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Full text of "School catalog, 1947-1948"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/schoolcatal194748phil 




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THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 



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THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM 

SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

BROAD AND PINE STREETS, PHILADELPHIA 
ANNUAL CIRCULAR, 1947-1948 



The year 1947 marks the 70th Anniversary of The School of 
industrial Art. For seventy years, the Art School hos corrlcd 
on its educational work without interruption. During these 
years it has given to the Art World well (rained men end 
women who have contributed greatly to the artistic activity 
of our time. The parent of the School is the Philodelphio Mu- 
seum of Art, an institution incorporated in 1876 at the lime of 
the Centennial Exhibition for the purpose of establishing a 
Museum of Art in all its branches, with a speciol view to the 
development of the Art Industries of the State. So widespreod 
was the interest in this new adventure, that the Trustees sow 
the opportunity to extend their activities in the field of art edu- 
cation. Accordingly the Art School, then known as the Penn- 
sylvania Museum School of Industriol Art, was opened during 
the winter of 1877-1878. In this year 1947, therefore, the 
Art School is celebrating its 70th Anniversary. During its seventy 
years, the Art School has endeavored to serve the Community 
in the more practical fields of art troining as outlined in Ihii 
catalogue. Its list of graduates includes men ond women hold- 
ing responsible positions in the Art World and the School con 
be justly proud of the contribution they hove mode to the 
artistic activity of our time. 



70 



FOREWORD 

The aim of the School of Industrial Art is to provide the experience and 
sound training underlying artistic creation; to guide the student in devel- 
oping his taste, his aesthetic appreciation; to direct his creative ability 
along individual lines. The student, in being prepared to enter the various 
professions of Art, is grounded in the best traditions of the past and 
emphatically encouraged to look forward with a creative vision, embodying 
a clear expression of the art appropriate to the life of the twentieth century. 
Tradition need not be a formula any more than modernism. Both may be 
a state of mind wherein there is a great creative urge for beautiful art 
expression. The dominant idea for which the School stands, is the best in 
Design and Composition, to which is added a thorough training in Drawing 
and Painting and the study of Color and Line. Thus technical training is 
developed with the view to its being the vehicle for expressing ideas. To 
attain knowledge that may be used to some creative advantage, research 
in the great art periods of the past is conducted at the Museums and in 
the Library. The student is sent to the Museums so that he may come into 
fruitful contact with the great art of the past, as well as with the work of 
outstanding living artists. This contact is made not for the purpose of 
imitation, but for the enrichment of his imagination, for the elevation of 
his taste and for the development of his discrimination, without sacrifice of 
his personal creative individuality. Lecture courses by outstanding authori- 
ties in the various fields of creative design supplement the Museum, Library 
and classroom work, giving a cultural background, and at the same time 
stimulating the imagination and stressing the desire for serious inquiry. 




J. STOGDELL STOKES, PRESIDENT OF THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART 



EDWARD WARWICK. DEAN OF THE SCHOOL Of INDUSTRIAL ART 




FACULTY 

ART SCHOOL — BROAD AND PINE STREETS 



STAFF 

EDWARD WARWICK °EAN 

WILLARD P. GRAHAM REGISTRAR 

E. BRUCE THOMAS DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

EUGENIE M. FRYER LIBRARIAN 

HELEN STEVENSON WEST PROPERTIES 

WILLIAM V. WENCE SUPERINTENDENT 



RAYMOND A. BALLINGER 

DIRECTOR: ADVERTISING DESIGN 
EXHIBITIONS 

MARJORIE-DAW BARNETT 

ASSISTANT: PAINTING 

JOHN F. BARRETT 

DIRECTOR: WOODWORK AND JOINERY 

CHARLES K. BROWN 

ASSISTANT: CERAMICS 

JOHN BUTLER 

DIRECTOR; CERAMICS 

JANE CASTLE 

ASSISTANT: DRAWING 

DANTE CATTANI 

NATURE DRAWING 

J. FRANK COPELAND 

WATER COLOR 

VIRGINIA WIREMAN CUTE 

DIRECTOR: JEWELRY AND METALWORK 

KENNETH DAY 

INTERIOR DESIGN 

LEOKADYA DECHNICK 

ASSISTANT: COSTUME DESIGN 

HILDA ORTH DOUGHERTY 

DIRECTOR: COSTUME DESIGN 

MARION LIESAU FAHRNER 

ASSISTANT: DRAWING 

FRANK FERG 

WOODCARVING 

GRACE NORCROSS FISHER 

ADVANCED DRAWING I 
ANATOMY 



PAUL FROELICH 

PAINTING 

JOHN GEISZEL 

ILLUSTRATION: METHODS OF 
REPRODUCTION AND COMPOSITION 



ALBERT GOLD 

ASSISTANT: ILLUSTRATION 

RAYMOND GUSS 

LETTERING 

JOHN HATHAWAY 

ASSISTANT: DRAWING 

HELEN HARTEL 

DIRECTOR: PATTERN DESIGN 
SURFACE DESIGN 

CYNTHIA ILIFF KOEHLER 

COLOR AND DESIGN 

ELSIE SIRATZ McGARVEY 

FASHION DRAWING 

LOUISE C. MacMILLAN 

ENGLISH 

AZIO MARTINELLI 

GRAPHICS 

THOMAS F. MEEHAN 

ASSISTANT: PAINTING 

JAMES KIRK MERRICK 

ADVANCED DRAWING I 

ANATOMY 

ANIMAL ILLUSTRATION 

O. ERNST MERTZ, JR. 

ASSISTANT: DRAWING 

PERSPECTIVE 

DOLLIE MORGAN 

ASSISTANT: ILLUSTRATION 

DOROTHY PARKE 

COSTUME DESIGN 

EVELYN PENNEGAR 

DIRECTOR: TEACHER EDUCATION 

GERALDINE PETERSON 

ASSISTANT: JEWELRY AND METALWORK 

HENRY C. PITZ 

DIRECTOR: ILLUSTRATION AND 



WILLIAM PLUMMER 

ASSISTANT: DRAWING 

HERBERT PULLINGER 

TECHNICAL DRAWING 
GRAPHICS 

RICHARD REINHARDT 

INSTRUMENTAL DRAWING 
ELEMENTARY INDUSTRIAL ARTS 
ASSISTANT: JEWELRY AND METALWORK 



AURELIUS RENZETTI 



DOROTHY RILEY 

PERSPECTIVE 

BEN ROSE 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

FRED deP. ROTHERMEL 



ROBERT RUSHTON 



S. GERTRUDE SCHELL 



JACK SCHWARTZ 

HEALTH EDUCATION 
CLYDE SHULER 

DIRECTOR: INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 
BENTON SPRUANCE 

