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Full text of "School catalog, 1959-1961"

THE UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS 
LIBRARY - ARCHIVES 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/schoolcata195961phil 



PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM COLLEGE OF ART 



CATALOG • 1959-1961 




PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM COLLEGE OF ART • 1959-1961 



Broad and Pine Streets, Philadelphia 2, Pennsylvania, Kingsley 6-0545 



CHARTER MEMBER NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOLS OF DESIGN 



Founded in 1876 and specializing in Advertising Design, Art Teacher Educa- 
tion, Dimensional Design, Fabric Design, Fashion Design, Fashion Illustration, 
General Arts, Illustration, Industrial Design, Interior Design and Photography. 



About the College 

Administration and Staff 

Admission Requirements ........ 

Alumni Association . 

Awards 

Board of Governors 

Calendar for 1959-60 and 1960-61 

Contributors 

Course Descriptions 

Curricula 21. 27. 31. 2 



111-113 



Curricula 21, 27, 31, 35, 39, 43 

47,51,55,59,63,67 

Directors of Departments . 104-105 

Electives (General Studies) 70 

Evening Division . 115 




106.109 



nd Curriculum. .20-21 



Studies 



idelphia Museum of" 
Corporation 

Pre-Professional Summer Classes 

Professional Arts Programs .... 

Professional Departments 

Related Arts 



p:- 


Saturday Art Classes for 

Young People 


m ■ 


Scholarships 


dn,:..' 


Services and Activities including 
Student Council 




Summer Workshop for Teachers 




L^., Tuition and Fees 


m 




Students share in a wide variety of ac 
tivities including exhibitions, concerts 
film showings, symposia and dances 



PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM COLLEGE OF ART 

Our change of name is not merely symbolic. It signifies our very substantial 
growth, since our founding in 1876, from an art school to an art college. It also 
proclaims our unqualified acceptance of the premise that, today, the education 
of the artist-designer and the artist-teacher must be based on the broadest 
possible foundation in the humanities. 

The modern world has gone a long way in its acknowledgement of the 
importance of the visual artist and of the vital part that he plays in the improve- 
ment of the appearance and function of all man-made objects. On the other 
hand, this new role of creative collaboration with industry demands of the artist 
a far deeper understanding of himself, his craft and his culture than ever before. 
In turn, this responsibility is placed — where it rightly belongs — on the shoulders 
of the colleges of art whose obligation it is to see that talent finds its fullest 
fruition and widest public recognition. 

However, the problem is not only of developing aptitudes, but of nurturing 
and securing their growth with solid values and communication skills. To achieve 
this, the rocket bursts of inspiration must be harnessed successfully to the dis- 
ciplines of a rigorous education in all of the major fields of human knowledge. 

Integral, therefore, with our professional departments, to which we have 
added, for the first time, a major in general arts, is a varied and carefully 
balanced core of general studies and related arts subjects. These are required of 
all entering students. Approved applicants for admission are now rostered for 
the objective of either the Bachelor of Fine Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. 

This is our answer to the challenge of our time : a complex age of immense 
opportunity for those who are competently trained for leadership. We believe 
that PMCA's graduate artists and art teachers will continue to make a dis- 
tinguished and enduring contribution to society. 

E. M. Benson, Dean 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 1959 -I960 

Fall Semester Begins Thursday, September 17, 1959 and ends Friday, January 22, 1960 



FRESHMAN REGISTRATION Tuesday, September 8, 1959 from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and from 

1 to 4 p.m. 

REGISTRATION FOR ALL Wednesday and Thursday, September 9 and 10, 1959 from 

OTHERS 9 a.m. to 12 noon and from 1 to 4 p.m. 

FRESHMAN ORIENTATION Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, September 14, 15, 16, 1959 

from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. 

LATE REGISTRATION PERIOD September 14, 15, 16 and 18, and 21 through 25. 

Late registration ends on Friday, September 25, 1959. 



NO REGISTRATION 

LAST DAY FOR ROSTER 
CHANGES 

LAST DAY FOR REMOVAL 
OF"E" (INCOMPLETE) 



Thursday, September 17, 1959. 
Thursday, October 1, 1959. 

An "E" received in the Spring Semester must be removed by 
the first Friday in November. (See General Information section 
in catalog.) 



THANKSGIVING VACATION Thursday, November 26, 1959 through Saturday, November 

28, 1959. 



WINTER VACATION 



CLASSES RESUME 



Monday, December 21, 1959 through Saturday, January 2, 
1960. 

Monday, January 4, 1960. 



PORTFOLIO EVALUATION Monday, January 18 through Friday, January 22, 1960. 

AND EXAMINATION WEEK 



REGISTRATION AND 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

FOR CURRENT STUDENTS 



Monday, January 18 through Friday, January 22, 1960 from 
9 a.m. to 12 noon and from 1 to 4 p.m. 



MID-YEAR INTERMISSION Monday, January 25 through Friday, January 29, 1960. 



REGISTRATION AND 
PAYMENT OF FEES FOR 
FRESHMEN AND ALL 
OTHER NEW STUDENTS 
ENTERING IN SPRING 
SEMESTER 

ORIENTATION FOR ALL 
NEW STUDENTS 

MID-YEAR GRADUATION 



Monday, January 25, 1960 from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and from 
1 to 4 p.m. 



Tuesday and Wednesday, January 26 and 27, 1960 from 10 a.m. 
to 12 noon. 

Friday, January 29, 1960 at 2:30 p.m. 



CALENDAR I960 

Spring Semester Begins Monday, February 1 and ends Friday, May 27, 1960 



LATE REGISTRATION / 
PERIOD 

LAST DAY FOR ROSTER 
CHANGES 

LAST DAY FOR REMOVAL 
OF "E"( INCOMPLETE) 



SPRING VACATION 

CLASSES RESUME 

PORTFOLIO EVALUATION 
AND EXAMINATION WEEK 

SPRING SCHOLARSHIP 
PARTY 

COMMENCEMENT 



Monday, February 1 through Friday, February 5, 1960. 
Late registration ends Friday, February 5, 1960. 

Monday, February 15, 1960. 



An "E" received in the Fall Semester must be removed by the 
first Friday in March. (See General Information section in 
catalog. ) 

Monday, April 11 through Saturday, April 16, 1960. 

Monday, April 18, 1960. 

Monday, May 23 through Friday, May 27, 1960. 

Friday, June 3, 1960 from 4 to 7 p.m. 

Monday, June 6, 1960. Commencement exercises are held from 
2 to 3 : 30 p.m., followed from 3 : 30 to 5 : 30 p.m. by a reception 
and preview of the student exhibition for graduating seniors, 
their parents and friends, and from 8 to 10:30 p.m. by the 
annual Open House for all students, their parents and friends. 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 1960-1961 

Kail Semester Begins Thursday, September 15, 1960 and ends Friday, January 20, 1961 



FRESHMAN REGISTRATION 



REGISTRATION FOR ALL 
OTHER STUDENTS 

FRESHMAN ORIENTATION 



LATE REGISTRATION 
PERIOD 

NO REGISTRATION 

LAST DAY FOR ROSTER 
CHANGES 

LAST DAY FOR REMOVAL 
OF"E" (INCOMPLETE) 



THANKSGIVING VACATION 
WINTER VACATION 

CLASSES RESUME 

PORTFOLIO EVALUATION 
AND EXAMINATION WEEK 

REGISTRATION AND 
PAYMENT OF FEES FOR 
CURRENT STUDENTS 



Tuesday, September 6, 1960 from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and from 
1 to 4 p.m. 

Wednesday and Thursday, September 7 and 8, 1960 from 
9 a.m. to 12 noon and from 1 to 4 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, September 12, 13, 14, 1960 
from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. 

September 12, 13, 14 and 16 and 19 through 23. 
Late registration ends on Friday, September 23, 1960. 

Thursday, September 15, 1960. 

Thursday, September 29, 1960. 

An "E" received in the Spring Semester must be removed by 
the first Friday in November. (See General Information section 
in catalog.) 

Thursday, November 24 through Saturday, November 26, 1960. 

Monday, December 19, 1960 through Saturday, December 31, 
1960. 

Monday, January 2, 1961. 

Monday, January 16 through Friday, January 20, 1961. 



Monday, January 16, 1961 through Friday, January 20, 1961 
from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and from 1 to 4 p.m. 



MID-YEAR INTERMISSION 



Monday, January 23, 1961 through Friday, January 27, 1961. 



REGISTRATION AND 
PAYMENT OF FEES FOR 
FRESHMEN AND ALL OTHER 
NEW STUDENTS ENTERING 
IN SPRING SEMESTER 

ORIENTATION FOR ALL 
NEW STUDENTS 

MID-YEAR GRADUATION 



Monday, January 23, 1961 from 9 a.m. to 12 noon and from 
1 to 4 p.m. 



Tuesday and Wednesday, January 24 and 25, 1961 from 10 a.m. 
to 12 noon. 

Friday, January 27, 1961 at 2:30 p.m. 



CALENDAR 1961 

Spring Semester Begins Monday, January 30 and ends Friday, May 26, 1961 



LATE REGISTRATION 
PERIOD 

LAST DAY FOR 
ROSTER CHANGES 

LAST DAY FOR REMOVAL 
OF"E" (INCOMPLETE) 



SPRING VACATION 

CLASSES RESUME 

PORTFOLIO EVALUATION 
AND EXAMINATION WEEK 

SPRING SCHOLARSHIP 
PARTY 

COMMENCEMENT 



Monday, January 30 through Friday, February 3, 1961. 
Late registration ends Friday, February 3, 1961. 

Monday, February 13, 1961. 



An "E" received in the Fall Semester must be removed by the 
first Friday in March. (See General Information section in 
catalog. ) 

Monday, March 27 through Saturday, April 1, 1961. 

Monday, April 3, 1961. 

Monday, May 22 through Friday, May 26, 1961. 

Friday, June 2, 1961 from 4 to 7 p.m. 

Monday, June 5, 1961. Commencement exercises are held from 
2 to 3 : 30 p.m., followed from 3 : 30 to 5 : 30 p.m. by a reception 
and preview of the student exhibition for graduating seniors, 
their parents and friends, and from 8 to 10:30 p.m. by the 
annual Open House for all students, their parents and friends. 





The work of several departments from the annual student exhibition. "Young Designers. 




Department directors answer parents' questions at Open House. 



FOR INFORMATION 



ADMISSIONS 

Applications for admission; billing of tuition 
and fees for entering freshmen ; scholarships 
for entering freshmen ; day college catalog ; 
evening school catalog; circular for Saturday 
Art Classes for Young People; pre-profes- 
sional summer session; summer art workshop 
for teachers. 

REGISTRATION 

Billing of tuition and fees for current stu- 
dents; transcripts; student records and rosters; 
veterans' affairs. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Housing; student activities; withdrawal; 
medical reimbursement insurance; loans. 

ALUMNI RELATIONS 
Events and publications. 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 



Incorporates the following functions: pub- 
licity; coordination of college events; indus- 
trial, community and alumni relations ; overall 
college development. 



PLACEMENT 



Part-time employment for entering and 
current students; full-time employment 
for graduates. 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

Payment of tuition and fees; Tuition Plan, 
Inc. ; deferred payment plan. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 

Housekeeping; security and construction; lost 
and found. 



10 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 



Applicants for admission must have a high 
school diploma or its equivalent, rank in the 
upper half of their graduating class, present an 
acceptable portfolio of art work and take the 
required entrance tests administered by the 
college. A fee of $10 must accompany the appli- 
cation. For transfer students from other colleges, 
this fee is $15. Application forms and detailed 
information are obtainable from the Office of 
Admissions. 

High school records are evaluated accord- 
ing to the following criteria : the transcript must 
show fifteen (15) acceptable college entrance 
credits with the final rank in the upper half 
of the class. These credits are to be distrib- 
uted as indicated below: 

(a) Nine (9) entrance credits: four (4) in 
English, one ( 1 ) in algebra (another math 
course may be substituted ) , one ( 1 ) in 
world history, one ( 1 ) in American his- 
tory, one ( 1 ) in general science, one ( 1 ) 
in biology (another science course will be 
accepted for general science) ; 

(b) Six (6) college entrance credits: foreign 
languages, mathematics, history, science, 
electives. No more than three (3) college 
entrance credits will be allowed in art. 
Five periods per week in art for one high 
school year will count as one-half ( ^2 ) 
college entrance credit. Typewriting and 



physical education will not be allowed as 
college entrance credits. 

As a rule, elective credit will be accepted 
for any major course for which the high school 
has granted credit toward graduation. Appli- 
cants may not be admitted with less than fif- 
teen (15) college entrance credits, with the 
exception of world history which may be 
counted as a deficiency to be made up dur- 
ing the freshman year, provided that the appli- 
cant holds a high school diploma, ranks in the 
upper half of the graduating class, and has 
fourteen (14) acceptable credits without it. 

High schools (public and private) furnishing 
transcripts in support of applicants for admis- 
sion must be on the accredited list of their 
regional association or approved by the Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction of their state. 

Applicants over 21 years of age may pre- 
sent diplomas earned through examinations by 
their state departments of education. 

Each applicant for admission is required to 
take a series of entrance tests. In the event that 
distance makes it difficult to report in person 
at the college, special arrangements may be 
made. Applicants for entrance in the spring 
semester are to report for the testing program 
on any of the following days at 9 a.m. : 
1st and 4th Saturdays in November/ 2nd Satur- 



11 



day in December / 2nd Saturday in January. 

A choice of day is made when the application 
is filed. 

Applicants for entrance in the following Sep- 
tember may also report on any of the afore- 
mentioned days at 9 a.m. or they may select 
a day listed below: 

3rd Saturday in February /1st and 4th Satur- 
days in March / 4th Saturday in April / 4th 
Saturday in May / 3rd Monday in June / 3rd 
Monday in July / 4th Monday in August. 

BASIC TUITION AND FEES 

The basic tuition per semester payable at reg- 
istration is $400. 

The general fees per semester are $50. 

These general fees include registration, 
library, locker, maintenance, laboratory, stu- 
dent activities, etc. Total fees per semester, 
excluding insurance and physical recreation 
charges, are $450. 

Students currently enrolled as diploma candi- 
dates will pay a basic tuition fee of $375 per 
semester plus general fees of $50 per semester. 

Students required to schedule Review English 
or World History or both will have an additional 
charge of $40 per subject per semester. 

Courses repeated as a result of failure require 
an additional charge of $20 per semester credit; 
for equivalent courses in the Evening Division, 
the prevailing fees. 

As of September 1959, all Art Teacher Edu- 
cation majors are required to pay a Practice 
Teaching fee of $10 in their junior year and 
$20 in their senior year. These fees are payable 



in full during the first semester of each year. 

For special students taking General Studies 
subjects — a roster carrying 1 to 7 semester 
credits inclusive requires additional General 
Fees of $25; 8 or more semester credits, the full 
General Fees of $50 per semester. 

The cost of the Pre-Professional Summer 
Session is $150 for a six-week period of five 
days each week. This includes all general fees 
and tuition. 

Effective as of September 1960, all applicants 
for admission are required to make a deposit of 
$50, credited toward tuition, at the time that 
the matriculation fee of $15 is payable. Neither 
the tuition deposit nor the matriculation fee are 
refundable in the event that a student fails 
to register. 

OTHER FEES 

Application $10. 

(must accompany application) 

Application for transfer students 15. 

Matriculation 15. 

(payable when billed) 

Late Rostering 5. 

Late Registration 5. 

Re-examination or Re-evaluation 5. 

Removal of Incomplete 5. 

Transcript of record 1. 

(after the first transcript) 

Duplicate bill, roster, class card, grade 

report, or matriculation card 1. 

Scholarship application 2. 

Graduation 20. 

(including cap and gown rental) 




















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Ink and wash drawing by Robert Steigelman 





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Two interpretations of the human figure: 

1. Ink and wash drawing by Jeanne Garland Beury 

2. Charcoal drawing by Francis Boppell 



■#« i. 




ifi I 




14 




SCHOLARSHIPS 



All tuition scholarships are awarded annually 
on the combined basis of need and merit. 
Neither need nor merit alone will be regarded 
as sufficient justification for scholarship consid- 
eration. Although scholarships may be granted 
initially for one year or a longer period, the 
college reserves the right to terminate this 
assistance at the end of any semester if the 
student's work falls below scholarship level, 
namely a grade average of "B", or if his finan- 
cial need is lessened to the point where, in the 
college's judgment, tuition help is no longer 
necessary. All recipients of scholarship aid who 
wish to request the continuance of this assist- 
ance must reapply each year at the specified 
time filling out the standard forms in complete 
detail. If this is not done, the scholarship will 
terminate automatically at the end of the cur- 
rent scholarship period. 

The scholarships offered by the Museum Col- 
lege are as follows: 

FOR ENTERING FRESHMEN 

1. One (1) full tuition 4-year .scholarship, 
value $3,200, open to graduates of accred- 
ited public or private high schools within 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

2. One (1) full tuition 4-year scholarship, 
value $3,200, open to graduates of accred- 
ited public or private high schools within 
the United States or its territories. 

3. Eight (8) full tuition I -year scholarships, 
each valued at $800, open to graduates of 



public or private high schools within the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

4. Six (6) full tuition 1-year scholarships, 
each valued at $800, open to graduates of 
public or private high schools within the 
United States or its territories. 

5. Two (2) full tuition 1-year scholarships, 
each valued at $800, open to non-citizen, 
non-resident applicants who satisfy the Mu- 
seum College's admission requirements and 
are approved by the Institute of Interna- 
tional Education, Inc. 

6. One (1) full tuition 1-year scholarship, 
value $800, to a student designated by the 
Scholastic Art Awards Competition. 

7. Five (5) half tuition 1-year scholarships, 
each valued at $400, open to graduates of 
accredited public or private high schools 
within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

8. Five (5) half tuition 1-year scholarships, 
each valued at $400, open to graduates of 
accredited public or private high schools 
within the United States or its territories. 

FOR STUDENTS ENTERING THEIR 
2ND, 3RD or 4TH YEAR 
A limited number of full and partial tuition 
scholarships is awarded annually to students 
who have spent a minimum of one year (two 
consecutive semesters) at the Museum College 
and whose scholastic record and need, in the 
judgment of the Scholarship Committee, jus- 
tify such assistance. 



15 



HOW TO APPLY FOR SCHOLARSHIP AID 



FOR ENTERING FRESHMEN 
To be eligible for consideration the applicant's 
high school rank must be in the upper third 
of the graduating class and the applicant must 
have satisfied all requirements for admission. 
An application form for a scholarship should be 
obtained from the Office of Admissions. This 
form must be completed and filed with the 
Princeton Scholarship Service between October 
1 and April 30 of the school year preceding 
admission to PMCA. Scholarships for freshmen 
are available only to students entering in Sep- 
tember immediately following their graduation 



from high school and not to those entering in 
February. Notification of the decision of the 
Scholarship Committee will be made in writ- 
ing not later than May 15. 

FOR ALL OTHER STUDENTS 
Applicants already enrolled who wish to be 
considered for scholarship aid must file appli- 
cations in the Office of Student Affairs between 
February 1 and April 30 of the school year 
preceding the year for which they request assist- 
ance. Notification of the decision of the Schol- 
arship Committee will be made in writing to 
all applicants by July 15. 



AWARDS 

PMCA Design Award, The Medal of Merit and Alumni Awards 

The Medal of Merit was presented, for the 
first time, in June, 1958, to Senator J. William 
Fulbright for furthering the cause of the arts 



Each year, at the June Commencement, PMCA 
presents a symbolic cluster of stars to the artist- 
designer who, during the past year, has, through 
his work, done most to broaden public accept- 
ance of good design as it relates to contempo- 
rary life. Honored in 1954 — the first time the 
award was made — was the widely known inte- 
rior and industrial designer Paul McCobb. In 
1955 the award was presented to photographer 
Edward Steichen for his Family of Man exhi- 
bition; in 1956 to the Ford Motor Company 
for the development of the Thunderbird and 
Mark II Continental; in 1957 to Stephen 
Bosustow, President of UPA, for outstanding 
work in the field of film animation; in 1958 
to Walter Dorwin Teague for his pioneering 
contribution as an industrial designer. 



by establishing the Fulbright Grants. 

Also at the June Commencement, Alumni 
Awards for Distinguished Achievement are pre- 
sented to two PMCA graduates who have 
achieved distinction in the fields for which they 
were trained. Recent award winners include 
photographer Irving Penn, fashion designer 
Tina Leser, illustrator and author Henry C. 
Pitz, advertising designer and author Raymond 
A. Ballinger, sculptor and furniture designer 
Wharton Esherick, painter Charles Sheeler, 
photographer Sol Mednick and art educator 
Earl Milliette. 



16 




Figure composition 

in charcoal 

by Leon W'iscioni 



17 



Oil painting 
Thomas Barron 




spring Scholarship Party 



Citations for distinguished achievement were 
presented at the Spring Scholarship Party to 
the following: industrial designer Henry Drey- 
fuss; Roy E. Larsen, President of Life, Time 
and Fortune. Inc.; sculptor Jacques Lipchitz, 
advertising designer Herbert Matter, fashion 
designer Norman Norell, fabric designer Pola 
Stout, publisher Charles E. Whitney, and 
painter Andrew Wyeth. 



Student Prizes 

Climaxing the Commencement exercises in 
June, some sixty prizes are awarded both to 
graduating seniors and students in the fresh- 
man, sophomore and junior classes. These 
honors include the following: 

OUTSTANDING SERVICE AWARDS: to 

the senior boy and senior girl who have made 
the largest contribution in point of service, 
cooperation, interest and general concern for 
the welfare of PMCA and its students during 
their four years of study. 

FACULTY ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS: to 

two students in each of the freshman, sopho- 
more, junior and senior classes who, during the 
past year, have shown the greatest over-all 
development in their work. 

PROFESSIONAL DEPARTMENTAL 
AWARDS: to those students in each year of 



each of the college's eleven professional de- 
partments who have demonstrated outstanding 
achievement in their majors during the past 
year. 

GENERAL STUDIES AND RELATED 
ARTS AWARDS : to those students who, dur- 
ing the past year, have demonstrated outstand- 
ing achievement in the General Studies and 
Related Arts Departments. 



Other Special Awards 

Elmer O. Aaron Memorial Prize in Advertis- 
ing Drawing (established by Mrs. Jeanne 
Herman ) 
Mrs. Henry A. Berwind, Jr. Prize for Water- 
color 
Bocour .Awards in Painting (on the freshman. 

sophomore, junior and senior levels) 
W. H. Ely Bequest — Travel Award for Illus- 
trators 
Gimbel Prize in Painting 

J. Labe, Jr. Memorial Award in Industrial 
Design (established by Mrs. Ruth K. Weil, 
Jacob Labe, III and Mrs. J. Solis-Cohen, Jr. ) 
Philadelphia Print Club Prize in Graphics 

All awards, except those listed above, are 
made possible through the combined resources 
of funds established by the Philadelphia Mu- 
seum College of Art and persons, organizations 
and trusts listed elsewhere in this catalog. 



