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Full text of "Scarab"

TOMPKINS-M c CAW LIBRARY 



CAWl 

•v 



191 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/scarab83aug1959medi 



R// 



Official Organ 

of the 

Alumni Association 

of the 

Medical College 

of 

Virginia 




February. 1957 
clume 6, Number 








Our Lost Sheep 



Official Organ of the 
Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 

Published by the Medical College of Virginia Alumni 
Association in February, May, August, and November 

Editorial Committee 

Robert V. Terrell M'34, Editor-in-Chief and Chairman 
j. Spencer Dryden M'33 Edward Myers D'26 

j. Berkeley Gordon M'26 Marguerite Nicholson- 

Harry Lyons D'23 n?4 

R. Reginald Rooke P'21 W. Roy Smith P'4l 

Minnie M. Franck, Managing Editor 
Mildred H. Clark, Assistant Managing Editor 

Officers 

James T. Tucker M'27, President 

Medical Arts Bldg., Richmond, Virginia 

William N. Hodgkin D'12, Immed. Past-President 

Warrenton, Virginia 

T. Spencer Dryden M'33, President-Elect 

6816 Millwood Rd., Bethesda 14, Md. 
). Berkeley Gordon M'26, Vice-President 

N. J. State Hospital. Marlboro, N. J. 

Harry Lyons D'23, Vice-President 
Medical College of Virginia. Richmond, Va. 
G. F. Hendley PT8, Vice-President 
2125 Fairmount Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

Frances Gordon N'43, Vice-President 

3212 \V. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 
Washington Winn M'35, Secretary 

303 Stockton Lane, Richmond, Va. 

Harvey B. Haag M'28, Treasurer 
Medical College of Va., Richmond, Va. 

Trustees 

Term Expires May, 1951 

Waverlt R. Payne M'23 

91 29th Street. Newport New 

H. Hudnall Ware, Jr. M'2 

816 W. Franklin St., Richmon 

Moffett H. Bowman D'35 

1412 Franklin Road, S.W., 

Roanoke. Va. 

Term Expires May, 1958 

E. L. Alexander M'27 Donald S. Daniel M'24 

Medical Arts Building, Johnston- Willis Hospital, 

Newport News, Va. Richmond, Va. 

R. Reginald Rooke P'21 W. Roy Smith P'41 

2929 Second Ave., Physicians' Products Co., 

Richmond, Va. Petersburg, Va. 

J. Spencer Dryden M'33 J. P. Broaddus D'30 

6816 Millwood Rd., Bethesda. 14, Md. Franklin, Va. 

Term Expires May, 1959 

Richard A. Michaux M'37 
Lee Medical Bldg. 
Rich 



Mrs. Sabra S. Russell N'31 
1439 Louise St., 
Santa Ana, Calif. 



Claiborne Robins P'33 
1407 Cummings Drive 
Richmond, Va. 
Edward E. Myers D'26 
511 Medical Arts Bldg. 
Norfolk, Va. 



Marguerite Nicholson N'34 

Cabaniss Hall. M.C.V. 

Richmond, Va. 

Robert V Terrell M'34 

Medical Arts Bldg. 

Richmond. Va. 



We've exhausted all possible sources that we can think of 
and now we ask your help to try to trace these lost alumni. If 
you know their whereabouts or can suggest someone who might, 
won't you let us know. Each issue we plan to list some of our 
lost sheep. 

C. L. Ague, P'32 

John M. Anderson. '37 

Evelyn M. Ball, M'38 

Franklin P. Best, P'02 

B. D. Bosworth, M'32 

Samuel D. Burroughs, MTO, UCM 

J. M. Callender, M'96 

\Y. T. Carper, M'99 

S. L. Carter, P'03 

Walter C. Conrad, P'50 

B. W. Cox, MT5 

N. D. Crickenberger, M'01 

J. W. Cringan, M'01 

J. B. Crockett, P'02 

J. H. Crone, P'80 

Bernard A. Daly, M'99 

Meredith Daniel, P'02 

Harry M. Echols, PT2 

J. W. Ellis, P'l2 

George Stone Ferrell, M'40 

About The Cover 

The time is December 17, 1956. 

The place is lovely and revered Monumental Episcopal Church 
adjacent to M.C.V. 

The occasion is the inauguration of Dr. Robert Blackwell 
Smith, Jr., as Fourth President of the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia. 

The camera has caught this important group as they listen 
to the able address of Dr. Joseph C. Robert, president of Hamp- 
den-Sydney College. One senses that in accepting his high posi- 
tion President Smith is earnestly dedicating his talents to its 
tasks. Also listening attentively are Chancellor William T. 
Sanger, Chief Justice Edward M. Hudgins of the Virginia Su- 
preme Court of Appeals, and Dr. James T. Tucker, president 
of the M.C.V. Alumni Association. 

Robert V. Terrell, M.D. 
Editor-in-chief 



Anyone For Drugs? 

Remember These Pharmacies! 



Highland Park Pharmacy 

2929 Second Avenue 
Richmond ■ Virginia 



R. Reginald Rooke, P 21 

C. K. Booth, P 41 

W. W. Johnson, P 38 



Telephone: 3-1847 




SUBURBAN PHARMACY 

Harry M. Eods, P'22 
Yvonne Phythian, P'55 

Telephone: 6-4929 

WE5TWOOD PHARMACY 

Field M. Hite, P47 
James W. Patterson, P'55 
Jonah M. Slipow, P'39 

Telephone: 88-2869 



BEVERLY HILLS PHARMACY 

Robert G. Gillespie, P 51 
Sol P. Kessler, P 52 
Abraham Cohen, P 34 

Telephone. 87-4231 

CRESTVIEW PHARMACY 

Joseph A, Arcaro, P'26 
A. B. Rodman, P'26 

Telephone, 88-2831 

LAFAYETTE PHARMACY 

R. L, Jarratt, P' 18 
John Giragosian, P 52 
J. A. McKenney, P'47 

Te/ephone, 5-1777 



Sandston Pharmacy 

2 West Williamsburg Road 
Sandston • Virginia 



Anthony P. Mehfoud, P'39 
W. H. Zirkle, P"15 
Jomes N. O'Grady, P'55 



Te/ephone: Fairfield 2270 



Stuart Circle Pharmacy 

1601 Park Avenue 

Richmond • Virginia 



J. W. Chamblee, P'23 
E. G. Johann, P'll UCM 
Forrest E. Parker, P'31 



Telephone: 5-1773 



Willey Drug Company 

1205 Bellevue Avenue 
Richmond • Virginia 

Edward E. Willey, P 30 
Grayson G. Fitzgerald, P'54 
R. C. Hargis, P'50 
James F. Clark, P'40 



Te/ephone: 5-4395 



Tarrant Drug Company 

1 West Broad Street 
Richmond • Virginia 



W. G. Tarrant, Jr., P 32 

W. G. Tarrant, Affiliate Member 



Te/ephone: 3-3469 



Grant Drug Company 

610 East Broad Street 

Richmond • Virginia 

OPEN ALL NIGHT 

L. H. Cosby, R.P. 

W. E. Locke, P'll UCM 

Howard G. Whitehead, P'07 UCM 

George W. Johnson, P'20 

M. P. Kelley, P'21 



Te/ephone: 3-1803 



Turner's Pharmacy 

2100 East Main Street 
Richmond • Virginia 



J. Walter Ernest, P 31 



Telephone: 2-9556 



FEBRUARY, 1957 



TOMPKINS-McCAW LIBRARY 

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 23219 



Announcing 



FOR DYSMENORRHEA and 
PREMENSTRUAL TENSION 
DYSMENORRHEA SYNDROME 



... a new physiologic corrective 
contains no analgesic drug 




ANTISPASMODIC 




COMB? 

THE 
TRIAD 



ANTIHISTAMINE 



Trilute contains 

TROCINATE, a clinically proved 
safe spasmolytic, especially po- 
tent, in pharmacologic studies, 
in relieving spasm of the uterus 
(J. Pharm. Exp. Ther. 89:131). 

theophylline, a diuretic to 
combat fluid retention and uter- 
ine tissue edema, important 
etiologically in the premenstrual 
tension-dysmenorrhea syndrome. 

pyrilamine maleate, an anti- 
histamine to combat any allergic 
factor. 

IN EACH PINK AND GRAY CAPSULE 
TROCINATE lOO MGMS.. THEOPHYLLINE 
lOO MGMS . PYRILAMINE MALEATE 25 
MGMS. 
IN BOTTLES OF 25 AND lOO CAPSULES 

Directions: One capsule after each 
meal and at bedtime, beginning 4 days 
before onset of menstruation, and 
continuing through first day of flow. 



// n 



Poythress & Co., 



URMACEUTI 



THE SCARAB 






Keciuitinc kcrt lomoMow 

Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, |r. 



It is heartening that our Alumni Asso- 
ciation is giving thought to the ways and 
means of insuring that the classes entering 
the several schools of the College shall 
be composed of the most promising young 
people who can be found. Only if this is 
accomplished can the College be of max- 
imum service. It is a relatively simple mat- 
ter to find a sufficient number of students 
possessing the minimum qualifications for 
entrance, but to be content with this is 
to limit the quality of our graduates and, 
inevitably, the quality of the medical care 
and other health services available to our 
citizens. 

Paradoxically, we are faced by the neces- 
sity of competing strenuously for our 
share of talented youth at a time when 
the actual supply of qualified young peo- 
ple is undoubtedly greater than it has ever 
been before. The explanation lies in the 
fact that never before have there been 
so many other challenging and stimulating 
opportunities clamoring vigorously for the 
attention of our more gifted people. The 
exciting discoveries of modern science, 
their ingenious application to technical 
problems, and the business ventures made 
possible by an economy which appears to 
expand endlessly, have all combined to 
create a world unbelievably rich in op- 
portunity. 

We shall have to bestir ourselves if we 
are not to lose by default the recruits 
which the health professions need and 
by virtue of their noble mission deserve. 
As in other instances where there is a 
contest for men's minds, we surely can- 
not win unless we can gain their atten- 
tion ; and we shall be exceedingly foolish 
if we delay our efforts until their atten- 
tion has been firmly fixed on goals other 
than ours. 

Even in medicine and dentistry, it may 
well be that the effort to interest and at- 
tract the best young people should begin 
when they are in high school. Certainly 
these fields cannot afford to sit quietly 
by enjoying a sense of security simply be- 
cause there are more applicants than can 
be accommodated. Somehow, more of our 
best high school students must be inter- 
ested in the health service fields, and this 
must be done so effectively that their in- 
terest will be difficult to divert. Recent 
experience has shown that in their college 

FEBRUARY, 1957 



years they now come into contact with 
disciplines which through modern ad- 
vances and developments, as in nuclear 
physics and other physical and chemical 
fields, have become sufficiently challenging 
to attract some of the people who earlier 
would almost certainly have entered med- 
icine or one of the closely related pro- 
fessions. 

The competition among industrial cor- 
porations for the more talented college 
graduates has become so intense as to 
alarm the corporations themselves. It is 
reported that at least one of the larger 
firms has offered, in addition to beginning 
salaries which would have been considered 
impossible only a few years ago, to pay 
to these young people when called to 
military duty a sum equal to the difference 
between their military pay and their regu- 
lar salaries. While medical schools are 
interviewing applicants to determine their 
acceptability, the industrial firms are send- 
ing skilled and aggressive representatives 
to persuade the more talented that their 
greatest opportunities lie with industry. 

These technics cannot be countered by 
decrying them; in fact, they are straight- 
forward and effective and might well be 
emulated. We cannot offer such immediate 
financial rewards; indeed, those motivated 
primarily by a desire for money have no 
place in the healing arts. We can attempt 
to cultivate more humane motivations in 
young students, and the healing arts can 
satisfy such motivations in a manner which 
defies competition from all but one pro- 
fession. 

The devoted, successful, and respected 
practitioners of medicine, dentistry, phar- 
macy, and nursing in every community, our 
alumni among them, are in a unique posi- 
tion to influence local youth through ex- 
ample and precept, and by speaking when- 
ever possible before youth groups, school 
assemblies, and elsewhere of the incom- 
parable opportunities for service to others 
offered by the healing arts and the deeply 
satisfying rewards which come to those 
who devote themselves to such service. 
The College and its people must play 
their part, but the local practitioner can 
do far more. The representatives sent by 
the College to "college days," the pro- 
grams arranged at high schools each year 
for the purpose of bringing together 



prospective college students, their parents, 
and college representatives, can help by 
supplying information about the College 
and the health professions; but they can- 
not effectively personify and give real 
meaning to the professions of medicine, 
dentistry, pharmacy, and nursing. Only 
the local practitioner, known by his deeds 
as well as his words can do this in such 
fashion as to inspire emulation; and if he 
does not do it, the efforts of the College 
are not apt to be as successful as they 
need to be. 

As soon as possible, we shall ask rep- 
resentative alumni of each of our schools 
to attend the "college days" of their local 
high schools as representatives of their 
respective professions and of MCV. It is 
important, too, that the local practitioner 
seek actively to lead capable and properly 
motivated young individuals of his ac- 
quaintance toward preparation for the 
health professions and that he enlist the 
advice and assistance of parents and teach- 
ers toward this end. 

There is another way to increase the 
supply of worthy recruits for our fields, 
and this is by enlarging the number of 
young people of promise who are able to 
attend college. It has been amply dem- 
onstrated that a substantial number of our 
brightest high school graduates cannot at- 
tend because they lack adequate financial 
resources. Too many of us have dismissed 
this fact as one of the hard realities of life 
which cannot be helped and hence had 
best be forgotten. That this is a mistake 
is a fact not generally appreciated. 

Some years ago, a committee of the 
United States Chamber of Commerce 
studied the relationship between the gen- 
eral educational level and the economic 
status of communities. This study, con- 
ducted by hard-headed business men, 
showed that there is a direct relationship 
between the two and that the average in- 
come in a community rises as the general 
educational level rises. In Virginia, the 
study gains validity from the fact that 
Mr. Thomas Boushall, the widely known 
and respected president of the Bank of 
Virginia, was chairman of the national 
committee which did the work. 

The results of this study underline the 
principle, widely recognized in other sec- 
tions of the United States but less so in 
the east, that it is sound public policy to 
provide higher education almost entirely 
at public expense for those who are clearly 
qualified to benefit from it. It is difficult 
(Continued on page 24) 



Tkel 



naueura 



ID 



av 



December 17, 1956, dawned foggy and 
cloudy and all of those concerned with 
the inauguration of Dr. Robert Blackwell 
Smith, Junior, as fourth president of the 
Medical College of Virginia were more 
than a little concerned. 

As the morning progressed, though the 
sky continued cloudy, the rains held off 
and the long and impressive academic pro- 
cession began to form in front of the Rich- 
mond Academy of Medicine. Dignitaries 




General William F. Tompkins leading the 
academic procession. 

from colleges far and near, from the state, 
and from our own MCV faculty began to 
line up for the march to Monumental 
Episcopal Church. General William F. 
Tompkins, the chief marshal, in his Army 
uniform, led the way followed by the 
presidential party and the Board of Visi- 
tors, the delegates of colleges and uni- 
versities, the delegates of learned societies 
and organizations, the members of the 
faculty, and representatives of the student 
body. It sounds impressive, and it was as 
they trooped into Monumental Church to 
the music of the Marche Triomphale, 
Opus 65. And so, in a church built on 
memories, another memorable occasion be- 
gan. 

Dr. George Ossman, rector of Monu- 
mental Church and chaplain of the Med- 
ical College of Virginia, pronounced the 
invocation and the MCV Chorus, under 
the directorship of Dr. George E. Ar- 
rington, Jr., sang the anthem. 

Mr. Buford Scott, chairman of the 
Board of Visitors, greeted the delegates 
and assembled friends, and then Chancel- 
lor William Thomas Sanger, with a touch 
of his subtle humor, introduced the speak- 
er of the day. Dr. Joseph Clarke Robert, 
president of Hampden-Sydney College, 



whose impressive address we, herewith, 
present to you. 

Governor Stanley, Chancellor Sanger, 
President Smith, and all who are engaged 
in, or sympathetic with, the ancient art 
of healing: 

This is a splendid hour in the already 
eventful history of the Medical College. 
a people's property, both magnificent and 
useful, an institution characteristically Vir- 
ginian. Today, we recognize in public 
ceremony the coming of a new president, 
and the graduation of a former president 
to duties more flexible if not more ar- 
duous. 

As to the chancellorship, I may say that 
only an institution endowed with an espe- 
cially strong leaning to experimental phys- 
iology could execute the maneuver which 
permits the school to eat its cake and 
have it too. Congratulations on all sides 
are in order. Dr. William T. Sanger is 
a humanitarian of great imagination (as 
you could see from his introduction of 



A\v l ; 



Scene during the ceremony in the church 

me!), a builder who can see his good 
works all about him. We are proud that 
for thirty years he has worn a degree from 
Hampden-Sydney College. 

We give the warmest of greetings to 
the incoming president, Dr. Robert Black- 
well Smith, Jr., an administrator of al- 
ready proven worth, a man with broad 
experience, and with an even broader 
heart. History and biography are well met 
in the union of this institution and this 
man. 

It I should unconsciously assume a 
fatherly tone this hour, you must forgive 
me, for my presence here is, in truth, rec- 
ognition of academic paternity. As you 
will be well aware by the time I resume 
my seat here on the platform, this school 
opened its doors in 1838 as the Medical 




Dr. and Mrs. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. and 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Blackwell Smith, his mother 

and father 

Department of Hampden-Sydney College. 

Into what sort of world was this in- 
stitution born? Testy and turbulent was 
its period of gestation and infancy, marked 
on the one side by the Panic of 1837 and 
on the other by the Log-Cabin-and-Hard- 
Cider Campaign of 1840. Martin Van 
Buren, President of the United States, 
was being blamed for the depression and, 
following a now well-understood pattern 
of American history, would soon be de- 
feated by a "man of the people." Who 
am I to quarrel with this time-honored 
political formula, especially since the vic- 
tor was William Henry Harrison, Hamp- 
den-Sydney Class of 1791. 

In the 1830's all society was in ferment; 
the world was to be renovated. The way 
was made uncommonly hard for transgres- 
sors who cultivated either major or minor 
vices. For example, the use of tobacco, 
said the reformers, was Satan's device. 
One Dr. Joel Shew carefully itemized 
eighty-seven diseases caused by demon 
nicotine. As the abolitionists spoke their 
minds, the sensitive South cried out against 




Dr. Dabney S. Lancaster and Dr. Smith 
THE SCARAB 




The receiving line, Dr. and Mrs. R. Black- 
well Smith, Jr., Mr. Buford Scott, and Dr. 
James T. Tucker 

what it considered intermeddling from 
the North. In other words, the patient 
was quite normal. 

Medical practice at the time was pro- 
gressing, but for most practitioners was 
still characterized by the grave -honored 
techniques of gross purging and bleeding. 
Yet there was more restraint in phlebot- 
omy than in an earlier generation, the 
time of Dr. Benjamin Rush, who, ac- 
cording to some critics, shed more blood 
than any man in history, with the possible 
exception of Napoleon Bonaparte. 

A weakened public hardly had strengdi 
to fight back. However, not all stood silent 
before the mountains of calomel. Note 
the following ode to mercurous chloride, 
drawn from the Richmond Enquirer of 
March 5th, 1825. I give only three verses: 

Howe'er their patients do complain 
Of head, or heart, or nerve, or vein. 
Of fever, thirst, or temper fell. 
The Medicine still, is Calomel. 

Since Calomel's become their boast, 
How many patients have they lost. 
How many thousands they make ill. 
Of poison, with their Calomel. 

And when I do resign my breath, 
Pray let me die a natural death. 
And bid you all a long farewell. 
Without one dose of Calomel. 




This college was initiated several years 
before anaesthetics were discovered. Not 
until 1842 did Crawford W. Long make 
his epochal use of ether. Louis Pasteur 
and Joseph Lister were still in their 'teens. 
And if infection did not follow surgery, 
something was thought to have gone 
wrong. All in all, it might not be unfair 
to say that for most ailments the lucky 
man was he who could not obtain profes- 
sional help. 

Such was the situation when a group of 
energetic young doctors, led by Augustus 
L. Warner, decided to compound their 
office apprenticeship and tutorial efforts 
and thereby create a medical school. Ac- 
cordingly, they petitioned the Trustees of 
Hampden-Sydney College for admission 
to that body academic as a department. 




Dr. William T. Sanger, Mr. George F. Hend- 

ley, Mr. R. Reginald Rooke, and Dr. J. P. 

Broaddus 



Mrs. Richard A. Michaux serves punch to 
Mr. Frank P. Pitts 

"After much discussion," to use the 
phrase in the Board minutes, the Trustees 
on December 1st, 1837, agreed, and thus 
there was effected a union between an 
institution in Prince Edward County and 
a group of doctors here in Richmond. 

It was — to put the matter bluntly — a 
marriage of convenience, not of love. 
Hampden-Sydney was called in to dignify 
and to make legitimate the Richmond or- 
ganization. 

The Medical Department of Hampden- 
Sydney College duly opened in 1838, in 
a remodeled version of the Old Union 
Hotel, down at the corner of Nineteenth 
and Main. As many, if not most, of you 
have doubtless heard several times over, 
a Nineteenth-century wit, noting the new 
functions of the hotel, remarked that 
"Limbs instead of cutting capers, were 
cut to pieces in the ballroom — portions 
were mixed instead of punch — poultices 
supplanted puddings. . . ." 

The Board of Trustees laid down the 
following requirements for the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine: Attendance on 
courses for one session of five months (a 



requirement almost immediately increased 
to two sessions); a final examination; a 
thesis; "attendance upon the dissecting 
room." Furthermore, the candidate "shall 
have studied medicine with a respectable- 
practitioner for two years." 

The Medical Department decided that 
improvement was impossible without ad- 
ditional funds, and (at this point I report 
to you a miracle of administration, one 
characteristic of those who have headed 
this school ) the Department did obtain 
money by gift or loan from city and state 
governments, and moved into the Egyp- 
tian Building, that remarkable monument 
to eclecticism at the corner of Fourteenth 
and Marshall. I must say that there was 
something appropriate, in a macabre sort 
of way. about using Egyptian mummies 
as fence posts. 

Soon a very natural thing happened. 
Hampden-Sydney and Richmond were, in 
the sense of transportation and communi- 
cation, farther apart than are Richmond 
and Chicago today. Many if not most 
decisions were being delegated by the 
President and Trustees to the Medical 
Faculty. Here was departmental autonomy 
with a vengeance. (I am tempted to turn 
aside and to point a moral, but seeing 
several of my colleagues from the Hill, 
I restrain myself.) 

Is schism inherent in the body medical ? 
I do not know, but gossip has it that 
medical life in Richmond in the nine- 
tenth century was always divided into 
(Continued on page 24) 




Dr. and Mrs. James T. Tucker 



FEBRUARY, 1957 



Ramon D. Garcin, M.D. 

Class of Medicine, 1887 

(Earliest Class Having a Surviving Alumnus.) 



As one who has been blessed by his 
gracious friendship and wise counsel for 
some thirty-five years, it is an unusual 
pleasure and special honor for me to have 
been chosen to prepare this biography of 
Doctor Ramon David Garcin, only sur- 
viving alumnus of our earliest medical 
class having a living representative. I am 
only afraid that my own limitations, lit- 
erary and otherwise, will make for the 
presentation of a seriously incomplete pic- 
ture of this remarkable man. For its merits, 
I am deeply indebted to the splendid col- 
laboration of my dear friend and classmate 
(M'28), Doctor Garcin's son, Ramon D. 
Garcin, Jr. 

Shortly after the War, in which his 
father, Ramon Garcin, had served with 
the forces of the Confederacy, Doctor 
Garcin was born on September 19, 1867 
in Powhatan County, near the courthouse. 
His mother was Margaret Thomas Garcin 
of Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. 

In 1873 the family moved to Richmond 
where Doctor Garcin attended the ele- 
mentary schools and graduated from the 
Old Richmond High School (now John 
Marshall) in 1884. He then entered the 
Medical College of Virginia from which 
he graduated with his M.D. degree in 
May, 1887. During his Medical School 
days his preceptor was Doctor Martin 
Luther James. While at the College he 
became a member of the Alpha Kappa 
Kappa Medical Fraternity. 

Upon graduation he accepted an ap- 
pointment as Physician to the State Pen- 
itentiary in Columbia, South Carolina, 
where he remained for approximately 
three years. Attesting to his zeal for schol- 
arly attainment which has characterized 
him throughout life, while at Columbia 
he arranged to attend the University of 
South Carolina from which he received 
an A.B. degree in 1890. He then left 
Columbia to further his professional train- 
ing at the New York Post Graduate School 
and Hospital where he spent a year prior 
to returning to Richmond. Here he opened 
his office at 24th and Broad Streets doing 
general practice with obstetrics as a spe- 
cialty. He has remained on Church Hill 



Harvey B. Haag 
Ph.G., B.S., M.D. 




sSnMSfes&ffli 



Dr. Ramon D. Garcin 



ever since, making only one move, and 
that was to 27th and Broad Streets on 
September 1, 1898. There he had his office 
and home until September 16, 1956 when 
he associated himself with his son, Ramon. 
Jr. It was while a Church Hill urchin and 
newsboy that I first became acquainted 
with him and his family shortly after the 
turn of the century. 

On October 11, 1893, Doctor Garcin 
married Miss Mary Edmonia Jackson of 
Charlottesville, Virginia, in the First Bap- 
tist Church of that city. They had four 
children: Raymond Edward, Lyne, Emma 
and Ramon, Jr. Raymond Edward died 
in infancy. Emma Garcin is now Mrs. J. 
William Lassiter of Charlotte, North Car- 
olina. Mrs. Garcin died on January 21, 
1948. 

Early in his life, Doctor Garcin dem- 
onstrated his great love and devotion to 
his profession and to the civic affairs of 
his city and community. It is possible to 
mention only a few of his activities in this 
regard. He has served, without monetary 
compensation, as physician to the Masonic 
Home since its origin in 1894. As this 
article is being written, he is preparing 
his 63rd annual report to the Board of 
that institution. He taught Practice of 
Medicine and Physiology at his Alma 
Mater for many years. 

For twenty-two years and up until quite 
recently, he was an active member of the 
Richmond School Board and his staunch 



and vigorous support of a basic policy 
of sound educational philosophy is re- 
flected in the high quality of elementary 
and high school training offered in our 
Richmond schools. He has always been a 
strong believer in vocational training, and 
Richmond's progress in this field is in no 
small way due to Doctor Garcin's keen 
interest and foresight in fostering this 
type of instruction. 

Doctor Garcin was appointed to mem- 
bership of the original Richmond Public 
Library Board by the then Mayor, Mr. 
George Ainslie, and for the past ten years 
or so has been its chairman. The asso- 
ciation in this activity of Doctor Garcin, 
who is a great lover and reader of books, 
has been of inestimable value to Richmond 
in the development of its fine and efficient 
library service. 

In the field of Public Health, Doctor 
Garcin has taken a leading role. He was 
a member of the first Board of Health of 
the City which led to the appointment of 
its first health commissioner, the illustrious 
Doctor Ernest C. Levy. During the office 
of Governor Swanson, Doctor Garcin 
served as Virginia's representative to the 
first national conference on tuberculosis. 

His interest in and love for children 
is illustrated not only in his personal life 
and his association with the Masonic 
Home, but also by the fact that he played 
a leading role in the establishment of the 
(Continued on pJge 23) 



THE SCARAB 



Kesealch lobau 

atuev 

Coordinated by 
Dr. G. Watson James, III 

In his essays on the purposes and func- 
tions of the university John Henry Cardi- 
nal Newman has concluded that in part it 
should be a repository for knowledge, 
a locus for the dissemination of knowl- 
edge, and an area where new knowledge 
is acquired by intellectual effort. In these 
three endeavors, the four schools, Medi- 
cine, Dentistry, Pharmacy, and Nursing 
of the Medical College of Virginia, are 
contributing well toward the fulfillment 
of this idea. The accumulation of new 
knowledge, generally regarded as research, 
constitutes a formidable effort. With re- 
search activities in nearly every depart- 
ment and in every division of the College 
and with a total monetary budget in ex- 
cess of $700,000.00, it seems of good 
purpose that a wider knowledge about 
these research activities be given. The pur- 
pose of this article is to bring to those in- 
terested alumni, facts about, facets of, 
and familiarity with the research pro- 
grams. 

Research requires funds. These funds 
are the mainstays for the purchase of tech- 
nical equipment, for salaries of research 
personnel. The responsible investigators, 
for the most part, receive no income from 
the grants. At present in the United States 
there is both nation-wide interest and a 
continuing stimulation for more research 
in the medical sciences. The Congress has 
recently appropriated large sums of money 
to further expand research ventures in the 
medical schools and undergraduate col- 
leges. Much of the money available for 
research purposes at the Medical College 
of Virginia has come from federal agen- 
cies, yet private foundations and even in- 
dividuals are significant contributors to the 
overall effort. The largest contributor at 
the Medical College of Virginia has been 
the Federal Government which at a budg- 
etary accounting in April of 1956 had al- 
lotted $452,737.00 in training contracts 
and research grants. The total expenditures 
for research from miscellaneous sources 
was $265,762.97 of which $66,595. 'SO was 
a private contribution from one of our 
benefactors, Adolph Dill Williams. It is 
necessary for the financial division of the 
Medical College of Virginia to set up a 
separate section, under the able guidance 

FEBRUARY, 1957 




Dr. G. Watson James, II 



of Mrs. Annie Kratz, to handle the re- 
search funds, grants, vouchers, expendi- 
tures, and disbursements. It is not general- 
ly realized that the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia derives a direct financial benefit 
from research grants, since accompanying 
the requested budgets are overhead ex- 
penses of from 15 to 27 percent paid di- 
rectly to the College. 

The research activities are many and 
varied. They extend from the pure ac- 
ademic basic research to investigations en- 
tirely clinical. It is a truism to say that 
basic research lays the fundamental 
groundwork for the clinical developments 
which will occur in the years to come. A 
single isolated seemingly unimportant ac- 
ademic fact might be the nucleus from 
which far-reaching and beneficial results 
will be made available to all. "What good 
will it do?" stimulates much more than 
a warm and friendly smile; it signifies a 
deeper understanding. 

The greatest majority of research effort 
is expended in the Schools of Medicine 
and Dentistry. In the School of Medicine, 
both the basic science and clinical de- 
partments, roughly corresponding to the 
first and last two years of the medical 
school curriculum have varied research 
projects. 

In the Department of Anatomy, School 
of Medicine, Dr. John W. Kelly, sup- 
ported by a research grant from the United 
States Public Health Service, is studying 
the properties of cells and tissues which 
stain with the metachromatic reaction. His 
is primarily a histochemical study of the 
mucoid secretions of epithelium and con- 
nective tissue and the mechanisms of the 



staining reaction employed in the localiza- 
tion of the secretions of these tissues. This 
work brings him into close correlation 
with investigation done in the Depart- 
ment of Medicine on the connective tis- 
sue disorders, for example, rheumatoid 
arthritis, lupus erythematosus, and periar- 
tertis nodosa. Dr. L. F. Cavazos also of the 
Anatomy Department has had a research 
interest in the physiology of the male re- 
productive tract. He is presently concerned 
with the effects of castration and male 
hormone replacement on the histochemical 
reactions in rat epididymides. His project 
has the support of the National Institutes 
of Health and the A. D. Williams' Fund 
at the Medical College of Virginia. An 
associated problem has been the effect of 
avitaminosis C and starvation on the re- 
productive tract of the male guinea pig. 
Working in close correlation with other 
members of his department, he is study- 
ing both the histochemical and the bio- 
chemical changes in these tissues. Dr. Wil- 
lie M. Reams. Jr., instructor in Anatomy, 
is investigating the effects of tissue en- 
vironment upon the development of pig- 
ment cells in the chick embryo. Using the 
meticulous and elaborate techniques re- 
quired in such a study, he hopes to gain 
information about the growth of pigment 
cells in different environments and the 
further development of these cells particu- 
larly in regard to the type of pigment pro- 
duced. 

Dr. Everett IngersoII in collaboration 
with Dr. Erling Hegre and Mrs. Louise 
Jones have studied the neural mechanisms 
involved in the urinary bladder physiology 
of laboratory animals. His project has a 
two-fold objective. First, to determine the 
type of bladder response mediated by the 
sympathetic and parasympathetic division 
in the autonomic nervous system together 
with the factors involved in pudendal in- 
nervation of the pelvic diaphragm ; and 
second, to study the control exercised in 
the laboratory animal over micturition and 
other vesical functions by the central nerv- 
ous system. He has utilized both acute 
and chronic experimental methods and the 
central nervous system will be explored 
with the aid of the Horsley-Clarke stereo- 
taxic apparatus, a highly specialized unit 
of research equipment. This research is 
partly supported by the National Institutes 
of Health Grant. 

Dr. Robert H. Brownson, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Anatomy, has research plans for 
the coming year relative to the investiga- 
(Continued on page 29) 



Df. H Hudnoll Ware, Jr. Dr. J. Robert Ma 



Miss L. Frances Gordon Miss Mary Esther Cibula Dr. Woodrow C. Henderson Dr. Moffett H. 



VOTE FOR ONE 



VOTE FOR ONE 



VOTE FOR ONE 



MAIL BALLOTS FOR THESE CANDIDATES WILL BE S 

Candidates ror The Board or Trustee 



H. Hudnall Ware, Jr. 

Bom: Baltimore, Maryland, now a resi- 
dent of Richmond, Virginia. 
Schools and Colleges Attended: College 
of William and Mary; MCV School of 
Medicine; postgraduate of New York Ly- 
ing-in Hospital, Jersey City Hospital. 
Professional Data: Specialist in gynecology 
and obstetrics; professor obstetrics, MCV; 
obstetrician-in-chief, MCV, P.B.K. 
Professional Memberships: American 
Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Fel- 
low, American College of Surgeons, Ob. 
and Gyn.; Fellow, American Association 
of Ob. and Gyn. and Abdominal Sur- 
geons ; past chairman, Section of Ob., 
Southern Medical Association ; past pres- 
ident, Virginia Ob. and Gyn. Society; 
past president, Richmond Ob. and Gyn. 
Society; past president, Richmond Acad- 
emy of Medicine; Fellow, Southeastern 
Surgical Congress; Fellow, A.M. A.; Fel- 
low, South Atlantic Medical Assn.; Board 
of Visitors, College of William and Mary; 
past president, member of Board of Trus- 
tees of Alumni Assn. of MCV; past presi- 
dent, Va. League of Planned Parenthood. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Country 
Club of Virginia; Commonwealth Club; 
Theta Delta Chi; Omicron Delta Kappa; 
Alpha Omega Alpha; Mu Sigma Mu; 
Rappahannock Yacht Club; Fishing Bay 
Yacht Club; Tappahannock Yacht Club. 

J. Robert Massie, Jr. 

Born: Perkinsville, Virginia, now a resi- 
dent of Richmond, Virginia. 
Schools and Colleges Attended: Randolph- 
Macon College; MCV School of Medi- 
cine. 

Professional Data: General surgeon, As- 
sistant Professor of Clinical Surgery MCV. 

8 



Professional Memberships: Southern Sur- 
gical Association; Eastern Surgical Society; 
Southern Surgeons Club; Medical Society 
of Virginia; Richmond Academy of Med- 
icine; A.M. A.; American College of Sur- 
geons; American Board of Surgery, South- 
eastern Surgical Society, American College 
of Chest Physicians. 

Hobbies and Club Memberships: Hunting 
and fishing; Commonwealth Club; Coun- 
try Club of Va.; Society of Cincinnati. 

L. Frances Gordon 

Born: LIrbana, Illinois, now a resident of 
Richmond, Va. 

Schools and Colleges Attended: Appomat- 
tox, Virginia; College of William and 
Mary, B.S.; MCV School of Nursing; 
M.S. in Nursing Education, Western Re- 
serve University, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Professional Data: Professor of Nursing ; 
Director of Clinical Instruction, School 
of Nursing, MCV. 

Professional Memberships: National 
League for Nursing, State and Local 
branches; American Nurses Association, 
State and District Branches. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Baseball ; 
American Association of University Wom- 
en; Church Organizations; Mortar Board; 
Phi Beta Kappa; Sigma Zeta, MCV. 

Mary E. Cibula 

Bom: Prince George County, now a resi- 
dent of Richmond, Va. 
Schools and Colleges Attended : Hopewell 
H. S.; MCV School of Nursing; R.P.I. 
Professional Data: Administrative and 
Service Supervisor, St. Philip Operating 
Room. 

Professional Memberships : Vice-Chair- 
man of Operating Room Conference 
Group of Virginia; Va. State Nurses' As- 
sociation; American Nurses Association. 



Woodrow C. Henderson 

Born: Halifax County, now a resident of 
Richmond, Va. 

Schools and Colleges Attended: C. H. 
Friend High School, South Boston; Col- 
lege of William and Mary ; MCV School 
of Dentistry. 

Professional Data: In private practice in 
Richmond, Virginia at present time; part 
time instructor in operative and exodontia 
dentistry at MCV, 1941-1942. 
Professional Memberships: Va. State Den- 
tal Society, Delegate at large to executive 
council, 1956-1957; American Dental As- 
sociation; Richmond Dental Society, Sec. 
and Treas., 1948-50, President, 1953. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Rich- 
mond Chamber of Commerce; Public Af- 
fairs Society; Cub Pack Master Troop 
712; River Road Baptist Church. 
Army Dental Corp 1941-1946, duty with 
45th General Hospital and 36th Field 
Artillery Group; Major, 1945-46. 

Moffett H. Bowman 

Born: Roanoke, Va., now a resident of 
Roanoke, Va. 

Schools and Colleges Attended: Jefferson 
High, Roanoke, Va.; College of William 
and Mary, MCV School of Dentistry. 
Professional Data: In private practice in 
Roanoke, Va. 

Professional Memberships: O.K.U., Hon- 
orary Dental ; Roanoke, Piedmont, Virgin- 
ia State and American Dental Associa- 
tions; Va. State Board of Dental Exam- 
iners, 1951-1961; Board of Trustees, 
Alumni Association of MCV, 1954-57. 
Hobbies and Clubs: Optimist Club, past 
president; Calvary Baptist Church. 

Philip W. Oden 

Born: Warrenton, Virginia, now a resi- 
dent of Ronceverte, West Virginia. 

THE SCARAB 





*rk* 




Dr. Philip W. Oden 



Dr. Athey R. Lutz 



VOTE FOR ONE 



Mr, Hunter M. Gaunt Mr. John M. 



VOTE FOR ONE 



THE VOTING MEMBERS FOR 1956 IN FEBRUARY. 

t The Alumni Association 



Schools and Colleges Attended: Reming- 
ton High School, University of Richmond. 
MCV School of Medicine. 
Professional Data: Chief surgeon, Green- 
brier Valley Hospital, Ronceverte, W. Va. 
Professional Memberships: Greenbrier 
Valley Medical Society; West Virginia 
State Medical Society councilor; A.M. A.; 
FACS; Fellow, Southeastern Surgical Assn. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Rotary ; 
American Legion; Greenbrier County 
School Board; American Orchid Society. 

Athey R. Lutz 

Bom: Orkney Springs, Virginia, now a 
resident of Parkersburg, West Virginia. 
Schools and Colleges Attended: Univer- 
sity of Richmond, MCV School of Medi- 
cine, postgraduate work in orthopedics at 
Willis Campbell Clinic. 
Professional Data: Orthopedic surgeon; 
Diplomate American Board Orthopedic 
Surgery; Fellow, American College of Sur- 
geons. 

Professional Memberships : Parkersburg 
Academy of Medicine, past president; 
W. Va. State Medical Assn., past presi- 
dent; Southern Medical Assn.; A.M. A.; 
American Academy Orthopedic Surgeons. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Past 
president. Rotary Club. 

Hunter M. Gaunt 

Born: Woodstock, Virginia, now a resi- 
dent of Winchester, Virginia. 
Schools and Colleges Attended: Wood- 
stock H. S., MCV School of Pharmacy. 
Professional Data: Proprietor Gaunt's 
Drug Store, Winchester, Virginia. 
Professional Memberships: Northern Vir- 
ginia Pharmaceutical Association, Virginia 
Pharmaceutical Assn.; N.A.R.D.; A.Ph.A. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Rotary 
Club. 

FEBRUARY, 1957 



John M. Bierer 

Born: Front Royal, Virginia, now a resi- 
dent of Lexington, Virginia. 
Schools and Colleges Attended: Warren 
County Eligh School; Randolph-Macon 
Academy; MCV School of Pharmacy. 
Professional Data: Owner Bierer's Phar- 
macy, Lexington, Virginia. 
Professional Memberships: Valley Phar- 
maceutical Association, past president; 
Virginia Pharmaceutical Association, past 
president; N.A.R.D. 

Hobbies and Club Memberships: Lexing- 
ton Rotary Club, past president; Lexing- 
ton Kiwanis Club; Lexington Country 
Club; woodworking and photography. 

Waverly R. Payne 

Born: Chesterfield County, now a resident 
of Newport News, Virginia. 
Schools and Colleges Attended: University 
of Virginia; MCV School of Medicine; 
postgraduate work at New York Lying-in 
Hospital, Elizabeth Buxton Hospital, and 
Jersey City Hospital. 

Professional Data: Chief of the Depart- 
ment of Obstetrics and Gynecology at 
the Riverside and Elizabeth Buxton Hos- 
pitals. 

Professional Memberships : American Col- 
lege of Surgeons ; Diplomate of the Amer- 
ican Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology: 
past president, Warwick Count)' Medical 
Society; A.M. A.; past president of the 
Virginia Peninsula Academy of Medicine; 
Southern Medical Association ; Virginia 
Obstetrical and Gynecological Society, past 
president ; Virginia Medical Service As- 
sociation, member of the Board of Direc- 
tors; Southern Obstetrical and Gynecologi- 
cal Society, past president; Sacres Ob- 
stetrical Society, past president; Seaboard 
Medical Society, past president: member 



Dr. Waverly R. Payne Dr. John F. Foste 



VOTE FOR ONE 



of the Board of Directors of MCV Foun- 
dation; member of Board of Visitors, 
MCV; past president, member of Board 
of Trustees of Alumni Association, MCV. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships : Penin- 
sula Association of Commerce, Executive 
Club; James River Country Club; Com- 
monwealth Club of Richmond. 

John F. Foster 

Born: Matthews, N. C, now a resident 
of Sanford, N. C. 

Schools and Colleges Attended : Prepara- 
tory school, two years at North Carolina 
Medical College, Charlotte at which time 
it merged with MCV and graduated from 
MCV in 1916. Post graduate work at 
Polly Clinic Medical Center, Mount Sinai. 
Bellevue, Harvard Children's Hospital, 
and Saint Louis Children's Hospital. 
Professional Data: General practitioner in 
Sanford. 

Professional Memberships: Lee County 
Medical Society, past president; District 
Medical Society, past president; Tri State 
and Southern Medical Societies; A.M. A.; 
and A.A.G.P.; Representative from State 
Society to Grass Roots Conference; past 
vice president, N. C. Medical Society and 
chairman of Comm. on Sect. G.P.; past 
president, North Carolina Branch, MCV 
Alumni Association, and chairman of the 
Steering Committee. 

Hobbies and Club Memberships: Chair- 
man, Charity Horse Show Committee; 
organizer of Kiwanis Club; Fraternal 
Mason ; American Legion, commander of 
Lee Post, three terms ; past Chief De Gare 
40 and 8, Medicine of local Voiture; 
Grand Medicine of State Voiture; member 
Methodist Church, served on Board of 
Trustees and past president of the Men's 
Bible Class ; past chairman, Lee County 
Democrats' Executive Committee. 




'Kounb ike Gkcuit 



From left to right are-. Belvin W. Blachman of Portsmouth, new 
secretary; Dr. Smith; Dr. W. R. Tyson, new president; Dr. Ed- 
ward Myers, outgoing president; and Dr. W. B. Jones, new 
vice president. 



MCV Alumni Party At Roanoke 



Tidewater Chapter 

The Tidewater Chapter met on October 
24 at the Norfolk Yacht and Country Club 
for their annual dinner meeting with Dr. 
Edward Myers and Dr. W. R. Tyson in 
charge. 

It was the usual wonderful party that 
the Tidewater Chapter always has — good 
food, good company, and a good time was 
had by the excellent turnout of about 
sixty-four alumni. The College was rep- 
resented by Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., 
who, as things developed, also had to 
represent the Alumni Association. "The 
best laid schemes of mice and men gang 
aft agley." Dr. James T. Tucker was all 
set to attend the meeting with a speech 
prepared when he was suddenly taken ill 
that noon. So Dr. Smith's broad shoulders 
had to carry the burden, make a speech 
and elucidate on the MCV movie which 
was shown. 

Election of officers was held following 
the meeting and Dr. W. R. Tyson was 
elected president, Dr. W. B. Jones, vice- 
president and Belvin W. Blachman, sec- 
retary. With such an excellent slate of 
officers, we expect the Norfolk Chapter 
will continue its splendid progress. 

Philadelphia Chapter 

The Philadelphia Chapter met on Oc- 
tober 31, Halloween night, at the Union 
League Club in Philadelphia. Dr. C. 
Eugene Perkins had made all the arrange- 
ments and it was a lovely party in a fas- 

10 



cinating setting. The Union League is 
the Republican stronghold of Philadelphia 
and dates back to the last century. Among 
the groups meeting there that night in 
another room was a group of Scottish Bag- 
pipers and so we had dinner music (?) 
furnished for free. 

Dr. Edward G. Sharp, the president, 
conducted the meeting. The college was 
represented by Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, 
Jr., and the Alumni Association by the 
president-elect. Dr. J. Spencer Dryden, 
and the executive secretary. 

Archer K. Tullidge, president of the 
student body, also attended and was 
awarded the MCV chair and became the 
first recipient of the Delaware Valley 
Award. His father, George B. Tullidge, 
P'26, his aunt, and an uncle were there 
to see him receive this honor. 

Dr. Smith gave an interesting talk on 
developments at the College and the movie 
of MCV was shown. 

At the meeting that followed, Dr. Ed- 
ward G. Sharp, president. Dr. Seymour 
Schotz, vice-president, and Dr. E. Eugene 
Perkins, secretary-treasurer, were all re- 
elected to their offices. The group is small; 
but their enthusiasm makes up for it. 

Medical Society of Va. 

At Roanoke October 13, 1956, the 
MCV alumni gathered for a cocktail party 
and dinner. The alumni were there in 
quantity and even some University of Vir- 
ginia alumni came, because they said MCV 
parties are always fun. 



This one was and Dr. James T. Tucker 
was toastmaster and introduced our Board 
of Trustees' members who were present, 
Richard M. Michaux, M'37, W. Roy 
Smith, P'4l, and Robert V. Terrell, M'34. 
Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. made a short 
and as it developed highly entertaining 
speech. It's now his favorite story, when 
you see him, ask him to tell you, we can 
say truthfully he "brought down the 
house." Dr. David Hume, new professor 
of surgery at MCV, attended and his re- 
marks were well received. 

We were most proud to see our fellow 
alumnus. Dr. James D. Hagood, MT3, 
UCM, installed as president of the Med- 
ical Society of Virginia. We take this op- 
portunity to congratulate him and to tell 
you who do not him well a little about 
him. A member of the Senate of Virginia 
from the fourth senatorial district since 
1942, the recipient of a Master of Science 
degree in General Practice from MCV in 
1950, twice elected "General Practitioner 
of the Year" in Virginia, we could con- 
tinue ad infinitum the honors, the achieve- 
ments of this graduate. We know his 
tenure of office will be most successful. 

We will mention just a few of our many 
alumni who took part in the program, 
E. Randolph Trice, M'47, Merritt W. Fos- 
ter, M'44, Allan M. Unger, M'50, Brad- 
ford S. Bennett, M'4l : James T. Gian- 
oulis, M'4l, Dean B. Cole, MT7, H. 
Hudnall Ware, Jr., M'24, and John D. 
French, M'51. 

We are already thinking and making 
plans for the Shoreham meeting this year, 
so plan to have cocktails and dinner with 
us. 

THE SCARAB 



The Man 

of the 

Hour 



Television fans need no introduction 
to our "Man of the Hour" this month. 
Dr. Harry A. Duncan, D'04, of Oak Hill, 
West Virginia. We watched him proudly 
as he displayed his tremendous knowl- 
edge of "Religions of the World" on Bert 
Park's "Break the $250,000.00 Bank". 

Not only was his knowledge of this 
subject impressive, impressive to the tune 
of $60,000.00, but the charm he exhibited 
made everyone his friend. At this financial 
pinnacle he said how much he had en- 
joyed the experience, but having traveled 
14,000 miles back and forth, he chose 




Dr. Harry A. Duncan 

to stop. Our candid opinion is he could 
easily have broken the bank. 

His three brothers appeared with him 
one night on the program and sang, and 
on another night he played a musical saw. 
His intriguing stories each week of the 
matrimonial proposals and the strange re- 
quests he had received were full of humor. 



Dr. Duncan, now a young 79, was 
graduated in dentistry in 1904 with a class 
of fourteen, most of whom he writes us 
are now deceased. He came to his home 
town Oak Hill to practice and has been in 
active practice there ever since. 

His son, Harry Duncan, Jr., (Tiny), 
graduated from MCV in dentistry in 1929 
and was associated with him until his 
death in 1941. He has a most attractive 
daughter, whom we saw on television, 
one grandson, and two great grandchil- 
dren. 

He has traveled extensively in South 
America, Mexico, Canada and forty-six 
of the forty-eight states. His travels bring 
him to Richmond each year for the Dental 
Alumni Homecomings. 

Dr. Duncan, we salute you — a scholar 
and a gentleman. 



Membership Campaign 

Dr. Edward Myers reports that Dr. 
Bernard Batleman, D'4l and Dr. Harold 
A. Epstein, D'40 hope to get 100% mem- 
bership in the Alumni Association for the 
Norfolk Dental Study Club. 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 

HOSPITAL DIVISION 

Medical College of Virginia Hospital 
Memorial Hospital 

Dooley Hospital 

Saint Philip Hospital 

Ennion G. Williams Hospital 

(Operated jointly with the State Health Department) 

A. D. Williams Memorial Clinic 

(Outpatient Department) 



To preserve and restore health To seek the cause and cure of disease 

To educate those who would serve humanity 



FEBRUARY, 1957 



11 



School of Medicine 

Many of you know that the Legislature 
at its last session created a State Council 
on Higher Education. This council is 
charged with making a study of the entire 
program of higher education in the State 
in the light of the needs of the people of 
this Commonwealth. The School of Med- 
icine, together with the other schools of 
the college, enthusiastically supports the 
work of this council. At the present time 
the Dean's Office is assembling data re- 
quested by this body. It appears that this 
information will form the basis for a 
preliminary though very penetrating study 
of the performance and potentialities of 
our school. Dr. William F. Maloney, who 
takes office this month as Dean of Med- 
icine, will no doubt keep you informed 
concerning this and other major activities 
of the school. 

May we take this opportunity to wel- 
come Dr. Maloney to the college and to 
wish him success and satisfaction in carry- 
ing out his program. 

Erling S. Hegre, Chairman 
Interim Dean's Committee 



School of Dentistry 

We have a conviction that if undergrad- 
uate dental education, our chief mission, 
is to be improved and enriched to the 
fullest possible extent schools such as ours 
must undertake extensive research and 
teacher training programs. It is not enough 
to transmit the already known knowledge 
and technics. We have an obligation to 
discover additional facts and to develop 
newer and better technics. This is the mis- 
sion of research. It is also our obligation 
to improve teaching methods in dentistry. 
This, too, requires investigation, study, 
and training. The teacher skilled in teach- 
ing methods and constantly striving to 
widen the horizon of dental knowledge is 
the keystone of a better educational pro- 
gram in dentistry. We aspire to train 
young men and women dedicated to this 
objective. 

On December 1, we were awarded a 
grant by the National Institute of Dental 
Research in the amount of $35,000 to sup- 
port our research and teacher training 
program at the graduate level. Support- 
ing stipends for trainees are available un- 
der this program. Graduate students may 
work for Master of Science and Ph.D 
degrees in basic science disciplines and, at 

12 



Deans' Page 



the same time, may secure certificates of 
advanced training in a related clinical 
subject. The grant in support of this pro- 
gram is scheduled for annual renewal 
over a period of five years or more. This 
is one of our most exciting developments 
in recent years. 

Additional grants for research recently 
received from several sources exceed $26,- 
000 and research grant applications for a 
total in excess of $60,000 are pending. 
These figures are cited to indicate our in- 
terest in meeting our responsibilities for 
a better future for dental education and 
dentistry. 

Harry Lyons, Dean 



School of Pharmacy 

In recent months, some of our alumni 
have been approached and asked to rep- 
resent pharmacy and the Medical College 
of Virginia at college day programs in 
high schools throughout the State. We 
have been most encouraged by the re- 
sponse pharmacists have given our re- 
quests. We certainly appreciate their con- 
tribution of time and effort on behalf of 
the profession and the Medical College of 
Virginia. These college day programs are 
of considerable interest to us because they 
present an opportunity for students and 
parents to obtain information about our 
school, pharmacy, and the other health 
professions. 

The Virginia Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion has been very cooperative in this ef- 
fort and individual district officers have 
been most helpful in obtaining pharma- 
cists willing to represent the profession 
at high schools. This year we have been 
represented at more schools than in any 
previous year. This program is of con- 
siderable interest to us in pharmacy since 
students can enter the school of pharmacy 
directly from high school. However, we 
also believe that these representatives are 
doing a public relations job for all the 
health professions since this aspect of 
these contacts is of considerable impor- 
tance. In many instances, parents and stu- 
dents have very little idea about the health 
professions and factual information from 
a professional may serve to correct any 
false impressions held by the public. Our 



representatives have told us of many in- 
stances where they have given general in- 
formation to students and parents aside 
from specific information about the Med- 
ical College of Virginia. 

We feel that this program is most 
effective when local pharmacists represent 
us at college day because people in the 
community are more willing to discuss 
their interests with someone they know. 
Aside from the public relations aspect we 
also feel that more students will be in- 
formed about careers in the health field 
with the result that we will receive more 
applications in pharmacy. Our interest is 
in providing pharmacists for the future 
and with more applications we should be 
able to select more good students. Our 
impression is that applications are running 
heavier at the present time than they were 
a year ago. 

The school of pharmacy and the V.P.A. 
are sponsoring a seminar for pharmacists 
at the Richmond Academy of Medicine 
on March 18 and 19. The tentative pro- 
gram devotes the first day to topics of 
general professional interest, and the 
morning of the second day to animal 
health pharmacy. No registration fee is 
required and all pharmacists are welcome. 
We hope that you will attend so that we 
also can have the opportunity to show you 
our facilities in McGuire Hall. 

Warren E. Weaver, Dean 



School of Nursing 

Certain significant trends are affecting 
the nurse as an individual, the nature of 
her traditional functions and actual activ- 
ities, the social setting of her work, and 
finally the pattern of education provided 
in preparing her for the mosaic of roles, 
the several kinds of public, including the 
patient, doctor, hospital administrator, tax- 
payer, legislator and professional associate, 
expect her to fulfill. 

The generalization may be made that 
the average beginning practitioner of nurs- 
ing is socially, emotionally, and profes- 
sionally less mature as a consequence of 
starting her professional work at a young- 
er age than graduates of a generation ago. 
It must be conceded that this is not a rule 
and there are many remarkable exceptions. 
Interpersonal relationships in daily living 
are believed to be of greater significance 
today. It is known that there are many 
experiences which student nurses face that 
produce anxiety and feelings of inade- 

THE SCARAB 



quacy. Continued tension in the hospital 
situation may be greater on students today 
than formerly due to the complexity and 
increased tempo of the work sometimes 
making impossible the development of 
emotional maturity and warmth of per- 
sonality. Nevertheless, the average nurse 
of today has more professional and tech- 
nical knowledge than her counterpart of 
a decade ago. A shift in focus from train- 
ing in procedures to the development of 
judgment and skill in problem solving has 
been noted. 

Today the sole emphasis on "sick" 
nursing in the hospital has given way to 
an equal emphasis on "sick" and "health" 
nursing of patients and families. The trend 
is in the direction more and more of the 
salaried employee status appointed by the 
hospital or health agency away from the 
private, practitioner status in which the 
nurse was engaged and paid by her client, 
the patient. The incredible expansion of 
medicine has been the largest factor in 
the ever-changing role of the nurse. The 
rapid growth of health facilities, prepay- 
ment plans, shorter hospitalization, early 



ambulation, increased life span, new and 
better medical techniques and drugs, all 
these and many other influences have 
brought about changes in nursing care 
that require refresher courses and pro- 
grams of in-service education in order that 
safe practice may be provided in our hos- 
pitals and homes. The number and com- 
plexity of medical-technical measures that 
nurses perform today concern administra- 
tors and teachers not only because of the 
added responsibility but also because of 
the legal implications. This trend or drift 
will eventually lead to serious conse- 
quences unless nurses are prepared to as- 
sume the therapeutic role which greatly 
expanded health services are demanding 
of them. 

A more purposeful trend is observed 
in the planning of nursing care on a team 
basis with the professional nurse as team 
leader. In this capacity the nurse identi- 
fies each patient's nursing problem, in- 
terprets the nursing problems to co-work- 
ers and seeks their cooperation in planning 
for groups of patients, assigning to her- 
self, staff nurses, practical nurses, aides 



and orderlies, the appropriate task or activ- 
ity to secure effective utilization of all 
skills related to total care. Unquestionably 
this newer concept has possibilities for 
nursing as a profession that are far-reach- 
ing suggesting for the future a distinct 
therapeutic role unique to nursing based 
upon a growing knowledge of clinical 
nursing. 

The challenging experience of team 
leadership should be offered to all senior 
students to complement their present cur- 
riculum, to give them the opportunity to 
apply their knowledge of human relations, 
communication skills, and cooperative 
management, at the same time enabling 
them to provide for their patients con- 
tinuous, comforting care. The interest of 
all members of the hospital staff, physi- 
cians, and other health therapists is earn- 
estly sought by the faculty of the school 
of nursing in making this adventure in 
human planning, old and tried as far as 
operating room administration is con- 
cerned, successful and eventually, accept- 
able practice in the hospital-patient unit. 
Sybil MacLean, Dean 



CALLING ALL CLASSES 

WHO FINISHED IN 2 AND 7 YEARS AND ALL OTHERS, TOO 

THIS IS THE YEAR FOR YOU TO RETURN TO MCV 
FOR YOUR REUNION 

THURSDAY, MAY 23, 1957 

WILL BE ALUMNI DAY AT MCV 

The Reunion Committee has been hard at work making arrangements and they are bubbling with 
enthusiasm. So that you may start making plans, this is the tentative schedule. 



Thursday: 

Registration at the Alumni House 
1:00 p.m. Luncheon at the College Social Center 

Annual meeting of the Alumni Association 
Cocktail party at the Hotel John Marshall 
Banquet at the Hotel John Marshall 
Dance at the Hotel John Marshall 



3:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 

7:00 p.m. 

10:00 p.m. 



Friday: 

There will be lots going on and one of the things we 
are planning for you will be a trip to the Jamestown 
Festival and that night there will be individual class 
reunions. 



We advise you to write now to the hotel of your choice and make your reservations. Predictions are 
that Virginia will be jammed with tourists this spring. 

We will keep you posted as developments shape up, but this much we know, it's going to be fun, so 
start making your plans now and don't forget the day 

May 23, 1957 
FEBRUARY, 1957 13 





X 



>< 



Sketches or T lie Interior or The Alumni Lounge 

The Alumni House is paid for. Now we begin another project, the Alumni Lounge in the student 

dormitories. 



Monday, December 17, inauguration day, was outstanding 
with us — in attendance, program, and announcement by Dr. 
James T. Tucker, alumni president, that the board of trustees 
had voted unanimously to raise $100,000.00 over a period 
of years with which to finance the construction of the Alumni 
Lounge in the new and handsome dormitories to be built in 
1957-58. This will be a central feature of the new facilities, 
about 56 x 56 feet in floor area, with snack bar and conference 
rooms adjoining. 

Air conditioned and appropriately furnished, the Alumni 
Lounge will be the gathering and relaxing spot for the new 
dormitory's occupants, reminding students from their first 
day at MCV of alumni concern and responsibility for alma 
mater and those who work and learn there. What a happy 
and useful reminder! 

These new and long-needed living quarters, it must be 
emphasized, are not merely to house students; centered there 
will be an informal educational program, opportunities to 



meet faculty and guests, including alumni visitors, in free 
and easy conference and discussion of important topics in 
variety. Thus the regular and more formal educational pro- 
gram will be supplemented and enriched in many long-to-be 
remembered ways. Indispensable in this regard will be the 
Alumni Lounge and associated rooms on the second floor. 

The important effect of Alumni Lounge financing will be 
to reduce student room rents by curtailing debt service (in- 
terest and principal for bonds issued) as alumni funds are 
made available to the College. For years we have not found 
a method of financing dormitories without costs to students 
being unreasonable until a government loan, a State appropria- 
tion, and alumni support became available. Few, except our 
faculty, students, and alumni, can realize what it will mean, 
from so many points of view, to have 354 more students based 
on the college campus. A new era in student life is about to 
dawn at MCV. 

W. T. Sanger, Chancellor 



All contributions over $10.00 go for our Special Projects. Won't you send your contribution now. 




1 


1 


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Directory of Members 



1897 
MEDICINE 

B. W. Rawles 

1898 
MEDICINE (UCM) 

Hillary T. Willis 

1899 
MEDICINE IUCM) 

Emmett F. Reese, Jr. 
DENTISTRY (UCM) 

Charles T. Womack 
PHARMACY (UCMI 

Henry D. Zimmerman 

1900 
MEDICINE 
James J. Purdy* 
E. H. Terrell 
UCM 

Joseph L. Miller* 
Luther R. Stinson 

1901 
MEDICINE 
W. L. Cooke 
UCM 
John E. Cannaday 

1903 
MEDICINE (UCMI 
W. Wallace Gill 
Benjamin L. Traynham 
DENTISTRY 
James Mitchell Lewis 

1904 
MEDICINE 
Thomas Watkins 
UCM 

E. L. Grubbs 
John M. Williams 
DENTISTRY 
W. P. Williams 
UCM 

Harry L. Smith 
NURSING 
UCM 
Naomi S. Klipstein 

1905 
MEDICINE 
Francis A. Bell 
James M. Bland 
S. L. Craig 
Robert S. Fitzgerald 
George Green 
W. R. McCall 
M. E. Mease 
UCM 

J. D. Collins 
Delos D. Hooper 
Moir S. Martin 
D. C. Mayes 

Clarence V. Montgomery 
Jack W. Witten 
DENTISTRY 
W. Henry Street 

1906 
MEDICINE 
A. M. Arritt* 
William H. Craig 
Wylie Hodge Cunningham 
A. A. Marstellar 
Henry A. Mood 
Daniel D. Talley, Jr. 
L. F. Watson 
UCM 

Russell L. Cecil 
Ray Atkinson Moore 
O. K. Phlegar 

FEBRUARY, 1957 



These are the 1 ; 

PHARMACY 

J. T. Wallace 

UCM 

J. Conrad Kearfott 

NURSING 

Rose Hancock 

1907 
MEDICINE 
Mark T. Frizzell 
George W. Johnson 
PHARMACY (UCMI 
Elmer E. Grove 
Warren S. Grubbs 
George J. Hulcher 
H. G. Whitehead 

1908 
MEDICINE 
M. S. Brent 

B. H. Martin, Sr. 
G. W. Skaggs 
UCM 

T. C. Sutherland 
DENTISTRY (UCMI 
John M. Hughes 
NURSING 
Josephine D. Payne 

1909 
MEDICINE 
Walter E. Vest 
Byrd C. Willis, Jr. 
UCM 
A. B. Grubb 

C. L. Harrell 
Grover C. Plummer* 
S. A. Slater 
Thomas J. Tudor 
PHARMACY 

H. C. Hurdle 
NURSING 
Nancy J. West 

1910 
MEDICINE 
A. C. Broders 
R. H. Dunn 
E. T. Gatewood 
Turner S. Shelton 
W. O. Tune 
Oscar W. Ward 
UCM 

John W. Turman 
DENTISTRY 
J. H. Cocks 
UCM 

Paul E. Jones 
PHARMACY 
Douglas Atkinson 
R. E. Monroe 
NURSING 
Mela Lee Gilmer 
Saddie B. Vest 

1911 
MEDICINE 

Thomas W. Blanchard 
A. S. Brinkley 
Meade Edmunds 
G. G. Hankms 

D. P. Scott 

W. N. Thomas 

Albert U. Tieche 

R. E. Watts 

William M. Winn, Jr. 

UCM 

J. Henry Cutchin 

J. J. Hulcher 

A. D. Morgan 

William B. Porter 



members of the Alumni Association for 1956. 



DENTISTRY (UCMI 

M. J. Connell 
PHARMACY (UCMI 

E. G. Johann 

W. E. Locke 

NURSING 

Andrina Grove-Hagen 

Eugenia Tripled 

1912 
MEDICINE 
Jeter R. Allen 
Robert D. Glasser 
W. W. Hargrove 
R. C. Hooker 
UCM 

W. C. Akers 
L. J. Friedman 
T. V. Goode, Jr. 
M. Pinson Neal 
Charles S. Sink NCMC 
Charles C. Smith, Jr. 
DENTISTRY 
Guy R. Harrison 
J. O. Hodgkin 
William N. Hodgkin 
PHARMACY 

B. F. Foley 

1913 
MEDICINE 

E. L. Caudill 
W. C. Caudill 
J. O. Fitzgerald 

C. E. Flowers 
Herman Hertzberg 
L. F. Lee 

H. C. Padgett 

F. W. Poindexter 
Abraham I. Weinstein 
UCM 

Beverley F. Eckles 

J. D. Hagood 

George S. Hurt 

Douglas D. Martin 

W. L. Mason 

T. D. Morewitz 

R. W. Woodhouse, Jr. 

DENTISTRY (UCMI 

Henry T. Vaughan 

PHARMACY 

C. A. Cleveland 

UCM 

R. D. Heist 

1914 
MEDICINE 

G. E. Bowdoin 
G. B. Byrd 
Guy B. Denit 

E. Latane Flanagan 

L. M. Futrell 

J. R. Gorman 

Fred E. Hamlin 

Ben Lipshutz 

Howard Urbach 

J. C. Walker, Jr. 

William John Wigington 

C. B. Young 

Irving E. Shafer NCMC 

PHARMACY 

G. B. Cocke 

G. Van Durrer 

Henry G. Shirkey 

NURSING 

Nora Spencer Hamner 

1915 
MEDICINE 
James B. Anderson 
T. Neill Barnett 
C. B. Courtney 



Richard B. Davis 

G. Grady Dixon 

J. M. Emmett 

R. Finley Gayle, Jr. 

J. H. Hoskins 

Carroll H. Iden 

J. M. Mayer 

John McGuire* 

Walter J. Otis 

W. M. Phipps 

C. I. Sease 

G. V. Wood, Jr. 

DENTISTRY 

W. B. Caldwell 

PHARMACY 

B. B. Brown 

1916 
MEDICINE 

E. S. Barr 
James A. Bennett 
A. I. Dodson 

J. F. Foster 
W. P. Gilmer 
J. L. Hamner 
George F. Hughston 
Ralph H. Jenkins 
Henry C. Johnston 

F. W. H. Logan 
John William Martin 
A. D. Parson 
William O. Poindexter 
Albert T. Ransone 

R. C. Ray 
Philip S. Smith 
Ernest Lee Strickland 
F. P. Sutherland 
James Fred Van Pelt 
PHARMACY 
H. A. Moore 



Mr 



Ph 



P|T, 



1917 

MEDICINE 

Edward T. Ames 
Carl A. Broaddus 
Alan J. Chenery 
Dean B. Cole 
S. S. Cook 

D. S. Divers 
Samuel N. English 
James A. Fields 
Bernard F. Gilchrie 
J. Stewart Gilman 
Arthur E. Gouge 
Campbell Harris 
Joseph Heyman 
Basil B. Jones 

C. L. Outland 
George C. Snead 
W. G. Suiter 
R. F. Thornhill 
T. M. Vorbrinck 
H. E. Whaley 
Fred G. Woodruff 
DENTISTRY 
Beaman Story 
K. M. Yokeley 
PHARMACY 
L. C. Bird 

E. V. Greever 
Samuel Rosenthal 
NURSING 
Hattie E. Bell 

1918 
MEDICINE 
C. S. McCants 
William Meyer 
A. B. Siewers* 
Wallace Spigel 
H. H. Westcott 



DENTISTRY 

W. Archer Bagley 
W. I. Carpenter 
N. F. Muir 
M. M. Sherman 
G. A. Svetlik 
PHARMACY 
George F. Hendley 
Leo Rosenthal 

1919 
MEDICINE 
John R. Cain 
Robert H. Courtney* 
H. W. Decker 
H. R. Masters 
C. L. Nance 
DENTISTRY 
R. H. Bruni 
T. A. Price 
J. J. Stigall 
T. A. Underhill 
Leon J. Walton 
A. M. Wash 
PHARMACY 
A. R. Cross 
Edward C. Wilson 

1920 
MEDICINE 
H. O. Bell 
H. R. Huston 
J. G. Lyerly 
DENTISTRY 
C. B. Jennings 
PHARMACY 
W. P. Beahm 
R. J. Walker 
NURSING 
Lucy J. Millman 
Gertrude E. Uding 

1921 
MEDICINE 

Francisco Jose Casalduc 
Harry Lee Claud 
T. Dewey Davis 
Rob Roy Doss 

F. Ernest Hinchman 
Henry J. Langston 
Charles W. Putney 
R. Hugh Wood 
DENTISTRY 

Floyd L. Leonard 
John C. Tyree 
PHARMACY 

G. E. Andes 
John T. Monroe 
R. R. Rooke 
Sedona V. Shaw 
J. G. Thomas 
NURSING 
Eleanor B. Brown 
Marion B. Myers 
Mattie W. Poyser 
Veda B. Reddy 

1922 
MEDICINE 
Charles M. Caravati 
Joseph Coates 
Powell G. Fox 
Malcolm H. Harris 
Jury B. Loving 
W. J. Ozlin 
Clyde F. Ridge 
L. O. Snead 
Thomas N. Winn 
DENTISTRY 
D. L. Detwiler 
French H. Moore 



15 



no pain 




One donnagesic Extentab gives 10 
to 12 hours of steady, high-level codeine 
analgesia. Rebuilding of effective 
analgesia with repeated doses is avoided. 
Patient comfort is continuous. 
There is more pain relief in donnagesic 
Extentabs than in codeine alone — 
codeine analgesia is potentiated by the 
phenobarbital present. In addition, 
phenobarbital diminishes anxiety, lowering 
patient's reactivity to pain. 
donnagesic is safer, too, for codeine 
side effects are minimized by the peripheral 
action of the belladonna alkaloids. 



extended action— The intensity of effects 
smoothly sustained all-day or all-night 
by each donnagesic Extentab is equivalent 
to, or greater than, the maximum which 
would be provided by q. 4h. administration 
of one-third the active ingredients. 

Donnagesic 

Ext©ixt3Jbs* 



extended action tablets of CODEIXE with DONNATAIM 



once every 10-12 hours 
and 
for all codeine uses 



DONNAGESIC No. 1 (pink) 



DONNAGESIC No. 2 (red) 






CODEINE Phosphate 48.6 mg. (3/ 4 gr.) 97.2 mg. (IV2 gr.) 

Hyoscyamine Sulfate 3111 mg 0.3111 mg. 

Atropine Sulfate 0.0582 mg 0.0582 mg. 

Hyoscine Hydrobromide 0.0195 mg 0.0195 mg. 

Phenobarbital 48.6 mg. (%gr.) 48.6 mg. (% gr.) 

A. H. ROBINS CO.. INC.. RICHMOND. VIRGINIA 'f^S 

Ethical Pharmaceuticals of Merit Since 1878 



WtfmBA 



f 



'Reg. U. S. Pat. Off-, Pal. applied lor. 



Thomas W. Pumphrey 
Tillie L. Weinstein 
PHARMACY 
H. M. Eads 
T. F. Marshall 
Morris Noveck 
NURSING 
Hildred Bauserman 
Minnie L. Cole 
Elise Grimes 



M. Linton 
Schwab 



Ann 
Florenc 

1923 

MEDICINE 

William H. Balte 
W. S. Beazley, Jr. 
P. R. Fox 

B. E. Glass 
Robert P. Hawkins 
j. A. Mease 
Waverly R. Payne 

C. E. Perkins 
Joseph P. Treccasi 
Leta J. White 
DENTISTRY 

Job Oscar Belcher 
Shannon Butts 
Andrew B. Cooke 
R. Ashton Gay 
Harry Lyons 
Leland S. Mabry 
C. K. Polly 
C. B. Reese 
Preston M. White 
PHARMACY 
J. W. Chamblee 
E. R. Rush 

1924 
MEDICINE 
Ruth G. Aleman 
Robert W. Bess 
G. W. Black 



J. L. Blanton 


Gordon H. Page 


Roy Rhodes 


1928 


Doris C. Boatwright 


Irving L. Simpkins 


NURSING 


MEDICINE 


Carl J. Carter 


NURSING 


Lois F. Arundel 


C. R. Bowman 


Donald S. Daniel 


Fleda Colvard 


Maude L. Fox 


Clyde L. Brothers 


Clay W. Evatt 


1926 


1927 


A. R. Comunale 


Nathan B. Feinberg 


MEDICINE 


MEDICINE 


Garrett Dalton 


C. E. Haberlin 


Fletcher E. Ammons 


E. L. Alexander 


W. C. Elliott 


Henry A. Hornthal 


Guy C. Amory 


W. L. Ball 


E. D. Floyd 


B. E. Hunt 


Benjamin H. Bailey 


Harry E. Beard 


P. C. Grigg 


C. F. Lemley 


Webster P. Barnes 


Thomas S. Bowyer 


Harvey B. Haag 


William F. Matthews 


A. J. Blechman 


G. Norfleet Carter 


Wilbur E. Hoffman 


W. E. Newcomer 


O. C. Campbell 


Raymond H. Curry 


Thomas B. Hunter 


Roy L. Noblin 


A. D. Ferrell 


H. C. Davis 


N. B. Jeter 


Ernest C. Shull 


Harry Golston 


B. H. Denmon 


E. C. Joyner 


Giles S. Terry 


J. Berkeley Gordon 


R. L. Eastman 


Fred Y. Ketner 


H. Hudnall Ware, Jr. 


Thomas B. Gordon 


J. R. Ellison, Jr. 


Dorothy Kirschbaum 


T. B. Washington, Jr. 


H. L. Griffin 


V. J. Felitti 


Allen S. Lloyd 


DENTISTRY 


J. R. Grinels 


Jos Garrido-Collazo 


D. F. Love 


R. F. Freeman 


Jeanette T. M. Jarman 


L. Holmes Ginn, Jr. 


Frank Mongillo 


S. Nelson Gray 


J. Philip Jones 


J. Warren Hundley 


Claude L. Neal 


G. Fred Hale 


A. A. Karon 


C. C. Jackson 


John H. Reed, Jr. 


J. F. Hunt, Jr. 


Max Kliger 


E. W. Johnson 


J. R. St. George 


W. J. Sydnor 


Lewis C. Lush 


Oliver L. Jones 


Earl L. Shamblen 


PHARMACY 


W. Fuqua Mitchell 


Orvin C. Jones 


R. F. Simms 


James G. Albert 


R. Rodriquez-Molina 


James W. Keever 


W. R. Southward 


B. T. Allen 


Donnie M. Royal 


Athey R. Lutz 


William N. Thompson 


J. R. Myers 


J. Asa Shield 


C. L. Newland 


John R. Wood 


D. B. Schwetz 


H. L. Townsend 


Paul E. Prillaman 


DENTISTRY 


1925 


Harry Walker 


Irwin Rifkin 


M. A. Byrd 


MEDICINE 


Louis Wardell 


P. A. Shelburne 


W. C. Webb 


A. E. Amick 


William F. Work 


F. F. Sowers 


PHARMACY 


Roscoe D. Campbell 


DENTISTRY 


Wilbur S. Stakes 


1. J. Fratkin 


Douglas G. Chapman 


J. M. Burbank, Jr. 


M. S. Stinnett 


NURSING 


R. S. Coffindaffer 


William Tyler Haynes 


S. F. Stockhammer 


Mary Campbell Gale 


Robley R. Goad 


Edward Myers 


James T. Tucker 


MEDICAL TECHNICIAN 


W. Randolph Graham 


R. S. Powell 


DENTISTRY 


Katherine C. Kindred 


E. Bacon Hardee 


W. A. Ratcliffe 


J. R. Fleet 


1929 


H. P. Levin 
DENTISTRY 


PHARMACY 

C. B. Carlan, Jr. 


PHARMACY 

W. N. Collier 


MEDICINE 


Charles H. Wilson 


Braxton Coiner 


A. O. McCalley 


W. A. Anthony 


PHARMACY 


Hunter M. Gaunt 


NURSING 


S. O. Bennett 
Rex Blankinship 


Cecil C. Lipes 


Z. B. Johnston 


Florence S. Osborne 



A. G. DORIN AGENCY 

10 South 10th Street 
Richmond, Virginia 

You can save up to 25% in the cost of your fire insurance by buying 
from the American Druggists Insurance Company. This deviation from 
Bureau Rates is available to Doctors, Dentists, Pharmacists and 
Nurses on their homes, business property and contents of each. 
Let us serve you and save you money in the cost of your fire insur- 
ance through our connection with one of the finest old line stock in- 
surance companies in America. 

Our Agency also writes the Association Group Accident and Sick- 
ness plan, through the Inter-Ocean Insurance Company, which is 
sponsored by the Virginia Pharmaceutical Association for its mem- 
bers. 



18 



THE SCARAB 



James R. Brown* 


W. E. Butler 


W. N. Richardson 


Harold W. Miller 


Sydney Levy 


W. M. B. Brown 


J. R. Copenhaver 


John A. Tolley 


Tom H. Mitchell 


E. W. McCauley 


O. K. Burnette 


J. Glenn Cox 


PHARMACY 


John H. Murphy 


S. H. Mirmelstein 


A. C. Chandler 


Clyde L. Crawford 


T. J. Banton 


Thomas B. Payne 


B. W. Nash 


William L. Cooke 


Edwin S. Crisp 


J. M. Bierer 


E. Cotton Rawls 


Euston S. Robertson 


Edward G. Dewein 


John W. Davis, Jr. 


C. L. Biscoe 


Henry C. Spalding 


W. H. Saunders 


W. A. Graham 


R. E. Dunkley 


A. G. Spillman 


Howard M. Starling 


L. L. Shamburger 


L. M. Halloran 


Claude W. Dunlap 


E. E. Willey 


DENTISTRY 


Beecher L. Smith 


W. F. Hatcher 


Van M. Ellis 


NURSING 


J. W. Ames 


L. B. Todd 


B. A. Hopkins 


K. St. Clair Freeman 


Helen H. Crossley 


S. L. Friedman 


J. S. Vermillion 


T. N. Hunnicult, Jr. 


Lloyd H. Gaston 


Mary B. Healey 


W. C. Outten 


George D. Vermilya 


F. E. LaPrade 


D. L. Harrell, Jr. 


Mrs. C. H. Henderson 


W. F. Shumadine 


K. K. Wallace 


Charles Lipshutz 


H. J. Harris 


Eha W. McCauley 


Leon Slavin 


G. Randolph Wilsor 


Claude A. Nunnally 


Edwin J. Humphrey 


Laura S. V. Navy 


Samuel Stone 


J. M. Winkfield 


J. P. Pregnall 


J. R. B. Hutchinson 


Lucy B. Powers 


PHARMACY 


DENTISTRY 


Charles R. Robins, Jr. 


Clifford W. Lewis 


1931 


Roy M. Beard 


W. R. Elam 


C. P. Ryland 


Marsh McCall 


MEDICINE 


Herman E. Becker 


L. H. Goldman 


David M. Shevitz 


E. T. Montgomery 


D. B. Armistead 


J. W. Ernest 


J. B. Todd 


William P. Stull 


Leslie E. Morrissett 


Hugh B. Brown, Jr. 


Sidney G. Karp 


PHARMACY 


R. C. Thomason 


Zenas B. Noon 


Paul J. Bundy 


Bruce Rose 


H. L. Beamer 


R. L. Waddell 


James B. Pettis 


R. D. Butterworth 


NURSING 


J. F. Harshbarger 


B. G. Weathers 


M. M. Ralsten 


Julius Caplan 


Deborah E. Cappleman 


NURSING 


Ellis G. Winstead 


H. M. Richardson 


Frank Philip Coleman 


Minnie V. Jones 


Mary V. Blackburn 


P. H. Winston 


R. S. Roberson 


John E. Collier 


Elsie C. Kean 


Minnie E. Green 


DENTISTRY 


L. R. Shaw 


George F. Cormeny 


Sabra Sadler Russell 


Harriette F. Suits 


W. Howard Branch 


C. E. Simons 


Oscar W. Cranz 


1932 


Mary B. Thompson 


O. 5. Martin 


W. G. Stephenson 


Fred G. DeBusk 


MEDICINE 


1933 


M. Bagley Walker 


Meyer Vitsky 


B. L. Field 


Milton H. Bland 


MEDICINE 


PHARMACY 


Louis E. Wice 


R. O. Glenn 


Nathan Bloom 


R. H. Alterman 


F. S. Anderson, Jr. 


Edward H. Williams 


Victor Goodside 


H. G. Byrd 


Emory H. Anderson 


Bernard Behrmon 


J. H. Yeatman 


1. L. Hancock, Jr. 


Willard Cardwell 


C. E. Arnette 


James C. Bray 


DENTISTRY 


B. A. Helsabeck 


Richard C. Cecil 


L. P. Bailey 


James H. Sullender 


B. A. Brann 


G. W. Holmes 


R. Lee Clark, Jr. 


Ernest P. Buxton 


NURSING 


J. P. Broaddus 


William H. Hoskins 


Bertha M. Davis 


J. W. Carney 


Anne F. Mahoney 


J. P. Cross 


J. G. Jantz 


Murray Dick 


Edgar W. Childrey 


Elva Newman 


Stanley L. Dixon 


O. G. King 


Charles A. Easley, Jr. 


Milton A. Clark 


Minnie P. Oldham 


E. L. Houck 


J. C. LeFon 


R. F. Fasoli 


Florence H. Comess 


Lillian Winston 


C. P. Hurt 


Clarence E, Lewis 


S. A. Ford 


William D. Comess 


1930 


E. Budge Kent 


H. J. Lukeman 


R. H. Fowlkes 


C. W. Copenhaver 


MEDICINE 


J. J. O'Keefe, Jr. 


Edward H. Major 


E. C. Gates 


Samuel F. Driver 


E. S. Berlin 


W. Davis Parrott 


Frank Mayfield 


J. W. GrifFis 


J. Spencer Dryden 


M. Foscue Brock 


R. O. Reynolds 


Jesse McCall 


E. G. Kyle 


H. D. Fitzpatrick 



;T CIRC 

SITUATED ON HISTORIC MONUMENT AVENUE 

RICHMOND 20, VIRGINIA 

• A.M.A., American College of Surgeons 

• Virginia Hospital Assn. approval for general rotating internships 

• Participate in National Intern Matching Program 

• Complete Clinical & Bacteriologic Labs — Full time Pathologist 

• School of Nursing with Nat'l. Accrediting Service Approval 

• Medical, Surgical, Obstetrical and Pediatric Departments 



FEBRUARY, 1957 



19 



M. D. Foster 
James T. Green, Jr. 
B. C. Grigsby 
Paul Hogg 
J. B. Johnson, Jr. 
Mary E. Johnston 
J. Bernard Jones 
M. H. McClintic 
B. W. Mongle 
E. W. Perkins 
J. W. Phillips 
Joseph F. Phillips 
J. A. Robinson 
Victor Simiele 
W. P. Starling 
Alfred Steiner 
Edwin D. Vaughan 
John O. Watkins, Jr. 
P. L Wolgin 

A. A. Yurko 
DENTISTRY 
J. L Adams 

B. M. Haley 
M. D. Holland 
PHARMACY 
J. G. Ball 
Roger D. Brown 
Ralph Carino 
Allen N. Fore 
Wilhelm Haag 
G. Wallace Hook 
E. Claiborne Robins 
Joseph S. Rowe 
Barraud Tankard 

C. B. Wallace 
G. C. White 

1934 
MEDICINE 
Robley D. Bates 
E. C. Blum 
Robert A. Brown, Jr. 
C I. Butte, Jr. 
C. C. Chewning 
S. C. Cox 
C. Fallon Davis 
W. F. Delp 
H. A. Eldridge 
Manuel Fernandez-Fuster 
Claude S. Finney 
Mildred B. Forman 
William R. Hutchinson 
Brock D. Jones 
James P. Kent 
N. T. Keys 
Alan F. Kreglow 
J. H. Lamm 
Vincent E. Lascara 
G. M. Leaman 
W. S. Lloyd 
R. C. Manson 
J. Robert Massie, Jr. 

E. C. Mathews 
George W. McCall 
L. E. Neal 

Clyde G. O'Brien 
Philip W. Oden 
Edwin J. Palmer 
P. N. Pastore 
J. A. Payne, III 
Thomas B. Pope 
W. R. Pretlow 
C. L. Riley 
R. C. Siersema 
Robert V. Terrell 

F. N. Thompson 
Girard V. Thompson 
Elam C. Toone, Jr. 
S. Charles Werblow 
John W. Whitlock 
DENTISTRY 
Alexander Kaufman 
PHARMACY 

W. P. Bodmer 

20 



Abraham Cohen 
C. B. Freeman 
W. L. Hickok 
J. R. McDowell 
Myer Salsbury 
NURSING 
Vivian Bragg 
Nannie G. Cole 
Anna M. Copenhaver 
Marguerite Nicholson 

1935 
MEDICINE 
B. Randolph Allen 
Herbert M. Beddow 
John R. Bender 
George S. Bowers 
William H. Chapman 
Choi Chang Choi 
Solomon Disick 
Joseph M. Dixon 
J. B. Earle 
Hugh S. Edwards 
S. L Elfmon 
James Q. Gant, Jr. 
George A. Glass 
Cornelius E. Hagan, Jr. 
F. Hernandez-Morales 
Edmund M. LaPrade 
R. S. Legarde 
Samuel Levine 
Louis Lovenstein 
John P. Lynch, Jr. 
Aurelia G. Nicholls 
David Pollack 
Reno R. Porter 
Rupert W. Powell 
Wellford C. Reed 
John R. Saunders 
Seymour Schotz 

B. E. Stephenson, Jr. 
Leo L. Tylec 
William Roberts Tyson 
Angelo J. Villani 
Charles E. Watkins 
Washington C. Winn 
DENTISTRY 

Moffett H. Bowman 
Antonio C. Di Santo 
Louis I. Keren 
Elwood F. MacRury 
Richard L. Simpson, Jr. 
PHARMACY 
Charles E. Green 
J. Curtis Nottingham 
NURSING 
Alma Collier Baetz 
Erna L. Carlson 
Ruhamah W. Henshaw 

1936 
MEDICINE 

C. Raymond Arp 
Homer Bartley 
Ben Bogen 

Paul K. Candler 
A. A. Davis 
Louis DeAngelis 
L. F. Dobbs, Jr. 
Elbert W. Dodd 
Robert R. Eason 
James William Elliott 
Eugene R. Evans 
Helen G. Evans 
Homer E. Ferguson 
William Y. Garrett 
Frederick C. Goodall 
Marvin R. Houck 
Abraham Meyer Jacobs' 
A. R. Johnston 
John H. Judson 
Max Koenigsberg 
E. W. Lacy, Jr. 
Carl W. Meador 
Robert H. Mitchell 



Frank N. Pole 
Spotswood Robins 
Leroy Smith 
George I. Sneidman* 
Jack Jay Stark 
I. Ewen Taylor 
Lewis S. Trostler 
Arthur L. Van Name, Jr. 
Thomas U. Vermillion 
Walter E. Vermilya 
Hilda J. Walters 
Charles W. Warren 
John G. Welch 
George A. Welchons 
Claud B. White 
DENTISTRY 
Jack J. Goldman 
Samuel P. Kayne 
Thomas E. Martin 
William S. Miles, Jr. 
Nathan Neyman 
Herbert Tobias 
PHARMACY 
J. M. Early 
Alex Grossman 
T. C. Homlett 
NURSING 
Mae Belle W. Condit 

1937 
MEDICINE 
David T. Carr 
Marvin S. Cashion 
Delores Mendez Cashion 
Mary Louise Clark 
John P. Eastham 
Lendall C. Gay 
W. G. Hardy 
Clarence M. Hawke 
William B. Hoover 
William E. Irons 
John Paul Jones 
V. Clifton Lanier 
Louis Lipman 
Elmer McGraw 
Julian H. Meyer 
Richard A. Michaux 
Theodore J. Moss 
Richard N. O'Dell 
Earl M. Peck 
Eli A. Rosen 
George A. Shelter 
Julius J. Snyder 
Christine Thelen 

E. L. Thrasher 
Roger Williams 
William L. Wingfield 
DENTISTRY 

Claud R. Armistead 
Stephen F. Gutowski 
Woodrow C. Henderson 
Thomas M. Hunter 
Alexander L. Martone 
Norman G. Sedel 
PHARMACY 

F. Aubrey Frayser, Jr. 
John Ray Hurt 

Max L. Plotkin 
R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. 
NURSING 
Sara D. Ingold 
MEDICAL TECHNICIAN 
Louise Carden 
Joan E. Tubbs 
1938 
MEDICINE 
Hayes W. Caldwell 
Russell N. Carrier 
William H. Copley 
Samuel S. Dupuy 
Garland Dyches 
Ira C. Evans 
George S. Fultz, Jr. 
Edward E. Haddock 



Gordon D. Hall 

Jacob Camden Huffman 

Charles F. James, Jr. 

Sydney L. Lang 

Carl S. Lingamfelter 

M. Everett McRae 

Sidney G. Page, Jr. 

Henkel Moser Price 

C. Rodriguez 

Herbert G. Ruffin 

Irving M. Schor 

Earl S. Scott 

W. W. Scott 

Edward G. Sharp 

Otto S. Steinreich 

W. Taliaferro Thompson, Jr 

Gilman R. Tyler 

Annie Louise Wilkerson 

George H. Williams 

H. Joseph Williams 

William Hart Woodson 

DENTISTRY 

Ernest L. Bayton, Jr. 

P. N. Davis, Jr. 

Sanford A. Lipford 

A. G. Orphanidys 

William H. Traynham, Jr. 

PHARMACY 

Herald L. Edds 

James F. Hollenbeck 

William H. Joyner 

1939 
MEDICINE 
Kenneth J. Cherry 
Beverley B. Clary 
Jose D. Coll 
Dewitt C. Daughtry 
Helmut M. Dehn 
Eugenie Fribourg 
Arthur B. Gathright 
Thomas L. Grove 
John W. Hash 
Charles F. Hudson 
Marion F. Jarretl 
Saul Krugman 
Robert C. Longan 
Carl Manuta 
Buford W. McNeer 
Harold I. Nemuth 
Maurice E. B. Owens, Jr. 
John L. Patterson 
Debora Pineles 
William J. Robinson 
William M. Smethie 
John E. Stone 
Harry A. Tubbs 
George D. Vaughan 
DENTISTRY 
M. O. Fox 
Jack C. Kanter 
Robert L. Mason 
F. E. Rodriquez 
Charles M. Rosa 
PHARMACY 
Z. I. Blachman 
Charles O. Fore 
Sidney H. Hirsch 
Roderick L. Lucas 
A. P. Mehfoud 
Lorena A. Shepherd 
NURSING 
Sarah Edmondson 
Helen K. McNamara 

1940 
MEDICINE 
Olivia Abernethy 
Oscar Aguilo 
C. Sherrill Armentrout 
Vernon M. Bryant 
Galen G. Craun 
Dorothy Fisher 
Herman Jacob Flax 
Leonard M. Galbraith 



Robert S. Gatherum, Jr. 
Carl B. Hall 
Milton J. Hoover, Jr. 
John F. C. Hunter 
Gus T. Kerhulas 
Edward L. King 
Morris H. O'Dell 
Joseph C. Parker 
Elmer S. Robertson 
Benjamin Rosenberg 
James E. Spargo, Jr. 
Wilkin R. Stevens 
John T. Walke 
Amelia G. Wood 
DENTISTRY 
Aubrey C. Duffer 
John D. Edmondson 
Harold A. Einstein 
C. Robert Helsabeck, Jr. 
Raymond A. Holcomb 
W. Yates League 
PHARMACY 
Boyd S. Clements 
J. H. O'Brien 
NURSING 
Alberta C. Rosanio 
Frances D. Stewart 

1941 
MEDICINE 
Herbert C. Allen, Jr. 
Charles Baldini, Jr. 
William H. Bandy 
Bradford S. Bennett 
Frank N. Buck, Jr. 
Walter H. Buffey 
Estill L. Caudill, Jr. 
Pete Commings 
William E. Doner 
Jorge A. Colon Davila 
Robert S. Faircloth 
Mary V. Gallagher 
A. Broaddus Gravatt, Jr. 
Julius C. Hulcher 
William Russell Jones, Jr. 
Arthur A. Kirk 
Sidney Lyons 
J. David Markham 
John J. Marsella 
Elisabeth Martin 
L. M. Mason 
Percy J. McElrath, Jr. 
Donald S. Morris 
M. Jane Page 
Carl P. Parker 
Fletcher L. Raiford 
James S. Rhodes, Jr. 
William F. Richmond 
John Edgar Stevens 
George A. Stewart 
Adney K. Sutphin 
William R. Woolner 
DENTISTRY 
Edgar T. Crowe 
Margaret C. Draffin 
William C. Draffin 
Wesley B. Jones 
Joseph M. Kline 
Hume S. Powell 
Grover C. Starbuck 
John G. Wall 
PHARMACY 
Paul G. Caplan 
W. Russell Glover 
Alden S. Hankla 
W. Roy Smith 
John O. Wallace 
NURSING 
Hattie R. Kern 
Idell M. McElrath 

1942 
MEDICINE 
George K. Brooks, Jr. 
Pauline D. Carmichael 

THE SCARAB 



James W. Choate 

G. F. Dederick, Jr. 

Edward J. Evans 

Ansel Lipman 

Fred D. Maphis, Jr. 

George W. Melchior, Jr. 

Oscar Lee Ramsey, Jr. 

Catherine R. Stoeckel 

Evelyn L. SMI 

Maurice S. Vitsky 

O. W. Ward, Jr. 

Herbert F. Webb 

David C. Whitehead 

John F. Williams 

DENTISTRY 

George J. George 

Philip W. Handy 

Cyril R. Mirmelstein 

Rupert S. Walker 

M. E. Woody, Jr. 

Robert E. Woolwine, Jr. 

PHARMACY 

J. O. Hubbard, Jr. 

Ralph M. Ware, Jr. 

NURSING 

Mary Esther Cibula 

Aileen B. Hogood 

Bernice E. Richardson 

Margaret A. Robertson 

Elizabeth T. Topping 

1943M 
MEDICINE 
L. E. Banks 
Charles P. Blunt 
Custis L. Coleman 
William S. Grizzard 
William J. Hagood 
Melvin B. Lamberth 
A. M. Lang 
Francis B. Lee 
John D. Powell 
Robert H. Putney, Jr. 
Lucile W. Richardson 
Leroy S. Safian 
John S. ShaFfer 
James Avon Smith 
Russell N. Snead 
Wiley B. Trivett, Jr. 
G. R. Tureman, Jr. 
Herbert L. Warres 

1943D 
MEDICINE 
Wilbur J. Baggs 
Ellsworth F. Cale 
William H. Cox 
David D. Dexter 
Milton Ende 
Henry Edwin Ernst 
Irvin E. Fixel 
Eugene Freundlich 
James Cofer Gale 
Thomas V. Goode, Jr. 
Robert A. Hoffman 
A. C. Johnson 
William R. Kay 
Frank R. Kelly, Jr. 
Shirley Martin 
Fred C. McCall 
Frank F. Merker 
W. W. Mills 
Ruth O'Neal 
John M. Ratliff, Jr. 
William H. ReMine, Jr. 
Chauncey Shumaker 
John H. Sproles 
Jay E. Stoeckel 
George Vranian 
Harold E. Wolfe 

1943M 
DENTISTRY 

A. Robert Anderson, Jr. 
Harold W. Bonifer 

FEBRUARY, 1957 



James E. John, Jr. 
Samuel C. Patteson 

1943D 
Joseph H. Conduff 
Jack Garian 
R. L. Holle 
William J. Longan 
Henry Nakdimen 
Isaac F. Stone 

1943M 
PHARMACY 

Walter Maurice Allen 
Robert Page Kent 
R. T. Shepherd 
1943D 
Stanley A. Greenbaum 
NURSING 
L. Frances Gordon 
Dorsye Russell 
Edith West 
Virginia T. Maphis 
Pearl S. Wolfe 

1944 
MEDICINE 

Jane B. Adorns 
Raymond A. Adams 
Robert R. Dennison 
Hubert T. Dougan 
Rufus P. Ellett, Jr. 
G. W. Erickson, Jr. 
Walter A. Eskridge 
Cecil Glen Finney 
Merritt W. Foster, Jr. 
E. C. Garber, Jr. 
A. Lawson Hardie 
C. D. Houck 
Marguerite E. Kersey 
William W. Kersey 
J. W. Lambdin 
S. W. Lippincott 
Martin Markowitz 
Edward N. Maxwell 
W. Donald Moore 
William P. Morrissette 
Marcus Nakdimen 
Roy T. Parker 
Abraham Perlman 
Marion L. Rice, Jr. 
James Tidier 
Richard D. Turin 
J. B. Walker, Jr. 
Walter R. Wilkinson 
DENTISTRY 
Herbert H. Bonnie 
Howard C. Mirmelstein 
Elton P. Rosenblatt 
Frank H. Wolker 
NURSING 
Dorothy B. Berk 
Edna R. Oppenheim 

1945 
MEDICINE 

C. Cooper Bell, Jr. 
Raymond S. Brown 
William E. Copeland 
G. E. Cox 

James Lyle Dellinger 
Willard M. Fitch 
Martin Freundlich 
Owen Gwathmey 
G. D. Hoyden 
Larry Allison High 
William H. Huffstetler, Jr 
Alfred Joseph 
George R. Jones 
Edwin J. Kamons 
Franklin W. Mallamo 
A. A. McLean 
Albert J. Paine 
Ben T. Painter 



W. G. Painter 
M. W. Philips 
Paul W. Robinett 
Harvey R. St. Clair 
Roy Burton Sampson 
William H. Shaia 
Ramon M. Suarez, Jr. 
Forrest P. White 
DENTISTRY 
James A. Harrell 
Fred C. Jones 
Herbert W. Kaplan 
Martin Sheintoch 
Marvin E. Walker 
PHARMACY 
Eleanor L. Boothe 
Louise F. Simpson 
NURSING 
Ruth R. Brewer 
Eleanor S. Carson 
DIETITIAN 
Elsie Hooker 
1946 
MEDICINE 
William H. Barney 
Richard N. Baylor 
Charles H. Brant 
James W. Brooks 
Marvin G. Burdette 
Rowland H. Burns 
E. K. Carter 
William B. Cecil 
Rafael Cuevas-Zamora 
Albert H. Dudley 
David M. Dumville 
John R. Fitzgerald 
Jack Freund 
John A. Gill 
Rupert S. Hughes, Jr. 
George W. Hurt 
James W. Johnston 
Charles E. Llewellyn 
J. D. Mathios 
W. R. McCune 
David H. Miller 
Thomas G. Potterfleld 
Daniel Ross 
Jack J. Schwartz 
R. E. Stone 
Isabel Taliaferro 
Clayton L. Thomas 
Franklin C. Turner 
C. Newton Von Horn 
Richard Dale Wilson 
DENTISTRY 
W. N. Gillespie 
Gladstone M. Hill 
Alexander W. Jordan, Jr. 
Tore E. Skeppstrom, Jr. 
L. Ray Shields 
NURSING 
Margaret D. Carter 
Emily R. Lynch 
Faye B. Wilkerson 
MEDICAL TECHNICIAN 
Frances B. Holsinger 

1947 
MEDICINE 
Franklin L. Angell 
Robert W. Bradley 
H. Chesley Decker 
Genevieve G. Dutton 
Wayne W. Dutton 
Richard H. Fisher 
Milton D. Friedenberg 
David J. Greenberg 
Douglas O. Hill 
J. Edward Hill 
Jerome Imburg 
George R. Krupp 
Stuart H. Light 
B. J. McClanahan 
William W. McClure 



Philip L. Minor 
Lloyd L. Olsen 
Robert E. Paine, Jr. 
Francis R. Payne, Jr. 
Forrest W. Pitts 
Ralph S. Riffenburgh 
Joseph A. Solomon 
Randolph Trice 
Carl C. Tully 
Fred Walls, Jr. 
L. Mildred Williams 
DENTISTRY 
John N. Pastore 
Joseph R. Suggs 
PHARMACY 
Walter P. Bailey 
Russell E. Simpson, Jr. 
PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 
Virginia L. Williams 
PHYSICAL THERAPY 
Emma G. Robinson 
X-RAY TECHNICIAN 
Quetita Miro 
1948 
MEDICINE 
Regina Barbena 
Doris A. Berlin 
Arthur K. Black 
Henry A. Bullock, Jr. 
Elizabeth R. Caro 
Ernest T. Cobb 
Vernon L. Cofer 
Lee Roy Conn 
J. M. Damron 
Roy A. Edwards 
Thomas B. Hardman 
W. Robert Irby 
Charles D. Jordan 
S. Ben Judy 
Carl H. Laestar 
Alvin P. Long, Jr. 
Thomas H. Moseley 
William A. Niermann 
William H. Pate 
Robert E. Richard 
Lucien W. Roberts, Jr. 
Thomas A. Saunders 
John L. Whaley 
Ann H. Williams 
Charles M. Zacharias 
DENTISTRY 
Ernest S. Benson 
Nathan B. Evens 
Martin Rosenberg 
James R. Turnage 
NURSING 
Elinor E. Michdel 
Faye Hensley Starr 
Laura G. Stephens 

1949 
MEDICINE 
Leo Blank 
Eleanor E. Bundy 
Wiley H. Cozart 
Joseph G. Doboy 
Hilda Garcia 
Frank A. Gonzalez 
Harold O. Kamons 
Ulric J. Laquer 
J. H. Masters 
Harry Nenni 
David S. Palmstrom 
Stanley S. S.mon 
Ralph J. Stalter 
Robert G. Stineman 
John L. Thornton 
W. T. Walker 
Ralph B. Winston 
DENTISTRY 
William H. Becker 
Ralph L. Crobill 
Henry B. Field 
James O. Hodgkin, Ml 



Charles H. Sugg 

J. Frank Thomason 

PHARMACY 

Fred Preas Casey 

Logan M. Ives, Jr. 

John E. Marks 

Montague C. Marshall, Jr 

Richard E. Marshall 

Thomas F. Marshall, Jr. 

George J. Savage, Jr. 

NURSING 

Inez L. Goldsby 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Florence M. Frazier 

1950 
MEDICINE 
W. B. Adams 
Wyndhom B. Blanton, Jr, 
George M. Bullard 
Thornton R. Cleek 
M. Cade Covington 
Evelyn P. Daniel 
Griffith B. Daniel 
William W. Gillespie 
John T. Glick, Jr. 
J. K. Hall, Jr. 
Ward Harshbarger, Jr. 
Thomas B. Hedrick 
Russell E. Herring, Jr. 
James R. Holsinger 
Will, am H. Johnson 
James Loster 
Harvey A. Martin 
Margaret L. Masters 
Eugene E. Mihalyka 
Donald S. Myers 
John W. Powell 
Paxton Powers 
Ellen J. Preston 
Stuart Ragland, Jr. 
John B. Rose, Jr. 
Thomas C. Royer 
Leo F. Sherman 
Robert D. Shreve 
Eustace H. Smith 
Joseph A. Smith 
Lawrence O. Snead, Jr. 
Allan M. Linger 
Leroy Webb 
DENTISTRY 
Marvin W. Aldndge 
James E. Cannon, Jr. 
John S. Dilday 
Max Largent 
Lawrence G. Mathews 
Cornelius Ramsey, Jr. 
Woodrow W. Poss 
Claude D. Richardson, Jr. 
Walker P. Sydnor 
Harding L. Thomas 
PHARMACY 
Thomas C. Bishop 



Tho 



Edwin A. Myrick 

U. Bryan Puckett, Jr. 

Eugene V. White 

MS^ 

Emily E. Mueller 

1951 
MEDICINE 
Joseph H. Britton 
James David Brown 
D. Sheffer Clark 
Merle B. Davis 
John D. French 
R. Flnley Gayle, III 
William F. Gibbs 
William C. Grigsby, Jr 
Frederick A. Gunion 
Norman N. Hill, Jr. 
William J. Hotchkiss 
Aubrey A. Houser, Jr. 
William D. Irvine 
Ernest J. Keffer, Jr. 



21 



Edward A. Lewis 

Arthur J. Martin 

Thomas D. McCahill 

Brooke M. Moffett 

W. E. Newby 

Wilmer G. Oliphant 

C. J. Roncaglione 

Norman R. Tingle 

Paul E. Totten 

Albert J. Wasserman 

Julian Weinstein 

Robert F. Willis 

DENTISTRY 

Thomas W. Armstrong, Jr. 

William J. Artrip 

R. H. Bruni, Jr. 

Eugene Eskey, Jr. 

Robert P. Fultz 

Carlton E. Gregory 

David H. Marshall 

Kemper McCloud, Jr. 

Daniel R. Miller 

Thomas W. Peterson 

L. T. Rogers 

PHARMACY 

Henry W. Addington, Jr. 

Otha C. Boyne, Jr. 

George J. Janosik 

NURSING 

Vivian E. Edmondson 

Mae Belle Lee 

Thelma Mendez 

Anne W. Muller 

Faith C. Pratt 

DIETITIAN 

Rosalyn M. Frank 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

Nathan Bushnell, III 

James E. Case 

John C. Hess 

C. D. Jenkins 

Barrington Kinnard 

Joseph S. Stubbs, Jr. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Nelson H. Coryea 
1952 

MEDICINE 

George E. Arrington, Jr. 

Henry V. Belcher 

Roland S. Birckhead 

David W. Branch 

Jean P. Cavender 

Gene Clapsaddle 

A. P. Dickson, III 

James L. Grobe 

Kenneth M. Heatwole 

George H. Hull 

Emily E. Jones 

Earle J. Kerpelman 

C. M. Keys 

Jack A. Lawson 

Howard Maxwell 

David Z. Morgan 

John A. Murray 

Thomas P. Overton 

Bernard L. Patterson 

William A. Shelton 

George O. Ship.p 

Peter W. Squire 

William R. Tabor 

William W. Trigg, Jr. 

George F. Tucker 

Thomas W. Turner 

Louis R. Wilkerson 

DENTISTRY 

C. L. Baltimore 

F. Allen Cavedo, Jr. 

Jack W. Chevalier 

James J. Elliott 

Harry W. Fore, Jr. 

John H. Goode 

Kenneth S. Gusler 

22 



S. Guy Hall 
Robert L. Hopkins, 
T. O. Layman 
William B. May 
Jacob A. Pearce 
James E. Rayhorn 
PHARMACY 
Kenneth E. Conne 
Millson S. French 
John Giragosion 
William R. Hale 
Dalton E. McCoy 
Jack D. Proctor 



The 



W. Ro 



I. M. Tatum 
NURSING 

Emily H. Baxter 

Margaret Greek 

Faye Landers 

Sue L. Richardson 

Mae W. Shehee 

Mary W. Stanford 

Jean C. Waters 

Frances A. Wilkins 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

William M. Bucher 

Hunter A. Grumbles 

John F. Harlan, Jr. 

William R. Reid 

Robert R. Sheilds 

David G. Williamson, Jr. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Richard B. Kemp 

Ruth M. Latimer 

1953 
MEDICINE 
James G. Beach, Jr. 
Mary D. Brown 
Kenneth M. Clements 
Catherine E. Craun 
Donald E. Cunningham 
Cecil F. Evans, Jr. 
Allan L. Forbes 
Joseph E. Gardner 
William N. Gee 
Ota T. Graham, Jr. 
Charles P. Harwood 
Ernest C. Hermann 
Raymond C. Hooker, Jr. 
Farrar W. Howard 
W. Randolph McLeod 
Samuel S. Morrison 
George Naymick 
Jean F. Ragsdale 
Charles W. Richardson 
Julie M. Sanford 
A. R. Southall, Jr. 
Henry S. Spencer 
Walter J. Stanford 
Paul A. Tanner, Jr. 
Terry F. Tanner 
William B. Tarry, Jr. 
James H. W.ley 
DENTISTRY 
John W. Atkins 
Donald S. Brown 
Richard T. Bruce, Jr. 
D. W. Fawley, Jr. 
Clyde E. Godbold 
Ronald N. Levin 
George T. Parker 
Frederick C. Shaw 
Thomas G. Warrick 
PHARMACY 

Robert E. Christopher, Jr. 
Milton E. Cornblatt 
Norman L. Hilliard 
James F. Poole 
NURSING 
Joanne Flanagan 
Margaret Lawton 
Alice L. Smith 
Elsie M. Solonka 



Anne R. Waters 
Laurie Lee Watson 
HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

Thomas Curtis 

Stanley F. Gumerlock, Jr. 

MS 

Marion Waller 

MEDICAL TECHNICIAN 

Rocelia May Warren 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Christine E. Friedrich 

Philip N. Pulizzi 

Joseph A. Taylor 

1954 
MEDICINE 
Donald L. Baxter 
Robert M. Cook 
James F. Crosby 
Leonard L. Davis, Jr. 
Edgar C. Goldston 
Lloyd L. Goulder, Jr. 
Henry T. Harrison, Jr. 
Alan E. Kinsel 
Emerson L. Kirby 
Donald H. McNeill, Jr. 
Richard M. Newton 
Samuel B. Rentsch, Jr. 
Robert Richards 
Philip A. Rosenfeld 
Paul H. Schellenberg 
Alan V. Yoho 
Emma Jane Yoho 
Ellis N. Zuckerman 
DENTISTRY 
Charles E. Barr 
Lewis R. Belote 
Clarence H. Collins 
Charles Halsteod 
L. J. Hecht 
John T. Jobe, III 
Harry L. Mears, Jr. 
John A. Morris 
C. B. Williams 
Peter S. Yeatras 
PHARMACY 
R. O. Edds 
Samuel H. Kalman 
Lily L. Kue 

Richard M. Peatross, Jr. 
H. Malcolm Robbins 
W.ll.am R. Rollings 
John B. Williams 
NURSING 
Anne R. Andrews 
Jocelyn D. Mumpower 
HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 
Richard B. Anderson 
Richard Brooke, Jr. 
Ronald Burton 
Curtis A. Clayton 
Gerald W. DeHaven 
Paul F. Flanagan 
Joseph H. James, Jr. 
Jesse W. Reel 
1955 
MEDICINE 
Theodore Adler 
John D. Bradford 
Robert B. Chevalier 
Nancy M. Garrett 
Cary J. Lambert 
Willard E. Lee, Jr. 
William B. Lundeen 
Hunter H. McGuire 
William T. Norris, Jr. 
James T. Robinson 
William P. Sinclair 
Milton Wigod 
R. Lewis Wright, Jr. 
DENTISTRY 
Lewis G. Coffey 
Richard L. Fisher 



Thomas L. Harlow, Jr. 


Gerald W. Roller 


Edgar C. Hatcher, Jr. 


James C. Sams 


George R. D. Hedrick 


Frederick H. Savage 


J. Crockett Henry, Jr. 


Rosemary F. Schellenb 


Eugene L. Kanter 


James R. Sease 


Emanuel W. Michaels 


Kenneth B. Sizer 


John F. Morris 


Dave J. Skewes 


1. Slaydon Myers 


John R. Smith 


Hubert S. Rowlings, Jr. 


Robert S. Smith 


PHARMACY 

Robert L. Beamer 
Jean P. Day 
James N. OGrady 
NURSING 


Paulus C. Taylor 
J. E. Temple 
Doris A. Thurman 
William Thurman, Jr. 
Raymond O. Wallace, 
Rheudolph J. Wells 


Lucy Credle 


Edward J. Wiley, Jr. 


Wanda G. Edwards 


H. B. Wilkins 


Jean R. Loving 


Nancy J. Wing 


Kathryn E. Shaw 


Bernard F. Wittkamp, J 


HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 


Harriet E. Wood 


Paul N. Bridge 


Lawrence C. Zacharias 


Charles L. Hite 


Walter M. Zirkle, Jr. 


Kenneth Gallier 
Charles T. Wood 
PHYSICAL THERAPY 


DENTISTRY 

W. E. Armstrong, Jr. 
Charles B. Barnett 


Ruth G. Godwin 


Louis C. Blazek 


Mary M. Neate 


John K. Bohon 


1956 
MEDICINE 


Arthur K. Brown 
R. J. Brown 
A. W. Busbee 


Charles C. Ashby 


Richard D. Collier 


Leigh O. Atkinson 


Patrick B. Colvard 


Thomas H. Bain 


W. W. Crittenden, Jr. 


William P. Bennett 


R. L. Croft 


Charles R. Blake 


J. F. Darden 


Gilbert P. Blankinship 


Clarence E. Deane, Jr 


Robert R. Bowen 


Herbert D. Deane, Jr. 


William B. Brown 


C. P. Fletcher 


Robert J. Buchanan 


Clyde L. Fulcher 


F. G. Burns, Jr. 


Robert W. Gravely, Jr 


William H. Canada 


Mark H. Hillman 


Roderick A. Comunale 


A. E. Hodges, Jr. 


Tony Constant 


A. L. Huband, Jr. 


Anthony A. Deep, Jr. 


K. E. Hutton 


Raymond D. Dyer, Jr. 


Dick S. Hyatt 


Keith C. Edmunds 


Richard F. Hymack 


Freeman Epes 


Glenn James 


Andrew M. Fekete 


J. G. Jenkins, Jr. 


George L. Fifer 


C. D. King 


Hugh E. Fraser, Jr. 


J. B. Lapentina 


Lester L. Gillespie 


Samuel R. Lawson 


Clarence K. Glover, Jr 


L. L. Lindamood 


Anne S. Goldston 


Paul M. March 


John R. Good 


P. L. McBride, Jr. 


Elkanah B. Gray 


Robert L. Motyca 


P. G. Gregoriou 


E. C. Moulds 


William P. Grigsby 


D. A. Mowles 


John J. Halki 


J. W. Pash, Jr, 


Echols A. Hansbarger, Jr. 


W. L. Pratt 


Lucius A. Harrison, Jr. 


John M. Prince 


Donald F. Hensley 


Gene P. Reasor 


Donald S. Howell 


Clayton R. Robinson 


Richard Page Hudson, Jr. 


L. B. Sheppard 


Russell L. Hughes 


N. Shreve Spitler 


E. Sidney Hunter, Jr. 


Edwin A. Thomas 


Marion E. Ingram 


Howard S. Tugwell 


William C. Kappes, Jr. 


Robert B. Whitmore, J 


Marvin A. Krane 


James E. Williams 


John J. Krueger 


Marvin C. Winn 


William J. Lawson 


Jordan M. Wollard, Jr 


William R. Mauck 
Boyd H. May, Jr. 


PHARMACY 


Robert L. Miles 


Faye LaRue Andrews 


Charles H. Moseley, Jr. 


Robert H. Bell 


Albert W. Moser 


Betsy Anne Berry 


F. X. Mullins, Jr. 


Charles A. Brown 


Eugene D. Nolley 


Henry C. Brown, Jr. 


Benjamin R. Ogburn 


Edwin L. Burnette 


Robert K. Osborne 


Sydney B. Clement 


John B. Parker 


Richard L. Collins 


Sterling N. Ransone 


Barbara R. Glover 


Louis J. Read 


Larry L. Goldman 


Gary L. Ripley 


Gilbert P. Grossman 


Robert J. Robertson, Jr. 


James F. Hart 



THE SCARAB 



John W. Hasty 


Ann E. Gosse 


Elizabeth Jefferson 


C. B. Kirchmier 


Randolph H. Hoge 


Joyce Hines 


Patsy Grant 


Carol Kolton 


G. A. Montgomery 


Edwin L. Kendig, Jr. 


Alice M. Hostetter 


Ann Harkleroad 


Edith Moody 


A. W. Saul 


Paul Larson 


Robert L. Hudson 


Harriet L. Helton 


Wilhelmina Ormond 


J. C. Trout 


Sybill MacLean 


Phillip B. May 


Janet B. Hoylman 


Dorothy Richardson 


Glenn Updike 


James E. Mclver 


Raymond C. McConnell, Jr. 


Rebecca McGlohon 


Matilda Stone 


Henry Gunst, Jr. 


Charles E. S. McKeown 


Barbara Andrews Morgan 


Emily Menefee 






John M. Meredith 


Emily G. Morrison 


Eleanor G. Moser 


MEDICAL TECHNICIAN 


FACULTY AFFILIATES 


G. Kenneth Miller 


Anne S. Rienhold 


Frances Nickols 


Sally E. Neidermayer 


S. Elmer Bear 


Robert E. Mitchell, Jr. 


James P. Roberts 


Willie N. Norfleet 




Wyndham B. Blanton 


J. K. Owen 
Leroy S. Pearce 


Robert E. Robinson 


Margaret S. Scott 


PHYSICAL THERAPY 


Lewis H. Bosher, Jr. 


James T. Savage 


Patricia W. Taylor 


Dwight Aultman 


Harry Brick 


Benjamin W. Rowles, Jr. 


Robert W. Schanz 


Betty Queries Tesh 


Elisabeth Heckel 


Paul L. Chevalier 


E. S. Ray 


John G. Sharpe 


Ann V. Weaver 


Sharon Potash 


James B. Dalton 


Arnold M. Salzberg 


Harold L. Smith 
Virginia L. Webber 


DIETITIAN 


Mary Lou Riddleberger 
Shirley E. Shank 


Ernst Fisher 
Herbert H. Galston 


John G. dos Santos 
Eric C. Schelin 


Jessica T. Wright 


Ruth Beaver 


Clara Ann Turner 


Albert E. Harris 


Maynard Smith 




Annie Carter 


Herman L. West 


Walter H. Hartung 


Arnold F. Strauss 


NURSING 


Martha Chalmers 




Kathryn Heitshu 


Katherine Bobbitt 


Annette Fletcher 


PHARMACY AFFILIATES 


Jacob J. Hladys 


HONORARY MEMBER 


Connie May Dulaney 


Marian Hopkins 


G. E. Henderson 


Ebbe C. Hoff 


Anne Skinner Nottingham 



Dr. Ramon D. Garcin, M.D. 

(Continued from p.ige 6) 

Memorial Child Guidance Clinic, of which 
he was the first president. 

Doctor Garcin has served as examiner 
for practically all of the leading life in- 
surance companies and still acts in an ad- 
visor}- capacity for several. He was per- 
sonal physician to a number of Virginia 
Governors, including Governor Swanson 
and Governor Pollard. 

Further evidence of the breadth of his 
interests is his association with the Bank 
of Commerce and Trusts as a director 
since 1912, and his similar services to 
the old Church Hill Bank. 

Dr. Garcin is a devout man and is a 
life-long Baptist, belonging to the Leigh 
Street Baptist Church. His professional 
contributions to Baptist activities are dem- 
onstrated by his services as physician to 
the Foreign Mission Board of the South- 
ern Baptist Association for a number of 
years. 

Doctor Garcin is a member of a num- 
ber of fraternal and professional organi- 
zations including the Masons, both York 
and Scottish Rite — K.C.C.H. and Shrine, 
the American Medical Association, the 
Southern Medical Association, the Rich- 
mond Academy of Medicine and the Med- 
ical Society of Virginia from which he 
received a fifty year certificate some time 
ago. He is one of the relatively few 
physicians south of the Mason-Dixon line 
holding membership in the New York 
Academy of Medicine. He has served on 
the staff of the MCV Hospitals, St. Lukes, 
Sheltering Arms, and Retreat for the Sick. 
When the latter hospital was located 
downtown he taught materia medica and 
therapeutics in the nursing school for 
many years. In his earlier years, he was 

FEBRUARY, 1957 



a frequent contributor of professional arti- 
cles to the Virginia Medical Monthly, 
the Journal of the American Medical As- 
sociation and the Archives of Surgery and 
Gynecology. During this time, he also 
devised a modification of the axis-traction 
forceps which became known as the Gar- 
cin forceps. 

Through the years Doctor Garcin has 
been a prolific and critical reader of both 
professional and non-professional litera- 
ture, one result of which naturally was 
the accumulation of a good library. In it 
was a large collection on Virginia and the 
Confederacy. On discontinuing his office 
at 27th and Broad Streets last year he 
disassembled his collection and donated 
some 1,000 volumes to the Medical Col- 
lege Library and 3,000 volumes to the 
Richmond City Library. 

At present Doctor Garcin has chosen 
to limit his practice and makes his office 
and home with that of his son, Ramon, lr. 
He has lost little of his vim and vigor, 
and is as keenly interested in current med- 
ical and civic affairs as ever. He is still an 
inveterate reader and for relaxation leans 
particularly towards detective and mystery 
stories. 

One of his main hobbies and pleasures 
through the years has been cigar smoking 
which he still enjoys (in chain fashion!). 
He has a fine sense of wit, and in his 
younger daj-s, this lent itself to enjoyable 
pranks on his fellow physicians, which I 
am told, were amply returned in kind. 
Equally pleasing, if not more so, I should 
think, was his knack in gently teasing 
his nursing associates. His love for chil- 
dren still remains strongly entrenched; 
now this can be further enriched through 
his contacts with his grandchildren with 
whom he is particularly fond of playing 



games, such as checkers (at which he 
seems so proficient at losing ! ) . 

This saga, deficient though it is, points 
to a way of life which might well serve 
as a pattern for all of us, a way of life 
which has brought and is still bringing 
so much to that large number of patients, 
friends, associates, and fellow citizens of 
Doctor Ramon David Garcin. We salute 
him and look forward to a long living 
continuation of his beneficent influences. 



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23 



Recruiting for Tomorrow 

(Continued from page 3) 

to argue with the position taken by some 
who feel deeply, despite kindly inclina- 
tions, that those individuals who have the 
privilege of higher education should pay 
at least part of the cost. Where this is 
impossible, however, it seems fair to main- 
tain that it is foolish of any society to 
deprive itself of the benefits which ac- 
crue to all its citizens from the subsidized 
higher education of its more talented but 



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needy youth. To be completely practical, 
it may be reasonably expected that in most 
cases individuals so subsidized will more 
than return the extra public investment 
in their education in the form of increased 
income tax payments, to say nothing of 
the extra contributions they will make 
to their communities as educated citizens. 

It would seem worthwhile for the mem- 
bers of the health professions as responsi- 
ble citizens to give effective support to 
the proposal that a system of State scholar- 
ships be established for the purpose of 
insuring that needy Virginia high school 
graduates of demonstrated ability shall 
have the opportunity to develop their tal- 
ents to the fullest through higher educa- 
tion. This is not charity but prudent in- 
vestment. Certainly it is sound public 
policy to conserve our most precious nat- 
ural resource. 

For all the assistance and advice our 
alumni can give us in attracting to the 
health professions their fair share of tal- 
ented and worthy youth, we shall be 
grateful. 

The Inaugural Day 

(Continued from page 5) 
two or three groups; suspicious and jeal- 
ous factions they were. (Mark my words: 
I speak of the nineteenth century.) 

If that question is fair, then it is equally 
fair to ask if "split-ism" is a basic creed 
of theologians with Scottish background. 

Whatever the urges and drives, separa- 
tion came over the question of an appoint- 
ment. A new chair was created, a pro- 
fessorship of physiology and medical 
jurisprudence (or was it a bench?). The 
Medical Faculty recommended Dr. Martin 
A. Scott for the professorship; an articu- 
late and dissatisfied group of doctors in 
Richmond outside the Medical Faculty 
presented the name of Dr. Goodridge A. 



Wilson, the man whom the Trustees final- 
ly appointed. Then all Vesuvius broke 
loose. 

In the course of the conflict, the Med- 
ical Faculty went to the General Assembly 
and asked that the Gordian knot be cut 
in the good old American way by the pas- 
sage of a law, this to give the professors 
separate existence. 

I leave to others the intricate lega 
questions involved. A reading of the case 
Trustees of Dartmouth College v. Wood 
ward, suggests that the Trustees of Hamp 
den-Sydney might have successfulh 
pleaded in the Federal Courts their char 
tered rights. But instead, whether from 
poverty or from principle, I cannot say, 
the Trustees finally mustered what dignity 
they could and issued their own declara- 
tion of independence. They appointed a 
committee to prepare what they termed 
a "minute" on the subject. The minute 
at first seems deceptively conciliatory 
(one of the "whereas" lines goes as fol- 
lows: "Whereas this Board have no dis- 
position to embarrass the operations of the 
new corporation"). And then apparently 
the gentlemen up in Prince Edward caught 
fire. (This was June 15, 1854, a hot day. 
I judge.) Or perhaps I should say that the 
committee to prepare the minute dipped 
quill pens in the juice of sour grapes, for 
it gave a parliamentary version of good- 
riddance-of-bad-rubbish by stating that 
"they [the Trustees] yet congratulate 
themselves on being thus relieved of the 
trouble and responsibility of a Department 
of our College which has brought to us 
neither profit nor honour." Once we alka- 
lize the acidity in the manuscript of 1854. 
we see the humor of this declaration now 
102 years old. 

