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1+1 



Agnculture and Agriculture et Canadian Agriculture Library 

ri"f,°,° d Agroalimentaire Bibliotheque canad,enne de I'agnculture 

Canada Ottawa K1A 0C5 



Quality 

is in our nature 



Savour 



RECIPES 




^P 11153 



;|2010 

c. 3 







1*1 



Agriculture and 
Agri-Food Canada 



Agriculture et 
Agroalimentaire Canada 



Canada 



Publication information: 

Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada, 2010 

AAFC-AAC: 11153B 
CAT: A72-85/2010 
ISBN: 978-1-100-51103-0 



Savour 

CANADA 



Chances are, no matter where you are in the world, 
a Canadian food product — or one made with Canadian 
ingredients — is close at hand. 

Our pork, beef and fish and seafood products are 
exported to more than 180 countries, as are our wheat, 
pulses and canola oil. Our soybeans are a preferred choice 
among the world's nations for their higher protein content 
and consistency in shape and size. And who could forget 
that we are the world's largest producer and exporter of 
maple syrup? And one of only two countries that produce it? 

Surprised? You shouldn't be. The global reach and range 
of Canadian food and agricultural products is astounding — 
and continues to expand! 

You'll find a special selection of recipes created by six of 
Canada's top chefs and others that showcase Canada's 
finest and most diverse food products and ingredients. 
All chefs have cooked internationally, but always return 
home saying the same thing: We have one of the most 
unique and distinct food cultures in the world. And it's 
not just about the product or commodity. It's about the 
people, their passion, their innovation. It's about our 
land, our pristine water and our cultural mosaic. 

It just doesn't get better than Canada, because Quality 
is in our nature! 



/T S* g , 











A 



CnGT Michael Smith 

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island 



Chef Smith is an award-winning author and inter- 
nationally-known TV food show host. In 1992, his 
roving culinary adventures landed him in Canada's 
smallest province, Prince Edward Island, where he 
made his home. 

"Cooking is not just about the end product or 
ingredients. It's about the people and their passion 
for excellence. Canada has one of the most distinct 
and unique food cultures in the world. It's reflective 
of our surroundings, our different climate zones and 
our broad ethnic diversity. We are close to the land, 
and close to the sea. Food is woven into our 
cultural fabric. " 




West Coast Smoked Salmon 
with Slow-Scrambled Eggs 



Canadian smoked salmon, sliced 


10 ounces 


Rye bread 


4 slices 


Butter 


1 tbsp 


Eggs, extra large 


4 


Milk or cream 


2 tbsps 


Chives or green onions, 




thinly sliced 


1/4 cup 


Gouda cheese, grated 


4 ounces 


Salt 


1/2 tsp 


Ground pepper 


pinch 


Caviar 


1 ounce 


Chives, whole 


3 


Fresh dill or parsley 


3 sprigs 


Canadian oysters 


4 



300 g 



15ml 

30 ml 

60 ml 

2 ml 



30 g 



Invert a ramekin over each slice of rye bread and then, with a small paring 
knife, trace tightly around the exterior to cut out a small circle. Toast the 
circles until they're golden brown and crispy; they will shrink slightly. 

Gently line four lightly oiled 6-ounce (3/4 cup/175 ml) ramekins or small 
tea cups with plastic wrap taking care to work out any air bubbles. Ensure 
that any extra plastic wrap is folded down the outside of the moulds. Line 
each ramekin with a single layer of smoked salmon, trimming the salmon 
to make the lining as even as possible. 

Fashion a double boiler by placing a glass or metal bowl over a pot of 
simmering water. Toss in the butter and heat it until melted. Meanwhile, 
whisk together the eggs, milk, chives, Gouda cheese, salt and pepper. 

When the butter is melted, pour in the egg mixture. Stir with a wooden 
spoon until the eggs have thickened into soft, creamy curds. This will 
take about 10 minutes. 

Spoon the scrambled eggs into the smoked salmon moulds. Top each 
mould with a toasted rye bread round. Place a small plate over top of 
the filled ramekin and flip the ramekin and plate over. Remove the ramekin 
and gently peel off the plastic wrap revealing the smoked salmon stuffed 
with slowly scrambled eggs. Top with a shucked oyster and additional 
recommended topping.* 

Makes 4 servings 



*Chef Michael Smith recommends that the dish be topped with 
a generous dollop of Brown Butter Hollandaise, a small tangle of 
pickled red onions, a generous spoonful of caviar, a chive or two 
and perhaps a sprig of dill. For recipes on these recommended 
toppings visit www.eatcanadian.ca. 

Recipe created by Michael Smith. Additional recipes developed 
by Chef Smith can be found at www.eatcanadian.ca. 




