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Full text of "School catalog, 1891-1892"



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

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http://www.archive.org/details/schoolcatalog 1 891 92penn 






THE 



Pennsylvania Museum 



AND 



School of Industrial Art, 

PHILADELPHIA. 



Circular 



OF THE 



Committee on Instruction 

1891-92. 



CLASS-ROOMS: 

1336 Spring Garden Street, 

philadelphia. 

I89I. 




6 
Pi 

o 

C 



THE 

Pennsylvania Museum 



AND 



School of Industrial Art, 

PHILADELPHIA. 



Circular 



OF THE 



Committee on Instmction 

1891-92. 



CLASS-ROOMS: 

1336 Spring Garden Street, 
philadelphia. 

I89I. 



Press of 

GLOBE PRINTING HOUSE, 

112 North Twelfth St., 

Philadelphia. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Officers 4 

Committees . . . . 5 

Historical Sketch 9. 

Location 15 

Tlie ^Associate Committee of Women 15. 

ART SCHOOL. 

Faculty 6 

lO Courses of Stud}-, General Statement 20 

1 — Teachers' Course 21 

0> Course in Wood-Car\-ing ... .21 

' Course in Stained-Glass Work , . 21 

Graduate Course 20 

Preparator}^ Course 21 

<X> Lectures ... 22 



fciC 



-it: 



^ Lists of Exercises axd Studies. 

^ Industrial Drawing 23 

c: Decorative Painting and Applied Design 25 

Decorative Sculpture 27 

c: Advanced Drawing Class : 29 

Teachers' Class 30 

_ Carv'ing Class . . . 30 

as Class in Stained-Glass Work 31 

1^ Certificates and Diplomas ji 

Fees 32 

•3 Prizes 32 

H-TEXTILE SCHOOL. 

Faculty 7 

Courses of Study, General Statement s^, 

Special Course in Dyeing 34 

Lectures 34 

Subjects of Study. 

Designing and Weaving — First Year 35 

" " " — Second Year 27 

" •' " — Third Year 40 

Dyeing 41 

Certificates and Diplomas 42 

Fees 42 

Deposits . . . 42 

Prizes 42 

Donations 43 

School Year 16 

Hours of Study . 16 

Requirements of Admission 17 

Scholarships 17 

Examinations 18 

Materials for Study 17 

Board 18 

Evening Classes 16 

Discipline - • 18 

Employment for Graduates 19 

Roll of Students 45 



OFFICERS FOR 1891. 



President, 

WILLIAM PLATT PEPPER. 

Vice-Presidents, 

THEODORE C. SEARCH. CRAWFORD ARNOLD. 

Treasurer, Secretary and Curator, 

STUART WOOD. DALTON DORR. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 
ex-officiis. 

The Governor of the State. The Mayor of the City. 

by appointment. 

Thomas Cochran, Appointed by the State Senate. 

Alexander Crow, Appointed by the House of Representatives. 

Theodore C. Search, Appointed by Select Council. 

F. William Wolff, Appointed by Common Council. 

.8. G. Thompson, Appointed by the Commissioners of Fairmount Park. 

elected by the members. 

To serve for three years : 

Chas. D. Clark, Crawford Arnold, 

William Wood, T. P. Chandler, Jr.i 

To serve for two years : 

John Struthers, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, Thomas Hockley. 

To serve for one year: 

Henry C. Gibson, Chas. E. Dana, 

Stuart Wood, Isaac Norris, M.D. 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN TO THE BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES. 



Chairman, 

MRS. E. D. GILLESPIE. 



Secretary, 

MRS. FREDERIC R. SHELTON. 



Treasurer, 

MRS. CRAWFORD ARNOLD. 



Mrs. Matthew Baird, 
Mrs. C. C. Bartol, 
Mrs. C. Howard Clark, 
Miss Colahan, 
Miss Mary Cohex. 
Mrs. Robert R. Deardex, 
Mrs. E. E. Denniston, 
Mrs. Wm. H. Eisenbrey, 
Miss Elizabeth Gratz, 
Mrs. Johx Harrison, 
Mrs. Joseph Harrison, 
Mrs. G. Craige Hebertox, 



Mrs. Thomas Hockley, 
Mrs. Chas. B. Keen, 
Miss Magee, 
Mrs. DeCourcy May, 
Miss McMurtrie, 
Mrs. Byron P. Moulton, 
Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 
Mrs. John H. Saunders, 
Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith, 
Mrs. W. Hinckle Smith, 
Mrs. Wm. Weightman, Jr., 
Mrs. Howard Wood, 



Miss Zell. 

Honorary Members. 

Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore, Mrs. H. C. Townsend, 

Mrs. Matthew Simpson, Mrs. Caspar Wister, 

Mrs. Seth B. Stitt, Mrs. Robert K. Wright. 



COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTION. 

Theodore C. Search, Chairman, Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, 
Chas. D. Clark, Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 

Chas. E. Dana, Mrs. F. R. Shelton, 

William Wood, Mrs. Howard Wood, 

Thomas Hockley, Mrs. George K. Crozer, 

Stuart Wood, Mrs. Byron P. Moulton. 



COMMITTEE ON MUSEUM. 



John Struthers, Chairman, 
Dalton Dorr, Curator, 
Crawford Arnold, 
Isaac Norris, M.D., 
Chas. D. Clark, 



Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, 
Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith, 
Mrs. Frederic R. Shelton, 
Mrs. G. Craige Heberton, 
Mrs. Wm. Weightman, Jr., 



Mrs. Joseph Harrison. 



5 



FACULTY OF ART SCHOOL. 



Principal, 

L. W. Miller, 

From Mass. Normal Art School and School of the Boston Museum 

of Fine Arts. 

Vice-Principal, 

Howard F. Stratton, 

Graduate (1882) of The Pennsylvania Museum and School 

of Industrial Art. 

Professor of Sculpture, 

John J. Boyle, 
Pupil of Dumont, Paris. 

Lecturer on 'Water-Color Painting, 

Chas. E. Dana, 
Pupil' of Luminals. 

Instructor in Applied Design, 

Myrtle D. Goodwin, 
From the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. 

Instructor in Applied Ijesign — Evening Class, 

Paul Rosenzwey, 
From I'Ecole des Arts et Metiers, Paris. 

Instructors in Drawing Classes, 

Paul Lachenmeyer, 

Graduate (1891) Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. 

Helen A. Fox. 

Instructor in Modeling, 

Mary Ellen Slater, 
Graduate (1889) Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. 

Instructor in Carving, 

Amory C. Simons. 

Instructor in Stained-Glass 'Work, 

Maria L. Holt. 

Secretary, 

Leonora J. C. Boeck. 



FACULTY OF TEXTILE SCHOOL. 



Head Master, 

E. W. France, 

Graduate of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 

Industrial Art. 

Formerly of Conshohocken Woolen Mills. 

Professor of Textile Design, and Lecturer on Raw Materials, 
E. A. POSSELT, 

Graduate of the Advanced Weaving School, Reichenberg, Austria : 

Author of Technology of Textile Design ; The Jac- 

QUARD Machine: The Structure of Yarns, 

Fibres and Fabrics, etc. 

Instructor in Theoretical and Practical CI sses, 

Bradley C. Algeo, 
From the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. 

Instructor in Dyeing, 

Conyers B. Finckel, 

Graduate of the Pennsylvania Museum and School of 

Industrial Art. 

Instructor in Applied Design, 

Myrtle D. Goodwin, 
From the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. 

Instructor in Applied Design— Evening Class, 

Paul Rosenzwey, 

From L'Ecole des Arts et Metiers, Paris ; Designer of 17 years' 

experience with Eddystone Manufacturing Co. 

7 




Design by Florence C. Fetherston, a Pupil in the School. 



THE PENNSYLVANIA MUSEUM 

AND 

SCHOOL OF INDUSTRIAL ART. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

The Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art 
was incorporated on the twenty-sixth day of February, 1876, 
for the purpose, as stated in its charter, of establishing "for 
the State of Pennsylvania, in the City of Philadelphia, a Mu- 
seum of Art in all its branches and technical applications and 
with a special view to the development of the Art Industries 
of the State, to provide instruction in Drawing, Painting, 
Modeling, Designing, etc., through practical schools, special 
libraries, lectures and otherwise." 

The purpose of the institution as thus defined is dis- 
tinctly industrial. The collections at Memorial Hall, where the 
Museum is located, embrace examples of art work of every 
description ; but as the city already possessed, in the Penn- 
sylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, an institution devoted to 
the advancement of the Fine Arts, it was determined by the 
founders to make the collections of the Pennsylvania Mu- 



seum as largely as possible illustrative of the application of 
Art to industry, and the instruction in the School has con- 
stant reference to a similar purpose. 

The institution owes its origin to the increased interest 
in Art and Art Education aw?.kened by the Centennial Ex- 
hibition of 1876. 

Pending the incorporation of the institution, a fund of 
^25,000 was subscribed with which to make purchases 
at the Exhibition. In the selection of objects, the trus- 
tees had the benefit of the advice of the foreign commis- 
sioners to the Exhibition, and, in several instances, the insti- 
tution was the recipient of valuable gifts from individual ex- 
hibitors. Around the nucleus thus formed the Museum has 
grown by purchase, gift and bequest to its present proportions, 
numbering in its collections upward of ten thousand objects. 
The major part of the collection of the products and man- 
ufactures of British India, shown at the Centennial Exhibi- 
tion, was presented to the Museum by the British Government 
at the close of that Exhibition. It occupies the whole of the 
west corridor at Memorial Hall. 

The Moore memorial collection of objects of Art, pre- 
sented to the Museum by Mrs. Bloomfield-Moore as a memorial 
of her late husband, occupies the entire east corridor. It 
contains exquisite examples of Lace, Embroidery, Fans, 
Jewelry, Pottery and Porcelain, Metal Work, Enamels, Carved 
Work in Ivory and in Wood, Tapestries and Pictures. 

The Museum also possesses several smaller collections, 
sufficiently complete in themselves to be regarded as fairly 
representative of the departments to which they belong. Of 
these the Caspar Clark collection of Persian Metal Work, the 
Vaux collection of Etruscan Pottery, and the Fulgence collec- 
tion of Textiles are perhaps the most important. 

In addition to its actual possessions the Museum is con- 
stantly receiving accessions in the form of loans of a more or 
less permanent character, by which the element of freshness 
is secured, and popular interest in the collections continually 
renewed. 

The purpose of the School is to furnish such instruction 
in Drawing, Painting, Modeling, Carving and Designing as is 
required by designers, superintendents and workmen in the 

10 



various Constructive and Decorative Arts, and to serve as a 
Training School for teachers of these branches. 