May I underscore the fact that for six- 
teen formative years this school drew 
strength from the older college. Thus you 



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24 



THE SCARAB 



here at .in institution of professional learn- 
ing, as well as those of us some three- 
score miles to the west in a college of 
liberal arts, owe an inescapable debt to 
the men of vision, giants we now know 
them to have been, who determined "to 
form good men and good citizens," to 
quote from the earliest prospectus, pub- 
lished in 1775. They then created a sin- 
ewy, a tough, and a productive little col- 
lege. Remembering that the late Dr. 
Joseph D. Eggleston described Hampden- 
Sydney as the alma mater of colleges, I 
remind you that not only the Medical 
College of Virgina and the Union The- 
ological Seminary, both of Richmond, owe 
parental affection to Hampden-Sydney, but 
likewise do over a dozen other colleges 
and universities which were either 
founded by or revitalized by graduates of 
Hampden-Sydney. 

The Medical College in 1854 went its 
own way, and this separate way has been 
the good way. Of its particular history 
for the last century, we shall have time 
to say little. If one believed in pre-natal 
institutional influence, he might have pre- 
dicted stormy times, with "alarums and 
excursions," and he would have been right. 
The now-happy union of the University 
College of Medicine and of the Medical 
College, an amalgamation initiated in 
1913, is a savory narrative in itself. When 
I say that the true account "would be a 
story of personal differences, of profes- 
sional rivalry, and of political contention," 
I am merely quoting Dr. Stuart McGuire 
himself whose father, Dr. Hunter Mc- 
Guire, had founded the University College 
of Medicine. I cannot help but comment 
at this point on the statesmanship of Drs. 
Stuart McGuire and George Ben Johnston 
in effecting the merger. 

But episodes of tension should not con- 
fuse the calendar of substantial achieve- 
ment. There were aggressive and dynamic 
professors. And the hallmark of the in- 
stitution has been the wholesome ideal of 
service to the people, a service best per- 
formed by alert attention to the individ- 
ual, and especially by emphasis on bedside 
teaching, a characteristic which could be 
seen from the first days in the old Union 
Hotel. I am proud to state that .it the 
present time forty-six Hampden-Sydney 
students are enrolled at the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia. 

This college has contributed to and 
benefited from the great medical tradi- 
tion of America. To define that inheritance 
is not easy. Without pretending to com- 

FEBRUARY, 1957 



pleteness, I say that this tradition certainly 
embraces: (1) experimental adventure, 
(2) broad scholarship, (3) sacrificial cit- 
izenship, and ( 4 ) human concern. The 
major points, I think, can be sustained 
by reference to the great men and women 
who have given themselves to the healing 
profession. 

Ephraim McDowell, who spent his 
childhood in Rockbridge County, Virginia, 
went into the wilds of Kentucky and in 
1809, courageously performed an ovari- 
otomy. I quote J. T. Flexner when I say 
that "Every operation for appendicitis or 
gall-stones is a lineal descendant of one 
daring experiment made in the wilderness 
of Kentucky." This deed reflects the cour- 
age and the self-reliance imposed by life 
on the edges of civilization. 

Many of our early medical men pos- 
sessed general scholarship and breadth of 
learning in a marked degree. Is it too 
much to ask that those interested in the 
art of healing be people of culture? The 
late Dr. Josiah C. Trent, Duke surgeon, 
once remarked that "Today in our struggle 
for the mastery of science, particularly as 
it applies to our special fields, we as phy- 
sicians, too often neglect the humanities, 
become narrow and limited in our ideas 



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and fail to assume that leadership in cul- 
tural pursuits which is our heritage." 

But when it comes to the warm-interest 
in the underprivileged, who can match the 
record of the American doctor and his 
co-workers! Recall to your minds a wom- 
an, promoter of one of the grandest-move- 
ments in the history of service to helpless 
mankind. I refer to the remarkable career 
of Dorothea Lynde Dix (this isn't that 
Dorothy Dix who gives advice to the love- 
lorn!). This Miss Dix, living in the List 
century almost single-handedly revolu- 
tionized our attitude towards and treat- 
ment of the insane, especially those who 
were poor and depended on public care. 

Note the citizenship record of our early 
doctors. Five of the fifty-six Signers of 
the Declaration of Independence were 
medical men. It is perhaps not too much 
to say that in the late eighteenth century 
the stature of the profession was raised 
as much or more by the civic talent as 
by the professional aptitude of the med- 
ical men. 

Now on this Richmond hill the code 
of American healing joins forces with the 
code Virginian. The American Way 
merges with the Virginia Way. I refer 
particularly to the ideal of the Virginia 



gentleman, the Cavalier. In historical 
jousting he has at times become unhorsed, 
but rumor tells me that there is in Char- 
lottesville a thesis bravely entitled, "The 
Cavalier Re-Mounted." Whether he is still 
in the saddle or on the sod, one cannot 
ignore him. If in cold fact we discover 
him few in numbers, we know that the 
hope of a people makes a mockery of 
statistics. Strong in ancestor-worship and 
in professions of Christianity, this gen- 
tleman of Virginia holds high the idea of 
noblesse oblige. 

In searching for phrases illuminating 
the Virginia spirit, I discovered some time 
ago an exhilarating verbal detour, a side 
remark in Capers' biography of Mem- 
minger, the Confederate statesman. Those 
of us so luckless as to have been born at 
some place other than Richmond, must 
be patient as I read, and all must remem- 
ber that Capers meant no irreverence. I 
quote: "A Virginia gentleman of the old 
school may not have been produced alone 
in Richmond. Far be it from me to locate 
the virtues of the old Commonwealth ex- 
clusively at this place, but I do say that 
they were to be found in this glorious 
old city in 1861, in the fullest expressions 
of the highest type of civilization America 




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26 



has ever seen. I do not know how it is 
today in the 'City by the James.' [This 
was written in 1893]. ... I have won- 
dered how it was in the old metropolitan 
cities of the South: if the sora of the 'East- 
ern Shore' and the rice bird of our South- 
ern seaboard, the Madeira of Charleston 
and the Sherry of Richmond, the oysters 
of York River and the rice of the Waca- 
maw, with the spirit of Christ and the 
cavalier in and over all, still produce the 
men and women of yore. I must not, how- 
ever, digress, let the reverie be ever so 
pleasant." 

No indeed, I say, let us not digress, but 
for the purposes of the moment the sen- 
tences are not digression. The phrase, "the 
spirit of Christ and the cavalier in and 
over all," suggests an important kind of 
suture. The humanity of Christianity and 
the social concern in the healing arts come 
together here at this school. With an 
aristocracy of talent (which is the truest 
democracy of all), and with a purpose 
sharpened by dedication, all resources here 
are designed to serve humanity. 

We must remember that in the medical 
arts there is a unity of service which can 
be denied only at the highest' cost to all 
concerned. Healing is a co-partnership. 
Imagine, if you can, surgery without the 
anaesthetist. Where would modern treat- 
ment be without the skilled pharmacol- 
ogist and the patient nurse? I state a sim- 
ple fact when I report that the chaplain 
provides a therapy rich and fruitful. In- 
deed, healing is a seamless garment. 

Today those coming from colleges such 
as this possess an awesome influence. Once 
here in the Southland, superimposed on 
the planter-cavalier ideal, was the concept 
that the prestige professions were law, 
theology, and military sendee. Today, for 
better or for worse, there is an upsetting 
of the old triumvirate. Bright young men 
want to be doctors or big-business execu- 
tives. The beau ideal is, of course, a com- 
bination of the two, let us say a surgeon 
with business inclinations, whether toward 
cattle farming or the New York Stock Ex- 
change is immaterial. Ah, those versatile 
scissors, clipping the appendix by day and 
the coupon by night! Such is one frag- 
ment of a young man's dream. 

With this distinction, I say in all seri- 
ousness, goes a hazard. Against this hazard 
may I issue a respectful, a humble warn- 
ing? Guard against residence in the sterile 
valleys of arrogance, the dangerous occu- 
pational waste lands, insidiously beckon- 
ing all those engaged in the arts of heal- 

THE SCARAB 



ing. Gravitation towards this treacherous 
acre comes not from any inherent weak- 
ness in the professions, but rather from the 
weakness of mankind in general, which 
often appears more desperate over its 
stomach aches than its heart aches, and 
more concerned with athletes' toot than 
with the scabrous and festering hate of 
man for man. 

Again I remind you of your obligations 
to scholarship and to citizenship, despite 
the pressures and complexities in the in- 
evitably specialized world of medicine. I 
applaud the recent and public concern of 
the healing profession with the whole 
man. This concept, avowedly old but as- 
suredly urgent, will make more complete 
men and women of the nurses, technicians, 
hospital administrators, pharmacists, den- 
tists, and doctors. 

In a word, you must in a sense return 
to the priesthood from which you came. 
Then will the complex become simple, the 
mysterious plain, and your efforts be 
crowned with joy. 

A few moments ago I spoke of a 
prospectus affirming that the purpose of 
Hampden-Sydney was "to form good men, 
and good Citizens." It was signed by 
Samuel Stanhope Smith, first head and 
one of the founders of the college. That 
President Smith has something to say to 
this President Smith, his academic heir. 
And all of us who admire and believe in 
this college must still the clamor of the 
irrelevant, and of the less consequential 
in order that the message may be heard. 
I think I hear the Great Prescription: To 
length of life we must add depth, and then 
we shall be clean in the court of con- 
science. 

Yes, the past has much to say to this 
President Smith, but the future even more. 
He excites our best hopes, and he stirs 
us to believe that he shall prolong this, 
the golden age of the Medical College 
of Virginia. 

Mr. Buford Scott then presented Dr. 
Robert Blackwell Smith, Junior, and the 
oath of office was solemnly administered 
by the Honorable Edward Wren Hudgins, 
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of 
Appeals of Virginia, and we who watched 
knew that another chapter in MCV his-, 
tory was beginning. The prayer of inter- 
cession and dedication was offered by the 
Reverend Benjamin Rice Lacy, Junior, 
Chaplain of Hampden-Sydney College. 

Greetings to the new president were 
brought by Archer K. Tullidge, president 

FEBRUARY, 1957 



of the student body, from the students. 
Dr. frank L. Apperly, professor of Pa- 
thology, from the faculty, and Dr. James 
T. Tucker, president of the Alumni As- 
sociation, presented the following message 
from the alumni: 

Mr. Chancellor, President Smith, fellow 
colleagues and alumni, distinguished 
guests, students, and friends of the Med- 
ical College of Virginia. It is with con- 
siderable pleasure that on this occasion, 
I bring you greetings from the 7,764 grad- 
uates of this honored institution, whose 
telegrams and letters from their alumni 
clubs in New York, Philadelphia, Wash- 
ington, West Virginia, North Carolina, 
Norfolk, Roanoke, and Richmond have 
urged me to extend to you their greetings, 
and good wishes for success and satisfac- 
tion in the high office to which, today, 
you fall heir. 

Of the 1,839 college and university 
presidents in the United States, only 242 
were nurtured by the institution they now 
serve. So, it is a matter of particular pride 
to us that you are a graduate of this Col- 
lege; that you came from among our ranks. 
This gives us confidence. 

From your earliest memories, you have 
known man's need for medical science, 



and you have devoted your formative years 
to its study and research. You have known 
the college as a student, professor. Dean, 
and presidential assistant. You, therefore, 
are no stranger to this institution in the 
field of administration. For you, there will 
be no interim of apprenticeship. You 
know our college, its faculty and students, 
its needs and its dreams. 

As its fourth President, you add your 
name to the worthy predecessors. Dr. Sam- 
uel Chiles Mitchell, Dr. Stuart McGuire, 
Dr. William T. Sanger. The Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia stands today, as the 
lengthening shadow of these men, and we 
have reason to feel that in the years to 
come, this shadow will be immeasurably 
extended by the stature of the son who 
today takes office. It is our hope. Dr. 
Smith, that as alumni, we may be both 
companions and inspiration in the chal- 
lenge of your charge. 

As testimony of our confidence in the 
future, and of our allegiance to our new 
president, the Board of Trustees of the 
Alumni Association, on November 5th, 
pledged a gift of a one-hundred thou- 
sand dollar alumni lounge in the new 
dormitory now being designed. Our fu- 
ture support awaits you as you need us. 

Dr. Smith, your fellow alumni wish 



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you a long, happy, and successful term. 
With your ability, loyalty, energy, and vi- 
sion already so adequately proven, we can 
foresee for the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia in the years ahead, nothing but good 
fortune. 

Following Dr. Tucker, the Honorable 
Colgate Whitehead Darden, president of 
the University of Virginia, proffered the 
greetings from the Virginia institutions of 
higher learning, and then the Honorable 
Thomas B. Stanley, governor of Virginia, 
brought salutations from the Common- 
wealth of Virginia. 

Dr. Smith replied: 

Mr. Chairman, Mr. Governor, Mr. Chief 
Justice, .Mr. Chancellor, President Robert, 
and distinguished delegates, members of 
the faculty and of the student body, and 
friends: 

May I express to each of you my per- 
sonal appreciation of your kindness in 
taking time from busy schedules to honor 
the College with your presence and par- 
ticipation in these exercises. 

I shall not keep you long, as I am mind- 
ful of the counsel of an eminent gentle- 
man who wrote of remarks such as these : 
"Who remembers much of anything he 
has ever heard on such an occasion ? The 
usual remark is that the new president con- 
ducted himself with great dignity. Let him 
accomplish this briefly." 



This is a happy day for me, as it would 
be for anyone who has aspired to great 
opportunities. I now have the sobering 
experience of full realization that such 
opportunities impose proportionate ob- 
ligations. 

Without reservation, I dedicate myself 
to the fulfillment of these obligations to 
the limit of whatever abilities and energies 
I may have. I enter upon this undertaking 
with awareness of my own limitations, 
knowing that the future of this institution 
depends upon the combined talents and 
efforts of all our people and with the 
hope that they may find me worthy of 
their confidence, loyalty, cooperation, and 
support. 

I should be guilty of the sin of ingrat- 
itude if I did not acknowledge here my 
indebtedness to those who have made pos- 
sible the opportunities for service which 
are now given me in trust. 

It is a debt created by the devoted and 
effective labors of many men who, over 
a period of almost a hundred and fifty 
years, have wrought the Medical College 
of Virginia as we know it. 

It is a debt created by millions of our 
citizens who have taxed themselves heavily 
to provide the support without which the 
College could not have endured. 

It is a debt created by the generosity 
of many people of large and small means, 
those benefactors of the College who have 




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Richmond Established 1871 



28 



given of their personal resources in the 
faith that their gifts would help in making 
possible better health and happier lives 
for others. 

More personally, may I give testimony 
to the debt I owe to my friends and teach- 
ers who have given me encouragement and 
have tried to help me cultivate such talents 
as from time to time I may have appeared 
to have: 

To my father and mother, who have 
ever given me their love and understand- 
ing ; to my brother who has shown me the 
meaning of brotherhood ; and to my wife 
and children who have never stinted their 
affection although often they have had to 
content themselves with much less in the 
way of companionship and attention than 
is their natural right. 

Although many people have made high- 
ly significant contributions to the College 
and its progress over the years, its present 
stature and its great potentialities stem to 
an unusual degree from the work of one 
man. I should miss a cherished oppor- 
tunity if I did not pay tribute to the mag- 
nificent services of Chancellor William T. 
Sanger, during whose presidency the Col- 
lege as we know it has largely come into 
being. 

I trust he will sense in this brief ac- 
knowledgment our respect, our admira- 
tion, and our gratitude. 

The Medical College of Virginia exists 
to serve those who would serve the sick 
and the suffering and to seek new knowl- 
edge for their benefit. Its existence can and 
will be meaningful only to the extent that 
it fulfills this purpose. The College has 
come a long way; it still has a long way 
to go. It is good that we realize this, for 
the institution which is confident it has ar- 
rived may be as confidently expected to 
depart. The interval between may vary, 
but the end may be predicted with cer- 
tainty. As characteristic as any other trait 
of the College is the willingness of most 
of its people to admit their shortcomings 
and to exert themselves with cheerfulness 
and vigor to the task of improvement. Of 
course, there is the normal variation one 
might expect among any group of human 
beings, but the overall level of discon- 
tentment with present achievement is 
heartening. 

Despite the fact that we still have a long 
way to go, there is no doubt that the course 
of the College as it works its way into the 
future will be marked by ever increasing 
excellence and usefulness. The evident 
concern with the effectiveness and im- 

THE SCARAB 



provement ot teaching, the steady increase 
in the proportion of the faculty who ac- 
cept the obligation of productive scholar- 
ship and venture in eager pursuit ot new 
knowledge, the demonstrated ability of the 
institution to attract to its faculty and stu- 
dent body young men and women of 
ability and promise who would be wel- 
comed in the most distinguished centers 
of medical learning, and the obvious ded- 
ication of the great majority of our peo- 
ple to the ideal of service to others as a 
way of life, all testify to the accelerating 
momentum of the progress which makes 
the College such an exciting and satisfy- 
ing place in which to live and work. All 
of these things give promise of graduates 
increasingly well equipped with scientific 
and professional knowledge and skills, 
with minds alert to the challenge of con- 
tinuous self-education and imbued with 
the curiosity so necessary in the unending 
struggle against complacency, who realize 
that their lives will have real meaning 
only to the extent that they dedicate them- 
selves to the service of others. 

Though perfection is not to be attained 
in this life, the devoted people who have 
been and are the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia have never ceased to reach out and 
to strive for the goal of maximum useful- 
ness in their assigned mission of serving 
those who would serve humanity. They 
never will. 

May it please God to grant me the 
blessing of fitness to walk in such com- 
pany. 

The chorus and audience then joined 
in singing the Alma Mater song, after 
which the benediction was pronounced 
by the Reverend Ossman, and as the day 
progressed the sun came out and who 
could help but feel it a good omen. 

A luncheon for invited guests was held 
in the Social Center of the College and 
there amidst good food, good fellowship 
abounded. 

The Alumni House was the scene of the 
reception that afternoon when alumni from 
far and wide, the delegates, faculty, and 
student body came by to offer their con- 
gratulations to the new president. 

Not to brag, but to tell you alumni 
that could not make it, and we missed 
you, the house looked beautiful with the 
new furnishings and thanks to the talent 
of Mrs. Douglas Atkinson, wife of Doug- 
las Atkinson, P'10, who did the floral ar- 
rangements. Serving punch were Miss 
Marguerite Nicholson, a board member 
and four wives of board members, Mrs. R. 

FEBRUARY, 1957 



Reginald Rooke, Mrs. Richard Michaux, 
Mrs. Robert V. Terrell, and Mrs. George 
F. Hendley. The receiving line of Dr. 
and Mrs. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., Mr. 
Buford Scott, and Dr. and Mrs. James 
T. Tucker shook a multitude of hands. 
It was a very satisfying feeling to see 
the Alumni House used as the scene of the 
inaugural reception of one of its own. 

Monday night the MCV Chorus pre- 
sented a concert in the Student Activities 
Building. 

The story would not be complete with- 
out words of praise for General Tompkins 
and his inaugural committee, for some- 
thing so big, so impressive to move with- 
out a hitch, showed careful planning and 
the excellent cooperation of his committee. 

So ended the inauguration day of Dr. R. 
Blackwell Smith, Jr. as fourth president 
of the Medical College of Virginia. 



Research Today 

(Continued from page 7) 
tions on the ageing of the nervous system. 
He is interested in the comparative study 
of age changes in normal and in stressed 
animals and his work is supported in part 
by the A. D. Williams' Fund. 

Dr. Robert W. Ramsey, Professor of 
Physiology, is carrying on research en- 
deavor in two general phases in his de- 
partment. The first is the study of ryano- 
dine induced contractures in skeletal mus- 
cle. Ryanodine (used as an insecticide) is a 
crystalline compound extracted from a 
South American herb which induces con- 
tractures in skeletal muscles. His work- 
has been supported by the Office of Naval 



Research. Another investigative problem 
is a large cooperative project regarding 
factors underlying human performance. 
Involved are several universities, the Na- 
val Medical Research Institute, and the 
Gerontology Branch of the United States 
Public Health Service. Administratively, 
the project is handled by the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia and Dr. Ramsey acts 
as coordinator. The fields of human gra- 
dient layer calorimetry, biochemical 
changes in working arm muscles, auto- 
nomic reactivity under stress, and the ef- 
ficiency of performance of various bodily 
movements in different age groups by in- 
direct calorimetry methods have all been 
studied. 

Dr. Ernest Fischer, Research Professor 
of Physiology, has several projects under 
his immediate direction. One of these, the 
effect of alcohol on various enzymatic 
processes in brain slices is supported by 
the Virginia State Alcohol Commission. 
In this work, he has studied various enzy- 
matic processes using the brain slice tech- 
nique and finds they are quite differently 
affected by alcohol. The apparent coupling 
between oxidative processes and phospho- 
rylation is especially sensitive to alcohol 
and the alcohol sensitivity of the enzymatic 
processes involved in activity metabolism 
is much higher than of those processes in- 
volved in resting metabolism. Two addi- 
tional projects are the effects of ultrasonic 
irradiation upon reinnervation of partly 
denervated muscles, and the multiple in- 
nervation of muscle. 

A study of ion-binding by rat kidney 
brei has recently been started in the Phys- 



Compliments 
of 

Richmond Memorial 
Hospital 



29 



lology Department by Dr. Sidney Solomon 
with aid from a National Institutes of 
Health grant. Dr. Ernest G. Huf, Profes- 
sor of Physiology, has been studying the 
metabolism and active ion transport in 
frog skin. His project deals with the 
physio-chemical and biochemical mech- 
anisms of the transport of the strong 
electrolytes across cell membranes, a field 
in which all physiologists have long had 
an intense interest. Dr. Huf's work has 
been supported by grants of the United 
States Public Health Service since 1952. 
In addition, there is an investigation of 
the mechanisms of salicylate excretion by 
the human kidney. It is concerned with 
answering the question whether salicylate 
is removed by tubular transport mech- 
anisms. Some phases of this problem are 
supported by an A. H. Robins Research 
Grant. A third project centers on the 
distribution, excretion, and metabolism of 
a new tranquilizing drug in man and ani- 
mals. At the present time, a quantitative 
chemical method for estimation of the 
new drug in the body fluids has been de- 
veloped. Additional research funds given 
by A. H. Robins will also support a grad- 
uate student in the Department of Phys- 
iology. 

Dr. William Stepka, a recent addition 
to the staff and an Assistant Professor of 



Research Physiology, has been actively in- 
terested in the biochemistry of the path- 
ways in the intermediary metabolism of 
green plants. Using radioactive C" tagged 
compounds, he and his associate, Dr. L. J. 
Dewey have been tracing the biosynthesis 
of nicotine in the tobacco plant and they 
have recently obtained evidence that leu- 
cine, an amino acid, contributes carbon 
atoms to the nicotine molecule. Dr. Stepka 
is also currently occupied with the prob- 
lem of getting the nutriculture chamber 
used for the biosynthesis of the radioactive 
carbon "C-14" labeled compounds, into 
operation. After several trial runs on 
"cold" material, hot carbon (C 14 ) was in- 
troduced last week and the nutriculture 
chambers are now in operation as a re- 
search unit. The meticulous care needed 
for these experiments cannot be appre- 
ciated unless one has an opportunity to 
visit his laboratory. This research is sup- 
ported by the Nutriculture Fund, a re- 
volving fund donated by the American 
Tobacco Company. 

Dr. Leslie E. Edwards, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Physiology, has two projects. 
The first is the nature of the growth re- 
sponse in pancreatic deficient rats and 
dogs. Pancreatic deficient rats grow on a 
diet containing U.S.P. pancreatin, but lose 
weight on a diet containing no pancreatin. 



Particularly involved is the hormonal na- 
ture of an active principal found in 
pancreatin. A supplementary project has 
been the amino acid requirement in the 
pancreatic deficient rat studied by feeding 
the various amino acids while the animals 
are on a controlled diet. With this ap- 
proach he hopes to determine what amino 
acids will function in the deficiency state. 
Dr. Sidney Solomon, Assistant Professor 
of Physiology is particularly interested in 
studies on the rat kidney potential, and his 
studies interlock with those of other mem- 
bers of his department. 

Dr. ]. David Markham, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Research Physiology, has been 
doing clinical research in rehabilitation in 
the division of alcohol studies. A coop- 
erative project with Drs. Ebbe Hoff and 
Charles McKeown with this physiology 7 
group is primarily studying clinical al- 
coholism. 

In the Department of Pharmacology, 
School of Medicine, there are eleven ac- 
tive research programs. Since 1936 when 
research effort was begun in the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacology over $450,000 has 
been given from Federal, special funds 
for the support of research in this de- 
partment. Drs. Harvey B. Haag, Herbert 
McKennis, Jr., J. H. Weatherby, and A. S. 
Yard are carrying out research studies on 




THE SCARAB 



the health hazards of military chemicals. 
Supported by the Chemical Corps Medical 
Laboratories, the results are classified and 
can only be released after clearance from 
the military authorities. A second project 
only recently initiated on the pharmacol- 
ogy of alcohol is supported by the division 
of Alcohol Studies and Rehabilitation, De- 
partment of Health, State of Virginia. A 
cooperative study between Dr. Isabel 
Taliaferro, Department of Medicine, as 
chief investigator and Drs. Haag and Lar- 
son, Department of Pharmacology seek 
the biologic significance of the action of 
2, 2-bis-(p-ethyl-phenyl)-l, 1-dichloro- 
ethane and its derivatives on the adrenal 
cortex. In dogs, all of the derivatives thus 
far studied have been shown to lower the 
plasma 17-OH-corticosteroid response to 
adrenocorticotrophic hormone regardless 
of whether the compound causes the his- 
tologic appearance of atrophy or hyper- 
trophy in the adrenal cortex. In man, an 
additional derivative is being studied. It 
appears to be without effect on normal 
plasma 17-OH-corticosteroid levels, but 
does lower abnormally high plasma levels 
and decreases the response to adrenocor- 
ticotrophic hormone. In rats, evidence has 
been obtained that the compound effec- 
tive in man. inhibits hypertrophy of the 
adrenal cortex by adrenocorticotrophic 
hormone, but does not measurably affect 
the normal function of the gland. 

Dr. Herbert McKennis, Jr. is studying 
the enzymatic transformations of nicotine 
and the metabolism of nicotine and nor- 
nicotine. Administering C-14 randomly 
labeled nicotine, to the dog, he has found 
three major and possibly four minor nico- 
tine metabolites in the urine, and their 
identity is being investigated. This work 
has the support of the American Tobacco 
Company and the Tobacco Industry Re- 
search Committee. Dr. W. A. Peabody 
and Dr. Paul Larson are studying the ab- 
sorption, tissue distribution, and routes 
and rates of elimination from the body 
of tobacco smoke constituents ■ following 
their deposition as component parts of 
smoke in the lungs of dogs. They have 
established a feasibility of carrying out this 
study using C-14 labeled cigarette con- 
stituents and this study is also supported 
by the American Tobacco Company. 

Dr. J. K. Finnegan, Associate Profes- 
sor of Pharmacology, is carrying on three 
research projects on the toxicologic studies 
on insecticides, fungicides, enzyme prep- 
arations. This work is being supported 
by the Rohm and Haas Company, the 

FEBRUARY, 1957 



General Chemical Division of Allied 
Chemical and Dye Corporation, and by 
the Olin Mathieson Chemical Corporation. 

A research project of particular interest 
in the Department of Pharmacology is the 
preparation of a book by Dr. Herbert Sil- 
vette on the biological effects of tobacco. 
The book will be an exhaustive review 
of all the published experimental and clin- 
ical studies on this subject and two or 
perhaps three more years will be necessary 
for its completion. 

In the Department of Biochemistry, re- 
search activities have been carried out 
along three somewhat different lines. Dr. 
J. C. Forbes, Research Professor of Bio- 
chemistry, has long been interested in fat 
and cholesterol metabolism and is now 
continuing his work on the clinical signif- 
icance of the various cholesterol fractions 
on the development of atherosclerosis. 
In addition, he is investigating the bio- 
chemical effect of alcohol, vitamin, and 
protein deficiencies on the adrenal of rats. 
A cooperative study of the effects of al- 
cohol on cholesterol metabolism between 
the Department of Biochemistry and the 
Department of Pharmacology has been 
supported by the State of Virginia, De- 
partment of Health, Division of Alcohol 
Studies. Since 1949, the researchers have 
been authorized $70,000.00 for this re- 
search. Research of this type has also been 
supported by a research grant from the 
Reynolds Metals Company. 

Dr. Charles Clayton, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Biochemistry, has a project in- 
vestigating the factors influencing azo dye 
cardinogenesis in experimental animals. In 
his work rats are fed various diets contain- 
ing different concentrations of azo dye, 
(butter yellow), and the incidence of 
rumors is determined. Dr. Lynn D. Ab- 
bot, Jr., Professor of Biochemistry, has 
initiated studies on the effects of certain 
benzimidazole derivatives on the incorpo- 
ration of heavy nitrogen (N 15 ) from N 15 - 
glycine into the hemin of avian eryth- 
rocytes. These studies have fundamental 
significance on the relationship of purine 
derivatives to the enzymatic reaction in- 
voh'ed in pyrrol ring synthesis. In addi- 
tion Dr. Abbott has been working in cor- 
relation with Dr. G. Watson James, III, 
Associate Professor of Medicine, on serv- 
eral projects. One has been the fate of 
N 15 labeled erythrocytes after transfusion. 
This work has been carried out in col- 
laboration with Dr. B. W. Haynes, of the 
Department of Surgery. The same investi- 
gators are also working on a project in- 



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vestigating the source of certain fractions 
of stercobilin and the relationship of the 
stercobilin to erythropoiesis. 

Dr. E. S. Higgins, Assistant Professor 
of Biochemistry, and recently appointed 
to the Department, is studying the char- 
acterization of a nitroaryl reducing enzyme 
from the mold Aspergillus iiigev. His 
work is supported in part by the A. D. 
Williams' Fluid Research Fund. The total 
expenditures in the Department of Bio- 
chemistry for research have been in ex- 
cess of $100,000.00. 

The Department of Microbiology in the 
School of Medicine has four research pro- 
grams. The first, under the direction of 
Dr. H. J. Welshimer, is a study of lister- 
osis and its causative agent, Listeria mono- 
cytogenes. Miss Muriel M. Jones and Dr. 
). Douglas Reid have been making a sur- 
vey of methods for the isolation and iden- 
tification of superficial fungus infections. 
In other studies on systemic fungi, Dr. 
|. Douglas Reid and Miss Jones have been 
investigating serologic diagnosis by hem- 
agglutination techniques. Dr. E. C. Nelson 
and Miss Muriel M. Jones have been 
studying growth factors for Entamoeba 
histolytica. This research is being sup- 
ported by research grants from the Na- 
tional Institutes of Health. 

In the Department of Pathology, School 
of Medicine, Dr. Frank Apperly and his 



Compliments 
of 



Churchill 

Pharmaceutical 

Inc. 



associate, Miss Katherine Cary have been 
trying to fill in some of the gaps in our 
knowledge concerning the biochemical 
changes leading to the cancerous state. 
Their experiments in mice over the years 
have led to disappointing negative results, 
but now the biochemical events stopping 
growth by some new antimetabolites have 
been promising and are being conducted 
on a larger scale. Dr. Apperly, in both 
clinical and pathological research through- 
out the years, has been able to trace a 
biochemical connection between pulmo- 
nary emphysema and peptic ulcer as well 
as between endemic goiter, dental caries 
and drinking water. Dr. Gordon Hennigar 
and Dr. Robert" W. Ferguson in the De- 
partment of Pathology have been prima- 
rily interested in the pulmonary alterations 
found in pulmonary hypertension. In ad- 
dition, they are studying coronary and 
bronchial artery changes and in dogs have 
demonstrated bronchopulmonary arterial 
anastomoses. The dogs are infested with 
difillaria immitis (dog heart worm). Dr. 
Gordon Hennigar, Jr., Associate Profes- 
sor of Pathology, has been granted $7,- 
439.00 to carry out a study on changes 
in pulmonary arteries in pulmonary hyper- 
tension. In addition, Dr. Hennigar is un- 
dertaking a study of the interrelationship 
of the various clinical forms of diabetes 
mellitus, to histological changes in the 
pituitary and adrenal glands. A part of 
this study is the effect of cholesterol, hy- 
pertension and desoxycorticosterone in al- 
loxan diabetic animals. Dr. John Nichols, 
Department of Pathology, is studying the 
action of the adrenal inhibiting com- 
pounds of amphenone, and also plasma 
steroid levels in anencephalic monsters. 
Dr. John Salley, Assistant Professor of 
Pathology and of Dentistry, is working 
on the effects of carcinogens on the epi- 
thelium of the hamster cheek pouch. He 
is primarily interested in the different 
carcinogenic solvents and the role of vi- 
tamin B deficiency as a factor in oral 
carcinoma. His work is supported by a 
grant from the United States Public Health 
Service and is done in connection with 
the Department of Dental Research. 

The most recent of our new depart- 
ments in the School of Medicine is that 
of the Department of Biophysics under 
the directorship of Dr. William T. Ham, 
Professor of Biophysics. In general the 
department is engaged in research work 
in the field of thermal and ionizing radia- 
tion injury. A large portion of the work 
is devoted to the production and study of 



32 



the retinal burns in the rabbit, under a 
contract with the U. S. Air Force. In ad- 
dition to this, Dr. Ham is conducting 
collaborative work under Army contracts 
in the field of thermal injury. 

Of particular interest to research work- 
ers at the Medical College of Virginia, is 
the present construction of a magnetically 
suspended ultracentrifuge. This instrument 
being built by Dr. Ham and his associ- 
ates will be used as an analytical tool for 
the determination of molecular weights 
and for the study of purity of large mole- 
cules. It will be one of the few instru- 
ments in the country which is able to carry 
out quantitative data of this nature. It is 
a very valuable asset to the research po- 
tential of the Medical College of Va. 

Dr. Hans Hoch, A. D. Williams' Fel- 
low in the Department of Biophysics, has 
been developing specialized techniques 
in the zone electrophoresis. These tech- 
niques are applicable to thermal injury 
studies and to the analysis of pathological 
and normal sera of burn subjects. The 
most recent member of the department. 
Dr. Alan Mounter, is initiating studies in 
the physical properties of enzymes. 

The Department of Biophysics works in . 
close collaboration with the Department 
of Surgery and in this collaboration they 
are carrying out studies with Dr. Ole 
Malm, Associate Professor of Experimen- 
tal Surgery, on a program of toxic factors 
in burns. Dr. Ralph Natvig, a Research 
Fellow in the Department of Surgery, is 
working on the effects of x-irradiation and 
heat on the viability of erythrocytes by 
combine radio-phosphorus (P-32) red cell 
volume and radio-chromium (CR-51) red 
cell survival techniques. His support is 
from the National Institutes of Health. 

This year for the first time the Depart- 
ment of Biophysics will give as a part 
of its educational activity and research 
endeavor a course in the techniques and 
uses of radioisotopes as applied to med- 
ical and biological research. Certain as- 
pects of clinical medicine will also be dis- 
cussed. The course is open to clinicians, 
research scientists and senior medical stu- 
dents and is primarily designed to provide 
basic radioisotope training as required by 
the Atomic Energy Commission for au- 
thorization to use radioisotopes. The sup- 
port of the research in the Department of 
Biophysics comes from the United States 
Air Force, National Institutes of Health, 
and the A. D. Williams' Foundation. 

This article will be continued in our 
May issue. 

THE SCARAB 



Glass U 



ass news 



1905 UCM D. C. Mayes (M), who has 
treated the sick in Church Road, Virginia. 
for 48 years, was given a testimonial dinner 
on November 1. Tin' genial gentleman of 
medicine has made his services available to 
the rich and poor, the white and the negro. 
They all love him for his outstanding profes- 
sional ability and his friendly and warm 
attitude. 

1906 UCM Russell L. Cecil (II), of New 
York City, internationally known authority 
mi arthritis, came to Richmond on Decem- 
ber L2 to address a public forum on that 
subject. 

1915 R. Finley Gayle, Jr. (M), professor 
of neuropsychiatry, has been made a cor- 
responding fellow of the Royal Medico-Psy- 
chological Association of London, England. 

W. F. McAnally (M). has resigned as 
Medical Director of Consolidated Natural 
lias Company, effective October 1. He will 
remain as a consultant until his retirement 
October 1. 1957. 

1916 J. F. Foster (M) of Sanford. X. C. 

has 1 u named "Physician of the Year" 

in Lee County. He will be entered as a 
candidate for Xorth Carolina "Physician of 
the Year" at the 1957 convention of the 
State Medical Society. 

1923 The Richmond Dental Society had a 
testimonial dinner for Dr. Harry Lyons, pies 
ident of the American Dental Association, 
at the Commonwealth Club on Thursday, 
November 8, 1956. 

1924 H. Hudnall Ware, Jr. (M), profes- 
sor of obstetrics and gynecology, has been 
appointed a director of the Fred Lyman 
Adair Foundation, whose aim is to broaden 
and encourage research and study in ob- 
stetrics and gynecology. 

Rachel Weems (M), formerly of Ashland, 
Virginia, has been named full-time director 
of physical medicine and rehabilitation at 
the Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center 
in Fishersville. She has been serving as part- 
time director while maintaining her practice 
in Hanover County. 

1927 J. Garrido-Collazo (Mi, will be back 
to this year's reunion. He has a son, Jose 
Alberto, win, will enter MCV in September 
and a daughter. Maritza. a sophomore at 
MCV. 

L. Holmes Ginn ( M ) made a visit to Dr. 
J. Garrido-Collazo in Puerto Rico. 

John W. Parker, Jr. (M) of Seaboard, 
X. ( '. was elected president of the Seaboard 
Air Line Railroad Company Association at 
their convention in New Orleans, La. on No- 
vember 26-29. 

James T. Tucker (M) discussed a paper 
by Dr. Harry D. Morris, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Orthopedic Surgery at Tulane on 
the treatment of Xon-Lnion Fractures of 
Long Bones by Intra Medullary Fixtures 
and Cancellous Grafts at Seaboard Air Line 
Railroad Company Convention in Xew Or- 
leans, La. on November 26-29. 

1929 A. Ray Dawson (M), chief of physical 
medicine and rehabilitation at MeGuire Vet- 
erans Hospital, Richmond. Virginia, served 
as moderator for two panels at a meeting 
of the National Rehabilitation Association 
held in Denver, Colorado, in October. 

1930 Lucy B. Powers (X) has a son in the 
fourth grade who wishes to be a doctor like 
his idol, the late Dr. J. J. Purdv of Oriental, 
X. C. 

1931 Ira L. Hancock, Jr. (M), was ap- 
pointed by Governor Stanley as a member 
of the State Hospital Board. 

1932 Robert J. Walker, Jr. (M) is district 
health director of Bibb Jones Twiggs Health 
District in Macon, Georgia. 

1933 William Bickers (M) of Richmond. 



\'a. was honored on December :i tor twenO 
years of voluntary obstetrical services to 
the Salvation Army's Evangeline Booth 
Home and Hospital. Dr. Bickers, who has 
his own private practice, is chief of staff at 
the hospital. The hospital awarded him a 
plaque inscribed as an "award of appre- 
ciation in recognition of meritorious serv- 
ice. 

1934 C. C. Chewning was elected vice-pres- 
ident of the Southeastern Proctologic Asso 
ciation on November 14. 1956. 
1938 Phillips L. Claud (M) is engaged in 
the practice of radiology in El Centro, Cali- 
fornia. 

1941 John 0. Boyd, Jr. (M) of Roanoke, 
Virginia, has been elected president of the 
Roanoke Chapter of the Virginia Cancer 
Society. 

Mary Virginia Gallagher (M). prominent 
pediatrician of Charleston, West Virginia, 
was elected chairman of the division of 
women physicians of the Southern Medical 
Association at the annual meeting held in 
Washington. D. C, November 12, 1950. 

1942 Hiram Davis (M) visited the Alumni 
Office on December 27, 1956. and we chatted 
ol the good old days at William and Mary 
and MCV. 

Edward Evans (M) just finished redeco- 
rating the interior of his house. 

Berkeley H. Martin, Jr. (M) has com- 
pleted residency in ophthalmology at Epis- 
copal Eye-Ear Hospital in Washington, D. C. 
and reopened his office in Richmond for 
practice of ophthalmology in January. 

1944 Leon H. Alexander (M) received a 
certificate citing his "outstanding" service 
as Chief of the Out-Patient Clinic, U. S. 
Army Hospital, Fort Monroe, Virginia. 

Twin sons, Julian Pratt, III, and Howard 
Gill, arrived on December 5 for Dr. and 
Mrs. Julian P. Todd, Jr. (D). 

1945 William H. Shaia (M) of Charlotte, 
X. C, was one of the godfathers when his 
brother's quadruplets were christened in 
Richmond, Virginia. 

Harriet Blanche Smith (N) visited the 
Alumni Office on October 10. She is working 
at Western North Carolina Sanatorium. 
Black Mountain, N. C. 

1946 C. C. Coleman, Jr. (M), assistant 
professor of surgery of the University of 
Virginia, will be in charge of the new plastic 
surgery division of the University. 

1947 Nolan M. Canter (M), Harrisonburg, 
Virginia, was guest speaker at Broad Street 
Methodist Church on Layman's Day, Octob- 
er 21. 

1949 Inez L. Goldsby (N) visited the 
Alumni Office on January 3 with her two 
daughters, Rhea and Candy, and her mother, 
Mrs. Lucas. 

A son, Thomas Douglas, was born to Dr. 
and Mrs. W. Warren Walthall, Jr. iM) 
of New York. 

1950 Peggy J. Ragland (N) was married 
to John E. Haas in December. 

1951 W. D. Irvine (M) has moved from 
Lewisburg to Beckley. West Virginia, where 
he is serving as a member of the staff of 
Becklev Memorial Hospital. 

Cap't. Harold W. Miller, Jr. (M) recently 
completed the Army Medical Service School 's 
Military Orientation course at Fort Sam 
Houston. Texas. 

Garnett Moneymaker ( M ) is practicing an- 
esthesiology in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

Albert M. Valentine (M) is a new member 
of the staff of the Wheeling Clinic. 

Cap't. Yale H. Zimberg (M) recently com- 
pleted the Army Medical Service School's 
Military Orientation Course at Fort Sam 
Houston. Texas. 

1952 William R. Tabor (M) visited the 
Alumni House on October 26. 

1953 Dominic Brancazio (M) is associated 
with Ray S. Greco (M'47) in general prac- 
tice in Weirton, W. Va. 

Cap't. Calvin S. Garrett (M) recently 



completed the Army Medical Service School 's 
Military Orientation course at Fort Sam 
Houston. Texas. 

James E. Moore, Jr. (Mi is a resident 
at University Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, and 
specializing in hematology. He has two boys 
and one girl. 

1954 Philip Frederick Jr. (M), who served 

with the Fleet Aircraft Service s.| Iron 

on Okinawa from August, 1955, to August. 
1956. has a new assignment. He is medical 
officer aboard the USS Yorktown. 

Donald H. McNeill, Jr. (Ml. who has 
been in the Navy Medical Corps since July. 
1955, is attached to a mobile construction 
battalion in the Philippine Islands. 

Ann Reams (X), instructor in nursing 
arts, was married to Jack Preston Andrews. 

1955 William A. Cassada, Jr. (M) has 
joined Dr. W. O. Tune (M'10) in the prac 
tice of medicine at Brookneal. Dr. Cassada 
formerly was an industrial physician at 
Lewis-Gale Hospital in Roanoke. 

William M. Comer (D) is a dentist at the 
Tokyo Army Hospital. 

Richard Lee Fisher ( D) has been promoted 
to captain in the Army Dental Corps at Ft. 
Lee. 

Cap't. John T. Myles (M) recently com 
pleted the Army Medical Service School's 
Military Orientation course at Ft. Sam Hous- 
ton, Texas. 

Cap't. G. Hugh Warren, Jr. (M) recently 
completed the Army Medical Service School's 
Military Orientation course at Fort Sam 
Houston. Texas. 

1956 1st. Lt. Clarence E. Deane (D) re- 
cently completed the Army Medical Service 
School's Military Orientation couree at Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas. 

R. Page Hudson, Jr. (M) is now an intern 
in pathology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and 
an assistant in pathology at Johns Hopkins 
University. He married Sally Sewell (N'56) 
in June. 

1st. Lt. Richard F. Hymack (D) recently 
was assigned as dental officer at the U. S. 
Army Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia. 

1st. Lt. Danny A. Mowles (D) recently 
completed the Army Medical Service School's 
Military Orientation course at Fort Sam 
Houston. Texas. He has received orders as- 
signing him at Fort Eustis, Va. 

Allen (M) and Lee (M) Thurman are in- 
terns at Watts Hospital in Durham. N. C. 

LEST WE FORGET 

1899 John B. Wright (M) of Raleigh, 
Xorth Carolina, died November 19, 1956. 

1900 UCM Joseph Lyons Miller (M), 81, 
died January 6, 1957, in Thomas, West Vir- 
ginia. 

A member of the Virginia Historical 
Society, he was a student of the history of 
genealogy of the Virginias and Kentucky. 
He was the author of ' ' The Descendants of 
Captain Thomas Carter" of whom he. him- 
self, was a descendant. 

His collection of rare medical volumes 
formed the nucleus of the library of the 
Richmond Academy of Medicine. His por- 
trait was presented to the academy in 1949. 
1904 Martha B. Henderson (N) died Sep- 
tember 30, 1956. 

1908 UCM Lyle S. Booker (M) of Waynes- 
boro. Virginia, died August 10. 1956. 

1909 UCM William R. Warriner (M) of 
Crewe, Virginia, died November 6, 1956. 
1918 Roger Harold DuBose (M) died Ap- 
ril 2. 1956. 

Albert Bernard Siewers (M) senior psy- 
chiatrist at the Syracuse Memorial Hospital, 
did November 4, 1956. 

1929 George S. Pine (P) died November 
2, 1956, at his home in Berryville after a 
long illness. 

1932 Henry Merritt Escue (M) of Charles- 
ton, W. Va.. died on October 17, 1956. follow- 
ing a year's illness. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



Return Postage Guaranteed 



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FLOOR PLAN FOR 



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U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Richmond, Virginia 
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THE ALUMNI LOUNGE AND PART OF THE DORMITORY 





}. Spencer Dryden M'33 
|. Berkeley Gordon M'26 
Harry Lyons D'23 
R. Reginald Rooke P'21 



Official Organ of the 
Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 

Published by the Medical College of Virginia Alumni 
Association in l : ebruary, May, August, and November 

Editorial Committel 
Robert V. Terrell M'34, Editor-in-Chiej and Chairman 
Edward Myers D'26 
Marguerite Nicholson 

N'34 
W. Roy Smith P'41 
Minnie M. Franck, Managing Editor 
Mildred H. Clark, Assistant Managing Editor 

Officers 

James T. Tucker M'27, President 

Medical Arts Bldg., Richmond, Virginia 

William N. Hodgkin DT2, Immed. Past-President 

Warrenton, Virginia 

J. Spencer Dryden M'33, President-Elect 

6816 Millwood Rd., Bethesda 14, Md. 

J. Berkeley Gordon M'26, Vice-President 

N. J. State Hospital, Marlboro, N. J. 

Harry Lyons D'23, Vice-President 

Medical College ol Virginia, Richmond, Va. 

G. F. Hendley PT8, Vice-President 

2125 Fair-mount Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

Frances Gordon N'43, Vice-President 

3212 W. Franklin St., Richmond, Va. 

Washington Winn M'35, Secretary 

303 Stockton Lane, Richmond, Va. 

Harvey B. Haag M'28, Treasurer 

Medical College of Va., Richmond, Va. 

Trustees 
Term Expires May, 1951 

Waverly R. Payne M'23 Allen N. Fore P'33 

91 29th Street, Newport News 308 Second Avenue 

H. Hudnall Ware, Jr. M'24 Parmville 
816 W. Franklin St., Richmond 
Moffett H. Bowman D'35 Mrs. Sabra S. Russell N'31 

1412 Franklin Road, S.W., 1439 Louise St., 

Roanoke. Va. Santa Ana, Calif. 

Term Expires May, 1958 

E. L. Alexander M'27 Donald S. Daniel M'24 

Medical Arts Building, Johnston. Willis Hospital, 

Newport News, Va. Richmond, Va. 

R. Reginald Rooke P'21 W. Roy Smith P'41 

2929 Second Ave., Physicians' Products Co., 

Richmond, Va. Petersburg, Va. 

J. Spencer Dryden M'33 J. P. Broaddus D'30 

S816 Millwood Rd.. Bethesda, 14, Md. Franklin, Va. 

Term Expires May, 1959 

Lloyd C. Bird P'17 Richard A. Michaux M'37 

303 S. 6th St., Richmond, Va. Lee Medical Bldg. 
Richmond, Va. 

E Claiborne Robins P'33 Marguerite Nicholson N'34 

1407 Cummings Drive Cabaniss Hall, M.C.V. 

Richmond, Va. Richmond, Va. 

Edward E. Myers D'26 Robert V. Terrell M'34 

511 Medical Arts Bldg. Medical Arts Bldg. 

Norfolk. Va. Richmond, Va. 



Our Endowment Story 

Our development of endowment and trust funds is a heart- 
ening story — and the work of many hands! This story begins 
about twenty-five years ago; some of it can be told now, some 
of it later, when presently planned gifts and bequests can be 
announced. 

Today our endowment and funds held in trust are carried at 
approximately $6,700,000.00; their market value is considerably 
higher, perhaps a million dollars. Bequests known to be set up 
in the wills of friends of the college and our alumni will increase 
our endowment and trust funds substantially. We hope the col- 
lege is the planned-for beneficiary in many wills still unknown 
to us. 

Why is endowment vital to M.C.V. ? This resource assures 
the stature and marked excellence of services which our day 
calls for; this resource provides the margin of difference between 
just another good institution and one of prestige and magnified 
usefulness. 

We have a special bulletin on gifts to the Medical College 
of Virginia Foundation and the Medical College of Virginia. 
Equipped with a copy, every alumnus could work something 
akin to wonders for alma mater. This bulletin gives different 
forms in making wills, each to accomplish a different objective; 
tells of our successful investment policies; gives the legal pro- 
visions whereby the State government in making appropriations 
will not by reason of available endowment and trust funds re- 
duce such appropriations, a very important provision; and also 
sets forth some current and continuing needs. 

It is easy to hand such a bulletin to another, saying, "Maybe 
this booklet will make a useful suggestion to you," or "here 
is some reading which may appeal to you," etc. Everyone must 
plan to dispose of his estate sooner or later. M.C.V. has a strong 
potential appeal, if presented with enthusiasm. 

Each alumnus can do more for our endowment than he may 
think, if only he begins. Try it; there is a real thrill possible. 
I am now working on building a greater endowment and will 
possibly come to see you, if you think I can help. Won't you 
send for one or more of the bulletins on gifts and start some 
thinking and planning? Remember, I'm hoping to hear from 
many of you. Of course, I should like for it to be each of you. 

In the next issue maybe I shall say something on saving taxes 
now by setting up irrevocable trusts which yield a quarterly in- 
come for life to person authorizing such trusts. 

W. T. Sanger, Chancellor 



About The Cover 

Dr. William Farlow Maloney, our new Dean of Medicine, has 
recently come to us from the University of Minnesota. Dr. Ma- 
loney is most enthusiastic about his challenging job and the 
college is most pleased with the energetic manner in which 
he assailed its problems. We hope our alumni will avail them- 
selves of every opportunity to meet Dr. Maloney and give him 
their loyal support. 



The Scarab 





Published by The Alumni Association of the Medical College of Virginia"" 



LI O RA R Y 

i MAY 31 1957 

MEO. COL. of Va! 

RICHMOND , VA, 

■*■ 



Volume 6, No. 



Richmond. Virginia 



May, 1957 



(Jul jutwie faculty 



Not long ago it was remarked that the 
College is nearing the end of an era in 
the sense that many of the gifted and 
dedicated faculty members, brought to- 
gether by Chancellor Sanger in the early 
years of his tenure as president, have re- 
cently or will soon retire to enjoy a sea- 
son of well-earned leisure. 

Since the members of the faculty are 
the College, the loss of even one member 
of major status imposes an exacting task 
in the selection of a suitable successor. 
In the years immediately ahead, those en- 
trusted with the welfare of the College 
must select new chairmen for several of 
the key departments of the institution. 
This responsibility presents opportunities 
which challenge our best efforts. The fu- 
ture of the College depends upon the 
manner in which this challenge is met. 
It must and will be met in the only fashion 
worthy of our present great opportunities 
and the efforts of those who have made 
these opportunities our heritage, by the ap- 
pointment of the best qualified people 
available. 

Inherent in the policy of appointing the 
best qualified individual available are three 
tasks: first, a clear and comprehensive 
delineation of the job to be done and of 
the personal and professional character- 
istics necessary and desirable in the indi- 
vidual to be selected; second, a survey of 
the field of possible candidates and their 
qualifications; and third, a comparison of 
the qualifications of the individuals will- 
ing to be considered as candidates. 

It is apparent that the task of identify- 
ing the best qualified person may be an 
arduous and time-consuming process, re- 
quiring mature consideration and group 
judgment of all factors involved. For 
this reason, the governing memorandum 
adopted by the Board of Visitors pro- 
vides, in part, that in the appointment 
of professors, a special committee ad hoc 
may be appointed by the dean concerned 

MAY, 1957 




Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. 

in each case. If the individual is to be ap- 
pointed to teach in more than one school, 
all deans concerned participate in the ap- 
pointment of the committee. Such com- 
mittees submit their nominations to the 
dean, who in turn forwards the nomina- 
tions with his recommendations to the 
president. The appointment is made by 
the Board of Visitors on the basis of the 
recommendations submitted by the dean 
and the president. Of particular impor- 
tance are the provisions of Section 1, par- 
agraph 3 of the governing memorandum 
which is quoted in full below. 

"In filling vacant positions, serious 
consideration should be given fac- 
ulty members of the institution. It 
is also important to keep a depart- 
ment in balance through periodic 
introduction of new ideas and new 
faces from other institutions. In gen- 
eral, appointments should be made 
from as many different institutions 
as possible. Constant appointment 



from only one school is as serious 
as inbreeding from our own." 

The memorandum provides that an ap- 
pointee to a full professorship "shall have 
a national reputation in his field, supe- 
rior ability as a teacher and in research, 
and proven ability in his field." If the 
appointee is to serve as departmental 
chairman, he must also have "ability in 
administration." 

Except in cases where a member of our 
faculty is a person of nationally recognized 
ability having qualifications clearly and 
obviously as outstanding as could be found 
elsewhere in an available candidate for 
the post of professor and departmental 
chairman, the committee faces the task 
of corresponding with all the schools in 
the country, the national foundations and 
others who might be able to recommend 
suitable candidates. There follows the job 
of writing to the suggested candidates to 
determine whether they wish to be con- 
sidered and of accumulating all applicable 
data and information concerning the qual- 
ifications of those who are interested. 
Many can be eliminated at this point. The 
remaining candidates are invited to visit 
the institution and confer with the com- 
mittee and others concerned. Only after 
this has been done can the committee 
weigh the qualifications of the several 
candidates, one against the other, and 
come to a decision as to which gives the 
greatest promise of meeting the needs of 
the institution. 

The task is exacting. The members of 
the College committees who have recently 
nominated candidates have set a standard 
of excellence for which we should all be 
grateful. 

As the process is repeated in the months 
and years ahead, the advice of alumni will 
be sought as in the past. Your cooperation 
and support will be indispensable as we 
dedicate ourselves to the fulfillment of 
this great responsibility, which will have 
as much if not more influence than any 
other in determining the kind of institu- 
tion our College will become. 

1 



ITlebicai Gctucation — Q Plosbectus 



By Dr. William F. Maloney 



The title, "Medical Education — A Pro- 
spectus," was chosen purposefully. One 
of the definitions of "prospectus" in Web- 
ster's dictionary 1 is "a statement ... is- 
sued by . . . the administration of a school 
or college giving advanced information 
calculated to arouse interest and win sup- 
port." Such is exactly what I hope to do 
— give you information, arouse your in- 
terest, and win support. 

Yesterday morning the secretary in the 
Dean's office learned of some of the re- 
marks I planned to make and reminded 
me that in 1955 Virginia's was one of 
nine state medical societies to receive the 
Award of Merit, given by the Board of 
Directors of the American Medical Edu- 
cation Foundation for outstanding gifts 
of time and money. So I feel a little fool- 
ish talking to you about interest and sup- 
port. My hat is off to the physicians of the 
Commonwealth for such a record. How- 
ever, it was too late to change the subject 
or the title, so I will only have to hope 
that my remarks assist in advancing that 
already fine record of 17% of the State's 
physicians contributing toward that per- 
fect 100%. 

To develop this picture, it is not neces- 
sary to bore you with recounting the dy- 
namic nature of medical thought, practice, 
and education through the centuries. You 
are all aware that these are a product not 
only of the genius and inventiveness of 
men at any given period but are also a 
product of the politics, freedom, religion, 
superstitution, war, and economics of that 
time. 

Whatever the factors might be, suffice 
it to rightly conclude that medicine en- 
tered the twentieth century with an enor- 
mous accumulation of knowledge but had 
yet to develop the methods and technics 
that would result in the effective utiliza- 
tion of it. 

The manner in which this was accom- 
plished to the miraculous degree demon- 
strated by today's medicine was the only 
way in which it could be optimally done; 
namely, by developing medical schools 
where learned men could be brought to- 
gether in an atmosphere that would al- 
low the creation and development of new 



ideas, the application of new methods, 
and an opportunity for cooperative 
thought and work on the solution of 
problems; and where critical thinking, as 
well as factual knowledge, could be de- 
veloped in students who were to carry 
the burden of the understanding of life 
and the health of the people. 

Let us step back, then, through the 
pages of the history of medical education 
to just fifty years ago in the United States. 
At that time most physicians were trained 
in proprietary schools maintained for prof- 
it by groups of busy practitioners. A few 
university-connected medical schools were 
exceptions. The large number of inferior 
schools, or so-called diploma mills, came 
into being because of the necessity of hav- 
ing doctors, as Flexner said, "before there 
was any way of educating them." 

It was Flexner's 1910 report — a blister- 
ing indictment of the profession's educa- 
tional system — which climaxed a reform 
movement that began within the profes- 
sion itself and resulted in the cutting of 
the number of schools in half, from 162 
to less than 70. Minimum standards were 
established and the creation of institutions 
which could justify being the perpetu- 
ators of the profession in its truest and 
finest tradition of service to humanity 
was begun. 

The school of that day relied on only 
two or three years of didactic lectures. 
The education given was based, as was the 
practice of medicine, on an empiric fol- 
lowing of tradition. 

As Atchley 2 has described it: "There 
was little understanding of disease; but 
worse, there was a somewhat complacent 
satisfaction with the existing status. True, 
isolated doctors with imagination and 
curiosity had made valuable discoveries, 
but a majority of even the best men were 
more interested in practicing than in per- 
fecting their art. The aphorisms of the 
previous generation were revered and were 
easier to follow than the leadership of 
contemporary scientific research. One was 
approached as an independent, highly 
codified field to be pursued without 
knowledge of the mechanisms involved. 
Diagnosis was usually mere cataloguing 



■ — applying a descriptive Latin phrase or 
attaching the name of the first observer, 
as Bright's disease — and this classification 
was looked upon with satisfaction as an 
end, if not the end, to be achieved." 

Today's medical school relies much less 
on didactic lectures and more on challeng- 
ing the student to think in seminar and 
tutorial sessions, to see for himself how 
things work, through his own experience 
in the laboratory, and to understand not 
just the disease but the patient, at the bed- 
side and in the home. 

Today's medical school aims at produc- 
ing a physician who, to quote Atchley 2 
again, "combines the clinician and the 
laboratory man. His is a thoughtful con- 
sideration of the total problem. This is 
a scientist at work on a complex single 
human being, and concern with the whole 
person inevitably uncovers human facets 
that evoke the compassion which is so 
necessary for good medical care. Because 
of his scientific orientation, today's physi- 
cian is able to analyze his experience 
critically; thus he is constantly growing, 
a lifetime student of disease and of man 
himself." 

"The Objectives of Undergraduate Med- 
ical Education" 3 were formally enunciated 
in 1953 by the medical schools of this 
country and should be of interest to you 
if you are not already familiar with them. 
I quote from the introductory paragraphs : 
"Undergraduate medical education must 
provide a solid foundation for the future 
physician's development. It should not 
aim at presenting the complete, detailed, 
systematic body of knowledge concerning 
each and every medical and related dis- 
cipline. Rather, it must provide the setting 
in which the student can learn fundamen- 
tal principles applicable to the whole 
body of medical knowledge, establish hab- 
its of reasoned and critical judgment of 
evidence and experience, and develop an 
ability to use these principles and judg- 
ments wisely in solving problems of 
health and disease. 

"Undergraduate medical education can- 
not achieve these aims if the student is 
relegated to a passive role. It must pro- 

( Continued on page 12) 



* Presented before the Richmond Academy of 
Medicine on February 26, 1957. 

'Webster's New International Dictionary. 

"Atchley. Dana W.: "The Changing Physi- 
cian." The Atlantic Monthly, August 1956, 
29-31. 

3 "The Objectives of Undergraduate Medical 
Education." 1. Med. Educ, March 1953, 28: 
57-59. 

THE SCARAB 



Those We Honor, Tr 

of 1907 



ie 



cl 



asses 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA, 
Medicine 

Dr. Bernard S. Clements, Matoaka, W. Va. 
Dr. Eddie L. Johnson, Bedford, Va. 
Dr. G. W. Johnson, Beckley, W. Va. 
Dr. James C. Killey, Roanoke, Va. 
Dr. Reese M. Pedicord, Wheeling, W. Va. 
Dr. William Wilson, Danville, Va. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, 
Medicine 

Dr. Noah T. Counts, Cocoa, Florida 
Dr. George H. Davis, Warrenton, Va. 
Dr. John W. Devine, Lynchburg, Va. 
Dr. Elam A. Drum, Richmond, Va. 
Dr. Mark T. Frizzelle, Ayden, N. C. 
Dr. William A. Hoggard, Hertford, N. C. 
Dr. Paul H. Mitchell, Ahoskie, N. C. 
Dr. James C. Moore, Keen Mountain, 

N. C. 
Dr. Clifton G. Parker, Woodland, N. C. 
Dr. Frank C. Pratt, Fredericksburg, Va. 
Dr. George C. Woodson, Richmond, Va. 

NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAL 
COLLEGE 

Dr. Edgar H. Hand, Charlotte, N. C. 
Dr. Charles A. Peterson, Spruce Pine, 

N. C. 
Dr. Slade A. Smith, Whiteville, N. C. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, 
Pharmacy 

Mrs. Alice Drake, Valrico, Fla. 
Mr. Elmer E. Grove, Luray, Va. 
Mr. W. S. Grubbs, Alexandria, Va. 
Mr. E. W. Wade, Richmond, Va. 
Mr. H. G. Whitehead, Richmond, Va. 

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA, 
Pharmacy 

Mr. J. C. Croft, Roanoke, Va. 

Dr. Henry H. Simmerman, Richmond, Va. 

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA, 
Dentistry 

Dr. Chauncey Crawford, Richmond, Va. 
Dr. L. D. Lewis, Great Bend, Kansas 
Dr. G. W. Parker, Bedford. Va. 

MAY, 1957 



UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, 
Dentistry 

Dr. Arthur H. Johnson, Greensboro, N. C. 
Dr. Hugh G. Russell, Petersburg, Va. 
Dr. James A. Semones, Bristol, Va. 
Dr. A. F. DeCosta Ramos Sharp. Rio de 
Janeiro, Brazil, S. A. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, 
Nursing 

Miss Elizabeth Anderson, Beaverdam, Va. 
Miss Ruby E. Chambers, Blackstone, Va. 
Mrs. Fereba B. Croxton, Eastville, Va. 
Miss Blanche W. Flippo, Afton, Va. 
Miss Willie Otey, Norfolk, Va. 
Mrs. Hattie Stuckey Owens, Richmond, 

Va. 
Mrs. Lucy Daniel Palfrey, Duxbury, Mass. 



Rub}- E. Chambers tells us: "I was a 
country girl with 
little experience 
of the outside 
world beyond two 
years at college in 
Petersburg when 
I entered training. 
It was a big awak- 
ening in every 
phase of life. Well 
do I remember 
when in charge of the operating room, 
Dr. Ned McGuire was scheduled for a 
major operation. When he came in to 
scrub up, he said, 'Child (his name for 
all nurses), I bet you haven't sterilized 
the instruments I need for the operation.' 
"My reply was, 'Dr. Ned, I may not 
have what you want, but every instrument 
in your case is sterilized,' which was lit- 
erally true. 

"He turned to Dr. Hugh Taylor just 
chuckling, 'Hugh, you hear that child?' 
Everything went off well. 

"The forty years of private duty were 
a worthwhile life. The harder and more 
serious the case, the greater the satisfac- 
tion, and the more humble I felt for the 
trust and confidence placed in me by our 
doctors." 





Dr. Reese M. Pedicord pays tribute to 
one of his profes- 
sors: "In our lec- 
tures on Practice 
of Medicine at the 
old MCV, we 
were impressed by 
the value of his- 
tory taking, 
through examina- 
tion of patients 
and differential 
diagnosis. Our facilities, such as x-rays, 
blood tests, and all laboratory work, were 
extremely limited in those days. 

"During the latter part of my senior 
year I was invited for dinner one evening 
at the home of a friend about fifteen 
miles from Richmond. While there I 
found her mother extremely ill, and was 
requested to make a tentative diagnosis, 
if I could, of her illness. I noted care- 
fully and made a record of all symptoms 
and signs as I interpreted them and the 
next day after a lecture by our Professor 
of Practice of Medicine, I asked for an 
interview with him and laid the case be- 
fore him. After some consideration of the 
symptoms and signs, he asked if it would 
be of any value to me or to the patient 
for him to go with me and visit the case 
as it seemed to be an interesting one. 

"The following Sunday I met him at 
his office and we went out to the house 
in his buggy. I well remember the little 
bay horse he drove, which seemed to be 
quite a favorite with him. 

"After his thorough examination of the 
patient, which consumed about one hour, 
we drove back to Richmond. All the way 
on that return trip I listened to one of 
the best and most elucidating lectures on 
how to handle a patient and interpret the 
symptoms and signs that we had available 
at that time. At the end of the trip, he 
suggested a prescription which I saw that 
the patient received, and, to my delight, 
she ultimately recovered. 

"I have never forgotten the things that 
were told me on the trip back to Rich- 
mond, and I use all of them yet in my 
methods of diagnosis and treatment. I 
have often wanted to pay tribute to Dr. 
Manfred Call, who was then Professor 
of Medicine at the old MCV, but the oc- 
casion has never arisen until this time. It 
gives me the greatest pleasure to say that 
the information and advice that I received 
from Dr. Call then has been of the utmost 
value to me and that occasion was one of 
the most memorable pleasures in my four 
years of medical school work." 




Kyle McCormick, former publisher of 
the Princeton Ob- 
server, was kind 
enough to send 
this information 
about Dr. Bern- 
ard S. Clements: 
"Dr. Clements is 

La highly respected 
man in this com- 
4|j, ; munity. He has 

l^^"* been president of 

the Bank of Matoaka, West Virginia for 
twenty-five years. He is a past president of 
the Mercer County Medical Society. He 
was a member of the Mercer Count) - Medi- 
cal Society and a past president of the 
Matoaka Kiwanis Club. He is still practic- 
ing. 

"He came to this county on May 27, 
1907 and was a physician, often having as 
many as fifty patients a day, for a number 
of coal companies. 

"The most unusual and exciting experi- 
ence of Dr. Clements occurred in 1944 
when a miner named William Sperry got 
his leg caught in a cutting machine. This 
was in the Crane Creek Mine No. 6 at 
McComas, West Virginia. 

"Although six feet and six inches in 
height, Dr. Clements crawled a thirty-six 
inch seam of coal, and without aid. ampu- 
tated the miner's leg and saved his life. 
Thus you see that if Floyd Collins, the 
Kentucky cave explorer, had lived in Dr. 
Clements' territory, he, perhaps, would 
still be living. Floyd Collins died in a 
Kentucky cave under similar conditions 
back in 1925." 

Dr. Chauncey E. Crawford tells us 

amusing anec- 
dotes: "I was born 
in western New 
York in 1878 and 
graduated from 
Fredonia State 
Teachers College 
in 1898. I entered 
the Medical Col- 
lege School of 
Dentistry in 1904, 
and on graduating went to Buchanan, Vir- 
ginia and practiced there from 1907-1916. 
In 1916 I came to Richmond, where I 
have been since. 

"Through a period of fifty years one 
has many experiences that he does not for- 
get. Soon after establishing the office at 
Buchanan a man came with a severe tooth- 
ache which to him was definitely located 




in the second molar. Careful examination 
indicated perfectly sound teeth in that area 
but a badly decayed and sore upper third 
molar. After trying to explain it to the 
man, he said, 'Doc, you must think I'm 
a D— fool if I don't know which tooth is 
aching.' More talking and the upper tooth 
was removed but only on my promise to 
extract the lower tooth if it continued to 
ache, and to do so without an additional 
fee. The regular fee then was fifty cents. 
Financial journals say there was a depres- 
sion in 1907! 

"Then there was the German lady with 
a swollen jaw from a badly putrescent 
pulp. Opening through the tooth brought 
prompt relief from the pain but with a 
wide dissemination of the odor. Dentists 
get used to such things but this one caused 
the doctor to shy off a bit and to say, 
'That's an awful odor, isn't it?' To which 
the good lady replied, 'Mister Doctor, you 
mean my tooth smell like that? I think 
Mein Gott ! What a breath that man 
have!' " 



Dr. E. L. Johnson tells us how times 
have changed: 
"There have 

been wonderful 
changes made in 
the practice of 
medicine in the 
past fifty years 
and only those 
who have passed 
this period can re- 
alize this great 
change. 

"I started in the horse and buggy days 
and the mode of transportation has also 
helped to make a lot of the changes pos- 
sible. At that time I could carry all of 
the basic medicine in saddle bags and dis- 
pense it myself. Today, you would have- 
to have a station wagon to carry the new 
medicine that is on the market. 

"The same principles existed then as 
today. The main objective is to get your 
patient well. Fifty years ago you had to 
depend on objective symptoms to make a 
diagnosis. Doctors did not have an X-ray 
machine or any way to take blood pres- 
sure, no cardiogram or laboratory facil- 
ities, so they had to depend on their gen- 
eral knowledge. Some of the new drugs 
today are wonderful, but a lot of the old 
home remedies have passed out of exist- 
ence. 




"Years ago, for example, if Mrs. X 
called me in the night to see little Jimmy 
suffering with the croup, I would tell her 
to give him a teaspoonful of Ipecac or 
one-half teaspoonful of kerosene in sugar. 
The child would soon be relieved and go 
back to sleep. 

"Today, it is entirely different. You 
have to take Jimmy to the hospital and 
put him under a croup kettle or an oxygen 
tent. Jimmy keeps choking and mother 
becomes frantic and demands a pediatri- 
cian. The doctor comes and gives him a 
shot of penicillin and a teaspoonful of 
Elixir Benadryl. Jimmy keeps on choking 
and the doctor suggests a throat specialist. 
The specialist comes and looks in his 
throat and says he has Edema and he ad- 
vises him to get a surgeon to put a tube 
in his throat, and, in the meantime, he 
advises him to get an X-ray specialist to 
see if he swallowed anything. 

"By that time, the chickens are crowing 
for day, and Jimmy turns over and goes 
to sleep. They have a consultation and de- 
cide to keep him in the hospital for ob- 
servation. Mr. X gets a bill for $300.00. 

"So, I have lived to see some of the 
wonderful changes that have taken place 
in the world of medicine in the past fifty 
years. I am still in active practice and will 
begin my fifty-first year on May 21. Just 
recently, I was elected president of the 
Bedford County Medical Society, in which 
I have served in various capacities through 
the fifty years I have practiced." 

Dr. A. H. Johnson tells us an amus- 
ing experience. 
''About two 
months ago a 
'new' patient 
came into my of- 
fice with two new 
plates and said 
she was afraid she 
had ruined her 
lower plate and 
wanted me to fix 
it if possible. 

"I examined it thinking she had 
trimmed it too much, but could see noth- 
ing wrong. I asked about it. 

" 'No, I was afraid to trim it. The low- 
er plate did not hold my cheeks out 
enough so I put it in hot water until it 
got soft so that I could open it enough 
to hold my cheeks out more.' 

"I made her two new plates that did 
hold her lips and cheeks out like she 
wanted them to do." 




THE SCARAB 




Dr. J. W. Devine recalls: "I finished 
high school at the 
age of sixteen and 
I was very inter- 
ested in being a 
doctor. I matricu- 
lated at the Uni- 
versity College of 
Medicine. After a 
month. I had a 
talk with Dean 
Miller and told 
him that I was going to Washington and 
Lee University and take a year and he 
advised that a year would do very little 
good. He suggested that I take a year in 
Pharmacy. This I did, and made the State 
Board of Pharmacy when I was seventeen 
years old. I remember that one of the 
members of the Board said, 'This Board 
must be getting easy when children can 
make it.' That year many failed who took 
the Board. 

"I received Registered Assistant in Phar- 
macy on account of my age. This advice 
came in good because I was able to work 
ever)' other night in one of the drug 
stores in Richmond and through the sum- 
mers. 

"My interest was entirely in surgery. On 
my return from World War I, I limited 
my work to surgery. 

"In 1934, I became a Fellow of the 
American College of Surgeons. My son, 
who is a Board Surgeon, practices with 



Dr. George W. Johnson communi- 
cated: "I have 
been in general 
and industrial 
practice in McAl- 
phin. West Vir- 
ginia and now 
live in Beckley, 
West Virginia. 

"Many interest- 
ing experiences 
have come and 
gone with the fifty years I have practiced 
medicine. My thoughts often go back to 
the four years spent in the 'old School' on 
Marshall Street. I think of Doctors Chris- 
topher Tompkins, George Ben Johnston, 
E. G. Williams, Lewis Bosher, Chas. 
Haden, Jacob Levy, W. H. Taylor, and 
others, who were examples of professional 
attainment and dignity that inspired their 
students to high ideals." 

MAY, 1957 





Dr. Hugh G. Russell recalls for us 
an interesting bit: 
"Probably the in- 
cident that I recall 
most vividly dur- 
ing my association 
with the College 
was the big fire 
of 1911. 

"At that time I 
was lecturing on 
Dental Pathology 
at the U.C.M. and on the way to my nine 
o'clock lecture on the street car going 
down Broad Street, I overheard a remark 
by another passenger that the Virginia 
Hospital was on fire. When I reached 
there, I found our main building in ruins 
but the fire was under control. Well, 
we had no class that morning, but every- 
one got to work and shortly we had con- 
verted the old abandoned tobacco factory 
just north of us into classrooms and we 
carried on there until our new quarters 
(which is now McGuire Hall) were com- 
pleted. 

"The old M.C.V. extended the use 
of their Infirmary and such other facilities 
necessary to carry on. I believe this calam- 
ity was partly responsible for precipitating 
the merger of the two schools which had 
been under consideration for some time." 



Dr. W. A. Hoggard in his letter said: 
"I do not know 
what to say con- 
cerning myself. I 
have been work- 
ing doing the best 
that I could for 
my people. My 
work has been for 
these fifty years in 
general practice, 
which has been 
general and included all parts of the medi- 
cal field from surgery down. I am a general 
practitioner, mostly in the country and 
all the way through the days of the Horse 
and Buggy Doctor; I have tried to serve 
the people and be the best of a friend to 
all. I hope that I have not ever refused to 
render service because of pay or anything 
else. I have had shocks, et cetera, but am 
still riding the roads from swamps to Hos- 
pital and hope to keep going yet for some 
time. I am proud of the Medical College 
of Virginia and am happy that I am one 
of you; one of the boys, and I do wish 
that I could see more of the Boys." 





Dr. Mark T. Frizzelle wrote: "On 
graduation fifty 
years ago, I took 
the North Caro- 
lina Board exami- 
nation at More- 
head City and 
promptly located 
for general prac- 
tice at Ayden, 
North Carolina, a 
town of about 
three thousand people, ten miles east of 
my native home in Greene county. I will 
have practiced there fifty years on July 1st, 
1957. 

"In 1923. I married Florence H. Hardee 
of Greenville who was born and reared 
in the same native community. Both of 
us have been healthy and active in profes- 
ional and community affairs and have 
enjoyed participation in the general prog- 
ress of our county, state, and nation. 

"On arriving at seventy years of age, I 
began restriction of my practice to office 
work. At seventy-seven, I am still in good 
condition and finding pleasure and satis- 
faction in light office practice. 

"During the last ten years, we have been 
traveling some; we have visited every state 
in the nation. On these trips, we have 
used our car exclusively, neither of us likes 
trains or airplanes. 

"We plan to attend the Golden Anni- 
versary of my class of 1907 in May. With 
muih interest and anticipation, we are 
looking forward to this occasion. I hope 
all living members of my class will be in 
attendance for the delightful and whole- 
some fraternization." 



Dr. James C. Moore in his letter said: 
"During my fifty 
years of practice 
there have been 
many incidents of 
interest, but at the 
moment I cannot 
think of any par- 
ticular one that 
could be related 
i n a hundred 
words. 

"In case you need this information — 
all but two years of my fifty years of prac- 
tice have been with the W. M. Ritter Lum- 
ber Company of Columbus, Ohio." 




Reunion 

Program 




HOWARD G. WHITEHEAD DR. C. D. PARKER 



An excerpt from the letter of Alice S. 
Drake: "In an age of wonderful adven- 
tures, miraculous scientific discoveries, and 
world crises, an incident should be out- 
standing to merit space in The Scarab. 

"I recall none from my quite ordinary 
life and am far beyond a time for photog- 
raphers. 

"Please accept this small gift for the 
Alumni Fund with my best wishes for the 
Medical College of Virginia. May its use- 
fulness grow through the years, never 
forgetting that the measure of an insti- 
tution, like an individual, is help given 
to others." 



An excerpt from letter which we re- 
ceived from Elmer E. Grove: "I wish to 
thank you for your offer but I cannot qual- 
ify for this honor. I am a graduate in 1907 
but since 1930 I have been out of phar- 
macy. I have kept my license alive by an- 
nual renewal and have paid membership 
fees to the Alumni Association for a num- 
ber of years. Again let me say "Thank 
you.' 



9:00 A.M. 

to 
4:00 P.M. 
1:00 P.M. 



3:00 P.M. 
6:00 P.M. 
7:00 P.M. 



10:00 P.M. 



9:30 A.M. 



Thursday, May 23, 1957 

Registration, Alumni House. There will be a hospitality room open and 
we would be delighted to have you drop by. 

Luncheon in honor of fifty year graduates, College Social Center. The 
graduates of fifty years and back will be guests of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. All other alumni are cordially invited; the charge for this lunch- 
eon will be $2.00. The deadline for tickets will be 3:00 P.M., Tues- 
day, May 21. 

Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association at the Alumni House 
Cocktail Party, Hotel John Marshall, Patrick Henry-Jackson Room 
Banquet, Hotel John Marshall, Virginia Room 

The movie of the inauguration of Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. will be 
shown and the fifty year pins awarded. 
Dance, Hotel John Marshall, Virginia Room 

The tickets for the cocktail party, banquet, and dance will be $5.00 each. 
The deadline for tickets will be Tuesday, May 21, 3:00 P.M. No tickets 
will be sold after that date. For the classes of 2's and 7's, special class 
tables will be set up; when you order your tickets, we will reserve places 
for you at yours. Dress will be optional. 

Friday, May 24, 1957 

Tour by bus to the Jamestown Festival leaving from the Alumni House. 
Tickets will be $6.00 each, which will include transportation, admission 
to the Festival area, a box lunch, and a personal guide for each bus. 
The tour will leave Jamestown in time to arrive back in Richmond by 
5:00 P.M. The buses will load at the front of the Alumni House at 
1105 East Clay Street at 9:30 A.M. The deadline for tickets will be 
Tuesday, May 21 at 3 :00 P.M. Those of us who have been to the James- 
town Festival have found it most interesting and well worth a visit. 
Individual Class Reunions, 2's and 7's will hear from their class reunion 
chairmen who are planning these activities. 

Senior Dance, Tantilla Garden Ballroom. Admission by card only. Cards 
for this may be obtained at the Alumni House. The Alumni will be 
welcome. 

Saturday, May 25, 1957 
Tour, Richmond Memorial Hospital. Alumni, who are interested, will 
meet at the hospital and be conducted on a tour. 

Open House in honor of the senior class, Alumni House; the Alumni 
will be most welcome. 



Sunday, May 26, 1957 

Baccalaureate Sermon, Second Presbyterian Church, Dr. Frederick Olert 
Commencement Exercises, The Mosque. The speaker will be Dr. Dabney 
S. Lancaster, Chairman, State Council of Higher Education. 

Other Activities Available to Alumni 

Thursday and Friday: Tours of Liggett and Myers Tobacco Company, anytime between 

the hours of 8:00-11:30 A.M. and 12:45-3:30 P.M. 
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, 10:00 A.M.-2:00 P.M.: Historical Exhibits of Health 
Professions in connection with the Jamestown Festival at the Richmond 
Academy of Medicine. 
Visits to the schools and hospitals of the Medical College of Virginia will be ar- 
ranged for those desiring it. 

The Virginians, Richmond's International League Team, will be playing in Rich- 
mond both Friday and Saturday nights at Parker Field. 

Free parking will be provided by the College. A ticket will be mailed to all alumni 
ordering tickets. 

Please Remember the Deadline for Tickets Will be 3:00 P.M., Tuesday, May 21 . 
No Tickets Will be Sold After This Deadline 

THE SCARAB 



Friday Night 
9:00 P.M. 



10:00 


A.M. 


3:00 


P.M. 







6:00 


P.M. 


9:30 


A.M 


4:00 


P.M. 



Kesealclt \ooa\i 

atlnev 

Coordinated by 
Dr. G. Watson James, III 

(Continued from February issue) 

Research in both basic mechanisms and 
in pure clinical investigation is active in 
the various clinical departments of the 
Medical College of Virginia. 

In the Department of Otology, Rhi- 
nology, and Laryngology, under the 
chairmanship of Dr. P. N. Pastore, the 
research programs are clinical in nature 
and are important facets of the overall 
research effort at the Medical College of 
Virginia. Dr. Pastore and his staff com- 
posed of Dr. G. D. Hayden, Dr. John A. 
Gill, and Dr. R. B. Hunt are active in a 
continuing 15 year project concerned with 
the structure and clinical importance of 
the lateral pharyngeal lymphoid fold. Dr. 
Hayden's major research interest is the 
result obtained with autogenous grafts in 
the repair of large defects in the tympanic 
membrane. Dr. John A. Gill and Dr. 
R. B. Hunt are making observations on 
the comparison of surgical and X-ray treat- 
ment of neoplasms of the larynx. One of 
the most interesting and fruitful research 
programs in this department is the study 
by Mr. James Cutler and other members 
of the staff on the value of special train- 
ing for totally deaf pre-school children. 

Orthopedic surgery, under the able 
chairmanship of Dr. M. J. Hoover, Jr., 
has two research projects underway. Frac- 
ture healing associated with head injuries 
is being studied by Dr. Joseph Kell of the 
Neurosurgical Department in collabora- 
tion with Dr. Earnest Carpenter and Dr. 
J. F. Butterworth of the Orthopedic De- 
partment. Basic study is being done pri- 
marily in the laboratory. The chief inves- 
tigational interest of Dr. M. J. Hoover, 
Jr., is a study on the changes in intra- 
articular joint fluid in disease, orthopedic 
conditions, fractures, and the therapeutic 
use of various drugs available for the 
control of intra-articular joint infection. 

Four research projects are presently in 
progress in the Department of Ophthal- 
mology whose chairman is Dr. DuPont 
Guerry. A study on the "flash burns in 
the rabbit retina" sponsored by the School 
of Aviation Medicine of the U. S. Air 

MAY, 1957 



Force in collaboration with the Depart- 
ment of Biophysics has been previously 
cited. Since Nagasaki and Hiroshima, 
thermal injuries of the retina have been 
reported after exposure to explosions of 
nuclear weapons. Such injuries constitute 
an additional hazard to the other known 
effects of atomic blasts. The present study 
hopes to shed light on retinal damage 
from blinding flashes and if possible meas- 
ure the threshold of energy producing ir- 
reversible lesions. Dr. Guerry and Dr. 
William T. Ham are the principal inves- 
tigators. Other members of this research 
team are Dr. H. Wiesinger, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Ophthalmology, Fred C. 
Schmidt, Ray C. Williams, and Raymond 
Ruffin of the Department of Biophysics. 
M. C. Shaffer of the Department of Visual 
Education is contributing a key role to 
this research program through his excel- 
lent photographic work. With the De- 
partment of Anatomy, a companion study 
is being done on the microanatomy of the 
eye by serial level microphotography on 
motion picture film, an exquisite technique 
developed by Dr. Erling S. Hegre. His 
methods are particularly applicable to the 
study and such collaborative research is 
an excellent example of cooperative effort. 

Dr. M. C. Waddell is conducting both 
clinical and experimental research in the 
MCV Outpatient Department in order to 
improve presently available contact lenses. 
Contact lenses and the problem arising 
from their use is sponsored in the De- 
partment of Ophthalmology by the Tit- 
mus Ophthalmological Foundation. This 
will especially benefit patients with anom- 
alies as keratoconus and irregular astig- 
matism whose visual acuity cannot be 
improved by other means. The Orthoptics 
Division of the Department of Ophthal- 
mology has just been opened and will 
provide orthoptic care for squint children 
by means of pre- and postoperative treat- 
ment. Clinical research on ocular motility 
and improvement of treatment of squint 
is done in this division. Mrs. Elizabeth 
E. Porter from New Orleans, a newcomer 
to the staff, will head and conduct this 
type of research, partially sponsored by 
the Titmus Ophthalmological Foundation. 

The Laboratory for Surgical Research 
in the Department of Surgery was found- 
ed several years ago by the late Dr. E. I. 
Evans, and it has been engaged in a com- 
prehensive study of the problems in the 
management of severely burned patients 
for the last seven years. Dr. B. W. Haynes, 
Assistant Professor of Surgery, is the di- 



rector and responsible investigator of a 
large number of research projects directed 
toward this end. Early in this research 
program it was obviously necessary to es- 
tablish a metabolic ward for the day to 
day carefully conducted clinical and lab- 
oratory observations on the burned pa- 
tients, particularly in the immediate post- 
burn and convalescent phase of the in- 
juries. This ward was the first such pro- 
gram at the Medical College of Virginia. 
Working within the Surgical Research 
Laboratories, the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia has been fortunate in having a group 
of Scandinavian investigators. Dr. Ole 
Malm, Associate Professor of Experimen- 
tal Surgery, is engaged in studies relating 
to burn toxicity and the causes of burn 
toxemia and death. Support in excess of 
$48,000.00 has come from the Armed 
Forces Special Weapons Project. Drs. P. 
Lingjerde, L. Skjelkvole, and E. J. Storen 
are working as research fellows. Radio- 
phosphorus (P 32 ) is being used in tracer 
amounts to study the role of the thymus 
and pineal gland in rats subjected to 
various stresses, such as burn, surgical 
trauma, and anesthesia. United States 
Army contracts to study the metabolic and 
kidney response to severe injury have 
been awarded to Dr. B. W. Haynes, Jr. 
In addition to this, an investigation of 
causes of death in severe burns is being 
carried out under an Army Contract under 
which the total expenditure since 1953 
has been $168,000.00. The surgical pro- 
cedures required to handle casualties with 
both radiation injury and thermal burns 
have been investigated since the project 
was commenced in 1947 by Dr. Evans. 
The total amount authorized for expend- 
iture has been slightly less than one mil- 
lion dollars. Grants in excess of $171,- 
000.00 from the U. S. Public Health Serv- 
ice have been given for the study of the 
use of whole blood, the separation of 
blood cells and plasma, and plasma sub- 
stitutes in traumatic surgery. Some idea 
of the scope of this study may be gained 
from a consideration of the principal 
areas of research which have been covered 
during this past year. These include an 
evaluation of clinical therapy, covering 
newer methods of debridement, colloid 
administration, homografts, the manage- 
ment of burns involving bone, and a statis- 
tical analysis of the extensive burn data 
collected at the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia. Research projects have included 
studies on red blood cell survival, pro- 
(Continued on page 19) 




Dr. Ebbe C. Hoff 



The Man of the Hour 



We introduce to you with pleasure our 
newest dean, Dr. Ebbe Curtis Hoff, Dean 
of the School of Graduate Studies. His 
appointment was announced on January 
11, 1957. He will coordinate the work 
in research at the graduate level. 

Dr. Hoff was born in Rexford, Kansas 
and received his Bachelor of Science De- 
gree (summa cum laude) from the Uni- 
versity of Washington in Seattle. He 
studied at the University of Oxford, Hon- 
ours School of Physiology, where he took 
his pre-clinical training. While there he 
did research in neurophysiology under 
Sir Charles Sherrington. Vacation studies 
during this period were at Guy's Hospital, 
London, and in the department of Anat- 
omy and Biochemistry, University of Ly- 
ons. He continued his clinical training 
at the University of Oxford and the Lon- 
don Hospital Medical College, University 
of London. He has degrees from Oxford 
of B.A., D.Phil., M.A., B.M., B.Ch., and 
D.M. He is M.R.C.S., England, and 
L.R.C.P., London, as well as D.N.B. in 
the U. S. 

He has worked with the government 
doing research in Aviation Medicine and 
has had research fellowships at Yale. His 
war record with the U. S. Navy was most 

8 



interesting. To list all of his member- 
ships and prior honors would take pages. 

He is married to Phebe Margaret Flath- 
er, M.A. (Oxon), daughter of David 
Flather, Esq., J. P. of Hooten-Lavet Hall, 
Mattby, Yorkshire, England. They have 
two children, Phebe May and David Chris- 
tiansen. He is a member of St. Mary's 
Church in Goochland and superintendent 
of the Sunday School. Mrs. Hoff is as- 
sistant to him in this endeavor. 

In addition to being a very active mem- 
ber of the Richmond Astronomical Society, 
Dr. Hoff gives time to the Richmond As- 
sociation of Junior Astronomers which his 
son, David, helped to organize from the 
members of his school. 

He is a member of the Children's The- 
ater in Richmond and has taken part in 
many of the plays presented by this group 
and has often performed in the Summer 
Theater at St. Catherine's. 

This July Dr. Hoff will attend a meet- 
ing of the International Neurological Sci- 
ences Congress in Brussels and just prior 
to that a meeting of the Symposium on 
the History of Brain Function in London. 

We are happy to have him as our new 
dean and our Man of the Hour. 



LEST WE FORGET 

1898 UCM Charles Warner Lemon (M), 81, 

of Lewisburg, West Virginia, died on March 

6. 

1900 UCM Horace Gibbs Lazelle (M) died 

March 19 after a long illness. He retired 

from active practice in 1942. 

Frank Harwood Lukin (M) died February 
5. He was a general practitioner and drug- 
gist in Pamplin, Va. 

1902 UCM Richard Phillips Bell (M) of 
Staunton, Va. died January 23. He was chief 
of staff of the King's Daughters Hospital 
and a consultant for the Virginia School for 
the Deaf and Blind and Western State Hos- 
pital. 

1904 Sarah Browne Roller (N) died March 
22. She was appointed Richmond's first 
juvenile probation officer on October 11, 1912 
and served in this capacity until she retired 
on September 30, 1949. She also served on 
the board of directors of the Virginia Home 
and Industrial School for Girls at Bon Air 
from 1924 until 1930. 

1909 William Royall Warriner, prominent 
Crewe physician, died November 6. 
1912 Guy Rothwell Fisher of Staunton, Va., 
died January 15. He was president of The 
Medical Society of Virginia in 1948. 
1914 Burleigh Nichols Mears (M) of Belle 
Haven, Virginia, died January 10 following 
a brief illness. 

1917 Thomas M. Vorbrinck (M) Norfolk, 
Va. died February 13 after a short illness. 
1922 Thomas W. Pumphrey (D) of West 
Point. Va. died February 17. 

1925 R. Lee Lewis (P) of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, former owner of Westover Pharmacy, 
died January 19. 

1926 Lewis B. Kelleher (M) of Richmond, 
Virginia died March 30. 

1927 Ewell Claude Jamison I'M) who had 
practiced in Rocky Mount, Va. since his 
graduation, died January 29. Rites for Wil- 
bur S. Stakes (M) Patchogue, L. I., N. Y. 
were held March 22. 

1928 Alice Randall (M) of Charleston, 
W. Va. died January 21. She had established 
her laboratory at Memorial Hospital. Now 
Soroptimist International has named it ' ' Al- 
ice Randall Memorial Cytology Laboratory ' ' 
and her work of cancer detection will con- 
tinue. She was a medical missionary in India 
for 21 years, retiring in 1951. She received 
three decorations from the British govern- 
ment for her outstanding work as head of 
the American Baptist Hospital in Gauhati 
Assam, India, and for her work with the 
Burmese people. 

1932 Murray Dick (M), Newport News, 
Va. died November 30. 

1934 Ralph M. Mulligan (M), chief of 
medicine at St. Joseph's Hospital, Reading, 
Pa. was killed in an automobile accident on 
February 25. 

1937 Ballard Norwood (M) medical prac- 
titioner in Virgilina, Virginia, died March 5. 
1949 Benjamin P. Baker (M), captain and 
flight surgeon in the 321st bomb wing of 
the USAC, died at Pine Castle Air Base, Or- 
lando, Florida, on February 11. His death 
was the result of hypertension and chronic 
nephritis. 

THE SCARAB 



You Can Help in the Mounting Emergency Easily! 

You are in a position to lend a hand amazingly and easily in our mounting emer- 
gency, the almost tragic nurse shortage, which is made daily worse by the rapid increase 
in hospital beds to be staffed and the pressing demands for nurses in public health, in- 
dustry, the armed services, veterans administration, commercial establishments, doctors of- 
fices, teaching and administration, et cetera. 

_ Despite all proposals to improve the situation one urgent fact remains: we must re- 
cruit more nurses for your local school and for MCV. 

Won't you daily seek every chance to talk to young people about considering nursine 
as a career; perhaps few others can do it so well. 

You already have the facts about your own local school, if any. Here are ours at MCV: 

1. Financial Help— Lack of funds should not deter a student from exploring by mail 
or conference with our dean, school of nursing, the good prospects for help, if needed. 

2. The MCV Basic Four- Year Program— Based on good high school preparation, 
this course leads to the B.S. degree in nursing, preparing for leadership opportunities. This 
type of nurse education is needed but not for all graduates. 

3. St. Philip Three- Year and Five-Year Programs— These courses for Negro stu- 
dents cover the usual three-year curriculum based on high school graduation and the five- 
year curriculum based on two prescribed years of college. 

4. Practical Nurse Education— This is a one-year course for high school graduates 
or mature persons with at least two years of high school work. There are programs here 
both for white and Negro students in cooperation with the Richmond City schools. 

5. Dormitories— There are superior housing facilities for each student group named 
above and others are to be constructed shortly. 

6. Possible Two-Year Junior College Nursing Course— Such a program is now 
under active study at the college and may be instituted by September, 1958. Two years 
of about eleven months of intensive preparation would lead to the degree of Associate in 
Arts or Science, might be followed by a year's internship with good salary, and would 
admit to the examination for registered, professional nurses. This is an important under- 
taking, as evidenced by excellent reports from other institutions where now tried experi- 
mentally. 

Full information on any course will be sent to you or to any prospective student 
upon request of the Dean, School of Nursing, MCV. Please ask for it. Let's lick this nurse 
shortage. 



MAY, 1957 



School of Pharmacy 

Nearly one hundred and forty persons 
registered for the pharmacy seminar held 
in Richmond on March 18 and 19 at the 
Richmond Academy of Medicine. The 
seminar, as most of you know, was spon- 
sored jointly by the School of Pharmacy 
and the Virginia Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion and featured developments in phar- 
macy including the pharmacist and animal 
health. Dr. Milton L. Neuroth, Professor 
of Pharmacy, was chairman of the seminar 
and presided at the morning session on 
March 18. 

After greetings from President Smith, 
Dr. Weaver and Mr. Braxton Coiner, 
V.P.A. President, the seminarians heard 
papers by Dr. Walter H. Hartung and 
Mr. Okla Johnson. Dr. Hartung spoke 
on "New Drugs" and particularly on the 
chemical basis for modern therapeutics. 
Dr. Hartung is chairman of the depart- 
ment of pharmaceutical chemistry and pro- 
fessor of pharmaceutical chemistry at 
M.C.V. Mr. Johnson, Federal Narcotic 
Agent for Virginia, spoke on "Develop- 
ments in Narcotic Regulations." Mr. John- 
son's talk was especially well received in 
view of recent changes in the narcotic reg- 
ulations affecting the handling of narcotic 
prescriptions. 

The afternoon session on March 18 
featured talks by Dr. Joseph Krezanoski, 
Mr. Ralph M. Ware, and Mr. J. O. Hub- 
bard, Jr., who also acted as presiding of- 
ficer for the session. Dr. Krezanoski spoke 
on "New Developments in Pharmaceutical 
Dispensing" and featured latest handling 
of ophthalmic preparations and new sur- 
face active agents. Dr. Krezanoski is as- 
sistant professor of pharmacy at M.C.V. 
and teaches junior courses in the pharmacy 
department. Mr. Ware, Secretary of the 
State Board of Pharmacy, spoke on "Re- 
cent Legislation Affecting the Practice of 
Pharmacy." Mr. Hubbard followed with 
an informative talk on recent activities 
of the Association, including the Federa- 
tion plan and various committees of the 



Deans' Page 



Association. The afternoon session was 
concluded by a showing of the M.C.V. 
picture which covers recent developments 
and activities at the College. 

During the evening, a banquet was held 
at the John Marshall Hotel. Preceding the 
banquet, local wholesalers sponsored a 
cocktail party. More than one hundred at- 
tended this banquet, making it the best 
attended in seminar history. Dr. Weaver 
acted as toastmaster and introduced the 
guest speaker, Dr. Ebbe C. Hoff, Dean 
of the School of Graduate Study at M.C.V. 
Dr. Hoff spoke on "How We Determine 
Drug Effectiveness." 

Mr. John M. Bierer of Lexington pre- 
sided at the last session on Tuesday morn- 
ing, March 19. Dr. James H. Steel, vet- 
erinarian with the Public Health Service, 
Dr. Harry K. Royer, Lynchburg veteri- 
narian, and Dr. S. L. Kalison of V.P.I. , 
presented papers featuring animal health 
pharmacy. Dr. Steel's paper on "Diseases 
Transmissible Between Animals and 
Man" was well received. Dr. Royer and 
Dr. Kalison spoke on symptoms indicat- 
ing differential diagnosis in large and 
small animals. Whether the pharmacist is 
practicing in a large or small community 
had no bearing on the importance of these 
talks since they covered educational sub- 
jects of broad interest to all concerned 
with the animal economy in Virginia. 

It was generally agreed by all who at- 
tended and participated in the seminar 
that this venture was very worthwhile. 
We are hopeful that in future years we 
will see even larger and more representa- 
tive attendance at the pharmacy seminar. 
Be sure to attend the seminar when it is 
offered next year. 

Warren E. Weaver, Dean 



School of Medicine 

"Firsts" are always thrilling. This first 
opportunity to communicate with you 
through the columns of The Scarab is 
particularly exciting. It begins the develop- 
ment, I hope, of a working relationship 
which will result in the furthering of the 
best interests of the Medical College and 
the alumni and in the fulfillment of their 
highest goals. In accepting the challenge 
which the opportunities of the office of the 
Dean of Medicine offer, I have been • 
impressed with the capabilities, enthu- 
siasm, and loyalty of not only the faculty 
but also the alumni and the medical com- 
munity in general. It is only through such 
a broad base of support that the school 
can fulfill its charter as an institution for 
medical education and can continue to 
develop its potential as a leader in this 
field. As is appropriate, medical practice 
and medical progress, both of today and 
of tomorrow, depend principally upon the 
medical school. 

Perhaps the biggest event of recent 
weeks has been the announcement of in- 
tern appointments. All of our senior class 
have been placed. Medical school grad- 
uates will be interning in 13 states and 
in the District of Columbia, Hawaii, and 
Canada. Of a class of 96 students, 55 are 
interning in hospitals in Virginia. Inci- 
dentally, the Medical College Hospital 
gained its full quota of 40 rotating in- 
terns and a desired number of straight in- 
terns in medicine and surgery. Such an 
indication of faith in the quality of the 
educational experience offered here places 
the greatest responsibility on each indi- 
vidual member of the teaching staff. 

A significant compliment to this school 
has been the recent awarding of a grant 
by the National Institute of Neurological 
Diseases and Blindness of over $100,000 
a year for a longitudinal collaborative 
study of the events of the peri-natal period 
relevant to the broad scope of problems 
of neuropsychiatric impairment, such as 
cerebral palsy, epilepsy, mental retarda- 



Left to right-John M. Bierer P'30, Ralph M. Ware P'42, Dean Warren Weaver, Braxton H. Coiner P'26, Dr. Milton L. Neuroth, and 



R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. P'35 



tion, malformation, etc. The seven schools 
selected include Harvard, Johns Hopkins, 
Medical College of Virginia, University of 
California, University of Minnesota, Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, and Yale Uni- 
versity. The carrying out of such a study 
will involve supplementing our faculty- 
personnel. The attracting of additional 
high-quality talent for such an endeavor 
has implications for the entire future of 
the school. 

I consider this column an essential 
communication device and welcome the 
opportunity to keep you informed of the 
progress of the school — progress which 
will reflect your efforts as well as those of 
the faculty and the community. 

William F. Maloney, Dean 

School of Dentistry 

There were 610 registrants for the 6th 
Annual Alumni Homecoming Program 
of the School of Dentistry on January 
28th and 29th. Richard L. Simpson, Den- 
tistry '35 was this year's chairman. 

Dentists crowded into the Academy of 
Medicine to hear the scientific sessions. 
On Monday morning, Dr. Lester W. 
Burket, Dean and Professor, Department 
of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, 
University of Pennsylvania, discussed 
"Common Lesions of the Oral Mucosa." 
This was followed by a discussion of 
"The Factors of Support in Removable 
Partial Dentures" by Dr. Oliver C. Ap- 
plegate, Professor of Dentistry, School of 
Dentistry, University of Michigan. 

Following the luncheon, the scientific 
sessions continued with a lecture on "The 
Key to Success in Periodontal Treatment" 
by Dr. Samuel Charles Miller of the Col- 
lege of Dentistry, New York University. 
This was followed by a session on the 
"Treatment and Restoration of Injuries 
to the Teeth of Children" by Dr. Roy G. 
Ellis, Dean and Professor of Operative 
Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University 
of Toronto. 

Monday night alumni and their wives 
met at the Hotel John Marshall for a 
friendship hour and banquet at which 
time they were entertained by Dr. W. M. 
Krogman, Professor of Physical Anthro- 
pology at the University of Pennsylvania, 
Graduate School of Medicine. 

On Tuesday morning the scientific ses- 
sion continued with two lectures on "An 
Analysis of High Speed Technics and In- 
strumentation" by Dr. R. A. McEwen of 
Atlanta, Georgia. 

MAY, 1957 




Dean Harry Lyons greets Dr. William N. 
Hodgkin at the Dental Homecoming 

Dr. Arthur A. Gathright, Jr.. Associate 
Professor of Clinical Medicine, School of 
Medicine, Medical College of Virginia, ad- 
dressed the group on the problem of "The 
Dentist and His Personal Health." 

An excellent motion picture film pre- 
pared by Dr. F. W. Salisbury and Dr. 
S. Elmer Bear was shown for the first 
time. Also shown was a motion picture 
portraying the many functions and activ- 
ities of all the schools within the Medical 
College of Virginia. 

Luncheon on Tuesday was held at the 
Hotel John Marshall at which time Mr. 
Frank W. Lovejoy, Executive Sales Di- 
rector, Socony Mobil Oil Company, dis- 
cussed dentistry through the eyes of a 
sales executive. 

Alumni throughout this section of the 
country who attended the Homecoming 
Program were very liberal in their praise 
of the scientific session made available to 
them. Plans for the 1958 program will 
be completed in the near future. 

School of Graduate Studies 

Since 1934, there has been functioning 
at the Medical College a program of grad- 
uate study leading to research degrees. In 
the last ten years, this program has been 
broadened in scope until now opportuni- 
ties are offered for the education of young 
investigators in the fields of Anatomy, 
Biochemistry, Biology, Biophysics. Dental 
Research, Hospital Pharmacy, Legal Medi- 
cine, Microbiology, Pathology, Pharma- 
ceutical Chemistry, Pharmacology, and 



Physiology. Although a majority of grad- 
uate students in the past have worked for 
the Master of Science degree, an increas- 
ing emphasis is now being placed upon 
advanced study leading to the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree, especially in Pharma- 
cology, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Anat- 
omy, and Physiology. 

Designation of the graduate study pro- 
gram as a School with its own dean rec- 
ognizes the growing importance of re- 
search, and the education of research work- 
ers and teachers in the health sciences. 
More than ever before, it is realized that 
advance in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, 
and nursing will be seriously curtailed 
unless we maintain a sufficient cadre of 
competent basic research workers with 
trained, creative minds. Such workers are 
a major resource. Our debt to these basic 
researchers is well illustrated in the lead- 
ing part they have played in the past in 
such great developments as the antibiotics, 
poliomyelitis prevention, the tranquilizing 
drugs, and a host of others. 

The short supply of health research 
personnel is a cause for concern through- 
out the country. We believe that the Med- 
ical College has a significant role in help- 
ing to relieve this shortage of scientific 
manpower. In fact, in many of the fields 
we have mentioned, advanced education 
can only be obtained in a teaching center 
such as the Medical College. In point of 
numbers of graduate students, the program 
is relatively small ; in terms of the poten- 
tial value of each student, the task is of 
vital significance. 

At the Medical College, as in other 
great teaching centers, a sound graduate 
study program helps to invigorate teach- 
ing of all students by keeping to the fore 
a fresh spirit of adventurous inquiry and 
objective search for new knowledge. The 
health fields cannot remain static; it is a 
part of our commitment to the future to 
contribute to their advance. 

Ebbe Curtis Hoff, Dean 

School of Nursing 

Curing the fall and winter months of 
1956-1957, Shirley Downs, registrar and 
secretary of recruitment, interviewed ap- 
proximately five hundred students at col- 
lege and career day programs held in Vir- 
ginia high schools. Detailed information 
concerning the School of Nursing was 
provided for interested students. The 
school bulletins and application papers 
(Continued on page 25) 

11 



Medical Education 

(Continued from page 2) 

vide incentive for active learning on the 
part of the student. This can best be done 
by giving him definite responsibility in 
real, day-to-day problems of health and 
disease. This responsibility must, of 
course, be carefully graded to the student's 
ability and experience and must be exer- 
cised under careful guidance by the faculty. 
"Given incentive to learn and guidance 
toward the grasp of principles, with the 
problems of health and disease as a frame 
of reference, the student will build the 
necessary foundation for his career in 
medicine, be it practice (general or lim- 
ited), teaching, research or administration. 
"In working toward this fundamental 
objective, undergraduate medical schools 
must strive to help the student, and these 
are the aims : to acquire basic professional 
knowledge; establish essential habits; at- 
tain clinical and social skills necessary to 
the best utilization of that knowledge; and 
develop those basic intellectual attitudes 
and ethical or moral principles which are 
essential if he is to gain and maintain the 



confidence and trust of those whom he 
treats, the respect of those with whom he 
works and the support of the community 
in which he lives. 

"These five aims are obviously not dis- 
tinctly separable, but are mutually interde- 
pendent. All together they summarize the 
desirable characteristics of the responsible 
professional person medical education is 
attempting to produce." 

Such are the stated objectives. These 
are not always entirely fulfilled, but this 
does not lessen their appropriateness or 
their desirability. 

This account, then, of the recent evolu- 
tion gives us a beginning appreciation of 
the tremendous complexity of this effort. 
A word now about the present status. 

There are 82 approved medical schools 
in the United States. Two have just grad- 
uated their first class; six are two-year 
schools, three of which are in the stage of 
transition to a four-year curriculum. In ad- 
dition, three brand-new four-year schools 
are in varying stages of beginning opera- 
tion, soon to bring the nation's total to 
85. Forty, or approximately half of the 
four-year schools, receive varying degrees 
of state-support. 



Two active and effective organizations, 
the Association of American Medical Col- 
leges and the Council on -Medical Educa- 
tion of the American Medical Association, 
are responsible for accreditation and see to 
it that standards are maintained. They are 
responsible for the fact that every medical 
school in the United States today offers . 
a good medical education. Accreditation 
means that each school meets requirements 
for suitable classrooms, teaching hospitals, 
library, clinics, and a well-integrated pro- 
gram of instruction. There are no unap- 
proved schools in operation in this country. 
Entrance requirements and curricula for 
the four-year course are similar in all 
schools. Each imparts the basic scientific 
knowledge and understanding necessary to 
diagnose and treat disease. Each school, 
however, has its own flavor and creates 
a particular kind of doctor in terms of 
medical personality and ability to advance 
medical science and otherwise contribute 
to medical practice. 

What, then, are the problems? They 
concern four major areas: faculty, stu- 
dents, facilities (including curriculum), 
and finances. The discussion of certain as- 
pects of these areas as "problems" should 



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You are cordially invited to use the many banking services now 
conveniently available right inside the MCV at The Bank of 
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of staff, students and patients. 

Members of the medical arts profession are equally welcome at all 
locations of this bank in six Virginia cities. 

In the MCV Facility or elsewhere, you're always welcome at 

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NORFOLK 



12 



THE SCARAB 



be set in appropriate perspective. Most 
difficulties have arisen as a result of the 
continual progress of medicine; many are 
a consequence of the lack of proper appre- 
ciation, emphasis, and evaluation of their 
relative importance in the community's 
total activity by individuals in the position 
of determining major support. Some rep- 
resent a decreased attractiveness of medi- 
cine as a field of endeavor, and a few 
depend for resolution upon the more com- 
plete appreciation and thinking through 
of relationships by colleagues within the 
profession. 

In this day of rapid scientific develop- 
ment and expansion innumerable other 
scientific fields have come into being that 
attract men and minds that would, in 
former days, have studied medicine. For 
example, in 1900, 26% of college students 
entered upon medical studies. Today's per- 
centage is between 2 and 3%. Of course, 
the number of college students has in- 
creased greatly, but proportionately fewer 
men enter medicine and fewer in medicine 
enter the teaching field. The multimillion- 
dollar drug industry, the sprawling gov- 
ernment health facilities, the intriguing 
fields of electronics and nuclear physics, 
along with many others, draw personnel 
who previously would have likely found 
satisfaction in investigation and teaching 
in medicine. 

This attraction away is not only one of 
an intellectual character but is also a finan- 
cial one. Higher income is possible in 
other fields; indeed, higher income is pos- 
sible with only four years of college edu- 
cation as compared to fourteen. Money is 
just not available to adequately compete 
in today's market for such personnel. 
Higher financial return is also a factor in 
persuading those who do complete medi- 
cine to practice the art rather than teach it. 

Some of you may not fully realize it, but 
this is a problem of very great moment 
to all of us. There is vital concern among 
medical educators as to where the teachers, 
especially of the so-called basic sciences, 
are to come from in the future. Their 
ranks continue to decrease in the face of 
increasing need. 

I am referring, in talking about teachers, 
especially to that basic core of full-time 
faculty required in any progressive insti- 
tution today. These are supplemented, of 
course, by a far greater number of part- 
time teachers — notably practicing physi- 
cians. As stated recently by President Kirk* 
of Columbia University, "The greatest 
achievements of scientific medicine were 

MAY, 1957 



made possible when our medical schools 
adopted the principle of establishing clin- 
ical departments on the same full-time 
teaching basis as the scientific departments. 
No greater single step forward has ever 
been taken in medical education." 

Medicine, in general, but more espe- 
cially, the teaching institution itself must 
be able to attract faculty by providing ade- 
quate pay, good teaching opportunity — 
that is, students of good quality, oppor- 
tunity to grow through investigation (the 
research opportunity), a service-load that 
is not too great, and adequate physical 
facilities. There will be more students to 
be educated. Already the new courses need 
to be taught or to be expanded, such as 
biophysics, physical medicine, and psy- 
chiatry. 

The need for physicians is increasing. 
Our population grows in rapid strides. 
Simple arithmetic reveals the awesome sig- 
nificance of 4 million births per year 
against li/ 2 million deaths per year in the 
United States. It is estimated, for example, 
that it will require 30 new medical schools 
to take care of the nation's need for medi- 
cal education in the next fifteen years. Just 
last week our population reached 170 mil- 
lion. It is projected that we will be a 



nation of 200 million by 1970. 

There is no prospect, of course, for any 
great increase in the number of physicians 
in the near future. The expansion process, 
even if made possible, after first providing 
sounder footing for the present establish- 
ment, is a slow one. At least eight years 
elapse from the beginning of the planning 
until the first student graduates. 

This brings us then to the student. We 
are involved in a strange paradox at the 
moment. We are an enterprise, unable to 
accommodate the expected load of appli- 
cants just around the corner, assuming that 
the 3% rate continues, yet faced now with 
a decreasing number of applicants for 
medical school. Not only has the actual 
number of applicants been decreasing re- 
cently, but, more seriously, the quality has 
decreased as well. For example, at present 
between the University of Virginia and the 
Medical College of Virginia the list of 
well-qualified candidates from Virginia is 
exhausted each year. 

We are actively making an effort to at- 
tract more able high school and college 



'Kirk. Grayson L.: Martin Memorial Lecture, 
before Amer. Coll. Surgeons, Monday. Oct. 31. 
1955. 



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13 



IN DIABETES MELLITUS: 

New clinical reports raise hopeful questions: 



Can an adequate 



high-protein, low-fat diet 



HIGHLIGHTS OF CLINICAL REPORTS 12 

SCOPE OF STUDY. Approximately 200 patients with diabetes mellitus 
were followed clinically for nearly two years. In addition, laboratory 
studies were done on 25 of the 200 patients, selected at random. 
BASIC PROGRAM. As outlined by Lowenstein, his program employs 
four lines of defense: (1) a prescribed diet of high-protein, low-fat 
content, fortified by gelatin and brewers' yeast, and divided into 6 
feedings; (2) Entozyme tablets, to assure full protein digestion and 
assimilation; (3) a "reasonable" degree of hyperglycemia, permissi- 
ble or actually encouraged; (4) insulin, as necessary to prevent aceto- 
nuria, or to correct it if it occurs. 

DIETARY PRINCIPLES. All of the Lowenstein diets, from 1500 to 2500 
calories, contain a minimum of 125 Gm. of protein, and a maximum 
of 45 Gm. of fat. Caloric differences are made up in carbohydrate. 

CLINICAL RESULTS. "Marked" improvement was manifest in all 200 
patients. A number of patients previously unemployable because of 
their diabetes returned to work. Cases of diabetic acidosis declined 
from 23 to 3 in before-and-after 2-year periods. 
Of the 93 patients controlled by insulin at the start of the study, all 
noted "significant" decreases in insulin requirements. In 48, it was 
possible to discontinue insulin altogether, "without complications." 
No cases of diabetic neuritis developed. Susceptibility to infection 
proved "no greater" than among non-diabetics. No new cases of reti- 
nitis developed. 

LABORATORY FINDINGS. Among 25 patients subjected to laboratory 
tests, 10 had "significant" albuminuria at the start of the study. 
After 1 year, 2 cases showed traces only. 

Serum cholesterol levels dropped to normal in all cases in which they 
had been elevated at the start of the study. 



Lowenstein, B. E 
Washington, D.C. 
Lowenstein, B. E. 



.: Report presented before Southern Medical Association, 
Nov. 12-15, 1956. 
American Pract. & Digest Treat. 7:1465. 1956. 



Available on request: Copies of Lowenstein report, together 
with sample menu plan and instructions to patients. 



o 



augmented by ElltOZyiTie 



COMPREHENSIVE DIGESTIVE ENZYME REPLACEMENT 



lead to general clinical improvement? 



reduce the incidence of diabetic complications'? 



reduce the requirement for exogenous insulin? 



In a preliminary report on 25 cases, pub- 
lished in American Practitioner and Digest 
of Treatment (September, 1956), and in a 
more comprehensive report on 200 cases, 
presented at the Washington Meeting of the 
Southern Medical Association (November, 
1956), Lowenstein submitted significant 
answers to these questions. The highlights 
of his study are briefly reviewed at the left. 

What clinical results were achieved under 
Lowenstein's diet-plus-Entozyme regimen? 

"Marked" clinical improvement in all 200 
cases 1 ... reduction of insulin require- 
ments in 48.4% of insulin-controlled 
group 1 . . . discontinuance of insulin en- 
tirely in 51.6% of insulin-controlled group. 1 



Is Entozyme an insulin substitute? 

No. It is a replacement of natural digestive 
secretions, releasing 250 mg. of pepsin in 
the stomach from its gastric-soluble coat- 
ing, and 300 mg. of pancreatin and 150 mg. 
of bile salts in the upper intestine, from its 
enteric-coated core. 

What role does Entozyme play in the treat- 
ment of diabetes mellitus? 

It is suggested that, by promoting full diges- 
tion and absorption of protein, Entozyme 
helps to make available the full metabolic 
activity of protein, aids in restoring nitro- 
gen balance, and encourages the pancre- 
atic islet cells to secrete insulin in greater 
amounts. 1 



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16 



THE SCARAB 



students into medicine. To do this, not 
only must the student be "sold" on medi- 
cine but there must be some way found to 
supplement the resources of the individual 
applicant through scholarships or other- 
wise. Financial ability is a highly undesir- 
able selection factor. We have no data on 
how many able individuals never start 
medicine because of lack of money. 

Before talking about finances, however, 
let us consider facilities, including curricu- 
lum. As you are now beginning to see, 
these various areas are interrelated and in- 
terdependent in a very intimate and com- 
plicated way. I hope at this point you do 
not feel like Alice in Wonderland and 
think that this maze is just a pack of cards 
— a stacked one at that. Adequate facilities 
are needed to attract faculty and to permit 
the education of increased numbers of stu- 
dents and teachers. 

Curriculum has been included under the 
general area of facilities. As mentioned 
earlier, today's medical education requires 
laboratories and bedsides and patients. The 
new facts, tools, and methods in medical 
science are accumulating at a staggering 
rate and this mass threatens to inundate 
the educational effort. Educators are pres- 



ently wrestling with possible solutions of 
this problem. We can no longer cram the 
accumulated knowledge of the past ten 
years into the same curriculum that took 
the same four years to be effective then. 
Much minutia has been eliminated and 
today much attention is devoted to teach- 
ing basic principles rather than detailed 
facts. 

This flood has had its beneficial effect 
on education. It has made the measure of 
success of the medical school's effort the 
degree to which the graduating student 
has learned to use his mind rather than 
what he has been able to store in it during 
medical school days. 

The supply of teaching material is being 
significantly decreased by a changing socio- 
economic world. The upheaval in medi- 
cal economics, brought about by health 
insurance and increased numbers of hos- 
pitals, is making the so-called ward patient 
a vanishing thing. The increased interest 
and knowledge about medicine among lay 
people today, as well as the quality of 
medical schools in general, is probably 
responsible for the observation among a 
majority of physicians that most patients 
not only recognize the role they must play- 



as teaching material but also are enthusias- 
tic about it and feel they gain thereby. 

One other matter related to medical 
school teaching: specialization has been a 
natural outgrowth of the accumulation of 
medical knowledge. No one mind can 
comprehend all. The fact that it possibly 
could fifty years ago attests only to the 
meagerness of real scientific fact at that 
time. This change makes the part that the 
general physician must play even more 
essential. We need both the specialist and 
the generalist. In today's overwhelmingly 
heavy undergraduate curriculum there is 
time only for the teaching of fundamental 
fact and basic principle and for the culti- 
vating of understanding. 

The changing character of practice ap- 
pears to be not only a natural outgrowth 
of the accumulation of knowledge but to 
result perhaps even more from changing 
social customs, politico-economic evolution 
and modern communication. The horse 
and buggy have been replaced by the 
Jaguar, the family doctor by the group, 
the twenty-four-hour, seven-day-week by 
the every-other-night, every-other-weekend 
off call. Yet medical education today has 
as its central theme teaching through con- 



SITUATED ON HISTORIC MONUMENT AVENUE 

RICHMOND 20, VIRGINIA 

• A.M.A., American College of Surgeons 

• Virginia Hospital Assn. approval for general rotating internships 

• Participate in National Intern Matching Program 

• Complete Clinical & Bacteriologic Labs — Full time Pathologist 

• School of Nursing with Nat'l. Accrediting Service Approval 

• Medical, Surgical, Obstetrical and Pediatric Departments 



MAY, 1957 



17 



tact of students with patient and the many 
facets of the patient's problem considered 
in the educational process make the term 
"comprehensive medicine'' most appropri- 
ate. Fifty years ago the student contacted 
only the professor. 

Finally, to finances. Much of this need 
has already become obvious to you. Al- 



though medical schools are better support- 
ed today than at any time in history, their 
operating costs have greatly increased. It 
takes money — more money than now avail- 
able — to attract and hold faculty, to in- 
crease enrollment, to assume the necessary 
responsibility for the creation of new ideas 
and the incorporation of these new con- 



The Jamestown 

350tn Anniversary 

Historical Booklets 

Twenty-three authoritative booklets of exact and scholarly information 
on the history of Virginia during the Jamestown era compose this series. 
Each book is written by a specialist in his field and the series is edited by 
Dr. E. G. Swem. librarian emeritus of the College of William and Mary. 
Here is the list of titles and authors: 



1. A Selected Bibliography of Vir- 
ginia, 1607-1699- By E. G. Swem, 
John M. Jennings and James A. 
Servies. 

2. A Virginia Chronology, 1585-1785. 
By William W. Abbot. 

3. John Smith's Map of Virginia, with 
a Brief Account of its History. 

By Ben C. McCary. 

4. The Three Charters of the Vir- 
ginia Company of London, with 
Seven Related Documents: 1606- 
1621. Introduction by Samuel M. 
Bemiss. 

5. The Virginia Company of London. 
1606-1624. 

By Wesley Frank Craven. 

6. The First Seventeen Years, Vir- 
ginia, 1607-1624. 

By Charles E. Hatch, Jr 

7. Virginia under Charles I and Crom- 
well, 1625-1660. 

By Wilcomb E. Washburn. 

8. Bacon's Rebellion, 1676. 

By Thomas J. Wertenbaker. 

9. Struggle Against Tyranny and the 
Beginning of a New Era, Virginia, 
1677-1699- By Richard L. Morton. 

10. Religious Life of Virginia in the 
Seventeenth Century. 

By George MacLaren Brydon. 

11. Virginia Architecture in the Seven- 
teenth Century. 

By Henry Chandlee Forman. 



12. Mother Earth — Land Grants in Vir- 
ginia, 1607-1699. 

By W. Stitt Robinson, Jr. 

13. The Bounty of the Chesapeake; 
Fishing in Colonial Virginia. 

By James Wharton. 

14. Agriculture in Virginia, 1607-1699- 
By Lyman Carrier. 

15. Reading, Writing and Arithmetic in 
Virginia, 1607-1699- 

By Susie M. Ames. 

16. The Government of Virginia in the 
Seventeenth Century. 

By Thomas J. Wertenbaker. 

17. Domestic Life in Virginia in the 
Seventeenth Century. 

By Annie Lash Jester. 

18. Indians in Seventeenth-Century Vir- 
ginia. Bv Ben C. McCary. 

19. How Justice Grew. Virginia Coun- 
ties. By Martha W. Hiden. 

20. Tobacco in Colonial Virginia; "The 
Sovereign Remedy." 

By Melvin Herndon. 

21. Medicine in Virginia, 1607-1699- 
By Thomas P. Hughes. 

22. Some Notes on Shipbuilding and 
Shipping in Colonial Virginia. 

By Cerinda W. Evans. 

23. A Pictorial Booklet on Early James- 
town Commodities and Industries. 
By J. Paul Hudson. 



PRICE 50« EACH 
Complete set in ottractive shelf box — $11.50 

Order of your Dealer or direct of 

GARRETT & MASSIE, INC., Sales Agent 
P. O. Box, 1837, Richmond, Virginia 




•1, 1607-1957 ^ 



cepts into the curriculum, to prevent the 
obsolescence of the physical plant. In sum- 
mary, the entire ongoing of the effort de- 
pends on increased financial support. 

Many groups have entered into this pic- 
ture. The number and variety attest to the 
increasing recognition over a broad area of 
the importance of the endeavor. Wealthy 
private foundations, like Ford, Rockefel- 
ler, Commonwealth Fund, Hill, Kellogg, 
to name but a few, are bearing a major 
load. Such organizations as the American 
Cancer Society and the American Heart 
Association devote a portion of their funds 
to the support of medical education in gen- 
eral, in addition to the highly significant 
indirect support through research grants. 

In Virginia, particularly, many individ- 
uals have been gratifyingly generous with 
their own private funds. 

State governments, as mentioned, bear 
a varying amount of the cost of half of 
the schools. In Virginia this amounts only 
to one-third of the cost of operation at 
both the Medical College of Virginia and 
the University of Virginia medical schools. 

Industry, now including over 40% of 
the 500 top corporations, has organized 
the National Fund for Medical Education 
and is increasing its contributions yearly 
to all the individual medical schools. They 
promote, as do all who give support, 
the following broad objectives: 5 (1) to 
strengthen the nation's ability to survive 
by training a sufficient corps of skilled men 
and women to care for the people's health 
and medical needs; (2) to interpret the 
needs of medical education to the Ameri- 
can public; (3) to increase the develop- 
ment and advancement of constantly im- 
proving standards in medical education ; 
and (4) to preserve academic freedom for 
medical education. 