LECTURES: HISTORY OF ART I AND H 

LITHOGRAPHY 

MARY B. SWEENY 

DRAWING 
VINCENT TAGGART 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

ROBERT N. TAYLOR 

ASSISTANT: ADVERTISING DESIGN 

E. BRUCE THOMAS 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 

PSYCHOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY 

HISTORY 

EDWARD A, WALTON 

FURNITURE DESIGN AND 
FULL-SIZE DRAWING 
PERSPECTIVE 
WATER COLOR 

EDWARD WARWICK 



EDWARD W. WARWICK 

INSTRUMENTAL DRAWING 

REBA COHN WEINER 

ASSISTANT: ADVERTISING DESIGN 

HELEN STEVENSON WEST 

DIRECTOR: STAGE CRAFT 
LECTURE: HISTORY OF COSTUME 

JESSIE WISSLER 

DIRECTOR INTERIOR AND FURNITUBE 
DESIGN 



ELIZABETH C. WYNKOOP 

OIRtCIOH fASMlOr* 111U5T»*II0N 
DOROTHY MCENEN YODER 

NATURE DPAV/ING 



SAMUEL S. FLEISHER 
ART MEMORIAL 

719 CATHARINE STREET 

THEODORE F. READ 

DIRECIOP 

LOUISE LINDENMANN 

SUPERINttNOENI 

FILOMENA OELLARIPA 

ASSISTANT WATER COIOI 

BENJAMIN EI5ENSTAI 
WATER COLOR 

EDWARD ELLIS 

ASSISTANT NATURE OiAWINC 
ROBERT J. FLECK 

ASSISTANT PERSPECTIVE 

MAXIM G. COTTIIEB 
WILLIAM HAGUE 

ASSISTANT DRAWING 

LOUIS P. HIRSHMAN 

ASSISTANT DRAWING 

MARTIN JACKSON 

ASSISTANT: PAINTING 

EDA KASSEL 

ASSISTANT: SCUirTURE AND DtAWINC 

J. WALLACE KELLY 

SCULPTURE AND DRAWING 



HARRY ROSIN 

DB*'.V.C. 

MATTHEW E. SHARPS 

:ic*Ai-.G 
KARL SHERMAN 

DEAWINC 

BENJAMIN soiowrr 

PAINTING AND ORAWIMC 

DANIEL YODER 

ASSISTANT NATURE DRAWING 



TUITION 
AND FEES 



MATRICULATION FEE $ 10 

The Matriculation Fee is required of all accepted applicants. It is paid prior to 
the time of Registration for the applicant's First Year in the School. It is not 
returnable, and it will not be considered as a credit toward any tuition payment. 

TUITION FOR DAY SCHOOL FOR ONE YEAR $350 

For First Semester — Payable upon Registration, September 18, 19, 20, 

1947 $175 

For Second Semester — Payable on or before 1 2 noon, Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 7, 1 948 $1 75 

There will be no Registration on the opening day of School, Monday, September 
22, 1947. Tuition is payable in advance and no deduction is made for absence. 
Checks should be made payable to the Philadelphia Museum of Art. For further 
information on Application for Admission and Regulations Governing Payments, 
consult similar headings under General Information, page 23. 

ADDITIONAL FEE FOR LATE REGISTRATION $5 

Students who register for the First Semester of the Day School after 1 2 noon, 
Saturday, September 20, 1947, will be charged an additional fee of $5.00; 
also those students registering for the Second Semester after 12 noon, Saturday, 
February 7, 1948. 

FEE FOR SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Fee per half-day a week for the School Year $35 

For First Semester: Payable upon Registration, September 18, 19, 20, 

1947 $17.50 

For Second Semester: Payable on or before 1 2 noon, Saturday, Feb- 
ruary 7, 1 948 $1 7.50 

LOCKER FEE $2 

($0.50 refunded at the end of the Day School Year) 

LABORATORY FEE 

A Laboratory Fee will be charged for the following listed courses: Woodwork, 
Costume Design, Jewelry and Metalwork, Ceramics, Industrial Design, Stage 
Craft and Photography — the amount to be adjusted at the time of registration. 



DAY CLASSES 

First Semester begins Monday, September 22, 1947 and 
ends Saturday, January 31, 1948. 

Second Semester begins Monday, February 9, 1948 and 
ends Saturday, May 29, 1948. 

REGISTRATION 

For Day School: Thursday, September 18 to Saturday, 
September 20, 1 947, inclusive, from 9 to 12, and 1 to 4, 
except Saturday, 9 to 12. 



HOLIDAYS 

Thanksgiving Recess: November 27, 28, 29, inclusive. 
Christmas Recess: Monday, December 22, 1947 to Tues- 
day, January 6, 1948 inclusive. 

Midyear Recess: Monday, February 2, 1948 to Saturday, 
February 7, 1948, inclusive. 

Washington's Birthday: Monday, February 23, 1948. 
Easter Recess: Friday, March 26, 1948 to Monday, 
March 29, 1948, inclusive. 



COMMENCEMENT AND EXHIBITION 

Commencement Exercises, Monday Morning, June 7, 

1948. 

Annual Exhibition opening the evening of June 7, 

through June 12, 1948. Weel<days 1 to 5, Saturdays 

10 to 12. 



CALENDAR 

SCHOOL YEAR 1947 1948 



CURRICULUM The curriculum covers a period of four years for tiie fol- 

lowing major courses: Advertising Design, Costume Design, 

DAYSCHOOL ,. .n-r.... 

Interior and Furniture Design, Industrial Design, Illustration 

and Decoration, Fashion Illustration, Stage Craft, Pattern 
Design and Crafts. Students who have satisfactorily com- 
pleted the prescribed work of a four year course are 
awarded a diploma by the Board of Trustees, upon the 
recommendation of the Dean. 

The course in Teacher Education covers four years. Upon 
the satisfactory completion of this course, the Board of 
Trustees will award a degree of Bachelor of Applied Arts 
in Education, as authorized by the State Council of Educa- 
tion of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

The School has also arranged with the School of Fine Arts 
of the University of Pennsylvania, certain five-year co- 
ordinated courses leading to a degree of Bachelor of 
Applied Arts, as explained on page 22. 

