts: a special 
trade program which leads to a certifi- 
cate in one of the following specialties: 
Auto-Mechanics. Body and Fender. Gen- 
eral Woodwork, Carpentry. Badio and 
Television. Electricity. Shoe Bepair and 
Masonry. A third program of this Divis- 
ion has been approved and students may 
register now: this is a curriculum lead- 
ing to a B.S. degree in each of the fol- 
lowing: Automotive Technology. Build- 
ing Construction Technology and Elec- 
tronic Technology. 

In a prepared statement for the Press, 
Mr. Nelson made several important 
points. "American civilization is funda- 
mentally a technological civilization. It 
is a civilization in which man at long 
last has succeeded in conquering his en- 
vironment. He has harnessed the forces 
of nature and made them his servant. 
He can prevent famines and pestilences. 
Hunger and starvation need no longer 
exist. A small percentage of our popu- 
lation produces all the food needed by 
the entire nation, with a surplus suffic- 
ient to feed millions in other lands. The 
same holds true in many other com- 
modities. The word surplus, formerly 
used only by bankers and financiers, 
has today, because of the advances in 
applied science and technology, taken 
on a new meaning, and has become a 
common word in our daily vocabulary." 



W. B. Nelson clearly points out that 
the very existence of American society 
depends upon science and technology; 
that since the beginning, technological 
processes have been generally accepted 
and constantly developed through the 
years. 

Nelson said that all citizens have 
made and are continuing to make con- 
tributions to this growth and develop- 
ment. Concerning this, James P. Mit- 
chell. Secretary of Labor, has this to 
say. "If anyone has any doubts about 
the status — present or future — of the 
Negro in American life, he has only to 
read the progress record of the past 
fifteen years." 

Our American society is becoming in- 
creasingly technological and complex. 
Savannah State College, in its efforts to 
prepare its students to meet such a 
challenge successfully, is expanding its 
program in technical education. 



Commencement 
Program - 1958 

Saturday, May 24 

7:30-9:00 P.M.— President's Reception 

for Seniors — President's Residence. 

Thursday, May 29 

12:00 Noon — Senior Class Day Exer- 
cises — Meldrim Auditorium 
8:00 P.M.— Senior Class Night Exer- 
cises — Meldrim Auditorium 



Friday, May 30 

8:00 P.M. — Junior - Senior Prom — - 
Wilcox Gymnasium 

Saturday, May 31 

10:00 A.M. — Senior Breakfast — Adams 

Hall 
5:00 P.M.— National Alumni Meeting 

— Meldrim Auditorium 
8:00 P.M.— National Alumni Banquet 

— Adams Hall 

Speaker: Samuel Smith, Principal. 

Liberty High School, Mcintosh, 

Georgia 

Sunday, June 1 

5:00 P.M. — Baccalaureate Exercises — 
Meldrim Auditorium 
Sermon: Elder H. L. Cleveland, 
Minister, Seventh Day Adventist 
Church, Savannah, Georgia 

5:30 P.M.— President and Mrs. W. K. 
Payne — President's Residence 
At home to Alumni, faculty, mem- 
bers of the graduating class, their 
parents and friends 

Monday, June 2 

11:00 A.M. — Commencement Exercises 
— Meldrim Auditorium 
Address: Dr. William A. Early. 
Superintendent. Savannah and 
Chatham County Public Schools. 
Savannah, Georgia 




Superb passing and running by Sa- 
vannah's Sammy White and Halfback 
Moses King, plus the all-around ability 
of the Tigers, gave them a convincing 
38-13 triumph over their ancient rivals, 
Paine College, in the annual Thanks- 
giving Classic at Augusta. 






1 



Teachers of the Year feted by the Southern Association Chapter of Savannah State College National 
Alumni Association. (Left to right): Mrs. Hatlie Scott, Mrs. Bettye Pope, Mrs. Albert Thweath, William 
Jackson, Mrs. Nona Hawkins, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Young, Mr. Young also District Teacher of the 
Year for Georgia Teachers and Education Association, Mrs. Ruth Dobson, Miss Rita Dunmore and Mr. 
Wade Simmons. 













J^ceaestob 

Cjeorgi 

ZoiucAtio) 

Co Glut 

Savanna} 
Alumni 







nenvberedC. . . 



,550Cl£tlOVU 

, (ijeororU 

zte College 
5 tftere-. 










SSC Participates 
In National 
Honor Society 

Alpha Nu Chapter at Savannah State 
College of Alpha Kappa Mu Honor So- 
ciety was represented among the thirty 
three chapters that met at Tennesse A 
& I State University. Nashville, Ten- 
nessee. The annual three day convention 
was being held for the first time in 
twenty-one years at the site of its birth, 
Tennessee State University. Alpha Nu 
Chapter at Savannah State College was 
represented by Sara Reynolds and Mar- 
garet Bing, student delegates and Dr. 
E. K. Williams. Mr. J. B. Clemmons and 
Miss Marcelle Rhodriquez, faculty ad- 
visors. 

The program of activities at this 
anniversary was centered around the 
theme "Alpha Kappa Mu In Retrospect 
and In Prospect." All sessions, meetings 
and discussions were presented accord- 
ingly. 

The first general sessions were on the 
order of a get acquainted affair. Dele- 
gates introduced themselves and the var- 
ious reports were given. A welcome was 
extended by the president of the host 
chapter, Phi Beta Tau of Tennessee 
State. We were formally received at 
the college by President W. S. Davis of 
Tennessee State at the reception held 
in his home. The convention was thus 
underway. 

Some of the speakers at the conven- 
tion were Dr. S. J. Wright, President. 
Fisk University, Mr. Robert Nagel, 
President of the Association of College 
Honor Societies, University of Tennes- 
see, Knoxville. Mr. Nagel and Dr. L. B. 
Allen, President of Bluefield State Col- 
lege, West Virginia were presented with 
laureate membership certificates into 
Alpha Kappa Mu. Dr. Samuel Nabrit, 
Jr. of Howard University also spoke. 
The highlights of all addresses were 
centered around the history of honor 
societies, the history of Alpha Kappa 
Mu, its purpose and the problems that 
confront us as Alpha Kappa Muians and 
as members of a minority race. The 
panel discussion of which Dr. E. K. 
Williams of Savannah State was chair- 
man was of the same nature. 

At the final business session those 
chapters that were accredited with doing 
outstanding work were awarded tro- 
phies. Among these were Pi Lambda 
Psi, Morgan State College, Maryland 
and Alpha Nu Chapter, Savannah State 
College, Savannah, Georgia. Worthy of 
note is the fact that J. B. Clemmons, 



rfy Leonard Law, President of Savannah State College Alumni and Personnel Assistant at Union Bag 

r /M and Paper Corporation receives SSC's Alumni in summer school in Health Education Workshop 



Chairman of the Department of Mathe- 
matics and Physics and honorary mem- 
ber of Alpha Nu Chapter was given 
special recognition. Mr. Clemmons re- 
cently received the National Science 
Foundation Fellowship to study at the 
University of Southern California for 
1958-59. 



With so much international interest 
in math and physics, Dr. William K. 
Payne, President of Savannah State Col- 
lege, noted contributions of recent State 
College graduates in that area; Gerus 
Ford has been selected to participate in 
an Electronic Training Program for the 
United States gcvernment; William 
Western is now employed as a mathe- 
matics expert at the U. S. Naval Ob- 
servatory, Washington; Alonza Perry 
is now employed as mathematician in 
the National Security Agency, Wash- 
ington ; James Otis Thomas is employed 
as mathematician in the United States 
Patent Office, Washington; Earl Green 
is employed as a mathematician at 
White Plains Proving Grounds, New 
Mexico: Maceo Scott is also working 
as a mathematician in New Mexico; 
Miss Sarah Paden is employed as mathe- 
matician in the Department of Civil 
Service. Washington. D. C. Thmere are 
numerous other graduates of the De- 
partment of Mathematics or Science in 
secondary schools throughout the coun- 
try. 

John B. Clemmons is the Chairman 
of the Department of Mathematics and 
Physics at Savannah State. 



(continued from page 13) 

School. Moultrie; third place, Barbara 
Beauford, Monroe High, Albany; fourth 
place, Emma Sou McClary, Spencer 
High, Columbus; fifth place, Edith 
Shanks, Lucy Laney, Augusta; sixth 
place. Sylvia Poole, Carver, Vocational 
High, Atlanta. 

The newly elected officers of the 
G.Y.I.E.A. are: President, Wilbur 
Dixon, Carver Vocational High School, 
Atlanta; Vice President, Ozella Myrick, 
Spencer High School, Columbus; Sec- 
retary, Dorothy Halt, Spencer High 
School, Columbus; Assistant Secretary, 
Shirley Norwood, Booker T. Washing- 
ton High School, Atlanta; Treasurer, 
Joseph Trowell, Monroe High School, 
Albany; Reporter, Bobby Thomas, Lucy 
Laney High School, Augusta; Chaplin, 
Willie Thompkins, Lucy Laney High 
School, Augusta; Pianists, Chalsie Cas- 
per, Ballard-Hudson Sr. High School, 
Macon and Andrea Walker, Moultrie 
High School, Moultrie. 




ALUMNI NEWS 



1918 

GEORGE M. ROBESON. 929 West 
37th Street, Savannah, Georgia is a re- 
tired railway postal clerk. Mr. Robeson 
retired in 1953 after 35 years in gov- 
ernment service. Long interested in 
church, civic and public affairs, he is 
a member of St. Philip AME Church, 
where he is presently serving on the 
trustee board and is a member and 
teacher of the Men's Bible class of the 
Sunday School. Mr. Robeson is pres- 
ently married to the former Miss Louise 
Holland, and is the father of two at- 
tractive daughters. Mrs. Paula R. Mc- 
Neely of Brunswick and Miss Barbara 
Robeson of Cleveland, Ohio, by a for- 
mer marriage. 

1922 

WILSON J. BRYANT, SR.. 105 Dick- 
erson Drive, Vidalia, Georgia, is teach- 
ing at the Dickerson Training School. 
He was named "teacher of the year" for 
1958. Mr. Bryant has done further study 
at Atlanta University. Mr. Bryant ma- 
jored in science, English, and mathe- 
matics. 

1928 

HENRY WILLIAM TARVER, 102 

West Main Street, Hogansville, Georgia, 
teaches mathematics and social sciences 
at Greenville Consolidated High School. 
He has served as principal of schools 
for 26 years and has received a great 
number of recognitions during this time. 



He has completed work on the Mas- 
ter's degree at Atlanta University. He 
majored in mathematics and social 
science. 

1931 

HOMER T. EDWARDS, 1249 West 
Broad Street, Athens, is principal of 
Athens High and Industrial School. He 
received the B.S.A. degree in the field 
of agricultural education. Mr. Edwards 
has done additional study at Atlanta 
University. University of Michigan and 
New York University, receiving the M. 
Ed. degree from Atlanta University. Mr. 
Edwards served as vice-president and 
president of the Georgia Teachers and 
Education Association 1949-51, presi- 
dent, General Alumni Association in 
1940, and he was the speaker at the 
alumni banquet in 1951. 

1932 . 

MRS. JIMMIE J. R. DENNIS, 606 
East Pine Street, Fitzgerald, is Jeanes 
Supervisor for Camden, Charlton and 
Brantley Counties. She holds the A.B. 
degree in the fields of English and 
Social Studies. Mrs. Dennis has done 
advanced work at Atlanta University, 
Cornell University, University of Michi- 
gan, North Carolina College and Tus- 
kegee Institute. She received the M.A. 
degree from Atlanta University in 1947. 
Mrs. Dennis has held several offices in 
the Jeanes Association; Camden Coun- 
ty sent her to the University of Mich- 
igan, and also to Washington, D. C. to 
represent National Council of Negro 
Women. She has served as classroom 



teacher, principal of school and at pres- 
ent Jeanes Supervisor of instruction. 

1935 

ALPHONSO F. McLEAN. 1119 West 
48th Street. Savannah, is a teacher at 
Alfred E. Beach High School. Mr. Mc- 
Lean has done further study at Colum- 
bia University and New York Univer- 
sity. He is working toward a Master's 
degree in "the teaching of acounting". 
McLean also received the Y.M.C.A. 
award for leadership of Omega Hi-Y 
Club at Beach High School. Mr. Mc- 
Lean majored in English while attend- 
ing SSC (at that time GSC). 

1936 

MRS. ESSIE HANNAH-HALL, 423 

Cherry Street, Douglas, is an elementary 
teacher at G. W. Carver Elementary and 
High School. Mrs. Hall holds the B.S. 
degree in home economics. She has done 
further study at Atlanta University, and 
was named Coffee County "Teacher 
of the Year" for 1956-57. 

MRS. MARY B. TRAWICK, 388 
Bailey Street, Athens, serves as jeanes 
supervisor in Clarke County. She ma- 
jored in social and natural sciences. 
Mrs. Trawick has done further study at 
Hampton Institute, Atlanta University 
and New York University. 

1937 



WILLIAM H. HARRIS, 416 Wynn 
Street. Americus, is teaching at the 
Oglethorpe Grammar School, Ogle- 
thorpe, Georgia. Mr. Harris has done 
additional work at Fort Valley State 
College. He received recognition for 
corn raising in Calhoun County in 1955. 
He majored in Agriculture. 







1938 

RUFUS R. BUTLER, Jr., P. 0. Box 

141, Statesboro, is a vocational agri- 
culture instructor at William James 
High School. He holds a B.S.A. degree 
in agriculture education. Mr. Butler has 
done additional work at Tuskegee In- 
stitute and is looking forward to re- 
ceiving his Master's degree this summer. 

MRS. DOROTHY LAWSON BOZE- 
MAN, 224 Forrest Street, Americus, is 
jeanes supervisor in the Sumter County 
and Americus School systems. Mrs. 
Bozeman is an elementary major. She 
received the M.A. degree from Atlanta 
University in 1952, and further study at 
Columbia University. 

MRS. ELLA MAE TARVER. 102 
West Main Street, Hogansville. is a 
fourth grade teacher at Mount Pleasant 
Elementary School, and a former stu- 
dent of Savannah State College. She 
has done further study at Tuskegee and 
SSC. Mrs. Tarver has been teaching for 
32 years and has received many recog- 
nitions during this time. 

1939 

MRS. PAULINE HOWELL LADD. 
Route 1, Box 132, is a teacher of voca- 
tional home economics at the Flint River 
Farm School. She holds the B.S. degree 
in home economics. Mrs. Ladd studied 
at Tuskegee Institute in 1955-57, where 
she received the M.S. degree in home 
making education. She was named 
"Teacher of the Year" at her school in 
1955. 

1940 

MISS PEARLIE C. LAY, 303 South 
Tennessee Street, Cartersville, is a 
teacher at Summer Hill Elementary 



School. She received her B.S. degree 
from the college and has done further 
study at Tuskegee Institute toward Mas- 
ter's. Miss Lay is honored as one of 
the founders of the local P. T. A. and 
was elected as "Teacher of the Year" 
at her school. 

1941 

MRS. JANETTE B R A N H A M 
HAYES, 4001 Augusta Road, Savannah, 
is principal of Harris Street School. 
While here at the college, Mrs. Hayes 
majored in social studies. She attended 
New York University where she re- 
ceived the M.A. degree in administra- 
tion and supervision. She has also done 
additional work towards the sixth year 
certificate. Mrs. Hayes was "Teacher 
of the Year" at Florence Street School 
in 1955, and she became principal of 
Harris School, October 1956. 

