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Full text of "The Scarlet letter: Annual publication of the Greek letter fraternities [of ..."

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ciMti^tf-^ tC 






Tie Scarlet Letter I 



Rutgers College 



(^ •'::.»»#'•- 



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Tiffany & Co. 



Jewelry, WATCHES, rings, fobs, emblem 

PINS, TROPHIES. SILVER CUPS, NOTE PAPERS 
WITH MONOGRAMS IN COLOR. INVITATIONS TO 
COMMENCEMENT AND CIASS-DAY EXERCISES 
MENUS, AND DIES FOR STAMPING CORPORATE 
AND FRATERNITY SEALS 

Purchases can be made of Tiffany & Co 

EITHER IN PERSON OR BY MAIL 

Fifth Avenue & 37™ Street 
New York 



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Rutgers College 



EXAMINATIONS FOR ADMISSION: 

Friday and Saturday, June 14 and 15, 1912 
Monday to Wednesday, September 16 to 18, 1912 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

The College offers courses leading to the degrees of A.B., 
Litt.B., and B.Sc. Under the last are included a general science 
course, and technical science courses in Civil Engineering, 
Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Chemistry, 
Ceramics, Agriculture, and Biology. The A.B., the Litt.B., 
and the general science courses permit large freedom in the 
choice of electives and provide liberal preparatory training 
for the professions of law, medicine, theology, teaching, and 
journalism. The technical science courses are designed to pre- 
pare for industrial positions of leadership, except the course 
in Biology, which aims to give a liberal training in the sciences, 
and is especially appropriate as a preliminary to the study of 
medicine. Short courses, not leading to a degree, are offered 
in Ceramics and in Agriculture. 



For catalogue or for any information, address 
IRVING 5. UPSON, Registrar 



W. H. S. DEMAREST 
President 



IL 



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O'NEILL'S 



97»CHURCH STREET 
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 



THE COLLEGE STORE 



Sole Agent for 

Custom Made Clothes 

Suits to order 
$16.50 to $40.00 

We fit your suit in the making, and 
guarantee perfect fit. Large selection 
to choose from. Try one of our 

Full Dress Suits 
at $32.00 



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h^—^B^^ai^^k^^^MM 



^UAa^Bl^kllBi^^^BiriM^^^^Alfc 



El^t ^tntkt m^tt^r 




ANNUAL YEAR BOOK OF 

RUTGERS 

PUBLISHED by the CLASS of 1913 



NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 
MAY, 1912 



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COURIER-NEWS PUBLISHING CO., 

PLAINFIELD, N. J. 

1912 



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^ 783755 



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^marli Sumett IBooriitta 
1056-1911 

The services rendered by Edward Burnett Voorhees to 
agricultural science entitle him to a place among the leaders 
of men of his generation. Within a period of less than fifty- 
five years, he placed to his credit a splendid record of achieve- 
ment. As it pointed out by Doctor E. W. Allen, of the 
United States Department of Agriculture, Doctor Voorhees 
"was a type of this present generation of leaders. In a sense 
he was a link between the old and the new regime, for he was 
trained under the pioneers, and his most notable work was 
done since the experiment station movement became a national 
one. He represented in a characteristic way the vigor and 
aggressiveness of the new generation in organizing and pro- 
pagating experiment station work, and in making its results 
felt by the farmers. He shared generously in the confidence 
and appreciation which have come of such effort, and in the 
demand for leadership which this agricultural awakening has 
brought. He was a product of his times, the embodiment of 
a new idea." 



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FOREWORD. 

College-mates at Rutgers: the Scarlet Letter this year is 
an innovation. The Junior Class has taken upon itself the 
pleasant burden of its publication and has worked hard to 
make the book a success. We now place it in your hands, 
awaiting your commendation or praise. We have done our 
part, the rest lies with you. 

The Faculty of Rutgers: The present Scarlet Letter is 
meant to be symbolic of the new spirit around college. We 
have tried to make the book representative of the best that is 
in our collegiate life; we have eliminated all objectionable per- 
sonalities and have given every student and professor a 
**square deal." 

The book this year is a new venture. If its publication 
will add one measure in praise for old Rutgers the Scarlet 
Letter of the Class of 1913 has attained success. This is the 
goal toward which we have been striving. May our annual 
this year be symbolic of the increased prosperity of our college. 



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COLLEGE 

Read at the Charter Day Alumni Dinner 
by Prof. Louis Bevier ^78. 

A college is a group of halls, 

Dotting a campus here and there, 
With rooms rectangular and bare, 

And gracious ivy-mantled walls. 

A college is a crowd of boys, 
Of ardent spirits still untaught, 
Whose half-formed purposes are 
fraught 

With endless griefs and endless joys. 

A college is a band of men. 

Of vision clear, in love with truth. 
Ripe manhood leading eager youth 

To fields of thought beyond their ken. 

A college is a life-long mood 
Of love and loyalty and hope, 
A subtle spell of boundless scope 

To form a royal brotherhood. 

A college is a holy shrine, 

Beneath whose central cellars dome 
Is found a consecrated home 

For what in man is most divine. 



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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



EX OFFICIO 

His Excellency Woodrow Wilson, ph.d Trenton 

Governor of the State of Ne*w Jersey 

Hon. William S. Gummere, ll.d Newark 

Chief Justice of the State of Ne<w Jersey 

Hon. Edmund Wilson, a.m Trenton 

Attorney-General of the State of Ne<iv Jersey 

BY ELECTION 
Name Address Dale of 

Rev. Wm. H. S. Demarest, d.d., ll.d New Brunswick Mar. 

President of the College 

David Bingham, esq East Orange Mar. 

Tunis G. Bergen, PH.D Brooklyn, N. Y. Jun. 

Frederick Frelinghuysen, a.m Newark Jun. 

James Neilson, a.m., ll.b New Brunswick Jun. 

Rev. Edward B. Coe, d.d., ll.d New York, N. Y Oct. 

Rev. James LeFevre, d.d Somervillc Jun. 

Frederick J. Collier, a.m Hudson, N. Y Jun. 

Paul Cook, a.m Troy, N. Y Jun. 

Hon. Garret D. W. Vroom, ll.d Trenton, Jun. 

J. Bayard Kirkpatrick, a.m New Brunswick Jun. 

William H. Leupp, a.m New Brunswick Jun. 

Rev. J. Preston Searle, d.d New Brunswick Jun. 

John W. Herbert, jr., m.sc, ll.b Helmetta Jun. 

Hon. William H. Vredenburgh, ll.d Freehold Mar. 

Hon. Foster M. Voorhees, ll.d Elizabeth Oct. 

Wm. H. Van Sternbergh, a.m., ll.b New York, N. Y Jun. 

Hon. Alphonso T. Clearwater, ll.d Kingston, N. Y Jan. 

Howard N. Fuller, a.m Albany, N. Y Jan. 

L. Laflin Kellogg, ll.d New York, N. Y Jan. 

Rev. Joseph R. Duryee, d.d New York, N. Y Mar. 

Phillip M. Brett, a.b., ll.b New York, N. Y Jan. 

Charles L. Edgar, e.e Boston, Mass Oct. 

W. Edwin Florance, a.m New Brunswick Oct. 

Rev. Livingston L. Taylor, a.m Canandaigua, N. Y Sep. 

Drury W. Cooper, a.b., ll.b New Brunswick Oct. 

Hon. Willard P. Voorhees, a.m., ll.d New Brunswick Jun. 

Rev. William I. Chamberlain, ph.d New Brunswick Oct. 

Leonor F. Loree, M.SC., c.e New York, N. Y Oct, 

Duncan D. Sutphen, a.b New York, N. Y Oct. 

tS. Oakley Vander Poel, m.d New York, N. Y Oct. 

♦John Neilson Carpender, a.m New Brunswick Jan. 

Anthony Dey, a.m New York, N. Y Jun. 

Rev. Henry Evertson Cobb, d.d New York, N. Y Oct. 



tu 


'ctton 


7 


1882 


7 


1881 


19 


1883 


16 


1885 


22 


1886 


25 


1887 


16 


1888 


16, 


1891 


16 


1891 


21 


1892 


21 


1892 


18 


1895 


21 


1898 


19 


1901 


4 


1902 


28 


1902 


17 


1903 


14 


1904 


12 


1905 


12 


1905 


7 


1905 


11 


1906 


12 


1906 


12 


1906 


20 


1907 


9 


1908 


23 


1909 


8 


1909 


8 


1909 


8 


1909 


14 


1910 


10 


1911 


21 


1911 


13 


1911 



♦Died November 21, 1911. 
tDied April, 1912. 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 
Rev. J. Preston Searle, d.d Ne<w Brunswick 

Secretary of the Board 
Irving S. Upson, a.m Ne<w Brunswick 

Treasurer of the Board 



STATED MEETINGS OF THE BOARD 
Second Friday Id October, second Tuesday in January, and second Friday in April at 
2 p. m.; commencement day at 10:30 a. m. 

9 



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BOARD OF VISITORS OF STATE COLLEGE 

LFIRST CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

Ephraim T. Gili HaddonHeld 

Alexander P. Owen Mickleton 

SECOND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

William T. Baggs Beverly 

Frank E. Bate Fishing Creek 

THIRD congressional DISTRICT 

I> AVID D. Denise Freehold 

James Neilson New Brunswick 

FOURTH congressional DISTRICT 

Philip Todd Peapack 

William V. McGallard Trenton 

FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

NicoDEMUS Warne Broadwav 

Joseph D. Budd Chester 

SIXTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

Arthur Lozier Ridgewood 

Henry Marelli Paterson 

seventh congressional DISTRICT 

George E. De Camp Roseland 

George M. Canfield Caldwell 

EIGHTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

(iEorge Oorer East Orange 

John F. McDonough South Orange 

NINTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT 

James McCarthy Jersey City 

John R. Hartung Jersey City 

TENTH congressional DISTRICT 

Daniel Cole Jersey City 

Henry A. Gamb Hobokcn 

David D. Denise, President 

Irving S. Upson, Secretary and Treasurer 

10 



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The President The Dean 



WILLIAM H. S. DEMAREST, President Seminary Place 

A*, 4>BK 

A. B. Rutgers 1880. Teacher in Rutgers Preparatory School 1886. M. A. Rutgers 
1885. New Brunswick Theological Seminary 1888. Pastor of Reformed Church at 
Walden, x\. Y., 1888-1896. Pastor of Reformed Church at Catskill, N. Y., 1897-1901. 
Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Church Government, New Brunswick Theo- 
logical Seminary 1901-1905. D. D. Rutgers 1901. Acting President 1905-1906. 
President 1906. — Huguenot Society of America, Holland Society. 

FRANCIS CUYLER VAN DYCK, Dean Highland Park 

AKE, *BK 

A. B. Rutgers 1865. Assistant in Chemistry, Rutgers, 1865-1866. Tutor 1865-1869. 
Travel and study in Europe 1869-1870. Professor of Analytical Chemistry Rutgers 
1870-1878. Professor of Chemistry, Rutgers, 1878-1880. Professor of Physics and 
Inorganic Chemistry 1880-1882. Professor of Physics and Experimental Mechanics 

1882 . Dean of College 1901 . A. M. Rutgers 1868, Ph.D. Union 1888. U. S. 

Commissioner to National Conference of Electricians, Philadelphia, 1884. 

CHARLES EDWARD HART 33 Livingston Avenue 

*BK 

A. B. College of New Jersey 1858. A.M. College of New Jersey 1861. Princeton 
Theological Seminary 1861. Clergyman of the Reform Church 1861-1880. B. D. 
Rutgers 1880. Professor of English Language and Literature, Rutgers, 1880- 
1897. Professor of Ethics and Evidences of Christianity and English Bible 1897-1903. 
Professor of Ethics and Evidences of Christianity 1903-1907. Professor Emeritus 

1907 . 

12 



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AUSTIN SCOTT 24 Livingston Avenue 

^I'T, <I»BK 

A. B. Yale 1869. M. A. University of Michigan 1870. Universities of Leipsic and 
Berlin 1870-1873. Ph.D. University of Berlin 1873. Private Secretary to George 
Bancroft, the historian, 1872-1873. Instructor in German, University of Michigan, 
1873-1875. Assistant to George Bancroft in his History of the U. S. Constitution 1875- 
1882. Associate Professor of History, Johns Hopkins, 1875-1881. Voorhees Professor of 
History and Constitutional Law, Rutgers, 1883-1890. President of Rutgers 1891-1906. 
Voorhees Professor of History and Political Science, 1906 . 



LOUIS BEVIER Bishop Place 

*BK 

A. B. Rutgers 1878. A.M. 1881. Ph.D. Johns Hopkins 1881. Universities of Leipsic, 
and Bonn 1881-1882. Traveled in Italy, Greece, France, 1882-1883. American School 
Classical Studies, Athens, 1883. Litt. D., Rutgers, 1908. Instructor French, Rutgers, 
1883-1885. Adj. Professor Modern Languages 1885-1890. Acting Professor Latin 
1887-1889. Professor Greek Language and Literature 1893 . Lecturer on Lit- 
erary and Educational Subjects, New Jersey State Board Education, 1901-1904. State 
Inspector High Schools 1904-1909. State Council Education of New Jersey. Am. 
Phil. Assn. Modern Language Assn. Am. Author French Grammar. Brief Greek 
Syntax, Numerous monographs and contributor to periodicals. 



ALFRED ALEXANDER TITSWORTH 590 George Street 

AKE,*BK 

B. Sc, Rutgers, 1877. M. Sc, Rutgers, 1880. C. E., Rutgers, 1880. D. Sc, Rutgers, 
1907. Professor of Graphics and Mathematics, Rutgers, 1886-1903. Professor Civil 
Engineering and Graphics, Rutgers, 1903 . Society for the Promotion of Engi- 
neering Education. Author Elements of Mechanical Dra<wing. 



JULIUS NELSON Adelaide Avenue 

*BK 

B. Sc, University of Wisconsin, 1881. M. Sc, University of Wisconsin, 1883. Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins, 1888. Summer School Work at Beaufort, N. C, 1884-1887. Travel 
and study in Bahama Islands, 1887. Biologist of State Experiment Station, 1888. 
Professor of Biology 1888. — Special work in State Oyster Beds. Author of various 
papers on Biological subjects. 



BYRON DAVID HALSTED 121 Livingston Avenue 

4>BK 

B. Sc. Michigan 1871. M. Sc Michigan 1874. D. Sc. Harvard 1878. Editor 
"American Agriculturalist" 1879-1885. Professor of Botany, Iowa State College, 

1885-1889. Professor of Botany, Rutgers, 1889 . Fellow Am. Assn. Advancement 

of Science. American Society of Naturalists. American Botanical Society (Pres. 
1901). American Society of Plant Morphology and Physiology. Society for Promo- 
tion of Agricultural Science (Pres. 1899-1900). Author of "Diseases of Plants," and 
various other botanical publications, articles, etc. 

13 



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►JOHN BERNHARD SMITH 157 College Avenue 

Entered New York Bar 1879. Special Agent Entomological Division of U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture 1884. Assistant Curator of U. S. National Museum 1886. Pro- 
fessor of Entomology, Rutgers, 1889 . D. Sc. Rutgers 1891. State Entomologist 

1898 . Fellow A.A.A.S. Author of Economic Entomology for the Farm and Fruit 

Growers for Use as a Text Book in Agricultural Schools and Colleges 1896. Author 
of several hundred articles in government and technical publications. 



JOHN CHARLES VAN DYKE Seminary Place 

*BK 

L. H. D. Rutgers 1889. Admitted to New York Bar 1877. Librarian Sage Library 

1878 , Extensive travel and study in Europe. Professor of History of Art, Rutgers, 

1889 . Lecturer Columbia, Harvard and Princeton. University Club, Century 

Club, Authors Club. Author of History of American Art, Serious Art in America, 
Art for Arfs Sake, Modern French Masters, Nature for Its 0<wn Sake, The Desert, 
Italian Painting^ The Opal Sea, The Ne<w Ne<w York, etc. State Commissioner of 
Education. 



ROBERT WOODWORTH PRENTISS 7 Grant Avenue 

AT, *BK 

B. Sc. Rutgers 1878. M. Sc. Rutgers 1881. Fellow in Johns Hopkins University 
1879-1881. Assistant in Nautical Almanac Office 1881-1891. Professor of Physics 
Copeland Scientific Schoool, Washington, D. C, 1888-1891. Associate Professor in 
Mathematics and Astronomy 1891-1892. Professor Mathematics and Astronomy 

Rutgers 1892 . Chief Examiner in Mathematics on College Entrance Examination 

Board 1907-1911. Fellow A. A. A. S. 



ELIOT ROBERTSON PAYSON The Bayard 

AT 

A. B. Hamilton 1859. Teacher at Homer, N. Y., Petersborough and Utica, N. Y. 
M. A. Hamilton 1872. Study in Classical Philology at Leipsic and Berlin. Principal 
Binghamton H. S. Head Master Rutgers Prep. School 1891-1908. Professor of 
History and Art of Teaching, Rutgers, 1893-1908. Professor of History of Teaching 
1908 . Associate Professor German Language 1908 . Head Masters' Asso- 
ciation. Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of Middle States and 
Maryland. N. Y. State Teachers' Association. N. Y. A. of Academic Teachers. 
School Masters' Association of New York City and Vicinity. 



WILLIAM HAMILTON KIRK 35 Mine Street 

Ben,*BK 

Early Education German Gymnasium. Johns Hopkins 1893. Ph.D. Johns Hopkins 
1895. Professor of Latin, Vanderbilt, 1895-1900. Professor of Latin Language and 
Literature, Rutgers, 1900 . American Philological Association. Classical Asso- 
ciation of Atlantic States. Contributor of articles to various Philological journals. 

•pied March 12, 1912. 

14 



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JOSEPH VOLNEY LEWIS 4 Union Street 

B. E. University of North Carolina 1891. S. B. Harvard 1893. Special study Johns 
Hopkins and Columbia 1893-1899. Assistant in Biology University of North Carolina 
1889-1890. Professor of Geology, Clemson College, 1896-1904. Professor of Geology 

and Mineralogy, Rutgers, 1904 . Field Assistant in U.S. Geological Survey 1891- 

1902. Geologist North Carolina Geological Survey 1891-1896. Geologist of Geolo- 
gical Survey of New Jersey 1905 . Member of firm of Washington & Lewis, 

Mining Geologists, N. Y. Fellow A. A. A. S. Geological Society of America. Ameri- 
can Association of Mining Engineers. Mining and Metallurgical Society of America. 
Author of various reports and scientific papers. 



EDWIN BELL DAVIS 145 College Avenue 

AKE, <I»BK 

B. L. Dartmouth 1889. Instructor in Mathematics New Brunswick High School 1889- 
1890. Instructor of Mathematics and Languages Salt Lake City Academy 1891. In- 
structor in Languages in New Hampshire State Schools 1892-1895. Studied at 

Sorbonne School, Paris, 1895. Professor of Romance Languages, Rutgers, 1896 . 

Author of papers in various magazines, especially "The Nation." 



IRVING STRONG UPSON 64 College Avenue 

AT, 4»BK 

A. B. Rutgers 1881. A.M. Rutgers 1884. Librarian Rutgers 1884-1906. Registrar and 

Treasurer of Rutgers College 1906 . Chief Clerk, Secretary and Treasurer of 

New Jersey State Agricultural Experiment Station 1891 . Clerk Geological Survey 

of N. J. 1881-1890. 



WALTER RUSSELL NEWTON 39 College Avenue 

A^I', 4>BK 

A. B. University of Vermont 1881. Teacher in Berry Academy Vermont 1881-1882. 
Teacher at Union High School, Keaseville, N. Y., 1882-1883. Study at Union Theo- 
logical Seminary 1884-1885. Instructor in Latin, Rutgers Preparatory School, 1885- 
1891. Instructor in German, Phillips, Andover, Mass., 1891-1905. Professor of 

German Language and Literature, Rutgers College, 1905 . Ph. D. Syracuse 1899. 

Study and travel in Germany 1891, 1900, 1905. 



GEORGE HUBBARD PAYSON 41 Mine Street 

AT, *BK 

A. B. Hamilton 1873. D. D. Hamilton 1902. Instructor in free schools. Homer, N. Y., 
1873-1875. Union Theological Seminary 1878. Pastor of Presbyterian Churches at 
Roslyn, Elmhurst, Rahway, N. J.^ 1880-1904. Pastor of Reform Church, Paterson, 

1905-1908. Professor of Ethics and Evidences of Christianity, Rutgers, 1908 , 

15 



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RALPH GARRIGUE WRIGHT 21 Huntington Street 

22;, *BK 

B. S. Columbia 1899. Reporter for the St. Louis Star 1895-1897. Federal Polytechnic, 
Zurich, Switzerland, 1899-1900. M. A., Ph. D., University Basle, 1903. Mosanto 
Chemical Works 1903. Assistant in Chemistry, Columbia, 1904. Professor of Chem- 
istry, Washington and Jefferson, 1905-1907. Professor of Chemistry, Rutgers, 
1907 . American Chemical Society, Deutsche Chemische Gesellschaft. 



ROBERT C. H. HECK 35 College Avenue 

*BK, TBII 
M. E. Lehigh 1893. Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, Lehigh, 1893-1903. Asst. 
Professor Mechanical Engineering, Lehigh, 1903-1907. Professor of Experimental 

Eng. Lehigh, 1907-1908. Professor Mechanical Engineering, Rutgers, 1908 . 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Author Steam Engines and other Steam 
Motors, 2 Vol. Notes on Elementary Kinematics, Notes on Graphics of Machine 
Forces. The Steam Engine and Turbine. 



CULLEN WARREN PARMELEE Adelaide Avenue 

Ben, *BK 

B. Sc. Rutgers 1896. Engaged in Manufacture 1895-1901. Instructor in Chemistry, 
Rutgers, 1901-1905. Professor Applied Chemistry 1905-1908. Professor of Ceramics 
1908. . Director of Department of Clay Working and Ceramics 1903. Ameri- 
can Chemical Society. American Ceramic Society. Author of various reports and 
articles on Ceramic subjects, published in The American Chemical Society Journal 
and other publications. Member English Ceramics Society. 



FRANK FORESTER THOMPSON The Bayard 

*rA, <I»BK 

A. B. Princeton 1894. Fellow in Experimental Science, Princeton, 1894-1895. A.M. 
Princeton 1895. E. E. Princeton 1897. Instructor in Physics, Union, 1897-1898. 
Instructor in Electrical Engineering, Penna. State, 1897-1901. Engineering Work 
1901-1903. Instructor in Electrical Science, Rutgers, 1903-1906. Associate Professor 

Physics, Rutgers, 1906-1908. Professor of Electrical Engineering, Rutgers, 1908 . 

Vice-President N. Y. State Science Teachers* Association. Society Promotion En- 
gineering Education. Associate in American Institute Electrical Engineers. Con- 
tributor to technical journals. 



MYRON TRACY SCUDDER 59 West 96th Street, New York City 

A*, *BK 

A. B. Rutgers 1882. A.M. Rutgers 1886. Teacher in Preparatory Schools. Post 
Grad. Work at Yale 1895-1899. Principal State Normal School at New Platz, 
N. Y., 1899-1908. Head Master Rutgers Prep. School, 1908-1911. Professor of the 

SdeDce of Teaching, Rutgers, 1908 . Author: Various articles in educational 

publicatioDS and lecturer at several colleges and universities. 

16 



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RICHARD MORRIS 94 Easton Avenue 

B. Sc. Rutgers 1899. M. Sc. Rutgers 1902. Ph.D. Cornell 1907. Instructor in Mathe- 
matics and Graphics, Rutgers, 1895-1905. Associate Professor Mathematics and 

Graphics 1905-1909. Professor of Mathematics and Graphics 1909 . A. A. A. S. 

American Mathematics Society. Society for Promotion of Engineering Education. 
Member Board of Education of City of New Brunswick. Author: Algebra — Selected 
Chapters^ and several articles in engineering publications. 



WALTER TAYLOR MARVIN 179 Somerset Street 

4»BK 

A. B. Columbia 1893. Post Graduate Work at University of Genua 1893-1894, at 
General Theological Seminary, New York, 1894-1895, at Columbia 1895-1897, in 
universities of Halle, Bonn, 1897-1898. Ph.D. University of Bonn 1898. Assistant 
in Columbia 1898-1899. Instructor and Assistant Professor at Adelbert College 
1899-1905. Preceptor at Princeton 1905-1909. Professor of Logic and Mental 
Philosophy, Rutgers, 1909 . American Philosophical Society. American Psycho- 
logical Association. Author: Die Giltiglseit underer Erlseuntuis der Objectiven IV alt. 
Syllabus of an Introduction to Philosophy, Introduction to Systematic Philosophy. 



JACOB GOODALE LIPMAN College Farm 

B. Sc. Rutgers 1898. M. A. Cornell 1900. Sage Fellow at Cornell 1901. Ph.D. 
Cornell 1903. Assistant Chemist N. J. State Agriculture Station 1898-1899. Soil 

Chemist and Bacteriologist N. J. S. A. E. S. 1901 . Farmers' Institute Lecturer 

1901-1905. Instructor in Agricultural Chemistry, Rutgers, 1902-1906. Assistant 
Professor of Agriculture 1906-1907. Associate Professor of Agriculture 1907-1910. 

Professor of Soil Chemistry and Bacteriology 1910 . Director N. J. S. A. E. S. 

1911 . Director of College Farm 1911 . Lecturer in Soil Bacteriology, 

Illinois and Cornell, 1906. Tennessee 1909-1910. Iowa State 1910. American 
Chemical Society. American Society of Agron. Society for Promotion of Agricul- 
tural Science. Public Health Association. Author: Bacteria in Relation to Country 
Life, and a great many other articles and reports on scientific subjects. 



ARTHUR EMMETT AHRENDS 38 Lincoln Avenue 

1897-1899, Indiana State Normal School. West Point 1903. Second Lieutenant in 
20th Infantry, U. S. A., 1903. Service in Philippine Islands, 1904-1906. First 
Lieutenant 29th Infantry, U. S. A., 1909. Professor of Military Science and Tactics, 
Rutgers, 1910 . 



KARY CADMUS DAVIS Raritan Avenue 

*BK 

B. Sc. Kansas State 1891. M. Sc, Kansas State 1894. Kansas State Normal 1892. 
Ph.D. Cornell 1900. Principal State High School, Austin, Minn., 1892-1898. Pro- 
fessor of Botany and Biology, State Normal School, Minn., 1900-1901. Professor of 
Horticulture and Industrial Botany, West Virginia, 1901-1902. Principal of Dunn 
Co. School of Agriculture and Domestic Economy, Wis., 1902-1907. Dean of New 
York State Agricultural School, Canton, N. Y., 1907-1908. Professor of Agronomy 

Rutgers, 1908 . Principal of Short Courses in Agriculture 1908 . A. A. A. S. 

National Educational Association, North American Ranunculaceae. Author: Bitter 
Rot and Blight Diseases, Trees in Winter Condition, etc. 

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ChArLES HUNTiNGTON WhITMAPJ . . * . . 189 College Avcnu* 

AKE, *BK 

A.B. Colby 1897. Ph.D. Yale 1900. Fellow in English, Yale, 1900. Instructor in 
English and Assistant Professor of English, Lehigh, 1900-1906. Study at University 
of Munich 1905-1906. Associate Professor of English, Rutgers, 1906-1911. Professor 

of English, Rutgers, 1911 . Modern Language Association. Concordance Society. 

Author of a Translation, The Christ of Cynewuif, contributor to Modern Language 
Notes, American Philological Journal, Anglia, 



EDWARD LIVINGSTON BARBOUR 172 College Avenue 

*BK 

B. O. National School of Elocution and Oratory. M. E. National School of Elocution 
and Oratory. Instructor in Public Speaking, Rutgers, 1897-1911. Professor of Public 
Speaking, Rutgers, 1911 . Recitationist and Lecturer on Elocutional subjects. 



JOHN HUBBARD LOGAN 172 College Avenue 

A. B. Mercer University 1900. Studied theology at Newton Center, Mass., and 
Chicago University. Union Theological Seminary 1903. M. A. Columbia 1904. 
Studied at Marburg and Berlin 1904-1907. Instructor in French and Italian, Colgate, 
1907-1908. Associate Professor of History and History of Theology, Colgate Theo- 
logical Seminary, 1908-1910. Acting Professor of History, Rutgers, 1910 . Ameri- 
can Historical Association. 



WILLIAM EUGENE BREAZEALE 142 Hamilton Street 

2AE. *BK 

M. M. P. Furman University 1889. Instructor in Belton High School, S. C, 1889-1891. 
Instructor in Mathematics, Rutgers, 1892-1895. Professor of Mathematics, Winthrop 
College, S. C, 1895-1900. Study at University of Bordeaux, France, 1900-1902. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics, Rutgers, 1902 . 



ALBERT CHESTER DEREGT Winants Hall 

*BK 

A.B. Hamilton 1900. M. C. Hamilton 1903. U. S. Geological Survey 1900. Post 
Graduate Work in Zoology and Mineralogy, Rutgers, 1900-1901. Instructor in Chem- 
istry, Rutgers, 1902-1906. Associate Professor of Chemistry, Rutgers, 1906 . 

