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Full text of "School catalog, 1980-1981"

PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF ART 1980-1981 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/schoolcatalog198081phil 



CONTENTS 



2 President's Message 

3 Campus 

5 PCA Profile 

6 Calendar 

1 1 Educational Programs 

1 2 General Program Requirements 

13 Foundation: The First Year 

14 Liberal Arts 

21 General Studies 

22 Art Therapy Concentration 

23 Degree Programs 

23 Education 

Teacher Certification 

Master of Arts in Art Education 
27 Craft 

Ceramics 

Fibres 

Metals 

Wood 
32 Environmental Design 
35 Graphic Design 
37 Illustration 
40 Industrial Design 
43 Painting and Drawing 
46 Photography/Film 
50 Printmaking 
53 Sculpture 

56 Part-time Study 

57 Admissions 

62 Tuition and Expenses 

63 Student Portfolio 

79 Student Services 

Housing 

Health Service 

Career Development and Placement 

Financial Aid 



The cover design depicts the diverse 
media students work with at the 
Philadelphia College of Art. From left 
to right the clay, wood, etching plate, 
canvas, paper, film, metal, type, fabric, 
plastic, marble and blueprint represent 
the various pursuits at the College. 



85 Academic Regulations 

SB Curricular Requirements 

91 Administration 

92 Faculty 
95 Index 

97 Application Forms 



PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 



Imagine a world without art and design. It would be cold, colorless, 
and dreary. Every facet of our lives is touched by the hand of the artist 
and designer — our paintings and sculpture, furniture, street signs, 
cars and planes, buildings, packages, books, and toys. Think of any 
man-made object, one of a kind or mass produced, and most likely it 
has been marked by an artist. In a complex and confusing envirorunent, 
artists and designers bring clarity and beauty; they shape our world 
and touch our souls. Their contribution to our lives is inestimable. 

The Philadelphia College of Art, one of the oldest and best-known 
private art colleges in the nation, is dedicated to educating and train- 
ing professional artists and designers. It recognizes the special needs 
of artists and designers by providing them with an incredible myriad of 
resources: spacious studios with twenty-foui-hour access, advanced 
technical equipment, a rich liberal arts curriculum, and a faculty of 
practicing professionals who are as interested in the student artist as 
they are in his or her art. 

One resource that PCA provides free is the city of Philadelphia itself. 
If you know Philadelphia only as the cradle of American liberty, you are 
in for a surprise, for the city is undergoing a cultural renaissance that is 
as exciting to the hrst-time visitor as it is to longtime residents. This 
metropolis is a kaleidoscope of lively places and events — a new 
restaurant cuisine touted by journalists in other cities; heartstopping 
architecture; a reclaimed waterfront; a profusion of galleries, museums, 
and private collections; the Schuylkill (the natives say Skew-kill), a 
river for rowers that serpentines through the center of town; funky 
South Street crammed with boutiques and the Rocky Horror Picture 
Show; and acres and acres of green parks — more than any other city 
in the USA. The best feature of all is that they are just a walk away 
from PCA. 

Should you come to PCA' Yes, if you want a well-structured curricu- 
lum that encourages creativity; yes, if you want to make art; yes, if you 
want a high degree of intensity and involvement with other students 
and committed, caring professors and staff; and yes, if you want to live 
in a dynamic, changing city. PCA can cultivate your talent and extend 
your vision. Come visit us soon. We welcome you. 



Thomas F. Schutte 
President 



Boston I hi. by plane 



Chicago 

2 hrs. by plane 



Philadelphia - PCA 




Atlanta 2 V2 his. by plane 




The Philadelphia College of Art Campus ( 1 ) Anderson Hall (2) ARCO Park (3) Haviland Building (4) College Housing (5) MerrUl Building 



v^ 



43 



44 



N- 




1 


Pennsylvania Ballet Company 


14 


YMCA 


28 


Head House Square 


42 


Zellerbach Theatre 


2 


Shubert Theatre 


15 


Curtis Institute of Music 


29 


Ritz Theatre 


43 


Sports events at Veterans' Stadium 


3 


Academy of Music 


16 


Rittenhouse Square 


30 


Penn's Landing 


44 


Concerts at the Spectrum 


4 


New Locust Theatre 


17 


Art Alliance 


31 


Franklin Square 


45 


Italian Market 


5 


Philadelphia Opera Company 


18 


Walnut Street Theatre 


32 


Independence Hall 


46 


Market Street 


6 


Print Club 


19 


Aire- American Museum 


33 


Washington Square 


47 


Broad Street 


7 


Philadelphia Dance Alliance 


20 


Chinatown 


34 


Jewish Museum 


48 


Delaware Avenue 


8 


YMHA 


21 


Logan Circle 


35 


Rodin Museum 


49 


Delaware River 


9 


Antique Row 


22 


Free Library 


36 


Fairmount Park 


50 


Vine Street 


10 


Forrest Theatre 


23 


Franklin Institute 


37 


Philadelphia Art Museum 


51 


Schuylkill River 


U 


Reading Terminal Market 


24 


Moore College Gallery 


38 


University of Pennsylvania 


52 


Schuylkill Expressway 


12 


City Hall 


25 


Academy of Natural Sciences 


39 


Institute of Contemporary Art 


53 


Philadelphia Zoo 


13 


Pennsylvania Academy of the 


26 


Rosenbach Foundation 


40 


University Museum 








Fine Arts 


27 


Theatre of the Living Arts 


41 


Museum of Phila. Civic Center 







THE CAMPUS 



PCA PROFILE 



Philadelphia 

A major facet of the Philadelphia 
College of Art's personality is its 
location in the heart of downtown 
Philadelphia, the fourth -largest city in 
the United States. Within easy walking 
distance of the College are an exciting 
array of galleries, museums, restau- 
rants, libraries, open-air markets, and 
theatres that offer the best in ballet, 
opera, film, drama, and orchestral 
performances. For quiet hours, the 
city's tree-lined streets, pocket parks, 
and Fairmount Park, the largest 
municipal park in the world, all 
become an extension of the College's 
center dty campus. 

Boasting a long tradition of respect 
for the visual arts, Philadelphia is the 
home of the first museum and art 
school in the country. Among the list 
of distinguished irmovators who have 
lived and worked in Philadelphia are 
the Calders, Thomas Eakins, and 
Louis Kahn. 



1406 Spruce Street vrill house, for the 
first time, upperclass students while 
remaining the offices for a nonprofit 
organization with on-site printmaking. 

ARCO Park and Sculpture Garden, 

a bridge between the historic Haviland 
Building and Anderson Hall, is a vest- 
pocket park with huge outdoor murals, 
both designed by the internationally 
known Bauhaus artist Herbert Bayer. 
Here, students can relax on grass and 
benches, take lunch, and play Frisbee. 



The Broad and Pine Complex consists 
of the Greek-pillared Haviland Building 
and its two red -brick wings designed 
by the noted architect Frank Furness. 
The Furness structure, home of the 
Ceramics and Sculpture Departments, 
will soon become a new dormitory. 
Behind Haviland is a courtyard that is 
a green oasis for students and also the 
longtime home of a family of white 
ducks. 

The Merrill Building is owned by the 
College and currently leased to The 
Philadelphia Company, a regional 
theatre group. 

The Student Residence at 15th and 
Spruce Streets, once the hne old 
Bellerich Hotel, has a stately air with 
its marbled lobby and old-fashioned 
elevators. The residence has six apart- 
ments on each of its fourteen floors, 
housing approximately 160 students. 

Anderson HalL a twenty-one-story 
skyscraper with light-filled studios and 
classrooms, is the heart of PCA. It con- 
tains seven of the nine major studio 
departments, all the administrative 
offices, the new cafeteria and com- 
mons, library, slide library. College 
store, and the Gallery. 



Accreditation: The Philadelphia 
College of Art is accredited by the 
Middle States Association of Colleges 
and Schools, the Commonwealth of 
Permsylvania, and National Associa- 
tion of Schools of Art. 

History: PCA, one of the oldest art 
colleges in the nation and a pioneer in 
industrial design, was established in 
1876 when interest in art and art edu- 
cation was stimulated by the 
Centennial Exposition of that year. 
The school has undergone a number of 
name changes and physical dislo- 
cations, but in 1964 it separated from 
the Philadelphia Museum of Art and 
took its present name. The College has 
expanded from its historic site at Broad 
and Pine to include the twenty-one- 
story Anderson Hall building and 
renovations throughout the campus 
continue to create more functional and 
exciting spaces. 

Student Body: About 1200 full time, 
half of whom are over 2 1 , representing 
over 33 states and 22 foreign coun- 
tries; approximately as many 
part-time students. 

Student-Faculty Ratio: 111 

Ownership: Private 

Campus: Four square blocks in Center 
City, Philadelphia, next door neighbors 
are the Philadelphia Orchestra, 
Academy of Music, Shubert Theatre, 
and the Philadelphia College of the 
Performing Arts. 

Undergraduate Degrees Offered: 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Craft, Graphic 
Design, niustration, Painting and 
Drawing, Photography and Film, 
Printmaking and Sculpture. 
Bachelor of Science in Environmental 
Design and Industrial Design. 



The Pennsylvania Instructional I Cer- 
tificate for teachers can be earned in 
conjunction with a B.F.A. and B.S. 
A B.F.A. and B.S. can be earned with a 

concentration in Art Therapy. 

Graduate Degrees Offered: Master 

of Arts in Art Education 

Facilities: Instructional: a complete 
bronze-casting foundry; welding shops; 
facilities for working in plaster, 
plastics, wood, stone and terra cotta, 
glass, ceramics, metals, fibres; 
photographic processing equipment 
and darkrooms, and other specialized 
equipment requisite to departmental 
offerings; individual studios for 
painters, individual enlargers for 
photography students, individual 
benches for crafts students. 
Library: 45,000 volumes; subscriptions 
to 270 periodicals; collection of back 
issues in bound volumes, microfilm or 
boxed files; 1000 circulating records 
and audio tapes; over 100,000 in- 
dexed pictures and pamphlets; more 
than 300 mounted posters. 
Slide Library: over 140,000 slides and 
more than 800 feature and short films; 
slides may be reserved and viewed in 
an adjacent projection facility. 
College Store: sells required textbooks 
and art materials, trade books, records, 
gift items, museum cards, and prints; 
students may arrange charge accounts. 
The Gallery: attracts 45,000 people 
annually; features nationally known 
contemporary artists; sponsors films, 
performances, lectures, and symposia; 
students are invited to all openings 
and events which are frequently 
attended by the exhibiting artists. 



1980-81 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
FIRST SEMESTER Thuisday, September 4-FridaY. December 19 15 weeks 



1980-81 ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

SECOND SEMESTER Monday, January 19-Friday, May 15 16 weeks 



Student residence opens 

Labor Day - Holiday 

Orientation and registration 

Orientation • new students 

Foundation Program student 

registration 

Readmitted and new upperclass 

transfer students' registration 

New graduate students 

Classes begin 

Late registration {5 days) 

Drop/add period (1 week) 

Last day for removal of incomplete 
grades received in the 1980 spring 
semester and withdrawal from class 
with a "W" notation 

Advising period for advance 
registration 

Advance registration for 1981 
spring semester 



Saturday, August 30 

Monday, September 1 

Tuesday, Wednesday, September 2, 3 

Tuesday, Wednesday, September 2, 3 

Tuesday, September 2, 1 p.m. -5 p.m. 

Tuesday, September 2, 9:30 a.m.- II :30 a.m. 

Wednesday, September 3, 3:30 p.m.-5:00 p.i 

Thursday, September 4 

Thursday, September 4 — Wednesday, 

September 10 

Thursday, September 4 — Wednesday, 

September 10 



Careers in Art/Portfolio Day 
Thanksgiving vacation — (student 
residence remains open) 
Deadline for filing petition for 
graduation in January 
Evaluation/examination week 

Final semester grades due from 

faculty 

Student residence closes for 

mid-year intermission 

Mid-year intermission 



Wednesday, October 15 



Monday, November 3 — Thursday, 
November 13 

Thursday, November 13 - graduate students 
Friday, November 14 - seniors 
Monday, November 17 - juniors 
Tuesday, November 18 - sophomores 
Thursday, November 20 * freshmen 
Saturday, November 8 

Thursday, Friday, November 27, 28 

Monday, December 1 

Monday, December 15 — Friday, 

December 19 

Friday, December 19 

Saturday, December 20 

Monday, December 22 — Friday, January 16 



New and readmitted students' 

registration 

Student residence opens 

Classes begin 

Late registration (5 days) 

Drop/add period {1 week) 

Financial aid application period 

for 1981-82 (enrolled and former 

students) 

Last day for removal of incomplete 

grades received in 1980 fall 

semester and withdrawal from class 

with "W" 

Deadline for filing petition for 

graduation in June 

Last day for tiling for financial aid 

for 1981-82 

Student residence closes 

Spring vacation 

Student residence opens 

Classes resume 

Freshman major orientation 

Open house 

Advising period - advance 

registration 

Advance registration - fall 1981 

All students 

Classes end 

Study period and liberal arts exams 

Studio class evaluation week 

Final grades due from faculty 

Student residence closes for all 

students except seniors 

Studios and workshops open for 

completion of projects 

Commencement 



Wednesday, January 14 

Sunday, January 18 

Monday, January 19 

Monday, January 19— Friday, January 23 

Monday, January 19 — Friday, January 23 

Monday, February 2 — Tuesday, March 31 



Friday, February 27 

Friday, March 20 

Tuesday, March 3 1 

Saturday, March 14 

Monday, March 16 — Friday, March 20 

Sunday, March 22 

Monday, March 23 

Monday, March 30 — Friday, April 3 

Saturday, April 1 1 

Monday, April 6 — Thursday, April 16 

Friday, AprU 17 

Friday, May 1 

Monday, May 4 — Friday, May 8 

Monday, May 1 1 — Friday, May 1 5 

Friday, May 15 

Saturday, May 16 

Monday, May 18 — Thursday, May 2 1 
Friday, May 22 



CITY AND CAMPUS VIEWS 




Ben Franklin Parkway 




Anderson Hall 



Commons — dining area 




Commencement at the Academy of Music 




Famous Philadelphia Italian Market 

10 



EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 



He is the greatest artist who has embodied, in the sum of his works, 
the greatest number of the greatest ideas. — John Ruskin 



PCA is a comprehensive college of art offering a carefully structured 
program in the study of art and design. The College maintains 
demanding standards and encourages students to develop innovative 
approaches to their work. 

Students spend the freshman year in the Foundation Program, a core 
curriculum of studies in drawing and two- and three-dimensional design 
supplemented by electives and liberal arts courses. The core curriculum 
introduces basic processes and concepts and provides technical 
information to develop visual awareness. Problems are presented to 
stretch the imagination and refine drawing abilities. The elective 
courses in selected major studio programs give students an opportunity 
to explore areas of interest preparatory to electing a major. 

In the sophomore year students choose a major from one of the nine 
studio departments: Craft (which includes Ceramics, Fibres, Metals, and 
Wood), Environmental Design, Graphic Design, Dlustration, Industrial 
Design, Painting and Drawing, Photography and Film, Printmaking, and 
Sculpture. Each department is unique, with its own curriculum and 
structure. Students are also required to take courses in studio areas 
outside their specialization, providing exposure to other artistic 
disciplines and opening up alternative career possibilities. Faculty 
advisors and the generous student-to-faculty ratio (1 1 to I) assure close 
individual attention and assistance throughout a course of study. At 
graduation, students are awarded a Bachelor of Science in Environ- 
mental Design or Industrial Design and a Bachelor of Fine Arts in one 
of the other seven studios. 

Classes are small and casual. One of the major teaching modes is the 
critique or "crit," a critical evaluation of student work by the instructor. 
These "crits" are usually informal and are given as often as every week 
to the class or individual; they are an invaluable tool for checking one's 
progress. 

One- third of PCA's curriculum is devoted to liberal arts courses such 
as psychology, art history, literature, and philosophy. The College has 
made a commitment to a strong liberal arts program because it is 
convinced that the educated artist is the better artist. Ideas that are the 
core of liberal arts courses often generate concepts that are translated 
into new visual forms in the studio. 




The Department of Education offers a program in teacher certification 
whereby students can earn the Pennsylvania Instructional I Certificate 
concurrent with major studio work. Students choosing this option are 
qualified to teach art, kindergarten through twelfth grade. The Depart- 
ment of Education also offers a Master of Arts in Art Education, which 
combines graduate study in education with liberal arts and advanced 
studio work. 

An Art Therapy concentration, which provides the academic founda- 
tion for students interested in careers as art therapists or in graduate 
study in the field, is available through the Liberal Arts Department. 

In addition to the undergraduate and graduate curricula, PCA offers 
part-time study at varying professional levels through its Continuing 
Studies Program. A Pre-College summer program is open to high school 
students considering a career in art and design. The Saturday School, 
for students aged eight to eighty-plus, offers studio courses. For more 
detailed information about any of the above programs, please turn to 
the appropriate section. 




GENERAL PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 



General program requirements vary within each department. 
Departments issue a list of required courses at appropriate times during 
the year. Majors must follow both departmental requirements for 
specified courses and the recommended sequence in which these 
courses are to be taken. The department chairperson must approve any 
exception to these regulations. 

The Art Therapy and Education Programs are special courses of study 
that are offered in conjunction with a studio major program. Interested 
students should refer to the program descriptions in those departments. 

The College requires an absolute minimum of 132 credits for 
graduation. In general the basic credit breakdown is as follows: 



Foundation 

Major Department credits 

Other required credits outside the Department 

Remaining electives (9 credits must be taken in a department 

other than the major) 

Liberal Arts 



Credits 

18 

45 

6 

18 
45 



132 



Numbering System 

The capital letters preceding the digits identify the department; i.e., 
LA indicates Liberal Arts. 

The initial digit is an approximate indication of the level of the course; 
i.e., 100 indicates a beginning course, 400, a course for the most 
advanced students. Courses offered for graduate credit are on the 500 
level. The second digit indicates the subject category as below: 

LA 010 Literature 

LA 020 

LA 030 Foreign Languages 

LA 040 Art History 

LA 050 

LA 060 Social Studies 

LA 070 Philosophy 

LA 080 Science 

LA 090 Interdisciplinary or otherwise unclassified 



The third digit is an arbitrary designation of the particular course. A 
indicates first semester; B indicates second semester; S indicates a 
seminar in which the enrollment is limited to approximately 15 students 
who must have an overall grade point average of at least 3.0. 



Clothespin by Claes Oldenburg at Perm Center 
12 



FOUNDATION: The First Year 



The Foundation Program at the Philadelphia College of Art provides 
incoming students with a yearlong sequential study of visual form. The 
student, working within a framework of three classes that relate 
problems in two- and three-dimensional form, builds an awareness of 
the independent and interdependent character of these concerns. 
Through this interaction, new life is given to the student's concept of the 
visual arts. Each of the courses — two-dimensional design, three- 
dimensional design, and drawing — stresses precise observation, sound 
working habits, and sensitivity to materials and tools unique to its 
particular processes. Students are encouraged to take part in discussions 
of their work and to discover the cormections between historic examples 
and their own art. 

The Foundation studio classes are supported by studio electives 
offered by the major departments. These electives are designed to 
acquaint students with standards, techniques, and practices of the major 
studio areas and to enable the student, with the help of an advisor, to 
choose a field of concentration at the end of the Foundation year. 




Faculty 



Introductory — Required 



Robert McGovern, Co-Chairperson Steven Jaffe 

Michael Rossman, Co-Chairperson Leon Lugassy 

Edna Andrade Kaien Saler 

Eugene Baguskas Richard Schultz 

Thomas Butter Charles Seailes 

Dante Cattani Raymond Spiller 

Sharon Church Doris Staffel 

WiUiam Daley Richard Stetser 

Eileen Goodman Elsa Tarantal 

Gerald Herdman Lily Yeh 



Required Credits per Year 


Year 


Foundation 
Major 


Studio 
Electives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foundation 


18 


3 or 
more 


12 



Freshmen are required to register 
for FP 100, 120, and 190 in the fall 
and spring semesters for a total of 9 
credits each semester. In addition, 
students may choose one of a number 
of electives offered by the major 
departments. Electives are 1.5 credits 
per course and a complete list of those 
available to freshmen will be issued 
each semester prior to registration. 
Six hours of liberal arts credits are 
required each semester, three in Art 
History and three in Language and 
Expression. Students not assigned 
Language and Expression may choose 
a liberal arts elective in its place. 

FPlOO 
Drawing 

6 hours a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The student is involved with 
perceptual and conceptual drawing. 
The course is intended to acquaint 
students with materials and 
procedures that facilitate seeing and 
promote appropriate recording of 
visual information. 



FP 120 
Two-Dimensional Design 

6 hours a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Working with point, line, shape, and 
color in a variety oi media, the student 
moves toward a mastery of two- 
dimensional form. Projects are 
designed to focus on the interaction 
of these complex elements, bringing 
about spatial illusion and coherent 
pattern. 

FP 190 
Three-Dimensional Design 

6 hours a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The student explores the physical and 
visual properties of three-dimensional 
media. Skills in working materials are 
combined with three-dimensional 
formal analysis. Projects deal with 
organization, perception, and utility. 




LIBERAL ARTS 



A total of 45 credits must be earned in liberal arts courses during the 
undergraduate program. Studies in liberal arts are divided into four 
major categories: Language and Literature, History and Social Studies, 
Art History, and Philosophy and Science. All students are required to 
complete successfully a minimum of 12 credits in art history. This 
includes LA140A Art History I, LA MOB Art History IL and 6 credits 
of art history electives. Based on the entering student's transcript and 
SAT verbal test or TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) 
scores. Language and Expression (LA 108, LA 109, or LAI 10) may be 
required. Students must satisfy the credit total in each subject category. 
Minimum credit requirements are as follows: 



Language and Literature, exclusive of LAK 
Art History, exclusive of Fihn History 
History and Social Studies 
Philosophy and Science 
Liberal Arts Electives 



,LA109,LA110 



Credits 

6 
12 



Total minimum Liberal Arts requirement 



45 



Approximately one-third of the credit hours required in liberal arts 
are electives which may be chosen from among the offerings in any of 
the categories. There is also an independent study program which 
permits upperclass students to work with a faculty member on a special 
project. 

Students discovering a strong interest in any particular liberal arts 
subject area may, with the approval of their faculty advisors, register for 
considerably more credits than are normally required. With the major 
department chairperson's permission, credits thus earned beyond the 
45-credit minimum reduce the student's basic studio elective 
requirement in the same manner as do studio electives. 

To make normal progress toward graduation, registering tor 6 liberal 
arts credits per semester is recommended. 

A student may not register tor the same course twice for credit unless 
it is taught by different instructors. 

Students must complete 30 credits in liberal arts courses in residence. 
Up to 1 5 credits in liberal arts subjects may be transferred, provided the 
course work completed elsewhere does not duplicate PCA course 
offerings. 

All students must earn a minimum of 12 credits in PCA 300-400 level 
liberal arts courses. Transfer students are responsible for fulfilling the 
45-credit requirement. 



Faculty 



Helen Berezovsky 
Stephen Berg 
Martha Breiden 
Theresa Conn 
Patricia Cruser 
Lawrence Curry 
Anne Davenport 
Mary Ellen Didier 
Helen WilUams Diutt 
Leah Freedman 
Dorothy Grimm 



Rogelio Hernit 
Knolly HiU 
Anne Karmatz 
Constance Kirker 
Sherry Lyons 
Nancy Markowich 
Mary Martin 
Wilham Norton 
Diane Perkins 
Ruth Perlmutter 
Lanie Robertson 



Carl Silver 
Ward Stanley 
Patricia Stewart 
Judy Trachtenberg 
Fabian Ulitsky 
Susan Viguers 
William Webster 
Carla Weinberg 
Burton Weiss 
Lily Yeh 
Toby Zinman 



LA 108 

Language and Expression 

3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
The objectives of this course are to 
prepare students for whom English is 
not a native language to produce the 
kinds of writing expected of them on 
the college level, and to improve upon 
their reading, study, and test-taking 
skills. Concepts of paragraph unity, 
coherence, and outlirung are 
introduced through the chief methods 
of composition development: 
chronological, spatial, examples, 
definition, cause and effect, 
comparison, contrast and logical 
division. Further, the course provides 
a review of those principles of English 
grammar that present the greatest 
difficulty to students of English as a 
second language: verb tenses, modals, 
irregular comparative forms, and 
correct preposition and article usage. 
Standard English punctuation practice 
is also stressed. Five major essays and 
a series of shorter written assignments 
are required. Attendance is 
mandatory. Grades in LA 108 will be 
assigned on a pass/ no grade basis. 
Credits earned do not satisfy the 
Language and Literature distribution 
requirement. A student who 
successfully completes the course is 
subsequently assigned LA 109. 
Exception al st uden tsmay be 
assigned LA 11 GA- 



LA 109 

Language and Expression 

3 credits/ semester: fall or spring 
The objective of this course is to 
provide every student enrolled in it 
with an opportunity to succeed in 
college. To this end, the course is 
designed to help students improve in 
reading, writing, and study skills. The 
technical aspects of writing, 
specihcally grammar, punctuation, 
spelling, and paragraph construction, 
are stressed, along with reading com- 
prehension, vocabulary, sentence 
structure, logical relationships, and 
usage. Students have the opportunity 
to improve particular problem areas 
through completion of individual 
projects in the Reading and Study 
Skills Center. These projects include 
the areas of listening and note taking. 
Grades in LA 109 will be assigned on 
a pass/no grade basis. A final grade 
in LA 109 is earned for demonstrated 
competence in basic expository 
writing. Credits earned do not satisfy 
the Language and Literature distribu- 
tion requirement. Students who 
successfully complete LA 109 must 
register for LA 1 10 A the subsequent 
semester. LA 109 is normally 
registered for no more than two times. 
If a student is permitted to register for 
LA 109 a third time, failure to com- 
plete the course will necessitate 
withdrawal from the degree program. 



LAllOA&B 

Language and Expression 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Training and practice in expository 
and argumentative writing. Students 
who are required to register for 
LA 1 10 must satisfactorily complete 
LA 1 lOA before registering for 
LA 1 lOB. LA 1 lOB must be satisfac- 
torily completed for graduation; it 
must be registered for the semester 
following completion of LA 1 lOA. 



Language and Literature 



LA210A(&B 
American Writers 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The hrst semester course examines 
the major ideas and trends in 
nineteenth-century American litera- 
ture. The course includes the study of 
works by Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, 
Dickinson, and James. 
The second semester course focuses 
on twentieth -century American 
writers and includes the study of 
works by Wharton, Lewis, Hemingway, 
Fitzgerald, and Steinbeck. 

LA211 
Women Writers 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA214A&B 
Oriental Literature 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA215A5tB 
Short Prose 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
As wide a selection as possible of 
short stories and short novels v^rill be 
read and analyzed to discover the 
development of the short story, the 
themes that appear and reappear 
throughout the stories, and the appli- 
cation of these themes to today's 
problems. An anthology containing a 
wide selection of twentieth-century 
short stories, one collection of short 
stories by an individual author, and 
several short novels will be used as 
texts for each semester. 



LA218A&B 
Major Writers: 
Willa Cother/Edith Wharton 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 219 

Children's Literature 

3 credits/semester: spring 
This course is designed as an investi- 
gation into the anonymous oral tra- 
ditions of world literature, which 
continue to nurture the imagination 
and sense of identity of children today, 
and into the modern tradition of 
children's literature. The course 
focuses on children's literature as an 
introduction to the principles and 
forms of art and to the role of the 
imagination in child development. 

LA310A&B 

Literature of Self-Discovery 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 311 
Greek Drama 

3 credits/semester: fall 
Plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, 
Euripides, and Aristophanes are read 
and examined to understand their 
integrity as works of art and to de- 
velop an appreciation of the extraor- 
dinary accomplishment of Greek 
drama. 



LA 312 

Creative Writing: Drama/Film 

3 credits/semester: spring 
Here is a course in the "poetics" of 
script writing- Techniques are 
studied that allow the beginning 
writer to develop an initial idea into 
a workable script for stage or screen. 
Prerequisite: LA 1 10 A <Sr B or 
equivalent. 

LA 313 

Poetry Writing Workshop: 

Composition and Theory 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
In this workshop the students write 
poems to be brought into class, dis- 
cussed, criticized, and put through 
some of the stages of revision that 
would improve the poems and help 
the students to bring them to a further 
degree of excellence. Principles 
governing the decision to change a 
poem in various ways, the study of 
poems by American and English 
poets, the reading of some criticism, 
concentration on the nature of and on 
some of the basic principles of craft — 
these are the main areas that are 
covered. 

LA 314 

Literature and Film 

3 credits/ semester: fall 

By the study of various literary works 

and the films made from them, the 

student develops a knowledge of the 

structural complexities of several 

genre. 

Prerequisite: 3 hours of a 200 level or 

higher literature course. 

LA315 A&B 

Elements of Modern and 

Contemporary Drama 

Not offered 1980-81. 



LA 317 

William Bloke and The English 

Romantic Poets 

3 credits/semester: spring 
This is a survey course which covers 
the poetry of Blake, Coleridge, Words- 
worth, Keats, Shelley, and Byron. 
Works by these writers, and those of 
others, will be studied in an attempt to 
comprehend the larger implications 
of the term "romanticism." 
Prerequisite: 3 hours of a 200 level 
or higher literature course. 

LA 320 A 

Humanities I: Classic. Medieval, 

and Renaissance 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 320 B 

Humanities 11: Neo-classic, 

Romantic, and Modern 

Not offered 1980-81, 

LA411/511 A,411/511 B 
Renaissance Literature 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Works by Petrarch, Erasmus, More, 
Machiavelh, Rabelais, Cervantes, 
Calderon, Shakespeare, and others are 
read to explore the unique contribu- 
tion of those writers and to develop an 
understanding and appreciation of 
the Renaissance. 

LA414A/514A 

Studies in the Novel— Contemporary 

English Writers 

3 credits/semester: fall 
Students read a selection of eight 
English novels written during the last 
thirty years with emphasis upon the 
historical events and issues that were 
the framework in which the authors 
wrote. The authors include such 
established writers as George Orwell 
and Graham Greene as well as the 
feminists Doris Lessing and Margaret 
Drabble. 



LA414B/514B 

Studies in the Novel— Colonial 

Writers 

3 credits/semester: spring 
A study of twentieth-century English- 
speaking writers from former British 
colonies in the Caribbean, Africa, and 
India is made with particular empha- 
sis upon the colomal experience. 
The course begins with the classic. 
The Story of an AIncan Farm, by 
Olive Schreiner and moves through 
the centuiy, ending with The Bend m 
the River, the current novel of V. S. 
Naipaul. 