1942 

MRS. ETHEL W. KIGHT, 403 E. 
Depot Street, Hogansville, is employed 
as jeanes supervisor of the Troup Coun- 
ty Schools and the Hogansville Public 
School System. She has done graduate 
work at Atlanta University, where she 
received the Master's degree in educa- 
tion, Columbia and New York Univer- 
sities. She was instrumental in consoli- 
dating the Troup County one and two 
teacher schools into six centers by 1948, 
and now two fully equipped plants 
house the Troup County school children 
which bear her name — Ethel W. Kight 
School, an elementary and high school. 
She pioneered in the library movement 
in the city of LaGrange which resulted 
in the erection of a completely furnished 
and artistically designed public library. 
This accomplishment together with 



many other community activities won 
for her LaGrange's "Woman of the 
Year" in 1955. In connection with this 
honor, a Silver Roaster was presented 
her by the parents, pupils and teachers 
of LaGrange. Mrs. Kight taught at the 
Kelley grammar school in 1942, she be- 
came Jeanes Supervisor of the Troup 
County Schools and the Hogansville 
Public School System in 1946, and 
served as president of Georgia Congress 
of Colored Parents and Teachers for six 
years during which time the member- 
ship grew from 9000 members to 32,000, 
and set up the organizational structure 
into districts. She also served as presi- 
dent of the National Congress of Col- 
ored Parent and Teachers in 1957. Mrs. 
Kight is regional director of region II, 
Georgia Teachers and Education As- 
sociation. 

MRS. M. S. WALLACE, 821 Bowden 
Street, is teaching at Powell Laboratory 
School. She has studied further at the 
University of Pittsburgh and Atlanta 
University. Mrs. Wallace was named 
"Teacher of the Year" at her school in 
1955. 

MRS. BERNICE GRAVES MACON, 
116 Church Street, Claxton, is the 8th 
grade teacher at Evans County High 
School. Mrs. Macon was "Teacher of 
the Year" 1956-57, president of States- 
boro District P. T. A. 1956, and served 
as Jeanes Supervisor from 1950-56. 

HENRY J. LADD, Route 1, Box 132, 
Montezuma, is teaching vocational ag- 
riculture at the Flint River Farms 
School, where he has taught for 12 
years. He has done graduate work at 
Tuskegee Institute. Mr. Ladd is Local 
Unit President of Macon County teach- 
ers, served as president of Civic Men's 
Club for 6 years, and is a member of 




Improvement Committee of Camp John 
Hope. He is also County chairman for 
Negro Division of County Fair. 

1943 

MRS. CLYDE MITCHELL CLAY- 
TON, 639 East Broad Street, Sparta, is 
a teacher at the L. S. Ingraham High 
School. She has done further study at 
Hampton Institute and Atlanta U. 

1944 

MRS. THELMA WALKER WEST, 
363 Drayton Street, Montezuma, is 
teaching at the Macon County Training 
School.^ She has done advanced study 
at Atlanta University and North Caro- 
lina College. She holds the M. Ed. de- 
gree. Since leaving SSC Mrs. West has 
served as president of Georgia Jeanes 
Association 1954-56, and as president 
of Cordele District of the Georgia Con- 
gress of Colored Parents and Teachers 
since 1954. 

1945 

MRS. VIRGINIA D. NELSON, 1802 
W. 55th Street. Savannah, is a teacher 
at Harris Street School. Mrs. Nelson re- 
ceived her M.A. degree in elementary 
education from New York University. 
She was "Teacher of the Year" 1956- 
57. 

MRS. LEANNA TANNER WILCOX. 
1203 Lincoln Street, Savannah, is act- 
ing post mistress at Savannah State 
College. She has done graduate work at 
North Carolina College, Indiana Uni- 
versity and Atlanta University where 
she received her Master's degree. Mrs. 
Wilcox received three science workshop 
scholarships to Atlanta University, and 
fellowships to Indiana University and 
North Carolina College, served 5 years 
as critic teacher SSC, and assistant pro- 
fessor of education at Albany State Col- 
lege 1956. 

CHARLES A. OGLETREE, Post Of- 
fice Box 212, Jackson, is a county agent. 
He has done further study at Prairie 
View A. & M. College. Mr. Ogletree had 
the honor of being named "County 
Agent of the Year", 1957. 

1947 

MRS. EMMA D. LINDSEY, 532 East 
Anderson Street, Savannah, is a pri- 
mary grade teacher at Harris Street 
School. She has done advanced work 
through extension workshops from At- 
lanta University held at Savannah State 
and Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

JOHN H. CAMPER, 654 Jessie Street, 
Jacksonville, Florida, is principal of 
Brooks County Training School, Dixie, 
Georgia. He received his M.A. degree 
from New York University. 



1948 

A. CHESTER ROBINSON, Post Of- 
fice Box 93, Fort Valley, is acting head 
of the Department of Health and Phy- 
sical Education, Fort Valley State Col- 
lege. He is a member of Phi Delta 
Kappa, Phi Beta Sigma, and Georgia 
Department of Public Health. Mr. Rob- 
inso nreceived a citation for outstanding 
work in cancer education, recipient of 
Esso Grant for study at New York Uni- 
versity, and he is also director of School 
Health Workshop, Atlanta University. 
Some of Mr. Robinson's articles have 
been published in the Georgia Teach- 
ers and Education Association Herald 
and The Physical Educator. He has done 
graduate work at North Carolina Col- 
lege and New York University. He holds 
M.S.P.H. degree and working toward 
Ph.D. degree. 

MRS. SADIE DAVIS STEELE, 633 
West 35th Street, Savannah, is a teacher 
at the Powell Laboratory School. She 
has done graduate work at Columbia 
University where she received her M.A. 
degree. Mrs. Steele was the first to re- 
ceive the honor of being named "Teach- 
er of the Year" in Chatham County and 
Region 2. and she was also the first 
woman to be named general chairman of 
Christmas Seal sale in Chatham County. 

MRS. IRMA S. FIELDS. 801 West 
39th Street, Savannah, is jeanes super- 
vising teacher in Candler and Toombs 
Counties and Vidalia City. She received 
her Master of Arts degree from Atlanta 
University. 

1949 

MRS. KATHLEEN BOLES 
SCRUGGS, 1605 Vine Street, Savannah, 
is teacher-librarian at Springfield Cen- 
tral High School. Springfield. She has 
done additional study at Fisk Univer- 
sity, Simmons College, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, and North Carolina College. 

MRS. ELDORA DIXON MARKS, 12 
Pounder Street. Savannah, is teaching 
at Powell Laboratory School. She was 
"Teacher of the Year" 1956-57. Mrs. 
Marks received her Master's degree 
from Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

WILLIAM VANN WEBB, 1035 Fisk 
Avenue, Columbus, is a science teacher 
at Central High School, Newnan. Mr. 
Webb was granted a National Science 
Foundation grant to attend Howard Uni- 
versity. He has done advanced work at 
Tuskegee Institute where he received the 
M. Ed. degree. 

HENRY A. JOHNSON, 78 Troup 
Street, S.W., Apt. 820, Atlanta 15, is a 
minister. Mr. Johnson has studied at 
Gammon Theological Seminary and At- 



lanta University. He holds the B.D. and 
M.A. degrees. 

MRS. WILLIE B. WILLIAMS, 235 
Johnson Street, Statesboro, is a 6th 
grade teacher at William James Ele- 
mentary and High School. She has done 
additional study at Tuskegee Institute. 

WALTER J. LEONARD, 341 Chilton 
Drive, N.W. Atlanta 18, is manager of 
book store, Hopkins Book Concern. He 
has done further study at Allen Uni- 
versity, Graduate School Department of 
Agriculture, Washington, D.C., and At- 
lanta University. Mr. Leonard is presi- 
dent of the Atlanta Business and Pro- 
fessional Association; vice chairman, 
Executive Planning Committee for But- 
ler Street Y.M.C.A.; first vice president, 
Omega Chapter Y's Men's International 
and he is also in demand as a public 
speaker. 

1950 

MRS. MILDRED J. MOBLEY, 1938 
West 57th Street, Savannah, is the sec- 
retary at Sophronia Tompkins High 
School. She has studied Temple Uni- 
versity and Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. Mrs. Mobley received a 
Westinghouse Fellowship to MIT. 

SAMUEL GILL, 3126 Gilbert Ave- 
nue, Savannah, is a music teacher at 
Tompkins High School. He has done 
further study at Columbia University. 

MRS. NATHALIE WILLIAMS REY- 
NOLDS, 5121 Doney Street, Savannah, 
is office manager at Greenbriar Chil- 
dren's Center. While at the college Mrs. 
Reynolds majored in Business Adminis- 
tration. 

MRS. RUTH S. DOBSON, 1103 West 
42nd Street, Savannah, is teaching at 
Powell Laboratory School. She received 
the M.A. degree from Columbia Univer- 
sity. Mrs. Dobson was selected "Teacher 
of the Year" (1957-58) at her school. 

1951 

HERMAN BAKER, P. 0. Box 425, 

Wadley, is principal of Booker T. Wash- 
ington Elementary School. He has done 
advanced study at Penn State and Fort 
Valley State College. 

MRS. LEELA HARGROVE WHITE, 
Route 1, Box 8, Riceboro, is a teacher 
at Liberty County Elementary School, 
Mcintosh. Mrs. White majored in social 
studies. 

1955 

MRS. CELESTINE L. WASHING- 
TON ALLEN, 509 West 35th Street, 
Savannah, is a substitute teacher in 
Chatham County. Mrs. Allen has done 
further study at Savannah State Col- 
lege. Mrs. Allen majored in Elementary 
Education while attending SSC. 






JAMES WILLIS, 612 7th Avenue, N. 
W., Cairo, Georgia is a teacher at Mon- 
itor High School, Fitzgerald, Georgia. 
Mr. Willis holds the B.S. degree in 
elementary education and the M. Ed. 
degree at the University of Tallahassee, 
Florida. 

MISS FRANCIE L. HOWARD, 1025 
W. Hancock Avenue, Athens, Georgia, 
is a teacher in Lyons Elementary School, 
Athens, Georgia. Miss Howard was 
"Miss National Alumni" of Savannah 
State College, 1957-58. 

MRS. OTTLEE DAVIS DANIELS, 
1009 East Gwinnett Street, Savannah, 
is a teacher at Haven Home School. She 
holds the B.S. degree in elementary edu- 
cation. Mrs. Daniels reigned as "Miss 
Savannah Alumni", 1957-58. 

MR. LUKE SIMMONS, 945 West 
38th Street. Savannah, is a fireman. Mr. 
Simmons is a Century Member at the 
YMCA, Savannah. 

MRS. SHIRLEY J. COLE, P. 0. Box 
7, Frogmore, South Carolina, is a sub- 
stitute teacher at St. Helena. 




! ' 
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George Robeson 

(Taken from the Savannah Tribune) 

George M. Robeson, veteran railway 
postal clerk, retired from that position 
after 35 years in government service in 
December, 1953. Born in Higgston, 
Georgia, the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas W. Robeson, he came to Savan- 
nah to attend Georgia State Industrial 
College ( now Savannah State College), 
graduating from that institution in 1918. 

Mr. Robeson served in World War I, 
being sent overseas to the combat area. 
Upon being discharged from the army 
in July 1919, he entered the Railway 
Mail Service in November, 1919, and 
has served in that position until his re- 
tirement became effective. 

Long interested in church, civic and 
public affairs, he is a member of St. 
Philip AME Church, where he is pres- 



ently serving on the trustee board and is 
a member and teacher of the Men's 
Bible class of the Sunday School. He 
is also president of the Savannah branch 
of the National Alliance of Postal Em- 
ployees and for 10 years previous he 
has served as secretary of the third dis- 
trict area of the Alliance and is known 
for his activity in local as well as na- 
tional circles of the organization, being 
a delegate to the meetings and serving 
on various committees. 




Mis. Lillian S. Scott 








Henry W. Tarver 

He has served as secretary of the 
Citizens Registration Club in 1952, and 
takes an active interest in the Mutual 
Society, Savannah State College Alilmni 
Association, the NAACP, and West 
Broad- Street Y. 

Mr. Robeson is the father of two at- 
tractive daughters. Mrs. Paula R. Mc- 
Neely of Brunswick and Miss Barbara 
Robeson of Cleveland, Ohio, by a for- 
mer marriage and is presently married 
to the former Miss Louise Holland. Be- 
ing an ardent sportsman, Mr. Robeson 
will keep abreast of what's going on in 
athletic and other sports, besides doing 
a little fishing, hunting, traveling and 
rocking his grandchildren as opportu- 
nity offers. 



i 




Dr. William K. Payne addresses 13ih Annual Meeting of the National Alumni Association at 
Savannah State College. 



SUMME R 


SCHOOL 


1958 



SAVANNAH STATE 
COLLEGE 

Savannah, Georgia 



WORKSHOP REGULAR QUARTER 

June 13 — July 24 June 13 — August 21 

SHORT SESSION 

July 25 — August 21 

FOR 
BEGINNING FRESHMEN 

Start your education NOW. Complete a full 
quarter by September. 

UPPER CLASSMEN 

Continue your study during the summer. Complete 
your college education in three years. 

IN-SERVICE TEACHERS 

Renew, upgrade, reinstate, or reconvert your 
certificate, improve your professional status and 
development. Enroll in one of these WORKSHOPS 
or SPECIAL COURSES: 

1. Science Workshop for Teachers. 

2. Middle Grades Workshop. 

3. Workshop in Methods of Teaching in the Ele- 
mentary School. 

4. Workshop in Communication (Mass media). 

5. Workshop in Family and Community Service. 

6. Introduction to Exceptional Children. 

7. Tests and Measurements for Teachers. 

8. General Shopwork. 

9. Labor Institute (officers, members and pros- 
pective members of labor unions). 

10. Special Courses in Mathematics and Science, 
and in the several curricula. 

Approved by the Southern Association of Col- 
leges and Secondary Schools and by the State De- 
partment of Education. 



SPECIAL FEATURES 

1. Outstanding specialists and consultants are 
added to the summer school faculty. 

2. Workshops and short courses are provided to 
meet the special needs and interests of in-service 
teachers. 

3. An evening session is provided for students 
who are not able, or who do not wish to attend 
classes during the day. 

4. Courses are offered for special trade students 
who are primarily concerned with vocations. 

5. An adult education program is provided for 
qualified persons not interested in completing de- 
gree requirements. 

6. The College will offer during the summer 
quarter any courses that is listed in the regular 
bulletin upon sufficient demand. 

7. A rich program of concerts, recitals, lec- 
tures, plays and educational tours is planned for 
the students who enroll at this college for the sum- 
mer quarter. 

8. The College is conveniently located near 
beaches, summer resorts and shopping centers. 



Ideal location — Moderate Expenses — Mod- 
ern Equipment — Faculty Well-Trained — 
Graduates Placed — Student Wel- 
fare Stressed. 