American Chemical Society. Science Teachers' Association of New Jersey. 

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EDMOND WOOD BtLLETDOUX i44 Hamilton Street. 

*BK 

A.B. Williams 1899. A. M. Williams 1901. Assistant in French, Williams 1899-1900. 
Assistant in French and German, Williams, 1900-1901. Study in Belgium and France 
1901. University of Paris, with collateral work at College de France, 1901-1902. 
Universities of Madrid, Rome, Siena and Pisa, 1902-1903. University of Heidel- 
berg 1903. Instructor in Romance Languages^ Williams, 1903-1907. Associate Pro- 
fessor Romance Languages, Rutgers, 1907 . Officer d'Academie. 



RALPH OGDEN SMITH 17 Huntington Street 

X*, *BK 

B. Sc. Rutgers 1902. Post Graduate study at University of Pennsylvania 1902-1905. 
M. A. Pennsylvania 1903. Ph. D. Pennsylvania 1905. Instructor in Chemistry, Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, 1905-1906. Assistant Professor at State College Pennsylvania 

1906-1908. Associate Professor of Chemistry, Rutgers, 1908 . American Chemical 

Society. 



HENRY BRIGGS NORTH 92 Easton Avenue 

AXS, *BK 

Ph. G. School of Pharmacy, University of Wisconsin, 1902. B. Sc. University of Wis- 
consin 1904. M. A. University of Wisconsin 1906. Instructor in Chemistry, Wis- 
consin, 1903-1907. Swiss Polytechnic School, Zurich, 1907. University of Paris 1908. 
D. Sc. University of Paris 1909. Instructor in Qualitative Analysis, Case, 1909-1910. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, Rutgers, 1910 . American Chemical Society. 

American Electro-Chemical Society. Societe chemique de France. Author of UAction 
de I'Eau sur les Alumnates de Calcium^ U Action du chlorure de Sulfuryle sur Certains 
Metaux, Book, Cement Testing (1912). 



MAURICE ADIN BLAKE 197 Somerset Street 

B. Sc. Massachusetts Agricultural College 1904. Assistant Horticulturist, Rhode Island 
Agricultural College and Experiment Station, 1904-1905. Instructor in Horticulture, 
Mass., Agricultural College, 1905-1906. Horticulturist New Jersey State Agriculture 
Experiment Station 1906. Associate Professor Horticulture, Rutgers, 1907 . Horti- 
cultural Society. Author Peach Grotwing in Ne*w Jersey, etc. 



FRED HERBERT DODGE 116 Hamilton Street 

^T, *BK 

A. B. Yale 1884. Sargent School Physical Education 1887-1888. Physical Director, 
Scranton, Pa., Y. M. C. A., 1889-1890. Director of Gymnasium, Bates College, 
1890-1891. Private Gymnasium, Bangor, Me., 1891-1892. Director of Athenaeum, 
Chicago, 111., 1893-1894. Director of Gymnasium, University of Illinois, 1895. 

Director of Gymnasium, Rutger8,1896 . Instructor in Physical Training, Rutgers, 

1896 . American Society of Physical Education. 

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CLARENCE WARD 37 Lincoln Avenue 

A. B. Princeton 1905. M. A. Princeton 1907. Assistant Professor of History of Art, 

Rutgers, 1909 . Instructor in Architecture, Princeton, 1908 . American 

Architectural Institute. Geographical Society of America. 



FRANK RANDALL PRATT 4 Union Street 

rs, *BK 

B. Sc Rutgers 1906. M. Sc. Rutgers 1907. Instructor in Mathematics, Rutgers, 1906- 
1909. Instructor in Physics, Rutgers, 1909-1911. Assistant Professor of Physics, 
Rutgers, 1911 . Society Promotion Engineering Education 1907-1909. 



FREDERICK CHARLES MINKLER College Farm 

B. S. Iowa State College 1906. Journalistic work 1906-1907. New Jersey State Ex- 
periment Station 1907-1908. Instructor in Agriculture, Rutgers, 1908-1911. Assist- 
ant Professor of Animal Husbandry, Rutgers, 1911 . 



ALBERT RITTENHOUSE JOHNSON 121 Codwise Avenue 

*BK 

State Normal School, Trenton, N. J., 1900. B. Sc. Rutgers 1907. Engineering work 
with Hudson and Manhattan R. R. Co. on North River Tunnel, 1907-1908. Engineer- 
ing work U. S. Lighthouse Dept., Hudson River, 1908-1909 Instructor in Mathe- 
matics and Graphics, Rutgers, 1909-1911. Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 
Rutgers, 1911 . 



WILLIAM BERTRAM TWISS 6 Grant Avenue 

*K>|/, 4»1JK 

A. B. Dartmouth 1906. A.M. Harvard 1907. Professor of English Language and 
Literature, Temple University, Philadelphia, 1907-1908. Head of English Depart- 
ment, Temple University, 1908-1909. Instructor in English, Rutgers, 1909-1911. 

Associate Professor of English, Rutgers, 1911 . Modern Language Association. 

Author of poems, and contributor to magazines. 

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GEORGE AUGUSTUS OSBORN 4 Grant Avenue 

BBII, *BK 

B. Sc. Rutgers 1897. Assistant in Library, Rutgers, 1897-1907. Librarian, Rutgers, 
1907 . 



JOHN HOWARD RAVEN 185 College Avenue 

Z>|/, *BK 

A. B. Rutgers 1891. A.M. Rutgers 189+. New Brunswick Theological Seminary 
1894. Pastor Reformed Church, Metuchen, N. J., 1894-1899. Acting Professor Old 
Testament Langs, and Exegesis, New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 1898-1899. 
Professor O. T. Langs, and Exegesis, New Brunswick Theological Seminary, 
1899 . University of Berlin 1902-1903. D. D. Rutgers 1899. Instructor in He- 
brew, Rutgers. American Geographical Society. Author of Old Testament Intro- 
duction, Essentials of Hebre<w Grammar. Lecturer on English Bible, Rutgers, 
1910 . 



HENRY BARNARD KUMMEL Trenton 

A.B. Beloit 1889. M. A. Harvard 1892. Fellow University of Chicago 1892-1895. 
Ph.D. Chicago 1895. Instructor Beloit 1889-1891. Assistant in Geology, Harvard, 
1891-1892. Assistant Professor Physiography, Lewis Institute, Chicago, 1896-1899. 
Assistant State Geologist of New Jersey 1899-1902. State Geologist, New Jersey, 

1902 . Am. Association Advancement of Science. American Geological Society. 

President of Association of State Geologists 1908 . Lecturer on Geology of New 

Jersey, Rutgers. 



EREK SCHOTH PALMER 70 Lawrence Avenue 



Ph. B. Yale 1906. Research Chemist for Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Co., Phil- 
adelphia, 1906-1907. Professor of Mathematics, Rollins College, Florida, 1908-1909. 
Instructor of Mathematics and Graphics, Rutgers, 1910 . 



STUART AUGUSTUS STEPHENSON, JR 226 Redmond Street 

Z^ 

B. Sc, New York, 1899. C. E., New York, 1901. U. S. Engineering Corps in Porto 
Rico 1900-1901. Engineering work for Pennsylvania Railroad 1901-1905. Engi- 
neering and Railroad Surveying in Cuba 1906. J. G. White & Company, New York 

City, 1906-1910. Instructor in Mathematics and Graphics, Rutgers, 1910 . 

Am. Society of Civil Engineers. Society for Promotion of Engineering Education. 

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WILLIAM DANA HOYT* ....*.... Fourth Avenue 

A. B. University of Georgia 1901. M. Sc. Georgia 1904. Assistant in Biology, 
Georgia, 1901-1904. Ph. D. Johns Hopkins 1909. Fellow in Johns Hopkins 1909. 
University of Heidelberg 1909-1910. Holder of the Table of the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution at the Stazione Zoologica, Naples, 1910. Instructor in Botany, Rutgers, 
1910 . Am. Association Advancement of Science. Torrey Botanical Club. 

ELDON LEON LOBLEIN 172 Somerset Street 

AKE 

D. V. S. University of Pennsylvania 1910. Practitioner, New Brunswick, N. J., 
1910 . Lecturer Veterinary Science, Rutgers. 1910 . 

ROY GORDON VOORHORST Alumni and Faculty House 

AZ 

B. Sc. Michigan Agricultural College 1910. Assistant State Orchard Inspector, 
Montana, 1910. Instructor in Horticulture, Rutgers, 1910 . 

FRANK W. LINSLEY Hertzog Hall 

A. B. Columbia. M. A. New York University. Cortland Normal School. Albany 
Normal College. Instructor Mathematics Rutgers 1912 . 

LUTHER HARNED MARTIN Metuchen 

Assistant Registrar 

GEORGE WINFIELD NUTTMAN Alumni and Faculty House 

B. Sc, M.Sc. (Rutgers) 
Assistant in the Library 

MARION CUSHMAN .......... Raritan Avenue 

Assistant in the Library 

MARY GILLESPIE 2 Richardson Street 

A.B. (Mt. Holyoke) 
Assistant in the Library 

CATHERINE L. DAVIDSON Seminary Place 

Secretary to the President 

WILLIAM SEYMOUR VALIANT 132 New Street 

Assistant in the Geological Museum 

HOWARD MATTHEW GARGAN 52 College Avenue 

B. S. (Fordham) 
Assistant in Physical Training 

LUTHER EDWARD RIDDLE, JR. . Metuchen 

Office Assistant 

HENRY ANDREW VRUWINK Hertzog Hall 

A. B. (Hope) 
Executive Secretary of Young Men's Christian Association 

JAMES CLAUDE THOMPSON Alumni and Faculty House 

B. Sc. (Rutgers) 
Assistant in Chemistry 

RALPH HEIDINGSFELD 40 Albany Street 

B. Sc. (Rutgers) 
Assistant in Ceramics 

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FLOYD EARL CHIDESTER 
33 Lincoln Avenue 
Born October, 1884, at Chicago, 111. Graduate of 
Newark Valley, N. Y., High School. Ph. B. Syracuse, 

1907. Assistant in Biology, Syracuse, 1906-1907. Senior 
University Scholar, Clark, 1907-1908. A. M. Clark 

1908. Fellowship Table Marine Biological Labora- 
tory, Woods Hole, Mass., summer of 1908. Fellow in 
Anatomy and Zoology and Assistant in Histology, 
Chicago, 1908-1909. Instructor in Zoology and Phys- 
iology, De Pauw, 1909-1910. Investigator at U. S. 
Fisheries Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass., 1910. Senior 
Fellow, Clark, 1910-1911. Ph.D. Clark 1911. In- 
structor in Biology, Rutgers, 1911 . Member Sig- 
ma Xi, Hon. Scientific Fraternity, Gamma Alpha, 
Graduate Sci. Fraternity. Am. Association of Anato- 
mists. Corporation of Marine Biological Laboratory. 
Author of Papers on Behavior of Crustacea and 
Mammalian Teratology-. 



FREDERICK FRELINGHUYSEN COUCH 

Alumni and Faculty House 

KA 

Born at Carbondalc, Pa., Nov. 25, 1887. Elemen- 
tary educator at Carbondale High School. M. E. 
Lehigh 1909. Draftsman, Pennsylvania R. R., 1909- 
1911. Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, Rutgers, 
1911 . 



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CHARLES HALE 
College Avenue. 

Born November 18, 1859, at Hudson, N. Y. Ele- 
mentary education in private schools and Catskill 
Free Academy. Graduated in 1880; then followed 
Courses in English under direction of Harvard Uni- 
versity and N. Y. State Normal College. Instructor in 
English, Catskill High School, for several years. 
Principal of Catskill High School 1904-1911. In 
August, 1911, elected District Superintendent of 
Schools for First District of Greene Co., N. Y. In- 
structor in English, Rutgers, 1911. 



EDWARD FRANKLIN HAUCH 
196 Somerset Street. 

Born near Pembroke, Ont., on Dec. 28, 1878, of 
German parentage. Elementary and High School 
Education in schools of Ontario. Instructor in schools 
of Ontario 1903-1907. B. A. Toronto University 1907. 
Assistant in German, Horace Mann School, 1907-1911. 
Study and travel in Germany and France, 1908-1911. 
M. A. Columbia 1909. Instructor in Modern Lan- 
guages, Rutgers, 1911 . 



HARRY REYNOLDS LEWIS 
College Farm 

Born at Providence, R. I., in 1885. Elementary 
Education in Providence Grammar Schools, and 
Providence Technical High School. B. Sc. Rhode Isl- 
and State 1907. Professor of Agriculture, Baron de 
Hirsch Agricultural School, 1907-1910. Instructor in 
Short Course in Agriculture, Rutgers, 1910 . In- 
structor in Dairy Husbandry Rutgers, 1911 . Mem- 
ber of International Association of Poultry Instructors 
and Investigators. American Dairy Institute. Au- 
thor of "Poultrv Laboratory Ciuide." 



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CLASS OF 1912. 

President— WALTER C. BOWEN. 
Vice-President— VALENTINE B. HAVENS. 
Secretary— JOHN D. MORRISON. 
Treasurer— HERBERT R. PEEBLES. 
Historian— GEORGE W. MARTIN. 



YELL. 

Trimble tramble, trimble tramble, 
Trimble tramble, trelve; 
Rutgers on the Raritan. 
Nineteen twelve. 



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HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1912. 



THOSE who have followed the Scriptural injunction to work while it is yet day can 
best appreciate the accompanying suggestion as to the brevity of the time al- 
lowed them. It is, therefore, to be expected that to the members of so busy a class 
as 1912 it should seem but yesterday when they entered college. And, indeed, when 
in the fall of 1908 we assembled in Kirkpatrick Chapel for the first time as a class and gazed 
with awe upon the Seniors in the center, our pathway toward their eminence seemed long and 
arduous and beset with many a treacherous snare and pitfall. Nevertheless, we essayed it 
right valiantly* and now we who have survived are, for the last time as undergraduates, to 
review our college career. 

It is not idle boasting to say that our coming marked a new era in the life of Rutgers. 
Before we entered, one hundred and sixty strong, no class had passed the century mark. Of 
course, mere numbers are not in themselves a cause for gratulations, but they have their 
very great value as an indication that in her one hundred and forty-sixth year our Alma 
Mater is still young and prosperous. 

As a matter of course, we at once took a prominent place in all of the activities of the 
college. The story of our career as underclassmen has already been told. Suffice it is to 
say that as freshmen we taught 1911 to fear us and as Sophomores we carefully trained our 
successors of 1913. 

Our Junior year cannot be passed over with so brief mention. In athletics we remained 
the leaders as in the two previous years, furnishing six out of the seventeen varsity football 
men. In track, baseball and gym we likewise more than held our own, one member of our 
class beating all college records for scoring points at track meets, while another is the only 

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man who ever succeeded in capturing the intercollegiate club swinging championship for two 
successive years. The Junior Prom of February 24, 1911, is universally admitted to have 
been the most successful social affair in the history of Rutgers, establishing once for all the 
standard by which all similar events may be measured. In the intellectual field we were 
no less distinguished, Sparker Gilbert being appointed official prize-taker of the class and 
getting away with everything worth having. In all things we upheld the hands of the 
faltering class of 1911, and now that they have departed, we are the vigorous class that has 
succeeded to their position of leadership. It is not for us to say how well we, as Seniors, 
have succeeded in moulding the life of the College and in shaping her destinies. We do 
know that if a sincere devotion to her, joined with the ability to direct that devotion into 
practical channels can be of any effect, then we do not need to fear the criticism of posterity. 
All this has not been without loss. Of the hundred and thirty-six with whom we started 
but thirty-three are still in the class. The others have left us for one reason or another and 
but three have permanently joined us to recompense us for their loss. And of those of us^yvho 
are left, many have failed to live up to the full measure of the opportunities which have been 
presented to us. Yet we cannot help but be thankful for those opportunities which we have 
used and above all for the four years of stimulating fellowship which we have enjoyed. 
Surely it has been good for us to have been here! May it be equally good for our college 
and may she ever feel an increasing satisfaction in the knowledge that we are her sons. 



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Senior Class 



WALTER COX BOWEN 

Shiloh, N. J. 

AKE, C. & S., C. & D. 

"His actions speak much stronger than my pen." 

President Senior Class; Manager 'Varsity Football; 

Captain 'Varsity Baseball ; Captain R. C. C. President 

C. E. Club, Class Baseball, Football and Relay Teams; 

Self-Government Board 1910-1911; Holder Individual 

Baseball Cup 1910-1911; Treasurer Dramatic Club. 



VALENTINE BRITTON HAVENS 
Highland Park, N. J. 
AT, C.&S. 
'*On their own merits modest men are dumb." 
President Athletic Association; 'Varsity Track; Cap- 
tain 'Varsity Track 1911-1912; 'Varsity Relay Team; 
Holder of College Records, 100 yards, 220 yards, high 
hurdles, one mile relay; College Tennis Team; Col- 
lege Tennis Champion 1911; College Debating team 
1910, 1911, 1912; Secretary Debate Committee; Col- 
lege Chess Team; Vice-President Y. M. C. A.; Secre- 
tary Freshman Class; Vice-President Senior Class; 
First Barbour Prize in Speaking; Second Smith Prize; 
Winner of Junior Exhibition; Class Basketball, Track 
and Relay Teams. 



JOHN DITTGEN MORRISON 
Ridgefield Park, N. J. 
A*, ONE, C. & S. S. & C. 
''He sung his songs at morning, noon and night." 
Secretary Senior Class; Captain R.C. C. ; Co-winner 
Horton Prize in Music; Leader College Choir; First 
Tenor Glee Club; Manager Glee and Mandolin Clubs, 
1910-1911; Song Leader; Manager Varsity Track 
Team; Football Scrub; 'Varsity Track Team; Class 
Track; Captain Sophomore Football Team; Chair- 
man Freshman Banquet Committee; Member Self- 
Government Board 1908-1909; Chairman Senior Ball 
Committee. 



HERBERT RAMSEY PEEBLES 

Paterson, N. J. 
Scarlet Club 
"Watch thou and wake when others be asleep." 
Treasurer Senior Class; Class Football; Class 
Basketball; Class Track; Class Relay Team; Self- 
Government Board; Chairman Cap and Gown Com- 
mittee. 



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*^ 



HAROLD CURTICE AMOS 
Rochester, N. Y. 
A4», GNE 
"Rhymer, come on and do the most you can." 
Barbour Prize in Speaking; Sophomore Hop Com- 
mittee; Historian Sophomore and Junior Classes; 
Junior Orator; Assistant Editor; Targum; Senior 
Memorial Committee. 



JAMES K. ALVERSON 
East Orange, N. J. 
Pi: 
"A long farewell to all my greatness." 
Captain 'Varsity Football; President Quad Club; 
Class President Junior Year; Member Board of Man- 
agers; 'Varsity Football; 'Varsity Track; 'Varsity 
Gym; Class Basketball; Class Bowling; Chairman 
Sophomore Banquet Committee; Chief Musician R. C. 
C; Cast, **She Stoops to Conquer," 1912. 



JOHN ARTHUR 

Newark, N. J. 

Queens Club 

"My crown is in my heart, not on my head." 

Lieutenant Rutgers Cadet Corps; 'Varsity Football. 



GEORGE DAVID AUCHTER 
Jersey City, N. J. 
X-k, C.&S. C.&D. 
"He lives at ease that truly lives." 
Sophomore Hop Committee; Junior Prom. Commit- 
tee; Class Baseball; Class Football; V'ice-President 
C. E. Club; Cast, "She Stoops to Conquer," 1912. 



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JOHN VAIL BISSETT 

New Brunswick, N. J. 

"I do remember an apothecary." 



EDWARD FRANCIS BLATZ 

Elizabeth, N. J. 

Queens Club 

"Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit." 



WALTER SAX BLOOM 
Catskill, N. Y. 
Scarlet Club 
"Besides, 'tis known he can speak Greek." 
Second Sloan Entrance Prize; Junior Class Secre- 
tary; Junior Orator; Mgr. Class Basketball Team; 
President Philoclean Literary Society; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet; Vice-President Self-Government Board. 



FRED ARTHUR BRIEGS 
Perth Amboy, N. J. 

rs 

"In notes by distance made more sweet." 
President and Leader of Glee and Mandolin Clubs; 
Sophomore Hop Committee; Principle Musician R. 
C. C. 



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LEONARD SCOTT BRIGGS 
Firthcliffc, N. Y. 
Queens Club 
"To bear no malice or hatred in my heart." 
'Varsity Gym; Intercollegiate Champion Club 
Swinging 1912; Class Bowling; Junior Prom. Com- 
mittee; Lieutenant R. C. C. ; Alumni Day Committee; 
Secretary Athletic Association. 



PERRY H. BASCOM 
7.^ 
"An easy going and easy mannered man." 
Football Scrub; Class Football; Class Baseball; 
Editor-in-Chief 1911 Scarlet Letter; Freshman Ban- 
quet Committee; Junior Prom. Committee; Junior Ban- 
quet Committee; Cast, "She Stoops to Conquer," 1912. 



HAROLD JASPER CADMUS 

Ridgewood, N. J. 

Scarlet Club 

"He is a worthy gentleman." 

President of Chemical Club. 



ALLAN DITCHFIELD CAMPBELL, JR. 
New Brunswick, N. J. 
"He stood in his stockings just six foot ten." 
First Sloan Prize; Second Spader Prize; Vice-Presi- 
dent Philoclean Literary Society; Secretary Y. M. 
C. A.; Junior Orator; Class Track Team. 



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ROBERT STEPHEN CLEAVER 
Schuylcrville, N. Y. 
**Much had he read." 
Lieutenant R. C. C. 



HENRY CLIFTON COOPER 
Palmyra, N. J. 

X*; C. & S. 

"Health is the vital principle of bliss." 
'Varsity Football; 'Varsity Track; Class Baseball; 
Editor-in-Chief of 1912 Scarlet Letter; Junior Prom. 
Committee; Cast, "She Stoops to Conquer," 1912. 



ELBERON FISHER 

Highland Park, N. J. 

AKE 

"As silent as the hills, yet strong." 

Treasurer C. E. Club; Mandolin Club; Member 

1912 Scarlet Letter Board; Senior Cap and (iovvn 

Committee. 



FRANCIS CLYDE FITTING 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
"Banish plump Jack and banish all the world." 
Class Football; Agricultural Club. 



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SAMCJEL FURMAN FOSTER 

Bayhead, N. J. 

AT 

**The best of men have ever loved repose." 

'Varsity Football Team. 



FRED MONTGOMERY FOUNTAIN 

Hackensack, N. J. 

X^k, S. Sc C, C. & B., C. & D. 

"One ear it heard, the other it went out." 

Freshman Banquet Committee; Class Bowling 

Team; Mgr. Class Bowling Team; President Tennis 

Association; 'Varsity Tennis Team; Class Baseball; 

Self-Government Board. 



RUSSELL WOODWORTH GIES 

Newark, N. J. 

AT 

"Oh, he sits high in all the people's hearts." 

President Biological Club; President Philoclean 

Literary Society; Elected Business Manager 1912 

Scarlet Letter; Associate Editor Targum; Sergeant 

R. C. C; Secretary Dramatic Club. 



SEYMOUR PARKER GILBERT, JR. 
Bloomfield, N. J. 
"Come, my best friends, my books, and lead me on." 
President Hertzog Club; Tunis Quick Prize; First 
Spader History Prize; Van Vechten Prize; Sophomore 
and Junior years; First Luther Laflin Metaphysics 
Prize; Van Doren Missions Prize; Bradley Prize in 
Roman Law. 



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AUGUSTUS LEMUEL GLADDING 

Lincoln, Cal. 

AKE, ONE, C.&D. 

"Far Eastward cast thine eye from out the West.'* 

Sophomore Hop Committee; 'Varsity Baseball 1909, 

1910, 1911; Member of Board of Managers 1911- 

1912; Class Baseball Team. 



FREDERIC GLANDER 

Bloomfield, N. J. 

Scarlet Club 

"What a charming thing is a battle." 

'Varsity Football Senior year; Class Football; Class 

Basketball; Junior Prom. Committee. 



JACOB WALTER GROENDYKE 

Monmouth Junction, N. J. 

"Intermingle jest with earnest." 

Class Bowling; Class Baseball; Intercollegiate 

Rifle Team; Manager Bowling Team; Senior Cap 

and Gown Committee. 



AARON MARTIN HAGEMAN 

Bound Brook, N. J. 

"Remote from life's bewildering way." 



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GEORGE EDWARD HAGEMANN 

Newark, N. J. 
"The labor wc delight in physics pain." 



ALBERT LEWIS HAGEN 

Cranford, N. J. 
"I value study, none can prize it more." 
Class Track Team. 



EDWARD HOWE HALSTED 

New Brunswick, N. J. 

A* 

"A farmer, yet a noble minded man." 

Chairman Junior Banquet Committee; Football 

Scrub; Class Track Team; First Lieutenant and 

Quartermaster R. C. C. 



HERBERT WILLIAM HEILMANN 

Newark, N. J. 

Queens Club 

"Far from gay cities and the ways of men.' 

Sophomore Hop Committee. 



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WILLIAM GETTIER HERRMAN 
Plainfield, N. J. 
A^ 
"Let authors write for glory or reward.'* 
Business Manager 1912 Scarlet Letter; Member 
Junior Prom. Committee; Alumni Day Committee; 
Self-Government Board 1911; Junior Orator; Class 
Relay Team four years; 'Varsity Track Team, Sopho- 
more year; Chairman Sophomore Proc. and Cap 
Committee; Business Manager Dramatic Club. 



HENRY KILMER HOTALING 
Delmar, N. Y. 

Ben 

"A man he was to all his country dear." 
Class Football; Class Track; 'Varsity Football; 
'Varsity Track; Self-Government Board; Junior 
Orator; Assistant Business Manager 1912 Scarlet 
Letter. 



HENRY VICTOR JACOBSON 

Newark, N. J. 

''Rebellion in this land shall lose its sway." 



ORAN KELLER 

New Brunswick, N. J. 

"Good luck go with thee.' 



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RALPH JACOB KIEFFER 

Lake Katrine, N. Y. 

Scarlet Club 

**He would himself have been a soldier." 

First Lieutenant R. C. C; Class Bowling; E. E. 

Club. 



ALSON CARLTON LLEWELLYN 

Moorestown, N. J. 

Scarlet Club 

"Discretion of speech is more than eloquence." 

Class Football; E. E. Club. 



JOHN FRANCIS McGOVERN, JR. 
New Brunswick, N. J. 

'*As proper a man as one shall see in a summer's day." 
'Varsity Football 1909, 1910, 1911; Sophomore Hop 
Committee; Drum Major R. C.C. ; Class Baseball. 



JOHN PRESTON MAILLER 

Cornwall, N. Y. 

Scarlet Club 

"His heart and hand both open and both free." 

Class Football; Color Sergeant R. C. C. 



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JAMES WALTER MAILLER 
Cornwall, N. Y. 
Scarlet Club. 
"All grant him prudent; prudence never wanes." 
Class Football; Class Baseball; Lieutenant R. C. C; 
President £. E. and M. E. Club; Class Secretary, So- 
phomore year. 



JOHN OSBORN MARSH 
Rahway, N. J. 
"Love's the weightier business of all mankind." 
Civil Engineering Club. 



GEORGE WILLARD MARTIN 

Metuchen, N. J. 

Queens Club 

"He knows his mind; a man well worth the name." 

Editor-in-Chief of the Targum. 



WILLIAM HERBERT MARTIN 

Bloomfield, N. J. 

Scarlet Club 

"He is ever precise and promise keeping." 

'Varsity Baseball; Class Baseball, three years; 

Class Bowling, three years. 



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LOUIS FOWLER MERRILL 
Sergeantsville» N. J. 
''Let dairies therefore be brought in use." 
Glee Club; President Agricultural Club; Class 
Track; First Lieutenant R. C. C. 



MILO CLAUDE MOSEMAN 
Big Hollow, N. Y. 

rs 

"His speech, his form, his action full of grace." 
Business Mgr. of Targum; Chairman Alumni Day 

Committee; Junior Prom. Committee; Cast, "She 

Stoops to Conquer," 1912. 



ALFRED ARTHUR NELSON 
South Amboy, N. J. 
"For I have tasted from the cup of fame." 
'Varsity Gym Team 1910, 1911. Intercollegiate 
Club Swinging Champion 1910, 1911; Treasurer Ten- 
nis Association 1910, 1911, 1912; Manager Tennis 
Team 1912; Secretary C. E. Club; Cadet Captain 
and Adjutant R. C. C' 1912. 



J. RICHARD NEVIUS 

East Millstone, N. J. 

Queens Club, ONE 

"Creeping like snail unwillingly to school." 

Member of Scarlet Letter Board of 1912; Member 

Intercollegiate Rifle Team; Secretary C. E. Club. 



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JACOB PRESS 

Harrison, N. J. 

*'I say not much, I study, that is all." 