It was opened during the winter of 1877-78 in temporary 
rooms in Industrial Art Hall, at Broad and Vine Streets. It 
was afterward removed to the rooms of the Franklin Insti- 
tute, at 15 South Seventh Street, and again in 1880 to the 
building 1709 Chestnut Street, where it remained until its re- 
moval, in 1884, to the building which it occupies at present. 
The classes were very small for several years, but the attend- 
ance has increased rapidly since 1884. 

Up to the time of this last removal the work of the classes 
-was confined to the general courses in Drawing, Painting and 
Modeling, with constant regard to the needs of the indus- 
tries, it is true, but without attempting to provide instruction 
in any of the occupations themselves, which it was hoped 
would be directly benefited by the training which the students 
received here. 

The need of providing facilities for such technical in- 
struction, however, became apparent very early in the history 
of the School, as it was seen that only by this means could 
the proper direction be given to such purely artistic training 
as the School had to offer, by familiarizing the students with 
the processes by which any industrial application of design 
would have to be made. 

The Committee desires to call especial attention to the 
work accomplished by the Department of Weaving and 
Textile Design. 

Establishment of the Department of Weaving and 
Textile Design. 

The Philadelphia Association of Textile Manufacturers 
was formed in 1882, and among the objects for which it was 
specially created was the fostering of technical education. 
Its members represented the progressive element of the 
manufacturing community of Philadelphia and vicinity. 
These gentlemen were fully aware of the progress of techni- 
cal schools for the Textile Arts in Germany, France and 
England, and were persuaded that the United States could 
not hope to maintain the best market for her products unless 
those products combined the highest skill in manufacture and 

II 



the best taste in design. At that time no thorough school 
existed in this country, and it was necessary to begin at the 
foundation of the work, without previous knowledge of the 
exact methods to be adopted, or the means to be employed to 
reach the desired end. 

It was apparent that considerable money must be raised 
to properly lay the foundation for a successful school. The 
sum of $50,000 was fixed upon as the minimum amount with 
which to inaugurate the work, and the Association endeavored 
to obtain this sum from the manufacturers of Philadelphia by 
subscription ; but, as with every public-spirited enterprise, a 
few leading men and firms bore the burden of the work, and 
the subscriptions finally closed at $35,000, all of which was 
subscribed with the understanding that no call should be 
made unless the entire $50,000 was secured. The sum was 
never reached, and the whole enterprise seemed likely to be 
abandoned. 

At this juncture Mr. Theodore C. Search, who had been 
actively engaged in the effort to raise the $50,000, despairing 
of success in that direction, concluded to assume the re- 
sponsibility of attempting the work without the aid of any 
subscriptions. 

The project was made known to the Trustees of The 
Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, who very 
kindly placed rooms in their school building at his disposal, 
without charge. Teachers were engaged, two Jacquard looms 
were ordered, and a night class of enthusiastic students or- 
ganized in 1883. The outfit was necessarily limited, but was 
increased without delay, as experience showed the needs to 
be supplied. Only men of acknowledged skill were engaged 
as teachers, a fact which greatly assisted the projectors of the 
enterprise, and won for the School the confidence of the 
community. 

After the School had been in operation for a few weeks, 
the fact of its actual existence became known to Mr. William 
Arrott and Mr. Thomas Dolan, who specially requested that 
they might divide the burden of its expenses with Mr. Search, 
and at once joined in the work. Matters thus rested while 
the School made most active progress. 

Some time afterward at a meeting of the Philadelphia Tex- 

12 



tile Association the School project was again discussed, and the 
Association decided that it would be wise to sustain the en- 
terprise, and recommended the subscribers to the ^50,000 
fund to turn over the amount of their subscriptions to its use. 
Nearly $30,000 out of the original $35,000 was trans- 
ferred in this way ; twenty-five per cent, of which was 
authorized to be paid in for the use of the School in cash. 
These subscribers were as follows : 



Thomas Dolan & Co. . l5,ooo 00 
John & James Dobson . . 5,000 00 
William Wood & Co 2,500 00 

William Arrott 2,000 00 

John Yewdall 2,000 00 



John Bromley & Son . . |i,ooo 00 
Thomas L. Leedom . . . 1,000 00 
James Doak, Jr., & Co. . 500 co 
Charles Spencer & Co. 500 co 

Andreas Hartel ... 250 00 



Fiss, Banes, Erben & Co 2,000 00 ; S. B. M. Fleisher . . . ^ 250 00 

Conyers, Button & Co . . 1,500 go j Grundy Bros. & Campion 250 00 

George & James Bromley 1,000 00 ] H. W. Butterworth& Sons 250 00 

Alexander Crow & Son. 1,000 00 | Stead & Miller 100 00 

James Smith & Co. . . . 1,000 00 



M. A. Furbush & Son . . 1,000 00 | |28,ioo 00 

The following season. President Wm. Piatt Pepper, of 
The Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, under- 
took to raise funds for the erection of a building for the use 
of the School. He succeeded, within a very few days, in 
securing the amount needed ; the building was completed in 
time for the new school year. 

The leading manufacturers of machinery responded very 
generously to an appeal to supply the institution with the very 
best machinery ; and the evening class of 1884-85 was pro- 
gressive and enthusiastic, acknowledging the great benefit 
they derived from their connection with the School. 

In September, 1885, the instructors were regularly en- 
gaged to give their whole time to the School, and a day class 
was organized, specially to prepare young men for the higher 
departments of the work, by means of a regular course of 
instruction, extending over a period of three years. 

The season of 1885-86 was prosperous, and proved con- 
clusively that such a school must not only be a great addition 
to a manufacturing community like Philadelphia, but an ele- 
ment of strength to the whole country. Friends of the enter- 
prise visited the best schools of Europe in the interest of this 
institution, and whenever methods were found superior to our 

13 



own, they were unhesitatingly put into practice, until to-day 
the management feel that they are entirely ready to supply 
the want that has so long been pressing on the country. 

It is no longer incumbent upon anyone to visit Europe 
for technical instruction in -Textile Art, as this School is fully 
prepared to supply technical information on all subjects con- 
nected therewith: Designing, Weaving, Dyeing, Cleansing of 
raw materials, all being provided for, as shown by the 
curriculum. 

Indeed in several important respects the superiority of 
the School over any of its European rivals is acknowledged. 
These advantages are of two kinds. First, the association of 
the technical instruction with artistic culture is more direct 
and complete than in any European school whose mission is 
so distinctly technical as this. Pupils of the Pennsylvania 
School are provided with opportunities for carrying their 
individual work to completion in a much more liberal manner 
than is allowed in the European schools, where the rule is to 
arrange the work of the weaving rooms ; to grade the work 
required by the Course ; to adjust all machinery ; to make all 
warps, etc., at the beginning of the year, a few designs only 
being selected from among all those produced by pupils, to be 
executed during the year, the students passing from one loom 
to another, assisting with the weaving and other technical pro- 
cesses involved, at first in those that are simple, and then in 
the more complicated, but still without any work being con- 
secutive in the case of any individual student, and without 
any direct relation between the work executed and his own 
design. In the Pennsylvania School, on the other hand, the 
individual student has an opportunity to work out his own 
designs in the fabric. Every step in the process of production, 
from the first sketch to the finished product, is his own work. 
The advantages of this method are not only apparent to any 
intelligent observer, but ample testimony to its efficiency has 
been furnished by pupils who have attended some of the best 
European schools before coming here, and who cheerfully 
testify to the superiority of the Pennsylvania School. 



14 



LOCATION. 

The School is located in the building, 1336 Spring Gar- 
den Street, which has been purchased by the Trustees with 
funds provided for this purpose by the Associate Committee 
of Women, and adapted to the needs of the classes in the 
most thorough manner. Ample provision has been made for 
the comfort of students, and every convenience furnished that 
will facilitate the work of the classes. 

The work in each department or class is carried on in a 
room by itself, so that the annoyances and interruptions in- 
separable from the assembling of large classes and different 
grades of work in a common room are avoided. 

The building contains a Lecture-Room ; a Library and 
Reading-Room ; a room for Elementary Work from casts 
and models ; a gallery for Advanced Work from the cast ; 
one for the Life Class ; a room for the Grinding and Prepara- 
tion of Colors ; one for the Work in Applied Design ; one for 
Modeling ; one for Wood Carving ; and a suite of rooms for 
the Class in Weaving and Textile Design. The Chemical 
Laboratory and Dye House are located at 1346 and 1348 
Spring Garden Street. 

The Associate Committee of "Women. 

The School is under the immediate supervision, and re- 
ceives the active support, of the Associate Committee of 
Women, who act conjointly with the Board of Trustees in 
managing the affairs of the Pennsylvania Museum and School 
of Industrial Art. 

This Committee now numbers thirty women, each and 
all zealously active in promoting the best interests of the cor- 
poration, with especial reference to the creation and support 
of such an Industrial School in connection therewith as those 
most competent to judge of the educational needs of the city 
have long desired to see established here. 

The Committee was organized in 1883, and it has (besides 
greatly increasing the list of members, by whose subscrip- 
tions the Institution is largely supported) paid over since 
that time to the Trustees $27,400 for carrying on the work 
of the School and advancing the interests of the whole In- 
stitution. 

15 




Design for Wall Paper (border) 

(Wilson & Fenimore, First Prize, 1890), 

by Mary S. Sword. 



School Year. 

The next School year of thirty-six weeks begins on Thurs- 
day, October ist, 1891, and ends June 13th, 1892. The 
evening classes open on Monday, October 5th, and close April 
3d. There is a vacation of one week at Christmas. The 
School is also closed on legal holidays and on the Friday fol- 
lowing Thanksgiving Day. 

Hours of Study — Day Classes. 

The hours of study for the day classes are from nine 
o'clock to one, and from two to four every day in the week 
except Saturday. 

Evening Classes. 

Evening classes in all the branches are in session from 
October until April, on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and 
Fridays, from half-past seven to half-past nine o'clock. Thurs- 
day evening in each week is devoted to lectures. 



16 



Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission are expected to be as proficient 
in the common English branches as the completion of the 
Grammar School Course would imply. It is also desired that 
pupils should be fairly well grounded in a knowledge of free- 
hand drawing; but proficiency in this branch is not required as 
a condition for admission, and pupils who are deficient in this 
respect will be given an opportunity, and furnished With every 
facility, for making up such deficiency. Students in the Tex- 
tile School must also pass an examination in Arithmetic 
(through percentage). 

Scholarships. 

In consideration of an annual appropriation to the School 
by the Legislature of Pennsylvania, each county in the State 
is entitled to one free scholarship in any department of the 
School for the full course of three years. These appoint- 
ments are made by the Governor of the State, usually on the 
recommendation of the County Superintendent of Schools. 

Five free scholarships are also competed for annually by 
pupils from the advanced classes of the grammar schools of 
the city of Philadelphia. Application for admission to this 
competition should be made through the Principal of the 
School from which the applicant comes to the Board of 
Public Education, 713 Filbert Street. 