For further information write to: 

DR. E. K. WILLIAMS, 
Director of Summer School 
Savannah State College 
State College Branch 
Savannah, Georgia 



FALL CALENDAR 

1958-1959 

September 22-26 Orientation and Registration 

September 29 Day and Evening Classes begin 

October 1 Last day for adding courses 

October 10 Last day dropping courses 

November 4-5 Mid-quarter Examinations 

November 27-30 Thanksgiving Recess 

December 12 Classes End 

December 15-18 Final Examinations 

December 18 Fall Quarter ends 

December 19 Registration for Winter Quarter 

Christmas Vacation begins at 4:30 P. M. 
January 5 Classes begin for Winter Quarter 



ssc 



1/ 



n(< t* 4 



193 




AUGUST 1958 



Published by 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



The Savannah State College Bulletin 

Vol. XI August 1958 No. 6 

President Dr. W. K. Payne 

Editor Wilton C. Scott 

Director of Summer School, Dr. E. K. Williams 
Photography Robert Mobley 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published in 
October, December, February, March, April, anil May 
by Savannah State College. Entered as second-class 
matter, December 16, 1947, at the post office at Savan- 
nah, Ceorgia, under the Act of August 24, 1912. 




President W. K. Payne presents the Distinguished 
Service Award to Mayor Lee Mingledorff, Mayor 
of Savannah. 



Foreign Language Program 

at Savannah State College, 

Summer, 1958 

At Savannah State College this summer 
there are twenty-seven students studying for- 
eign languages: ten are studying Spanish and 
seventeen are pursuing work in French. Most 
of these students are in these classes in order 
to satisfy the foreign language requirements 
for graduation, but two of them have a more 
interesting reason. These two students, Mrs. 
Sarah O. Greene and Mrs. Margaret W. Wal- 
den, are already regular teachers in the public 
schools of Georgia, and they are studying 
French this summer in order to teach this 
language this fall in their schools. Howard 
Jason, associate professor of languages, is 
instructor. 

The fact that these two ladies are on the 
campus with that purpose in mind is proof 
that they and the school administrators under 
whom they work are abreast of the times and 
know that there is an urgent need in all sec- 
tions of the country for the study of foreign 
languages. This need is so urgent and so 
many reasons can be given for it that it is 
no longer necessary for teachers of such lan- 
guages as French, Spanish and German to 
justify their role in a modern school program. 
It is actually the other way around. It is 
rather up to those who oppose the teaching of 
foreign languages or who favor the exclusion 
of foreign languages from the public school 
program to defend their position and to ex- 
plain why they have taken such a stand. 




The Honorable Hyde Gillette, assistant post- 
master general of the U. S., is being interviewed 
by Mrs. Rose Vann, in-service teacher in the SSC 
communication workshop while President W. K. 
Payne looks on. Mrs. Vann is a former Miss SSC 
and an English instructor at Beach High School. 



Opposition to the teaching of foreign lan- 
guages dates from the period in the 1930's 
and 1940's when "life adjustment"' became the 
primary aim of education. The theory was 
that the purpose of education was to prepare 
the child for the life he was going to lead 
in his community. The theory was further 
that there were so many things which the 
child needed to know to prepare him for this 
life and the time was so limited that some 
things already in the school curriculum would 
have to be eliminated to make room for these 
more essential subjects. Looking around for 
courses to eliminate, the eyes of the school 
administrators fell upon foreign languages. 
They became convinced that it was more es- 
sential for a student to know how to drive 
a car than for him to be able to carry on a 
simple conversation in French, and gradually 
French was eliminated. They felt that courses 
in beauty care, or fly casting, or on family 
problems were more vital to the student's 
future life than an elementary knowledge of 
German, and German was dropped from the 
curriculum. 

Now, if the student's future life were to be 
limited to a few blocks up and down and 
around Main Street or to the few miles be- 
tween his home, his job and his vacation spot, 
it is conceivable that he might be somewhat 
adjusted for life with courses such as the ones 
listed. Unfortunately, our experience in World 
War II and in our "cold war" struggle with 
Russia since then have proved that the world 
he will live in will not be limited for him or 
for anybody else to a few blocks on Main 
Street or to the few miles between his home 
and his job. We see now that, whether we 
like it or not, "life adjustment" must not 
mean, cannot mean simply adjustment to life 
in our immediate community but that it must 
mean adjustment to life in a world where mil- 
lions and millions of people speak languages 
different from our own, where we are becom- 
ing increasingly dependent on raw materials 




Recipients of West Broad YMCA Distinguished 
Service Awards presented by President W. K. 
Payne are (left to right, front row) Mrs. Lillian 
Scott, President Payne, Miss Frankie Golden, 
Mayor W. Lee Mingledorff, Mrs. Sadie Cartledge, 
J. R. Jenkins, Executive, West Broad YMCA; (left 
to right, back row) Malcolm Thomas, Norman 
Elmore, James Luten, Eugene Isaac, and William 
Jackson. 



and other products from other nations, where 
we have been called upon to assume a posi- 
tion of leadership which we did not seek and 
for which we are poorly prepared because we 
as a nation know so little about the peoples 
we are supposed to lead. This ignorance 
about these people was vividly illustrated this 
spring when Vice President Nixon visited 
South America. Naturally, we did not expect 
everyone to receive him with open arms, but 
we certainly were not prepared for the amount 
or for the intensity of the ill-will which his 
visit helped to expose. We need then to 
become better acquainted with the people to 
the south of us. We need also to help them 
to know us better, and learning their lan- 
guage is the first step. 



Association of Child Care 

Operators Formed at 

Savannah State 

The Workshop for day care center operators 
culminated its activity for the summer with 
the organizing of an association of Child Day 
Operators. Mrs. Evanel R. Terrell, director, 
Division of Home Economics, presided at the 
initial meeting. This group of women who 
comprise the charter organization for Negro 
Day Care Center Operators were brought to- 
gether for initial study and preparation to 
meet licensed registration and certification be- 
ginning September 1958. 

Highlights of the discussion pointed out the 
fact that all communities have problems which 
have to be met by the concerted action of 
alert citizens and assisted by organized com- 
munity agencies. 




Planning Committee for Group Activities: An- 
geline Weaver, Chairman of Hospitality; Jamie 
L. Bryant, Chairman of Chapel Program; Maribelle 
Bryant, Lois Barker, and Ora Gordon, Reporter. 



Dr. R. Grann Lloyd, Mrs. Payne, and President 
Payne chat with Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Oliver during 
State Labor meeting. 



(Left to right) President W. K. Payne chats with 
Alfonso Orr, alumnus and Research Physiologist; 
Malcolm Thomas, Principal, East Broad School; 
and Prince Jackson, Jr., alumni secretary. 



, .... «?a«4. 







New Technical and Trades Building to be erected at Savannah State College 



Savannah State College Alumni Serve Georgia 

Forty-eight out of eighty-four Agriculture Extension Agents are proteges of Savannah State. 
Forty-one county agents and seven state agents in Georgia Agriculture Extension Serv- 
ice, are graduates of Savannah State College. With headquarters at Savannah State College, 
the Negro unit of the State Agriculture Extension Service has eighty-four county and home 
demonstration agents in Georgia, serving fifty-eight counties and approximately thirty thousand 
farmers who manage or help to manage more home p ] anning am \ development, method and 
than three million acres of land. 

A. S. Bacon, former president of Savannah 
State College Alumni Association, heads the 
Agriculture Extension Office at Savannah 
State. The service is a phase of the Univer- 
sity System of Georgia and is directly under 
the supervision of Dr. C. C. Murray, Dean and 
Coordinator, University of Georgia College of 
Agriculture with W. A. Sutton, a director. 
Because of Mr. Bacon's leadership, Georgia 
Negro farmers are learning how to increase 
their yields and conserve their soils. They 
are putting into practice more efficient meth- 
ods of production. These farm families are 
developing a higher sense of responsibility for 
community improvement and citizenship that 
will result in better agricultural practices in 
the future and lead toward a better Georgia. 

Many of these farm families are providing 
themselves with a more wholesome and nu- 
tritious diet which makes for better health 
and more efficient manpower. They are keep- 
ing pace with others in farm mechanization 
and technology. As a whole, they are im- 
proving their level of living. 

Negro personnel of the Agricultural Exten- 
sion Service of the College of Agriculture 
have promoted this movement by taking defi- 
nite, worthwhile information to the families. 
This is done by emphasizing better farm and 




Delegation greets the Honorable Hyde Gillette, 
in the president's office at SSC. (Left to right) 
S. Joseph Ward, Jr., Administrative Assistant, 
Chamber of Commerce; J. M. Stubbs, local U. S. 
Postmaster; Dr. W. K. Payne, President, SSC; Hon. 
Hyde Gillette, Assistant Postmaster General; John 
Delaware, local postman and civic leader. (Stand- 
ing) Wilton C. Scott, Director Public Relations; 
T. C. Meyers, Dean of Faculty; E. A. Bertrand, 
Comptroller; Samuel Brown, retired mail carrier 
and Reporter, Savannah Morning News; Marion 
Johnston, retired postman; Dr. E. K. Williams, 
Director Summer School; John Mcintosh, postman, 
and John Law, Sr., retired postman. 



result demonstrations, meetings, farm and 
home visits and other Extension Service edu- 
cational methods. 

Assisting Mr. Bacon in the State's Extension 
Office are the following graduates of Savan- 
nah State who have received their Master's 
degree or completing work on same: A. S. 
Bacon, State Agent for Negro Work; Doris T. 
Owes, Assistant State Agent for Negro Work; 
Augustus Hill, Assistant Supervisor for Negro 
Work; K. G. Childers, Special Negro County 
Agent; Alexander Hurse. Negro Club Agent; 
M. C. Little, Assistant Negro Club Agent; and 
Carrie B. Powell, Assistant Negro Club Agent. 

The County Farm Agents who are graduates 
of Savannah State College are: Clarence Ser- 
mons. Baxley; J. M. Hill, Macon; J. B. Ste- 
vens, Quitman: G. Samuel Stone, Waynesboro; 
Charles A. Ogletree, Jackson; L. C. Trawick, 
Athens; Wesley Myers, Brunswick; C. L. Tap- 
ley, Greensboro; L. D. Kennedy, Sparta; Har- 
rison Miller. Hamilton; Alvin Willis, McDon- 
ough; J. M. Moody, Perry; J. C. Douglas, 
Millen: Eugene B. Harvey. Barnesville; Lu- 
ther Coleman, Dublin; E. R. Gay, Dublin; 
Clarence Williams. Hinesville; J. W. Saun- 
ders, Valdosta; F. R. Spencer, Greenville; 
J. W. Home, Covington; Oscar B. Brooks, 
Cedartown; E. S. Spikes, Griffin; R. C. Rob- 
inson, Americus; C. W. Mclver, Thomasville; 
John H. Morgan, Tifton; Tom McBride, La 
Grange; L. M. Jackson, Jeffersonville; John 
A. Demons, Sandersville; Ernest Martin, San- 
dersville; Charles Williams, Cuthbert. 

The Home Demonstration Agents who re- 
ceived their undergraduate training at the 
local college are: Mrs. Mattie T. Copeland, 
Quitman; Mrs. Leona B. Henley, Pembroke; 
Mrs. Johnny M. Freeman, Waynesboro; Miss 
Mattie R. Turner, Decatur; Mrs. Reatha M. 
Shaw, Springfield; Mrs. Margaret Knox, 
Swainsboro; Miss Alberta L. Campbell, 
Brunswick; Mrs. Remell W. Jackson, Cairo; 
Mrs. Shirley Dwight, Millen; Miss Alfreta 
Adams, Hinesville; Mrs. Eveilu S. Brown, 
Darien; Mrs. Anne J. Postell, Sandersville; 
and Pearlie J. Bailey, Dublin. 

In most instances, these agents are working 
in counties where the Negro population is 
heaviest or where there is a definite interest 
in providing this service for farm families. 



Alumni Scholarship Drive 

By Prince A. Jackson, Jr. 

The $5,000 goal of the Alumni Scholarship 
Fund has reached the $3,750 point and the 
possibility of it becoming 100% successful is 
good. The amount now on hand is almost 
$1,000 more than was raised last year. 

There are several factors accounting for this 
year's increase. Perhaps, the biggest factor is 
the participation of many of the recent gradu- 
ates in alumni affairs. In all of the chapters, 
the young graduates are playing an important 
role and many of them are now holding high 
offices in their respective chapters. Our 
mother organization, The National Alumni 
Association, has a "new look" with a liberal 
sprinkling of young alumni homogeneously 
mixed with the dynamic leadership provided 
by Leonard D. Law, the National President. 

The organization of new chapters is another 
key factor. During the past three years, it 
has become obvious that organization of chap- 
ters is the best way to keep our alumni func- 
tioning. Through organized chapters, the 
Alumni Scholarship Fund can realize its full 
potential. The National Organization spends 
a tremendous amount of time organizing and 
revitalizing chapters in addition to its other 
obligations. The presidents of these individual 
chapters are doing a marvelous job of getting 
their respective chapters to do their part. 
This year, chapter contributions are almost 
100% greater than last year. 

Industries and Business of Savannah have 
been the lifeblood of our Fund so far and 
plans are now being formulated to extend 
this drive all over the state. This year, we 
have received $2,500 from them and will prob- 
ably receive more by Homecoming. Savannah 
Sugar Refining Corp., Union Bag-Camp Paper 
Corp., Southern Paperboard Corp., have given 
$1,500 ($500 each) to the Fund. We are sure 
there are other industries in the state who will 
help us. 

Our outlook for the coming school year is 
optimistic. We have organized six alumni 
chapters this year and hope there will be 
more this coming school year. We are bringing 
our mailing list up to date so that more 
alumni will be learning of the many change- 
that are taking place at the College and in 
Alumni Affairs. We feel that when the others 
learn of what we are trying to do, they will 
be happy to do their part. 

This fund has been a tremendous help to 
many students who have the mental ability to 
achieve a College education but lack the 
financial backing to accomplish it. We are 
obligated to help them. This is the purpose 
of the Fund and we must continue to con- 
tribute to it. 




Center Founder, P. H. Stone, right; and State 
Extension Supervisor A. S. Bacon of Savannah 
State College, discuss care and maintenance of 
the cottages with Center Superintendent El lie R. 
Gay, left. 




Timothy C. Meyers, dean of faculty, Savannah State College, visited the Elementary Science Work- 
shop on the closing day of its activities. In the picture is seen Dean Meyers and two members of the 
Workshop observing a model of our solar system. The two ladies are: (left) Miss Rhunette D. Frazier, 
Holt Elementary School, Irwin County, and Mrs. L. G. Bauknight, Sophronia Tompkins, Savannah. 

Dean T. C. Meyers Visits Science Workshop 

The Science Workshop featured numerous experiments. Timothy C. Meyers, dean of faculty 
addressed the in-service teachers studying science projects for elementary schools. Among 
other things, Dean Meyers stated that "he hoped that these experiences in an elementary 
science workshop have motivated the teachers to recognize science in our everyday living, and 
that this consciousness of science will be transferred to the pupils in their classrooms and bettei 
science teaching will result from having at- beaker the water had changed to an acid, and 
tended this workshop." 

Some of the featured experiments were the 
following: converting electrical energy into 
heat energy, use of electricity through magnet, 
difference between plant cell and animal cell, 
how rocks are made, living and non-living 
things. 

Benjamin Simon, teacher at Eulonia School, 
Mcintosh County, converted electrical energy 
into heat. This experiment shows that steel 
nails resist electricity and cause friction which 
makes the nails hot. 