19 



FRESHMAN ORIENTATION YEAR 

All students entering in September, 1959, are rostered for a four-year curriculum 
leading to a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree or a Bachelor of Science in Art Educa- 
tion. They begin their careers at PMGA with a year of basic training. This is 
known as the Freshman Orientation Year and is the same for everyone, whatever 
field the student plans to enter. 

There are three reasons for this plan. To begin with, there is a definite 
foundation that artists and designers need, whether they are to create illustrations 
for magazines, design chairs or paint pictures. They must have a firm grasp of 
the problems of drawing, painting, sculpture and the graphic arts; a first-hand 
understanding of the principles of two and three dimensional design; an appre- 
ciation of the art of the past and an understanding of how past achievements 
can be put to use in creating art and design for our time. The Orientation Year 
builds this background. 

The second purpose of this plan is to give students a year of guided experi- 
mentation, a year to explore their own abilities and interests. Students are often 
uncertain about which art field is for them. The Orientation Year gives them a 
chance to find the answer. 

But self-discovery is only one goal of the Orientation Year. Equally impor- 
tant is the job of expanding one's interests, learning about other human beings 
and about the workings and creative possibilities of the world at large. Basic to 
the freshman program are such courses as Structure, Form and Growth, a class 
in anatomy that furthers an understanding of both the animate and inanimate 
world; Science Survey, which looks at nature as Leonardo da Vinci did, with 
the artist's eye and the scientist's mind; subjects which study the links between 
art, music and literature and which encourage an appreciation of our written 
language; introductory courses in the History of Art and the History of Civiliza- 
tion which serve as a solid scaffolding for further study. 

It is in such classes that students gain the deep, imaginative imderstanding 
of art, of nature and of the humanities from which fresh and original work 
may emerge. 



20 



FRESHMAN ORIENTATION YEAR CxiTTicxxlMTa (B.F.A. and B.S.) 



First Semester Seconii Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

100 English: Composition and Types of Literature 3 2.5 3 2.5 

110 History of Civilization: Prehistoric to Greece and Rome 2 2 2 2 

141 Materials and Techniques 1.5 1.5 — 

142 Orientation 1 n.c. — — 

143 Your Career in Art — — 1 n.c. 

144 Science Survey 1 1 1 1 

145 ' Art History 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

AlOO Drawing 4 2 4 2 

A104 Painting 4 2 4 2 

*A105 Graphics 4 2 — — 

A106 Anatomy I: Structure, Form and Growth 4 2 4 2 

A107 Visual Techniques I 2 1 2 1 

*A109C Design in 3-D, Clay, Plaster — — 2 1 

*A109M Design in 3-D, Metals ^ — 2 1 

Alio Color and Design 4 2 4 2 

Totals 32 19.5 30.5 18 

First Year Total for Degree: 37.5 Semester Credits 

*This course is given in either the first or second semester dependent upon the section roster. 
A series of four illustrated lectures on the History of Photography will be offered to freshmen. 
One semester of Physical Education is required of all students and must be scheduled and the 
requirement satisfied before graduation. 



21 



Symbol for brotherhood by Patrick Procaccino 



Brotherhood : paper cutout by John Albright 





f^ 



Opposite page : 

1. Construction' in cardboard by William Helm 

2. Metal horse by Barbara Stamper 

3. Wood sculpture by Donald Walton 



22 





23 




Lithograph by Sidney Goodman 



24 



PROFESSIONAL ARTS PROGRAMS 2nci, Srd, 4th Years 

Having completed the Freshman Orientation Year, students are ready to decide 
upon the major department in which they will spend their next three years. 
This applies to all students except those who hope to enter one of the following 
three departments: Dimensional Design, Industrial Design and Interior Design. 
These students will be rostered for a special second year program at the end of 
which they will select their major. 

This is an important decision. Aided by two freshman courses, Orientation 
and Your Career in Art, and with the assistance of the Student Advisors and 
instructors, students are encouraged to weigh their talents and their interests 
carefully to decide which of the college's eleven departments they are best 
suited to enter. 

The training which students acquire in their major departments is geared 
to develop young artists and designers who are capable of working at a profes- 
sional level before they graduate. Highly individualized instruction is given by 
men and women who bring to the classroom first-hand knowledge of the pro- 
fessional fields they teach. 

Supplementing this is the important contribution made by leading artists 
and designers who offer their advice in the planning of courses, speak to groups 
of students about professional problems and are invited to enter the studios and 
workshops to present projects and offer criticism of student work. 

It is this personal attention to students' professional needs that makes it 
possible for PMCA graduates to go directly into career jobs and successful 
free-lance practices. 



25 



ADVERTISING DESIGN 

Raymond A. Ballinger, Director 
Richard Hood^ Associate Director 




Posters by students in Advertising Design 
become part of Courtyard decor. 



Advertising designers are the architects of the 
printed page. They are called upon to create or 
direct the production of the drawings, illustra- 
tions, paintings, photographs, lettering, typog- 
raphy and layouts for magazines, brochures, 
books, posters, packages, displays, film and tele- 
vision. Class projects, presented by instructors 
who are all professional advertising designers, 
range from the highly experimental to the prac- 
tical. Student work is often reviewed by guest 
critics from agencies, studios, magazines, and the 
printing and production industries. Frequent field 
trips are an important aspect of the instructional 
programs. One of the educational objectives of 
the Advertising Design Department is the devel- 
opment of artists of integrity and imagination 
who are capable of finding fresh solutions to the 
problems they meet. No less important is the 
hope that they will be equally capable of making 
a solid and durable contribution to their profes- 
sional and social community. 



26 



ADVERTISING DESIGN Curriculum (B.F.A.) 



Fi rsl Scmviter Second Semester 

Hours Hours 
Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

FIRST YEAR TOTALS 19.5 18 

SECOND YEAR 

200 English Literature 2 2 2 2 

210 History of Civilization: 
Middle Ages through 

19th Century 2 2 2 2 

225 History of Philosophy. . 2 2 2 2 

241 History of Advertising. .1 .5 — — 

242 History of Illustration. .1 .5 — — 

244 General Science 

(1960-1961) 2 2 2 2 

245 Art History II 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

A200 Drawing 4 2 4 2 

A204 Painting 4 2 4 2 

A205 Graphics 4 2 4 2 

Ad200 Advertising Design 4 2 4 2 

Ad201 Lettering, Images and 

Alphabets 2 1 4 2 

Ad202 Studio Practice 2 1 — — 

Totals 31.5 20.5 29.5 19.5 

THIRD YEAR 

310 History of the United 

States — — 3 3 

*320 Psychology 3 3 — — 

*325 Sociology 3 3 — — 



Firsl Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

*355 .Anthropology - — 3 3 

345 Art History III 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

tRelated Arts Elective 8 4 8 4 

Ph201 Photography 4 2 4 2 

Ad300 Advertising, Illustration 

and Design 4 2 4 2 

Ad301 Lettering and Type 

Forms 4 2 4 2 

Totals 26.5 16.5 29.5 19.5 

FOURTH YEAR 

435 Economic Institutions. .1 1 — — 

436 Mass Media — — 1 1 

445 Art History IV 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

446 Philosophy of Art 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

^Related Arts Elective 4 2 4 2 

\?i\l Typographic Design 

Workshop 3 1.5 3 1.5 

Ad400 Art for Communication 8 4 8 4 

Ad401 Advertising Drawing. . . 4 2 4 2 

Ad403 Production/Portfolio 

Techniques 2 1 2 1 

Totals 27 16.5 27 \^ 

Four Year Total for Degree: 146.5 Semester Credits 



*T:vo of the three Social Sciences must be taken for credit. 
**The section under General Studies Program should be consulted concerning the elective offerings. 
XRelated Arts elective subjects must be approved by the department director. 



27 





Representative examples of the work of the Advertising Design Department: 

1. Point-of-sale counter display by Patrick Procaccino 2. Billboard by Lynne Swisher 3. Advertising 
illustration by Suzanne Wertman 4. Magazine cover by Elizabeth Ann Klase 5. Lettering by 
Alfred Verrecchio 



28 



■ 




INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 



ART TEACHER EDUCATION 

Louise Bowen Ballinger, Director 




Individualized instruction is given 
to student by department director. 



Art teachers have the opportunity and responsi- 
bihty of bringing to young people through art a 
better understanding of themselves and a greater 
appreciation of the world in which they live. 
The training of art teachers, therefore, includes 
the broadest possible studio experience in all the 
basic arts and crafts to enable them to become 
profe.ssional artists in addition to providing sound 
knowledge of the humanities and of many spe- 
cialized subjects relating to the philosophy, psy- 
chology and methodology of education. They 
learn the art of teaching by actually conducting 
cla.sses in elementary and secondary schools while 
they are still undergraduates. Graduates receive 
the degree of Bachelor of Science in Art Educa- 
tion with eligibility for a Clollege Provisional Cer- 
tificate granted by the State of Pennsyhania to 
teach and supervise art in any public school. 
Philadelphia Museum Clollege of Art graduates 
hold key positions in .\rt Education throughout 
the United States. 



30 



ART TEACHER EDUCATION Cxirriculxxxii (B.S. in Art Education) 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock /Credit Clock /Credit 

FIRST YEAR TOTALS 19.5 18 

SECOND YEAR 

200 English Literature 2 2 2 2 

210 History of Civilization : 
Middle Ages through 

the 19th Century ... 2 2 2 2 

220 Hygiene — — 2 2 

221 Physical Education .... 2 1 — — 

225 History of Philosophy . . 2 2 2 2 

245 Art History n 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

Ed200 History and Philosophy 

of Education 2 2 — — 

Ed201 Principles of Education 2 2 — — 

Ed202 School Arts and Crafts .4242 

A200 Drawing 4 2 4 2 

A204 Painting 4 2 4 2 

A205 Graphics 4 2 4 2 

A208 Layout and Lettering . . — — 4 2 

Totals 29.5 20.5 29.5 19.5 

THIRD YEAR 

300 American Literature . . 2 2 2 2 

310 History of the United 
States and 
Pennsylvania 3 3 — — 

320 Psychology 3 3 — 

335 Sociology — — 3 3 

340 History of Fashion and 

Furniture 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

345 Art History III 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

EdSOO Audio- Visual Aids 3 2 — — 

Ed301 Art in the Elementary 

Schools 4 3 — — 

Ed302 Art in the Secondary 

Schools — — 4 3 

Ed303 Practice Teaching and 

Observation — — 6 3 

A301 Drawing and Painting .4 2 — — 

A303 Watercolor — — 4 2 

A309 Ceramics 4 2 — — 

A3 15 Arts of Presentation . . . 4 2 4 2 

Totals 30 22 26 18 

FOURTH YEAR 

400 Public Speaking 2 2 — — 

403 Contemporary 

Literature 2 2 2 2 

445 Art History IV 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

446 Philosophy of Art 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

Ed400 Art Curriculum 3 3 3 3 

Ed403 Practice Teaching 6 3 6 3 

Ed404 Observation of Teaching 6 3 — — 

Ed405 Educational Psychology. 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

.A415 Jewelry and Metalwork. 2 12 1 

Ph201 Photography 4 2 — — 

^Related Arts Elective 4 2 4 2 

Totals 33.5 22.5 21.5 15.5 

Four Year Total for Degree: 155.5 Semester Credits 



XRelated Arts elective subjects must be approved by the department director. 



31 




Students in the Art Teacher Education Department are 
trained to be artists as well as art teachers. Their own art 
work, in a variety of media, is illustrated here along with 
the work of their students in practice-teaching situations. 

1. Woodcut by Kathleen Demitroff Small 2. Photograph by Kathleen 
Demitroff Small 3. Drawing of a duck by a 7-year old 4. Still-life by Iris 
Williams 5. Group project by Holly Nickles, Virginia Bunting, Elaine Balis 
and Rosa Umile 



DIMENSIONAL DESIGN 

William D. Parry, Director 




Portion of Dimensional Design installation, 
"Young Designers" exhibition. 



The dimensional designer is part sculptor, part 
architect and part craftsman. He is primarily 
concerned with forms, either in relation to prod- 
ucts or their presentation. He is employed mainly 
by architects, industrial designers, department 
stores and museums to design exhibitions, dis- 
plays, sets for the theatre and for television, and 
such one-of-a-kind works of art as lighting units, 
murals and sculpture. The preliminary training 
for dimensional designers in drawing, painting, 
design theory, visual techniques, and engineering 
is the same as for industrial and interior designers. 
However, in their third and fourth years they 
spend more time working on projects which in- 
volve the exploration of such materials as plaster, 
metals, plastics, ceramics, glass and wood, seek- 
ing individualized solutions to design problems 
of a dimensional nature : module exhibition units, 
garden or architectural sculpture, decor for plays, 
indoor and outdoor lighting fixtures for domestic 
and industrial use, and point-of-sale displays. 



34 



DIMENSIONAL DESIGN Ciarrlculum (B.F.A.) 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 
Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

FIRST YEAR TOTALS 19.5 18 
SECOND YEAR 

200 English Literature 2 2 2 2 

210 History of Civilization : 
Middle Ages through 

the 19th Century ... 2 2 2 2 

225 History of Philosophy . . 2 2 2 2 
240 Growth and Form in 

Architecture 1 1 1 1 

243 Basic Science and 

Engineering 4 2 4 2 

244 General Science 

(1960-1961) 2 2 2 2 

245 Art History II 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

A201 Drawing and Painting .4242 

A207 Visual Techniques 2 1 2 1 

A209C Ceramics 2 12 1 

A209S Sculpture 4 2 4 2 

A210 Design Theory 2 12 1 

A2 1 3 Materials and Fabrica- 
tion Techniques .... 2 1 2 1 

Totals 30.5 20.5 30.5 20.5 

THIRD YEAR 

310 History of the United 

States — — '3 3 

*320 Psychology 3 3 — — 

*335 Sociology 3 3 — — 

*355 Anthropology — — 3 3 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

345 Art History III 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

A309C Ceramics 2 1 2 1 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock /Credit Clock /Credit 

A208 Layout and Lettering . . 4 2 — — 

A3 15 Arts of Presentation ... — — 4 2 
A3 17 Typographic Design 

Workshop — — 3 1.5 

JRelated Arts Elective — — 4 2 

Di300 Dimensional Design: 

Project Development .424 2 
Di301 Dimensional Design: 

Wood 4 2 — — 

Di302 Dimensional Design: 

Metal — — 4 2 

Ph201 Photography 4 2 — — 

Totals 24.5 15.5 30.5 19.5 

FOURTH YEAR 

435 Economic Institutions .1 1 — — 

436 Mass Media — — 1 1 

445 Art History IV 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

446 Philosophy of Art 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

Di400 Dimensional Design ... 4 2 4 2 
Di401 Dimensional Design: 

Wood 4 2 — — 

Di402 Dimensional Design: 

Metal — — 4 2 

Di404 Advanced Arts of 

Presentation 4 2 4 2 

Di405 Portfolio Preparation . . 4 2 — — 

Di406 Thesis — — 4 2 

** General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

tRelated Arts Elective 4 2 4 2 

Totals 26 16 26 16" 

Four Year Total For Degree: 145.5 Semester Credits 



*Two of the three Social Sciences must be taken for credit. 
**The section under General Studies Program should be consulted concerning the elective offerings. 
tRelated Arts elective subjects must be approved by the department director. 



35 













«?,^ ) 



>-^^ 



\j" 



X 






) ■ > 



* > 









The Dimensional Design Department creates 
objects for interior and exterior use in mosaic, 
plaster, plastics and ceramics, as well as sculp- 
ture in wood, metal, concrete and mixed media: 

1. Ceramic fish by Robert Koch 2. Texture exercise by Joe 
Alderfer 3. Sculpture by Alice Oeljeklaus 4. A portion of the 
Dimensional Design installation, "Young Designers" exhibition 



36 





37 



FABRIC DESIGN 

Jack Lenor Larsen, Director i 

Win Anderson, Co-Director 

Miriam Kellogg Fredenthal, Associate Director 




Silk-screen printing project, 
Fabric Design Department 



The fabric designer is in the unique position of 
developing ideas which, when realized, become 
the tools of another designer's trade. The textile 
industry is the absolute foundation of the fashion 
field. It supplies the home furnishing field with 
printed wallpaper, plastics, linoleum; woven or 
printed carpeting, upholstery and drapery fabrics; 
and it also includes the design of numerous ar- 
ticles of household use and personal adornment 
such as ties, handkerchiefs, toweling, scarves, etc. 
Work opportunities in this field, therefore, are 
numerous, varied and challenging. The students' 
technical knowledge and creative ability are de- 
veloped simultaneously. To this end, courses are 
offered in the history of textiles, the study of 
fibers and fabric construction, the techniques of 
weaving and printing, as well as creative design 
in both woven and printed fabrics. Students are 
made aware of professional problems and prac- 
tices through frequent visits to studios and mills 
as well as by means of class projects presented 
and criticized by designers, stylists and other rep- 
resentatives from industry. 



38 



FABRIC DESIGN Cur r Icxilxixn (B. FA.) 



FIRST YEAR TOTALS 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

19.5 18 



SECOND YEAR 

200 English Literature 2 2 2 2 

210 History of Civilization: 
Middle Ages through 

the 19th Century ... 2 2 2 2 

225 History of Philosophy . . 2 2 2 2 

240 Growth and Form in 

Architecture 1 1 1 1 

244 General Science 

(1960-1961) 2 2 2 2 

245 Art History II 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

Fb200 Fabric Orientation: 

History and Workshop 8 4 8 4 

Fb205 Nature Study Research 4 2 4 2 

A205 Graphics 4 2 4 2 

A207 Advanced Color and 

Design 4 2,4 2 

Totals 30.5 20.5 30.5 20.5 

THIRD YEAR - 

310 History of the United 

States — — 3 3 

*320 Psychology 3 3 — — 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 
Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

*335 Sociology 3 3 — — 

*355 Anthropology — — 3 3 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

345 Art History III 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

340 History of Fashion and 

Furniture 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

Fb300 Weaving 4 2 8 4 

Fb301 Printing 8 4 4 2 

Fb302 Jacquard — — 4 2 

JRelated Arts Elective 8 4 4 2 

Totals 28 18 31 21 

FOURTH YEAR 

435 Economic Institutions .1 I — — 

436 Mass Media ~ — 1 1 

445 Art History IV 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

446 Philosophy of Art 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

Fb400 Printing 1 

and/or J- 12 6 12 6 

Fb401 Weaving J 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

IRelated Arts Elective 8 4 8 4 

Totals 26 16 26 16 

Four Year Total for Degree: 149.5 Semester Credits 



*Two of the three Social Sciences must be taken for credit. 
**The section under General Studies Program should be consulted concerning the elective offerings. 
XRelated Arts elective subjects must be approved by the department director. 



39 





The work of the Fabric Design De- 
partment includes loomed materi- 
als and designs for printed fabrics: 

1. Woven fabric by Bannie McCorkle 

2. Printed designs by Murrie Gayman 



0300 




/-ri.' v^^ 




^i 
-^ 




# %' 






#•• 














•«^^ 



FASHION DESIGN 

Dorothy Parke^ Director 




Sports outfit designed and modeled 
by Patricia Shaeff 



Fashion designers plan the design, production, 
and marketing of clothing and accessories. They 
combine imagination, skill and taste with an 
understanding of what the public buys and why. 
Fashion designers need a thorough understanding 
of fabrics, anatomy, and the history of fashion. 
They learn every step of "building a garment" 
from the creation of the paper pattern, fabric 
selection, draping on the form, to the sewing, 
fitting, and finishing. Finally, they must be fa- 
miliar with fashion trends, mass production and 
merchandising problems. To coordinate the vari- 
ous aspects of the fashion field, outstanding 
designers, colorists, department store fashion per- 
sonnel, fashion illustrators, and magazine and 
newspaper fashion leaders meet with the students 
from time to time. The Costume Wing of the 
Philadelphia Museum College of Art is also used 
as a valuable resource for research and inspiration. 
The Annual Fashion Show of student designs has 
become an important Philadelphia fashion event. 



42 



FASHION DESIGN Curriculum (B.F.A.) 



FIRST YEAR TOTALS 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock /Credit Clock /Credit 

19.5 18 



SECOND YEAR 

200 English Literature .... 2 

210 History of Civilization: 
Middle Ages through 

the 19th Century ... 2 

225 History of Philosophy . . 2 

244 General Science 

(1960-1961) 2 

245 Art History H 1.5 

A201 Drawing and Painting . 4 

A205 Graphics 4 

Fb201 Fabric Design 

Orientation — 

Fa200 Fashion Design 8 

Fa201 Fashion Drawing 4 



2 

2 

2 
1.5 

2 

2 



2 
2 

2 

1.5 

4 



1.5 

2 

2 

2 
4 



Totals 29.5 19.5 29.5 19.5 



THIRD YEAR 



310 



History of the United 
States 



^320 Psychology 3 

^335 Sociology 3 



-33 
3 — — 
3 — — 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock /Credit Clock /Credit 

*355 Anthropology — — 3 3 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

345 Art History III 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

340 History of Fashion and 

Furniture 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 



12 
4 
4 



Fi302 Figure Drawing and 

Rendering Techniques 4 

Fa300 Fashion Design 12 

Fa301 Design Sources — 

^Related Arts Elective 4 

Totals 28 18 31 21 



FOURTH YEAR 

435 Economic Institutions . 1 1 

436 Mass Media — — 

445 Art History IV 1.5 1.5 

446 Philosophy of Art 1.5 1.5 

Fa400 Fashion Design 12 6 

Fa401 Professional Practice . . 4 2 

JRelated Arts Elective 4 2 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 



1 

1.5 
1.5 
12 
4 
4 

9 



1 

1.5 
1.5 
6 

2 

2 



Totals 26 16 26 16 

Four Year Total for Degree: 147.5 Semester Credits 



*Two of the three Social Sciences must be taken for credit. 

*The section under General Studies Program should be consulted concerning the elective offerings. 

XRelated Arts elective subjects must be approved by the department director. 



43 





J 



\ 




Fashion Design Department originals: 

1. Child's dress by Elsa Senges 2. Coat by Charles Hanford modeled by Adele Rapp 
3. & 4. Wedding gown by Elsa Senges modeled by Barbara Zuschlag 



45 



FASHION ILLUSTRATION 

Clarissa Gross Rogers, Director 




Samples of student work in Fashion Illustration 



The foundation of fashion illustration is the 
understanding of the human form and the ability 
to interpret it effectively. Fashion illustrators cre- 
ate drawings or paintings of the finished clothing 
and accessories that come from the workrooms 
of fashion designers. Working primarily for ad- 
vertising agencies, newspapers, fashion publica- 
tions, individual designers, and stores, the fashion 
illustrator helps to present products in their most 
favorable light by conveying fashion sense, taste 
and personality. The ability to draw is essential. 
Equally important are a love of clothes and a 
knowledge of their construction. Instruction in 
fashion and fabric orientation supplements the 
basic training in drawing, painting, anatomy and 
the graphic arts. These students meet with fash- 
ion authorities in the Coordination of the Fashion 
Field lectures. A cooperative program with Phila- 
delphia's leading department stores, enables the 
students to sketch professional fashion models 
wearing clothes and accessories styled by the 
world's finest fashion artists. 