Canadian Bison Blanquette 
with Morel Mushrooms 



Canadian stewin 


g bison 


1 1/4 lbs 


600 g 




Garlic 




1 cloves 






Thyme, fresh 




4 stalks 






Poultry stock (unsalted) or water 


3 cups 




750 ml 


Morels, dried 




1/2 cup 


1 to 1 5 g 




Cream (35%) 




1 1/3 cups 




300 ml 


Lemon 




1/2 






Butter 




2 tsps 


30 g 


30 ml 


Flour 




3 tsps 


30 g 


45 ml 


Salt, coarse 




to taste 






Pepper, white or 


cayenne 


to taste 







Blanch garlic cloves by placing in a saucepan, covering with cold water 
and boiling gently for five minutes. Remove garlic, rinse with cold water 
and set aside. 

Soak Morel mushrooms in lukewarm water for 20 minutes to reconstitute 
them. Rinse and cook gently in the cream over medium heat. Cook for 
20 minutes and turn off heat. 

Cut meat into approximately 30 to 35 g (1/2") cubes. Rinse the meat in 
ice water and place in a saucepan. Add the poultry stock or cold water 
to 2 cm (3/4") above the pieces. Add coarse salt and slowly bring to a boil. 
Skim carefully and add the thyme and blanched garlic cloves. Cook gently, 
covered, for 50 minutes until the meat is tender. 

In a saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat and add the flour to 
make a roux. Turn off heat when the roux becomes white and frothy. 
Set aside to cool. 

Remove the chunks of cooked meat, garlic and thyme from the cooking 
liquid. Pour this liquid, while still warm, onto the cooled roux, whisking 
it continuously. Bring to a low boil and cook for a few minutes. Add the 
Morel mushrooms and cream, then cook for a few more minutes. Place 
the meat back in, along with a pinch of cayenne and a dash of lemon 
juice, and simmer for two to three minutes. Taste for seasoning, and 
serve with wild rice. 

Makes 2 to 4 servings 

Recipe provided by Agriculture and Agri-Food Cananda. 



Japanese-style Canadian 
Soybean Salad 



Canadian soybeans, cooked 


1 1/2 cups 


225 


g 


350 ml 


Spinach, raw and well rinsed 


2 cups 


200 


g 


475 ml 


Fresh tomatoes 


2 


225 


g 




Vinaigrette 










Soya sauce (naturally brewed) 


1/4 cup 






60 ml 


Mirin (mild cooking sake) 


4tsps 






20 ml 


Dashi (Japanese fish broth) 


4 tsps 






20 ml 


Rice vinegar 


3 tsps 






15 ml 


Sesame oil 


a few drops 








To Garnish: 










Sesame seeds 


to taste 









Cut tomatoes into thin slices. Spread over plate. 

Cook soybeans in salted boiling water for five minutes. Cool in cold water. 
Drain soybeans and mix with spinach. 

Pour soya sauce, mirin and dashi into a pot and bring to a boil. 
Turn off the heat and add the vinegar and sesame oil. Cool. 

Add spinach and soybeans to the sauce and let soak for a few minutes. 
Set the soybeans and spinach in the middle of the plate already garnished 
with tomatoes, and add a spoonful of sauce. 

Garnish with sesame seeds. 
Makes 4 servings 

Recipe provided by Agriculture and Agri-Food Cananda. 






W. I* 



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■ 



ChGT Daryle Nagata 

Vancouver, British Columbia 



Chef Nagata's stellar international background 
includes cooking stints at the exclusive Savoy in 
London, La Reserve Geneva, and the Fairmont 
in Washington, D.C., where he served as personal 
chef to numerous heads of state and celebrities. 
He is currently Executive Chef at the Pan Pacific 
Hotel in Vancouver. 

"I travel a lot and I can tell you it just doesn't 
get better than Canada. We have a great bounty 
of products available with outstanding quality. 
Canadian beef, for example, is revered around 
the world for its flavour and high quality. It's very 
distinctive. We finish our beef with grain, it's properly 
aged and marbled, and as a result, it is tender, juicy 
and has a unique taste. " 




Asian-style Canadian 
Beef Short Ribs 



Beef short ribs, 

cut in 2" (5 cm) pieces 3 lbs 
Salt and freshly ground pepper 

Sesame oil 2 tbsps 
Garlic, separated into 

cloves and peeled 1 bulb 

Star anise 5 whole 

Japanese soy sauce 1/2 cup 

Packed brown sugar 1/4 cup 

Fresh ginger, chopped 3 tbsps 
Green onions, coarsely chopped 1/2 cup 

Rice vinegar or cider vinegar 2 tbsps 

Water 2 cups 



1.5 kg 



30 ml 



125 ml 
60 ml 
45 ml 

125 ml 
30 ml 

500 ml 



Trim fat from short ribs. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper. 
Heat oil over medium-high heat in Dutch oven or large heavy pot; 
add short ribs and brown all over. 