Johnnie Mae Powell, teacher in Liberty 
County, demonstrated to her first grade class 
the difference between living things and non- 
living things and that non-living things change 
too. 

In order to show the difference between 
living and non-living things, Miss Powell used 
charts with diagrams of cells of living things, 
and crystals of rock. She explained to them 
the difference between the two, and that is 
the basis for living and non-living things. 

She also performed an experiment to show 
that non-living things changed. She used two 
beakers with about 200 cc's of water in each 
of them, adding a few drops of hydrochloric 
acid to one beaker, and a similar amount of 
ammonium hydroxide to the other. They 
looked the same; a change had occurred but 
the pupils could not detect it. She then added 
a few drops of an indicator (phenolthalein) to 
show that a change had taken place. In one 



the other to a base. In the basic solution 
there was a red color, and the acid remained 
the same. She then changed the base back 
to water by adding acid. 

The practical value of this experiment, says 
Miss Powell, is "Everything that looks like 
water is not water. So be careful of what 
you drink." 

Mrs. Olivia Golden, Chatham County teach- 
er, showed the pupils on the first grade level 
the biological basis of living things, and the 
difference between animals and plants. 

In order to do this, she prepared cells from 
both animals and plants in the presence of 
all members of the class for microscopic ob- 
servation. She used epithelial cells taken from 
the inside of the mouth, stained them with 
a simple stain, removed the excess stain from 
the slide, and then placed a cover-glass on 
the cells. And for the plants, she used a small 
piece of elodea leaf, placed it on the slide, 
and without staining it she placed a cover- 
glass over the piece of leaf. 

The class then observed the slides of animal 
cells, and then, the plant cells. 

Miss Powell helped the class to understand 
just what they had seen, and just why that 
substance is so important to living things. 



Lomiie Mae Culver 

(On Our Cover) 
A junior at Savannah Stage College, ma- 
joring in Business Education and a Minor in 



Play Production Class 
Presents Play 

The class in play production presented 
"Everyman, ' a story of each and every man 
summoned by death. All the worldly treasures 
he possesses will vanish or flee, leaving only 
his good deeds to avail him, and usually they 
are small to be seen. 

Mrs. Piccola B. Osborne, 1956 graduate of 
SSC, teacher of English and dramatics, Lib- 
erty County High School, Mcintosh, Georgia, 
directed the play. The Co-director was Mrs. 
Constance Strong, graduate of Oakwood Col- 
lege, Huntsville, Alabama, and Principal of 
Ephesus Academy School, Jacksonville, Flor- 
ida. 

The characters were: Everyman — Daniel W. 
Giles, Junior at SSC, Major, English; God: 
Adonai-Strength — Leon Coverson, senior, Busi- 
ness Administration; Death — Louis Hill Pratt, 
senior, English; Messenger — Almenia Steven- 
son, senior. Business Education; Fellowship— 
Mattie Belle Collins, 1953 gradcate of SSC, 
in-service teacher at Tompkins Elementary 
School, Savannah, Georgia; Cousin — Edward 
Manigo, junior, English; Kindred-Doctor — 
Samuel Benjamin Harris, senior, Social Sci- 
ence; Goods — Esther Stokes, senior, Business 
Education; Servants — Deborah D. McCoy, five 
years old, Savannah; Cynthia Wallace, six 
years old, William James Elementary School; 
Good Deeds — Kay Frances Stripling, senior, 
Business Education; Discretion — Anglia Sin- 
gleton, senior Elementary Education; Five 
Wits — Rebecca Gray, Savannah, Social Sci- 
ence; Beauty — Pearlie Mae Harden, 1953 
graduate of SSC, in-service teacher at Screven 
County Training School, Sylvania, Georgia; 
Knowledge — Clifford Juanita Chance, 1954 
graduate of SSC, in-service teacher at Swains- 
boro, Georgia; Confession — Nancy E. Holland, 
graduate of State Teachers Agriculture Col- 
lege, in-service teacher at Tattnall County 
Industrial High School, Reidsville. Georgia; 
Angel — Claire Barnwell, senior, Elementary 
Education. 

Social Science. 

Miss Culver is a native of Savannah, Geor- 
gia and a 1956 graduate of Alfred E. Beach 
High School. 

She is a member of the following organiza- 
tions: 

(1) Business Club, (2) Majorette, 
(3) Tigers' Roar Staff, and (4) Delta 
Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. 
Her hobbies are sewing and reading. Her 
ultimate desires are to become a private sec- 
retary. 



This scene portrays EVERYMAN (Daniel Giles), standing, and his 
Good Deeds (Kay Frances Stripling) draped in chains of woe. 



Here EVERYMAN pleads with his BEAUTY (Pearlie Mae Harden), 
FIVE WITS (Rebecca S. Gray), STRENGTH (Leon Coverson), and KNOWL- 
EDGE (Clifford Juanita Chance) to touch the rod of penance and 
accompany him on his journey, but all refuse to go. 








The lovely young ladies above were chosen as official guides at Savannah State College for the 
Georgia AFL-CIO Second Annual Convention. Left to right, Miss Kay Frances Stripling, Miss Margaret 
Bing, Miss Teresa Grant, Miss Ernestine Hill, Mrs. Shirley McAllister, Miss Shirley Thomas. 

Life on the Campus in the Residence Halls 

By Nelson R. Freeman, Dean of Men 
Philosophy. The College residence hall, making its appearance on many campuses as a 
necessary evil, is in the process of becoming a vital element in the socialization and educational 
processes. As more and more college housing is constructed, increasing concern is being 
expressed about the role of the residence hall in the total operation of the educational insti- 
tution of which it is a part. 

It is the thesis of the personnel worker that 
the residence hall can be and should be a 
scene of guided growth and development for 
the individuals concerned; growth in the sense 
of achieving intellectual and social maturity 
of personality; development in the sense of 
achieving social as well as academic compe- 
tency not likely to emerge from classroom 
experiences alone. 

The Boarding Student. For the boarding 
student, the College inevitably assumes the 
role of parent-surrogate. It is naive to assume 
that the individual, between spring high school 
graduation and fall college enrollment, has 
undergone a metamorphosis causing him sud- 
denly to hatch from his adolescent cocoon and 
emerge as an adult butterfly. This magical 
process, while characteristic of many species 
in the animal world, cannot be imputed, on 
the basis of evidence, to Homo Sapiens. A 
more realistic view of the boarding student, 
freshman in particular, is that of an adolescent 
suddenly separated from the parental, peer, 
school, and community forces which have here- 
tofore exerted forceful guidance on his evolv- 
ing personality. 

The college years constitute a period of 
transition during which the relatively imma- 
ture, family-protected, dependent individual is 
expected to gradually take on a mature and 
independent role. The entering freshman is, 
in many cases for the first time, away from 
the security-giving familiarity of his habitual 
environment. The strangeness of his new col- 
legiate surroundings may bring out a great 
variety of behaviors ranging from fears and 
misgivings at one extreme through a confident 
and rational adjustment to a hyper-egocentric 
distortion of all about him at the other ex- 
treme. 

Campus Life at Savannah State College. 
Savannah State College has been studying for 
some time the conditions under which stu- 
dents live while attending college. Recently, 
it was discovered that some students who live 
out of town come to Savannah and live under 
conditions which are not favorable to educa- 
tion. The College has, through the Board of 
Regents, been able to provide first-class hous- 
ing and living facilities for out-of-town stu- 
dents. Accommodations for one hundred and 
seventy-five women are available in the dor- 



mitory for women (Camilla Hubert Hall) and 
a new men's dormitory provides accommoda- 
tions for two hundred and ten men. The stu- 
dents who live in the dormitories have ideal 
living conditions, regular meals, recreation, 
clean and sanitary living quarters, and super- 
vision which would meet the best standards. 
All of these factors contribute significantly 
to a student's success in getting an education. 

Residential life of boarding students is 
supervised by the Dean of Women and Dean 
of Men and assisted by Dormitory Directors. 
Practice in democratic living is provided 
through dormitory organizations such as the 
Women's Council and the Men's Council with 
the help of professional counselors. Through 
this form of student self-government, the stu- 
dents help to plan dormitory activities and 
participate in developing standards of. conduct 
and determining social regulations for the 
groups. 

Religious Life. The dormitory student is 
provided with a rich and varied religious life 
program. Through its religious activities, the 
College seeks to develop an understanding of 
and an appreciation for the place of religion 
in everyday living, to deepen spiritual in- 
sight, and to make the practice of Christian 
principles a vital part of the life of the well- 
educated citizen. 

Weekly church and vesper services bring to 
the campus outstanding thinkers and leaders 
in religious and social living. 

The religious life activities of the College 
are under the supervision of an ordained min- 
ister. The Sunday School, Y.M.C.A. and 
Y.W.C.A., the Newman Club, and an annual 
Religious Emphasis Week provide opportuni- 
ties for religious growth and development for 
the boarding student. 

Food Service. The College also puts great 
emphasis upon the nutritional aspects of liv- 
ing. The boarding student is served three 
well-balanced meals per day in a beautiful 
and spacious dining room. All meals are pre- 
pared under the expert supervision of the 
College Dietitian and her well qualified staff. 

Laundry Services. The College provides a 
modern laundry with all new machinery to 
satisfy the boarding student's needs for clean 
and sanitary living. All work in the College 
Laundry is done by professionally trained 
workers. 



Recreational and Social Activities. Many 
activities supplement formal education for the 
boarding student at Savannah State College. 
In addition to the religious and cultural op- 
portunities provided through assemblies, lec- 
ture, and lyceum programs, there are many 
co-curricular activities, such as: intramural, 
glee club, quartets, Choral Society, student 
papers, Student Council, and special interest 
groups. Informal socials are held regularly 
in the campus recreational rooms. Hikes and 
tours also provide many pleasant hours of 
wholesome recreation. 

It was mentioned earlier that the college 
student is expected to gradually take on a 
mature and independent role. Such was not 
stated to give the reader the assumption that 
we advocate a break in the family circle. This 
assumption would be contrary to the facts. 
It should be borne in mind that the signifi- 
cance of the parental relationships in the 
typical child's life gradually diminishes as 
the significance of the peer relationships in- 
crease through adolescence. While the rela- 
tive importance of the two varies from indi- 
vidual to individual, it is highly desirable in 
the American scene that the late adolescent 
achieve a high degree of independence from 
the parental family and come to take his cues 
to behavior from the wider society of which 
he is a part. This is not necessarily a weak- 
ening of affectional ties with the parental 
family but a preparation for finding happiness 
as well as constructive participation in this 
highly mobile, changing heterogeneity that is 
the American society. 




Miss Irish Parrish, lovely coed at Savannah State 
College, enjoys the cool breeze on the grassy 
plains of SSC's Campus. 




m 



Miss Alfreta Adams, graduate of Savannah State 
College, enjoys chatting with Dean T. C. Meyers. 
Miss Adams is a Home Demonstration Agent in 
Hinesville, Georgia. 





"^il^JSS&Li. 





ft~ 



f 






1. Mr. C. V. Ciay, and three class members of the Science Workshop check experi- 
ments of living ceils on the first grade level. 

2. Mrs. Louise C, Jones, Miss Opal McClain, and Mrs. Rosa B. Glover (left to right), 
summer school students with Mr. Leon Coverson, a student library assistant, view paint- 
ings of Paris School Children recently shown at the Savannah State College Library. 

3. Students in the Mass Communications Workshop at Savannah State College 
observe a printing machine at Kennickeli Printing Co. Standing, left to right, are Car! 
Roberts, Liliie Ferguson, Yvonne Hooks, and Rose Vann. 

4. Science Workshop — Mr. C. Vernon Clay, Chairman, Department of Chemistry, 
assists Mrs. Olivia Golden and Mr. Benjamin Simon, in-service teachers, in making sci- 
ence posters. 



5. Piano instruction in Public School Music Class. 



6. Mr. Nelson Freeman and Mrs. Vernetta Frazier, college dietician, bid Willie 
Hamilton goodbye as he leaves with a group of forty-one students for the Green Giant 
Plant tn Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

7. The summer heat causes Ben Harris' temperature to rise, so Nurse Holmes, Col- 
lege Nurse, says. 

8. Students in Savannah State College Mass Communication Workshop observe a 
photographic plate that had just been produced while on a tour at Kennickeli Printing 
Company. Standing, left to right, are Andrew Russel, Rose Vann, Yvonne Hooks, Liliie 
Ferguson and Carl Roberts. 

9. Mrs. Minnie R. Clinton, Mrs. Clyde Faison, Mrs. Helen H. Graham, Elementary 
Workshop participants, and Mrs. Dorothy Hamilton, demonstration teacher and consult- 
ant, check their script for a TV show sponsored by the Elementary Workshop at SSC, 
while R. J. Martin, workshop consultant, looks on. 

10. Mrs. Terrell, Director of the Home Economics Department, gives lecture on 
child-growth in the Child Care Class. 

1 ]. 4 H'ers Tour SSC Campus — The 4 H'ers with guide tour the Biology Labora- 
tory in Hill Hall. Left to right: Albert Copeland, Jr., Ernestine Phillips, Freddie N. Wil- 
liams, guide, and Evelyn Coley. 

1 2. Miss Mae Champen, former student in the department of Chemistry, visited the 
Savannah State College Campus while here for the week end. Miss Champen is pres- 
ently working as a Research Chemist in New York City. 

13. Dean Meyers inspects various experiments during his visit to the Science 

Workshop at the College. 

14. Mr. R. J. Martin, Consultant, Macon, Georgia; Miss Josie P. Armstrong, Sparta, 
Georgia; Mrs. Mamia L. Eason and Jewel Grant, Savannah, Georgia, look over mechan- 
ical devices for teaching arithmetic of elementary grade level. 

15. Mrs. Dorothy C. Hamilton, Principal of elementary department of Powell 
Laboratory School, Savannah State College, is preparing the children participating in the 
SSC elementary workshop to perform experiment on how rain is made. 

















Advanced Art Offered 
For First Time 

Advanced public school art, which is pri- 
marily a summer specialty, was offered for 
the first time this summer. Advanced art has 
grown from a need, or perhaps a demand, of 
teachers and prospective teachers of the pub- 
lic schools. Many persons enrolled in the 
course hoping to acquire more art knowledge 
and further improve their art abilities. 

This art course was taught by Phillip J. 
Hampton, assistant professor of fine arts. 
Each student had a special project to work 
on other than his regular class responsibilities. 

Mrs. Queen Ballentine worked on stitchery 
which was done on burlap. Mrs. Ballentine 
came from Tattnall County where she works 
at Collins Elementary School. Mrs. Carrie 
Belle Bostic worked on picture paintings. 
Mrs. Bostic is from Wadley, Georgia. Miss 
Dorothy Brown, Savannah, designed an intri- 
cate stoneware bowl which was dried and 
fired in one of the kilns to an extremely high 
temperature. Mrs. Arneta Campbell, who 
works at Ralph Bunche High School, Wood- 
bine, Georgia, molded a lamp and made a 
bowl from paper mache using Mexican de- 
signs. Msr. Evelyn Irene Davis, Savannah, 
made curtains produced by the silk screen 
process. 