Students without previous professional art training enter 
the Freshman Class. The curriculum of the Freshman or 
First Year Class is designed as a foundation for all major 
courses, and consists of certain subjects which an artist 
must know, regardless of the course in which he may later 
specialize. Each subject is of importance and each subject 
is required. 

10 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SUBJECTS: design 

COLOR 

DRAWING 

NATURE DRAWING 

The work for this year is the basis for all major 
courses except the Costume Design course which 
has a special Freshman roster. Specialization 
begins the second year of work. 

Drawing, Color and Design form the basis of the 
first year curriculum, and are presented with a 
view to developing clear thinking, accurate 
observation, critical judgment and good taste. 
To achieve this end in drawing, draughtsmanship 
is considered as a tool, the mastery of which 
becomes the artist's vehicle for the expression of 
ideas. 

Closely related in importance to the study of 
drawing, is the understanding of the use of color 
and the principles of design which underlie all 
expressions in art. 

By experimenting and working with created 
forms in color and design as they move on sur- 
face or in space, the student learns a means of 
expression for his ideas and emotions. 

Rendering and painting in water color is an 
important medium of expression, the study of 
which is begun in the first year. It introduces 
the student to the various methods and tech- 



WATER COLOR RENDERING 
TECHNICAL DRAWING 
LETTERING 



PERSPECTIVE 
HISTORY OF ART 

INSTRUMENTAL DRAWING 



niques of handling water color. It is o medium 
which is extensively used and is related to the 
work done in the classes in Drawing, Color and 
Design, as well as in all courses of odvonced 
study and in the field of Industrial Arl generolly. 

Technical Drawing is a first year subject dcoling 
with the drawing and arrangement of outdoor 
and figure material with future grophic ond 
illustrative work in view. 

An understanding of fine lettering is a necessary 
part of the student's basic training, especially in 
its application to Advertising Design, Illustra- 
tion and Decoration and Industriol Design, where 
lettering often becomes of major importance in 
the composition. 

The subject. Instrumental Drawing, is planned to 
secure to the student o reody focility in the use 
of drawing instruments in order thol he may 
express ideas and impressions in both historic 
and contemporary modes. It is o very important 
medium in the field of Industriol Design. 

A basic knowledge of the principles of one ond 
two point Perspective is given o$ it relotcs to 
problems in Interior Design, llluslrollon and Dec- 
oration, Advertising Design ond allied courses. 



11 



PROFESSIONAL COURSES: 

DAY SCHOOL 

Students who have successfully completed the 
work of the Freshman Year, select one of the 
following described courses in which to major 
for their remaining three years. 
Each major course is supported by progressively 
advancing classes in Drawing, Painting, Water 
Color, Design and Graphics as dictated by the 
needs of the respective major course. 



ADVERTISING DESIGN 

RAYMOND A. BALLINGER, Director: Advertising Design and Exhibitii 

REBA COHN WEINER, Advertising Design 

ROBERT N. TAYLOR, Advertising Design 

BEN ROSE, Advertising Photography 

BENTON SPRUANCE, Lithography 

AZIO MARTINELLI, Graphics 

LEMUEL B. LINE, Exhibitions 

Planned as an interpretation of the demands of 
the publicity field in relation to art, the course 
in Advertising Design prepares the student to 
cope with problems of practical design. Not 
only is the student taught the importance of 
elementary principles, of research, of experiment 
and taste, but he is also made familiar with the 
idea of advertising art as a selling force and to 
fit his art to this idea. The expression of bril- 
liance, force, and ingenuity is therefore balanced 
with salesmanship, psychology and presentation. 
The course includes problems in Layout and Typo- 
graphic Arrangement, Advertising Illustration 
and Decoration, Package and Commodity Design, 
Outdoor and Window Publicity. The use of all 
media helpful to expression in the publicity field 
is encouraged and human nature forms are con- 



tinually used in relation to regular assignments. 
Problems are presented, in the advanced classes, 
with all the specifications and requirements of the 
professional studio or agency so that the student 
may feel as little as possible the transition from 
the classroom to the professional field. Advanced 
students are encouraged to procure professional 
assignments to execute. Professional criticism of 
these assignments is given by the instruction stafF. 
By a special arrangement with the Art Directors 
Club of Philadelphia a group of eight informal 
discussions relating to phases of professional 
work is presented by members of the Club to the 
advanced classes. 

Correlated with the work in Advertising Design 
and offered to advanced students as elective sub- 
jects are Lithography, Graphics and Photography. 



12 



ILLUSTRATION AND DECORATION 



HENRY C. PITZ, Director: Illustration 

DOLLIE MORGAN, Assistant: Illustration 

ALBERT GOLD, Assistant: Illustration 

JOHN GEISEL, Methods of Reproduction, Composition 

HERBERT PULLINGER, Graphics 

BENTON 5PRUANCE, Lithography 

This course is designed to afford the serious and 
talented student the greatest possible latitude 
and opportunity for reaching a professional de- 
gree of individual expression. The student is 
developed as an individual and his imagination 
and capacity are trained in the fields of decora- 
tive, representational and abstract composition, 
and in drawing for the accepted methods of 
reproduction. 

Experimentation is encouraged. All media: oil, 
water color, pen and ink, pencil, charcoal and 
the various print processes are practiced. The 
use of the human figure and of animal forms in 
composition is stressed. 



The student is trained to observe ond to record 
from nature and to build up a fund of visual im- 
pressions in order that he may work from his 
accumulated knowledge. In the third and fourth 
years, he may specialize in the type of pictorial 
expression most suited to his ability. Professional 
men in the field of Illustration visit the School 
from time to time during the year to present class 
projects and to give criticisms of student work. 
The course is thoroughly practical, fitting the 
student to enter his chosen field. 
The senior classes will be open to graduates 
wishing to do advanced work. 



FASHION ILLUSTRATION 



ELIZABETH CHAMBERS WYNKOOP, Director: Fashion llluslr< 
ROBERT RUSHTON, Fashion Figure Drawing 

The course in Fashion Illustration is planned to 
train the student to present in pictorial form, 
original designs and accepted styles in current 
fashions and fashion accessories for Illustration 
and Advertising outlets. To illustrate fashion, the 
ability to draw superlatively well is most essen- 



tial. To this end the student is well grounded in 
the study of anatomy, drawing from life and cos- 
tume model; in imaginative figure composition 
and in methods of pictorial reproduction for 
magazines and newspapers. 