Materials for Study. 

Instruments and materials for study must be provided by 
the students. All articles required in any class are for sale at 
the School at less than retail prices, and students are expected 
to purchase them here. The cost is usually about $12.00 per 
year for a day student, and $5.00 per year for an evening 
student. 

Each student is provided with a locker, in which drawing- 
boards and materials are to be placed before leaving the 
class-room. On receiving the key the student must deposit 
fifty cents, which, when the key is returned, will be refunded, 
provided the return is made within one month after the date 
at which the student's term expires ; otherwise the deposit is 
forfeited. 

17 



Students will be furnished with facilities for working at the 
Museum in Memorial Hall when this is desired. 

Board. 

Good board may be obtained in the vicinity of the School 
for from $4.50 a week upward. A list of desirable boarding- 
houses is kept at the School, and will be furnished to the stu- 
deat on application. 

Examinations. 

Examinations are held semi-annually, in January and 
May, on the results of which, taken in connection with the 
quality of the work done in the class-room and regularity of 
attendance, the standing of students is made to depend. 

Monthly reports of attendance and standing are made to 
parents and guardians, and students whose progress is shown 
by these reports to be unsatisfactory for three months in 
succession will not be allowed to continue their studies in the 
School. 

Discipline. ' 

The discipline of the School is made as simple as possible, 
and students are made to feel that as the requirements are 
definitely stated, and the instruction in each branch given at 
well-known hours, the progress of each is substantially in his 
own hands. 

All students, however, are expected to be prompt and 
regular in their attendance on all the exercises and lectures 
of their Course, and irregularity in this respect will be regarded 
as sufificient reason for dismissal. 

Polite and orderly conduct is also insisted upon at all 
times, and any damage to School property must be made 
good by the student causing it. No book, chart or other 
educational appliance will be allowed to leave the building 
under any circumstances. 

All work must be put away before the student leaves the 
building. Lost articles may be inquired for of the janitor. 
Students are requested to give prompt notice of change of 
address. 

Conversation should be avoided during heurs of study, 
and loud talking or laughing under any circumstances is pro- 

18 



hibited. Pupils must not wander through the rooms or lounge 
about the seats of other pupils. They are appealed to for the 
preservation of order and neatness in the class-rooms. 

Employment for Graduates. 

The School doesnot undertake to find places for graduates, 
but applications for teachers and designers are constantly being 
received by the Principal, and students desiring employment 
are requested to notify him to that effect. 

No pupil, who has not spent at least one year in the School, 
will be recommended for a position either as teacher or designer. 



19 




Water Cart from the India Collection in the Museum at Memorial Hall, from a Pen- 
and-ink Drawing by Vernon H. Bailey, a Pupil in the School. 



ART SCHOOL 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

The general course of study embraces Drawing and 
Painting in water colors, from models, casts, draperies and 
still life ; Lettering ; Plane and Descriptive Geometry ; Pro- 
jections, with their application to machine construction and 
to cabinet work and carpentry ; Shadows, Perspective, Mod- 
eling and Casting; Practice in the use of Color, with special 
reference to the needs of designers — especially in textiles ; 
Historical Ornament, study from the Living Model and Ori- 
ginal Design. The Instrumental Drawing is taught by means 
of class lessons or lectures, and lectures are also given on An- 
atomy and Historical Ornament, upon which examinations 
for certificates are based. 

Graduate Course. 

Graduates from the general course may continue in the 
School for advanced study without payment of fees, on con- 
dition that they devote a certain amount of time to teaching 
in the School, or to other work, for the promotion of the 
interests of the Institution. 

20 



Teachers' Course. 

This course is arranged for the benefit of those who, 
while unable to devote as much time to the work of this 
School as would be required to complete the regular course 
covered by the certificate, are yet desirous of properly qual- 
ifying themselves, either to teach drawing in elementary 
schools or to make a good use of the blackboard in teaching 
other branches. 

Especial attention is paid to this last consideration, and 
classes in blackboard work, under the personal instruction of 
the Principal, meet every Tuesday afternoon for just such 
practice as is particularly desired by kindergartners and pri- 
mary school-teachers. 

Course in Wood Carving. 

Pupils who do not wish to take the full course in Model- 
ing and Carving, can take Carving alone as a Special Course. 
The work is thoroughly practical in its character and is in- 
tended to familiarize the pupil with the methods of the shop 
and to enable him to occupy at once a position as a workman 
considerably in advance of any which he could expect to fill 
without this preliminary training. 

Course in Stained-Glass "Work. 

This course has been established to furnish pupils an op- 
portunity to acquire a knowledge of the beautiful art of work- 
ing in colored glass amid associations which alone can give to 
its practice that character to which it is certainly entitled 
among the crafits. It is taught not merely as a trade, but as 
an art, and the student who learns to do not one branch 
alone, as is usually the case, but all branches, also learns to 
produce beautiful original effects, as well as to do accurate 
and well-finished work. 

Preparatory Course. 

A preparatory course is arranged for pupils who are not 
sufficiently advanced in their studies to enter the Regular 
Course. 

21 



Class for Teachers in Public and Other Schools. 

Special arrangements are made for the accommodation of 
teachers, as follows : In addition to the facilities afforded by 
the evening classes, persons employed as teachers, in either 
public or private schools, may attend every Tuesday and 
Thursday afternoon, from 2 o'clock until 4, without ex- 
tra charge. - Particular attention is paid to blackboard work, 
especially to such forms of it as are needed in kindergarten 
and primary schools ; and every Tuesday afternoon is devoted 
to this kind of practice, under the personal instruction of 
the Principal. 

Lectures. 

Lectures on the Anatomy of the Human and of Animal 
Form, as applied to Decorative Art, on Harmony of Color, 
Water-Color Painting and related subjects are given through- 
out the year. 

Class instruction in the Geometrical branches is given 
every Wednesday morning, and lectures on Original Design, 
on Art History and on Perspective are given by the Princi- 
pal every Monday morning from 11 o'clock to half -past 12, 
and every Thursday evening. All first-year students are ex- 
pected to attend these lectures. 

Lectures on Color Harmony and on Anatomy are given 
Fridays from 12 to i o'clock. Mr. Dana's lectures on Water- 
Color Painting are given every other Friday from half past 9 
until 12. 



22 




Design for Oil-Cloth Rug (Committee's Prize, 1890), by Cora Warren. 



SUBJECTS OF STUDY. 



INDUSTRIAL DRAWING. 



CLASS A. 



EXERCISES. 



Freehand Drawing. 

(i) Drawing of Ornament from casts in charcoal, pen-and- 
ink and crayon. 

(2) Model drawing in charcoal, pen-and-ink and crayon. 

(3) Drawing of Pieces of Furniture, Chairs, Tables, etc. 

23 



(4) Studies of Drapery in crayon, pen-and-ink, wash, etc. 

(5) " " Objects of Industrial Art from the Museum. 
' 6 ) " " Flowers and Foliage from Nature, in charcoal, 

pen-and-ink and water-color. 
(/) Lettering. 

(8) Analysis of Plants for the purposes of Design. 

(9) Original Designs from natural forms. 

',10) Studies in Historic Ornament, especially the designing, 
in the different styles, of work which can be executed in 
the School ; Architectural Sculpture, Furniture, Cabinet 
Work, Pottery, Glass, etc 

(11) Design applied to Surface Decoration, flat or in relief. 

Instrumental Drawing. 

(12) Exercises with instruments (construction of plane figures 
line shading, etc.). 

(13) Plans and elevations of buildings and machinery. 

(14) Descriptive Geometry (intersections and developments, 
shades and shadows). 

(15) Perspective. 

Examinations. 

(i ) Plane Geometrical Drawing. 

(2) Projections. 

(3) Machine Drawing. 

(4) Perspective. 

(5) Model Drawing. 

(6 ) Drawing from Memory. 

(7) Historical Ornament, a written paper, illustrated by 
drawings. 

I This class attends lectures once a week on Geometry in all its applications 
to drawing: and once a week on Perspective, on the Principles of Design, on Historical 
Ornament, or some other subject directly related to the work of the class-room.) 



24 




Dagger, with Sheath of Silver, in 
the collection at Memorial Hall. 
From a Pen-and-ink Drawing by 
Fanny C. L. Smith, a Pupil in the 
School. 



DECORATIVE PAINTING AND 
APPLIED DESIGN. 



CLA.SS B. 



EXERCISES. 

(i) Enlargement and reduction of colored ornament, from 
Plates having a historical interest and from Actual Fab- 
rics, Carpets, Wall Papers, etc. 

(2) Exercises with Instruments. Drawing of Geometrical 

Patterns from Plates and Fabrics. (For students who 
have not taken the Certificate of Class A.) 

(3) Grinding and Preparation of Colors. 

(4) Studies in Color Harmony, consisting of Original Designs 

treated in different schemes of color. 

(5) Studies of Plants and Flowers from Nature. 

(6) " " Groups, Draperies, etc. 

(7) " " Objects from the Museum. 

25 



(8) Studies from the Living Model in the Advanced Drawing 

Class. 

(9) Original Designs for Body Brussels and Ingrain Carpets, 

Smyrna Rugs, Turcoman Curtains, Upholstery Goods, 
Wall Papers, Oil Cloths, Linoleum, Lace, Embroidery, etc. 

(10) Diploma Work — Design executed in Color for some deco- 
rative work, as a Frieze, Panel, Spandril, etc. 

Examinations. 

(i ) Time Sketch in water colors of flowers or a group of ob- 
jects. 

(2) Exercises in Color Harmony, in water colors. 

(3) Paper on the Origin and Chemistry of Pigments. 

(4) " " Principles of Design in Surface Decoration. 

(5) Description of Lithography, Engraving and Etching, 

Porcelain and Pottery Decoration, Fresco Painting, Mo- 
saic Work, Inlays, Colored Glass Work. 

(6) Study from the Living Model. 

(This class attends the lectures on Anatomy, on Harmony of Color, on 
Historic Ornament, and on Principles of Decorative Design.) 

The work of the class-room is supplemented by visits to 
industrial establishments in the neighborhood, and accounts 
of these visits, as well as criticisms of current exhibitions of 
pictures, etc., are expected from every pupil. 




Porcelain Vase in the collection at Memorial Hall. From a Pen-and-ink Drawing by 
Jennie W. Woodhull, a Pupil in the School. 

26 




GardenlVase (Maddock First Prize, 1S50), designed and modeled by Mary Ellen Slater, 



DECORATIVE SCULPTURE. 

CLASS C. 



EXERCISES. 



In Clay. 

(i) Studies of Ornament from casts. 

(2) " " Details of Human Figure from casts. 

(3) " " Animal from casts. 

(4) " " Ornament from prints and photographs. 