Mrs. Gerald Dealing, Savannah, made a 
Terra-Cotta clay sculpture of a woman. Mrs. 
Sammye Doby, Orlando,. Florida, made an 
orange grove by using stitches, tooth picks, 
buttons and crayon on burlap. Miss Annie J. 
Graham, Lavonia, Georgia, selected silk 
screening to make a beautiful tablecloth. Mrs. 
Nancy E. Holland, Reidsville, Ga., teacher at 
Tattnall County Industrial High, worked with 
clay sculpturing to make the bust of a man. 
Miss Julia Johnson, Savannah, made com- 
munity scenes by using water colors. Almeta 
Odom, Savannah, made a tea kettle. She used 
clay to make the form and poured plaster 
over the clay form, making a mold. Slip, a 
liquid clay, was poured into the mold to 
make the kettle. 

Miss Fredretha Roberson, Mcintosh, Ga., 
made a rug from old stockings. The color 
was removed from the stockings and the de- 
sired colors added later. Charles Winn, Sa- 
vannah, made a dresser scarf using the silk 
screening process. 



- 1 



Elementary Workshop 
Concludes Activities 

The Elementary Workshop concluded its 
activities for the session Friday, July 25. The 
activities that took place during the week 
were Open House, a continuation of teaching 
demonstrations, and Mr. R. J. Martin served 
as resource person in Human Relations and 
an evaluation of the Workshop. 

The Open House was attended by the fac- 
ulty, student body and many visitors. There 
was a display of teaching aids, charts, art 
projects and bulletin boards arranged by the 
following interest groups: Fine Arts, Language 
Arts, Science and Social Studies. The visitors 
were greeted and guided through the halls by 
Workshop hostesses. 

The Workshop was visited by Dr. Alonzo 
Stevens. Associate Professor of Social Science, 
who spoke to the group on "The Role of 
Social Studies in Elementary Schools." The 
Workshop was also visited by Dr. H. J. Briggs, 
Consultant for Sears, Roebuck Educational 
Foundation. 

The Workshop participants who did the 
final demonstrations, the area in which they 
taught and the schools that they represented 
are as follows: Mrs. Alma Whitaker, Social 
Studies, Candler County Training School, 
Metter; Mrs. Mamie L. Eason. Fine Arts, 
W. H. Grayman School, Atlanta; Mrs. Georgia 
M. Williams, Science, principal Oak Hill Ele- 
mentary School, Toccoa; Mrs. Ida Willis. 
Science, Peter H. Craig School, Augusta; Mrs. 
Ella Smith, Social Studies, Wilkes County 
Training School, Washington. 

The Elementary Workshop was on the 
"Happy Dan" program, WTOC-TV, Thursday, 
July 24. 




Mrs. Glen Era Butler of Statesboro, Georgia, 
poses gracefully as she broadens her scope by 
searching the latest magazines and daily news in 
Savannah State College's Library. 




Special Adult Education 
Classes 

The Home Economics Department offered 
four courses in adult education, Dressmaking 
and Tailoring, Upholstering, Home Decora- 
tion, and Slip Covering this summer. These 
classes function at night for continuing edu- 
cation and vocational training. 

The purposes of these classes are: (1) to 
help community citizens interpret responsibili- 
ties in the community to a fuller extent; 
(2) assist those already employed to do a 
better job, and (3) open up new avenues of 
self employment to others. 

Adult Education is under the auspices of 
Savannah State College but directly the Divi- 
sion of Home Economics. Certificates of pro- 
ficiency are given to students upon complet- 
ing his or her training. 

Projects the adult education classes are 
working on this summer are: (1) Home Im- 
provement — classes in Home Decoration and 
Upholstering, anrl (2) Personal Wardrobe and 
renovation problems — classes in Dressmaking 
and Tailoring. 

The adult staff is composed of Mrs. Martha 
Avery, Dressmaking and Tailoring; Mrs. Eva- 
nel Terrell. Director Home Economics De- 
partment; and Mrs. Erma Quarterman, Up- 
holstering and Slip Covering. 




Miss Althea Williams, Assistant Librarian, Savan- 
nah State College (right) views paintings of Paris 
School Children recently shown at SSC Library 
with Miss Thelma Gilpin, Assistant Librarian from 
Virginia Union, and Arthur Reeves, a summer 
school student. 



Miss Jewel Grant, Savannah State Elementary 
Workshop Participant, views some art work made 
by some of the workshoppers. 



Miss Opal McClain points out to Mrs. Rosa B. 
Glover the vivid coloring of "Suburbs," one of 
the paintings done by Paris School Children which 
were recently shown at the Savannah State Col- 
lege Library. 




Misses Minnie Ruth Smith and Delores Williams 
are doing building exercises in Mass Activity 
Class, Savannah State College. 



£0- 




Miss Minnie Ruth Smith and Delores Williams 
are doing building exercises in Mass Activity 
Class. 



14 Schools Represented in 
Science Workshop at SSC 

Fourteen schools had teachers participating 
in SSC's Science Workshop under the direc- 
torship of Dr. B. T. Griffith, Chairman, De- 
partment of Biology, and C. Vernon Clay, 
Chairman, Department of Chemistry. Dr. Grif- 
fith received all three degrees, B.S., M.S., and 
Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh. Clay 
earned both B.S. and M.S. from Kansas State 
College and pursued study at Iowa State Col- 
lege, Columbia University and the University 
of Michigan. 

The primary objective of the workshop was 
to HELP GOOD SCIENCE TEACHERS IN 
THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS TO BE- 
COME BETTER SCIENCE TEACHERS IN 
THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. The par- 
ticipating teachers in this workshop undertook 
this task with a great deal of interest and en- 
thusiasm. Each teacher worked independently 
on the problem, or problems which cause them 
the greatest trouble in attempting to teach the 
natural sciences on the elementary level. This 
resulted in: reviewing scientific principles 
relative to the problems which are being 
studied; organizing data for teaching pur- 
poses; preparing experiments and teaching 
aids for better understanding of scientific 
principles; making use of the natural re- 
sources in the teaching of science, and using 
literature on the natural sciences to the great- 
est advantage. 



27 Students Made the Dean's 

List During the Spring 

Quarter at Savannah 

State College 

Dean T. C. Meyers announced the following 
persons as having attained an average of 2.50 
or higher on a full program during the spring 
quarter. Each is therefore accorded a place 
on the Dean's List for the summer quarter, 
1958. They are: Artis, Hattie H., 2.66; Baker, 
Janie, 2.72; Barnwell, Claire, 2.66; Bozeman, 
Eva C, 2.68; Cumbess, Betty K., 2.66; Davis, 
Gwendolyn, 2.57; Davis, Nathaniel, 2.68; 
Deen, James E., 2.66; Faison, Carl J., 2.66; 
Hooks, Yvonne 0., 2.72; Jackson, Oscar, 2.66; 
Johnson, Eleanor E., 3.00; Johnson, Julia, 
2.66; Jones, Thomas J., 2.72; Jordan, Emma 
Lue, 2.66; Lambert, Gladys, 2.75; McGlock- 
ton, Yvonne, 3.00; Mercer, Virginia, 2.58; 
Pryor, Willie H., 2.66; Rhodes, Cynthia B., 
3.00; Shepperd, Minnie B., 3.00; Singleton, 
Angela, 2.66; Stafford, Carolyn, 2.50; Staf- 
ford, Martha, 2.66; Steele, Pender V., 2.66; 
Stokes, Ester R., 2.72; Stripling, Kay F., 2.78. 



Five Hundred and Sixty-five 

Were Enrolled at SSC 

This Summer 

Mr. Ben Ingersoll, Registrar, announced the 
enrollment of 459 students for the summer 
session, with 106 enrolled in the Department 
of Trades and Industries for a total of 565. 

These students studied in a variety of areas 
from General Education to special workshops 
for in-service teachers as well as students pur- 
suing degree courses in biology, building con- 
struction, business administration, business 
education, chemistry, child development, cloth- 
ing and textiles, economics, elementary edu- 
cation, English, foods, nutrition and institu- 
tion management, general science, industrial 
arts, industrial education, mathematics, music, 
secretarial sciences, social sciences, technical 
sciences, trades and industries, health and 
physical education. 




4 H'er Glennera Martin receives first place 
"Public Speaking Award" from Mr. B. J. James, 
sponsor of the 4H Public Speaking Contest, while 
Ella Cunningham, guide, and Albert Copeland, 
Jr., look on. 



"Bishop's Mantle" Was 

Presented on August 7, 

By the Savannah State 

College Playhouse 

"The Bishop's Mantle," a play in three acts 
was presented August 7, at Alfred E. Beach 
High School. It was the story of the life and 
work of a young rector of an Episcopal 
Church. John B. Clemmons was director of 
the play. 

The characters were : Hilary Laurens — Carl 
Roberts, senior, English Major, Sylvania; Dick 
Laurens — Alfonso Arnold, senior, Chemistry 
Major, Savannah; Hastings — Andrew Russell, 
senior, English Major, Elizabeth City, N. J.; 
J. V. Dunn — Daniel Washington, senior, Eng- 
lish Major, Savannah; Mr. Alvord — Leonard 
Law, recent graduate of Morehouse College, 
Savannah; Lex McColly — Kay Stripling, sen- 
ior, English Major, Savannah; Miss Maubray 
— Ann Meyers, recent graduate of St. Pius 
School, Savannah; Mrs. Reed — Irene Davis, 
senior, Elemenlary Education Major, Savan- 
nah; Mrs. Adams — Ida White, senior, Elemen- 
tary Education Major, Rome; Dottie Dunn — 
Jewel Grant, in-service teacher, Savannah; 
Miss Brekenridge — Laura S. Carter, in-service 
teacher, Savannah ; Maru Perkins — Theo Da- 
vis, senior, Business Major, Savannah. 

Mr. Clemmons stated that the College Play- 
house, while providing excellent opportunities 
in acting, also provides activities in costum- 
ing, speech, make-up and staging. He is a 
member of the Atlanta University Players. 




Getting a view of a group of the cottages are Center Founder, P. H. Stone and State Extension 
Supervisor A. S. Bacon, graduate of Savannah State College. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION WORKSHOP LEADERS— Seated, left to right: Beatrice D. Ketterer, 
Baxley, Georgia— Ralph J. Bunche High School, Woodbine, Georgia; Mrs. Rosa Lee McClain, Savannah, 
Georgia (Unemployed); Mrs. Eloise C. Castain, Savannah, Georgia— Cuyler Jr. High School, Savannah; 
William W. Graham, Brunswick, Georgia— New Risley Jr. & Sr. High School, Brunswick, Georgia; 
Mrs. Martha Rawls Smith, Jesup, Georgia— Wayne County Training School, Jesup, Georgia; Floyd Story, 
Marion County— Buena Vista High School; Mrs. Reolure Ruth Mallard, Jesup, Georgia— Wayne County 
Training School, Jesup, Georgia. 




Department of Fine Arts- 
Music Offerings, 
Summer, 1958 

Music courses offered in the Department of 
Fine Arts during the current Summer session 
include the following: Music Appreciation, 
Fundamentals of Music, Public School Music, 
Chora] Society, and Piano. 

As part of the General Education program 
at the college, the course in Music Apprecia- 
tion is devoted essentially to the study of the 
music of the world beginning with the baroque 
period of Bach and Handel. All areas of 
musical development are studied as musical 
forms, styles, and leading composers are dis- 
cussed in relation to their typical works. This 
course is offered each quarter throughout the 
year for regular students and during the sum- 
mer in conjunction with Art Appreciation, 
the other required General Education course 
in Fine Arts. 

Music 300 (Fundamentals of Music) is a 
required course in the field of Elementary 
Education, together with Music 301 (Public 
School Music for the Elementary Grades). 
This combination is also offered during the 
six-week period as Music S302 for in-service 
teachers. For the first time during a summer 
session the two courses have been divided for 
regular students as they are during the regu- 
lar school session. This procedure has en- 
abled students to pursue either course or both 
during the summer, thus leaving room in their 
schedules for other required courses during 
the regular quarters. 

This intensive course in the rudiments of 
Music includes such elements as lines and 
spaces, kinds of notes, dynamics, keyboard 
construction, time signatures, key signatures, 
major scaler in all keys, all minor scales, in- 
tervals, sight-reading, sight-singing, ear-train- 
ing, melodic dictation, and rhythmic drills. 
As a prerequisite for Public School Music, 
these materials provide students with several 
means of developing musical skills. 

Public School Music for Elementary Grades 
focuses itself in three directions: a review of 
the fundamentals of Music 300, the activation 
of specific musical skills, and the considera- 
tion of a philosophy of Music Education con- 
ceived along the lines of modern thought in 
the field of elementary school music. 

After a refreshing period dealing with fun- 
damentals, attention is then paid to the crea- 
tive aspects and the fostering of musical in- 
terest and understanding. Some of the group 
activities used in this connection are piano 
playing, flute playing (each student purchases 



a toy flute and instruction book), conducting, 
and singing. Individual activities center 
around the making and playing of rhythm 
band instruments, playing on the autoharp, 
writing units, and making scrapbooks. 




Demonstrations in 
Elementary Workshop 

Mrs. Dorothy C. Hamilton, demonstration 
teacher, Elementary Workshop, began teach- 
ing demonstrations with three groups of pu- 
pils. Other things done by the workshop in- 
cluded assignment of each person to his dem- 
onstration group, registration of 23 additional 
pupils for the summer demonstration school, 
making final plans for a harbor tour, learning 
children's songs and techniques suitable for 
teaching them. 

Mrs. Hamilton carried on the demonstra- 
tions with the pupils divided into three groups: 
Group I, first and second grades; Group II, 
third and fourth grades, and Group III, fifth 
through seventh grades. 

All demonstrations were centered around 
"How Science Affects Man's Living." Mrs. 
Thelma M. Harmond coordinated the evalua- 
tion of each demonstration. 



Tenth Workshop in 
Arithmetic 

For the tenth consecutive year the mathe- 
matics department offered its facilities in co- 
operation with the State Department of Edu- 
cation to conduct a workshop in "The Teach- 
ing of Arithmetic." J. B. Clemmons, Chairman 
of the Department of Mathematics and Phys- 
ics, directed the Workshop. 

Although this class was designed to serve 
the In-service teachers, it was open to pros- 
pective teachers of Elementary Education and 
Mathematics Majors. In-service teachers were 
taught to plan units in mathematics for all 
elementary grade levels. 

Participants in the arithmetic workshop 
were: Mrs. Laura Soloman Carter, Savannah; 
Mrs. Constance Johnson, Savannah; Mr. Luke 
Brinkley, Mathematics Major, Covington, Ga. ; 
Miss Freddie Mae Williams, Savannah; Mrs. 
L. F. Patterson, Savannah; Mrs. Earline C. 
Frazier, Savannah; Mrs. Olivia J. Wright, Sa- 
vannah; Mr. Nathaniel Jenkins, Savannah; 
Miss Joan Williams, Math Major, Ocilla, Ga.; 
Mrs. Bidie M. Beard, Savannah; Mrs. Annie 
R. Joyce, Savannah; Carl Brown, Math Major; 
Mrs. Rosa L. Glover, Savannah; Miss Annie 
Graham, Savannah; Miss Estella Meggett, 
Miss Berdie Moore, Savannah; Mrs. Cleo 
Campbell, Savannah; Napoleon Blackwell, 
Elberton, Ga.; Miss Laura Fimble, Savannah. 