13 



COSTUME DESIGN 



HILDA ORTH DOUGHERTY, Director: Costume Design and Dressmaking 

DOROTHY PARKE, Costume Design 

LEOKADYA DECHNICK, Assistant: Costume Design 

ELSIE SIRATZ McGARVEY, Fashion Drawing 



This course is planned to meet the requirements 
of students who may wish to enter the field 
of dress designing or some other professional 
branch of the garment industry; or who desire 
to acquire sufF(cient knowledge to design, cut 
and make their personal wardrobes. 
In this course the student progresses from basic 
foundation work to advanced trade problems 
under the direction of fashion and design experts. 
The projects presented are problems of commer- 
cial value rather than hypothetical student ex- 
amples. In this manner students are trained to 
develop ability, not only in creative design, but 
also to present and execute their original ideas 
to conform skillfully with the necessary require- 
ments for a finished designer. 
Students are given trade reports, and fashion in- 
formation from the leading fashion centers. They 



are informed as to the outside forces with which 
a designer must deal. 

Emphasis is placed on the relationship between 
modern and historic costumes; professional and 
expert methods in developing all problems; and 
in the importance of fabric as applied to Costume 
Design. Detailed drawing, forecasting for ad- 
vance fashions and the importance and evolution 
of color are included. Lectures by prominent 
people in the fashion field are given at intervals 
during the year. The student acquires vital and 
intimate knowledge in related fields of designing, 
fabrics, fashion reporting, merchandising and 
buying. 

A fashion show of garments designed and made 
by the students of this course is presented in 
the Spring of each year. 



INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

CLYDE 5HULER, Director: Industrial Design 

HELEN HARTEL, Surface Design 

JOHN F. BARRETT, Woodwork and Joinery 

JOHN BUTLER, Ceramics 

VIRGINIA WIREMAN CUTE, Jewelry and Metalwork 

AURELIUS RENZETTI, Industrial Sculpture 

EDWARD A. WALTON, Furniture Design 

This course is planned to give the student expe- 
rience in all phases of work in the field of design 
for mass production. 

In the first year the regular Freshman subjects 
are given. The second year is devoted almost 
exclusively to practice in the various techniques 
required in Industrial Design. These include free- 
hand perspective drawings, finished client pres- 
entation drawing in all media, detail drawings 
for blue printing, shop work for model making 



in wood, metal, plastic, clay and plaster; study 
of materials and their characteristics, mass pro- 
duction methods, including field trips to factories, 
and analysis of design theories. 

In the third and fourth years, projects are 
given to the student by men in industry, and the 
development of the problem is based on the 
practice of Industrial Design organizations. The 
student is taken to the plant, and the problem 
is presented by the officials in charge of design. 



14 



it is then discussed in class conference, a pro- 
cedure is outlined, appropriate materials and 
processes are researched, competition is studied, 
field and consumer surveys are developed and 
analysis charts are prepared. Preliminary sketches 
are made and submitted to the plant for study 
and selection. Finished renderings, full-size de- 
tails and models are submitted. In short, a 
complete Industrial Design procedure is followed 
in each project. This personal contact with men 



in the field is very valuable and often the fin- 
ished designs are bought and used by industry. 

This course co-ordinates for specific problem 
needs with the following: 

Plastic and Sculptural Form 
Ceramic Structure, glazing and firing 
Wooden Structure and the nature of woods 
Metals, their qualities and fabrications 



INTERIOR AND FURNITURE DESIGN 

JESSIE WISSLER, Director: Interior and Furniture Design 

JOHN F. BARRETT, Woodwork and Joinory 

KENNETH DAY, Contemporary Interior Design 

FRANK FERG, Wood Carving 

EDWARD A. WALTON, Furniture Design and Full-size Drawing 

The aim of this course is to train the student in 
the art of designing, decorating and furnishing 
the interiors of homes and public buildings. Al- 
though every opportunity is taken to bring the 
student in contact with actual execution, yet, 
as in the study of architectural design, much of 
the creative work must necessarily be visualized 
on paper in the form of plans, elevations, details 
and perspective renderings. 

The development of taste, by means of lectures, 
library and museum research, visits to important 
operations, solution of creative problems and a 
constant comparison of all the arts, is considered 
the prime funclion of this course. 



Particular emphasis is placed upon functions in 
design of architectural interiors and furniture and 
in the creative use of contemporary materials, 
fabrics and color. 

The study of furniture design is supplemented by 
lectures on "Furniture — Its History and Develop- 
ment," and by research in the museums. The aim 
of this study is to develop ideas and creative 
composition in design and their practical appli- 
cation to the construction and arrangement of 
furniture. The work is further supplemented by 
classes in full-size detail drawing of furniture and 
in making actual pieces of furniture. 



STAGE CRAFT 

HELEN STEVENSON WEST, Director: Stage Croft 

The Stage Craft course is designed to give the 
student a comprehensive grasp of the fundamen- 
tal, artistic and practical values necessary for a 
theatrical designer. 

Instruction is given in designing complete pro- 
ductions; sets, costumes and properties, also the 
making and building of all necessary elements. 



Opportunity is provided to work bock-stage on 
actual performances, thus acquainting the student 
with all the aspects of a complete production. 
Lectures are given during the year on the historic 
background of the theatre, general stage pro- 
cedure, the technique of lighting, and historic 
costume. 



15 



PATTERN DESIGN 



HELEN HARTEL, Director: Pattern Design 
MARGARET C. WALTON, Interior Design ( Ev 
EDWARD A, WALTON, Interior Design lEven 
EDWARD WARWICK, History of Furniture 
HELEN STEVENSON WEST, History of Costum 



ig School Lectures) 
School Lectures) 



This course is planned for the creative student 
who desires to design printed and woven fabrics. 
Its aim is to train designers for the textile industry. 
Decorative painting techniques are developed to 
fulfil the requirements of roller printing or silk 
screening dress prints, wallpapers and deco- 
rators' fabrics. Special attention is given to 
drawing and painting of animals, figures and 
plant forms and to the use of color. Frequent 
field trips are planned in addition to work in 
the School. The study of contemporary trends 



in decoration and the history of Furniture, Cos- 
tume and Fabrics are integral parts of the course. 
Certain of the classes are held in the Phila- 
delphia Textile Institute, under the direction of 
members of its Faculty, where the student learns 
to weave ideas into actual cloth. Working with 
both the hand and jacquard looms, the student 
progresses from simple cloth construction to com- 
plex fabrics of his own design. Thus the technical 
knowledge is gained to meet the challenge of 
creating patterns to enrich daily life. 