The National Fund is based on the 
premise that the key to effectiveness in this 
entire establishment which is responsible 
for the health of our nation is medical 
education; personnel, facilities, research, 
leadership, and standard of practice — all 
depend on the quality of training offered 
by our compact network of medical 
schools. 

The American Medical Education Foun- 
dation, organized medicine's counterpart 
of the National Fund, is similarly dedi- 
cated and contributing. 

By virtue of the inseparability of medi- 
cal teaching and medical research, the 



18 



6 National Fund for Medical Education, Inc. 
By Laws, Article I, Sec. 1. 



THE SCARAB 



Federal government, through its research 
grants but also in some measure through 
graduate teaching grants, is aiding ma- 
terially in maintaining our schools. With 
the present magnitude of faculty financial 
problems, it requires constant will power 
on the part of the administration to resist 
the temptation to support faculty out of 
such grants for research. 

To summarize the objectives of the 
modern medical school as I see them, I 
paraphrase the creed of the school in 
which I received my education, as follows : 
founded in the faith that men are ennobled 
by understanding; dedicated to the ad- 
vancement of medical science and to as- 
suring the application of these advances 
to medical practice through the education 
of students; devoted to the development 
in students of sound, critical thinking in 
an environment of scientific understand- 
ing. 

I have also sketched the present status of 
our enterprise. I say "our enterprise" be- 
cause medical education today is not a 
function of the college or the profession 
alone, but a function of modern civiliza- 
tion in which the entire community is vital- 
ly interested and concerned. What knowl- 



edge shall be perpetuated and brought to 
bear on the patient, the soundness of the 
attitudes of the physician and his ethical 
and professional principles are all deter- 
mined primarily by the medical school. 
The President's Commission on the Health 
Needs of the Nation 6 stated it this way: 
"Many of us who take for granted the 
tremendous victories won by medical sci- 
ence against the deadliest killers of only a 
generation ago often overlook one crucial 
fact — all of these advances would have 
been impossible without our modern sys- 
tem of education for physicians and other 
health personnel." 



"Building America's Health. Findings and 
Recommendations, 1:11. 

A Report to the President by the President's 
Commission on the Health Needs of the Na- 
tion. 1:11. 



Research 

(Continued from page 7 ) 

tein utilization, retinal burns, peritonitis, 
renal function, nutritional problems, anti- 
biotics and endocrine studies including 



adrenal, thyroid, thymus, and pineal. 
Members of the Department of Medi- 
cine, Department of Dietetics and De- 
partment of Biochemistry have worked 
in close collaboration with the Depart- 
ment of Surgery in these research en- 
deavors. 

In addition to the burn projects, re- 
search is now gaining headway in the 
general field of the neural control of en- 
docrine function under the direction of 
Dr. David Hume, Professor of Surgery. 
Both clinical and laboratory investigations 
will be aimed at an elucidation of en- 
docrine mechanisms in three broad cate- 
gories. First, the neuro-endocrine response 
to injury, its functional adequacy in vari- 
ous types of trauma, and its advantages or 
disadvantages to the patient. Secondly, the 
etiology and treatment of psychosomatic 
disease possibly related to imbalance in 
the vegetative neural or neuro-endocrine 
function; i.e.. peptic ulcer and hyperten- 
sion, and lastly, the relationship of the 
endocrine glands to cancer, particularly 
cancer of the breast, thyroid, and adrenal. 
These studies have been supported by 
grants from the Commonwealth Fund and 
the National Institutes of Health. Dr. 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 

HOSPITAL DIVISION 

Medical College of Virginia Hospital 
Memorial Hospital 

Dooley Hospital 

Saint Philip Hospital 

Ennion G. Williams Hospital 

(Operated jointly with the State Health Department) 

A. D. Williams Memorial Clinic 

(Outpatient Department) 



To preserve and restore health To seek the cause and cure of disease 

To educate those who would serve humanity 



MAY, 1957 



19 



Hume has been granted $20,000.00 to 
study the blood ACTH levels in experi- 
mental animals and in surgical patients 
after trauma, anesthesia and other stimuli 
to corticortrophin secretion. Projected for 
the future, the Surgical Department will 
be concerned with a consideration of the 
immunological mechanisms involved in 
homotransplant rejection. Two of the ul- 
timate goals of this research will be at- 
tempts to find means of stimulating an 
antibody response to rumor cells, a method 
of cancer control, and an attenuation of 
individual's specific protein antibody re- 
sponse to permit organ homotransplanta- 
tion. The obvious therapeutic benefit of 
such research can be readily appreciated. 

The Department of Psychiatry and 
Neurology, whose chairman is Dr. Fin- 
ley Gayle, Jr., is engaged in clinical ex- 
periments with drug therapy. Clinical test- 
ing of drugs used in the treatment of al- 
coholism and ataraxic drugs in the treat- 
ment of obsessive-compulsive states are 
emphasized at present. 

In the Department of Urology, under 
the leadership of Dr. A. I. Dodson, a five 
year project is underway on the role that 
ureteral calculi play in the causation of 
urinary disturbances and the best method 



of treatment. This research is carried on 
by the staff members in the Department 
of Urology and it is primarily a clinical 
study in the Richmond area. 

In close collaboration with the Depart- 
ment of Psychology and Neurology, the 
Department of Neurological Science un- 
der the chairmanship of Dr. Ebbe Hoff is 
carrying out several important investiga- 
tions. Dr. Joseph F. Kell, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Neurological Surgery and Re- 
search Associate in Neurological Science, is 
studying changes in the autonomic nervous 
system secondary to brain damage from 
trauma and tumors, and the effects of these 
changes in the production of pathologic 
physiology in other organs and organ sys- 
tems. In addition, Dr. Hoff has had re- 
search support since 1947 from the United 
States Navy in excess of $159,000.00 to 
study the cerebral regulation of the auto- 
nomic nervous system. During this ten 
year period, he has trained many young 
men. Another important research project 
supported by the National Institutes of 
Health with Dr. E. C. Hoff as principal 
investigator has been an investigation of 
the cerebral cortical autonomic mecha- 
nisms. 

Since 1929 under Dr. William Branch 



Porter, Professor of Medicine, and now 
being carried on by Dr. Harry Walk- 
er, Acting Professor of Medicine, the 
Department of Medicine has had many 
years of active research programs. Dr. 
Porter's two fields of particular interest 
were cardiovascular pulmonary disease, 
and disorders of the blood forming tis- 
sues. Today these two disciplines are still 
areas of active research. His able guidance 
initiated investigation in arthritis, bac- 
terial and viral diseases, renal physiology, 
and tissue culture. The research programs 
for the entire medical school owed much 
to his foresight and planning. 

Dr. John L. Patterson, Associate Profes- 
sor of Medicine, has had research grants 
from the United States Navy since 1953 
to carry out studies on the dynamics of 
the circulation and mechanisms of cir- 
culatory adjustments under normal and 
abnormal conditions. Dr. Patterson has 
also been studying the effects of acid-base 
balance on cerebral and extremity blood 
flow with a research grant from the Na- 
tional Institutes of Health. He is studying 
early pulmonary air way obstruction on a 
grant-in-aid from the American Medical 
Association. In the area of cardiovascular 
diseases, Dr. Reno Porter, Associate Pro- 



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'.0 



THE SCARAB 



fessor of Medicine, directs research pri- 
marily involved with a study of the hemo- 
dynamic effects of digitalis on normal and 
hypervolemic dogs. 

Arthritis and the connective tissue dis- 
eases, a rapidly expanding research field, 
has had active support from the United 
States Public Health Service and the Ar- 
thritis and Rheumatism Foundation. The 
major research activity in this area is be- 
ing conducted by Dr. John Vaughan, As- 
sistant Professor of Medicine, who has re- 
ceived research grants for the last two years 
to study the anti-arthritis factor (A.A.). 
Recently he received a research grant in 
collaboration with Dr. Robert Q. Marston 
to study biochemical changes in leukocytes 
by immune reactions. Working with him 
in this project are Dr. Richard Dutton, a 
physician and biochemist, and Dr. Anne 
Dutton, his wife, also a biochemist. Dr. 
and Mrs. Dutton are from London, Eng- 
land and will spend the next eighteen 
months here at the Medical College of 
Virginia. Dr. Robert Q. Marston, Assistant 
Professor of Medicine and a John and 
Mary R. Markle Scholar in Medical Sci- 
ences, has received a United States Public 
Health Service Research Grant to investi- 
gate the susceptibility of human leukocytes 
to viral infections. Available for these 
studies are funds of over $50,000.00. 

Dr. E. Lovell Becker, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Medicine and also a John and Mary 
R. Markle Scholar in Medical Sciences, 
has a primary interest in renal physiology 
and is developing a renal and electrolyte 
laboratory. He has recently been awarded 
a United States Air Force Contract to 
study renal function and red cell produc- 
tion in dogs rendered polycythemic with 
cobalt. In addition to this research project, 
he has investigations supported by the 
Virginia Heart Association for the evalu- 
ation of the rate of renal tubular transport 
of inorganic sulphate in the normal man 
and a grant from the American Medical 
Association to study the transport of cer- 
tain dyes in the cat fish renal tubule. For 
this research, he has approximately $18,- 
000.00 in grants-in-aid. 

In the field of hematology proper, Dr. 
G. Watson James, III, Associate Professor 
of Medicine, has received research grants 
from the National Institutes of Health to 
study stercobilin synthesis and erythro- 
poiesis. Working with him in the Labora- 
tory for Clinical Investigation is Dr. John 
H. Moon, United States Public Health 
Service Research Fellow, who has received 
a grant to study the dynamics of red cell 

MAY, 1957 



life span in various hemolytic anemias 
by multiple tagging of the erythrocytes 
with radioactive chromium and heavy 
nitrogen. Dr. James has a research grant 
from the National Vitamin Foundation 
to investigate the vitamin B-12 growth 
activity of P. stipihita in human leukemia. 
He is collaborating with Dr. Lynn D. 
Abbott, Jr. in this study conducted both 
in basic as well as clinical investigation. 
These investigators have an interest in 
developing a fuller utilization of protozoa 
(unicellular animals) for biochemical 
study as tools for clinical investigation. 

Dr. Stuart Ragland, Jr., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Medicine, was recently awarded 
a National Institutes of Health Research 
Grant to study the relationship of small 
intestinal mucosa hexokinase to carbo- 
hydrate absorption in burned and pine- 
alectomised rats. 

Dr. Allan M. Unger, formerly an A. D. 
Williams' Research Fellow in Medicine, 
is associated with Dr. E. Lovell Becker in 
the Division of Renal and Electrolytes 
Studies in the Department of Medicine, 
and has two major projects. One of Dr. 
Unger's primary interests has been in the 



study of patients hemodialyzed with the 
artificial kidney. Dr. Richard Kirkland, 
Assistant Professor of Medicine, also 
works with Dr. Unger in this activity. 
In collaboration with Dr. David Richard- 
son, Chief of the Cardiovascular Section 
of McGuire Veterans Hospital, a study of 
the anti-hypertensive drugs has been car- 
ried out. The investigators will study the 
changes in cardiac output, coronary blood 
flow, glomerular filtration rate, renal blood 
flow, and other adjustments occurring in 
the anti-hypertensive drug treatment. 

Cancer research programs primarily un- 
der the directorship of Dr. Louis Leone, 
Assistant Professor of Medicine, have 
their major effort at the present time in 
a study of some aspects of the protolytic 
and anti-protolytic mechanisms in malig- 
nant disease. Dr. Susan Mellette, a United 
States Public Health Fellow, has been work- 
ing with Dr. Leone in this investigation. 
Dr. Leone also has a research grant to 
study fibrinolysis in the carcinoma of the 
prostate. The total amount available for 
these investigations is $25,000.00. Drs. 
Leone and James have recently received a 
United States Public Health Service Grant 







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to study the effects of myleran and chlo- 
rambucil, two alkylating drugs, in the 
chronic leukemias, multiples myeloma, and 
in far advanced malignancy of the lung 
and breast. This is a cooperative program 
with seven other medical schools in the 
southeastern United States. 

Aside from the clinical research activ- 
ities, there are the increasingly important 
aspects of teaching and training carried 
on through training grants. In the De- 
partment of Surgery, Dr. B. W. Haynes, 
Jr., is the responsible investigator for 
training in military and disaster medicine 
and has received a total of $13,500.00 
under the Medical Education for National 
Defense. In the Department of Medi- 
cine, a training grant has recently been 
awarded to Dr. Elam C. Toone and Dr. 
John Vaughan to carry out a cooperative 
study on the physiology and pathology of 
the connective tissue diseases. This grad- 
uate training grant enables investigators 
in the various disciplines of medicine to 
work together on seminar programs and 
enables them to invite guest speakers to 
the Medical College for teaching to the 
house staff and students. In the field of 
cardiovascular diseases, the teaching pro- 
grams have been under the direction of 
Dr. Reno Porter and in the last eight 
years funds in excess of $154,000.00 have 
been available for the cardiovascular teach- 
ing program from the National Institutes 
of Health. Used primarily for undergrad- 
uate teaching, the expenditures offer teach- 
ing aids as well as the establishment of 
undergraduate training programs. The 
Virginia Heart Association has awarded 



the Medical College of Virginia a cardio- 
vascular teaching fellowship in clinical 
medicine. The present recipient of this 
award is Dr. H. Page Mauck, Jr., who 
is conducting studies in cardiovascular dis- 
orders under Dr. Porter's immediate di- 
rectorship. There is an undergraduate can- 
cer teaching grant formerly under the 
directorship of Dr. Arthur Gathright and 
now principally conducted by Dr. Louis 
Leone. This undergraduate teaching pro- 
gram in cancer has been supported by 
funds in excess of $210,000.00 over a 
period of the last eight years. 

A training grant program has been 
given in the amount of $3,600.00 to the 
Department of Ophthalmology in the 
School of Medicine by the Titmus Eye 
Foundation to Dr. Marion C. Waddell 
for the purpose of enabling him to con- 
tinue his education and training recogni- 
tion and treatment of diseases of the eye. 
Closely associated with teaching pro- 
grams, research money and contracts have 
been available to members of the faculty 
of the Medical College of Virginia for 
the purpose of recording historical events 
in the field of medicine. Dr. Ebbe C. 
Hoff, Professor of Neurological Science, 
has had a United States Army Contract 
to write a history of the preventive medi- 
cine in World War II. This grant which 
commenced in July 1, 1955 has been ex- 
tended through June 30, 1957 in the total 
amount of $16,919.00. It replaced a sim- 
ilar contract which extended from August, 
1948 to 1955 and there has been a total 
authorized expenditure of $76,465.00 for 
this purpose. 



Compliments 
of 

Richmond Memorial 
Hospital 



22 



A History of the 45th General Hospital 
in World War II is being written by Dr. 
Alton D. Brashear, Professor of Anatomy. 
Undertaken as a memorial volume to the 
late Dr. John Powell Williams, Professor 
of Clinical Medicine at the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, and former Chief of 
Medical Service of the 45th General Hos- 
pital, this work will complete the record 
of contributions made by the Medical 
College of Virginia during both World 
Wars. The work traces the evolution of the 
45th General Hospital from its predeces- 
sor in World War I, Base Hospital 45, 
to the termination of the affiliated agree- 
ment by the Department of the Army 
during May of 1953. 

In narrative style, a detailed account 
of the active service of the 45th General 
Hospital with the humorous as well as 
serious aspects of two and a half years 
duty in the United States, Africa, and 
Italy is included. Supported in part by a 
nominal grant from a private source with 
clerical assistance furnished by the Medi- 
cal College of Virginia, this work is ex- 
pected to be ready for publication during 
the spring of 1957. 

Training and teaching grants have been 
made available to Dr. Herbert W. Park, 
Chairman of the Department of Physical 
Medicine, for the purposes of training 
in rehabilitation medicine and teaching in 
the field of physical therapy. Authorized 
for this investigation is about $14,000.00. 
To stimulate interest in investigative 
medicine, the United States Public Health 
Service has over the last three years 
awarded to the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia part-time student research fellow- 
ships. In 1954, four such awards were 
made; in 1955, six; and in 1956, eight 
awards. The total amount has been over 
$10,000.00. The purpose of this money 
is to stimulate the interest of medical 
students during their pre-clinical and 
clinical years toward research. Many valu- 
able preliminary investigations have been 
accomplished by the sophomore, junior, 
and senior medical students under this 
program. 

Dr. Henry Kupfer, Professor of Clinical 
Pathology, and Dr. Nelson Young, Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Biochemistry, of the 
Department of Clinical Pathology have 
received over the last three years an 
Atomic Energy Commission research grant 
to study the treatment of the damaging 
effect of irradiation on antibody forma- 
tion ability of rabbits injected with sheep 
red blood cells. This study which has been 

THE SCARAB 



extended to include platelets has had an 
authorized expenditure of $33,900.00. 

In the School of Dentistry, there is an 
ever increasing amount of clinical and 
basic research. Under the directorship of 
Dr. Holmes T. Knighton, Professor of 
Dentistry and Bacteriology, the Depart- 
ment of Dental Research has carried out 
a research program studying the reaction 
of the dental pulps to filling materials. 
Techniques for the preparation of cavities 
and the restoration in molar teeth of rats 
and the reaction of the pulp tissue to the 
filling material during various periods of 
time are being studied. Associated with 
this investigation, the bacteriostatic effect 
of various cement and acrylic filling ma- 
terials is also being investigated. This 
project has been supported by the L. D. 
Caulk Company of Milford, Delaware, 
manufacturers of dental materials. Dr. 
George W. Burke, Associate Professor of 
Operative Dentistry and Assistant Profes- 
sor of Anatomy, Dr. O. W. Clough, Pro- 
fessor of Operative Dentistry and Oral 
Anatomy, and Dr. Knighton are the chief 
investigators. Ultrasonic dental units have 
been recently loaned to the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia School of Dentistry by 
the Cavitron Equipment Corporation and 
the Ritter Company. Studies are underway 



in regard to the possible dental pulp and 
periodontal tissue reactions following use 
of ultrasonic dental units for preparation 
of cavities. Dr. John Salley, Assistant 
Professor of Pathology and of Dentistry, 
working in close collaboration with the 
Department of Pathology of the School 
of Medicine, has been studying the effect 
of whole tobacco smoke on oral tissues. 
This work has been supported by $13,- 
000.00 grant from the United States Army. 
By the means of a specially designed ma- 
chine, cigarette smoke is applied to the 
lips and oral mucosa of mice and ham- 
sters. So far no adverse findings either 
grossly or microscopically have been noted 
on the tissues of these animals. The in- 
vestigators feel that the washing action 
of the tongue and saliva is an important 
factor in the rapid removal of the tobacco 
tars from the site of contact. A companion 
project supported by the Damon Runyon 
Fund for Cancer Research is a study of 
the early action of carcinogenic hydro- 
carbons on the oral epithelium. This in- 
vestigation, aimed at observing the tissue 
changes before tumor formation begins, 
is done in the hamster whose cheek pouch 
can be studied in the living state when it 
is spread on a microscopic stage. This 
unique procedure may shed more light on 



some of the subtle changes occurring be- 
fore the chemically treated epithelial cells 
undergo malignant transformation. This 
research is also under the directorship of 
Dr. J. J. Salley. 

Although extensively used for nearly 
15 years by dental researchers, the grow- 
ing use of the hamster in dental research 
requires need for more knowledge of its 
nutritional requirements. In order to gain 
a clearer understanding of the funda- 
mental biological nature of this valuable 
animal the importance of diet cannot be 
over emphasized, particularly in caries and 
periodontal studies. The Department of 
Dental Research has begun preliminary 
investigation with a totally synthetic diet 
for the hamster. This study has been 
supported by the A. D. Williams' Fund 
of the Medical College of Virginia with 
Dr. J. J. Salley as the chief investigator. 

Similar to the programs in the School 
of Medicine, the Department of Health 
Education and Welfare of the U.S.P.H.S. 
has allocated funds to the School of Den- 
tistry to support part-time research fellow- 
ships for four dental students. This is to 
stimulate their interest in dental research 
and into the academic aspects of dentistry. 
Dr. Holmes Knighton holds the chief re- 
sponsibility for the undergraduate cancer 



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23 



training grant for dental students. Since 
October, 1948 to the present time, a total 
of $41,157.00 has been authorized for 
expenditure to train undergraduate dental 
students in cancer detection and therapy. 
In the School of Pharmacy, an active 
research program in the various phases of 
pharmaceutical chemistry is underway. 
Dr. Linwood Payne, graduate assistant in 
Chemistry, Dr. W. E. Weaver, Professor 
of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemis- 
try, and Dr. J. D. Smith, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry, have been preparing 
basic ethers derived from 2,2-diphenyl- 
ethanol. These compounds were prepared 
for testing by the Department of Phar- 
macology. In collaboration with the De- 
partment of Pharmacology, Mr. B. F. 
Franko, and Dr. J. K. Finnegan, Associate 
Professor of Pharmacology, have carried 
out the preliminary testing for local an- 
esthetic, antihistaminic, anti-spasmotic, and 
ganglionic blocking activity of these com- 
pounds. The same investigators have pre- 
pared 8-alkoxycaffeines and their related 
sulfur and nitrogen analogs and also a 
number of related tetraalykl uric acids. 
These compounds are being tested for 
anticancer activity by the Cancer Chemo- 
therapy National Service Center. Other 
work relative to cancer chemotherapy is 



being conducted by Dr. Robert Beamer, 
graduate assistant in Chemistry, Dr. W. 
E. Weaver, and Dr. J. D. Smith. These 
investigations concern the preparation of 
compounds related DDD and are to be 
tested for activity in causing atrophy of 
the adrenal cortex and also the prepara- 
tion of sulfur compounds related to nitro- 
gen mustard for testing against certain 
forms of cancer. Drs. Smith, W. R. May- 
nard. Jr., and Miles E. Hench, Associate 
Professor of Clinical Bacteriology in the 
Department of Clinical Pathology, are 
involved in an investigation on the prep- 
aration and testing of compounds related 
to para-amino salicylic acid for activity 
against the tubercle bacillus. Dr. Hench 
has also carried out in vitro and in vivo 
tests on a number of these compounds. 
He is supported in this work by the A. D. 
Williams' Fund. 

One of the principal research efforts 
in pharmaceutical chemistry has been a 
study of the derivatives of 1-amino-gam- 
ma-cyanobutyric acid. The aim is to study 
an approach to the synthesis of ovnithine 
and some of its peptide derivatives. Peni- 
cillin-amides are projected as likely modi- 
fications of penicillin that will make it 
more stable in the presence of enzymes 
like penicillinase. Dr. Walter H. Hartung, 



Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 
and Dr. L. Neelakanton, graduate student 
in the School of Pharmacy, have been in- 
vestigating the 1-oximino acids and their 
various derivatives as well as the hydro- 
xylamino acids. The latter, little known 
compounds, are being prepared in order 
to permit a comparison of their biological 
properties with the natural amino acids. 
Dr. Hartung in association with Dr. Dom- 
inick A. Coviello have been preparing 
pressor amines and 1-oxemino acids and 
their conversion by the Bischler-Napier- 
alski reaction into isoquinaline analogs 
of some of the naturally occurring alka- 
loids. 

In the Department of Biology and 
Genetics in the School of Pharmacy, a 
number of research investigations are be- 
ing carried out by Dr. R. D. Hughes, 
Professor of Biology, and his associates. 
The first of these is a review of the fam- 
ily anoetidae (Acarina). This study deals 
with the biology, tasonomy, and speciation 
of a little known group of mites. It is basic 
research and its significance is that it will 
serve as a base line for further studies in 
the evolution of sex determination and 
speciation of the mite. Also, the genetics 
of the anomaly "contracted pelvis" in mice 
is being studied and the Pelger-Huet 




THE SCARAB 



anomaly of the leukocytes in man are 
being actively investigated. Dr. B. L. 
Hanna, an A. D. Williams' Fellow, has 
been studying hair pigment concentration 
and the biochemistry of pigmentation in 
the human. A long range investigation 
of twins is intended to elucidate growth 
patterns in dento-facial characteristics. The 
workers in this field are Mrs. Marion 
Waller, Instructor in Medical Technology 
and in Clinical Pathology, Dr. James E. 
Mclver, Associate Professor of Orthodon- 
tics, Miss Mary Ellen Macdonals, Re- 
search Assistant, Department of Biology 
and Genetics, Dr. B. L. Hanna, Assistant 
Professor of Biology, Jack Boger, Volun- 
tary Research Associate, Department of 
Biology and Genetics, and Dr. R. D. 
Hughes, Professor of Biology. 

Although no active clinical or basic re- 
search programs are being conducted in 
the School of Nursing, they have had 
investigative efforts in two general areas. 
One study has been related to the basic 
curriculum offered in university schools 
of nursing. Included in the study were the 
state universities of Washington, Arkan- 
sas, Texas, Missouri, North Carolina, and 
Virginia. It was found that the total num- 
ber of credit hours required for gradua- 
tion varied slightly in the degree pro- 
grams. The Medical College of Virginia 
program was exceeded only by the Uni- 
versity of Washington in this aspect of 
curriculum. Research studies at the Uni- 
versity of Washington have led to the 
evaluation of nursing practice in the terms 
of credit hours and the credit hours are 
included in the grant total. It is the opin- 
ion of the investigator. Miss Sybil Mac- 
Lean, Dean of the School of Nursing, that 
each school of nursing should conduct 
this type of research study in order to 
put a value on nursing practice as a 



laboratory experience and to insure con- 
trolled skillful practice. 

The second area of interest investigated 
by the faculty of the School of Nursing 
answered the question with a fair degree 
of accuracy, "Are the graduates of the 
classes of 1953, 54, 55 engaged in the 
practice of nursing?" It was found that 
the employment activities of the gradu- 
ates who answered the questionnaire in- 
cluded ten types of positions in nursing 
and more than one-third of the nurses 
were engaged in hospital nursing as staff 
or head nurses. Such a record and such 
academic studies as regards the develop- 
ment of the school and the placing of 
personnel constitute a valuable facet to 
the overall health program conducted in 
the Medical College of Virginia. 

One can see that the admonition of 
Cardinal Newman is well appreciated by 
the faculty and students of the four schools 
of the Medical College of Virginia. Al- 
though to many the basic research and the 
monetary expenditures may seem a dichot- 
omy to the results achieved, it is only 
through persistence, analysis, observation, 
and induction, that these footpaths of 
medical science can be broadened to gain 
the ultimate benefits. It is hoped that the 
Medical College of Virginia in its research 
activities will add some important frag- 
ments to the ever increasing knowledge 
of disease. 



Deans' Page 

(Continued jrom page 11) 

were sent at their request. Not only pro- 
spective student nurses inquired about op- 
portunities for study offered at the Col- 
lege. Miss Downs answered questions 



concerning requirements for admission to 
other schools and departments, notably 
pharmacy, physical therapy, medical tech- 
nology, x-ray technology, and in a few 
instances, medicine and dentistry. 

The following is a list of schools vis- 
ited: 

High School & Area 
Turner Ashby. Dayton, Va. 
Handley, Winchester, Va. 
James Wood and Clarke County, Cul- 
peper, Va. 
Hopewell, Hopewell, Va. 



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Park View and Bluestone, South Hill, Va. 
Brunswick, Greenville, and Jarrett, Law- 
renceville, Va. 
Covington, Covington, Va. 
Jefferson, William Byrd, William Flem- 
ing, Andrew Lewis, Cave Spring, Roa- 
noke, Va. 

Warwick, Warwick, Va. 
Hampton, Hampton, Va. 
Newport News, Newport News, Va. 
Harrisonburg, Harrisonburg, Va. 
Robert E. Lee, Staunton, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Virginia Beach, Va. 
Princess Anne, Princess Anne, Va. 
Norview, Granby, Maury, Norfolk, Va. 
Oscar F. Smith, South Norfolk, Va. 
Craddock, Churchland, Woodrow Wilson, 
Portsmouth, Va. 

Great Bridge and Deep Creek, Great 
Bridge, Va. 

Falls Church, Falls Church, Va. 
Durham, Durham, N. C. 
Thomas Jefferson, Hermitage, John Mar- 
shall. Varina, Highland Springs, Man- 
chester, Thomas Dale, Douglas Freeman, 
Midlothian, Goochland, and Powhatan, 
Richmond, Va. 

George Wythe and Wythe County, Wythe- 
ville, Va. 

Virginia High School, Bristol, Va. 
Marion and Smyth County, Marion, Va. 

It is estimated that fifty-five high school 
graduates will matriculate into the Medi- 
cal College School of Nursing in Sep- 



tember of this year, and twenty-five to 
thirty students from other colleges will 
join our sophomore class in June. As of 
April 1, fifty-seven affiliating students 
from twelve schools of nursing are at- 
tending classes and having clinical ex- 
perience in psychiatry, obstetrics, and pe- 
diatrics. 

There are two outstanding handicaps to 
the foregoing ambitious program, namely, 
an overcrowded dormitory and too few 
instructors. When in future days many of 
these inequities are corrected bringing 
more cheerful and hopeful prospects to 
patients, students, graduates, and instruc- 
tors, we shall owe a word of gratitude to 
those of the present time who went the 
extra mile. 

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ass news 



1907 Ruby Chambers (N) of Blackstone. 
Virginia, visited tbe Alumni Office on March 
38, 1957. Clifton G. Parker (M— TJCM) of 
Woodland, N. C. visited the Alumni Office on 
April 8. 

1909 Walter E. Vest (M) will serve as an 
AMA delegate from West Virginia at the 
annual meeting in New York City, June 
3-7. He was also re-elected to the publica- 
tion committee of the State Medical Asso- 
ciation for seven years. 
1912 TJCM William N. Hodgkin (D) was 
elected second vice-chairman of Virginia 
Council on Health and Medical Care. 
1915 T. Neill Barnett (M) is a member of 
the Board of Governors of the American Col- 
lege of Gastroenterology. 
1917 Charles L. Outland (M), director of 
the City School Health Service, and a lec- 
turer in the department of community medi- 
cine, was elected to the Royal Society of 
Health. 

1919 Leon J. Walton (D) visited the Alum- 
ni Office on January 29 while attending the 
Dental Alumni Homecoming. 

1921 Julian H. Gary (P) of the Henry P. 
Gilpin Co. has been elected president of the 
Cosmopolitan Club of Norfolk. 

Mattie Wood Poyser (N) visited the Alum- 
ni House on March 5 and told us of many 
interesting and amusing incidents in her life 
while in training here and as director and 
owner of Camp Nimrod for Girls. 

1922 R. F. Cline (M) has been elected 
chief of surgery at the Winchester Memorial 
Hospital, Winchester, Va. 

Malcolm H. Harris (M) of West Point, 
Va., has been appointed by Governor Stanley 
to membership on a special legislative com- 
mission studying problems of aged persons. 
He was elected vice-president of the Tri- 
State Medical Association. 

1923 Harry Lyons (D), dean of the school 
of dentistry of the Medical College of Va., 
has received the Alpha Omega Fraternity 

THE SCARAB 



Achievement Medal for 1956. Others who 
have received this medal are Dr. Thomas 
Parran, Dr. Selman A. Waksman, Dr. Al- 
bert Einstein, and Dr. Jonas E. Salt. He will 
also be awarded an honorary doctor of sci- 
ence degree by the Temple University School 
of Dentistry on May 1. 

1924 H. H. Shiner (P) of Petersburg. Vir- 
ginia, has been installed as chairman of the 
Appomattox District Boy Scouts of America, 
H. Hudnall Ware, Jr. (M) gave three 
talks on obstetrical topics at the meeting 
of the International Medical Assembly of 
Southwest Texas, January 28-30. He also 
attended the meeting of the South Atlantic 
Association of Obstetricians and Gynecolo- 
gists in Charleston, South Carolina, Feb- 
ruary 7-9. 

1926 J. Asa Shield (M) served as a mar- 
shal for Homecoming at William and Mary 
this year. 

1927 J. Wesley Parker, Jr. (M). Seaboard, 
North Carolina, visited the Alumni Office on 
February 1. 

James T. Tucker (M), with his horse, Colo- 
nel, placed second in the Open Hunters and 
Middle and Heavyweight Hunters classes in 
the Deep Run Hunt Club 's hunter trials on 
March 17. 

1928 Harvey B. Haag (M) is among a 
group of 45 scientists who received research 
grants from the Tobacco Industry Research 
Committee in 1956. He is preparing a book 
for publication on the biological aspects of 
tobacco and its smoke. 

E. R. Ware (M) has been named vice 
president of the medical staff of Mary Wash- 
ington Hospital, Fredericksburg, Virginia. 

1929 C. A. Nunnally (M) has been named 
president of the medical staff of Mary Wash- 
ington Hospital in Fredericksburg, Va. 

1930 John M. Bierer (P) presided at the 
Tuesday morning session of the Pharmacy 
Seminar at the Richmond Academy of Medi- 
cine on March 19 and visited the Alumni 
House. 

Ermion S. Williams (M) has been elected 
vice president and medical director of The 
Life Insurance Company of Virginia. He is 
also president of the Children's Home So- 
ciety of Virginia. 

1931 Ira L. Hancock (M) of Creeds, Va., 
has been appointed by Governor Stanley to 
the State Hospital Board. 

E. Cotton Rawls (M) was elected presi- 
dent of the Connecticut Society of American 
Board of Surgeons at their annual meeting 
in December. 

Wyatt E. Roye (M), chief, tuberculosis 
section, McGuire VA Hospital and associate 
in medicine, Medical College of Virginia, 
spoke on ' ' Drugs in the Treatment of Tuber- 
culosis" on March 21 for the tenth annual 
Stoneburner Lectures. 

1933 The First Pan American Congress on 
Caneer Cytology will be held in Miami, April 
25-29. The Congress is sponsored by the 
Southern Society of Cancer Cytology, the 
Cancer Institute at Miami, the University 
of Miami and the Cancer Cytology Founda- 
tion of America, Inc. William Bickers (M) 
is one of the program chairmen on clinical 
cytology. 

MAY, 1957 



Mary E. Johnston (M) of Tazewell, Va., 
was named to the board of directors of the 
American Academy of General Practice in 
March. 

E. Claiborne Robins (~P ) , president of the 
A. H. Robins Co. of Richmond, Va,, has 
closed the pharmaceutical plant's doors to 
send employees on trips to Washington, New 
York, and Miami. Recently, employees re- 
versed the picture, and on his 20th anni- 
versary as company president gave him two 
checks, one drawn on the ' ' Bank of Good 
Times" and the other for $4,200 specifying 
that he use the money for a vacation for him- 
self and his wife. On January 25 they left 
for Acapuleo, Mexico. All employees — home 
plant workers, field representatives in the 
United States and territories, Canada and 
Latin America — had chipped in for the trip 
for "the world's most popular boss" as 
they view him. 

Russell Smiley (M) has been elected as a 
medical advisor to the Salem Rescue Squad. 
1934 P. N. Pastore (M), professor of 
otolaryngology, addressed the Williamsburg- 
Jamestown County Medical Society at Wil- 
liamsburg. He delivered three talks and took 
part in a panel discussion of the Dallas 
Southern Clinical Society and addressed the 
Birmingham Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat So- 
ciety as main speaker. 

Robert V. Terrell (M), assistant professor 
of clinical proctology, gave a paper on 
"Hemorrhoids in Pregnancy" before the 
Tri-State Medical Society, Clemson, South 
Carolina in February. 



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1935 J. Curtis Nottingham (P) of Wil- 
liamsburg, Virginia, has been elected presi- 
dent of the Chamber of Commerce of that 
city. 

Reno R. Porter (M) spoke on "Indica- 
tions for Surgery in Congenital Heart Dis- 
ease" on Thursday, January 24 during the 
annual MeGuire Lectures at M.C.V. 

1936 Elbert W. Dodd, Jr. (M) is practicing 
ophthalmology in Washington, D. C. He and 
his wife have three sons and reside in Chever- 
ly, Maryland. 

1937 R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. (P), president 
of the Medieal College of Virginia, was 
elected treasurer of Virginia Council on 
Health and Medical Care. 

1939 Sidney J. Hellman (M) has recently 
become a diplomat© of the American Board 
of Surgery. He is practicing general surgery 
in Great Neck, New York. 

1940 Richard P. Bellaire (M) has been in 
general practice in Saranae Lake, New York 
for ten years. He is president of the New 
York State Academy of General Practice. 

Edward L. King (M), formerly of Charles- 
ton, West Virginia, is now serving as chief 
of the surgical staff of the Battey State 
Hospital in Rome, Georgia. His specialty is 
chest surgery. 

W. Thomas Spain (P) has been named 
medical director of the Purdue Frederick 
Company of New York. 

1941 Frank Buck (M) has been named 
chief of staff of Virginia Baptist Hospital, 
Lynchburg, Va. 

1942 Hiram W. Davis (M), of Hunting- 
ton, West Virginia, who had been superin- 
tendent of Huntington State Hospital for 
the past six years, was appointed State Com- 
missioner of Mental Hygiene and Hospitals 
in the state of Virginia. He assumed his 
duties on February 1. 

J. O. Hubbard, Jr. (P), executive secre- 
tary of the Yirginia Pharmaceutical Asso- 
ciation, presided at the Monday afternoon 
session of the Pharmacy Seminar on March 
18 at the Richmond Academy of Medicine. 
Ralph M. Ware (P) spoke on "Recent Legis- 
lation Affecting the Practice of Pharmacy" 
at the same meeting. 

1943M James Chitwood (M) has been 
elected president of the Pulaski County 
Heart Council at its organizational meeting 
on January 8. This is the first Heart Coun- 
cil to be formed in Virginia and as such 
conducts a year-round program depending 
on which seems best for the area concerned. 
It is primarily one of education and com- 
munity service. 

1944 G. Walter Erickson (M) of South 
Bend, Indiana, visited the Alumni House 
with his son on April 4, 1957. 

Marion L. Rice, Jr. (M) has been ap- 
pointed to the part-time position of medi- 
cal examiner in the Richmond City Em- 
ployees' Medical Service. He has recently 
been with the Veterans Adminstration Hos- 
pital at Kecoughtan. 

1947 G. Edward Calvert (M) has been 
elected president of the staff of Marshall 
Lodge Memorial Hospital and Guggenheimer 
Memorial Hospital in Lynchburg, Va. 

1948 Robert D. Ailsworth, Jr. (M) opened 
the Ailsworth Medical Center in August, 



28 



1956, in Keysville, Virginia, where he has 
practiced since being discharged from the 
Army in 1951. In addition to the general 
practice of medicine, some minor surgery is 
done. Only maternity patients, however, are 
hospitalized here. 

Ezra Goyings, Jr. (M), of Ronceverte, 
West Virginia, a member of the medieal 
staff of the Greenbrier Valley Hospital, has 
moved with his family to Biloxi, Mississip- 
pi, where he will serve as a member of the 
medical staff of the Veterans Hospital there. 

Richard H. Kirkland (M), assistant pro- 
fessor of medicine at the Medical College 
of Virginia, spoke to the staff of the North- 
ampton-Accomack Memorial Hospital, Nas- 
sawadox, on February 6. His subject was 
' ' Electrolytes. ' ' 

T. Stacey Lloyd (M) has been re-elected 
secretary-treasurer of the medical staff of 
Mary Washington Hospital, Fredericksburg, 
Va. 

19S0 Donald G. Siegel (M) is engaged in 
psychiatric practice as well as having a full 
time teaching appointment with the Depart- 
ment of Psychiatry at U.C.L.A. Medical 
School. 

1952 Jean Plunkett Cavender (M) and Jer- 
ill D. Cavender (M) are both doing general 
practice in Charleston, West Virginia. They 
have two sons, John Andrew born November 
3, 1955, and Thomas Mont born November 
11, 1956. 

1953 Don E. Cunningham (M) started pri- 
vate practice in St. Albans, West Virginia in 
February. 

Lilian Hope Farrior was born on February 
12 to Ellen and Hugh Farrior (M). 

Nick Kendall (M), now in the Air Force 
stationed at Wichita Falls, Texas, is plan- 
ning to begin a residency in Internal Medi- 
cine in June in Albany, New York. 

1954 Perry N. Trakas (D) has completed 
his tour of duty with the Army in Okinawa 
and is now practicing general dentistry in 
Spartanburg, S. C. 

John B. Williams (P) recently was grad- 
uated from a military medical orientation 
course at the Army Medical Service School, 
Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

1955 John Myles (M) and his wife Penny 
(N) are living in Washington, D. C. He is 
in the Army. 

Frank Mullinax (M) and Grace Lane were 
married in December. 

Thomas Natchus (P) on active duty with 
the U. S. Navy has been assigned to the 
Hospital Corps as a pharmacy technician. 
He is stationed at the Naval Air Station 
Dispensary, Corpus Christi, Texas. 

William R. Smouse (M) recently was as- 
signed to the U. S. Army Hospital staff, 
Fort Stewart, Ga. as a pediatrician. 

1956 Charles B. Barnett (D) was elected 
secretary-treasurer of the Greenville County 
Dental Society. 

George N. Calamos (P) recently was as- 
signed as a pharmacist at Fitzsimons Army 
Hospital in Denver, Colorado. 

A. W. Saul of Norfolk, Virginia, and 
Charles E. Britt of Richmond, Virginia, 
visited the Alumni House on March 18 dur- 
ing the Pharmacy Seminar. 

THE SCARAB 



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The Graduate 
Pharmacist can 

GROW . . . w,th 

Peoples Service Drug Stores, Inc. 



Whichever way your present hopes and plans may tend, the broad professional 
and geographic scope of Peoples Service Drug Stores is a very fertile field for 
the graduate pharmacist. Peoples' offer the indispensable experience of 
working and learning with seasoned professionals, as well as practical 
experience in store operation and management. This assures you of the soundest 
of backgrounds, whether you plan eventually to operate your own drug 
store, or to advance through the opportunities offered by the chain drug stores. 

Peoples' has enjoyed steady growth for fifty-two years — from Store Number 
1 in 1905 to Store Number 178 in 1957. Naturally our pharmacists can 
expect to "grow'' too — in professional knowledge, in income and security. 

Peoples operate 49 stores in principal Virginia cities, of which 6 were newly 
established during the past year. 



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RICHMOND 

VIRGINIA 



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PAID 

Richmond, Virginia 
Permit No. 761 









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Official Organ 

of the 

Alumni Association 

of the 

Medical College 

oi 

Virginia 




ugust. 195' 
me 6. Number 



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Official Organ of the 
Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 

Published by the Medical College of Virginia Alumni 
Association in February, May, August, and November 

Editorial Committee 

Robert V. Terrell M'34, Editor-in-Chief and Chairman 
j. Spencer Dryden M'33 Edward Myers D'26 

J. Berkeley Gordon M'26 Marguerite Nicholson 

Harry Lyons D'23 n ' 34 

R. Reginald Rooke P'21 W. Roy Smith P'4l 

Minnie M. Franck, Managing Editor 
Mildred H. Clark, Assistant Managing Editor 
Officers 
James T. Tucker M'27, President 
.Medical Arts Bldg., Richmond, Virginia 
William N. Hodgkin DT2, Inimed. Past-President 
Warrenton, Virginia 
J. Spencer Dryden M'33, President-Elect 

6816 Millwood Rd., Bethesda 14, Md. 

J. Berkeley Gordon M'26, Vice-President 

N. J. State Hospital, Marlboro, N. J. 

Harry Lyons D'23, Vice-President 

Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Va. 

G. F. Hendley PT8, Vice-President 

2125 Fairmount Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

Frances Gordon N'43, Vice-President 

4514 W. Grace St., Richmond, Va. 

Washington Winn M'35, Secretary 

303 Stockton Lane, Richmond, Va. 

Harvey B. Haag M'28, Treasurer 

Medical College of Va., Richmond, Va. 

Trustees 
Term Expires May, 1951 

Waverly R. Payne M'23 

91 29th Street, Newport News 

H. Hudnall Ware, Jr. M'24 

816 W. Franklin St., Richmond 

Moffett H. Bowman D'35 

1412 Franklin Road, S.W., 

Roanoke, Va. 



Mrs. Sabra S. Russell N'31 
1439 Louise St., 
Santa Ana, Calif. 



Term Expires May, 1958 



Donald S. Daniel M'24 

Johnston-Willis Hospital, 

Richmond, Va. 

W. Roy Smith P'41 

Physicians' Products Co., 

Petersburg, Va. 

J. P. Broaddus D'30 



E. L. Alexander M'27 
Medical Arts Building, 

Newport News, Va. 

R. Reginald Rooke P'21 

2929 Second Are., 

Richmond, Va. 

J. Spencer Dryden M'33 

816 Millwood Rd., Bethesda, 14, Md. Franklin, Va. 

Term Expires May, 1959 

Lloyd C. Bird P'17 Richard A. Michaux M'37 

303 S 6th St., Richmond, Va. Lee Medical Bldg. 
Richmond, Va. 

E. Claiborne Robins P'33 Marc.uerite Nicholson N'34 

1407 Cummings Drive Cabaniss Hall, M.C.V. 

Richmond, Va. Richmond, Va. 

Edward E. Myers D'26 Robert V. Terrell M'34 

511 Medical Arts Bldg. Medical Arts Bldg. 

Norfolk, Va. Richmond. Va. 



Keep Your Cake and Eat It To 

Your Income Reserved Trust at MCV 

It is possible to set up a trust fund, receive the annual in- 
come for life produced by the trust, and make a tax saving at 
the same time. 

It works this way. Forms are available with other pertinent 
information from my office, showing how you may create a 
reserved income charitable trust fund at MCV, using up to 20 
per cent of gross income, make a substantial tax saving, and 
receive the full income produced by the trust for life. The 
amount of the tax saving will depend upon your age at the 
time the trust is established, and your age if and when sub- 
sequent additions are made to the trust. 

If, for example, there is gross income of $10,000 and a 
taxable income of $8,000 ($10,000 less exemptions and deduc- 
tions), $2,000 or 20 per cent of $10,000 may be claimed a 
charitable deduction, thereby reducing the taxable income to 
$6,000; for a taxpayer at age 50 each $1,000 thus given to a 
reserved income trust will result in $480.30 income tax deduc- 
tion; for age 75, the deduction will be $782.48 per $1,000 
contributed. 

The larger the gross income and the greater the age of the 
taxpayer, the larger the saving in creating a reserved income 
charitable trust. Of course, if the taxpayer does not need the 
income on his gift, such a gift will carry a 100 per cent tax 
benefit within the 20 per cent of gross income. 

The reserved income charitable trust is a device for contribut- 
ing securities or cash to an institution like the Medical College 
of Virginia, continuing to earn for life the full amount of the 
trust income, and make a worth while tax saving at the same 
time. The tax deductible portion of the gift at different ages is 
shown in a table compiled by the government. 
Requests for further information are welcomed. 

W. T. Sanger, Chancellor 



About The Cover 

Dr. Thomas W. Murrell graduated from the University 
College of Medicine in 1901 and interned at the Richmond City 
Hospital from 1901-1902. For the past fifty-five years he has 
been in the practice of dermatology in Richmond, Virginia and 
has had long and sincere interest in the Medical College of 
Virginia. 

Following a period of training at the University Hospitals, 
London, England in 1904, he joined the adjunct faculty of 
the University College of Medicine. In 1912 he was made pro- 
fessor of dermatology and syphilology of that institution and 
following the amalgamation in 1916, became associate profes- 
sor of the Medical College of Virginia. From this time until 
1936 when he was made professor and further until 1947 when 
he became emeritus professor, Dr. Murrell gave most of the 
didactic lectures in his specialty at the College. His lectures 
and clinics reflected not only great interest in his specialty and 
love of teaching but his respect and concern for his fellow man. 

Dr. Murrelf is a member of the A.O.A., the American 
Dermatological Association, the Richmond Academy of Medi- 
cine (president in 1918), and numerous other medical societies. 
In 1955 the Medical College of Virginia honored him with a 
degree of Doctor of Literature. 



The Scarab 



i 

I 

Published by The Alumni Association of the Medical College of Virgipia 



Volume 6, No. 3 



Richmond, Virginia 



August, 1957 



Our Capital Outlay Program 



COLLEGE DIVISION 

The College is requesting from the 
General Assembly for the coming bien- 
nium for the College Division $5,227,- 
094 for buildings and $287,000 for gen- 
eral repairs and improvements, a total of 
$5,514,094. An additional sum of $225,- 
000 is being requested for land purchase. 

Medical Education Building. — This 
building takes priority over all other capi- 
tal outlay requests because it is vital to the 
teaching program of our school of medi- 
cine. It is to be located on Marshall Street, 
between Eleventh and Twelfth. 

The preclinical sciences of the school 
of medicine are now widely scattered in 
crowded, inefficient, and in some instances 
dangerous quarters. Many of the clinical 
departments have no departmental quar- 
ters at all; the rest are operating from a 
few small private offices and rooms in- 
tended for patient examining rooms. As 
far as students in the medical school 
are concerned, classrooms, lecture halls, 
lounges, and locker rooms are woefully 
inadequate in comparison to enrollment. 

Currently the school of medicine is 
occupying much space originally designed 
for other purposes. // is financially un- 
wise, as well as inefficient, to continue to 
use poorly adapted and arranged space 
for the needs of the school of medicine. 

The proposed Medical Education Build- 
ing is the single greatest need of the Col- 
lege and will bring our school of medicine 
to a point where it is physically adequate 
to meet its primary function — to provide 
medical education for the future physi- 
cians of the Commonwealth. In addition 
the provision of adequate space could 
also help materially in the maintenance 
and further development of a faculty of 
high quality — an absolute necessity if the 
College is to continue to progress. 

The new building will house the basic 
science departments of anatomy, biophys- 

AUGUST, 1957 



ics, biochemistry, microbiology, pathology, 
and physiology. Ample morgue facilities 
and space for the department of legal 
medicine will be provided in close prox- 
imity to each other. These departments will 
occupy the sub-basement, basement, first, 
second, third, fourth, and fifth floors. 

The seventh, eighth, and ninth floors 
will be given over to departmental and 
faculty offices and laboratories for depart- 
ments of medicine, surgery, obstetrics, 
pediatrics, neurosurgery, urology, orthope- 
dics, gynecology, dermatology, neurology, 
ophthalmology, otolaryngology, and pub- 
lic health. The offices of the dean of the 
school of medicine and some other ad- 
ministrative offices will be located on the 
ninth floor. 

The sixth floor of the building will be 
reserved for rental space for physicians' 
offices. 

Ample space has been planned in the 
building for animal quarters, student lock- 
ers and lounges, laboratories for both 
teaching and research, secretaries' offices, 
and storage. 

Over-street passages will connect the 
third, fourth and fifth floors with the A. 
D. Williams Memorial Clinic (outpatient 
department). 

The areas vacated in other buildings 
are needed to accommodate adequately the 
present activities of the Hospital Division, 
as well as to provide for the needs of 
other schools and courses of the institu- 
tion. 

The total cost of the Medical Education 
Building is estimated at $5,688,119 (not 
including land for which a separate re- 
quest is being made). Complete financing 
for the building is proposed as follows: 
an appropriation from the General As- 
sembly of $4,627,997; a federal grant of 
$514,222; and a bond issue of $545,900. 

Animal Housing Facilities. — That re- 
search by faculty members is an integral, 
appropriate, and necessary function is a 



well-established fact. Present investigative- 
efforts of our faculty members are being 
hampered and delayed by lack of adequate 
quarters for experimental animals. Seventy 
thousand dollars will erect fairly suitable 
quarters. The State is being asked to ap- 
propriate $35,000 toward this facility, 
with the expectation of obtaining a like 
amount from the federal government. 

McGuire Hall Annex— Phase III.— 
$323,080 is being requested from the 
General Assembly, to complete the devel- 
opment of McGuire Hall to provide addi- 
tional facilities needed for the enlarged 
enrollment in the school of pharmacy, 
such as lockers and lounge rooms, a large 
teaching classroom, office space for faculty 
members, and a main entrance to McGuire 
Hall. The new main entrance will provide 
access from Clay Street to the new con- 
struction and existing McGuire Hall. The 
old Virginia Hospital building has been 
razed to make way for the completition 
of this project. 

Psychiatric Research Laboratory. — 
This involves construction of an additional 
floor on the east wing of the new Ennion 
G. Williams Hospital (planned originally 
but omitted because of lack of funds). 
This laboratory will provide space for 
research personnel to attack many prob- 
lems of psychiatry on a sound laboratory 
basis, something not yet done in the State. 
Abundant funds are available for psy- 
chiatric research but we have not been able 
to request these because no space has been 
available for research purposes. The State 
is being asked to appropriate $90,217 and 
it is confidently expected that a grant for 
a like amount can be obtained from the 
federal government. 

General Repairs and Improvements. 
A total of $287,000 for general repairs 
and improvements in the College Divi- 
sion is being requested. That amount 
would provide for: improved parking 
facilities; renovations to Dooley Hospital 
to make it feasible to use it for basic sci- 
ence laboratories (patients will be moved 
(Continued on page 24) 

1 




The Board members and officers of the Alumni Association; the deans; the chancellor and the president of MCV; 

and their wives were seated at the speaker's table at the reunion banquet. Note Dr. Sanger in his tailor-made 

suit, the order for which was the gift of the Alumni Association last year. 




The graduating class of 57 at the banquet gleeful as the big day nears while the members of the class of '07 and their families enjoy 
their reminiscences. Below at the Open House for the seniors on Saturday afternoon, the alumni welcomed into the fold the new graduates. 




THE SCARAB 



2 



eunion, 



1957 




I h e 6 '97 e arad Lt n0r , "' *t 't^ "'■! ^ ?" ° f '° ? ^° »** '° med «" the s P e ° ke - "Al. by two of 

E wad Twi, "'r^r- ° f thS A,Umm ASSOC ' afl0n; R ' Re 9' ndd Ro ° ke ' -™ Airman 
Edward E. W.lley, luncheon cha.rman; and R, Blackwell Smith, Jr., president of MCV. 




The alumni at the luncheon pay tribute to the guests of honor of the Alumn, Association in the College Social Hall. Other guests at the 
luncheon were the classes back from 1907 and p,ctured are three tables of these revered alumni. 




AUGUST, 1957 




Walter E. Green, president of the class of 

. . . medicine, 1957, receives congratulations 

Members of the class of medicine of 1917 assembled for a picture at the.r reun.cn 

luncheon at the Hotel John Marshall and rehashed those days of yore. 



from Dr. Benjamin W. Rawles, class of 1897. 




The 1927 class of medicine had a good bull session to bring everyone up to date at a 
buffet supper at the home of Dr. and Mrs. James T. Tucker. 




Reunion 

Notes 



That happy reunion weekend of May 
23-26 now seems but a dream of pleasant 
memories. Thinking back, one recalls the 
hard work and the time that the reunion 
committee put in to make everything go 
smoothly. The really terrific job the in- 
dividual class chairmen did to get you back 
and to give you a good time while here; 
the association owes them all a hearty vote 
of thanks. 

We have no pictures to prove it but we 
did go to the Jamestown Festival. Two 
buses of hearty alumni spent a delightful 
day at Jamestown. 

The dance after the banquet was a real 
ball and ended in the wee small hours. 

Jonah Larrick was on hand and, as al- 
ways, one wonders what you would have 
done without his gracious help. No task 
is ever too large or small for him to help 
you tackle. 

And so as another reunion goes into 
history, we begin to think of next year. 
Alumni Day in 1958 will be on June 2, 
and the honored classes will be the threes 
and eights, so start making your plans 
now to be with us then. 

Prints of the pictures of the reunion 
may be obtained from the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, 1105 East Clay Street, Richmond, 
Virginia, for $1.00 each. 

THE SCARAB 



7 he Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association of the 
Medical College of Virginia 

The annual meeting of the Alumni Association of the Medical College of Virginia was held at 3:00 P.M. on May 23 1957 in 
the Board Room of the Alumni House. 

The meeting was called to order by the president, Dr. James T. Tucker and the minutes of the May 28, 1956 Annual Meeting 

were approved. fc 

The financial statement was read and approved and was as follows: 



Treasurer's Report 

"The Alumni Association of the Medical College of Virginia 
had income for the year of 1956 as follows: 

Contributions $10.00 and under $14,984.75 

Contributions over $10.00 3,910.00 



This was a decrease in income from contributions of $244.75 
from 1955. 

The operating account shows an excess of income over expense 
in the amount of $3,895.94 after allowing depreciation of office 
equipment of $284.32 and a transfer of $3910.00 to the Special 
Account. 

The Special Account shows income in excess of expense of 



$238.21 after giving effect to depreciation of $1,649.34 on 
building and equipment. 

The small increase in the fund balance of the Special Account 
is explained by the expenditures made for redecorating the first 
floor and apartments and the addition of furniture and equip- 
ment. 

The balance in the savings account is $5,188.42. 

The records have been audited by the A. M. Pullen Company, 
Certified Public Accountants, and copies are available in the 
office of the Alumni Association if you wish to examine them. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Harvey B. Hagg, Treasurer 1 



Dr. James T. Tucker delivered his report on the year's activities of the association: 



President 

"July 1, 1957, brings the school year to a close with many 
highlights and significant events that are worth noting. It is 
the first full year of administration by our new president, Dr. 
R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. The transformation from the retiring 
command of our beloved Dr. William Sanger to our new presi- 
dent has been noteworthy because of its smoothness, affability, 
and its accomplishments. The alumni are greatly indebted to 
our new president and the interest he has taken in die alumni 
affairs of the College and this Association. We welcome him 
at our meetings and we reserve the privilege of calling on him 
for advice at all times. 

Another outstanding phase of this past year has been the work 
of our new executive secretary, Miss Minnie Franck. With an 
interest and fervor unequaled, she has taken hold of the helm of 
this organization, and with her very efficient associate, Mrs. 
Mildred Clark, has done a magnificent job for us. I want to 
assure you that the records of the Alumni Association are in 
excellent condition, the finances are within our anticipated hopes, 
and our Alumni House is fully paid for, completely decorated 
and furnished with a full capacity of renters in the space that we 
do not occupy and have no particular use for at this particular 
moment. 

I want to thank the officers and the Board of Trustees for 
their untiring cooperation and loyal advice. The attendance at 
the Board of Trustees' meetings has been exceptionally good. 
The interest shown at these meetings has been spiced with en 
thusiasm and a willingness to work. 

AUGUST, 1957 



s Report 

The committee chairmen are to be complimented on their 
accomplishments. Especially do I wish to mention Dr. Robert V. 
Terrell who is the editor-in-chief of The Scarab. The publica- 
tion has come out on time and we have had numerous compli- 
ments on its composition, its excellent articles, and the well- 
rounded manner in which it has covered the activities of the 
Alumni Association and the alumni individually, as well as the 
Medical College of Virginia. The advertising in this magazine 
has increased considerably and it is due to the efforts of our 
executive secretary that this increase has been attained. We 
welcome your criticism and your contributions to this worthy 
publication. 

I wish also to pay tribute to our alumni secretary, Dr. W. 
C. Winn. His report is herewith enclosed, and I call your 
particular attention to its fullness and the description of the 
activities of the Alumni Association and the Board of Trustees 
for the past year. 

For the past several months Dr. Edward L. Alexander has 
been working on a proposed alumni Scientific Assembly. This is 
going to be a real Scientific Assembly, sponsored jointly by the 
chiefs of services at the Medical College of Virginia and the 
Alumni Association. We now have laid the groundwork and 
the first session will materialize during the last two weeks of 
February. The committee to work with him has been named 
and is composed of the following: Dr. William F. Maloney, 
chairman, Drs. Kinloch Nelson, Harry Walker, David Hume, 
Patrick Drewry, Walter Bundy, and Joseph Parker. 



As you have been informed, through past articles and descrip- 
tive pages, our next ten year project is the Student Alumni 
Lounge." This is a $100,000.00 commitment, $10,000.00 per 
year for the next ten years. The Project Committee headed by 
Dr. Donald Daniel has been at work and we hope to submit 
something very concrete by early fall, certainly, by the next 



Board of Trustees' meeting in November. We are asking that 
you bear this in mind as the year draws to a close, and remember 
us in your donations, as all of your gifts are tax deductible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

James T. Tucker, M.D., President" 



The report of the secretary. Dr. Washington C. Winn, was read: 



Secretary's Report 



"Mr. President and fellow alumni of the Medical College 
of Virginia. 

Dr. Tucker has made a real effort this past year to increase the 
membership of the Alumni Association. This was his private 
project and a most difficult task. The membership at a correspond- 
ing date in 1956 was 1,310. The membership at the present for 
19^7 stands at 1,332. 

We are all deeply indebted to our efficient executive secretary, 
Miss Minnie M. Franck, and her capable assistant, Mrs. Mildred 
H. Clark, for their wonderful help and cooperation during the 
past year. 

The Scarab has been a real credit to the Alumni Association 
under the editorship of Dr. Robert V. Terrell. He should be 
commended for an excellent job. 

Dr. Tucker has met with the presidents of the senior classes 
in the various schools in an effort to learn ways and means for 
the Alumni Association to be of service to the students. A copy 
of The Scarab is now being sent all seniors in an effort to keep 
them informed about and stimulate their interest in the affairs 
of the Alumni Association. 

A reception for the freshmen, held at the Alumni House last 
fall, was a great success. 

At the present time a study is being made to determine the 
advisability of establishing a preceptorial system in the various 
schools, particularly in the medical school, in an effort to bring 
the student in more intimate contact with the faculty. The dental 
school has active faculty advisers. 

The deans of the four major schools have expressed a great 
need for a larger number of applicants, who have a good scho- 



lastic record, so that the schools can be more selective in accepting 
applicants. This problem was very ably discussed in an article 
by Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., in the February issue of The 
Scarab. A recruiting committee from the Alumni Association, 
with representatives from the various schools, has attempted to 
convey this information to all members of the health professions 
in Virginia by sending this information to the officers of the 
various' local societies and organizations requesting their help 
on a local level. 

The board room in the basement of the Alumni House has 
been painted and panelled by the Alumni Association, furnished 
by the Virginia Pharmaceutical Association, and is ready for use 
by both groups. All of the rooms and the apartment in the 
Alumni House are rented to very desirable tenants. 

Last, but by no means least, is the main project of the Alumni 
Association, now that the Alumni House is paid for, redecorated, 
and refurnished. You have all probably read in The Scarab of 
the Alumni Association's undertaking to raise $100,000 over a 
period of years to finance an Alumni Lounge in the proposed 
student dormitories. As Dr. Sanger wrote in The Scarab, This 
air conditioned and appropriately furnished lounge will remind 
students from their first day at M.C.V. of alumni concern and 
responsibility for Alma Mater and those who work and learn 
there.' 

All contributions over $10.00 to the Alumni Association will 
go for our special project. 

Respectfully, 

W. C. Winn, Secretary 



The executive secretary gave the following report: 



Executive Secretary's Report 



"My report is very short and it starts with thanks to all the 
officers and the Board of Trustees for their splendid cooperation. 
Their devotion to the cause of the Alumni Association has been 
a most pleasant revelation. My personal thanks to each of them 
for their helpfulness— and to all you alumni for your interest 
and the cordiality which you have shown me as 1 have met you. 

It would certainly be remiss of me if I did not extend a 
separate and very special thanks to Dr. Tucker for his patience 
and advice during this first year. There has never been a time 
when I've worried him that he didn't come up with the right 
answer. Needless to say, I'm grateful. My thanks go, too, to 
Mildred Clark for her cooperation and niceness. 

As to activities, you might be interested to know that the As- 
sociation was represented at the following meetings: 



Virginia Pharmaceutical Association 
West Virginia Medical Society 
Philadelphia Chapter 
Southern Medical Society 
Washington Chapter 
Virginia State Dental Society 
Medical Society of North Carolina 
Peninsula Chapter 
It's been a real pleasure to work with you and I look forward 
to the opportunity to meet more of you. Your suggestions for 
the improvement of the association and its activities will be most 
welcome. 

Thank you. Respectfully, 

Minnie M. Franck" 

THE SCARAB 



There was no old business and no new business. 



Dr. Tucker announced that the following had been elected to the Board of Trustees by mail ballot: 

New Board of Trustees 



Mr. Hunter M. Gaunt 
Miss L. Frances Gordon 
Dr. Woodrow C. Henderson 
Their terms of office will begin on January 1, 1958. 



Dr. Phillip W. Oden 
Dr. Waverly R. Payne 
Dr. H. Hudnall Ware. Jr. 



The nominating committee presented this slate of officers: 

New Officers 

President DR- J- Spencer Dryden Vice President Dr . 



President-elect Mr. R. Reginald Rooke 



Harry Lyons 



Vice President Mrs. Anne F. Mahoney 



Vice President Dr. f. Robert Massie, Jr. Secre 

Vice Preside »r t- ^ ^ecretar } Dr p IETRO N p ASTORE 

" PfeMdent ■ ' MR - GEORGE F - HEN — Measurer Dr . HarvE y B. Haag 

The report was seconded and the candidates were elected by unanimous vote. 

The meeting was adjourned. 

Respectfully, 

Washington C. Winn, Secretary 



^ometkituj llew "fa TLe Gl 



utnni 



Biennial Scientific Assembly 

First Session — February 21 and 22, 1958 

The Scient.fic Assembly, jointly sponsored by the Alumni Association and the School of Medicine of MCV, will he- 
designed to include those in attendance as participants rather than spectators. 
A preliminary outline of the program follows: 
Friday, February 21 
9:00 A.M. to 10:00 A.M.— Registration. 
10:00 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. and 2:30 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. 
1. Clinics presented by various departments in 



the medical school. 

2. Ward rounds by departments. 

3. Tour designed to view research and investigate 
programs in clinics and laboratories. 

4. Tour of physical facilities. 



1:00 P.M.— Luncheon. 

6:00 P.M.— Cocktail Party at The Jefferson Hotel. 

7:00 P.M.— Dinner, The Jefferson Hotel, guest speaker 
on a subject of general interest. 

Saturday, February 22 

9:00 A.M. — Clinics, ward rounds and discussion. 
12:00 Noon — Adjournment, "Auld Lang Syne." 



Final plans will be announced in the November issue of The Scarab and further information will be sent to alumni 
of the school of medicine under separate cover. 

AUGUST, 1957 



The fiaccalauleate Q'lmon 

Frederick H. Olert 
A.B. B.D., Th.M., D.D. 



I can record in simple terms our delight 
in a word of welcome to all of the gradu- 
ates of the various schools of the Medical 
College of Virginia, their families, the 
faculty, and friends. I give you Christian 
congratulations upon the remarkable 
achievements which you register in your 
educational preparation. You are about 
to receive the rewards of your educational 
labors and many of you will very likely 
dedicate yourselves to some form of spe- 
cialized study and others will seek to take 
their places in the tangled scheme of 
things. 

I cannot refrain from reflecting upon 
the difference between your commence- 
ment and my own some thirty years ago. 
We went out, as it were, to a great sea of 
magnificent things. We were riding the 
crest. Scientific discoveries were binding 
the world together in an unity. War had 
been outlawed; diseases that decimated 
thousands were being conquered and just 
around the corner was that perfect Utopia 
that all men longed for. 

Certainly no such thoughts as these are 
in your minds today. If you are thinking 
at all, you must be aware of the tremen- 
dous tasks which you face in your day and 
in your generation. For certainly no group 
of students ever assayed to meet the total 
challenge of life under terms of sterner 
competition than the graduates of 1957. 
It has been customary that the signifi- 
cance of this event in your lives shall 
receive the emphasis of a sermon and, as 
you go forth, I want to press upon you 
some considerations that grow out of the 
subject, "The Obligation To Be Intelli- 
gent." 

Have you ever thought about your after- 
man, the creature you are going to be 
five, ten, or twenty years from now? You 



Dr. Frederick H. Olert, who delivered the 
baccalaureate sermon, is the former 
pastor of Second Presbyterian Church, 
Richmond. He left there on July 1, 
1957. Though it is a little unusual to 
publish a sermon in our magazine, we 
have had so many requests for it that 
we felt that his message was such that 
all our alumni would find it inspiring. 

8 



have it within your power to make his 
life either happy or miserable. What kind 
of a body will you bring to the after-man, 
a body which has been destroyed by dissi- 
pation and disillusion or will it be a body 
that has been made strong by the disci- 
plines of life and by sound laws of man- 
hood and womanhood? What kind of a 
mind will you bring to the after-man, a 
mind enriched upon all the accumulated 
wisdom of the ages or a mind that is 
shriveled and shrunk because it has fed 
on absolutely nothing? What kind of a 
heart will you bring to the after-man, a 
heart as big as a ham in terms of its 
world-wide sympathies or a heart that is 
shriveled and narrow, critical and bigoted? 
What kind of a spirit will you bring to 
the after-man, a spirit enriched by all of 
the thoughts of God or a spirit that has 
been stunted and seared in its normal de- 
velopment? Your present power is always 
the sum total of your past honest invest- 
ment. 

Henry Van Dyke has a little bit of 
verse that I think aptly describes exactly 
what I want to say this morning: 

"Four things a man must learn to do, 
If he would make his record true, 
To think without confusion clearly, 
To love his fellow men sincerely, 
To act from honest motives purely, 
To trust in God and heaven securely." 

I suspect these four are essentially three. 
They are the impulse inward, the impulse 
outward, and the impulse upward. They 
are know yourself, know your world, and 
know God. They are personal initiative, 
social responsibility, and spiritual discern- 
ment. They are culture, friendship, and 
religion; and I plead with you today to 
keep these all in their proper balance. 

There are so many lop-sided individuals 
in the world today, giants in one field 
and pygmies in the other; magnificent in 
one area of life but babes in other areas 
of life. Take for example, if you train 
only the mind, you become overly sensi- 
tive. Train only the emotions and you 
become overly sentimental. Train only the 
soul and you become superstitious or a 
religious fanatic. All of these three areas 
are described in history. When men ex- 
alted reason to the exclusion of all the 



other departments of life, you have ra- 
tionalism and scholasticism; when men 
sought to emphasize only the qualities of 
the heart, you have pure humanitarianism ; 
and when they sought to emphasize only 
the things of the spirit, you have asceticism 
or monasticism, each of which represents 
an excrescence on the body of mankind. 
There ought to be a balance of them all. 
If you had mumps on only one side of 
your face, you would be a terrible looking 
spectacle. At least, you would be a little 
better to look at if you had mumps on 
both sides at the same time. When you 
row a boat with only one oar, you keep 
going round and round and you never get 
anywhere. I plead with you to mark the 
well balanced life in all of its various 
facets of activity. 

How balanced, after all, was this man 
Jesus? According to the psychologists he 
had all of the fifty-two qualities that make 
up a perfect man and every quality was 
perfectly blended and harmonizing with 
all the rest. It enabled a man like Sidney 
Lanier to express what ought to be elo- 
quent in the hearts of us all when he said: 

"Oh, what amiss may I forgive in Thee, 
Jesus, good Paragon, 
Thou Crystal Christ?" 

It is necessary to train the mind. The 
demand today is for prepared men and 
women and there are no boundaries that 
can be set upon the development of the 
human mind. Nature sets certain bounda- 
ries upon the body. We grow to certain 
size and stature and then, as times goes 
on and age overtakes us, we begin to 
shrink just a little bit, but though, for the 
most part, nature sets its own boundaries 
upon the human body, nature sets no 
limitations upon the development of the 
mind. Day by day we can push back the 
lean horizons of our minds and we can 
come to the time when we can say, "My 
mind to me a kingdom is." 

It is important that we be as intelligent 
as we ought to be. There is a divine obli- 
gation to" be intelligent. We live in a day 
when we ought to have learned how to 
think. Some one has said that five per cent 
of the population think, five per cent think 
they think, and ninety per cent would 
rather die than think. We need to develop 
these minds of ours. 

Here is a surgeon,, for example, who 

enters an operating room. A row of pretty 

nurses gather there and they have made 

all the preparations and the patient is 

(Continued on page 21) 

THE SCARAB 



Professor of Medicine Appointment 



The Board of Visitors, in its session 
on Friday, July 26, appointed Dr. Harry 
Walker professor of medicine on the 
recommendation of the dean of medicine 
and the president. This appointment was 
effective immediately, supersedes all pre- 
ceding appointments, and will be renew- 
able June 30, 1964, in accordance with 
established College policies. 

The Board also appointed him chairman 
of the department of medicine, effective 
immediately, as recommended by Dean 
Maloney and Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. 
In accordance with his wishes as expressed 
to Dean Maloney and the president, this 
appointment will terminate not later than 
June 30, 1958, and the search for a 
suitably qualified individual willing to 
serve indefinitely as chairman will be 
pressed vigorously. 

At the same time the gratitude of the 
Board was expressed to him for his dedi- 
cated service to the college in past years 
and tor his willingness to carry the respon- 
sibilities of the departmental chairmanship 
until his successor can be appointed. 

Dr. Harry Walker was born in La- 
Crosse, Virginia, and received his early 




education in South Hill, Virginia. He was 
an infantryman in World War I and was 
wounded during the Meuse-Argonne of- 
fensive. 

He received his pre-medical education 
at the Medical College of Virginia school 




August 22 

September 11 

September 16 
October 3 
October 23 
October 28 

November 13 

November 14 

February 21-22 

March 
AUGUST, 19 



Cocktail Party for MCV Alumni at the West Virginia State Medical 
Association at The Greenbrier. 

Freshman Open House— party for freshmen given by the Alumni 
Association in honor of the freshmen. 

Opening Convocation. 

Richmond Chapter, MCV Alumni Fall Get-together. 

Philadelphia Chapter MCV Alumni, Union League Club. 

Cocktail Party and Dinner for MCV Alumni at the Medical Society 
of Virginia meeting in Washington. 

McGuire Lecture, 8:30 P.M.; Dr. Francis D. Moore, Moseley Pro- 
fessor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School; subject: "Stimuli to 
Bodily Change after Surgical Trauma." 

McGuire Lecture, 8:30 P.M.; Dr. Moore; subject: "Dilutional Hypo- 
tonicity: A Common Electrolyte Disturbance after Trauma." 

Biennial Scientific Assembly, sponsored jointly by the Alumni Asso- 
ciation and the School of Medicine. 

Stoneburner Lectures, the date will be announced later. 
57 



of pharmacy and Randolph-Macon Col- 
lege and graduated from the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia in medicine in 1926. Serv- 
ing on the house staff of the MCV hos- 
pitals for the next five years, he was a 
medical resident for the last two years 
of this period. Dr. Walker has served on 
the faculty of MCV since his graduation, 
rising from assistant in medicine to pro- 
fessor of clinical medicine. 

He is the author of a text book on physi- 
cal diagnosis. 

Dr. Walker is a member of the Rich- 
mond Academy of Medicine, the Medical 
Society of Virginia, American Medical 
Association, American Clinical and Cli- 
matological Association, and a Fellow, 
American College of Physicians. 

His wife is the former Anne Gary and 
they have two children, Harry, Jr., a sen- 
ior at the University of Virginia, and 
Anne, a senior at Collegiate School for 
Girls. 



Board of Pharmacy 
Appointment 

Anthony P. Mehfoud, P'39, was recent- 
ly appointed to the Board of Pharmacy 
by Governor Thomas P. Stanley. He is a 
past president of the Richmond Retail 
Druggist Association and has been active 
in both the MCV Alumni Association and 
Virginia Pharmaceutical Association. 



The Man 

of the 

Hour 



Our "Man of the Hour" this time is 
one whom all of the pharmacy alumni are 
well aware of. His work for pharmacy 
has endeared him to all. On June 2^ at 
the Virginia Pharmaceutical Association 
Convention, George F. Hendley was 
awarded the highest honor that pharmacy 
in the state offers, the title and trophy of 
"Pharmacist of the Year." 

We will have to admit that we sat back 
and beamed with pride as he received the 
honor because we in the Alumni Associa- 
tion are deeply indebted to him for his 
efforts in gathering into the alumni fold 
the pharmacists of the state. No one, un- 
less they have seen him in action, would 
believe the hours that he has devoted to 
this good cause. 

Mr. Jeff, a Tarheel by birth, graduated 
from the Medical College of Virginia 
School of Pharmacy in 1918, served in the 
316th Field Artillery, 81st Division, dur- 
ing World War I, and has been in the 
retail drug business since. Currently, he 
is president of Fairmount Drug Store in 
Richmond. 

John Lee wrote in "Trade Names" in 
the Richmond News Leader, "Several 
years ago, only 17 per cent of the phar- 
macy graduates from the Medical College 
of Virginia were active members of the 
MCV Alumni Association. The percent- 



George F. 
Hendley 




age compared with 30 per cent of grad- 
uates in medicine and 23 per cent in 
dentistry. 

"Then Jeff Hendley, class of '18, went 
to work as membership chairman for phar- 
macy alumni, and the active memberships 
shot up to 62 per cent. 

"On another occasion, the John W. Dar- 
gavel Fund — a national organization that 
gives financial assistance to pharmacists 
and pharmacy — began a fund-raising cam- 
paign. Hendley was named Virginia chair- 
man, and the state ranked fourth in con- 
tributions. 

"At another time the Virginia Pharma- 



ceutical Association was trying to build 
up its organization around the state. Hend- 
ley became interested and helped organize 
the Northern Virginia Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation and served as its first president." 

He is a past president of the VPA and 
was their membership chairman this year. 
He was re-elected to the vice presidency 
of the Alumni Association this May. 

Our admiration and respect go out to 
this "worker," who gives his all for the 
causes he thinks worthy. We wish we had 
a baker's dozen more like him. We salute 
you, George F. Hendley, our "Man of the 
Hour." 



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10 



THE SCARAB 



e $aj> tribute 



Dr. William Harrison Higgins 

When we learned of the death of Dr. 
William H. Higgins, we were saddened. 
The editorial, which appeared in the Rich- 
mond Times-Dispatch of June 11, ex- 
pressed our sentiments and we quote it 
to you: 

"If, as many believe, the personality of 
the physician is as important as his med- 
ical knowledge, Dr. William H. Higgins 
cured many patients, with his personal 
charm and his ability- to inspire confi- 
dence. It would be difficult to name a 
member of his profession with a more de- 



lightful bedside manner. His mere pres- 
ence in the sick room was often sufficient 
to effect a recovery. 

"But Dr. Higgins, whose funeral took 
place yesterday, had far more to offer than 
personal magnetism. A member of the 
faculty of the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia for over forty years, he had pro- 
fessional competence in high degree. In 
capacity as a teacher for more than four 
decades, he had not only made a sub- 
stantial contribution to medical education, 
but he won for himself a warm place in 
the hearts of the hundreds of students. 

"Dr. Higgins also served his community 



as chairman of the City Board of Health 
and as president of the Richmond Acad- 
emy of Medicine and the Richmond Heart 
Association. A deeply religious man, he 
was an elder in the Second Presbyterian 
church. 

"Such men as Dr. Higgins reflect credit 
upon the medical profession. As a prac- 
titioner of internal medicine for nearly 
half a century, he touched life in Rich- 
mond at many points. He leaves a legacy 
of professional ability and integrity, com- 
bined with a capacity for friendship, 
which caused him to be both admired and 
loved." 



Dr. Hjalmar Laurites Osterud 

Hjalmar Laurites Osterud, Emeritus 
Professor of Anatomy, died in Seattle, 
Washington on May 16, 1957, where he 
had gone to live with his family after 
retirement. I am sure this is as he planned 
and wished. Dr. Osterud was either teach- 
ing, helping to select the future student, 
helping the student once in M.C.V. to stay 
in school, and always understanding the 
students' problems, and sometimes help- 
ing deans and others to understand the 
students with problems; or he was en 
route home to be the wonderful husband 
and father that he truly was. Thus, to be 
in Seattle with his children, his brother 
and sister at the time of death was a ful- 
fillment of a hope. 

Dr. Osterud wrote the dean in August, 
1952 that he would retire in June, 1953. 
I will take a few quotes from this letter 
which reveal the heart and soul of this 
man dedicated to his students and his 
family. "The serious obligation is ours, 
first to the College and next to our chil- 
dren. The desire of any and every parent 
to have at least a short period of some 
genuine usefulness to his children must 
be understandable. 

"For the privilege of working at M.C.V. 
for thirty years, with great tolerance for 
my choice of doing what was closest to 
my nature and capacities, I am overwhelm- 
ingly grateful. They have been in cher- 
ished contacts with youth rich beyond all 

AUGUST, 1957 



expectations. Willingness to part with the 
joys and satisfactions of this long period, 
which you now even wish to extend in 
sympathetic kindness, could make no pre- 
tense of honesty. We merely bow to the 
inevitable because our days of gambling 
with fate are too close to past, but also 
with a good deal of selfishness in obliga- 
tion to our children, particularly to our 
eldest son, so miraculously snatched from 
the clutches of death a year or so ago. 
For what surgeons, nurses, technicians 
and many others at that Seattle hospital 
did for us in bringing him back to his 
present health against such terrible odds, 
we could never make adequate reward. 
Being spared to his wife and children 
and to us in our declining years has been 
a gift of indescribable proportions. But 
also it creates a tremendous urge to make 
up to as dutiful a son as parents ever had, 
a small fragment of the devotion we owe 
him. Nothing is now more cherishable 
than to recapture before it is too late 
those blessed times, while he was grow- 
ing up at home, when we found time to 
work and study together, cherished times 
never frequent enough, since duty seemed 
to dictate that I give more of myself to 
other men's sons than I could find for 
my own." 

This is the man of whom the class of 
1926 was extremely fond. He came to 
M.C.V. the same year we did, and when 
we were being introduced to bones by 
Dr. Billy Christian and introduced to 



Cunningham's manuals by Dr. Novak, Dr. 
Osterud in his kind way came around to 
the tables and helped us in our dissec- 
tions, explaining to us what we were do- 
ing and what that part of the anatomy 
did and where this started and that 
stopped. 

He tolerated the fun that we had to 
have, I guess, to stand the strenuousness 
and strain of our introduction to medi- 
cine. He was indefatigable in his desire 
to go over and over again things that 
we were slow in learning. Wonderful 
memories come to mind as I think of him. 
He was a man with whom everyone was 
in rapport. You knew he would like to 
help you with your question, however sim- 
ple or unimportant he may or may not 
think it was. 

It he was leaving the laboratory or 
the dissecting hall, you would like to walk 
and talk to him. He had the gift of al- 
ways having time even if he was hurry- 
ing, a state no one ever saw him in if 
you wanted some of his time. 

These memories are of a kindly man, 
one who knew so well that difficult things 
were taught with simple clarity. Most of 
all he made his students respect them- 
selves by the great respect he showed to- 
ward everyone. Thus, he gave confidence 
to the freshman student when he needed 
it most, in those first few weeks of anat- 
omy. 

James Asa Shield, M.D. 
Medicine — 1926 



11 



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atal. 



'Round lite Circuit 




Richmond Chapter 

The Richmond Chapter had its annual 
Spring Party on April 1 1 at the Common- 
wealth Club in Richmond. Over two hun- 
dred loyal alumni and their wives turned 
out for a most enjoyable evening. Presi- 
dent R. Reginald Rooke presided and told 
a mighty interesting story about one of 
Dr. Custis L. Coleman's hunting trips. 
Physicians' Products of Petersburg were 
kind enough to sponsor our cocktail party. 

Mixed in with the fun of the evening- 
was the election of officers and we are 
happy to tell you that the officers for the 
coming year are: Dr. W. C. Henderson, 
President; Dr. Custis L. Coleman, Vice 
President; Sen. Edward E. Wiley, Secre- 

( Continued on page 19) 



Dr W. T. McAfee, Secy.-Treas. of the Va. State Dental Assoc.; Dean Harry Lyons; Dr. 

William N. Hodgkin; and Dr. J. Pilcher Bradshaw, president of the Va. State Dental Assoc. 

at the testimonial dinner for Dean Lyons. 



The Virginia State Dental 
Association 

The Alumni Association did not have 
any planned activity at the Dental Asso- 
ciation meeting at the Cavalier Hotel from 
April 29-May 1. They did sit back, how- 
ever, and feel most proud as one of their 
Alumni was honored at a testimonial din- 
ner on Monday night, April 29. Dean 
Harry Lyons, president of the American 
Dental Association, our own dean of den- 
tistry, was showered with well deserved 
praise and handsome gifts as the dentists 



liam N. Hodgkin was toastmaster and 
exuded his everpresent southern gentle- 
manliness that endears him to everyone. 
Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. paid a beauti- 
ful tribute to Dr. Lyons and all in all it 
was a mo;t gala evening. 

Dr. Richard L. Simpson, D'35 was one 
of the speakers on the scientific program 
and to list all of our alumni who took 
part in the clinical program would take 
pages. 

John C. Tyree, D 21 was elected pres- 
ident of the Association. To him we ex- 
tend our congratulations for a happy and 
successful tenure of office. 




of Virginia paid tribute to him. Dr. W 

Dr and Mrs David M. Alexander, Miss Marguerite G. Nicholson, Dr. and Mrs. Custis Coleman, Dr and Mrs W. 
and Mrs R. Reginald Rooke, Dr. and Mrs. James T. Tucker, Dr. and Mrs. W. T. Sanger, Dr. and Mrs. R .Blackwell Sm 
Mrs. J. Robert Massie, Jr. at the speaker's table, Richmond Chapter Spring Party. 



C. Henderson, 
th, Jr., and Dr. 



Mr. 
and 




14 



THE SCARAB 



School of Medicine 

In foregoing pages of this issue the crit- 
ical need for a Medical Education Build- 
ing is outlined for you. The most effective 
function this Dean's column can perform 
is to reiterate and clarify this need in 
order that you as an alumnus ma}- be 
more stimulated and better prepared to 
press the granting of this request by your 
representatives in government. 

It seems almost trite to state that no 
one can do his job adequately without a 
place to work. Similarly, no school is an 
adequate educational institution without a 
physical facility in which faculty and stu- 
dents can study and carry on the instruc- 
tion of youth, the advancement of learn- 
ing, and the search for truth. 

The medical school is the only school 
of the College without physical facility or 
identity. Present efforts are housed in 
scattered and totally inadequate quarters, 
especially those in the Medical College 
Hospitals. The hospital exists to provide 
a teaching laboratory for clinical medicine 
and does so in an excellent manner. It 
is, however, a grossly improper place to 
attempt to locate the center of operation 
of a medical school. Not only is the utili- 
zation of hospital area for classrooms, de- 
partmental offices, and research labora- 
tories expensive but it is also educationally 
drastically inefficient. 

The bottleneck of critical shortage of 
space in our school of medicine is now 
holding up normal development of the 
Medical College of Virginia. This has 
come about for several reasons. The first 
of these, curiously enough, is not through 
any growth in size of our medical school 
classes but rather because of increasing 
demands of our other three major schools, 
dentistry, pharmacy, and nursing, all of 
which have raised their enrollments in 
answer to public demands and all of 
which depend on the basic science depart- 
ments for many of their courses. 

A further reason for our growing con- 
gestion has been the inauguration of the 
younger schools of physical therapy, medi- 
cal technology, and graduate studies, which 
have been developed in areas previously 
occupied by the school of medicine. 

Still another pressure has resulted from 
the introduction of such units as the tumor 
clinic, arthritis clinic, blood bank, visual 
education and those in fields of hematol- 
ogy, surgical pathology, anesthesiology, 
cardiology, renal function, and so forth. 
All of these have been developed within 

AUGUST, 1957 



Deans' Page 



the past fifteen to twenty years and consti- 
tute an important feature of educational 
and medical care operations. Each by its 
contributions to the teaching and health 
service efforts of the institution has justi- 
fied its continuation and growth. Each has 
called for additional staff and faculty and 
has added persistently to the space prob- 
lem in our basic science departments, in 
the outpatient department, and in the 
main College Hospital. 

Several of our college departments, such 
as ophthalmology, urology, dermatology, 
have no definite space assigned to them 
at all, but are occupying scattered labora- 
tory tables, classrooms, and desks in vari- 
ous areas. Surgery and medicine, the two 
main departments of the school, have 
neither adequate central headquarters nor 
staff conference rooms, but occupy a series 
of laboratories and separate private offices 
scattered between the eighteenth floor of 
the Medical College of Virginia Hospital 
and the Brown-Sequard Building. This 
latter aged, hazardous structure has long 
since been regarded by our engineers as 
a serious fire risk. It has nevertheless pro- 
vided the only available quarters for some 
of the most important research we have 
been carrying on for the Armed Forces 
and the National Institutes of Health. It 
houses our greatest concentration of ex- 
pensive laboratory equipment. 

The very success of our efforts in apply- 
ing and contributing to the amazing new 
knowledge made available in medicine 
during the past two decades has caused 
a kind of institutional indigestion. The 
building requested is not for purposes of 
expansion and it will not create the need 
for further construction. On the contrary, 
it is meant to care for the actual, acute, 
and critical present deficiencies by bring- 
ing together in an adequate functional 
unit the various medical school depart- 
ments. 

William F. Maloney, Dean 

School of Nursing 

The announcement of the resignation 
of Miss Sybil MacLean as Dean of the 
School of Nursing was received with deep 
regret. In 1947 she became dean and 
under her able leadership, the school of 
nursing has made marked progress. The 
initiation of the four year basic degree 



program has been the most outstanding 
accomplishment of her administration. 

Miss MacLean is a native of Nova 
Scotia although she has many times said 
that Virginia is home to her. Along with 
two brothers already medical doctors she 
had always been interested in the health 
fields. Therefore, after several years of 
school teaching following her graduation 
from college, she entered Johns Hopkins 
School of Nursing. 

Her love for both teaching and nursing 
found expression when she accepted a 
position as educational director at Bridge- 
port Hospital School of Nursing, Bridge- 
port, Connecticut. Frequently, Miss Mac- 
Lean has indicated that it was necessary 
for her to spend long hours in the class- 
room for it was the belief of those in 
authority at that time that one person 
could teach the major portion of the cur- 




Miss Marguerite G. Nicholson admiring the 

diamond watch presented to Miss MacLean 

at the tea honoring her. 

A more challenging position took her 
to the Rhode Island Hospital School of 
Nursing, Providence, Rhode Island in the 
same capacity, educational director, and 
she remained in this position until she 
went to Teacher's College, Columbia Uni- 
versity for further study. She received her 
M.A. degree from this institution and 
following graduation was appointed edu- 
cational director at St. Luke's Hospital 
School of Nursing, New York City. It 
was while there that she accepted the 
position of assistant dean here at the 
Medical College School of Nursing. 

Miss MacLean in her gracious, unas- 
suming way has made a place for herself 
in the hearts of all her students and faculty 
(Continued on page 16) 

15 



Deans' Page 

(Continued from page 1}) 
members. Those who were privileged to 
have studied and worked with her have 
been inspired by her enthusiasm, devotion, 
and loyalty. All who have been closely 
associated with her realize the depth of 
her intellectual achievement and the dedi- 
cation of her time to study and wide read- 
ing which have kept her abreast of all 
the developments in a rapidly changing 
profession. 

She has been active in both professional 
and civic organizations. A devout person, 
Miss MacLean's daily living has shown 
the spirit of her religion. Sensitive and 
understanding, many of her students and 
faculty members will remember her kind- 
ness, thoughtfulness, and wise counsel. 

Miss MacLean leaves the Medical Col- 
lege with a "well done, thou good and 
faithful servant." As does any good teach- 
er, she leaves a part of herself in our 
school and in time the school becomes a 
living memorial to her and to those other 
deans whose combined efforts have made 
it what it is today. 

Marguerite G. Nicholson 
L. Frances Gordon 

School of Pharmacy 

Most people often wonder how the 
faculty members spend their summer 
months. These months actually are among 



the busiest for some of us but they also 
do provide an opportunity for relaxation. 
In the office we have been busy cleaning 
up the work of the past year including 
the usual transcripts, selective service rec- 
ords, and interviewing new applicants for 
school. Then the work of the coming ses- 
sion must be set up including course pro- 
grams for individual students and sched- 
uling. 

Orders for the coming year must be 
made out so that supplies will be on hand 
for September. A considerable group of 
the faculty is actively engaged in research 
work. In pharmaceutical chemistry, Dr. 
J. D. Smith and Dr. Andrako are direct- 
ing a summer project involving the syn- 
thesis of compounds of potential interest 
in cancer chemotherapy. All together four 
graduate students are working on this ef- 
fort. Dr. Hartung left for Paris in early 
July to attend the meetings of the Inter- 
national Union of Pure and Applied 
Chemistry where he will present a paper. 
He is also a delegate of the National Re- 
search Council. 

In biology, Dr. Hughes and Dr. Hanna 
are working on a genetics problem in- 
volving twins and certain dental char- 
acteristics that are of genetic interest. This 
group is also continuing their genetic 
studies of mites. 

In pharmacy, Dr. Krezanoski is carry- 
ing on work concerning enzyme systems 
and the influence of drugs on these sys- 



Comvh merits 



of 



Richmond Memorial 



Hospital 



16 



terns. He is using techniques that he de- 
veloped at the University of California 
prior to his joining our staff. 

Aside from research work, the staff 
members are in the process of reorganiz- 
ing lecture notes and laboratory directions 
for the coming year. This is a never end- 
ing process that goes on constantly. It 
has been estimated by many people teach- 
ing in college that the average set of notes 
is revised completely every three years. 

The coming of fall will mark the be- 
ginning of College and Career days in 
high schools around Virginia. It is most 
important to have pharmacy represented 
at these affairs. From time to time, we 
may call upon you to help us at your local 
high school. Last year many of you did a 
very commendable job in representing 
pharmacy and we will be looking for- 
ward to your help again. We were not 
flooded with applications to our freshman 
class beginning in September and we must 
all remember that if the shortage of phar- 
macists is to be relieved even partially, we 
will need students to fill our classes. In 
addition, this provides an occasion for you 
to present pharmacy to youngsters and 
their families and this makes it an excel- 
lent public relations opportunity. 

Warren E. Weaver, Dean 

School of Dentistry 

The School of Dentistry is privileged 
to report a very successful session for the 
academic year 1956-1957. 

Fifty-one seniors were graduated on 
May 26. All of our 1957 graduates who 
took the Virginia State Dental Board ex- 
aminations were successful in securing 
licensure. The record of our graduates 
before state examining boards all over 
the country is an exceptionally good one. 
Eighty students have been matriculated 
for the next entering freshman class. We 
expect a total enrollment of 276 under- 
graduate dental students for the next ses- 
sion. 

The MCV Dental Fund has purchased 
six new dental chairs for our clinic. This 
was made possible by the contributions of 
many of our loyal alumni. 

One of our most exciting developments 
in recent years is the establishment of a 
Cleft Palate Oral Rehabilitation Clinic. 
This new clinic will be housed in the 
Wood Memorial Building. Equipment has 
been ordered and the clinic is expected to 
be in operation in September. It is being 
financed by a grant from the Children's 

THE SCARAB 



Bureau of the U. S. Department of 
Health, Education, and Welfare and is 
sponsored jointly by the Virginia State 
Health Department and our Dental 
School. Administration of this clinic is 
the responsibility of our Department of 
Pedodontics of which Dr. C. J. Vincent 
is chairman. Dr. Joseph Bragassa has been 
employed on a full time basis to serve 
in this new clinic. Many members of our 
full time faculty will serve as consultants 
on an * evaluation team for cleft palate 
patients. 

A number of new faculty appointments 
have been made tor the next academic 
session. These include: Dr. Louis D. 
Mitchell, Associate Professor of Diag- 
nosis and Therapeutics; Dr. Donald S. 
Brown, Instructor in Orthodontics; Dr. 
Irvin H. Schmidtt, Instructor in Dental 
Materials; Dr. J. M. Woolard, Instructor 
in Crown and Bridge Prosthesis; Dr. R. C. 
Woods, Instructor in Denture Prosthesis; 
and Dr. James E. Rayhorn, Instructor in 
Denture Prosthesis. 

Harry Lyons, Dean 

School of Graduate Studies 

At the Commencement Exercises held 
on May 26 of this year, five candidates 
were admitted to graduate degrees. Mar- 
vin Jay Bleiberg (Pharmacology) and Al- 
lan Stanley Yard (Pharmacology) received 
the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and 
Howard B. Hucker, also from the De- 
partment of Pharmacology, was awarded 
the degree of Doctor of Science. The Mas- 
ter of Science degree was earned by Barry 
Green Miller for his work in the Depart- 
ment of Dental Research and by Robert 
Lewis Beamer, a graduate student in the 
Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 
During the 1956-57 session there were en- 
rolled 25 graduate students, 12 working 
for Master's degrees, 11 for Doctorates, 
and 2 special students. Admissions for 
new graduate students for 1957-58 are 
still in progress, with indications of some 
increase in total enrollment over last year. 

A characteristic feature of the graduate 
study program at the Medical College is 
the high degree of individualization of 
each student's work. For every student 
there is devised a plan of courses, semi- 
nars, and supervised research to suit the 
student's particular requirements; each 
student works with a faculty advisor in 
his major department. Study for the Mas- 
ter's degree usually requires two years be- 
yond the Baccalaureate degree. Students 
with a Master's degree need a minimum 

AUGUST, 1957 



of two years further study for the Doc- 
torate. Graduates with the Baccalaureate 
degree ma)' work for the Doctorate direct- 
ly — a plan requiring at least three years. 
The most recent extension of the scope 
of our graduate study program is in the 
area of biophysics. Beginning this autumn 
session, we shall have one and possibly 
two candidates working in the Depart- 
ment of Biophysics for the Doctor's de- 
gree. A new and promising field in the 
health sciences, biophysical research is 
concerned, for example, with the effects 
of the atomic radiation upon life processes. 
An active newcomer of the past two years 
to the graduate study program is the De- 
partment of Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 
Graduate programs have been offered for 
some time in the Departments of Anat- 
omy, Biochemistry, Biology, Dental Re- 
search, Hospital Pharmaq', Legal Medi- 
icine, Microbiology, Pathology, Pharma- 
cology, and Physiology. The graduate 
study program is thus involved in a broad 
coverage of the activities of the Medical 
College. 

Ebbe Curtis Hoff, Dean 



Glass Ti 



ass news 

1909 UCM S. A. Slater (M), superintended 

of the Southwestern Tuberculosis San.-itnri 
uni in Minnesota, was presented with a 
"Golden Legion Certificate of Merit" in 
recognition of service to the university over 
a period of fifty years since his graduation 
in 1907 at the annual Alumni Day program 
on the University of Richmond campus. 
From here he went to St. Paul where he was 
honored at the Minnesota Medical Associa- 
tion annual convention. He was presented 
with a "Citation of Appreciation" in rec- 
ognition of his pioneer service in tuberculosis 
control in the state and particularly, because 
he was the first sanatorium director in the 
United States to make routine use of the 
Manteau tuberculin skin test in the schools 
of his district for the detection of tuber- 
culosis infection and disease. 
"1912 UCM William N. Hodgkin (D) will 
attend the Twelfth International Dental 
Convention in Romp, September 4-14. 
1913 UCM Glenn Updike (P) of Danville 
was elected first vice president of the Vir- 
ginia Pharmaceutical Association. 
1915 Baxter I. Bell (M) of Williamsburg, 
Virginia was honored recently at the public 
reception for his forty years of community 
service. Hundreds paid tribute and he re- 
ceived many gifts, including a watch, a 




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silver service and air-conditioning unit. He 
opened the first private hospital there. 

Mary D. Halterman (N) is doing private 
duty nursing at Rockingham Memorial Hos- 
pital in Harrisonburg, Virginia. 
1916 A portrait of Austin I. Dodson (M) 
was presented to MCV following a dinner 
in his honor at the Country Club of Vir- 
ginia by former residents who have trained 
under him. 

1919 Henry W. Decker (M) was awarded 
the honorary degree of Doctor of Science 
at the commencement exercises at the Uni- 
versity of Richmond. 

1921 R. Reginald Rooke (P) of Richmond 
was re-elected treasurer of the Virginia 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

1922 Marshall Gayheart (P) was elected 
president of the Rappahannock Pharma- 
ceutical Association. 

Malcolm H. Harris (M) of West Point, 
Virginia is the new president of the Virginia 
Academy of General Practice. 

1923 Joe Chamblee (P) of Richmond was 
elected president of the Virginia Phar- 
maceutical Association at the annual con- 
vention in Roanoke in June. 

R. P. Hawkins, Jr. (M), Clifton Forge, 
Virginia, is secretary of the Alleghany-Bath 
Medical Society. 

Harry Lyons (D) gave the opening ad- 
dress at the Hawaiian Territorial Dental 
Convention on June 24 in Honolulu. He will 
be a delegate from the American Dental 
Association of which he is president to 
the Twelfth International Dental Conven- 
tion in Rome, September 4-14. While abroad 



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he will visit dental schools in Portugal, 
Spain, and Italy. 

1924 H. Hudnall Ware, Jr. (M) was re- 
elected vice rector of the Board of Visitors 
of the College of William and Mary in June. 

1926 J. Berkeley Gordon (M), medical di- 
rector of New Jersey State Hospital, Marl- 
boro, New Jersey, made an address to the 
Virginia State Department of Mental Hy- 
giene and Hospitals at its first annual Con- 
ference in Roanoke, Virginia on "Dealing 
With Institutional Problems." It is pub- 
lished in the February issue of ' ' The 
Welfare Reporter. ' ' 

1927 W. Linwood Ball (M) of Richmond 
was elected president of the Virginia Acad- 
emy of General Practice at its meeting in 
Roanoke on May 26. 

James T. Tucker (M) will attend the 
meeting of the International Society of 
Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology in 
Bareelonia, Spain from September 16-21. 

1928 E. C. Joyner (M) has been elected 
president of the Suffolk-Nansemond Tuber- 
culosis and Health Association. 

1929 Leslie Hughes (P) was elected secre- 
tary of the Richmond Retail Druggists 
Association. 

1931 Herman Becker (P) was elected pres- 
ident of the Richmond Retail Druggists 
Association. 

1932 Helen Powell Oliver, daughter of Otis 
Oliver (D) of Mount Airy, North Carolina, 
was married on June 1 to Lonnie Rosen- 
bluth, one of the nation's top basketball 
players. 

L. L. Shamburger (M), director of the 
Bureau of Maternal and Child Health in 
the State Department of Health, spoke on 
• • Future Clinic Services for the Retarded in 
Virginia" at the meeting of the Virginia 
Association for Retarded Children, Inc. in 
Richmond on April 26. 

1934 Abe Cohen (P) of Richmond was re- 
elected secretary and Walter Hickok (P) 
of Waynesboro was elected vice president 
of the Virginia Pharmaceutical Association. 

Marguerite Nicholson (N), associate dean 
of nursing, has been elected to a second term 
as president of the Richmond League for 
Nursing. She attended the Biennial Con- 
vention of the National League for Nursing 
in Chicago. 

1935 J. Curtis Nottingham (P) of Williams- 
burg was elected vice president of the 
Chesapeake Pharmaceutical Association. 

1936 William A. Young (M) of Richmond 
was re-elected treasurer of the Virginia 
Academy of General Practice. 

1937 Kenneth N. Byrne (M), who has been 
a member of the staff of Grace Hospital in 
Welch, West Virginia for the past five years, 
has been named acting superintendent of 
Welch Emergency Hospital. 

John A. B. Holt (M) of Charleston, West 
Virginia was honored recently by being 
named the recipient of the West Virginia 
Institute of Technology's "Alumni of the 
Year ' ' award, which was presented at the 
Alumni Association's annual banquet in 
Montgomery on May 25. He was further 
honored by being invited to present a paper 
before the annual meeting of the Inter- 



18 



national Congress of Otolaryngology which 
was held at the Statler Hotel in Washing- 
ton, D. C, May 5-10. He was also elected 
vice president of the West Virgina State 
Society of Allergy. 

Russell G. McAllister (M) of Richmond 
was re-elected secretaiy of the Virginia 
Academy of General Practice. 

R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. (P) flew to Ge- 
neva, Switzerland on June 8. He served the 
World Health Organization as a temporary 
adviser on toxicological matters related to 
the use of food additives. He also served 
as a member of a joint expert committee 
on food additives, appointed by the World 
Health Organization and the Food Agri- 
cultural Organization of the United States. 
Before his return, he visited medical cen- 
ters in London and Paris. 

1938 George S. Fultz (M) was named pres- 
ident of the Memorial Guidance Clinic. 

W. Taliaferro Thompson (M) was gen- 
eral chairman of the Richmond Mental 
Health Association drive and has been 
named vice president of the Memorial Guid- 
ance Clinic. 

1939 Jonah M. Slipow (P) is the new pres- 
ident of the Patterson Avenue Business and 
Civic Association. 

1941 Thomas F. Coates, Jr. (M) of Rich- 
mond was elected president of the Neuro- 
psychiatry Society of Virginia. 

Grover Starbuck (D) of Alexandria, Va. 
is a candidate for the Lieutenant Governor 
position in the Tenth Division of the 
Capitol District of Kiwanis. 

Frank Stephens (P) was elected vice 
president of the Rappahannock Pharma- 
ceutical Association. 

1942 Mary Cibula (N) was a delegate at- 
tending the Institute for Operating Room 
Nurses in April at the University of Missis- 
sippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi. 

Hiram W. Davis (M), commissioner of 
mental hygiene and hospitals, spoke at a 
luncheon meeting of the Virginia Associa- 
tion for Retarded Children Inc. on April 26. 
Tom Smith (M) of San Antonio, Texas 
visited the Alumni House on June 10. 
1943M Frances Gordon (N) attended a 
meeting of the Southern Regional Educa- 
tion Board in Williamsburg, Virginia. She 
and Miss Pauline Steigleder (N'4.8) visited 
institutions in New Jersey recently observ- 
ing and discussing the two-year nursing 
education programs as they are conducted 
there. 

Dorsye Russell (N), president of the Vil- 
ginia League for Nursing, presided at the 
first meeting of the Council on Mental 
Health and Psychiatric Nursing of the Vir- 
ginia League for Nursing at the Richmond 
Academy of Medicine. 

George F. Schuster (M) of Corona, Cali- 
fornia visited the Alumni House on May 
20. 

R. T. Shepherd (P) of Hayes, Virginia 
was elected secretary of the Chesapeake 
Pharmaceutical Association. 
1943D Martha Gleason (P) was elected 
treasurer of the Roanoke Valley Pharma- 
ceutical Association. 

(Continued on page 20) 

THE SCARAB 



'Round The Circuit 

(Continued from page 14) 




Richmond Chapter Spring Party 

tary; and Miss Marguerite Nicholson, 
Treasurer. Elected to the Board of Trus- 
tees were Dr. David M. Alexander, Dr. 
J. Robert Massie, Mr. George F. Hendley, 
and Miss Frances Gordon. 

Plans are now being made for the Fall 
Get-Together and we hope that all of you 
that were at the Spring Party will be with 
us and to those of you who were not able 
to make it, please plan to be there; we 
have fun. 

The date and place of the fall party 
will be October 3 at the Officers Club. 




Richmond Chapter Spring Party 



Roanoke Chapter 

The annual meeting of the Roanoke 
Chapter of the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia Alumni Association was held on 
May 8, 1957 at the Vinton War Memo- 
rial, Vinton, Virginia. The meeting was 
preceded by a cocktail hour and dinner. 
There were thirty-one members and guests 
present. 

The meeting was called to order by Dr. 
Moffett Bowman, president. The invo- 
cation was given by Dr. Thomas Wood- 
ford. 

Dr. William F. Maloney, Dean of the 
School of Medicine, was introduced as 
guest speaker. He brought messages from 
the Deans of Dentistry, Pharmacy, and 
Nursing. Dr. Maloney, in his message, 
stressed the growing importance of more 
medical schools over the entire country. 

Dr. Samuel Driver, chairman of the 
Nominating Committee, presented the fol- 
lowing slate of officers: 

President, Dr. Rufus Ellett, Jr. 

Vice President and President-elect, Mrs. 
Elizabeth L. Sibley 

Secy.-Treas., Miss Ann Shannon 
The slate was approved and elected for 
the 1957-58 year. 

The meeting was then turned over to 
Dr. Ellett. The minutes of the last meet- 
ing were read and approved. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting was adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted: 
Elizabeth L. Sibley, Secretary 

Peninsula Chapter 

The Peninsula Chapter of the Alumni 
Association met on Saturday, April 27th 
at the Hotel Chamberlin. Mr. Ralph J. 
Walker presided and it was an entertain- 



ing meeting. Among the dignitaries pres- 
ent were. Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., 
Dr. James T. Tucker, and Deans William 
F. Maloney, Harry F. Lyons, and Sybil 
MacLean. They had interesting informa- 
tion for the alumni and after their talks 
there was a question and answer period 
which was most stimulating. 

This was the first meeting of this chap- 
ter in some time and from the amount of 
enthusiasm there, we are sure that an- 
other meeting will soon be forthcoming. 
Elected to office that night were Dr. John 
P. Todd, President, Dr. Thomas A. Hun- 
mcutt, Jr., Vice President, and Mr. S. B. 
Wright, Secretary-Treasurer. We hope that 
you in other areas who have not met re- 
cently will follow their example. The 
Alumni Office will be delighted to help 
you make the necessary arrangements. 

Virginia Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation Convention 

The MCV alumni were there and had 
dinner together on Monday night, fune 
24th. President-elect of the Alumni As- 
sociation R. Reginald Rooke presided and 
introduced the new and old board mem- 
bers present to the assembled crowd. 

The convention met this year at the 
Hotel Roanoke and as usual the hotel was 
hill of surprises. For instance, the menu 
came as a complete surprise even to those 
who had ordered it. Nevertheless, we had 
a good time even though Mrs. Rooke 
would not let her husband tell any of 
his prize Ante jokes. 

These alumni get-togethers are always 
one of the nicest things about the various 
meetings. 

1957 graduates receiving awards there 
were Marelene Bertram, Rudd and Pitts 
awards and Robert Stiff, Crockett award. 



The Alumni Dinner at the Virginia Pharmaceutical Convention 

9 43 : 




AUGUST, 1957 



19 



North Carolina Chapter 

The North Carolina Chapter met on 
Monday night, May 6 at the Vanderbilt 
Hotel in Asheville. Dr. John F. Foster 
was our able chairman and in the absence 
of Dr. Irving Shafer presided at the meet- 
ing. 

The Tarheels were most kind and were 
most interested in the progress of MCV 
and the Alumni Association. 

They elected as officers for the coming 
year: Dr. William J. Frohbose, President, 
Dr. David M. Cogbell, Vice President, 
and Dr. John F. Foster, Secretary. 

All the alumni in that area seem to look 
forward to these annual get-togethers. 

Washington Chapter 

It was on April 24, 1957 that the Great- 
er Washington Alumni Chapter of the 
Medical College of Virginia met at Evans 
Coffee Shop in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. 
Peter Commings presided and it was a 
most enjoyable evening for all who at- 
tended. What could beat a steak dinner 
mixed with the good fellowship of our 
alumni. 

Dr. Joseph M. Kkine was elected Pres- 



ident for the next year and on his team 
he has Dr. James Choate as Vice Presi- 
dent and Dr. Gordon Bell as Secretary- 
Treasurer. With such a fine slate of offi- 
cers, we are sure that the Greater Wash- 
ington Chapter will grow even bigger and 
better. 



Class News 

(Continued from page 18) 

Camilla Jeffries (P) was elected vice 
president of the Richmond Retail Druggists 
Association. 

1944 Boyd C. Getty (D) has assumed the 
orthodontic practice of the late Dr. De- 
Forest Whitmarsh in Binghamton, New 
York. 

1945 Robert R. Rector (M) of Elkins, West 
Virginia was elected treasurer of the Bar- 
bour-Randolph-Tueker Medical Society. 

1946 William H. Barney (M) of Lynch- 
burg has been re-elected president of the 
Piedmont Heart Association. 

1947 F. L. Angell (M) of Roanoke, Vir- 
ginia was named chairman of the profes- 
sional services division of the Roanoke Val- 
ley Polio Eradication campaign. 

Anne Glover (P) was married to Thomas 
\Y. Durkin. 

Mary Ann Magee (P) attended the an- 
nual meeting of the American Pharma- 



ceutical Association in New York in April. 

Major Forrest W. Pitts (M) completed 
a course in management of mass casualities 
at the Army Medical Service School, Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas. Military officers and 
civilians learn the effects of nuclear weap- 
ons and resulting medical problems during 
this course. 

1948 LCDR. Lucy R. Benjamin (PT) is 
now at Great Lakes after being in Japan 
for the past two years. 

L. P. Hudnall (M) was elected secretary- 
treasurer of the Fort Henry Academy of 
Medicine at the Wheeling Country Club in 
Wheeling, West Virginia on May 23. 

Harry G. Lockard, Jr. (M) has been ap- 
pointed as chairman of the physicians divi- 
sion of the Roanoke Valley Polio Eradica- 
tion campaign. 

1949 Hilda Garcia de la Noceda (M) is 
working as a full time consultant in internal 
medicine at Sanatorio Ruiz Soler, a 1200 
bed Puerto Riean government sponsored 
tuberculosis sanatorium. 

Jean Hayter (N) attended a meeting of 
the Southern Regional Education Board in 
Williamsburg. 

1950 Walter Bailey (P) of Front Royal was 
elected vice president of the Northern Vir- 
ginia Pharmaceutical Association. 

Donald Myers (M) of Hot Springs, Vir- 
ginia is president of the Alleghany-Bath 
Medical Society. 

Irma Hope Rivera (M) recently opened 
her office limited to the practice of obstetrics 



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You are cordially invited to use the many banking services now 
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RICHMOND . PETERSBURG . ROANOKE .NEWPORT NEWS;. PORTSMOUTH . NORFOLK 



20 



THE SCARAB 



and gynecology at 520 Franklin Avenue, 
Garden City, New York. 

Lee W. Shaffer (M). who is practicing 
at the Roanoke Orthopedic Clinic, visited 
the Alumni House on June 12. 

Ernest Spitler (P) was elected treasurer 
of the Rappahannock Pharmaceutical As- 
sociation. 

1951 Carl Bain (P) was elected treasurer 
of the Richmond Retail Druggists Associa- 
tion. 

W. E. Newby (M) visited the Alumni 
House on . I tine 2.'>. 

1952 Rudolph Gurley (P) of Kilmarnock. 
Virginia was elected treasurer of the Chesa- 
peake Pharmaceutical Association. 

Marshall J. Carper (M) of Charleston was 
elected secretary of the West Virginia State 
Society of Allergy. 

Harry H. Howren (P) has been appointed 
sales supervisor of the Southeastern Division 
of Stephen F. Whitman & Son, Inc. 

1953 Margarita Caceres (M) has finished 
her residency training in pediatrics at San 
Juan City Hospital and is planning to con- 
tinue working with the School of Medicine 
there. 

Warren C. Hagood (M) of Clover, Vir- 
ginia was elected secretary of Halifax Coun- 
ty Medical Society. 

1954 Linwood K. Payne, Jr. (P) has re- 
ceived a fellowship from the American 



Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education 
for 1957-58. 

1955 The sons, Joseph, 9, and Milton, 7, 
of Harry L. Kraus (M) were drowned on 
June 2-1 in the Warwick River near New- 
port News, Virginia. 

1956 Larry K. Musselman (M) was married 
on June 2. 

Sally Eileen Neidermayer (MT) was mar- 
ried on April 6 to William Robert Hopkins. 

Nathan S. Spitler (D), a dental surgeon 
in the dental clinic at Fort McNair, Wash- 
ington, D. C, has been promoted to captain. 



The Baccalaureate Sermon 

(Continued jrom page 8) 

wheeled in. The anesthetic is administered 
and then in almost a debonair, a noncha- 
lant sort of way, with a few deft move- 
ments, the surgeon performs the operation 
and in twenty or thirty minutes, it is all 
over. You will say that is easy but back of 
it lies disciplined skill of a dozen, or 
fifteen, or twenty years; disciplined skill, 
information, and experience that calls for 
the trained mind. 

It was said that Abraham Lincoln wrote 
the Gettysburg Address on the back of an 
envelope going on a train to Gettysburg. 



Don't you believe it! He may have put 
it down in writing but there were long, 
hard, disciplined years back of the accom- 
plishment of writing the Gettysburg Ad- 
dress. 

There ought to be the training of the 
mind and we ought to dedicate our minds 
to some of the great objects of charity 
and service and to consecrated effort in 
many realms of human life. There are 
after all three kinds of intelligence or 
wisdom. There is an ordinary type of in- 
telligence, the sagacity of the carnal mind; 
that's the lowest level. There is also a 
deeper intelligence that stems from the 
heart, that somehow deals with the moral 
relationships of life and the larger per- 
spective of history and begins to under- 
stand something of the framework of the 
world. There is the third level of wisdom 
that identifies all wisdom with God, who 
is author of all law, the gateway to the 
comprehension of human history, and 
the key to the understanding of the uni- 
verse itself. For God is the source of all 
energy and all wisdom is eventually iden- 
tified with Him. It is well to be reminded 
of the words of the Psalmist, "The fear 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 

HOSPITAL DIVISION 

Medical College of Virginia Hospital 
Memorial Hospital 

Dooley Hospital 

Saint Philip Hospital 

Ennion G. Williams Hospital 

(Operated jointly with the State Health Department) 

A. D. Williams Memorial Clinic 

(Outpatient Department) 

To preserve and restore health To seek the cause and cure of disease 

To educate those who would serve humanity 



AUGUST, 1957 



21 



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of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom." 
With wisdom must come love. There is 
the independence of the mind and there 
is, also, the interdependence of the heart. 

One of the dangers of education today 
is that it may become riddled with the 
philosophy of self-expression. Far too 
many people who are educated today use 
their education not primarily to make 
some significant contribution to the well- 
being of mankind but rather to gain a 
certain amount of information and skill 
to enable them to leap at the earliest pos- 
sible moment into the higher income 
brackets. With all intelligence there ought 
to come a sense of social responsibility. 
Blessed is the man who has sympathies 
that are as wide as the universe, who 
understands what it means to say, "I am 
my brother's keeper." We are members 
one of another ; when one member suffers, 
we all suffer. 

How sensitive Jesus was in that area. 
He couldn't pass through a crowd without 
inviting the touch of pain on the hem of 
his garment. When he was hanged upon 
a cross, he heard the cry of the pentitent 
thief and when he passed through the 
gates of paradise, he had that pentitent 
in His arms. 



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22 



We are all shipmates on the voyage 
of life. We may take different routes, 
travel different roads but in the last 
analysis a deaf ship is a dead ship, as far 
as giving help in time of need is con- 
cerned. 

It's true in another realm. The springs 
of Shakespeare's genius were not in his 
mind, but rather in his heart. He went 
forth to face the blast of winter with King 
Lear. He understood something of the 
morbid self- introspection of Hamlet and 
because he first understood them and felt 
them, he was able to describe them in 
poetry such as has made him immortal. 

There appeared in Paris a magnificent 
singer who was pure of technique and 
who had a lovely voice but audiences soon 
dwindled because the voice was metallic 
and lacking warmth and color and a sense 
of interest and sympathy in people. On 
the other hand, here is a woman like Jenny 
Lind who said, "Oh, if I could only give 
another concert to make enough money 
to establish another orphanage." As the 
sun lends its warm blush to the rose, 
so that sense of sympathy thrilled and 
throbbed through the voice of Jenny Lind 
and made her immortal. 

There is one incomparable story that 
comes to us out of the life of Count Leo 
Tolstoy. He was known as a man of 
wealth. One day he was walking down a 
dusty road in northern France when he 
passed two beggars on the road. They 
recognized Tolstoy and while one waited, 
the other overtook Tolstoy and asked him 
for alms. When he rejoined his com- 
panion, he was asked, "Did he give you 
anything?" 

"No," he said, "he didn't give me any- 
thing but he did something better than 
that. He called me brother." The world 
is waiting for the sunrise of that spirit 
today. 

To intellect, there must be added heart, 
and to heart there must be added soul. 
Religion must play a part in every well- 
ordered life. I make no apology, especial- 
ly on an occasion like this, within a sanc- 
tuary, of making a plea for religion as an 
honest part of life; perhaps, not a fanati- 
cal brand of religion but a clear-eyed, 
intellectually defensible, spiritually ade- 
quate brand of religion. For, after all, our 
human personalities are incomplete unless 
they are supplemented by the divine per- 
sonality. Macaulay was right when he 
said that nine-tenths of the calamities that 
have come upon mankind have come be- 

THE SCARAB 



cause of high intelligence linked to low 
moral ideals. It's well to remember that 
clever men are as common as blackberries 
but it is exceedingly difficult to find good 
men, men who sense something of the 
eternal. 

Take a boy who is in the habit of steal- 
ing rides from the railroad. Educate him, 
make him a "Philadelphia lawyer." When 
he gets out into law, he won't steal rides 
from the railroad, he'll steal the whole 
railroad. This is exactly what happens 
when you just educate the mind. 

Education is something more than the 
culture of the mind. It's dealing with the 
whole personality, down deep within the 
man, where character is formed, where 
decisions are made and from whence 
arise all of the finer aspirations of life. 
We need a religion in such a day as this to 
counterbalance all the remarkable advances 
which we have made in every other di- 
rection. Education needs to be touched by 
the glory and the romance of a great re- 
ligion. 

We may be even now emerging into one 
of the great creative periods in the field of 
religion. History records that sort of trend. 
In fifty years in the eighteenth century, 
industry made its most significant develop- 
ment. You had the invention of the steam 
engine, the locomotive, the loom, and the 
cotton gin. In fifty years in the fifteenth 
century, you had some of the great artists, 
Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelange- 
lo, and Correggio. In the seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries, you had some of the 
great musicians like Bach and Handel, 
Haydn, Beethoven, Schumann, and Mo- 
zart. In a hundred years in the seventeenth 
century, you had Spencer, Marlowe, Mil- 
ton, and Shakespeare. Then in twenty-four 
years in the eighteenth century, you had 
Dickens, Tennyson, Browning, and 
George Eliot. 

The truth of the matter is in the words 
of Babson to Stienmetz when he said, 
"God in heaven will not allow us to ad- 
vance any more materially until we have 
caught up spiritually." 

There have always been creative periods 
in the field of religion. There was such a 
time when Moses received the Ten Com- 
mandments on Mount Sinai. There was 
a great resurgence of religion at the time 
of the beginning of the Christian era, at 
the time of Christ, and again in the days 
of the Protestant Reformation. I believe 
that today we confront a similar period in 
the life of our world. Be prepared for it 

AUGUST, 1957 



by providing a well-balanced experience 
in culture, friendship, and religion. 

A good many years ago, I took a group 
of boys out for an overnight hike. We 
made a fire out in the woods and as you 
sat in the presence of the fire, you were 
aware of a circle of light beyond which 
you couldn't see, only a few dim shadows 
among the trees. You looked up in the 
presence of the fire to the sky and you 
could scarcely see the stars. Then the fire 
died down, a few glowing embers and 
then ashes. As your eyes grew accustomed 
to it, you could see a little more distinctly 
the shadows of the trees and as you looked 
up into the sky you saw there the stars, 
palpitating points of brilliance, beating 
hearts of light. I thought the glory of the 
flame was but for a moment but when the 
flame had spent itself, there were those 
eternal lights in the sky and four lines of 
a poem leaped into my mind: 

"Those stars will shine for a million years, 
For a million years and a day. 
But God and I shall live and love 
When the stars have passed away." 

Graduates of the Class of 1957, I salute 
you ! 



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23 



Our Capital Outlay Program 

(Continued from page 1) 
to the new Ennion G. Williams Hospital 
when MCV's portion of the building is 
completed in 1958); completion of the 
second floor of the Wood Memorial 
Building of the school of dentistry; the 
correction of certain fire hazards; sanitary 
facilities needed in McGuire Hall proper; 
and alterations and new equipment for 
the third floor of McGuire Hall. In the 
total request for repairs and improvements 
the sum of $172,000 is needed for comple- 
tion of the second floor of the Wood 
Memorial Building, omitted originally for 
lack of funds. Eighty freshmen are now 
accepted each year in the school of den- 
tistry, which means that we shall have 
150 dental students (seniors and juniors) 
operating in the dental clinics in 1958. 
Unless we can complete the second floor, 
we shall be faced with the necessity of 
reducing the scope and quality of clinical 
training in dentistry. This would obvious- 
ly be most unfortunate and must not be 
allowed to happen. 

HOSPITAL DIVISION 
A sufficient number of beds is now 
available in the Hospital Division to meet 
the clinical teaching needs of the school 
of medicine in the foreseeable future. 

With the construction of the proposed 
Medical Education Building much space 
in MCV Hospital and in the A. D. Wil- 
liams Memorial Clinic (outpatient depart- 
ment) can be returned to hospital use to 
provide needed space for badly crowded 
service departments. Therefore, no money 
has been requested for additional build- 
ings for the Hospital Division. 



We are requesting an appropriation of 
$365,000 for general repairs and im- 
provements in the Hospital Division. This 
amount of money would provide for: a 
bridge from the A. D. Williams Memorial 
Clinic to the St. Philip Hospital, greatly 
needed to conserve time of staff members 
and make certain services more readily 
available to patients; the correction of cer- 
tain fire hazards; alterations in the St. 
Philip Hospital to provide better patient 
care and to relieve the overcrowded con- 
ditions in admitting and emergency facil- 
ities; the expansion of oxygen tubing; the 
purchase of ice making machines for MCV 
Hospital; the construction of a pulmonary 
function laboratory for the Ennion G. 
Williams Hospital; the purchase of addi- 
tional x-ray equipment for the new En- 
nion G. Williams Hospital and x-ray 
equipment replacements for the MCV 
Hospital; recreational, educational, and 
office facilities for the school of nursing 
in the old church building already owned 
by the College and adjacent to Randolph- 
Minor Hall; expansion of the tube sys- 
tem (now seventeen years old) ; and new 
lounge and recreational facilities for the 
St. Philip school of nursing to replace 
those taken away when the Sir Moses 
Montefiore building was razed for park- 
ing space. 

SUMMARY 

To sum up . . . we are asking from the 
General Assembly for the biennium 1958- 
1960 for the College Division, $5,514,- 
094; for the Hospital Division, $365,000; 
for land purchase $225,000, a grand total 
of 56,104,094 for capital outlay. It is 
folly to delay the purchase of land until 
we have a planned building to erect on 




it; this method leads to excessive costs 
for needed land. All land owned by the 
College is used for parking lots, bringing 
in a fair income, until needed for building 
construction. 