DONALD ROSS 

Newark, N. J. 

Z^k, C. & D., C. & B. 

"I never write as funny as I can." 

Scarlet Letter Editor; Associate Editor Targum; 

Sophomore Hop Committee; Class Football. 



VIVIAN CLINTON ROSS 
New Brunswick, N. J. 

Ben 

" *Tis death to me to be at enmity." 
President Targum Association; Associate Editor 
Targum; Student Self-Government Board; Manager 
Gymnasium '^eam; Chairman Junior Prom. Commit- 
tee; Junior Orator; Sophomore Orator. 



ROBERT SCHMIDT 
Yorktown, Va. 
"A quiet man» but 'sooth, a happy one." 
Vice-President Agricultural Club. 



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EDWARD COLLIER SCOTT 

Oswego, N. Y. 

X^ 

"I hope I don't intrude." 

Associate Editor Targum; Vice-President Chemical 



Club. 



ERNEST WELD SCUDDER 
Atola, Okla. 
A* 
*'An ounce of mirth is worth a pound of sorrow." 
Manager 'Varsity Baseball Team; Glee Club; Sec- 
ond Tenor Single and Double Quartet; Captain Senior 
Basketball Team; Class Bowling Team. 



RICHARD ALEXANDER SMITH 
New Brunswick, N. J. 
Z^, C.&D., S.&C. 
*'My only looks are woman's looks." 
Junior Prom. Committee; Military Ball Committee; 
President Dramatic Club; Choir Leader; Class Vice- 
President Freshman and Junior years; Associate Edi- 
tor Targum; Captain R. C. C. ; Class Bowling four 
years; Class Basketball four years; Class Football; 
Class Baseball; Cast, "She Stoops to Conquer," 1912. 



STEPHEN PARSON SMITH 

Leesburg, N. J. 

"Doth make the night joint laborer with the day.' 



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WILLIAM EMMONS SMOCK 
Newark, N. J. 

rs 

"I've lived and loved." 
Second Lieutenant R. C. C; C. E. Club. 



WILLIAM RUDOLF FUERCHTEGOTT STIER 

Sayreville, N. J. 

"His feelings leaned to virtue's side.'* 

President Y. M. C. A.; Glee and Mandolin Clubs; 

Secretary Biological Club; Junior Orator; First 

Myron W. Smith Memorial Prize; Associate Editor 

Targum; 'Varsity Track Team. 



HAROLD MORLOCK TERRILL 

Rahway, N. J. 

"Genius must be borne and never can be taught.' 



ALFRED BENTLEY TITSWORTH 
Plainfield, N. J. 
X^k, S.&C. 
"A pleasant youth, and with a pleasant smile." 
Vice-President Athletic Association; 'Varsity Foot- 
ball four years; Class Baseball; Captain R. C. C. 



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EARL EDWARD VAN DERWERKER 

Schuylcrvillc, N. Y. 

Scarlet Club 

"My soul is free from fear." 

First Lieutenant R. C. C. ; Member Self-Govern- 

ment Board 1910-19U. 



ELMER LEIGH WALKER 
Newark, N. J. 

rs 

"Young in age, in judgment old." 
Civil Engineer Club. 



DEXTER WHITE 

New York, N. Y. 

»en, C.&D., C.&B. 

"With a laugh that was merry and long." 

'Varsity Football four years; Captain Gymnasium 

Team; President Double R Club. 



FREDERICK WOELFLE 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
"Happy the man who studies nature's laws." 
Agricultural Club. 



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LEROY COLVER WILSEY 
Newark, N. J. 
AKE, S. & C. 
"Music exalts each joy, allays each grief." 
Freshman President; Class Track Team; Junior 
Prom. Committee; Second Wall Targum Prize; 'Var- 
sity Gym Team I9I0, 1911, 1912; Musical Club 1910, 
1911, 1912; Assistant Editor Targum. 



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,■■ r.' 



To the Senior 



The four long years of college work are ended, 

You stand upon the threshold wide of life, 
Fond memories remain of joy and sorrow blended, 
Of friendships found, and severed now, for unattended 
You go to take a man's part in the toil and strife. 

Success perhaps was yours, but now you're hasting. 

With high resolve to paths as yet untrod. 
The world indeed is wide and hope is everlasting. 
Yet seasons change, and trees, their foliage casting, 

Make of the rustling leaf but earth and dust and sod. 

Past failure and success have now no bearings 

College was but a step toward the goal; 
Men, equal in the sight of men, the battle sharing. 
Think of the future only, for the past not caring, 
Stand to be measured in the balance of the soul. 

— E. R. S. 



W '^i^^'-^^1^^9I^^^SM 





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CLASS OF 1913. 

President— CLIFFORD E. DENNIS. 
Vice-President— LAWRENCE H. OBECNY. 
Secretary— MAHLON G. MILLIKEN. 
Treasurer— GEORGE R. MERRILL. 



YELL. 

Ricka, racka, ricka, racka, 
Ricka, racka, reen ; 
Bow, wow, 
Rutgers' thirteen. 



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JUNIOR HISTORY. 

THE JUNIOR HOLDS SWAY. 

A Drama in One Act. 
Scene — Queen Campus. 
Time— 12.05 A. M., January I, 1912. 
Characters — The Senior, an old man, bent with the burden of knowledge; the Junior, a roan 

in the prime of liiPe, sturdy of limb and strong of feature; the Sophomore, a young 

boy, flashily dressed, wearing red coat, red tie, red socks, etc.; the Freshman, a little 

boy in short trousers, scowling ferociously at the Soph. 
(Curtain discovers the four figures grouped around the cannon. The Senior has just finished 

speaking, a slight handclapping following the statement of his accomplishments.) 
The Junior steps forth and speaks. 

College men, you all have heard 

That the Senior is a bird — 
Soph — So at least he thinks. 
Junior — And we're glad to know that he 

Is a man — 
Soph — or seems to be. 

Junior — But, in fact, his history 

Isn't worth three winks. 
Soph and Fresh, singing — 

But, in fact, his history 

Into dimness sinks. 
Junior — 

Listen, my comrades, and you shall hear 

The tale of a class without a peer, 

We hazed the freshmen from far and near 

We placed the Sophomore upon his bier, 

In short, we were ever the winner; 

When only wee freshmen we made quite a hit, 

The Junior and Soph didn't phase us a bit, 

And into the Senior we threw quite a fit; 

The faculty really grow thinner. 

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Soph — By Jove, you indeed were the winner. 
Junior — 

As Sophomore students we raised quite a row, 

The college remembers our deeds even now, 

And all the professors were willing to bow. 

Whenever they passed by the way. 

We "bopped on" the freshmen in football and track. 

And always they failed when they tried to come back. 

Defeated, in silence they bore every whack; 

Indeed, they had nothing to say. 
Soph — 

Indeed, we had nothing to say. 
Junior — 

And now as a Junior we stand, 

Secure at the head of the band. 

In deep exultation 

We measure each ration, 

To Senior and Freshmen alike, 

The Profs all adore us, 

There's no one before us — 
Senior — 

1 guess it is me for the pike. 
Soph — 

I think we had all better hike. 
Junior — 

In the present year to show 

We're progressive, don't you know; 

And are willing to grow even better, 

We have taken our stand 

In the editor's band, 

We have charge of the new Scarlet Letter. 
Senior — 

I think, If 1 may speak, 

We are all very weak. 

When compared to the Junior so gay, 

I blink When I think 

Of this class; so I say 

We should all bid good day 

And should hasten away> 

For the Junior is Queen of the May. 
Soph and Fresh — 

For the Junior is Queen of the May. 
The three classes bow in submission before the Junior. Suddenly the Registrar's voice is 

heard from a window in Queens. The Senior, Sophomore and Freshman instantly 

vanish in the air, leaving the Junior standing triumphant by the cannon. 
The curtain falls. 



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WILLIAM CAROL BALL, JR. 
''Billy" 
Here's cheer-leader, fair Billy Ball, 
At one time his mustache was small, 
But now it has grown 
Till we're all forced to own 
It is easily king of them all. 



THOMAS TURNER BARR, JR. 
"Turner" 
Behold the Metuchenite Barr, 
As a fusser he sure is a star; 
He goes home each Sunday 
And fusses till Monday. 
You see he don't live very far. 



HARLAND BARTHOLOMEW 
"Ban" 
A man in a thousand is Bart, 
As a worker he sure does his part, 
Be it study or drill 
He can ne'er get his fill. 
He learns all his lessons by heart. 



WALTER BASTEDO 
"fVali" 
The lad who is posing before you, 
Bastedo, he's sure not to bore you, 
He studies each day 
In his own little way, 
And if you're a prof he'll adore you. 



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HERBERT M. BERGAMINI 
"Bergie" 
Although he is six feet in height, 
'Tis in class he discloses his might, 
Old Bergie's a man 
On the generous plan, 
And the tellows all think him all right. 



ARTHUR DE LONG BERGEN 
"Berg" 
As to Bergen, it's surely a pity. 
That he can't write an amorous ditty, 
A gallant of renown 
In Somerville town; 
Look out when he goes to the city. 



WALTER CHARLES BAUER 
"Walt" 
Right here in the corner is Bauer, 
As a sport he's the man of the hour, 
With a crease in his pants 
He attends every dance. 
And hires a cab in a shower. 



WHITFIELD JENKS BELL 
"Whit" 
Here is a young man from Hoboken 
We knew it as soon as he'd spoken, 
As a Soph he raised — Well, 
His name's Whitfield Bell, 
And his record can never be broken. 

HOWARD ANTHONY JULIE 
"Ju" 
To the right poses Julie, note how 
He discloses the grace of his bow. 
He's an Aggie, and gee. 
You can easily see 
He enjoys sitting next to a cow. 



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JOSEPH BURSTEIN 
'*Joe" 
Here's Burstein who came back to us 
By inverted promotion, poor cuss, 
He's a modest young man 
Who learns what he can 
Without anv bombast or fuss. 



JACOB CHOBRICHER 
'*Chobby*' 
A youth of much promise, Chobricher, 
Knows nothing of half-back or pitcher. 
But in studies first rate, 
And in college debate 
If you don't watch out he will "git yer." 



EDWARD DUDLEY CHASE 

We have here a fellow named Chase, 

On the track he can hit a good pace, 

When he runs with the pack 

He is never in back; 

He's always in front during a race. 



CHARLES HENRY CONNORS 

"Chuck" 
In lessons he ever gets A, 
He'd much rather study than play. 
He's an honor man sure. 
And his place is secure, 
As the studious "Queen of the May." 



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RALPH EMERSON COOPER 
"Ralphr "Coop*' 
While Cooper in person is lean, 
He's endowed with an intellect keen, 
He will sit by the hour 
With his book in a bower, 
That knowledge may enter his bean. 



HENRY ANTHONY COZZENS 
"Hein'te" 
Before us is Cozzens, much sought 
By the maids of New Brunswick; he 

ought 
To excel as a student 
For he's modest and prudent 
And in lessons he never is caught. 



FRANK HAYWARD CONOVER 

"Connie" 
Here's Connie, a man in the store, 
Who disposes of chocolates galore, 
H in money you're nil, 
He will loan you a bill, 
And he never gets angry or sore. 

WALTER HORNBRUCK 
"Horn'te** 
Here's Hornie, our merchant who lurks 
In his store at the Dorm where he works, 
He thinks it is funny 
To take in the money. 
But no one can sav that he shirks. 



LESTER EMERY COOK 

"Lester" 
A peach of a singer is Cook, 
With his notes from a musical book, 
As a soloist sweet 
He's a hard one to beat; 
And manv's the hand he "has shook." 



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LOUIS MORRIS DAVIS 
"Davis" 
Here's Davis, a man from Bound Brook, 
Who once by the Soph'morcs was took. 
But he soon settled down 
In this quiet old town. 
And is frequently seen with his book. 



CLIFFORD E. DENNIS 
'*Dennie" 
The chief of the Juniors is Dennie, 
He can play the piano with any. 
He can also play ball, 
And the best of it all, 
As a pitcher his curves are uncanny. 



JOHN CLYDE ENK 
"Enk" 
John Enk is a student of note, 
Who learns all his lessons by rote, 
He's gathered in college 
A cargo of knowledge, 
And yet, we opine, he will float. 



FRANK EDWIN FIELD 
"Frankie" 
This shy looking youngster is Field, 
His brain as a club he can wield, 
And every professor 
Thinks him the possessor 
Of knowledge that never can yield. 



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FRANCIS W. FLANAGAN 
"Flanny" 
youngster 



the fellows call 



There's 

Flanny, 

With a yell that is long and uncanny, 
He's so young he enjoys 
Every kind of a noise, 
Yet his hair is as gray as a granny. 



ELMER SMITH GRYMES 
"Grymesie" 
By Jove, right before us is Grymes, 
We can use him in one of our rhymes, 
He tries to be witty, 
But oh, what a pity» 
His jokes are not up to the times. 



JOSEPH KIRK FOLSOM 
''Joe" 
So quiet and thoughtful is Joe, 
He seems quite inactive, you know, 
But he works with a vim 
In both class-room and gym. 
You can see him wherever you go. 



CUTHBERT WEAD HAASIS 

"Cutty" 
Cuthbert Haasis' pictorial art. 
Of this book is a notable part, 
He draws night and day. 
He'll not marry, they say. 
For he's given his easel his heart. 



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PAUL W. HAASIS 

"Paul" 

Here's a student from Rahway, named 

Paul, 
You can see by his picture he's small, 
Overflowing with vim, 
He's a peach in the gym, 
And his lessons don't phase him at all. 



CHARLES HAMBROCK, JR. 
"Charlie" 
A track man of merit are you, 
And a leader in scholarship too, 
With never a stammer, 
You once hurled the hammer, 
And up to the heavens it flew. 



DONALD S. HAVENS 
"Don" 
Don Havens is bright, so they say. 
He works on the year book each day, 
With a corps of advisers 
He stabs advertisers, 
So doubtless the bus'ness will pay. 



JOHN C. HEINS 

"John," "Heinsy" 
And here's a young fellow named Heins, 
In the Glee Club as tenor he shines, 
W^ith his presence he honors 
All the great prima-donnas, 
For a ticket he never declines. 



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JOHN PACKER HICKMAN 
"Hick" 
A busy young fellow is Hick, 
He's there with the scholarship kick, 
He's a man of the class 
Who is certain to pass; 
He's one of the men who will stick. 



RAYMOND D. HOWELL 
"Ray" 
Here's Howell, whose first name is Ray, 
He's a student of note, so they say. 
And a runner to fear. 
For he's ne'er in the rear. 
Though he runs on the track every day. 



FREDERICK J. JOHNSON 
"Johnny" 
Fred Johnson's a man from the shore, 
As a jumper of note, 
He gets everyone's goat. 
Would we had of his like many more. 



AUGUST LEISTNER 
"Auffie" 
Here's a boy who is certainly bright, 
With a laugh often heard in the night, 
You can see him each day. 
In a top-coat of gray, 
And his shoes are a perfect delight. 



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WESTON LENNOX 

Here now is a youth of the class, 

Who merely will nod as you pass, 

He cares not at all. 

For a good game of ball. 

But work he absorbs in a mass. 



LAMBERT JENKINS LEONARD 
"Len" 
Here's a vouth of the Holy Hill gang* 
He's a peach in the slinging of slang, 
He keeps everyone buzzin' 
With puns by the dozen 
For lessons he don't give a hang. 



JESSE BURCiESS LESLIE 
"Jay'* 
This fellow's a worker named Jay, 
He is active by night and by day. 
To be sure he is small, 
But give him the ball, 
And we pity the man in his way. 



CLAREMONT W. MASKER 

"Matr 
A reckless young fellow is Masker, 
He rhymes very well with Alaska, 
And here with his sweater 
He never looked better; 
By Jove, he's preparing to ask 'er. 



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HOWARD D. McKINNEY 
"Mac" 
We greet a musician in Mac, 
Who displays a commendable knack, 
At least once a week, 
In the organ technique, 
And he's traveled to Europe and back. 



NEIL McDOUGAL 
"Mac" 
MacDougal lives many miles back. 
From the waters of trie came Mac, 
When his lessons are done. 
He goes out for a run, 
By Jove, he's a peach on the track. 



GEORGE MENAKER 
"George" 
We now have a student before us, 
Who in class meetings often will score us. 
His words smoothly flow 
Like a river, you know, 
Thev never can tire or bore us. 



GEORGE RAYMOND MERRILL 
"Merrie" 
Here's Merrill, the guy with the "mon," 
As treasurer he's A number one, 
He collects from each man 
Just as much as he can. 
He's got all the class on the run. 



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CHARLES MILLER 
"Charley" 
A farmer of note, Charley Miller, 
Besides, he's a quaint Holy Hiller, 
Though in lessons he's slow, 
He's a plugger, you know. 
In church down at home he's a "pillar." 



MAHLON G. MILLIKEN 
"Millie" 
From Bloomfield to Rutgers came Millie, 
Through the week he stays here willy- 
nilly, 
But when Friday comes round 
In dear Bloomfield he's found. 
But perhaps the attraction is Tillie. 



OLIVER FRITTS MITCHELL 

"Mitch" 
The Juniors at bowling are fair. 
They make an occasional spare, 
Mitchell counts it a sin 
If we don't always win. 
The game is his worry and care. 



THOMAS VASSAR MORTON 
"T. Vassar" 
T. Vassar's of dignified plan, 
He will give you advice when he can. 
It is easy to see> 
And we think you'll agree, 
Tom Morton's a notable man. 



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THURLOW C. NELSON 
"Thurloiv'' 
Each morning he walks from the Park, 
As happy and blithe as a lark; 
He never will shirk 
From a moment of work. 
In lessons they say he's a shark. 



HERMAN A. NEWMARK 
"AT 
And here we present to the reader 
Friend Newmark, a socialist pleader, 
Who believes in Earl Marx 
And if marks produce sharks, 
Why, Newmark will soon be a leader. 



JOSEPH S. OBECNY 
"Beer "Joe*' 
Obecny and Quint are the two 
Who are looking for something to do, 
Just leave it to Beck, 
To have fun by the peck, 
He never is worried or blue. 



BRYCE A. QUINT 

"Squint" 
Old Quint came from out of the West, 
He decided that Rutgers is best. 
He sure is a winner 
And though a beginner 
He mingles with all of the rest. 



LAWRENCE H. OPDYKE 
"Larry" 
Here's Larry, a man on his toes 
In baseball, as everyone knows. 
He once had a Hre 
With consequence dire, 
It burned up his new suit of clothes. 



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JOHN H. S. PUTNAM 
"Put,*' " General" 
Hail to the student called Put, 
He's certain of honors, — all but. 
At the Y. M. C. A. 
He is seen every day, 
When he "cusses" he mummurs, "Tut, 
tut." 



GEORGE HERBERT RAMSEY 
"Doc" 
Here's a man with the nickname of Doc, 
Who is strongly opposed to a knock. 
Though few of us know it, 
He shines as a poet. 
And can write epic verse by the clock. 



GEORGE STANLEY ROBINS 
"Robby" 
Here's Robby, a friend of the lasses. 
Who smiles at each one that he passes, 
He's a runner beside, 
When he gets in his stride; 
And he's safe, we believe, in his classes. 



G. RAYMOND ROBINSON 
"Robby" 
Here's the hero of battles galore. 
Who made all the Navy men sore, 
Robby made a great run, 
And the battle was won, 
But the umpire cancelled the score. 



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MILES ROSS 

"June** 

We present next a student (?), Miles 

Ross, 
Who'll become a political boss, 
Now he's happy and gay, 
And he smiles all the day. 
And for friends he is ne'er at a loss. 



OLIN R. RUNDALL 

"Run" 
Old Rundall's a peach of a scout. 
No danger of him dropping out, 
He isn't to blame 
If he looks rather tame. 
He isn't a fellow to shout. 



MORRIS SCHECHTER 
''Morry" 
We never have heard much from 

Schechter, 
When we did, though, we didn't expect 

ter, 
For he got in a fight, 
Smashed some glass with his "right," 
And then had to pay the collector. 



CORNELIUS F. SCHENCK 
"Neil," "Square" 
There was a young fellow named 

Schenck, 
Who stands in the very first rank, 
He absorbs all the knowledge 
That is found around college; 
His brain is a regular tank. 



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HAROLD W. SCHENCK 

"Fatr "Round" 
Fat Schenck is a jovial youth, 
With a humor a trifle uncouth, 
But we prize him the more 
For he's sound at the core. 
And his actions are founded on truth. 



SAMUEL M. SHARKEY 
"Sam" 
Sam Sharkey's an editor small. 
And reporter of each game of bal 
He uses with glee 
The editorial "we," 
And he never gets tired at all. 



HOMER LEWIS SHEFFER 
"Shef" 
Old Sheffer's a star at debate. 
To classes he never is late. 
His eyes are of blue, 
His actions are true. 
He comes from the Empire State. 



EARL REED SILVERS 

"Sir 

There was a voung fellow named Sil, 

Who of running can ne'er get his fill, 

When he sprints up the track 

In the midst of the pack, 

You can see he is not standing still. 



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HERBERT SIMON 
"Herb'' 
From Newark came Simon one day, 
With a spirit serene and blase, 
And since then, by gum. 
He's been studying some. 
He seldom gets stuck, so they say. 



JAMES R. SLATER 

"Slater" 
\ modest young fellow 



named 
bread, meat, and 



There's a 

Slater, 
Who partakes of 

partater 
And gravy encore, 
And many things more. 
And besides, he's of studious nater. 



EDWARD T. SMITH 
"Tielie" 
There was a young fellow named Tiel, 
His smile is a good one, and real. 
Though in class he's asleep. 
When the Prof doesn't peep; 
He attends every banquet and spiel. 



HILMAR F. SMITH 
"Fritz" 
Here's a busy young fellow named Fritz, 
Who in college has made many hits. 
You will always find him 
In the field or the gym. 
For from one to the other he flits. 



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THOMAS D. SMITH 
"T, D." 
Here's Smith, who is quite literary, 
Nor will he maintain the contrary. 
For he passes away 
Many hours each day. 
In the office or in the libra rv. 



CHARLES C. STOVER 
"C/iarlie" 
We now introduce Charley Stover, 
In his studies he's always in clover. 
For he wakes up at dawn, 
Shakes his head with a yawn. 
And with sturdy resolve — he turns over. 



CHARLES A. TITUS 

"Lyiy" 
A fellow named Titus one year. 
Entered Rutgers with purpose sincere, 
But he wandered away 
For a year and a day. 
So now he's a class in the rear. 



CHARLES C. VAN DERIPE 
"Fan" 
By, Jove, here's a fellow from town. 
In his lessons you can't keep him down. 
As a student he's best. 
And enjoys every test, 
And vacation, they say, makes him frown. 



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HENRY L. VAN MATER 
"Fan" 
And here is a student called Van, 
Who studies whenever he can, 
As quiet and still 
As a house on a hill. 
But yet, he's* a popular man. 



THEODORE VAN WRINKLE 
"Rip" 
Before us is Captain Van Winkle, 
With eyes that with comradeship twinkle. 
He doesn't care much 
For lessons and such. 
But of football he knows everv wrinkle. 



PAUL WALRATH 
"Paul" 
Paul Walrath's a worker of vim. 
No lesson can ever phase him, 
If a problem is tough 
He will murmur, "hot stuff," 
And attack it with countenance grim. 



FRANCIS E. WEIS 
"Skeeter" 
Before us is drum-beater Weis, 
With a twinkle in both of his eyes, 
He revels in fun, 
The old son of a gun. 
He'll do something yet — if he tries. 



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CLASS OF 1914. 

President— JOHN P. TOOHEV. 
Vice-President— GEORGE W. SCHMIDT. 
Secretary— PAUL D. PRENTISS. 
Treasurer— FRANKLIN O. CHURCH. 
Historian— OREN F. BROWNINCJ. 



YELL. 

Alo go Rex, go Rex, go Reen, 
Hurra! Hurra! Hurra! Reen! 
Rutgers, Rutgers, Rutgers; '14. 



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HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1914 



List'! List'! Ye idle ones! 
For through these pages runs, 
And now unbiased comes 

This our class story. 
Though not a poet old> 
To sing of deeds so bold, 
My tale, though poorly told. 

Smacks much of glory. 



Last year though Freshmen new, 
We soon saw what to do; 
And hit the Sophs a few ; 

Who can deny it? 
We ripped them up the back, 
Paused in our wild attack. 
Several thick skulls to crack; 

Do facts belie it? 



You see us once more here 
At last in Sophomore year, 
Putting respect and fear 

Into the slimers. 
And on that dark Proc. night. 
We put 'em all to flight, 
Not one was left to fight. 

With us oldtimers. 



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And in the Flag Rush, too, 
Though our band numbered few, 
And many formed their crew; 

We didn't spare it. 
Leaping into the fight. 
We pulled with all our might, 
The Freshmen held it tight, 

We wouldn't tear it. 



It was a gorgeous sight, 
The Gym ablaze with light. 
On that December night. 

And bright with flowers. 
Gaily each merry pair. 
Sophomore and maiden fair. 
Free from all thought of care, 

Danced through the hours. 



Then in our next class bout. 
We'd have won without doubt. 
Had but the rope held out. 

All gone, confound it. 
We cooked one Freshman's goosct 
But used up every noose; 
This is a poor excuse. 

But one wav 'round it. 



In the athletic field, 

To none we prestige yield. 

Stands nineteen fourteen's shield 

In the van ever. 
In baseball and in track. 
In football line and back. 
Foremost in each attack. 

Giving ground never. 



Now and then in the games. 

We let them make their names, 
'Cause all the pretty dames 

Said we should let 'em. 
But with no girls around. 
We gave them thrashings sound. 
And their presumptions downed. 
Whene'er we met them. 



All students, old and new, 
Our class would say to you: 
Do you be ever true 

To Alma Mater. 
However high your aim. 
Never forget her claim; 
Never for sake of fame. 

Her honor barter. 



To get a hat or two. 

The whole green Freshman crew. 

Rushed on the Sophomore few. 

Yet 'tis recorded; 
Many a sturdy bat 
Knocked those bold Freshmen flat. 
And not a single hat. 

Their pains rewarded. 



•*To thine own self be true." 
Happy the men, but few, 
Who to themselves are true, 

True to their ideals. 
*Tis not the swiftest pace 
That always wins the race. 
Failure in honor's place 

Life oft reveals. 

Historian. 



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CLASS OF 1915. 

President— WILLIAM E. SKILLMAN. 
Vice-President— JOSEPH P. TAYLOR. 
Secretary— ALLAN S. RICHARDSON. 
Treasurer— WAINWRIGHT D. TWING. 
Historian— FREDERIC K. SHIELD, JR. 



YELL. 

Ally garoo, garoo, garoo, 
Ally garoo, gareen; 
Rah, rah, Rutgers, 
Rutgers fifteen. 



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A HISTORY OF THE CLASS OF 1915 

To the undergraduates of our Alma Mater a written history of the class of 1915 is 
hardly necessary. Indeed, it is almost superfluous, for the deeds of this valiant class are 
emblazoned upon the memories of the Sophomores (for instance) in letters engraved by the 
physical and intellectual prowess, and illumined by the very brilliancy of its individual 
members. Nevertheless, for the benefit of those not fortunate enough to be intimately as- 
sociated with the youngest but not the least ambitious class of Rutgers, an endeavor will 
be made to relate in an unprejudiced nianner the chief facts concerning the 1915 Fresh- 
man's career. 

Into the breaches left in the ranks of Rutgers' loyal students by the advance of the 
classes rushed a crowd of youth eager to join in the struggle against the so-called "wary 
Sophomores." On the evening of September 19, 1911, the moon and stars seemed to smile 
with quiet approval upon the Freshmen, as they began their course with the first test of 
their young manhood, the "proc" rush. After tearing down the last vestige of the "procs," 
they demonstrated their ability to "Peerade" in unprecedentedly good form (as many 
Juniors and even Seniors have admitted), and to hurl the zealous but helpless "Sophs" from 
their proud perch, the railroad bank. Then, unmolested, they calmly "peeraded" to bed. 

The following morning was bright and clear, a propitious omen to the class of 1915. 
One hundred and forty-seven strong filed into chapel, the largest class that had ever entered 
those sacred walls. 

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At ten o'clock of the same day the Freshmen appeared for the flag rush with a feeling 
of supreme confidence. The few, brave enough to be present, rushed with the right spirit, 
but alas! they were completely lost in the mass of squirming Freshmen, who kept 15 hands 
on the coveted flag to 4 of the Sophomores. 

On the following Friday the new class easily won its third victory by the score of 3 to 1 
in the spectacular rope rush. 

In the field of organized athletics as well as in the rushes the Freshmen have made a 
deep impression, first by winning the most points in the annual Fall interclass track meet, 
and, secondly, by their achievements in the realm of football. This sturdy class has pro- 
duced 4 men who have served Alma Mater on the 'Varsity and as many more have no less 
faithfully performed their duty on the "Scrub" team. Relative to this it might be well to 
record the Freshman-Sophomore football game, which with a score of 15-0 resulted in 
another most decisive defeat for the dejected second year men. 