Add garlic, star anise, soy sauce, brown sugar, ginger, onions, vinegar 
and water. Bring to a boil; reduce heat to simmer. Cook uncovered for 
1 1/2 to 2 hours, until the short ribs are quite tender. 

Preheat oven to 450°F (225°C). Remove ribs from the braising liquid 
and place them on a broiler pan; roast in oven until crispy, about 
1 5 minutes. Meanwhile, skim any fat from the surface of the braising 
liquid, then boil liquid over high heat for 10 minutes to concentrate 
the flavours. The sauce should thicken slightly. Remove only the star 
anise. Ladle sauce into shallow bowls and place a rib in each. 

Makes 4 to 6 servings 



Recipe provided by Beef Information Centre (www.beefinfo.org). 
Chef Daryle Nagata has enhanced the Asian flavour by adding star 
anise to the recipe. 

Recipes developed by Chef Nagata can be found at 
www.eatcanadian.ca. 



7 



Canada's beef herd is built on British and European 
continental breeds that are different from the beef 
herds, of key competitors. These breeds deliver meat 
that is more tender and well-marbled, which 
is why Canadian beef is popular with discerning 
beef eaters everywhere. 




Wild Rice Frittata 
with Dried Cranberries 



Canadian wild rice, 








cooked in salted water 


1/2 cup 


100 g 


125 m 


Shallots, finely chopped 


2 tbsps 


30 g 


30 m 


Red pepper, finely chopped 


3 tbsps 


40 g 


45 m 


Fresh tarragon, chopped 


1 tbsps 




15 m 


Canola oil 


2 tbsps 




30 m 


Green onion, finely chopped 


1 






All-purpose flour 


2 tbsps 


20 g 


30 m 


Eggs 


4 






Dried cranberries 


1/4 cup 


35 g 


60 m 


Cream (35% or sour cream) 


1/4 cup 




60 m 


Salt and freshly ground pepper 


to taste 







Soak dried cranberries in lukewarm water for five minutes. 
Drain and chop. 

Heat 1 5 ml (1 tbsp) of canola oil in a frying pan, add the shallots and red 
pepper, cover and steam for one minute. Before they get discoloured, turn 
off the heat and add the green onion, cranberries, tarragon, salt and pep- 
per. Sprinkle thoroughly with 20 g (2 tbsps) of flour. Mix well and set aside 
to cool. 

Break the four eggs into a bowl. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. 
Mix in 60 ml (1/4 cup) of sour cream or 35% cream. Add 100 g (1/2 cup) 
of cooked wild rice and the mixture of shallots, red pepper, cranberries, 
tarragon and green onion. 

Pour this mixture into a buttered and floured pan. Bake at 180°C (350°F) 
for 12 to 15 minutes. 

Serve as an accompaniment to white fish or poultry. 

Makes 2 to 4 servings 

Recipe provided by Agriculture and Agri-Food Cananda. 



Grilled Salmon 
with Berry Compote 



Canadian salmon fillets (4) 6 to 8 oz 

Shallot, finely chopped 1 

Lemon zest and juice 1/2 lemon 

Canadian berries, fresh or frozen 1 1/3 cups 
(cranberries, blueberries, Saskatoon berries) 

Fresh thyme 2-3 sprigs 

Canadian honey to taste 

Salt and pepper to taste 

Canola oil 2 tbsps 

Assorted vegetables 



170 g to 225 g 



200 g 



300ml 



30ml 



In a medium saucepan, slowly bring the berries, shallot, thyme, lemon 
zest and juice to a simmer. 

Add some honey, adjusting the quantity according to the sweetness 
of the berries used. 

Cook until the berries are softened. 

Adjust seasonings to taste, remove thyme sprigs, and keep warm. 

Brush salmon fillets with oil, season with salt and pepper and barbecue 
to desired firmness. 

Serve with berry compote and assorted grilled vegetables. 
Makes 4 servings 

Recipe provided by Agriculture and Agri-Food Cananda. 



Canadian salmon are a cornerstone of the 

country's world-renowned seafood industry and 

a favourite of fish lovers everywhere. These magnificent 

fish have created a rich cultural heritage for all Canadians, 

and are a mainstay of many communities on both 

our Pacific and Atlantic coasts. 




10 




Chef/? 