It is hoped that every alumnus will 
help us with the task of telling the story 
of our needs to the members of the next 
General Assembly before it meets in Janu- 
ary, 1958. We can put down figures in 
black and white for the Governor and the 
General Assembly and can write up a 
good case to back our requests . . . BUT 
. . . a friendly chat with members of the 
General Assembly by our alumni whom 
they know and respect is invaluable. 
Won't you help? 



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THE LIFE 



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New Appointments 

Donald S. Brown D'53 was appointed 
instructor in orthodonics and Harry W. 
Fore D'51 instructor in operative dentistry 
on the MCV Dental school faculty. 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



RICHMOND. VIRGINIA 



24 



LEST WE FORGET 

1895 UCM Emily Terrell Habliston (N) 
died Jul}- i. 

1903 Frank B. Hart (D) died May 30. He 
was an ordained minister and had held sev- 
eral pastorates in Virginia. He had practiced 
dentistry in Virginia for more than fifty 
years. 

1904 Francis Robertson Talley (D) of Pe- 
tersburg, Virginia died April 25. 

1909 Cecil Edward Martin (M), who had 
practiced medicine in Emporia, Virginia for 
forty-six years, died May 25. 

1910 UCM Edwin C. Bryce (M), an eye, 
ear, nose, and throat specialist in Richmond 
for many years, died April 15. 

1921 John Calvin Hopkins (P) died April 
;i in Radford, Virginia. He was a past 
president of the Board of Pharmacy. 

1929 Brewster Arthur Hopkins (M), well- 
known physician of Stuart, Virginia, died 
March 21 following a heart attack. He was 
prominent in community affairs. 

George F. Simpkins (D) of Williamsburg, 
Virginia died April 29. 

1926 James Bataurst Smith, Jr. (M) died 
April 22 at his home in Keysville, Va. 

1930 Ernest L. Copley (M), a general prac- 
titioner and former Methodist minister in 
the Virginia Methodist Conference, died 
May 13. 

1932 Frederick L. Finch (M), chief of the 
X-Ray department at the Norfolk Naval 
Shipyard and a retired naval commander, 
died May 21. 

1933 C. E. Arnette (M) died May 12 after 
a long illness. He was the founder of the 
Emory and Henry College Alumni Asso- 
ciation. He was, also, most active in the 
Greater "Washington Chapter of our Alumni 
Association. 

THE SCARAB 



first things 




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is not obvious 



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ETHICAL PHARMACEUTICALS • RICHMOND 17. VIRGIN 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

MJJDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

Return Postaee Guaranteed 



THE HOPED FOR 
NEW LOOK 
FOR McGUIRE HALL 





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CMiL M. LINONfcR. £ SON. 

A.. I. A.. W1CMIT6CTS 

R. I OH MONO; VIE.6,1 ni a, 




Official Organ of the 

Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 

Published by the Medical College of Virginia Alumni 

Association in February, May, August, and November 

Editorial Committee 
Robert V. Terrell M'34, Editor-in-Chief and Chairman 
} Spencer Dryden M'33 Edward Myers D'26 

J. Berkeley Gordon M'26 Marguerite Nicholson 

Harry Lyons D'2 3 N 34 

R. Reginald Rooke P'21 W. Roy Smith P41 

Minnie M. Franck, Managing, Editor 
Mildred H. Clark, Assistant Managing Editor 
Officers 
James T. Tucker M'27, President 

Medical Arts Bldg., Richmond, Virginia 

William N. Hodgkin DT2, Immed. Past-President 

Warrenton, Virginia 

J. Spencer Dryden M'33, President-Elect 

6816 Millwood Rd., Bethesda 14. Md. 

J. Berkeley Gordon M'26, Vice-President 

N. J State Hospital. Marlboro, N. J. 

Harry Lyons D'23, Vice-President 

Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Va. 

G. F. Hendley PTS, Vice-President 

2125 Fairmount Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

Frances Gordon N'43, Vice-President 

4514 W. Grace St., Richmond, Va. 

Washington Winn M'35, Secretary 

303 Stockton Lane, Richmond, Va. 

Harvey B. Haag M'28, Treasurer 

Medical College of Va., Richmond, Va. 

Trustees 
Term Expires December 31. 1951 



Waverly R. Payne M'23 

91 29th Street, Newport News 

H. Hudnall Ware, Jr. M'24 

816 \V. Franklin St., Richmond 

Moffett H. Bowman D'35 

1412 Franklin Road, S.W., 

Roanoke, V; 



Allen N. Fore P'3 

308 Second Avenue 

Farmville 



;. Sabra S. Russell N'31 
1439 Louise St., 
Santa Ana, Calif. 

Term Expires December 31, 1958 

E L Alexander M'27 Donald S. Daniel M'24 
Medical Arts Building, Johnston-Willis Hospital, 

Newport News, Va. Richmond, Va. 

R Reginald Rooke P'21 W. Roy Smith P 41 

2929 Second Ave., Physicians' Products Co.. 
Richmond, Va. Petersburg, Va. 

J. Spencer Dryden M'33 J. P. Broaddus D 30 

6816 Millwood Rd., Bethesda, 14, Md. Franklin, Va. 



Term Expires December 31. 1959 



3n; 



Lloyd C Bird P'17 
S. 6th St., Richmonc 



P'33 



E. Claiborne Robins 

1407 Cummings Drive 

Richmond, Va. 

Edward E. Myers D'26 

511 Medical Arts Bids. 

Norfolk. Va. 



Richard A. Michatjx M'37 

Lee Medical Bldg. 

Richmond, Va. 

Marguerite Nicholson N'34 

Cabaniss Hall. M.C.V. 

Richmond, Va. 

Robert V. Terrell M'34 

Medical Arts Bldg. 

Richmond, Va. 



About The Cover 

Participating in ground breaking ceremonies for the long an- 
ticipated Medical College of Virginia student dormitory on Mon- 
day, September 30, are (left to right) Chancellor William T. 
Sanger, Drs. John Daniel Call and Thomas W. Murrell, and 
President R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., ably assisted by John Daniel 
Call, Jr., and Page Nelson Murrell. 

John D. Call, Jr., is the grandson of the late Dr. Manfred 
Call, clinical professor of medicine and former dean at the 
Medical College of Virginia. Page Nelson Murrell is the grand- 
daughter of Dr. T. W. Murrell, emeritus professor of derma- 
tology and syphilology. 

The shovel used is of sterling silver fashioned by Tiffany and 
was a gift to the College by the Williams family in 1903 and 
first used in ground breaking ceremonies for what is now affec- 
tionately known as the "Old Memorial Hospital." 



Attention-. All Alumni 

Your nominating committee under the chairmanship of the 
immediate past president. Dr. William N. Hodgkin, will wel- 
come your recommendations for candidates for the Board of 
Trustees. These recommendations may either be sent directly 
to Dr. Hodgkin at Warrenton, Virginia or to the Alumni Office 
and we in turn will send them to him. 



Our Lost Sheep 



We've exhausted all possible sources that we can think of 
and now we ask your help to try to trace these lost alumni. If 
you know their whereabouts or can suggest someone who might, 
won't you let us know. Each issue we plan to list some of our 
lost sheep. 

Edwin G. Adams P'23 

Minnie Andrews N'20 

Frances H. Barnes P'26 

Shirley Berry N'53 

John A. Black, Jr. D'34 

Robert T. Cauthorne M'?0 

Ruth Mosby Cox P'42 

William Cox D'32 

Elizabeth J. Crawley N'vi 

Crowell T. Daniel, Jr. M'48 

Walter Draper M'55 

J. C. Early M'30 

Meyer Morris Edison D'44 

Charles Feingold P'47 

Margaret L. Frasier N'^ 5 " 

William W. Fuller M'36 

James E. Furr, Jr. D'44 

R. F. J. Hamilton D'l4 

C. F. Hawthorne P'21 

D. Q. Hicks D'lS 
Barbara Howard N'4S 
James E. John, Jr. D'43M 
W. M. King D"50 
Walter M. Ormes, Jr. D'-(7 
F. F. Rangeley D'09LJCM 



The Scarab 



Published by The Alumni Association of the Medical College of Virginia 



Volume 6, No. 4 



Richmond, Virginia 



November, 1957 



The Indispensability or Oirts 
To The College 



Dr. R. Blacknx'ell Smith, Jr. 



It is natural to assume — and some have 
— that the status of the Medical College 
of Virginia as a State institution gives 
adequate assurance that the financial sup- 
port necessary for future development and 
operation will be forthcoming from pub- 
lic funds. If all our friends had proceeded 
on this assumption during the past thirty 
years, the College as we know it today 
would not exist. This is true despite the 
fact that the Commonwealth has provided 
ever more adequately for the basic needs 
of the institution during relatively recent 
years. The future is not likely to differ 
remarkably from the past. 

It is important to understand that this 
implies no criticism or lack of apprecia- 
tion of the State's efforts in behalf of the 
College. During recent years, the College- 
has received sympathetic consideration in 
the distribution of available tax funds. 
There is ever}' reason to expect that this 
will continue to be true so long as the 
College continues to merit the confidence 
of our citizens. Nevertheless, the real 
needs of the institution are so great that 
State tax funds and student fees may be 
expected to provide only the basic neces- 
sities. Even the provision of these basic 
needs will require the appropriation of 
sums markedly in excess of present State 
support. If the College is to continue to 
progress toward its goal of real excellence 
in its educational programs and in the 
scholarly activities of our faculties, addi- 
tional funds from other sources must be 
forthcoming to supplement the basic 
funds provided by the Commonwealth. 

Let's take a look at some of the great 
advances made possible through the gen- 
erosity of past donors, advances for which 
State financing was not available, or was 
available only in part. Outstanding ex- 
amples are the advances made possible 

NOVEMBER, 1957 



through the great and generous gifts and 
bequests of the late Mr. and Mrs. Adolph 
Dill Williams. The first modern unit of 
our medical center to be built, other than 
dormitory structures, was the A. D. Wil- 
liams Memorial Clinic, erected and 
equipped at a total cost of $593,112, of 
which Mr. Williams gave 5350,000, the 
remainder being furnished by a Public 
Works Administration grant. The Medi- 
cal College of Virginia Hospital was 
made possible in part through the magnif- 
icent bequest of the late Jud and Bettie 
Davis Wood. State funds available for 
the construction and equipment of this 
S2, 600,000 building totalled approxi- 
mately $400,000. A PWA grant provided 
51,144,800. 

Such gifts have also been highly signif- 
icant in providing for needs other than 
physical plant development. Mr. Adolph 
D. Williams' bequest provided for the 
establishment of the A. D. Williams Fel- 
lowship and Scholarship program. The 
income from the greater portion of Mr. 
Williams' bequest is used to give scholar- 
ships to students in need of financial as- 
sistance and to provide fellowships for 
advance study and research. The impor- 
tance of aiding worthy students needs no 
elaboration. Less obvious are the highly 
significant benefits that will accrue through 
the years from the availability of the 
Williams fellowship funds. Already these 
funds have made it possible for the Col- 
lege to attract outstanding young scien- 
tists who have made and are making real 
contributions to the programs of the Col- 
lege and to medical science. Such men 
will occupy places of importance on our 
faculty in the years ahead. Other income 
from the bequests of Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liams and from the bequests of the late 
Martha Allen Wise and the late Isaac 



Davenport provides for the support of 
services for indigent patients in our teach- 
ing hospitals and clinics, a type of sup- 
port which is difficult to obtain but essen- 
tial in a medical teaching institution. The 
income from the trust recently established 
through the generosity of the late Arthur 
Graham Glasgow will be of far reaching 
significance in enabling the College to 
attract and to hold outstanding scholars 
in key professorships. In keeping with 
Mr. Glasgow's profound interest in the 
improvement of hospital care, the Arthur 
Graham Glasgow chair of hospital ad- 
ministration has already been established. 

The generosity of Mr. Bernard M. 
Baruch made possible the establishment 
of the Baruch Center of Physical Medi- 
cine and Rehabilitation, including one of 
the country's largest schools of physical 
therapy, as a memorial to Mr. Baruch's 
father, Dr. Simon Baruch. who was an 
alumnus of the College and widely known 
as the father of hydrotherapy in this 
country. Mr. Baruch also gave funds for 
the beautiful Baruch Auditorium in the 
Egyptian Building and for the establish- 
ment of the Simon Baruch Research Fund. 

The establishment of the Hunton Me- 
morial Eye Bank by Mr. and Mrs. Eppa 
Hunton, IV, as a memorial to Mr. and 
Mrs. Eppa Hunton. Jr.. has provided a 
much needed facility of great usefulness 
in ophthalmological research and service. 
Mr. and Mrs. Eppa Hunton, IV. have also 
established as a memorial to his mother 
and father the Hunton Special Duty Nurse 
Fund, the income of which is used to pay 
the expenses of special duty nurses for the 
care of premature infants and for pur- 
chase of special equipment for nurseries. 
Here again is an example of a generous 
private gift providing much needed serv- 
ice which could not be made available 
from tax funds. 

Another example is the recent estab- 
lishment of the Titmus Eye Foundation 
of the College through grants from the 
Titmus Foundation, Incorporated. Promis- 
ing research in the field of ophthalmology 
is being supported in a new laboratory 
(Continued on page 21) 



Next Project of MCV Alumni 

The Lounge of the New Dormitory 

Donald S. Daniel, M.D. 
Johnston-Willis Hospital 



The greatest need for years at the 
Medical College of Virginia has been 
adequate and comfortable housing fa- 
cilities and living quarters for the stu- 
dents. Every former student well remem- 
bers the rundown boarding and rooming 



houses, hardly accommodations, in the sur- 
rounding area. Many of these two and 
three story buildings were ill heated, badly 
lighted, and were veritable firetraps. 

Realizing this deplorable situation and 
endeavoring to keep up with the physical 





November 


L3 


November 


14 


November 


is 


January 27 


-28 


February 2 


1-22 


March 




June 1 




June 2 




June 3 




2 





8:30 P.M. — McGuire Lecture— see program on page 8 
8:30 A.M.— McGuire Lecture— see program on page 8 
8:30 P.M.— McGuire Lecture— see program on page 8 
10:00 A.M.— McGuire Lecture— see program on page 8 
Dental HOMECOMING, see program on page 12 
Biennial Scientific Assembly, sponsored jointly by the Alumni Associ 
ation and the School of Medicine, see program on pages 16-17 

Stoneburner Lecture 
Commencement Sermon 
Alumni Day 
Commencement Exercises 



standards of hospital and college build- 
ings, the Medical College of Virginia has 
broken ground for a students' dormitory. 
The Alumni Association of the Medi- 
cal College of Virginia, in order to be 
a vigorous and growing organization, 
should have a definite purpose. The 
Alumni's last project, the restoration of 
the Fontaine Maury house for the present 
War Memorial Alumni Building, is now 
a valuable and successful fact. Here is 
situated the main office of the Alumni 
Association, its secretarial staff, and quar- 
ters in which the alumni and students may 
gather for study, association, and recre- 
ation. Each year students, faculty, and 
alumni have get-acquainted programs. 
Here, the freshmen of all the major schools 
are introduced to the alumni and enter- 
tained by the Association. Since this Alum- 
ni House project has been completed and 
is successfully functioning as an office and 
as an oasis for the faculty, students, and 
alumni, the Board of Trustees of the 
Alumni Association has unanimously 
adopted as its next financial project the 
lounge and adjacent units of the new 
dormitory of the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia. This dormitory will be located 
between Leigh and Turpin Streets facing 
on Tenth Street. It will have sufficient 
rooms to house 350 students with comfort- 
able quarters at a reasonable rent. At last 
the long needed dormitory will be a real- 
ity. 

The lounge unit of this dormitory will 
be the center for student activities and 
associations; stimuli for academic thought, 
so necessary to modern scientific educa- 
tion. Included in the alumni unit, with 
the central lounge, will be a snack bar 
and adjacent rooms for conferences and 
study. 

Although a part of the dormitory, this 
unit will retain the identity of the Alumni 
Association and will be designated as the 
Medical College of Virginia Alumni 
Lounge with an appropriate plaque. 

This project is estimated to cost 
Si 00,000. The Board of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, realizing the dire need of such 
a dormitory and lounge, has unanimously 
adopted this project as the best method 
to aid the students and the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia. 

To make this project a success will 
take work and money. The Alumni Asso- 
ciation, in launching this undertaking, is 
asking you to remember the situation 
when you were a student and to con- 
tribute to this most worthy undertaking. 
THE SCARAB 



Cjioinc anc) Clioete ynclease at 772(3 V 



William T. Sanger, CLu 



ellor 



The College has had in gifts, bequests, 
and grants, exclusive of state appropria- 
tions and the Glasgow bequests, in the 
past 32 years, $15,874,806.57; and we 
are grateful for every penny of it. 

During the last fiscal year we received 
$1,452,963.63, in gifts ($162,787.54) 
and in grants ($1,290,176.09) ; there were 
no bequests. This is a record for gifts and 
grants alone in a single year. 

Bequests are made direct to the College 
or left in trust. We have tiptop arrange- 
ments for investment and control of funds. 

Grants are derived from philanthropic 
foundations, business corporations, and 
departments of the Federal government. 
A number of grants may be secured from 
a single department of government, like 
the Public Health Service, in a single year. 
Reference to grants in this report refers 
to specific sources of funds rather than 
to the number of single grants. 

Bequests by will continue to be an 
important source of our revenues. In past 
years, thirty-five bequests have been made 
to us. We know of a good many wills of 
those who are living in which the College 
is mentioned. It is hoped, too, that there 
are many more of which we have no 
knowledge. 

Dr. and Mrs. Jud B. Wood, through 
the will of Mrs. Wood, were the first to 
provide more than a million dollars for 
us in a single bequest. This fund of nearly 
one and one-half million dollars is an 
important part of our endowment. The 
bequests of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Williams 
later substantially exceeded the Wood be- 
quest. The bequests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Graham Glasgow of recent date 
are immensely helpful now and may be 
more so in time. Current annual income 
from our share of Mr. Glasgow's trust is 
$34,000. 

Inasmuch as a number of bequests to 
us are held in trust, no effort is here made 
to report the grand total of bequests to 
date. That perhaps will be covered in a 
special feature in a later issue of The 
Scarab. 

During the period, January 1, 1926, to 
June 30, 1930, four and one-half years, 
the College had made a good start in se- 
curing gift monies. During that time 
five wills made the College a beneficiary 
in a substantial total; this now amounts 

NOVEMBER, 1957 



to more than $200,000. In 1926 there was 
a Richmond and general alumni campaign 
tor many givers which reached more than 
one-half million dollars. Cabaniss Hall 
was built with somewhat more than half 
of this fund. Some funds from foun- 
dations also were then secured, the first to 
the College. 

In recent years the tempo of giving has 
fundamentally increased substantially. For 
example, in 1952-53 there were 20 grants, 
one bequest, 61 gifts in a total amount 
of $871,454.06. The next year this total 
was $667,723.78 from 17 grants, no be- 
quests, and 106 gifts. 

In 1954-5 5 15 grants, four bequests, 
and 226 gifts produced $633,990.95. The 
following year $743,537.85 was derived 
from 19 grants and 134 gifts. 

For the fiscal year 1956-57, there were 
19 grants and 207 gifts for a total of 
$1,452,963.63, as mentioned above. 

What the whole College earnestly at- 
tempts to do is to make its work and ser- 
vice ot such indispensability as will war- 
rant support by gifts, bequests, and 
grants. The opportunities for strengthen- 
ing our development are almost matchless. 
It must be rewarding to a contributor to 
see his interest and generous will work 
for him where he has faith and confidence. 
We daily seek to merit such faith and 
confidence. 

Some helpful ideas of the number and 
variety of special College funds, as de- 
rived from income from investments, gifts 
to be used and not invested, and grants 




for specific purposes, is available from 
our auditor's report. This report lists 
342 such funds. Their purpose covers a 
wide range: scholarships, prizes, fellow- 
ships, student loans, research in many 
fields, patient care in hospitals and clinics, 
special lectures, and extra support of cer- 
tain departments. These funds undergird 
the work of all schools and many general 
activities. 

It can now be seen from this report to 
alumni how fundamental, even indispensa- 
able, gifts, bequests, and grants are to alma 
mater. They are made in any amount and 
for any purpose or without restrictions 
as the donor may desire. Again may I say 
how appreciative we are of every one of 
them. 



Remember Us 


At Income Tax Time 


Deduct 20% of yo 


ur adjusted gross 


income for gifts 


to recognized 


charities. 10% additional mc 


iy be d 


sducted if at lee 


st 10% of the 


adjusted gross income is given to a 


tax exempt sch 


ool for a total 


of a 30% deduction. 








This means that 


on an ad 


usted g 


ross income of $5,000— $1500 


is deductible 










on $10,000- 


-$ 3,000 




on $30,000- 


-$ 9,000 


on $15,000- 


-$ 4,500 




on $35,000- 


-$10,500 


on $20,000- 


-$ 6,000 




on $40,000- 


-$12,000 


on $25,000- 


-$ 7,500 




on $45,000- 
on $50,000- 


-$13,500 
-$15,000 



Trusteeship and Investment oi College Endowment 
Funds and Other Contributed Girts 



This article is written in accordance with 
a request from The Scarab for an ar- 
ticle on the "trusteeship of the contributed 
money and how it is invested." In the 
interest of brevity, the article is necessarily 
a summarization, but 1 will be glad to 
give more detailed information to any who 
desire it. 

The College has been fortunate in re- 
ceiving constantly a large number of gifts 
and grants which have enabled it to carry 
out most valuable work which otherwise 
could not have been undertaken. Many of 
these gifts are for carrying out specific 
projects, to be undertaken immediately. 
Others, usually received as bequests in 
wills, provide a principal amount which 
is given to the College as an endowment. 
The principal of the gift is invested 
and the annual income from the invested 
principal is then used to carry out the 
specific project sponsored by the donor. 

During the last fiscal year, the College 
expended a total of $1,442,056, received 
from gifts and grants, including income 
from endowment and trust funds. The 
largest group were the grants and con- 
tracts from the Federal government, gen- 
erally from the National Institutes of 
Health and the Armed Services, $523,000 
being spent for research and $104,636 
for teaching purposes. Other gifts were 
for various educational purposes, scholar- 




William F. Tompkins Comptroller 
Medical College of Virginia 

ships, fellowships and prizes, care and 
benefit of patients, and research in many 
varied fields. 

In expending these funds, our pro- 
cedure provides for expenditures being 
made on request from the principal inves- 
tigator on research projects, or the depart- 
ment head or individual primarily con- 
cerned as approved by the dean concerned 
and the Comptroller. Expenditures for 
equipment and supplies are processed 
through our purchasing department to 
obtain advantages of advertisement and 
insure acquisition of the items needed 
at the lowest possible cost. Similarly, 
where funds are used for employment, say 
for example, a laboratory technician under 
a research grant, the request is submitted 
by the principal investigator, or other 
individual principally concerned with the 
conduct of the work, through the depart- 
ment head and the dean of the school con- 
cerned, to our personnel department, 
where the employment of the desired indi- 
vidual at the proper salary is arranged. 

The principal of our endowment fund 
investment account at the end of the fiscal 
year amounted to $2,043,135, book value, 
and $2,798,674 market value. The income 
from these invested funds during the last 
fiscal year was $84,159.68. The principal 
funds, except for certain real estate and 
certain U. S. Government Bonds, are in- 
vested by the trust department of a bank 
under the direction of the Finance Com- 
mittee of the Board of Visitors. This com- 
mittee is made up of three exceptionally 
well qualified businessmen with wide 
experience in the investment field. The 
bank reviews the investments and submits 
quarterly reports with recommendations, 
which are in turn reviewed by the Finance 
Committee of the Board and, as will be 
noticed from the figures given above, the 
market value of this consolidated invest- 
ment account exceeds the book value by 
more than three-quarters of a million dol- 
lars. It might be of interest to know that 
at the end of the fiscal year 32.9% of 
these investments were in U. S. Govern- 
ment or Corporate Bonds, 2.46% were in 
Preferred stock, 54.59% were in Com- 
mon stocks, and 9-98% in real estate. 



The common stocks include stocks in the 
leading companies of our American in- 
dustry, in the fields of finance and in- 
surance, public utilities, chemicals, oils, 
manufacturing, food, stores, and railroads. 
The real estate consists of properties which 
are needed for the present or future de- 
velopment of the College. Pending such 
ultimate use, the return from the real es- 
tate properties, in general, has been suffi- 
cient to permit substantial retirement 
each year of the principal cost, after paying 
the cost of maintaining the properties. 

In addition to our endowment funds, 
there is held in trust for the benefit of the 
College, funds totalling $4,764,673. These 
funds are carefully invested by the trust 
departments of various banks and the in- 
come, which in the last fiscal year amounted 
to $211,109, is remitted periodically to 
the College. These trust funds comprise 
many of our major contributions, includ- 
ing the A. D. Williams Funds for schol- 
arships and fellowships and for the A. 
D. Williams Memorial Clinic, the Isaac 
and Frank Davenport Memorial Funds 
for care of the patients, and the Arthur 
Graham Glasgow Fund for the general 
aid of the College and its hospitals. 

Another important field for contribu- 
tions is in student loan funds. The need 
for these funds has become more em- 
phasized as the so called "G.I." col- 
lege program for veterans has been re- 
duced. At the present time, the total 
of all student loan funds received as gifts 
and grants amounts to $106,571. In ad- 
dition, we have a state student loan fund 
of $29,043. A student desiring a loan 
completes a form showing his need for 
the loan including a budget, giving his 
revenues and expenditures for the school 
year. This is submitted by the dean of the 
school concerned with his recommenda- 
tion and is then reviewed by the Secretary 
and the Comptroller of the College. This 
procedure insures that the funds, which 
are available for loans, are expended in 
a uniform manner to obtain the maximum 
benefit. Unless the gift specifies otherwise, 
the student pays 2% interest per year on 
the loan while in college. The interest 
(Continued on page 28) 

THE SCARAB 



Wltv UUalitable (^optfaibutioiis tile QncleasiitG 

TN recent years, there has been a great increase in charitable contributions 
■*■ by both individuals and corporations. There are three reasons for this: 
( 1 ) There is a growing conviction among individuals and corporations that 
educational institutions, religious and other charitable organizations are the 
bulwark of democracy and the independent way of life in this country; (2) 
There are more people who have a good or reasonably high standard of living 
and who are able and willing to help others; and (3) The federal government 
encourages such contributions by allowing certain tax deductions. 



Because of the large number of indi- 
viduals and corporations that are interested 
in and affected by charitable contributions, 
a few of the more important factors in- 
volved in gifts to charity follow. 

TAX DEDUCTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS 

Under present law, an individual is 
permitted to deduct up to 20% of his ad- 
justed gross income for federal income 
tax purposes for gifts made to recognized 
charities. In addition, an extra 10% de- 
duction is allowed for contributions made 
to churches and to tax-exempt schools or 
hospitals. 1 In other words, an individual 
is permitted to deduct 30% of his adjusted 
gross income in any one year for charitable 
contributions provided that at least 10% 
of his adjusted gross income is given to 
churches or to tax-exempt school or hos- 
pitals. 

As a general rule, gifts to charity are 
made in cash or by check. In such cases, 
there is no question about the amount of 
the gift. It is merely necessary to main- 
tain adequate records and proof that the 
gift has actually been made. 

In many cases, however, gifts are made 
in property instead of in cash. In these 
cases, the amount of the gift is the fair 
market value of the property at the time it 
is transferred. Here again, if the gift is 
made in listed stocks or bonds, there is no 
question about the value — it being the 
average of the high and low of the market 
on the date the gift was made. On the 
other hand, if such a gift is a work of art, 
a piece of real estate, or other property 
without an established value, it is usually 



^Reprinted from September. 1957 lane of 
T.txo .ind Est.ttes. Baltimore, Md. 
l The additional 10% deduction is alio at ail- 
able for contributions to a convention or asso- 
ciation of churches and certain types of medical 
research organizations. 
Copyright 1957. Lowe and McKenne) 

NOVEMBER, 1957 



wise to establish the value of the gift 
by an independent appraisal prior to the 
transfer. 

Gifts of Appreciated Property 

In many instances, there is a definite 
advantage in making a charitable contri- 
bution in property rather than in cash. 
For example, if the property has increased 
in value, the donor is allowed to deduct 
its full market value, and no capital gains 
tax is payable on the appreciation that 
has taken place. Conversely, if property 
has decreased in value, the donor can 
sell it in order to establish a tax loss and 
then secure a second deduction by giving 
the proceeds to charity. Consider the fol- 
lowing illustration — 

Mr. A, who is in a 50% tax bracket, has de- 
cided to give SI, 500 to Ins college. He has 
one stork certificate which cost him $500 sev- 
eral years ago and is now worth SI. 000. He 
has another stock certificate which cost him 
SI, 000 when purchased in 1955 and is now 
worth $500. He gives the first certificate to 
the college and is allowed a $1,000 deduction 
for its present value, and no capital gains tax 
is payable. He sells the second security to es- 
tablish a S500 long-term loss and then secures 
a S500 deduction when he gives the cash pro- 
ceeds to the college. In this case, (1 ) A avoids 
a $125 capital gains tax, (2) receives a $500 
long-term capital loss deduction, and (3) is 
entitled to a $1,500 deduction for a charitable 
contribution. 

Indirect Contributions 

Many individuals give freely of their 
time for the welfare of certain charities. 
Such persons frequently use their own 
funds for traveling expenses, hotel ac- 
commodations and meals away from home 
in attending meetings or in devoting them- 
selves to the business of a specific charity. 
Such out-of-pocket expenses, which often 
amount to a fairly large sum over a period 
cf time, are fully deductible. The indi- 
vidual should maintain an adequate record 
of them, however, in order to substantiate 
the deduction. 



The Use of Pledges or Notes 

There are many instances where an 
individual desires to make a substantial 
capital contribution for a specific chari- 
table purpose. However, if the amount 
that is given in any year is greater than 
the 20% or 30% deduction allowed, the 
excess contribution is lost and cannot be 
carried over to a succeeding year. Such 
a loss may be unnecessary and can often 
be avoided by spreading the contribution 
over two or more years. This can be ac- 
complished simply by making a pledge or 
giving notes for the balance and paying 
such pledge or notes in subsequent years. 

Mr. B, for example, desires to give $10,000 
to a hospital in which his wife is interested. 
In view of his annual contributions to other 
charities, B estimates that the amount given 
to the hospital should not exceed $2,500 in 
any one year. Therefore, in order to assure the 
hospital of his intention to give the entire 
SI 0,000 and at the same time, to secure the 
maximum tax benefits for himself, Mr. B 
pledges 110,000 with the understanding that 
S2,500 will be paid this year and that an equal 
sum will be paid in each of the next three years. 

CHARITABLE TRUSTS DURING LIFE 
In recent years, an increasing number 
of persons of substantial means have cre- 
ated individual charitable trusts. Such a 
trust may be restricted so that the income 
and principal may be used only for a 
specific organization or field of activity, 
or the terms of the trust may be extremely 
broad so that the funds may be used for 
all types of charitable purposes. 

In some instances, a charitable trust 
is created by one large contribution or the 
capital in the trust may be built up grad- 
ually by periodic contributions. 

Reasons for a Charitable Trust 

The present popularity of the individual 
charitable trust is due to a number of fac- 
tors. Such a trust may be used to commem- 
orate the name of the grantor or a member 
of his family. Such a trust is convenient 
in that the grantor may make his total 
charitable contribution or contributions to 
one entity. Furthermore, an individual, 
by the use of a charitable trust, may ac- 
complish a specific charitable objective 
during life or at the time of death which 
would be impractical or impossible to 
achieve in any other way. Finally, if cer- 
tain conditions are met, (1) a federal 
income tax deduction is available to the 
grantor for the value of the gift that is 
made to charity under the trust and (2) 
(Continued on page 25) 



^ f B ft» £ f^ A » (21 <* f ^|P ^ ^ * & % ' f f 

4£ <"v ^ n ^ r * & r -> <3 O.f O & t*/^* ^ ° -: { * 

Q O £> £ v -, & <?/ ? f ^ ? A 





Personnel of the 45th General Hospital, World War II 



Lire or 45th General Hospital Lustily Relived 



FROM LEE TO BARI is an authentic 
and detailed story of the part played 
by the Medical College of Virginia's 45th 
General Hospital in World War II. The 
former chief of dental service for the 45th 
General Hospital, Colonel Alton D. 
Brashear, now professor of anatomy at 
the Medical College of Virginia, has writ- 
ten a very readable history embellished 
with 100 photographs. The Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia is to be commended for 
making such a volume possible. 

For the unacquainted, the author begins 
by telling how the story came to be writ- 
ten. More than the years of declared hos- 
tilities are covered in his story. He reviews 



FROM LEE TO BARI is printed in a limited 
edition. The very small profit from this 
enterprise will be credited to the Stone- 
burner Fund to assist in financing an an- 
nual lecture in medicine. This lectureship 
was established in 1947 in memory of 
Captain Lewis T. Stoneburner, III (M-37), 
who was killed in North Africa. The book 
may be ordered by mailing a check for 
$7.50, made payable to the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, to the 45th General 
Hospital History Committee, Box 906, 
M.C.V. Station, Richmond 19, Virginia. 
All copies are individually boxed and 
gift copies can be mailed direct from 
Richmond in name of the donor. 



Renewed by W. M. Reams, Jr.. PhD. 

briefly the history of Base Hospital No. 
45, better known as the McGuire Unit, 
in deference to the late Dr. Stewart Mc- 
Guire. He tells of the organization and 
training of personnel by the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia for service in the Army 
in the days before Pearl Harbor. He de- 
tails the story of the hospital's sphere 
of activity at Camp Lee. A harrowing six 
months on an "alert status" at Camp Lee 
culminating in a sudden departure for 
parts unknown are dramatically recorded. 
The reactions of various members of the 
unit to the unescorted trip on HMT 
ANDES in which "going to sea in war- 
time has the added risk of being 
drowned," are humorously recalled. First 
in operation at Rabat, French Morocco, 
the hospital admitted nearly 6,000 patients 
and served many other thousands of out- 
patients. 

This is not a purely technical volume. 
The colorful descriptions of "White 
Rabat," French Morocco, the inhabitants 
with which the unit came in contact, the 
enchanting festival of Ramadan, and the 
decoration of several members of the unit 
with the Sultan's highest order before 
whose members "lions quake and foxes 
crawl into their holes," balance nicely with 
the professional side of the story. 

The move to Italy in late November 
of 1943 was finally accomplished after 
an enforced detour to "Goat Hill" near 



Oran. The reception of their first battle 
casualties in Italy on Christmas Eve of 
1943 dramatizes the violence of war. 

In Naples the 45th General Hospital 
became part of the 6744th U. S. Medical 
Center located in "those regions of the 
Phlegrean Fields that lie between the fair 
hill of Pausilypon and the solitary rock 
of the Cumae." It was here in "the storied 
land of Virgil and the Caesars" that the 
45th General Hospital played its most 
spectacular and important mission; that 
of hospitalizing in 497 days of continuous 
operation nearly 28,000 patients which 
included over ten per cent of all wounded 
from the Fifth Army during the 607 days 
of the Italian campaign. It was here where 
"sailboating and swimming corrupted the 
waters of Baia, but no Propertius had to 
cry, 'A pereant Baiae, crimen amoris, 
aquae.' " 

All soldiers who were in Naples dur- 
ing August of 1944 will be delighted 
with the author's description of the teem- 
ing city where "one way traffic confused 
partially GI clad Neopolitans on Via 
Roma . . . Naples was crowded but not 
by a crowd in a holiday mood." It was 
in August of 1944 that "the benevolence 
of the 45 th General Hospital spread 
among the fictitious characters whose por- 
traits John Home Burns painted in the 
Galleria Umberto." 

(Continued on p-ige 20) 

THE SCARAB 



saassfiafcifcS£=£estaj-a=8=£fcse=83s=£S3»ra 



An Urgent Message To Our Al 



umni 



The College budget requests for the 1958-60 biennium have been presented to the State Council 
of Higher Education and to Governor Thomas B. Stanley and his Budget Advisory Board. Within the 
next several months, decisions will be reached which will play an important part in determining the 
kind of institution the Medical College of Virginia will become in the years ahead. 

Elsewhere in this issue the point is made that the College as we know it today owes its exist- 
ence in large part to the generosity of private donors who have provided funds needed for many 
essential purposes. // is equally true that the College would not exist at all had not the past gover- 
nors and legislatures of the Commonwealth given sympathetic consideration to the needs of the in- 
stitution and provided tax funds insofar as these were available for the support of our programs. 

In the preparation of our budget requests, we were faced first of all with the determination 
of the philosophy on which our requests should be based. The conclusion of our deans and 
other administrative officers was that our requests should represent the amounts necessary for 
the proper operation of our programs on a mini mum adequate basis. To ask for less would make 
it impossible for our people to accomplish in acceptable fashion their assigned missions. To ask 
for more would be to exhibit irresponsibility in regard to tax funds at a time when the State is faced 
with rising costs and needs for expansion in many vital health and welfare programs. We have 
asked for what we believe to be our honest needs. We have asked for no frills. Even with this con- 
servative philosophy the amount of funds requested is necessarily large; as substantial sums are needed 
for making effective improved salary scales already approved as fair and proper by the Governor, 
for adding urgently needed people to our staff, and for the construction and equipping of essential 
physical facilities. 

Elsewhere in this issue Dean Maloney has explained the basis of our need for large additional 
sums to provide salaries for teachers in the field of clinical medicine. The size of the request for this 
purpose is based in part on the fact that this need has existed for years and is still unmet. There is 
no doubt that the quality of our clinical instruction will never be what it should until these funds 
are provided. The significance of this need is obvious. In this area which affects so vitally and directly 
the quality of medical care available to our citizens, the best is none too good — and anything less 
is unthinkable. 

The pressing need of the school of medicine for additional space was set forth fully in the 
last issue of THE SCARAB. In this area our resources are so limited that our teaching mission is 
seriously embarrassed. Proper physical facilities for education in clinical medicine have never been 
provided, and this structure is an absolute must if our school of medicine is to do its job properly. 

Fortunately the needs of our other schools are relatively modest at this time and are based pri- 
marily on increased enrollments. Funds are requested for moderate increases in faculty, in salary 
scales, and for some improvement of physical plant. Though these requests are not large in size, they 
represent needs which must be met if the programs in these schools are not to be permitted to decline 
in quality. 

Our alumni are people of worth, dedicated to public service. You are so regarded in your com- 
munities. Your fellow citizens and their legislative representatives in the General Assembly know by 
your deeds that you seek to serve humanity. If you will let them know that your college has real 
and vital needs and that these needs must be met if high quality medical care is to continue to be 
available, you will do much to serve your college in her efforts to serve the Commonwealth. 

R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., President 




NOVEMBER, 1957 



PROGRAM 



TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL McGUIRE LECTURE SERIES 

and 

SYMPOSIUM ON ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM IN SURGERY 



Wednesday, November 13, 1957 

8:30 P.M. Electrolyte Disorders Characteristic of the 
Surgical Patient 

Francis D. Moore, M.D., Moseley Pro- 
fessor of Surgery, Harvard Medical 
School. 

Thursday, November 14, 1957 

8:30-10:00 A.M. Registration 
10:00-10:30 A.M. The Regulation of Endocrine Secretion 
Following Operative Trauma 

David M. Hume, M.D., Professor of 
Surgery, MCV. 
10:30-12:00 A.M. Epinephrine and Norepinephrine Secretion 

1. Urinary Catechol Amines 

McChesney Goodall, M.D., Profes- 
sor of Experimental Surgery, Duke 
University School of Medicine. 

2. Epinephrine Secretion in Adrenal 

Venous Blood, David M. Hume, M. 
D. 

3. Blood Catechol Amines, Francis D. 

Moore, M.D. 

4. Panel Discussion 

2:00- 2:30 P.M. Ammonia Metabolism in Liver Disease 
Stuart Ragland, Jr., M.D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Medicine, MCV. 

2:30- 3:00 P.M. Ammonia Metabolism in Shock 

J. Shelton Horsley, III, M.D., Resident 
in Surgery, Peter Bent Brigham Hos- 
pital. 

3:00- 3:30 P.M. Normal Aldosterone Secretion 

Frederic C. Bartter, M.D., Chief, Section 



on Clinical Endocrinology, National 
Heart Institute. 
3:30- 4:00 P.M. Aldosterone Secretion in Response to Trau- 
ma 

Bernard Zimmermann, M.D., Associate 
Professor of Surgery, University of Min- 
nesota Medical School. 

Thursday, November 14, 1957 

8:30 P.M. Protein Starvation and the Wound 
Francis D. Moore, M.D. 

Friday, November 15, 1957 

10:00-10:30 A.M. The Anti-Diuretic Hormone 
Frederic C. Bartter, M.D. 

10:30-11:00 A.M. Sodium and Potassium Metabolism 
Bernard Zimmermann, M.D. 

11:00-12:00 A.M. Functioning Carcinoid 

1. Clinical Findings 

William Parson, M.D., Professor of 
Medicine, University of Virginia. 

2. Laboratory Studies 

Albert Sjoerdsma, M.D., Senior In- 
vestigator, National Heart Institute. 

2:00- 2:30 P.M. Management of Acute Renal Failure 

Allan M. Unger, M.D., Associate 
in Medicine, MCV. 

2:30- 3:00 P.M. Electrolyte Problems in Pediatric Surgery 
Arnold M. Salzberg, M.D., Associ- 
ate in Surgery, MCV. 

3:00- 3:30 P.M. The Diagnosis of Adrenal Tumors 
William Parson, M.D. 

3:30- 4:00 P.M. Surgery of the Adrenal Gland 
David M. Hume, M.D. 



All lectures will be held in the Baruch Auditorium of the Egyptian Building, Medical College of Virginia. There is no charge 
for the McGuire Lectures themselves; there will be a charge of $5.00 a day for the lectures given during the days of November 
14th and 15th, except to members of the faculty of the Medical College of Virginia, the Medical Department of the University of 
Virginia, the physicians of the McGuire Veterans Hospital, medical students, and members of the house staff of any hospital. 





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THE SCARAB 




Kounb 



•\OlMl 



Rupert W. Powell, M'35, president West Va. Chapter, Minnie M. Franck, James E. Spargo, 
M'40, Mrs. Pollock, Julian Sanger, Dr. William T. Sanger, Mrs. Spargo, Lee B. Todd, M'32, 
Bruce H. Pollock, M'32 at the Alumni Party, West Virginia State Medical Association. 



West Virginia Chapter 

The West Virginia Chapter of the 
Alumni Association gathered at a cock- 
tail party at The Greenbrier on August 
22. Dr. Rupert W. Powell, M'35, presi- 
dent of the West Virginia Chapter, was 
a most gracious host and we were happy 
to have such a large group of our alumni 
present. 

We are always impressed each year 
with the hospitality at the West Virginia 
Medical Meeting. Confidentially, we think 
the West Virginians are giving the Vir- 
gianians a good run for the money in 
hospitality. 

Our alumni participated actively in the 
program of the convention. Serving as 
chairmen of committees were: Dr. Upshur 
Higginbotham, M'33, Constitution and 
Bylaws; Dr. J. C. Huffman, M'38, Liaison; 



Dr. William L. Cooke, M'29, Public Re- 
lations; Dr. C. M. Scott, M'40, Cancer; 
and Dr. Athey R. Lutz, M'27, Council. 
Dr. Cooke also presided at the symposium 
on Medicare Problems, Dr. A. C. Thomp- 
son, M'45, introduced Dr. William S. Mid- 
dleton who spoke at the symposium on 
Diseases of the Liver, Dr. Bruce H. Pol- 
lock, M'32, was the guest speaker at the 
section on Industrial Medicine and Public 
Health, Dr. Lutz presented the charm 
to Dr. E. Lyle Gage, the outgoing presi- 
dent, and Dr. Rupert W. Powell presided 
at the meeting of the Radiology Section. 
Dr. Everett W. McCauley, M'32, was 
elected president of the West Virginia 
Chapter of the Alumni Association. We 
see new faces each year at our party and 
these signs of growth are encouraging 
when we welcome them with the alumni 
who have attended before. 

Glimpses from the Freshman Party 



lite Csilcuit 

Freshman Party 

The Alumni Association entertained 
the brand new freshmen on September 1 1 
at the Alumni House. All of the alumni, 
who were here to greet them, were im- 
pressed with the fine group who had been 
chosen to attend our alma mater. 

The freshmen in medicine and dentistry 
came in the afternoon and the pharmacy 
and nursing group attended in the eve- 
ning. They survived the heat and humidity 
of a typical September freshman party 
day. 

We were happy to welcome them to 
the College and to take this opportunity 
to let them know that the Alumni Associ- 
ation was interested in them and their wel- 
fare. 




s mm 

(Continued on page 10) 




NOVEMBER, 1957 



'Round The Circuit 

(Continued from page 9) 

Tidewater Chapter 

The Tidewater Chapter of the Alumni 
Association met on Wednesday, October 
16, at the Planters Club. Dr. William R. 
Tyson, M'35, president of the Chapter, 
presided. Mrs. Tyson had decorated beau- 
tifully the tables with pomegranates and 
autumn leaves. Dr. Wesley B. Jones, D'41, 
vice president, and Belvin Blachman, 
P'26, secretary-treasurer, ably assisted in 
the arrangements and "hosting." The 
cocktail party was given by Henry B. 
Gilpin Company and Murray Wholesalers 
for which we were most grateful. 

The large number of alumni present was 
heartening to the guests, Dr. James T. 
Tucker, president of the Alumni Associ- 
ation ; Dr. Warren E. Weaver, dean of 
pharmacy; Dr. E. L. Alexander, chairman 
of the alumni and school of medicine's 
Biennial Scientific Assembly; Dr. Charles 
J. Vincent, professor of Pedodontics; the 
executive secretary, and Dr. William T. 
Sanger, chancellor of the Medical College 
of Virginia. Dr. Sanger was given a hand- 
some pen and pencil by the Tidewater 
group which Dr. Tyson presented. Dr. 
Edward Myers graciously helped in the 
introduction of the guests. 

The officers elected for next year are 
Dr. C. Newton Van Horn, M'46, presi- 
dent; Dr. Alexander L. Martone, D'37, 



vice president; and Mr. David B. Schwetz, 
P'24, secretary-treasurer. It was a most 
enjoyable meeting and the talk of the 
alumni is the dramatic trip back of the 

Richmond contingent. 

Philadelphia Chapter 

The Philadelphia Chapter of the Alum- 
ni Association met on October 23 at the 
Union League Club in Philadelphia. Dr. 
William F. Maloney, dean of the school 
of medicine, brought the alumni present 
up to date on news of the College and 
told them about some of the future plans 
for the school of medicine. The executive 
secretary told the group about the activ- 
ities of the Alumni Association. Dr. Ed- 
ward G. Sharp presided and the officers 
elected will be announced in the next 
issue. 

The second Delaware Valley Fund 
Award given by this Chapter went to 
Gordon A. Hearne, senior dental student. 
He was chosen to receive the MCV chair 
by his classmates. To brief you a little on 
the recipient of this honor, Gordon is 
from Cradock, Virginia. He has been 
married for eight years, received his B.S. 
degree in Chemistry from Randolph Ma- 
con College, Ashland, and has served 
four years in the Army. At MCV he re- 
ceived the A. D. Williams scholarship 
award for the term 1955-56. He was 
president of the junior class, is president 





Gordon A. Hearne 

of the dental school student body and 
of student government this year, and vice 
president of Sigma Zeta, honorary fra- 
ternity. We have worked with Gordon 
on the Student-Alumni Committee and 
can add that he is an unusually fine boy. 

Richmond Chapter 

The Richmond Chapter of the Alumni 
Association held its "Fall Get-Together" 
at the Officers' Club on October 3. We 
were so pleased to have 266 of our alumni 
meet for an evening of fun and fellow- 
ship. 

Bill Garter, P'29, of Churchill Pharm- 
aceuticals, Inc. was the affable host again 
for our cocktail party. What would we do 
without Bill ! 

These evenings, when we see so many 
of our alumni together, make us even 
more proud that we graduated from 
MCV. We could not let this go to press 
without adding a word of thanks to the 
other officers and board of our Chapter 
as well as the many other alumni who 
worked so hard to make this party a suc- 
cess. 

W. C. Henderson. President 



BIENNIAL SCIENTIFIC 



Candid Shots of the Richmond Chapter Party 



10 



ASSEMBLY 



February 21 and 22, 1958 



THE SCARAB 



The Man 
of the 



Hour 



Nobody will be more surprised to see 
himself as "Man of the Hour" than the 
recipient of the honor in this issue. Dr. 
James T. Tucker, president of the 
Alumni Association during the past year, 
has gone above and beyond the call of 
duty. We have tried several times to 
recognize his service in The Scarab and 
each time he has caught on and put his 
foot down. This time a trip of Mrs. Tuck- 
er's and his to Spain and France had him 
out of touch so that the Editorial Com- 
mittee might go ahead, literally behind 
his back, to pay him a deserved tribute. 

To fill you in a little on his back- 
ground, Dr. Tucker was born in Rich- 
mond, the son of the late Reverend Joel 
T. Tucker. His mother still lives in 
Richmond. He served in the United States 
Navy in World War I and holds at the 
present time the rank of lieutenant com- 
mander in the Naval Reserve. He received 
his A.B. from the University of Richmond 
and graduated from the Medical College 
of Virginia in 1927. After interning at 
the Memorial Hospital here and at Walter 
Reed Hospital, he obtained his post gradu- 
ate training at Children's Hospital, Boston, 
and Massachusetts General. Following his 
graduate training in this country, Dr. 
Tucker spent a year abroad doing gradu- 
ate work in orthopaedics at the Uni- 
versity of Vienna, Vienna, Austria; the 
University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; 
the University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, 
Scotland; and the University of Berlin, 
Berlin, Germany. On his return to this 
country, he became associated with the 
late Dr. William Page Graham in the 
practice of orthopaedic surgery. He is 
chief of surgery at Crippled Children's 
Hospital, clinical professor of orthopaedic 
surgery at MCV, and is on the consulting 
staff of orthopaedic surgery at Stuart 
Circle and Saint Elizabeth's Hospitals. 

NOVEMBER, 1957 



Dr. James T. 
Tucker 




He is married to the very charming 
Katherine Huff. Dr. Tucker is a past 
president of the Deep Run Hunt Club and 
has been an active member of the Kiwanis. 
He, also, holds membership in a long list 
of medical groups. 

As to his service to the Alumni Asso- 
ciation and the innumerable hours he has 
devoted to it, we think the instigation on 
his part of meeting each six weeks with 
the presidents of the senior classes and 
the student body officials has proved a 
most beneficial project. The contact with 
the students while they are in school has 
made the Association a more vital force 
to them and the offer to help them with 
their problems has given new purpose 
to the Association's aims. 

He has counseled with all the com- 
mittees that have worked diligently dur- 
ing the year and through the splendid 
cooperation of all of them has made the 
Alumni Association grow in stature. 

Dr. Robert V. Terrell, the editor of 
The Scarab, put it very aptly when he 
said that modesty was one of Dr. Tucker's 
most becoming traits and that "to know 
his good works, look about you." Our 
gratitude goes to our "Man of the Hour" 
who has given so unstintingly of his time 
and effort on behalf of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 



Prescription for Pleasure 



TRAVEL 



Complete Information 

On 

FALL * WINTER * SPRING 

CRUISES 

Extensive List of Medical Meetings 
In Europe 1958 

<■ 

Reservations And Tickets 
For All 

AIR LINES ** STEAMSHIP LINES 

Telephone 3-8376 

C. O. ALLEY 
TRAVEL AGENCY 

708 E. Grace St., Richmond, Va. 
3 T Years of Irani Service in Virginia 

11 



A 



nnua 



1H 



omecomini 



rodrani 



JANUARY 27 AND 28 

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA, SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 



MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 1958 

Registration, Academy of Medicine Building — 8:30 A.M. 
Porcelain Veneer Crown — 9:00 A.M. 

A film prepared by Dr. John C. Barrels, University of Oregon 
Dental School, demonstrating the preparation, technics of 
impression, and cementation of porcelain veneer crowns. 

The Post Insertion Phase of Denture Treatment— 9:30 A.M. 
Richard H. Kingery, professor of dentistry and chairman of 
the graduate and post-graduate complete denture department, 
University of Michigan. 

Orthodontics for the Family Dentist — 11:00 A.M. 

Robert E. Moyers, professor of dentistry (Orthodontics). 
School of Dentistry, University of Michigan. 

Alumni Luncheon, basement, Richmond Academy of Medicine 
Building— 12:30 P.M. 

Immediate Denture Surgery — 2 :00 P.M. 

A film showing the methods of designing surgical guides and 
practical surgical procedures for immediate dentures. 

Does Your Practice Have a Future?— 2:15 P.M. 

Jay H. Eshleman, private practitioner and lecturer on Dental 
Practice Administration, Temple University, School of Med- 
icine. 

Sterilization and Filling of the Root Canal — 3:15 P.M. 
Louis I. Grossman, professor of Oral Medicine, School of 
Dentistry, University of Pennsylvania. 

Friendship Hour, Marshall Room, John Marshall Hotel — 
6:30 P.M. 

Alumni Banquet, Virginia Room, John Marshall Hotel — 
7:00 P.M. 



The Simplicity to Wonder — 

Dr. John C. Krantz, Jr., professor of Pharmacology, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, School of Medicine, and author of the 
textbook, Pharmacologic Principles of Medical Practice. 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1958 

Immediate Endodontics and Periapical Surgery — 8:30 A.M. 
A film by Dr. John Ingle, School of Dentistry, University of 
Washington, depicting a progressive method of root canal 
therapy and periapical curettage. 

Problems in Oral Surgery and their Solution — 9:00 A.M. 
P. Earle Williams, private practitioner in Oral Surgery, Dallas, 
Texas. 

Trends in Group Purchase of Dental Care — 10:00 A.M. 
Rudolph H. Friedrich, secretary of the Council on Dental 
Health, American Dental Association; consultant to the Veter- 
ans Administration; and consultant in Oral Surgery to the 
Army. 

Minor Tooth Movement in General Practice — 11:00 A.M. 
Leonard Hirschfeld, associate clinical professor of dentistry, 
section of Periodontology, School of Dental and Oral Surgery, 
Columbia University. 

Alumni Luncheon, Virginia Room, John Marshall Hotel — 
1:00 P.M. 

A Layman Looks at the Dentist in a Changing Social Order 
—2:00 P.M. 
Arthut W. Harrison is assistant vice-president of the Chesa- 
peake and Potomac Telephone Company of Virginia. 

Adjournment — 3:00 P.M. 



Class 72 



ass I Lews 



1 899 UCM George Barksdale ( M ) has pre- 
sented a life-size bronze statue of Edgar 
Allan Poe to the State of Virginia. Dr. and 
Mrs. Barksdale have moved from Richmond, 
Virginia, to Fletcher, North Carolina. 
1901 James M. Taylor (M), medical rat- 
ing specialist for the past eleven years with 
the Veterans Administration Regional Office, 
retired July 31. He was in private practice 
in Greensboro, N.C., until 194(1 when he be- 
gan work with the V.A. He and his wife 
plan to continue their residence in Greens- 
boro. 

1905 Foy Vann (M) of Norfolk, Virginia, 
has been presented with a plaque for his 
outstanding work with the Kiwanis Clinic 
for Crippled Children. He was surgeon-in- 
eharge of the clinic from 1948, when it was 
founded, to 195G. 

1906 Drewry H. Mason (M), Ridgeway, 
Virginia, was honored with a party on 
August 31 commemorating his 50th year of 
service to Henry County. He was also pre- 
sented with a plaque. 

12 



Daniel D. Talley, III, son of Daniel D. 
Talley, Jr. (M), was married September 7. 
1911 COM Ed Locke (P.) with his wife 
and daughter, Virginia, attended the West 
Virginia Pharmaceutical Association 's meet- 
ing at The Greenbrier, White Sulphur 
Springs, West Virginia. 

1913 W. C. Caudill (M) of Pearisburg, 
Virginia, was named president of the United 
Fund drive of Giles County. 

1915 The new building for criminally in- 
sane at Southwestern State Hospital will be 
dedicated as the Finley Gayle Observation 
and Treatment Center at 2 p.m. on Decem- 
ber 1. The building will be a memorial to 
R. Finley Gayle, Jr. (M), professor of 
psychiatry at the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia ami a member of the State Hospital 
Board for almost twenty years. 

1916 Austin I. Dodson (M) has a new 
book ' ' Urologieal Surgery ' ' off the press. 

1917 Charles L. Outland (M) is back in 
his office after an illness. 

T. Maxfield Barber (M) of Charleston, 
West Virginia, was named to his thirty-first 
consecutive term as treasurer of the West 
Virginia State Medical Association at the 
annual meeting at The Greenbrier in White 
Sulphur Springs, August 22-24. 



Ramon M. Suarez (M) of Puerto Rico 
was presented a citation at the Southern 
Medical Association 's meeting in Miami 
Beach, Florida, on November 11. This was 
awarded for his contribution to tropical 
medicine. 

1921 Mr. and Mrs. R. Reginald Rooke (P) 
toured Europe in August. 

1922 Charles M. Caravati (M) was on the 
program of the fall meeting of the Hunting- 
ton Chapter of the West Virginia Academy 
of General Practice on November 3. 

1923 R. P. Hawkins (M) of Clifton Forge, 
Virginia, was re-elected secretary-treasurer 
of the Alleghany-Bath Medical Society. He 
is serving for his thirty-fifth consecutive 
year. 

1924 Donald S. Daniel (M) and his wife 
toured Europe this summer. 

H. Hudnall Ware, Jr., (M) was on the 
program of the Huntington Chapter of the 
West Virginia Academy of General Practice 
on November 3. His son,- Hudnall, III, was 
married in August. 

1926 W. P. Barnes (M) was the principal 
speaker at the opening session of the 75th 
anniversary celebration of St. Luke's Hos- 
pital, Richmond, Virginia, in September. 
(Continued on page 22) 

THE SCARAB 



School of Medicine 

In the last issue of The Scarab an 
effort was made to provide you with in- 
formation relevant to the capital outlay 
requests of the medical school for the 
1958-60 biennium. This was done so 
that you, a most vital link between the 
school and the legislators in your area, 
could better interpret to them the vital 
needs of the institution. 

The State Council on Higher Educa- 
tion has now approved our request for 
the Medical Education building. What 
impact this recommendation will have in 
the final formulation of the budget of 
the legislature is, of course, not yet 
known. However, in spite of this most 
significant recognition of our needs, the 
budget request of the school must con- 
tinue to be explained, interpreted, and 
kept before each legislator until the close 
of the legislative session next March 15. 
The operating budget is the other aspect 
of our 1958-60 request about which you 
deserve some knowledge. This includes 
the money required for faculty salaries, 
supplies, equipment, operation of the 
physical plant, et cetera. 

Since its beginning 120 years ago, this 
medical school has provided education in 
clinical medicine through the devoted ef- 
forts of many doctors who contributed a 
share of their time from private practice. 
The complexity of medical science and 
the changing methods of education in the 
clinical years today require that a central 
core of teachers in the clinical depart- 
ments, such as medicine, surgery, pedi- 
atrics, psychiatry, serve on an essentially 
full-time basis in order to provide the 
necessary coordination of the efforts of 
the many who contribute to the educa- 
tional effort, to give continuity in the 
educational program, to encourage and 
support the investigative pursuits of the 
faculty, and to give constant direction to 
the medical attack on the different diag- 
nostic and treatment problems referred to 
such institutions. 

Budget requests for the biennium 1958- 
60 include a request for funds in support 
of such personnel. The salary item is 
thus markedly increased over requests in 
previous years. This increased request is 
made in full recognition of its magnitude, 
and with the sincere conviction that it 
represents an amount barely necessary to 
keep the faculty we have and to provide 
the medical school with vitally needed 
personnel. It would bring Virginia's sup- 

NOVEMBER, 1957 



Deans' Page 



port of the medical school up to the level 
at which other states of the nation, and 
especially those of the South, maintain 
faculties in comparable institutions. 

We have the startling total of 2 full- 
time faculty members. Among the re- 
maining 405 part-time clinical faculty, 287 
receive no financial remuneration from the 
school. 

We have no right to continue to ask 
doctors contributing a share of their 
time without pay to go on doing so with- 
out the benefit of direction and leader- 
ship from departmental chairmen and 
their assistants who have the time and 
ability to make the contribution of the 
volunteers maximally effective. At the 
present we do not have clinical faculty 
members who are paid a basic salary that 
is sufficient to provide themselves and 
their dependents with even the essentials 
of living. In other words, any clinical 
faculty member must obtain additional 
financial support from other sources (us- 
ually private practice) in order to live. 

The medical school will never be able 
to operate without the contributed time 
of many practicing physicians, but these 
men and the school must have assistance 
of a core of full-time faculty members. 
We do not have the right to continue to 
ask those accepting teaching responsibil- 
ities to sacrifice — as they must when paid 
only part-time — those activities essential 
to the optimally effective educator in 
the medical sciences, namely investigative 
work, reflective thinking, and keeping in- 
formed through exhaustive reading of the 
advances of medical science. This means 
paying a limited number of faculty a sal- 
ary that is sufficient for their livelihood, 
instead of requiring them to divide their 
time and dilute their value by gaining 
enough additional income from other pur- 
suits to feed, clothe, and house their fam- 
ilies. Such additional salary support for 
academically oriented personnel does not 
mean additional income, but rather a 
chance to abandon outside obligations and 
devote themselves totally to their edu- 
cational responsibilities. At the same time 
such faculty members would never expect 
a total income comparable to what might 
be expected in the private practice of 
medicine. 



The basic principle of organization of 
an adequate modern medical school as 
enunciated here — namely, a core of full- 
time clinical faculty adequately paid — 
has also been approved by the State Coun- 
cil on Higher Education. 

William F. Maloney, Dean 

School of Dentistry 

More than the usual amount of excite- 
ment pervaded the school of dentistry 
at the opening of the current academic 
session. This was probably due to the 
widened scope of our program to which 
a number of new projects have been added 
recently. 

We admitted eighty freshman students, 
the largest freshman enrollment in our 
history. This is the maximum capacity 
of our school now housed in our enlarged 
facilities. Our total undergraduate stu- 
dent enrollment for this session is 274, 
distributed among the four classes as fol- 
lows: freshmen 80, sophomores 72, jun- 
iors 68, and seniors 54. 

Our faculty has been increased by sev- 
eral recent additional appointments. Dr. 
Louis D. Mitchell has been appointed 
associate professor of Diagnosis and 
Therapeutics. Dr. Harry W. Fore has 
joined our faculty on a full time basis 
as instructor in Operative Dentistry. Dr. 
Joseph Bragassa has been appointed in- 
structor in Pedodontics. Dr. Donald S. 
Brown is instructor in Orthodontics on 
a part time basis. Other part time instruc- 
tors are Doctors I. H. Schmitt, J. M. Wool- 
ard, J. E. Rayhorn, and R. C. Woods. 
Dr. Richard Slatten, associate professor 
of Diagnosis and Therapeutics, has re- 
turned to active duty on a part time basis, 
after completing a tour of military service 
in Europe. 

One of the most exciting attainments 
related to our school of dentistry in recent 
years is the establishment of an Oral Re- 
habilitation Center for Cleft Palate Crip- 
ples. This is the culmination of efforts 
over a period of several years to establish 
a cleft palate service program and a teach- 
ing center for dentists who may wish to 
prepare themselves for practice in this 
important field of dental care. We are 
associated with the Virginia State Depart- 
ment of Health in this venture, with 
financial support attained by a grant from 
the Children's Bureau of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Health, Education, and Welfare. 
This project is housed in the Wood Me- 
(Continued on page 18) 

13 



• '////"'"////fy 'V/, 



Significant I&>bins research discovery 



yfr//////s//////yyvy/s 



A NEW SKELETAL 
MUSCLE RELAXANT 




Robaxin — synthesized in the Robins Research Laboratories, and 
intensively studied for five years - introduces to the physician an 
entirely new agent for effective and well-tolerated skeletal muscle 
relaxation. Robaxin is an entirely new chemical formulation, with 
outstanding clinical properties: 

• Highly potent and long acting. 5,8 

• Relatively free of adverse side effects. 1 ' 23,467 

• Does not reduce normal muscle strength or reflex activity 
in ordinary dosage. 7 

Beneficial in 94.4% of cases with acute back pain 
due to muscle spasm. ,3,4,4,7 




f* 



jdt. 





(a) Muscle spasm secondary 
to sprain 



(b) Muscle spasm due to 
trauma 

(c) Muscle spasm due to 
nerve irritation 

(d) Muscle spasm secondary 
to discogenic disease 
and postoperative 
orthopedic procedures 



Miscellaneous (bursitis, 
torticollis, etc.) 



M* 




(Methocarbamol Robins, U.S. Pat. No. 2770649) 



Highly specific action 

Robaxin is highly specific in its action on the 
internuncial neurons of the spinal cord - with 
inherently sustained repression of multisyn- 
aptic reflexes, but with no demonstrable effect 
on monosynaptic reflexes. It thus is useful in 
the control of skeletal muscle spasm, tremor and 
other manifestations of hyperactivity, as well 
as the pain incident to spasm, without impair- 
ing strength or normal neuromuscular function. 



Beneficial in 94.4% of cases tested 

When tested in 72 patients with acute back 
pain involving muscle spasm, Robaxin in- 
duced marked relief in 59, moderate relief in 
6, and slight relief in 3 - or an over-all bene- 
ficial effect in 94.4%. 1 - 8 < 4 ' 6 - 7 No side effects 
occurred in 64 of the patients, and only slight 
side effects in 8. In studies of 129 patients, 
moderate or negligible side effects occurred 
in only 6.2%. 1 - 3 ' 4 - 6 - 7 



WITH 


ROBAXIN IN ACUTE BACK PAIN' ■ » -»■ a. 7 








NO. OF 
CASES 


DURATION 
OF 

TREATMENT 


DOSE PER DAY (divided 


RESPONSE 
marked mod. sligh 


neg 


SIDE EFFECTS 




18 


2-42 days 


3-6 Gm. 


17 


1 








None, 16 
Dizziness, 1 
Slight nausea, 1 




13 


1-42 days 


2-6 Gm. 


8 


1 


3 


1 


None, 12 
Nervousness, 1 




5 


4-240 days 


2.25-6 Gm. 


4 


1 








Nono, 5 




30 


2-28 days 


1.5-9 Gm. 


24 


3 





3 


None, 25 
Dizziness, 1 
Lightheaded- 
ness, 2 
Nausea, 2 * 




6 


3-60 days 


4-8 Gm. 


6 











None, 6 




72 






59 


6 


3 


4 


* Relieved on 
reduction 
oFdose | 





References: 1 Carpenter, E. B.: Publication pending. 2. Carter, 
C. H.. Personal communication. 3. Forsyth, H. F.: Publication 
A n M n Tn^t F F e R nd V *" ^ tSO r l C ° m ™ ni -«°n. 5. Morgan 
4fi -wi ?a£ \ B ^, Jr U and Llttle - J - M " American Pharm. Assn 

7 O^Dohertv n'- P^r""?' tt £ : Pers ° nal communication. 
7 . O Doherty, D.: Publication pending. 8. Truitt, E. B., Jr., and 
Little, J. M.: J. Pharm. & Exper. Therap. 119:161. 1957. 



Indications - Acute back pain associ- 
ated with: (a) muscle spasm secondary to 
sprain; (b) muscle spasm due to trauma; 

(c) muscle spasm due to nerve irritation; 

(d) muscle spasm secondary to discogenic 
disease and postoperative orthopedic 
procedures; and miscellaneous conditions, 
such as bursitis, fibrositis, torticollis, etc. 

Dosage - Adults: Two tablets 4 times 
daily to 3 tablets every 4 hours. Total daily 
dosage: 4 to 9 Gm. in divided doses. 

Precautions - There are no specific con- 
traindications to Robaxin and untoward 
reactions are not to be anticipated. Minor 
side effects such as lightheadedness, dizzi- 
ness, nausea may occur rarely in patients 
with unusual sensitivity to drugs, but dis- 
appear on reduction of dosage. When ther- 
apy is prolonged routine white blood cell 
counts should be made since some decrease 
was noted in 3 patients out of a group of 
72 who had received the drug for periods 
of 30 days or longer. 

Supply - Robaxin Tablets, 0.5 Gm., in 
bottles of 50. 

A. H. ROBINS CO., INC., Richmond 20, Va. 

ffhiral P(iormo^„i;„lo ~< «»,:. .._.. lo-ro 



8:30- 9:00 

9:00-10:00 

10:00-12:00 

and 

2:00- 4:00 



Biennial Scier 

First Session-Febri 



Friday, Febi 



Registration 

Welcome, remarks by President, Dean, and Department Chairmen 



Ben Johnston Auditorium 

Cholinesterase and Other Newer Liver 

Function Tests 
Effect of Viruses on Cells 
Foreign Bodies in the Esophagus 

Audio-Visual Aids in Diagnosis of Car- 
diovascular Disease 

Cushing's Syndrome 

Use of Radioactive Iodine in Thyroid 

Disease 
The Present Therapy of Pancreatitis 
The "Whiplash" Injury 
Surgery of the Heart 
A Review of the Most Recent Advances 

in Uretero-Cystostomy 
The Surgical Management of Bleeding 

Esophageal Varices 

The Advisability of Early Oil Study in 
Negative Exploration for Lumbar Disc 
with Persistent Post-Operative Symp- 
toms 

The Management of Acute Vascular 
Emergencies 

A Follow-up of Patients with Perforated 
Peptic Ulcers 



Lectures 

Baruch Auditorium 

Diagnosis and Management of Bleed- 
ing Conditions in Pregnancy 
Clinical and X-Ray Pelvimetry 
Use and Abuse of Obstetrical Forceps 
Use and Abuse of Tranquilizing Drugs 
Office Psychotherapy 
The Why of Physical Medicine and Re- 
habilitation 

Meningitis in Children 

Common Adolescent Problems 

Poisoning in Children 

Erythroblastosis 

Recent Developments for Improvement 
in Hearing 

Experience with Anterior Chamber Plas- 
tic Implants 



6:00- 7:00 
7:00 

9:00-10:30 

10:30-12:30 
16 



Social Hour 
Dinner 

Ward rounds — all services 

Ben Johnston Auditorium 

Medical and Surgical Grand Rounds 



Saturday, I 



THE SCARAB 



tine Assembly 

iry 21 and 22, 1958 



iry 1, 1958 



Laboratory 

Radioactive Iodine 

3 ulmonary Function 

/irology 

Artificial Kidney 

lardiac 

Iholesterol Studies 

Ixperimental Surgery 

lurgical Clinical Labs. 

:lectro-Encephalography 

'sychological Testing 

'hysical Medicine and Rehabilitation 

lurn Study 

obacco Research 

matomy Research 

adiation Injury 

lectrophoresis 

athology 

.linical Hematology 



Patient Demonstration Clinics 

Dermatology 
Neurology 

Congenital Heart Lesions 
Ophthalmology 
Physical Medicine and 
Rehabilitation 



Cine Clinics 

Porta-Caval Shunts 
Pancreatic Pseudocysts 
Arterial Surgery 
Surgery of the Adrenal Gland 
Renal Tubular Functions 
A New Research Tool and 
Technique for the Microscopist 



ary 22, 1958 



Baruch Auditorium 

Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Pathology — Perinatal Conference 

NOVEMBER, 1957 



17 



Deans' Page 

(Continued from page 13) 

morial Building in a new facility equipped 
with the most modern equipment available 
for clinics of this type. The program is 
under the direction of our Department 
of Pedodontics of which Dr. C. J. Vin- 
cent is the Chairman. Members of our 
faculty in all the clinical divisions arc- 
participating on a patient evaluation team 
and in other activities related to this proj- 
ect. In addition to supplying a unique 
type of service to cleft palate cripples our 
Oral Rehabilitation Center will be used 
for the instruction of undergraduate stu- 
dents and ultimately for the training of 
dentists at the postgraduate level. 

Our 1958 Annual Dental Alumni 
HOMECOMING is scheduled for next 
January 27 and 28. A splendid program 
has been arranged for this event. An- 
nouncements including details for the 
program will be mailed to our alumni in 
the very near future. In the meantime, all 
dental alumni are urged to make their 
hotel reservations for HOMECOMING 
19^8. 

Harry Lyons, Dean 



School of Nursing 

There are 191 students enrolled in the 
school of nursing and 53 affiliates, making 
a total of 244, which is the largest en- 
rollment since the years of World War 
II. In our freshman class there are three 
students who are daughters of three of 
our former graduates. In the entire stu- 
dent body there are eleven whose fathers 
are Medical College graduates either in 
medicine, dentistry, or pharmacy. This is 
an encouraging trend and bears out the 
fact that the alumni make up an important 
recruiting group. 

At last we are happy to report that 
Randolph Minor Hall is being enlarged 
to relieve the overcrowded condition that 
exists in our dormitories. Four additional 
floors will be constructed this year. We 
have long been aware of this need, realiz- 
ing that proper living conditions contri- 
bute to the well-being and achievement 
of students. 

The first class of our four year program 
graduated in May. The members of the 
class were enthusiastic about the program 
and gave a number of suggestions regard- 
ing improvements for the future. These 



have already proved helpful to the cur- 
riculum committeee which is constantly 
studying the program and ways of im- 
proving it. 

Up to this date we do not have any 
report to make regarding a new dean but 
the committee is working earnestly in an 
attempt to fill the position. There are 
several promising candidates under con- 
sideration. 

We know that you as alumni will join 
the faculty in our appreciation to Miss 
MacLean for remaining with us until 
the end of this fall quarter. 

Marguerite G. Nicholson, 
Associate Dean 

School of Graduate Studies 

The 1957-58 session opens with an en- 
rollment of 23 graduate students, 11 of 
whom are working for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy and 12 for masters' 
degrees. The Graduate Council, which 
works with the Dean in promoting the 
welfare of the graduate program, is com- 
posed of the following faculty members: 
Lynn D. Abbott, Jr., Biochemistry; Lester 
F. Belter, M.D., Pathology; Larry F. 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 



HOSPITAL DIVISION 



Medical College of Virginia Hospital 
Memorial Hospital 

Dooley Hospital 

Saint Philip Hospital 

Ennion G. Williams Hospital 

(Operated jointly with the State Health Department) 

A. D. Williams Memorial Clinic 

(Outpatient Department) 



To preserve and restore health 



To seek the cause and cure of disease 



To educate those who would serve humanity 



18 



THE SCARAB 



Cavazos, Ph.D., Anatomy; Ernst Fischer, 
M.D., Physiology; John C. Forbes, Ph.D., 
Biochemistry; William T. Ham, Jr., Ph.D., 
Biophysics; Walter H. Hartung, Ph.D., 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry; Ernst G. Huf, 
Ph.D., M.D., Physiology; David M. 
Hume, M.D., Surgery; G. Watson fames, 
III, M.D., Medicine; Holmes T. 
Knighton, D.D.S., Dental Research; Her- 
bert McKennis, Jr., Ph.D., Pharmacology; 
J. Douglas Reid, D.Sc, Microbiology; 
and Jesse H. Weatherby, Ph.D., Pharma- 
cology. 

In addition, there are 55 members of the 
faculty of the Medical College who arc- 
participating in the program as advisors 
to graduate students, teachers of graduate 
courses, and in other capacities. As well 
as courses in the other schools of the Col- 
lege, there are now offered -12 courses 
especially for graduate students. Gener- 
ally speaking, graduate courses involve 
small groups of students and teaching is 
done in seminar or discussion sessions, 
often with special, advanced laboratory 
work or demonstrations. This permits 
highly individualized instruction and re- 
quires a high faculty-student ratio. The 
course plan of most graduate students is 
rounded out by courses in the basic sci- 



ences offered primarily to medical, dental, 
or pharmacy students. 

The strength of our graduate program 
depends in large measure upon the strength 
of our faculty. Students are attracted to 
work under faculty members known to be 
creative investigators and dedicated teach- 
ers. It has been gratifying to see the growth 
of our College in the numbers and quality 
of such dedicated teachers. To provide for 
them, adequate educational and research 
facilities is a continuing responsibility. 
Ebbe Curtis Hoff, Dean 

School of Pharmacy 

Enrollment in the school of pharmacy 
this year fully reflects our recent remodel- 
ing and expansion program. We now 
have the largest student enrollment in 
the history of the school and the largest 
senior class of record. We have 291 stu- 
dents in all classes which includes 82 
freshmen, 80 sophomores, 67 juniors, and 
62 seniors. Our senior class is made up of 
54 males and 8 females. Of the group, 
22, or more than one-third, are married. 
Five of the group hold degrees from other 
colleges. 

While final statistics have not been 



compiled we feel certain that we have 
had more inquiries handled by our office 
than we have ever had before. This in 
all probability reflects our increased par- 
ticipation in college day programs through- 
out Virginia. Many of you have been 
approached in regard to these programs 
which are annual affairs in the high 
schools. It is extremely important to have 
pharmacy properly represented, not only 
to acquaint students with opportunities 
in pharmacy but also to familiarize all 
concerned with the educational back- 
ground and qualifications of the pharma- 
cist. This is an important public rela- 
tions job for all of us and we hope to 
have pharmacy represented on a broader 
scale than last year. You may be sure that 
we do appreciate the effort many of you 
have made in this program. 

The student organizations in the school 
are actively engaged in recruiting mem- 
bers. The student branch of the Virginia 
Pharmaceutical Association and President 
Don Allen, P-3, as well as the student 
branch of the American Pharmaceutical 
Association and its President Frank 
Robertson, P--1, are planning good pro- 
grams for the students during the year. 
We are especially pleased with student 



FOR OVER 



20 YEARS 

HASKELL'S 



BELBARB 



has provided Safe, Effective Spasmolysis and Sedation 
Now In 

5 Convenient Dosage Forms 





Fhenobarbital 


Belladonna 
Alkaloids 


Supplied 


\ BELBARB No. 1 
per tablet 


J /4 gr. 


hyoscyainine, 
atropine, 
and 

scopolamine 
in fixed 
proportion, 
approximately 
equivalent to 
Tr. Belladonna, 
8 min. 


Bottles of 100, 500 
and 1,000 tablets 


2 BELBARB No. 2 
per tablet 


% gr. 


Bottles of 100, 500 
and 1,000 tablets 


3 BELBARB-B 

with B Complex Supplement* 


l A gr. 


Bottles of 100, 500 
and 1,000 tablets 


4 BELBARB Elixir 

per fluidrachm (4 cc) 


Vi gr. 


Bottles containing 
1 pt. and 1 gal. 


5 BELBARB Trisules 


1 Trisule is equivalent to 
3 Belbarb tablets 


Bottles of 30 and 100 
Trisules 



'Thiamine Hydrochloride — 5 mg., Riboflavin — 2 mg., Calcium Pantothenate — 2.5 mg., Pyridoxine 
Hydrochloride — 0.5 mg., Niacinamide — 10 mg., Vitamin B 12 Activity — 2 meg. 

Send for free samples and literature. 

CHARLES C. HASKELL & CO., INC., Richmond, Virginia 



NOVEMBER, 1957 



19 



participation in these organizations for it 
speaks well for the welfare of the pro- 
fession when these boys and girls gradu- 
ate. We can see the results of this activity 
by surveying the officers of the various 
district associations around Virginia. An 



The Garden Spot for Chronic Citizens 



amazing number of recent graduates are 
officers or have completed terms as officers. 
This augurs well for the future of phar- 
macy in Virginia. 

Warren E. Weaver, Dean 




9 minutes fay car from any local hospital 

skilled NURSING CARE 

24 Hours Daily Professional Supervision 

AGED * CHRONICALLY ILL 

INVALIDS ♦ CONVALESCENTS 

. Each Patienl Attended by Own Doctor 

• Res. R.N. and Res. M.C.V. Extern 

• Formerly 52 Bed General Hospital 

• Trained Dietitian. Part Time O.T. 

• Private and Semi-Private Rooms and Toilets 

• targe Trained Staff of Nurses and Attendants 

• Kidde ATMO Fire Detection System 

• Rates From $50 to $75 Weekly, Gen. Core 

Write or Phone Bernard Maslan, Adm. 

Terrace Hill Nursing Home 

"Understanding dire" 

2112 Monteiro Avenue, Richmond 

Phone 3-3993 



45th General Hospital 

(Continued from page 6) 

"Off-Post Cultural Recreation," decreed 
by the Army, is vividly described. Pompei, 
Capri, Sorrento, the opera from which 
"many left sensing something had been 
added to their cultural advancement," and 
the eruption of Mount Vesuvius are all 
given their place in this history. The less 
cultural "aerial nitecaps and bed checks" 
by the Luftwaffe "assured one of never a 
dull moment." The author's description 
of the confused private in Rome will re- 
call for many an ex-Fifth Army GI their 
rest camp days in the Eternal City. 

The end of the war in Italy did not 
mark the termination of duty for the 45th 
General Hospital. Already overseas for 
twenty-six months, it was ordered to the 
Adriatic to serve the 15th Air Force. The 
final curtain on its activity was lowered 
at Bari, Italy on 30 September 1945. 

General Mark W. Clark, Commanding 
General of the Fifth Army, has written 
the Foreword in this history. In referring 
to the accomplishments of the unit Gen- 
eral Clark states: 

"From the moment of its arrival at 
Casablanca late in March, 1943, through 
the entire ensuing campaign which 




Symbol of Security 
for you and yours 

This Company, one of the Nation's old- 
est, largest and strongest, provides a 
means of financial security for more than 
a million Americans and their families. 



THE LIFE 



INSURANCE 
COMPANY 



OF VIRGINIA 



ESTABLISHED 1871 



RICHMOND. VIRGINIA 



20 



eventuated in the German surrender 
in the spring of 1945, the 45th served 
Allied Forces in the fields with the 
greatest diligence, distinction, and brav- 
ery. There is no way of estimating the 
number of lives saved by the valor and 
loyalty of the doctors and nurses in the 
45th General Hospital. Its load was 
at all times oppressively heavy, and, 
as Colonel Brashear's history makes 
clear, it was called on during the blood- 
iest phases of battle to handle upwards 
of 2,000 casualties daily . . . adding a 
special luster to the battle fame of the 
proud State of Virginia." 

The book has ten chapters and an ap- 
pendix containing the major citations and 
all personnel rosters. The first nine chap- 
ters tell the story. A liberal use of an 
abundant supply of 45th General Hos- 
pital anecdotes and individual activities 
add considerable interest to the text for 
those who read it for personal and senti- 
mental reasons. The ninth chapter closes 
the story with a proud note of accomplish- 
ment and a nostalgic commentary on in- 
activation. 

The tenth chapter details the admini- 
strative and professional services accom- 
plishments. The dramatic results of the 
first use of penicillin by the surgical 
service of the unit, and their experience in 
early closure of wounds are faithfully 
recorded. The humorous reactions to the 
treatment evolved for infectious hepatitis 
in which "a guy can get awfully tired of 
steaks and malted milks, believe me . . . 
why don't they serve Spam once in a 
while," add much color to what could 
have been, in less experienced hands, de- 
tails of interest to professional people 
only. 

Written in a slightly changing style, 
it establishes an atmosphere closely remi- 
niscent of the confused days of 1940- 
1945. There are a minimum of footnotes 
and an abundance of references which 
thoroughly document the source material 
indicating careful and arduous research 
by the author. From musty archives, dusty 
attics, and rusty memories, he has pieced 
together an unusual unit history. It adds 
another chapter to the distinguished ser- 
vice by the Medical College of Virginia 
in wartime. Alumni of the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia, former personnel of 
the Medical Department of the Army, and 
"those who served in more colorful activ- 
ities" will find this book a worthwhile 
addition to their bookshelves. 

THE SCARAB 



Indispensability of Gifts 

(Continued from pjge 1) 

provided with Titmus Foundation funds. 
The work already done demonstrates how 
useful such generous gifts can be in pro- 
viding our people with opportunities for 
contributing to the solution of important 
problems. Even more recently, the Buford 
and Mary Nixon Scott Foundation, the 
Jeffress Memorial, and the John Stewart 
Bryan Memorial Foundation have estab- 
lished a fund to finance research on the 
development of a more efficient heart- 
lung apparatus. 

Space permits the mention here of only 
a few of the gifts and bequests received. 
Many other gifts of substantial size have 
aided the College in ways for which no 
other financing was available. All are 
recorded in the College catalog and all 
are deeply appreciated. 

Smaller gifts to important funds estab- 
lished for specific purposes have also been 
of the greatest assistance. The Wortley 
Fuller Rudd Memorial Fund, created by 
gifts of Virginia pharmacists, ranging 
from S5 to $500, made possible the 
creation of the Rudd Memorial Labora- 
tory. Numerous alumni gifts to the Dental 
Fund have aided substantially the pro- 
grams of the school of dentistry. Substan- 
tial gifts already made to the Bigger Me- 
morial Fund will in time, as further 
contributions are added, make real our 
plans for the Bigger Memorial Audi- 
torium, a memorial to the late, beloved 
Dr. Isaac A. Bigger. Gifts to the Medical 
College of Virginia Foundation have been 
of inestimable value in providing unre- 
stricted funds to cover special needs for 
which no other support was or is available. 
Among industrial benefactions, the an- 
nual research grants from the American 
Tobacco Company over a period of more 
than twenty years have been of great 
assistance; and the Company's gift of the 
Nutriculture Laboratory will make pos- 
sible research of far-reaching significance. 
In addition to contributions from local 
friends, national foundations have given 
indispensable aid in regard to our basic 
instructional programs, the conduct of 
research, and the advanced training of 
scholars. There are numerous examples, 
but the most outstanding are the National 
Fund for Medical Education and the Amer- 
ican Medical Education Foundation, which 
have given substantial yearly grants with- 
out which our instructional program in 

NOVEMBER, 1957 



medicine could not have progressed to 
the point where it now stands. Also highly 
important and helpful have been grants 
from the John and Mary R. Markle 
Foundation Fund, the Commonwealth 
Fund, the Kellogg Foundation, and the 
General Education Board. 

The list could be extended indefinitely, 
but the point is clear. The Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia could not have been de- 
veloped to its present stature solely on 
the basis of State tax funds and student 
fees. The future of the College, as medical 
and related education, research, and service 
become constantly more complicated and 
expensive, will certainly not be less de- 
pendent on the gifts and bequests of gen- 
erous friends; and quite possibly we shall 
become relatively more dependent on 
such donors, as we strive for a level of 
leadership and excellence which reaches 
beyond but has as its foundation the basic 
programs for which State support can be 
reasonably expected. In seeking these vital 
gifts, your college needs the support and 
help of every loyal alumnus. 



LEST WE FORGET 

1888 Joseph Spencer Dejarnette (M), for- 
mer superintendent of Western State Hos- 
pital in Staunton, Virginia, and widely 
known in the Held of mental health, died 
September 3. 

1898 QCM Elizabeth Terrell Faulkner (N) 
of Fredericksburg, Virginia, died July 23. 

1899 1'i'M Thomas David Tyson (M) died 
August 17 in Mebane, North Carolina. He 
had retired from practice about five years 
ago. In 1954 he received a medal from the 
North Carolina Medical Society commemo- 
rating his more than fifty years of service 
in the practice of medicine. 

1904 Elisha Barksdale (M), widely known 
surgeon of Lynchburg, Virginia, died 
September' 12 after a long illness. He was 
a pioneer in public health and among those 
responsible for the founding of the Lynch- 
burg Genera] Hospital and served as its 
first chief of the staff. 

1910 Walter Otis Tune (M) of Brookneal, 
Virginia, died August 20. He had retired in 
January because of ill health. 

1912 Stewart McBryde (M), practicing 
physician in the Northern Virginia area for 
32 years, died in Arlington, Virginia, of a 
heart ailment on July 10. 

1913 CJCM B. Blanton Dutton (M), promi- 
nent physician of Winchester, Virginia, died 
August 22 after a long illness. On the 
occasion of his sixty-second birthday, the 
citizens of Winchester honored him at a 



reject tot CoH#mfcon4 




tictel 



John Marshall 



FRANKLIN AT FIFTH 

"Richmond's Host for 
Every Occasion" 

Wonderful food, beautiful rooms, perfect 
service, plus air-conditioning, establish 
Hotel John Marshall as the civic, social 
and convention center of Richmond. Con- 
venient to stores, theatres, shops, points 
of historic interest and to the financial 



I 



A 



.JSsM?PSfj; ffl 



J ,( JiPij^P^li 




Chamberlin 

Old Point Comfort, Fort Monroe, Va. 

The Largest and Finest 
Hotel on Virginia's East Coast 



Spend a week end or a season at Hotel 
Chamberlin, you will enjoy the luxury of 
one of America's finest resort hotels, with 
food, rooms and service all you could 
desire. Nearby are Yorktown, Langley 
Field, Jamestown and Williamsburg. 



&/M/l>fO/V0//or£LS,//VC., TP/OMWD, V/PGMA- 



HOTEL 
KING CARTER 

ISO too.,, 

RatM from $3.50 



HOTEL 
RICHMOND 

300 Bo»m, 

Rate* from $4.00 



HOTEL 
WM. BYRD 

200 Boema 
Kates from 14 .08 



All Hotels Have Modern Off-Street Parking Facilities! 
ned and Operated by Richmond Hotels, Incorporated 

wim*mmmmmmmmmmm 



21 



public reception and the mayor declared the 
day to be set aside as ' ' Dr. Dutton Day ' ' 
to do honor to a useful and beloved citizen. 
T. D. Morewitz (M) of Newport News, 
Virginia, died September 5 after a long 
illness. 

1914 Thomas Griffin Hardy (M) of Farrn- 
ville, Virginia, died .June 24. He was a 
principal participant in the organization 
of the Southside Community Hospital and 
was a member of the hospital surgical staff. 

1915 George Garland Rhudy (M) of Roa- 
noke, Virginia, died June 20. He. apparently 
having suffered a heart attack, was found 
dead in his car near Strasburg, Colorado, 
where he was on a vacation trip. 

1922 William Edwin Dickerson (M) of 
Danville, Virginia, died March 28. 
1927 Jeremiah Robert Johnson (M) of El- 
kins, North Carolina, died April 11. 

1931 Gladys Corbitt (N) of Sunbury, North 
Carolina, died in September. 

1932 Carroll Spencer Credle (M) of Ahoskie, 
North Carolina, died April 3. 

1938 Hubert D. Crow (M) of Suffolk, Vir- 
ginia, died July 21. He was director of the 
Tri-C'ounty-Suffolk health district, com- 
prised of Isle of Wight, Nanseniond, South- 
ampton counties, and the city of Suffolk. 



Class News 

(Continued from page 12) 

Frances Shield, daughter of J. Asa Shield 
(M) was married on September 7. 
1927 Col. Seth Gayle (M) visited the 
Alumni Office on October 1. He has recently 
retired from the Army and is living in 
Spartanburg, S. C. 

J. W. Parker, Jr., of Seaboard, North 
Carolina, was chosen president of Seaboard 
Air Line Railroad Surgeons Association at 
their meeting in Richmond, Virginia, in 
October. 



1928 Harvey Haag (M) attended the fall 
meeting of the American Society for Phar- 
macology and Experimental Therapeutics at 
Johns Hopkins University, September 4-7. 

N. B. Jeter (M) of Covington, Virginia, 
was elected president of the Alleghany-Bath 
Medical Society. 

1930 Capt. J. C. Early (M) was relieved 
of his duties as commanding officer of the 
U. S. Naval School of Aviation Medicine in 
a formal ceremony at the Naval Air Station, 
Pensacola, Florida, on July 23. He reported 
to Norfolk, Virginia, for duty as Fleet Sur- 
geon for the Atlantic Fleet. 

1931 Deborah Cappleman (N) of Brooks- 
ville, Florida, visited the Alumni House on 
August 9 with Mrs. Eugenia Triplett 
(N'll). 

1932 W. H. Saunders (M) is a viee-presi- 
leiit of the Roanoke Academy of Medicine. 

1933 David S. Garner (M) was installed 
in September as president of the Roanoke 
Academy of Medicine. 

J. Bernard Jones (M) of Culpeper was 
elected president of the Culpeper County 
Medical Society. 

1935 Washington C. Winn (M) of Rich- 
mond, Virginia, spoke at the ninth annual 
meeting and scientific assembly of the Mary- 
land Academy of General Practice at Easton 
on October 9 and 10. 

1936 Raymond Arp (M) of Atlanta, 
Georgia, presented a paper at the meeting 
of the Southeastern Allergy Association at 
Fort Sumter Hotel, Charleston, South Caro- 
lina, in November. 

1937 Guy W. Daugherty (M), internist at 
the Mayo Clinic at Rochester, Minnesota. 
and assistant professor of medicine in the 
Mayo Foundation, Graduate School, Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, was chairman of a 
committee which planned a symposium on 
peripheral vascular diseases presented by 
the Minnesota Heart Association and the 
Mayo Foundation on September 23, 24, and 



Compliments 
of 

Richmond Memorial 
Hospital 



22 



1938 Gordon D. Hall (M) is back in his 
office after a brief illness. 

J. C. Huffman (M) of Buekhannon, West 
Virginia, was named vice-president of the 
West Virginia State Medical Association at 
the annual meeting at The Greenbrier in 
White Sulphur Springs, August 22-24. His 
wife was installed as president of the 
Woman's Auxiliary to the West Virginia 
State Medical Association. 

W. T. Thompson, Jr., (M), chief of medi- 
cine at McGuire Hospital, was the speaker 
at the banquet for the 75th anniversary cele- 
bration of St. Luke's Hospital, Richmond, 
Virginia, in September. He was a former 
staff member. 

1939 Col. James W. Humphreys, Jr., (M) 
was awarded a plaque of appreciation by the 
University of Santo Tomas faculty of medi- 
cine and surgery while he was stationed 
with the U. S. Thirteenth Air Force on Clark 
Air Base in the Philippines. He was cited for 
his valuable help and contribution to the 
University's Internship Training Program. 
He also was credited for his assistance to 
the Philippine Department of Health in the 
training of department personnel in the 
fields of hospital administration, medical 
records, plants maintenance, labor tech- 
nology, and other phases of hospital opera- 
tion. 

1940 John F. Gibson, Jr., (M) is working 
for the National Academy of Sciences, Na- 
tional Research Council, as research analyst, 
preparing a monograph of data on respira- 
tory physiology. 

1941 A. A. Kirk (M) was elected treasurer 
of the Portsmouth Academy of Medicine. 

1942 Fred Maphis (M) of Strasburg, Vir- 
ginia, has been named vice-president of the 
Shenandoah County Tuberculosis Associa- 
tion. 

1944 Harold Goodman (M) of Richmond, 
Virginia, recently resigned as chief of the 
radiology service at McGuire Veterans Ad- 
ministration Hospital and has opened his 
office at 104 Berrington Street for the pri- 
vate practice of radiology. 

Virginia Wessells (N) is supervisor of 
obstetrics at the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia Hospital. 

1945 Paul Robinett (M) has been elected 
vice-president of the newly organized Ports- 
mouth Academy of Medicine. 

1946 A. Jack Freund (M) attended the 
fall meeting of the American Society for 
Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeu- 
tics at Johns Hopkins University, Septem- 
ber 4-7. 

Paul Mazel (P) is working on his Ph.D. 
in Pharmacology at Vanderbilt University. 
He gave a paper at Johns Hopkins in Balti- 
more, Maryland, for the National Associa- 
tion of Pharmacologists. 

1947 Mary Ann Magee (P) has gone to 
the hospital pharmacy at Richmond Memo- 
rial Hospital. 

C. Carl Tully (M) of South Charleston, 
West Virginia, has been named "Citizen 
of the Year" by the South Charleston Lions 
Club in cooperation with other service clubs 
of that city. He was instrumental in start- 
ing Pony League baseball several seasons 
ago and he coached several championship 
teams which represented the Lions Club. 
He is now president of the league. 

1948 Robert W. (M) and Jean K. Bedin- 
ger (MT '47) are the proud parents of a 
daughter, Martha Blaekwell, who was born 
July 18. 

THE SCARAB 



Collinson P. E. Burgwyn (M) visited the 
Alumni Office on September 11. He has 
finished his training at North Carolina 
Baptist Hospital and Bowman-Gray School 
of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Caro- 
lina. He opened his offiee for practice of 
obstetrics and gynecology at 1213 West 
Franklin Street, Richmond, Va.. Septem- 
ber 1. 

Ed Marston (M) is chief resident in 
surgery at North Carolina Baptist Hospital, 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 

1950 Thomas C. Royer (Ml of Norfolk, 
Virginia, visited the Alumni Office on 
August 14. 

Allan M. Unger ( M ) announces the open- 
ing of his office on the fifth floor of the 
Medical College of Virginia Hospital for 
practice limited to internal medicine. 

1951 Julia C. Dickinson (Ml was married 
to Wilbur Taylor Phillips, Jr., on Friday, 
May 31 at Calvary Episcopal Church, Sea- 
side, Oregon. 

James D. Faber (D) and Sarah (N '44) 
have bought a new home in Charleston, 
West Virginia. They have two daughters, 
Sarah Lee, 5 ; Rosemary 2% and a son, 
James Daniel (Danny), 4% months. 

M. C. Glynn (M) was elected secretary 
of the Portsmouth Academy of Medicine. 

Bob Hale (P) of Richmond, Virginia, 
vacationed at Princeton. West Virginia, and 
attended the West Virginia Pharmaceutical 
Association 's meeting at The Greenbrier, 
White Sulphur Springs. 

Luther J. Hamlett (Ml is now practicing 
in Roanoke, Virginia. He completed his 
work in obstetrics and gynecology in June 
at the University of Pittsburgh's Magee 
Hospital. 

Ernest J. Keffer, Jr., (M) announces the 
opening of his office for the practice of 
orthopedic surgery at 1315 Second Street 
S.W., Roanoke, Virginia. 

Levi Old ( M ) announces the opening of 
his office for the practice of thoracic, car- 
diac, and peripheral vascular surgery in the 
Medical Arts Building, Norfolk, Virginia. 

Edward Woodward, Jr., (Ml received a 
master of science degree from the University 
of Minnesota on July 18. 
1952 George E. Arrington, Jr., (M) was 
chosen honorary grand vice-president of 
Alpha Kappa Kappa medical fraternity at 
the recent national convention held in Rich- 
mond in August. 




NOVEMBER, 1957 



E. W. Bosworth (M) of Lexington, Vir- 
ginia, has been appointed post surgeon for 
the Virginia Military Institute effective 
September 1. 

Faye Landers (N), now Mrs. Jack Peters, 
is Educational Director at Lewis-Gale Hos- 
pital School of Nursing in Roanoke, Vir- 
ginia. 

Eugene Linton (Mi is now a resident in 
obstetrics and gynecology at the North Caro- 
lina Baptist Hospital, Winston-Salem, North 
Carolina. 

Rose M. Morecock (M) was assigned by 
the State Department of Health as assistant 
to Dr. W. P. Jackson, director of the health 
district comprising the counties of Bedford, 
Craig, Franklin, and Roanoke. 

Thomas P. Overton (M). of Richmond, 
Virginia, has been elected president of the 
Virginia. Chapter, National Nephrosis Foun- 
dation. 

1 953 Dominic A. Brancazio (Mi is begin- 
ning a residency in neurology at Jackson 
Memorial Hospital in Miami, Florida. 

Ota T. Graham I M ) has been installed as 
president of the Optimist Club of West Rich- 
mond. 

E. C. Irby (M) of Richmond, Virginia, 
has been appointed as city jail physician. 

Margaret Lawton (M) was married to 
Frederick O. Way, Jr., on August 4. Their 
address is 310 West Burke Street, Martins- 
burg, West Virginia. 

1954 Hall G. Canter (M) is a resident in 
internal medicine at Georgetown University 
Hospital, Washington, D. C. He completed 
two years in Army Medical Corps in June. 

L. Lynton Goulder (M) was discharged 
as a captain from army duty and began 
residency training in obstetrics and gyn- 
ecology at Boston City Hospital. 



Leon J. Hecht (D) has recently moved 
his office to the new Southern Shopping 
Center in Norfolk, Virginia. 

Linwood Payne (P) presented a paper 
at the national convention of the American 
Chemical Society in New York in September. 
He has received his master of science degree 
and is now working on his Ph.D. in pharma- 
ceutical chemistry at the Medical College 
of Virginia. 

Laurie E. Rennie (M), after having been 
released as a captain in the medical corps 
at the U. S. Military Academy where he 
served as corps squadron physician for the 
Army athletic teams, is now assistant resi- 
dent in medicine training for cancer and 
allied diseases on the Cornell University 
service at both Bellevue Hospital and Memo- 
rial Center. They have two daughters, Vic- 
toria, 3, and Sarah Elizabeth, 2. 

Ralph M. Robinson (M) is studying sur- 
gery in Lund, Sweden, until August. L958. 

Pendleton E. Thomas, III, (M) of De- 
troit, Michigan, visited the Alumni Office on 
September 3. He has three sons, Robert, 
Randall, and Ronald ( a word of advice from 
him — don't ever name them with names 
beginning with the same letter). He plans 
to return to Virginia next year. 
1955 Bob Beamer (P). who received his 
master of science degree and is now working 
for his Ph.D. in pharmaceutical chemistry 
at the Medical College of Virginia, presented 
a paper at the national convention of the 
American Chemical Society in New York in 
September. 

Luke M. Stephens (P) and his wife en- 
tertained the pharmacists on duty with the 
Army in the Canal Zone at a cocktail party 
and dinner at their home in Balboa. Among 
their guests were Billy Bray (P '52), Macel 



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23 




Drs. Moloney and Nancy Garrett, M'55 

Holiday (P '55), and Spencer Moffett 
(P '55'). 

Clarence W. Taylor (M) is associated in 
the general practice of medicine with Dr. 
George Robert Smith, Jr., at Shawsville, 
Virginia. 

R. Lewis Wright, Jr., (M) is serving as 
chief medical officer on the cruiser North- 
ampton. 

1956 Robert R. Bowen (Mi is an assistant 
resident in general surgery at St. Eliza- 
beth's Hospital, Richmond, Virginia. 

F. G. Burns, Jr., (M), after having fin- 
ished his internship at Jackson Memorial 
Hospital in Miami, Florida, has entered 
general practice in Triangle, Virginia. 



William H. Canada (M) is a first year 
resident in general surgery at Memorial 
Hospital, Charleston, West Virginia. He 
plans to be a plastic surgeon. 

Roderick A. Comunale (M) is a first year 
pediatric resident at Children 's Medical 
Center, Dallas, Texas. 

Charles R. Daniel (M) is stationed at 
Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam 
Houston, Texas. 

William A. Deardorff (M) is beginning a 
three year residency at Henry Ford Hos- 
pital, Detroit, Michigan. 

Anthony A. Deep, Jr., (M) is stationed 
at Randolph Field, San Antonio, Texas. 

Raymond D. Dyer, Jr., (M) is stationed 
at the U. S. Naval Mine Depot, Yorktown, 
Virginia. 

George L. Fifer (M) entered the U. S. 
Air Force in September for two years. 

Hugh E. Fraser, Jr., (M) is a resident in 
dermatology at U. S. Naval Hospital, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

After completing his internship at De- 
Paul Hospital, Norfolk, Virginia, Clarence 
Glover, Jr., (M) entered the Navy. 

John R. Good (M) and William R. Mauck 
(M) were recently graduated from the mili- 
tary medical orientation course at the Army 
Medical Service School, Fort Sam Houston, 
Texas. The course stressed medical service 
in combat. Captain Mauck 's orders assign 
him to DeWitt Army Hospital, Fort Belvoir, 
Virginia, and Captain Good's to Fort Meyer, 
Virginia. 

Elkanah B. Gray (M) is now in general 
practice in Widen, West Virginia. 

William P. Grigsby (M) is going to the 
Far East and then into the Army. 

John J. Halki (M) is a junior assistant 



resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the 
Medical College of Virginia. 

Echols A. Hansbarger (M) entered the 
Army in August. 

Chester D. Harman (M) was graduated 
from the military medical orientation course 
at the Army Medical Service School, Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas. 

Lucius A. Harrison (M) is a resident in 
radiology at the United States Naval Hos- 
pital, Oakland, California. 

Robert L. Hudson (P), having completed 
basic combat training at Fort Jackson, 
South Carolina, is receiving advanced medi- 
cal training at Brooke Army Medical Center. 
Marion E. Ingram (M) is a resident in 
anesthesiology in the Veterans Administra- 
tion Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri. 

William C. Kappes, Jr., (M) is a junior 
assistant resident in pediatrics at St. Chris- 
topher 's Hospital for Children in Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania. 

Marvin A. Krane (M) is a first year 
resident in obstetrics and gynecology at 
Charity Hospital of New Orleans, New Or- 
leans, Louisiana. 

William J. Lawson (M), Boyd H. May, 
Jr., (M), William 0. McCabe, Jr., (M), 
Gary L. Ripley (M), Gerald W. Roller (M), 
James C. Sams (M), Larry C. Smith (M), 
Robert S. Smith (M). John W. Yost (M), 
and Walter M. Zirkle (M) are in the Army. 
Charles H. Moseley, Jr., (M) is a full 
lieutenant in the regular navy with a resi- 
dency in obstetrics and gynecology at Ports- 
mouth Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Virginia. 
F. X. Mullins, Jr., (M) is a resident in 
general surgery at Johnston-Willis Hospital, 
Richmond, Virginia. 



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24 



THE SCARAB 



Eugene D. Nolley (M) is entering private 
practice at Churchville, Virginia. 

William L. Pratt (U) announces the open- 
ing of his office for the practice of general 
dentistry at 9600 Old Georgetown Road 
Bethesda, Maryland. 

Sterling N. Ransone (M) is beginning 
general practice in Mathews, Va. 

Louis J. Read (M) is entering general 
practice at Lynchburg, Virginia. 

Robert J. Robertson, Jr. (M) is a junior 
assistant resident in medicine at Grady 
Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia, 

Alan E. Swersky (P) recently was as- 
signed as a laboratory technician with the 
U. 8. Army Garrison 's Medical Detachment 
at Fort Stewart, Georgia. 

J. E. Temple (M) is beginning general 
practice in Franklin, Virginia. 

Raymond D. Wallace, Jr., (Ml is a resi- 
dent in internal medicine at Brooke Army 
Hospital, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

Howard B. Wilkins (M) is stationed at 
the l'. S. Naval Station, Bermuda. 

Derek W. Williams (M) is at Brooke 
Army Hospital, San Antonio, Texas. 

Nancy Jane Wing (M) is assistant medi- 
cal director of the Greater Atlanta Regional 
Blood Program of the American Red Cross. 
Harriet E. Wood (M) is a first year resi- 
dent in obstetrics and gynecology at Nor- 
folk Genera] Hospital, Norfolk, Virginia. 

James H. Woodruff, Jr., (P), having com- 
pleted basic combat training at Fort Jack- 
son, South Carolina, is receiving advanced 
medical training at Brooke Army Medical 
Center. 

1957 Marlene B. Barnard (P) is an in- 
structor in pharmacy at the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia. 

John R. Corder (D) recently was gradu- 




now working in 



Office on August 13. He 
Crozet, Virginia. 

Robert Stiff (P) is doing graduate work 
m pharmaceutical chemistry at the Medical 
College of Virginia. 



Ramona Friend, Carol Cantrell, Betty Young, 

and Mary Donnelly, N'57s have stayed 

together through school and into the IVNA- 

City Nursing Service. 



ated from the military medical orientation 
course at the Army Medical Service School, 
Fort Sam Houston, Texas. The course 
stressed medical service in combat with 
emphasis on field dental training. Robert 
M. Hoffman (D) also graduated here. 

Elmer Kiser (D) and his wife are the 
proud parents of a son. Elmer is in the 
service stationed at Mitchell Air Base, New 
York. 

Robert S. Markley ( D ) and Augusta Cook 
from Dalton, Georgia, were married in 
August. He was recently graduated from 
the military medical orientation course at 
Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 

Conway Stanley (P) visited the Alumni 



Charitable Contributions 

(Continued jrom page 5) 
the income from such a trust is exempt 
from federal tax. 

A Gift of Income Only 

Sometimes a trust is created for a desig- 
nated period of time or until the happen- 
ing of an event with only the income pay- 
able to charity in the meantime. Quite 
often it is provided that when the trust 
terminates the principal is to be returned 
to the grantor or distributed to a member 
of his family. Such a trust, for instance, 
may be advantageous if the individual 
wishes to accomplish a particular charitable 
purpose for a specified period but does 
not want the property to pass out of the 
family permanently. 

It a charitable trust is created with a 
provision that the fund is to be ultimately 
returned to the grantor, he is said to have 
a reversionary interest in the property. 
Under present law, if the grantor retains 
a reversionary interest that is worth more 
than 5% of the trust principal, no income 



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clarify the symptoms and diag- 
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create in the patient a mental 
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THE SCARAB 



tax deduction is allowed for the value of 
the income interest that is given to char- 
it)-. On the other hand, if the property 
is ultimately to pass to someone other 
than the grantor, such as his wife or child, 
no reversionary interest is involved. In 
such a case, existing law allows a deduc- 
tion for the present value of the income 
interest that is given to charity under the 
trust. 2 

A Practical Example 

Mr. C places $10,000 in a trust that is to 
terminate at the end of 10 years. During this 
period, all of the income from the fund is 
payable to his college. In other words, the 
college is made the income beneficiary of the 
trust. Since the trust is to run for 10 years, the 
value of the income interest, according to the 
government valuation tables, is about 29' ', of 
the value of the trust principal. The gift to 
charity therefore is valued at about S2.900. 
The value of the remainder interest is ap- 
proximately 71% of the value of the principal. 

Now. if the trust provides that the principal 
is to revert to C, no charitable deduction will 
be allowed for the gift to charity. This is true 
under present law because the reversionary in- 
terest retained by Mr. C is worth more than 5% 
of the trust principal. On the other hand, if 
the trust provides that the property is to be 
distributed to C's son when the trust termi- 
nates, a deduction will be allowed under pres- 
ent law for the value of the income interest 
(approximately $2,900) given to charity. 2 Here 
Mr. C does not retain any reversionary 
interest at all. In such a case, however, the 
value of the remainder interest (about S7.100) 
will be a gift of a future interest to the son. 

Tax-Free Income to Trust 

Even though the grantor retains a re- 
versionary interest in the principal of a 
trust that is created for a short period of 
time, the income from the trust may be 
tax-free. Under present federal law for 
example, if the trust is to run for less 
than ten years but for at least two years, 
the income from such a trust is tax-free 
if it is payable to a specified church or 
to a specified tax-exempt school or hos- 
pital. If, however, the income from such 
a trust is to be paid to any other type of 
charity or to a charity to be selected by 

'At the present time Congress is giving con- 
sider.ition to denying the deduction for the 
value of an income interest given to charity 
under a trust if the remainder interest in such 
a trust is worth more than 3% f ,j, e trUit 
principal and is given to certain specified per- 
sons other than the grantor. 

"Since such income is actually paid to a char- 
ity, however, it may he taken as a charitable de- 
duction by the grantor on his personal income 
tax return subject, of course, to the usual rules 
that limit charitable deductions. 

NOVEMBER, 1957 



the trustee, the income will be taxable 
to the grantor. 3 

On the other hand, if a trust in which 
the grantor retains a reversionary interest 
is created for ten years or more, much 
broader charitable purposes can be accom- 
plished. In such a case, the trust income- 
is tax-free regardless of the type of char- 
ity or charities to which it is payable. In 
addition, the income from such a trust 
is tax-free even though the charities may 
be selected in the discretion of the trustee. 

GIFTS BY CORPORATIONS 
Gifts by corporations, both large and 
small, have played an increasingly impor- 
tant part in solving the budget problems 
of many worthy charitable organizations. 

Tax Deductions for Corporations 

Subject to certain adjustments, a cor- 
poration is allowed an income tax deduc- 
tion under present law up to 5^ of its 
taxable income for charitable contribu- 
tions. If a corporation's contributions ex- 
ceed that amount, in any year, it is per- 
mitted to carry the excess forward for 
two successive years. 

Charitable Trusts by Corporations 

Some national ly known corporations 



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27 



have established large foundations which 
are making very substantial contributions to 
educational institutions and to hospitals and 
for medical research or scientific develop- 
ment. In addition, a great many progres- 
sive corporations of small and medium 
size have also created charitable trusts. 
In these cases, the corporation makes its 
contribution to its own trust and a board 
of trustees decides from year to year on 
the specific gifts to charity. 

One of the chief advantages of such 
a trust is that a corporation may contrib- 
ute greater amounts to the trust in years 
of large profits and reduced amounts in 
poor years and, at the same time, carry 
out a uniform charitable program that is 
not dependent on fluctuating corporate 
profits. As in the case of an individual, 
the contribution can consist of property 
that has appreciated in value. In such 
a case, the full value of the property is 
deductible, and the corporation avoids an 
income tax on the appreciation. 

GIFTS WITHOUT LOSS OF INCOME 
Many individuals would like to make 
substantial gifts to charity but cannot afford 
the loss of income from the property that 




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would be given away. In cases where it 
is practical to do so, it is not only 
possible to make such gifts without the 
loss of current income but also to increase 
the spendable income of the donor. 

How It Works 

An individual may make a gift, or a 
series of gifts over a period of years, 
either directly to the charity or to a char- 
itable trust — retaining, however, the right 
to the income from the property for life. 
Here the donor retains the income interest 
in the property, and he gives the remainder 
interest in the property to charity. In 
other words, the donor retains the income 
from the property for life, and the charity 
must wait until the donor's death to ac- 
quire complete ownership of the prop- 
erty. 

In such cases, the individual is allowed 
a federal income tax deduction for the 
value of the remainder interest that is 
given to the charity. This value is de- 
termined on an actuarial basis and con- 
sequently depends upon the age of the 
donor. For example, Mr. D. who is 60 
years of age, transfers property worth 
$10,000 to a charitable trust but retains 
the income from the property for life. 
In this instance, the value of the char- 
itable remainder is worth approximately 
$6, 000, and this amount is deductible 
for federal income tax purposes. As a 
result of such a gift, therefore, D does 
not lose any gross income; and at the 
same time, because of the tax deduction 
allowed for the contribution to charity, 
his spendable income is actually increased. 

People Without Children 

It is also possible to make a gift to 
charity with the understanding that the 
income will be retained for the lifetime 
of more than one person. In this case, 
the income tax deduction depends upon 
the value of the remainder interest at the 
end of two lives. Consider the following 
example — 

Mr. and Mrs. E are 62 and 60 years of 
age respectively. They have no children. Mr. 
E plans to leave his estate in trust for the 
benefit of his wife as long as she lives with 
the provision that, upon her death, one-half 
of the property is to pass to charity and the 
other half is to be paid to surviving relatives 
of himself and his wife. In this case, however, 
E can establish a charitable trust during life 
and periodically transfer to it one-half of his 
property over a period of years with a pro- 
vision that the income from the property is 
to be paid to him as long as he lives and sub- 
quently to his wife for her lifetime if she 
survives him. 



In this instance, Mr. E is able to carry 
out his general estate plan and, at the 
same time, to increase his spendable in- 
come because of the income tax deductions 
allowed for his annual contributions of 
so-called "charitable remainders." 

In the case of people without children, 
therefore, it is often economically sound 
to establish a charitable trust in order to 
adopt a program of charitable gifts, but 
with the income from the property re- 
tained for their joint lives. 

CONCLUSION 

Philanthropic institutions have become 
firmly entrenched as an integral part of 
this country's way of life. In this period 
of high costs and inflation, such organi- 
zations depend heavily upon both indi- 
vidual and corporate contributions to carry 
on their worthy and needed work in this 
divided world. Furthermore, the great 
growth in this nation has added to the 
services that are required and expected 
from many charitable organizations. As 
a result, contributions to charities by cor- 
porations and by property owners are 
increasing. 

In view of the amounts involved and 
the vast participation of individuals and 
corporations in such a program, a better 
understanding of the methods of giving 
and of the tax laws involved is important. 
Consequently, if a substantial gift or series 
of gifts is contemplated, the possibilities 
and advantages that may be available 
should be considered or reviewed by an 
experienced attorney. 



Trusteeship 

(Continued from page 4) 

rate is increased to 4 c /r annually one year 
after graduation. Thereafter, students are 
urged to repay the loan in whole or in 
part as soon as can be done without undue 
hardship, so that the principal may again 
be available for loans to other students. 

In closing, I would like to add that the 
policy of the College has been for the per- 
son primarily concerned, such as the 
principal investigator in the case of a 
research project, directly or through the 
dean concerned, to keep the donor in- 
formed of the use being made by his gift. 
We have found that this information is 
not only received with interest but results 
in good advice and often in additional 
contributions when needed. 

THE SCARAB 



The Alumni Association Needs You! 
We cannot build the lounge 

in the 
new dormitories without you 









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ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

MEDICAL COELEGE .OF VIRGINIA 

RICHMOND.-.VIRGINIA 



Retur 



Gua 



Dr. E'rllng Hegrs 
Medical College of Va, 
Ri2>->Tond 19, Va. 




LET US DO YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING 

_14 oz. Highball Glasses per dozen $ 6.25 

-7'/ 2 oz. Old Fash.on Glasses per dozen 6.00 

_3!/ 2 oz. Stem Cocktail Glasses per dozen 10.00 

-Desk Baskets, black, maroon, green, each 3.00 

-Picture Troy, 12" x 18", black, maroon, green, each 5.50 

-Waste Bosket 10" x 13", black, maroon, green, each 5.50 

-Choir, black with MCV seal in gold 25.00 



ORDER FROM THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF MCV 
1105 East Clay Street, Richmond, Virginia 



We pay shipping charges on all ire 



ept the chaii 



Official 

the 

Alumni Assoc). 

Medical Cell* 
Virgi 









Official Organ of the 
Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 

Published by the Medical College of Virginia Alumni 
Association in February. May. August, and November 

Editorial Committee 

Robert V. Terrell, M'34. Editor-in-Cbief and Chairma 

James T. Tucker, M'27 

William T. Sanger, Chancellor 

Minnie M. Franck. Managing Editor 

Mildred H. Clark, Assistant Managing Editor 

Officers 

J. Spencer Drvden, M'33, President 

6816 Millwood Road, Bethesda 14, Md. 

James T. Tucker, M'27, Immed. Past President 

Medical Arts Building, Richmond, Va. 

R. Reginald Rooke, V21, President-Elect 

2929 Second Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

I. Robert Massie. Jr., M'34, Vice-President 

1000 West Grace Street, Richmond, Va. 

Harry Lyons, D'23, Vice-President 

Medical College of Virginia, Richmond. Virginia 

George F. Hendley, P'iS, Vice-President 

2125 Fairmount Avenue. Richmond, Virginia 

Mrs. Anne F. Mahoney. N'29, Vice-President 

907 West 31st Street, Richmond, Virginia 

Peter N. Pastore, M'34. Secretary 

Medical College of Virginia. Richmond. Virginia 

Harvey B. Haag, M'28, Treasurer 
Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia 

Trustees 
Term Expires December 31. 1958 



Edwakd L. Alexander, M'27 

Medical Arts Building, 

Newport News, Va. 

J. Pelham Broaddus, D'30 

Franklin, Va. 

Donald S. Daniel, M'24 

Johnston-Willis Hospital, 

Richmond, Va. 



J. Spencer Drtden, M'33 

6816 Millwood Road, 

Bethesda 14, Md. 

R. Reginald Rooke, P'21 

2929 Second Avenue 

Richmond, Va. 

W. Rot Smith, P'41 

ans Products Co., Inc 

Petershurg, Va. 



I'll 



Term Expires December 31, 1959 



Lloyd C. Bird, P'17 

303 South Sixth Street, 

Richmond, Va. 

Richard A. Michaux, M'37 

Lee Medical Building, 

Richmond, Va. 

Edward Myers, D'26 

511 Medical Arts Building, 

Norfolk, Va. 



Marguerite Nicholson, N'34 

. Cabaniss Hall, MCV 

Richmond, Va. 

E. Claiborne Robins, P'33 

1407 Cummings Drive 

Richmond, Va. 

Robert V. Terrell, M'34 

Medical Arts Building 

Richmond, Va. 



Term Expires December 31. I960 



Hunter M. Gaunt, 

Main and Valley Streets. 

Winchester, Va. 

L. Frances Gordon, N'43 

4514 West Grace Street 

Richmond, Va. 

W. C. Henderson, D'37 

301 East Franklin Street, 

Richmond, Va. 



Philip W. Oden. M'34 

Greenbrier Valley Hospital 

Ronceverte, West Va. 

Waverly R. Payne, M'23 

91 29th Street. 

Newport News, Va. 

H. Hudnall Ware, Jr., M'42 

816 West Franklin Street, 



Id, hi, 



nd. Va. 



About The Cover 

Emmett Herman Terrell was born near Beaver Dam, Vir- 
ginia, and educated in private schools in Hanover and Louisa 
Counties prior to attending the College of William and Mary. 
He graduated from the Medical College of Virginia in 1900 and 
interned at Norfolk General Hospital. Returning to Richmond, 
he married his childhood sweetheart, Daisy Moody Ellett, and 
to this union were born two daughters, now Virginia Sydnor 
and Margaret Cooke. 

He entered general practice with the late Dr. Everett W. Gee 
and also became instructor in anatomy under the esteemed pro- 
fessor, J. Fulmer Bright, who later became mayor of Richmond. 
In 1913 he resolved to discontinue general practice because of 
a growing dissatisfaction with obstetrics in the home, and to 
limit his practice to the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of 
the anus and rectum. He was aided in this decision by personal 
experience as a patient and first hand knowledge of the general 
lack of scientific interest among physicians in measures to re- 
lieve proctologic disorders. 

In 1916 he claimed a new use for Quinine Urea HCl; prior 
to this the drug in great dilution was widely used as a local anes- 
thetic. He proved Quinine Urea HCl to be the drug of choice 
in the injection treatment of internal hemorrhoids. This an- 
nouncement was made at a time when the injection treatment 
of hemorrhoids was in disrepute, having been largely relegated 
to the quacks who surrounded it with great secrecy. Dr. Terrell 
was very largely responsible for making sclerotherapy of hem- 
orrhoids a scientific and ethical procedure and a most valuable 
adjunct to proctologic surgery. 

Dr. Terrell was continuously a member of the faculty of the 
Medical College of Virginia from 1901 to 1947 when ill health 
forced his retirement and he was made Emeritus Professor of 
Clinical Proctology. He is a member of the Richmond Academy 
of Medicine and was its president in 1946; he is also a Fellow 
of the American Proctologic Society and was its president in 
1923; he is a Fellow of the American Medical Association and 
Chairman of its Section on Gastroenterology and Proctology in 
1944. He is a member of the Medical Society of Virginia, Tri- 
State Medical Society, and the Southern Medical Association, 
a member of Phi Beta Kappa (Alpha Chapter) and Omega 
Upsilon Phi, and was awarded the College of William and Mary 
Alumni Medallion for recognized eminence in his specialty. 



Our Lost Sheep 



We've exhausted all possible sources that we can think of 
and now we ask your help to try to trace these lost alumni. If 
you know their whereabouts or can suggest someone who might, 
won't you let us know. Each issue we plan to list some of our 
lost sheep. 

June Adams N'46, Mary Jacqueline Allen N'43, Joan Bertrand 
Alston PT'48, Margaret Snowden Altsman N'34, Dorothy Grum 
Amberman N'31. Elizabeth Q. Ammerman PT'48, Joseph Ardiz- 
zone PT'49, Dorothy E. Arey MT'55, Evelyn Mary Ball M'38. 
Virginia Linthicum Barret P'51, L. R. Bell P'32, E. M. Corns 
M'15. William H. Harriman M'54, Ellen Hall Hogg N'06 UCM, 
H. M. Horton M'16, William Steele Johnson M'43 Mar., John 
Milton Lukeman M'45. John J. Marra M'45, Otis W. Snyder, 
M'37. David Tyler M'52. Betsy C. Wiley N'53, June Bullard 
Williamson N'51, Mary Ann Worth N'54, Dorothy U. Wright 
M'56, Agnes Stuart Yore N'50. 



The Scarab 



Published by The Alumni Association of the Medical College of Virginia 



Volume 7, No. 



Richmond, Virginia 



February, 1958 



An Urgent Message To Our AJ 



umm 



Dr. R. Blackwell Smith. Jr. 



The budget transmitted to the Gen- 
eral Assembly by Governor Stanley on 
January 9, 1958, places the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia at a perilous crossroads. 
If Governor Stanley's recommendations 
prevail, our School of Medicine and its 
hospitals will decline in effectiveness to 
a point where the College will be unable 
to fulfil its mission in medical education. 
This is no exaggeration — it is a plain, 
unvarnished statement of a simple fact. 

Budget proposals for the other schools 
and activities were also cut, but they can 
maintain reasonably satisfactory programs 
with the funds recommended. The Med- 
ical School and hospitals cannot. 

Funds must be obtained for three es- 
sential needs: (a) salaries for teachers 
in the clinical medical departments; (b) 
the medical education building; and (c) 
for maintenance and operation of the 
hospitals. It is absolutely necessary that 
our State legislators be fully informed 
about these needs. We at the College will 
do our part; but in order to be sure that 
the delegates are fully aware of the po- 
tentially dangerous situation which exists, 
we ask that each and every member of 
our alumni groups residing in Virginia 
write or speak to his delegates and sen- 
ators to tell them about these needs for 
which funds simply must be appropriated. 
These are not needs of the alumni, of the 
professors or of the College staff. These 
are needs of the people of Virginia — all 
of them — and unless these needs are met 
the health of Virginians will suffer to- 
morrow and throughout the years ahead. 

The material which follows presents as 
briefly as possible all the essential facts 
in relation to the plight in which we find 
ourselves. Digest them, and then make 
your concern known to your representa- 
tives as soon as possible. Your College 
needs your help note as never before. To- 
morroit may be too late. 

