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Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association of Virginia Commonwealth University 



OFFICERS 

Dr. Harry I. Johnson. Jr. 
(M.D. '53), president 
1315 Second Street, S.W. 
Roanoke, VA 24016 

Mrs. Marianne R. Rollings 

(B.S. pharmacy '63), 

mmiiatt pas/ president 

306 North Mulberry, Apartment 3 

Richmond, VA 23220 

Dr. Michael O. McMunn 
(D.D.S. '77), president-elect 
1100 Welbourne Drive 
Richmond, VA 23229 

Dr. Frederick T. Given, Jr. 
(M.D. '53), vice-president 
960 Jamestown Crescent 
Norfolk, VA 23508 

Mr. Nick G. Nicholas 
(B.S. pharmacy '52), pice-president 
1821 Westover Avenue 
Petersburg, VA 23805 

Miss Mary O. Lindamood 

(B.S. nursing '67, M.S. nursing '75) 



Ms. Mary Beth Pappas 

(A.S. radiologic technology '77, 

B.S. clinical radiation s 



Dr. Alfred J. Szumski 
(B.S. physical therapy '51), 
M.S. '56, Ph.D. physiology '64), 



Dr. Edward James Wiley, Ji 
(M.D. '56), secretary 
8803 Bellefonte Road 
Richmond, VA 23229 

Mrs. Frances W. Kay 
(B.S. nursing '59), treasurer 
504 Kilmarnock Drive 
Richmond, VA 23229 

Dr. Thomas W. Nooney, Jr. 
(Ph.D. '70), misttut treasurer 
1741 Buford Road 
Bon Air, VA 23235 



TRUSTEES 

Term Expires June 30, 1988 

Mr. Nathan Bushnell III 
(M.H.A. '51) 
1002 Ridge Top Road 
Richmond, VA 23229 

Dr. Ota T. Graham, Jr. 
(M.D. '53) 
3415 Floyd Avenue 
Richmond, VA 23221 

Dr. William E. Holland 
(M.D. '62) 

2511 Arrandell Road 
Midlothian, VA 23113 

Mrs. Carol W. Lunsford 
(B.S. occupational therapy '77, 
M.S. occupational therapy '83) 
2614 Pershing Avenue 
Richmond, VA 23228 

Mrs. June Hudnall Turnage 
(B.S. nursing '59, M.S. nursing '71) 
Route 2, Box 395 
Mechanicsville, VA 23111 

Dr. Charles O. Watlington 
(M.D. '58, Ph.D. physiology '68) 
1707 Park Avenue 
Richmond, VA 23220 

Dr. Edward James Wiley, Jr. 
(M.D. '56) 

8803 Bellefonte Road 
Richmond, VA 23229 

Term Expires June 30, 1989 

Mr. Ronald C. Abernathy 
(B.S. pharmacy '76) 
Route 1, Box SIC 
Stony Creek, VA 23882 

Dr. Sam Barton 
(M.D. '82) 

518 West 31st Street 
Richmond, VA 23225 

Miss Katherine C. Bobbitt 
(B.S. nursing '56) 
8025 Marilea Road 
Richmond, VA 23235 

Mrs. Corinne F. Dorsey 
(B.S. nursing '54) 
P.O. Box 101 
Quinton, VA 23141 

Dr. Steven E. Evens 
(D.D.S. '78) 

5311 Patterson Avenue 
Richmond, VA 23226 

Mrs. Charlotte E. Fitch 
(B.S. physical therapy '70) 
Route 3, Box 231 
Crozet, VA 22932 

Mrs. Rebecca Gusich 
(B.S. occupational therapy '78) 
81 19 Michaels Road 
Richmond, VA 23229 

Eh\ Thomas W. Nooney, Jr. 

(Ph.D. '70) 

1741 Buford Road 

Bon Air, VA 23235 



Mrs. Shirley H. Odell 

(B.S. nursing '58, M.S. nursing '78) 

108 Villa Road 

Newport News, VA 23601 

Mrs. Katherine A. Prentice 
(B.S. medical technology '63) 
2117 Williamstowne Drive 
Richmond, VA 23235 

Mr. Alvin J. Schalow, Jr. 
(B.S. pharmacy '61) 
2630 Kentford Road 
Midlothian, VA 23113 

Dr. John H. Speegle 
(D.D.S. '79) 
112 Chapel Hill Lane 
Williamsburg, VA 23185 

Dr. Frank A. Wade III 
(B.S. pharmacy '76, D.D.S. '82) 
104 Covebrook Lane 
Mechanicsville, VA 23111 

Dr. Jock R. Wheeler 

(M.D. '58) 

250 West Brambleton Avenue, 

Suite 101 

Norfolk, VA 23510 

Term Expires June 30, 1990 

Mr. Thomas C. Bishop 
(B.S. pharmacy '50) 
Route 1, Box 398 
Ashland, VA 23005 

Mrs. Dorothy Sholes Crowder 
(B.S. nursing '74, M.S. '76) 
1729 Stuart Avenue 
Petersburg, VA 23803 

Dr. John B. Lapetina 
(D.D.S. '56) 
9601 Granby Street 
Norfolk, VA 23503 

Mrs. Patricia Blount Moore 
(B.S. occupational therapy '77) 
2251 Winterfield Drive 
Midlothian, VA 23113 

Dr. W. Donald Moore 
(M.D. '44) 
P.O. Box 280 
Coats, NC 27521 

Dr. Samuel V. Russo 
(D.D.S. '61) 
114 Shore Drive 
Portsmouth, VA 23701 

Mrs. Jean Moye Shepard 
(B.S. nursing '58) 
46 Barclay Road 
Newport News, VA 23606 

Mr. James M. Thrower 
(B.S. pharmacy '53) 
P.O. Box 215 
Dinwiddie, VA 23841 

Dr. E. Randolph Trice 
(M.D. '47) 

4304 Kensington Avenue 
Richmond, VA 23221 



CHAPTER OFFICERS 

Delaware Valley Chapter 

President Dr Stanley N. Cohen (M.D. '52) 
222 Delancey Place. Philadelphia, PA 19103 

Secretary-treasurer-Mis. Elsie J- White (nursing) 

Kanawha Valley Chapter 

Presidenl-Ur C Carl Tully (M.D. '47) 

4530 Springhill Avenue, Charleston, WV 23509 

Via-pnsidiriUh. Jerrill D. Cavendar (M.D. '52) 

Secretary-treasurer-Dr. James L. Mangus (M.D. '59) 

New York Chapter 

Presidenl-Dr. Edwin C. Weiss (M.D. '69) 
75 Arleigh Road, Great Neck, NY 11020 

North Carolina Dental Chapter 
PraMmf-Dr. James H. Edwards (D.D.S. '46) 
3137 Essex Circle, Raleigh. NC 27603 

North Carolina Medical Chapter 
Praaml-Dr. Walter G Bullington (M.D '57) 
4335 Colwick Road, Charlotte, NC 28211 

Northern Virginia, Washington, and Southern Maryland 

Chapter 

Via-praitknl-Dr. Robert E. Ware (M.D. '53) 

Peninsula Chapter 

Pnrafair-Dr. Oscar W. Ward, Jr. (M.D. '42) 

15 South Mallory, Phoebus, VA 23663 

PrB«fot/-rf«(-Dr. William H. Traynham, Jr (D.D.S. '38) 

Puerto Rico Chapter 

Prestdenl-Dr. Hilda Garcia De la Noceda (M.D. '49) 
108 Betances Street, Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 

Richmond Chapter 

President -Dr. Diane R. Goodloe (D.D.S. 75) 

26 Crickett Court, Richmond, VA 23229 

Vice-president-Mrs Marianne R. Rollings 

IBS pharmacy '63) 

306 North Mulberry, Apartment 3, 

Richmond, VA 23220 

Secretary-treasarer-Mrs Ann D Broaddus (B.S 

nursing '59) 

4325 Shirley Road, Richmond. VA 23225 

Roanoke Valley Chapter 

Chairman. Medicine-Dr Henry R. Ivey. Jr. (M.D. '74) 

4124 Falling Creek Drive, Vinton, VA 24179 

Chairman. Pharmacy-Mr. Beniamin W. Powell 

(B.S. pharmacy '51) 

329 Union Street, Salem, VA 24153 

Chairman. Nursing-Mrs Patricia Sharpe Eby 

(B.S. nursing '69) 

3504 Old Town Road, S.W., Roanoke, VA 24018 

Tidewater Chapter 

Pnsaml-Mrs. Ann K. Taylor (B S- nursing '64) 

1657 Baypoint Drive, Virginia Beach, VA 23454 

Valley Chapter 

PresMotl-Mrs. Rita Darlene Folds 

(B S physical therapy '83) 

332 S Dogwood Drive. Harrisonburg, VA 22801 

President electDr Walter M. Zirkle. Jr (M.D 56) 

43 Maplehurst. Harrisonburg, VA 22801 

West Virginia Chapter 

Presidenl-Dr Joseph C Woofter (M.D. '68) 

29 Fairview Heights 

Parkersburg, WV 26101 



Cover photos 

Top photo: Dr. David Turner 
(left) and Dr. Joseph Boykin, 
M.D. '76, perform plastic surgery 
in a Kenya hospital. Bottom 
photo: A typical ward in the Nai- 
robi, Kenya, hospital where MCV 
Campus surgeons served for 
three weeks. See story that 
begins on page 2. 



Scarab 



November 1987 



Volume 36 



Number 4 



Medical College of Virginia 

Alumni Association of 

Virginia Commonwealth University 




The Scarab is the official publication of the Medical College of Virginia 
Alumni Association of Virginia Commonwealth University and is pub- 
lished in February, May, August, and November. 



® 1987 Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association of Virginia 
Commonwealth University, Box 156, Richmond, VA 23298-0156. 
(804) 786-0434 



VCU PUBLICATIONS 6 



2 The Kenya Mission 

Joseph Boykin, M.D. '76, and Michael Estes, M.D. '80, dis- 
cuss their recent work in Kenya. 

7 MCV Campus Hosts Unique Summer Classes 

A look at Elderhostel 

10 Attending the MCV Campus: a Family Tradition 

13 Pharmacy Family Lends Support 

Harvey B. Morgan, B. S. pharmacy '55 

14 Do You Know? 

15 Alumni House Contributors 

21 In Days Gone By 

22 Capsules 

26 Newsmakers 

28 Alumni Update 

31 Lest We Forget 

Executive editor: Mrs. Frances W. Kay 

Editor: Joann Spitler 

Designer: Regis A. Perhac 

Director, VCU Publications: Dr. David Mathis 

Editorial Committee: 

Mrs. Frances W. Kay, chairman 

Mr. Nathan Bushnell III 

Dr. A. E. Hodges, Jr. 

Mrs. Marianne R. Rollings 

Dr. Charles O. Watlington 

MCV Alumni Association of VCU staff: 
Mrs. Franklin B. Stone, executive director 
Ann M. Norman 
Lynn Merrick 



The Kenya Mission 




Dr. Joseph Boykin's first Kenyan patient, 
By Paul Woody 

When Dr. Joseph Boykin looked at 
the patient in front of him, he saw 
a six-year-old child with burn scars 
on his face, neck, and chest. 

The scars were so severe that 
the little boy's chin had been pulled 
to his chest, his mouth pulled 
open, and he hadn't looked around 
or eaten normally for two years. 

"It depressed me when I first 
saw him," Dr. Boykin said. "I 
thought, 'Oh my God, how has 
this kid survived all this time like 
this?' It made me a little angry that 
more couldn't have been done." 

More couldn't have been done 
because Dr. Boykin was 10,000 
miles from home and starting his 
second day of surgery in Nairobi, 
Kenya, when he performed this 
examination. And in Kenya, there 
are five plastic surgeons for 20 mil- 
lion people. 

Dr. Boykin, M.D. '76, and Dr. 
Michael Estes, M.D. '80, both staff 



pictured after successful surgery. 

members of the MCV/VCU School 
of Medicine, were in Kenya as a 
part of a seven-member team of 
four plastic surgeons, an ortho- 
pedic surgeon, an anesthesiologist, 
and a recent graduate from the 
School of Medicine to help lessen 
some of the suffering of Kenyan 
children. They went there to per- 
form corrective surgery on the 
children who had cleft palates and 
lips, limb deformities, and burn 
injuries. 

And none of the children was 
suffering more or injured any 
worse than this six-year-old named 
Kamul Margo who had been 
burned two years ago when he fell 
into an open fire. 

But this was a problem with no 
simple solution. Because of the 
position of the child's chin, pulled 
to his chest by the binding of the 
scar tissue, it was impossible for 
Dr. Estes, an anesthesiologist, to 
put a tube into the child's throat 
for the anesthesia. Dr. Boykin, a 



plastic surgeon, and Dr. Estes 
weren't sure what to do. But they 
were sure of one thing — if they 
didn't do something then, chances 
were good that nothing would 
ever be done to help this child. 

Finally, after an hour of delibera- 
tion, Dr. Boykin hit upon what 
might be a solution. He would give 
the child a local anesthetic and cut 
the scar tissue, freeing the child's 
chin. Then Dr. Estes could admin- 
ister the anesthetic, and Dr. Boy- 
kin could perform the necessary 
reconstructive surgery. 

Dr. Boykin's idea worked, and 
what had been a problem became a 
challenge that the doctors met suc- 
cessfully. After several hours of 
surgery and recovery, the child 
awoke, lifted his head, and looked 
around a room normally for the 
first time in almost two years. 

"After that, he was a different 
kid," Dr. Boykin said. "He had been 
withdrawn. You could see a new 
glow in his eyes. He had signifi- 
cantly improved self esteem. Where 
before he had hung behind other 
people, now he was playing with 
other children. He became a leader. 

"For us that procedure was a 
real confidence builder. When we 
were finally able to get it done, we 
said, 'We can do the job. This is 
why we're here.' " 

Dr. Estes agreed. "It solidified 
the team. It made us realize that 
we really could do it," he said. 
"Performing that procedure made 
us realize the level of cooperation 
was there, and we really could go." 

And go they did. 

Why We Went 

Drs. Boykin and Estes were in 
Kenya as a part of the Operation 
Kids team. The program was a col- 
laborative effort of the MCV Hos- 
pitals, the Richmond-based Chris- 
tian Children's Fund, and the 
University of Nairobi School of 
Medicine. 

"We didn't go there to impress 
anyone," Dr. Boykin said. "We 



were there to help and to share 
any knowledge we had." 

Other MCV physicians who 
went to Kenya were Dr. Austin 
Mehrhof, assistant chairman of the 
Department of Plastic and Recon- 
structive Surgery; Dr. Arthur 
Simon and Dr. David Turner, plas- 
tic surgeons; Dr. Mark deBlois, an 
orthopedic surgeon; and Dr. Ma- 
kena Marangu, a Kenyan who 
graduated from the School of Med- 
icine last spring. 

The doctors were in Kenya from 
May 23 until June 15 and worked 
at Kenyatta Hospital at the Uni- 
versity of Nairobi. Dr. Boykin left 
Kenya a week earlier than the rest 
of the group because his wife was 
expecting their first child. 

He left with mixed emotions. 
When you work closely with peo- 
ple for two weeks under such chal- 
lenging conditions, you feel a cer- 
tain loyalty to them and the cause. 
But he was needed at home. 

Before the entire team came 
home, they had performed 103 
operations on young Kenyans. 
They had changed the lives of 
their patients; and, in a way, the 
physicians had changed their own 
lives. 

Dr. Boykin and Dr. Estes had 
some idea what might happen 
before they left Richmond. When 
you take on an assignment like 
this, you do so for several reasons. 
You don't just pack and go to 
Kenya on a whim. This was no 
cushy visiting professorship and 
not something everyone would 
want to do. But Dr. Boykin and 
Dr. Estes had their reasons for 
accepting this challenge. 

"We aren't taken for granted 
around here," Dr. Boykin said. 
"But we are taken as a part of the 
daily work force. This trip sounded 
like an awesome undertaking for 
us. 

"This was an excellent opportun- 
ity to help the Kenyans and for us 
to grow and develop our skills. I 
wanted to be able to experience 
the total gamut of problems in my 
specialty." 

Dr. Boykin treated 20 burn vic- 
tims in his two weeks in Kenya. 
Dr. Estes was involved in every 
one of the surgical procedures. He 



was the only anesthesiologist in 
the group, and he went prepared. 
He took every piece of equipment 
he anticipated needing with him. 
His expertise was crucial. 

"He was a key man," Dr. Boykin 
said. "He was handpicked because 
of his pediatric specialty." 

A MASH-like 
Operation 

Any equipment Dr. Estes didn't 
take or that the hospital didn't 
have, he managed to create. 

"I can't think of anything that 
reminded me more of a MASH 
operation than what we did, espe- 
cially Estes," Dr. Boykin said. "This 
guy brought his own anesthesia 
with him. He had vaporizers, mon- 
itors, some things the people in 
Kenya had never seen before. It 
was incredible. I can't even begin 
to explain how he wired every- 
thing." 



Dr. Estes laughed at the 
memory. 

"There were some Rube Gold- 
berg-looking contraptions," he 
said. 

But for Dr. Boykin and the 
other physicians, what Dr. Estes 
was able to achieve was no laugh- 
ing matter. 

"He essentially set up the anes- 
thesia devices for the two theaters 
(operating rooms) that we were 
allowed to use, and he turned 
them into two of the most produc- 
tive theaters they'd ever seen," Dr. 
Boykin said. 

That was all part of the chal- 
lenge for Dr. Estes. 

"I found it very exciting to have 
an opportunity to share some of 
the skills I possess with people who 
need them," Dr. Estes said. "I felt I 
would obtain a lot of personal ful- 
fillment because it was a chance to 
give of myself while getting noth- 
ing, in a concrete sense, in return. 




Dr. Joseph Boykin (left) and Dr. Arthur Simon in surgery. The nurse is a Kenyan. 



"You see, here (in the United 
States), if you don't take a case, 
there's another doctor who will. 
And if you take it a step further, 
we operate on a fee for service 
basis. But this was an opportunity 
to give something to someone who 
didn't have anything." 

And then Dr. Estes laughed at 
another thought. 

"And it gave me the opportunity 
to hang around with surgeons," he 
said. 

Actually, there wasn't a lot of 
time to hang around. The doctors 
arrived at the hospital each day at 
7:30 am, began surgery an hour 
later, and continued until 5 or 6 
pm each day. 

"That goes against the grain of 
how things are done there," Dr. 
Estes said. "We found we were 
battling a lot of inertia. Their 
society isn't as quick-moving as 
ours. But we had gone there feel- 
ing we needed to be almost maniac 
to get done what we wanted to do. 
The hours were terribly long, but 
it was more the intensity that 
drained you. We felt like if we 
didn't get it done today, it wasn't 
going to get done tomorrow." 

There are some things you can't 
accelerate, though, and a surgical 
procedure is one of them. 