LA415A&B 

Modern Poetry and Its Interpretation 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The course consists of the reading and 
interpretation of poetry by major 
poets — Eliot, Stevens, Williams, 
Lawrence, Whitman, Bishop, for 
example — and some of the important 
contemporary poets such as Kirmell, 
Levertov, Wright, and others. Foreign 
poets, in translation, are also part of 
the course: Milosz, Pavese, Hikmet, 
Akhmatova, to name four. 
Prose on poetry by most of the poets 
IS included as an important part of 
understanding and interpreting the 
readings. 

LA 416/516 

American Fiction After 1945 

3 credits/ semester: fall 
This course attempts to examine 
representative examples of fiction 
written since 1945. Classes are 
primarily devoted to discussion of the 
fiction as it relates to our culture as a 
product of the times in which it was 
written. The hnal grade is based on 
class participation, two or three 
papers/tests, and a final. 
Prerequisite: LA 1 lOA/B or the 
equivalent. 



LA130A&B 
French I 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
In this course we study the basic 
elements of French grammar through 
conversation and drills derived from 
readings of easy modern prose and 
from a cultural reader. 

LA 132 A&B 
Italian I 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This course covers conversation about 
everyday life and basic grammar 
through reading of Italian prose and 
culture m general. 

LA 230 A & B 
French II 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Open to students who have completed 
French I or who have had two or more 
years of high school French. 
In this course we study French social 
life, geography, art, and literature. It 
includes readings of theater pieces by 
Giraudoux and lonesco. Language of 
class: French. 




Art History 



Beginning in the fall 1980, the Art History faculty will provide a two- 
semester art history sequence which will be required of all students 
matriculating in or after fall 1980. All students matriculating at PCA 
in September 1980 or thereafter must successfully complete a minimum 
of 12 credits in art history to satisfy the art history graduation 
requirement. Students are expected to register for Art History I and 
pass it before they register for Art History II. 



LA 140 A & B 

Art History I, Art History 11 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Students will be expected to 
understand the interaction between 
the structure of society for each major 
style period and the form of major 
works of art from the period. Students 
should gain a framework so that they 
can pursue more specialized courses 
in Liberal Arts and Studio with some 
overall sense of historical and stylistic 
order. They should have a familiarity 
with major innovators in each period. 
They should recognize the vision of 
each age and the logic that produced 
it, thereby making unknown but 
representative works recognizable. 
They should gain a new sense of 
history, of artists, of society, and of art. 

LA 150 A 

Oriental Art History I 

Not offered 1980-81 

LA 150 B 

Oriental Art History II 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 242 A & B 

Classical and Medieval Art History 

Not offered 1980-81, 

LA 243 A 

Northern Renaissance Art 

3 credits/semester: fall 
Course material includes late Gothic 
illuminators, German, Flemish, and 
Dutch painters and graphic artists: 
their style, their iconography, and 
their environment. 



LA 243 B 

Florentine Artists of the Renaissance 

3 credits/semester: spring 
Florence as the focal point of 
Renaissance creativity is studied in 
depth in order to understand the 
variety of new ideas the city produced 
from the fourteenth through the 
sixteenth centuries. 

LA 244 A & B 
Mythology In Oriental Art 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 245 A & B 

History of Architecture 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
From antique to post-modern 
architecture, the Western (nee Euro- 
pean) tradition of architectural 
development has come to represent 
almost all of what we term 
"architecture." This tradition is not 
only the dominant form in industrial 
societies today but has become the 
worldwide language of urban shelter. 
This two-semester course investigates 
not only the chronological progression 
of this development, but attempts also 
to correlate these developments with 
the societies they represent. Non- 
Western and vernacular architectural 
traditions are also considered when 
pertinent. 

LA 250 A & B 
History of Sculpture 

3 credits/semester; tall and spring 
A chronological history of Western 
sculpture from ancient Egypt to 
contemporary America. Emphasis is 
on problems of materials and site as 
well as on the changing social roles of 
the artist. 



LA 254 

European Modernism 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 255 

History of Photography 

3 credits/semester: fall 
The objectives of the course are to 
provide an introduction to the 
signihcant photographers and their 
work in the history of the medium, to 
discuss the major visual and aesthetic 
trends in the development of 
photography as well as those in other 
media, and to describe the larger 
social context in which photography 
has developed. 

LA 345, LA 345 S 
Modern Architecture 

Not offered 1980-81, 

LA 346 

Art of Africa 

3 credits/semester; fall 
Religious, sociological, and geo- 
graphical aspects of several art- 
producing tribes of Western, Central, 
and South Central Africa are studied. 
Intensive stylistic studies are 
presented to establish continuity as 
well as distinction within a given tribe 
and from one tribe to another. Local 
field trips are required. Contemporary 
African artists as well as African 
influence on black American artists 
are discussed. 

LA 347 
Pre-Columbian Art 

3 credits/semester: spring 
Several aspects of Pre-Columbian Art 
emphasizing stylistic distinctions and 
similarities utilizing a geographic and 
chronological structure are studied. 
The cultures of the Aztecs, Mayas, 
and Incas receive particular attention. 
Influence of these Pre-Columbian 
cultures on contemporary artists is 
discussed. 



LA 348 

American Art from the Colonial 

Period to World Warn 

3 credits/semester; fall 

The course anal'i^es the struggles of 

American artists to create an art that 

serves and speaks of America, 

independent of the traditions of 

Europe, 

LA 350 A & B 

History of Modern Crafts 

3 credits/semester: spring 
This course explores the development 
of twentieth-century contemporary 
crafts {ceramics, glass, wood, metal, 
and fabrics) vdth an emphasis on the 
unique contributions of the studio 
artist post-World War 11 to the present. 

LA 353, LA 354 

Impressionism. Post -Impressionism 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 355 

Dada and Surrealism 

3 credits/semester: fall 
The history of the post-World War I 
antirationalist movements, Dada and 
Surrealism. Since these were literary 
and political as well as artistic 
movements, attention is given to texts 
by such authors as Artaud, Breton, 
Freud, larry, Rimbaud, and Tzara as 
well as to works of art. 

LA 422/542 

Arts and Crafts Movement 

3 credits/ semester; fall 
This artistic development m the latter 
half of the nineteenth century, which 
dominated the decorative aits of 
Victorian England, was the foundation 
upon which Europe developed 
twentieth-century modern design. The 
semester course investigates the 
ramihcations of this development from 
the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood to the 
Bauhaus. 



LA 443/543 
Art Nouveau 

3 credits/semester: spring 
This "decorative" style of the 1890s, 
one so short in duration yet so effective 
in its synthesis of so many social and 
artistic influences, is the focus of this 
semester course in the history of 



Art Nouveau was the first conscious 
attempt to develop a modern art — 
one that would be rapidly exploited, 
yet constantly revived in the twentieth 
century. We will investigate and 
research the ramifications of this 
singular period in the history of 
Western society. 

LA 446/546 

Aesthetics of the Urban Environment 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 448/548 
American Art After 1945 

3 credits/semester: spring 
In 1945 World War U ended; the focus 
of modern art shifted from Paris to 
New York City. The course begins with 
Abstract Expressionism, studies other 
major American styles such as Pop 
Art and Mimmalism, and concludes 
with post -Modernist developments 
such as performance and decoration 
by artists. 

LA 450/550 
Art of India 

3 credits/semester: fall 
The course covers painting, sculpture, 
and architecture from the Indus Valley 
civilization of the 2nd millenium B C. 
through the different periods of 
Buddhist, Hindu, and Islamic 
dominance to the Rajput paintmg of 
the eighteenth century A.D. The 
different art styles are related to their 
historical, religious, and social 
background. Prerequisite: 6 hours of 
Art History. 



LA 452/ 552 A, 452/552 B 
Art of China 

3 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
The course covers painting, sculpture, 
architecture, and decorative arts from 
the Neolithic period (sixteenth 
century B.C.) to the Northern Sung 
Dynasty (twelfth century A.D-) in the 
hrst semester, from the Southern 
Sung Dynasty (twelfth century A.D.) 
to the Ch'ing Dynasty (eighteenth 
century A.D.) in the second semester. 
Special emphasis is placed upon the 
Shang bronze ware, the H'an and 
T'ang sculpture, the Sung and Yuan 
landscape painting, and the Sung and 
Ch'ing pottery. Prerequisite: 6 hours 
of Art History. 

LA 453/553 
Art of Japan 

3 credits/semester: spring 
The course covers painting, sculpture, 
architecture, and decorative arts of 
Japan from the Neolithic period to the 
eighteenth century A.D, It studies 
the emergence of a unique national 
style from an art world dominated by 
Chinese influence. Special attention is 
placed upon the influence of Zen 
Buddhism on Japanese culture. 
Prerequisite: 6 hours of Art History. 

LA 454/554 

The Bauhaus: Art and Design 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 455/555 

Art Deco: Art and Design 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 456/556 

Major European Baroque Artists 

3 credits/ semester: spring 
The course covers the major baroque 
artists of Europe, their styles as 
individual, national, and baroque 
exemplars. The religious and social 
environments that supported this rich 
and varied art are also considered. 



History and Social Studies 



LA 160 A&B 
World History 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 162 

Introduction to Sociology 

3 credits/semester: fall 
An introduction to the study of society, 
including an examination of language 
and symbols, socialization, status and 
class, ethnic groups, religion, social 
organization, deviance, families, and 
social change- Particular emphasis 
on politics and culture. 

LA 164 
Archaeology 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 165 A&B 

African and Afro-American History 

and Cultures 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 260 A 
Human Origins I 

3 credits/semester: fall 
An introduction to General 
Anthropology, the "history of ideas," 
mechanisms of evolution, and the 
place of Homo sapiens within the 
animal kingdom. Focus and major 
emphasis is on the order Primate, 
living nonhuman primates — their 
biology and behavior — and trends in 
primate evolution with emphasis on 
hominid evolution. 



LA 260 B 
Human Origins II 

3 credits/ semester: spring 
This course forms an intellectual and 
somewhat chronological succession to 
Human Origins I, The course 
framework is archeology as 
anthropology and the archeological 
record. Emphasis is on human 
biological and cultural evolution 
throughout the Paleolithic v/ith a 
discussion of the major biological 
stages of human evolution, and an 
introduction to Paleolithic 
technologies. The course also 
addresses the question of the 
peoplmg of the New World. The 
course ends with an introduction to 
contemporary Stone Age societies. 

LA 262 A & B 

For Eastern Ifistory 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 263 A & B 
Political Science 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An introductory course dealing with 
the fundamentals of the American 
political system via its institutions and 
political behavior. Topics include: power 
and change, confUct and consent, liberty 
vs- authority. 

LA264 

Contemporary American Institutions 

and Systems 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 265 A & B 

History and Culture of Latin 

America 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 266 

Social Interaction and 

Social Structures 

Not offered 1980-81. 



LA 267 

Introduction to Cultural 

Anthropology 

3 credits/semester: iall 
An introduction to the cultural 
variation of Western and non-Western 
societies. This survey of cultural 
expression includes religion, myth and 
art; kinship, marriage, and formation 
of social groups; ecological 
adaptation; economic and political 
organization; and the relationship 
between culture and personality, 

LA 268 A & B 
American Civilization 

3 credits/semester; fall and spring 
An m-depth study of the origins of 
American democracy with an 
emphasis on how the Umted States 
was shaped into its paiticulai 
political, social, and cultural patterns. 
The subject matter of the first 
semester includes the process of 
settlement, colonial societies, the 
movement for independence, the 
framing of the Constitution, the trials 
of the new nation. 
The subject matter of the second 
semester includes the growth of the 
egalitarian spirit, the Civil War, 
Reconstruction, and the rise of 
national consciousness. 
LA 268 A & B is the first year of a 
two-year cycle. LA 269 A & B will 
study the periods 1877-1917 and 
1917 to the present. 

LA 359 

Sociology of Politics 

3 credits/ semester; fall 
Interaction of political and social 
forces within the American 
community and the resultant impact 
on government structure and process 
are analyzed. Factors such as 
population profiles, "suburbanites," 
elite groups, public opinion, party 
organization, elections, and reform 
movements are studied. 



LA 360 A 

Renaissance and Reformation 

(1400-1648) 

3 credits/semester: fall 
A historical approach to an 
understanding of major aspects of 
Western civihzation. The intellectual 
and cultural explosion that 
distinguishes the Renaissance period 
and the religious and political 
upheaval that distinguishes the 
Reformation are the subject matter 
of the course. Political, economic, 
intellectual, and cultural 
developments are studied. The unique 
contribution of the period to Western 
development is stressed. 

LA 360 B 

Age oi Science and Enlightenment 

(1600-1815) 

3 credits/ semester: spring 
A continuation of LA 360 A with 
special emphasis on the unique 
contribution of the period to Western 
development. The dramatic intellectual 
revolution of the Age of Science and the 
applications of that revolution to every 
province of human experience are the 
subject matter of the course, Political, 
intellectual, economic, and cultural 
developments are studied. 

LA 361 A&B 
Criminology 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 363 

Social Problems 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 364 
Sociology of Art 

3 credits/semester: spring 
An introduction to the study of art and 
society, including an examination of 
social influences on art and artists' 
visions of society. This course focuses 
on film, literature, and painting, 
studying such artists as Oscar Wilde, 
Albert Camus, Picasso. 



LA 366 A & B 

The City: Its History and Uses 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A study of the city in history, the forces 
that shaped its development, and the 
impact the city has had on history. 
The American City from the 
seventeenth century to the present will 
be used as the model for this study. 
The second semester of this course will 
be an in-depth study of selected urban 
problems and themes dealing with 
urban history. Prerequisite: LA 366 A 
or permission of the instructor. 

LA 367 

Major Historical Figures 

3 credits/semester: fall 
This course examines conflicting 
appraisals of the lives and times of 
significant Western and non- Western 
figures. Emphasis is on the historical 
method and differences in Eastern 
and Western viewpoints. 

LA 368 
World War II 

3 credits/semester: spring 
This course is a thorough examination 
of World War II which includes the 
rise of fascism, the origins of the war, 
and Hitler's life and personality. 
Conflicting inter'pretations of such 
events as Pearl Harbor and Potsdam 
are studied. Emphasis is on causes 
and effects rather than battles and 
generals. 



LA 369 
Cultural Ecology 

3 credits/semester: spring 
This course reviews the adaptations 
human groups have made to differing 
environments: deserts, grasslands, 
circumpolar regions, tropical and 
temperate forests, island, high 
altitude, and urban. Adaptations of 
the hunter-gatherer, fisherman, 
pastoralist, agriculturalist, and of 
shiftmg, irrigation, and industry are 
examined in light of their use of 
energy, labor, technology, resources, 
their attitude to the environment, and 
rate of population growth. 

LA 460, 560 

Twentieth-Century American 
Society 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 461/561 
The Civil War 

3 credits/semester: spring 
An in-depth study of the most tragic 
period in American history, including 
an analysis of the causes of the war, 
the social and economic changes 
precipitated by the war, the battles, 
and the long and equally tragic effort 
to reconstruct the nation. 



Philosophy and Science 



LA 170 A&B 
Introduction to Philosophy 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An introduction to analytic 
philosophy;includes a brief 
examination of the history of Western 
philosophy with an emphasis on 
modern philosophy and the works of 
Descartes, Berkeley, and Hume. 
Several substantive problems are 
considered in detail, such as the 
existence of God, the mind-body 
problem, and the nature of knowledge. 



LA 181 A 

Child and Adolescent Psychology 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This course includes study of the 
physical, intellectual, emotional, and 
social development of the child, 
parent-child relationships, personality 
development, self-concept, the 
psychosocial stages of human life, and 
the quest for identity. 



LA 181 B 

Adult Psychology 

3 credits/semester: spring 
This course is developmentally 
oriented and focus is upon Eiikson's 
psychosocial crises from adolescence 
to death. Some major topics studied 
are career choice, human sexuality, 
love, marriage, values, mental health 
and mental illness, aging and death 

LA 281 

Readings in Psychology 

Not offered 1980-81, 

LA 282 

Concepts and Structures of 

Mathematics 

3 credits/ semester: fall or spring 
This course is designed for students 
with no previous background in 
mathematics. Elementary topics in 
logic, space, and functions are 
discussed, Of interest m itself, the 
course forms a suitable foundation for 
students who wish to pursue more 
advanced courses in analytic 
geometry and calculus. 

LA371 

Theories of Knowledge and Reality 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 372 
Existentialism 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 373 A & B 
Comparative Religion 

3 credits/ semester: fall and sprmg 
This course covers the world's major 
religions by studying their historical 
development, beliefs, and sacred 
literature, and the works of 
contemporary writers. The first 
semester is concerned with Eastern 
religions, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, 
and Taoism, the second semester 
deals with Judaism, Christianity, 
and Islam, 



LA 380 A 
Life Sciences 

3 credits/semester: fall 
The study of life as it evolved from 
unicellular organisms to humans. 
Special emphasis on behavior, instinct 
and learning, aggression and human 
nature, and ecology. 

LA 380 B 
Physical Sciences 

3 credits/ semester: spring 
An investigation of astronomy, 
geology, and other physical sciences, 
the origin of the universe and solar 
system, the nature of physical 
sciences, matter and energy. This 
course provides a background for 
understanding the problems of 
scientihc impact on human values. 

LA 381 

Psychology of Creativity 

3 credits/ semester: fall 
This course examines the creative 
process and the problems involved in 
attemptmg both to define and 
measure creativity. The course is 
developmentally oriented and so we 
study the relationships between 
creativity and normal growrth and 
development, intelligence, and 
personality. 

LA 382 

Contemporary Psychology 

Not offered 1980-81 

LA 384 

Abnormal Psychology 

3 credits/ semester: fall 

Human development and abnormal 

psychology: ego defenses, emotional 

disorders, therapeutic theories and 

treatment techmques. Clinical 

diagnosis and classification of mental 

disorders. 

Prerequisite: LA 181 A or LA 181 B. 



LA 385 

Social Psychology 

3 credits/ semester: spring 
An exploration of family dynamics, 
group behavior, attitudes, 
communications, group processes, 
roles, and culture. An examination of 
our social institutions and social 
problems. Prerequisite: LA 181 A or 
LA 181 B- 

LA386 

Advanced Mathematics 

3 credits/semester: spring 
The major topics covered in this 
course include the real number 
system, functions and relations, 
exponential and logarithmic functions, 
elementary circular and trigonometric 
functions, and an introduction to the 
calculus. Elementary differentiation 
and integration are combined with 
applied problems in rates, areas, 
curve length, and volumes. 

LA 387 

Applied Psychology of Design 

3 credits/ semester: fall or spring 
An introduction to the general 
concepts of human information, 
utilization, intake, and output. 
Subjects covered include the nature 
of human attention, rules affecting the 
rate and types of information that can 
be attended to and the way that such 
information is mternally processed. 
The design of visual and auditory 
displays, devices for human manual 
manipulation (knobs, levers, controls 
in general}, work spaces, and general 
environmental considerations are 
explored in depth. The relationship of 
design to environmental stress and 
human safety and comfort is 
considered. 

LA 388 
Perception 

3 credits/ semester: fall or spring 
The structure and function of the 
senses of vision, audition, olfaction, 
gustation, touch, temperature, 
Idnesthesis, time, and the brain and 
nervous system are considered as 
they relate to perception. 



LA 470, 570 
Introduction to Aesthetics 

3 credits/ semester: fall 
An introduction to the philosophy of 
art. After a brief examination of 
analytic philosophic methods and the 
history of aesthetics, we consider some 
of the fundamental problems in 
aesthetics: the intention of the artist, 
the physical object/ aesthetic object 
distinction, and the nature and 
comparison of different kinds of art 
media. The relationship between 
language and art is central to the 
course. Prerequisite: LA 170 or 
permission of the instructor. 

LA 470 S/ 570 S 
Aesthetics Seminar 

3 credits/ semester: spring 
The course is a critical, in-depth 
examination of some fundamental 
problems m the philosophy of art. It 
reviews the analytic method of 
philosophic inquiry, considers the 
relevance of Wittgenstein to 
contemporary aesthetics (i.e., what 
can be said about works of art and 
what cannot be said}, and also covers 
some recent theories of Nelson 
Goodman regarding representation, 
exemplihcation, and symbol systems. 
Prerequisite: LA 170 or instructor's 
permission. 

LA 471 

Social Philosophy 

Not offered 1980-81, 

LA 481, 581 

Freud and Freudian Psychology 

Not offered 1980-81. 

LA 482, 582 
Post-Freudian Psychology 

Not offered 1980-81. 




General Studies 



LA 091 A&B 
Music as Art 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This IS primarily a listening course of 
Romantic music from the second half 
of the nineteenth century- This period 
begins with the death of Beethoven 
and ends with the death of Mahler. It 
includes Berlioz, Brahms, Wagner, 
and French Impressionism. 

LA 148 
Introduction to Film 

3 credits/semester: fall 
A survey on the art of the film and the 
nature of the film experience, with 
special emphasis on the relationship 
of signihcant films to the modern 
tradition — such as Dada/Surrealism, 
constructivism, German 
Expressionism, abstract and 
conceptual art. Attention is paid to 
narrative and theatrical conventions 
and the impact of social, intellectual, 
and cultural forces- Films by directors 
like Orson Welles, Jean Renoir, Ingmai 
Bergman, Jean-Luc Godard, Stanley 
Kubrick, Robert Altman, and the New 
American Experimental cinema group 
are supplemented with readings by 
major cinema theorists. 

LA 248 A 
History of Film I 

3 credits/semester: spring 
The course examines the nature of the 
film experience as a major force in 
the "idea of the contemporary," It is 
concerned, therefore, with the 
relationship of significant films to the 
modern tradition — to art-historical 
movements; to narrative and theatrical 
conventions; to social, intellectual, and 
cultural forces. Critical readings will 
supplement the screenings. Works of 
major films from Griffith and Eisenstein 
through Renoir, Bergman, and Godard 
will be studied. 



LA 248 B 
History of Film II 

3 credits/semester: spring 
A continuation of History of Film I, 
with emphasis on cinema as narrative, 
through an understanding of the 
major trends of contemporary cinema. 
The focus is on World Cinema, with 
special emphasis on the avant-garde 
and experimental. The relationship 
between image and viewer and the 
treatment of women in films will also 
have a major emphasis in the course, 

LA 394 

Creative Life of the Early Twentieth 

Century 

Not offered 1980-81, 

LA 395 

Creative Life of the Later Twentieth 

Century 

Not offered 1980-81, 



a«v5h?rr'T'. 



City Hall 



ART THERAPY 

Students who wish to enroll in the Art Therapy program register for art 
therapy courses as studio electives. Students complete all requirements 
in their chosen major department; the B.F.A. or B.S. degree is awarded 
in the studio major with concentration noted in art therapy. 

Interested students should request an interview with the Art Therapy 
advisor, Martha Breiden; the Liberal Arts division can schedule 
appointments. 



Faculty 

Martha Breiden, Director 
Leah Freedman 
KnoUy Hill 



Sherry Lyons 
Nancy Markowich 



Liberal Arts Requirements: 

By the end of the sophomore year, 
students should have completed 
LA 181 A, Child and Adolescent 
Psychology; LA 181 B, Adult 
Psychology, and any two of the 
following courses: LA 170, 
Introduction to Philosophy; LA 162, 



Introduction to Sociology; LA 260, 
Human Origins; LA 267, Introduction 
to Cultural Anthropology; LA 361, 
Criminology; LA 369, Cultural 
Ecology- Juniors should register for: 
LA 384, Abnormal Psychology and 
LA 385, Social Psychology. 




Avenue of the Arts celebrat: 



PCA Campus in background 



AT 300 

Introduction to Art Therapy: 

Emotional and Social Problems 

3 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall 
An introduction to art therapy 
including the normal development of 
art; emotional and social problems of 
children, adolescents, adults, and the 
aged. The course includes field visits 
to a variety of institutions where art 
therapy can be practiced. The student 
is exposed to a wide range of 
intellectual, physical, emotional and 
social disorders. AT 300 and AT 301 
must both be taken first semester. 



AT 301 

Social and Group Process 

3 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester; fall 

A group dynamics course structured 

to help the student better understand 

him or herself and his or her 

interaction in dealing directly with 

feelings activated by field visits. 

AT302 

Clinical Aspects of Art Therapy 

3 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: spring 
A weekly meeting with the art 
therapist and psychiatrist to present 
a survey of the held of art therapy 
through live interviews, films, 
literature and discussion. AT 302 and 
AT 303 must both be taken second 
semester. 



AT 303 

Theories and Techniques of Art 

Therapy 

3 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: spring 

An introduction to the different types 

of disorders and the theories and 

techniques of art therapy utilized with 

the various papulations. 

AT 400 

Theories of Personality 

3 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall 

An emphasis on psychoanalytic theory 

but also including behaviorism, 

humanism, existentialism, etc. 

Prerequisites: All AT 300-level 

courses. 



AT 401 

Senior Practicum (restricted) 

3 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: spring 
A field placement for the mature and 
exceptional student. An opportunity 
for supervised clinical practicum is 
arranged for students; selection is 
based on demonstrated ability, 
academic average in AT courses, 
individual maturity, and potential for 
growth. Placement is determined by 
consensus of the Art Therapy faculty 
and advisor. 




EDUCATION 



Faculty 



William Russell, Acting Chairperson 
Arlene Gostin 
Ted Katz 

Charles Kaprelian 
Fred Osborne 



Claire Owen 
Karen Saler 
Karen Scholnick 
Robert Sebastian 
David Taller 



Teacher Certification: Undergraduate 

The teaching of art offers opportunities for students to work in a 
profession that provides possibilities for their own continued growth 
while they, in turn, provide for the aesthetic and creative experience of 
children and young adults. In preparing students for careers in 
education, PCA is committed to producing graduates who are "able to 
do" as well as "able to teach." To that end the Education Department 
offers a competency-based program leading to the Pennsylvania 
Instructional I Certihcate, qualifying the student to teach art 
kindergarten through twelfth grade. 

The curriculum is designed to provide the student with both the 
theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for effective teaching. 
Students gain a command of the theories and concepts supporting art 
and education and are involved in initial teaching experiences at the 
sophomore level. Opportunities to teach in traditional and alternative 
settings such as the College's multi-age Saturday School, special 
education and museum programs, and adult education classes provide 
experiences directed toward the development of excellence in 
teaching. 

Students are able to earn a teaching certificate while majoring in a 
studio department and working toward the B.F.A. or B.S. degree. By 
enrolling in the Teacher Certihcation Program in the sophomore year, 
a student may earn a degree and a teaching certificate within the 
four-year program. 

Teacher Certification: Post-Graduate 

Students who hold bachelor's degrees enroll in the certification 
program as special students. Program requirements will be determined 
by the student's qualifications. Upon review of a student's credentials, 
credit may be given for prior course work and job experience by 
approval of the department. Special students normally complete the 
program in two semesters. 

Master of Arts in Art Education 

Graduate study at PCA offers students the opportunity to pursue 
individually designed irmovative combinations of education and visual 



studies. Choosing from one of the College's major studio departments, 
students are able to combine advanced studies in the studio with those 
in education and liberal arts. The education components of the 
program are theoretical and culminate in a thesis project reflecting 
original investigation. Students may design their education studies to 
include an internship in a special-interest area such as museum 
education. Upon graduation, students pursue careers as fine artists, 
teachers; in research, educational media arts administration, and 
design. 

The College offers through its Education Department a 33-credit 
Master of Arts in Art Education degree. The program consists of three 
components: The Studio Major (15 credits), Liberal Arts (6 credits), and 
Studies in Education (12 credits). 

1. Liberal Arts, 6 credits 

Graduate work in literature, aesthetics, art history, philosophy, 
and psychology may be pursued through coursework or approved 
independent study. Any 500-level Liberal Arts course may be 
taken to satisfy this requirement. Courses below the 500 level 
must be authorized by the program chairperson. 

2. Studio Major, 15 credits 

With approval, studio work may be taken in any one of the 
College's nine major departments. 

3. Studies in Education, 12 credits 

Requirements are the courses listed and acceptance of the thesis 
or visual project. 

The completion of a candidate's resident program does not guarantee 
the granting of the Master's degree. Not only the academic record of 
the candidate but the complete thesis is subject to final review and 
approval by the student's thesis committee. The complete thesis must 
be approved by the student's thesis committee one month prior to the 
anticipated date of graduation. 

A student who does not achieve the required cumulative average will 
be placed on academic probation for one semester. At the conclusion 
of that semester, the student's progress vrill be reviewed and a 
determination about continuance in the program will be made by the 
Academic Review Committee upon recommendation by the graduate 
faculty. 

Transfer of Credits 

Students transferring from other graduate programs, or those having 
completed acceptable post-baccalaureate study elsewhere, may be 
allowed to transfer up to 6 credits toward their Master's program. The 
acceptance of these credits is based on faculty evaluation. 

Academic Requirements 

To be admissible, a candidate must hold a Bachelor's degree or 
equivalent. A Teaching Certificate is not required, but those who want 
one may pursue it concurrently with the M.A. program. 



Students without degrees in the visual arts will be required to 
complete 18 credits of Foundation studies, 30 credits of a Studio major, 
6 credits of Liberal Arts, and 12 credits of Studies in Education. 

The Master of Arts in Art Education program may be pursued either 
full- or part-time. The program must be completed within a maximum 
period of five years including leave of absence from the date of 
admission. All degree candidates must maintain a cumulative point 
average of 3.0 in course work to be regarded in good academic 
standing. Students will qualify for candidacy for the M.A. upon 
satisfactory completion of half the required coursework and with the 
approval of the major studio and education departments. 

Financial Aid 

Financial aid to graduate students consists of assistantships, grants- 
in-aid, and loan assistance through the State Guaranteed Loan 
Programs. To be considered for an assistantship or grant administered 
by the College, a student must complete a Graduate and Professional 
School Financial Aid Service application which can be obtained from 
PCA or the College Scholarship Service. Parental information is 
required by all applicants; the College reserves the right to exempt 
where indicated. The application deadline for such assistance is 
April 15 for fall and November 15 for spring. Applications for state 
guaranteed loans must be obtained from your local bank. Students with 
assistantships must maintain a "B" average and enroll for 10 credits 
per semester. 

Graduate applicants are also encouraged to investigate the State 
Guaranteed Loan Program in their resident state. 

Students enrolling for the Teacher Certification Program who have 
earned a master's or baccalaureate degree are ineligible for financial 
assistance from the college. 



Studio Requirements: 

All certification candidates must 
complete 4.5 credits m two- 
dimensional studio courses if their 
major is in a three-dimensional area, 
and vice versa. Also, one studio course 
is required in Photography or Film. 

Liberal Arts Requirements: 

By the end of the sophomore year, it is 
recommended that the student 
complete LA 181, Child and 
Adolescent Development, plus one 
course in Sociology. In addition, 
students must register for 6 credits 
in Art History at the 200, 300, or 
400 level. 