CRAFT COURSE 

JOHN BUTLER, Director: Ceramics 

CHARLES K. BROWN, Assistant: Ceramics 

AURELIUS RENZETTI, Ceramic Sculpture and Mold Making 

JOHN F. BARRETT, Director: Woodwork and Joinery 

FRANK FERG, Wood Carving 

VIRGINIA WIREMAN CUTE, Director: Jewelry and Metalwork 

GERALDINE PETERSON, Assistant: Jewelry and Metalwork 

RICHARD REINHARDT, Assitont: Jewelry and Metalwork 

The School offers a four year Craft Course. The 
first year deals with the Freshman subjects. For 
the remaining three years a special roster may 



be arranged to include any of the following 
listed subjects. 



CERAMICS 

JOHN BUTLER, Director 

The Ceramic Department offers a four year course 

for the artist potter. Design, the study of ceramic 

materials, and workshop practice are the basic 

elements of this course. 

The first year subjects are those of the Freshman 

Course with the exception of Lettering. 

The course for the second and third years in- 



cludes: a lecture on the "History and Value of 
Materials and Processes", laboratory problems 
in glazed design, modeling and drawing, deco- 
rative media, plaster design and mold making 
and clay techniques. 

The fourth year concentrates on advanced cre- 
ative work in pottery design, ceramic sculpture 



16 



and sectional mold making: the work directed in 
conference with the instructor in charge. 

Part time students are admitted only if they 
register for a minimum of 15 hours (2 72 days). 
The exception to this is that the special student 
may register for the Lecture Course (3 hours) 
though no other work is taken. 

Special students must adhere to the days speci- 



fied on their rosters at the lime of registration 
and may not change or shift class time. Time 
lost cannot be made up by attending classes not 
on the roster. 

All students applying for enrollment in this class 
must be interviewed by the Director of the course 
before registering. 



WOODWORK AND JOINERY 

JOHN F. BARRETT, Director 



The course in Woodwork and Joinery develops 
the student not only in the technique of the bench 
but also in the practical application of design 
to the construction of furniture. 

The work of the class includes creative design, 

the copying of fine furniture and the working out 

at the bench of problems in wood and wood 

carving. 

Cabinet work instruction is planned to develop 

the ability to lay out, shape, fit, assemble, fasten 

and prepare to finish furniture; to set up and 



operate machinery necessary to do this type of 
work; to work from blue prints and to make 
rough sketches. 

Attention is given to research through a group of 
lectures on the History of Period Furniture which 
is amplified by study in the Library and at the 
Museum. 

The students registering in the course in Interior 
and Furniture Design take much of this work. For 
those who wish to specialize in the designing 
of furniture a more intensive course is offered. 



JEWELRY AND METALWORK 

VIRGINIA WIERMAN CUTE, Director 

The aim of this course is to give a practical 
workshop training in the use of tools, methods, 
processes and materials. By the application of 
design as an essential part of good workmanship, 
a gradual perfection of craftsmanship is obtained 
through the making, first of a very simple object, 
and so up to one of importance. 

Special or part-time students may register in this 
course, subject to the following regulations: They 
must adhere to their rosters and may not change 
or shift class time. Disregard of scheduled class 
hours causes confusion and an overcrowded 



studio. If extra hours are desired, the student 
should enroll for an extra half day or day. Time 
lost cannot be made up by attending classes 
not on roster. 

All students applying for enrollment in this class 
must be interviewed by the Director of the course 
before registering. This is done in order to place 
the student in the proper class, according to 
ability and experience. 

We reserve the right to limit the number in this 
class according to the amount of working space 

available to each student. 



17 



TEACHER EDUCATION 

EVELYN PENNEGAR, Director: Teacher Education 

LOUISE C. MocMILLAN, English 

DR. E BRUCE THOMAS, Sociology, Psychology and History 

RICHARD REINHARDT, Elementary Industrial Arts 

FRED deP. ROTHERMEL, Anatomy 

JACK SCHWARTZ, Health Education 

VINCENT TAGGART, Physical Education 



TEACHER EDUCATION 

DEGREE COURSE 



The departmetnt of Teacher Education prepares 
art students for responsible positions in public, 
private and professional schools. Cultural sub- 
jects and subjects in teaching theory and tech- 
niques are coordinated with the regular art work 
of the School in order to satisfy the full require- 
ments of the State Council of Education of Penn- 
sylvania. The degree of Bachelor of Applied 
Arts in Education is awarded at the successful 
completion of the four year course. The depart- 
ment is cognizant of the latest developments in 
educational theory and practice, and gives a 
thorough background of training for the in- 
creased emphasis upon art work now current in 
American schools. 

Specialization in Teacher Education begins with 
the second year of study. An applicant to the 
Teacher Education Department must be a gradu- 
ate of an accredited high school or secondary 
school, with fifteen units of work. Twelve of 
these units must have been completed in the last 
three years of school. The units of work may be 
distributed among the following subjects: English, 
Social Science, Science, Foreign Language, Math- 



ematics, Music, Art and Public Speaking. Others 
will be considered individually. 
The applicant must have a satisfactory rating in 
the work of the first year at the Philadelphia 
Museum School of Industrial Art. College Apti- 
tude Tests will be given by the Department as 
part of the requirement for admission to candi- 
dacy for the Degree Course. 

At the end of the second year in the School, 
any student whose work does not come up to 
the standards of the Department, will be advised 
to change his field of specialization. 
Graduates of the Teacher Education Course hold 
positions as instructors and supervisors of art 
work in the public schools of Philadelphia and 
numerous cities and towns in Pennsylvania and 
in other eastern states, as well as in private and 
professional schools. Many have found success 
in professional and commercial fields as well. 
A Teacher Placement Bureau, under the direction 
of Dr. E. Bruce Thomas, endeavors to place all 
students upon graduation and to be of assistance 
to former graduates. 



18 



TEACHER EDUCATION SUBJECTS 

Note on credits — In ttie Course Numbers listed below, the last number or the last number plus the 
decimal, gives the Semester Hours Credit for each subject. A Lecture course or an academic subject 
will allow one semester credit for each class hour. Laboratory subjects allow one semester credit 
for each two hour period of class work. 



