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Full text of "School catalog, 1993-1994"

The University of the Arts 



Course Catalog 




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1993- 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/schoolcatalog199394univ 



The University of the Arts 



Course Catalog 
1993-94 



ff U 



The University of the Arts Philadelphia Philadelphia 

Office of Admissions College of College of 

320 South Broad Street Art and Design Performing Arts 

Philadelphia, PA 19102 
215-875-4808 



The University of the Arts is the only university in 
the nation that is devoted exclusively to education 
and professional training in the visual and per- 
forming arts. The University of the Arts was 
founded in 1987 through the consolidation of two 
century-old institutions: The Philadelphia College 
of Art and The Philadelphia College of the 
Performing Arts. Located in central Philadelphia, 
The University of the Arts offers comprehensive 
curricula in design, fine arts, crafts, music, dance 
and theater arts, and prepares its students to 
assume over one hundred career paths in the 
visual and performing arts and related fields. 

The University of the Arts gives equal consider- 
ation to all applicants for admission and financial 
aid, and conducts all educational programs, 
activities, and employment practices without 
regard to race, color, sex, religion, national 
or ethnic origin, or disability. Direct inquiries to the 
Office of Personnel, The University of the Arts, 
320 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102; 
(215)875-4838. 

All information listed herein is subject to change. 
2/94 

The University of the Arts 

320 South Broad Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19102 

215.875.4808 

800. 272. 3790 (in PA + NJ) 

Fax:215-875-5458 



Contents 

The University of the Arts 



4 


Academic Calendar 1993-94 


6 


Degree Programs 


6 


Admissions 


8 


Registration 


9 


Tuition and Expenses 


10 


Financial Aid 


11 


Grants and Scholarships 


12 


Loan Programs 


12 


Student Employment 


12 


Academic Regulations 


14 


Access to Student Records 


15 


Student Services 


17 


Continuing Education Programs 


17 


Alumni 



Philadelphia College of Art and 
Design 

21 Programs of Study 

22 Admissions Requirements 
24 Graduate Admissions 

24 Scholarships 

25 Facilities 

25 Career Services 

26 Enrichment Programs 

26 Undergraduate Academic Requirements 

27 Graduation Requirements 

28 Undergraduate Curricula 

28 Foundation 

29 Crafts 

29 Ceramics 

30 Fibers 

30 Jewelry/Metals 

30 Wood 

32 Graphic Design 

33 Illustration 

34 Industrial Design 

35 Painting/Drawing 

36 Photography 

37 Film 

37 Animation 

38 Printmaking 

39 Sculpture 

40 Fine Arts Sophomore Option 

40 Art Therapy 

41 Education 

42 Graduate Programs 

42 Master of Arts in Art Education 

42 Master of Arts in Teaching in visual Arts 

44 Master of Fine Arts in Book Arts/ 
Printmaking 

45 Master of Fine Arts in Museum Exhibition 
Planning and Design 

45 Ceramic Studio Residence Program 

46 Philadelphia College of Art and Design 
Course Descriptions 

62 Faculty 



Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 



79 


Major Areas of Study 


80 


Admissions Requirements 


80 


Graduate Admissions 


81 


Regulations 


81 


Graduation Requirements 


82 


The School of Dance 


83 


Programs of Study 


83 


Admissions/Audition Requirements 


83 


Scholarships 


84 


Undergraduate Curricula 


86 


Special Class/Performance Requirements 


87 


School of Dance Course Descriptions 


91 


The School of Music 


93 


Undergraduate Programs 


94 


Graduate Programs 


94 


Undergraduate Audition Requirements 


96 


Graduate Audition Requirements 


97 


Scholarships 


98 


Undergraduate Curricula 


104 


Graduate Programs 


106 


Regulations/Requirements 


107 


Graduation Requirements 


108 


School of Music Course Descriptions 


115 


The School of Theater Arts 


116 


Programs of Study 


117 


Admissions Requirements 


117 


Scholarships 


118 


Undergraduate Curricula 


119 


Performance Requirements 


119 


Regulations 


121 


School of Theater Course Descriptions 


124 


Philadelphia College of Performing Arts 




Faculty 



Division of Humanities 

137 Requirements 

138 Humanities Course Descriptions 
146 Faculty 

151 Administration 



Academic Calendar 



Fall '93 Academic Review 



Spring Semester 1994 

Registration Dates: 
January 13 & 14 

See specific dates below 

Wednesday January 5 
& Thursday, January 6 

Thursday, January 1 3, 9:00 am Student Residences open 

Late Registration for 
Continuing students 

Registration for Returning 
Former students 



Friday, January 14 

Monday, January 17 
Tuesday, January 18 



Tuesday, January 18 & 
Wednesday, January 19 

Tuesday, January 18 thru 
Monday, January 31 

Tuesday, January 18 thru 
Monday February 7 

Tuesday. February 1 



Friday, February 18 

Monday, February 21 
thru Friday, February 25 

Monday, February 28 



Friday, March 4 



Registration all new 
Students 

Martin Luther King Holiday 

Degree Program classes begin 

Dance Extension Classes begin 

Late Registration 

Drop/Add period for 
Degree Programs 

Drop/Add period 
for PCPA ensembles 

Deans and Directors submit 
courses for Summer I and II 
to Registrar 

Deans and Directors submit 
courses for Fall '94 to Registrar 

PCAD freshman major 
selection week 

Last day for removal of 
"Incomplete (I") grades 
from Fall '93 semester 

Faculty send Sixth week academic 
deficiencies to students 

Deadline to withdraw from class 
with "W" grade 

PCAD freshman deadline to 
declare a major 

Returning Former students' 
deadline to petition for May or 
August graduation 



Monday, March 28 



Monday, April 4 thru 
Wednesday, April 13 

Thursday, April 14 



Friday, April 15 
Tuesday, April 26 

Monday, May 2 

Monday, May 2 & 
Tuesday, May 3 



Tuesday, May 3 thru 
Monday, May 9 

Monday, May 9 thru 
Thursday, May 12 

Saturday, May 14 

Monday, May 16 

Monday May 16 thru 
Friday, May 20 

Friday, May 20 

Saturday, May 21 

Monday, May 30 

Wednesday, June 1 

Thursday, June 2 and 
Friday, June 3 



Study Abroad and Mobility 
applications due to Registrar 
for Fall '94 



Advising for Fall '94 registration 

Fall '94 registration forms due to 
Registrar from graduate students 
and seniors 

Fall '94 registration forms due to 
Registrar from juniors, 
sophomores and freshmen 

State Grant application deadline 
for all students for 1993-94 
academic year 

Degree Program classes end 

Registration for Summer 
Sessions I & II for all current 
and new students 

Summer registration for PCAD 
Foundation Semester 



Classroom examinations 

Studio Critiques & Juries 

Student residences close 10:00 pm 
Final grades due to Registrar 5:00 pm 
Senior Week 

University Awards Ceremony 

Commencement 

Memorial Day Holiday 

Readmission application deadline 
for Fall '94 Semester 

Academic Review 



Monday, March 7 thru 
Sunday, March 13 

Monday, March 14 

Tuesday, March 15 



Friday, March 18 



Spring Break for faculty 
and students 

Degree Program Classes resume 

Talent Scholarship application 
deadline for Fall '94 applicant 
for admission 

Art Education M.S. thesis 
approval due for May degrees 



Saturday, March 26 



Open House 



Summer Semester 1994 



Monday, May 2 & 
Tuesday, May 3 



Session I 
Monday, May 16 



Monday, June 13 

Sunday, June 19 
Monday, June 20 
Friday, June 24 



Friday, July 1 

Session II 
Monday, June 27 
Sunday, July 3 
Monday, July 4 
Tuesday, July 5 



Friday, July 8 
Friday, July 15 



Friday, July 29 



Registration dates for current and 
new students 

Registration for PCAD Summer 
Foundation semester 



Humanities courses begin 

PCAD Summer Foundation 
semester begins 

PCPA MAT Program begins 

Fall Registration for PCAD 
Summer Foundations students 

PREP Students move in 

PCAD PREP Program begins 

Humanities courses end 

PCAD Summer Foundation 
semester ends 

PCPA MAT Program ends 

Faculty submit grades to Registrar 
before 5:00 pm 



PCAD Studio Electives begin 
Pre-College Students move in 
Independence Day Holiday 
Pre-College Summer Institute 



Summer World of Dance Begins 

PCPA Mini Semester begins 

Academic Review (Foundation) 

Application deadline for 
International Candidates for 

Fall Admission 

Two-week pre-college 
program ends 

Pre-College Summer Institute ends 

Summer World of Dance ends 

PCPA Mini-Semester ends 



Saturday, July 30 
Friday, August 5 



Student Residences close 12 Noon 

PCAD Studio Electives end 

Final transcripts due to Registrar 
for Summer Degree 

August Degrees granted 



Degree Programs within 
The University 

Philadelphia College of 
Art and Design 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts degree is a four-year 
program in the majors of Crafts, Graphic Design, 
Illustration, Painting, Printmaking, Photography/ 
Film/Animation, and Sculpture. The four-year 
program in the majors of Industrial Design and 
Architectural Studies leads to the Bachelor of 
Science degree. 

At the graduate level are programs leading to 
the degrees of Master of Arts in Art Education, 
Master of Arts in Teaching in Visual Arts, Master 
of Fine Arts in Book Arts/Printmaking, Master of 
Fine Arts in Museum Exhibition Planning and 
Design, and Master of Architecture. Teaching 
certification is offered on a nondegree basis, 
either independently or in conjunction with an 
undergraduate degree in the Philadelphia College 
of Art and Design. A Concentration in Art Therapy 
is offered within the Humanities and Studio 
undergraduate elective category. 

Through the Continuing Education Office, an 
Associate degree is offered on a part-time basis in 
Communication Design, Fine Arts and Interior 
Design. 

Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

The School of Dance offers four-year Bachelor of 
Fine Arts degrees in Ballet, Modern and Jazz/ 
Theater Dance Performance, Dance Education, and 
a two-year Certificate in Dance. 

The School of Music offers a four-year Bachelor 
of Music degree in Performance, Composition, 
or Theory. Students may elect either a Classical or 
Jazz/Commercial major for degrees in Perfor- 
mance or Composition. Additional programs are 
the four-year Undergraduate Diploma and the 
two-year Certificate of Music. 

Graduate programs in the School of Music 
include the Master of Arts in Teaching in Music 
Education, the Master of Music in Performance, 
the Master of Music in Composition, the Graduate 
Diploma in Performance. Majors for the Master 
of Music in Performance are Instrumental Perfor- 
mance, Voice, Opera Singing, Piano, Piano Accom- 
panying, and Chamber Music. 

The School of Theater Arts offers the Bachelor 
of Fine Arts in Theatre Arts with programs in Act- 
ing, Directing, Stage Combat, or Musical Theater. 



Admissions 

Barbara Elliott 

Director of Admissions 
First Floor, Haviland Hall 
215-875-4808 
800-272-3790 (in PA + NJ) 

The University of the Arts selects its student body 
after a careful evaluation of a variety of creden- 
tials. A candidate must show a commitment to the 
visual or performing arts and should have a strong 
desire to be educated in the humanities as well. 
The following information is applicable to both the 
Philadelphia College of Art and Design and the 
Philadelphia College of Performing Arts. In addi- 
tion, requirements for the portfolio review or the 
audition can be found under the heading of Admis- 
sions within each College. 

Admissions Calendar 

The University of the Arts accepts students on 
a rolling basis until all available spaces have been 
filled. Students are advised to apply early to 
ensure that space is available. 

Admissions Procedures 

Freshman Admission 
Requirements 

The Admissions Office accepts applications on a 
rolling basis. Applicants to the freshman class 
must graduate from an accredited high school and 
have taken an appropriate distribution of high 
school subjects, including four (4) years of English. 

Applicants not holding a regular high school 
diploma may qualify for admission in the following 
ways: 
1 . GED (General Education Diploma) tests through 

the Department of Public Instruction. 
Freshman applicants should submit the following: 

1 . Completed undergraduate application and 
application fee. 

2. Official high school transcript bearing 
the school seal and mailed directly to the 
University. 

3. Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American 
College Test (ACT) scores. Note: the University 
does not set a minimum score for acceptance. 

4. Statement of Purpose (one type-written page). 

5. Letters of recommendation. 

6. Resume (Philadelphia College of Performing 
Arts only). 

7. Music applicants only: repertoire for an 
audition. 

8. Dance and Theatre Arts applicants only: 
a recent photograph. 

9. A personal interview with an admissions officer 
is recommended, but not required. 



Portfolio Review/Audition 

Arrangements must be made for a portfolio 
review or audition at the time of application by 
contacting the Admissions Office. Please see the 
appropriate sections in The Philadelphia College 
of Art and Design and The Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts and its Schools of Music, Dance, 
or Theater Arts for additional admissions portfolio 
and audition information. 

Advanced Placement Examination 

The University of the Arts may award three credits 
toward the Humanities requirements for a score 
of 4 or better in any CEEB Advanced Placement 
Examination on an academic subject. Advanced 
Placement credit is not given for studio art or 
performance. 

International Baccalaureate 

The University may award 6 credits toward the 
Humanities requirements for a score of 4 or better 
in an HL (High Level) International Baccalaureate 
Examination and 3 credits for a score of 4 or bet- 
ter in an SL (Subsidiary Level) International Bacca- 
laureate Examination in an academic subject. No 
credit by examination is given for studio art or 
performance. 

College Level Examination Placement 
(CLEP) Program 

Credit may be awarded toward the Humanities 
requirement by CLEP subject examination. For 
additional information contact the Director of the 
Humanities Division. 

Interviews 

Though not required, a personal interview is 
recommended. Interviews must be scheduled in 
advance by calling the Admissions Office at 
215-875-4808. 

Transfer Admission 

A student who has successfully completed twelve 
(12) or more hours of coursework in a college-level 
program as a fully matriculated student will be 
considered a Transfer. Admission decisions will be 
made on a rolling basis. 

Transfer Admission Requirements 

Transfer students should submit the following: 

1. Portfolio or audition. 

2. Transcripts of all previous college experience 
and a listing of courses that will be completed 
before entrance into The University of the Arts. 

3. Catalog or other publications describing 
coursework recorded and credit assignment for 
studio work. 

4. Official high school transcript bearing 
the school seal and mailed directly to the 
University. 

5. Statement of Purpose. 

6. Letters of recommendation. 

7. Resume (Philadelphia College of Performing 
Arts only). 



Transfer Credits 

Transfer applicants may receive credit for courses 
taken at other accredited institutions that are 
similar in content, purpose, and standards to those 
offered at The University of the Arts. For credit 
to be granted, official transcripts of all previous 
college study must be presented along with a 
current catalog of that institution. A minimum 
grade of "C" is required for courses presented for 
transfer credit. A grade of "Pass" can be consid- 
ered for transfer only if the transcript documents 
that "Pass" is equal to a grade of "C" or better. 
The evaluation of credit is made by the Humani- 
ties and Studio or Performance Department chair- 
persons/directors in consultation with the Office 
of the Registrar. 

Residency Requirements 

Every transfer student must complete a minimum 
of two semesters in residence preceding gradua- 
tion and must earn a minimum of 48 credits in 
Studio/Performance and/or Humanities courses. 
Students must transfer or complete the required 
Humanities and Studio/Performance major depart- 
ment courses stipulated for the degree regardless 
of the number of credits completed at other 
accredited institutions. The number of credits 
required for completion of the Studio/Performance 
major is determined by the chairperson/director of 
that department. The remaining Humanities 
requirements are determined through the transfer 
credit evaluation process cited above. For this 
reason, transfer students may be required to 
remain in residence at The University of the Arts 
for more than the minimum two semesters and to 
complete more than the minimum 48 credits. 

Credit by Portfolio Review 

Students who qualify will be granted credit by 
portfolio review in studio subjects. Portfolio credit 
requires the approval of the appropriate studio 
major chairperson. Academic standing and course 
credit based on portfolio evaluation are normally 
determined during the admissions process. Credit 
by portfolio may be granted only for studio art 
work done prior to matriculation in the Philadel- 
phia College of Art and Design. This work cannot 
be part of the assigned work for a secondary or 
post-secondary course. In order for matriculated 
students to receive credit for independent art work 
or other projects done outside the University, an 
independent study or internship, whichever is 
appropriate, must be rostered as part of the 
student's semester schedule. The University of the 
Arts does not award credit for experience outside 
the classroom other than outlined above. 

Credit by Audition 

Students who qualify may be granted credit by 
audition in Performance subjects. Audition credit 
requires the approval of the Auditioning Commit- 
tee and/or School Director. Academic standing 
and course credit based on audition for transfer 
students are normally determined during the 
admissions process. 



Early Admission 

The University of the Arts accepts applications 
from advanced high school juniors who have 
completed extra high school coursework. These 
students may enroll as freshmen instead of com- 
pleting the senior year in high school. 

The candidate's high school authorities may 
grant the applicant a high school diploma upon 
completion of the freshman year at The University 
of the Arts. 

Deferred Admission 

The University of the Arts will accept applications 
from candidates who plan a year of activities, 
work, or travel between high school and college 
and who wish to enter college one full year after 
graduation from high school. A brief note explain- 
ing the deferment should be attached to the 
application. Deferred applicants should otherwise 
follow regular application procedures. A decision 
on the deferred application will be tendered when 
the file is complete. 

Any applicant offered admission to the current 
September freshman class who wishes to defer 
enrollment until the following September or Janu- 
ary should request this consideration in writing. 
Deferred candidates will be required to submit a 
tuition deposit to guarantee their place in the next 
year's class. 

January Admission 

Students may enter most programs in music, 
dance, and design and the visual arts programs 
in January during the spring term. Contact the 
Admissions Office for further details. 

Academic Achievement Program 
(AAP) 

The Academic Achievement Program is designed 
for full-time residents of Pennsylvania who have 
been chosen on the basis of their academic poten- 
tial, motivation, and aspirations. Eligible students 
for the Program are evaluated and accepted on the 
basis of their application interview, SAT scores, 
portfolio review or auditions, and potential to 
succeed at The University of the Arts. In addition, 
eligibility in the Program is determined by the 
family's adjusted income. 

As a talented student, chosen to be a part of 
this University's and The Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania's Program, AAP students are entitled 
to many special privileges, including a scholarship 
to attend the summer PREP Program. Most impor- 
tantly, the University is committed to retaining an 
AAP student for at least 4 semesters if that 
student is actively involved in the Program. This 
means that the student has taken advantage of 
the Program's counseling/tutoring services as well 
as participated in numerous cultural activities and 
special events. 



The services provided by the AAP program 
include: 

1. Counseling — personal, academic, career, and 
financial. Each new student is assigned an 
AAP counselor who will assist the student from 
admission through graduatiori- 

2. Tutoring — students experiencing difficulty in 
their Humanities, Studio, or Performance 
courses through the AAP tutorial program. 
Typically, tutors are upper division or graduate 
students. 

3. A special required summer program — studio 
and academic courses. 

To be accepted to this program students must 
meet the following criteria: 

1 . Though not academically acceptable under 
normal admission policies, demonstrate poten- 
tial for success. 

2. Meet program guidelines for family's adjusted 
income. 

3. Be residents of Pennsylvania. 

Students who think they meet these criteria 
and wish to be considered for the AAP program, 
should contact the Admissions Office. 
A financial eligibility form will be sent to the 
student for return to the Financial Aid Office. 

Graduate Admissions 

Requirements for all graduate applications are 
as follows: 

1 . A completed graduate application form and 
non-refundable application fee of $30.00. 

2. Official transcripts from each undergraduate or 
graduate (if any) institution previously attended. 
Transcripts should be sent directly to the Office 
of Admissions by the college(s) or school(s) 
involved. 

3. Three letters of recommendation from refer- 
ences listed on the application. Two of these 
must come from professors in your field or 
professionals in the major area who are famil- 
iar with your capabilities and credentials. 

4. A one-to two-page statement of professional 
plans and goals. 

5. Proof of High School Graduation. 

6. Foreign-born students or international students 
must submit Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) scores. 

7. Portfolio or audition. 

Veterans 

As an accredited degree-granting institution, the 
University is approved for the training of veterans. 
Information about education benefits may be 
obtained from any VA office. 



English as a Second Language 
(ESL) Students 

Students for whom English is spoken as a second 
language, who are either foreign or U.S. residents, 
are required to take the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) as a requirement for 
admission to The University of the Arts. The 
University may require students with below 500 
TOEFL scores to attend a college-level English as a 
Second Language (ESL) course offered during the 
summer prior to the fall semester. 

International Students 

Students who are neither U.S. citizens nor resident 
aliens are considered international students. Inter- 
national applicants whose native language is 
other than English are required to take the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), as stated 
above. All foreign transcripts and other documents 
must be translated and certified by an embassy, 
legation, or consular officer of the U.SA and 
mailed directly to the University by the institution. 

The University of the Arts has no financial aid 
for international students. Applicants must file 
proof of their ability to support themselves from 
their own financial resources. Documentation of 
these resources is required on official bank statio- 
nery indicating the equivalent of $20,000 U.S. 
Dollars to meet the expense of attending the 
University. The documentation is required as part 
of the Admissions Application. 

Please contact the Admissions Office Interna- 
tional Applicant Coordinator for information, assis- 
tance and an international application. 

Readmission 

Written appeal for reinstatement as a degree 
candidate is made through the Office of the 
Registrar. Appropriate departmental chairpersons/ 
directors and the Finance Office must endorse the 
readmission prior to any registration process. 
Students' program requirements are subject to 
review at the time of readmission. 

The University reserves the right to reevaluate 
work toward a degree completed more than seven 
years prior to readmission. 

Tuition and Housing Deposits 

A $200 Tuition Deposit is required three weeks 
from the date an acceptance letter is issued. This 
deposit ensures that a space will be reserved for 
an admitted student in the upcoming class. 

A $100 Housing Deposit is required to re- 
serve a student's space in the dormitory facili- 
ties. After June 1 , space is available on a first- 
come first-served basis only. The Tuition De- 
posit is required before the Housing Deposit 
will activate the housing reservation. 



Registration 

Rita DiRenzo 

Registrar 

Second Floor, Haviland Hall 
215-875-4848 

The Office of the Registrar develops and maintains 
all records and files relating to the student's 
academic life at the University. All course and 
program transactions or changes are not official 
unless properly processed through the Office of 
the Registrar. In order to register, students must be 
formally admitted to the University and pay all 
applicable tuition and fees. Students must have a 
program of courses documented and approved by 
the required advisorfs). All students are advised to 
obtain a copy of their curriculum requirements as 
soon as possible after admission to the University, 
and to check those against their transcript after 
each term. Student copies of the transcript are 
available upon request. The Office of Registrar is 
responsible for certification of completion of 
requirements for graduation. 

Registration 

Official registration forms must be filed in order 
for the student to attend class. Students are re- 
sponsible for knowing regulations regarding with- 
drawals, refund deadlines, program changes, and 
academic policy. 

Matriculating students must register for subse- 
quent semesters in accord with the posted sched- 
ule (see Academic Calendar). Failure to register 
will result in a late registration fee (see below). 

Late Registration 

A late registration fee of $35 will be charged to 
any student registering after the dates listed in the 
Academic Calendar. Late registration may jeopar- 
dize a student's chances of obtaining the program 
desired. 

Schedule Revision (Drop/Add) 

Any schedule revision must be approved in writing 
by the appropriate instructor or department chair- 
person. A drop/add period is held during the first 
ten days of classes each semester. A fee of $10 
will be charged to students who submit schedule 
revision forms after the official drop/add period. 

Non-Attendence 

Any student who neither attends class nor sends 
an explanation for absence may be dropped from 
the course at the end of the first week. 

ID Cards 

At the time of registration, the Public Safety 
Department issues and validates identification 
(ID) cards to students who have fulfilled all 
financial obligations to the University. Student 
ID cards allow students to gain access to all 
buildings and facilities and to procure services 
and privileges available at the University. In 
addition, ID cards may be used for admission to 
performances and exhibitions at the University 
and to qualify students for discounts at many 
locations throughout Philadelphia. 



Tuition and Expenses 

Louis J. Mayer 

Director of Finance 
Second Floor, Haviland Hall 
215-8754865 

Undergraduate Tuition and Fees 

Annual tuition is charged to all full-time 
undergraduate students, payable one-half each 
semester. Full-time students carry a minimum of 
12 credits per semester and may carry up to 18 
credits without incurring additional charges. Ex- 
cess credits are subject to additional charges at 
the standard semester credit rate. Permission of 
the Dean of the appropriate College is required for 
a student to carry more than 18 credits in one 
semester. 

In addition to the annual tuition charge, all 
students registered for 12 credits or more are 
required to pay an annual general student fee. The 
general student fee is applied toward the cost of 
library facilities; studio and laboratory operations; 
orientation; student activities; and special ser- 
vices, including health services, placement, and 
registration. The annual general student fee is not 
refundable. 

Students registering for less than 12 credits are 
charged per credit. There are no other mandatory 
course fees or charges except for certain deposits 
and the cost of expendable materials in selected 
studio classes. Reservation deposits for housing 
and tuition are credited to the student's bill and 
are not refundable. 



Schedule of Annual 
Undergraduate Charges and Fees 

1993-94 Academic Year 

Philadelphia College of Art and Design 

Full-time tuition $11,900 

(12-18 credits/semester) 

Tuition per credit $515 

Philadelphia College of Performing Arts 

Full-time tuition $11,900 

Tuition per credit $ 450 

Both Colleges 

General Student Fee $515 

(all full-time students) 

Housing Fees 

Housing — Furness Hall + 1500 Pine $3570 
Housing reservation deposit $ 1 00 

Housing damage deposit (refundable) $ 200 



Graduate Tuition and Fees 

Full-time graduate students pay annual tuition plus 
the general student fee. Teacher certification 
special students in visual arts are considered full 
time at 10.5 credits. General student fee charges 
are the same for graduate and undergraduate 
students. Tuition for part-time graduate studies is 
charged per semester credit. 

A student who has completed all the course 
requirements for the Masters degree and is cur- 
rently working on the graduate project, either on 
or off campus, must register and pay a graduate 
project continuation fee (equal to the cost of 0.5 
credits/semester). This registration, through the 
Office of the Registrar, is required in each suc- 
ceeding semester until all degree requirements 
are met. 

A student without an approved leave of 
absence who does not register each semester will 
be considered to have withdrawn from candidacy 
for the degree. Students who have not maintained 
continuous registration must apply through the 
Office of the Registrar for readmission to the 
program, and will be retroactively charged for the 
intervening semesters. 

Schedule of Annual Graduate 
Charges and Fees 

1993-94 Academic Year 

Philadelphia College of Art and Design 

Full-time tuition $11,900 

(10.5 credits or more) 

Tuition per credit $ 685 

Philadelphia College of Performing Arts 

School of Music 

Full-time tuition $11,900 

(Master of Arts — 8 credits; 

Graduate diploma — 6 credits) 

Tuition per credit $ 685 

Both Colleges 

General Student Fee 
(all full-time students) 



$480 



Tuition Payments and Financial 
Responsibility 

Payment in full for each semester is required be- 
fore students may attend classes. Tuition invoices 
are mailed to students each July and November. 
The first semester bill must be paid by mid-August 
and the second semester bill must be paid by mid- 
December. Any amount unpaid after the due date 
is subject to a late payment fee of $60 unless an 
alternative payment plan has been arranged. 
Settlement of all financial obligations of the 
University rests with the student, or the student's 
parents if the student has not attained indepen- 
dent adult status. 



Students may not withdraw in good standing 
unless all financial obligations to the University 
have been met. Students whose accounts become 
delinquent are subject to dismissal. Students may 
not receive diplomas, certificates, transcripts, or 
letters of recommendation, and may not be al- 
lowed to register for the following semester if 
their accounts have not been paid in full. 

Payment Plans 

As a service to our students and their parents, the 
University offers the following commercially 
sponsored tuition payment plan. The plan allows 
for the total tuition and fees to be paid over ten 
months, from May through February. 

Tuition Management Systems, Inc. (TMS) - TMS 
offers a budget plan that allows you to pay all or 
part of your annual charges in ten monthly install- 
ments for a $30 annual administrative fee. 
A separate insurance program is also available to 
participants in this plan. For More information 
contact Tuition Management Systems Inc. at (800) 
722-4867 or (401 ) 849-1 550 

Tuition Remission 

Sons and daughters of alumni of The University 
of the Arts are eligible for a 10% remission on 
their tuition. To qualify, a student must present the 
Registrar with an official copy of the long-form 
birth certificate, which lists the names of both 
parents. The remission applies to each semester 
that the student matriculates on a full-time basis. 

Families that have two or more members 
attending The University of the Arts are eligible for 
a tuition remission. Presentation of the long-form 
birth certificate is required for each sibling attend- 
ing. The youngest member of the family may 
receive a 10% tuition remission each semester 
during which he or she is a full-time matriculating 
student. 

For more information, contact the Office of the 
Registrar at 21 5- 875-4848. 

Housing Fees 

Housing fees must be paid in full at the time of 
billing. Students are not permitted to move into 
University housing until all tuition and fees are 
paid in full. A housing damage deposit of $200 is 
required of all students who live in University 
housing. This deposit is held in escrow and will be 
refunded to the student after the apartment is 
vacated. Any charges for damage to the apartment 
will be subtracted from this deposit. An additional 
Housing Reservation Deposit of $100 is required 
to reserve a space in University housing. This 
deposit will be credited to the student's bill and is 
not refundable. 



Special Charges and Fees 

Application Fee 

An application fee of $30 is required with every 
application for admission and readmission. 

Tuition Deposit 

Once the student has been accepted for admission 
to the University, a $200 deposit is required to 
reserve a place in the class. This deposit will be 
credited to the student's bill and is not refundable. 
The tuition deposit must be paid within three 
weeks of the offer of admission. 

Schedule Revision 

A fee of $10 will be charged for schedule revision 
(drop/add) forms received after the first ten (10) 
days of classes of the semester. A fee of $25 will 
be charged for schedule revisions made after the 
semester ends. 

Late Registration 

A late registration fee of $35 will be charged to 
any student registering after the dates listed in the 
Academic Calendar. 

Late Payment 

A late payment fee of $60 will be charged to any 
student failing to pay his or her tuition and/or 
housing bill by the due date. 

Bad Check Penalty 

A $25 fine is charged for all checks issued to the 
University and not paid upon presentation to the 
bank. 

Transcript Fee 

A $5 fee is charged to students requesting an 
official transcript from the University. 

Tuition Refund Policy 

The following tuition refund policy is in effect: 
For withdrawal 

Prior to the first class 1 00% refund 

Until end of second week 80% refund 

During third week 40% refund 

After end of third week 0% refund 

A student required to withdraw for disciplinary 
reasons will not be entitled to a tuition refund. A 
student's residence apartment rent, general fees, 
and other charges are not refundable. 



Financial Aid 

John Musto 

Director of Financial Aid 
Second Floor, Haviland Hall 
215-875-4858 

The University administers financial aid provided 
by a variety of federal, state, and institutional 
programs. Financial aid is offered in the form of 
scholarships and grants, loans, and part-time 
employment. University funds are awarded for an 
academic year (two semesters) and must be re- 
newed annually by formal application. Questions 
regarding financial aid should be addressed to the 
Office of Financial Aid. Also, refer to the "Smart 
Money" brochure available upon request. 

Application Procedure 

The University's financial aid funds are limited and 
early application is essential. Therefore, financial 
aid applications should be received by March 15. 

Financial aid decisions are made separately 
from admission decisions. Applicants for financial 
aid should not wait until they have been offered 
admission to the University to apply for aid. Ad- 
mission and financial aid applications should be 
made simultaneously. Once an applicant has been 
offered admission to the institution, his or her 
name is forwarded to the Financial Aid Office. If 
the student's financial aid needs analysis has been 
received, the student will be notified of any finan- 
cial aid funds that have been awarded by the 
University within two weeks after being offered 
admission. 

New Undergraduate Students 

To apply for institutional financial aid, students 
must file the Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA) to be considered for financial aid. 
Residents of Pennsylvania also are required 
to submit the Pennsylvania Aid Information 
Request Form (PAIR). Students residing outside 
Pennsylvania should check with their state's 
Department of Higher Education to determine if 
additional forms are required. All forms are 
available from your high school guidance office or 
college financial aid office. 

Pennsylvania residents should submit the 
Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance Agency 
(PHEAA) grant application. 

Transfer Students 

Every undergraduate who is transferring to the 
University from another postsecondary educa- 
tional institution and is applying for financial aid 
must submit a Financial Aid Transcript to the 
Office of Financial Aid to document the aid re- 
ceived at the previous institution(s). This form can 
be obtained from the University's Office of Finan- 
cial Aid and must be completed by the Financial 
Aid Office at the previously attended institution. 
Transfer students will not be considered for finan- 
cial aid from the University unless this form is 
received and the application procedure properly 
completed. Transfer students must also submit the 
FAFSA and PAIR forms. 



Graduate Students 

Financial aid to graduate students consists of 
assistantships and grants-in-aid. To be considered, 
a student must complete a Graduate and Profes- 
sional School Financial Aid Service (GAPSFAS) 
form, which can be obtained from the University 
Financial Aid Office or the College Scholarship 
Service, Princeton, New Jersey. The application 
deadline is April 1 5 for Fall and November 15 for 
Spring. Students with assistantships must 
maintain a B average and enroll for 9 credits per 
semester. 

Students are also eligible to apply for a Guaran- 
teed Student Loan (GSL). Eligible students can 
borrow up to $7,500 per academic year, up to an 
aggregate amount of $54,750 (which includes all 
undergraduate loans). Application forms can be 
obtained from local banks and credit unions. 

Students enrolling for the Teacher Certification 
Program who have earned a master's or baccalau- 
reate degree are ineligible for financial assistance 
from the University. 

International Students 

Federal regulations limit financial aid to U.S. 
citizens or eligible noncitizens, i.e., permanent 
resident aliens. Aid is not available for interna- 
tional students. 

Currently Enrolled and Former 
Returning Students 

Enrolled students or former students considering 
readmission, who are applying for financial aid, 
must: 

1 . Complete a FAFSA grant application 

2. Complete a University Financial Aid Application. 
The processed application and University Financial 
Aid applications must be received by the Financial 
Aid Office by April 30. Late applications will be 
processed on a funds-available basis. 

Aid awards are normally limited to a maximum 
of eight semesters (four academic years). Students 
who fail to complete the necessary number of 
credits required for graduation within the four-year 
period due to change of major or transfer status 
will be considered for a fifth year of financial as- 
sistance only on an individual basis. The University 
cannot guarantee financial assistance beyond 
eight semesters or after completion of the re- 
quired number of credits needed for graduation. 

A student who withdraws from the Univer- 
sity midsemester for other than an approved 
reason (namely, health) will not be eligible for 
financial aid upon returning for a repeat of that 
semester's courses. 

Financial aid awarded by the University may be 
used only to meet educational expenses incurred 
by enrollment at the University or one of the insti- 
tutions with which the University has a student 
exchange program. The University is not able to 
offer financial assistance for enrollment at foreign 
institutions. 



10 



Academic Requirements 

To receive financial aid at the University, the stu- 
dent must be enrolled as a matriculated full-time 
student in a degree program. 

A student receiving aid must maintain at least a 
2.0 (C) grade point average for continuation of 
funding. The University reserves the right to termi- 
nate financial assistance at the end of the Fall 
semester if the student's grade point average is 
below the level required for eligibility. 

Academic Dismissal/Reinstatement 

A student who has been academically dismissed 
from the institution is not eligible for financial aid. 
If at a later date the student is readmitted to the 
University, he/she may reestablish eligibility for 
financial aid by submitting a letter from his/her 
Dean (or other designated official) stating that the 
student has been readmitted to the University for 
the period during which aid is requested. 

Student Responsibilities 

Students who receive awards from any outside 
agency or private organization are obligated to 
notify the University Financial Aid Office of such 
aid. At no time can total financial assistance, 
including awards from outside or private organiza- 
tions, exceed the student's established level of 
demonstrated financial need. 

Eligibility 

Financial aid is not available to any student who 
has already earned a bachelor's degree in any 
field. Students enrolled only for teacher certifica- 
tion are also ineligible. Only matriculated, full-time 
day-students may receive financial assistance 
from the University. 

Financial Aid Package 

The amount of aid offered by the Financial Aid 
Office is determined by the applicant's unmet 
financial need. Financial need is determined by 
subtracting financial resources (Pell Grant, state 
grant, family contribution, Guaranteed Student 
Loan) from the educational budget. The resulting 
need is usually met by a combination of awards 
called the "financial aid package." 

Self-Supporting (Independent) Students 

A student will be considered self-supporting if the 
federal requirements as described on the Financial 
Aid Form (FAF) or PHEM form are met. 

Dependent Students 

If a student cannot meet all the federal require- 
ments to be considered self-supporting, he or she 
will be classified as a dependent student. 



1993-94 Projected Expense Budget 



Dependent 
Student 



Independent 
Student 



Resident Commuter 

Tuition $11,900 $11,900 $11,900 

(12-18 semester 

hours) 

General Fee $ 500 $500 $ 500 

Room $ 3570 $900 $ 3870 

Board $ 1250 $900 $ 1725 

(student's expenses 
for meals, etc.) 

Supplies & Books $ 1500 $1500 $ 1500 

Transportations $ 1000 $1500 $ 1705 
Miscellaneous 

Estimated Annual $19,900 $17,200 $21,200 
Expenses 



Grants and Scholarships 

Institutional Grants and 
Scholarships 

All financial aid funds administered by the institu- 
tion are awarded on the basis of demonstrated 
financial need and the availability of funds. Prefer- 
ence is given, in the case of new students, to 
those who demonstrate outstanding promise of 
success in the University's curricula. However, any 
applicant who applies before the published dead- 
line will also be given priority. University-adminis- 
tered financial aid funds will not be used to re- 
place federal or state grants for which a student is 
eligible but who fails to complete the required 
applications. 

Additional scholarships are available through 
the Philadelphia College of Art and Design and 
through the Schools of Dance, Music, and Theater 
Arts in the Philadelphia College of Performing 
Arts. Specifics on these scholarships are listed 
under Financial Aid within each College. 

Grant-in-Aid 

These grant funds, with no repayment obligation, 
are allocated by the University to supplement all 
other financial aid programs. Partial funding for 
this program is provided by endowed scholarships 
for students with demonstrated financial need. 



State and Federal Grant 
Programs 

Pennsylvania Higher Education 
Assistance Agency (PHEAA) 

PHEAA is a state program for undergraduate 
Pennsylvania residents who will be matriculated 
students enrolled full time for an academic year. 
All permanent residents of Pennsylvania are 
expected to make application for a PHEAA grant. 
Application is made by submitting a FAFSA and 
PAIR application. PAIR grant applications 
must be sent to PHEAA in Harrisburg no later than 
May 1 . Applications are available from high 
school guidance counselors or college financial 
aid officers. 

Other State Grant Programs 

If you are a permanent resident of either Connecti- 
cut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Ohio, or Ver- 
mont, you must apply for funding from the state 
grant agency of your home state. 

Pell Grant 

To be eligible for a Pell Grant, the student must be 
matriculated and enrolled for at least six credits in 
an undergraduate program. 

All applicants for financial aid are required to 
apply for this federal grant program. If you 
have submitted a completed Federal Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), there 
is no need to submit a separate Pell Grant 
application. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity 
Grant (SEOG) 

These grant funds, which require no repayment obliga- 
tion, are supplied by the federal government and 
awarded by the institution's Financial Aid Office to 
students with the greatest financial need. 



Loan Programs 

Federal Stafford Loan 

Every matriculated student is eligible to apply for a 
Stafford Loan. The Federal Stafford Loan is a low 
interest student loan awarded on the basis of 
financial need, A full-time student may borrow up 
to $2,625 for the first year, up to $3,500 for the 
second year, and up to $5,500 for each of the last 
two years. The interest rate is 6.2% and 
repayment does not begin until six months after 
leaving school. 

Federal Supplemental Loan to 
Students (SLS) 

A full-time student may borrow up to $4,000 for 
each of the first two years and up to $5,000 for 
each of the last two years. The interest rate is 
7.3% and repayment begins immediately after the 
check is disbursed. 

Parent Loan to Undergraduate 
Students (PLUS) 

This program is for parents who wish to borrow 
funds to meet a student's educational costs. The 
maximum amount that can be borrowed cannot 
exceed the cost of education minus other financial 
aid. The interest rate is 6.6% and repayment 
begins immediately after the check is disbursed. 

Perkins Loan 

Perkins Loans, funded by the federal government, 
are awarded by the institution to matriculated 
students as part of the financial aid package. 
Repayment of the principal and interest does not 
begin until nine months after graduation or with- 
drawal from the University. The interest rate is 5% 
(subject to change). Depending on the total 
amount borrowed, a student may take up to ten 
years to fully repay this loan. 

Exit Interviews 

An exit interview is required of all students who 
graduate or withdraw from the University and who 
have received either a Federal Stafford Loan or 
a Perkins Loan while they were students. The 
purpose of this interview is to make students 
aware of their financial obligations and to deter- 
mine a repayment schedule. 

Student Employment 

College Work-Study Program (UWSP) 

The Work Study Program provides employment for 
students who need financial aid and who require 
the wages to defray their educational expenses. 
Students who are awarded work-study funds will 
be placed in various jobs in departments within 
the University. Students receive a biweekly pay- 
check for the hours worked. 

Funds are awarded as part of the Financial 
Aid Package. 



Academic Regulations for 
The University 

Specific policies pertaining to academic require- 
ments and advising for each college are stated 
under the sections describing the individual 
colleges. 

Terms of Enrollment 

An undergraduate student is enrolled full time if 
courses, both Studio and Humanities, total 12 or 
more semester hours. For graduate students, 9 or 
more semester credits constitute full-time enroll- 
ment. 

Grading System 



A 


4.00 


A- 


3.67 


B+ 


3.33 


B 


3.00 


B- 


2.67 


C+ 


2.33 


C 


2.00 


c- 


1.67 


D+ 


1.33 


D 


1.00 


F 


0.00 



Grades not included in computing averages: 

I Incomplete 

N6 No Grade 

NC No Credit 

W Withdrawal 

OP Optional Pass (Grade of "C" or better) 

OF Optional Fail (Grade of less than "C") 

AU Audit 

Computing Grade Point Average 
(GPA) 

The GPA may be computed by multiplying the 
number of credits earned for a course by the 
numerical value of the grade. The resulting figures 
from all courses for that semester are then 
totalled, and this figure is divided by the total 
number of credits attempted that semester. The 
grades of I, NG, OP, OF, W, and AU are not entered 
in this computation. 

Pass/Fail Option 

1 . In courses taken on a Pass/Fail basis, the stan- 
dard letter grades of A-C are converted to OP 
by the registrar. A grade of D or F is recorded as 
an OF. 

2. The Pass/Fail grading option must be selected 
prior to the end of the add/drop period; no 
change from Pass/Fail to regular grade or regu- 
lar grade to Pass/Fail may be made after the 
deadline. 

3. Grades of OP or OF are not computed in grade 
point average. 

4. The Pass/Fail policy stipulates that the instruc- 
tor is not to be informed as to who is enrolled 
on a Pass/Fail basis. 

5. Availability of this option is limited to a total 
of nine (9) credits in Humanities courses or 
Electives. 



Grade of Incomplete 

An incomplete grade may be granted only in ex- 
traordinary circumstances, either personal or aca- 
demic, which prevent the student from completing 
coursework by the end of the semester. The grade 
"I" is given only when the completed portion of 
the student's work in the course is of a passing 
quality. In order to receive the grade of Incom- 
plete, the student must obtain the approval of the 
course instructor and the Dean of the College prior 
to the conclusion of the semester. An Incomplete 
grade must be removed by the end of the sixth 
week of the following semester or an "F" for the 
course is assigned. (In certain Dance courses a full 
semester is allowed.) Forms are available from 
the Office of the Registrar. 

Change of Grade 

If a student questions the correctness of a grade, 
the student should first discuss the matter with 
the instructor. If a satisfactory resolution is not 
reached, the chairperson of the department or 
director of the school should be consulted. The 
student may, as a last resort, bring the matter to 
the attention of the Dean of the appropriate 
college. Any change of final grade requested by a 
student must be approved by the course instructor, 
who must submit the signed Change of Grade 
Form to the Office of the Registrar no later than 
the end of the semester following the one in 
which the grade was given. 

Class Attendance 

All students are expected to attend classes regu- 
larly and promptly and for the duration of the 
scheduled instructional time. Individual instructors 
will decide the optimum time for taking atten- 
dance and may penalize for habitual lateness or 
absence. Repeated unexcused absences may 
result in a grade of "F" for a course. 

Instructors should advise a student whenever 
his or her performance in the course is considered 
unsatisfactory by use of a Notice of Deficiency 
in coursework. This form is filed with the Office of 
the Registrar which will mail a copy to the 
student. 

Dean's List 

This list is compiled each semester in the respec- 
tive Dean's offices and is recorded as part of the 
student's permanent record. The Dean's List hon- 
ors those students who have met the following 
criteria: 

1 . Are full-time undergraduate degree candidates. 
Candidates for Certificate, Diploma, and Gradu- 
ate programs are not eligible. 

2. Have attained a minimum GPA of 3.60. 

3. Have received no grade lower than a "B" in any 
course. 

4. Have no grade of "I" or "F". 

5. Take at least 12 credits for a letter grade (no 
"OP" or "OF"). 



12 



Academic Probation 

Philadelphia College of Art and Design 
Academic Warning 

When a student, previously in good standing, 
receives a semester GPA (grade point average) 
between 1 .0 and 2.0, the student will receive a 
letter of Academic Warning from the Academic 
Dean's Office of the College on advisement from 
the ARC, Academic Review Committee. Students 
will be advised to achieve a 2.0 GPA during the 
next semester in order to avoid further probation- 
ary action. A student who receives below a 1 .0 
GPA will automatically be placed on Initial Proba- 
tion and will not receive an Academic Warning. 
Initial Probation 

If the student is unable to acieve a 2.0 GPA in 
response to the conditions of Academic Warning, 
the student will receive a letter of Initial Probation 
from the Dean's Office on behalf of the ARC. The 
student will be advised that if a 2.0 GPA and/or 
other conditions are not attained by the following 
semester, the student will be placed on Final 
Probation and will possibly lose financial aid 
according to federal regulations. 
Final Probation 

If the student fails to attain a 2.0 GPA and/or other 
conditions for a third semester, a letter of Final 
Probation will be sent advising the student that 
financial aid will not be granted for that semester 
and that, if a 2.0 GPA is not achieved during the 
semester, the student may be dismissed from the 
College. 

There may be differences in the requirements 
for scholarships, state and federal grants, and 
loans. If you find yourself with a low GPA, you are 
advised to check with the Financial Aid Office to 
see how your financial aid might be affected. 
Additional Conditions 

1. Freshmen entering in the Academic Achieve- 
ment Program will enter under Academic 
Warning. 

2. A student attaining a 1 .0 GPA or under will 
automatically be placed on Initial Probation and 
not receive an Academic Warning. 

3. Students formerly dismissed from PCAD on 
probation who reapply for admission to the 
College would be readmitted subject to the 
conditions of Final Probation and possible 
additional conditions. 

4. Students who have been on probation and 
have removed themselves from probation for a 
semester or longer, and who fail to attain 
between 1 .0 and a 2.0 GPA later in the degree 
program, will receive a letter of Academic 
Warning. 

5. Students who are readmitted to the College 
following a return from a Leave of Absence or 
Withdrawal will be readmitted subject to the 
probation conditions existent during their last 
semester at the College. 

6. The ARC may require additional conditions of 
the student during any one of these actions 
based on departmental advice or school policy. 

7. If a student fails to comply with the terms of 
Academic Warning or Probation, she or he may 
be dismissed from the University. 



Philadelphia College of Performing Arts 
Probation 

Students whose semester grade point average is 
below 2.0 and/or who receive the grade of "D" or 
below ("C" for Theater students) in their major 
area, will be placed on academic probation for one 
or two semesters, as determined by the Academic 
Review Committee. Failure to meet the stipulation 
for removal of Probation by the end of the speci- 
fied period may result in dismissal from PCPA. 

If the cumulative GPA for a semester is below 
2.0 ("C") the student is automatically placed on 
academic probation and is required to attain at 
least a 2.0 cumulative GPA is the following semes- 
ter. In the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts, 
a grade of "B" in the major is required in the 
following semester. These requirements may be 
set higher by the Academic Review Committee, 
depending on the student's overall record. The 
financial aid of a student may be placed in jeop- 
ardy is the student does not maintain satisfactory 
academic progress. If a student fails tc comply 
with the terms of academic probation, he or she 
may be dismissed from the University. Additional 
requirements may be set by the department/ 
school or by the Academic Review Committee. 

Dismissal 

It is the University's prerogative to dismiss a 
student for stated cause: 

1 . Failure to maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 
("C"). 

2. Failure to resolve academic probationary 
requirements as specified by the Academic 
Review Committee. 

3. The Campus Standards Committee may recom- 
mend suspension or expulsion for student con- 
duct considered unacceptable at the University. 

Students on academic probation who have failed 
to meet their GPA requirement by the end of the 
term but who are continued on academic proba- 
tion for a second consecutive semester may be 
dismissed at the conclusion of the second semes- 
ter if they have failed to meet the GPA specified by 
the Academic Review Committee. 

Such students will not be considered for 
readmission before the end of one full academic year. 

Readmission 

Written appeal for reinstatement as a degree 
candidate should be addressed to the Office of the 
Registrar by June 1 for the fall semester and 
November 1 for the spring semester. Appropriate 
departmental chairpersons/directors and the 
Finance Office must endorse the readmission prior 
to any registration process. 

Withdrawal from Course 

A student may withdraw from a class and receive 
a "W" through the seventh week of the semester. 
After that date, a withdrawal is possible only un- 
der unusual circumstances such as accident, seri- 
ous illness, or psychological stress. A "W" must 
be agreed upon by the faculty member teaching 
the class and the Dean of Students. A grade of 



"W" will not affect the student's GPA. 

Grades for courses in progress are assigned 
according to the academic grading policy. 

Special note: A student who withdraws from 
a course after the tuition refund period is not 
eligible for a refund. 

Withdrawal from The University 

A student may withdraw from The University of 
the Arts by initiating an official withdrawal with 
the Dean of Students. Clearance must be received 
from the appropriate College Dean, the Finance 
Office, the Library, and the major department 
chairperson or school director. Grades for courses 
in progress are assigned according to the aca- 
demic grading policy. 

Withdrawal is official when the student 
receives a written notification from the Registrar. 
A student who withdraws from the University with 
a semester or cumulative GPA of less than 2.0 
("C") will be recorded as "withdrawn not in good 
academic standing." 

Leave of Absence 

A leave is granted for one or two semesters at the 
discretion of the department chairperson or school 
director. A student who remains absent past the 
date of expected return must apply for readmis- 
sion to the University. A leave of absence may be 
requested through the Office of the Registrar. An 
extension of the leave may be increased for an 
additional one or two semesters. 

Change of Major 

Students may request a change of major through 
the Office of the Registrar. Students are advised to 
initiate the change of major petition prior to regis- 
tration for the upcoming semester. The petition 
requires the approval of the appropriate chairper- 
sons or directors of both the former and the new 
department or school. Deadlines are June 1 for 
the fall semester and November 1 for the spring 
semester. 

Change of major forms are available in the 
Office of the Registrar. After completion of a 
change of major, students are advised to review 
their degree program requirements with their 
academic advisor. 

Transfer Between Colleges 

A presently enrolled student who wishes to 
transfer into a program in another college of the 
University must apply through the Office of Admis- 
sions. All requirements for the college to which 
the student is applying must be satisfied and 
approval is granted by the Dean of the college. 
Deadlines for transfer between colleges are June 
1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the 
spring semester. The student will be required 
either to present a portfolio of artwork, or to audi- 
tion, as part of the transfer requirements. 



13 



Graduation — Conferral of Degrees and 
Diplomas 

Students expecting to complete requirements for 
a degree within the year (December, May or 
August) are required to file a graduation petition, 
signed by the appropriate department chair, in the 
Office of the Registrar at the November registra- 
tion for the Spring semester. The Office of the 
Registrar is responsible for certification of comple- 
tion of requirements for graduation. 

Degrees and diplomas are conferred once a 
year at the spring commencement exercises. 
For students who complete degree require- 
ments in other terms, the transcript will be 
posted "degree granted" and the date of the 
official last day of examinations. A cumulative 
GPA of 2.0 is required of all graduating 
students. Requirements for graduation must be 
approved by the Dean of the college. 

Access to Student Records 

In 1 974 the Congress of the United States enacted 
the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, 
Public Law 93-380, as amended, setting out 
requirements designed to protect the privacy of 
students. Specifically, the statute governs (1) ac- 
cess to records maintained by certain educational 
institutions and agencies, and (2) the release of 
such records. In brief, the statute provides that 
such institutions must provide students access to 
official records directly related to themselves and 
an opportunity for a hearing to challenge such 
records; that institutions must obtain the written 
consent of the student before releasing personally 
identifiable data from records to other than speci- 
fied exceptions; and that students must be notified 
of these rights. 

As such, all students of The University of the 
Arts have the following rights with regard to edu- 
cational records maintained by the University: 
A The right to review and make copies of educational 
records which are maintained by the University. 
These records generally include all records of a 
personally identifiable nature; however, they ex- 
clude the financial records of parents and confiden- 
tial letters and statements of recommendation 
received prior to June 1 , 1 975. 
B. Records which, while an individual has been a 
student at the University, have been created or 
maintained by a physician, psychiatrist, psy- 
chologist, or other recognized professional or 
paraprofessional, are not available for review; 
however, the student does have the right to 
select a physician or other appropriate profes- 
sional, at personal expense, to review these 
records on the student's behalf. 



C. University educational records are maintained 
by: 

1. Office of the Registrar 

2. Office of the Dean of Students 

3. Financial Aid Office 

4. Finance Office 

5. Office of Continuing Studies 

6. Some educational records may also be 
maintained by the Dean of Academic 
Affairs, academic major departments, 
the Learning Skills Center, and the 
AAP Office. 

D. The University may not generally release any 
information outside the University which is 
maintained in educational records without prior 
consent or waiver. However, the University 
does have the right to release the following 
directory-type information: 

1. Name 

2. Address 

3. Telephone listing 

4. Date and place of birth 

5. Major field of study 

6. Participation in officially recognized 
activities 

7. Dates of attendance 

8. Degrees and awards received 

9. The most recent previous educational 
institution attended by the student 

If a student does not wish any of this information 
made public, either in a directory of students or in 
any other manner, the student must inform the 
Office of the Registrar — no later than the end of 
the second week of classes each semester — of 
the information not to be released. 

E. The permanent record maintained by the 
University will consist of: 

1 . Directory information as noted above 

2. Application for admission 

3. Applicant's secondary school records 

4. Cumulative University of the Arts 
records of grades, credits, grade point 
average, and academic actions 

5. Correspondence (or copies thereof) 

re: admission, enrollment, registration, 
probation 

6. Student petitions 

7. Letters of reference/recommendation 
dated after January 1, 1975 

8. Disciplinary actions 

9. Departmental appraisals and evalua- 
tions of student progress 

F The permanent records of the University do not 
include: 

1. Parents' and students' confidential 
financial documents 

2. Counseling psychologists' files 

3. Health Office files 

4. Faculty and staff memoranda/files 
retained for personal/ professional use 

G. Requests to inspect and review records may be 
made by completing an Access Request — 
Educational Records, which is available in the 
Office of the Registrar and/or the Office of the 
Dean of Students between the hours of 10:00 
a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Copies of available records 
may be made for $.25 for each sheet at the 
time the student reviews the files. 



H. If a student believes any information in the file 
is inaccurate or misleading, that individual may 
request, in writing, the custodian of the record 
to amend, delete, or otherwise modify the 
objectionable material. If said request is 
denied, the student may request that a hearing 
be held to further pursue the request. At this 
hearing, the student may be represented by a 
person of his or her choice, if so desired. If after 
the hearing the request to amend is again 
denied by the University, the student has the 
right to place in the file a statement or other 
explanatory document, provided that such 
statements or documents relate solely to the 
disputed information. 

I. If a student believes that any of his or her rights 
hereunder have been violated by the University, 
he or she should make such facts known to the 
Dean of Students in writing. If the Dean of 
Students does not resolve the matter and the 
student still feels that his or her rights have 
been violated, he or she may so inform ttie 
Department of Education in writing. 

J. Release of information from permanent records 
to outside parties requires the student's explicit 
consent. Those exceptions which do not require 
the student's consent are: 

1 . Obligatory cooperation with police action 
and litigation of criminality 

2. Compilation of general enrollment data for 
reports required by U.S. Government and 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania authorities 

3. Participatory information-sharing with 
educational service associations such as the 
College Scholarship Service, the American 
Council on Education, and the Union of 
Independent Colleges of Art 

4. Information about an individual student in 
the event of a personal emergency which is 
judged to threaten the health/safety of that 
student 

5. Compliance with judicial orders and 
subpoenas 

6. Response to inquiries by parents of depen- 
dent students (see section K) 

7. Reference by appropriate University of the 
Arts' faculty and professional staff 

Any release of information as outlined 
above which identifies an individual student 
and requires that student's consent will be 
logged in his or her permanent record. 
K. As provided by the act, the Office of the Dean 
of Students will respond to valid requests by 
parents of dependent students for grades and 
related cumulative information. Although the 
student's consent is not required, he or she will 
be informed that such a request has been 
made. 

A dependent student is defined as one who is 
declared a dependent by his or her parents for 
income-tax purposes. The University, however, will 
continue to mail semester grade reports and 
actual transcripts of records directly to the student 
at his or her permanent address. 



14 



Student Services 

John Klinzing 

Dean of Students 
1st Floor, 1500 Pine 
215-875-2229 

The Student Services Division consists of a group 
of concerned professionals committed to assisting 
students of the University in reaching their goals. 
The staff offers students an opportunity to develop 
the interpersonal, leadership, organizational, and 
communications skills that will serve the students 
on a personal and professional level in the future. 
The office of the Dean of Students administers 
and coordinates student services and represents 
student concerns to campus groups, faculty, staff, 
and administration. 

Student Governance 

Students have the opportunity to participate in 
government on a collegial or departmental level. 
Students interested in collegial governance should 
contact the Student Congress, Mezzanine, 333 
South Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102. 

Student Resource Center 

The Student Resource Center provides a wide 
variety of support programs to aid in the develop- 
ment of the student in his or her collegiate as well 
as professional career. They include: 

Career Planning and Placement 

The University recognizes the student's increasing 
concern for career planning and employment 
following graduation, as well as the need for tem- 
porary and part-time employment while enrolled. 
As one of its vital services, the Center provides 
career counseling, internship experience, career 
and arts resources, and professional survival skills 
information to students throughout their college 
careers. Career workshops focus on developing 
practical job-hunting skills and addressing 
personal growth and development issues involving 
setting long- and short-term goals. These career 
and job development services supplement the 
students' classroom and studio instruction. 

The career office is located on the Mezzanine of 
Anderson Hall. The counselor may be reached at 
215-875-1069. 

Personal Counseling 

Frequently, students have concerns about their 
emotional and social adjustment to college life. 
Their concerns range the spectrum of personal 
issues: relationships, identity, career goals, 
achievement, and roommates. To assist students 
in dealing with these needs, free psychological 
counseling is available on an individual basis as 
well as from peer support groups. 

Students in need of psychiatric and long-term 
psychological counseling may consult one of the 
staff counseling psychologists for assistance and 
advice on contacting resources in the Philadelphia 
community. 

Monthly workshops are also conducted to help 
students effectively deal with these personal, 
emotional, and social aspects of their college 
adjustment. 



Academic Services 

The academic support services offered by the 
Student Resource Center are available to all 
students as a supplement to their classroom in- 
structions. The Center helps students develop 
skills in reading, writing, and other academic 
areas, including successful classroom strategy and 
improving study habits. 

Professional and peer tutoring are available for 
general skills and for specific subjects or courses. 
Computer-assisted academic instruction is also 
available. Throughout each semester, workshops 
are given that are designed to address students' 
academic concerns and needs. Professional coun- 
seling is provided to enhance students' academic 
and personal strategies and skills. Further, specific 
support services are available to learning-disabled 
students to assist them in meeting academic 
requirements. 

The Center provides to any student a variety of 
resources, such as tape-recording equipment, 
typewriters, a reference library, and a computer 
center. Although they may be referred to the 
Center by their Studio or Humanities instructors, 
students are also welcome to avail themselves 
freely of these resources and support services. 

Academic Achievement Program 

The Academic Achievement Program is part of the 
Higher Education Opportunity Act of the State of 
Pennsylvania. At The University of the Arts, the 
purpose of the program is to provide develop- 
mental maintenance and transition services to 
students who need preparation in arts and 
academics. Many students who are eligible for the 
program are not aware of that fact. Students are 
selected to participate in the program because of 
demonstrated financial need and must be resi- 
dents of the State of Pennsylvania. The residency 
requirement is important because the program is 
state funded. Because of life circumstances, some 
students who are a part of the program have not 
done as well academically in high school as they 
would have liked. With the extra support of the 
SRC, these students in particular become a highly 
motivated, cohesive group whose determination to 
succeed is reflected in the high percentage of 
students who make Dean's List. 

For more information, contact the Academic 
Achievement Program at 215-875-2229. 

Services for the Disabled 

The staff of the Student Resource Center works to 
ensure that all students with learning or physical 
disabilities have equal opportunity to participate 
fully at the University. Special support services are 
available, as well as academic and psychological 
counseling for these students. The staff assists 
individual students in joint efforts to meet their 
needs and to act as a liaison between the stu- 
dents and their instructors. Information related to 
a student's disability is used to provide requested 
services and is otherwise communicated only with 
the permission of the student. 



International Student Services 

In an effort to meet the special needs of the inter- 
national student, the Student Services Division 
has developed a network of University personnel 
and offices to provide specialized services to 
students from abroad. These services are provided 
through Admissions, the Learning Resource Cen- 
ter, the Counseling and Career Center, the Office 
of Campus Life, and the Dean of Students. 

The Student Services Division has designated 
one member of the professional staff as Interna- 
tional Student Advisor. In addition to serving as 
liaison for students from abroad, the International 
Student Advisor will assist the student in securing 
necessary services provided through the support 
areas of the University. Special programs designed 
to help international students include: ESL tutorial 
assistance, Immigration Service advisement, and 
the International Student Association. 

Students interested in participating in the 
Residential Life program will deal directly with the 
Office of Campus Life as do all other entering 
students. While there is not a distinct residential 
program for students from abroad, special efforts 
are made by the Office of Campus Life to consider 
the needs of the international student. 

Likewise, the University Health Service, while 
meeting the needs of all enrolled students, does 
consider the support needs of international 
students. All international students should take 
special note of the University's requirement that 
they maintain or secure appropriate medical insur- 
ance coverage, either through their family or 
through the medical insurance plan offered 
through the University. 

When in need of assistance, students are 
advised to contact either the International Student 
Advisor in the Student Resource Center at 
21 5-875-2266 or the Office of the Dean of Student 
Services at 21 5- 875-2229. 

Health Services 

The University maintains a health office, open 
weekdays throughout the academic year and for 
six weeks in the summer. First aid is rendered, 
minor illnesses are treated, and appropriate refer- 
ral to other health professionals is made. Health 
counseling emphasizes disease prevention, health 
maintenance, stress control, and wellness activi- 
ties. 

Additional medical needs and attention by a 
physician are provided by the Jefferson Hospital 
Family Medicine Associates. This service provides 
a complete range of physicians services to all 
students enrolled on a full-time basis. 

Students are encouraged to see the University 
nurse to help evaluate illnesses and to discuss 
other health problems. She will aid in the contact 
of the on-call doctor if medical intervention is 
needed. The Jefferson Family Medicine Depart- 
ment is located on the fifth floor in Thomas 
Jefferson University Hospital at 1 1 10 Walnut 
Street, a short distance from the University. 



15 



Because of the high cost of medical care and 
because many of our students no longer are cov- 
ered by their parents' hospitalization plans, the 
University in conjunction with Blue Cross of 
Greater Philadelphia and Pennsylvania Blue Shield 
offers an optional plan to all of our students. This 
plan includes hospitalization, medical, surgical, 
and major medical health benefits. Students and 
their families are strongly encouraged to provide 
for medical emergency needs through either this 
program or an alternate insurance program 
through the student's family or family member's 
employer. It is highly recommended that some 
form of coverage be provided for the student while 
enrolled at the University. 

Residential Life 

The University of the Arts has made a strong 
commitment to providing a living/learning environ- 
ment. Furness Hall is a historic remodeled build- 
ing which houses students. The residence features 
three-person apartments with separate kitchen 
and bathroom facilities. The facility is located 
within the historic block of the University and is 
within a one-block walk of all University facilities. 
1500 Pine is a 10-story building acquired by the 
University in 1989. Its furnished apartments 
include a kitchen and bath. Two to five students 
are housed in studio, one- and two-bedroom 
apartments. Laundry facilities are located within 
the building. 

The University also provides housing facilities 
through privately owned apartments. All students 
residing in these facilities, through the University, 
are entitled to all services provided by the Office 
of Residential Life. 

All living environments are supervised by 
specially selected resident advisors. Advisors are 
upperclass students, trained in peer counseling 
and crisis intervention, who assist students in 
their adjustment to college as well as to life in the 
city. The entire residence program is supervised by 
the director of Residential Life. 

Students will receive a housing brochure outlin- 
ing all facilities and accommodations after they 
are admitted to the University. 

Freshmen from outside the Philadelphia area 
are guaranteed housing if the office receives 
their contracts by June 1 . Noncommuting fresh- 
men are required to live in University residence 
during their first year. 



The office also assists students in finding off- 
campus accommodations through its off-campus 
housing services. Early inquiries regarding this 
service are strongly recommended. 

Student Activities 

The University annually sponsors a variety of pro- 
grams and activities to complement the academic 
program. A sampling of the planned programs 
includes the Friday Night Film Series, dances and 
social activities, gallery and museum trips, and 
sports and physical fitness programs at the "Y." 
In addition, all students are invited to attend the 
Philadelphia College of Performing Arts' recitals 
and the Philadelphia College of Art and Design's 
exhibitions, free of charge. 

All extracurricular and social activities are coor- 
dinated through the Student Congress and the 
Office of Campus Life. Students have a major role 
in determining and implementing the nature of the 
student life program at The University of the Arts. 

Meals 

Student residences feature separate kitchens 
within each room. Students prepare their own 
meals according to individual schedule and dietary 
preference. In addition, the University maintains a 
cafe that serves breakfast and lunch and an 
optional meal plan. Food-vending machines are 
accessible at all times. 

Automobiles 

Because parking in Philadelphia can become very 
costly, the University discourages students from 
bringing automobiles. 

Campus Security 

The University has assigned security personnel to 
all its buildings to provide 24-hour protection. The 
University maintains a strict ID policy to ensure 
the safety of students, faculty, and staff. A limited 
escort service is provided for students living on 
or around the University's campus. The general 
campus area is patrolled on a regular basis. 

Campus Security also provides programs to 
develop student awareness of safety and security 
concerns in an effort to isolate exposure to loss. 
The campus Security Department administers the 
University safety program to ensure the safety of 
all students, faculty, and staff. 



In the event of a family emergency and you 
wish to contact your son or daughter at the Univer- 
sity, call (21 5) 875-1 01 at any time of the day. 
Security personnel will take the necessary infor- 
mation, contact the appropriate offices to locate 
the student and deliver the message. 

Student Social Regulations 

The University's regulations governing nonaca- 
demic student conduct are intended to maintain a 
viable and orderly institutional society, safeguard 
the particular values and common welfare of its 
student body, and promote the best possible envi- 
ronment for professional study. Membership in 
the University community is regarded as a privi- 
lege, and the student is expected to exercise self- 
discipline and good judgment. By official registra- 
tion, the student acknowledges the University's 
authority to define and enforce standards of ac- 
ceptable conduct. Adjudication of alleged student 
misconduct is the responsibility of the Office of 
the Dean of Student Services. A committee on 
campus standards, representing the student body, 
faculty, and administration, serves in an advisory 
capacity to the Dean. A complete reference to all 
rules and procedures is contained in the current 
code for student rights, responsibilities, and 
conduct. 

University policy provides that a student may 
be required to withdraw from the University for 
psychological/health reasons. A student who is 
withdrawn under this policy is one whose behav- 
ior is assessed as sufficiently disturbed to necessi- 
tate his or her leaving the University community. 
A detailed copy of the University policy regarding 
emergency withdrawals may be obtained from the 
Office of the Dean of Student Services or the 
Student Resource Center. 



School Closings 

In the event of inclement weather, students should 
listen to the radio stations that announce official 
school closings. The University code number is 1 16. 



16 



Continuing Education 
Programs 

The University of the Arts' Continuing Education 
programs offer professional instruction within a 
curriculum designed specifically for students who 
work during the day or cannot study full time. 
Classes run in both the evenings and on Saturdays 
during the academic year. In addition, there are 
summer programs for both precollege and post- 
college populations and a provision for part-time 
study in the day program. 

The New Studies Center of the Philadelphia 
College of the Performing Arts of The University of 
the Arts serves the educational and cultural needs 
of adult learners. Offering a full program of credit 
and noncredit courses in the arts, humanities, 
education, and personal enrichment, the New 
Studies Center extends a special atmosphere and 
flexibility uniquely suited to the needs of mature, 
active adults wanting to take courses for 
nonmatriculated credit or self-enrichment. In 1986, 
a Teachers' Institute was formed, offering semi- 
nars and workshops geared to education in the 
classroom. Most classes meet on weekday eve- 
nings, but there are also weekend courses and a 
unique Travel/Study program designed to provide 
highly selected educational travel seminars. 

Catalogs are available for all programs offered. 
Please refer to them for specific listings and regis- 
tration procedures. For additional information, 
please contact to: 

Continuing Education — 215-875-3350 

New Studies Center— 215-875-3380 

Dance Extension: School of Dance — 
215-875-2270 



Alumni 

The value and the strength of an academic and 
professional institution are often interpreted and 
measured by the accomplishments of the men and 
women it graduates. The alumni of The University 
of the Arts are among the most accomplished and 
skilled visual and performing practicing artists and 
include pianist Andre Watts, photographer Irving 
Penn, dancer Judith Jamison, metals artist 
Samuel Yellin, jazz artist Stanley Clarke, and 
painter Sidney Goodman. 

The work of Philadelphia College of Art and 
Design painters, sculptors, illustrators, and crafts- 
men are represented in numerous collections 
worldwide, and have travelled in national and 
international exhibitions; the creations of its film- 
makers and photographers have been honored in 
international festivals; and the products and publi- 
cations of its designers have become nationally 
familiar. The Philadelphia College of Performing 
Arts has produced an outstanding spectrum of 
musicians, including many of the founders and 
members of the illustrious Philadelphia Orchestra. 

The alumni of the University reside in 46 states and 
1 5 foreign countries. The Alumni Association of The 
University of the Arts' purpose is to maintain an ongo- 
ing and reciprocal relationship between the alumni 
and the University through various support programs, 
services, special events, and publications; to assist in 
the development of plans; to participate in the im- 
provement and support of the University; to promote 
the general welfare and best interests of The Univer- 
sity of tfie Arts. 



17 



I UNIVERSITY 
OF THE ARTS 



PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE 
OF ART AND DESIGN 



C r 



Philadelphia College of Art 
and Design 

Stephen Tarantal, Dean 
Carol Moore, Assistant Dean 

Accreditation 

The Philadelphia College of Art and Design of The 
University of the Arts is accredited by the Middle 
States Association of Colleges and Schools, the Na- 
tional Association ofSchoolsofArtand Design, the 
Industrial Designer's Society of America, and has 
approval of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for 
granting of degrees in the visual arts. 



Programs of Study 

The Philadelphia College of Art and Design is a 
comprehensive college of the visual arts, offering 
a full range of study in art and design. The college 
maintains demanding standards and encourages 
students to develop innovative approaches to 
their work. The college offers coursework toward 
a BFA degree in Painting and Drawing, Print- 
making, Photography, Rim, Animation, Sculpture. 
Graphic Design, Illustration, and Crafts with con- 
centrations in: ceramics, fibers, metals, and wood; 
BS degrees in Architectural Studies and Industrial 
Design; an MA degree in Art Education; an MAT 
(Master of Art in Teaching) in Visual Arts; MFA's 
in Book Arts/Printmaking and Museum Exhibition 
Planning and Design; an M. Arch, in Architecture; 
a special concentration in Art Therapy, and a certi- 
fication program in Art Education. 

All freshman students enter the Foundation 
Department which is an 18 credit core program of 
two-dimensional, three-dimensional and drawing 
courses. The Foundation program introduces the 
basic language and processes of the visual arts 
and prepares the students for entry into a major 
department Through elective course offerings and 
the Foundation Forum (a lecture series presented 
by practicing professionals in the Design, Crafts 
and Fine Arts fields), students are introduced to 
career options and opportunities offered at the 
College of Art and Design. 



Sophomore Year 

Students choose a major in the sophomore year 

from one of nine departments: 

Crafts: Ceramics, Fibers, Metals, and Wood 

Graphic Design 

Illustration 

Industrial Design 

Painting and Drawing 

Photography/Film/Animation 

Printmaking 

Sculpture 

Fine Arts Option 

Junior and Senior Years 

Students concentrate increasingly in their major 
during the last two years of study. Many depart- 
ments offer opportunities to study off-campus 
during this period. Frequent field trips to muse- 
ums, galleries, artist's studios, and design studios 
in Philadelphia, New York, and Washington, D.C. 
supplement the work in studios and workshops. 
The major studio concentration is augmented 
by required and elective courses in other depart- 
ments at the College of Art and Design and Col- 
lege of Performing Arts to encourage an aware- 
ness of the productive interaction that can occur 
between the many disciplines available at the 
University. Alternative career opportunities are 
often developed by students stimulated by 
courses outside their major. 

Class Size and Structure 

Each department is unique, with its own curricu- 
lum and structure, but in every department 
classes are small and informal. Faculty advisors 
and the generous student/faculty ratio assure 
close individual attention and assistance through- 
out a course of study. 

One of the important teaching modes in the 
college is the critique, or "crit," an evaluation of 
student work by the instructor with participation 
by the class. Given informally to the class or indi- 
vidual as often as once a week, crits have proven 
to be an invaluable method for the development 
of critical thinking and self-awareness, which are 
major goals in the educational program. 



21 



Admissions Requirements 

The admissions staff encourages the prospective 
student to send in an application at your earliest 
convenience. The applicant will be notified of a 
decision as soon as all credentials are complete 
and the faculty have reviewed the submitted 
portfolio. Decisions are made on a rolling basis. 
After receiving the admission letter, a tuition 
deposit ($200) is required within three weeks in 
order to hold a place in the class. This deposit is 
not refundable. 

The Financial Aid Office strongly recommends 
filing a financial aid form as soon as possible after 
January 1 to ensure full consideration of all sup- 
port options are reviewed. 

The Philadelphia College of Art and Design gives 
equal consideration to all applicants for admission and 
financial aid regardless of race, color, sex, religion, 
national or ethnic origins, or handicaps. 

Freshman Admission 
Requirements 

An applicant to the freshman class must graduate 
from an accredited high school and have taken an 
appropriate distribution of high school subjects 
including four (4) years of English. A minimum of 
two (2) years of art and design are recommended. 
Those applicants who do not hold a regular high 
school diploma may qualify for admission in the 
following ways: 

1. GED (General Education Diploma) tests through 
the Department of Public Instruction. 

2. CLEP (College Level Examination Program) ad- 
ministered monthly through the testing centers 
of most major universities. 

Freshman applicants should submit the following: 

1. Official High School transcript 

2. Portfolio 

3. CEEB Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the 
American College Test (ACT) 

4. One letter of recommendation 

5. Statement of Purpose (one type-written page) 
Optional — A personal interview and addi- 
tional support materials may be submitted to 
assist your application. 

Portfolio Content 

At the Philadelphia College of Art & Design, one of our 
major interests is your portfolio; your portfolio should 
describe you as a visual person. We do not list specific 
requirements nor assign problems to be solved. The 
portfolio should reflect your visual experiences to date; 
projects completed for Saturday, summer or outside 
classes, as well as your classroom projects and work 
done without supervision. Your admissions portfolio 
should consist of 10 to 20 pieces of original work 
completed within the past year. The best way to put 
together a portfolio is to select from a representative 
group of your collected work those pieces which dem- 
onstrate your strengths, depth in areas of particular 
interest and the range of your visual abilities and expo- 
sure. The selection of pieces in your portfolio tells us a 
great deal about you, so choose thoughtfully and care- 
fully — and make the selection yourself. 



Preparing Your Portfolio 

The Admissions Committee reviews your work 
relative to the type of art program from which you 
have come. We expect to see different levels of 
work from applicants. If you have been enrolled in 
a school with a well developed art program, your 
portfolio will certainly be different than if your 
school curriculum did not focus on the visual arts. 
Similarly, a student who has had extensive experi- 
ence with photography and film may not have 
developed the same level of manual skills as a 
student who has concentrated on drawing and 
design. Although there are no "right" or "wrong" 
pieces to include in your portfolio, there are cer- 
tain elements in which we are interested. 

Portfolio Pieces 

Drawings 

Drawing is a skill fundamental to all visual artists. 
It provides an important means to analyze and 
record your environment and ideas. The ability to 
draw should be reflected throughout your portfo- 
lio. Drawings from observation are preferable to 
those that are merely copies of photographs or 
other artists' work. You can present landscapes, 
self-portraits, figure drawings, mechanical draw- 
ing or drafting projects, still life or objects from 
your surroundings. 

Work in Color 

Your use of color is another important factor. The 
variety of media demonstrates the breadth of your 
experimentation with materials such as water- 
color, pastel, paint, collage or mixed media. 

Design Work 

Some of your portfolio pieces should demonstrate your 
understanding of 2-Dimensional design. The use of 
letterforms, composition of a photograph, arrange- 
ment of shapes and patterns in the picture plane are 
all part of 2-D design. 3-D work such as sculpture, 
ceramics, jewelry, weavings or architectural models 
are a welcome addition in your portfolio. 

Sketchbooks 

Although not required, a sketchbook can be an 
important part of the portfolio presentation. The 
development of an idea can often be as important 
as the finished product. A comprehensive sketch- 
book shows us that you work to develop your 
ideas and skills between class assignments. 

Optional Presentations 

You may wish to include projects you have under- 
taken in computer graphics, video, original writ- 
ings, performance pieces in music dance or drama 
or a supplemental portfolio of work in one concen- 
trated area such as crafts, design or photography. 



Presenting Your Portfolio 

Selecting the work to include in your portfolio is 
the first step. Equally important is your presenta- 
tion. Although your presentation does not need to 
be elaborate, it should demonstrate the respect 
you have for your work. If you present your portfo- 
lio in person, part of your presentation will be your 
ability to talk about your work. What a particular 
project involved, why you made the design deci- 
sions you did, what you learned from the experi- 
ence and how you feel about the finished piece 
are all important to us. 

Although we do not require that you mount or 
mat your work, it is important that your portfolio 
be presented neatly. If your portfolio pieces are in 
a specific order (i.e., grouped by medium, size or 
subject matter) both you and your interviewer may 
have an easier time seeing your portfolio as a 
coherent body of work. 

Keep in mind that work done in charcoal, chalk 
or pastels should be sprayed with a fixative and 
covered with a clean sheet of paper to protect the 
work. Because you may have work too large to 
bring to the interview we encourage your supple- 
menting your original work with photographs or 
35mm color slides. When documenting 3-D pieces, 
it is helpful to show them from several angles. 

Slides 

If you are unable to come to The University for a 
personal interview you should submit your portfo- 
lio in the form of 35mm color slides. For best re- 
sults, use a 35mm single reflex camera. Since 
taking slides can be difficult, you may want to 
shoot several rolls of film and experiment with 
various camera settings. 