"The surgery wasn't done fast," 
Dr. Estes said. "The surgeons set 
their pace for that. But in an oper- 
ating room, the turnaround time is 
what slows you down — getting the 
patient in, prepped, draped, posi- 
tioned. In addition to my anesthe- 
siology duties, I felt it was one of 
my roles to organize that technical 
aspect of the procedures. I was 
constantly asking the aides, 'Is the 
next patient here? Have you seen 
him? Have you seen him with 
your eyes?' And I would point to 
my eyes. 

"Eventually, they got into our 
system. They'd even walk in dur- 
ing the middle of the first case and 
say, 'The next patient is here. I've 
seen him with my eyes.' " 

All the talking, cajoling, and 
intensity paid off. The doctors 
admitted 105 children to the hospi- 
tal with the promise they would 
try to treat them in the limited 
time they would be there. They 



treated them all. 

And while the doctors were 
treating the patients, they noticed 
something about the parents of 
those patients. 

Strangers from a 
Strange Land 

"It was kind of fun because at first 
we obviously were distrusted. We 
were strangers from a strange 
land," Dr. Estes said. "And on look- 
ing back, that's understandable. 
They saw us admit all these pa- 
tients, and they probably thought 
we weren't going to get everything 
done and that their child would be 
one of the ones left out. 

"By the end of the first week, a 
few people would kind of smile at 
you. Usually those were the par- 
ents of the children who had 
already had surgical procedures, 
and they could see what the 
results were going to be. 

"By the end of the second week 
and beginning of the third week, 
you'd walk on a ward — it was very 
much like the old style of ward 
medicine with all the beds in two 
large rooms — and everyone would 
smile at you. It was fun for all of 
us to go back to the floor and see 
all the kids." 

Part of the trust that developed 
could be traced back to that proce- 
dure on the six-year-old on the 
second day of surgery. 

"This required an incredible level 
of cooperation and communication 
between all of us," Dr. Estes said. 
"At any time, we could have just as 
easily killed a child as helped him. 
We were taking a lot of risks in 
what we were doing. 

"But we didn't have one mortal- 
ity, and there were no major com- 
plications. You don't think about 
mortalities, but it's something 
you're always aware of. In these 
circumstances, it's very important. 
You wouldn't want to injure some- 
one on the first day and expect 
them to trust you for the next 
three weeks." 

There was one close call. As he 
was finishing surgery on a little 
girl, Dr. Boykin noticed her hemo- 
globin level was dropping. 

It turned out that this was a rare 



reaction to the anesthetic gas Hal- 
othane. With ice, medication, and 
other procedures, the problem was 
solved and the little girl was fine. 

One potential hurdle the doctors 
faced was language. Swahili and 
English are the two dominant lan- 
guages in Kenya, but not everyone 
is bilingual. It turned out to be no 
problem, though. 

"If someone in the patient's fam- 
ily didn't speak English, there was 
usually someone around who did," 
Dr. Boykin said. 

When Not in Surgery 

When they were out of the operat- 
ing room, the doctors managed to 
gain a certain amount of knowl- 
edge about the rest of Kenya. 

They stayed in one of Nairobi's 
finest hotels, the Nairobi Club, 
which had been a British civil ser- 
vants' residence. (Kenya was a 
British province until 1963.) Dr. 
Boykin and Dr. Estes described it 
as a "haven." 

It was in the high-ceiling com- 
fort of the Nairobi Club's sitting 
rooms that, after dinner, the doc- 
tors would sit, discuss the events 
of the day, and become friends. 
They were all married, all have 
children (Dr. Boykin has a daugh- 
ter now), and they all "missed our 
families intensely," Dr. Estes said. 

Kenya isn't deepest, darkest 
Africa, but it's not exactly a coun- 
try where you can reach out and 
touch someone long distance on 
the telephone without considering 
the cost. 

A call from Nairobi to Rich- 
mond, involving a minimum of 
talking, costs about $40. Getting 
involved in an extended conversa- 
tion could cost $80. It was far less 
expensive to call Nairobi from 
Richmond than to call Richmond 
from Nairobi. 

As for food, the Americans' diet 
included British, Indian, and Chi- 
nese fare. The restaurants fea- 
tured almost any kind of food 
anyone could want. "We never did 
figure out what 'Kenyan' food 
was," Dr. Estes said with a laugh. 

On the weekends, the doctors 
discovered another side of Kenya. 
They took the night train to 




Physicians who went to Kenya are pictured outside their hotel. They are (left to right) 
Dr. Mark deBlois, Dr. Arthur Simon, Dr. Michael Estes, Dr. David Turner, Dr. 
Makena Marangu, Dr. Joseph Boykin, and Dr. Austin Mehrhof. 



Mombasa, Kenya, and spent a 
weekend on the beaches of the 
Indian Ocean. They took an air- 
plane ride to the Plains of the Ser- 
engeti, stayed in a lodge, and saw 
the animals that Kenya is famous 
for — elephants, giraffes, lions, 
ostriches, wart hogs, monkeys, 
Thomson's gazelles, rhinoceroses, 
zebras, antelopes, buffalo, cheetah, 
and leopards. 

They also ran into one of Ken- 
ya's most prominent citizens. 

Perhaps the most famous family 
in Kenya is the Leakey family. 
Louis Leakey and his wife, Mary, 
are among the world's best known 
archaeologists. In the early 1960s 
in Kenya, they found jaws and 
teeth believed to be 14 million 
years old and belonging to the 
early ancestors of human beings. 

Their son, Richard, has carried 
on their work. He also has the job 
of administrative director of the 
National Museums of Kenya. The 
physicians met him, and he con- 
ducted a private tour of the mu- 
seums for them. 

"That was really kind of neat," 
Dr. Estes said. "He met with us for 
about an hour and gave us a pri- 
vate tutorial. I guess that's how 
you'd feel if you met the president. 
You were just kind of in awe. Here 
was a guy who is the world's lead- 
ing expert in this field. When you 
were in college, you read articles 



about various members of his fam- 
ily. And here he was, dressed casu- 
ally, wearing sandals, and just 
chatting with us about the fossils 
he had uncovered." 

Each morning the doctors would 
gather and make their 500-yard 
walk to Kenyatta Hospital. 

"We had to go through an indi- 
gent neighborhood, and that's 
when you really realized you were 
in a foreign country." Dr. Estes 
said. "That's when everything 
began to change. That's when we 
began to experience Nairobi as an 
African experiences it." 

The Hospital 

Once they arrived at the hospital, 
things weren't exactly outstanding 
either. There was no air condition- 
ing in the hospital, and Kenyatta 
had a steam sterilizing system. 

"They'd fire it up early in the 
morning, and the floors would be 
wet from it when we got there," 
Dr. Estes said. 

He had to take special care to 
make sure the patients didn't de- 
hydrate from the stress of surgery 
and heat of the hospital. 

"I had to give the children twice 
as much water as I give them in 
the states," Dr. Estes said. "I fig- 
ured that out in a little bit of time 
and made sure I had them nice and 
hydrated when they left the recov- 
ery room." 



The hospital was impressive to 
look at from the exterior, but once 
inside the doctors found it was 
more of a shell than the full- 
fledged treatment center they are 
accustomed to at MCV Hospitals. 

Although the hospital has 2,000 
beds and is Kenya's largest major 
referral center, it had no EKG 
machine. The facility was well- 
staffed; but the equipment, even in 
the intensive care unit, wasn't 
state of the art. 

It is not the most medically 
advanced country in the world. 

"If there is a sick newborn, with 
say, underdeveloped lungs, they 
have a family member give oxygen 
to the child. If that doesn't work, 
the child dies. End of discussion," 
Dr. Estes said. 

For Kenyans in rural locations, 
the treatment is even simpler than 
that. If someone gets hurt, the 
family does the best it can for 
treatment and then the patient 
heals as best he/she can. Such was 
the case with six-year-old Kamul 
Margo. When he fell into that fire, 
which is not an unusual occur- 
rence in the rural parts of the 
country, his family did what it 
could to alleviate the pain and then 
he healed on his own. 

"There are literally hundreds 
waiting to get to government-run 
hospitals for elective surgery," Dr. 
Boykin said. "We treated the child- 
ren who needed surgery the most. 
Every child we saw had some hid- 
eous deformity." 



Kenya 



To better understand what the 
medical team faced, it helps to 
know a bit more about Kenya. 

Vasco da Gama, the Portuguese 
explorer, was the first European to 
reach Kenya. He sailed around the 
Cape of Good Hope in 1498 and 
reached the Kenyan coast. From 
1890 until 1920, Kenya was a Brit- 
ish Protectorate. In 1920 it became 
a crown colony, which it remained 
until 1963 when it was granted its 
independence. 

The Republic of Kenya is located 
in eastern Africa, with a population 
of 20,373,000 spread over 224,081 
square miles. Eighty-three percent 




Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya, where 
MCV Campus surgeons operated for 
three weeks. 



of the people live in rural areas. It 
is the sixth most populous nation 
in Africa. 

The per capita income is $415, 
and unemployment runs close to 
30 percent. Four-fifths of the work 
force is in agriculture, but only 
one-fifth of the land is considered 
to be suitable for farming. Five to 
10 percent of the work force are 
nomads who raise livestock. Tour- 
ism is one of the largest industries, 
providing some 40,000 jobs and 
$80 million annually. Coffee is the 
country's leading agricultural pro- 
duct. Education is noncompulsory 
and free only through the fourth 
grade. Nairobi is the largest city 
with a population of 828,000. 
Health services are provided by the 
government and private practi- 
tioners. 

Into this environment came Dr. 
Boykin, Dr. Estes, and the rest of 
the physicians. They were struck 
immediately by the difference 
between habits in Kenya and the 
United States. 

"We had enough supplies to do 
all the operations, even if we 
worked day and night," Dr. Boykin 
said. "We were using disposable 
gowns and gloves, and we would 
take them off and discard them. 
But after a couple of days, we 
noticed they were picking them up 
behind us, washing them, and stor- 
ing them so they could use them 
again. 

"We were a little embarrassed 
that we discarded things so 
readily." 



"It made me more appreciative 
of the things we do have in this 
country," Dr. Estes said. "It made 
me think it would be nice if we as 
a nation could share more of the 
things we have with other 
countries. 

"I was frugal while I was there, 
and I'm somewhat more so that 
way now that I'm back." 

Many countries, of course, could 
use and would welcome a visit 
from such a team of American 
physicians. Kenya was selected for 
this mission because of the Chris- 
tian Children's Fund's strong con- 
tacts in Kenya, because the Ken- 
yan field representative for the CCF 
was one of the first to respond to 
the CCF's call for requests for such 
help. 

The Christian Children's Fund 
sponsors 35,000 children in Kenya 
and 500,000 children throughout 
the world. 

Another important reason that 
Kenya was picked as the desti- 
nation was the work of Dr. 
Marangu. "She volunteered her 
services to help arrange this trip, 
and that's when things really 
began to shape up," Dr. Boykin 
said. "Things moved a lot faster 
than most people thought possible. 

"And we were fortunate to get 
with the Christian Children's 
Fund." 

Supplies for the expedition were 
donated by three dozen companies 
in the United States. 

When the three weeks had end- 
ed, Dr. Estes said he and his fellow 



physicians were ready to come 
home. 

"We had accomplished what we 
set out to do, we had finished the 
patient list, we missed our families, 
and we were ready to go," Dr. 
Estes said. 

Returning to Kenya? 

Now that they're back, the seven 
team members don't see each 
other as often as they did for that 
three-week tour of duty 10,000 
miles from home. 

"I miss the rest of the group," 
Dr. Estes said. "Coming home kind 
of broke up the 'boys.' " 

Thoughts of their work in Ken- 
ya are never far from their minds. 

"You think about how you 
would do things differently," Dr. 
Boykin said. "You think about that 
a lot. And then you begin to say, 
'I'm looking forward to going 
back.' " 

There are hopes that this will 
become an annual visit. 

"We will go back," Dr. Estes said. 
"Even now, they're trying to lay 
the groundwork for a return trip. 

"In the months before we went, 
I don't think any of us doubted 
we'd be successful. But none of us 
knew it would be as positive as it 
was. We realize that if we could do 
the same thing again, it would do 
just as much good." 

Paul Woody is a sports writer with the 
Richmond News Leader. 



MC V Campus Hosts Unique 
Summer Classes 




By Elizabeth Acosta-Lewis 

It's 8:30 on the first day of classes, 
and students file in for the morn- 
ing lecture on the history of medi- 
cal advances. No bell rings to signal 
the beginning of class; neverthe- 
less, everyone seems to be on time. 
The room is full, and an air of 
expectancy permeates the atmo- 
sphere. The professor begins, "Be- 
hold the astounding, the drama of 
man! What a remarkable machine!" 

These are not first-year medical 
students, but a mix of retired busi- 
nessmen and women, others on 
vacation, grandparents, perhaps 
your next-door neighbor. It is the 
first day of Elderhostel classes on 
the MCV Campus. On the day 
before, June 7, 50 students had 
checked into Cabaniss Hall for one 
week to participate in the only 
Elderhostel program in the United 
States and abroad that is hosted by 
a medical school. 



The Elderhostel 
Program 

Elderhostel is a nonprofit educa- 
tional program for older adults. 
Based on a concept similar to the 
youth hostels of Europe and the 
folk schools of Scandinavia, the 
American Elderhostel program was 
initiated in 1975 by Marty Knowl- 
ton, a social activist and educator. 

VCU soon realized the value of 
being a part of the Elderhostel 
program. In 1979 VCU and Mary- 
mount College held the first such 
programs in Virginia. 

Since its beginning, the program 
has grown enormously. By 1986 
more than 112,000 hostelers were 
enrolled in programs at 1,000 col- 
leges, universities, and other learn- 
ing centers in all 50 states, ten 
Canadian provinces, and 35 foreign 
countries. 

In 1987, 114 weeks of program- 
ming were scheduled at 42 schools 
in Virginia and the District of Col- 
umbia. These programs attract more 



Elderhostel students view the preparation of 
a plaster cast. 

than 3,600 people annually from 
out of state who generate about $1 
million for the tourism industry. 

Elderhostel was designed for 
"elder citizens on the move" who 
enjoy new challenges and oppor- 
tunities. The courses are based on 
the liberal arts and sciences and are 
designed and implemented by the 
individual institutions that host 
them. No particular previous knowl- 
edge or study of a subject is re- 
quired. In fact hostelers include 
people from every social, economic, 
and intellectual group. 

The format for the week-long 
Elderhostel sessions usually in- 
cludes three courses, each of which 
meets for one and one-half hours 
every day. The courses are not for 
credit; and there are no exams, 
grades, or required homework 
(with the exception of the case of 
intensive studies programs). 

People enroll in various Elder- 
hostel programs for a variety of 
reasons. Some are interested in 
visiting a particular geographical 
location they have never visited 
before or one where they have rel- 
atives. Others choose specifically 
for course content. While Rich- 
mond is a draw for some, the con- 
tent of the MCV Elderhostel pro- 
gram is what attracts more parti- 
cipants. "The medical program offered 
here is unique," said Ms. Debbie 
Snyder, assistant director of the 
Virginia Center on Aging and coor- 
dinator for both of VCU's Elder- 
hostel programs. "One can attend 
other programs to learn about 
Shakespeare or music theory; but 
this program offers practical, use- 
ful information that participants 
can take home with them." 




The MCV Campus 
Elderhostel 

The MCV Campus Elderhostel 
program is quite popular; and, this 
year, as in the past, some appli- 
cants had to be turned away due to 
the finite number that could be 
accommodated by available campus 
facilities. Nevertheless, this group 
was one of the best ever, according 
to Ms. Snyder. "The interesting 
thing was the sophistication of the 
program participants. There was a 
retired medical doctor, a retired 
dentist, and a doctor from Ken- 
tucky who said that our program 
was so good that it had convinced 
him to make Elderhostel a steady 
diet," she said. 

"This is the fifth year that the 
University has provided an Elder- 
hostel program on the MCV Cam- 
pus, and I think everything is 
down to a fine science now," con- 
tinued Ms. Snyder. "This year, for 
example, we had the least number 
of complaints, of which we never 
have many. We had two partici- 
pants who were confined to 
wheelchairs, which was a new 
challenge for me, but everything 
worked out just fine." 

During their stay, students 
attended classes on the history of 
medical advances, preventive medi- 
cine, and nutrition. When they 
were not in class, hostelers toured 
facilities such as the Special Collec- 



tions and Archives Department of 
Tompkins-McCaw Library, the 
Virginia State Library and Archives, 
the White House and Museum of 
the Confederacy, the Capitol and 
Governor's Mansion, the Valentine 
Museum, and the John Marshall 
House. At night there were films, 
a reception, music, and dancing; 
and on the final evening, the par- 
ticipants staged the entertainment 
with live music and skits. 

Most students attended every 
lecture and field trip. Between lec- 
tures, many gathered to discuss 
points of the lecture, share infor- 
mation on exercise, common ail- 
ments and treatments, and to 
socialize. There was a general 
sense of friendliness and rapport 
among the participants. "These are 
people who are interested in life- 
long learning and who also are a 
lot of fun," said Ms. Snyder. 

The Hostelers 

Lou Mervis and Freda Spar tra- 
veled from Tumunga, California, 
to attend the MCV Campus pro- 
gram. "I have a brother in Rich- 
mond, an interest in medicine, and 
I like going to school," said Mr. 
Mervis, "so this was a good oppor- 
tunity for me." 

Donald and Joyce Hogue from 
Port Charlotte, Florida, chose the 
program because medicine is a sub- 
ject in which they both are inter- 



Dr. Peter Pastore is assisted by nurse ]odi 
Koste and attendant Ted Batt during the 
"operation" in the old South Hospital. 

ested. "We have lots of medical 
books and magazines at home," 
said Mr. Hogue, "and this session 
also fit in with our schedule. This 
is our fourth Elderhostel; and we 
will go on to High Point, North 
Carolina, for a fifth one on furni- 
ture design, dances of the world, 
and ethics." 

Harvey and Felice Rovner from 
Margate, New Jersey, probably 
were the most experienced hostel- 
ers in attendance this year. Mr. 
Rovner, a semi-retired accountant, 
and his wife had enrolled in 21 
Elderhostel programs before com- 
ing to the MCV Campus. "We 
came here because we are inter- 
ested in medical things," said Mr. 
Rovner. "We went to California to 
study nutrition, but this is more 
comprehensive. With so many 
people interested in medical infor- 
mation, I don't know why more 
medical colleges don't participate," 
he said. The Rovners had sched- 
uled Elderhostel sessions for May, 
June, July, and August. 

Tony Wong from Honolulu, 
Hawaii, and Linton Bylund from 
Richmond traveled the longest and 
shortest distances, respectively, to 
attend the MCV Campus Elder- 
hostel. Mr. Wong began volunteer- 
ing his services to an Elderhostel 
program in Honolulu six years ago. 
"Later I began to travel to other 
programs to learn what was being 
taught on the mainland," said Mr. 
Wong. "Now I go to about four 
programs each year," he said, "and 
I think that this one is the best run 
Elderhostel that I have attended." 