46 



FASHION ILLUSTRATION Ciarrlculum fB.F.A.) 



FIRST YEAR TOTALS 

SECOND YEAR 

200 English Literature .... 2 

210 History of Civilization: 
Middle Ages through 

19th Century 2 

History of Philosophy . . 2 

History of Advertising . 1 

History of Illustration . 1 

General Science 

(1960-1961) 2 

Art History II 1.5 

Drawing 4 

Painting 4 

A209S Sculpture 4 

Fi200 Fashion Illustration ... 8 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

19.5 18 



225 
241 
242 
244 

245 

A200 

A204 



2 

2 
.5 
.5 

2 
1.5 

2 
2 
2 

4 



2 

1.5 

4 

4 
4 



2 
1.5 



Totals 31.5 20.5 29.5 19.5 

THIRD YEAR 



310 

'320 
^335 
^355 



History of the United 
States 



Psychology 3 

Sociology 3 

Anthropology — 



— 3 
3 — 
3 — 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock /Credit Clock /Credit 

345 Art History III 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

340 History of Fashion and 

Furniture 1.5 



**General Studies Elective 2 

IRelated Arts Elective 8 

A3 17 Typographic Design 

Workshop 3 

Fi300 Fashion Illustration ... 8 

FiSOl Fashion Figure 4 

Totals 31 

FOURTH YEAR 

435 Economic Institutions . 1 

Mass Media — 

Art History IV 1.5 

Philosophy of Art 1.5 

Fi400 Fashion Illustration ... 4 

Fi401 Fashion Figure 4 

Fi402 Portfolio Preparation and 

Professional Practice . 4 

JRelated Arts Elective 8 

**General Studies Elective 2 



436 
445 
446 



1.5 

2 
4 

1.5 
4 

9 



1.5 
2 



1.5 
1.5 

2 



1 

1.5 
1.5 
4 



1.5 

2 
4 

1.5 
4 

9 



19.5 34 22.5 



1 

1.5 

1.5 

2 
2 



Totals 26 16 26 16 

Four Year Total for Degree: 151.5 Semester Credits 



*Two of the three Social Sciences must be taken for credit. 

I he section under General Studies Program should be consulted concerning the elective offerings. 
XRelated Arts elective subjects must be approved by the department director. 



47 



Examples of the work of the Fashion Illustration 
Department: 

1. By Eileen Blatt 2. By Constance Murdock 3. By Eleanor 
Sokolow 4. By Gerald Buckley 





i<^_ 



49 



GENERAL ARTS 

George R. Bunker^ Director 




The General Arts program provides a systematic 
relation of several art studies toward a mature 
understanding of esthetic values with the broad- 
est possible applications. The first two years 
constitute a uniform foundation, not only in 
developing technical skills but also in stimulating 
an exploratory and venturesome attitude on the 
part of the student in utilizing form. In the third 
and fourth years students elect to specialize in 
painting, sculpture or graphic arts. These basic 
interpretive disciplines, while not necessarily in- 
dicating a vocational objective, form the core of 
the student's creative expression. The elected 
area of specialization is supplemented by inten- 
sive studio work in one other discipline to pro- 
mote a cross fertilization of ideas. The aim of 
the program is to present guided creative activity 
as a humane study which, along with closely 
integrated general studies requirements, is in- 
tended to form a well-rounded individual, 
equipped not only with the tools and techniques 
of expression, but the understanding, curiosity 
and initiative to employ them fruitfully. 



50 



GETSfERAL ARTS Curriculum (B.F.A.) 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

FIRST YEAR TOTALS 19.5 18 

SECOND YEAR 

200 English Literature ... 2 2 2 2 

210 History of Civilization: 

Middle Ages through 

19th Century 2 2 2 2 

244 General Science 

(1960-1961) 2 2 2 2 

245 Art History II 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

A2 1 Advanced Color and 

Design 4 2 4 2 

Ga200 Drawing, Painting 

and Collage 4 2 4 2 

Ga204 Painting 4 2 4 2 

Ga205 Graphics 4 2 4 2 

Ga209S Sculpture and 

Drawing 4 2 4 2 

Toffl/j 29.5 19.5 29.5 19.5 

THIRD YEAR 

3 1 History of the United 

States — — 3 3 

*320 Psychology 3 3 — — 

*325 Sociology 3 3 — — 

*355 Anthropology — — 3 3 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

Ga300 Drawing 4 2 4 2 

Ga Painting A, Graphics ] 

A, Sculpture A . . . ( o a q a 
Ga Painting B, Graphics T » ^ » ^ 

B, Sculpture B . . .J 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock /Credit Clock /Credit 

GaSlO Experimental Design 

(1960-1961) 4 2 4 2 

$General Arts Elective: 4 2 4 2 

Ga Painting Techniques 1 

&II (1960-1961) 

Ga Ceramic Decoration 

(1960-1961) 

Ga Graphic Design I & II 

(1960-1961) 

Ga Composition: 

Texture and Relief 
(1960-1961) 

345 Art History III 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

Totals 26.5 16.5 29.5 19.5 

FOURTH YEAR 

435 Economic Institutions. 1 1 — — 

436 Mass Media — — 1 1 

445 Art History IV 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

446 Philosophy of Art ... 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

**General Studies Elective 4 2 4 2 

Ga400 Experimental Drawing 

(1960-1961) 4 2 4 2 

Ga Painting A, Graphics 1 

A, Sculpture A. .. 1 8 4 8 4 
Ga Painting B, Graphics | 

B, Sculpture B . . .J 

§Ga Senior Elective I .... 4 2 4 2 

§Ga Senior Elective II . . . 4 2 4 2 

Totals 28 16 28 16 

Four Year Total for Degree: 144.5 Semester Credits 



*Two of the three Social Sciences must be taken for credit. 
**The section under General Studies Program should be consulted concerning the elective offerings. 
^All General Arts majors must elect one of two disciplines other than their area of specialization. These courses 

will be given outside the department. 
XGeneral Arts elective subjects must be approved by the department director. 



51 






A thorough study of the materials of art and the skills needed 
to use them creatively is basic to the General Arts program: 
1. Painting by Barbara Torode Paone 2. Sculpture by Lennart Johnson 3. Print 
by Don Shanosky 



ftwk 







53 



ILLUSTRATION 

Henry C. Pitz, Director 




City Councilmen, charcoal drawing 
by James McCauley 



The illustrator's job is to put on paper or canvas 
the look and feel of the world around him. Books, 
magazines, newspapers, advertisements, and an 
enormous variety of other printed material all 
call for his talents. Drawing and painting, the 
core of the program, prepare the student to re- 
cord and dramatize illustrations to accompany 
the printed word. The study of nature, anatomy, 
people and history is essential to the person who 
interprets the passing scene and who may want 
to specialize in nature, medical, historical or re- 
ligious subjects, or advertising illustration. Field 
trips are important teaching stimulants for illus- 
trators: sketching at museums, the zoo, city hall 
or city scenes and landscapes is a part of the 
training. Action models such as prizefighters, 
dancers, a jazz combination or a bullfighter are 
brought to the college as models who perform 
while the illustrators record their mo\'ements in 
drawings. Films and guest critics further add to 
the student's growth and understanding. 



54 



ILLUSTRATION Curriculum (B.F.A.) 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 
Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

FIRST YEAR TOTALS 19.5 18 

SECOND YEAR 

200 English Literature 2 2 2 2 

210 History of Civilization: 
Middle Ages through 

19th Century 2 2 2 2 

225 History of Philosophy . . 2 2 2 2 

241 History of Advertising .1 .5 — — 

242 History of Illustration .1 .5 — — 

244 General Science 

(1960-1961) 2 2 2 2 

245 Art History II 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

A200 Drawing 4 2 4 2 

A203 Watercolor — — 4 2 

A204 Painting 4 2 — — 

A208 Layout and Lettering . . 4 2 4 2 

11200 Composition and 

Criticism 2 1 — — 

11201 Illustration 

Development 2 1 2 1 

11202 Production and Repro- 

duction Techniques . — — 2 1 

11203 People and Backgrounds 4 2 4 2 

Totals 31.5 20.5 29.5 19.5 

THIRD YEAR 

310 History of the United 

States — — '3 3 

*320 Psychology 3 3 — — 

*325 Sociology 3 3 — — 

*355 Anthropology — — 3 3 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

340 History of Fashion and 

Furniture 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 
Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

345 Art History III 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

A300 Drawing 4 2 4 2 

A3 17 Typographic Design 

Workshop 3 1.5 3 1.5 

{Related Arts Elective 8 4 8 4 

11300 Composition and 

Criticism 2 1 2 1 

11301 Illustration 

Development 2 1 2 1 

11304 Passing Scene 2 1 2 1 

11305 Experimental 

Illustration 2 12 1 

Totals 31 19.5 34 22.5 

FOURTH YEAR 

435 Economic Institutions .1 1 — — 

436 Mass Media — — 1 1 

445 Art History IV 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

446 Philosophy of Art 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

IRelated Arts Elective 4 2 8 4 

11400 Composition and 

Criticism 2 1 2 1 

11401 Illustration 

Development 2 1 — — 

11402 Watercolor 2 1 — — 

11403 People and Backgrounds 4 2 4 2 

11404 Passing Scene 2 1 2 1 

11405 Advanced Experimental 

Illustration 2 1 2 1 

11406 Portfolio Preparation and 

Professional Practice. 2 12 1 

Totals 24 14 24 iT" 

Four Year Total for Degree: 147.5 Semester Credits 



*Two of the three Social Sciences must be taken for credit. 

**The section under General Studies Program should be consulted concerning the elective offerings. 
^Related Arts elective subjects must be approved by the department director. 



55 




A varied selection of student work 
from the Department of Illustration: 

1. Woodcut by Elizabeth Gibson 2. By Trina 
Schart 3. By WiUie Moffit 4. Line drawing by 
Eileen Taber 



56 






S^' .Ai*^ 



^,t ^^/^'^f '^'■' ' w ^^ t* 



INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

Joseph Carreiro^ Director 

Richard H. Reinhardt^, Associate Director 




Experimental steering device 
by Aristides Makris. 



Artist, engineer, architect, businessman — the in- 
dustrial designer should combine all of these. 
His work is problem-solving: the development 
of manufactured products, the machines which 
make the products, the packages in which they 
are sold. His assignment may be the design of a 
can opener or the layout of a supermarket; the 
shaping of a fountain pen or an automobile, and 
often the offices, cafeterias or parking lots of the 
plants where they are made. Industrial designers 
need to be familiar enough with fabrication, en- 
gineering, merchandising and management prob- 
lems to put their creative designing ability to 
work effectively, and to be able to talk the lan- 
guage of the engineers and industrialists with 
whom they will work. The foundation courses in 
drawing, painting, sculpture, color and design, 
ceramics, graphics and photography are aug- 
mented by the study of design theory, visual 
techniques and basic science and engineering. 
The department's guest critics and lecturers rep- 
resent top industrial and design firms. 



58 



INDUSTRIAL DESIGN Curriculum (B.F.A.) 



Firs! Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock /Credit Clock /Credit 



FIRST YEAR TOTALS 

SECOND YEAR 

200 English Literature .... 2 

210 History of Civilization : 
Middle Ages through 

19th Century 2 

225 History of Philosophy. . 2 

240 Growth and Form in 

Architecture 1 

243 Basic Science and 

Engineering 4 

244 General Science 

(1960-1961) .... 

245 Art History II 1.5 

A201 Drawing and Painting 

A207 Visual Techniques . . 

A209C Ceramics 

A209S Sculpture 4 

A210 Design Theory , 

A2 1 3 Materials and Fabrica- 
tion Techniques . . 



19.5 



1{ 



2 


2 


2 


2 


1.5 


1.5 


1.5 


1.5 


4 


2 


4 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


4 


2 


4 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 



Totals 30.5 20.5 30.5 20.5 



THIRD YEAR 



310 



History of the United 
States 



— 3 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

*320 Psychology 3 3 ^ — 

*325 Sociology 3 3 — — 

*355 Anthropology — — 3 3 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

345 Art History III 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

A208 Layout and Lettering. .4 2 — — 

A3 17 Typographic Design 

Workshop — — 3 1.5 

Id300 Industrial Design 12 6 12 6 

Ph201 Photography — — 4 2 

JRelated Arts Elective 4 2 4 2 



Totals 26.5 16.5 32.5 21 



FOURTH YEAR 

435 Economic Institutions. . 1 

436 Mass Media — 

445 Art History IV 1.5 

446 Philosophy of Art 1.5 

**General Studies Elective 2 

Id400 Industrial Design 12 

Id401 Professional Practice . . 4 

Id402 Portfolio Preparation . . — 

IRelated Arts Elective 4 



1.5 
1.5 
2 
6 

2 



1 

1.5 
1.5 
2 
12 

4 
4 



1 

1.5 

1.5 

2 

6 

2 

9 



Totals 26 16 26 16 

Four Year Total for Degree: 148 Semester Credits 



*Two of the three Social Sciences must be taken for credit. 
**The section under General Studies Program should be consulted concerning the elective offerings. 
XRelated Arts elective subjects must be approved by the department director. 



59 







Design problems as solved 
by Industrial Design majors? 

1. Group project: mass-produced 
transistor radios by Richard Ditsche, 
Mitchell Sielicki and Emory Mead 

2. Steering wheel and instrument clus- 
ter by Rodd Bixler 3. Suggested solu- 
tion for an inexpensive family car by 
William Pennock 4. Monorail pod: 
inventive answer to high-speed rail- 
way transportation with each com- 
partment a self-sufficient unit (in- 
cluding meals), a group project (g 
James Mahoney, Catherine Rollings. 
William Fisher, Milton Helmuth, 
Terra Sweet and Warren Von Uffel, Jr 



GO 



/\ 




INTERIOR DESIGN 

George Mason, Director 




Ingenious lighting elements by Interior Design 

students made of plastic sheeting and embroidery 

hoops for "Young Designers" exhibition. 



Interior designers plan the rooms in which we 
live, work and play. They frequently plan the 
architectural details or supervise the design, pro- 
duction and marketing of carpeting, draperies, 
wallpaper, lighting fixtures. Since they create the 
color and arrangement of the surroundings in 
which people spend their lives, interior designers 
must not only have a strong design sense and 
substantial knowledge of how home furnishings 
are made and sold, but also a broad understand- 
ing of human beings and their needs. Training 
in the first two years is identical with that of 
dimensional and industrial designers. Advanced 
instruction includes fabric and furniture design, 
and the construction of both module and full- 
scale furniture in the college's workshops. The 
Philadelphia Museum College of Art's interiors, 
as designed by Paul McCobb, are in keeping with 
the attitude of this department that people work 
and study best in rooms which are tastefully fur- 
nished and planned with an over-all feeling for 
color and the efficient use of space. 



62 



INTERIOR DESIGN Curriculum (B.F.A.) 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 



FIRST YEAR TOTALS 



19.5 



18 



SECOND YEAR 

200 English Literature 2 2 2 2 

210 History of Civilization: 
Middle Ages through 

19th Century 2 2 2 2 

225 History of Philosophy . . 2 2 2 2 

240 Growth and Form in 

Architecture 1 1 1 1 

243 Basic Science and 

Engineering 4 2 4 2 

244 General Science 

(1960-1961) 2 2 2 2 

245 Art History n 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

A201 Drawing and Painting . . 4 2 4 2 

A207 Visual Techniques 2 1 2 1 

A209C Ceramics 2 12 1 

A209S Sculpture 4 2 4 2 

A210 Design Theory 2 1 2 1 

A2 1 3 Materials and Fabrica- 
tion Techniques .... 2 1 2 1 

Totals 30.5 20.5 30.5 20.5 

THIRD YEAR 

310 History of the United 

States — — 3 3 

*320 Psychology 3 3 — — 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

*335 Sociology 3 3 — — 

*355 Anthropology — — 3 3 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

340 History of Fashion and 

Furniture 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

345 Art History III 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

A301 Drawing and Painting. . 4 2 4 2 

JRelated Arts Elective 4 2 4 2 

InSOO Interior Design 4 2 4 2 

InSOl Materials and Methods 

of Construction .... 8 4 8 4 

Totals 28 18 31 21 

FOURTH YEAR 

435 Economic Institutions . . 1 I — — 

436 Mass Media — — 1 1 

445 Art History IV 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

446 Philosophy of Art 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

Related Arts Elective 4 2 4 2 

In400 Interior Design 8 4 8 4 

In401 Materials and Methods 

of Construction .... 4 2 4 2 

In402 Professional Develop- 
ment 4 2 4 2 

Totals 26 16 26 16 

Four Year Total for Degree: 149.5 Semester Credits 



*Two of the three Social Sciences must be taken for credit. 
**The section under General Studies Program should be consulted concerning the elective offerings. 
XRelated Arts elective subjects must be approved by the department director. 



63 



Work by Interior Design majors: 

1. Alumni Annual Exhibition as installed by In- 
terior Design students under the direction of their 
department director 2. Client presentation by 
Melvyn Shutz 3. Carole Ulrich 




65 



PHOTOGRAPHY 

Sol MednicKj Director 




Artist-photographers use the camera to record 
and interpret the world. Their work plays an in- 
creasingly important part in journalism, adver- 
tising, education, entertainment, including films 
and television, scientific research and documen- 
tation, and the world of fashion. The photogra- 
pher learns to observe, to interpret, to direct and 
to communicate. Students are introduced early to 
camera and darkroom work, and to courses in 
advertising, editorial and industrial photography, 
color and motion picture photography. They 
work with the most modern equipment in the 
way of cameras, lights and laboratory facilities 
in Philadelphia Museum College of Art's work- 
shop studio and darkrooms. Field trips and the 
cooperation and advice of outstanding profes- 
sional photographers contribute to the growth 
of the student artist-photographers who use the 
camera to express their talents. 



66 



Photograph by William Pennock 



PHOTOGRAPHY Curriculum (B.F.A.) 



FIRST YEAR TOTALS . 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

19.5 18 



SECOND YEAR 

200 English Literature 2 2 2 2 

210 History of Civilization: 
Middle Ages through 

19th Century 2 2 2 2 

225 History of Philosophy. .2222 

240 Growth and Form in 

Architecture 1 1 1 1 

244 General Science 

(1960-1961) 2 2 2 2 

245 Art History n 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

A200 Drawing 4 2 4 2 

A209S Sculpture- 4 2 4 2 

A210 Advanced Color and 

Design 4 2 4 2 

Ph200 Photography Major ... 8 4 8 4 

roiaZi 30.5 20.5 30.5 20.5 

THIRD YEAR 

310 History of the United 

States 3 3 — — 

*320 Psychology — — 3 3 

*325 Sociology 3 3 — — 

*355 Anthropology 3 3 — — 

♦♦General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 



First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 
Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

340 History of Fashion and 

Furniture 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

345 Art History III 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

IRelated Arts Elective 8 4 8 4 

Ph300 Photography Major ... 4 2 4 2 

Ph301 Photography Major: 

Theory and Techniques 4 2 — — 

Ph302 Motion Picture 

Photography 4 2 4 2 

Ph303 Photography Major: 

Color — — 4 2 

Totals 31 21 28 18 

FOURTH YEAR 

435 Economic Institutions. .1 1 — - — 

436 Mass Media — — 1 1 

445 Art History IV 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

446 Philosophy of Art 1.5 1.5 1.5 1.5 

**General Studies Elective 2 2 2 2 

JRelated Arts Elective 4 2 4 2 

Ph400 Photography Major ... 8 4 8 4 

Ph402 Motion Picture 

Photography 4 2 4 2 

Ph404 Photography Major: 

Professional Practice and 

Portfolio Preparation .4242 

Totals 26 16 26 16 

Four Year Total for Degree: 149.5 Semester Credits 



*Two of the three Social Sciences must be taken for credit. 
**The section under General Studies Program should be consulted concerning the elective offerings. 
XRelated Arts elective subjects must be approved by the department director. 



67 






68 




Explaining the world through 
the eyes of the camera: 

1. By Michael McHale 2. By Harris 
Radin 3. By Rodd Bixler 4. By Joseph 
Martino 5. By Robert Thompson 




69 



GENERAL STUDIES DIVISION 



Paul W. Partridge, Jr., Coordinating Director 

Chairmen 

Sidney Axinn, Ph.D., Philosophy 
Louis Finkelstein, Art History 
Frank Kensill, S.T.B., Physical and 

Natural Sciences 
Jack Lit, Ph.D., Social Sciences 



The program of the Division of General Studies 
fosters a broad understanding of the develop- 
ment of human values necessary for the inte- 
gration of the creative individual in the modern 
world and provides the stimulus to intellectual 
adventure which is essential to personal and 
professional fulfillment. The offerings of the 
Division of General Studies are comprised of 
courses in the humanities: literature, history 
and philosophy; and special areas of interpreta- 
tion including the physical and natural sciences, 
psychology, anthropology, sociology and eco- 
nomics. These are organized in terms of re- 



JoHN Meister, M.A., Literature and 
Language 

Jill B. Nadell, M.A., European History 

Paul W. Partridge, Jr., Ph.D., 

American Studies 



quired subjects which are the core of liberal 
arts study for each student throughout the four 
years of schooling, together with a successively 
widening choice of electives which offer di- 
versified approaches to a mature insight into 
cultural and social problems. Courses are or- 
ganized to give a unified picture of human ex- 
perience through the interrelation of disciplines 
and to develop insight into the humanistic re- 
sponsibilities and opportunities implicit in the 
professional areas of activity which the col- 
lege serves. 



General Studies Electives 

The courses listed below are offered as electives for juniors and seniors. 

First Semester Second Semester 

Hours Hours 

Clock/Credit Clock/Credit 

300 American Literature 2 2 2 2 

301 Masterpieces of Literature 2 2 2 2 

31 1 Problems in Contemporary World History 2 2 2 2 

315 Eastern Civilizations (1960-61) 2 2 2 2 

350 Comparative Religions (1960-61 ) 2 2 2 2 

402 Contemporary Literature 2 2 2 2 

410 History and Appreciation of Music 2 2 2 2 

*260 French I 2 2 2 2 

*360 French n (1960-61) 2 2 2 2 

**1 70 Choral Music 2 .5 2 .5 

*Both courses are required for credit. French I is a prerequisite for French H. 
**CTedit will be given only when the student has completed four semesters of Choral Music. 



70 



RELATED ARTS 

The Related Arts courses are the backbone of 
every curriculum. They include all the studio 
and workshop classes in drawing and painting, 
graphic arts, metals, plastics and wood, ceram- 
ics and typography, as well as such subjects as 
visual techniques, anatomy, layout and letter- 
ing, color and design, design theory, basic 
science and engineering, etc. These courses are 
an integral part of the freshman program and 
of the instructional program of all department 
majors. The Department of Photography serves 
both as a professional major and as an impor- 
tant service area for other professional majors 
whose students take courses in photography. 