You can photograph your work out-of-doors 
using natural light, or inside using special photo- 
graphic flood lights. The piece of artwork should 
completely fill the camera frame. It is distracting 
to see extraneous background objects therefore 
we recommend using a simple backdrop when 
photographing 3-D pieces, i.e. a white wall is 
usually a good solution. 

Your slides must be clearly labeled. Print your 
name and social security number on each slide 
and place a dot in the lower left hand comer. This 
facilitates placement in the slide projector. Al- 
ways number each slide and include a separate 
list of descriptions. You should indicate the size 
and media of the work and briefly explain the 
concept, project or problem involved. When more 
than one picture is used to illustrate a piece ( i.e. 
sculpture, ceramics, three-dimensional design) the 
slides should be labeled in sequence (2a, 2b, 2c, 
etc.). Slides should be presented in an 8 1/2" x 1 1" 
slide file page. 

If you wish to have your slides returned to you 
at the completion of the application process, en- 
close a self-addressed, pre-stamped envelope 
with your application. 



22 



Options or Additions to the Portfolio 

If you are applying as a freshman in the Founda- 
tion Department, you may choose to supplement 
or replace the portfolio with The University of the 
Arts PREP program. This is a six week summer 
program offered by the Philadelphia College of Art 
and Design focusing on core studies in 2-D and 3- 
D Design, Drawing and studio electives. Any appli- 
cant who wishes to substitute PREP for the fresh- 
man portfolio requirement must give written no- 
tice to the Admissions Office. 

The Interview 

As an applicant, you are invited and encour- 
aged to visit The University and have an inter- 
view with one of the Admissions staff or fac- 
ulty. If you select an interview with portfolio, 
you will be expected to present your work dur- 
ing the scheduled meeting. The University has 
not established a format or schedule of ques- 
tions for the interview. Each student applying 
to The University is evaluated on an individual 
basis. You should be prepared to discuss your 
academic record, personal achievements, extra- 
curricular activities, and your portfolio. The 
interview will also provide you with the oppor- 
tunity to ask questions of us. Do feel free to 
note questions that you may have about the 
application process, financial aid, courses, 
instructors, programs of study or student life 
and bring these with you to your interview. We 
want to assist you in making the right college 
choice and we will be happy to answer your 
questions during your interview. 

Transfers 

A transfer student may be admitted at one of the 
three following levels: 

Advanced Standing 

Students who have accumulated at least 18-21 
studio credits may be considered for admission 
into a departmental major. Applicants must indi- 
cate the studio department they wish to attend. A, 
student's portfolio will be reviewed by the in- 
tended department and a subsequent evaluation 
will be made regarding admission status, semes- 
ter level, and required curriculum. Final admissions 
decisions will be made by the Admissions Office 
based on the departmental recommendation. If an 
applicant is not admitted into a studio major, he or 
she may request to be reconsidered for another 
department or Transfer Freshman status. 



Three-Year Transfer 

Students who do not have sufficient studio credits 
to apply for advanced standing but have a clear 
understanding of their goals in visual arts may be 
considered for the Three- Year Transfer Program. 
Typically these candidates have at least 24 credits 
in Humanities and college-level studio experience. 
Under this program, students take the Foundation 
year and sophomore Studios at the same time. It 
is a demanding program and requires a very ma- 
ture student. If approved by both Foundation and 
major department chairpersons, the transfer stu- 
dent may attain junior status at the start of his or 
her second year. 

Transfer Freshman 

Students who have not completed at least 18-21 
studio credits are usually considered for entrance 
into the Foundation Program. College-level elec- 
tive credits may be received for Humanities and 
Studio courses depending on the content of those 
courses under review. The evaluation and determi- 
nation of transfer studio credit and distribution 
towards the bachelor's degree for transfer fresh- 
men is deferred until the student enters his or her 
sophomore year. The evaluation is then conducted 
by the chairperson of the student's studio major 
department. All other requirements for transfer 
freshmen are the same as for freshman admission. 

Transfer Application Requirements 

1. Portfolio (slides preferred). 

2. Transcripts of all previous college experience 
and a listing of courses that will be completed 
before entrance into The University of the Arts. 

3. Catalog or other publication describing 
coursework recorded and credit assignment for 
studio work. 

4. Official High School transcript. 

5. CEEB Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the 
American College Test (ACT) or the Test of En- 
glish as a Foreign Language (TOEFL — 
required of all international students). 

6. Present a written statement of purpose 
outlining your future art education objectives 
(minimum: one type-written page). 

7. If you are an advanced-standing and three-year 
transfer applicant, you must indicate the one 
department in which you wish consideration. 

8. Letter of recommendation. 

Transfer Portfolio 

1 . Applicants without extensive studio experience 
should follow instructions for freshman port- 
folio. 

2. Advanced-standing applicants should present a 
portfolio demonstrating basic abilities — 
drawing, two-dimensional and three- 
dimensional design — as well as competence 
and preparation in the area of intended major. 



3. Applicants to the Graphic Design Department 
must submit a slide portfolio. Slides or a port- 
folio of original work may be submitted in all 
other departments. Original work will be re- 
viewed as part of the transfer interview. 

4. For mailing the portfolio, follow the instructions 
above. 

Transfer Interviews 

The chairperson of the department to which you 
are applying encourages you to have an 
appointment by April 1 . In most departments, 
interviews are scheduled when all your 
credentials are on file. 

Conditional Admission for Freshmen 

Offers of admission may specify one or more of the 
following conditions: 

1 . Successful completion of the University's Sum- 
mer Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program (PREP). 
PREP is a non-credit program but grades will be 
given to measure performance and determine 
admission. A 2.0 grade point average (GPA) - 
determines successful completion. This condi- 
tion is made when the portfolio review indi- 
cates that additional studio preparation is nec- 
essary to ensure a student's success in the 
Foundation curriculum. The Pre-Freshman En- 
richment Program includes studies in drawing, 
two-dimensional design, and three-dimensional 
design, as well as several elective courses. 
Classes are scheduled for a six-week session, 
thirty hours of instruction per week. Portfolio 
review after completion may be required. For 
more information on PREP, please contact the 
Admissions Office at 21 5-875-4808. 

2. Successful completion of the University's 
Academic Achievement Program in addition to 
PREP Program. This requirement is made when 
the Admissions Committee determines that 
additional scholastic training as well as studio 
preparation is necessary. The program involves 
workshops in reading and writing skills and 
studio coursework. This workshop has been 
funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania's 
Higher Education Equal Opportunity Act. 

3. Academic Probation. Requires achievement of a 
"C" (2.0) grade point average at the end of the 
freshman year in order to be promoted to the 
second-year level. 

Special Student Status 

Undergraduate enrollment in the day college is 
available for non-matriculated students on a 
space-available basis for credit or audit 
registration in the day college. Students wishing 
to apply for non-degree granting (Special Student) 
status in the day college should submit an 
application to the Continuing Education Office at 
215-875-3350. 



23 



Graduate Admission 

Requirements for all graduate applications: 

1 . Completed graduate application form. 

2. Non-refundable application fee of $30.00 by 
check or money order. University of the Arts 
graduates are exempt from fee. 

3. Official transcripts from each undergraduate or 
graduate school attended. Transcripts should be 
sent to the above address directly by the 
college(s) or school(s) involved. 

4. Three letters of recommendation, one from 
each of the three people listed on the applica- 
tion. Two of these recommendations must 
come from professors in your field or profes- 
sionals in this major area who are familiar with 
your capabilities and credentials. 

5. A one- to two-page statement of professional 
plans and goals. 

6. Proof of High School Graduation. 

Additional requirements for graduate applicants 
to the Philadelphia College of Art and Design — 
" Portfolio 

7. Graduate Record Exams (not required, but rec- 
ommended). 

A portfolio of twenty (20) 35mm color slides 
presented in a one page slide sheet is required. 
Slides should represent the recent direction of the 
work as well as the full range of experience in the 
area to which application is being made. All slides 
must be clearly labeled and identified. Include an 
inventory list of the slides indicating the slide 
number, title or description of the work, size, me- 
dium, and date of completion. Original work 
should not be mailed to the Admissions Office. An 
applicant wishing to have his/her slides returned 
must enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope. 

Applicants to the Master of Architecture Pro- 
gram may present a portfolio not exceeding 11" x 
14°, with a 2" x 9" x 12" format preferred. 



A personal interview is strongly recommended 
with the director of the program to which you are 
applying. To schedule an appointment you should 
contact: 

MFA in Book Arts/Printmaking 
(215)875-1066 

MFA in Museum Exhibition Planning and Design 
(215)875-1110 
Master of Architecture 
(215)8754881 

MAT in Visual Arts 

(215)875-4881 

MA in Art Education 

(215)875-4881 

All supporting documents for the application 

should be submitted to the Admissions Office prior 

to the interview. 

Applicants to the Master of Fine Arts in Museum 
Exhibition Planning and Design Program may substi- 
tute an alternative presentation for the slide portfolio. 
This presentation may include, but is not limited to, 
materials that demonstrate professional skills or expe- 
rience in exhibition installation, research, design, archi- 
tecture, theater, and fine arts, and may include original 
work, written or published documents, slides, photo- 
graphs, and videotapes. The applicant will be respon- 
sible for arrangements for the return of any portfolio/ 
presentation materials submitted. If there are any 
questions, please contact the director of the program. 

Transfer of Credits 

Students transferring from other graduate 
programs, or those having completed acceptable 
post-baccalaureate study elsewhere, may be 
allowed to transfer up to 6 credits toward their 
Master's program. The acceptance of these 
credits is based on faculty evaluation and review 
and approval of the department chairperson. 



Scholarships 

Jacob and Gertrude Arronson and 
Trustee Scholarship Competitions 

Each year the Philadelphia College of Art and 
Design will award the Jacob and Gertrude 
Arronson Scholarship to a number of entering 
Foundation-year freshmen. Each scholarship is 
one-half tuition for the four years the student is 
enrolled. In addition, up to four entering Founda- 
tion-year freshmen may be awarded Trustee 
Scholarships, equal to up to one-half tuition for 
the four years the student is enrolled. Arronson 
and Trustee Scholarship winners will be selected 
on the basis of outstanding artistic and academic 
performance and for their promise as future fine 
artists, designers, or craftsmen. Recipients must 
maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade point average for 
scholarship renewal. 

Application Requirements 

The competition for Arronson and Trustee 
Scholarships is open to all high school seniors 
who have shown a commitment to the visual arts 
and a strong academic record. Students applying 
for the competition should have outstanding port- 
folios and rank in the top 25% of their class. 

Application Procedure 

To enter the Arronson and Trustee Scholarship 
Competition, students must make formal applica- 
tion to the Scholarship Committee by March 1. 
The following credentials are required: 

1. Application for admission. 

2. Official high school transcripts. 

3. Letter of recommendation from an art teacher 
or a professional in the arts. 

4. A typewritten essay on your goals as a visual 
artist (minimum: one page). 

5. A portfolio of twelve pieces; 35mm slides are 
required. (Follow freshman portfolio 
requirements in catalog.) 

The Selection Process 

Applicants who are awarded an Arronson or 
Trustee Scholarship will be notified in April. 

Endowed Scholarships 

Numerous endowed scholarships are awarded to 
students on the basis of financial need or on the 
basis of merit. Students who apply for financial 
aid will automatically be considered for endowed 
scholarships. Consult the Financial Aid section of 
the catalog for further details on the financial aid 
application process. 



24 



Special Facilities 



Studios and Galleries 

Anderson Hall, at 333 South Broad Street, is a 
nine-story visual arts facility which houses a dra- 
matic gallery, natural light through large windows 
and skylights, studios, classrooms, and a library 
designed with a feeling of openness. Combined 
with Haviland Hall across the street, the University 
offers modern studios, shops, equipment, galler- 
ies, and libraries to support the making of art.. 

The variety of studios and equipment is 
extensive, ranging from woodworking and metal 
shops, printmaking and computerized typesetting 
shops, to fine arts, crafts, and design studios and 
photo labs. Three large kilns enhance ceramic- 
making capabilities and a forge has been built for 
sculpture. A large weaving shop is complete with 
dozens of looms and a dyeing room. A nineteenth- 
century carriage house was turned into a skylit 
figure-modeling studio for sculpture students. 

The Exhibition Program at The University of the 
Arts showcases major contemporary exhibitions 
that relate to the University's diverse instruction. 
In recent years, The University of the Arts has 
presented exhibitions that feature professional 
developments and issues pertaining to the follow- 
ing areas: Architecture, Crafts, Graphic Design, 
Industrial Design, Papermaking, Painting and 
Drawing, Photography, Sculpture, and Book Arts. 

The University's galleries play a unique role in the 
educational process of the colleges and the Philadel- 
phia community. As a teaching tool, the galleries func- 
tion to enhance the programs within the college cur- 
riculum and enrich the city's cultural life by presenting 
innovative and provocative exhibitions in contempo- 
rary art The galleries are highly accessible, within the 
center of Philadelphia's artistic community, the exhibi- 
tions are open to the public free of charge and all 
events are publicized to reach beyond the college 
community. 

Over the years, the Rosewald-Wolf Gallery, the 
university's primary exhibition space, has pre: 
sented high quality exhibitions having attracted 
national and international artists to the campus. 
To further the Exhibitions Program dedication to ' 
education, major exhibitions are accompanied by 
catalogs, symposia, and lectures. Complementing 
the Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery, The University of the 
Arts provides additional exhibition space in 
Haviland Hall Galleries, the Great Hall Gallery, and 
the recently created Window on Broad. These 
auxiliary galleries furnish exhibition opportunities 
for the faculty, alumni, and students of the univer- 
sity as well as local artists. 

Many smaller galleries are available, as well as 
departmental exhibition spaces. Nearly every 
academic department launches its own series of 
shows featuring the work of students, faculty, and 
outside artists. Students gain experience in 
hanging shows, and there are student-run 
invitationals and juried exhibitions. Highlights of 
the year are the Annual Student Show, which is a 
featured Commencement event, the Annual 
Student Scholarship Exhibition, and senior student 
exhibits. 

Taken together, the facilities at the University 
provide a superior environment. 



Borowsky Center for 
Publication Arts 

The Borowsky Center for Publication Arts is both a 
unique educational arm of the University and a 
printing facility that provides students, staff, fac- 
ulty and visiting artists from all departments, the 
resource to explore the creative potential inherent 
in the offset lithographic printing medium. The 
Center enables qualified users the ability to expe- 
rience the complete graphic arts process from 
initial conceptualization through production, while 
maintaining the highest printing standards. 
Housed in its own independent setting on the 
ninth floor of Anderson Hall, the Center is 
equipped with state of the art equipment includ- 
ing a Heidelberg Kors 19"x25" offset press, a Dos 
flatbed horizontal camera, a darkroom for shooting 
and developing negatives, and platemaking and 
stripping facilities. Staffed with two master print- 
ers and student assistants, the Borowsky Center 
produces a wide variety of printed material includ- 
ing but not limited to posters, catalogs, bro- 
chures, announcements, and limited edition prints. 
The Center's Fact Sheet, which includes all proce- 
dures for project submittal, is distributed annually 
to the University community and is always avail- 
able in the PCAD Dean's office. The Borowsky 
Center Advisory Committee reviews applications 
each semester to schedule appropriate projects 
that reflect the educational criteria of the Center. 

Electronic Media Center 

The Electronic Media Center provides a foundation 
for learning principles of the new digital media 
that have become pivotal to many contemporary 
art and design activities. Central to this study is 
the computer, one of the most flexible tools avail- 
able to the artist, designer, or musician. Students 
from any department within the university may 
learn the principles of digital processes, and how 
these techniques may be employed to enhance 
creative problem solving. 

Subjects covered include word processing, 
spreadsheet usage, electronic paint systems, two 
and three dimensional computer aided design, 
video digitizing, image processing, animation, and 
communication processes such as desktop 
publishing, as well as video presentation. 
Throughout introductory and advanced courses 
there is emphasis upon the integrative nature of 
digital processes. The program encourages stu- 
dents from differing disciplines to share their ap- 
plication of the computer with each other. This 
approach provides students an opportunity to 
examine creative problems outside their own ma- 
jor, and has led to joint ventures that have been 
most productive. 

The University has created two excellent facili- 
ties for teaching numerous courses in Electronic 
Media as well as Graphic Design and Animation. 
Each facility is equipped with Macintosh llci com- 
puters with color monitors. In addition each facility 
has two high speed LaserWriter NTX printers net- 
worked to the computers, a high quality ink jet 
color printer, flatbed scanner, and video digitizing 
capabilities. 



The Electronic Media Program is further 
equipped with Amiga computers that are used 
primarily for three dimensional animation in con- 
junction with the existing Animation major and 
elective courses. 

Scanner Laboratory 

This state of the art pre-press color scanner 
facility provides University students with access to 
some of the most recent technological 
advances in electronic imaging procedures. 
Dramatic changes in the Graphic Arts process 
have softened the distinction between design and 
production. This allows more continuous creative 
input on the part of designers, illustrators, 
printmakers, and photographers whose images are 
ultimately realized in the reproduction printing 
process. The University, recognizing these 
changes, has installed a Hell 300 Laser Scanner, a 
color processor and proofing equipment, with the 
support of our Graphic Arts Industry Advisory Com- 
mittee, the Graphic Arts Association of 
Delaware Valley, and generous gifts from the Hell 
Corporation and DuPont Corporation. The 
University offers workshops and courses in color 
theory for reproduction and color separation 
through its Continuing Education program. 

Oxberry Animation Stand 

The University's photography/film/animation 
department recently acquired a Master Series 
Oxberry animation stand-the same kind of stand 
used by Disney Studios and other professional 
firms to film animation drawings. The new stand 
enables students to produce professional quality 
work. Other photography/film/animation facilities 
include darkrooms, a fully-equipped sound studio, 
drawing stands, editors, splicers, synchronizers, 
projectors and all the essential equipment for 
studio photography. 

Libraries 

The Albert M. Greenfield Library, one of the largest 
contemporary art school libraries in the mid-Atlantic 
region, houses over 60,000 books, exhibition catalogs, 
and periodicals. In addition, there is a large picture 
resource file, an extensive slide library, and several 
special collections, including textiles. 

Career Services 

Because the art profession is a highly competitive 
one, the Philadelphia College of Art and Design 
puts considerable emphasis on career planning. 
This is done through visiting lecturers from the 
professional community who assess and critique 
classwork, class assignments involving major 
corporations, and on-campus recruitment 
programs. At the same time, the Student 
Resource Center offers career planning and place- 
ment services to inform students of part-time and 
full-time job opportunities, and offers workshops 
on preparing resumes and developing interviewing 
skills. The counselor helps students to locate ca- 
reer directions through individual counseling tai- 
lored to specific needs. 



25 



It is essential that students have some idea of 
the business side of art. The Philadelphia College 
of Art and Design is recognized as a major support 
for the arts community. Working with 
organizations such as the Philadelphia Volunteer 
Lawyers for the Arts, the Student Resource Center 
presents lectures and seminars on copyright laws, 
negotiating with galleries and dealers, tax laws 
and business record keeping, and health hazards. 
The intent is to prepare artists — Philadelphia 
Col lege of Art and Design alumni and others — to 
work successfully in their field, to assure their 
rights and protect their physical well-being, and to 
make them aware of the benefits and services 
open to them, locally and nationally. 

Enrichment Programs 

Student Exchange 

Student exchange is available through the East 
Coast Consortium of Art Schools Mobility 
Program. Students in the Philadelphia College of 
Art and Design may spend a semester (with a 
possible extension to two) as a guest at the 
following institutions: 
Atlanta College of Art, Atlanta 
The Cooper Union School of Art, New York 
Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore 
Massachusetts College of Art, Boston 
Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Nova 
Scotia 

Otis Art Institute of Parsons School of Design, 
Los Angeles 

Parsons School of Design, New York 
Pratt Institute, School of Art and Design, 
Brooklyn 

Rhode Island School of Design, Providence 
School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 
Tyler School of Art, Philadelphia 
Students apply through their home institution, 
which is responsible for the selection of 
participants. For further information, contact the 
Mobility Coordinator, Office of the Registrar, at 
215-875-4848. 

Nonparticipating Institutions — 
Incoming Students 

Students in good standing from other institutions 
may attend the University for either one or two 
semesters on a full-time basis. To be eligible, a 
student must have completed the freshman year 
at the home institution and receive approval from 
the department chair of the major department in 
the Philadelphia College of Art and Design. In 
addition, the student must provide a letter from 
the dean of the home college granting permission 
to take courses at The University of the Arts and 
agreeing to accept those credits for credit at the 
student's own institution. All University expenses 
are the responsibility of the student. Inquiries 
should be addressed to the Assistant Registrar, 
Office of the Registrar, at 21 5-875-4848. 



Brighton Exchange 

The University of the Arts offers juniors in the 
Illustration Department the opportunity to 
experience the illustration field as it operates in 
England and Europe through a cooperative 
exchange with Brighton Polytechnic, England. 
Interested students must apply in the spring 
semester for the following fall by contacting the 
chair of the Illustration Department. Selection is 
made by portfolio review for this exchange, and an 
equal number of Brighton students coming to the 
Philadelphia College of Art and Design. 

Foreign and Summer Study Programs 

Foreign and summer studies are available through 
a number of programs hosted by other 
institutions. Those most popular with Philadelphia 
College of Art and Design students are: 

-The Academies of Fine Arts in Florence and 

Rome, Italy 

-Parsons School of Design in Paris, France 

-Skowhegan School of Painting and 

Sculpture in Maine 

-Tyler School of Art in Rome, Italy 

-Vermont Studio School, Vermont 
The University of the Arts is the accrediting 
institution for the Vermont Studio School and our 
students receive a discount on tuition charges. 

Cooperative Program with the 
Philadelphia College of Textiles and 
Science 

An agreement between the Continuing Education 
Department of The University of the Arts and the 
Philadelphia College of Textiles and Sciences per- 
mits a limited number of students in each 
institution to register for a maximum of 4 credits 
per semester at the sister institution without the 
payment of additional tuition. Students are limited 
to a total of 12 exchange credits during their 
four-year enrollment at the home institution. 
Registration is available on a selective basis for 
qualified students and is restricted to courses not 
offered at the home institution. 

Interested students should contact the Director 
of Continuing Education at 215-875-3350, for addi- 
tional information and registration materials. 

Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
Coordinate-Degree Program 

Established in 1970, the Coordinate-Degree 
Program enables students and alumni of the 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts the 
opportunity to earn a degree from The University 
of the Arts by enrolling in, and successfully com- 
pleting, the University's prevailing Humanities 
credit requirements for its Bachelor of Fine Arts 
degree. For information, contact the Office of the 
Registrar at 21 5-875-4848. 



Undergraduate Academic 
Requirements/Policies 
Academic Advising 

Academic advising at the University is designed to 
provide maximum information and assistance to 
students from the time they enter the Foundation 
Program in their freshman year until they complete 
their final semester as seniors. 

In the Foundation year, each student is assigned 
to a Foundation section with its own advisor. Each 
student is required to meet with the advisor at 
least once each semester, and each student is 
encouraged to seek out the advisor as soon as any 
difficulties begin to occur. 

At the end of the Foundation year, when the student 
selects and enters one of the major departments, the 
student is assigned to a faculty member who teaches 
in that department This faculty member serves as that 
student's advisor for the next three years. Each student 
meets with his or her advisor at least once a semester 
to discuss the student's academic program. In addition, 
there are three formalized advising sessions: (1 ) First 
semester, sophomore year When students enter a 
major department, during the first two weeks the 
advisor meets in small groups (4-5 students) to orient 
them to collegiate and departmental academic re- 
quirements and standards, departmental expectations, 
elective options and opportunities, program strategies, 
two-year planning, introduction to advisors (Humani- 
ties and Studio), office hours: (2) Second semester, 
junior year Individual meetings to review progress and 
credit counting sheets from the Registrar, plan final 
year (both semesters), and look at graduation require- 
ments; (3) Last semester Exit interview. Students are 
encouraged to meet with advisors as often as neces- 
sary to deal with any problems that arise. 

Each professional department is assigned one 
or more Humanities faculty members who assist 
both faculty advisors and their assigned students 
in the selection of a Humanities course of study. 

Transcript copies of student records are supplied on 
request to faculty advisors by the Registrar following 
the recording of grades each semester. 



26 



Departmental Requirements 

The chairperson, with the concurrence of the 
faculty, may: 

1 . Establish a minimum major course grade or 
major grade point average requirement higher 
than the minimum set by the University; 
students must be given written notification of 
such requirements. 

2. Place on academic probation students who fail 
to meet the minimum grade requirement in a 
course required for a departmental major or a 
University program. 

3. Dismiss a student from the department for 
academic deficiencies with written notification 
to the student and the Dean of the College and 
the Dean of Students. Students who are dis- 
missed may submit a written appeal to the 
Academic Appeals Committee. 

Each department will provide student majors with 
written statements describing any additional 
requirements for its programs at the beginning of 
the academic year. 

Every student must have the approval of his or 
her department to proceed to the next level of 
coursework. Advising is a shared responsibility 
betwewen the department and the student. Each 
must remain informed about the student's 
progress toward graduation. And finally, the 
student's petition to graduate must be approved by 
the department advisor or chairperson in 
conference with his or her faculty. 

Credit Distribution 

The student is ultimately responsible for 
completion of all course requirements for the de- 
gree program in which he or she is enrolled. The 
University requires a minimum of 132 credits for 
graduation. A student carrying an average of 16.5 
credits per semester would be making 
normal academic progress toward graduation. 
The general credit structure is as follows: 

Courses Credits 

Foundation 18 

Major department credits 45 

Elective Studio 24 

Humanities 45 



Total credits 



132 



Studio Electives 

• Major studio departments may require up to 
6 credits in another studio major, and/or 
Humanities. 

• Students may elect to replace up to 6 studio 
elective credits with Humanities courses. 

• Students may take up to at least 9 credits of 
studio elective courses outside their major. 

• Elective studio credits may be completed in any 
of the fine art, craft, and design departments at 
the Philadelphia College of Art and Design, or 
in the Schools of Dance, Music, and Theater of 
the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts. 

• Ceramic, Fibers, Metals, and Wood majors may 
not select from Craft courses. 

• Animation, Film, and Photo majors may not 
select Photo/Film/Animation courses. 



General program requirements vary within each 
department. Departments issue a list of required 
courses at appropriate times during the year. 
Majors must follow both departmental 
requirements for specified courses and the 
recommended sequence in which these courses 
are to be taken. The department chairperson must 
approve any exception to these regulations. 

The Art Therapy and Education programs are 
special courses of study that are offered in 
conjunction with a studio major program. 
Interested students should refer to the program 
descriptions in those departments. 

Credit-Hour Ratio 

Credit is earned at the ratio of one credit for one 
class-contact hour in the Humanities courses. 
Credit is earned at the ratio of one credit for two 
class-contact hours in studio courses. 

Dean's List 

The Dean's List honors those students who meet 
the following criteria: 

1 . Are full-time undergraduate degree candidates. 
Candidates for Certificate, Diploma, and 
Graduate programs are not eligible. 

2. Have attained a minimum GPA of 3.60. 

3. Have received no grade lower than a "B" in any 
course. 

4. Have no grade of "I" or "F" 

5. Take at least 12 credits for a letter grade (no 
"OP" or "OF"). 

This list is compiled each semester in the 
respective Deans' offices. 

Credit by Portfolio Review 

Students who qualify will be granted credit by 
portfolio review in Studio subjects. Portfolio credit 
requires the approval of the appropriate Studio 
major chairperson. Academic standing and course 
credit based on portfolio evaluation is normally 
determined during the admissions process. 

Residency Requirements 

Every transfer student must complete a minimum 
of four semesters in residence preceding 
graduation and must earn a minimum of 48 credits 
in Studio and/or Humanities courses. Transfer 
credits and credits completed in residence must 
total at least 132, and must fulfill the specific 
Studio and Humanities requirements stipulated for 
the degree, regardless of the number of credits 
completed at other accredited institutions. Stu- 
dents must transfer or complete the required Hu- 
manities and Studio major department courses 
stipulated for the degree regardless of the number 
of credits completed at other accredited 
institutions. For this reason, transfer students may 
be required to remain in residence at the Univer- 
sity for more than the minimum three semesters 
and to complete more than the minimum 48 cred- 
its. Transfer credit is evaluated by the Department 
Chairs and the Director of Humanities in consulta- 
tion with the Office of the Registrar. 



Graduation Requirements 

It is the student's responsibility to complete the re- 
quirements for the BFA, BS, MA, MFA, MAT, or 
MArch. degrees. This condition also applies to the 
Diploma, Certificate, and Associate degrees within the 
University's Continuing Education Division. 

To be certified for graduation, a student must fulfill 
all applicable credit requirements, satisfy the minimum 
residency requirements, achieve a minimum cumula- 
tive GPA of 2.0 (C average) for the BFA and BS degrees 
and a 3.0 (B average) for the graduate degrees, receive 
the approval of his or her department chairperson as 
having met all major requirements, and submit a 
graduation petition to the Office of the Registrar. 

Students expecting to complete degree 
requirements within the year (December, May, or 
August) are advised to secure and file the Petition for 
Graduation with the Office of the Registrar at the time 
of the November registration for Spring semester. 

Graduation with Honors 

A candidate for the baccalaureate degree, only, 
may graduate with honors if he or she achieves a 
minimum cumulative GPA of 3.6 at the conclusion 
of the semester prior to graduation. 

Return Degree Program 

Diploma graduates of the Philadelphia College of 
Art and Design may apply credits earned for the 
diploma towards the University's baccalaureate 
requirements. For additional information and to 
apply, contact the Office of the Registrar. 



27 



Undergraduate Curricula Foundation Program 



Elsa Johnson 
Niles Lewandowski 

Co-Chairpersons 

215-875-1030 

The Foundation Program in the Philadelphia 

College of Art and Design provides the incoming 

freshman with a year devoted to a basic 

understanding of principles and concepts in the 

visual arts. 

The studio curriculum is composed of three 
courses: Drawing, Two-Dimensional Design, and 
Three-Dimensional Design. Each class meets for 
three hours, twice a week. 

Each student is a member of a Foundation 
section which has a team of three faculty 
members who stress not only the independent disci- 
plines but the interdependent character of these disci- 
plines. Through basic studies and their interaction, the 
student discovers the underlying values and principles 
important to all visual artists. 

Classroom work is enriched by home 
assignments, critiques and reviews, guest artists, 
films, slides, and class trips. 
One faculty member from the section's team is 
designate#as the advisor from that section. 
Students meet fndividually with the advisor to 
discuss concerns, the registration process, and 
their choice of major. 

Along with the Foundation courses of Drawing, 
Two-Dimensional Design, and Three-Dimensional 
Design, the student chooses an additional course 
offered by the Studio departments each semester. 
These elective courses are designed to acquaint 
the student with the practices of the major studio 
areas. Students also register for two Humanities 
courses, one in Art History and one in Language 
and Expression. 



The regular freshman is rostered for 1 6.5 credits 


each semester, usually as follows: 




Required Courses: 


Credits 


FP100 Drawing 


6.0 


FP120 Two-Dimensional Design 


6.0 


FP190 Three-Dimensional Design 


6.0 


FP 060 Freshman Forum 


0.0 


Studio Electives 


3.0 


Humanities 


12.0 


Freshman Year Total 


33.0 



Faculty 

Ron Dorfman, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Eileen Goodman, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Gerald Herdman, Associate Professor 

Jeanne Jaffe, Senior Lecturer 

Elsa Johnson, Associate Professor 

Niles Lewandowski, Assistant Professor 

John Mathews, Senior Lecturer 

Bob McGovem, Professor 

Al Pastore, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Mike Rossman, Professor 

Karen Saler, Associate Professor 

Charles Searles, Senior Lecturer 

Richard Stetser, Professor 

Lily Yeh, Professor 

FT from Painting, Humanities, and Foundation 



28 



Crafts 



The Crafts Department seeks to develop artists of 
originality and resourcefulness who can excel in 
the most competitive professional environment. 
Studio experience is provided in four major craft 
areas: ceramics, fibers, metals, and wood. There 
are also offerings in glass, plaster, and papermak- 
ing to complement the curriculum. 

Each major area offers a balanced concentra- 
tion in both the technical and aesthetic aspects 
of the medium. While practical training and 
specialized skills are necessary for creative 
ability, the conceptual and expressive evolution 
of each student is the essential focus of the 
department. An ongoing study of the contempo- 
rary crafts movement is seen as an integral 
element for those involved in the program. The 
range of faculty in each area provides the stu- 
dent with exposure to a diversity of profes- 
sional perspective and experience. 

Through an incisive and rigorous curriculum, the 
department is devoted to preparing students for pro- 
fessional involvement in their craft. Upon graduation, 
students elect to become independent artists, teach- 
ers, or designers, or find employment in industry. Indi- 
viduals often combine these occupations in order to 
meet their singular needs and goals. 

Required Courses for All Crafts Majors: 

CR201 Intro, to Concept Development 3 credits 
CR 301 Modem Crafts: A Critical History 3 credits 
CR401 Senior Craft Seminar 3 credits 

Faculty 

Ceramics 

Larry Donahue, Assistant Professor 

Alec Karros, Lecturer 

James Makins, Associate Professor 

Lizbeth Stewart, Associate Professor 

Petras Vaskys, Professor Emeritus 

Fibers 

Sandra Brownlee, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Sheryl Gibson, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Bobbie Lippman, Senior Lecturer 

Kris Parker, Lecturer 

Annabeth Rosen, Lecturer 

Warren Seelig, Professor 

Glass 

Roland Jahn. Associate Professor 

Jewelry/Metals 

Sharon Church, Associate Professor 

Barbara Mail, Lecturer 

Rodney McCormick, Associate Professor 

Richard Reinhardt, Professor Emeritus 

Wood 

Michael Hurwitz, Associate Professor 

Peter Pierobon, Lecturer 



Ceramics 

Through studio practice and research, you will 
acquire a thorough knowledge of ceramics as you 
learn to take risks, find alternatives, and create 
persuasive, original work in clay and plaster. You 
may also take glassblowing and stained glass as 
electives. 

The Ceramics program is devoted to preparing 
you for the broadest possible range of career in- 
volvement. This includes fostering such practical 
abilities as designing a studio, photographing 
work, and seeking commissions. Graduates 
become studio artists, selling through shops and 
galleries. Some concentrate on the expanding 
realm of architectural commissions. Others direct 
their artistry toward designing for industry or 
teaching — they are chairpersons or instructors at 
such schools as the Cranbrook Academy of Art, 
the Rochester Institute of Technology, Purdue 
University, and the Massachusetts College of Art 
Still others combine a number of related pursuits. 



Credit Requirements 




Sophomore/Introductory 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




CR 201 Introduction to Concept 




Development 


3.0 


CR 21 1 Introduction to Throwing 


3.0 


CR212 Introduction to Handbuilding 


3.0 


Craft Introduction Course in 




Chosen Craft 


6.0 


Studio Electives 


6.0 


(CR251Moldmaking-Casting) 




Humanities 


12.0 


Sophomore Year Total 


310 


Junior/Intermediate 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




CR313 Ceramic Technology 


3.0 


CR 31 1 Intermediate Ceramics 


6.0 


CR 312 Intermediate Ceramics 


6.0 


CR 301 Modem Craft: A Critical History 


3.0 


Studio Electives 


3.0 


Humanities 


12.0 


Junior Year Total 


33.0 


Senior/Advanced 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




CR401 Crafts Seminar 


3.0 


CR 41 1 Advanced Ceramic Studio 


6.0 


CR412 Advanced Ceramic Studio 


6.0 


Studio Electives 


9.0 


Humanities 


9.0 


Senior Year Total 


310 



Fibers 

The Fibers studio provides the undergraduate art 
student with a unique multimedia experience 
grounded in fabric processes and materials as a 
means of personal expression. A Fibers student 
receives a strong foundation in two- and three- 
dimensional woven structures, feltmaking, fabric 
collage, tapestry, screen printing, resist printing, 
hand-painted fabrics, papemnaking, and more. 

With increasing emphasis on studio problems 
that concentrate on conceptual issues, guidance is 
offered through intensive group critiques and indi- 
vidual evaluation with Fibers faculty. Students are 
kept abreast of current issues in contemporary 
fabric through a strong visiting-artist program, 
field trips to New York City, Washington, and Bal- 
timore, and the Philadelphia area. The Fibers fac- 
ulty has achieved national reputation in regard to 
their personal work in major galleries and 
museums throughout the country. 

Recent graduates are working as professional 
artists or as apprentices to established artists; 
other students have received grants and scholar- 
ships to the most prestigious graduate fibers 
schools, including Cranbrook Academy of Art, the 
Chicago Art Institute, Tyler School of Art, and the 
Banff School of Visual and Performing Arts; some 
are teaching at institutions such as the Cleveland 
Institute of Art and the State University of New 
York at Cortland; still others hold positions in the 
fashion and home-fumishing industries. 



Credit Requirements 



Credits 



3.0 



Sophomore/Introductory 

Required Courses: 

CR 201 Intro to Concept Development 

CR221 Intro to Fibers: 

Structural Investigation 3.0 
CR222 Intro to Fibers: Media 

Explorations 3.0 

CR 324AFibers Technology 1 .5 

CR324B Textile History 1.5 

Craft Intra Course in Chosen Craft 6.0 

Studio Electives 3.0 

Humanities 12.0 

Sophomore Year Total 33.0 

Junior/Intermediate Credits 

Required Courses: 

CR321 Intra to Surface Design 6.0 

CR322 Intermediate Structural Fibers 6.0 

CR301 Modern Craft A Critical History 3.0 

Studio Electives 3.0 

Humanities 12.0 

33.0 

Credits 



Junior Year Total 



Senior/Advanced 

Required Courses: 

CR401 Crafts Seminar 3.0 

CR423 Advanced Surface Design 6.0 

CR425 Advanced Structural Fibers 6.0 

Studio Electives 9.0 

Humanities 9.0 



Jewelry/Metals 

The intent of the Jewelry/Metalsmithing program 
is to expose each student to as wide a range of 
concept, media, and process as possible in order 
to ensure versatility and competence. Courses are 
designed to give students breadth, from precious 
jewelry-making to metalworking, on a small- 
sculpture scale. Assignments ask that the student 
consider numerous issues pertinent to the field, 
such as the role of function and utility in 
contemporary holloware, or the development of 
multimedia ornament as applied to performance. 
Emphasis is placed on personal format and pre- 
sentation. Studio work is supplemented by work- 
shops and symposia conducted by internationally 
known artists in the field. 

Jewelry/Metalsmithing students are self-deter- 
mined in their career goals. Before graduation, 
they are made aware of the many possibilities 
available to them. Students enter national compe- 
titions and win distinction for their efforts. Gradu- 
ates may choose to design for major metal and 
jewelry firms. Others pursue their art through the 
making of one-of-a-kind, limited-production pieces 
on a commission basis or through galleries. Some 
seek placement in positions with alumni or jew- 
eler/metalsmiths in the Northeast, and those who 
choose to pursue graduate study enter the pro- 
gram of their choice. Whatever they do, students 
are equipped to seek and establish these contacts 
as they leave the undergraduate environment 



Credit Requirements 

Sophomore/Introductory 

Required Courses: 



Credits 



CR 201 Intra to Concept Development 


3.0 


CR 241 Intro to Jewelry Making 


3.0 


CR242 Intro to Metalsmithing 


3.0 


CR245 Metals Technology 


3.0 


Craft Intro Course in Chosen Craft 


6.0 


Studio Electives 


3.0 


Humanities 


12.0 


Sophomore Year Total 


33.0 


Junior/Intermediate 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




CR 341 Intermediate Jewelry and 




Metalsmithing 


6.0 


CR 342 Intermediate Jewelry and 




Metalsmithing 


6.0 


CR 301 Modem Craft: A Critical History 


3.0 


Studio Electives 


6.0 


Humanities 


12.0 



Junior Year Total 



33.0 
Credits 



Senior Year Total 



33.0 



Senior/Advanced 

Required Courses: 

CR401 Crafts Seminar 3.0 

CR 441 Advanced Studio: Jewelry/ 

Metalsmithing 6.0 

CR 442 Advanced Studio: Jewelry/ 

Metalsmithing 6.0 

Studio Electives 9.0 

Humanities 9.0 



Senior Year Total 



33.0 



Wood 

The Wood program is directed toward the 
realization of three basic ideals: 

1. To produce active, professional studio 
furniture-makers. 

2. To develop the students' potential for personal 
expression and technical skill. 

3. To provide the students with the learning skills 
that will enable them to continue growing as 
artists after graduation. 

The curriculum is based on maintaining a bal- 
ance between practical and formal aspects of 
woodworking, and the more elusive concerns 
involved in making art Recognizing that technical 
mastery and creative ability are of equal impor- 
tance, the problems are structured to encourage 
the development of both concerns simultaneously. 
Often the semesters are started with looser, 
quicker investigations meant to stimulate ideas 
and act as potential catalysts for larger, more 
time-intensive pieces. Specifically, some of the 
formal aspects of furniture making covered in the 
introductory and intermediate levels are: tradi- 
tional joinery techniques, theory of solid wood 
construction, frame and panel construction, and 
the lamination process. Also required is the 
"Wood Tech" class, which covers in depth the 
practical and technical considerations of running a 
shop, such as purchasing and setting up machin- 
ery, dealing with humidity, and considering the 
advantage of one material over another, among 
other things. Concurrent with these issues, stu- 
dents engage in discussions and assignments 
aimed at the development of their critical aware- 
ness, which is essential to the creative process. 

Credit Requirements 

Sophomore/Introductory Credits 

Required Courses: 

CR201 Intro to Concept Development 3.0 

CR261 Intro to Woodworking 6.0 

CR262 Intro to Woodworking 6.0 

Studio Electives 6.0 

Humanities 12.0 

Sophomore Year Total 33.0 

Junior/Intermediate Credits 

Required Courses: 

CR364 Wood Technology 3.0 

CR361 Intermediate Woodworking 6.0 

CR362 Intermediate Woodworking 6.0 
CR301 Modem Craft A Critical History 3.0 

Studio Electives 3.0 

Humanities 12.0 

Junior Year Total 33.0 

Senior/Advanced Credits 

Required Courses: 

CR401 Crafts Seminar 3.0 

CR 461 Advanced Woodworking 6.0 

CR462 Advanced Woodworking 6.0 

Studio Electives 9.0 

Humanities 9.0 

Senior Year Total 33.0 



Guest Speakers and Critics 

Wayne Bates 

pottery 

Jamie Bennett 

jewely 

Harry Boom 

mixed media 

Nancy Carmen 

ceramics 

Syd Carpenter 

ceramics 

Kai Chan 

fibers 

Jon Clark 

glass 

Ben Cohen 

Ben and Jerry's Ice Cream 

William Daley 

ceramics 

Harris Deller 

ceramics 

David Ellsworth 

woodturner 

Roberta Griffith 

ceramics 

Chris Guston 

ceramics 

Helena Hermarck 

tapestry 

Jim Holmes 

glass 

Susam Kingsley 

jewelry 

Jack Larrimore 
furniture maker 
Mary Lee Hu 
goldsmith 
Joan Livingstone 
fibers 

Jim Mak'ms 
potter 

Grahm Marks 
ceramics 



Alphonse Mattia 
furniture maker 
John McQueen 
basketmaker 

Wendy Maruyama 

furniture maker 

Richard Mawdsley 

jewelry 

Laura Foster Nicholsen 

fibers 

Pavel Opocensky 

jewelry/sculpture 

Albert Paley 

blacksmith 

Elliott Pujol 
metalsmith 

Rudi Staffel 
ceramics 
Lonette Stonitsch 
artist and writer 
Tommy Simpson 
furniture maker 
Jill Slosburg-Ackerman 
jewelry/sculpture 
Roy Superior 
woodworker 
Blair Tate 
artist and writer 
Marianna Torgovnick 
writer 

Vlbeke Vestby 
fibers 
Bruce Volz 
furniture maker 
Katrina Wesleyan 
performance artist 
Stephen Whittlesley 
furniture maker 
Paula Winokur 
ceramics 



Design 



Graphic Design 

Laurence Bach 

Chairperson 
215-875-1060 

The combination of words, symbols, drawings, 
photographs, and diagrams to communicate ideas 
and products is the basis of graphic design. In the 
senior year, in-depth experience in creating these 
components of graphic communications at a high 
level of formal excellence precedes their integra- 
tion in larger sets of work such as visual identity 
programs, books and publications, exhibits, and 
packages. Opportunities for additional study of 
photography, animation, filmmaking, and emerging 
technologies are available. 

Throughout the three years of major 
concentration, problems in graphic communication 
are combined with exploratory and experimental 
studies in drawing, color, photography, typography, 
and computer-generated imagery. The 
curriculum is supplemented by special lecture 
programs, workshops with invited design firms, 
and on-site seminars in selected design offices 
and studios, paper and printing plants, and with 
video-, film-, and computer-graphic producers. 

With successful completion of the program, and 
depending on individual strengths, students are 
prepared for entry-level positions as graphic 
designers with, for example, design groups or 
studios, publishers, corporations, nonprofit 
institutions, governmental agencies, architects 
and planners, or advertising agencies. 

The faculty consists of practicing professionals with 
distinguished records of accomplishment in their 
fields, sensitive and responsive to changes in the 
practice of design, while maintaining a clear sense of 
the bases for structuring communications. 



Credit Requirements 




Sophomore/Introductory 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




GD210 Letterform Design 


6.0 


GD211 Descriptive Drawing 


6.0 


GD213 Design Systems 


6.0 


Studio Electives 


6.0 


Humanities 


12.0 


Sophomore Year Total 


36.0 


Junior/Intermediate 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




GD306 Typography Emphasis 


6.0 


GD311 Communications 


6.0 


GD302 Materials and Processes 


1.5 


GD303 Production Seminar 


1.5 


Departmental Elective 


3.0 


GD300 Drawing/Graphic Proc. 




GD310 Photographies 




GD313 Color Studies 




GD316 Drawing Applications 




GD322 3-D Graphic Design 




Studio Electives 


3.0 


Humanities 


12.0 



Junior Year Total 


33.0 


Senior/Advanced 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




GD411 Design Studio 


6.0 


GD412 Problem Solving 


6.0 


Studio Electives 


12.0 


Humanities 


9.0 


Senior Year Total 


310 



Faculty 

Hans Allemann, Adjunct Professor 

Laurence Bach, Professor 

Richard Felton, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Kenneth Hiebert, Professor 

William Longhauser, Professor 

Chris Myers, Assistant Professor 

Chris Ransom, Senior Lecturer 

Lee Willett, Assistant Professor 

Chris Zelinsky, Associate Professor 



Illustration 

Robert Stein 

Chairperson 
215-875-1070 

Illustrators give visual substance to thoughts, 
stories, and ideas. The Illustration Department 
seeks to prepare its students for entry into the 
fields of book and periodical publishing, promo- 
tion, education, advertising, and specialty fields. 

Illustrators must call upon a broad range of 
traditional and up-to-date competencies to re- 
spond to today's visual problems. As visual prob- 
lem-solvers and communicators, illustrators need 
to be open-minded, eclectic, flexible, and imagina- 
tive. The illustrator's solution should be appropri- 
ate, intelligent, expressive, and visually engaging. 

In order to prepare for a career in this competi- 
tive field, The University of the Arts Illustration 
student develops skills that encompass two- 
dimensional media, from painting and drawing to 
photography and technical image-making and 
reproduction processes and emerging opportuni- 
ties in electronic imaging. Students may concen- 
trate on either a design oriented or pictorially 
oriented curriculum. These skills are nurtured 
within a stimulating cultural climate provided by 
the resources of the faculty, of visiting profession- 
als, and of the University and the city at large. 
Each student progresses from general competen- 
cies to a personal viewpoint, clarified career 
goals, and a professional attitude. 



Faculty 

Inge Board, Senior Lecturer 

Richard Burke, Lecturer 

Robert Byrd, Senior Lecturer 

Chris Cantera, Senior Lecturer 

Don Daily, Senior Lecturer 

Martha Erlebacher, Adjunct Professor 

Ed Ferszt, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Renee Foulks, Senior Lecturer 

Ralph Giguere, Senior Lecturer 

Paul King, Lecturer 

Alan Klawans, Senior Lecturer 

Nathan Knobler, Professor 

Deborah Kogan, Senior Lecturer 

Jim Lakis, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Tim O'Brien, Lecturer 

Phyllis Purves-Smith, Associate Professor 

Eileen Rosen, Lecturer 

Robert Stein, Professor 

Stephen Tarantal, Professor 

Mark Tocchet, Assistant Professor 



Credit Requirements 

Sophomore/Introductory Credits 

Required Courses: 

IL 200 Pictorial Foundations 6.0 

IL 201 Drawing as Design 3.0 

IL202 Figure Anatomy 6.0 

IL 204 Typography 3.0 

Required Studio: 

PF211 Introduction to Photography 1.5 

Studio Elective 1.5 

Humanities 12.0 

Sophomore Year Total 33.0 

Junior/Intermediate Credits 

Required Courses: 

IL 300 Illustration Methods 6.0 

IL 301 Design Methods 3.0 

IL 206 Materials and Techniques 3.0 

IL302 Figure Utilization I 1.5 
Select one of the following for a total 

of 3 credits: 3.0 
IL304 Design Groups 3.0 
IL303 Figure Utilization II 3.0 



Studio Electives 


4.5 


Humanities 


12,0 


Junior Year Total 


33.0 


Senior/Advanced 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




IL400 Illustration 


6.0 


IL 401 Graphic Problems or 


3.0 


IL 402 Communications Workshop 




IL403 Portfolio Seminar 


1.5 


Studio Electives 


13.5 


Humanities 


9.0 


Senior Year Total 


33.0 


Guest Lecturers 




Illustrators (General) 




Guy Billout 




Harry Bliss 




Wendell Minor 




Wilson McLean 




Childrens' Book Illustration 




Carolyn Croll 




3-Dimensional Illustration 




Ellen Rixford 




Story Board Illustration 




Sam Dion 




Art Directors 




Jim Cardillo 




Clark Mills 




Elmer Pizzi 





33 



Industrial Design 

Charles Bumette 

Chairperson 
215-875-1040 

The Industrial Design Department provides a 
professional education for those wishing to bring 
beauty and appropriateness to the products, 
presentations, and settings of modern society. The 
program prepares one for careers in product, pack- 
aging, and exhibit design, as well as for the design 
of communications, furniture, equipment, vehicles, 
and interiors. It also addresses problems of human 
factors research, computer-aided de- 

sign, product development, manufacturing, mar- 
keting, and a host of other considerations related 
to the humanistic uses of technology. 

The department places emphasis on the 
development of graphic, sculptural, and spatial 
design skills as a complement to creative problem 
solving, technical innovation, and effective 
communications during the solution of actual 
problems of design. 

After initial coursework to introduce basic 
design and production processes, including com- 
puter-aided design and modelmaking, 
students begin to develop and apply theory, skill, 
and knowledge to actual design problems, many 
brought into the studio by industry. Visiting 
designers also bring knowledge of current design, 
manufacturing, and marketing practices into 
studio and lecture courses, and visits to industry 
provide opportunities for direct observation and 
first-hand knowledge of manufacturing processes. 
Based on this foundation of skills, experience, and 
information, emphasis in the final year shifts the 
responsibility for knowledge of design to the 
individual student, who works directly with a cli- 
ent/sponsor on a thesis project prior to 
graduation. During the final semester the 
instructional focus also shifts to career planning, 
portfolio preparation, and the development of 
information gathering and business 
communication skills to better prepare the student 
for entering the job market. 

Due to the wide scope, and creative yet 
practical character of an Industrial Design 
education, many career opportunities await the 
graduate: with consulting firms, corporate design 
staffs, manufacturing firms, exhibit houses, 
retailers, advertising agencies, research 
organizations, museums, educational institutions, 
and government agencies, all of whom recognize 
the need to constantly improve the appearance, 
manufacture, performance, and social value of 
their products. 



Faculty 

Jack Andrews, Professor 
Charles Burnette, Professor, 

Joseph Carreiro Professorship in Design 
Robert Croston, Assistant Professor 
Kenneth A. Root, Lecturer 
Goetz Linger, Lecturer 
Steve Wilcox, Lecturer 
Julian Winston, Associate Professor 
Peter Wood, Assistant Professor 
Steven Yarnall, Lecturer 
Orly Zeewy, Lecturer 

Guest Speakers 

David Gresham 
Details, New York 

Nancy Skolos, Tom Wedell 
Skolos/Wedell, Boston — graphic design, 
photography 

Richard Penny 

The Richard Penny Group, New York — 

product design 

David Kelley 

David Kelley Design, Palo Alto — product 

development 

Bill Moggridge 

ID Two, San Francisco — product 

conceptualization, design 

Rick Valicenti 

THIRST, Chicago — graphic design 

Wes Jones 

Holt Hinshaw Pfau & Jones, San Francisco — 

exhibits, architecture 

Neil Denari 

Cor-tex, Los Angeles — architecture 

David Frej 

Influx, Chicago — graphic identity 

Michael McCoy 

Fahnstrom & McCoy, Chicago — product design 



Credit Requirements 




Sophomore/Introductory 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




ID 200 Studio 1: Projects 


6.0 


ID 220 Studio 2: Tehcniques 


6.0 


ID 290 Design Seminar 


1.5 


ID 214 Materials and Processes 


1.5 


ID 280 Technical Communication 


1.5 


Studio Electives 


7.5 


Humanities 


12.0 


Sophomore Year Total 


36.0 


Junior/Intermediate 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




ID 300 Studio 3: Projects 


6.0 


ID 320 Studio 4: Techniques 


6.0 


ID 390 Design Seminar 


1.5 


ID 326 Intro to Human Factors 


1.5 


Studio Electives 


7.5 


Humanities 


12.0 


Junior Year Total 


34.5 


Senior/Advanced 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




ID 400 Studio 5: Projects 


6.0 


ID 420 Professional Communications 


6.0 


ID 490 Design Seminar 


1.5 


Studio Electives 


6.0 


Humanities 


9.0 


Senior Year Total 


28.5 



Departmental Electives 

While none of the following are required for 

graduation, they are recommended. 

ID 113 Freshman ID 

ID 251 Introduction to Computer Aided Design I 

ID 252 Introduction to Computer Aided Design I 

ID 327 Advanced Technology 

ID 351 Design with Kids I 

ID 352 Design with Kids II 

ID 412 Exhibit Design 

ID 425 Advanced Computer Aided Design 

Recommended Outside Electives 

PF 208 Photography for Industrial Designer 

CR252 ID Plaster Workshop 

CE180 Design Drawing 

CE305 Airbrush 

EM 110 Computer Concepts 

HU251 History of Design 

HU452 Topics of Design 



34 



Fine Arts 



Painting /Drawing 

Robert Keyser 

Chairperson 

215-875-1080 

The Painting Department provides a firm basis for 

students to develop a professional involvement 

with their work. A balance is sought between the 

acquisition of studio skills and the development of 

a critical intelligence. 

Students are encouraged, through the rigor of 
studio activity, to understand the breadth of art in 
both its traditional and contemporary forms, and to 
gain increasing authority in their own work. 

Courses evolve from the study of basic working 
methods and fundamental issues of image making 
to the subtleties of complex pictorial organization 
and the refinements of aesthetic judgment. In the 
final semester of the senior year, each student is 
required to complete a thesis project, which 
includes a formal presentation of a paper and an 
exhibition of a coordinated body of work. 

The faculty of practicing professional artists 
represents a diversity of attitudes and ideals. 
Through the format of studio instruction, dialogue, 
and critique, they seek to instill in each student a 
habit of self-instruction which will serve far 
beyond the program at the University. 

The Painting/Drawing Department now has an 
art gallery in its own area. Visiting artists/speak- 
ers exhibit their latest work here. Students have 
an opportunity to show their work and a student 
exhibition committee is formed each year to invite 
artists, manage and install the exhibitions. 

Studio activity is augmented by lectures, semi- 
nars, visiting artists, and field trips to museums 
and galleries. 



Credit Requirements 




Sophomore/Introductory 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




PT 202 Sophomore Painting 


9.0 


PT224 Sophomore Drawing 


6.0 


Studio Electives 


6.0 


Humanities 


12.0 


Sophomore Year Total 


33.0 


Junior/Intermediate 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




PT302 Junior Studio 


12.0 


PT324 Drawing 


1.5 


PT390 Junior Seminar 


1.5 


Studio Electives 


6.0 


Humanities 


12.0 


Junior Year Total 


33.0 


Senior/Advanced 


Credits 


Required Courses: 




PT402 Senior Studio 


12.0 


PT 490 Senior Seminar 


1.5 


PT424 Senior Drawing 


1.5 


Studio Electives 


9.0 


Humanities 


9.0 


Senior Year Total 


33.0 


Painting Department Guest Lecturers 


Timothy Arzt 




Bo Bartlet 




David Brewster 




Anne Seidman 




James Wallace 





Faculty 

Eugene Baguskas, Associate Professor 

Peter DiGuglielmo, Lecturer 

Frank Galuszka, Professor 

David Goerk, Senior Lecturer 

Steven Jaffe, Associate Professor 

David Kettner, Professor 

Robert Keyser, Professor 

Nathan Knobler, Professor 

Eileen Neff, Lecturer 

Gerald Nichols, Professor 

Boris Putterman, Associate Professor 

Warren Rohrer, Professor 

Doris Staffel, Professor 

Lily Yeh, Professor 



35 



Photography/Film/Animation 

Alida Fish 
Chairperson 
215-875-1020 

The Photography/Film/Animation Department 
offers major concentrations in each of these 
disciplines while providing elective classes to 
the University at large. The three-year curricu- 
lum of each major is built around a sequence of 
classes designed to move the student to a posi- 
tion of independence within the discipline. An 
introduction to the intrinsic conceptual and 
material concerns of the medium fills much of 
the sophomore year. Within the two remaining 
years, the student is expected to develop and 
expand a sense of personal vision, practice, 
and goals. 

Within the first semester of the sophomore 
year, each student is required to take both Still 
Photography and Filmmaking. Separate pro- 
grams of studies within each discipline com- 
mence with the second semester of that year, 
although work in the other areas may be con- 
tinued on an elective basis. 



Faculty 

Norinne Betjemann, Lecturer 

John Carlano, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Jack Carnell, Associate Professor 

Connie Coleman, Lecturer 

John Columbus, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Sky David, Associate Professor 

Stephen Fiorella, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Alida Fish, Professor 

Anthony Gorny, Associate Professor 

Gerald Greenfield, Associate Professor 

David Lebe, Lecturer 

Paula Marincola, Lecturer 

Doug Mellon Lecturer 

Nora Monroe, Lecturer 

Thomas Moore, Lecturer 

Jeannie Pearce, Lecturer 

Peter Rose, Professor, Film Area Head 

David Tafler, Associate Professor 

John Woodin, Lecturer 



Photography 

The Still Photography major, in the sophomore 
year, gets a solid background in craft competence 
and the conceptual concerns of photographic ren- 
dering. Distortion of both process and effect is 
considered, as is the use and control of traditional 
color-print materials. 

The junior year asks the student to consider 
photographic forms beyond the traditional print — 
the photographic book, nonsilver processes, and 
the extended photograph, among others — while 
also providing instruction in the practice of large- 
format photography and studio practice with its 
control of artificial lighting. In both the junior and 
senior years, the student may also pursue the 
study of specialized issues on an elective basis, 
including the photograph in a graphic arts context, 
documentary photography, multi-image 
production, and the photograph within a larger 
fine arts context. 

The senior year largely concerns the production 
of an independent body of work of the student's 
own choosing and direction. The senior thesis 
provides the opportunity to begin the process of 
self-definition as photographers and artists. A 
required senior-level course in photographic 
criticism, coupled with required classes in 
photography history, culminates the strong 
emphasis that the department places on critical 
thinking and the ability to express one's self in 
words as well as through photographs. 

An internship program, which places advanced 
students within a variety of positions in the "real 
world" one day each week, is also available. 
Current positions include assistantships in 
commercial studios, galleries, medical 
laboratories, hospitals, and multi-image and 
special-effects houses. 



Credit Requirements 

Sophomore/Introductory Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF210 Introduction to Film 3.0 

PF 21 1 Introduction to Photography 6.0 

PF217 Color Printing Workshop 3.0 

Studio Electives 9.0 

Humanities* 12.0 

Sophomore Year Total 33.0 

Junior/Intermediate Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF311 Junior Workshop I & II 6.0 

PF313 Basic Studio I & II 6.0 

PF315 Extended Photo Apps 3.0 

Select 3 credits from the 

following courses: 3.0 

PF323 Selected Topics 3.0 

PF413 Professional Practices 3.0 

PF499 Practicum 1.5 or 3.0 

PF999 Independent Study 3.0 



Studio Electives 




3.0 


Humanities* 




12.0 


Junior Year Total 




33.0 


Senior/Advanced 




Credits 


Required Courses: 






PF411 Senior Workshop I & II 




6.0 


PF415 Senior Seminar I & II 




6.0 


Select 3 credits from the 






following courses: 




3.0 


PF 323 Selected Topics 


3.0 




PF 41 3 Professional Practices 


3.0 




PF499 Practicum 


3.0 




PF999 Independent Study 


3.0 




Studio Electives 




9.0 


Humanities* 




9.0 


Senior Year Total 




33.0 



* Please note: HU255A&B, History of 
Photography is required of all Photography majors 
as part of the total humanities load. 



36 



Him 

The independent film and video artist serves as 
the model for our program in both live-action film 
and animation. At the same time, a solid prepara- 
tion and foundation in craft has enabled an ex- 
tremely high percentage of our graduates to enter 
the professional field as freelance editors, sound 
recordists, cinematographers, technicians, anima- 
tors, screenwriters, and directors. 

The filmmaking area provides its students with 
a background in all phases of film and video 
production, including film cinematography, video- 
graphy, film and video editing, sound/image 
manipulation. As in the still area, the filmmaking 
students acquire a strong background in criticism, 
theory, and history of media. 

Media study at the University has been supple- 
mented by a number of other activities and 
resources, including "Mediaworks," a year-long 
series of visiting artists. Under this program, film- 
makers, animators, video artists, and performance 
artists of both national and international reputa- 
tion have visited the campus for lectures, screen- 
ings, and performances. Our facilities have been 
expanded, and we now offer basic video as an 
adjunct to the program. In addition, the University 
possesses an audio-visual department with its 
own film library, a computer center, and a Friday 
Night Film Series. 

Credit Requirements 

Sophomore/Introductory Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF210 Introduction to Film I & II 6.0 
PF211 Introduction to Photography I 3.0 

PF212 Animation Drawing I 3.0 

Studio Electives 9.0 

Humanities* 12.0 

Sophomore Year Total 33.0 

Junior/Intermediate Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF310 Junior Cinema Production I & II 6.0 

PF314 Junior Film Forum 6.0 

PF320 Film Sound 3.0 

PF322 Film Technology 3.0 

Studio Electives 3.0 

Humanities* 12.0 

Junior Year Total 33.0 

Senior/Advanced Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF410 Senior Cinema Production I & II 6.0 

PF414 Senior Film Forum I 3.0 

PF430 Light and Sound 3.0 

Studio Electives 12.0 

Humanities* 9.0 

Senior Year Total 33.0 



Animation 

Animation brings together a wide variety of 
interests and skills. While the final presentation 
utilizes the technology of filmmaking, the visual 
materials being animated may be generated 
through such diverse disciplines as painting and 
drawing, sculpture, illustration, graphic arts, and 
still photography. The Animation program offers 
instruction in both traditional and experimental 
approaches to the medium and is geared to 
providing a foundation broad enough for either 
personal explorations or a professional career. 

In addition to the traditional major. Animation 
also provides the opportunity for students to 
pursue a concentration in Animation while 
studying in other major departments. Students 
considering a concentration in Animation should 
consult with the Film program advisor as well as 
with their own department chairperson for 
assistance in arranging appropriate course 
sequencing and schedules. 

Credit Requirements 

Sophomore/Introductory Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF210 Introduction to Film I & II 6.0 

PF211 Introduction to Photography I 3.0 

PF212 Animation Drawing I & II 6.0 

PF216 Computer Animation I 3.0 

Studio Electives 6.0 

Humanities* 9.0 

Sophomore Year Total 33.0 

Junior/Intermediate Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF 31 2 Junior Animation Workshop I & II 6.0 

PF316 Computer Animation II 3.0 

PF320 Film Sound 3.0 

PF322 Film Technology 3.0 

Studio Electives 6.0 

Humanities* 12.0 



Junior Year Total 



33.0 
Credits 



Senior/Advanced 

Required Courses: 

PF 41 2 Senior Animation Workshop I & II 6.0 
PF414 Senior Film Forum I & II 6.0 

Studio Electives 9.0 

Humanities* 12.0 



Senior Year Total 



33.0 



* HU 248 A&B, Film History are required of all 
animation majors as part of the total humanities 
load. 



Film/Animation 

Credit Requirements 

Sophomore/Introductory Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF210 Introduction to Film I & II 6.0 

PF 21 1 Introduction to Photography I 3.0 

PF212 Introduction to Animation 6.0 

PF216 Computer Animation I 3.0 

Studio Electives 3.0 

Humanities* 12.0 

Sophomore Year Total 33.0 

Junior/Intermediate Credits 

Required Courses: 

PF 31 Junior Cinema Production 6.0 

PF 31 2 Junior Animation Workshop I & II 6.0 

PF316 Computer Animation II 3.0 

PF320 Film Sound 3.0 

PF322 Film Technology 3.0 

Humanities* 12.0 



Junior Year Total 



33.0 
Credits 



Senior/Advanced 

Required Courses: 

PF410 Senior Cinema Production 6.0 
PF412 Senior Animation Workshop I & II 6.0 

PF414 Senior Film Forum I & II 6.0 

PF420 Light and Sound 3.0 

Studio Electives 3.0 

Humanities* 9.0 



Senior Year Total 



33.0 



*HU 248 A&B, Film History are required of all 
film/animation majors as part of the total humani- 
ties load. 



* HU 248 A&B, Film History are required of all film 
majors as part of the total humanities load. 



37 



Printmaking 

Patty Smith 

Chairperson 
215-875-1054 

The Printmaking Department bases its 
instructional program on the development and 
realization of visual ideas through multiple 
image-making processes. The primary objectives 
are to develop conceptual abilities and technical 
proficiencies leading the student to acquire 
personal imagery and professional competence in 
printmaking media. Printmaking is a bridge be- 
tween Fine Arts and Design, from philosophical 
approach to practical realization. 

The department provides extensive facilities 
and the expertise of a faculty of professional 
artists for study in traditional and contemporary 
methods. The major graphic media explored 
include relief processes, etching (intaglio), 
lithography-stone, metal plate, and offset-and 
water-based screenprinting. Courses in book and 
typographic design stimulate experimentation in 
unifying the elements of paper, prints, typography, 
and bookbinding. 

Visiting artists, field trips, and guest lecturers 
supplement the studio experience. Using the city 
as an extended workshop. Print students attend 
seminars and museum collections. The Print Study 
Seminar is held in the Print Room at the Philadel- 
phia Museum of Art and furnishes a unique oppor- 
tunity to study original prints from the fifteenth 
through the twentieth centuries. 

The main emphasis over the three-year 
undergraduate period of study is on the evolution 
of students as artists who make individualized 
demands upon the media. As with any study in the 
fine arts, the experience should be 
multidimensional, reflective of a broad range of 
personal and professional involvement, and 
reinforced with stimulation from related areas of 
interest, including drawing, painting, photography, 
graphic design, illustration, sculpture, and crafts. 

The undergraduate curriculum is enhanced by 
the graduate program in Book Arts/Printmaking. 
This two-year course of study of 60 credits, 
culminating in a Master of Fine Arts Degree, 
the program provides the opportunity for indi- 
vidual artist's expression in limited edition 
bookworks. Undergraduate students work 
alongside MFA candidates in studios, work- 
shops, and some major and elective classes. 
(Students interested in the MFA degree in Book 
Arts/Printmaking should contact the Depart- 
ment of Printmaking or Office of Admissions.) 

Department graduates find career opportunities 
in the areas of fine arts, education, book design 
and binding, commercial graphic arts, illustration, 
and edition printing. 



Facilities 

The Printmaking Department provides extensive 
facilities for waterbased screenprinting, stone and 
plate lithography, relief, etching and non-silver 
photographic processes. The bookbinding room 
houses book presses and a guillotine paper cutter. 
The letterpress studio contains 3 Vandercook 
presses for printing hand-set type and over 1 00 
fonts of varied type. In the offset lithography press 
room there is a Davidson 901 offset press and an 
AF Davidson Super Chief two-color press, both 
are used by the students for hands-on experience. 
An important resource is the Borowsky Center 
for Publication Arts, which is equipped with a 
Heidelberg KOFiS offset press and full darkroom 
for experimental and production printing. 

Faculty 

Carol Barton, Lecturer 

James Green, Lecturer 

Lois Johnson, Professor 

Jerome Kaplan, Professor Emeritus 

Hedi Kyle, Senior Lecturer 

Peter Lister, Senior Lecturer 

Barbara Mauriello, Senior Lecturer 

Jeanette McGrath, Lecturer 

Mary Phelan, Assistant Professor 

Tony Rosati, Senior Lecturer 

Patricia Smith, Assistant Professor 

Lori Spencer, Lecturer 

Franz Spohn, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Sarah Van Keuren, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Jennifer Woods, Senior Lecturer 

Visiting Artists 

Garo Antreasian, Professor Emeritus 

University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 

Clive Barstow 

Wales 

Carol Barton 

Washington, D.C. 

Sebastian Carter, Rampant Lions Press 

Cambridge, England 

Betsy Davids, Rebis Press 

California College of Arts & Crafts, Berkley 

Johanna Drucker, Druckwerk 

Columbia University, New York 

Ruth Fine, Curator 

National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 

Bilge Friedlaender 

University of Pennsylvania 

Warren Lehrer, ear/say 

State University of New York at Purchase 

Clive Phillpot 

Director of Library, Museum of Modern Art, NY 

John Risseiw, Cabbagehead Press 
Professor, Arizona State University, Tempe 

Keith A. Smith 

Rochester, NY 

Claire Van Vliet, Janus Press 

West Burke, Vermont 

Philip Zimmerman, Spaceheaters 

State University of New York at Purchase 



Credit Requirements 




Sophomore/Introductory 


Cred 


Required Courses: 




PR 201 Relief Printing 


3.0 


PR 202 Screenprinting 


3.0 


PR 204 Etching 


3.0 


PR 205 Concepts I, II 


3.0 


PR 206 Printmaking Workshop 


3.0 


Studio Electives 


6.0 


Humanities 


12.0 



Sophomore Year Total 



33.0 
Credits 



Junior/Intermediate 

Required Courses: 

PR 300 Lithography 3.0 

PR 305 Advanced Relief Printing 1.5 

PR 306 Print Study Seminar 3.0 

PR 223 Book Arts I 1.5 

PR 307 Book Arts II 1.5 
PR 308 Advanced Lithography Workshop 3.0 

PR 309 Advanced Etching 1.5 

Studio Electives 6.0 

Humanities 12.0 



Junior Year Total 
Senior/Advanced 



33.0 

Credits 

Required Courses: 

PR 400 Printmaking: Advanced Workshop 3.0 
PR 407 Thesis Seminar 3.0 

PR 410 Book Arts III 1.5 

PR 412 Advanced Screenprinting 1.5 

PR 420 Thesis Workshop 6.0 

Studio Electives 9.0 

Humanities 9.0 



Senior Year Total 



33.0 



38 



Sculpture 

Barry Parker 

Chairperson 
215-875-4884 

Sculpture reflects one of the deepest creative 
impulses of artistic endeavor. Sculptors today are 
called upon to create images that range in size 
from coins to monuments. Usually working as 
independent artists, sculptors make objects for 
exhibition and sale, or work on commission for 
architects and planners. 

The Sculpture Department offers instruction and 
experience in both the traditional and the most 
innovative aspects of the art. Resources are avail- 
able for work in clay, wood, stone, ferrous and 
nonferrous metals, plaster, wax, and plastic. 

The department's instructional aim is to provide 
a sound, balanced exposure to the formal 
technical and intellectual aspects of sculpture, in 
preparation for continued professional growth 
beyond the undergraduate years. The curriculum is 
carefully designed to provide both disciplined 
instruction and time for individual creative 
development. 

At the introductory level, fundamentals of sculp- 
ture are taught along with technical 
procedures in a variety of materials. At advanced 
levels, students may specialize and are 
increasingly expected to initiate and complete 
works reflecting their own artistic interests under 
critical supervision. 

Studio and shop facilities are comprehensive 
and include air tools for carving, a foundry for 
bronze and aluminum casting, a wood and 
fabricating shop, a complete metal shop for forg- 
ing and three types of welding, and a moldmaking 
shop. Technical assistance and su- 

pervision in the facilities is provided by a full-time 
shop supervisor who is in charge of 
maintaining the equipment. 

Faculty members are chosen from a variety of 
backgrounds, and field trips to New York, Wash- 
ington, and neighboring museums serve to expand 
students' visions. 



Faculty 

Phoebe Adams, Lecturer 

Harvey Citron, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Gail Ferretti, Lecturer 

Alan Greenberg, Lecturer 

Aaron Goldblatt, Lecturer 

Barbara Lekberg, Lecturer 

Steve Nocella, Lecturer 

Barry Parker, Professor 

John Phillips, Lecturer 

Thomas Steams, Associate Professor 



Credit Requirements 

Sophomore/Introductory Credits 

Required Courses: 

SC201 Sculpture I 3.0 

SC202 Sculpture I 3.0 

SC220 Molding and Casting 3.0 

SC 231 Introduction to Figure Modeling 3.0 
SC251 Theories of Structure 1.5 

SC252 Theories of Structure 1.5 

Choose a minimum of 3 credits from the 
following courses: 3.0 

SC232 Intro to Figure Modeling 3.0 
SC 241 Sculpture Projects: 

Introductory Studio I 3.0 
SC 242 Sculpture Projects: 

Introductory Studio II 3.0 
Studio Electives 3.0 

Humanities 12.0 



33.0 
Credits 

3.0 

3.0 
1.5 
1.5 

6.0 



6.0 
3.0 



3.0 



3.0 



Sophomore Year Total 

Junior/Intermediate 

Required Courses: 

SC301 Sculpture II 

SC302 Sculpture II 

SC321 Carving 

SC421 Metal Studio 

Choose a minimum of 6 credits from the 

following courses: 

SC 260 Structure of the Figure 

SC431 Advanced Figure 

Sculpture 
SC432 Advanced Figure 

Sculpture 
SC441 Sculpture Project: 

Advanced Studio 
Studio Electives 6.0 

Humanities 12.0 

Junior Year Total 33.0 

Senior/Advanced Credits 

Required Courses: 

SC401 Sculpture III 3.0 

SC402 Sculpture III 3.0 

Choose a minimum of 6 credits from the 
following courses: 6.0 

SC260 Structure of the Figure 6.0 
SC322 Carving 1.5 

SC422 Metal Studio 1.5 

SC431 Advanced Figure 3.0 

Sculpture 
SC432 Advanced Figure 3.0 

Sculpture 
SC 441 Sculpture Projects: 

Advanced Studio 3.0 

SC 442 Sculpture Projects: 

Advanced Studio 3.0 

Studio Electives 12.0 

Humanities 9.0 



Guest Lecturers 

Bill Barrett 
Natalie Charcow 
Cynthia Eardley 
Thomas Golya 
Kristen Jones 
Michael Malphs 
Joe Moss 
James Rosati 
Alvin Sher 
Takeo Shimizu 
James Wines 
Isaac Witkin 



Senior Year Total 



33.0 



Fine Arts Sophomore Year Option 

Faculty Advisor. Professor Jerry Herdman 

Students who elect to pursue a fine arts 
education majoring in Painting and Drawing, 
Photography/Film/Animation, Printmaking, or 
Sculpture, have two program options. 

1 . Students who want to study in one particular 
Fine Art Department can declare that program 
major during the second semester of their 
foundation year and commence a concentration 
as sophomores. 

2. Students may choose the Fine Arts Sopho- 
more Year Option and may defer major de- 
partment selection until as late as the sec- 
ond semester of the sophomore year, and 
begin a major concentration at the start of 
their junior year. Students who choose this 
option and expect to graduate without time 
penalty must take a minimum of six major 
department credits as sophomores in the 
department of their ultimate choice. 

Painting and Drawing, Printmaking, and 
Photography/Film/Animation Departments will 
substitute 6 credits from the three other fine arts 
departments toward their 45 major department 
credit requirements. The Sculpture Department 
will allow no substitutions and will require 45 
credits in major department courses, which 
students will be able to complete without time 
penalty before graduation. 

The 30 credit elective component and 39 major 
credit distribution of the Fine Arts Sophomore Year 
Option (for sculpture: 24 elective and 45 major 
credits) makes it possible for those students that 
wish it, to minor and major simultaneously. 

A seminar is scheduled every semester by the 
fine arts departments (on a rotating basis) that is 
recommended to students that choose the Fine 
Arts Sophomore Year Option. These courses focus 
on those issues that are common to all of the fine 
arts. The emphasis is on learning the language of 
art and clarifying the intention of the student. This 
program encourages interdisciplinary work as well 
as alternatives to traditional forms of expression. 

Students who choose the Fine Arts Sophomore 
Year Option will be considered Fine Arts Unde- 
cided Majors until they declare a major. They will 
be advised by a designated Fine Arts Advisor who 
is authorized to sign roster forms and will work 
with students and fine art department chairs to 
insure knowledgeable and appropriate selection of 
courses and program. Once students become jun- 
iors they will have to be a member of one of the 
four fine arts major departments. 



Ait Therapy 

Sherry Lyons 

Director 
215-875-1104 

Art Therapy is a new discipline within the human 
services professions that offers an opportunity to 
explore personal problems and potentials through 
verbal and nonverbal expression. Physical, emo- 
tional, and learning skills may be developed 
through therapeutic art processes, forms, content, 
and associations as reflections of an individual's 
development, personality, and conflicts. 

An undergraduate art college is the ideal place 
to begin the study of Art Therapy. At The Univer- 
sity of the Arts the student is equipped with prac- 
tical experience in art while acquiring a back- 
ground in psychology and behavioral science. 

While majoring in one of the studio 
departments of the University, the student is intro- 
duced to Art Therapy on the undergraduate level. 

Students who wish to enroll in the Art Therapy 
program register for Art Therapy courses as studio 
electives. Students complete all requirements in 
their chosen major department. At graduation, Art 
Therapy Concentration students will receive a 
certificate of completion in Art Therapy in addition 
to the BFA degree. 

Interested students should request an inter- 
view with the Art Therapy Director. The Hu- 
manities Department can schedule appoint- 
ments at 215-875-1 104. 



Faculty 

Karen Clark-Schock 
Ronald Hays 
Sherry Lyons 

Sophomore/Introductory Credits 

HU 181 A Child Psychology 3.0 

HU181B Adult Psychology 3.0 

HU162 Intro, to Sociology 3.0 

Junior 

HU384 Abnormal Psychology 3.0 

AT 300 Intro, to Art Therapy 3.0 

AT 301 Social and Group Process 3.0 

AT 302 Theories & Tech. Art Therapy 3.0 

Senior 

AT 303 Clinical Aspects of Art Therapy 
AT 401 Senior Practicum 
HU 483 Theories of Personality 



3.0 
3.0 
3.0 

3O.0 



Education 

JanisT. Norman 

Chairperson 
215-875-4881 

Pre-CertificatJon Concentration in Art 
Education 

The teaching of art is a profession that allows for 
the artist-teacher's continued growth while 
nurturing the aesthetic and creative experience of 
others. Recent national as well as state-wide 
attention to education and to the role of the arts in 
education makes this an especially good time for 
students to consider becoming an art teacher as 
well as an artist. In preparing students for careers 
in art education, The University of the Arts, Phila- 
delphia College of Art and Design, is committed to 
the ideal of teachers who are able to produce their 
own competent works as well as teach others. To 
that end, the University offers a flexible program 
of competency-based education at the under- 
graduate level to prepare students to complete a 
professional certification program after graduation 
or within a nine semester undergraduate program. 