G 



em i cousyn 

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan 



i 




Chef Cousyn decided at a young age to pursue 
cooking and polished his culinary skills across 
France, Switzerland and Canada before finally 
settling in Saskatoon in 1995. With his wife and 
co-owner, Janis Cousyn, Chef Cousyn took over 
Calories Restaurant and transformed it into one of 
Saskatchewan's most popular dining establishments. 

"The taste and quality of Canadian beef and pork 
are second to none. And Canada continually produces 
amazing specialty and niche products, such as bison, 
and wild mushrooms... the University of Saskatchewan 
just came out with a new variety of hardy sour 
cherries called Carmine jewel, which are particularly 
versatile. We use them in our mustards, lamb 
meatballs and many other dishes. They're excellent 
for processing of any kind, dried for use in granola 
and fruit bars, or fresh in jams and jellies. " 



" 






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Prairie Steak and Eggs 



Rib-eye medallions (1) 3 to 4 oz 

Unsalted butter 

or fat from making lardons 1 tsp 

Quail egg 1 

A handful of crisp coarse lardons 



90 to 120 g 



5 ml 



Heat a grill to medium-high and barbecue steak until the desired 
doneness. 

Meanwhile, melt butter or pork fat in a small skillet and fry quail egg 
until still runny in the centre, about 45 - 60 seconds. 

To make pork lardons, cut salt pork or thick-cut bacon into small cubes. 
Fry over medium heat until well-browned and crisp. Drain on paper towels 
and keep warm until needed. 

Top steak with egg, surround with warm lardons and serve. 

Makes 1 serving 



Recipe created by Remi Cousyn. Additional recipes developed by 
Chef Cousyn can be found at www.eatcanadian.ca. 



Canadian beef: the taste you love; the nutrients 
you need. Meticulous breeding, careful stock-raising 
and state-of-the-art processing facilities mean that the 
taste and quality of Canadian beef are unequalled 
anywhere. Look for our speciality products such 
as halal-certified, kosher, natural 
and organic beef. 



11 




12 



Lentil and Feta Patty 



Canadian lentils, green or red 


1 cup 


200 g 


250 m 


Water 


2 cups 




500 m 


Garlic, crushed 


1 clove 






Celery 


1/2 stalk 






White onion, diced 


3 tbsps 


30 g 




Feta cheese, diced 


1/3 cup 


100 g 


80 m 


Red pepper, diced 


3 tbsps 


25 g 


30 m 


Green onion, minced 


1 






Canola oil 


3 tbsps 




45 m 


Oregano, chopped 


3 sprigs 






Flour 


2 tbsps 


30 g 


30 m 


Egg 


1 






Salt and pepper 


to taste 







Rinse lentils in cold water. Place them in a saucepan along with the water, 
garlic, celery and onion. Bring to a boil, skim if necessary. Cook covered 
on low heat for 1 5-30 minutes or until tender. When the lentils are tender, 
add salt and cook for another five minutes. Be careful not to overcook; 
the lentils must remain intact. Drain and set aside to cool. 

While cooking the lentils, saute the red pepper and green onion in 
1 5 ml (1 tbsp) of canola oil, until lightly browned. Turn off heat and 
add the oregano. 

In a bowl, combine the lentils, cooked vegetables, egg, flour and diced 
feta. Mix thoroughly. Shape the patties and cook them in a hot frying pan, 
using the remaining canola oil. Brown evenly on both sides. 



Makes 2 to 4 servings 

Recipe provided by Agriculture and Agri-Food Cananda. 



Pork Medallions with 
Fresh Blueberry Sauce 



Canadian pork tenderloin 


1.1 lbs 


500 


g 




Honey 


2 tbsps 






25 m 


Rice vinegar 


2 tbsps 






30 m 


Sweet white wine 


2 tbsps 






30 m 


Blueberry juice 


2/3 cup 






100 m 


Beef broth (unsalted) 


1 2/3 cups 






400 m 


Fresh blueberries 


3/4 cup 


150 


g 


180 m 


Cornstarch 


2 tbsps 


10 


g 




Canola oil 


2 tbsps 






30 m 


Water 


1 tbsp 






15 m 


Salt and pepper 


to taste 









Prepare the pork tenderloin by cutting into 1 .5 cm-thick (1/2") medallions. 
Season with salt and pepper and leave at room temperature. 

Pour honey and 1 5 ml (1 tbsp) of water into a saucepan and bring to a 
boil. Add the vinegar, reduce heat and cook for one minute. Add the white 
wine and reduce sauce to the consistency of a syrup. Add the blueberry 
juice and reduce to half. Add the beef broth and boil until desired 
consistency. Taste for seasoning and add the fresh blueberries. 