FEBRUARY, 1958 



* The Medical School — Salaries 

The Medical College of Virginia will 
ultimately be unable to provide accredited 
education in medicine under the budget 
recommended by the Governor for the 
biennium 1958-60. 

Retirements and deaths have made nec- 
essary the immediate appointment of new 
chairmen and other faculty members in 
the major departments of medicine, psy- 
chiatry, neurology, pathology, and urol- 
ogy. Within this next biennium ad- 
ditional retirements will require further 
replacements. This has brought the med- 
ical school to a unique and critical point 
in its 120-year history. 

The efforts of virtually all of our clin- 
ical faculty have been totally contributed 
or compensated only in small part finan- 
cially. It is now impossible to fill these 
key positions with volunteer or part- 
time people, as in the past. 

The knowledge, material, and meth- 
ods in medical science today have changed 
so completely and are of such complexity 
that those who create and guide the edu- 
cational program must devote full-time 
to this endeavor. In fact, the country's 
medical educators are greatly concerned 
about where qualified teachers to educate 
future doctors can be found. The com- 
pensation must be such that faculty are 
not required to seek income from sources 
outside the institution. 

The necessity for a corps of full-time 
faculty in the basic science departments 
was wisely recognized and supported 
several years ago. A corps of full-time 
faculty in the clinical departments is 
equally vital, dangerously long overdue, 
and now absolutely essential to the main- 
tenance of an accredited educational pro- 
gram in this school of medicine. 

Those doctors in the private practice 
of medicine who volunteer their part- 



*Prepared by Dr. William F. Maloney 



time assistance are an essential part of 
the faculty also. However, these same 
doctors require the assistance of a full- 
time corps of teachers to make their con- 
tributions maximally effective. 

The basic minimum increase required 
to adequately meet this need is the S264,- 
000 originally asked by the medical 
school for the first year of the biennium. 
This amount was requested with full 
recognition of the marked increase it rep- 
resented, but also with the objective anal- 
ysis and sincere conviction that it is 
the minimum amount necessary' to sup- 
port medical education. The increase rec- 
ommended in the Governor's budget for 
this period was $47,000. 

In the face of this failure to provide 
money for these needs, we have again 
explored every conceivable compromise 
and alternative without success. We im- 
plore the Legislature to provide at least 
enough increase to give us some hope 
and possibility of holding the faculty we 
now have and filling enough of these po- 
sitions to avoid collapse of the educational 
effort and the morale of the institution. 
To maintain even a skeleton staff would 
require at least $147,000 additional funds 
each year of the biennium. 

The State Council of Higher Educa- 
tion unanimously recognized this need 
and recommended implementation at the 
rate requested. 

♦The Medical School — Medical 
Educational Building 

The present educational effort in the pre- 
clinical sciences of medicine is housed in 
scattered, cramped, and in some instances, 
dangerous units. Several clinical sciences 
of medicine have no departmental head- 
quarters or working areas of any kind. 
The remainder operate from a few small 
private medical offices, fashioned out of 
hospital bedrooms, and also used as med- 
ical examining rooms. For the students, 
classrooms, lecture halls, teaching labor- 
atories, locker rooms are inadequate, and 
lounges are nonexistent. Sufficient lab- 
(Continued on page 25) 

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THE SCARAB 



Medical College or Virginia 

Touches the home of every citizen through its 

graduates, students, care of patients, 

and research 



If you were to guess that the Medical College of Virginia is touching, directly or indirectly. 
the home of almost every citizen of the State, that would be a good guess. 

We are not going back a hundred years to prove the point or look ahead too far, though the vista 
in either direction is appealing. 

Uniquely our work is directed to meeting the State's health needs; this year educating 1665 stu- 
dents for the health profession, caring for thousands of patients from every county and city of Vir- 
ginia, conducting extensive research to facilitate better health services, and cooperating with many 
institutions and agencies to the same end. 

Then there are our 4135 graduates in Virginia who were prepared for practice in our eleven 
schools and courses. How widely scattered they are can be grasped from the striking fact that they 
get their mail at 402 different post offices, one-fourth of all such offices in Virginia. 

Specifically what impact do our physician graduates, 1434 of them practicing in Virginia, make 
on the State year after year? 

Then add to the 1434 physicians 844 dentists, 909 pharmacists in widely-scattered drug stores, 645 
nurses in homes, hospitals, clinics, public health, doctors' offices, industry, et cetera. Withal, hospital 
administrators, graduated by us, and medical technologists, physical therapists, x-ray technicians, and 
dietitians working in hospitals, school cafeterias, et cetera. 

Add to all of these thousands, 51 graduates in medicine, 1957, working in Virginia hospitals 
this year as interns. 

And this is not all by any means. We have here at the College at this time, among our students, 
over 1000 from Virginia preparing for the health professions. Every year hundreds of these and 
others fan out over the State to begin practice, or serve the public as hospital interns and residents. 
The exact number of the latter is unknown at this time, but important to hospital operation. 

Thus it can readily be seen how it is that our institution by one service or another touches the 
homes of our people through our many and varied ranges of graduates, our large group of Vir- 
ginia students, our care of patients drawn widely from over the State, our extensive research, and our 
cooperation with many institutions and agencies in Virginia. 

This record too becomes more impressive with the years. We bespeak consideration of it by our 

citizens and by our great body of alumni. 
D W. T. Sanger. Chancellor 

B 
H 

FEBRUARY, 1958 




VOTE FOR ONE 



VOTE FOR ONE VOTE FOR ONE 

MAIL BALLOTS FOR THESE CANDIDATES WILL BE SEN 



Candidates for The Board of Trustee 



Donald S. Daniel 

Born: Wilson, North Carolina. Now re- 
siding in Richmond, Virginia. 
School and Colleges Attended: University 
of North Carolina and Medical College 
of Virginia. 

Professional Data: Associate surgeon at 
Johnston-Willis Hospital and assistant 
professor of surgery at Medical College 
of Virginia. 

Professional Memberships: American 
Board of Surgery, American College of 
Surgeons, past president (1956) of 
Southeastern Surgical Board of Councils 
for Virginia in the Southern Medical As- 
sociation. 

Hobbies and Club Memberships: Kappa 
Alpha, Psi Chi Medical, Country Club 
of Virginia, Commonwealth Club. 
Honors Received: Past president of the 
Alumni Association of the Medical Col 
lege of Virginia, past president South 
eastern Surgical Association, present coun 
cilor for Virginia, Southern Medical As 
sociation. 

James D. Hagood 

Born: Mecklenburg County, Virginia. 
Now resides in Clover, Virginia. 
School and Colleges Attended: Warren- 
ton Academy, Warrenton, North Caro- 
lina and University College of Medicine. 
Professional Memberships: American 
Medical Association, Medical Society of 
Virginia, Halifax County Medical So- 
ciety, Association of Southern RR Sur- 
geons, AAGP, World Medical Society. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Lions, 
Shriner, Commonwealth. 
Honors Received: Past president of State 
and AAGP Society. Honorary degree in 
General Practice, MCV. 



Edward Lee Alexander 

Born: Ellerson, Virginia. Now residing 
in Newport News, Virginia. 
School and Colleges Attended: University 
of Richmond and MCV. 
Professional Data: Internships at St. 
Luke's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital. 

Professional Memberships: American Col- 
lege of Physicians, diplomate of Ameri- 
can Board of Internal Medicine. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Farming. 
Honors Received: Chief of staff at Riv- 
erside Hospital; citation — surgeon gen- 
eral of U. S. Navy for work in rehabili- 
tation in World War II. 

William R. Tyson 

Born: Norfolk, Virginia, where he still 
resides. 

School and Colleges Attended: Patrick 
Henry, Maury High, William and Mary, 
Williamsburg, Virginia and MCV. 
Professional Data: Surgery, obstetrics and 
gynecology. Depot surgeon (Lt. Col.) 
New Guinea and Philippine Islands 
during World War II. Post graduate 
work at New York University — Bellevue 
Medical Center and Cook County Gradu- 
ate School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. 
Professional Memberships: AMA, Med- 
ical Society of Virginia, Norfolk County 
Medical Society, Tri -State Society and 
Seaboard Medical Society. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships /Music — 
violin (plays in the Norfolk Symphony 
Orchestra and "Scratch Quartette"), fish- 
ing, photography, anthropology, teach- 
ing adult mixed class in Sunday School, 
and flying (in the past). President of 
Men's Club of Larchmont Methodist 
Church in 1957, chairman of Red Cross 



Disaster and Relief Committee, Cosmo- 
politan Club, Civitan Club, Toastmasters 
Club, Torch Club, Norfolk Sports Club, 
Knights Round Table Club, Military Or- 
der of World Wars, Astronomy Club, 
Norfolk Yacht and Country Club, Khe- 
dive Temple — AAONMS, Corinthian 
Lodge 226, AF&AM, Scottish Rite Bod- 



Custis Lansing Coleman 

Born: Lexington, Virginia. Now a resi- 
dent of Richmond, Virginia. 
School and Colleges Attended: Washing- 
ton and Lee University and MCV. 
Professional Data: Associate in surgery 
and associate in gynecology at the Medical 
College of Virginia, attending staff Rich- 
mond Memorial Hospital, visiting staff 
at Retreat for the Sick Hospital and Shel- 
tering Arms Hospital. 
Professional Memberships: Richmond 
Academy of Medicine, American College 
of Surgeons, American Board of Surgery, 
Southeastern Surgical Congress, Virginia 
Surgical Society, Virginia Medical So- 
ciety, American Medical Association, Rich- 
mond Surgical and Gynecological Society. 
Hobbies and Club Membership: Country 
Club of Virginia, Deep Run Hunt Club, 
Golden Horseshoe Club, Vice President 
of the Richmond Chapter and Reunion 
Chairman, Alumni Association of MCV. 
Honors Received: AOA, Phi Beta Pi, 
Sigma Zeta. 

William J. Frohbose 

Born: New York. Now a resident of 
Rocky Mount, North Carolina. 
School and Colleges Attended: Randolph 
Macon College, Ashland, Virginia; Med- 
ical College of Virginia. 

THE SCARAB 




VOTE FOR ONE 



VOTE FOR ONE 



VOTE FOR ONE 



D THE VOTING MEMBERS FOR 1957 IN FEBRUARY. 

r The Alumni Association 



Professional Data: Internship and resi- 
dency at St. Elizabeth Hospital, Rich- 
mond, Virginia, and a residency in 
urology at Pennsylvania Hospital, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. Now practicing 
urology in Rocky Mount, North Carolina. 
Professional Memberships: N. C. Medi- 
cal Society, N. C. Urological Society, 
Diplomate American Board of Urology, 
Fellow American College of Surgeons, 
Member of Southeastern Section Ameri- 
can Urologic Association, and member 
of American Urologic Association. 
Hobbies and Club Membership: Hunting 
and fishing. 

James Pelham Broaddus 

Born: Bowling Green, Virginia. Now re- 
siding in Franklin, Virginia. 
School and Colleges Attended: University 
of Richmond and Medical College of Vir- 
ginia. 

Professional Data: Past president of the 
Southside Dental Society, alternate dele- 
gate to the American Dental Association, 
member of the Pierre-Fauchard Acad- 
emy, and a member of the Federation 
Dentaire International. 
Professional Memberships: Member of 
the work panel of the Virginia State Den- 
tal Association, member of the American 
Society of Dentistry for Children. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Mem- 
ber of the Franklin Chamber of Com- 
merce, Lions International, Elks Club, 
and Franklin Masonic Lodge. 

John C. Tyree 

Bom: Spring Hope, North Carolina. Now 
residing in Richmond, Virginia. 
School and Colleges Attended : Richmond 
public schools and the Medical College 
of Virginia. 

FEBRUARY, 1958 



Professional Memberships : Richmond 
Dental Society, Virginia State Dental As- 
sociation and American Dental Associ- 
ation. 

Hobbies and Club Memberships: Si 
Omega, Shrine, Virginia Boat Club. 
Honors Received: Past president of the 
Richmond Dental Society and president 
of the Virginia State Dental Association. 

George Frank Hendley 

Born: Polkton, North Carolina. Now re- 
siding in Richmond, Virginia. 
School and Colleges Attended: Union- 
ville and Churchland High Schools and 
Medical College of Virginia. 
Professional Data: Pharmacist — President 
of Fairmount Drug Company. 
Professional Memberships: Virginia Phar- 
maceutical Association, NARD, Rich- 
mond Retail Druggist Association. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Fishing 
and hunting and growing roses. 
Honors Received: Pharmacist of the Year 
in 1957-58, vice president Alumni As- 
sociation. 

Ralph J. Walker 

Bom: Hampton, Virginia. Now residing 
in Newport News, Virginia. 
School and Colleges Attended: Hampton 
High School and MCV. 
Professional Data: Retail druggist. 
Professional Memberships: American 
Pharmaceutical Association, National As- 
sociation Boards of Pharmacy. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Khedive 
Shrine Club, Rotary Club, American Le- 
gion. Fishing and daffodils. 
Honors Received: Past president of State 
Board of Pharmacy, past president of 
Peninsula Chapter of Medical College of 
Virginia Alumni Association. 



Walter M. Allen 

Born: Amelia County, Virginia. Now a 
resident of Roanoke, Virginia. 
School and Colleges Attended: Blackstone 
High School and MCV. 
Professional Data: Owner-operator of Al- 
len's Pharmacy, Roanoke, Virginia, for 
the past fourteen years. 
Professional Memberships: Roanoke Val- 
ley Pharmaceutical Association, Virginia 
Pharmaceutical Association, NARD. 
Honors Received: Past president of the 
Roanoke Pharmaceutical Association; 
member and past president of Rho Chi; 
member of Sigma Zeta, Sigma Eta Mu, 
and Phi Gamma, social fraternity. Rho 
Chi Award '39-40; Dean's List '39-43; 
Chemistry award '43; Lehn and Fink- 
Award '43. 

William Roy Smith 

Born: Petersburg, Virginia, where he still 
resides. 

School and Colleges Attended: Petersburg 
public schools and MCV. 
Professional Data: President of Physicians 
Products Co., Inc., Petersburg, Va. 
Professional Memberships: Virginia Phar- 
maceutical Association, American Phar- 
maceutical Association. 
Hobbies and Club Memberships: Past 
president of Petersburg Lions Club; Ma- 
sons; chairman of Advisory Board, Sal- 
vation Army; Country Club of Peters- 
burg; Kappa Psi. 

Honors Received: Member of House of 
Delegates of Virginia from Petersburg 
and Dinwiddie County (member. Gov- 
ernor's Advisor)' Board on the Budget; 
State Auditing Committee, Appropri- 
ations Committee, Education Committee, 
and Committee on Federal Relations) . 



7leu> Veal Resolutions 

Dr. Walter E. Vest 

Reprint from The West Virginia Medical 

journal 

The custom of New Year resolutions 
is a beautiful one and has much to com- 
mend it. What it amounts to is essen- 
tially an annual inventory of the self 
of the individual and his environment 
with an effort to adjust and produce a 
more pleasurable ego and a more ideal 
community for the future. Regardless of 
the old adage that "New Year's resolu- 
tions, like piecrusts, are made to be 
broken," we feel that they are worth 
while. 

No New Year's dawn in the lifetime 
of this generation has presented so many 
question marks and uncertainties as that 
of 1958. Sputniks, space missiles and 
even interplanetary communication loom 
large in the consciousness of the ordinary 
mortal and occupy the full time thinking 
of scientists, especially physicists. Of 
things strictly mundane, cold war, back- 
breaking taxes, a business recession, a 
mountainous debt, a deadlocked govern- 
mental setup, the slough in which edu- 



cation finds itself, and the tendency of 
statesmen (?) and simon-pure politicians 
to push America further and further into 
the morass of socialism, make thoughtful 
persons pause long and wonder seriously. 

With such a somber outlook, what 
should a doctor include in the time hon- 
ored custom of New Year resolutions, 
even assuming that he, as usual, disre- 
gards them promptly? 

Medicine scientifically, in our judg- 
ment, has attained a somewhat higher 
level of development than most other 
human activities. Medical science and 
medical research are becoming continually 
better and more accurate. This is unques- 
tionably true of therapeutics, as Julian 
Price so aptly pointed out in his address 
before the American Hospital Association 
on The Health of the Nation." Med- 
icine admittedly has numerous unsolved 
problems but they are largely in the field 
of medical economics. One of the glaring 
deficiencies of our calling currently is 
that the doctor himself is still turtle-like, 
too much withdrawn into the shell of 
medicine and too forgetful of all the 
general activities of society at large. While 
this is partly due to the nature of the 
service our profession renders, it affords 



a legitimate criticism, especially from the 
standpoint of public relations, and should 
be remedied. 

We would suggest, therefore, the fol- 
lowing points to consider in a doctor's 
New Year resolutions: 

1. To be a better doctor than ever 
before through study and realization of 
the fact that he handles the most precious 
of all commodities, the life, health and 
happiness of human beings. 

2. To engage more and more in those 
general civic activities which tend to 
make for a better community, say church, 
library, school and general health, es- 
pecially the voluntary health agencies. 

3. To support medical education bet- 
ter. No doctor ever repays his alma mater 
for his training, and an annual gift to 
the medical school which honored him 
with its diploma is in order. 

4. To vote at every election. 

5. To make known his sentiment re- 
garding proposed legislation to his rep- 
resentatives in the law-making bodies, 
local, state and national. 

6. To support a stable form of general 
education which will tend to inculcate bet- 
ter reasoning power in the student. 

Happy New Year! 



'J f -# J 




Nearby and Neighborly 
THE BANK OF VIRGINIA 

Medical College Facility 
Social Center Building 



Staff, students and patients now en- 
joy the convenience of banking fa- 
cilities right here at MCV. 
Welcome to The Bank of Virginia— 
at MCV, and at 15 other locations 
in Richmond, Petersburg, Roanoke, 
Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Newport 
News. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Member Federal Reserve System 

THE SCARAB 



The Woman 
of the 



Hour 



The faculty of the School of Nursing 
is very happy that the first "Woman of 
the Hour" to be presented to the alumni 
is our new dean, Doctor Doris B. Ying- 
ling. Dr. Yingling is a native of Balti- 
more, Maryland. She attended Goucher 
College and while there decided to study 
nursing. She is a graduate of Union Me- 
morial Hospital School of Nursing in Bal- 
timore. She received her Bachelor of 
Science Degree from the University of 
Oregon. Later she studied at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland where she received 
both her Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Education Degrees. She was the recipient 
of a Commonwealth Fund Fellowship for 
eighteen months to complete her doctor- 
ate. 

Dr. Yingling' s experience has been 
varied. Beginning as a staff nurse she soon 
became a supervisor and instructor in her 
own school of nursing. Later she was a 
lecturer in Nursing Education at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. As Industrial Health 
Consultant for the Liberty Mutual Insur- 
ance Company, Middle Atlantic Division, 
she conferred with industrial manage- 
ments in the interest of health conserva- 
tion of employees, methods of health 
education programs, writing and present- 
ing educational programs, promotion of 
medical surveys of industry, and in-plant 
medical planning. 

Dr. Yingling served as a leader at a 
workshop held at the Catholic University 
of America in which the topic was The 
Selection and Use of Methods of Teach- 
ing in the Clinical Fields. 

Her interest and ability in research 

FEBRUARY, 1958 



Dr. Doris B. 
Yingling 




were recognized when she was appointed 
Executive Secretary of the Subcommittee 
on Survey of Nursing Needs and Re- 
sources, Committee on Medical Care, 
Maryland State Planning Commission. 
The results of this study served as a basis 
for long-range planning for meeting 
Maryland's nursing needs. 

Upon completion of her doctorate, she 
accepted an appointment to organize the 
first school of nursing in Nevada at the 
University of Nevada. 

Dr. Yingling is a member of the Amer- 
ican Nurses Association, The National 
League for Nursing, The American Asso- 
ciation of Industrial Nurses, Association 
for Adult Education, and the Phi Kappa 
Phi, national honor society. 

She has published a number of articles, 
among which are Absenteeism in Industry, 
Health Education in Industry, and The 
Selection and Use of Methods of Teach- 
ing in the Clinical Fields. 

In addition, Dr. Yingling has many 
other interests, especially skiing, art, and 
music. 

Now that you have been introduced to 
our dean, we hope you will avail your- 
selves of every opportunity to meet her 
in person for thus she will be assured of 
your continued interest in the school. 



Report of the Membership 
Committee 

For the past year the Alumni Associ- 
ation of the Medical College of Virginia 
has devoted its entire efforts to its num- 
ber one project, namely, the Student 
Alumni Lounge in the undergraduate stu- 
dent dormitories which are now well 
under way. 

The Association has progressed most 
remarkably during the past ten years un- 
der the capable leadership of ten great 
presidents, all chosen by you from the 
alumni roster. 

Up until this issue of The Scarab, 
there has never been a concerted member- 
ship drive organized on a definite regional 
basis with school division chairmen, sub- 
chairmen, and field workers. Today we 
have approximately 8000 graduates of the 
Medical College of Virginia, and one- 
quarter, or 2000, are paid alumni mem- 
bers. With the effort of the Membership 
Committee, the state of Virginia, as well 
as other states where a large number of 
alumni reside, has been divided into dis- 
tricts with chairmen and committee mem- 
bers. At a later date the chairmen will 
be announced in The Scarab. 

James T. Tucker, M. D. Chairman 



Wt Pap ftrtimte 

Dr. Robert Finley Gayle, Jr. 



Robert Finley Gayle, Jr., Professor of 
Clinical Psychiatry and Chairman of the 
Department of Psychiatry and Neurology, 
died in Richmond November 4, 1957. 
In his death the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia lost a champion who through his 
personal recognition in the field of psy- 
chiatry represented MCV throughout this 
country and abroad. 

The impact of the loss of such a man 
to his profession, his community, and 
to his alma mater is difficult to quantitate. 
The story of his effectiveness is not writ- 
ten in the length of his bibliography, 
although this was extensive; it is not 
written in his memberships in profes- 
sional societies, although these were le- 
gion; it is not written entirely in the mem- 
ories of his former students, even though 
many hundreds will remember him well 
for his lectures and case discussions. Dr. 
Gayle shared the conviction that the first 
and foremost duty of every physician is 
to treat the sick. He pursued this goal 
with singleness of purpose which carried 
to the very end of his professional career. 
The onset of his terminal illness occurred 
at a patient's bedside. In his pursuit of 
this goal he was endowed with an unsur- 
passed intuitive capacity to ferret out basic 
physical as well as emotional malfunction. 
He was not afraid to admit that some of 
his decisions were based on what he 
called his "bird dog sense." Others ob- 
serving this, however, might say that 
through many years of restless listening, 
he had unconsciously learned to recognize 
and calibrate many of the subtleties and 
nuances which develop in the doctor- 
patient relationship. Because of these fac- 
tors. Dr. Gayle's teaching ability was most 
appreciated by those who were able to 
observe first-hand his skill with patients. 
Conscious of the fact that he was less ar- 
ticulate in the lecture hall, he delegated 
increasing responsibility for this phase 
of medical teaching to his associates. His 
physical appearance was a provocative be- 
ginning for the treatment situation. With 
his portly size, immaculate dress, courtly 
manner and guard's mustache he was cer- 
tain to provoke an immediate response of 
either extreme paternal confidence or 
unmollified rebellion, depending upon the 

8 



sick needs of the patient. With the ca- 
pacity for earthiness as need be, the least 
as well as the most sophisticated were as 
easily disarmed. He was further distin- 
guished for his ability in clinical judg- 
ment and for an unerring rapidity in 
making important decisions. In this trait 
he had the unshakable strength of his 
convictions and, as in the case of a man 
who moves in a positive manner, he did 
not hesitate to provoke disagreement. 
These are a few of the intangibles which 
he mastered. 

Among the more tangible records of 
his achievement would be his pioneering 
work in the description and treatment 
of heavy metal intoxications, the earlier 
treatment of Parkinsonism with whole 
root belladonna alkaloids, the function of 
the psychiatric unit as an integral part 
of a general hospital, and the more re- 
cent encouragement of a more realistic 
and harmonious understanding between 
psychiatry and religion. His leadership 
in professional organizations was recog- 
nized first in Richmond where he was 
president of the Academy of Medicine, 
subsequently in the south as president of 
the Southern Psychiatric Association, and 
ultimately in the nation as president of 
the American Psychiatric Association. It 
is further tribute to his stabilizing influ- 
ence and valued opinion that the Council 
of the American Psychiatric Association 
invited him to serve on its executive com- 
mittee beyond the accustomed time. Dr. 
Gayle satisfied his personal needs entirely 
in the society of his fellow man. He was 
active in several social organizations in 
Richmond among them the Country Club 
of Virginia which he served as president. 
His reputation for conviviality and inex- 
haustible supply of poignant anecdotes 
ran a close second to that of his profes- 
sional prowess. Dr. Gayle will long be 
remembered for the part he played in 
helping establish the reputation of the 
Medical College of Virginia through its 
Department of Psychiatry. He will, how- 
ever, probably be remembered longest in 
the hearts of his patients and in the mem- 
ories of those fortunate enough to ob- 
serve his therapeutic effectiveness. 

Merritt W. Foster, M. D. 



Dr. Douglas VanderHoof 

Dr. Douglas VanderHoof was born 
in Brooklyn, N. Y., December 31, 1879. 
He was a direct descendant of the original 
Dutch settlers of New York. He was grad- 
uated from Dartmouth College, cum 
laude, in 1901. He then entered the 
School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, from which he was graduated in 
1905 with rank of first in his class. He 
served one year as medical house officer 
in the Johns Hopkins Hospital, 1905-06. 
He came to Richmond, Virginia, in the 
fall of 1906 and became the first special- 
ist in internal medicine in the city and 
was appointed a member of the adjunct 
faculty of the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia. In 191-4 he became head of the 
Department of Medicine in this insti- 
tution. In addition to a heavy teaching 
load he continued a large consulting prac- 
tice. In 1927 he was made Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Medicine and in 1929 he was 
appointed to the Board of Visitors of the 
College, a position which he held until 
1953. He was chairman of the Executive 
Committee from 1936 to 1953. 

He was married in 1910 to Miss Julie 
Marriott Osterloh of Richmond, Virginia. 
She died in 1924. In 1926 he married 
Mrs. Nancy Randolph Selden Habilston, 
who survives him. There were no children 
by either marriage. 

In 1936 he retired from the active prac- 
tice of medicine but devoted much time 
to administrative duties at the Medical 
College of Virginia, to numerous civic 
activities of which the Community Fund 
was one of the foremost, and above all 
to Saint Stephen's Episcopal Church, 
where he will be sorely missed. 

During his medical career he published 
numerous papers dealing with his work, 
was a member of the medical organiza- 
tions most related to his field of activity, 
and at his death he retained membership 
in his local, state, and national societies. 
He was a member of the Staff and 
Board of Directors of the Johnston-Wil- 
lis Hospital through the years of his 
active medical practice. 

His friends were numerous and all will 
remember the gracious hospitality of 
Windemere with its attractive setting and 
its beautiful gardens. He will be missed 
by his many friends in, all walks of life. 
His death on October 31, 1957, closed 
a long and useful life. He was indeed a 
man of rich attainment. 

T. Dewey Davis, M. D. 

THE SCARAB 



School of Medicine 

Remember February 21 and 22! On 
these important dates the medical school 
is privileged to present a Scientific As- 
sembly in cooperation with the Alumni 
Association. 

The purpose of this Assembly is sev- 
eral-fold. One of its most important 
functions is to provide you with knowl- 
edge about current medical fact, theory, 
method, and equipment. It is proposed 
to do this not with the standard lecture 
alone but also with patient demonstra- 
tion clinics, teaching films, short semi- 
nars in the laboratories of the school, 
and bedside rounds. You make your 
own choice as to what functions best 
fulfil your own needs. 

It is also an opportunity to inform you 
about the caliber, variety, and scope of 
activities and abilities of the medical 
school and its faculty today. Many people, 
because of the institution's lack of com- 
munication, are not aware of the collec- 
tion of special brains, special talents, and 
special equipment that this medical cen- 
ter offers as a consultant particularly to 
the physicians but to every citizen of the 
Commonwealth. 

Finally, it provides the chance to re- 
new old friendships with colleagues and 
faculty. The knowledge of how and in 
what areas each person's capabilities have 
developed should increase immeasurably 
the opportunities for mutual consul- 
tation and interchange of knowledge in 
the future. 

Since this Assembly was originally 
conceived it has become obvious that it 
can and must perform another vital 
function; namely, it will increase your 
knowledge of the need for support of 
medical education by the State. It will 
make you better able to transmit to the 
legislators in your area understanding of 
the crucial need for financial support for 
faculty salaries and for money to begin 
construction of the Medical Education 
Building. 

The provision of a place to work and 
the provision of sufficient monies for 
salaries are inseparable components in 
the preservation of the medical educa- 
tional program of the Medical College of 
Virginia. The Council of Higher Educa- 
tion of the State of Virginia clearly rec- 
ognized both these needs and unani- 
mously recommended support. 

Please plan to come on February 21 

and 22 to the Alumni Scientific Assembly. 

William F. Malonev. Dean 

FEBRUARY, 1958 



Deans' Page 



School of Dentistry 

Our School of Dentistry continues to 
prepare for the exciting future. While 
the world at large is concerned about mis- 
siles, satellites, and atomic destruction we 
are planning for more and better dental 
care for our growing population. 

Our population is growing not only 
numerically but also in its appreciation of 
dental care as an important health service. 
These considerations motivated us to plan 
for new facilities, larger faculty, increased 
student enrollment, postgraduate and grad- 
uate programs, and expanded research and 
teacher training activities. Plans for these 
phases of our program were developed in 
recent years on the basis of our own pro- 
jections of future needs for dental per- 
sonnel in Virginia and the neighboring 
geographic area of our immediate inter- 
est. The published report of a recent study 
confirms the soundness of our estimates. 

About a year ago the Southern Regional 
Education Board established a Commis- 
sion on Dental Education in the Sonlh 
to study and project the needs and de- 
mands for dental care between the present 
and 1975. The report of the Commission's 
study was released recently. It presents 
a startling story, substantiated by sound 
data and logic. The report is of immediate 
interest to every citizen of the South, es- 
pecially educators, legislators, and health 
service personnel. 

The Commission notes that, by con- 
servative estimates, the South will add 
over 14 million people to its current pop- 
ulation figure of 50,000,000 by 1975. Our 
entire population will have a markedly 
higher average income, enjoy a finer level 
of education, and demand more medical 
and dental care. 

The Commission advises that by 1975 
the shortage of dentists in the South will 
be distressingly acute unless provisions are 
made now for the education of a much 
larger number of dentists than the current 
sources will provide. A sharp note of 
warning is issued by the Commission on 
the subject of expanding dental education 
facilities with special reference to facul- 
ties. It notes that sizeable increases of 
dental faculties and faculty salaries arc- 
pressing and serious problems. Expansion 



of programs in Southern dental schools 
for research, teacher training, graduate 
study, and specialty training are other ur- 
gent problems calling for immediate con- 
sideration. 

Most of the Commission's recommen- 
dations have already been implemented 
at MCV. In order that we may carry on 
our many new projects and undertake 
still others we must have additional staff. 
To attract and retain an adequate faculty, 
salary schedules for dental teachers must 
be materially improved. We must also 
provide additional facilities by completing 
and equipping several undeveloped areas 
in the Wood Memorial Building. 

Our budgetary requests submitted to 
the Governor for consideration by our 
General Assembly reflect the financial aid 
which we should have. Our alumni can 
be very helpful by supporting our requests 
in appropriate ways. We solicit your help. 
Harry Lyons. Dean 

School of Graduate Studies 

Among educators, scientists, and others 
who influence the growth of resources 
of intellectual life in our country, there 
has been a growing concern over the 
direction, pace, and quality of this na- 
tion's scientific educational progress. This 
concern has received wide public attention 
since the recent Soviet astronautical con- 
tributions to the International Geophysical 
Year. These achievements have had an 
impact upon the world which is unique 
and unprecedented. Some first reactions 
were of stunned incredulity, giving place 
quickly to critical questions summed up in 
the question, "Why have we lagged be- 
hind?" Discussions, plans, and reorgan- 
izations arising out of these dramatic 
events are now in progress. They involve 
many departments of government, insti- 
tutions of higher learning, educational 
associations, technical and engineering 
groups, school boards, and the public. The 
whole picture is not yet fully clarified but 
we are definitely plummeted into a new 
age. 

I have chosen to write about this in 
the present issue of The Scarab because 
I believe that one of the practical and val- 
uable outcomes of the new astronautical 
advances can be a wholesome and en- 
during rebirth of science and scholarship 
generally in our country. This is not a mat- 
ter of special pleading. In common with 
many others. I am concerned lest we be 
(Continued on p.tge 26/ 



To Our Alumni 

Seldom does one have the privilege of acknowledging generosity as out- 
standing as that demonstrated toward the College and 
the Alumni Association by E. Claiborne Robins. Most of our alumni 
are familiar with the gifts made by Mr. Robins during the period when the 
Alumni House was being acquired and restored. 

The College now has the privilege of acknowledging a 
gift in the amount of $36,000 recently made by the A. H. Robins Company 
for the purpose of providing the air conditioning equipment needed 
to make fully usable certain animal rooms and laboratories in the second 
phase of McGuire Hall Annex, now under construction. Due to increases in 
building costs subsequent to the appropriation of funds for this structure 
by the General Assembly, the State funds available were inadequate 
to enable the purchase of this equipment. When approached by Doctors 
Paul Larson and Harvey Haag, the officials of the Robins Company im- 
mediately recognized this need as real and acted to provide 
the assistance required. 

All who love the College are their debtors. 

Sincerely, 

R. Blackwell Smith, Jr.. President 



WE WANT YOU AT THE 
Medical Scientific Assembly 

for Alumni of 

The Medical College of Virginia 

tyeUuaiy 21-22, 1958 

Sponsored by 

The Alumni Association and the School of Medicine 

of the 

Medical College of Virginia 

See Dr. William F. Moloney's column on page 9 
for further details 

Programs were mailed to medical alumni in January 

10 THE SCARAB 



The Oeneral Practitioner or 
the Year 



Dr. Baxter I. Bell, Sr. of Williams- 
burg was chosen to receive the General 
Practitioner of the Year Award of the 
Medical Society of Virginia in October. 

Dr. Bell was born near Swan Quarter, 
North Carolina August 26, 1889. He at- 
tended the University of North Carolina, 
and received his M. D. degree from the 
Medical College of Virginia in 1915. 
Following his internship at the Abingdon 
Hospital, Abingdon, Virginia, he served 
as physician for a mining company until 
1917. He came to Williamsburg as assist- 
ant physician at Eastern State Hospital 
in 1917, where he remained until 1925; 
during the 1918 influenza epidemic, he 
was one of two physicians on the staff. 

He began his general practice in Wil- 
liamsburg in 1925. One year later he- 
moved his office and home to the build- 
ing of the former Williamsburg Hotel, 
and used rooms there for tonsillectomy 
and obstetrical patients. Through his own 
planning and financing, the newly con- 
structed Bell Hospital on Cary Street was 
opened in 1930. He built his home next 
to his small hospital several months later. 
In 1935 an addition to the original 
building increased its capacity to twenty 
beds and eight bassinets. He provided 
the first general hospital in Williamsburg 
and on the Peninsula between Richmond 
and Newport News. It has been the only 
general hospital in the Williamsburg area 
and between Richmond and Newport 
News in these twenty-seven years. He has 
made its facilities available to all practic- 
ing physicians in Williamsburg and neigh- 
boring areas for hospitalization of their 
patients in their own care. 

He was appointed physician at the Col- 
lege of William and Mar)- in 1935 to 
succeed the late Dr. David J. King, and 
filled that position for twelve years. He 
has also been a surgeon for the Chesa- 
peake and Ohio Railway. He is a past 
president of the Williamsburg-James City 
County Medical Society. 

Dr. Bell has been a general practitioner 
in this community for thirty-two years, 
and has remained a general practitioner 
above all else. His practice has been his 

FEBRUARY, 1958 



only interest, and all his efforts have been 
directed to the relief of his patients. 
Although he has been described by a 
long-time friend as "frail in body, modest 
in spirit," these qualities have never hin- 
dered his capacity for work or the care 
of his patients. While actively supporting 
all community projects, and charitable and 
civic organizations, he has not sought pub- 
lic office or a prominent role in any organ- 
ization. He had courage to build and to 
open the first general hospital in the com- 
munity in a period of economic depres- 
sion when his family demands were in- 
creasing with a young son and infant 
twin daughters. His son, now Dr. Baxter 
I. Bell, Jr., joined him in practice a year 
ago. He has maintained his hospital with 
its facilities available to all local prac- 
ticing physicians as a private enterprise 
in a rapidly expanding area embracing 
educational institutions, historic shrines, 
and military installations. He has met the 
increasing problems in operation of an 
individually owned hospital and has kept 
the hospital in continuous service except 
for a short period following World War 
II when a minimum number of nurses 
could not be obtained. He has cooper- 
ated with charitable organizations, especi- 
ally the King's Daughters, in providing 
hospital care for indigent patients. He has 
earned the respect and trust of his pa- 
tients, his professional colleagues, and of 
the entire community. To many he has 
been the needed and always available- 
family physician. 

The College of William and Mar)' felt 
that Dr. Bell had fulfilled the require- 
ments of the New York Southern So- 
ciety "in the possession of such character- 
istics of heart, mind and conduct as evince 
a spirit of love for and helpfulness to 
others" when the College bestowed the 
Algernon Sydney Sullivan Award of that 
Society upon him in 1955. The esteem and 
tribute of the community was expressed 
to him on May 27, 1957 in the Com- 
munity Night Program "in appreciation 
of his endless, unselfish, untiring devotion 
to the people of this area." And so for this 
record, went another richly deserved trib- 
ute, "General Practitioner of the Year." 



The Scarab — Its Meaning 

Dr. Robhrt V. Terrell. M'34 

Recently your editor was asked just 
what the word, Scarab, meant. Defensively 
he replied that it was the Egyptian word 
tor beetle and that it had something to 
do with fertility and the resurrection in 
their religious thinking. 

The Encyclopedia Brittanica has the fol- 
lowing to say: "scarab means literally a 
beetle and derivatively an Egyptian sym- 
bol in the form of a beetle. The Egyptian 
dung beetle lays its eggs in a ball of dung 
and may be seen on sandy slopes in hot 
sunshine compacting the pellet. The Egyp- 
tians compared the pellet to the globe of 
the sun and used its name, kheperer, 
kheperi to mean 'become' and perhaps 
'create,' and also the substantive 'phenom- 
enon' or 'marvel.' The insect was sacred 
to the sun god at Heliopolis and has been 
found mummified. 

The scarabaeus was much used in Egyp- 
tian religions, appearing sometimes with 
outstretched wings or with a ram's head or 
horns as the vivifying soul. It is often 
seen in this form on coffins of the New 
Kingdom and later, when it became the 
custom to place in the bandages of the 
mummy a large stone scarab engraved 
with a chapter of the Book of the Dead. 
This chapter, the 64th, identified the ob- 
ject with the heart of the deceased and 
conjured it not to betray him in the judg- 
ment before Osiris. A winged scarab 
might also be laid on the breast; and later 
a number of scarabs were placed about 
the body. These are often of hard stone 
and fine workmanship. . . . 

Scarabs were also used for seals, or 
beads or ornaments. Their impressions 
are found on sealed documents of the 
Middle and New Kingdoms. The inscrip- 
tions on scarabs are often mottoes, e.g. 
'Memphis is mighty forever,' 'Ammon 
protecteth,' 'Mut give thee long life,' 
'Buchastis grant a good year,' 'May thy 
name endure and a son be born to thee.' " 

The editor is quite conscious of the 
scholarship of Scarab readers and invites 
contributions of further information on 
this subject for later printing. 



REUNION DATES 

June 2-3, 1958 

11 



Tentative Program — Proressional Pharmacy Seminar 

Sponsored by the School of Pharmacy and Virginia Phar maceutical Association 
MARCH 17-18, 1958 



MONDAY AFTERNOON— MARCH 17, 1958 

Richmond Academy of Medicine, 12th & Clay Streets, 
Richmond, Virginia 
Russell H. Fiske, Presiding 

1:30 General Topics to be presented: 

Pharmaceutical Information on Small Hospitals. 
The Hospital Pharmacy. 

The Local Pharmacist and the Community Hospital. 
Panel Discussion. 

MONDAY EVENING 

Hotel John Marshall 
6:30 Social Hour 

7:30 Dinner 

8:30 Speaker 

TUESDAY MORNING— MARCH 18, 1958 

Richmond Academy of Medicine, 12th & Clay Streets, 
Richmond, Virginia 
Dr. M. L. Neuroth, Presiding 

9:30 General Topics to be Presented: 
New Products Refresher. 
Merchandising. 

Legislation Affecting Pharmacy. 
Film. 
General Discussion. 



The annual Pharmacy Seminar will be held in Richmond 
at the Academy of Medicine auditorium, 12th and Clay Streets. 
The dates selected are March 17 and 18, 1958. This year the 
Seminar will begin Monday, March 17 at 1:30 P.M. There 
will be an afternoon session on Monday, and an evening dinner 
with a speaker and a session Tuesday morning. It is believed 
by the committee that these arrangements will permit more 
pharmacists to attend. Topics selected for presentation are in 
the field of pharmaceutical service to hospitals and clinics, par- 
ticularly in smaller communities, and interesting topics in the 
field of pharmacy administration, or the economic and business 
side of pharmacy. Plan now to make arrangements to be present 
and to take advantage of an informative program. You owe 
it to yourself, to your employees, and to your profession, to 
keep abreast of trends in the practice of Pharmacy. 

Again this year there will be no registration fee for the 
seminar. There will be a nominal charge for the banquet on 
Monday evening, March 17. Ladies are invited and encouraged 
to be with us. The atmosphere of the comfortable auditorium 
lends diginiry to any professional meeting. Plans need to be 
made early in order that an orderly efficient program can be 
carried out, so you will want to help us by letting us know 
that you plan to attend either part or all of the sessions. 

THE COMMITTEE 

M. L. Neuroth 
Russell H. Fiske 
Jim Hubbard 



Afat&yk 




February 21 Medical Scientific Assembly sponsored by Alumni Association and the 

School of Medicine. 
February 22 Medical Scientific Assembly sponsored by Alumni Association and the 

School of Medicine. 
February 21 Social Hour and Banquet for those in attendance at the Scientific Assem- 
bly and their guests, 6:00 p.m., Hotel Jefferson. 
March 12-13 Stoneburner Lectures, Dr. A. McGhee Harvey, professor of medicine and 

chairman of the Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University. 
April 10 Richmond Chapter Spring Party, Cocktails and Dinner, Commonwealth 

Club. 
April 17 Washington Chapter, Cocktails and Buffet Supper, Army and Navy 

Club, 17th and Eye Streets, N.W., Washington, D. C. 
June 1 Commencement Sermon 

June 2 Alumni Day 

1 .00 p.m. Luncheon 

6:00 p.m. Social Hour and Banquet, Hotel John Marshall 
June 3 Commencement Exercises 

12 




Knights Templar Present Gift. Presentation 
of $15,000.00 check by Messrs. William T. 
Buckner and Zachariah B. Johnston to Dr. 
DuPont Guerry, III, Professor and Chairman 
of the Department of Ophthalmology, and 
General William F. Tompkins, comptroller 
of the Medical College, for research in 
that department. 



THE SCARAB 



' Kouvib 

ike (silcuit 

Washington Chapter 

The Washington Chapter will have a 
cocktail party and buffet supper at the 
Army and Navy Club, 17th and Eye 
Streets, N.W., on April 17. 

Dr. J. Gordon Bell, M'33, is the chair- 
man for the party and has planned a de- 
lightful evening. Representatives of both 
the College and the Alumni Association 
will attend. There will be no speeches. 

Medical Society of Virginia 

On October 28 the Alumni of the Col- 
lege in attendance at the Medical Society 
of Virginia meeting had dinner together 
in the Blue Room of The Shoreham. Dr. 
Custis Coleman was chairman for the din- 
ner and toastmaster. He introduced Dr. 
James T. Tucker, then president of the 
Alumni Association, and Dr. J. Spencer 
Dryden, then president-elect, who greeted 
the alumni on behalf of the Association. 
Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. spoke about 
the needs of the College and Dean Wil- 
liam F. Maloney brought news of the 
school of medicine. Dr. Edward L. Al- 
exander extended an invitation to all the 
alumni to attend the Scientific Assembly 
on February 21 and 22. 

It was an enjoyable evening and most 
of our alumni went on to hear Dr. James 
D. Hagood's scholarly address to the 
House of Delegates on the subject of 
'Socialized Medicine." The time and 
study that Dr. Hagood had devoted to its 
preparation was certainly evident. 



Glass 72 



ass news 



1887 Ramon D. Garcin (M) of Richmond, 
Virginia, was honored on his ninetieth birth- 
day at ;i dinner by the Board of Directors of 
the State Planters Bank of Commerce and 
Trusts and presented with a mounted scroll 
of commendation. He has been a director 
of the bank since 1912. 

1908 Meade S. Brent (M), Heathville, Vir- 
ginia, has been made a life member of the 
Neuropsychiatrie Society of Virginia in rec- 
ognition of his long association with the 
American Psychiatric Association and service 
to psychiatry. 

1909 Mrs. Martha S. Callaham (N) visited 
the Alumni Office on November 19. 
Walter E. Vest (M) of Huntington, West 
Virginia, was named chairman of the Board 
of Trustees of the Southern Medical Associ- 
ation at the annual meeting in Miami Beach, 
Florida. November 11-14. This is the second 
time he has served in this capacity. 

1916 Dr. and Mrs. Austin I. Dodson (M) 
have returned from a vacation trip to Ha- 

1917 Senator and Mrs. Lloyd C. Bird (P) 
attended the Queen's dinner on October 16 
:it Williamsburg Inn. 

1923 Harry Lyons (D) headed the Amer- 
ican delegation to the Twelfth International 
Dental Congress in Rome. He was made an 
honorary member of L 'Arpa, an international 
(European) society for the study of peri- 
odontal diseases. He was also named consult- 
ing member of the scientific commission of 
the Federation Dentaire Internationale. The 
Federation includes national dental associ- 
ations of 59 countries. He, as president, also 
presided at the meeting of the American 
Dental Association in Miami, Florida, in No- 
vember. 

Leta J. White (M), pediatrician from Peters- 
burg, Virginia, will remain in Nigeria and 
the Belgian Congo for a year. She is work- 
ing in the mission hospitals and clinics under 
the Foreign Mission Board of the Southern 
Baptist Convention. 

1924 The Gynaecological Travellers of 
Great Britain and Ireland were the guests 
of H. Hudnall Ware, Jr. (M) on September 
11. After a tour of the College, the fourteen 
physicians were entertained at dinner by 
the Richmond Obstetrical and Gynecological 
Society. Dr. Ware also attended a meeting 




Speakers' Table — MCV Alumn 
FEBRUARY, 1958 



nquet, Medical Society of Va. 



of the Gynecological Travelers at the Mayo 
Clinic, November 1-2 and presented a paper 
before the section on obstetrics of the Med- 
ical Society of Virginia at its annual meet- 
ing in Washington, October 28-29. Dr. and 
Mrs. Ware were guests at the banquet Eor 
the Queen at Williamsburg Inn. 

1926 J. Berkley Gordon (M) and his wife 
have .just returned from a Mediterranean va- 
cation which took them to Spain, France, 
Italy, Syria, Greece, Lebanon, Jordan, and 
Egypt. Their daughter, Janey, received her 
Master 's degree in Fine Arts at Goueher 
College in June and was married to Earl 
Harrison Gale, Jr. soon after. Their son, 
Richard, completed his master's thesis in 
Political Science at Columbia University. 
James Asa Shield (M) portrayed George 
Washington at the mock battle of Yorktown 
in October. 

1927 E. N. Pleasants (M) has received an 
appointment to the faculty of the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania School of Medicine 
in the Department of Psychiatry. He will 
be full-time in the Hospital of the Univer- 
sity, engaged in both in- and out-patient 
clinical work; will be teaching clinical psy- 
chiatry to senior medical students and resi- 
dents in psychiatry; and will be assisting 
in planning and carrying through various re- 
search projects in the field of psychiatry. 

1928 Harvey B. Haag (M) attended the 
meeting of the AMA Committee on Toxi 
oology in Chicago on October 3. 

1929 Oscar L. Hite (M) of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, received a citation for ' ' Meritorious 
Christian service" at the annual convocation 
of Crozer Theological Seminary at Chester, 
Pennsylvania, in October. Eight recipients 
were chosen from throughout the United 
States. 

Claude A. Nunnally (M) of Fredericksburg, 
Virginia, has recently been elected to the 
School Board by the City Council. 

1930 J. P. Broaddus (D) attended the In- 
ternational Dental Congress in Rome. 
Elizabeth K. Ryan (N) has returned to the 
Medical College of Virginia after a year's 
leave of absence for work toward her mas- 
ter 's degree, which she received from Boston 
University, August 17. She is rehabilitation 
nursing coordinator between nursing service 
and the rehabilitation department. She was 
initiated in Sigma Zeta Tau, national hon- 
orary nursing society. She spoke on Nursing 
Responsibilities in Rehabilitation in an in- 
stitute on rehabilitation held recently at the 
University of Virginia Hospital for the 
nursing staff. 

1932 R, Lee Clark, Jr. (M) of Houston, 
Texas, was elected second vice president of 
the Alumni Association of the Mayo Foun- 
dation at the thirty-third annual meeting of 
tliat organization in Rochester. Minnesota, 
October 2-5, 1957. He w-as a fellow in sur- 
gery in the Mayo Foundation from 1935- 
1939. 

Minnie E. Thorne (N), supervisor of John 
ston County. North Carolina, public health 
nurses and director of the Orthopedic Clinic 
that is now in its second year of operation 
at the County Health Department, received 
a "Certificate of Appreciation" from the 
National Foundation for Infantile Paral- 
ysis. She was chiefly responsible for the 
establishment of the crippled children 's 
clinic in the county in January, 1956. 
(Continued on page 31) 

13 



Educational Signposts 

C. W. Shilling, M.D. 

Deputy Director, Division of Biology and Medicine, U. S. Atomic Energy Commission 

Delivered at Founders' Day Convocation, MCV, December 9, 1957 



Sputnik has pierced outer space. It has 
also pierced the thick shell encasing our 
complacent faith in America's technologi- 
cal supremacy and fortunately it has even 
shaken our faith in our sacrosanct educa- 
tional system. No wonder we are hearing 
much nowadays about our struggle for 
national survival. The situation is alarm- 
ing. This is no time for complacency. 

Our nation certainly cannot muster a 
superior number of men — our potential 
enemy has manpower resources that out- 
number our possible resources in man- 
power many times over. 

We definitely cannot draw upon greater 
natural resources for once again our po- 
tential enemy has far greater natural re- 
sources within its sphere of power than we 
have. 

Our only hope of protection lies in mak- 
ing maximum use of our intellectual re- 
sources; in new ideas translated through 
research into new end products that will 
strengthen not only our national defense 
but our national economy. Although we 
cannot afford to fail in this area, it is in 
precisely this most crucial area where we 
find ourselves far behind. 

We must have more scientists and engi- 
neers. 

We must have more medically oriented 
professional and scientific personnel. 

We must have better educated scientists 
of all types. 

We must have leaders with well-rounded 
educations who understand that progress 
is achieved only through struggle. 

And most importantly, we must have 
people who both can and will assume re- 
sponsibility. 

There is a justifiable uneasiness exist- 
ing inside America today which is related 
to our failure to live up to our moral capac- 
ity as a nation. We have been living aim- 
less lives with disjointed purposes — too 
many of us have been concerned with big- 
ger incomes, bigger television screens, and 
bigger cars ; and not with bigger ideas or 
with developing a back-log of basic infor- 
mation on which our freedoms and our 
very lives may soon depend. 

The solution to our problem demands 
a reawakening, a changed emphasis, differ- 
ent goals, new value judgments — in fact, 
a national renaissance. To be effective, our 

14 



effort must start with the American educa- 
tional system. 

As many of you heard President Eisen- 
hower say, the Office of Education reported 
that when Russian young people graduate 
from high school they have had five years 
of physics, four years of chemistry, one 
year of astronomy, five years of biology, 
ten years of mathematics through trigo- 
nometry, and five years of a foreign lan- 
guage. 

In our present predominantly super- 
kindergarten system with its trend toward 
effortless education, and the substitution 
of pastimes for disciplines, it is entirely 
possible (particularly for a superior ath- 
lete) to graduate from high school with- 
out any of the above requirements except 
perhaps for a few years of simple mathe- 
matics, a couple of years of inadequate in- 
struction in a foreign language, and a 
course in general science. 

In case you doubt this, let me ask you, 
do you know that one-fourth of all Ameri- 
can high schools offer no chemistry, one- 
fourth offer no physics, one-fourth offer 
no geometry, and many offer no courses 
in biology. And worst of all, in many 
schools offering science and mathematics 
courses, the quality of instruction is un- 
believedly low. For example, last year in 
the relatively superior high schools of 
New York City, more than 10,000 stu- 
dents were in science classes taught by 
teachers who were not trained in any 
science. Unless drastic action is taken, this 
is a situation that will become much worse. 

No wonder the students lose interest 
and drift away from science and mathe- 
matics courses. No wonder they are so 
poorly prepared for college. No wonder 
we are falling behind in the production of 
well-trained scientists. And this at a time 
when our complete reliance on technology 
demands an ever-increasing supply. 

This failure to engender interest in 
science as a career has led to a staggering 
loss of young people who have the ability 
and talent to be successful scientists. Last 
year, almost 200,000 able high school 
graduates failed to enroll in college for 
one reason or another. Of the most intelli- 
gent 20% in the group of college age, 
fewer than half enter college and only 
about a third graduate. 



As I am sure all of you who are on ad- 
missions committees can testify, the situ- 
ation in so far as our college education 
is concerned is not much better. Under- 
graduates fail to prepare in college for 
professional or graduate work in the same 
way the high school students failed to pre- 
pare for college. If it were not for rigid 
requirements set up, for example, by your 
medical school, I am sure the present gen- 
eration of young people would come to 
you with no science courses at all. 

Unfortunately, a very small percent of 
college graduates enter into any graduate 
work. Educational authorities estimate that 
fewer than two percent of those in the 
college age group who are mentally 
equipped to obtain Ph.D degrees will 
actually obtain them. 

I have emphasized the need at the un- 
dergraduate level for a reawakening but 
the same need for adoption of more ef- 
fective teaching techniques, and for re- 
vitalizing the faculty by strengthening the 
research program exists in our professional 
schools. What measures can we as citizens 
take to remedy this situation — how can 
we bring about a realization of the value 
of a well-rounded education from kinder- 
garten through graduate school? 

The President in his Oklahoma speech 
said we should, "have a system of nation- 
wide testing of high school students ; a 
system of incentives for high-aptitude stu- 
dents to pursue scientific and professional 
studies; a program to stimulate good qual- 
ity teaching of mathematics and science; 
provision of more laboratory facilities ; 
and measures, including fellowships, to 
increase the output of qualified teachers." 
He also admonished all of us "to scruti- 
nize through our PT.A.'s and school 
boards your school's curriculum and stand- 
ards to see whether they meet the stern 
demands of the era we are entering." 

I think an important point was omit- 
ted — namely, a marked increase in the 
level of pay for teachers all the way 
through the education system. I know the 
comparison is odious, and one shouldn't 
have to awaken Americans by mentioning 
Russia, BUT in their system the teacher, 
the scientist and the professional man com- 
prise the honored class, second only to 
the commissars and the members of the 
polit bureau. They are bountifully paid 
and enjoy lovely homes, vacations, maids, 
chauffeur-driven cars, and other privileges. 

The need for higher recompense for 
(Continued on page 28) 

THE SCARAB 



Directory of Members 



♦Deceased 


NURSING 




George J. 


Hulch 


ur 


Thomas J. Tudor 


G. G. Hankins 




Ellen W. Goss 




Howard G.Whit 


head 


William R. Weisiger 


A. A. Houser 


1897 


1906 




1908 




PHARMACY 


D. P. Scott 


MEDICINE 










H. C. Hurdle 


W. N. Thomas 


Benjamin W. Rawles 


MEDICINE 




MEDICINE 






Albert U. Tieche 




George Brunner 




M. S. Brent 




1910 


R. E. Watts 


PHARMACY 

A. T. Gray 


Wylie Hodge Cunnin 
Daniel D. Talley, Jr. 
L. F. Watson 


3 ham 


G. W. Skaggs 




MEDICINE 


UCM 






UCM 




A. C. Broders 


J. Henry Cutchin 


1899 






Brady D. Epling 




R. H. Dunn 


A. D. Morgan 


MEDICINE IUCMI 


UCM 

Russell L. Cecil 




T. C. Sutherland 
E. P. Whelan 




Turner S. Shelton 
Oscar W. Ward, Sr. 


NCMC 


Emmett F. Reese, Jr. 


Ray Atkinson Moore 










James B. Whittington 


DENTISTRY (UCM) 
Charles T. Womack 

PHARMACY (UCM) 

Henry D. Zimmerman 

1900 
MEDICINE 


O. K. Phlegar 

PHARMACY 

J T. Wallace 

UCM 

J. Conrad Kearfott 

NURSING 

Rose Hancock 




NCMC 

Frank L. Mock 

DENTISTRY IUCM) 

John M. Hughes 
George E. Petty 

NURSING 

Josephine D. Payne 


UCM 

John W. Turman 
DENTISTRY 

J. H. Cocks 

UCM 

Paul E. Jones 

PHARMACY 


DENTISTRY (UCM) 

M. J. Connell, Sr. 

PHARMACY (UCM) 

E. G. Johann 
W. E. Locke 

NURSING 

Andrma Grove-Hagen 


Emmett H. Terrell 




1909 




Douglas Atkinson 


Eugenia Triplett 


UCM 


1907 




MEDICINE 




R. E. Monroe 


UCM 


Luther R. Stinson 
1901 


MEDICINE 

Mark T. Frizzell 
George W. Johnson 




Walter E. Vest 
Byrd C. Willis, J 




NURSING 

lleta L. Gilmer 
Saddle B. Vest 


Anne C. Stephenson 
1912 


MEDICINE 

W. L. Cooke 


PHARMACY (UCM) 




UCM 

"J. K. Cowherd 




1911 


MEDICINE 

R. D. Glasser 


John L. Hankins 


Alice Drake 
Elmer E. Grove 




A. B. Grubb 
C. L. Harrell 




MEDICINE 

Thomas W. Blanchard 


W. W. Hargrove 


UCM 


Warren S. Grubbs 




S. A. Slater 




A. S. Brinkley 


UCM 


John E. Cannaday 












W. Clyde Adkerson 
Robert A. Ashworth 
L. J. Friedman 


1902 














PHARMACY (UCM) 














M. Pinson Neal 


Charles L. Guthrie 






Mem 


oersliip 


Sta 


tistics 


Charles C. Smith, Jr. 


1903 












NCMC 
















Charles S. Sink 


MEDICINE 

W. J. Sturgis 




Year 




1954 


1955 


1956 1957 


DENTISTRY 


UCM 




Total Members 


1786 


1661 


1836 2022 


Guy R. Harrison 


W. Wallace Gill 














UCM 


Benjamin C. Shuler 
Benjamin L. Traynham 








M 


embers 


Percent of Total 


J. O. Hodgkin 
W. N. Hodgkin 


DENTISTRY 












Membership 


PHARMACY 


James Mitchell Lewis 
1904 




Medicine 




1192 


35% 


B. F. Foley 
E. D. Fugate 


MEDICINE 




Dentistry 






MIO 


24% 


1913 


Thomas Watkins 
UCM 




Pharmac) 






256 


23% 


MEDICINE 

E. L. Caudill 


E. L. Grubbs 














W. C. Caudill 


John M. Williams 




Nursing 






132 


127o 


C. E. Flowers 


DENTISTRY 

W. P. Williams 




Dietetics 












Herman Hertzberg 
H. C. Padgett 
F. W. Poindexter 


UCM 

H. A. Duncan 




Hospital 


Administration 








Abraham 1. Weinstein 


Harry L. Smith 




Medical 


Technology 


* 


46 


5% 


UCM 

Beverly F. Eckles 


PHARMACY (UCM) 














J. O. Fitzgerald 
J. D. Hagood 


W. S. Cavedo 




Physical 


Therap\ 










1905 














George S. Hurt 






Af? ; 






Douglas D. Martin 


MEDICINE 














W. L. Mason 


Francis A. Bell 
W. R. McCall 




Board of Visitors 








-Thomas D. Morewitz 
W. T. Rainey 


J. M. Northington 




Administ 


"ation 










R. W. Woodhouse, Jr. 


UCM 
















NCMC 


Robert S. Fitzgerald 
Delos D. Hooper 




Faculty 








96 




Pinkney J. Chester 


Moir S. Martin 
















PHARMACY 


D. C. Mayes 




Pharmac) 












C. A. Cleveland 


Clarence V. Montgomery 


















Jack W. Witten 




Dentistry 




J 








UCM 

R. D. Heist 


DENTISTRY 














Guy L. Miller 


W. Henry Street 














Glenn Updike 



FEBRUARY, 1958 



15 



/ MW //// '" ////// %%% 

Significant Rabins research discovery 

$% / //////s,sss////mM> 



A NEW SKELETAL 
MUSCLE RELAXANT 




Robaxin - synthesized in the Robins Research Laboratories, and 
intensively studied for five years - introduces to the physician an 
entirely new agent for effective and well-tolerated skeletal muscle 
relaxation. Robaxin is an entirely new chemical formulation, with 
outstanding clinical properties: 

• Highly potent and long acting. 5 8 

• Relatively free of adverse side effects. 1,2,3 ' 4,6,7 

• Does not reduce normal muscle strength or reflex activity 
in ordinary dosage. 7 

• Beneficial in 94.4% of cases with acute back pain 
due to muscle spasm. 1,3,4,6,7 





(b) Muscle spasm due to 
trauma 

(c) Muscle spasm due to 
nerve irritation 

(d) Muscle spasm secondary 
to discogenic disease 
and postoperative 
orthopedic procedures 



Miscellaneous (bursitis 
torticollis, etc.) 



(Methocarbamol Robins, U.S. Pat. No. 2770649) 



Highly specific action 

Robaxin is highly specific in its action on the 
internuncial neurons of the spinal cord - with 
inherently sustained repression of multisyn- 
aptic reflexes, but with no demonstrable effect 
on monosynaptic reflexes. It thus is useful in 
the control of skeletal muscle spasm, tremor and 
other manifestations of hyperactivity, as well 
as the pain incident to spasm, without impair- 
ing strength or normal neuromuscular function. 



Beneficial in 94.4% of cases tested 

When tested in 72 patients with acute back 
pain involving muscle spasm, Robaxin in- 
duced marked relief in 59, moderate relief in 
6, and slight relief in 3 - or an over-all bene- 
ficial effect in 94.4%. 1 ' 3 ' 4 ' 6 ' 7 No side effects 
occurred in 64 of the patients, and only slight 
side effects in 8. In studies of 129 patients, 
moderate or negligible side effects occurred 
in only 6.2%. i-M.4,M 



WITH ROBAXI 


M IN ACUTE BACK PAIN <•••*■ "■» 




NO. OF 
CASES 


DURATION 
OF 

TREATMENT 


DOSE PER DAY (divided) 


RESPONSE 
marked mod. slight neq. 


SIDE EFFECTS 


18 


2-42 days 


3-6 Gm. 


17 


1 








None, 16 
Dizziness, 1 
Slight nausea, 1 


13 


1-42 days 


2-6 Gm. 


8 


1 


3 


1 


None, 12 

Nervousness, 1 


5 


4-240 days 


2 25-6Gm. 


4 


1 








None, 5 


30 


2-28 days 


1.5-9 Gm. 


24 


3 





3 


None, 25 
Dizziness, 1 
Lightheaded- 
ness, 2 
Nausea, 2 * 


6 


3-60 days 


4-8 Gm. 


6 











None, 6 


72 






59 


6 


3 


4 


•Relieved on 
reduction 
of dose 



References: 1 Carpenter. E. B.: Publication pending. 2. Carter 
^. H.: lersonal communication. 3. Forsyth, H. F.: Publication 
a 6 "™^ 4 -\ F ^ e VT d ' J - : PersonaI communication. 5. Morgan 
%%?W& « V'U and L £' e - J - M ' : African Pharm. A Sn 
f'f?n i, f ™ Nachman, H. M.: Personal communication. 
7. _ ODoherty, D.: Publication pending. 8. Truitt, E. B.. Jr., and 
Little, J. M.: J. Pharm. & Exper. Therap. 119:161 1957 



Indications - Acute back pain associ- 
ated with: (a) muscle spasm secondary to 
sprain; (b) muscle spasm due to trauma; 

(c) muscle spasm due to nerve irritation; 

(d) muscle spasm secondary to discogenic 
disease and postoperative orthopedic 
procedures; and miscellaneous conditions, 
such as bursitis, fibrositis, torticollis, etc. 

Dosage - Adults: Two tablets 4 times 
daily to 3 tablets every 4 hours. Total daily 
dosage: 4 to 9 Gm. in divided doses. 

Precautions - There are no specific con- 
traindications to Robaxin and untoward 
reactions are not to be anticipated. Minor 
side effects such as lightheadedness, dizzi- 
ness, nausea may occur rarely in patients 
with unusual sensitivity to drugs, but dis- 
appear on reduction of dosage. When ther- 
apy is prolonged routine white blood cell 
counts should be made since some decrease 
was noted in 3 patients out of a group of 
72 who had received the drug for periods 
of 30 days or longer. 

Supply - Robaxin Tablets, 0.5 Gm., in 
bottles of 50. 

A. H. ROBINS CO., INC., Richmond 20, Va. 

Ethical Pharmaceuticals of Merit since 1878 



1914 

MEDICINE 

G. E. Bowdoin 
G. B. Byrd 
Guy B. Denit 
E. Lotone Flanogan 
L. M. Fulrell 
J. R. Gorman 
Fred E. Hamlin 
Ben Lipshutz 
Edgar P. Norfleet 
Howard Urbach 
J. C. Walker, Jr. 
Wm. John Wiglngfon 
C. B. Young 

NCMC 

Irving E. Shafer 

DENTISTRY 

Vivian V. Gillum 

PHARMACY 

K. C. Bliss 
G. B. Cocke 
George Van Durrer 
William H. Long, Jr. 
Henry G. Shirkey 

NURSING 

Nora Spencer Hamner 

1915 

MEDICINE 

James B. Anderson 

C. B. Courtney 

Richard B. Davis 

G. G. Dixon 

J. M. Emmett 

*R, Finley Gayle, Jr. 

J. H. Hoskins 

Carroll H. Iden 

J. M. Mayer 

Walter J. Otis 

John E. Porter 

G. V. Wood, Jr. 

DENTISTRY 

W. B. Caldwell 



NURSING 

Mary F. Halterman 

1916 
MEDICINE 

E. S. Barr 
G. O. Crank 

A. I. Dodson, Sr. 
J. F. Foster 
W. P. Gilmer 
P. G. Hamlin 
J. L. Hamner 
George F. Hughston 
Henry C. Johnston 

F. W. H. Logan 
John W. Martin 
A. D. Parson 
William O. Poindexter 
Albert T. Ransone, Jr. 
R. C. Ray 

Alex F. Robertson, Jr. 
PhillipS. Smith 
Ernest L. Strickland 
F. P. Sutherland 

1917 
MEDICINE 

Edward T. Ames 
Carl A. Broaddus 
Randolph G. Broaddus 
Alon J. Chenery 
Dean B. Cole 



S. S. Cook 
D. S. Divers 
James A. Fields 
Bernard F. Gilchriest 
J. Stewart Gilman 
Campbell Harris 
Joseph Heyman 
Basil B. Jones 
J. M. Rogers 
George C. Snead 
Ramon M. Suarez 
W. G. Suiter 
Toson O. Summers 
Edwin B. Thompson 
R. F. Thornhill 
*T. M. Vorbrinck 
H. E. Whaley 
Fred G. Woodruff 

DENTISTRY 

Beaman Story 

PHARMACY 

L. C. Bird 



1918 

MEDICINE 

C. S. McCants 

William Meyer 
H. H. Wescott 

DENTISTRY 

W. Archer Bagley 
W. I. Carpenter 
G. W. Holliday 
N. F. Muir 
G. A. Svetlik 

PHARMACY 

George F. Hendley 
Leo Rosenthal 

NURSING 

Nancy P. Dailey 

1919 

MEDICINE 

John R. Cain 
H. W. Decker 
H. R. Masters 
C. L. Nance 

DENTISTRY 

R. H. Bruni 

William H. Lewis, Jr. 

T. A. Price 

J. J. Stigall 

Leon J. Walton 

A. M. Wash 

PHARMACY 

A. R. Cross 
R. C. Parsons 

1920 

MEDICINE 

H. R. Huston 
J. G. Lyerly 

PHARMACY 

B. E. Burnette 
R. J. Walker 

NURSING 

Lucy J. Millman 

1921 
MEDICINE 

Francisco Jose Casalduc 

Harry Lee Claud 

T. Dewey Davis 

Rob Roy Doss 

F. Ernest Hinchman 

Henry J. Langston 



Charles W. Putney 
R. Hugh Wood 

DENTISTRY 

W. E. Clark 
Floyd J. Leonard 
John C. Tyree 

PHARMACY 

R. R. Rooke 
Sedona V. Shaw 

J. G. Thomas 

NURSING 

Marion B. Myers 
Mattie W. Poyser 
Maria A. Rommel 

1922 

MEDICINE 

E. P. Bray 

Charles M. Caraval 
Joseph Coates 
P. G. Fox 
Malcolm H. Harris 
W. J. Ozlm 
George W. Parson 
B. P. Seward 
L. O. Snead 
Thomas M. Winn 

DENTISTRY 

French H. Mcore 
Tillie L. Weinstein 

PHARMACY 

L. W. Butler 
H. M. Eads 
T. F. Marshall 



NURSING 

Hildred Baus 



Annie M. Linton 
Florence Schwab 

1923 

MEDICINE 

William H. Batte 
W. S. Beazley, Jr. 
P. R. Fox 

Robert P. Hawkins, Jr 
J. A. Mease 
Waverly R. Payne 
*C. Eugene Perkins 
Joseph P. Treccase 
Leta J. White 

DENTISTRY 

Job Oscar Belcher 

Shannon Butts 
R. Ashton Gay 
Harry Lyons 
Leland S. Mabry 
G. G. Overholt 
Clyde B. Reese 
Preston M. White 

PHARMACY 

J. W. Chamblee 
M. W. Gutridge 
E. R. Rush 
NURSING 
Mary H. Oliver 

1924 

MEDICINE 

Ruth G. Aleman 
Robert W. Bess 
G. W. Black 
J. L. Blanton 
Doris C. Boatwright 
Donald S. Daniel 
Clay W. Evatt 
Nathan B. Feinberg 



Samuel J. Ferguson 
Lulu Woods Garst 
C. E. Haberlin 

B. E. Hunt 

L. Rush Lambert 

C. F. Lemley 
William F. Matthews 
W. E. Newcomer 
Roy L. Noblin 
Ernest C. Shull 
Giles S. Terry 

H. Hudnall Ware, Jr 
T. B. Washington 

DENTISTRY 

R. F. Freeman 
S. Nelson Gray 
G. Fred Hale 
J. F. Hunt, Jr. 
W. J. Sydnor 

PHARMACY 

James G. Albert 
B. T. Allen 
J. R. Myers 



D. 



Schwetz 



1925 
MEDICINE 

A. E. Amick 
Roscoe D. Campbell 
Douglas Chapman 
R. S. Coffindaffer 
Bernard Disick 
Robley R. Goad 
W. Randolph Graham 
E. Bacon Hardee 
H. P. Levin 
J. C. Repass 

DENTISTRY 

Charles H. Wilson 
PHARMACY 

Cecil C. Lipes 
Irving L. Simpkins 

NURSING 

Fleda H. Colvard 

1926 
MEDICINE 

Fletcher E. Ammons 
Guy C. Amory 
Benjamin H. Bailey 
Webster P. Barnes 
A. J. Blechman 
O. C. Campbell 
Helen M. Elkins 
A. D. Ferrell 
Harry Golston 
J. Berkeley Gordon 
Thomas B. Gordon 
H. L. Griffin 
Jeanette T. M. Jarmar 
J. Phillip Jones, Jr. 
A. A. Koran 
Max Kliger 
Lewis C. Lush 
W. Fuqua Mitchell 
R. Rodriquez-Molina 
Maurice Rosenthal 
J. Asa Shield 
Harry Walker 
Louis Wardell 
William F. Work 

DENTISTRY 

William Tyler Haynes 
Edward Myers 
R. S. Powell 
W. A. Ratcliffe 

PHARMACY 

C. B. Carlan, Jr. 
Braxton Coiner 



Hunter M. Gaunt 
L. A. Gregory 
Z. B. Johnston 
Roy Rhodes 

NURSING 

Lois F. Arundel 
Maude L. Fox 

1927 

MEDICINE 

Edward L. Alexander 
W. L. Ball 
Harry E. Beard 
Thomas S. Bowyer 
G. Norfleet Carter 
Raymond H. Curry 
H. C. Davis 

B. H. Denman 
R. L. Eastman 
*J. R. Ellison, Jr. 
V. J. Felitti 

Jos Garrido-Collazo 

Seth Gayle, Jr. 

J. Warren Hundley 

C. C. Jackson 

E. W. Johnson 
Sidney F. Johnston 
Oliver L. Jones 
Orvin C. Jones 
James W. Keever 
Athey R. Lutz 

F. U. Metcalf 
C. L. Newland 
John W. Parker, Jr. 
Paul E. Prlllaman 
Irwin Rifkin 

P. A. Shelburne 
F. F. Sowers 
M. S. Stinnett 
James T. Tucker 

DENTISTRY 

J. R. Fleet 
PHARMACY 

A. O. McCalley 

NURSING 

Florence S. Osborne 

1928 
MEDICINE 

Joseph F. Barrett 
C. R. Bowman 
Raymond L. Claterbaugh 
A. R. Comunale 
Garrett Dolton 
W. C. Elliott 
E. D. Floyd 
P. C. Grigg 
Harvey B. Haag 
C. H. Henderson 
Wilbur E. Hoffman 
Joseph J. Hornisher 



N. B 

E C 



Jete 



Joyn 
d Y. Ke 
rothy K 
en S. Lloyd 



hba 



Frank Mongillo 
Claude L. Neale 
John H. Reed, Jr 
R. H. Reitzel 
R. F. Simms 
J. R. St. George 
W. R. Southwarc 
William N. Thon 
John R.'Wood 
H. B. Yeatts 

DENTISTRY 

M. A. Byrd 
W. C. Webb 



18 



THE SCARAB 



PHARMACY 

I. J. Frotkin 
J. R. Ward 

NURSING 

Mary Campbell Gale 
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Katherine C. Kindred 

1929 
MEDICINE 

W. A. Anthony 
S. O. Bennett 
Rex Blankinship 
W. Howard Branch 
W. M. B. Brown 
O. K. Burnette 
A. C. Chandler 
William L. Cooke 
Edward G. Dewein 
W. A. Graham 
W. F. Hatcher 
*B. A. Hopkins 
T. N. Hunnicutt, Jr. 
Charles Lipshutz 
Eugene M. McDaniel 
Claude A. Nunnally 
J. P. Pregnall 
Richard M. Reynolds 
James 5. Richardson 



Cha 



R. Robins, Jr 



C. P. Ryland 
David M. Shevitz 
William P. Stull 
R. L. Waddell 
B. G. Weathers 
Ellis G. Winsteac 

DENTISTRY 

O. 5. Martin 

M. Bogley Walke 



PHARMACY 

F. S. Anderson, Jr. 
Bernard Behrman 
M, W. Bridgets 
William C. Garter 
J. Lesl.e Hughes 
James H. Sullender 

NURSING 

Anne F. Mahoney 
Elva Newman 
Minnie P. Oldham 
Virginia M. Porter 

1930 
MEDICINE 

E. S. Berlin 
M. Foscue Brock 
W. E. Butler 
J. R. Copenhaver 
J. Glenn Cox 
Clyde L. Crawford 
Edwin S. Crisp 
John W. Davis, Jr. 
William S. Dosher 
R. E. Dunkley 
'Claude M. Dunlap 
K. St. Cla.r Freeman 
Lloyd H. Gaston 

D. L. Harrell, Jr. 
H. J. Harris 
Edwin J. Humphrey 
J. R. B. Hutchinson 
CliFford W. Lewis 
Marsh McCall 

E. T. Montgomery 
Leslie E. Morrissett 
Sigmund Newman 
Zenas B. Noon 
James B. Pettis 

M. M. Ralsten 



H. M. Richardson 
R. S. Robcrson 
C. E. Simons 
W. G. Stephenson 
Meyer Vitsky 
Louis E. Wice 
Edward H. Willion 
James N. William; 
J. H. Yeatman 



J. P. Broaddus 
J. P. Cross 
Stanley L. Dixon 
E, L. Houck 
C. P. Hurt 
E. Budge Kent 
J. J. O'Keefe, Jr 
W. Davis Parrotl 
R. O. Reynolds 
W. N. Richardso 
John A. Tolley 
S. B. Towler 

PHARMACY 

T J. Banton 
J. M. Bierer 
C. L. Biscoe 
E. E, Willey 

NURSING 

Mary B. Healey 
Lucy B. Powers 

1931 
MEDICINE 



Paul B. Bundy 
R. D. Butterwoi 
Julius Caplan 



Frank Philip Colema 
Oscar W. Cranz 
Fred G. DeBusk 
R. O. Glenn 
Victor Goodside 
I. L. Hancock, Jr. 
William H. Hoskins 
J. G. Jantz 
O. G. King 
Carl W. LaFratta 
Clarence E. Lewis 
H. J. Lukeman 
Frank Mayfield 
Jesse McCall 
Harold W. Miller 
Tom H. Mitchell 
John H. Murphy 
Thomas B. Payne 
Cotton Rawls 
Henry C. Spalding 
Howard M. Starling 
T. G. Synnott 

DENTISTRY 

J. W. Ames 
S. L. Friedman 
W. C. Outten 



San 



Slavii 

jel Sta 



PHARMACY 

Isadore I. Bass 
Roy M. Beard 
Herman E. Beck 
Hilda S. Ellerso 
J. W. Ernest 
Max Frotkin 
Forrest E. Parke 
Bruce Rose 

NURSING 

Hattie H. Browr 



Deborah E. Cappleman 
Minnie V. Jones 
Elsie C. Kean 
Sabra Sturt Russell 

1932 
MEDICINE 

Milton H. Bland 

Nathan Bloom 

H. G. Byrd 

William Cardwell 

Richard C. Cecil 

R. Lee Clark, Jr. 

Bertha M. Davis 

Charles A. Easley, Jr. 

S. A. Ford 

R. H. Fowlkes 

J. W. Griffis 

J. J. Grizzard, Jr. 

J. F. Hobbs 

W. T. LaNeave, Jr. 

Sydney Levy 

Everett W. McCauley 

S. H. Mirmelstein 

B. W. Nash 

Walter A. Porter 

P. A. Richards 

Paul S. Richards 

Euston S. Robertson 

W. H. Saunders 

L. L. Shamburger 

Beecher L. Smith 

L. B. Todd 

J. S. Vermillion 



K. K. Wallace 
G. Randolph Wils 
J. M. Winkfield 

DENTISTRY 
S. I. Dyckman 



TUCKER HOSPITAL, Inc. 

212 West Franklin Street 
Richmond, Virginia 

A private hospital for diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological patients. Hospital 
and out-patient services. 

(Organic diseases of the nervous system, psychoneuroses, psychosomatic disorders, mood disturb- 
ances, social adjustment problems, involutional reactions and selective psychotic and alcoholic prob- 
lems.) 



Dr. Howard R. Masters Dr. James Asa Shield Dr. Weir M. Tucker 

Dr. George S. Fultz. Jr. Dr. Amelia G. Wood Dr. Robert K. Williams 



FEBRUARY, 1958 



19 



L. H. Goldman 
Philip Lasting 
E. C. Rogers 
J. B. Todd 

PHARMACY 

H. L. Beamer 
Robert L Booker, Jr. 
J. F. Harshbarger 
J. H. Jones 
William G. Tarrant, Jr 

NURSING 

Addie H. Gale 

Minnie E. Green 
Harriette F. Suits 
Mary B. Thompson 

1933 
MEDICINE 

Robert H. Alterman 
J. Gordon Bell 
Ernest P. Buxton, Jr. 
J. W. Carney 
Edgar W. Childrey 
Florence H. Comess 
William D. Comess 
C. W. Copenhaver 
J. Spencer Dryden 
W. F. Evans 
H. D. Fitzpatrick 
M. D. Foster 
James T. Green, Jr. 
B. C. Grigsby 
Paul Hogg 
J. B. Johnson, Jr. 
Mary E. Johnston 
J. Bernard Jones 
J. B. Kiser 
M. H. McClintic 
B. W. Mongle 
E. W. Perkins 
J. W. Phillips 
Joseph F. Phillips 
J. A. Robinson 
Nathan Sharove 
Victor Simiele 
Russell B. Smiley 
W. P. Starling 
Edwin D. Vaughan 
John O. Watkins, Jr. 
P. L. Wolgin 

A. A. Yurko 

DENTISTRY 

J. L. Adams 
M. A. Clark 

B. M. Haley 
M. D. Holland 
R. T. Johnson 

PHARMACY 

J. G. Ball 
Roger D. Brown 
Ralph Carino 
G. L. E. Edmiston 
Allen N. Fore 
Wilhelm Haag 
G. Wallace Hook 
E. Claiborne Robins 
Joseph F. Rowe 
Barraud Tankard 
G. C. White 

1934 
MEDICINE 

Robert A. Brown, Jr. 
C. C. Chewning 
S. C. Cox 
C. Fallon Davis 
W. F. Delp 
H. A. Eldridge 
Claude S. Finney 
George T. Flesher 
Mildred B. Forman 
Grey C. Hughes 

20 



William R. Hutchinson 

Brock D. Jones 

James P. Kent 

N. T. Keys 

Alan F. Kreglow 

Vincent E. Lascara 

G. M. Leamon 

James E. Lipscombe, Jr. 

W. S. Lloyd 

R. C. Manson 

J. Robert Massie, Jr. 

E. C. Mathews 
George W. McCall 
L. E. Neal 

Clyde G. O'Brien 
Philip W. Oden 
P. N. Pastore 
J. A. Payne, III 
Thomas B. Pope 
W. R. Prellow 
C. L. Riley 

Clyde A. Smith 
Robert V. Terrell 

F. N. Thompson 
Girard V. Thompson 
Elam C. Toone, Jr. 
John W. Whitlock 

DENTISTRY 

Alexander Kaufman 

PHARMACY 

C. B. Freeman 

John W. Gallagher, Jr. 

J. R. McDowell 

A. A. Phaup 
R. M. Reilly 
Myer Salsbury 

NURSING 

Vivian Bragg 
Anna M. Copenhaver 
Marguerite Nicholson 
Dorothy K. Thomson 

1935 

MEDICINE 

B. Randolph Allen 
Herbert M. Beddow 
John R. Bender 
George S. Bowers 
William H. Chapman 
Chai Chang Choi 
Solomon Disick 

J. B. Earle 
Hugh S. Edwards 
S. L. Elfmon 

Hunter B. Frischkom, Jr 
James Q. Gant, Jr. 
George A. Glass 
Cornelius E. Hagan, Jr. 
F. Hernandez-Morales 
Edmund M. LaPrade 
Samuel Levine 
John W. Linfesty 
Louis Lovenstein 
John P. Lynch, Jr. 
Aurelia G. Nicholls 
Reno R. Porter 
Rupert W. Powell 
Wellford C. Reed 
John R. Saunders, Jr 
Seymour Schotz 
B. E. Stephenson, Jr. 
Leo L. Tylec 
William Robert Tyson 
Angelo J. Villani 
Charles E. Watkins 
W. C. Winn 

DENTISTRY 

D. Blanton Allen 
Moffett H. Bowman 
Thomas C. Bradshaw 
Antonio C. Disanto 



Elwood F. MocRury 
Richard Lee Simpson, Jr 

PHARMACY 

Charles E. Green 
J. Curtis Nottingham 

NURSING 

Alma C. Baetz 
Erna L. Carlson 
Ruhamah W. Henshaw 
Martha Nicholes 

1936 

MEDICINE 

C. Raymond Arp 
Homer Bartley 
Paul K. Candler 
A. A. Davis 
Louis DeAngelis 
L. F. Dobbs 
Elbert W. Dodd 
Robert R. Eason 
James W. Elliott 
Eugene R. Evans 
Helen G. Evans 
W. Hughes Evans 
William Y. Garrett 
Frederick C. Goodall 
Marvin R. Houck 
A. R. Johnston 
John H. Judson 
Max Koenigsberg 
E. W. Lacy, Jr. 
Carl W. Meador 
Robert H. Mitchell 
Frank N. Pole 
Spotswood Robins 
Leroy Smith 
Jock Jay Stark 
Lewis S. Trostler 
Arthur L. VanName, Jr. 
Walter E. Vermilya 
Hilda J. Walters 
Charles W. Warren 
John G. Welch 
George A. Welchons 
Claud B. White 
R B Woodhull 

DENTISTRY 

Jock J. Goldman 
Samuel P. Kayne 

Thomas E. Martin 
William S. Miles, Jr. 
Nathan Neyman 
Herbert Tobias 

PHARMACY 

J. H. Carter 
J. M. Early 



NURSING 

Madge F. Cole 

Mae Belle W. Condit 

1937 

MEDICINE 

David T. Carr 
James O. Burke 
K. N. Byrne 
Delores Mendez Cashi< 
John P. Eastham 
Lendall C. Gay 
W. G. Hardy 
Clarence M. Howke 
John B. Holt 
William B. Hoover 
John P. Jones 
V. Clifton Lanier 
Louis Lipman 
Elmer McGraw 
Julian H. Meyer 



Richard A. Michaux 
Richard N. O'Dell 
E. A. Pushkin 
Eli A. Rosen 
Herbert N. Schwartz 
George A. Shetter 
Julius J. Snyder 
Christine Thelen 
Roger Williams 
Williams L. Wingfield 

DENTISTRY 

Stephen F. Gutowski 
I. Michael Harris 
Woodrow C. Henderson 

Thomas M. Hunter 
A. L. Martone 
Alexander G. Russell 
Norman G. Sedel 

PHARMACY 

Jacob H. Fratkin 

George Gay, II I 

John Ray Hurt 

W. P. Lewis 

R. Blockwell Smith, Jr. 

NURSING 

Mary J. Hudgins 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Louise Carden 
Joan E. Tubbs 

1938 

MEDICINE 

Russell N. Carrier 

William H. Copley 

Samuel S. Dupuy 

Garland Dyches 

Alexander Earle 

George S. Fultz, Jr. 

Edward E. Haddock 

Gordon D. Hall 

Jacob C. Huffman 

Charles F. James, Jr. 

Sydney L. Lang 

M. Everett McRae 

Sidney G. Page, Jr. 

Henkel M. Price 

C. Rodriguez 

Herbert G. Ruffin 

Irving M. Schor 

Earl S. Scott 

W. W. Scott 

Edward G. Sharp 

Otto S. Steinreich 

W. Taliaferro Thompson. Jr 

Gilman R. Tyler 

Annie Louise Wilkerson 

George H. Williams 

William H. Woodson 

DENTISTRY 

Ernest L. Bayton, Jr. 
P. N. Davis, Jr. 
Sanford A. Lipford 
A. G. Orphanidys 
Will. am H. Traynham, Jr. 

1938 

PHARMACY 

George E. Barrow, Jr. 
Herald L. Edds 
James F. Hollenbeck 
William W. Johnson 
William H. Joyner 
Oakley O. Vaughan 

1939 
MEDICINE 

A. L. Cannon 
Kenneth J. Cherry 
Beverly B. Clary 
Jose D. Coll 
Dewitt C. Daughtry 



Thomas H. S. Ely 
Eugenie M. Fribourg 
Arthur B. Gathright 
Thomas L. Grove 
John W. Hash 
Sidney J. Hellman 
Charles F. Hudson 
Marion F. Jarrett 
Saul Krugman 
Gerald A. Logrippo 
Robert C. Longan 
Carl Manuta 
Buford W. McNeer 
Harold I. Nemuth 
Maurice E. B. Owens, Jr 
John L. Patterson 
Deboro Pineles 
Willard Pushkin 
William J. Robinson 
William M. Smethie 
John E. Stone 
Harry A. Tubbs 
George D. Vaughan 

DENTISTRY 

M. O. Fox 
N. D. Fox 
Jack C. Kanter 
Robert L. Mason 
J. Weaver Reed 
Charles M. Rosa 
F. E. Rodriquez 

PHARMACY 

Z. I. Blachman 
Charles O. Fore 
Sidney H. Hirsch 
Roderick L. Lucas 
A. P. Mehfoud 
Lorena A. Shepherd 
J. Muriel Wilkerson 

NURSING 

Mrs. John D. Edmondso 
Frances W. Etheridge 

1940 

MEDICINE 

Olivia Abernethy 
Oscar Aguilo 
C. Sherrill Armentrout 
Richard P. Bellaire 
Vernon M. Bryant 
Galen G. Craun 
Dorothy Fisher 
Herman J. Flax 
Leonard M. Galbraith 
Robert S. Gatherum, Jr 
Carl B. Hall 
Milton J. Hoover, Jr. 
John F. C. Hunter 
Gus T. Kerhulas 
Edward L. King 
Morris H. O'Dell 
Glenn F. Palmer 
Joseph C. Parker 
A. Bernard Pasternack 
Elmer S. Robertson 
Beniamin Rosenberg 
James E. Spargo, Jr. 
Wilkin R. Stevens 
John T. Walke 

DENTISTRY 

Aubrey C. Duffer 
John D. Edmondson 
Harold A. Epstein 
Raymond A. Holcomb 
W. Yates League 

PHARMACY 

Boyd S. Clements 

J. H. O'Brien 

NURSING 

Alberta C. Rawchuck 



THE SCARAB 



1941 


PHARMACY 


PHARMACY 


PHARMACY 


Jock Ganan 


MEDICINE 


Charles K. Booth 


J. O. Hubbard 
L. D. Jones 


Walter M. Allen 


R. L. Holle 




W. Russell Glover 


Beverly J. Broadwater 


William J. Longan 


Herbert C. Allen, Jr. 


Alden S. Hankla 


Mapr J. Sorah 


Robert P. Kent 


Henry Nakdimen 


Charles Baldini, Jr. 


Linwood S. Leavitt 


Ralph M. Ware 


Floyd A. Robertson, Jr. 


Morris Robinson 


Bradford S. Bennett 


Martin Soger 








Samuel Blank 


NURSING 


NURSING 


PHARMACY 


John O. Boyd, Jr. 
Frank N. Buck, Jr. 


W. Roy Smith 
John O. Wallace 


Mary Esther Cibula 
Aileen B. Hagood 


L. Frances Gordon 
Dorsye Russell 


Stanley A. Greenba 


Estill L. Caud.ll, Jr. 


NURSING 


Julia K. Longerbeom 


Edith West 


1944 


Jorge A. Colon Davila 
William E. Doner 


Idc-ll M. McElrath 


Margaret A. Robertson 
Bessie C. Spivey 


1943 December 


MEDICINE 


Robert S. Fairclolh, Jr. 


1942 


Elizabeth T. Topping 


MEDICINE 


Jane B. Adams 


Mary V. Gallagher 

A. Broaddus Gravatt, Jr 


MEDICINE 


1943 March 


Ellsworth F. Cole 
Fay Carmines 


Raymond A. Adams 
Robert R. Dennison 


Julius C. Hulcher 


George K. Brooks, Jr. 


MEDICINE 


William H. Cox 


Hubert T. Dougan 


Arthur A. Kirk 


Pauline D. Carmichael 


L. E. Bonks 


David D. Dexter 


Rufus P. Ellett, Jr. 


Sidney Lyons 


James W. Choate 


Hugh S. Brown 


Milton Ende 


G. W. Enckson, Jr. 


John J. Marsella 


G. F. Dederick, Jr. 


Custis L, Coleman 


Henry E. Ernst 


Walter A. Eskridge 


Elisabeth Martin 


Edward J. Evans 


William J. Frohbose 


Irvin E. Fixel 


James A. Farley 


Percy J. McElrath, Jr. 


Donald R. Gilbert 


William S. Grizzard 


Eugene Freundlich 
James C. Gale 


Cecil Glen Finney 


Donald S. Morns 


Fred D. Maphis, Jr. 


Will. am J. Hagood 


Merritt W. Foster, J 


M. Jane Page 


George W. Melchoir, Jr. 


Melvin B. Lamberth 


Thomas V. Goode, Jr. 


E. C. Garber, Jr. 


Carl P. Parker 


Oscar L. Ramsey, Jr. 


Francis B. Lee 


Robert A. Hoffman 


A. Lawson Hardie 


Fletcher L. Raiford 


Catherine R. Stoeckel 


John D. Powell 


A. C. Johnson 


Thomas C. Iden 


James S. Rhodes, Jr. 


Evelyn L. Stull 


Lucile W. Richardson 


William R. Kay 
Frank R. Kelly, Jr. 


Marguerite E. Kerse 


John Edgar Stevens 


Maurice S. Vitsky 


Norman Rosenthal 


William W. Kersey 


Adney K. Sutphin 


O W. Ward, Jr. 


Leroy S. Safian 


Shirley Martin 


J. W. Lambdin 


John S. Williams 


Herbert F. Webb 


George Schuster 


Virgil R. May 


S, W. Lippincott 


William R. Woolner 


David C. Whitehead 


John S. Shaffer 


Fred C. McCall 


Martin Markowitz 
Edward N. Maxwell 


Abraham Zies 




James A. Smith 


Frank F. Merker 


DENTISTRY 

Bernard B. Batleman 
Margaret C. Draflfin 
William C. Draffin 


DENTISTRY 

David M. Alexander 
Will, am H. Brown 
George J. George 


Russell N. Snead 
Wiley B. Trivclt, Jr. 
G. R. Tureman, Jr. 
Herbert L. Warres 


W. W. Mills 
Ruth O'Neal 
John M. Ratliff, Jr. 
Will. am H. ReMine, Jr. 


W. Donald Moore 
William P. Morrisset 
Marcus Nakdimen 
Roy T. Parker 
Abraham Perlman 


Charles R. Guthrie 


Phillip W. Handy 


DENTISTRY 


John R. Sproles 


Marion L. Rice, Jr. 


Wesley B. Jones 


Frederick W. Hines 


A. Robert Anderson, Jr. 


Jay E. Stoeckel 


James Tidier 


Joseph M. Kline 


Cyril M. Mirmelstein 


Harold W. Bonifer 


George Vranian 


Richard D. Turin 


Hume S. Powell 


Ruperts. Walker 


John L. Gunter 


Harold E. Wolfe 


J. B. Walker, Jr. 


Grover C. Starbuck 


M. E. Woody, Jr. 


James L. Parker 


DENTISTRY 


Charles B. Wilkersor 


John G. Wall 


. Robert E. Woolwme, Jr 


Samuel C. Patteson 


Guy L. Alphin 


Walter R. Wilkinson 



IT CIRCLE HOS Ti 

SITUATED ON HISTORIC MONUMENT AVENUE 

RICHMOND 20, VIRGINIA 



• A.M.A., American College of Surgeons 

• Virginia Hospital Assn. approval for general rotating internships 

• Participate in National Intern Matching Program 

• Complete Clinical & Bacteriologic Labs — Full time Pathologist 

• School of Nursing with Nat'l. Accrediting Service Approval 

• Medical, Surgical, Obstetrical and Pediatric Departments 



FEBRUARY, 1958 



21 



DENTISTRY 

Herbert H. Bonnie 

Walter H. Dickey 

Ira Gould 

J. Hart Long 

Howard C. Mirmelstein 

Elton P. Rosenblatt 

PHARMACY 

J. F. Jackson 

Benjamin J. Montgomer 

NURSING 

Dorothy B. Berk 
Charlene P. Park 
Edna R. Oppenheim 

1945 

MEDICINE 

Kenneth D. Bailey 
C. Cooper Bell, Jr. 
Frank M. Booth 
Raymond S. Brown 
John W. Compton 
William E. Copeland 
G. E. Cox 
Willard M. Fitch 
•Martin Freundlich 
Fred S. Gotses 
Owen Gwathmey 
Charles H. Hagan, Jr. 
G. D. Hayden 
Larry Allison High 
George R. Jones 
Edwin J. Kamons 
Mann T. Lowry 
Franklin W. Mallamo 
A. A. McLean 
Elliot N. Namay 
Albert J. Paine 
Ben T. Painter 
M. W. Phillips 
Robert R. Rector 
Paul W. Robinett 
Harvey R. St. Clair 
Roy Burton Sampson 
William H. Shaia 
Raymond M. Suarez, Jr 
Forrest P. White 
Earl E. Wilkison 
David E. Yoho 

DENTISTRY 

James D. Cochran, Jr. 
James A. Harrell 
Fred C. Jones 
Roy A. Miller, Jr. 
Marvin E. Walker 

PHARMACY 

Louise F. Simpson 

NURSING 

Ruth R. Brewer 
Eleanor S. Carson 
DIETETICS 

Elsie Hooker 



1946 
MEDICINE 

William H. Barney 
Richard N. Baylor 
R. E. Berman 
John P. Bing 
James H. Bocock 
Charles H. Brant 
James W. Brooks 
Marvin G. Burdette 
Rowland H. Burns 
Wyson Curry, Jr. 
Albert H. Dudley 
David M. Dumville 
John R. Fitzgerald 
Jack Freund 
John A. Gill 
Rupert S. Hughes, . 

22 



George W. Hurt 
James W. Johnston 
Charles E. Llewellyn 
W. R. McCune 
A, B. H. Mirmelstein 
Daniel Ross 
Jack J. Schwartz 
Robert L. Sommerville 
Raymond E. Stone 
Isabel Taliaferro 
Clayton L. Thomas 
Franklin C. Turner 
C. Newton Von Horn 
Richard D. Wilson 

DENTISTRY 

Nelson D. Large 
John J. Richardson 
L. Ray Shields 
Tore E. Skeppstrom, Ji 



NURSING 

Emily L. Cassity 
Marye H. Marks 
Faye B. Wilkerson 

MEDICAL TECHNICIAN 

Frances B. Holsinger 
PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Ruth I. Moeller 

1947 

MEDICINE 

Franklin L. Angell 
Robert W. Bradley 
G. Edward Calvert 
Noland M. Canter, Jr. 
Elmond L. Coffleld 
H. Chesley Decker 
Genevieve G. Dutton 
Wayne W. Dutton 
Richard H. Fisher 
David J. Greenberg 
Douglas O. Hill 
J. Edward Hill 
Jerome Imburg 
Alfred Joseph 
George R. Krupp 
B. J. McClanahan 
William W. McClure 
Philip L. Minor 
Robert E. Paine, Jr. 
Francis R. Payne, Jr. 
Forrest W. Pitts 
Ralph S. Riffenburgh 
J. E. Rogers, Jr. 
Joseph A. Solomon 
Randolph Trice 
Carl C. Tully 
Fred Walls, Jr. 
L. Mildred Williams 

DENTISTRY 

George Goldfarb 
John N. Pastore 
Joseph R. Suggs 

PHARMACY 

Thomas W. Eppes 

Yale Jurin 

Russell E. Simpson, Jr. 

NURSING 

Anna McD. Anderson 
Betty S. Brown 
Helen Byrd 
Virginia L. Williams 

X-RAY TECHNOLOGY 

Quetita Miro 

1948 

MEDICINE 

Dan N. Anderson 
Doris A. Berlin 
Arthur K. Black 
Henry A. Bullock, Jr. 



Elizabeth R. Caro 
Ernest T. Cobb 
Vernon L. Cofer 
Lee Roy Conn 
J. M. Damron 
Conley L. Edwards, Jr. 
Edward Blair Guy 
Thomas B. Hardman 
Charles D. Jordan 
S. Ben Judy 
Carl H. Laestar 
William B. Looney 
Michael J. Moore 
Thomas H. Moseley 
William A. Niemann 
William H. Pate 
Robert E. Richard 
Lucien W. Roberts, Jr. 
Henry P. Royster 
Thomas A. Saunders 
John L. Whaley 
Charles M. Zacharias 

DENTISTRY 

Ernest S. Benson, Jr. 
Lonnie B. Dickens, Jr. 
Irving J. Imburg 
Sanford L. Lefcoe 
James R. Turnage 

PHARMACY 

C. A. Moses 

Lemuel R. Shadwell, Jr. 

Ida J. Sternberg 

Faye H. Starr 

Laura G. Stephens 

1949 

MEDICINE 

Leo Blank 
Arnold L. Brown 
Wiley H. Cozart 
Hilda Garcia 
Frank A. Gonzalez 
Robert E. Holzgrafe 
Herbert C. Hoover 
Harold O. Kamons 
Ulric J. Laquer 
Suzanne B. Little 
Joseph H. Masters 
Robert T. Melgaard 
William B. Moncure 
Harry Nenni 
Heth Owen, Jr. 
David S. Palmstrom 
Lilliane F. Pinero 
Stanley S. Simon 
Ralph J. Stalter 
Robert G. Stineman 
Charles G. Thompson 
W. T. Walker 

DENTISTRY 

William H. Becker 
Ralph L. Crabill 
Henry B. Field 
Charles H. Sugg 
J. Frank Thomason 

PHARMACY 

R. K. Chewning 
Robert A. Garland 
Logan M. Ives, Jr. 
John E. Marks 
Montague C. Marshall, Jr 
Richard E. Marshall 
Thomas F. Marshall, Jr. 
Wallace F. Whitmore 

NURSING 

Arline R. Harris 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Florence M. Frazier 



1950 

MEDICINE 

W. B. Adams 
William W. Beckner 
Wyndham B. Blanton, Jr. 
George M. Bullard 
Thornton R. Cleek 
M. Cade Covington 
Evelyn P. Daniel 
Griffith B. Daniel 
Hugh Fitzpatrick, III 
John T. Glick, Jr. 
J. K. Hall, Jr. 
Thomas B. Hedrick 
Russell E. Herring, Jr. 
James R. Holsinger 
Eileen T. Jennings 
James Laster 
Margaret Masters 
Eugene E. Mihalyka 
Donald S. Myers 
John W. Powell 
Paxton Powers 
John B. Rose 
Thomas C. Royer 
Lee W. Shaffer, Jr. 
Leo F. Sherman 
Robert D. Shreve 
Donald G. Siegel 
Eustace H. Smith 
Joseph A. Smith 
Lawrence O. Snead, Jr. 
Allan M. linger 
Leroy Webb 

DENTISTRY 

Marvin W. Aldridge 
James E. Cannon, Jr. 
John S. Dilday 
William B. Fitzhugh 
Maior D. Gayle, Jr. 
Max Largent 
Virgil H. Marshall 
Lawrence G. Mathews 
Woodrow W. Poss 
Cornelius H. Ramsey 
Claude D. Richardson, Jr. 
William A. Stokes 
Walker P. Sydnor 
Harding L. Thomas 

PHARMACY 

M. Lee Baker 
Thomas C. Bishop 
Richard C. Hargis 
William E. Hemby 
John J. Minahan, Jr. 
Roy A. Moon 
Hugh A. Morse, Jr. 
Edwin A. Myrick 
Eugene V. White 
Hiram H. Whitehead 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Diane G. Winston 
PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Emily E. Mueller 
Barbara E. Teasdale 

1951 

MEDICINE 

John D. French 
R. Finley Gayle, III 
William F. Gibbs 
William C. Grigsby, Jr. 
Frederick A. Gunion 
A. Epes Harris, Jr. 
Norman N. Hill, Jr. 
William J. Hotchkiss 
Thomas A. Jennings 
Walter S. Jennings 
Ernest J. Keffer, Jr. 
Edward A. Lewis 
H. Reece Little, Jr. 



V. A. Marks 
Arthur J. Martin 
Thomas D. McCahil 
Brooke M. Moffett 
W. E. Newby 
Wilmer G. Oliphar 
Paul E. Shutts 
Norman R. Tingle 
Albert J. Wassermc 
Julian Weinstein 

DENTISTRY 



The 



ias W. Armstrong, Jr 
Edward S. Barnwell 
R. H. Bruni, Jr 
William M. Ditto 
Eugene Eskey, Jr. 
Carlton E. Gregory 
Thomas W. Peterson 

PHARMACY 

Henry W. Addington, Jr. 
Carl E. Bain 
Otha C. Bayne, Jr. 
Harry W. Brown, Jr. 
Robert F. Hale 



Walla 
W. C. 



; Jane 



Gordon F. Martens 
Benjamin W. Powell 
John E. Timberlake 

NURSING 

Vivian E. Edmondson 
Mae Belle Lee 
Anne W. Muller 
Faith C. Pratt 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

Nathan Bushnell, III 
James E. Case 
John C. Hess 
C. Dimmock Jenkins 
Joseph S. Stubbs, Jr. 

1952 

MEDICINE 

George E. Arrington, Jr. 
William M. Atkins 
Roland S. Birckhead 
David W. Branch 
John E. Bryant 
Jean P. Cavender 
Gene Clapsaddle 
J. William Giesen 
James L. Grobe 
Frank A. Hamilton, Jr. 
Harry H. Howren 
George H. Hull 
Emily Jones 
Earle J. Kerpleman 
Jack A. Lawson 
Ellis F. Maxey 
David Z. Morgan 
John A. Murray 
Thomas P. Overton 
Bernard L. Patterson 
John S. Prince 
William A. Shelton 
George O. Shipp 
Peter W. Squire 
William W. Trigg, Jr. 
George F. Tucker 
Thomas W. Turner 
Louis R. Wilkerson 

DENTISTRY 

C. L. Baltimore 
Jack W. Chevalier 
Harry W. Fore, Jr. 
John'H. Goode 
Kenneth S. Gusler 
S. Guy Hall 
Robert L. Hopkins, Jr. 
T. O. Layman 

THE SCARAB 



William B. May 
Jacob A. Pearce 

James E. Royhorn 

PHARMACY 

Billy J. Bray 
Kennth E. Conner 
Millson S. French 
Greer P. Jackson 
Dalton E. McCoy 
Nick G. Nicholas 
Jack D. Proctor 
M. Blair Robertson 
Thomas W. Rorrer, Jr. 

NURSING 

Emily H. Baxter 
Anne M. Duffer 
Dot F. Gorber 
Margaret Greek 
Faye L. Peters 
Mae W. Shehee 
Mary W. Stanford 
Jean C. Waters 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

William M. Bucher 
Hunter A. Grumbles 
William R. Reid 
Robert R. Shields 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 
Richard B. Kemp 
Ruth M. Latimer 



MEDICINE 
Robert F. Barbe 



sley C. Bern 
neth M. Cle 



Catherine E. Craun 
Cecil F. Evans, Jr. 
Allan L. Forbes 
Earl R. Fox 
Joseph E. Gardner 
Ota T. Graham, Jr. 
Warren Hagood 
Charles P. Harwood 
Ernest C. Hermann 
Farrar W. Howard 
Robert O. Hudgens 
Samuel S. Morrison 
John T. Myles 
George Naymick 
Mary D. Brown Pryor 
Jean F. Ragsdale 
Charles W. Richardsc 
Julie M. Sanford 
A. R. Southall, Jr. 
Henry S. Spencer 
Walter J. Stanford 
Terry F. Tanner 
William B. Tarry, Jr. 
Charles Townsend 
James H. Wiley 

DENTISTRY 

John W. Atkins 
Edwin L. Boker, Jr. 
Donald S. Brown 
Richard T. Bruce, Jr. 
Clyde E. Godbold 
Frederick C. Shaw 

PHARMACY 

Milton E. Cornblatt 
Edgar E. Crockett 
S. Wallace Cundiff 
Austin W. Farley 
Norman H. Hilliard 
Newton J. Peters 






F. Poo 



Eames A. Powers 
Shelby B. Sturgill 

NURSING 

Alice L. Smith 
Anne R. Waters 
Margaret L. Way 

MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Marion Waller 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Nancy Beach 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Christine E. Friednch 
Joseph A. Taylor 

1954 

MEDICINE 
Donald L. Baxter 
Paul M. Burd 
Hall G. Canter 
Robert M. Cook 
Lawrence S. Cowling 
James F. Crosby 
Leonard L. Davis, Jr. 
John T. Edmonds 
Rudolph C. Garber, Jr. 
Edgar C. Goldston 
Lloyd L. Goulder 
Henry T. Harrison 
Charles T. Lively 
Randolph McCutcheon, Jr. 
Donald H. McNeill, Jr. 
R. M. Newton 
Robert D. Richards 
Philip A. Rosenfeld 
Paul H. Shellenberg 
Joseph A. Vance, III 
DENTISTRY 
Charles E. Barr 



Lewis R. Belote 
Clarence H. Collins 
B. I. Einhorn 
H. P. Graham 
Leon J. Hecht 
John T. Jobe, III 
Harry L. Mears, Jr. 
Barry G. Miller 
John A. Morris 
Perry N. Trokos 
Peter S. Yeatras 

PHARMACY 

Irby B. Brown 
L. W. Cheatham, Jr. 
Gerald W. Duffer 
R. O. Edds 
Samuel H. Kalman 
Everett F. Kohne 
Lily L. Kue 
Robert S. Lawrence 
Daniel M. Myers 
Richard M. Peatross, Jr. 
H. Malcolm Robbins 
William R. Rollings 
Herbert F. White, Jr. 

NURSING 

Anne R. Andrews 
Margaret N. Lefebvre 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

Richard Brooke, Jr. 
Curtis A. Clayton 
Charles L. Gwinn 
Joseph H. James, Jr. 
Jesse W. Reel 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Joseph B. Alschier 

X-RAY TECHNOLOGY 

Alice Bridaers Hatcher 



1955 

MEDICINE 

Theodore Adler 
John A. Board 
J. David Bradford 
Richard Dodd 
Nancy M. Garrett 
John A. Goodno, Jr. 
William R. Harlan, Jr. 
Harry L. Kraus 
Williard E. Lee, Jr. 
Hunter H. McGuire 
Edward C. Paarfus, Jr. 
James T. Robinson 
William P. Sinclair 
Milton Wigod 
R. Lewis Wright, Jr. 

DENTISTRY 

Lewis G. Coffey 
Richard L. Fisher 
Eugene L. Kanter 
Emanuel W. Michaels 
John P. Morris 

PHARMACY 

Jean P. Day 
Malvin D. Lafoon 
James N. OGrady 
Don F. Verne 

NURSING 
Katherine E. Shaw 
June Shimer 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 
Paul N. Bridge 
Kenneth L. Gallier 
Charles L. Hite 
Charles T. Wood 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Peggy J. Edmondson 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 



HOSPITAL DIVISION 



iMedical College of Virginia Hospital 
Memorial Hospital 

Dooley Hospital 

Saint Philip Hospital 

Ennion G. Williams Hospital 

(Operated jointly with the State Health Department) 

A. D. Williams Memorial Clinic 

(Ontpatient Department) 



To preserve and restore health 



To seek the cause and cure of disease 
To educate those who would serve humanity 



FEBRUARY, 1958 



23 



1956 

MEDICINE 

Charles C. Ashby 
William H. Canada 
Roderick A. Comunale 
Tony Constant 
Raymond D. Dyer, Jr. 
E. K. Gray 

E. Sidney Hunter, Jr. 
Marion E. Ingram 
William J. Lawson 
William R. Mouck 
William O. McCabe, Jr. 
Charles H. Moseley, Jr. 

F. X. Mullins, Jr. 
Robert K. Osborne 
James W. Profitt 
Sterling N. Ransone 
Louis J. Read 
Gerald W. Roller 
Rosemary F. Schellenberg 
Kenneth B. Sizer 
Robert S. Smith 

Paulus C. Taylor 
Dons A. Thurman 
William A. Thurman, Jr. 
Raymond D. Wallace, Jr. 
Edward J. Wiley, Jr. 
Howard B. Wilkins 
Bernard F. Wittkamp, Jr. 
Harriet E. Wood 
Walter M. Zirkle, Jr. 

DENTISTRY 

Charles B. Bornett 
Arthur K. Brown 
Richard D. Collier 
W. W. Crittenden, Jr. 
James Darden 
C. P. Fletcher 
Robert W. Graveley 
J. G. Jenkins, Jr. 
J. B. Lapentina 
Samuel R. Lawson 
Paul M. March 
P. L. McBride, Jr. 
E. O. Moulds 
W. L. Pratt 
N. Shreve Spitler 
James E. Williams 
J. Marion Woolard 

PHARMACY 

Henry C. Brown, Jr. 
Sidney Clement 
Emily M. Ellis 
Gilbert P. Grossman 
Phillip B. May 
Barbara A. Morgan 
John G. Sharpe 

NURSING 

Malisa Harklerood 
Harriet Helton 
Janet B. Hoylman 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

John C. Blackenbeckler 
Carl N. Napps 
Joseph E. Peery, Jr. 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Sally N. Hopkins 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Sidney A. Krukin 
Herman L. West 

DIETETICS 

Ruth Beaver 
Marian Hopkins 



MEDICINE 

Jack P. Andr. 



B. A. Baber 

John T. Baggerly, Jr 

R. J. Bailey 

S. Joseph Bailey 

Charles L. Baird, Jr. 

Daniel B. Barber 

Carl C. Baraer 



t E. 



ett 



H. R. Bates, Jr. 
John M. Bishop, Jr. 
Wilbur J. Blechman 
William T. Booker, Jr. 
Walter G. Bullington 
Ted F. Burton 

C. Lee Campbell 
J. H. Caricofe 
Elizabeth R. Carmichael 
L. Glenn Christi, Jr. 
Thomas D. Davis, Jr. 
John R. Deem 
Eugene C. Divita 
Nellie Ray Dorsey 
James D. Drinkard 

J. Wayland Dunn 
Robert K. Emy 
Russell D. Evett 
W. Noel Fender 
Robert H. Fike 
Jack R. Flanary 
Norman Franklin 
Hunter M. Gaunt, Jr. 
Julian L. Givens 
Marvin H. Goldstein 
Francisco A. Gonzalez 
Walter F. Green, III 
Robert F. Haden 
Henry B. Hahn, Jr. 
L. Clark Hansbarger 
William H. Hark 

D. Ewell Hendricks 
Gilbert L. Hendricks 
Edwin J. Humphrey, III 
John Walker Jones 
Henry J. King 

Stacy H. Kinlaw 
Charles W. Kinzer 
Marshall Klavan 
James L. Lynde 
Gordon L. Mason 
M. Joy Mason 
Michael P. Mesaros 
Ronald E. Miller 
Fred W. Miltenberger 
Murray G. Mitts 
Benjamin E. Norfleet 
Sidney Pavilack 
Courtney P. Persinger 
Harry C. Press, Jr. 
John M. Queries 
Richard L. Relyea 
Clement J. Robbins, III 
Edgar H. Rorsheim 
Thomas J. Schermerhorn 
John Schug 
James A. Selph, Jr. 
Jack O. Sheppe 
Teresa Silverman 
J W. Simmons, III 
Ralph C. Slusher 
Alvin J. Southworth 
William F. Sowers 
I Norman Sporn 
Thomas H. Stark 
Allen C. Thomas 
William R. Thornhill 
William L. Threlkeld 
James W. Tinsley, III 
John A. Tolley, III 
Sarabeth Trinkle 
Archer K. Tullidge 
Earl E. Virts, Jr. 
Thomas Walker 
Fred W. Wampler 
Jack Wells 
Stuart B. White 



Ruth F. Williams 
Charles A. Wilson 
George F. Winks, Jr. 
Percy Wooton 
Rueben B. Young, Jr. 
Alvin M. Zfass 
Sidney H. Zuber 

DENTISTRY 

J. M. Adair 
E. K. Adams 
Dick S. Ajalat 
Robert B. Alexander 
William H. Allison 
Fred G. Alouf, Jr. 
J. J. Andre 
William R. Beasley 
Calvin L. Belkov 

B. W. S. Cabell, IV 
John R. Corder 
Robert E. Elvington 
Zach T. Gray, III 
Alfred J. Gross 
Fred C. Hamer, Jr. 
W. W. Hankins, Jr. 
Harold P. Heafner, Jr. 
William R. Henley 
Robert L. Hill 
Robert M. Hoffman 
Thomas U. Hopkins 
Vernon C. Howerton 
W. B. Howerton 
Jack S. Hurley 
James H. Johnson, Jr. 

C. R. Jones, Jr. 
H. Elmer Kiser 
Melvin M. Koogler 
Charles S. Maas 

C. Marshall Mahanes 
Nick J. Manos 
Robert S. Markley 
Hal S. McCarter, Jr. 
J. Henry McCoy, Jr. 
Melvin R. Morrison 
J. Thomas Nicholson 
Robert B. Perkins, Jr. 
J. T. Wyatt Read, II 
W. John Root 
Charles L. Shank 
Felix E. Shepard 
William P. Stanton 
C. Raines Sydnor, Jr. 
George T. Tunstall, Jr. 
John E. Wessinger 
William C. Williams 
Jennings L. Wilson, Jr. 
Robert C. Woods 
Edward D. Woolridge, Jr 

PHARMACY 

Marlene B. Barnard 
Frank W. Bennett 
John L. Butler 
Hugh L. Clark 
William S. Cooper 
John D. Cowley, Jr. 
Catherine Anne Everly 
Linwood 1. Fraher, Jr. 
Claude M. Fulton, Jr. 
Robert L. Geil 
Frank Grossman 
RobertO. Hillman 
Joseph F. Jones 
Walter R. Jones 
James L. Marshall 
Mayer J. Mervis 
Melvin C. Morelock 
Paul E. Roberts 
Robert W. Rorrer 
Monte Z. Rosenberg 
Donald R. Seldes 
Shirley Mae Spencer 
Conway Stanley 
Edwin M. Sternberg 
Robert S. Stiff 
R. Powell Terrell 



Joseph A. Thorne 
Bruce L. Van Huss 
Raymond E. Weddle 
G. Max White 
Guylene M. Wysong 

NURSING 
Jean E. Bond 
Carol L. Brenneman 
Patricia B. Brown 
Phyllis C. Burton 
Sally B. Cline 
Anna Mae Craddock 
Marian C. Davis 
Mary M. Donnelly 
Judith L. Fike 
Ramona S. Friend 
Janet C. Garber 
A. Page Gentry 
Janice L. Greene 
Joyce A. Helton 
Phyllis H. Jenkins 
Carolyn C. Leonard 
Barbara R. Lightner 
Elizabeth S. Meredith 
Mary M. Ogburn 
Gail R. Patrick 
Sharon Phelps 
Barbara W. Phillips 
Shirley A. Priode 
Elizabeth Sawyer 
Dorothy M. Shepard 
Johanna L. Smith 
Shirley J. Steel 
Ann R. Yankovich 
Betty C. Young 

BOARD OF VISITORS 

Mr. Harry H. Augustine 
Mr. Samuel M. Bemiss 
Mr. W. Welby Beverley 
Mr. Eppa Hunton, IV 
Mr. George L. MacLean 
Mr. Davis Y. Paschall 
Mr. Edward P. Phillips 
Mr. Buford Scott 
Mr. R. F. Burke Steele 

ADMINISTRATION 

Rev. George Ossman 
Dr. William T. Sanger 
Gen. William T. Tompkins 

FACULTY 

Mr. Harry P. Anderson, Jr. 

Mr. R. Dean Anderson 

Dr. John Andrako 

Dr. S. Elmer Bear 

Dr. H. Wallace Blanton 

Dr. Wyndham B. Blanton 

Dr. Lewis H. Bosher, Jr. 

Dr. Alton D. Brashear 

Dr. Harry Brick 

Dr. Ernest B. Carpenter 

Dr. Paul L. Chevalier 

Dr. James B. Dalton 

Dr. John G. dos Santos 

Dr. Ernst Fisher 

Dr. Hebert H. Galston 

Dr. AlbertE. Harris 

Dr. Jacquelm M. Harrison 

Dr. Walter H. Hartung 



Boyd W. Haynes, Jr. 
ss Kathryn Heitshu 

Jacob J. Hladys 

Fred M. Hodges 

Ebbe C. Hoff 

Randolph H. Hoge 

Edward M. Holmes 

David M. Hume 

Saul Kay 

Edwin L. Kendig, Jr. 

Henry G. Kupfer 

Paul Larson 
. Jason R. Lewis 
. Lillian C. Lindemann 
. Charles E. S. McKeowr. 

John M. Meredith 
. G. Kenneth Miller 
. Robert E. Mitchell, Jr. 
. Milton L. Neuroth 
. Leroy S. Pearce 
. Frank P. Pitts 
. Benjamin W. Rawles, Jr. 
. E. S. Ray 

. Arnold M. Salzberg 
. Eric C. Schelin 
. Maynard P. Smith 
. Arnold F. Strauss 
. William Durwood Suggs 
. Lee E. Sutton, Jr. 
. Warren E. Weaver 



DENTAL AFFILIATES 

Dr. D. J. Alexander, Sr. 

Dr. Pat J. Bisese 

Dr. Lawrence H. Cash 

Dr. Ted Greene 

Dr. Gene W. Hirschfield 

Dr. Leonard L. Levin 

Dr. H. B. Mendelsonn 

Dr. Edwin I. Schwartz 

Dr. Stanton J. Teitelman 

PHARMACY AFFILIATES 

Lee L. Angell 
R. C. Bray 
Charles E. Britt 
E. A. Buck 
L. C. Campbell 
L. P. Chandler 
Roy L. Crouch 
E. R. Deffenbaugh 
A. G. Eastwood 
W. W. Fountain 
Frank P. Green 
J. B. Hanes 
W. R. Heily 
G. E. Henderson 
J. B. Lipscomb 
S. L. London 
Edward Lovell 
G. A. Montgomery 
J. S. Nance 
Charles Passmore 
J. E. Passmore 
Lawrence J. Powell 
A. W. Saul 
Fleet Hall Scroggs 
Max Shapiro 
Harold Y. Spencer 
William G. Tarrant 



REUNION DATES 
June 2-3, 1958 



24 



THE SCARAB 



An Urgent Message to our 
Alumni 

(Continued from page 1) 

oratories for graduate teaching and in- 
vestigative efforts of the staff are sim- 
ilarly lacking. 

Many of these areas are presently 
crowded into the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia Hospital. The Hospital, however, 
exists to care for the sick and in so doing 
to provide a teaching laboratory and clin- 
ical material for the instruction of stu- 
dents. A sufficient number of hospital 
beds is now available to meet these needs 
for all times. The Hospital is an im- 
proper and drastically inefficient place 
to house many of the other functions 
mentioned above. 

The impossibility of filling the over- 
whelming number of vacant key positions 
in the medical school with other than 
full-time faculty is explained in a sep- 
arate accompanying memo. In addition 
to the inability of our facilities to house 
the present program, it is equally im- 
possible to physically accommodate re- 
placements, since they will require space 
far in excess of the former volunteer or 
part-time faculty members. 

The one key post filled to date, namely, 
the chairmanship of the department of 
surgery, has taxed physical facilities of 
the institution to their limit. We have 
utilized every conceivable area in the 
widely scattered buildings of the College. 
For example, we are presently converting 
an eight-foot square janitor's housekeep- 
ing closet on one of the hospital floors 
to an office for an outstanding young 
member of the surgical faculty. 

The building requested, therefore, is 
not elaboration and will not create the 
need for further construction. On the 
contrary, it is meant to accommodate ex- 
isting medical school departments. The 
College is in danger of losing its present 
productive faculty and cannot attract nec- 
essary replacements, because we do not 
have any adequate place for them to carry 
on their endeavors as educators of our 
future physicians. With sufficient faculty, 
construction of such a facility will make 
it possible to ultimately increase the size 
of our medical classes to 125 students. 

The provision of a place to work and 
the provision of sufficient monies for 
salaries are inseparable components in 
the preservation of the medical educa- 
tional program of the Medical College 
of Virginia. 

FEBRUARY, 1958 



Even an immediate start on planning 
this building will mean that eventual 
availability of the space is at least four 
years away. It is not possible to commit 
all of the $4,628,000 necessary to finance 
this project at this time, $225,000 to fi- 
nance the almost two-year task of draw- 
ing plans is requested. 

The State Council of Higher Educa- 
tion has unanimously recognized this 
need and recommended the total request. 

** Hospital Division 
Biennium Requests 

It appears from the Governor's budget 
recommendations for the Medical College 
of Virginia that the Hospital Division 
situation is not fully understood. Due to 
delay in the construction of the Ennion 
G. Williams Hospital, the St. Philip 
Division will not commence operation 
before March, 1958. The delay was due 
primarily to original construction bids 
which exceeded appropriations, and it 
was necessary that new bids be submitted. 
The 200 Ennion G. Williams tubercu- 
losis beds are now in full operation. The 
42 surgical and diagnostic beds are now 
available for operation, and the 200 gen- 
era] hospital (ward) beds will be opened 
prior to July 1, 1958. Provided funds 
are available, patient day population will 

** prepared by Charles P. Cardwell, 
Administrator 



then be 1,149, an increase of 163 in our 
daily census of Negro patients. Since 
the 1957-58 appropriation provided for 
full operation of the Ennion G. Williams 
Hospital, it might be expected that there 
would be a surplus of general funds for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1959; 
however, due to salary regradings ap- 
proved by the State Personnel Depart- 
ment in the amount of approximately 
$425,000, this surplus will not material- 
ize. Of this amount, $40,000 has been 
promised from the Governor's Discre- 
tionary Fund for the current fiscal year 
which leaves a balance of $385,000 to 
be absorbed by the institution. 