(5) " " the Living Model, in advanced Drawing Class 

(6) Wood Carving and Plaster work. 

(7) Original Designs for Ornament in Terra Cotta. 

27 



(8) Anatomical Studies of the Human Figure. 
\^g) Designs for Work in Cast or Wrought Metal. 
( lo) Designs for Furniture or Cabinet work with carved 

enrichments. 
(ii) Diploma Work. A piece of Decorative Sculpture either 
in relief or the round. 

Examinations. 

(i) Paper on Principles of Design as applied to Sculptured 
Objects. 

(2) Time Sketch in Clay of Ornament from cast or print. 

(3 ) Paper on Anatomy of the Human Figure. 

(This class attends the lectures on Animal Anatomy, on the Principles of Construc- 
tive and Decorative Design, and on Historical Ornament ) 




Pen-and-ink Drawing, from Photograph, by Vernon H. Bailey, a Pupil in the School. 



28 




Study of Indian Corn, in Pen-and-ink, by Mary L. Price, a Pupil in the School. 

ADVANCED DRAWING CLASS. 



This class is for the thorough study of the figure from 
the cast and from the Hving model. Students are admitted 
only after completing the courses described on pages 25 and 
27, or, in the case of those who do not desire to complete the 
course, or who have received their preliminary training in 
other institutions, on passing a satisfactory examination in 
drawing the human figure, either from life or from the cast. 

The class works from the draped model, and each pose is 
arranged with as much reference to the study, either of his- 
torical costume or of beauty of decorative effect, as of the 
figure itself. 

This class is under the personal instruction of the Prin- 
cipal. 

29 



TEACHERS" CLASS. 

(For those employed as Teachers in either PubUc or Private Schools.) 



EXERCISKS. 



Freehand Work. 

(i) Drawing of Ornament fi'om the cast. 

(2) " from models. 

(3) " Pieces of Furniture, as chairs, tables, etc. 

(4) Foliage from Nature. 

(5) Analysis of Plants for the purpose of Design. 

(6) Elementary Design. 

(7) Studies of Historic Ornament. 

(8) Applied Design. 

(9) Drawing from Dictation. 

(10) Modeling, with special reference to the work of the 
Kindergarten. 

Instrumental Work. 

(11) Plane Geometrical Drawing. 

(12) Elements of Projection. 

(13) P21ements of Perspective. 

Examinations. 

(i) Model Drawing. 

(2) Drawing from Dictation. 

(3) Plane Geometrical Drawing. 

(4) Elements of Projection. 

(5) Elements of Perspective. 

(6) Drawing on the Blackboard. 



CARVING CLASS. 



Course of Study. 

( i) Selection, Sharpening and Care of Tools. 
(2) Bosses and Scrolls from Casts and Models. 

30 



(3) Intaglios and Mould Sinking. 

(4) Ornament from Prints and Drawings. 

(5) Original Designs for Panels, Carved Enrichments for 
Furniture and Cabinet Work, Picture-frames, Easels, etc. 



CLASS IN STAINED-GLASS WORK. 



Course of Study. 

(i) Selection and Care of Tools. 

(2) Tracing from Cartoons. 

(3) Pattern Cutting. 

(4) Glass Cutting. 

(5) Lead Glazing. 

(6) Painting in Vitrifiable Colors and Glass Enamel. 

(7) Etching on Glass. 

(8) Glass Mosaic. 



CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 



Students completing satisfactory exercises in the enumer- 
ated Subjects of Study in Class A (see page 23) will be eli- 
gible for the examinations which are held at stated times during 
the year, and on passing the examinations will receive the 
certificate. Pupils who, having received the certificate, also 
complete the courses in Decorative Painting and Decorative 
Sculpture, will receive the diploma of the School. All works 
executed by pupils are regarded strictly as exercises, not as 
results, and students will practice the several kinds of subjects 
until the work required can be performed with facility in a 
reasonable time. 

At least one specimen of each student's work in each 
class will be retained by the School. 



Fees. 

All fees are payable in advance, and money once paid will 
in no instance be refunded except by special action of the 
Committee. The fee for the day class is ^40.00 a year. 
Students entering for less than a year pay at the rate of ^8.00 
a month. 

The fee for the evening class is ^10.00 a year. 

The fee for the teachers' class is the same as that for the 
evening class. 

Prizes. 

The following prizes are awarded annually at the close of 
the School year: 

Presidenf s Prize. — A set of instruments and materials of the 
value of $25.00, offered by the President for the best set 
of drawings executed by students in the Course in Indus- 
trial Drawing. 

First Committee s Prize. — Of $20.00, awarded by the Associate 
Committee of Women for the second best set of works in 
the Course in Industrial Drawing. 

Second, Third and Fourth Committees' Prizes. — Of $10.00 
each, offered by the same Committee for work in original 
design. 

Ripka Prize. — Sketching Outfit for best decorative work in 
color. Offered by Ripka & Co., Philadelphia. 

First Richards Prize. — Portfolio of Etchings offered by Mr. 
F. DeBourg Richards for best work in pen-and-ink. 

Second RicJurrds Prize. — Of the same character, awarded for 
the same class of work. 

Wilson &- Fenimore Prizes. — First Prize, $15.00; Second 
Prize, $10.00. Offered by the firm of that name for 
designs for wall paper. 

Maddock Prizes. — First Prize, $20.00; Second Prize, $10.00. 
Offered by Thomas Maddock, of Trenton, N. J., for 
designs for pottery. 

32 




Design for Brussels Carpet (ground) (Committee's Prize, 1890) by Elizabeth F. 
Washington. 



TEXTILE SCHOOL. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

The general course of instruction embraces the Theory 
of Textile Designing and its practical applications to the art 
of weaving and related branches — scouring, bleaching and 
dyeing of yarns and materials. In addition, chemistry is 
taught with special reference to the needs of the different 
branches of the textile industries. 

The course of instruction extends over a period of three 
years, and is especially adapted to meet the wants of those 
desiring to study cloth manufacturing, designing of textiles, 

33 



weaving and dyeing. The course is intended to give the 
student a thorough scientific and practical knowledge of these 
subjects. 

Lectures. 

Lectures are given on the different materials used in the 
Textile industries, such as wool, cotton, silk, mohair, jute, 
flax, etc., their source, chemical and physical structure of the 
fibre, the action of chemicals on the different fibres, and their 
affinity for the various dyestuffs. 

Having studied the raw materials, the different pro- 
cesses by which they are converted into yarns, such as sort- 
ing, cleansing, carding and spinning of wools, mixing, open- 
ing, carding, drawing and spinning of cotton, etc., are taken 
up systematically. 

Dyeing. ' 

In connection with the department of dyeing, there is a 
laboratory fitted up in the most complete manner with appar- 
atus and chemicals for carrying on experimental work, as 
well as for the practical applications of scientific principles to 
the art of dyeing. The students work in a small dye-house 
and learn, in a practical way, not only the art of dyeing, but 
also how the yarns are scoured and bleached. From time to 
time, the class visits the large dye-houses to be found among 
the many large manufacturing establishments in and around 
Philadelphia and view the methods of carrying out their 
student work on a large scale. 

Special Course in Dyeing. 

For those who desire to take up the course of dyeing 
alone, a special course is arranged, the student spending the 
greater portion of his time in the laboratory at practical 
work. 



34 



SUBJECTS OF STUDY. 



DKSIONINa AND WE^AVINO. 



First Year — Theoretical W^ork. 

Squared Designing Paper for the different Textile Fabrics. 
Classification of Weaves " " " " " 

Foundation Weaves. 

The J^/ain or Cotton ]Veave. — Construction. Influence of 
the Twist of the Yarn. Fancy effects produced by using 
Threads of Different Sizes, or by the Combination of Two or 
More Colors. 

Tzvills. — Construction. Influence of the Twist of the 
Yarn upon the Various Textures. Division of Twill Weaves. 
Combination of Two or More Colors for Producing Different 
Effects. • 

Satins. — Methods and Rules for Constructing the Various 
Satin Weaves. Influence of the Twist of the Yarn upon 
Fabrics Interlaced with Satin Weaves. 

Drazuing-in of the Warp in the Harness. — Description of 
the Operation. Principle of a Drawing-in Draft. Methods 
Used for Preparing Drawing-in Drafts. Division of Drawing- 
in Drafts. Straight Drawing-in Drafts. Fancy Drawing-in 
Drafts. Drafting of Drawing-in Drafts from Weaves. Pre- 
paring the Harness-Chain by Fancy Drawing-in Drafts. Rules 
for estimating the Number of Heddles Required for Each 
Harness, a. For Straight Drawing-in Drafts, b. For the 
Various Fancy Drawing-in Drafts. The Reed, and Rules for 
Calculations. 

Derivative Weaves. 
From the Phrin or Cotton Weave. — Common Rib- Weaves. 
Common Basket-Weaves. Fancy Rib-Weaves. Fancy Basket- 
Weaves. Figured Rib-Weaves. Effects Produced by using 
Two or More Colors in Warp and Filling of Fabrics Inter- 
laced upon Rib and Basket Weaves. Oblique Rib-Weaves. 
Combination of Common and Oblique Rib-Weaves. 

35 



From the Regular Twill- Weave. — Broken Twills. Using 
Two or More Colors for Producing Various Effects upon 
Fabrics Interlaced with Broken Twills. Steep Twills of 
63° Grading or Diagonals. Steep Twills of 70° Grading. 
Steep Twills having a Grading of 75°. Reclining Twills or 
Twills having a 27° Grading. Curved Twills. Skip Twills. 
Combination of Two Different Common Twills to Steep 
Twills of 63° Grading. Corkscrew Twills. Entwining Twills. 
Twills having Double Twill Effects. Twill Weaves Producing 
Checkerboard Effects. Combination of Warp and Filling 
Effects from a 45° Twill Weave after a Given Motive. Fancy 
Twill Weaves. Pointed Twills. 

Derivative Weaves from Satins. — Double Satins. Granite 
Weaves. Combination of Different Systems of Weaves into 
One Weave. Figured Effects Produced by the Fancy Arrange- 
ment (of Two or More Colors) upon Fabrics Interlaced with 
Derivative Weaves. 

Weaves for Single Cloth Fabrics of a Special Construction 
and Pecnliar Character. — Honeycomb Weaves. Imitation 
Gauze (Plain and Figured). Combination of Weaves for 
Fabrics constructed with One System of Warp and Two 
Systems of Filling. Combining Two Systems of Filling to 
One Kind of Warp for Increasing the Bulk of a Fabric. 
Figuring with Extra Filling upon the Face of Fabrics inter- 
laced with their own Warp and Filling. Combination of 
Weaves for Fabrics constructed with Two Systems of Warp 
and One System of Filling. Two Systems of Warp and One 
System of Filling for Producing Double-Faced Fabrics. Using 
an Extra Warp as Backing for Heavy-Weight Worsted and 
Woolen Fabrics. Figuring with Extra Warp upon the Face 
of Fabrics Otherwise Interlaced with the Regular Warp and 
Filling. 