Undoubtedly it is the duty of a true historian to relate the mistakes as well as the suc- 
cesses of the lives of the people he is portraying, but there is not even space enough in which 
to tell of 191 5's triumphs; — how one morning beneath a tree upon the campus a crowd of 
"Sophs" were seen gazing longingly and with open-mouthed wonder at their "brand" new 
hats, as they, high and dry, gayly flapped in the breeze, and then how they mysteriously dis- 
appeared ; how those stylish hats in their immaculate whiteness were soiled; how the Fresh- 
men bowling team won two games out of three played with the experienced team of 1914; 
how the Freshman picture was successfully taken; and how daily was heard the defiant 
"Allee-Garro-Garre," et cetera, fere ad infinitum. 

As for the errors, they have been numerous. All men, even the best arc prone to err. 
It is also true, however* that some mistakes are pardonable, when not made twice. If there 
were no faults, there would be no room for improvement. Truly, this young class of 1915 
has caught the splendid spirit, which has characterized old Rutgers ever since its founding, 
and there is every reason to believe that in possession of it 1915 will progress to unattained 
heights of greatness, and thereby do great honor to themselves and their Alma Mater. 

Historian. 



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Delta Phi 



SEMPER UBIQUE 



CURATORES 



William H. S. Demarest. 
L. Laflin Kellogg, 



Tunis G. Bergen, 
Irving Hoagland. 



FRATRES IN URBE 



George V. N. Baldwin, E 

John R, Baldwin, E 

J. Neilson Carpender, Jr., E 

Henry De la B. Carpender, E 

Sidney B. Carpender, II 

William Carpender, 2nd, E 

Robert A. Cook, N 

Drury W. Cooper, E 

Charles T. Cowenhoven, Jr., E 

William H. S. Demarest, E 

John E. Elmendorf, E 

Irving Hoagland, E 

J. Bayard Kirkpatrick, Jr., E 

Charles B. Ludlow, E 

John W. Mettler, E 

J. Livingston R. Morgan, E 



Henry D. B. Mulford, 
Henry A. Neilson, 
Robert C. Nicholas, 
Frederick W. Parker, 
William Reiley, 
Richard C. Rice, 
Laurance p. Runyon, 
Arthur V. Schenck, 
Charles J. Scudder, 
Myron T. Scudder, 
Frank II. Skinner, 
DouwE D. Williamson, 
Nicholas N. Williamson, 
J. Frederic Berg, 
S. M. Nelson, 
Dumont F. Elmendorf, 



E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
E 
£ 
E 
E 
E 
E 
£ 
E 
E 
£ 
£ 



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Fraternitas Delta Phi 



In Collegio Concordiae Dedicato 

Instituta est XIV Kal. Dec. 

Anno MDCCCXXVII 

Epsilon 
Collegio Rutgersensi 

III NoN. Feb. 
Anno MDCCCXLV 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Alpha Union College. 

Beta Brown University. 

Gamma New York University. 

Delta Columbia University. 

Epsilon Rutgers College. 

Eta University of Pennsylvania. 

Lambda Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 

Nu Lehigh University. 

Xi Johns Hopkins University. 

Pi Cornell University. 

Omicron Yale University. 

Rho University of Virginia, 



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DELTA PHI 

CLASS OF 1912 



Harold Curtice Amos. 
Edwin Howe Halsted. 
William Gettier Herrmax. 
John Dittgen Morrison. 

Ernest Weld 



♦Francesco Giglio Urbano. 
♦William Carpender, 2nd. 
♦Dean Courtney Anderson. 
♦Everett Melvin Freystadt. 

SCUDDER. 



CLASS OF 1913 

Edward Dudley Chase. Lawrence Hall Opdycke. 

♦Chalmers Wolf-Tone Overton. ♦Robert (Gregory Sparrow. 

Earl Reed Silvers. 

CLASS OF 1914 

Oren Focle Browning, Jr. Roy Bennett Anderson. 

Worthington Shumway Farley. John Edward Elmendorf, Jr. 

♦George Washington Pratt, 2nd. 



Harvey William Banks. 
Eliot Payson Corbin. 
♦Leon Abbott Erickson. 
William Louis Gay. 
♦Left college. 



CLASS OF 1915 



Ward Brewster Malmar. 
♦Charles Gross Slauson. 
Ralph Ten Broeck Todd. 
Laird Sumner Van Dyck. 



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'i^' 



/'.^ f ^^ 






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Zeta Psi 



Founded at New York University, 1846. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 

Phi New York University. 

Zeta Williams College. 

Delta Rutgers College. 

Sigma University of Pennsylvania. 

Chi Colby University. 

Epsilon Brown University. 

Kappa Tufts College. 

Tau Lafayette College. 

Upsilon University of North Carolina. 

Xi University of Michigan. 

Lambda Bowdoin College. 

Beta University of Virginia. 

Psi Cornell University. 

Iota University of California. 

Gamma Syracuse University. 

Theta Xi University of Toronto. 

Alpha Columbia University. 

Alpha Psi McGill University. 

Nu Case School of Applied Science. 

Eta Yale University. 

Mu Leland Stanford, Jr., University. 

Alpha Beta University of Minnesota. 

Alpha Epsilon University of Illinois. 

Lambda Psi University of Wisconsin. 

CHAPTER ROLL 

Pacific Association of Zeta Psi San Francisco, Cal. 

Northwestern Association of Zeta Psi Cleveland, O. 

Capitol Association of Zeta Psi Washington, D. C. 

Philadelphia Association of Zeta Psi Philadelphia, Pa. 

New England Association of Zeta Psi Boston, Mass. 

New Jersey Association of Zeta Psi Newark, N. J. 

State of Washington Association of Zeta Psi Seattle, Wash. 

Western Pennsylvania Association of Zeta Psi Pittsburg, Pa. 

Southern California Association of Zeta Psi Los Angeles, Cal. 

St. Louis Association of Zeta Psi St. Louis, Mo. 

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Zeta Psi 



Delta Chapter. Established 1848. 



TRUSTEES 



J. Bayard Kirkpatrick, 
Rev. John H. Raven, 



Benjamin Chandler Sears, 

COURTLAND PARKER. 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Hon. James H. Van Cleef, \ T 
William H. Waldron, A 
Edward H. Waldron, A 
J. Bayard Kirkpatrick, A 
Rev. Allen D. Campbell, A 
Herbert M. Waldron, A 



Howard V. D. Waldron, A 
Rev. John H. Raven, A 
Henry G. Cook, A 
Freeman Woodbridge, * 
John L. Duryee, A 
Theodore R. Varick. 



Ralph L. Willis, K 



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ZETA PSI 

UNDERCiRADUATE MEMBERS 
CLASS OF 1912 



John F. McC^overn, Jr. 
Richard Alexander Smith. 



DoxALD Ross. 

Perry Hadwick Bascom. 



CLASS OF 1913 

•Harland Bartholomew. John Parker Hickman. 

Howard A. Julie. 



Harry Cattenhorn Davies. 
Adolph Bauman. 
Thomas U. Purrington. 



CLASS OF 1914 



John Sanderson Elliott. 
Frank Lodge Walton. 
♦Charles Ewan Merritt, Jr. 



Arthur Barton. 



♦Left College. 



CLASS OF 1915 

John Conger. 
Lawrence G. Gillam. 



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Fraternity of Delta Upsilon 



Founded at Williams College, 1834. 



1834. Williams. 1847. 

1838. Union. 

1847. Hamilton. 
1847. Amherst. 1860. 

1856. Middlebury. 

1857. BowDOiN. 
1858. Rutgers. 1873. 

1868. MiAML 

1869. Cornell. 
1870. Marietta. 1885. 

1880. Northwestern. 

1885. Wisconsin. 
1885. Lafayette. 1891. 

1887. De Pauw. 

1888. Pennsylvania. 
1890. Minnesota. 1896. 

1898. Nebraska. 

1898. McGiLL. 
1899. Toronto. 1905. 

1910. Washington. 

1911. Penn State. 



Western Reserve. 
1850. Colby. 

1852. Rochester. 
Brown. 
1865. Colgate. 

1865. New York. 
Syracuse. 
1876. Michigan. 

1880. Harvard. 
Columbia. 
1885. Lehigh. 

1886. Tufts. 
Technology. 
1894. Swarthmore. 

1896. Stanford. 
California. 
1900. Chicago. 

1904. Ohio. 
Illinois. 



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Delta Upsilon 



Rutgers Chapter. Founded 1858. 



B. H. B. Sleight. 
F. A. Pattison. 
Charles Deshler. 



TRUSTEES 

William I. Chamberlain. 
C. E. Pattison. 
P. L. Van xNuis. 



MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS TO THE DELTA UPSILON 

FRATERNITY, INC. 

William H. Van Steenberg 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Rev J. Preston Searle. 
Prof. Eliot R. Payson. 
Prof. George H. Payson. 
Prof. Robert W. Prentiss. 
Registrar Irving S. Upson. 
William I. Chamberlain. 
Rev. Isaac Schenck. 
Charles Deshler. 
Louis B. Chamberlain. 
Prof. Melville T. Cook. 



Warren R. Schenck. 
A. L. Smith. 
Spencer Devan. 
T. Alan Devan. 
Percy Van Nuis. 
Harold R. Segoine. 
Marcus C. T. Andre ae. 
Luman J. Shafer. 
F. Marmaduke Potter. 
Raymond S. Patterson. 



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CLASS OF 1912 
Samuel Furman Foster. Russell Woodvvorth Gies. 

V^ALEN'TINE BrITTON HaVENS. 

CLASS OF 1913 
Donald Leston Havens. George Stanley Robins. 

Jesse Burge:s Leslie. Harold William Schenck. 

Howard Decker McKinney. Cornelius Frelinghuysen Schenck. 

John Henry Stowits Putnam. Charles Coane Stover. 

Paul Walrath. 

CLASS OF 1914 
Edward Hopkins Brill. David Bevier Van Dvck. 

Franklin Oscar Church. Paul Dudley Prentiss. 

Edgar Chesebro Cook. Austin L. de la Torre. 

Arthur Hartland Mershon. Rawson Parkhurst Dickerson. 

Albert George Leeds. 

CLASS OF 1915. 
Robert Wyckoff Searle. Edgar George Hermman. 

Ray-mond Bovey Searle. Roy Mundy Davidson Richardsom. 

Theodore Voorhees. 
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Fraternity of Delta Kappa Epsilon 



Founded at Yale, 1844. 



CHAPTER ROLL 



Phi. Yale College, 

Theta, Bowdoin, 

Xi, Colby, 

Sigma, Amherst, 

Gamma, Vanderbilt University, 

Psi, University of Alabama, 

Upsilon, Brown University, 

Chi, University of Mississippi, 

Beta, University of North Carolina, 

Eta, University of Virginia, 

Kappa, Miami University, 

Lambda, Kenyon, 

Pi, Dartmouth, 

Iota, Central University, 

Alpha Alpha, Middlebury, 

Omicron, University of Michigan, 

Epsilon, Williams, 

Rho, Lafayette, 

Tau, Hamilton, 

Mu, Colgate, 

Nu, College of the City of New York, 

Beta Phi, University of Rochester, 

Phi Chi, Rutgers, 

Psi Phi, DePauw University, 

Gamma Phi, Wesleyan University, 

Psi Omega, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 

Beta Chi, Adelbert, 

Delta Chi, Cornell, 

Delta Delta, University of Chicago, 

Phi Gamma, Syracuse University, 

Gamma Beta, Columbia University, 

Theta Zeta, University of California, 

Alpha Chi, Trinity, 

Phi Epsilon^ University of Minnesota, 

Sigma Tau, Boston Institute of Technology, 

Tau Lambda, Tulane University, 

Alpha Phi, University of Toronto, 

Delta Kappa, University of Pennsylvania, 

Tau Alpha, McGill University, 

Sigma Rho, Lei and Stanford University, 

Delta Pi, University of Illinois, 

Rho Delta, University of Wisconsin, 

Kappa Epsilon, University of Washington, 

91 



Box 137, Yale Station, New Haven, 

Box 110, Brunswick, Me. 

Box 166, Waterville, Me. 

Box 109, Amherst, Mass. 

Nashville, Tenn. 

University P. O., Tuscaloosa Co., Ala. 

65 College St., Providence, R. I. 

University P. O., Lafayette Co., Miss. 

Box 172, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

University of Virginia, Va. 

Box 132, Oxford, O. 

Box 337, Gambier, O. 

Box 437, Hanover, N. H. 

Danville, Ky. 

Box 691, Middlebury, Vt. 

607 South State St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Box 27, Williamstown, Mass. 

D. K. E. House, Easton, Pa. 

Lock Box 8, Clinton, N. Y. 

Box 1033, Hamilton, N. Y. 

48 West 125th St., New York City. 

285 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. 

78 College Ave., New Brunswick, N. J. 

307 E. Seminary St., Greencastle, Ind. 

332 High St., Middletown, Conn. 

183 2d St., Troy, N. Y. 

2199 Adelbert Rd., S. E., Cleveland, O. 

Ithaca, N. Y. 

5754 Woodland Ave., Chicago, 111. 

D. K. E. House, Syracuse, N. Y. 

608 West 113th St., New York City. 
2330 Telegraph Ave., Berkeley, Cal. 
94 Vernon St., Hartford, Conn. 

518 12th Av., S. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 

215 Newbury St., Boston, Mass. 

New Orleans, La. 

91 Wellesley St., Toronto, Canada. 

307 S. 39th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

20 Shuter St., Montreal, Canada. 

Stanford University, Cal. 

407 East Green St., Champaign, 111. 

Madison, Wisconsin. 

Seattle, Washington. 



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Delta Kappa Epsilon 



Phi Chi Chapter. Founded 1861. 



Richard T. Green. 
William H. Leupp. 
Wayne H. Thompson. 



TRUSTEES 

Elliott E. Van Cleef. 
Warren C. Van Slyke. 
Willard p. Voorhees. 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Prof. A. A. Titsworth, *, X 

Prof. F. C. Van Dyck,4>, X 

Prof. E. B. Davis, II 

Prof. C. H. Whitman, a 

William H. Leupp, *, X 

Hon. Charles T. Cowenhoven,*, X 

John H. Leupp, 4>,X 

Frederick Winfield Conger, *,X 

Prof. L. Fisher, - 



Theodore B. Booraem,*, X 
J. A. Van xXest,*, X 
H. V'. M. Dennis,*, X 
Thomas S. Brock, r,4> 
E. B. Vail,*,X 
Robert A. Cooke, *, X 
Willard P. Voorhees, *, X 
Elliott E. Van Cleef, *,X 
Rev. E. B. Joyce,* 



E. R. Benson, O 



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UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS 

CLASS OF 1912 
Walter Cox Bowen. Elbron Fisher. 

Augustus Lemuel Gladding. Leroy Colver Wilsey. 



CLASS OF 1913 
Whitfield Jenks Bell. Hilmar Frederick Smith. 



Miles Ross. 



John C. Heines. 
Mahlon G. Milliken. 



James Anderson Mason. 
Stanley M. Wilsey. 



CLASS OF 1914 

Roscoe S. Conkling. 
Lloyd F. Regendahl. 



Harry B. Smith. 
Harry B. Jackson. 



CLASS OF 1915 

Ferdinand D. P. Hasbrouck. 
Herbert A. Thompson. 
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Fraternity of Chi Phi 



Founded at Princeton, 1824. 



Alpha, 

Beta, 

Gamma, 

Delta, 

Epsilon, 

Zeta, 

Eta, 

Theta, 

Iota, 

Lambda, 

Mu, 

Nu, 

XI, 

Omicron, 

Rho, 

Phi, 

Chi, 

Psi, 

Omega, 

Alpha Chi, 



CHAPTER ROLL 

University of Virginia, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 

Emory College, 

Rutgers College, 

Hamoden-Sidney College, 

Franklin and Marshall College, 

University of Georgia, 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 

Ohio State University, 

University of California, 

Stevens Institute of Technology, 

University of Texas, 

Cornell University, 

Yale University, 

Lafayette College, 

Amherst College, 

Dartmouth College, 

Lehigh University, 

Georgia Institute of Technology, 

Ohio Wesleyan, 



Charlottesville, Va. 
Boston, Mass. 
Oxford, Ga. 
New Brunswick, N. J. 
Hampden-Sidney, Va. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Athens, Ga. 
Troy, N. Y. 
Columbus, O. 
Berkeley, Cal. 
Hoboken, N. J. 
Austin, Tex. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Easton, Pa. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Hanover, N. H. 
South Bethlehem, Pa. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Delaware, O. 



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Chi Phi 



Delta Chapter. Established 1867. 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Dr. Samuel Long. 
Prof. Ralph O. Smith. 
James Bishop. 
Wm. S. Mvers. 
Geo. C. Towle. 
Gregory R. Gilmore. 
Edward F. Johnson, 
Geo. R- Deshler. 



Chas. T. Tindell. 
W. Frank Parker. 
Wm. p. Clark. 
Chas. W. Stevens, Jr. 
Harold B. Osborn. 
Schuyler S. Rust. 
Raymond P. Wilson. 
Walter C. Sedam. 



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CHI PHI 



CLASS OF 1912 
Henry C. Cooper. 

CLASS OF 1913 
Ralph E. Cooper. 
Clifford E. Dennis. 

CLASS OF 1914 
George M. Bechtel. 
Frank DeVVitt Blanchard. 
Eric W. Luster. 

CLASS OF 1915 



Edward T. Smith. 
Raymond D. Howell. 

Robert O. Bouton. 
Frederick W. Holcomb. 
George W. Wilmot, Jr. 



George R. Morrison. 






William Shearer. 


♦Wesley Benner. 






Arthur C. Busch. 


♦Ralph L. Shearer. 






J. Paul Taylor. 


♦J. Champlin Pierce. 






Theodore G. Sulllivan, Jr. 




JOSEP 


H Kerr. 




♦Left College. 




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Fraternity of Beta Theta Pi 



Founded at Miami University, 1839. 



CHAPTER ROLL 



DISTRICT I. 
Amherst (BI), Amherst, Mass. 
Boston (T), Boston, Mass. 
BowDOiN (B2), Brunswick, Mc 
Brown (K), Providence, R. I. 
Dartmouth (AU), Hanover, N. H. 
Maine (BH), Oreno, Mc. 

DISTRICT II. 

Columbia (A A), New York, N. Y. 
Rutgers (BT), New Brunswick, N. J. 
Stevens (2), Hoboken, N. J. 
Wesleyan (^1E), Middletown, Conn. 
Yale (*X), New Haven, Conn. 

DISTRICT III. 

Colgate (BB), Hamilton, N. Y. 
Cornell (B A), Ithaca, N. Y. 
St. Lawrence (BZ), Canton, N. Y. 
Syracuse (BE), Syracuse, N. Y. 
Toronto (BZ), Toronto, Ont. 
Union (N), Schenectady, N. Y. 

DISTRICT IF. 
Dickinson (A 2), Carlisle, Pa. 
Johns Hopkins (AX), Baltimore, Md. 
Lehigh (BX), South Bethlehem, Pa. 
Pennsylvania (*), Philadelphia, Pa. 

DISTRICT V. 
Davidson (*A), Davidson College, N. C. 
Hampden-Sidney (Z), Hampden-Sidney, Va. 
North Carolina (HB), Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Virginia (O), Charlottesville, Va. 

DISTRICT VI. 
Bethany (^), Bethany, W. V. 
Penn State (AT), State College, Pa. 
Washington- Jefferson (P), Washing'n, Pa. 
West Virginia (B^), Morgantown, W. Va. 

DISTRICT VII. 

Central (E), Danville, Ky. 

Cincinnati (BN), Cincinnati, O. 

Miami (A), Oxford, O. 

Ohio (BK), Athens, O. 

Ohio State (^A), Columbus, O. 

Wittenberg (AT), Springfield, O. 



DISTRICT VIII. 
Case (AK), Cleveland, O. 
Denison (AH), Granville, O. 
Kenyon (BA), Gambicr, O. 
Ohio Wesleyan (©), Delaware, O. 
Western Reserve (B), Cleveland, O. 
WoosTER (A A), Woostcr, O. 

DISTRICT IX. 
De Pauw (A), Greencastle, Ind. 
Hanover (I), Hanover, Ind. 
Indiana (H), Bloomington, Ind. 
Purdue (BM) Lafayette, Ind. 
Wabash (T), Crawfordsville, Ind. 

DISTRICT X. 
Beloit (X), Beloit, Wis. 
Chicago (AP), Chicago, 111. 
Illinois (EP), Champaign, 111. 
Knox (AS), Galesburg, 111. 
Michigan (A^, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Northwestern (P), Evanston, 111. 

Wisconsin (All), Madison, Wis. 
DISTRICT XI. 

Iowa (AB), Iowa City, la. 

Iowa State (T 2), Ames, la. 

Iowa Wesleyan (A E), Mt. Pleasant, la. 

Minnesota (BIT), S. E. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Nebraska (AT), Lincoln, Neb. 
DISTRICT XII. 

Kansas (AN), Lawrence, Kan. 

Missouri (Z4>), Columbia, Mo. 

Oklahoma (T*), Norman, Okla. 

TuLANE (B2), New Orleans, La. 

Vanderbilt (BA), Nashville, Tenn. 

Washington (A I), St. Louis, Mo. 

Westminster (A A), Fulton, Mo. 
DISTRICT XIII. 

Colorado (BI), Boulder, Col. 

Colorado Mines (B*), Golden, Col. 

Denver (A Z), Denver, Col. 
DISTRICT XIV. 

California (12), Berkeley, Cal. 

Stanford (Ail), Standford University, Cal. 

Washington State (BQ), Seattle, Wash. 

Oregon (B P), Eugene, Oregon. 



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Beta Theta Pi 



Beta Gamma Established 1871. 
Founded as the Alpha of Alpha Sigma Chi. 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Howard V. Buttler, B r 
George Hill, B r 
Prof. Cullen W. Parmelee, B r 
Prof. William H. Kirk, A X 
Everett L. Freeman, B 8 
George A. Osborne, B r 



George H. Buttler, B r 
Schuyler Rust, *X 
Alexander W. Quackenbush, B r 
William N. MacNeill, BT 
Edward B. Irish, N 
Tracy S. Voorhees, B r 



William B. Cook, B r 



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BETA THETA PI 



CLASS OF 
Henry Kilmer Hotaling. 
♦Carlton A. Ayres. 
♦Frederick R. Mackey. 

CLASS OF 
Herbert M. Bergamini. 
♦Arthur W. Ellis. 
Samuel M. Sharkey. 

CLASS OF 
Donald Henry Gesse. 
Theodore Hill Conklin. 

CLASS OF 
George Joseph Smith. 
Harry Newton Blue. 
John Page Noble. 

♦Francis Xavier 
♦Left College. 

101 



1913 



1912 

Vivian C. Ross. 
Dexter White. 
♦George Milton Frieze. 

Thomas Turner Barr, Jr. 
Theodore Van Winkle. 
Cjeorge Herbert Ramsey. 

♦Reginald Bulkley Crowell. 
Raymond Carlton Robbins. 

1915 

Joseph Miller Davis. 

Mahlon Lee Harker. 

Stanley Underwood North. 
Archibald. 



1914 



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Fraternity of Chi Psi 



Founded at Union College, 1841. 



ACTIVE ALPHAS 

Pi Union College, 1841. 

Theta Williams College, 1842. 

Mu Middlebury College, 1843. 

Alpha Wcsleyan University, 1844. 

Phi Hamilton College, 1845. 

Epsilon University of Michigan, 1845. 

Chi Amherst College, 1864. 

Psi Cornell University, 1869. 

Nu University of Minnesota, 1874. 

Iota University of Wisconsin, 1878. 

Rho Rutgers College, 1879. 

Xi Stevens Institute, 1883. 

Alpha Delta University of Georgia, 1890. 

Beta Delta Lehigh University, 1894. 

Gamma Delta Stanford University, 1895. 

Delta Delta University of California, 1896. 

Epsilon Delta University of Chicago, 1898. 



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Alpha Rho of Chi Psl 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 

AsHER Atkinson, P Martin A. Schenck, P 

W. Edwin Florance, P F. E. Wilder, P 

John H. Gillespie, P C. P. Wilber, P 

George A. Viehmann, P Russell E. Watson, P 

Adrian Vermeulb, Jr., P Harold S. Watson, P 

George W. Nuttman, P Moncure C. Carpender, 5 

Frederick M. Hart, P W. D. Hoyt, AA 

Huyler Von Hovenburg, P W. D. Conklin, * 

J. C. Thompson, R 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 

New York City New York, N. Y. 

Detroit Detroit, Mich. 

Chicago Chicago, III. 

South Carolina Columbia, S. C. 

Alpha Alpha Middletown, Conn. 

Alpha Xi Hoboken, N. J. 

New England Boston, Mass. 

Northern and Eastern New York Schenectady, N. Y. 

Alpha Rho New Brunswick, N. J. 

Washington Washington, D. C. 

Northwestern Minneapolis, Minn. 

Philadelphia Philadelphia, Pa. 

Western Pennsylvania Pittsburg, Pa. 

Wisconsin Milwaukee, Wis. 

Georgia Atlanta, Ga. 

DuLUTH West Duluth, Minn. 

Portland Portland, Me. 

San Francisco San Francisco^ Cal. 

Colorado Denver, Col. 

St. Louis St. Louis, Mo. 

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CHI PSI 

UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS 
1912 



Geo. D. Auchter. 
Fred M. Fountain. 

VV. C. Ball, Jr. 

S. M.. Firth. 

W. H. Brandow. 
F. C. Brush. 
H. V. D. Cory. 
Douglas Cum.mings. 



1913 



1914 



1915 



E. C. Scott. 

A. B. Titsworth. 

Neil Mac Dougall. 

F. H. Low. 

Louis Du Bois. 
John Nevin, Jr. 
R. J. Savitz. 
Dudley Watson. 



G. W. WiNSLOW. 

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Gamma Sigma 



Founded 1904. 



TRUSTEES 

L1.0YD B. Wheeler. Irving L. Owen. 

R. Lester Beach. Herbert B. Fenn. 

E. Stanley Chedister. 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Professor Richard Morris. Irving L. Owen. 

Frank Randall Pratt. Professor Frank R. Pratt. 



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James Kav Alverso\. 
Fred Arthur Briegs. 



Henry Anthony Cozzens, 
Frederick James Johnson. 
Joseph Kirk Folsom. 

Charles Henry Gant. 
Charles A. Hallenbeck. 



Guy Foster Buckman. 
Eric Henry Jentz. 
Warren Durward McCloskey. 
♦Allan Seymour Richardson. 
Frederick Kull Shields, Jr. 
♦Left College. 



GAMMA SIGMA 

CLASS OF 1912 

MiLo Claude Moseman. 
William Emmons Smock. 
Elmer Leigh Walker. 

CLASS OF 1913 

Homer Lewis Sheffer. 

Thomas Vassar Morton. 

Sandford Roy Smith. 
CLASS OF 1914 

Reginald Pennington Lukens. 

CJeorge William Schmidt. 
CLASS OF 1915 

Henry Edgar Riker. 

Franklin Morrow Ritchie. 

Phillip Ritter, Jr. 

Albert Martin Schultz. 

William Edgar Skillman. 



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Queens Club 



Founded 1909. 



TRUSTEES 

Alfred J. Mahnken. Arthur T. McMichael. 

Myron H. Beekman. Russell Foote Stryker. 

William Voight Becker. 



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QUEENS CLUB 

CLASS OF 1912 
John Arthur. Herbert William Heilmann. 

Edward Francis Blatz. John Richard Nevius. 

Leonard Scott Briggs. George W. Martin. 

CLASS OF 1913 
Frank Haywood Conover. George Raymond Merrill. 

Walter Hornbruch. George Raymond Robinson. 

Francis Elmer Weis. 

CLASS OF 1914 
Edward Oscar Boller. Elroy Wilson Steedle. 

William Henry McCallum. Ronson Joseph Warne. 

James Archer Stackhouse. Alfred August Gaipa. 

♦John Peter Toohey. 

CLASS OF 1915 
Joseph Russell French. *Wainwright Darrow Twing. 

♦William Henry Hudson. ♦Russell Day Van Sickle. 

Morton Lang. 

»Left College. 

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SCARLET CLUB 



Harold J. Cadmus. 
William H. Martin. 
James W. Mailler. 
Herbert R. Peebles. 
Walter S. Bloom. 

Arttiur D. Bergen. 
Walter C. Bauer. 

William W. Summeri 
John Louery. 
Howard F. Huber. 



Walter Anner. 
Ross H. Flanagan. 
Charles R. Martin. 



CLAS OF 1912 

Ralph J. Kieffer. 

Alson C. Llewellyn. 

J. Preston Mailler. 

Earle E. Van Derwerker. 

Frederic (Jlander. 
CLASS OF 1913 

P'rancis W. Flanagan. 

Henry L. Van Mater. 
CLASS OF 1914 
LL. Ned O. Howlett. 

Harry M. Allen. 

Lester E. Nei^on. 
Carl R. Woodward. 
CLASS OF 1915 

William A. Schure, Jr. 