Please note that the 1957-58 general 
fund appropriation amounted to $1,996,- 
415, whereas the amount recommended 
for the first year of the 1958-60 bien- 
nium of $1,994,500, a decrease of $1,915. 
Since regradings of personnel are still 
being made, and all hospital costs are 
continuing to increase at an annual rate 
of 5%, this means that adequate funds 
have not really been provided for the 
continuance of our present operation, 
excluding the 163 additional Negro ward 
beds. It is noted that the 1958-59 budget 
provides an increase of $734,620 in 
special funds, the amount requested ; 
however, this estimate included $330,000 
contingent upon an additional general 
fund appropriation to help finance the 
increased ward load of 163 patients. 



The general fund situation is shown in the following table: 



Requests 

1957-58 $2,137,030 
1958-59 2,653,931 
1959-60 2,829,754 



Governor's Budget 
Recommendation 

$1,996,415 
1,994,500 
2,145,550 



Governor's Reduction 
of Budget Request 

(appropriated) $140,615 

659,431 
684,204 

Please note that our budget has been reduced $659,431 for the first year of the 
new biennium. By increasing our rates which we are reluctant to do because of 
a recent rate increase and because our rates are presently comparable with other 
hospitals in this general area, our request may be reduced $150,000 each year of 
the biennium. 

It has been noted that new positions amounting to $373,120 were requested for 
professional care of patients. In view of the increased patient load, we wish to 
advise that the national average is two employees for each patient hospitalized. 
Our estimate of approximately 1.5 employees for each additional patient is con- 
siderably below the average for hospitals with a bed capacity exceeding 300. 
However, we are willing to gamble after a careful review (position by position) 
that we may not fill all of the positions and our request may be further reduced 
$90,000. This leaves a request of an additional $400,000 for each year of the bien- 
nium from general fund appropriation over Governor's recommendation, which we 
feel is the absolute minimum under which ue can operate. 



25 



Deans' Page 

(Continued from page 9) 

satisfied with emergency actions based on 
fear of competitive disadvantage. In due 
time, any anxiety that may have been en- 
gendered will tend to die down and with 
it could also die down the energy of emer- 
gency measures. 

It seems to me also that we should 
guard against limiting our measures to 
applied engineering and technological de- 
velopments, much as these are needed. 
We pride ourselves on our American 
"know how" and inventive ingenuity. 
This is well, but we need most of all an 
attitude towards education that will pro- 
duce competent, imaginative scientists who 
are fully educated men and women. I 
think it is time to take a candid, compre- 
hensive look at our whole educational 
system to see where we can improve stand- 
ards, foster the love of learning, provide 
suitable rewards for scholarly and scien- 
tific achievement, and encourage devoted 
and capable people to enter teaching and 
investigative work in all fields. 

We live in a democracy in which our 
people, by and large, get what they want 
and are willing to work and pay for. Per- 



haps one of our problems is that we do 
not know about and want badly enough 
some of those things upon which our sur- 
vival now depends. Perhaps we need to 
learn that a society devoted chiefly to 
luxury, entertainment, and soft living 
lacks the stamina required for vigorous 
longevity. Perhaps we need to relearn the 
ancient proverb that where there is no 
vision the people perish. I believe that 
in a democratic system we can, in the long 
run, make greater progress than could ever 
be possible in a system where the people 
are not free, even though a totalitarian 
government may make dramatic strides by 
coercion and regimentation. But as free- 
people, we must decide what our progress 
shall be. 

Here at the Medical College in all of 
its Schools, we have the opportunity to 
play our part in this renaissance of science 
which I hope we are going to experience. 
I hope by our example that we will help 
to dispel the idea that the scientist is an 
"ivory-tower" visionary, oblivious of the 
interests of society, or that he is an irre- 
sponsible genius whose research is des- 
tined to destroy the world. For the world 
of the present and the future, the scientist 
needs to be a person with a poised, honest 



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mind and an educated intellect. His should 
be a mind of inappeasable freshness. He 
must have a breadth of understanding of 
society around him, and a lively sense of 
the value of human beings. 

A friend, whose judgment I respect, 
said to me the other day that he believes 
many scientists are impelled — in a world 
that places a premium on security — to 
content themselves with "safe," pedes- 
trian research rather than risk their careers 
by daring ventures into the unknown. It 
seems to me that a part of what we must 
accomplish is the creation of a climate 
of public understanding that will en- 
courage us all to face the new world with 
its frontiers of science, of esthetics, and 
of ideas and spirit as a challenge to keen- 
est adventure. 

Here in Virginia and elsewhere in the 
country, proposals and plans for educa- 
tional improvement will emerge. As I 
write this, some proposals are already 
being publicized. These and others re- 
quire full study and sound decisions about 
localizing and characterizing responsibility 
for educational support. I hope we will 
give to this job the devoted, sustained 
attention its importance deserves. 

Ebbe Hoff. Dean 

School of Pharmacy 

Several years ago the American Associ- 
ation of Colleges of Pharmacy voted that 
all member colleges must have a five-year 
course in pharmacy effective no later than 
the fall of I960 and further, no four- 
year program could be offered after that 
date. Schools that fail to go along with 
this plan will be dropped from the mem- 
bership of this Association with the re- 
sult that graduates would lose all rights 
to be examined for licensure in other 
states and in addition, opportunity for 
reciprocity would be denied. With this 
in mind, our School has been actively 
working for the last several years with 
suitable plans to effect the transition to 
the five-year program in the fall of I960. 

A principal concern of pharmacists in 
regard to the new program is manpower. 
There has been a shortage of pharmacists 
in Virginia for many years and it is un- 
derstandable why some fear that the five- 
year course may result in a decreased 
number of students. However, if we 
understand all the factors that are in- 
volved, it will enable us to cope with 
the transition without greatly affecting 
our supply. First, we must recognize 

THE SCARAB 



that the last freshman class of the four- 
year program will be enrolled in 1959. 
These students will graduate in 1963. 
In I960, we will be looking for two 
groups of students. One group, which 
will be small, must be obtained to re- 
place those freshmen who have dropped 
out from the class enrolled in 1959. This 
group must meet our present require- 
ments for sophomore standing. The sec- 
ond group of students will be freshmen 
who have completed one year in college 
with biology or chemistry, college math- 
ematics, English and electives. This 
should be a large group if we are to 
have a graduating class of some size 
in 1964. There has always been current 
the remark that there will be no grad- 
uating class in 1964. This is not true, 
if we are able to get students in I960. 
We must remember, however, that the 
high school graduates of 1959 will be 
the main source of supply for the classes 
that we enroll in both 1959 and I960. 
Since the number of high school grad- 
uates is increasing and will continue to 
increase in the next decade, we will 
probably have a sufficient source of sup- 
ply. 

In the long run, we must always re- 
member that regardless of the length of 
the program of education, that our ability 
to attract new students is directly related 
to pharmacists now active in the pro- 
fession. It is important to maintain phar- 
macy in good shape and make it attractive 
to youngsters. With the advent of sput- 
nik, an increasing emphasis will be placed 
on the sciences. This can directly benefit 
us since pharmacy is a scientific program. 
However, we must continue to remain ac- 
tive in interesting young people in phar- 
macy or otherwise they will enroll in other 
scientific programs. 

Our school has increased enrollments 
in recent years in the face of decreasing 
enrollments in schools of pharmacy na- 
tionally and regionally. This has been 
accomplished because of the virility of 
pharmacy in the state, and your con- 
tinued interest will give us in the long 
run the students who will provide our 
pharmacists of the future. 

Warren E. Weaver, Dean 



LEST WE FORGET 

1900 UCM Gibson L. Sikes (M) of Raleigh, 
North Carolina, died July 25. 
1904 William McMtath' Revercomb (M) 
of Clifton Forge, Virginia, died November 
8. He was a member of the medical staff of 
the Chesapeake and Ohio Hospital. 

FEBRUARY, 1958 



1905 Warren Maynard Davis (M) of 
Bridgeport. West Virginia, died July 26. 
George Fugett Turman (M-UCM) of' Mis- 
soul;!, Montana, died July 12. He was a 
past president of the Montana Department 
of Public Health and on the staff of St. 
Patrick Hospital. 

1907 Noah Counts (M) of Cocoa, Florida, 
died June 24. He had practiced there for 
thirty-eight years. 

Paul Hayne Mitchell (M) of Ahoskie, 
North Carolina, died July 24. He was on 
the staff of the Roanoke-Chowan Hospital. 

1908 Wade H. Foy (P), Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, died October 11. 

UCM Efford H. Mitchell (P), Danville. Vir- 
ginia, died September 26. 
1910 UCM W. S. Hodnett (M). an eye, 
ear, nose, and throat specialist of Richmond, 
Virginia, died January 6. 
1914 Thomas Griffin Hardy (M) of Farm- 
ville, Virginia, died June 24. He was for- 
merly a member of the State Board of Med- 
ical Examiners. 

1916 Frank Albert Farmer (M) of Roa- 
noke, Virginia, died October 9. He was 
found dead in his office by a patient. Death 
was due to a heart attack. 
1918 Martin Armstead Hatcher (M) of 
Hamlet, North Carolina, died June 23. He 
was on the staff of the Richmond ( 'ounty 
Memorial Hospital. 

1923 C. Eugene Perkins (Mj died No- 
vember 15. He was a member of the staff 
of Stetson, Northeastern and Methodist Hos- 
pitals and the board of counsel of the 
Penn-Widows Asylum. He served in the 
Civil Service Commission medical post from 
1944 to 19.32. He was most active in the 



Philadelphia chapter of the Alumni Associ- 
ation. 

Archer A. Wilson (M), prominent neuro- 
surgeon of Charleston, West Virginia, died 
at his home September 28. He had been in 
ill health for several weeks. 
1924 Willard Sigsbee Parson (M) of Bal- 
timore, Maryland, died June 3. He was 
vice-president of the American Academy 
of General Practice of Maryland. 
1929 Richard Moncure Reynolds (M), 
widely known physician of Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia, died October 29. He was past pres- 
ident of the Tidewater Academy of General 
Practice. He was chairman of the committee 
on arrangements for the annual meeting of 
the Virginia Academy of General Practice 
to be held at Virginia Beach in 1958. 



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Educational Signposts 

(Continued from page 14) 
teachers, professors, and research workers 
is nicely pointed up by Dr. Lippard, Dean 
of the Yale Medical School, who says, 
"Men who choose basic research and teach- 
ing usually need a strong incentive and 
an understanding wife, or a private source 
of income." This is a true but sad com- 
mentary on our value judgments in this 
country. 

The next area in which a change in 
emphasis is important is in the support of 
basic or fundamental research. In a recent 
publication of the National Science Foun- 
dation entitled, "Federal Funds for 
Science" we find that in fiscal year 1957 
it is estimated that all Federal agencies 
will spend in the order of $2,635,000,000 
for the total conduct of research and de- 
velopment. Of this amount, Basic Research 
(by the most liberal interpretation) will 
get only $217,000,000 or 8% of the total. 
If we are to win the race, we must change 
this proportion and the change must be 
toward a greater percentage. 

A little over four years ago, Admiral 
Strauss, the present Chairman of the 
Atomic Energy Commission, said, "Of 
all of the natural resources with which 
this country is endowed, the predispo- 
sition to science is perhaps our greatest 
treasure. I am sure that we will never 
allow this resource to be stifled. On the 
contrary, we will make every effort to 
encourage it to the maximum of our abil- 
ity. Funds spent today on fundamental re- 
search are one of the best investments 
that, as a people, we can make." 



The National Science Foundation just 
recently issued a booklet entitled, "Basic 
Research — A National Resource" in which 
under the heading "Basic Research" they 
have this to say, "Science has played an 
important role in the rise of the U. S. from 
frontier land to world power. Indeed, the 
growth of our scientific effort parallels the 
growth of our strength as a Nation. The 
physical means to conquer wilderness, con- 
trol natural forces, increase the length and, 
hopefully, the enjoyment of life, achieve 
national security — these things have come 
largely from ideas which observation, 
measurement, and other laboratory arts 
have developed into useful methods and 
machines at home and abroad. Our con- 
fidence in the future rests in no small 
measure on prospects for the continued 
and accelerated advancement of science." 
Nobel Prize winner, Dr. Szent-Gyorgyi 
declares, "Research is four things: brains 
with which to think, eyes with which to 
see, machines with which to measure — 
and money. It is brains and eyes which are 
most important." 

He also spoofed the idea that all that 
it takes is lots of people and money to 
get the research answers. He said, "Some 
businessmen say in effect: 'If it takes nine 
months for a woman to produce a baby, 
let's put nine women on the job and get 
it done in one month.' " 

Some people will still ask, no matter 
how much we discuss it, "Of what value 
is basic research?" I wish I had time to 
answer this question adequately. Perhaps 
I don't need to before such a group as this 
but even among the most sophisticated 




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I find a lack of real appreciation for the 
type of research which is merely a search 
for knowledge, an effort to dispel man's 
ignorance of the world and the universe 
in which he lives. This type of research is 
often considered to be useless but eventu- 
ally, the results are put to some useful end. 
Probably the best known modern ex- 
ample of the usefulness of useless research 
is the release of nuclear energy. When 
Einstein first scribbled his equation E-Mc 2 , 
stating the equivalence of energy and 
mass, it had no meaning for most of the 
world. Certainly, the Federal granting 
agencies would not have supported his 
abstract cerebrations nor, for that matter, 
most of the other fundamental work which 
was done during the previous years. How- 
ever, the combining of ideas and discov- 
eries made it possible to construct the 
bombs which hastened the end of World 
War II. 

It is fortunate for us that the destructive 
powers of atom-splitting are only one as- 
pect of the release of nuclear energy. The 
phenomenon of nuclear fission has in fact 
provided us with a new tool for exploring 
the mysteries of the universe including the 
greatest of all mysteries, life itself. Al- 
ready great good has come from the peace- 
ful uses of the atom and we have seen 
only a bare beginning. 

But let us look at some other basic re- 
search that paid off in somewhat less 
startling ways ; ways not visualized when 
the work was begun. This accidental dis- 
covery is Serendipity, if you wish, but 
never forget that unless you search you 
never find, even by accident. You may be 
interested in an old story illustrative of 
how basic research paid dividends in med- 
icine. Let us hastily sketch the events lead- 
ing to the successful treatment of diabetes. 
As early as the 17th century, Thomas Wil- 
lis, a prominent London practitioner, ob- 
served that patients with diabetes had su- 
gar in their urine. Incidentally, the test 
used to detect sugar was the sense of 
taste — aren't you laboratory people glad 
for the modern methods of analysis? 

Many years later, two investigators, von 
Mering and Minkowski, were studying 
the relationship of the pancreas to diges- 
tion. They had no immediate interest in 
diabetes but during the course of their re- 
search they removed the pancreas from 
experimental animals in order to see what 
effect this would have on the digestive 
process. A few days after the operation 
was performed, the animal caretaker re- 
ported to the professors that the cages of 

THE SCARAB 



these postoperative animals seemed to be 
particularly attractive to flies. Von Mering 
and Minkowski took this information 
seriously and investigated. They soon 
found that the reason for this attraction of 
flies to the cages was the fact that the an- 
imals were excreting large quantities of 
sugar in their urine. Knowing that sugar 
is also excreted in the urine of diabetics, 
they immediately sensed the association 
of the pancreas with the disease and set 
out to study this relationship. 

Some time later came Banting and Best 
who built upon this work and discovered 
Insulin. Today, thousands of diabetics in 
this country are now living normal lives 
because of the chance observations and 
basic research of these groups. 

Let us take a look at another series of 
experiments in basic research that ended 
with the development of a multimillion 
dollar industry. Many of you have heard 
of lysozyme and know that it is an enzyme 
found in body secretions, principally tears 
and saliva. In 1928, Dr. Fleming of Eng- 
land was studying lysozyme and while 
doing this work, a particle of mold con- 
taminated his blood agar culture plate 
inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus. 
He noted that around this growth the bac- 
teria were killed. He had no idea of its 
future use but since he was an astute ob- 
server he studied the mold and identified 
it as Penicillium notatum, publishing his 
findings in 1929. Some additional work 
was done by others but no one foresaw the 
enormous impact the antibiotics would 
soon have in medical therapy. 

The next link in the chain of develop- 
ment of penicillin comes from some basic 
research being done by Dr. Aver)- who 
was working on a bacterial genetics prob- 
lem and wanted to strip the pneumococcus 
of its capsule. Dr. Dubos had an idea of 



how to do it for he already knew of soil 
bacteria which produced an enzyme which 
would attack carbohydrates, and the cap- 
sule was composed largely of carbohy- 
drates. In working on this problem, he 
found a substance which destroyed grain 
positive bacteria. From this came the first 
antibiotic, called gramicidin. The only 
trouble was that it could not be taken in- 
ternally for it hemolyzed red blood cells, 
although it did have great value in the 
treatment of external wounds. 

With the advent of gramicidin, scien- 
tists turned to the earlier work on peni- 
cillin and with the stimulus of the war 
and with the genius of American industry, 
we soon had this antibiotic in production. 
And now we have an antibiotic industry 
with sales in the hundreds of millions of 
dollars per year. The money, however, is 
unimportant compared to the fact that out 
of the accident of the mold blowing in the 
window and the incidental basic research 
of several workers came life to untold 
numbers of people who would otherwise 
have succumbed to infection and disease. 
A much more recent example of the 
value of basic research may be of interest 
to you. In January of this year the Wash- 
ington Evening Star carried a story that 
was amusing to most readers, but was a 
tale of real success to those directly con- 
cerned. 

A scientist was interested in the incu- 
bation temperature of the penguin egg. 
He planned to go to the Antarctic to do 
research on this problem and asked the 
Navy's help in the acquisition of certain 
electrical equipment. He wished to check 
the theory that the development of the 
penguin embryo occurs at a much lower 
temperature than normally expected for 
growth. The equipment he wanted was 
a tiny potentiometer — an instrument that 



records temperature by measuring changes 
in electrical resistance induced by heat. 

A Navy scientist (sympathetic, the 
Star noted, to the mamma penguin's 
privacy during the egghatching period) 
conceived the idea of a wireless or tele- 
metering system that would be less disturb- 
ing to the lady bird. While developing 
the gadget, he realized that such a device 
could be utilized to great advantage in 



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29 



testing cold weather clothing so impor- 
tant to Navy men in the Antarctic. 

The tiny instrument was perfected, 
used to the satisfaction of the man who 
cared how warm it was inside a penguin 
egg, used to practical advantage in de- 
veloping adequate cold weather clothing — 
and the most amazing part of the story, 
may lead to real enhancement of the 
Navy's underwater mine detection tech- 
niques. 

This latter possible use came about by 
a chance observation when this tiny tele- 
metering device was being looked at and 
examined in an office in Washington, for 
it was observed that the little "ping" noise 
it transmitted changed in tone when it 
touched metal. In fact, the recorded pulse 
was of an entirely different nature when 
it touched copper or nickel from the sound 
when it came in contact with wood, cloth, 
or other material. It was, of course, water- 
proofed when fashioned to survive im- 
mersion in the fluid content of the pen- 
guin egg, so it was all ready for use in 
the waters of the sea. 

Thus, it is entirely possible that a "gadg- 
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as aid in the production of warm clothing. 
We don't have the final word from the 
penguin as the work is still going on. A 
ham radio operator talked last week with 
Little America and they mentioned the 
project. 

I am sure that these four illustrations of 
the usefulness of so-called useless research 
are enough to convince you that basic re- 
search is vital and that this is the business 
we should be about. This is the life blood 
of any university, for the quest of new 
knowledge and the imparting of knowl- 
edge to students are so inextricably inter- 
woven that they cannot be separated. A 
good research university or college is a 
good teaching institution, for a faculty in- 
terested in doing research make good teach- 
ers. 

In spite of all this evidence, it is ex- 
ceedingly difficult to sell the idea of sup- 
port for basic research. Part of the prob- 
lem is that mo3t Americans want tangible 
results in the form of new gadgets now. 
But this is shortsighted for even gadgets 
depend upon basic research some time in 
the past. Admiral Strauss has said this 
nicely, "The production line actually starts 
with basic research, perhaps 20, 30, and 
even 50 years before the product gets on 
the market — limit basic research today 
and we may or may not hurt ourselves, 
but we are sure to hurt our children and 
we cannot fail to jeopardize the future 
security of the United States." 

I cannot conclude the discussion of 
science education and of basic research 
leaving the impression in your minds that 
I think this is the sole salvation of the 
country. True, we must have a revitaliza- 
tion of the educational system, and there 
must be an appropriate emphasis on 
science but at the same time we must not 
decrease our emphasis on the humanities — 
in fact, the emphasis should be increased 
here also. To effect a complete dominance 
of science in our educational system might 
produce nuclear giants but ethical infants. 
We would produce scientists unaware of 
philosophy and admirals and generals un- 
aware of history. In this age of delicate 
atomic balance, our leaders might know 
more about war than peace, more about 
killing than living, and this would be 
tragic indeed. 

President Eisenhower put it this way 
in his Oklahoma speech, "Young people 
now in college must be equipped to live 
in the age of intercontinental ballistic 
missiles. . . . However, what will then be 
needed is not just engineers and scientists, 



30 



but a people who will keep their heads 
and, in every field, leaders who can meet 
intricate human problems with wisdom 
and courage. In short, we shall need not 
only Einsteins, but Washingtons, and Em- 
ersons." 

How can we possibly increase the em- 
phasis on both science and the humani- 
ties? By changing our education system so 
as to prevent the mass production of un- 
educated young people, we must stop 
interpreting equality of opportunity as 
equality of ignorance. We must learn that 
mediocrity is not democracy. We must 
engender a yearning for learning and then 
make it possible to satisfy it. 

Dr. Hafstad writing on Science, Tech- 
nology and Society in the American Scien- 
tist cleverly points out that, "Above all, 
at some point in the educational process 
it should perhaps be brought to the at- 
tention of the students (very delicately, 
to be sure, to avoid psychological trauma) 
that progress cannot be made without 
struggle, nor freedom enjoyed without 
personal responsibility." 

There is another problem and that is 
that the general public has an aversion for 
science and scientists. James Killian, Pres- 
ident of Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, in a meeting of the American 
Academy of Arts and Sciences in Decem- 
ber, 1955, pointed out that the colleges 
and universities are themselves partly to 
blame for this situation. He stressed the 
danger of the cleavage in academic circles 
between the scientists and the humanists. 
The following quotation we believe to 
be pertinent to our problem: "This atti- 
tude toward science is described more 
bluntly in academic circles by well-worn 
observations. One of them notes that the 
scientist knows nothing of the liberal arts 
and regrets it, while the humanist knows 
nothing of science and is proud of it. The 
other reports an incident in a liberal arts 
faculty meeting. When a student named 
Cicero was reported as having flunked 
Latin, everybody laughed, but when a stu- 
dent named Gauss was named as having 
failed in mathematics, only the science 
professors laughed. 

"This drawing away from science is 
related to an attitude of antagonism and 
fear with respect to scientists. The old 
cliche about the expert is applied to the 
scientist. The scientist, it is repeatedly 
said, should be on tap but not on top. He 
thus is considered to be merely one of the 
hired men who has no business doing 
anything but what he is told to do in the 

THE SCARAB 



field of his specialty. . . . This attitude 
reflects something wrong in the relation- 
ship of the scientist to society and in so- 
ciety's current estimate of the scientist." 
But this is not all, for even if we were 
to remodel our educational system so that 
it is well-nigh perfect and should decis- 
ively win the research race, there would 
still be the greatest problem of all — that 
of convincing the people of the rest of 
the world that what we seek is peace with 
justice to all, and that our democratic way 
of lite is the surest way to achieve this 
goal. 

We must reach their minds and con- 
vince them of the Tightness of our way of 
life. This is a colossal problem in human 
relations and in communication. To be 
successful, we must constantly demonstrate 
to the rest of the world that our form of 
government and our way of life is the 
most desirable — we are not doing it now. 
We need a true moral and spiritual 
awakening as a people. We have within 
us the potential for greatness but much 
must be done before this potential is 
realized. 

To me, the most important thing to 
be done is to change our value judg- 
ments — what we consider most important 
in life. Let me give you a few figures for 
1956 that speak for themselves. 

We spent 577,500,000 for external per- 
sonal deodorants and only $70,000,000 
for Federal support of basic research in 
all of life sciences. We even spent more 
for lipsticks than for life sciences' basic 
research— §71,330,000. We spent $296,- 
050,000 for chewing gum and only $217,- 
000,000 for all of the basic research sup- 
ported by the Federal government. 

We spent S-i, 674, 250,000 for cigar- 
ettes, and only $3,746,000,000 for all re- 
ligious and welfare giving; and only $3,- 
000,000,000 to operate all of our colleges 
and universities; and only $2,635,000,000 
for all research and development by all 
Federal agencies — just think, almost 11/, 
billion more to enhance our chances of 
lung cancer than for higher education; 
and 2 billion more than for research and 
development. 

We also spent S10,580,750,000 for al- 
coholic beverages which is more by a bil- 
lion and a half than the $9,000,000,000 
we spent as a nation on all of our public 
elementary' and high schools. 

If this array of figures doesn't convince 
us that we are emphasizing the wrong 
things, then nothing will. Let me repeat, 

FEBRUARY, 1958 



we have disjointed value judgments, we 
are stressing the wrong things. 

To reiterate, we have a task before us of 
revitalizing the entire educational system. 
As Admiral Rickover said in a speech re- 
cently, "Let not men of little vision with 
their soothing words hold back our right- 
eous anger. We must sweep clean the tem- 
ple of learning and bring back quality." 
Tor as President Sproul of the University 
of California warns us: "If we fail in our 
hold upon quality, the cherished Ameri- 
can dream of universal education will de- 
generate into a nightmare." Let's be at 
the job, and remember there is need for 
reform and improvement even in the pro- 
fessional schools. 

And never forget that basic research is 
the very life blood of any professional 
school, of any university, of any military 
department, of any nation. Without the 
acquisition of new knowledge, all prog- 
ress will stop. 

And let us, everyone, as individuals, by 
our words and our acts demonstrate that 
we are working for the spiritual and moral 
awakening that will save America and 
make her a model among the nations of 
the world. To do this, we will have to 
have a sharp right-about-face with radi- 
cally changed values so that we will put 
more emphasis on training than on tail- 
fins; on college than on cosmetics; on 
church than on chewing gum; on learning 
than on lipstick; on research than on rec- 



reation; on defense than on deodorants; 
on technology than on tobacco ; on brains 
than on beer; and on preparedness than on 
perfume. 

Remember that bringing about a na- 
tional awakening is our problem, the re- 
sponsibility of ever)- man, woman and 
child in this great nation of ours. 



Class News 

(Continued from page 13) 

1933 J. Gordon Bell (M) visited the 
Alumni Office on December 2(5, 1957. 

J. Spencer Dryden (M) is chairman of the 
Department of Ophthalmology of the Wash- 
ington Hospital Center. This new hospital 
combines three of Washington's oldest and 
finest institutions — Episcopal Eye, Ear and 
Throat Hospital, Garfield Memorial Hos- 
pital, and the Central Dispensary and 
Emergency Hospital. 

E. Claiborne Robins (P) took his employees 
on a vacation trip to Havana. He is also 
adding 30,000 square feet increasing the 
plant by one-third. 

1934 C. C. Chewning (M) was among those 
who helped to organize the new Richmond 
Symphony Orchestra and is termed a "foun- 
der. ' ' 

Elam C. Toone (M) has been named vice 
president of the Inter-Chapter Medical Ad- 
visory Committee of the National Arthritis 
and Rheumatism Foundation. 

1935 L. A. Dickerson (Ml of South Charles- 
ton, West Virginia, has accepted the appoint- 
ment as Director of Disease Control of the 
State Health Department. 

James 0- Gant, Jr. (M) attended the 
Eleventh Intel-national Congress of Derma- 
tology in Stockholm, Sweden, in August. 



Compliments 
of 

Richmond Memorial 
Hospital 



31 



He also visited the Skin Clinics in Germany, 
Switzerland, France, and England. 
J. Curtis (P) and Anne Skinner Nottingham 
of Williamsburg, Virginia, are the proud 
parents of a son, Robert Blackwell, bom on 
November 9. 

Under the direction of Reno R. Porter (M) 
associate professor of medicine at the Med- 
ical College of Virginia, the Work Evalu- 
ation Unit of the Richmond Area Heart As- 
sociation opened November 1 on the north 
wing, second floor, MCV Hospital. Those 
referred to the clinic will have their job 
capabilities evaluated by a physician, a 
clinical psychologist, a social worker, and 
a selective placement counselor. 

1936 Leroy Smith (M) attended the Amer- 
ican Society meeting on Cancer of the Head 
and Neck in New York. He is one of the 
• ' founders ' ' of the Richmond Symphony 
Orchestra. 

1937 Richard Michaux (M), chairman of 
the Speaker's Bureau and a member of the 
Representative Assembly of the Richmond 
Unit of the Society, attended the meeting 
of the Virginia Division, American Cancer 
Society in Lynchburg, October 23. 

1939 Beverly Clary (M), as president, pre- 
sided over the Virginia State Orthopedic 
business meeting in Washington on October 
29. 

Charles F. Hudson (M) of Coral Gables, 
Florida, visited the Alumni House on No- 
vember 1, 1957. 

John L. Patterson, Jr. (M) of Richmond, 
Virginia, spoke before the annual meeting 



Prescription for Pleasure 



TRAVEL 



Complete Information 

On 

SPRING — SUMMER 

CRUISES & TOURS 

Special Cruise from Norfolk 

"QUEEN OF BERMUDA" 

7 Days to Havana — Nassau 

■> 

Extensive List of Medical Meetings 

In Europe 1958 

<• 

Reservations And Tickets 
For All 

AIR LINES ** STEAMSHIP LINES 
HOTEL RESERVATIONS 
Telephone Milton 4-7848 

C. O. ALLEY 
TRAVEL AGENCY 

708 E. Grace St., Richmond, Va. 
38 Years of Travel Service in Virginia 



of the American Heart Association in Chi- 
cago in October. Circulation and Respiration 
in the Giraffe was his subject and he dis- 
cussed findings made last October during a 
Navy sponsored safari to South Africa. 

1940 M. Josiah Hoover (M) was on the 
program of the Seaboard Surgical Society 
in Richmond, October 2. 
W. Yates League (L>) was elected president 
of the Richmond Dental Society. 

1941 John Wallace (P) and his wife are 
the proud parents of a son, John O. Wallace, 
Jr. on September 28. 

1943D Warren L. Moorman, Jr. (M) has 
joined the staff at Lewis-Gale Hospital, 
Roanoke, Virginia, as a plastic and recon- 
structive surgeon. 

William H. ReMine (M), head of a section 
of general surgery in the Mayo Clinic at 
Rochester, Minnesota, and instructor in sur- 
gery in the Mayo Foundation, Graduate 
School, University of Minnesota, has been 
elected to the Senate of the University of 
Minnesota at Minneapolis. He will represent 
faculty members of the Mayo Foundation in 
the categories of instructors and assistant 
professors. He is also a member of the Med- 
ical Graduate Committee of the Mayo Foun- 
dation. 

1944 Gervas S. Taylor (M) of Norfolk, 
Virginia, visited the Alumni Office on Oc- 
tober 23. 

1945 Forrest P. White (M) of Norfolk, 
Virginia, was one of the nine winners in the 
second annual Ted V. Rogers awards for 
articles on highway improvement in the con- 
test sponsored by Trailmobile, Inc. 

1946 C. Newton Van Horn (M) of Norfolk, 
Virginia, visited the Alumni Office on Oc- 
tober 23. 

1947 Dr. and Mrs. E. Randolph Trice (M) 

spent a short time in London before going to 
the Scandinavian peninsula, where Dr. Trice 
attended a medical meeting. They also vis- 
ited Mrs. Trice's brother-in-law and sister 
in Heidelberg, Germany. 

1948 Roy A. Edwards (M) has been ap- 
pointed to serve as consultant at Barbours- 
ville State Hospital, West Virginia. 

1950 Ed and Frances Hemby (P), Rich- 
mond, Virginia, are the proud parents of a 
baby daughter, Rebecca Jane, born on Oc- 
tober 8. 

A. M. Unger (M), department of medicine 
at MCV, spoke on Clinical Experience with 
Twenty Consecutive Patients Treated by 
Hemodialysis at the Biological Seminar in 
the MCV Clinic Building on December 18. 

1951 0. C. Bayne (P) and his wife of 
Richmond, Virginia, announce the arrival 
of Christina Marie on September 14. 
John Salley (D) and his wife are receiving 
congratulations on the birth of a daughter, 
Martha. 

1952 H. Dewey Bell (D) and his wife are 
the proud parents of a daughter, Vicky Lynn. 
R. S. Birckhead (M) of Gauley Bridge. West 
Virginia, was elected president of the Fay- 
ette County Medical Society. 

Violet Barnes Fitts (N) on the staff at U. 
S. Naval Hospital, Portsmouth, Virginia, has 
been promoted to lieutenant, junior grade, 
Nurse Corps, U. S. Naval Reserve. 



W. Edward Holladay (M) is associated with 
Robert Powell C'oggins for the practice of 
internal medicine and cardiology in Augusta, 
Georgia. 

Keith Kinsey (M) is at his father's home in 
Claypool, Indiana, recovering from injuries 
received in an auto accident last February 
while on a house call. He has had five oper- 
ations since the accident. 

Bob Piccolo (P) and his wife of Ashland, 
Virginia have a daughter, Susan Eloise, born 
on October 6. 

1953 Ross M. Orr, Jr. (M) and his wife, 
the former Sandra Schneider (P'52) are now 
in West Palm Beach, Florida. He is at the 
1707th USAFB Hospital. 

1954 Alice Bridgers (XRT) was married 
to William Carlyle Hatcher on July 24 at 
Giesen, Germany. 

1955 Willis E. Anderson (M) is a naval 

flight surgeon and is stationed in Iceland. 
Milton D. Chalkley (M) of Suffolk, Vir- 
ginia, is serving as chief medical officer on 
the MSST Geiger. 

Reginald R. Cooper (M) is doing a residency 
in orthopedic surgery at the University of 
Iowa Hospital. 

Ronald K. Elswick (M) is a lieutenant in 
the medical corps, USNR, and is stationed 
at the Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry 
Point, North Carolina. 

Paul Brown Givens, Jr. (M) of Warwick, 
Virginia, is serving in the Air Force at the 
Air Force Hospital in Tripoli. 
George Stevens Richardson (M) and Rocelia 
May Warren (MT'53) were married in Nor- 
folk, Virginia, on September 7, 1957. Dr. 
Richardson is serving aboard the USS Vulcan 
as chief medical officer. Ronald K. Elswick 
(M'55) and Robert Stevens Jones (P'53) 
were among the members of the wedding- 
party. 

George H. Warren, Jr. (M) of Smithflelcl, 
Virginia, is serving in the Army at the 98th 
General Hospital in Germany. 
Davis B. Wyatt (M) graduated from the 
military medical orientation course at the 
Army 'Medical Service School, Fort Sam 
Houston. Texas. He is now in Korea. 

1956 Gerald W. Roller (M) was graduated 
from the military medical orientation course 
at the Army Medical Service School, Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas. 

1957 John L. Butler (P) visited the 
Alumni House on December 16. 
Robert E. Cundiff (HA) has been appointed 
as the hospital's first full-time administra- 
tor by the South Boston Hospital officials. 
Phyllis Hicks (N) was married to J. G. Jen- 
kins, Jr. (D'56). They are now at Fort Mc- 
Clellan, Anniston, Alabama. 



yi 



REUNION DATES 
June 2-3, 1958 

THE SCARAB 




in asthma, 



3 

plus values. 



■mu 



dhane 



Potassium iodide*, repeatedly affirmed a very 
useful drug in asthma, 1 - 2 . 3 . 4 . 5 plus aminophylline, 
ephedrine, phenobarbital 

a buffer for tolerance. Mudrane is an exception- 
ally well tolerated preparation with a near- 
neutral pH 

a better balanced formula — more phenobarbital 
(1/3 grain) and less ephedrine (1/4 grain) 
avoids ephedrine nervousness and makes Mudrane 
slightly sedative 

FORM U LA 

Potassium Iodide* 3 gr. 

Aminophylline 2 gr. 

Ephedrine HC1 1/4 gr. 

Phenobarbital 1/3 gr. 

BOTTLES 36 AND lOO TABLETS 

DOSAG E 

One tablet with full glass of water, 3 or 4 times 
a day 

*6 drops saturated solution potas- B 1 BLIOGRAPHY 

sium iodide equivalent in each '■ Rackemann, F. M.. in 3. Feineold, B. F., J.A. 

Mudrane tablet ?' x - t , b ? k , 0, K M . e .1! c te- "■*•« "«iMMI 

k t't-ll & L,oeb, Mn !■.(!. 
2. Barach. A.L..J.A.M.A.: 4. Tuft. L., J.A.M.A.; 
147:730-7 146:1480-86 

5. Banyai.A.L..J.A.M.A.: 
148:501-4 

wm. p. poythress & o>., inc. 

_■_ * ETHICAL PHARMACEUTICALS • RICHMOND 17. VIRGIr 



AL T JMNI ASSOCIATION 

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

Return Postage Guaranteed 



4 



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NON-PROF. ORG. 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Richmond, Virginia 
Permit No. 761 













<V 






It 'g Ju n e In J a nua ry! 

We're Planning For Our Reunion 

ALUMNI DAY, JUNE 2, 1958 



This Year The "3's" and "8's" Will Be 
Our Honored Classes 

Make Your Plans NOW To Be Witk Us 



Official Organ 

of the 

Alumni Association 

of the 

Medical College 

of 

Virginia 




May, 1958 
olume 7. Number 2 





Official Organ of the 
Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 

Published by the Medical College of Virginia Alumni 
Association in February, May, August, and November 

Editorial Committee 

Robert V. Terrell, M'34, Editor-in-Chiej and Chairm 

James T. Tucker, M'27 

William T. Sanger, Chancellor 

Minnie M. Franck, Managing Editor 

Mildred H. Clark, Assistant Managing Editor 

Officers 

J. Spencer Dryden, M'33, President 

6816 Millwood Road, Bethesda 14, Md. 

James T. Tucker, M'27, hnmed. fast President 

Medical Arts Building, Richmond, Va. 

R. Reginald Rooke, P'2i, President-Elect 

2929 Second Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

J. Robert Massie, Jr.. M'34, Vice-President 

1000 West Grace Street, Richmond. Va. 

Harry Lyons, D'25, Vice-President 

Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia 

George F. Hendley, V'18, Vice-President 

2125 Pairmount Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 

Mrs. Anne F. Mahoney. N'29. Vice-President 

907 West 31st Street, Richmond, Virginia 

Peter N. PaSTORE. M'34. Secretary 

Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia 

Harvey B. Haag, M'28. Treasurer 
Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia 

Trustees 
Term Expires December 31, 1958 



Edward L. Alexander, M'! 

Medical Arts Building, 

Newport News, Va. 

,T. Pelham Broaddus, D'30 

Franklin, Va. 

Donald S. Daniel, M'24 

Johnston-Willis Hospital, 

Richmond, Va. 



Llotd C. Bird. P'17 

303 South Sixth Street, 

Richmond, Va. 

Richard A. Michaux, M'37 

Lee Medical Building, 

Richmond, Va. 

Edward Myers. D'26 

511 Medical Arts Building. 

Norfolk, Va. 

Term Expires De 
Hunter M. Gaunt, P'26 
Main and Valley Streets, 

Winchester, Va. 

L. Prances Gordon, N'43 

4514 West Grace Street 

Richmond, Va. 
W. C. Henderson, D'37 
301 East Franklin Street, 

Richmond, Va. 



Bethesda 14. Md. 



R. Regisa 


LD Rooi 


;e, P'21 


2920 St 


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Rich 


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W. Roy 


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Physicians Products 


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Petersburg, "\ 




cember 31, 


1959 




Marguerite 


Nicholson. N'34 


Cahanis 


s Hall, 


MCV 


Rich 


nond. ^ 


a. 


E. Claiborne Robins, P'33 


1407 Cu 


innings 


Drive 


Rich 


loud. A 


a. 


Robert V. 


Terrell. M'34 


Medical 


\rts Bi 


tiding 


Rich 


nond. \ 


a. 


cember 31, 


I960 




Philip \ 




. M'34 


Greenhriei 


Vallev 


Hospital 


Ronceve 


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t Va. 


Wavehi.v 

91 2 


; Pay> 
5th Stre 


E, M'23 


Newpo 


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Va. 


H. Hudnall 


Ware. 


Jr., M'42 


81G West 


Frankli 


Street, 



About The Cover 

Dr. Daniel D. Talley, Jr., is emeritus professor of clinical 
radiology of the Medical College of Virginia. After attending 
McGuire's and St. Alban's School in Radford, Virginia, he en- 
tered the University of Virginia where he was awarded his 
bachelor's degree in 1904. He was graduated from the Medical 
College of Virginia in the class of 1906 and served his intern- 
ship at the Memorial Hospital. 

After a brief period of general practice, under the guidance 
of Dr. Ennion G. Williams and Dr. George Ben Johnston, he 
went north to specialize in radiology. Within ten years of the 
initial basic observations on X-rays by their discoverer, Dr. 
Talley spent a period in New York and Philadelphia at the 
lefferson Hospital where he studied with pioneers in this spe- 
cialty. Returning to Richmond in 1909, he has been in con- 
tinuous practice since that time and has been associated with 
academic and clinical pursuits in the medical school during many 
of these years. 

Dr. Talley is a member of the American Roentgen Ray So- 
ciety of which he served as first vice-president in 1913, a fellow 
of the American College of Radiology, and holds membership 
in numerous other medical societies. He is a member of the 
board of directors of Tucker Hospital and secretary-treasurer of 
lohnston-Willis Hospital, the only active member of the original 
visiting staff. 

In 1920 Dr. Talley was married to Anne Hays Myers of 
Richmond. They have three sons, two of whom are physicians 
active in radiology. Since its opening in 1917, he has had offices 
in the Professional Building at Fifth and Franklin Streets, 
which by coincidence stands on the site of the house of his birth. 



Our Lost Sheep 



We've exhausted all possible sources that we can think of 
and now we ask your help to try to trace these lost alumni. The 
address listed is the last one we had and mail has been returned 
to us from it. If you know their whereabouts or can suggest 
someone who might, won't you let us know. Each issue we plan 
to list some of our lost sheep. 

Mrs. Mary Sue Allen Adams N'45, 4406 Evert Avenue, Richmond 24, 
Virginia; Mrs. Greta Kellison Alexander N'52, Route 2, Glen Allen, 
Virginia; Miss Minnie Andrews N'20. 215 "D" Street N.W., Wash- 
ington 1, D. C. ; Mrs. Mary Baker N'44, 1665 Orange Blossom Ter- 
race, Orlando, Florida; Mrs. Mary F. Ballou N'45, Fmcastle, Virginia; 
Mrs. Marcia A. Barlow N'47, 305 Pitt Street, Greenville, North Caro- 
lina; Mrs. Edna G. Bays N'43 March. Route 9, Rodman Road, Rich- 
mond, Virginia; Mrs. Margaret S. Berkley N'42, 1741 T Street, Apt. 
302. Washington, D. C; Miss Shirley Berry N'53, 4100 Hermitage 
Road, Richmond, Virginia; Mrs. Elizabeth N. Blair N'15, Urbanna, 
Virginia; Mrs. Gay H. Boswell N'53. 2223 H Street NW, Everglades 
Apt. 201, Washington 7, D. C; Mrs. Elizabeth P. Bowles N'41, Route 
1. Box 511. Ellerson, Virginia; Mrs. Elizabeth F. Bowlin N'46, 4363 
Nickols Avenue SW, Apt. 229, Washington, D. C; Mrs. Barbara G. 
Broocks N'51. 351 Norfolk Avenue, Lynchburg, Virginia; Mrs. Emma 
B. Brook Nil, 1609 Rivermont Avenue, Lynchburg, Virginia; Mrs. 
Kathleen W. Brown PHN'51, 345 Pochin Place. Hampton. Virginia; 
Mrs. Marie Page Bryant N'47. Bladenboro, North Carolina; Mrs. Mary 
M. Buffey N'40. 2917 E. Broad Street. Richmond 23. Virginia; Miss 
Elsie M. Burrows N'55, 14S East 48th Street, New York 17, New 
York; Mrs. Mabel D. Calder N'4l, Edgewood Knoll Apartments. Apt. 
22, Asheville, North Carolina; Mrs. Louise S. Chaffin N'36, 1800 Daron 
Lane. Richmond 22, Virginia; Miss Mary A. Coleman N'43 March. 
#1 Central Boulevard. Sunset Park, Wilmington, North Carolina; Mrs. 
Flcda H. Colvard N'25. 3804 Plymouth Drive, Richmond 22, Virginia; 
Mrs. Louise H. Cottingham N'38, 1528 Adams Street, Lafayette. Indiana; 
Miss Izetta L. Couch N'49. 114 Venus Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee; 
Mrs. Clara W. Curtis N'44, 1316 Pingree Street, Lincoln Park, Michi- 
gan. 

(Continued on page 28) 



The Scarab 



Published by The Alumni Association of the Medical College of Virginia 



Volume 7. No. 2 



Richmond, Virginia 



May, 1958 



Message To Our Alumni 

Dr. R. Blackwell Smith. Jr. 



The many members of the Alumni As- 
sociation who read and heeded our plea 
for assistance as presented in the last issue 
of The Scarab did much to help their 
Alma Mater in a situation as grave as any 
the College has faced in generations. At 
that time Governor Stanley had just pre- 
sented to the General Assembly his budg- 
et recommendations for the 1958-60 bi- 
ennium; and his were recommendations 
which if adopted without amendment, 
would have blocked much future progress 
as effectively as a stone wall. 

That was the situation in January when 
Governor Almond took office and the 
members of the General Assembly began 
their difficult task of trying to allocate 
the tax funds available w r ith due regard 
both to the needs of the several agencies 
and institutions and to the necessity of 
producing maximum returns in State serv- 
ices for each tax dollar expended. Within 
the first few days after Governor Almond 
took office, he was good enough to receive 
representatives of the College who laid 
before him the facts and figures bearing 
on the College's need for tax funds over 
and above those recommended by Gov- 
ernor Stanley — funds needed to supply- 
three absolute musts: (a) salaries for 
clinical teachers in the school of medicine; 
(b) a medical education building to house 
most of the preclinical departments, now 
badly scattered in inadequate quarters, 
and the activities of the clinical depart- 
ments for which no proper accommoda- 
tions have ever been specifically designed 
and built; and (c) certain administrative 
offices now inadequately situated. Gov- 
ernor Almond expressed his appreciation 
of the perilous situation facing the Col- 
lege; and, with his sympathetic encour- 
agement and understanding, members of 
the College administration set out to ac- 
quaint the members of the Assembly with 
the needs which would have to be met if 

MAY, 1958 



essential programs of the College and its 
services to the Commonwealth were not 
to be allowed to deteriorate. 

It was at this point that the College 
called upon the Alumni Association for 
assistance. Many alumni responded 
promptly and effectively with the result 
that members of the Assembly received 
information concerning the College's 
needs from their own constituents who 
were well known to them as people dedi- 




cated to the cause of better health for the 
people of Virginia. Especially impressive 
and appreciated was the help of Dr. Mal- 
colm H. Harris, president of the Virginia 
Academy of General Practice, who. en- 
tirely on his own initiative, asked the 
members of the Legislature to consider 
sympathetically the needs of medical edu- 
cation at both the State's medical schools. 
One could not emphasize too strongly 
the real interest and desire to be helpful 
manifested by the great majority of the 



legislators whenever they were approached 
in connection with this problem. The 
members of the House Appropriations 
Committee and of the Senate Finance 
Committee, as well as many other mem- 
bers of the Assembly, recognized at once 
the d'fficulties faced and moved promptly 
to provide relief. In the end, the budget 
bill as finally enacted provided for the 
biennium 31,094,000 more than had been 
recommended by Governor Stanley, a sub- 
stantial proportion of the unallocated 
funds available to the General Assembly 
tor appropriation. This additional sum 
will provide $147,000 annually for the 
salaries of clinical teachers in the school 
of medicine; $287,500 annually for 
maintenance and operation of the College 
hospitals (support for indigent patients) ; 
and $225,000 to prepare plans and speci- 
fications for the Medical Education Build- 
ing. However, even this magnificent re- 
sponse will not make it possible to utilize 
fully our hospital resources, a fact which 
emphasizes eloquently the gross inade- 
quacy of Governor Stanley's original 
recommendations. 

We have written to all members of the 
Assembly to express our appreciation of 
their assistance. It is hoped that every 
alumnus located in Virginia will express 
personally his own as well as the Col- 
lege's thanks to his representatives in the 
House of Delegates and in the Senate. 

Those of us at the College must also 
add deeds to words and do everything 
possible to fulfill the obligations the As- 
sembly's support has laid upon us. We 
must put forth our best efforts to make the 
funds provided maximally effective. To 
exert any lesser effort would be to exhibit 
ingratitude. 



REUNION NEWS 
Page 10 



A Backward Glance 

MEDICAL SCHOOL DEANS 

1922-1958 

By William T. Sanger, Chancellor 

It has been suggested that alumni will be interested in seeing listed together those who have headed our school 
of medicine during my association with the College, beginning July 1, 1925. This superb group can be contemplated 
only with affectionate appreciation. 

Manfred Call 1922-1929.— Doctor Call was well established in leadership when I arrived. Though a part-time 
official few could have done more for his alma mater. He was warmly esteemed by students, faculty, and alumni. 
Many remember him as an outstanding internist. His able leadership and great wisdom are gratefully recalled. He 
helped the new president tackle many difficult problems, gave almost unlimited time when needed, and was untax- 
ing in his appreciation of the unrealized potentials of the institution. At the same time he had magnificent respect tor 
our honored past. He was a constant stimulation to me personally. His premature death is still secretely mourned. 
Lee E Sutton Jr., 1929-1942.— Doctor and Mrs. Sutton made a real MCV team. In their home they did much 
to supply in part our then lack of socializing opportunities. Mrs. Sutton is a gifted and generous hostess. 

Dr Sutton worked tirelessly to raise academic standards in medicine and lead in pediatrics as well. With more 
time to give than most predecessors, when dean, he rather quickly made effective his high ideals and standards, lhis 
bothered a few who preferred the old way of operating, but it must be recorded with pride that his efforts were most 
timely and in the right direction. The impact of his constructive administration is still with us. 

Jacques P. Gray, 1942-1946.— Doctor Gray was our war dean. He came to us from public health, well prepared 
for meeting the challenge of accelerated medical education, despite certain disadvantages. He was an excellent team 
member, contributing substantially to total institutional well being. Mrs. Gray met her responsibilities with apparent 
ease and much charm. Their departure for Oklahoma occasioned great regret. 

Interim Committee, 1946-1947.— This interim committee was headed by George W. Bakeman with Dr. James 
P. Baker and Dr. Harvey B. Haag as associates. Such a committee can sustain academic and administrative gains 
and deserves our continuing thanks. Mr. Bakeman's committee gave real leadership and was widely appreciated. 
This is typical of all of Mr. Bakeman's work with us since he came to MCV in 1941, richly prepared for a career 
here. 

Harvey B. Haag, 1947-1951.— Doctor Haag was drafted for this post. He was in his office both early and late; 
his research and teaching in pharmacology had to go on, too. He was always and still is as popular with alumni as 
with students. "Harvey Haag Day" continues to be a happy occasion. Doctor Haag advanced the office of dean, 
but felt called to return to full-time teaching and research, his first love. 

John B Truslow January, 1951, to April 1, 1956.— Doctor Truslow came to Richmond from Columbia and left 
us for the Medical Branch of the University of Texas at Galveston. During his administration our greatest gains in 
research and finances in general perhaps were effected. He worked hard for general advancement in medicine and 
medical education. Before many of his plans could be accomplished, however, he answered the call of the great 
Southwest. Mrs. Truslow is remembered as a gracious hostess. 

Interim Committee, April 1, 1956, to February 1, 1957, composed of Dr. Erling S. Hegre, professor of anat- 
omy, George W. Bakeman, associate dean of medicine, and Dr. Wyndham B. Blanton, Jr., assistant to the dean, 
deserves great praise for strenuous work well done. Routine had grown, and there were many special problems as 
well. An interim committee does more extra work than most of us can realize. We are deeply indebted to such a 
committee as Doctor Hegre's. 

William F. Maloney, February 1, 1957, to date, and we hope that date will be long extended. Doctor Maloney 
is an internist with a flair for administration and cooperation with other units of the College. He was the unanimous 
choice of a large nominating committee, because of warm personality, experience, and medical education philosophy. 
He is young, speaks well in public, and inspires confidence. We have great expectations of his promising leadership. 
He has already shown the stature expected of him. As always, much hard work is at hand. In this he has under- 
standing support from Mrs. Maloney, who is much liked by all who know her. 

THE SCARAB 



Those We Honor, The Classes 
of 1908 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 
School of Medicine 

Dr. Meade S. Brent, Heathsville, Va. 
Dr. Burt O. Choate, Sparta, N. C. 
Dr. William L. Cowles, Shawmut, Ala. 
Dr. Samuel C. Draper, Wytheville, Va. 
Dr. Berkeley H. Martin, Richmond, Va. 
Dr. John H. Moorman, Conicville, Va. 
Dr. Guy M. Naff, North Emporia, Va. 
Dr. Frank G. Scott, Jr., Orange, Va. 
Dr. George W. Skaggs, Dublin, Va. 
Dr. Alick T. Smith, Greensboro, N. C. 
Dr. Evans M. Tanner, Bluefield, \V. Va. 
Dr. William R. Wallace, Chester, S. C. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 
School of Medicine 

Dr. Eugene C. Eggleston, Richmond, Va. 
Dr. Brady D. Epling, Petersburg, III. 
Dr. Antonio G. Fidanza, Providence, R. I. 
Dr. Frank S. Givens, Roanoke, Va. 
Dr. Anderson M. Owen, Gretna, Va. 
Dr. E. Barbour Pendleton, Cuckoo, Va. 
Dr. Bickerton L. Phillips, Richmond, Va. 
Dr. David L. Rawls, Suffolk, Va. 
Dr. Albin M. Saunders, Norfolk, Va. 
Dr. Tivis C. Sutherland, Haysi, Va. 
Dr. Alfred P. Upshur, New York, N. Y. 
Dr. Edward P. J. Whelan, Nutley, N. J. 
Dr. Harry F. White, Fishersville, Va. 

NORTH CAROLINA MEDICAL 

COLLEGE 

School of Medicine 

Dr. Frank L. Mock, Lexington, N. C. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 
School of Dentistry 

Dr. Frederick A. Gill, Petersburg, Va. 
Dr. John M. Hughes, Richmond, Va. 



Dr. Harry L. Mcars, Richmond, Va. 
Dr. George E. Petty, Newport News, Va. 
Dr. David E. Stone, Rocky Mount, Va. 
Dr. William E. Whitt, Yalaha, Fla. 

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 
School of Pharmacy 

Mr. Charles F. James, Appomattox. Va. 
Mr. Charles W. Mason, Va. Beach, Va. 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 
School of Pharmacy 

Mr. Banister Anderson, Danville, Va. 
Mr. Robert R. Copeland, Ahoskie, N. C. 
Mr. Theron E. Moore, Blackstone, Va. 
Mr. S. Parrish Reams, Richmond, Va. 
Mr. Thomas H. Wilson, Gastonia, N. C. 

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 
School of Nursing 

Miss Frances Boyd 

Mrs. Rebecca Bland Coleman 

Miss Effie Holston 

Miss Frances Liggett 

Mrs. J. D. Payne, Costa Mesa, Calif. 

Mrs. Courtney Perry Rogers 

Mrs. Cleo Major Sherfey, Arlington, Va. 

Miss I. L. Thomason, Fredericksburg, Va. 

Miss Leulli Wood 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 
School of Nursing 

Mrs. Martha J. Campbell, Va. Beach, Va. 
Miss Annie Clay, Lynchburg, Va. 
Miss Mary N. Craft, Bramwell, W. Va. 
Mrs. E. D. Goodloe, Charlottesville, Va. 
Mrs. Sarah W. Healy, Norfolk, Va. 



We wrote to our fifty year graduates and requested that they 
send us a picture and a little incident that they remembered 
from their college days or some interesting experience that oc- 
curred during the years. The pleasant results appear on the 
following pages. 




Dr. Meade S. Brent 

After graduating in medicine from the 
Medical College of Virginia, I served as 
intern at Retreat for the Sick Hospital, 
Richmond, Virginia, for one year. Then 
on July 1, 1909, I joined the medical staff 
of the Central State Hospital, Petersburg, 
Virginia. After holding various positions 
on that staff, I was appointed superin- 
tendent of that Institution on July 1, 
1938, which position I held until my 
resignation and retirement on February 1, 
1955. Since that time I have lived at 
Heathsville, Virginia, where I was born. 




Barbour Pendleton 



My great grandfather's desk had a label 
on one of its drawers: "Morphine, Water- 
melon Seed, and Gunpowder." Morphine 
was, of course, to alleviate suffering; 



MAY, 1958 



watermelon seed, when soaked, made a 
potent diuretic. I suppose the gun powder 
was intended for old doctors who had 
outlived their usefulness. 

Following in the footsteps of my father, 
grandfather, and great grandfather, I dis- 
pense most of the drugs used by my 
patients. 




Dr. John H. Moorman 

After graduation I located in western 
Shenandoah County. Since 1908 I have 
made many, many house calls through- 
out my territory. 

On July 13, 1946, I got a call I shall 
remember. A girl called and said she 
wanted me to go up to Old Sawmill Camp 
to see her Uncle Pete who had suffered a 
heart attack. I used all the alibis I could 
think of and suggested the possibility 
that Pete might be drunk. She assured 
me not. 

Agreeing to go and overlooking a re- 
cent flash flood, I took a near-cut to save 
mileage. I crossed the first stream and hit 
quicksand. While trying to pull out, I 
tore the tire and tube from one wheel. 
Finding myself entirely surrounded by 
water, I decided to climb a tree and 
swing to the wire bridge. The tree broke 
and I landed in three feet of water. I 
climbed the bridge post and walked a 
half mile for help. A truck pulled me 
out and across two more creeks. I put on 
a spare and continued to Old Sawmill 
Creek and found Pete lOCK'r drunk. 

Due to his inability to pay, I charged 
a very small fee and never got that ! 




^^>»^k. 



Dr. Frank S. Givens 

I was born at Newport, Virginia, in 
1883 and graduated from the University 
College of Medicine in 1908. After grad- 
uation I engaged in general practice in 
my home town. During 1918 I moved to 
Wise County, Virginia, where I did gen- 
eral practice until 1946 and served as 
mayor of Wise, Virginia, from 1944 to 
1946. At that time I moved to Roanoke, 
Virginia, and was made a rating specialist 
with the Veteran's Administration at 
which position I served until 1958. 

During the past fifty years many new 
discoveries have taken place in medicine 
and surgery. Two outstanding ones were 
the antitoxin for diphtheria and insulin for 
diabetes. I well remember a boy eight 
years old in 1910 who looked hopelessly 
ill with larygeal diphtheria. After adminis- 
tering large doses of antitoxin, he made a 
quick recovery. We had no remedy to 
combat diabetes until insulin. Two other 
outstanding discoveries were the anti- 
biotics and the sulfa drugs. With these 
we have effective remedies for pneumonia 
and other blood stream infections. 

During World Wars I and II, I served 
on the County Examiners Boards where I 
was located. I retired on January 1, 1958, 
and live in Roanoke, Virginia. I have a 
family of six living children, three boys 
and three girls, who are all making good 
citizens. 

Mr. Banister Anderson 

I attended the public schools in Dan- 
ville, the Danville Commercial College, 
and V.P.I. (Va. Tech), Blacksburg, Vir- 
ginia. I am a registered pharmacist in 



both Virginia and North Carolina. My 
years in the drug business have been 
spent as follows: ten years at one drug 
store in Hampton, Virginia; twelve years 
in a store at High Point, North Carolina; 
and twenty-one years with my brother, the 
late Samuel E. Anderson in the operation 
of Anderson's Pharmacy, Danville, Vir- 




ginia. At present, I am relief pharmacist 
for Mr. Walter H. Jordan, Sr., owner of 
Jordan's Pharmacy, Danville, Virginia. I 
have been active continuously during the 
fifty years. 

I recall this incident from my days at 
UCM. After a pleasant week-end at 
Hampton and Old Point Comfort, I re- 
turned to Richmond via the C & O Rail- 
road, not many autos in those days. I was 
a little late as I entered the class room 
for a lecture on Chemistry. Professor 
Rudd called on me to go to the black- 
board and told me to write the Graphic 
Formula, m-dihydroxybenzene. I could 
not, so returned to my chair. All the class 
laughed. He called upon each of the 
others and not a one could. So Professor 
Rudd asked, "Who's laughing now?" 
Silence, of course. 

I will be glad to hear from or be 
visited by any members of the 1908 UCM 
Pharmacy Class. 



REUNION NEWS 
Page 10 



THE SCARAB 




Dr. Berkeley H. Martin 

I matriculated at the Medical College 
of Virginia in 1904. The Egyptian Build- 
ing was one of the outstanding places of 
beauty and architectural grandeur, with 
three large lecture halls and many other 
rooms of different sizes and uses. 

There were seventeen professors; the 
small number gave us an opportunity of 
knowing them quite well. They were 
very friendly and helpful. Two or three- 
times during each session the students 
were invited to their homes for dinner. 
No student would turn down an invita- 
tion to dine with the "big dogs." 

Dr. Charles A. Blanton, professor of 
pediatrics, at the beginning of a lecture 
would ask a question and then would 
answer the question in detail. He then 
would ask a student if his answer was 
correct and the student would respond 
with a "yes." Dr. Blanton would then 
say, "No, sir, just the opposite." 

Dr. William H. Taylor, professor of 
chemistry, two or three times a year, 
would lecture at night at which time the 
students, the physicians, and citizens of 
Richmond would be invited. The main 
auditorium was always filled to overflow- 
ing and he would explain to the audience 
that it was not due to his popularity but 
to his position as City Coroner, where he 
was not in competition with any of his 
audience. He also informed us something 
about a woman's anatomy. He stated that 
all women were bow-legged. This indi- 
cated to me a very gentlemanly attitude 
of innocence. 

MAY, 1958 



Mrs. Ivy Lee Thomason 

Nurses form a small part of a base 
hospital but they are greatly needed. The 
worst thing that I had to encounter, 
while in France during World War I, 
was being put in charge of the Gas Hos- 
pital at the time of the Saint Mihiel 
Drive with not one mouthful to eat or 
drink. I had been cautioned that the first 
thing to be done for a gassed patient was 
to see that he had something hot to drink. 
Well, I sent out and got some tea and a 
sack of bread. I gave them the tea and 
bread, nothing on the bread. The only 
thing I had to make the tea in was a five 
gallon GI tin. Water was also a problem. 

Several hundred patients were sent in. 
We had a hard time getting cups, using 
mostly cups the boys had in their mess 
kits. 




Dr. David L. Rawls 

I remember some little incidents and 
experiences during the four years at 
UCM. When we were dissecting the 
cadaver, occasionally one boy would cut 
off a little piece and slip it into another 
boy's pocket. 

From 190-1 to 1908 we were more or 
less "put." There were no automobiles 
or buses and mostly dirt roads. Our travel- 
ing was very much limited. We would go 
home once a year — Christmas. Of course, 
if there were serious illness or death in 
the family we would go. There was good 
train service at that time. 

It would seem that we didn't have a 
very good time but we did. We attended 
church and some of the social functions, 
went to a show occasionally, promenaded 




Broad Street, hung around in front of 
Murphy's Hotel, and saw the girls go 
by. Byrd Park was very popular then, so 
we would ride a street car out there and 
have a big time. I enjoyed all four years. 

Dr. Bickerton Lewis Phillips 

I was born at Beaverdam, Hanover 
Count)', Virginia, and was educated at 
Bel-Air Private School and Randolph- 
Macon College. I graduated from Univer- 
sity College of Medicine in 1908. 

After practicing in Thomas, West Vir- 
ginia, under Dr. Henry Hoffman for a 
year, I went to Mineral, Virginia, where 
I was associated with Dr. E. A. Terrell 
from 1909 to 1913. In 1914 I came to 
Richmond and went into private practice 
at which I am actively engaged at the 
present time. 





Dr. John M. Hughes 

I was born in Amissville, Virginia, and 
attended Randolph Macon Academy and 
Richmond College before my UCM days. 
I served my country in World War I in 
the Dental Corps, USA. 

I was a teacher in a rural school from 
1902-1904 and farmed from 1902-1905. 
From 1910 to 1913, I lectured on crown 
and bridge work at the University Col- 
lege of Medicine and from 1914-1916 
served as professor at MCV in crown and 
bridge; ethics, jurisprudence, and eco- 
nomics ; and was secretary of the dental 
faculty during 1913-1916. In 1916 and 
again in 1926, I was president of the 
Richmond Dental Society. The Honor- 
able Harry F. Byrd, while governor of 
Virginia in 1926, appointed me to the 
Virginia State Board of Dental Examiners 
and I was elected Secretary of this Board 
that year and am at present holding the 
same office. I was president of the Alumni 
Association of the Medical College in 
1919-1920. 

Among my activities outside my profes- 
sion, I have had the pleasure of serving 
as Master of the Fox Hounds of the Deep 
Run Hunt Club for 1934-1945 and from 
1948-1950. 

Dr. Alfred P. Upshur 

As regards incidents of my college days, 
I do not recall too many that might be 
of interest. The boys were rather serious 
and they worked hard. I recall that some 
of those living in the nearby "boarding 
houses" paid all of $12.00 a week which 
included meals ! 

On one occasion it was rumored that 



at a meeting of the Faculty, the subject 
of installing elevators in the hospital was 
discussed. One of those opposing com- 
mented to the effect that, when he was 
an intern, he carried patients up and down 
the steps in his arms and, if he could do 
so, he didn't see why these young fellows 
of today could not do the same. 

I recall a story of my father (MCV 
'68) when he was a student. The pro- 
fessor lecturing on Physical Diagnosis 
was explaining auscultation and how to 
apply first one ear and then the other to 
the chest wall. The doctors of those days 
were slow to accept new procedures and 
hesitant to abandon the old ones. How- 
ever, being a teacher, it was his duty to 
report a new device which was beginning 
to attract attention. And so, in a some- 
what leering voice, he said, "And now, 
gentlemen, there is a new invention 
known as a stethoscope ! A stethoscope, 
gentlemen, is a little wooden tube with 
a sick man at one end and a damn fool at 
the other." 





Dr. William E. Whitt 

I think so often of an incident which 
occurred during my freshman year. 

Early in the session I was taking a stroll 
in the Infirmary and came upon a junior 
having much difficulty in getting an im- 
pression for an upper partial denture for a 
lady. He had soft plaster everywhere, in- 
cluding all over himself. The boy was 
sweating blood for fear that Dr. Richard 
Simpson would appear. I asked him if I 
could be of any help. With a few sug- 
gestions from me, not taught in text 




books, he obtained a good impression 
and everything was cleared away before 
Dr. Simpson came to check his work. Dr. 
Simpson complimented him and asked 
him where he got his idea. 

Later, as I was leaving, I heard some- 
one calling to me. The junior came run- 
ning, threw his arms around me, and 
thanked me profusely. "You saved my 
life," he said, "where did you learn that 
technique?" 

I told him that I had practiced with 
my father and another dentist for five 
years and had taken a four month post- 
graduate course at Vanderbilt Dental Col- 
lege before entering UCM as a freshman. 
From that day we became permanent 
friends. 




Dr. George E. Petty 

THE SCARAB 




Dr. William R. Wallace 

In 1908 there were comparatively few 
internships awarded by medical colleges. 
There was always speculation and anxiety 
among the seniors. It was a great thrill 
when I was given an immediate appoint- 
ment to Memorial. 

It was an inspiration and privilege to 
serve under Drs. Johnston, Willis, 
Horsley, Robins, Bosher, Call, Vander- 
hoof, Tucker, and others. Here was taught 
the absolute necessity of a correct diag- 
nosis and a proper surgical technique. 
The memory of these noble doctors and 
their skill in teaching as well as practicing 
medicine will linger until time effaces 
from the innermost recesses of the mind 
the virtues of grateful appreciation. 




Dr. Anderson M. Owen 

Two weeks after entering Medical 
School I had an appendectomy by Dr. 
Stuart McGuire. The same year he was 
called two hundred miles in the country 
to operate on a Doctor Powers. Returning 
to class, he related his experience. The 
operating table had consisted of two bar- 
rels and one window blind. 

I was married in 1907 to Janie E. Mat- 
tox and a son was born in 1908 whom we 
named for Dr. McGuire. My present loca- 
tion in Pittsylvania County was pur- 
chased in 1910. After practicing there a 
short while, I learned from my patients 
that the operation performed by Dr. Mc- 
Guire on Dr. Powers was done in this 
home and in the room which I now oc- 
cupy as my DEN ! 




Dr. David E. Stone 
MAY, 1958 



Dr. Brady D. Epling 

As you know I am still in active office 
practice and am feeling fine. Yes, I will 
always be loyal to the Old Dominion and 
the good people I know there. For the 
past few years we have spent our winter 
vacation in Florida. 

The following experience always causes 
me to appreciate boyhood days. Recently, 
I was called to see a little patient with 
the measles. Being a nice sunny day, I 
decided to walk the few blocks. On my 
way a bunch of boys blocked the side- 
walk with a game of marbles. I was 
brushing by when their dog decided to 
offer combat. Defending myself as best I 
could, I felt the dog was going to win. I 
demanded of the largest boy that he beat 
the dog off. "Doctor," he said, "we were 
waiting for him to bite you, then we were 
going to beat him !" 




Fifty years is a very short time as I look 
back, full of memories that are dear and 
sweet with a headache here and there. 

But how things have changed — from 
Kitty Hawk to Sputnik. So with our pro- 
fession, it has been no less. It's been excit- 
ing with no dull days, and wonderful to 
be a part of it all. 

Me — along with the trend — I have 
changed to a platinum blonde, for there 
are few black hairs with the silver, but 
I'd like very much to have another fifty 
years just to see what happens. 

In 1908 we had a class of thirteen. Six 
are still with us. I think that's wonder- 
ful after fifty years. 

May God Bless Them All! 



nr<&' 



nsv 




Dr. Harry L. Mears 




women, and had about thirty patients. In 
the small hours of the morning when 
everything was very quiet, I heard a 
strange noise in the far end of the hall 
which led to the operating room. I lis- 
tened frozen to my chair. Finally courage- 
came to me and I went rapidly to the 
"second flat" in the semi-darkness, for 
all the lights were out or turned dim, and 
told my story to Miss McGhee who came 



Dr. Samuel C. Draper 

Five or six years before "Sister Ken- 
ny's" treatment was reported, I was called 
to see an eight year old girl who was suf- 
fering severe pain, high temperature, and 
fast pulse. 

I believe the first twenty-four to thirty- 
six hours' treatment of a polio case is very 
important. I gave her sedatives with ap- 
parently no results. We put wide boards 
on bed springs with a firm mattress on 
top, then we soaked a yarn blanket in 
very hot water and wrung it as dry as 
possible. After removing the little girl's 
clothes, we wrapped her in the blanket, 
putting cover over that, and in a short 
time she was easy. 

Her mother was a practical nurse, so 
these treatments were continued for thirty- 
six hours. Then we used the warm dry 
applications to arm, leg, and back of 
neck. After thirty-six hours her tempera- 
ture, pulse, and respiration were nearly 
normal, but she had difficulty moving her 
right arm and leg. She was kept in bed 
two weeks with a foot board to rest her 
feet against, followed with mild massages. 

In two months she had no visible paral- 
ysis or deformity and returned to school 
that fall. I sent a specimen from this pa- 
tient to the State Board of Health and it 
was confirmed as polio. 

Evelyn K. Daniel Goodloe 

The class had received their caps at 
the end of the second month in training 
and I was a timid young nurse. On the 
fourth month, I was put on night duty 
on the Second Annex of Virginia Hos- 
pital, one ward for men and one for 




back with me to investigate the noise in 
the darkness. There were no flash lights 
in those days. By this time I had im- 
agined that we would find anything. We 
found our noise being made by a cat who 
had climbed in through an open window 
and had gotten onto a large sheet of 
sticky fly paper. 





Dr. Eugene C. Eggleston 



Mr. Robert R. Copeland 

In an article in the Hertford County- 
Herald on July 1, 1957, the day of Mr. 
Copeland's retirement, this 1955 recipient 
of the trophy of the North Carolina 
Pharmaceutical Association to the "Phar- 
macist of the Year" tells how in the old 
days he filled prescriptions. The druggist 
beat up with the mortar and pestle granu- 
lar gentian to make tincture of ginger or 
gum oak to make laudanum through the 
process of maceration. 

Other herbs and berries were used to 
make just about all the medicine pre- 
scribed. There were no restrictions and 
one batch of laudanum, for instance, 
might be stronger than the last. One 
could buy four or five ounces of tincture 
of opium or laudanum which now would 
be morphine or codeine made from opium 
and sold by strict restrictions. 

The modern druggist doesn't have to 
fill capsules from beat up quinine any- 
more but instead uses pharmaceutical 
preparations. In fact, Mr. Copeland said 
that he has had his mortar and pestle at 
his home in use as an ash tray for about 
ten years. 

He recalled riding to Tunis on a log 
train that was the forerunner of the At- 
lantic Coast Line through town now. 
"There was a sail boat, perhaps not over 
thirty feet long, unloading corn and I 
thought it was the biggest boat in the 
world," he said. 

He also recalled the "road days" when 
every male citizen would be notified to be 
present and to bring designated tools to 
fix the roads. 

THE SCARAB 




Dr. George W. Skaggs 
In reminiscing over these fifty years of 
practice, one incident in my early practice 
comes to mind vividly. Among my first 
OB cases was a call from the Peters 
Mountain Valley section of West Vir- 
ginia, some twelve miles from my home 
in Greenville, West Virginia. It was a 
January night with the temperature ten 
degrees below zero and sleeting. I had to 
go by horseback and upon arrival was al- 
most frozen and could not dismount. I 
had to be assisted from my horse and 
could not work until I had warmed for 
some time. I faced a case in which the 
woman had been in labor for hours and 
soon found that instrument delivery 
would have to be attempted. There I was 
by myself with no assistance available. I 
had never had a case like this before, one 
in which I had to do everything myself. 
After as good a preparation as possible, 
under the circumstances, I gave ether and 
proceeded to apply forceps. To my grati- 
fication everything went along smoothly 
and I was happily on my way home the 
next day. 

Dr. Frank L. Mock 

I remember back to 'i question asked 
me by Dr. Housten on anatomy which 
W'as, "Now, Mr. Mock, you may describe 
the upper third of the femur bone and 
give its articulation with other bones." 

I replied, "Yes, sir, Doctor, I have not 
had any experience of this kind before 
and, if you will pardon me, I will go 
ahead and do the best I can." 

"Well, the upper third of the femur 
bone is one-third of the entire bone 
length. It has two spurs, one little spur, 
the other a big spur. Just at the upper 

MAY, 1958 



part of the big spur it turns in looking 
for a place to hitch to. I believe the part 
of bone connecting with a ball head 
shaped bone with a little hole in the 
center of the ball and in that hole a little 
something like a shoestring to tie into 
some other bone. Now I believe there is 
a bone called the neck connecting the 




spur with the ball head. Now the upper 
one-third of the femur as I remember 
articulates, or I say connects or ties in, 
with that shoestring to a hole in a bone 
that has never been named. Now, Dr. 
Housten, I believe that's all I know about 
the upper one-third of that long bone." 




Mrs. Josephine D. Payne 

The Scarab over the years has been 
my only contact with the M.D.s and the 
nurses with whom I worked during the 
early part of my nursing career. 

The first highlight of my college days 



was receiving my diploma from Memorial 
Training School, signed by Dr. George 
Ben Johnston. The second that influenced 
my future was serving my country in 
World War I, Base Hospital 45. From 
1920-1930 I followed my nursing pro- 
fession in Southern California at the Los 
Angeles Veterans Administration Hos- 
pital. During the 1933 earthquake, I was 
the only Red Cross nurse in this town. I 
helped serve a frightened community. 

I have known the happiness of mar- 
riage and the heartbreak of widowhood 
but, as a whole, life has been very good 
to me over the years. I appreciate your 
thoughts of me and, if any alumni re- 
member me, my best wishes to them. 




Dr. This C. Sutherland 

I was born in Tiny. Dickenson Count)-, 
Virginia, on February 12, 1880, the same 
year Dickenson County (Virginia's baby 
county) was formed. 

Since my graduation from the Univer- 
sity College of Medicine in 1908, I have 
practiced continuously in my native and 
adjoining counties. I do general practice 
and have also practiced industrial medi- 
cine in the coal fields. 

I rode horseback making my rounds 
for about twenty years but we now have 
improved highways and I am able to see 
most of my patients in my trusty "Chevy." 

I was married in 1911 to Emma B. 
Yates of Clintwood, Virginia. We have 
five children living. One son, Joshua 
Price Sutherland, of Harman, Virginia, 
is also a doctor. 

I do not make many night calls now, 
only emergency ones. Many of my doctor 
friends say I have delivered more babies 
in homes than anyone in our territory. 



(It's Glmost Mele! 

The 1958 Reunion 



An Invitation 



May 10, 1958 

Dear Alumnus: 

On behalf of the officers and executive committee of the Alumni Association 
of the Medical College of Virginia, I extend to each of you a most cordial in- 
vitation to attend the annual Alumni Association Reunion on June 1-2-3, 1958. 

Each of your alumni reunions marks a milestone in your busy professional 
career and should not pass unnoticed. This annual opportunity to renew old 
acquaintances and enjoy the fellowship of classmates and friends will serve as 
a stimulus to you and your Association throughout the ensuing year. For those 
having graduated in the classes of 3's and 8's, this is your special class reunion 
year. Do not disappoint your classmates by your absence. 

Cordially yours, 



TlieP 



C 

J. Spencer Dryden, M.D. 



12:00 Noon 



SUNDAY, JUNE 1, 1958 

Board of Trustees of the Alumni As- 
sociation Meeting 

3:00 PM - 6:00 PM Open House honoring the Senior Class 
and Fifty Year Graduates. We extend 
an invitation to all our alumni. 

8:00 PM Baccalaureate Sermon, Saint Paul's Epis- 

copal Church, Sermon by The Reverend 
Joseph Thomas Heistand, A.B., D.D. 

MONDAY, JUNE 2, 1958 
9:00 AM -2:30 PM Registration, Alumni House. There will 
be a hospitality room open and we 
would be delighted to have you drop in. 
Meeting of Board of Visitors, Board 
Room, MCV Hospital 
Luncheon in honor of the Fifty Year 
Graduates, College Social Center. The 
graduates of fifty years and before will 
be guests of the Alumni Association. 
All other alumni are cordially invited. 
The charge for the luncheon will be 
$2.50. Tickets sold after 3:00 PM, 
Friday, May 30 will be $3.00. 
Annual meeting of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation at the Alumni House 
Social Hour, Hotel John Marshall, Pat- 
rick Henry — Jackson Room 



rogram 

7:00 PM 



10:30 AM 



1 :00 PM 



2:30 PM 



6:00 PM 



10 



Banquet, Hotel John Marshall, Virginia 
Room. The fifty year pins will be 
awarded to our honored graduates. 
9:30 PM Dance, Hotel John Marshall, Virginia 

Room. The tickets for the cocktail 
party, banquet, and dance will be $5.00 
each. Tickets sold after 3:00 PM, Fri- 
day, May 30 will be $6.00. For the 
classes of 3's and 8's, special class 
tables will be set up. When you order 
your tickets, we will reserve places for 
you at yours. Dress will be optional. 

TUESDAY, JUNE, 3, 1958 

12:00 Noon Buffet luncheon given by the Medical 

College of Virginia for the Senior Class. 
All alumni are invited. 
3:00 PM-5:00 PM Tea, Nursing Section of the Alumni 

Association, Cabaniss Hall 
8:0 o PM Commencement Exercises, The Mosque 

Address by The Honorable James Lind- 
say Almond, Jr., Governor of Virginia 

10:00 PM Reception and Dance, Hotel John Mar- 

shall. Admission by card only. Cards 
may be obtained at the Alumni House. 
Alumni will be most welcome. 

Tours of the various schools have been arranged. Times may be 

obtained from the Alumni Office, 1105 East Clay Street. 

THE SCARAB 



General Reunion Chairman 

Dr. Custis L. Coleman, M'43M 

Banquet and Social Hour Chairman 

Dr. Merritt W. Foster, Jr., M'44 

Dance Chairman 
Dr. W. C. Henderson, D'37 

Hospitality Chairman 
Dr. P.N. Pastore, M'34 

Luncheon Chairman 

Mr. R. Reginald Rooke, P'21 

Medical Classes Chairman 
Dr. William R. Kay, M'43D 

Class Chairmen 

1913 (MCV)— Dr. I. H. Goldman 

1913 (UCM)— Dr. J. D. Hagood 

1918— Dr. George Snead 

1923— Dr. Waverly Payne 

1928 — Dr. Reuben Simms 

1933— Dr. Edgar Childrey 

1938— Dr. Sidney Page 

1943 March— Dr. C. Russell Riley 

1943 December— Dr. William Cox 

1948— Dr. Henry Bullock 



Ike Ucmmitiee 

1953 — Dr. Henry Spencer 
Dentistry Classes Chairman 

Dr. Hume S. Powell, D'4l 

Class Chairmen 

1913 (MCV-UCM)— Dr. Whitt R. Dodd 

1918— Dr. W. A. Bagley 

1923— Dr. Clyde B. Reese 

1928— Dr. E. N. Mason 

1933— Dr. J. L. Adams 

Dr. W. W. Wright 

1938— Dr. M. Milton Neale 

1943 March— Dr. E. W. Baker 

1943 December— Dr. Anthony Kell 

1948— Dr. John D. Bell 

1953— Dr. Phil B. Peters 

Pharmacy Classes Chairman 
Mr. Carl Bain, P'51 

Class Chairmen 

1913— Mr. Hugh S. Grant 

1918— Mr. R. L. Jarrett 

1923 — Mr. Joe Layman 

1933— Mr. Bill Haag 



1938 — Mr. Paul Martin 

1943 March — Mr. Floyd Robertson 

1943 December — Mr. Stan Greenbaum 

1948— Mr. L. C. Smith 

1953 — Mr. Norman Hilliard 

Nursing Classes Chairman 
Miss Mary E. Cibula, N'42 

Class Chairmen 

1913— Mrs. Lelia Pollard Phillips 

1918— Mrs. Charles Woodard Haase 

1923— Mrs. Viola Ellis Sherrod 

1928— Mrs. Mary Campbell Gale 

1933— Mrs. Isobel Walker Galbraith 

1938 — Mrs. Helen Matyiko Lehman 

1943 — Mrs. Alice Buford Booth 

Mrs. Kate Robertson Kaempf 

1948 — Mrs. Claudine Buchanan Jordan 

Mrs. Martha Parkinson Sumpter 

1953— Mrs. Betsy York 

Student Registration Chairman 

Mr. Frank P. Pitts 

Alumni Registration Chairman 
Dr. Richard L. Simpson, D'35 



The News of MCV from Chancellor Sanger 



Three large building projects are well 
launched at MCV, the extensive residence 
halls formen to accommodate 378 students; 
the addition of four floors to Randolph 
Minor Hall to house 120 additional stu- 
dents in nursing; and an addition to Mc- 
Guire Hall to cover a part of the site of 
the old Virginia Hospital, which has been 
completely torn down. The latter repre- 
sents the second phase of the McGuire 
Hall expansion. The third phase, which 
will parallel Clay Street, will follow some 
years hence. 

The College has acquired 400 North 
Twelfth Street, the property on the north- 
west corner of Twelfth and Marshall 
Streets. This rather large residence with 
the building on the rear has long been 
desired by the College. 

The Executive Committee of the Board 
ot Visitors has authorized the administra- 
tion to take whatever steps as may be 
necessary to acquire all of the property 
on the west line of Twelfth Street be- 
tween Broad and Marshall not now owned 
by the College. This property will then 
furnish an important part of the site for 
the medical educational building, plans 
for which will shortly be undertaken by 

MAY, 1958 



the College and its architects. Two hun- 
dred twenty-five thousand dollars for the 
plans was appropriated by the last ses- 
sion of the General Assembly. 

The administration has been authorized 
to take immediate steps to work out plans 
and financing of a large parking garage 
to be constructed just north of the Heat- 
ing Plant at the end of Clay Street. This 
will be designed to drive on the top deck 
at about the grade of Clay Street with 
either four or six decks below. Cars will 
leave the garage at the Thirteenth Street 
level to Marshall Street. This will be a 
self-parking unit housing 344 to 530 cars 
depending upon decisions yet to be 



reached as to the extent of need. Parkers 
will return to the Clay Street level by an 
automatic elevator system and will reach 
their cars when leaving the garage by the 
same system. This greatly needed facility 
will be centrally located close to hospitals 
and other buildings and can be extended 
to the north to accommodate additional 
parking when required. 

It is expected that some committee 
work will soon be underway to set up 
plans for the 125th Anniversary Year of 
the College, which is 1962. This cele- 
bration will not be concentrated within a 
few days but will be developed during a 
number of periods across the year. 




r 5?- 






New Dormitory Progresses 



11 



The Man 



of the 



Hour 



There is an adage of old vintage, if 
you want something done, ask a busy man. 
Edward Lee Alexander has been a busy 
man and his accomplishments somewhat 
singular. In addition to carrying forth an 
extremely large and demanding medical 
practice with one hand, he has managed 
to juggle successfully a variety of inter- 
ests with the other. 

Alec, as he is known to his colleagues, 
was born in Hanover County, Virginia, 
the son of Sarah Estelle Martin Alex- 
ander and the late Edward Franklin 
Alexander. He was educated at the Uni- 
versity of Richmond and the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia (Class of '27). After his 
internships at the McGuire Clinic and 
The Johns Hopkins Hospital, he entered 
private practice in Newport News, Vir- 
ginia. 

The mechanics of operating a 180 acre 
cattle raising enterprise in Hanover Coun- 
ty have absorbed increasing amounts of 
his energy over the last decade. The land 
which brings him so much diversional 
pleasure at the present, was the fountain- 
head of his career. 

His father, cast upon his own resources 
early in life without formal education, ob- 
tained the property with capital labori- 
ously earned as a sawmill hand. The con- 
tributions of these acres to Alec's life are 
best read in the property woodlands. 

The timber has been cut-over on three 
occasions about fifteen years apart. The 
first yielded the lumber of the homestead 
and outbuildings. The second, together 
with truck crops, was exchanged for 
Alec's medical education. The third, and 
most recent cutting, made possible re- 
purchase of a section of the farm which 
had been sold during a period of adver- 
sity. 

In addition to this larger agricultural 
venture. Alec has one of the most intense 
and successful home gardens found any- 
where. All the knowledge of agronomy 
that he has stored is given expression in 
this small plot. It is of considerable in- 
terest that he has not employed an insecti- 
cide of any kind in raising vegetables 
of outstanding quality. Experience and 
knowledge gained have been freely 

12 



Dr. Edward L. 
Alexander 




shared with others informally and more 
formally in lectures and published articles. 

Alec is a past president of the Rotary 
Club and represented the local club at 
the International Meeting in Mexico City. 

The Peninsula Academy of Medicine, 
which he helped to organize and served 
as its first president, is the fulfillment of 
his dream. 

He is a member of the medical staffs 
of the Mary Immaculate Hospital and the 
Riverside Hospital, the latter of which he 
is immediate past president, and serves 
on The Advanced Planning Committee 
for working out ways and means of ex- 
panding the Riverside Hospital. 

For the past several years he has served 
as Medical Consultant in Allergy at the 
Kecoughtan Veterans Administration Hos- 
pital. 

Alec was Chairman of The Medical 
Forum Committee for the forums which 
were sponsored by the Warwick -Newport 
News Medical Society and the local news- 
paper and was moderator for one of the 
series on Respiratory and Heart Diseases. 
For four and a half years he served as 
Commander in the Medical Corps of the 
U. S. Navy and was recipient of Com- 
mendation from the Surgeon General. 

He is a Fellow of the American Col- 
lege of Physicians and the American Col- 



lege of Allergy and a Diplomate of the 
American Board of Internal Medicine. 

This past February the Medical College 
of Virginia held the first Scientific Assem- 
bly, of which Alec was Chairman. This 
was another of his dreams for many years. 
How satisfying it must be to him to see 
its successful culmination. 

His curiosity about things at large have 
carried him into many other areas. He 
reads extensively, especially about the 
works and lives of two men — Lincoln 
and Jefferson. He finds great pleasure in 
music, his preference being grand opera. 

With all this, he has found time to 
guide his son along the path of internal 
medicine. Edward L. Alexander, Jr., 
graduated from The Johns Hopkins 
School of Medicine in 1952, completed 
residency training in 1956 and entered 
the U. S. Air Force. Upon completion of 
his two year tour of duty this summer, he 
will join his father in private practice. 
Father and son share the same deep in- 
terest in the soil. 

Margaret Alexander, the distaff side, 
completes the family. Her knowledge and 
ability in arranging flowers and judging 
flower shows have gained her national 
recognition. She has lectured extensively 
throughout the Eastern Seaboard and in- 
to the Midwest. 

THE SCARAB 



School of Medicine 

The event of greatest importance re- 
cently, if not in the history of the medical 
school, was the addition by the Legisla- 
ture to the budget recommended by Gov- 
ernor Stanley of an item of $147,000 for 
support of faculty, and of $225,000 for 
the planning of a medical education build- 
ing. You should know that the other 
schools of the Medical College sacrificed 
many of their own essential requirements 
in order to help the medical school obtain 
these absolutely vital sums. The adminis- 
tration of the College and school, of 
course, worked very hard to communicate 
the institution's needs to the Legislature. 
However, the recognition and support of 
our needs by the Legislature could not 
have been as effectively accomplished 
without the individual and collective ef- 
forts of a multitude of alumni and friends 
of the medical school. 

The additional monies granted by the 
Legislature represent most importantly an 
awareness and understanding on the part 
of a great many individuals of the needs 
of medical education and of this medical 
school, as well as an increasing sense of 
responsibility for the support of medical 
education in the Commonwealth. 

I extend, on behalf of the medical 
school and its faculty, our grateful thanks 
and appreciation for the individual ef- 
forts of each of you. Yours was a 
significant service to the future health of 
our people. We in the medical school arc- 
very much aware of our responsibilities, 
and pledge ourselves to make the maxi- 
mum effort in fulfilling them. 

A successful first Scientific Assembly 
resulted from the wholehearted coopera- 
tion of the alumni and faculty of the 
medical school. Two particular features 
of the group in attendance, in addition 
to their interest and enthusiasm, were 
thrilling to us all, and augur well for 
future occasions: first, the very long dis- 
tance, in spite of transportation difficulties, 
from which some individuals came, and 
second, the number of people for whom 
this represented the first visit back to the 
College in many, many years. 

The comment and criticism of those in 
attendance were solicited by mail sub- 
sequent to the Assembly, and response 
was excellent and constructive. The sug- 
gestions will be very helpful in planning 
better meetings in the future. The prin- 
cipal and almost unanimous change 
recommended in the replies was to an 

MAY, 1958 



Deans' Page 



annual rather than biennial assembly. 

The faculty of the medical school looks 

forward to seeing you at the next occasion. 

William F. Maloney, Dean 

School of Pharmacy 

The annual seminar, jointly sponsored 
by the school and the Virginia Phar- 
maceutical Association, was held on March 
17 and 18, and turned out to be the most 
successful seminar yet conducted. Over 
one hundred and fifty pharmacists from 
Virginia were in attendance during the 
two half-day sessions. The first day fea- 
tured the "pharmacist and the local hos- 
pital" and the program was well balanced, 
featuring talks on the hospital, the hos- 
pital administration's responsibility and 
the retail pharmacist's relationship to his 
community hospital. A panel discussion 
following the formal presentations was 
marked by lively discussion. Mr. Russell 
Fiske, chief pharmacist of the M.C.V. 
hospitals, must be complimented for his 
part in organizing and presenting this 
program. We can only hope that this pro- 
gram will stimulate greater cooperation 
among pharmacists and hospital adminis- 
trators in Virginia, with the result that 
the public will enjoy better pharmaceutical 
service in our hospitals. 

The feature of the banquet session at 
the John Marshall Hotel was a talk by 
Dr. Robert L. Swain, editor of Dnto 
Topics. The morning session on March 18 
featured talks on new drugs, inventory 
control, and latest legislative develop- 
ments of interest to pharmacists. 

It was very heartening to hear of the 
recent decision of the Richmond Phar- 
maceutical Association to sponsor a 
scholarship for deserving students enter- 
ing the School of Pharmacy. The Penin- 
sula Registered Pharmacists Association 
has sponsored scholarships for several 
years and we hope that other associations 
will join these two groups in this very 
important effort. 

The need for scholarship assistance in 
pharmacy is very real. In order for us to 
attract high quality students and support 
those in financial need, we must put our- 
selves in a position to compete effectively 
with other schools recruiting students for 
the sciences. Pharmacy is in a unique posi- 



tion because our practitioners are in daily 
contact with the public. It is the mark 
of a professional man, indeed a duty, to 
see that new blood enters the profession. 
Pharmacists throughout Virginia have been 
very cooperative in this respect and we 
look forward to continued good fortune. 
The Board of Visitors recently approved 
an increase in tuition fees for students of 
pharmacy. The Virginia tuition has been 
increased from $300 to $375 per year and 
out-of-state tuition from S400 to $575. 
We have not increased tuition in phar- 
macy since 19-47 but it has now become 
necessary to effect an increase because of 
rising costs of instruction. Tuition is still 
a bargain at the new figures when we con- 
sider that the cost of educating each stu- 
dent in pharmacy during the last fiscal 
year was over S850. Since the bulk of the 
cost of education is in living costs for the 
student while in school, the new tuition 
fees probably represent less of the total 
educational cost now than in 1947 when we 
consider the general increase in the cost of 
living. 

Warren E. Weaver, Dean 

School of Dentistry 

Homecoming 1958 attracted a very 
large number of alumni, many of whom 
were accompanied by their wives. Total 
registration was over 500. The scientific 
program, the two luncheons, and the ban- 
quet session were the subjects of many 
favorable comments. 

Next year's Homecoming is scheduled 
for January 26 and 27, 1959. We are al- 
ready at work on the program for which 
we have set the highest possible stand- 
ards. 

The recently adjourned General As- 
sembly appropriated a capital outlay item 
of 5172,000 for our school of dentistry 
to be used for the completion and equip- 
ment of an undeveloped area in the 
Wood Memorial Building. This new 
facility will be used for our Pedodontic 
Clinic and will provide adequate space 
and special equipment for all types of 
dental care for children. With the aid 
of this new facility and our Oral Re- 
habilitation Center for cleft palate crip- 
ples our teaching program in Pedodontics 
will be expanded to an ideal level. 

The clinic which we are currently using 

for Pedodontics and Orthodontics will be 

devoted solely to the Orthodontics. For 

the first time in our history we will have 

(Continued on page 25) 

13 



'Kouhc) 

Ike Cskcuit 

Richmond Chapter 

Never could it more tritely be said, 
"when it rains, it pours," than on April 
10, the night of the Richmond Chapter 
Spring Party at the Commonwealth Club. 
But it could be said that the fun within 
did much to allay, what with the social 
hour and the excellent dinner. Dr. A. I. 
Dodson asked the blessing and after din- 
ner Dr. \V. C. Henderson, president, pre- 
sided. We chuckle still as we remember 
how he extended the thanks of the Rich- 
mond Chapter to Bill Garter of Churchill 
Pharmaceuticals for the cocktail hour. He 
told the two hundred alumni about a few 
of Bill's new products: one simple elixir 
composed of Energine and Pepsi-Cola, 
the Pepsi-Cola hits the spot and the En- 
ergine removes it. He also has a brand 
new one, not named and not yet on the 
market, that beats Hadacol — it's composed 
of vitamins and alcohol. The vitamins 
give you the energy and the alcohol tells 
you where to use it. We still are impressed 
by the testimonial that he received on 
his little liver pills from a lady who said 
that her father had taken them for years 
and when he died at the ripe old age of 
108, they had to beat his liver to death 
with a broom. 

Dr. Henderson kept on with his clever 
humor as he introduced the V.I.P.s at the 
speaker's table and in the audience. Dr. 
R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., greeted the alum- 
ni on behalf of the College and Dr. J. 
Spencer Dryden for the Alumni Associa- 
tion. As to the serious business of the 
evening, the new officers were elected and 
installed: Dr. Custis L. Coleman, presi- 

14 



Shots from The Richmond Chapter 
Spring Party 



dent; Senator Edward E. Willey, vice 
president; Dr. John Pastore, secretary; 
and Miss Marguerite Nicholson, treasurer. 
On the Board of Trustees for the coming 
year are: Dr. J. Robert Massie, Jr., Dr. 
W. Linwood Ball, Dr. David Alexander, 
Dr. Hugh Wren, Mr. R. Reginald Rooke, 
Mr. William Tarrant, Jr., Mrs. Virginia 
Wessells, and Mrs. Edna Hooker. We 
know with such capable officers that the 
successfulness of the Chapter will con- 
tinue. We must add our word of praise, 
first to the wonderful job that Dr. Hen- 
derson did as president and second to the 
officers and board who cooperated so fully 
to make the Richmond Chapter grow. 



Puerto Rico 

It was my good fortune during the 
past month to spend two very happy and 
unforgettable weeks in Puerto Rico. I ar- 
rived armed with the MCV moving pic- 
ture in color which most of you have seen. 
Also, I carried a very warm letter of good 
wishes from Doctor Dryden, president of 
our Alumni Association, to our graduates 
in Puerto Rico. The brilliant sunshine 
and the beautiful colors of the island and 
the ocean were most impressive but even 
more so were the warmth and genuine 
hospitality of the people. This was par- 
ticularly true of our alumni who seemed 
to feel a real loyalty for and an interest 
in the Medical College of Virginia. 

To add to my pleasure, I was visiting 
in the home of one of our graduates in 
hospital administration who is a native 
(Continued on page 2~> ' ) 




London Hos- 



May 13 8:00 p.m. Richmond Academy of Medicine 

Speaker: Mr. W. Alexander Law, O.B., M.D., F.R.CS, 

pital, London, England 

Subject: Surgical Osteotomy of Marie Strumpell — Arthritis of Spine 
June 1 3:00-6:00 p.m. Open House honoring the seniors and fifty year gradu- 

ates at the Alumni House 
June 2 1 :00 p.m. Luncheon honoring the fifty year and before graduates 

(All other alumni are invited as paying guests) 

College Social Center 

2:30 p.m. Annual Meeting of the Alumni Association 

6:00 p.m. Social Hour, Hotel John Marshall 

7:00 p.m. Banquet, Hotel John Marshall 

9:30 p.m. Dance, Hotel John Marshall 
June 3 8:00 p.m. Commencement Exercises, The Mosque 

June 16 6:15 p.m. Alumni Dinner Party, Virginia Pharmaceutical Convention 

August 21 Cocktail Party, West Virginia State Medical Association 
October 13 Alumni Dinner, Medical Society of Virginia 

THE SCARAB 



Alumni-Student Meetings 



In 1956 Dr. James T. Tucker, then 
president, came up with the thought that 
it would be a worthwhile project for the 
Alumni Association to meet with some of 
the student body and class officers to see 
if there were any problems or ideas that 
the Association could help them with. 
This suggestion was carried out immedi- 
ately with Dr. Tucker and other officers 
of the Association meeting with the 
students. 

The first year proved successful and the 
new president. Dr. J. Spencer Dryden, 
appointed Dr. Tucker again to head the 
committee. So again this year we have 
had the pleasure of meeting with the 



students and telling them what was go- 
ing on in the Association as well as lis- 
tening to them. The following are some 
of the comments which we received on 
these meetings. 

I would like to express my apprecia- 
tion to Dr. Tucker and Miss Franck for 
the enjoyable luncheons you have spon- 
sored for the student body officers this 
year. 

It has been most pleasant and informa- 
tive to meet informally to discuss the 
problems of the various schools and to 
hear of the active role the Alumni As- 
sociation plays in enriching life at MCV. 

I endorse these meetings and heartily 



recommend that you continue them next 
year. 

Robert O. Snoddy, President. 

School of Pharmacy 

I am sure that I speak the sentiments 
of all the student officers at MCV when 
I thank Dr. Tucker and all the others at 
the alumni office for the opportunity of 
attending the monthly student-alumni 
luncheons and for the hospitality ex- 
tended. It has been enlightening to hear 
your plans and problems as well as your 
successes. The association with students 
in different schools has produced a better 
understanding of their problems for us 
and, we hope, for you. It has been a re- 
( Continued on page 28) 



Clockwise around the table: Jim Baker, president of the school of medicine; Mildred H. Clark, alumni office- Marguerite Nicholson 
associate dean of nursing and chairman of the Nursing Recruiting Committee; Dr. Custis Coleman, chairman of the Medicine Re- 
cruiting Committee; Dr. Waiter Green, alumni member of the Alumni-Student Committee; Winnie Latham, president of the school 
of nursing; Dr. James T. Tucker, chairman of the Alumni-Student Committee; Minnie M. Franck, alumni office- Gordon Hearne pres- 
ident of the student body of MCV; Lew Flippen, president of the school of dentistry; Tony Livingston, new president of the school 
of dentistry; Gene Morehead, new president of the school of pharmacy; Bob Snoddy, president of the school of pharmacy George 
Bailey, president of the senior class of the school of pharmacy; and Bill Hale, president of the school of medicine ' 




MAY, 1958 



IS 



Critical Shortage of Personnel 



Mr. Ed P. Phillips, Chairman of the 
Virginia Council on Health and Medical 
Care, announced the establishment of a 
Special Committee on Health Careers to 
deal with the increasingly critical short- 
age of hospital and other health person- 
nel throughout the State. Nathan Bush- 
nell, III, (HA '51), administrator of 
Franklin Memorial Hospital, Rocky 
Mount, Virginia, has been named chair- 
man of the committee. 

The committee was established at the 
suggestion of Dr. William T. Sanger, 
chairman of the Virginia Council's Com- 
mittee on Nursing, and Chancellor of the 
Medical College of Virginia. Doctor 
Sanger is recognized as one of the na- 
tion's outstanding authorities on health 
and medical care. He stated: "The acute 
shortage of properly trained medical and 
technical personnel poses the greatest 
single health problem in our nation today. 
In this era of specialty and technology, it 
seems absurd that we consider building 
additional hospitals and other health 
facilities until we can adequately staff 



them. All of the new equipment available 
in our modern facilities is wonderful, but 
of little value without personnel who 
know how to operate it. Of equal, or per- 
haps even greater, importance is the need 
for additional nursing personnel to render 
the T.L.C. ( tender loving care) for which 
there is no mechanical substitute." 

When asked for the means he expects 
to employ in attaining this objective, Mr. 
Bushnell commented: "In my judgment, 
the solution resolves itself into three 
broad fields: 

1. More efficient utilization of existing 
personnel. 

2. The recruitment of greater numbers 
of personnel. 

3. Education of the general public to 
an awareness of the situation, and a desire 
to help correct it. 

"Broadly speaking again, our program 
will be largely devoted to education. We 
must educate our young people to an in- 
terest in entering the ever expanding 
health fields. We must educate the hos- 
pitals, their medical staffs, and their 



The Largest Private Hospital in the South 

Located in a Quiet Residential Section 

Overlooking the Grounds of Battle Abbev 

Fireproof Construction 

Most Modern Equipment 




Johnston-Willis Hospital 

Richmond, Virginia 
Medical, Surgical, Obstetrical, and Pediatric Departments 

Accredited Training School for Nurses 

Approved Rotating Internships and 

Approved Residencies in Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, 
and Pathology 

235 Beds, Single and Double Rooms 



boards of trustees to the enormous gravity 
of the situation, and a compelling desire 
to do something about it at a local level. 
We must educate the legislators to the 
problem, and offer a specific program 
which will help alleviate it; and, above 
all, we must educate the general public 
to an awareness and understanding of the 
problem. 

"Although seemingly far afield, hos- 
pital rates represent one of the keys to the 
problem. One of the essentials in attract- 
ing people into any type industry, is aver- 
age or better than average working con- 
ditions and wages. Unfortunately, hos- 
pitals have lagged behind in this respect. 
Of necessity, they must continue to do so 
until their revenues can be increased. Since 
the paying public is the primary source of 
revenue, increased hospital rates are un- 
avoidable. It is up to us now to show the 
citizens of Virginia that when they pay 
an average of 85(t an hour for hospital 
care they are getting one of the greatest 
bargains on the American market today. 
And when rates ultimately reach a level 
where hospitals can meet the competitive 
wages and benefits of industry, the pa- 
tient will still be receiving a spectacular 



16 



Mr. Phillips stated that in addition to 
the voluntary organization being headed 
up by Mr. Bushnell, the Virginia Council 
on Health and Medical Care is seeking 
additional staff whose initial responsibility 
will be implementation of the action pro- 
gram being drawn up by the Health 
Careers Committee. 

Mr. Phillips indicated that in order to 
make effective headway toward helping to 
solve personnel shortages, it will be neces- 
sary to carry on an aggressive program 
throughout Virginia. He said that this 
would cost money, and that the Council 
will have to count on the generosity of in- 
dividuals, industry, banks, foundations, 
hospitals, and the many voluntary health 
organizations all of which will benefit 
both directly and indirectly from this 
stepped up council program. 

Telethon Participants 

A number of MCV alumni participated 
in the telethon on WTVR, Richmond, 
for the Virginia Chapter, Arthritis and 
Rheumatism Foundation March 22-23. 
They were Drs. R. D. Butterworth M'31, 
A. Ray Dawson M'29, Robert Irby M'48, 
Robert Q. Marston M'47, Virgil R. May, 
Jr., M'43D, Elliott Oglesby M'40, and 
James T. Tucker M'27. 

THE SCARAB 



Qife an*b Qtanis to lUQV* 

Grants received during die 1957 fiscal year amounted to $1,310,176 09- 
gifts to $162,435.54— a total of $1,472,611.63. As listed in the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia's Annual Report for the 1957 fiscal year, a list of donors 
to various funds and to individual schools follows: 



GRANTS 

American Heart Association 

American Tobacco Company 

L. D. Caulk Company 

The Commonwealth Fund 

Eaton Laboratories 

Thomas F. Jeffress Memorial 

John Stewart Bryan Memorial Foundation 

Meade Johnson and Company 

National Institutes of Health 

National Vitamin Foundation 

A. H. Robins Company 

Buford Scott 

E. R. Squibb and Sons 

Titmus Eye Foundation 

Tobacco Industry Research Committee 

United States Department of Agriculture 

United States Air Force 

United States Army 

United States Navy 

United States Office of Vocational 

Rehabilitation 
Upjohn Company 

GIFTS 

I. A. Bigger Memorial Auditorium 
Fund 

*Dr. John M. Emmett 

Dr. Williams E. Pembleton 
*Mr. and Mrs. Max Plotkin 

Miss Louree Pottinger 

Student Body, School of Pharmacy 

I. A. Bigger Memorial Fund 

Senior Medical Class 

Cardiac Foundation Fund 

Eleanor Glaser 

Rena Markoff and Eleanor Glaser 
Dr. H. Page Mauck. Jr. 
Mrs. Virginia B. Moncure 
■ : Dr. Reno R. Porter 
Dr. David W. Richardson 

The William Harrison Higgins 
Memorial Fund 

A. L. Adamson Trustee Account 

Minnie B. Alexander 

Harry H. Augustine. Sr. 

Mrs. HowelfM. Baker 

Mr. and Mrs. N. R. Beverley 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Binns 

Mary Ball Blackwell 

Miss Lizzie E. Boyd 

J. Leo Buchanan 

Dr. Earnest B. Carpenter 

Leslie Cheek. Jr. 

Mrs. Jane M. Cone 

Elizabeth C. Davenport 

Dickinson Leaf Tobacco Company 

Mr. and Mrs. Hallowell Dickinson 

Mrs. O. J. Glaser 

Colonel and Mrs. Walter Goodwin 

Mrs. Margaret Herd 

Mrs. Eugene B. Holt 

Clare L. Hutzler 

Charlotte M. Kent 

D. W. McKeel 

* denotes alumni donors 

MAY, 1958 



Mrs. E. R. Markoff 
Dr. John M. Meredith 
Samuel A. Patterson 
Mrs. Robert E. Peyton 
Mrs. Stuart Ragland, Sr. 
Mrs. Edmund A. Saunders 
Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Smith, and 

Miss Elizabeth Smith 
Miss Laurie J. Sutherland 
Miss Margaret V. Taylor 
Preston B. Watt 
Whittet and Shepperson 

Hospital Director's Fund 

Mr. and Mrs. George C Anderson 

Mrs. Sara B. Baird" 

J. H. Bradford 
*Dr. Kenneth C. Cherry 

M. A. Bernard Clay Jr 

M. R. Crockin 

Captain and Mrs. Deaver, Ir. 

Augusta S. Goodman 

Mrs. Eppa Hunton, IV 

Elizabeth Kanvsek 

Theo Kelly 

Mrs. Louis G. Larus 
*Dr. and Mrs. Philip Lasting 

John A. Messer, Sr. 
*Dr. Herman Nachman 
*Dr. and Mrs. Harold I. Nemuth 

Mrs. Harold I. Nemuth 

Dr. and Mrs. Allen Pepple 

Thomas G. Powell 

Junes C. Rees 

Mrs. Fred Q. Saunders 



*Dr. K. Blackwell Smith, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Sutherland 
*Dr. Adney K. Sutphin 

Women's Auxiliary of St. Luke's Church 

Peter N. and Julia R. Pastore 
Fund 

Miss Anna Alexander 

Mrs. A. H. Brockwell 

Alvin Brockwell 

George R. Burwell 

Dr. J. L. Cabaniss 

Dr. C C. Clayton 

Mrs. Everett I. Evans 

Harris Hart 
*Dr. and Mrs. G. Douglas Hayden 

Hearing Center Collections 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucien N. Jones 

George T. McLean Company 

George Meyer and Sons 
*Dr. Peter N. Pastore 

Quota Club of Richmond 
*Dr. W. I. Stanford 

E. H. Talley, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Thalhimer Jr 

Mrs. Sophie G. Weilman 

Scherer Memorial Cancer Fund 

Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Berry 

Mr. and Mrs. L. T. Christian III 

Mr. and Mrs. William Di\ 

Mrs. M. C. Huber 

Ruth and Gloria Pollard 

Virginia Coal Merchants Association 

Mrs. Virginia Walker 

Mary S. Weaver 

Robert Waller Memorial Fund 

Anonymous 
Welby W. Beverley 
Biochemistry Department 
H. Carl Boschen 
*Dr. H. R. Boyd, Jr. 
Dr. John C. Forbes 
Kathryn Heitshu 
Thelma Vaine Hoke 




Life of Virginia is one of the 
nation's oldest and largest life 
insurance companies. During 
the past 87 years it has proved 
to he a good company to insure 
with, a good company to work for. 

THE LIFE 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

OF VIRGINIA 

SINCE 1871 • RICHMOND. VIRGINIA 

"The Natural Bridge to Security" 



17 



Mrs. Tressa B. McCabe 
Sybil MacLean 
MCV Woman's Club 
Dr. Porter P. Vinson 
Post Office Personnel 
*Mrs. Marion Waller 

School of Medicine 

American Cyanamid Company 

American Medical Education Foundation 

National Council to Combat Blindness, 

Incorporated 
National Fund for Medical Education 
Tobacco Industry Research 

School of Dentistry 

Dr. Robert E. Allen for student loan fund 
Dr. Herbert Bonnie for Virginia Tidewater 

Loan Fund 
Class of 1957 for Samuel H. B. Wright 

Dental Student Loan Fund 
Dr. I. J. Feetelman for Virginia Tidewater 

Loan Fund 
C. P. Jones, Jr., for Samuel H. B. Wright 

Dental Student Loan Fund 
Robert S Markley for Samuel H. B. Wright 

Dental Student Loan Fund 
Virginia Tidewater Dental Association for 

Loan Fund 

School of Dentistry — 
Dental Alumni Fund 

J. William Ames 
*Dr. Edward S. Barnwell 
*Dr. M. H. Bowman 
*Dr. W. Howard Branch 
*Dr. R. H. Bruni, Sr. 
*Dr. Andrew Brewer 
Dental Alumni 
*Dr. E. A. Hodges 
*Dr. Eugene L. Kanter 



*Dr. Jack C. Kanter 
Sonja Lindblad 
*Dr. J. H. Long, Jr. 
*Dr. P. D. Miller 

Piedmont Dental Society 
*Dr. Elton Rosenblatt 
Dr. Lester H. Roth 

Shenandoah Valley Dental Association 
*Dr. Ray Shields 
Dr. M.'R. Smith 

School of Pharmacy 

Irvin Adelson for general pharmacy scholar- 
ship fund 

Harold S. Flournoy for pharmacy equipment 
fund 

Henry B. Gilpin Company for scholarship 
fund 

Owens, Minor, Bodeker Drug Company for 
scholarship fund 

School of Nursing 

Anonymous for scholarship fund 

Gladys Girton for Girton Scholarship Fund 

Mrs. Doris K. Neale for Spencer Kellog 

Scholarship 
Richmond Chapter, L'nited Daughters of the 

Confederacy, for scholarship fund 
Major General William F. Tompkins, for 

scholarship fund 

School of Physical Therapy 

U. S. Department of Health, Education, and 
Welfare, for traineeship in physical 
medicine 

Herman L. West for Rachel Whipple Loan 
Fund 

Miscellaneous Projects 

Anonymous for Dr. Paul S. Larson, equip- 
ment for pharmacology 



Anonymous for Department of Pharmacology. 
General Fund 

Anonymous for Physiology and Pharmacology 
Department 

Anonymous for MCV and St. Philip Hospital 
for care of children 

Anonymous for stuccoing west side of Social 
Center Building 

American Rheumatism Association for 
Arthritis Fund 

American Tobacco Company for additional 
funds for completion of nutriculture 
laboratory 

American Tobacco Company for Paul S. 
Larson 

Dr. Lewis H. Bosher for Cardiovascular 
Research 

Dr. Lewis H. Bosher for Cardiovascular 
Surgery 

Belle Bryan and John G. Hayes Trust Fund 
for unrestricted use 

H. Coleman Baskerville for Baskerville Re- 
search Fund in Psychiatry 

F. Coplan for Nathan Bloom Heart Fund 

General Chemical Research Fund for Depart- 
ment of Pharmacology General Fund 

H. W. Goodwyn for Social Service 
Department 

H. W. Goodwyn for indigent patient care 

Samis Grotto Research Fund for Dr. Louis 
A. Leone (gift of a calculator for tumor 
clinic) 

Trustees of Will of Mr. and Mrs. Eppa Hun- 
ton, Jr., for establishment of eye bank 

Mr. and Mrs. Josephson for Nathan Bloom 
Heart Fund 

Dr. Paul S. Larson for Department of Phar- 
macology General Fund 

Kenneth F. Lee for Alcohol Clinic Fund 

John and Mary R. Markle Foundation for Dr. 
Robert Q. Marston for the Markle Foun- 
dation Fellowship Fund 



TUCKER HOSPITAL, INC. 

212 West Franklin Street 
Richmond 20, Virginia 

A private hospital for diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological 
patients. Hospital and out-patient services. 

(Organic diseases of the nervous system, psychoneuroses, psychosomatic dis- 
orders, mood disturbances, social adjustment problems, involutional reactions 
and selective psychotic and alcoholic problems.) 



Dr. Howard R. Masters 
Dr. George S. Fultz, Jr. 



Dr. James Asa Shield 
Dr. Amelia G. Wood 



Dr. Weir M. Tucker 
Dr. Robert K. Williams 



18 



THE SCARAB 







C 



TAKE A NEW LOOK AT ALLERGENS' 
TAKE A LOOK AT NEW 



There is no antihistamine better than dimf.tane for allergic protection, dimetane 
gives yon good reasons to re-examine the antihistamine yon are now using: unex- 
celled potency, unsurpassed therapeutic index and relative safety. ..minimum 
drowsiness or other side effects. Has been effective where other antihistamines have 
failed, dimetane Extentabs* (12 mg.) protect for 10-12 hours on one tablet. Also 
available: Tablets (4 mg.), Elixir (2 mg. per 5 cc). 
A. H. ROBINS CO., INC., Richmond 20, Virginia 
Ethical Pharmaceuticals of Merit Since 1878 



•Typical Allergens: Animal Hair and Dander • Pollen • Molds • Bacteria 
and Viruses • Feathers • Insect Scales • Vegetable Fibers and Seeds 
Plant juices • House Dust ■ Drugs and Chemicals • Minerals and Metals. 






* 




Mathieson Research Fund for Department of 
Pharmacology General Fund 

Mathieson Research Fund 

Mead Johnson and Company for Dr. Lee Sut- 
ton. Jr. 

Miss Virginia Moncure for leukemia research 

New Eyes for the Needy- 
Mary Nixon and Buford Scott Trust Fund for 
Alcohol Clinic Fund 
*Dr. John L. Patterson for Pulmonary Func- 
tion Fund 
*Dr. Reno R. Porter for Cardiovascular Re- 
search 

Richmond Tuberculosis Association for X-rays 
on inpatients 

A. H. Robins Company for Dr. Ernest Huf 
for student summer fellowship 

A. H. Robins Company for Pulmonary Func- 
tion Laboratory Fund 

Rohm and Haas Fund for Department of 
Pharmacology General Fund 

Schwarzschild Foundation for Schwarzschild 
Physiotherapy Fund 

St. Catherine's League for St. Philip and 
Dooley Hospitals 

St. Catherine's School for St. Philip and 
Dooley Hospitals 

Roy B. St. John for Department of Opthal- 
mology Fund 

Robert F. Sycle for Nathan Bloom Heart Fund 

Bequest of Mrs. Lillian F. Thompson of 
daguerreotypes of Dr. W. F. Farrar 

Roy D. Thompson for Newby Toms Fund for 
Deaf 

Zach Toms for Newby Toms Fund for Deaf 

Virginia Academy of Science for Dr. Roscoe 
Hughes for research on identical and 
fraternal twins 

Virginia Chapter of Arthritis and Rheumatism 
for research 



Virginia Chapter of Arthritis and Rheuma- 
tism for Dr. Elam C. Toone 

Virginia Chapter of Arthritis and Rheuma- 
tism for Dr. John Vaughan 

Virginia Trust Company for Samuel H. Gell- 
man Residency Fund 

Western Institute on Epilepsy for Western 
Institute summer recipient 

Mrs. Byrd Charles Willis for Department of 
Opthalmology Fund 

LEST WE FORGET 

1898 Benjamin Atwood Hord (M) of Rich- 
mond, Virginia, died March 23. 

1899 John K. Caldwell (M) of Galax, Vir- 
ginia, died October 3. 

1900 UCM Charles F. Collins (P) of Crewe, 
Virginia, died January 31. 

1902 Edward M. Sandidge (M) of Pleasmt- 
view, Virginia, died November 30. He served 
as member and chairman of the Amherst Coun- 
ty Board of Supervisors. 

Emma Royall Scott (N) of Arcadia, Florida, 
died November 4. She returned to the College 
for her golden reunion in 1952. 

1903 UCM Louis K. Leake (M) of Irwin, Vir- 
ginia, died March 18. 

1905 Foy Vann (M) of Norfolk, Virginia, 
died March 15. 

1907 UCM E. W. Wade (P) of Richmond. 
Virginia, died April 6. He had retired several 
years ago. 

1909 UCM John C. Anderson (M) of Chat- 
ham. Virginia, died February 14. 
1909 George Hannah Reese (M) of Peters- 
burg. Virginia, died February 13- He was at 
one time director of the medical center at 
Central State Hospital. 
Clare Field Shafer (M) of Grafton, West Vir- 



ginia, died December 28 following a brief ill- 
ness. 

1912 UCM J. T. Worsham (P) of Richmond, 
Virginia, died April 5. 

1913 Samuel S. Conner (M) of Waynesboro, 
Pennsylvania, died November 12. 

1913 UCM Carroll Edward Foley (M) of Front 
Royal, Virginia, died at his office desk on 
February 27. He practiced in Lovettsville for 
seven years. After graduate work at Tulane 
L : niversity and the New York Eye and Ear 
Hospital of Columbia University, he opened 
a practice in Washington. D. C. A year later 
he went to Raleigh, North Carolina. In 1927 
he opened his office in Front Royal. He was 
a member of the staff of the Warren Memo- 
rial Hospital at Front Royal. 
1916 Colonel Francis Moylan Fitts (M) died 
March 17 in Walter Reed Hospital, Washing- 
ton, D. C. Funeral services were held in the 
chapel at Fort Myer with burial in Arlington 
National Cemetery. He was special assistant to 
the Surgeon General from 1940-43. He ex- 
pedited the formation of the 45th Division. 
He held the Legion of Merit and the Com- 
mendation Ribbon. 

1919 Cornelia Elliott (N) of Lancaster, South 
Carolina, died suddenly December 13. 
1922 D. L. Detwiler (D) of Herndon, Vir- 
ginia, died September 4. 

1924 Willard S. Parson (M) of Baltimore, 
Maryland, died June 3. 

1925 Samuel Weinstein (M) of Richmond, 
Virginia, died unexpectedly at his home on 
April 3. 

1927 A. B. Hutton (M) of Marion, Virginia, 
died February 11. He was a member of the 
staff of Southwestern Virginia State Hospital. 
1932 Chase Gray Gage (M) of Girard, Pa. 
died November 1. He served on the staffs of 
Hamot and St. Vincent's Hospital in Erie, Pa. 




Nearby and Neighborly 
THE BANK OF VIRGINIA 

Medical College Facility 
Social Center Building 



Staff, students and patients now en- 
joy the convenience of banking fa- 
cilities right here at MCV. 
Welcome to The Bank of Virginia — 
at MCV, and at 15 other locations 
in Richmond, Petersburg, Roanoke, 
Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Newport 
News. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Member Federal Reserve System 



20 



THE SCARAB 



eu n 



ass news 



1911 Arthur S. Brinkley (M) of Richmond, 
Virginia, was presented a silver tray by the 
Board of the Retreat for the Sick Hospital 
upon Ins retirement from active practice in 
January. 

1912 UCM H. R. Boyd (D), dentist in Peters- 
burg, Virginia, for nearly 45 years, has retired. 
He expects to spend much of his time hunting, 
fishing, and working in his yard where he has 
150 rose bushes. He has two sons; Herbert 
Reed. Jr.. D'48. who teaches in the dental 
school at MCV, and lames Arnold, a senior 
in the dental school at MCV. Dr. Boyd, Jr.. 
also has two sons, Herbert Reed, III, and 
Stuart Arnold. In addition to the three Boyds 
being dentists, each has served in the armed 
services. 

1913 D. Lone Elder (M) has been named to 
a lite membership on the medical staff of the 
John Randolph Hospital, Hopewell, Virginia. 
He selected for his long service to the hospital 
and the city, is the first to receive the honor 
from the medical staff. He moved to Hopewell 
in 1915 and served as mayor from 1920 to 
1954 with the exception of four years. 

Frank S. Johns (M), chief surgeon and presi- 
dent of the Johnston-Willis Hospital Board of 
Directors,. served as host to the visiting group 
of 38 doctors and their wives who attended the 
October meeting of the Frederick A. Coller 
Surgical Society in Richmond Virginia 
1914 William R. Laird (M) of Montgomery, 
West Virginia, will receive the Distinguished 
Service Award of the American Colfege of 
Surgeons at the Clinical Congress to be held 



in Chicago, Illinois, October 6-10. In selecting 
him, the Board of Regents recounted his many 
years of devotion and support of the College; 
his professional attainments and the high 
standards of the Laird Memorial Hospital and 
the great contributions to the elevation of the 
quality of medical care in his state. 
1915 R. B. Davis (M) of Greensboro. North 
Carolina, was elected secretary-treasurer of the 
Tri-State Medical Association at the annual 
meeting in Richmond, Virginia, February 10-11. 
Baxter I. Bell (M), recently chosen Virginia 
general practitioner of the year, was honored 
by the Williamsburg-James Citv Medical So- 
ciety at a dinner meeting on December 1 1 
1917 Harry E. Whaley (M). of Victoria, Vir- 
gima, has been named as Victoria's outstanding 
citizen of the year. He is the first citizen to be 
honored^ by the local Chamber of Commerce 
for his "loyal and devoted service to the citi- 
zens of the community." 

1922 Thomas N. Winn (M) of Covington, Vir- 
ginia, was elected vice president of the Virginia 
Society of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology 
at the annual meeting in Roanoke, December 
5-7. 

1923 R. Preston Hawkins, Jr., (M\ of Clifton 
Forge, Virginia, was elected president of the 
Association of Surgeons of the C & O Railway 
at its meeting held at The Greenbrier. 
Waverly Payne (M), of Newport News. Vir- 
ginia, attended the American College of Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, in April. 

1924 H. Hudnall Ware, Jr.. (M). of Rich- 
mond, Virginia, and Mrs. Ware visited Holly- 
wood, Florida. Dr. Ware was a participant in 
Gasparilla Day in Tampa. He also attended the 
meeting of the American College of Obstetrics 
and Gynecology in Los Angeles, California in 
April. 



1926 Webster P. Barnes (M) became presi- 
dent of the Richmond Academy of Medicine at 
the annual meeting on December 10. 

J. Asa Shield (M) of Richmond. Virginia, and 
his wife were in England for the running of 
the Grand National. 

1927 E. L. Alexander (M) of Newport News. 
Virginia, was named to the Board of Censors 
of the Warwick-Newport News Medical Society 
on November 12. 

W. Linwood Ball (M) of Richmond. Virginia, 
is a member of the Committee on Arrange- 
ments of the annual meeting of the Medical 
Society of Virginia. 