Miscellaneons Yarn Calculations. 

Analysis of Textile Fabrics. 

Methods and rules in practical use for ascertaining the 
Weight per Yard, and Ends per Inch, in Warp and Filling 
for the Finished Fabrics from a given sample. Ascertaining 
the Weave. Ascertaining Raw Materials used in the con- 
struction of Textile Fabrics. Ascertaining the Texture 



required in Loom for a given fabric sample. Ascertaining 
the Arrangement of Threads in a sample, according to their 
Color and Counts for the Warp and Filling. Ascertaining the 
Sizes or Counts of the Yarns necessary for the Reproduction 
of a given Sample. Ascertaining the Weight of Cloth per 
yard from Loom. Ascertaining the Process of Finishing 
necessary. (Ascertaining the Shrinkage of a Fabric during 
Finishing, with an Explanation of the Relations between 
Finished Width and Length of a Fabric and its Width and- 
Length from Loom.) 

Practical Work. 

The Practical Work in the weave-room for the first year 
is confined to small Hand Looms especially adapted to the 
purpose. Each student has the use of one of these Looms, 
and he performs, himself, the various operations such as Warp- 
ing, Beaming, Drawing-in, Reeding, Adjusting the Warp in 
the Loom, Chain Building, etc., after which he weaves the 
experimental designs, and thus sees the practical results of 
his theoretical instruction. 

Instrumental Drawing. 

Exercises with instruments; construction of plane fig- 
ures ; line shading, etc. 

Freehand Drawing. 

Enlargement and Reduction of Designs ; Analysis of 
Plants for use in Design for Textile Fabrics. 

Students must pass satisfactorily the Course of Freehand 
Drawing to be admitted into the Second Year's Course. 

Second Year — Theoretical Work. 

Double Cloth. 
Description and object of making double cloth fabrics. 
Rules for designing double cloth fabrics. Double cloth 
weaves designed with warp and filling, one end face to alter- 
nate with one end back. Warp, one face, one back, filling, 
two face, one back. Warp, two face, one back. Filling, one 
face, one back. Warp and filling, two face, one back. Warp 



and filling, two face, two back. Warp, two face, two back, 
filling, two face, one back. Warp and filling, three face, one 
back. Double cloth weaving without stitching both cloths. 
Principle of constructing seamless bags, hose and similar 
fabrics. Double cloth fabrics in which the design is produced 
by the stitching being visible upon the face of the fabric. 
Worsted coatings. Matelasses. Quilts (plain pique fabrics 
and figured pique fabrics). Rib fabrics. Three-ply fabrics. 
Four-ply fabrics, etc. 

Pile Fabrics. 

Pile Fabrics Produced by the Filling. — Velveteens, Fus- 
tians, Corduroys. Chinchillas, Whitneys, Plain and Figured. 
Chenille for the Manufacture of Curtains and Rugs. Chenille 
as Produced in the Manufacture of Fringes. 

Pile Fabrics in which the Pile is Produced by a Separate 
Warp in addition to the Ground Warp. — Description of the 
Structure of Warp Pile Fabrics. Terry and Velvet Pile. 
Velvet and Plush Fabrics. Figured Velvet. Astrakhans : 
their various methods of construction. Tapestry Carpets. 
Brussels Carpets. Double-faced Carpets. 

Double Pile Fabrics. — Principle of their Construction. 
Methods of Operation for Producing Double Pile Fabrics and 
Cutting the same on the Loom during Weaving. 

Turkish Tozvelings and Similar Fabi'ics. — Smyrna Car- 
pets and Rugs. Two-ply Ingrain Carpet. 

Gauze Fabrics. 

Principle of Construction of Gauze Fabrics. Combina- 
tion of Plain and Gauze Weaving. Jacquard Gauze. 

The Jacquard MacJdne, as Necessary for Figured Work. 
History of the Jacquard Machine. The Jacquard MacJiine. 
General Arrangement and Application. Illustration of the 
different parts of the Jacquard Machine. Method of Opera- 
tion, etc. The Jacquard Harness. The Comber-boards. 
Tying-up of Jacquard Harness. Straight-through Tie-up. 
Straight-through Tie-up for Repeated Effects, in one Repeat 
of the Design. Straight-through Tie-up of Jacquard Loom, 
having Front Harness attached. Centre Tie-up. Straight- 
through and Point Tie-up Combined. Straight-through 



Tie-up in Two Sections. Tying-up a Jacquard Harness for 
Figuring Part of the Design with an Extra Warp. Straight- 
through Tie-up in Three Sections. Point Tie-up in Three 
Sections. Combination Tie-up in Two Sections. Straight- 
through Tie-up in Four Sections. Tying-up of Jacquard 
Loom with Compound Harness attached. Tying-up Jacquard 
Looms for Gauze Fabrics. 

Modifications of tJie Single Lift Jacqiiat'd Machine. — Dou- 
ble Lift Single Cylinder Jacquard Machine. Double Lift 
Double Cylinder Jacquard Machine. Substitution of Tail- 
cords for Hooks, etc. 

Tying-up of Jacquard Harness for Tzvo-ply Ingrain 
Carpet, etc. — General Description of the Construction of the 
Fabric. Straight-through Tie-up. Point Tie-up. 

Stamping of Jacquard Cards ; with reference to the 
Designs. 

Lacing of Jacqnard Cards. 

Square Designing Paper for the different Textile Fabrics 
executed on the Jacquard JMachine. — Selection for Designing 
Paper for Single Cloth. For Double Cloth. For Two-ply 
Ingrain Carpet, etc., etc. Colors used for Painting Textile 
Designs. 

Work in Color ; Lectures on Color Harmony. 

Freehand Drawing. 

Sketching of Designs for Textile Fabrics to be executed on 
the Jacqnard Machine. — Methods of Setting the Figures. 
Size of Sketch Required. Enlarging and Reducing Figures 
for Sketches. Transferring of the Sketch to the Squared 
Designing Paper. Outlining in Squares. Rules for Outlining 
in Squares Inside or Outside the Drawing Outline. Illustra- 
tion of a Sketch. Outlining on Squared Paper. Finished 
Design. Fabric Sample (Single Cloth). Design for Damask 
Fabrics to be executed on a Jacquard Loom, with Compound 
Harness attached. Designs for Two-ply Ingrain Carpet- 
Designs for Dress Goods, Figured, with Extra Warp. Designs 
for Figured Pile Fabrics. 

InstriiDiental Dj'azving. 

Plans for machinery, mill buildings, etc. Illustrating 
process of weaving. Illustrating sectional cuts of Textile 
fabrics, etc. 

39 



Second Year — Practical Work. 

The practical work for the second year embraces the 
study of the various Power Harness Looms, including the 
Knowles and Crompton of the latest patterns, single and 
double beams, dismantling, setting up and timing of their 
various parts. Box motions and chain building explained. 
Rules and calculations for change gears, also such as to 
ascertain desired speed of shafting, and size of pulley required 
for a given speed of loom. Practical weaving on these looms 
of various worsted and woolen Fabrics. Drawings of the 
various "take-up motions" and other principal parts of the 
looms. 

Principles of the cam-loom and of the roller-loom, with 
reference to the best manner of adapting these to fancy work. 

TJie Jacqiiard Machine. — Principles of construction and 
method of operation of the single-lift machine ; the various 
modifications, such as double-lift single cylinder, double-lift 
double cylinder, laying out of comber boards, and figuring for 
various changes in texture. 

The study of the Bridesburg Clipper Loom, timing of its 
various parts, and practical work with the same, with special 
reference to its use in connection with the double-lift double 
cylinder Jacquard machine for damask table-covers, etc. The 
study of the Ingrain Carpet Machine and various tie-ups for 
the same. The Ingrain Carpet Hand Loom and the Murkland 
Power Carpet Loom analyzed and explained ; practical work 
with these looms. Card-stamping for the different fabrics, as 
damask table-covers, dress goods, upholstery, ingrain carpets, 
etc. Card lacino-. 



Third Year. 

The third year is devoted mainly to Dyeing and the 
higher classes of Textiles. 

It is also intended for students who desire to study more 
fully any special branch in which they may wish to engage. 

Tools Required in Practical Department by each Scholar. — 
One small monkey-wrench ; one screw-driver (medium size) ; 
one pair plyers ; one pair scissors ; one pair overalls and jacket. 

40 



DYEING. 



Theoretical Chemistry. 

Lectures and Laboratory Practice. 

The Elementary Substances. 

Chemical Changes. 

Metallic and Non-metallic Elements. 

Theory of Atoms and Molecules. 

Application of the Atomic Weights. 

Chemical Equations and their Interpretation. 

Acids, Bases, Salts. 

Qualitative Analysis. 

Detection of Metallic Elements. 

Detection of Acids. 

Analysis of Salts. 

Organic Chemistry as Applied to Dyeing. 

Wool, Cotton, Linen, Silk, Mohair. 

Chemical and Physical Structure. 

How to Distinguish Fibres from each other. 

Action of Chemicals of Fibres. 

Affinity for Different Coloring Matters. 

Wool Scouring and Bleaching. 

Cotton Bleaching. 

Theories of Dyeing. 

Mordants and their Application. 

Artificial Coloring Matter. 

Natural Coloring Matter. 

Application to Different Fibres. 

Forms in which Fibres are Dyed. 

Fast and Fugitive Colors. 

Matching of Colors. 

Practical Work in Dyeing. 



41 



CERTIFICATES AND DIPLOMAS. 



On the completion of the regular First and Second Year 
Courses respectively, Certificates are awarded. 

The Diploma of the department is only awarded to those 
who have satisfactorily completed the full Three Years' 
Course of Study. 

Fees. 

Full Textile Course, Day Class, ^loo per year of 36 
weeks. 

Dyeing alone. Day Class, $100 per year of 36 weeks. 

Designing and Weaving Course, Evening Class, $20 per 
term of 6 months. 

Designing alone, Evening Class, $15 per term of 6 
months. 

Dyeing, Evening Class, $15 per term of 6 months. 

Special Courses in Textile Design can usually be arranged 
to suit the requirements of the pupil. . The fees for such 
courses will, however, never be less than those paid in the 
regular course. Special courses cannot be taken in the 
evening class. 

Deposits. 

Students in the Dyeing Department, Day Class, are re- 
quired to make a deposit of $10 to cover breakage ; for the 
Evening Class this deposit is $5. 

Prizes. 

Three Prizes are offered in the Textile Department, one 
in each of the first, second and third year classes, as follows r 

The American Wool Reporter Prize of $20 for the 
most meritorious work by a student who has completed the 
first year course. 