Mr. Bylund has attended several 
Elderhostel programs in such 
exotic locations as Newfoundland 
and Switzerland. He did not stay 
on campus this time but attended 
the sessions, meals, and activities 
with the other hostelers. 

The Faculty and Staff 

"The faculty who participate in 
Elderhostel are just great," said 
Ms. Snyder. "Elderhostel is a non- 
profit organization that doesn't try 



to make money; we just try to 
break even. The faculty get small 
stipends, but most donate them 
back to the school. They don't 
teach for the money. I think they 
do it because they get a charge out 
of it," she said. 

"We pick the courses and set up 
the curriculum by identifying first 
the faculty who really want to par- 
ticipate," Ms. Snyder continued. 
"Most of the faculty say that 
Elderhostel students are a joy to 
teach. The students are enthusias- 
tic, and they make the faculty feel 
appreciated. In fact the hostelers 
used to stand up and applaud for 
one professor." 

The professors who participated 
in this year's Elderhostel were Ms. 
Betty Moore, Dr. Peter Pastore, 
M.D. '34, and Dr. Frederick 
Spencer. Their specialties were 
nutrition, the history of medical 
advances, and preventive medicine, 
respectively. Guest speakers 
included Dr. Charles Caravati, 
M.D. '22, who lectured on the last 
75 years of medical advances; Mr. 
S. James Cutler, who spoke on 
hearing loss; Ms. Susan Mac- 
Queen, a physical therapist; Dr. 
Edward Peeples, who addressed 
social and cultural factors in health 
and disease; and Dr. John Taylor, 
who discussed memory loss. 

The hostelers were impressed 
with the courses that were pre- 
sented. One participant commented 
that the sessions were beyond crit- 
icism. He also said, "This Elderhos- 



tel rates number one with me on 
courses. Professor Betty Moore 
even invited all 50 of us plus some 
staff people to her historic home. 
As a final word, Dr. Pastore is the 
shining five-star personality of the 
Elderhostel at Richmond. I wish 
that I could have Dr. Pastore and 
Dr. Spencer as my next-door 
neighbors." 

"A Nostalgic Journey," Dr. Pas- 
tore's re-creation of turn-of-the- 
century surgical procedures in the 
old South Hospital's amphitheater, 
was the highlight of the week for 
many hostelers. 

Richmonders John and Jean Bil- 
hartz volunteered to assist with 
the MCV Campus program. As 
special resident host and hostess, 
they moved into the dormitory 
where they were accessible to the 
hostelers. "They were a tremen- 
dous help with many things, such 
as picking up people at the airport, 
making trips to the drugstore, 
finding extra clothes hangers, and 
arranging bridge games," said Ms. 
Snyder. 

Responses to the 
Program 

In an effort to improve the quality 
of the Elderhostel program, an 
extensive evaluation form was 
given to each participant at the end 
of the week. "The MCV Campus 
program received an excellent eval- 
uation and many glowing com- 
ments. We get a great amount of 




feedback through this tool that is 
very helpful," said Ms. Snyder. 
"Planning the program takes a 
large commitment, but once the 
program gets going, it rolls along 
like a freight train. The object is to 
plan thoroughly, but to remain 
flexible, because something is 
always going to come up." 

This year was no exception to 
that rule. On Tuesday afternoon, 
for example, the group was sched- 
uled to visit the State Capitol and 
Governor's Mansion. When Ms. 
Snyder called to confirm their 
plans, she was told that the Capitol 
was being used that day for the 
filming of a TV movie, "The Ballad 
of Mary Phagan." "The guides had 
planned to sneak us in through the 
portico entrance. Of course, in- 
stead, everyone walked through the 
set to see what was going on," said 
Ms. Snyder. "It was a zoo, but it 
was very exciting. Someone saw 
Jack Lemmon walk by, and I think 
it was a high point for some, and 
probably more memorable than an 
ordinary tour would have been," 
she said. 

"Everyone on this campus, from 
the bus driver to students, has 
been so supportive of what we are 
doing," said Ms. Snyder. "I am 
proud of the southern hospitality 
the University shows to the hos- 
telers. I think this is a great school, 
and I love showing it off." 

Elderhostel publishes three seasonal 
catalogs and three newsletters annually. To 
receive these free publications, write to 
Elderhostel, 80 Boylston Street, Suite 400, 
Boston, MA 02116. A current edition of 
the Elderhostel catalog should be available 
at your local public library. 

Elizabeth Acosta-Lewis is a doctoral stu- 
dent at the College of William and Mary. 



Dr. Frederick Spencer chats with hostelers 
during a break. 



Attending the MCV Campus: 
a Family Tradition 



By Elizabeth Acosta-Lewis 

We asked and you responded! Our 
thanks to the folks who wrote to 
us about their MCV family trees. 
The Scarab staff was interested in 
knowing more about families who 
have made attending MCV/VCU a 
tradition. We found that, over the 
years, not only have offspring and 
siblings of MCV students come 
back to the MCV Campus as stu- 
dents themselves, but many stu- 
dents met here and "became fami- 
lies." Here are some tales from the 
trees of the Caulkins, Eanes, Judy, 
and Thorne families. 

Caulkins 

Dr. C. Whitney Caulkins, Jr., M.D. 
'47, met his wife, Jennie Kennedy 
Caulkins, nursing '47, during an 
operation at MCV: he was admin- 
istering anesthesia to the patient; 
she was a scrub nurse. "Dating 
was tough back in those days," 
commented Dr. Caulkins in a 
recent interview. "The nursing 
students were under strict control. 
At curfew, the supervising nurse 
at the old Cabaniss Hall would 
stand at the front door with her 
arm across the doorway just like a 
toll gate. As the nurses came in, 
she would hoist up her arm, and as 
soon as they would cross, that arm 
would come right back down," he 
said. "None of the nurses lived off 
campus at that time. They all were 
censored, even the married stu- 
dents." One other important point 
Dr. and Mrs. Caulkins remem- 
bered ("which you might not want 
to print") was that bandage scis- 
sors were a great tool for getting 
into the dormitory for those who 
stayed out too late. 

Dr. Caulkins remembers most 
fondly Dr. Isaac Bigger, professor 
of surgery at MCV. "Dr. Bigger 
was the shining light and greatest 



influence on my surgical career," 
said Dr. Caulkins. Dr. Bigger 
influenced more than Dr. Caulkins' 
career, too. "Before I could get 
married, I had to ask Dr. Bigger to 
persuade Dr. Barney Brooks at 
Vanderbilt University to still take 
me on down there following my 
marriage because, at the time, 
Vanderbilt wouldn't take married 
housestaff officers. You were sup- 
posed to be 'married to medicine.' 
Most fellows about to be married 
have to ask the father's permis- 




The Caulkins family (left to right): Mike, 
Pam, Dave, Pat, ]ennie, and Whit. 

sion, but I had to have Dr. Bigger's 
and Dr. Brooks', too," he chuckled. 

Mrs. Caulkins grew up in 
Clearwater, Florida. Her uncle, Dr. 
R. M. Gallant, was a member of 
the medical class of 1915. "I sup- 
pose I knew of MCV because of 
him," she said. "There was also a 
girl from my hometown here. I 
knew the school had a good repu- 
tation and I was accepted, so I 
said, 'why not?' and came to 
Richmond." 

Mrs. Caulkins was the supervis- 
ing nurse when the 16th floor of 
West Hospital opened. "This floor 
was considered the 'elite' floor at 
the time because it had single 
rooms and a sunporch on one 
wing," she recalls. "I believe it was 
the first floor to house the nursing 
station in the center of the lobby, 
too." 



The Caulkins' ties to MCV did 
not stop with themselves. Both of 
their sons graduated from the 
School of Medicine, David in 1980 
and Mike in 1982. David's wife, 
Mrs. Pat Shell Caulkins, graduated 
from the School of Nursing in 
1978, and Mike's wife, Dr. Pam 
Marston Caulkins, graduated with 
Mike from the School of Medicine 
in 1982. 

Dr. Whitney Caulkins has been 
in surgical practice in Waynesboro 
for several years. Mrs. Jennie 
Caulkins practices with him. Dr. 
David Caulkins joined his father in 
1985 after finishing his general 
surgical residency at MCV Hospi- 
tals. David's wife, Pat, is the surgi- 
cal admissions nurse in the 
Department of Nursing at Waynes- 
boro Community Hospital. Drs. 
Michael and Pam Caulkins are in 
group family practice medicine 
with two other associates in 
Lynchburg. They both received 
their family practice residency 
training at Riverside Hospital in 
Newport News and began their 
practice in 1985. 

Eanes 

Dr. Richard H. Eanes graduated in 
the old Egyptian Building in 1911. 
In a recent letter he wrote that he 
is living in Frederick, Maryland, 
and in "pretty fair condition" at 
this time. Dr. Eanes has researched 
his genealogy for more than 60 
years and has found that his MCV 
family tree is extensive. 

Dr. Richard Ernest Wilkinson, 
M.D. '97, was Dr. Eanes' uncle. Dr. 
Wilkinson practiced in Dinwiddie 
County from 1897 until just 
before his death. His son and Dr. 
Eanes' cousin, Dr. Ernest Malcolm 
Wilkinson, M.D. '23, practiced 
medicine in West Virginia. For the 
May 1961 issue of the Scarab, 
which featured remembrances of 



members of the class of 1911 who 
wrote in celebration of their 50th 
reunion, Dr. Eanes recounted this 
tale about a vacation that he spent 
with the Wilkinsons. 

"It was Christmas 1908, my 
sophomore year at MCV. I was 
spending the holidays with my 
uncle, Dr. R. E. Wilkinson, M.D. 
'97, in Dinwiddie County. I was 
taken ill. Early one morning, Dr. 
Wilkinson prescribed for me [sic] 
and left to make a call in Nottoway 
County. During a retching spell, I 
dislocated both sides of my mandi- 
ble. I knew that Dr. Wilkinson 
would not return until night, and I 
faced a day of extreme discomfort. 
Thinking this over, I called to my 
cousin, now Dr. Ernest M. Wilkin- 
son, M.D. '23, and explained my 
predicament. I requested that he 
saddle one of the horses and ride a 
couple of miles to the home of 
Meade Edmunds, a classmate, and 
if he could find Meade, request 
that he come to see me. It was not 
long before he came. 

"With extreme difficulty on my 
part, for I could not talk, we two 
embryo doctors held a consulta- 
tion. I proposed that Meade reduce 
the dislocation. He protested that 
we had not been instructed and 
were lacking in experience. Never- 
theless, we got from Dr. Wilkin- 
son's library such books as we 
thought instructive in the case and 
proceeded to try and reduce the 
joints. He pulled and shoved and 
wrenched and still the dislocation 
was the same. Finally we gave up 
and Meade left me to await the 
return of Dr. Wilkinson. 

"It was about night when I 
heard him drive up on the lawn. 
Then I heard some conversation, 
and I knew that my cousin was 
relating my sad story. My uncle let 
out a roar and, laughing loudly, 
came up the steps, two at a time. 
With one glance at me and before I 
could try to speak, he was astride 
me: both his thumbs were in my 
mouth. There was just one little 
practiced twist and my troubles 
were over. Contrary to predictions 
made at the time, there has never 
been a recurrence." 

Dr. Eanes sat for classes at MCV 
from 1907 to 1911 in a chair next 



to Dr. James Puryear Bowles of 
Goochland County, not knowing 
until years later that they were 
distant cousins through the Wil- 
kinson family. In addition to the 
Wilkinson family, Dr. Eanes had 
two brothers-in-law who were 
tied to the college. Eanes' older sis- 
ter married a graduate of the Uni- 
versity College of Medicine, Dr. 
Charles J. Kinsolving, UCM '03, 
who practiced in St. Maries, Idaho. 
Dr. Jerrell R. Reams, D.D.S. '24, 
who practiced dentistry in Rich- 
mond for many years, was the 
brother of Dr. Eanes' wife, Mrs. 
Viola Reams Eanes. 

Dr. Eanes spent most of his pro- 
fessional life in the United States 
Army. A retired colonel, he now 
lives in the Homewood Retirement 
Center in Frederick, Maryland. 



Judy 



Jess N. Judy, M.H.A. '77, is the 
third generation of Judys to attend 
college on the MCV Campus. 
His grandfather, Dr. William J. 
Judy, came from West Virginia and 
enrolled at MCV from 1899-1904. 
Interested in athletics, Dr. Judy 
was a member of the college's 
Y.M.C.A. as there were no formal 
athletic classes. After he received 
his degree, Dr. Judy returned to 
West Virginia to practice general 
medicine. Eventually he turned his 
attention to diseases of children, 




The ]udy family: ]ess Judy (left), Ben 
Judy, and possible "fourth generation" 
MCV Campus students. 



which was of special interest, for 
he had ten children of his own. Dr. 
Judy also was an ordained minister 
and pastor of a Baptist church in 
Parkersburg, West Virginia. 

One of Dr. Judy's children, Dr. 
S. Ben Judy, M.D. '48, followed his 
father's footsteps from West Vir- 
ginia to Virginia to receive his 
higher education. The younger Dr. 
Judy attended Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute before coming to MCV. 
Also interested in athletics, he 
bears the distinction of being the 
first student who received an 
athletic scholarship from Virginia 
Tech to later attend medical 
school. He chose, of course, MCV. 

Dr. Ben Judy most vividly 
remembers two professors, Dr. 
Harvey Haag and Dr. Hjalmar 
Osterud. "Dr. Haag would mis- 
pronounce our names on purpose," 
said Dr. Judy. "He always called me 
Mr. Juddy, but he didn't annoy us 
because we knew it was all in fun," 
he said. "Sometimes Dr. Osterud 
would get mad in class and I would 
think he was going to blow his top, 
but he never did," Dr. Judy con- 
tinued. "The professors had their 
idiosyncracies but they were great 
teachers." Since 1949 Dr. Judy has 
practiced family medicine in 
Clarksville. 

Jess Judy, Dr. Judy's son, gradu- 
ated from the University of Rich- 
mond and worked at St. Mary's 
Hospital, first as a physical therapy 
aide, and then in business adminis- 
tration. "I knew I wanted to go 
into health care, but never having 
seen my father while I was grow- 
ing up, I didn't want to be a doc- 
tor," said Mr. Judy, M.H.A. '77. 

"I was lucky to have the expe- 
rience of having a father who was 
a physician, however," Mr. Judy 
continued. "I saw that many doc- 
tors have a general lack of interest 
in business affairs; they are too 
busy going about their work of 
making people well. I realized that 
there was a need to provide exper- 
tise to doctors in this area so they 
can go about their own business." 
On a more personal level, Mr. Judy 
feels that having his father's repu- 
tation precede him has been help- 
ful too. "I have met people every- 
where who went to school with 



11 



Dad," said Mr. Judy. "They say, 'If 
you are Ben Judy's son, you must 
be a good guy.' " 

Mr. Judy has lived in Nashville, 
Tennessee, since 1985 where he 
was vice-president of the Hospital 
Corporation of America's (HCA) 
Physician Services Company. In 
July he became an administrator at 
HCA's Southern Hills Hospital in 
Nashville. Mr. Judy enjoys hospital 
administration and feels that the 
training he received at MCV pre- 
pared him very well. "The man- 
agement of a hospital is one of the 
most interesting businesses to be 
in," said Mr. Judy. "You deal with 
all kinds of employees from jani- 
tors to doctors, as well as patients 
and their families. The many com- 
plex personalities and situations 
involved make it a real 'people bus- 
iness,' " he said. 

Thorne 

Miss Minnie E. Thorne, from Elm 
City, North Carolina, went to 
MCV to study nursing with her 
first cousin, Miss Minnie E. Green. 




The Thorne and Green families: Minnie 
Thorne (left) and Janice Green Proctor; 
(inset) Minnie Green. 

They both graduated in 1932. "I 
recall the first day of classes very 
well," said Miss Thorne. "Eight or 
ten of us had come in at mid-year. 
Nurse Zeigler was teaching a 
course on the history of medicine 
and she said to our group straight 
away, 'You have only two alterna- 
tives; you pass the courses or you 
eliminate yourselves,' " said Miss 
Thorne. "Students usually took 15 
semester hours back then, but for 
those of us who came in at mid- 



term, we had to take 20 hours of 
courses to catch up. In addition, we 
put in four hours of work each day 
on the floor and eight hours on 
Saturday and Sunday when classes 
weren't in session," Miss Thorne 
continued. 

Miss Thorne previously had 
studied education at Eastern Caro- 
lina Teachers' College and taught 
primary school, which she feels 
helped to prepare her for the 
rigors of her nursing training. She 
said, however, that she never has 
had a strong science background. 
"Dr. Frank Pitts taught chemistry 
to the nurses back then," said Miss 
Thorne. "At the end of six weeks, 
he called four names and said these 
students were to see him after 
class. Mine was one of the names 
called by Dr. Pitts, and I knew 
what I was going to hear when I 
went to see him," she continued. 

Miss Thorne went to Dr. Pitts 
and said, "I know you want to talk 
to me because I am not doing well 
in your class, but I have had my 
training in teaching, not in 
science." She explained that she 
had tried to learn chemistry but 
could not get the hang of it so she 
wanted to drop the course. Miss 
Thorne said that Dr. Pitts advised 
her to continue coming to class. He 
urged her to copy and learn what 
he put on the board; if she did 
that, he felt she would pass. 

"I told him that I couldn't do that 
because if I didn't understand what 
I had copied, it would be cheating," 
said Miss Thorne. "Dr. Pitts said 
that anyone who was that con- 
scientious would make a good 
nurse whether she had a knack for 
chemistry or not, so he refused to 
let me drop the course. He said 
that the plateau of knowledge 
would open up eventually, and he 
was right," she said. "There were 
15 questions on the state examina- 
tion, and we could pick three that 
we did not have to answer. I left 
out some of the chemistry ques- 
tions, but the ones that I had to 
answer were easy. I still don't 
know a great deal about chemistry, 
however," she said. 

Because of a special interest in 
public health nursing, Miss Thorne 
was awarded a scholarship by the 



state to attend the College of Wil- 
liam and Mary for postgraduate 
work. She worked as a public 
health nurse throughout North 
Carolina for 23 years before retir- 
ing in Elm City and has received 
many honors for her achievements 
and activities. 

Miss Minnie Green, Miss 
Thome's cousin, practiced nursing 
for several years in Williamsburg. 
Mrs. Janice Green Proctor, the 
niece of Miss Green, and the first 
cousin of Miss Thorne, graduated 
from the School of Nursing in 
1957. Mrs. Proctor currently is the 
nurse manager of Same Day 
Surgery, Heritage Hospital, in 
Tarboro, North Carolina. 

Elizabeth Acosta-Lewis is a doctoral stu- 
dent at the College of William and Mary. 




The Sease family: As noted in the 
November 1986 Scarab, the Rich- 
mond Times-Dispatch carried a 
vignette last fall on the five Doctors Sease 
of Harrisonburg, all graduates of the 
School of Medicine. Pictured (seated, left to 
right): Robert H. Sease and Cyril I. Sease: 
and (standing, left to right) W. Craig 
Sease, Robert H. Sease, jr., and James R. 
Sease. 