Saute the medallions on high heat in a bit of canola oil. Turn over once 
and keep the meat slightly pink. Remove the medallions from pan and 
set aside on a warm plate. Remove the fat from the saucepan and pour 
in the blueberry sauce to deglaze the pan. If necessary, thicken the sauce 
with a little cornstarch dissolved in blueberry juice. 

Pour the hot sauce over the medallions and serve. 
Makes 2 to 4 servings 

Recipe provided by Agriculture and Agri-Food Cananda. 




14 








% 



v-llGT Donna Dooher 



Toronto, Ontario 



Author, restaurateur, and internationally-known 
TV food show host, Chef Dooher is one of North 
America's leading advocates of the rewards and 
entertainment value of hands-on-cooking. Chef Dooher's 
newest restaurant venture is Mildred's Temple Kitchen 
in the heart of Toronto's Liberty Village 

"We are spoiled here in Canada. We have an incredible 
food and agriculture distribution system, and we have 
vast ethnic influences from around the world. We make 
innovative products like chickpea flour, which is great 
for people who have a wheat intolerance. Chickpeas 
provide excellent nutritional value and are a staple in 
many diets around the world. " 



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Canadian-style Dosas with Sweet 
Potato and Roasted Onion Curry 

Canadian-style Dosas 



Canadian chickpea flour 


1 cup 


250 m 


Canadian buckwheat flour 


1/4 cup 


60 m 


Salt 


1/2 tsp 


2 m 


Ground cumin 


1/2 tsp 


2 m 


Water 


1 1/2 cups 


325 m 


Clarified unsalted butter 


as needed 




(a.k.a. ghee) 







In a medium-sized mixing bowl, combine the chickpea and buckwheat 
flours. Stir in the salt and cumin. Whisk in the water to make a thin batter. 
Let stand for about 30 minutes before using. 

Heat a cast iron griddle or crepe pan over medium-high heat. To test to see 
when pan is ready to use, sprinkle the pan with water. If the drops hiss and 
dance, it's ready to cook the dosas. 

Brush the pan quickly with clarified butter (ghee) and pour on about 1/4 cup 
(60 ml) of the batter. Spread it with the back of a spoon or swirl it to 
ensure that the dosa is very thin. When the top surface is dry, brush with 
more clarified butter, loosen the edges and flip. Cook until the underside 
is richly golden. It will take only a few seconds if the pan is hot enough. 
Keep the dosa warm and repeat until all the batter is used. Set aside 
and prepare the Sweet Potato and Roasted Onion Curry. 

Makes 6 servings 



Recipe created by Donna Dooher. Additional recipes developed 
by Chef Dooher can be found at www.eatcanadian.ca. 



Canadian pulses come in a wide variety of colours, 
shapes and sizes. Whether it is chickpeas, lentils, beans 
or peas, there is no shortage of choice. Seeded area in 
Canada has expanded 400 per cent in the past 15 years, 
with annual production at 4.8 million tonnes. International 
. demand for this quality, nutritious and economical 
product, is fuelling the growth. 



15 




Sweet Potato and Roasted Onion Curry 



Sweet potatoes, peeled and 

cut into 1 " (2.5 cm) cubes 3 

Unsalted butter 2 tbsps 30 ml 

White onion, thinly sliced 1 

Cumin seeds 1 tsp 5 ml 

Green chili, minced 1/2-1 

Clove garlic, minced 1 

Fresh ginger, grated 1 " (2.5 cm) piece 

Garam masala 1 tsp 5 ml 

Black mustard seeds 1/2 tsp 2 ml 

Turmeric, ground 1/4 tsp 1ml 

Fresh coriander, chopped 1/4 cup 60 ml 

Fresh lemon juice 1 tsp 5 ml 

Kosher salt to taste 

Cook the sweet potatoes in boiling salted water until just cooked through, 
about 10 minutes. Drain and set aside in a large bowl. 

Melt the unsalted butter in a large skillet. Saute the onion until golden, 
about five minutes. Combine the cumin seeds, green chili, garlic, ginger, 
garam masala, black mustard seeds, and turmeric and stir into the onions 
and cook for one minute. 

Add the sweet potatoes to the onion mixture and mix well. Stir in the 
chopped coriander and the lemon juice. 

Season to taste with the kosher salt. 

To serve, spoon some of the sweet potato and roasted onion curry onto 
each dosa, roll or fold over. 

Makes 6 servings 



Recipe created by Donna Dooher. Additional recipes developed 
by Chef Dooher can be found at www.eatcanadian.ca. 