The American Wool Reporter Prize of $30 for the most 
meritorious work by a student who has completed the second 
year course. 

The Finckel Prize of $25 for the best work by a gradu- 
ate of the full three years' course. 

42 



Rules for Competition. 

A student is considered eligible to enter into competition 
for these prizes when he has completed, to the satisfaction of 
his instructors, the course of study prescribed for the first 
thirty weeks of the term. 

At the end of this period, those desiring to compete are 
allotted time for this work ; while those who are not eligible, 
or who do not care to enter the competition, must devote that 
time to regular work. 

The Prize Work may consist of either Trouserings, Suit- 
ings, Dress Goods, Upholstery, or any other class of fabric on 
which the authorities of the School may decide. 

In the first year the student, after completing his de- 
signs, is supplied with the necessary colored yarns and per- 
forms his work on the hand-loom. 

The second and third-year students dye their own yarn, 
make all the necessary calculations, and perform the work on 
the power-looms, entirely unaided. 

Donations. 

The School has to thank the following manufacturers, 
firms and individuals for their generous donations of yarns and 
materials for use in this department during the year: 

F. A. Bochman & Co., Philadelphia, fine worsted yarns, 
various colors. 

R. Sergeson & Co., Philadelphia, shuttles. 

G. C. Hetzel & Co., Chester, Pa., fine double and twist 
and fancy-colored worsted yarns. 

Wm. R. Weeden, Providence, R. I., woolen and worsted 
yarns, fancy colors. 

Paul Whitin Manufacturing Co., Northbridge, Mass., fine- 
dressed cotton yarns. 

Aberfoyle Manufacturing Co., Chester, Pa., fine-colored 
cotton yarns. 

Griswold Silk Co., Philadelphia, spun silk yarns, various 
colors. 

Erben, Search & Co., Philadelphia, stock illustrating the 
various processes of worsted manufacture. 

43 



Samples of jute, flax and hemp from Messrs. E. H. Fitler 
& Co., J. F. Bailey & Co., and C. Moore & Co., Philadelphia. 

Samples of wool from Justus, Bateman & Co., Philadel- 
phia. 

Samples of cotton in the various stages of manufacture 
from R. D. Wood & Sons, Millville, N. J. ; R. Garsed & Co., 
Philadelphia. 

Samples of dyestuffs from Messrs. W. Pickhardt & Kut- 
troff, W. J. Matheson & Co., Sykes & Street, E. Sehlbach & 
Co., Schulze, Berge & Koehl, Lutz & Movinx. 



44 



ROLL OF STUDENTS. 

1890-91. 



ADAM, ROBERT U. 
ALGEO, BRADLEY C. 
ALLEN, JENNIE HOVEY 
ALLEN, MARIA PURDON 
ALSOP, RACHEL G. 
ANDREWS, SUE M. 
APPLEYARD, WM. S. 
ATWOOD, ANNA T. 
BAILEY, VERNON HOWE 
BALDERSTON, ANNE 
BATES, .WM. 
BAYARD, MABEL 
BELL, EMILY 
BENNETT, JOHN B. 
BERG, KATE DeWITT 
BERNER, FRANK 
BERRY, FRANK S. 
BETTON, W. L. 
BLAIR, JOHN J. 
BLOUNTZ, JOHN 
BLUM, HENRY L. 
BOTTOMLEY, FRANK S. 
BOWMAN, EVA F. 
BRADLEY, JOSEPH F. 
BRAID, CHRISTINA F. 
BREADIN, HARRIET N. 
BREHM, W. H. 
BROWN, EVERETT H. 
BROWN, F. G. 
BRYAN, JAMES G. 
BRYLAWSKIE, DELLA 
BUNTING, ETHEL 
BURY, GEORGE 
BUTTERWORTH, ALBERT 
CAMERON, ROBERT 



campbell, j. w. 
capelli, samuel 
chamberlin, bertha 
chambers, s. p. 
chase, eliza b. 
cheyney, marianna 
clephane, p. m. 
colesberry, j. bennett 
colgan, michael h. 
comfort, wm. c. 
conger, wm. h. 
coupe, albert 
crawford, james w. 
crowther, john 
cutler, n. p. 
dansig, meyer 
demoll, carl G. 
dennison, grace 

DesANGES, JOSEPHINE 
DEWAR, WM. H. 
DOBBIN, HENRIETTE 
DONOHUE, MICHAEL H. 
DOUGHERTY, EDWARD J. 
DRYFOOS, CARRIE 
EGBERT, SUSAN ROGERS 
EICHHOFF, ALBERT F. 
EINSTEIN, HENRIETTE 
FISHER, SALLIE R. 
FORSYTH, ELIZABETH S. 
FOX, HELEN A. 
FOX, JOSEPH C. 
FRALEY, BLANCHE D. 
FRIEND, GEORGE J. 
GAENSLER, FRED. B. 
GALLAGHER, CARRIE H. 



45 



CtALLER, m. v. 
GARVIN, LIDIE L. 
GEIGER, T. NEILSON 
GERBER, FRED. 
GILMORE, WM. J. 
GOLDBACH, CARL B. 
GOODELL, CAROLINE D. 
GOODWIN, F. D. 
GRAF, HARRY C. 
GRAHAM, SAMUEL 
GRAUZM, WM. 
GRAY, WM. F. 
GREEN, BESSIE G. 
GRIESSINGER, FRED. 
GRING, AMY 
GUILLOU, ELISE 
GUMPHERT, W. B. 
HACKER, MARTHA B. 
HALLOWELL, ELIZABETH M. 
HALLOWELL, H. F. 
HARKNESS, CARRIE V. 
HARMSTEAD, L. D. 
HARRIS, WALTER J. 
HARTLEY, ERNEST 
HARTMAN, A. 
HARTSHORNE, A. C. 
HARVEY, SARAH J. 
HEERGEIST, C. W. 
HEGER, GODFREY 
HEMING, CHAS. M. 
HEMSING, W. S. 
HENRY, MATTHEW M. 
HILL, THOMAS 
HIMELSBACH, JOS., Jr. 
HOGAN, MARY H. 
HOHLFIELD, HERMAN 
HOLLINGSWORTH, JOHN A. 
HOLT, MARIA L. 
HOLT, THOS. C. 
HORNSBY, THOMAS 
HORROCKS, T. HOWARD 
HUDSON, MILTON S. 
HUNTZINGER, B. FRANK 
HYLAND, JOHN T. A. 
IVES, E. 
IVES, EDITH 
IVES, HENRY G. 
JACKSON, MARY K. 



JACOBS, L. LOUISE. 
JAMIESON, JAMES P. 
JONES, JENNIE S. 
JONES, MARY ANNA 
KEENE, CHARLES 
KELLER, FRANK W. 
KELLER, SALLIE F. 
KELLEY, ANNA LAURA 
KELSH, EDWARD 
KEXDIG, LEAH 
KENYON, ANGIE 
KERSHAW, K. K. 
KEYES, ARBELIN HAYDN 
KEYS, GEORGE 
KIEHL, NETTIE I. 
KINEAVY, ROBERT F. 
KITE, REBECCA 
KUNZE, GRANT 
LACEY, RICHARD 
LACHENMEYER, PAUL 
LAMPHERE, W. D. 
LAWRENCE, JOHN 
LEE, VALENTINE B. 
LEECH, MATTHEW 
LENTZ, OLIVER G. 
LENZ, FRED. 
LETCHWORTH, S. H. 
LINDERM, P. 
LIPP, EMMA L. 
LOCKHART, GEORGE 
LONGSTRETH, EMMA J. 
LOTTE, EDWARD L. 
LOVATT GEORGE J. 
LOVELAND, WALTER H. 
LUFKIN, BERTHA V. 
MacALISTER, JANET B. 
MacGREGOR, NORMAN R. 
MACLAREN, J. T. 

maginniss, maud 
maguire, clarence C. 
marcellus, p. s. 
marks, martin 
marshall, mary w. 
mathers, john 
maxwell, samuel r. 
may, anna kane 
mayer, fred e. 
mccollin, margaret m. 



46 



3ICCOLLUM, JAMES D. 
McCONAGHY, J. 
McINTIRE, HARRY B. 
McILWAYxXE, MATTIE 
McKEOWN, PHILIP 

Mclaughlin, john 

MEEK, W. 
MERCER, SARA 
MILLER, CLARA L. 
MOLITOR, JOHN 
MORTON, JOHN I. 
MUNZ, JACOB 
NAYLOR, GEORGE 
NIEWMAN, O. B. 
NEWMAN, W. MAUD 
TSTYE, MYRTIE E. 
o'fARRELL, JOHxN 

o'hara, a. p. J. 

OPPERMAN, A. A. 
■O'tOOLE, THOMAS 
■OTTO, P. J. 
PARRY, ANNA W. 
PARRY, LUCY S. 
PATCHELL, D. C. 
PAYNE, EDWIN D. 
PEARCE, JOSEPH N. 
PEARSON, FRED. 
PEDDLE, C. R. 
PENNOCK, OLIVIA C. 
POLLOCK, GRACE H. 
POOLE, WM. H. 
POSTELMAN, GEORGE 
POTSDAMER, BELLE 
POWELL, BERRY F. 
PRICE, MARY L. 
PRICE, WALTER F. 
PURDY, ISABEL B. 
RADCLIFFE, JOHN R. 
RAWLINS, MARY B. 
REBER, HARRY 
REDMAN, MATTIE 
REDMAN, SALLIE A. 
REITH, EMIL W. 
PEUSTLE, JOSEPH 
RICE, WILLARD M. 
RICH, WM. 
ROBERTS, AMY J. 
J^OBERTSON, WM. J., Jr. 



ROBESON, EMMA J. 
RUNYAN, STANFORD K. 
RUSH, FRANK H. 
RUTTER, FLORENCE 
SCHILLINGER, HUGO 
SCHMIDT, HATTIE F. 
SCHOETTLE, FERD. 
SCHOETTLE, MARC. 
SCOTT, WALTER 
SECKEL, LAWRENCE 
SHEPPARD, MRS. F. C. 
SHIRLEY, ROBERT 
SHULTZ, LOUIS 
SLEATER, C. M. 
SMILEY, WILLIE 
SMITH, ALFRED W. 
SMITH, CHANNING 
SMITH, EMMA A. 
SMITH, WAGER 
SOMERS, MAE E. 
SOUDER, CURTIS 
SPARKS, WM. 
SPEIRS, JAMES 
SPENCER, J. W. 
STAIBLE, KARL 
STANDRING, G. L. 
STECK, ELWYN A. 
STEIN, D. AMBROSE 
STEPHENSON, ALBERT E. 
STEVENSON, THOMAS 
STRANDBERG, CONSTANCE 
STUBBS, JOHN 
SUPPLEE, EUGENIE 
SUTTON, CHARLES 
SWEENEY, MRS. D.W. 
TAYLOR, JAMES 
TAYLOR, JOHN 
TAYLOR, SARAH A. 
THOMPSON, JOHN D., Jr. 
THOMPSON, WALTER 
TRITTEN, EMIL CLARK 
TROTH, EMMA 
TURNER, WM. LAIRD 
URE, ALLAN McLYMONT 
VALENTINE, CORA 
VanGUNTEN, CHAS. J. 
WAGNER, WM. F. 
WALENTA, GEORGE J. 