Pharmacy Family Lends 
Support 




By Linda K. Livengood 

Whether you're talking with Har- 
vey B. Morgan the pharmacist, 
B.S. pharmacy '55, or Delegate 
Morgan, the distinguished repre- 
sentative from the 98th House 
District, the Gloucester native 
quickly attributes his numerous 
successes to his family's support 
and encouragement. 

A co-owner of Morgan's Drug 
Store in Gloucester, Mr. Morgan 
says he would not be able to make 
the time-consuming commitment 
to the General Assembly without 
his pharmacist family's willingness 
to run the business while he is 
away. 

Actively participating in the 
family-owned firm are his wife, 
the former Barbara Andrews, B.S. 
pharmacy '56, his father, Loran V. 
Morgan, pharmacy '22, and his 
brother, James, B.S. pharmacy '53. 
Although his brother's son, Wil- 
liam R. Morgan, decided to pursue 
medicine instead of pharmacy, he 
maintained the family's link to 
MCV, the health sciences division 
of VCU, graduating in 1983. 

Harvey Morgan has been active 
in a number of professional and 



Harvey B. Morgan (B.S. pharmacy '55) 

civic organizations, including ser- 
vice as president of the Virginia 
Pharmaceutical Association in 
1976, a director of the Gloucester 
Chapter of the American Red 
Cross, and chairman of the Glou- 
cester County Steering Committee 
for Drug Abuse Control. 

He has served also as a member 
of the Governor's Advisory Com- 
mittee on Medicare/Medicaid and 
on the Virginia Drug Abuse Advi- 
sory Council. A former director of 
the Virginia Mental Health Associ- 
ation, Mr. Morgan has been a trus- 
tee of the Virginia Council on 
Health and Medical Care. 

Among his numerous honors 
are the Virginia Pharmacist of the 
Year in 1978, the Boy Scouts 
Order of the Arrow in 1976, the 
Kiwanis Distinguished Service 
Award in 1969, and the A. H. 
Robins Bowl of Hygeia Award in 
1966. 

Mr. Morgan has maintained 
close ties with the MCV Campus, 
volunteering his time as an asso- 
ciate clinical professor of pharmacy 
for the past 15 years. In his role as 
practitioner/teacher, he serves as a 
mentor for pharmacy students 
during the one-month community 
pharmacy clerkship program that 
is required during the second 
semester of the senior year. In 
addition, he has served as a 
member of the Board of Trustees 
of the MCV Alumni Association of 
VCU. 

He also sponsors an internship 
program for students who are 
interested in the political process at 
the General Assembly. When the 
Legislature is in session in Rich- 
mond, the students research 
health-related issues, monitor 
committee activities, and help with 
correspondence. 

As the only direct health care 



provider in the 100-member House 
of Delegates, Harvey Morgan fre- 
quently provides expert informa- 
tion to his peers on legislation 
impacting health care. His 
regularly-assigned responsibilities 
include service on the Corporation, 
Insurance, and Banking; Chesa- 
peake and its Tributaries; and 
Counties, Cities, and Towns 
Committees. He has served on 
numerous legislative study com- 
mittees and currently is chairman 
of the subcommittee that is inves- 
tigating charges of unfair competi- 
tion between nonprofit organiza- 
tions and small, for-profit 
businesses. 

"I strongly support the mission 
of nonprofit organizations," Dele- 
gate Morgan said. "That mission is 
important and should be protected. 
We are acting on concerns about 
the proliferation of ancillary activi- 
ties that are taking them into new 
fields." 

During recent hearings in Rich- 
mond, the subcommittee heard 
testimony that indicated some 
small businesses were forced to 
close due to competition from non- 
profit entities. 

"While we don't want to inter- 
fere with the legitimate mission of 
the nonprofits, we need to take a 
close look if tax-paying entities are 
being forced out. That hurts every- 
one who benefits from taxes, 
which means all of us," he said. 

Delegate Morgan said he was 
surprised to learn no state agency 
knows exactly how many non- 
profit organizations are currently 
operating in Virginia. The explo- 
sive growth of nonprofits is under 
scrutiny by the U.S. Congress and 
a number of states. 

Citing figures published recently 
in national magazines, Mr. Morgan 
said nonprofits are accounting for 



13 



an ever-increasing portion of the 
nation's gross national product. "In 
1930 they were less than three 
percent of the GNP, a figure which 
remained relatively constant until 
1984. By 1987, more than eight 
percent of GNP was attributed to 
nonprofits. That represents the 
loss of significant tax revenues," he 
said. 

"There is a movement to focus 
on this growth and shed some sun- 
light on a clouded issue. We would 
like to see more accountability. An 
organization with nonprofit status 
can form an umbrella organization 
and compete with such tax-paying 
businesses as laundries, restau- 
rants, and office buildings, just by 
saying the profits are used to sup- 
port the nonprofit's legitimate 
mission." 

Delegate Morgan said, "I am 
fiercely free enterprise, and I wel- 
come competition, but it should be 
on the same terms. By receiving 
preferential tax treatment, which 
is proper for their legitimate mis- 
sion, nonprofits can gain an unfair 
competitive advantage against tax- 
paying businesses. This is an 
uneven playing field. 

"What we are most concerned 
with is preserving the legitimate 
mission of the nonprofit while 
ensuring small businesses are not 
unduly injured. We are interested 
in accountability and openness 
which will, I believe, ultimately 
protect nonprofits from those who 
abuse that special and essential 
status." 

Linda K. Livengood is a freelance writer 
living in Richmond. 



Do You Know 

About the 
Alumni House? 




W*^*c 



Do you know that our Medical College of Virginia Alumni 
Association will soon have its 100th birthday? (1989) 

Do you know that our home for the past 40 years has been 
in the Maupin-Maury House at 1105 East Clay Street? 

Do you know that several months ago a fund drive was 
started to raise $1.2 million for the moving and 
restoration of the old house? 

Do you know that $784,500 has been pledged already by 
the MCV Foundation, the University, the alumni board, 
the Alumni Association Building Fund, and individual 
alumni? 

Do you know that the MCV Alumni Association has 
20,000 registered alumni and that only 2.4 percent of 
those alumni have made a pledge or gift for this most 
important project? 

Do you know that if every alumnus would pledge only 
$100 for three years, our goal for Phase I, for Phase II, 
and for furnishings would be met and construction could 
begin? 

Well! Now that you know all of these facts, you surely must 
know also how very much we need your help. Please show 
that you care by making a pledge today to the MCV Alumni 
House Building Fund. 



Alumni House Contributors 

If you contributed or pledged to help fund the relocation and restoration of the MCV Alumni Association of VCU 
headquarters, the Maupin-Maury House, by October 9, 1987, your name is listed below. 

Contributions and pledges received by October 9 total more than $784,500. If your name is not listed, why not 
complete the form on page 19 and mail it today. Please make checks payable to MCV Alumni Association of VCU, 
Box 156, Richmond, VA 23298-0156. 




MCV-Alumni Association of VCU 

MAUPIN-MAURY HOUSE 

BUILDING FUND 

Phase I Goal- -l.06S.OO0. 



*l,065.000 
1,000,000 
900,000 
800,000 
700,000 
600,000 
00,000 

>o,ooo 

o,ooo 

x>.ooo 

?oo,ooo 



-1 



Dr. Kinloch Nelson, dean emeritus of the School of Medicine, and Mrs. Frances W. Kay, B.S. nursing '59, treasurer of the Alumni 
Association who has also been working as director of development for the Alumni House Building Fund Campaign, check a computer print- 
out of West Virginia physicians who have contributed to the campaign. In support of the campaign, Dean Nelson wrote to all 240 West 
Virginia physicians who received their medical degree from MCV during the period when West Virginia's physicians were educated here 
through an agreement between the two states. Dean Nelson claims that he has taught most of the West Virginia physicians medicine and 
some of them golf. 



ROBERT MAURY SOCIETY 

Pledge and/or gift of $10,000 and up. 
Dr. Alvin E. Conner 
Dr. Harry I. Johnson, Jr. 

SOCRATES MAUPIN SOCIETY 

Pledge and/or gift of $5,000 to $9,999 
Dr. Allan L. Forbes 
Dr. A. Edward Hodges 



M 


53 


M 


53 


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Mrs. Frances Whitlock Kay 

Mr. Linwood S. Leavitt 

In memory of Mr. Thomas F. 

Marshall, Sr., by his widow 

and sons 
Mrs. S. Jean Moye Shepard 
Dr. Henry S. Spencer 
Dr. Harry A. Wellons, Jr. 



N 


59 


P 


41 


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22 


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58 


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15 



HERITAGE SQUARE 
SOCIETY 

Pledge and/or gift of $1,000 to $4,999. 

Dr. Simeon H. Adams 

Mrs. Emily H. Baxter 

Dr. W.C. Bernhart 

Dr. Charles L. Boatwright 

Dr. David W. Branch 

Dr. Raymond S. Brown 

Mr. Nathan Bushnell III 

Class of Medicine '47 

Dr. Custis L. Coleman 

Dr. William W. 

Crittenden, Jr. 
Dr. Charles A. Easley, Jr. 
Dr. Hunter M. Gaunt, Jr. 
Dr. Frederick T. Given, Jr. 
Dr. Ota T. Graham, Jr. 
Mr. L. Preston Hale 
Dr. W.C. Henderson 
Mr. Charles F. Kingery 
Dr. Carl W. LaFratta 
Dr. Hudnall J. Lewis 
Mr. Cecil C. Lipes 
Dr. Mior G. Martin 
Dr. Michael O. McMunn 
Estate of Joseph L. 

McSparran 
Dr. Philip L. Minor 
Mr. Nick G. Nicolas 
Dr. T.W. Nooney 
Dr. George J. Oliver, Jr. 
Dr. Shirley Carter Olsson 
Dr. Norman C. Ratliff 
Dr. Arthur M. Reynolds, Jr. 
Mrs. Bertha C Rolfe 
Mrs. Marianne R. Rollings 
Mr. Alvin J. Schalow, Jr. 
Dr. Stephen L. Schlesinger 
Dr. Alton R. Sharpe, Jr. 
Mrs. Mae Belle Lee Smyth 
Florence and Robert 

Cabaniss in honor of 

Henry Spencer 
Dr. Alfred J. Szumski 
Dr. William B. Tarry, Jr. 
Dr. Charles G. Thedieck, Jr. 
Mrs. June H. Turnage 
Dr. Robert E. Ware 
Dr. Charles O. Watlington 
Dr. John William Watson 
Dr. Jock R. Wheeler 
Dr. David C. Whitehead, Jr. 
Dr. Edward J. Wiley, Jr. 
Dr. Charles A. Wilson 
Dr. Robert B. Woodhull 
Dr. Joseph C Woofter 
Dr. Hugh O. Wrenn 

FOUNDERS' CLUB 

Pledge and/or gift of $500 to $999 

Mr. Henry W. Addington 

Mrs. Mary V. Bedinger 

Dr. Robert W. Bedinger, Sr 

Dr. D. Earl Brown, Jr. 

Dr. Ruth W. Campbell 

Dr. Joseph E. Gardner 

Dr. Ernest C. Hermann 



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Dr. William E. Holland 
Dr. Hampton Hubbard 
Foundation for 

Immunotoxicology 
Dr. H.R. Ivey 
Dr. Barry V. Kirkpatrick 
Dr. Hermes A. Kontos 
Miss Mary O. Lindamood 
Dr. Robert L. Mason 
Dr. W. Baxter Perkinson 
Mr. E. Donald Reynolds 
Mr. Thomas W. Rorrer 
Miss Dorsye Russell 
Mrs. Margaret B. Stokes 
Dr. Paul A. Tanner, Jr. 
Dr. Terry F. Tanner 
Dr. E. Randolph Trice 



SCARAB CLUB 

Pledge and/or gift of $250 to $499 
Dr. Charles Daniel 

Armstrong 
Dr. Sam Barton 
Dr. Russell V. Bowers 
Dr. J. Erwin Cannon, Jr. 
Dr. Beverley B. Clary 
Mrs. Dorothy Sholes 

Crowder 
Mrs. Thomas E. 

Donnelly 
Dr. Rufus P. Ellett, Jr. 
Mrs. Charlotte Elaine 

Fitch 
Dr. Warren C. Hagood 
Dr. Carl Bemis Hall 
Dr. Echols A. 

Hansbarger, Jr. 
Dr. Karen L. 

Hermansen 
Dr. Robert M. Litt 
Dr. Harry Lyons 
Mrs. Magdalena Major 
Dr. R. Campbell Manson 
Dr. Frank F. Merker 
Mr. Harvey B. Morgan 
Dr. Reno R. Porter 
Dr. Robert B. Scott 
Dr. John H. Speegle 
Dr. W.T. Thompson, Jr. 
Dr. David L. Via 
Mrs. Shirley M. Wood 

PATRON 

Pledge and/or gift of $100 to $249. 
M 
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Dr. Robert A. Abernathy 
Dr. Joe M. Adair 
Mr. Leon P. Andrews 
Dr. Harry W. 

Bachman, Jr. M 

Dr. James H. Baird M 

Dr. Robert F. Barbe M 

Dr. Charles B. Barnett D 

Dr. James L. Blanton M 

Miss Katherine C. 

Bobbitt N 

Dr. S. Gaylen Bradley Faculty 

Dr. Guy H. Branaman M 

Mr. David W. Brown Friend 



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44 

70 
53 

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57 



55 
63 
53 
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24 



Dr. Henry A. Brown 
Mr. Henry C. 

Brown, Jr. 
Dr. Herman W. 

Brubaker 
Dr. Edwin C. Bryce II 
Dr. Baxter H. Byerly 
Mr. Clarence F. Cauble 
Dr. Melvin D. Childers, Jr. 
Dr. C.C. Choi 
Mr. Frederick Cifelli 
Class of Nursing '72 
Mr. Robert W. Clyburn 
Dr. LeMoyne Coffield 
Mrs. Maebelle W. 

Condit 
Mrs. Janet C. Coon 
Dr. L.B. Copenhaver 
Ms. Linda Corey 
Dr. Fred B. Cornett 
Dr. Wiley H. Cozart 
Mrs. Nell Maynard 

Cranor 
Dr. Kenneth D. Crippen 
Mrs. Helen H. Crossley 
Dr. Rafael Cuevas- 

Zamora 
Dr. Jorge A. Colon 

Davila 
Dr. Fred O. Dorey, Jr. 
Mrs. Corrine F. Dorsey 
Dr. Samuel F. Driver 
Mr. Greer L.E. 

Edmiston 
Dr. Roy A. Edwards, Jr. 
Mrs. Karen Sproles 

Emroch 
Dr. Steven E. Evens 
Dr. Herman J. Flax 
Dr. William P. Fletcher 
Dr. Albert A. Fratrick 
Mr. C.B. Freeman 
Dr. Antonio G Gandia 
Dr. Seth Gayle 
Dr. Herbert Gershberg 
Dr. J. Berkeley Gordon 
Dr. Philip R. Gordon 
Dr. John F. Hacker 
Dr. Edith L. Hardie 
Dr. John S. Harman 
Dr. James P. 

Harnsberger 
Dr. Claude A. Harper 
Dr. A. Epes Harris, Jr. 
Dr. Charles P. Harwood 
Dr. Robert D. Hess 
Dr. Douglass O. Hill 
Dr. John A.B. Holt 
Dr. R. Jack Irons 
Dr. Edward R. Isaacs 
Dr. Leo Jacobs 
Mrs. Helene Bergemann 

Jamelarin 
Dr. Francis C. Johnson 
Mrs. Kendall Kellum 
Dr. A.A. Kirk 
Dr. James E. Landen 
Dr. John D. Lentz 



M 


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Dr. Sanford A. Lipford 
Dr. Philip London 
Mrs. Carol W. Lunsford 
Mrs. Anne F. Mahoney 
Dr. Jimmie L. Mangus 
Dr. Edward N. Maxwell 
Dr. Carolyn Moore 

McCue 
Dr. Robert M. 

McDonald 
Dr. Charles H. McKown 
Dr. Donald H. 

McNeill, Jr. 
Dr. Arthur C. Meakin 
Dr. Harry L. Mears, Jr. 
Mr. C.V. Montgomery, Jr. 
Dr. W. Donald Moore 
Dr. John Franklin 

Morris 
Dr. John A. Murray 
Dr. Mark L. Nichols 



D 


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Dr. Paul J. Nutter 
Mrs. Shirley H. Odell 
Dr. Benjamin R. 

Ogburn 
Ms. Mary Beth Pappas 
Miss Harriette A. 

Patteson 
Dr. Earl R. Peters 
Mr. Kendall Peters 
Dr. Allen C Pirkle 
Dr. Forrest W. Pitts 
Dr. David Pollack 
Dr. David Polster 
Dr. Sandra Polster 
Dr. William L. Pratt 
Mrs. Jacquelynne Prince 
Dr. John S. Prince 
Dr. Jack D. Proctor 
Dr. Richard C. Rashid 
Dr. John A. Rawls 
Dr. John Rebman III 







Mr. Richard B. Rice 


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Dr. Leroy S. Safian 


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Dr. M.M. Sanders 


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Dr. Julie C. Moller 










Sanford 


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Dr. Earl S. Scott 


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Dr. Richard H. 










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Dr. Roy E. Stanford 


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Dr. Thomas P. Stratford 


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Dr. Frederick Nimrod 










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Mr. James M. Thrower 
Dr. C. Vincent 


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Dr. C. Carl Tully 


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Mrs. Celia Neff 










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Dr. William B. Yancey 


M 


76 


M 


69 


Mr. and Mrs. Tom 






M 


pO 


Yeaman 


Friend 




D 


56 








N 


78 








M 


52 








M 


62 








M 


62 








M 


60 








M 


53 









17 



SUSTAINERS 

Pledge and/or gift of $1 to 
Mr. J.B. Abernathy 
Mrs. Cula M. Adams 
Mrs. Sarah Lee Pride 

Allen 
Anonymous 
Anonymous 

Mrs. William A. Anthony 
Capt. R.T. Arnest 
Mrs. Lois F. Arundel 
Dr. F. Michael Ashby 
Mrs. Mary Ellen Cox 

Bandy 
Mr. Stephen Bandy 
Dr. Donald W. Barnes 
Mrs. Margaret M. Barnes 
Dr. Thomas G. Barsanti 
Dr. Homer Bartley 
Mr. Roy M. Beard 
Mr. Herman E. Becker 
Dr. C. Cooper Bell, Jr. 
Miss C. Virginia Besson 
Dr. Margaret N. 