The Pre-Certification concentration is designed 
to be taken in conjunction with a regular studio 
major in the BFA program. In addition to meeting 
the requirements of a major studio department, 
students entering a teacher certification program 
take courses in the Education Department, plus 
recommended courses in Humanities, Photo- 
graphy, Electronic Media, and other studio areas. 
These courses are taken within the general 
Humanities and studio electives requirements. 

The Art Education concentration provides a 
strong theoretical and practical foundation for 
teaching as a career. Through field experiences 
starting in the sophomore year, the student is able 
to explore teaching in a variety of traditional and 
alternative settings. Students are also provided 
with the necessary competencies in teaching Dis- 
cipline-Based Art Education through special stud- 
ies in education combined with Humanities 
coursework in Art History, Aesthetics, Social Sci- 
ences, and Psychology, plus studies in studio pro- 
duction and criticism. 

The Pre-Certification Concentration may be 
taken in its entirety or in part to fit individual plans 
and needs. Students who satisfactorily complete 
the program will be able to enroll directly in the 
Professional Semester following graduation, com- 
pleting the student teaching requirement and 
qualifying for the Pennsylvania Instructional I Cer- 
tificate to teach Art K-12 in as little as one regular 
semester beyond the bachelor's degree. Another 
viable alternative is that qualified graduates may 
enter the Master of Arts in Teaching program. 

This program, if taken in conjunction with the 
BFA degree, allows for the majority of the concen- 
tration in Art Education to be completed within the 
four years required for the bachelor's degree. Fol- 
lowing graduation, remaining course requirements 
for certification may be completed in one addi- 
tional professional semester, in which AE 659 
Student Teaching Practicum is taken, along with 
GR 550 Group Process in the Classroom and 
AE 657 Professional Forum. 



Faculty 

Paul Adorno, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Diane Foxman, Lecturer 

Arlene Gostin, Associate Professor 

Janis Norman, Associate Professor 

Susan Rodriguez, Adjunct Associate Professor 

David Tafler, Associate Professor 

Recommended Schedule of Courses for 
Pre-Certification in Art Education 

Freshman 

Standard Foundation and Humanities Program 
. *HU 151 Language of Art History 

Sophomore 

First Semester or Second Semester 

AE201 Intro, to Visual Arts Education 1.5 

*HU 1 62 Individual and Society 3.0 

*HU 270lntroduction to Aesthetics 3.0 

*HU 181 Child and Adolescent Psychology 3.0 

*HU249ModernArt 3.0 

or 

*HU 448American Art After 1 945 3.0 

Junior 

First Semester or Second Semester 

AE459 Saturday Practicum 3.0 

*HU 363Modern Culture 3.0 

or 

*HU 462American Social Values 3.0 

*HU374Personality and Creativity 3.0 

or 

*HU480Psychology of Creativity 3.0 

Senior 

First Semester 

AE 547 Program Design/Methods in 

Elementary School 3.0 

AE 548 Program Design/Methods in 

Middle/Secondary School 3.0 

* Balance of required Humanities. 

** Photography and Computer competency is re- 
quired for certification with a minimum 
requirement of one course in each area. 



Required Studio Electives 

Pre-Certification students should complete at least 
three credits in two-dimensional media if their 
major is in a three-dimensional area, and vice 
versa. Other studio work should include at least 
one course each in photography and computer. 

The Professional Semester 

The Pre-Certification Concentration, when coupled 
with the Professional Semester, is accredited by 
the Pennsylvania Department of Education as an 
approved program to prepare students to receive 
the Instructional I Certificate to teach Art K-12. 
Since June 1987, all applicants for certification in 
Pennsylvania must also pass the Pennsylvania 
Teacher Certification Testing Program (PCTCP) 
Tests to qualify for the certificate. 

The Professional Semester is an intensive 
experience built around a twelve-week student 
teaching practicum, in which the student devotes 
six weeks to teaching at the elementary school 
level and six weeks to teaching at the middle or 
secondary school level under the guidance and 
supervision of highly qualified master teachers 
and Art Education Department faculty. 

Supplementary courses and activities complete 
the preparation of the future teacher to enter the 
profession. The professional semester is available 
to students only after major requirements have 
been met, and normally after graduating with a 
bachelor's degree. 

Professional Semester or 9th Semester of BFA 
Program 

AE 550 Group Process in the Classroom 1 .5 
AE657 Professional Forum 1.5 

AE659 Student Teaching Practicum 9.0 

Academic Regulations 

Students working toward certification are required 
to maintain a 3.0 average in certification course- 
work. Admission to the Student Teaching 
Practicum is by permission of the department 
based on satisfactory completion of all prerequi- 
sites and on evidence of promise as a teacher 
shown in prior coursework. A grade of B or better 
in the Student Teaching Practicum is required for 
recommendation for certification. 



41 



Graduate Programs 



Art Education 

JanisT. Norman 

Chairperson 
215-875-4881 

Master of Arts in Art Education 

The Master of Arts in Art Education is designed 
to develop the studio, intellectual, and profes- 
sional education background of art educators, 
enabling them to meet professional goals be- 
yond those possible with bachelor-level cre- 
dentials. Coordinating professional education 
courses with work in humanities and studio, 
the MA in Art Education offers students an ' 
opportunity to pursue custom-designed pro- 
grams of study to meet individual needs. 

The program is primarily addressed to established 
or new teachers, for whom the degree may satisfy 
credit accrual requirements for Permanent Certifica- 
tion or lead to other career advancement. However, 
graduates have also found the program relevant to 
positions in museum education, college (especially 
junior college) teaching, arts administration, educa- 
tional media, and other fields related to art education. 
Applicants must hold a Bachelor's degree or equiva- 
lent with no less than 40 credits in studio. A teaching 
certificate is not required. Students not holding de- 
grees in the visual arts can expect to roster 1 8 credits 
of foundation studies and/or up to 40 credits of studio 
work, dependent upon faculty review of their portfolio. 

The MA program may be completed in one aca- 
demic year plus a summer if the student is enrolled in 
full-time study. However, course work may be under- 
taken part-time over as many as five years. 

Master of Arts in Teaching in Visual Arts 

The Art Education Department also offers the 
Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree in 
Visual Arts, a professional degree incorporat- 
ing preparation for the Pennsylvania Instruc- 
tional I Certificate to teach Art K-12. Additional 
coursework includes the history, theory and 
practice of art education. Intended to follow an 
undergraduate degree in studio art, the MAT 
degree is the most efficient way to earn a 
graduate degree while becoming eligible for 
certification to teach in the public schools. 

Applicants to the MAT Program should possess 
a BFA or BA degree in studio art with a minimum 
of forty (40) studio credits with a "B" or better 
average. They also must have satisfactorily com- 
pleted the following coursework and/or acquired 
competencies in fields relating to teacher certifi- 
cation. If deficiencies exist, up to 6 credits may be 
completed concurrently with the degree and 
applied to elective requirements. 

• 3 upper division credits in a 3D studio area if a 
2D studio major 

• 3 upper division credits in a 2D studio area if a 
3D studio major 

• Introduction to computers, preferably including 
graphic applications 

• Basic photography 

• Art History, 12 credits, including at least one 
course in 20th Century Art 



• Introduction to Psychology 

• Sociology or Cultural Anthropology 

• Aesthetics (may be satisfied by AE 691 A) 

• Art Criticism (may be satisfied by AE 691 A) 

• Speech or Acting (recommended) 

Master of Arts in Teaching in Visual Arts 
(augmented program) 

For those who seek to become certified to teach art 
but do not yet have a sufficient background to prepare 
for certification within the normal one-year framework 
of the MAT program, the 36 credit degree may be 
augmented by simply adding coursework in the areas 
needed. The principal difference between the aug- 
mented MAT degree and the MA certification program 
is that the latter involves completion of a graduate 
research project in addition to the student teaching 
experience. 

Master of Arts in Art Education 
(with Teacher Certification) 

Those who seek to become certified to teach art 
and are qualified to enter the MAT program di- 
rectly but prefer the academic research orientation 
of the MA program may augment the MA program 
with the required certification coursework, becom- 
ing eligible for certification as early as the comple- 
tion of the second semester of full-time study. 
Normally, this option requires a minimum total of 
57 credits, and it leads to a single degree. 

Faculty 

Janis T. Norman, Associate Professor 

Paul Adorno, Lecturer 

Arlene Gostin, Associate Professor 

Nathan Knobler, Professor 

Susan Rodriguez, Adjunct Associate Professor 

David Tafler, Associate Professor 



42 



Requirements for Master of Arts in 
Art Education 



Total Credits: 36 








Fall 


Spring 


AE 606 Research in Art Education 


3.0 


- 


AE610 Graduate Studio Seminar 


1.5 


1.5 


AE602 History of Ideas in 






Art Education 


- 


3.0 


AE 649 Graduate Project/Thesis 


- 


6.0 


GR 691 University Seminar 


3.0 


3.0 


Studio Elective 


7.5 


1.5 




15 


15 




Summer 


Studio Elective 




3.0 


Humanities Elective 




3.0 



6.0 

The Graduate Project 

The MA Program culminates in the production of a 
graduate project. The Thesis Project, normally 
completed in a single semester, may take one of 
two distinct forms: 1 ) an academic thesis present- 
ing original research in a significant historical, 
theoretical, or pedagogical question relating to 
visual arts education, or 2) a studio or curriculum 
project for use as a pedagogical tool. Whichever 
form it takes, the process followed is essentially 
directed independent study under the supervision 
of a faculty advisor. The student must prepare a 
project proposal prior to the assignment of a 
project advisor. The proposal, which need by only 
a few pages in length, should include the follow- 
ing components to establish the project's viability: 
1 ) a concise description of the project: 2) a state- 
ment of the significance of the project; 3) an 
explanation of the students competence to under- 
take the project (e.g., previous study or work on 
the topic area or other relevant experience); 4) a 
timetable for the project; and 5) a preliminary 
bibliography. The proposal should be developed 
with the advice of a member of the MA Program 
Committee and must be submitted to the Commit- 
tee at least four weeks prior to the end of the 
semester preceding that in which the project is to 
be undertaken. The appointment of the advisor is 
by the Department Chairperson in consultation 
with the student and the Committee. 

The project advisor meets periodically with 
the student as needed and is responsible for 
overseeing the development and acceptability 
of the project. Not later than the week of final 
examinations, the completed project will be 
reviewed by a three or four member panel con- 
sisting of persons appointed by the Department 
Chairperson from the following categories, 
which may be overlapping: 1) the project advi- 
sor; 2) two members of the MA Program Com- 
mittee; 3) a member of the Art Education fac- 
ulty; and 4) a faculty person outside the Depart- 
ment who is knowledgeable in the field of the 
project. In certain cases the extra-departmental 
reviewer may be from outside of the University. 
The purpose of this panel is not to work with 
the student to develop the project, but simply 
to act as a review panel to recommend on ac- 
ceptance of the finished project. Final accep- 
tance is the responsibility of the MA Program 



Committee, in consultation with the review 
panel. Upon acceptance, the student must pro- 
vide two copies of the project and/or related 
documentation, durably bound or otherwise 
presented in a form appropriate to the project. 
The diploma will not be released until these 
copies are satisfactorily deposited. 

In the extraordinary event that a project is 
unacceptable as submitted, the MA Program 
Committee may at its discretion offer one of the 
following alternatives to the student, as circum- 
stances warrant: 1 ) repetition of the project, sub- 
ject to requirements which may be specified by 
the Committee; or 2) assignment of a grade of 
"Incomplete" to be made up within the first six 
weeks of the following semester, with no addi- 
tional registration required. 



The Studio Component 

The studio component of the MA Program is 
intended to serve the professional development 
needs of art educators. As such, it is tailored to 
individual students along two different but not 
necessarily exclusive lines. For the student whose 
studio background is broad and not concentrated 
in a particular discipline, the program offers an 
opportunity to develop greater mastery in a single 
studio area. For the student whose experience is 
more narrowly concentrated in one area, the pro- 
gram provides a framework for expanding studio 
skills in two or more other areas. It is therefore not 
expected that the MA student will have graduate 
level skills in the areas being studied. Accordingly, 
most studio work will utilize undergraduate 
courses open to Junior and Senior majors in the 
various departments of the College. However, it is 
assumed that students in the MA Program will 
have a sophistication, focus, and maturity which 
enables them to accomplish at a level beyond that 
generally required of undergraduates in these 
courses. For the student whose studio background 
is already both broad and deep, graduate level 
work in the student's principal area may be under- 
taken on an independent study basis, drawing on 
the rich resources of the College's faculty by ar- 
rangement through the Art Education Department. 
The specific studio requirements are set at the 
time of admission in consultation with the studio 
department(s) involved, whose evaluation of the 
applicant's portfolio is necessary for placement 
purposes. Special attention should therefore be 
given in the application to explaining the 
applicant's objectives in the studio component and 
to presenting an accurate presentation of the 
applicant's studio experience and accomplishment. 



Requirements for the Master of Arts in 
Teaching in the Visual Arts 



Total Credits: 36 








Fall 


Spring 


AE 558 Program Design & Methods: 




Middle and Secondary 


3.0 


- 


AE 459 Saturday Practicum 


3.0 


- 


AE 606 Research in Art Education 


3.0 


- 


AE 657 Professional Forum 


1.5 


_ 


AE 551 Group Process in the 






Classroom 


- 


3.0 


AE 602 History of Ideas in 






Art Education 


- 


3.0 


AE659 Student Teaching Practicum - 


9.0 


Studio, Education, or 






Humanities Electives 


6.0 


- 




15 


15 




Summer 



AE 550 Creative and Cognitive 

Development in Children 3.0 

AE 557 Program Design & Methods: 

Elementary 3.0 



6.0 



Electives of particular interest: 

GR 691 University Seminar: Structure and 

Metaphor 

3 credits. Fall 
GR 691 University Seminar: Art and Society 

3 credits. Spring 



43 



Master of Fine Arts in Book Arts/ 
Printmaking 

Mary Phelan 

Director 
215-875-1066 

The University of the Arts Master of Fine Arts 
Degree in Book Arts/Printmaking builds upon the 
University's thirty-year tradition of involvement 
with the book and printed image. Open to all quali- 
fied students with an undergraduate degree in 
Liberal Arts, Design, Printmaking or Fine Arts, the 
program emphasizes the development of students 
as artists who make individualized demands upon 
printed media and the book as an art form. The 
course of study, based upon the student's interests 
and level of experience, allows for the advance- 
ment of conceptual abilities and technical 
proficiencies in traditional and state-of-the-art 
processes. The program enables the student to 
develop in areas which are applicable to an aca- 
demic career as well as to a range of professional 
endeavors. 

Visiting artists, field trips, and guest lecturers 
supplement the studio experience. Access to 
Philadelphia's rich heritage of public and private 
collections furnishes a unique opportunity to study 
page forms from manuscripts to contemporary 
prints and books. Internships in professional print- 
related organizations and libraries in Philadelphia 
are available for qualified students. 

In addition to studios for stone and plate lithog- 
raphy, water-based screenprinting, intaglio, relief, 
and non-silver photographic processes, the depart- 
ment contains a bookbinding room with stationary 
vertical and portable book presses, a tabletop and 
floor board shear, and one guillotine paper cutter. 
An important resource is The Borowsky Center for 
Publication Arts. The Center is equipped with a 
Heidelberg KORS offset press and full darkroom 
for experimental and production printing leading to 
career work in the publication arts. There is also 
separate graduate studio space for book arts/ 
printmaking students that provides work stations, 
light tables, portable book presses, a paper cutter 
and a Vandercook press. 

The main emphasis of the program is on the 
development of students as artists who make 
individualized demands upon the media. As with 
any study in the fine arts, the experience should 
be multi-dimensional, reflective of a broad range 
of personal and professional involvement, and 
reinforced with stimulation from related areas of 
interest, including humanities, drawing, painting, 
photography, graphic design, illustration, computer 
imaging and typesetting, papermaking and crafts. 



Requirements 
Total Credits: 60 

Year One 

PR 600 Print Colloquium 
PR 603 History of the Book 
PR 617 Type/Letterpress 
PR 618 Workshop:Color/Mark 
PR 623 Book Binding 
PR 626 Offset Lithography 
PR 691 University Seminar 
Humanities or Studio Electives 

Year Two 

PR 700 Print Colloquium 
PR 710 MFA Project Type 
PR 720 MFA Project Binding 
PR 725 MFA Project Offset 
PR 715 Graduate Studio 
PR 741 MFA Thesis Studio 
PR 742 MFA Thesis Studio 
PR 791 University Seminar 
Humanities or Studio Electives 



Fall Spring 



1.5 


1.5 


- 


1.5 


1.5 


3.0 


1.5 


- 


1.5 


1.5 


3.0 


1.5 


3.0 


3.0 


3.0 


3.0 


15 


15 


1.5 


1.5 


1.5 


- 


1.5 


- 


1.5 


- 


1.5 


- 


- 


3.0 


- 


3.0 


3.0 


3.0 


4.5 


4.5 



15 15 



Faculty 

Frank Galuszka, Professor 
James Green, Lecturer 
Lois M. Johnson, Professor 
Nathan Knobler, Professor 
Hedi Kyle, Lecturer 
Barbara Mauriello, Lecturer 
Mary Phelan, Assistant Professor 
Patricia M. Smith, Assistant Professor 
David Tafler, Associate Professor 



44 



Master of Fine Arts in Museum 
Exhibition Planning and Design 

Jane Bedno 

Director 
215-875-1110 

Recognized formally as a part of the museum pro- 
fession by the American Association of Museums 
since 1 981 , the field of exhibition planning and 
design has become a demanding, fast-growing 
profession as museums respond to the demand for 
exhibitions addressed to public needs and inter- 
ests. Through the efforts of NAME, the National 
Association for Museum Exhibitions, and the ini- 
tiative of The University of the Arts, a fully profes- 
sional graduate program in Museum Exhibition 
Design is offered. The two year, 60 credit, Master 
of Fine Arts Degree in Museum Exhibition Design 
prepares students for professional careers in the 
planning and design of exhibits and the presenta- 
tion of artifacts, objects, phenomena and informa- 
tion to diverse publics in museums of art, nature, 
science and the humanities. 

The curriculum addresses the conceptual- 
ization, researching, organization, design and 
production of museum exhibits and presentations 
utilizing a variety of techniques and media. 
Throughout the program, the student will explore 
exhibit programming, evaluation and management 
methods applicable in a wide range of museum 
situations. Visiting experts in many aspects of 
museum presentation, education and manage- 
ment will participate in the curriculum while 
students will make privileged visits to design de- 
partments, production shops, galleries, exhibits 
and programs in varied and numerous museums in 
Philadelphia, the Mid-Atlantic Region, Washing- 
ton, and New York. Students will undertake a 
thesis project and a supervised museum internship 
related to their career interests during the second 
year of the program. To preserve the intimate con- 
tact with museum professionals and to guarantee 
participants studio facilities, the program is lim- 
ited to nine entrants per year. 

Most candidates will have previously com- 
pleted a baccalaureate in industrial, graphic, 
interior or architectural design and demonstrate 
an acceptable level of professional accomplish- 
ment through a portfolio or another appropriate 
means. Alternatively, they may seek admission 
with a baccalaureate in a discipline related to 
their career direction, and take courses to de- 
velop the necessary background in design. Stu- 
dents from non-design, non-art backgrounds 
are welcome and encouraged to apply. 



Participating Institutions 

Many museums in Philadelphia and the northeast 
actively participate in the program through 
lectures in the museum course, sponsorship of 
studio projects, hosting visits, and supporting 
internships. 

Museums presently committed to such partici-, 
pation include: 

The Cooper Hewitt Museum, New York 
The Franklin Institute Science Museum, 

Philadelphia 
The Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, 

Delaware 
The Please Touch Museum, Philadelphia 
The Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Faculty 

Jane Bedno, Associate Professor 

Ed Bedno, Adjunct Professor 

Arthur Friedman, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Frank Galuszka, Professor 

Nathan Knobler, Professor 

David Tafler, Associate Professor 

Requirements 

Total Credits: 60 

Year One Fall Spring 

ME 500 Museum Course 3.0 3.0 
ME 610 Museum Exhibition Design 

Studio 6.0 6.0 

ME 621 Environmental Graphics 3.0 
ME 623 Exhibit Materials and 

Technology - 3.0 

GR691 University Seminar 3.0 3.0 

Elective 1.5 1.5 





16.5 


16.5 


Summer 






ME 759 Museum Internship 


3.0 




Year Two 

ME 710 Museum Exhibition 






Design Studio 


- 


6.0 


ME 622 Media 


- 


3.0 


ME 749 Thesis Development 


3.0 


3.0 


GR791 University Seminar 


3.0 


3.0 


Elective 


1.5 


1.5 



Ceramic Studio Residence 
Program 

Lizbeth Stewart 

Director 

The Ceramic Studio Residence Program is open to 
graduates of undergraduate ceramic programs. 
The program offers a rare opportunity for pursuing 
work in clay. The essential emphasis is to develop 
each student's potential for personal expression 
and artistic invention. Energies are focused on 
developing ceramic artists who are prepared to 
realize their creative capacity and succeed with 
distinction in a professional environment. 

There are five places which are awarded by 
portfolio references. Accepted candidates are 
required to enroll for at least six credits a semes- 
ter for two semesters, be present in the studio 
during major days and contribute three hours of 
work as teaching assistants or technical monitors 
to the undergraduate program. In exchange for 
this, the student is provided individual twenty-four 
hour workspace, excellent equipment, and sup- 
portive tutorial instruction. Residents may audit 
plaster workshop or ceramic tech class. 

Former participants have been recent BFA 
graduates continuing preparation for graduate 
study. Others are young professional developing 
their work for production and sale in their future 
studios. Some residents have been teachers on 
leave or ceramic artists who wish to work again in 
an academic setting. 

Inquiries should be made to Lizabeth Stewart, 
Studio Resident Program, Ceramic Studio at The 
University of the Arts. Applicants will be required 
to submit from 8 to 20 slides (35 mm) and a letter 
of recommendation from their ceramic instructor. 
In addition, a resume and letter stating profes- 
sional plans and goals is required. 

The studio, located at The University of the Arts 
in center city Philadelphia, is within walking 
distance of the country's leading craft galleries, 
museum collections, and design studios. 



7.5 16.5 



Philadelphia College of 
Art and Design 
Course Descriptions 



Foundation 

FP060 
Freshman Forum 

1 hour a week 

credits/semester: fall 

The Freshman Forum is a series of presentations 

given by each major studio department in the 

College of Art and Design, and each school in the 

College of Performing Arts, which offer insight 

into career opportunities as they relate to each 

discipline. 

FP100 

Drawing 

6 hours a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

The student pursues the investigation of drawing 

strategies on both a perceptual and conceptual 

level. The use of line and tone are developed to 

examine the basic forms and structures and to 

build a visual vocabulary. Exercises are designed 

to acquaint the student with many aspects of 

drawing as a process. 

FP120 
Two-Dimensional Design 

6 hours a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Working with point, line, shape, and color, 
the student examines the principles of two- 
dimensional design. Projects are designed to 
focus on the interaction of these elements to yield 
coherent organizational principles, spatial illusion, 
and integrated compositional units. 

FP190 
Three-Dimensional Design 

6 hours a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

The student explores the physical and visual 

properties of three-dimensional form. The studio 

experience emphasizes formal analysis and 

three-dimensional design processes, using diverse 

materials, to study concepts of structure, 

organization, and aesthetics. 

Art Education 

AE201 

Introduction to Visual Arts Education 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits 

A theoretical and practical introduction to the 
entire field of art education. Through field obser- 
vations and classroom lecture-discussions, the 
student surveys the various aspects of teaching 
ina variety of situations and environments. 
Included are teaching in public and private schools 
K-12, as well as specialized and alternative set- 
tings in museum education, early childhood educa- 
tion, special education (for handicapped and gifted 
children), and adult education. 



AE459 

Saturday Practicum 

3 hours lecture-discussion, 
3 hours field work each week 
3 credits 

Students are involved in various aspects of the 
Saturday School. They observe classroom instruc- 
tion, plan and teach lessons, and exhibit student 
work under the supervision of cooperating master 
teachers and a college supervisor. 

AE500 

Graduate Studio Seminar 

3 lecture-discussion hours once a week, 

two semesters 

1 .5 credits each semester 

AE502 

History of Ideas in Art Education 

3 seminar hours, once a week 
3 credits 

Seminar on major issues and trends in the history 
of Art Education, with an emphasis on child- 
centered and content-centered theories and the 
theoretical antecedents of the discipline-based art 
education movement. 

AE504 

Art Theory and Criticism 

3 seminar hours, once a week 
3 credits 

AE505 

Graduate Studio Seminar 

3 lecture hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

An interdisciplinary seminar exclusively for art 

educators. Topics of broad concern to studio 

artists will be addressed in response to students' 

work, assigned readings, and relevant public 

lectures or other art events in the University and 

the community. 

AE506 

Research in Art Education: Methods and 

Trends 

3 seminar hours, once a week 

3 credits 

A graduate education seminar on principal 

approaches to Art Education research. The course 

examines several recent studies for their 

methodologies and findings and in so doing takes 

an overview of the field. 

AE508 

Art and Society 

3 seminar hours, once a week 
3 credits 



46 



AE539 
Thesis Project 

6 credits (may be divided over more than one 

semester) 

Directed independent study culminating in a 

project supervised by a faculty advisor. The 

graduate project, normally completed in a single 

semestr, may take either of two distinct forms: 

a) an academic thesis presenting original research 
in a significant historical, theoretical, or pedagogi- 
cal question relating to visual arts education, or 

b) a studio or curriculum project intended for use 
as a pedagogical tool. 

AE547 

Program Design and Methods in the 

Elementary School 

3 hours lecture-discussion, 
3 hours field work each week 
3 credits 

Through review of current literature, lecture- 
discussion, field observation, and mini-teaching, 
students explore various educational philosophies 
and develop and implement effective classroom 
curricula based on prevailing theories of learning 
and child development. 

AE548 

Program Design and Methods in the 

Middle and Secondary School 

3 hours lecture-discussion, 

3 hours field work each week 

3 credits 

Continuation of AE 547, with emphasis on the 

Middle and Secondary School. 

AE550 

Cognitive and Creative Development 

3 hours lecture-discussion each week 
3 credits 

This course is designed to develop skills in 
recognizing the developmental stages of children 
and adolescents according to the theories of Jean 
Piaget, Lawrence Kohlberg, Viktor Lowenfeld, 
and Erick Erickson. In addition, the course will 
explore the learning theories of Jerome Bruner, 
B.F. Skinner, Howard Gardner, Madeline Hunter, 
and Bernice McCarthy toward understanding 
individual difference in creative and cognitive 
development and learning styles. 

AE551 

Group Process in the Classroom 

3 hours once a week 
1.5 credits 

Various aspects of classroom dynamics are 
examined. These include cultural and family 
factors that influence learning, expectations con- 
veyed by teacher and peer behavior, techniques 
of instruction, and creativity. 



AE557 
Professional Forum 

1 .5 hours lecture-discussion, once a week 
1 .5 credits 

Lectures and discussions on contemporary issues 
and topics in art and art education. 

AE559A&B 

Student Teaching Practicum 

5 full days a week for twelve weeks, plus 2 hours 
discussion, once a week 

9 credits 

An intensive experience build around a twelve- 
week student teaching practicum, in which the 
student devotes six weeks to teaching at the ele- 
mentary school level and six weeks at the middle 
or secondary school level under the guidance and 
supervision of highly qualified master teachers 
and Art Education Department faculty. 

AE602 

History of Ideas in Art Education 

3 credits 

Seminar on major issues and trends in the history 
of Art education, with an emphasis on child-cen- 
tered and content-centered theories and the theo- 
retical antecedents of the Discipline-Based Art 
Education movement. 

AE606 

Research in Art Education: Methods and 

Trends 

3 credits 

A graduate education seminar on principal ap- 
proaches to Art Education research. The course 
examines several recent studies for their method- 
ologies and findings and in so doing takes an 
overview of the field. 

AE610 

Graduate Studio Seminar 

1 .5 credits each semester 
An interdisciplinary seminar exclusively for art 
educators. Topics of broad concern to studio art- 
ists will be addressed in response to student's 
work, assigned readings, and occasional public 
lectures or other art events in the University and 
the community. 

AE649 

Graduate Project/ Thesis 

6 credits (may be divided over more than one 
semester) 

Culminating independent project supervised by a 
faculty advisor. The graduate project or thesis, 
normally completed in a single semester, may 
take either of two distinct forms: a) an academic 
thesis presenting original research in a significant 
historical, theoretical, or pedagogical question 
relating to visual arts education, or b) a studio or 
curriculum project intended for use a pedagogical 
tool. 

AE657 
Professional Forum 

1 .5 credits 

Lectures and discussions on contemporary issues 

and topics in art and art education 



AE659 

Student Teaching Practicum 

5 full days a week for twelve weeks, 9 credits 
An intensive experience built around a twelve- 
week student teaching practicum, in which the 
student devotes six weeks to teaching at the el- 
ementary school level and six seeks at the middle 
or secondary school level under the guidance and 
supervision of highly qualified master teachers 
and Art Education Department faculty. 



Crafts 



CR201A&B 

Introduction to Concept Development 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

A drawing course directed toward a visual 

investigation of drawing conventions necessary 

to describe the individual craftsman's ideas and 

concepts. 

CR301A&B 

Modern Craft: A Critical History 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

The modern craft aesthetic is examined in terms 

of late 19th- and 20th-century ideas and issues. 

Emphasis is placed on the interdependency of all 

the arts with an eye to the unique contribution of 

crafts' ideology and practice. Topical discussions 

encourage students to find contemporary 

relevancy and validity in an analysis of historical 

precedents. 

CR401A&B 

Senior Craft Crafts Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A forum for the discussion of ideas and issues of 
concern to students of crafts through student par- 
ticipation, guest lecturers, and professional offer- 
ings. A study of style and the survival techniques 
of contemporaries working in craft media will be 
emphasized. 

CR999 
Independent Study 

3-6 hours 

1 .5-3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

An independent course of study dealing with a 

particular issue of interest to student and one or 

more faculty. Prior approval by the chairperson 

required. 



47 



Ceramics 

CR211A&B 
Introduction to Throwing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Beginning studio work with class using the throw- 
ing process and related glazing and firing tech- 
niques. Problems are given with an emphasis on 
developing each student's potential for personal 
expression and artistic invention. 

CR212A&B 

Introduction to Handbuilding 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Beginning studio work with clay using the 
handbuilding processes of slab, coil pinch, and 
pressing form molds, plus related glazing and 
firing techniques. Problems are given with an 
emphasis on developing each student's potential 
for personal expression and artistic invention. 

CR251A&B 
Moldmaking — Casting 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A two-semester course in modelmaking, mold- 
making, and casting techniques, using plaster and 
synthetic compounds. Emphasis is given to devel- 
oping proficiencies in slip casting for use in the 
artist's studio and in industry for serial production. 

CR311A&B 
CR312A&B 
Intermediate Ceramics 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The second level of study overlaps the first and 
concentrates on resolving conceptual and formal 
issues as they relate to individual exploration. 
Problems are given which encourage uniqueness 
and challenge abilities. Typical issues include 
usage and symbolic function, serial production, 
site-oriented applications, and large-scale use of 
materials. All problems stress practical as well 
as aesthetic resoucefulness. 
Prerequisites: CR2T1 and CR 212. 

CR313A 

Ceramic Technology: Clays and Kilns 

1.5 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall 
A lecture and lab course to investigate the theo- 
retical and practical aspects of clays, clay bodies, 
and kilns. 



CR313B 

Ceramic Technology: Glazes 

1 .5 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: spring 
A lecture and lab course to investigate the theo- 
retical and practical aspects of glazes. 

CR411A&B 
CR412A&B 
Advanced Ceramic Studio 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The third phase of the ceramic program is tutorial. 
Senior majors conceive their own projects and 
seek their resolution independently while confer- 
ring regularly with all faculty. The term culminates 
with each student selecting representative work 
for a public exhibition. 

Fibers 

CR221A&B 

Introductory Fibers: Structural Investigation 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A survey of both traditional and experimental use 
of materials and structural processes in the fabric 
media. Through a series of developmental assign- 
ments, students begin to explore potential two- 
and three-dimensional forms in preparation for a 
versatile and solid approach to the, fibers media. 
Fall semester emphasizes loom-woven structures, 
tapestry, and a range of off-loom mixed-media 
techniques: spring semester introduces problems 
in constructed surface/fabric collage and the study 
of fabric forms involving armature and skeletal 
fabric-support constructions. 

CR222A&B 

Introductory Fibers: Media Exploration 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A survey course that may be taken independently 
but does complement Introductory Fibers: Struc- 
tural Investigation. Through a series of develop- 
mental assignments, students are provided with 
a solid technical and conceptual base in the fabric 
media. Fall semester emphasizes nonloom 
constructions and a thorough study of color and 
multifiber dye techniques; spring semester 
focuses on woven color and advanced woven 
structures. 

CR321A&B 

Introduction to Surface Design 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Introductory class in fabric design which empha- 
sizes the techniques of silk-screen printing and the 
conceptual potential of the media. Course material 
focuses on both screen-printing processes, from 
basic cut-and-resist stencils to advanced photo 
stencils, as well as hand-techniques: painting, 
stamping, sewing, and other construction. Textile 
pigments are taught fall semester; dyes are taught 
spring semester. 
Prerequisites: CR 221 and/or CR 222 



CR322A&B 

Intermediate Structural Fibers 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Through a series of developmental assignments 
with a conceptual emphasis, and by using 
acquired knowledge from previous semesters, 
students are encouraged to explore forms that 
reveal the inherent physical qualities and potential 
image-making possibilities of fabric. Loom-woven 
and mixed-media fabric techniques are used as 
appropriate, depending on the student's interest in 
the development of a diverse range of two-dimen- 
sional constructions, sculptural forms, costume, 
etc. Prerequisites: CR 221 and/or CR 222 

CR324A 

Fibers Technology 

1.5 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall 
This lecture course systematically investigates a 
wide range of fabric structures from simple to 
complex weaves. Students draft weave structures 
to understand better the range of fabrics possible 
on a multiharness loom. The aesthetics of woven 
cloth are also discussed with a focus on the qual- 
ity of line, stripe, pattern, and texture unique to 
the textile. 

CR324B 
Textile History 

1 .5 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: spring 
This lecture course surveys the major textile 
cultures of the world, including Egyptian, pre- 
Columbian, Chinese, French, and English, utilizing 
slides, books, and examples from the textile col- 
lection. The various textile styles are related to 
their historical, religious, and social background, 
as well as to the art and decorative art occurring 
simultaneously. 

CR423A&B 

Advanced Surface Design 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Advanced fabric surfaces, forms, and technical 
problems are studied on an independent concen- 
trated level, guided by the students' acquired 
knowledge and experience from previous semes- 
ters into the areas that are relevant to their 
interests — whether two- or three-dimensional, 
functional fabric design or fine art. Emphasis is on 
senior portfolio development and personalized 
assignments. Prerequisites: CR 321, CR 322 



48 



CR425A&B 

Advanced Structural Fibers 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Emphasis on personal expression and style in an 
open studio where each student draws from 
knowledge and experience acquired in previous 
years. Through individual guidance and intensive 
group critique, each student begins to define him- 
self or herself as a unique and creative individual. 
Portfolio preparation and senior thesis exhibition 
form a vital part of this course. 
Prerequisites: CR 321, CR 322 



Glass 

CR231A&B 

Introduction to Glass Blowing 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Hot working molten glass at the furnace. Through 

demonstrations, assignments, and tutoring by the 

instructor, the students are guided toward mastery 

in off-hand blowing. 

CR231A&B 
Introductory Glass 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Glass is considered as an expressive and creative 
medium. Students work with molten glass in off- 
hand blowing techniques and with flat glass in 
stained-glass techniques. 

CR331A&B 
Advanced Glass 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Glass is considered as an expressive medium, and 
development toward a personal style is encour- 
aged. Students work with hot glass in advanced 
off-hand work, blowing into molds, casting, and 
enameling, as well as advanced stained-glass 
work incorporating blown and cast pieces on two- 
and three-dimensional stained-glass problems. 
Prerequisite: CR 231 



Jewelry/Metals 

CR241A&B 

Introduction to Jewelry Making 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The student is asked to explore notions of jewelry 
and body adornment as means of personal expres- 
sion. Projects range from precious jewelry making 
to adornment that extends into performance. Ba- 
sic goldsmithing skills are taught as essential, 
while three-dimensional sketching and experi- 
mentation in mixed media is encouraged. Suc- 
cessful integration of design, material, and pro- 
cess is the goal. Projects are designed to provide 
students with broad exposure to the many possi- 
bilities inherent in jewelry and ornament as re- 
lated to the human form. 



CR242A&B 

Introduction to Metalsmithing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Metal is an extremely versatile material; though 
hard and durable, it is quite malleable and easily 
worked. This course covers direct working of 
metal. Sheet, wire, bar, and rod are given form by 
hammering, seaming, bending, etc. The majority 
of work is done in bronze, brass, and copper, 
though steel, stainless steel, aluminum, and pre- 
cious metals may be used as well. Given that 
basic technical knowledge is a key to the full 
development of ideas, emphasis is on basic hand 
and machine processes conveyed through orga- 
nized, comprehensive technical information. The 
focus of the course is on the possibilities of metal 
for the contemporary artist. Contemporary issues 
addressed include the object as sculpture, process 
as a source material, the importance of surface 
and detail, and functional objects made by artists. 

CR243A&B 

Jewelry Rendering and Design 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Students will explore two-dimensional pencil 
and gouache techniques effective in creating the 
illusion of finished pieces of jewelry. Emphasis is 
placed on the skill development necessary to 
communicate and evaluate ideas prior to making. 
Presentation and development of a portfolio are 
an integral part of the course. 

CR245A&B 
Metals Technology 

1.5 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A lab, lecture, and demonstration course investi- 
gating the theoretical, practical, and physical 
properties of metals and other materials as they 
relate to methods of construction, forming, and 
finishing. Maintenance of related tools and 
equipment will be studied. 



CR247A&B 

Blacksmithing 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Blacksmithing is both spontaneous and self- 
conscious. The objects thus created embody the 
calculated mystery of its creation. Although the 
processes are simple, by their nature they require 
a great deal of discipline and control. Group and 
individual projects will be assigned during the 
semester which should allow the students to 
satisfy their creative and technical needs. 

CR248A&B 

Introduction to Jewelry and Metalsmrthing 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Jewelry and Metalsmithing are presented as 
vehicles for individual expression. Emphasis is 
placed on mastering basic metalworking skills: 
soldering, forming, riveting, stone setting, and 
finishing. The student is exposed to contemporary 
attitudes in jewelry and metalsmithing and asked 
to develop his or her own approach using the tech- 
niques covered. 

CR249A&B 
Enameling 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Enameling is the art of firing colored glass onto 
metal. The transparent, opaque, and opalescent 
enamel colors are layered to produce incredible 
richness, detail, depth, and brilliance in this 
durable and painterly medium. Students learn 
traditional techniques such as cloisonne, grisaille, 
and champleve, as well as contemporary and ex- 
perimental processes. Once they have gained a 
facility with the medium, students go on to pro- 
duce jewelry or small jewel-like paintings. 

CR341A&B 
CR342A&B 
Intermediate Jewelry and Metalsmithing 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Continued development through more advanced 
metalworking processes is coupled with refinement of 
skills and ideas. This increased versatility provides 
potential for greater individual expression and aids the 
student in formulating personal goals. 
Prerequisites: CR 241, CR 242 

CR441A&B 

CR442A&B 

Advanced Studio: Jewelry and 

Metalsmithing 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This final year course is devoted to mastery of 
metalworking skills and the search for unique and 
appropriate application. A student's personal 
expression finds focus in the senior thesis, an 
opportunity for in-depth exploration of an individ- 
ual's concept and technology. 
Prerequisites: CR 341, CR 342 



49 



Wood 

CR261A&B 

Introduction to Woodworking 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An introduction to basic woodworking skills and 
processes, including sharpening and setting up 
hand tools and machinery, theory of solid wood 
joinery and construction. In addition to building 
technical skills, there is emphasis on exposing 
students to contemporary and historical furniture- 
design issues. 

CR361A&B 
CR362A&B 

Intermediate Woodworking 

6 hours, twice a week 

6 credits/semester: fall and spring 

The junior year is a further investigation of 

techniques, processes, joinery, and structure. Strip 

lamination, tambour, and drawer work will be 

covered along with assignments that deal with 

surface, form, color, and content. 

CR364 

Wood Technology 

1.5 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A two-semester lecture-demonstration course that 
deals with shop procedures including the funda- 
mentals of machine- and hand-tool alignment, tool 
sharpening, and maintenance; the structure and 
design requirements of wood as a material deal- 
ing with humidity, appropriateness of different 
adhesives, glues, finishes, fasteners, etc.; and the 
setting up of a woodworking business. 

CR461A&B 
CR462A&B 
Advanced Woodworking 

6 hours, twice a week 

6 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Intensive work in personal development is handled 

on a one-to-one basis with instructor. Students 

continue to develop their aesthetic vision and 

technical skills while working on projects that 

challenge their preconceptions and notions about 

making art. furniture, and decorative objects. 



Design 
Architectural Studies 

AS 101 
Design Studio 

Freshman Elective 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Introduction to the study of architecture as it 

manifests itself in an articulate materiality and in 

problems of interpretation. 

AS 202 A 

Building Technology I: Structure 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall 
A nonquantitative approach to the behavior of 
structures. Identification of the various character- 
istics and reactions due to the development of 
stresses generated primarily in determinate 
structures. 

AS 202 B 

Building Technology I: Construction 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: spring 
Methods and materials of construction. Investiga- 
tion of wood, masonry, concrete, and steel 
construction. 
Prerequisite: AS 202 A 

AS210A&B 
Design Studio 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Vico's understanding that man first defines dwell- 
ing in a poetic sense is the point of departure for 
a series of problems intended to familiarize the 
student with the more active thread of meaning 
that has coursed through architecture. Emphasis 
is upon the realization of projects in the form of 
models and drawings — a coming to terms with 
design in its more profound sense. 

AS 214 A 
Drawing I 

3 hours, twice a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 

Investigation into various accepted techniques of 
architectural delineation — plan, section, axono- 
metric — in order to prepare the student for an in- 
depth questioning of the various meanings implied 
in their use. Not merely a drafting course, the 
intention is to define the ground upon which think- 
ing finds its limits in drawing and vice versa. 

AS 214 B 
Drawing I 

3 hours, twice a week 

3 credits/semester: spring 

Techniques for "seeing" architecture will be 

investigated in order to uncover the limits as well 

as more relevant meanings of various types of 

drawing. 



AS 302 A 

Technology II: Construction 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: spring 
Continuation of Construction I with emphasis on 
masonry and steel construction systems. A study 
of the principles of construction in terms of materi- 
als and assemblies used in the following systems: 
the structural system, the building envelope, and 
the interior systems. Issues of joints, connecting 
assemblies, and construction sequence will be 
studied in large-scale detail. Emphasis will be on 
the interaction between the pragmatic and the 
expressive issues involved in the design of con- 
struction details. 
Prerequisite: AS 202 B 
AS 302 B 

Technology II: Environmental Control 
Systems 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: spring 
An examination of mechanical systems, compo- 
nents, and materials used to control and affect 
interior/exterior environment. Integration of envi- 
ronmental control systems in design process. 

AS310A&B 
Design Studio 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An extension of those values established in the 
sophomore year, this studio's focus shall be the 
isolation of tendencies and interests exhibited in 
the previous year. With the emphasis upon the 
physical realization of projects, the work will be an 
in-depth search through tne context and implica- 
tions surrounding a given topic. The goal is to find 
the specific content that will point to that area 
outside of mere topic or idea. 

AS 314 

Drawing II: Contract Documents 

3 hours, twice a week 

3 credits/semester spring 

Instruction in and production of a complete set 

of documents for construction. 

AS 320 

Case Studies in Architectural History 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall 

An in-depth study documenting, analyzing, and 

interpreting major works of architecture. 



50 



AS402A&B 

Technology III: Structural Design 

3 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Statics and strengths of materials. Technology III 

is recommended for those who wish to go on to 

graduate school for their professional degree. 

AS410A&B 
Design Studio 

6 hours, twice a week 

6 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Development of mature work as both an extension 

and synthesis of previous years' work. Spring 

semester: fall semester students are asked to 

submit a proposal for their graduation project for 

approval. 

AS 414 
Drawing II 

AS 420 

Advanced History/Theory of Architecture 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall 

Investigation of selected topics in architectural 

theory. Guest lecturers. 

AS 430 

Communications and Presentation Graphics 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall 
Instruction and professional assistance in visual 
communication techniques, with emphasis on the 
development of portfolios, resume, and presenta- 
tion methods. Working knowledge of existing 
reproduction technologies. 

AS600A&B 

Architecture Seminar Workshop 

3 credits each semester 
Through readings in the history of architecture 
and related fields, writing and drawing, students 
undertake a series of analytical studies that inves- 
tigate problems in representation, including its 
relationship to spatial conceptions guiding the 
creation of architecture. 

The spring semester is a continuation of the 
first semester's work to include current theories 
and speculations within the framework of an in- 
creased historical consciousness. 

AS610A&B 

Architecture Graduate Studio 

6 credits each semester 

Structured studio under the direction of assigned 
instructor focusing on various rational and irratio- 
nal design methodologies. Programmatic defini- 
tion is investigated through a series of projects 
researching the relationship between architecture 
and its history as well as to other fields such as 
literature, painting, geography, theater, music, 
medicine, science, etc. The emphasis is on "mak- 
ing" and processes that incorporate and embody 
meaning. To this end students research the limits 
of drawing, model making, and problems in repre- 
sentation. A first-year review is required to 
proceed through the program. 



AS700A&B 

Architecture Seminar Workshop 

3 credits each semester 
The focus of this semester is on preparation of 
a written document as a program defining the 
proposal for the Master's Project. 

The spring semester seminar workshop covers 
contemporary issues in architecture in light of the 
work being developed in the design studio. 

AS710A&B 

Architecture Graduate Studio 

6 credits each semester 
Independent work under the supervision of an 
architecture advisory committee leading to a 
completion of a Master's Project. 

AS 999 

Independent Study 

1.5-3 credits 

Graphic Design 

GD105 

Graphic Design Projects 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall or spring 
This course is designed to introduce Foundation 
students to a selected aspect of the graphic design 
discipline. The classwork begins with directed formal 
studies and leads to an introductory communication 
project. Emphasis will be placed on the craft and work- 
ing habits of the student, as well as the breadth and 
depth of the student's individual visual investigations. 
The student is offered an opportunity to measure his or 
her suitability to the Graphic Design major. Past topics 
have included color, drawing, and typography. 

GD210 
Letterform Design 

6 hours, once a week 
3.0 credits/semester: fall and spring 
In the first semester, the emphasis is on freehand 
drawing of letterforms in various media and scale. 
The development of the Roman alphabet is explored 
through study of hand-drawn letters and later in print- 
ing types. The second semester emphasizes precision 
and clarity in individually designed letterforms and 
sets of letterforms. The semester concludes with an 
introductory communication piece based upon letter- 
form design. The course is instrumental in developing 
subtlety of optical relationships, therefore the use of 
mechanical aids throughout tine course is discouraged. 



GD211 
Descriptive Drawing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A freehand drawing method teaches the student 
consciously to observe, analyze, understand, and 
represent the underlying structure and form of 
man-made and natural objects. In the process a 
visual vocabulary of line, shape, value, texture, 
and its spatial organization is developed as a 
means of research and invention. Logical repre- 
sentation rather than personal expression is 
emphasized. 

GD213 
Design Systems 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This class is utilized as an intensive laboratory 
to investigate the formal aspects of composition, 
organic and geometric form, color, symbolic draw- 
ing, craft, and the processes of conception, all 
based in a serial format. All assignments are 
founded on directed and playful investigation to 
train the student in the areas of selection and 
visual logic. 
GD300 

Drawing for Graphic Processes 
6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 

This course emphasizes perceptive observation of 
man-made objects. The student studies the form 
and surface qualities of an object as described by 
light, and through a conscious selection of 
observed information and its translation evolves a 
more significant visual symbol of the object. 

GD302 

Materials and Processes 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall 
A course that utilizes various design projects to 
explore and perfect techniques for crafting visual 
images for reproduction. Extensive use of the 
Macintosh computer will be explored using Page- 
maker, Illustrator and other software. Mechanicals 
will be executed in a hands-on manner. 

GD303 
Production Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: spring 
A course to familiarize the student with the techni- 
cal aspects of graphic reproduction, services, 
processes, and their specifications through actual 
design projects. Includes field trips. Use of the 
Macintosh computer system is emphasized. 

GD306A&B 
Typography Emphasis 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The study and investigation of typographic prin- 
ciples is related to communication needs. Explora- 
tion is directed toward determining visual hierar- 
chy through typographic grammar and structure as 
well as examining its expressive potential. 



51 



GD310 
Photographies 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
This course emphasizes design as a way to achieve 
both structure and meaning in photography, and as a 
way to extend the range of how objects can be seen 
and translated using photographic processes. Projects 
include the integration of graphic, typographic, arid 
photographic elements as a preparation for applied 
communications. Involves extensive studio and dark- 
room work. 
Prerequisite: PF 21 1 A to Photography 

GD311 
Communications 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester fall and spring 
This course concentrates on developing an under- 
standing of formal relationships and how to use 
them to create visual impact and clarity while 
solving simple communications problems. Inven- 
tion, intuition, and discovery are combined with 
logical thought and thorough preliminary research. 
Special attention is given to refining the student's 
perceptual abilities, hand skills, color sensitivity, 
and the integration of other media. 

GD313 
Color Studies 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: varied semesters 
Study of color concepts developed deductively 
from nature and inductively by programming 
relationships based on the primary attributes of 
color: temperature, intensity, and value. An appli- 
cation, in which color is the central feature of a 
communication, evolves from the studies. Diverse 
media, two- and three-dimensional contexts. 

GD316 

Drawing Applications 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: spring 
Drawing, as a primary design tool, enables the 
student to develop pictorial images (signs) that 
serve as means for representing and communicat- 
ing ideas, feelings, and information about a sub- 
ject. The course culminates in an application using 
drawing, color, and typographic form. 

GD322 

3-Dimensional Design 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: varied semesters 
An elective course exploring the design of mes- 
sages in spatial environments ranging from pack- 
age design to exhibitions. Photography plays an 
important part of this process. 

GD411A&B 
Design Studio 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Wide-ranging explorations of questions concern- 



ing visual identity and programs of intercon- 
nected, diverse applications. Supportive studies in 
semiotics, information theory, and research meth- 
ods. The design of a professional portfolio is in- 
cluded during the second semester. The emphasis 
in both semesters is a self-generated degree 
project, involving research, proposal, complete 
design formulation and final presentation. 

GD412A&B 
Problem Solving 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester fall and spring 
Approaches to solving communications problems 
of diverse character and increasingly practical 
application are developed in this course. It as- 
sumes a high level of formal ability of the student 
and places special emphasis on meeting time and 
technical constraints as well as developing clear 
and concise thought patterns. 

GD426 

Advanced Typography 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester fall and spring 
This course addresses typography as both the 
primary vehicle for the communication of informa- 
tion and as a support to images. The formal 
aspects of text are investigated: spacing, scale, 
form, legibility, meaning/information, and hierar- 
chy. The Macintosh computer will be a tool 
explored during this course. 



Illustration 

IL200A&B 
Pictorial Foundations 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Introduction to drawing and painting skills as they 
relate to illustration. Objective visual perception, 
clarity in drawing, and technical facility are 
stressed. Continuing slide lectures expose the 
student to applicable areas of art history. Also 
presented are methods of research and develop- 
ment useful in creating illustrations. 

IL201 

Drawing as Design 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall or spring 

Drawing will be viewed in the context of traditional 
design principles-composition and use of space, con- 
trast focus, positive/negative relationships, texture, 
and the like will be considered in the construction of 
drawings from observation as well as invention. A 
holistic approach to all aspects of making a drawing 
will be the primary focus. 

IL202A&B 
Figure Anatomy 

2 hours, once a week (lecture) 

4 hours, once a week (drawing lab) 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Focus on the investigation and application of line, 
plane, mass, light and shade, shadow, perspec- 
tive, anatomy, and proportion as they relate to 
figure drawing. Weekly sessions include a lecture, 
demonstrations from the skeleton, and drawing 
from life. 



IL204 

Typography 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester fall or spring 
Beginning studies in the form, use, nomenclature, 
and history of typography. Individual letters, word 
formations, text arrangements, and the application 
of type to simple communication exercises. Hand- 
drawn as well as mechanically generated 
letterforms will be used. 

IL206A&B 

Materials and Techniques 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

This workshop emphasizes the development of 

traditional and contemporary media. Classwork, 

demonstrations, museum visits, and lectures will 

support development in a variety of media — 

pencil, ink, watercolor, collage, markers, airbrush, 

graphic materials, and others will be considered. 

IL300A&B 
Illustration Methods 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This course deals with the development of narra- 
tive imagery, pictorial illusion, and space, and their 
combined potential for communication. Procedures 
focus on developing visual awareness, personal 
imagery, and conceptual directions. Direct drawing 
situations and photographic reference (existing or 
student-produced) will also serve as source mate- 
rial for pictorial development. Various media and 
technical procedures will be explored. Assign- 
ments and lectures will focus on the requirements 
of applied illustration. 

IL301 

Design Methods 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
Further development of the design process in 
conjunction with the requirements and options 
available through photomechanical techniques. 
Projects will deal with image/typography relation- 
ships and will be presented for their intrinsic 
design interest as well as being useful as vehicles 
for understanding the processes of commercial 
reproduction. Previous photographic and indirect 
image-making experiences will be continued and 
built on at this level. 

IL302 

Figure Utilization I 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall 

Work from life is combined with work from a wide 
range of resources. Composing figures in rational 
space with a convincing relationship to the envi- 
ronment is stressed. Drawing and painting media 
will be examined. History of poses, contexts, and 
pictorial conventions will be discussed. 



52 



IL303 

Figure Utilization II 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: spring 
Studies of the figure in narrative contexts will be 
explored, as will work from single and grouped 
models, nude and costumed. Concentration will be 
on developing compositions and concepts from 
different and often combined resources. Drawing 
and painting techniques will be utilized. 

IL304 
Design Groups 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: spring 

Course focuses on sequential formats. Potential 

areas of inquiry include brochures, direct-mail 

pieces, simple animations, slide presentations, 

multipage spreads, and identity programs. 

IL310 

Children's Book Illustration 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This course is concerned with the design and illus- 
tration of children's trade books. The emphasis is 
on the stages of development of a book from 
manuscript through dummy design to finished* art. 
Professional practice, working with editors and art 
directors, will be discussed. Students will become 
familiar with the work of past and present book 
illustration and design. Guest lecturers will be 
invited to share their experiences with the class. 

IL4O0A&B 
Illustration 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Assignments revolve around specific areas of 
illustration — advertising, book, documentary, 
editorial, and institutional. Emphasis is on solu- 
tions, both practical and relevant, to professional 
needs and demands. A senior thesis project (com- 
peting for Ely awards) will be incorporated in the 
spring semester. 

IL401 

Graphic Problems 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Previous design experiences in process and tech- 
nique are synthesized and applied to practical 
problems. A variety of traditional formats — post- 
ers, book and record jackets, folders, and the like 
— will be explored. 

IL402A&B 
Communications Workshop 

6-12 hours, once a week 
3 or 6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Structured as an actual studio, the workshop will 
produce visual material for a variety of clients. 
Admission to the workshop will be by portfolio 
review with a maximum of sixteen participants to 
be selected. 



IL403 

Portfolio Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: spring 
This course is involved with identification of 
personal style, professional presentation (portfo- 
lio, letterhead, business cards), and techniques of 
promotion. Each student is expected to develop 
a portfolio based on existing and recommended 
projects. Guest lectures on a variety of topics. 

IL999 
Independent Study 

3-6 hours 

1.5-3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

An independent course of study dealing with a 

particular issue of interest to the student and a 

faculty member. Prior approval by the chairperson 

required. 



Industrial Design 

ID 113 
Freshman ID 

1.5 credits 

ID 200 

Studio 1: Projects 

6 hours 
3 credits 

ID201A&B 
Conceptual Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A drawing class concerned with the processes of 
getting ideas from one's head onto paper. The 
course is structured with the Design, Craft, or 
Illustration student in mind — those who would 
wish to explore dimensional forms on paper be- 
fore transferring them to a permanent material. 
A one-semester course. 

ID210A&B 
Processes 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The exploration and study of the "hard" and "soft" 
information processes that are used by designers. 
Various problem-solving techniques are introduced 
and implemented. Emphasis is placed on the written 
word as a method of communication. Several short 
research papers are required. The student is given a 
grounding in basic technology and science, including 
wood, metal and plastic technology, optics, mechan- 
ics, basic electronics, and energy systems. 

ID211A&B 
Visual Languages 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The study and application of the language and 
visual systems that are used by designers to deal 
with the concerns and problems among people, 
technology, and the environment. Two- and three- 
dimensional concepts are combined with form, 
drawing, and graphic skills while studying meth- 
ods of practical application. 



ID213A&B 
Design Methods 

6 hours, twice a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A course combining the teaching of the "tools" of 
designer mechanical drawing, perspective draw- 
ing, basic shop techniques, and model making. 
Field trips are taken to industrial manufacturers to 
acquaint the students with advanced production 
methods. 

ID 220 

Studio 2: Techniques 

6 hours 
3 credits 

ID 280 

Technical Communication 

1.5 credits 

ID 230 

Design Seminar 

1 .5 credits 

ID 300 

Studio 3: Projects 

6 hours 
3 credits 

ID301A&B 
Design Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

A forum for the discussion and study of current 

ideas within the design field. Presentations are 

made by the staff and guest lecturers. 

ID 302 A 

Visual Techniques 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall 
This course will develop proficiency in the use 
of mixed media as a means of making effective 
forms in drawing. Drawing techniques will be 
developed for precise descriptions of surface, 
color, and material using pastels, markers, 
prismacolor, and other designer's materials. The 
student will also learn to make effective portfolio 
presentations. 

ID 302 B 

Presentation Techniques 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: spring 
The use of photographic, video, and advanced 
digital media, including scanners, paint programs, 
and animation, augmented as appropriate with 
traditional media, in the design of product presen- 
tations. Instruction in the art of organizing the 
presentation of information to convey the under- 
standing of a design to particular audiences. 
Prerequisite. ID 302A, Visual Techniques 



53 



ID303A&B 

Industrial Materials and Processes 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Films, lectures, and field trips are used to familiar- 
ize students with industrial fabrication processes 
for wood, metal, and plastics; techniques such as 
die making, injection molding, blow molding, laser 
cutting, explosion forming, etc., are explored. 
Emphasis is placed on the study of material char- 
acteristics and their appropriate use with forming 
methods. 

ID 304 
Package Design 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This course complements the existing typographi- 
cally oriented graphics course with one that ad- 
dresses creative packaging concepts, production 
processes and the graphic communication of prod- 
uct information through good packaging design. 

ID 310 A SB 
Design Studio 

3 hours, twice a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This studio teaches the day-to-day practices of 
being a designer. Covers theory and methodology 
applied to designing for mass production. Many 
projects are conducted with the help of consult- 
ants from industry. Problems include the consider- 
ation of human needs, packaging, manufacturing 
processes, and marketing. 

ID311A&B 
Graphic Design 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An intensive workshop in the structuring of visual 
and typographic information as applied by the 
industrial designer to products, packaging, corpo- 
rate identity, stationery, signage, and exhibits. 

ID312A&B 
Exhibit Design 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

The exploration of the exhibit design process; the 

collection of information, planning, traffic flow, 

display, and communication techniques. Exhibit 

design requires the extensive use of all the 

designer's skills. 

ID 320 

Studio 4: Techniques 

6 hours 
3 credits 

ID 326 
Human Factors 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A study of human-engineering principles for the 
design of products and equipment used by people. 
The first half of the semester focuses on human 
anatomy, anthropometrics, and the motion and 
strength of body components. The second half 
explores the sensory systems, human perception 
and sensitivity. During the semester, the lectures 
are complemented with laboratory experiments 
designed to teach students methods of testing and 
evaluating their own product design concepts. 



ID 390 

Design Seminar 

1.5 credits 

ID 400 

Studio 5: Projects 

3 credits 

ID401A&B 

Industrial Design Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

A forum for the discussion and study of current 

ideas within the design field. Presentations are 

made by the staff and guest speakers. The course 

requires a term paper concerned with the issues 

considered. 

ID 402 

Advanced Design Workshop 

3 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

A workshop where each student deals with 

problems of an advanced nature of his/her own 

choosing. 

ID 407 

Computer Aided Design 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Instruction and self-guided tutorials in the use of 

the Macintosh II computer as a tool for 3-dimen- 

sional design, product modeling, and presenta-' 

tion. Previous coursework in computer studies is 

recommended. 

ID410A&B 

Senior Design Studio 

3 hours, twice a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Focused on raising the levels of design skill and 
knowledge to the professional level, the senior 
studio places increasing responsibility on the 
student to rethink, improve, and supplement previ- 
ous work in preparation for entering the profes- 
sion. The final semester is devoted to an industry- 
sponsored thesis project in which the student 
obtains sponsorship, organizes, manages, and 
realizes a project in near professional circum- 
stances. 

ID411A&B 
Portfolio Preparation 

3 hours 

1.5 credits: fall and spring 

Instruction and guidance in the preparation of 

professional stationery, resume, portfolio, and 

slide presentation. 

ID412A&B 
Exhibit Design 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
The exploration of the exhibit design process; the 
collection of information, planning, traffic flow, 
display, and communication techniques in archi- 
tectural space, requiring the extensive use of all 
the designer's skills. 



ID 422 

Advanced Technologies 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall 

Through a series of lectures, video tapes, and field 
trips, students are introduced to the technologies 
and inventions responsible for state-of-the-art 
mobile robots, electronic media, and smart appli- 
ances. The basic principles of electro-mechanics, 
sensors, micro-processors, systems integration, 
electronic packaging, and user interface are 
examined through hands-on investigation. Each 
student selects an automated appliance to exam- 
ine in detail and prepares a graphic report that 
illustrates the way the product works. 

ID 423 

Automated Appliance Design 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: spring 
Innovative and futurist thinking is the focus of this 
course. Students select a functional activity that 
will take place in the houses of the future. These 
activities could include: food storage, food prepa- 
ration, cleaning, care of clothing, or personal 
hygiene. The selected activity will be researched 
and concepts presented utilizing automation tech- 
niques, innovative processing or robotics to create 
a new generation of effort-saving appliances. 
Current and future approaches to these activities 
will be reviewed in detail with lectures on hydrau- 
lics, pneumatics, thermodynamics, composite 
materials, controllers, communication, and chemi- 
cal processing. 

ID 490 

Design Seminar 

1 .5 credits 

ID 999 
Independent Study 

3-6 hours 

1 .5-3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

An independent course of study dealing with a 

particular issue of interest to student and one or 

more faculty. Prior approval by the chairperson 

required. 



Museum Exhibition Planning and Design 

ME500A&B 
Museum Course 

3 credits 

A lecture course exploring the history, organiza- 
tion, and operation of the museum as a cultural 
institution, an economic entity, and a management 
enterprise. Frequent guest speakers will bring a 
wide range of knowledge and practices from their 
respective institutions to provide the student with 
insight into the functional differences between 
museums of different types, sizes, and missions. 
The course is intended to provide students with an 
overall understanding of the museum as an insti- 
tution and to provide access to the thinking of 
various people responsible for running museums, 
departments within museums, and activities 
within the department of museums. All institu- 
tions which actively sponsor an internship will 
provide speakers for this course. 



54 



ME 610 A &B. ME 710 

Museum Exhibition Design Studio 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This studio course is the primary vehicle for explor- 
ing museum exhibition design and presentation 
concepts, for developing skills and techniques in 
museum exhibition design, and for developing 
the ability to organize and produce outstanding 
exhibits that clearly communicate their intended 
messages to diverse audiences. The intent of the 
course is to educate the student in the conceptual- 
ization, researching, organization, design, produc- 
tion and evaluation of museum exhibits and pre- 
sentations through direct problem solving 
experience under tutorial guidance in a studio 
environment. Exhibit programming, evaluatio'n, 
and management methods applicable to a wide 
range of museum situations will be explored-often 
with input from museum professionals to simulate 
the circumstances and issues of actual museum 
work. The structuring and presentation of informa- 
tion through design using different state of the art 
media, display systems, and presentation tech- 
niques will be accomplished in the studio. 

ME 621 

Environmental Graphics 

3 credits 

A studio course focusing on the writing, typo- 
graphic layout, and production of descriptive 
labels, signage, graphic images, and other infor- 
mation that document and define an exhibition, 
message or message system in an environment. 
The course will provide the student with an intro- 
duction to the issues, skills and practices related 
to the design and production of two dimensional 
images used to convey meaning in a three dimen- 
sional context. The phenomena of perception, 
color, scale, and lighting as the effect type form 
and imagery in three dimensional environments 
will be introduced while the use of different tech- 
niques for applying lettering and graphic images 
to surfaces bounding and defining architectural 
space will be explored. 

ME 622 

Media for Exhibition Communication 

3 credits 

A laboratory/workshop course focused on the 
ways in which sound, video, computers and 
robotic devices may be incorporated into museum 
presentations of various types. The course will 
provide the student with an introduction to the 
issues, skills, and practices related to the design 
and production of interactive communications 
using electronic media and mechanisms. The 
studio will introduce the organization, production 
and production languages, touch screens, and 
senors for the purpose of organizing an educa- 
tional experience. 



ME 623 

Exhibition Materials and Technology 

3 credits 

A demonstration/visitation course directed at the 
problems of exhibit production and the application 
of different technologies to meet many types of 
museum exhibition needs. The student will be 
introduced to the range of suppliers and services, 
including display fabricators, security system 
providers and others, often through direct behind- 
the-scene visitations and discussions with those 
directly concerned. The course is intended to pro- 
vide students with an introduction to the issues, 
skills, equipment, information, resources, and 
practices which define the correct use of the many 
technological systems used in modern exhibit 
design. 

ME749A&B 
Thesis Development 

6 credits 

An independent research or design project which 
may take the form of a publishable document of 
potential value to the profession of museum exhi- 
bition design. The project may be carried out in 
conjunction with the internship. 

ME 759 

Museum Internship 

6 credits 

The course will provide the student with super- 
vised, practical experience doing actual exhibit 
design in a museum environment. Designed to 
bridge the summer between the first and second 
year and to extend through the third semester of 
the program, the internship is supervised jointly by 
the Director of the MFA Program and the supervis- 
ing official at the host institution. The internship is 
structured to provide the student with a thorough 
understanding of the practice of exhibit design 
within the host institution, and is a practicum in 
which the experience gained in the Museum Exhi- 
bition Design Studio course is tempered by appli- 
cation in the setting of an actual museum. 

Fine Aits 

Fine Arts Major 

FA260A&B 

Sophomore Fine Arts Studio/Seminar 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A lecture/discussion course in which the structural 
and expressive components common to two- 
and three-dimensional arts are explored. Lecture/ 
discussions alternate with assigned problems in 
which students utilize a wide variety of materials 
and methods to form objects that confirm or ques- 
tion the ideas addressed in the lectures. 

FA460A&B 

Senior Fine Arts Studio 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This is an issue-oriented course directed toward 
individual development. A quarter of the time is 
given to presentation and discussion of contempo- 
rary issues, and the remaining time is given to 
studio practice. Individual critiques supplement 
the studio work. The development of the senior 
thesis is also addressed in this course. 



Photography/Film/Animation 

PF20B 

Photography for Industrial Designers 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester 

The goals of this course are the development of 
the necessary skills to produce a slide portfolio of 
extremely fine quality; to understand the role of 
photography as a research tool in design, as well 
as to learn how to put together a coherent visual 
presentation of a design idea. After establishing 
basic studio lighting techniques for two and three 
dimensional objects, students will deal with the 
problems of lighting an arhitectural model and 
lighting in a non-studio setting. The semester will 
culminate in a slide portfolio of the student's work 
which will include a mock slike presentation of a 
design idea. 

PF210A 
Introduction to Him I 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 

An introduction to the mechanics and techniques 
of silent filmmaking. Principles of shooting and 
composition, lighting, the logic of arrangement, 
and editing are explored. In addition to critique of 
student work, selected screenings of outside work 
of historical and critical significance form an im- 
portant aspect of the course. 

PF210B 
Introduction to Film II 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: spring 
A continuation of PF 21 A with emphasis on more 
experimental modes: timing, staging and blocking 
exercises to develop a sense of direction, multiple 
projections, and an introduction to sound concepts 
and techniques. 
Prerequisite: 210 A 

PF211A 

Introduction to Photography I 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 
Introduction to basic concepts, processes, and 
techniques of black-and-white photography, 
including camera operation, exposure, darkroom 
procedures, lighting, and their controlled applica- 
tions. Emphasis is upon the normative standard of 
photographic rendering. Required for admission 
to Photography courses above PF 21 1 . 

PF211 B 

Introduction to Photography II 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: spring 

While consolidating the student's control of the 

medium, this course introduces the student to a 

departure from normative photographic rendering, 

techniques, and modes of expression and form. 

There is a heavy emphasis on manipulation of 

materials. 

Prerequisite: PF 21 1 A, or by portfolio inspection 



55 



PF212A 
Animation Drawing I 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 
Through a series of specific lessons centered 
around drawing from the moving human figure, 
the student is introduced to the kinesthetic sense 
— a sense of motion, time, and space. Special 
emphasis is placed upon the student's develop- 
ment of responsibility for the dramatic aspects of 
timing. Films are also viewed to enhance the 
extensive drawing practice done in class. 

PF212B 

Animation Drawing II 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester, spring 
While continuing with issues of animation draw- 
ing from the fall semester, emphasis is placed 
upon the development of a sense of dramatic film 
structure, specifically centered around the issue of 
pacing. This concern is developed through both 
individual and class projects. Films are once again 
screened in each class to enhance practice. 
Prerequisite: PF 21 2 A 

PF213 

Photo Studio Techniques 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester 

The goal of this is the development of the neces- 
sary skills to produce a slide portfolio of extremely 
fine quality. After establishing the basic studio 
lighting techniques for two and three dimensional 
objects, the student will deal with the lighting and 
optical problems posed by the differing materials 
of glass, wood, clay, metals, and fibers. While the 
traditional photo studio is the backdrop for under- 
standing the various lighting possibilities, much 
discussion will take place regarding the use of the 
artist's workplace or other equally appropriate 
context for display of workpieces. The use of the 
camera as a sketching tool will be addressed. 

PF215 

Photo Materials I 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: spring 
A course acquainting students with both tradi- 
tional and less traditional black-and-white and 
color materials through experimentation with 
films, papers, chemistry, and techniques. Linkages 
between photography and other media such as 
nonsilver, graphic arts and digital imaging pro- 
cesses are explored. 

PF216 

Computer Animation I 

3 credits 

An introductory course in computer animation 

required for Animation majors. Emphasis in this 

course will be upon developing the student's 

expertise with the Amiga computer and electronic 

media. 



PF217 

Color Printing Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: spring 
Introduction to traditional methods of color print- 
ing leading to an exploration of the technical and 
creative possibilities of color in photography. 
Prerequisite: PF 21 1 A, or by portfolio inspection 

PF218 
Creative Sound 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: spring 
An exploration of the creative use of sound as a 
primary artistic medium. Topics include sound and 
hearing, microphones and recording, tape editing 
and manipulation, sound aesthetics and produc- 
tion styles, voice and narration, signal processing 
and sound manipulation, and production formats. 
Through audio production projects, students will 
gain insights into new ways of using sound, both 
on its own and with other media. 

PF228 

Selected Topics (Animation) 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

An exploration of media used in animation. The 

content of each course offereing will reflect the 

professional interests of the instructor. 

Prerequisites: may vary with topic. 

PF310A&B 

Junior Cinema Production 

6 hours a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Production techniques in actual filming situations: 

starting from the script through budgeting, script 

breakdown, camera work, and editing, to the 

finished release print. Students are expected to 

execute specific assignments in lighting, editing, 

and sound, and are introduced to synch-sound 

procedures. 

Prerequisites: PF210 A &B 

PF311A&B 

Junior Workshop (Photography) 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Exploration of photographic imagery through a 

series of problems aimed at personal vision and 

creative growth. 

Prerequisites: PF 21 1 A & B, or by portfolio 

inspection. 

PF312A&B 

Junior Animation Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Emphasis within the course is placed upon the 
development of keen observation of movement 
phenomena — motion in three dimensions, 
complex and compound movement, phrasing of 
movement, and issues of timing — and the ability 
to translate these observations into sequential 
drawings. Various skills and techniques are intro- 
duced, including table-top animation techniques, 
pixilla-tion, track reading for animation, and 
rotoscopic methods. Special attention is placed 
upon the integration of these skills and investiga- 
tions toward the realization of a short personal 
animated film. 
Prerequisite: PF 21 2 A 



PF313A&B 
Basic Studio 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Introduction to studio techniques, use of the 

4" x 5° camera, and artificial lighting, and color 

transparency material. 

Prerequisites: PF211A&B 

PF314A&B 
Junior Film Forum 

3 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A study of the aesthetics of cinema through an 
examination of the elements of film language and 
film as a visual art. Specifically, the course is a 
theoretical and practical inquiry into the ways in 
which visual and aural elements are used to ex- 
plore and produce artistic meaning, along with an 
examination of the relationship between film and 
the other visual arts. 

PF315 

Expaneded Photographic Applications 

3 credits 

A course emphasizing the linkages between cam- 
era work, computers, and offset printing. Through 
the use of electronic imaging, image editing, color 
separations, traditional darkroom processes, and 
printing processes, students will explore the tech- 
nical, aesthetic, and ethical approaches to elec- 
tronic imaging and photography. 

PF316 

Computer Animation II 

3 credits 

An advanced course in computer animation using 
the Amiga computer and video. Emphasis in this 
course will be placed upon the students personal- 
ized exploration of animation and graphic model- 
ing software. 

PF320 
Film Sound 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 
Introduction to the application of sound in film 
with instruction and practice in the use of sound- 
recording equipment, mixers, sound transfer, edit- 
ing, general techniques, and an introduction to the 
ARP 2600 electronic synthesizer. 
Prerequisite: PF210B or PF 21 2 B 

PF322 

Rim Technology 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: spring 
An examination of some of the technical materials 
and procedures that complement the filmmaker's 
production skills: basic electronics, optical print- 
ing, on-line video editing, computer image pro- 
cessing and mechanical skills. Projects in image/ 
sound relationships and alternative screening 
formats are undertaken. 
Prerequisite: PF210BorPF212B 



56 



PF323 

Selected Topics (Photography) 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
Study of one or more various media, methods, or 
problems in still photography to be offered according 
to the instructor's interests and students' requests. 
Courses have covered areas such as: portraiture, docu- 
mentary photography, digital imaging, color manipula- 
tion, photographic illustration. 
Prerequisites: may vary with topic. 

PF410A&B 

Senior Cinema Production 

6 hours a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Continuation of PF 310. Increased independence 

is required of senior majors. 

Prerequisites: PF 310 B, PF 320, PF 322 

PF411A&B 

Senior Workshop (Photography) 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Continuation of Junior Workshop; work on long- 
term individual project or shorter-term problems to 
develop technical, aesthetic, and conceptual mas- 
tery of the medium.The course culminates in a 
group thesis exhibition. 

Prerequisite: 6 credits in Photography, including 
PF 31 1 , or by portfolio inspection. 

PF412A&B 

Senior Animation Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Directed independent production of a short film 

project in an idiom of the student's choosing, and 

production of a VHS video portfolio composed 

of several short animated sequences that each 

student will be able to use to get work as either a 

free-lance animator or for an animation company. 

Prerequisite: PF 312 A&B 

PF413A&B 

Professional Practices (Photography) 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Study of the practice of professional photography, 
with attention to various career opportunities, 
portfolio presentation, business practices, profes- 
sional ethics, photographic law, and personal 
objectives. A variety of professional guests visit 
the course. 
Prerequisite: PF 313 

PF 414 A&B 
Senior Him Forum 

3 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Selected topics dealing with specific issues in 

film history, theory, and analysis. 

PF415A&B 

Senior Seminar (Photography) 

3 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An analysis of contemporary criticism in photogra- 
phy. Extensive reading and some writing with 
attention to current showings and exhibitions are 
required. 

Prerequisite: permission of department 
chairperson. 



PF499 
Practicum 

3-6 hours, arranged 
1 .5-3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An apprentice or intern program in which the stu- 
dent is placed in one of several professional pho- 
tographic situations. Placements include assisting 
in professional studios, practice in biomedical 
photography laboratories, and curatorial positions 
in galleries, among others. 

PF999 
Independent Study 

3-6 hours 

1 .5-3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

An independent course of study dealing with a 

particular issue of interest to student and one or 

more faculty. Prior approval by the chairperson 

required. 



Painting 

PT202A&B 
Sophomore Painting 

9 hours a week 

4.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Studio work will introduce the student to the 
elements of pictorial construction — form, color, 
composition, and technique — through life-study 
and project assignments emphasizing analysis, 
perception, and pictorial imagination. Integration 
of the technical aspects of painting and the inter- 
pretations of meaning will be sought. Periodic 
formal critiques and museum and gallery visits will 
supplement studio activity. 

PT219* 
Watercolor 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall or spring 
A course in which the preferred medium is trans- 
parent watercolor, the particular characteristics of 
which will be explored. Both perceptual and 
nonperceptual approaches will be introduced. 

PT224 

Sophomore Drawing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An introduction to the issues of drawing, including 
perception, analysis, invention, and experimenta- 
tion. A variety of thematic ideas, structural possi- 
bilities, and imaginative interpretations will be 
explored. Examples of historic and contemporary 
masterworks will be shown. 

PT225* 
Figure Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall or spring 
This course will consider issues of drawing that 
focus on the human figure. Perennial qualities 
associated with figure drawing will be investi- 
gated as well as contemporary approaches. The 
class will consider gesture, volume, spacial illu- 
sion, tonality, and compositional and stylistic 
responses. The students wil'l work with models in 
the studio and with other source materials: 



FT 226* 
Abstract Drawing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Studies in the diverse forms and processes of 
abstraction. Using both improvisational and sys- 
tematic methods, drawings will explore composi- 
tional principles based on nature, chance, and 
geometry. 

PT237* 
Representational Painting 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
A studio course addressing contemporary atti- 
tudes toward representational modes of painting. 
Why do figurative paintings today look the way 
they do? What are the sources, the premises, and 
the processes that have generated the styles that 
have emerged since 1945. 

PT238* 
Abstract Painting 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
Two approaches will be considered — abstraction 
as pictorial structure that interprets the concrete 
world nonrepresentationally, and abstraction as 
pictorial structure that graphically presents ideas 
and emotions that have their genesis in other than 
observed reality. Studio assignments will investi- 
gate concepts, sources, and procedures. Examples 
from traditional and contemporary art will be used. 

PT240* 

Materials and Techniques 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall or spring 
This course will concern itself with the materials 
and processes used in making pictorial works of 
art. Information on the appropriate use of materi- 
als, such as pigments and painting supports, will 
be given and explored by the students. This course 
will also delve into materials and processes to 
create aesthetically significant surfaces. 

PT241* 
Color Studies 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall or spring 
Studio work and independent projects will con- 
sider the purposes and effects of color organiza- 
tion, color perception, and color theory. Color will 
be approached as emotive, symbolic, depictive, 
and structural. 