Major General William H. Powell, Jr., (M). 
formerly Deputy Surgeon General of the' United 
States Air Force, was named Chief Medical 
Officer for Supreme Headquarters Allied Pow- 
ers Europe effective June, 1957, His head- 
quarters are at Paris, France. 

1928 Harvey B. Haag (M) attended the meet- 
ing of the Research Advisory Committee of the 
Institute for the Study of Analgesic and Seda- 
tive Drugs in New York City. December 10. 
He also attended a conference at the Army 
Medical Center in Maryland on January 13 

1929 Ramon D. Garcin, Jr., (M) of Richmond, 
Virginia, was named chairman of the Ameri- 
can Legion oratorical committee for Virginia. 

1930 John Wyart Davis, Jr., (M) was elected 
to the executive board of the staff of the Mar- 
shall Lodge and Guggenheimer Memorial 
Hospitals in Lynchburg, Virginia. 

Elizabeth Ryan (N) has been elected president 
of the Richmond League for Nursing. She has 
been a hospital patient and is now convalescing 
at her home in Pulaski. 

William G. Stephenson (M). general surgeon of 
Chattanooga. Tennessee, was named president- 
elect ot the Mid-South Postgraduate Medical 
Assembly. 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 



HOSPITAL DIVISION 



Medical College of Virginia Hospital 

Memorial Hospital 

Dooley Hospital 

Saint Philip Hospital 

Ennion G. Williams Hospital 

(Operated jointly tilth the State Health Department) 

A. D. Williams Memorial Clinic 

(Outpatient Department) 



To preserve and restore health 



To seek the cause and cure of disease 
To educate those who would serve humanity 



MAY, 1958 



2^ 



E. E. Willey (P) of Richmond, Virginia, spent 
a vacation in Florida in March. 

1931 Ira L. Hancock, Jr., (M). of Creeds. Vir- 
ginia, has been elected Illustrious Potentate of 
Khedive Temple. Norfolk, Virginia. 

Harold W. Miller (M) of Woodstock. Virginia, 
has been reappointed Medical Examiner of 
Shenandoah County for another three year term. 
Sabra Sturt Russell (N) of Santa Ana, Califor- 
nia, is fellowship chairman of the A.A.U.W.; 
program chairman for an institute for nurses 
— school, hospital, public health, private duty, 
and industrial — on heart disease; and member 
of the public relations committee of the 
Woman's Auxiliary to the Orange County 
Medical Association. 

1932 S. H. Mirmelstein (M) of Newport 
News, Virginia, was elected vice president of 
the Warwick-Newport News Medical Society 
on November 12. 

Paul Hogg (M) of Newport News. Virginia, 
was elected vice president of the Virginia 
Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. 

1933 Mary Elizabeth Johnston (M) of Taze- 
well, Virginia, was elected a vice president of 
the Tri-State Medical Association at the an- 
nual meeting in Richmond, Virginia, February 
10-11. 

1934 Robley D. Bates, Jr. (Ml, was elected 
vice president of the Richmond Academy of 
Medicine on December 10. 

J. Robert Massie, Jr., (M), of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, vacationed in Florida in February. 
Marguerite Nicholson (N) of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, attended the annual initiation banquet of 
Alpha Sigma Chi on February 27 and was 
elected an honorary member. 

Elam C. Toone, Jr., (M), having completed his 
term as president, became the chairman of the 
board of the Richmond Academy of Medicine 
on December 10. 



1935 L. A. Dickerson (M), of Charleston. 
West Virginia, director of the Kanawha- 
Charleston Health Department since its or- 
ganization in 1947, resigned this position on 
December 1 to become Director of Disease 
Control of the State Health Department, State 
of West Virginia. His new duties are primarily 
concerned with the accelerations of a chronic 
disease prevention and control program, par- 
ticularly in the areas of heart, cancer, tuber- 
culosis, and other chronic illnesses affecting the 
state's population. 

Reno R. Porter (M) of Richmond, Virginia, is 
the recipient of a "grant-in-aid" from the Pen- 
insula Heart Association. The $3,900 grant 
supports the research studies conducted by him 
at the Medical College of Virginia which are 
concerned with the "Circulatory Dynamic Ef- 
fects of Digitalis in the Normal and Hyper- 
volemic Dog." 

1936 William S. Miles, Jr., (D) of Glenside, 
Pennsylvania, his wife, daughter, and an ex- 
change high school student from Germany 
visited the Alumni House on April 4. 

1937 D. Coleman Booker (M), who was at- 
tendant surgeon at St. Elizabeth's Hospital, 
Richmond, Virginia, has opened his office in 
Hopewell, Virginia, for the practice of gen- 
eral surgery and gynecology. 

Richard A. Michaux (M) visited Florida in 
January. 

Richard N. O'Dell (M). of Charleston, West 
Virginia, has been appointed West Virginia 
Governor for the American Diabetes Associa- 
tion. 

1938 Charles F. James, Jr., (M), a general 
surgeon in Tallahassee, Florida, represented 
VPI at the inauguration of the president of 
Florida State University recently. 

Carl W. Meador (M) was named vice president 
of the Richmond Academy of medicine on 
December 10. 



W. T. Thompson, Jr., (M) of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, has been named a co-chairman of a 
two and a half million dollar campaign for 
higher education by the Presbyterian Synod of 
Virginia. He will serve as chairman for laymen 
in the campaign to begin this fall. 
1939 John R. Bumgarner (M) of Greensboro, 
North Carolina, visited the Alumni House on 
March 28. 

Dr. and Mrs Beverly Clary (M) and Dr. and 
Mrs. W. C. Henderson (D '37) of Richmond, 
Virginia, vacationed in Bermuda in February. 
James W. Humphreys, Jr., (M) has been award- 
ed a citation of appreciation by the faculty of 
medicine and surgery at the University of 
Santo Tomas in the Philippines. The citation 
acknowledged his contributions and help to 
the university's internship training program. 
He also was credited for his assistance to the 
Philippine Department of Health in the train- 
ing of department personnel. 
R. C. Longan, Jr., (M) of Richmond, Virginia, 
has been appointed as a member of the State 
Hospital Board to fill the unexpired term of 
the late Dr. R. Finley Gayle, Jr. (M'15). 
Harold I. Nemuth (M) of Richmond, Virginia, 
is a member of the Committee on Arrange- 
ments of the annual meeting of The Medical 
Society of Virginia. 

1940 John Franklin Gibson (M) of Washing- 
ton, D. C, accepted appointment as Senior 
Research Analyst for a project that has been 
tentatively titled "Standard Values in Respira- 
tion." This is being prepared by the office of 
the Handbook on Biological Data, Division of 
Biology Data, Division of Biology and Agri- 
culture, National Academy of Sciences — Na- 
tional Research Council. Washington, D. C. 
Carl B. Hall (M) of Charleston. West Virginia, 
was elected vice president of the Kanawha 
Medical Society. 
Morris O'Dell (M) of Charleston, West Vir- 




l est6rooA Sanatorium 



mo no 



■ Cstablished 10 U 



A. private psychiatric hospital em- 
ploying modern diagnostic and treat- 
ment procedures — electro shock, in- 
sulin, psychotherapy, occupational 
and recreational therapy — for nervous 
and mental disorders and problems of 
addiction. 



Staff PAUL V - ANDERSON, M.D., President 

REX BLANKINSHIP, M.D., Medical Director 



THOMAS F. COATES, M.D., Associate 

JAMES K. HALL, JR., M.D., Associate 

CHARLES A. PEACHEE, JR., M.S., Clinical 
Psychologist 

R. H. CRYTZER, Administrator 



Brochure of Literature and Vietvs Sent On Request - P. 0. Box 1514 - Phone 5-3245 



11 




ginia, was named for a three year term as a 
member of the council of the Kanawha Medical 
Society. 

Charles M. Scott (M) of Bluefield, West Vir- 
ginia, is a councillor of the West Virginia 
Chapter of the American College of Surgeons 
which held its annual meeting at The Green- 
brier in White Sulphur Springs. April 18-19. 

1941 Carolyn McCue (M) ofRichmond, Vir- 
ginia, was recently elected secretary-treasurer 
of the Virginia Chapter of the American Acad- 
emy of Pediatrics. 

Grover C. Starbuck (D) of Arlington, Virginia, 
was elected Lt. Governor of the Tenth Divi- 
sion Capitol District of Kiwanis International 
at a three-day convention in Baltimore, Mary- 
land. 

1942 Mary Cibula (N), operating room su- 
pervisor of St. Philip Hospital, attended the 
fifth National Congress of Operating Room 
Nurses in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. February 
10-13. 

1943D Mary Tom Bunting Long (M) is now 
in practice in Blacksburg, Virginia, where her 
husband is professor in mechanical engineering 
at V.P.I. 

1943M Frances Gordon (N) of Richmond, 
Virginia, attended a meeting of the Steering 
Committee of the Division of Nursing Educa- 
tion of the Virginia League for Nursing at 
Charlottesville, Virginia, on February 21. 
1944 Earl M. Bane (M), Lawrenceville, Vir- 
ginia, was elected vice president of the Fourth 
District Medical Society. 

Claude A. Fraiier (M) of Asheville, North 
Carolina, and his wife visited the Alumni 
House on February 6. 

James W. Lambdin (M) of Franklin. Virginia, 
was named Fellow of the American College of 
Physicians at the meeting of the Board of 
Regents in Philadelphia on November 9-10. 



Gustave Lasoff (D), practicing orthodontics in 
New York, has an appointment to the ortho- 
dontic staff, Columbia University, New York. 
He is assigned to research at present. He is 
editor for and treasurer of the Central Queens 
Dental Society, a component of the Tenth Dis- 
trict Dental Society of New York. He, serving 
with the rank of commander, separated from 
the United States Navy in 1956. 
Ray Moore, Jr., (M) of Hampden Sydney, Vir- 
ginia, was elected chairman of the Steering 
Committee of the Fourth District Medical So- 
ciety. 

1945 John Milton Lukeman (M) is currently 
a lieutenant colonel. Medical Corps, U. S. 
Army, and is stationed at Fourth United States 
Army Medical Laboratories, Fort Sam Houston, 
Texas. He is a diplomate of the American 
Board of Pathology and Clinical Pathology. 

F. B. Spencer (M) of Salisbury, North Carolina, 
visited the Alumni House on February 20. 

1946 Robert D. Keeling (M), South Hill, Vir- 
ginia, has been installed as president of the 
Fourth District Medical Society. 

Stuart M. Sessoms (M) has been appointed 
assistant director of the National Cancer In- 
stitute, Bethesda, Maryland. 

Robert Lee Somerville (M) received his master 
of science in medicine from the University of 
Minnesota on December 19. 
Isabel Taliaferro (M) of Richmond, Virginia, 
was named Fellow of the American College of 
Physicians at the meeting of the Board of 
Regents in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on No- 
vember 9. 

1947 G. Edward Calvert (M) has been re- 
elected president of the staffs of the Marshall 
Lodge and Guggenheimer Memorial Hospitals 
in Lynchburg, Virginia. 

Carl C. Tully (M) of Charleston, West Virginia, 
was named for a three year term as a member 



of the council of the Kanawha Medical So- 
ciety. 

L. M. Howard (M) was elected to the executive 
board of the staff of the Marshall Lodge and 
Guggenheimer Memorial Hospitals in Lynch- 
burg, Virginia. 

Robert Q. Marston (M) of Richmond, Virginia, 
has been named a member of the Virginia 
Committee for the selection of Rhodes scholars. 
1948 Doris Berlin (M) and Saul R. Kelson of 
Toledo, Ohio announce the arrival of Joel 
Mark on February 27. 

Charles Guttas (M), chief of the cardiovascular 
service at William Beaumont Army Hospital, 
El Paso, Texas, left the service in March and 
will return to private practice. He will be 
cardiologist at San Mateo Clinic, San Mateo, 
California. On his departure from Beaumont 
Hospital, Captain Guttas was presented a 
Certificate of Achievement by Brig. Gen. L. 
Holmes Ginn, Jr. (M'27) MC, hospital com- 
mander. 

T. S. Lloyd, Jr. (M) has been elected president 
of the Fredericksburg Medical Society. 
1950 Merton E. Miller (PT) has his own 
practice in New Orleans. Louisiana, and has 
started working at the New Industrial Clinic 
in the afternoons. 

Edwin A. Myrick (P) of Lynchburg, Virginia, 
and Leslie Estelle Wood were married on 
February 17 at Lyttleton Street Methodist 
Church. Camden, South Carolina. 
Mothcw E. O'Keefe (M). diplomate of Ameri- 
can Board of Radiology, announces the open- 
ing of his office for the practice of radiology 
at Anaheim Memorial Hospital, Anaheim, Cali- 
fornia. 

John W. Painter (M) was elected secretary- 
treasurer of the staff of the Mary Washington 
Hospital, Fredericksburg, Virginia. 
Paxton P. Powers (M) of Staunton, Virginia, 



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23 



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ETHICAL PHARMACEUTICALS • RICHMOND 17. VIRGIN 



24 



THE SCARAB 



was named Fellow in the American College 
of Physicians at the meeting of the Board of 
Regents in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on No- 
vember 9. 

1951 Faith Collins Pratt (X) of Buffalo. New 
York, and her husband. Robert, announce the 
birth of their son. Robert Scott, on January 1. 

1952 Floyd F. Bennett (P) of Staunton, Vir- 
ginia, visited the Alumni House on January 29. 
William C. Gill (M) is serving on the Medical 
Advisory Committee of the Richmond-Henrico 
Chapter of the National Foundation for In- 
fantile Paralysis. 

S. Guy Hall (D) of Richmond. Virginia, is 
president of the Richmond Alumni Chapter 
of Lynchburg College. They held a dinner 
meeting at the Hot Shoppe Cafeteria on March 

Faye Landers Peters (X) of Roanoke. Virginia, 
and her husband. Jack, announce the arrival 
of Paul Dillard on March 5. 

1953 Julius Griffin (M) is practicing child 
and adult psychiatry in the Overland Build- 
ing. Los Angeles. California. He and his wife. 
Rosalyn. have three children; David Alan, five 
years old; Kenneth Scott, IS months; and 
Judith Ellen, three weeks. 

1954 Richard Brooke, Jr., (HA) has resigned 
from Riverside Hospital. Jacksonville, Florida, 
and has accepted a position with Blue Cross 
of Florida in the same city. 

Manuel A. Jaffe (M) has been awarded a fel- 
lowship in dermatology in the Mayo Founda- 
tion in Rochester. Minnesota. 
Samuel H. Kalman (P) visited the Alumni- 
House on February 3. 

Geneverette Oldham (X) and Charles McDer- 
mott were married in Lystria Baptist Church, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on January 18. 
They will make their home in Williamsburg, 
Virginia. 

Paul Schellenberg (M) and his wife. Rosemary 
(M'56) arrived in Richmond from Alaska dur- 
ing December. He is in physical medicine at 
the Medical College of Virginia. 
1956 Leigh O. Atkinson (M) is a resident in 
anesthesiology at V. A. Hospital, Houston 
Texas. 

Anthony A. Deep, Jr., (M) is serving with the 
U. S. Air Force as flight surgeon in Japan 
and expects to return to the United States in 
June. 1959. 

Laurence K. Musselman (M) recently completed 
the military orientation course at Brooke Army 
Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 
Raymond D. Wallace, Jr., (M) recently was as- 
signed as a physician at Brooke Army Hos- 
pital, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. 
Dorothy U. Wright (M) has an appointment 
beginning July 1 as research fellow in medicine 



at Children's Medical Center, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

1957 Erolyn J. Blount ( MT ) is a first year 
medical student at the Medical School of the 
University of Xorth Carolina. 
John L. Butler (P) is at PHS Indian Hospital. 
Red Lake, Minnesota. 

Robert L. Edwards (P) recently began medical 
training at Fort Sam Houston. Texas, under 
the Reserve Forces Act program. 
Clyde W. Mallory (PT) completed basic train- 
ing February 15 under the Reserve Forces Act 
program at Fort Knox, Kentuckv. 



Deans' Page 

(Continued from page 13) 

adequate clinical facilities for this clinical 
discipline. We are planning to extend the 
scope of undergraduate instruction in this 
subject. We are also looking forward to 
the establishment of a postgraduate pro- 
gram in Orthodontics as soon as adequate 
teaching personnel may be secured. 

Our class entering next September has 
already been selected and we look for- 
ward to welcoming 80 new freshmen cm 
September 9. 

Negotiations are underway with several 
prospective teachers whom we hope to 
add to our staff for the next session. 

Harry Lyons, Dean 

School of Graduate Studies 

Because of the individualized character 
of their work, students in graduate schools 
are sometimes isolated from campus ac- 
tivities and contacts with students of other 
schools. Too often, their studies bring 

, . o 

them in contact with only a few people 
in their own or related departments. Here 
at the Medical College of Virginia, we 
hope to give our students the advantage 
of broadened horizons that come from a 
truly corporate life in the College. This 
thinking lies behind the organization this 
year of the graduate students as a regular- 



ly constituted group with membership in 
the student body of the Medical College 
of Virginia. The president of the gradu- 
ate students is Linwood K. Payne, Jr., 
Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry; 
the vice-president is Harold Smith, also 
in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Miss Gertrud 
Graubart, Physiology, is secretary-treasurer 
and Harvey Rappaport, Hospital Phar- 
macy, is historian. The representative on 
the Student Council is Dominick Coviel- 
lo, Pharmaceutical Chemistry. 



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For some time now, the school of 
graduate studies has had a committee un- 
der the chairmanship of Dr. E. G. Huf, 
Physiology, to study and promote rela- 
tions with other colleges and schools in 
Virginia. This committee sponsors visits 
of college students to MCV to observe 
research activities and also invites se- 
lected groups of high school students to 
attend certain laboratory sessions to help 
them gain an idea of the basic health sci- 
ences as a guide to career decisions. In 
these days, when wise choices about 
careers in science are so important, we 
believe that this committee has a signif- 
icant function. 

Ebbe Curtis Hoff, Dean 

School of Nursing 

"Now — from the place where we are, 
that is the only way to make a begin- 
ning." Such quotation from a favorite 
book of mine perhaps best expresses the 
position I feel privileged to represent as 
dean of your school of nursing. It ex- 
emplifies also the spirit of development 
which the school is undertaking. Perhaps, 
I should say schools of nursing, since we 
are now three programs of nursing educa- 
tion at the Medical College of Virginia, 
each with its specific objectives and each 
dedicated to the fulfillment of these ob- 
jectives. 

As of March 1, 1958, a new plan of 



Compliments 
of 

Richmond Memorial 
Hospital 



26 



organization within the school was 
adopted. Miss Marguerite Nicholson be- 
came acting director of the Diploma Pro- 
gram; Miss Frances Gordon became act- 
ing director of the Baccalaureate Program. 
Miss Berenice Skehan, appointed as di- 
rector of the Associate Degree Program, 
joined the faculty in January, 1958. The 
need for such organizational planning 
came about largely to fulfill increased en- 
rollment trends in nursing education pro- 
grams and to meet the equally imperative 
need for developing constructive means 
for alleviating shortages of graduate nurse 
personnel. Each of the directors appointed 
is assuming full time responsibility for her 
respective program. Within each program, 
also, activities are directed toward the 
critical evaluation of curricula in light of 
stated objectives and the planning for 
faculty needs. The momentum of ac- 
complishment within our school already 
has increased significantly as the direct re- 
sult, we believe, of this reorganization. 

Development of the Associate Degree 
Program holds significant promise for all 
of nursing and especially at the Medical 
College. Graduates of this program, which 
is twenty-two months in length, are being 
prepared for staff nurse positions in 
hospitals and clinics and as trainees 
in public health agencies. They are 
eligible upon successful completion of 
the program to take the State Board 
Examinations for the licensing of regis- 
tered nurses within Virginia. The cur- 
riculum is college centered and controlled, 
with students paying total tuition and liv- 
ing expenses throughout the two years 
and assuming no service responsibilities in 
the hospital during the learning process 
except that inherent in the laboratory of 
the nursing courses. Specialized instruc- 
tional planning, developed by Miss Ske- 
han and her staff, centers around inte- 
grated science courses and concentration 
of nursing subjects as well as English and 
the social sciences essential to the criteria 
of the objectives of the program. To date 
twenty-five carefully selected students are 
enrolled for the program beginning in 
September, 1958. 

None of the aforementioned accom- 
plishments could have been achieved 
without two essentials; namely, (a) the 
steadfast work of those who have pre- 
ceded me and who laid the very firm 
foundation upon which we are now build- 
ing; and (b) the excellent cooperation 
of the college administration, the school 

THE SCARAB 



of nursing faculty and students, and col- 
leagues of the other schools on campus. 
So — we begin where we are — to achieve 
what others have envisioned and to fulfill 
our own hopes and purposes in our chosen 
field. 

Doris B. Yingling, Dean 



'Round the Circuit 

(Continued from page 14) 
Puerto Rican. In this way I had access to 
many attractive features of Puerto Rico 
not normally open to visitors. Also, Mr. 
Willys Julia, my host, arranged a party 
for the alumni of MCV. Approximately 
twenty physicians arrived with their wives 
and watched the moving picture of our 
institution with a great deal of interest. 
It was wonderful to hear them exclaim 
with enthusiasm when they remembered 
someone in the picture or some scene 
which was familiar to them. They asked 
that the picture be left with them so they 
could have another meeting to get all of 
our alumni together in the hopes that a 
chapter of our Alumni Association could 
be reactivated in Puerto Rico. This cer- 
tainly would be worthwhile as I doubt 
seriously whether any group would be 
more enthusiastic. 

It was my pleasure also to visit the 
medical school and several hospitals. You 
may remember that the Medical School of 
Puerto Rico was the outgrowth of the 
School of Tropical Medicine and was 
started about seven years ago. They ac- 
cept about forty-five students in each 
class, and their clinical experience during 
the junior and senior years is provided by 
the Municipal Hospital in San Juan and 
the two hundred-bed Veterans Adminis- 
tration Hospital in an adjoining suburb. 
There are many plans for the develop- 
ment of a medical center in San Juan and 
for the improvement of medical facilities 
throughout the island. 

I was extremely proud to learn that the 
medical group in San Juan, led by one of 
our graduates, Dr. Ramon Suarez, has 
more distinguished graduates from the 
Medical College of Virginia than perhaps 
any other medical school. So many of 
these physicians sent messages to you that 
it would be impossible to embody them 
all in this short article. However, if you 
have friends or classmates in Puerto Rico, 
please write them as they would be most 
appreciative. 

C. P. Cardwell, Jr., Director 
Hospital Division 

MAY, 1958 



Greater Washington Chapter 

The Greater Washington Chapter of 
the Alumni Association met for a festive 
party at the Army-Navy Town Club 
through the courtesy of Dr. W. A. Mor- 
gan on April 17. Dr. J. Gordon Bell, 
secretary, was the chairman for the party 
and with the help of his wife and a group 
of our loyal alumni made this a most en- 
joyable party. Dr. Joseph Kline, presi- 
dent, was a gracious host. The thing that 
makes all these chapter meetings worth- 



while is the work of one plus many. We 
wish we could list all the alumni in at- 
tendance as there were seventy, and Drs. 
Sanger and Smith were there from the 
College and our Association president, 
Dr. J. Spencer Dryden, as well as the 
executive secretary. It's hard to convey the 
fun and congeniality that occur at these 
meetings — you just have to be there to 
understand. The officers elected for the 
new year are Dr. J. Gordon Bell, presi- 
dent, Dr. Roger Williams, vice president, 
and Dr. Fred W. Hines, secretary-treas- 




erated by 

RICHMOND HOTELS, INCORPORATED 



ALL HOTELS HAVE TELETYPEWRITER CONNECTIONS 



27 



urer. We wish to them a year that sees 
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even more. 



Alumni — Student 
Meeting 

(Continued from page 1}) 

warding experience to see how the Asso- 
ciation is eager to assist the students. You 
must know that we stand ready to serve 
the Alumni Association. 

Gordon A. Hearne 

President of Student Body of MCV 

and the School of Dentistry 

The association of student representa- 
tives with the Alumni organization by 
means of monthly luncheon meetings has 
indeed been profitable. It has afforded a 
means of exchange of ideas between fu- 
ture pharmacists, dentists, nurses, physi- 
cians and alumni. This exchange has 
proven beneficial not only in the immedi- 
ate conduct of student affairs but. we 
hope, in the future inter-professional re- 
lationship between these groups. In ad- 
dition, with the counsel of Dr. Tucker, 
we have been able to see the role that we 



QUALITY 

A MUST PRODUCT 




as future alumni might well play in the 
growth of MCV. 

William E. Hale, President. 

School of Medicine 

I would like to be among the first to 
thank you. Dr. Tucker, and all of the 
other members of the alumni organiza- 
tion for the very fine student-alumni 
luncheons which we have held this year. 
This is certainly an excellent method to 
promote expressions from the student 
body and in turn receive information on 
alumni policy. The informal atmosphere 
also contributed to the success of the pro- 
gram. I sincerely hope that the meetings 
can be continued. 

Lew Flippen, President Senior Class 

School of Dentistry 

Members of the Alumni Association, 
as a means of proving their sincere inter- 
est in the students here at the Medical 
College of Virginia, have held several 
luncheon meetings throughout the year to 
which representatives from each of the 
four major schools have been invited. 

At these meetings, problems and sug- 
gested methods of solving them have 
been discussed. 

Benefits have been immeasurable, and 
to all the people responsible for the ar- 
rangements and success of these meetings, 
we wish to extend our deep appreciation. 
Winnie Latham, President 
School of Nursing 



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LETTERPRESS • OFFSET 

Richmond, Virginia 
MI 8-2809 

28 



Staunton, Virginia ; Mrs. Mary H. Grahek 
N'42, 120 Redwood Drive, Juliette, 
Illinois; Mrs. Robert S. Gray N'44, P.O. 
Box 1677, Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Miss 
Barbara J. Grossman N'55, Plymouth, 
Michigan; Mrs. Margaret B. GrunerN'43, 
530 Charles Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota; 
Mrs. Mary T. Hamilton N'52, Box 492, 
Shepherdstown, West Virginia ; Mrs. Ho- 
mer J. Hancock N'40, 810 West Frank- 
lin Street, Richmond, Virginia; Mrs. 
Evangeline G. Hardee N'51, 39 W. Cope- 
land Drive, Orlando, Florida; Mrs. Inez 
B. Hare N'35, Route 2, Virginia Street, 
Crystal Lake, Illinois; Miss S. Maxine 
Harlow N'55, 2610 Semmes Avenue, 
Richmond, Virginia; Mrs. Rachel E. Har- 
rell N'52, VF-6F, College Park, Maryland; 
Mrs. Lillian A. Hatke N'13, 2123 Rose- 
wood Avenue, Richmond, Virginia; Mrs. 
Jessie W. Hefley N'13, UCM, 601 N. 
Washington Street, Liberal, Kansas; Mrs. 
Florence C. Highsmith N'46, Thomasville, 
North Carolina; Miss Rebecca Hill N'31, 
Cabaniss Hall, Medical College of Vir- 
ginia, Richmond, Virginia; Miss Mary M. 
Hock N'55, 19 Roanoke Street, Richmond, 
Virginia; Miss June Hopkins N'5 2, Big 
Stone Gap, Virginia. 



r x — for Your Chronically III Patients 



Lost Sheep 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

Mrs. James Davis N'21, 36 Alleghaney 
Street, Clifton Forge, Virginia; Mrs. Pa- 
tricia C. Dowdy N'51, 4805 Patterson 
Avenue, Richmond 21, Virginia; Miss 
Connie May Dulaney N'56, Randolph- 
Minor Hall, Medical College of Virginia 
Richmond, Virginia; Miss Ann Early 
N'54, 3219 Brook Road, Richmond, Vir 
ginia; Mrs. Charles A. Felvey N'20 
Brook Hill, Virginia; Mrs. Olivia D 
Flannigan N'l4, R.F.D. 1, Shelton Place 
Norfolk, Virginia; Miss Margaret L 
Frasier N'55, Bell Hospital, Williams- 
burg, Virginia; Mrs. Sarah Bryant Tank- 
ard N'54, N. A. Memorial Hospital, Nas- 
sawadox, Virginia; Miss Evelyn Lee Fish- 
er N'43 Mar., Lowell, North Carolina; 
Mrs. Katherine St. C. Ginascol N'44, 
2801 N. Guadalupe Street, Austin, Texas; 
Mrs. Anne M. Gish N'44, 2894 Lenox 
Avenue, Atlanta, Georgia; Mrs. Louise 
Goode N'16, 112 S. Washington Street, 




9 minutes by car from any local hospital 

SKILLED NURSING CARE 

24 Hours Daily Professional Supervision 

AGED * CHRONICALLY ILL 
INVALIDS ♦ CONVALESCENTS 

a Each Patient Attended by Own Doctor 

• Res. R.N. and Res. M.C.V. Extern 

• Formerly 52 Bed General Hospital 

• Trained Dietitian. Part Time O.T. 

• Private and Semi-Private Rooms with Toilets 

• Large Trained Staff of Nurses and Attendants 
o Kidde ATMO Fire Detection System 

• Rates From $50 to $75 Weekly, Gen. Care 

Write or Phone Bernard Maslan, Adm. 

Terrace Hill Nursing Home 

"Understanding Care" 
Phone Milton 3-2777 
2112 Monteiro Avenue, Richmond 22, Va. 
THE SCARAB 



COMPLETE 




LOCATIONS 



PRESCRIPTIONS arc compounded by a uniform 
procedure insuring accuracy through constant double- 
checking. Peoples pharmacists demonstrated public con- 
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FOUNTAIN - GRILLS maintain Peoples good repute 
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attended by clerks trained as cosmetic advisers. 

MAGAZ . INES ' POCKET NOVELS, approved 
children s books and supplementary reading for primary 
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PHOTO -FINISHING SERVICE creates quality 
work promptly. Camera and photo- supplies. 

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ALTJMNl ASSOCIATION 

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 



Return Postage Guaranteed 



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NON-PROF. ORG. 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Richmond, Virginia 
Permit No. 761 







AVAILABLE 






14 oz. Highball Glasses per dozen 
7'/, oz. Old Fashiori*Glasses per dozen 




$ 6.25 




6.00 


3'/j oz. Stem Cockfdil Glasses per dozen 




10.00 


Desk Baskets, black, maroon, green, each 




3.00 


-Picture Tray, 12" x 18", black, maroon, g 


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each 5.50 


.Waste Basket 10" x 13", black, maroon, g 


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ORDER FROM THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF MCV 
1105 East Clay Street, Richmond, Virginia 



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all items except the 



Official Organ 

oi the 

Alumni Association 

of the 

Medical College 

of 

Virginia 




August, 1958 
?lume 7. Number 3 





Scarab 




Official Organ of the 
Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 

Published by the Medical College of Virginia Alumni 
Association in February, May, August, and November 

Editorial Committee 

Robert V. Terrell, M'34. Editor-in-Chief and Chairman 

James T. Tucker, M'27 

William T. Sanger, Chancellor 

Minnie M. Franck, Managing Editor 

Mildred H. Clark, Assistant Managing Editor 

Officers 

J. Spencer Dryden, M'33, President 

6816 Millwood Road. Bethesda 14, Md. 

James T. Tucker, M'27, Immed. Past President 

Medical Arts Building, Richmond. Va. 

R. Reginald Rooke, P'2i, President-Elect 

2929 Second Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

T. Robert Massie. Jr.. M'34, Vice-President 

1000 West Grace Street, Richmond, Va. 

Harry Lyons, D'23, Vice-President 

Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia 

George F. Hendley, VIS, Vice-President 

2125 Fairmount Avenue, Richmond, Virginia 

Mrs. Anne F. Mahoney. N'29. Vice-President 

907 West 31st Street, Richmond, Virginia 

Peter N. Pastore, M'34, Secretary 

Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia 

Harvey B. Haag, M'28. Treasurer 
Medical College of Virginia. Richmond, Virginia 

Trustees 
Term Expires December 31, 1958 



Edward L. Alexander, M'27 

Medical Arts Building, 

Newport News. Va. 



Donald S. Daniel, M'24 

Johnston-Willis Hospital. 

Richmond, Va. 



Ph 



J. Spencer Dryden, M'33 

6816 Millwood Road, 

Bethesda 14, Md. 

R. Reginald Rooke, P'21 

2929 Second Avenue 

Richmond. Va. 

W. Roy Smith. P'41 

Products Co., Inc. 
Petersburg, Va. 



Term Expires December 31, 1959 



Lloyd C Bird, P'17 

303 South Sixth Street, 

Richmond, Va. 

Richard A. Michaux, M'37 

Lee Medical Building, 

Richmond, Va. 

Edward Myers. D'26 

511 Medical Arts Building, 

Norfolk, Va. 



Marguerite Nicholson, N'34 

Cabaniss Hall. MCV 

Richmond, Va. 

E. Claiborne Robins, P'33 

1407 Cummings Drive 

Richmond, Va. 

Robert V. Terrell, M'34 

Medical Arts Building 

Richmond, Va. 



Term Expires December 31, I960 



Hunter M. Gaunt, 

Main and Valley Streets, 

Winchester, Va. 

L. Frances Gordon, N'43 

4514 West Grace Street 

Richmond, Va. 

W. C. Henderson, D'37 

301 East Franklin Street, 

Richmond, Va. 



Phelip W. Oden, M'34 

Greenbrier Valley Hospital 

Ronceverte, West Va. 

Waverly R. Payne, M'23 

91 29th Street. 

Newport News. Va. 

H. Hudnall Ware. Jr.. M'24 

816 West Franklin Street, 

Richmond, Va. 



About The Cover 

Hidden behind the handsome 510,000 check is Dr. J. Spencer 
Dryden, president of the Alumni Association. He has just 
presented it to Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., president of the 
College, at the Alumni Banquet on June 2. In doing so, he 
told Dr. Smith that this was the first $10,000 payment on 
the promised $100,000 for construction of the Alumni Lounge 
in the new dormitories. He emphasized that this payment was 
possible only through the cooperation of so many of our loyal 
alumni who had contributed generously for this gift. In all 
truth, it was a momentous occasion, and makes one conscious 
of the many who have worked so hard in the past as well as 
in the present to bring the Association to this instant. 



Our Lost Sheep 



Mrs. Elizabeth G. Huggins N'34, Route 3, Columbia, South Carolina; 
Mrs. Alice Mabel Garber Jetton N'4l. 2610 Sheraton Street, Silver 
Spring, Maryland; Miss Dorothy Virginia Jones N'51, 409 Spottswood 
Road, Staunton. Virginia; Miss Frances Jones N'99. 19 North Boule- 
vard, Richmond 20. Virginia; Mrs. Rita R. Kell N'46, 2811 Summit 
Street, Sioux City. Iowa; Mrs. Molly A. Kidd N'15, 406 South Shep- 
pard Street, Richmond 21, Virginia; Mrs. Bernice S. King N'45. 2123 
Stuart Avenue. Richmond, Virginia; Mrs. Floyd King N'26, 3218 War- 
saw Avenue. Cincinnati 5. Ohio; Mrs. Robert L. King, Jr. D'41, 6208 
U.S.A. F. Hospital, APO 64, San Francisco, California; Miss Inge 
Koester N'49, 3057 N.W. 63rd Street. Miami, Florida; Miss Irma 
Dean Lane N'30. 395 Riverside Drive. Apt. 11-B, New York 25 
New York; Miss Pauline H. Larrick N'43. Route 3. Winchester, Vir 
ginia; Mrs. Carolyn C. Leonard N'57, 1308 Minefee Street, Richmond 
Virginia; Mrs. Verlinda L. Martin N'48. Route 1. Vaelbel Road. Flights 
town, New Jersey; Mrs. Bland W. Mason N'15, Bon Air, Virginia 
Miss Margaret L. Massie PHN'53, 2224 Windsor Road, Richmond 24 
Virginia; Mrs. Esther M. Matthews N'41, 25 Leake Avenue, Rich 
mond 24, Virginia; Miss Rebecca McGlohon N'56, Randolph-Minor 
Hall, Medical College of Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; Miss Augusta 
Meyer N'04, 3325 Delaware Avenue, Richmond 22, Virginia; Mrs. 
Elizabeth C. Miller N'42, 2134 West 107th Place, Chicago 43, Illinois; 
Mrs. Anne H. Moore N'll, c/o H. S. Hamilton, Box 254-B, Falmouth, 
Virginia; Mrs. Marian H. Morrisey N'33, 315 Essex Street, Warwick, 
Virginia; Miss Zula Dove Newman N'47, Clinton, North Carolina; 
Miss Frances I. Nickels N'56, Randolph-Minor Hall, Medical College 
of Virginia. Richmond, Virginia; Mrs. Willie Newkirk Norfleet N'56, 
2706 Northumberland, Richmond, Virginia; Miss Billie J. Osborne N'55, 
Randolph-Minor Hall, Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia; 
Miss Nancy A. Overton N'55, Randolph-Minor Hall, Medical College 
of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia; Miss Sue West Owen N'45, Crozet, 
Virginia; Mrs. Ruby S. Payson N'37. USAF Hospital. Raney Air Force 
Base Hospital, New York, New York; Mrs. Betty Pettus N'23, c/o 
Mrs. S. M. Arwin. Victoria, Virginia; Mrs. Jean R. Pohly N'44, 1903 
Arthur Lane, Austin Texas; Miss Mildred Jaynes Prestwood N'51. 
Fredericks Hall. Virginia; Miss Doris E. Prusa N'50, V. A. Hospital, 
East Orange, New Jersey; Mrs. Betty Jean Tesh Quarles N'56, Ran- 
dolph-Minor Hall. Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia; 
Miss Mary T. Quinn N'53. Randolph-Minor Hall. Medical College of 
Virginia. Richmond. Virginia; Mrs. Zelda F. Ralston N'47, 6466 Mont- 
gomery Road, Cincinnati 13, Ohio; Mrs. Lila S. Rawlinson N'19. 22i8 
Terrace Way, Columbia 5, South Carolina; Mrs. Laurie W. Reed N'53, 
1400 Fairmont, Fort Worth, Texas; Mrs. Margaret R. Ruck N'51, 
6100 Morningside Drive, Richmond 26, Virginia; Mrs. Mary J. San- 
ford N'49, 7302 Park-Line Drive, Richmond, Virginia; Mrs. Maria 
Shoemaker Sedman N'42, Hopwood, Pennsylvania; Miss Jean Seigle 
N'51, 2095 Fulton Street. San Francisco, California; Mrs. Mabel W. 
Seldon N'25. Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Maryland; Mrs. Celena S. 
Selover N'28, 92-12 Jamaica Avenue, Woodhaven 21, Long Island, New 
York; Mrs. Ann A. Smith N'51, Fourth Avenue, Richmond, Va. 



The Scarab 



Published by The Alumni Association of the Medical College of Virginia 



Volume 7, No. 3 



Richmond, Virginia 




Medical College of Virginia 

M C V S TAT I O N 

RICHMOND 19, VIRGINIA 

July 21, 1958 



Dr. J. Spencer Dryden, President 
Alumni Association of the 

Medical College of Virginia 
Richmond, Virginia 

Dear Doctor Dryden: 

Although the Alumni Association resolved sometime ago to 
contribute $100,000 to provide an Alumni Lounge in the new College 
residence halls, your letter of July 17, 1958, transmitting the first 
payment of $10,000 marks the real activation of this project. 

It is my hope that aU who love the College will sense the tre- 
mendous significance of this project through which the Alumni have 
undertaken to share in the institution's responsibility of caring for 
the needs of the student body. While the Alumni for many years have 
given indispensable aid in providing guidance and assistance in the 
procurement of the capital and operating funds of the College, the 
present gift represents a sharing of personal means and an°acceptance 
of responsibility which signals a new era in the history of the College 
and the Association . 

We at the College wish to express to you and through you to 
the Alumni group at large our heartfelt thanks. We pledge our best 
energies toward the achievement of the only goal worthy of your con- 
tinued support-- an ever greater Medical College of Virginia, a 
community of scholars dedicated to the attainment of true excellence 
through fulfillment of aU the responsibilities involved in our threefold 
mission of teaching, research, and the care of the sick. 

Sincerely yours, 

Robert Blackwell Smith, Jr. 
President 



AUGUST, 1958 



A Backward Gl 

DENTAL SCHOOL DEANS 
By William T. Sanger, Chancellor 



ance 



1922-1958 

Dental education in Virginia dates from 1893. Deans selected to lead this development are here listed. From 
the beginning there has been only one dental school in the State, except 1897-1913. 

University College of Medicine: Lewis M. Cowardin, 1893-1910; Richard L. Simpson, 1910-1913. 

Medical College of Virginia: Henry C. Jones, 1897-1901; J. Hall Moore, 1901-1906; Frank W. Stiff, 1906-1913; 
Richard Simpson" 1913-1915; J. A. C. Hoggan, 1915-1925. 

R D Thornton 1925-1929.— Doctor Thornton had just been appointed whole-time dean to succeed Doctor 
Hoccan who had been on part-time while dean, when I arrived at MCV. The school was then small, only 59 stu- 
dents dunne 1924-25; standards had been pushed up ahead of many other schools, affecting enrollment adversely. 
Doctor Thornton worked hard to recruit students and build up the faculty. When he returned to Canada for prac- 
tice and teaching in Toronto, the number of dental students had more than doubled. There were other accomplish- 
ments as well. 

Harry Bear 1929-1950 —Doctor Bear, a native son and member of the faculty from his graduation, 1913, brought 
to the deanship a combination of integrity, dedication, and capacity for sustained work, which set an example for 
all of us His meticulous concern for raising admission requirements, developing the faculty, improving facilities 
and their use, advanced the school in every way, launching a new era in dental education in our region Doctor 
Bear made a profound impact on dental education, locally and nationally. He made little and big things alike count. 

Interim Committee, September to December, 1950, composed of Alton D. Brashear, professor of anatomy chair- 
man" Robert W. Ramsey, professor of physiology; and O. Wendell Clough, professor of operative dentistry and oral 
anatomy carried the work of the dean's office smoothly and effectively while selection of a dean was under consider- 
ation. 

Harry Lyons January 1, 1951 to date.— Doctor Lyons, at our school, in the State, and in the nation, has shown the 
stature we had anticipated. Under him the new dental building materialized, the school grew in size and quality, 
including dental research. Alumni responded to his dynamic leadership, to set an example for other schools To- 
gether with the faculty he has brought far-flung recognition to our dental school, and graduated greater numbers 
for the State and area. 




Dean Harry Bear and Dean Harry lyons 



THE SCARAB 







Reunion '58 



At the Open House on Sunday afternoon, 
June 1, 1958, on the porch of the Alumni 
House, Dr. Gordon A. Hearne, D'58, presi- 
dent of the student body, on the far right, 
shows the new construction to (from the 
left) Dr. Frederick A. Wood, D'OO, of Rich- 
mond, Virginia; Dr. J. Spencer Dryden, 
M'33, president of the Alumni Association, 
of Washington, D. C; Dr. John W. Dough- 
erty, M'05, Santurce, Puerto Rico; and Dr. 
Foushee O. Mooklar, D 98, of Reedville, 
Virginia. 



Chatting at the Open House are, from the 
left: Dr. William E. Hale, M'58; Dr. Llew- 
ellyn T. Flippen, D 58; Mrs. Ora P. Locke 
(Mrs. W. Edward), N 08; Mrs. J. Spencer 
Dryden, wife of the president of the Alumni 
Association; Miss Clementine C. Sadler, 
N 58; Dr. W. Archer Bagley, D'18; and 
Dr. W. C. Henderson, D 37. 





Our guests enjoying the refreshments at the Open House. 



AUGUST, 1958 







Dr Custis L. Coleman, M'43M, Richmond Chapter president, on the right, has |ust pre- 
sented to the president of the Alumni Association, Dr. J. Spencer Dryden M 33, ot 
Washington D. C, the beautiful silver punch bowl which was a gift to the Alumni 
Association from the Richmond Chapter. The Nursing Section of the Alumn. Association 
also gave the Association a pair of handsome antique brass candlesticks. Both ot these 
gifts provide much needed appointments for the Alumni House. 





Class of 1928 at the reunion banquet. 



'The best class that ever graduated from 

the Medical College of Virginia" (as they 

say )_the class of '28 at their party. 




THE SCARAB 




From the left, the group attending the Golden Reunion Luncheon are: Dr. Harry L Mears D'08 UCM- Dr lohn M Hi,nh». n™ 
UCM; Dr Meade S. Brent, M'08, MCV ; Dr. William F. Maloney, dean, school of media eD^ John H Moo man M'O "mCV Dr 
George W. Skaggs, M 08, MCV ; Dr. William R. Wallace, M'08; MCV ; Dr. J. Spencer Dryden, Alumni Association pSid^ntM^s 

J. bpencer Dryden, and Minnie M. Franck, executive secretary. 




The speakers' table at the Alumni Banquet. 



Miss Minnie M. Franck presents to Dr. 
Alfred P. Upshur, M'08, UCM, his fifty year 
pin as Dr. William R. Wallace, M'08, MCV, 
and Dr. Berkeley H. Martin, M'08, MCV, 
look on. 




Candid shots of the 08 classes at the reunion banquet. 




Trie Annual Meeting of tlie Alumni Association of tke 
Medical College of Virginia 



The annual meeting of the Alumni Association of the Medical College of Virginia was held at 2:30 p.m. on June 2, 1938, 
in the board room of the Alumni House. 

The meeting was called to order by the president, Dr. J. Spencer Dryden. On motion duly made and seconded the mmutes of 
the May 23, 195V, annual meeting were approved. 

The financial statement was read and approved. It follows: 



Treasurer's Report 

The fiscal year of the Alumni Association of the Medical College of V.rginia runs from January 1 through December 31. 
The Association operates with three accounts: 
OPERATING ACCOUNT: 

Cash on hand, January 1 
Memberships $10.00 and under 
Miscellaneous income 
Total income 



1957 
$ 8,832.77 



$16,493.00 
10,360.20 



26,853.20 
^35,685.97 



$14,984.75 
8,429.10 



1956 
$ 5,078.32 



Total expense including $5,000 
transfer to savings in 1957 
Bank Balance, December 31 



28,685.83 
$ 7,000.14 



19,659.40 
$ 8,832.77 



SPECIAL ACCOUNT: 

Cash on hand, January 1 
Memberships over $10.00 
Miscellaneous income 
Total income 



7,448.50 
3,412.36 



$ 2,421.80 



10,860.86 

[37282.66 



3,910.00 
3,702.00 



S 4,006.63 



7,612.00 
11,618.63 



Total expense including $5,000 
transfer to savings in 1957 
Bank Balance, December 31 



SAVINGS ACCOUNT: 



1957 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

225.00 



8,043.23 
5,239.43 



9,196.83 



$ 2,421.80 



TOTAL CASH ON HAND, ALL ACCOUNTS 



- 



1956 . Operati 

$ 5,000.00 Cash on hand, January 1 Special 

Transfer from operating account Savings 

Transfer from special account Total 
193.94 Interest 



J 7,000.14 $ 8,832.77 

5,239.43 2,421.80 

15,225.00 5,193.94 



"$277464. 57 $16,448.51 



$15,225.00 $ 5,193.94 Bank Balance, December 31 

The records have been audited by A. M. Pullen Company, certified public accountants, and copies of the full report are avail- 
able in the office of the Alumni Association if you wish to examine them. 

Respectfully submitted 

Harvey B. Haag. Treasurer 



6 



THE SCARAB 



Dr. J. Spencer Dryden delivered his report on the year's activities of the Association: 



President's Report 



With the closing of the school year 1957-58, the time has 
arrived for the Alumni Association of the Medical College 
of Virginia to review the past year's work. In such a review, 
it is gratifying to note that the total active membership has 
continued to rise and this year for the first time it has exceeded 
the two thousand mark. This accomplishment is largely due to 
the untiring efforts of our membership chairman and to our 
most efficient executive secretary and her staff. 

On February 21 and 22 the Alumni Association sponsored 
the Scientific Assembly. To our alumni chairman. Dr. Edward 
L. Alexander, Dean William F. Maloney, and the entire faculty, 
we extend our appreciation for the success of this event. 

As has been the custom in the past, the Association has been 
represented at the following Alumni meetings: The Virginia 
Pharmaceutical Association Convention at Roanoke (Alumni 
Dinner), the West Virginia State Medical Society (Cocktail 
Party), the Tidewater Chapter (Dinner), the Medical Society 
of Virginia (Alumni Dinner), the Philadelphia Chapter (Din- 
ner), the Richmond Chapter (Fall and Spring Dinners), the 
Washington Chapter (Buffet), and the North Carolina Medical 
Society (Alumni Dinner). The importance of alumni and Col- 
lege representatives at these meetings cannot be overemphasized, 
since a great source of our strength lies in our chapter organiza- 
tions. 

The Alumni House has been utilized to its fullest capacity 
during the year. In addition to housing all activities of the As- 
sociation, the basement is rented to a most desirable tenant, the 
Virginia Pharmaceutical Association. The second floor apart- 

The secretary read his report: 



ment and the third floor bedrooms are likewise rented. 

At the annual banquet on June 2, 1958, the Alumni Associ- 
ation will pay to the College the first installment of $10,000 
on our §100,000 pledge for the Alumni Lounge now under 
construction in the student dormitories at Tenth and Leigh 
Streets. This Lounge is expected to act as a living reminder to 
the student of the interest of the Alumni Association in his 
personal well-being during his stay at the College. This is our 
project for the next ten years and its fulfillment represents 
a major feat, the attainment of which has been made possible 
only through the help of such a large number of our devoted 
alumni. 

During the year your president has had the privilege of sitting 
with the Board of Visitors of the College at its regular meet- 
ings. The Board of Trustees of the Alumni Association has 
had the benefit of the counsel and advice of our College pres- 
ident, Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., and our chancellor. Dr. 
William T. Sanger, at its regular meetings. This exchange of 
ideas has been a tremendous help in working toward our com- 
mon goal. 

We are greatly indebted to Dr. Robert V. Terrell for again 
assuming the great responsibility of editor-in-chief of our alumni 
publication. The Scarab. It has been prompt and excellent in 
both composition and coverage. 

I wish to pay special tribute to the officers, Board of Trustees, 
and our executive staff for the enthusiastic cooperation and 
sound advice which have made our efforts for this year a success. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. Spencer Dryden. President 



Secretary's Report 

Covering period ]une, 7957 through June 2, 1958 



The fall meeting was held on November 10, 1957, and the 
winter Board of Trustees' meeting was held on January 19, 
1958. All meetings were held at the Alumni House. The com- 
plete minutes of all meetings are on record in the Alumni Office, 
and the following outstanding factors are certainly worth men- 
tioning: 

1. The regularity in the publishing and distribution of The 
Scarab. 

2. An increase in the total membership of the Alumni Associ- 
ation. 

3. Improved relationship between the College and the Alumni 
Association. 

4. The first Alumni Scientific Assembly. 

5. The outstanding support shown by the alumni at the time 
of the meeting of the General Assembly of Virginia and their 
fruitful efforts in acquainting the Legislature concerning the 
needs of the College. 

The latter two items are worthy of further comment. 

For the very successful Scientific Assembly, the appreciation 

AUGUST, 1958 



of all goes to Dr. Edward L. Alexander and his committee of 
Drs. Kinloch Nelson, Harry Walker, David Hume, Patrick 
Drewry, Walter Bundy, and Joseph Parker, who worked with 
Dr. William F. Maloney, dean of the medical school, and the 
entire school of medicine faculty. The members of the Alumni 
Association and others who were fortunate enough to attend 
and participate in the enjoyment of the program found material 
of tremendous usefulness and topics having as broadening an 
effect as a postgraduate course should have. 

At the January meeting of the Board of Trustees, Dr. R. 
Blackwell Smith, Jr., president of the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia, acquainted the Board with the serious problem resulting 
in a reduced budget following a ait by Governor Stanley in the 
requested appropriations for the College. These cuts eliminated 
completely the Medical Education Building and salaries for full- 
time professors in the school of medicine and reduced the hos- 
pital budget at a time when 147 beds were to be opened in the 
new Ennion G. Williams Hospital. The Board then instructed 
your secretary to send a letter advising the medical alumni and 
members of the General Assembly of the facts. 



Dr. William F. Maloney in the May 1958 issue of The Scarab 
summarizes the effort as follows : 

■The administration of the College and school, of course, 
worked very hard to communicate the institution's needs to 
the Legislature. However, the recognition and support of our 
needs by the Legislature could not have been as effectively 



accomplished without the individual and collective efforts of 
a multitude of alumni and friends of the medical school." 



With best wishes for a greater MCV. 



Respectively submitted, 
P. N. Pastore, Secretary 



Executive Secretary's Report 



pleasure of seeing often know just how busy it has been. 

We extend to you all a cordial invitation to drop by and 
chat with us. Thank you all again. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Minnie M. Franck, Executive Secretary 



My report is mainly deep appreciation for the cooperation 
from the officers and board, the College officials, and all the 
alumni that I've had the pleasure to work with during the past 
year These thanks include the personnel of the office, who 
too have given unstintingly of their time and thought through 
this extremely busy year. Those of you whom we have the 

, r 11 ■ u a k„ m fWt-Prl t-o the Board of Trustees by mail ballot and reminded the members 

New Members of the Board of Trustees 

MEDICINE 

Dr. Edward L. Alexander, Newport News, Virginia 
Dr. Custis L. Coleman. Richmond, Virginia 



DENTISTRY 

Dr. J. P. Broaddus, Franklin, Virginia 

PHARMACY 

Mr. George F. Hendley, Richmond, Virginia 
Mr. W. Roy Smith. Petersburg, Virginia 



Dr. Donald S. Daniel, Richmond Virginia 

The nominating committee presented its slate of officers; the report was seconded and the candidates were elected by unani 
mous vote. 

New Officers 

President 
Mr. R. Reginald Rooke 

President-elect 
Dr. Edward L. Alexander 

Vice-President, medicine 
Dr. James D. Hagood 

Vice-President, dentistry 
Dr. John Tyree 

Vice-President, pharmacy 
Mr. Cecil C. Lipes 

Vice-President, nursing 
Miss Mary E. Cibula 




Dr. 



Secretary 
Peter N. Pastore 



Treasurer 
Dr. James T. Tucker 




Dr. James T. Tucke 



There was no unfinished business and no new business. 

Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., greeted the alumni at the 
meeting on behalf of the College and thanked them for their 
support and cooperation in securing funds for the operation 
of the College and Hospital from the Legislature. 

Mr. R. Reginald Rooke expressed his thanks to the alumni 

8 



for the honor of being elected president. He told them that 
he would do all that was within his power to continue the 
growth of the Association during his term of office. 
The meeting was adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Peter N. Pastore. Secretary 

THE SCARAB 



Honorary Degrees 



At the commencement exercises on 
June 3, honorary degrees were awarded to 
Mr. Edwin Claiborne Robins and Dr. 
Paul DeLeon Sanders. 

In presenting Mr. Robins for his de- 
gree, Dr. Warren E. Weaver, dean of 
the school of pharmacy, said: 

"Mr. President, I have the honor of 
presenting Mr. E. Claiborne Robins for 
the honorary degree of Doctor of Pharma- 
ceutical Science. 

"Mr. Robins is a native Virginian, who 
was educated at the University of Rich- 
mond and the Medical College of Virginia 
where he received his B.A. and B.S. 
degrees, respectively. 

"He founded the first major pharma- 
ceutical industry in the South, beginning 
with a small business carried on for many 
years by his grandparents and parents. 
"Mr. Robins is a humane being, whose 
generosity, thoughtfulness, and concern 
for the welfare of his many employees 
has won him their affections and the 
respect of his fellow citizens. 

"He is a loyal alumnus of both his 
alma maters, having given freely and 
generously of his time and means on their 
behalf. Likewise an outstanding citizen 
of his community, he has contributed 
greatly to many worthwhile civic and 
humanitarian projects. 

"His interest in philanthropic, civic, 
and educational enterprises is manifested 
by his being a trustee on the Boards of 
the Richmond Memorial Hospital, the 
University of Richmond, the Richmond 
Area Community Chest, the Crippled 
Children's Hospital, the Medical College 
of Virginia Foundation, and the Alumni 



Association of the Medical College of 
Virginia. He is a past president of the 
Richmond Chamber of Commerce and 
has been especially active in the affairs 
of his church. 

"Mr. President, it gives me great pleas- 
ure to present this outstanding citizen of 
the Commonwealth for the appropriate 
degree." 

Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., president 
of the Medical College of Virginia, then 
said the following: 

"Distinguished pharmacist 
"Builder of a great international phar- 
maceutical industry, the first in the South 
"Loyal and generous to your alma 
mater 

"Devoted and effective in your many 
services to your community 

"We are proud to honor you. 
"Therefore, by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by the Commonwealth of 
Virginia, and on unanimous vote of the 
Board of Visitors of the College, I now 
confer upon you the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Pharmaceutical Science with 
all its rights and privileges, as evidenced 
by this diploma and appropriate hood." 
Dr. Ebbe C. Hoff, dean of the school 
of graduate studies, presented Dr. Sanders 
for his degree, and said: 

"Dr. Paul DeLeon Sanders was born 
on a farm in Attala County, Mississippi. 
He earned a B.S. degree in agriculture and 
science from Mississippi State College in 
1922, a M.S. degree from the University 
of Maryland in 1924, and a Ph.D. de- 
gree from Harvard University in 1930. 

"Dr. Sanders is editor of The Southern 
Planter and vice-president of The Southern 




Planter Publishing Company. He was 
president of the Virginia Council on 
Health and Medical Care, made up of 
over 800 organizations and individuals 
interested in better health for the people 
of Virginia, 1952-56. The Health Coun- 
cil in 1955 received the Lane Bryant 
Award for rendering the outstanding vol- 
untary community service in the Nation. 
"Dr. Sanders is a member of the Board 
of Visitors, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, 
Blacksburg, and a member of the Gov- 
ernor's Committee on the Advisory Coun- 
cil on the Virginia Economy. 

"Dr. Sanders was awarded an hon- 
orary Doctor of Science degree by the 
University of Maryland in 1947 'in rec- 
ognition of work he has done for the 
general improvement of rural life in the 
South,' and an honorary Doctor of Ag- 
riculture degree by Salem College in Sa- 
lem, West Virginia, in June, 195 3. 

"Among the many committees that Dr. 
Sanders has served on are: the 10-man 
Advisory Council to the Committee on 
Post Office and Civil Service, United 
States Senate, 1953-54: member of Citi- 
zens Advisory Committee to the Commit- 
tee on Banking and Currency of the 
Lmited States Senate to study expansion 
of international trade, especially as re- 
lated to the Export-Import Bank; member 
of the Foreign Agricultural Trade Policy 
Advisory Committee, USD A; and in- 
numerable others." 

Dr. Hoff further stated many more 
honors and achievements. 

In presenting Dr. Sanders the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Laws, Dr. R. Black- 
well Smith, Jr., said: 
"Distinguished editor 
"Devoted servant and outstanding citi- 
zen of your community, state and nation 
"Unselfish and generous friend to 
many 

"We are proud to honor you. 
"Therefore, by virtue of the authority 
vested in me by the Commonwealth of 
Virginia, and on unanimous vote of the 
Board of Visitors of the College, I now 
confer upon you the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws with all its rights and 
privileges, as evidenced by this diploma 
and appropriate hood." 



Mr. E. Claiborne Robins, Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., and Dr. Paul D. Sanders 
AUGUST, 1958 



Appointment 

Dr. Elam C. Toone was appointed chair- 
man of the Inter-Chapter Advisory Com- 
mittee of the Arthritis and Rheumatism 
Foundation recently at San Francisco. 



The Man 
of the 



Hour 



Proudly we present as our Man of the 
Hour, William Linwood Ball of Rich- 
mond, Virginia, graduate of the school 
of medicine of the Medical College of 
Virginia in 1927. At the recent meeting 
of the American Medical Association in 
San Francisco, Dr. Ball was made a vice- 
president. He is a delegate to the A.M. A. 
from the Medical Society of Virginia and 
is on many of its committees. 

Dr. Ball entered the general practice 
of medicine in 1929 in Richmond where 
he has remained except for the period 
of 1941 to 1946 when he served in the 
U. S. Army Medical Corps. After prior 
service in the Virginia National Guard, 
he went on active duty in 1941 with the 
rank of major. His first assignment was 
the organization of the U. S. Armed 
Forces Induction Center at Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, following which he was made execu- 
tive officer of the Camp Pickett Station 
Hospital. He is a graduate of the school 
of tropical medicine of Walter Reed Gen- 
eral Hospital. In 1942 he organized the 
31st Field Hospital at Camp Rucker, 
Alabama, and was promoted to lieutenant 
colonel. After having commanded the 
hospitals on Kwajalein and Saipan in 
1944, he was made executive officer of 
the Tripler General Hospital at Hono- 
lulu in 1945 and remained there until 
his discharge in 1946. 



Dr. W. Linwood 
Ball 




Among his many activities outside of 
his profession, Dr. Ball is president of 
the All Saints Episcopal Church Boys' 
Choir Guild and is a member of Masonic 
Lodge #292, Scottish Rite, and the Acca 
Temple Shrine. 

Gardening with Mrs. Ball, the former 
Mary Lou Pamperlin of Greensboro, 
North Carolina, whom he married in 
1929, is one of his hobbies. They have 
a beautiful yard and they both enjoy plan- 
ning and caring for it. Mrs. Ball is ex- 
tremely talented in flower arranging and 
in making decorations of all kinds. Dr. 
Ball is clever at designing and building 
larger decorations. His Christmas innova- 
tions are uniquely original. He has used 




August 21 MCV Alumni Cocktail Party, West Virginia Medical Society 

October Richmond Chapter Fall Party (no definite date has been set) 

October 13 Alumni Social Hour and Dinner, Medical Society of Virginia 

February 27-28 Medical Scientific Assembly 

February 27 Social Hour and Banquet, John Marshall Hotel, Medical Scientific 
Assembly 

10 



electrified Christmas tree door adornments, 
gaily decorated with tinsel and other or- 
naments, and life-sized carolers, hand 
painted with cleverly concealed music; 
really, very professional. 

He is greatly interested in all sports, 
particularly baseball and basketball. 
Known as "Coach" by his many friends 
at these events, he has gained this title 
because of his fervor and vocifervous ad- 
vice to the players, umpires, and coaches. 
Another of his spare time occupations 
is reading. History is his favorite, espe- 
cially American and military, as well as 
historical novels. 

Both of the Balls enjoy entertaining 
and giving parties and are gracious and 
entertaining hosts. 

Dr. Ball is obviously most enthusiastic 
about the practice of medicine and has 
won many honors through merit and dis- 
tinction. He is now president of the Vir- 
ginia Academy of General Practice and 
is past president of the Richmond Acad- 
emy of General Practice, and, also a 
past president of the Richmond Academy 
of Medicine. For the past three years Dr. 
O. T. Graham, Jr., has been associated 
in practice with him. 

We are sure that his legion of friends 
will join us in saluting William Linwood 
Ball, the Man of the Hour! 

THE SCARAB 



faculty CUanc 



* 



ances 



At the Board of Visitors' meeting on May 9, 1958, Drs. Frank Longstaff Apperly, Wyndham 

Boiling Blanton, and Frederick Murchison Hodges were made Emeritus Professors in 

recognition of their long years of association and devotion to the College. We offer the 

following resolutions of appreciation for their outstanding service. 



Frank Longstaff Apperly 




Frank Longstaff Apperly was born in 
Shepparton, Victoria, Australia, on July 
26, 1888. He first studied medicine be- 
tween 1907 and 1910 at the University 
of Melbourne, where he won numerous 
honors, including his "Oars" as a mem- 
ber of Queen's College crews. At that 
time he was awarded a Rhodes Scholar- 
ship for further work at Oxford Univer- 
sity, England. 

Doctor Apperly's achievements as a 
physician, investigator, and teacher won 
recognition for him in a series of posi- 
tions in England, Ireland, and Australia 
between 1915 and 1932, at which time 
he was appointed professor and chair- 
man of the department of pathology at 
the Medical College of Virginia. Since 
that time he has served uninterruptedly 
with outstanding success in one of the 
pivotal positions of our medical staff. He 
has always been a man of ideals and in- 
tegrity and a stout fighter for the high- 
est possible standards of education. He 
has well merited the affection, respect, and 
appreciation of countless students of med- 



icine who have been inspired by his lec- 
tures, his stimulating personality, and his 
guidance. 

A long list of scientific publications 
attests to his continuing search for knowl- 
ege throughout his career. His recent text- 
book of pathology, Patterns of Disease, 
is widely used among medical schools. 

Quite apart from his unusual talent 
as a teacher, Doctor Apperly will be re- 
membered by all who know him for his 
modest, scholarly bearing, his clear, con- 
cise, Oxford English, his keen sense of 
humor, and his unwavering loyalty to 
friends and the College. His colleagues 
will also long remember the warm hos- 
pitality of his family in their home, 
"Sleepy Hollow," the vivid personality of 
Mrs. Apperly, and the important contri- 
bution she has made over the years to 
the cultural progress of Richmond. 

George W. Bakeman 



*denotes graduates of the Medical College 
of Virginia 



AUGUST, 1958 



Wyndham Boiling Blanton 

Dr. Wyndham Boiling Blanton, who 
since 1939 has been professor of clinical 
medicine, has been elected Emeritus Pro- 
fessor, thus bringing to a close his valu- 
able contribution of many years' service 
to the College. Dr. Blanton received his 
academic education at Hampden-Sydney 
College and the University of Virginia, 
and then attended the College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons in New York, from 
which he graduated in 1916. This was 
followed by graduate work at Columbia, 
Berlin, and Edinburgh. He served with 
the American Ambulance Service in 
France prior to the entry of this country 
in World War I, transferring to the Med- 
ical Corps of the United States Army, 
from which he was released in 1919 with 
the rank of captain. He first joined the 
staff of the College as an instructor in 
192 3 and served in the several grades, 
being made professor of the history of 



medicine in 1933. In 1939 he was made 
professor of clinical medicine. 

An avid student of history. Dr. Blanton 
has been able to combine in a way which 
is given to but few men his avocation 
and his vocation. In addition to the bur- 
den of a large private practice in internal 
medicine and his heavy teaching responsi- 
bilities, he has labored and enjoyed re- 
search in the field of history, being the 
author of Medicine in Virginia in the 
Seventeenth Century, Medicine in Virginia 
in the Eighteenth Century and /Medicine 
in Virginia in the Nineteenth Century. 
He is also the author of The Making of 
a Downtown Church, and numerous con- 
tributions to professional and historical 
publications. 

He has held many important positions 
in the societies of which he is a mem- 
ber, having been president of the Rich- 
mond Academy of Medicine in 1929 and 
presently president of the Virginia His- 
torical Society. In the latter capacity and 
in his professional life, Dr. Blanton will 
continue to carry a heavy responsibility. 
It is interesting to note that his father. 
Dr. C. A. Blanton, was for many years 
professor of the diseases of children 
at the Medical College of Virginia, and 
that on the same day on which Dr. Blan- 
ton retired his son, Dr. Wyndham B. 
Blanton, Jr., became assistant dean of 
the school of medicine, thereby contin- 
uing the valuable contribution which this 
family has made over the years to the 
College. 

His services as a teacher will be great- 
ly missed by the institution which he has 
served for so many years with such devo- 
tion, and he will be remembered grate- 
fully by a host of his former students. 

Eppa Hunton, IV 



Frederick Murchison Hodges 

Fred M. Hodges was born October 31, 
1887, in Linden, North Carolina. Follow- 
ing his primary training in the local 
schools, he attended the University of 
Georgia, the Medical College of Virginia, 
and the University of Pennsylvania. Upon 
graduation in 1910, Dr. Hodges returned 
to Richmond and for two years engaged 
in the practice of general medicine. Being 
ever interested in newer things, the then 
still new specialty of X-ray attracted his 
(Continued on page 26) 



11 



THE CHANG 





,lank space 



now, but very 



Periodontic Clinic The A| Umni Lo ung e'i n fh( 



e 'ong now. 





A vista of the College as seen from the new Richmond-Peters- 
burg Turnpike. 




A bedroom in one of rn e ; 




ew dormitories. 



Phase 



'~ kAru ire HaU Annex 



__progresses. 



ING SCENE 




Randolph-Minor Halls new 







,f r emode/, na c 

ex ' h ome of ft 



sf Ch 



urch, re 




9 rr ogror 




The freshmen chemistry students' fine new equipment in 
McGuire Hal 



Down she goes, 1103 East Clay Street, next to the Alumni 
House, for parking. 




Enni'on VV 



"" 0m s Hospital 



lobby. 



The Ennion 



Williams Hospi' 



I 



11 



Thoughtful 
Trihute 



Acknowledgement of Memorial Contribution 



The Alumni Association of The Medical College of Virginia 

gratefully acknowledges a gift 

in memory of 



John Doe 

Presented by 

Mary Doe 



Many persons have found deep satisfaction Ln maktng memorial contributions to a worthy cause. In 
this way they have both served the living and paid thoughtful tribute to the memory of a friend, associate, 
or relative. 

Should you desire to make such a gift to the Alumni Association of the Medical College of Virginia, 
you can be assured that it will have lasting value. Your contribution will serve well the estimable pur- 
poses of this Association. In this day when so many obituaries state "please omit flowers," there could 
be no nicer way to express your thoughtfulness. 

An acknowledgement will be sent to the family of the person honored. The amount of the gift will be 
held in confidence. As the donor, you will be sent an official receipt for vour tax-exempt contribution. 
The contribution form, at the bottom of the page, is included for vour convenience. Why not tear it out 
now and save it for a time when you will need it? 



Alumni Association of The Medical College of Virginia 

1105 East Clay Street 
Richmond, Virginia 



Enclosed is contribution of $_ 
In memory of 



Please send acknowledgement to- 

Name 

Address _ 



From (Donor's Name) 
Address 



School of Medicine 

The end of the academic year was 
marked by general major faculty changes. 
Dr. Frank L. Apperly, professor and 
chairman of the department of pathology 
for twenty-six years, retired on June 30, 
1958. Elsewhere in the pages of this is- 
sue are a summary of Dr. Apperly's ca- 
reer and a richly-deserved, eloquent trib- 
ute. Dr. Apperly is beloved and respected 
by his students and fellow-colleagues as 
a stimulating, patient, and thorough teach- 
er and a gentleman with broad, cultural 
interests and knowledge. His is a sym- 
pathetic and compassionate understanding 
of his fellowmen. His contributions to 
education in the medical sciences and to 
the welfare of this institution are mul- 
titude and a basic part of its strength. 

Thus, with mixed emotions, it was an 
honor to bestow on Dr. Apperly the rank 
of Professor Emeritus. At this same time 
the school also had the honor of confer- 
ring the rank of Emeritus Professor on 
three other individuals who have con- 
tributed significantly to the education of 
youth in die clinical fields. These were 
Dr. Wyndham B. Blanton, Sr., Dr. E. 
Trible Gatewood, and Dr. Fred M. 
Hodges. Dr. Blanton, in addition to his 
activities as a teacher, has also contributed 
much to the development of sound policy 
for the institution as a whole. The school 
was particularly dependent upon the vol- 
untary contributions to teaching of Dr. 
Gatewood and Dr. Hodges. 

Two other major administrative changes 
have occurred at this same time. After 
twenty years as chairman of the depart- 
ment of pediatrics, Dr. Lee E. Sutton, 
Jr., has chosen to give up his adminis- 
trative work and confine himself to his 
academic responsibilities as professor of 
pediatrics. It is difficult for all of us to 
think of the department of pediatrics with- 
out Dr. Sutton at its helm. However, we 
are most grateful that he has seen fit to 
continue to be active in his regular fac- 
ulty capacity. Finder his guidance the 
department of pediatrics has presented 
an educational program well recognized 
for its soundness and thoroughness and 
over-all excellence in both undergraduate 
and graduate education. 

Dr. Harry Walker, who has guided the 
destinies of the department of medicine, 
first as acting chairman and then as full 
chairman of the department since July, 
1956, is also giving up the administrative 
duties and returning to full-time partici- 
pation in his faculty capacity as professor 

AUGUST, 1958 



Deans' Page 



of medicine. Dr. Walker's acceptance of 
additional administrative responsibilities 
in a time of need for the institution is 
deeply appreciated and will be grate- 
fully remembered. 

Thus, committees of the faculty are 
currently seeking to nominate new chair- 
men in several of our major departments. 
In the interim, Dr. Carolyn McCue has 
accepted full-time appointment in the de- 
partment of pediatrics as associate pro- 
fessor and has accepted the responsibility 
as interim chairman for the administrative 
affairs of the department. Interim chair- 
men have not been appointed in the de- 
partments of pathology and medicine, 
but Dr. Lester F. Belter is carrying on 
administratively as executive officer in 
the department of pathology and Dr. 
Kinloch Nelson in a similar capacity in 
the department of medicine. The institu- 
tion is grateful to these individuals for 
accepting the additional responsibility in- 
volved. We could not carry on without 
this spirit of cooperative effort on the 
part of all individuals of the faculty. 

With the coming and going of faculty, 
so also have students come and gone. 
This year's graduating class totalled 97 
students, four of whom were women. 
These 97 had come from Virginia and 
eight other states. They have gone from 
the College to intern in all parts of the 
United States. Eight are interning with 
the Armed Forces and of the remaining, 
half are interning in various hospitals in 
Virginia and half in seventeen other 
states and the District of Columbia. This 
was a graduation of not only 97 students, 
but of 65 families, since that number of 
senior students were married. That the 
Medical College Hospitals continue to of- 
fer a fine educational experience is indi- 
cated by the fact that the full quota of 
40 rotating internships and 15 straight 
medicine and surgery internships is again 
filled. 

William F. Malonkv. Dedii 



School of Graduate Studies 

At the Commencement Exercises on 
June 3, 1958, three graduate students 
were admitted to the degree of doctor 
of philosophy. Dominick Anthony Coviel- 



1<>. working under Dr. Walter H. Har- 
tung, head of the department of chemistry 
and pharmaceutical chemistry, carried out 
chemical research on alpha-alkyloximino 
acids. Bernard Vincent Franko's advisor 
was Dr. J. K. Finnegan, of the depart- 
ment of pharmacology. His dissertation 
research involved pharmacological studies 
of certain diphenyl ethers derived from 
N, N-disubstituted ethanolamines. Lin- 
wood Kennerly Payne, Jr., worked under 
the advisorship of Dr. Hartung in phar- 
maceutical chemistry and conducted his 
research on amino ethers derived from 
various arylalkanols. These three research 
studies reflect and contribute to modern 
advancement in the synthesis and clinical 
application of new drugs created in the 
laboratory. 

The autumn session will open with a 
predicted enrollment of approximately 
thirty graduate students in the various 
departments, the largest number so far. 
The proportion of students working for 
the Ph.D. degree has steadily increased 
and in the coming academic year will be 
higher than ever before. The new cat- 
alogue of the Medical College will con- 
tain a detailed section on the school of 
graduate studies with a description of 
special graduate and other courses. There 
are now offered at the Medical College 
a large number of such advanced courses, 
making possible sound graduate studies 
toward the Ph.D. in many of the depart- 
ments. It is expected that this program 
will continue to expand. 

The graduate students' organization, 
a part of the M.C.V. student body, has 
been active this year, and, though a rel- 
atively small group, is growing in its con- 
tributions to the corporate life of the 
College. 

Never before has the importance of 
research and the education of investigators 
and teachers in the health fields been so 
clearly recognized. Such education is a 
vital force in the life of a Virginia medi- 
cal center. It is gratifying that our own 
College is growing in this as in the other 
educational functions. 

Ebbe Curtis Hoff, Dean 



The School of Dentistry 

Our entire class of 52 seniors grad- 
uated on June 3. . . . Our 1958 gradu- 
ates posted a perfect "batting average" 
in passing the licensure examinations held 
by the Virginia State Board of Dental 
(Continued on page 27) 



15 



' Kounb 

Ike dlcuit 

Virginia State Dental Society 

At the Virginia State Dental Associa- 
tion meeting on May 6 at the John 
Marshall Hotel, Richmond, Virginia, the 
alumni of the Medical College had a 
dinner meeting. 

It was the first meeting of this group 
in several years and those who were 
there informed the chairman, Dr. W. C. 
Henderson, that they would like to have 
this dinner meeting each year. It was a 
very congenial group, and we were hon- 
ored with the presence of the current pres- 
ident of the Dental Society, Dr. John 
Tyree, and Mrs. Tyree and Chancellor 
and Mrs. William T. Sanger. 

Roanoke Chapter 

The Roanoke Chapter assembled at the 
Shenandoah Club in Roanoke on June 
27 for a dinner meeting. Dr. Rufus Ellett 
was chairman for the dinner, and it was 
a lovely party. 

About seventy-five alumni and their 
wives were present. Dr. Harvey Haag 
and Dr. Warren Weaver brought mes- 
sages from the College, and Dr. Haag 
also talked about the activities of the 
Association during the year. 

The new president for the coming year 



will be Mrs. Elizabeth L. Sibley, the pres- 
ident-elect is Mr. Walter M. Allen, and 
the secretary-treasurer will be Miss Anne 
E. Shannon. 

North Carolina Medical 
Society 

The North Carolina Medical Society 
met on May 5 at Asheville, North Caro- 
lina. Dr. William J. Frohbose, president 
of the alumni group, was chairman for 
the alumni dinner. 

It was so nice to have such a large 
group of our good medical alumni in at- 
tendance. We missed Dr. John F. Foster, 
who, for many years, had handled all 
the arrangements. Dr. Frohbose made an 
appeal to the alumni to help the Alumni 
Association with its projects. The exec- 
utive secretary reported on the progress 
of the Association during the year. 

Elected to office for the coming year 
were Dr. John H. Nicholson, president, 
Dr. Powell G. Fox, vice-president, and 
Dr. John F. Foster, secretary-treasurer. 

Virginia Pharmaceutical 
Association 

The Virginia Pharmaceutical Associa- 
tion convention was held this year at 
the Hotel John Marshall, Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, on June 15-18, and on Monday, 
June 16, the alumni of MCV had their 
dinner meeting. 

It was a most enjoyable evening. Mr. 
R. Reginald Rooke was toastmaster, and 
Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., brought greet- 
ings to the pharmacy alumni from the 
College. Dean Weaver told them of re- 
cent activities in the school of pharmacy. 




Alumni Dinner, V. P. A. Convention 



16 



Glass flews 

1903 Frank E. Perkins (D). who has prac- 
ticed dentistry in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, since 
1913, has returned to Morganton, North Caro- 
lina. He is in the offices of Drs. Ralph Cof- 
fey. Ralph Falls, and C. C. Diercks in the 
Kibler Building. He feels fortunate to be able 
to associate with this group as Dr. Coffey is 
at present president of the North Carolina 
Dental Association. 

1908 E. Barbour Pendleton (M) of Cuckoo. 
Virginia, was honored by Louisa County on his 
seventy-third birthday on June 1. He was 
presented a gold vase and in the fall a roadside 
planting of shrubs, trees, and flowers, with 
a marker in his honor, will be made. He is 
the county's oldest practicing physician. 

1909 Sidney Slater (M) of Worthington, 
Minnesota, visited the Alumni House on May 
16. 

Charles D. Townes (D) of Waverly, Virginia, 
has been appointed aide-de-camp on the per- 
sonal staff of Governor J. Lindsay Almond, 
Jr. 

Walter Vest (M) of Huntington. West Virginia, 
was awarded an honorary degree of Master 
of Arts at the College of William and Mary 
in June. In 1756 Benjamin Franklin was the 
first to receive this honorary degree. Dr. Vest 
is the first to be given the degree "honoris 
causa" in the twentieth century. 
1913 S. B. Berkley (M) of Lynchburg, Vir- 
ginia, visited the Alumni House on April 21. 
1917 Samuel M. English (M) of Baltimore, 
Maryland, head of the medical and surgical 
department of the Baltimore and Ohio Rail- 
road, retired July 1. 

C. L. (Jutland (M) of Richmond, Virginia, is 
vacationing in Maine. 

1923 Waverly R. Payne (M) of Newport 
News, Virginia, has been named as Virginia 
chairman of the American College of Obste- 
tricians and Gynecologists 

1924 James H. Whitfield (M) is now em- 
ployed as a physician on a half-time basis at 
the City Home. 

1926 J. Berkeley Gordon (M) and his wife 
of Marlboro, New Jersey, visited mental hos- 
pitals in Scotland, England, the Channel 
Islands, and Ireland. He says the differences 
between the British and Irish hospitals and 
our American hospitals were quite marked 
and he acquired a great deal of useful infor- 
mation with particular reference to their Na- 
tional Health Act and their system of socialized 
medicine. 

R. Rodriguez-Molina (M), assistant director of 
professional services for research at the Vet- 
erans' Administration San Patricio Hospital, 
San Juan. Puerto Rico, and clinical professor 
of medicine at the University of Puerto Rico 
school of medicine, presented a paper at the 
Fifth Congress of the International Society of 
Internal Medicine held in Philadelphia in 
April. He also participated in a panel at the 
39th annual session of the American College 
of Physicians at Atlantic City, New Jersey, in 
April. He was a discussor at a symposium held 
(Continued on page 24) 

THE SCARAB 



Dormitory Poli 



lcies 



William F. Tompkins, Comptroller 



For a number of years the College has 
desired to construct dormitories for its 
students and has been seeking ways and 
means of financing them, but, except 
for students in the school of nursing, 
it has not been able to do so until the 
present time. The administration feels 
that dormitories are desirable from the 
normal college point of view of having 
students living in the college area, and 
thereby obtaining the advantages of close 
association. This is particularly so in an 
institution such as the Medical College 
where many students are required for 
hospital, clinical, and emergency room 
work, often at night as well as in the 
daytime. The need for dormitories be- 
came more pressing each year as room- 
ing houses, formerly available within 
close distances, gradually were displaced 
by business facilities and students were 
forced to live farther away, frequently 
many miles from the College. The ad- 
ministration was pleased when the 1956 
General Assembly appropriated $300,000 
towards the construction of student dor- 
mitories and the Housing and Home Fi- 
nance Agency, under the College Housing 
Program, agreed to a Federal loan of 
$1,113,000, with very favorable terms, 
for this purpose. As a consequence the 
dormitory buildings, four in number, 
are rapidly taking shape in the block 
bounded by Ninth and Tenth Streets and 
Leigh and Turpin Streets, the date for 
completion of the project being January 
1, 1959. 

Although the terms of the Federal loan 
were most advantageous and the con- 
struction contract was obtained at a lower 
cost than estimated, interest on the loan 
and repayment of the principal amount, 
as well as operating costs, must be paid 
from dormitory rentals. This requires 
that the dormitories be fully occupied. 

Several months ago the president ap- 
pointed a student dormitory committee 
to consider plans for the occupancy of 
the new dormitories and to submit rec- 
ommendations in the premises to the Ad- 
ministrative Council. Subsequently the 
committee recommended that one build- 
ing, building 4, the dormitory parallel 
to and adjacent to Leigh Street, be set 
aside for female students and that the 
other three dormitories, buildings 1, 2, 

AUGUST, 1958 



and 3, be used for male students. This was 
approved by the president who requested 
the comptroller, with the aid of the dormi- 
tory committee, to draw up policies for 
their occupancy. The following paragraphs 
contain the policies prepared in accord- 
ance with this directive. 

Buildings 1, 2, and 3 are joined in the 
shape of the letter T, building 1 on the 
south, 2 on the north and 3 to the west, 
forming the tail of the T, are for male 
students. Building 1, the closest to the 
hospital area, will be made primarily 
available for medical students; building 
2 for dental students; and building 3 
for pharmacy students. Male students of 
smaller schools, such as the school of 
physical therapy and the school of hos- 
pital administration, will be accommodated 
where practicable in these buildings. It 
is expected that members of fraternities 
can be assigned together provided the 
fraternities request such assignments at 
an early date. All rooms except for six- 
single rooms are designed for occupancy 
by two students. As far as practicable 
students will be assigned to floors in order 
of seniority with freshmen on the top 



floors and seniors on the lower floors. 
Application forms are being prepared 
by the dormitory committee, and it is 
requested that these forms be distributed 
promptly to all students by the deair; and 
school directors. Replies should be re- 
turned to the deans who will forward 
them to the chairman of the dormitory 
committee. After review by the commit- 
tee they will be sent to the College busi- 
ness office which will assign the rooms. 

In general, all single students will be 
assigned space in the dormitories except 
those residing with their families in Rich- 
mond or in the immediate vicinity, and 
student nurses who will be housed in Ca- 
baniss Hall and Randolph-Minor Hall. 
Those residing with their families in 
Richmond or vicinity will be given con- 
sideration for assignment to the dormi- 
tories on request. However, since there 
are approximately 100 more male 
single students, who do not live with 
their families in Richmond, than the num- 
ber of persons who can be accommodated 
in the dormitories, deans and school di- 
rectors are requested to recommend to 
the dormitory committee, when forward- 
ing the applications, those who should be 
excluded from occupancy in the dormi- 
tories for special reasons, including in- 
stances where a financial hardship would 
result. 




17 



The dormitories include a spacious 
main lounge, provided by the Alumni As- 
sociation and two smaller lounges, one of 
which is attached to building number 4. 
They also include a snack bar where 
breakfast, light lunches, and snacks can 
be provided. Arrangements are being made 
to have this snack bar operated by Joseph 
Beddingfield who is well known to many 
of the students, especially those attending 
classes in McGuire Hall. Meals can also 
be obtained in the Campus Room, which 
has been operated since June 3, 1958, by 
Mr. and Mrs. Haskins, the former owners 
of McCleary's Restaurant. Post office boxes 
and washer and dryer facilities will be 
installed in the dormitory. 

It is thought that rules and regulations 
governing the dormitories should include 
only the essentials and the student gov- 
ernment has been asked to prepare recom- 
mendations for such rules as are considered 
necessary and to submit them to the dor- 
mitory committee. 

The College is acquiring land in the 
vicinity of Ninth Street and the turnpike. 
It proposes to demolish the old buildings 
thereon and to develop the area into 
parking which will be made available, 
as far as possible, without charge to stu- 
dents occupying the dormitory. In ad- 



dition the College has recently constructed 
a lighted fenced parking lot, with an 
automatic gate, in the area to the north 
of the dormitories between Ninth and 
Tenth Streets, Turpin Street, and the turn- 
pike where parking can be provided MCV 
personnel to the limit of available space 
at the rate of S3 per month or $25 for 
a nine-month period. 

Maid and janitor service will be avail- 
able to the extent of a thorough cleaning 
of rooms once a week. Laundry and linen 
will not be provided but it is expected 
to arrange for laundry services for those 
who wish it by an outside laundry at the 
lowest possible cost, after advertising for 
bids. Telephone service is not provided 
for individual rooms but official tele- 
phones will be available in the dormitory 
buildings, and pay stations for outside 
calls. 

Except for the six single rooms, the 
cost per student, which is based on the 
cost of amortizing the loan and paying 
operating costs, is $261 for the nine- 
month period, to be paid $87 per quarter 
in advance. The six rooms which have 
been prepared for single occupancy will 
be available on request, at a cost of $50 
per month. 



The Largest Private Hospital in the South 

Located in a Quiet Residential Section 

Overlooking the Grounds of Battle Abbey 

Fireproof Construction 

Most Modern Equipment 




Johnston-Willis Hospital 

Richmond, Virginia 

Medical, Surgical, Obstetrical, and Pediatric Departments 

Accredited Training School for Nurses 

Approved Rotating Internships and 

Approved Residencies in Medicine. Surgery, Obstetrics, 
and Pathology 

235 Beds, Single and Double Rooms 



LEST WE FORGET 

1896 UCM H. F. Givens (M) of West Bend, 

Iowa, died April 15. 

Charles Newland (D) of Wytheville. Virginia, 

died January 15. 

1899 S. R. Jordan (M) of Carolina Beach, 

North Carolina, died February 6, 1958. He 

retired from practice ten years ago. 

1904 Charles S. Dodd (M), an eye. ear. nose. 

and throat specialist, died May 13 in Peters- 
burg, Virginia. He was a founder and member 
of the board of directors of the Virginia Negro 
Baptist Children's Home in Chesterfield Coun- 
ty. In 1954 he received an award from the 
American Medical Association in recognition 
of his contribution to medicine for fifty years. 
1909 Douglas D. Martin (M) died suddenly 
at his home in Tampa, Florida, in May. He 
was a pediatrician at Children's Hospital 

1911 William Meredith Winn (M) of Clarks- 
ville. Virginia, died April 20 in Atlantic City, 
New Jersey, where he had been visiting for 
a week. 

1912 UCM John Franklin Stover (M) of Doe 
Hill. Virginia, died January 12. He was a 
staff member of King's Daughters Hospital in 
Staunton. 

1913 Frank W. Poindexter (M) of Newport 
News, Virginia, died July 4. He was widely 
known as an eye, ear, nose, and throat special- 
ist. 

1915 G. Grady Dixon (M) of Ayden, North 
Carolina, died May 7. He had attended the 
North Carolina State Medical Society in Ashe- 
ville, where he presided as president of the 
North Carolina State Board of Health annual 
meeting. He was riding home with his wife 
and friends when he died suddenly. 

1916 Lewis Brown Hill (M) of Towson, Mary- 
land, died February 4. He was assistant pro- 
fessor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins University 
school of medicine in Baltimore. 

1918 Lester Paul (Argie) Argenbright (P) of 
Salisbury, Maryland, died April 12. He was the 
Lilly representative in this area. 
1920 Arthur Dennis Ownby (M) of Greens- 
boro. North Carolina, died January 9. He was 
on the staff of St. Leo's Hospital and was 
formerly secretary of the Guilford County Med- 
ical Society. 

1930 Samuel Byron Pope (M) of Norfolk, 
Virginia, died April 3 after a long illness. 
1932 Younger L. Power (M) of Ilion, New 
York, died on March 4. 

1939 Thomas Grove (M), of Saluda. Virginia, 
died on July 2. 

Paul T. Harrell (D) of Wake Forest, North 
Carolina, died July 5. He was a past president 
of the Fourth District of the North Carolina 
Dental Society. 



18 



Commencement Addresses 

Dr. William T. Sanger delivered the I 
commencement address at the graduation 
exercises of Bridgewater College, on June I 
1, 1958. Dr. Sanger'is a native of Bridge- 
water and graduated from the College in 
1909. He also spoke at the commencement j 
exercises of the school of nursing of 
Roanoke Memorial Hospital. 

THE SCARAB 



Qi^ts anb Cjlants to TllCV* 

Grants received during the 1958 fiscal year amounted to $953,381.91; 
gifts amounted to $200,108.66 — a total of $1,153,490.57. The list of donors 
to various funds and to individual schools follows: 



GRANTS 

American Cancer Society. Virginia Division 
American Chemical Society 
American Cyanamid Company 
American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 

Education 
American Medical Association 
American Medical Education Foundation 
American Tobacco Company 
Arthritis and Rheumatism Foundation 
Atomic Energy Commission 
L. D. Caulk Company 
The Commonwealth Fund 
Easter Seal Research Foundation 
Messrs. Robert M. Jeffress, Tennant Bryan. 

and Buford Scott 
Mead Johnson Company 
National Fund for Medical Education 
National Heart Institute 
National Institute of Arthritis and Metabolic 

Diseases 
National Institute of Dental Research 
National Institute of Health 
National Nephrosis Foundation 
National Vitamin Foundation for Lukemia 

Research 
Richmond Area Heart Association. Inc. 
Richmond Area University Center 
A. H. Robins Co. 
The Titmus Foundation, Inc. 
Tobacco Industry Research Committee 
Trustees of the Webster-Underhill Fund 
The Upjohn Company Fund 
Virginia Chapter, Arthritis and Rheumatism 

Foundation 
Virginia Heart Association 
Virginia Society for Crippled Children and 

Adults 

GIFTS 

I. A. Bigger Auditorium Fund 

F. N. Harrison 
Mrs. E. R. Markoff 
Miss Louise Pottinger 

Blood Research Fund 

Employees of C. & O. Annex Building 
Mrs. Paul Christian 
Mrs. Fred Pleasants 

Nathan Bloom Heart Fund 

Harry P. Freeman 
M. Josephson 
Southside Loan Office 

Cardiac Foundation — Cardiac 
Research 

*Dr. Reno Porter 
Mrs. E. Leonard Pollard 



^denotes alumni donors 

AUGUST, 1958 



MCV Dental Fund 

*Dr. J. H. Long. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Stern 
'Dr. P, D. Miller 
*Dr. E. F. Hodges 
*Dr. I. Wilson Ames 
*Dr. Calvin L. Belkov 
*Dr. P L. McBride, Jr. 

Dr. Howell F. Shannon 
*Dr. James A. Harrell 
*Dr. Robert E. Long 
*Dr. Jack Garian 
*Dr. Irwin Heyman 
*Dr. C. R. Mirmelstein 
*Dr. E. S. Parson, Jr. 

: Dr. L R. Fleet 
*Dr. R. H. Bruni 
*Dr. Elton P. Rosenblatt 
*Dr. Robert L. Mason 
*Dr. Leland S. Mabry 
*Dr. Samuel P. Kayne 
*Dr. I. E. Cannon, Jr. 
*Dr. Jack VX'. Chevalier 
*Dr. A. W. Jordan. Ir. 

Cliff Weil, Inc. 
*Dr. Samuel E. Buxton. Jr. 
*Dr. I. M. Kline 
*Dr. L. Ray Shields 
*Dr. M. L. Cherry 
*Dr R. F. Freeman 
*Dr. lohn S. Dilday 
*Dr. N. F. Muir 
*Dr. John C. Tyree 
*Dr. B. O. Brann 
*Dr. M. Bagley Walker 
*Dr. G. T. Taiton 
*Dr. A. G. Orphanidys 
*Dr. William A. Stokes 
*Dr. Harry L. Mears 
*Dr. Howard B. Watkins 
*Dr. G. A. Svetlik 
*Dr. Marvin E. Pizer 
*Dr. John G. Wall 
*Dr. E. S. Benson, Jr. 

Dr. Harry Roush 

Dr. Oscar R. Rosen 
*Dr. John E. Wessinger 
*Dr. Glenn R. Penny 
*Dr. Robert E. Woolwine 
*Dr. W. Howard Branch 
*Dr. Marcus R. Smith 
*Dr. Louis I. Keren 
*Dr. R. L. Holle 
*Dr. Eugene L. Kanter 

Virginia State Dental Association 

MCV Directors Fund 

Edwin J. Crockin 
Mr. L. G. Larus 
Mr. J. H. Jonessoff 
H. W. Goodwyn 



Dr. William H. Higgins Memorial 
Fund 

Nancy Conduff 

Hugh Skipwith 

Mrs. Fannie F. Berry 

H. V. Whitney 

Dr. and Mrs. W. H. Higgins. Jr. 

Mary E. Bowers 

Zach Toms 

Mrs. Warren R. Pollard. Jr. 

J. P. Green 

F. W. Gwaltney 

R. T. Wilson, Jr. 

Nat Kaufman 

A. G. Farrell 

M. R. Mills, Jr. 

James Mullen 

Mrs. Charles W. Throckmorton. Jr. 

Bernard H. Strause 

lohn Stewart Bryan Memorial Foundation. 

Inc. 
Mrs. William E. Wood 
Maurice Block 
Dr. W. T. Sanger 
E. Griffith Dodson 
Mrs. George D. Gibson 
Mrs. L. Dudley George 
Mrs. David W. Maver 
K. Lewis Warren 
T. G. Layfield, Ir. 
W. E. Barrett 
Conrad L. Price 
Mrs. C. W. Hopkins 
Mrs. J. H. Hankms 



Prescription for Pleasure 



TRAVEL 



Complete Information 
On 

SUMMER— FALL— WINTER 
CRUISES & TOURS 



Reservations And Tickets 
For All 

AIR LINES ** STEAMSHIP LINES 
HOTEL RESERVATIONS 
Telephone Milton 4-7848 

C. O. ALLEY 
TRAVEL AGENCY 

708 E Grace St., Richmond, Va. 
38 Years of Travel Service in Virginia 



19 



Sallie Belle W. Sydnor 
* Floyd S. Bennett 
Dr. Jason R. Lewis 
Miss Florence Wright 
Mrs. Joseph W. Cochran 
Mrs. J. L. Blair Buck 
Mrs. E. A. Cornett 
Helen H. Ryland 
Gertrude Conduff 
J. T. Mathews 
Mrs. E. W. Hening. Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Catterall 
Mrs. James A. Smith 
William B. Thalhimer and Annette G. 

Thalhimer Fund. Inc. 
Mrs. William H. Higgins. Sr. 
Mr. and Mrs. V. C. Barrington 
Charles P. Juroe 
Chester D. Snell 
T. C. Martin 
Mrs. Richard B. Saunders 
Mrs. T. J. Todd 
Harnett W. Elam 
Helen Draper 
Helen Starke Warriner 
Mrs. Wymond Cabell 
Morton G. Thalhimer 
Hilda C. Harris 
Mrs. B. O. Cone 
Mrs. Irene J. Schloss 
George T. Baughan 
Mrs. G. M. Zehmer 
Mrs. Ernest A. Wiedmann 
*Dr. A. S. Brinkley 
Mrs. A. S. Brinkley 
Nathan Mollen 
Margaret M. Heard 



Dr. Harry J. Warthen 
Mrs. James Henry Parsens 
P. St. George Cooke 
Mrs. P. E. Dunnington 
T. Leo Buchanan 

Hunton Memorial Eye Bank 

Rabbi Jules Lipschutz 

James River Lions Club 

Trustees of will of Eppa Hunton, Jr. 

Trustees of will of Virginia Payne Hunton 

Northside Lions Club 

Bayside Lions Club 

Southside Lions Club 

South Norfolk Lions Club 

Kempsville Lions Club 

Northumberland Lions Club 

Warwick Lions Club 

Poquoson Lions Club 

Gloucester Lions Club 

Hampton Chesapeake Lions Club 

The Lions Club of Williamsburg 

Chesterfield Lions Club 

Tuckahoe Lions Club 

Leesburg Lions Club 

Emporia Lions Club 

East Gate Lions Club of Richmond 

Lakeside Lions Club of Richmond 

Department of Medicine, General 
Fund 

Dr. lohn H. Vaughan 
*Dr. E. S. Ray 

Dr. Kinloch Nelson 
*Dr. Richard H. Kirkland 



Dr. 
Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr. 
*Dr 
*Dr 
*Dr 
*Dr 



Louis A. Leone 

H. St. George Tucker Jr. 

Allen Unger 

Tohn L. Patterson 

William Kay 

Elam C. Toone 

Robert Irby 

Albert J. Wasserman 

Reno Porter 

G. Watson James, III 

Nathan Bloom 

Arthur Klein 

John Bullock 

Miriam Carmichael 

Harold I. Nemuth 

Stuart Ragland 

John Moon 

Raymond Adams 

David Greenberg 

Robert Marston 

Jack Freund 

Harry Walker 



Peter and Julia R. Pastore Fund 

!: Dr. P. N. Pastore 

Alvin Hill Brockwell 
*Dr. Richard W. Fowlkes 

Mr. George Messick 

Mr. Harris Hart 

Mrs. D. E. Scott 

William B. Thalhimer and Barbara J. 
Thalhimer Fund, Inc. 

The Quota Club of Richmond 

Miss Anne Alexander 

Fred A. Haycox 

George T. McLean 



SITUATED ON HISTORIC MONUMENT AVENUE 

RICHMOND 20, VIRGINIA 

• A.M.A., American College of Surgeons 

• Approved for General Rotating Internships 

• Virginia Hospital Association 

• Participate in National Intern Matching Program 

• Complete Clinical & Bacteriologic Labs— Full time Pathologist 

• School of Nursing with Nat'l. Accrediting Service Approval 

• Medical, Surgical, Obstetrical and Pediatric Departments 



THE SCARAB 



20 



Dr. and Mrs. W. R. Hill 
Mr. H. E. Doyle 
Mrs. Helen Will 
The Honorable A. E. S. Stephens 
Miss {Catherine L. Warren 
The Reverend William L. Taylor 
Dr. and Mrs. H. William Fink 
Mr. Harry Brown 
Dr. J. Warren Montague 
Virginia Society for Crippled Children 
Dr. George N. Thrift 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney T. Weilman 
*Dr. Julius Hulcher 
Mr. and Mrs. Maurice L. Strause, Sr. 

Department of Pharmacology 

*Dr. Harvey B. Haag 
Anonymous 

General Pharmacy Scholarship 
Fund 

Owens & Minor, Inc. 

The Henry B. Gilpin Co. 

Peninsula Registered Pharmacists' Association 

I. B. Scherer Memorial Fund 

Mr. and Mrs. Terrence J. Brady 

Kate Hearn Abrams 

Mrs. Charles M. Glenn 

McGreevey, Werring & Howell. Inc. 

Charles W. Frazier 

Greensboro Manufacturing Co. 

Mrs. Rosalie Spencer Robertson 

Miss Mary S. Weaver 

Iota Gamma Phi Kappa Chapter 



Mrs. Lester Endlar 
Lewis G. Larus 
Mrs. Gordon F. Wood 
Mrs. Martha C. Patton 
Mrs. John B. Bullard 
Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Gilman 
Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Carlton 
Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Lefew 
Margaret L. Sorg 
Mr. 'and Mrs. H. R. Wood 
Cook's, Inc. 
Mrs. G. L. Richardson 
Mr. and Mrs. S. I. Weilman 
Gilbert H. Parker 
Vernon S. Yow 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilmer A. Sims. Jr. 
Mrs. Charles Kruse 
Effie Pauline Scott 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Bayliss 
Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Covey 
Mrs. J. Roland Rooke 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanton Glaser 
*Dr. R. Blackwell Smith, Jr. 
Employees — Rucker-Rosenstock 
Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Mooers 
Mr. Edgar M. Andrews 
Mrs. Comer P. Jackson 
Mrs. Ray E. Alsop 
Mrs. T. A. Fulghum 
Mrs. J. A. Rucker 
Mrs. E. S. Fitz 
Mrs. Anne P. Sanders 
Halifax County Cancer Association 
Power Equipment Co. 
Mrs. J. B. Bullard 
Mr. Samuel W. Meek 



The P.O.E. Chapter M 

Mr. and Mrs. Noel C. Dawson 

Mr and Mrs. Fred Williams 

Mrs. Thompson's Club of Hill School 



Scholarships 



Anonymous 

Benwood Foundation. Inc. 

The Norfolk Foundation 

American Business Clubs Spastic Paralysis 

Fund 
Edwards Scholarship Fund 
Mecklenburg Scholarship Fund 
The Colonial Dames of America 
Petersburg Medical Auxiliary 
Jessie Smith Noyes Foundation, Inc. 
First Baptist Church 
United Daughters of Confederacy 
Virginia Methodist Conference of The 

Methodist Church 
Mrs. Doris K. Neale 
The Payne Fund 
Mecklenburg Scholarship Association. Inc. 

Buford Scott Fund 

Elizabeth Scott and John H. Bocock Trust 
Mary Ross Scott and William T. Reed. Jr. 
Trust 

Social Senice Department Fund 

Westover Hills Methodist Church 

John J. Powers 

Mrs. H. W. Goodwyn 



ffffj 

\if ■ 




Nearby and Neighborly 
THE BANK OF VIRGINIA 

Medical College Facility 
Social Center Building 



Staff, students and patients now en- 
joy the con\enience of banking fa- 
cilities right here at MCV. 

Welcome to The Bank of Virginia — 
at MCV, and at 15 other locations 
in Richmond, Petersburg, Roanoke, 
Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Newport 
News. 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Member Federal Reserve System 



AUGUST, 1958 



21 



Newby Toms Fund for the Deaf 

Mr. and Mrs. Zach Toms 

Anonymous 

Mary Nixon and Buford Scott Trust 

The four Toms children 

MCV Urological Research Fund 

O. W. Dudley, Jr. 
Pineville Corporation 

Robert Waller Memorial Fund 

Anonymous 
Mr. H. Carl Bosher 
Dr. Frank L. Apperly 
MCV Woman's Club 
Miss Anne Alexander 
Dr. John M. Meredith 
Pathology Department 
Glenn Weaver 

Sam Wright Memorial Student 
Fund 

J. T. W. Read, II 

M. M. Kooglei 

Alice A. Corwin 

Dr. George Parker Barnes 

Miscellaneous Projects 

Alcohol Research Fund, Research in Alco- 
holic Study by Dr. John Forbes — State 
Health Department 

A. F. P. E. Undergraduate Scholarship Fund — 



American Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education 

B. C. G. Clinical Investigation Fund — Rich- 
mond Tuberculosis Association 

Dr. Brooks for research in Tung Cancer 
Chemotherapy — Dr. Sidney Farber 

Cardiovascular Surgery Fund — Dr. Reno Porter 

School of Dentistry — Mr. W. M. Duncan 

Endocrine Research Fund — Dr. Isabel Talia- 
ferro 

Samuel H. Gellman, Residency in Medicine 
— Va. Trust Co., agent for Mrs. Anne B. 
Gellman 

Henrico Fund, Pediatrics Department. Dr. 
Kendig — Henrico County Tuberculosis As- 
sociation 

Knights Templar Eye Fund, Dr. Guerry — 
Knights Templar Eye Foundation 

Larus Fund — Lewis G. Larus 

McGuire Hall Annex, Phase II — Anonymous, 
American Tobacco Co. 

National Society for Crippled Children and 
Adults Seminar — Easter Seal Research 
Foundation 

Department of Ophthalmology — Dr. DuPont 
Guerry. Ill 

Dr. DuPont Guerry, Department of Ophthal- 
mology — DeSoto Fitzgerald 

Department of Otolaryngology, Plan II — Dr. 
P. N. Pastore 

Patients Care — Va. Annual Conference of 
the Methodist Church and National Council 
to Combat Blindness 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry, General Fund — 
Smith. Kline and French Foundation 



School of Pharmacy — People's Drug Stores 

Physical Therapy General Fund — The Rees 
Corporation 

St. Philip Director's Fund — J. H. Jonessoff 

St. Philip and Dooley Children— St. Cath- 
erines' League 

Samis Grotto Research — Samis Grotto 

Samis Grotto Research Fellowship — Samis 
Grotto 

Schwarzchild Physiotherapy Fund — Schwarz- 
child Foundation 

Sinsheimer Loan Fund, Student Nurses — 
Marie Sinsheimer 

Aubrey Straus Prize Fund — Mrs. Augusta S. 
Goodman 

Student Loan Fund — Burlington Industries 
Foundation 

Tobacco Industry Research Fellowship — To- 
bacco Industry Research Committee 

Construction of Toxicology Laboratory — Dr. 
H. B. Haag 

Unrestricted Endowment Fund for Construc- 
tion of Laboratory — Dr. H. B. Haag 

Vose Dental Clinic Fund, for children or other 
charity work — Estate of Eloise F. Vose 

Hudnall Ware Loan Fund — Ware Research 
Society 

Rachel Whipple Memorial Fund — Katherine 
Lee Johnson 

Dr. Fisher, Alcohol Research in Physiology — 
State Health Dept. 

Dr. Paul Larson, Alcohol Research in Phar- 
macology — State Health Dept. 
Dr. Forbes, Alcohol Research in Biochemis- 
try — State Health Dept. 



TUCKER HOSPITAL, INC. 

212 West Franklin Street 
Richmond 20, Virginia 

A private hospital for diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological 
patients. Hospital and out-patient services. 

(Organic diseases of the nervous system, psychoneuroses. psychosomatic dis- 
orders, mood disturbances, social adjustment problems, involutional reactions 
and selective psychotic and alcoholic problems.) 



Dr. Howard R. Masters 
Dr. George S. Fultz, Jr. 



Dr. James Asa Shield 
Dr. Amelia G. Wood 



Dr. Weir M. Tucker 
Dr. Robert K. Williams 



22 



THE SCARAB 



TAKE A NEW LOOK AT FOOD 
ALLERGENS*-TAKE A LOOK 

AT NEW DIMETANEliiiilii 

In a recent 140-patient study 1 dimetaxe gave "more relief or was superior to other anti- 
histamines," in 63, or 45% of a group manifesting a variety of allergic conditions. Gave 
good to excellent results in 87%. Was well tolerated in 92%. Only 1 1 patients (8%) 
experienced any side reactions and 5 of these could not tolerate any antihistamines. 

dimetane Extentabs (12 mg. each, coated) provide antihista Hfe ' M '" A »» A "«gy '«:'* '958 

mine effects daylong or nightlong for 10-12 hours. Tablets ] '{ j .. j j I (p ABABR0MDYLAMINE maleate) 

(4 mg. each, scored) or pleasant-tasting Elixir (2 mg./j cc.) 

ma) he prescribed t.i.d. oi qid., 01 as stipple- KjjjjjjjjjB^ 

mentary dosage to Extentabs in acute allergic M S5ffiS| 

situations. A. H. ROBINS CO., IN( .Richmond WfiBS. 

20, Virginia. Ethical Pharmaceuticals of Merit Since 1878. EXTENTABS '"' • TABLETS • ELIXIR 





Class News 

(Continued from page 16) 

at the World Congress of Gastroenterology of 
the 59th annual meeting of the American 
Gastroenterological Association in May. Dr. 
and Mrs. Rodriguez -Molina attended the com- 
mencement of their daughter, Mirian-Theresa, 
at the Georgetown Visitation Preparatory 
School. Washington, D. C. 
J. Aso Shield (M) of Richmond. Virginia, was 
recently elected executive vice-president of 
the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. 

1927 Blake W. Meador (M) of Richmond, 
Virginia, attended the American Medical As- 
sociation meeting in San Francisco, California, 
in June. 

1928 Horvey B. Haag (M) gave a paper on 
psychotherapeutic agents at the Neuropsychiatric 
Society of Virginia. He, also, attended the 
A.M. A. meeting in San Francisco. 

1929 Chapman H. Binford (M) has been 
elected president of the International Academy 
of Pathology at the annual meeting in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, in April. He is a medical director 
of the United States Public Health Service on 
duty as Public Health Service representative 
at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. 
William L. Cooke (M) of Charleston, West 
Virginia, was named vice-president of the 
National Tuberculosis Association at the an- 
nual meeting in Philadelphia in May. 

John C. Watts (P) of Smithfield, Virginia, was 
elected secretary-treasurer of the Tri-County 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

1930 State Senator Edward E. Willey (P) was 



presented the Association's Distinguished Serv- 
ice Award by the Richmond Pharmaceutical 
Association on May 7. 

1933 Mr. and Mrs. Wilhelm Haag (P) of 
Richmond Virginia, announce the birth of 
Douglas Pickett on April 23. 

Edwin D. Vaughan (M) of Richmond, Virginia, 
is vacationing in Europe. 

1934 Robert V. Terrell (M) of Richmond. 
Virginia, with his family is vacationing in 
California. 

Elam Toone (M) of Richmond, Virginia, at- 
tended the American Medical Association meet- 
ing in San Francisco, California. 

1935 John D. Hamner, Jr., (M) has been 
named regional director of local services of 
the Virginia State Health Department. He 
will give advisory services to health directors 
and health department personnel in the north- 
ern section of the State. 

J. Curtis Nottingham (P) of Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia, was elected president of the Chesapeake 
Pharmaceutical Association on May 14. 

1937 Kenneth N. Byrne (M) of Welch, West 
Virginia, has been named West Virginia State 
chairman of the Flying Physician's Association 
at a recent Flying Physician's Flight Proficiency 
Course at Tulsa, Oklahoma. The Association 
is a national organization of pilot physicians 
who have been active in promoting flight safety. 
Richard N. O'Dell (M) of Charleston, West 
Virginia, has been appointed West Virginia 
Governor for the American Diabetes Associa- 
tion. 

1938 Charles F. James, Jr., (M), general 



surgeon at Tallahassee, Florida, represented 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute at the inaugura- 
tion of the president of Florida State Uni- 
versity recently. 

Sidney G. Page (M), accompanied by his wife 
and daughter, Diane, attended the American 
Medical Association meeting in San Francisco, 
California. 

1939 Robert Coleman Longan, Jr., (M), who 
has been engaged in the private practice of 
psychiatry in Richmond since 1947, has been 
appointed to the State Hospital Board. 

1940 Boyd Clements (P) was elected treasurer 
of the Chesapeake Pharmaceutical Association 
on May 14. 

1941 Estill L. Caudill, Jr., (M) was elected 
president-elect of the Tennessee Academy of 
General Practice at the annual meeting of the 
Academy in Gatlinburg in April. 

1943D Camilla Jeffries (P) has been elected 
president of the Richmond Retail Drug Asso- 
ciation. 

1943M Dr. and Mrs. Custis L. Coleman (M) 
have another daughter, Anne Louise, born on 
May 29. 

H. David Kafka (P) of Moore's Drug Store, 
Alexandria, Virginia, has been named one of 
the 29 winners in the Sickroom Needs Dis- 
play contest. 

Clark Richardson (P) was elected vice-president 
of the Chesapeake Pharmaceutical Association 
on May 14. 

1944 Rufus Elleft (M) of Roanoke, Virginia, 
visited the Alumni House on May 15. 

1946 Marvin G. Burdette (M) has moved from 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 



HOSPITAL DIVISION 



Medical College of Virginia Hospital 
Memorial Hospital 

Dooley Hospital 

Saint Philip Hospital 

Ennion G. Williams Hospital 

(Operated jointly ivith the State Health Department) 

A. D. Williams Memorial Clinic 

(Outpatient Department) 



To preserve and restore health To seek the cause and cure of disease 

To educate those who would serve humanity 



24 



THE SCARAB 



Huntington, West Virginia, to Winter Haven, 
Florida, where he will continue the practice 
of his specialty of general surgery. 
Paul Mazel (P) is working towards a Ph.D. in 
pharmacology at Vanderbilt University in Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. He received his M.A. in 
Texas. He has read papers before societies in 
Baltimore and Philadelphia. 

1947 R. David Anderson, (P), chief pharmacist 
at the Kings Daughters' Hospital, Staunton, 
Virginia, was nominated vice-president of the 
American Society of Hospital Pharmacists at 
the A. Ph. A. meeting. 

1948 Elizabeth R. Caro (M) and Albert Straw- 
insky were married December 28. She will 
continue to practice at Saint Elizabeths Hospital 
in Washington, D. C. 

R. W. Moseley (M) was transferred from the 
Carroll-Grayson-Galax Health District to the 
Caroline-Hanover-King William District of the 
Virginia State Health Department. 

1949 Esperanza Ares Day (PT) is with her 
husband at the American Institute for Foreign 
Trade, Phoenix, Arizona, where she has had 
the opportunity to learn the language and cus- 
toms of the country in which her husband 
plans to work. The course of study concen- 
trates on techniques of international business 
administration, foreign language, and char- 
acteristics of foreign countries. He specialized 
in Latin American countries. 

Allen Faircloth (P) of Suffolk, Virginia, was 
elected president of the Tri-County Pharma- 
ceutical Association Charles F. Kingery (P) of 
Franklin was elected vice-president of the same 
group. 

At a recent meeting of the Stuart Circle Ex- 
Interns Club in Richmond, Virginia, William 
B. Moncore (M) was elected secretary. 
Cecil Mullins (P) of Danville. Virginia, was 
elected treasurer of the Southside Pharma- 
ceutical Association on April 29. 

1950 Walter Bailey (P) of Front Royal. Vir- 
ginia, was elected vice-president of the North- 
ern Virginia Pharmaceutical Association on 
April 17. 

Wyndham Blantan, Jr.,(M) has been appointed 
assistant dean of medicine at the Medical 
College of Virginia. 

Graham Barkley (P) of Danville, Virginia, was 
elected vice-president of the Southside Pharma- 
ceutical Association on April 29. 
John Minahan (P) of Dante, Virginia, was 
elected president of the Lonesome Pine Phar- 
maceutical Association on May 25. 
John Powell (M) of Richmond, Virginia, was 
elected president of the Stuart Circle Ex-In- 
terns Club of Richmond, Virginia, at a recent 
meeting. 

1951 Tom Holland (P) of Danville, Virginia, 
was elected secretary of the Southside Pharma- 
ceutical Association on April 29. 

1952 Raymond C. Houghton (M) has finished 
his residency in obstetrics and gynecology at 
DePaul Hospital in Norfolk, Virginia, and is in 
private practice in New Bern, North Carolina, 
William R. Tabor (M) is now beginning a resi- 
dency in interal medicine at MCV. 

1953 Ben B. Gee (P) has joined Eli Lilly 
and Company as a representative with head- 
quarters in Portsmouth, Virginia. His terri- 
tory includes several southeastern Virginia and 
northeastern North Carolina counties. 

AUGUST, 1958 



James E. Moore, III, (M) received the degree 
of master of medical science from Ohio State 
LTniversity in June. 

1954 Leon J. Hecht (D) of Norfolk, Virginia, 
is engaged to Miss Marlene Swain of Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

1955 Harvey Morgan (P) of Gloucester, Vir- 
ginia, was elected secretary of the Chesapeake 
Pharmaceutical Association on May 14. 

1956 Tony Constant (M) of Richmond. Vir- 
ginia, is the proud father of twin daughters, 
Elaine and Allison, born on March 31. He also 
has another daughter, Kathy. Dr. Constant is 



in general practice on the Northside. 
C.ipt. R. Poge Hudson (M) was on the path- 
ology house staff of Johns Hopkins Hospital 
and instructor at Johns Hopkins University. 
His wife, Sally Sewell (N), was the first non- 
Hopkins graduate to be head nurse on the Osier 
service in many years. They are now at Tachi- 
kawa, Japan. 

1957 Gary Max White (P) is now undergo 
ing the 32-week Marine Officers Basic Course 
at Quantico, Virginia, to become a qualified 
infantry platoon leader. He was commissioned 
a Marine second lieutenant in June. 




ALL HOTELS HAVE TELETYPEWRITER CONNECTIONS 



25 



Faculty Changes 

(Continued from page 11) 
attention, so he closed his office to take 
special training in Vienna. Once again 
home he practiced roentgenology until 
World War I, when he joined Base Hos- 
pital 45. While in France he was selected 
to be chief radiologist of a group of 
hospitals in the Toul area. After the War 
Major Hodges came back to practice, to 
teach, and to become a leader in civic 
as well as medical affairs. 

Although busy in private practice, he 
found time to become president of the 
Richmond Academy of Medicine. The 
Southern Medical Association, American 
College of Radiology, and The American 
Roentgen Ray Society. Dr. Hodges has 
always believed in the clinical aspect of 
radiology and has always insisted on 
"looking at the patient as well as the 
film." He is recognized for his contri- 
butions that have resulted in improvement 
in the treatment of certain malignant and 
inflammatory conditions. His conserva- 
tive approach does not restrain him when 
he is convinced that something more 
radical should be tried. 

Dr. Hodges' other interests include 
sports, gardening, and people. Recogniz- 
ing the need of certain underprivileged 
children in Richmond, he and his friend, 
the late Dr. W. T. Graham, started and 
counseled the Gambles Hill Community 
Center in its useful work in that part 
of this city. 

In 1929 Dr. Hodges married Louise 
Anderson of Richmond and they have 
two children and three grandchildren. 
Dr. and Mrs. Hodges make their home 
in Richmond. He continues to practice 
because he likes it, his energy demands 
it, and his friends just won't let him stop. 
Hunter B. Frischkorn. Jr.. m.d. 



NEW APPOINTMENTS 

April 

*Dr. Bernard V. Franko, instructor in 

pharmacology 
Dr. Robert H. Jordon, clinical instructor 

in medicine 
Dr. Franklin B. McKechnie, associate 

professor of anesthesiology 
Dr. Sami I. Said, assistant professor of 

medicine 
Dr. Robert W. Shippee, instructor in 

denture prosthesis 
Dr. Edward L. Tucker, assistant pro- 
fessor of English 
Miss Margaret C. Nelson, instructor in 

nursing 

May 

Miss Margaret Daniel, instructor in 
nursing (two-year nursing program) 

Dr. Eugene W. Wyso, associate in medi- 
cine 

Miss Mary Ann Robinson, instructor in 
nursing 

Miss Margaret Epps, instructor in Saint 
Philip School of Nursing 

pine 

Miss Justina E. Bishop, assistant pro- 
fessor of nursing 

Dr. Doyle E. Roebuck, instructor in 
microbiology 

RESIGNATIONS 

April 
Dr. William B. Lundeen, instructor in 

roentgen technic 
Dr. William A. Peabody, assistant re- 
search professor of pharmacology 
*Mrs. Bertha C. Rolfe, instructor in phar- 
macy 
*Mrs. Phyliss B. Freund, instructor in 
nursing 
Mr. William E. Goldsmith, instructor in 
community medicine 



Dr. Bernard M. Savage, instructor in 
radiology 

Miss Nancy M. Shields, assistant in- 
structor in roentgen technic 

Dr. Billy W. Sloope, assistant professor 
of biophysics 

Dr. J. V. Turner, Jr. assistant professor 
of crown and bridge prosthodontics 

Miss Mildred G. Scott, instructor in nurs- 
ing 
May 

Dr. Herbert D. Coy, professor of oper- 
ative dentistry 
June 

Dr. Richard W. Dutton, visiting lec- 
turer in biochemistry 



One Hundred Twenty-Fifth 
College Anniversary — 1962 

Committtees to make elaborate plans 
for MCV's 125th anniversary, 1962, will 
likely be announced in the near future, 
and ideas will be sought widely. These 
from alumni will be welcomed warmly. 

It is expected that the program when 
completed will provide for a series of 
functions, extending over a year or maybe 
more. All schools will have important 
roles both in developing and executing 
plans. No doubt some surprises will be 
in prospect for all of us. 

The new medical educational building 
for which planning funds are now avail- 
able from the State in the amount of 
$225,000 should be financed and ready 
for dedication hopefully by the end of 
the celebration period. That will be a 
great day for all of us at MCV. 

Meanwhile we hope ideas will begin 

to pour into our alumni headquarters 

for the Centennial Planning Committee. 

W. T. Sanger, Chancellor 



RHEASTAT 

for control of diarrhea 

and relief of inflammations 
and acute upsets of the gastro- 
intestinal tract 

Each fluidounce contains: phenobarbital, % gr. (16.2 mg.); hyoscyamine sulfate, 0.1286 mg; atropine sulfate, 0.0250 mg; 
hyoscine hydrobromide 0.0074 mg; kaolin, colloidal, 90 gr. (6 Gm); pectin, 5 gr. (0.32 Gm); sodium, 6 mEq; potass.um, 4 
mEq. in a special aluminum hydroxide gel. 

Usual adult dose: 1 or 2 tablespoonfuls every 3 or 4 hours 

Detailed literature available on request. 

VANPELT & BROWN, INC., Richmond 4, Va. 



2o 



THE SCARAB 



Deans' Page 

(Continued from page 15) 

Examiners. . . . New faculty appointments 
for the next session have been announced. 
... Dr. R. W. Shippee, graduate of North- 
western University dental school and the 
University of Michigan graduate school 
joined our faculty on a full-time basis 
on July 1. . . . Numerous additional part- 
time teachers have been appointed to help 
us with instruction of our larger classes. 
. . . Construction has been started on a 
new and larger Pedodontic Clinic in our 
Wood Memorial Building. . . . Later in 
the year a special Orthodontic Clinic will 
be set up. . . . Summer clinic session is 
in full swing. . . . Our next entering class 
of 80 freshman students has been an- 
nounced. . . . The Virginia State Dental 
Association recently established a student 
loan fund with proceeds from sale of 
amalgam scrap. . . . MCV alumni cur- 
rently hold many offices in the Virginia 
State Dental Association: D. Blanton 
Allen, D'35, president; B. M. Haley, 
D'33, president-elect; R. L. Simpson, 
D'35, chairman of the Executive Coun- 
cil. . . . Dr. H. T. Knighton, professor of 
bacteriology and dentistry, was recently 
elected vice-president of the International 
Association for Dental Research. . . . Dur- 
ing the last two years dental faculty mem- 
bers published 23 papers in scientific den- 
tal journals and appeared on innumerable 
programs all over the U. S. from Boston 
to San Francisco. . . . We continue to 
labor for improvement in our undergrad- 
uate program, for greater efforts in re- 
search, and for an expanded program of 
graduate and postgraduate dental edu- 
cation. . . . The next session should be 
our finest. . . . We invite our alumni 
and others to visit with us for a "look- 
and-see" tour of our school. 

Harry Lyons. Dean 



School of Pharmacy 

A record number of senior students 
were graduated with the B.S. degree at 
the June Commencement exercises. Of 
the fifty-nine graduates in the class, eight 
were women. Not all of these students 
were able to take the complete State 
Board examination because some lacked 
experience, but of the entire group, fifty- 
three intend to practice either retail or 
hospital pharmacy. Two of the group are 
entering graduate school next fall and 

AUGUST, 1958 



lour have been accepted by the school 
of medicine for their freshman class. 

All of the honors awarded to the senior 
students were won by Carl R. Johnson of 
Orange, Virginia. Mr. Johnson had a 
straight "A" average for his four years 
of work in pharmacy — a most remarkable 
achievement. He was awarded the A. D. 
Williams Scholarship Award for having 
obtained the highest average during the 
senior year, the Wortley F. Rudd Award 
for the highest average over four years, 
the Frank P. Pitts Award for the highest 
average in chemistry, and the William 
G. Crockett Award for the highest aver- 
age in pharmacy subjects. Mr. Johnson 
has enrolled in the graduate school of 
the University of Illinois where he will 
major in chemistry. He has been awarded 
the Roger Adams fellowship which will 
support his work during his first year 
there. 

The A. D. Williams Awards for un- 
dergraduates who achieve the highest av- 
erages in their respective classes were 
won by women. Miss Nancy C. Gill of 
Petersburg led the freshman class with 
an almost perfect record for the year. 
Miss Helen J. Beavers of Richmond led 
the sophomores with a straight "A" rec- 
ord and Miss Betty J. Somervell of White 
Stone led the juniors with an excellent 
record. 