Bixenman 
Dr. James L. Blanton 
Ms. Lena J. Booker 
Mr. John A. Booth 
Dr. John I. Bowman, Jr. 
Mrs. Ruth R. Brewer 
Dr. J.W. Brown III 
Mrs. Mary P. Brown 
Dr. Collinson P. Burgwyn 
Mrs. Harriet W. Buss 
Dr. Kenneth N. Byrne 
Dr. Timothy D. Cablish 
Mrs. Agnes M. Canzona 
Dr. Robin Carleton 
Dr. C.W. Caulkins, Jr. 
Mrs. Marie F. Cenedella 
Dr. Stephen Cenedella 
Dr. Arthur C. Chandler 
Dr. Jan F. Chlebowski 
Lt. Col. Margaret P. Clark 
Dr. Walter E. Clark, Sr. 
Dr. Patrick B. Colvard 
Mrs. Blanche S. Connell 
Dr. Samuel L. Cooke 
Mr. William J. Councill 
Dr. A.M. Cox 
Dr. George E. Cox 
Ms. M. Elise Cox 
Ms. Ann Patricia Crispin 
Mrs. Beauty D. 

Crummette 
Dr. Nathaniel W. 

Cuthbert 
Dr. Joel A. Danisi 
Mrs. Doris R. Davis 
Dr. Philip C. Davis 
Dr. Lynne P. Deane 
Mrs. Clara B. Deyton 
Mrs. Kathleen K. Dill 
Dr. Solomon Disick 
Dr. Ronald G. Downey 
Dr. Laniel Dubose 
Mr. Edward M. Durand 
Miss Joan E. Eanes 



$99. 

PT 56 

N 47 



N 



47 



Friend 




M 


52 


N 


2o 


M 


82 


P 


84 


P 


84 


PhD 


71 


P 


68 


M 


82 


M 


3d 


P 


31 


P 


31 


M 


45 


N 


22 


M 


82 


M 


24 


St.P 




PT 


80 


D 


58 


N 


45 


D 


7b 


St.P 




M 


48 


N 


oo 


M 


37 


D 


74 


Diet 


58 


M 


82 


M 


47 


PT 


07 


M 


08 


M 


20 


Friend 




N 


37 


D 


21 


D 


56 


N 


31 


M 


20 


PT 


40 


M 


32 


M 


45 


MT 


73 


N 


85 



M 


84 


M 


82 


N 


37 


M 


o4 


M 


82 


N 


53 


N 


80 


M 


35 


D 


74 


PhD 


85 


P 


58 


N 


44 



Mrs. Patricia S. Eby 
Miss Cheryl A. English 
Mrs. Anne B. Ergenbright 
Dr. Russell D. Evett 
Dr. Thomas G. Faison 
Dr. Dorothy Fisher 
Dr. Charles P. Ford, Jr. 
Mrs. Charles P. Ford, Jr. 
Mrs. Virginia Robbins 

Foster 
Dr. Parham R. Fox 
Mrs. Patricia P. Fox 
Mrs. Rosalyn M. Frank 
Dr. Mark Freilich 
Dr. John D. French 
Dr. M.D. Friedenberg 
Mrs. Isabelle W. Galbraith 
Mr. J.W. Gallagher, Jr. 
Dr. Margaret M. Gary 
Dr. William N. Gee, Jr. 
Dr. Darrell K. Gilliam 
Dr. William T. 

Gladden, Jr. 
Dr. Clarence K. 

Glover, Jr. 
Dr. Jeffrey S. Goldblatt 
Mrs. Anne N. Goodman 
Dr. Saul Gorman 
Mr. Gary W. Grant 
Mr. Stanley A. 

Greenbaum 
Dr. David N. Grenblum 
Mr. Frank Grossman 
Mr. Stephen A. Gudas 
Mrs. Rebecca L. Gusich 
Mrs. Elizabeth W. Hale 
Dr. Richard M. 

Hamrick III 
Dr. James A. Harrell, Sr. 
Dr. Charlotte Harris 
Mrs. Elizabeth W. Harris 
Dr. Jordan H. Harris 
Dr. Rodgers Harshbarger 
Mrs. Martha Edwards 

Hart 
Ms. Evelyn Hebberd 
Dr. Tabitha A. Henderson 
Mrs. Barbara L. Hendricks 
Dr. L. Frank Henry 
Miss Ruhamah Henshaw 
Dr. Chris M. Hicks 
Dr. J. Edward Hill 
Dr. Eric Robert Hoffer 
Mrs. Lottie J. Howard 
Dr. Shirley Martin 

Howard 
Mrs. Mary Sue D. 

Hudson 
Mrs. Rachel H. Hughes 
Dr. George H. Hull 
Dr. R.W. Humphrey, Jr. 
Dr. J. Warren Hundley 
Dr. Martha S. Hynes 
Dr. W. Robert Irby 
Dr. Thornton S. Jennings 
Dr. J.T. Jobe III 
Dr. Eliot W. Johnson 
Mr. Daney L. Jones 



N 


69 


PT 


81 


N 


34 


M 


57 


M 


32 


M 


40 


M 


43 


MT 


43 


N 


o4 


M 


71 


P 


70 


Diet 


51 


M 


75 


M 


51 


M 


47 


N 


33 


P 


34 


M 


82 


M 


53 


M 


59 



M 


56 


M 


67 


N 


41 


M 


73 


P 


85 


P 


43 


M 


76 


P 


57 


PT 


76 


OT 


78 


N 


70 


M 


82 


D 


73 


M 


82 


N 


37 


D 


71 


M 


43 


N 


75 


Friend 




M 


82 


N 


57 


M 


63 


N 


35 


M 


81 


M 


47 


M 


72 


N 


37 



N 


53 


N 


29 


M 


52 


[1 


60 


M 


27 


M 


81 


M 


48 


M 


30 


D 


54 


M 


27 


P 


70 



Dr. Fred C. Jones 
Dr S. Ben Judy 
Mrs. Mary E. Kahn 
Dr. Jay M. Kalan 
Miss Cynia Katsorelos 
Dr. Alexander Kaufman 
Dr. John J. Kelly III 
Dr. Bruce Ketner 
Dr. Edward L. King 
Mrs. Agnes T. Kirkman 
Mrs. Linda Gale Krause 
The Rev. Jack A. Kyle 
Dr. Sydney L. Lang 
Dr. Katherine P. Law 
Dr. William P. Lea, Jr. 
Miss Barbara J. Leavitt 
Dr. Clifford W. Lewis 
Miss Susan C. Lewis 
Mrs. Susan B. Lilly 
Mrs. Gwendolyn D. Long 
Dr Robert E. Long 
Mr. Ben W. Longest, Jr. 
Dr. T.C. Lovelace 
Dr. H.J. Lukeman 
Dr. John P. Lynch 
Dr. Lester M. Mason 
Dr. W.A. McClellan 
Mrs. Edith L. McLendon 
Dr. David B. Mika 
Dr. Katherine D. Mika 
Dr. Pamela R. Moore 
Mrs. Patricia B. Moore 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael 

Morchower 
Miss Edna Morgan 
Mrs. Frances C. Morgan 
Mrs. Alicia Weldon 

Motley 
Mr. A. Douglas 

Motley, Jr. 
Dr. John M. Mueller 
Miss M. Teresa Mullin 
Mrs. Empsy M.W. 

Munden 
Dr. George L. Nance 
Mrs. Italy D. Nelson 
Miss Martha L. Nicholes 
Mr. Lewis R. Nobles 
Mr. Eric P. Norwood 
Mrs. Gale Nuckols 
Dr. Margaret B. 

Obenschain 
Dr. Catherine S. Oden 
Dr. Leonard O. Oden 
Dr. Walter M. Ormes, Jr. 
Dr. Louis F. Owens, Jr. 
Dr. Ruth O'Neal 
Dr. Donald S. Parker 
Dr. Peter N. Pastore 
Mrs. Frances L. Pickard 
Mr. Edward Pickett 
Dr. Bernard Pitt 
Dr. Leonard D. Policoff 
Mrs. Clementine Sadler 

Pollok 
Dr. Charles K. Polly, Jr. 
Mrs. Karen P. Pontes 
Dr. Walter A. Porter 



D 


45 


M 


48 


N 


71 


M 


83 


N 


58 


D 


34 


M 


48 


D 


61 


M 


40 


N 


40 


P 


68 


PC 


62 


M 


38 


M 


82 


D 


61 


DH 


79 


M 


30 


N 


43 


N 


59 


N 


80 


D 


32 


P 


58 


M 


17 


M 


31 


M 


35 


M 


41 


D 


53 


N 


40 


M 


83 


M 


83 


M 


51 


OT 


77 


Friend 




N 


54 


N 


35 



P 


84 


M 


72 


N 


76 


P 


72 


D 


75 


N 


33 


N 


35 


P 


55 


MHA 


81 


P 


77 


M 


43 


D 


84 


D 


54 


D 


47 


M 


71 


M 


43 


M 


40 


M 


34 


N 


29 


P 


81 


M 


14 


M 


42 


N 


58 


D 


62 


P 


77 


M 


32 



Ms. Rebecca L. Powell 
Mrs. [Catherine Acree 

Prentice 
Mrs. Rebecca B. Price 
Dr. Mary D. Pryor 
Dr. Mathew M. Ralsten 
Dr. Frank Ramey 
Mrs. Alberta C. 

Rawchuck 
Mrs. Anne M. Rawls 
Mrs. Patricia M. Rich 
Dr. George S. Richardson 
Dr. Lucile W. Richardson 
Mrs. May 

Warren Richardson 
Dr. William L. Roberson 
Mrs. Kathleen 

Priddy Robertson 
Mr. Michael S. Robertson 
Mrs. Eleanor R. Roller 
Dr. Gerald W. Roller 
Mrs. Blondell J. Ross 
Dr. Thomas K. Ruth 
Dr. Richard G. Samaha 
Mr. T.A. Saunders 
Mrs. Victoria P. Saunders 
Mrs. George J. Savage, Jr. 
Mr. J. Thomas Savage 
Mrs. Lois Schmidt 
Dr. William J. Schmidt 
Mrs. Doris C. Scott 
Dr. William A. Shelton 
Mrs. Louise Fauson 

Simpson 
Mr. Jonah M. Slipow 
Mrs. Alice L. Smith 
Mrs. Jane W. Smith 
Dr. Thomas G. Smith 



MT 


63 


P 


83 


M 


53 


M 


34 


M 


30 


N 


40 


MT 


60 


N 


73 


M 


55 


M 


43 


MT 


53 


M 


48 


N 


37 


P 


80 


N 


55 


M 


56 


N 


75 


M 


83 


M 


84 


M 


48 


HA 


66 


MT 


50 


P 


56 


PT 


53 


PT 


53 


N 


59 


M 


52 


P 


45 


P 


39 


N 


53 


N 


38 


M 


71 



Dr. Edwin L. Snolowitz 
Ms. Karen Soeth 
Dr. George M. Solan 
Dr. Thomas H. 

Solenberger 
Dr. William F. Sowers 
Mrs. Dorothy H. Spiggle 
Mr. Philip C. Spiggle 
Dr. Otto S. Steinreich 
Dr. Bennett E. 

Stephenson 
Mrs. Viola M. Stoick 
Dr. Frank Dew 

Stoneburner, Jr. 
Mr. Joseph Suarez 
Mr. James H. Sullender 
Ms. Patricia W. Surface 
Mrs. Shannon F. Tate 
Miss Shirley M. Thomas 
Mr. Jay T. Thompson III 
Mrs. Dorothy K. 

Thomson 
Ms Lonni Trykowski 
Dr. Richard D. Turin 
Mrs. Thelma Mendez 

Voska 
Dr. Frank A. Wade III 
Mrs. Nancy B. Wade 
Dr. John G. Wall 
Mr. David A. Weems 
Mrs. Barbara M. 

Weimerskirch 
Miss Kindra L. Welcher 
Mrs. Virginia Gibbs 

Wessells 
Dr. Frank M. West, Jr. 
Mrs. Esther A. Westra 
Dr. Forrest P. White 



M 


75 


NA 


84 


M 


55 


M 


74 


M 


58 


P 


62 


P 


62 


M 


38 


M 


35 


PT 


50 


M 


82 


P 


69 


P 


29 


N 


47 


PT 


66 


N 


62 


P 


80 


N 


34 


PT 


74 


M 


44 


N 


51 


D 


82 


P 


76 


D 


41 


OT 


51 


MHA 


84 


N 


79 


N 


44 


D 


54 


N 


36 


M 


45 



Dr. James L. White M 
Dr. Frances S.A. Williams M 

Dr. H. Joseph Williams M 

Dr. Jeffrey Williams D 

Mrs. Mary Lee Williams N 

Dr. J. Henry Wills BHS 

Dr. S. Glenn Wilson, Sr. M 

Dr. William L. Wingfield M 

Dr. J.M. Winkfield M 

Miss Betty Winston OT 

Mrs. Lillian G. Winston N 

Miss Eleanor V. Wolfe OT 

Mrs. Harold E. Wolfe N 

Dr. Harold E. Wolfe M 
Dr. Robert W. 

Woodhouse III M 

Mrs. Alyce E. Woodyard N 

Miss Elizabeth L. Wright MT 

Mr. James R. Wyatt P 

Dr. Terry P. Yarbrough M 

Dr. George S. Yeatras D 

Dr. Peter S. Yeatras D 

Dr. Elizabeth York M 

Dr. A. A. Yurko M 
Mrs. Virginia R. 

Zehringer N 37 

Dr. George A. Zirkle, Jr. M 45 

Mr. William Zoltowicz PT 53 

Ms. Beverly Zweig P 77 

The following companies have made 

matching gift donations: 

Bon Secours — St. Mary's Health Care 

Foundation 
Hospital Corporation of America 

Foundation 
Philip Morris, Inc. 
Reynolds Metals, Inc. 



62 

54 
38 
73 
47 
36 
30 
37 
32 
56 
29 
56 
43 
43 



55 
61 
65 
66 
54 
82 
33 



Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association of Virginia Commonwealth University 

Building Fund 

Yes, I want to help fund the relocation and restoration of the MCV Alumni Association Headquarters, the Maupin-Maury 

House. 

Total gift/pledge $ Enclosed $ Pledge $ 

in 1987 $ in 1988 $ 



Billing instructions 



(Please print) 
Name 



Address 

City, State, Zip 

Do you or your spouse work for one of the more than 1,000 companies that have a matching gifts program? If so, you can 
double your gift! Please enclose your company's matching gift form and/or notify your company personnel department. The 
Alumni Association cannot initiate this action. 

Name of company 

Your gift is tax deductible to the full extent allowed by law. Please make checks payable to MCV Alumni Association Building 
Fund and mail to MCV Alumni Association of VCU, Box 156, Richmond, VA 23298-0156. 



Signature 











MCV Foundation: Making a Difference 



Making a difference is what the MCV Foundation is all about. Your support allows MCV 
to be the best at what it is — a teaching facility for the health sciences. Foundation funds 
provide educational and research opportunities to faculty and students which could not 
be provided any other way. The results — excellence! 

Make a difference by making a lifetime gift or bequest to the MCV Foundation. For 
additional information, please contact David E. Bagby, Jr., executive director, MCV 
Foundation, (804) 786-9734. 



Medical College of Virginia Foundation 

Box 234 
§L Richmond, VA 23298-0234 







IN DAYS GONE BY 



For this issue of the Scarab, the items of 
happenings on the MCV Campus 5- 
10-25-50 years ago were gleaned from 
old issues of VCU Today, The Medkovan, 
and the Skull and Bones. 

5 Years Ago 

Dr. Elam C. Toone, professor of 
immunology and connective tissue dis- 
eases on a part-time basis and profes- 
sor of medicine and chief of rheuma- 
tology at McGuire VA Hospital, was 
the only 45-year service award 
recipient. 

Dr. S. Gaylen Bradley was named 
dean of the School of Basic Sciences to 
succeed Dr. Daniel T. Watts who 
retired. 

Dr. John S. Ruggiero succeeded Dr. 
Warren Weaver who retired as dean of 
the School of Pharmacy. 

The name "Children's Medical Cen- 
ter" was adopted to identify selected 
pediatric activities on the MCV Cam- 
pus and to demonstrate to the public 
the scope, quality, and comprehensive- 
ness of medical and surgical programs 
and services available on the MCV 
Campus. 

Dr. Harold J. Fallon, chairman of the 
Department of Medicine, was 
appointed to the advisory council of 
the National Arthritis, Diabetes, 
Digestive, and Kidney Diseases 
Institute. 

10 Years Ago 

Kathy Bobbitt, assistant dean of the 
School of Nursing, was elected for a 
second term to the Board of Directors 
of the Virginia Nurses Association. 

Dr. Stephen F. Cleary, associate pro- 
fessor of biophysics, was named to a 
15-member committee that advises the 
Food and Drug Administration on 
radiation safety standards for elec- 
tronic products used in homes, indus- 
try, and medicine. 

The cornerstone of Hunton Hall, 
which was laid on September 13, 1937, 
was removed on March 16, 1977, 
when the demolition of Hunton Hall 
made room for the building of Main 
Hospital. 

The $110 million project for Main 
Hospital received a double A rating for 
its bonds from Standard and Poor's 
bond raters. 

Dr. Lemont B. Kier was named 
chairman of the pharmaceutical chem- 
istry department. 

Miss L. Frances Gordon, assistant 
dean of the School of Nursing from 
1958-65 and a 1943 graduate of the 



School of Nursing, was awarded the 
Outstanding Nursing Alumnus 
Award. 

25 Years Ago 

In 1962 the General Assembly appro- 
priated $2,568,850 for the mainte- 
nance and operation of the College 
Division and $3,466,100 for the main- 
tenance and operation of the Hospital 
Division for fiscal 1962-63. 

Three hundred and forty-five per- 
sons earned degrees from MCV on 
June 3. They represented 20 states, 
Hong Kong, and Singapore; 233 of 
them were Virginians. 

Dr. Paul S. Larson, professor of 
pharmacology and chairman of the 
department, was made president-elect 
of the Society of Toxicology. 

Dr. Reno R. Porter, associate profes- 
sor of medicine and chief of the sub- 
section on cardiovascular disease, was 
cited by the President's and Governor's 
Committee on Employment of the 
Physically Handicapped as the Virginia 
physician "who did the most for 
employment of the handicapped last 
year." 

Dr. Sidney Stevens Negus retired 
after 35 years of dedicated service as 
chairman of the Department of 
Biochemistry. 

Gifts and grants for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1962, totaled 
$3,780,445.48. 

Dr. Susan J. Mellette, assistant pro- 
fessor of medicine, was appointed 
director of the Division of Cancer 
Studies. 

50 Years Ago 

Dr. Frank L. Apperly, professor of 
pathology, was appointed to a mem- 
bership to the Royal College of Physi- 
cians of London, England. 

A notice in the Skull and Bones stated 
that "students who insist and demand 
attention near the library side of the 
Dental Department via the tooting of 
horns, racing of motors, etc., play 
havoc with the serenity of the class- 
room and it will be to the advantage of 
all concerned if quiet be maintained in 
that area during class periods." 

Dr. W. G. Crockett, professor of 
pharmacy, spoke to a School of Phar- 
macy student body meeting on the 
subject of "Patent Medicine Fraud." 

In January 1937, Richmond expe- 
rienced no snowfall. For the first time 
in the history of the U. S. Weather 



Bureau here, 35 days of the new year 
passed without even a snow flurry. 