Theodore H. Smith. 

Lloyd N. Lewis. 
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Phi Beta Kappa 



Alpha of New Jersey, Established February 22, 1869. 



OFFICERS FOR 1911-12 

President PROF. E. B. DAVIS, B. L. 

Vice-President REV. J. A. INGHAM, D. D. 

Recording Secretary PROF. F. F. THOMPSON, E. E. 

Corresponding Secretary PROF. RICHARD MORRIS, Ph. D. 

Treasurer PROF. A. R. JOHNSON, B. Sc. 



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CLA! 



OGIETI 



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CAP and SKULL 



SENIOR SOCIETY MEMBERS 



David G. Auchter. Henry Clifton Cooper. 

Walter C. Bowen. Valentine B. Havens. 

John Dittgen Morrison. 



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CASQUE aftd DAGGAR 

JUNIOR SOCIETY 

MEMBERS 

Howard A. Julie. Whitfield J. Bell. 

Neil McDougall. ♦Willet H. Drake. 

♦Left College. 



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THETA NU EPSILON 

SOPHOMORE SOCIETY. Founded at Wesleyan University, 1870. 

Alpha Wesleyan University, 1870. Phi Rutgers College, 1892. 

Beta Syracuse University, 1876. Chi Dartmouth College, 1893. 

Gamma Union College, 1876. Psi Ohio State College, 1893. 

Delta Cornell University, 1877. Omega Swarthmore College, 1894. 

Zeta Univ. of Rochester, 1877. Delta Kappa Bowdoin College, 1894. 

Eta Univ. of California, 1879. Delta Sigma Kansas University, 1894. 

Theta Colgate College, 1880. Alpha Iota Harvard University, 1895 

Iota Kenyon College, 1882. Delta Rho Northwestern Univ., 1895. 

Kappa Adelbert College, 1882. Delta Tau Chicago University, 1895. 

Lambda Hamilton College, 1882. Pi Phi University of Virginia, 1895 

Mu Rensselaer Poly. Inst., 18S2. Lambda Lambda. .University of Nebraska, 1895. 

Nu Stevens Institute, 1883. Beta Beta Ohio Wesleyan Univ., 1895. 

Xi Lafayette College, 1884. Delta Delta University of Maine, 1895. 

Omicron Amherst College, 1885. Epsilon Epsilon. .Case School of Ap. Sci., 1896. 

Pi Allegheny College, 1887. Gamma Xi College of City of N. Y., 1897. 

Rho Penn. State College, 1888. Kappa Gam.ma Vermont Medical Col., 1898. 

Sigma Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1888. Beta Upsilon Brown University, 1900. 

Tau New York University, 1889. Alpha Omega Columbia University, 1901. 

Upsilon Wooster College, 1891. Beta Epsilon Colby University, 1903. 

Epsilon Univ. of Michigan, 1892. Alpha Chi Illinois University, 1909. 

Mu Mu Leland Stanford Univ. Sigma Sigma Ohio Northern, 1909. 

Nu Nu Univ. of Marquette. Xl Xi University of Louisville. 

Rho Rho Norwich University. 

Epsilon Deuteron University of Rochester. 

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John D. Morrison. 
John Richard Nevius. 



Edward Dudley Chase. 
Walter Hornbruch. 



CLASS OF 1912 

Augustus L. Gladding. 
Harold C. Amos. 

CLASS OF 1913 

G. Raymond Robinson. 
Earl Reed Silvers. 



CLASS OF 1914 
Roy Bennett Anderson. John Peter Toohey. 

Roscoe Seymour Conkling. James A. Mason. 

Worthington S. Farley. Wilijam H. McCallum. 

Oren Fogle Browning, Jr. Elroy W. Steedle. 

Ronson J. Warne. 



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CHAIN and BONES 



SOPHOMORE SECRET SOCIETY 
Founded at Rutgers College in 1906. 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Donald Ross. 
♦Ralph M. Pitcher. 
E. B. Van Ness. 
♦R. B. Davis. 



CLASS OF 1912 

♦Chester V. Lvall. 
Dexter White. 
♦F. R. Mackey. 
♦Chas. W. Piez. 
Fred M. Fountain. 



T. T. Barr. 
Clifford E. Dennis. 



CLASS OF 1913 

♦Arthur A. Prentiss. 
♦Charles A. Traver. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS— CLASS OF 1914 
George Milne Bechtel. Donald H. Gesse. 

John Sanderson Elliott. Frederick W. Holcomb. 

Stuart M. Firth. Albert G. Leeds. 

♦Left College. 

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SERPENT and COFFIN 

FRESHMAN SECRET SOCIETY 



Founded February 1, 1903, by the Class of 1906. 



MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1912 
John D. Morrison. 'Dean C. Anderson. 

Richard A. Smith. Arthur B. Titsworth. 

♦Fred R. Mackey. Fred M. Fountain. 

Leroy C. Wilsey. 

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1913 
♦C. Wolfe-Tone Overton. Whitfield J. Bell. 

•John E. D. Coffey. Theodore Van Winkle. 

T. Turner Barr, Jr. Charles A. Traver. 

MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1914 



♦Reginald B. Crowell. 
Donald H. Gesse. 
James A. Mason. 
Stanley M. Wilsey. 



Stuart M. 



Ralph T. B. Todd. 
♦George W. Pratt. 
Roy B. Anderson. 
Fred H. Low. 
Firth. 



MEMBERS OF THE CLASS OF 1915 



Harry M. Blue. 
Arthur C. Busch. 
George C. Conger. 
William L. Gay. 
Charles G. Slausen. 



Mahlon Lee Harker. 
Harry B. Jackson. 
Ward B. Malmar. 
John P. Noble. 
Harry B. Smith. 



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C/3 

Qu 

< 

O 



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ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

Since its formation early in the history of the college, and 
its incorporation under the laws of New Jersey in 1879, the 
athletic association has played an important part in college life. 
All forms of intercollegiate sport are controlled by the associa- 
tion, through its Board of Managers. The Board, chosen by 
the students, is composed of three student members, two alumni 
members, three faculty members, a representative from the 
Board of Trustees and the Athletic Director. The Board reg- 
ulates practically all the athletics of the college, including the 
schedules and management of teams, the granting of the R, 
and the financial affairs of the association. 

Through the kindness of Mr. James Neilson, free use 
of an athletic field, known as Neilson P^ield, has been given to 
Rutgers since 1891, 



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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Treaserer Louis Bevier, Jr., 78. 

Secretary C. W. Parmelee, '96. 

Frederick Weigel. C. W. Parmelee. 

♦John N. Carpender. Louis Bevier, Jr. 

George A. Viehmann. 

FACULTY MEMBERS 
Prof. Titsworth. Prof. E. R. Payson. 

Mr. Dodge. 

BOARD OF MANAGERS 

Chairman, Ex-Officio V. B. Havens, '12 

Secretary, Ex-Officio Louis Bevier, Jr. 

F. H. Dodge. R. O. Smith, '02. 

*J. B Smith, CJ. W. Nuttman, '96. 

Percy L Van Nuis, '02. 

UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS 
McDouGALL, '13. Gladding, '12. 

♦Deceased. Elliott, '14. 



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Captain James K. Alverson. 

Manager Walter C. Bowen. 

..,,,, \ T. T. Barr. 

Assistant Managers ] . . . . F. J. Johnson. 

Coach Howard Gargan. 

'VARSITY TEAM 

t i, t? J S Cooper, '12. 

^^'f^ ^""^ ).... Robinson, '13. 

Left Tackle Toohey, '14. 

Left Guard Van Winkle, '13. 

Center Julie, '13. 

D' I, r^ J S Foster, '12. 

Right Guard / . . . . TmwoRTH, '12. 

Right Tackle McCallum, '14. 

^ McGovern, '12. 

Right End Bergamini, '13. 

' ....Todd, '14. 

r, s I I. \ White, '12. 

Quarterback -^ .Elmendorf. 'U. 

Left Half Back Johnson, '13. 

Right Half Back Gay, '15. 

Full Back Alverson, '12. 

SUBSTITUTES 

Glander, '12, Half Back. Hotaling, '12, Guard. Archibald, '15, Full Back. 

Martin, '15, Half Back. Pierce, '15, Center. 

TwiNG, '15, Guard. Van Sickle, '15, End. 

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Capt. Alverson. Mcr. Bovven. 



FOOTBALL SEASON, 1911 

In spite of an unusually hard schedule, the 19U football team made the 
season a very successful one. Though defeated in four games, the record of 
our eleven is still one of which we may feel justly proud in that our defeats 
invariably came from institutions which were stronger and much heavier than 
our own. Due to the excellent work of Coach Gargan, there was last fall an 
ever present, sincere enthusiasm, and a persistent football spirit, manifested by 
the extraordinarily large number of scrub men daily on the field. 

Our first game was with Princeton. It resulted in a defeat, the score being 
37 to 0. However, added to their greater strength and larger amount of foot- 
ball material, Princeton had the advantage of being engaged in their second 
contest of the season — so the defeat was really not so bad as the score would 
seem to indicate. It is indeed pleasant to feel that athletic relations have again 
been established with the neighboring university, and to remember the courteous 
treatment that we received at Princeton. 

On October 7th, the first home game of the season was played with Haver- 
ford. Our men showed marked improvement in their playing, and it was an 
easy Rutgers victory, the score being 10-6. 

The next Saturday, October 14th, the team journeyed to West Point to meet 
the strong Army aggregation. The Rutgers fighting spirit was there. The 
team did hard, consistent work, but were not able to compete with the West 
Point eleven. The final score was 18 to in our opponents' favor. 

On a muddy field, and in a disheartening drizzle, we played Union the 
next Saturday, October 21st. The score was 6-0 in our favor, but that doesn't 
imply a great deal, for had Neilson Field been in better condition, the team 
would have rolled up a much larger score. 

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On October 28th, with our team crippled by the loss of several 'Varsity 
men who were "out on studies," Swarthmore came back and was able to 
take revenge for the defeat in 1910. The final score was 21-0, and was due to 
a lack of concentrated effort in our eleven 

The R. P. I. game was at New Brunswick on November 4th, and the 
Rensselaer players proved to be no mean foes. The contest was well and 
cleanly played, a victory, 6-0, was well deserved, for our men did a lot of 
good, consistent work. 

New York University was our next foe. This game was played on 
November 11, on Ohio Field, a 0-0 score. We undoubtedly played the better 
game of the two teams, and had fortune favored us, would have defeated 
N. Y. U. with a large score 

The last home game was played on November 18th with IJrsinus. Skilful 
use of trick plays and forward passes gave the visitors a victory, the score 
being 17 to 0. 

Last — but far from least — the Stevens game. 'Twas a Rutgers' victory 
again — due largely to Jimmy Alverson's wonderful kicking ability. Fine spirit 
and lots of enthusiasm were the chief characteristics of the contest which was 
witnessed by five thousand people. The score was 3 to 0. 



THE SEASON'S SCORES 
Rutgers. 

Princeton 37 

10 Haverford 6 

Army 18 

6 Union 

Swarthmore 21 

6 R. P. 1 

N. Y. U 

Ursinus 17 

3 Stevens 



'Rip" Vam Winkle 



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BASEBALL 

Captain L. M. Van Ness, '11. 

Manager H. S. Best, '11. 

Assistant Manager J. K. Alverson, '12. 

Coach Frank Cox. 

'vARSITV 

Van Ness, 'U (Captain). 

Catcher — Bowen, '12. 

Pitchers 
Andreae, '09. Martin, '12. 

Sangster, 'U. Dennis, '13. 

Infielders 
Sangster, '11. Gladding, '12. Prentiss, '13. 

MiLLiKEN, '13. Boller, '14. Leeds, '14. 

Traver, '14. 

Outfielders 
Van Ness, '11. De Baum, '11. Robinson, '12. 

Mir.LiKEN, '13. ScHENCK, '13. Bell, '13. 



Captain Bovven at the Bat 
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BASEBALL SEASON, 1911 

Last year's season began on the last Saturday in March, the 
25th, and it began well. Our aggregation kept the score down to 
3-0, though playing against the strong West Point team. Captain 
Van Ness played good, clean ball that day, and continued his excel- 
lent work throughout the season. 

Our second southern trip — that occupied all of Easter vacation, 
from April 12th to 19th. Of course our men were hardly selfish 
enough to insist upon winning every game, but they did some good 
team work, and learned a lot about baseball that was of material 
assistance during the remainder of the season. 

The season, as far as the winning of games is concerned, we 
can't call a bright and shining success. However, there were sev- 
eral snappy, interesting games and some fine individual playing. 

This year, everything looks well — and with "Bowie" as captain 
and with Mr. W. S. Brodie, of Princeton, as coach, there's no rea- 
son why Rutgers should not "come back" into baseball prominence. 



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SOUTHERN TRIP 

April 12, Rutgcrs-Navy, Annapoliss Md 0-10 

April 13, Rutgers-Washington and Lee, Lexington, Va. 4-6 

April 17, Rutgers-Mt. Saint Joseph 8-9 

April 18, Rutgers-Mt. Saint Mary's 3-8 



REGULAR SCHEDULE 

March 25, Rutgers-Army, West Point 2-3 

April 1, Rutgers-Columbia, New York 5-6 

April 8, Rutgers-Stevens, New Brunswick 1-3 

April 29, Rutgers-Unioi>, New Brunswick 2-5 

May 6, Rutgers-Lehigh, New Brunswick 0-3 

May 13, Rutgers-Rennselaer Pol. Inst., Troy, N. Y 1-2 

May 17, Rutgers-Franklin and Marshall, N. B'wick.. 6-1 

May 20, Rutgers-Wesleyan, Middletown, Conn 5-4 

May 27, Rutgers-Delaware, New Brunswick 10-0 

June 3, Rutgers-Union, Schenectady, N. Y 8-6 

June 10, Rutgers-Pratt Inst., New Brunswick 7-2 

June 17, Rutgers-Stevens, Hoboken, N. J 4-8 



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TRACK TEAM 

Captain V. B. Havens, '12. 

Manager A. Hunt, '11. 

Assistant Manager J. D. Morrison, '12. 

Coach Mr. F. H. Dodge. 

100 YARD DASH POLE VAULT 

Havens, '12. Wilsey, '14. Manley, '11. Schmidt, '14. 

440 YARD DASH 220 YARD DASH 

MacDougal, '13. Silvers, '13. "'^^^•^^' '*2- Wilsey, '14. 

MILE RUN »»^ ^^^^^ ^AS" 

MacDougal, '13. Crane, '14. 

Crane, '14. Mershon, '14. 

Walton, '14. TWO MILE RUN 

Slater, '13. Mershon, '14. 

120 YARD HURDLES 

Havens, '12. Boynton, '14. 220 YARD HURDLES 

Havens, '12 Chase, '13. 

SHOT PUT Boynton, '14. 

Alverson, '12. Toohey, '14. HAMMER THROW 

HIGH JUMP C- Hambrock, '13. L. Hambrock, '13. 

Johnson, '13. Boynton, '14. BROAD JUMP 

Lukens, '14. Dickerson, '13. Johnson, '13. 

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SEASON OF 1912 



Valentine Havens, Captain. John D. Morrison, Manager, 

Raymond Howell ) , • , ^ ,, 

G, H. Ramsey ^^^sistant Managers. 



TRACK SCHEDULE FOR 1912 

Saturday, April 27th, 1912 Penn. Relays, at Philadelphia. 

Saturday, May 4th, 1912 Lehigh Univ., at New Brunswick. 

Saturday, May 11th, 1912 N. Y. U., at New York. 

Saturday (10 a. m.). May 18th, 1912. . . .Muhlenburg Col., at New Brunswick. 

Saturday, May 25th, 1912 Swarthmore Col., at Swarthraore. 

Saturday, June Ist, 1912 Intercollegiates, at Philadelphia. 

Interscholastic, at New Brunswick. 
Saturday, June 8th, 1912 Stevens Inst., at New Brunswick. 



Silvers Winning 440 at Lehigh. 
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Crane First, MacDougal Second in Half Mile. 



RUTGERS VS. LEHIGH, South Bethlehem, May 6, 1911. 











time or 


EVENT. 


FIRST. 


SECOND. 




distance. 


100 Yard Dash 


Havens (R) 


WiLSEY (R) 




:10 2-5 


220 Yard Dash 


WiLSEY (R) 


Murphy (L) 




:23 4-5 


440 Yard Dash 


Silvers (R) 


Knox (L) 




:53 4-5 


880 Yard Dash 


Crane (R) 


MacDougal (R) 




2:12 2-5 


120 Yard Hurdles 


Havens (R) 


Graham (L) 




:17 


Mile Run 


Michel (L) 


Mershon (R) 




4:50 


Two Mile Run 


j Smith (L) 
/ Lawson (L) 


Dead heat. 




10:58 


Hammer Throw 


Hambrock (R) 


Bailey (L) 


110 ft. 


11 3-4 in. 


Shot Put 


Wells (L) 


Bailey (L) 


36 ft. 


11 3-4 in. 


High Jump 


Johnson (R) 


BOYNTON (R) 


5 ft. 8 3-4 in 


Broad Jump 


Murphy (L) 


Graham (L) 


20 ft. 3 1-4 in. 


Pole Vault 


Graham (L) 


Manley (R) 




10 ft. 4 in. 


Score: Rutgers, 55; 


Lehigh, 49. 









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RUTGERS VS. NEW YORK UNIVERSITY, Neilson Field, May 13, 1911. 











time or 


EVENT. 


FIRST 


second. 




distance. 


100 Yard Dash 


Lauer (N. Y. U.) 


Havens (R) 




:10 


220 Yard Dash 


Lauer (N. Y. U.) 


WiLSEY (R) 




:23 1-5 


440 Yard Dash 


MacDougai. (R) 


Silvers (R) 




:55 2-5 


880 Yard Dash 


Smith (N. Y. U.) 


MacDougal (R) 


2:13 2-5 


Mile Run 


McAdams (N. Y. U.) 


Crane (R) 




5:7 


120 Yard Hurdles 


Havens (R) 


BOYNTON (R) 




:16 2-5 


220 Yard Hurdles 


Havens (R) 


Chase (R) 




:28 3-5 


Shot Put 


Makay (N. Y. U.) 


Galbelein (N 


. Y. U.) 


35 ft. 4 in. 


Hammer Throw 


C. Hambrock (R) 


L. Hambrock 


(R) 


109 ft. 9 9-10 in. 


High Jump 


Johnson (R) 


BOYNTON (R) 




5 ft. 5 in. 


Broad Jump 


Dickerson (R) 


Johnson (R) 




19 ft. 4 3-4 in. 


Pole Vault 


W^HITE (N. Y. U.) 


Manley (R) 




10 ft. 



Score: Rutgers, 71; New York Univ., 33. 



RUTGERS VS. PRATT INSTITUTE, Neilson Field, May 20, 1911. 



event. 
100 Yard Dash 
220 Yard Dash 
440 Yard Dash 
880 Yard Dash 
Two Mile Run 
120 Yard Hurdles 
220 Yard Hurdles 
Shot Put 
High Jump 
Broad Jump 
Pole Vault 
Score: Rutgers, 71 ; 



FIRST. 

Havens (R) 
Havens (R) 
Silvers (R) 
MacDougal (R) 
Mershon (R) 
Rutgers by defrult. 
Chase (R) 
Morris (P) 
Johnson (R) 
Dickerson (R) 
Manley (R) 
Pratt. 17. 



SECOND. 

Roch (P) 

W^ILSEY (R) 

MacDougal (R) 
Spenman (P) 
Slater (R) 

Boynton (R) 
HOUK (P) 
LUKENS (R) 

Morris (P) 
Schmidt (R) 



TIME or 

DISTANCE. 

:10 

:23 

:53 3-5 

2:6 

10:32 

28 4-5 
33 ft. 6 in. 

5 ft. 4 in. 

19 3-5 ft. 
10 ft. 2 in. 



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Val Havens Winning the 220 at Stevens. 



RiriXJKRS VS. STEVENS, Castle Field, May 30, 1911. 











time or 


EVENT. 


FIRST. 


second. 




distance. 


100 Yard Dasli 


Havens (R) 


Zieger (S) 




:10 2-5 


220 Yard Dash 


Havens (R) 


ZlEGER (S) 




:22 4-5 


440 Yard Dash 


Bell (S) 


Silvers (R) 




:521-5 


880 Yard Dash 


Bell (S) 


Crane (R) 




2:6 


Mile Run 


Lawrence (S) 


Walton (R) 




4:55 


Two Mile Run 


Lawrence (S) 


Mershon (R) 




10:22 


120 Yard Hurdles 


Havens (R) 


Harris (S) 




16 1-5 


220 Yard Hurdles 


Havens (R) 


ZlELER (S) 




27 3-5 


Shot Put 


Adams (S) 


Huebner (S) 




37 ft. 2 in. 


Hammer Throw 


Hambrock (R; 


L. Hambrock 


R) 


92 ft. 2 1-2 in. 


High Jump 


Harris (S) 


Schwartz (S) 


Johnson 


(R) 5 ft. 7 in. 


Broad Jump 


Harris (S) 


Dickerson (R) 




21 ft. 7 in. 


Pole Vault 


Harris (S) 


Schmidt (R) 




9 ft. 6 1-2 in. 


Score: Rutgers, 48; 


Stevens, 54. 









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GY 



M 



GYMNASIUM TEAM 

Captain D. White, '12. 

Manager V. C. Ross, '12. 

Coach Mr. F. H. Dodge. 

Horizontal Bar 
Anderson, '14. Pritchard, '15. 

Side Horse 
White, '12. C. W Haasis, '13. 

Club Swinging 
Briggs, '12. C. W. Haasis, '13. 

Parallel Bars 
White, '12. Wilsey, '12. Gaipa, '14. 

Flying Rings 
Chase, '13. Gaipa, '14. 

Tumbling 
P. W. Haasis, '13. Silvers, '13, Pritchard, '15, 



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Captain White. Manager Ross. 

GYMNASIUM 

Last year's season was without doubt one of the most successful in the history of gym- 
nasium, as a sport, at Rutgers. Our team was not defeated in a single meet and, through the 
efforts of the club swingers, was able to capture second place in the annual intercollegiate 
meet held at New Haven, giving higher rank than Pennsylvania, Harvard, Princeton and 
other larger and stronger institutions. 

Perhaps it was the work of Rutgers in this meet that brought about the proposed change 
in the intercollegiate rules with regard to club swinging. 

Next yeai;, prospects for the gymnasium season are the best. Captain-elect Anderson is 
doing excellent work and the team will undoubtedly make the season a successful one. Mr. 
Rooney, who has had experience in a circus, has assisted in the coaching of tumbling. 

GYMNASIUM SCHEDULE 
February 24 — Rutgers, 35; Columbia, 19; at New Brunswick. 
March 2 — Rutgers, 37; Lehigh, 17; at New Brunswick. 
March 9 — Rutgers, 19; New York University, 35; at New Brunswick. 



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RUTGERS TENNIS ASSOCIATION 

President Fred M. Fountain. 

Vice-President Donau) Havens. 

Secretary Valentine B. Havens. 

Manager Alfred A. Nelson. 

Although the team won only two out of the six matches played last season, the general 
position of tennis as a college sport has been gradually improving. The courts have been 
resurfaced at considerable expense and it is hoped that from now on it will be possible to 
keep them in proper shape. The most notable advance, however, has been the recent action 
of the Board of Managers in adopting tennis as an intercollegiate sport. This step has been 
long hoped for and will undoubtedly establish tennis on a firm footing with the other sports. 

The annual tournament for the college championship was held last spring with great 
success. A large number of students participated and great interest was shown in the result. 
The final round found Val. Havens and Fred Fountain pitted against each other and after 
three hard sets the former finally won out. 



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1911 SCHEDULE 

April 26 Rutgers, 4; Stevens, 0. 

May 6 Rutgers, ; Lafayette, 5. 

May 10 Rutgers, 0; Pratt, 3. 

May 20 Rutgers, 4; Drexel, 1. 

May 27 Rutgers, 0; Pratt, 3. 

June 3 Rutgers, ; Union, 5. 



Prof. Prentiss on the Courts. 
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LASS TEAMS 



1913 CLASS NUMERALS 



Barr 


C. Hambrock 


Bell 


Havens 


Bergen 


Hickman 


Chase 


Howell 


Conover 


Julie 


Davis 


Heines 


Dennis 


Leslie 


Flanigan 


MacDougal 


FOI^OM 


Merrill 


Milliken 


Sheffer 


Mitchell 


H. SCHENCK 


Morton 


Silvers 


Obecny 


Slater 


Opdyke 


E. T. Smith 


Putnam 


H. F. Smith 


Robins 


Van Winkle 


Robinson 


C. SCHENCK 



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CLASS FOOTBALL TEAM 

1913—6 1912—0 

1913—5 1914—0 



CLASS BASEBALL TEAM 

1913—7 1912—3 

1913—5 1914—2 



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Track Team 



Relay Team 



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Basketball Team 



Bowling Team 



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1913 FRESHMAN BANQUET 

February 24, 1910, Trenton House, Trenton, N. J. 

TOASTS 

C. A. Traver, "Gridiron Roasts;" A. W. Thomas, "Feminitia;" 

S. M. Sharkey, "Pipe Dreams;'* W. C. Ball, "Casting Bread Upon the Waters;" 

C. K. Savage, "Class of 1913." 

COMMITTEE 

V. W. Pingry, Chairman. 

C. K. Savage. C. A. Traver. C. C. Stover. F. Van Winkle. N. MacDougal 



1913 SOPHOMORE BANQUET 

February 6, 1911, Reisenweber's, New York. 

TOASTS 
G. S. Robins, "The Odd Classes;" F. E. Weis, "Wine, Women and Song;" 

R. S. Lees, "Class Spirit." 

COMMITTEE 

H. A. Julie, Chairman. 

C. R. Van Riper. L. Hambrock, Jr. S. M. Sharkey. 




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THE FRESHMAN'S DEBUT 



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CLASS 0/1913 SOPHOMORE HOP 



Robert F. Ballantine Gymnasium, December 9, 1910. 



COMMITTEE 



T. T. Barr, Jr., Chairman. 

E. D. Chase. E. Hauser. J. B. Leslie. G. R. Merrill. R. S. Lees. 

R. D. BouLTON. W. C. Ball, Jr. T. V. Morton. R. D. Howell. 

The rhythm of music, the whirling dance, 

Afar in a corner sit he and she; 
"Why did you come to the dance?" he says; 

"1 only came to dance with thee." 

"And why did you?" she asks in turn; 

In his eyes shines the answer, bright and clear, 
And soft in her listening ear he says, 

"Because I knew that you'd be here. 

The music swells in a rapturous waltz, 

The dancers are beautiful, fair to sec, 
Unmoved by the rhythm and swing of the dance. 

Alone in a corner sit he and she. 

C. W. H. 



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s 

o 

Pu 

O 



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1913 JUNIOR PROM. 



Robert F. Ballantine Gymnasium, February 16, 1912. 



COMMITTEE 
Donald Havens, Chairman. 



W. C. Ball, Jr. 
H. M. Bergaminl 
E. D. Chase. 
H. A. CozzENS, Jr. 



W. HORNBRUCH. 

M. Ross. 

E. T. Smith. 

H. L. Van Mater. 



J. P. Hickman, Jr. 



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u 
< 



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1911 SENIOR BALL 



Robert F. Ballantine Gymnasium, Wednesday, June 21, 1911. 



COMMITTEE 
Du Mont F. Elmendorf, Chairman. 
Edwin D. Chedister. George E. Jones. 

Roscoe W. De Baun. Henry Kreh, Jr. 

Scott M. Fell. Leonard K. Van Dyck. 

Charles E. Jacquart. Tracy S. Voorhees. 



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1911 MILITARY BALL 



Robert F. Ballantine Gymnasium, May 19, 1911. 



COMMITTEE 
Cadet Captain, F. M. Smith, Chairman. 
Cadet First Lieutenant, H. Steelman. Cadet Corporal, W. J. Bell. 
Cadet First Sergeant, R. A. Smith. Cadet Private, R. B. Anderson*. 



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Recording Secretaries. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 

President W. Rudolf F. Stier, '12. 

Vice-President Valentine B. Havens, '12. 

Alan D. Campbell, Jr., '12. 

(1st Term) 

Charles Miller, '13. 

(2d Term) 

Treasurer Thurlovv C. Nelson, '13. 

Assistant Treasurer David B. Van Dyck, '14. 

General Secretary Henry A. Vruwink, Hope '10. 

CABINET 

Walter S. Bloom, '12. John H. S. Putnam, '13. 

William H. Martin, '12. Harold W. Schenck, '13. 

Stephen P. Smith, '12. James R. Slater, '13. 



It goes without saying that every year is the "most successful year" in the history of 
every organization at Rutgers. Thus, we also, might make boastful statements, but we de- 
sire to leave the higher moral and spiritual standard to speak for itself. 

We might mention, however, some of the more important evidences of the activities of 
the association. In the first place, the work of the Northfield Committee deserves comment. 