Students who choose to work toward 
certihcation will take education 
courses as electives. To assure 
coordination between the major and 
the teacher certification program it is 
strongly recommended that each 
student meet with his or her education 
department advisor each semester 
prior to advance registration. 

A detailed description of the 
coordinated program with Teacher 
Certihcation is available in the 
Education Department. Students 
interested in Education but not 
wishing to work toward the certificate 
may, with department permission, 
take courses on an elective basis. 



Freshman students who have achieved 
a score of 500 on their verbal SAT 
may begin certification coursework 
during their freshman year. Students 
will not be admitted to the 



certification program who have not 
satisfactorily completed LA HOB, 
Language and Expression. They may, 
however, begin certification course 
work as elective students. 



Teacher Certification with Studio Major 

In addition to meeting the requirements of a major studio department, 
students seeking teacher certification are required to meet course 
requirements in the Education Department. These courses are 
to be registered for as a part of the elective portion of the studio 
program. All courses are one semester. The recommended sequence 
of education courses is as follows: 



TE214 


- Introduction to Visual Arts 
Education 


1.5 


Sophomore 
Fall 


TE21S 


Contemporary Concepts in 
Teaching 


1.5 


Spring 


TE220 


Education Psychology 


1.5 


Sophomore or Junior 
Fall or Spring 


TE216 


Materials and Methods 


1.5 


lunior 

Fall or Spring 


TE313 


Soturday Practicum 
Prerequisites: TE 214, 
TE215, TE216 


3.0 


lunior 

Fall or Spring 

Senior 

Fall 


TE314 


Practicum/Seminar 
(eight weeks only) 
Prerequisites: TE 214, TE 215. 
TE 216, TE 220, TE 313 


9.0 


Senior 

Fall or Spring 


TE414 


Professional Practices 
Prerequisites: TE 214. TE 215. 
TE216. TE220, TE313 


1.5 


Senior 

Fall or Spring 


Choice of: 
TE999 
GESOO 
GE501 


Special Project 
Research Methods 
Readings in Art and 
Education 


1.5 
1.5 
1.5 


lunior or Senior 
Fall or Spring 



TE214 

Introduction To Visual Arts 

Education 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Through school observations, 
introduction to the philosophies of art 
education, learning theory, child 
development, curriculum 
development, and mini-teaching, the 
student has the opportunity to 
experience the various aspects of 
teaching kindergarten through 
twelfth grades. 

TE215 

Contemporary Concepts in Teaching 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The student is exposed to specialized 
and alternative teaching situations. 
Included are — museum education, 
schools for all ages, traditional and 
open classroom, teaching basic skills 
through the arts, early childhood 
education and special education, 
higher and adult education. Through 
review of current literature, field trips, 
guest lecturers, and discussions, 
students develop curricula for these 
areas of specialization. 

TE220 

Educational Psychology 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
Various aspects of educational 
psychology are examined. These 
include cultural and family factors 
that influence learning, the 
expectations conveyed by teacher 
behavior, techniques of instruction, 
behaviorism and creativity. Emphasis 
is placed on retrospective analysis of 
each student's individual educational 
experiences. 



TE216 

Materials and Methods 

3 hours, once a week 
1,5 credits/semester: fall and sprmg 
Through observation, planning, and 
participation in media workshops, this 
course examines the process of 
selecting material for effective 
classroom use with emphasis on means 
of lesson implementation. 

TE313 

Saturday Practicum/Seminar 

4.5 hours, once a week 
1.5 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Students are involved in all aspects of 
the Saturday School. They observe 
classroom interaction, plan and teach 
lessons, and exhibit student work 
under the supervision of professional 
artist -educators and a college 
supervisor. 

TE314 

Pr act icum /S emi nar 

6 hours, 5 times a week for eight weeks 
1 ,5 hours, once a week for eight weeks 
9 credits/semester; fall and spring 
The student registers for the semester 
in two eight-week blocks. The hrst is 
devoted to eight weeks of student 
teaching, four weeks at the elementary 
level and four at the secondary. The 
second eight weeks are devoted to an 
intensive studio program. Students are 
supervised by cooperating teachers 
and a college supervisor. 

TE414 

Professional Practices 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
As a culmination of their work in 
studio and in education, seniors 
design and install an exhibition and 
participate in a seminar workshop on 
professional practices and 
contemporary issues in education. 



Choice of: TE 999, Special Project; 
GE 5CX), Research Methods; GE 501, 
Readings in Art and Education. 

GE500 
Research Methods 

1 V2 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Emphasis is on problem solving 
pertinent to the writing of research or 
funding proposals in the areas of art 
education or administration. Students 
are required to learn elementary 
research design and investigative 
techniques before conducting a study 
or submitting a grant proposal of their 



GE501 

Readings In Art and Education 

1 Vz hours, once a week 
1 ,5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This seminar cultivates creative 
thinking. It focuses on the effect of 
education on one's life, the role of art 
education, and the place art occupies 
in the world at large. Assumptions 
based on historic and contemporary 
philosophies are questioned and 
critically examined. Specified 
readings and a paper are course 
requirements. 

GE509 
Professional Studies 

6 hours, twice a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
With faculty consultation, students 
plan and carry out an internship in 
some aspect of art education: museum 
education, special education, higher 
education, research, art supervision, 
arts administration, or educational 
media. 



GE510 
Thesis 

1.5 - 5.5 credits: fall and/or spring 
The thesis represents independent and 
original inquiry into a theoretical or 
practical problem or issue in art 
education. The thesis may be visual 
but must include formal written 
support. The student develops and 
executes the thesis under the 
guidance of an advisor and thesis 
committee. 

GE512 

Seminar: Organizational Concepts 

1 hour, once a week 
0.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Individually prescribed work on thesis 
proposal and attainment of thesis 
objectives- Seminar and structured 
individual study. A satisfactory thesis 
proposal must be written by the 
conclusion of the course. 

GE515 

Contemporary Concepts In Teaching 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: tall and spring 
The student is exposed to specialized 
and alternative teaching situations. 
Included are — museum education, 
schools for all ages, traditional and 
op>en classroom, teaching basic skills 
through the arts, early childhood 
education and special education, 
higher and adult education. Through 
review of current literature, field trips, 
guest lecturers, and discussions, 
students develop curricula for these 
areas of specialization. 

Education Department Electives 

Education courses for teacher 
certihcation are registered for as 
electives. Refer to the program in 
Education for complete course 
descriptions. 





CRAFT 

The Craft department provides studio experience in the processes and 
materials of four major areas: ceramics, fibres, metals, and wood. There 
are supplementary offerings in glass and plaster as well. 

Craft studies are planned so that the student can acquire a 
comprehensive understanding of the irmate properties of the materials 
and a full command of manipulative and technical skills. Emphasis is 
also placed on the investigation of ideas and possibilities through 
drawing and design. The combined knowledge gained by these studies 
helps each student develop a personal mastery of materials and self- 
expression. 

In the program, majors are encouraged to take at least 6 credits in a 
craft other than their concentration in order to investigate more than 
one possibihty and to expand their experience. li the student has 
demonstrated ability to do successful work in two crafts, he may choose 
to pursue others as well in the last two years of the program. 

The study of crafts at PCA is particularly rewarding because of the 
extensive crafts resources and professional activity in the Philadelphia 
area. The Crafts department is committed to providing instruction by 
artists/craftspeople who are practicing professionals as well as 
teachers. Students are advised to study the History of Twentieth- 
Century Crafts, which provides additional exposure to the background 
and philosophy of crafts. 

The program is further enhanced by visits to exhibitions, museums, 
and private collections and by frequent lectures by prominent and 
distinguished guest artists/craftspeople. 

Upon graduation 'some students choose to continue study on the 
graduate level. Increasingly, however, more graduates work as 
independent artists operating private studio/shops, as teachers of 
crafts, or as consultants to industry and architects. In many cases, 
individuals combine these pursuits to meet either personal or particular 
needs and goals. 

The goal of the department is to develop artists/craftspeople of in- 
dividuality and imagination with the resourcefulness to achieve the 
highest professional and creative level. 



Faculty- 
Richard H. Reinhardt, Co-Chairperson Roland Jahn 
Petras Vaskys, Co-Chairperson Richard Kagan 
Mark Bums Leon Lugassy 
Sharon Church Warren Seelig 
Wilham Daley Rudi Staffel 
Robert De Fuccio Stephanie Tyiska 
Robert Forbes Robert Worth 



All Department courses— students in 
every area must attend. 

CR201 A&B 
Introduction to Concept 
Development 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester; fall and spring 
A two-part course in the study of 
visual investigation and manipulation 
of formal ideas. 



CR 401 A&B 

Senior Croit: Crafts Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A forum for the discussion of ideas and 
issues of concern to students of crafts 
through student participation, guest 
lecturers, professional offerings. A 
study of style and the survival 
techniques of contemporaries working 
in craft media will be emphasized. 



Intermediate (Junior) — Required 



Credits 



CRAFT: Ceramics - Required Credits per Year 


Year 


Ceramics 
Major 


Studio 
Electives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foundation 


18 


3 


12 


II Sophomore 


15 


6 


12 


III Junior 


15 


6 


12 


IV Senior 


IS 


6 


12 



Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 



CR 201 Introduction to Concept Development 
CH 2 1 1 Introduction to Throwing 
CR 2 12 Introduction to Handbuilding 
Ciaft Introduction Course in Chosen Crait 

Studio Electives (CR 25 1 Moldmaking-Casting) 

Liberal Arts 



3,0 
3,0 
3,0 
6.0 
6.0 
12,0 



CR211 

Introduction to Throwing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: iall and spring 
Beginning studio work with clay using 
the throwing process and related 
glazing and firing techniques. 

CR212 

Introduction to Handbuilding 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Beginning studio work with clay using 

the handbuilding processes of slab. 

coil, pinch, and pressing from molds, 

plus related glazing and firing 

techniques. 



CR213A 

Ceramic Technology: Cloys & Kilns 

1.5 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits/semester: fall 

A lecture and lab course to investigate 

the theoretical and practical aspects 

of clays, clay bodies, and kilns. 



CR 313 Ceramic Technology 
CR 3 1 1 Intermediate Ceramics 
CR312 Intermediate Ceramics 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



CR311 A&B 
CR 312 A&B 
Intermediate Ceramics 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Studio work with clay to develop 
individual ability with the processes 
and concepts of the craft. 
Demonstrations and projects are given 
by the instructor. 
Prerequisite: CR211 &212 

CR313B 

Ceramic Technology: Glazes 

1.5 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits/semester: spring 

A lecture and lab course to investigate 

the theoretical and practical aspects 

of glazes. 



Advanced (Senior) — Required 



CR 401 Crafts Seminar 

CR 4 1 1 Advanced Ceramic Studio 

CR412 Advanced Ceramic Studio 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



CR411 A&B 
CR412 A&B 
Advanced Ceramic Studio 

6 hours twice a week 
6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The intensive work in personal 
development is handled on a one-to- 
one basis with the instructor. The 
guidance offered affirms the student's 
development as a distinct and 
creative person. 



3.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 

12,0 



Credits 



3,0 
6,0 
6.0 
6.0 
12.0 



CRAFT: Fibres - Required Credits per Year 1 


Year 


Fibres 
Major 


Studio 
Electives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foundation 


18 


3 


12 


II Sophomore 


15 


6 


12 


III lunior 


IS 


6 


12 


IV Senior 


15 


6 


12 



Intermediate (Junior) — Required 



Credits 



Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 



Credits 



CR 20 1 Introduction to Concept Development 
CR 221 Introduction to Rbres Media Explorations 
CR 222 Introduction to Rbres Structural Investigation 
Crait Introduction Course in Chosen Craft 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
6.0 
6.0 
12.0 



CR221 

Introductory Fibres Media 

Exploration 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits /semester: fall and spring 
Materials and fibres are explored 
through a series of developmental 
assignments — exploratory work in 
two-dimensional and three- 
dimensional form prepares student for 
versatile and solid approach to fibres 
design orientation — discharge 
printing, resist printing, felting, etc. 



CR222 

Introductory Fibres Structural 

Investigation 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Structural processes explored in two- 
dimensional and three-dimensional 
form. Equal emphasis to be placed on 
primitive loom and off-loom 
techniques. Dyeing methods and the 
reaction to various fibres to dyes are 
included - 



CR 334 Fibres Technology 

CR 321 Intermediate Surface Design 

CR 322 Intermediate Structural Fibres 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 

12.0 



CR321 A&B 

Intermediate Surface Design 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Surface design — two-dimensional 
design approached incorporating 
small-scale and large-scale design 
problems associated with individual 
and industrial production. 

CR 322 A & B 

Intermediate Structural Fibres 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
Through a series of developmental 
assignments, the student becomes 
familiar with a loom through 
appropriate exercises. A continuation 
of advanced off-loom projects. 



CR334 

Fibres Technology 

1.5 hours, once a week 
1,5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A lecture course that investigates 
textile structure vrith emphasis on 
drafting of basic weaves. It will also 
explore color and material in relation 
to texture in preparation for portfoUo 
presentation. 



Advanced (Senior) — Required 



CR401 Crafts Seminar 

CR 423 Advanced Surface Design 

CR 425 Advanced Structural Fibres 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 

12.0 




CR 423 A & B 

Advanced Surface Design 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Suitably complex problems based 
on the knowledge and experience 
acquired in previous years with 
further investigation into specific 
techniques for special projects. 
Emphasis is placed on self- 
development and structuring of 
personal assignments. PortfoUo 
preparation. An independent study 
program is possible with the approval 
of the instructors. 



CR 425 A & B 

Advanced Structural Fibres 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Suitably complex problems based on 
the knowledge and experience 
acquired in previous years with further 
investigation into specihc techniques 
for special projects. Emphasis is 
placed on self-development and 
structuring of personal assignments. 
Portfolio preparation. An independent 
study program is possible vrith the 
approval of the instructors. 



CRAFT: Metals - Required Credits per Year 


Year 


Metals 
Major 


Studio 
Electives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foundation 


18 


3 


12 


II Sophomore 


15 


6 


12 


III Junior 


15 


6 


12 


IV Senior 


15 


6 


12 



Advanced (Senior) — Required 



Credits 



Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 



Credits 



CB 201 Introduction to Concept Development 
CR 24 1 Introduction to Jewelry and Metal Working 
CR 242 Introduction to Metalsmithing 
Ciait Introduction Course in Chosen Croft 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
6-0 
6.0 
12.0 



CR241 

Introductory Jewelry and 

Metal working 

3 hours, twice a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An introduction to the fundamental 
techniques of metalworldng. 



CR242 

Introductory Metalsmithing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester; fall and spring 
An introduction to the fundamentals of 
the making of flat and hollow ware. 



Intermediate Junior) — Required 



Credits 



CR 345 Metals Technology 
CR341 Intermediate Metal 
CR342 Intermediate Metal 

Studio Qectives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
12.0 



CR 345 A & B 
Metals Technology 

1 .5 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A lab, lecture, and demonstration 
course investigating the theoretical, 
practical, and physical properties of 
metals and other materials as they 
relate to methods of construction, 
forming, and Hnishing. Maintenance 
of related tools and equipment will 
be studied. 



CR341 A&B 
CR 342 A & B 
Intermediate Metal 

6 hours, twice a week 

6 credits/semester; fall and spring 

The course develops metalworking 

techniques and concepts toward 

increased skills and individual 

developments. 



CR401 Crafts Seminar 

CR 44 1 Advanced Metals Studio 

CR 442 Advanced Metals Studio 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
6.0 
6.0 

6.0 
12.0 



CR441 A&B 
CR 442 A & B 
Advanced Metals Studio 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The intensive work in personal 
development is handled on a one-to- 
one basis with the instructor. The 
guidance offered afhrms the student's 
development as a distinct and 
creative person. 



CRAFT: Wood - Required Credits per Year 


Year 


Wood 
Major 


Studio 
Electives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foiindation 


18 


3 


12 


II Sophomore 


15 


8 


12 


III Junior 


15 


8 


12 


IV Senior 


15 


6 


12 




Introductory (Sophomore) - Required 




Credits 



CR 201 Introduction to Concept Development 
CR261 Introduction to Woodworking 
CR261 Introduction to Woodworking 
Craft Introduction Course in Chosen Craft 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
3.0 

3.0 

6.0 
6.0 
12.0 



CR 261 A & B 
Introductory Woodworking 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
An introduction to basic woodworking, 
hand and machine tools, wood joinery, 
and adhesives along with an 
exploration of the design possibilities 
in wood. 



Intermediate (Junior) — Required 



Ceramics-Plaster 



CR 364 Wood Technology 

CR361 Intermediate Woodworking 

CR 362 Intermediate Woodworking 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
12.0 



CR 361 A & B 
CR 362 A & B 
Intermediate Woodworking 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Further investigation of woodworking 
techniques, processes, joinery, and 
structure. Furniture design problems 
involving solid and plywood case 
construction and chairs. Full-scale 
working models to be produced by the 
student. 



CR364 

Wood Technology 

1 .5 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

A lecture course that deals with the 

fundamentals of machine technology 

and maintenance, the operating of a 

shop, and other practical aspects of 

woodworking. 



Advanced (Senior) - Required 



Credits 



CR401 Crafts Seminar 

CR 461 Advanced Woodworking 

CR 462 Advanced Woodworking 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 
12.0 



CR 461 A & B 
CR 462 A & B 
Advanced Woodworking 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
Intensive work in personal 
development is handled on a one-to- 
one basis with the instructor. Emphasis 
on the design and construction of 
furniture with full-scale working 
models to be produced by the student. 



CR 215 A SB 
Moldjnaking-Casting 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester; fall and spring 
Plaster-working skills; model and mold 
making. Modeling techniques. 
Preference for registration is given to 
Crafts majors. 



Glass 



CR231 Ac&B 
Introductory Glass 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Glass is considered as an expressive 
and creative medium. Students work 
with molten glass in offhand blowing 
techniques and with flat glass in 
stained-glass techniques. 



CR331 ASfB 
Advanced Glass 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Glass is considered as an expressive 
medium and development toward a 
personal style is encouraged. Students 
work with hot glass in advanced 
offhand work, blowing into molds, 
casting and enameling, as well 
as advanced stained-glass work 
incorporating blown and cast pieces 
in two- and three-dimensional stained- 
glass problems. 




Open area behind castmg and welding studios 



■mt-&^' 



-fsT 



■!r-\-^;fr 




ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN 



Environmental design is a rich mixtuie of the traditional professions of 
architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, and urban 
planning. Since the product of environmental design is large in visual 
scale and has important and long-lasting impact on people's lives, the 
decisions of the designer must be careful, thoughtful, and in the highest 
public interest. 

The major objective of the department is to teach a design process 
whereby data and users' needs are creatively translated into physical 
form. The process is one that encourages and nurtures imagination, 
responsibility, individuality, and personal commitment. There is a 
continuous effort in the department to achieve a balance betwreen 
many forces: to balance skill with philosophy and thought; exploratory 
work with traditional design; specific subjects with overviews; hard 
work with enjoyment. 

The faculty is composed of active professionals from the fields of 
architecture, interior design, environmental programming, landscape 
architecture/ ecology, and urban design. Recognizing the large number 
of leading design professionals in the Greater Philadelphia area, the 
department has implemented a senior thesis program that draws upon 
this talented, multidiscipluiary pool. This program affords each senior 
the opportunity to meet with his or her selected design advisor — on a 
one-to-one basis and in a professional setting — while pursuing a 
design project of his or her choice. 

Recent graduates awarded the B.S. degree in Environmental Design 
have found the department's broad but comprehensive educational 
approach an important asset because it has given them access to a 
wide variety of design careers and job opportunities, has prepared 
them for specialization at a graduate professional level in fields such 
as architecture, and has also provided them with a foundation upon 
which to build an independent practice. 



Faculty 



Benjamin Martin, Chairperson 

Jotin Chase 

Barry Eiswerth 

Alan Johnson 

Karen Lagosky 

Robert McCauley 

Richard Meyer 

Burton Miller 

Richard Stange 

Sam Unger 



Design Advisory Program 

Cecil Baker 

Charles Dagit 

Barry Eiswerth 

Robert Hedley 

Roger Lewis 

Adolf DeRoy Mark 

Peter Saylor 

Gray Smith 

Russell Thompson Jr. 

Thomas Todd 

Shirley Vernon 



Liberal Arts Requirements 

LA 387, Applied Psychology of Design 
LA 388, Perception 
6.0 credits of: History of Design and/ 
or Architecture, and/ or The City. 



Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 



Credits 



Freshman Elective 



EN 101 
Design Studio 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Introduction to the concerns, 
techniques, and processes of 
environmental design. Exploration of 
design considerations for existing and 
new environments. 



Environmental Design - 


- Required Credits 


per Year 




Year 


Environ- 
mental 
Design 
Major 


Studio 
Electives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foundation 


18 


3 


12 


II Sophomore 


15 


6 


12 


III Junior 


15 


6 


12 


IV Senior 


15 


6 


12 




EN 202 Structure & Construction 
EN 210 Design Studio 
EN 211 Residential Environments 
EN 214 Skills I - Drawing 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
4.5 
4.5 
3.0 

6.0 
12.0 



EN 202 A & B 

Structure and Construction 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester; fall and spring 
A study of natural and man-made 
structures, their principles, and 
applications. Development of the 
ability to understand forces and 
recognize their corresponding forms. 
An introduction to the built 
environment from the standpoint 
of materials and how structures are 
assembled or rehabiUtated. 

EN 210 
Design Studio 

3 hours, three times a week 
4.5 credits/semester: fall 
The primary purpose of this studio is 
the development of a conscious design 
procedure. The work consists of a 
variety of short discrete problems, 
stressing the visual aspects of design 
procedure. 

EN 211 
Design Studio 

3 hours, three times a week 

4.5 credits/semester: spring 

A continuation of the concerns of 

EN 210 with particular attention to 

residential building types. 

Prerequisite EN 210 



EN212A&B 
Alternote Energy: Solar 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Introduction to the principles, 
properties, and technology of solar 
energy. Problems focusing on the 
analysis and development of natural 
energy systems for the heating and 
cooling of spaces. Particular emphasis 
shall be placed on the integration of 
active, passive, and hybrid solar 
designs for energy conservation in 
existing and new structures. 

EN214A&B 
Skills I — Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This studio addresses the 
craftsmanship and vocabulary of 
traditional architectural drawing with 
emphasis on the needs of the designer. 

EN 220 
Design Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits: fall 

Lectures, field trips, and discussions 
with guests and staff exploring the 
elements of arcfiitectural, interior, 
landscape, and urban design. 
Emphasis will be placed on 
professional accomplishments and 
new directions in environmental 
design. Research dealing with topic 
relevant to seminar vrill be required. 



PCA, Anderson Hall, Arco Park — Pine Street Campus 



Intermediate Junior) — Required 



Credits Advanced (Senior) — Required 



EN 301 Programming 

EN 310 Design Studio 

EN 3 1 1 Design Studio 

EN 314 Skills II - Rendering 

EN 320 Design Seminar 

Studio Electives 
Liberal Arts 



1,5 


EN 4 10 


Design Studio 


4,5 


EN411 


Thesis 


4,5 


EN 4 14 


Skills in - Contract Documents 


3,0 


EN 420 


Design Seminar 


1,5 


EN 430 


Portfolio Development 


6,0 




Studio Electives 


12.0 




Liberal Arts 



4.5 
4.5 
3.0 
1.5 
1.5 
6.0 
12.0 



EN 301 
Programming 

3 houis, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall 
Explores predesign problem 
identification within the context of 
the designer process. Emphasis is 
placed on the methodologies involved 
in identifying users' needs, 
performance characteristics, and 
functional requirements. 

EN 302 

Environmental Control Systems 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: spring 
An examination of mechanical 
systems, components, and materials 
used to control and effect interior/ 
exterior environments: illumination, 
acoustics, waste disposal, climate 
control. 

EN 310 
Design Studio 

3 hours, three times a week 
4,5 credits/semester: fall 
Problems given at various scales and 
degrees of complexity: interiors, 
architecture, and planning. Emphasis 
shall be placed on design procedure 
and the relationship between 
programming and design resolution. 
Prerequisite: EN 211 

EN 311 
Design Studio 

3 hours, three times a week 
4.5 credits/semester: spring 
A continuation of EN 310 with 
particular emphasis on environments 
for special uses and populations. 
Prerequisite: EN 310 



EN314 A&B 

Skills n — Rendering 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and sprmg 
Instruction in the use of various media 
to communicate design ideas. 
Emphasis is placed on the use of 
rendering as a design tool as well as 
a method of presentation to clients. 

EN 316 A &B 
Urban Design 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An investigation of the meaning of 
urban form and structure and the 
potential of architecture at the scale 
of the city, developed by the 
introduction of historical precedent 
as a design resource, theory and tactics 
of an urban design method, structured 
in the context of short studio 
problems. 

EN 320 

Design Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits: fall 

Lectures, field trips, and discussions 
with guests and staff exploring the 
elements of architectural, interior, 
landscape, and urban design. 
Emphasis will be placed on 
professional accomplishments and 
new directions in environmental 
design. Research dealing with topic 
relevant to seminar will be required. 



EN 4 10 
Design Studio 

3 hours, three times a week 
4-5 credits/semester: fall 
Larger scale projects which require 
orderly analysis of program and 
clarification of the designer's goals 
through integration of visual form, 
functional relationships and building 
technologies. Prerequisite: EN 311 

EN 411 
Thesis 

3 hours, three times a week 
4.5 credits/ semester: spring 
Unique opportunity for students to 
pursue a design project of their choice 
under the guidance of a non-faculty, 
professional designer. Thesis topic 
and program proposal must be 
approved by faculty by mid-term fall 
semester. Prerequisite; EN 4 10 

EN413A&B 
Landscape Design 

3 hours, once a week 
1 ,5 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
An introduction to landscape 
architecture: site analysis, design and 
environmental systems. Understanding 
is developed through a progression of 
problems from urban and interior 
gardens to larger scale landscapes. 



EN414A&B 

Skills in — Contract Documents 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Instruction in, and the production of, a 

complete set of documents for 

construction, including working 

drawings, contracts, and 

specifications. 

EN 420 
Design Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall 
Lectures, field trips, and discussions 
with guests and staff, similar to 
EN 320. Seniors will be required to 
research a topic relevant to the 
seminar and make a verbal 
presentation in class. 

EN 430 

Portfolio Development 

3 hours, once a week 
1 -5 credits/ semester: spring 
Instruction and professional assistance 
in the development of written, 
photographic and graphic materials 
for resume and portfolio presentation. 



Those students interested m an Interior 
Design concentration in Environmental 
Design may substitute any of the 
following courses to fulhll the 
departmental elective portion of their 
program. 



IN 301 E 
Furniture Design 

1-5 credits 

IN 302 E 

Fabric Production and Application 

1.5 credits 




GRAPHIC DESIGN 



Graphic Design consists of the organization of words, symbols, and 
pictorial images to convey information and feelings about products, 
services, and ideas. The program of the department stresses the 
development of the basic thought and perceptual skills that form a basis 
for visual communications. 

Larger contexts for the graphic message, such as sign systems, 
publications, exhibits, packaging, visual identification programs, and 
other publicity modes, are explored in depth. Value throughout is placed 
on thorough research, design aesthetic and logical clarity, material 
integrity and concept originality during the developmental process and 
in the final graphic product. 

Throughout the three years, courses in graphic application are 
combined with exploratory visual studies in drawing, color, 
photography, and typography. In addition, the Graphic Design Studio 
curriculum is supplemented with special lecture programs, workshops 
vrith designers having specific professional expertise, and field trips to 
studios, print shops, and paper plants. 

All faculty members are actively working as designers, engaged in a 
variety of projects for business, corporations, institutions, or design 
studios. 

Graduates work in design groups or studios, as in-house designers 
with corporations, publishers, schools, architects, and other institutions, 
in advertising agencies, or as independent self-employed designers. 



■""" Faculty 



William Longhauser, Chairperson 
Hans-U. Allemann 
David Gibson 
Kenneth Hiebert 



Joel Katz 
Wayne Stettler 
Christine Zelinsky 



Graphic Design — Required Credits per Year 


Year 


Graphic 
Design 
Major 


Studio 
Electives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foundation 


18 


3 


12 


11 Sophomore 


18 


3 


12 


III Junior 


16.5 


6 


12 


IV Senior 


9 


12 


12 



Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 



Credits 



GD210 Letterfonns 
GD 2 1 1 Descriptive Drawing 
GD213 Basic Design 
PF 2 1 1 Introduction to Photography I 
Liberal Arts 



6.0 
6,0 
6.0 
3.0 
12.0 



GD210 

Designs: Letteriorms. Symbols 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
An understanding of major historical 
type styles developed through 
comparative perceptual studies. 
Includes spontaneous lettering, 
constructed alphabets, and invented 
signs. The second semester includes an 
introduction to typography. 

GD211 

Descriptive Drawing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Observation and drawing analysis of 
simple man-made objects. Second 
semester introduction to drawings 
from organic forms. 



PF211 A 

Introduction to Photography I 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Introduction to basic concepts, 
processes, and techniques of 
photography including camera usage, 
exposure, darkroom procedures, 
lighting, and their controlled 
applications. This course is offered by 
the Photography Department and has 
to be taken in the first or second 
semester of the sophomore year. 

GD213 
Basic Design 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Developing diverse approaches to 

solving design and simple 
communications problems. Serial 
techniques for the development and 
evaluation of design solutions. 



Intermediate Qunior) — Required 



GD306 Typography 

GD 311 Communications 

GD310 Photo Emphasis 

GD 315 Production Seminar (2nd- or 3rd-year requirement) 

Studio El ectives 

Liberal Arts 



6.0 
6.0 
3.0 

1.5 
6.0 

12,0 



GD300 

Drawing tor Graphic Processes 

3 hours, once a week elective 
1 ,5 credits/semester: fall and sprmg 
Observation and analysis of objects 
leading to formalized modes of 
drawing, taking into consideration 
processes of reproduction. 
Prerequisite: GD 211 



GD306 

Lab A: Typography Emphasis 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
Study of the organization and design 
of verbal information in relation to 
other graphic elements. 



GD310 

Lab B: Photo Emphasis 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall 

The refinement of photographic 

techniques and visualization for use in 

communications design. 

GD311 

Lab C: Conununications 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Elementary communications problems 
including research. Synthesis of 
typographic-illustrative content. 

GD314 
Advanced Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Experimentation of media and 
introduction to figure drawing. 



GD315 
Production Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester 

A course to familiarize the student with 

the technical aspects of graphic 

reproduction, services, and processes 

and their specification. 

GD322 
Packaging Design 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An exploration of the basic disciplines 
of packaging including folding 
cartons, glass and plastic containers, 
and closures. Marketing objectives, 
research material, point -of-purchase, 
requirements and engineering 
constraints will be covered. 
Prerequisite: GD 213 

GD326 
Single Image 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall 

The design of a complete publicity 

unit as exemplified in the poster. 