First Year Course N 

Drawing '16 

Color and Design H 3 

Water Color 111-5 

Tectinical Drawing 1 1 1 .5 

Lettering 111-5 

Instrumental Drawing 111.5 

Perspective 121.5 

History of Art I Ill -121 

Noture Drowing 111.5-121.5 

Total credits — 35 semester hours 



Second Year Course Number 

English Composition 213 -223 

History of Civilization 212 -222 

Orientation to Educotion 213 

History of U. S. and Penn -222 

Elementary Industrial Arts 212 -222 

Drawing 213 -224.5 

Science (Anatomy) 213 -223 

Oil Painting 211.5-221.5 

Water Color 2 1 1.5-221.5 

Health Education 212 -222 

Interior Design 211.5 

History of Art II 211 -221 

Total credits — 46 semester hours 



Third Year Course Number 

General Psychology 313 

English Literature 313 -323 

Educational Psychology 323 

Educational Sociology 311 -321 

Principles of Education 313 

Techniques of Teaching 323 

Drawing 314.5-324.5 

Water Color 311.5-321.5 

Costume Design 311.5 

Ceramics 311. 5-321. 5 

History of Costume 311 -321 

Woodwork 31 1.5-321.5 

Practice Teoching 321.5 

Total credits — 43 semester hours 

Fourth Year Course Number 

Visual Education 412 

Child Psychology -422 

Art. Cur. in Pub. Schools -423 

Aims and Organization 413 

Generol Sociology 412 -422 

Proctice Teaching 41:5.25-42:5.25 

Life Drawing 4 1:2.25-4 2:2.25 

Graphics 411.5-421.5 

Jewelry 411.5-421.5 

History of Furniture 411 -421 

Elective three lemciter credits 

Tolol credits 40 semester hours 



19 



LECTURE COURSES 



FURNITURE: ITS HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT 

By EDWARD WARWICK 
EDWARD A. WALTON 

The furniture of the Italian Renaissance. English furniture 
from Gothic Times to the End of the 18th Century. French 
furniture: The Styles of Louis XiV, XV, XVI, and Empire. 

HISTORY OF COSTUME AND ARMOR IN WESTERN EUROPE 

By EDWARD WARWICK 

HELEN STEVENSON WEST 
Their Origin and Development. Their use in illustration and 
pageantry. Costumes of Ancient Egypt, Greece, Rome and 
Byzanthium; The Dark Ages; The Mediaeval Period in 
France and England. The Renaissance Costume in Western 
Europe as influenced by Italy, Germany and Spain. 18th 
Century Costume in France, England and America. 

HISTORY OF ART 

By BENTON SPRUANCE 

HISTORY OF ART I 

Prehistoric through the Italian Renaissance 

HISTORY OF ART II 

Western Renaissance to present day 

This course of lectures serves as an introduction to the 

History of Art 

The character of the Architecture, Sculpture and Painting 

of each great period is studied by means of lantern slides, 

photographs, Library and Museum research. 

MEMBERS OF THE CORPORATION MAY ATTEND ALL THE ABOVE 
MENTIONED LECTURES WITHOUT EXTRA FEE. ANYONE DESIRING TO 
ATTEND THESE LECTURES CAN DO SO BY BECOMING A MEMBER OF 
THE CORPORATION. 



20 



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A SECTION OF THE ANNUAL EXHIBITION OF STUDENT WORK— 1946 




SWITZERLAND 




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iO :#■ 



OUABALAJABA 
JU2ATUN 




ADVERTISING DESIGN 

JOHN KENNEDY 
RICHARD KRECKER 
BERNARD CLASSMAN 
ED SENAT 



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FASHION ILLUSTRATION 

NANCY WOLTEMATE 
RUTH JANE LAESSLE 
NANCY WOLTEMATE 






I 




vsy^ 



"^^-S. ^4J^i 



ILLUSTRATION AND DECORATION 

BERNICE LEDFORD 
JOSEPH E. KIRBY 
PETER BURCHARD 



LIFE DRAWING 

COLLY MORGAN 
DOROTHY RILEY 





PAINTING 

JOSEPH E. KIRBY 
MIRIAM GREENSTEIN 
WARREN BLAIR 





LITHOGRAPHY 

RICHARD KRECKER 
JACK FELDMAN 
JOHN KENNEDY 



WATER COLOR 

JOAN RICHARDSON 





GRAPHICS 

ANITA TRASOFF 
NORMA BERKE 





PHOTOGRAPHY 

SEYMOUR MEDNICK 

WILLIAM SCHILLING-WARREN BLAIR 

SEYMOUR MEDNICK 





FURNITURE DESIGN 

CALLIOPE G. VARLAN 



INTERIOR DESIGN 

B. LAWRENCE ROZOV 







?%♦ 



^1 



JEWELRY 

SARAH McKINNEY 
MIRIAM ZEITLIN 
FLORENCE M. LOEB 



STUDENT AT WORK AT CERAMIC WHEEL 



STAGE COSTUME 

COSTUMES DESIGNED 

AND EXECUTED BY STUDENTS 

FOR THE YELLOW JACKET" 




^ 






COSTUME DESIGN 

EVENING GOWN AND SUIT — MILDRED BARTO 




GENERAL INFORMATION 



HOURS OF ATTENDANCE 

The hours for the Day School are from 9 to 1 2 
and from 1 to 4; Saturday School, 9 to 1 2; Eve- 
ning School, Monday and Wednesday, 7 to 9:30. 
Circulars for Evening School and Saturday Morn- 
ing Junior and Adult Classes may be obtained 
upon application. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

No person under sixteen years of age will be 
considered for registration, except for the Satur- 
day Morning Junior Class. A student entering 
the First Year Class should be prepared to present 
a transcript of all High School and Preparatory 
School work, along with the School's personality 
rating. The applicant must be physically well 
and capable of taking the regular full program 
of work. 

A student entering after November 1st will be 
required to take a test in drawing. A new stu- 
dent entering the Freshman Class in the Second 
Semester, as well as a student applying for ad- 
vanced standing, will also be required to take 
a test in drawing. 

Any student applying for admission to advanced 
standing in the Teacher Education Course, lead- 



ing to a degree of Bachelor of Applied Arts in 
Education, is required to present a transcript of 
secondary school work showing 15 units of credit 
in an acceptable course. Aptitude and person- 
ality tests must be taken by the applicant prior 
to completion of registration. 

COORDINATED COURSES WITH THE UNIVERSITY 
OF PENNSYLVANIA 

The School has arranged with the University of 
Pennsylvania's School of Fine Arts certain five- 
year coordinated courses leading to a degree of 
Bachelor of Applied Arts. The courses offered 
are Industrial Design, Illustration, Interior Design, 
Fashion Illustration and Advertising Design. 
Applicants for one of the above-listed courses 
must contact both the University of Pennsyl- 
vania's School of Fine Arts and this School for 
Registration details. The Philadelphia Museum 
School of Industrial Art requires the applicant 
to submit to its Office of Admissions a transcript 
from an accredited school presenting 1 5 units 
of credit in an acceptable college preparatory 
course. Further details will be given upon 
inquiry. An applicant from a High School or 
Preparatory School, not accredited, may be 
admitted through an examination. 