Shrimp Salad with Fresh 
Soybeans and Tofu Sauce 



Canadian northern shrimp, cook* 


;d 1 cup 


150 g 


250 m 


Soybeans, cooked 


1 1/2 cups 


225 g 


350 m 


Red onion, chopped 


3 tbsps 


25g 


45 m 


Red pepper, chopped 


3 tbsps 


25 g 


45 m 


Rice vinegar 


1 tsp 




5 m 


Canola oil 


2 tsps 




10m 


Tofu 


3/4 cup 


125 g 


180 m 


Sesame oil 


2 tsps 




10 m 


Lime juice 


1/2 






Honey 


1 tsp 




5m 


Salt 


to taste 






White pepper 


to taste 







Drain and squeeze excess water from shrimp and set aside. 

In an electric mixer, combine the tofu, sesame oil, juice of half a lime, 
honey, salt and pepper, and mix until smooth and thick. Set aside 
in a bowl. 

In another bowl, mix the soybeans, onions and peppers. Add a pinch 
of salt, rice vinegar and canola oil. 

Add the shrimp to the tofu sauce and fold in. 

In the middle of a plate, form a "nest" with the mixture of soybean, onion 
and red pepper. Place the shrimp seasoned with tofu sauce in the center 
of the nest and serve cold. 

Makes 2 to 4 servings 

Recipe provided by Agriculture and Agri-Food Cananda. 






18 



v*nGT Alain Pignard 



Montreal, Quebec 



Chef Alain Pignard plied his trade in some of the 
finest kitchens around the world before coming to 
Canada. He is currently Executive Chef of Fair- 
mont The Queen Elizabeth where he — along with 
his 90-member kitchen brigade — prepares dishes 
for clients staying in the hotel's 1,000-plus rooms 
or those attending functions. Every year, Chef 
Pignard and his team prepare more than 100,000 
meals for other high-visibility events throughout 
Montreal. 

"Canadian pork is the best in the world. Our 
achievements in breeding selection have resulted 
in a lean and flavorful pork that is second to none. 
And it comes in such a wide variety of cuts. 
Fork is endlessly versatile. " 








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French Canadian Pork Cretons 



Canadian pork belly 


1 1/2 lbs 


675 g 




Carrots, peeled and 








sliced lengthwise 


2 






Cooking onion, cut into 








1/2" (1 cm) thick slices 


1 






Dry white wine 


1 1/4 cups 




300 m 


Salt and freshly ground pepper 


pinch 






Mayonnaise 


2oz. 


56 g 




Grainy mustard 


1 oz. 


28 g 




Whipping cream (35%) 


2 tbsps 




30 m 


Sunflower oil 


2 tbsps 




30 m 


Salt 


1/2 tsp 




2 m 


Freshly ground white pepper 


to taste 






Cinnamon 


pinch 






Cloves 


pinch 







Arrange the carrots and onion slices in a small roasting or cake pan. Top 
with the pork belly, skin side up. Pour on the wine. Sprinkle lightly with 
salt and ground pepper. Cover with a loose tent of foil and roast at 350°F 
(180°C) for three hours or till the pork is very tender. Let cool. 

When pork is cool enough to handle, remove the lean meat with your 
fingers. You should have about 10 oz (280 g). Set aside. Discard the rest. 

Measure the mayonnaise, mustard and whipping cream into a food 
processor. Process mixture for a few seconds until it is light in colour. 
Add the oil, salt, white pepper, cinnamon and cloves and pulse again 
briefly to blend. Add the reserved meat; pulse briefly till coarsely ground. 

Serve with chutney and mustard on warm baguettes. 

Makes about 116 cups (375 ml) 



Recipe created by Alain Pignard. Additional recipes developed by 
Chef Pignard can be found at www.eatcanadian.ca. 



Canadian pork: lean, healthy and delicious. 
What could be more tempting than the aroma 
of crisp, sizzling bacon for breakfast? Or more 
delectable for a dinner treat than roast pork tenderloin 
accented with blueberries? Canada is the world's 
' ird largest pork exporter. 



19 



... --?-'■ 




20 



Broiled Beef Bavette 
Marinated in Canadian Beer 



The marinade 










Canadian stout beer 


1/2 cup 




125 m 


Canadian pilsner 


beer 


1/2 cup 




125 m 


Onion, finely chopped 


2/3 cup 


100g 


150 m 


Garlic, diced 




1 clove 






Tamarind paste 




2 tbsps 


40 g 


30 m 


Ginger, grated 




1 tbsp 


20g 


15 m 


Soya sauce 




2 tbsps 




30 m 


Canola oil 




1 tbsp 




15 m 


Maple syrup 




2 tbsps 




30 m 


Cane sugar 




2 tbsps 


30 g 




Salt and cayenne 


pepper 


to taste 






Beef bavette 




1.25 lbs 


600 g 





In a small saucepan, reduce the two beers by half. Before removing from 
the heat, add half of the onions, garlic, tamarind, ginger, soya sauce, and 
maple syrup. Return to boil for three to four minutes. Turn off heat and 
add the canola oil and a pinch of cayenne. Once cooled, place the meat 
in the marinade and turn it frequently for six hours (less for finer cuts). 