Prerequisite: GD 213, GD 306 



A.dvanced (Senior) — Required 



Credits 



GD 41 1 Identity Programs 
GD421 Problem Solving 
El ectives 
Liberal Arts 



6.0 
3.0 
12.0 
12.0 



GD411 

Lab B: Applied Identity Programs 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall and sprmg 
The application of programmatic 
studies to solve problems of 
identihcation of a firm or organization 
as required in a variety of specihc 
situations of space, scale, and material. 

GD421 

Lab C: Problem Solving 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall 
Developing approaches to solving 
communications problems of diverse 
character. Increasingly practical 
application. Emphasis on developing 
multiple responses to problems. 



GD423 
Publications Design 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: spring 

Prerequisite: GD 207. The design of 

publications including content, image 

sequence, production, material 

interrelationship. 

Prerequisite: GD 213, GD 306 

GD425 

Graphic Concepts 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/ semester: spring 

Practice in the development and 

application of texts and images for 

mass communications. 

Prerequisite: GD 2 1 3, GD 306, 

GD311 





ILLUSTRATION 



Illustrators produce visual images that represent or extend words and 
ideas in the fields of book and periodical publishing, education, 
advertising in all its forms, and television. 

Illustrators do not work alone: in their creative efforts they 
collaborate with writers, editors, art directors, and clients. Since the 
sum of their efforts is generally reproduced through either printed or 
electronic media, the final product is achieved jointly with printers 
and/or film technicians. In this collaborative venture, the illustrator is a 
primary force for aesthetic quality and so his or her artistic and 
technical standards must be of the highest order. The advancement of 
these standards is a most important aspect of the student's training in 
the College's Illustration Department. 

During the first two years of the major program there is a strong 
emphasis on drawing, pictorial composition, design, and studies in the 
fine arts including painting, art history, and photography. Assignments 
are both basic and experimental in nature, planned to give a 
foundation of competence and analytical perception, v/hile at the 
same time, stimulating creative thought processes which will extend 
the pupil's conception beyond the pragmatic and conventional. As the 
student advances, classroom work is supplemented by more 
individualized student-teacher tutorial relationships. Advanced 
assignments focus more specifically on the demands and parameters of 
commercial illustration problems. Augmenting the entire program are 
visiting critics and professionals from a wide variety of disciplines. 

All instructors are practicing professionals, aware of today's 
qualitative standards and the constantly changing nature of illustration. 
The overriding goal of the department is for the college-trained 
illustrator to be an innovator and leader in the profession, able to 
handle numerous problems competently and unvirilling to settle for the 
ordinary either in specific projects or in his or her professional life style. 

The profession has developed new vitality and importance in the last 
decade and affords extremely rewarding opportunities. However, 
prospective illustrators should realize that it is also a highly 
competitive and demanding profession. The student of illustration must 
possess conviction and a positive sense of dedication to hard work and 
to the fine arts. 



Faculty 

Ruth Lozner, Co-Chairperson 
Robert Stein, Co-Chairperson 
Benjamin Eisenstat 
Martha Erlebacher 
Frank Galuszka 
Albert Gold 
James Lakis 



John Martin 
Michael McNeil 
Edward O'Brien 
Phyllis Purves-Smith 
Peter Schaumann 
Stephen Tarantal 
Steven Weiss 



Illustration — Required Credits per Year 


Year 


Illustration 
Major 


Studio 
Electives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foundation 


18 


3 


12 


II Sophomore 


16 


4.5 


12 


III Junior 


17.5 


4.5 


12 


IV Senior 


ll.S 


10.5 


12 




Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 




Credits 



IL 200 Pictorial Foundations 6 

IL 201 Design Foundations 6 

IL 202 Figure Anatomy 3.0 

IL 203 History of Illustration 1 

Studio Electives (Introduction to Photography required) 4 5 

Liberal Arts 12.0 



IL 200 A & B 
Pictorial Foundations 

6 hours, once a week 
3 ciedits/semester: fall and spring 
The first semester focuses on objective 
visual perception — clarity in drawing 
and technical facility will be stressed. 
The second semester, which will have 
as its focus a workshop introduction to 
various materials and techniques, will 
allow for more interpretive and 
individual conceptual and stylistic 
approaches. 

IL201 A&B 
Design Foundations 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Design is viewed as a process that 
integrates a variety of factors common 
to problem solving — problem 
definition, research, logic, free 
association, and the like — in 
conjunction with the appropriate 
formal visual elements (line, shape, 
color, proportion, etc.). Problem 
solutions will be by comparison of 
options rather than by single chance 
solutions. In the second semester, the 
design process will focus on indirect 
processes (stencils, xerography 
printing horn relief surfaces) as well as 
direct drawing. 



IL 202 A 
Figure Anatomy 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall 
Focuses on measurement, proportion, 
and geometry of the human figure. 
Analysis of the space around the 
figure. Further concentration on the 
structure and continuity of the hgure, 
emphasizing the skeleton. Secondary 
attention to the circulatory and 
nervous systems and to internal 
organs. Work from life and other 
sources. Drawing media. 

IL 202 B 
Figure Anatomy 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: spring 
Continues study of figure geometry. 
Concentrates on muscle anatomy, with 
secondary attention to surface 
anatomy and sense organs. Attention 
to the psychology of expression and 
gesture. Work from life and other 
sources. Drav/ing media. 



IL 203 A & B 
History of Illustration 

Fall, 1 V2 hours, alternate weeks 
,5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A series of lectures highlighting major 
trends and artists in the field of 
illustration. The historical context of 
illustration, as it relates to varying 
societal factors, wiU serve as the 
unifying thread for this brief survey. 

IL206 

Materials and Techniques 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Workshop in classical and 
contemporary media and techniques. 
Areas of study include grounds and 
supports as well as a variety of 
drawing and painting media. Home 
assignments and slide lectures 
supplement the workshop activity. 

IL207 
Calligraphy 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Classic and current mformation with 
emphasis on penmanship — cursive, 
uncials, Spencerian script, and Roman 
letter forms are presented. 



IL208 
Letter forms 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Investigation of classical and modem 
letterforms with emphasis on 
contemporary applications, i.e., logo 
types, posters, and a variety of design 
formats. Comprehensive as well as 
finished rendering covered. 

PF 100E/PF211 A 
Introduction to Photo I 

3 or 6 hours, once a week 

1,5 or 3 credits/semester: fall or spring 

Introduction to basic concepts, 

processes, and techniques of 

photography, including camera usage, 

exposure, darkroom procedures, 

lighting, and their continued 

applications. 

This course has to be taken in the first 

or second semester of the sophomore 

year. 



Intermediate Junior) — Required 



IL 300 Illustration Methods 

IL 301 Design Methods 

IL 206 Materials and Techniques 

IL 302 Figure Utilization 

IL 305 Illustration Forum 

Select 2 of the following for a total of 6 credits: 
IL 303 Illustration 
IL 304 Design Groups 
IL 302 Figure Utilization 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
1.5 
1.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 

4.5 
12.0 



IL300 

Illustration Methods 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 
This course deals with the 
development of primary narrative 
imagery, pictorial illusion and space, 
and their combined potential for 
communication. Initial procedures 
focus on developing visual awareness 
and concepts. Direct drawing 
situations and photographic reference 
(existing or student produced) serve 
as the source material for pictorial 
development. Simultaneously, various 
materials and technical procedures 
will be examined and experimented 
with. 

IL301 

Design Methods 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 
Further development of the design 
process in conjunction with the 
requirements and options available 
through photo-mechanical techniques. 
Projects v/ill deal with image/ 
typography relationships and will be 
presented for their intrinsic design 
interest as well as being useful as 
vehicles to understand the processes 
of commercial reproduction. Previous 
photographic and indirect image- 
making experiences will be continued 
and built on at this level. 

IL302 

Figure Utilization 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/ semester: fall 
Studies of the hgure in narrative 
contexts. Work from single and 
grouped models, nude and costumed. 
Concentration on developing 
narratives from different, often 
combined, resources. Emphasis is on 
the history of poses, contexts, and 
narrative conventions. 



IL 305 A & B 
Illustration Forum 

2 hours, alternate weeks 
.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Visiting lectures, symposia, guest 
critics, departmental discussions. 

Li the spring semester, junior 
Illustration students have a choice of 

2 of the following electives: 

IL 302 B 

Figure Utilization 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: spring 
Combines work from life with a wide 
range of resources. Composing figures 
in rational space with a convincing 
relation to the environment is stressed. 
Emphasis is on the psychology of 
expression, especially in the face, 
hands, gesture. Drawing and painting 
media. 

IL303 
Illustration 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: spring 
Personal imagery and conceptual 
directions are further developed as 
students show facility in the use of 
source material. Clear and concise 
drawing, complex compositional 
arrangements, and color and tonal 
systems are practiced and discussed 
in cormection with more advanced 
painting procedures. Assignments 
and lectures will focus more 
specihcally on the requirements of 
applied illustration. 

IL304 
Design Groups 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: spring 
Structure of this class wrill involve the 
formation of a maximum of hve 
''groups," each of which will select 
one project from a pool of problems 
requiring a design solution. Following 
the selection, the group will develop 
any necessary internal structure to 
allow it to break down and distribute 
individual responsibilities. Projects 
will be of a complexity as to require 
the full semester for the development 
and implementation of the solution. 



Advanced (Senior) — Required 



Credits 



IL 400 Illustration 
IL 401 Graphic Problems 
IL 405 Illustration Forum 
IL 406 Business Practices 
IL 403 Thesis 

Select 1 of the following for a total of 3 credits: 
IL 400 Illustration 
IL 402 Communications Workshop 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 

3.0 

.5 

.5 

1.5 

3.0 
3.0 
10.5 
12.0 



IL400A 
Illustration 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 
Assignments revolve around specific 
areas of illustration — advertising, 
book, documentary, editorial, and 
institutional. Emphasis is on solutions, 
both practical and relevant to 
professional needs and demands. 

IL401 

Graphic Problems 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall 
Previous design experiences in 
process and technique are synthesized 
and applied to practical problems. A 
variety of traditional formats — 
posters, book and record jackets, 
folders, and the like — vdll be worked 
with. 

IL403 
Thesis 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: spring 
Students will select, from a wide range 
of suggested projects, a thematic 
project to be developed over the 
period of the semester. Results of the 
projects will be evaluated by an 
outside jury, who vrill determine 
possible recipients of the William Ely 
Travel Award. 

IL405 
Illustration Forum 

2 hours, alternate weeks 
.5 credits/semester: fall 
Visiting lectures, symposia, guest 
critics, departmental discussions. 



IL406 

Business Practices 

IV2 hours, alternate weeks 
.5 credits/semester: spring 
A series of lectures dealing with 
varying necessary and advantageous 
small business requirements. Taxes, 
record keeping, agents, contracts, 
pricing, professional associations, 
and the like will be presented. 

In the spring semester, senior 
Illustration students have a choice of 
one of the following electives: 



IL 400 B 
Illustration 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: spring 

Continuation of above, IL 400 A. 

IL402 

Communications Workshop 

6-12 hours, once a week 
3 or 6 credits/semester: spring 
Structured as an actual studio, the 
workshop vnW produce visual material 
for a variety of clients. Some of the 
projects wiU be assigned by the 
instructor; however, workshop 
members will be encouraged to solicit 
additional projects of either an 
individual or group nature. Admission 
to the workshop will be by portfolio 
review with a maximum of sixteen 
participants to be selected. Applicants 
from related departments will be 
considered. 




INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

Although Industrial Design as a profession is relatively young and 
small in scale, its practitioners have had a major impact on all of our 
lives. Furniture, appliances, exhibits, packaging, graphics, 
transportation, and interior design are only a few of the areas in which 
the industrial designer has become involved. 

Through an integrated program m college, the student learns the 
skills, processes, and attitudes necessary to practice as a professional. 
The program prepares the students to pursue their interests in any one 
or all of the design areas mentioned. 

The relationship between people, cost, convenience, utility, safety, 
production processes, and rational aesthetics are clarified and applied 
to the design process. 

Today's designer interacts with many other disciplines in order to 
develop a successful project. The skill of communicating effectively 
with marketing, planning, advertising, and management personnel is 
explored and developed as an important segment of the students' 
design education. 

The entire process is augmented by a program of visiting guests 
drawn from these disciplines who explore current and future 
implications of design. 

Most of the instructors in the department are practicing designers. 
However, all of the instructors are aware of the need to continue to 
raise the quality of design solutions. 

The graduating industrial designer has exciting career opportunities 
with consulting design firms, corporate design staffs, educational and 
research organizations as well as a growing number of design-conscious 
government agencies. 



Faculty 

Noel Mayo, Chairperson 
Jack Andrews 
Virginia Gehshan 
Abraham Leibson 



Jack McGarvey 
Joseph Nicholson 
Petras Vaskys 
Julian Winston 



Industrial Design - 


Required Credits per Year 




Year 


Industrial 
Design 
Major 


Studio 
Qectives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foundation 


18 


3 


12 


II Sophomore 


18 


1.5 


12 


III lunior 


15 


6 


12 


IV Senior 


12 


9 


12 



Intermediate (Junior) — Required 



Credits 



Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 



Credits 



ID 210 Processes 6,0 

ID 211 Visual Language 6.0 

ID 213 Design Methods 6.0 

Studio Qectives (CR 252 Plaster Workshop Recommended) 3,0 

Liberal Arts 12 



ID 201 

Conceptual Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A drawing class concerned with the 
processes of getting ideas from one's 
head onto paper. The course is 
structured with the design, craft, or 
illustration student in mind — those 
who would wish to explore 
dimensional forms on paper before 
transferring them to a permanent 
material. A one-semester course. 

ID 210 
Processes 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The exploration and study of the 
"hard" and ''soft" information 
processes that are used by designers. 
Various problem-solving techniques 
are introduced and implemented. 
Emphasis is placed on the written 
word as a method of communication. 
Several short research papers are 
required. The student is given a 
grounding in basic technology and 
science including: wood, metal, and 
plastic technology, optics, mechanics, 
basic electronics, and energy systems. 



ID 211 

Visual Languages 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The study and application of the 
language and visual systems that are 
used by designers to deal with the 
concerns and problems between 
people, technology, and the 
environment. Two- and three- 
dimensional concepts are combined 
vfiih. form, drawing, and graphic skills 
while studying methods of practical 
application. 

ID213 

Design Methods 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: spring and fall 
A course combining the teaching of 
the "tools" of designer mechanical 
drawing, perspective drawing, basic 
shop techniques, and model making. 
Field trips are taken to industrial 
manufacturers to acquaint the 
students with advanced production 
methods. 



ID 301 Design Seminar 
ID 310 Design Studio 
ID 31 1 Graphic Design 
ID 312 Exhibit Design 
Studio Electives 
Liberal Arts 



3.0 
6.0 
3.0 
3.0 
6.0 
12.0 



ID 301 

Design Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A forum for the discussion and study 
of current ideas within the design 
field. Presentations made by the staff 
and guest lecturers. 

ID 302 

Visual Techniques 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/ semester; fall and spring 
The first semester is used to develop 
proficiency in the use of Lawson 
Charts as a means of making 
measured drawings. The second 
semester is devoted to developing 
effective drawing techniques for 
precise descriptions of surface, color, 
and material, using pastels, markers, 
prismacolor, and other designer's 
materials. 

ID 303 

Industrial Materials and Processes 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Films, lectures, and field trips are used 
to famiharize students with industrial 
fabrication processes for wood, metal, 
and plastics; techniques such as die 
making, injection molding, blow 
molding, laser cutting, explosion 
forming, etc. Emphasis placed on the 
study of material characteristics and 
their appropriate use with forming 
methods. 



ID 310 
Design Studio 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A study of design methodology related 
to designing for mass production. 
Most projects are conducted with the 
help of consultants from industry. 
Problems are given in product design, 
packaging, exhibition design, 
transportation design. 

ID 311 
Graphic Design 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An intensive workshop in the 
structuring of visual and typ>ographic 
information as they relate to the 
industrial designer. Clear approaches 
are explored on the application of 
this information to products, 
packaging, stationery, etc. 

ID 312 
Exhibit Design 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
The exploration of the exhibit design 
process; the collection of information, 
planning, traffic flow, display and 
communication techniques. Exhibit 
design requires the extensive use of 
all the designer's skills. 



Advcmced (Senior) — Required 



Credits 



ID 401 Industrial Design Seminar 

ID 410 Studio I 

ID 41 1 Portfolio Preparation 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



6.0 
3-0 
9.0 
12.0 



ID 401 

Industrial Design Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/seminai: fall and spring 
A forum for the discussion and study 
of current ideas within the design 
field. Presentations made by the staff 
and guest speakers. The course 
reqiiires a term paper concerned with 
the issues considered. 

ID 402 

Advanced Design Workshop 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A workshop where each student deals 
with problems of an advanced nature 
of his own choosing. 



ID 410 
Studio I 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The first semester is devoted to the 
solution of design problems offered by 
selected industries and is a 
continuation of ID 310. The second 
semester provides the student with an 
opportunity to work on a twelve-week 
problem: the time is divided between 
research, thematic development, 
design, and presentation. 

ID 411 

Portfolio Preparation 

3 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Instruction and guidance in the 

preparation of professional stationery, 

resume, portfolio, and slide 

presentation. 





PAINTING AND DRAWING 

In preparing students for a career in the fine arts, the Painting and 
Drawing Department concerns itself primarily with the problems of 
two-dimensional work. The study of sculptural and environmental forms 
is not overlooked, however, since the nature of contemporary painting 
and drawing has been much influenced by these concerns in recent 
years. The department places great emphasis on the fundamentals of 
painting and drawing as skills, involving both materials and 
techniques. Concurrently, emphasis is given to the development of the 
individual's initiative and capacity for self-criticism. 

Although required drawing credits are minimal, drawing is strongly 
recommended. Expanded course offerings are available in this area for 
students wishing to seriously pursue a drawing/painting career. 

A faculty of practicing professional artists presents the students with 
a structured sequence of problems, exploring the field from the 
rudiments of pictorial organization to the refinements of aesthetic 
interpretation. Studio work is augmented by seminars, courses in theory, 
programs of visiting lecturers, and held trips to various museums in 
Philadelphia, suburban Pennsylvania, and bordering states. This 
supplementary curriculum is designed to expand the student's 
conceptual range, capacity for criticism, and personal vision. At the 
end of the sophomore and junior years, students will have a year-end 
review of their work. Several Painting Department faculty members 
will determine whether the student should be advanced to the next 
level or be required' to repeat courses. 

Qualified painting majors at PCA have a unique opportunity to 
spend one semester living, working, and studying under the auspices 
of the Artists for Environment Program. For more information see 
Cooperative and Exchange Programs. 



Faculty 

Cynthia Carlson, Co-Chairperson 

Gerald Nichols, Co-Chairperson 

Eugene Baguskas 

Will Barnett 

Morris Berd 

Sarah Canright 

Dante Cattani 

Larry Day 

Fred Gutzeit 

Albert Gold 

Gerald Herdman 

Steven Jaffa 



Annson Kenney 
David Kettner 
Robert Keyser 
Robert McGovem 
Edith Neff 
Jane Piper 
Boris Putterman 
Warren Rohier 
Harry Soviak 
Doris Staffel 
Thomas Stearns 
Lily Yeh 



.i - v**A ^ ■'*«:* 



The Department of Painting and 
Drawing seeks to offer students 
alternative aesthetic and stylistic 
approaches to the visual arts. For this 
reason sections of identically 
numbered courses, taught by different 
instructors, may have some 



programmatic differences. Students 
registering for these courses will be 
provided with descriptive statements 
clarifying the intentions, goals, and 
procedures anticipated by the 
instructor assigned to each section. 



Painting and Drawing - 


- Required Credits per Year 




Year 


Painting & 

Drawing 

Major 


Studio 
Electives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foiindation 


18 


3 


12 


II Sophomore 


16.5 


4.5 


12 


III Junior 


15 


6 


12 


IV Senior 


13.5 


6 


12 



Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 



Credits 



PT 201 Representational Painting 

PT 203 Non-Representational Painting 

PT 201 or 203 Second Semester 

DR207 Drawing Problems 

PT 219 Painting Practices 

PT 217 Media and Techniques 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
1.5 
3.0 
4.5 
120 



PT201 

Representational Painting 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

An introduction to painting from 

nature. The figure, landscape, and still 

life may be employed as subject 

matter. 

PT203 

Non-Representational Painting 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
An introduction to abstract and 
nonobjective concepts in painting. 



PT217 

Media and Techniques 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Investigation through lectures, 
demonstrations, and in-class work of 
the diverse materials and methods of 
the painter. Pigments, binders, 
grounds and their supports, 
presentation and conservation are 
studied in depth. 

PT219 

Painting Practices 

1 .5 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This course is a historical survey of 
attitudes and form as regards various 
schools, movements, and individuals ir 
the recent history of painting. 



PT221 

Beginning Painting 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester; fall and spring 
A general introduction for beginning 
students concerned with the 
organization of elements and the 
manipulation of materials, taught with 
the references provided by art history, 
past and present. 

DR205 

Descriptive Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits/ semester: fall and spring 

This course covers the many 

techniques that may be used for 

describing objects, animate and 

inanimate, and locating them in 

space. 

DR207 

Drawing Problems 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Introduction to various kinds of 
drawings as defined through historical 
uses; for example, drawing as 
preparatory sketch, as diary, as 
finished product, etc. 

DR209 
Oriental Media 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Explores various Oriental painting 
techniques and materials, such as 
brush and ink on mulberry paper, etc. 
Students are not taught to paint in 
Oriental styles. They are expected, 
through practice, to formulate their 
own techniques and images. 

DR211 
Aqueous Media 

3 hours, once a week 
1,5 credits/semester; fall and spring 
An introduction to the art and craft of 
transparent and opaque {watercolor 
and gouache) painting. The student 
learns how these media may serve 
personal goals in both perceptual 
and conceptual painting. 



DR213 

Anatomy and the Figure 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This course gives the student the 
opportunity to investigate the basic 
visual structure of the human figure — 
both skeletal and muscular. During 
the second semester, the human head 
will be studied as well as basic 
positions of the figure with their 
context. 

DR215 

Pastel Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
Response to color line and color mass 
constitute the direction of course 
format. Inventiveness of technique 
and facility of application are 
directed toward expansion of the 
individual's approach to this media. 

DR223 

Figure Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 
1,5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Principles of figure drawing, including 
proportion, motion, form and structure, 
including some anatomy, light and 
shade, and variety of handling. 



Intermediate (Junior) — Required 



Credits 



PT 401 Advanced Painting 12.0 

or 

PT403 Multi-Media 12.0 

PT411 Art Theories 1.5 

PT413 Artist in Society 1.5 

Studio Qectives (Junior majors must elect 3 credits in 

Advanced Drawing) 6.0 

Liberal Arts 12 



Advanced (Senior) — Required 



Credits 



PT 401 Advanced Painting 



PT403 Multi-Media 
PT 409 Senior Seminar 



Studio Electives {Senior majors must elect 3 credits in 
Advanced Drawing) 
^Liberal Arts 



12.0 

1.5 



6.0 
12.0 



' In the second semester of the senior 
year, students will be expected to 
formulate a thesis project as the 
content of their advanced painting 
courses. This project will be reviewed 
by the members of the Painting/ 
Drawing Department faculty. 

PT401 

Advanced Painting 

6 hours, once a week or 3 hours, twice 
a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The course intends to cultivate the 
student's ability to work 
independently. Projects will be 
encouraged rather than assignments. 
The work may be representational or 
not and may employ various media. 
Emphasis is placed on procedures for 
gathering, recording, and organizing 
visual information. As dictated by the 
individual student's needs, inquiry 
and experiment in areas of art history 
and visual perception will be 
encouraged. 



PT403 

Multimedia/Comparative Aesthetics 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A format for the presentation of visual, 
verbal, and auditory aesthetics with 
special attention given to the 
peculiarities posited by any 
classification system dealing with the 
innately trans-systematic discourse 
of art. 

DR405 

Advanced Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Drawing taught as depiction, 
organization, metaphor, and object. 



PT407 
Tutorial 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/ semester; fall and spring 
For painting majors only. One-houi 
individual appointments once every 
three weeks to review and discuss, on 
a one-to-one basis, the concerns and 
forms adopted by the student in the 
unsupervised pursuit of his or her 
work. 

PT409 

Senior Seminar 

1.5 houis, once a week 

1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

A forum in which senior students 

discuss formal, philosophical, and 

poetic concerns in their work. 

Emphasis is placed on student 

participation. 



PT411 

Art Theories 

1.5 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

A lecture class dealing with the 

nature and effect of various aesthetic 

theories. 

PT413 

Artist in Society 

2 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A study of the cultural, political, and 
economic forces that affect art and 
artist. An investigation of the structure 
of the art world and how reciprocal 
meanings establish themselves 
between society and art. 



Graduate — Required 



PT500 

Advanced Education/Painting 

Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1,5-7,5 credits/semester: fall and 
spring 

A tutorially taught class with one-to- 
one discussions attempting to assist 
students in pursuing ideas and works 
originating with them. In addition, 
one-to-group participation will be 
encouraged. 





PHOTOGRAPHY/riLM 

Photography and Film encompass a broad range of forms and functions. 
As descriptive and interpretive media they serve to record and define 
our social and physical environment. Pursued for their expressive and 
creative possibilities, they reveal and shape attitudes, concepts, and 
feelings. The Photography and Film department concerns itself with 
this whole spectrum, within which students are helped both to develop 
a personal vision and to acquire the appropriate tools and discipline 
to pursue it. 

The department's programs are designed to move the student in a 
thorough, orderly progression through the principal problems and 
materials of the held, while permitting ample opportunities for 
individual interest to find outlets in special concentrations or emphases. 
During the first year of the program, the student explores both 
photography and filmmaking, not only for the specific concerns of each 
but also as interrelated disciplines. After the initial year, the 
photography or film major concentrates on a program of study in his or 
her chosen area, although work in the other medium may be continued 
on an elective basis. 

Within the still-photography area, students may place special 
emphasis on their work in any of the department's principal directions, 
including color printing, studio photography, multimedia performance 
as well as to contemporary black-and-white concerns. In the filmmaking 
area, specialized concentrations are available in independent 
filmmaking, cinematography and production, and animation. Although 
there is no formal provision for a dual major, there is an opportunity for 
students to combine photography/ him concentration in tandem with 
other departments. 

Graduates work in studios, in advertising agencies, as in-house 
photographers with corporations, publishers, schools, television stations, 
and other institutions or as independent self-employed photographers. 
Some graduates pursue careers in other fields while practicing 
photography or filmmaking as an avocation. Other graduates have 
entered graduate school to prepare for teaching careers. 



Faculty 

Ron Walker, Chairperson 
Howard Danelowitz 
Eric Duist 
Tom Goodman 
Gerald Greenfield 



Alfred Ignarri 
Ron Kanter 
Ray K. Metzker 
Thomas Poiett 
Peter Rose 



Photography — Required Credits per Year 


Year 


Photography 
Major 


Studio 
eectives 


Liberal 
Arte 


I Foundation 


18 


3 


12 


11 Sophomore 


13.5 


4.5 


12 


III lunior 


15 


6-9 


12 


IV Senior 


15 


6-9 


12 




Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 




Credits 



Intermediate (lunior) Required 



Credits 



PF210 Introduction to Filmmaking I. II 
PF 2 11 Introduction to Photography I, II 
PF215 Photo Materials 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts (Art History/Photo History) 

Liberal Arts (other) 



6,0 
6.0 
1.5 
4.5 
6.0 
6-0 



PF210A 

Introduction to Filmmaking I 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/ semester: fall 

An introduction to the mechanics and 

techniques of silent tilminaking — 

principles of shooting and 

composition — lighting, the logic of 

arrangement, and editing. 

PF210B 

Introduction to Filmmaking II 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/ semester: spring 

A continuation of PF 210 A with 

emphasis on more experimental 

modes: image and time manipulations, 

multiple projections, and an 

introduction to sound concepts and 

techniques. Prerequisite: PF 210 A 

PF211 A 

Introduction to Photography I 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
hitroduction to basic concepts, 
processes, and techniques of 
photography including camera usage, 
exposure, darkroom procedures, 
lighting, and their controlled 
applications. Required for admission 
to photography courses above PF 21 1. 



PF211 B 

Introduction to Photography II 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Continuation of normative approach 
to black-and-white, small camera 
methods. Technical controls are 
strengthened as a basis for exploring 
modes of seeing. 

PF215 

Photo Materials 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A nonproduction course acquainting 
students with less traditional black- 
and-white materials through 
experimentation with films, papers, 
and chemistry, and with basic 
functions of color in photography and 
film through practical work with color 
transparency materials. 
Prerequisite: PF211 A 



PF311 Intermediate Workshop 

PF313 Basic Studio 

PF 3 1 7 Color Printing Workshop 

Choice of one of the following: 
PF 313 B The Constructed Subjea 
PF315 Studio Workshop 
PF318 Interacting Images 
PF 323 Selected Topics 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts (Art History/Photo History) 

Liberal Arts (other) 



6.0 
3.0 
3.0 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 

3.0 

6-9.0 

6.0 

6.0 



PF311 A&B 
Intermediate Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester; fall and spring 
Exploration of photographic imagery 
through a series of problems aimed at 
personal vision and creative growth. 
Prerequisite: PF 21 1 A & B, PF 2 1 5 

PF313A 
Basic Studio 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall 

Introduction to studio techniques, use 

of the 4" X 5" camera, and artificial 

lighting. 

Prerequisite: PF 21 1 A & B 

PF313B 

The Constructed Subject 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: spring 

An approach emphasizing the 

photographer's responsibility for 

assembling and directing all aspects 

of the picture. 

Prerequisite: PF313A 

PF315 

Studio Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Intensive practice of studio 
techniques, with emphasis on 
controlled lighting, large- and small- 
scale set-ups, view camera usage with 
both color and black/white materials. 
Prerequisite: PF 2 1 1 A 



PF317 

Color Printing Worlcshop 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
Introduction to traditional methods of 
color printing, leading to an 
exploration of the technical and 
creative possibilities of color in 
photography. 
Prerequisite: PF211 A 

PF318 
Interacting Images 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: spring 

A study of how meaning is affected by 

the ordering of discrete images. 

Sequences are programmed for slide 

projection. 

Prerequisite: PF211 A 

PF319 

Large Format Photography 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Production course using the 4" x 5" or 
8" X 10" view camera, directed 
toward a mastery of the basic 
techniques and an understanding of 
the potentials of large format 
photography. Emphasis is placed on 
the use of the view camera outside of 
the studio. 
Prerequisite; PF 211 A 



PF321 
Selected Topics 

3 hours, once a week 
1-5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Study ol one or more various media, 
methods, or problems in still 
photography, to be offered according 
to the instructor's interests and 
students' requests. Prerequisites: may 
vary with topic. 