Ceramics 

William D. Parry, Director 

Manual forming of plastic clay media remains 
one of the basic exploratory procedures for 
searching out the problems of form rooted in 
function and esthetics. Development of the 
plastic sense is a major aim of the work of this 
department for all students whose major field 
involves work in three dimensions, as well as 
the disciplines of process involved in the 
chemistry of fire and the fabrication of plaster. 
The facilities are open not only to those stu- 
dents who have a special interest in the ceramics 
field (Dimensional Design majors in particu- 
lar), but to students in all other departments. 

Drawing and Painting 

Morris Berd, Director 

Ben Eisenstat and Paul Froelich, 

Associate Directors 

This largest of the college's Related Arts 
departments provides the foundation courses 
on which all the professional programs are 
built. All students receive extended training in 
drawing and painting during their freshman 
year and in the succeeding three years. The 



subjects are taught both as an independent 
creative experience and as an experience related 
to each student's career objective. The funda- 
mental value of PMCA's emphasis on a firm 
grounding in these subjects lies in the fact that 
it is in the drawing, graphics, painting and 
sculpture studios that the faculties of the matur- 
ing artist are fully challenged to evolve a 
structural, visual language that expresses his 
deepest feelings and knowledge. 

Graphic Arts 

Benton Spruance, Director 
Jerome Kaplan, Associate Director 

The Department of Graphic Arts, like the 
Department of Drawing and Painting, is 
equipped to offer the student a stimulating 
opportunity to challenge his resourcefulness. 
Working with fine equipment in every impor- 
tant graphic medium, lithography, engraving 
on wood and metal, woodcutting, etching, 
aquatint, monotype, silk-screen and stencil, 
students face expressive and technical prob- 
lems that make a valuable contribution to their 
professional growth. 

Typography 

Eugene Feldman, Director 

The technical considerations of type and print- 
ing are essential to the successful designer. To 
meet the need for training in this complex and 
specialized field, this department has been ex- 
panded during the past four years and today 
represents one of the most modern college shops 
in the country offering facilities for setting type, 
and printing by letterpress and offset lithog- 
raphy. The courses offered by this department 
also give students the opportunity to become 
familiar with the design and characteristics of 
type, their uses in the past and their current 
application. They are also encouraged to use 
the typographic workshop in relation to other 
class projects. 



71 




72 





A busy calendar of student and college activities 
combines enjoyment and learning: 

1. Felix Topolski, outstanding British illustrator, painter and 
author talks to a group of students. 2. Jacques Lipchitz, distin- 
guished sculptor and citation recipient at the Spring Scholarship 
Party, looks at construction by faculty member, Leo J. Branden- 
burger. 3. Pola Stout, widely known fabric designer, gives gallery 
talk during an exhibition of her work. 



73 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



DAYS AND HOURS OF ATTENDANCE 

Classes are held Monday through Friday. For 
February freshmen, the week extends into Sat- 
urday. The hours for class sessions vary with 
individual rosters : sessions may start as early 
as 8 a.m. and end as early as 2 p.m.; others may 
start as late as 10 a.m. and end as late as 
4:30 p.m. Typographic Workshop classes are 
scheduled for the early evening hours, normally 
from 6 to 9 p.m. 

ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Regular attendance is required in all classes. If 
a student finds it necessary to be absent, he is 
expected to furnish an explanation in writing 
satisfactory to his instructor. An unsatisfactory 
attendance record may result in dismissal from 
the course, or other penalty, subject to the 
approval of the Dean. Classes begin promptly 
at the time scheduled. Each lateness will be 
regarded as one fourth ( J4 ) of an absence. The 
student will be marked late if he arrives within 
15 minutes after the class is scheduled to begin. 
After that he will be marked absent. Students 
who miss class time because of lateness or ab- 
sence must complete all course requirements. 

MEDICAL REQUIREMENTS 

Approved applicants for admission are required 
to submit a confidential medical report filled 
out by their family physician on a form pro- 
vided by the Office of Admissions. This form 
includes the vaccination certification required 
by State Law. 

INSURANCE 

Accident-medical expense insurance is available 
to all students on a group basis. There is an 
option of two plans: 



1. A policy covering the participant up to $500 
for each accident, effective 24 hours a day 
over a 12-month period; 

2. A policy providing, in addition to the above, 
health, hospitalization and surgical benefits. 

Policy No. 1 is required for all Dimensional, 
Industrial and Interior Design majors whose 
fees are to be paid at the time of registration. 
Either policy is available to all other students. 

Students may join the program at the begin- 
ning of a semester through the Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs. The closing date is the eighth day 
of classes. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

An honors degree program requires the elec- 
tion and completion with distinction of an 
added minimum of four (4) credits for each 
of two (2) years. 

GRADUATION 

Degrees are awarded after satisfactory com- 
pletion of no fewer than 8 semesters' work. A 
four-year average of "C" is the minimum re- 
quirement for graduation. Candidates must 
complete an application for graduation in con- 
sultation with the Registrar at the beginning of 
the semester in which graduation is to take 
place. Students failing to meet this requirement 
will not be graduated. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Students who wish to transfer from other col- 
leges should get in touch with the Director of 
Admissions. The Application Fee for transfer 
students is $15. 



74 



Students who enter with advanced standing 
based on credit from other institutions are 
awarded degrees only after the satisfactory 
completion of no fewer than two years of full- 
time work in one of the eleven professional 
departments. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Special students with a degree objective may 
register only for courses offered by the Depart- 
ment of General Studies. Arrangements to at- 
tend these classes must be made with the 
Registrar. Tuition for these courses is $20 per 
semester credit plus all other college fees. 

POST-GRADUATE STUDY 
Graduates are accepted for post-graduate work. 
The application for re-admission is made 
through the Office of Admissions. Upon ap- 
proval, a $15 matriculation fee is payable, and 
at registration the tuition and college fees are 
due as listed in the catalog for either the Pro- 
fessional Arts or General Studies program. 

COURSE CHANGES 

No course change will be allowed after the end 
of the second week of either semester. Sessions 
missed as a result of such a change will be con- 
sidered as absences. 

A failing grade will be recorded for courses 
dropped after the eighth week. The proper 
forms for course changes must be filled out in 
the Office of the Registrar. 

CHANGES IN MAJORS 

No change in a departmental major will be 
allowed after the end of the second week of 
the fall semester. A student wishing to apply 
for permission to change his major is required 



to discuss this with the Office of Student Af- 
fairs before filling out the necessary forms for 
presentation to and approval by the Registrar, 
the two department directors, and the Dean. 

The college reserves the right to recommend 
a change of major on the basis of a student's 
scholastic record, character or other considera- 
tions. 

DISMISSAL 

The college reserves the right to dismiss a stu- 
dent for a just cause. Students dismissed for 
academic failure may obtain refunds in accord- 
ance with the regulations noted below. Students 
dismissed for disciplinary reasons forfeit the 
privilege of a refund. 

WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURE 

In the event that a student wishes to withdraw, 
he must fill out an official Withdrawal Form 
obtained at the Office of Student Affairs. Only 
after this form has been certified by the Regis- 
trar and approved by the Dean is the student's 
withdrawal completed. Failure to comply with 
the above regulations may cause forfeiture of 
refund if the withdrawal occurs during the re- 
fund period. 

REFUNDS AFTER OFFICIAL 
WITHDRAWAL 

Refunds authorized for cause when withdrawal 
has been completed (see above) will be calcu- 
lated as follows: 

Students in attendance two weeks 

or less 75% 

Between two and three weeks 50% 

Between three and four weeks 25% 

After four weeks 0% 



75 



In all cases concerning veterans, the refund 
policy will be adjusted to conform with federal 
regulations. 

GRADES 

Reports of grades are mailed to all students at 
the end of each semester. Students with unsat- 
isfactory mid-semester grades are advised of 
this immediately. The grading system is as 
follows : 

Grade 

Point 

Grade Interpretation Credit 

A excellent 3 

B good 2 

C fair 1 

D poor but passing 

E incomplete 

F failing — 1 

GRADE OF "E" FOR INCOMPLETE WORK 

No instructor may give a grade of '"E" except 
by written application to the Registrar whose 
approval is required for the recording of this 
grade. 

Note that an "E" carries no grade point 
credit and that if and when it is finally re- 
placed by a passing mark the grade point aver- 
age is not altered. Grade point averages are 
computed at the close of each semester and are 
not subject to change. It is important to keep 
this fact in mind, since a grade of "E" may 
seriously affect a student's eligibility for schol- 
arship aid, as well as his class rank as filed 
with his draft board. 

The grade of "E" received in any subject at 
the end of the Fall semester must be removed 



by the first Friday in March. A grade of "E" 
received at the end of the Spring semester must 
be removed not later than the first Friday in 
November. If the required work is not pre- 
sented at the times noted above, the grade of 
"E" automatically becomes an "F". 

The student who has received an "E" in a 
course for the semester's work should see the 
instructor involved and make arrangements to 
complete the work. The student should then 
obtain the proper form from the Registrar, pay 
the $5 Reevaluation Fee to the Business Office 
and submit the certified form with the com- 
pleted work to the instructor. The instructor 
will then enter the new grade and sign the 
form. It is the responsibility of the student to 
return the completed form to the Registrar. 

DEAN'S LIST 

Students who maintain a grade point average 
of 2.5 qualify for inclusion in the Dean's List, 
issued at the end of each semester. 

GRADE OF "F" FOR FAILURE 

A grade of "F" received at the end of either 
semester requires the rerostering of that sub- 
ject or its equivalent. An additional course fee 
is payable upon registering for a repeat course 
resulting from a failure. 

MINIMUM GRADE POINT 
REQUIREMENTS 

A student with a grade point average of less 
than 1, namely less than "C", at the end of 
any semester is automatically placed on proba- 
tion. In the semester immediately following he 
must achieve a grade point average sufficiently 



76 



high so that the combination of the current and 
the past semester gives him an average of 1 or 
better. Failure to achieve this will result in 
automatic dismissal. 

LIBRARY 

The library is open throughout the academic 
year according to the following schedule : Mon- 
day through Friday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Sat- 
urdays from 9 a.m. to 12 noon. A student must 
present his matriculation card to the librarian 
when first requesting books at the beginning of 
each semester. Damage to borrowed books will 
be billed at their replacement value. 

COST OF MATERIALS 

The approximate cost of materials for the fresh- 
man year is $175. The cost for other years varies 
with the student's individual course schedule. 

SUPPLY STORE 

All materials and books required for course 
work are available in the Supply Store. The 
Store is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and from 
6:15 to 8:15 p.m. Monday through Friday; 
from 8:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. on Saturdays. 
Charge accounts may be arranged by a deposit 
made in the Business Office. 

CAFETERIA 

The Cafeteria is open Monday through Friday 
from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

PERMISSION TO WORK AFTER HOURS 

Temporary or permanent permission to work 
in the studios and shops after normal class hours 
may be secured from the Office of Student 
Affairs with the written approval of the instruc- 
tor. This permission is limited to certain week- 



days and Saturdays until 10 p.m., but never 
after 10 p.m. and never on Sundays, holidays 
or during the midyear intermission. Passes is- 
sued to students must be carried with them at 
all times and presented, when so requested, by 
the building maintenance staff. Students fail- 
ing to comply with the restrictions and regula- 
tions defined for holders of late-work passe§ 
will be immediately deprived of this privilege. 
Insurance is obligatory for all students using 
power tools. 

ROSTER, FEE AND COURSE CHANGES 

Rosters and fees are subject to change without 
notice. The college reserves the right to make 
substitutions for any course for which there are 
fewer than fifteen (15) students registered. 

STUDENT WORK 

The college reserves the right to retain one 
example of each student's work each semester 
to be added to its Permanent Collection of 
Student Art. 

SMOKING AND FIRE REGULATIONS 

Students are permitted to smoke only in the 
cafeteria. Fire regulations prohibit smoking in 
any other part of the building. This ruling is 
strictly enforced. 

FIRE AND AIR RAID REGULATIONS 

Emergency regulations are posted throughout 
the buildings and described fully in the Stu- 
dent Handbook. 

TELEPHONE CALLS 

No student will be called from his class except 
in a case of extreme emergency. However, 
messages for students may be left with the In- 



77 



formation Office and will be posted on the 
student bulletin board. 

PARKING, POSTING OF NOTICES 
AND LOCKERS 

Students are not permitted to use the parking 
lot. Permission to load or unload materials or 
passengers is obtainable from the Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs. 

Students may not post any notices without 
the approval of the Office of Student Affairs. 

Students are required to use only the locker 
combinations or separate combination locks 
issued. They may not use their own locks under 
any circumstances. Should a student use his 
own lock, this will be removed and the student 
deprived of the use of the locker. 

LOSS AND DAMAGE TO PROPERTY 

No responsibility is assumed for loss or damage 
to the property of students. Student work placed 
on display in supervised areas is insured for 
nominal loss or damage only during the exhibi- 
tion period. 

HOUSING AND PART-TIME WORK 

The Office of Student Affairs maintains a list 
of currently available housing facilities. The 
Office of Placement will assist students in find- 



ing part-time employment during after-school 
hours. 

VETERANS 

PMCA is approved for veterans. All veterans 
who are approved for admission are required 
to make their own arrangements with the Vet- 
erans Administration for approval of training. 
At registration they will settle their bill with 
the Business Office and sign all required forms 
in the Office of the Registrar. On the last 
school day of each month veterans will report 
to sign the forms certifying attendance. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 
SCHOLARSHIP STUDENTS 

Students who have been awarded a Philadel- 
phia Board of Education Scholarship valued 
at $400 annually are required to pay the differ- 
ence between this amount and PMCA's charges. 

LOANS 

Students qualifying for loans may apply to the 

Office of Student Affairs. 

PAYMENTS 

Checks and money orders are to be made pay- 
able to the Philadelphia Museum College of 
Art. 



SERVICES AND ACTIVITIES 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

As the annually elected governing body and 
voice of the students, the Student Council 
works cooperatively with the Faculty Council 
and the Office of Student Affairs. Its member- 
ship includes one sophomore, junior and senior 
from each of the college's eleven professional 



departments, and an elected representative 
from each freshman section. The Council plans 
all student social events and works closely with 
the Alumni Association in organizing the Senior- 
Alumni Career Conferences. A list of the cur- 
rent members of the Student Council is posted 
on the bulletin board outside the Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs and at the entrance to the cafeteria. 



78 



HONOR SYSTEM 

As a part of its philosophy of self-government, 
an honor system is practiced at PMCA. Each 
student assumes the responsibility of protecting 
himself and his colleagues from unethical con- 
duct. Students are honor-bound to report in- 
fractions of the college's honor code to the 
Student Council, which appoints an honor 
court to judge the offense and recommend 
appropriate penalties. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The social calendar of student events includes 
a variety of informal and traditional collegiate 
functions beginning with a Freshman Square 
Dance early in the fall, a Christmas Party, a 
Costume Ball, Talent Night, and a Spring For- 
mal held at the Museum of Art. Throughout 
the year there are film showings, a series of 
concerts and three symposia. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Membership in the Alumni Association is open 
to all former students. Its annual program of 
activities includes an exhibition of the work of 
outstanding alumni opening concurrently with 
a banquet. The Alumni Medal, presented each 
year at the banquet has, in recent years, been 
awarded to such outstanding graduates as pho- 
tographer Irving Penn, illustrators Henry C. 
Pitz, Rudolph Freund and Joseph Hirsch, and 
advertising designer and author Raymond A. 
Ballinger. The reports and bulletins of the 
Alumni Association are issued regularly bring- 
ing together articles of general interest as well 
as information about the activities of PMCA 
alumni. 

In addition to providing scholarship aid to 



deserving undergraduates, the Alumni Associa- 
tion assists in the planning of many events in- 
cluding the career conferences at which students 
meet to discuss their work with graduates who 
have won distinction in the career fields which 
the students hope to enter. The Alumni Associa- 
tion also spearheads the annual Spring Schol- 
arship Party. This event, first launched in 1956 
to celebrate the 80th anniversary of the college, 
was considered so successful in raising money 
for the scholarship fund and in widening our 
circle of friends, that it has been continued 
as an annual event. 

EXHIBITIONS 

Throughout the year, the exhibition gallery is 
the scene of varied displays of distinguished 
art and design, both of our time and of the 
past. These exhibitions are planned primarily 
for their educational value to students, sec- 
ondarily for their important cultural contribu- 
tion to the community at large. 

Recent exhibitions have included the follow- 
ing: Style and Security, an exhibition of locks 
by the Yale & Towne Manufacturing Com- 
pany; Fabric Designs by Pola Stout; drawings 
by fashion artist Gene Loyd; The Art of Glam- 
our, editorial art from Glamour Magazine; 
Cover Designs for Paperback Books; The Best 
of Harper's Bazaar; Drawings by John Marin; 
Layout, a selection from a new book by Ray- 
mond A. Ballinger; Designs for Stained-Glass 
Windows by Marguerite Gaudin; Posters by 
Armin Hofmann and Modern Tapestries by 
Johanna Schidlo and Fritz Riedl. Two annual 
exhibitions climax the school year: Meet Our 
Instructors, the annual faculty show; and Young 
Designers, the comprehensive exhibition of stu- 
dent work. 



79 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Interpretation of clock and credit Iiours:"^ 

All courses offered by the Department of General Studies carry semester credits equal 
to the number of clock hours per semester. 

All other courses (Related and Professional Arts) carry semester credits equal to 
approximately one-half of the number of clock hours per semester. 



General Studies 

001 REVIEW ENGLISH (n.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Freshmen who lack the ability to express their 
ideas effectively in written form are required 
to take this review course. Emphasis is on 
spelling, basic grammar, sentence structure 
and unity of thought. 

010 WORLD HISTORY (n.G.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

First-year students who have had no high- 
school course in World History, or who lack 
a basic knowledge of the events and ideas 
which have shaped the culture of Western 
Civilization, must take this review of world 
history. 

100 ENGLISH: COMPOSITION AND 
TYPES OF LITERATURE (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 3 hours, lecture and 
writing lab, once a week 

An introduction to basic types of poetry, fic- 
tion, drama, essay and biography. Analysis of 
esthetic form, the creative process and cul- 
tural content furnish a basis for the study of 

*N.c. — No credits s.c. — Semester credits 



literary history and builds an appreciation of 
literature as a dynamic, living art. Effective 
written expression is cultivated by reading 
outstanding selections in the areas of descrip- 
tion, narration, and exposition and by the 
writing of personal narratives, short stories 
and criticism. 

110 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

The first semester will deal with man's ear- 
liest efforts to adjust himself to his environ- 
ment, beginning with the transition from food 
gathering to agricultural settlements in the 
ancient Near East and culminating in the 
birth of civilization in Egypt and Mesopo- 
tamia. The second semester traces the rise 
of Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages and 
the formation of the Western kingdoms which 
comprise Western Civilization. 

141 MATERIALS & TECHNIQUES (1.5 S.C.) 

1st or 2nd semester lYz hours, once a week 

Lecture demonstrations that illustrate and de- 
scribe the properties and uses of watercolor, 
gouache, tempera, casein, oil, and the various 



80 



drawing media including wash, carbon, char- 
coal, conte, pastel, pencil and pen and ink. 
Many of the techniques of picture construc- 
tion are discussed but always as a point of 
departure for individualized expiession. 

142 ORIENTATION (n.C.J 

1st or 2nd semester, 8 weeks only 1 hour, 

once a week 
Making the most of a college education is 
largely dependent upon the student learning 
to organize his time and efforts effectively. 
The improvement of his study habits and a 
better understanding of his personality in re- 
lation to his school environment are the two 
major objectives of this course. 

143 YOUR CAREER IN ART (n.C.) 
2nd semester 1 hour, once a week 

To encourage students to give careful con- 
sideration to the choice of their careers. The 
eleven department directors interpret the na- 
ture and scope of their professional objectives 
and describe the qualifications and training 
essential to success. 

144 SCIENCE SURVEY (2 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 1 hour, once a week 

A general survey of science designed to illus- 
trate the methods and philosophy of science, 
as well as to present a foundation in the nat- 
ural and social sciences. 

145a ART HISTORY I (1.5 S.C.) 

1st semester ly^ hours, once a week 

An examination of the nature of artistic ex- 
pression. Dev^elopment of a vocabulary of in- 



terpretation in the visual arts. Principles of 
esthetic choice and survey of major artistic 
problems and their relationship to society, 
belief and historical process. 

145b .\RT HISTORY I (1.5 S.C.) 

2nd semester / J/4 hours, once a week 

The study of the development of esthetic 
values in primitive and ancient art. Examina- 
tion of the effects on artistic expression in 
geography, techniques, social structure and 
primitive and ancient systems of thought: 
animism, magic, myth, ritual. Prehistoric, 
primitive, Egyptian, Mesopotamian and 
Minoan art. 

200 ENGLISH LITERATURE (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 
A survey of English literature from Beowulf 
through Shakespeare in the first semester, and 
from the Puritans through the 19th century 
in the second semester. 

■^170 CHORAL MUSIC (1 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 
The preparation, detailed analysis and pres- 
entation of different choral literature covering 
most periods in the development of music, 
together with the training in vocal techniques, 
posture, breathing, resonance, natural pro- 
nunciation, phrasing, style and interpretation. 
*Note: Credit for this course will be given 

only when the student has completed four 

seriiesters. 

210 HISTORY OF CIVILIZATION II (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 
The economic, political and social environ- 



81 



ment of the Renaissance in art, music, and 
literature; the age of exploration and discov- 
ery and the religious movements which led 
to the Protestant Reformation are studied in 
the first semester. The evolution of modern 
European culture and the development of 
nationalism in the West from the seventeenth 
through the nineteenth centuries occupies the 
lectures and discussion in the second semester. 

220 HYGIENE (2S.C.) 

1st or 2nd semester 2 hours, once a week 

Lectures cover the various aspects of physical 
and mental hygiene essential to a healthy, 
well-adjusted, mature adulthood. Discussion 
encourages a better understanding of the 
above principles and helps the student-art 
teacher to meet his psychological and per- 
sonal needs. 

221 PHYSICAL EDUCATION (1 S.C.) 

1st or 2nd semester 2 hours, once a week 

Physical education is required of all students 
and may be taken in any one of the four years. 
The student takes part in activities designed 
to offer him the opportunity to achieve body 
coordination, balance and equilibrium through 
exercise and swimming. Participation in such 
other recreational activities as handball, bas- 
ketball, volleyball, badminton. 

225 HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Examines the philosophical problems which 
have been the chief concern of thinking men 
from the early Greek philosophers to our 
own day. 



240 GROWTH AND FORM IN 
ARCHITECTURE (2 S.C.) 

1 St and 2nd semesters 1 hour, once a week 

Illustrated lectures presenting a general, semi- 
technical understanding of architecture from 
the point of view of the development of or- 
ganic design. 

241 HISTORY OF .\DVERTISING (.5 S.C.) 

1st semester, 8 weeks only 1 hour, once 

a week 

The arts of advertising from its earliest begin- 
nings to the present. Individual illustrated 
lectures include the history of layout, type, 
the poster, as well as surveys of technical 
advances and pioneering contributions. 

242 HISTORY OF ILLUSTRATION (.5 S.C.) 

1 st semester, 8 weeks only 1 hour, once 

a week 

A companion sur\ey to 241 History of Adver- 
tising. These eight slide lectures explore illus- 
tration through the ages, discussed by phases 
of expression rather than chronologically. 