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Who rcmcipbcrs the time when Rutgers had ten delegates at that great conference? Our 
Hand-book Committee fulfilled its duty in conveying all the necessary information to the 
members of the incoming class. Our Freshman Reception, too, was no mean social function. 
Then began the work of the Membership Committee. By the first of January it succeeded 
in gaining one hundred and one active members and fourteen associate, who by this step 
expressed their desire to uphold the moral, the just, the holy, the godlike in the life of 
college men. 

The Social Service Committee is holding monthly song and prayer services in Well's 
Hospital, is working among the boys about the Throop Avenue Mission, and is organizing 
classes among the foreigners of the city to teach them English and to aid them in the in- 
terpretation of civic righteousness. 

Our Meetings Committee has arranged most helpful discussions and addresses, and has 
obtained several outside speakers of note. No one can forget the messages of Mr. Mercer 
and Dr. Vander Muelen. 

Lastly we must speak with praise of the work of the Bible Study Committee. Classes 
have been formed in all but one fraternity. These and the three in the Dormitory are 
meeting weekly under most capable men. 

A word of respect is also due here to the devotion and activity of our general secretary, 
Mr. Vruwink. Without his executive capacities our work would have been quite futile. 
Again, we must say, that what little we may have accomplished has been made possible by 
the fact that the student body is backing the work with all of its good will. We are grateful 
not only for its generous financial support, but for its sympathetic interest. May this con- 
tinue! For without it, Rutgers cannot hold its own in the fight for sound morality, noble 
manhood, and Christian devotion. 



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THE TARGUM 

President V. C. Ross, '12. 

Treasurer Dr. W. R. Newton. 

Faculty Representative Dr. R. Morris. 

Alumni Representatives 
G. A. OsBORN, 97. L. J. Shafer, '09. 

Board of Editors 

Editor-in-Chief G. W. Martin, 'U. 

Assistant Editors H. C. Amos, '12; L C. Wii^ey, '12. 

Associate Editors 

D. Ross, '12. H. M Bergamini, '13. 
V. C. Ross, '12. S. M. Sharkey, '13. 
R. A. Smith, 12. D. L. Havens, '13. 

E. C. Scott, '12. H. F. Smith, '13. 
W. R. F. Stier, '12. E. R. Silvers, '13. 
H. W. Schenck, '13. O. F. Browning, '14. 

Business Manager M. C. Moseman, '12. 

Assistant Business Manager G. H. Ramsey, '13. 

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The Targum 



There has been no marked change in the conduct of the Targum during the past year. 
Those in charge of the paper have endeavored to conduct it as nearly as possible in accord- 
ance with the standard set by the preceding volumes, believing that the experience of the 
other boards has resulted in the evolution of a paper well adapted to the conditions existing 
at Rutgers. While they cannot claim to have been wholly successful in their attempt, they 
feel that the Targum may be compared not unfavorably with similar publications issued 
by the students of many colleges having a standing similar to ours. 

A commendable start has been made toward furnishing and decorating the Targum 
Room and making it a genuine meeting place for the members of the Cabinet, and it is hoped 
that future administrations will continue this work. 

Finally, if the paper has merited any small measure of approval this year, the fact is 
entirely due to the loyal and hearty support received from both alumni and students. 



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m 



N 



OARD. 



1911-1912 



Dean F. C. Van Dyck. Ex of do. 



Walter S. Bloom, '12. 
Fred M. Fountain, '12. 
George W. Martin, '12. 
Vivian C. Ross, '12. 
Harry K. Davies, '14. 
James A. Mason, '14. 



Whitfield J. Bell, '13. 
Ralph E. Cooper, '13. 
Lambert J. Leonard, '13. 
Samuel M. Sharkey, '13. 
Henry E. Riker, '15. 
George L. Shultz. '15. 



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RUTGERS INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATING ASSOCIATION 

Professor Louis Bevier, Chairman. 
T. Vassar Morton, '13, Secretary. 

Professor E. R. Payson. Professor E. L. Barbour. 

Professor G. H. Payson. Valentine B. Havens, *12. 

Professor R. O. Smith. Henry K. Hotaling, '12. 

Rutgers may well point with pride to her debating record. Twenty victories out of a 
possible twenty-two. 

About forty men took part in the preliminary trials which were held before the Christ- 
mas recess. The successful eight were: V. Havens, '12; Campbell, '12; G. W. Martin, '12; 
Stier, '12; Sheffer, '13; D. L. Havens, '13; Elmendorf, '14, and Le Fevre, '14. In the final 
trials the following team was chosen: V. B. Havens, Sheffer, Le Fevre, and D. L. Havens, 
alternate. 

The question submitted by Rutgers was, "Resolved, That 
women in the United States should be given the right to vote 
on the same terms as men." Lafayette decided to uphold the 
negative, and wished the debate to be held in New Bruns- 
wick on March Ist. Rutgers lost the debate. 



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RUTGERS CADET CORPS 

1911-1912 
Commandant 
First Lieutenant A. E. Ahrends, Twenty-ninth Infantry, U. S. A. 

Field and Staff 
Cadet Major, A. A. Nelson. 
Cadet Captain and Adjutant, E. E. Van Derwerker. 
Cadet First Lieutenant and Quartermaster, E. H. Halsted. 

Noncommissioned Staff 
Cadet Sergeant Major, N. McDougall. 
Cadet Quartermaster Sergeant, O. F. Mitchell. 

Cadet Captains 
Company A — R. A. Smith. Company C — J. D. Morrison. 

Company B— W. C. Bowen. Company D— A. B. Titsworth. 

Cadet First Lieutenants 
Comoany A— G. W. Martin. Company C— J. W. Mailler. 

Company B— R. J. Kieffer. Company D— L. F. Merrill. 

Cadet Second Lieutenants 
Company A— L. S. Briggs. Company C— W. E. Smock. 

Company B— J. Arthur. Company D— R. S. Cleaver. 



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Cadet First Sergeants 



Company A— W. C. Ball, Jr. 
Company B — R. D. Howell. 



Company C — T. Van Winkle. 
Company D — G. S. Robins. 



Cadet Sergeants 



Company A— W. J. Bell. 

C. E. Dennis. 

T. D. Smith. 

H. L. Van Mater. 

Company C — H. M. Bergamini. 
J. K. Folsom. 
J. B. Leslie. 
M. G. Milliken. 



Company B — E. S. Grymes. 

J. P. Hickman, Jr. 

C. F. Schenck. 

F. N. Van Deripe. 

Company D — T. T. Barr. 

H. Bartholomew. 
H. D. McKinney. 
H. F. Smith. 



Cadet Corporals 



Company A — J. S. Elliott. 
F. H. Low. 
R. P. Lukens. 
J. A. Stackhouse. 
W. W. Summerill. 
E. H. Van Wagenen. 
C. R. Woodward. 

Company C — H. K. Davies. 
R. G. Dooling. 
E. W. Luster. 
L. W. Martin. 
J. P. Toohey. 
J. A. Ward. 



Company B — R. B. Anderson. 

F. O. Church. 
S. M. Firth. 

W. H. McCallum. 

G. W. Schmidt. 
H. Solomon. 

Company D — A. H. Baumann. 
R. S. Conkling. 
W. T. Hulsizer. 
G. R. Maxson. 
L. F. Regendahl. 
F. L. Walton. 



Color Guard 
Cadet Color Sergeants, C. E. Hagemann, J. P. Mailler. 

1 4 ^ Field Music 

Cadet Chief Musician, H. A. Julie. 
Cadet Drum Major, J. F. McGovcrn, Jr. 
Cadet Principal Musician, F. A. Briegs. 



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PHILOCLEAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 



First Term: Second Term: 

President— RvsSELL W. Gies, 1912. PresUenf—W alter S. Bloom, 1912. 

Vice-President — George H. Ramsey, 1913. Vice-President — John H. S. Putnam, 1913. 

Secretary — Harold W. Schenck, 1913. Secretary — Levi S. Ernst, 1914. 

Treasurer— David B. Van Dyck, 1914. Treasurer— Carl R. Woodward, 1914. 



The only society in college that offers an opportunity for literary culture and that aims 
to supplement the ordinary scholastic training in debating, essay writing, extempore speak- 
ing, and a liberal appreciation of kindred arts is the Philoclean Society. All Rutgers men 
who desire to develop themselves along these lines are eligible for membership. The society 
has had an almost continuous existence since 1825, and its members include some of our 
most illustrious alumni. Except for a few years interval around 1900 the society has pros- 
pered greatly, and since its revival and re-organization in 1907, interest has been strongly 
maintained and its future appears encouraging. It is worthy of note that about one-half 
of the prizes offered in college are taken by Philoclean members. Innovations during the 
past year have been the adoption of a regular Philoclean pin and society banner. 

The annual banquet of the society was held on March 14th at the Mansion House, and 
was highly successful in every way. 

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RUTGERS COLLEGE DRAMATIC CLUB 



OFFICERS 



President Richard A. Smith, '12. 

First Vice-President Herbert Bergamini, '13. 

Second Vice-President Cornelius Schenck, '13. 

Secretary Russell W. Gies, '12. 

Treasurer Dr. Charles H. Whitman. 

Assistant Treasurer Walter C. Bowen, '12. 

Business Manager W. G. Herrman, '12. 



The Rutgers College Dramatic Club was organized October 23, 1911. For several years 
the plans for such a permanent club to promote dramatics at Rutgers had been thought of, 
but little was done toward the production of a college play until the musical comedy 
•*Raritania" was brought out in 1909. The success of that effort, together with the increasing 
size of the college, has stimulated the present successful attempt at a well organized dramatic 
association to take charge of the historic efforts of the undergraduates. 

It is the intention to produce a play each year, one that will compare favorably with 
the productions of other colleges. 

There are over a hundred members enrolled already, so that the club will not lack 
undergraduate interest and support. Goldsmith's "She Stoops to Conquer," has been selected 
for this year's production, to be given on June 15th. Mr. J. E. Hart, of the N. Y. Academy 
of Dramatic Arts, has been secured as coach of the play. It only remains for the entire 
student body to stand behind it, and the dramatic club will take its place along with the 
athletic teams, the glee club and the debating team in keeping high the reputation of old 
Rutgers. 



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Qee and MandoViu C\vx\>s . 



RUTGERS COLLEGE GLEE a,,d MANDOLIN CLUBS 



First Tenors 

J. C. Heincs, '13. 
J. A. Mason '14. 
A. G. Leeds, '14. 
H. A. Thompson^ '15. 
H. B. Smith, '15. 
J. P. Noble, '15. 



First Mandolin 

F. A Briegs, '12. 
E. Fisher, '12. 
C. C. Stover, '13. 
A. G. Leeds, '14. 
T. H. Smith, '15. 
H. A. Thompson, '15. 
K. O. Bouton, '14, 



SEASON 1911-1912 



OFFICERS 

President — Fred A. Briegs, '12. 
rice-President — 

Manager — Leroy C. Wilsey, '12. 
Ass'utant Manager — Ralph E. Cooper, '13. 
Secretary — Charles C. Stover, '13. 
Historian — W. Rudolph F. Stier, '12. 
Leader — Fred A. Briegs, '12. 



GLEE CLUB 



Second Tenors 



First Basses 



E. W. Scudder, '12. F. A. Briegs, '12. 
L. C. Wilsey, '12. R. E. Cooper, '13. 



W. R. F. Stir^r, '12. 
L. F. Merrill, '12. 
W. B. Malmar, '15 
P. Ritter, Jr., '15. 



T. V. Morton, '13. 
H. K Davies, '14. 
L. F. Regendahl, '14. 
B. A. Furman, '15. 
R. O. Bouton, '14. 



MANDOLIN CLUB 
Second Mandolin Guitars 



W. R. F. Stier, '!2. 
L. C. Wilsey. '12. 
J. A. Mason, '14. 
P. Ritter, Jr., '15. 
W. B. Malmar, '15. 
J. B. Howell, '15. 



J. C. Heines, '13. 
C. H. Connors, '13. 
R. L Aken, '14. 

'Cello 
E. H. Jentz, '15. 



Second Basses 

C. H. Connors, '13. 
H. L. Van Mater, '13. 
C. C. Stover, '13. 
L. E. Cook, '13. 
I). H. Gesse, '14. 
R. G. Dooling, '14. 
F. K. Shield, Jr., '15. 



Accompanist 
H. D. McKinney, '13. 

Recitationist 
G. Stanley Robins, '13. 



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GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUB 

The Glee and Mandolin Club is now up to its former excellence. With George W. 
Wilmot to coach and Fred A. Briegs, '12, to lead, it seems almost as if the palmy days of 
Lauren Bragdon had returned. 

With a larger roster than ever before and as good a program as had ever been sung 
it took both Newark and Plainfield by storm in the first two concerts of the schedule. These 
concerts were run by the club itself and without a paid advertisement, which, although we 
believe in advertising, shows that our fame is abroad. 

Already all the mid-week concerts allowed by the faculty have been scheduled and 
there are still a number of week-end trips on the list. The concert following the Junior 
Promenade was so good as to receive public recognition by President Demarest in chapel, 
which as we all know is a high compliment. 

Although the musical clubs receive no financial aid from the student body and less 
concessions from the faculty they do more to advertise the college than any other student 
organization, and it should be the duty of the alumni and students to get concerts for 
the clubs. 

Heines, '13, who has a tenor voice with gre^t possibilities, has been the mainstay of 
the first tenors as well as our most popular soloist. Briegs, '12, who has led both clubs and 
coached the Mandolin Club, has written one of the selections, but being extremely modest 
would not allow it to be used, save as an encore. Robins, '13, who until this year has kept 
his light under a bushel, made a decided hit at every concert with a recitation which he 
himself composed, while Leeds has been encored to the echo for his imitations with a man- 
dolin of an organ and a banjo. The club as a whole has formed a good back-ground for 
these major planets, and each star has twinkled consistently. Mid-year exams, as usual 
caught us amidship and eight men were washed overboard by the high seas, but most of 
them got back again by the aid of life-boats sent out in the shape of re-exams., and so, 
with the patronage of our friends and alumni the club looks forward to an even more suc- 
cessful season for 1912-1913. 

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QUAD CLUB 

President "Jimmy" Alverson. 

P' ice-President "Don" Ross. 

Treasurer George Robinson. 

Custodian of the Grip Oren Browning. 

Pianist "Jimmy" Mason. 

Sergeant-at'Arms Ed Paxton. 

S. H. Tenor "Hound" Scudder. 



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THE DOUBLE R CLUB of RUTGERS 



Founded December, 1911. 



MEMBERS 



Dexter White, President — Football and Gym. 

Earl Reed Silvers, Secretary and Treasurer — Track and Gym. 
G. Raymond Robinson — Football and Baseball. 

Frederick James Johnson — Football and Track. 



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'VARSITY CLUB of RUTGERS 



OFFICERS 

V^ALENTINE B. HAVENS President. 

Earl Reed Silvers Vice-President. 

Albert G. Leeds Secretary. 

Neil MacDougal Treasurer. 



MEMBERS 



1912. 



Alverson, J. K. (F) 
BowEN, W. C. (B) 
Briggs, L. S. (G) 
Cooper, H. C. (F) 
Foster, S. F. (F) 
Gladding, A. L (B) 



Bell, W. J (B) 
Bergamini. H. M. (F) 
Dennis, C. E. (B) 
Hambrock. C. (T) 
Johnson, F. J. (T&F) 



1913. 



Van Winkle, T. (F) 



Havens, V. B. (T) 
McGovERN. J. F. (F) 
Nelson, A. A. (G) 
Tits WORTH, A. B. (F) 
White, D. (G&F) 
Wii^EY, L. C. (G) 



Julie, H. A. (F) 
MacDougal, N. (T) 
MiLLIKEN, M. G. (B) 
Robinson, G. R (B&F) 
Silvers, E. R. (T&G) 



Anderson, R. B. (G) 
Boller, E. O. (B) 
Crane, E. J. (T) 
DiCKERSON, R. P. (T) 



Gay. W. L. (F) 



1914. 

1915. 
178 



Elmendorf, J. E. (F) 
Leeds, A. G. (B) 
McCallum. W. H. (F) 
Mershon, a. H. (T) 

Todd, R. T. B. (F) 



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CHEMICAL CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President Harold J. Cadmus. 

rice-President Edward C. Scott. 

Secretary and Treasurer CJeorge S. Robins. 



This, our first year in the new Chemistry Building, has been unusually successful. We 
have held meetings twice each month, and several of our speakers have been practical 
chemists. These lectures by men well versed in their respective industries have been of 
great value to all who heard them. 

Our first lecture, by Dr. Wright, traced "The Development of the Dyestuff Industry." 
Dr. Van Dyke lectured on the "Kinetic Basis of Gaseous Laws," and Dr. R O. Smith showed 
how the Kinetic Theory was applied in Physical Chemistry. A stereopticon lecture by Dr. 
Kilmer on "Crude Drugs," showed the sources from which many of the drugs used in medi- 
cine are drawn. The typewriter ribbon industry was represented by Mr. Frank Mittag, 
who spoke on "Aniline Lakes." Dr. Dulca talked on "India Rubber;" and Dr. Miner 
showed us how Welsbach mantels are made. In addition to these, several of the Seniors and 
Juniors read papers on various topics. 

With such an array of speakers we feel that the club has indeed prospered during the 
past year, and we look to the future with a surety of continued success and increasing 
usefulness. 

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AGRICULTURAL CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President Louis F. Merrill, *12. 

Vice-President Robert Schmidt, *12. 

Secretary George Menaker, *13. 

Treasurer Charles Miller, '13. 



To record the activities of the Agricultural Club is simply to enumerate the steps of a 
healthy progress. One very sad event has occurred in the passing away, in the spring of 
1911, of Dr. E. B. Voorhees. His presence in the Agricultural Department will be missed 
by those who knew him. 

The work of the club consists of lectures by prominent men and papers by students. Dr. 
Lipman, who succeeded Dr. Voorhees as Director of the Experiment Station, addressed the 
club on "Extension Work in Agriculture." He emphasized the growing demand for men 
trained in scientific agriculture. Dr. K. C. Davis gave an illustrated lecture on "Secondary 
Schools of Agriculture in Wisconsin.' Other speakers were Dr. M. T. Cook, State Plant 
Pathologist, Dr. Blair, of the Soils Department, and Mr. Arthur J. Farley, of the Horti- 
cultural Department. 

Among the student speakers were: Hagen, '12; Halsted, '12; Foster, '12; Schmidt, *12; 
Woelfle, '12; Miller, '13. Miller's paper on "A Hot- footed Insect" was demonstrated by 
passing out the bee's products which the club consumed together with cake. 

The departed class of 1911 has been missed, but we have not allowed our tears to blind 
us to the work to be done. The course in agriculture is becoming deservedly popular and 
the improvements which are being made each year arc justified by the increased interest 
taken. 

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ELECTRICAL and MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Prof. F. F. Thompson, E. E.; Prof. R. G. H. Heck, M. E.; Mr. F. F. Couch, M. E. 

Prof. F. R. Pratt, M. Sc. 

President James W. Mailler, '12. 

Vice-President Ralph J. Kieffer, '12. 

Secretary and Treasurer Paul Walrath, '13. 



The Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Club was organized by the Electrical 
section of the class of 1909 during the latter part of 1907. The club at the present time is 
composed of those members of the Senior and Junior classes taking Electrical or Mechanical 
Engineering courses together with the professors and assistants in these two departments. 

Meetings are held monthly and papers of general interest are presented by student 
members or a lecture by one of our professors is enjoyed. It is the aim of the club to obtain 
prominent out-of-town speakers whenever it is possible to do so. 

As our Electrical and Mechanical Engineering courses grow in importance and equip- 
ment the club is able to fill a position of ever increasing value to the students who take 
advantage of its privileges. Its object is a worthy one and its results can be nothing but 
beneficial. 

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CIVIL ENGINEERING CLUB 

The past year has been one of great progress for the Civil Engineering Club. Not only 
have the Seniors shown a great interest and enthusiasm in the club by their careful and 
diligent work in preparing papers and looking up material for five-minute reports, but the 
under classes also have shown an unusual interest in their attendance at the meetings. 

Among the papers presented have been: "Practical Experiences in the Field," by J. O. 
Marsh; "The Pennsylvania Railroad," by G. D. Auchter; "Johnson & Johnson Filtration 
Plant," by H. R. Peebles; "New York City Water Supply," by A. A. Nelson, and "Sewer 
Construction," by W. C .Bowen. Besides these papers many five-minute reports on current 
topics were given by different members. 

During the year a public meeting was given, which was attended by a large number 
of town people as well as students. At this meeting a very interesting talk on "The Engi- 
neer and Contractor" was given by J. Wallace Higgins, '93, C. E. (M. Am. Soc. C. E.) 

The club holds its meetings in Professor Prentiss' room in the Engineering Building. 
This room is equipped with a projectoscope which enables the speaker to offer illustrations 
pertaining to his subject. The club meeting, besides being a constant benefit and source of 
engineering enjoyment to the student, brings him intimately in contact ^ith the current 
practical problems of the day and afiPords ample opportunity for open discussion of the 
various means of their development. Historian. 

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BIOLOGICAL CLUB 



OFFICERS 
Dr. Julius Nelson. Dr. William D. Hoyt. 

President Russell W. Gies. 

Vice-President Thurlow C. Nei^on. 

Secretary W. Rudolf F. Stier. 

Treasurer James R. Slater. 



The Biological Club is perhaps not much different, in its object, than most clubs of its 
nature, i. e., to grant to some one another opportunity to see his face in the Scarlet Letter. 
But upon second thought we must form a more dignified opinion of this club. Of its twenty 
enrolled members, one-half were regular attendants at its meetings. These and the visitors 
(who are always welcomed) showed by their attention and discussions that men were still 
interested here in the subjects that are, after all^ of fundamental importance in life. 

Thus far our meetings have been most interesting and helpful. The speakers and their 
subjects were as follows: Dr. J. G. Lipman on "Diseases of Economic Plants and Insects;" 
Dr. Chidester on "Relation of Zoology to Medicine;" Dr. Nelson on "Oyster Observation 
Service of New Jersey;" S. M. Nelson, '11, on "Game Fish and Other Fish of New Jersey;" 
E. E. Vanderwerker, '12, on "Protective Coloration in the Animal Kingdom;" R. W. Gies, '12, 
on the "Marine Gardens of the Cataline Islands." 

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THE riddlf: 



The dust of time lies heavy 

On a candle, a book and a glove, 

And they long have been bound together 
By the web that the spider wove. 

What mean this book and the candle, 
And the glove that is lying there. 

Treasured by time and the spider, 
As though they were relics rare? 

List, I will read you the riddle, 
Of the treasures of days gone by, — 

The glove held the hand of the poet, 
And the candle the muse held high. 

To lighten the path as he trod it. 
Through the golden and palmy days. 

And there is the book he created. 
By the light of the candle's rays. 

Time holds the book and the candle. 
And the glove in a sacred bond, 

But the poet has ended his labors, 
And rests in the Great Beyond. 



C. W. H. 



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^tuarb Suntftt Hoorljwa 



1856-1911 



By J. G. LIPMAN, Ph. D. 

Edward Burnett Voorhees was born at Minebrook, Somerset County, New Jersey, on 
June 22n4, 1856. He died at New Brunswick, New Jersey, on June 6th, 1911. 

Previous to his coming to college he lived and worked on the farm, and imbibed freely 
of the life and traditions of rural New Jersey. He entered Rutgers College in 1876 and 
graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1881. The honorary degree of Doctor 
of Science was conferred upon him by the University of Vermont in 1900. After his gradua- 
tion from Rutgers he acted as assistant to Professor W. O. Atwater of Wesleyan University. 
In 1882 he returned to New Jersey as assistant chemist in the State Experiment Station, and 
began his career of investigator, administrator and teacher. He was made chemist in 1888, 
appointed professor of agriculture in Rutgers College in 1890, elected director of the State 
Experiment Station in 1893 and of the College Experiment Station in 1896. 

His contributions to agricultural science and practice include the development of methods 
of agricultural analysis, the planning of experiments on soil fertility, and the economic use 
of commercial fertilizers, the study of forage and field crops, and their utilization in milk 
production. As director of the Station he established departments of dairy husbandry, hor- 
ticulture, soil fertility, animal husbandry and poultry husbandry. Under his inspiration 
these departments attained a marked degree of usefulness both within and without the State. 
Himself an enthusiastic worker he inspired enthusiasm in his associates, and was always 
generous in recognizing the services rendered by them. To quote Dr. Allen again, "He was 
director in a true sense, maintaining sympathetic and helpful relations with the men of his 
staff, and a vital connection with the principal lines of investigation." His services to 
agriculture were recognized by the farmers in the State. This appreciation of his work 
found almost constant expression from individuals and organizations of farmers. Outside 
of the State farmers, as well as men of science, knew of his work and esteemed it highly. 
In 1902 he was awarded the Nichols medal by the New York Section of the American 
Chemical Society for the best paper embodying the results of original chemical research 
submitted during the year. The Association of Offidal Agricultural Chemists honored him 
by electing him president in 1893-94, while the Association of American Agricultural Col- 
leges and Experiment Stations made him its secretary for seven years (1897-1904)^ and 
its president in 1904-05. The farmers of the State placed him at the head of the State 
Board of Agriculture and refused to accede to his plea to release him from the burdens of 
this position. He was also president of the Board of Directors of the New Jersey Weather 
Bureau in 1893, and president of the New Jersey State Microscopical Society in 1905-06, and 
a member of the New Jersey State Conservation Commission. 

To agricultural education Doctor Voorhees rendered distinguished service by individual 
instruction, by numerous popular and scientific bulletins, and by his books, "First Principles 
of Agriculture," "Fertilizers" and "Forage Crops." It was largely, thanks to his endeavors, 
that the Short Courses in Agriculture were established at Rutgers College, and their suc- 
cessful growth has been made possible to his careful planning of the work. As a lecturer 
before the graduate school of agriculture of the University of Illinois, in 1906, and his 
lectures in many States before various farmers' organizations, he was effective in inspiring 
interest in and enthusiasm for the great problems of agriculture. 

To those who knew him personally, as well as to those to whom he is known by his 
writings, his life and work stand out as, in many respects, characteristically American. His 
services and his devotion to agriculture will for many years to come serve as an inspiration 
to other men. 

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THE POET 

God, give me strength to write a poem that's true, 
Give me expression for the thoughts within my soul ; 
Make me a writer that the whole wide world will know, 
Give me the strength to write a poem that's whole. 

Love, faith and truth, — God, give me these, and then 
Give me the power to transport to other men. 
God, you must feel and see the longing in my soul, 
Give me the strength to write a poem that's whole. 

E'en now I feel indeed my effort here has failed, 

Lost, like the storm-wrecked ship that toward the harbor sailed; 

God, you must know the inner workings of my soul. 

Give me the strength to write a poem that's whole. 



TRUTH 

Prophets and singers and poets talk of the power of love. Ancient philosophers tell of 
its frailty, and cynics discourse on its shallowness. Science has made of its strong points a 
weakness, until its power is questioned and only the dreamer still holds it untarnished. But 
truth stands supreme. The ages are teeming with tales of its power; the poet and the singer 
take truth as the goal of the theme; the cynic stands mute and philosophy halts at the sub- 
ject of truth. True men and true women are the backbone of progress and the memories 
of true lives are the stepping stones of history. Learn to be true. Fearlessly do what you 
think to be right, measure the deed by its standard of truth, measure success on the scales of 
thy conscience. Learn to be true. 



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TO THE RUTGERS GIRL 

Dark eyes from out of the embers are shining, 
Red lips are smiling a message, 'twould seem, 

The wind roars unheeded and stilled is its whining, 
For I am alone with the Girl — and a dream. 

The arms of the Dream-girl stretch forth from the fire, 
The love-light gleams true from the depths of her eyes. 

The heart throbs responsive, and former desire 
Is banished by love, and all restlessness dies. 

The embers fade slowly and softly are glowing. 
The eyes of the Dream-girl grow dim to the view, 

Again sounds the wail of the wind, and the blowing; 
But doubting has vanished — and all things are true. 



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AN ANSWER to the CRITICS of AMERICA 

By EDWARD T. PAXTON, '14. 

The Philosopher sat in his chair and mused. On his knee lay a current magazine, 
brimming with woeful cries of prophets and preceptors, and their warnings re-echoed in 
the Thinker's brainchatter of treachery and crime, of betrayed trust, of oppression and 
hypocrisy, and throughout the whole there throbbed a sullen fundamental beat, "America 
is not the cradle of a new, but the grave of an old race!" The drowsy warmth of the 
hearth fire and the muffled howl of the unfelt wind that blew in Yuletide gusts in the outer 
world, were better than a lullaby; the cheery sparks that scurried into the yawning chimney 
mouth grew less and less distinct, the paper-bound Cassandra slipped unheeded to the floor, 
and as the Philosopher mused, he slept; and as he slept, he dreamed. 