PF323 
Selected Topics 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
Study of one or more various media, 
methods, or problems in still 
photography to be offered according 
to the instructor's interests and 
students' requests. Prerequisites: may 
vary with topic. 



Advanced (Senior) — Required 



PF411 Advanced Photography 
PF 4 15 Criticism Seminar 

Choice ol: 
PF413 Professional Practices 
PF323 Selected Topics 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



Credits 



6.0 
6.0 

3.0 

3.0 

6-9.0 

12,0 



Film- 


- Required Credits per Year 






Year 


Film 
Major 


Studio 
Electives 


Uberol 
Arts 


I Foundation 


18 


3 


12 


II 


Sophomore 


12 


4.5 


12 


III 


lunior 


15 


6 


12 


IV 


Senior 


15 


6 


12 



Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 



PF 2 1 Introduction to Filmmaking I II 
PF 21 1 Introduction to Photography I 
PF 2 12 Introduction to Animation 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts (Art History/Photo History) 

Liberal Arts (other) 



Credits 



6.0 
3.0 
3.0 
4.5 
6.0 
6.0 



PF411 A&B 
Advanced Photography 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Continuation of Junior Workshop; 

work on long-term individual project 

or shorter-term problems to develop 

technical, aesthetic, and conceptual 

mastery of the medium. 

Prerequisite: 2 credits in Photography 

mcludingPF311. 

PF413 

Professional Practices 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
Study of the practice of professional 
photography, with attention to various 
career opportunities, portfolio 
presentation, business practices, 
professional ethics, photographic law, 
and personal objectives. A variety of 
professional guests visit the course. 
Prerequisite; PF 313 



PF415 A&B 
Criticism Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
An analysis of contemporary criticism 
intended for both film and 
photography students. Extensive 
reading and some writing, with some 
attention to current showings and 
exhibitions. 

PF499 
Practicum 

3 or 6 hours arranged 

1.5-3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Prerequisite: Major with PF 211 B 

PF999 
Independent Project 

2 to 6 hours, arranged 

1-3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Prerequisite; Major with PF 21 1 B 



PF 212 A & B (For B-Prerequisite 

212 A) 

Introduction to Animation 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A workshop class covering basic 
theory, techniques, and practice of 
drawn, stop-action, and graphic 
ammation. Students execute a series 
of assigned exercises and complete 
a short him using selected animation 
techniques. 



PF218 
Creative Soimd 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/ semester; fall and spring 
A course dealing with the production, 
utilization, and organization of sound 
as a medium unto itself. The classical 
studio techniques such as editing, 
tape over, and mixing will be 
explored as well as the use of the 
ARP 2600 electromc music 
synthesizer. The course deals with 
both production and history of 
recorded sound as an artistic 
endeavor. 



Intermediate (Junior) — Required 



Credits 



PF 3 10 Cinematography and Production Workshop 

PF314 Film Form 

PF320 Film Sound 

PF 322 Film Technology 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts (Art History/Photo History) 

Liberal Arts (other) 



6.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
6.0 
6.0 
6.0 



PF310A&B 

Cinematography and Production 

Workshop 

6 hours a week 

3 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
Production techniques in actual 
iilming situations: starting from the 
script through budgeting, script 
breakdown, camera work, and editing 
to the finished release print. Students 
are expected to execute specific 
assignments in lighting, editing, and 
sound and are introduced to synch- 
sound procedures. Prerequisite: 
PF210AC&B 

PF314 
Film Form 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A study of the aesthetics of cinema 
through an examination of the 
elements of film language and film 
as a visual art. Specifically, the course 
is a theoretical and practical inquiry 
into the ways in which visual and 
aural elements are used to explore 
and produce artistic meaning. 
Prerequisite: PF 2 1 B or PF 2 1 2 B 

PF316 

Film Directing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Translation of him script into film 
reality, approached through the study 
of narrative and dramatic continuity 
in selected hlms and tlirough practical 
exercises in the problems of directing. 
Prerequisite: PF 310 A 



PF 320 A & B 
Film Sound 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Introduction to the application of 
sound in hhn, with instruction and 
practice in the use of sound-recording 
equipment, mixers, sound transfer, 
editing, and general techniques. 
During the second semester, the 
student completes a sound track for 
a film in conjunction with 
Cinematography and Production 
Workshop, Animation, or Advanced 
Filmmaking. 
Prerequisite: PF 210 B or PF 212 B 

PF 322 A & B 
Film Technology 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
An examination of some of the 
technical materials and procedures 
that complement the hlmmaker's 
production skills. Basic electronics, 
optical printing, editing procedures, 
mechanical skills. Second term 
considers the aesthetic implications 
of some of these concepts. 
Prerequisite: PF 210 B or PF 212 B 



Advanced (Senior) — Required 



Credits 



PF410 Advanced Cinematography and Production Workshop 6 

PF414 Filmmaking Seminar 3 

PF415 Criticism Seminar 6 

Studio Electives 6.0 

Liberal Arts 12 



PF410A&B 

Advanced Cinematography and 

Production Workshop 

6 hours a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Continuation of PF 310. 

Increased independence is required of 

senior majors. 

Prerequisite: PF 310 B, PF 320, PF 322 



PF414A&B 
Filmmaking Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1-5 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
Screening and criticism of student 
work. Emphasis is on the personal film 
and animated films, in distinction from 
dramatic and documentary film. 
Intended to serve as a context for 
pursuing advanced independent 
production in film and animation. 
Prerequisite: PF310BorPF312 



Animation 



Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 



Credits 



PF210 Introduction to Filmmaking I 
PF 2 1 1 Introduction to Photography I 
PF 2 1 2 Introduction to Animation I. II 
PF215 Photo Materials 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts (Art History/Photo History) 

Liberal Arts (other) 



3.0 
3.0 
6.0 
1.5 
4.5 
6.0 
6.0 



Intermediate (Junior) — Required 



Credits 



PF 3 1 2 Animation Workshop 

PF320 Film Sound 

PF 322 Film Technology 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts (Art History/Photo History) 

Liberal Arts (other) 



6.0 
3.0 
3.0 
9.0 
6.0 
6.0 



PF312 A&B 
Animation Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A continuation of PF 212 B, with 
increased independence and 



emphasis on individual production of 
animated films. May be repeated. 
Prerequisite: 212 B 



Advanced (Senior) — Required 



Credits 



PF 4 1 2 Advanced Animation 
PF 415 Criticism Seminar 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



6.0 
6.0 
9.0 
12.0 



PF 412 A&B 
Advanced Animation 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Long-term independent project. 
Prerequisite: PF 312 A & B 



PRINTMAKING 




The Printmaking Department offers extensive facilities and expertise 
for work in traditional and contemporary print methods. The major 
graphic media — relief, etching (intaglio), lithography, and 
screenprinting — are studies in both traditional and experimental 
modes. During the three-year period of study, emphasis is placed on the 
unique evolution of each student toward an individualized use of the 
graphic processes. This is a multidimensional program in printmaking 
with additional stimulation provided by optional courses in related 
areas. 

The department's objectives are the development of conceptual 
abilities, technical prohciencies, a broad-based experience, diversely 
multidirectional in range of possibilities of self-expression, as well as 
career entry competencies. 

Creative Concepts courses focus particular attention on the 
development of visual images from the initial conception through a 
process of articulation to a completed resolution. Visiting artists, field 
trips, and guest lectures supplement studio experience. Courses in Book 
Design stimulate experimentation in joining the elements of paper (as 
well as other materials), prints, typography, construction, and 
bookbinding. 

The Printmaking Department workshop experience is enriched by 
firsthand encounters with original fine prints in outstanding 
Philadelphia collections. A Print Study Seminar is held at the Print 
Department of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. The seminar and visits 
to other area museums and collections to see original prints ranging 
from the fifteenth to the twentieth century facilitate and extend the 
students' investigation of the graphic, symbolic, and aesthetic 
characteristics inherent in each medium. 

Department graduates may choose to continue their development 
with graduate studies or find more immediate application of their quest 
for professional achievement in the areas of fine arts, education, book 
design and production, edition printing, or illustration. 



Faculty 

Jerome Kaplan, Chalrpe 
Patricia Dreher 
Lois Johnson 
Nathan Knobier 



Michael Lasuchii 
Nancy Reid 
Martha Zelt 



Printmaking - Required Credits per Year 


Year 


Printmaking 
Major 


Studio 
Qectives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foundation 


18 


3 


12 


II Sophomore 


15 


6 


12 


III Junior 


15 


6 


12 


IV Senior 


15 


6 


12 




Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 




Credits 



PF201 Etching 

PR 202 Lithography 

PR 203 Screenprinting 

PR 209 Relief Printing 

PR 210 Drawing/Printmaking 

PR 227 Typographic Elements 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3,0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
1.5 
1.5 
6.0 
12.0 



PR 201 
Etching 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: spring 
Basic extrapolated techniques in 
traditional and contemporary etching, 
engraving, diypoint, aquatint, 
mezzotint, coUagraphy, photoetching, 
and any combination oi them; their 
application in the modern modes of 
expression; and exploration of 
inherent qualities and idiosyncracies 
of them. 

PR 202 
Lithography 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: spring 
Both aluminum plate and stone 
lithography as two of the strongest 
autographic media are carefully 
investigated and elaborated in the 
effort to obtain the rich rewards m 
this venerable medium. The use of 
color is also seriously considered. 



PR 203 
Screenprint ing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall 
Introduction and investigation of all 
basic methods of serigraphy: paper 
stencil, glue and tusche, cut-film, 
photosensitive emulsion, selesttne 
method, flocking, relief screening, etc. 

PF209 
Relief Printing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 
All basic relief-printing methods, such 
as linoleum cut and etching, woodcut, 
wood engraving, metal relief, 
cardboard cut, collagraphic 
assemblages, plaster relief, cello-cuts, 
embossment as well as a number of 
unorthodox methods related to relief 
printing, will be investigated and 
pursued. 



PR 209 A & B 
Relief - 2 

3 hours, once a week 
1,5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An introduction to basic relief-printing 
methods including stamp prints, 
linoleum cuts, woodcuts, and wood 
engravings, as well as work with metal 
and cardboard cutting and collage. 

PR 210 
Drawing/Print making 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A course emphasizing the 
development of visual perception and 
the organization of experience into 
compositions related to printmaking. 
Both directly observed subject matter 
and conceptual images will be used as 
basis for miage making. 

PR211 
Etching 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Introduction to the basic methods in 
etching such as drypoint, engraving, 
aquatint, mezzotint, coUagraph, 
photoetching, as well as possible 
combinations of th^m in creative 
processes, 

PR 212 
Lithography 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The same as above but limiting some 
of the technical areas inherent in the 
medium. This affords the serious 
student the opportunity to concentrate 
on the most important aspects of the 
lithograph. 



PR 213 
Screenprinting 

3 hours, once a week 

1 ,5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Basic stencil methods such as paper, 

glue, film, direct photosensitive 

emulsion, glue-resist, etc., will be 

elaborated. 

PR 223 

Bookbinding Methods 

3 hours, once a week 
1 ,5 credits/semester; fall and spring 
A workshop class emphasizing 
familiarity with the characteristics 
and handling qualities of materials 
used to fabricate familiar objects such 
as pamphlets, portfolios, sketchbooks, 
and solander boxes. 

PR 227 

Typographic Elements 

3-6 hours, once a week 
1.5-3 credits/semester: spring 
Introduction to the basic organization 
of typographic elements through 
monotype (metal) hand composition. 
Study will include analysis and 
development of the printed page 
vis-a-vis the application of type and 
image (relief printing). Process will 
extend to letterpress reproduction. 



Intermediate (Junior) - Required 



Credits 



Advanced (Senior) - Required 



Credits 



PR 300 Printmaking Workshop 
PR 305 Creative Concepts 
PR 306 Print Study Seminar 
PR 311 Book Design 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
3,0 
6,0 
12.0 



PR 300 

Printmaking Workshop 

6 houis, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A continuation of the development of 
skills in all basic media such as relief, 
intaglio, lithography, screenprinting, 
in a concentration on one or any 
combination of them, including non- 
printmaking methods. Investigation of 
combination of media, including 
three-dimensional forms and 
unorthodox uses of materials and 
techniques with an emphasis on 
integration, is included. 

PR 305 

Creative Concepts 1. 2 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Development of ways and means for 
concept, grovrth, and resolution of 
visual ideas. Primary concern is 
acquisition of professionalism, 
applicational skills, group discussions, 
and general growth of critical 
evaluative abilities. 

PR 306 

Print Study Seminar -1,2 

3 hours, alternate weeks 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Study and discussion of original prints 
and rare books from masters of the 
fifteenth through the twentieth 
centuries; research and discussion of 
individual artist's response to the 
politics, literary, and musical arts of 
his period and the development of 
his imagery. 



PR 311 

Book Design - 1, 2 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The course offers experience in 
forming ideas for combination of 
paper and printed surfaces. The 
challenge of joining printmaking, 
typography, and binding is explored 
on an individual basis. 

PR 321 

Contract Editioning 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/ semester: fall 
Involvement in the technology and 
experience of printing limited editions 
for other artists. 

PR 222 

Printmaking: Non-Silver 

Photoprocesses 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Exploration of ideas in cyanotype. 
Van Dyke Brown, gum bichromate, 
quick-print, and other non-silver 
photographic techniques. 

PR 326 

Offset Lithography 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: spring 
Development of skills in printing with 
offset lithography for personal 
imagery in both hand-drawn and 
commercial photographic methods. 
Prerequisite: 3 credits in Lithography; 
class limit 10. 



PR 400 Printmaking: Advanced Workshop 

PR 407 Thesis Seminar 

PR 420 Printmaking: Advanced Workshop 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



6.0 
3.0 
6.0 
6.0 

12.0 



PR 400 

Printmaking: Advanced 

Workshop - 1 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Students continue to develop their 
own style and technique while 
establishing their own direction, 
personal and original expression. The 
workshop atmosphere permits a 
comfortable handling of all 
procedures and problems in all 
printmaking processes and possible 
involvement with adjacent expressive 
means such as drawing, painting, 
sculpture, photography, audio visuals, 
crafts, etc. 

PR 407 

Thesis Seminar — 1.2 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Acquisition of a professional profile: 
portfolio preparation, resume, slides, 
exhibition participation, discussions of 
works-in-progress- The pregraduation 
presentation of portfolio and the 
one-person show as well as cultivation 
of awareness of contemporary 
conditions and practices in the field 
are among the primary concerns of 
this class. 



PR 420 

Printmaking: Advanced 

Workshop - 2 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

An equal extension and an integral 

part of PR 400, this course is another 

half of the senior's required workshop 

time. 

PR 999 
Independent Project 

3 hours-6 hours, once a week 
1-5-3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A tutorial arrangement, on 
exceptional basis only, with one or 
more faculty and chairperson. Well- 
prepared and motivated students may 
have projects difhcult to fit into 
existing courses or they may be 
better suited to the particular abilities 
and expertise of faculty members 
willing to enter into special 
extracurricular arrangements. 




SCULPTURE 



Sculptuie reflects one of the deepest creative impulses of artistic 
endeavor. Its image-making options now encompass all its traditional 
forms and many new, innovative possibilities that range in size from 
coins to monuments. Usually working as independent artists, sculptors 
make objects for exhibition and sale, or on commission from architects 
and planners. A sculptor's special education and acquired skills — 
woodworking, welding, forging, molding and casting, carving and 
modeling — can be productively applied to the many occupations 
that require the ability to conceive, organize, and construct materials 
in a spatial and volumetric manner. 

The department's instructional aim is to provide a sound, balanced 
exposure to the formal, technical, and intellectual aspects of sculpture 
in preparation for continued professional growth beyond the 
undergraduate years. Students are encouraged to develop their ideas 
uniquely and they receive a great deal of individual attention; but they 
must also continuously work on assigned, carefully structured 
sculptural problems as the basis for knowledgeable self-definition. 
At the introductory level, fundamentals of sculpture are taught 
concurrently with technical procedures in a variety of materials. At 
advanced levels, students may specialize and are increasingly 
expected to initiate and complete works reflecting their ovm maturing 
artistic concerns. 

Along with the studio curriculum, a sense of sculpture history is 
promoted to facilitate the intelligent understanding of present 
concepts. Seminars and held trips to artists' studios, galleries, and 
museums in Philadelphia, New York, and Washington further augment 
the program. Courses are taught by practicing sculptors virith diverse 
critical viewpoints who can offer students instruction in a broad range 
of sculptural methods. Several of the faculty have backgrounds in fields 
related to sculpture — industrial and environmental design, painting 
and the crafts — providing opportunities for students to integrate 
studies in these fields with sculpture. Whether the intention is to major 
in sculpture, or to supplement another discipline vrith studies in 
sculpture, students' programs can be devised to reflect particular 
interests and needs. 

A full complement of studio resources is available to work in ferrous 
and nonferrous metals, clay, wood, stone, plaster, wax, and plastics. A 
new, sophisticated power system is being installed with air tools for 
carving, metal finishing, and pellet blasting. Technical assistance and 
supervision in the department's facilities is provided by a full-time shop 
supervisor who is in charge of maintaining the extensive array of hand- 
and machine-powered equipment provided for student use. 



Faculty 



Walter Erlebacher, Chairperson 
Barbara Goodstein 
Thomas Stearns 



Karl Stirner 
Petras Vaskys 
Steven L. Weiss 



Sculpture - Required Credits per Year 


Year 


Sculpture 
Major 


Studio 
Electives 


Liberal 
Arts 


I Foundation 


18 


3 


12 


II Sophomore 


18 


3-6 


12 


III Junior 


18 


3-6 


12 


IV Senior 


15 


3-6 


12 




Introductory (Sophomore) — Required 




Credits 



SC 20 1 Sculpture I (Forms, Compositions and Methods) 
SC 202 Sculpture I (Forms, Compositions and Methods) 
SC220 Molding and Casting 
SC 25 1 Theories of Structure 
SC 252 Theories of Structure 

Choose a miniinum of 6 credits from the following; 
SC 231 Introduction to Figure Modeling 
SC 232 Introduction to Figure Modeling 
SC 24 1 Sculpture Projects - Introduction Studio 
SC 242 Sculpture Projects — Introduction Studio 

Studio Electives 

Liberal Arts 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
1.5 
1.5 

3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3-6.0 
12,0 



Liberal Arts Requirements 

LA 250 A & B, History of Sculpture 



SC201, SC202 

Sculpture I (Forms. Composition 

and Methods) 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An introductory studio course on the 
fundamentals of sculpture. The 
approach is through tactile and visual 
perception with instruction in both 
traditional and contemporary form 
making in a variety of materials and 
techniques. Sculptural issues 
addressed are the recognition and 
construction of space and form, axial 
relationships, movements, scale, 
weight, balance, organic and 
geometric qualities, modularities, 
transformations, and symbolic 
meaning. 

SC 220 A 5e B 
Molding and Casting 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
hi the first semester, the course covers 
processes and techniques utilizing 
plaster, rubber, plastics, clays, and 
wax for making hard and flexible 
molds and casting sculpture in 
durable materials. The second 
semester provides a thorough 
foundation in foundry practices, 
including wax preparation, investing, 
pouring bronze or aluminum, chasing, 
hnishing and painting finished metal 
casts. 

SC231,SC232 

Introduction to Figure Modeling 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Modeling from life for the beginner, 
stressing direct observation, eye-hand 
coordination and depth 
discrimination. Both perceptual and 
conceptual skills are developed and 
fimdamental studio practices are 
taught, such as armature construction, 
clay utilization, and modeling 
techniques- Works are fired in clay or 
cast in plaster. 



SC241,SC242 
Sculpture Projects — 
Introductory Studio 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester; fall and spring 
An open studio oriented toward 
helping the development of individual 
initiative. Stressed are how ideas 
are transformed into sculptural 
statements through aesthetic 
reasoning and the internal logic of a 
sculpture's color, material, and 
physical construction. 

SC251,SC252 
Theories of Structure 
(Seminar — Lecture) 

1 V2 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
Lectures and discussions of various 
concepts and philosophies of 
structure: mathematical, biological, 
linguistic, perceptual, etc., and their 
implications to the definition of art. 

SC 260 A & B 
Structure of the Figure 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An anatomic and morphological 
analysis of male and female bodies for 
artists through a three-dimensional 
constructional method. Covered are 
proportions, anatomic structure, 
surface topology, morphological 
variation, and the body in movement. 
This course is directed toward two- 
dimensional artists as well as 
sculptors, and what is stressed are the 
means by which the body's salient 
features can be recognized from any 
viewpoint in any pose. 



Intermediate (Junior) — Required 


Credits 


SC301 


Sculpture II 


30 


SC302 


Sculpture II 

Choose a minimum of 12 credits from the following: 


3.0 


SC260 


Structure of the Figure 


6.0 


SC421 


Metal Studio 


3.0 


SC422 


Metal Studio 


3.0 


SC431 


Advanced Figure Sculpture 


3,0 


SC432 


Advanced Figure Sculpture 


3.0 


SC441 


Sculpture Projects — Advanced Studio 


3.0 


SC442 


Sculpture Projects — Advanced Studio 


3.0 




Studio Qectives 


3-6.0 




Liberal Arts 


12.0 




Advanced (Senior) — Required 


Credits 


SC401 


Sculpture III 


3.0 


SC402 


Sculpture III 

Choose a minimum of 9 credits from the following: 


3.0 


SC260 


Structure of the Figure 


6.0 


SC421 


Metal Studio 


3.0 


SC422 


Metal Studio 


3.0 


SC431 


Advanced Figure Sculpture 


3.0 


SC432 


Advanced Figure Sculpture 


3.0 


SC441 


Sculpture Projects — Advanced Studio 


3.0 


SC442 


Sculpture Projects - Advanced Studio 


3.0 




Studio Electives 


3-6.0 




Liberal Arts 


12.0 



SC301,SC302 
Sculpture II (Attitudes and 
Strategies) 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/ semester: fall and spring 
A studio-criticism course that focuses 
on the issue of artistic strategy as it 
applies to sculptural creation. 
Assignments given attempt to aid 
students to recognize their own and 
alternative tendencies through 
projects that are made to reflect 
attitudes like expressionism, idealism, 
mathematical systems, decoration, 
naturalism, etc. Prerequisite; SC 201, 
SC202 



SC401,SC402 

Sculpture III (Types and Modes) 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Terms like monumental, genre, 
narrative, emblematic, environmental, 
etc., reflect the cluster of types of 
sculptural imagery. This studio- 
criticism course is concerned with the 
ideational and technical issues raised 
by various such types of sculptural 
imagery, which are assigned in turn. 
What is stressed in each case is the 
relationship that sculptures have with 
the context they exist in and the 
purposes they serve. 
Prerequisite: SC 201, SC 202 



SC421,SC422 
Metal Studio 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Form making in noncast metal 
sculpture has contributed a large 
share to the history of sculpture, 
particularly in the present, where the 
idiom has become as familiar as 
carving and modeling. Concurrently 
offering both basic and advanced 
technical instruction in welding, 
forging, and other ferrous metal 
techniques, this course is oriented to 
making sculpture with iron or steel. 
Prerequisite: SC 201, SC 202 or 
SC 241, 242 

SC431, SC432 

Advanced Figure Sculpture 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
For students seriously involved with 
the figure, this course provides an 
atelier to continue figure modeling on 
increasingly advanced levels, and a 
context to help formulate a personal 
figurative sculptural idiom. Works are 
sculpted at various scales, including 
Ufe size; and independent projects are 
undertaken in consultation with the 
faculty. Critiques involving the 
meaning and sculptural significance 
of the works are an integral part of the 
ongoing class activity. 
Prerequisite: SC 231, SC 232 



SC441, SC442 
Sculpture Projects — 
Advanced Studio 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This course provides a studio context 
where maturing self-initiated areas of 
concentration in sculpture can be 
developed to fruition on an advanced 
level. Whatever the direction, a 
critical emphasis is placed, through 
both open and devised assignments, 
on how materials and forms 
compatible to personal statements 
are found. 
Prerequisite: SC 241, SC 242 







Courtyard at Broad and Pine Street complex 



PART-TIME STUDY AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Continuing Studies 

Nearly as many people study part time at PCA in the Continuing 
Studies Program as are enrolled full time in the day College. This 
program offers to persons whose other responsibilities do not permit 
them to study full time the opportunity to study art and design in the 
College's professional atmosphere. 

The population wishing this land of educational experience is 
growing rapidly, necessitating a continually expanding program and 
the recent addition of off-campus courses. Although most courses meet 
during the evening, there are courses in the daytime as well. The 
program has offerings during the fall, spring, and summer. 

Basic introductory courses can be taken with no admissions 
requirement. Courses may be taken independently for college credit 
or as part of caielully designed piogiams leading to a certificate. 
Certificates are granted in four areas: Advertising Design, Illustration, 
Interior Design, and Photography. 

More than ninety courses are offered by Continuing Studies with 
selections from all the studio areas of the College. They range from 
introductory to advanced, professional levels of study. In addition, a 
selection of College Liberal Arts courses and Complementary Studies 
which includes courses in art history is given each semester. 

A new program of noncredit workshops in art-related subjects of 
special, timely interest was established last year. 

Main Line Extension 

PCA's Main Line Extension was established as a new center for the 
visual arts in the J. Gardner Cassatt mansion on the property of the 
Upper Main Line Y in Berwyn (near Paoli). A lull program of studio 
courses selected from the main campus curriculum is now conveniently 
available to residents of the Main Line during fall, spring, and summer. 

Classes are small and run during the day, evenings, and weekends. 
Like other part-time students, those at the Extension are entitled to all 
college services including advising, the art library, and special film and 
art programs. 

University In-Service Teacher Education Network (UITEN) 

UITEN is a consortium of eight regional institutions of higher learning, 
which offers graduate-level courses especially designed for teachers 
of area schools. The credits accrued in this program may be applied to 
Permanent Certification, Master's Degree Equivalency, Master's Degree 
(at the discretion of the granting institution), and Master's plus Thirty. 

To receive a current catalogue and further information about any of 
the programs described above, please write to the Office for 
Continuing Studies at PCA, or call (215) 893-3160. 



The Saturday School 

An open enrollment, noncredit program of visual studies is offered at 
PCA on Saturdays during the fall and spring semesters for students 
aged eight to eighty-plus. Staffed by professional artist-teachers and 
student teachers, the Saturday School is under the direction of the 
Education Department. Course offerings include Elementary Art Studio 
for Kids, Junior High Studio, Senior High Studio, Drawing, Figure 
Drawing, Painting in Oils and Acrylics, Jewelry, Ceramics, 
Photography, Introduction to Fashion Illustration, Layout and Design, 
and Weave It, Dye It, Print It, Wear It. The Saturday School has been an 
established tradition at PCA for thirty-five years. 
(For further information call (215) 893-3125.) 

Summer Programs 
Pre-College Program 

The Philadelphia College of Art offers a popular five-week program 
each summer for 1 1th and 12th grade high school students, college 
students, and people of all ages interested in exploring a career in the 
visual arts. 

Patterned after PCA's outstanding Foundation Program, the summer 
program provides a solid introduction to the basic elements of a 
professional art education — drawing, two-dimensional design, and 
three-dimensional design. In addition, students choose two electives 
from a selection of courses including painting, printmaking, sculpture, 
photography, ceramics, fibres, jewelry, graphic design, illustration, and 
woodworking. 

The program, taught by professional artist-teachers, has always had 
an enthusiastic enrollment of people with a variety of goals who enjoy 
and can benefit from a total immersion art experience in the summer. 
To enrich the summer courses, the program also includes trips away 
from campus, films, seminars and career counseling. Students may stay 
in the nearby college residence. (For additional information, please 
write or call (215) 893-3200.) 

Summer Studio 

PCA offers special Day College Summer Sessions with courses drawn 
from the major studio areas, taught by faculty from those departments. 
Up to six credits may be earned in the program and may be applied to 
any PCA program or transferred to other institutions at their discretion. 
(Please call (215) 893-3200 for further information.) 



FRESHMAN ADMISSION 

Each year, we select fiom among our applicants those who we feel will 
most fully benefit by study at PCA. The Admissions Committee prefers 
those applicants who choose to express themselves through visual 
images; who demonstrate the intellectual abilities to meet, question, 
and challenge the ideas of their time; who wish to increase their 
awareness of themselves and of their world and to address their 
envirorunent in a positive, individual manner; and who bring energy, 
concern, humor, and initiative to their inquiry. The college believes 
that diversity is essential to establish a well-balanced mixture of 
experience and opinion. In our student body, differences in age and 
racial, educational, and cultural background help insure a genuine 
learning environment. 

PCA has not constructed a model against which to measure all 
aspirants to the freshman class, and there is no weight or rank assigned 
to application credentials. Both the portfolio and high school 
academics, along with any self-presentation options, are reviewed 
together to establish a picture of each candidate. Using these 
composites, we decide which applicants vrill be best served by study at 
PCA. Offers of admission are made to those who demonstrate visual 
and academic abiUties, stamina and motivation to be successful in a 
demanding program of study. 

During the admission process, we hope that you will ask as many 
questions of us as we will of you, and that you will find an opportunity 
to visit PCA in order to meet our faculty, students, classrooms, and 
facilities firsthand. Anyone who wishes a tour of the college should call 
or write the Admissions Office for an appointment. 

The Admissions Committee believes that a decision to deny 
admission in no way reflects upon the future of that individual as an 
artist, nor his or her success at another college, nor his or her potential 
at PCA after more training and education. 

Application Procedures and Deadlines 

PCA practices a rolling admissions system for the freshman class. 
Decisions are made on a continuing basis for those who have completed 
the application requirements. PCA begins accepting applications in 
September for the following academic year. We urge candidates who 
are applying ior financial aid to complete applications for 
admission prior to March 15. 

Applicants offered admission to the freshman class before April 15 
are required to submit a $100 tuition deposit and a notification of 
intention to enroll before May 1. Applicants who receive an affirmative 
answer after April 15 must remit the tuition deposit within three weeks 
of the offer of admission. The tuition deposit is not refundable after 
May 1. 

A maximum of three weeks is allowed between receipt of 
application and submission of all supporting credentials. Because of the 



large nimiber of applicants, the Admissions Office must ask the 
candidate to assume responsibility for his or her own application 
procedure. Files are checked to monitor applications and notices are 
sent when credentials are overdue; if no response to such notice is 
received, the files are closed. 

Application Requirements for First-Time Freshmen 

1 . High School Transcript 

2. Portfolio 

3. CEEB Scholastic Aptitude Test 

4. Optional — Interview 

5. Optional — Self-Presentation. 

Scholastic Requirements with High School Diploma 

Freshmen must be graduates of an accredited secondary school or the 
equivalent. A curriculum of college preparatory subjects is 
recommended. Specific course distribution is not required, although a 
minimum of four (4) years of English and two (2) of history is strongly 
reconmiended. Remaining courses should be selected from the 
approved college preparatory program, including studies in languages, 
mathematics, sciences, humanities, art history, psychology, and 
sociology. A minimum of two (2) years of art and design is 
recommended. 