"Bo" Hanna, Medical College varsity 
forward, had his right leg broken in 
the basketball battle with the 
Hampden-Sydney Tigers. 

The Jigsaws, one of the city's most 
difficult basketball teams, won by a 
score of 38-30 over the Medico nurses. 
Miss M. W. Kuykendall was high 
scorer of the evening, and the pass 
work of Miss Julia Tyler and Miss Ann 
Lee Moore was unsurpassed. 

The 1937 production of the Dra- 
matic Society was "Making Daddy 
Behave." 

Senior medical student Robert 
McEwen suffered injuries in an auto- 
mobile accident while he was on the 
way to the Virginia-Navy boxing 
matches held at Annapolis. 

The dental clinic closed from March 
15 to March 18 to permit members of 
the faculty to attend the annual meet- 
ings of the International Association 
for Dental Research and the American 
Association of Dental Schools in 
Baltimore. 

Dean W. F. Rudd of the School of 
Pharmacy was selected to assist in the 
reorganization of Columbia Universi- 
ty's pharmacy department. 

Miss Lulu K. Wolfe, on a leave of 
absence from the nursing division, was 
furthering her studies at Bedford Col- 
lege, London, Florence Nightingdale 
International Foundation. 

The Egyptian Building received an 
internal decoration of paint. 

Dr. W. T. Sanger, president of the 
Medical College, invited students of 
the senior classes and the wives of 
those married to an informal tea and 
reception at the home of President and 
Mrs. Sanger on April 18. 

MCV mopped up in table tennis 
against the Pops Club of Richmond. 

Women were beginning to occupy 
an increasingly important place in 
American medicine. They represented 
5 percent of all medical students last 
year (1936). 



21 



CAPSULES 



Gumenick Gift and Tabb Bequest 

for MCV Campus Functions Announced 





Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Gumenick 

Mr. Charles G. Thalhimer, chairman 
of the Campaign for VCU, has 
announced two recent major gifts to 
be used on the MCV Campus. They 
are a grant of $1,050,000 from the 
Nathan and Sophia Gumenick Philan- 
thropic Fund and a bequest of approx- 
imately $600,000 from the estate of 
Mr. Thomas Tabb. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gumenick, formerly 
of Richmond, created the Nathan and 
Sophia Gumenick Philanthropic Fund to 
be managed by the Jewish Community 
Federation of Richmond's Endowment 
Fund. They recommended that the 
$1,050,000 grant, the largest commit- 
ted to the Campaign for VCU since its 
kickoff in November 1986, be commit- 
ted to establish three sets of special 
service accommodations at MCV 
Hospitals. 

These six special rooms, with adja- 
cent amenities, will enhance the qual- 
ity of care for patients and their fami- 
lies, according to Mr. Carl Fischer, 



executive director of MCV Hospitals. 
The first unit will be ready for occu- 
pancy in mid-1988. 

In announcing Mr. and Mrs. Gum- 
enick's gift, Mr. Thalhimer emphasized 
that Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Gumenick 
and Mr. and Mrs. Harry Grandis 
played a vital role in making these new 
facilities at MCVH a reality. 

Mr. Thalhimer also stated that the 
bequest of approximately $600,000 
from the estate of Mr. Tabb is in sup- 
port of the Dr. Susan J. Mellette Fund. 
Money from the fund will be used for 
scholarships and fellowships for medi- 
cal students in the field of cancer re- 
search. The late Mr. Tabb of Hampton 
specified the bequest in memory of his 
wife, the late Mrs. Ann Poindexter 
Tabb. 

Dr. Mellette, who is director of the 
Cancer Rehabilitation and Continuing 
Care Program at the Massey Cancer 
Center, is recognized nationally and 
internationally as a leader in the field 
of cancer rehabilitation and education. 
Under her leadership, the Cancer 
Rehabilitation and Continuing Care 
Program at the Massey Cancer Center 
has developed into a model for other 
cancer centers. The program is de- 
signed to help ease the adjustment of 
patients and their families to the psy- 
chological and physical hardships of 
cancer. 



Your Office 
Is Moving 

The office of the MCV Alumni 
Association of VCU is moving to 
make way for the relocation and 
restoration of the Alumni House, 
the Maupin-Maury House. 

Temporary headquarters for 
the Alumni Association is the 
west wing of the 16th floor of the 
West Hospital. So next time you 
are in Richmond, drop by to tell 
the staff "hello" in their new 
quarters. 

The telephone numbers are the 
same: (804) 786-0434 and (804) 
786-0435. 

The new mailing address is 
MCV Alumni Association of 
VCU, Box 156, Richmond, VA 
23298-0156. 



" 


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WinterFestival to Be 
February 19 and 20 

Mark your calendars now to be in 
Richmond February 19 and 20, 1988, 
to attend the university's gala third 
annual WinterFestival — dance at the 
Omni . . . cheer on the Rams against 
ODU . . . meet classmates and old 
friends! 

Plans are progressing so watch your 
mail for details and registration 
material. 

By popular request, the School of 
Nursing will again hold a luncheon and 
fashion show during WinterFestival. 
Details will be in the next School of 
Nursing newsletter. 

Medicare Certifies 
Heart Program 

MCV Hospitals' heart transplant pro- 
gram has been designated as one of 
the first two in the United States to be 
certified as a Medicare provider. Fewer 
than 20 heart transplant centers are 
expected to be designated during the 
first year. 

The criteria for certification require 
that hospitals perform at least 12 heart 
transplants in each of the two years 
before seeking Medicare certification 
and 12 transplants before that, but 
since January 1, 1982. In addition, a 
hospital must perform at least 500 car- 
diac catheterizations and coronary 
arteriograms and 250 open-heart sur- 
geries annually. 

The MCVH clinical heart transplant 
program is the second oldest and today 
one of the three largest heart trans- 
plant programs in the United States. 
Dr. Richard Lower, chairman and pro- 
fessor of cardiac surgery, performed 
the United States' second heart trans- 
plant at MCV Hospitals on May 25, 
1968. MCV Hospitals and Stanford 
University have the oldest continuous 
heart transplant programs in the 
nation. 

Erratum 

The Scarab regrets a misidentification 
in the caption accompanying the Nurs- 
ing 1937 reunion photograph in its 
August issue. 

Mrs. Louise H. Blowe was identified 
incorrectly as Mrs. Grace Walker. 



Dr. Elam Toone Helps Secure Cecil Exhibit 

" J' 




Dr. Elam Toone, M.D. '34, is pictured in front of an exhibit commemorating Dr. Russell L. Cecil, 
M.D. '06 UCM, and Sc.D. '28 MCV. Dr. Toone is holding one of the early editions of A Text- 
book of Medicine: By American Authors, edited by Dr. Cecil and for many years the stan- 
dard medical textbook. 



Dr. Elam Toone, M.D. '34, emeritus 
professor of internal medicine, recently 
assisted the Special Collections and 
Archives Department, Tompkins- 
McCaw Library, University Library 
Services, in obtaining an exhibit com- 
memorating Dr. Russell L. Cecil, M.D. 
'06 UCM, and Sc.D. '28 MCV. 

The exhibit, created in 1984 for the 
50th anniversary of the American 
Rheumatism Association, depicts Dr. 
Cecil's career as a faculty member at 
Cornell University's New York Hospi- 
tal, medical director of the Arthritis 
Foundation, co-founder and third pres- 



ident of the American Rheumatism 
Association, and editor of A Textbook of 
Medicine: By American Authors in 1926 
that became the standard text used by 
almost all American medical schools. 
The text has been through a number 
of editions and is still used today. 

Dr. Toone, himself a nationally and 
internationally renowned rheumatolo- 
gist, introduced the idea of transfer- 
ring the exhibit to the MCV Campus 
and made the preliminary contacts and 
arrangements with the American Rheu- 
matism Association. 



MCV Foundation Announces 
New Gifts, Allocations, Trustees 



The MCV Foundation received gifts of 
$4,198,494 in 1986-87, an increase of 
34 percent over 1985-86. The total 
represents approximately $2.4 million 
in endowment funds and $1.8 million 
in current needs support. The 1986-87 
fiscal year was the second year that 
the MCV Foundation received and 
dispersed funds for current needs on 
the MCV Campus. 

Major gifts not previously reported 
in the Scarab included $180,000 from 
the estate of Albert del Castillo to the 
Massey Cancer Center Endowment 
Fund for ongoing cancer research 
activities; $105,000 from the estate of 
Gladys V. Haag to the Haag Professor- 
ship Endowment Fund and $52,000 
from the late Vivienne K. Harris for 



research in cardiac and pulmonary dis- 
eases. From the estate of Marion 
Crump, $241,000 will support disease- 
related research, and $94,000 from the 
combined estates of Dr. George C. and 
Victorine Andes are unrestricted 
endowment funds. 

Corporate support included 
$100,000 from the Ethyl Corporation 
for the Ethyl Corporation Cancer 
Research Endowment Fund and 
$135,000 from the R. J. Reynolds 
Tobacco Company for current 
research in the Department of Human 
Genetics. 

The MCV Foundation benefits 
annually from the support of other 
foundations: the Metropolitan Health 
Foundation contributed $100,000 for 



the establishment of the VCU Sports 
Medicine Center, the Helen Fuld 
Health Trust gave $50,000 to the 
School of Nursing, and the Massey 
Foundation gave an annual donation of 
$100,000 to the Massey Cancer 
Center. 

Other gifts include contributions 
from Virginia dentists to support the 
Virginia Dental Association Endow- 
ment Fund and an anonymous dona- 
tion of $50,000 to open a new opera- 
tional fund for the Division of 
Neurological Surgery. 

Almost $150,000 was donated to the 
MCV Alumni Association building 
campaign for the MCV Alumni House 
construction. 

The MCV Foundation recently 
awarded grants and allocations totaling 
over $1 million to MCV Campus 
schools and hospitals for fiscal 1987- 
88. Of the total, approximately 
$280,000 comes from unrestricted 
endowment funds. 

The majority of the unrestricted 
income will help to enhance the quality 
of student life on the MCV Campus. 
Projects funded include a new School 
of Dentistry student affairs center, 
computer equipment for student use in 
the School of Nursing, a scholarship 
program in the School of Pharmacy, 
and the furnishing of a new student 
center. 

Funds will support research also: 
$16,400 for research in cardiovascular 
disease, $21,000 for research benefit- 
ing children, $14,600 for alcohol- 
related research, and $5,500 for 
research in geriatric medicine. 

Approximately $736,000 in endow- 
ment income from restricted funds will 
support endowed chairs, professor- 
ships, and fellowships, as well as 
numerous student scholarships and 
loans. Several departments in the 
School of Medicine will purchase major 
equipment with income from depart- 
mental endowment funds. 

Four new members have been 
named to the foundation's Board of 
Trustees. They are Kenneth S. 
Houghton, vice-president for research 
and development for Philip Morris 
International; John T. McGrann, most 
recent past president of the Bank of 
Virginia Trust Company, now a part 
of Signet Bank; Lewis N. Miller, Jr., 
president of Central Fidelity Bank, Inc.; 
and Troy A. Peery, Jr., president of 
Heilig-Meyers, Inc. They will serve 
three-year terms. 

Ralph M. Ware, Jr., B.S. pharmacy 



23 



'42, retiring after 20 years as a trustee, 
was named a lifetime honorary 
•trustee. 

Dr. W. Robert Irby, M.D. '48, was 
elecied the new president. 

NCI Names Massey 
Cancer Center 

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) 
recently recognized the Massey Cancer 
Center by identifying it as one of 42 
NCI-designated cancer centers in the 
United States. The designation was 
made on the basis of the evaluation of 
the Massey Oncer Center's overall 
program of cancer research, patient 
care, and cancer education. 

The Massey Cancer Center, a part 
of the MCV Campus, was selected to 
be included in this elite group of cancer 
centers on the basis of a peer review 
by teams of cancer scientists, clinical 
cancer specialists, and administrators 
from nongovernmental facilities 
around the nation. 

Caribbean Dental 
CE Program Set 

The Office of Continuing Education in 
the School of Dentistry has scheduled 
a week's study/play program on St. 
Maarten Island in the Carribean from 
April 28-May 4, 1988. 

The program, to be held at Mullet 
Bay Resort, features Dr. W. Baxter 
Perkinson, Jr., D.D.S. '70, as the con- 
tinuing education speaker for the 
seminars that will be held for several 
hours each day. His topics will be 
"Everyday Approaches to Restorative 
Dentistry" and "Practice Management." 

Additional information is available 
from Dr. F. B. Wiebusch, assistant 
dean for continuing education, at (804) 
786-0869. 

Governor Names 
Board Members 

Richard Meador and F. Dixon Whit- 
worth, Jr., recently were appointed to 
four-year terms on the VCU Board of 
Visitors by Governor Gerald Baliles. 

Mr. Meador, an insurance and real 
estate agent with Barger Insurance 
Company in Waynesboro, received a 
bachelor's degree in business from 
Richmond Professional Institute. 

A regional executive vice-president 



MCV Alumni Association of VCU Treasurer's Report 


July 1, 1986-June 30, 1987 








1987 


1986 


INCOME 






VCU funding 


$178,206 


$173,017 


Rent 


— 


2,058 


Souvenir sales 


5,519 


8,631 


Miscellaneous receipts 


11,543 


8,197 




$195,268 


$191,903 


DISBURSEMENTS 






Publishing, Scarab 


$ 47,612 


$ 43,132 


Dinners, assemblies, Senior Dance, 






division activities 


24,968 


27,241 


Building expenses 


9,847 


10,234 


Souvenir costs 


4,529 


6,025 


Administrative and general 


122,500 


109,689 




$209,456 


$196,321 


Net income (loss) 


$(14,188) 


$ (4,418) 


General fund balance 






beginning of year 


43,483 


47,901 


General fund balance 






end of year 


29,295 


43,483 


Designated funds 


11,391 


11,230 


Scholarship funds 


18,025 


17,285 


Building fund 


414,479 


290,631 


TOTAL FUND 


$473,190 


$362,629 


The complete audit by McGladrey, Hendrickson and Pullen, certified public 


accountants, is available at the Alumni As 


sociation Office shou 


dyou wish 


to see it. 








Respectfully 


submitted, 




Frances V\ 


.Kay 




Treasurer 





of F & M National Corporation and a 
resident of Winchester, Mr. Whit- 
worth received a master's degree from 
VCU. 

Other members of the Board of Vis- 
itors are Nina F. Abady, Richmond; 
Richard L. Beadles, Richmond; William 
B. Berry, Richmond; Rozanne C. Epps 
(secretary), Richmond; James B. Farin- 
holt (rector), Richmond; Roger L. Gre- 
gory, Richmond; William E. Holland, 
Richmond; Weldon H. Latham, 
Bethesda; Eric M. Lipman (vice-rector), 
Richmond; French H. Moore, Jr., 
Abingdon; W. Roy Smith, Petersburg; 
Anne Marie Whittemore, Richmond; 



and Alan L. Wurtzel, Washington, 
DC. 

Nursing Preparing 
for Centennial 

The School of Nursing already is pre- 
paring for its centennial celebration in 
1993. Ideas are being generated to 
make the celebration a memorable 
event. 

Alumni and friends of the School of 
Nursing are urged to be on the alert 
for communications from the Nursing 
Division of the MCV Alumni Associa- 



tion of VCU and to submit ideas and 
requests for the centennial celebration 
to Constance Stonnington, Director of 
External Affairs, School of Nursing, 
Box 567, Richmond, VA 23298-0567. 

lies Named VCU 
Alumni Director 





Dr. William P. lies joined the univer- 
sity recently as director of alumni 
activities in the University Advance- 
ment Division. 

In this position, Dr. lies is responsi- 
ble for planning and implementing 
programs to strengthen ties between 
alumni and the University. 

Formerly associate director of the 
University of Iowa Alumni Association 
and Division of Alumni Records, he 
has served in numerous capacities, 
including special assistant to the direc- 
tor of public information, assistant to 
the president, and visiting professor of 
history. Dr. lies received his bachelor's, 
master's, and doctoral degrees from 
the University of Iowa. 

Two New Master's 
Programs Approved 

The university has established an 
executive Master of Science program 
in health administration specifically 
designed for health care professionals 
who work full time. 

Using an innovative combination of 
computer conferencing, programmed 
instruction, videotape packages, and 
self-directed study modules, the pro- 



gram will allow working health care 
professionals to earn a graduate degree 
in health administration without inter- 
rupting their careers. The two-year 
program, which begins in 1988, is 
designed so that students spend only 
five periods on campus, each ranging 
from six to 12 days. 

The second new master's program 
recently approved by the Board of Vis- 
itors will replace the baccalaureate 
program in physical therapy in 1989. A 
master's entry-level physical therapy 
program, which consists of three 
years' preparatory work and three 
years of studies in physical therapy, 
will be available. Advanced graduate 
studies in physical therapy will con- 
tinue to be offered. 

Rossiter Directs 
Williamson Institute 

Dr. Louis F. Rossiter, associate profes- 
sor of health administration, has been 
appointed director of the David G. 
Williamson, Jr., Institute for Health 
Studies. 

Dr. Rossiter, a health economist, 
came to the MCV Campus in 1982 as 
assis- 
tant professor of health administra- 
tion. A graduate of Lenoir Rhyne Col- 
lege, he has a master's degree from the 
University of South Carolina and a 
doctoral degree from the University of 
North Carolina. 

The David G. Williamson, Jr., Insti- 
tute for Health Studies was created 
earlier this year as a center for study- 
ing health care services and was named 
in honor of David G. Williamson, Jr., 
M.H.A. '57, vice-chairman of the Hos- 
pital Corporation of America, who, 
until his death in 1986, chaired the 
New Ventures for Excellence in Health 
Administration Education Campaign 
which provided funds for the institute. 

NIH Awards Grant 
to Study AIDS 

The National Institutes of Health 
(NIH) has awarded a $500,000 grant to 
a team of scientists and clinicians on 
the MCV Campus for their work with 
AIDS. The program, "Exploration of T 
Lymphocyte Expandability in AIDS," 
will be funded for three years. 

The research team is led by Dr. R. 
A. Carchman, professor of pharmacol- 
ogy and toxicology and associate scien- 



tific director of the Massey Cancer 
Center. Other team members are Dr. 
Carl McCrady, research associate, 
Department of Pharmacology and Tox- 
icology; Dr. W. H. Carter, Jr., profes- 
sor and chairman, Department of Bios- 
tatistics; Dr. Lisa Kaplowitz, assistant 
professor, Department of Internal 
Medicine; and Dr. Eric Westin, assist- 
ant professor, Department of Internal 
Medicine. 

Moose Association 
Aids MCC 

The Virginia Moose Association 
(VMA) and its 100 lodges and 78 chap- 
ters have established a $100,000 
endowment fund to be used for cancer 
research at the Massey Cancer Center 
on the MCV Campus. 

Concerned by the tremendous loss 
of life and disability associated with 
cancer in its membership and others 
throughout Virginia, the VMA hopes 
to raise $100,000 each year for the 
fund, eventually reaching a total of $1 
million. 