First he stood among the wreckage of a great rebellion. He saw thirteen colonies, too 
weak to stand separately, too jealous to unite, too independent to agree. He saw law dis- 
regarded, government powerless, currency without value, party factions in armed revolt. 
Again he heard the voices of the prophets, foretelling nothing that existing conditions did 
not sfem to bear out — yet this was an America of the past, and out of it came not the 
prophesied chaos, but a great republic. He watched the new country as it passed through 
the throes of genesis; watched it struggle within itself over the form and distribution of 
internal authority; saw it tossed about, a toy among the older nations of the earth — its 
ministers insulted, its citizens maltreated, its commerce destroyed. Small wonder that he 
gave ear to the cry of the pessimists, "America is a theory; a republic so conceived cannot 
endure." Yet the Americans upheld their new commonwealth and compelled a universal 
recognition of their national dignity and force of arms. For the next fifty years he saw 
the nation, now a recognized world power, torn by internal dissensions, racked by questions 
of tariff, of national finance, of state rights and secession, of slavery and abolition. Still the 
old chorus rose in a new form, "Your republic is on too vast a scale. You have factions that 
can never get the same viewpoint. You cannot mix oil and water. Your country cannot 
stand." He saw the crisis come: beheld seven states drawn up in solemn array against the 
Union, and the whole country plunged into civil war, while the staid old imperial govern- 
ments looked on with cynical smiles. But the miracle happened: the two factions united, 
buried their differences, fell into step and pushed on as one. No longer are they Virginians, 
or Californians, or New Yorkers, but all Americans. Still he heard the prophets, "America 
is not the cradle of a new, but the grave of an old race." 

The message recalled the prophecies of former days. How great the difficulties of the 
past must then have seemed! Even advanced as we are, we may well be thankful that they 
are not for us to meet: and being fearful in perspective, how much more terrible must they 
have been in their time. How were they met? To what human agency may one ascribe 
their conquest? The Philosopher, musing in his dream, gave the credit to the spirit of the 
American people. For it was the American people who drew and adopted their own national 
Constitution, who compelled first their own lawless brothers and then the powers of the 
world to recognize and respect their self-invested authority. It was they who for half a cen- 
tury threshed pro and con the great national issues which arose, who donned uniforms and 
shouldered guns in support of their views, and who, when the balance was struck and the 
right determined, sat down together and worked out the reconstruction which has produced 
the greatest nation of them all. Is this the race for whom your grave is dug? Is it a dying 
race? Then it has been dying for nearly a century and a half: during the process it has in- 
creased ten-fold in numbers and in occupied territory; it has become a byword for paramount 
cleverness and ingenuity; it has set a new standard for efficiency in manufacture and com- 
merce; and has advanced the cause of science in no less rapid strides, giving the world its 
Morton, its Edison, and its Wrights. 

Has the race become degenerate? Are Twentieth Century Americans inferior to the 
men who have composed this "dying race" for a hundred and forty years? In his dream the 

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Philosopher stood among the moors and fenland of ancient Scandinavia. Amid the fogs of 
the old north countrec he lived again with the first Anglo-Saxons; moved with them through 
sea and forest and mead hall as they hunted and feasted and conquered and sang, and 
grappled with the mysteries of life as well as with the material obstacles that met their 
path. Here was the Anglo-Saxon spirit in its very root. "So shall a prudent man do good 
works," sang the oldest of gleemen: "By praiseworthy deeds man shall flourish in every 
tribe." The Philosopher compared the two remote ages, and could find none of the elements 
of the root lacking in the highest branch. In modern America he found a love of personal 
freedom no duller than any that ever livened a Jute's or Angle's breast; he found the same 
instinct of religion and reverence for woman, the same responsiveness to nature and the 
lure of the sea, the same idea that the purpose of life is to "do good works." The last charge 
to Wiglaf of the dying Beowulf has lived on through the ages, has found voice in Long- 
fellow's "Excelsior," has appeared in Tennyson's message of the dying Merlin, and is evident 
in another form in the calm statement of the American scientist^ "I believe that nothing is 
impossible." So he knew that the "dying race" is not yet devitiated. 

Then he bethought him of leadership, and in his dream his gaze rested upon the Ameri- 
can colleges, the high places of the land, the hills up which a few of its men and women 
toil to get a first glimpse of the distant, brightening gleam and point out to their eager com- 
panions below the spot where the sun wvk\ rise. He reviewed the army of leaders that this 
source has already supplied, and found it good — conscientious men, coming from the people 
and educated for their service. And he knew that leaders would not be lacking. 

So the dream became a vision, and the Philosopher read in each pessimistic cry not a 
prophecy but a challenge. In each case he saw the inspired people rise to the situation, saw 
them grapple earnestly with problems of immigration, of food supply, of conservation, of 
monopolies and trusts, of capital and labor, of home purity, of graft, bribery, corruption^ 
and political dishonesty; saw the Anglo-Saxon spirit each time a victor; and beheld America 
rise through a sea of troubles, higher and higher on every crest, toward the fulfillment of 
its Creator's Purpose — its unfathomable mission, which perhaps only a few have guessed at 
and none have ever dared to name. 

Thus the Philosopher awoke, and stooping, picked up the cause of his reverie from the 
rug beside his feet. And as he laid the magazine gently away on the shelf of the big table, 
he smiled a broad smile of tolerance. 



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MY GIRL 

Her profile's like a diamond clear, 

Cleanly cut and true, 
Her lips are red, she holds her head 

As no one else can do; 
Her hair is combed in pompadour, 

Her nose is straight and small; 
In fact, of girls I've quite a store, 

But she is best of all. 



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THE SOUND THAT RINGS TRUE 

By earl reed SILVERS. '13. 

Have you ever heard the sound of a village fire gong at midnight? Out of the stillness 
there suddenly vibrates through the air the deep quivering gong of alarm. The sleeper 
is awakened from unconsciousness and the dreamer is aroused from his fairyland of dreams. 
One and all sit upright and listen. Clear and deep sounds the bell, sending its message 
ringing throughout the village — calling for men to arise from slumber and to fight for the 
salvation of property. The sounding of a fire gong at midnight is always remembered by 
those who hear. It impresses itself indelibly on the mind of the listener; it has a message 
of importance. And finally, it is a sound that rings true. When the fire bell peals some- 
thing has happened; there is no false note, and all who live in sound of the gong feel thril- 
ling within them an inexplicable something which appeals to their better natures and instills 
within them a desire to aid the fellow-man who is in trouble. The ringing of the bell is 
firm and deep; there is no hesitating, no faltering. It has a message to give and it sends 
it forth with a sound that rings true. 

In the history of the past the sound that rings true has ever awakened the better nature 
of man. In Rome, ages and ages ago, an Emperor by the name of Augustus Caesar builded 
on the ruins of one empire another which was distinguished by a peace and prosperity such 
as the world has never known. The ruler's chin was firm, his eye was clear, and his mouth 
was moulded with the sinews of strength. When he had a thing to do he did it, explaining 
to his subjects the reasons for his actions, and the people heard and cheered and worshipped 
the leader, for his words had in them a sound that rang true. So it has been throughout the 
history of the ancients; Caesar, Pericles, Alexander and other of the world's greatest men 
have led armies to victories and nations to prosperity sinnply because with their wisdom and 
genius was mingled the essence of the true. 

In our own country conditions have been the same. The greatest leaders of our nation 
have been those of the greatest strength of character. Strong of purpose, enduring of body, 
clean of mind, they have stood true, not only to their country and their God, but to the best 
that was in them — their soul. And by the efforts of these great men the United States has 
arisen to a predominance among the nations of the earth; the people have drawn to them- 
selves some of the greatness of their leaders and have come to recognize true worth from 
the false. 

It was this recognition of the truth that caused them to elect Abraham Lincoln President 
of the United States. The speeches which the former rail splitter made during the election 
campaign had in them a sound which rang true; there was no shifting of responsibility, no 
dodging of issues; only a clear and concise statement of his policy in regard to some of the 
most important questions which have ever confronted a nation. The directness of the quiet, 
confident, and earnest candidate appealed to the people, and he was made their leader in 
the crisis of the nation's life. His words had rung true, and after the election his actions 
were symbolic of the truth. He solved problem after problem with an unparalleled 

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foresight, unswerving in his purpose, unchanging in his determination. When he issued his 
Emancipation Proclamation, the South trembled with apprehension and the North quivered 
with anticipation, for the word had been spoken by Lincoln and it was a sound that rang 
true. And finally, when the slave had been given his freedom and the stain of this greatest 
proof of man*s inhumanity to man had been wiped from this land of ours, the "Martyred 
President" paid a final tribute to the men who had fought for the life of the nation and 
wrote in the pages of history a speech which is a masterpiece in the literature of the world. 
Lincoln was the greatest American; his name shall never die, for his actions were in ac- 
cordance with his words and his words had in them a sound that rang true. 

Today, no less than thirty years ago, great men are distinguished by the truth of their 
actions and words. 

In the narrow limits of our college life as well as in the world at large leadership 
is symbolized by a mingling of the true. The college student who has earned the respect 
of his companions and the love of his friends has sown the seeds of success. He has laid 
the foundation of his greatness, he has paved the way for greater accomplishments. 

But the man who has achieved success in his college career is not the one who has 
flinched in the performance of duty or who has hesitated in striving toward his ideal. 
He, too, must be strong of purpose and clean of mind; his daily actions must be in accord- 
ance with his words, and his words must have in them the sound that rings true. 



THE STORM 



All alone and far from refuge, 

I was wandering slow. 
Suddenly the sky was darkened. 

Ominous and low. 
Came a rumbling roar. 

Then deeper darkness seemed to flow. 



Peace again! The sun in beauty 

Sent its rays of cheer. 
Yet a dire, deep destruction 

Symbolized that here 
Passed the tempest; 

I, the human, only knew no fear. 



Suddenly the rain descended, 

In the mists around 
Lightning darted, strangely, swiftly. 

Heavily the sound 
Of the deep and grumbling thunder 

Echoed o'er the ground. 



He who in this storm of nature 

Watched my trusting soul. 
As the lightning flashed around me 

With its thunder's roll. 
Through the storm of life will guide me. 

Lead me to the goal. 



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NON DIGXUS 

«. — ^,IGE W. MARTIN. '12. 

Fair is my lady in form and face; 

Fair and fragrant as breezes blown 
From far-off forests in wildness place; 

And full of a grace that is all her own. 
Sweet and fragrant and fair is she — 
Far too fair> alas, for me! 

Clear is her mind as a mountain mere, 
Whence thoughts, like a lucent river, flow. 

Freighted with all things rich and dear 
That the tale of the years gone by can show; 

In all their learning her mind made free. 

Why should she waste a thought on me? 

Spotless her soul, and its radiant light 
Brightens her path, and keeps her apart 

From all that might sully or mar or blight, 
To share the delight of the pure in heart 

Who commune with God and His glory see — 

Then how can she spare a glance for me? 

She is lovely in thought and word and deed, 
In outward semblance no less divine; 

I am all unworthy my cause to plead, 

Or to have her heed any prayer of mine! 

She shines above me like some bright star; 

While I — I worship her from afar! 



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THE RACE 

By earl reed SILVERS, '13. 

Crouching low, the runners wait 
With their muscles strained and tense, 
Eyes that stare and hearts that beat, 
Only for a second fleet 
Hangs the dread suspense. 
Then the gun, the race begun. 
They are off, the turn is passed. 
And each runner^ first and last. 
Like some wild, unbridled steed. 
Struggles for the lead. 

"Faster, faster," sings the crowd. 
Eyes are bulging, breath is loud. 
Half the distance gone. 
"Faster, faster," beats the heart, 
"Faster, faster," drums the mind. 
Onward in the awful grind 
Till each muscle seems to part 
With the ache and strain; 
Onward though it rips the heart 
Into sections twain. 
Faster speed, to lead, to lead, 
Faster, faster, nor to heed 
All the ache and pain. 

Faster! Ah! the finish comes, 
In the ear the throbbing drums. 
Through the din the cheering hums 
Like the far-heard sea; 
Faster now; the strain! the strain! 
Through the dullness of the pain 
Sounds the echo, full and whole, 
Faster, faster, to the goal. 

Will the finish never come? 
Oh, the pain! the strain! the hum! 
Faster, faster, they are gaining, 
Faster, faster, muscles straining. 
Knees are failing, cheeks are paling, 
Stagger on with jaw that hangs. 
Struggle through the breathless pangs; 
Faster, faster, one yard more, 
Weak the body, limp the jaw^ 
Faster — ah! the end, the end! 
Ready stands the waiting friend. 
Blackness — and the race is o'er. 



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THE LOVE-EXCHANGE 

My girl has eyes as deep and blue 
As is the sky that smiles on you, 
Her teeth are white as purest snow, 
And even, like a dolTs, you know. 

Her cheeks are like the pinkest rose; 
She's got the cutest little nose, 
Her lips are red and full, and she 
Contracts them when she's mad at me. 

Her face, at least to me it seems, 
Is like the ones we see in dreams. 

Although her face is sweet and fair, 
It isn't for her looks I care, 
I love her, though, and she loves me. 
We've had a heart exchange, you see. 

We once agreed to give away 
Our hearts to someone for a day, 
I gave my heart to her, and she 
Refused to give it back to me. 

Instead she gave me hers, and so 
We love each other, don't you know. 



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THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCARLET LETTER 

By G. H. RAMSEY, '13. 

It was in the April of 1871 that the first "Scarlet Letter" made its appearance. This 
first edition was an outgrowth of the statistical supplements of the "Targums" of 1869 and 
1870. As these supplements were merely large sheets, folded into four pages, and having 
printed on their advertisement-like squares information concerning the Rutgers students and 
their activities, little more would be expected in their substitute, and such was the case.' 
Styled by the editors as a "magazine," it was composed of quaint, oddly printed, and un- 
illustrated pages, bristling with statistical information. Only in the editorial pages did 
the compilers allow themselves any literary freedom. 

The first editors were five in number, chosen by the fraternities. Three of them were 
Seniors and two Juniors and, though his name is not printed first on the list, George S. 
Duryee, 72, was the instigator of the publication, and probably the most zealous of the 
editors. The book was known as a Senior publication until 1885. 

The second "Scarlet Letter" and in fact, those of the next fourteen years, were of much 
the same character. That of 1872 added to its predecessor's fund of information a list of 
fictitious clubs such as "Ye Jolly Boys' Cassino Club," "Ancient Order of Eaters," "Big 
Stout Eaters of the Little Table," and the like — the beginning of the modern nonsensia de- 
partment. The following year pseudo-class histories were introduced, bearing the sugges- 
tive name, "Memories," and also a number of wood cuts and engravings, some of which 
were apparently used for decorative purposes only in that it is impossible to decipher any 
connection between them and the accompanying printed matter. A list of "Applicable 
Quotations," which custom still survives in the form of the greatly dreaded upper class 
epithets, was one of the features of the book. 

Under like policies, the "Scarlet Letter" was published until 1887. In 1885, says the 
editorial of that year, all rights to its publication were bequeathed by the Senior editors 
to the scribes of the Junior class — and now that it be their publication, has become a firmly 
established precedent. 

The book published in 1887 by the fraternity members of the class of 1888 departed 
materially from the accepted magazine form of publication. The editors issued a book in 
whose hundred and fifty pages can be found all the various features and departments that 
are familiar as essential to the "Scarlet Letter." Also the frontispiece is the first photo- 
graphic reproduction of a college building in a Rutgers year book. This is a view of 
Queen's Campus, taken in the summer time, and showing the Chapel and Queen's Building. 

The past fourteen years have witnessed a gradual, but sure development. Each year 
the Junior editors have attempted to improve upon the publication of the preceding board, 
and to make their own "Scarlet Letter" the best annual in college history. The result of 
this friendly rivalry has been the addition of new departments and the elimination of 
useless, time-worn features — up to the present editions which, by contrast, make the books 
of 1871 and their immediate followers appear mere pamphlets — wholly unlike our modern 
college year book. This year the assuming of the responsibilities of the "Scarlet Letter" 
publication by the Junior class as a whole, the old fraternity system having been dropped, 
undoubtedly marks another step in the growth of our annual — a step which will enable it to 
rank successfully with its competitors in other colleges. 



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ON THE DEATH OF A FRIEND 

Good-night, beloved, good-night, 

The mystery of death has turned to light, 

Thy spirit has ascended, but its flight 

Has left to us the sweetness of thy soul; 

Life's dreams have ceased and, never more to roam, 

Thy rest art found, and thou art home; 

Good-night, good-night. 

Farewell, beloved, farewell. 

The peace of death is thine which none can tell« 

Life's doubts and fears are o'er, the sounding knell 

Of death has pealed its last and final note, 

Truth, love and strength, these we have lost with thee, 

Still, we are better for thy memory. 

Farewell, farewell. 

E. R. S. 



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Editorials 



Another year has passed. We say this at the beginning of each college term but, never 
mind, we're going to say it again. 

Another year has passed. The Tooter takes this opportunity to welcome the incoming 
class of freshmen into old Rutgers. We think this is a good editorial. An editor always 
ought to welcome incoming freshmen. 

But — another year has passed. This time next year we can say the same thing again. 
The Tooter always makes it a specialty to begin the term in this way. It helps fill up space. 
And if any student wants to skip it over, he is perfectly welcome to do so. That's what 
everyone does. Another year has passed. 

Rutgers is a good college. It grew a number of years ago on the banks of the old Rari- 
tan. We're glad that the freshman class has come. Come again, and bring your friends. 
We always managed to squeeze through in our lessons somehow and we hope that you will 
be able to do the same. 

Another year has passed. May you say the same thing about yourselves after examina- 
tions. This is our editorial. Another year has passed. 



The Tooter believes that Rutgers should have velvet cushions on the seats in the 
Grand-Stand. This would make the college famous and would also greatly augment at- 
tendance at all baseball games. The College catalogue was wrong when it said we have 
velvet cushions. We have only wooden seats. The Tooter stands for progress. It also 
stands for velvet cushions on the Grand-Stands. They should be installed at once. 



A good deal has been said about the honor system in Rutgers. This is an important 
question. If the honor system is a good one and the students want it, let us adopt it. But, 
if the honor system is not a good one and the students don't want it, let us not adopt it 

The Tooter has spoken. The question is an important one. 



WITH OTHER COLLEGES 

A new swimming pool has been installed in Soapus University. The absence of pool 
has hitherto made billiards the prevailing athletic sport. 

Professor Hokus Pokus, of "See See and Why," has written a new book entitled, "He 
Who Nose All." 

Peevems College has at last been given a dormitory. It is hoped that now the students 
down there will start to live. 

New Pork University is situated on the banks of the Hudson. It is said on good author- 
ity, however, that her favorite song is anything but "On the Banks." 



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FACULTY NOTES 

Dr. W. H. S. Demarest, President of the College, ate his supper last night. 



Professor E, Livingston Barbour teaches elocution in Van Nest Hall. He will be pleased 
to meet any freshman who desires to become an elocutionist. 



Dr. Scott walked to his home on Livingston avenue yesterday noon. 



Librarian Osborne was seen coming out of the Library Tuesday. 



It is rumored that all of the faculty thought about attending Chapel one day last year. 



Dr. Lipman says that this college is going to be Co-ed some day. Tim Smith says he's 
sorry he's going to graduate so soon. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

0000. Adam and Eve have just been married. 



'77. H. C. Bingam announces the engagement of his daughter, Mary, to John John 
St. John. 



'95. P. C. Dillydally was married to Jane J. Janejane on Wednesday. 



'96. O. U. Fudge and B. A. Taffy were married in Pottsville last week. 



'96-1913. A good many other Rutgers men have been married. 



ex . Among the alumni around college last week were Bert Sparrow, Tone Over- 
ton, etc., none of whom have graduated. 




Football Term — Ploughing Up the Field. 



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MY GIRL 

With apologies to the Targum. 

Her breath ain't as sweet as the new mown hay, 

I get a whiff of it every day, 

Her teeth aren't even, as far as I've seen, 

Her hands when she scrubs them are passably clean; 

Her cheeks look like roses, but sometimes they ain't, 

On Sundays, however, she dabs them with paint; 

Her hair once was black, but it's changed now to yellow; 

She told me she thinks I'm a peach of a fellow; 

In fact, she's like other girls, laying for me, 

Only she's different — she's caught me, you see. 

SAYINGS of SORE-HEAD 

By the Targum, 

Some people think they're stars just because they happen to shine once in a while. 
Wise, indeed, is the man who knows the pattern of his own pajamas. 
A bull-dog is noted for his stick-to-it-tiveness, but most of us wouldn't have the face to 
hold on as long as he does. 

Smile and the world smiles with you — unless your teeth are bad. 

Some girls have swelled heads just because their hair is puffed up a bit. 

Some people are so popular that they continually go around telling other people about it. 

SAYINGS of BONE-HEAD 

By the Tooter. 

Some fellows think they're sons just because they wear a sporty necktie and a college hat. 

Weis, indeed, is the man who doesn't know the pattern of his own pajamas. They're 
faded. 

A bull-dog is noted for his stick-to-it-tiveness, but most of us would lose our teeth if we 
held on so long. 

Smile and the world smiles with you — especially if the joke's on you. It doesn't matter 
so very much about your teeth. 

Just because a person eats cream-puffs for dinner is no reason why he should be 
puffed up. 

Some people are so unpopular that they never say anything about it. 



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FUSSERS CLUB 



OFFICERS 



President Richard Alexander Smith. 

Vice-President Richard A. Smith. 

Secretary R. Alexander Smith. 

Treasurer Tim Smith. 



AMONG THE ALSO-RANS 



Don Ross — My smile is irresistable. 

ScuDDER — The mysterious fusser. 

Herrman — Up in Hartford. 

Enk — Makes a hit in Somerville. 

Putnam — Carries her picture around. 

Don Havens — Brooklyn girls for me. 

Dennis — Only at dances. 

Slausen — I'm "blondie" to all of the girls. 

R. CONKLING — Takes her to the football games. 

Gay — Does well for a farmer. 

Van Wagenen — Fusses over the telephone. 

Chase — Goes home to see her every week. 

MoSEMAN — "Columbia the gem of the ocean." 



THE TRIALS of the YOUTHFUL FUSSER 

Once I has a girl what loved me, 

'At would smile 'most all the day, 
'At would walk wif me in school-times, 

And wif only me would play; 
Somfin happened ovver evening*, 

She was meaner'n before, 
Now she walks wif ovver fellers, 

She don't love me anv more. 



But when I get big and pow'ful, 

Go to college all alone, 
And come home on each vacation 

Wif a football all my own. 
Wen I kiss my pa and mamma 

As they meet me at the door; 
Then you bet that she^W be sorry 

She don't luv me anymore. 

If she comes aroun' to see me. 

Tells me 'at she loves me still, 
'En my heart wif joy will patter 

And myself wif gladness fill; 
'En I'll take her hand an' tell her 

'At I luv her as afore, 
After that she'll never tell me 

She don't luv me any more. 
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BACHELOR'S CLUB 

President H. L. Sheffer. 

Vice-President Joe Folsom. 

Treasurer Tubba Arthur. 

Secretary Charlie Stover. 

Coach H. Du Bois Mulford, ex-officio. 



MINOR OFFICERS 

Chief Woman-hater — Leonard. 

Against Woman's Suffrage — G. W. Martin. 

Father John — They all get married — Johnny Morrison. 

Stag at every dance — Ed. Halsted. 

A Bachelor in New Brunswick — Toddie. 

Promises to be one — Ritchie. 

Wedded to his art — C. W. Haasis 

No time for fussing — Val Havens. 

Confirmed — Rudolph Stier. 

A studious bachelor — Dave Van Dyke. 

A bachelor 'til you know him — Jack Marsh. 

Takes a vacation in Plainfield — Neil Schenck. 

Me and my pipe are one — Scudder. 

Became famous in a day — Skillman. 

Gradually leaving the ranks — Fat Schenck. 



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FIRST NIGHTER'S CLUB 

Motto — "When your studies interfere with the Bijou give up your studies 

OFFICERS 

King of the Front Roiv Dave Auchter. 

Second only to Dave Hoot Fountain. 

Always on the Job Turner Barr. 

Sits in the Box luith his Girl Worth Farley. 



SEEN AT THE OPERA HOUSE. 

Al Leeds — Enjoys the singing. 

Doc Ramsey — Hopes to start again soon. 

Harvey Banks — Twirls his mustache with a critical air. 

Roy Anderson — Likes the acrobats. 

Dexter White — Picks out the good ones. 

Bull Cooper — Sure to be present. 

Don Ross — Always looking for artistic effects. 

Paul Walrath — Sits in the fourth row. 

Billy Ball — Applauds every act. 

Stan Robins — Goes when he gets a chance. 

The Aggies — Every first night. 



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COMMUTERS' CLUB 



Motto — "The Penn is cheaper than the Board.'' 

OFFICERS 

Head Mucky-Muck Harold M. Tbrrill. 

First Assistant *'Augie" Leistner. 

Star Talker "Choby" Chobricher. 

Upholder of Dignity Camp. 

Champion Pie-Eater Schecter. 



AMONG THOSE PRESENT. 

Slmon — Newark misses me when I am here. 

Masker — A trolley ride with his pipe each morning. 

Bastedo — I and my book — and Enk. 

Press — I have to go home and study. 

Davis — When I was a freshman I had my hair cut. 

Jacobson — 1 believe in standing up for my rights. 

Marsh — Four years back and forth. 

FiNEOAN — The Celtic representative of Isclin. 



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LAZY BONES 

A Great American Novel — Published Complete in this Issue of the Tooter. 

Chapter I. The Bell. 

The sun had risen, but another son was still in bed. It was already eight but our hero 
had not yet "ate." Moreover, he was sleepy. 

'*If the President was as tired as I am would Dr. Demarest?'' he said, as he turnjed 
over in bed. 

Suddenly, the bell sounded, but the sound was not a ringing one. Here is where the 
joke is on you. 

It was only Whitfield Bell snoring at the other side of the room. 



Chapter II. The Dream. 

Our hero fell into a deep sleep. The fall, however, did not hurt him in the least. He 
then dreamed that a miracle had happened. He thought that compulsory Chapel had been 
abolished. He dreamed that there was no more drill. 

"Gee," he muttered to himself, "if there isn't any Chapel in the morning what will Prof. 
Billetdoux?" 

He awoke with a start. It was eight-thirty, and he realized that he had been dreaming. 

"Oh, Keller," he said, "would that I could sleep some more." 

"Is breakfast waiting?" he asked a moment later. 

"No," answered his roommate; "but Dr. Davis." 

Aside, our hero sighed a sigh of monstrous size and, discouraged, walked disconsolately 
to the French recitation. 



Chapter III. Stuck. 

On the way upstairs in Queens he looked into the Philosophy room. 

"Is Dr. Marvin?" he asked his companion. 

"No," answered the one addressed; "he'Slater than usual." 

As our hero walked into the French recitation a thought struck him. He withstood the 
shock. 

"If second year French would make Harold Terrill would it make Ray Howell?" he 
asked the prof. 

"Vou may leave the room," said the Professor sternly. "You're stuck." 



Chapter IV. The End. 

This is the last chapter. We haven't any more room in the Tooter, 
Our hero walked down the cold stairs. He was met by cold stares wherever he went. 
Two students were talking in the lower hall. 

"If he should quit college would it make Jacob Chobricher?" asked one. 
"I Gant say," answered his companion, who was suffering from a cold in the head. 
Our hero fell down in a faint. 
"Get up," urged a terror-stricken freshman. 
"I Gant, I Gant," muttered the victim. 

Then he fainted again and the college watched mournfully as they bore him away 
unconscious to the Dormitory. 

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After the Dance 



MISQUOTED QUOTATIONS 

•'And some have lateness thrust upon them." — Mr. Upson. 

"The faces of the hoary lead but to the shave." — Banks. 

"Farewell, a long farewell to all my sedateness." — Nelson. 

"When I have bossed the Barr." — Ramsey. 

"The noblest Herrman of them all.*' — Bill H. 

"Let not ambition mock the midnight oil." — Campbell. 



THE FRESHMAN CAMPAIGN SONG 

With Apologies. 

Every time I come to town 

The Sophs keep kickin' me aroun', 

I don't care if 1 am a houn', 

They gotter stop kickin' me aroun'. 



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PICKED UP AROUND COLLEGE 

ONE ON BROWNIE. 

Brownie, to Freshman during football season — "Don't you know me, I'm Captain 
Alverson." 

Innocent Freshie, much impressed — "Gee, I thought you were Coach Gargan " 

WANTED— A GIRL. 

Billy Gay, before the Prom. — "Savt, do any of you fellows know of a girl who's going 
stag to the Junior?" 

OR HIS HEAD. 

Freshman, after being thrown heavily against the piano in the Quad Room — "Naw, it 
didn't hurt; I struck the soft pedal." 

THE WINE OF LIFE 

Taken from Ted Pockman's letter from Turkey — "Last night I lay in a gondola in one 
of the canals, drinking it all in, and life never seemed so full before." 

THE RACE OF MAN. 

A freshman, in answer to the question, "What are the five great races of mankind?" 
answers — "The one hundred yard dash, the high hurdles, the quarter mile, the half and 
the mile." 