243 BASIC SCIENCE AND 
ENGINEERING (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

The science of physics and engineering with 
emphasis on the construction of three-dimen- 
sional studies to illustrate theory in structures, 
mechanics of motion, light and color and elec- 
tricity. Particular attention is directed to the 
understanding of form and structure as an 
outgrowth of the scientific laws of nature. 
Basic concepts thus developed are directly 
applicable to product design. 



244 GENERAL SCIENCE : 

244a PHYSICAL SCIENCES (4 S.C.) 

(1960-1961) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

The opportunity to gain a working knowl- 
edge of the physical and natural sciences is 
offered to all students in a ratio in relation 
to their professional objectives. This course 
deals mainly with the physical sciences — 
primarily physics and chemistry. 

244b NATURAL SCIENCES (4 S.C.) 

(1960-1961) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

The opportunity to gain a working knowl- 
edge of the physical and natural sciences is 
offered to all students in a ratio in relation 
to their professional objectives. This course 
deals mainly with the natural sciences — 
primarily zoology, biology and botany. 

245a ART HISTORY II (1.5 S.C.) 

1st or 2nd semester 1 5/2 hours, once a week 

Classical art and its aftermaths. The antithesis 
between pagan art and the art of higher 
religions. The formation of a naturalistic- 
humanistic world outlook in Greek and Ro- 
man art, and the decay of the classical ideal 
in early Christian, Islamic and Byzantine art. 

245b ART HISTORY II (1.5 S.C.) 

1st or 2nd semester 1 /a hours, once a week 

Medieval art of the East and West related to 
the development of religious and philosophic 
attitudes. The art of India, China and Japan, 
Romanesque and Gothic European art. 



260 FRENCH I (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Elementary course with emphasis on pronun- 
ciation, fundamentals of grammar, composi- 
tion, reading of texts of graded difficulty, 
aural comprehension and conversation culmi- 
nating in selected readings from the classics. 

300 AMERICAN LITERATURE (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

The first semester of this survey of our na- 
tional literature discusses the European back- 
grounds and influences, and the various types 
of our written expression from the Colonial 
Period to the Civil War era. The second 
semester continues the reading and analysis 
of American literature from the period of 
realism and naturalism to the present. 

301 MASTERPIECES OF LITERATURE 

(4 S.C.) 

I st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Critical analysis and evaluation of literature 
as an art form. Reading and discussion of 
the outstanding examples of literary art (po- 
etry, fiction and drama) from the Greek, 
Roman and medieval masters in the first se- 
mester; Renaissance literature through the 
important works of English, American, Rus- 
sian, Spanish and French literature of the 
19th century in the second semester. 

310 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 
AND PENNSYLVANIA (3 S.C.) 

1 St and 2nd semesters 1 J/2 hours, once a week 

The political, economic, social, cultural and 



83 



intellectual growth of America, with parallel 
consideration of the story of Pennsylvania. 

311 PROBLEMS IN CONTEMPORARY 

WORLD HISTORY (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 
Readings and discussion in the problems of 
contemporary world history, with particular 
reference to present-day international con- 
flicts as a culmination of social, political and 
economic forces concomitant with the growth 
of national states. 

315 EASTERN CI\TLIZ.\TIONS (4 S.C.) 

(1960-1961) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

The development of the important Oriental 
civilizations, including China, India and Ja- 
pan, with an analysis of the interrelationship 
of these cultures and their impact on Western 
thought. 

320 PSYCHOLOGY (3 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 1 1^ hours, once a week 

.\n introduction to the study of psychology 
intended to present a body of knowledge deal- 
ing with behavior and the broad aspects of 
psychology as a science. 

335 SOCIOLOGY (3 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters iVi hours, once a week 

The historical background of sociology, the 
values and scientific method of its study, the 
meaning of terms and an understanding of 
such modern social problems as race relations. 



juvenile delinquency, personality problems, 
and problems arising from the urbanization 
and social stratification of contemporary 
society. 

340 HISTORY OF FASHION AND 

FURNITURE (3 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters P/i hours, once a week 

These illustrated lectures are designed to in- 
terpret the development of styles and uses of 
dress and furniture through the ages against 
the background of the daily life of the people. 

345a ART HISTORY III (1.5 S.C.) 

1st semester / '/; hours, once a week 

European art of the Renaissance. The revival 
of humanism, its basis in social evolution, and 
its artistic concomitants. The interplay of so- 
cial and religious forces in forming the West- 
ern world outlook. The humanism of northern 
and southern Europe. 

345b ART HISTORY III (1.5 S.C.) 

2nd semester I Vi hours, once a week 

Post-Renaissance European art. Baroque 
through the 19th century. The rise of national 
schools and individuals. The effects of chang- 
ing social forces on art. Problems of later 

art styles. 

346 COORDIN.A.TION OF THE FASHION 

FIELD (n.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 3 times a semester 

A series of lectures on trends, marketing and 

merchandising. 



84 



350 COMP.\RATlVE RELIGIONS (4s.C.) 

(1960-1961) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 
The study of the development of world reli- 
gions examined historically through the "sa- 
cred" writings, the literature inspired by these 
writings, and selected readings from the large 
body of religious criticism. 

360 FRENCH II (4 S.C.) 

(1960-1961) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 
Intensive review, composition and conversa- 
tion. Reading of chosen works together with 
discussion and lectures on French literature. 
French I is a prerequisite. 

355 ANTHROPOLOGY (3 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters /J/a hours, once a week 
A systematic study of man based on physical 
evolution and psychiatric concepts of per- 
sonality. The course utilizes the discoveries 
of archaeology in forming a concept of man's 
history and principles of comparative cul- 
tures in understanding the dynamics of social 
structure. It is, in contrast to sociology, an 
individual-centered study of man. 

400 PUBLIC SPEAKING (2 S.C.) 
1st semester 2 hours, once a week 
To help art teachers improve their presenta- 
tions to their classes as well as to assume 
group leadership among their associates and 
in the broader school community. For ATE 
majors only. 

402 CONTEMPORARY, LITERATURE (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 
The forms of contemporary literature with 



special emphasis on ideas as expressed in 
poetry, drama and fiction. Movements in 
twentieth century literature and present day 
currents are discussed. 

435 ECONOMIC INSTITUTIONS (1 S.C.) 
1st semester 1 hour, once a week 

An understanding of the organization and 
operation of industry as well as the principles 
and problems of economics. 

436 MASS MEDIA (1 S.C.) 

2nd semester 1 hour, once a week 
The arts of communication and their applica- 
tion to the local, national and world scene 
with special emphasis on the role of the 
artist-designer and his utilization of the psy- 
chology of propaganda. 

445a ART HISTORY IV (1.5 S.C.) 
1 St semester 1 J/a hours, once a week 
Study of the basic premises of modern art 
and an examination of the major movements 
and individuals from Cezanne to the present 
day. Formalism, Expressionism, their offshoots 
and their relation to contemporary thought. 

445b ART HISTORY IV (1.5 S.C.) 
2nd semester / 5/2 hours, once a week 
A survey of American art from colonial times 
to the present day. The influences of Euro- 
pean traditions and the working out of typi- 
cally American modes of expression. 

446 PHILOSOPHY OF ART (3 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters /J/2 hours, once a week 

Emphasis upon the philosophic theories of art 



85 



and on art as imitation, significant form and 
experience. The relations of art and philos- 
ophy and of art to society are discussed and 
interpreted. 

470 HISTORY AND APPRECIATION 

OF MUSIC (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

The great trends in the art of music from 
early times to the present; instruments, forms 
and composers. Music as it echoes the feeling 
of an age is studied and discussed. Occasional 
attendance at musical performances may be 
required to supplement the lectures, record- 
ings and discussions. 



Related Arts 

AlOO DRAWING (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

A basic course in observing and recording 
shapes, divisions and volumes in space. Stu- 
dents start with the simple geometric shapes 
found in still-life material and progress to 
studies of the human figure. The second se- 
mester includes an introduction to the prob- 
lems of design and expression as indispensable 
requirements for drawing. All students are 
required to keep a sketchbook for out of class- 
room work. Sketching from nature includes 
supervised field trips and visits to the zoo. 

A104 PAINTING (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

An investigation of the uses and potentialities 
of oil painting and gouache, employing still- 
life, life models and studies from nature. An 
understanding of the many means of repre- 



senting nature is supplemented by a study of 
composition that relates to the two dimen- 
sional organization of form and color. 

A105 GRAPHICS (2 S.C.) 

1st or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

An introduction to the unique character of 
the printed image. Working freely in various 
relief techniques the student learns to manip- 
ulate and plan increasingly complex printed 
effects. Media include the stencil, woodcut 
and serigraph. 

A 106 ANATOMY (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

An understanding of the structure and func- 
tion of the animate and inanimate world, but 
primarily the living body, both human and 
animal, in action and in repose. This course 
for freshmen also offers a basic knowledge of 
the skeleton and the character of the surface 
muscles, through drawing from casts, nature, 
and human models, and through reading and 
study in basic anatomy. 

A107 VISUAL TECHNIQUES (2 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Universally accepted methods of graphic rep- 
resentation, orthographic, isometric, and per- 
spective drawing, become the basis for creative 
exploration in all design fields. 

A109C DESIGN IN THREE DIMENSIONS 

(clay AND plaster) (1 S.C.) 
1st semester 2 hours, once a week 

Investigation through a series of exercises of 
the nature of three dimensional design: vol- 



86 



umes, positive and negative space, texture, 
organic and architectonic form. Emphasis on 
manipulation of plastic clay media and fabri- 
cation of plaster. 

A109M DESIGN IN THREE DIMENSIONS 

(metal) (1 s.c.) 
1st or 2nd semester 2 hours, once a week 

The use of non-ferrous wire and sheet metal 
to define space by enclosing it optically or 
psychologically. The potentialities of metal as 
a structural and design material. 

Alio COLOR AND DESIGN (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

A foundation course in the esthetics and me- 
chanics of design. An investigation of the 
nature and properties of color, shape and 
space leads to the discovery of individual solu- 
tions to problems in two-dimensional design. 
Working from the simple to the complex, 
students develop an awareness of the subtle- 
ties within the vocabulary of design. Museum 
visits afford the student an opportunity to 
study the design achievements of other cul- 
tures and these are often related to class 
assignments. 

A200 DRAWING (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, onCe a week 

Training in visual identification and interpre- 
tation including the documentary figure and 
object drawing. Frequent use of the quick 
sketch to sharpen observation. 

A201 DRAWING AND PAINTING (2-4 S.C.) 
1st and/ or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 
Descriptive and expressive picture-making- 



problems involving the use of drawing media, 
transparent and opaque watercolor and oils 
using the still-life and the human figure as 
subject matter. 

A203 WATERCOLOR (2-4 S.C.) 

1st and/ or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

The unique characteristics of transparent 
watercolor as a fluid, spontaneous medium 
as used in relation to still-life, figure and 
landscape. 

A204 PAINTING (2-4 S.C.) 

1st and/ or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

Painting projects paralleled by museum re- 
search in contemporary painting are planned 
to sharpen perception of shape, color and 
complex form relationships. Demonstrations 
and discussions of various technical problems, 
the preparation of grounds and underpainting. 

A205 GRAPHIC ARTS (2-4 S.C.) 

1st and/ or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

The graphic techniques of press-pulled im- 
pressions, wood engraving, metal plate and 
lithography. Emphasis on creative drawing 
and composition. 

A207 VISUAL TECHNIQUES (1-2 S.C.) 

1st and/ or 2nd semester 2 hours, once a week 

The various techniques of rendering are ap- 
plied to the effective description of products 
from their formative to their final stages. This 
course may be required of any student de- 
ficient in this area. 



87 



A208 LAYOUT AND LETTERING (2-4s.C.'l 

1st and/ or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

Study and practice in basic letter forms em- 
phasizing their application in layout and de- 
sign. This is followed by a consideration of 
the relationship between illustration and ty- 
pography through a series of layout and type 
problems. 

A209C CERAMICS (1-4S.C.) 
1 St and/ or 2nd semester 2 or 4 hours, once 
a week 

Experimentation with the plastic character- 
istics of clay in forming and fabrication. Prep- 
aration of glazes and clay bodies. Projects 
include problems of function and sculptural 
principles. 

A210 DESIGN THEORY (2 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

New approaches to the solving of fundamen- 
tal problems from the context of many cul- 
tures; developed in a wide variety of two and 
three dimensional media. Encourages uncon- 
ventional and imaginative insights into the 
process of creativity. 

A21 1 FABRIC DESIGN ORIENTATION 

(2 S.C.) 

1st or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

A critical and esthetic response to fabrics 
developed by studying the history of textiles 
as it relates to fabric construction ; the evolu- 
tion of fibers and their characteristics: the 
nature of the iFepeating pattern, its history 
and design. Students are instructed in the 
ways in which construction and pattern dic- 



tate the function of a fabric. Hand looms are 
used to evolve basic weaves and simple woven 
designs. Painted designs for printed fabrics 
are silk-screened in the workshop. 

A213 MATERIALS AND FABRICATION 

TECHNIQUES (2 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 
Study and practice in the forming, shaping, 
cutting, joining and finishing of various ma- 
terials such as wood, metal, plastics, fabrics 
and ceramics. 

A300 DRAWING (4 S.C.) 
1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 
A wide variety of drawing media, using life, 
portrait, costume models and still-life. Em- 
phasis on imaginati\'e response through ab- 
stract composition. 

A301 DRAWING AND PAINTING (4 S.C.) 
1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a -week 
Descriptive and expressive picture problems 
involving the use of drawing media, trans- 
parent and opaque watercolor and oils using 
the still-life and the human figure. Mixed 
media used by advanced students. Problems 
are frequently related to outside observation 
and research. 

A303 WATERCOLOR (2-4 S.C.) 

1 st and/or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

Comprehensive coverage of all contemporary 
aqueous media: watercolor (transparent and 
opaque), gouache, caseins and colored inks. 
The use of a variety of techniques from the 
documentary to the non-objective. 



88 



A304 PAINTING (4 s.c.) 

} St and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Still-life, figure composition, imaginative com- 
position and landscape with a broadening 
experimentation of the oil medium. Greater 
demand on the student's capacity to express 
individualized pictorial ideas within a more 
complex structural framework. 

A305 GRAPHIC ARTS (2-4 S.C.) 

1 st and/or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

The students work and print in color. Prin- 
cipal techniques are those involving experi- 
mental use of the metal plate and stone. 
Experimentation with color in woodcut and 
serigraph are permitted in individual cases. 

A309C CERAMICS (1-2 S.C.) 

1 st and/ or 2nd semester 2 hours, once a week 

Analysis and use of the techniques of forming 
and glazihg clay products. Emphasis is placed 
on developing a sense of individual outlook 
in esthetic and functional framework. Projects 
include model and mold making in plaster; 
machine and sculptural processes. 

A315 ARTS OF PRESENTATION (2-4 S.C.) 

1 st and/ or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

To train Art Education students to meet the 
demands on their services and talents outside 
their art classes. Such extra-curricular activ- 
ities as planning and carrying out a publicity 
program, planning and installing exhibitions, 
designing art classrooms and designing and 
producing plays are included in this work- 
shop of two semesters. Dimensional Designers 
take this course only for the second semester. 



A317 TYPOGRAPHIC DESIGN WORKSHOP 

(1.5-3 S.C.) 

1st and/ or 2nd semester 3 hours, once a week 

Workshop experience in hand composition, 
lockup, presswork, binding and paper, history 
of type, nomenclature, production procedure 
and reproduction processes. Typographic re- 
lationship to editorial and advertising layout. 

A400 DRAWING (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Greater individualism, self-reliance and a 
probing for a deeper statement is sought in 
the senior year. Structure, composition and 
experimentation are stressed. Emphasis is on 
the students' portfolio of drawing, rather than 
on individual achievements. 

A401 DRAWING AND PAINTING (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Picture-making problems involving the use of 
transparent and opaque watercolor and oil 
paints. Occasional use of mixed media toward 
an experimental approach to still-life, models, 
outdoor drawing and painting. 

A404 PAINTING (2-4 S.C.) 

1st and/or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

Intensive individual instruction. The develop- 
ment of an individual viewpoint extended to 
reach beyond the plateau gained in previous 
years. 

A405 GRAPHIC ARTS (2-4 S.C.) 

1st and/or 2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

Participation in advanced projects in coop- 
eration with the classes in typography and 



89 



the major departmental courses. Experimen- 
tal work in color printing in the medium of 
the student's choice. 

A409C CERAMICS (1-2 s.c.) 

1st and/or 2nd semester 2 hours, once a week 

Advanced studio and laboratory practice in 
the use of ceramic processes based on a series 
of projects determined by the student in areas 
of quantity production, architectural use and 
sculpture. 

A415 JEWELRY AND METAL WORK 

(2 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

An investigation of the creative possibilities 
of jewelry and metal work. All the basic op- 
erations such as sawing, filing, soldering and 
polishing are included. Also projects in metal 
sculpture and elementary enameling. 



PROFESSIONAL ARTS 
Advertising Design 

Ad200 ADVERTISING DESIGN (4 S.C.) 

1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Basic concepts of the arts of communication 
in advertising and editorial design. The first 
semester is devoted to two-dimensional proj- 
ects involving drawing, design, color and 
techniques for the printed page. In the second 
semester the student works with three-dimen- 
sional form, moving from optical to actual 
dimension, thus providing the basis of design 
for packaging, display and promotional art. 



Ad201 LETTERING, IMAGES AND 

ALPHABETS (3 S.C.) 
1 st and 2nd semesters 2 to 4 hours, once 

a week 

The history, anatomy, and design of letters is 
a requisite part of the knowledge and ability 
of the graphic designer. In both semesters a 
specific program of work is given in the tech- 
niques and construction of letters, making 
full use of visual aids. All basic letter forms, 
classical, mechanical, and script are studied 
and used in assignments. 

Ad202 STUDIO PRACTICE (1 S.C.) 
1 st semester 2 hours, once a week 

The practical and experimental use of the 
tools, materials and methods of working most 
appropriate for the advertising designer. 

AdSOO .ADVERTISING, ILLUSTRATION 

AND DESIGN (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Advanced course in advertising and editorial 
art with emphasis on resourcefulness and in- 
quiry in both the creative and technical as- 
pects of design. Projects are presented for 
completion at required intervals and are criti- 
cized and analyzed by the faculty, \'isiting 
critics and the students themselves. 

AdSOl LETTERING AND TYPE FORMS 

(4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

An advanced course in lettering offered as an 
extension of Ad201 and incorporating basic 
instruction in type. While given an advanced 
opportunity to explore letter forms, the stu- 



90 



dent is instructed in the nomenclature of 
type faces and technical terms used in type 
design. Projects are so presented that the 
student receives a thorough training in letter 
and typographic usage and procedures. 

Ad400 ART FOR COMMUNICATION 

(8s.c.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 

The scope and procedures of advertising and 
editorial art on a professional level. Instruc- 
tion is augmented by guest critics who pre- 
sent and analyze assigned projects. As the 
student's abilities mature he becomes increas- 
ingly aware of the special areas and oppor- 
tunities within his field. 

Ad401 ADVERTISING DRAWING (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

A series of four, related, eight week sessions 
in phases of drawing for advertising and edi- 
torial art each taught by a qualified guest 
instructor. The human figure is stressed and 
the student is given the opportunity to create 
his own professional expressions in a wide 
variety of methods including the decorative 
and the humorous. 

Ad403 PRODUCTION AND PORTFOLIO 

TECHNIQUES (2 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Instruction in production and presentation to 
gain an appreciation of the designer's role in 
evolving designs from the drawing board to 
the printed page. Methods and techniques of 
preparing and presenting a portfolio. Guest 
speakers from the advertising profession and 
visits to studios and agencies. 



Art Teacher Education 

Ed200 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF 

EDUCATION (2 S.C.) 
1st semester 2 hours, once a week 
The history of educational thought and of 
the major educational philosophers; should 
lead to a better understanding of their con- 
tributions and place in the stream of learning. 

Ed201 PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION 

(2 S.C.) 

2nd semester 2 hours, once a week 
A companion course to Ed200, the second 
semester's work is concerned with the profes- 
sional aspects of teaching, the preparation of 
a teacher, and the objectives and principles 
of the profession. Analysis of the relationship 
of the school to society, the background of 
the contemporary educational system, and 
current changes and events in the teaching 
profession. Emphasis is also placed on the 
American public school system in relation to 
the community and to local and state sys- 
tems. Supplemented by field trips to schools 
in the area, assigned reading, films, and guest 
speakers in the field of art education. 

Ed202 SCHOOL ARTS AND CRAFTS 

(4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 
Students develop imagination, skills and tech- 
niques to increase understanding and experi- 
mentation in the crafts which are used in art 
programs at the elementary and secondary 
school levels. Assigned projects make use of 
plaster, wood, metal, plastic, fabrics, rubber 
cement, paper, glass and other miscellaneous 
materials. 



91 



EdSOO AUDIO VISUAL AIDS (2s.c.) 

1 st semester 3 hours, once a zveek 

A required lecture and laboratory course for 
ATE majors which describes and illustrates 
the techniques, use and operation of still, 
motion picture and opaque projectors, tape 
recorders and other equipment which may be 
used effectively in instructional situations. It 
also includes experimental work relating to 
use in the classroom, as well as visits to tele- 
vision studios and research into the use of 
television in education. 

EdSOl .\RT IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

(3s.c.) 

1st semester 2 hour lecture and 2 hour 

workshop, once a week 

Lectures investigate the creative growth of 
the child at various age levels in relation to 
his maturing abilities, personality and aware- 
ness of the world around him. Students plan 
art lessons and classroom procedure on an 
elementary level, and discuss the role of the 
art teacher in the life of the school and in 
the community. Discussions, visits to schools, 
assigned readings and written reports. 

The workshop session introduces studio 
work for art classes in elementary schools, 
including the use of a variety of media and 
processes, research, visits to schools, planning 
and arranging exhibitions and participating 
in group evaluations. 

Ed302 .\RT IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

(3s.c.) 

2nd semester 2 hour lecture and 2 hour 

workshop, once a week 

Comprehensive study of the art programs of 



the Junior and Senior high school level, 
through lectures, reading in current educa- 
tional publications, films, visits to local and 
out-of-state museums, and research using local 
resources to bring into focus the contempo- 
rary issues and trends in education. 

The workshop portion makes use of many 
media and a broad approach to the problems 
of Junior and Senior high schools. Field trips 
to museums to study material of historic and 
cultural significance, to exhibitions of con- 
temporary interest, and term projects involv- 
ing research into the artistic contributions of 
the past and present. 

Ed303 PRACTICE TEACHING AND 

OBSERVATION (3 S.C.) 
2nd semester 6 hours, once a week 

Visits to elementary and secondary schools in 
the Philadelphia area to observe experienced 
teachers and to study the youth of this age 
level, as a preparation for teaching art in these 
schools. Reports, conferences, planning art 
programs, and actual teaching and assisting. 