Secondary Workshop 

The Secondary Workshop got under way 
under the supervision of Dr. Calvin L. Kiah, 
Chairman of the Department of Education, 
and Mrs. Ida J. Gadsden, also of the Depart- 
ment of Education. 

This workshop was designed to meet the 
needs of teachers in grades 7-12. It was com- 
posed this year of 11 in-service teachers, rep- 
resenting six different counties. The members 
were as follows: Camden County, Beatrice D. 
Ketterer, Commercial Education, Ralph J. 
Bunche High School, Woodbine; Chatham 
County, Gwendolyn L. Bass, Savannah; Olga 
B. Camper, Savannah; Eloise Castain, Health 
and Physical Education, Cuyler Jr. High 
School, Savannah; Rosa Lee McClain, Arts 
and Social Studies, Savannah; Charlesetta 
Reddick, Social Studies and Physical Educa- 
tion, Alfred E. Beach Adult School, Savannah; 
Fulton County, Thomas W. Hinds, Dry Clean- 
ing Instructor, Carver Vocational School, At- 
lanta; Glynn County, William N. Graham, 
Principal, Brunswick Vocational School, and 
Science and Mathematics instructor, New Ris- 
ley Jr. and Sr. High School, Brunswick; 
Marion County, Floyd Story, Buena Vista 
High and Elementary School, Buena Vista; 
Wayne County, Reolure R. Mallard, Music 
and Social Science teacher, Wayne County 
Training School, Jesup; and Martha R. Smith, 
Physical Education and Health teacher, Wayne 
County Training School, Jesup. 

Mr. Graham was appointed chairman for 
the Workshop with Mrs. McClain serving as 
secretary and Mrs. Ketterer as treasurer. The 
various committees were set up as follows: 
Public Relations, B. Ketterer, Chairman; R. 
L. McClain, F. Story, T. Hinds, and G. L. 
Bass; Bulletin Boards, R. R. Mallard, Chair- 
man; R. L. McClain, M. Smith, T. Hinds; 
Audio Visual Aids, F. Story, Chairman; B. 
Ketterer, E. Castain, O. Camper; Field Trips, 

E. Castain, Chairman; M. Smith, W. Gra- 
ham; Schedules and Materials: R. McClain, 
Chairman; R. Mallard, O. Camper, G. Bass; 
Recreation, M. Smith, Chairman; E. Castain, 

F. Story. 

The Workshop was organized into small 
groups according to various problem areas. 
Several interesting activities were planned, 
including field trips, presentation of consult- 
ants in the various discussion areas, and one 
or two recreational activities. 

The members of the Workshop enjoyed a 
pleasant and interesting six weeks. 



SSC ALUMNI ENJOY READING STUDENT 
NEWSPAPER-Left to right: Cornelius W. Mclver, 
Miss Alberta L. Campbell, a former Miss Savan- 
nah State, Mrs. Remell W. Jackson, Mrs. Ruth S. 
Martin, and Harrison Miller. 




Miss Jewel Grant, Savannah State Elementary 
Workshop participant, views some art work on 
an easel made by a workshopper for Open House 
exhibit at SSC. 



Lonnie Culver, lovely coed 
photographer how easy it is to 
stamped. 



at SSC, shows the 
get your envelopes 






SSC Gets Huge Construction 
Under Way 

With construction already started on the 
Sol Johnson High School and Elementary 
School and the new library, Savannah State 
College is a bee-hive of activity. 

The laboratory school, located on the Shell 
Read, was made possible through the coopera- 
tion of the Chatham County Board of Edu- 
cation and the Board of Regents of the Uni- 
versity System of Georgia. 

This new facility is costing the board nearly 
one million dollars. The school is being con- 
structed by Rives Worrell Construction Com- 
pany, with Oscar M. Hansen, A1A, as archi- 
tect. 

The Elementary unit has eight classrooms 
with the administration area and a health 
room. The high school unit has 39 instruc- 
tional units and of the 39 units, there are 
three homemaking rooms, two math labs, so- 
cial studies, chemistry and physics lab and a 
lecture room that serves three labs in the 
science wing. 

There is one bookkeeping room, two typing 
rooms, one arts and crafts room, and one art 
room. In the shop wing, there is a vocational 
agricultural shop with its classes, a drafting 
room, and an industrial arts shop. 

The type of construction is reinforced con- 
crete floor and roof, brick exterior with ex- 
posed concrete block interior . All roof slabs 
are insulated and have a 20-year built-up 
roof. All areas are to have acoustical tile 
ceilings and vinyl floor covering, except in 
the areas for the janitor's closets, etc. 

The new library is being constructed by 
Rives Worrell, with Cletus A. Bergen and 
William P. Bergenas, architects. The new 
library is located at the main entrance to 
the campus. 

The moss-laden campus with dotted oak 
trees and a few palms near the Atlantic 
Ocean. The library is being built of matte- 
type face brick in colors similar to Richard 
R. Wright Hall, men's dormitory. 

The main lobby in the library will extend 
through two stories and will have book stacks 
and exhibit areas and a balcony. 

There will be fireproof stair towers. The 
library will have fireproof walls. There will 
be offices for the librarians, audio-visual staff. 
The building will be L-shaped and will be 
completely air-conditioned. There will be a 
lounge and recreation room for the staff, ade- 
quate rest rooms for men and women stu- 
dents, public telephones. 

The library will have a receiving room 
through which books and supplies will be 
indexed and processed. The library will con- 
sist of an audio-visual auditorium for movies 
and film demonstrations, audio-visual and 
storage. This half-million-dollar structure will 
also have a seminar room, textbook and insti- 
tutional material reading room and a large 
reading area as well as a large music room 
devoted to music appreciation in all forms. 
The east elevation of the library will consist 
of two stories of window walls forming the 
outside wall of the lobby, stack rooms, and 
balconies. 

According to President W. K. Payne, the 
bids for the $1 million technical building will 
be issued by the University Building Author- 
ity, and the construction should begin very 
soon. 



Georgia Dental Society Meets 

At Savannah State College, 

June 9-11, 1958 

Savannah State College was headquarters 
for the Annual State Convention of the Geor- 
gia Dental Society and its Auxiliary, June 
9-11. Dr. J. P. Cheevers, Albany, State Presi- 
dent, presided at the meetings. Among the 
outstanding participants were: William D. 
Powell, Jr., U.M.D., Graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Alabama School of Dentistry, Instructor 
in Crown and Bridge Department, 1953-1956, 
Chairman, Crown and Bridge Department, 
1957-1958; Norman H. C. Griffiths, D.D.S., 
Howard University, Washington, D. C, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Prosthodontia, D.D.S., How- 
ard University, 1947, M.S.D., Northwestern 
University, 1948; D.Sc, University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1957; F.A.A.A.S. (Fellow, American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, 
1956); F.A.P.H.A. (Fellow, American Public 
Health Association, 1957) ; State Vice Presi- 
dent, National Dental Association. 

The social calendar consisted of: Sunday, 
June 8, Boat Ride, 2:00 p.m.; Monday, June 
9, Cocktail Party at home of J. W. Wilson, 
9:00 p.m.; Tuesday, June 10, a dance, Fla- 
mingo, 10:00 p.m.; Wednesday afternoon, 
June 11, a Beach Party. 

The Ladies Auxiliary Calendar consisted of 
Savannah State College, Monday, June 9, 
10:00 a.m., Registration; 11:00 a.m., Public 
Meeting; 12:00 Noon, Lunch; 2:00 p.m., 
Executive Meeting. Tuesday, June 10, 11:00 
a.m., Business Meeting; 12:30 p.m.. Lunch; 
2:30 p.m., Champagne-Bingo Party at the 
home of Dr. ami Mrs. P. W. Cooper. Mrs. 
E. 1). Hamilton, Albany State, is President of 
the Auxiliary The State Officials are: Mrs. 
Elizabeth Atkinson, president; Mrs. Agatha 
Cooper, vice president; Mrs. Luther Thomp- 
son, secretary; and Mrs. J. W. Wilson, treas- 
urer. 



* - ; : | ' 




Dorothy D. Davis, "Miss Savannah State Col- 
lege," presented the "Mother of Year" plaque 
to Mrs. Eliza Lee Butts, who was chosen the most 
outstanding Mother of the year, 1958-59. 



11 Cities Were Represented 

In Communication 

Workshop 

Seventeen in-service teachers, community 
leaders, and advanced students representing 
eleven cities enrolled in SSC's Mass Communi- 
cation Workshop this summer. This work-hop 
was operated on the full schedule during the 
summer quarter. The participants shared va- 
rious activities and experiences. 

Several communications experts served as 
consultants. Among these were William Lu- 
cas, Program Director, WSAV-TV; Dave Ran- 
dall, Program Director, WTOC-TV; Mrs. 
Willie A. Johnson, Publisher and Editor, Sa- 
vannah Tribune; L. E. Lee, Production Super- 
intendent, Kennickell Printing Co.; Willie C. 
Day, Manager Star Theater; Arthur Matthews, 
Operator Star Theater; Robert Mobley, Col- 
lege Photographer; and Mrs. Sylvia Bowens, 
Director College Audio Visual Aids Center. 

Special interest groups were organized at 
the beginning of the workshop session. These 
groups have worked on projects of their inter- 
est including the different media of communi- 
cation. Evaluated were: (1) Journalism and 
the School Press; (2) Radio; (3) Television; 
(4) Pictures and other publicity media. Top- 
ics for group discussion were selected from 
these areas and research work was done for 
class presentation. 

As a result of information gained from 
local communications media, the workshop 
has prepared a radio script for presentation. 
This information was gained through tours 
of the local Radio and TV stations. 

The Campus Bulletin, a weekly news sheet, 
is distributed each week as a special project 
of the workshop. The students have the re- 
sponsibilities of gathering, writing, and edit- 
ing the news and distributing the mimeo- 
graphed sheet on the campus each Thursday. 

Other projects being planned include pub- 
lication of the regular school paper, "The 
Tiger's Roar" and the school yearbook. 

The members of the workshop are: Mrs. 
Gwendolyn Strickland, Claxton, serving as 
secretary; Miss Lossie M. Greene, Atlanta; 
Mrs. Juanita O. Parker, Wadley; Carl Rob- 
erts, Sylvania; Mrs. Rose G. Vann, Savannah; 
Miss Doris Porter, Glennville; Miss Geneva 
Bray, Gainesville; Mrs. Louise B. Jones, Sa- 
vannah; Andrew Russell, Elizabeth City, N. 
J.: Miss Almenia Stevenson, Savannah; Miss 
Lillie Ferguson, Macon; Miss Yvonne Hooks, 
Savannah; Miss Daisy Kendrick, Atlanta; Mrs. 
Mattie Walden, Wadley. 

The workshop is under the direction of 
Mrs. Luetta C. Upshur, Assistant Professor, 
Department of Languages and Literature, and 
Wilton C. Scott, Director of Public Relations. 










James Johnson, president of the June senior class, presents the class' gift, a movie camera, to 
President W. K. Payne, while Yvonne Williams looks on. 







Wfc 




1. Flute Playing and Conducting in Public School Musi< 
Pansie Geter, Alberta Royal, Alice Wilkinson; standing 
Mack, Glen Butler, Juanita Garvin, Porter Hankerson, 
garet Burney, Janie Baker, Catherine Williams, Almeta 
Daniel Giles as Everyman, Kay Frances Stripling as Go 
Here, Everyman is soon to enter into his eternal gravt 
3, Miss Yvonne Williams, senior, Savannah State Colli 
service to the College, passes the Mantle on to Miss Y- 
leadership and service. This was one of the phases of 
sociation of Women Students. 4. Conducting Class in 
waite, giving instructions; Glen Butler, Lillian Nobles (hid 
Geter, Carolyn Stafford, Almeta Odom, Constance Joh 
Alberta Royal, Rosa Hamilton, Pearlie Haynes, Margai 
Boker. 5. The Georgia Teachers and Education Assoc 
addressing student body. Standing, left to right are; 
Martin, co-director for the Elementary Workshop and pi 
L. Butler, president of GTEA and principal of Ursula Co 
Payne, president of Savannah State College 6. A see 
and Jewel Grant. 7. Scene from "The Bishop's Ma 
Stripling (female leading character), Carl Roberts (male 
company appeared at Savannah State College in a da 



-Seated, left to right: Lillian Nobles, Carolyn Stafforc 

left to right: Pearlie Haynes, student conductor; id- 
Constance Johnson, Ralph Baisden, Evelyn Davis, 

Odom, and Rose Hamilton, 2. This scene portray 
od Deeds, and Clifford Juanita Chance as Knowledge 

with no one to accompany him but his Good Deed 
ge, and most outstanding woman in leadership ar 
onne Hooks, junior, and most outstanding woman 
the Annual Charm Week Program presented by the A: 
Public School Music-Left to right: Dr. Coleridge A. BraW 
den), Juanita Garvin, Ida Mack, Evelyn Davis, Pa 
nson, Porter Hankerson, Catherine Williams (hidden 
et Burney, Alice Wilkinson, Ralph Baisden, and Jan 
ation president chats with college representatives aft 
Willie Russell, president of SSC chapter of SNEA; R. 
incipa! of Ballard-Hudson High School, Macon; Charle 
llins Elementary School, Augusta; and Dr. William 

from "The Bishop's Mantle." "Danny" Washingit 
ntie." Left to right; Laura Solomon Carter, Koy Franc 

eading role). 8. Flower Hujer, prima ballerina, ar 
nee fair, Thursday, July 10, 1958. 





lo3 



Savannah State College 

"JAe College Lf tke Sea" 



v.'. 

-And Here We Shall Build For The Future- 




ALUMNI 



ISSUE 



Vol. 12 No. 4 



This Issue 



Someone has said that it never rains but 
that it pours. So many things have happened 
recently in the Agricultural Extension Depart- 
ment that your editor's head is spinning. Upon 
investigation, we found that three of our alum- 
ni were involved in a series of promotions to 
strategic positions. To what better purpose 
then, could we dedicate this issue? Then, by the 
time we had recuperated from these activities, 



lo and behold, another alumna becomes front 
page news, by being selected the Teacher of 
the Year for the state of Georgia. So, to A. S. 
Bacon, Sr., Augustus Hill, Mrs. Mattie T. Cope- 
iand, all of the Agricultural Extension Depart- 
ment, and to Mrs. Sadie Steele, classroom 
teacher, Powell Laboratory School, Savannah 
State College, we dedicate this Alumni Issue of 
the Savannah State College Bulletin. 



SOMETHING NEW ON S. S. C. CAMPUS 



^ 




New $60,000 warehouse under construction. In this building 
will be stored valuable equipment necessary for the main- 
tenance of SSC. 

THE BULLETIN 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

Dr. William K. Payne, President 

Wilton C. Scott, Editor 

Gwendolyn Bryant Glover, Copy Editor 

Phillip J. Hampton, Art and Layout 

J. L. Bryant, Justine Thomas, Rose Ann Lanier, Jimmy Veal, 

Henry Balloon— Student and Alumni Assistants 

Vol. 12 No. 4 May, 1959 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published in Oc- 
tober, December, February, March, April and May by Savan- 
nah State College. Entered as second class matter, December 
16, 1947, at the Post Office at Savannah, Georgia, under 
the Act of August 24, 1912. 




This patio was given to Savannah State College by Delta Eta 
Chapter, Alpha Phi Alpha, Inc. Prince Jackson, Jr., class of '49 
is the graduate advisor. 