22 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

The Freshman or First Year Class, is limited to 
160 students, but the School reserves the right 
to increase or decrease this limitation according 
to the amount of working space available to 
each student. 

The prospective student v/ishing to register for 
the Freshman Class, must: 

1. Apply to the School for the Application Form. 

2. Complete the first page of the Application 
Form. 

3. Send the entire Application Form to the prin- 
cipal of the Secondary School attended by 
the prospective student for completion of 
pages 3 and 4. The Principal will return the 
completed form to the Office of Admissions 
of the Philadelphia Museum School of Indus- 
trial Art for evaluation. 

If all entrance requirements are satisfactorily met, 
a Matriculation Form will be forwarded to the 
prospective student for completion and return to 
Mr. Willard P. Graham, Registrar, 320 South 
Broad Street, Philadelphia 2, Pa., accompanied 
by a Certificate of Vaccination and the Matricu- 
lation Fee of $10.00. This will reserve a place 
for the applicant in the Freshman Class. 



Any prospective student may be required to take 
an entrance drawing examination and aptitude 

test. 

A student entering the Freshman Class should be 

provided with cosh or a check for the following 

amounts: 

Tuition for First Semester $175 

Locker Fee 2 

Total $177 

This must be paid during the period of Registra- 
fion — September 18, 19, 20, 1947. There will 
be no Registration the opening day of School, 
Monday, September 22, 1947. 

REGULATIONS GOVERNING PAYMENTS 

1. Payments due the School must be made in 
cash or by check drawn to the order of the 
Philadelphia Museum of Art for the exact 
amount due. 

2. All fees are payable in advance and no 
deduction shall be made for late registration 
or absence. The Matriculation Fee is never 
returned. 

3. Students shall be considered in attendance 
until formal notice of withdrawal in writing 
is received by the Dean or the Registrar. 



23 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



4. If a refund is authorized by the Board, it 
will be calculated as follows.- 

2 weeks or less 80% 
Between 2 and 3 weeks 60% 
Between 3 and 4 weeks 40% 
Between 4 and 5 weeks 20% 

Refunds will not be considered after the 5th 
week of a semester. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Board of Public Education of the City of 
Philadelphia awards a number of scholarships 
to students who receive appointments. Gradu- 
ates of all the City High and Vocational Schools 
are eligible for these appointments, nominations 
for which are made by the Board of Education 
on the recommendation of the Principals of the 
several schools, to whom all applications should 
be addressed. 

A limited number of students who have spent 
at least one year in the School of Industrial Art 
and have done meritorious work may be awarded 
partial scholarships granted by the Board of 
Trustees of the School on application by letter 
to the Dean. All applications must be submitted 
by May 1st. The Alumni Association, upon action 
of its Board of Directors, awards a scholarship 
for outstanding work and interest in the School. 



RATING OF WORK 

A Report Card is issued to each student twice a 
year: at the end of the First Semester, and at 
the end of the School Year. 

DEGREE 

A degree of Bachelor of Applied Arts in Edu- 
cation is awarded by the Board of Trustees to 
students in the Teacher Education Course who 
have met the requirements set by the Board 
of Governors. 

DIPLOMAS 

A diploma is given to those students complet- 
ing a major course, who have met the require- 
ments set by the Board of Governors. 

CHANGES IN COURSES 

After enrollment, students are held responsibia 
for the subjects assigned on their rosters for each 
semester, and they may not drop or change a 
subject without permission of the Office of the 
Dean. Such changes should be made within two 
weeks after the beginning of the semester, and 
a notation of the change must be made on the 
student's roster. A change in a major course may 
be made only upon consultation with the Dean 
and the Director of the course. 



24 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



EXHIBITION 

An Exhibition of student work will be held in 
the School for a period of one week at the end 
of the School Year. The work selected for the 
Exhibition is not to be taken from the wall during 
the period of the Exhibition. The School reserves 
the right to select one example of the work of 
each student for a permanent collection. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Special students for part-time work are accepted 
in the following classes only: Jewelry, Ceramics 
and Woodwork and Joinery. Registration for 
these classes is limited. 

Continuation courses for graduates of the School 
may be arranged by consultation with the Dean. 

SCHOOL LIBRARY 

The School Library is specially arranged and 
equipped for purposes of research, so vital a 
requisite to the student. The books cover a wide 
range of subjects — the many phases of design, 
the history of art, subjects of education — and 
are augmented by a fine collection of plates, 
prints and photographs. 

The Library is open daily, except Saturday, 9 to 
4; Saturday, 9 to 1 2. 



COST OF MATERIALS 

The approximate cost of materials for the Fresh- 
man Year is $70. 

SUPPLY STORE 

A Supply Store is maintained by the School, 
where students may purchase all materials 
needed. The Supply Store is open from 8:30 to 9, 
12:30 to 1, and 4 to 4:15. During the Evening 
School Term, it is open Monday and Wednesday 
evenings from 6:45 until 7:15. 

TELEPHONE CALLS 

Students will not be called from the class during 
the school hours to answer the telephone. 
Telephone messages will not be delivered to 
students except in cases of emergency. 

LUNCH ROOM 

A Lunch Room on the cafeteria plon is maintained 
in the building. A simple lunch may be obtained 
at a reasonable cost between the hours of 1 2 
and 1 . 

LOSS AND DAMAGE TO PROPERTY 
The School assumes no responsibility concerning 
the property of students, whether by loss or 
damage. Students are urged to be responsible 
for their materials; also for their personal be- 
longings. 