Scholastic Requirements without High School Diploma 

Applicants not holding regular high school diplomas may qualify for 
admission consideration by one of the following methods: 

1. GED (General Education Diploma) tests are acceptable on 
conversion to a state diploma through the Department of Public 
Instruction of the applicant's resident state. 

2. Applicants not holding a diploma may qualify for admission 
consideration through the College Level Examination Program 
(CLEP). General Examination scores should be forwarded to the 
Admissions Office vrith all available scholastic records. CLEP is 
administered monthly through the testing centers of most major 
universities from which registration information may be obtained. 

Portfolio 

Your portfolio should describe you as a visual person. While PCA 
does not list specific requirements or assign problems, we do strongly 
recommend that your work be captured from life rather than from a 
photograph, and that with each piece you demonstrate your abiUty to 
deal with sources of light, form, volume, weight, and aspects of 
compositional design (e.g., still lifes, figure drawings, etc.). Your 
portfolio should be a representative group of collected works that 
demonstrate your strengths, depth in areas of particular interest, and 
the range of your visual abilities and exposure. You tell us a great deal 
about yourself by the selection of pieces in your portfolio, so choose 
thoughtfully and carefully — and make the selection yourself. 



Portfolio Requirements 

A portfolio of at least twelve (12) pieces of original work completed 
within the past year. 

1 . Portfolios sent to the college must be presented in color slides or 
color photographs with a separate list of descriptions. Slides or 
photographs must be numbered to correspond with their 
descriptions. You should indicate the size and mediimi of the work 
and briefly explain the concept, project, or problem involved. When 
more than one picture is used to illustrate a piece (i.e., sculpture, 
ceramics, 3-dimensional design, etc.), the slides should be labeled in 
sequence (2a, 2b, etc.). Slides should be presented in Sii" x 11" 
slide file pages and clearly labeled with the applicant's name. 

2. Freshmen applicants selecting the interview with portfolio option 
may present actual work and/ or slides. All work will be reviewed 
and discussed during the interview. 

CEEB Scholastic Aptitude Test 

CEEB SAT results are required for admissions and they will be used as 
an ingredient in the application evaluation. Students who have not had 
college-level course work in English Composition should make 
arrangements to take the CEEB Scholastic Aptitude Test. For further 
information and application forms, see your guidance counselor or vinrite 
to CEEB, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. PCA's College 
Entrance Examination Board school code is 2664. 

Interview 

Applicants are invited to visit the college and have an interview vrith 
one of the Admissions staff or faculty. If you select an interview vrith 
portfolio, you will be expected to present your work during the 
scheduled meeting. 

PCA has no established format or schedule of questions for the 
interview; the primary responsibility rests on you. In general, you 
should discuss your visual background, training and goals, other 
interests, special problems, and so forth. You should use the time wisely 
to let the interviewer discover what is important to you, the elements of 
your background and personality that make you unique, and the 
reasons you have selected an arts college for your education. 

It is equally important for you to investigate the college. The 
interview provides an opportunity for you to find out if PCA has the 
programs, philosophies, faculties, and envirormient which are most 
suited for your education. 

Whenever possible, interviews will be arranged within the month 
requested by the applicant. Interviews are scheduled during office 
hours (9-5), Mondays through Fridays. It is possible for us to arrange 
appointments on the first Saturday of each month (9-12). 

Self-Presentation 

PCA encourages applicants to design their own application process 
by supplementing the required records and portfolio vrith any 



additional credentials they think helpful. Any self-presentation 
options that you vrish the Admissions Conunittee to use in evaluating 
your application for admission|to PCA should be presented within 
three weeks from the date of application. 

Suggested Self-Presentation Options 

1 . Letters of reference 

2. Statement of purpose or autobiography 

3. Sketchbooks or ideabooks 

4. Visual presentations (not substitutes for the portfolio), slides, or 
photos of additional work 

Films 

Independent visual projects 

5. Supplemental portfolio of work in one concentrated area 

6. Original writings 

7. Testing results: 

American College Testing (ACT) 
CEEB Achievement Tests 
Other 

8. Musical, dance, drama, etc. 



Early Admission 

PCA will accept applications from qualified high school juniors for 
entrance as freshmen in September provided either of the following 
conditions is met: 

1 . By taking an overload during the junior year or summer courses, the 
applicant is able to complete high school diploma credit 
requirements and receive the diploma before fall enrollment; or 

2. Under written agreement, the candidate's high school authorities 
grant the applicant a high school diploma upon completion of the 
freshman year at PCA. 

Conditional Admission 

Offers of admission may specify one or more of the foUovring 
conditions: 

1 . Successful completion of PCA's summer Pre-CoUege Program. This 
condition is made when the portfolio review indicates that 
additional studio preparation is necessary to insure a student's 
success in the Foundation curriculum. The Pre-CoUege Program 
includes studies in drawing, two-dimensional design, and three- 
dimensional design as well as several elective courses. Classes are 
scheduled for a five-week session, thirty hours of instruction per 
week, usually during the month of July. 

2. Successful completion of PCA's Pre-Freshman Academic and Studio 
Workshop. This requirement is made when the Admissions 
Committee determines that additional scholastic training as well as 
studio preparation is necessary. The program involves workshops in 
reading and writing skills and studio course work. For the past four 



summers, this workshop has been fuBded by the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania's Higher Education Equal Opportunity Act. 
3. Academic Probation. Requiring achievement of a C (2.0) grade 
point average at the end of the freshman year in order to be 
promoted to the second-year level. 

Deferred Admission 

PCA vrill accept applications from candidates who plan a year of 
activities, work, or travel between high school and college and who, 
therefore, wish to enter college one full year after graduation from 
high school. A brief note explaining the deferment should be attached 
to the application. Deferred applicants should follow procedures listed 
in this brochure; a tentative decision on the deferred application vrill 
be tendered when the file is complete. 

Any applicant offered admission to the current September freshman 
class who wishes to defer enrollment until the following September may 
also request this consideration. Deferred candidates will be required 
to submit a statement of their activities and reaffirm their interest in 
PCA before January 15 of the academic year preceding desired 
matriculation. 

Waiver of Application Fee 

PCA will waive the application fee in cases of extreme family financial 
need. A verification of same is required from a high school guidance 
counselor, two-year college counselor, or other authorized personnel. 



Fees and Deposits 



Amount Due 



Refund Date 



Application 
Tuition Deposit 
Housing Deposit 
Security Deposit 

Pre-College Program Deposit 



$ 20.00 with application not refundable 
$100.00 Mayl not refundable 

$100.00 lunel not refundable 

$ 1 00.00 June 1 refundable at end of first 

academic year 
$ 50.00 June 1 not refundable 



TRANSFER ADMISSION 



PCA considers any applicant who has been enrolled in a college-level 
program of studies after secondary school to be a transfer applicant. 
Transfers enjoy a preferred position among applicants for admission 
since it can be assumed they have matured in their goals and have 
demonstrated their abilities at the college level. 

Transfer Credits and Residence Requirements 

Transfer applicants may receive credit for courses taken at other 
accredited institutions that are similar in content, purpose, and 
standards to those offered at the Philadelphia College of Art. For credit 
to be granted, official transcripts of all previous college study must be 
presented. A minimum grade of C must have been obtained in a course 
that is presented for transfer credit. The evaluation of credits is made 
by the department in which the equivalent comse is taught, in 
consultation with the registrar. Transfer credit for studio courses may 
be granted only after official transcripts and portfolio material are 
presented. Studio credits will not be granted on the basis of the 
transcript or portfolio alone. 

Every transfer student must complete a minimum of two semesters in 
residence preceding graduation; he or she must earn a minimum of 
33 credits in studio or liberal arts courses. Students must transfer or 
complete the required distribution of liberal arts and major 
department courses stipulated for the degree regardless of the credits 
completed at other accredited institutions. For this reason, transfer 
students may be required to remain in residence at PCA for more than 
the minimum two semesters, completing more than the minimum 33 
credits. 

Freshman Transfers 

Transfer students with fewer than 24 transferable hberal arts credits 
and vrithout qualifications for advanced standing in studio should 
expect to be registered for the Foundation Program and anticipate 
being enrolled at PCA for the equivalent of eight semesters. Those who 
qualify for either the three-year program or advanced standing but who 
wish to take advantage of the Foundation Program core and elective 
courses may also apply as freshman transfers. 

Three- Year Transfer Program 

Students who have not had substantial studio instruction but who do 
present a minimum of 24 transferable semester credits in liberal arts 
may qualify for the three-year transfer program. Under this program, 
students have an opportunity to fulfill PCA's graduation recpiirements 
in three years. In the first year the Foundation Program core curriculum 
is combined with studies in major department and related areas; if 
approved by both Foundation Program and major department 
chairmen, the transfer student may attain jimior status at the start of 



his or her second year. This program requires an extremely demanding 
schedule and is best suited to mature students who have definitely 
decided on a choice of major. 

Advanced Standing 

Students transferring into the sophomore or junior level in major 
department and related arts studio work are considered advanced- 
standing candidates. Those who have completed 21 or more semester 
credits in studio and who have fulfilled the foundation requirements 
may be considered for sophomore status; applicants presenting 42 or 
more credits in studio and intensive study in a major area may be 
considered for junior status. Please note that at PCA studio credits are 
assigned on a 2:1 class hour to credit ratio. 

Decisions concerning admission to a major department, class 
standing, and mandated prerequisites and/or related arts are made by 
major department faculty upon an evaluation of the admission 
portfolio and transcripts. 

Transfer from PCA's Continuing Studies Program 

Credits for the three portfolio courses offered by PCA's Continuing 
Studies Program — Drawing, AlOOE; Color and Design, AllOE; and 
Form Study, A109E — carmot be transferred. The History of Art and 
Culture course will also not transfer to the day College program. 
Advanced Continuing Studies courses can, however, be transferred to 
the day school record as electives. 

Transfer Application Requirements 

1. Portfolio 

2. Transcripts of all previous college experience and a listing of 
courses that will be completed before entrance into PCA. 

3. Catalog or other publication describing course work recorded and 
credit assignment for studio work. 

4. High School transcript (not required if the applicant holds a 
bachelor's degree). 

5. Advanced-standing and three-year transfer applicants must present 
a written statement of purpose outlining their objectives in future 
art education. 

6. Advanced -standing and three-year transfer applicants must indicate 
the one department for which they wish consideration. 

7. Transfer applicants anticipating freshman or three-year status may 
elect to complete any of the self-presentation options listed on page 58. 

Transfer Portfolio 

1 . Applicants writhout extensive studio experience should follow 
portfolio instructions on page 57. 

2. Advanced-standing applicants should present a portfolio 
demonstrating basic abilities — drawing, two-dimensional and 
three-dimensional — as well as competence and preparation in the 



area of intended major. Your pjortfolio should generally represent the 
studio areas in which you have studied at the college level. 

Applicants electing to present work during an interview (see 
below) may present actual work and/or slides. All work will be 
reviewed and discussed during the interview. 

Portfolios sent to the College must be presented in their original 
form or color or in color slides with a separate list of descriptions. 
SUdes should be in 8'/2" x 11" slide file pages and clearly labeled 
with the applicant's name. 

Interviews 

Applicants for advanced standing in studio or the three-year transfer 
program who file application and transcripts prior to April 1 will be 
invited to come to the College and meet with major departmental 
faculty to discuss transfer status and programs of study. Application 
portfolios may be presented during this interview. If the application 
and transcripts are filed after April 1, portfolios must be sent to the 
College in slides. Excessive demands of final critiques and graduation 
prohibit scheduling of interviews for advanced applicants after May 1 . 
Freshman transfers have the option of an interview with portfolio as 
described above. 

Notice of Admission 

Transfer applicants judged admissible at an advanced level will be so 
informed when an evaluation of their portfolio and all credentials 
have been completed. Decision letters will be mailed on a continuing 
basis for those who have completed the application process. 

Additional Informotion 
Advcmced Placement Examination 

PCA awards three credits toward the liberal arts requirements for a 
score of 3 or better in any CEEB Advanced Placement examination on 
an academic subject. 

College Level Examination Placement (CLEP) Program 

Credit will be allowed toward the PCA liberal arts requirement for a 
score of 50 or better on CLEP subject examinations. This allowance is 
only for those applicants who have not been enrolled in school or 
college for over two years. 

Foreign Student Applications 

Because of the lengthy procedures and extensive time needed to 
receive and evaluate credentials from overseas, foreign applicants 
should apply well in advance of desired admission. 

Foreign applicants whose native language is other than English are 
required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 
If 'TOEFL scores are acceptable, the College will send the necessary 
forms for completing application. All foreign transcripts and other 



documents must be certified by an embassy, legation, or consular 
officer of the U.S.A. 

The College has no financial aid for students who are not U.S. 
citizens. Foreign students must file proof of their ability to support 
themselves from their own financial resources. 

The immigration forms necessary for student visas will be completed 
by the College only after an applicant has accepted an offer of 
admission. This school is authorized under Federal law to enroll 
nonimmigrant alien students. 

Veterans 

As an accredited degree-granting institution, the College is approved 
by the Veterans Administration. Information about education benefits 
may be obtained from any VA office. 

Special Student Status 

Undergraduate enrollment in the day College is usually reserved for 
matriculated students pursuing degree graduation. Special students 
can be accommodated for credit or audit registration in the Continuing 
Studies Program in the day College. Students applying for non- 
matiiculated statiis in the day College should submit the undergraduate 
application form with transcripts and a portfolio of studio work to 
the Office of Admissions. Evaluation of application is made by the 
appropriate departmental faculty and the Director of Admissions. 

Groiqi Information Sessions 

A member of PCA's faculty or admissions staff will be available for 
group information sessions on scheduled days of the week. Any student, 
parent, counselor and/or art teacher who wishes to meet in a group 
session to learn about the College should contact the Admissions Office 
for an appointment. This may be coordinated with a tour of the College 
facilities, if desired. 

Admission to the Master of Arts in Art Education Program/ 
Teacher Certification Program 

The following information applies to students holding Bachelor's degrees 
who are interested in obtaining a Master of Arts in Art Education and/ 
or the Pennsylvania Instructional I Certificate (K-12). 

Application for the M.A. in Art Education/Teacher Certification 

Required: 

1. Completed application form and $20 application fee. Applicant 
for M.A. must include a statement describing his or her plans for the 
studio major on the application form. 

2. A brief, typewritten statement defining the applicant's professional 
experience and objectives. 

3. Two official transcripts of academic record for each undergraduate 
and graduate (if any) institution previously attended. 



4. Ten samples or slides of recent original studio work. 

5. Letters of recommendation (three for M.A., two for Teacher 
Certification) from faculty, program advisors, art teacher supervisors, 
and/or any other authority familiar vrith and qualified to evaluate 
the applicant's academic and studio performance. 

Dates of Application 

Applications for admission to the graduate program must be completed 
and all credentials submitted by April 15 for admission in the 
succeeding fall semester and by November 1 5 for the spring semester. 
Submit all credentials to the Graduate Admissions Office. 

Interviews 

All applicants for the M.A. in Art Education will be invited to the College 
for an interview conducted by the faculty of the program. Interviews 
are scheduled immediately after the deadline dates noted above. Each 
applicant who has submitted all credentials will be contacted by the 
Graduate Admissions Office to arrange an appointment. If you can take 
advantage of the interview option, you may present your portfolio of 
studio work at that time. If you carmot visit the College for the 
interview, please submit your portfolio by the deadline. 




Philadelphia waterfront 



TUITION AND EXPENSES 

Ck>inprehensive Tuition Program 

This year PCA has adopted a Comprehensive Tuition Program which 
replaces our past method of determining tuition charges on a per credit 
basis. Comprehensive tuition will be charged to all imdergraduate 
students who are full time. A full-time undergraduate student takes a 
minimum of 12 credits per semester. The comprehensive plan permits a 
full-time student to carry up to 18 credits per semester without 
additional charge. Students will be charged $150 ($135 tuition, $15 
general fee ') for each credit in excess of 18 in one semester. Students 
registering for less than 12 credits will be charged on a per credit 
basis at the rate of $150. 

Comprehensive Tuition per semester effective July 1, 1980. will be 
$2250. (This represents $2000 in tuition charges and a $250 general 
fee.) The comprehensive tuition charge will be applied to those 
students registered for a combined total of 12 to 18 credits in the day 
and evening programs. 

The only additional charge is the mandatory $10 Student Health Plan 
Fee covering service for all students through The Thomas Jefferson 
University Hospital. 

Schedule of Semester Charges and Fees 

Tuition per credit $150 

Graduate tuition per credit (see below) $150 

Late registration $ 25 

Late payment $ 20 

Transcript of record $ 1 

Diploma and commencement fee $ 20 

Health services fee $ 10 

Schedule change (after drop/add period) S 5 
Thesis (per semester) 1 .5 credits or $225 

Credit by examination per credit $ 10 



* General fees contribute toward the costs of library facilities, operation and 
maintenance of physical plant, student activities, specialized services such as 
health, placement, and registration. The Board of Trustees has resolved that $5 
of the per credit tuition charge may be set aside for the sole purpose of capital 
expenditures. The general fee is not refundable under any circumstances. 

A $50 damage deposit is required for every dormitory resident. Any breakage 
or damage for which the student is responsible will be deducted from this deposit. 
The unexpended portion of the deposit is refunded when the student vacates 
the dormitory. 



Tuition for Graduate Students 

Tuition for graduate studies for the 1980-81 year will be charged at 
the rate of $ 1 50 per semester credit for part-time students taking 
10 credits or below. Full-time students (10.5-18 credits) will be charged 
$2250 per semester. Teacher Certification special students will be 
considered full time at 12.5 and above credits. General fee charges 
are the same for undergraduate students. A fee of $225 or 1 .5 credits 
per semester will be charged to thesis students who continue thesis 
study beyond designated coursework. 

Annual Undergraduate Expenses 



Tuition and genial fee 

(12-18 semester hour credits) 

Student residence apartment rental 

Board (assuming the use of 
apartment kitchen facilities) 

Art supplies and books 

Commuting and lunch 

Estimated annual expenses 

(including miscellaneous expenses) 

If you have any questions about the Comprehensive Program, please 
contact the Finance Office. 



Tuition Payments and Financial Responsibility 

Payment in full of semester billing is required for clearance to attend. 
The College does not offer a monthly installment plan whereby 
enrollment costs may be paid over the course of a year. However, there 
are several such plans available from various banks, and information 
will be supplied to all students at the time tuition statements are mailed, 
or upon request. The College offers a deferred payment plan which 
permits payment of a minimimi of 60% of a semester's tuition prior to the 
first day of classes and the balance forty-five days from the first day of 
classes. Approval for this deferred plan must be requested from the 
Financial Aid Office as soon as the student receives his or her tuition 
bill. The student personally, and his or her parents if he or she has not 
attained the age of majority, must assume full obligation for any and all 
College charges levied. 

Students are prohibited from advance registration or enrollment 
should there be any outstanding obligation, whether tuition, fees, loans, 
or library books, from a prior semester. 



lent Student 


Commuting Student 


$4500 


$4500 


$1500 




$ 650 




$ 500 


$ 500 




$ 600 


$7150 


$5600 



STUDENT PORTFOLIO 





Education, Maria Wheeler, graduate student 











Education, James Rauchman, graduate student 




Ceramics, John De Fazio, junior 




Glass, Rhonda Throne, senior 





Jewelry /Metals, Nancy Lanyon, junior 
66 



Jewelry/ Metals, Todd Noe, junior 




Fibres, Brian Oninn, junior 




Wood, Marty Linder, junior 








-oebebe OB : 


^[iD bb'be'd" c : 


j 


'^^^"' ' 


*'■ 




EAST ELEVATION 



EnvironmentaJ Design, Ouinn DeMenna, 



Environmental Design, Denise Shamro, senior 



v«^ 








!^N 



FUTURISM 



Balla 
Boccioni 
Severini 



Philadelphia Museun i of Art 
Octolxr6-January4 



Graphic Design, Doregeas Shaw, junic 



Graphic Design, Karen Keenan, junior 




Illustration, Casmore Edwards, senior 




Illustration, John Ignarri, sophomore 




Illustration, Barbara McGrath, senior 




Industrial Design, Richard Nadeau, junior 



Industrial Design, Siri Korsgren/Paul Finkleston, juniors 




Painting, Ellen Soffer, junior 




Painting, Matt Marello, sophomore 




Painting, Daniel Topalis, junior 




Photography/Film, John Paskevich, senior 




Photography/Film, Joanne Larry, sophomore 




Sculpture, Rachel Marshall, sophomore 





Sculpture, Steve Nocella, junior 



Printmaking, Deena Underwood, senior 




Piintmaking, Daniel Sadler, 



STUDENT SERVICES 



Introduction 

The Student Services division of PCA is a vital information center 
consisting of the offices of the Dean of Students, Career Development 
and Placement, Financial Aid, Housing and Activities, Health Services, 
Registrar and Records, Credit Counseling, and Psychological 
Counseling. 

Student Services also provides counseling on off-campus housing 
arrangements, general and personal counseling, foreign study, student 
exchange programs, information and advice on College regulations 
and policies, and cultural activities in the Greater Philadelphia area. 

We are a very special community of people devoted to your success 
in all aspects of student life. We are here to help you achieve your goals 
and to be certain that your experiences measure up to your expectations. 
We look forward to meeting each of you individually in the begiiming of 
your Foundation year. 

Housing 

Campus Housing for approximately 160 students is located at 15th and 
Spruce close to all College facilities. This residence is co-educational 
and features apartment accommodations each with a kitchen and bath. 
The Residence staff consists of a Residence Director and Resident 
Advisors with counseling and supervisory responsibilities. Applications 
for housing will be mailed to new students after they aie admitted to the 
College. Freshmen from outside the Philadelphia area are guaranteed 
housing and are required to live in College housing their first year. 
Students who are not freshmen may choose to live in off-campus 
apartments. PCA will assist any student in finding off-campus 
accommodations. 

Counseling Services 

Students vrill frequently have concerns about their emotional, physical, 
sexual, or intellectual development. To assist you with these questions 
and needs, ^ee psychological counseling is available through the 
Student Services division of the College. Most counseling is done on an 
individual basis, but on occasion, group counseling can be arranged. 
Appointments may be arranged in the Dean of Students office. Students 
in need of psychiatric coimseling may consult one of the staff counseling 
psychologists for assistance, or be advised by one of the physicians from 
the Family Medicine Unit of The Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. 

Career Development and Placement Office 

The Career Development and Placement Office provides both 
students and alumni with a full program for the development of their 
careers. A student's career development is an integral part of the 
academic experience, beginning vrith his or her admission to the 



College. The office, as with any other college and university, caimot 
guarantee job placement; however, it does provide opportunities for 
students to gain experience and earn income while they study. Career 
counseling, information seminars, and internships supplement classroom 
and studio instruction. 

The office receives approximately 1,000 part-time, full-time, and 
freelance positions each year for both students and alumni. A grovring 
number of recruiters come to PCA each spring to interview and hire 
graduating seniors. Firms from across the country contact the office with 
career opportimities for graduating seniors and alumni. While entry 
level salaries for artists and designers vary considerably, many of the 
PCA graduating seniors obtain positions that are in the $10-$ 17,000 
range. Within the first six months of gradxration, 85-90% of the students 
obtain employment. 

The office publishes a career newsletter, and has a career library that 
includes information on grants available to visual artists, exhibitions 
and competitions, and business and legal concerns for the professional 
artist. Other programs include a credentials service to assist students 
and alumni/ae in their application for employment or graduate school 
and individual and group workshops in resume vnriting, interviewing, job 
marketing skills, and locating prospective employers. Students are 
strongly urged to arrange an individual meeting with the director in the 
first years of their academic preparation. The student and director wiU 
discuss career goals and options in order to maximize the integration of 
his or her academic and career development. 

The Alumni Association 

The Alumni Association of the Philadelphia College of Art assists in the 
support of the College and in establishing strong and helpful 
relationships among former, present and future students of the College. 
Directed by a representative Board, the Association runs an active 
program throughout the year with special emphasis on directing career 
coUabs vrithin the College, focusing in on outstanding alumni by 
directing a major alumni show in the College's Main Gallery each year 
and by holding aliunni reunions and outreach programs throughout the 
country. 

Credit Counseling 

The credit counselor provides each upperclass student with an updated 
credit count during the advising period and counsels him or her twice 
yearly regarding courses and credits needed in both liberal arts and his 
or her major. Each student is thus assured of making normal progress 
toward graduation. 

Health Service 

The College maintains a health service, open weekdays throughout the 
regular academic sessions and staffed by a resident nurse. The medical 
needs of the PCA student community are met by the Jefferson Hospital 
Family Medicine Department. A complete range of physician's services 



are available to all matriculated PCA students by payment of a 
mandatory annual health fee. The Jefferson Family Medicine 
Department is located in the new Jefferson Hospital at 1 1 th and Walnut 
Streets, a short walking distance from the College. 

Learning Skills Center 

This center, opened in 1979, helps students develop reading 
proficiency and writing skills, provides peer tutoring by upperclass 
students, and counsels students on study skills and strategies. Many 
undergraduates are referred here by their instructors, but those 
students who wish to improve their academic performance can freely 
avail themselves of the center's resources. 

Student Safety 

PCA has assigned security personnel to all its buildings to provide 
twenty-four-hour protection. The College maintains a strict I.D. policy 
to ensure the safety of students, faculty, and staff. Dorm students may 
request escort service for trips between residences and campus 
buildings from midnight to 8 a.m. 

Meal Service 

The College maintains a cafeteria that serves breakfast, limch, and a 
light dinner. Food-vending machines are accessible at all times, both in 
the main instructional building and at the residence hall. 

Student Activities 

The social life at PCA is relaxed and informal. Special student 
activities are coordinated and funded by the Arts Coimcil, a h)oard of 
students, faculty, and staff with ten to fifteen members. Any student 
wanting to organize an activity is encouraged to come to the Council 
to present a proposal. Activities sponsored by the Council in the past 
include partial funding of the student memberships at the "Y" at Broad 
and Pine Streets which has facilities for svrimming, indoor track, 
basketball, exercising, and racquetball; organizing and funding the 
annual Spring Formal; the Friday Night Film Series; the Halloween 
Dance; several outstanding art film series; various coffee houses; dances; 
the basketball team, and performances by musicians. An effort is made 
to supplement the extraordinary range of social and cultural events in 
Philadelphia, but not to duplicate them. For more information, please 
contact the Student Services offices. 

Monday-Sunday is a weekly nevreletter that is distributed throughout 
the College informing students of scheduled lectures, films, exhibits, 
and performances as well as news of note about faculty, students, and 
alumni. A closed-circuit television monitor, on prominent view in the 
main lobby of Anderson Hall, also publicizes special events and 
activities. 



Social Regulations 

The College's regulations governing nonacademic student conduct are 
intended to maintain a viable and orderly institutional society, 
safeguard the particular values and common welfare of its student 
body, and promote the best possible enviromnent for professional study. 
Membership in the College community is regarded as a privilege, and 
the student is expected to exercise self-discipline and good judgment. 
By official registration, he or she acknowledges the College's authority 
to define and enforce standards of acceptable conduct. 

Adjudication of alleged student misconduct is the responsibility of the 
Office of the Dean of Students and is delegated to the Disciplinary 
Committee, representing the student body, faculty, and administration. 
A complete reference to all rules and procedures is contained in the 
current PCA Student Handbook. 

Student Work 

The College reserves the right to retain one or more examples of each 
student's work to be added to its permanent collection of student art. 

College Liability 

The College cannot be responsible for the loss of a student's personal 
property resulting from fire, theft, or any other cause. Personal 
insurance is recommended. 

Work done in the studio under the supervision of a faculty member is 
considered a part of the educational program. Reasonable care will be 
exercised to protect assignments and projects, but the College cannot 
assume responsibility for loss or damage to student work stored or 
exhibited on the premises. 




The neighborhood YM-YWHA, Broad and Pine Streets 



COOPERATIVE AND EXCHANGE PROGRAMS 

COOPEBATIVE AND EXCHANGE PROGRAMS 
Programs in the USA 

PCA has designed an attractive array of cooperative programs wrhich 
serve to expand and enrich your educational experience. Student 
exchange programs offer you the opportunity to spend a semester or 
year as a visiting student on the campus of another art college. The 
following schools share exchange programs vrith PCA: 

Atlanta College of Art 

Aiiists for Environment Progiam, Delaware Water Gap National 

Recreation Area (see below) 
California College of Arts and Crafts 
Center for Creative Studies, College of Art and Design 
Cleveland Institute of Art 
The Cooper Union 
Kansas City Art Institute 
Maryland Institute, College of Art 
Massachusetts College of Art 
Minneapolis College of Art and Design 
Nova Scotia College of Art and Design 
Otis Art Institute of Parsons School of Design 
Parsons School of Design 
Pratt Institute 
San Francisco Art Institute 
School of the Art Institute of Chicago 
School of the Museum of Fine Arts 
Tyler School of Art 

Additional information and application forms are available in the Dean 
of Students office. 

Artists for Environment Program 

This unique program permits sophomores and juniors majoring in 
painting to enroll for one semester at the Delawrare Water Gap National 
Recreation Area in Walpack Center, New Jersey. This nonprofit 
foundation, located in unspoiled mountainous isolation, is affiliated 
vrith the National Park Service of the U.S. Department of the Interior. 
Artists for Enviroimient is a community of painters working, living, and 
studying together for concentrated periods, attempting to reroot their 
identities in nature and their envirormient. 

Each student is provided vrith his or her ovm. living quarters and 
studio space. Students work independently, vrith weekly or biweekly 
instruction from resident staff. Final reports and evaluations are sent to 
the student's home institution. Participants in the program work closely 
with National Park Service persoimel — naturalists, historians, and 
Rangers. The curriculum is augmented by trips to museums and 
galleries, and visiting faculty, artists, photographers, and musicians 
are available for presentations and critiques on an informal basis. 



Pennsylvania Academy /PCA Cooperative Program 

In 1970, PCA and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
inaugurated an extraordinary transfer program to serve the Academy's 
scholastically qualified four-year certificate candidates and graduates 
who seek a baccalaureate degree. 

PAFA graduates and students currently enrolled in the PAFA 
96-credit certificate program who gain formal Academy endorsement 
are admissible to PCA as degree-credit registrants. These registrants 
complete PCA's prevailing liberal arts credit requirements for their 
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. They will be considered to have fulfilled 
PCA's studio requirements for degree graduation upon receipt of the 
Academy's certificate. A maximum 12 semester credits earned at 
another institution in liberal arts course work vrill be evaluated for 
transfer toward PCA's requirements. 