47 



WALTER, W. 
WALTON, ANNA 
WALTON, H. L. 
WARNER, ELIZABETH W. 
WARREN, CORA 
WATERHOUSE, GEORGE W. 
WEEDEN, WM. RAYMER 
WEIHENMAYER, F. C. 
WEIHENMAYER, WM. J. 
WEISEL, DEBBIE D. 
WEISS, HERMAN 
WELSH, LAURA 
WHITTINGTON, FRED. O. 
WILKINSON, HOWARD M. 



WILLIAMS, ANNA W. 
WILLIAMS, THYRZA C. 
WILSON, A. 
WILSON, JAMES 
WISE, HERBERT 
WOLFENDEN, DANIEL 
WOLFERSBERGER, RENA 
WOLFERSBERGER, WM. C 
WOOD, FRANK 
WOOD, WM. W. 
WRIGHT, ALEXANDER 
WRIGHT, W. S. 
YARNALL, SALLIE G, 
ZELLERS, JOHN W. 




Study of Chrysanthemums, by Helen A. Fox, a Pupil in the School, 



48 




Study in Pen-and-ink Drapery from Lay Figure, by Vernon H. Bailey, 
a Pupil in the School. 



A Partial List of Former Students of the School, 
with their Present Occupations. 



ALDRICH, W. S., Instructor, Johns Hopkins University. 

ALLEN, FRANKLIN, Designer, Boston Manufacturing Co., Waltham, Mass. 
ALSOP, RACHEL G., Teacher of Drawing, Friends' Select School, i6th cS: Race Sts., 
ADOLPH, ALBERT J., Designer, Carhle & Joy, Philadelphia. [Phila. 

BANES, J. W., of Erben, Search & Co., Philadelphia. 

BARR, WILLIAM, Dyestuff Salesman, Davis & Walton. 

BEATTY, JOHN R., Woolen and Cotton Manufacturer. 

BECK. ROBERT K., Designer, John A. Lowell, Boston, Mass. 

BERG, KATE H. W., Decorative Painter, Philadelphia. 

BILSON, C. R , Designer, DeKosenko & Hetherington, Philadelphia. 

BIRD, CLINTON H., Woolen Manufacturer, Bethlehem, Conn. 

BISSEGGER, J. J., Draughtsman, Cope & Stewardson. 

BLACK, W. A., Designer, Carey Bros., Philadelphia. 

BOND, W. E., Designer, Neshuanick Mills, East Hampton, Mass. 

BREADY, EDWIN K., Designer, with Clarence Whitman, N. Y. 

BROOKS, JAMES E., Ink Manufacturer, 

BROOM, HARRY, Dyeing, Firth & Foster Bros., Philadelphia. 

BURT, JOHN, Boss Dyer, M. A. Furbush & Sons. 

BUTTERWORTH, SAMUEL, with Saranac Silk Mills, Philadelphia. 

49 



CAMPBELL, PETER, Dyeing. 

CAMPBELL. ARCHIE, Boss Dy-r. Ivins, Dietz & Magee. Philadelphia. 

CAMPBELL. J. ADDISON. Woolen Manufacturer, Manayunk. 

CARROLL, BENJAAfIN, Designer. Philadelphia. 

CONDON. MORRIS G.. Overseer, James Doak, Jr., & Co., Philadelphia. 

CHADWICK, ROBT., Conshohocken Woolen Mills. 

CHALK, WM. GEORGE, Designer, Philadelphia. 

CHUBB, AMY, Designer, John B. Bierck & Co. 

COUPE, ALBERT, Designer, North Star Woolen Mill, Minnsapohs, Minn. 

CUMMINGS, HELEN N., Decorative Painter, Philadelphia. 

DAVIDSON, H. O , Designer Wamsuta Mills, New Bedford. 
DAVIS, SAMUEL, Designer, Albert Cranshaw, Manayunk. 
DEWAR, WM. H., Designer with Geo. W. Smith, Philadelphia. 
DIEZ, JOHN, Designer, Philadelphia. 

ENGEL, GEO. W., Designer, Philadelphia. 

ENTWISLE, ALBERT, Instructor, Manual Training School, Philadelphia. 

EVANS. GERALD, Designer, Vollmer, Philadelphia. 

FARLEY. ROBERT, Overseer Weavmg Department, Philadelphia. 
FENNER, ETHLYN K., Teacher of Drawing, Pratt Institute. Brooklyn. 
FINCKEL, CONYERS B., Instructor in Dyeing, Pennsylvania Museum and School 

Industrial Art. 
FIRTH, EDWARD, with Firth & Foster Bros.. Philadelphia. 
FITZGERALD, SMITH. Foreman Wool Sorting, Craven & Dearnley. 
FOSTER. J. W., with Firth & Foster Bros., Philadelphia. 
FOSTER, FRANK, with Firth & Foster Bros. 

FRISSELL, FRANK, Ass't Superintendent Russell Mfg. Co., Middleton, Conn. 
FROMUTH, AUGUST, Designer, J. & J. Dobson, Philadelphia. 
FRY, J. W. B , Architect, Philadelphia. 

GADSBY, H. C, Treasurer Hope Mills, of North Carolina. 

GLEDHILL, JOSEPH, Designer, Philadelphia. 

GOODWIN, HOWARD R., Designer. Philadelphia. 

GOODWIN, MYRTIE D., Teacher, Pennsylvania Museum and School Industrial Art. 

GRANGE, CHARLES, Plush Weaver, J. &. J. Dobson. 

GRAY, W. F., Professor of Drawing, Manual Training School, Philadelphia. 

HALL, T. L., Designer, Philadelphia. 

HALLOWELL, ELIZABETH M., Teacher of Drawing, Philadelphia. 

HARRIS. W. J., with T. A. Harris. 

HOGAN, MARY H., Teacher of Drawing, Pubhc Schools, Harrisburg. 

HORROCKS, J. HOWARD, with Horrocks & Bro., Dyers, Philadelphia. 

HARVEY, GEO. H., Carpet Manufacturer (firm of Harvey & Co.), Philadelphia. 

HAYES, J. I., Boss Dyer, West Jersey Dye Works. 

HAYS, FRANK A., Architect, Philadelphia. 

HENRY, JAMES, Designer, Leedom, Bristol. 

HILL, EUGENE H.. Designer, Philadelphia. 

HILL, JOSEPH E., Teacher of Drawing, Philadelphia. 

HOLT, MARIA L., Teacher of Stained-Glass Work, Philadelphia. 

HOLT. THOMAS, with Shaum & Uhlinger. 

HOLT, WILLIAM, Designer, Berkey. Gay & Co., Grand Rapids. 

HOPFER, CHARLES, Designer, Philadelphia. 

HUQUENELE, ADELA, Teacher of Drawing and Painting, Philadelphia. 

HOSEY, THOS., Dyeing, Wm. Wood & Co., Philadelphia. 

HUDSON, MILTON, Architect. Williamsport. 

IVINS, WM , Jr., with Ivins. Dietz & Magee, Carpet Manufacturing. 

JACKSON, CHAS., Teacher of Drawing, Media. 

JACKSON, WALTER H., Mechanical Draughtsman, Schoen Manufacturing Co. 

JACOBS. GEARY, Woolen Manufacturer, Jacobs Bros., Portland, Oregon. 

JUNGKURTH, JOHN W., with Thomas Wood & Co., Philadelphia. 

50 



KELLY, JOHN, Designer. Philadelphia. 

KENWORTH, SAMUEL P., Tapestry Carpet Manufacturer. 

KETCHAM, WINIFRED E., Designer, Keystone Watch Case Co., Philadelphia. 

KNEEDLER, HARRY M, Manufacturer. 

KNIGHT, HARRY B . Dyestuff Salesman, F. Brett & Co. 

KRAYER, J. FREDERICK. Designer, DeKosenko & Hetherington, Philadelphia 

KUNZE, GRANT, with Stead & Miller, Upholstery Manufacturers. 

LACHENMEYER, PAUL, Instructor in Drawing, Pennsylvania Museum and School 
Industrial Art. 

LANG, ^^'M., Designer, Philadelphia. 

LATHROP, BESSIE, Teacher ModeUng and Carving, School for Deaf-Mutes, North- 
ampton, Mass. 

LAWSON, DAVID, Designer, Philadelphia. 

LAYCOCK, JOHN, with Stead & Miller, Philadelphia. 

LETCHWORTH, SARAH H., Teacher of Drawing, Frankford Asylum, Philadelphia. 

LEVERING, JOHN, with Erben, Search & Co., Philadelphia. 

LEWIS, D. C, with R. D. Wood & Son, Millville. N. J. 

LITTLEWOOD, A. C. with G. J. Littlewood & Co., Dyers. 

LITTLEWOOD, BENJ., Boss Dyer, Wm. Wood & Co., Philadelphia. 

LUDELL, HAROLD, Designer, Philadelphia. 

LUTZ, EDWIN G., Designer (General), Philadelphia. 

MAGEE, JAMES S., Carpet Manufacturer, Philadelphia. 

MALCOM, JOHN, Dyeing, OuakerCity Dye Works Co , Philadelphia. 

MARTIN, WM. S., Designer, Philadelphia. 

MASON, A. HAMILTON, Swift Manufacturing Co., Columbus, Ga. 

McGUIGAN, JOHN, with Thos. Dolan & Co., Philadelphia. 

McKEE, VEAGH, Designer, Philadelphia. 

MERCER, FRED. T., Draughtsman, Philadelphia. 

MERCER, W. HARRY, Designer (Furniture >, Philadelphia. 

MELLON, WM. S., Designer, Philadelphia. 

MITCHELL, ALEXANDER T., Designer, Everett Woolen Mill, Great Barrington, 

Mas=. 
MORTON, JOHN I., with Thomas Dolan & Co., Philadelphia. 

OGIER, VICTOR, Designer, Philadelphia. 

PARRY, ANNA W., Illustrator, with Strawbridge & Clothier, Philadelphia. 
PENNELL, JOSEPH, Artist, London, England. 
PHILLIPS, A. C, Finishing, Joseph Bancroft & Sons. 
PHILIPS, John C, Finishing, Joseph Bancroft & Sons. 
PRICE, S. M., Teacher of Drawing, Miss Irwin's School, Philadelphia. 
PUGH, GEO. W., Designer, Philadelphia. 