PT245* 
Figure Drawing 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall or spring 
This course is based on the concept that drawing 
and modeling are mutually supportive. Students 
draw from the model using a variety of materials 
and approaches. They model in clay. Emphasis is 
placed on the exploration of intentions and con- 
cepts, and the development of visual perception. 



57 



PT261* 
Inter-Media 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall or spring 

The development of artworks that are realized 

through the combination of diverse materials and 

media. 

PT264* 
Mixed-Media 

3 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits/semester: fall or spring 

A diversity of drawing and watercolor materials 

and techniques will be explored, and used in order 

to develop a versatile repertoire of drawing skills. 

PT269* 
Collage 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall or spring 
Projects will explore pictorial conventions through 
the use of material collected and assembled by 
the student and developed as elements of compo- 
sition. Attention will be given to the history of 
collage and its influence upon the methods and 
meanings of painting. 

PT302A&B 

Junior Studio 

12 hours a week 

6 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Studio activity that develops a professional work- 
ing routine in the student, who will be encouraged 
to show increasing personal initiative and direc- 
tion. Regular critiques on both an individual and 
group basis will connect the student to the values 
of the past and the present, stimulate interest in 
the major questions of our time, and provide 
resources for progress. Visiting artists will be 
invited to participate through lectures and studio 
critiques. 

PT324 
Junior Drawing 

3 hours a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall or spring 

An intermediate studio class continuing the 

general concerns of FT 224. Required for majors; 

open as an elective, space permitting. 

FT 390 
Junior Seminar 

2 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall or spring 

A lecture course on the nature and effect of various 

theories of art. Emphasis is placed upon the meaning, 

the imperatives, and the choices that are significant in 

shaping the course of individual works and generic 

movements in the history of painting. 



PT402A&B 
Senior Studio 

12 hours a week 

6 credits/semester: fall or spring 

15 hours a week 

7.5 credits/semester: fall or spring 

Critical commentary will center on four areas 

of concern: 

1 . The character of the work — its formal 
properties, its physical properties, aspects of 
intelligibility. 

2. Intentionality — investigation of motives and 
choices. 

3. Context — ways that a work relates to a larger 
body of work, both generic and stylistic. 

4. Quality — approaches to questions of value. 
There will be individual critiques each week and 
periodic group critiques involving the participation 
of visiting artists. 

FT 424 
Senior Drawing 

3 hours a week 

1.5 credits/semester; fall or spring 

Advanced drawing, specialized projects. 

FT 490 
Senior Seminar 

2 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall or spring 

This seminar will focus on pictorial art and its role 

in culture, both in historic and contemporary 

contexts. Issues surrounding the various purposes 

of art and how culture deals with artists will be 

explored. Emphasis will be placed on student 

participation. 

Courses marked * are open to all majors and 
nonmajors. 



Printmaking 

PR 201 
Relief Printing 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 

Basic relief-printing methods, including linoleum 
cut, woodcut, metal relief, cardboard cut, 
collagraph assemblages, embossment, and re- 
lated techniques will be introduced and explored. 

PR 202 
Screenprinting 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 

Introduction and investigation of all basic methods 
of serigraphy, for use with water-based inks: pa- 
per stencil, resist, photosensitive emulsion, with 
emphasis on acquisition of visual expression and 
technical skills in the screenprinting media. 

PR 204 
Etching 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: spring 
Basic techniques in traditional and contemporary 
etching, drypoint, aquatint, collagraphy, 
photoetching, and possible combinations of them 
are explored. Development of inherent qualities, 
idiosyncracies, their application in the modern 
modes of expression, and interrelationship of all 
etching methods are investigated. 



PR205A&B 

Concepts I and II 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Idea development, visual perception, and the orga- 
nization of experience into compositions related to 
printmaking. Primary concern is acquisition of 
professionalism, applicational skills, group discus- 
sions, and general growth of critical evaluative 
abilities. 

PR 206 

Printmaking Workshop 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: spring 

A continuation of the development of skills in all 

media — relief, intaglio, and screenprinting — by 

concentration on one or any combination of them, 

including nonprintmaking methods. 

PR 211 
Etching/Monoprint 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Introduction to the basic methods in etching, 

such as drypoint, aquatint, collagraph, and 

photoetching. 

PR212A&B 
Lithography 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Lithographic drawing and printing methods are 
introduced and investigated in this autographic 
medium. Students are encouraged to develop their 
own ideas through this medium and explore it 
with regard to their major field. 

PR213A&B 
Screenprinting 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Basic stencil methods, such as paper, direct 

photosensitive emulsion, and resist, for use with 

water-based inks, are developed through 

individual imagery. 

PR 222 

Nonsilver Printmaking Processes 

3 or 6 hours, once a week 
1.5 or 3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
Building images in color with layers of brushed-on 
light-sensitive emulsion. Light-resists can range 
from photogram objects to drawings and paint- 
ings, to film or paper negatives. Processes covered 
are Vandyke brown, cyanotype, gum bichromate, 
and palladium. 

PR 223 

Book Arts I: Bookbinding Methods 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A workshop class familiarizing the student with 
the characteristics and handling qualities of mate- 
rials used in various book structures. Some of the 
items covered include pamphlets, multisignature 
books, clamshell boxes, portfolios, accordion 
structures, and Oriental binding. Emphasis will be 
placed upon both the use of conservationally 
sound materials and the use of these structures as 
vehicles for the students' creative expression. 



58 



PR 224 

Book Arts: Structures 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall or spring 
Historical book forms serve as models as well as a 
departure point for innovative new work. Students 
are made familiar with traditional binding tech- 
niques, encouraged to explore new applications 
and to experiment by combining images and text 
into unique book structures. 

PR 300 

Lithography 

6 hours, once a week 

3 credits/semester: fall 

All of the basic techniques of drawing, image 

making, and printing skills that are necessary to 

produce hand-pulled, black-and-white lithographs 

from stones or plates will be experienced. 

PR 305 

Advanced Relief Printing 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall 

More demanding methods of relief printing will be 
introduced and cultivated. Wood engraving, en- 
graving on plastic, color printing, and related tradi- 
tional and contemporary methods will be pursued. 
Special emphasis will be on the relief-printing 
methods' affinity and compatibility to many other 
methods, particularly intaglio and hand-set type. 

PR306A&B 

Print Study Seminar I and II 

3 hours, alternate weeks 

1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

Study and discussion of original prints and rare 

books from masters of the fifteenth through the 

twentieth centuries; studio research into various 

print processes that parallel the course. 

PR307A&B 

Book Arts II: Letterpress 

3 hours, once a week 

1 .5 credits/semester: spring 

Introduces the basic organization of typographic 

elements through hand composition (metal type) 

and letterpress printing. Study invclves the 

analysis and development of the printed page by 

combining type and images. 

PR 308 

Advanced Lithography Workshop 

3 or 6 hours, once a week 
1 .5 or 3 credits/semester: spring 
Further investigation and development of litho- 
graphic image making, including photographic 
techniques and multicolor printing. Editioned 
prints of greater scope and complexity are under- 
taken consistent with the student's interest and 
experience. 



PR 309 
Advanced Etching 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: spring 
Introduction of more advanced technology in etch- 
ing than was considered in the previous semester 
— messotint, engraving, blend, and viscosity 
printing, as well as their interrelationships and 
compatibilities; acquisition of necessary profes- 
sional skills in handling these concerns; develop- 
ment of perceptual and visual applications of the 
peculiarly etching-related abilities to one's image 
making. 

PR 322 

Advanced Nonsilver 

3 or 6 hours, once a week 
1 .5 or 3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
Continued development of image and skills in 
combinations of nonsilver processes. 

PR 326 

Offset Lithography 

3 or 6 hours, once a week 
1.5 or 3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
A hands-on course which develops skills in print- 
ing with offset press lithography for personal 
imagery in both hand-drawn and photographic 
methods. 

PR 327 

Advanced Offset Lithography 

3 or 6 hours, once a week 
1 .5 or 3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
Continuation of printmaking in offset lithography: 
advanced individual projects and production to 
poster printing in this versatile medium. 

PR 400 

Printmaking: Advanced Workshop I 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall 
Students continue to develop their own style, 
ideas, and technique while establishing their 
direction and personal and original expression. 
The workshop atmosphere permits a comfortable 
handling of all procedures and problems in all 
printmaking processes and possible involvement 
with adjacent expressive means, such as drawing, 
painting, sculpture, photography, crafts, etc. 

PR 407 

Thesis Seminar I and II 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Acquisition of a professional profile: portfolio 
preparation, resume, slides, exhibition participa- 
tion, discussions of works in progress. The pre- 
graduation presentation of portfolio and the one- 
person show as well as cultivation of awareness 
of contemporary conditions and practices in the 
field are among the primary concerns of this class. 

PR 410 

Book Arts III: Artists Books 

3 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits/semester: fall 

The course offers experience in forming ideas 

for combination of paper and printed surfaces in 

book organization. The challenge of joining 

printmaking, typography, and binding is explored 

on an individual and experimental basis. 



PR 412 

Advanced Screenprinting 

3 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall 
Continued investigations of this versatile medium 
on an advanced technical and image level, includ- 
ing printing on three-dimensional forms and 
decals, with emphasis on integration of idea and 
process. 

PR 420 

Printmaking: Thesis Workshop I and II 

6 hours, twice a week 
6 credits/semester: spring 
Preparation of a series of prints and related draw- 
ings for portfolio and exhibition presentation. 

PR600A&B.PR700A&B 

Book Arts/Printmaking Colloquium 

1 .5 credits each semester 

Professional practices and issues related to 

printmaking, book and publication arts are 

explored through discussions, lectures and field 

trips. 

PR 603 

History of the Book 

1.5 credits 

Hands-on study of rare books and manuscripts 
from antiquity to the present with discussions that 
deal with the structural, historical and artistic 
significance of the book. The class meets at the 
Library Company of Philadelphia and other local 
rare book collections. 

PR617A&B 
Type/Letterpress 

1.5 credits/fall 
3 credits/spring 

The student learns to incorporate calligraphic, 
handset or computer-generated letterforms with 
images in unique and editioned books. Emphasis 
is placed on proficiency in process and the cre- 
ation of a personal visual language. 

PR 618 

Workshop: Color/Mark 

1.5 credits 

Provides the student with an opportunity to ex- 
plore a broad range of image-making approaches. 
The emphasis will be on mark making with a 
number of instruments and media, the use of color 
as a structural basis for composition, and the com- 
positional and expressive use of letter forms. 

PR623A&B 
Bookbinding 

1 .5 credits each semester 
Basic book structures are explored in the first 
semester with emphasis on sound conservation 
techniques and good craftsmanship. In the second 
semester historic book structures serve as models 
and departure points for innovative bindings. 



59 



PR826A&B 
Offset lithography 

3 credits fall 
1.5 credits spring 

Offers the student hands-on experience with off- 
set lithography as an artist's medium. The primary 
focus is on the creation of personal imagery (pho- 
tographic and/or hand drawn) for prints and books. 
The course enables students to take advantage of 
state-of-the-art production methods and develops 
skills in photo-mechanical processes, platemaking 
and color printing. 

PR 710. PR 720. PR 725 

MFA Project Type, Binding, Offset 

1.5 credits each 

The MFA candidate develops an individual course 
of study and defines the number of projects in a 
written contract. The evolution of ideas and imag- 
ery is encouraged through frequent faculty and 
visiting artist critiques. 

PR 715 
Graduate Studio 

1.5 credits 

Expansion of studio time for development of indi- 
vidual candidates Book Arts/Printmaking projects 
as defined in their contracts. 

PR 741 

MFA Thesis Studio 

3 credits 

Continuation of book and printmaking projects 
combined with related visual concerns in prepara- 
tion for the required MFA Thesis Exhibition to be 
presented during the final semester. 

PR 742 

MFA Thesis Studio 

3 credits 

An independent studio format that allows for con- 
sultation with major professors in preparation for 
the required MFA Thesis Exhibition. 

PR 999 
Independent Study 

3-6 hours 

1.5-3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

An independent course of study dealing with a 

particular issue of interest to student and one or 

more faculty. Prior approval by the chairperson 

required. 



Sculpture 

SC201.SC202 

Sculpture I (Forms, Composition, and 

Methods) 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An introductory studio course on the fundamentals 
of sculpture. The approach is through tactile and 
visual perception with instruction in both tradi- 
tional and contemporary form making in a variety 
of materials and techniques. Sculptural issues 
addressed are the recognition and construction of 
space and form, axial relationships, movements, 
scale, weight, balance, organic and geometric 
qualities, modularities, transformations, and sym- 
bolic meaning. 

SC220A&B 
Molding and Casting 

3 hours, once a week 

1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 

In the first semester, the course covers processes 

and techniques utilizing plaster, rubber, plastics, 

clays, and wax for making hard and flexible molds 

and for casting sculpture in durable materials. The 

second semester provides a thorough foundation 

in foundry practices, including wax preparation, 

investing, pouring bronze or aluminum, chasing, 

finishing, and patinating finished metal casts. 

SC231.SC232 

Introduction to Figure Modeling 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Modeling from life for the beginner, stressing 
direct observation, eye-hand coordination, and 
depth discrimination. Both perceptual and concep- 
tual skills are developed and fundamental studio 
practices are taught, such as armature construc- 
tion, clay utilization, and modeling techniques. 
Works are fired in clay or cast in plaster. 

SC241.SC242 

Projects Studio: Introductory Studio 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An open studio oriented toward helping the devel- 
opment of individual initiative. Stressed are how 
ideas are transformed into sculptural statements 
through aesthetic reasoning and the internal logic 
of a sculpture's color, material, and physical con- 
struction. 

SC251.SC252 

Theories of Structure (Seminar— Lecture) 

1.5 hours, once a week 
1.5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Lectures and discussions of various concepts and 
philosophies of structure: mathematical, biologi- 
cal, linguistic, perceptual, etc., and their implica- 
tions to the definition of art. 



SC260A&B 
Structure of the Figure 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
An anatomic and morphological analysis of male 
and female bodies for artists through a three- 
dimensional constructional method. Covered are 
proportions, anatomic structure, surface topology, 
morphological variation, and the body in move- 
ment. This course is directed toward two-dimen- 
sional artists as well as sculptors, and what is 
stressed are the means by which the body's 
salient features can be recognized from any view- 
point in any pose. 

SC301.SC302 

Sculpture II (Attitudes and Strategies) 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
A studio-criticism course that focuses on the issue 
of artistic strategy as it applies to sculptural cre- 
ation. Assignments given attempt to aid students 
to recognize their own and alternative tendencies 
through projects that are made to reflect attitudes 
like expressionism, idealism, mathematical 
systems, decoration, naturalism, etc. 
Prerequisites: SC 201, SC 202 

SC321.SC322 
Carving 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This course introduces the student to carving, one 
of the basic methods of forming sculpture. Stu- 
dents learn to prepare, maintain, and use the tools 
of the carver. They will be introduced to the char- 
acteristics of suitable carving materials. Emphasis 
is placed on the exploration of the formal and 
expressive potentials of cawed sculpture. 

SC401.SC402 

Sculpture III (Types and Modes) 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits, semester: fall and spring 
Terms like monumental, genre, narrative, emblem- 
atic, environmental, etc., reflect the cluster of 
types of sculptural imagery. This studio-criticism 
course is concerned with the ideational and tech- 
nical issues raised by various types of sculptural 
imagery which are assigned in turn. What is 
stressed in each case is the relationship that 
sculptures have with the context they exist in and 
the purpose they serve. 
Prerequisites: SC 201, SC 202 

SC421.SC422 
Metal Studio 

3 hours, once a week 
1 .5 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Form making in noncast metal sculpture has con- 
tributed much to the history of sculpture, particu- 
larly in the present, where the idiom has become 
as familiar as carving and modeling. Concurrently 
offering both basic and advanced technical 
instruction in welding, forging, and other ferrous 
metal techniques, this course is oriented to mak- 
ing sculpture with iron or steel. 



60 



SC431.SC432 

Advanced Figure Sculpture 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
For students seriously involved with the figure, 
this course provides an atelier to continue figure 
modeling on increasingly advanced levels, and a 
context to help formulate a personal figurative 
sculptural idiom. Works are sculpted at various 
scales, including life size, and independent 
projects are undertaken in consultation with the 
faculty. Critiques involving the meaning and sculp- 
tural significance of the works are an integral part 
of the ongoing class activity. 
Prerequisites: SC 231 and SC 232, or by permission 

SC441.SC442 
Project Studio 

6 hours, once a week 
3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
This course provides a studio context where 
maturing self-initiated areas of concentration in 
sculpture can be developed to fruition on an 
advanced level. Whatever the direction, a critical 
emphasis is placed through both open and devised 
assignments on how materials and forms compat- 
ible to personal statements are found. 
Prerequisites: SC 241 or SC 242 

SC 999 
Independent Study 

3-6 hours 

1.5-3 credits/semester: fall and spring 

An independent course of study dealing with a 

particular issue of interest to student and one or 

more faculty. Prior approval by the chairperson 

required. 

All Sculpture classes can be taken as studio 

electives by nonmajors. 



Art Therapy 

AT 300 

Introduction to Art Therapy 

3 credits 

Following a brief introduction to the field of art 
therapy, students visit a variety of institutions and 
are exposed to a wide range of disorders — intel- 
lectual, physical, emotional, and social. The course 
is developmentally oriented, starting with children, 
followed by adolescents, adults, and the aged. 

AT 301 

Social and Group Process 

3 credits 

The focus of this course is on the understanding of 
how individuals function as members of society, 
as well as on the basic elements of group dynam- 
ics. By helping students deal directly with group 
behavior, this course enables them to understand 
better themselves and the interactions of others. 



AT 302 

Theories and Techniques of Art Therapy 

3 credits 

An introduction to the examination of types of 

mental and behavioral disorders as it pertains to 

art therapy is presented, along with the general 

theory and techniques used with the various 

populations. 

AT 303 

Clinical Aspects of Art Therapy 

3 credits 

A weekly class with an art therapist held at the 
Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute of the 
Medical College of Pennsylvania. This course 
presents a survey of the field of art therapy in 
practice through live interviews, films, literature, 
and discussion. 

AT 401 

Senior Practicum 

3 credits 

A field-experience placement is arranged to 
provide an opportunity for the student to become 
acquainted and to work with a specific special 
population. This clinical practicum is carefully 
supervised by the Art Therapy faculty. 

mi 483 

Theories of Personality 

3 credits 

This course is concerned with the study of person- 
ality, the patterns of behavior and predisposition 
that determine how a person will perceive, think, 
feel, and act. Psychoanalysis, behaviorism, 
humanism, and existentialism are among the 
theories explored. 



Graduate Seminar 

GR691A 

University Seminar Structure and Metaphor 

3 credits 

A University-wide seminar in which graduate 
students from various disciplines in the visual arts 
examine theoretical issues in art and design. Top- 
ics covered include the psychology of perception 
and systems of organization, representation, and 
expression. 

GR691B 

University Seminar Art and Society 

3 credits 

The second semester of the University Seminar 

focuses on the place of art and the artist in 

society. 

GR791A&B 

University Seminar Criticism 

3 credits each semester 
A two-semester seminar in which second-year 
graduate students from various disciplines in the 
visual arts further examine the nature of image- 
making with particular attention to the theory and 
application of criticism. 



61 



Philadelphia College of 
Art & Design Faculty 



Paul Adomo 

Lecturer: Art Education 
AB, Georgetown University 
MSC, University of Pennsylvania 
Experience: founder and first director of Bartram 
High School for Human Services, an alternative 
for humanizing high school education; trainer and 
consultant for other alternative schools in the 
Philadelphia area; consultant for National Com- 
mission on Resources for Youth. Currently an 
Instructional Support Teacher for the Priority One 
Program, School District of Philadelphia. 

Hans-Ulrich Allemann 

Adjunct Professor: Graphic Design 
Swiss National Diploma (MFA Equiv.) 
School of Design, Basel, Switzerland 
Exhibitions: Shows in Switzerland, Germany, 
and USA 

Awards: Swiss National Award for Applied Arts; 
Typomundus Award; NY Type Directors Club 
Award; AIGA Awards; Philadelphia Art Directors 
Club Awards 

Publications: Graphis; Print Magazine; ID Maga- 
zine; Graphic Design USA; Type Directors Club NY 
Annuals; Top Symbols and Trademarks of the 
World, Deco Press Milano; Graphic Design Educa- 
tion, ABC Edition. 

Jack Andrews 

Professor: Industrial Design 
BID, Pratt Institute 

Experience: Industrial designer General Motors 
Styling Staff; Director Industrial Design, Center for 
Creative Studies; Design director Samuel Yellin 
Metalworkers, Co.; President Skipjack Press, Inc. 
Awards: Walter Dorwin Teague, IDSA.-1967; NEA 
Grant 1988; NEA Grant 1990. 
Book: Edge of the Anvil, a resource book for black- 
smiths. 

Laurence Bach 

Professor: Graphic Design 
Chairperson: Graphic Design 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Allgemeine Gewerbeschule, Basel, Switzerland 
Experience: instructor, State University of New 
York — Purchase; Moore Col lege of Art; The 
Aegean School of Fine Arts 
Exhibitions: Zygos Gallery, Washington, DC; 
Dolan/Maxwell Gallery, Philadelphia; Laurence 
Miller Gallery, NY; Marian Locks Gallery, 
Philadelphia; Wesleyan University; The 
Photographic Center of Athens; Robert Samuel 
Gallery, NY; Modernism Gallery, San Francisco; 
The Photographers' Gallery, London; The 
Neuberger Museum, NY 

Grants: New York State Council on the Arts; Pola- 
roid Corporation; National Endowment for the Arts 
Awards: Art Directors Club Gold Medal 



Eugene Baguskas 

Associate Professor: Painting/Drawing 
BFA, Yale University 

Exhibitions: "Earth Art I & II." Philadelphia; 
one-man show: Green Mountain Gallery; "In 
Praise of Space," landscape painting in American 
art; two-man exhibit, Gross-McLeaf Gallery, 
Philadelphia; group show, Butcher-More Gallery, 
Philadelphia; "Broad Spectrum," PCA Faculty 
Show — Allentown Art Museum, Gallery at 
University of Pittsburgh, and William Penn Memo- 
rial Museum, Harrisburg; paintings in numerous 
private and public collections; "Landscapes," 
Swarthmore College; "Drawings," Butcher-More 
Gallery, Philadelphia; One Person Exhibit, Morris 
Gallery PA Academy of the Fine Arts; Phila. 
Museum of Art, "Art Now", Contemporary Art in 
Philadelphia; Institute of Contemporary Art "25 
Pick 25", Philadelphia 

Rick Barrick 

Lecturer: Photo/Film/Animation 

B.A., University of Georgia 

He has his own commercial studio in New York 

City and his clients include: American Express, 

IBM, Reader's Digest, The New York Daily News, 

General Foods and others. 

Jane Bedno 

Director: Museum Exhibition Planning and Design 

Associate Professor 

BA, Roosevelt University 

Graduate studies at The Institute of Design, 

Illinois Institute of Technology, and Virginia 

Commonwealth University 

JD, College of William and Mary 

President, Bedno/Bedno Museum Exhibition 

Planning and Design. 

Ed Bedno 

Adjunct Professor: Museum Exhibition Planning 

and Design 

BFA, Art Institute of Chicago 

MS/GD, Institute of Design, Illinois Institute 

of Technology 

Former Chief of Exhibits, The Smithsonian's 

National Air and Space Museum, and The Field 

Museum of Natural History, Chicago 

Norinne L Betjemann 

Lecturer: Photo/Film/Animation 
BFA, Moore College of Art 
Experience: Invited speaker at: University of 
Delaware, Old Dominion University, The Fleisher 
Art Memorial, Moore College of Art 
Exhibitions: Delaware Art Museum (1 989 
Purchase Award), Philadelphia Museum of Art, 
Beaver College, Penn State University, Philadel- 
phia Art Alliance, Jessica Berwind Gallery 
Collections: Dupont Corp; Moore College of Art; 
Delaware Art Museum, Boca Raton Museum of 
Art, and various corporate collections. 
Among her commercial clients is The Philadelphia 
Orchestra. 



62 



Sarah Bodine 

Lecture: Crafts 

BA, Cornell University 

Publications: Metalsmith, American Craft, Studio 

Potter, American Ceramics, Ceramics Monthly, 

New Art Examiner, NCECA Journal, Design Book 

Review, Places, Industrial Design, AIGA Quarterly, 

Metropolis, American Studio Jewelry{f\'\iio\'\, 

1991). Editor, Metalsmith Magazine. 

Sandra Brownlee-Ramsdale 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Crafts 
BRA, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design 
MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 
Exhibitions: "Brocade", Minneapolis, Minnesota; 
"Pictorial and Narrative Fibers", Texas, Colorado, 
Louisiana; "Figure and Place," Chicago, Illinois; 
"Grrrrhhh. . . a study of social patterns, Collabora- 
tive Book Project with Warren Lehrer," Halifax, 
Nova Scotia; "Works of Craft — The Massey 
Foundation Collection," Ottawa, Ontario; 
"Cranbrook Connection: New Images in Fabric," 
Detroit, Michigan and New York. 
Awards: National Endowment for the Arts; Pennsylva- 
nia Council for the Arts; The Canada Council; The 
Ontario Arts Council; The Nova Scotia Talent Trust 

Charles Bumette 

Professor: Industrial Design 
Joseph Carreiro Professorship in Design 
Chairperson: Industrial Design 
B Arch, M Arch, PhD Arch, University of 
Pennsylvania 

Experience: industrial designer, George Nelson & 
Co. Inc.; Educational Consultant, General Motors; 
principal investigator, Institute for Environmental 
Studies; executive director, Philadelphia Chapter 
American Institute of Architects/Center for the 
Building Industry; dean/professor, School of Archi- 
tecture, University of Texas at Austin 
Awards: Citation for Excellence in Design, Phila- 
delphia, AIA; National Endowment for the Arts 
(The University City Science Center, 1977; Phila- 
delphia Art Alliance, 1 981 ); DOE, Passive Commer- 
cial Demonstration Grant; DOE, Appropriate 
Technology Grant; College of Fellows, American 
Institute of Architects; Board of Directors, IDSA. 

Robert J. Byrd 

Senior Lecturer: Illustration 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Experience: illustrator, teacher/instructor: 
Philadelphia Colleges of the Arts, Moore 
College of Art 

Exhibitions: Philadelphia Art Alliance; Rosenfeld 
Gallery; Society of Illustrators; Graphis/Graphis 
Posters; Bologna World Book Children's Fair; 
Children's Book Showcase; "The One Show — 
Original Children's Book Art," Master Eagle Gallery 
Clients: AT&T, SmithKline Beckman, Manufactur- 
ers Hanover, Cigna Corp., CBS, ABC, World Book/ 
Childcraft, National Wildlife Federation, 
Houghton-Mifflin, Macmillan, First Pennsylvania 
Corp., Doubleday & Company 
Publications: Marcella Was Bored, E.P. Dutton: 
1985, Pinocchio, Doubleday: 1980, The Children's 
Aesop, Doubleday: 1989, The Emperor's New 
Clothes, Dutton Children's Books: 1991, Dragons 
And Dinosaurs, Random House: 1990 



Christine Cantera 

Senior Lecturer: Illustration 
BFA, Philadelphia Colleges of the Arts 
Awards and Exhibitions: Type Directors Club 26, 
NY; Artists Guild of Chicago; Art Directors Club of 
Chicago; American Society of Magazine Photogra- 
phers; AIGA Communications; AIGA/Design 2 
Experience: magazine publishing, book publishing, 
advertising/PR, corporate design, signage 

John J. Carlano 

Adjunct Associate Professor. Photo/Film/Animation 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Experience: free-lance photographer; clients in- 
clude: CIGNA, American Craft Magazine, MGM/ 
UA Home Video, Stroemann Bread, Academy 
Insurance Group, Philadelphia Industrial Develop- 
ment Corporation 

Exhibitions: Chicago Art Institute; Allentown Art 
Museum, Allentown, PA; Marian Locks Gallery, 
Philadelphia; "Challenge Exhibition," Fleisher Art 
Memorial, Philadelphia; Mednick Gallery, solo 
show, Philadelphia; Nexus Gallery, Philadelphia; 
The Photography Gallery, Philadelphia 
Awards: PCA Venture Fund recipient; American 
Photographer Magazine; Fellowship: PA Council 
on the Arts: 1990 

Jack Carnell 

Assistant Professor: Photo/Film/Animation 

BFA: The University of New Mexico 

MFA: Tyler School of Art 

Exhibitions: Allentown Art Museum, Institute of 

Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, Philadelphia 

Museum of Art 

Awards: NEA, Emerging Artist Grant; Pennsylvania 

Council on the Arts, Guggenheim Fellowship 

Sharon Church 

Associate Professor: Crafts 
Chairperson: Crafts 
BS, Skidmore College 

MFA, School for American Craftsmen, Rochester 
Institute of Technology 

Exhibitions: "Craft Today: Poetry of the Physical," 
American Craft Museum, NYC, "Form, Formel, 
Formalismus," Munich, West Germany, "American 
Jewelry Now" Touring Exhibition, "Jewelry USA," 
American Craft Museum, NYC; "Contemporary 
American Crafts" Philadelphia Museum of Art. 
Collections: Delaware Art Museum 
Organizations: American Craft Council, Pennsylva- 
nia Society of Goldsmiths, Society of North Ameri- 
can Goldsmiths 
Awards: NEA Fellowship Grant, 1978 

Harvey Citron 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Sculpture 
BFA Ed, Pratt Institute 
Diploma, Academy of Fine Arts, Rome, Italy 
Exhibitions: "Contemporary Realism" international 
travelling show (Pennsylvania Academy of Fine 
Arts; Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; Oakland Mu- 
seum of Art; Berlin Museum of Art; Holland); Dart 
Gallery, Chicago; "Figurative Art in New York" 
Artist's Choice Museum; Tibor de Nagy Gallery; 
Soho Center for Visual Arts; 41 st Eucharistic Con- 
gress; Union League, NY 



Karen Clark-Schock 

Senior Lecturer 

Art Therapy 

BA, Rosemont College 

MCAT, Hahnemann University 

Experience: registered art therapist and program 

coordinator, Paoli Memorial Hospital 1977-1989; 

teaching faculty at Hahnemann University; private 

practice. Co-founder Intraspect, a personal and 

professional development company; national 

lecturer and published author. 

Connie Coleman 

Lecturer: Photo/Film/Animation 
BFA, MFA Rhode Island School of Design 
Experience: single-channel videotapes, radio 
pieces, computer generated graphics, multi- 
channel video installations. 
Publications: Art Forum, Independent, Afterimage. 
Awards: PA State Council on the Arts and the 
NEA/AFI Mid Atlantic Regional Media Arts 
Programs; Artist-in-Residence, Experimental Tele- 
vision Center, Oswego, NY 

John Columbus 

Adjunct Associate Professor. Photo/Film/Animation 
BFA, Hartford Art School 
MFA, Columbia University School of the Arts, 
Film Division 

Experience: Columbia University, Film Division; 
Stockton State College, Pomona, NJ; director, 
Thomas A. Edison/Black Maria Film & Video 
Festival, 1980 to present; producer or production 
collaborator, various commissioned independent, 
and commercial media projects, 1970 to present 
Exhibitions: Independent Filmmaker's Program; 
New Jersey Network Public Television; Lancaster 
Gallery; Nexus Gallery, Philadelphia; Stockton 
State College Performing Arts Center; Oakside 
Gallery Series, Bloomfield, NJ; Sinking Creek Film 
Festival, Swain School of Design; Dartmouth 
College; Morris Museum 

Robert B. Croston 

Assistant Professor: Industrial Design 
Director: I.D. Advanced Technology Lab 
BA, Franconia College 
MS, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 
Experience: director. Industrial Design, Transitions 
Research Corp.; Senior Human Factors Engineer, 
General Dynamics Land Systems 
Awards: National Endowment for the Arts, Design 
Student Fellowship 

Exhibitions: Herter Gallery, University of Massachu- 
setts; Robots 12, "Helpmate," Detroit, Michigan 
Organizations: member IDSA, HFS, AEMS, AUVS 

Thomas Daley 

Lecturer: Crafts 

BA, Temple University 

Experience: Partner, Samuel Crothers Associates, 

Architects 



63 



Don Daily 

Instructor: Illustration 
AA, Trenton Junior College 
BFA - Illustration, Art Center College of Design 
Awards: Merit, Society of Illustrators, NY; NY 
Salmagundi Club Illustrations for major motion 
pictures, national magazines and advertising 
campaigns, book covers 
Private portrait commissions 

Sky David 

Assistant Professor: Photo/Film/ Animation 
BFA, Texas Tech University 
MFA, California Institute of the Arts 
Experience: headed Animation Department at 
Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts and Harvard 
University; instructor, San Francisco Art Institute 
and California College of Arts and Crafts 
Exhibitions: Los Angeles County Museum of Art; 
PBS Television's NOVA; World Festival of Anima- 
tion, Zagreb, Yugoslavia; American Film Festival, 
New York; Festival of Abstract Film, Paris; Los 
Angeles International Filmmakers Exposition; 
Toronto International Festival of Animation (retro- 
spective exhibition); Sinking Creek Film Celebra- 
tion; Canadian BBC Arthur C. Clarke Special; 
Athens International Film Festival; Chicago Inter- 
national Film Festival; Ann Arbor Film Festival; 
Marin County Film Festival; International Tournee 
of Animation, Black Maria Film Festival 
Awards: International Festival of Animation in 
Zagreb, Yugoslavia; Athens International Film 
Festival; Independent Filmmakers Exposition, NY; 
American Film Institute and the National Endow- 
ment for the Arts, 1 976; Society for the Encourage- 
ment of the Arts, sponsored by San Francisco 
Museum of Modern Art; grant from Sinking Creek 
Film Celebration; Pennsylvania Council on the Arts; 
Marin County Film Festival 

Peter DiGuglielmo 

Lecturer: Painting/Drawing 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art and Design 
Associate Director — Jessica Berwind Gallery 
Lecturer, Anderson Ranch Center for the Arts, 
Snowmass, CO, Watercolor Painting. 
Lecturer, Cheltenham Art Center, Cheltenham, PA 
Exhibitions: Faculty Exhibition, Cheltenham, PA. 
Annual Awards Show, Cheltenham Art Center, 
Spector-Gorsin Award for Painting. Invitational, 
Nexus Gallery. Juried Painting Exhibition, 
Westburg Gallery-Glassboro State College and 
The Philadelphia Art Alliance. One-Man Show, 
Philadelphia Art Alliance. Alumni Exhibition, Phila- 
delphia College of Art and Design. Juried Drawing 
Exhibition, Beaver College. 

Larry Donahue 

Assistant Professor: Crafts 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MA in Education, The University of the Arts 

Professional Experience: Moravian Pottery and 

Tile Works 

Grants and Awards: Venture Fund Grant 

Lectures Nationally on Plaster Mold Making 

Exhibitions: Campbell's Soup Tureen Show, 1986 



Ronald Dorfman 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Foundation 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 
Experience: proprietor, Ronald Dorfman Design, 
Richboro, PA, a full-service agency with interna- 
tional clients in the fashion, home furnishings, 
travel, and book-publishing industries 
Exhibitions: General Electric Company, Philadel- 
phia; faculty shows, Philadelphia College of Art 

Michael Dunas 

Lecturer: Crafts 

BA, New York University 

Publications: Metalsmith, American Craft Studio 

Potter, American Ceramics, Ceramics, Monthly, 

New Art Examiner, NCECA Journal, Design Book 

Review, Places, Industrial Design, AIGA Quarterly, 

Metropolis, American Studio Jewelry{K\zzo\\, 

1991) 

Martha Mayer Erlebacher 

Adjunct Professor: Illustration 

BID, MFA, Pratt Institute 

Gallery: J. Rosenthal Fine Arts, Chicago, IL; Koplin 

Gallery, Santa Monica CA 

Laurie Feinberg 

Lecturer: Architectural Studies 
B Arch, Cornell University 
Center for Architecture and Urban Studies, 
San Francisco Design Studio 
Experience: registered architect State of Pennsyl- 
vania; urban designer. Department of Planning, 
City of Baltimore; project architect, Campbell Tho- 
mas, Philadelphia; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 
San Francisco 

Richard Felton 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Graphic Design 
MFA, Yale University 

Gail Ferretti 

Lecturer: Sculpture 
BFA, Tyler School of Art 
MFA, Alfred University 
Exhibitions: Philadelphia Art Alliance; Gross 
McCleaf gallery; Fleisher Challenge Exhibitions 
Finalists; Show-Mellon Bank (Phila); Port of History 
Museum 

Apprenticeship: Moravian Tile Works 
Award: James Wilbur Johnston Sculpture Compe- 
tition, Honorable Mention 

Edmund J. Ferszt 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Illustration 

Director: Continuing Education 

BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 

MA, University of Wisconsin 

MS Ed., Bank Street College of Education and 

Parsons School of Design 

Exhibitions: Janet Fleisher Gallery, Rosenfeld 

Gallery, Philadelphia Art Alliance, Moravian 

College, Langman Gallery, Cheltenham Art Center, 

Moore College of Art, Allentown Art Museum 

Collections: Penn Federal Bank, Philadelphia 

Museum of Art, numerous private collections in 

the Greater Philadelphia area 

Awards: Tobeleah Wechsler First Prize, Annual 

Awards Show, Cheltenham Art Center 



Stephen Fiorella 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Photo/Film/Animation 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, University of Delaware 
Experience: lecturer in photography, Beaver College 
Experience: Freelance Photographer specializing 
in editorial and Public Relations Photography; 
Lecturer in Photography, Beaver College. 
Selected Group Exhibitions: Lowe Art Museum, 
Miami, Florida; Museum of Fine Arts, St. Peters- 
burg, Florida; Scottsdale Art Center, Scottsdale, 
Arizona; Salina Art Center, Salina, Kansas; Burden 
Gallery, Aperture Inc., N.Y; The Photo Center 
Gallery, Tisch School of the Fine Arts, New York 
University; International Print Biennial, Cabo Frio, 
Brazil; Philadelphia Photographers International, 
Cigna Museum, Philadelphia. 
Solo Exhibitions: Sol Mednick Gallery, Philadel- 
phia; Booktrader Gallery, Philadelphia. 
Awards/Nominations: Indo-U.S. Subcommission 
on Education and Culture, Nominee to Indo-Ameri- 
can Fellowship; Council for International Exchange 
of Scholars, Fulbright Fellowship, Nominee to 
India; Philadelphia College of Art Venture Fund; 
University of Delaware Arts Council Grant. 
Collections: The Asia Society, N.Y; EMBRAGEL, 
Cabo Frio, Brazil. 

Publications: Aperture Magazine; Focus On Asian 
Studies Journal; American Poetry Review; Passion 
International Magazine. 

Alida Fish 

Professor: Photo/Film/Animation 
Chairperson: Photo/Film/Animation 
BA, Smith College 

MFA, Rochester Institute of Technology 
Experience: visiting artist, Arrowmont School of Arts 
and Crafts, Gatlinburg, TN; Photography Program 
Coordinator and Visiting Artist, Penland School, 
Penland, NC; visiting artist, Roanoke College, Salem, 
VA; Univ of New Mexico, Albuquerque 
Exhibitions: Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago; 
Fine Arts Center, University of Kentucky; Tianjin 
Fine Arts College, China; Kohler Arts Center, 
Sheboygan, Wl; Nexus Gallery, Philadelphia; Dela- 
ware Art Museum; Photocollect, NYC; Delaware 
State Arts Council Gallery; University of Alabama; 
Morris Gallery, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine 
Arts; Toledo Museum; Project Arts, Cambridge, 
MA; Santa Barbara Museum; Lightfantastic Gal- 
lery, Michigan State University; Southern Light 
Gallery, Amarillo College; Cameravision Gallery, 
Los Angeles; Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, 
NY; Morning Art Center, Chicago; University of 
Vermont; Portland Museum of Art 
Publications: Searching Out the Best, Exploring 
Color Photography, American Photographer, The 
Alternative Image, Camera, Modern Photography, 
Quiver '84, Contemporary Photography as 
Phantasy, Women See Woman 
Collections: George Eastman House International 
Museum of Photography; Standard Oil of Indiana; 
Triboro Electric Corp.; Morton, Lewis, King and 
Krieg; Humboldt State University; Murray State 
University; Rochester Institute of Technology 
Awards: Delaware Individual Artists Grant, PCA 
Venture Fund, Polaroid Artists Program 



64 



Renee P. Foulks 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Illustration 
BFA, Moore College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 
Exhibitions: Grand Central Art Galleries, NY; John 
Pence Gallery, San Francisco; St. Louis Artists 
Guild; Delaware Art Museum; Noel Butcher 
Gallery, Philadelphia; State Museum of Pennsylva- 
nia; Woodmere Art Museum; University of 
Scranton; Moravian College; Goforth Rittenhouse 
Gallery, Phila.; John Szoke Gallery, N.Y.; Philadel- 
phia Museum of Art "Contemporary Phila Artists" 
Awards: NJ State Council on the Arts Painting 
Grant, American Artist Magazine National 
Competition Painting Award; Venture Fund Grant, 
The University of the Arts 

Diane Taylor Foxman 

Lecturer: Art Education 
BA, Antioch College 
MA Art Education, Goddard College 
Experience: Mainline Night School; Art Teacher, 
Lower Merion School District, 28 years 
Exhibitions: Woodmere Art Gallery; Paul Tash Gallery 
Publications: Authored art education booklets for 
Lower Merion School District; awaiting publica- 
tion of The Dispossessed Child in Art Education 
Affiliations: Member National Art Education Asso- 
ciation, Faculty Sponsor of Student Chapter, 
National Art Education Association 

Malcolm Frazier 

Lecturer: Sculpture 

BA, University of Kansas 

Bordese Studios, Carrara, Italy; Stone Carving 

Exhibitions: Shidoni Gallery, Santa Fe, annual 

sculpture exhibitions; McAllister Gallery, Texas; 

East 7th Gallery, Lawrence, Kansas 

Frank Galuszka 

Professor: Painting 

BFA, MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 
Experience: Tyler School of Art; Louisiana Tech 
(AASCU Studies) Center in Rome; Aegean School, 
Greece 

Exhibitions: More Gallery, Philadelphia; Sherry 
French Gallery, NY; National Academy of Design, 
NY; Artist's Choice Museum, NY; Yale University, 
New Haven, CT; "New American Drawing," 
Galleria de Ca Pesaro, Venice; Drawing Center, NY; 
University of Virginia; Galleria Primo Piano, Rome; 
USIS, Rome; Courthouse Show I & II, Philadelphia 
Awards: Fulbright recipient; joint US-Romanian 
government grant for a "Young Professional in the 
Arts" in Bucharest; fellowship recipient, Pennsyl- 
vania State Council for the Arts 



Sheryl Gibson 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Crafts 

BS, University of Maryland 

MA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 

Exhibitions: Handweavers Guild of America, 

Galveston Center for the Arts, Tyler School of Art, 

Beaver College, Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Salt 

Lake Art Center 

Awards: Temple University Fellow, Utah Designer/ 

Craftsman, University of Maryland Honors Scholarship 

Ralph Giguere 

Senior Lecturer: Illustration 
BFA, The University of the Arts 
Clients: The New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly; Psy- 
chology Today; Omni; Redbook U.S. News and World 
Report; The Boston Globe; Texaco; Scott Foresman; 
RCA; AH. Robbins; Cigna; Rhone Poulenc Rhorer 
Pharmaceutical; Wyeth Laboratories. 
Awards: The Society of Illustrators; American 
Illustration; Graphis; Communication Arts. 

David Goerk 

Senior Lecturer: Painting 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Indiana University 

Exhibitions: Larry Becker Gallery, Jessica Berwind 
Gallery, Momenta, Beaver College — Works on 
Paper, Biennial '89 — Delaware Art Museum, 
"Transmutations" — University of Pennsylvania, 
1 x 12: A Decade of Fleisher Challenge Artists, 
Janet Fleisher Gallery, 1988 Philadelphia Drawing 
Competition — Philadelphia Art Alliance, Alli- 
ances in the Park 

Collections: Philadelphia Museum of Art, Beaver 
College 

Aaron Goldblatt 

Lecturer: Sculpture 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA Rutgers University 
Experience: instructor; University of Vermont; 
Germantown Academy; Rutgers University; techni- 
cal assistant, Alice Ayckock, Lauren Ewing, Ann 
and Patrick Poirier 

Exhibitions: A.J. Wood Gallery; Moore College of 
Art; "Jazz, '81," Vernon Park; one person show, 
Haverford College; "Alliance in the Park," Fairmont 
Park; "Duchampiou" The University of the Arts; 
"Philadelphia Redevelopment Authority Park Pro- 
posals," Nexus Gallery; "Summerfest," Rutgers 
University; Zimmerli Museum Annual Exhibition, 
New Brunswick, NJ; Vox Populi Gallery 



Eileen Taber Goodman 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Foundation 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Exhibitions: one-woman shows Marian Locks Gallery, 
Swarthmore College, Hollins College, Pennsylvania 
Academy of the Fine Arts, Peale House Galleries, 
Gross-McLeaf Gallery; group exhibitions, "New Tal- 
ent," Terry Dintenfass, NYC; "Still Life," First Street 
Gallery, NYC; Art in City Hall, Phila; Allentown Art 
Museum; Beaver College; Greater Harrisburg Art 
Festival; "Philadelphia Images" 
Collections: AT&T, Chemical Bank of New York 
Awards: Cheltenham Art Center Painting Annual, 
Tobeleah Wechsler Painting Prize, Beaver College 
Purchase Award 

Publications: Painting the Still Life, Watson- 
Guptill, NY, 1985; American Artist, 1981 TheArtof 
Watercolor, Prentice-Hall, 1985 

Anthony Petr Gorny 

Associate Professor, Photo/Film/Animation 

MFA, Yale University School of Art 

BFA, S.U.N.Y College at Buffalo 

Experience: Tyler School of Art, Professo; Pennsylvania 

Academy of Fine Arts, Instructor; has taught at Moore 

College of Art, Drexel University, Community College 

of Philadelphia, Fleisher Art Memorial 

Collections: Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo; S.R. 

Guggenheim Museum; Brooklyn Museum; Victoria 

and Albert Museum; Cleveland Museum of Art; 

Philadelphia Museum of Art; National Gallery of 

Art, Washington, D.C.; Pennsylvania Academy of 

the Fine Arts. 

Awards: NEA Individual Artist Fellowship; PA 

Council on the Arts Individual Fellowship 

Arlene Gostin 

Associate Professor: Education 
University of Cincinnati 
BA, University of Delaware 
MA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Exhibitions: Philadelphia Art Alliance, The Print 
Club, Rosenfeld Gallery, Langman Gallery 
Collections: Philadelphia Museum of Art, Salzburg 
Academy; prints included in public and private 
collections 

Experience: printer/painter collaborations with 
Neil Welliver for Brooke Alexander Gallery, NYC; 
Clarkson M. Potter Publishers, Inc., NYC; The Lim- 
ited Editions Club, NYC; Institute of Contemporary 
Art, Philadelphia, PA 

James Green 

Lecturer: Printmaking 
BFA, Oberlin College 
M Ph., Yale University 
MLS, Columbia University 



65 



Alan Greenberg 

Lecturer: Sculpture 

BFA, Tyler School of Art 

MFA, Purdue University 

Exhibitions: Foster Goldstrom Gallery, NYC; Tower 

Gallery, Penn State University; Bank of America, 

San Francisco, CA.; Nexus Gallery, Berkeley, CA.: 

Souther Exposure Gallery, San Francisco, CA.; 

Oakland Museum, Oakland, Ca.; Dobrick Gallery, 

Chicago III.; Louisiana State University, Baton 

Rouge; Fendrick Gallery, Washington, D.C.; 

Artpark, Lewiston, NY.; San Francisco Art Institute, 

CA.; The House in Contemporany Art, California 

State University, Staniscus, Tinrock, CA.; Art 

Agolo, Santa Ana College, CA 

Collections: Carnegie Museum of Art; Indianapolis 

Museum 

Grants and Awards: PCA Fellowship Grant; 

Artpark; Oakland Arts Council; Oakland Museum 

Gerald Greenfield 

Associate Professor: Photo/Film/Animation 
Director, Graduate Studies 
BA, Pacific University 
MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 
Experience: Adjunct Associate Professor, Drexel 
University; Visiting Associate Professor: University 
of Oklahoma, Indiana University of Bloomington, 
University of Massachusetts at Boston; research 
specializations in Chinese photography and soci- 
ety, theory of art, computer art, color theory and 
processes 

Exhibitions: Gallery 913 Wilmington DE; Rutgers 
University, NJ; Simon's Rock College; Chiaroscuro 
Gallery, Lenox, MA; Nexus Gallery, Philadelphia; 
The Gallery, Bloomington, IN; Vincennes Univer- 
sity; Art Museum, Indiana University; Addison 
Gallery of American Art, Andover, MA; Boston 
Center for the Arts; University of Massachusetts at 
Boston; Lewis and Clark College; Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; Museum of Art, University 
of Oregon 

Awards: Unicolor Artist Support Grant; National 
Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar; 
Ford Foundation Grant; Philadelphia College of Art 
Venture Fund Award 

Thomas Y. Han 

Assistant Professor: Architectural Studies 
BA, University of California, Berkley 
M Arch, Southern California Institute of 
Architectue, L.A. 
Cranbrook Academy of Art 
Experience: Architecture Intermundium, Milan, 
Italy; various offices in California and Philadelphia 
Exhibitions/Awards: Galerie Z.B.,Frankfurt, West 
Germany, 1989-90; Levy Gallery, Moore College of 
Art, Philadelphia, PA, "Topographies," 1989; Mu- 
seum of Modern Art, New York. "Deconstructivist 
Architecture," 1988; Gropius Museum, Berlin, 
West Germany, I.B.A. "City Edge" Competition. 
First Prize, 1987; Venice Biennale, Italy. Three 
Architectural "Machines" and Drawings, 
Palmanova Competition, Grand Prize, 1985 
Publications: catalogue, Traume um ein Haus: 
Aktion Poliphile. Frankfurt, 1990; catalogue, 
Deconstructivist Architecture. New York, 1988; 
DOMUS, August issue. Milan, 1988; catalogue, 
The International Bauausstellung. Berlin, 1988; AA 
Files, Issue no. 14. London, 1987; catalogue, Venice 
Giennale, 1985 



Ronald E. Hays 

Senior Lecturer: Art Therapy 
MS, Hahnemann Medical College 
Experience: assistant professor and director, 
Creative Arts in Therapy Education, Hahnemann 
University; consultant, Arts in Special Education 
Projects of Pennsylvania; Past president, Associa- 
tion for Care of Children's Health. 

Gerald Herdman 

Associate Professor: Foundation 

Director, Pre-College Programs 

Certificate, Cleveland Institute of Art 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Experience: visiting artist/lecturer, University of 

Vermont, Colgate University, Cooper Union, Pratt 

Institute, Pennsylvania State University, Maryland 

Institute 

Exhibitions: Cleveland Museum of Art; Judson 

Memorial Church, NYC; various universities; 

Gross-McLeaf Gallery, Philadelphia; organized 

exhibitions independent of commercial or 

institutional support since 1963; representative, 

JoAnn Nostrand, Oklahoma City 

Kenneth Hiebert 

Professor: Graphic Design 
BA, Bethel College 

Diploma, Allgemeine Gewerbeschule, Basel, 
Switzerland 

Experience: research associate in the arts, Yale 
University, Graphics in the Street faculty, Federal 
Design Seminar, Carnegie Mellon and Yale- 
Brissago Summer Programs. 
Projects: typographic systems designed for IBM 
and Westinghouse; designer of Hermeneia series, 
published by Fortress Press (AIGA 50 Best Books 
Award); NEA grant for documenting design 
processes using electronic technology. 
Selected Awards: AIGA communication graphics; 
AIGA Philadelphia Awards; Society of Typographic 
Arts; Type Directors Club of New York; Art Direc- 
tors Club, Philadelphia. 

Selected Exhibitions: "Post-Modern Typography," 
Ryder Gallery; "Ephemeral Images: Recent 
American Posters," Cooper-Hewitt; "American 
Culture Posters," University of Louisville; "Twelve 
Eclipses, Depleted Armour," Lima Art Association, 
Lima, OH; "Thirty Years of Poster Art," Gewer- 
bemuseum, Basel, Switzerland; "The Expanded 
Photograph," Philadelphia Civic Center. 
Publications: Author, Graphic Design Processes. . . 
universal to Unique, Van Nostrand Reinhold, NY: 
1992 



Michael Hurwitz 

Associate Professor: Crafts 

BFA, Boston University 

Experience: workshops: Altos de Chavon, 

Dominican Republic; Appalachian Crafts Center, 

Smithville, TN; Boston University 

Exhibitions: "Twice Gifted," Workbench Gallery, 

NY; "Beeken/Parsons, Hurwitz & Somerson," 

Snyderman Gallery, Philadelphia; "Dairy Barn," 

Athens, OH; "Mid-Atlantic Woodworkers," Stifel 

Arts Center, WV; "Artist Designed Furniture," 

Norton Gallery of Art, West Palm Beach, FL; 

"Contemporary Crafts: A Concept in Flux," 

National Craft Showroom, NY 

Publications and reviews: American Craft, 1986; 

Craft International, 1985, 1984; Living with Crafts, 

Design Book Three; Fine Woodworking, 1983 

Awards: National Endowment fot the Arts Visual 

Artist Fellowship; Pennsylvania Visual Artist 

Fellowship 

Jeanne Jaffe 

Senior Lecturer: Foundation 

BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 

MFA, Alfred University 

Exhibitions: Tweed Museum of Art, Duluth, MN; 

El Paso Museum of Art, El Paso, TX; Carborundum 

Museum, Niagara Falls, NY; Tyler Visiting Artists, 

Philadelphia; Whitney Counterweight, NYC; 

various group shows in NY area 

Awards: National Endowment for the Arts;. 

Assistantship; PA Council on the Arts Grant Visual 

Arts Fellowship; Philadelphia College of Art 

Venture Fund 

Steven Jaffe 

Associate Professor: Painting/Drawing 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art 
Exhibitions: Philadelphia Museum of Art, 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Academy 
of Arts and Letters, University of North Carolina, 
Atlantic College of Art 

Collections: The University Museum, University of 
Louisville; Samuel White Institute of Art, Louis- 
ville; Philadelphia College of Art 
Exhibitions: Phila. Museum of Art, PA Academy of 
Fine Arts, Academy of Arts and Letters, New York; 
University of North Carolina; Atlantic College of 
Art, Rutgers University; Charles More Gallery, 
Philadelphia 

Collections: Phila. Museum of Art, Delaware Mu- 
seum of Art; Allen R. Hite Collection, University of 
Louisville, KY. 



66 



Roland Jahn 

Associate Professor: Crafts 
BA, MS, MFA, University of Wisconsin 
Collections: Corning Museum of Glass; 
Philadelphia Museum of Art; Vassar College; 
Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, Memphis; Delaware 
Art Museum; Johnson Foundation; numerous 
private collections 

Publications: Contemporary Art Glass, Modern 
Glass, Glass Registry, Glass Art Magazine 
Exhibitions: "Philadelphia: Three Centuries of 
American Art," Philadelphia Museum of Art; "New 
American Glass," Huntingdon Galleries, 
Huntingdon, WV 

Commissions: nine chalices for the 41st Eucharis- 
tic Congress, Philadelphia; USA delegate, Interna- 
tional Conference on Glassblowing, London; 
correspondent for Studio and Glass magazines 

Elsa Johnson 

Associate Professor: Foundation 

Co-Chairperson: Foundation 

BFA, Cooper Union 

MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Exhibitions: sculpture for University City Town-houses; 

Redevelopment Authority of Philadelphia; Marian 

Locks Gallery, Philadelphia; Art Alliance, Philadelphia; 

Cheltenham Art Center, Cheltenham, PA 

Grants: Philadelphia College of Art Venture Fund 

Lois M. Johnson 

Professor: Printmaking 
BS, University of North Dakota 
MFA, University of Wisconsin, Madison 
Exhibitions: The Brooklyn Museum National Print 
Exhibition; Pratt International Print Exhibition; ■ 
Graphics International, India; The Print Club; 
"Works by Women on Paper," Los Angeles; 
Boston Printmakers National Exhibition; Prints 78 
National Print Invitational; Philadelphia Museum 
of Art History of Silk Screen; American Drawings, 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; Marian 
Locks Gallery Contemporary Philadelphia Artists, 
Philadelphia Museum of Art; "Recent Publica- 
tions" Arizona State University, VAR1 Studios 
Collections: Atlantic Richfield Corporation, General 
Electric Corporation, University of North Dakota, 
University of Wisconsin, New York Public Library, 
Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Metropolitan 
Museum of Art, Fogg Museum of Art, Boston . 
Awards: Visual and Performing Arts Program, 1980 
Winter Olympics, Lake Placid, NY; Pennsylvania 
Council on the Arts Artist Fellowship, 1980; One 
Percent Commission for City of Philadelphia, 1988 

Alec Karros 

Lecturer: Crafts 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 
Experience: instructor, Rhode Island School of 
Design; artist in residence, Glassell School, 
Houston Museum; artist in residence, University 
of Georgia 

Exhibitions: Monarch National, San Angelo Mu- 
seum, San Angelo Texas; Nicolayson Museum, 
Caspar Wyoming; Pewabic Pottery, Detroit, Michi- 
gan; The Elements, Greenwich, Connecticut; The 
Hallowed Vessel, Lill St. Gallery, Chicago, Illinois 



David Kettner 

Professor: Painting and Foundation 
BFA, Cleveland Institute of Art 
MFA, Indiana University 
Exhibitions: "Made in Philadelphia 2," Institute of 
Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; "Contemporary 
Drawing," Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; 
"Six Serf-Portraits, 1975 Series," Whitney Museum of 
American Art, NYC; "Recent Works." NYU, Albany, 
NY; "A Bach Transcription," Morris Gallery, Pennsylva- 
nia Academy of the Fine Arts; "The Bach Project," 
Marian Locks East, Philadelphia 
Collections: Philadelphia Museum of Art; Rutgers 
University; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; 
The Davidson Collection, Chicago 
Awards: Philadelphia College of Art Venture Fund 

Robert Keyser 

Professor: Painting/Drawing 
Chairperson: Painting/Drawing 
University of Pennsylvania 
Certificate: Atelier Fernand Leger, Paris 
Twenty-nine solo exhibitions since 1951 in U.S.A. 
(New York, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., 
Williamsburg, VA, New Haven and Chicago) and 
abroad (London, Paris and Rome). 
Selected public collections: College of William and 
Mary, Virginia, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 
Arts, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Phillips Collec- 
tion, Washington, D.C. 

Paul H. King 

Senior Lecturer: Illustration 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

4-year Certificate, Pennsylvania Academy of the 

Fine Arts 

MFA, Boston University 

Experience: Boston University, Emmanuel College, 

Moravian College, Baum School of Art, Community 

College of Philadelphia. Work in numerous private 

collections and group shows. 

Clients: AT&T, Pennwalt Corp., Merc Sharp + 

Dome, Campbell Soup Co., Lewis Gilman & Kynett, 

Pennwalt Corporation, Gray & Rogers 

Alan J. Klawans 

Senior Lecturer: Illustration 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Lecturer: Tyler School of Fine Arts, Moore College 
of Art, Annenberg School of Communications 
Director of Design: SmithKline Beckman Corporation 
Design projects exhibited: NY Art Directors Club, 
Society of Illustrators, American Institute of Graphic 
Arts, Society of Publication Designers, New York Type 
Directors, Philadelphia Art Directors Club 
Paintings and prints exhibited: Museum of 
Modern Art; Whitney Museum of American Art; 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts; The 
Brooklyn Museum; Philadelphia Museum of Art; 
Smithsonian Institution; The Print Club, Philadel- 
phia; Dulin Museum; Corcoran Gallery 



Nathan Knobler 

Professor: Graduate Studies 
Diploma in Civil Engineering, Ohio State University 
BFA, Syracuse University 
MA, Florida State University 
Experience: Art Director and Illustrator, New York 
and Hartford, CT; Professor, Head, Department of 
Art, University of Connecticut; Dean of Academic 
Affairs, The Philadelphia College of Art 
Exhibitions: Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 
Arts; Brooklyn Museum; American Federation of 
Arts, National Drawing Exhibition; American 
Federation of Arts traveling exhibition, "New En- 
gland Printmakers," Institute of Contemporary Art, 
Boston; Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, CT; 
DeCordova and Dana Museum; Worcester 
Museum; William Benton Museum, CT; Smith 
College Museum; Allentown Museum; Manwaring 
Gallery; Connecticut College; Lyman Allen Mu- 
seum; Berkshire Museum, Pittsfield, MA; Slater 
Museum; New Britain Museum of American Art; 
Joan Peterson Gallery, Boston; Angeleski Gallery, 
NY; Chase Gallery, NY 

Publications: author, The Visual Dialogue (three 
editions in English, translated and published in 
Spanish, Indonesian and Roumanian editions); 
articles and lectures on visual perception, draw- 
ing, the artist in society, political art, children's art 
Research on visual perception and creativity 

Deborah Kogan 

Senior Lecturer: Children's Book Illustration 
Philadelphia College of Art 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
Experience: painter, illustrator, author 
Exhibitions: AIGA; American Watercolor Society; 
Carnegie-Mellon University; Hibiya Library, Tokyo, 
Japan; Philadelphia Museum of Art 
Awards: Louis Comfort Tiffany Grant for Painting, 
Drexel Citation for Book Illustration 
Publications: author/illustrator: The Cloud, Harper 
& Row; Fog-Drift Morning, Harper & Row; My 
Dog, Trip, Holiday House; illustrator: Hubknuckles, 
Crown; Immigrant Girl, Holiday House; My Prairie 
Year, Holiday House; Through Grandpa's Eyes, 
Harper & Row 

Andrea Krupp 

Lecturer: Printmaking 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Experience: assistant conservator of rare books, 

Library Company of Philadelphia; limited edition 

box and portfolio production, Atelier Dermont- 

Duval, Paris, France 

Exhibitions: Paris International Pring Group, Oslo; 

The Arts of the Book, Philadelphia; Practival and 

Provocative, Philadelphia; Grafiek, Utrecht 

Commissions: Artist's book editions: Nottamum 

Town; Le Desir de Pleindre, for Editions Carina, 

Paris/Utrecht 



67 



Hedi Kyle 

Senior Lecturer: Printmaking 

Diploma, Werk-Kunstschule, Wiesbaden, West 

Germany 

Experience: graphic design, illustration, fabric 

design, hand bookbinding 

Teaching: Center for Book Arts, NY, 1977-85; 

Paper and Book Intensive, Oxbow, 1983-86; 

numerous workshops, US and Canada; Cooper 

Union, NY, 1981,1983 

Exhibitions: 3 one-person, 1 two-person, and 

17 group shows 

Publications: one book, four articles, several book 

reviews 

Collections: mostly private; some libraries and archives 

Memberships: board of directors, Center for Book 

Arts; American Institute for Conservation; Pacific 

Center for Book Arts; Friends of the Dard Hunter 

Museum; Guild of Book Workers 

Jim Lakis 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Illustration 
Exhibitions and Awards: Art Directors Club of 
Philadelphia; Photo Graphis; AIGA Award of 
Excellence; Art Directors Club of New York; 
Advertising Club of New York 
Major clients: Smith, Kline and French Laboratories; 
N.W. Ayer Advertising Agency; Spiro and Associates 
Advertising Agency; Widmere Communications 

David Lebe 

Lecturer: Photo/Film/Animation 
Philadelphia College of Art 
Exhibitions: XYZ Gallery, Gent, Belgium; Catherine 
Edelman Gallery, Chicago; University of Maryland; 
Fine Arts Museum of Long Island; Roanoke 
Museum of Fine Arts; Alternative Museum, NYC; 
Marcuse Peifer Gallery, NYC; The Noyes Museum; 
Images Gallery, Cincinnati; Marianne Deson 
Gallery, Chicago; Kohler Arts Centr, Sheboygan, 
Wl; Jayne H. Baum Gallery, NYC; Nexus Gallery, 
Atlanta; Allentown Art Museum 
Publications: Through a Pinhole Darkly, Photogra- 
phy: Art and Technique: "Looking Back," Darkroom 
Photography, Poetic Inquiry, Truth Fantasy: David 
Lebe Photographs' The I.C.P Encyclopedia of 
Photography: "Open to Light: The Photography of 
David Lebe, " Darkroom Photography, Lenseless 
Photography, The Advocate 
Collections: Philadelphia Museum of Art; Allen- 
town Art Museum; The J. Paul Getty Museum, 
Santa Monica, CA; The Albin 0. Kuhn Library and 
Gallery, University of Maryland; Miller/Plummer; 
Henry S. McNeil, Jr; Dechert, Price and Rhoads; 
Poloroid Corporation 



Barbara Lekberg 

Lecturer: Sculpture 
BFA, MA, University of Iowa 
Honorary Doctor of Fine Arts, Simpson College 
Exhibitions: Whitney Museum; Museum of 
Modern Art; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 
Arts; Chesterwood (Daniel Chester French Estate); 
National Academy of Design; seven solo exhibi- 
tions at Sculpture Center Gallery, NYC; numerous 
show in other national galleries 
Awards: two Guggenheim Fellowships; grant from 
the National Academy and Institute of Arts and 
Letters; numerous commissions 
Public Collections: Whitney Museum; Des Moines 
Art Center; Birmingham Museum of Fine Art; 
corporate and private collections internationally, in 
the U.S, Canada, Brazil, Sweden, Bermuda 

Niles Lewandowski 

Assistant Professor: Foundation 
Co-Chairperson: Foundation 
Director of New Talent and Prep Programs 
BFA, Maryland Institute College of Art 
MFA, University of Pennsylvania 
Exhibitions: Gross-McLeaf Gallery; Meredith 
Contemporary Art, Baltimore, MD; Bucks County 
Community College; Chestnut Hill College; Fifth 
Street Gallery, Wilmington, DE; Nesbitt Design 
Arts Gallery, Drexel Univ; McKinney Gallery, West 
Chester University. 

Awards: Philadelphia College of Art Venture Fund 
Tobleah Wechsler Award, Cheltenham Annual, 
Purchase Prize Award, Camden County Cultural 
Heritage Commission. 

Collections: INA Cigna Corporation, Delaware Art 
Museum Sales and Rental Gallery, MBank USA, 
Bell Savings Association, Penn Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Company 

Bobbie Lippman 

Senior Lecturer: Crafts 
BA, Sarah Lawrence College 
Certificate, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
Experience: instructor, Penland School of Crafts; 
program director/instructor, RittenhouseTown Paper- 
making Workshops, Fairmount Pari? workshops 
Exhibitions: "Innovative Prints and Paper," Plum 
Gallery, MD; "Crossover: Contemporary Artists' 
Books and Paperworks," Marlboro Gallery, MD; 
Cheltenham Annual Exhibition; Pennsylvania 
Academy of the Fine Arts Fellowship Shows 
Collections: Gannett Publications, Inc., Headquar- 
ters, USA Today, VA; Bethesda Hospital, Maryland; 
CIGNA Corporation, Philadelphia 



Peter Lister 

Senior Lecturer: Printmaking 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
Barnes Foundation 

Experience: instructor, Rosemont College; Guilford 
College, NC; Philadelphia Museum of Art; 
Holmesburg Detention Center; The Print Club; 
Cheyney State College 
Exhibitions: The Print Club; Philadelphia Art 
Alliance; Woodmere Art Center; Pennsylvania 
Academy of the Fine Arts; Cheltenham Art Center; 
National Academy of the Fine Arts; "112 Prints, 1 
Portfolios," Philadelphia College of Art; Rosemont 
College; Virginia Intermont College; George 
O'Bannon Gallery 

Collections: Phillips Collection, Washington, DC; 
Philadelphia Museum of Art; Free Library of Phila- 
delphia; ARCO; IBM; RCA; Bell of Pennsylvania 

William Longhauser 

Professor: Graphic Design 
BS, University of Cincinnati 
MFA, Indiana University 
Graduate study, Allgemeine Gewerbeschule, 
Basel, Switzerland 

Experience: visiting professor, University of 
Cincinnati, summer 1980 
Organizations: member, American Institute of 
Graphic Arts 

Exhibitions: Typographism, Georges Pompidou 
National Contemporary Art Center, Paris; Thirty 
Years of Poster Art, Basel, Switzerland; AIGA Just 
Type, New York; AIGA Philadelphia Shows, Phila- 
delphia; New York Art Directors Club Exhibition, 
New York, Europe, Asia; STA 100 Shows, Chicago, 
New York; 10th and 11th International Poster 
Biennale, Warsaw, Poland; Lahti VI & VII Poster 
Biennale, Lahti, Finland; Works on Paper, Tianjin, 
Peoples Republic of China; Design USA, Soviet 
Union; Design Excellence: 50 Posters of the 80's, 
The University of Tennessee; Letterforms and 
Typography, Indiana University; American Institute 
of Graphic Arts: Effective Assignments in Graphic 
Design, New York 

Books/Publications: Graphic Style from Victorian 
to Post-Modernism, 1988; Type and Image, 1989; 
Step-By-Step Graphics, Vol. 6, No. 2, 1990; 77ie 
Twentieth Century Poster-Design of the Avant 
Garde (Revised Edition), 1990; The History of 
Graphic Design (Revised Edition), forthcoming 

Sherry J. Lyons 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Humanities and Art 

Therapy 

Director: Art Therapy 

BA, University of Pennsylvania 

MS, Hahnemann Medical College 

Experience: assistant professor, Hahnemann 

University and Hospital; registered art therapist, 

Ashbourne Day School, 1967-72; lecturer and 

author on art therapy with children; consultant for 

Arts in Special Education Project of Pennsylvania 

and private practice in Art Therapy. 



Barbara Mail 

Senior Lecturer: Crafts 
BS, State University College at Buffalo, NY 
MFA, State University College at New Paltz, NY 
Exhibitions: "American Jewelry Now," American 
Craft Museum; Solo shows at Convergence 
Gallery, NY; and Swan Gallery, Philadelphia 
Awards: Pennsylvania Council on the Arts 
Fellowship Grant, 1983 

Paula Marincola 

Lecturer: Photo/Film/Animation 
BA, Syracuse University 

Experience: curator, "Independence Sites: Sculp- 
ture for Public Places"; art critic, ARTFORUM 
magazine; consultant. The Fabric Workshop; assis- 
tant director/curator, Institute of Contemporary 
Art, Philadelphia 

Publications: reviews of Jack Tworkov, Laurence 
Bach, Georgia Marsh, Phoebe Adams, and Guy 
Goodwin in ARTFORUM magazine; "William 
Larson: Photographs 1969-1985," Investigations 
1985 (exhibition catalog, ICA); "Kenny Scharf: 
Paintings and Customized Appliances," Investiga- 
tions 1985; "Face to Face: Recent Portrait Photog- 
raphy," Investigations 1984, "Chronology," Laurie 
Anderson: Works from 1969- 1983 (exhibition cata- 
log); Image Scavengers: Photography (exhibition 
catalogue), 1982 

Kent Massey 

Senior Lecturer: Industrial Design 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Experience: Consultant in computerizing design 

processes of graphic and industrial designers. 

Previously an aerospace systems engineer on 

space station and communications satellite 

projects. 

Clients: DuPont, Campbell Soup, CIGNA, Conrail, 

Allemann, Almquist & Jones, Cloud Geshen, 

Malish Design Ltd. 

John Mathews 

Senior Lecturer: Foundation 
BS, Skidmore College 
MFA, University of Pennsylvania 
Exhibitions: Interiors, Saratoga Springs; Faculty 
Club, University of Pennsylvania; Mendola Gallery, 
Boston; Venture Fund Award Show; Phillips Mill, 
New Hope; Bucks County Community College; 
Lehigh Art Alliance; Southern Vermont Art Asso- 
ciation; Harrisburg Art Association 

Barbara Mauriello 

Senior Lecturer: Printmaking 

BA, Trinity College 

MA, New York University, School of Education 

Rodney McCormick 

Associate Professor: Crafts 

BFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 

MFA, Rhode Island School of Design 

Recent Exhibitions: Solo Show, 1990, Owen 

Patrick Gallery, Philadelphia; Contemporary 

Philadelphia Artists: A Juried Exhibition, 1 990, 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Awards: National Endowment for the Arts 

Individual Fellowship Grant, 1990 



Robert F. McGovern 

Professor: Foundation 

Diploma, Philadelphia College of Art 

Collections: Philadelphia Museum of Art; Free 

Library of Philadelphia; Cornell University Rare 

Rook Collection; American Catholic Historical 

Society 

Commissions: Daylesford Abbey, Paoli, PA; Our 

Lady of Lourdes Hospital, Camden, N.J.; Mount St. 

Joseph's Academy, Flourtown; Franklin Institute, 

Philadelphia 

Exhibitions: over 14 one-man shows of paintings, 

drawings, and prints 

Publications: Article Contemplation and the Artist, 

The Way, Herthrop College, London 

Awards: two time recipient of the Philadelphia 

College of Art Venture Fund 

Jeanette McGrath 

Lecturer: Printmaking 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Doug Mellor 

Lecturer: Photo/Film/Animation 
BS, Roanoke College 

Experience: commercial photographer; owner, 
D.W.Mellor Studio; clients include: Cigna 
Insurance, American Express, Fortune Magazine, 
Lewis Gilman and Kynet Advertising, Apple 
Computer, Wyeth International, Ketchum 
Advertising, Elkman Advertising. Director, The 
Photography Gallery, Philadelphia and La Jolla, 
CA, 1980-83 

Larry Mitnick 

Associate Professor: Architectural Studies 
Chairperson: Architectural Studies 
B Arch, Cooper Union 
M Arch, Harvard University 
Experience: Registered Architect Pennsylvania and 
Massachusetts; Principal, Larry Mitnick, Architect; 
public lectures at Laval University, New York 
Institute of Technology, Ecole Polytechnique Fed- 
eral du Lausanne 

Awards: Progressive Architecture magazine 
citation — multifamily housing, January 1981 
Competitions: new public office building, Vienna, 
Austria, collaborators Robert Krier, Kunibert 
Gaugusch, 1975-76; new multi-purpose 
community facility, Morges, Switzerland, 
collaborator Professor P. von Meiss, assistant 
Marc Henry Collomb, 1975-76; NEA grant-John 
Hejduk, "The Riga Project," 1987 
Exhibitions: Cooper Union, works by invited poets, 
painters, writers, sculptors, architects, responding 
to the themes "window, room, furniture;" 
"Pedagogy and Practice," National Academy of 
Design, NYC, exhibition of drawings, painting, 
architecture; "Young Faculty Architecture," Joe 
and Emily Lowe Art Gallery, Syracuse University; 
Bank of Indochina, Lausanne, Switzerland 
(painting in bank collection); gallery of the Theatre 
du Vide-Poche, Lausanne, Switzerland 



Nora L Monroe 

Lecturer: Photo/Film/Animation 
BA: Ohio State University 
MFA: Candidate, Temple University 
Experience: Producer/Director/Sound/Editor of 
Skin and Ink; Artists and Collectors, half hour 
documentary film released in December 1989. 
Sound Person for Talk Out W(M.Wellner, 1988, 
Gabrielle's Story (P. Romeu, 1989). Time Til Light 
(M. Connor, 1989), A Temporary Life (Y. Leach, 
1990). 

Exhibition: Skin and Ink: Artists and Collectors has 
been featured at the American Folklore Society's 
Centennial Conference, The Athens International 
Film and Video Festival, The Houston International 
Film Festival, Independent Focus 1990 WNET-TV 
New York, Independent Images 1990 WHYY-TV 
Philadelphia. 

Awards: Skin and Ink: Artists and Collectors re- 
ceived the Bronze Award for documentary at the 
Houston International Film Festival, 1990 

Thomas Moore 

Lecturer: Photo/Film/Animation 
BA: Temple University 
MFA: University of Delaware 
Director of the Booktrader Gallery in Philadelphia, 
Freelance Curator at the University of Delaware, 
University of the Arts and other public institutions. 
Board member of The Society for Photographic 
Education. On the Advisory Panel for the Photogra- 
phy Department of The Philadelphia Community 
College. 

Exhibitions: University of Delaware; Old Dominion 
University; Millersville University; The Philadelphia 
Print Club; Nexus Gallery 

Chris Myers 

Assistant Professor: Graphic Design 

BA, University of Toledo 

MFA, Yale University 

Awards: The Alexey Brodovitch Award for 

Distinction in Graphic Design, Yale School of Art; 

American Institute of Graphic Arts; Philadelphia 

Art Directors Club; Philadelphia Chapter of the 

American Institute of Graphic Arts; Society of 

Typographic Arts; The University and College 

Designers Association; Individual Design Grant, 

National Endowment for the Arts 

Group Exhibitions: STA 100, Design America 1988, 

The University and College Designers Association, 

Principal of the Philadelphia design firm, The 

Office of Mayer + Myers, Philadelphia 



69 



Gerald Nichols 

Professor: Painting/Drawing 
Diploma, Cleveland Institute of Art 
MFA, postgraduate fellow, University of 
Pennsylvania 

Exhibitions: "Made in Philadelphia 2 and 3," 
Institute of Contemporary Art; "Contemporary 
Drawings," Philadelphia Museum of Art; Philadel- 
phia College of Textiles and Science; "Iceberg 
Project," University of Vermont, Burlington; "The 
Fox Hunt," Morris Gallery, Pennsylvania Academy 
of the Fine Arts; Allentown Art Museum; "Figura- 
tively Sculpting," P.S.1, Long Island City, NY; " 
Arctic, Antarctic, Audubon," NYC; "Terminal New 
York," Brooklyn, NY; "Reflections," C.W. Post Col- 
lege, Greenvale, NY; Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, 
NYC; "Synthetic Art," Harm Bouckaert Gallery, 
NYC; "Activated Walls," The Queens Museum, 
Flushing, NY; University City Science Center, Phila- 
delphia; "Memento Mori," Museum of Contempo- 
rary Art, Mexico City, Mexico; "Pale Gate," More 
Gallery, Philadelphia "Kronos, God of War, Cleve- 
land Institute of Art, Cleveland, Ohio; "Tox 
Project", Art Park, Lewiston, N.Y. 
Collections: The Cleveland Museum of Art; 
Philadelphia Museum of Art 
Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship 

Eileen Neff 

Lecturer: Painting/Drawing 
MFA, Tyler School of Art 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
BA, Temple University 

Exhibitions: Installation, Carnegie Mellon Gallery, 
Pittsburgh, PA, 1990; Installation, "Philadelphia Art 
Now", Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, 
PA 1990; Solo Exhibition, Lawrence Oliver Gallery, 
Philadelphia, PA, 1989; "Philadelphia Art Now", 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadel- 
phia PA, 1988; Installation, Roland Gubson Galley, 
Potsdam, NY, 1987; "Made in Philadelphia", Insti- 
tute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, PA, 1 984; 
Installation, PSI, Long Island City, NY, 1981. 
Collections: Larry Mangel, Dietrich Foundation 
Awards: PA Council on the Arts, 1989; National 
Endowment of the Arts, 1988; Mid Atlantic States 
Grant, 1987. 
Philadelphia critic for Art Forum magazine. 