SOME KNOCKING. 

Freshman fusser, to his fair companion — "Yes, my roommate is just like me — making 
witty remarks half the time." 

Fair One — "Oh, yes, I see; sort of half witted." 

STUNG. 

"One thing about corporal punishment," remarked Slater after Pedagogy recitation, "at 
least it makes the pupils smart." 

WITHOUT HIS KNOWLEDGE. 

Extract from a father's letter to his son in Rutgers: 

"It seems to me that ycu are spending too much money and therefore I am going to 
keep you strictly on your regular allowcnce. Everything is all right at home. Your mother, 
the gocd woman spoils you as usual. Enclosed you will find a check for fifteen dollars 
which she sends without my knowledge. Lovingly, Father." 

AN AWKWARD PAUSE. 

A certain student at Rutgers was out fussing. The conversation turned to the new Col- 
lege song book. 

"Who wrote the seventh song, anyhow?" said the girl. "It's the worst thing I ever 
heard." 

"Oh," answered the student, "I wrote that." 

"Er, er," stammered the fair maiden in distress. "I didn't mean the music, that's fine. 
It's the words. Who wrote that slush, anyway?" 

Student — "Why, er, my brother wrote them." 

There was an awkward pause. 

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Nonsensia (?) 

Hey, Mac! Did you get stuck in Bobby? 
No, by Heck. 



"Hello, Swifty, matcher fer chocolate." 



Notables at the Junior Prom. 

Duke Smixture from Woodwich Connecticut. 



Count Yerchange from Wherhas Oregon. 



General Nuisance from Whatcan Tennessee. 



Lord Nose from Allthat Arkansas. 



Announcement — Dave Auchter, of the Chi Psi House, will wear an overcoat this week. 



Harold Schenck 

With apologies to Life. 
There lives within the Junior rank 
A blooming youth called Harold Schenck. 

Ah me! I have myself to thank, 

I first pronounced it Harold Shank. 

But next we learned from Johnny Enk, 
The proper way was Harold Skenk. 

But then, if 't rhymes with German "denk,' 
Why not pronounce it Harold Shenk 

But now we've found — the thought has "sank," 
To say it right is Harold Skank. 

And since Tve found the proper way, 
I call him Schenkie every day. 



"A man he was — to all his countrv Stier.' 



It always takes a little man to make a big fuss. 



Mary Had 

Mary had a little bird; 

She kept it in a cage, 

One day a cat espied it there — 

Let's turn another page. 

Milfwaukee Sentinel, 

Mary had a busy flee 
Alight on her one day — 
You will excuse us now for we 
Must look the other way. 

Houston Post. 

Mary had a harem skirt 

One day upon the street, 

To get her home they had to take 

A copper off his beat. 

Elizabeth Journal. 

Mary had a bathing suit. 

She said it was a peach. 

But when she wore it out one day — 

They shooed her off the beach. 

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Acknowledgements 



The editors of the *'Scarlet Letter'' wish to express their ap- 
preciation for the suggestions and valuable assistance given them 
by friends, faculty, alumni and students of the college. Especial 
mention, we feel, should be made of the help given by Dr. Dem- 
arest, Dr. Bevier, Mr. Upson, Dr. Lipman, Dr. Whitman, Mr. 
R. S. Patterson, Ml, and Mr. Russell Tandy, of Rahway, N. J.; 
also we gratefully acknowledge the loan of cuts of the college 
buildings and campus by the College Office. 



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IB 



The Students' 
Supply Store 

12 WINANTS HALL 



Books, Stationery, Pennants, 
Athletic Goods, Etc. 



SCARLET LETTERS 



u 



Next Time" 

GIVE THE 



TrophyHouse 

OF NEWARK 

An Opportunity to Estimate on 
Your Trophies and Medals 

El 

Frank Holt & Co. 

Newark's Foremost Jewelers 

BROAD ST., Cor. ACADEMY ST. 

Opposite P. O. 

El 

We are specialists in the Trophy line. 

Estimates cheerfully given on 

small and large lots. 

TRY US 



Cox Sons & Vining 

72-74 Madison Ave. 
New York 



CAPS 

and 

GOWNS 



Hoods for all Degrees 

Judicial and Pulpit Robes 

Choir Vestments 




WE ARE 

Headquarters for Fountain Pens and 

high-grade Stationery, boxed 

or by the pound 

OUR SPECIAL-- 

Cascade Linen 

48 sheets and 48 envelopes for 

25c 



Miller's Drug Store 

Cor. George and Paterson Sts. 
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 



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o: 



QUALITY WORKMANSHIP SATISFACTION 



Thomas J. Beckman Co. 

College and School Engravers, 
Stationers, Printers, Jewelers 

827-29 Filbert Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



William C. Rowland 



UNIFORMS 

Supplies, Equipments, Presentation 
Sabres, Belts, Buckles, Etc. 

1209 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Uniformer of Rutgers College 

I'l H 

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John J. McManus 



R. Levine 



Plumbing 


Ladies' and Gentlemen's 


and 
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Custom Tailoring 




15 Easton Avenue 


140 Somerset Street 


New Brunswick 


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Telephone Call 212-W 


Cleaning, Pressing 
and Repairing 



a Specialty 



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Telephone Call 559- VV 


a^fitourant 


A. Weinraub 


ALL HOME COOKING 


MERCHANT 


Everything absolutely Clean 
and First Class 


TAILOR 

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422 George Street 
New Brunswick 

isi - ■ 


Cor. George and Schureman Sts. 
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 

1^1 



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The United States Cream Separator 

WON THE TWO LARGEST PRIZES OF 1911 



At the OJifornia State Fair the Interlocking U, S. Cream Separator was given the highest awrard over all competiton. 
Over six competitori, including the DeLaval, Shades, International. Simplex, Empire and Automatic, the United States 
Interlocking received the coveted title **The Beafc Cream Separator/' 



Read the State Fair Manager's letter: 



Sacramento, Cal., December 1, 191 1 



Replying to yours ci the 29th ult. will say that the Vermont Farm Machine Company was awarded the 6rrt prize on 
best cream separator at the recent State Fair, the second priie being awaided to the DeLaval Dairy Supply Company. 

C. ALUSON TELFER 

The Interlocking United States Cream Separator has the advantage over every other Cream Separator in that power 
may be applied in two places on either a de. 



The laroest butter prize oi the year, the $500 Silrer Cup, offered by the Northern Padlic R.R., was won by A. 
G. Scholes. Townsend, with creamery butter made from United States Separator cream. Q For separating the smooth, 
even quality cream which makes the haghest grade butter, the United States Cream Separator has no equal. 

These are not Unusual Performancea— Less than three vean ago. at th't Alaska -Yukon -Pacific Exposition in 
Seattle, the Interlocking United States Cream Separator won the GRAND PRIZE (h.ghest award) on the five poinU 
of Skimming. Construction, Sanitation, Installation and Power. For ten years the U. S. Cream Separator has held the 
World's Record (made in 30 consecutive runs at the Pan-American Expoation) for cleanest skimming. 

If You Want Quality of Cream— (Jus cleanest skiinming— the easiest cream separator to run and to wash— -in- 
vestigate our claims, we want to prove them at your convenience to your complete satisfaction. Prices for farm sizes $25 
to $160. according to the guaranteed capacity. 



Vermont Farm Machine Co., 

Agents Everywhere 

Portland. Me. LaCrosse, Wis. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Toledo. Ohio Omaha. Neb. 

Chicago, 111. Kansas Gty. Mo. 



Bellows Falls, Vermont 

Distributinc Warehouses in 

Houston, Texas Portland, Ore. 

Helena. Mont Montreal. Que. 

Salt Lake City. Utah Winnipeg. Man. 

OaUand. Cal. Calgary, Alta. 



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Cafe and 
Restaurant 

LEONARD SCHEIDIG 

PROPRIETOR 

HI 



135 ALBANY STREET 
New Brunswick, N. J. 



A. ZSILKAY 



Fine Tailor 



II 



20 FRENCH STREET 

NEW BRUNSWICK 

NEW JERSEY 



Peter Troulinos 

MERCHANT 
TAILOR 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
$16.00 and up 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing 
and Altering 

All work done at reasonable prices 

MEN'S SUITS LADIES' SUITS 

Pressed - - .60 



Cleaned and 

Pressed - .50 

Scoured - 1.00 Cleaned and 

Steamed - 1.50 Pressed 



.85 



Goods called for and delivered 

393 George St. 

Down from National Bank Building 



Students and Students' Clubs 
should patronize those who 
patronize them. 

C. W. Russell 

has completed his new coal 
elevator on Comstock Street, 
and all coal must pass over 
screens to reach the wagons, 
so it must be clean. Try a 
ton and see for yourself. 



All orders taken at the office, 

French and Schuyler Streets 



EC 



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'•I ■•■ 

WILLIAM J. McDEDE 

LIVERY STABLES 



Rutgers Stables, 39-41 Easton Ave. Grand Central Stables, 68-70 Albany St. 
I I 

H. M. PRICE'S SONS 

EitablUhed 1829 



PLUMBING, TINNING 
AND STEAMFITTING 



Q 



We are also Sole Agents for the 
Celebrated CANOPY RANGE 



H. M. PRICE'S SONS 

249-25 1 -253 Burnet Street, - New Brunswick. N. J. 



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Compliments of 

Kolesch & Co, 

138 Fulton Street 
New York 



As Good a Store 

For Men 



As It Is 

For Women 



CLARK 

®I|F IFIorlHt 

CUT FLOWERS and 
FLORAL DESIGNS 



BIRDS and GOLDFISH 

WE SHIP FLOWERS TO ALL 
PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES 



77 CHURCH STREET 
NEW BRUNSWICK 
NEW JERSEY 
Phone 548 



D, Van Nostrand Co, 

are prepared to supply, either from 
their complete stock or at short 
notice, 

Any Technical or 
Scientific Book 

In addition to publishing a very 
large and varied number of SCIEN- 
TIFIC and ENGINEERING 
BOOKS, D. Van Nostrand Com- 
pany have on hand the largest 
assortment in the United States of 
such books issued by American and 
foreign publishers. 

All inquiries are cheerfully and 
carefully answered and complete 
catalogs sent free on request. 

25 Park Place New York 



BH 



33 



XI. 



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DON'T Miss It--Saves_You_$65 

Special Limited Offer to Scarlet Letter Readers of 100 Latest 

MODEL 8 j\MERICAN TYPEWRITERS 

This special offer gives you a high-grade Typewriter at $35, the lowest price at which 
a standard machine has ever been sold, and on easy terms. The American will do the work 
of the $100 machines at high speed, and is covered with the same guarantee. It is their equal 
because it has every essential feature; 1200 cumbersome, troublesome and easily broken 
parts of other machines have been eliminated. Its simplicity of construction, the absence 
of the thousand and one little levers, bars, screws and springs which make the cost of $100 
machines accounts for this unequaled offer. The absence of all these complicated parts 
makes the American tip the scales at 12 pounds. It's the only high grade machine that is 
really portable. The fundamental point of American superiority is the single type-bar- 
one-piccc of steel ncn-bendable and unbreakable by any stroke that can be delivered on 
the key, and this is the cause of its simplicity, durability, efficiency and compactness. 



The $100 Machine 



Universal Keyboard 
Print from Ribbon 
Type Bar Machines 
Adaptability for Rapid 

Work 
Various Degrees of 
Complicated Mech- 
anism 
High Quality of Work 
Carriage Action on 
Some, Light; Others 
Cumbersome 
Portability Impossible 
When Convenience is 
Considered 
Durability Varied 
Two-Color Ribbon 

Shift only on Some 
A few have Tabulat- 
ing Indicator 

Pric e $ 100 

You have the choice 
of three styles of type: 
Large for public speak- 
ers, medium for busi- 
ness, elite for personal 
correspondence. 



Compare the Essential Features of 

the $100 Machine and the 

$50 American as 

noted below: 



American Typewriter Co., 265 Bwy., N. Y. 

Please have ihipped to me for 3 days' free trial, one 
latest model American Typewriter offered in Scariet 
Letter, the regular price of vvhic^ is $50. I authorize 
you to do this with the understanding that if I am not 
satisfied— if the machine is not satisfactory to me, I am 
to notify you within five days to that etfect, and hold 



■ subject to your order or deKver it to the express 
It carefully packed as you may direct, or, if I de- 
cide to keep it, 1 am to pay $5 after 5 days and $5 per 



month until the full special price of $33 is paid, ma- 
chine to remain your property until paid for. 



Addr« 



Town 



State 



Reference required 



The $50 American 

So Has the American 
So Does the American 
So Is the American 
Speed Unlimited on 

American 
1200 Less Parts on the 

American 
Perfectly Aligned, 

Clear Cut Impression 

from American 
Extremely Light, Ball- 
bearing Carriage on 

American 
Fewer Parts, Less 

Weight 
One-piece Bar, Less 

Complex, Longer Life 
Two-Color Ribbon 

Shift 
Tabulating Indicator on 

Every American 

Special Price, $35 



Each machine has rub- 
ber dust cover, oil, type 
brush and full dire-^- 
tions for using. Hand- 
some enameled metal 
case $2.50 extra, canvas 
traveling case $5 extra. 

FlVP Dav^' Frp#» Trial ^°"^ *^y **»« American on 

attached coupon, and mail it to us at once. We will ship you an 
American F.O.B.. N. Y. Use it in your office, give it the severest 
test you can, note its simplicity, the durability assured by the use of 
only the very finest materials throughout, iu efficiency, its compact- 
ness, iu superior finish and its high speed. If the machine is all we 
say and you are entirely satisfied, keep it, send us $3 as a first pay- 
ment, not $33 all in one lump, the balance yo-i can pay at $3 a 
month for six months. Don t delay, simply fill out and mail the 
coupon with references. The machine will answer all questions. 
Specify die style of type you wish and if you wish a hard platen for 
manifolding. 

Made in aluminum weighty only 9 ll>s. , $5. 00 extra. 



AMERICAN TYPEWRITER CO.. 

265 Broadway. New York 
Incorporated 1893 



ZIL 



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THE PERFECT 
FARM ENGINE 

WOODPECKER 



Stationary 



Portable 



Tractor 



T-ITTCT-I 39-41 CORTLANDT 
nUon ST., NEW YORK 



ZB 



The Grit That's Rough 
The Grit That's Sharp 
The Grit That Grinds 

Order "MAKA SHEL'' Grit 

Hens prefer it to gravel, slass 
or oyster shell. It contains 
Lime, Iron, MaKnesium and 
other elements that are suited 
to the dieestive processes, and 
increases ejjK production. 

Ask your dealer or send us $1.00 
for two 100 lb. bass, f.o.b. cars. 
The orizinal SILICA GRIT. 
Avoid substitutes. Order today. 
Sample free. 



TRADE MARK agents wanted 
Edge Hill Silica Rock Co. 

Box S New Brunswick, N. J. 



:i 



ROBERT M. MAYO 



EDWIN C. SCHAEFER 



CHomftattg 



(Incorporated) 



QUALITY 
FURNITURE 

REPAIRING 
REN OVATI N G 
UPHOLSTERING 



11-15 Peace Street, New Brunswick 
Telephone 409 



Wright & Ditson 

Headquarters for 




mm: 

u. a. PAT. orp. 

Send for catalogue 



22 Warren Street 

New York 
City 



EC 



33 



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I'^i I'' 



1871 1912 



]. Bayard Kirkpatrick 
Andrew Kirkpatrick 



iiiiiiiiiiii 



FIRE INSURANCE AGENCY 
AGENTS AND BROKERS 



393 George Street New Brunswick, N. J. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



366 George Street 
New Brunswick 
New Jersey 

Telephone 52 



be: 



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IS 

COMPLIMENTS 
OF A FRIEND 

11 



P. J. YOUNG 
Dry Goods Co. 

Men's and Ladies' 
Furnishings 

The Largest and Best Assort- 
ment in this Part of the State 



33 



Young's Hats 
Redman Collars 
E. & W. Shirts 

Three of the Popular 
Articles Controlled by 

Stewart & Clayton 

FOR 83 YEARS 
No. 109 Church Street 

NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY 



Established 1888 



George and Paterson Sts. 
New Brunswick 



B. U. Tapken 



All kinds of Emblems 
Made to Order 



111 Church Street 

New Brunswick. N. J. 



BL. 



311 



XV. 



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^ 



TH^ Electric City Engraving Co. 

BUFFALO, N.Y. 



\NE MADE THE ENGRAVINGS FOR THIS BOOK. 



s a 



XVI. 



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33 



Ladies' and Men's Garments 
Cleaned Equal to New at 



WALL'S 

FRENCH DRY 
CLEANING WORKS 



28-30 CONDICT ST, 



Office: 115 CHURCH STREET 
NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY 
Phone 157-R Write for Price List 



C 



G. H. Bissett 

DRUGGIST 



Sole Agent for Huyler's 
Bonbons and Chocolates 



420 GEORGE STREET 
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 



EVERDELL'S 

Restaurant 

Good things to eat for college boys 
Regular Meals— the best in the city 

Light Lunch 



We buy nothing but the best food 
products, and serve same at very 
moderate prices. 

Open from 5.00 a. m. until 2.00 p. m. 



Church Street 

Next to New Bank 



EC 



Telephone 273-L 

Emil Volkert 

(Successor to Lorenz Volkert) 

Mml\mt 
ulatlnr 



359 George Street 

New Brunswick 



33 



xvn. 



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33 



Class Pins, Visiting 
Cards 

Wedding An- 
nouncements and 
Invitations 

Modern Advertis- 
ing, Novelties, Art 
Calendars steel en- 
graved and hand 
painted 

Photo Engravingand 
Half-tone Work, 
Photograv ure, 
Lithographing 



Established 1872 



Excelled by None 



E. A. WRIGHT 

Eitgrmi^r, Printer, ^tatUitier 

Commencement Invitations, Dance Invitations, Programs, 
Menus, Fraternity Inserts and Stationery. Complete facilities 
for turning out College Publications. Special rates to Frater- 
nities and Class Committees. Before ordering elsewhere com- 
pare Samples and Prices. : : : : : 

SPECIAL DESIGNS SUBMITTED for SPECIAL OCCASIONS 



E. A. WRIGHT BANK NOTE CO. 

Sank ^otr anil (Srnrral lEnsrattrrB 

Stock Certificates, Bonds and Securities of Money Value 
(Engraved according to Stock Exchange requirements) 

Diplomas, Checks, Bills of Exchange, Drafts, Railroad Passes 
1108 Chestnut Street PHILADELPHIA 



Photographers to Senior Class of 1912 



Main office: 
1546-1548 Broadway, New York 

Branches: 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y., (Vassar) Northampton, Mass., (Smith) 
South Hadley, Mass., (Mt. Holyoke) 



GE 



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Enterprise Laundry 

I I 

We are modern, sanitary 
and American, and are 
anxious for the patronage 
of our own kind. Give 
us a trial and you will 
be satisfied. 



L 



ALEX. STEWART, Prop. 



You'll want a thoro job done 

— the reason why our quality 
work "wins out." 

Ktttrmr irrorattng 



T T AVE the work done right in 
'■' -■■ the first place and eliminate 
the necessity of having it done 
frequently. We c>in give you a 
lasting good job when we take 
the work over. 

Let us make a bid on your needs. 



ROBERT S. TURTON 

Phone 167-W 185 Neilson Street 



D 



I. S. Van Derveer 
^l|0t09ra)ilf(r 



High Grade Portraiture- Com- 
mercial and Landscape Photog- 
raphy — a specialty in large groups 



Studio: 355 GEORGE STREET 
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF A FRIEND 



L 



3 



JB 



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'■■ '■' 



UNITED STATES 
RUBBER COMPANY 



New Brunswick, - New Jersey 



THE RANDOLPH STUDIO 



Artists' Proofs and Sepia Platinums 
Enlarged Portraits in Platinum and 
Carbon. Porcelain Pictures in Carbon 



GOLD LEAF FRAMES SPECIAL PRICES TO STUDENTS 



319 George Street New Brunswick, New Jersey 

OPPOSITE SOLDIERS' MONUMENT 



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Charming Footery 

. - - IN - - - 

$3.50 and $4.00 Orfords 



Harding & Mansfield 

BIG S H O K H O i; S E 
9 Peace Street New i'm.nvivtu.k. 



Established 1879 

O. O. Stillman 

inttrlrr anil 
(9)itinitrtrist 



Diamonds, Watches, Sterling Silver 
Fine Watch Repairing a SpeciaJty 



133 Albany Street 

New Bniaswt-ck, X. U 



3 



NeilsonT. Parker 



lvr/^fft*'Vtf JTr'^v 



Ktt^ttranrr 



El 






s: 



"Macy's" and 
*The Gunn" 

Sectional Book Cases; 
for the Home 

'^ 1%^ (fif^tc^.fifjff and R«£ Crew* Ma;:- 

i.tAVAl't) HINGHER 



S 



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3E1 (Srorge ^tr^t ISStm 9mtvmxtk 



R. N. WALLACE F. BRIDGER 

Proprietor Manager 

MANSION HOUSE 

New Brunswick, New Jersey 



Under new management and will be run as a 
first class hotel on the European plan, service a la 
carte at all hours. Board by the day or week 



XXII. 



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T ET us make your pictures for you. De- 
-■— ' veloping, either six or twelve ex- 
posures, 10c. Printing, 2, 3, 4 and 
5c, according to size. 



L. H. HOAGLAND 

VAN DEUSEN PHARMACY also 
HIGHLAND PARK PHARMACY 



Joseph New's Sons 

IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC 

GROCERIES 

Fresh Butter and Eggs 
Teas and Coffees a Specialty 



110 Somerset Street 

Telephone 173-J 



IB 



CONFECTIONERY 

Somerset Street, across 
from Prep. School :: 



H. J. NEW 



The College Barber 

S. ZIMMERMAN 

Shop Closed on Sunday 
BIRDS for SALE 

No. 381 George Street 



MULLER'S ORCHESTRA AND BAND, Inc. 



50 Court Street 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Tel. 3277 Main 



DOUWE D. WILLIAMSON 



Arrtftt^rt 



National Bank of New Jersey Building 
New Brunswick, N. J. 



b: 



33 



XXIII. 



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Hotel Cumberland 

Broadway, at 54th Street, - - New York 

Near 50th St. Subway Station and 53d St. Elevated 



[ 3 



HEADQUARTERS for COLLEGE MEN 



\ 3 



"Broadway'* Cars from Grand Central Depot 

Pass the Door. Also 7th Avenue Cars 

from Pennsylvania Station 



I I 



NEW AND FIREPROOF 



I I 



Strictly First Class. Rates Reasonable. $2.50 
HARRY p. STIMSON with Bath and up 

Formeriy with Hotel Imperial 

\ 1 

SPECIAL RATES FOR COLLEGE TEAMS 

Ten Minutes' Walk to Thirty Theatres 
R Id 



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jn 




The name JOHNSON on your 

Atlilrtir ll^^ar 

is a guarantee of satisfaction. We 
have catered to the STUDENT 
ATHLETIC TRADE for 25 
years. You owe it to yourself 
to get the best. 



Artiptr Jl0t|tt0xitt $c (He. 

112 W. Forty-Second Street 

Consolidated Gas Bids Near Sixth Ave. 



MxhhkBtx ]^lfartttarg 

PRESCRIPTION 
DRUGGISTS 

16 FRENCH STREET 
Opposite Railroad Station 



Telephone Orders Delivered 



Anything Anywhere Anytime 
Telephone 780 



Paul F. Williams 



FARMS 

SALE AND RENT 
Room 501 National Bank Bldg 



E. V. McCormick 

Manager of 

Rutgers College 
Dining Hall 



OFFICE : 

Rutgers College 
Dining Hall 



B. 



:jsi 



XXV. 



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33 




The Hanover Shoe— $3.00 

STYLE PRE-EM INENCE 

The striking smartness of Hanovers enables you to "spot** them anywhere, any time, 
on anybody. They*ve got a rollicking, nifty air, chic expression and unmistakable custom 
tang that*s all their own. 

This note of distinction is only partly responsible for the wonderful popularity of Han 
overs. They're the best known and most worn $3 shoes in the world. Other reasons 
for the pre-eminence of Hanovers is shape retention, Btting qualities, solid comfort and 
durabflity. 

And all this for $31 Looks like a gold brick to many, but it*s a good one to buy. 
Big sales and the elimination of three middlemen does the trick. Wont you get in line? 



HANOVER SHOE STORES: 



Akron, Ohio 
Albany. N. Y. 
Allentown. Pa. 
Alloona, Pa. 
Baltimore. Md. 
Binmngham, Ala. 
BrooUyn. nI. Y. 



Camden. N. J. 
Oiesler. Pa. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cleveland. Ohio 
Dayton, Ohio 
Easton, Pa. 
Hanover, Pa. 



Harraburv, Pa. 
Indianapous, Ind. 
Johnstown, Pa. 
Lancaster. Pa. 
Newark, N. J. 
New Brunswick, N. J. 
New Casde. Pa. 



New York, N. Y 
Norfolk. Pa. 
Paterson. N. J. 
PhiUdelphU. Pa. 
Pittsburg. Pa. 
Reading. Pa. 
Richmond. Va. 



Scranloo. Pa. 
Sprmgnekl, Ohio 
Trenton. N. J. 
Wilkesbarre. Pa. 
WiiliamsporU Pa. 
Wilmington, Del. 
York, Pa. 



New Brunswick Store — 377 George Street 



ac 



na 



XXVI. 



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New Brunswick 

FEIBER & SHEA 
Managers 



Always presenting a really 
good show 

INCOMPARABLE 
VAUDEVILLE 

Three times daily-3, 7.15 and 9 p. m. 

Matinee daily, 10 and 20 cents 

Evenings, 10, 20 and 30c 



Program changed 
Monday and Thursday 



The 

Science of Slicing 

Dried Beef 

Revelation in the Art of Slicing. 
Unlike any other Sliced Dried Beef. 
Thin as paper ; smooth as glass. 
Glossy, large, broad wafer slices. 
Every slice uniform in thickness. 
Rosy, pink-tinted, beautiful slices. 
Sliced in the highest style of the art. 

40 CENTS THE POUND 

Johnson's Grocery 

28 Liberty Street 
Phone 966 



Louis A. Stokes 

(Outfitter tii Mtn 



HATS A SPECIALTY 



Sole agent for B. STEIN & 
SONS Custom-Made Clothes 



103 CHURCH STREET 
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 



John Collier 

Ice and Coal Co. 



Wholesale 
and Retail 



215 BURNET STREET 
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 



o: 



30 



XXVII. 



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33 



1913 

Scarlet Letter 

$1.50 




Address 

DONALD HAVENS 

Business Manager 

Bleeker Place, 
New Brunswick, N. J. 



1913 
$1.50 



Be Satisfied and Smoke a 

Pressler Make Cigar 

Step in and see 

PRESSLER, 409 George St. 

One block from the College 



Go to 

Osborn & Smith 

For Your Summer Cottage 

lUal £atatp 



mi 



Mattison Avenue 

Asbury Park 

N. J. 



Paterson Street 



Mathushek & Son 

PIANOS 

'TpHE perfectly equipped factories and 
"*■ ample capital to conduct business on 
the most economical lines put the Mathu- 
shek & Son Piano Company in a position 
where it would be a crime to build anything 
but a first class piano. 

56 Church St., New Brunswick, N. J. 



33 



XXVIII. 



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MONOGRAM CIGARETTES 

SMOKE your special blend and have your own monogram on your 
own cigarettes. It is a distinguished habit to have cigarettes made 

to order. Smoking is a thousand times more enjoyable when your 
cigarettes are specially blended to exactly suit your taste. It's very little 
trouble arranging for this, and having your monogram on all your cigar- 
ettes. We take care of that for you. Wc are making cigarettes for the 
most particular smokers in New York, Philadelphia and Washington. 

Private order, mild blends for ladies, made up and delivered promut- 
ly and carefully. 

Write or call, and tell us what your particular preference is, and 
receive sample blends. We will guarantee to please you. State your 
initials or name, so that we may submit appropriate ideas for marking. 
$2.00 per box of 100 cigarettes. 



CHARLES FOX COMPANY, Inc. 

17-19 BROADWAY :: :: :: NEW YORK CITY 



©Iff (Hanmr-'^tmB J^rinttttg ani 

J^ttbltalfttlg OIn. Plainfield, N. J. 

Promoters of Dignified Simplicity in Tj^pe Arrangement 



This issue of UUft ^turltt C^ttrr 
is a sample of our work 



HI , ■ 111 

XXIX. 



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['I ~F1 



ESTABLISHED 1818 





BHOkWfMf coit. TWENTY-SECOND ST. 

new YORK. 

Advantages offered in our ready-made 
Clothing: Double materials — exclu- 
sive styles — moderate prices. 

In other things as well — English Shirts, 
Neckwear, Underwear, Hosiery, Hats, 
Shoes, Trunks, Bags and Traveling 
Cases. 

English Blazers, Polo Ulsters, Mackin- 
toshes Clothing and Outfittings for 
Travel at home or abroad. 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 



if i a 

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