Ed400 ART CURRICULUM (6 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 3 hours, once a week 

A study of art curricula, elementary and sec- 
ondary, together with the study of authorita- 
tive texts and periodicals in the field of art 
education. Through his own study, reading, 
planning and observation, as well as his con- 
current experiences in practice teaching situ- 
ations, the student prepares a course of study 
in art for grades one to twehe. 



92 



Ed403 PRACTICE TEACHING (6 S.C.) 

Ed404 AND OBSERVATION (3 S.C.) 
PRACTICE TEACHING 

1st and 2nd semesters 6 hours, once a week 

OBSERVATION 

1st semester 6 hours, once a week 

Practice Teaching: seniors teach all day, one 
day a week, for two semesters. The student- 
teachers are required to plan lessons in ad- 
vance to be checked and evaluated, write 
reports of their teaching experiences, and dis- 
cuss their methods and approach in confer- 
ences with the department instructors who 
act as supervisors. 

Observation: a continuation of the experi- 
ence gained in Ed303. The schedule of ob- 
servation is enlarged in the senior year to 
include a wider variety of schools. Students 
do more planning, teaching, and assisting, 
followed by reports and conferences in the 
field of adolescent development. 

Dimensional Design 

DiSOO PROJECT DEVELOPMENT (4 S.C.) 
1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Exploration of qualities of space, form and 
surfaces in a series of projects based upon 
preparation and successive arrangement of 
simple geometric forms as modules. Model 
preparation, casting and reproduction. 

Di301-302 WOODS AND METALS (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Projects involving exhibition and display tech- 
niques, sculpture, specialized furniture. Plan- 
ning and documentation via drawings and 



execution in full scale or models. Beginning 
specialization in wood, metals or plastics. 

Di400 DIMENSIONAL DESIGN (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Development of projects drawn from areas 
of exhibition, product design and sculpture. 
Selection of materials and procedures is deter- 
mined by the student as part of his specializa- 
tion in one of the areas of metals, wood, 
ceramics and plastics. 

Di401-402 WOODS and metals (4 s.c.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Project development of Di400 in workshop 
under supervision in areas of metals, wood, 
ceramics and plastics. 

Di404 ADVANCED ARTS OF 

PRESENTATION (4 S.C.) 
1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 
A study of theatrical design and lighting. 
Students plan complete productions of plays 
for classic and contemporary theater and 
for television. Projects start with preliminary 
sketches in line and color and progress 
through scale working drawings to set models. 
One project for a community theater is com- 
pletely executed at the theater. Field trips to 
professional theaters and television studios 
are included. 

Di405 PORTFOLIO PREPARATION (2 S.C.) 
1 st semester 4 hours, once a week 

Determination of portfolio type, organization 
and preparation. Review of previous project 
documentation. 



93 



Di406 THESIS PROJECT (2 s.c.) 

2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

Proposal by student of area of investigation 
within the design field. Consultation and 
supervision by course director. Preliminary 
sketches, detail drawings, models and final 
presentation fully documented. 



Fabric Design 

Fb200 HISTORY AND WORKSHOP (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 to 8 hours, once 

a week 

A survey of the history of textiles from the 
earliest times to the present coordinated with 
workshop projects relating to the historical 
evolution of fabrics. Museum research is an 
integral part of this program. 

Fb205 NATURE STUDY RESEARCH (4 S.C. ) 

1 St and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

The subject matter of nature, rocks, grasses, 
trees, flowers, and animals — in relation to its 
possible design application. Students are in- 
structed in rendering techniques involving 
watercolor and drawing. 



FbSOl PRINTING (4-8 S.C.) 

1 St and 2nd semesters 4 to 8 hours, once 

a week 

Design coloring and printing of materials for 
upholstery, draperies, wallpaper, table linens, 
toweling, handkerchiefs and dress fabrics. 
Visits to printing mills and factories for in- 
struction on production problems and styling. 

Fb302 J ACQUARD DESIGN (2 S.C.) 

2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

A study of the Jacquard loom and the char- 
acteristic types of textiles it can produce: 
damask, matelasse, brocade, and tapestry. 
Sketches and renderings are made for each 
of the above types of Jacquard fabrics. 

Fb400 WEAVING or Fb401 printing 

(12 S.C.) 

1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, three times 

a week 

Advanced and intensive training in either 
weaving or printing. Projects are planned 
with consideration for professional standards 
and production. 



Fb300 WEAVING (6 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 to 8 hours, once 

a week 

Experimentation on the hand loom to explore 
the design possibilities of basic weaves. Stu- 
dents are then given problems in pattern 
making and in designing fabrics for a specific 
purpose. Research in relation to all fibers — 
natural and man-made. 



Fashion Design 

Fa200 FASHION DESIGN (8 S.C.) 

1 St and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 

Techniques in clothing construction, draping 
and drafting basic slopers and flat pattern con- 
struction. The principles and elements of de- 
sign in fashion are emphasized in all projects. 



94 



Fa201 FASHION DRAWING (2 S.C.) 
1st semester 4 hours, once a week 

The fashion design student is instructed in 
the techniques of fashion drawing. Many 
media are used to interpret the model in 
fashion poses and sketches. 

FaSOO FASHION DESIGN (12 S.C.) 
1 St and 2nd seryiesters 4 hours, three times 

a week 

Specific professional projects include the plan- 
ning and completion of original dress designs. 
Problems stress construction, patternmaking, 
layout planning, draping, tailoring, grading 
and marketing. 



vision of the department. Preparation of a 
portfolio for presentation is considered in the 
light of current and anticipated trends. 



Fashion Illustration 

Fi200 FASHION ILLUSTRATION (8 S.C.) 

1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 

Stress on varieties of layout incorporating the 
fashion figure. Outstanding fashion advertis- 
ing is studied and the basic approaches ap- 
plied. In the second semester the emphasis is 
on layout for accessories and special projects 
in relation to fashion display. Field trips to 
fashion markets and shows. 



Fa301 DESIGN SOURCES (2 S.C.) 
2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

Research in fashion design in the costume 
wing of the Art Museum and the imagina- 
tive adaptation of this research to contempo- 
rary design. Study of advanced techniques of 
fashion illustration. 

Fa400 FASHION DESIGN (12 S.C.) 
1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, three times 

a week 

Advanced fashion design stressing specializa- 
tion and individual needs of the student. Co- 
ordination of the fashion field with guest 
speakers, field trips, reports, merchandising 
display and boutique. 

Fa401 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Opportunity for the student to gain profes- 
sional experience is oflfered under the super- 



FiSOO FASHION ILLUSTRATION (8 S.C.) 

1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 

Learning to define the fashion story in line 
and fabric. Home problems using figures in 
layout designed for various advertising media. 
The development of a personal style is en- 
couraged. Study of current techniques and 
styles in the fashion figure and accessories. 

FiSOl FASHION FIGURE (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

The fashion figure and accessories are related 
and interpreted together with a study of cur- 
rent techniques. A study of reproduction 
methods with field trips to printing plants. 
Lectures on fashion art as illustrated in dif- 
ferent periods of art history. 

Fi400 FASHION ILLUSTRATION (4 S.C.) 
/ ^t and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 
Translating the model into a finished fashion 



95 



drawing emphasizing the fashion story. Home 
problems combine the finished fashion figure 
and layout for various advertising media. Ac- 
cessories and the interpretation of these into 
finished drawings. 

Fi401 FASHION FIGURE (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

With models and accessories, the student is 
guided toward the successful coordination of 
knowledge, feeling and ability. Rendering 
techniques in relation to these factors are 
continually stressed. 

Fi402 PORTFOLIO PREPARATION AND 

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (4 S.C.) 
1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

The preparation of a professional portfolio 
and discussion to guide the student in his 
understanding of those factors that contribute 
to success in fashion illustration. 



General Arts 

Ga200 DRAWING, PAINTING AND 

COLLAGE (4 S.C.) 
1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Analysis, of the symbolic function of artistic 
language derived from formal and manipula- 
tive choice. Study of rendering, spatial or- 
ganization, color and movement in painting 
and drawing problems. 

Ga204 PAINTING (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

An examination of the basic elements of paint- 
ing designed to increase the student's percep- 



tion of form in nature and to acquaint him 
with the conceptual and expressive problems 
inherent in the composition of these elements. 
Drawing and painting from life and other 
natural forms and from the imagination in 
gouache and various oil techniques. 

Ga205 GRAPHICS (4 s.c.) 

1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

The first semester is devoted to a continuation 
in depth of the relief and planographic print- 
making techniques introduced in Graphics 
A 105. During the second semester one of two 
press-pulled print techniques (lithography or 
etching and aquatint) will be examined in 
detail. Outside preparation will be regularly 
assigned, while slide lectures, visits to current 
print exhibitions and lectures by visiting print- 
makers will be scheduled. 

Ga209S SCULPTURE & drawing (4 s.c.) 

1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

An examination of the similar problems of 
form representation encountered mutually in 
drawing and sculpture. In drawing: the prob- 
lem of expressing both formal and representa- 
tional ideas of weight and depth; in sculpture: 
the importance of the two-dimensional image 
implicit in all three-dimensional form. Model- 
ling in clay and all graphic drawing media 
will be used. 

Ga210 ADVANCED COLOR AND DESIGN 

(4 s.c.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

The mechanics and esthetics of two-dimen- 
sional design are related to more complex 
exercises in this extension of Al 10 Color and 



96 



Design. The student is encouraged to relate 
his comprehension of design relationships to 
problems of a large scope that challenge his 
perception and invention. 

GaSOO DRAWING (4s.c.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Work in various drawing techniques: char- 
coal, conte, wash and pastel, with a basic 
concern for the perception of the inherent 
qualities of forms: their character, volume 
and structure in space. 

GaSOl COMPOSITION : TEXTURE AND 

RELIEF (3s.c.) (1960-1961) 
1st semester 4 hours, once a week 

A study in the composition of surfaces in 
terms of constructed effect, impression, and 
carving. Basic dependency upon tonalities re- 
sulting from texture and relief. Use of plaster, 
clay, plastic resin and a variety of tesserae. 

Ga304a painting techniques i 
(2s.c.) (1960-1961) 

1st semester 4 hours, once a week 

An empirical survey of the basic materials of 
the painter: supports, grounds, pigments, ve- 
hicles and binders and their characteristics. 
Oil, gouache, tempera, fresco, encaustic and 
plastics. 

Ga304b painting techniques ii 
(2 s.c.) (1960-1961) 

2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

Projects in painting techniques examining the 
esthetic opportunities and problems implicit 
in the use of varying media. 



Ga304 painting a & b (8 s.c.) 

1 st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 

Two successive days of painting with the 
same teacher. Only for students who elect 
Painting as their departmental specialization. 
Students may work in a variety of painting 
media and through a program of specific and 
free problems will be encouraged to deal with 
increasingly complex formal and expressive 
problems. 

Ga305 graphics a & b (8 s.c.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 

Engraving on both wood and metal, lithog- 
raphy, drypoint, etching and aquatint will be 
examined at various stages during the year. 
In each medium the manipulative and press 
techniques will be thoroughly explored as a 
basis for understanding the potential of the 
medium and its adaptation to an imaginative 
and individually expressive aim. Only offered 
to students specializing in Graphics A and B. 
Held on successive days and taught by the 
same teacher. 

Ga305 GRAPHIC DESIGN I (2 s.c.) 

1st semester 4 hours, once a week 

An understanding and appreciation of letter- 
ing and typography as applied to advertising 
layout, editorial design and art production 
procedure. 

Ga305 GRAPHIC DESIGN II (2 s.c.) 

2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

After surveying the field of book publishing, 
the student edits, designs and publishes a 
book during the period of this course, cover- 
ing the fields of engraving, printing processes, 



97 



paper and binding. The combined facilities 
of the Typographic and Graphic Arts De- 
partments are available for this purpose. 

Ga309C CERAMIC surfaces (2 s.c.) 

(1960-1961) 
2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

A continuance of surface composition in tex- 
ture and relief accomplished in the use of 
clay, and monochromatic glaze effects. Tile 
constructions, mosaic, impression and carving 
in\ol\ing fired treatment. 

Ga309S SCULPTURE a & b (8 s.c.) 

I st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 

For students specializing in sculpture, classes 
will be held on two successive days by the 
same teacher. An introduction to the classic 
and contemporary materials of sculpture: 
clay, terra cotta, stone, wood and welded 
metal. Techniques of casting will be exam- 
ined. Working from life, from drawings, and 
directly in the various materials employed, 
the student will be required to explore the 
architectonic problems peculiar to sculpture, 
while being assured an opportunity to express 
his individual initiative. 

Ga310 EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN (4 S.C.) 

(1960-1961) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

An advanced study of design theory. Creative 
initiative in setting and resolving individual 
problems on the most imaginative level. Great 
latitude allowed in the choice of the material 
most appropriate to formal and expressive 
needs. All conventional graphic techniques 



may be used as well as wood, plaster, relief 
collage, clay and metal. 

Ga400 EXPERIMENTAL DRAWING (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Development of the use of drawing as a pri- 
mary response to a visual or imaginative ex- 
perience. Further investigation of the potential 
of drawing as a self-sustaining expressive me- 
dium. Increased emphasis on the development 
of creative treatments appropriate to the 
formal and imaginative requirements of the 
subject, regardless of style. 

Ga PAINTING A & B ; GRAPHIC ARTS A & B ; 

SCULPTURE A & B (8 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 

All senior A and B classes will be taught on 
two successive days by the same teacher in 
each area of specialization. Regularly through- 
out the year visiting artist-critics will join the 
teacher for a thorough professional discussion 
and criticism of each student's work. Students 
are expected to adopt the disciplines, techni- 
cal and personal, of the professional artist, and 
will be required not only to formulate their 
own creative problems but to take a fully 
responsible initiative towards their resolution. 

Ga SENIOR ELECTIVE I (4 S.C.) 

SENIOR ELECTIVE II (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 

Students in each area of specialization are 
required to select two courses from the fol- 
lowing elective areas: ( 1 ) an additional stu- 
dio class in their own field of specialization — 
for one or two semesters; (2) any of the 



studio electives offered, and not previously 
elected, in the Junior year — for one or two 
semesters; (3) a one semester Senior project. 



Illustration 

11200 COMPOSITION AND CRITICISM 

(Is.c.) 

1st semester 2 hours, once a week 

Basic problems of composition for illustration. 
Specific problems in magazine, book and ad- 
vertising illustration. Field trips are correlated 
with classroom work. 

11201 ILLUSTRATION DEVELOPMENT 

(2s.c.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Students plan and develop illustrative prob- 
lems through each stage: the preliminary 
sketch, study of research material, studies 
from the model and objects, to the finished 
drawing. 

11202 PRODUCTION AND REPRODUCTION 
TECHNIQUES (1 S.C.) 

2nd semester 2 hours, once a week 

The methods and techniques of reproducing 
pictorial material in line and half-tone (or 
combinations) by letter-press, offset, gravure 
and silk-screen. 

11203 PEOPLE AND BACKGROUNDS 

(4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 
In the first semester, life models are used for 



the study of volumes. The student is taught 
to work from the inside of a form to its perim- 
eter so that eventually line can become in- 
formed with an awareness of volume. In the 
second semester the student works from the 
costumed model in relation to background. 

11300 COMPOSITION AND CRITICISM 

(2 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Composition projects, such as magazine illus- 
tration, album covers, travel folders, book 
jackets and posters. Group and individual 
criticism by the department director. 

11301 ILLUSTRATION DEVELOPMENT 

(2 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Advanced course in the planning, sketching 
and complete development of illustrations, em- 
phasizing types which will fulfill the require- 
ments for magazine and book reproduction. 

11304 THE PASSING SCENE (2 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Training in the ability to get quick, salient 
impressions of the flow and panorama of life : 
people in action and at rest, and to interpret 
these rapidly and selectively. 

11305 EXPERIMENTAL ILLUSTRATION 

(2 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

This course is designed to encourage the 
illustrator to investigate many fresh facets of 
expression with a view to their possible ap- 
plication to professional projects. 



99 



11400 COMPOSITION AND CRITICISM 

(2s.c.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Criticism of assignments from the standpoint 
of the professional requirements, emphasizing 
technical competence and the imaginative 
use of dramatic, reproduction and pictorial 
values. 

11401 ILLUSTRATION DEVELOPMENT 

(Is.c.) 
1st semester 2 hours, once a zveek 

Problems in developing an illustration, work- 
ing from the preliminary sketch to the fin- 
ished illustration. Criticism from practicing 
illustrators. 

11402 WATERCOLOR (1 S.C.) 

1st semester 2 hours, once a week 

The protean medium of watercolor is ex- 
plored in all its phases. It is used to study 
light, color and form both in class and out- 
doors in relations to all kinds of textures, 
objects, animate and inanimate. 

11403 PEOPLE AND BACKGROUNDS 

(4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

An advanced study of the human figure in all 
its forms of action in its natural environment. 

11404 THE PASSING SCENE (2 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a zveek 

Advanced studies of people at work and at 
play using many media from pen and ink, 
pencil and charcoal to watercolor and oil. 



11405 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL 
ILLUSTRATION (2 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 
An exploratory extension of 11305. 

11406 PORTFOLIO PREPARATION AND 
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE (2 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 2 hours, once a week 

Seniors study methods for presenting their 
work and themselves to art directors. The 
operation of publishing houses and advertis- 
ing agencies is explained. 



Industrial Design 

IdSOO INDUSTRIAL DESIGN (12 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, three times 

a week 

Color and surface treatment of form in visual 
and functional relationship to specific prob- 
lems of industrial design. Study in depth of 
the following categories: exhibition struc- 
tures, consumer and industrial products, pack- 
aging, transportation and problems of social 
environment. Students work with wood, metal, 
ceramics, fiber and plastic materials. Instruc- 
tion seeks to improve skills of sketching, 
rendering, engineering drawing and model- 
making. 

Id400 INDUSTRIAL DESIGN (12 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, three times 

a week 

Advanced development of Id300 on a pro- 
fessional level. Close cooperation and coordi- 
nation with several area industries enables 



100 



the study of particular problems under closely 
reproduced field conditions. Designers and 
engineers of cooperating industries participate 
in the presentation and evaluation of student 
projects. Field trips are part of the program. 
The final problem is an eight week thesis 
project. 

Id401-402 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 

AND PORTFOLIO PREPARATION 

(4s.c.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

A seminar in the esthetic, philosophical and 
professional problems of designers. Lecturers 
and guest speakers from the fields of indus- 
trial design, architecture, fine arts, psychology, 
business law, etc. The course encourages the 
student to develop an awareness of his pur- 
pose values and contributions as a product 
designer. 



Interior Design 

InSOO INTERIOR DESIGN (4s.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Introduction to Interior Design, including 
complete plans for remodeling an early Phila- 
delphia house, designing a business office, 
constructing a scale model of either, and field 
trips to contemporary sources of supply and 
to museums to study examples of interior de- 
sign of the past. 

InSOl MATERIALS AND METHODS OF 

CONSTRUCTION (8 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 
Under the supervision of a registered archi- 



tect the students are assigned projects incor- 
porating an understanding of materials and 
construction as applied specifically to their 
use in interiors, architecture and furniture 
design. 

In400 INTERIOR DESIGN (8 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 

Production of finished designs of interiors for 
the annual A.I.D. competition as well as in- 
teriors for a vacation house, a store, or show- 
room. Students do a complete conversion job, 
including preliminary plans, finished draw- 
ings, color renderings, selection of colors, 
furniture and fabrics and the construction of 
a model. 

In401 MATERIALS AND METHODS OF 
CONSTRUCTION (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

The study of basic architectural forms, the 
problems involved in remodelling existing 
structures, the construction of simple addi- 
tions to buildings and of models of furniture 
and built-in furniture units. 

In402 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

(4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Research in the history of furniture applied 
to contemporary modes of living. Visits to 
factories, cabinet makers, millworkers, rug 
manufacturers, showrooms and discussions 
with leading professional designers and their 
associates. 



101 



Photography 

Ph200 PHOTOGRAPHY MAJOR (8s.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 

History of photography, an analysis of the 
operation of cameras, materials, introduction 
to the basic techniques of lighting, exposure, 
darkroom procedures, printing and enlarging. 
The esthetics of photography and fundamen- 
tals of photographic chemistry and optics. 
The second semester is devoted to a more 
intensive and varied application of photo- 
graphic assignments and problems. 



Ph300 PHOTOGRAPHY MAJOR (4 S.C.) 

1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 

Third-year majors in photography investigate 
the use of the photograph as an expressive 
and creative medium; comprehensive work 
in illustration, photo-journalism and problems 
associated with the development of an indi- 
vidual point of view. 



Ph301 THEORY AND TECHNIQUES 

(2 S.C.) 

1st semester 4 hours, once a week 

Experiments with lenses and optical devices, 
preparation and use of photo-sensitive ma- 
terials and use of new materials. This course 
is intended to help the student find new 
methods and ways of expression. 



Ph302-Ph402 motion picture 

WORKSHOP (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 
The basic history, technique and values of 
the motion picture. Development of the stu- 
dent's awareness of the motion picture as a 
major medium of contemporary expression. 
Student projects explore creative problems in 
scripting, cinematography, editing and sound. 
During the course students have the oppor- 
tunity to produce short films. Classwork in- 
cludes lectures, discussion and film showings. 

Ph303 COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY (2 S.C.) 
2nd semester 4 hours, once a week 

Lectures, demonstrations and practice in the 
use of color photography, color theory and 
recording processes, printing, transparencies, 
toning and dyeing. 

Ph400 PHOTOGRAPHY MAJOR (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, twice a week 
Long range projects to strengthen the stu- 
dent's point of view and expressive capacity 
by enabling him to pursue a particular area 
of work related to his eventual goal. 

Ph404 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE AND 

PORTFOLIO PREPARATION (4 S.C.) 
1st and 2nd semesters 4 hours, once a week 
Assignments directed towards documentary, 
news, commercial, advertising, fashion, indus- 
trial, and other fields of photography. 



102 




Students are particularly interested in seeing the work of their fac- 
ulty members in the annual exhibition, "Meet Our Instructors." 




103 



DIRECTORS OK DEPARTIVIENTS 



General Studies Division 

PAUL W. PARTRIDGE, JR., PH.D. 

B.A. and M.A., University of Florida; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania; co-author of "Read- 
ings for College Composition," 1954. 

Freshman Program 

JOHN FOSTER 

Artist-educator, awarded a number of prizes 
including Dana Watercolor Medal, Sketch Club 
and other regional prizes; wartime artist with the 
United States Army in Iran; graduate of PMCA. 

Related. Arts 

Ceramics william d. parry 

(See biographical summary under Dimensional 
Design.) 

Drawing and Painting morris berd 
Former advertising designer now devotes himself 
exclusively to painting; currently president of 
Philadelphia Chapter, Artists' Equity; graduate 
of PMCA. 

Graphic Arts benton spruange 
Studied at the University of Pennsylvania and 
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts ; 
received two Cresson travelling fellowships and 



a Guggenheim fellowship; has headed the Art 
Department at Beaver College for many years. 