JanisT. Norman 

Associate Professor: Art Education 
Chairperson: Art Education 
BAE, University of Kansas 
MA, University of Missouri, Kansas City 
PhD, University of Kansas 
Awards: Nancy B. Altwater Scholarship, for out- 
standing Art Education Candidate, University of 
Kansas; Official Commendation, Art Education 
Appreciation Award, Missouri Art Education Asso- 
ciation Cultural Leadership Grant; USA/Para Broth- 
ers National Partners of the Americas Title Grant 
Recipient, Environmental Protection Agency 
Publications: "Counseling the Gifted Student for a 
Career in the Visual Arts", NACAC Journal; "Do 
Videos Work?", Transfer Magazine, "Making Art 
Basic in Secondary Schools - A Model for Effec- 
tive Instruction"; "The Effectiveness of an Inte- 
grated Arts Program on Student's Academic 
Achievement," National Arts Education Research 
Center anA topic of published dissertation; "The 
Art Education Connection, A Solution for Local 
Concerns," Missouri Art Education Journal; " Tal- 
ent and Energy in Art Education, focus article; 
"Development and Appreciation of Natural Dyes 
for Fibers Used in Textile Design," published by 
Environmental Protection Agency; "Individualiza- 
tion in the Instruction of Art," curriculum guide; 
"Why Teach Art in Our Schools?"; "Design, the 
Key to Successful Art Instruction." 
Exhibitions: Juried Group Exhibit, Federal Reserve 
Gallery, Kansas City, MO; juried Group Exhibit, 
Unitarian Gallery, Kansas City, MO; Juried Group 
Exhibit, Unity Village Gallery, Kansas City, MO; 
Invitational Group Show, University of Kansas, 
Lawrence Kansas, 1967, '84, '85, '86; Invitational 
Group Show, Ball State University, Muncie, Indi- 
ana; Crown Center Juried Exhibition, Hallmark, 
Kansas City, MO; Invitational Show, Kansas City 
Philharmonic Designer's Showcase; Missouri Art 
Festival, first place award, Chillecothe, MO; Mid- 
west Research Institute Gallery, Kansas City, MO, 
two person show; Garfield Gallery, Union, MO, 
two person show; Thornhill Gallery Invitational 
Show, Avila College, Kansas City, MO 

Robert Oppecker 

Senior Lecturer: Crafts 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Exhibitions: "Contemporary Metals USA," Downey 

Museum of Art, CA, 1985; "PCA Metals: More 

Than a Decade," Sign of the Swan Gallery, 1984; 

"Statements in Sterling," 1982; "More 

Metals," Sign of the Swan, 1982 

Tim O'Brien 

Instructor: Illustration 
BFA, Paier College of Art, New Haven, CT 
Freelance Illustrator 

Awards: Merit Society of Illustrators 29, 30, 31; 
Society of Publication Designers, Merit 1990; Print 
Design Annual, 1 989; Institute of Outdoor Adver- 
tising National Award, 1988 



Barry Parker 

Professor: Sculpture 
Chairperson: Sculpture 
MFA, Eastern Michigan University 
University of Massachusetts 
Experience: Sculptor-in-Residence, Vermont 
Studio School; Sculptor-in-Residence, Studio 
L'Homme Dieu Art School 
Exhibitions: Tech World Plaza, Washington, D.C.; 
Artluminium, Montreal, Canada; George Mason 
University, VA; "The Artists Hand," The Sculpture 
Center, NY; one person show at Westchester Uni- 
versity, PA; outdoor sculpture, Burlington County 
Community College, NJ; Three Rivers Arts Festi- 
val, PA; The Soho Building, NY: one person outdoor 
show at Houston and Bowery, NYC; Sculptor's 
Guild Annual Exhibits, Lever House, NY: "Sculpture 
'84," Beaver College, PA; "New Directions," sculp- 
ture invitational, Harrisburg, PA; one-man show, 
Christine Price Gallery, Castleton State College, 
VT; Hallwalls Gallery, Buffalo, NY; Associated 
Artists Exhibit, Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh; one- 
man show, Jamestown, NY; Society of Sculptors 
Exhibit, PPA Gallery, Pittsburgh, PA 
Awards: Philadelphia College of Art Venture Fund 

Kris Parker 

Lecturer: Crafts 
BFA, Maryland Institute 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 
Experience: instructor, Maryland Institute, Tyler 
School of Art, Interlochen Center for the Arts 
Exhibitions: "Fiber National '88," Dunkirk, NY; "Art 
in City Hall: Philadelphia Panoramas, the Cityscape 
in Three Dimensions;" "New Work," Mobilia Gal- 
lery, Cambridge, MA; "50th Golden Anniversary: 
Alumni Exhibition," Tyler School of Art; "The 65th 
Cleveland May Show," Cleveland Museum of Art; 
20th Century Gallery, Philadelphia; "Sculpture/ 
Penn's Landing," Port of History Museum, Philadel- 
phia; "Constructions," Provident National Bank, 
Philadelphia; "Sculpture 300," Philadelphia Art 
Alliance, Philadelphia, 

Albert J. Pastore 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Foundation 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 
Experience: freelance illustrator 
Organizations: Society of Illustrators, NYC 
Exhibitions: Festival di Giovantu, Trieste, Italy; 
Society of Illustrators, NYC; Philadelphia Art 
Directors Club; Philadelphia Artists Guild; 
Rosenfeld Gallery, Philadelphia; Philadelphia Art 
Alliance; Kutztown State College 
Clients: TV Guide; After Six, Inc.; General Electric; 
Binswanger; Bookbinders 



70 



Jeannie Pearce 

Lecturer: Photo/Film/Animation 
BFA, Rochester Institute of Technology 
MFA, University of Delaware; Tyler School of Art, 
Temple University 

Exhibitions: Nexus Gallery, Philadelphia; Tianjin 
Fine Art College, China; Art in City Hall, 
Philadelphia; Art Space, Modesto, CA; Pratt 
Institute, NYC; Muse Gallery, Philadelphia; 
Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts, 
Wilmington; University of Kentucky, Lexington; 
University of Florida, Gainesville; Foto Gallery, 
NYC; Color Services Gallery, Santa Barbara, CA; 
Allentown Art Museum, Allentown, PA; The Light 
Factory, Charlotte, NC; Friends of Photography, 
Carmel, CA; Soho 20 Gallery, NYC; Western 
Heritage Museum, Omaha, NE; Los Angeles 
Center for Photographic Studies; Delaware Art 
Museum, Wilmington; Cambridge Photography 
Gallery, Cambridge, MA 
Awards'. Pennsylvania Council on the Arts; 
Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts 
Award; University of Delaware Purchase Award; 
L.A. Center for Photographic Studies Award; 
Philadelphia College of Art Venture Fund 
Collections: Coopers and Lybrand, University of 
Delaware, Los Angeles Center for Photographic 
Studies, Murray State University, George Eastman 
House 

Mary Phelan 

Assistant Professor: Printmaking 

Director, Graduate Program Book Arts/Printmaking 

BS, The College of Saint Rose 

MA, University of Wisconsin 

Proprietor: Irish Pig Press; Blind Hand Press 

Exhibitions: "The Arts of the Book," The University 

of the Arts; "Practical and Provocative," The 

Painted Bride; "Artist's Books," The Print Club; 

"Point of Departure," Elvehem Museum, Madison, 

Wisconsin; "Books in the Delaware Valley," 

Swarthmore College; "Bookworks, 1982," Moore 

College of Art; "Paper in Particular," Columbia 

College; Vermillion "80," University of South 

Dakota 

Awards: American Association of Museums; PCA 

Venture Fund 

Peter Pierobon 

Senior Lecturer: Crafts 
Wendell Castle School of Woodworking 
Experience: Wendell Castle Design Workshop, 
designer of one-of-a-kind commissioned furniture 



Tom Porett 

Professor: Electronic Media 

Director: Electronic Media 

BS, University of Wisconsin 

MS, Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of 

Technology 

Electronic music studies, Philadelphia Musical 

Academy 

Experience: computer graphics and design 

systems consultant; computer graphics program 

design; educational multimedia presentation 

design 

Exhibitions and installations: PIX IM Art Show, 

Paris, France; IBM Gallery, NYC; SIGGRAPH Art 

Show (traveling exhibition); Prix Ars Electronica 

'87, Linz, Austria; Center for Creative Photography, 

Tucson, AZ; Everson Museum, Syracuse, NY; 

Computer Images '86: one man show, York 

University, CUNY; University City Center Gallery, 

Philadelphia; Musee d'Art Moderne de la Ville de 

Paris, France; Electronic Imaging Exhibition, 

Stockholm, Sweden 

Awards: Philadelphia College of Art Venture Fund 

Faculty Grant; UICA Faculty Grant; Guggenheim 

Fellowship 

Phyllis Purves-Smith 

Associate Professor: Illustration 
BFA, Cooper Union 

MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 
Solo exhibitions: Tyler School of Art, Temple 
University; Moravian College, Bethlehem, PA; 
Gross-McLeaf Gallery, Philadelphia, PA; Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania, University Museum, 
Indiana, PA; Pindar Gallery, NYC 
Group exhibitions: More Gallery, Philadelphia, PA; 
American Artist Golden Anniversary National Art 
Exhibition, John Pence Gallery, San Francisco; St. 
Louis Artists' Guild, St. Louis, MO; Grand Central 
Art Galleries, NY 

Boris Putterman 

Associate Professor: Painting 

Diploma, Cooper Union 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Indiana University 

Teaching experience: Indiana University, John 

Herron Art School, Cleveland Institute of Art 

Exhibitions: PCA "Observances," "Gallery Space 

1976," Philadelphia YM/YWHA; Moravian 

College; St. Joseph's University; "Representational 

Painting in Philadelphia"; "The Human Face,"Rider 

College, curator and participant 



Susan Rodriguez 

Adjunct Assistant Professor: Saturday School 
Education Coordinator 

BFA, M Ed, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 
Barnes Foundation, Merion, PA 
Honorary Doctorate, Moore College of Art 
Experience: School District of Philadelphia, Tyler 
School of Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art, 
Fleisher Art Memorial 

Awards: official commendation, Excellence in 
Teaching, Philadelphia Board of Education; federal 
grant; Pennsylvania teaching grant, 1982; 
corporate grant 

Publications: MuseumJournal, Carnegie Institute; 
Arts and Activities Magazine, California; Instructor 
Magazine, New York; The Special Artists Hand- 
book, Date Seymour Publishers, 1984; Art Smart, 
Prentice Hall, 1988. 

Exhibitions: "Women in Art," Philadelphia 
Museum of Art; "Ten Philadelphia Artists," 
Villanova University; Artists' Equity at the 
Waterworks; Kammer Gallery; Kroungold Gallery; 
Arabesque Gallery; Plastic Club Drawing Award 

Warren Rohrer 

Professor: Painting 
BA, Eastern Mennonite College 
BS, Madison College (James Madison University) 
Selected group exhibitions: "Pittsburgh 
International," Carnegie Museum of Art; "Three 
Hundred Years of American Art," Philadelphia 
Museum of Art; Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine 
Arts; Corcoran Gallery of Art; "A Sense of Place," 
Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, Nebraska 
Solo exhibitions: CDS Gallery, NYC; Lamagna Gal- 
lery, NYC; Morris Gallery, Pennsylvania 
Academy of the Fine Arts; Marian Locks Gallery; 
Makler Gallery 

Collections: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania 
Academy of the Fine Arts, Delaware Art Museum, 
Smith College Museum of Art, Allentown 
Museum of Art, Portland (OR) Art Museum 
Awards: Artists' Fellowship, Pennsylvania Council 
on the Arts; Artists' Fellowship, National 
Endowment for the Arts 

Kenneth Root 

Senior Lecturer: Industrial Design 
BSID, Art Center College of Design 
Experience: Designer — Loewy Intemation, 
General Motors Design Staff, DuPont Clinical 
Systems, DuPont Photo Products, Design Director 
— Masterpiece Miniatures. 
Consultant Clients: Ford Truck, Navistar, Hess + 
Eisenhardt Coach, American Motors, Masco Corp., 
Intermetro Industries. 



71 



Tony Rosati 

Senior Lecturer: Printmaking 
BA, Rider College 

MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 
Experience: assistant to the curator, The Lessing J. 
Rosenwald Collection, Jenkintown, PA; visiting 
artist, Tyler School of Art 
Collections: National Gallery of Art, Washington, 
DC: DeCordova Museum of Art, Lincoln, MA; Dulin 
Gallery of Art, Knoxville, TN; Zimmerli Art 
Museum, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ; 
Philadelphia Museum of Art; Pennsylvania Acad- 
emy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA; numerous 
private and corporate collections 
Exhibitions: "Plate/Print II," The Print Club, 
Philadelphia; Philadelphia Art Alliance; 
"Contemporary Philadelphia Printmakers," Paley 
Library, Temple University, Philadelphia; 14th Dulin 
National Print and Drawing Competition; 56th 
Annual International Competition, The Print Club, 
Philadelphia; 8th International Miniature Print 
Competition, Pratt Graphics Center; invitational 
exhibition of American printmakers, Kipp Gallery, 
Indiana University of Pennsylvania; 
Dolan/Maxwell Gallery, Philadelphia; Woodmere 
Museum of Art, Philadelphia; Gallery Kobe, Kobe, 
Japan; Beaver College, Glenside, PA; 62nd Annual 
International Competition, The Print Club, Philadel- 
phia; Art in City Hall, Philadelphia 
Awards: Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, 
Artist-in-Residence Grant, 1984-88; Abbington Art 
Center, Artist in Residence; Venture Fund Award, 
University of the Arts, numerous awards from 
exhibition competitions 

Peter Rose 

Professor: Photo/Film/Animation 
BA, CCNY 

MFA program, San Francisco State College 
Solo Exhibitions: Chicago Art Institute; American 
Museum of the Moving Image, Astoria, NY; 
Centre Pompidou, Paris; Experimental Intermedia, 
NYC; Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions; 
American Center, Paris; Corcoran Gallery, 
Washington, DC; University of Arizona, Tucson; 
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond; Portland 
Art Museum, ME; Brattle Theatre, Cambridge, 
MA; San Francisco Cinemateque; The Kitchen, 
NYC; Collective for Living Cinema, NYC; Cornell 
Cinema; Boston Film and Video Foundation; 
Athens Film and Video Festival; Pacific Film 
Archives, Berkley, CA; Millenium Film, NYC; 
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Museum of Art, 
Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; and elsewhere 
Group Exhibitions: MOMA Anthology Film Ar- 
chives, NYC; films and tapes shown at festivals, 
museums and media centers in US and abroad 
Collections: Australian National Film Archive; 



California Institute of the Arts; Donnell Film 
Library, NYC; Oberhausen Film Collection, West 
Germany; Enoch Pratt Free Library, Baltimore; 
Haftford Atheneum; Museum of Modern Art, NYC; 
Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute; Free Library of 
Philadelphia; Northwestern University; Simon 
Frazer University, Vancouver, Canada; South 
Carolina Arts Commission; West Virginia Library 
Commission; Port Washington Public Library; Okla- 
homa Museum of Art; Image Forum. Tokyo; Centre 
Pompidou, Paris 

Awards: National Endowment for the Arts; 
Guggenheim Fellowship; Pennsylvania Council on 
the Arts; Mid-Atlantic Regional Media Grant; 
Governor's Hazlett Award in Media Arts; 
Philadelphia College of Art Venture Fund; and 
awards from many film festivals 

Eileen Rosen 

Lecturer: Illustration 

BS, Moore College of Art 

Publications: The New Yorker, Single Parent, 

Science + Children 

Michael Rossman 

Professor: Foundation 
BID, Pratt Institute 
MFA, Pratt Institute 

One-man Exhibitions: The More Gallery, Philadel- 
phia 1989; Gross McCleaf Gallery, Philadelphia 
1979 and 1973 

Selected Group Exhibitions: "Artists Choose Art- 
ists", The Institute of Contemporary Art, 1991; 
The More Gallery, 1986-1990; "Affects/Effects 2", 
Invitational Traveling Exhibition: Philadelphia Col- 
lege of Art, Allentown Art Museum, Museum 
Gallery at the University of Pittsburgh; William 
Penn Memorial Museum, Harrisburg, PA; Bucks 
County Community College, Doylestown, PA; 
"Eastern Pennsylvania Regional Drawing" and 
"Drawing in Philadelphia", Beaver College, 
Glenside, PA; Invitational Exhibition, Woodmere 
Art Galley, Chestnut Hill, PA; "The Earth Show", 
Philadelphia Civic Center, Recipient of the 
Wintersteen Prize; Philadelphia Art Alliance 
Design History. Senior Designer, Creative Playthings, 
Inc., Summer Seminar, 1966; Industrial Designer, 
General Electric, Computer Department, 1963 

Karen Saler 

Associate Professor: Foundation 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, Maryland Institute College of Art 

PA Teacher Certification 

Exhibitions: "Women's Regional Drawing 

Exhibition," Philadelphia Art Alliance; Venture 

Fund Exhibition 

Collections: works in public and private collections 

in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Rome 

Grants: Prix de Rome painting grant; Rome Prize 

renewal grant; Philadelphia College of Art Venture 

Fund; American Professors Abroad Grant to Israel 

Organizations: fellow, American Academy in 

Rome; Artists Equity 



Joanne Schiavone 

Lecturer: Printmaking 
BS Ed, University of Delaware 
Philadelphia College of Art 
Experience: workshops given at Penland School, 
Penland, NC; Peters Valley, Layton, NJ; SUNY- 
Purchase, Purchase, NY 

Grants: artist fellowship, NJ Council on the Arts; 
artist fellowship, Pennsylvania Council on the Arts; 
Distinguished Artist Award from the State of NJ 
Exhibitions: "Artists Books," New Delhi, India; "Accent 
on Color," Scarsdale, NY; Pennsylvania Grants Recipi- 
ents Exhibit; "Design '86," Prallsville Mill Gallery, 
Stockton, NJ; "Book Sculptures," Doshi Center for 
Contemporary Arts, Harrisburg, PA "Breaking the 
Bindings," Elvehjem Museum of Art, Madison, Wl; 
"24th Annual Delaware Art Museum Craft Exhibition," 
Wilmington, DE; "Books by Printmakers," The Print 
Club, Philadelphia 

Charles Searles 

Senior Lecturer: Foundation 
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 
University of Pennsylvania 
Awards: General Services Commission; 
International Arts Festival, "Festac," Lagos, 
Nigeria; National Endowment for the Arts Fellow- 
ship; Creative Arts Program Fellowship, "CAPS," 
to develop metal sculpture, NYC 
Solo Exhibitions: Land Mark Gallery; Sande 
Webster Gallery, Phila.; Mont Clair Museum, NJ; 
Noyes Museum, NJ 

Group Exhibitions: "Black Art, Ancestral Legacy", 
Dallas Museum of Art (traveling exhibition); Peale 
House Galleries; CAPS Fellowship Exhibit; "Afro- 
American Abstraction," PS-1, NYC; "Painted 
Sculpture," Sculpture Center Gallery, NYC; "The 
Cun/e of a Plane II," 22 Wooster, NYC 
Public Commissions: William J. Green Federal 
Building, Phila.; Newark Amtrack Station, Newark, 
NJ; Dempsey Multi Service Center, NYC 
Also teaches at Bloomfield College, NJ and Jersey 
City State College, NJ 

Warren Seelig 

Professor: Crafts 

BS, Philadelphia College of Textiles and Science 
MFA, Cranbrook Academy of Art 
Exhibitions: Miller/Brown Gallery, San Francisco, 
CA; one-man show. The Roberts Gallery, Contem- 
porary Craft Association, C.W. Post Center of Long 
Island University, NY; The Cleveland Museum of 
Art; Philadelphia Museum of Art; The Denver 
Museum of Art; Crafts Advisory 
Committee, London; The Central Museum of 
Textiles, Lodz, Poland; Hadler/Rodriguez Galleries, 
New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; 
Institut fur Kunstlerische Textilgestaltung, Linz, 
Austria; The Textile Museum, Washington, DC 
Gallery: The Hadler/Rodriguez Gallery, New York 
Awards: Pennsylvania Council on the Arts 
Individual Fellowship; National Endowment for the 
Arts Individual Fellowship Grant 



72 



Timothy P. Sheesley 

Lecturer: Printmaking 
BA, State University New York, Oneonta 
MFA, Tyler School of Art 
TMP Tamarind Institute of Lithography 
The Banff Center, School of Fine Art 
Academic Program, Tours, France 
Experience: Owner/master printer of Corridor 
Press; President of MD Litho Stones, Inc.; Master 
Printer, Western Graphics; Tamarind Institute Mas- 
ter Printer Fellowship 

Exhibitions: Penn Prints, Associated Artists, 
University of Pennsylvania; Hobart and William Smith 
College; Strozzi Place, Florence, Italy; Rhode Island 
College of Art Kutztown State University; Prints of the 
80's, Swansea Wales Momenta Art Alternative, Phila- 
delphia; Philadelphia Art Alliance; The Woodmere Art 
Museum; Color Print Society 

Patricia M. Smith 

Chairperson and Assistant Professor: Printmaking 
BA, Immaculata College 
MA Ed., Philadelphia College of Art 
Yoshida Hanga Academy, Tokyo, Japan 
Exhibitions: "Multiple NewWave," The Print Club; 
"Prints from the Brandywine Workshop," Hahn Gal- 
lery; "Positive Direct Offset," State University of New 
York, Purchase; "Original Offset," World Print Council, 
San Francisco; Moore College of Art, Philadelphia; 
Lunami Gallery, Tokyo; College Women's Association, 
juried exhibition, Tokyo, Japan 

Lori Spencer 

Lecturer: Printmaking 

BFA, State University of New York, Purchase 
MFA, The University of the Arts 
Experience: Offset technician at Moore College of 
Art and Design; printer in the Borowsky Center for 
Publication Arts at the University of the Arts; off- 
set printer at various commercial shops; hand 
bookbinding 

Exhibitions: Pyramid Atlantic, Book Arts work from 
The University of the Arts, Small Computers in the 
Arts, SCAN Exhibition '90; Limited Editions from 
the Borowsky Center; The Laurie W and Irvin 
Borowsky Gallery 

Collections: The University Library of the 
University of the Arts; private collections 

Franz Frederick Spohn 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Printmaking 
MFA, Ohio State University 
Experience: printer for screen editions by Pat Steir 
and Jules Olitski, and Edgar Heap-of-Birds; 
illustrator for Delacourt Press (Doubleday/Dell) 
including, children's alphabet book and "Boys and 
Sex" and "Girls and Sex"; collaborations-Glen 
Vivian Museum, Swansea, Wales; Strozzi Palace, 
Florence Italy; visiting artist, Carnegie Mellon, 
Tulane University, Washington State University, 
Spokane Falls Community College. Consultant for 
Hunt Manufacturing, Instrucitonal Video- 
Waterbased Screenprinting 
Exhibitions: Southern Alleghenies Museum of 
Art; Glenbow Museum; Philadelphia Museum of 
Art; Mississippi Museum of Art; Please Touch 
Museum, Philadelphia; "The Confectioner's Art," 
American Craft Museum, New York (3 year 
travelling exhibition) 



Thomas Stearns 

Associate Professor: Sculpture 
Memphis Academy of Art 
Cranbrook Academy of Art 
Accademia di Belli Arti, Venice 
Exhibitions: Venice Biennale; Brussels 
International; Parke-Bernet Gallery; Smithsonian 
Institution; Musee d'Art Moderne, Paris; Carnegie 
Institute; Municipal Museum, Warsaw, Poland; 
L'Uomo et L'Arte, Milan, Italy; Pennsylvania 
Academy of the Fine Arts; Detroit Institute of Art; 
Renwick Gallery; National Museum of American 
Art, Washington, DC; Willard Gallery, NY; Musee 
des Artes Decoratifs, Montreal, Canada 
Awards: John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship, 
Italian Government Award, National Institute of 
Arts and Letters Grant, Fulbright Travel Grant, 
Artists and Writers Revolving Grant 
Publications: Who's Who in American Art, Who's 
Who in the East 

Robert Stein 

Professor: Illustration 
Chairman: Illustration 
BFA, Massachusetts College of Art 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 
Experience: staff designer, KYW-TV; freelance 
designer and consultant, Chilton Publishing; panel 
member, NAEA Eastern Arts Conference; guest 
curator and promotion material designer, "Design 
and Illustration: USA," Iran-American Society, 
Tehran, Iran; poster series, "The Chiasmal Syn- 
drome," "Pseudo-Tumor Cerebri," commissioned 
by Pennsylvania College of Optometry; Poster, 
Pennbook Festival '90, PA Center for the Book. 
Exhibitions: Rosenfeld Gallery, Philadelphia; 
Philadelphia Art Alliance; University of Delaware; 
William Penn Memorial Museum; Philadelphia 
Civic Center; Monmouth College; Anton Gallery, 
Washington, DC 

Collections: Westinghouse Corporation, RCA, First 
Pennsylvania Bank, William Penn Memorial 
Museum, numerous private collections. 
Member: Society of Illustrators, Design Advisory 
Board, Community College of Philadelphia 
Publications: represented in Graphis Posters 87 

Richard Stetser 

Professor: Foundation 
BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 
Exhibitions: sculpture executed for Adath Zion 
Congregation, Philadelphia; Whitman Park, 
Philadelphia; Thompson, Ramo, Woodridge Corp.; 
Redevelopment Authority of Philadelphia; Phila- 
delphia Art Alliance; Glassboro State College; 
Faculty Group Show, PCA 1977, '81; American 
College in Paris, 1981; Venture Fund Award Exhibi- 
tion, 1986; Duchampidou, PCA, 1987; Faculty 
Drawing Exhibition, 1989. 



Lizbeth Stewart 

Associate Professor: Crafts 
BFA, Moore College of Art 
Maintains Independent Studio, Represented by 
Helen Drutt Gallery, NY 

Selected Exhibitions: International Ceramics Exhi- 
bition, Hookodden Art Center, Museum of Modern 
Art, Oslow, Norway; American Clay Artist, Port of 
History Museum, Philadelphia; From the Mold, 
Kansas City Art Institute, MO; Craft Today — 
Poetry of the Physical, American Craft Museum, 
NY; Solo Exhibition, Morris Gallery, Pennsylvania 
Academy of the Fine Arts; American Porcelain, 
New Expressions in an Ancient Art, Renwick Gal- 
lery, Smithsonian Institute, Washington, DC. 
Awards: Pennsylvania Council on the Arts 
Craftsmen's Fellowship; National Endowment for 
the Arts Craftsmen's Fellowship 
Collections (selected): Campbell Museum, NJ; 
Purchase Award, Lennon Foundation, Palm Beach 
Florida; Joseph Hirshorn Collection, Washington, 
DC. 

Elizabeth Swartz 

Lecturer: Architectural Studies 

BFA, Rochester Institute of Technology 

Philadelphia College of Art 

Experience: freelance designer; Gray and Rodgers 

Advertising Inc., Philadelphia; Modem 

Photography magazine, NY; North American 

Publishing Company, Philadelphia 

David Taffler 

Associate Professor: Education and Photo/Film/ 
Animation 

BA, Harpur College, SUNY Binghamton 
MFA, Columbia University 
MA, University of Wisconsin, Madison 
PhD, Columbia University 
Experience: co-chair. Media Arts Caucus, College 
Art Association; consultant and judge. Black Maria 
Film/Video Festival; technical advisor, Film Divi- 
sion, Columbia College; steering committee, Inde- 
pendent Film/Video Association, Philadelphia 
Exhibitions: solo show, "Berks Filmmakers," Read- 
ing, PA; "The Best of Philadelphia Filmmakers," 
solo show, "Five Films," Collective for Living Cin- 
ema, NYC; "Affects/Effects II," The University of 
the Arts; Rosemont College 
Publications: "I remember television. . ." New Mu- 
seum Catalogue, "Der Blick und der Sprung", Kunst- 
forum, "The Circular Text". Journal of Film and Video, 
"Autonomy/Community: Marginality and the New 
Interactive Cinema", Cinematograph, "Beyond Narra- 
tive: Notes Toward a Theory of Interactive Cinema", 
Millennium Film Journal, "Commentary: Videography 
and Computer Graphics", Leonardo, "The Economics 
of Renewal: Music Video and the Future of Alternative 
Filmmaking, AFTERIMAGE. "DOUBLE YOU (and 
X,Y,Z)"; Video's New Interactive Frontier," SPOT; "An 
Argument for a Foundation Course in Video", AFI Edu- 
cation Newsletter, "Adventures with Art," Art Teacher 



73 



Stephen Tarantal 

Dean, Philadelphia College of Art and Design 
Professor: Illustration 

BFA, Cooper Union School of Art and Architecture 
MFA, Tyler School of Art, Temple University 
Exhibitions: NY Historical Society: Guggenheim 
Museum; Bertha Schaefer Gallery, NY; Richard 
Rosenfeld Gallery, Phila. 
Collections: Guggenheim Museum, NY; North 
American Phillips Corp., NJ; SmithKline Beckman, 
Philadelphia; Westinghouse Corp., Pittsburgh; US 
Cultural Library, Bombay; Xerox Corporation, 
Stamford, CT; AT&T, NY; Time Life, Inc. NY; Phila- 
delphia National Bank. 

Publications: "42 Years of Graphic Covers"; work 
has been represented in numerous design arts 
publications including: Graphis Magazine and 
Graphis Annuals, Society of Illustrators Annuals, 
NY and Phila. Art Director's Annuals, Print Maga- 
zine and Print Regional Annuals. 
Awards: Fulbright Grant to India; UICA Faculty 
Research and Development Grant; Illustration/ 
Design Awards — NY and Phila. Art Director's 
Club, NY Society of Illustrators, Phila.; Vietnam 
Memorial Competition; Fountain of Freedom — 
Monument to the US Constitution. 

Mark Tocchet 

Assistant Professor: Illustration 
Illustrator, Creative Director, Tocchet Studio, Inc. 
BFA, School of Visual Arts 
Clients: Ash/Ledonne; BBD+O; Cunningham + 
Walsh; Doyle, Dane, Berbach; Oglivy & Mather; 
Wells, Rich, Greene, Inc.; American Diabetes 
Association; American Museum of Natural His- 
tory; Citibank; The Meadowlands; Pepsi-Cola; 
Reebok; Resorts International; School of Visual 
Arts Press; Seagrams; CBS; Dell; Holt, Reinhart & 
Winston; MacMillan; Random House; Rodale 
Press; Sierra Club; Simon & Schuster; New York, 
The New York Times: Viking/Penguin; Ziff-Davis 
Awards: Society of Illustrators; Communication 
Arts Magazine; Print Magazine; Master Eagle 
Merit Award; National Calendar Awards Medal 
Winner; The Rhodes Scholarship Award for Out- 
standing Achievement in the Media Arts 
Exhibitions: Museum of American Illustration; Art 
Directors Club, NY; Master Eagle Gallery 

Gotz Unger 

Senior Lecturer: Industrial Design 
BS, Design, Gesamthechschule, Kassel; 
MID, Royal College of Art, London 
Experience: Development Manager, Knoll Inter- 
national; Director, Design Development Dept., 
Wallace; Senior Lecturer, New York School of 
Interior Design. Design Consultant 



Sarah Van Keuren 

Adjunct Associate Professor: Printmaking 

BA, Swarthmore College 

Philadelphia College of Art 

MFA, University of Delaware 

Exhibitions: The Book Trader, 'The Print Club Selects"; 

"Challenge Exhibition," Fleisher Art Memorial; 

Swarthmore College; Philadelphia Art Alliance 

Grants: Philadelphia College of Art Venture Fund; 

Brandywine Offset Institute Artist Fellowship; 

Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Photography 

Fellowship 

LeeWillett 

Assistant Professor: Graphic Design 
Allgemeine Gewerbeschule, Basel, Switzerland 
Ohio State University 

Experience: Hi. Chu & Co., NY; Principle, Harvey/ 
Willett Design New York. 

Julian Winston 

Associate Professor: Industrial Design 

BID. Pratt Institute 

Clients: Philo Records, Pixenbar Music, American 

Institute for Homeopathy, National Center for 

Homeopathy, Creative Playthings 

Joseph Wong 

Associate Professor: Architectural Studies 
B Arch, University of Kentucky 
M Arch, Cranbrook Academy of Art 
Awards: International Student Studies; University 
of Kentucky travel award to study in England and 
Western Europe 

Exhibitions/competitions: "Berlin Edge Project," 
design team member with Daniel Libeskind, 
exhibits and several publications; exhibition of 
drawings and paintings at the China Museum of 
Art, Beijin, 1988; one man show, Tianjin College of 
Fine Arts, University of Kentucky, Stoneman 
Gallery, Washington, D.C., William Hunt Architec- 
tural Bookstore, San Francisco, CA; "Parameto," 
journal of Architecture and Urbanism 
Public lectures: Tianjin College of Fine Art, Chong 
Quing Institute of Architecture and Engineering, 
Xian Fine Arts College, Qing Hua University, China; 
Chief speaker "Society for the Advancement of 
Architecture and Culture in China," Beijin; 
Pennsylvania Council of the Arts Grant 
Publications: Unitas, Taiwan; Internationale 
Bauausstellung, Berlin; Deconstructivist Architecture, 
Domas, Italy; Outlook, Beijing, China; and others 

Peter Wood 

Assistant Professor: Industrial Design 

BA, Pennsylvania State University 

BA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Experience: partner, Sundberg & Wood, firm for 

special design 



Jennifer Woods 

Senior Lecturer: Printmaking 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

Mellon Internship, Folger Shakespeare Library, 1984 

Experience: chief of conservation. The Library 

Company of Philadelphia 

Organizations: Guild of Bookworkers, seminar 

coordinator, 1985; American Institute of 

Conservation; Designer Bookbinders 

Steven Yarnall 

Lecturer: Industrial Design 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Art 

NAABB Architecture, University of Tennessee 

Lily Yen 

Professor: Painting, Humanities 
BA, National Taiwan University 
MFA, University of Pennsylvania 
Visiting professor at Central Academy of Fine Arts in 
Beijing and Tianjin Fine Art College in Tianjin, China. 
Villege of Arts and Humanities, Philadelphia 
Awards: The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts; 
The Pennsylvania Humanities Council; The Phila- 
delphia Foundation, Philadelphia; The Asian 
American Art Center, NY; The Stockton Rush Bartol 
Foundation. 

Orly Zeewy 

Senior Lecturer: Industrial Design 

BS, University of Cincinnati 

BA University of Cincinnati 

Experience: Associate Professor Drexel University; 

principle, Zeewy Design. 

Christine Zelinsky 

Assistant Professor: Graphic Design 

MFA, Allgemeine Gewerbeschule, Basel, 

Switzerland 

Publications: Graphis, Typographicsche 

Monatsblaetter, Publicite, Modern Publicity, ID, 

"Universal Unique, "Basel School of Design: The 

Arman Hofman Years" 

Exhibitions: "15 Graphic Designers," AIGA 

Invitational; group shows in Zurich, Switzerland, 

Philadelphia and New York City. 



74 



Emeritus Professors 

Edna Andrade 

Foundation 

Morris Berd 

Painting 

William Dailey 

Crafts/Ceramics 

Larry Day 

Painting 

Benjamin Eisenstat 

Painting/Illustration 

Albert Gold 

Illustration 

Jerome Kaplan 

Printmaking 

Oscar Mertz 

Foundation 

Richard Reinhardt 

Crafts/Metals 

Petras Vaskys 

Crafts/Ceramics 



75 



I UNIVERSITY 
OF THE ARTS 



PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE 
OF PERFORMING ARTS 



vlv 



Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts 

Stephen Jay, Dean 

Annette DiMedio, Assistant Dean 

Accreditation 

The Philadelphia College of Performing Arts (PCPA) 
of The University of the Arts is accredited by the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Schools, and the National Association of Schools 
of Music, and has approval of the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania for the granting of degrees in the 
performing arts. 



The College 

The Philadelphia College of Performing Arts is 
comprised of the Schools of Dance, Music, and 
Theater Arts. Its curricula combine the 
performance emphasis of the traditional 
conservatory, stressing individualized training, 
practice, and discipline, with a liberal arts 
education. 

Founded in 1870 as the Philadelphia Musical 
Academy, and merged with the Philadelphia Con- 
servatory of Music in 1962, the College has long 
been regarded as one of America's foremost pro- 
fessional schools of higher education. Many of its 
early graduates and faculty were members and 
founders of the Galley Philadelphia Orchestra 
when it was formed in 1900. The Philadelphia 
Orchestra continues to play a significant role in 
the life of PCPA with many of its members cur- 
rently serving on the College faculty. The Academy 
of Music, home of the world-famous Philadelphia 
Orchestra, is adjacent to the historic Shubert The- 
ater building, headquarters of the Philadelphia 
College of Performing Arts. 

In 1976 the institution was renamed the Phila- 
delphia College of the Performing Arts, thereby 
signaling its intention to expand its program to 
include all three of the performing arts disciplines 
— Music, Dance, and Theater. In 1977, the Phila- 
delphia Dance Academy joined the College to 
become the School of Dance. Founded in 1947, 
The Philadelphia Dance Academy was one of the 
foremost conservatories of dance in the nation 
and one of the first three institutions in the coun- 
try granting a degree in dance. The School of The- 
ater was initiated in 1983. 

The Philadelphia College of Performing Arts 
thus became Pennsylvania's first and only inde- 
pendent college dedicated exclusively to the per- 
forming arts, and one of the first of its kind in the 
United States. Its philosophy is founded on the 
principle that there is a common bond among 
artists, whatever their discipline, and that artists 
must interact with each other for their inspiration 
and growth. Indeed, many of the College's stu- 
dents have developed interdisciplinary careers 
which require familiarity with all the performing 
arts. Its recent association with the Philadelphia 
College of Art and Design as part of The University 
of the Arts, adds an extraordinary new dimension 
to PCPA's artistic training by bringing performing 
and visual arts and artists together in a single 
professional educational community. 

Major Areas of Study 
School of Dance 

Undergraduate Programs 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance 
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance Education 
Certificate in Dance 

Dance Majors 

Ballet 

Dance Education 

Modern 

Theater Dance/Jazz 



School of Music 

Undergraduate Programs 

Bachelor of Music (BM) - Classical Music 
Bachelor of Music (BM) - Jazz/Commercial Music 
Bachelor of Music (BM) - Theory 
Bachelor of Music (BM) - Composition 
Diploma Program 
Certificate Program 

Graduate Programs 

Master of Music (MM) 

Master of Arts in Teaching, Music Education 

Graduate Diploma 

Areas of Concentration 

Bassoon* 

Clarinet 

Composition 

Contra Bass 

Electric Bass 

Flute 

French Horn* 

Guitar 

Harp* 

Oboe* 

Opera Singing+ 

Organ* 

Percussion 

Piano 

Piano Accompanying and 

Chamber Music+ 

Saxophone 

Theory* 

Trombone 

Trumpet 

Tuba* 

Viola 

Violin 

Violoncello 

Voice* 

Voice/Opera* 

* Classical Only 

+ Graduate Only 



School of Theater Arts 

Undergraduate Program 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Theater Arts 

Programs: 

Acting 

Directing 

Stage Combat 

Musical Theater 



79 



Admissions Requirements 

Admissions decisions are based on an evaluation 
of artistic proficiency and potential together with 
academic performance. 

Also refer to the sections on general admissions 
requirements for entrance to The University of the 
Arts, and to the sections concerning the particular 
School of Dance, Music, or Theater for additional 
information about Admissions, including Audition 
requirements. 

Undergraduate Admissions 

To qualify for admissions to the Philadelphia 
College of Performing Arts, students must have 
graduated from an accredited high school and 
have taken an appropriate distribution of subjects, 
including four years of English. A General 
Education Diploma (GED) or completion of the 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP) may be 
accepted as substitutes for a high school diploma. 

The Admissions Office must have the com- 
pleted application on file no later than two weeks 
prior to the scheduled date of the audition. To 
complete the application, the following must be 
submitted: 

1 . A completed application form along with the 
nonrefundable $30 application fee. 

2. An official copy of the high school transcript, or 
GED or CLEP certification. 

3. Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American 
College Test (ACT) scores. 

4. A statement of purpose: One-page, type-writ- 
ten essay describing the student's ambitions, 
goals, motivations, and commitment to training 
for the performing arts. 

5. A resume of performance experience and pri- 
vate training (include all applicable names and 
dates). 

6. A letter of recommendation from the student's 
performing arts teacher. 

Additional supportive materials are welcome. 
Though not required, a personal interview in the 
Admissions Office is recommended. Interviews 
must be scheduled in advance by calling the Ad- 
missions Office at 215-875-4808. 

Audition 

Every student applying to the Philadelphia College 
of Performing Arts must pass an entrance audi- 
tion. An application must be completed and filed 
in the Admissions Office before an audition will be 
scheduled. Taped auditions should be accompa- 
nied by a completed application. Specific audition 
requirements are presented in the sections con- 
cerning the Schools of Dance, Music, or Theater 
Arts. Applicants may audition in person at the 
University, by submitting an audition tape, or audi- 
tion in specified locations throughout the US. 

Transfer Admissions 

Students who have enrolled in a college-level 
program and completed more than twelve hours of 
course work will be considered a transfer 
student. The admissions process for a transfer 
student is the same as that outlined above under 
"Undergraduate Admissions." In addition, transfer 
students must submit official copies of all 
post-secondary school transcripts. 



Transfer Credits 

Students may receive credit for courses taken at 
other accredited institutions that are similar in 
content, purpose, and standards to those offered 
at The University of the Arts. For credit to be 
granted, the student must submit official 
transcripts of all previous college study along with 
current catalog(s) of the institution(s). A minimum 
grade of "C" is required in order to present a 
course for transfer credit. The evaluation of credit 
is made by the Division of Humanities faculty and 
school directors in consultation with the Office of 
the Registrar. 

Advanced standing credit in music perfor- 
mance, music composition, theater and dance 
may be transferable. At the time of the en- 
trance audition, the appropriate faculty Audi- 
tions Committee will evaluate the student's 
performance with respect to the level of 
achievement for advanced standing. Transfer 
credits are granted in the amount which would 
normally be given for similar courses in the 
curricula of the Philadelphia College of Per- 
forming Arts, up to the level of placement. 

Should the amount of previously earned 
credit be less than that awarded by PCPA for 
similar work, Advanced Standing credit will be 
automatically granted. 

Advanced Standing or transfer credits are 
not normally awarded to students in graduate 
degree programs. 

Final determination of transfer status cannot be 
made until all final transcripts from previously 
attended schools have been received, and all 
appropriate placement and entrance examinations 
have been completed. 

Additional Stipulations 

School of Music 

A maximum of half of the total required credits 
(two years) in Music may be transferable in the 
major field of study such as major study in Instru- 
ment, Voice, Composition, Theory. 

School of Theater Arts 

A maximum of half of the total required credits 
(two years) in Theater may be transferred in 
the major field of study: Acting, Speech, Move- 
ment, Mime, etc. 



Graduate Admissions 

Applicants to the Graduate Programs in the School 
of Music must complete an application file and an 
audition to be eligible for admission. 
Auditions are scheduled by calling the Admissions 
Office. A completed application must be on file in 
the Admissions Office no later than two weeks 
prior to the scheduled audition date. In order to 
complete the application file, the student must 
submit the following: 

1 . An Application for Graduate Admissions form 
(available from the Admissions Office) along 
with the nonrefundable $30 application fee; 

2. An essay (minimum length: 1,000 words) de- 
scribing your reasons for wishing to attend the 
University in terms of career goals and commit- 
ment to training for the professional performing 
arts; 

3. Official copies of all transcripts from high 
schools, undergraduate and graduate schools 
which were attended; 

4. Three letters of recommendation (two of these 
must come from professionals in the major 
area); 

5. Repertoire for the audition. 

International Student Admissions 

Students who are neither U.S. citizens nor resident 
aliens are considered international students. Inter- 
national students must comply with all provisions 
of the Immigration Act, and may only be admitted 
on a full-time basis. All foreign transcripts and 
other documents must be translated and certified 
by an embassy, legation, or consular officer of the 
United States. 

Application and audition procedures are identi- 
cal to those of undergraduate, transfer, and gradu- 
ate admissions listed above with the following 
exceptions/additional requirements: 

1 . The scores for the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language) TOEFL) are required instead of SAT 
or ACT scores. 

2. International students must file proof of ability 
to support themselves from their own financial 
resources or the resources of a sponsor. Docu- 
mentation of these resources is required on 
official bank stationery and must be stated in 
U.S. dollars.The estimated annual expense for 
an international student is $18,000 (U.S. dol- 
lars). The documentation is required as part of 
the Admissions application. 

3. Official Transcripts of every academic record 
since high school graduation must be submitted 
with the application and fee. If the original 
records are not in English, a certified English 
translation must also be included. Handwritten 
documents are not acceptable. 



80 



Regulations 

Attendance 

Professional Standards and Behavior 

It is expected that students of the Philadelphia 
College of Performing Arts maintain high stan- 
dards of professionalism with respect to studio, 
classroom, rehearsal, and performance commit- 
ments. Regular and punctual attendance and 
appropriate preparation for lessons, classes, 
rehearsals, and performances are of the utmost 
importance to the attainment of professional 
artistic goals. 

Absence 

An "excused" absence is one which has received 
the prior consent of the instructor; is due to illness 
or emergency, appropriately documented by medi- 
cal certificate, etc.; or caused by performance at 
an official school function with the approval of the 
appropriate School Director or Dean of PCPA. All 
other absences are "unexcused." 

It is the responsibility of the student to arrange 
with his/her instructors to make up all missed 
work. Failure to do so will result in lowered 
grades. Students who are excessively absent will 
receive an "F" in the course. (Due to the ensemble 
nature of the courses, work in Acting Studio and 
musical ensembles cannot be made up.) 

Students must notify PCPA concerning absences 
involving private lessons and/or rehearsals involv- 
ing other participants. Messages should be di- 
rected to the office of the School Director. 

Change of Major or Status 

Students wishing to change their major or pro- 
gram status must: 

1 . Secure appropriate form from the Registrar; 

2. If approved by the appropriate School Director, 
take a special audition, as required; 

3. Return completed form to the Registrar. 

Class/Lesson Cancellations or 
Lateness of Instructor 

Students must check every morning for notices 
regarding class or lesson changes. Such notices 
are posted in a designated area. If none is posted 
for the scheduled class or lesson and the instruc- 
tor is not present, students are expected to wait 
for 10 minutes for an hour-long class/lesson and 
1 5 minutes for those of longer duration. In the 
event the instructor fails to appear within the 10- 
15 minute waiting period, students are to report to 
the appropriate School Director's office, and may 
then leave without penalty. 



Dean's List 

The Dean's List honors those students who meet 
the following criteria: 

1 . Are full-time undergraduate degree candidates. 
(Candidates for Diploma and Graduate Degrees 
are not eligible.) 

2. Have attained a minimum GPA of 3.60. 

3. Have received no grade lower than a "B" in any 
course. 

4. Have received no grade of "I" or "OF." 

5. Have taken a minimum of 12 credits for letter 
grades (not "OP" or "OF"). 

Faculty Advisory 

All students are assigned to a faculty advisor. Lists 
are posted in the Shubert Student Lobby during 
the first week of the academic year. 
Appointments will be made at the mutual 
convenience of the student and the faculty 
advisor. 

Students should feel free to see their advisor at 
any time concerning problems they may encounter. 

Probation 

Students whose semester grade point average is 
below 2.0 and/or who receive the grade of D or 
below in their major area ("B" in Theater), will be 
placed on probation for one or two semesters, as 
determined by the Scholastic Standing 
Committee. Failure to meet the stipulation for 
removal of Probation by the end of the specified 
period will result in dismissal from PCPA. 

Student Status 
Special Students 

"Special" students are those not matriculated in a 
degree, diploma or certificate program of the 
Philadelphia College of Performing Arts. Special 
students are not usually admitted to the School of 
Theater Arts. 

Full-Time/Part-Time Status 

Full-time undergraduate students are those who 
are enrolled for 12 to 18 credits per semester, 
except for Double Degree students in the School 
of Music. 

Part-time students carry fewer than 12 credits 
in any given semester. 

Full-time enrollment for graduate students is 
considered to be the maximum number of credits 
proscribed in each semester of the student's par- 
ticular curriculum. 

Students wishing to enroll for more than the 
maximum credit load must receive approval from 
the Dean PCPA, and a per-credit surcharge may be 
levied. 

Note: Only Full-time students are admitted to the 
School of Theater Arts. 



Graduation Requirements 
Undergraduate 

To qualify for graduation, a student must fulfill the 
following requirements: 

1. Achieve a minimum cumulative grade point 
average (CGPA) of 2.0 ("C" average). 

2. Earn the total required credit hours for the par- 
ticular curriculum. 

Graduate 

Graduate Degree students are bound by the 
followign policies and requirements. 

1 . Achieve a minimum cumulative grade point 
average (CGPA) of 3.0 ("B" average). 

2. Pass a written comprehensive examination in 
the final semester of residency. 

3. Courses in which Graduate student earns a 
grade of "C need not be repeated. Courses in 
which a grade of "F is earned must be re- 



Graduation With Honors 

A candidate for the baccalaureate degree, only, 
may graduate with hoors if he or she achieves a 
minimum cumulative GPA of 3.6 at the conclusion 
of the semester prior to graduation. 

Graduation honors apply only to undergraduate 
degree students. 



81 



The School of Dance 

Susan B. Glazer 

Director 
Edna Cohen 

Assistant Director 
309 South Broad Street 
215-875-2269 

The School of Dance is dedicated to the training of 
young artists for careers as professional perform- 
ers, dance educators, and choreographers, and 
provides an intensive exploration of dance in its 
physical, intellectual and creative aspects. The 
School provides an environment in which students 
may develop an individual artistic vision while 
being exposed to a variety of artistic roles. 



Faculty by Department 

Ballet 

Edward Myers 
Andrew Pap 
Barbara Sandonato 
Carol Luppescu Sklaroff 
Jon Sherman 
Suzanne Slenn 

Jazz/Theater Dance 

Peter Bertini 
Beth Hirschhaut-lguchi 
Nancy Berman Kantra 
Ronen Koresh 
Henry Roy 
Wayne St. David 

Modern Dance 

Manfred Fischbeck 
Naomi Mindlin 
Milton Myers 
Faye B. Snow 
Pat Thomas 
JoAnn Tulli 

Tap Dance 

Joan Lanning 
Michael Lanning 
LaVaughn Robinson 

Dance Studies 

Peter Bertini - Dance Notation 

Alice Bloch - Dance History 

Robert Christophe - Mime 

Annette DiMedio - Music Survey 

Manfred Fischbeck - Eurythmics/lmprovisation/ 

Dance Composition 

Charles Gilbert- Voice 

Susan B. Glazer - Fundamentals of Dance 

Sherry Goodil - Dance Therapy 

Julia Lopez - Spanish Dance 

Rae Mangan - Nutrition 

Rachel Mausner - Alexander Technique 

Gabriela Roepke - Dance in Literature 

Pearl B. Schaeffer - Dance Pedagogy 

Connie Vandarakis- Anatomy/Kinesiology 

Paul Wagar - Acting 

Kariamu Welsh-Asante - African Dance 

Technical 

Jay Madara - Director 
Janette Howard - Assistant 

Costumes 

Clyde M. Hayes - Director 



Facilities 

The three main studios of the School of Dance are 
located at 309 South Broad Street. These spa- 
cious, bright, and well-lighted studios are fully 
equipped with barres and mirrors, huge windows, 
pianos, audio consoles, and ceiling fans. Their 
floors have been newly renovated with four-inch, 
state-of-the-art suspension for the safest and 
most comfortable dancing surface available. Lock- 
ers, dressing rooms, showers, and lounges are 
found adjacent to the studios. Three additional 
studios are located at 313 South Broad Street. The 
University has completely restored its historic 
Shubert Theater, which serves as the institution's 
major performance hall for students, as well as 
"home" to a number of regional performing arts 
organizations, including the Pennsylvania Ballet. 
The University's Drake Theater, a 250-seat theater, 
is used for dance student performances, as is a 
200-seat theater in the 313 South Broad Street 
building. The Albert M. Greenfield Library contains 
books, journals, and videotapes devoted to dance, 
which are available to students for research and 
coursework. 

Visiting Artists 

Visiting artists are a continuous and significant compo- 
nent of education in the School of Dance. Recent 
guests who have conducted master classes and work- 
shops have included Edward Villella, Donna 
McKechnie, Oleg Briansky, Gabriella Darvash, James 
Truitt, Meredith Monk, and Ronnie Favors. The profes- 
sional dance community feels very much at home in 
the School's studios. Frequently dancers from touring 
companies surprise dance students by making 
unannounced appearances, taking class, sharing their 
professional experiences, and providing inspiration. 



82 



Programs of Study 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance 
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance Education 

(BFA Dance Ed) 
Certificate in Dance - two-year program 

Majors 

Ballet 

Jazz/Theater Dance 
Modern Dance 
Dance Education 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance: Ballet 
Modem, or Jazz/Theater Dance 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance is a program 
designed for those students who wish to prepare for 
professional careers in dance performance and/or 
choreography. The BFA in Dance program is normally 
completed in four years of full-time study with a total 
requirement of 130-136 credits. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance 
Education 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Dance Education 
is a program designed specifically for students 
whose primary intention is to enter the profession 
as a teacher of dance. Although there is currently 
no Pennsylvania State certification for dance 
teachers, this program includes supervised class 
teaching in schools and/or private dance studios. 
The BFA in Dance Education is designed as a four- 
year program of full-time study with a total re- 
quirement of 130-136 credits. 

Certificate in Dance 

The Certificate in Dance is a two-year program 
intended for those students who wish to concen- 
trate exclusively on dance studies. This intensive 
program is designed to develop the student's fa- 
miliarity with and proficiency in a broad spectrum 
of dance styles. The Certificate in Dance is 
awarded in recognition of achievement, and does 
not constitute an academic degree. 



Admissions Requirements 

In addition to the general application requirements 
for all students to the Philadelphia College of Per- 
forming Arts, applicants to the School of Dance 
must submit the following: 

1 . A one-page (250 words) statement of purpose, 
outlining the applicant's goals, expectations, 
and reasons for choosing the dance program. 

2. A resume outlining all previous dance experi- 
ence and instruction including performances, 
names of teachers and studios, length of study, 
and all applicable dates. 

3. A letter of recommendation from the current 
dance instructor. 

Auditions 

An audition is required of all applicants to the 
School of Dance. The audition may be taken in 
Philadelphia, at designated regional audition loca- 
tions, or submitted on VHS format video tape. The 
audition evaluates the applicant's current level of 
technical proficiency and potential for professional 
development. 

The Philadelphia and regional audition consists of 
four parts: 

1 . A one-half-hour ballet class taken with other 
applicants. 

2. A one-half-hour modern dance class taken with 
other applicants. 

3. A one-half-hour jazz dance class taken with 
other applicants. 

4. A prepared dance solo. The solo may not be 
longer than two minutes in length, and may be 
the choreography of the applicant or someone 
else. Musical accompaniment must be provided 
by the applicant on cassette audio tape or 
record (audio equipment will be provided). The 
dance solo should feature the area of dance in 
which the applicant is most proficient and with 
which he or she feels most comfortable. 

Video-taped auditions must show: 

1 . Ballet and either Modern or Jazz Dance. 

2. Warm-up including both floor work and barre: 
Barre should be taped from the side and front, 
and should include plies (demi- and grand-), 
tendus, degages (battements jetes), ronds de 
jambes, grand battements, developpes (exten- 
sions) en croix. 

3. Center work should include small and large 
jumps, pirouettes, adagio, and a modem or jazz 
combination. 

4. Locomotor in modern or jazz — a combination 
of at least eight measures which includes leaps 
and turns. 

5. A short solo presentation, not longer than two 
minutes. 

Video tapes should be VHS format; all tapes must 
be clearly labeled with name, address, and reper- 
toire descriptions. 



Scholarships 

Trustee Scholarship 

Each year the School of Dance awards a Trustee 
Scholarship to an entering freshman. The award is 
made on the basis of outstanding artistic and 
academic performance, and for promise as a fu- 
ture dancer. Recipients must maintain a 3.0 cumu- 
lative grade point average. All auditioning stu- 
dents will be considered for this award but must 
audition prior to March 1 . Notification of the 
award is made in April. 

Talent Scholarships 

Talent Scholarships are awards to matriculating 
students who give evidence of outstanding artistic 
ability. Recommendation for the Talent Scholarship 
is based on the audition as well as demonstrated 
need. To maintain eligibility, the student must 
participate fully in rehearsals and performances, 
have a "B" or better in the Major area, and main- 
tain a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point aver- 
age (2.75 minimum for Freshmen) in all Dance 
courses. 

Students applying for Talent Scholarships must 
file a Talent Scholarship Application as well as the 
appropriate Financial Aid Form, obtainable from 
the Financial Aid Office. 

New students should audition prior to March 1 5. 
Those auditioning after March 15 will be considered 
for scholarships as funds become available. 

Returning students applying for Talent Scholar- 
ships are subject to special audition and/or evalu- 
ation of their work in Dance Studio and Ensemble. 

The Curriculum 

The curriculum in the School of Dance has been 
carefully organized to allow the student to grow to 
his/her maximum potential as a dancer. It has 
been developed over the years by professionals 
who are experienced with the world of dance and 
its demands. 

Daily technique classes in ballet, modern 
dance, and jazz dance are basic to all courses of 
study. Electives include improvisation, repertory, 
partnering, Spanish dance, ethnic dance, charac- 
ter, and mime. Through courses such as dance 
history and score reconstruction the student will 
gain a historical perspective of different dance 
traditions. Music, voice, and acting classes pro- 
vide the necessary links to allied performing arts. 
The curriculum includes courses in the liberal arts 
and social sciences, with special emphasis placed 
upon the manner in which they relate to the arts. 



83 



Core Curriculum 

The Core Curriculum is common to all Bachelor of 
Fine Arts programs in the School of Dance for the 
first two years. These required courses develop a 
solid foundation from which students pursue their 
specific areas of interest. 

Freshman Year Semester 

1st 2nd 

DA101A&B Ballet HI 2 2 

DA103A&B Modem Dance HI 2 2 

DA113A&B JazzDanceHI 1 1 

DA123A&B Tap HI 1 1 

DA 107 Eurythmics 1 - 

DA 109 Improvisation I - 1 

DA 1 1 6A&B Fundamentals of the 

Art of Dance HI 1 1 

DA117A&B Survey of Music HI 3 3 

Electives 1 1 
HU110A Language & Expression 3 - 

HU103A&B Intro, to Modernism 3 3_ 

18 15 

Sophomore Year 

DA201A&B Ballet IIHV 2 2 

DA203A&B Modem Dance IIHV 2 2 

DA213A&B Jazz Dance IIHV 1 1 

DA205A&B Dance Notation HI 2 2 

DA 209 Anatomy 1 - 

DA 210 Kinesiology - 1 

DA211A&B Dance History HI 3 3 

DA 216 Music for Dancers 1 - 

DA 217 Dance Composition I - 2 

DA 77- Dance Ensemble 1 1 

Electives 1 1 

HU— Humanities 3 3 



17 18 



Ballet Major 

The final two years of the Ballet major emphasize 
advanced technique in ballet, including Pointe or 
Men's Ballet class. In addition, Ballet majors con- 
tinue non-major studies in either Modem or Jazz 



17 18 

Senior Year 

DA401A&B Ballet Major IIIJV 4 4 
* — Modern or Jazz for 

non-majors 1 1 

DA407A&B Ballet Repertory IIIJV 2 2 

DA419A&B Dance Production I, II 2 2 
DA421A&B Pointe IIIJV or 

DA427A&B Men's Class IIIJV 1 1 

DA 77- Dance Ensemble 1 1 

Electives 1 1 

HU— Humanities 3 3 

HU — Humanities 3 - 



18 15 



*DA 326A&B, DA 328A&B, DA 426 A&B, 
DA 428A&B, as appropriate 



Jazz/Theater Dance Major 

The Jazz/Theater Dance major emphasizes acting, 
music, and voice in addition to the technical study 
of jazz dance, and prepares students for dance 
careers related to theatrical performance. 



uance. 








Junior Year 




Semester 


Junior Year 




Semester 






1st 2nd 






1st 2nd 


DA 311 A&B 


Jazz Major l.ll 


4 4 


DA 301 A&B 


BalletMajorl.il 


4 


4 


* — 


Ballet or Modem for 




* — 


Modern or Jazz for 


1 


1 




Non-majors 


1 1 


DA308A&B 


Dance Pedagogy l.ll 


2 


2 


DA308A&B 


Dance Pedagogy I, II 


2 2 


DA307A&B 


Ballet Repertory l.ll 


2 


2 


DA317A&B 


Dance Composition II, III 


2 2 


DA309A&B 


Partnering l.ll 


1 


1 


DA 319 


Theater Functions 


- 2 


DA 31 9 


Theater Functions 


- 


2 


DA323A&B 


Tap Dance IIIJV 


1 1 


DA 324 


Character Dance 


- 


1 


DA345A&B 


Voice l.ll 


1 1 


DA347A 


Acting I 


1 


- 


DA347A&B 


Acting Ml 


1 1 


DA 321 A&B 


Pointe I, II or 


1 


1 


DA77- 


Dance Ensemble 


1 1 


DA327A&B 


Men's Class l,ll 








Elective 


1 


DA77- 


Dance Ensemble 
Electives 


1 
1 


1 


HU — 


Humanities 


3 3 


HU — 


Humanities 


3 


3 






17 18 



Senior Year 

DA 411 A&B Jazz Major IIIJV 
* — Ballet or Modem for 

non-majors 
DA419A&B Dance Production l,ll 
DA423A&B Tap Dance V,VI 
DA445A&B Voice IIIJV 
DA447A&B Acting IIIJV 
DA 77- Dance Ensemble 

Electives 
HU — Humanities 

HU — Humanities 



4 4 



18 15 



*DA 325A&B. DA 326A&B, DA 425A&B, DA 426 
A&B, as appropriate. 



Modem Dance Major 

Modern Dance majors further develop technique, 
repertoire, and composition in the area of Modern 
Dance. In addition, Modem Dance Majors also 
pursue non-major studies in either Ballet or Jazz 
Dance. 



Junior Year 

DA303A&B 



DA305A&B 

DA308A&B 

DA317A&B 

DA 319 

DA322A&B 

DA77- 



HU- 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

Modern Dance Major V-VI 4 4 

Ballet or Jazz for 

Non-majors 

Modern Repertory l-ll 

Dance Pedagogy l-ll 

Dance Composition ll-l 

Theater Functions 

Improvisation ll-lll 

Dance Ensemble 1 1 

Elective 1 - 

Humanities 3 3 



1 1 

2 2 
2 2 
2 2 
- 2 
1 1 







17 


18 


Senior Year 








DA403A&B 


Modem Dance 






i_ 


Major VII-VIII 
Ballet or Jazz for 


4 


4 


DA405A&B 
DA 41 7 
DA419A&B 


Non-majors 
Modern Repertory lll-IV 
Dance Composition IV 
Dance Production l-ll 


1 
2 
2 
2 


1 
2 

2 


DA77- 


Dance Ensemble 
Electives 


1 
1 


1 
1 


HU — 


Humanities 


3 


3 


HU — 


Humanities 


- 


3 



16 17 



*DA 325A&B, DA 328A&B, DA 425A&B, 
DA 428A&B, as appropriate. 



Dance Education Major 

Students choosing to pursue the Bachelor of Fine 
Arts in Dance Education continue dance technique 
studies in one major area and one non-major area 
of concentration. The culmination of the program 
is an internship as a student teacher. 



Junior Year 

DA 3 — A&B Major Technique 

DA 3 — Non-major Technique 

DA 308A&B Dance Pedagogy l-ll 

DA 31 7A&B Dance Composition II- 

DA319 Theater Functions 

DA 77- Dance Ensemble 

Elective 

HU — Humanities 

HU — Psychology 



Senior Year 

DA 4 — A&B Major Technique 

DA 4 — Non-major Technique 

DA 408A&B Dance Symposium l-ll 

DA 410 Student Teaching 

DA419A&B Dance Production 

HU 4 — Humanities 

HU 4 — Humanities 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

4 4 

1 1 

2 2 
II 2 2 

- 2 
1 1 
1 - 

3 
3 3 



17 15 



16 17 



Certificate 


in Dance 




Total Credits: 55 




First Year 




Semester 
1st 2nd 


DA 101A&B 


Ballet l-ll 


2 2 


DA 103A&B 


Modem Dance l-ll 


2 2 


DA 107 


Eurythmics 


1 - 


DA 109 


Dance Improvisation 


1 - 


DA113A&B 


Jazz Dance l-ll 


1 1 


DA116A&B 


Fundamentals of the 
Art of Dance l-ll 


1 1 


DA117A&B 


Survey of Music l-ll 


3 3 


DA123A&B 


Tap Dance 1-111 1 




DA 211 A&B 


Dance History l-ll 
Electives 


2 2 

1 1 



Second Year 

DA 201 A&B Ballet lll-IV 
DA 203A&B Modem Dance lll-IV 
DA 207 A&B Dance Pedagogy-ll 
DA 209 Anatomy 

DA 210 Kinesiology 

DA213A&B Jazz Dance lll-IV 
DA 21 6 Music for Dancers 

DA 21 7 Dance Composition I 

DA 31 9 Theater Functions 

DA 77- Dance Ensemble 

Electives 



15 14 



2 2 

2 2 

2 2 

1 - 

- 1 
1 1 
1 - 

- 2 

- 2 

1 1 

2 1 



12 14 



85 



Special Class/ 
Performance Requirements 

Dance Technique Class 

Presence in Dance Technique class is especially 
vital to the student's professional development. 
Dance Technique classes meet up to five times 
per week depending upon the course and level. 
Absences must not exceed twice the number of 
weekly class meetings per semester for the par- 
ticular course. Extensive absences, whether "ex- 
cused" or "unexcused," will adversely effect the 
course grade. 

Dance Ensembles 

Dance majors are expected to actively participate 
each semester in a Dance Ensemble. (Note: There 
is no performance requirement for freshmen.) 
Dance Ensembles are performance-oriented 
groups in Ballet, Jazz, and Modem Dance. Reper- 
tory for Dance Ensembles may be an original work 
by a faculty member, an exceptional student work, 
or one reconstructed from dance notation. 

Students are expected to complete six en- 
semble credits (one each semester). The require- 
ment may be fulfilled by participation in Consort, 
the student performing dance company. Consort 
carries variable credits and may, with special 
permission of the Director of the School of Dance, 
also fulfill certain curricular requirements such as 
Repertory and Partnering. 

Required Performance credit may also be 
satisfied by participation in Senior Concerts, 
Composition Concerts, and approved outside 
professional work. 

Additionally, Seniors may earn Performance 
credit in conjunction with their Dance Production 
course. Sophomores and Juniors may be awarded 
ensemble credit by doing their own choreography 
if the work is shown in concert form. 



Senior Dance Concert 

1 . Preparation for the senior concert takes place 
during the two-semester Dance Production 
course under the supervision of a senior faculty 
member. Each student may select an advisor 
who will assist in the choreographic and tech- 
nical production of the concert. Performance 
dates are chosen in September. Most concerts 
are shared by several seniors and are per- 
formed in the Drake Theater. 

2. Jury: All senior dance students will present their 
finished concert three weeks before their sched- 
uled date of performance to a jury consisting of 
three faculty members and the Director and Assis- 
tant Director of the School of Dance. During this 
presentation, all technical cues should be in place 
and announced, and the technical crew must also 
be present. A draft of the program copy is to be 
submitted for review. 

3. Requirements: 

a. Choreography — Modern majors must cho- 
reograph a solo work and a large or small 
group piece. Ballet majors must choreograph 
one work, either solo or small group. Jazz ma- 
jors must choreograph one solo and one group 
piece, or two group pieces. If any singing is 
included, the School of Dance vocal coach must 
be consulted and approve the work. 

b. Performance — All students must perform in 
at least one work of their own choreography 
and one work of a fellow student. Additionally, 
Ballet majors must perform in a piece from the 
standard ballet repertory. 

c. Technical Assistance — Each student must 
fulfill a technical-personnel requirement either 
as Stage Manager, Lighting Technician/De- 
signer, or Sound Technician. Personnel are 
selected well in advance of the concert date 
and meet with the Technical Director of the 
Theater early in the semester to set up re- 
hearsal dates. 

4. Responsibilities: The University will provide the 
theater, a technical director, and the basic tech- 
nical facilities. Any additional support, special 
lighting, or sound needs must be provided by 
the student. All programs, flyers, and promo- 
tional material can be duplicated by the Dance 
Office if presented well in advance of the pro- 
duction in finished (typed) state. 

5. Evaluation: Most senior Dance students view 
their Senior Concert as the culmination of their 
four years at The University of the Arts and a 
most important aspect of their college experi- 
ence. The faculty, too, judges this performance 
as a serious demonstration of the student's 
ability as a dance artist. Evaluations of the 
content of the performance are offered by at 
least three faculty members after the 
preconcert jury presentation. 

The production aspect of the concert will be 
graded by the faculty in charge of the course. The 
final grade thus reflects both the process and the 
choreographic end result. 



Graduation Requirements 

In addition to the general PCPA requirements 
for graduation, each Dance Major must fulfill 
the Senior Dance Concert requirements, as 
previously described. 



Dance Extension 

309 South Broad Street 
215-875-2269 

The Dance Extension Division offers credit and 
noncredit dance courses for students of all ages, 
from beginner through advanced levels. The pro- 
grams enable students to explore their potential in 
a stimulating and professional environment. The 
Extension Division presents a wide variety of 
courses, taught by the same highly qualified in- 
structors who work with our full-time students of 
the School of Dance. These courses for non-Dance 
Majors are open to all University of the Arts stu- 
dents for elective credit. 



86 



The School of Dance 
Course Descriptions 

DA101A&B 
Ballet Ml 

2 credits per semester 

Fundamentals of ballet technique including barre 
and center floor work. The course serves to intro- 
duce and develop basic ballet technique and vo- 
cabulary. Body placement and alignment is 
stressed through an understanding and application 
of these basics. Continuous advancement and 
development is provided from beginning to ad- 
vanced levels throughout this four-semester se- 
quence (Ballet l-IV). Required of all Dance majors. 

DA103A&B 
Modern Dance III 

2 credits per semester 

Basic technique of modern dance for the develop- 
ment of skills, intellectual understanding, kinetic 
perception, and maximum versatility. Includes 
barre work, center floor, isolation, falls and recov- 
eries, contractions and release. Part of two-year 
sequence (Modern Dance l-IV). Required of all 
Dance majors. 

DA 107 

Eii rythmics 

1 credit 

A beginning course in dance theory and composi- 
tion which explores the development of rhythm 
perception through movement improvisation. Stu- 
dents receive weekly movement assignments 
directed toward specific rhythm and dance prob- 
lems. Required of all Dance majors. 

DA 109 
Improvisation I 

1 credit 

This course comprises breathing and centering 
warm-ups, isolation exercises, and technical im- 
provisation on movement qualities, including 
swinging, gliding, falling, rising, slow motion. 
Students learn to develop choreographic ideas 
through group improvisational structures. A con- 
tinuation of the creative work of DA 107. Required 
of all Dance majors. 

DA113A&B 
Jazz Dance III 

1 credit per semester 

A presentation of styles designed to broaden 
knowledge and technique of concert and theater 
jazz dance. Classes employ floor stretches and 
center barre as warm-up procedures. Movement 
patterns emphasize simultaneous coordination of 
multiple rhythm patterns in different parts of the 
body. Combinations advance from simple to com- 
plex throughout this four-semester sequence (Jazz 
Dance l-IV). Required of all Dance majors. 



DA116A&B 

Fundamentals of the Art of Dance III 

1 credit per semester 

This freshman course deals with basic aesthetic 
considerations of the dance art form. The first 
semester examines the nature and forms of dance, 
dance in relation to other arts, and its language 
and literature. The second semester is an "Effort- 
Shape" course, based on the principles of Rudolph 
Von Laban. Required of all Dance majors. 

DA117A&B 

Survey of Music III 

3 credits per semester 

Study of rhythm, melody, harmony, tempi and dy- 
namics, and musical forms. The course also sur- 
veys the history of music from ancient to modern, 
including jazz. Musical rhythms and structures are 
studied in the one-hour laboratory section. Re- 
quired of all Dance majors. 

DA123A&B 
Tap III 

1 credit per semester 

Basic vocabulary of tap, and development of rhyth- 
mically accurate footwork and accompanying body 
movements. Required of all Dance majors. 

DA201A&B 
Ballet lll-IV 

2 credits per semester 

Continuation of DA 101 A&B. Required of all 
Dance majors. 

DA 203 A&B 
Modern Dance lll-IV 

2 credits per semester 

Continuation of DA 1 03 A&B. Required of all 

Dance majors. 

DA 205 A&B 
Notation III 

2 credits per semester 

Notation I is an introduction to the Laban system 
of recording dance movement. The course deals 
with the study of basic notation symbols for read- 
ing and writing movements involving steps, arm 
and leg gestures, turns, and rhythmic and spatial 
patterns. Notation II comprises intermediate study 
in reading and writing dance phrases including 
torso, parts of the limbs, and head. Required of all 
Dance majors. 

DA 209 

Anatomy for Dancers 

1 credit 

A study of the structured makeup of the human 
body, and the relationship of body systems to each 
other. Included is a study of the structure and func- 
tion of the nervous, pulmonary, circulatory, and 
digestive systems. Required of all Dance majors. 

DA 210 
Kinesiology 

1 credit 

A study of the mechanics of the body in motion 
based upon the background provided in Anatomy 
for Dancers (DA 209). Muscular and biomechanical 
aspects are presented, with a stress on overuse 
syndrome and prevention of dance injuries. Re- 
quired of all Dance majors. 



DA 211 A&B 
Dance History III 

3 credits per semester 

The study of the interaction between dance and 
the society in which it develops, emphasizing the 
changing role and nature of dance. Dance History I 
deals with dance from the Renaissance through 
Diaghilev's Ballet Russe. Dance History II surveys 
dance from pre-World War II to the present. Re- 
quired of all Dance majors. 

DA 213 A&B 
Jazz Dance lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 

Continuation of DA 1 1 3 A&B. Required of all 

Dance majors. 

DA 216 

Music for Dancers 

1 credit 

An exploration of various kinds of musical materi- 
als and literature, from Gregorian chant to New 
Music, relating the selection of music to the cre- 
ation of dance composition. Improvisation utilizing 
different sounds and instruments. Prerequisite to 
Dance Composition (DA 217). Required of all 
Dance majors. 

DA 217 

Dance Composition I 

2 credits 

The course integrates the improvisational skills 
acquired earlier in Eurythmics, Improvisation, and 
Music for Dancers. Designed to provide the begin- 
ning choreographer with the tools needed to struc- 
ture a dance composition in solo and duet forms. 
Required of all Dance majors. 

DA 301 A&B 
Ballet V-VI 

4 credits per semester 

Continuation of DA 201 A&B. Required of students 
majoring in Ballet. 

DA 303 A&B 
Modern Dance V-VI 

4 credits per semester 

Continuation of DA 203 A&B. Required of students 

majoring in Modern Dance. 

DA 305 A&B 
Modern Repertory III 

2 credits per semester 

A study of contemporary and/or classical repertory 
by resident or guest choreographers or notators, 
as well as the viewing, discussion, and analysis of 
great works on video and film. Required of Mod- 
ern Dance majors. 

DA 307 A&B 
Ballet Repertory III 

2 credits per semester 

The study and performance of dances of the 
Renaissance and Baroque periods, followed by 
major classical and modern ballets. Required of 
Ballet majors. 



87 



DA308A&B 
Dance Pedagogy III 

2 credits per semester 

Dance I is an introduction to current philosophies 
and practices of teaching dance, and a historical 
survey of the role of dance in education. The sec- 
ond semester deals with identification and 
exploration of basic concepts of teaching dance, 
and application of these principles to the concrete 
development of lesson plans. Required of all 
Dance majors. 

DA309A&B 
Partnering III 

1 credit per semester 

The basic technique of adagio (pas de deux). Students 
perform major classical works. Required of Ballet 
majors. May be taken as an elective by other Dance 
majors with permission of the instructor. 

DA311A&B 
Jazz V- VI 

4 credits per semester 

Continued development of technique and various 
styles as introduced in DA 1 13 A&B. The course 
progresses from basic to complex rhythm and 
isolation exercises and movement combinations 
stressing subtlety of dynamics, as well as prepara- 
tion of repertory. Required of students majoring in 
Jazz/Theater Dance. 

DA 317 A&B 

Dance Composition 11—111 

2 credits per semester 

Continuation of DA 230. Problem solving and 
analysis of materials through individual projects. 

DA 319 

Theater Functions 

2 credits 

A basic production course dealing with concepts 
of lighting and set design dance. Students are 
required to gain practical experience by working in 
the theater on dance concerts during the year. 
Required of all Dance majors. 

DA 321 A&B 
Pointe Ml 

1 credit per semester 

Basic technique of dancing ballet on pointe. 
Women dance variations from the classical reper- 
toire. Required of students majoring in Ballet. May 
be taken as an elective by other Dance majors. 

DA 322 A&B 
Improvisation If— III 
1 credit per semester 

Individual improvisations are performed on themes 
with objects in restricted or altered spaces and times. 
Various structures are used for group improvisation. 
Free improvisation with live music is stressed. Re- 
quired of students majoring in Modem Dance. 



DA 323 A&B 
Tap lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 

The first year of a two-year sequence (DA 333- 
334, 433-444). The study and practice of the 
tap style of dance from simple rhythmic foot- 
work to more complex multirhythms and reper- 
tory. Required of students majoring in Jazz/ 
Theater Dance. 

DA 324 
Character Dance 

1 credit 

The course deals with the study of the relation- 
ship between ethnic styles and classical ballet, 
and the proper technique for performing national 
dances stylized for the classical ballet repertory. 
Required of students majoring in Ballet. May be 
taken as an elective by other Dance majors with 
permission of the instructor. 

DA 325 A&B 

Ballet for Non-majors V-VI 

1 credit per semester 

Continuation of DA 201 A&B. For students major- 
ing in Modern or Jazz/Theater Dance. 

DA 326 A&B 

Modern Dance for Nonmajors V-VI 

1 credit per semester 

Continuation of DA A&B. For students majoring in 

Ballet or Jazz/Theater Dance. 

DA 327 A&B 
Men's Class Ml 

1 credit per semester 

The technical movements of dance frequently 
performed by the male dancer. Required of stu- 
dents majoring in Ballet. May be taken as an elec- 
tive by other Dance majors. 

DA 328 A&B 

Jazz for Nonmajors V-VI 

1 credit per semester 

Designed for Ballet and Modern majors. The 
course further develops the vocabulary and skills 
learned in DA 213 A&B. 

DA 345 A&B 
Voice Ml 

1 credit per semester 

Vocal training for the non-Voice major. Designed 
to develop the vocal instrument to meet both the 
musical and nonmusical vocal requirements of the 
theater. Required of students majoring in Jazz/ 
Theater Dance. 

DA347A 
Acting I 

1 credit 

Techniques of theatrical expression, improvisa- 
tion, and interpretation. Required of students 
majoring in Ballet and Jazz/Theater Dance. Open 
to Modern Dance majors as an elective. 

DA347B 
Acting II 

1 credit 

Continuation of DA 347A. Required of students 
majoring in Jazz/Theater Dance. Open to other 
Dance majors as an elective. 



DA 401 A&B 
Ballet VII-VIII 

4 credits per semester 

Continuation of DA 301 A&B. Required of students 

majoring in Ballet. 

DA 403 A&B 
Modern Dance VII-VIII 

4 credits per semester 

Continuation of DA 303 A&B. Required of students 

majoring in Modern Dance. 

DA 405 A&B 

Modem Repertory lll-IV 

2 credits per semester 

Continuation of DA 305 A&B. Required of students 

majoring in Modern Dance. 

DA 407 A&B 

Ballet Repertory lll-IV 

2 credits per semester 

Continuation of DA 307 A&B. Required of students 

majoring in Ballet. 

DA 411 A&B 
Jazz VII-VIII 

4 credits per semester 

Continuation of DA 31 1 A&B. Required of students 

majoring in Jazz/Theater Dance. 