ABOUT OUR COVER 




Mr. Augustus Hill ponders over a report submitted by art 
Agricultural Extension Agent. 



l\\ 



Presidents Message 



It appears that America is just beginning to wake up 
to the need for education of the talented and gifted. It is 
well known that economic resources for education do not 
distribute themselves according to ability and talent. Many 
of the talented boys and girls find it impossible to pursue 
their education to the extent that they can make a contribu- 
tion to society in terms of their potentialities. 
America needs now and in the future all of the 
potential abilities which may be available in 
the youth of today. 




Alumni groups, public-spirited citizens, 
civic clubs, fraternal orders, philanthropic foun- 
dations, and individuals have long recognized 
the need for the education and training of all of 
the talented and gifted youth. This fact has been 
almost completely neglected by the federal 
government. The National Defense Education 
Act of 1958 represents a recognition of this 
need. While it is not adequate to provide all 
the funds needed for education of youth who 
could not afford to attend high school and col- 
lege, it represents a departure from the policy 
of leaving to chance the greatest resource 
which we have in our country today. The re- 
sponse of the colleges and universities to this 
program during the present academic year 
was so great that the request had to be scaled 
down to one-tenth of the estimated needed 
amounts. If America is to keep strong and pro- 
gressive it must increase the allotment for this 
phase of education many-fold within the next 
few years. 



W. K. PAYNE 

The provisions of this act will not provide by any 
means for all of the financial needs required by 
the gifted and talented in our colleges today. 
The program should be considered as a supple- 
ment to scholarship and loan funds already de- 
veloped in our colleges and universities. Alumni 
groups and other agencies which have worked 
in this area for a long time should take heart 
with the participation of the federal govern- 
ment in this worthy program. More scholarships 
and more funds will be required for the use of 
our promising young men and women who are 
destined to come in larger numbers. If every 
alumnus of each college gave a minimum of ten 
dollars per year to his college, the institution 
would be in far better position to care for the 
needs of worthy and deserving students. The 
alumni of Savannah State College are contribut- 
ing in increasing numbers to the scholarship 
fund which has done so much to improve educa- 
tional opportunities here at the College. It is 
our belief that this program will be one of the 
major phases in strengthening the college and 
providing some of the desirable leadership call- 
ed for in our country. 



Some individuals may misunderstand the 
full significance of the National Defense Act. 



W. K. PAYNE 



lllli 



THESE 

Albert S. Bacon, Sr. 



I N T E 



Albert S. Bacon, Sr., class of 1938, former 
president of Savannah State College Alumni 
Association, has been appointed assistant to the 
assistant administrator in charge of the program 
work of the extension service, of the United 
States Department of Agriculture. This office is 
the educational aim of the Department. Al- 
though his appointment will not take effect un- 
til June, he is already in Washington working 
with Paul B. Stone who retires next month from 
this position. 

Mr. Bacon will work principally with state 
extension supervisors throughout the South in 
developing more effective educational pro- 
grams to assist the millions of rural Negro peo- 
ple in the region by providing cooperative ex- 
tension services on the farm and in the home, 
of some 900 Negro farm and home demonstra- 
tion agents who base their counsel on research 
results obtained by the Department of Agricul- 
ture, State land grant colleges, and the experi- 
ment stations. 

Mr. Bacon started his extension career in 
his native home, Brooks County, Georgia, in 
1943. Two years later, he was promoted to as- 



sistant state supervisor with headquarters at Sa- 
vannah State College. In 1955, he became state 
supervisor when Paul Stone, who had held that 
post was transferred to Washington. 

Prior to entering extension service, he was 
assistant county supervisor for the Farm-Home 
Administration and earlier was a high school 
principal and vocational agriculture teacher in 
Sylvester, Georgia. 

Mr. Bacon, who was born in Quitman, 
Georgia, received his training at Savannah 
State College, and at the University of Minne- 
sota, having received the B.S. degree in Agricul- 
ture and the M.S. degree in agricultural eco- 
nomics respectively. 

His hobbies are poultry and landscape 
gardening, when he has time for such activities. 

He is married to the former Julia Spain, a 
graduate of Howard University, who is teaching 
in the Chatham County public school system. 
Mrs. Bacon and Albert, Jr., will join Mr. Bacon 
in Washington, D. C, after their son's gradua- 
tion from Alfred E. Beach High School, Savan- 
nah, June, 1959. 




WEIGH CHANGER— Committee consultants at the Extension 
Service Supervisors' Regional Workshop at the Dublin (Ga.) 
4-H Center discuss ways of adjusting their prgorams to meet 
the changing needs of rural people. Left to right: Mrs. Minnie 



M. Brown, North Carolina; Ashford O. Williams, Louisiana; 
R. A. Sanders, Texas; A. S. Bacon, Georgia; Mrs. Equelle M. 
Haskins, Maryland, Dr. Grady W. Taylor, Alabama, and S. E. 
Marshall, Virginia. 



TING ALUMNI 



a a 



Augustus Hill, State Agent 



Augustus Hill, Assistant Supervisor of Negro Work, Georgia 
Agricultural Extension Service, 1955-59, has been promoted to 
State Agent for Negro Work, effective April 15, 1959. 

Mr. Hill comes to this position with a well-fortified back- 
ground, both in training and experience. A native of McRae, 
Georgia, he finished high school at the State Teachers Agricul- 
tural College, Forsyth, Georgia, in 1933. In 1937, he earned the 
B.S. degree in Agricultural Education at Georgia State College, 
(Savannah State). Immediately he was hired as principal and 
teacher of vocational agriculture at Evans County Training 
School, Claxton, Georgia, a position he held for two years. 

For the next two years he was NYA project coordinator at 
Albany State College, Albany, Georgia. At the close of the NYA 
project in 1941, he was appointed County Agent in Grady County, 
Georgia. In 1945, he became Assistant Negro State Club Agent 
(Agricultural Extension Service). 

During the summer of 1947 he attended Pendle Hill, Wall- 
ingford, Pennsylvania, where he was enrolled in courses dealing 
with problems in rural housing. (Pendle Hill is an exclusive school 
for graduate study maintained by the Society of Friends. Pendle 
Hill scholars are usually invited to attend the school. Its curri- 
culum and practices are patterned after Pendle Hill School, Eng- 
land). 

After serving four years as special agent in the rural housing 
agricultural extension service, Mr. Hill was again assigned to work 
as Assistant Negro State Club Agent. 

In 1955 he was promoted to Assistant Supervisor for Negro 
Work (Agricultural Extension Service). His work was of such qua- 
lity that, when the vacancy occured, Mr. Hill was given the nod 
to become the State Agent for Negro Work. 

As additonial proof of his ability to get along with people, 
he is an active member of St. Matthews Episcopal Church, Savan- 
nah, and has served as vestryman. He is also an active member 
of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, and of the Mutual Benevolent Society 
Club, Savannah. 

In spite of a busy year round schedule, Mr. Hill has found 
time to study and play. He has attended a Regional Workshop 
in Extension Supervision at Southern University,- this summer will 
find him at Prairie View A&M College. 

As for play, he enjoys hunting and fishing, and is a do-it- 
yourself fan. He says that he is pretty good in the hunting area, 
for he bagged his deer limit (2) last fall, and as for fishing, he 
didn't count the number of bass, implying that there were several. 

He probably is most proud of his major do-it-yourself project, 
a beautiful brick home. However, he asked that the county agents 
who helped him be given due credit, also. 

Mr. Hill's present position makes him responsible for all the 
agricultural extension services among Negroes in the State of 
Georgia. There are fifty-six counties with eighty-three Negro 
workers presently employed. The farm agents work directly with 
the farmers and the 4-H Clubs in the state. The home demonstra- 
tion agents work with the housewives in trying to raise the home 
standards. 

Mr. Hill, noted that two-thirds of the agents employed in 
Georgia and the entire office personnel are Savannah State Col- 
lege graduates. 

He is married to the former Marian Forrester, who is em- 
ployed in the public school system of Savannah, Georgia. Mr. 
Hill stated that he enjoyed his 4-H Club best of all. He is fond of 
children and he feels that this level of activity is the most reward- 
ing. 





(Continued on Pages 6 and 7) 



Organize alumni chapter today, 
Prince Jackson, Jr., alumni secretary 



contact 
at SSC. 



THESE INTER 



Mattie Tharpe Copeland 



Mrs. Mattie Tharpe Copeland was 
appointed assistant state agent for 
Negro work, agricultural extension 
service, January 16, 1959. 

This position carries with it much 
responsibility and requires not only 
ability to get along with people, 
but also experience in working with 
groups. Mrs. Copeland stated in an 
interview that she was directly re- 
sponsible for the programs of the 
thirty-eight Negro home demonstra- 
tion agents in thirty-seven counties. 

The purpose of the home demon- 
stration agents is to help the rural 
housewife and mother raise the liv- 
ing standards in her home. These 
housewives are learning many tech- 
niques for improving family living. 
These agents assist 12,000 families 
annually in making improvements in 
their homes and surroundings and 
10,000 with selection and use of 
home furnishings and equipment. 

After Mrs. Copeland graduated 
from Savannah State College in 
1939, she served as a teacher of 
home economics at the Seminole 
County Training School, Donaldson- 
ville, Georgia, for two years. 

She moved to Newark, New Jer- 
sey shortly afterwards and opened 
a men's clothing shop which she 
operated until 1950. Subsequently, 
she spent four years as maintenance 
supervisor for the Radio Corpora- 
tion of America, Harrison, New Jer- 
sey. Upon her return to Georgia, 
she was employed by the Agricultu- 
ral Extension Service as home dem- 
onstration agent in Morgan County 
and later transferred to Brooks 
County where she remained until 
her promotion to her present posi- 
tion. 

She likes to sew and is fond of 
sports, especially baseball. Someone 
remarked that Mrs. Copeland was 
"never far from a sewing machine." 

We are proud to welcome Mrs. 
Copeland to Savannah State Col- 
lege campus. 




Mrs Mattie Copeland and Mr. Augustus Hill discuss state 4-H Club program. 




Mrs. Copeland confers with Mr. Hill about extension matters. 



TING ALUMNI 



Sis 



Sadie Steele 
Teacher Of The Year, 1959 



This month, Mrs. Sadie Steele, class of '48, was selected 
as the "Teacher of the Year" for the State of Georgia. The 
announcement was made at the Annual Banquet tendered the 
eleven regional Teachers of the Year. This honor marks another 
first for Savannah State College as well as for Chatham 
County. 

Mrs. Steele states that Savannah is home, for she was born 
and reared here. Although she attended elementary school in 
Savannah, she finished Stanton High School, Jacksonville, 
Florida. An Elementary Education major at Savannah State 
College, she was graduated with the bachelor of science de- 
gree. She also holds the master of arts degree in Elementary 
Education from Columbia University. 

She has been teaching for more than twenty years and 
is truly dedicated to the teaching profession. At present she 
has a cpmbined class of 1st and 2nd grades at Powell Labora- 
tory School, Thunderbolt, Georgia. To see her teach is an in- 
spirational experience in itself. The trust, respect and admira- 
tion that her pupils have for her can only come from sincerity, 
outgoing personality, and her obvious attitude that every 
child is first a dynamic human being who possesses at least 
some one thing that should be developed so that he can make 
his contribution to society. Under her guidance, even the most 
shy and reticent children blossom out. 

During an interview with Mrs. Steele, it was noted that 
her pupils speak clearly and distinctly. She was asked to com- 
ment on her success in this area. "We try to stress good speech. 
However, I have my children only a year and a half, they are 
ready to leave just about time we are beginning to make some 
headway in developing desirable speech patterns. Much at- 
tention should be given to speech development at least through 
the third grade. By that time, we believe that perhaps most 
speech patterns have become fixed in the child's way of 
speaking." 

Mrs. Steele's advice to college students is that the "teach- 
ing profession is the noblest and most rewarding one. I would 
certainly encourage young people to enter this profession." 

Our "Teacher of the Year" does things outside her pro- 
fession too. Among her hobbies are interior decorating, "not 
the sewing part particularly," she explained, "but all the 
rest." She writes poetry, some of which she has released to 
newspapers and magazines. The 1958-59 convention issue 
of the GTEA Magazine contains one of her poems. 

In addition to her professional committments she find t 
time to be president of the Savannah Alumnae Chapter of 
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority; she is a member of the Hodge 
Memorial Kindergarten Board; she serves on the Tuberculosis 
Citizenship Board; she is active with several volunteer agencies) 
and charities; she is an active member of Bunn's Memorial 
Baptist Church, Savannah, both as a member of the Board of 
Trustees and Church organist. 

Mrs. Steele is the wife of Clarence J. Steele and the 
mother of a 16-year-old son. 

Savannah State College salutes a favorite alumna, Mrs. 
Sadie Steele, Georgia's "Teacher of the Year," 1959. 




Mrs. Steele gives her pypils a little help in a reading lesson 




"Goodbye, Mrs. Steele" 




Mrs. Steele receives "Teacher of the Year" Plaque 




I. ACCOUNTANTS 

1. Raymond Knight-agent, U. S. Internal Revenue Service, Col- 
lections Division. 

II. CHEMISTS 

1. Howard C. Williams-research employee at the Ohio Stat' 
University Agricultural Experiment Station. 

2. James Curtis-technical analyst, supervisory chemist, Herry Four 
dation, Savannah, Georgia 

3. Alphonso Orr-research worker at Crevemore Hospital, Queen 
New York. 

4. Mae Champen-chromatographer, Sloan Kettering Institute, Mt. 
Vernon, New York. 

5. J. S. Green-research, Food Science and Technology, New York 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 

6. Lois Hines-Junior chemist, Neurological Institute of Health, 
Washington, D. C. 

7. Delore Perry-research assistant, National Institute of Health, 
Washington, D. C. 



8. James Thomas-supervisor, U. S. Chemical Patent Office, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

9. Arnett Anderson-group leader, National Institute of Health, 
Bethesda, Maryland. 

10. Ranson Bell-research chemist-pesticides, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. 

11. Sadie Z. Chisholm-Supervisor of Medical Technology, Chicago 
Hospital. 

12. Geneva Hill-junior chemist, State Health Department, Connecti- 
cut. 

13. Daniel Pelote-research assistant, University of California, Los 
Angeles, California. 

14. Mercedes Mitchell-histologist, George Washington University 
Hospital. 



2n 




III. ELECTRONICS 

1. Gerue Ford-Electronic Training Program for the United States 
Government. 

IV. HISTOLOGIST 

1. Mercedes Mitchell-George Washington University Hospital 
Washington, D. C. 

V. GROUP LEADER 

1. Arnett Anderson, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Mary- 
land. 

VI. HOME ECONOMIC 

1. Margaret George-Food Services, U. S. Army, Germany. 

2. Myrtle Joy-Dietician, Rest Haven, Pinehurst, New Jersey. 

3. Willie Mae Gordon-Teacher, Home Economics, Spinard, Alaska. 



William Witherspoon-Assistant Professor, Animal Husbandry, 
Prairie View A&M College, P.V., Texas. 

Dr. Clyde Hall-Point Four Program, Harbel, Liberia. 

Dr. H. Copeland Williams-Assoc. Professor, Agricultural Eco- 
nomics, Ohio State University. 



Dr. Julian Gooden-Professor, State Teachers College, Bowie, 
Maryland. 