Typographic Design eugene feldman 
Painter, graphic artist and printer; heads print- 
ing firm, the Falcon Press; studied at PMCA; 
received several Art Directors' and Printing 
Industry Awards; co-designer of "Doorway to 
Portuguese" with Brazilian artist, Aloisio 
Magalhaes. 

Professional Arts 

Advertising Design Raymond a. ballinger 
Advertising artist, author of "Lettering Art in 
Modern Use," 1952, and "Layout," 1956, selected 
by the American Institute of Graphic Arts as one 
of 50 outstanding books of the year; winner of 
many awards for distinguished work; graduate 
of PMCA. 

Art Teacher Education louise b. ballinger 
Studied at University of Pennsylvania and Barnes 
Foundation; graduate of PMCA; former curator, 
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; 
taught art in Friends' Schools. 

Dimensional Design william d. parry 
Sculptor and ceramist; studied at Alfred Univer- 
sity where he also served as an instructor; work 
has been exhibited throughout the United States. 



104 



Fabric Design jack lenor larsen 
B.A., University of Washington and M.A. in Tex- 
tile Design, Cranbrook Academy; heads manu- 
facturing organization, Jack Lenor Larsen, Inc. 
and design consultation firm, Larsen Design 
Corp.; many one-man shows and international 
exhibitions; trustee, American Craftsman's 
Council. 

Fashion Design Dorothy parke 

Studied fashion design at Pratt Institute : associ- 
ated with Charles Amour and Arkay Junior 
Frocks before joining PMCA faculty. 

Fashion Illustration Clarissa gross Rogers 
Studied at Ecole d'Art et Publicite in Paris and 
with Arthur Carles and Morris Blackburn in 
Philadelphia; formerly Art Director of the John 
Wanamaker store; free-lance fashion illustrator. 

Gen^T-a/ ^rf.f GEORGE R. BUNKER 

B.A., Yale University; studied at Art Students' 
League, Brooklyn Museum Art School, Academic 
Julien, Paris, and privately with Victor Candell ; 
has exhibited prints and paintings here and 
abroad; winner of several awards; currently 
member of the Board of Directors of the Print 
Club and of Artists' Equity, Philadelphia Chapter. 



Illustration henry c. pitz 

Illustrator of more than 150 books and countless 
magazine stories; author of "Pen, Brush and 
Ink," "Practice of Illustration," "Treasury of 
American Book Illustration" ; contributing editor, 
"The American Artist"; winner of many awards 
for watercolors. oils and drawings as well as 
illustrations; graduate of PMCA. 

Industrial Design Joseph carreiro 

B.S. in Education, Massachusetts School of Art; 
studied at Cranbrook and Harvard; member,' 
American Society of Industrial Designers and 
Industrial Design Institute; Design Coordinator 
for the 1958 Brussels Fair. 

Interior Design george mason 

Maintains interior design office in Philadelphia. 
Interior designs for the city of Philadelphia, col- 
leges, clubs, as well as commercial buildings and 
private residences. Member, National Society of 
Interior Designers. Studied at PMCA. 

Photography sol mednick 

Maintains studios in New York and Philadelphia; 
photographs exhibited at the Philadelphia Mu- 
seum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art; 
award winner in numerous exhibitions ; eraduate 
of PMCA. 



105 



FACULTY 

HENRY J. ABRAHAM, AsSOciate PfofeSSOT, 

General Studies 
WIN ANDERSON, Associate Professor, 
Fabric Design 

EDNA ANDRADE, InStrUCtOr, 

Related Arts 
SIDNEY AxiNN, Assistant Professor, 

General Studies 
LOUISE BOWEN BALLiNGER, Associate Professor, 

Art Teacher Education 

RAYMOND A. BALLINGER, ProfeSSOr, 

Advertising Design 
ROBERT D. BARNES, Instructor, 

Dimensional Design 
ISA BARNETT, Instructor, 

Illustration 
RITA BARNETT, Assistant Professor, 

Related Arts 
WILLIAM BARNETT, Assistant Professor, 

Related Arts 
THOMAS BARRON, Instructor 

Illustration 

BETH A. BENNER, InstrUCtor, 

Related Arts 

ROBERT W. BENNER, InStrUCtor , 

Related Arts 

MORRIS BERD, ProfcSSOr, 

Related Arts 
JANE D. BONELLi, Instructor, 
Art Teacher Education 

LEO J. BRANDENBURGER, AsSOCiatC ProfeSSOT, 

Industrial Design 
GEORGE R. BUNKER, Assistant Professor, 
General Arts 

CHARLES BURKHART, InStrUCtOr, 

General Studies 
LEONARD J. BRUNO, Instructor, 

Advertising Design 
JOSEPH CARREiRO, Professor, 

Industrial Design 

ETHEL F. CARTER, InStrUCtOr, 

Fashion Illustration 
DANTE CATTANi, Associate Profcssor, 

Advertising Design & Related Arts 
SOL c. COHEN, Assistant Professor, 

Advertising Design 



JOHN CONDAX, Assistant Professor, 

Photography 
BERT GORMAN, Assistant Professor, 

Related Arts 
CARL CRiswELL, Assistant Professor, 

General Studies 
WILLIAM p. DALEY, Assistant Professor, 

Industrial Design & Related Arts 
LAURENCE DAY, Assistant Professor, 

Related Arts 
NEWBOLD DUNN, Instructor, 

General Studies 
BEN EisENSTAT, Associate Professor, 

Related Arts 
JANE EISENSTAT, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
WILLIAM ERWiN, Instructor, 

Illustration 
EMLEN ETTiNG, Assistant Professor, 

Related Arts 
EUGENE FELDMAN, Associate Professor, 

Related Arts 
LOUIS FiNKELSTEiN, Assistant Professor, 

General Studies and Related Arts 
JOHN FOSTER, Associatc Professor, 

Freshman Program 
DONALD M. FOX, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
JEAN FRANCKSEN, Assistant Professor, 

Advertising Design 
MIRIAM K. FREDENTHAL, Assistant Professor, 

Fabric Design 
PAUL FROELICH, Associatc Profcssor, 

Related Arts 
JOHN GEiszEL, Assistant Professor, 

Illustration 
LOUIS R. GLESSMAN, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
ALBERT GOLD, Associate Professor, 

Illustration & Related Arts 
DOROTHY F. GRIMM, Assistant Professor, 

General Studies 
WILLIAM p. HAGUE, Assistant Professor, 

General Studies & Related Arts 
WILLIAM HAMILTON, Instructor, 

Illustration 



106 



W. EMERTON HEITLAND, AsSOcicte ProfeSSOT, 

Illustration 
FRANK HERMAN, Assistaut ProfessoT, 

Photography 
RICHARD HOOD, Associate Professor, 

Advertising Design 
ALFRED iGNARRi, Assistant Professor, 

Related Arts 
JEROME KAPLAN, Associate Professor, 

Related Arts 
EDITH J. KAPLAN, /n^irucior, — 

Advertising Design 
PAUL KEENE, Assistant Professor, 

Related Arts 
CHARLES V. KELLY, Assistant Professor, 

General Studies 
FRANK KEN SILL, Assistant Professor, 

General Studies 
ADA L. KiRKPATRiCK, Instructor, 

Fashion Design 
JOSEPH KRUSH, Assistant Professor, 

Illustration 
M. c. KUHN, Instructor, 

General Studies 
ELAINE K. KURTZ, Instructor, 

Advertising Design 
MICHAEL LALLi, Assistant Professor, 

General Studies 
LISA o. LANGLEY, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
JACK LENOR LARSEN, Associate ProfcssoT, 

Fabric Design 

LEONARD LEHRER, InStrUCtor, 

Related Arts 
SOL LIBSOHN, Assistant Professor, 

Photography 
CHARLES M. LIGHT, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
JACK LIT, Instructor, 

General Studies __^ 

ROBERT LUEBBERS, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
THERESA MARANZiNi, Instructor, 

Fashion Design 
GEORGE MASON, Associate Professor, 

Interior Design 



MERCEDES MATTER, AssistUUt ProfcSSOr, 

Related Arts 
KEITH MEASE, Instructor, 

Advertising Design 
SOL MEDNICK, Associate Professor, 

Photography 
SEYMOUR MEDNICK, Assistant Professor, 

Related Arts 

ALICE MEISENHEIMER, InstrUCtor, 

Advertising Design 
JOHN MEisTER, Associatc Profcssor, 

General Studies 
J. KIRK MERRICK, Associate Professor, 

Related Arts 
HENRY MITCHELL, Assistant Professor, 

Related Arts 
ELSIE s. MCGARVEY, Instructor, 

Fashion Design 

ROBERT MC GOVERN, InstrUCtOr, 

Related Arts 
JAMES E. MC NULTY, Visiting Associate Professor, 

General Studies 
JILL B. NADELL, Instructor, 

General Studies 
PETER PAONE, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
DOROTHY PARKE, Associate Professor, 

Fashion Design 
WILLIAM D. PARRY, Professor, 

Dimensional Design & Related Arts 

PAUL W. PARTRIDGE, JR., ProfeSSOr, 

General Studies 
HERBERT s. PASTON, Assistant Professor, 

Art Teacher Education 
HENRY w^. PEACOCK, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
WILLIAM PECKHAM, Instructor , 

Related Arts 
PETER F. PETRAGLiA, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
HENRY c. piTZ, Profcssor, 

Illustration 
WILLIAM PLUMMER, Instructor, 

Illustration 
RUDY POTT, Instructor, 

Illustration 



107 



RICHARD REINHARDT, AsSOCiate ProfcSSOT, 

Industrial Design 
AURELius RENZETTi, Associdte ProfessoT, 

Related Arts 
NORMAN N. RICE, Assistant Professor, 

General Studies 
HOWARD RiEGER, Instructor , 

Advertising Design & Related Arts 
THEODORE ROBINSON, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
CLARISSA ROGERS, Assistatit Profe)s.sor, 

Fashion Illustration 

DONNA J. SIIEI.I.ABVRGER, Instructor, 

General Studies 
KARL SHERMAN, Associatc Professor, 

Related Arts 
EDWARD J. SMITH, Assistant Professor, 

Illustration 
STANLEY SMITH, Instructor, 

General Studies 
BEN SOLOWEY, Instructor, 

Illustration 

RAY SPILLER, lustrUCtor, 

Related Arts 

BENTON SPRUANCE, ProfcSSOr, 

Related Arts 



DORIS STAFFEL, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
WILLIAM STEPHENS, Instructor, 

Industrial Design 
LiBBiE L. STEWART, Assistant Professor, 

Advertising Design 
ARTHUR TOFANi, JR., Assistant Professor, 

Interior Design 
CLAIRE VAN VLiET, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
PETRAs VASKYS, Instructor, 

Related Arts 
MURRAY WEISS, Assistant Professor, 

Photography 
HELEN s. WEST, Associate Professor, 

General Studies 
HUGH WILEY, Instructor, 

Illustration 
ROBERT wiRTH, Assistant Professor, 

Related Arts 
BEN WOLF, Assistant Professor, 

General Studies & Related Arts 
MARTIN WOLFSON, Assistant Professor, 

General Studies 
JANET YAMRON, Instructor, 

General Studies 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATION 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 

All matters pertaining to Administrative-Faculty 
policy, admissions policy, new faculty appoint- 
ments and all other educational affairs of the 
College are directed by the Executive Council, 
subject to approval by the Boards of Governors 
and Trustees. The Executive Council includes, 
among others, all department directors and is 
chaired by the Dean. It meets once a month 
throughout the academic year. 

Two important standing committees of the 
Executive Council are: 



ACADEMIC STATUS 

George R. Bunker, Chairman (1958-1960) 
The Committee acts in an advisory capacity to 
the Dean and the Board of Governors concern- 
ing the rank and status of all full-time faculty 
members. 



EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

Raymond A. Ballinger, Chairman (1958-1959) 
Composed of at least five members appointed 
annually by the Executive Council and meeting 
once a month throughout the academic year. 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Composed of 20 members, 10 of whom are elected 
each year by the faculty. Meets once a month. 
BENTON SPRUANCE, Pr^5z^^ni (1958-1959) 

RAYMOND A. BALLINGER JEROME KAPLAN 

RITA BARNETT PAUL KEENE 

BETH O. BENNER GEORGE MASON 

MORRIS BERD JOHN MEISTER 

JOSEPH CARREIRO DOROTHY PARKE 

WILLIAM DALEY HENRY C. PITZ 

JANE EISENSTAT RICHARD H. REINHARDT 

EUGENE FELDMAN AURELIUS RENZETTI 

JOHN FOSTER CLARISSA ROGERS 

MIRIAM FREDENTHAL HELEN S. WEST 



An important standing committee of the Faculty 
Council is: 

FACULTY AFFAIRS 

Joseph Carreiro, Chairman (1958-1959) 

Composed of five or more faculty members 
appointed annually by the President of the 
Faculty Council. 

Other Committees 

All committees meet on call. Membership is sub- 
ject to change by annual appointment. 



ADMISSIONS 

John Foster, Chairman 

PORTFOLIO EVALUATION 

Karl Sherman, Chairman 
scholarship: freshmen 
John Foster, Chairman 
scholarship: upper classmen 
Jack Hawthorne, Chairman 

LIBRARY 

Ben Wolf, Chairman 

ACADEMIC REVIEW 

Jack Hawthorne, Chairman 



ADMINISTRATION 

E. M. Benson, Dean of the College 
Edward Warwick, Dean Emeritus 
Hannah D. Beiter, Student Advisor 
Elaine K. Goff, Director of Publicity 
Benjamin C. Hand, Business Manager 
Jack G. Hawthorne, Registrar 
Frank Kensill, Director of Maintenance and 

Building Development 
Kurt M. Loeb, Student Advisor 
E. Bruce Thomas, Director, Office of 

Admissions and Director of Non-Academic 

Personnel 

STAFF 

Zeola Allen, Manager, Cafeteria 
Ernest Brandie, Supervisor, Office of 

Maintenance and Building Development 
Mildred K. Cocchi, Secretary, 

Information Office 
Emma M. Estabrooks, Secretary, Office of 

Maintenance and Building Development 
Donald M. Fox, Assistant to the Registrar 
M. Juanita Gilbert, Secretary, 

Information Office 
Margaret M. Glasgow, Telephone Operator 
Dorothy F. Grimm, Assistant to the Librarian 
Herbert H. Hickmott, HI, Assistant 

to the Dean 
Harold E. Hoffmeister, Carpenter, Office of 

Maintenance and Building Development 



Richard Hood, Design Coordinator 

Gail D. Landow, ^ecreiary. Office of Admissions 

Mary E. Lewis, Secretary, 

Office of the Registrar 
Genevieve M. Loos, Secretary, 

Office of Public Relations 
Gertrude Myers, Circulation Clerk, Library 
Julia Patton, Assistant to the Librarian 
Harriett B. Routzahn, Manager, Supply Store 
Lillian Satinoff, Bookkeeper, Business Office 
AiLEEN M. Sharp, Secretary, 

Office of Public Relations 
Thelma Sharp, Models and Properties 
Phyllis N. Swartz, Assistant to the 

Director of Admissions 
Maria A. Tillman, Assistant to the Manager, 

Supply Store 
Peggy Wells, Secretary, 

Office of Student Affairs 
Helen Stevenson West, Librarian 
Leonard G. Williams, Projectionist and 

Painter, Office of Maintenance and 

Building Development 
Mary C. Young, Secretary, Business Office 



CONSULTANTS 

Dr. Theodore Asnis, Physician 
Dr. Charles W. David, Librarian 
Norman N. Rice, Architect 



109 



PMCA BOARD OF OOVERNORS 



CHARLES T. COINER, Chairman 
Vice-President in Charge of Art, N. W. Ayer 
& Son 

GEORGE D. BECK, Co-Chairmati 

Chairman of the Board and Treasurer, Beck 

Engraving Company 

PAUL c. BALDWIN, Vice-Presidcnt, Scott 
Paper Company 

MRS. CURTIS BOK 

MRS. ALBERT M. GREENFIELD, Member, 

Board of Public Education, Philadelphia 

R. STURGIS INGERSOLL 

President, Philadelphia Museum of Art 

MRS. SAMUEL H. LAVERTY, Fabric Designer 

MRS. MALCOLM LLOYD, Member, Board of 
Trustees, Philadelphia Museum of Art 

DOMENico MORTELLITO, Manager, Central 
Design Section, E. I. duPont de Nemours 
and Company, Inc. 

MRS. RUSSELL RICHARDSON, Member, 

Board of Trustees, Philadelphia Museum of Art 

MEL RiCHMAN, President, Mel Richman, Inc. 

SAMUEL R. ROSENBAUM, Attorney at Law; 
Trustee, Music Performance Trust Funds 

MRS. LESSING J. ROSENWALD 



JOANNE SEYBOLD, Interior Designer, 

E. I. duPont de Nemours and Company, Inc. 

HOPE SKiLLMAN, President, Skillman Inc. 

MRS. ANDREW J. SORDONI, JR. 

MRS. NORMAN H. TAYLOR, Color Consultant, 
W. T. Grant Company; Tanners' Council 
of America 

WALTER DORWiN TEAGUE, Industrial Designer, 
Walter Dorwin Teague Associates 

BRADBURY THOMPSON, Art Director, 
Mademoiselle Magazine 
MRS. JOSEPH B. TOWNSEND, JR., President, 
Associate Committee of Women 

FRANK A. vossENBERG, Assistant Manager 
Director, Research Division, Yale & Towne 
Manufacturing Company 

DR. MICHAEL wATTER, Director of Airframe 
Research, The Budd Company 

MRS. THOMAS RAEBURN WHITE 

GEORGE D. wiDENER^ ex officto. Chairman, 

Board of Trustees, Philadelphia Museum of Art 

MRS. JOHN wiNTERSTEEN, Member, Board 
of Trustees, Philadelphia Museum of Art 

HOWARD A. WOLF, Partner, Wolf Brothers 

FREDERICK M. YOST, Vicc-Presidcnt, 
John Wanamaker 



COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



BUDGET 

George D. Beck, Chairman 

Paul C. Baldwin Howard A. Wolf 

DEVELOPMENT AND INDUSTRIAL 

RELATIONS 

Mrs. Malcolm Lloyd Mel Richman 

Samuel R. Rosenbaum Mrs. Russell Richardson 

Mrs. Lessing J. Rosenwald 

Mrs. Helen D. Taylor Mrs. John Wintersteen 

CURRICULUM, FACULTY AND STUDENT 
RELATIONS 

Domenico Mortellito, Chairman 
Mrs. Curtis Bok Hope Skillman 
Walter Dorwin Teague Michael Watter 
Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White 



PUBLIC EVENTS, ALUMNI AND 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

Mrs. Samuel Laverty, Chairman 
Mrs. Albert M. Greenfield 
Mrs. Malcolm Lloyd 
Samuel R. Rosenbaum 
Joanne Seybold 
Mrs. Andrew J. Sordoni, Jr. 
Mrs. Joseph B. Townsend, Jr. 
Frederick M. Yost 

The President of the Corporation, the Chairman 
and Co-Chairman of the Board of Governors 
and the Dean are members of all committees. 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS 

for awards, scholarships, library, development, general operations 



Elmer O. Aaron 

Baugh-Barber Memorial Fund 

Chapman Biddle 

James H. Cresson 

Emma S. Crozier 

Robert P. DeSilver 

Edward Tompkin Dobbins 

William H. Ely 

Clayton French 

Foltz Fund 

Elizabeth Duane Gillespie 



Frederick Graff 
Emily Leland Harrison 
John Harrison 
Thomas Skelton Harrison 
M. Theresa Keehmle 
Charles Godfrey Leland 
Henry Leland 
Frank Hamilton Magee 
Margaret S. Hinchman 
John T. Morris 
Georgia B. Mcllhenny 



and special purposes 

Mr. & Mrs. John D. Mcllhenny 

Charles V. Neuman 

Thornton Oakley 

Mrs. Frank Thorne Patterson 

Aspasia E. Ramborger 

Elizabeth B. Roberts 

Annie E. Sinnott 

Joseph E. Temple 

William Weightman 

Rynear Williams, Jr. 



CONTRIBUTIONS 1958-1959 

for awards, scholarships, library, development, general operations and special purposes 



PATRONS ($5,000 or more) 
Estate of Mrs. Hortense Loeb 

FELLOWS ($1,000 or more) 

W. M. Armistead Foundation, Inc. 

Art Directors Club (through Typographic 

Service Inc. — Sam Dalton, President) 
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Eastwick 
Ford Motor Company 

DONORS ($500 or more) 
Alumni Association PMCA 
Associate Committee of Women 
The Concora Foundation 
Mr. & Mrs. Eckley B. Coxe, III 
Samuel S. Fleisher Art Memorial 
The Albert M. Greenfield Foundation 
Mrs. Malcolm Lloyd 
Mr. & Mrs. Samuel R. Rosenbaum 
Mr. & Mrs. Ira Schwartz (Edward B. Freed 
Memorial) 

ASSOCIATES ($250 or more) 
Allen, Lane & Scott 
Mr. George D. Beck 
Mr. & Mrs. E. M. Benson 
Curtis Publishing Company 
Anthony H. Geuting Memorial 



The Pew Memorial Foundation 



Scott Paper Company 
Smith Kline & French Foundation 
United States Steel Foundation, Inc. 
Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company 



Mr. Andrew J. Sordoni 

Mrs. William T. Tonner 

Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White 

Mr. George D. Widener 

Mrs. John Wintersteen 

Mr. & Mrs. Ben Wolf (Daniel Banks 

Memorial) 
Mr. & Mrs. Howard A. Wolf 



George Gugert Memorial 
(established by The Willet 
Stained Glass Studios) 
Mount Lawn Cemetery 
Penton Kelly Company 



Mr. & Mrs. Lessing J. Rosenwald 

Edward Stern & Co., Inc. 

John Wanamaker Philadelphia, Inc. 

F. W. Weber Company 

Winner Manufacturing Co., Inc. 



Ill 



SUSTAINING ($100 or more) 

The American Institute of 

Decorators 
Mrs. J. Arronson 
Mr. Paul C. Baldwin 
Mr. Arnold A. Bayard 
Mr. & Mrs. Stephen Beiter 
Bocour Artist Colors 
Mr. Orville H. Bullitt 
Mr. Charles T. Coiner 
Mrs. Rodolphe deSchauensee 
B. F. Dewees, Inc. 
Mrs. Benjamin Ditenfass 
*Mr. Frank Eltonhead 

Faculty PMCA 

Mrs. Myer Feinstein 
*Miss Marguerite Gaudin 
*Dr. & Mrs. Edward Gifford 

Mr. M. L. Girsh 

Mrs. Nancy Brewster Grace 

Gray & Rogers 

CONTRIBUTING ($25 or more) 

Mrs. J. Deaver Alexander 
*Mrs. Marion B. Amon 
Mr. Schofield Andrews 
Mrs. Pierce Archer 
Artcraft Picture Framing 
Mrs. King Baird 
*Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Ballinger 

Mr. Boyd T. Barnard 
*Mrs. Pauline L. Becker 
*Mrs. Mary L. Beitzel 

Mr. Benjamin D. Bernstein 

Mrs. Nicholas Biddle 

Mrs. Richard C. Bond 

Mr. George Bortin 

Broad Street Trust Company 

Mr. Charles T. Brown, Jr. 