DA 417 

Irrterarts Composition IV 

2 credits 

This course is designed for choreographers to 
work collaboratively with artists in related media 
such as video, photography, music, crafts, and/or 
text. Work is presented at the end of the semester. 
Course may be team-taught. Required of Modem 
majors; open as an elective to all University stu- 
dents with permission of instructor. 

DA 419 A&B 

Dance Production Ml 

2 credits per semester 

Designed to assist senior students in meeting their 
graduation performance requirement. Each stu- 
dent participates in the rehearsal, performance, 
and technical aspects of the senior graduation 
concerts scheduled at the end of each spring. 
Students are expected to take major responsibili- 
ties for the production of these programs. A gradu- 
ation requirement for all Dance majors. 

DA 421 A&B 
Pointe lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 

Continuation of DA 341 A&B. Required of students 
majoring in Ballet. May be taken as an elective by 
other Dance majors. Prerequisite: DA 342. 

DA 423 A&B 
Tap V-VI 

1 credit per semester 

Continuation of DA 323 A&B. Required of students 

majoring in Jazz/Theater Dance. 

DA 425 A&B 

Ballet for Non-majors VII-VIII 

1 credit per semester 

Continuation of DA 325 A&B. For students major- 
ing in Modern or Jazz/Theater Dance. 



DA426A&B 

Modem Dance for Nonmajors VII-VIII 

1 credit semester 

Continuation of DA 326 A&B. For students major- 
ing in Ballet or Jazz/Theater Dance. 

DA 427 A&B 
Men's Class lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 

Continuation of DA 327 A&B (1 hour weekly). Re- 
quired of all male Ballet Majors. May be taken as 
an elective by other Dance majors. Prerequisite: 
DA 352. 

DA 428 A&B 

Jazz for Nonmajors VII-VIII 

1 credit per semester 

Continuation of DA 328 A&B. For students major- 
ing in Ballet and Modern Dance. 

DA 445 A&B 
Voice lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 
Continuation of DA 345 A&B. 

DA 447 A&B 
Acting lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 

Continuation of DA 347 A&B. Required of students 
majoring in Jazz/Theater Dance. May be taken as 
an elective by other Dance majors. Prerequisite: 
DA 338. 

DA 77- 

Dance Ensembles/Labs 

1 credit per semester 

DA 771 

Ballet Ensemble 

DA 772 
Dance Consort 

DA 773 

Modern Ensemble 

DA 774 

Jazz Ensemble 

DA 775 

Tap Ensemble 



Dance Education 

DA 308 A&B 
Dance Pedagogy III 

2 credits per semester 

Dance I is an introduction to current philoso- 
phies and practices of teaching dance, and a 
historical survey of the role of dance in educa- 
tion. The second semester deals with identifi- 
cation and exploration of basic concepts of 
teaching dance, and application of these prin- 
ciples to the concrete development of lesson 
plans. Required of all Dance majors. 

DA 408 A 

Dance Symposium I 

3 credits 

A course designed specifically for those students 
who will be completing their student teaching 
requirement in the following semester. The course 
includes observation techniques, source material 
preparation, and evaluation criteria. Discussion 
sessions center around the application of dance 
principles to the learning situation. The role of 
dance teacher is examined. 

DA 408 B 

Dance Symposium II 

3 credits 

This course is designed to complement the actual 
student teaching experience. Specific situations, 
problems, and achievements of the student teach- 
ing process are discussed and evaluated. 

DA 410 

Student Teaching 

8 credits 

Students teach under supervised direction for one 
semester in a public or private school. If place- 
ment for student teaching is not within a school 
system, arrangements are made for the student to 
do this supervised teaching through local dance 
studios. Student Teaching must be taken concur- 
rently with DA 408 B. Prerequisite: DA 408 A. 



Dance Electives 

DA 111 
Spahish Dance 

1 credit 

A study of the basic techniques of playing casta- 
nets for the Sevillanas, as well as development of 
fundamental skills in footwork and handclaps for 
flamenco. 

DA 115 
Mime 

1 credit 

An exploration of the commedia deH'arte, Kabuki, 
and twentieth-century techniques developed by 
Decroux, Barrault, and Marceau. Emphasis is 
placed on animals as the primary key to funda- 
mental movement, as well as analysis of human 
movement, including elements of age, environ- 
ment, body type, and facial features. 

DA 119 
Yoga 

1 credit 

The study of a system of exercises to achieve 

physical and spiritual well-being. 

DA 121 

The Alexander Technique 

1 credit 

A method for moving with ease and grace which 
can be used in any situation (ballet, jazz, modern 
dance, and also everyday activities). By releasing 
unnecessary tension in movement, the student 
learns to avoid dance injuries or change harmful 
habits so that chronic injuries can heal. 

DA 124 
Ethnic Dance 

1 credit 

The study of the contribution of black dance to the 
development of American dance through the mas- 
tery of the technique. 

DA 126 

Dance Ethnology 

2 credits 

A survey of the broad perspectives of dance as an 
expression of culture through investigation of 
Western and non-Western dance forms. 

DA 127 
Stage Combat 

1 credit 

Introduces dancers to stage fencing techniques 

using courtswords, sabers, and daggers. 

DA 129 
Nutrition 

1 credit 

The study of nutrition and its application to food 
selection, with special emphasis on the nutritional 
needs of the dancer. 



89 



DA 130 
Dance Therapy 

1 credit 

An examination of the use of dance movements as 
therapeutic tools in working with the physically 
and mentally handicapped. 

DA223A&B 

Tap lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 
Continuation of DA 123 A&B. 

DA 314 

Score Reconstruction 

2 credits 

The application of Laban principles to the re-cre- 
ation of notated solo and/or group works. The 
works studied are drawn from repertory of estab- 
lished choreographers and include compositions in 
the various styles of dance. The course may in- 
clude performance of reconstructed works. 

DA 422 
Styles of Jazz 

1 credit 

An exploration of Jazz styles of historic and con- 
temporary Jazz dance artists. 
Note: The following courses, required of particular 
Dance majors, are open as electives to other 
Dance majors: 

DA 345 A&B & DA 445 A&B 
Voice l-ll-lll-IV 

DA 317 A&B 

Dance Composition ll-lll 

DA 324 
Character Dance 

DA 323 A&B & DA 423 A&B 
Tap lll-IV-V-VI 

DA 347 A&B & DA 447 A&B 
Acting l-ll-lll-IV 

DA 321 A&B & DA 421 A&B 
Pointe l-ll-lll-IV 

DA 327 A&B & DA 427 A&B 
Men's Class l-ll-lll-IV 



DA101X 
Ballet Elective 

1 credit per semester , 

A fundamental ballet technique course for non- 
dance majors. 

DA103X 

Modern Dance Elective 

1 credit per semester 

A fundamental modern dance technique course for 

non-dance majors. 

DA113X 

Jazz Dance Elective 

1 credit per semester .,..,, ., 

A fundamental jazz dance technique course for 
non-dance majors. 

DA 114X 
Karate Elective 

1 credit per semester 

DA123X 

Tap Dance Elective 

1 credit per semester 

A fundamental tap technique course for non-dance 

majors. 






90 



The School of Music 

Marc Dicciani 

Director 

250 South Broad Street 

215-875-2206 

The School of Music is dedicated to the prepa- 
ration and training of young musicians for a 
professional career in performance, composi- 
tion, music theory, and music education. The 
student's growth as a musician is the primary 
goal of the program. The School stresses indi- 
vidualized training in a conservatory atmo- 
sphere in order to produce professional musi- 
cians and teachers of the highest caliber. 

Undergraduate students in the School of Music 
study the performance and composition of jazz or 
classical music. All programs lead to an academic 
degree, diploma, or certificate. Preparatory 
courses for the MAT in Music Education are also 
offered at this level. 

Graduate programs are available in instrumen- 
tal or vocal performance, opera, piano accompany- 
ing and chamber music, music education, and 
composition. These programs offer flexibility along 
with intensive study in the major area. 

Performance opportunities play an important 
part in the student's education by sharpening tech- 
nical skills and increasing the student's musical 
repertory. The School sponsors a student orches- 
tra, chamber ensembles (including a New Music 
Ensemble), jazz and fusion ensembles, and choral 
groups. Students are involved in a rigorous sched- 
ule of performances, with over 125 concerts pre- 
sented each year. 

The faculty of the School of Music is made up 
of experienced and practicing artists; included are 
members of the Philadelphia Orchestra and New 
York Philharmonic, professional opera singers, and 
well-known soloists, composers, theorists, and 
music historians. 

Close work with the faculty is supplemented by 
the School's ongoing Master Class Series. Artists 
who have participated in this series include pia- 
nists Andre Watts and Victor Borge; trumpeter 
Wynton Marsalis; composers Pierre Boulez, John 
Cage, and George Crumb; singers Beverly Sills and 
Placido Domingo; conductors Klaus Tennstedt and 
Ricardo Muti; and jazz musicians Thad Jones, Mel 
Lewis, Peter Erskine, and Stanley Clarke. 

To further prepare its students for careers in the 
professional music world, the School of Music 
provides electronic equipment and facilities in- 
cluding synthesizers, an electronic studio, a com- 
puter laboratory, and a facility for computer musi- 
cal calligraphy. Through a grant from the William 
Penn Foundation, the School of Music has recently 
opened a state-of-the-art music technology facil- 
ity, which includes a recording studio, three midi 
studios, an editing room, and a number of re- 
hearsal rooms. 

Founded in 1871 as the Philadelphia Musical 
Academy, and later merged with the Philadelphia 
Conservatory of Music, the School counts among 
its alumni some of the nation's finest musicians, 
including pianist Andre Watts, composer Vincent 
Persichetti, and jazz artists Stanley Clarke, John 
Davis, and Lew Taborkin. 



Faculty by Department 



Classical Applied and 


Bassoon 


Chamber Music Studies 


Mark Gigliotti 


Strings 


Saxophone 




Marshall Taylor 


Violin 


William P. Zaccagni 


'David Arben 




*Frank Costanzo 


Woodwind Chamber Music 


'Robert de Pasquale 


"Jonathan Blumenfeld 


"William de Pasquale 


Shirley Curtiss 


Chin Kim 


"Lorin Lind 


"Joseph Lanza 


Adeline Tomasone 


A. William Liva 


Brass 


Viola 


Trumpet 


"Leonard Mogill 


James Hala 


Janee Munroe 


Anthony Marchione 


Violoncello 


"Seymour Rosenfeld 


Ulrich Boeckheler 


Evan Solot 


""Lome Munroe 


Dennis Wasco 


"Deborah Reeder 


French Horn 


Contrabass 


Francis Orval 


"Neil Courtney 


"David Wetherill 


"Henry Scott 


Trombone 


Craig Thomas 


"Tyrone Breuninger 


Harp 


Richard Genovese 


"Margarite Csonka Montanaro 


Dan Tomasone 


Classical Guitar 


Tuba 


John Leonard 


Jay Paul Krush 


Pat Mercuri 


"Paul Krzywicki 


Peter Segal 


Brass Chamber Music 


String Chamber Music 


Richard Genovese 


"Robert de Pasquale 


James Hala 


"William de Pasquale 


Jay Paul Krush 


A. William Liva 


Percussion 


String Orchestra Repertory 


Percussion 


"William de Pasquale 


"Michael Bookspan 


"Deborah Reeder 


Joseph Nero 


"Neil Courtney 


"Anthony Orlando 


Classical Guitar Ensemble 


Percussion Ensemble 


John Leonard 


Anthony Orlando 


Peter Segal 




Woodwinds 


Keyboard 




Piano 


Flute 


Susan Starr, Chair 


""Julius Baker 


Annette DiMedio 


Jeffrey Khaner 


Marina Gusak-Grin 


"Lorin Lind 


David Hartl 


Adeline Tomasone 


Benjamin Whitten 


Oboe 


Piano Class 


"Jonathan Blumenfeld 


Annette DiMedio 


"Louis Rosenblatt 


Mark Valenti 


Clarinet 


Organ 


"Anthony Gigliotti 


Michael Stairs 


Guido Mecoli 




"Ronald Reuben 





91 



Voice-Opera 

Voice 

Vivian Wagner, Chair 
Paula Brown 
Marianne Casiello 
David Hartl 
Patricia Stasis 

Opera 

Vivian Wagner, Chair 

Yoko Hashimoto-Sinclair (make-up) 

Paula Mlinar (costume mistress) 

Leland Kimball (stage direction) 

Gary Magby (coaching and vocal literature) 

Richard Raub (Coaching) 

Paul Wagar (Acting) 

Languages and Diction 

Leila Calder 

Carmela Novielli 

Therese Casadesus Rawson 

Jazz Applied and Ensemble Studies 

Evan Solot, Chair 

Strings 

John Blake 

Saxophone 

Ronald Kerber 
William Zaccagni 

Trumpet 

Richard Kerber 
Evan Solot 
Dennis Wasco 

Trombone 

Richard Genovese 
James Pugh 

Keyboards 

Mark Valenti 

Guitar 

Robert DiNardo 
Ed Flanagan 
Thomas Giacabetti 
Patrick Mercuri 

Contrabass 

Craig Thomas 

Percussion 

Joseph Nero 

Piano 

Trudy Pitts 

Ensembles and Conducting 

Orchestra 

Sean Deibler 

Chorus and Chamber Choir 

Jeffrey Kern 

Conducting 

Sean Deibler 
Janice Goto 

Jazz Ensembles 

John Blake-Small Jazz Ensemble 
Robert DiNardo-Jazz Guitar Ensemble 
Ed Flanagan-Small Jazz Ensemble 
Craig Thomas-Small Jazz Ensemble 
Evan Solot-Fusion Ensemble 
William Zaccagni-Stage Band 



Music Studies 

Composition and Theory 

Andrew Rudin, Chair 
Joseph Castaldo 
Donald Chittum 
Frederick Kaufman 
Andrew Rudin 
Carl Schmidt 
Lee Silvan 
Evan Solot 

Computer and Electronic Music 

George Akerley 
Andrew Rudin 

Musicianship 

Sean Deibler, Chair 
Ruben del Pilar Andino 
Mark Valenti 

Music History and Literature 

Donald Chittum 
Gary John Magby 
Gabriels Roepke 
Andrew Rudin 
Carl Schmidt 
William Zaccagni 

Recording 

James Gallagher 

Music Business 

Marc Dicciani 

Music Education- Undergraduate and 
Graduate Studies 

Douglas Medlin, Director 
Leila Calder 
Sean Deibler 
Marc Dicciani 
Janice K. Goto 
Richard Kerber 
"Joseph Primavera 
William Zaccagni 

Graduate Studies- Applied Music and 
Composition 

Carl Schmidt, Director 
Joseph Castaldo 
Donald Chittum 
Kent Christensen 
Sean Deibler 
Joseph Primavera 

Orchestral Manager and Librarian 

Robert Loy 

Concert Manager 

Richard Hotchkiss 

Music Librarian 

Mark Germer 

School of Music Accompanists 

Andrea Clearfield 

Reuben del Pilar Andino 
'Denotes present or former member of the 

Philadelphia Orchestra 
**Denotes present or former member of the 

New York Philharmonic Orchestra 



Facilities 

The School of Music is located in the Shubert 
Theater building at 250 South Broad Street and at 
313 South Broad Street. Facilities include chamber 
music studios, electronic music and recording 
studios, computer studios, practice rooms, a class 
piano laboratory, and various-sized classrooms. 
Practice rooms are generous in size, and most are 
equipped with grand pianos. Six new piano stu- 
dios and a harpsichord studio have recently been 
opened, reserved for private instruction and prac- 
tice by keyboard majors. A two-manual Challis 
Harpsichord, two harps, and a complete set of 
percussion instruments are available for practice. 

The University's newly-restored, historic 
Shubert Theater and several smaller theaters 
are used for student performances. There are 
several studios for electronic music composi- 
tion, equipped with computer hardware and 
software, various synthesizers, and mixing, 
recording, and monitoring equipment. The mu- 
sic library, located in the Shubert building, con- 
tains books, manuscripts, journals, and scores, 
and listening and viewing facilities for the 
study of audio and video recordings. 

Performance Opportunities 

Orchestra 
Chorus 

Chamber Singers 
New Music Ensemble 
Stage Band 
Fusion Ensemble 
Small Jazz Groups 
String Trios and Quartets 
Flute Ensemble 
Woodwind Quintet 
Saxophone Ensemble 
Brass Ensemble 
Percussion Ensemble 
Classical Guitar Ensemble 
Jazz Guitar Ensemble 
Piano Chamber Music 
Piano Accompanying 
Mixed Chamber Ensembles 
Opera Staging 
Aria Class 



92 



Programs of Study 

Major Areas of Concentration 

Accompanying/Chamber Music (graduate 

only) 

Bassoon 
"Cello 
"Clarinet 
"Composition 
"Contrabass 

Electric Bass (jazz/commercial only) 
"Flute 

French Horn 
"Guitar 

Harp 

Harpsichord 

MIDI Emphasis (jazz/commercial only) 

Oboe 

Organ 

"Percussion 
"Piano 

Piano Accompanying and Chamber Music 

(graduate only) 
"Saxophone 

Theory 
"Trombone 
"Trumpet 

Tuba 
"Viola 
"Violin 

Voice 

Voice-Opera Emphasis 

Woodwind Emphasis (jazz/commercial only) 
"May be studied as a classical or jazz major. 

Otherwise, the listing is for classical only. 



Undergraduate Programs 

Students in the Bachelor of Music in Perfor- 
mance program may choose either a classical 
or jazz/commercial major. See "Major Areas of 
Concentration." 

Bachelor of Music in Classical 
Performance 

The classical major offers concentrated studies in 
a major performance area and a solid background 
in supportive musical areas. These include private 
lessons in the major area, coaching, large en- 
semble activities, chamber music, and opportuni- 
ties for solo and ensemble performances. 

The Opera Emphasis program allows singers to 
concentrate on opera studies. Beginning in the 
third year, the curriculum includes special opera 
courses in acting and staging, opera repertory, 
opera preparation and additional coaching, dance, 
and movement. The program also includes regular 
performance in aria classes, staged performances 
of opera scenes, and presentations of full-length 
operas in the Shubert Theater. 

Bachelor of Music in Jazz/Commercial 
Music 

The Jazz/Commercial major provides a direct and 
pragmatic education for students interested in 
establishing a career as a performer, arranger, or 
composer in jazz and/or commercial music. Stu- 
dents receive lessons in both classical and jazz/ 
commercial areas. Performance opportunities are 
available in the School's award-winning jazz en- 
sembles. Special courses include Jazz Arranging, 
History of Jazz, The Business of Music, Computer 
Music Composition, MIDI Synthesis, and Record- 
ing Techniques. 

Students may elect to enroll in the MIDI em- 
phasis program which begins in the third year, 
in addition to their performance or composition 
classes, students take courses in advanced 
MIDI stynthesis and the analysis and composi- 
tion of commercial music. 

Woodwind majors may elect to enroll in a 
woodwind specialist program which includes the 
study of various woodwind instruments. 



Bachelor of Music in Composition 

Students enrolled in this program take both 
class and private instruction in composition in 
addition to courses in orchestration, computer 
music composition, computer calligraphy and 
conducting. Virtually all student compositions 
are read or performed, and frequent perfor- 
mances of student's music highlight the 
school's concert schedule. Student composers 
are also encouraged to collaborate with danc- 
ers, choreographers, filmmakers, and actors, 
taking full advantage of the creative environ- 
ment of the University. Students may major in 
Classical or Jazz/Commercial Composition. 

Bachelor of Music in Theory 

The theory major prepares students to pursue 
graduate study in theory or musicology. In addition 
to taking the core theory program, students take 
courses in the History of Theory, Advanced Tonal 
Theory, Set Theory, Reduction Theory, Serial 
Theory, and do a senior project in analysis, re- 
search, or composition. 

Master of Arts in leaching- Co-requisite 
Program (MATPREP) 

A seventeen-credit course of study designed to 
satisfy co-requisite requirements for entrance into 
the Master of Arts in Teaching in Music Education 
program. Open to all undergraduate music majors, 
classes include an introduction to music educa- 
tion, basic conducting, lab teaching, functional 
piano and classroom skills, psychology of music 
teaching, and orchestration. Completion of the 
MATPREP program with an average of 3.0 or 
higher in these courses satisfies most MAT en- 
trance requirements. 

Diploma Program 

This four-year program is designed primarily for 
students who wish to take the entire musical por- 
tion of the undergraduate curriculum without hu- 
manities courses. Students wishing to transfer 
from this program to the Bachelor's degree pro- 
gram may do so in any year of their matriculation. 

Certificate in Music 

The Certificate in Music program consists of the 
musical studies normally taken during the first two 
years of the Bachelor of Music program. No hu- 
manities courses are required. 



93 



Graduate Programs 

Master of Music 

The Master of Music degree program is designed 
for students who already hold a Bachelor of Music 
degree or its foreign equivalent. Intended for 
those preparing for careers as professional musi- 
cians, this two-year program provides superb 
musical training with renowned teachers and 
intensive classroom study. Performance degrees 
are offered in orchestral instruments, piano, piano 
accompanying and chamber music, voice, and 
opera singing. Many students enrolled in the pro- 
gram perform regularly in a variety of greater 
Philadelphia musical ensembles. 

The School also offers a Master of Music de- 
gree in composition. Students work closely with 
their major teacher and are encouraged to draw 
on the creative talents of a department rich in 
compositional experience. 

Master of Arts in Teaching in Music 

Education (MAT) 

The Master of Arts in Teaching in Music Educa- 
tion is a thirty-six credit program designed for 
students who have completed Bachelor's de- 
grees in applied music, music theory/composi- 
tion, music history/literature, or other non- 
education curricula. The MAT can be com- 
pleted in a summer-plus one academic year 
format, provided that co-requisite requirements 
. have been met and placement testing does not 
indicate the need for supplementary studies. 
Undergraduate students in music at the Univer- 
sity may take advantage of the preparatory 
program known as MATPREP, a seventeen- 
credit course of studies which satisfies all co- 
requisites. The MAT in Music Education leads 
to teaching certification in the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania. 

Graduate Diploma 

The Graduate Diploma is a two-year advanced 
plan of study in performance. The curriculum is 
flexible in order to address the needs of the indi- 
vidual student. Admission to the program is lim- 
ited to students who possess a Bachelor's Degree, 
College-Level Conservatory Diploma, or the for- 
eign equivalent of either, and who possess ad- 
vanced performance ability. Specific and individu- 
alized programs of study are developed in consul- 
tation with the Director of Graduate Studies for 
Master of Music and Graduate Diploma Programs. 



Undergraduate Audition 
Requirements 

An audition is required of all applicants to the 
School of Music. The audition is designed to dem- 
onstrate that an applicant's technical proficiency 
and potential for professional development are at 
the college level. The audition may be taken in 
Philadelphia, at designated regional audition loca- 
tions, or may be submitted on audio cassette tape 
or VHS format video tape (tape must be clearly 
labeled with name, address, and repertoire). 
Audition requirements are the same for all 
undergraduate programs: Bachelor of Music. Un- 
dergraduate Diploma, Certificate in Music. 

Classical Auditions 
String Instruments 

Violin 

1 . Major and minor scales, two or three octaves. 

2. A technical study or etude (suggested: 
Kreutzer). 

3. Two solo pieces demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style 
(suggested: a sonata by Handel or Mozart, and 
a concerto by Mozart or Haydn). 

4. Sight-reading. 

Viola 

1 . Major and minor scales, two or three octaves. 

2. A technical study or etude (suggested: Kreutzer 
or Mazas Special and Brilliant Etudes). 

3. Two solo pieces demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style 
(suggested: Handel, Telemann, Stamitz). 

4. Sight-reading. 

Violoncello 

1 . Major and minor scales, two or three octaves. 

2. A technical study or etude (suggested: Popper). 

3. Two solo pieces demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style 
(suggested: a movement from one of the Bach 
Suites, and a movement from any standard 
concerto). 

4. Sight-reading. 

Contrabass 

1 . Major and minor scales, two octaves. 

2. A technical study or etude (suggested: Simandl 
Exercises, Book I, pp. 74-75, 104-105). 

3. One solo piece demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style. 

4. Sight-reading. 

Guitar 

1 . Major and minor scales with Segovia Fingering. 

2. A technical study (suggested: Sor-Segovia Stud- 
ies Nos. 1, 6, 9, or 10; Carcassi Op. 60, Studies 
20 or 23; Villa-Lobos Etudes). 

3. Two solo pieces demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style. One 
piece should be from the sixteenth or seventeenth 
century and the other from the twentieth century. 

4. Sight-reading. 

Harp 

1 . Major and minor scales, two octaves. 

2. A technical study or etude. 

3. One solo piece demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style. 

4. Sight-reading. 



Woodwind Instruments 
Flute 

1 . Major and minor scales, two octaves, with vari- 
ous articulations. 

2. A technical study or etude. 

3. One solo piece demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style. 

4. Sight-reading. 

Oboe 

1 . Major and minor scales, two octaves, with vari- 
ous articulations. 

2. A technical study or etude. 

3. One solo piece demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style. 

4. Sight-reading. 

Clarinet 

1 . Major and minor scales, two octaves, with vari- 
ous articulations. 

2. A technical study or etude (suggested: Close, 
Cavellini, or Rose). 

3. One solo piece demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style (sug- 
gested: first and second movements of a con- 
certo by Weber or Mozart). 

4. Sight-reading. 

Bassoon 

1 . Major and minor scales, two octaves, with vari- 
ous articulations. 

2. A technical study or etude (suggested: 
Wiessenborn Studies, 1-50). 

3. One solo piece demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style (sug- 
gested: one movement from both the Mozart 
and Vivaldi Bassoon Concerti). 

4. Sight-reading. 

Saxophone 

1 . Major and minor scales, two octaves, with vari- 
ous articulations. 

2. A technical study or etude (suggested: Labanchi 
Concert Etudes). 

3. One solo piece demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style (sug- 
gested: Creston or Ibert). 

4. Sight-reading. 



Brass Instruments 

Trumpet 

1 . Major and minor scales, two octaves, with vari- 
ous articulations. 

2. A technical study or etude (suggested: Arban 
Characteristic Studies). 

3. One solo piece demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style (sug- 
gested: Haydn or Hummel Concerti). 

4. Sight-reading. 



94 



French Horn 

1 . Major and minor scales, two octaves, with vari- 
ous articulations. 

2. A technical study or etude (suggested: 
Kopprasch, Vol. 1, No. 15). 

3. One solo piece demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style (sug- 
gested: Mozart, Horn Concerto No. 3, or its 
equivalent). 

4. Sight-reading. 

Trombone 

1 . Major and minor scales, two octaves, with vari- 
ous articulations. 

2. A technical study or etude (suggested: 
Kopprasch, Book I, or Rochut, Melodious 
Etudes). 

3. One solo piece demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style. 

4. Sight-reading. 

Tuba 

1 . Major and minor scales, two octaves, with vari- 
ous articulations. 

2. A technical study or etude (suggested: Cimera, 
Tuba Studies, 7 through 1 1 ). 

3. One solo piece demonstrating technical ability, 
tone quality, musicality, and sense of style. 

4. Orchestral excerpt (suggested: Wagner, Over- 
ture to Die Meistersinger. 

5. Sight-reading. 

Percussion 

1. Snare drum: rudimental study or orchestra solo, 
open and closed rolls. 

2. Mallets: all major and minor scales and arpeg- 
gios, two octaves; solo or etude from the solo 
repertoire. 

3. Timpani: tuning two drums; solo for two or more 
drums. 

4. Sight-reading. 



Keyboard Instruments 

Piano 

1 . Major and minor scales and arpeggios in two 
octaves. 

2. One work of J.S. Bach: a Three-Part Invention or 
a prelude and fugue from The Well-Tempered 
Clavier. 

3. Any sonata by Haydn (except C major H XVI:35); 
Mozart (except C major, K 545); or Beethoven 
(except Op. 49). 

4. A solo piece from the Romantic period (sug- 
gested: Chopin, Schumann, or Mendelssohn). 

5. An impressionist or a twentieth-century work. If 
a twentieth-century work is chosen, it is prefer- 
able that it be by an American composer (ex- 
cept the Gershwin Preludes). 

6. All selections must be memorized. 

Organ 

1 . Piano: major and harmonic minor scales, major 
and minor arpeggios, all in two or three oc- 
taves; a study or etude; a Two- or Three-Part 
Invention by Bach; a first or last movement of a 
Classical or Romantic sonata, or a twentieth- 
century piece. 

2. Organ: two solo works for organ from two dif- 
ferent periods. 

3. Improvisation. 

4. Sight-reading. 



Voice and Opera 

Voice 

1. One art song in English. 

2. One art song in Italian. 

3. One art song in any other language. 

4. Sight-reading. 

5. All selections must be memorized. 

Voice-Opera Emphasis 

1 . One art song in English. 

2. One art song in Italian. 

3. One art song in any other language. 

4. One operatic aria (optional). 

5. Sight-reading. 

6. All selections must be memorized. 



Composition 

1 . Applicants must submit a portfolio of original 
compositions. Compositions should be for a 
variety of instruments. Suggested: solo piano, 
voice, chamber ensemble, large ensemble, tape 
or computer pieces). 

2. Some compositions may be presented in tape 
recordings, but at least one composition must 
be in fully notated manuscript form. 

3. Theory and Musicianship placement at the 
freshman level or higher. 

4. Performance of one piece on an instrument or 
vocally. 

Note: Composition portfolios must be on file in the 
Admissions Office no later than two weeks 
prior to the scheduled audition date. 



Theory 

1 . Applicants must submit a portfolio of original 
analyses, essays, exercises, and/or composi- 
tions. Compositions should be for a variety of 
instruments. 

2. Performance of one piece on an instrument or 
vocally. 

3. Theory and Musicianship placement at the 
freshman level or higher. 

4. Applicants should understand that the main 
thrust of the program is to prepare students to 
continue their training and education in theory 
or musicology at the graduate level. 

Note: Theory portfolios must be on file in the Ad- 
missions Office no later than two weeks prior 
to the scheduled audition date. 



Jazz/Commercial 

Instrumental Performance 

Except Guitar, Electric Bass and Percussion Jazz/ 
Commercial 

1 . Major and harmonic minor scales, two octaves. 

2. Major and minor arpeggios, two octaves. 

3. A technical study, etude, or solo piece from the 
classical repertoire (see the audition require- 
ments for classical majors). 

4. A prepared jazz solo or an improvisation over a 
twelve-bar blues progression. 

5. Sight-reading. 

Guitar 

1 . Major and harmonic minor scales, two octaces, 
two fingerings. 

2. Major and minor arpeggios, two octaves. 

3. Melody and chord solo from the jazz or pop 
repertoire. 

4. Improvisation on a blues progression or stan- 
dard tune. 

5. Sight-reading. 

Electric Bass 

1 . Major and harmonic minor scales, one octave. 

2. Major and minor arpeggios, one octave. 

3. Demonstration of knowledge of basic rhythm 
section style, i.e., a bass line to a blues, stan- 
dard, or contemporary selection. 

4. A prepared jazz melodic piece or solo, such as 
the melody and improvised chorus of a jazz 
standard or twelve-bar blues, (ex. So What, 
Yardbird Suite, or tunes in The Real Book) 

5. Sight-reading of a bass part from jazz ensemble 
literature. 

Percussion 

1 . Snare drum: open and closed rolls, rudimental 
or orchestral solo. 

2. Mallets: (strongly recommended but not re- 
quired) all major scales and arpeggios, two 
octaves; solo or etude from the standard reper- 
toire. 

3. Timpani: (strongly recommended but not re- 
quired) tune perfect 4th and 5th; solo for two 
drums from standard repertoire. 

4. Drum set: play a swing feel, latin (bossa nova 
and samba), rock (slow-fund and moderate fast- 
fusion), and ballad (swing with brushes and 
rock with sticks); Optional-written out solo 
(rock, latin, or swing) or play through drum part 
with a tape or record. 

5. Sight-reading. 



Composition 

1 . Applicants should submit a portfolio of original 
compositions, arrangements, and/or transcrip- 
tions in a jazz/commercial style. Compositions 
should be arranged for a variety of instruments. 
Suggested: small jazz ensemble, large jazz 
ensemble such as stage band, solo piano, 
voice, tape or computer pieces. 

2. Compositions may be presented in tape record- 
ings, but at least one composition must be in 
fully notated manuscript form. 

3. Performance of one piece on an instrument or 
vocally. 

4. Theory and Musicianship placement at the 
freshman level or higher. 



95 



Graduate Audition 
Requirements 

Master of Music Degree Programs 
Graduate Diploma Programs 

Performance-Instrument 

1. Applicants should prepare a full recital program 
and submit the repertoire list to the Admissions 
Office one month prior to the audition. The 
repertoire for this program should exhibit a 
diversity of styles, periods, and technical de- 
mands. It is highly recommended that at least 
one piece be from the last fifty years. All major 
works should be learned in their entirety, and 
must be performed with piano accompaniment 
where indicated. Performance of solo orches- 
tral excerpts is optional. 

Percussion applicants should include pieces for 
snare drum, timpani, and a mallet instrument. 
Pieces for solo multiple percussion instruments 
are optional. 

2. Performance of all or a portion of the program 
by memory is highly recommended but not 
required. Pianists must present the entire pro- 
gram by memory. 

3. The Audition Committee will select various 
pieces from the program for performance at the 
audition. 

3. Sight-reading. 

4. Graduate interview. 

Performance-Voice or Voice Opera 
Emphasis 

1 . Applicants should prepare a full recital program 
and submit the repertoire list to the Admissions 
Office two weeks prior to the audition. The 
repertoire for this program should exhibit a 
diversity of styles, periods, and technical de- 
mands. It is highly recommended that at least 
one piece be from the last fifty years. The pro- 
gram must include one piece in English, one piece 
in Italian, and one piece in either French or Ger- 
man. Singing in other languages is optional. 

2. While the applicant in Voice Opera Emphasis 
may include several selections from song lit- 
erature, the emphasis should be upon operatic 
arias and scenes. 

3. The program must be performed by memory. 

4. The Audition Committee will select various 
pieces from the program for performance at the 
audition. 

4. Sight-reading. 

5. Graduate interview. 



Performance-Accompanying/ 
Chamber Music Emphasis 

1 . One representative piano solo work not to ex- 
ceed ten minutes in length. 

2. One movement from the violin or violoncello 
sonatas of Beethoven, Brahms, Faure', Franck, 
or Prokofieff. 

3. Three contrasting art song accompaniments 
chosen from the works of Schubert, Schumann, 
Brahms, Richard Strauss, Wolf, Faure, Debussy, 
Duparc, Rachmaninoff, Britten, and Barber. 
These selections should show both lyrical and 
dramatic qualities and include at least one of 
advanced technical difficulty. Suggested: 
Schumann: Fruhlingsnacht 

Brahms: Meine Liebe ist grijn 

Blinde Kuh 

Wolf: Er ist's 

Der Rattenfanger 

Lied vom Winde 
R. Strauss: Cacilie 

Standchen 

Wiegenlied 
Rachmaninoff: Floods of Spring 
Duparc: L'invitation au voyage 

Faure: Toujours 

Barber: Nocturne 

4. Sight-reading: equivalent to the difficultly of a 
Faure or Schubert song. 

5. The applicant is expected to bring at least one 
soloist to the audition if at all possible. Excep- 
tions may be requested in the case of great 
distance and/or financial burden. 

Master of Music in Composition 

1. Applicants should submit a portfolio of original 
compositions to the Admissions Office one 
month prior to the audition. These compositions 
should be for a variety of solo instruments and/ 
or ensembles (suggested: solo piano, voice, 
chamber ensemble, large ensemble, tape and 
computer pieces). Scores or tapes should show 
the date of composition. 

2. Compositions may be presented in tape record- 
ings, but at least one composition must be in 
fully notated manuscript form. 

3. Applicants are expected to be able to dis- 
cuss their works and compositional style at 
the audition. 

4. Applicants must be able to meet the course 
requirements for the undergraduate program as 
outlined in the catalog. This includes orchestra- 
tion, 20th-century music, electronic and/or 
computer music, and new music performance. 



Graduate Music Proficiency 
Examinations - Master of Music Degree 
and Graduate Diploma Programs 

Graduate Proficiency Examinations are usually 
given on the day of audition. All deficiencies must 
be corrected before the Graduate Degree or Di- 
ploma can be awarded. 

Degree Programs 

Musicianship and Functional Piano 

All Master of Music students will be examined in 
Musicianship to determine their level of profi- 
ciency. Students are expected to show an achieve- 
ment equivalent to second year levels in the 
School of Music. In addition, applicants in Compo- 
sition, Voice and Voice Opera Emphasis will be 
examined in Functional Piano. If judged deficient, 
students may satisfy the requirements by taking 
recommended undergraduate courses, or by pass- 
ing special examinations, available each semester 
upon request through the Graduate Office. 

Music Theory. History, and Literature 

All students will be examined to determine their 
competency in Music Theory and History/Litera- 
ture. Students found to be deficient in any of these 
areas may be required to do special work, to re- 
move the deficiencies. 

Languages 

Graduate students majoring in Voice and Voice/ 
Opera Emphasis are required to demonstrate profi- 
ciency in two languages: Italian and either French 
or German. Those judged deficient will be advised 
of a proper course of action which may include 
taking appropriate course work. 

Diploma Programs 

Students are required to take Graduate Proficiency 
Examinations as determined by the Director of 
Graduate Studies. 



96 



Admissions Requirements: MAT in 
Music Education 

1. Successful completion* of an undergraduate 
degree in musical performance, composition, 
theory, or related applied field from a college or 
university appropriately accredited by the Na- 
tional Association of Schools of Music (NASM). 

2. Successful completion* of co-requisite course 
work and/or acquired competencies as follows: 

a. an introductory course in Educational Psy- 
chology, focus upon theoretical foundations. 

b. a course in child growth and development, 
focus upon contemporary theories and their 
applications. 

c. a knowledge of current issues, trends, and 
methods in music teaching. 

d. actual field experience (practicuum) involving 
observation and teaching and the planning 
of lessons. 

e. functional knowledge and performance skills 
on piano, guitar, and recorder. 

f. a course in basic conducting and score read- 

ing. 

g. a course in orchestration/arranging. 

Co-requisite requirements may be satisfied as 
follows: 

a. through completion of The University of the 
Arts MAT in Music Education Preparatory 
Program (MATPREP). Entering freshmen 
wishing to work toward the MAT in Music 
Education may enroll in the MATPREP pro- 
gram upon acceptance to the institution. 
Ongoing undergraduate music majors may 
enter the MATPREP program at any time. 

b. by examination based upon any of the crite- 
ria in item No. 2, above. Examinations shall 
be developed by Music Education Division 
faculty and shall adhere strictly to current 
course syllabi and program objectives. Ex- 
aminations will cover cognitive as well as 
psychomotor skills, where appropriate. 

c. through professional experience of the can- 
didate. Such experience must by docu- 
mented to the satisfaction of the MAT in 
Music Education Committee through the 
submission of employment records and let- 
ters of recommendation providing evidence 
of the candidate's success in such requisite 
professional experience. 

d. through successful completion* of appro- 
priate courses at an NASM accredited 
institution other than The University of 
the Arts. Course descriptions and relevant 
transcripts from outside institutions must 
be made available. 



With the approval of the MAT in Music Education 
Committee applicants who have completed most, 
but not all, co-requisite requirements may be ad- 
mitted to the MAT in Music Education degree 
program. However, any additional work needed 
must be completed outside of credit requirements 
for the degree and may result in an increase in the 
length of study for the degree. 

3. Submission of all admissions forms, letters of 
recommendation, and supporting data as re- 
quired by the Division of Music Education, the 
MAT in Music Education Committee, the School 
of Music, and the Office of Admissions. Such 
data shall include: 

a. application form. 

b. three letters of recommendation. 

c. personal letter of interest and intent. 

d. transcripts of all applicable post-secondary 
study. 

e. high school transcript 

4. Satisfaction of placement testing requirements 
in music theory, ear training, music history/ 
literature, and piano proficiency. Placement 
tests may be waived for Bachelor of Music 
graduates of The University of the Arts at the 
discretion of the MAT in Music Education Com- 
mittee. Deficiencies in the above areas may not 
necessarily disqualify an applicant for admis- 
sion to the MAT program, but additional studies 
outside credit requirements for the degree may 
be required and may result in an increase in the 
length of time needed to complete the degree. 

5. Successful performance audition as adjudi- 
cated by the MAT in Music Education Com- 
mittee. Such audition may be waved for 
Bachelor of Music graduates of The Univer- 
sity of the Arts, at the discretion of MAT in 
Music Education Committee. 

* Applicants must present a 2.75 or higher under- 
graduate cumulative GPA (A=4.0), with a 3.0 
GPA in co-requisite courses and/or any gradu- 
ate work previously completed. These stan- 
dards may be waived only by agreement of the 
MAT in Music Education Committee. 



Scholarships 

Trustee Scholarship 

Each year the School of Music awards a Trustee 
Scholarship to an entering freshman. The Trustee 
Scholarship totals half tuition for the four years 
the student is enrolled. The award is made on the 
basis of outstanding artistic and academic perfor- 
mance, and for promise as a future musician. Re- 
cipients must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade 
.point average as well as a minimum grade of B in 
the major area. High School Seniors who wish to 
be considered for the Trustee Scholarship should 
make formal application by March 1 . Notification 
of the award is made in April. 

Talent Scholarships 

Talent Scholarships are awards to matriculating 
students who give evidence of outstanding artistic 
ability. Recommendation for the Talent Scholarship 
is based on the audition. To maintain eligibility, the 
student must participate fully in rehearsals and 
performances, have a "B" or better in the Major 
area, and maintain a minimum 3.0 cumulative 
grade point average (2.75 minimum for Freshmen) 
in all Music courses. Scholarship students are 
expected to provide service to the School as as- 
signed by the School Director. 

Students applying for Talent Scholarships must 
file a Talent Scholarship Application as well as the 
appropriate Financial Aid Form each year. These 
are obtainable from the School of Music and the 
Financial Aid Office. 

New students should audition prior to March 
15. Those auditioning after March 15 will be 
considered for a talent scholarship if funds are 
available. 

Students applying for Talent Scholarships are 
subject to the following evaluations: 

1 . Vocal and instrumental majors are subject to a 
jury examination. 

2. Composition and theory majors are interviewed 
and/or will have their work examined. 

School of Music Scholarships and Prizes 

The Joseph Cairns, Jr. and Ernestine Bacon 

Cairns Memorial Scholarship 
The Ezerman Piano Scholarship 
The Jazz Department Scholarship 
The John T. Mathis Saxophone Award 
The Music Faculty Composition Prize 
The Music Alumni Scholarships (two to five) 
The Music Excellence in Teaching Award 
The Music Education Scholarship 
The Orchestra Soloist Prize 
The Clement C. Petrillo Memorial Piano Prize 
The Mary Luznicky-Poth Memorial Award 
The Presser Scholarship Award 
The Strine Graduate Piano Scholarship 



97 



Undergraduate Curricula 

Woodwind, Brass, Percussion, String, 
Harp Majors 

Total Credits: 125 



Freshman Year 

MU19XA&B Major 

MU 103A&B Musicianship HI 

MU 1 07A&B Freshman Theory l-ll 

MU131A&B Class Piano l-ll 

MU 77X Ensemble 

HU 1 1 0A Language & Expression 

HU 1 03A&B Intro, to Modernism 

HU — Humanities 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 



Junior Year 

MU39XA&B Major 
MU301A&B Music History l-ll 
MU 77X Ensemble 

Humanities 

Electives 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



HU3XX 



MU001 
MU002 



Senior Year 

MU49XA&B Major 

MU 401A&B Music History lll-IV 

MU77X Ensemble 

Humanities 

Electives 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



HU4XX 



MU001 
MU002 



1 1 

2 2 

3 - 
3 3 

- 3 


- 



18 18 



Sophomore Year 

MU29XA&B Major 

MU203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 

MU207A&B Sophomore Theory lll-IV 3 

MU 231A&B Class Piano lll-IV 

MU 77X Ensemble 

HU 2XX Humanities 6 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



3 
3 

3 

1 1 

2 2 
3 






18 15 





_- 0_ 

14 14 



14 14 

Ensemble must include four semesters 
of Chorus and two semesters of New Music 
Ensemble. 



Guitar Major 

Total Credits: 125 

Freshman Year 

MU191A&B Guitar Major 

MU103A&B Musicianship l-ll 

MU 1 07A&B Freshman Theory l-ll 

MU131A&B Class Piano l-ll 

MU 772 Chorus 

HU 1 1 0A Language & Expression 

HU 1 03A&B Intro, to Modernism 



HU — 
MU001 
MU002 



Humanities 
Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



Sophomore Year 

MU291A&B Guitar Major 
MU 203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 
MU 207A&B Sophomore Theory lll-IV 
MU 231A&B Class Piano lll-IV 



MU772 
HU2XX 



MU001 
MU002 



Chorus 

Humanities 

Electives 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



Junior Year 

MU391A&B Guitar Major 
MU 301A&B Music History l-ll 
MU 327A&B Fingerboard Harmony I 
MU7XX Ensemble 

Humanities 

Electives 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



HU3XX 



MU001 
MU002 



Senior Year 

MU491A&B Guitar Major 

MU 401 Music History 

MU 425A&B Guitar Hist. & Lit. l-ll 

MU76 Guitar Ensemble 

HU 4XX Humanities 
Electives 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 
3 3 
3 3 
1 1 


1 1 
3 - 
3 3 

- 3 


- 


17 17 


3 3 
3 3 
3 3 
1 1 


1 1 
6 3 

- 3 


- 


17 17 


3 3 
3 3 
2 2 


3 3 
3 3 

- 


15 15 


3 3 
3 - 
2 2 


3 3 
3 3 


15 12 



Piano Major 

Total Credits: 123 

Freshman Year 

MU191A&B Piano Major 

MU103A&B Musicianship l-ll 

MU 07A&B FreshmanTheory l-ll 

MU 772 Chorus 

HU 1 1 0A Language & Expression 

HU 1 03A&B Intro, to Modernism 

HU- Humanities 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Sophomore Year 

MU291A&B Piano Major 

MU 203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 

MU207A&B Sophomore Theory lll-IV 

MU 237A&B Keyboard Harmony l-ll 

MU 772 Chorus 

HU 2XX Humanities 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Junior Year 

MU391A&B Piano Major 
MU 301A&B Music History l-l 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 



MU431 

MU7XX 
HU3XX 
MU001 
MU002 



Piano Literature 
Free Electives 
Ensembles 
Humanities 
Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



Senior Year 

MU 491A&B 
MU401 
MU432A&B 
MU 773A&B 

HU4XX 
MU001 
MU002 



Piano Major 
Music History 
Piano Pedagogy l-ll 
Accompanying 
Electives 
Humanities 
Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



1 1 

3 - 

3 3 

- 3 


- 

16 16 



1 1 
1 1 
6 3 


-_ 0_ 

17 17 



1 1 
3 3 


_- 0_ 

15 15 



3 3 

3 - 

2 2 
1 1 

3 3 
3 3 


_- 0_ 

15 12 



98 



Organ Major 

Total Credits: 126 

Freshman Year 

MU191A&B Organ Major 

MU 103A&B Musicianship Ml 

MU 107A&B Freshman Theory Ml 

MU 772 Chorus 

HU 1 1 0A Language & Expression 

HU 1 03A&B Intro, to Modernism 

HU — 

MU001 

MU002 



Humanities 
Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



Sophomore Year 

MU291A&B Organ Major 
MU 203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 
MU 207A&B Sophomore Theory lll-IV 
MU 237 A&B Keyboard Harmony 
MU 772 Chorus 

Humanities 

Electives 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



HU2XX 



MU001 
MU002 



Senior Year 

MU 491 A&B 

MU401 

MU317 

MU313A&B 

MU772 

HU4XX 
MU001 
MU002 



Organ Major 
Music History 
Orchestration 
Organ Literature 
Chorus 
Electives 
Humanities 
Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



Junior Year 

MU 391 A&B Organ Major 

MU 301 A&B Music History Ml 

MU 254 Choral Conducting 

MU 255 Instrumental Conducting 2 

MU 772 Chorus 

HU 3XX Humanities 

Electives 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 
3 3 
3 3 


3 - 
3 3 

- 3 


- 


16 16 


3 3 
3 3 
3 3 
1 1 


1 1 
6 3 
3 

- 


17 17 


3 3 
3 3 
- 2 
2 - 


3 3 
3 3 

- 


15 15 


3 3 
3 - 
3 - 
2 2 


3 3 
3 3 

- 


18 12 



Voice Major 

Total Credits: 125 

Freshman Year 

MU191A&B Voice Major 

MU103A&B Musicianship Ml 

MU 107 A&B Freshman Theory Ml 

MU 131 A&B Class Piano Ml 

MU 772 Chorus 

HU 1 1 0A Language & Expression 

HU 1 03A&B Intro, to Modernism 



HU — 
MU001 
MU002 



Humantities 
Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



Sophomore Year 

MU291A&B Voice Major 
MU203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 
MU 207 A&B Sophomore Theory lll-IV 
MU231A&B Class Piano lll-IV 
MU 772 Chorus 

Humanities 

Electives 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



HU2XX 



MU001 
MU002 



Junior Year 

MU 391 A&B 
MU 301 A&B 
MU 341 A&B 
MU7XX 

MU772 
HU3XX 
MU001 
MU002 



Senior Year 

MU 491 A&B 

MU401 

MU 342A&B 

MU7XX 

HU4XX 

MU772 

MU001 
MU002 



Voice Major 
Music History Ml 
English Diction Ml 
Ensemble 
Electives 
Chorus 
Humanities 
Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



Voice Major 

Music History 

Voice Pedagogy 

Ensemble 

Humanities 

Chorus 

Electives 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



Humanities include one year of Italian, 
French, and German. 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 
3 3 
3 3 
1 1 


1 1 
3 - 
3 3 

- 3 


- 


17 17 


3 3 
3 3 
3 3 
1 1 


1 1 
6 3 

- 3 


- 


17 17 


3 3 
3 3 
1 1 


1 1 
3 3 


3 3 

- 


15 15 


3 3 
3 
1 1 


1 1 
3 3 


3 3 

- 


15 12 



Opera Major 

Total Credits: 131 



Freshman Year 

MU191A&B Voice Major 

MU 103A&B Musicianship Ml 

MU 107A&B Freshman Theory Ml 

MU131A&B Piano Ml 

MU 772 Chorus 

HU 1 1 0A Language & Expression 

HU 1 03A&B Intro, to Modernism 

HU 1XX Humanities 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU002 Jury Examination 



Sophomore Year 

MU291A&B Voice Major 
MU203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 
MU 207A&B Sophomore Theory lll-IV 
MU231A&B Piano lll-IV 
MU 772 Chorus 

HU2XX Humanities , 

Electives 
MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 



Junior Year 

MU 391A&B 
MU 301 A&B 
MU 341A&B 
MU 344A&B 
HU3XX 
MU772 

MU001 
MU002 



Senior Year 

MU491A&B 

MU401 

MU444A&B 

MU446A&B 

MU342A&B 

HU4XX 

MU772 

MU001 
MU002 



Voice Major 
Music History Ml 
English Diction 
Opera Staging Ml 
Humanities 
Chorus 
Electives 

Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



Voice Major 
Music History 
Opera Staging 
Vocal Literature lll-IV 
Voice Pedagogy 
Humanities 
Chorus 
Electives 

Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



1 1 

1 1 

3 - 

3 3 

- 3 



■ 0_ 

17 17 



1 1 
1 1 



17 17 



1 1 

2 2 

3 3 
1 1 



16 16 

3 3 

3 - 

2 2 
1 1 
1 1 

3 3 
1 1 
3 3 



17 14 



Humanities include one year each of 
Italian, French, and German. 



99 



Composition Major 






Theory Major 






Jazz Composition Major 






Total Credits: 127 






Total Credits: 127 






Total Credits: 130 










Semester 






Semester 






Semester 


Freshman Year 


1st 2nd 


Freshman Year 


1st 2nd 


Freshman Year 


1st 2nd 


MU191A&B 


Composition Major 


3 


3 


MU 191A&B 


History of Theory l-ll 


3 


3 


MU191A&B 


Composition Major 


3 


3 


MU 103A&B 


Musicianship Ml 


3 


3 


MU 103A&B 


Musicianship l-ll 


3 


3 


MU103A&B 


Musicianship l-ll 


3 


3 


MU107A&B 


Freshman Theory l-ll 


3 


3 


MU 107A&B 


Freshman Theory l-ll 


3 


3 


MU107A&B 


Freshman Theory l-ll 


3 


3 


MU121 


Calligraphy 


1 





MU 131A&B 


Class Piano l-ll 


1 


1 


MU131A&B 


Piano l-ll 


1 


1 


MU131A&B 


Piano l-ll 


1 


1 


MU77XX 


Ensemble 


1 


1 


MU772 


Chorus 


1 


1 


MU772 


Chorus 


1 


1 


HU110A 


Language & Expression 


3 




HU110A 


Language & Expression 


3 




HU110A 


Language & Expression 


3 




HU103A&B 


Intro, to Modernism 


3 


3 


HU 103A&B 


Intro, to Modernism 


3 


3 


HU103A&B 


Intro, to Modernism 


3 


3 


HU1XX 


Humanities 


- 


3 


HU1XX 


Humanities 





3 


HU1XX 


Humanities 




3 


MU001 


Recital Attendance 








MU001 


Recital Attendance 








MU001 


Becital Attendance 








MU002 


Jury Examination 


- 





MU002 


Jury Examination 







MU002 


Jury Examination 











17 


17 






17 


17 






18 


17 


Sophomore 


(Tear 






Sophomore 


rear 






Sophomore 


/ear 






MU291A&B 


Adv. Tonal Analy. l-ll 


3 


3 


MU 292A&B 


Composition Major 


3 


3 


MU291A&B 


Composition Major 


3 


3 


MU 203A&B 


Musicianship lll-IV 


3 


3 


MU 203A&B 


Musicianship lll-IV 


3 


3 


MU 203A&B 


Musicianship lll-IV 


3 


3 


MU207 


Theory 





3 


MU 307A&B 


Sophomore Theory lll-IV 


3 


3 


MU 207A&B 


Sophomore Theory HI-IV 


3 


3 


MU231A&B 


Class Piano lll-IV 


1 


1 


MU 232A&B 


Jazz Piano 


1 


1 


MU231A&B 


Piano lll-IV 


1 


1 


MU317A&B 


Orchestration 


3 


3 


MU765 


New Music Ensemble 


1 





MU317A&B 


Orchestration 


3 


3 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1 


1 


HU2XX 


Humanities 


6 


3 


MU772 


Chorus 


1 


1 


HU2XX 


Humanities 


6 


3 




Electives 





3 


HU2XX 


Humanities 


3 


3 


MU001 


Recital Attendance 








MU001 


Recital Attendance 








MU001 


Recital Attendance 








MU002 


Jury Examination 


- 





MU002 


Jury Examination 


- 





MU002 


Jury Examination 


17 



17 


Junior Year 




17 


17 


Junior Year 




17 


16 


Junior Year 








MU391A&B 


Reduction, Set Theory 


3 


3 


MU 392A&B 


Jazz Composition Major 


3 


3 


MU391A&B 


Composition Major 


3 


3 


MU301A&B 


Music History l-ll 


3 


3 


MU315A&B 


Jazz Arranging l-ll 


2 


2 


MU301A&B 


Music History l-ll 


3 


3 


MU255 


Basic Conducting 


2 





MU317A&B 


Orchestration l-ll 


3 


3 


MU415 


Computer Composition 


3 





MU254 


Choral Conducting 





2 


MU 405A&B 


Jazz History 


2 


2 


MU765 


New Music Ensemble 


1 


1 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1 


1 


MU415 


Computer Composition 


3 







Electives 


3 


3 




Electives 


3 


3 




Electives 


- 


3 


HU3XX 


Humanities 


3 


6 


HU3XX 


Humanities 


3 


3 


HU3XX 


Humanities 


3 


3 


MU001 


Recital Attendance 








MU001 


Recital Attendanqe 








MU001 


Recital Attendance 








MU002 


Jury Examination 


- 





MU002 


Jury Examination 


- 





MU002 


Jury Examination 


- 









16 


16 






15 


15 






16 


16 


Senior Year 








Senior Year 








Senior Year 








MU491A&B 


Composition Major 


3 


3 


MU491A 


Serial Theory 


3 




MU 492A&B 


Jazz Composition Major 


3 


3 


MU401 


Music History 


3 





MU491B 


Theory Project 


- 


3 


MU410A&B 


Music History l-ll 


3 


3 


MU255 


Conducting 


2 





MU401 


Music History 


3 


- 


MU413A 


Recording I 


2 


- 


HU4XX 


Humanities 


3 


3 


MU415A 


Computer Composition 


3 




MU 420A 


Business of Music I 


2 






Electives 


3 


6 


MU7XX 


Ensemble 


1 


1 


HU4XX 


Humanities 


3 


3 


MU001 


Recital Attendance 








HU4XX 


Humanities 


3 


3 




Electives 


3 


6 


MU002 


Jury Examination 









Electives 


3 


6 


MU001 


Recital Attendance 












14 


12 


MU001 


Recital Attendance 








MU002 


Jury Examination 







Ensemble must include one year of 


MU002 


Jury Examination 


- 









16 


15 


Chorus and one semester of New Music 










16 


13 


















Ensemble must include four semesters 






















of Chorus anr 


one semester of New 






















Music Ensemble. 















100 



Jazz Composition/MIDI Major 

Total Credits: 130 

Freshman Year 

ML) 1 91 A&B Composition Major 

MU 103A&B Musicianship l-ll 

Ml) 107A&B Freshman Theory l-ll 

MU131A&B Piano l-ll 

MU 7XX Ensemble 

HI) 1 1 0A Language & Expression 

HU 1 03A&B Intro, to Modernism 

HU 1XX Humanities 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Sophomore Year 

MU 292A&B Composition Major 

MU203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 

MU 207A&B Sophomore Theory lll-IV 

MU232A&B Jazz Piano 

MU7XX Ensemble 

HU2XX Humanities 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Junior Year 

MU392A&B 

MU308A&B 

MU315A&B 

MU415A&B 

MU405A&B 

MU7XX 

HU3XX 

MU001 
MU002 



Senior Year 

MU492A&B 

MU 401 A&B 

MU413A 

MU416A&B 

MU420A 

HU4XX 

MU001 
MU002 



Jazz Composition Major 

Analysis & Composition 

Jazz Arranging l-ll 

Computer Composition 

Jazz History 

Ensemble 

Humanities 

Electives 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



Jazz Composition Major 

Music History l-ll 

Recording I 

MIDI Synthesis 

Business of Music I 

Humanities 

Electives 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



Ensemble must include two semesters 
of Chorus and one semester of New 
Music Ensemble. 



Semester 


1st 2nd 


3 3 


3 3 


3 3 
1 1 


1 1 
3 - 


3 3 


3 





- 


17 17 


3 3 


3 3 


3 3 
1 1 


1 1 
6 3 





- 


17 14 


1.5 1.5 


1.5 1.5 


2 2 


3 3 


2 2 

1 1 


I I 

3 3 


3 3 





- 


17 17 


1.5 1.5 


3 3 


2 - 


1.5 1.5 


2 - 


3 3 


3 6 





- 


16 15 



Jazz Instrumental Major 

Total Credits: 130 (Instrumental) 
126 (Piano) 

Freshman Year 

MU192A&B Jazz Major 

MU103A&B Musicianship l-ll 

MU 1 07 A&B Freshman Theory l-ll 

# MU 131A&B Piano 

MU 7XX Ensemble 

HU 1 1 0A Language & Expression 

HU 1 03 A&B Intro, to Modernism 

HU 1XX Humanities 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Sophomore Year 

MU292A&B Jazz Major 

MU203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 

MU307A&B Jazz Theory 

MU 21 3A&B Jazz Improvisation l-ll 

*MU232A&B Piano 

MU7XX Ensemble 

HU2XX Humanities 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Junior Year 

MU392A&B Jazz Major 

MU405A&B Jazz History l-ll 

MU7XX Ensemble 



HU3XX 



MU001 
MU002 



Humanities 
Electives 

Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



Senior Year 

MU492A&B 

MU410A&B 

MU413A 

MU420A 

MU7XX 

HU4XX 

MU001 
MU002 



Jazz Major 

Music History l-ll 

Recording 

Business of Music 

Ensemble 

Humanities 

Electives 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



Ensemble must include two semesters 
of Chorus and one semester of New 
Music Ensemble. 
*Not required of Jazz Piano Majors. 



Semester 


1st 2nd 


3 3 


3 3 


3 3 
1 1 


1 1 
3 - 


3 3 


3 





- 


17 17 


3 3 


3 3 


3 3 


2 2 
1 1 


1 1 
3 3 





- 


16 16 


3 3 


2 2 


2 2 


6 3 


3 3 





- 


16 13 


3 3 


3 3 


2 - 


2 - 


2 2 


3 3 


3 6 





- 


18 17 



Jazz Performance/MIDI Major 

Total Credits: 130 (Instrumental) 
126 (Piano) 

Freshman Year 

MU192A&B Jazz Major 
MU103A&B Musicianship l-ll 
MU 1 07A&B Freshman Theory l-ll 
*MU 131A&B Piano 
MU 772 Chorus 

HU 1 1 0A Language & Expression 
HU 1 03A&B Intro, to Modernism 
HU 1XX Humanities 

Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



MU001 
MU002 



Semester 

1st 2nd 

3 3 

3 3 

3 3 

1 1 

1 1 

3 - 

3 3 

- 3 


- 

17 17 



Sophomore Year 

MU292A&B Jazz Major 

MU 203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 

MU307A&B Theory 

*MU 232A&B Piano 

MU 7XX Ensemble 

HU2XX Humanities 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Junior Year 

MU392A&B Jazz Major 
MU 308A&B Analysis & Composition 
MU313 Jazz Improvisation 

MU 41 5A&B Computer Composition 
MU405A&B Jazz History l-ll 
MU 7XX Ensemble 

Humanities 

Electives 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



HU3XX 



MU001 
MU002 



Senior Year 

MU492A&B 

MU410A&B 

MU413A 

MU416A&B 

MU420A 

HU4XX 

MU001 
MU002 



Jazz Major 
Music History 
Recording 
MIDI Synthesis 
Business of Music 
Humanities 
Electives 

Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



1 1 

1 1 

6 3 



- 

17 14 



1.5 1.5 
1.5 1.5 
2 2 



3 
2 
1 

3 
3 

- 

17 17 



1.5 1.5 

3 3 

2 - 

1.5 1.5 

2 - 

3 3 
3 6 


_- 0_ 

16 15 



Ensemble must include one year of 
Chorus and one semester of New 
Music Ensemble. 
*Not required of Piano Majors. 



101 



Diploma in Music — 
Performance Major (Classical) 

This program is not available to Voice Majors or 
Voice-Opera majors 
Total Credits: 96 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 



Freshman Year 

MU191A&B Major 

MU103A&B Musicianship l-ll 3 3 

MU107A&B Freshman Theory l-ll 3 3 

*MU 131A&B Piano III 

MU 77- Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



1 1 

2 2 



j 0_ 

12 12 

Sophomore Year 

MU291A&B Major 3 3 

MU203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 3 3 

MU207A&B Sophomore Theory lll-IV 3 3 
*MU231A&B Piano lll-IV 
MU 77- Large Ensemble 
MU 001 Recital Attendance 
MU 002 Jury Examination 



1 1 

2 2 

j 0_ 

12 12 

Junior Year 

MU391A&B Major 3 3 

MU301A&B Music History l-ll 3 3 

MU303A&B Musicianship V-VI 3 3 

MU76- Chamber Ensemble 1 1 

MU77- Large Ensemble 2 2 



12 12 



Senior Year 

MU491A&B Major 3 3 

MU407 Senior Theory V 3 - 

MU — Advanced Theory Elective - 3 

MU401A&B Music History lll-IV 3 3 

MU76- Chamber Ensemble 1 1 

MU77- Large Ensemble 2 2 

MU001 Recital Attendance 

MU002 Jury Examination - 



12 12 



*Piano majors substitute Keyboard 
Harmony MU 237A&B, MU 337A&B. 



Diploma in Music — 
Composition Major (Classical) 

Total Credits: 102 

Freshman Year 

MU191A&B Composition Major l-ll 

MU103A&B Musicianship l-ll 

MU107A&B Theory l-ll 

MU121A&B Calligraphy 

MU131A&B Piano l-ll 

MU 77- Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Sophomore Year 

MU 291 A&B Composition Major I 

MU 203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 

MU207A&B Theory lll-IV 

MU 231 A&B Piano lll-IV 

MU 77- Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Junior Year 

MU 391 A&B Composition Major V-IV 

MU301A&B Music History l-ll 

MU303A&B Musicianship V-VI 

MU317A&B Orchestration l-ll 

MU 77- Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Senior Year 

MU491A&B 

MU415A 

MU407 

MU401A&B 

MU254 

MU255 

MU001 
MU002 



Composition Major Vll-V 
Computer Composition I 
Senior Theory V 
Music History lll-IV 
Choral Conducting 
Instrumental Conducting 
Elective 

Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



Semester 


1st 2nd 


3 3 


3 3 


3 3 
1 1 


1 1 

2 2 





- 


13 13 


3 3 


3 3 


3 3 


1 1 

2 2 





- 


12 12 


3 3 


3 3 


3 3 


3 3 


2 - 





- 


14 12 


1113 3 


3 - 


3 - 


3 3 


2 - 


- 2 


- 4 





- 


14 12 



Diploma in Music — Performance Major 
(Jazz/Commercial) 

Total Credits: 104 



Freshman Year 

MU192A&B Jazz Major l-ll 
MU103A&B Musicianship l-ll 
MU107A&B Freshman Theory l-ll 
"MU131A&B Class Piano l-ll 
MU 77- Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 



Junior Year 

MU392A&B Jazz Major V-VI 

MU307A&B Jazz Theory & 
Ear Training l-ll 

MU 313A&B Jazz Improvisation lll-IV 

MU315A&B Jazz Arranging l-ll 

MU764 Small Jazz Ensemble 

MU 77 — Large Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Senior Year 

MU492A&B Major VII-VIII 

MU 403A&B4 Jazz History l-ll 

MU410A&B Music History l-ll 

MU413A Recording 

MU 420A Business of Music 

MU 76- Small Jazz Ensemble 

MU 77- Large Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



1 1 

2 2 

- 





12 


12 


Sophomore Year 

MU292A&B Jazz Major lll-IV 
MU 203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 
MU 207A&B Sophomore Theory lll-IV 
*MU 232A&B Jazz Piano lll-IV 


3 
3 
3 

1 


3 
3 
3 
1 


MU 21 3A&B Jazz Improvisation l-ll 
MU 77- Large Ensemble 
MU 001 Recital Attendance 


2 
2 




2 
2 



MU 002 Jury Examination 


- 






14 14 



3 3 



1 1 

2 2 


- 0_ 

13 13 



3 3 

2 2 

3 3 
2 - 
2 

1 1 

2 2 


_- 0_ 

15 11 



*Piano majors will substitute MU 237A&B 
and MU 337 A&B. Keyboard Harmony. 
Ensemble must include one year of Chorus 
and one semester of New Music. 



102 



Diploma in Music — Composition Major 
(Jazz/Commercial) 

Total Credits: 104 



Freshman Year 

MU191A&B Composition Class l-ll 

MU103A&B Musicianship l-ll 

MU107A&B Theory l-ll 

MU121A&B Calligraphy l-ll 

MU131A&B Piano l-ll 

MU 77- Large Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Sophomore Year 

ML) 291A&B Composition Major lll-IV 

MU203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 

MU207A&B Theory lll-IV 

MU 21 3A&B Jazz Improvisation l-ll 

MU232A&B Jazz Piano lll-IV 

MU 77- Large Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Junior Year 

MU 392A&B Jazz Comp. Major V-VI 

MU307A&B Jazz Theory & 
Ear Training l-ll 

MU315A&B Jazz Arranging l-ll 

MU 317A&B Orchestration l-ll 
MU765 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 



3 


3 


3 
1 


3 
1 


1 
2 


1 
2 













13 


13 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 














MU001 
MU002 



New Music Ensemble 

Elective 

Recital Attendance 

Jury Examination 



14 14 

3 3 

3 3 

2 2 

3 3 
1 - 
- 1 


j 0_ 

12 12 



Senior Year 

MU492A&B Jazz Comp. Major VII-VIII 3 

MU405A&B Jazz History l-ll 2 

MU407 Theory V 

MU — Advanced Theory Elective 3 



MU410A&B Music History l-ll 

MU413A Recording I 

MU 420A Business of Music I 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



13 13 



Ensemble must include one year of Chorus. 



Certificate in Music — 
Performance Major (Classical) 

Total Credits: 52 

First Year 

MU191A&B Major 

MU103A&B Musicianship l-ll 

MU107A&B Theory l-ll 
**MU 131 A&BCIass Piano III 

*MU 76- Chamber Ensemble 

MU 77- Large Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 



1 1 

1 1 

2 2 

- 



13 


13 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 
1 


3 
1 


1 
2 


1 
2 








- 






Second Year 

MU291A&B Major 
MU 203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 
MU207A&B Theory lll-IV 
**MU231A&BCIass Piano lll-IV 
*MU 76- Chamber Ensemble 
MU 77- Large Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 

13 13 

'Voice majors substitute Foreign Language, 3 
credits per semester, Total credits required: 60. 
"Keyboard Majors will substitute MU 237 A&B, 
and MU 337 A&B Keyboard Harmony. 

Certificate in Music — 
Performance Major 
(Jazz/Commercial) 

Total Credits: 52 



First Year 

MU192A&B Jazz Major l-ll 

MU103A&B Musicianship l-ll 

MU107A&B Theory l-ll 

*MU131A&B Class Piano l-ll 

MU 77- Large Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Second Year 

MU 292A&B 
MU 203A&B 
MU 207A&B 
MU213A&B 
*MU 232A&B 
MU77- 
MU001 
MU002 



Jazz Major l-ll 
Musicianship lll-IV 
Theory lll-IV 
Jazz Improvisation I- 
Jazz Piano lll-IV 
Large Ensemble 
Recital Attendance 
Jury Examination 



'Keyboard Majors will substitute 
MU 237A&B and MU 337A&B, 
Keyboard Harmony. 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 




j 0_ 

12 12 




_- 0_ 

14 14 



Certificate in Music — 
Composition Major 
(Jazz/Commercial) 

Total Credits: 54 

First Year 

MU191A&B Composition Major 

MU103A&B Musicianship l-ll 

MU107A&B Theory l-ll 

MU 121 A&B Calligraphy l-ll 

MU 131 A&B Piano l-ll 

MU 77- Large Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Second Year 

MU 291A&B Composition Major 

MU 203A&B Musicianship lll-IV 

MU207A&B Theory lll-IV 

MU 21 3A&B Jazz Improvisation l-ll 

MU232A&B Jazz Piano lll-IV 

MU 77- Large Ensemble 

MU 001 Recital Attendance 

MU 002 Jury Examination 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 



1 1 

2 2 

- 

13 13 



3 
3 
3 
2 
1 
2 



14 14 



103 



MAT in Music Education 
Preparatory Program (MATPREP) 

All undergraduate degree students in music at The 
University of the Arts may enroll in and take ad- 
vantage of the MAT in Music Education Prepara- 
tory Program (MATPREP). Completion of this pro- 
gram allows students to satisfy all co-requisite 
requirements for admission to the MAT in Music 
Program. MATPREP is also an important means for 
maintaining continuity between undergraduate 
and graduate experiences and for fostering com- 
munication between students and faculty in Music 
Education. 

Admission to the University as a BM/MAT stu- 
dent in Music indicates acceptance into the Bach- 
elor of Music program and into the MATPREP 
program. Full admission to the MAT in Music Edu- 
cation program must be granted prior to the begin- 
ning of graduate-level instruction on the same 
bases as other MAT candidates. 

MATPREP courses are to be offered each aca- 
demic year. A suggested sequence for completing 
the program is shown: 

Total MATPREP Credits: 17 









Sem/Yr 


MU151A 


Intro, to Music Educ. I 


1 


Fall/1 


MU151B 


Intro, to Music Educ. II 


1 


Spring/1 


MU357A 


Lab Teaching/ 








Practicuml 


2 


Fall/2 


MU357B 


Lab Teaching/ 








Practicumll 


2 


Spring/2 


MU254 


Basic Conducting 


2 


Fall/2 


MU356A 


Music Teh. Skills I* 


1 


Fall/3 


MU3568 


Music Teh. Skills II* 


1 


Spring/3 


MU451A 


Psych, of Music 
Teaching I Theoretical 
Foundations 


2 


Fall/4 


MU451B 


Psyc. of Music Teach- 
ing II Child Growth and 
Development 


2 


Spring/4 


MU317A 


Orchestration 


3 


Fall/ 
3or4 



* Incorporates advanced skills in functional piano, 
guitar, recorder, writing/arranging for elementary 
classroom ensembles, operation of basic audio/visual 
equipment establishment of classroom environment 



Graduate Programs 

Master of Music — Performance 

Total Credits: 42 



First Year 

MU591A&B Major 

MU 501 A&B Seminar in Bibliography 

and Writing 
MU521A&B Advanced Theory & 

Analysis 
MU7XX Ensemble 
MU523A&B Graduate Humanities 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 

2 2 





11 


11 


Second Year 






MU691A&B Major 


3 


3 


MU 601 A&B Seminar in Performance 






Practice 


3 


3 


MU 603 Master's Project 


- 


1 


Electives 


2 


1 


MU7XX Ensemble 


2 


2 



10 10 

At least one semester of Ensemble must be 
fulfilled by the New Music Ensemble (MU 765). 
Keyboard majors generally take two semesters 
of Piano Accompanying (MU 773). 



Master of Music — Piano Accompanying 
and Chamber Music Performance 

Total Credits: 42 



First Year 

MU 591 A&B Accompanying 

Major 
*MU501A&B Seminar in Bibliography 

and Writing 
MU 521 A&B Advanced Theory & 

Analysis 
MU 523A&B Graduate Humanities 
MU 76- Ensemble 



Semester 
1st 2nd 



2 2 
2 2 
1 1 





10 


10 


Second Year 






MU 691 A&B Accompanying Major 


3 


3 


*MU601A&B Seminar in Performance 






Practice 


3 


3 


MU 765 New Music Ensemble 


- 


1 


MU 76- Chamber Music 


1 


- 


HU — Foreign Language 


3 


3 



10 10 



*May be interchanged. 



Special Requirements: 

1 st Semester — Accompanying for teachers'- 
artist studios, and participation in school en- 
sembles, as assigned. Performance in six repre- 
sentative programs in remaining three semesters, 
including vocal and instrumental accompanying, 
and a minimum of three major chamber works. 
Performances are subject to approval by the major 
teacher and the Graduate Director. 



104 



Master of Music — 
Voice/Opera Emphasis 

Total Credits: 44 

Semester 
First Year 1st 2nd 

MU591A&B Voice Major 3 3 

MU517A&B Opera History & Literature 2 2 
MU541A&B Repertory Coaching 1 1 

MU544A&B Staging 2 2 

HU — *Foreign Language 3 3 

11 11 



3 3 



3 3 
1 1 



Second Year 

MU691A&B Voice Major 

MU 601 A&B Seminar in Performance 

Practice** 
MU 641 A&B Repertory Coaching 
MU644A&B Staging III, IV 2 2 

MU523A&B Graduate Humanities 2 2 

11 11 

'Students will take one year of a foreign language 
(6 credits). Students who cannot pass the profi- 
ciency examination in Italian will take Italian. 
Those who pass out of Italian will substitute either 
French or German. Students who are able to pass 
out of all of these languages will take six credits 
of electives to be approved by the Graduate Direc- 
tor, or, if it is offered, a second year of Italian, 
French, or German. 

**MU 601 A&B is offered only in alternate years and 
must be taken in the first available year it is given. 



Master of Music — Composition 

Total Credits: 42 

Semester 



First Year 




1st 


2nd 


MU 591 A&B 


Composition Major 


3 


3 


MU 501 A&B 


Seminar in Bibliography 
and Writing 


1 


1 


MU 521A&B 


Advanced Theory & 
Analysis 


1 


2 


MU 531 A&B 


Conducting 


1 


1 


MU 523 A&B 


Graduate Humanities 


1 


2 



Second Year 

MU 691 A&B Composition Major 
MU 601 A&B Seminar in Performance 

Practice 
MU 765 New Music Ensemble 

MU 61 5A&B Computer Composition 



11 11 



3 3 



3 3 

1 1 

3 3 

10 10 



Master of Arts in Teaching in 
Music Education 

Total Credits: 36 

Summer Session 

MU 551 Education in American 

Society 
MU 560 Workshop/lnst. 

Methods I 
MU 552 Workshop in Vocal 

Methods 



MU 554B 



MU550 



MU557 
MU 560B 



Spring Semester 

MU 553 Music and Special 

Children 
MU 555 Elementary Student 

Teaching 
MU 556 Secondary Student 

Teaching 
MU 558 Student Teaching Seminar 

and Major Project 
MU 559 Research, Evaluation and 

Technology 



Fall Semester 

MU 554A Elementary Methods/ 3 

Materials 

Secondary Methods/ 3 

Materials 

Adv. Conducting-Choral 3 

or Instrumental 

Music Admin./Supervision 3 
Workshop/Instrumental 2 

Methods 



14 



Graduate Diploma — 
Performance 

Total Credits: 28 

First Year 1) 

MU 591 A&B Major 

MU 7XX Ensemble 

MU 765 New Music Ensemble 



Second Year 

MU 691 A&B Major 
MU 7XX Ensemble 
MU — Electives 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

3 3 
2 2 
J 1_ 

6 6 



3 3 

2 2 

3 3 

8 8 



Keyboard majors generally take two semesters of 
Piano Accompanying (MU 773). 






105 



Regulations/Requirements 

Attendance 

Professional Standards and Behavior 

It is expected that students of the Philadelphia 
College of Performing Arts maintain high stan- 
dards of professionalism with respect to stu- 
dio, classroom, rehearsal, and performance 
commitments. Regular and punctual atten- 
dance and appropriate preparation for lessons, 
classes, rehearsals, and performances are of 
the utmost importance to the attainment of 
professional artistic goals. 

Excused Absence 

An excused absence is one which has received 
the prior consent of the instructor; and is due to 
illness or emergency, appropriately documented 
by medical certificate, etc.; or is caused by perfor- 
mance at an official school function with the ap- 
proval of the appropriate School Director or Dean. 

Unexcused Absence 

All other absences are "unexcused. "It is the re- 
sponsibility of the student to arrange with his/her 
instructors to make up all missed work. Failure to 
do so will result in lowered grades. Students who 
are excessively absent will receive an "F" in the 
course. (Due to the nature of the work in acting 
studio and musical ensemble courses, work in 
these courses cannot be made up.) 

Students must notify PCPA concerning ab- 
sences involving private lessons and/or rehearsals 
involving other participants. Messages should be 
directed to the office of the School Director. 
The number of hours of "Unexcused Absences" 
permitted per semester in the School of Music 
may not exceed the number of credits per course; 
i.e., in a three-credit course no more than three 
hours of unexcused absences are permitted, in a 
two-credit course, no more that two hours of 
unexcused absences are permitted, etc. 

Attendance at Lessons 

Students must attend all private lessons as sched- 
uled except in the case of illness or emergency 
(see "Excused Absence"). It is the student's re- 
sponsibility to notify the teacher if he/she is un- 
able to keep the appointment time. Failure to give 
at least 24 hour prior notice may mean forfeiture 
of the lesson. A maximum of three lessons per 
semester will be made up in the case of excused 
absences. Lessons missed because of unexcused 
absences will not be made up. 



Lessons missed due to the teacher's absence 
will be rescheduled and made up by the teacher. 

Unless circumstances render it impossible, 
"make-up" lessons for the Fall semester are to be 
completed prior to the Spring semester; "make- 
up" lessons for the Spring should be complete by 
June 15. 