RADCLIFFE, JOHN R.. Foreman Dye Works, R. D. Wood & Son, Millville. 
RAM BO, H. E., Carpet Manufacturer, Philadelphia. 

REDDIE, ARCHIBALD F., Designer, McCallum & Sloan, Philadelphia. 
REDIFER, ANNA E., Instructor of Drawing, State College, Pa. 
REINECKE, WM., Dyeing, with Wm. R. Diller & Co. 
RICE, R. A., Superintendent, Imman Pascoag, R. I. 
RICE, WILLARD M., Designer, John Bromley & Sons, Philadelphia. 
RICORDS, JENNIE T., Designer, Ketterlinus & Co., Philadelphia. 
RILEY, JOSEPH F., John Bromley & Son, Philadelphia. 
ROLLER, OSCAR F., Foreman Ketterlinus & Co., Philadelphia. 

ROGERS, WM. H., Overseer Weaving Department, JohnG. Carruth & Co., Philadel- 
phia. 
SCHLESINGER, ALFRED R., Designer, Chicago. 
SHAW, ALEXANDER, Color Mixer. 
SHINLE, JOHN, Designer, Philadelphia. 

SIMONS, A. C, Instructorin Carving. Pennsylvania Museum and School Industrial Art. 
SKEEN, JOHN, Designer and Illustrator, Philadelphia. 

51 



SLATER, NELLIE, Instructor in Modeling, Pennsylvania Museum and School Indus- 
trial Art. 

SMITH, THOMAS, Designer, John Bromley & Sons, Philadelphia. 

SOMERS, MAE E., Decorative Painter, Philadelphia. 

STEWART, JAMES T., Manufacturer, Philadelphia. 

STONE, THOMAS, Designer, Potomka Mill, New Bedford, Mass. 

STRATTON, HOWARD F., Teacher, Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial 
Art. 

SWARTZ, ALBERT, with Quaker City Dye Works, Philadelphia. 

TROOST, WM., Designer for Rutter & Merritt, Ornamental Iron Works, Philadelphia. 
TITHER, JAMES T., Designer and Superintendent, Media, Pa. 
TOLMAN, ANDREW, Designer, South Berwick, Maine. 
TRUITT, JOSEPH, with Thomas Dolan & Co., Philadelphia. 

VAN GELDER, PETER, Decorative Painter, Philadelphia. 

WALTON, JOHN P., Designer, Philadelphia. 
WATSON, AGNES M , Artist, Philadelphia. 
WATT, THOS. E., Designer. 

WEISNER, CHAS. B., Designer Amoskeag Mfg. Co., Manchester 
WILKINSON, HOWARD M., Designer, with Andrew Cochran, Philadelphia. 
WILLIS, ALBERT P., Instructor of Drawing, Cornell University, Ithica, N. Y. 
WILSON, VICTOR, Designer and Draughtsman, New York. 
WOODWARD, ESTELLE. Teacher of Drawing, Philadelphia. 
WOLTERS, HERMAN, Designer, Cornelius & Sons, Philadelphia. 

YUNDT, CHARLES, Designer, Philadelphia. 

ZELLERS, JOHN W., Designer, Montgomery W^eb Co , North Wales, Pa. 



52 



President IMiller's wise niansgenient, has teccme a great success, and has passed from it 
days of speculation to be a recognized power and influence in business life, so much so- 
that every available vacancy is filled. 1 he influx of new students this season has been so 
large that no more can at present be admitted, and any applicant must enter his name 
and wait for a vacancy. Designing, modeling, carving, dyeing and weaving are the- 
thing's taught in their highest branches, and the success in these has been so great that 
the Potters' Association of the United States has voted to contribute substantially to 
the regular support of the School that the ceramic art can be included in its curriculum. 

"American "Wool Reporter," Boston, Tebruary 13, 1891. 

From the commencement this School has numbered among its Board of Officers the 
leading Manufacturers, who have devoted a large share of attention to the development of 
the work. At this School young men and women are thoroughly instructed in the useful 
arts, including drawing, painting, modeling, wood carving, textile desioning, weaving, 
chemistry and dyeing. In order to thoroughly appreciate the work of this School, a per- 
sonal visit will convince all that it is filling a mucii-needed want. So thoroughly is this 
School appreciated that with its present accommodations it is overcrowded, and several 
students are awaiting vacancies. And the need today is a much larger building where- 
the work of the School can be more eftectually carried on. During the past year, by the 
generous contributions of our leading textile machinery manufacturers, generally, the 
practical work has been brought up to a state of perfection second to no other institution 
of its character in this country or in Europe. 

" The 3Ianufacturer," Philadelphia, Marcli 2, 1891. 

The Pennsvlvani.a. Museum and School of Industrial Art. 

The Manufacturer notes, with special interest, the January report of the above- 
named Institution. It shows that we have in our midst one of the most progressive 
schools in the country : one which stands without a rival in its peculiar course of study, 
and one which not only the decorative artists of our city look to for intelligent progress, 
but which also inspires our Philadelphia textile manufacturers with the warmest interest. 
It would be speaking less than the whole truth to set such limitations to its influence, as 
the School is now almost national in its character. A constantly increasing demandfor 
the skilled talent of the graduates is being received from the best manufacturing" districts 
of the country, and the school is sure to leave the marks of its influence upon the indus- 
trial community. 

The managers are tborough-goino: and energetic. Every want in the development of 
the work is at once met, nothing being permitted to interfere with its progress. The 
Mamifactiirer is glad to be able to say that much of this rapid development in the Tex- 
tile Department is due to the interest taken by many of our leading manufacturers, and, 
while commending- this especial feature of the School, we do not desire to detract one 
particle from the splendid w^ork done by the enthusiastic men and women in the other 
departments of art, a work which has long since made itself felt in many decorative and 
mechanical industries, not only in Philadelphia but elsewhere. Yet it is none the less true 
that the generous subscriptions of our textile interests established and maintained the Tex- 
tile Department and made it the first school of the country. 

Extract from the "Art Amateur" for January, 1891. 

There is, it may be safely said, no other art school in the United States, and possibly 
no other in the world, where a student can acquire in so short a time that technical 
knowledge which makes his labor of higher market value, or attain it in a greater degree, 
than at this one. 

The School endeavors to qualify its young American students that they may be 
equipped to supersede the Scotch, German or French designers, who, taking advantage 
of the unpractical training of our home talent, come over here to draw large salaries. A 
graduate of this School may feel assured that, if industrious and energetic, he is in no 
danger of being pushed to the wall in the struggle for existence that rages vigorously in 
our large cities : and it may be safely said that the students of few art schools dare vent- 
ure a similar belief in the marketable value of the education they have received. 



54 



From Frank P. Bennett «& Co., Pi-oprletors "American AVool Reporter," 

Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Theodore C. Search, Philadelphia. June 15, 1SS9. 

Dear Sir:— Our Mr. Bennett having been greatly surprised and pleased at the excellent 
and original work which is being done in the Textile Department of the Pennsylvania 
Museum and School of Industrial Art. making a degree of progress in American technical 
education, which is not being applied to the textile mdustries to anything like the same 
extent anywhere else in the United Sates we desire to make a very modest testimonial of 
our appreciation of the enterprise by offering a prize of twenty-five dollars for the most 
meritorious work by any pupil who has completed two j'ears of study in the School at the 
time of the next graduating exercises. 

The prize shall be called " The American Wool Reporter Prize," and awarded upon 
such method of decision as to the merits of the pupil's work as may seem best to you. 
Such technical education as this School is promoting seems to us more important than the 
tariff. Y'ours respectfully, 

Frank P. Bennett & Co. 

"The Times," Philadelphia, Jime 14, 1891. 

The School is carrying on a most important work in a way that is unequaled in this 
country, and is doing it for the public benefit with very little public aid. The State ought 
long ago to have recognized its duty to this admirable institution, and it is earnestly hoped 
that the Governor may not find it necessary to withhold the very modest appropriation of 
$10,000 voted by the last Legislature and now awaiting his approval. No more proper use 
of public money can be made than for public industrial education. The State should rec- 
ognize in the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art its best memorial of 
the great Centennial. 

"The Press," Philadelphia, Jnne 15, 1891. 

The Legislature acted most worthily when it passed a bill appropriating gio,ooo for 
the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art in this city, which measure is 
still in the hands of the Governor. The institution, an outgrowth of the Centennial Ex- 
position, is not confined in its usefulness to this city, but each county in the State is en- 
titled to a free scholarship. Its Board of Officers comprise some of the best known and 
most substantial business and professional men, Governor Pattison and Mayor Stuart 
being members (?-V;(9^«o. All branches of artisticdesigning as applied to manufactures 
are taught at the School, and the pupils are thus fitted for positions both more remunera- 
tive and more useful than if they were compelled to seek employment without such in- 
struction. It is a School which is in every way deserving of the most generous encour- 
agement. 

"The Philadelphia Kecord," June 14, 1891. 

The bill appropriating $10,000 for the Pennsylvmia Museum and Schoolof InHustrial 
Art, which passed the Legislature and is now in the hands of the Governor, would afford 
valuab'e aid to a.n important adjunct of the industrial resources of this community. The 
benefits of this School are widespread, as each county in the State is entitled to a free 
scholarship. The institution, which is located at 1336 Sprinp; (rarden Street, is an out- 
come of the Centennial Exposition. Here are taught all methods and branches of artistic 
-designing as applied to manufacturing. When its pupils graduate, they are able to secure 
employment as designers at lucrative salaries. V'oung men who might be otherwise 
obliged to take positions as operatives in a factory, after graduating" fi'om this School, 
readily command $50 a week as designers. It is through the development of artistic 
taste in this direction that industrial supremacy may be secured and maintained. 

" The Press," Philadelphia, Jnne 13, 1891. 

The Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art is, at cnce. one of the most 
useful and best known of the educational institutions of the city. It has attracted atten- 
tion in this country and in Europe. Its methods have profoundly modified practical 
technical training elsewhere, and its graduates obtain positions and discharge duties 
which place the success of the School Beyond question. Like all higher education of the 
best order, this School deserves and demands the support and aid of the State. 

"The Dry Goods Economist," >«ew York, Fehruary 7, 1891. 

Our Philadelphia correspondent writes under date of Feb 4:— On Monday evening 
the first working reception of the season was given at the School of Industrial Art, in Phila- 
delphia, and many ladies and gentlemen made an inspection of the premises and the man- 
ner in which the students were taught the principles of technical education. Very few 
can have gone away without being impressed with tl»e efficiency of the training, and the 
influences the students of the School must exert in the future in their competition in 
business life against the highly-trained artistic designers of Europe. The School, under 



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