Miss Vera D. Bruestle 

Mr. Edward G. Budd, Jr. 

Mrs. M. J. Callahan 

Major Aaron E. Carpenter 
* Alumni & Associate Alumni 



Mrs. Albert M. Greenfield 

Mrs. Richard M. Huber 

Mrs. Harry Hubschman 

Mr. & Mrs. R. Sturgis Ingersoll 

Mrs. T. Carrick Jordan 

Mr. C. Mahlon Kline 

Mrs. I. H. Krekstein 
*Mr. Jacob Labe III 

Mrs. Austin Lamont 
*Mrs. Samuel H. Laverty 

Mrs. Bertram Lippincott 

Mrs. H. Gates Lloyd 
*Mrs. August Martin 

Mr. Sydney E. Martin 

Mrs. Robert McLean 
*Mr. Oscar E. Mertz, Sr. 
Mrs. Herbert C. Morris 
Mr. & Mrs. Domenico Mortellito 
Mr. Peter MuUer-Munk 
Mrs. Staunton B. Peck 



Cherry Hill Inn 
Mr. George M. Cheston 
Mrs. Benjamin Coates 
*Miss Carlotta Colajezzi 
*Mr. & Mrs. Ralph P. Coleman 

Mrs. Dorothea S. Collins 
*Mrs. W. S. Corkran 
*Mr. Edward CuUen 
Mr. & Mrs. Edward W. Danien 
Mr. Samuel H. Daroff 
Delta Patrons Club 
*Mr. & Mrs. D. A. Dezmelyk 
*Mr. Louis R. Dijoseph 

Mrs. Stella Drabkin 
*Mr. Boris Drucker 
Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Earle 
Mr. & Mrs. Michael H. Egnal 
*Mr. Philip John Eitzen 
Mrs. Madeline M. Ellis 
Mr. George Essayian 



I 



*Miss Loyola C. Pedrick Scholarship 
Fund (Camden, N.J. High School) 
Philadelphia- Weeks Engraving Co. 
Phototype Engraving Co., Inc. 
Dr. I. S. Ravdin 
Mrs. Russell H. Richardson 
Mr. Mel Richman 
Royal Electrotype Company 
Senior Class 1957 
Mr. I. M. Simon 
Mr. Kurt A. Solmssen 
*Mr. & Mrs. Andrew J. Sordoni, Jr 
Student Council PMCA 
Mr. Walter Dorwin Teague 
Mr. J. Bradbury Thompson 
Mrs. Carroll Tyson, Jr. 
Mrs. Morris Wenger 
Women's Home Fashion League 
(Phila. Chapter) 



Mr. & Mrs. S. A. Feld 
Mr. Eugene Feldman 
*Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Ferleger _ 
*Mr. Maurice Freed 
Mr. Titus C. Geesey 
Mr. Wilfred D. Gillen 
Mr. & Mrs. David D. Goff 
Mr. & Mrs. Warren Goff 
Mrs. J. Maurice Gray 
Mr. Sidney N. Greenberg, Jr. 
Mr. Brydon S. Greene 
*Mr. & Mrs. Henry Hagert 

Mrs. F. Woodson Hancock 
*Mr. G. W. Hansberry 

Mrs. Flagler Harris 

Mr. & Mrs. Aaron Heine 
*Mrs. Joseph E. Helweg 

Mrs. Dunham Higgins 
*Mr. H. David Hill 

W. Franklin Hodges & Sons, Ii 



112 



CONTRIBUTING ($25 or more) continued 



*Mr. & Mrs. Jack E. Hopwood 

Mr. Walter M. Jeffords 

Mr. & Mrs. Paul F. Keene 

Mr. N. Paul Kenworthy 
*Mr. Bruno W. Kersten 

Mr. H. M. Kieckhefer 

Mrs. Benjamin Klebanoff 

Mr. Robert E. Lamb 

Albert & Mary Lasker Foundation 

Mr. & Mrs. James H. Lavenson 

Mrs. Fairfax Leary, Jr. 

Robert LeFort and Co., Inc. 

Mrs. Nelson J. Leidner 

Mrs. Herman Levine 

Mr. & Mrs. Sydney Longmaid 

Mrs. William F. Machold 
*Mrs. Robert E. Manley, Jr. 
*Mr. & Mrs. David Marder 
*Mr. Otto Victor Maya 

Mrs. Thomas B. McCabe 
*Mr. Seymour Mednick r • 

*Miss Emily Mercer 

Dr. & Mrs. Leon Miller 



*Mr. Robert Miller 
*Dr. Earl B. Milliette 

Dr. John E. Mock 

Mr. & Mrs. Matthew T. Moore 
*Miss Helen Benson Murphy 
*Mr. George W. Myler 

Mr. & Mrs. William Netzky 

Newman Galleries, Inc. 

Mr. & Mrs. Marvin Orleans 

Mr. Charles Peberdy 

Mrs. J. Howard Pew 

Philadelphia Art Supply Co. 

Philadelphia Print Club 

Mrs. Webster Plass 

Mr. Philip Price 
*Mrs. Herbert B. Rishel 

Dr. George Roth 

Mr. & Mrs. Edwin Sabol 

Mr. Morris Satinsky 

Mr. Benjamin F. Sawin 
*Miss S. Gertrude Schell 

Mr. George Schermer 

Mr. Harold W. Scott 



Mr. & Mrs. Orvel Sebring 
Selby, Battersby & Co. 
Mr. Edward B. Smith, Jr. 
Mr. & Mrs. L. M. C. Smith 
Mrs. J. Solis-Cohen, Jr. 
Mr. Irwin W. Solomon 
Stapler Fabrics, Inc. 
Mr. & Mrs. Floyd T. Starr 
Mrs. J. Stogdell Stokes 
Mrs. Leon C. Sunstein 
*Mrs. Kenneth Thomson 
Mr. George F. Tyler, Jr. 
Mrs. David VanPelt 
Mr. William R. Wallace 
General L. W. T. Waller, Jr. 
*Miss Ruth Audrey Wescott 
*Mrs. Helen Stevenson West 
Mrs. Samuel S. White II 
Mrs. David E. Williams 
Mr. Morris Wolf 
Mrs. Efrem Zimbalist 
Irving Zucker Art Books 



SUBSCRIBERS (less than $25) 

Miss Katherine Adams 

Mrs. Donald Alexander 
*Mr. Larry Alten 

Mr. Walter Annenberg 

The Arnold Co., Inc. 
*Mrs. Donald A. Beadell 

Mrs. Henry A. Berwind 
*Mr. & Mrs. Charles H. Bode 
*Mr. Lee H. Boyd 

Mrs. Clarence C. Brinton 

Mr. Iso Briselli 

Mr. William H. Campbell 

Mr. Fred Carmosin 
*Miss Sophia Chitjian 
*Miss Patricia C. Cole 

Mrs. Tristram C. Colket 
*Miss Virginia L. Corbeil 
*Mrs. Gordon Crouter 

Mrs. Gribbel Corkran 
*Mr. James A. Demas 

Mrs. E. Paul duPont 
I * Alumni & Associate Alumni 



Mr. R. T. Entenmann 
*Mrs. Dorothy H. Erickson 
*Mr. Edward L. Espen 

Mr. Leonard Eveley 

Mr. Otto M. Gerson 
*Mrs. Herman L. Greiner 
*Mr. William H. Hamilton, Jr. 
*Mr. Adolph W. Heinrich 

Mr. & Mrs. Louis L Kahn 
*Mrs. Meredith Langberg 
*Miss Beatrice Lebaris 

Libros Apothecary, Inc. 

Mrs. R. Schuyler Lippincott 
*Mrs. Mary B. McKinney 

Mrs. Jesse T. Morie 

Mr. Henry S. Muskett 

Mr. Frank L. Newburger, Jr. 

Mr. W. Paul O'Neill 
*Mrs. Odell Prather 

Mrs. Alfred Putnam 

Miss Mary Bailey Reinhardt 



Mr. G. Frederick Roll 
*Mr. Henry N. Schroder, Jr. 

Mrs. Earl Scott 
*Mr. Joseph S. Simboli, Jr. 
*Mrs. Henry R. Smedley 
*Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Trippetti 

Uplight Club of No. Philadelphia 
*Mrs. Dorothy Doe Vanderford 
*Mrs. Arthur B. W. Waring 
*Dr. Edward Warwick 

Mrs. Edith S. Wasserman 

Mrs. Sol Weinberg 

Mr. Allen H. Wetter 

Mr. Charles Weyl 

Dr. Martha Wharton 

The Women's Auxiliary to 

The Cumberland County 

Medical Society 
*Mr. & Mrs. Bruce Woodhouse 



113 




One of several evening workshop classes in 
"Color and Design". 




Summer art workshop for students preparing 
to enter the College as freshmen. 



114 



I 



EVENINQ DIVISION 

An Associate Degree of Arts is now being offered for the first time to qualified candi- 
dates enrolled in PMCA's Evening Division in addition to its currently functioning 
Certificate program. Classes for degree students are extended to five (5) evenings a 
week, Monday througfi Friday from 7 to 10 p.m. over a period of thirty-two (32) 
weeks divided equally into two semesters, each of sixteen (16) weeks. 

The studio and workshop classes are planned, as heretofore, for Tuesday, Wednes- 
day and Thursday evenings; the general studies subjects — among them, art history, 
English and American literature, the social sciences and philosophy — are scheduled 
for Monday and Friday evenings. 

Areas of professional specialization in the arts leading to a Degree or Certificate 
include Advertising Design, Fashion Design, Fashion Illustration, Industrial Design, 
Interior Design and Photography. It is hoped that the number and scope of these 
professional offerings will be expanded over the years until they are equal to the day 
college program of eleven (11) departmental majors. 

For beginners as well as more advanced students, a wide variety of studio courses 
in the related arts, such as painting in oil and watercolor, drawing, sculpture, color 
and design, photography, rendering and technical illustration, ceramics and jewelry 
and silversmithing are available to all who are enrolled in the Evening Division whether 
or not they wish to take these subjects for credit. A number of general studies courses, 
namely art history and music appreciation, may also be taken by non-credit registrants. 

The complete facilities of PMCA, including the library and the excellently equipped 
workshops, are available to all students enrolled in the Evening Division. The confer- 
ring of Degrees and Certificates will, in the future, become part of the commencement 
exercises of the College. 

A separate publication on the Evening Division, listing courses, faculty, fees, dates 
and hours is available on request. Inquiries should be directed to the Office of 
Admissions, Evening Division, Philadelphia Museum College of Art, Broad and Pine 
Streets, Philadelphia 2, Pa. 



115 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL SUIVIMBR SESSION 

Many applicants for admission to the College find it difficult to roster the desired 
number of art courses as part of their high school curriculum. To provide the necessary 
pre-professional training required of all entering freshmen, the college offers a six-week 
summer session starting the first Monday after the 4th of July. The fee for the Summer 
Session is $150. 

Registrants for this summer program are limited to : 

1. High school students who have completed the eleventh grade and have decided 
that they wish to enter the field of professional art: 

2. High school graduates who are deficient in the pre-professional art training required 
for entering the college or any other professional art college : 

3. College students or college graduates and other mature applicants who lack art 
training may make application to satisfy this requirement in the Summer Session. 

For admission to the Pre-Professional Summer Session all applicants must be 
approved by the Office of Admissions and the course director. Inquiries should be 
addressed as follows : 

Office of Admissions, Pre-Professional Summer Session 

Philadelphia Museum College of Art 

Broad and Pine Streets, Philadelphia 2, Pa. 

SUMMER ART WORKSHOPS FOR TEACHERS 

I. Workshop for Art Teachers 

This three-week art workshop program is oflfered in response to the many requests 
fi'om certified art teachers working in the public and private schools. 

Workshop courses will be given in painting, drawing and two and three dimensional 
design, supplemented by lectures on art curriculum, community relations and art 
today. Registration will be limited to 25 applicants. 

Classes will meet 6 hours a day, 5 days a week for 3 weeks. The total cost will be $75, 
including registration fee, library fee, locker fee and tuition. A deposit of $25 will 
guarantee a reservation. 

Credits earned in this program will be accepted by the Pennsylvania Department 
of Public Instruction toward making a college provisional teaching certificate perma- 
nent. These credits may also be filed with other departments of public instruction 
and school districts. 

Those interested should write directly to : 

Office of Admissions, Simimer Art Workshops for Teachers 

Philadelphia Museum College of Art 

Broad and Pine Streets, Philadelphia 2, Pa. 



116 



II. Art Workshop for Elementary Teachers 

Elementary teachers are required increasingly to give added time and attention to art 
as part of the curriculum. To supplement their basic college training in art, elementary 
teachers have requested that the Museum College offer summer workshop courses in 
art which would help them teach this subject more effectively. 

Since we are always willing to cooperate in satisfying an expressed need on the part 
of teachers, we have planned a program designed to fill their needs. Registration will 
be limited to 25 applicants so that a high degree of personalized instruction will be 
possible. All aspects of art education in elementary schools will be included. 

Classes will meet 6 hours a day, 5 days a week for 3 weeks. Since we are offering 
this program entirely as a service, the registration fee, locker fee and library fee, 
together with tuition will be only $75. A deposit of $25 will guarantee a reservation. 

Credits earned in this program will be accepted by the Pennsylvania Department of 
Public Instruction toward making a college provisional teaching certificate permanent. 
These credits may also be filed with other departments of public instruction. 

For details about application write directly to: 

Office of Admissions, Art Workshop for Elementary Teachers 

Philadelphia Museum College of Art 

Broad and Pine Streets, Philadelphia 2, Pa. 



SATURDAY MORNING ART CLASSES 
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 

Running from October through April are the college's Saturday Morning Art Classes 
for Young People instructed by distinguished professional artist-teachers. Meeting on 
25 Saturdays from 9 to noon, these classes introduce the practice and appreciation of 
art to students of elementary and secondary school age. A separate publication on this 
program, listing dates and fees, is available on request from the Office of Admissions. 
Students who have attended the Young People's Art Classes for four years are 
awarded a Certificate of Merit and receive enrollment preference among applicants 
for admission to PMCA's college-level professional program. Those awarded a Certifi- 
cate of Merit at the time of their graduation from high school are also eligible for 
two (2) $400 half -tuition scholarships awarded each spring to the outstanding boy and 
girl who plan to attend PMCA full time the following fall. 



117 



PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART 

The Art Museum, the College of Art and the Fleisher Art Memorial are divisions of the corpo- 
rate entity known as the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Each division is administered by a Board 
of Governors responsible to a Board of Trustees. 



OFFICERS 

Chairman of the Board 

George D. Widener 

President 

R. Sturgis IngersoU 

Vice-President 

Sydney E. Martin 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Ex Officiis 

David H. Lawrence 

Governor of Pennsylvania 



Secretary and Treasurer 
Julius Zieget 
Assistant Secretary and 

Treasurer 
Willard P. Graham 



Richardson Dilworth 

Mayor of Philadelphia 



ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS 

Schofield Andrews R. Sturgis IngersoU 

George D. Beck Mrs. Malcolm Lloyd 

Edward G. Budd. Jr. Mrs. Stuart F. Louchheini 

Orville H. Bullitt Sydney E. Martin 

Aaron E. Carpenter James Alan Montgomery, Jr. 

George B. Clothier Arthur E. Pew, Jr. 

Charles T. Coiner Philip Price 

Jay Cooke L S. Ravdin 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

R. Sturgis IngersoU. Chairman 

Mrs. Walter H. Annenberg 

Cummins Catherwood 

George M. Cheston 

Mrs. Rodolphe de Schauensee 

Fitz Eugene Dixon, Jr. 

Henry F. DuPont 

Titus C. Geesey 

David Gwinn 

T. Edward Hanlev 



OF THE MUSEUM 
Frank T. Howard 
Walter M. Jeffords 
Morton Jenks 
Mrs. John F. Lewis 
Mrs. H. Gates Lloyd 
Graeme Lorimer 
Mrs. John H. McFadden, Jr. 
Mrs. Robert McLean 
Mrs. William R. Mercer 
Mrs. Herbert C. Morris 



Director of the Museum 
Henri Marceau 
Vice-Directors 
Carl Zigrosser 
Horace H. F. Jayne 
Dean of the College 
E. M. Benson 



James H. J. Tate 
President of City Council 
John B.Kelly 

President of Fairmount Park Commission 

Mrs. Russell Richardson 
Lessing J. Rosenwald 
Floyd T. Starr 
Mrs. J. Stogdell Stokes 
George F. Tyler, Jr. 
George D. Widener 
Mrs. John Wintersteen 
Morris Wolf 



Lessing J. Rosenwald 
Lawrence M. C. Smith 
Louis E. Stern 

Mrs. Joseph B. Townsend. Jr. 
Mrs. Carroll S. Tyson 
Mrs. Charles R. Tyson 
George D. Widener, ^.v officio 
Mrs. George D. Widener 
Mrs. John Wintersteen 
William Coxe Wright 



INVESTMENT COMMITTEE 

Floyd T. Starr, Chairman 
Donald F. Bishop 
Orville H. Bullitt 



Jay Cooke 

William Fulton Kurtz 



R. Sturgis IngersoU, ^.v officio 

Morris Wolf 

George D. Widener, e.x officio 



118 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

Charles T. Coiner. Chairman 
George D. Beck, Co-Chairman 
Paul C. Baldwin 
Mrs. Curtis Bok 
Mrs. Albert M. Greenfield 
R. Sturgis Ingersoll 
Mrs. Samuel H. Laverty 
Mrs. Malcolm Lloyd 
Domenico Mortellito 



OF THE COLLEGE OF ART 

Mrs. Russell Richardson 

Mel Richman 

Samuel R. Rosenbaum 

Mrs. Lessing J. Rosenwald 

Joanne Seybold 

Hope Skillman 

Mrs. Andrew J. Sordoni, Jr. 

Helen D. Taylor 

Walter Dorwin Teague 



PMCA ALUMNI ASSOCIATION (1958-1959) 



Louise B. Ballinger 
Beth O. Benner 
John William Brown 
Frank S. Bugbee 
Dorothy M. Ford 

Corresponding Secretary 
Maurice Freed, President 
Virginia M. Gifford 
Richard Hood 



Jack E. Hopwood 

Elaine R. Klawans 

Irene M. Laverty 

Hal Lewis 

David Marder 

George Mason, Vice-President 

Terry Oakley 



Bradbury Thompson 

Mrs. Joseph B. Townsend, Jr. 

Frank A. Vossenberg 

Dr. Michael Watter 

Mrs. Thomas Raeburn White 

George D. Widener, ex officio 

Mrs. John Wintersteen 

Howard A. Wolf 

Frederick Yost 



Jan Ozog, Treasurer 

Paul W. Partridge, Jr. 

Richard H. Reinhardt 

S. Gertrude Schell 

Marguerite Walter 

Helen S. West, Recording Secretary 

Arthur Williams 

Ann K. Zaslow 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE SAMUEL S. FLEISHER ART MEMORIAL 

George B. Clothier, Chairman Mrs. Stuart F. Louchheim Benton Spruance 

Mrs. Gideon Boericke Sydney E. Martin Harold M. Shaw 

R. Sturgis Ingersoll, ex officio Earl B. Milliette George D. Widener, ex officio 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



President 

Mrs. Joseph B. Townsend, Jr. 

Vice-Presidents 

Mrs. Dorothea Collins 

Mrs. H. Fairfax Leary, Jr. 

MEMBERS 

Mrs. J. Deaver Alexander 

Mrs. Pierce Archer 

Mrs. King Baird 

Mrs. Henry A. Berwind, Jr. 

Mrs. Richard C. Bond 

Mrs. George S. G. Cavendish 

Mrs. J. Hamilton Cheston 

Mrs. Benjamin Coates 

Mrs. Eckley B. Coxe, 3rd 

Mrs. Joseph L. Eastwick 

Mrs. F. Woodson Hancock 



Recording Secretary 
Mrs. H. Orvel Sebring 
Corresponding Secretary 
Mrs. William F. Machold 



Mrs. John Harrison, Jr. 
Mrs. Thomas Hart 
Mrs. J. Bertram Hervey 
Mrs. H. Lea Hudson 
Mrs. Joseph B. Hutchinson 
Mrs. R. Sturgis Ingersoll 
Mrs. Albert F. A. King 
Mrs. R. Schuyler Lippincott 
Mrs. Malcolm Lloyd 
Mrs. Henry Lyne 
Mrs. Staunton B. Peck 



Treasurer 

Mrs. George B. Junkin 
Assistant Treasurer 
Mrs. Bertram Lippincott 



Mrs. J. Howard Pew 

Mrs. Philip Price 

Mrs. Alfred Coxe Prime 

Mrs. William T. Tonner 

Mrs. David Van Pelt 

Mrs. Morris Wenger 

Mrs. John Wintersteen 

Mrs. Nicholas Biddle, Sustaining 

Mrs. Henry S. Jeanes, Sustaining 

Mrs. W. Logan MacCoy, Sustaining 

Mrs. Russell Duane, Honorary 



119 



PAST AND PRESENT 




Both the College and the Art Museum owe their origin to the increased interest in art and art education 
awakened by the Philadelphia Centennial of 1876, the year of the college's founding. The college 
began as a dream in the minds of a few practical visionaries who believed that the artists and the 
men of industry could talk a common language. More than 5,000 PMCA-trained artist-designers, many 
of whom have won national recognition, have helped to achieve this. 

The famous neo-classic building which the college has occupied since 1893, was designed in 1824 
by architect John Haviland. The original granite, blue marble and limestone building was augmented 
in 1852 when two wings of red brick were added by another distinguished Philadelphia architect, 
Frank Furness. 

Starting in 1953 an extensive development program of renovation and restoration, of both the 
exterior and interior of the buildings, has been in progress. Architect Norman Rice directed the exterior 
restoration retaining those features which make the college "an outstanding monument of the Greek 
Revival period." He was also responsible for transforming the center courtyard to an attractive 
campus garden. 

Designer Paul McCobb planned the renovation of the interiors bearing in mind that a college of 
art should reflect the best in contemporary design. Many areas show the unmistakable stamp of his 
functional ingenuity and good taste: the lobby, the exhibition galleries, the conference room. Each 
year significant progress is made in the improvement of the facilities, equipment and appearance of 
the studios, workshops and administrative offices. The best of the new and the old have found a way to 
live happily together. 



120 



CREDITS 

Catalog prepared at the 

Philadelphia Museum College of Art 
Designer: Raymond A. Ballinger 
Photo-Coordination: Richard Hood 

Color Cover Photograph: 
Seymour Mednick 

Student Work: Individually credited 
throughout the catalog 

Photography: Al Ignarri, Henry J. Lav- 
erty, Seymour Mednick, Sol Mednick 
Sam Miller, Charles P. Mills and Son,' 
Aurelius Renzetti, Murray Weiss 

Typography: Typographic Service Inc. 

Display text set in Craw Modern 
(foundry) and body text in Basker- 
ville linotype 

Printing: Beck Engraving Company, 
by letterpress