Normally, students are entitled to thirty, one- 
hour lessons during the academic year (fifteen per 
semester). 

Class/Lesson Cancellations or Lateness of 
Instructor 

Students must check every morning for notices 
regarding class or lesson changes. Such notices 
are posted on the official bulletin board in the 
lobby of the Shubert building. If none is posted for 
the scheduled class or lesson and the instructor is 
not present, students are expected to wait 10 
minutes for an hour-long class/lesson and 15 min- 
utes for those of longer duration. In the event the 
instructor fails to appear within the 10-15 minute 
waiting period, students are to report to the appro- 
priate School Director's Office, and may then leave 
without penalty. 

Change of Major Teacher 

Students who wish to petition for a change of 
major teacher must: 

1 . Secure "Request for Change of Major Teacher" 
form from the Director of the School of Music 

2. State reasons for requesting a change of 
teacher 

3. Obtain the approval of the present and the re- 
quested teacher 

4. Obtain the approval of the Director of the 
School of Music 

5. Return the completed form to the Registrar. 
Such changes are not usually effected during the 
semester, or in the final year of study. 

Faculty Advisory 

All students are assigned to a faculty advisor. Lists 
are posted in the Shubert Lobby during the first 
week of the academic year. Appointments can be 
made at the mutual convenience of the student 
and the faculty advisor. 

Students should feel free to see their advisor 
at any time concerning problems that they may 
encounter. 

Jury Examinations 

Each student takes a jury examination in the major 
area at the end of each academic year. Students 
do not have to take a jury examination in the year 
that they play their graduation recital. 



Performance Attendance Requirement 

Full-time, undergraduate music students are 
required to attend twelve musical performances in 
each year (except the year in which the student's 
Senior Recital is performed when only six are 
required). Performance Attendance credit will be 
given for presence at recitals, concerts, studio 
concerts, workshops, and lectures in which music 
is performed. All attendance requirements must 
be fulfilled in the year in which they are required. 
Failure to meet requirements will result in a fail- 
ing grade for Recital Attendance. 

Part-time undergraduate music students are 
responsible for attending a number of perfor- 
mances in direct proportion to the number of cred- 
its in which they are enrolled. The specific number 
is assigned at the beginning of each semester. 

Students are required to attend a maximum of 42 
performances during their undergraduate years of 
study. At the beginning of every semester, each stu- 
dent will receive written notification of the number of 
performances he/she is expected to attend. 

Studio Concerts 

Studio Concerts are designed to provide music 
students the opportunity to gain experience in 
public performance. All students are encouraged 
to participate as often as possible, and to support 
other students by their attendance. A minimum of 
one performance per year is required of all sec- 
ond-, third- and fourth-year students. 

Written consent of the major teacher or en- 
semble director is necessary in order to be sched- 
uled for Studio Concert performance. The com- 
pleted form must be returned to the Director of 
the School of Music no later than one month prior 
to the requested date of performance. 

Jury Recital Requirements 

Regulations regarding Jury Examinations, Junior 
and Senior Recitals are available in the office of 
the School of Music. 

Performance Hour 

Performance Hour is devoted to faculty and 
guest recitals, lectures, master classes, and work- 
shops, as well as student performances. 

Music majors should not schedule other com- 
mitments during the time designated as the Per- 
formance Hour. 

Students who are absent from the required 
sessions (without special permission of the Direc- 
tor of the School of Music) have an opportunity to 
make up the absences by attending additional 
recitals. If they are not made up, the student will 
receive a grade of "F" on their transcript for Per- 
formance Hour attendance. Others will receive a 
grade of "P" A student may be excused from a 
required Performance Hour program by the Direc- 
tor of the School of Music. In such cases the ex- 
cused Performance Hour will be added to the 
number of required Recital attendances. 



106 



Graduation Requirements 

In addition to the general PCPA requirements for 
graduation, the following must be fulfilled: 

Undergraduate Requirements 

1 . Performance Majors must present a satisfactory 
Graduation Recital before a Faculty Jury ("satis- 
factory" performance to be determined by ma- 
jority vote of the Jury), as well as a public re- 
cital. 

2. Theory Majors must submit a satisfactory major 
project in the Senior year. 

3. Composition Majors must submit a satisfactory 
substantial work in the Senior year, to be 
publically performed, and adjudicated by the 
faculty of the Composition Department. 

Graduate Requirements — 
Master of Music Degree Programs 

1 . Each student shall compete at least once in the 
Annual Concerto Competition which is held 
each year in the fall semester. Usually this is 
done during the second year of study. It is the 
student's responsibility to discuss this activity 
with the major teacher. 

2. Each student must perform a first-year juried 
recital of 30-45 minutes duration before a Com- 
mittee. This recital will be graded and the 
grade entered on the student's transcript. The 
program for this recital must be approved by 
the Committee in September (for fall receitals) 
or in February (for spring recitals), and will not 
form part of the second-year Graduation Re- 
cital. Compositions requiring accompaniment 
must be performed with accompaniment and 
the program should be presented from memory. 
If student accompanists are not available, the 
School of Music will assign the music to a staff 
member or other qualified accompanist. 

3. In consultation with the major teacher, each 
student must submit a list of repertory to be 
studied each semester. This list will be for- 
warded to the Director of the Program for Mas- 
ter of Music and Graduate Diploma Programs 
after the third lesson (approximately the fourth 
week of the semester) for review by the Gradu- 
ate Committee for Master of Music and Gradu- 
ate Diploma Programs.. Evaluation will be made 
at the end of the semester. 

Repertoire over the normal four semesters of 
graduate study should exhibit a variety of 
genres (concerti, sonatas, etudes, etc.), style 
periods (Baroque to the present, if applicable), 
and composers. It is expected that orchestral 
excerpts will be included where appropriate, 
and that sight-reading will receive stress in the 
lesson context. 

4. Students are expected to perform either as soloists 
or in small ensembles as often as possible. 



5. A full-length recital will be presented in the 
final semester of residency. The content and 
length of the recital will be determined in con- 
sultation with the major teacher and must be 
approved by the Director for Master of Music 
and Graduate Diploma Programs. All recitals 
will be judged on a Pass/Fail basis by a faculty 
committee appointed by the Director of Gradu- 
ate Studies and which includes the major 
teacher. It is expected that the program will 
demonstrate a balance of styles and periods, 
including the twentieth century. The recital will 
normally be presented from memory. 

6. Each degree candidate must pass three reper- 
tory listening examinations, one in each of the 
first three semesters. 

Graduate Voice/Opera Emphasis Major 

1 . Students are expected to participate in opera 
workshops and productions, as assigned. 

2. Repertory for the recital (see preceding section 
on "Graduation Recital") should display the 
student's full vocal range and dramatic ability. 
Three languages, in addition to English, must 
be represented. The recital must include at 
least four operatic arias or one extended solo 
operatic scene of equivalent duration. 

Graduate Composition Major 

1 . Students are expected to explore various com- 
positional media and techniques, and to com- 
pose at least six works for various media, and 
of various lengths. One of these compositions 
should be for a large ensemble. 

2. The student's progress will be evaluated at the 
end of the second and fourth semester by a 
faculty committee which includes the major 
teacher (chair) and other faculty members ap- 
pointed by the Chair of the Composition Divi- 
sion. It is this committee's responsibility to 
determine if the composition requirements have 
been met in both quality and quantity. 

3. The Graduate Division for Master of Music and 
Graduate Diploma Programs desires that as 
many student compositions as possible be 
performed and will make every effort to help 
composition majors in this regard. It is the 
student's responsibility to assist performers in 
preparing new works for performance. 

Exit Requirements for the MAT in 
Music Education 

Successful completion of all course and related 
requirements shall lead to the granting of the 
Master of Arts in Teaching with a major in Music 
Education, provided that an overall GPA of 3.0 or 
higher is maintained. However, approval of the 
MAT in Music Education Committee is required for 
recommendation for teacher certification. It should 
be noted also that the initial Instructional I Certifi- 
cate cannot be issued by the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania Department of Education unless PDE 
testing requirements have been met. 



107 



The School of Music 
Course Descriptions 
Composition 

MU 121 A&B 
Calligraphy 

1 credit per semester 

This course is aimed at teaching students profes- 
sional methods of musical score and parts prepa- 
ration, both in the traditional way with paper and 
pen, and with computer programs. It is required for 
composition majors, and is an elective for all other 
majors. 

MU 191 A&B 
Composition Class III 

3 credits per semester 

The four components of MU 191 are: 

1 . An introduction to important twentieth-century 
composers, their works, styles, and composi- 
tional methods. 

2. The investigation of twentieth-century writing 
techniques and modes of thought such as mod- 
ern modalism, new scale formulation, 
polytonality, serial techniques, and contempo- 
rary harmonic usage. 

3. Composition in small forms. 

4. Studies in contemporary aesthetic and philo- 
sophic thought as they relate to composition. 

Required of first-year Composition majors. Avail- 
able as an elective for other Music majors with 
permission of the instructor. 

MU 291 A&B 
Composition Major lll-VIII 

3 credits per semester 

Private composition lessons weekly throughout 
course of study. General assignments and at least 
one complete work in a variety of media are re- 
quired in each semester. A minimum of three 
works written during the last four semesters re- 
ceive public performances. Scores of all works 
written in fulfillment of Composition major re- 
quirements are submitted to the Composition 
faculty for review toward the end of the final se- 
mester of residence. Jazz/Commercial Music ma- 
jors are required to take only Composition Major 
lll-IV. 

MU 316 Composition 

3 credits 

Composition Class for music students who are not 
Composition Majors. A study of formal organiza- 
tions, musical materials, and compositional de- 
vices as practiced in the twentieth-century, 

MU415A 

Computer Composition I 

3 credits 

A detailed "hands-on" examination of the use of 
micro-computers in the present day composi- 
tion environment. The course includes the uses 
of a computer, the language of MIDI, sequenc- 
ing, FM and other types of synthesis, and a 
survey of currently available music software 
packages. Students are strongly encouraged to 
engage in independent work based on their 
own compositional interests. No prior computer 
or synthesis experience is needed. Required of 
all Composition and Theory majors. 



MU415B 

Computer Composition II 

3 credits 

Continuation of MU 41 5A, focusing on the un- 
derstanding and application of advanced tech- 
niques using existing software and hardware. 
There is a strong emphasis on composition. 
Among the topics explored are integrating tape 
and computer functions, advanced music tran- 
scription, programming drum machines, and 
advanced FM. Individual work is encouraged. 
Prerequisite: MU 415 A or permission of the 
instructor. 



Music Theory 

MU007 

Introduction to Music Theory 

3 credits 

Fundamentals of music theory designed to pre- 
pare students for entrance into regular college- 
level music theory program. Credit is not appli- 
cable to degree requirements. 

MU 107 A&B 
Theory III 

3 credits per semester 

An introduction to the principles of theory, includ- 
ing scale structure, intervals, triads, and seventh 
chords. A study of the basic principles of diatonic 
harmony, including chordal spacing, chordal pro- 
gression, voice-leading, modulation and an intro- 
duction to chromatic harmony. Harmonic analysis 
and the analysis of small forms. Required for all 
Music majors. 

MU207A 
Theory III 

3 credits 

A study of chromatic harmony, including aug- 
mented sixth, Neopolitan, altered and added-tone 
chords, irregular resolutions, and modolation prac- 
tices of the late nineteenth century. In addition, a 
survey of the standard forms is covered (song 
forms, variation, sonata. Rondo, Minuet, and 
Scherzo). Students are taught rudiments of score 
reading in this course (clefs, instrument names 
and terms in French, Italian, and German, and 
transpositions of the orchestral instruments). 
Required of all music majors. 

MU207B 
Theory IV 

3 credits , 

Beginning with the rudiments of melodic analysis, 
the student proceeds to analyze and construct 
examples. The course then proceeds by writing 
and analysis through a study of sixteenth and 
eighteenth century practices. Analysis includes 
works by Paletrina, Lassus, Josquin, Buxtehode, 
and Bach. Writing projects include 2-voice species 
counterpoint in Fux style, canon, motet, invention, 
and fugue exposition. The course ends with an 
analytical survey of 20th-century contrpuntal ex- 
amples. Required of all music majors. 



MU 237 A&B 
Keyboard Harmony III 

1 credit per semester 

Melody and figured bass harmonization; trans- 
position; clef reading, and score reduction. 
Required of Classical Piano Majors; open to 
other majors as an elective. 

MU317A 
Orchestration I 

3 credits 

An introduction to instrumentation, designed to 
acquaint the student with ranges, transpositions, 
and characteristics of individual instruments. Four 
orchestration projects are scored, performed, re- 
corded, and critiqued: 1 ) four woodwinds, 2) four 
woodwinds and seven brasses, 3) string en- 
semble, and 4) small orchestra with winds in pairs. 
Required of Composition and Theory majors; open 
to other music majors as an elective. 

MU317B 
Orchestration II 

3 credits 

Primarily intended for composers and music theo- 
rists, this course presents an analytical history of 
orchestration centering on the works of Ravel, 
Schonberg, Prokofieff, Wagner, Strauss, Debussy, 
and Stravinsky. Coursework culminates in a large 
project for full orchestra which is scored, per- 
formed, recorded, and critiqued. Composers are 
encouraged to orchestrate one of their own com- 
positions. Required of Composition and Theory 
majors; open to other Music majors as an elective. 

MU 327 A&B 
Fingerboard Harmony Ml 

2 credits per semester 

A survey of voice leading techniques through five 
centuries of lute, vihuela, and guitar music. The 
course examines sixteenth-century intabulations, 
Baroque guitar accompaniment, figured bass and 
the Baroque lute, harmonic and technical consider- 
ations in nineteenth-century sonata forms, and 
contemporary practices. The course includes both 
writing and performance. Required of Classical 
Guitar majors. 

MU 337 A&B 
Keyboard Harmony lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 

A continuation of MU 237 A&B. 

MU407 
Theory V 

3 credits 

A study of twentieth-century literature, including 
harmony, counterpoint, form, and orchestration. 
Techniques discussed include bitonality, atonality, 
and pantonality; serial technique; and minimalism. 
Both acoustic and electronic works are discussed 

The sequence of courses MU 1 91 -491 B may be 
rearranged according to background and interests 
of students. 



108 



MU 191 A&B 
History of Theory Ml 

3 credits per semester 

A survey of the history of music theory including 
the Greeks, the Early Christian Era, Anonymous IV, 
Boethius, Cassiadorus, Guido, Odo of Cluny, 
Franco of Cologne, de Vitry, Apel, Waite, Zarlino, 
Glareanus, the Camerata, Arnold, Rameau, Fux, 
C.P.E. Bach, Riemann, Reti, Sachs, Yeston, Walker, 
and Toch. Required of Theory majors. 

MU 291 A&B 

Advanced Tonal Analysis III 

3 credits per semester 

A study of analytical techniques related to the 
form, harmony, thematic unity, melody, rhythm, 
and tonal organization of music from the Baroque 
to late nineteenth century. Special emphasis on 
reinforcement and development of concepts intro- 
duced in Theory lll-IV which is normally taken 
concurrently. Required of Theory majors. 

MU391A 
Reduction Theory 

3 credits 

A survey of the principles, terminology, and appli- 
cation of Reduction Theory, including those of 
Forte, Hindemith, Katz, Reti, Salzer, Schenker, and 
Warfield. Required of Theory majors. 

MU391B 
Set Theory 

3 credits 

A survey of the principles, terminology, and appli- 
cation of Set Theory, including those of Babbitt, 
Forte, Gauldin, Lewing, Martino, Morris, and 
Teittlebaum. Required of Theory majors. 

MU491A 
Serial Theory 

3 credits 

A survey of the principles, terminology, and appli- 
cation of Serial Theory, including the writings of 
Babbitt, Smith-Brindle, Leibowitz, Perle, Rochberg, 
Rufer, Searle, Schoenberg, and Spinner. Required 
of Theory majors. 

Mil 491 B 

Theory Project 

3 credits 

A major research, compositional, or analytical 
study undertaken during the senior year. Project 
must be approved by department chairman and 
supervising instructor. Required of Theory majors. 



Musicianship Studies 

MU 103 A&B 
Musicianship Studies III 

3 credits per semester 

This course centers on tfie establishment of funda- 
mental skills through the singing and recognition of 
diatonic materials, i.e., scales, intervals, triads, and 
seventh chords, both as isolated phenomena and in 
musical contexts. Solfeggio performance of diatonic 
melodies and rhythmic performance in all basic meters 
is emphasized, as well as the dictation of these mate- 
rials. Required of all Music majors. 

MU 203 A&B 
Musicianship Studies lll-IV 

3 credits per semester 

Continuation of MU 103 A&B to include compound 
intervals, ninth chords, and chord progressions. 
Performance and dictation materials include chro- 
matic melodies with modulations and more ad- 
vanced rhythmic exercises that include 
polyrhythms. Required of all Music majors. 

MU 303 A&B 
Musicianship Studies V-VI 

3 credits per semester 

Continuation of MU 203 A&B. Performance mate- 
rials progress from increasingly chromatic melo- 
dies to nontonal ones in single and multivoice 
contexts. Advanced rhythmic materials include 
changing meters and beat values, as well as more 
complex beat subdivisions. Dictation skills focus 
on harmonic progressions with modulations and 
altered chords, and two- and three-part melodic 
textures. Materials from all musical perids includ- 
ing Jazz. Also included are skills in vocal develop- 
ment, improvisation and score reading. 

MU 403 A&B 

Musicianship Studies VII-VHI 

3 credits per semester 

An elective course designed to provide advanced 
work in multivoice performance and dictation, 
score-reading, pitch, and rhythmic performance of 
all musical styles, with an emphasis on twentieth- 
century materials. 



Music Education- 
MATPREP Courses 

MU 151 A&B 

Introduction to Music Education 

1 credit per semester 

A two-semester sequence required of all candi- 
dates for the BME degree, and open to any stu- 
dent interested in exploring Music Education as a 
career option. Introduction to Music Education is a 
survey course designed to provide an overview of 
music teaching — past, present, and future — 
and to serve as an introduction to the philosophy, 
methodology, and professional role of the music 
teacher. MU 151 A is prerequisite to MU 151B. 



MU254 

Basic Conducting 

2 credits 

A study of fundamental conducting skills and tech- 
niques with emphasis upon physical aspects of 
conducting, score reading and preparation, and 
rehearsal principles. Undergraduate co-requisite 
for full acceptance into the MAT in Music Educa- 
tion program. Open to all candidates for the Bach- 
elor of Music degree. 

MU 256 A&B 

Music Teaching Skills I & II 

1 credit per semester 

Incorporates advanced skills in functional piano, 
guitar, recorder, writing/arranging for elementary 
classroom ensembles, operation of basic audio/ 
visual equipment, establishment of classroom 
environment. Projects include arranging, perform- 
ing, and simulated teaching. 

MU317A 
Orchestration 

3 credits 

Basic orchestration and arranging techniques with 
special emphasis on their application within an 
educational setting. Required of all Double Degree 
candidates except Composition and Theory majors 
who take MU 317 A&B. 

MU 327 A&B 

Lab Teaching/Practicum I— II 

2 credits per semester 

Observation and introduction toteaching in the 
schools. Minimum of one field experience plus 
one required seminar per week. Schedule to be 
arranged between student and cooperating 
teacher/institution. 

MU 451 A 

Psychology of Music Teaching I 

2 credits 

The first of a two-semester sequence required of 
all students in the MATPREP Program and open by 
elective to all Bachelor of Music Degree candi- 
dates. Focus is upon behavioral, gestalt, and field 
theories of learning, and associated concepts and 
the application of theory to practice in the music 
classroom. 

MU 451 B 

Psychology of Music Teaching II 

2 credits 

Emphasis is placed upon the application of learn- 
ing theories to practical considerations of teach- 
ing, including motivation, learning sequence, stu- 
dent-teacher interaction, and classroom manage- 
ment. Developmental theories, like those of Piaget 
and Erikson, are explored with attention to select- 
ing learning experiences in the music classroom. 
Prerequisite: MU 451 A. 



109 



Jazz/Commercial 

MU 131 A&B 
Piano III 

1 credit per semester 

Introductory and elementary keyboard training 
using basic theoretical, harmonic, and technical 
concepts in practical keyboard application: trans- 
position, melody harmonization, elementary jazz 
improvisation, technique and repertoire. Required 
of non-Keyboard Jazz/Commercial Music majors; 
open to other majors as an elective. 

MU 213 A&B 

Jazz Improvisation Ml 

2 credits per semester 

The application of improvisational techniques 
encompassing all standard forms and styles. Per- 
formance practices are related to the individual 
student's abilities, background, and experience. 
Coursework includes solo transcription and analy- 
sis, a comparison of improvisational methods, and 
a survey of educational resources. Required of all 
Jazz/Commercial Music majors. 

MU 232 A&B 
Jazz Piano lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 

Harmonic concepts in keyboard application for 
jazz and popular music; chord voicings for popular 
tunes, standards, and original harmonizations; 
continuation of jazz improvisation. Requirements 
include completion of juried Jazz Piano Proficiency 
Examination. Required of non-Keyboard Jazz/ 
Commercial Music majors; open to other majors 
as an elective. 

MU 307 A&B 

Jazz Theory and Ear Training III 

3 credits per semester 

A practical study of jazz and pop theory combined 
with an advanced ear-training program, emphasiz- 
ing instrumental application. Students are re- 
quired to bring their instruments to class. 
Coursework includes recognition, writing, dicta- 
tion, and sight reading of: advanced chords, chord 
additions and alterations, chord substitutions, 
progressions, and rhythm. Required of all Jazz/ 
Commercial Music majors. 

MU 308 A&B 

Analysis and Composition of Commercial 

Music 

1.5 credits per semester 

An examination of compositional techniques used 
in pop songs, jingles, soundtracks, and under- 
scores for radio, TV, records, films, shows and 
industrials. Students will investigate the ways in 
which music serves to enhance the overall goals 
of the product or project. Musical analysis will 
serve to demonstrate how each style is created. 
Students produce their own musical compositions 
in each media context. 



MU 313 A&B 

Jazz Improvisation lll-IV 

2 credits per semester 

Continuation of MU 213 A&B. Required of all 

Jazz/Commercial Music majors. 

MU 315 A&B 
Jazz Arranging 

2 credits per semester 

A functional approach to ensemble scoring includ- 
ing score analysis, combo arranging, arranging for 
mixed instrumentation, musical settings for vocal- 
ists, string writing, writing for pop recording, and 
special techniques for multitrack recording. Re- 
quired of all Jazz/Commercial Music majors. 

MU 392 A&B 

Jazz Composition Major l-IV 

3 credits per semester 

A two-year specialized course for Jazz/Commer- 
cial Music Composition majors which follows a 
two-year concentration in classical composition. 
(See course descriptions for Composition Class 
MU 1 91 A&B and MU 291 A&B.) MU 392 is an 
applied course of study designed to familiarize the 
student composer with the styles and techniques 
of composition in the jazz idiom and related 
genres. Included is an analysis of a broad spec- 
trum of musical models illustrative of the develop- 
mental roots through contemporary trends. Em- 
phasis on writing for various combinations both for 
acoustic and electronic (MIDI) use and as they 
might be used in the recording studio. 

MU 405 A&B 
History of Jazz 

(Refer to Music History and Literature section) 

MU 413 A&B 
Recording 

2 credits per semester 

A study of the recording process and the many 
facets of the recording studio. Designed to famil- 
iarize the student with conventional and creative 
recording techniques through practical experience 
in the studio. Required of all Jazz/Commercial 
Music majors. 

MU 416 A&B 
MIDI Synthesis 

1 .5 credits per semester 

Students will become proficient at the skills nec- 
essary to work creatively in the MIDI studio. Infor- 
mation presented will include current synthesis 
methods and programming of original sounds and 
drum machines; sampling procedures; collecting 
and editing original samples; MIDI studio record- 
ing processes; the use of sync codes. 

MU 420 A&B 
Business of Music 

2 credits per semester 

An examination of the legal, practical, and proce- 
dural problems encountered by the practicing 
musician. Specific course content varies each year 
according to the needs of the students and their 
particular career goals. Required of all Jazz/Com- 
mercial Music majors. 



Music History 

MU 301 A&B, MU 401 A&B 

This four-semester Music History and Literature 
sequence is designed to define the major style 
periods from Greek times to the present in terms 
of their philosophies, accomplishments, and inter- 
relationships. Composers, performers, and theo- 
rists are examined in the context of musical litera- 
ture with emphasis upon styles, forms, and tech- 
niques of composition as they evolve and change. 
The sequence puts into historical perspective the 
materials presented in the Music Theory courses. 
Through listening assignments, students are ex- 
pected to further develop their aural skills and 
knowledge of musical literature. Required of all 
music students, except Jazz/Commercial Majors. 

Ml) 301 A 

Music History I: Medieval — Renaissance 

3 credits 

MU301B 

Music History II: Baroque — Classical 

3 credits 

MU401A 

Music History III: Classical — Romantic 

3 credits 

MU402B 

Music History IV: Post-Romantic — Twenti- 
eth Century 

3 credits 

MU 403 A&B 
History of Jazz 

2 credits per semester 

A two-semester study of jazz from its African and 
European roots through its emergence at the turn 
of the twentieth century as a unique and distinc- 
tive American art form. The various styles of jazz 
are studied (ragtime, New Orleans Dixieland, Chi- 
cago style, swing, be-bop, cool, hard-bop, free- 
form, third stream), including their effect on the 
popular music with which jazz has coexisted. The 
course includes in-depth study of the primary ex- 
ponents of the various styles. Audio and video 
materials are used to provide students with a 
better understanding of jazz and its influences on 
the music industry. Required of all Jazz/Commer- 
cial Music majors. 

MU 410 A&B 
Music History 

3 credits per semester 

A one-year survey of music history designed for 
Jazz/Commercial Music majors. The course en- 
compasses music history and literature from antiq- 
uity through the contemporary period with particu- 
lar emphasis on history and literature since the 
Classical period. Required of and limited to stu- 
dents majoring in Jazz/Commercial Music. 

MU 425 A&B 

Guitar History and Literature 

2 credits per semester 

A study of the history of the guitar and music lit- 
erature written for, or adaptable to, the classic 
guitar. The development of the guitar is surveyed, 
including the 4 course Renaissance guitar, the 5 
course Baroque guitar of Corbetta, and Classical 
guitar of Sor and Giuliani to the present. Required 
of Guitar majors. 



110 



Music Literature 

Mil 311 

Masterpieces of Operatic Literaure 

3 credits 

An examination of operatic works, largely from the 
standard repertory and a closer study of five great 
operas. Three papers and attendance at specified 
operatic performances are required. 

MU318 
Medieval Music 

3 credits 

An in-depth study of the vocal and instrumental 
music of the Medieval Period. Special emphasis 
will be given to the development of Plainsong and 
the schools of Ars Antigua and Ars Nova. Students 
will be expected to do outside listening, research, 
and analysis. 

Mil 319 

Renaissance Music 

3 credits 

An in-depth study of the vocal and instrumental music 
of the Renaissance Period. Special emphasis will be 
given to the works of Dufay, Dunstable, Obrecht, 
Ockeghem, Isaac, Josquin, Palestrina, G. Gabrieli, 
Gesualdo, and Monteverdi. Students will be expected 
to do outside listening, research and analysis. 

Ml) 320 

Chamber Music-Performance and Analysis 

3 credits 

A course open to all students who wish to both 
perform and analyze works from the chamber 
music literature. Students will elect to prepare 
specific chamber works for performance, which 
will also be analyzed and discussed in class. 

MU321A&B 
J. S. Bach I -II 

3 credits each semester 

Bach's works surveyed and analyzed, with particu- 
lar attention to the organ works and cantatas. 
Aspects of Bach scholarships are treated such as 
source materials, reference tools, editions, prob- 
lems of interpretation and performance. Papers 
are required on instrumental work, organ chorale, 
prelude and cantata. 

MU323 
Classical Music 

3 credits 

A course concerned with composers from the 
Mannheim School through Haydn, Mozart, 
Beethoven and Schubert. The literature covered 
includes the dramatic, symphonic, chamber music 
and solo works of these composers. 

Mil 328 

Beethoven 

3 credits 

An in-depth analysis of selected works from the 
piano, vocal, chamber music, symphonic and dra- 
matic literature. 

MU411 

Twentieth Century Music I 

3 credits 

A study and analysis of the music of the first half 
of the twentieth century, such as Schonberg, Berg, 
Webern, Stravinsky, Hindemith, Varese. Bartok, 
Copland, and Messiaen. 



MU412 

Twentieth Century Music II 

3 credits 

Music since 1945. A study of musical literature 
since Webern, which includes movements toward 
tonal organization, chance and indeterminacy, 
musique concrete, and electronic music, multi- 
media, and the music of the avant garde. 

MU421 

Symphonic Literature 

3 credits 

A survey of symphonic literature from the 1 8th Century 
to the present, dealing largely with the standard reper- 
tory. Assignments in listening and analysis. 

Mil 423 

Late Romantic Music 

3 credits 

A survey of the works of Wagner, Richard Strauss, 
Mahler, Bruckner, Brahms, Debussy, and early 
Schoenberg, with special attention paid to stylistic 
developments from the early Romantic Period to 
the Twentieth Century as shown in the composi- 
tions of these late Romantic composers. 

MU424 

Wagner and the Ring Cycle 

3 credits 

An in-depth study of Wagnerian Opera with spe- 
cial emphasis on the four operas that constitute 
the Ring Cycle. Lectures and discussions will cover 
libretti, harmonic idiom, staging and symbolism. 

MU426 

The String Quartets 

3 credits 

Analysis of the quartets with emphasis on the compo- 
sitional techniques used by Beethoven; harmony, 
melody, form, rhythm and meter, and thematic unity 
will be discussed in an integrated fashion. 

MU427 

Diaghilev and His Time 

3 credits 

This course will investigate the role of Serge 
Diaghilev and his famous Ballet Russes in shaping 
the course of music and dance from c. 1909-1929. 
Special emphasis will be placed on the works of 
Igor Stravinsky with reference to his music for the 
stage. Time will also be devoted to the interrela- 
tionships between various artists, dancers, and 
writers such as Picasso, Cocteau, Nijinsky, Bakst, 
Massine, and others who were active in Paris. 
Works studied will be looked at from the perspec- 
tive of the composer, the choreographer, the set 
and costume designer, the dancers and the audi- 
ence. Literature to be studied includes Stravinsky 
(Firebird, Petrushka, Rite of Spring, Les Noces, 
Pulcinella, Oedipus Rex), Debussy (Jeux), Ravel 
(Daphnis and Chloe), Satie (Parade), De Falla (The 
Three-Cornered Hat), Milhaud (Le Train Bleu, La 
Creation du Monde), Poulenc (Les Biches) and 
Prokofiev. 



Piano Studies 

MU 131 A&B 
Piano Ml 

1 credit per semester 

Introductory and elementary keyboard training 
using theoretical, harmonic, and technical con- 
cepts in practical keyboard application: transposi- 
tion, melody harmonization, elementary improvisa- 
tion, technique, and repertoire. Required of non- 
Keyboard Music majors; open to non-Music ma- 
jors as an elective. 

MU 231 A&B 
Piano lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 

Continuation of MU 131 A&B from elementary to 
intermediate level. Requirements include comple- 
tion of the juried Piano Proficiency Examination. 

MU 431 A&B 
Piano Literature Ml 

2 credits per semester 

A survey of keyboard literature of various periods 
and styles through performance and analysis. 
Required of Piano majors. 

MU 432 A&B 
Piano Pedagogy Ml 

2 credits per semester 

A variety of methods and materials used in teach- 
ing piano at the various levels of development 
from beginner to artist. Discussion is based on 
required texts, supplementary books, articles, and 
magazines, including the major philosophies of 
past and present pedagogical thought. In the sec- 
ond semester, student teaching in class and in 
private lessons is observed and evaluated provid- 
ing practical experience in a constructive format. 
Required of Piano majors; open as an elective for 
other qualified students. 

MU 773 A&B 

Piano Accompanying 

1 credit per semester 

Designed to provide theoretical knowledge and 
practical experience in vocal, instrumental, and 
dance accompanying. The course includes histori- 
cal information, stylistic guidelines, vocal diction 
training, and coaching techniques, in addition to 
regular class performances and studio accompany- 
ing for major teachers. In addition, a sight-reading 
lab is required to facilitate the learning and prepa- 
ration of music for class and studio assignments. 
The final project includes a public performance 
demonstrating accompanying skills. 



111 



Voice 

MU143A&B 
Italian Diction 

1 credit per semester 

The objective of the course is fluency and a firm 
grasp of the language in general with strong em- 
phasis on mastery of a native speaker's diction in 
particular. The International Phonetic Alphabet is 
used to ensure proper pronunciation. Required of 
Voice and Voice/Opera majors. 

MU243A&B 
German Diction 
1 credit per semester 

The objective of the course is fluency and a firm 
grasp of the language in general with strong em- 
phasis on mastery of a native speaker's diction in 
particular. Oral drills based in part upon the texts 
of lieder and arias. Required of Voice and Voice/ 
Opera majors. 

MU 341 A&B 
English Diction 111 

1 credit per semester 

The study and performance of English diction for 
singers, emphasizing the correct formation and 
projection of vowels and consonants in singing. 
The International Phonetic Alphabet is utilized. 
Required of Voice and Voice/Opera majors. 

MU342A 

Voice Pedagogy I 

1 credit 

An in-depth study of the anatomy and physiology 
of the voice; its structure and function. Required 
of Voice majors. 

MU342B 

Voice Pedagogy II 

1 credit 

A continuation of MV 361 . The study and evalua- 
tion of various pedagogical theories of voice train- 
ing based upon the knowledge gained in Voice 
Pedagogy I. Required of Voice majors. 

MU 343 A&B 
French Diction 

1 credit per semester 

The course focuses mainly on diction, stressing 
phonetics, fluent reading aloud, and translation of 
aria and art song texts. Emphasis is placed upon 
the literary vocabulary used in French vocal reper- 
toire. Students are coached in correct pronuncia- 
tion when singing, and taught proper interpreta- 
tion of French vocal repertoire. Required of Voice 
and Voice/Opera majors. 

MU 346 A&B 
Vocal Literature Ml 

1 credit per semester 

The purpose of the course is to develop a greater 
knowledge of the vocal literature of all periods. 
The course is arranged to complement both the 
Music History and the Opera History courses. 
Semester I is centered around early Italian and 
Baroque literature. Semester II is focused on Clas- 
sical Viennese literature. 



MU 446 A&B 

Vocal Literature lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 

A continuation of Vocal Literature l-ll. Semester 
III is centered around middle and late Romantic 
literature, and late 19th century French litera- 
ture. Semester IV is centered around late 20th 
century literature. 



Opera 

MU 344 A&B 
Staging l-ll 

2 credits per semester 

The interpretation and performance of opera roles. 
Technical and artistic preparation for public perfor- 
mance from workshops to 
major productions of full operas. Required of 
Voice/Opera majors. 

MU 417 A&B 
Opera Literature l-ll 

3 credits per semester 

Survey of operatic styles and genres. Emphasis is 
placed on the cultural and social contexts of a 
wide diversity of operas, and 
upon character analysis. Intensive examination of 
complete operas. Required of Voice/Opera majors. 

MU 444 A&B 
Staging lll-IV 

2 credits Der semester 

Continuation of MU 344A&B. Required of Voice/ 

Opera majors. 



Music Ensembles 

MU 761 Chamber Ensemble 1 credit 

MU 761 Classical Guitar Ensemble 1 credit 

MU 761 Percussion Ensemble 1 credit 

MU 762 Chamber Singers 1 credit 

MU 764 Small Jazz Ensemble 1 credit 

MU 764 Jazz Guitar Ensemble 1 credit 

MU 765 New Music Ensemble 1 credit 

MU771 *Orchestra 1 credit 

MU772 Chorus 1 credit 

MU 773 Piano Accompanying 1 credit 

MU 774 Fusion Ensemble 1 credit 

MU 774 Large Jazz Ensemble 1 credit 

MU344A&B **Opera Staging 2 credits 

MU444A&B **0pera Staging 2 credits 

MU544A&B "Opera Staging 2 credits 

MU644A&B "Opera Staging 2 credits 
*ln conjunction with Orchestra, MU 771, Orchestra 
Repertory Class 0.0 credit. 
**ln conjunction with Staging, MU 344A&B, Aria 
Class 0.0 credit. 



Courses for Non-Music Majors 

MU 123 A&B 

Guitar Class for Non-Music Majors 

1 credit per semester 

This course is designed for non-music majors who 
wish to learn how to play folk/pop guitar. The 
course will deal with chords, single-line melody, 
reading pitch and rhythmic notation and chord 
symbols, and various strumming styles. Students 
must have their own guitars. 

MU 130 A&B 

Piano Class for Non-Music Majors 

1 credit per semester 

This one semester course which meets one hour 
weekly begins with the rudiments of piano play- 
ing. The following areas will be covered: learning 
the keyboard and the musical alphabet, rhythmic 
notation, pitch notation; playing melodies harmo- 
nized with chords as well as easy popular and 
classical repertoire; scales, arpeggios, and chords. 

MU 141 A&B 

Voice Class for Non-Music Majors 

1 credit per semester 

One hour class of voice instruction in the classical 
training of voice. Course will cover proper tech- 
nique of breathing, support, focus of tone, produc- 
tion of clear vocal line, and some musical interpre- 
tation of literature. 

MU 190 A&B 

Applied Instruction for Non-Music Majors 

1 .5 credits per semester 
The primary purpose of this course is to provide 
music instruction in the areas of instrumental, 
vocal, and compositional studies for non-music 
majors. However, it may also be taken by music 
majors as well. Students receive fifteen half-hour 
lessons per semester, given by members of the 
School of Music faculty and/or advanced students 
in the school's graduate program. The material 
covered in these lessons is tailored to the level 
and experience of the student. The course may be 
continued for credit. An extra fee is required. 
Rates may be obtained from the business office. 

MU 306 A&B 
History of Rock Music 

3 credits per semester 

This course investigates the History of Rock from 
its inception in the 1950s to the present. It begins 
with the important antecedents of Rock and Roll 
and then historically traces the various styles that 
evolved from that time to the present. There will 
be live demonstrations and illustrations by guests 
in class. May be taken for elective credit. 



112 



Graduate Course 
Descriptions 

Master of Music Degree and 
Graduate Diploma Programs 

MU 501 A&B 

Seminar in Bibliography and Writing 

1 credits per semester 

Introduction to the elements of musical bibliogra- 
phy. Basic bibliographic materials are stressed, 
and a series of topics are investigated which are 
designed to further the student's ability to use the 
library at the graduate level. Topics include music 
encyclopedias and dictionaries, collected editions 
and editing, periodicals, general bibliography, 
histories of music, introduction to biographies, 
thematic catalogs, bibliographies of music theory 
and analysis, discographies, and iconography. 
Required of all Graduate Degree Music majors 
except Voice Opera Emphasis. 

MU 517 A&B 

Opera History and Literature I— IB 

2 credits per semester 

The course explores the relationship of opera to 
literature, visual art, and ballet, as well as to his- 
tory, drama, psychology, and philosophy. Operas 
for study are chosen from the standard repertory 
of the world's leading opera houses; recorded 
excerpts by great singers of the past are chosen 
for comparison with today's singers; and more 
obscure or neglected operas that deserve exami- 
nation because of their cultural contribution are 
studied. Required in Voice/Opera Emphasis. 

MU 521 A&B 

Advanced Theory and Analysis Ml 

2 credits per semester 

An intensive investigation of contemporary meth- 
ods with emphasis on the study of recent compo- 
sitional techniques. Required of all Graduate De- 
gree Music majors except Voice/Opera Emphasis. 

MU 523 A&B 

Graduate Studies in Humanities Ml 

2 credits per semester 

This two-semester course may take several ap- 
proaches depending on the needs and interests of 
the class: 1 ) the survey of a particular period, em- 
phasizing ideas, currents, and tendencies influenc- 
ing the various arts of that period; 2) the study of a 
particular artist, with attention to the oeuvre and 
chief critical studies of that artist; and 3) the study 
of a particular style or stylistic development and 
its manifestation in several arts. 

Individual projects are assigned in which stu- 
dents study a single major artwork and the litera- 
ture about it, working toward their own evaluative 
analysis of the artwork. Required of all Graduate 
Music majors. 

The following are examples of the subjects 
covered in recent years: 

Stylistic Change in the Nineteenth-Century: Litera- 
ture, Music, Visual Arts. 
The Arts Before and After World War I 
Twentieth-Century Opera Based on Significant 
Literature 
Wagner's Ring in His Time and Ours 



Idea of the Artist in Renaissance, Nineteenth 

Century, and Today 

Decadence in Twentieth-Century Art 

MU 531 A&B 
Conducting Ml 

2 credits per semester 

The study of conducting and rehearsal techniques, 
score analysis, and musical interpretation of works 
from the Classical, Romantic, and contemporary 
periods. Required of Graduate Composition ma- 
jors. 

MU 541 A&B 
Repertory Coaching Ml 

1 credit per semester 

The course deals with role preparation and score 
analysis, as well as aspects of diction and inter- 
pretation. It involves independent study, coaching, 
and ensemble work. Required in Voice/Opera 
Emphasis. 

MU 544 A&B 
Staging Ml 

2 credits per semester 

A study of the practical aspects of stagecraft 
(make-up, acting, movement, and projection of 
theatrical meaning) as they apply to operatic per- 
formance. Audition techniques are developed. The 
course includes numerous performances. Required 
in Voice/Opera Emphasis. 

MU 601 A&B 

Seminar in Performance Practice 

3 credits per semester 

Focuses on performance practice for the contem- 
porary performer. Emphasizes the study of Ba- 
roque, Classical, Romantic, and Twenthieth-Cen- 
tury performance practice. In the first semester, 
selected major works are studied in detail. In the 
second semester, students prepare performing 
editions and perform some of the music studied. 
Period writings are read in translation, with stress 
on theories of ornamentation. Required of all 
Graduate Degree Music majors. 

MU603 
Graduate Project 

1 credit 

This course is usually taken in the semester in 
which the student performs the Graduate recital. It 
provides an opportunity for the student to investi- 
gate the musicological and cultural aspects of 
repertoire in his or her major performance area, 
especially that which has been chosen for perfor- 
mance in the recital. The results of this study are 
customarily presented in the form of an essay or 
program notes on the recital program. The course 
also assists the student in preparing for the Gradu- 
ate Comprehensive Examination. Required of 
Graduate Performance majors. 

MU 615 A&B 
Computer Composition 

3 credits per semester 

Computer application to musical composition. The first 
semester concentrates on the basic principles of com- 
puter operation, tape recording, and digital sound 
synthesis. The second semester is devoted to creative 
work in the computer/tape idioms. Students are ex- 
pected to complete one large compositional project 
Required of Graduate Composition majors 



MU 641 A&B 

Repertory Coaching lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 

Continuation of ML) 545A&B. Required in Voice/ 
Opera Emphasis. 

MU 644 A&B 
Staging lll-IV 

2 credits per semester 

Continuation of MU 544A&B. Required in Voice/ 
Opera Emphasis. 



Master of Arts in Teaching in 
Music Education 

MU550 

Advanced Conducting - 

Choral or Instrumental 

3 credits 

Advanced conducting techniques and applications 
of these techniques to instrumental or choral mu- 
sic teaching at the secondary school level. Empha- 
sis will include the selections of appropriate litera- 
ture, style and interpretation, rehearsal planning 
and implementation, evaluating performance out- 
comes, and special considerations relative to the 
teaching of music through the vehicle of perfor- 
mance. Students will select either instrumental or 
choral emphasis. Required of all candidates for the 
MAT in Music Education. Prerequisite: A course in 
Basic Conducting; full admission to the MAT pro- 
gram or consent of the Director of Music Educa- 
tion. 

MU551 

Education in American Society 

3 credits 

The course utilizes lecture/discussion, seminar, 
field and research presentation experiences to 
address historical, philosophical, and contempo- 
rary issues in American Education. Students are 
required to complete four major papers dedicated 
to the aforementioned issues and present them 
during seminar sessions. Assigned readings and 
the keeping of a notebook devoted to current 
events in education are required. Students are 
granted released time from class to complete 
research papers and are counselled individually to 
facilitate their projects. The class meets once per 
week in a three-hour block. Guest speakers typi- 
cally include a school administrator, counsellor/ 
social worker, a supervisor or teacher from another 
curricuiar area other than music, and related 
school personnel. 

Required of all candidates for the MAT in Music 
Education degree. Prerequisites: full admission to 
the MAT program or consent of the Director of the 
Music Education Division. 



113 



MU552 

Workshop in Vocal Methods 

2 credits 

Class instruction and participatory experiences in 
voice theory, vocal production, teaching methods, 
and instructional materials for use in elementary 
and secondary schools. The physiology of the 
voice is studied with reference to principles of 
choral singing. Special problems of the child and 
adolescent voice are considered. Required of all 
candidates for the MAT in Music Education. Pre- 
requisite: full admission to the MAT program or 
consent of the Director of Music Education. 

MU553 

Music and Special Children 

2 credits 

The course meets for one two-hour session each 
week for one semester. 

Through readings, discussions, guest speakers, 
classroom observations and simulated teaching, 
the goals of the course are: 

1 . to define and examine various types of dis- 
abilities. 

2. to offer a background on special education 
practices and laws in America. 

3. to aid students in developing an appreciation 
of the needs of handicapped persons in gen- 
eral society, in education, and in music edu- 
cation. 

4. to guide music education students in devel- 
oping goals and objectives, adapting lessons 
and preparing meaningful lesson plans for 
special students in the music classroom. 

Participation in class discussion based on as- 
signed reading, a written/verbal presentation on a 
specific disability, field observations, and two 
written examinations provide bases for evaluating 
student achievement. 

Required of all MAT in Music Education degree 
candidates. Prerequisites: full acceptance into the 
MAT program or consent of the Director of the 
Division of Music Education. 

MU554A 

Elementary Methods and Materials 

3 credits 

A concentrated study of methods and materials 
involved in planning, implementing, and evaluat- 
ing instructional programs in elementary music 
education. Lecture, workshop, and simulated 
teaching sessions. Required of all candidates for 
the MAT in Music. Prerequisite: full admission to 
the MAT program. 



MU554B 

Secondary Methods and Materials 

3 credits 

A concentrated study of methods and materials 
involved in planning, implementing, and evaluat- 
ing instructional programs in secondary music 
education. Lecture, workshop, and simulated 
teaching sessions. Required of all candidates to 
the MAT in Music. Prerequisite: full admission to 
the MAT program. 

MU555 

Elementary Student Teaching 

4 credits 

Taken concurrently with ML) 556 and MU 558. 
Offered only during the spring semester to stu- 
dents in their final semester of study. The equiva- 
lent of six weeks experience at the elementary 
level is required. Placement in schools is deter- 
mined by the Director of Music Education. 

MUS56 

Secondary Student Teaching 

4 credits 

Taken concurrently with MU 556 and MU 558. 
Offered only during the spring semester to stu- 
dents in their final semester of study. The equiva- 
lent of six weeks experience at the secondary 
level is required. Placement in schools is deter- 
mined by the Director of Music Education. 

MU557 

Music Administration and Supervision 

3 credits 

Course addresses issues and concerns of adminis- 
tering school music programs — program planning 
and development, budget and finance, facilities, 
equipment, public relations, scheduling, concert 
planning, and related matters. Principles and 
methods of effective supervision of programs and 
personnel constitute a second focus of the course. 
Required of all candidates for the MAT in Music 
Education. Prerequisite: full admission to the MAT 
program. 

MU558 

Student Teaching Seminar and Major Project 

2 credits 

Taken concurrently with MU 555 and MU 556. 
Required of and limited to students who are prac- 
tice teaching. Discussion and analysis of filed 
experiences, special workshops and field trips. 
Major paper comprises a thorough status study 
and evaluation of the programs in which each 
student in interning. 



MUS59 

Research, Evaluation, and Technology in 

Music Education 

3 credits 

The course has three primary foci: 

1 . Examination of the role of research in music 
education, sources of research, analysis of 
research types and methods, and the criti- 
cism of research in terms of internal and 
external criteria. 

2. Principles of effective evaluational strategies 
in music education; standardized and 
teacher-constructed approaches to evaluat- 
ing music teaching and learning in the cogni- 
tive, psychomotor, and affective domains. 

3. Study of computer applications and related 
technological advances relative to the teach- 
ing and administration of programs in music 
education. Required of candidates for the 
MAT in Music Education. Prerequisite: Ac- 
ceptance into the MAT program. 

MU560A 

Workshop in Instrumental Methods I 

2 credits 

Class instruction and participatory experiences in 
performing on woodwind and string instruments 
and teaching woodwinds and strings in elemen- 
tary and secondary schools. The class will consti- 
tute a lab ensemble for exploring methods and 
materials. Full class sessions will be supple- 
mented with small-group instruction, and clinics 
will focus on instrument care and repair, instru- 
ment selection, developing beginning instrumental 
programs in schools, and related issues. Required 
of all candidates for the MAT in Music. Prerequi- 
site: full admission to the MAT program or consent 
of the Director of Music Education. 

MUS60B 

Workshop in Instrumental Methods II 

2 credits 

Class instruction and participatory experiences in 
performing on brass and percussion instruments 
and teaching brass and percussion in elementary 
and secondary schools. The class will constitute a 
lab ensemble for exploring methods and materials. 
Full class sessions will be supplemented with 
small-group instruction, and clinics will focus on 
instrument care and repair, instrument selection, 
developing beginning instrumental programs in 
schools, and related issues. Required of all candi- 
dates for the MAT in Music. Prerequisite: full ad- 
mission to the MAT program or consent of the 
Director of Music Education. 



114 



The School of Theater Arts Faculty 



Walter Dallas 

Director 

Barbara Washington-Grant 

Managing Director 
313 South Broad Street 
215-875-2232 

The School of Theater Arts of The University of the 
Arts is committed to developing the skills, craft, 
and attitudes of its students to prepare them for 
careers in the professional theater. The training of 
the actor is different from most other professional 
training in that the instrument of the training is the 
human being itself - the body and soul of the actor 
- and that the work is done from the inside out 
rather than from the outside in. An actor has to be 
trained in a variety of disciplines, each vital in 
itself and intimately related to all the others. The 
curricula acknowledges that the focal point of the 
training is the Acting Studio; that voice and body 
training are the principal support areas; that all 
other curricular programs address themselves to 
the basic knowledge of techniques necessary to 
produce the craft. The training is based on the 
conservatory approach combining studio training 
with rehearsal and performance in varying kinds of 
productions which challenge the actor's ability to 
perform demanding roles. The highly focused and 
demanding training is enhanced by appropriate 
courses in the humanities. 



Acting Studio 

Irene Baird 
James Cunningham 
Johnnie Hobbs, Jr. 
Drucie McDaniel 
Alexandra Toussaint 
H.German Wilson 

Directing Studio 

Walter Dallas - Tutorial 
Charles Conwell - Studio 
Don Auspitz - Studio 

Voice Production/Speech 

Susanne Case 
Deborah Stern 
Paul Wagar 

Stage Combat/Fencing 

Charles Conwell 
James Murray 

Performance Coaching/Audition Techniques 

Irene Baird 

Walter Dallas 

Johnnie Hobbs 

Alexandra Toussaint 

Don Auspitz 

Rehearsal/Performance (1991-92 Season) 

Don Auspitz 

Irene Baird 

Deborah Block 

Daniel Burke 

Charles Conwell 

Walter Dallas 

Manfred Fischbeck 

Scott Hitz '91 

Johnnie Hobbs, Jr. 

Louise Langford 

Vladimir Prahcharor 

Paul Wagar 

Jacquelyn Yancy 

Mask Characterization 

Walter Dallas 

Make-up 

Chris Whelen - Make-up 

Theater Studies 

Barbara Leiland - Script Analysis 
Gabriela Roepke - Dramatic Literature 
- Currents in Contemporary Theater 
Jane Marie Glodek - Theater History 
Staff - Dramatic Criticism and Theory 

Dance/Movement 

Nancy Kantra - Modern Dance/Ballet 
Manfred Fischbeck - Movement 
Vema Leslie - Movement 
Rachel Mausner - Alexander Technique 
Phuoc Phan - Tan Vo Dao 
LaVaughn Robinson - Tap Dance 
Lisa White -Jan Dance 



Music/Voice 

Annette DiMedio - Introduction to Music 
Barbara Washington-Grant - Voice 

Musical Theater 

Charles Gilbert 
Tonda Hannum DiPasquale 
Terry Boyle Greenland 
Mary Ellen Grant Kennedy 

Advisory Board of the School of Theater Arts 

John Allen 
Artistic Director 
New Freedom Theatre 
Philadelphia 

Irene Baird 

Actress/Director/Professor of Theater 

Villanova 

Earle Gister 

Associate Dean 

Yale School of Drama 

New Haven 

Bernard Havard 
Executive Director 
Walnut Street Theater 
Philadelphia 
Leslie Lee 
Playwright 
New York City 

Stephanie Powers 

Actress/Producer 

Los Angeles 

Mary B. Robinson 

Artistic Director 

Philadlephia Drama Guild 

Marjorie Samoff 

Producing Director 

American Music Theater Festival 

Barbara Silzle 
Artistic Associate 
Philadelphia Drama Guild 
Ellen Stewart 
Artistic Director 
La Mama Theater 
New York 

Robert Wagner 
Actor/Producer 
Los Angeles 



115 



Facilities 

The School of Theater Arts is located in the 31 3 South 
Broad Street building. Facilities include classrooms for 
Acting Studio classes and Stage Combat classes. 
Large dance studios and music facilities are also used 
by acting students. Two theaters in the 313 South 
Broad Street building are available for School of The- 
ater performances. The first is the Black Box theater, 
an exciting, flexible space that allows for theater- in- 
the-round, 3/4 thrust, environmental, and many other 
possible arrangements. The second is an intimate 200- 
seat proscenium theater. In addition, and truly the 
most attractive facility available for student produc- 
tions, is the University's newly renovated historic 
Shubert Theater, located at 250 South Broad Street. 

Visiting Artists 

Each year, various professionals are guests, lectur- 
ers, or performers at the School of Theater Arts. 
Some of these artists have participated formally 
with the program; others have visited informally 
and shared experiences with the students and 
faculty. Some of the visiting artists in the recent 
past have been: 

Joseph Papp-producer of the New York 
Shakespeare Festival and the Public Theatre 
James Baldwin-the novelist, playwright 
Laurie Anderson-performance artist — Home of 
the Brave 

David Henry Hwang-playwright, M. Butterfly; WOO 
Airplanes on the Hoof 

Tommy Hicks-star of Spike Lee's She's Gotta Have It 
Elizabeth Ashley-actress in theater, television, film 
Maryann Plunkett-Agnes in Agnes of God 
Greg Poggi-directorof the Philadelphia Drama Guild 

Mercedes McCambridge-internationally renowned 
Broadway star 

Bernard Havard-producing director of The Walnut 
Street Theater 

Blanka Ziska-director of the Wilma Theater 
Erika Alexander-actress in theater, television, film 
Clarice Taylor-actress in theater, television, film 

These professionals have been able to share with 
our students an insider's viewpoint of what the 
acting field is really like. 



Programs of Study 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) 
Acting Program 

The four-year BFA Acting Program prepares stu- 
dents for careers in the professional theater or for 
continued study in graduate school. In the first 
year, students concentrate on finding the "core of 
the actor" through the study of improvisation, 
mask characterization, speech, and movement. 

The first year of training in the acting program is 
designed to encourage in-depth self-analysis of 
the student's commitment to the craft as well as 
foster the development of particular acting skills. 

Progress from one semester to the next is by 
faculty invitation and is based not only on the 
successful completion of the course work, but also 
on the faculty's assessment of the student's poten- 
tial for a career in the professional theater. 

The second and third years are devoted to addi- 
tional study to establish depth of characterization 
and to refine physical and vocal technique. The 
focus of the fourth year is on performance, testing 
the student's ability to achieve the full dimension 
of a characterization and to sustain that character 
over the length of a play. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) 
Directing Program 

Each year a few exceptionally talented students 
will be admitted to the School of Theater Arts as 
candidates for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theater 
Arts in Directing. The goal of the Directing Pro- 
gram is three-fold: to prepare students for careers 
as director in the professional theater, to prepare 
students for graduate level professional training in 
directing, and to enhance the School of Theater's 
concept of the performing ensemble by incorporat- 
ing directing students into the acting ensemble 
represented by each first-year class. 

The training of directors is closely related to 
the training of actors. In the first year, directing 
students participate in all courses required of first- 
year acting students. In the second, third, and 
fourth years, directing students study other disci- 
plines necessary for the development of the craft. 
Courses in directing, theater history, movement 
and dramatic literature are reinforced with studies 
in sociology, philosophy, psychology and solid 
practical directing experience. 



Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) 
Stage Combat Program 

The Stage Combat Program at the University 
includes instruction for all theater arts students in 
unarmed combat, knife, nineteenth-century saber, 
samurai sword, rapier and dagger, and two- 
handed broadsword. These styles of fighting are 
taught in two mandatory semesters of combat. 
All theater students may choose to take the 
certification test in stage combat-sponsored and 
adjudicated by the Society of American Fight 
Directors that results in a nationally-recognized 
certificate of competency. This certification can be 
helpful in getting acting and/or choreographing 
jobs involving staged violence. The student may 
select to continue studies in stage combat by 
choosing the stage combat program. The pre- 
requisite for this program is Certification as an 
Actor-Combatant by the Society of American Fight 
Directors (SAFD). The certification test is given at 
the end of the sophomore year. Students are 
strongly encouraged to attend the National Stage 
Combat Workshop in the summer following their 
sophomore year and the SAFD Advanced Teacher 
Training in the summer following their junior year. 
These experiences will expose the student to the 
varying fighting and teaching styles of the leader- 
ship of the SAFD. The Advanced Teacher Training 
provides an opportunity to be certified as stage 
combat instructors. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) 
Musical Theater Program 

The four-year BFA Musical Theater Program 
prepares students for professional careers as 
performers in the musical theater or for continued 
study in graduate school. The program defines the 
term "musical theater" in a way that embraces the 
richness and diversity of this challenging interdis- 
ciplinary art form, which includes musical comedy, 
musical drama, "Broadway opera," cabaret and 
revue. Students receive the same "core" of tech- 
nique training as other Theater Arts students; this 
training is complemented by training in vocal tech- 
nique, musicianship and dance, and the study of 
the repertoire of the musical theater in print, in 
recordings, and in rehearsal and performance. 

The Musical Theater Program features a part- 
nership with Philadelphia's acclaimed American 
Music Theater Festival, which has earned interna- 
tional praise for its productions of works by artists 
such as Philip Glass, William Bolcom, and Anthony 
Davis. Opportunities for master classes, guest 
speakers, internships, apprenticeships and 
observerships are among the professional experi- 
ence open to students in this program. 

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theater Arts nor- 
mally takes four years of full-time study to be 
completed and carries a total graduation require- 
ment of 124-133 credits. 



116 



Admissions Requirements 

Students are admitted to the School of Theater 
Arts in the Fall Semester only. Admission to the 
School of Theater Arts is highly competitive and 
based on talent. 

Due to the strenuous physical demands of the 
program, general fitness is a prime requisite for 
successful completion of the programs in theater 
arts. Applicants should be physically able to par- 
ticipate in all aspects of the training. 

In addition to the general PCPA application 
requirements, applicants to the School of Theater 
Arts should submit the following: 

1 . A statement of purpose: a one-page description 
of the student's ambitions, goals, motivations, 
and commitments to training for the profes- 
sional theater. 

2. A letter of recommendation concerning dra- 
matic ability. This letter may be written by a 
high school acting coach, or by a theater 
director or producer. 

3. A one-page resume of previous theater train- 
ing, including the names of teachers, studios, 
length of study, and performance experience. 

4. A recent photograph. 

Auditions 

An audition is required of all applicants to the 
School of Theater Arts. The audition may be taken 
in Philadelphia or at designated regional audition 
locations (contact the Admissions Office for dates 
and locations). Video-taped auditions may be 
submitted instead of a live audition. 

The audition evaluates applicants on technique, 
quality of expression, imagination, motivation, 
talent, and physical agility. 

The Philadelphia and regional auditions are 
identical in content and consist of two parts. 

1. Applicants must prepare and perform two con- 
trasting monologs from memory, each lasting 
no more than two minutes. Scenes must be 
selected from published plays and should be 
contrasting in character, style, or tone (e.g., a 
comedy and a drama; a contemporary piece 
and a classical piece). Each scene must not 
exceed two minutes in performance time. 

2. For the second part of the audition, applicants 
participate in a personal interview with the 
Theater faculty. 

3. In addition, students applying to the Musical 
Theater Program will be required to present 
two musical theater songs in contrasting 
styles. One may be an operatic aria. At least 
one of the songs must have a strong emotional 
content. Auditioners should be prepared to 
discuss their choice of material and their inter- 
pretation. Combined performance time for the 
two songs is not to exceed five minutes. An 
accompanist will be provided for Philadelphia 
auditions; students auditioning out of town 
should provide a pre-recorded accompaniment. 
Students auditioning in Philadelphia will par- 
ticipate in a group dance audition which will 



focus on fundamental technical skills. Students 
auditioning out of town or on videotape are 
asked to present a prepared dance solo demon- 
strating their level of proficiency in dance and 
movement. This solo, which may be choreo- 
graphed by the applicant or someone else, must 
not exceed two minutes in length. Students 
auditioning in Philadelphia also have the option 
of presenting such a solo in addition to their 
group audition. 

If a video tape is submitted, clearly state your 
name at both the beginning and end of the taped 
audition. Combine full body and close-up shots. 
Perform two solo scenes as described above. 
During the interview portion of a taped audition, 
applicants should speak to the camera regarding 
current and past theater activities, future aspira- 
tions, and career goals in theater. Tapes must be 
submitted on VHS format video tape and should 
be clearly labeled with name, address, and reper- 
toire being performed. 

Scholarships 

Trustee Scholarship 

Each year the School of Theater Arts awards a 
Trustee Scholarship to one returning sophomore. 
The Trustee Scholarship totals $1 2,000 over the 
three years the student is enrolled. The award is 
made on the basis of outstanding artistic and 
academic performance and forpromise as a future 
actor. Recipients must maintain a 3.0 cumulative 
grade point average. 

Director's Scholarship 

Each year the School of Theater Arts will award a 
Directors Scholarship to a newly entering student. 
The Director's Scholarship totals $10,000.00 over 
the four years. The scholarship winner will be 
selected on the basis of outstanding audition re- 
view and academic achievement. Recipients must 
maintain a 3.0 cumulative average. 

Talent Scholarships 

Talent Scholarships are awards to matriculating 
students who give evidence of outstanding artistic 
ability. Recommendation for the Talent Scholarship 
is based on the audition. To maintain eligibility, the 
student must participate fully in rehearsals and 
performances, have a "B" or better in the Major 
area, and maintain a minimum 3.0 cumulative 
grade point average (2.75 minimum for Freshmen) 
in all Theater Arts courses. 

Students applying for Talent Scholarships must 
file a Talent Scholarship Application as well as the 
appropriate Financial Aid Form, obtainable from 
the Financial Aid Office. 

New students should audition prior to March 
1 5. Those auditioning after March 1 5 will be con- 
sidered as funds become available. 

Returning students applying for Talent Scholar- 
ships are subject to yearly review by the School of 
Theater Arts Scholarship Committee. 



The Curriculum 

An actor must be well versed in a variety of disci- 
plines, each vital in itself and intimately related to 
the others. Training in voice, movement, dance, 
speech, improvisation, masks, combat, music, 
mime, history, and literature supports work done in 
the acting studio, the heart of the curriculum. Stu- 
dents are exposed to a variety of methods and 
approaches to acting, and encouraged to utilize 
that which works best for them. Two semesters of 
stage combat are required. Combined skills are 
tested through the rehearsal and performance of 
productions that challenge the student's ability to 
perform a variety of demanding roles. Electives are 
offered that emphasize directing and dramatic 
criticism, and appropriate courses in the humani- 
ties provide a sense of the history of the craft and 
its impact on other disciplines. 



117 



Theater Arts Major, 
Acting Program 

Total Credits: 133 

Freshman Year Semester 

1st 2nd 

TH 101 A&B Dramatic Literature l-ll 2 2 

TH103A&B Acting Studio l-ll 3 3 

TH103L Crew 

TH105A&B Stage Combat l-ll 2 2 

TH107A&B Modern Dance l-ll 1 1 
TH109A&B Voice Production 

for Actors l-ll 3 3 

TH 114 Mask Work - 2 

TH115A&B Movement for Actors l-ll 1 1 

TH119A&B Business of the Arts 

HU110A Language & Expression 3 - 

HU103A&B Intro, to Modernism 3 3_ 

18 17 

Sophomore Year 

TH241A&B Voice (Singing) l-ll 1 1 

TH203A&B Acting Studio lll-IV 3 3 

TH207A&B Jazz Dance l-ll 1 1 
TH 209A&B Voice Production 

for Actors lll-IV 3 3 

TH211 Make-up 1 - 

TH213A&B Script Analysis l-ll 2 2 

TH215A&B Movement for Actors lll-IV 1 1 

TH208A&B Intro, to Music l-ll 2 2 

TH219A&B Business of the Arts 

HU2— Humanities 3 3 



Junior Year 

TH 303A&B Acting Studio V-VI 

TH 307A&B Tap Dance l-ll 

TH 309A&B Voice Production (Lab) 

TH 311 A&B Theater History l-ll 

TH313A&B Behearsaland 
Performance l-ll 



17 16 

2 2 
1 1 
1 1 

3 3 



5 5 



TH315A&B Movement for Actors V-VI 1 



TH316 Mime - 1 

TH319A&B Business of the Arts 

HU 3 — Humanities 3 3 

HU — Shakespeare 3 - 



Senior Year 

TH413A&B Rehearsal and 

Performance lll-IV 
TH415A&B Movement for 

Actors VII-VIII 
TH 41 1 A&B Currents in Contemp. 

Theater l-ll 
TH419 Business of the Arts 

TH 420 Auditioning Techniques 

Electives 
HU 4 — Humanities 



19 17 



6 6 



1 1 



2 2 





3 3 
3 - 



15 13 



Theater Arts Major, 
Stage Combat Program 

Total Credits: 133 

Freshman Year 

TH 1 01 A&B Dramatic Literature l-ll 

TH103A&B Acting Studio l-ll 

TH 103L Crew 

TH105A&B Stage Combat l-ll 

TH107A&B Modern Dance l-ll 

TH109A&B Voice Production 

for Actors l-ll 

TH 114 Mask Work 

TH 1 1 5A&B Movement for Actors I 

TH119A&B Business of the Arts 

HU 1 1 0A Language & Expression 

HU 1 03A&B Intro, to Modernism 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

2 2 

3 3 


2 2 

1 1 




18 17 

Sophomore Year 

TH 241 A&B Voice (Singing) l-ll 1 1 

TH203A&B Acting Studio lll-IV or 3 3 
TH217A&B Directing Studio 

TH205A&B Stage Combat lll-IV 2 2 

TH207A&B Jazz Dance l-ll 1 1 
TH 209A&B Voice Production 

for Actors lll-IV 3 3 

TH211 Make-up 1 - 

TH213A&B Script Analysis l-ll 2 2 

TH215A&B Movement for Actors lll-IV 1 1 

TH219A&B Business of the Arts 

HU2— Humanities 3 3 



17 16 

Junior Year 

TH303A&B Acting Studio or 2 2 

TH317A&B Directing Studio 

TH305A&B Competitive Fencing 2 2 

TH 307 A&B Tap Dance l-ll 1 1 

TH309A&B Voice Production (Lab) 1 1 

TH 311 A&B Theater History l-ll 3 3 

TH313A&B Combat Rehears. & Pert. 3 3 

TH315A&B Movement for Actors V-VI 1 1 

TH316 Mime - 2 

TH319A&B Business of the Arts 

HU3— Humanities 3 3 

HU — Shakespeare _3 ^_ 

19 18 



Senior Year 

TH414A&B Combat Thesis l-ll 
TH415A&B Movement for 

Actors VII-VIII 
TH 41 1 A&B Currents in Contemp. 

Theater l-ll 
TH419 Business of the Arts 

TH 420 Auditioning Techniques 

Electives 
HU 4 — Humanities 



6 6 



1 1 



15 13 



Theater Arts Major, 
Directing Program 

Total Credits: 137 

Freshman Year 



TH101A&B Dramatic Literature 

TH103A&B ActingStudiol.il 

TH105A&B Stage Combat I, II 

TH107A&B Modern Dance 

TH109A&B SpeechfortheActorl.il 

TH 1 1 4B Mask Characterization 

TH115A&B Movement 

TH119A&B Business of the Arts 

HU1 1 0A Language & Expression 

HU1 03A&B Intro, to Modernism 



Sophomore Year 

TH205A&B Stage Combat 



Semester 
1st 2nd 

2 2 



1 1 

3 3 

- 2 

1 1 



3 - 

3 3 

18 17 



TH211A 

TH213A&B 

TH217A&B 

TH219A&B 

TH220A&B 

HU274B 

HU315B 

HU2— 



Makeup 
ScriptAnalysisl.il 
Directing Studio 
Business of the Arts 
Dramatic Criticism 
Intro, to Philosophy 
Contemporary Drama 
Humanities 





3 3 

3 - 

- 3 

3 3 

17 16 



Junior Year 

TH311A&B Theater History 3 3 

Rehearsal & Performance 5 5 



TH313A&B 
TH317A&B 
TH319A&B 
HU316B 
HU — 
HU — 
HU — 



Directing Studio 
Business of the Arts 
American Playwright 
Sociology Elective 
Psychology Elective 
Electives 



Senior Year 

TH417A&B 
TH419A&B 
TH420A&B 
TH411A&B 



Directing Studio 
Business of the Arts 
Audition Techniques 
Currents in Contemp. 
Drama 

TH 421 A&B Directing Thesis 
Electives 

HU 4 — Humanities 



3 3 



- 3 
3 - 

- 3 
3 - 

17 17 



3 3 

1 



17 18 



118 



Theater Arts Major, 
Musical Theater Program 

Total Credits: 142 

Freshman Year Semester 

1st 2nd 

TH101A&B DramaticLiteraturel.il 2 2 

TH103A&B ActingStudiol.il 3 3 

TH109A&B SpeechforActorsl.il 3 3 

TH115A&B Movement for Actors 1 1 

TH118A&B Musical Theater Dance 1 1 

TH140A&B Voice for Musical Theater 2 2 

HU110A Language & Expression 3 - 

HU103A&B Intro, to Modernism 3 3 

HU — Humanities Elective - 3 



18 18 



Sophomore Year 

TH203A&B ActingStudiolll.lV 3 3 

TH209A&B SpeechforActorslll.lV 3 3 

TH211 Makeup - 1 

TH218A&B Musical Theater Dance 2 2 

TH215A&B Movement for Actors 1 1 

TH222A&B Theory & Ear Training 3 3 

TH240A&B Voice for Musical Theater 2 2 

HU2— Humanities 3 3 



17 18 



Junior Year 

TH312A&B Musical Theater History 3 3 

TH313A&B Rehearsal & Performance 5 5 

TH318A&B Musical Theater 

Dance Rep 2 2 

TH322A&B Theory & Ear Training 3 3 

TH340A&B Voice for Musical Theater 2 2 

HU3 — Humanities 3 3 



18 18 



Senior Year 

TH413A&B Rehearsal & Performance 6 6 

TH419 Business of the Arts 

TH420 Audition Techniques - 1 

TH411A&B Curr. in Contemp. Theater 2 2 

MU — Music Elective - 3 

Electives 3 3 

HU4 — Humanities 6 3 



17 18 



Performance Requirements 

The School of Theater Arts restricts student per- 
formance in the first year, permits outside perfor- 
mances in the second year by faculty approval, 
and carefully governs third and fourth-year student 
involvement in University-based and outside pro- 
fessional productions. 

Theater students in the Acting Program are 
expected to participate in solo and ensemble pro- 
ductions in the third- and fourth-year Rehearsal 
and Performance sequence. 

Prerequisites for participation in Rehearsal and 
Performance sequences are minimum grades of "B" 
in the previous semester's Acting Studio, Speech, and 
Movement, and/or special permission of the faculty 
and Director of the School of Theater Arts. 

Each third-year acting student is required to 
successfully produce and perform a 45 minute 
theatrical solo performance. Under the close 
supervision of the faculty and staff, and with the 
assistance of a fourth-year student advisor, this 
rite of passage into the fourth-year ensemble 
reflects the synthesis of theory, technique, and 
individual growth. 

Each production in the Rehearsal and Perfor- 
mance sequence is followed by an open critique of 
the production. 

Certain professional work outside the School of 
Theater Arts can be directed toward completion of 
the Rehearsal and Performance sequence through 
special permission of the Faculty and the Director 
of the School of Theater Arts. Students must 
secure written permission to participate for credit 
in work outside the School of Theater Arts prior to 
committing to the outside project. The faculty's 
decision is based on two factors: 

1 . the project must contribute to the student's 
continued growth; 

2. the project must be supervised by a responsible 
person who has been approved by the School of 
Theater and who will report on the student's work. 

First year students in good academic and depart- 
mental standing may, in the Spring Semester, with 
faculty approval, audition for and perform in 
University of the Arts productions. 

Master Class Productions 

Each year, members of the theater faculty, profes- 
sional directors, cast major productions from the 
entire student body of the School of Theater. 
These productions, in addition to being valuable 
learning experiences, allow students from each 
year to form ensembles outside of the normal 
third- and fourth-year Rehearsal and Performance 
sequences. 

In some cases, third- and fourth-year students 
may receive Rehearsal and Performance credit for 
participation in Master Class Productions. First- 
and second-year students receive no grade for 
participation. 



Directing Studio 

Advanced students in the Directing Program are 
required to direct at least one short play each 
semester. The process is supervised by the faculty 
and the plays are cast from students in the School 
of Theater Arts and are performed before an audi- 
ence. A critique which focuses on the director's 
craft and process follows each production. Third 
and fourth year directing students earn Rehearsal 
and Performance credits through directing pro- 
jects, stage management and, in the fourth year, 
thesis production. The Director of the School of 
Theater Arts supervises thesis projects. 

School of Theater Arts Regulations 

Absences 

Students in the School of Theater Arts are ex- 
pected to attend all classes, studios, workshops, 
rehearsals and crews for which they are regis- 
tered or otherwise committed. The school does 
not permit lateness except for unavoidable and 
unforeseeable emergencies. 

In case of emergencies, the Director, Assistant 
to the Director, Technical Director, or the faculty 
member should be contacted immediately. 

On the occasion of the second absence, the 
student will receive a verbal warning from the 
instructor and a letter of warning from the Assis- 
tant to the Director of the School of Theater Arts. 

On the occasion of the third absence, the stu- 
dent will receive a deficiency notice and will be 
asked to meet with the Director. At this time the 
student will be placed on departmental probation. 

A student who is absent a fourth time may be 
dropped from the course with a grade of "F" and 
placed on academic probation. If the course is in 
one of the major areas (Studio, Speech, or Move- 
ment) the student, if on academic probation, may 
be asked to leave the program. 

Advisors 

Students are assigned advisors when they enter 
the School of Theater Arts. Advisory lists are 
posted in the theater lounge during the first week 
of the academic year. The advisor conveys infor- 
mation from the faculty to the students and coun- 
sels the student in artistic and academic matters. 
The student, however, is fully responsible for ful- 
filling his or her artistic and academic obligations 
and for meeting the requirements for graduation. 

Call Boards 

Call boards are located in the theater lounge on 
the first floor of 313 South Broad Street, next to 
the Theater Offices, and near the Production Office 
just outside the Black Box Theater. The call boards 
are used for the posting of all rehearsal and crew 
notices, as well as School and professional audi- 
tion notices. 

All Theater students must check the call boards 
daily and will be responsible for all official notices 
posted there within 24 hours. 



119 



Crew Assignments 

All first-year students are required to serve on produc- 
tion crews. Crew assignments and calls are scheduled 
and monitored by the Technical Director. 

All crew persons are expected to be prompt for 
crew calls. Lateness will not be tolerated and 
action may be taken against anyone who misses 
an assigned call. A student who misses a crew 
call without prior permission from the Technical 
Director may be dropped from crew and required 
to serve on crew in the second year. 

Extra-Curricular Activities 

Students in the School of Theater Arts sometimes 
accept jobs or roles in extra-curricular projects. At no 
time should a student accept an activity which con- 
flicts with a class, rehearsal, crew assignment, etc., or 
which prevents the student from being fully prepared 
for class, rehearsal, and/or performance. 

Observation of Classes and Rehearsals 

Some classes in the School of Theater Arts are 
open for observation only by prior arrangement 
with the instructor and/or the Director of the 
School of Theater. 

All rehearsals are open unless otherwise an- 
nounced and/or posted, although a director may 
declare a rehearsal closed at any time. 

It is expected that all visitors to classes or re- 
hearsals will appear prior to the beginning of that 
activity and will remain quietly in place until a 
break is called. 

Physical Demands of the Program 

The Theater Arts program is physically demanding. 
Good health and its maintenance are of para- 
mount importance to an actor. 

No smoking will be allowed in any classroom or 
rehearsal space. 

Students should be in good health and have no 
medical or psychological problems which impair or 
jeopardize his or her safety, performance, or the 
safety of others. 

If a students physical condition changes in any 
significant way, he or she must immediately inform the 
Director of the School of Theater Arts in writing so that 
the student's participation in the program may be re- 
evaluated by the Theater Arts faculty. 

Occassional illness or injuries are, of course, 
justification for short-term absences. Specific 
chronic physical or emotional disorders which 
impair attendance or ability to function within the 
program over a longer period of time should be 
covered by a formal leave-of-absence. 

In either case, the student should confer with 
his or her advisor as soon as a potential health 
problem arises. 

Professional Standards and Behavior 

It is expected that students maintain high standards 
of professionalism with respect to studio, classroom, 
rehearsal, crew, and performance commitments. 

It is important that each student realize that he 
or she represents the School of Theater Arts at all 
times, on stage and off. Students are expected to 
maintain and cultivate their unique individuality 
while exhibiting the highest standards of charac- 
ter, behavior, and personal hygiene. 



Student Evaluations: Warnings, 
Probations, Dismissals 

Each student is evaluated twice each semester by 
the School of Theater Arts faculty and the Director. 
The School of Theater Arts recognizes that in this 
art form it is possible for a student to receive an 
adequate grade for a specific course, but not show 
promise for a future career in the theater as an 
actor. The School's obligation to its students, 
therefore, is to keep them abreast of their pro- 
gress by personal contact and review. 

In addition to demonstrated ability and progress 
in the Major areas- Studio, Speech, and Move- 
ment-the student's attitude and seriousness of 
purpose are also evaluated. Progress from one 
semester to the next is by invitation only. 

There are three academic/artistic reasons why 
a student in the School of Theater Arts might be 
placed on probation or not invited to return for 
additional study: 

1 . receiving a grade of "B-" or lower in one or 
more of the Major area courses (Studio, 
Speech, Movement); 

2. conduct which proves disruptive to the educa- 
tional process and/or the overall well-being of 
the ensemble; 

3. the realization that the program offered by the 
School of Theater Arts does not or cannot ad- 
dress the specific needs of the student. In this 
instance, the faculty will work with students 
and parents to find an appropriate alternative 
theater or related training. 

It is expected that the student's commitment 
to professional training will be clearly reflected in 
the quality of work in each studio and class. 

Warnings — In addition to cases of absences, a 
student will be verbally warned if his or her perfor- 
mance in class is below par as defined by the 
instructor's expectations expressed in the class 
syllabus, rules, etc. More specifically, a student 
will receive a verbal warning, followed by a defi- 
ciency notice from the Director's Office if he or she 
is not demonstrating ability, lacks seriousness of 
purpose, demonstrates attitudinal behavior which 
proves disruptive to the ensemble or educational 
process, is excessively tardy, is not prepared to 
work in class, or who is not seriously committed to 
professional training. 