Continuing Dental 
Education Calendar 

December 12, 1987—9 am-3 pm 

Bonded Porcelain Restorations: Dentistry's 

Finest 

Frank B. Gardner, D.D.S. 

Williamsburg, Virginia 

January 8, 1988—9 am-4 pm 

How Superstar Dentists Create Constellations 

Linda Miles 

Richmond, Virginia 

January 16, 1988 — 9 am-3 pm 
The Restoration of Coronally Debilitated Teeth 
David R. Federick, D.M.D., M.Sc.D. 
Williamsburg, Virginia 

February 1-2, 1988 — 4 pm-6 pm 
Management of Dental Patients with AIDS 
and Other Oral Lesions 
John Svirsky, D.D.S. 
Wintergreen, Virginia 

February 13, 1988—9 am-3 pm 

Positive Money Making Ideas: A Prosthodontic 

Seminar 

Martin G. Koch, D.M.D. 

Williamsburg, Virginia 



NEWSMAKERS 



February 19-21, 1988—9 am-4 pm 

A Practical Approach to Crown and Bridge for 

the '80s 

W. Baxter Perkinson, Jr., D.D.S. 

Richmond, Virginia 

February 27, 1988—9 am-5 pm 
A New Approach to Molar Endodontics 
Marshall C. England, D.D.S. 
John B. Holcomb, D.D.S. 
E. Neil Dodds, D.D.S. 
Gary R. Hartwell, D.D.S. 
Richmond, Virginia 

Board Names 
New Chairmen 

The Board of Visitors recently named 
three new chairmen of MCV Campus 
departments and divisions. 

Dr. James C. Burns, associate pro- 
fessor of oral pathology, has been 
appointed chairman of the department. 
Dr. Burns is a 1972 graduate of the 
School of Dentistry and joined the 
faculty in 1978. 

Dr. Robert Lamb, associate profes- 
sor of physical therapy, has been 
appointed acting chairman of the 
Department of Physical Therapy. Dr. 
Lamb joined the department in 1968 
and has directed its graduate studies 
program since 1982. 

Dr. Anthony V. Proto, professor of 
radiology, has been appointed chair- 
man of the Division of Diagnostic 
Radiology. Dr. Proto has been on the 
faculty since 1984. 



Class of 1938 
Reminiscences to 
Be in Next Issue 

Members of the Class of 1938 are 
reminded to mail their photo- 
graphs and reminiscences to Mrs. 
Franklin B. Stone, Executive 
Director, MCV Alumni Associa- 
tion of VCU, Box 156, Richmond, 
VA 23298-0156, to be received by 
December 1, 1987, for inclusion in 
the February 1988 issue of the 
Scarab. 

All alumni should mark their 
calendars now for REUNION '88 
to be held April 8, 9, 1988, at 
Richmond's Omni Hotel. 

DENTAL HOMECOMING, 
which also will be April 8, 9, 1988, 
will be held at the Richmond Mar- 
riott Hotel. 



Three faculty were honored recently 
for "excellence in medicine and com- 
munity service" by The National 
Italian-American Foundation, The 
Italian-American Cultural Association, 
and Guiseppe Verdi Lodge #315, 
Order Sons of Italy in America. The 
honorees are Dr. Joseph F. Borzelleca, 
professor, Department of Pharmacol- 
ogy and Toxicology; Dr. John S. Rug- 
giero, professor, Department of Phar- 
macy and Pharmaceutics, and dean, 
School of Pharmacy; and Dr. Joseph 
Zanga, professor, Department of 
Pediatrics. 

Dr. William L. Banks, Jr., co-director 
of the Massey Cancer Center and pro- 
fessor of biochemistry, was installed 
recently as president of the Virginia 
Academy of Science. 

Dr. William H. Barr, professor and 
chairman, Department of Pharmacy 
and Pharmaceutics; Dr. Lemont B. 
Kier, professor. Department of Medi- 
cinal Chemistry; and Dr. John H. 
Wood, professor, Department of 
Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics, have 
been installed as fellows in the newly- 
formed American Association of 
Pharmaceutical Scientists. 

Dr. Richard B. Brandt, professor of 
biochemistry and molecular biophysics 
and a member of the staff of the Mas- 
sey Cancer Center, recently received 
the J. Shelton Horsley Research Award 
from the Virginia Academy of Science 
for his study on the "Inhibition of 
Glyoxalase I." 

Dr. Francis M. Bush, associate profes- 
sor, Department of General Dentistry, 
was the author of an article entitled 
"Tinnitus and Otalgia in Temporo- 
mandibular Disorders" published in the 
October issue of the journal of Prosthetic 
Dentistry. Dr. Bush recently presented 
"Pain Perception and Assessment 
Among Patients with Temporoman- 
dibular Disorders" at the Fifth World 
Congress on Pain in Germany. He col- 
laborated with Dr. Vernon M. Chin- 
chilli, associate professor, Department 
of Biostatistics, and Dr. M. F. Martelli, 
Sheltering Arms Hospital. 

Dr. Joseph P. Bush, assistant profes- 
sor, Departments of Psychology and 
Pediatrics, recently presented "Racial 
and Ethnic Factors in the Perception of 
Chronic Pain and Subsequent Behav- 
ior" at a symposium on "Chronic Pain: 



Clinical Issues in Health Care." The 
symposium was part of the annual 
meeting of the American Psychological 
Association in New York. 

Dr. Vernon M. Chinchilli, associate 
professor, Department of Biostatistics, 
has been elected chairperson of the 
biopharmaceutical section of the Amer- 
ican Statistical Association. His term 
begins in January 1989. 

Dr. Alexander Clarke, associate pro- 
fessor of biomedical engineering, has 
developed a new windshield film that 
protects people with hypersensitive 
skin or eye conditions from harmful 
sun rays. The film screens out irritat- 
ing rays of light but allows transmis- 
sion of sunlight needed for proper 
vision. 

Dr. Mary Corley, assistant professor, 
Nursing Service Administration Pro- 
gram, lectured on "The Effect of Modi- 
fied Work Week Schedules on Nurse 
Job Satisfaction and Perceived Ade- 
quacy of Nursing Care" at a recent 
Southern Nursing Research Society 
Conference in Atlanta. 

Dr. Dwain L. Eckberg, professor, 
Department of Medicine, was one of 
the two non-Europeans invited to 
address a meeting on baroreflex func- 
tion and parasympathetic cardiac con- 
trol convened by the Commission of 
the European Communities in Italy. 

Dr. Joan Farrell, dean of the School of 
Nursing, presented "Assessment of 
Homebound Patients with Chronic 
Obstructive Lung Disease According 
to Their Activities of Daily Living, 
Stress, and Pulmonary Function" at 
the International Research Congress, 
Edinburgh, Scotland, recently. 

Dr. Richard A. Glennon, professor, 
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, 
recently participated in a conference on 
designer drugs entitled "Technical 
Aspects of Drug Control: Assessment 
of Issues Relative to Illicit Substances 
of Abuse and Controlled Substance 
Analogs." The conference, held in 
Rabat, Morocco, was sponsored by the 
Mental Health Division of the World 
Health Organization and the United 
States Drug Enforcement Adminis- 
tration. 



Dr. Louis S. Harris, professor and 
chairman, Department of Pharmacol- 
ogy and Toxicology, recently attended 
the International Conference on Drug 
Abuse and Illicit Traffic in Austria. Dr. 
Harris recently was appointed as the 
science advisor to the director of the 
National Institute on Drug Abuse and 
is a representative of the Committee 
on Problems of Drug Dependence. 

Dr. S. James Kilpatrick, Jr., professor, 
Department of Biostatistics, has been 
invited by Japan's Council for Envi- 
ronment and Health to speak at its 
International Conference on Indoor 
Air Quality next month. The title of 
the presentation is "Model Specifica- 
tion Effects in ETS/Nutrition 
Research." 

Dr. Pulla R. S. Kishore, professor and 
chairman, Department of Radiology, 
has been selected as a fellow by the 
American College of Radiology's Board 
of Chancellors. Dr. Kishore was 
honored for his outstanding contribu- 
tions to the field of radiology. 

Dr. William R. Krause, assistant pro- 
fessor, Department of Biomedical 
Engineering, has received the Leroy 
Wyman Award from the American 
Society for Testing and Materials. The 
award is presented annually to an 
engineer who has made outstanding 
contributions to the development of 
standards. 

Dr. Daniel M. Laskin, professor and 
chairman, Department of Oral and 
Maxillofacial Surgery, and editor-in- 
chief of the journal of Oral and Maxillofa- 
cial Surgery, is the recipient of the 
William J. Gies Foundation for the 
Advancement of Dentistry Editorial 
Award for 1987. His editorial, entitled 
"Telling It Like It Is" and published last 
year, was selected as the outstanding 
editorial entered in the competition 
this year. This is the fourth time Dr. 
Laskin has received the award. He has 
been presented the 1987 International 
Education Award by the International 
Congress of Oral Implantologists. Dr. 
Laskin received this award for his con- 
tributions to the field as an educator, 
researcher, and clinician. Dr. Laskin 
also was the author of an article 
entitled "Smoking Habits and Atti- 
tudes of Oral and Maxillofacial Sur- 
geons" published in a recent issue of 
the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial 
Surgery. 



Dr. Susan J. Mellette, professor of 
internal medicine and rehabilitation 
medicine and director of the Cancer 
Rehabilitation and Continuing Care 
Program of the Massey Cancer Cen- 
ter, was honored recently by the 
YWCA as one of Richmond's outstand- 
ing women. 

Dr. Otto D. Payton, professor, De- 
partment of Physical Therapy, has 
been named editor of the journal of Phys- 
ical Therapy Education, a new venture of 
the education section of the American 
Physical Therapy Association. 

Dr. Anthony V. Proto, professor, 
Department of Radiology, and chair- 
man, Division of Diagnostic Radiology, 
was recently an invited speaker at the 
Australian College of Radiology in 
Sydney. This was part of a series of 
lectures Dr. Proto presented in Austra- 
lia and New Zealand. 

Dr. Mitchell L. Schubert, assistant 
professor, Department of Internal 
Medicine, has received the American 
Gastroenterological Association 
Research Scholar Award and the Veter- 
ans Administration Research Associate 
Career Development Award. Dr. 
Schubert is studying the neural and 
paracrine regulation of gastric acid 
secretion. 

Dr. Jennie D. Seaton, assistant dean, 
School of Allied Health Professions, 
has been elected chairman of the Advi- 
sory Board for Health Occupations 
Education, Richmond Technical 
Center. 

Dr. Ramesh K. Shukla, professor, 
Department of Health Administration, 
spoke at the annual meeting of the 
Saskatchewan, Canada, Nursing 
Assistants' Association recently. 

Dr. William Stepka, emeritus profes- 
sor of pharmacy and pharmaceutics 
and a consultant for employee rela- 
tions at VCU, was honored recently at 
a luncheon hosted by the Virginia 
Conference of the American Associa- 
tion of University Professors. Dr. 
Stepka was cited for his sustained and 
selfless devotion to higher education in 
Virginia. 



Dr. Henry H. Stonnington, professor 
and chairman,»Department of Rehabili- 
tation Medicine, has been elected 
treasurer of the International Society 
for the Study of Brain Injury. Dr. 
Stonnington was instrumental in the 
formation of the society. 

Dr. Alfred J. Szumski, M.S. '56, Ph.D. 
'64, associate professor, Department of 
Physiology, was invited to attend the 
Bi-National Colloquium of the Alex- 
ander von Humboldt Foundation held 
recently at the University of Texas, 
Austin. The colloquium was sponsored 
by the von Humboldt Foundation for 
awardees who studied and participated 
in research projects under their spon- 
sorship at German universities. Dr. 
Szumski's one-year tenure was at the 
University of Munich. 

Dr. J. Randall Thomas and Dr. Robert 

A. Petry, assistant clinical professors of 
psychiatry in psychology, published 
"Comparison of Cognitive and Behav- 
ioral Self-Control Treatments of 
Depression" in a recent issue of Psycho- 
logical Reports. 

Dr. George P. Vennart, chairman, 
Department of Pathology, was inter- 
viewed recently by the CBS Evening 
News for his expert opinion on the 
ability of laboratories to meet 
increased demands for testing of drug 
dependency and diseases. Dr. Vennart 
is responsible for more than four mil- 
lion laboratory procedures performed 
at MCV Hospitals each year. 

Dr. F. B. Wiebusch, assistant dean for 
continuing education, School of Den- 
tistry, was elected president of the 
Eastern Conference for Dental Con- 
tinuing Education at its annual meet- 
ing held in Washington, D.C., in June. 



27 



ALUMNI UPDATE 



1923 



Harry Lyons (D.D.S.) has received the 
Callahan Award for "distinguished 
service to the dental profession" from 
the Ohio State Dental Association and 
the dental schools of Case Western 
University and Ohio State University. 
Dr. Lyons is serving as the honorary 
chairman of the VCU Friends of the 
Library. 



1935 



Solomon Disick (M.D.) has been ap- 
pointed senior member of the Appeal 
Board in the Biomedical Sciences for 
Graduate and Research Investigators 
at Pennsylvania State University and is 
serving his fourth three-year term on 
the university's Institutional Review 
Board in the Biomedical Sciences. 



1941 



John J. Marsella (M.D.) has retired 
after 40 years of practicing OB-Gyn in 
Danville and many hours of communi- 
ty service in the Danville Health 
Department.. His wife is Bernice Wil- 
liams Marsella (B.S. nursing '43) and 
their daughter, Judith Marsella- 
Gonzales, is an (B.S. nursing '70) 
alumnus. 



1943 



Fleming W. Gill (M.D.) succeeds W. 
Taliaferro Thompson, Jr., (M.D. '38) 
as medical director of Westminster- 
Canterbury retirement community in 
Richmond. 



1944 



Claude A. Frazier (M.D.) of Asheville, 
North Carolina, continues his crusade 
to allow trained laymen to administer 
epinephrine to people with an anaphy- 
lactic reaction to insect stings. The 
American Academy of Allergy and the 
American Academy of Pediatrics have 
supported him. Ten states have passed 
the model bill prepared by the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. 

Ira Gould (D.D.S.) of Hampton has 
been elected National Dental Surgeon 
of the Reserve Officers Association of 



the U.S. He was a member of the 
National Council Steering Committee 
and has a private practice in Norfolk. 



1945 

Baruj Benacerraf (M.D.), the 1980 
recipient of the Nobel Prize in Medi- 
cine and Physiology and chairman of 
the pathology department at Harvard 
Medical School, has had a professor- 
ship in pathology named in his honor 
at Harvard Medical School and the 
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for his 
work in the area of immunology. In 
October 1986 he shared the Nobel 
Prize in Medicine for his discoveries of 
genetically determined structures on 
the cell's surface that regulate immu- 
nological reactions. 



1946 



Darlene Smith Walter (B.S. occupa- 
tional therapy) has been employed in 
occupational therapy positions in a 
number of places where her career air 
force husband is assigned. She has 
now retired and lives in Boulder, 
Colorado. 



1947 



Willie D. Crockett (D.D.S.) retired on 
June 30 from the faculty of the School 
of Dentistry. Dr. Crockett joined the 
dental faculty in 1954 as an assistant 
professor of operative dentistry. He 
escalated through the academic ranks 
and attained the position of professor 
and director of the Division of Opera- 
tive Dentistry. For a year he served as 
acting chairman of the Department of 
Restorative Dentistry. 



1949 



Marvin E. Pizer (D.D.S.) of Falls 
Church was the guest speaker at the 
Tenth Annual Dental Public Health 
Conference in August 1987. The title 
was "New Concepts in Diagnosis and 
Treatment of Oral Disease." 



1952 



Dewey H. Bell, Jr., (D.D.S.) retired as 
professor and chairman of the 



Department of Removable Prostho- 
dontics of the School of Dentistry on 
June 30. Currently serving as presi- 
dent of the American Prosthodontic 
Society, Dr. Bell is practicing his spe- 
cialty in Richmond several days each 
week. 



1954 

Jean Edmonston Comyns (B.S. occupa- 
tional therapy) lives in the country 
near Asheville, North Carolina, where 
she works part time in physical disabil- 
ities, plays tennis, and is a beekeeper. 



1955 



Jean L. Harris (M.D.) and husband, 
Leslie Ellis, have two daughters. Dr. 
Harris has been elected to the city 
council in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. 



1956 



John J. Halki (M.D.) has been named 
professor of obstetrics and gynecology 
at Wright State University. He also 
holds a professorship of pharmacology 
and toxicology. Dr. Halki received his 
Ph.D. in pharmacology from the Uni- 
versity of Kansas and retired from 
active military service in 1981 with the 
rank of brigadier general. 

Artelia Bailey Perry (B.S. occupational 
therapy) of Tabb is working part time 
at the VA Medical Center with 
emphasis on rehabilitation. 



1957 



Sandra Ogden Struckman (B.S. occu- 
pational therapy) of Montvale, New 
Jersey, has worked in occupational 
therapy in psychiatry and cerebral 
palsy and has been a medical assistant 
for 17 years. 



1961 



Richard K. Ames (D.D.S.) has been 
awarded the diplomate status of the 
American Board of Dental Public 
Health and serves as the dental execu- 
tive director of the Broward County, 
Florida, Public Health Unit. Colonel 
Ames is commander of the 3342 U.S. 
Army Dental Service Detachment in 
Perrine, Florida. 



Mary Burrage Caudill (B.S. occupa- 
tional therapy) married Hugh Caudill 
on October 26, 1985, and bought a 
condominium on Lake Norman in 
Huntersville, North Carolina. 

Alvin J. Schalow, Jr. (B.S. pharmacy) 
has been named the Virginia Pharma- 
cist of the Year by the Virginia Phar- 
maceutical Association. 



1963 

Cleveland H. Porter (D.D.S.), imme- 
diate past president of the Lynchburg 
Dental Society, is active on several 
VDA committees and is the associate 
editor of the Virginia Dental journal. 



1969 



1964 



Susan Jean Enoch Grayer (B.S. occupa- 
tional therapy) spent nine years living 
in Canada and has moved with her 
husband and two children to Erie, 
Pennsylvania, where she is the staff 
occupational therapist at the Erie 
County Crippled Children Society. 

William N. Riley (D.D.S.) has been 
elected president of the Lynchburg 
Dental Society. He has a general dental 
practice in Lynchburg. 

Richard Zechini (D.D.S.) has been 
elected secretary-treasurer of the 
Lynchburg Dental Society. 



1967 



Daniel E. Grabeel (D.D.S.) is the pres- 
ident of the Piedmont Dental Society 
and serves as a representative of the 
executive council of the Virginia Den- 
tal Association. 

Dennis M. Smith (D.D.S.) has been 
elected president of the Ohio Society 
of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. He 
has practiced in Milford, Ohio, for 18 
years. 



1968 



John V. Sawicki (D.D.S.) has been 
elected to a five-year term as fire 
commissioner for Mattituck, New 
York. 