Reciprocally, the Academy will accommodate PCA students who 
vrish to augment their studio programs by registering for selected 
PAFA course offerings, class size permitting. 

Foreign and Summer Study Programs 

PCA students are encouraged to apply for admission to the visual arts 
programs at colleges, universities, and institutes in the United States 
and other countries. Written approval from the PCA chairperson for 
PCA credit upon successful completion of studies at another institution 
must he obtained. Summer programs and international art institutes 
where PCA students have recently enrolled include: 

The Academies of Fine Arts in Florence and Rome 

Blossom-Kent Art Program, Kent State University 

Croydon College of Art, England 

Epsom College of Art and Design, England 

The Fulbright-Hays Grants 

Lake Placid School of Art, New York 

Royal College of Art, England 

Scandinavian Seminar 

Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine 

Tyler School of Art in Rome 

Yale-Norfolk Summer School, Connecticut 

Further information on any of the above programs can be obtained 
from the Dean of Students. 



FINANCIAL AID 



FINANCIAL AID FOR NEW STUDENTS 
Application Procedures 

If you are applying for admission to the Philadelphia College of Art 
as a freshman or a transfer student and will need additional funds to 
supplement youi own resources for the cost of your education, you 
should apply for financial aid. Undergraduate financial aid awards 
may consist of grant, loan, and employment or a combination of these 
funds from federal, state, or college-administered aid programs. 

To apply for financial aid, applicants must submit a completed 
1 981-82 Financial Aid Form (FAF) to the College Scholarship Service. 
The Philadelphia College of Art has no additional application form for 
new students. The Financial Aid Form is available from high school 
guidance counselors or college financial aid offices. The College 
Scholarship Service will analyze the information on the Financial Aid 
Form to determine your eligibility for financial aid. Your application is 
then forwarded to the PCA Financial Aid Office where the application 
is reviewed, adjusted if necessary, and funds are awarded. 

The College's financial aid funds are limited and we cannot offer 
assistance to every eligible applicant. Early application for both 
admission and financial aid is essential for aid consideration. Therefore, 
to be considered for College-administered funds, a completed 1981-82 
Financial Aid Form should be mailed to the College Scholarship 
Service in January or early February. Generally speaking, a student 
whose Financial Aid Form is received by the PCA Financial Aid Office 
(after processing by the College Scholarship Service) after March 15, 
cannot be offered College-administered aid funds. 

Financial aid decisions are made separately from admission 
decisions and do not affect each other in any way. Applicants for 
financial aid should not wait until they have been offered admission to 
the College to apply for aid. ADMISSION AND HNANCIAL AID 
APPUCATIONS SHOULD BE MADE SIMULTANEOUSLY. Once an 
applicant has been offered admission to PCA, his or her name is 
forwarded to the Financial Aid Office. If the CSS Financial Aid Form 
has been received by the College, the student will be notified of any 
financial aid funds that have been awarded by the College within two 
weeks after being offered admission to PCA. 

Eligibility 

If a student has already earned a bachelor's degree in any field, he 
or she is ineligible for financial aid. Students enrolled only for teacher 
certification are also ineligible. Only matriculated, full-time or part- 
time undergraduate day students may receive financial assistance 
from the College. 

All financial aid funds administered by the Philadelphia College of 
Art are awarded on the basis of demonstrated financial need and the 



availability of funds. Preference is given, in the case of new students, 
to those who demonstrate outstanding promise of success in PCA's 
curriculum. However, any applicant who applies before the published 
deadline will also be given priority. College-administered financial 
aid funds will not be used to replace federal or state grants for which 
a student is eligible but who fails to complete the required applications. 



TYPES OF HNANCIAL AID AVAILABLE 
College- Administered Financicd Aid Programs 
National Direct Student Loan 

When a student is awarded NDSL funds from the College, repayment of 
the principal and interest does not begin until nine months after 
graduation. The rate of interest is 3%. Students awarded NDSL funds 
are provided with copies of loan repayment schedules. Depending on 
the total amount borrowed, a student may take up to ten years to fully 
repay this loan to the College. 

College Work-Study Program 

Students who are awarded work-study funds will be placed in various 
jobs in the offices and departments within the College. Jobs vary 
depending on class schedules, student skills, and experierice. Work- 
study students receive a monthly paycheck for the hours worked. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant 

These grant funds, which require no repayment obligation, are awarded 
by the Financial Aid Office to students with the greatest financial need. 

PCA Grant-In-Aid 

These grant funds, vrith no repayment obligation, are allocated by the 
College to supplement all other financial aid programs. Partial fimding 
for this program is provided by endowed scholarships, listed by name of 
donor on page 89 of the catalogue, for students with demonstrated 
financial need. For the current academic year, the College has 
provided over $500,000 for the grant-in-aid program. 

State-Administered Financial Aid Programs 
Pennsylvania 

All residents of Permsylvania are expected to make application for the 
Pennsylvania Higher Education Grant Program (PHEAA). Eligibility 
for this program is determined by a separate PHEAA grant application 
form. Therefore, all Pennsylvania residents must submit a 1981-82 
PHEAA GRANT APPLICATION in addition to the Financial Aid Form. 
PHEAA GRANT APPUCATIONS must be sent to the PHEAA Agency in 
Hairisburg no later than MAY 1 . Applications are available from high 
school guidance counselors or college financial aid offices. 



Other Storte Grant Programs 

If you are a permanent resident of either Connecticut, Massachusetts, 
Rhode Island, Ohio, Vermont, or New Jersey, you must apply for funding 
from the state grant agency of your home state. Each of these state 
grant programs require that you submit that particular state's version 
of the 1981-82 Financial Aid Form. These applications are available 
from the PCA Financial Aid Office. If you have completed the 
appropriate state version of the Financial Aid Form, you will not need 
to fill out an additional state grant application. College Scholarship 
Service will forward the information on your Financial Aid Form to your 
state grant agency. 

Federally-Administered Financial Aid Programs 
Basic Educational Opportunity Grant 

All applicants for financial aid are required to apply for this federal 
grant program. There is no repayment involved. If you have submitted 
a completed 1981-82 Financial Aid Fonn, there is no need to use a 
separate Basic Grant application. The College Scholarship Service will 
forward your information directly to the Basic Grant program. 

Guaranteed Student Loan Program 

Every matriculated student should be eligible to participate in this 
federal student loan program. Guaranteed Student Loans are 7% 
interest loans. Students may borrow up to $2,500 per academic year 
vrith a cumulative amoimt not to exceed $7,500 for an undergraduate 
course of study. Repayment of loan principal and interest does not 
begin as long as the student maintains continuous enrollment at least 
on a half-time basis. Applications for Guaranteed Student Loans are 
available from most banks. 

Student Responsibilities 

Students who receive awards from any outside agency or private 
organization are obligated to notify the PCA Financial Aid Office of 
such aid. At no time can total financial assistance, including awards 
from outside or private organizations, exceed the student's established 
level of demonstrated financial need. 

All transfer students are required to submit a Financial Aid 
Transcript to PCA from any post-secondary institution attended, 
whether or not financial aid was received from that institution. 

Renewal Application 

College aid funds are awarded for an academic year (two semesters) 
and must be renewed annually by formal application. A student 
receiving aid must maintain at least a 2.0 (C) grade point average for 
continuation of funding. The College reserves the right to terminate 
financial assistance at the end of the fall semester if the student's grade 
point average is below the level required for eligibility. 



Financial Aid for Currently Enrolled and Former 
Returning Students 
Application Procedures 

Enrolled students or former students considering readmission who are 
applying for continuation of aid funds must maintain at least a 2.0 
(C) semester and cumulative grade point average. 

The annual financial aid application period for enrolled students is 
FEBRUARY 1 through MARCH 31. Late applications will not be 
considered for college-administered aid funds. 

A completed application for renewal of financial aid consists of: 

1. 1981-82 Philadelphia College of Art Application for Financial 
Aid 

2. 1981-82 College Scholarship Service (CSS) Financial Aid Form 

3. 1981-82 PHEAA Grant application (Pennsylvania residents 
only) 

4. Copies of federal IRS 1040 or 1040A Income Tax Forms for 
both the student and the parent(s) of the student 

Aid awards are normally limited to a maximum of eight semesters 
(four academic years). Students who fail to complete the necessary 
number of credits required for graduation vrithin the four-year period 
due to change of major or transfer status will be considered for a fifth 
year of financial assistance only on an individual basis. PCA cannot 
guarantee financial assistance beyond eight semesters or after 
completion of the required number of credits needed for graduation. 

A student who withdraws faom the College midsemester for other 
than an approved reason (namely health) will not be eligible for 
financial aid on his or her return for a repeat of that semester's courses. 

Financial aid awarded by the College may be used only to meet 
educational expenses incurred by enrollment at PCA or one of the art 
institutions vrith which PCA has a Student Exchange Program. The 
College is not able to offer financial assistance for enrollment at foreign 
institutions. 

Financial Aid For Graduate Students 

Refer to M.A. in Art Education. 

Act 101 Program 
Description of Program 

The Higher Education Equal Opportunity Program (Act 101), estab- 
lished by the Commonwealth of Peimsylvania in 1971, encourages 
institutions of higher learning to admit low-income students who, due to 
poor performance on standardized tests, inadequate high school 
preparation, or both, would not normally be admitted. 

These institutions recruit highly motivated students who show the 
potential to succeed in college with adequate support (counseling, 
tutoring, and financial assistance). The goal of Act 101 is to help these 
institutions provide opportunities for nontraditional students seeking a 
college education. 



Eligibility 

Act 101 participants are chosen on the basis of their academic 
potential, motivation, and aspirations. To be eligible for program 
services, students must have an adjusted family income of $10,000 or 
less and a predicted grade point average, as determined by the 
institution, of 2.0 (C) or less. 

Participants must be residents of Pennsylvania and must be admitted 
as full-time students to the postsecondary degree-granting institution. 
Students wishing to apply for support through the 101 Program should 
contact the Admissions Office or the 101 Office of the College. 

Economic Eligibility 

The adjusted family income is computed by deducting the following 
allowances from the gross family income (used for income tax 
purposes): 

• $1,000 per dependent 

• working mother allowance 

• unreimbursed medical expenses 

• other siblings enrolled in postsecondary education 

• handicapped child allowance 

• business or farm depreciation and asset taxes 

Some participants may exceed the $10,000 income figure in cases of 
documented hardship. 




ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 



Terms of Enrollment 

A student is enrolled full time if his or her courses, both studio and 
liberal arts, total 12 or more semester credits. For graduate students, 
10.5 or more semester credits constitute full-time enrollment. 

Class Attendance 

All students are expected to attend classes regularly and promptly 
and for the duration of the scheduled instructional time. There is no 
class cut allowance. Individual instructors will decide the optimum 
time for marking attendance and may penalize for habitual lateness. 
For absences totaling 15% of the number of class meetings scheduled 
through the semester, the student will receive formal warning that 
course registration is in jeopardy. Reported absences exceeding 25% 
of scheduled class time vrill be cause for the student being withdrawn 
from the course and the recording of an "F" or "OF" grade. 



Grading System 




A Excellent 


4.0 


B+ Very Good 


3.5 


B Good 


3.0 


C+ Moderately Good 


2.5 


C Satisfactory 


2.0 


D+ Slightly better than passing 


1.5 


D Poor but passing 


1.0 


F Failing 





I Incomplete 


— 


W Withdrew 





OP Optional pass 





OF Optional fail 






When a course previously failed is repeated and a passing grade 
earned, both the failing and repeat grades remain permanently 
recorded; on petition, however, the grade point average is recomputed 
to exclude any penalty for the initial failure. 

When registering for liberal arts courses, students may elect to be 
graded "OP" (pass) or "OF" (fail). Under this option, the "OP" grade 
earns credit; neither the "OP" nor the "OF" is computed in the grade 
average. 

Detailed information on the grading system can be found in the 
Student Resource Handbook which is given to all incoming students. 



Change of Grade 

If a student questions the correctness of a grade, either final or 
otherwise, the student should first arrange to discuss the matter with 
his or her instructor. If a satisfactory resolution is not reached with the 
instructor, the chairperson of the department should be consulted. The 
student may, as a last resort, bring the matter to the attention of the 
Dean of Students. Any change of final grade requested by a student 
and approved by his or her instructor must be endorsed by the 
department chairperson and the Dean of Students and effected no 
later than the end of the semester following the one in which the grade 
was given. 

Withdrawal from Courses 

Students may withdraw from courses with a notation of "W" 
(withdrawal) on their academic records up through the last day of the 
sixth week of the semester. Withdrawal or a grade of "W" does not 
affect the computation of the student's grade point average. After the 
sixth week, a grade of "F" will be recorded; exceptions, that is to say 
a grade of "W," may be made for extraordinary personal circumstances, 
by the faculty involved, in consultation with the Dean of Students. 

A student who withdraws from a course past drop-and-add week 
receives no refund of tuition. 

Withdrawal from the College 

A student in good academic standing who is granted an authorized 
withdrawal from the College after the sixth week will be assigned a 
"W" for all courses. A grade of "W" does not affect the computation of 
the student's grads point average. 

Student Petitions 

Enrolled students who want to petition for transfer of credit should 
complete a petition form available from the Office of the Registrar and 
present it to the appropriate chairperson of studio or liberal arts for 
approval. Requests for exceptions to the transfer credit regulation 
and/or exceptions to graduation requirements should be presented to 
either the Dean of Academic Affairs or the Dean of Students. 

Readmission 

Written appeal for reinstatement as a degree candidate should be 
addressed to the Dean of Students well in advance of the semester for 
which the former student desires to register. The deadlines are April 1 
for the follovring fall semester and October 15 for the following spring 
semester. The College will continue to process late requests but places 
may be scarce. The appropriate departmental faculty must endorse 
readmission. 



Return Degree Program 

Diploma graduates of the College are eligible to attain the bachelor's 
degree from PCA. All studio requirements for the degree will have been 
satisfied by earning the diploma. To earn the bachelor's degree, 
students must complete the prevailing 45-credit hour requirement of 
the Liberal Arts Department (see description of department below). 
Course requirements may be taken at PCA or any accredited college 
or university. Appropriate and equivalent courses may be transferred 
from other accredited institutions. 

Students may wish to consider completing some of the courses 
through the College Level Examination Program. Further information 
and request for readmission should be addressed to the Dean 
of Students. 

Dean's List 

Students whose semester grade point average is 3.5 (B+) or higher vrill 
be accorded the distinction of inclusion on the Dean's List compiled 
each semester and entered on the student's permanent record. To be 
eligible, a student must be matriculated and full time. The college 
recognizes those students who achieve Dean's List with a special 
educational and social event during the semester in which the student 
is on the Dean's List. 

Academic Probation 

If a student's semester or cumulative grade point average is below 
2.0 (C), he or she is automatically placed on academic probation and 
required to attain at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average in the 
next semester. This requirement may be set higher by the Academic 
Review Committee depending on the student's overall record. Severe 
academic failure in any one semester can mean dismissal. The 
voluntary withdrawal of a student facing probation vrill be recorded as 
"not in good academic standing." If a student fails to comply with the 
terms of probation or does not meet the expectations of the department, 
he or she may be dropped from that department. 

Admission on probation is a conditional acceptance requiring the 
new student to achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 
2.0 the first one or two semesters. 

Notations concerning academic probation are entered on the 
student's permanent record. 

Students Placed on Academic Probation for the First Time 

A student who has a cumulative grade point average greater than 
2.0 (C) but whose semester grade point average is less than 2.0 will be 
required to have a semester average of 2.0 by the end of the next 
semester. 

A student who has a cumulative grade point average of less than 
2.0 (C) will be required to have a cumulative average of at least 2.0 by 
the end of the next semester. 



The above procedures are automatic. The exceptions, which the 
Academic Review Committee will study, are: 

1. Students who have failed one or more of the major studios, and/or 
Liberal Arts 108, 1 lOA, or 1 lOB. 

2. Upperclassmen who have failed Liberal Arts 1 lOA or 1 lOB. 

3. Upperclassmen who have received a grade point average of less 
than I.O. 

Students Continued on Academic Probation 
ior a Second Semester 

Students on academic probation who fail to meet their grade point 
average requirement by the end of the term, but are continued on 
academic probation for a second consecutive semester, will be 
dismissed at the conclusion of the second semester if they fail to meet 
the grade point average specified by the Academic Review Committee. 
Such students will not be considered for readmission before the end of 
one full academic year. Requests for readmission, however, should be 
processed the semester prior to the student's anticipated return. 
Notations concerning academic probation are entered on the student's 
permanent record. 

Honors 

A student may graduate vrith honors if he or she achieves a minimum 
cumulative grade point average of 3.5. 

Graduation Requirements 

It is the student's responsibility to complete course requirements for 
the B.F.A., B.S., or M.A. degree. To be certified for graduation, a student 
must fulfill all applicable credit requirements, satisfy the minimum 
resident requirement, achieve minimum cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 (C average), and receive the approval of his or her 
department chairperson as having met all major requirements. 

Dual Degrees 

A student may graduate with a major in two departments if he or she 
completes the requirements for each department. Likewise, a student 
who wishes to graduate with both a Bachelor of Science in 
Environmental Design and/ or Industrial Design and a Bachelor of Fine 
Arts in one of the other studio areas must complete the requirements 
for each degree. Any course that fulfills a requirement in one degree 
program does not have to be repeated to fulfill the second. 

Dismissal 

It is the College's prerogative to dismiss a student for stated cause. 
Failure to clear academic probation requirements will result in 
dismissal action by the Academic Review Committee. The Disciplinary 
Committee may order suspension or expulsion for student conduct 
judged unacceptable. 



Further, a faculty member may drop a student from fiis or fier class 
for stated cause; i.e., nonattendance, nonachievement, or disciplinary 
reasons. 

Leave of Absence 

Leave of absence will be granted by the Dean of Students for 
reasonable cause, if the student is in good academic standing, i.e., a 
cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 (C). A leave is for a 
specified semester or year and before expiration does not require 
formal readmission. A student requiring a medical leave of absence 
will not necessarily be held to the stated grade point average 
requirement. A student who has been granted a leave of absence may 
advance register, in person only, during the semester preceding his or 
her return. 

Withdrawal from the College 

A student may withdraw at any time during the academic year by 
initiating his or her official withdrawal with the Dean of Students, 
securing clearance from the Business Office, Financial Aid Office, 
Registrar's Office, Library, and obtaining endorsement from his or her 
department chairperson for the Registrar's approval. Withdrawal is 
official when the student receives written notification from the 
Registrar. The enrolled student who does not register for the next 
semester will be considered unofficially vrithdrawn. 

Refund Policy for Withdrawal from College 

For official withdrawal the following refund policy is in effect: 

For withdrawal during the first week of classes: 80% refund 
For withdrawal during the second week of classes: 80% refund 
For withdrawal during the third week of classes: 60% refund 
For withdrawal during the fourth week of classes: 40% refund 
For withdrawal during the hfth week of classes: 20% refund 
No refund after the hfth week of classes 

A student required to withdraw for disciplinary reasons will not be 
entitled to any refund. Student Residence apartment rent, general fees, 
and other charges are not refundable. 

An appeals process exists for students and parents who feel that 
individual circumstances warrant exceptions from this policy. Appeals 
should be registered at the office of the Vice President of Finance. 

Student Access to Academic Records 

PGA is in compliance with the provision of the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA or the Buckley Amendment), which 
assures students confidentiality of their academic records. A statement 
to this effect may be obtained on request from the office of the Dean 
of Students. 



The College classifies the follovring as "directory information" and 
will disclose such information to anyone presenting a bona fide request: 
name, address, telephone listing, dates of enrollment, major program, 
and graduation date. Any student who does not want this information 
released must give wrritten notice to the Registrar's Office no later than 
the end of the second week of any semester or session for which he or 
she is enrolled. 

Students have the right to inspect their academic records by arrange- 
ment with the Registrar's Office. PCA requires a student's written 
consent to release his or her personal records to any individual, agency, 
or organization except to other school officials who have legitimate 
educational interests, government officials enumerated in FERPA, or in 
connection with a student's application for and receipt of financial aid. 




CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS 



Credit Distribution 

The student is ultimately responsible for the completion of all course 
requirements for the degree program in which he or she is enrolled. 

The College requires a minimum of 132 credits for graduation. 

In the Foundation Program, students must carry 9 credits each 
semester in the core program of two- and three-dimensional design 
studies and drawing. Also, they usually take 6 credits each semester 
in liberal arts subjects and at least one freshman studio elective each 
term for a year's total of 33 credits. 

First-time freshmen are not permitted to register for additional studio 
courses: transfer freshmen, however, may carry additional studio work 
in their second semester with the express approval of the Foundation 
Program co-chairpersons if schedules permit. 

A student carrying an average of 16.5 credits per semester is 
considered to be making normal progress toward graduation. Students 
majoring in each of the studio areas are required to fulfill their 
departmental programs. 

These programs include a basic credit structure as follows: 



Foundation 

Major Department Credits 

Other required credits outside the Department 

Remaining electives (9 credits must be taken in a department 

other than the major) 

Liberal Arts 



Credits 

18 

45 

6 

18 
45 



The minimum credit load for full-time status is considered to be 12 
credits per semester. Full-time status is not required to maintain 
enrollment in any undergraduate program. 

The normal maximum credit load is 18 credits per semester. 
Exceptions may be made only for students with a 3.0 grade point 
average virith the approval of the Dean of Faculty. 

Credit Hour Ratio 

Semester credits are earned at the ratio of one credit for one class- 
contact hour in all liberal arts courses; in studio courses one semester 
credit is given for two contact hours. In both instances the sum total of 
in-class and required out-of-class work is considered to be the same, 
that is, a minimum of 3 hours of work per week per credit. 

Students entering PCA as first-time freshmen must earn 30 credits of 
liberal arts courses (of the required minimum 45) at the College. A 
maximum of 15 credits in liberal arts may be acquired elsewhere, 
provided the course work involved does not duplicate courses already 



taken or available at PCA. Before enrolling in liberal arts courses 
outside the College, students should meet with the Liberal Arts 
chairperson. Twelve hours of liberal arts credits must be taken in 
300-400 courses. 

Advisors 

During the freshman year. Foundation Program chairpeople and faculty 
serve as student advisors. When beginning a major, each student is 
assigned a new faculty advisor who is retained throughout his or her 
tenure in the same department. A new faculty advisor is appointed only 
when the student changes a major department. Students may request a 
change of faculty advisor by application to the department 
chairperson. 

Students are expected to meet with their advisor at least twice each 
semester. All course and schedule changes require the advisor's 
approval. Advance scheduling, preceding each semester's registration, 
is always completed by the student in consultation with the faculty 
advisor. 

The student is responsible for the completion of all course 
requirements for the degree program in which he or she is enrolled, 
including meeting distribution requirements and the minimum 132 
credits required for graduation. 

Each professional department is assigned one or more Liberal Arts 
faculty members who are available to assist both major advisors and 
their advisees in the selection of a course of study. 

Transcript copies of advisees' records are supplied on request to 
faculty advisors by the Registrar following the recording of grades 
each semester. 

Departmental Function 

A student's progress and welfare within the several instructional 
programs of the College is primarily the responsibility of the major 
department. In addition to providing each student with the guidance of 
an assigned faculty advisor, the department's faculty and its 
chairperson undertake to establish and promote appropriate standards 
of performance. 

Beyond the College's minimum requirements, each department may 
establish additional in-major requirements with respect to attendance, 
lateness, and related matters. 

The chairperson, with the concurrence of the faculty, may: 

1. Establish a minimum major course grade or major grade point 
average requirement higher than the minimum set by the 
College; students must be given written notification of such 
requirements. 

2. Place on probation students who fail to meet the minimum grade 
requirement in a course required for a departmental major or a 
College program. 

3. Place a student on probation for academic or disciplinary reasons 
and define its terms in virriting to the student and the Dean of Students. 



4. Dismiss a student from the department for academic or 

disciplinary problems with written notification to the student and 
the Dean of Students. 
Each department will provide student majors with written statements 
describing any additional requirements for its programs. 

Every student must have the approval of his or her department to 
proceed to the next level of course work. It is the department's 
responsibility to keep each student informed of his or her progress 
toward graduation. And finally, the student's petition to graduate must 
be approved by the department chairperson in conference with his or 
her faculty. 

Credit by Examination 

Students who qualify may request credit by examination in liberal arts 
subjects and credit by portfolio evaluation in studio subjects. Requests 
will require approval from the Dean of Students and the Department 
chairperson. Such examinations/evaluations will be charged for at the 
rate of $10 per credit. 

Change of Major 

Students may request a change of major at the beginning of any 
semester during the drop/add period. The student's formal petition 
requires the approval of his or her faculty advisor and of the 
chairperson of both his or her former department and of the department 
he or she wishes to enter. All major and studio elective credits 
previously earned may be applied toward relative requirements in the 
new department, which then determines the student's remaining credit 
obligations. 

Residence Requirements and Transfer Credits 

Transfer applicants may receive credit for courses taken at other 
accredited institutions that are similar in content, purpose, and 
standards to those offered at the Philadelphia College of Art. For credit 
to be granted, official transcripts of all previous college study must be 
presented. A minimum grade of C must have been obtained in a course 
that is presented for transfer credit. The evaluation of credits is made 
by the department in which the equivalent course is taught, in 
consultation with the registrar. Transfer credit for studio courses may 
be granted only after presentation of official transcripts and portfolio 
material are presented. Studio credit will not be granted on the basis 
of the transcript or portfolio alone. 

Every transfer student must complete a minimum of two semesters in 
residence preceding graduation; he or she must earn a minimum of 
33 credits in studio or liberal arts courses. Students must transfer or 
complete the required liberal arts and major department courses 
stipulated for the degree regardless of the number of credits completed 
at other accredited institutions. For this reason, transfer students may 
be required to remain in residence at PCA for more than the minimum 
two semesters, completing more than the minimum 33 credits. 



Scholarships 

The following endowed scholarships are given to students virith 
demonstrated financial need as part of the College-administered 
financial aid program: 

Alumni Association PCA — Camden H.S. Scholarship Fund 

Alumni Association Scholarship Endowment Fund 

The Gertrude Anonson Scholarship Fund 

Baugh Barber Fund 

Biddle Scholarship Fund 

Winifred Cantor Scholarship Endowment 

James M. Cresson Scholarship Fund 

Cioziei Prize Fund 

Desilver Scholarship Fund 

Edward Tonkin Dobbins Scholarship Fund 

Clayton French Scholarship Fund 

The Gillespie Scholarship Fund 

Graff Prize Fund 

Peter W. Gregory Memorial Endowment Fund 

The Emily Leland Harrison Scholarship Fund 

The John Harrison Scholarship Fund 

Thomas Skelton Harrison Fimd 

Mark Higgison Memorial Scholarship Fund 

William & Kate J. Hofacker Scholarship Fund 

Jantzen Family Scholarship Fund 

Celia Kanev Scholarship Fund 

Mrs. M. Theresa Keehmle Scholarship Fund 

Charles Godfrey Leland Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Henry Perry Leland Prize Fund 

Frank Hamilton Ma^ee Scholarship Fund 

Georgia B, McHhenny Scholarship Fund 

Mr. & Mrs. John Mcllhenny Scholarship Fund 

Jane Dailey Naeye Scholarship 

Thornton Oakley Bequest 

Gertrude C. Partenheimer Scholarship Fund 

Alice H. Pechner Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Lyola C. Pedrick Scholarship Fund 

Ramborger Scholarship Fund 

Edith and Lessing J. Rosen wald Scholarship Fund 

Bernice Travis Rudnick Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Roberts Prize Fund 

S- Gertrude Schell Principal Endowment Fund 

Scott Memorial Scholarship Endowment Fund 

Sinnott Prize Fund 

Annie E. Sinnot Scholarship Fund 

The W. W. Smith Trust Scholarships 

Temple Fund 

Marguerite and Otis Walter Scholarship 

The John Wanamaker Beneht Scholarships 

Weightman Scholarship Fund 

Runear Williams, Jr. Memorial Fund 



Commencement Prizes 

The Lorraine and Benjamin Alexander Prize 

Craft 

The Jack Bowling Memorial Award in Metalsmithing 

The Mr. and Mrs. Leon C. Bunldn Award 

The Addie Grossman Armual Award in Jewelry Design and Creation 

The Metals Faculty Award 

The Harvey S. Shipley Miller Award in Ceramics 

The President's Purchase Prize 

Graphic Design 

The Art Directors Club Gold Medal 

The Champion Paper Imagination Scholarship 

The Elmer O. Aaron Award m Graphic Design 

The Graphic Design Faculty Award 

The Sun Printing House Award in Memory of Heberton E. Fricke, Sr. 

Illustration 

The William H. Ely Travel Award for Excellence in Illustration 

The Hunt Manufacturing Company Armual Award in Illustration 

The Marcel Vertes Award to a Senior Whose Drawing of the Human Figure 

Has Been Outstanding 

The Roger Hane Armual Memorial Award 

Industrial Design 

The Joseph Carreiro Memorial Award in Industrial Design 
The Industrial Design Society of America Award 

Painting and Drawing 

The Bocour Prize in Painting 

The Stuart M. Egnal Prize in Painting 

The Ernest M. Greenfield Annual Memorial Award in Painting 

The Gross-McCleaf Gallery Award in Painting 

The Hunt Manufacturing Company Annual Award in Painting 

The Philadelphia Watercolor Club Award 

The Rohm and Haas Company Purchase Award 

The F. Weber Company Annual Award in Painting 

The Winsor and Newton Painting Award 

Photography 

The Miller-Plummer Award for Excellence in Photography 



Printmaking 

The Garrett-Buchanan Company Prize 

The Gross-McCleaf Gallery Award in Memory of Jack Shane 

The Bertha von Moschzisker Armual Printmaking Award 

The Burton Van Deusen Prmtmaking Prize 

The Perakis Frames Award 

The Print Club Annual Award 

The PCA Library Purchase Prize 

The American Color Print Society Armual Award 

Sculpture 

The Gross-McCleaf Gallery Award in Sculpture 
The McCracken Award for Welded Sculpture 




Board of Trustees 

Mi. Sam S. McKeel, Chairman 

Mi. Arnold A. Bayaid 

Mis. Helen Boehm 

Mi. Nathaniel R. Bowditch 

Helen S. Chait, Esq. 

Ms. Evelyn Copelman 

Thomas Neil Cratei 

Mi. James Eiseman 

Ml. Phihp J. Eitzen 

Mr. Keimit J. Hall 

Mis. Samuel M. V. Hamilton 

Mr. Richard P. Hauser 

Mr. Marvin Dale Heaps 

Mr. H. Ober Hess 

Mi. Josef laffee 

Mi. Ijouis Klein 

Mi. Beiton E. Koiman 

Mrs. Austin Lament 

Mr. Al Paul Lefton, Jr. 