Remove the meat from the marinade and dry on paper towel. Salt the 
meat. In a deep frying pan, sear meat in hot cooking oil. Turn once to cook 
to desired consistency. Once cooked, place meat on a warm plate and 
leave for five minutes. Remove fat from frying pan. Add the other half of 
the onion, cover and steam for one minute. Sprinkle the onions with cane 
sugar and cook for one minute. Add the marinade to the frying pan and 
bring to boil with the onions and sugar, scraping the bottom of the pan 
with a wooden spoon. 

Cut meat into strips and fan out on a plate. Cover with the marinade sauce. 

Makes 2 to 4 servings 

Recipe provided by Agriculture and Agri-Food Cananda. 



Cornmeal Polenta 
with Wild Mushrooms 



Canadian mushrooms, 


dried 


1/2 cup 


I5g 


125m 


(chanterelle, porcini) 










Milk, lukewarm 




2 cups 




500 m 


Mushrooms, fresh 




1/2 cup 


50 g 


125 m 


Cornmeal 




1/2 cup 


80 g 


125 m 


Garlic 




1 clove 






Vidal Icewine 




1 tbsp 




15m 


Parsley, chopped 




1 tbsp 




15m 


Tarragon, chopped 




1 tbsp 




15 m 


Butter 




3 tbsps 


25 g 


25 m 


Egg 




1 






Egg yolk 




1 






Salt 




1 tsp 


5g 




Cayenne pepper 




to taste 






Nutmeg, grated 




to taste 







Soak the dried mushrooms in the warm milk for one hour. 

Remove mushrooms from the milk and squeeze out the liquid. 
Set milk aside. 

Chop the dried and fresh mushrooms. In a small frying pan, saute the 
chopped garlic in a bit of butter 10 ml (1 tbsp) over medium heat. Add the 
mushrooms before the garlic starts to brown, and cook until softened. Add 
1 5 ml (1 tbsp) of Icewine to deglaze. Add salt and pepper to taste. Turn off 
heat and keep warm. 

Heat the milk with 1 5 g (2 tbsps) of butter, 5 g (1 tsp) of salt, and a pinch 
of cayenne and nutmeg. When it reaches the boiling point, remove the 
milk from the heat and slowly pour in the cornmeal, stirring constantly to 
avoid lumping. Once all the cornmeal has been added, return the saucepan 
to heat and cook while stirring for seven minutes. Remove from the heat, 
add the combined eggs and return to boil for one minute. Add the sauteed 
mushrooms, parsley and chopped tarragon, and taste for seasoning. 

Spread the polenta on a buttered plate. Once cooled, cut the polenta up 
with a knife or a cookie-cutter. Heat and serve with a tomato sauce. 

Makes 2 to 4 servings 

Recipe provided by Agriculture and Agri-Food Cananda. 







: 




f 





Chef Chris a 



erni 



St. Andrews by-the-Sea, New Brunswick 



Chef Aerni is one of New Brunswick's most 
celebrated chefs. In 2001, following traditional chef 
training in Switzerland and time working around 
the world, Chef Aerni and his wife, Graziella, 
bought the Rossmount Inn in St. Andrews 
by-the-Sea, an 87-acre estate including an 18-room 
country inn with a lovely bar and restaurant. 

"Living in Canada, and specifically on the East Coast, 
is as close to nirvana as I could have ever hoped 
for. Within a 30-minute drive, I can pick up fresh 
sturgeon, sea urchins, mussels, scallops, snow crabs, 
herring, lobster... this area is incredibly rich in food 
products, from organic produce to wild mushrooms. " 




Maritime Lobster- Yukon Gold 
Eggs Benedict 

A Rosti made with Canadian Yukon Gold potatoes forms the base of 
this sumptuous breakfast treat with poached eggs, Summer Savoury 
Hollandaise Sauce, and lobster from Atlantic Canada. 



The Lobster 




One live Canadian lobster 


1 1/2 lbs 


Large pot of water 


12 cups 


Sea salt 


2 tbsps 


White vinegar 


1/2 cup 



675g 



4L 

30ml 

125 ml 



Bring the water to a boil, add the salt and the vinegar. Submerge the 
lobster into the water (head first) and cover with a lid. 