25 



PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART 



OFFICERS 

President 

J. STOGDELL STOKES 

Vice-Presidents 

GEORGE 0. WIDENER 

SYDNEY E. MARTIN 

Secretary and Treasurer 
JULIUS ZIEGET 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Ex Officiis 

Governor of Pennsylvnaia 
JAMES H. DUFF 

Mayor of Philadelphia 
BERNARD SAMUEL 
Elected by the Members 
WILLIAM M. ELKINS 
Chairman of the Board 
FREDERIC L. BALLARD 
MRS. EDWARD BROWNING 
AARON E. CARPENTER 
CHESTER DALE 
ALBAN EAVENSON 
ALBERT EUGENE GALLATIN 
THOMAS S. GATES 



Assistant Secretary and 
Assistant Treasurer 
WILLARD P. GRAHAM 

Dean of the School 
EDWARD WARWICK 



President of Philadelphia 
City Council 

FREDERIC D. GARMAN 
President of Fairmount Park 
Commission 
JOSEPH CARSON 



CHARLES D. HART 
R. STURGIS INGERSOLL 
WALTER M. JEFFORDS 
SYDNEY E. MARTIN 
ROBERT T. McCRACKEN 
STAUNTON B. PECK 
H. WICKLIFFE ROSE 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE MUSEUM 

R. STURGIS INGERSOLL 

Chairman 

MRS. RODOLPHE OE SCHAUENSEE 

MRS. JOHN T. DORRANCE 

HENRY F DU PONT 

W. KIRKLAND DWIER 

MRS. WILLIAM M. ELKINS 

WILLIAM M. ELKINS, ex officio 



COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

WILLIAM M. ELKINS 

Choirman 

DONALD F. BISHOP 

WILLIAM FULTON KURTZ 

FRANK H. THOMAS 



MORTON JENKS 
WILLIAM H. KIRKPATRICK 
MRS. JOHN F. LEWIS 
MRS. SYDNEY E. MARTIN 
MRS. WILLIAM R. MERCER 
MRS. HERBERT C. MORRIS 



Director of the Museum 
FISKE KIMBALL 



Dean of the Textile 
RICHARD S. COX 



A. S. W. ROSENBACH 
LESSING J. ROSENWALD 
MRS. WHARTON SINKLER 
J. STOGDELL STOKES 
GEORGE D. WIDENER 
MORRIS WOLF 
CHARLTON YARNALL 



J. STOGDELL STOKES, ex of 
CARROLL S. TYSON 
MRS. CHARLES R. TYSON 
SAMUEL S. WHITE, III 
GEORGE D. WIDENER 
MRS. GEORGE D. WIDENER 
MRS. JOHN WINTERSTEEN 



FLOYD T. STARR 

J. STOGDELL STOKES, 

MORRIS WOLF 



26 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART 



Chairman 

STAUNTON B. PECK 

MRS. WILLIAM ARTHUR 

MRS. GEORGE S. G. CAVENDISH 

MRS ALAN C. COLLINS 

NICOLA D'ASCENZO 

ALBAN EAVENSON 

WILLIAM M. ELKINS, ex officio 

GUY FRY 

MRS. J. BERTRAM HERVEY 



MISS ANNA WARREN INGERSOLL 

OSCAR E. MERTZ 

EARL B. MILLIETTE 

J. STOGDELL STOKES, ex officio 

MRS. J. STOGDELL STOKES 

FRANKLIN C. WATKINS 

FREDERICK W. WEBER 

MRS. THOMAS RAEBURN WHITE 



COMMITTEE ON THE SAMUEL S. FLEISHER ART MEMORIAL 



Chairman 
STAUNTON B. PECK 

MRS. GIDEON BOERICKE 
ALBAN EAVENSON 
WILLIAM M. ELKINS, ex offIci( 
MRS. STUART F. LOUCHHEIM 



EARL B. MILLIETTE 
BENTON SPRUANCE 
J. STOGDELL STOKES, 
HENRY J. TRAINER 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN 



President 

MRS. SYDNEY E. MARTIN 

Vice-Presidents 

MISS MARGARETTA S. HINCHMAN 

MRS. HENRY S. JEANES 

MRS. RICHARD WALN MEIRS 

MRS. STAUNTON B. PECK 

Members 

MRS. LEWIS AUDENRIED 

MRS. EDGAR. WRIGHT BAIRD 

MRS. EDGAR WRIGHT BAIRD, JR. 

MRS. HENRY A. BERWIND, JR. 

MRS. MONCURE BIDDLE 

MRS. NICHOLAS BIDDLE 

MRS. GEORGE S. G. CAVENDISH 

MRS. J. HAMILTON CHESTON 

MRS. RUSSELL DUANE 

MRS. CHARLES FRANCIS GRIFFITH 

MRS. EDWARD BROWNING 
Honorary Member 



Recording Secretary 

MRS. F. WOODSON HANCOCK 

Corresponding Secretary 
MRS H. LEA HUDSON 

Treasurer 

MRS. HENRY S. JEANES 

MRS. JOHN HARRISON, JR. 
MRS. THOMAS HART 
MRS. J. BERTRAM HERVEY 
MRS. JOSEPH B. HUTCHINSON 
MRS. WALTER C. JANNEY 
MRS. JOHN STORY JENKS 
MRS. GEORGE B. JUNKIN 
MRS. BERTRAM LIPPINCOTT 
MRS. RICHARD W. LLOYD 



MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 



W. LOGAN MocCOY 
J. HOWARD PEW 
HENRY N. PLAIT 
ALFRED COXE PRIME 
BENJAMIN RUSH, JR. 
C. SHILLARD-SMITH 
WILLIAM T. TONNER 
WILLIAM P. WEAR 
JOHN WINTERSTEEN 
C. STEWART WURTS 



27 



CREDITS 

CATALOG DESIGNED AT THE PHILADELPHIA MUSELJM SCHOOL 
OF INDUSTRIAL ART 

ALL ART WORK REPRODUCED IS FROM STUDENT ORIGINALS 

DESIGN AND LAYOUT RAYMOND A. BALLINGER 

COVER— SOLARIZED PHOTOGRAPH JEROME KAPLAN 

PHOTOGRAPHS AURELIUS RENZETTI 

SEYMOUR MEDNICK 
PHOTO-ILLUSTRATORS 

PRINTED AT THE AMERICAN PRESS, INC. 



ADVERTISING DESIGN 12 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSON 23 

ATTENDANCE 22 

CALENDAR 9 

CERAMICS 16 

COMMITTEES 26 

COSTUME DESIGN 13 

DESIGN 11 

DIPLOMAS 24 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 22 

FASHION ILLUSTRATION 13 

FEES 8 

FOREWORD 4 

INTERIOR AND FURNITURE DESIGN 15 

HISTORICAL SKETCH 3 

HOURS FOR ATTENDANCE 22 

ILLUSTRATION AND DECORATION 13 

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 14 

JEWELRY AND METAL WORK 17 

LECTURE COURSES 20 

LIBRARY 25 

LUNCH ROOM 25 

OFFICERS 26 

FRESHMAN YEAR 11 

SCHOLARSHIPS 24 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 25 

STAFF 6 

STAGE CRAFT 15 

SUPPLY STORE 25 

TEACHER EDUCATION 18 

WOODWORK AND JOINERY 17 



CONTENTS