The Honorable Samuel M. Lehier 

Mrs. H. Gates Lloyd 

Mr. Harvey S. Shipley Miller 

Mr. Jeffrey Natldn 

Mr. Charles W. Naylor 

Mi. Joseph L. Ponce 

Mi. WUham L. Rafsky 

Mi. Mel Richman 

Ms. Sydney Roberts Rockefeller 

Mis. I^ssing J. Rosenwald 

Mr. Samuel R. Shipley, III 

Mi. Haiold A. Soigenti 

Dr. J. Finton Speller 

Mr. Frederick T. Waldeck 

Mi. Philip H. Waid, ID 

Mi. Stephen M. Zablotny 

Thomas F. Schutte, President 

Honorary Trustees 

Mrs. Malcolm Lloyd 
Mr. Ronald K. Porter 
Mrs. Margueiite Waltei 
Mis. Thomas Raebuin White 
Mis. John Winteisteen 
Mr. Howard A. Woli 



Ex-Ofiicio Members 

The Honorable William J. Green 
Robert W. Crawford 
Joseph E. Coleman 



ADMINISTRATION 1980-1981 



Thomas F. Schutte A.B., M.BA., 

D.BA. 

Janet Buchan B A. 

Student Services 

Glenn Stroud, B A., MA. 
Susan McMonigal 
AldaR.Alvaiez,BA. 
Rebecca Cash, B.F A. 
Judith Katz, A.B., M.A., Ed.D. 
Aithur Sendrow, B A., M.A. 
Michael Oleksiw, B A., MA. 

Deborah Smith, R.N. 

Admiasions 

Caroline Kelsey.B. FA. 
Carolyn Connelly, B A. 
Claire Staffieri, BJ A. 

Academic Aiioirs 

Nathan Knobler, B.F A., M.A. 
Martin A. Novelli, B.S., MA., 

Ph.D., J.D. 
Fiedeiick Osborne, B.F A., MF A. 
Sharon Heain, B.S. 
Anne Todd, B J A. 
Kevin E. Consey, B A., M.A. 
Hazel Gustow, B.S., M.L.S. 
MaithaHall,BA.,M.L.S. 
Deboiah Stagg, BJ A., M.L.S. 
Carl G. Martin, B.S., M.S. 
Robert S. Schoenholtz, B A., M.S. 
Janice Curington, B.S., M.A. 
EveOrlow,B.S.,M.S.,Ed.D. 
KarenSaler,B.FA.,M.FA. 
John Caldwell, BA. 
Jack Snyder 

Financial Aiioirs 

Robert A. Foose, B A., M.B A. 

William Piatt, B A. 

Craig Rossler 

Marc Dashevsky, B.S., M.BA. 

Joseph Gaibarino 

Elizabeth Stegner, BA. 

External Aiioirs 

Mackarness M Goode, BA., M.A. 
Eileen Rosenau, B A. 

Michael Oleksiw, B A., M.A. 

Louise H. Turan, B A. 
Andrew Brown, B.F A. 



President 

Assistant to the Piesident 



Associate Dean of Student Affairs 

Acting Director of Financial Aid 

Registrar 

Director of Student Residence 

Counseling Psychologist 

Counseling Psychologist 

Diiectoi of Career Development and 

Alumni Affairs 
Staff Nurse 



Director of Admissions 
Assistant Diiectoi of Admissions 
Admissions Counseloi 



Dean of Academic Afiaiis 
Associate Dean 

Diiectoi of Continuing Studies 

Assistant Diiectoi, Evening Division 

Director of Summer Programs 

Director of Exhibitions 

Library Director 

Librarian 

Librarian 

Program Director, Act 101 

Act 101 Counselor 

Act 101 Academic Tutorial Coordinator 

Director, Learning Skills Center 

Education Coordinator of Saturday School 

Slides Librarian 

Audio-Visual Manager 



Vice President, Finance 

Assistant to the Vice President, Finance 

Director of Physical Plant 

Controller 

Director of Security and Safety 

Personnel Manager 



Vice President for External Affairs 
Director of Communications and 

Special Events 
Director of Career Development 

and Alumni Afiaiis 
Director of Annual Giving 
Director of Publications Design 



FACULTY 



Hans-Ulrich AUemann 

Associate Professor: Graphic Design 
Swiss National Diploma (M.FA. equiv.) 
Allgemeine Gewerbeschule, Basel 
Switzerland 

Edna Andrade 

Professor: Foundation 

B.F.A., University of Pennsylvania, 

Pennaylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 

Jack Andrews 

Associate Professor: Industrial Design, 
Environmental Design 
B.I.D, Pratt Institute 

Eugene Baguskas 

Associate Professor: Painting, Drawing 
B.FA, Yale University 

William Barnett 

Assistant Professor: Painting, Drawing 
Temple University, Phila. College of 
Art 

Morris Berd 

Professor: Painting, Drawing, 
Landscape Study 
Graduate of Philadelphia College 
of Art 

Helen Berezovsky 

Lecturer: Liberal Arts 
B.A., Maryland College 
M.S-, Georgetown University 
PhD., University of Pennsylvania 

Stephen Berg 

Associate Professor: English, Social 

Studies 

B.A., State University of Iowa 

Martha Breiden 

Lecturer: History, Comparative 

Religion 

Director: Art Therapy Program 

A.B,, Randolph-Macon College 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Mark Burns 

Assistant Professor: Crafts 
Diploma, Dayton Art Institute 
M.F. A., University of Washington 



Thomas Butter 

Lecturer: Printmaldng 

B.F A., Philadelphia College of Art 

M.FA,, Washington University 

Sarah Canright 

Lecturer: Painting 

B.F.A., Chicago Art Institute 

Cynthia Carlson 

Associate Professor: Painting 
Co-Chairperson: Painting 
B.F A., Chicago Art Institute 
M.F A., Pratt Institute 

Susan Corlo 

B.A., Smith College 
M.A., Harvard University 

Dante Cattani 

Professor: Anatomical Drawing, 

Painting 

B.F.A., Philadelphia College of Art 

John Chase 

Guest Lecturer: Environmental Design 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
B.A., M. Arch., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Sharon Church 

Lecturer: Metals 

B.S,, Skidmore College 

M.F A., School for American Craftsmen, 

Rochester Institute of Technology 

Therese Conn 

Lecturer: Liberal Arts 
A.B., St. Joseph's College 
M.A., Villanova University 

Patricia Cruser 

Professor: Literature 

A.B., Dickinson College 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Lawrence Curry 

Associate Professor: Social Studies 
BA., M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

William Daley 

Professor: Foundation, Ceramics 
BA., Massachusetts College of Art 
M.A., Columbia University 



Howard Danelowitz 

Instructor: Animation 

Pratt histitute 

B.F.A, California Institute of the Arts 

Nancy Davenport 

Assistant Professor: Liberal Arts 
B.A., M.A., Bryn Mawr College 

Larry Day 

Professor: Painting, Drawing 
B.F A., B.S., Tyler School of Art 

Robert DeFuccio 

Lecturer: Craft 

B.S., State University of New York 

Mary Ellen Didier 

Lecturer: Anthropology, Archeology 
B A., University of Wisconsin 
M.A., University of Chicago 

Larry Donahue 

Lecturer: Industrial Design 

B.F A., Philadelphia College of Art 

Ronald Dorfman 

Lecturer: Foundation 

B.F.A., PhUadelphia College of Art 

M.FA., Temple University 

Patricia Bryce Dreher 

Lecturer: Printmaking 

B.F A., M.E., SUNY at Buffalo 

Helen Williams Drutt 

Lecturer: History of Modern Crafts 
B.F.A., Tyler School of Art 
Albert Barnes Foundation 

Eric Durst 

B.FA., School of Film at California 
Institute of the Arts 

Benjamin Dsenstat 

Lecturer: Illustration 

Permsylvania Academy of the Fine 

Arts 

Albert Barnes Foundation 

Barry Eiswerth 

Lecturer: Envirorunental Design 

Martha Erlebacher 

Lecturer: Illustration 
B.I.D., M.FA., Pratt Institute 

Walter Erlebacher 

Professor: Sculpture 
Chairperson, Sculpture 
B.I.D., M.I.D, Pratt Institute 



Sherri Feldmon 

Lecturer: Foundation Program 
B.FA., Philadelphia College of Art 
M.FA., Maryland Institute College 
of Art 

Robert J. Forbes 

Assistant Professor: Ceramics 

BA., University of California at Santa 

Cruz 

M.FA., Alfred University 

Leah Freedman 

Lecturer: Art Therapy 
Temple University Hospital 

Frank Galuszka 

Special Lecturer: Graphic Design 
B.FA., M.FA., Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Virginia Gehshan 

Lecturer: Industrial Design 
B.S., Cornell University 

David Gibson 

Assistant Professor: Graphic Design 
Undergraduate studies in 
architecture, Cornell University 
Diploma in Graphic Design, Nova 
Scotia College of Art and Design 
M.F.A. in Graphic Design, Yale 
University 

Albert Gold 

Professor: Illustration 

Diploma, Philadelphia College of Art 

Eileen Taber Goodman 

Lecturer: Drawing, Foimdation 
B.FA., Philadelphia College of Art 

Thomas Goodman 

Visiting Assistant Professor 
B.A., Wesleyan University 
M.FA., University of New Mexico 

Barbara Goodstein 

Lecturer: Sculpture 
BA., Pennsylvania State University 
M.F.A., Queens College, City 
University of New York 

Arlene Gostin 

Associate Professor: Education 
Chairperson: Education 
University of Cincinnati 
B.A., University of Delaware 
M.A., Philadelphia College of Art 



Gerald Greenfield 

Associate Professor: 

Photography/Film 

B.A., Pacific University, 

Harvard University, Brandeis 

University, Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

M.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design 

Dorothy Grimm 

Professor: Literature, English, Social 

Studies 

B.A., Lebanon Valley College 

B.S., Simmons College 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Fred Gutzeit 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Painting 
M.A., Hunter College 

Gerald Herdman 

Assistant Professor; Foundation, 

Painting 

Certificate, Cleveland Institute of Art 

M.F.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Rogelio Her nit 

Lecturer: Art Therapy 

M.D-, University of Santo Thomas, 

Philippines 

A.A., Divine Word University, 

Philippines 

Kenneth Hiebert 

Professor: Graphic Design 

BA., Bethel College 

Diploma, Allgemeine Gev^erbeschule, 

Basel, Switzerland 

KnoUy Desmond Hill 

Lecturer: Art Therapy 
BJ^., Lakehead University 
M.A., Lakehead University 

Alfred J. Ignarri 

Associate Professor: Photography 
Diploma, Philadelphia College of Art 

Steven Jaf fe 

Assistant Professor: Painting, 

Foundation 

B.FA., Philadelphia College of Art 

M.FA., Tyler School of Art 

Roland Jahn 

Associate Professor: Glass, Ceramics 
B.A., M.S., M.FA., University of 
Wisconsin 



Alan Johnson 

Assistant Professor: Environmental 

Design 

B. Arch., University of Virginia 

M. Arch., University of Pennsylvania 

M. City Planning, University of 

Pennsylvania 

Certificate, Fontainebleau School 

of Fine Arts 

Lois Johnson 

Associate Professor: Printmaking 
B.S., University of North Dakota; 
M.F.A., University of Wisconsin 

Richard Kagon 

Lecturer: Woodworking 
Temple University 
New School 

Ron Konter 

Lecturer: Photo/Film 

BS., Temple University 

M.F-A,, University of Pennsylvania 

Jerome Kaplan 

Professor: Printmaking 

Chairperson: Printmaking 

Diploma, Philadelphia CoUege of Art 

Charles Kaprelion 

Lecturer: Education 
B.FA., M.FA., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Anne Ear mat z 

Lecturer: Liberal Arts 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania 
M.A., Villanova University 

Joel Katz 

Lecturer: Graphic Design 
BA. Scholar of the House with 
Exceptional Distinction, BT.A., M.FA., 
Graphic Design Program, Yale 
School of Art 

Ted Katz 

Lecturer: Education 
A.B., Franklin and Marshall 
Ed.M., Harvard University 
Ed. D., Harvard University 

Annson Kenney 

Lecturer: Painting 

BA., University of Pennsylvania 



David Kettner 

Associate Professor: Foundation, 

Painting 

B.FA., Cleveland Listitute of Art 

M.F.A., Indiana University 

Robert Keyser 

Professor: Painting, Drawing 
University of Pennsylvania 
Certificate, AteUer Fernand Leger, 
Paris 

Nathan Knobler 

Professor, Dean of Academic Affairs 
Drawing, Sculpture, Printmaking 
B.FA., Syracuse University 
M.A., Florida State University 

Richard J. Kreznar 

Lecturer: Sculpture 
Institute Allende, Mexico 
B.FA., University of Wisconsin- 
Milwaukee 

M.FA., Brooklyn College of the City 
University of New York 

Karen Lagosky 

Lecturer: Environmental Design 

James La Ids 

Lecturer: Calligraphy and Lettering 
Philadelphia College of Art 

Michael Lasuchin 

Assistant Professor: Printmaking 
A.A., B.F.A., Philadelphia College of 
Art; M.F.A., Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Abraham Leibson 

Lecturer: Industrial Design 
B.FA., Philadelphia College of Art 

William Longhauser 

Assistant Professor, Graphic Design 
Chairperson: Graphic Design 
B.S., University of Cincirmati 
M.FA., Indiana University 
Graduate Study, Allgemeine 
Gewerbeschule, Basel, Switzerland 

Ruth Lozner 

Assistant Professor: Illustration 
Co-Chairperson: Illustration 
B.FA., Carnegie-Mellon University 
M.FA., American University 



Leon Lugossy 

Assistant Professor: Jewelry 
BS., Philadelphia College of Art 

Sherry Lyons 

Lecturer: Art Therapy 
BA., University of Pennsylvania 
M.S., Hahnemann Medical College 
and Hospital 

Nancy Markowich 

Lecturer: Art Therapy 
B.FA., Philadelphia College of Art 
M.S., Hahnemann Medical College 
and Hospital 

Adolf DeRoy Marks 

Lecturer: Environmental Design 
BA., Pennsylvania State University 
M. Arch., University of Pennsylvania 

Benjamin Martin 

Assistant Professor: Environmental 

Design 

Chairperson: Environmental Design 

B.A., Trinity College 

M. Arch., University of Pennsylvania 

John Martin 

Lecturer: Illustration 

Noel Mayo 

Adjunct Professor: Industrial Design 
Chairperson: Industrial Design 

Robert McCanley 

Lecturer: Environmental Design 
B. of Arch., University of Illinois 

Jack McGarvey 

Lecturer: Industrial Design 

Robert F. Mc Govern 

Professor: Foundation 
Co-Chairperson: Foundation 

J. Michael McNeil 

Lecturer: Illustration 

B.S., University of Wisconsin 

M.F.A, Pratt Institute 

Ray K. Metzker 

Professor: Photography 

BA., Beloit College 

M.S., Illinois Institute of Technology 

Richard C. Meyer 

Lecturer: Environmental Design 
B. Arch., University of Virginia 



Burton Miller 

Lecturer: Environmental Design 

B. Arch., M. Aich., Cornell University 

Kathryn Narrow 

Lecturer: Craft 

B.F.A, Philadelphia College of Art 

Edith Nefi 

Lecturer: Anatomical Drawing 
B,F.A, Philadelphia College of Art 

Gerald Nichols 

Associate Professor: Painting and 

Drawing 

Co-Chairperson: Painting and 

Drawing 

Diploma, Cleveland Institute of Art 

M.F.A., University of Pennsylvania 

William Norton 

Lecturer: Political Science 

A.B., Lincoln University 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 



Edward O'Brien 

Lecturer: Dlustration 

B.FA., Philadelphia College of Art 

Frederick Osborne 

Director: Evening Division 
Lecturer: Education 
B.F.A., Tyler School of Fine Art 
M.F.A., Yale University 

Claire Owen 

Lecturer: Edrication 

B.F.A., Rochester Institute of 

Technology 

M.S., Rochester Institute of Technology 

M.F.A., Rochester Institute of 

Technology 

Barry Parker 

Associate Professor: Sculpture 

Albert Pastore 

Lecturer: Foundation 

Diane Perkins 

Lecturer: Liberal Arts 

B.A., M.A., Temple University 

Ruth Perlmutter 

Lecturer: Introduction to Film 

B.A., New York University 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 



lane Piper 

Lecturer: Painting, Drawing 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 
Arts 

Thomas Porett 

Associate Professor: Photography, Film 

B.S., University of Wisconsin 

M.S., Illinois Institute of Technology 

Phyllis Purves-Smith 

Lecturer: Illustration 

B.F.A., The Cooper Union, School of 

Art and Architecture 

M.F.A., Temple University 

Boris Putterman 

Associate Professor: Painting, 

Foundation 

Diploma, Cooper Union 

B.F.A., Philadelphia College of Art 

M.F.A., Indiana University 

Nancy Reid 

Lecturer: Printmaldng 
B.A., Skidmore College 

Richard H. Reinhardt 

Professor: Craft 

Co-Chairperson: Craft 

B.A. (Ed.), Philadelphia College of Art 

Lanie Robertson 

Assistant Professor: Literature 
Certificate, University of London 
Ph.D., Temple University 

Warren Rohrer 

Associate Professor: Painting 
B.A., Eastern Mennonite College 
B.S., Madison College 

Peter Rose 

Assistant Professor: Film 
B.A., City College of New York 
M.A., San Francisco State College 

Michael Rossman 

Associate Professor: Foundation 
Co-Chairperson: Foundation 
B.I.D., M.F.A., Pratt Institute 

William Russell 

Lecturer: Education 
Acting Chairperson: Education 
B.S., Kent State University 
M.F.A., Miami University 



Karen Saler 

Assistant Professor: Education 
Coordinator: Saturday School 
B.F.A., Philadelphia College of Art 
M.F.A., Maryland Institute College 
of Art 

Peter Schaumann 

Lecturer: Illustration 

B.F.A., Philadelphia College of Art 

Karen Scholnick 

Lecturer: Education 
B.A., Carleton College 
M.A.T., Harvard University 

Charles Seorles 

Lecturer: Foundation 
Painting, Drawing, Muralist 
Diploma: Pennsylvania Academy of 
the Fine Arts; Undergraduate studies. 
University of Pennsylvania 

Robert N. Sebastian 

Lecturer: Educational research 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania 
M.A., University of Toronto 
Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Warren N. Seelig 

Professor: Crafts/Fibres 
M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy ot Art 
B.S., Philadelphia College of Textiles 
and Science 

Carl Silver 

Lecturer: Liberal Arts 
B.A., Bowling Green State University 
M.A., Ohio State University 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Harry Soviak 

Professor: Paintmg 

M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Raymond Spiller 

Assistant Professor: Painting, 

Foundation (Fine Arts) 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 

Arts 

Dayton Art Institute 

Doris Stajiel 

Associate Professor: Painting 
B.F.A., B.S., Tyler School of Art 
M.A., University of Iowa 



Richard Stange 

Lecturer: Environmental Design 
B. Arch., Pratt Institute 

Ward Stanley 

Associate Professor: Art History 
B.A., University of Hawaii 
M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Thomas Stearns 

Associate Professor: Sculpture, 

Painting 

Memphis Academy of Art 

Cranbrook Academy of Art 

Academia De Belli Arti, Venice 

Robert Stein 

Associate Professor: Illustration 
Co-Chairperson: Illustration 
B.F.A., Massachusetts College of Art 
M.F.A., Tyler School of Art 

Richard Stetser 

Professor: Sculpture, Foundation 
B.F.A., Philadelphia College of Art 

Wayne Stettler 

Lecturer: Graphic Design 

Diploma in Advertising Design, PCA 

Pat Stewart 

Lecturer: Art History 

Karl Stimer 

Lecturer: Sculpture 

David Toiler 

Assistant Professor: Education 

BA., Harpur College, SUNY 

Binghamton 

M.F.A., Columbia University 

M.A., University of Wisconsin — 

Madison 

Elsa Taromtal 

Lecturer: Foundation 

B.F.A., Cooper Union 

M.F.A., University of Pennsylvania 

St. John's University 

Temple University 

Stephen Taromtal 

Professor: Illustration 
B.FA., Cooper Union 
M.FA., Tyler School of Art 



ludy Trachtenberg 

Lecturer: Liberal Aits 

B.A., Temple University 

M.S., University of Pennsylvania 

Stephanie Tyiska 

Lecturer: Fibres 

B.F.A., University of Michigan 

M.F A., Tyler School of Art 

Fabian Ulitsky 

Professor: Psychology 

B.A., M.Ed., Temple University 

Sam Unger 

Lecturer: Environmental Design 

B.A., Harvard College 

M. Arch., University of Pennsylvania 

Petras Vaskys 

Professor: Ceramics 

Co-Chairperson: Crafts 

Ceramics Coordinator 

Academy of Fine Arts: Kaunas, 

Lithuania 

Diploma, Academy of Fine Arts, Rome 

Susan T. Viguers 

Assistant Professor: Language and 

Literature 

A.B., Bryn Mawr College 

M.A., University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill 

Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

Ronald Walker 

Assistant Professor: Photography/Film 
Chairperson: Photography/Film 
B.A., University of the South 
MF.A., Maryland Institute, College 
of Art 

William Webster 

Associate Professor: Philosophy 
B.M., Curtis Institute of Music 
B.A., University of Iowa 
Ph.D., University of Permsylvania 

Carlo Weinberg 

Lecturer: French and Italian 
Doctorate in Foreign Languages and 
Literature, University of Pisa 

Burton Weiss 

Lecturer: Life Sciences, Physical 

Science 

Ph.D., Princeton University 



Steven L. Weiss 

Lecturer: Anatomy and Figure 
Drawing, Illustration Dept. 
M.F JV., Sculpture, University of 
Pennsylvania 

Julian Winston 

Associate Professor: Industrial Design 
B.LD., Pratt Institute 

Robert Worth 

Special Lecturer: Craft 

B.FA., M.F.A., Rochester Institute of 

Technology 

Uly Yeh 

Associate Professor: Art History 
B.A., National Taiwan University 
M.F.A., University of Permsylvania 

Nancy Young-Morkowich 

Lecturer: Art Therapy 
B.F.A., Philadelphia College of Art 
M.S., Art Therapy, Hahnemann 
Medical College and Hospital 

Chrtstine Zelinsky 

Lecturer: Graphic Design 

Diploma, Allgemeine Gewerbeschule, 

Basel, Switzerland 

Martha Zelt 

Lecturer: Printmaking 

Diploma, Pennsylvania Academy of 

the Fine Arts 

BA., Temple University 



INDEX 



85 Academic Regulations 
83 Act 101 Program 

80 Activities 

91 Administration 
57 Admissions 

88 Advisors 

79 Alumni Association 

97 Application Forms 

81 Artists for Enviroimient Program 

22 Art Therapy 

6 Calendar 1980-81 
3 Campus 
79 Career Development and Placement 

28 Ceramics 

96 Civil Rights Compliance 

5 College Store 

90 Commencement Prizes 

56 Continuing Studies 

27 Craft 

88 Credits 

88 Curricular Requirements 

5 Degrees Offered 

86 Dismissal 

86 Dual Degrees 

23 Education Department 
32 Environmental Design 

81 Exchange Programs 
62 Expenses 

92 Faculty 
62 Fees 

87 FERPA (Buckley Amendment) 

29 Fibres 

82 Financial Aid 

81 Foreign and Summer Study Programs 
13 Foundation Program 

5 Gallery 
31 Glass 

85 Grading System 

61 Graduate Admissions 

86 Graduation Requirements 
35 Graphic Design 

79 Health Service 
86 Honors 
79 Housing 



37 niustralion 

40 Industrial Design 

80 Learning Skills Center 

87 Leave of Absence 

14 Liberal Arts 

5 Library 

56 Main Line Extension 

23 Major Departments 

23 Master of Arts in Art Education 

80 Meal Service 

30 Metals 

43 Painting and Drawing 
56 Part-time Study 

81 Permsylvania Academy/PCA 

Cooperative Program 
46 Photography/Film 

31 Plaster 

56 Pre-CoUege Program 

2 President's Message 

50 Printmaking 

86 Probation (academic) 
5 Profile 

85 Readmission 

87 Refund Policy 

80 Safety 

56 Satiirday School 

89 Scholarships 

53 Sculpture 

5 Slide Library 

80 Social Regulations 

56 Summer Studio 

61 Teacher Certification Program 
96 Telephone Numbers 

59 Transfer Admissions 
91 Trustees 

62 Tuition 

56 University In-Service Teacher 
Education Network (UITEN) 

87 Withdrawal from College 
30 Wood 



Concerning the following: 



Write to or call: 



Admissions to day College, 
undergraduate, special student, M.A. 
in Art Education, teacher certification, 
and Pre-College Program 



Admissions Office: 

(215)893-3174 



Continuing Studies ad 
information 
Saturday School 



and Office for Continuing Studies: 

(215)893-3160 
(215) 893-3125 



Tours of the College and group 
information sessions 



Admissions Office: 

(215)893-3174 



Readmission, return-degree candidacy, 
PAFA and student exchange 
programs, extracurricular activities, 
student organizations. College 
regulations, counseling 



Office of the Dean or Associate Dean 
of Students: 

(215)893-3183/3186 



Financial Aid information 



Financial Aid Office: 

(215)893-3181/3182 



Housing information 



liousing Office: 

(215)893-3233 



Registration, scheduling, recording, 
transcripts, veterans 



Registrar's Office: 

(215)893-3190/3193 



Information about career planning 
and placement 



Career Development and 
Placement Office: 

(215)893-3184/3185 



The College is an institution oi purpose — 
the humanistic and professional education 
of visually talented persons for careers 
in visual arts and design. Opportunities for 
employment, advancement, and for 
enrollment in educational programs shall 
be extended to all qualified persons, 
without respect for race, color, religion, 
sex, age, handicap, or national origin. 
Qualifications for enrollment shall be those 
which indicate potential to succeed in and 
benefit from the courses of instruction 
ofiered by the College; qualifications for 
employment shall be those which with 
respect to the particular position are 
essential for and will best contribute to the 
accomplishment of the goals and purposes 
of the College. No criteria beyond those 
deemed necessary shall be required, nor 
shall any criteria be adopted which will 
affect adversely opportunity for 
employment, advancement or enrollment 
by reason of race, color, religion, sex, age, 
hcindicap, or national origin. 



Philadelphia College of Art 
Broad and Spruce Streets 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102 
(215)893-3100 



Design and Production: Barbara Sosson Design 

Cover Photography: Frank Bender 

Photography: John Cariano, Eugene Mopsik, David Tafler, Rob Wright 

Editor: Lisbeth Gross 

Editorial Assistant: Evelyn Shapiro 

Printing: Thomason Press Inc. 

Copyright 1980 Philadelphia College of Art 



Undergraduate Application 

Please type or print in ink. 



Name in Full 
(last, first, middle) 



Street 
City _ 



PermaneDt Addie: 



Street 
City _ 



Preferred Mailing Address 



Social Security Number 
Progrdzn 



. Zip. 



. Zip. 



'Personal Profile 

Check appropriate classifications: 

D Veteran 

D Financial Aid Applicant 

DMale 
D Female 



D Plan to commute 

D Plan to live in dormitory 



Citizenship _ 



DUS 
D Other 



It you are a foreign student, 

what type of visa do you have now? 



Name of parent and/cs guardian 



Applying to enter (semester/year): . 

D Degree Candidate 

D Non-Degree /Special Student 

D First-time Freshman 

D Transfer 

If you wish an interview 
please indicate below. 

D Interview with portfolio 
D Interview without portfolio 

Preferred month: 



Check the professional maior(s) in which 
you are interested. 



Have you previously applied to PCA? 

DYes 
DNo 



If yes, please give date and program: 



Students applying for transfer above the if members of youi family have attended PCA, 
fiist-year level must indicate only one please give names, relationships, and years attended: 

major department. 



n Craft — Ceramics 
D Craft — Fibres 
D Craft — Metal 

□ Craft — Wood 

□ Environmental Design 

□ Film 

□ Graphic Design 

□ Illustration 

□ Industrial Design 

□ Painting & Drawing 

□ Photography 

□ Printmaking 
O Sculpture 



□ Undecided 



'Data used for identification purposes only 



High School Name 
(last attended) i 



If you have had any art instruction other than secondary school, list below. 
Name of school Dates attended 



Date of 
. graduation . 



D Public D Private O Parochial List ejctra-curricular activities, travel, employment, giving dates & describing 
positions: 



Name of high school art teacher(s): 



Name of guidance counselor: 



Transfers: 

List below every college you have attended or are now attending: 



Date of Date of 

entrance leaving 



Address 



Date of Date of 

entrance leaving 



If you have been out of school for more than 3 months, 
please attach a letter detailing your activities. 



Have you ever been dismissed 
from another college or school? 

DYes 

DNo 

Who recommended 
PCAtoyou? 



If yes, please attach 
a letter explaining all 
circumstances leading 
to your dismissal. 



Check and give dates if you have ever attended: 
D PCA's Evening Division Dates 

D PCA's Pre-CoUege Summer Program Dates 

D PCA's Saturday School Art Classes Dates 



Signature 



Please complete and letum 

with the $20 applicxition fee to PCA's Admisaiona Office 

Philadelphia College of Art 
Broad and Spruce Streets 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102 



98 



Mast» oi Arts/Teacher Certiiication Program 

Please type or print in ink 



Applying for 

O M.A. in Alt Education Program 
D Teacher Certification 



Name 

(last, first, middle) 



To begin: 
September 19 
January 19 



Scholarships and fellowships previously held: 
Description 



Permanent Address: 



City 



Zip. 



City. 



Piefened Mailing Address 



Previous Education 



College, University, or 
Professional School 



Major, degree, and 
date of graduation 



College, University, or 
Professional School 



Major, degree, and 
Date of graduation 



-Zip 



Professional Employment 

Employer 



Dates of 
. attendance 



Dates of 
. attendance 



Prizes, distinctions, research grants awarded 
List all publications 



Recommendations 

List the individuals you have asked to write recommendations; Describe your plans for the studio concentration: 



The questions below ore to be answered by M.A. opplicants: 



Present Teaching 
Certificate 



List any graduate courses that you have completed and v/ould like 
reviewed for transfer to your graduate program: 



Course number and title 



If you vrill require financial assistance, please complete the 
Graduate and Professional School Financial Aid Service applicatic 
and file by the April 15 or November 15 deadline. 



Signature 



Please complete and return with the $20 application fee to: 



Graduate Admissions Oifice 

Philadelphia College of Art 
Broad and Spruce Streets 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102 



The Philadelphia College of Art 
Broad and Spruce Streets 
Philadelphia. PA 19102 



Non-Profit Organization 

U.S. Postage 

Paid 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Permit No. 1103