Samuel L. Smith-Principal, Liberty County High School, and 
Regional Director, Georgia Teachers Education Association. 

VII. MATHEMATICIANS 

1. Arthur L. Lloyd Haywood-Wright Brothers Aircraft Corporation, 
Dayton, Ohio. 

2. Bessie Capers-Statistician-Libby Owens Ford Co., Toledo, Ohio. 

3. Daniel Nichols-White Sands Proving Grounds, New Mexico. 

4. Benny Cooley-White Sands Proving Grounds, New Mexico. 

5. Maceo Scott-White Sands Proving Grounds, New Mexico. 

6. Earl R. Greene-White Sands Proving Grounds, New Mexico. 

7. William Weston-U. S. Naval Observatory, Washington, D.C. 

8. Alonza Perry-Employed as a mathematician in the U. S. Patent 
Office, Washington, D.C. 

9. Sarah Padden-Employed as a mathematician in the Department 
of Civil Service, Washington, D.C. 



Do You Know "hese Alumni? 



State 4-H Club Agent, was born in Baldwin County, Georgia; com- 
pleted high school at Tuskegee Institute; graduated with a B.S. in 
Agriculture from Savannah State College in 1934; received the M.S. 
degree in Agriculture at South Carolina State College, 1955. He has 
played an outstanding part in developing the Negro 4-H Club Cen- 
ter at Dublin, Georgia. 




IV This young woman was Georgia's first Negro 4-H Club Agent for 
Girls. A native of Liberty County, she taught school at Villa Rica 
Training School for two years following her graduation from Savan- 
nah State College. She is a former Home Demonstration Agent. Cur- 
rently she is assistant state 4-H Club. Agent. 





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Among Our Scholars 



Introductory Paragraph 

One of the major purposes of an undergra- 
duate four year college is to provide the stu- 
dent with a foundation for advanced study 
in a particular field. Savannah State College 
is proud of her graduates who, by the dint 
of their labors in college and on jobs secured 
after graduation, have been inspired to go on 
to do further study. Savannah State is even 
more pleased when one of her graduates has 
done such outstanding work that he is granted 
a fellowship to enable him to pursue further 
his academic and professional interests. 




Miss Jessie C. Deloach 

Miss Jessie C. DeLoach, class of 1950, is 
another National Science Foundation grantee. 
She has received a fellowship for the Mathe- 
matics Academic Year Institute, 1959-1960, 
Atlanta University, Atlanta, Ga., which carries 
a stipend of $3,000 plus tuition and all aca- 
demic fees. 



William Jackson ^ 



William B. Jackson, instructor of Mathe- 
matics at Sol C. Johnson Laboratory School 
of Savannah State College, has been awarded 
a stipend by the National Science Founda- 
tion to study for the academic year 1959-60 
at Atlanta University. In the summer of 1958 
he was recipient of a National Science Foun- 
dation Scholarship and studied chemistry at 
North Carolina College in Durham, North 
Carolina. Because of his outstanding work in 
the community and his proficiency as an in- 
structor, he was selected teacher of the year 
at Paulsen Elementary School in 1956 and 
again as teacher of the year at Paulsen Jr. 
High School in 1958. 



Richard Moore 

Richard Moore, class of 1958, and the first 
graduate of Savannah State College to re- 
ceive a Danforth Foundation award, is now 
studying at Yale University, New Haven, Con- 
necticut, toward a master of science degree 
in chemistry. Moore, a U. S. Army veteran, 
served as president of Delta Eta chapter, Alpha 
Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. He was graduated 
cum laude. 

Mrs. Irma Sessions Fields. 

Mrs. Irma Sessions Fields, class of 1948, has 
been awarded a scholarship by the Depart- 
ment of Agriculture to attend a regional Lead- 
ership Workshop for Jeanes Supervisors, Prin- 
cipals and Teachers at Tuskegee Institute, 
Tuskegee, Ala., June 8 to July 11, 1959. She 
is presently the Jeanes supervisor for Vidalia 
Independent System and Candler and Toombs 
Counties, a member of the Liberty County 
Evaluation Team, and secretary of the state 
Jeanes Supervisors. When Mrs. Fields is not 
busy supervising, she is being supervised by 
her husband, Alphonso E. Fields, a real estate 
broker and law office clerk. He attended 
Georgia State College for one year and 
Southern States Academy, Atlanta. 

James Densler 

James F. Densler, sophomore, Meharry 
Medical College, Nashville, Tenn., '54' re- 
ceived the S. H. Freeman Memorial Award, 
which is annually presented to the freshman 
medical student who attained the highest av- 
erage in gross anatomy, at the October con- 
vocation of the college. Densler was also the 
highest ranking freshman of the Dean's List. 
He is the son of Mrs. Janie Densler, 827 West 
44th Street, Savannah. 




Miss Dorothy Davis 

Miss Dorothy Dell Davis, '58, has been 
granted a National Science Foundation Fel- 
lowship to attend the Mathematics and Science 
Institute to be held during the months of 
June and July at Prairie View A&M College, 
Prairie View, Texas. The signal honor in this 
grant is that only four fellowships were avail- 
able to non-Texans. Miss Davis was selected 
in competition with more than two hundred 
applicants. She will receive a stipend for the 
six weeks plus her travel and academic ex- 
penses. Miss Davis is presently employed as a 
mathematics and science teacher at Haven 
Home School, Savannah, Ga. She is a mem- 
ber of Alpha Kappa Mu honorary society, 
Beta Kappa Chi, honorary science fraternity, 
and GTEA and other local professional or- 
ganizations. She also reigned as "Miss Sa- 
vannah State", 1957-1958, and is a member 
of Delta Sigma Theta sorority. Miss Davis is 
the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Coley Davis, of 
Savannah, Ga. 





m 



What Is New Among Our Alumni 



1902 

WALTER NATHANIEL NELSON 

903 Lindsay Street, Greensboro, North Caro- 
lina, is a life insurance salesman. He is the 
surviving member of his college class. In those 
days only the young men took the college 
work, the young ladies took the normal 
course. Nelson received a bachelor of arts 
degree, with a major in mathematics and 
manual training. His wife, Agnes is a gradu- 
ate of Rome (Ga.) High School. 

• 

1896 

REV. JOHN WILLIAM MAXWELL 

2410 Florance Street, Savannah, retired in 
1958 from active service, after having served 
his fellow man for 61 years, 17 of which he 
was a presiding elder in the A.M.E. Church. 



Besides being an active minister he has been 
principal of Hawkinsville District High School, 
Eastman, Georgia, Hope Normal School, Way- 
cross, Georgia, and Central Park Normal and 
Industrial School, Soale, Georgia. Also, honor- 
ary degree, doctor of divinity, has been con- 
ferred upon him. 

• 

1938 

HELEN (WOODSON) MOODY MAYES 

917 Dorsett Avenue, Albany, Georgia, has 
been elected assistant secretary of the Na- 
tional Association of Collegiate Deans and 
Registrars. Presently, she is employed as di- 
rector of admissions and assistant to the Dean 
of Instruction, Albany State College. Mrs. 
Mayes is also basileus of Delta Eta Omega 
Chapter, Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority and 
treasurer of the Albany chapter, Savannah 
State Alumnae Asscoiation. 



1938 

RUFUS R. BUTLER 

Statesboro, Georgia, received the master of 
education degree from Tuskegee Institute in 
1958. He is the vocational agriculture instruct- 
or at Williams James High School, States- 
boro. 



• 

1942 



MRS. ERMA ROBERTS WILLIAMS 

classroom teacher at West Broad Street School 
in Savannah, was selected Teacher of the 
Year by her colleagues. She is also chairman 
of the executive committee, Chatham County 
Teachers Association. 





The latest mural to be added to Adams Hall was painted by Henry 
Balloon, senior, majoring in industrial education. President W. K. 



Payne presented a plaque to him on behalf of the college in ap- 
preciation of his artistic effort at an assembly, May 6, 1959. 



What Is New Among Our Alumni (Continued) 



1944 

MISS CAROLYN L. ANDERSON 

1009 West 40th Street, Savannah, is Jeanes 
Supervisor, Screven County, with headquar- 
ters in Sylvania, Georgia. 

• 

1945 

MRS. MARY SHAW HARPE 

Newton, Georgia, is the home economics 
teacher at East Baker Elementary and High 
School. She attended summer school at Tus- 
kegee Institute, 1958. 



• 

1947 

MRS. VESTER B. OLIVER 

233. Church Street, Statesboro, was selected 
Teacher of the Year by the faculty of William 
James Elementary School. Mrs. Oliver has 
done advanced work at Tuskegee Institute, 
Tuskegee, Ala. 



• 

1948 

BENJAMIN F. CRAWFORD 

Box 106, Gray, Georgia, is executive secre- 
tary of the 4th District GTEA. He is also prin- 
cipal of Maggie Califf High School, Gray. 



• 

1949 



MRS. RUBY COLLEY BAKER 

Box 42, Ludowici, Georgia, is principal of the 
elementary department, Walker High School. 
She has a daughter, Juanita, who is a member 
of the senior class at SSC and a physical edu- 
cation major. 



• 

1949 

MRS. AGNES B. BRYANT 

P. O. Box 162, Sylvania, Georgia, is principal 
of the Arnett Elementary School, Sylvania. 



1949 

HENRY ADIS JOHNSON 

78 Troup St., S.W., Apt. 820, Atlanta, will 
complete requirements for the master's degree 
in guidance and counseling at Atlanta Uni- 
versity in June, 1959. He received the B.D. 
degree from Gammon-Turner Theological 
Seminary, and the M.A. degree in School ad- 
ministration and supervision from Atlanta Uni- 
versity, June, 1958. 



1950 

JOHNNIE C. OWENS 

Route 1, Box 192, Sylvania, is principal of the 
Annie E. Daniels Elementary School, Sylvania, 
Georgia. 



1950 

WALTER A. DAVIS 

1834 West 9th Street, Chester, Pennsylvania, 
has been appointed by Governor Lawrence 
of Pennsylvania to the Board of Commissioners 
of the Chester Housing Authority. Davis, an 
ordained minister in the A.M.E. Church, is 
completing requirements for the master's de- 
gree at the University of Pennsylvania. He is 
a 5th grade teacher at Derby Township 
Elementary School and also serves as circuit 
preacher in the Frederick, Delaware area. 



1950 

WILLIE IVEY MACK 

1324 Madison Avenue, Riviera Beach, Fla., is 
assistant counselor of the Juvenile Court, West 
Palm Beach, Fla. He is also chairman of the 
Riviera Beach Recreation Council, member of 
the Palm Beach County TB Associatoin, Presi- 
dent of District Eight PTA, and chairman, 
State committee on PTA organization. 



1951 

THARON STEVENS 

Director of the William James High School 
Choral Society, Statesboro, Ga., is now study- 
ing at the University of Illinois. Stevens has 
done outstanding work with the choral society 
which does a whole section of its programs 
in Latin as well as several selections arranged 
by him. 

• 

1951 

HERMAN BAKER 

Stevens Street, Wadley, Ga., has been ap- 
pointed principal of Booker T. Washington 
Elementary School, Bartow, Ga. He is an in- 
dustrial education major. 



• 

1954 

MISS ALMA B. HUNTER 

Stephens, Ga., became the bride of George 
A. Vann of Tallahassee, Fla., April 19, 1959. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Vann are employed at the 
Oglethorpe County Training School, Lexington, 
Ga. Mrs. Vann is an active member of the 
Athens Chapter of Savannah State Alumni. 



• 

1956 

MRS. ROSA MAE ROSS BURKE 

2735 Wheeler Road, Augusta, Ga., is a class- 
room teacher at Silas X. Floyd School and 
was selected Teacher of the Year by her col- 
leagues for the year 1958-1959. 



1959 

MISS JANIE BAKER 

Completed all requirements for the B.S. de- 
gree in elementary education at the end of 
the winter quarter is now teaching at Cousins 
Elementary School, Millen, Ga. She was an 
honor student in college and active in many 
extra curricular affairs, including Alpha Kappa 
Mu honorary scholastic society and Alpha 
Kappa Alpha sorority. 



Vl\ 




Sol C. Johnson, $1,000,000 Lab- 
oratory High School, opened 
March 16, 1959, with an enroll- 
ment of 631, a faculty and staff 
of 27, under the principalship 
of Alflorance Cheatham^ former- 
ly of Philadelphia. This new fa- 
cility has 39 instructional units 
which include two mathematics 
laboratories and two social 
science laboratories, as well as 
those for biology, physics, and 
chemistry. Other features incude 
a bookkeeping room, arts and 
crafts room, an art room, voca- 
tional agricutural shop, a draft- 
ing room, and an industrial arts 
shop. 



SOMETHING NEW 
ON S. S. C. CAMPUS 

(continued from inside front cover) 



The new $500,000 Library, 
scheduled to be completed by 
September, 1959, is located at 
the main entrance to the cam- 
pus. The main lobby in the li- 
brary will extend through two 
stories and will have book stacks, 
exhibit areas, and a balcony. 
Many other special features have 
been incorporated into the li- 
brary, such as a music apprecia- 
iton room. Most important of all 
is that the library is completely 
air-conditioned. 





The construction of the new mil- 
lion dollar Technical Center is 
progressing according to plan. 
Its completion date is January, 
1960. This building is of brick 
construction with four wings link- 
ed together. The southwest wing 
will house the electronic tech- 
nology section; the northwest 
wing will be the automotive 
technology department; the north 
center wing will house shops for 
building construction technology; 
and the southeast wing will be 
composed of the departments of 
chemistry and physics, which will 
occupy two floors. 

All Photos Were Made by 
Robert Mobley 



FALL CALENDAR 1959-1960 

September 16-24 . . . Orientation and Registration 

September 25 Day Classes begin 

September 28 Evening Classes begin 

September 29 ... . Last day for adding courses 
October 8 . . . . Last day for dropping courses 
November 3-4 .... Mid-quarter examinations 
November 26-29 .... Thanksgiving Recess 

December 14 Classes end 

December 15-18 Final examinations 

December 18 Fall quarter ends 

Christman Vacation begins at 4:30 P.M. 
January 4 Registration for Winter Quarter 

January 5 . . . Classes begin for Winter Quarter 



ALUMNI: 

Encourage Prospective Students to ap- 
ply for admission now. Deadline for 
New Applications for Fall Quarter, 
September 4, 1959. 



Savannah State College is a four-year college offering the bachelor of arts degree in music 
and the bachelor of science degree in any one of the following areas of concentration: 



Biology 

Building Construction 

Business Administration 

Business Education 

Chemistry 

Child Development 

Clothing and Textiles 

Economics 

Elementary Education 

English 

Foods 

Nutrition and Institution Management 



Automotive Technology 

Industrial Education 

Mathematics 

Secretarial Science 

Social Science 

Technical Sciences 

Trades and Industries 

Health Recreation and 
Physical Education 

Health Education 

Building Construction 
Technology 

Electronics Technology 



Courses are also offered for (1) special trade students who are primarily concerned with vo- 
cational proficiency, (2) qualified persons not interested in completing degree requirements, and 
(3) students who are not able, or who do not wish to attend classes during the day. 



Ideal location— Moderate Expenses- 
Modern Equipment — Faculty Well 
Trained— Graduates Placed — Student 
Welfare Stressed. 



For further information write to: 

THE REGISTRAR 
SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



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