David T. Kiger (D.D.S.) has been 
elected president-elect of the Lynch- 
burg Dental Society. 



1971 



S. Larry Schlesinger (M.D.) has had 
his surgecenter in Hawaii approved by 
Blue Cross as a free-standing, fully 
equipped surgecenter. 



1972 



Mary Schiller Dunford (B.S. nursing) 
has returned from three years of 
teaching in inservice education at the 
Capital Hospital of Peking Union Med- 
ical College in Beijing, China. She will 
reside in Vienna. 

Janice Kytle-Seargent (B.S. occupa- 
tional therapy) of Shelley, Idaho, has a 
private practice serving all ages and 
various diagnoses as a consultant for 
four nursing homes, nine school dis- 
tricts, three developmental centers, 
and a psychiatric hospital. She has set 
up equestrian and aquatic programs 
for the handicapped. 



1975 



Darrell Gary Griffin (M.D.) of Pen- 
sacola, Florida, has received a Master 
of Public Health degree from the Uni- 
versity of Alabama. 

Curtis H. Smith (B.S. pharmacy) and 
Marilyn Bowles Smith announce the 
birth of Marshall Riess Smith, June 15, 
1987. Mr. Smith is pharmacy director 
at Rappahannock General Hospital. 



1976 



Ronald C. Abernathy (B.S. pharmacy) 
of Stony Creek received the 1987 A.H. 
Robins Bowl of Hygeia at the Virginia 
Pharmaceutical Association meeting. 

Kyle L. Coble (D.D.S.) and spouse will 
be relocating in Fredericksburg. 

Janie Fuller (B.S. medical technology, 
D.D.S. '82) has completed public health 
service assignments in Florida, Missis- 
sippi, and Arizona and is working in a 
pedo/ortho practice on Florida's west 
coast. 



Dale Grubb Jones (B.S. nursing) of 
Norristown, Pennsylvania, has been 
promoted to eastern regional sales 
manager for Calcitek, Inc. 

Linda Rowe (B.S. occupational ther- 
apy) received her M.A. in developmen- 
tal disabilities from NYU in 1984. She 
has a private practice in pediatrics and 
has begun two businesses in NYC — 
the Therapists Resource Center fabri- 
cates equipment and sells therapy 
supplies, and the Well Equipped 
designs low-cost equipment for the 
handicapped. 



1977 

Sharon Brown Browning (B.S. radio- 
logic technology) and Logan Browning 
were married July 11, 1987. She is a 
surgical/portable technician at Martha 
Jefferson Hospital in Charlottesville. 

Shelley Flippen Conroy (B.S. nursing, 
M.S. nursing '84) and Richard Joseph 
Conroy III announce the birth of R. J. 
Conroy IV on April 16, 1987. They live 
in Kissimmee, Florida, with a daugh- 
ter, Jennifer. Mrs. Conroy is director 
of staff development at Park Place 
Hospital. 



1978 



Brenda Davis Frank (B.S. nursing) and 
Donald J. Frank announce the birth of 
Timothy Joseph on January 13, 1987. 
Mrs. Frank received her M.S. from 
Wayne State University and is a pedi- 
atric clinical nurse specialist at St. 
Joseph's Medical Center, South Bend, 
Indiana. 



1979 



Wanda Walker Terry (B.S. nursing) 
and husband, Cedric Terry, live in 
Tacoma, Washington. She is working 
as a psychiatric nurse. 



1980 



Robert V. Crowder III (M.H.A.), vice- 
president of operations at Virginia 
Baptist Hospital, has been appointed 
by the governor to a state task force 
on emergency medical response disas- 
ter planning. He and his wife live in 
Lynchburg. 



A. Isabel Garcia (D.D.S.) has begun a 
master's in public health program at 
the School of Public Health at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan at Ann Arbor. 

Denise Kinnish McCue (B.S. occupa- 
tional therapy) married George McCue 
in Norfolk on October 16, 1985. 

Bernardine C. Henderson Patten (B.S. 
nursing) has received her M.S. from 
the University of Delaware and is 
nurse educator with the HMO of Del- 
aware, Inc. 

Richard F. Rhodemyre III (D.D.S.) has 
opened a private practice in Richmond, 
where he and his spouse are working 
together. 

Brian A. Torre (M.D.) and wife Elea- 
nor Talley Torre (B.S. pharmacy '78) 
and two sons reside in Roanoke. Dr. 
Torre completed his orthopaedic 
surgery residency in Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina, and hand surgery fel- 
lowship at the University of Rochester, 
New York and is now practicing at 
Roanoke's Lewis-Gale Clinic. 



1981 

Suzanne Lee Foster Chabon (B.S. 
nursing) and husband, Stephen, reside 
in Summerfield, North Carolina. She 
received her M.S.N, from UNC at 
Chapel Hill and is working as nurse 
practitioner in a family practice office 
in Greensboro, North Carolina. 

Stanley F. Kayes (D.D.S) and wife, 
Maureen, of Haymarket announce the 
arrival of Rebecca on June 5, 1987. 

R. Ann Wildblood (M.S. nursing) is a 
nurse discharge planner for pediatrics 
at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medi- 
cal Center and is an instructor at Rush 
University in Chicago, Illinois. Pub- 
lished in the January 1987 issue of 
Pediatric Nursing is her "The How-To's 
of Home IV Therapy." 



1983 



1982 



Michael M. Hayter (B.S. pharmacy) 
and Susan Kling Hayter (B.S. physical 
therapy '83) of Falls Church announce 
the birth of Karl Harrison on June 25, 
1987. 

Debra P. Shockey (B.S. nursing) and 
Donald W. Shockey announce the 
birth of Matthew Ryan on April 10, 
1987. They have an older daughter 
and son. 



Linda Bird-Harden (M.S. gerontology) 
has been named executive secretary of 
the Virginia State Conference of the 
NAACP. 

Cathy Fox (B.S. occupational therapy) 
is employed at the Kennedy Institute 
on the Pediatric Rehabilitation Unit 
and consults weekly with the neuro- 
muscular clinic at Johns Hopkins Hos- 
pital. She is involved in the develop- 
ment of a swallowing program and 
appropriate treatment and is working 
towards her master's degree at Johns 
Hopkins. 

Dorie Leinaweaver Hanes (B.S. nurs- 
ing) married Billy W. Hanes, Jr., Sep- 
tember 26, 1987. She is employed in 
the children's unit at Brynn Marr Hos- 
pital, Jacksonville, North Carolina. 

Scott D. McPhee (B.S. occupational 
therapy) is attending the U.S. Army 
Command and General Staff College 
at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He and 
his wife and two daughters are moving 
to Houston where he will begin a doc- 
torate in public health at Texas Health 
Science Center. 

Nancy LeCompte Radtke (M.D.) has 
begun a fellowship in cardiology at the 
Indiana University Medical Center in 
Indianapolis. 

Robert Christopher Stout (M.D.) has 
completed a residency in pediatrics and 
is a senior resident in emergency medi- 
cine at East Carolina University. 

Laura Elliott Taylor (B.S. medical 
technology) and Michael P. Taylor 

(M.D. '78) were married June 27, 1987. 
They live in Richmond where Dr. Tay- 
lor is associated with the McGuire 
Clinic Department of Family Practice. 

W. Randy Wampler (B.S. pharmacy) 
received the 1987 Young Pharmacist of 
the Year Award at the Virginia Phar- 
maceutical Association meeting. 



1984 

David Alan Compton (M.D.) com- 
pleted an occupational medical resi- 
dency in June and is serving as chief of 
preventive medicine at Fort McClellan, 
Alabama. Dr. Compton and his wife, 
Debra Mercer Compton, have a son, 
William Alan, and a daughter, Anne 
Blythe. 



Mitchell L. Friedman (D.D.S.) has 
opened a private general practice in 
Tinton Falls, New Jersey. 

Theresa Ewell Morris (B.S. nursing) 
and Paul M. Morris were married June 
14, 1986. She works in the cardiovas- 
cular laboratory of Georgia Baptist 
Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia, and he 
works for AT&T. 



1985 

Hilda Alvarez Bass (B.S. dental 
hygiene) and Steven J. Bass (B.S. 
pharmacy '84) were married Sep- 
tember 26, 1987, and reside in Roa- 
noke Rapids, North Carolina. 

Billy W. Hanes, Jr., (D.D.S.) married 
Dorie Leinaweaver (B.S. nursing '83), 
September 26, 1987. He is serving in 
the U.S.N. 2nd Dental Battalion at 
Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. 

Barbara Bentley Light (M.S. nursing) 
is currently working on her Ph.D. in 
urban services leadership with a minor 
in nursing at VCU. 

Gayle Powers Park (B.S. nursing) and 
Douglas John Park were married July 
19, 1987. She is working as a rehabili- 
tation nurse at Sheltering Arms Reha- 
bilitation Hospital in Richmond. 



1986 



Jeannie Boucher (M.S. physical ther- 
apy) of Winterville, North Carolina, is 
an assistant professor at East Carolina 
University where she teaches courses 
in pediatric physical therapy and 
rehabilitation. 

Julie A. Baker Gilkey (B.S. nursing) 
and Andrew F. Gilkey were married 
June 20, 1987, and are stationed at 
Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas. Donna Mat- 
thews (B.S. nursing) was maid of 
honor. 



Lest We Forget 



1916 

James L. Hamner (M.D.) died August 
4, 1987. He served Amelia, Dinwid- 
die, and Nottoway Counties in Virgin- 
ia. He was named General Practi- 
tioner of the Year by the Medical 
Society of Virginia in 1952 and in 
1965 was presented the D. S. Free- 
man Award by the Virginia Tubercu- 
losis and Respiratory Association. Dr. 
Hamner served as executive secre- 
tary of the Amelia County Board of 
Health for 25 years. 

1917 

Frank Churchill Hodges (M.D.) of 
Huntington, West Virginia, died June 
12, 1987. He had served in the De- 
partment of Pathology in Base Hospi- 
tal No. 94 in France in World War I 
and was a well-known pathologist in 
West Virginia and Ohio. 

Basil B. Jones (M.D.) died July 13, 
1987. He was an associate professor 
of physiology and pharmacology, 
1919-1920, and taught pediatrics, 
1924-1925. He was one of the first 
directors of the Memorial Guidance 
Clinic and practiced pediatrics in 
Richmond from 1920 until his 
retirement. 



1918 

Merwin Randolph Bouldin (B.S. 
nursing) of Roanoke died March 7, 
1987. 



1919 

R. T. Morrissette (B.S. pharmacy) 
died July 4, 1987. A retired pharma- 
cist, Mr. Morrissette was on the 
MCV Honor Council and served as 
captain of the first official baseball 
team of MCV. 



1922 



Tillie Lyons Weinstein (D.D.S.), sis- 
ter of Harry Lyons (D.D.S. '23), died 
in Eugene, Oregon, on August 17, 
1987. She was one of the first three 
women admitted to the School of 



Dentistry. Dr. Weinstein had main- 
tained a private practice for ten years 
combined with public school work 
and continued in the dual role of 
housewife and part-time practitioner 
while raising a family. 



1925 

Joseph Cohn Passamaneck (B.S. 
pharmacy) died July 10, 1987. He 
worked at several local pharmacies 
and owned William Fox Pharmacy 
until he sold it in 1961. Subsequently 
he worked at other drug stores. 



1943 



1926 



Virginia Fix Coghill (B.S. nursing) of 
Richmond died August 24, 1987. Her 
daughter, Jean Coghill Patterson; 
son-in-law, James Patterson; grand- 
son, John Patterson; and grand- 
daughter-in-law, Lynette Patterson; 
are all MCV alumni. 



1932 



George D. Vermilya (M.D.) died 
August 15, 1987. Dr. Vermilya was 
chief of surgery with the Clinch Val- 
ley Clinic Hospital in Richlands and 
maintained a general practice there 
for 46 years. He served in World War 
II as a U.S. surgeon with the rank of 
lieutenant colonel. 



1934 



John W. Whitlock (M.D), a Beckley, 
West Virginia general practitioner, 
died June 9, 1987. A veteran of World 
War II, he returned to the area where 
he grew up and practiced there until 
his retirement in 1985. 



1941 



Melvin Gillette Baynard (M.D.) died 
May 15, 1987. A family practitioner 
and surgeon, he served the residents 
in Virginia's southside counties. Dur- 
ing World War II he served in central 
Europe. 



Maston Lewis Gray (M.D., Dec.) of 
Jacksonville, Texas, died July 11, 
1987. A retired pediatrician, he had 
practiced for 38 years. Dr. Gray 
served in the South Pacific in World 
War II and later was called back into 
the U.S. Air Force to serve in Eng- 
land and Germany. 



1946 



Wyson Curry, Jr. (M.D ) of Montgo- 
mery, West Virginia, died August 10, 
1987. 



1949 



Ralph E. Haynes (M.D.) of Freeman, 
West Virginia, died June 18, 1987. 
For several years he had a children's 
clinic in Bluefield, West Virginia. He 
was employed by Ohio State Univer- 
sity from 1966-1978 and then by 
Wright State University in Dayton, 
Ohio, from 1978-1982. Subsequently 
he returned to West Virginia as a 
pediatrician. 

John Walter Martin, Jr., (B.S. phar- 
macy) of Harrisonburg, died August 
19, 1987. He received a Ph.D. in 
pharmaceutical chemistry from the 
University of North Carolina in 1952 
and served until 1961 as professor of 
pharmaceutical chemistry at Butler 
University in Indianapolis. Dr. Mar- 
tin did postdoctoral work at the Uni- 
versity of London, England, and was 
a Fulbright lecturer at the University 
of Cairo, Egypt, in 1965-1966. Until 
his retirement in 1985, he was pro- 
fessor of chemistry at Bridgewater 
College. 



1953 



Fay Ishmael Carr, Jr. (B.S. pharmacy, 
M.D. '60) died July 17, 1987. Dr. 
Carr, a radiologist, had served in 
1971 as president of the medical staff 
of Maryview Hospital in Portsmouth. 

Mattie Young Morgan Lacy (M.D.) of 
Charleston, West Virginia, died 
August 12, 1987. 



31 



1955 



1962 



1970 



Arlie Harold Westfall (M.D.) died 
May 22, 1987. He practiced obstet- 
rics/gynecology for 21 years in Lum- 
berton, North Carolina, and was 
serving as chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Surgery at Southeastern 
General Hospital. Dr. Westfall had 
served in the U.S. Army. 

1956 

Merle H. Pindell (Ph.D.) of Sunapee, 
New Hampshire, died March 19, 
1986. Dr. Pindell was director of 
pharmacologic research at Bristol 
Laboratories, Inc., and the president 
of Panlabs, Inc., a company which he 
founded. 



1959 

Esther L. Kue (B.S. pharmacy) died 
July 2, 1987. A native of Norfolk, she 
worked for Peoples Drug Stores. 



Ida May Hogshead Steele (M.D.) of 
Nitro, West Virginia, was killed in an 
automobile accident on June 10, 1987. 
She was a physician with the West 
Virginia Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation Institute and also the 
West Virginia Department of Human 
Services. Dr. Steele had taught at 
Southern Methodist University for 
eight years. 

1963 

Cynthia DeLong Doctoroff (B.S. 
nursing) of Lancaster, Massachu- 
setts, died December 10, 1986. She 
had received her master's in psychiat- 
ric nursing from Boston University in 
1965 and her master's in library 
science from Simmons College in 
1983. She had served as assistant 
professor at Boston College from 
1967 to 1982 and was head librarian 
at Massachusetts Mental Health 
Center from 1984 to 1986. She had 
served as trustee of the Lancaster 
Library, North Middlesex Mental 
Health Board, and was a director of 
Friends of the Lancaster Library. 



Jo Rosier Erwin (B.S. physical ther- 
apy) of Roanoke died June 16, 1987. 

1972-1976 

Resident in Medicine 

Robert J. Baran ('72-'76, resident in 
medicine) of Oakridge, New Jersey, 
was killed in a car accident on Febru- 
ary 3, 1987, according to his wife, M. 
Patricia Baran, M.D. 



1978 

John Edward Patterson III (D.D.S.) 
of Blackstone died August 16, 1987. 
He is survived by his wife, Debra, 
and three sons. 



What's New with You? 



The Scarab welcomes updates on marriages, family additions, job changes, relocations, promotions — whatever you think is 
newsworthy. Help us keep track of you by filling out this form and returning it. Recent newspaper clippings and photographs 
also are appreciated. Please send updated information to 
MCV Alumni Association of VCU, Box 156, Richmond, VA 23298-0156. 



Name 
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(Indicate if currently attending MCV/VCU) 



Addr 



NEWS ITEMS 



32 






Collector's Items 



Chairs with seal 

The supplier will ship one directly to you for $175 

plus freight and applicable tax. (Because the Alumni 

Office is being relocated, it can no longer serve as the 

shipping address for chairs for subsequent pickup by 

purchasers.) 

Black lacquer captain's chair 

Black lacquer captain's chair with cherry 

arms 

Black lacquer Boston rocker 

Black lacquer side chair 

Massachusetts supplier will ship no less than 12 at a 
time. The alumni office accumulates orders of 12 or 
more to be shipped to the alumni office and picked 
up by you. 

Black enamel captain's chair 

Black enamel captain's chair with cherry arms 

Black enamel captain's chair with maple arms 

Dark pine stain captain's chair 

Dark pine stain Boston rocker 

Pictures — price includes postage. 

Alumni House (color) $15 plus applicable tax 

MCV Campus (black and white) 

$4.50 plus applicable tax 

Books — price includes postage. 

As 1 Remember, by Dr. W. T. Sanger 

$10 plus applicable tax 

Bright finished pewter with MCV Campus seal 
engraved. Free of lead hazard and safe for eating 
and drinking purposes. All orders add $2.50 per cup 
for postage and handling. 

Jefferson cup, 8 oz., $14 

Virginia cup, 12 oz., $21.50 

Virginia cup, 8 oz., $18 

Virginia cup, 2 oz., $12.50 

Virginia tankard, 14 oz., $32 

Additional 4.5 percent sales tax on all items 
delivered in Virginia. 

All prices subject to change without notice. 
Allow 10-12 weeks for chair shipments. 
Allow three weeks for pewter shipments. 

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Address 
City 



State 



Zip 



Shipping address 

Telephone ( ) 



Send orders to MCV Alumni Association of VCU, 
Box 156, Richmond, VA 23298-0156. 



Scarab 

MCV Alumni Association of VCU 

Box 156 

Richmond, VA 23298-0156 

Address Correction Requested 



Nonprofit Organization 

U.S. Postage 

PAID 

Permit No. 761 

Richmond, Virginia 



ion 




1987 Calendar 

Medical College of Virginia Alumni Association 
of Virginia Commonwealth University 



WINTERFESTIVAL 

February 19, 20, 1988 
MCV and Academic Campuses 






DENTAL HOMECOMING 

April 8, 9, 1988 
Richmond Marriott Hotel 



REUNION '88 

April 8, 9, 1988 
Richmond Omni Hotel 

For information about scheduled events, please call (804) 780-0434.