As soon as the water is back to a boil, pull the pot from the heat source 
and let the lobster simmer for four minutes, then remove from water. 
Set aside until cool enough to handle. Crack shells and remove the meat. 
Set aside. 

Meanwhile prepare the potato Rosti, Hollandaise and eggs. 



Potatoes Rosti* 

Canadian potatoes (Yukon Gold) 4 large 

Canola oil 3 tbsps 

Onion, minced 1/2 cup 

Salt 1/2 tsp 

Freshly ground pepper 1/2 tsp 



45 ml 

125 ml 

2 ml 

2 ml 



Cook unpeeled potatoes in boiling water until nearly tender. Cool 
completely and if possible, let stand overnight. Peel and shred coarsely 
into a large bowl. 

In a 1 0" (25 cm) skillet, add 1 tbsp (1 5 ml) of the canola oil and saute the onion 
until tender. Add onions to the potatoes and season with salt and pepper. 

Over medium heat, add the remaining canola oil in the skillet used to 
saute the onions. Pat the potato mixture evenly into the pan. Continue 
cooking until the underside is deep golden, about 20 minutes. 

*When cooking Rosti it is important to have a dry potato. The potatoes 
are cooked with the skin on until soft. They are drained and left to cool 
overnight or a full day without removing the skin. 

Continued on next page 



23 



Canadian lobster is available as live or frozen 
whole lobster, raw, pre-cooked or blanched, as frozen 
lobster tails, as lobster meat and in several other forms. 
Harvested from some of the cleanest, most pristine waters 
in the world, Canadian fish and seafood products are 
known internationally for their variety, 
quality and value. 




24 



Summer Savoury Hollandaise 



Salted butter 


1/3 lb 


Shallot 


1 


Dry white wine 


1/3 cup 


Apple cider vinegar 


3 tbsps 


White peppercorns 


10 


Summer savoury 


3 leaves 


Omega 3 egg 


1 


Lemon 


wedge 


Cayenne pepper 


pinch 



150 g 



75 ml 
45 ml 



Melt the butter in a small saucepan and let it boil until the milk particles 
start to turn brown. Set aside and keep warm. The brown milk particles 
will now settle to the bottom of the pan. This process creates a clarified 
butter. 

Peel and chop the shallot and place in a small saucepan. Add the wine, 
vinegar, peppercorns and savoury leaves. Bring to a boil over medium heat 
and simmer, uncovered until the liquid has been reduced by 10 per cent 
of the volume. Keep this reduction warm. 

Separate the egg yolk from the white and place the yolk in a stainless steel 
bowl. Discard the white or save for another use. Strain the reduction into 
the same bowl. Place the bowl over simmering water to create a double 
boiler; whisk in the egg yolk until the mixture reaches the consistency 
of a cream. 

Slowly, under steady mixing, incorporate the clarified butter into the egg 
mixture. Add some of the brown milk particles to the hollandaise for taste 
(the milk particles contain all the salt in the butter so use them carefully). 

Finish the Hollandaise by adding some lemon juice and a pinch of 
cayenne pepper. 



Poached Eggs 

Omega-3 eggs 1 
White vinegar 
Water 



6 

1/4 cup 

9 cups 



60 ml 
3L 



In a wide rimmed pot, bring water to boil; add white vinegar. 

Break the eggs one by one in a small bowl and let them slide into the 
water, simmer for a minute and a half. Turn the eggs carefully with a 
slotted spoon and simmer for another minute and a half. Remove one 
by one with a slotted spoon and let the water drip off. 



To Assemble 

Invert the potatoes onto a large, warmed plate and slice into six wedges. 

For each serving place a wedge of crisp Rosti on a heated plate with a 
poached egg on top. Spoon the Hollandaise over each egg. Arrange the 
lobster meat (tail cut into slices, claws and whole knuckles) in the center. 

Top with a tiny spoonful of caviar; sprinkle with chives and summer 
savoury leaves. 

Makes 6 servings 



Recipes created by Chris Aerni. Additional recipes developed by 
Chef Aerni can be found at www.eatcanadian.ca. 



Canada's Yukon Gold potatoes are 

the perfect spud for making Rosti because of their 

rich potato flavour and beautiful, natural golden-buttery colour. 

Yukon Gold was Canada's first bred potato variety to be promoted, 
packaged and marketed with its name right on the package. 
And it is one of the few varieties in the world that is marketed 
-at the retail and restaurant level by its name. 



25 




l 






Quality 

is in our nature 



Savour 



RECIPES 




P 11153 

2010 

c.3 



1*1 



Agriculture and 
Agri-Food Canada 



Agriculture et 
Agroalimentaire Canada 



Canada