The Dean's List for the final quarter 
of the year carried the names of twenty- 
five students. Students who earn this dis- 



tinction have averaged "B" or better on 
their courses for the last quarter of the 
year. This represents about 10% of the 
student body in the school of pharmacy. 
If all students who have matriculated 
register in September, we again will have 
a filled school for the 1958-59 year. 
There are 61 seniors, 68 juniors, and 80 
plus in each of the sophomore and fresh- 
man classes. This will give us about the 
same number of students as last year when 
we opened the school year with 292 stu- 
dents. We thank all of you who have 
worked so diligently in interesting quali- 
fied youngsters in the study of pharmacy. 

Warren E. Weaver, Dean 



School of Nursing 

Fifty-one students will have completed 
successfully the baccalaureate and diploma 
programs of the schools of nursing this 
year. We are proud of these graduates and 
we look forward to their contribution in 
the health fields and in the community. 

While graduation plans kept us occu- 
pied during spring months, the summer 
has been no less busy. We have been 
deeply engaged in maintaining and de- 
veloping the year-round teaching schedule 
of the various programs as well as plan- 
ning for the new enrollees in the fall. 

The response to recruitment efforts for 
all programs has been encouraging. Reg- 
istration for the baccalaureate program 



Compliments 
of 

Richmond Memorial 
Hospital 



27 



closed on June 23, 1958, when the quota 
of 6? freshmen students was reached. For 
the first time since the establishment of 
the baccalaureate program, we have been 
able to be more selective in view of the 
number of applications received. We aim 
to strengthen our selection procedures 
even more in the future in order to re- 
duce the withdrawal rate caused by low 
academic achievement in the program. 
This effort, combined with the inaugura- 
tion of the associate degree program in 
which we have 35 freshmen students en- 
rolled, should assist greatly in providing 
a larger number of well-qualified gradu- 
ate nurses. Anticipating 25 enrollees in 
the diploma program, the total number 
of entering freshmen students in the three 
programs should approximate 125, the 
largest class on record for the school. 

Admitting and holding larger numbers 
of students require additional teaching 
personnel. Although we are not yet reach- 
ing the desirable ratio of faculty to stu- 
dent load, we are improving our position 
greatly by increasing our staff with the 
following appointments: 

Baccalaureate Program 

Miss Mary Robinson, R.N., B.S. 



Rx — For Your Chronically III Patients 




9 minutes by car from any local hospital 

SKILLED NURSING CARE 

24 Hours Daily Professional Supervision 

AGED - CHRONICALLY ILL 

INVALIDS ♦ CONVALESCENTS 



c Each Patient Attended by Own Doctor 

• Res. R.N. and Res. M.C.V. Extern 

• Formerly 52 Bed General Hospital 

• Trained Dietitian. Port Time O.T. 

• Private and Semi-Private Rooms with Toilets 

• Large Trained Staff of Nurses and Attendants 

• Kidde ATMO Fire Detection System 

• Rates From $50 to $75 Weekly, Gen. Care 

Write or Phone Bernard Mas/an, Adm. 

Terrace Hill Nursing Home 

"Understanding Care" 

Phone Milton 3-2777 
2112 Monteiro Avenue, Richmond 22, Va. 



28 



Miss Mildred Bramble, R.N., B.S. 

Miss Dorothea Hall, R.N., B.S. 

Miss Harriette Patteson, R.N., B.S. 
Associate Degree Program 

Miss Justina Bishop, R.N., M.S. 

Mrs. Margaret Daniels, M.S. 
Diploma Program 

Mrs. Margaret Nelson, R.N., B.S. 

Mrs. Margaret Epps, R.N., B.S. (fill- 
ing newly created position as coordi- 
nator for Hampton Institute affiliates) 
Miss Jean Hayter, R.N., M.S., on leave 
to accept a fellowship award making pos- 
sible advanced study for a doctorate at 
Columbia University, will return to the 
school on September 1. 

Each of these persons brings consider- 
able educational and experienced back- 
grounds in her respective specialty areas 
to augment the well qualified faculty al- 
ready assembled. 

Of equal importance to meeting de- 
mands of expansion are teaching and hous- 
ing facilities. The four floors being added 
to Randolph-Minor Hall are scheduled 
for September first occupancy, making 
available living accommodations for 120 
students. The color schemes and furnish- 
ings for these units are different — and 
pleasing, we hope, especially since we have 
attempted to add a distinctive feminine 
touch. 

Teaching facilities for the associate 
degree program are being provided by re- 
modeling the First African Baptist Church, 
Broad and College Streets, newly named 
the Randolph-Minor Annex. When con- 
struction is completed in September, all 
offices, laboratories, and classrooms for 
this program will be housed in this unit. 

Although we have augmented to a de- 
gree our faculty staff and provided some 
additional housing and teaching areas, 
we are still cognizant of the fact that we 
are only approaching our actual needs 
and requirements in these areas if we 
mean to project and maintain the high 
academic standards we desire. 

A resume of recent activities for us 
would be remiss were we not to recog- 
nize the representation from our schools at 
the National Student Nurses' Association 
Biennial Convention in Atlantic City, 
New Jersey, June 5-9. Of the eleven 
students attending from the baccalaureate 



Medical Scientific ASSEMBLY 
February 27-28, 1959 



and diploma programs, five were sent 
by their state or national associations in 
recognition of the offices each held in 
the respective organizations. Miss Clem- 
entine Sadler, class of 1958, as second 
vice-president of the National Student 
Nurses' Association, presided at several 
scheduled meetings. Miss Shirley Hart- 
mann, also of the class of 1958, and Miss 
Berenice Skehan, director of the associ- 
ate degree program, appeared on a panel 
discussion. 

The school's activities for the past six 
months have been varied and exciting. 
Our air of "busyness" is aimed at action, 
progress, and accomplishment in the fu- 
ture. 

Doris B. Yingling. Dean 



Pharmacist of the Year 

Secretary of the Virginia State Board 
of Pharmacy, Ralph Marion Ware, Jr., 
was elected as "Pharmacist of the Year" 
for 1958 at the Virginia Pharmaceutical 
Association convention in Richmond on 
June 15-18, 1958, for his outstanding 
service and invaluable help in many 
phases of pharmacy in which he is in 



Jack M. Enoch Max H. Goodloe 

RICHMOND SURGICAL 
SUPPLY COMPANY 

5 WEST GRACE STREET 
RICHMOND, VA. 

Serving the Medical 
Profession of Virginia 

Surgical Instruments • Laboratory 

Supplies • Surgical Supplies 

Equipment • Repairs 

Dial Milton 8-6566 

"Quality and Service at Its Best" 



THE SCARAB 



first thinys 




When the Condition 

is not acute and ditiynosis 

is not obvious 



. change the patient's conscious- 
ness from anxiety to faith 

establish an inner calmness in 
the patient 

clarify the symptoms and diag- 
nosis by removing the symptoms 
due to anxiety 

create in the patient a mental 
climate for health 



creates a subtle, even, continuous mild 
sedation without depression . . . com- 
bats anxiety . . . separates functional 
from organic symptoms 

Each tablet or capsule contains 1/4 

grain phenobarbital and 1/3 grain 

colloidal sulfur 

One, three or four times daily 

Wm. p. Poythress & Co.. inc. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 

Return Postage Guaranteed 



HEDICAL SOCIETY OF VIRGINIA 
1105 WEST FRANKLIN STREET 
RICHMOND 19. VIRGINIA 



NON-PROF.ORG. 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

Richmond, Virginia 
Permit No. 761 



SECOND ANNUAL 
MEDICAL SCIENTIFIC ASSEMBLY 

February 27-28, 1959 

Now that the smoke has blown away from the little fire that was kindled at the first 
annual Scientific Assembly which was held on February 21 and 22, 1958, it may be re- 
called that this was a jointly sponsored project of the Alumni Association and the School 
of Medicine. The mission was to get you back to see what your school was doing in the 
education of physicians, dentists, pharmacists, nurses, and technicians and in research; also, 
that your school might get to see you, that your interest and efforts might be sought in 
helping the school to carry on this very important work. All who came said it was a great 
success. 

Your Board of Trustees of the Alumni Association unanimously agreed to have the 
Assembly again on February 27 and 28 of 1959— WON'T YOU PLEASE PUT THIS DOWN 
ON YOUR CALENDAR NOW— YOUR SCHOOL WOULD LIKE TO HAVE YOU BACK! 

EDWARD A. ALEXANDER, Chairman 




e 




ficia! Organ 

of the 
lumni Association 

of the 
Medical College 

Virginia 




r. 1958 
7, Number 4 






Official Organ of the 
Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 

Published by the Medical College of Virginia Alumni 
Association in February, May, August, and November 

Editorial Committee 

Robert V Terrell, M'34, Editor-in-Chief and Chairman 

James T. Tucker, M'27 

William T. Sanger, Chancellor 

Minnie M. Franck, Managing Editor 

Mildred H. Clark, Assistant Managing Editor 

Officers 

J. Spencer Dryden, M'33, President 

6816 Millwood Road, Bethesda 14, Md. 

James T. Tucker, M'27, Immed. Past President 

Medical Arts Building, Richmond, Va. 

R. Reginald Rooke, P'21, President-Elect 

2929 Second Avenue, Richmond, Va. 

J. Robert Massie, Jr., M'34, Vice-President 

1000 West Grace Street, Richmond, Va. 

Harry Lyons, D'23, Vice-President 

Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia 

George F. Hendley, P'iS, Vice-President 

2125 Fairmount Avenue. Richmond, Virginia 

Mrs. Anne F. Mahoney. N'29, Vice-President 

907 West 31st Street, Richmond, Virginia 

Peter N. Pastore, M'34, Secretary 

Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia 

Harvey B. Haag, M'28, Treasurer 
Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia 

Trustees 
Term Expires December 31, 1958 



dward L. Alexander, M'27 

Medical Arts Building, 

Newport News, Va. 

J. Pelham Broaddus, D'30 

Franklin, Va. 

Donald S. Daniel, M'24 

Johnston-Willis Hospital, 

Richmond, Va. 



Spencer Dryden, M'33 

6816 Millwood Road, 

Bethesda 14, Md. 

R. Reginald Rooke, P'21 

2929 Second Avenue 

Richmond, Va. 

W. Rot Smith, P'41 

Physicians Products Co., Inc 

Petersburg, Va. 



Term Expires December 31, 1959 



Lloyd C. Bird, P'17 

303 South Sixth Street, 

Richmond, Va. 

Richard A. Michaux, M'37 

Lee Medical Building, 

Richmond, Va. 

Edward Myers, D'26 

511 Medical Arts Building-. 

Norfolk, Va. 



Marguerite Nicholson, N'34 

Cabaniss Hall, MCV 

Richmond, Va. 

E. Claiborne Robins, P'33 

1407 Cummings Drive 

Richmond, Va. 

Robert V. Terrell, M'34 

Medical Arts Building 

Richmond, Va. 



Term Expires December 31, I960 

Hunter M. Gaunt, P'26 Philip W. Oden 

Main and Valley Streets, 

Winchester, Va. 

L. Frances Gordon, N'43 

4514 West Grace Street 

Richmond, Va. 

W. C. Henderson, D'37 

301 East Franklin Street. 

Richmond, Va. 



M'34 

Valley Hospital 

Ronceverte, West Va. 

Waverly R. Payne, M'23 

91 29th Street, 

Newport News, Va. 

H. Hudnall Ware. Jr.. M'24 

816 West Franklin Street, 

Richmond. Va. 



About The Cover 

Charles P. Cardwell, Jr. 

Any alumnus who doesn't know Mr. Cardwell, director ot 
the Hospital Division of MCV, has been deprived of acquaint- 
ance with a leading college official and a rare spirit. 

Mr. Cardwell came to MCV as an engineer in charge of build- 
ings and grounds. He fell in love with hospital operations at 
first sight and worked overtime to learn details, philosophy, 
and general principles of hospital administration. Today, eighteen 
years later, he is a top man in the field both in Virginia and 
in the nation. 

Mr. Cardwell is remembered for his remarkable sense of 
humor, good common sense, responsiveness to public demands 
for service, and a rare knack of keeping his staff happy and 
on their toes. He is truly a vital force on the MCV campus. 

Mention of an §8,000,000 operating budget for the Hospital 
Division is one index of his many responsibilities. Besides, on 
the educational side there is a house or resident staff of 177, 
a school of hospital administration, a school of X-ray technology, 
and residency training in dietetics. W. T. Sanger 



Our Lost Sheep 



We've exhausted all possible sources that we can think of 
and now we ask your help to try to trace these lost alumni. The 
address listed is the last one we had, and mail has been re- 
turned to us from it. If you know their whereabouts or can sug- 
gest someone who might, won't you let us know? 
Mrs. Fannie S. Atkinson DA'29, Waverly, Va.; Mis. Margaret M. 
Cleek DA'28, 3835 Hermitage Road, Richmond, Va.; Mrs. Hazel Pond 
Moore DA'29, Crewe, Va.; Miss Dorothy Schmitt DA'28, Masonic 
Home, Richmond, Va.; Miss Margaret Slaven DA'28, 2816 Ellwood 
Ave., Richmond, Va.; Miss Alice Thornton DA'28, Pamplin, Va.; Miss 
Elizabeth Bailey Diet. '29, Greenwood Hospital, Greenwood, S. C. ; Miss 
Betty lean Barton Diet. '47, 713 Avenue C, Galveston, Texas; Miss Emma 
Jean Bedler Diet. '33, Woodstown. Va.; Miss Margaret Brown Diet.'52, 
1630 Monument Ave., Richmond, Va.; Mrs. Opal Covington Churn 
Diet. '34, 2427 Brady St., Bon Haven Apts., Richmond 24. Va.; Miss 
Anna Crance Diet. '39, 921 Jefferson Ave.. Clifton Forge. Va.; Miss 
Helen B. Dandelet Diet.'48, 1663 Washington Blvd., Huntington, W. 
Va.; Miss Margaret Delaney Diet. '40, 313 W. Grand Ave., Beloit, 
Wisconsin; Miss Mary E. Feagin Diet.' 37, Catawba, Va.; Mrs. Dorothy 
Chapman Fultz Diet.'45. St. Vincent DePaul Hospital, Norfolk, Va; 
Miss Christine Gauldin Diet.'52, Newton House, MCV, Richmond 19, 
Va.; Miss Mabel B. Gladin Diet.'33, St. Elizabeth Hospital, Richmond, 
Va.; Miss Mary Alice Grantham Diet. '35, University Hospital, Char- 
lottesville, Va.; Mrs. Betty Johnston Hellerman Diet. '46, 300 Oakwood 
Ave., Apt. 4A,' Columbus, Ohio; Miss Frances Hill Diet.'37, Greenville 
General Hospital, Greenville, S. C. ; Mrs. Freida Waldmiller Hoag 
Diet.'43, University of Michigan Health Service, Ann Arbor, Michigan; 
Miss Martha Jane Howard Diet. 55. Medical College of Va.. Box 698, 
Richmond, Va.; Mrs. Agnes F. Jackson Diet.'40, 107 Greenwood Drive, 
Falls Church, Va.; Miss Carolyn Johnson Diet. '52. 263-B Rodgers Forge 
Road. Baltimore 12. Md.; Miss Roberta Jones Diet. '36, City Memorial 
Hospital, Winston-Salem, N. C; Miss Carol Kolton Diet.'56, Medical 
College of Va., Richmond, Va.; Mrs. Sarah Brandon Kirby Diet.'42, 706 
Florham Ave., High Point, N. C; Miss Ruby Lake Diet.'32. Pine Camp 
Hospital, Richmond, Va. ; Miss Helen Lehmann Diet.'45, Crawford Long 
Hospital, Atlanta, Ga.; Miss Diana Lewes Diet.'52, Newton House. 
Richmond, Va.; Miss Ulah Anne Lewis Diet.'44, Dietary Department, 
Presbyterian Hospital, New York 1, New York; Mrs. Ruth Ryan Majka 
Diet.'36. Luxor Apts., No. 31, Little Rock, Arkansas; Miss Pauline 
Marinick Diet. '48, 220 N. Grant St., Casper, Wyoming; Miss Sarah 
McClannahan Diet. '46. Poplar Corner Road, Jackson, Tenn.; Miss Mar- 
garet McDonald Diet.'34, St. Luke's Hospital, Richmond, Va.; Miss 
Dorothy McLean Diet. '43 Medical College of Va., Richmond, Va. 



The Scarab 



TOKFKK-MAW 

LIBRARY 



NOV 13 1958 
Published by The Alumni Association of the Medical College of Virginia 

I toed, cb L. of VAS 

1 BJjCMMOfctOL YA I 



Volume 7, No. 4 



Richmond, Virginia 



November, 1958 



President's Remarks to the Medical Statt of the 
Hospital Division, Septemher 19, 1958 



Dr. R. Blackwell Smith. Jr. 



Since I have not had an earlier oppor- 
tunity to talk and think with you about 
first purposes, I am going to devote my 
time on today's program, in part, to a 
discussion of the administration's views 
of the College's reason for being and to a 
consideration of the roles of the several 
activities involved in the operation of 
the school of medicine. 

The charter of the institution, as enacted 
and amended from time to time by the 
General Assembly, recites as follows: 
"The corporation is formed for the pur- 
pose of establishing and maintaining a 
medical college and such other institutions 
connected therewith, to teach medicine, 
dentistry, pharmacy, and all the arts and 
sciences and branches of learning relating 
to or connected with any of these subjects, 
and in connection therewith it is empow- 
ered to maintain and conduct hospitals, 
infirmaries and dispensaries, and such 
other kindred institutions, as in the opinion 
of the Board, are proper to its successful 
operation." 

It is significant, I believe, that the Legis- 
lature stated as the first purpose of the 
corporation "the establishment of a medi- 
cal college" and provided secondarily for 
"hospitals, infirmaries, and dispensaries" 
in connection therewith, so as to furnish 
such clinical facilities as might be neces- 
sary for "its (the College's) successful 
operation!" This enlightened recognition 
of the importance of bedside teaching 
marked the College from very early days. 
The point I wish to make, however, is 
that clinical facilities were provided as 
an adjunct necessary to good teaching. It 
is important to keep in mind, I believe, 
that the Commonwealth never intended 
to provide general hospital facilities other 
than those supportive of the teaching pro- 
gram. This view is buttressed by certain 
language in the Appropriations Act of 
1956, which expressly set forth this reser- 

NOVEMBER, 1958 



vation in connection with the appropri- 
ation of the funds needed to complete 
the general beds in Ennion G. Williams 
Hospital. 

My purpose in trying to clarify the in- 
tended place of our clinical faculties in 
our scheme of things is not to decry their 
importance. Well do I realize that mod- 
ern medical education is utterly dependent 
on such facilities; nor do I fail to realize 
the transcendent necessity of providing 
the very finest of patient care. I do wish 
to make perfectly clear that the privilege 
of practice in the College hospitals is 
and was intended to be supportive of our 
teaching activities. I make this point be- 
cause I believe it should be understood by 
our staff. You can do much to clarify the 
situations that arise not infrequently when 
physicians who make no contribution to 
our teaching programs claim as their right 
as taxpayers the privilege of practice in 
our hospitals. The privilege of practice 
has not been extended to non-faculty mem- 
bers for many years ; and for the past two 
years the regulations of the Board of Visi- 
tors have provided that faculty members 
who withdrew from their teaching ap- 
pointments, or were released prior to regu- 
lar retirement, should also relinquish the 
privilege of practice. 

Another reason why it is important 
that the mission of our hospitals be thor- 
oughly understood is that the public needs 
to know that the possession of or failure 
to possess privileges in our hospitals indi- 
cates only participation or non-participa- 
tion in our teaching program. If the mem- 
bers of our staff could help make this 
clear, many valued alumni could be spared 
embarrassment and their friendship con- 
served. We bespeak your cooperation to- 
ward this end. 

Such public understanding is important 
from another point of view. Medical edu- 
cation is expensive. If we are to receive 



the funds required for a really first class 
medical education program, our taxpayers 
will need to know that the large state ap- 
propriations made to our hospitals are 
made in support of medical education; 
that these funds support needy ward pa- 
tients, who are vitally necessary to our 
teaching effort and assure the proper 
education of the doctors we exist to supply. 
Often the point is made that the College 
hospitals are in a favored position as com- 
pared with private hospitals because we 
receive state support. You can help kill 
this myth. Not one cent of our state 
appropriation goes for the support of pri- 
vate patients. The truth is that our private 
patients pay not only their own way but 
also a slight excess over the cost of the 
services they receive, which excess helps 
to reduce the state appropriation from 
tax funds required to balance our hospital 
budget. 

There is another aspect of the utiliza- 
tion of our state appropriation that needs 
public understanding which you can help 
to bring about. As earlier noted, our hos- 
pital's large state appropriation is made 
in support of medical education in that 
this appropriation supports needy patients 
whose care provides essential opportuni- 
ties for clinical instruction. However, the 
medical care provided such indigents is 
a proper charge against the localities from 
which these patients come. If you, as re- 
spected and influential citizens conversant 
with the facts, will help to persuade these 
localities to accept their obligations to 
these indigent sick, that part of the state 
appropriation so conserved can be made 
available in time for other essential edu- 
cational purposes, such as the provision 
of more adequate teaching salaries. 

You can provide even more immediate 
help by utilizing to the maximum extent 
consistent with good education the MCV- 
City of Richmond Service Clinic by re- 
ferring to it all clinic patients not actually 
needed for teaching purposes. Only a 
(Continued on page 25) 



A Backward Glance 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY DEANS 

1893-1958 

By William T. Sanger, Chancellor 

Although there were pharmacy graduates of the Medical College of Virginia prior to 1893, it was then that the 
University College of Medicine chose T. Ashby Miller, a prominent Richmond pharmacist, as the dean of its 
school of pharmacy. 

The first fully organized school of pharmacy of the Medical College of Virginia began in 1898 under the admin- 
istration of Dr. Frank Reade, who served as dean until 1913 at which time the two schools were consolidated. 

Roshier W. Miller, who graduated in pharmacy at the University College of Medicine in 1895, succeeded Dean 
T. Ashby Miller when he retired in 1904 from the University College of Medicine school of pharmacy. By that 
time Doctor Miller had completed his studies in medicine at the University College of Medicine. His deanship 
continued to the time of the consolidation in 1913- 

The consolidated schools of pharmacy were headed from 1913 to 1920 by Dean Albert Bolenbaugh, a graduate 
of Ohio State University, who had come to the University College of Medicine in 1907 as its first full-time teacher 
of pharmacy. He made a profound impact on pharmacy in Richmond and Virginia and is remembered too for 
his influence on a then rising young man in pharmacy, Wortley Fuller Rudd. The latter often acknowledged his 
indebtedness for ideas, stimulated ambition, and dedicated purpose to Dean Bolenbaugh. 

Wortley F. Rudd, 1920-1947. — When I arrived at MCV, Dean Rudd was already well established, influential, 
and at times controversial. He battled nationally and locally for better pharmacy, pharmaceutical education, closer 
ties between the academic and business world, more research in the South, especially cooperative research, and 
for excellence in all departments of MCV. 

Many practitioners of medicine, dentistry, and pharmacy, still living, were profoundly influenced and stimulated 
by Dean Rudd to do their best; they were his students in chemistry. He had a flair for helping the promising to 
build confidence in themselves, but woe unto the slothful ! 

Dean Rudd wore his many honors with modesty — honorary degrees, presidencies, citations, a cherished medal, 
board memberships, committee leadership, and all the rest. First, last, all the time it was the College, MCV, that 
claimed his loyalty and dynamic efforts. 

Mrs. Rudd was a charming hostess. Her judgment of people supplemented the dean's remarkably. An evening 
in their home was a delight" long to be remembered. The College owes both of them more than can be here re- 
corded. Wortley and "Miss Kate" — they were grand people! 

R. Blackwell Smith, Jr., 1947-1956. — Doctor Smith had returned to his alma mater, 1945, as assistant dean of 
the school of pharmacy on the strong recommendation of Dean Rudd, who said of him that he was not only a po- 
tential dean but also a good prospect for the presidency of MCV. Doctor Smith brought vigor and well conceived 
plans for pharmacy to his administration and proved a most acceptable member of the general college administra- 
tive team. During his incumbency he gave several years to the office of assistant president of the College on a part- 
time basis. 

Warren E. Weaver, 1956 to date.— Doctor Weaver came to MCV in 1950 as an associate professor in chemis- 
try. He immediately attracted attention both for ability and for capacity of getting the job (whatever it was) done. 
The College was very fortunate that he was available to succeed Doctor Smith as dean. He has met his many 
obligations with praiseworthy effectiveness. Thus the school remains in most worthy hands. 



MEDICAL SCIENTIFIC ASSEMBLY 

February 27-28, 1Q5Q 
Sponsored by the Alumni Association and the School of Medicine 



THE SCARAB 



Llinical Pastoral Education at MCV 

By The Rev. A. P. L. Prest, Jr. 
Director of Religions Activities and Chaplain 



Starting in the next few months, the 
Medical College of Virginia will be able 
to add to its long list of educational facili- 
ties a school for the training of clergy. 
This type of a training center is new 
to the city of Richmond and to the Medi- 
cal College of Virginia, but there have 
been several centers in operation in the 
state of Virginia for a number of years. 
The most notable groups in operation 
are Eastern State Hospital and Western 
State Hospital. Outside of the state, there 
are about 50 clinical training centers 
throughout the country. 

Participants in the program will be 
ordained clergy who have had parish ex- 
perience as well as seminary students from 
theological schools throughout the land. 
They will be in residence for three months 
or more and will function in our hos- 
pitals as chaplains. Their work will be 
under the close supervision of a clinically 
trained and accredited chaplain, who will 
provide for the students the optimum 
learning experience. This program is open 
to all persons in a religious ministry, re- 
gardless of denomination or religion. 

The program for the trainees will not 
only provide lectures by outstanding per- 
sons in their field but will also require 
the students to write up the interviews 
which they have with patients. These in- 
terviews become the basis of seminars 
and personal conferences to aid the stu- 
dent in developing his pastoral skills. 

Those in training will often be on call 
at night for any emergencies. They will 
call on pre-operative patients as well as the 
critically ill. When they establish a warm 
and meaningful relationship with a pa- 
tient, they will be encouraged to deepen 
it further by regular visits. Whenever pos- 
sible they will be required to involve 
themselves in learning as much as they 
can about man in his sickness situations. 

Why should we have such a program 
at the Medical College of Virginia, and 
what do we hope to accomplish? For 
those of us who work with men in the 
problem areas of life, most of us would 
agree that man's needs are physical, emo- 
tional, and spiritual. Man is a unity with 
each of these areas expressing needs which 
hopefully will be met. Most of us would 
also agree that you can't treat one without 

NOVEMBER, 1958 




taking into consideration the other two. 
This trinity in man is not three separate 
compartments but is closely interwoven so 
that we need to treat the whole man. It 
is true that some problems can be met 
by one type of physician (the minister, 
the doctor, or the psychiatrist), but it 
is also true that where there is a problem 
in one area this may indicate that there 
are problems elsewhere. The purpose of 
clinical pastoral education is to point out 
the absolute necessity to cooperate with 
each other as well as to assimilate the 
insights of other disciplines. Each of us 
in the healing arts has a vitally important 
role to play as we attempt to bring re- 
covery of health to sick persons. After all 
is said and done, this really is our purpose 
in the different vocations we have chosen 
for ourselves. 

If this is true, then we at the Medical 
College of Virginia have a responsibility 
to provide for our patients the oppor- 
tunity to have a religious ministry. Th's 
will hopefully be met by ministers in 
the community where the patient attends 



The religious work in this hospital is 
sponsored by the Churches of Vir- 
ginia through the Interdenomination- 
al Religious Work Foundation, Inc., 
in cooperation with the hospital staff 
and the ministers of Richmond. 



church. But for those out-of-town and 
those with no church, the chaplains in 
the hospital are available at the patient's 
request. 

The Medical College of Virginia pro- 
vides one of the finest clinical centers 
in the country in which this kind of train- 
ing can be provided. Men and women 
from all kinds of religious backgrounds 
will come and work as a member of the 
healing team in the Medical College of 
Virginia and then will return to their 
own church situation better equipped to 
deal with an individual's basic needs. With 
the experience which a crisis situation of- 
fers and with the insights gained from 
supervised visitations, a clergyman is able 
to return to his people better qualified 
to assist them in life's problems. To put 
it another way, we learn from the critically 
ill in order to deal helpfully with the more 
or less healthy. 

Our setting then is clinical in that stu- 
dents are no longer confronted by theory, 
but by real human beings crying out for 
help. The student must learn to meet 
these expressions of needs as best he can, 
and to this end he is required to write 
word for word accounts of his interviews 
with patients. These clinical cases become 
the basis of the learning process. From 
these the supervisor is able to suggest 
paths to deal with needs expressed as well 
as to guide the student in meeting cre- 
atively his own anxiety. So the orientation 
of the course is clinical. 

The course itself is pastoral in content. 
The relationship which the student has 
to the supervisor is primarily pastoral. 
In the one to one confrontation, the trainee 
has a chance to explore the problem areas 
of his pastoral contacts. The student's 
contacts are pastoral in content in that 
he works with patients at the bedside. For 
each person with whom he comes in con- 
tact he may be the person they consider 
to be their pastor during their stay in 
the hospital. The content of the program 
then is pastoral. 

The purpose of the course is education- 
al. Each man who enters into this course 
of study does so with the intent of devel- 
oping his skills as a pastor and to this 
end he will give many long hours of 
devoted service. He will not only have 
certain responsibilities as a chaplain in- 
tern, but he will have a great deal cf 
written material to prepare. It will never 
during his training be more important 
for him to be a pastor than to be a pas- 
( Continued on page 51) 



School oi Hospital Administration 



Robert Smith Hudgens 



Attended by Mr. Charles P. Caldwell, 
Jr., director of the hospital division, who 
in turn was sustained by President Wil- 
liam T. Sanger, the Medical College of 
Virginia's school of hospital administra- 
tion was born January 2, 1950. 

Behind this event nationally there lay 
two decades of inquiry and limited ex- 
perimentation in the field of training hos- 
pital executives. At hand in Virginia in 
the 1940's there were concerns which 
focused attention on this subject. An 
awareness of this background does much 
to reveal the purposes of the school. 

With the advances in science and the 
changes in economic and social patterns 
which were accelerated by World War 
I, the nation's hospitals began taking on 
a new importance. The public was de- 
manding more. Hospitals, as they were 
forced more and more to dependence on 
earned revenue and less on charity, were 
taking on a significant business aspect. 
Also, with rising costs and too often with 
cloistered and unimaginative management, 
hospitals were being presented unfavor- 
ably. For their direction boards were 
doubtless employing the best administra- 
tors available, but there were not many 
persons to be had who had been especially 
selected and trained for the challenge of 
the times. 

There were stirrings. In April, 1922, 
the American Hospital Association pub- 
lished a Rockefeller Foundation spon- 
sored report entitled "Principles in Hos- 
pital Administration and the Training of 
Hospital Executives." Four years later a 
candidate for the degree of doctor of 
philosophy in economics at Marquette 
University investigated the working rela- 
tionships and duties of hospital administra- 
tors, and Marquette established a school 
from which more than a score were gradu- 
ated before its discontinuance in 1928. 
In February, 1933, the American College 
of Hospital Administrators was founded. 
Its objectives were to improve the efficiency 
of hospital administration, to promote and 
conduct educational courses for the train- 
ing of administrators and to develop poli- 
cies concerning such courses, to establish 
criteria of competency for hospital ad- 
ministrators, to familiarize hospital trus- 
tees and the public with the fact that the 
administration of hospitals necessitates 
the employment of executives who have 





special training and experience in hospital 
administration, and to provide the persons 
who desire to follow a career in the field 
of hospital administration opportunities 
for enlarging knowledge. These things 
proclaimed the need. 

The next year a program in hospital 
administration at the graduate level was 
established at the University of Chicago. 
No other university attempted graduate 
training until 1943 when Northwestern 
began its course. In subsequent years grad- 
uate courses were offered by Baylor Uni- 
versity, University of California, State 
University of Iowa, University of Michi- 
gan, University of Minnesota, University 
of Pittsburgh, St. Louis University, Uni- 
versity of Toronto, Washington Universi- 
ty, Yale University, and the Medical 
College of Virginia. Cornell and Emory 
University are now asking recognition and 
approval by the Association of University 
Programs in Hospital Administration. 
Still others are exploring needs and pros- 
pects. 

The desire for a school in Virginia re- 
ceived impetus when Congress in 1946 
enacted the Hill-Burton legislation which 
promised a rebuilding and extension of 
hospital plants. This pointed up anew 
the need for trained executives for hos- 
pitals. During the presidency of Mr. Gib- 
son Howell (1947-48), the Virginia Hos- 
pital Association endorsed the idea of a 
course in one of the State's teaching hos- 
pitals. Some months later Mr. Cardwell 
was in position to express the interest of 



the Medical College in creating such a 
school. He had been encouraged by Dr. 
John Bell Williams, director of Rich- 
mond's St. Luke's Hospital and a member 
of the Board of Visitors of the Medical 
College. From the first Dr. Sanger had 
given his active support. Now the way 
was opened for the initial step. 

On October 1, 1949, Mr. A. Gibson 
Howell resigned as administrator of the 
Raiford Memorial Hospital, Franklin, Vir- 
ginia, to accept on a part-time basis the 
position of director of the new school. 
He was also made associate professor of 
hospital administration. At the same time 
that the board confirmed this appointment 
it also made Mr. Cardwell professor of 
hospital administration and Mr. Carl Par- 
rish assistant professor. Others recruited 
to teach in the new school and their sub- 
jects were: Dr. Myra Williams, associate 
professor of science, Introduction to Medi- 
cal Sciences; Dr. Geoffrey T. Mann, assist- 
ant professor of legal medicine, Account- 
ing, Hospital Business Law, Statistics; Mr. 
Harris Hart, personnel director, State Per- 
sonnel Department, Personnel Manage- 
ment and Public Relations; President 
Sanger and Mr. Ronald Almack, director, 
Bureau of Hospital Survey and Construc- 
tions, State Health Department, Health 
and Medical Aspects of Current Social 
Problems; Mr. C. P. Cardwell, Introduc- 
tion to Hospital Service, and Seminar; Mr. 
Gibson Howell, Hospital Organization 
and Management; Mr. Carl Parrish, His- 
tory of Medicine, Medical Terminology 
and Ethics. 

For the first four classes (1950-54) the 
didactic phase was for a six months period. 
There were two other phases: the admini- 
strative residency program and admini- 
strative research. 

For their residency experience the stu- 
dents were moved through departments 
of MCV hospitals and through other se- 
lected hospitals for a period of three or 
six months. During their residency they 
worked under the supervision of hospital 
administrators who had been qualified as 
preceptors in the school. 

The research phase extended over both 
the didactic and administrative residency 
periods. It was under the general direc- 
tion of the director of the school and 
the student's preceptor and more specific- 
ally under that of a selected advisor. It 
was expected that the student demonstrate 
the methodology and judgment necessary 
to investigate a problem and adequately 
report his findings. This he does by writ- 

THE SCARAB 



- ;.■-.• c^ H pr 




The Newton House, home of the school of hospital administration 



ing a thesis and passing an oral examina- 
tion before members of the faculty. These 
phases have continued to be the basic 
plan of the school. 

During the early years the school was 
limited to eight students. The present 
limitation is now 14 admissions a year. 
From the first the school has enjoyed the 
actual environment of a hospital. This 
has not been a detached laboratory ex- 
perience to which students were signed 
for limited hours. They have worked and 
lived in the center of a teaching hospital 
activity. The first director had a desk 
in the president's suite. Memorial Hos- 
pital provided the next school office. Class- 
rooms were used wherever available in 
the hospital. After two years Director 



Powell resigned to assume a position as 
administrator of the Louise Obici Me- 
morial Hospital in Suffolk and Mr. Joseph 
K. Owen, an administrative assistant to 
Mr. Cardwell, took over the management 
of the program. The school was now lo- 
cated near the director's office on the first 
floor of the east wing of MCV hospital. 
A nursing classroom and the director's 
board room became meeting places. 

In the fall of 1953 Mr. Owen left to 
attend the University of Iowa and to 
seek a doctor of philosophy degree in the 
field of hospital administration. This he 
accomplished in 1955, the fourth person 
to do so in this field. During his absence 
Mr. Cardwell directed the program with 
the competent help of Mrs. Louise P. 



Mundy, who served efficiently as the first 
secretary of the school until 1956. With 
Dr. Owen's return to become the first 
full-time director, the school took on its 
present pattern. In September, 1956, it 
was moved into the Newton House, just 
adjacent to the hospital, where two floors 
were adapted to its purposes. The New- 
ton House is itself an historic building 
dating from the early nineteenth century. 
For five years prior to 1923 it was used 
as a school by the Richmond Professional 
Institute, a division of the College of 
William and Mary. After 33 years it again 
housed a school. In the interval it had 
served principally as a residence for MCV 
personnel. With this move Mrs. Mundy 
severed her association with the school 
and Mrs. Frances Ewing was engaged 
as the first full-time secretary. She con- 
tinues to give the school her devoted 
service. In 1953 it was decided to extend 
the didactic phase to nine months. Also 
it was decided that all who entered the 
school in the fall of 1955 and subsequent- 
ly would be candidates for the degree. 
The way was left open for a time for 
those who had completed the certificate 
course to qualify for the master's degree 
in hospital administration by presenting 
an acceptable thesis and passing the com- 
prehensive oral examination. Thirty-four 
met these requirements and were subse- 
quently awarded degrees. 

From its founding Mr. Cardwell and 
his associates utilized every opportunity 
(Continued on page 27) 



1951 class, top row, left picture, left to right: Joe Stubbs, Charles Jenkins, Thomas Greyard. Bottom row: John Hess, Nathan Bushnell, 
James Case, Barrington Kinnard. Front row, right picture, left to right: Garlond Evers, John McKinney, Luis Cervantes, Mr. Hudgens, 
Warren Betts, William Gibson, Edward Bennett. Top row: Lawrence Snead, William Draper, Sam Waddell, John Tobin, Howard Colon, 

the '59 class. 




NOVEMBER, 1958 







Dr. Robert A. 
Senescu 





Dr. Robert A. Senescu 

At its September meeting, the Board 
of Visitors announced the appointment 
of a chairman for the department of psy- 
chiatry at the Medical College of Virginia. 
This appointment was made following 
lengthy and careful consideration of a 
large number of candidates for the po- 
sition, and Dr. Robert A. Senescu had the 
unanimous recommendation of the com- 
mittee selected to search for a man quali- 
fied in teaching, administrative, and pro- 
fessional experience. 

Dr. Senescu, a native New Yorker, 
was born in 1921 and has not only a 
background of excellent psychiatric train- 
ing and experience but also is well ori- 
ented in the problems of internal medi- 
cine. He received his B.A. from Columbia 
College in 1944 and his M.D. from Bos- 
ton University Medical School in 1948. 
After a rotating internship at Metropoli- 
tan Hospital in New York City, he spent 
a year in a medical residency at the Green- 
wich Hospital, Greenwich, Connecticut, 
following which he entered his psychi- 
atric residency. His residency in psychi- 
atry was served partly at the Manhattan 
State Hospital and partly at Kingsbridge 
VA Hospital, both in New York. 

In addition to being a diplomate in psy- 



chiatry of the American Board for Psy- 
chiatry and Neurology, Dr. Senescu is 
also a member of the American Psycho- 
analytic Association, having had his train- 
ing in this discipline at the Psychoanalytic 
Clinic for Training and Research at Co- 
lumbia University. 

His research interests are broad and 
reflect an interdisciplinary approach to 
problems of medicine. There has not 
only been study of purely psychiatric 
problems, but also he has worked with 
groups in medicine upon the problem of 
ulcerative colitis and radiology upon the 
handling of neo-plastic disease. 

As a teacher, he has been on the faculty 
of Columbia University since 1953, with 
his primary interest being in instruction 
regarding the care of outpatients. Not 
only has he been engaged in the training 
of medical students and residents in the 
medical school at Columbia but has also 
served as a preceptor in residency training 
and consultant at other hospitals. Since 
1955, he has been coordinator of the 
Psychiatric Residency Training Program 
at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center. 

Clinically, Dr. Senescu is the director 
of the Vanderbilt Clinic Psychiatric Ser- 
vice and has been engaged in the private 
practice of psychiatry. 

He is a member of numerous medical 



The Men 



We are grateful to Dr. Patrick H. Drewry, 
Jr., B.S., M.D., for having written this article 
about Dr. Robert A. Senescu. 



societies, which include the American Psy- 
choanalytic Society, the American Psychi- 
atric Association, the Association for Re- 
search in Nervous and Mental Diseases, 
the American Medical Association, and 
others. 

Since this is a "family magazine," in 
a sense, the writer feels that he must make 
mention of another aspect of Dr. Senes- 
cu's life. He has a most charming wife, 
Betty, and three attractive children, Alex, 
Alan, and Cobey, aged six, four, and two, 
respectively. At this time, it is not known 
what the extra-curricular interests of the 
children are, but it is known that Betty 
enjoys painting and the doctor enjoys 
fishing when he can find the time. 

It is our feeling that the Medical Col- 
lege has been indeed fortunate in finding 
a man of Dr. Senescu's stature to fill 
the position as chairman of the depart- 
ment of psychiatry and we look forward 
with pleasure to the time when he as- 
sumes his new duties. 

Dr. Weir M. Tucker 

Born in our midst and raised in our 
own social and cultured structure is our 
Man of the Hour, Dr. Weir Mitchell 
Tucker. He is the son of one of our 
former outstanding and beloved neuro- 
psychiatrists, the late Dr. Beverley Ran- 
dolph Tucker, who served from 1912 
to 1937 as professor of neuropsychiatry 
at the Medical College of Virginia. In ad- 
dition, the Tucker family has contributed 
much in varied and diversified fields 
since sometime in the early history of 
the Commonwealth. Instilled with this 
background and himself the namesake 
of another pioneer in the field of neu- 

THE SCARAB 



tk 



Ho 



ur 



We are grateful to Dr. George Fultz, Jr., 
B.S., M.D., for having written this article 
about Dr. Weir M. Tucker. 



rology and psychiatry, the late Dr. Weir 
Mitchell of Philadelphia, this heritage 
aptly fits him for his newly appointed role 
as chairman of the recently created sep- 
arate department of neurology of" the 
Medical College of Virginia. 

Weir, as he is known to his friends and 
associates, was educated at the University 
of Virginia where he received his under- 
graduate training as well as his medical 
education, receiving his medical degree 
in 1942. He then had a well-rounded in- 
ternship at Bryn Mawr Hospital in Bryn 
Mawr, Pennsylvania, following which he 
had a period of resident training at the 
New York Psychiatric Institute. He then 
served in the medical department of the 
United States Army, both in the States 
and overseas, attaining the rank of Ma- 
jor. After his discharge from the service, 
he completed his resident training in the 
Institute of the Pennsylvania Hospital and 
became a fellow in psychiatry in 1949. 
Intertwined with this, he began his resident 
training in neurology at the Jefferson Hos- 
pital in Philadelphia in 1946 and com- 
pleted this in 1949. He became a diplo- 
mate in neurology of the American Board 
of Psychiatry and Neurology in 1949. 
Directly after this, he entered into private 
practice of both psychiatry and neurology, 
paying particular attention to his real love 
and interest, neurology, to which he has 
contributed diligently and outstandingly. 
He has his office in the Tucker Hospital 
where he is quite active with his partners 
in practice, Dr. Howard R. Masters and 
Dr. James Asa Shield. 

Primarily interested in his profession, 
he has little time for his other accom- 
plished interests. He is consultant in 
neurology to the various hospitals, both 

NOVEMBER, 1958 



Dr. Weir M. 
Tucker 




public and private, in Richmond. He has 
been associate clinical professor of neu- 
rology and psychiatry at the Medical Col- 
lege of Virginia and since 1950 has 
taught neurology at the Medical College 
of Virginia. He is acting chief of neu- 
rology and on the attending staff at Mc- 
Guire Veterans Administration Hospital 
and is Civilian Area Consultant (Virginia, 
Maryland, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, 
New Jersey, Delaware) in neurology to 
the Veterans Administration. He is also 
medical advisor for the Richmond Area 
Muscular Dystrophy Association, also the 
newly formed Multiple Sclerosis Associa- 
tion, and a member of the Medical Advi- 
sory Committee of the Polio Foundation. 
He is quite active in a number of medi- 
cal associations, among which are the 
American Medical Association; American 
Psychiatric Association; American League 
Against Epilepsy; Southern Electroenceph- 
alography Association ; Southern Psy- 
chiatric Association; Association for Re- 
search in Nervous and Mental Diseases; 
Tri-State Medical Association; Medical 
Society of Virginia; Richmond Academy 
of Medicine, of which he served as re- 
cording secretary for one year; and he is 
currently president of the Neuropsychi- 
atric Society of Virginia, a district branch 
of the American Psychiatric Association. 



The American Academy of Neurology has 
honored him as a fellow. 

Even with his activities in his private 
practice and his professional organizations, 
he has found time to write in the field 
of neurology on epilepsy, cerebral blood 
How, multiple sclerosis, and subarachnoid 
hemorrhage. His real dedicated interest 
in life seems at all times to be in neu- 
rology, and he loves to teach even as much 
as he loves to learn. Whether it be the 
novice beginning his or her training in 
nursing or medicine, or whether it be 
the polished professor, learned and bril- 
liant in his field, Weir is as interested in 
learning from either, as he is in sharing 
his own rather unlimited knowledge. His 
effervescent buoyant enthusiasm is highly 
contagious in his teaching and sharing, 
as it is in his own personal life. His stu- 
dents, as well as his associates, in spite 
of his sometimes dogmatism, hold him 
in the highest esteem. He has the unusual 
ability of being a person who has accumu- 
lated a vast fund of knowledge, not only 
in neurology but in other branches of 
medicine, but who uses this only to help 
and not to criticize. Even the most re- 
tiring students, when interested and sin- 
cere, will be comfortable and at ease with 
him. 

(Continued on pige 23) 



Alumni Dinner — 
Medical Society of Virginia 

The alumni of the College who were 
in Richmond for the Medical Society of 
Virginia meeting, met for cocktails and 
dinner at the Commonwealth Club on 
October 13. Dr. Richard A. Michaux was 
chairman and Van Pelt and Brown were 
the gracious hosts for the cocktail party. 
Dr. J. Spencer Dryden greeted the alumni 
on behalf of the Association, and Dr. 



ike (shcuit 

David M. Hume told about new develop- 
ments in the department of surgery, and 
Dr. James T. Tucker invited the medical 
alumni to the Scientific Assembly on Feb- 
ruary 27 and 28, 1959. All in all, it was 
a delightful party. 





On August 21 our good medical alum- 
ni in West Virginia gathered for a cock- 
tail party at The Greenbrier under the 
chairmanship of Dr. Everett W. Mc- 



West Virginia Chapter 

Cauley. It was nice as usual to see so many 
of our fine West Virginia alumni in 
attendance. President R. Blackwell Smith, 
Jr., and Dean William F. Maloney came 



out to represent the College. This is such 
a nice group of alumni and their interest 
in the College and its welfare is most 
stimulating. 




On September 25 the Richmond Chap- 
ter of the Alumni Association held its 
annual Fall Get-Together at the Hotel 
John Marshall. Dr. Custis L. Coleman, 



Richmond Chapter 

president of the Richmond Chapter, was 
chairman and was assisted by the officers 
and members of the Board of the Chap- 
ter. Bill Garter of Churchill Pharmaceu- 
ticals was again most kind in furnishing 
the cocktail hour. There were 235 alumni 



and their wives present. "No speeches" 
continued to be one of the customs of 
this fall party. The consensus of opinion 
was that it was a most pleasant evening. 





THE SCARAB 



faculty Chances 



During the months of July, August, and September, 1958, there were new 
appointments and resignations as follows: 



NEW APPOINTMENTS 
July 
Miss Mildred Ann Bramble, instructor 
in nursing 
♦Miss Dorothea G. Hall, instructor in 

nursing 
*Dr. R. Lewis Hensley, associate in crown 

and bridge prosthodontics 
Dr. Yoshiki Ishizaki, fellow in pathology 
*Dr. H. Shepard Moon, associate in op- 
erative dentistry 
*Miss Harriette A. Patteson, assistant pro- 
fessor of nursing 

September 
Miss Elizabeth Ann Brierley, instructor 
in biology 

*Dr. Clarence E. Deane, Jr., instructor in 
operative dentistry 

*Dr. Allan L. Forbes, associate in medi- 
cine 

Mr. David J. Gray, Jr., assistant profes- 
sor of sociology 



^denotes an alumnus of MCV 



*Mrs. Charlotte Yates Harris, instructor 
in pharmacy 

*Dr. Alton Edward Hodges, Jr., instructor 
in therapeutics 
Mrs. Margery Ingalls Maloney, instruc- 
tor in English 

*Dr. Alexander L. Martone, associate in 
dental prosthesis 

*Dr. William I. Snead, instructor in 
crown and bridge prosthodontics and 
dental materials 

RESIGNATIONS 
July 

Blanca M. Shoenut, instructor in physi- 
cal therapy 

September 
Dr. Manuel Hernandez-Ortiz, clinical 

associate in psychiatry 
Mrs. Caroline G. Jackson, instructor in 

biology 
Dr. Basil E. Roebuck, clinical associate 

in psychiatry 
Miss R. Elizabeth Samuels, assistant pro- 
fessor of physical therapy 



/yfeut^^m 




November 12 



November 13 



November 14 

January 26-27 
February 27-28 

March 

June 5 J 
June 6 I 
June 7 J 

NOVEMBER, 1958 



8:30 p.m. McGuire Lecture; speaker, Dr. G. A. Grant Peterkin, 
physician in charge, Skin Department, Royal Infirmary, Edin- 
burgh, Scotland; subject, "The Relationship of Dermatology 
to Other Fields of Medicine." 

8:00 a.m. -3. 00p.m. McGuire Lectures, Symposium on Derma- 
tology 
3:00 p.m. Dr. Peterkin, subject, "Rare Skin Rashes." 

10:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. McGuire Lectures, Symposium on Derma- 
tology 

Dental HOMECOMING 

Medical Scientific Assembly, sponsored jointly by the Alumni 
Association and the School of Medicine 

Pharmacy Seminar 



Alumni Reunion 



Dormitories 
Are Opened 

The first students moved into the new 
dormitory buildings on September 8. These 
pioneers were our women students from 
the schools of medicine, pharmacy, medi- 
cal technology, physical therapy, and X- 
ray technology. These young ladies moved 
into building #4 which had been re- 
served for female students by the dormi- 
tory committee. This marked the first 
time the College has been able to house 
adequately the girls from schools other 
than nursing under one roof. 

Building #4 is separated from the 
main group of buildings and has separate 
laundry facilities and its own air-con- 
ditioned lounge. Mrs. Mary Hutchison, 
housemother at Stephen Putney house, 
now lives in this building. As in any new 
operation, certain things just don't work 
out exactly right. For a few days, the 
girls slept on the box springs because 
the foam rubber mattresses were delayed 
by a strike at the supplier's factory. How- 
ever, by this time the more than 70 resi- 
dents have learned to call this their "home 
away from home." 

On October 15, building #3 was 
opened in advance of the other two dormi 
tories. The building was almost com 
pletely occupied although it had no 
been scheduled to open until January 1 
This building has been scheduled for oc 
cupancy by students in the school of phar- 
macy. Temporarily a number of medical 
and dental students are living there but 
they will move to building | 2 or 
#1 when those buildings are opened on 
November 15. 

The reaction of visitors to the dormi- 
tory area has been uniformly pleasing. 
The facilities and furnishings generally 
are excellent. The snack bar will begin 
operation on January 1, the original date 
scheduled for completion of the facility. 
The alumni lounge area, made possible 
by the generous support of the Alumni 
Association, provides the final touch to 
an excellent facility which will make our 
College better in a very tangible way. 

Warren E. Weaver 

Medical Scientific Assembly- 
February 27-28, 1959 



School of Medicine 

We begin the new academic year with 
a record of solid accomplishment behind 
us. Outstanding additions to the faculty 
have been accomplished. These include 
Dr. Robert E. Senescu, professor and 
chairman of the department of psychiatry ; 
Mr. Malcolm E. Turner, Jr., associate pro- 
fessor of biophysics (mathematics) ; Dr 
%ami I. Said, assistant professor of medi- 
cine; Dr. Richard H. Egdahl, associate in 
surgery and director of the surgical re- 
search laboratories; Dr. Lilburn T. Talley, 
associate in radiology; and Dr. Doyle E. 
Roebuck, instructor in microbiology. We 
have gained as a school and as individuals. 
We have already been stimulated to criti- 
cally appraise our ideas and methods and 
to seek and survey new ways and other 
answers. 

Individual faculty members received 
national awards, based not only on their 
own individual abilities, excellence, and 
promise, but which also represent a vote 
of confidence in the institutional environ- 
ment as a suitable place for the develop- 
ment of their exceptional talents. A Gug- 
genheim Award was made to Dr. John 
W. Kelly, associate professor in the de- 
partment of anatomy, for one year's study 
under Dr. Caspersson at the Cell Institute 
in Stockholm, Sweden; a Markle Fellow- 
ship was awarded to Dr. Richard H. Eg- 
dahl, associate in surgery (the fifth such 
award to this institution ) ; and a Lederle 
Faculty Award was made to Dr. Alan 
Mounter, associate professor of biophysics. 
These are not bestowed lightly. The na- 
tional competition is extremely keen. 

In presenting the Scientific Assembly 
for the alumni, we assembled, from with- 
in our own faculty, an impressive array 
of talent. Also held here were meetings 
of such national organizations as the So- 
ciety for Experimental Biology and Medi- 
cine, the Bracing Conference sponsored 
by the Easter Seal Research Foundation, 
the Association of American Bacteriolo- 
gists, the Arthur Purdy Stout Surgical 
Pathology Society, and a Postgraduate 
Course in Basic Concepts of Disease for 
the American College of Physicians. Every 
one of these was conducted in a manner 
which brought letters of sincere appreci- 
ation as well as real commendation of 
the exceptional quality and caliber of 
the meeting. 

Finally, it has been possible to convey 
to the General Assembly something of 
the philosophy and needs in medical edu- 
cation. They have this year accepted ad- 

10 



Deans' Page 



ditional responsibilities in supporting med- 
ical education in the Commonwealth. 
Thus, the requests of this school for money 
to support faculty and build a medical 
education facility, significantly more than 
anything ever requested before, have be- 
gun to be fulfilled. 

The freshman class of 1958 thus en- 
ters the medical school at a time of 
challenging accomplishment and oppor- 
tunity. The class of 84 students includes 
four women and represents 33 colleges, 
12 states, and two foreign countries, Brit- 
ish Malaya and Hong Kong. In addition, 
there is a student from Hungary, one 
of the Freedom Fighters who escaped af- 
ter the rebellion again Communist op- 
pression in 1957. 

We enter the new academic year also 
with confidence in the support of the 
alumni. The only basis for this school's 
existence is the providing of education in 
the medical sciences. We pledge ourselves 
to the advancement of learning and the 
search for truth. 

William F. Malonev, Dean 

School of Nursing 

In September a total of 119 students 
enrolled in the three programs of the 
school of nursing. Fifty-seven of this 
number enrolled in the baccalaureate pro- 
gram, 34 in the associate degree program, 
and 27 in the diploma program. While 
the majority of the freshmen students are 
Virginians, we have students from Florida, 
New Jersey, North Carolina, West Vir- 
ginia, Maryland, and Tennessee. This 
year a waiting list was established to per- 
mit more selectivity among applicants. 
Emphasis on scholastic potential in as- 
sociation with other desirable attributes 
for nursing, as they can be measured, is 
being exercised in an effort to reduce aca- 
demic failures in all programs. 

Enrollment of students with potential 
abilities for nursing depends largely upon 
concerted recruitment efforts. Our regis- 
trar spends full time each year, September 
through December, in the field attending 
College Day Programs in high schools, 
speaking to special interest groups, and 
analyzing recruitment needs. As a result 
of this effort, nearly fifteen hundred in- 



quiries were received and four hundred 
applications were processed. All three 
programs of nursing education are in- 
cluded in these data. 

The associate degree program became 
a reality with the admission of the first 
class of students. These students range in 
age from 18 years to 39 years. Six stu- 
dents are married; one student is a gradu- 
ate licensed practical nurse; two others 
have had some formal nursing education. 
Not to be overlooked is Virginia's entry 
to the 1958 Miss Universe contest who 
also is enrolled in this program. 

Former graduates who remember the 
sun porch rooms in Cabaniss Hall and the 
overcrowding of all rooms will be inter- 
ested to know that this residence for the 
present time is being occupied only by 
freshmen students. The sun porches are 
no longer used for sleeping areas. Single 
and double rooms are occupied only as 
planned for their original capacities. Re- 
decorating and refurnishing on a gradual 
basis is under way. Such planning has 
been made possible by the addition of 
four floors to Randolph-Minor Hall, hous- 
ing 120 students, and permitting sopho- 
mores, juniors, seniors, and affiliating stu- 
dents to be in one residence. 

Moving days have been continuous dur- 
ing September; but the satisfaction and 
pleasure expressed by our students for 
the new rooms, new teaching facilities 
for the associate degree program, and 
coming improvements in Cabaniss Hall 
have been rewarding. 

Doris B. Yingling. Dean 

School of Pharmacy 

The school of pharmacy opened the 
session with a record number of students 
enrolled. In all, 297 full-time students 
were registered in pharmacy, broken down 
as 84 freshmen, 84 sophomores, 69 jun- 
iors, and 60 seniors. An additional four 
special students made a total enrollment 
of 301 students. 

There were significant increases in our 
percentage of women enrolled and a de- 
crease in our out-of-state students. The 
increase in women is undoubtedly due to 
a growing interest and understanding of 
the opportunities in pharmacy for young 
ladies. We now have 43 women enrolled 
in our several classes and this, too, is a 
record for our school. The decrease in non- 
Virginia students is the result of the effort 
(Continued on page 28) 



THE SCARAB 




Upper left: Lounge in girls' dormitory, building 4; Upper right: Bedroom on sophomore floor of Randolph-Minor Hall; Lower left: Class- 
room in Randolph-Minor Annex; Lower right: Lounge room on fourth floor of Randolph-Minor Hall. 




tiSs^sMU / * I'VE *3J^lt v^ -^ 





NOVEMBER, 1958 



11 



WRITE US ABOUT YOURSELF 

Your friends who read The Scarab want to know about you. Use the form below to bring 
them up to date on personal news of yourself, your family, or other classmates. 

Date 



Name 



Class 



Mailing Address 



Occupation 



Change of job or address, promotion, marriage, addition to the family — these make news items. 
(Write in space below.) 



12 



Mail to Alumni Association of MCV, 1 105 East Clay Street, Richmond, Virginia 

THE SCARAB 



Directory of Members 



PHARMACY (UCMI 

A. T. Gray 

1899 
MEDICINE (UCMI 
Emmett F. Reese, Jr. 
DENTISTRY (UCMI 
Charles T. Womack 
PHARMACY (UCM) 



James H. Hagy 

E. H. Terrell 
MEDICINE (UCMI 
Luther R. Stinson 
DENTISTRY (UCMI 

F. A, Wood 

1901 
MEDICINE 
W. L. Cooke 
John L. Hankins 
MEDICINE (UCMI 
•John E. Cannaday 



Tho 



W. Mu 



ell 



1902 
MEDICINE (UCMI 

J. L DeCormis 
DENTISTRY 
S. A, McAnally 
PHARMACY (UCMI 
Charles L, Guthrie 
1903 
MEDICINE 
W. J. Sturgis 
MEDICINE (UCMI 
Benjamin C, Shuler 
Benjamin L. Traynhan 
DENTISTRY 
James Mitchell Lewis 
DENTISTRY (UCMI 



Mche 



1904 
MEDICINE 

Thomas Watkins 
MEDICINE (UCMI 

E. L. Grubbs 
John M. Williams 



DENTISTRY (UCMI 

H. A. Duncan 
Harry L. Smith 
NURSING (UCMI 
Naomi S. Klipstein 

1905 
MEDICINE 
Francis A. Bell 
W, R. McCall 



O. K. Phlegar 
NURSING 

Rose Hancock 

1907 
PHARMACY (UCMI 

Elmer E. Grove 
Warren S. Grubbs 
George J Hulcher 



NURSING 

Josephine D. Payne 

1909 
MEDICINE 
James R. Boldridge 
MEDICINE (UCMI 
A. B. Grubb 
C. L. Harrell 
S. A. Slater 



Is Your Name on this List? 

On October 1, 1958, these 1877 alumni 
had made a contribution to the Alumni As- 
sociation. The complete list of voting mem- 
bers of the Association for 1958 will be 
published in the February Scarab. Your 
membership payable now covers the period 
January 1, 1958-December 31, 1958. IF 
YOU HAVE NOT PAID YOUR DUES, 
WONT YOU DO SO TODAY? 



Jack W. Witten 
MEDICINE (UCMI 

Robert S. Fitzgerald 
Delos D. Hooper 
Moir S. Martin 
D. C. Mayes 
Clarence V. Montgom 



W. Le 



We 



DENTISTRY 

W. Henry Street 
NURSING (UCMI 



MEDICINE 

Wylie H. Cunningha 
Daniel D. Talley, Jr 
L. F. Watson 
MEDICINE (UCMI 

Russell L. Cecil 



1908 
MEDICINE 

M. S. Brent 
B. H. Martin, Sr. 
G. W. Skaggs 
MEDICINE (UCMI 
Brady D. Epling 
Antonio G. Fidanza 
A, M. Owen 
Eugene B. Pendleton 
A. M. Saunders 
T. C. Sutherland 
A. P. Upshur 
MEDICINE (NCMCI 
Frank L. Mock 
DENTISTRY (UCM) 
John M. Hughes 
Harry L. Mears 
George E. Petty 
W. E. WhiH 



William R. Weisigei 

DENTISTRY 

C. D. Townes 

NURSING 

Martha S. Callaharr 

1910 
MEDICINE 
A. C. Broders 
R. H. Dunn 
E. T. Gatewood 
Turner S. Shelton 
Oscar W. Ward, Sr 
MEDICINE (UCMI 
John W. Turmon 
DENTISTRY 
J. H. Cocks 
PHARMACY 
Douglas Atkinson 
PHARMACY (UCM) 
R. E. Monroe 



1911 
MEDICINE 

Thomas W. Blanchard 

Arthur S. Brinkley 

G. G. Hankins 

W, N. Thomas 

Albert U. Tieche 

MEDICINE (UCMI 

J. Henry Cutchin, Jr. 

MEDICINE (NCMC) 

James B. Whittington 

PHARMACY 

J. J. Harris 

PHARMACY (UCM) 

E. G. Johann 

W. E. Locke 

NURSING 

Eugenia Triplet! 

NURSING (UCM) 

Andrina Grove-Hagen 

1912 
MEDICINE 

Charles W. Haden 

W. W. Hargrove 

MEDICINE (UCM) 

W. Clyde Adkerson 

Waller C. Akers 

Robert A. Ashworth 

L. J. Friedman 

M. Pmson Neal 

Charles C. Smith, Jr. 

MEDICINE (NCMC) 

Charles S. Sink 

DENTISTRY (UCM) 

William N. Hodgkin 

PHARMACY (UCM) 

B. F. Foley, Jr. 

1913 

MEDICINE 

S. B. Berkley 

E. L. Caudill, Sr. 

W. C. Caudill 

Herman Hertzberg 

L. F. Lee 

H. C. Padgett 

*F. W. Poindexter 

Abraham I. Weinstein 

MEDICINE (UCM) 

Beverley F. Eckles 

J. O. Fitzgerald, Jr. 

J. D. Hagood 

George S. Hurt 

•Douglas D. Martin 



Return This With Your Contrihution 

Here is my $10.00 to make me a voting member for this calendar year, 1958, and with it 
is $ for the Alumni Lounge in the student dormitories. 

Name 



Address 



Make your check payable to: Alumni Association of MCV 
1105 East Clay Street 
Richmond, Virginia 

$90,000 TO GO ON OUR PROMISE TO THE COLLEGE 



NOVEMBER, 1958 



13 



W. L. Mason 

W. T. Rainey, Jr. 

R. W. Woodhouse, Jr. 

MEDICINE (NCMC) 

Pinkney J. Chester 

PHARMACY 

C. A. Cleveland 

PHARMACY (UCMI 

R. D. Heist 

Glenn Updike 

A. R. Warner 

1914 
MEDICINE 
G. B. Byrd 
Guy B. Denit 
E. Latane Flanagan 
L. M. Futrell 
J. B. Gorman 

Fred E. Hamlin 
Ben Lipshutz 

Edgar P. Norfleet 

J. C Walker, Jr. 

William John Wigington 

C. B. Young 

MEDICINE (NCMCI 

Irving E. Shafer 

PHARMACY 

G. B. Cocke 

Henry G. Shirkey 

G. Van Durrer 

NURSING 

Nora Spencer Hamner 
1915 

MEDICINE 

James B. Anderson 

C. B. Courtney 

J. M. Emmett 

J. H. Hoskins 

Carroll H. Iden 

Walter J. Otis 

W. M. Phipps 

G. V. Wood, Jr. 

PHARMACY 

A. E. Friddle 

NURSING 

Mary F. Halterman 

1916 
MEDICINE 
E. S. Barr 
G. O. Crank 
A. I. Dodson, Sr. 
W. P. Gilmer 
P. G. Hamlin 
J. L. Hamner 



George F. Hughston 
F. W. H. Logan 
John Wm. Martin 
W. R. Parker 
A. D. Parson 
Albert T. Ransone 
Alex F. Robertson, Jr. 
Philip S. Smith 
Ernest Lee Strickland 

F. P. Sutherland 

1917 
MEDICINE 
E. Ray Altizer 
Edward T. Ames 

G. C. Andes 
Carl A. Broaddus 
Alan J. Chenery 

C. Clyde Coffindaffer 
Dean B. Cole 

D. S. Divers 
James A. Fields 
Bernard F. Gilchriest 
J. Stewart Gilman 
Arthur E. Gouge 
Campbell Harris 
Basil B. Jones 
Claudius McGowan 
J. M. Rogers 
George C. Snead 
Ramon M. Suarez 
W. G. Suiter 
Edwin B, Thompson 
R. F. Thornhill 

H. E. Whaley 
DENTISTRY 
A. M. Perkins 
Beaman Story 
PHARMACY 
L. C. Bird 
E. V. Greever 
Samuel Rosenthal 
NURSING (VCHI 
Hottie E. Bell 

1918 
MEDICINE 
C. S. McCants 
William Meyer 
W. A. Simpson 
Wallace Spigel 
James F. Terrell 
DENTISTRY 
W. Archer Bagley 
W. I. Carpenter 
G. W. Holliday 



N. F. Muir 

J. Garves Poole 

M. M. Sherman 

G. A. Svetlik 

PHARMACY 

George F. Hendley 

Leo Rosenthal 

NURSING 

Nancy P. Dailey 
1919 

MEDICINE 

H. W. Decker 

H. R. Masters 

C. L. Nance 

S. D. Scott 

DENTISTRY 

R. H. Brum 

William H. Lewis, Jr. 

J. J. Stigall 

PHARMACY 

A. R. Cross 

1920 

MEDICINE 

H. O. Bell 

H. R, Huston 

PHARMACY 
R. J. Walker 
NURSING 

Mazie Rogers 

1921 
MEDICINE 
Harry Lee Claud 
T. Dewey Davis 
Henry J. Langston 
G. R. Moloney 
Charles W. Putney 
Paul A. Robertson 
R. Hugh Wood 
DENTISTRY 
W. E. Clark 
Floyd L. Leonard 
John C. Tyree 
PHARMACY 
R. Reginald Rooke 
Sedona V. Shaw 
J. G. Thomas 
NURSING 
Marion B. Myers 
Mattie W. Poyser 
Veda B. Reddy 
Maria A. Rommel 
NURSING IVCH) 
Mary Sue Bell 



1922 

MEDICINE 

Charles M. Caravati 
Robert F. Cline 
Joseph Coates 
Malcolm H. Harris 
W. J. Ozlin 
L. O. Snead 
Thomas M. Winn 
DENTISTRY 
French H. Moore 
Tillie L. Weinstein 
PHARMACY 
H. M. Eads 
T. F. Marshall 
NURSING 
Hildred Bauserman 
C. Virginia Besson 
Minnie L. Cole 
Florence Schwab 
NURSING (VCH) 
Annie M. Linton 

1923 
MEDICINE 
P. R. Fox 

Robert P. Hawkins, Jr 
Homer B. Luttrell 
J. A. Mease 
Waverly R. Payne 
Joseph P. Treccase 
Leta J. White 
DENTISTRY 
J. J. Bangel 
Shannon Butts 
Andrew B. Cooke 
R. Ashton Gay 
Leland S. Mabry 
Harry Lyons 
C. K. Polly 
PHARMACY 
J. W. Chamblee 
Arthur Cooper 
M. W. Gutridge 
E. R. Rush 

1924 
MEDICINE 
Ruth G. Aleman 
Robert W. Bess 
G. W. Black 
J. L. Blanton 
Donald S. Darnel 
Clay W. Evatt 
Nathan B. Feinberg 
Samuel J. Ferguson 



Lulo Woods Garst 

C. E. Haberlin 

Lucy S. Hill 

Henry A. Hornthal 

B. E. Hunt 

L. Rush Lambert 

William F. Matthews 

W. E. Newcomer 

Roy L. Noblin 

Ernest C. Shull 

GMes S. Terry 

H. Hudnall Ware, Jr. 

T. B. Washington 

DENTISTRY 

George W. Duncan 

R. F. Freeman 

S. Nelson Gray 

G. Fred Hale 

J. F. Hunt, Jr. 

W. J. Sydnor 

PHARMACY 

James G. Albert 

B. T. Allen 

D. B. Schwetz 

1925 

MEDICINE 

D. G. Chapman 
Bernard Disick 
Robley R. Goad 

W. Randolph Grahan 

E, Bacon Hardee 
PHARMACY 
Cecil C. Lipes 
Irving L. Simpkins 
Ernest W. Williams 

1926 
MEDICINE 
Fletcher E. Ammons 
Benjamin H. Bailey 
Webster P. Barnes 
O. C. Campbell 
Harry Golston 
J. Berkeley Gordon 
Thomas B. Gordon 
H. L. Griffin 
Jeanette T. M. Jarm 
J. Phillip Jones, Jr. 
A, A. Karan 
Max Kliger 
Lewis C. Lush 
W. Fuqua Mitchell 
R. Rodriquez-Molina 
Maurice Rosenthal 
J. Asa Shield 



the PYRALDINE® family 

for relief of cough and congeslion 

Each flui'dounce of bright yellow PYRALDINE contains: 

D.hyd-ocodeinone bi.ra.rate '/6 gr ( Controls, without completely suppress 

\ reflex 

Pyra-Maleate® 75 mg. \ Suppresses allergic manifestations,- 

[Brand of Pyrilamine Maleate) ( local anesthetic effect in the throat 

Ammonium Chloride 6 gr. ( Liquefy mucus and facilitate expecto 

Citric Acid 5 gr. } 

Amber PYRALDINE No. 2 — 

the basic Pyraldine formula plus ( 

Phenylephrine Hydrochloride 30 mg. ] For added mucosal decongestion 

per fluidounce 

VANPELT & BROWN, INC., Richmond 4, Va. 



ng, the cough 
provides mi'/d 



14 



THE SCARAB 



Louis Wardell 
William F. Work 
DENTISTRY 

William Tyler Hayne 
Edward Myers 
R. S. Powell 
W. A. Rotcliffe 
PHARMACY 

B. W. Blachman 

C. B. Carlan, Jr. 
Braxton Coiner 

J. Waller Crandol 

I. D. Harvey 

Z. B. Johnston 

Roy Rhodes 

NURSING 

Lois F. Arundel 

Maude L. Fox 

1927 
MEDICINE 
Edward L. Alexande 
W. Linwood Ball 
Harry E. Beard 
G. Norfleet Carter 
Raymond H. Curry 
R. L. Eastman 
Jose Gorndo-Collozo 
Serb Gayle, Jr. 
J. Warren Hundley 
C. C. Jackson 

E. W. Johnson 
Sidney F. Johnston 
Oliver L. Jones 
Orvin C. Jones 
James W. Keever 
Athey R. Lutz 

F. U. Metcalf 



A. A. Milburn 


J. R. St. George 


C. L. Newland 


W. R. Southward 


P. A. Shelburne 


James A. Soyars 


F. F, Sowers 


William N. Thompson 


M. S. Stinnett 


G. Hunter Wolfe 


S. F. Stockhammer 


John R. Wood 


James T. Tucker 
DENTISTRY 


DENTISTRY 

M. A. Byrd 


J. R. Fleet 
PHARMACY 
A. O. McCalley 
NURSING 

Florence S. Osborne 


W, C. Webb 
NURSING 

Mary Campbell Gale 
Katherine C. Kindred 


1928 


1929 


MEDICINE 


MEDICINE 


Joseph F. Barrett 


S. O. Bennett 


C. R. Bowman 


O. K. Burnette 


Raymond L. Cloterbaugh 


A. C. Chandler 


A. R. Comunale 


William L. Cooke 


Garrett Dalton 


Edward G. Dewein 


W. C. Elliott 


Ramon D. Garcin, Jr 


E. D. Floyd 


W. A. Graham 


P. C. Grigg 


L. M. Halloran 


Harvey B. Haag 


W. F. Hatcher 


S. O. Handy 


Oscar L. Hite 


C. H. Henderson 


T. N. Hunnicutt, Jr. 


Wilbur E. Hoffman 


Charles Lipshutz 


A. P. Hudgins 


Claude A. Nunnally 


N. B. Jeter 


J. P. Pregnall 


E. C. Joyner 


James S. Richardson 


Fred Y. Ketner 


Charles R. Robins, Jr 


Dorothy Kirshbaum 


C. P. Ryland 


Allen S. Lloyd 


David M. Shevitz 


D. F. Love 


William P. Stull 


Frank Mongillo 


R. L. Waddell 


Claude L. Neal 


B. G. Weathers 


Earl L. Shamblen 


Ellis G. Winstead 



DENTISTRY 


Zenas B. Noon 


M. Bagley Walker 


James B. Pettis 


PHARMACY 


M. M. Ralsten 


F. S. Anderson, Jr. 


Emmett V. Richard 


Bernard Behrman 


R. S. Roberson 


James C. Bray 


W. G. Stephenson 


M. W. Bridgers 


Meyer Vitsky 


J. Leslie Hughes 


Louis E. Wice 


S. T. McAfee 


James N. William 


James H. Sullender 


J. H. Yeatman 


NURSING 


DENTISTRY 


Anne F. Mahoney 


B. A. Brann 


Minnie P. Oldham 


J. P. Broaddus 


Virginia M. Porter 


Stanley L. Dixon 


Rosalind W. Roach 


W. Davis Parrott 


MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 


W. N. Richardson 


Elizabeth Caperton 


John A. Tolley 


1930 


S. B. Towler 


MEDICINE 


PHARMACY 


Harold B. Ashworth 


T. J. Banton 


E. S. Berlin 


J. M. Bierer 


W. E. Butler 


C. L. Biscoe 


J. R. Copenhaver 


J. H. Coflin 


J. Glenn Cox 


E. E. Willey 


Clyde L. Crawford 


NURSING 


Edwin S. Crisp 


Helen H. Crossley 


John W. Davis, Jr. 


Mary B. Healey 


R. E. Dunkley 


Elia W. McCaule) 


Van M. Ellis 


Lucy B. Powers 


K. St. Clair Freeman 


Elizabeth K. Ryan 


Lloyd H. Gaston 


1931 


D. L. Harrell, Jr. 


MEDICINE 


H. J. Harris 


D. B. Armistead 


J R. B. Hutchinson 


Hugh B. Brown, J 


Clifford W. Lewis 


R. D. Butterworth 


Leslie E. Morrissett 


Frank Philip Colerr 


Sigmund Newman 


L. B. Copenhaver 



MEDICAL COLLEGE OF VIRGINIA 

HOSPITAL DIVISION 

Medical College of Virginia Hospital 

Memorial Hospital 

Dooley Hospital 

Saint Philip Hospital 

Ennion G. Williams Hospital 

(Operated jointly with the State Health Department) 

A. D. Williams Memorial Clinic 

(Outpatient Department) 

To preserve and restore health To seek the cause and cure of disease 

To educate those who would serve humanity 



NOVEMBER, 1958 



15 



Oscar W. Cranz 
Fred G. DeBusk 
J. G. Faulk 
R. O. Glenn 
Ira L. Hancock, Jr. 
William H. Hoskins 
J. G. Jantz 
O. G. King 
Carl W. LaFratta 
H. J. Lukeman 
Jesse McCall 
Harold W. Miller 
Tom H. Mitchell 
John H. Murphy 
Thomas B. Payne 
Henry C. Spalding 
DENTISTRY 
J. W. Ames 
S. L. Friedman 
Leon Slavin 
Samuel Stone 
PHARMACY 
Herman Becker 
Hilda S. Ellerson 
J. W. Ernest 
NURSING 

Deborah E. Cappleman 
Minnie V. Jones 
Elsie C. Kean 
Sabra S. Russell 
1932 
MEDICINE 
Nathan Bloom 
John H. Bonner 
H. G. Byrd 
Richard C. Cecil 
R. Lee Clark, Jr. 
Bertha M. Davis 

C. A. Easley 
R. H. Fowlkes 
E. C. Gates 

J. W. Griflfis 
L. S. Hayes 
Lewis E. Jarrett 
Sydney Levy 
E. W. McCouley 
S. H. Mirmelstein 
P. A. Richards 

D. W. Puffin 

W. H. Saunders 

L. L. Shamburger 

Beecher L. Smith 

L. B. Todd 

J. S. Vermillion 

George D. Vermilya 

K. K. Wallace 

W. L. Weaver 

G. Randolph Wilson 

DENTISTRY 

S. I. Dyckman 

W. R. Elam 

V. S. Hart 

R. E. Long 

J. B. Todd 

PHARMACY 

J. F. Horshbarger 

William G. Tarrant, Jr 

NURSING 

Mary V. Blackburn 

Harriette F. Suits 

Mary B. Thompson 

1933 
MEDICINE 
Emory H. Anderson 
L. P. Bailey 

16 



J. Gordon Bell 
William McK. Bickers 
Ernest P. Buxton, Jr. 
J. W. Carney 
Edgar W. Childrey 
Ellis O. Coleman 
Florence H. Comess 
William D. Comess 
C. W. Copenhaver 
J. Spencer Dryden 
H. D. Fitzpatrick 
David S. Garner 
William H. Gordon 
B. C. Grigsby 
Paul Hogg 
Mary E. Johnston 
J. Bernard Jones 
J. B. Kiser 
M. H. McClintic 
Juan Mimoso-Raspaldo 

B. W. Mongle 
R. B. Nutter 

E. W. Perkins 
J. W. Phillips 
J. A. Robinson 
George F. Salle 
Andrew D. Shapiro 
Nathan Sharove 
H. B. Showalter 
Victor Simiele 
W. P. Starling 
Edwin D. Vaughan 
John O. Watkins, Jr. 
P. L. Wolgin 
A. A. Yurko 
PHARMACY 
J. G. Ball 
Ralph Carino 
G. L. E. Edmiston 
Allen N. Fore 
G. Wallace Hook 
E. Claiborne Robins 

C. B. Wallace 
G. C. White 

1934 
MEDICINE 
Allred Abramson 
E. C. Blum 
Robert A. Brown, Jr. 
C. C. Chewning 
S. C. Cox 
C. Fallon Davis 
W. F. Delp 
George T. Flesher 
Mildred B. Forman 
Cecil C. Hatfield 
Grey C. Hughes 
Brock D. Jones 
William R. Hutchinson 
James P. Kent 
N. T. Keys 
Alan F. Kreglow 
Vincent E. Lascara 
G. M. Leaman 
W. S. Lloyd 
R. C. Manson 
J. Robert Massie, Jr, 
E. C. Mathews 
George W. McCall 
L. E. Neol 
Clyde G. O'Brien 
Philip W. Oden 
Edwin J. Palmer 
P. N. Pastore 
J. A. Payne, III 



Fred G. Pegg 

W. R. Pretlow 

C. L. Riley 

R. C. Siersema 

Robert V. Terrell 

F. N. Thompson 

Girard V. Thompson 

Elam C. Toone, Jr. 

Hight C. Warwick 

John W. Whillock 

DENTISTRY 

John J. Kohout 

PHARMACY 

Abraham Cohen 

C. B. Freeman 

John W. Gallagher, Jr. 

W. L. Hickok 

J. R. McDowell 

NURSING 

Anna M. Copenhaver 

Marguerite Nicholson 

Dorothy K. Thomson 
1935 

MEDICINE 

Herbert M. Beddow 

John R. Bender 

William H. Chapman 

Chai Chang Choi 

Solomon Disick 

Joseph M. Dixon 

J. B. Earle 

Hugh S. Edwards 

S. L. Elfmon 

James Q. Gant, Jr. 

Hunter B. Frischkorn 

Cornelius E. Hagan, Jr. 

F. Hernandez-Morales 

Edmund M. LaPrade 

Samuel Levine 

Louis Lovenstein 

John P. Lynch, Jr. 

Wayland Nash McKenzie 

Sam Milchin 

Aurelia G. Nicholls 

Reno R. Porter 

Rupert W. Powell 

Wellford C. Reed 

S. T. Ryang 

Seymour Schotz 

B. E. Stephenson, Jr. 
Hack U. Stephenson, Jr. 
Leo L. Tylec 

William Roberts Tyson 
Angelo J. Villan. 
Charles E. Watkins 
W. C. Winn 
DENTISTRY 

D. Blanton Allen 
Moffett H. Bowman 
Antonio C. DiSanto 
Elwood F. MacRury 
Richard Lee Simpson, Jr 
S. D. Stancell 
PHARMACY 

E. K. Walters 
NURSING 

Alma Collier Baetz 
Ruhamah W. Henshaw 
Erna L. Carlson 
Martha Nicholes 
1936 
MEDICINE 

C. Raymond Arp 
Homer Bartley 
Ben Bogen 



Paul K. Candler 

A. A. Davis 

Louis DeAngelis 

L. F. Dobbs 

Robert R. Eason 

James W. Elliott 

Eugene R. Evans 

Helen G. Evans 

W. Hughes Evans 

Homer E. Ferguson 

Frederick C. Goodall 

Abraham M. Jacobson 

A. R. Johnston 

John H. Judson 

Max Koenigsberg 

E. W. Lacy, Jr. 

Carl W. Meador 

Robert H. Mitchell 

Richard C. Neale 

Frank N. Pole 

Spotswood Robins 

Leroy Smith 

Jack Jay Stark 

I. Ewen Taylor 

Lewis S. Trostler 

Arthur L. VanName, Jr. 

Walter E. Vermilya 

Hilda J. Walters 

Charles W. Warren 

Claude B. White 

R. B. Woodhull 

DENTISTRY 

Jack J. Goldman 

Samuel P. Kayne 

Thomas E. Martin 

William S. Miles, Jr. 

Herbert Tobias 

PHARMACY 

J. H. Carter 

J. M. Early 

Alex Grossman 

1937 
MEDICINE 

James O. Burke 

K. N. Byrne 

David T. Carr 

Delores Mendez Cushion 

Mary Louise Clark 

John P. Eastham 

Lendall C. Gay 

W. G. Hardy 

Clarence M. Hawke 

Irving R. Hayman 

John Paul Jones 

V. Clifton Lanier 

Louis Lipman 

Elmer McGraw 

Julian H. Meyer 

Richard A. Michaux 

Theodore J. Moss 

Richard N. O'Dell 

Eli A. Rosen 

Herbert N. Schwartz 

George A. Shetter 

Julius J. Snyder 

Christine Thelen 

Roger Williams 

DENTISTRY 

Samuel E. Buxton, Jr. 

Stephen F. Gutowski 

I. Michael Harris 

Woodrow C. Henderson 

Norman G. Sedel 

PHARMACY 

John Roy Hurt 



W. P. Lewis 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Joan E. Tubbs 

1938 
MEDICINE 

Russell N. Carrier 

Phillips L. Claud 

William H. Copley 

Garland Dyches 

Ira C. Evans 

George S. Fultz, Jr. 

Edward E. Haddock 

Gordon D. Hall 

Jacob C. Huffman 

Charles F. James, Jr. 

Sydney L. Lang 

Carl S. Lingamfelter 

Sidney Grey Page, Jr. 

Marvin B. Poole 

C. Rodriguez 

Herbert G. Ruffin 

Irving M. Schor 

Earl S. Scott 

W. W. Scott 

Edward G. Sharp 

Otto S. Steinreich 

W. Taliaferro Thompson, Jr. 

Gilman R. Tyler 

Annie Louise Wilkerson 

George H. Williams 

H. Joseph Williams 

William H. Woodson 

DENTISTRY 

Ernest L. Bayton, Jr. 

P. N. Davis, Jr. 

A. G. Orphanidys 

William H. Traynham, Jr. 

PHARMACY 

George E. Barrow, Jr. 

Herald E. Edds 

W. W. Gray 

James F. Hollenbeck 

William H. Joyner 

Pearl E. Martin 
1939 

MEDICINE 

Beverley B. Clary 

Jose D. Coll 

Dewitt C. Daughtry 

Thomas H. S. Ely 

Eugenie Fribourg 

•Thomas L. Grove 

Sidney J. Hellman 

Charles F. Hudson 

Marion F. Jarrett 

Saul Krugman 

Gerald A. Logrippo 

Robert C. Longan 

Carl Manuta 

Buford W. McNeer 

Lloyd Davis Miller 

Harold I. Nemuth 

Maurice E. B. Owens, Jr. 

John L. Patterson 

Debora Pineles 

William J. Robinson 

Catalina Scarano 

William M. Smethie 

John E. Stone 

Harry A. Tubbs 

George D. Vaughan 

DENTISTRY 

Ulpian G. Bradenham 

M. O. Fox 

Raymond L. Hensley 

THE SCARAB 



C. Kirtner Johnson 
Jock C. Kanter 
Robert L. Mason 
P. R. Milton 
H. S. Moon 
Charles M. Rosa 
PHARMACY 
Z. I. Blachman 
Charles O. Fore 
Sidney H. Hirsch 
Roderick L. Lucas 
A. P. Mehfoud 
Jacob Plotkin 
Lorena A. Shepherd 
J. Muriel Wilkerson 
NURSING 

Frances W. Etheridge 
Doris H. Jones 

1940 
MEDICINE 
Olivia Abernethy 
Oscar Aguilo 
C. Sherrill Armentrout 
Vernon M. Bryant 
Galen G. Craun 
Dorothy Fisher 
Herman Jacob Flax 
Leonard M. Galbraith 
Robert S. Gatherum, Jr 
William C. Grinnan 
Josefma Guarch 
Richard K. Hanifon 
M. Josiah Hoover, Jr. 
John F. C. Hunter 
Shelton B. Hur 
Gus T. Kerhu 
Edward L. Kin 



Jr. 



Jose Bou Lopez 
Evelyn A. Meadows 
Morris H. O'Dell 
Glenn F. Palmer 
Joseph C. Parker 
Elmer S. Robertson 
Ben|amin Rosenberg 
James E. Spargo, Jr 
Wilkin R. Stevens 
John T. Walke 
Walter E. Ward 
DENTISTRY 
Aubrey C. Duffer 
Harold A. Epstein 
C. Robert Helsabeck, 
Raymond A. Holcomb 
Jose O. Porrata 
William C. Sumner 
PHARMACY 
Boyd S. Clements 
James H. O'Brien, J 
NURSING 
Alberta C. Rawchuck 

1941 
MEDICINE 

Herbert C. Allen, Jr. 
Charles Baldim, Jr. 
Bradford S. Bennett 
Estill L. Caudill, Jr. 
William E. Doner 
Robert S. Faircloth 
Mary V. Gallagher 
A. Broaddus Gravatt, 
Julius C. Hulcher 
C. Fred Irons 
Malene G. Irons 
Charles B. Keppler 



Arthur A. Kirk 
Sidney Lyons 
J. David Markham 
John J. Marsella 
Edward T. Matsuoka 
Percy J. McElrath, . 
Donald S. Morris 
Lloyd F. Moss 
M. Jane Page 
Carl P. Parker 
Fletcher L. Raiford 
James S. Rhodes, Jr 
John Edgar Stevens 
Adney K. Sutphin 
Julian A. White 
William R. Woolner 
Abraham Zies 
DENTISTRY 
Margaret C. Draffin 
William C. Draffin 
Wesley B. Jones 
Hume S. Powell 
John G. Wall 
PHARMACY 
Paul G. Caplan 
W. Russell Glover 
Linwood S. Leavitt 
W. Roy Smith 
NURSING 
Bonnie P. Chitwood 
lone B. Hottle 
Idell M. McElrath 
1942 
MEDICINE 

Pauline D. Carmichael 
G. F. Dederick, Jr. 
Donald R. Gilbert 



Ansel Lipman 
Fred D. Maphis, Jr. 
Maxwell J. Marder 
Rutherford D. Neal 
Oscar Lee Ramsey 
Duvahl B. Ridgeway 
Catherine R. Stoeckel 
Richard G. Stoneburnei 
Evelyn L. Stull 
Maurice S. Vitsky 
O. W. Ward, Jr. 
Herbert F. Webb 
David C. Whitehead 
DENTISTRY 
David M. Alexander 
William H. Brown 
Miles W. Cheatham, Jr 
Frederick W. Hines 
Cyril R. Mirmelstein 
Rupert S. Walker 
M. E. Woody, Jr. 
PHARMACY 
J. O. Hubbard 
E. Carlyle Phillips 
John J. Schooley 
Ralph M. Ware, Jr. 
NURSING 

Mary Esther Cibula 
Aileen B. Hogood 
Julia K. Longerbeam 
Margaret A. Robertson 
Elizabeth T. Topping 
1943 March 
MEDICINE 
L. E. Banks 
Hugh Sharp Brown 
James L. Chitwood 



William S. Clifford 
Custis L. Coleman 
William S. Grizzard 
George L. Grubbs 
William J. Hagood 
Melvin B. Lamberth 
Francis B. Lee 
John S. Morris, Jr. 
John D. Powell 
Robert H. Putney, Jr. 
Lucie W. Richardsor 
Norman Rosenthal 
Leroy S. Saf.an 
John S. Shaffer 
Russell N. Snead 
Wiley B. Trivett, Jr. 
G. R. Tureman, Jr. 
Herbert L. Warres 
DENTISTRY 
A. Robert Anderson, 
Samuel C. Patteson 
PHARMACY 
Walter M. Allen 
Robert P. Kent 
Floyd A. Robertson, 
NURSING 
L. Frances Gordon 
Virginia T. Maphis 
Bernice W. Marsella 
Dorsye Russell 
Edith West 
1943 December 
MEDICINE 
Paul E. Brady 
Ellsworth F. Cale 
Wayne C. Campbell 



FOR OVER 



20 YEARS 

HASKELL'S 



BELBARB 



has provided Safe, Effective Spasmolysis and Sedation 
Now In 
5 Convenient Dosage Forms 





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hyoscyamine, 
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2 BELBARB No. 2 
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Hydrochloride — 0.5 mg., Niacinamide — 10 mg., Vitamin Bi 2 Activity — 2 meg. 

Send for free samples and literature. 

CHARLES C. HASKELL & CO., Richmond, Virginia 



NOVEMBER, 1958 



17 



Fay Carmines 
William H. Cox 
David D. Dexter 
Milton Ende 
Henry E. Ernst 
Irvin E. Pixel 
Eugene Freundlich 
James Cofer Gale 
Thomas V. Goode, Jr. 
Robert A. Hoffman 
A. C. Johnson 
William R. Kay 
Frank R. Kelly, Jr. 
Otis E. Linkoos 
Shirley Martin 
Fred C. McCall 
Frank F. Merker 
W. W. Mills 
Robert L. Morrison 
Ruth O'Neal 
John M. Ratliff, Jr. 
Charles H. Rawls 
George F. Schuster 
John H. Sproles 
Jay E. Stoeckel 
George Vran.an 
Harold E. Wolfe 
DENTISTRY 
Joseph H. Conduff 
R. L. Holle 
William J. Longan 

Earl W. Strickland 
PHARMACY 

Jean W. Payne 

Stanley A. Greenbaum 

NURSING 

Pearl S. Wolfe 
1944 

MEDICINE 

Jane B. Adams 

Raymond A. Adams 

Robert R. Dennison 

Rufus P. Ellett, Jr. 

James A. Farley 

Cecil Glen Finney 

Merntt W. Foster, Jr. 

E. C. Garber, Jr. 

Thomas C. Iden 

J. W. Lambdin 

S. W. Lippincott 

Martin Markowitz 

Edward N. Maxwell 

W. Donald Moore 

William P. Mornssette 

Marcus Nakdimen 

Roy T. Parker 

Nelson 5. Payne 

Eugene G. Peek, Jr. 

Abraham Perlman 

Marion L. Rice, Jr. 

C. F. Siewers 

Richard D. Turin 

Charles B. Wilkerson, Jr 

DENTISTRY 

Herbert H, Bonnie 

Ira Gould 

Howard C. Mirmelstein 

Dovid H. Reomes, Jr. 

J. P. Todd, Jr. 

PHARMACY 

J. F, Jackson 

NURSING 

Dorothy B. Berk 

Katherine D. Edwards 

Edna R. Oppenheim 

18 



Louise Rosenblatt 
Virginia G. Wessells 

1945 
MEDICINE 

C. Cooper Bell, Jr. 
Robert L. Chamberlain 
John W. Compton 
William E. Copeland 
James Lyle Dellmger 
Willard M. Fitch 
Paul S. Gotses 
G. D. Hayden 
Larry Allison High 
William H. Huffstetler, Jr 
George R. Jones 
Edwin J. Kamons 
Claude K. Kelly 
Mann T. Lowry 
John M. Lukeman 
A. A. McLean 
Franklin W. Mallamo 
James T. May 
Madge D. May 
John H. Nicholson 
Albert J. Paine 
W. G. Painter 
M. W. Phillips 
Robert R. Rector 
Paul W. Robinett 
Harvey R. St. Clair 
Roy Burton Sampson 
William H. Shaia 
Thomas E. Smith 
Ramon M. Suarez, Jr. 
Forrest P. White 
DENTISTRY 
James A Harrell 
Roy A. Miller, Jr. 
PHARMACY 
Louise F. Simpson 
NURSING 

Eleanor S. Carson 
1946 

MEDICINE 

William H. Barney 

Richard N. Baylor 

R. E. Berman 

James H. Bocock 

Charles H. Brant 

James W. Brooks 

Marvin G. Burdette 

Rowland H. Burns 

E. K. Carter 

Wyson Curry, Jr. 

Albert H. Dudley 

David M. Dumville 

John R. Fitzgerald 

Jack Freund 

John A. Gill 

Rupert S. Hughes, Jr. 

George W. Hurt 

James W. Johnston 

W. R. McCune 

J. D. Mathias 

A. B. H. Mirmelstein 

Thomas G. Potterfield 

Daniel Ross 

Jack J. Schwartz 

R. E. Stone 

C Newton Van Horn 

Richard K. Williams 

Richard Dale Wilson 

DENTISTRY 

Alec Epstein 

Gladstone M. Hill 



Nelson D. Large 
NURSING 
Marye H. Marks 
Faye B. Wilkerson 
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 



Patr 



eft 



B. Holsing 
1947 



MEDICINE 

Franklin L. Angell 
Robert W. Bradley 
Noland M. Canter, Jr. 
C. Whitney Coulkins, Jr. 
Elmond L. Coffield 
H. Chesley Decker 
Genevieve G. Dutton 
Wayne W. Dutton 
David J. Greenberg 
Douglas O. Hill 
J. Edward Hill 
Jerome Imburg 
George R. Krupp 
Robert Q. Marston 
B. J. McClanahan 
William W. McClure 
Philip L. Minor 
Frances R. Payne, Jr. 
Forrest W. Pitts 
Ralph S. Riffenburgh 
Jay E. Rogers, Jr. 
Joseph A. Solomon 
James A. Thompson 
Carl C. Tully 

Fred Walls, Jr. 

L. Mildred Williams 

DENTISTRY 

John N. Pastore 

Joseph R. Suggs 

PHARMACY 

R. David Anderson 

Russell E. Simpson, Jr 

NURSING 

Anna Mc.D Anderson 

Betty S. Brown 

Jane M. Light 

Virginia L. Williams 

X-RAY TECHNICIAN 

Quetita Miro 

1948 
MEDICINE 

Wilbur F. Amonette 

Dan N. Anderson 



Dc 



A. Berh 



Arthur K. Black 
Henry A. Bullock, Jr. 
Collinson P. E. Burgwyn 
Ernest T. Cobb 
Vernon L. Cofer 
J. M. Damron 
Conley L. Edwards, Jr. 
Roy A. Edwards 
George F. Elasser 
Thomas B. Hardman 
W. Robert Irby 
Charles D. Jordan 
S. Ben Judy 
William E. Kincaid 
Carl H. Laestar 
William B. Looney 
E. W. McPherson 
Arthur G. Meakin 
Michael J. Moore 
Thomas H. Moseley 
William A. Niermann 
William H. Pate 
John L. Pitts 



Robert E. Richard 

Lucien W. Roberts, Jr. 

Thomas A. Saunders 

Elizabeth C. Strawinsky 

John L. Whaley 

Ann Hardy Williams 

Robert C. Wingfield 

Charles M. Zacharias 

DENTISTRY 

Ernest S. Benson 

William H. Johnson 

James R. Turnage 

PHARMACY 

C. A. Moses 

Ida J. Sternberg 

NURSING 

Elizabeth F. Harlin 

Faye Hensley Starr 

1949 
MEDICINE 

Leo Blank 

Arnold L. Brown 

Wiley H. Cozart 

Hilda Garcia 

Frank A. Gonzalez 

Herbert C. Hoover 

Beverly Jones 

Harold O. Kamons 

Ulric J. Laquer 

Suzanne B. Little 

Joseph H. Masters 

Robert T. Melgaard 

William B. Moncure 

John H. Moon 

Harry Nenni 

Heth Owen, Jr. 

David S. Palmstrom 

Lillione F. Pinero 

Stanley S. Simon 
Ralph J. Stalter 
Robert G. Stineman 
Robert S. Turner, Jr. 
W. T. Walker 
William O. Winston 
DENTISTRY 
George H. Barnett 
William H. Becker 
Ralph L. Crobill 
Henry B. F.eld 
Charles H. Sugg 
J. Frank Thompson 
PHARMACY 
Robert A. Garland 
Charles F. Kingery 
John E. Marks 
Montague C. Marshall, Jr 
Richard E. Marshall 
Thomas F. Marshall, Jr. 
A. B. Motley, Jr. 

MEDICINE 195 ° 

W B. Adams 
Earl D. Allara 
Wyndham B. Blanton, Jr 
Russell V. Bowers 
Thornton R. Cleek 
Evelyn P. Daniel 
Griffith B. Daniel 
Hugh Fitzpatrick, III 
John T. Click, Jr. 
J. K. Hall, Jr. 
Ward Harshbarger, Jr. 
Thomas B. Hedrick 
Russell E. Herring, Jr. 
James R. Holsinger 
James Laster 



Margaret L. Masters 
Eugene E. Miholyka 
John W. Powell 
Stuart Ragland, Jr. 
John B. Rose, Jr. 
Thomas C. Royer 
Lee W. Shaffer, Jr. 
Leo F. Sherman 
Robert D. Shreve 
Eustace H. Smith 
Joseph A. Smith 
Lawrence O. Snead, Jr. 
C. G. Spivey 
Thomas W. Tusing 
Allan M. Unger 
Leroy Webb 
DENTISTRY 
Marvin W. Aldndge 
James E. Cannon, Jr. 
John S. Dilday 
Max Largent 
Virgil H. Marshall 
Lawrence G. Mathews 
Woodrow W. Poss 
Claude D. Richardson, Jr 
Wilbur L. Shearer, Jr. 
Harding L. Thomas 



Vine 



S. Till- 



PHARMACY 

M. Lee Baker 
Thomas E. Bruce, Jr. 
John J. Minahan, Jr. 
Roy A. Moon 
Edwin A. Myrick 
Eugene V. White 
Hiram H. Whitehead 
NURSING 

Margery A. Hughes 
MASTER OF SCIENCE 
Emily E. Mueller 
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 
Diane G. Winston 
PHYSICAL THERAPY 
Barbara E. Teasdale 

1951 
MEDICINE 
Charles S. Berrocal 
Miriam Carmichael 
John D. French 
R. Finley Gayle, III 
William C. Grigsby 
Frederick A. Gunion 
A. Epes Harris, Jr. 
Norman N. Hill, Jr. 
William J. Hotchkiss 
Walter S. Jennings 
Edward A. Lewis 



H 



V. A. Marks 
Arthur J. Martin 
Joseph E. Mathias 
Thomas D. McCahill 
Francis H. McMullan 
Brooke M. Moffett 
W. E. Newby 
Robert M. Phillips 
C. J. Roncaglione 
Norman R. Tingle 
Jesse M. Tucker 
Albert J. Wasserman 



Juli 



Weinsteii 



DENTISTRY 



ird S. Barnwell 



THE SCARAB 



Eugene Eskey, Jr. 
Carlton E. Gregory 
Thomas W. Peterson 
William B. Russell 
PHARMACY 
Henry W. Addington 
Carl E. Bain 
Otha C. Bayne, Jr. 
Thomas H. Holland 
George J. Janosik 
Wallace Klein 



W 



ell 



iberlake 



Beniami 

John E. 

NURSING 

Mae Belle Lee 

Mary W. Rebman 

Loretta Whanger 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

Nathan Bushnell, III 

John C. Hess 

C. Dimmock Jenkins 

Barringlon Kinnard 

Joseph S. Stubbs, Jr. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

M. D. Bates 

1952 

MEDICINE 

George E. Arrington, Jr. 
William M. Atkins 
Henry V. Belcher 
Jean P. Cavender 
Gene Clapsaddle 
Frank A. Hamilton, Jr. 
Kenneth M. Heatwole 
William E. Holladay, Jr. 
George H. Hull 
Emily E. Jones 
James B. Kegley, Jr. 



Jack A. Lawson 
Ellis F. Maxey 
Howard Maxwell 
David Z. Morgan 
John A. Murray 
Thomas P. Overton 
Bernard L. Patterson 
William A. Shelton 
George O. Shipp 
William R. Tabor 
George F. Tucker 
Thomas W. Turner 
Louis R. Wilkerson 



York 



Jarr 
DENTISTRY 

C. L. Baltimore 

Jack W. Chevalier 

Harry W. Fore, Jr. 

Kenneth S. Gusler 

S. Guy Hall 

Robert L. Hopkins, Jr. 

Jacob A. Peorce 

PHARMACY 

Kenneth E. Conner 

Millson S. French 

Greer P. Jackson 

Jack D. Proctor 

M. Blair Robertson 

NURSING 

Emily H. Baxter 

Dot F. Garber 

Betty B. Shephard 

Mary W. Stanford 

Edith Brooks Wamsley 

Jean C. Waters 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

William M. Bucher 



Hunter A. Grumbles 


Terry F. Tanner 


Paul M. Burd 


William R. Reid 


William B. Tarry, Jr. 


Robert M. Cook 


Robert R. Shields 


Charles G. Thedieck 


Lawrence S. Cowling 


David G. Williamson, Jr. 


Charles J. Townsend 


Leonard L. Davis, Jr. 


PHYSICAL THERAPY 


William G. Way 


John T. Edmonds 


Richard B. Kemp 


James H. Wiley 


Harold W. Felton 


Ruth M. Latimer 


DENTISTRY 


Rudolph C. Garber, J 


1953 


Donald S. Brown 


Edgar C. Goldston 


MEDICINE 


Robert T. Edwards 


Henry T. Harrison, Jr. 


Simeon H. Adams 


Frederick C. Shaw 


Mary Lou Hoover 


Robert F. Barbe 


Thomas G. Warrick 


Alan E. Kinsel 


James G. Beach, Jr. 


PHARMACY 


Emerson L. Kirby 


Wesley C. Bernhart 
Kenneth M. Clements 
Catherine E. Craun 
Donald E. Cunningham 
Cecil F. Evans, Jr. 


Robert W. Clyburn 
S. Wallace Cundiff 
Austin W. Farley 
Norman L. Hilliard 
James F. Poole 


Charles T. Lively 
Randolph McCutcheon, J 
Donald H. McNeill, J 
Robert D. Richards 
Phillip A. Rosenfeld 


Allan L. Forbes 


Eames A. Powers 


DENTISTRY 


Earl R. Fox 


NURSING 


Charles E. Barr 


Joseph E. Gardner 


Alice L. Smith 


Leon J. Hecht 


William N. Gee, Jr. 


Anne R. Waters 


John T. Jobe, III 


Ota T. Graham, Jr. 


Margaret L. Way 


John A. Morris 


Warren Hagood 


HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 


Perry N. Trakas 


Charles P. Harwood 


Robert A. Cramer 


Marion B. White 


Ernest C. Hermann 


Thomas J. Curtis 


Peter S. Yeatras 


Raymond C. Hooker, Jr. 
Farrar W. Howard 
Alvin O. Jarrett 
Samuel S. Morrison 


MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Marion Waller 
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 


PHARMACY 

Irby B. Brown 

L. W. Cheatham, Jr. 

R. O. Edds 


George Naymick 
Mary D. Brown Pryor 
Jean F. Ragsdale 
Julie M. Sanford 


Nancy A. Beach 
PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Christine E. Friednch 
Philip N. Puhzzi 


Samuel H. Kalman 
Everett F. Kohne 
Robert S. Lawrence 
Richard M. Peatross 


A. R. Southall, Jr. 


Joseph A. Taylor 


William R. Rollings 


Henry S. Spencer 


1954 


NURSING 


Walter J. Stanford 


MEDICINE 


Mary Jane M. Kroncke 


Paul A. Tanner, Jr. 


Donald L. Baxter 


Nancy Lee Luck 



TUCKER HOSPITAL, INC. 

212 West Franklin Street 
Richmond 20, Virginia 

A private hospital for diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric and neurological 
patients. Hospital and out-patient services. 

(Organic diseases of the nervous system, psychoneuroses, psychosomatic dis- 
orders, mood disturbances, social adjustment problems, involutional reactions 
and selective psychotic and alcoholic problems.) 



Dr. Howard R. Masters 
Dr. George S. Fultz, Jr. 



Dr. James Asa Shield 
Dr. Amelia G. Wood 



Dr. Weir M. Tucker 
Dr. Robert K. Williams 



NOVEMBER, 1958 



19 



HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

Richard Brooke, Jr. 
Curtis A. Clayton 
Gerald W. De Haven 
Paul F. Flanagan 
Charles L. Gwinn 
Joseph H. James, Jr. 
Jesse W. Reel 
Warren E. Stearns 

1955 
MEDICINE 
Theodore Adler 
John A. Board 
J. David Bradford 
William A. Cassada, Jr. 
Nelson M. Fox, Jr. 
Arthur B. Frazier 
Nancy M. Garrett 
Jack S. Garrison 
John A. Goodno, Jr. 
Williard E. Lee, Jr. 
Alden Mayer 
William P. Sinclair 
Don P. Whited 
Milton Wigod 
R. Lewis Wright, Jr. 
DENTISTRY 
Richard L. Fisher 
Eugene L. Kanter 
John P. Morris 
I. Slaydon Myers 
PHARMACY 
Jean P. Day 
James N. O'Grady 
NURSING 
Reva G. Dyer 
Eleanor R. Roller 
June Shimer 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 
John L. Freeland 
Kenneth L. Gallier 
Charles L. Hite 
Charles T. Wood 
MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 
Peggy J. Edmondson 

1956 
MEDICINE 
Thomas H. Bain 
Roderick A. Comunale 
Tony Constant 
Raymond D. Dyer, Jr. 
Hugh E. Fraser, Jr. 
Anne S. Goldston 
P. G. Gregoriou 
William J. Lawson 
Robert I. Miles 
Charles H. Moseley, Jr. 
F. X. Mullins, Jr. 
John B. Parker 
Sterling N. Ransone 
Louis J. Read 
Kenneth B. Sizer 
Paulus C. Taylor 
William A. Thurman, Jr. 
Raymond D. Wallace, Jr. 
Howard B. Wilkins 
DENTISTRY 
Richard D. Collier 
W. W. Crittenden, Jr. 
Robert W. Gravely, Jr. 
J. B. Lapentina 
Paul M. March 
E. Alton Thomas 
James E. Williams 
J. Marion Woolard 

20 



PHARMACY 

Henry C. Brown, Jr. 

Sydney Clement 

Phillip B. May 

Barbara A. Morgan 

John G. Sharpe 

NURSING 

Malisa Harkleroad 

Janet B. Hoylman 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

Joseph E. Peery, Jr. 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Sidney A. Krukin 

Herman L. West 

1957 
MEDICINE 
Jack P. Andrews 

B. A. Baber 
Charles L. Baird, Jr. 
Wilbur J. Blechman 
J. H. Caricofe 
Elizabeth R. Carmichael 
Walter F. Green, III 
Robert F. Haden 

Will. am H. Hark 

John Walker Jones 

Thomas J. Schermerhorn 

Thomas H. Stark 

John A. Tolley, III 

William L. Threlkeld 

Earl E. Virts, Jr. 

Jack Wells 

Ruth F. Williams 

DENTISTRY 

J. M. Adair 

Dick S. Ajalat 

Calvin L. Belkov 

W. W. Hankins, Jr. 

William R. Henley 

C. Marshall Mahanes 
Robert S. Markley 
Melvin R. Morrison 
Felix E. Shepard 
John E. Wessinger 
Robert C. Woods 
PHARMACY 

Frank W. Bennett 

John L. Butler 

Donald R. Seldes 

Conway Stanley 

Edwin M. Sternberg 

NURSING 

Jean E. Bond 

Mrs. Parvin B. Cantrell 

Sally B. Cline 

Anna Mae Craddock 

Marion C. Davis 

Janet C. Garber 

Janice L. Greene 

Phyllis H. Jenkins 

Shirley A. Priode 

Elizabeth Sawyer 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

Robert E. CundifF 

Donald K. Freeborn 

Ann May 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Elaine M. Phillips 

1958 
MEDICINE 

Douglas E. Andrews 
Donald R. Bailey 
James P. Baker 



James M. Barnes 
Louisa S. Batman 
H. Maynard Bellamy, 
Robert W. Bess, Jr. 
W. Kenneth Blaylock 
Donald C. Blose 
Joseph T. Bones 
Jane T. Carswell 
Beverly N. Chambers 
Melvin D. Childers, Jr 
Richard F. Clark 
John W. Cline 
L. Thomas Coleman 
Alfred B. Cramer, III 
John A. Cross, Jr. 
James R. Darden, Jr. 
John W. Dickerson 
Harold P. D.nsmore 
Thomas E. Donnelly 
Frank H. Dudley 
Gardner T. Edwards, 
F. Carlyle Evans, Jr. 
James L. Ferrell 
Thomas L. Fieldson 
Albert A. Fratnck 
B. William Freund, Jr 
Robert W. Fry 
Joseph M. Gardner 
Roland G. Garrett, Jr 
Gerald A. Gildersleev 
K. Arnold Gill, Jr. 

A. Ray Goodwin 
Patrick G. Graham 
Carl J. Greever 
William E. Hale 
Andrew W. Haraway, 
James W. Harding 

H. Summers Harrison 
Sherman E. Hatfield 
Robert D. Hess 
E. Beaumont Hodge, J 
Harry F. Hoke, Jr. 
Claude K. Hylton 
Leon Jennings, Jr. 
Charles D. Johnson 
H. Myron Kauffman, 

B. Phillip Kocen 
Andrew L. Lawrence, J 
William D. Lilly 
David L. Litchfield 
Clabe W. Lynn, Jr. 
Louis B. Massad 

John A. Mathews 
William W. McDonoi 
John M. Miller, Jr. 
Stage E. Miller 
H. Lynn Moore, Jr. 
Marion J. Murray, Jr. 
John J. Payette, Jr. 
William F. Peach, Jr. 
Justus C. Pickett 
George D. Roberson 
Jesse D. Robertson 
M. Neil Rogers 
Philip Rubin 
Robert B. Scott 
Owen C. Shull 
Gladstone E. Smith, 
Edwin M. Sokol 
Arnold F. Strother 
Jonas C. Strouth 
R. Dean Tester 
Henry J. Tucker, Jr. 
R. O. Van Dyke, Jr. 
Karl K. Wallace, Jr. 



J. Paul Wampler, Jr. 
Winfred O. Ward 
Charles O. Watlington 
Marvin L. Weger 
Jock R. Wheeler 
William W. Whitehurst 
Vivian M. Wilkerson 
Patrick C. Williams, Jr. 
Edward C. Wilson 
Robert W. Woodhouse, III 
Willis F. Wunder 
W. P. Willsee Young 

DENTISTRY 

Henry Pat Barham 
Robert S. Barlowe 
John I. Bowman, Jr. 
James A. Boyd 
James B. Bradley, Jr. 
Otis A. Bristow, Jr. 
Richard T. Brock 
Donald A. Brunton, Jr. 
William F. Bryson 
Jesse R. Cole, Jr. 
John L. Corey 
William S. Dodson 
Gerald Einhorn 
Marshall C. England, Jr. 
Donald C. Evans 
Grayson G. Fitzgerald 
Llewellyn T. Flippen 
James A. Flowers, Jr. 
Ralph R. Futterman 
Paul C. Hall 
Gordon A. Hearne 
Arnold M. Hoffman 
Herman L. Jones, Jr. 
Harold L. Kesser 
Robert M. Lawrence, Jr. 
William K. Lennon 
Bennett A. Malbon 
Jessie W. Mayhew, Jr. 
Robert L. McClanahan, Jr. 
George R. McGuire 
Paul G. Moerschell, Jr. 
Norman P. Moore 
Robert Garland Moore 
James H. Mullins 
William Pearlman 
Brownie E. Polly, Jr. 
Edward H. Radcliffe 
Harold P. Remines 
E. Eugene Rorrer 
James L. Ross 
Theodore S. Savvas 
Ronald D. Shocket 
William Snead 
Roy E. Stanford 
Harold E. Tucker 
Zed J. Wampler, Jr. 
N. Carl Wessinger 
Marvin F. West 
Philip P. Wilson 
Howard A. Woolwine 
PHARMACY 
Stephen C. Barnard 
Russell M. Belcastro 
Robert L. Bland 
William P. Caldwell 
William G. Conner 
William R. Crenshaw 
Mary V. L. Cummings 
Richard Dooley 
Edward M. Durand 
Joseph A. Florence, III 



Charles H. Friedman 

Margaret A. M. Gibrall 

Edward C. Glover, III 

Charlotte Y. Harris 

Frank K. Harris 

Mabel Pearl Harbour 

B. L. Hudson 

Harry W. Hudson, Jr. 

Carl R. Johnson 

James C. McArdle 

Fred C. McDowell 

Murray A. Moore, Jr. 

Gene Powell 

Lester E. Prince 

Richard B. Rice 

Gerald L. Selph 

Bertram M. Shevitz 

Robert O. Snoddy 

John C. White, Jr. 

NURSING 

Beverly Beaver 

Patricia Bray 

Charlotte W. Clarke 

Joan H. Collins 

Cary L. Davidson 

Beauty Denby 

Diane Diedrich 

Nancy Durrett 

Shirley Hartmann 

Winifred Latham 

Melody J. Marshall 

Phyllis May 

Shelby Jean Moye 

Ann B. Murray 

Baine Micham Ney 

Mary C. Northrop 

Judith Perry 

Charlotte Adams Sciota 

Clementine C. Sadler 

Judy Stoneburner 

Mary Jo Utt 

Marie Thomas Walker 

Martha Wayland 

Julia A. Weller 

Minnie V. Williams 

Sylvia W. Winchester 

HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

Constantine G. Hampers 

Kenneth L. Waddell 

ADMINISTRATION 

William T. Sanger 

William F. Tompkins 

BOARD OF VISITORS 

W. Welby Beverley 

Eppa Hunton, IV 

Ed. P. Phillips 

Buford Scott 

R. F. Burke Steele 

FACULTY 

Harry P. Anderson, Jr. 

William M. Anderson 

S. Elmer Bear 

H. Wallace Blanton 

Wyndham B. Blanton 

Lewis H. Bosher, Jr. 

Harry Brick 

Earnest B. Carpenter 

Merton E. Carver 

Mary Katherine Cary 

Paul L. Chevalier 

Robert S. Cunningham 

W. Minor Deyerle 

Ernst Fisher 

Herbert H. Galston 

THE SCARAB 



Waller H. Hartung 
Boyd W. Haynes, Jr 
Fred M. Hodges 
Ebbe C. Hoff 
Randolph H. Hoge 
David M. Hume 
Saul Kay 

Edwin L. Kendig, Jr. 
Seymour J. Kreshove 
Henry G. Kupfer 
Paul Larson 
Jason R. Lewis 
William F. Moloney 



Walter Mayer 
Charles E. S. McKeown 
E. A. McNeer 
John M. Meredith 
G. Kenneth Miller 
Robert E. Mitchell, Jr. 
Leroy S. Pearce 
William E. Pembleton 
Edward C. Peple 
Frank P. Pitts 
Elizabeth E. Porter 
Louree Pottinger 
Benjamin W. Rawles, Jr. 



E, S. Ray 
W, M. Reams, Jr. 
Arnold M. Salzberg 
John G. dos Santos 
Eric C. Schelin 
Maynard P. Smith 
Arnold F. Strauss 
William Durwood 
Lee E. Sutton, Jr. 
J. Warrick Thomas 
Warren E. Weaver 
Armistead M. Will 
Carrington Willian 



Suggs 



Louis H. Williams 

Doris Yingling 

DENTAL AFFILIATES 

Gene W. Hirschfield 

Stanton J. Teitelman 

PHARMACY AFFILIATES 

J. L. Beck 

R. C. Bray 

Charles E. Britt 

L. P. Chandler 

E. R. Deffenbaugh 

A. G. Eastwood 

Frank R. Green 



Stephen Huband 

C. B. Kirchmier 

G. A. Montgomery 

Leroy Riddle 

Dan Rogers 

A. W. Saul 

NURSING AFFILIATE 

Sybil MacLean 

FRIENDS 

Robert F. McCrackan 

George Ossman 

Northern Virginia Phan 

tical Association 



Class Ti 



ass news 



1908 Berkeley H. Martin (M) of Richmond, 
Virginia, celebrated his eightieth birthday in 
September with an Open House given by his 
family. 

1909 Walter E. Vest (M) of Huntington. 
West Virginia, who has served as one of the 
two American Medical Association delegates 
from West Virginia since 1934, will retire 
as a delegate after the American Medical As- 
sociation Clinical meeting in Minneapolis in 
December. He had served as alternate delegate 
for four years prior to his election as delegate. 

1912 The King William Ruritan Club paid 
tribute to A. Warner Lewis (M) of Aylett, Vir- 
ginia, for his long and faithful services to 
the rural peoples of this and adjoining counties. 
He was given a silver bowl in recognition 
of his work as a physician and as a charter 
member and former president of their Ruritan 
Club. 

1913 UCM James D. Hagood (M) of Clover, 
Virginia, and W. C. Caudill (M) of Pear- 
isburg, Virginia, have been appointed by Gov- 
ernor Almond to the new Advisory Council 
of Nursing Training. 

1921 R. Reginald Rooke (P) and his wife 
attended the World's Fair in Brussels. They 
also traveled in Scotland and England. 
1923 Leland Mabry (D) of Fork Union, Vir- 
ginia, visited the Alumni House on Septem- 
ber 2. 

1927 Edward L. Alexander (M) of Newport 
News, Virginia, has been appointed by Gov- 
ernor Almond to the new Advisory Council 
of Nursing Training. 

Brig. General L. Holmes Ginn, Jr. (M), com- 
manding general of William Beaumont Army 
Hospital, El Paso, Texas, retired September 
30. His retirement marks the culmination of 
a long and colorful career of over 31 years 
in the Army Medical Service. His career took 
him through the battles of North Africa, Sicily, 
Italy. Western Europe, and Korea. 

1928 Harvey B. Haag (M). professor of 
pharmacology at the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia, attended the fall meeting of the Ameri- 
can Society for Pharmacology and Experimental 
Therapeutics in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Au- 
gust 25-28. 

Edward Joyner (M) is chief of internal medi- 
cine of the Louise Obici Hospital in Suffolk, 
Virginia. 

1930 John Bierer (P) of Lexington, Virginia, 
and his wife took a six weeks' tour of the West. 
Edward E. Willey (P) and his wife of Rich- 
mond, Virginia, were in Brussels for Virginia 
Day at the World's Fair. They are also touring 
the Continent. 

1931 Sidney Karp (P) of Portsmouth, Vir- 
ginia, made his third annual trip abroad visit- 

NOVEMBER, 1958 



ing Spain, Portugal, France, Italy, Yugoslavia, 
Denmark, Austria, England, and the World's 
Fair in Brussels. 

1932 John H. Bonner (M) visited the Alumni 
House on September 25. 

K. K. Wallace (M) of Norfolk, Virginia, has 
been installed as president of the Norfolk 
County Medical Society. 

1933 J. Spencer Dryden (M) of Washington, 
D. C, announces the association of Pierre B. 
Scott with him in the practice of ophthalmology. 
Raymond Nutter (M) and his son of Erie, Penn- 
sylvania, visited the Alumni House on Septem- 
ber 11. 

A. H. Robins Company, pharmaceutical manu- 
facturer in Richmond, Virginia, has acquired 
property in Evanston, Illinois, to house the of- 
fices and facilities of Whittier Laboratories, 
which recently became a wholly-owned sub- 
sidiary. This makes the third major regional 
branch agency for the company. Others are in 
Dallas and Los Angeles. E. Claiborne Robins 
(P), president, said one reason for the ac- 
quisition was the need for another firm to 



market additional products being developed 
by Robins' research program. 

1934 Margeurite Nicholson (N) and Frances 
Gordon (N'43) of Richmond, Virginia, were 
honored at the annual Red Cross Award Lunch- 
eon. Miss Nicholson received recognition for 
15 years and Miss Gordon for five years of 
volunteer service. 

1935 At the annual meeting of the Virginia 
Heart Association, a distinguished service me- 
dallion was presented to Reno R. Porter (M), 
John R. Saunders (M) of Lynchburg, Virginia, 
was made a diplomate of the Board of Ob- 
stetrics and Gynecology in May. 

1936 Louis De Angelis (M) of New London, 
Connecticut, is now serving his second term 
as president of the New London County Chap- 
ter of the American Academy of General Prac- 
tice. His son, Louis, Jr., is a junior at the 
L'niversity of Richmond. His daughter. Clarissa 
Mae, entered Averett College in Danville, 
Virginia. 

Eula Mae Thompson (N) of Atlanta, Georgia, 
was married May 24 to Leonard Brown. 



The Largest Private Hospital in the South 

Located in a Quiet Residential Section 

Overlooking the Grounds of Battle Abbev 

Fireproof Construction 

Most Modern Equipment 




Johnston-Willis Hospital 

Richmond, Virginia 
Medical, Surgical, Obstetrical, and Pediatric Departments 

Accredited Training School for Nurses 

Approved Rotating Internships and 

Approved Residencies in Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics, 
and Pathology 

235 Beds, Single and Double Rooms 



21 



1938 J. C. Huffman (M) of Buckhannon, 
West Virginia, was chosen the new president- 
elect of the West Virginia State Medical As- 
sociation to take office in August of next year. 
He has been a vice president for three years, 
member of the council for four years, and 
chairman of the United Mine Workers liaison 
for four years. His wife is the retiring president 
of the Women's Auxiliary of the Association. 
He is also the new American Medical Associ- 
ation delegate from West Virginia. 

1942 Mary Cibula (N), supervisor of St. 
Philip Hospital operating rooms, is visiting 
her sister in Tabor, Czechoslovakia. 

Ralph Ware (P) and his wife of Richmond. 
Virginia, announce the birth of a son, James 
Berry, on July 28. 

1943 Mr. and Mrs. William E. Bate of Flor- 
ence, South Carolina, announce the adoption 
of a three months old baby girl. Barbara Ruth, 
on July 28. Mrs. Bate is the former Dorothy 
Coup (N). 

1943M Arthur Taylor (M) is chairman of 
the general practice section of the Louise Obici 
Hospital in Suffolk, Virginia. 

1944 Dorothy Tonjes Manogan (N) writes 
that she is anticipating her class reunion in 
June. She now has five children ranging from 
nine months to eight years. 

1945 "Medical Hypnosis" was the subject of 
a discussion and live demonstration by Kenneth 
S. Bailey (M), pediatrician of Fairmont, 
West Virginia, at the West Virginia State 
Medical Association meeting in White Sul- 
phur Springs, August 21-23. It was one of 
the most unusual scientific features ever pre- 
sented before a meeting of this Association. 

1946 Clayton L. Thomas (M) received the 
Master of Public Health Degree from the Har- 
vard University School of Public Health in 
June. On August 1 he began his duties as 
medical director of Tampax, Inc. 

1 947 A group of happy parents banded to- 
gether in July to pay tribute to one of the chief 
causes of all their joy — their obstetrician. The 
patients belonged to Philip Minor (M) and they 



held a picnic in his honor. They presented him 
with a gold loving cup inscribed "Have For- 
ceps — Will Travel." 

George J. Oliver (M) entered the practice of 
surgery in Williamsburg, Virginia, in August. 
He had served as chief of surgery and hospital 
commander at the Base Hospital, Tinker AFB. 
Oklahoma, for four years. 

Francis R. Payne, Jr. (M), of Petersburg, Vir- 
ginia, was made a diplomate of the American 
Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology in May. 

1948 Thomas S. Lloyd, Jr. (M) of Fredericks- 
burg, Virginia, and Lucien W. Roberts, Jr. (M), 
of South Boston, Virginia, were made diplo- 
mates of the American Board of Obst