Evaluations — Students who receive unfavor- 
able evaluations (i.e. recommendation for proba- 
tion) will meet with the full-time and major faculty 
(Studio, Speech, and Movement) to clarify and 
discuss problem areas and strategies for improve- 
ment. At the conclusion of the session, the student 
will be given two copies of a letter from the Direc- 
tor detailing the reasons and the conditions of the 
probationary status. The student will be asked to 
sign both copies of the letter indicating that he or 
she understands the reasons, conditions, and 
possible consequences of the probationary status. 
The student will keep one copy; the other will be 
placed in the student's file. 

Except in unusual circumstances, a student who 
receives an unfavorable evaluation should have 
received at least one verbal warning from the 
instructor and a copy or copies of the instructor's 
deficiency notice(s). 



The probationary period shall last from the date 
of the meeting until the next evaluation meeting 
(approximately 6 or 7 weeks). 

A senior placed on probation during the Spring 
semester who fails to successfully address his or 
her deficiency by the end of the semester will not 
be allowed to graduate. 

Counseling — The instructor will meet formally 
with the student at least twice before the next 
evaluation to apprise the student of his or her 
progress. These meetings are documented and 
copied to the Assistant to the Director. 

Final Evaluation Session — At the next evaluation 
session, approximately six weeks later, the major and 
full-time faculty will again discuss the pro-gress of 
each student Those students who are to be placed or 
continued on probation, or asked to leave the program, 
will come before the committee. 

A student who has shown improvement in rela- 
tion to the terms of the probation by the next 
evaluation, but who has violated another rule 
which could result in probationary status, may be 
asked to leave the program. 

In each case, the student will receive a letter 
which explains the faculty's decision and their 
recommendation to the Dean of the Philadlephia 
College of Performing Arts. 



120 



The School of Theater Arts 
Course Descriptions 

THUD 

Acting for Non-Majors 

3 credits 

TH101A&B 
Dramatic Literature Ml 

2 credits per semester 

An introductory course that places emphasis on 
the rale of the actor at the center of artistic move- 
ments throughout the centuries, from the Greek to 
the modern playwrights; on the importance, under- 
standing, and assimilation of a given text; on 
learning how to read and what to look for in a play 
and the means of communicating this knowledge 
to an audience through character portrayal. 

TH103A&B 
Acting Studio Ml 

3 credits per semester 

An introductory studio focusing on the fundamen- 
tals of acting, basic skills for stage communica- 
tion, voice and movement exercises, centering 
techniques, and exercises designed to increase 
physical and emotional stamina, identify and 
strengthen poor technique, develop focus and 
concentration, and to introduce the student to the 
demands of the theater. In the process of demysti- 
fying the craft, the student discovers the energy, 
power, and vulnerability of self. 

TH106A&B 
Stage Combat Ml 

2 credits per semester 

An introductory course focusing on the basic skills 
of stage combat. Introduces exercises designed to 
strengthen concentration, stamina, economy of 
movement, flexibility, and coordination. Physical 
and mental agility are strengthened and the 
student masters skills in unarmed combat, knife 
fighting, and dueling with quarterstaffs, 
courtsword, and nineteenth-century saber. 
Students are expected to perform safe, credible, 
and exciting stage combat. 

TH107A&B 
Modern/Ballet 

1 credit per semester 

Introduction to modern and ballet dance tech- 
niques and improvisation to develop the skills, 
kinetic perception, stamina, agility, and flexibility 
of the actor. Includes isolations, center floor, falls 
and recoveries, leaps, and other exercises de- 
signed to make the actor aware of his/her power 
and beauty of movement through time and space. 
TH109A&B 
Speech for Actors Ml 

3 credits per semester 

The first year will be devoted to creating an 
awareness of the vocal instrument and exploring 
its operation, as well as developing ways of 
communication through application of technique 
forwarded by Kristin Linklater. These would in- 
clude: standing awareness, physical relaxation, 
breathing awareness, touching sound, amplifica- 
tion, facial awareness, channeling sound, the jaw, 
the tongue, soft palate, resonance, range breath 
power, resonators, articulation, text work, floor 
work exercises, and standing exercises. 



TH114 

Mask Characterization 

2 credits 

Introductory course in character development 
focuses on a process designed to release and 
open the student's emotional and physical range, 
stimulate the imagination, place great emphasis 
on physical actions, acting with the whole body, 
and ridding the student of self-conscious manner- 
isms. Through the use of oversized masks (and a 
series of challenging exercises), the student is 
allowed the freedom to become someone else. 
The work aims to integrate the student's skills 
with his/her instincts, allowing impulses and the 
imagination to flow in conjunction with a flexible 
and vulnerable body. The work culminates with 
the presentation of a fully realized character; a 
synthesis of the entire semester's work. 

TH115A&B 
Movement for Actors Ml 

1 credit per semester 

Introduces basic movement vocabulary in Modem 
Dance using, primarily, basic improvisational tech- 
nique. Course designed to provide the student with 
awareness of his/her body and the basic skills of 
movement and dance, such as stretching, breathing, 
posture, coordination, balancing, etc. Course also 
allows student the experience of creative application 
of movement and movement expression through vari- 
ous forms and structures of improvisation. Each 
semester concludes with a presentation of a creative 
project which emphasizes movement in conjunction 
witfi other theatrical forms. 

TH118A&B 

Dance for Musical Theater Ml 

2 credits 

Dance technique training oriented to the specific 
needs of the musical theater performer. Classes in 
jazz, tap, movement, improvisation and related 
subjects build strength and awareness and extend 
the student dancer's physical and expressive 
range. Required of all musical theater majors. 

TH 119 A&B, 219 A&B. 319 A&B, 419 A&B 
Business of the Arts 

credit 

Exploration of the business and legal aspects of 
theater and the actor's career: the roles of agents, 
managers, producers, and managing directors are 
explored. Guest lecturers from the field conduct 
seminars on various topics such as unions, con- 
tracts, and starting theater companies. 

TH 140 A&B 

Voice for Musical Theater Ml 

2 credits 

Vocal technique training for musical theater stu- 
dents. Individual coaching sessions are combined 
with group sessions in which students rehearse 
and perform solo and ensemble musical theater 
repertoire. Each student will develop a working 
understanding of vocal anatomy, breathing, sup- 
port, placement, resonance and diction and a regi- 
men for out-of-class practice. Students work with 
cassettes outside of class. Required for all musical 
theater students. 



TH 203 A&B 
Acting Studio IIMV 

3 credits per semester 

This course continues the work started in TH 103 
A&B. Sensory work and its relationship to charac- 
ter work is further explored, leading to an in-depth 
study of motivation and subtext through sensory 
and adaptation exercises. Monologues and, 
finally, two-character scenes are used to deepen 
the actor's ability to execute honest and purpose- 
ful stage action and communication. Actor's logs 
are maintained on a daily basis, and extensive 
outside rehearsals on scenes are expected. All 
scene work is directed by the instructor. 
TH205A 
Stage Combat III 
2 credits 

This course continues the work started in TH 105 
A&B. Introduces the student to stage fighting with 
broadswords and rapiers. 

TH205B 
Stage Combat IV 

2 credits 

This course specifically prepares the student for 
the certification test of the American Society of 
Fight Directors. Fights are choreographed and 
perfected using several weapons and unarmed 
techniques in a credible, clear, and exciting stage 
fight in the context of a theatrical scene using 
dialog. Students admitted by invitation. Prerequi- 
site: minimum grade of B in TH 205 A. 

TH 207 A&B 
Jazz Dance Ml 

1 credit per semester 

Introduction to jazz movements and vocabulary, em- 
phasizing basic improvisational technique. Movement 
patterns, combinations of varying difficulty, and exer- 
cises to develop strength and coordination lead to 
structured improvisations which unite the skills of jazz 
with those of character development, exploring given 
and specific circumstances, objectives, and playing 
actions and intentions. Semester culminates with a 
showcase performance. 

TH 208 A&B 
Introduction to Music Ml 

2 credits per semester 

An introductory course focusing on developing under- 
standing of rhythm, note values and meter, tempi and 
dynamics, and the development of the student's ability 
to read and play songs on the piano. The course also 
involves listening, and surveys the history of music. 
Musical rhythms and structures are studied in the one- 
hour laboratory section. 



TH 209 A&B 

Speech for Actors 111—1 V 

3 credits per semester 

The first semester is spent restrengthening muscles, 
correcting pronunciation and placement, and redevel- 
oping range. Strict attention is paid to Standard En- 
glish pronunciation. The student is also drilled in and 
expected to be proficient in General American pronun- 
ciation both Polished and Common. The second se- 
mester continues the work of the first and begins the 
study of vocal interpretation from scripted material, 
both poetry and prose. Using unfamiliar texts, the 
actor is asked to interpret vocal character and develop 
vocal emotional line. The final step in the process is to 
train the actor to add the physical character without 
undermining vocal placement or creating strain. 

TH211 
Make-up 

1 credit 

The course focuses on the theory and execution of 
make-up techniques including aging, thinning, pros- 
thetics, facial analysis, and character study. At 
semester's end, the student should be able to execute 
character make-up in a consistent and effective way. 
The student will develop a professional make-up kit 
and will maintain a make-up log. 

TH213A&B 
Script Analysis Ml 

2 credits per semester 

Introduces the student to practical analysis of 
texts/scripts for enhancing the move from script to 
performance. The course explores the concepts of 
conflict, human action, character, action/reaction 
cycle, objective, dramatic structure, translations, 
and resources external to the script (historical 
perspective). At course's end, the student should 
possess a firm understanding of the process in- 
volved in script analysis, be thoroughly familiar 
with the composite types of dramatic literature, 
begin to understand the nature of an informed 
aesthetic, and to understand the consequences of 
each element of performance on its audience. 

TH215A&B 

Movement for Actors lll-IV 

1 credit per semester 

Movement for actors utilizing intensive physical- 
emotional improvisation work, including exercises in 
calisthenics, aerobics, rhythmic movement, combina- 
tions, center floor work, stretches, and the use of 
physical impulse to expand emotional range. 

TH217A&B 
Directing Studio Ml 

3 credits per semester 

An introduction to the basic fundamentals of di- 
recting including a thorough investigation of the 
directing vocabulary, exercises in space and com- 
position, exploration of scripts from the director's 
pofnt of view, and practical experience with 
ground plans. Finally the student will be asked to 
demonstrate his/her understanding of blocking 
values and textual analysis by conceptualizing and 
then staging simple scenes. The second semester 
introduces the basics of acting coaching and is 
coordinated with the script analysis and dramatic 
criticism. Semester culminates with student stag- 
ing and coaching a medium-length scene from a 
modern play. 



TH218A&B 

Dance for Musical Theater lll-IV 

2 credits per semester 

Prerequisite: Dance for Musical Theater l-ll. A 
continuation of the previous year's dance training. 
Technique training in jazz, tap, ballet and related 
subjects is continued, with focus on the technical 
needs of the musical theater performer. Required 
of all musical theater majors. 

TH219A&B 

Dramatic Criticism and Theory 

3 credits per semester 

A systematic introduction to the scope and range 
of thinking about the nature of theater through 
readings, discussions, and reports on major theo- 
rists and playwrights. Students will attempt to 
discover the underlying assumptions about life 
and art that affect each theorist in his time, and to 
note the major controversies, yet essential unity, 
of dramatic thought through the centuries. Major 
concepts considered for all periods include: the 
purpose of art; the test of good art; the nature of 
audiences and artists; and the proper language, 
setting, costumes, acting style, etc., for the drama. 

TH222A&B 

Theory and Ear Training 

3 credits per semester 

Skill training in sight reading, ear training, key- 
board and music theory, oriented to the needs of 
the musical theater performer. First year focuses 
on rudiments of notation, pitches, intervals, 
rhythms and simple chords. Students learn to read 
from "lead sheet" notation. Examples are drawn 
from the musical theater repertoire. In-class exer- 
cises and drills are supplemented with computer- 
based instruction. Required of all musical theater 
students. 

TH240A&B 

Voice for Musical Theater lll-IV 

2 credits per semester 

Prerequisite: Voice for Musical Theater l-ll. Indi- 
vidualized coaching session are used to solve 
individual vocal problems and continue develop- 
ment of the student's unique instrument. Students 
also meet weekly in group sessions to rehearse 
and present solo and ensemble musical theater 
repertoire. Listening assignments introduce stu- 
dents to the artistry of significant musical theater 
performers, past and present. Required of all mu- 
sical theater students. 

TH241A&B 
Voice Ml 

1 credit per semester 

Vocal training for theater students. Introduction to 
singing technique. Course designed to enable the 
student to demonstrate by performance that he/ 
she is able to produce vocal tones that are 
pointed, developed, and supported by a singing 
technique that is consistent. The student will dem- 
onstrate his/her capability by applying the tech- 
nique to standard vocal repertoire. Student works 
with cassettes outside of class. 



TH303A&B 

Acting Studio V-VI 

2 credits per semester 

This studio advances the work begun in TH 203 
A&B through more challenging exploration of 
technique leading to consistent open and honest 
communication on stage. Special emphasis is 
placed on physical actions and their attendant 
psychological actions, imagination cultivation and 
development, adjustment, inner objects, objec- 
tives, and communion. Acting Studio V will en- 
gage the student in an investigation of his/her 
acting instrument, both internally and externally 
through a variety of acting exercises and tech- 
niques based on Western, Eastern, and European 
theories of the art of acting. These techniques will 
then be researched and performed by the student 
through the use of monologues and scene work. 
Incorporates advanced scene work and problem 
solving using selected texts. 

TH 305 A&B 
Competitive Fencing 

2 credits per semester 

TH306 

Competitive Fencing-Foil 

2 credits per semester 

TH 307 A&B 
Tap Dance l-ll 

1 credit per semester 

An introduction to the basic vocabulary and tech- 
niques of tap dance. Exercises designed to de- 
velop rhythmically accurate footwork and accom- 
panying body and arm movements lead to mastery 
of simple combinations and time-steps. 

TH 309 A&B 

Speech for Actors (Lab) V-VI 

1 credit per semester 

The purpose of this course is to give the student a 
thorough and practical understanding of the voice 
and how it works as applied to Acting. Starting 
with physical awareness, the aim is, through tech- 
niques of self-sensing, to uncover and dismantle 
tensions which prohibit primary impulses. As the 
main element in the function of support, much 
emphasis is placed on spinal alignment and 
lengthening of the vertebral structure so the 
breathing is able to operate with more efficiency 
and economy. The goal is to undo blocks so that 
each area-jaw, tongue, soft palate-are systemati- 
cally examined and specific exercises are done 
which are designed to create a full awareness and 
understanding of how these muscles function. 

TH 311 A&B 
Theater History l-ll 

3 credits per semester 

A two-semester survey of the history of theater — 
its dramatic literature, theater structures and 
production methods, styles of acting, and histori- 
cal trends — through readings, discussions, and 
lectures. The course will explore the history of 
theater through its artistic, spiritual, political and 
cultural sources of empowerment. Students are 
provided with the historical background to apply 
acting, directing, and designing techniques to 
theater of other periods of history. 



122 



TH312A&B 

Musical Theater History Ml 

3 credits per semester 
A two-semester survey of the history of the 
American musical theater in the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. Students develop insight into 
the writers, performers and theater artists who 
created the legacy of the musical theater in 
America, and examine representative works from 
a variety of periods. Students will undertake re- 
search projects focusing on major performers, 
writers, directors and choreographers. Artists and 
their work will be studied in print and on audio 
and video recordings. Work in this class is 
complemented by rehearsal and performance of 
repertoire in a variety of periods and styles. 

TH313A&B 

Rehearsal and Performance Ml 

5 credits per semester 

Preparation and presentation of three faculty- 
directed works-in-progress acting projects. In 
addition, each student will prepare and present a 
solo performance. 

TH 313 A&B (Combat Program) 

Stage Combat Rehearsal and Performance 

Ml 

3 credits per semester 

An advanced course for combat majors including a 
review of fighting styles taught in the freshman 
and sophomore years. Training in sword and 
bockler, samurai sword, and quarterstaff. Students 
will publically perform at least two major fights 
each semester. 

TH 315 A&B 

Movement for Actors V-VI 

1 credit per semester 

A course sequence designed to aid the student in 
developing ease and flexibility of movement 
through increased awareness of habitual move- 
ment patterns. The student is guided through the 
process of substituting useful movement patterns 
for those that interfere with comfort and freedom 
of expression. A vocabulary and a consistent tech- 
nique is developed which the student can apply to 
stage movement, vocal work, dance, etc., and a 
greater kinesthetic sense enhances expressive 
movement and relaxed, controlled speech. 

TH316 
Mime 

2 credits 

Course designed to help the student become more 
aware of his/her body, how it works, how to con- 
trol its parts, and ultimately, how to express 
thoughts, feelings, and intentions with the body. 
Uses basic mime techniques such as isolations, 
rotations, resistance, and juggling to develop 
coordination, eye-hand flexibility, concentration, 
kinesthetic sense, and the ability to express physi- 
cally the essence of reality as well as reality. 



TH 317 A&B 
Directing Studio lll-IV 

3 credits per semester 

This studio advances the work of TH 21 7 A&B. 
The Stanislavski method is examined further and 
the student continues to explore the world of 
dramatic literature by extensive readings and by 
directing several scenes in the course of the year. 
Students cast and rehearse members of the acting 
ensemble for in-class scene presentations. In 
second semester, each student will direct at least 
one production, guided by a faculty advisor, as a 
work-in-progress presented before an audience. 

TH 318 A&B 

Musical Theater Dance Repertory 

2 credits per semester 

Prerequisite: Dance for Musical Theater lll-IV. 
Continued warm-ups and barre work offer the 
student the opportunity to develop strength and 
range and avoid injury. Combinations are drawn 
from the diverse styles of the musical theater 
repertory, enabling the student to develop versatil- 
ity and a sense of style. Required of all musical 
theater majors. 

TH320 

Musical Theater Performance 

2 credits 

An elective course for actors, singers and dancers 
in which students can explore the craft of the 
singing actor through exercises, improvisations 
and repertoire study. Students will learn and re- 
hearse solos, scenes and ensembles from the 
musical theater repertoire. Emphasis is on devel- 
oping honesty, ease and expressiveness in musi- 
cal theater performance. Prerequisite: one year of 
voice training, one year of acting training. 

TH 322 A&B 

Theory and Ear Training 

3 credits per semester 

Prerequisite: Music Skills for Musical Theater l-ll. 
Continued skill training in sight reading, ear train- 
ing, keyboard and music theory, oriented to the 
needs of the musical theater performer. Second 
year focuses on the ability to read more complex 
melodies, harmonies and rhythms at sight. Stu- 
dents learn to transpose melodies and chords. 
Theory studies include concepts of harmonic ten- 
sion and repose and elements of traditional song 
structure. Examples are drawn from the musical 
theater repertoire. In-class exercises and drills are 
supplemented with computer-based instruction. 
Required of all musical theater students. 

TH 340 A&B 

Voice for Musical Theater V-VI 

2 credits per semester 

Prerequisite: Voice for Musical Theater lll-IV A 
continuation of the musical theater vocal training 
sequence. Students work on more demanding and 
diverse literature in individual and group sessions. 
Students are coached on vocal skills pertinent to 
repertoire being represented in productions. Re- 
quired of all musical theater students. 

TH405A 

Competitive Fencing — Saber 

2 credits 



TH405B 

Competitive Fencing — Epee 

2 credits 

Each course provides the technique and tactics for 
the particular weapon. Training stresses coordina- 
tion, subtlety, speed, and quick decision making. 
Prerequisites: TH 105-106-205. 

TH 406 A&B 

Competitive Fencing-Elective 

2 credits per semster 

TH408 

Combat Review and Choreography 

2 credits 
Prerequisite: TH 206. 

TH 411 A&B 

Currents in Contemporary Theater l-ll 

2 credits per semester 

This course explores dramatic literature that re- 
flects the current trends in contemporary produc- 
tion. The plays read are selected from those writ- 
ers whose plays are being produced on Broadway, 
Off-Broadway, and/or at major regional theaters. 
The course is designed to give the student a prac- 
tical and intellectual knowledge of the works of 
contemporary playwrights representing and ad- 
dressing important issues, themes, and characters 
and ideas of the seventies and eighties. 

TH 413 A&B 

Rehearsal and Performance lll-IV 

6 credits per semester 

Preparation and public performances of faculty- 
and guest-directed theater productions. Faculty 
coach works with students on an individual basis 
in problem solving and strengthening technique 
related to the work in production. 

TH 414 A&B 

Senior Combat Thesis Ml 

6 credits per semester 

An advanced course in fight direction and stage com- 
bat instruction for senior combat majors. Each student 
will research, notate, and choreograph at leaset two, 
related, major fights per semester. These fights will 
be publically performed. Students will teach School of 
Theater Arts freshman and sophomore combat 
courses with appropriate lesson plans. 

TH 415 A&B 

Movement for Actors VII-VIII 

1 credit per semester 
Continuation of TH 31 5 A&B. 

TH420 

Auditioning Techniques 

1 credit 

Techniques of relaxation, resume preparation, and 
cold readings. Practice sessions with casting 
directors, producers, and agents give the student 
the necessary experience and technique to handle 
the challenge, stress, and fear of auditioning for 
the professional theater. 



123 



Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts Faculty 



George Akerley 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Computer/Electronic Music 
BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 
MM, Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts 
Studied composition with Joseph Castaldo and 
Andrew Rudin. Has worked as synthesist- 
performer, studio musician, and conductor with 
many entertainers, including singers Gloria Loring 
and Silvi Vartan, and Milton Berle and Henny 
Youngman; and in productions such as Cats, Evita, 
and Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect 
Up? Composer of electronic scores for dance 
companies, including Group Motion, and commer- 
cials. As member of Small Computers for the Arts 
Network (SCAN), presents workshops in use of 
computers in the recording studio. 
Operates Independent Sound East, which special- 
izes in commercial and noncommercial music. As 
harpsichordist, has frequently performed with 
Spectra Musica. 

David Arfaen 

Adjunct Professor 
Violin 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 
Early musical education at Chopin Academy of 
Music, Warsaw, Poland; continued studies at 
Mozarteum in Salzburg, Austria and Geneva Con- 
servatory of Music, Switzerland. Studied violin 
with Efrem Zimbalist. Former member of Detroit 
Symphony Orchestra and Cleveland Orchestra. 
Presently Associate Concertmaster of Philadelphia 
Orchestra. Solo career in Europe, Far East, Mexico, 
South America. Solo appearances with Philadel- 
phia Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra, the Orchestre 
de la Suisse Romande, Hong Kong Philharmonic, 
Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra. Premiered with 
Philadelphia Orchestra the violin concerto by 
Andrzej Panufnik. Recorded for Hellenic Broad- 
casting Corporation in Athens and was soloist at 
Athens Festival. Inaugurated the First International 
Music Festival at Santorini, Greece. 

Don AuspHz 

Lecturer 

Directing Studio/Solo Advisor 
BFA, Brandeis University 
Since playing Ben in the 1962 Society Hill 
Playhouse American premiere of Harold Pinter's 
The Dumbwaiter, he has split his time between 
theater and a variety of other activities such as the 
Peace Corps and criminal justice reform. At 
Brandeis he studied with Morris Carnovsky and 
Charley Moore. Directed thirty-five professional 
productions including Pinter's Old Times at Society 
Hill Playhouse. He has acted at most of the profes- 
sional theaters in the Philadelphia area and was 
Jacob Kahn in Chaim Potok's Sins of the Father, at 
the Festival Theatre for New Plays. Don is the 
co-author With Albert Einstein, which he also 
performed at Princeton University and the Walnut 
Street Theater. 



Irene G. Baird 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Acting Studio 
BFA, Carnegie-Mellon 
MFA, New York University 
Recipient of Ford Foundation acting fellowship. As 
Fulbright scholar, acted with the Bristol Old Vic 
Theatre in England. Performed with the American 
Shakespeare Festival in Connecticut, New York's 
Institute for Advanced Studies in Theatre Arts, and 
Circle in the Square Theatre; and in repertory with 
the Cleveland Playhouse, New York's Province- 
town Playhouse, and the Oregon Shakespeare 
Festival. Studied ballet with Leon Fokine and act- 
ing with Allan Miller, Lee Strasberg, and Allen 
Fletcher. Studied in Paris at the International Cen- 
ter for Theater Research under the supervision of 
director Peter Brook. Serves on the advisory board 
of The Philadelphia Company. Associate Professor, 
graduate theater department of Vlllanova Univer- 
sity, and directs for Vlllanova Theater. 

Julius Baker 

Adjunct Professor 

Flute 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 

Former member, Cleveland Orchestra under Artur 
Rodzinski; former member, Pittsburgh Symphony 
under Fritz Reiner; solo flutist of the Columbia 
Broadcasting Symphony Orchestra, New York City. 
Former member, for eighteen years, of Bach Aria 
Group; former solo flutist with the Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra; principal flute position with 
the New York Philharmonic until September 1983. 

Peter Bertini 

Assistant Professor 
Jazz Dance, Notation 
Coordinator: Jazz/Theater Dance 
BS, State University College at Brockport, NY 
MFA, Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts 
Studied in New York with JoJo Smith, Frank 
Hatchet, and Ligia Baretto. Performed with Garth 
Fagan's Bucket Dance Theatre in Rochester, NY, 
the Great Chazy Dance Company in Philadelphia, 
and as soloist and choreographer for Consort 
(PCPA). Has performed in Sydney, Australia, 
Buenos Aires, Paris, and Rio de Janeiro. 

John Blake, Jr. 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Jazz Violin 

BM, West Virginia State University. 

Studied at the Institute for Advanced Musical 
Studies in Switzerland. Recipient of grant from the 
National Endowment for the Arts to study the 
Southern Camatic violin style of India. Awarded 
special scholarship for study with violinist Zino 
Francescatti. Recordings with saxophonist Archie 
Shepp. Has toured nationally and abroad with 
Graver Washington, Jr., and McCoy Tyner. 
Member of ASCARBMI. 



124 



Alice Bloch 

Lecturer 

Dance History 

BA, University of Florida 

MA, UCLA 

Doctoral Candidate, Temple University 

Ed.D Dissertation: The Art of Duncan and Nijinsky. 
Lecturer and performer; presented "Isadora 
Duncan: Art of Embracing Life" throughout Penn- 
sylvania and the Midwest. 

Jonathan Blumenfeld 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Oboe 

BM, Curtis Institute of Music 
BA, Haverford College 

Studied with John DeLancie, John Mack, and 
Richard Woodhaus. Member of the Philadelphia 
Orchestra. Former principal oboe of the Savannah 
Symphony and member of the Concerto Soloists 
of Philadelphia. Has performed in numerous festi- 
vals, including Tanglewood, Spoleto, Blossom, 
Colorado, and Chautauqua. 

Ulrich Boeckheler 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Violoncello 

Post-graduate Diploma, Juilliard; 
Concert Exam, Detmold Academie, Germany 
Honorary degree, Accademia Chigiana, Siena/Italy 
Studied with Andre Navarra and Leonard Rose. 
Has appeared as soloist at the Florence (Italy) 
Maggio Musicale and toured with conductor 
Helmuth Rilling and the Bach Collegium of 
Stuttgart. Served as principal cellist of the Royal 
Philharmonic Orchestra of Flanders. Has received 
numerous awards including those bestowed by 
the International Tchaikovsky Competition in 
Moscow and the Gaspar Cassado Competition of 
Florence. In the United States, has performed at 
the Marlboro Music Festival and the Grand Teton 
Music Festival. Presently a member of the 
Concerto Soloists of Philadelphia. 

Michael Bookspan 

Adjunct Professor 
Percussion 

BS, Juilliard School of Music 
Studied with Morris Goldberg, Saul Goodman, and 
Fred Albright. Principal percussionist and associ- 
ate principal timpanist of the Philadelphia Orches- 
tra. Former xylophone soloist with the U.S. Air 
Force Band; former member of the Little Orchestra 
Society of New York, the New York City Ballet 
Orchestra, and the Goldman Band. 
Recipient of the C. Hartman Kuhn Award of the 
Philadelphia Orchestra. 



Tyrone Breuninger 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Trombone 

BS, West Chester State College 
MM, Temple University 

Studied with Henry C. Smith III. Associate princi- 
pal trombone with the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

Paula Brown 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Voice 

Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music 
BM, Peabody Conservatory 
Studied with Raquel Adonaylo. Soloist with the Phila- 
delphia Singers, Pennsylvania Pro Musica, Music 
Group of Philadelphia, Choral Arts Society of Philadel- 
phia, The Pennsylvania Opera Theater, as well as the 
Concerto Soloists, Kennett Square Symphony, and the 
Los Angeles Master Chorale. Performed on National 
Public Radio and Television. Has presented recitals 
throughout the United States. 

Lelia Calder 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Vocal Pedagogy/English Diction 
BA, Harvard University 
MM, Temple University 

Certified teacher of the Alexander Technique. Re- 
citalist; former soloist with Singing City, Philomel Trio. 
Former member of the Philadelphia Singers. Has 
taught at Swarthmore and Haverford Colleges. 

Susanne Case 

Lecturer 
Speech Lab 

BFA, University of the Arts 
Cum laude graduate of the University of the Arts 
in the spring of 1988, with an emphasis in acting. 
While attending, spent two years as a teaching 
assistant in Speech for the Actor I & II. Since 
receiving degree, performing member as well as 
vocal coach for the Philadelphia Area Repertory 
Theatre (PART.) Has taught for the Freedom The- 
ater as well as the University of the Arts. 

Marianne Casiello 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Voice 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 

Professional engagements include operatic roles 

of Mimi, Violetta, Micaela, Nedda, and Marguerite 

(Faust). Has taught at Curtis Institute of Music and 

Settlement Music School. 

Joseph Castaldo 

Professor 
Composition 

BM, MM, Philadelphia Conservatory of Music 
Studied at St. Cecilia Academy in Rome, and the 
Manhattan School of Music. Student of Vittorio 
Giannini and Vincent Persichetti. Numerous com- 
positions performed throughout the United States 
and abroad. Former founder and president of the 
Philadelphia Composers Forum. President Emeritus 
of the Philadelphia College of Performing Arts; 
served as president from 1966 to 1983. 



Donald Chittum 

Professor 
Theory 

BM, MM, DM, Philadelphia Conservatory of Music 
Studied with Boris Koutzen and Vincent 
Persichetti. Liberal Arts studies at Temple Univer- 
sity. Articles on music theory and analysis and 
criticisms and reviews appear in the British Music 
Review, The Musical Quarterly, Current Musicol- 
ogy, MLA Notes, The MENC Journal, and The 
American Music Teacher. Article on Berg's 
Wozzeck was cited and reprinted in Zur Musik- 
alischen Analyse by Der Wissenschaftliche 
Buchgesellschaft of Darmstadt. Past president of 
the Pennsylvania Music Teachers Association; 
president. Eastern Division, MTNA; National 
Theory-Composition Chair, MTNA; Task Force on 
Technology in Education, MENC; Fine Arts Advisor 
and Civil Service Examiner, State of Pennsylvania; 
State Arts Council Music Panel; Music Advisory 
Board Archdiocese of Philadelphia; recipient of 
Pennsylvania's Distinguished Service Award and 
Teacher of the Year, and awards from the 
Pennsylvania Music Teachers Association and the 
Alumnus of the Year Award from the Alumni 
Association of the Philadelphia Colleges of the 
Arts. Serves as chair of the Music Department of 
the Pennsylvania Governors School. 

Kent Christensen 

Associate Professor 

Humanities 

BA, Columbia University 

MA, University of Connecticut 

Doctoral studies, University of Pennsylvania and 

New York University 

Authority on opera and recorded vocal music. 

Andrea Clearfield 

Staff Accompanist 
BA, Muhlenberg College 
MM, Philadelphia College of Performing Arts 
Was awarded first prize in performance and 
musicianship from Muhlenberg College. Studied 
with Susan Staff and Margaret Garwood. In 
addition to being the Staff Accompanist at The 
University of the Arts, School of Music, teaches at 
Drexel University and is the Master Class Coordi- 
nator and Accompanist for the Sarasota Music 
Festival. Performer of classical and contemporary 
music, has worked in the Philadelphia area with 
Relache, Philadelphia Singers, Group Motion 
Multi-Media Theater, Philadelphia Festival Chorus, 
American Music Theater Festival, Philadelphia 
Improvisational Music Collective, West Jersey 
Chamber Chorus, Wilma Theater and the Susan 
Hess Dance Studio. 



125 



Charles Conwell 

Associate Professor 

Stage Combat/Competitive Fencing/Rehearsal and 

Performance 

BS, Northwestern University 

MFA, Brandeis University 

Certified recommended actor-combatant of the 
Society of American Fight Directors. Directed the 
wrestling match in As You Like It for the Hartford 
Stage Company, and the violence in Geniuses for 
the Philadelphia Company. Directed Hamlet, 
Macbeth, Twelfth Night, The Taming of the Shrew, 
The Cherry Orchard, Treasure Island, and A Lesson 
for Aloes for the People's Light and Theatre Com- 
pany; and God's Attic for the Philadelphia Festival 
Theatre for New Plays. Has taught stage combat 
at Temple University. 

Frank Costanzo 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Violin 

BM, University of Pennsylvania 

Member of the Philadelphia Orchestra, retired. 

Founder of the American String Orchestra. Recipient of 

the C. Hartman Kuhn Award from the Philadelphia 

Orchestra. Has taught at Bryn Mawr Conservatory. 

Neil Courtney 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Double Bass 

BM and Performer's Certificate, Eastman School of 

Music 

Studied with Oscar Zimmerman and Roger M. 
Scott. Member of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 
Former member of the U.S. Marine Corps Band 
and the Rochester Philharmonic under Erich 
Leinsdorf; former principal bass with the National 
Symphony Orchestra. 

Walter Dallas 

Associate Professor 
Director, School of Theater Arts 
BA, Morehouse College 
MFA, Yale Drama School 
Additional studies at Harvard University, 
University of Ghana at Legon 
Has directed regionally, including Baltimore's 
Center Stage, San Francisco's Lorraine Hansberry 
Theater, Philadelphia Festival Theater for New 
Plays, The Philadelphia Drama Guild and New 
Freedom Theatre, and Atlanta's Alliance Theatre; 
Off-Broadway, including New Federal Theater, 
Negro Ensemble Company, Hudson Guild Theatre, 
New York Shakespeare Festival, and Astor Place 
Theatre. Founder of Atlanta's Proposition Theatre 
Company and Drama School, and Yale's Black 
Ensemble Theatre Company. Member, National 
Endowment for the Arts Expansion Arts Panel; 
Pennsylvania Council for the Arts Theatre Panel; 
American Theatre Wing Panel; consultant, South- 
ern Arts Federation. Former National Endowment 
for the Arts Director Fellow. Recipient of Atlanta 
Critics Award for "Best Director" and "Creative 
Genius"; two Bronze Jubilee Awards for Theatre 
Excellence; an Atlanta Mayoral Proclamation, 
"Walter Dallas Day"; and a California Emmy nomi- 
nation. Taught theater at Antioch College, OH, and 
University of California, Berkeley. Member of the 
Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers. 



Wayne St. David 

Lecturer 

Jazz Dance Technique 

Choreographic credits include extensive musical 
theater work including Nunsense, Philadelphia's 
longest running musical, Washington Ballet 
Company, Maryland Youth Ballet, Society Hill 
Playhouse. Has taught in Paris, France and Wash- 
ington, DC at the Capitol Ballet. Currently Director 
of the Jazz Dance Department of Community 
College of Philadelphia. 

Sean Deibler 

Associate Professor 

Head, Classical Music Division 

Orchestra Conductor 

BS, Susquehanna University 

Graduate diploma, Kodaly Musical Training 

Institute 

Graduate certificate, Franz Liszt Academy, 

Budapest 

Founder and director of the Music Group of 
Philadelphia; artistic director of Choral Arts Soci- 
ety of Philadelphia. Prepares choruses for the 
Philadelphia Orchestra. Guest conductor of Euro- 
pean orchestras, including the Budapest Philhar- 
monic and Warsaw Symphony. 

Robert de Pasquale 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Violin 

Graduate, New School of Music 
Studied with Jascha Brodsky. Assistant principal sec- 
ond violin of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Violinist with 
the dePasquale String Quartet. Former member. New 
York Philharmonic and U.S. Navy Band. 

William de Pasquale 

Adjunct Professor 
Violin 

Studied with Veda Reynolds at the Curtis Institute 
of Music. Associate concertmaster of the Philadel- 
phia Orchestra. Received Fulbright Scholarship to 
study in Salzburg, Austria. Former concertmaster 
of the New Orleans Philharmonic; former concert- 
master and violin soloist with the St. Louis 
Sinfonietta. Violinist with the dePasquale String 
Quartet. Author of "Preparation of Orchestral and 
Concertmaster Auditions." Has taught at 
Haverford College and New York State School of 
Orchestral Studies. 

Ruben del Pilar Andino 

Lecturer 
Musicianship 

BM in Piano, University of the Arts 
MM in Voice, University of the Arts 
Vocal soloist with the Choral Arts Society of Phila- 
delphia. Regular accompanist, The Music Group of 
Philadelphia. Active voice/operatic and instrumen- 
tal accompanist. Major operatic roles include: 
Guglielmo, Bob (The Old Maid and the Thief), 
Marco (Gianni Schicchi), Bartalo (The Marriage of 
Figaro), Masetto (Don Giovanni), Sang world pre- 
miere of Boyle's Sonata for Singer. 



Marc Dicciani 

Director, School of Music 
Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Business of Music 
BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 
Music and record producer, conductor, arranger, 
composer, performer for albums, commercials, and 
soundtracks in California, New York, Philadelphia, 
Canada and Europe. Has conducted and performed 
internationally with Ben Vereen, Dionne Warwick, 
Joel Grey. Owns a record production and publish- 
ing company and operates a computer-based MIDI 
digital audio production facility. Drummer with 
numerous jazz and fusion bands, and house drum- 
mer at Caesar's Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City. 

Annette DiMedio 

Assistant Professor 

Musicianship for Dance, Theater 

Assistant Dean, Philadelphia College of 

Performing Arts 

BA, Swarthmore College 

MM, Temple University 

PhD, Bryn Mawr College 

Studied with Clement C. Petrillo, Philippe 
Entremont, Claudette Sorel. First to win all three 
Philadelphia Orchestra Student Division Competi- 
tions, performing with the orchestra on each 
occasion. Concert pianist experience includes 
performances in recital and soloist with orchestra 
nationally and internationally. As piano-duo with 
sister Regina has performed and directed the 
Department of Defense Overseas Tour in Germany 
and Egypt. Grand Prize winner of International 
Piano Recording Competition. Two piano record- 
ings and book "France McCollin" published by 
Scarecrow Press. 

Robert DiNardo 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Jazz Guitar 

Active studio musician; has performed with such 
artists as Tony Bennett, Ella Fitzgerald, Vic 
Damone, Joel Grey, and Shirley MacLaine. 
Frequent performances with Atlantic City casino show 
orchestras. Former staff guitarist of 'The Mike Dou- 
glas Show." Has performed with the Philadelphia 
Chamber Orchestra under Anshel Brusilow. 

Manfred Fischbeck 

Associate Professor 

Coordinator: Modern Dance; Artistic Director: 
Consort 

Studied at Freie University, Berlin 
Codirector, dancer, and choreographer of Phila- 
delphia's Group Motion Multi Media Dance Theatre 
Company and School, which has toured nationally and 
internationally, and has received grants from the 
Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the National 
Endowment for the Arts. Teaches and directs in the 
School of Theater Arts, University of the Arts, and in 
the Theater Department, University of Pennsylvania. 
Served as a dance panel member for the Pennsylvania 
Council on the Arts. 



126 



Ed Flanagan 

Lecturer 

Jazz Guitar 

MA, Temple University 

BA, La Salle University 

Studied guitar with Robert DiNardo and Dennis 
Sandoli; solfege with Evelyn Crochet and Annie 
Petit. Has performed with the Philadelphia 
Orchestra, and with Peter Nero and the Philly 
Pops, as well as numerous Broadway shows. Has 
worked with leading entertainers including, Liza 
Minnelli, Joel Grey, Steve Lawrence, Eydie Gorme, 
and Vic Damone. Numerous television and radio 
performances. Recorded album with Mike Dou- 
glas. Has taught at Temple University and Bucks 
County Community College. 

James Gallagher 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Recording Studio Techniques 
BA, Temple University 

Studio manager and chief engineer-Philadelphia Inter- 
national Records Studio 309. Producer and director of 
numerous films and videos; "Mainstream," winner of 
I.A.F grant from WHYY-TV1 2 aired on local cable and 
public TV. Audio engineer in Los Angeles, New York 
and Sigma Sounds, Philadelphia working with Stevie 
Wonder, Dionne Warwick, Teddy Pendergrass, the 
Spinners, Lou Rawls, O'Jays. 

Richard Genovese 

Senior Lecturer 

Trombone 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 

Studied with Glen Dodson, Charles Gusikoff, and 
Gordon Pulis. Freelance musician in Philadelphia 
and New York areas. Substitute trombone, Phila- 
delphia Orchestra. Has performed with orchestras 
of the Opera Company of Philadelphia, Marlboro 
Festival, Forrest Theatre, and Stuttgart Ballet. 

Mark Germer 

Senior Lecturer 
World Music 
Music Librarian 

Thomas Giacabetti 

Lecturer 
Jazz Guitar 

Anthony M. Gigliotti 

Adjunct Professor 

Clarinet 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 

Studied with Daniel Bonade at The Curtis Institute 

of Music. Principal Clarinet of the Philadelphia 

Orchestra since 1949. Member of the Philadelphia 

Woodwind Quintet. Former member of the Ballet 

Russe de Monte Carlo Orchestra and the Little 

Orchestra Society of New York. Soloist with the 

Philadelphia Orchestra. Well-known recitalistand 

clinician. Designer and manufacturer of patented 

clarinet mouthpiece and ligature. Consultant for 

the Selmer Instrument Company. Faculty member 

of The Curtis Institute and Temple University. 



Mark Gigliotti 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Bassoon 

Charles Gilbert 

Program Head, Musical Theater Program, 
School of Theater Arts 
MFA, Carnegie-Mellon University 
BA, University of Delaware 
Additional studies: Wilma Theater Playwrights 
Workshop, BMI Musical Theater Workshop 
Has directed productions for American Music Theater 
Festival, OperaDelaware, Delaware Theater Company, 
Theatre Express, Pittsburgh Park Players. Original 
musical theater works include Assassins (rights to the 
idea from this 1979 musical obtained by Stephen 
Sondheim as the basis for his new musical), A Is For 
Anything (commissioned by the Delaware Institute for 
the Arts in Education), Goosefeatos(Comrnissioned 
by the Reho-both Summer Childrens Theater), B.G.D.F. 
(New York showcase, Douglas Fairbanks Studio, 
1983). Has served as musical director and/or pianist 
synthesist for the Walnut Street Theater, Society Hill 
Playhouse, American Music Theater Festival, Opera 
Delaware, Theater Express. Formerly Associate 
Professor and Head of Musical Theater Program, Syra- 
cuse University; formerly Assistant Professor of The- 
atre, University of Delaware; visiting faculty member 
at Temple and Villanova Universities. 

Susan B. Glazer 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Director, School of Dance 
BA, American University 
MA, Temple University 

Additional studies at the Sorbonne, University of 
Pennsylvania, and UCLA 
Dance studies with Virginia Freeman, Paul 
Sanasardo, Pearl Lang, and Dan Waggoner. Mem- 
ber of the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts advi- 
sory panel. Has performed in and choreographed 
for companies in Philadelphia, Washington, DC, 
Los Angeles, Germany.and France. Founder and 
Artistic Director of Mosaic Repertory Dance Com- 
pany. Former editor of Dance Dialogue and autnor 
of articles on contemporary issues in dance. Has 
taught at Drexel University and Harcum Junior 
College; past president Philadelphia Dance Alli- 
ance. Current Editor of American Dance, publica- 
tion of the American Dance Guild. 

Janice K. Goltz 

Assistant Professor 

Music Education/Musicianship 

BM, BME, cum laude, Philadelphia College of the 

Performing Arts 

Kodaly studies with Erzebet Hegyi, and at the 
Kodaly Musical Training Institute. Solfege instruc- 
tor, Choral Arts Society. Composer of children's 
musicals. Former general music teacher, director 
of Concert Choir and Chamber Singers, and direc- 
tor of Theater Ensemble at Myers Elementary 
School, Cheltenham Township School District. 
General music teacher, St. Barnabas Episcopal 
School, Philadelphia. 



Sherry Goodill 

Lecturer 

Dance Therapy 

BA, Theater Arts/Dance and Psychology, Hollins 

College, VA 

MCAT, Hahnemann University 

ADTR, Academy of Dance Therapists, Registered 

Director of Movement Therapy Education, 

Hahnemann University. 

Marina Gusak-Grin 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Piano 

Graduate of Moscow State Conservatory 
Piano studies with Lev Oborin, Ensemble training 
with David Oistrakh, Leonid Kogan and Yuri 
Yankelevitch. Recipient of Special Diploma at the 
1970 International Tchaikovsky Competition. 
Extensive solo chamber music and orchestral per- 
formances throughout the United States, Canada, 
Europe, Central and South America. Former faculty 
member of Moscow State Conservatory. 

James W. Hala 

Senior Lecturer 
Trumpet 

BME, Temple University. 

Studied trumpet with Seymour Rosenfeld, Gerard 
Schwarz, and Frank Kaderabek; conducting with 
Gerard Schwarz. Member of Pottstown, Delaware, 
and Reading Symphony Orchestras. Has per- 
formed with the Brass Quintet in residence at the 
University of Delaware. Former member of the 
U.S. Army Band, Concerto Soloists, and Pennsylva- 
nia Pro Musica. Member of the Performance 
Organization. Has taught at Immaculata College 
and University of Delaware. 

David Haiti 

Lecturer 
Piano 

Yoko Hashimoto-Sinclair 

Lecturer 

Makeup 

MA, PhD, University of Michigan 

BA, MA, Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo, Japan 

Holds two theater certificates from Oxford 
University (Exeter College) and London University. 
Makeup designer for more than one hundred-fifty 
plays, musicals, operas and operettas including A 
Mid-Summer Night's Dream, The Threepenny 
Opera, Man ofLaMancha, Carmen, and Madam 
Butterfly. Artist-in-Education with Delaware State 
Arts Council from its inception to present. Visited 
more than twenty schools in Delaware presenting 
workshops on stage makeup, mask and Japanese 
folk dance and/or performing Japanese traditional 
dance. As president of RICE-Repertory of Interna- 
tional Cultural Exchange, organized two perform- 
ing tours to Japan. Also organized several East 
Coast tours. Worked several productions with 
Opera North and Opera Delaware. 



127 



Linda Haviland 

Dance History 

BA, Adelphi University 

fvl Ed, Temple University 

Doctoral candidate in aesthetics. Temple 

University 

Performs with Zero Moving Company. Has taught 

at BrynMawr College. 

Beth Hirshhaut-lguchi 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Jazz Technique, Jazz Ensemble 
BFA, MA University of Massachusetts 
Taught at Baltimore School for the Arts, Towson 
State University, and Dean Junior College. Assis- 
tant Artistic Director of the Danny Sloan Dance 
Company. Founder and Artistic Director of 
"Paradign Dance" and performed nationally with 
the Impulse Dance Company and Danny Sloan. 

Johnnie Hobbs, Jr. 

Assistant Professor 
Acting Studio 

Director and teacher of Philadelphia's New Freedom 
Theatres training program. Performance credits in- 
clude frequent key roles in New Freedom productions, 
including Zooman and the Sign, the Philadelphia pre- 
miere of Langston Hughes' Simply Heavenly, Julius 
Caesarax the Philadelphia Drama Guild, and Black 
Picture Show, directed by Walter Dallas. Guest-artist 
roles at Temple University and the Philadelphia Drama 
Guilds "POP. Festival of New Plays." Selected for 
1 987-88 Artist in Education Residency Program of the 
Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. 

Susan Hudson 

Lecturer 
Vocal Coaching 

Judith Jamison 

Distinguished Visiting Professor of Dance 
Modern Dance Technique/Guest Choreographer 
Studied at the Philadelphia Dance Academy (now 
the School of Dance of The University of the Arts) 
and the American Ballet Theatre. Made her debut 
with the American Ballet Theatre in 1965 and 
subsequently joined the Alvin Ailey American 
Dance Theatre where she became internationally 
acclaimed. Ms. Jamison inspired some of Alvin 
Ailey's most enduring choreography, including his 
seminal tribute to black women, "Cry." She has 
danced with two of today's leading male dancers 
in works specially created for them by Mr. Ailey: 
Mikhail Baryshnikov in "Pas de Duke" and 
Alexander Godonov in "Spell." Has made numer- 
ous appearances with ballet companies, including 
American Ballet Theatre, Harkness Ballet, San 
Francisco Ballet, and Maurice Bejart's Ballet of the 
20th Century. Has choreographed work for the 
Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre, Washington 
Ballet, Ballet Nuevo de Caracas, and Maurice 
Bejart. Recipient of three honorary doctorates, 
including one from the Philadelphia Colleges of 
the Arts. She has served as presidential appointee 
to the National Endowment for the Arts. 



Stephen Jay 

Professor 

Dean, Philadelphia College of Performing Arts 
Musicianship 

BM, MM, Manhattan School of Music 
Former president of the St. Louis Conservatory and 
Schools for the Arts and the Wisconsin Conserva- 
tory of Music; former dean of Cleveland Institute 
of Music. Former dean and chairman of Depart- 
ments of Theory and Composition of Manhattan 
School of Music and associate professor and 
chairman of the Music Department of University 
College of Arts and Science of New York Univer- 
sity. Former evaluator and member of the Expan- 
sion Arts Panel of the National Endowment for the 
Arts; evaluator for the National Association of 
Schools of Music; member of the NASM Commis- 
sion on Non-Degree Granting Institutions. Trustee 
of the National Guild of Community Schools for 
the Arts. Member of Advisory Board of Young 
Audiences of Eastern Pennsylvania. First president 
of the Organization of American Kodaly Educators. 
Author of Theory for Children; coauthor of Chro- 
matic Harmony and Sight Sound. 

Nancy Berman Kantra 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Modern/Jazz Dance 
BA, University of Colorado 
MFA, Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts 
MEd Candidate, La Salle 
Principal dancer with the Philadelphia Dance 
Company (Philadanco) since 1978. Scholarship 
recipient Pennsylvania Ballet Dance Theatre of 
Harlem and Harkness Ballet. Former director of the 
Powelton Mantner Educational Fund. Honored by 
Girl Scouts of Greater Philadelphia for her contri- 
bution to dance. Fellowship recipient from Penn- 
sylvania Council on the Arts. Teaches extensively 
throughout the tri-state area. 

Fredrick Kaufman 

Professor 

Theory/Composition 
BM, MM, Manhattan School of Music 
Compositions performed by orchestras including 
the Israel Philharmonic under Zubin Mehta, 
Pittsburgh Symphony under William Steinberg, 
Jerusalem Symphony, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, 
and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Ballet scores 
performed by the Royal Swedish Ballet, Royal 
Winnipeg Ballet, and Bat Sheva Dance Company. 
Author of The African Roots of Jazz and Diatonic 
Harmony. Music recorded by Orion Masterpiece 
Records. Awards from the National Endowment 
for the Arts; University of London; National Asso- 
ciation of Jazz Educators; California, Montana, and 
Pennsylvania Arts Councils; Norwegian Govern- 
ment; and Wisconsin Composers League. Recipi- 
ent of Fulbright Fellowship, and Darius Milhaud 
Award in Composition from the Aspen Music Fes- 
tival. Former resident composer. University of 
Wisconsin; formerly on faculty of the Rubin Acad- 
emy of Music in Israel, and resident composer and 
chairman of Music Department, Eastern Montana 
College. Former dean, Philadelphia College of the 
Performing Arts. 



Richard Kerber 

Lecturer 
Jazz Trumpet 
BM Ed, Temple 

Active freelance trumpet player in the 
Philadelphia-Atlantic City area. Has performed 
with Tony Bennett, Burt Bacharach, Crystal Gayle, 
Dionne Warwick, and Maureen McGovem on 
stages in Philadelphia, Atlantic City, and Las Ve- 
gas. Performs in productions at the Walnut Street 
Theater since 1 984. Jazz work includes participa- 
tion with the group Trumpets East at the New York 
Brass Conference and performances at the Mellon 
Jazz Festival. Has recorded on the Philadelphia 
International, Atlantic, MCA, and Columbia labels. 
His musical arrangements have been recorded by 
Kool and the Gang, Stephanie Mills, and Phyllis 
Hyman. Has appeared in numerous television 
productions including the Philadelphia Freedom 
Festival (1989) and the Mel Torme Special (1989). 
Was formerly on the faculty of the University of 
Nevada, Las Vegas. 

Ron Kerber 

Senior Lecturer 
Jazz Saxophone 
BM, Philadelphia Colleges of Arts 

Studied with Vince Trombetta and Marshall Taylor. 
Has performed in orchestras of the Forrest and 
Walnut Street Theatres, and in touring bands and 
orchestras in Philadelphia, Atlantic City, and other 
cities throughout the USA and Canada. 
Recordings and commercial work include jingles, 
films, and television programs. Featured rock and 
jazz performer with his own and other bands. A 
former member of the Philadelphia Saxophone 
Quartet, frequently performs with chamber groups. 

Jeffrey Kem 

Lecturer 
Musicianship 
Choral Conductor 

Jeffrey Khaner 

Adjunct Professor 

Flute 

BM.Julliard 

Principal flute of Philadelphia Orchestra beginning 

1990-91 season. Has been principal flute and has 

appeared as soloist with the Cleveland Orchestra 

(1982-1990), Pittsburgh Symphony, Mostly Mozart 

Festival, Atlantic Symphony in Nova Scotia. Past 

head of flute department of Cleveland Institute of 

Music. Faculty member of Curtis Institute. 

Chin Kim 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Violin 



128 



Leland Kimball 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Opera Staging 
BA, Pomona College 
MA, University of Pennsylvania 
Opera director and director of development, Opera 
Delaware. Has stage directed and designed numerous 
productions for Opera Delaware, including Aida. and 
Help, Help, The Globolinksas assistant to Gian Carlo 
Menotti. Designed and directed for Kentucky Opera, 
Providence Opera, Opera on the Sound, and Virginia 
Opera. During the 1987-88 season, directed A Masked 
fia//for Opera Delaware and La Boheme for the Dela- 
ware Valley Lyric Opera. Has sung with the Washing- 
ton Opera, the Opera Company of Philadelphia, and 
the Philadelphia Singers. 

Ronen Koresh 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Jazz/Theater Dance 

Studied at the Bat Sheva Dance School in Israel. Has 
performed with companies in Israel on stage and 
television. Soloist with Waves Jazz Dance Company 
and performs with the Evening Magazine Dancers. 
Has taught at the Pennsylvania Ballet School, Jazz 
Unlimited, and the Jazz Dance Center. 

Jay Paul Krush 

Senior Lecturer 
Tuba 

BM, Eastman School of Music 
MM, Northwestern University 
Studied tuba with Arnold Jacobs, Abe Torchinsky, 
and Cherry Beauregard; composition with Joseph 
Schwanter, Samuel Adler. Warren Benson, and 
Alan Stout. Member of Chestnut Brass Company. 
Performs with Concerto Soloists and the orchestra 
of the Pennsylvania and Milwaukee Ballet. Direc- 
tor of Wind Ensemble, Haverford College. Former 
principal tuba of Eastman Wind Ensemble and 
Yale/Norfolk Brass Quintet. Recipient of composi- 
tion awards from National Society of Arts and 
Letters, National Endowment for the Arts, Nation- 
al Association of College Wind and Percussion 
Instructors, and the Bicentennial Anthem Prize. 
Has taught at Temple University. 

Paul Krzywicki 

Adjunct Professor 
Tuba 

BM, MM, Performer's Certificate, Indiana 
University 

Teaching assistant to William Bell; studied with 
Joseph Novotny, Lloyd Geisler, Abe Torchinsky, 
and Leo Romano. Member of Philadelphia Orches- 
tra. Member of Philadelphia Brass Soloists.Former 
member of the Buffalo Philharmonic, Portland 
Symphony, Youngstown Symphony, Boston Ballet, 
Boston Opera Company, and the U.S. Military 
Academy Band. Has performed in the Tanglewood 
and Aspen Music Festival orchestras. Has taught 
at Curtis Institute of Music and Temple University. 



Joan Lanning 

Tap Dance 

Tap training with Michael I. Lanning, Charles Kelly, 
Phil Black, and Bob Audi of New York. 
Certified member of Dance Educators of America, 
Inc., Dance Masters of America, and International 
Teachers of Dance, Inc. Taught at various conven- 
tions along the east coast and various dance 
studios in the tri-state area. 

Michael Lanning 

Senior Lecturer 

Tap Dance 

Performer in and choreographer of numerous 

productions in the Atlantic City and Philadelphia 

area. Among his students are Frankie Avalon and 

Joey Lawrence. 

Joseph Lanza 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Violin 

BS, Juilliard School of Music 
Violin studies with Joseph Fuchs and Frank 
Costanzo; chamber music with Hans Letz, Edouard 
Dethier, and members of the Juilliard String Quar- 
tet. Member of Philadelphia Orchestra. Former 
member of U.S. Navy Band and Orchestra. 

Barbara Leiland 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Script Analysis 

BA, Beaver College 

MA, Villanova University 

Professional experience in areas of dramaturgy, 

directing, acting, stage management, as well as 

teaching of drama, including the Wilma Theatre, 

Villanova University's Contemporary Shakespeare 

Company and Michael Bennett's Dreamgirls. 

John Leonard 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Classical Guitar 

BM, MM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Studied with of Robert DiNardo; student of plec- 
trum guitar with Joseph Sgro and Dennis Sandole. 

Vema Leslie 

Lecturer 

Movement for Actors 

Studied dance, voice, and acting at New Freedom 
Theatre where she frequently performs and 
teaches movement and jazz dance. Directs work- 
shops and lecture demonstrations in dance pro- 
duction and theater movement. Formerly instructor 
in Philadelphia Summer Youth Program. 

Loren Lind 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Flute 

BM, Temple University 

Graduate studies, University of Hawaii 

Student of Murray Panitz. Member of the 

Philadelphia Orchestra. Former member of the 

Lyric Opera Orchestra and Honolulu Symphony. 



Amadeo William Liva 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Violin 

BS, Juilliard School of Music 
MA, Columbia University 
Studied with Theodore Pashkus, Mischa 
Mischakoff, Edouard Dethier, and Vladimir 
Blumberg. Recipient of the NDEA Scholarship, 
University of Florence, Italy; and Ford Foundation 
Scholarship in Chamber Music, Oberlin Conserva- 
tory. Former concertmaster of Binghamton Sym- 
phony, Huntington Philharmonic, and first violin of 
the Long Island String Quartet. Former member of 
National Orchestra Association, Baltimore Sym- 
phony, and Ars Musica Trio. Served on faculties of 
Peabody Conservatory and Man/wood College. 

Julia Lopez 

Lecturer 
Spanish Dance 

Julia Lopez of Madrid, Spain, received her training 
in traditional flamenco dance from such notables 
as Antonio Marin, La Quica and Ciro. She has 
danced in the Spanish cinema and in cabarets in 
Madrid, Paris, Haiti and throughout the Americas. 
She has performed as dance partner with Jose 
Greco and as a featured dancer in the Boston 
Flamenco Ballet, the Philadelphia Academy of 
Music's Carmen and various presentations of 
Pennsylvania Civic Ballet. 

Jay Madara 

Senior Lecturer 

Technical Director, Theater Functions 

BFA, SUNY Purchase, Theater Design Technology 

In addition to lighting design and technical direction 

for all University of the Arts productions, Mr. Madara 

is a free-lance lighting designer and consultant in the 

tri-state area. Past projects include designs for the 

Wilma Theater, Painted Bride Center, Opera Delaware, 

Westchester Lyric Opera and the Rutgers Fine Arts 

Center in Camden, New Jersey. 

Gary John Magby 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Vocal Literature 

BM, Boston Conservatory (Voice and Piano) 
MM, New England Conservatory (Vocal Coaching) 
Musical Director. Chautanqua Opera. Former 
Coach/Assistant Conductor of Washington Opera, 
St. Louis Opera; former Principal Coach, Wolf Trap 
Opera, The Juilliard School. 



129 



Anthony Marchione 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Trumpet 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 
Musical director, conductor, and principal trumpet, 
Valley Forge Music Fair. Former principal trumpet 
with the CBS Symphony Orchestra, Philadelphia 
Lyric and Grand Operas, and Philadelphia Little 
Symphony. Has performed and recorded with the 
Metropolitan Opera and Stuttgart Chamber Sym- 
phony. Performed as principal trumpet under Bruno 
Walter, Leonard Bernstein, and Josef Krips. Former 
principal trumpet at many theaters, including the 
Shubert, Forrest, and Walnut Street theaters. Has 
taught at Temple University. 

Rachel Mausner 

Lecturer 

Alexander Technique 
BA, Swarthmore College 
MFA, Temple University 

Studied the Alexander Technique with Mi. 
Barstow and the Alexander School in Philadelphia. 
Has taught dance and movement at Community 
College of Philadelphia. 

Guido Mecoli 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Clarinet 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 
Studied with Ralph MacLean, Jules Serpentine, 
Ignatius Gennusa, and Anthony Gigliotti. Member 
of the Pennsylvania Ballet Orchestra. Former prin- 
cipal clarinetist with the Philadelphia Lyric and 
Grand Opera companies; former member of Read- 
ing Symphony and Trenton Symphony Orchestra; 
guest soloist with Curtis String Quartet. 

Douglas S. Medlin 

Associate Professor 

Head, Music Education Division 

BM, University of Georgia 

MM, East Carolina University 

EdD, University of Illinois 

Former director of music education at West 

Virginia Wesleyan College, music instructor at 

Macon Junior College, and public school teacher 

in Connecticut and Virginia. 

Pat Mercuri 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Jazz Guitar 

BM, BME, Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Student of Robert DiNardo and Dennis Sandole. 
Performer on fretted instruments with the Phila- 
delphia Orchestra, Opera Company of Philadel- 
phia, The Pennsylvania Opera Theater, and the 
Forrest Theatre. Has taught at Cabrini College and 
Eastern College. 

Naomi Mindlin 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Modern Dance Technique 

BA, Brandeis University 

MA, New York University 

Performed with the Boston Ballet Company, New 

England Dance Theatre, Bridgeport Ballet, and 

Jose Limon Dance Company; has choreographed 

solo work. 



Paula Jean Mlinar 

Costumer 

Costume design, construction and coordination for 
productions at York Little Theater, Ephrata Play- 
house in the Park, Columbia Little Theater, and 
opera programs in Shubert Theater. Does free- 
lance costume design and construction; maintains 
personal costume inventory and rental business. 

Leonard Mogill 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Viola 

BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 
Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 
Studied with Louis Bailly. Member of the Philadel- 
phia Orchestra for 48 years (assistant solo viola for 
25 years), retired. Soloist with the Philadelphia 
Orchestra in Bach Brandenburg Concerto. Former 
member of Musical Fund Quartet. Publications by 
G. Schirmer include Orchestral Studies of 20th 
Century Composers, Mogill Scale Studies, and 
many transcriptions. Recipient of Honorary Doctor 
of Music degree from Philadelphia College of the 
Performing Arts. Has taught at Temple University. 

Margarita Csonka Montanaro 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Harp 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 
Graduate studies at Vienna Music Conservatory 
Studied with Carlos Selzedo and Marilyn Costello. 
Member of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Has per- 
formed in the Marlboro Festival. 

Janee Munroe 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Viola 

Studied viola with William Primrose at the Curtis 
Institute of Music and with Boris Kroyt of the 
Budapest String Quartet. First deskviolist, Na- 
tional Symphony, Washington, DC; first violist and 
soloist, European tour, Juilliard String Ensemble; 
principal violist and soloist, North Carolina Sym- 
phony. Violist Masters Festival of Chamber Music, 
Hidden Valley Music Seminars, Monterey and 
Carmel Valley, CA, June 1982-84. Member of 
Goffriller Piano Quartet. Has taught at Juilliard 
School precollege division. 

Lome Munroe 

Adjunct Professor 
Cello 

Student of Ivor James at Royal College of Music 
in London. Studied with Felix Salmond and Gregor 
Piatigorsky at the Curtis Institute of Music. Princi- 
pal cello, New York Philharmonic. Has made over 
85 solo appearances with the New York Philhar- 
monic, and has appeared as soloist with many 
other orchestras, including the Philadelphia 
Orchestra, Winnipeg Symphony, Kansas City Sym- 
phony Orchestra, and Long Island Symphony. 
Has performed with chamber music groups and in 
recitals throughout the United States, Canada, and 
Europe. Has toured Europe as conductor-soloist 
with the America String Ensemble. Has taught at 
Julliard School. 



James Murray 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Competitive Fencing 
BA, lona College 

Diploma, American Fencing Academy, Cornell 
University 

Fencing Master certified by the International 
Academy of Arms, was exchange student in 
fencing at the Institute National de Sport in Paris. 
Certified by the U.S. Fencing Coach's Association, 
is a member of the United States Fencing Asso- 
ciation Olympic coaching staff. Former instructor 
at the Academy of Fencing in Boston. Assistant of 
Maestro Lajo Csiszar, University of Pennsylvania. 
Head fencing coach at Haverford College. 

Edward Myers 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Ballet, Repertory 

Principal dancer with the National Ballet of 
Washington, DC and the Pennsylvania Ballet from 
1974-87. His repertory includes major roles from 
Swan Lake. Sleeping Beauty, Giselle and most of 
the great classics. Has guest taught, performed 
and choreographed throughout the United States. 

Milton Myers 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Modern Technique, Repertory 
Artistic director and choreographer of the Joyce 
Trisler Company for six years and company 
teacher and choreographer for the Alvin Ailey 
American Dance Theater. Former faculty member 
of NYU Tisch School of the Arts. Co-Director of 
the Modern Department at Jacob's Pillow. Inter- 
nationally recognized master teacher who is reg- 
ularly invited to teach in Europe, South America 
and Canada. 

Joseph Nero 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Jazz Percussion 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 
House drummer/percussionist, Forrest Theatre and 
Trump Plaza Hotel-Casino in Atlantic City. Freelance 
studio musician in commercial and jazz music. Has 
toured nationally with Burt Bacharach, Anthony 
Newley, Bette Midler; internationally with Bobby 
Rydell. Played many New York City jazz nightclubs 
and theaters; former house drummer, Waldorf 
Astoria. Has performed with Pennsylvania Ballet and 
Philly Pops orchestras. 



130 



Maria Carmela Novielli Stea 

Senior Lecturer 
Italian Diction 
BA, Temple University 
MA, Umversita di Bari, Italy 
Diploma, Institute Sacro Cuore Bari, Italy 
Has taught elementary and intermediate courses 
in Italian at Temple University, Chestnut Hill 
College and Villanova University; currently 
teaches elementary, intermediate and advanced 
courses in Italian at the America-Italy Society. 
Served as interpreter/translator for the Institute 
for the Achievement of Human Potential, Nation- 
alities Service Center, Council for International 
Visitors, and the Opera Company of Philadelphia. 
Is a member of the America-Italy Society and 
American Association of Teachers of Italian. 

Anthony C. Orlando 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Percussion 

BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy. 
Studied with Michael Bookspan, Fred Hinger. 
Member of the Philadelphia Orchestra. Former 
Principal Percussion and/or Timpanist with Grand 
Teton Music Festival, Pennsylvania Ballet Orches- 
tra, Greater Trenton Symphony Orchestra. Active 
clinician and recitalist, featuring ragtime xylo- 
phone and avant-garde music for marimba and 
solo percussion. Former Associate Fellow at 
Tanglewood. 

Andrew Pap 

Associate Professor 
Ballet 

Studied at Scoala de Coreografie in Romania. 
Former member of the Romanian State Opera and 
Ballet; taught at Scoala de Coreografie, the Italian 
Dancers Union, Saratoga Ballet Center, Interna- 
tional Dance Center in Rome, and The Alvin Ailey 
American Dance Theatre and Ballet Companies. 
Has choreographed for opera and ballet compa- 
nies. Faculty of Pennsylvania Ballet School and 
Artistic Director of the Volshky Dance Company. 

Phuoc Phan 

Lecturer 

Than Vo Dao 

BFA, University of the Arts 

Certificate, Nguyen Lahn Martial Arts School, 

Viet Nam 

Martial arts studies at the Hong Van Studio in 
Bahat. Has studied fine arts, graphics, illustration, 
and interior design at Saigon's National University 
of Art. Taught calligraphy at Temple University, 
and arts and crafts in Hong Kong. Founder and di- 
rector of the only Than Vo Dao martial arts school 
in the United States. 



James Pugb 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Trombone 

BM, Eastman School of Music 

New York recording and jazz artist. Five-time 

recipient of the National Academy of Recording 

Arts and Sciences' Most Valuable Player Award. 

Has been featured soloist on tours and recordings 

with Woody Herman, Chick Corea, Don Sebesky, 

Barbara Cook, William Galison, Dave Matthews 

and Eileen Farrell. Featured on two Grammy 

Award winning albums with Woody Herman, 

Giant Steps and Thundering Herd. Soundtrack 

credits include such films as Brighton Beach 

Memoires, The Morning After, Biloxi Blues, and 

Family Business. 

Trudy Pitts 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Jazz Piano 

Richard A Raub 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Vocal Coach/Accompanist 

BS, MM, West Chester University 

Studied with Benjamin Whitten and Martin Katz. 

Frequently performs with singers in recitals in the 

USA, Canada, and Europe. Has worked with many 

area opera companies, including The Hollybush 

Festival in New Jersey. Has taught at Academy of 

Vocal Arts, Temple University; opera workshop 

music director, Blossom Festival School at Kent 

State University. 

Therese Casadesus Rawson 

Senior Lecturer 

French Language and Diction 

MA, Sorbonne, Paris 

Ph 0, University of Pennsylvania 

Language coach for professional singing organiza- 
tions, including the Opera Chorus of Philadelphia 
and the Philadelphia Singers. Active church solo- 
ist. Has taught at Haverford College and Bryn 
Mawr College. Has taught at Curtis Institute of 
Music and Academy of Vocal Arts. 

Deborah Reeder 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Cello 

BM, MM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 
Studied with Lome Munroe and Luigi Salva. 
Principal cello, The Opera Company of Philadel- 
phia, Trenton Symphony, Mozart Society of Phila- 
delphia. Member of Pennsylvania and Milwaukee 
Ballet company orchestra; cellist of The Philadel- 
phia Trio and Amadio String Quartet. Former 
member of the Philadelphia Orchestra, Princeton 
Chamber Orchestra, Concerto Soloists, Pennsylva- 
nia Contemporary Players, Cheltenham Trio, and 
American Society of Ancient Instruments (viola da 
gamba). Cofounder of Music in the Mountains. 
Concert Artist Guild Award winner. Has taught at 
Haverford College and Temple University. 



Ronald Reuben 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Clarinet 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music; Temple 
University 

Studied with Joseph Gigliotti and Anthony Gigliotti. 
Member of the Philadelphia Orchestra (bass clarinet). 
Former member of the Stan Kenton Band, Chicago 
Little Symphony, and Chamber Symphony of Philadel- 
phia. Has taught at Temple University. 

LaVaughn Robinson 

Adjunct Professor 
Tap Dance 

Performed in Apollo Theatre in New York City and 
Frank Palumbo's clubs in Philadelphia. Performed 
with the Dancing Jets and South Sydney League 
in Australia, and with Wayne Newton's show for 
several years. Now performing internationally as a 
representative of the State Department. 
Recipient of the 1989 National Heritage Award. 

Gabriela Roepke 

Senior Lecturer 

Literature/Opera Literature/Dramatic Literature 

and Contemporary Theater 

Studied in Santiago, Paris, and at the University of 
North Carolina. Author and producer of over fifteen 
original plays in Latin America, the United States, and 
Spain. Numerous articles in publications, including: 
San Diego Opera Magazine, Opera News, New York 
City Opera Spotlight and The Opera Magazine. Lec- 
tures for New York City Opera Guild. Former faculty 
member of the Juilliard American Opera Center; 
former visiting lecturer at New York's New School for 
Social Research, and the Society for Ethical Culture. 
Recipient of two Fulbright Fellowships, The Roland 
Holt Playwright Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. 

Louis Rosenblatt 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Oboe, English Horn 
Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 
Joined the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1959 when 
his former teacher John Minsker retired as English 
Homist. Studied oboe at Curtis under Marcel 
Tabuteau. Was first oboist in the U.S. Army Field 
Band, English Hornist in the Houston Symphony, 
and the New Orleans Philharmonic. Has made 
numerous solo appearances with the Philadelphia 
Orchestra and three recordings as soloist: Sibelius' 
The Swan of Tuonela, Honeggar's Concerto da 
Camera for Flute, English Horn, and String Orches- 
tra, Skrowaczewski's English Horn Concerto, 
Persichetti's English Horn Concerto, and Diamond's 
Elegies for Flute, English Horn, and Strings. Soloist 
with the Philadelphia Orchestra in Fiala's English 
Horn Concerto during 1 989-90 season. 



131 



Seymour Rosenfeld 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Trumpet 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 

Studied with Saul Caston. Member of the Philadelphia 

Orchestra; founding member of the Philadelphia Brass 

Ensemble. Former first trumpet St Louis Symphony, 

and member of the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. 

Winner of three Grammy nominations and the 

Grammy for Best Classical Music Record of 1 969 in 

the Antiphonal Music of Gabrielli. Author of Thirty-Six 

Elementary Studies for Trumpet 

Henry Roy 

Jazz Dance 

BFA, Temple University 

An apprentice with The Alvin Ailey Dance Com- 
pany and has performed with Joan Kerr Dance 
Company, Sybil Dance Company and Civic Ballet. 
Is on the faculties of Glassboro State College and 
Bryn Mawr College. 

Andrew Rudin 

Professor 

Theory/Composition 
BM, University of Texas 
MA, University of Pennsylvania 
Studied composition with Kent Kennan, Paul Pisk, 
George Rochberg, and Karlheinz Stockhausen. 
Electronic music compositions heard in the film 
Fellini Satyricorr, has composed for the Pennsylva- 
nia Ballet, Murray Louis, and the Alwin Nikolais 
Dance Theatre; musical contributions to Tennes- 
see William's play Outcry. 

Barbara Sandonato 

Assistant Professor 
Ballet 

Studied with George Balanchine at the School of 
American Ballet. Former principal dancer and as- 
sociate founder of the Pennsylvania Ballet Com- 
pany. Former principal dancer with the National 
Ballet of Canada. Featured guest artist with the 
Boston Ballet Company, the Wisconsin Ballet with 
Rudolph Nureyev, and the New York City Opera 
Company. Has taught at the Pittsburgh Ballet The- 
atre and the Pennsylvania Governor's School for 
the Arts. Teaches at the Pennsylvania Ballet, Alvin 
Ailey American Dance Center and Philadanco. Has 
choreographed for opera ballet and ballet compa- 
nies here and abroad. Recipient of bronze medal 
senior division-1970 International Ballet Competi- 
tion, Varna, Bulgaria. 

Pearl B. Schaeffer 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Dance Pedagogy 

BS, Drexel University 

MFA, Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts 

Executive director of the Philadelphia Dance 
Alliance. Has performed with the Opera Company 
of Philadelphia, the Duncan Centenary Ensemble; 
has performed and worked with Mudra, the 
School of Maurice Berait, Opera Ballet of Lyon, 
France, the Academy of Vocal Arts, the Performing 
Arts School of Philadelphia. 



Carl B. Schmidt 

Professor 

Chair, Classical Performance Graduate Studies 
Theory and History 
BA, Stanford University 
MA, PhD, Harvard University 
Studied with Nadia Boulanger. Scholar of 
seventeenth-century Italian and French opera and 
ballet; recipient of research awards from the 
American Philosophical Society, the American 
Council of Learned Societies, and the National 
Endowment for the Humanities; general editor of 
the New Lully Edition. Articles and editions pub- 
lished in Journal of the American Musicological 
Society, Hivista Italiana di musicologia, Current 
Musicology, Recherches, The New Grove Dictio- 
nary, A-R Editions, Dix-septiem Steele, and Music 
Library Association Notes. 

Henry Scott 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Double Bass 

BM, University of Rochester, Eastman School of 

Music 

Student of Ferdinand Maresh, Oscar G. 
Zimmerman, and Roger M. Scott. Member of the 
Philadelphia Orchestra. Former member of the 
Rochester Philharmonic, the Chamber Symphony 
of Philadelphia, the Baltimore Symphony, and the 
New York Philharmonic. Conductor of Main Line 
Symphony. Director of Psychoanalysis, Heed 
University. Has taught at Temple University. 

Peter Segal 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Classical Guitar 

BA, MM, Temple University 

Studied with Jose Tomes, Alirio Diaz, and Oscar 

Ghiglia. Affiliate artist performances throughout the 

USA and Europe as chamber music recitalist, and 

soloist with orchestra. Wnner of 2nd Prize, 1 971 , 

International Competition for Guitarists, Italy. 

Jon Sherman 

Ballet-Dance Extension 
BS, Temple University 

Studied at the Pennsylvania Ballet, American Bal- 
let Theatre, and the Philadelphia College of the 
Performing Arts. Performed with the Opera Com- 
pany of Philadelphia, Danceteller, and Ballet Klos. 

Lee Silvan 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Theory 

BM in Composition, Summa cum laude, 
Philadelphia Musical Academy 
MA in Composition, University of Pennsylvania 
Student of George Rochberg. Associate Professor 
of Music and former Chairman, Community Col- 
lege of Philadelphia. Former Vice Chairman for 
Theory and Composition, Music Teachers National 
Association. 



Carole Luppescu Sklaroff 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Ballet 

Studied with Margaret Craske and Anthony Tudor 
at the Metropolitan Opera Ballet School. Former 
member of the Metropolitan Opera Ballet touring 
group and the Ballet Rambert, dancing roles in 
Coppelia and Giselle; principal dancer with the 
Pennsylvania Ballet Company, dancing leading 
roles in Lilac Garden, Sleeping Beauty, Mignon 
pas de deux, Le Corsaire pas de deux. Donizetti 
Variations and Concerto Barocco. Taught ballet 
classes at the Pennsylvania Ballet School and the 
Ballet Studio. Has taught at the School of the 
Pennsylvania Ballet Company. 

Suzanne Slenn 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Ballet 

Early ballet training with Ballet des Jeunes and at 
the Interlochen Arts Academy. Studied with 
Rosella Hightower. Also studied at the Harkness 
Ballet; trainee with the Joffrey Ballet Company. 
Former member of the Indiana Ballet Company and 
the Pennsylvania Ballet; former principal dancer 
for NBC Entertainment Corporation. Has per- 
formed as guest artist with the New Jersey Ballet. 
Toured extensively throughout the USA, Canada, 
Mexico, Europe, Australia, and the Orient. 

Faye B. Snow 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Jazz and Modern Dance Technique/Composition 
BS, West Chester State College 
MA, George Washington University 
Studied Horton Technique with Joan Kerr and ballet 
with Marion Cuyjet; also studied with James Truitte at 
Alvin Ailey American Dance Center. Choreographed for 
Juba and Joan Kerr Dancers. Danced with Arthur Hall 
African-American Dance Ensemble and the Copper- 
tone Review Worked with Duke Ellington and Count 
Basie bands. 

Evan Solot 

Professor 

Head, Jazz/Commercial Music Division 

BM, MM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 

Composer/arranger for bands, orchestras, record- 
ings, and artists-including Stan Kenton, Bette 
Midler, Sister Sledge, Clark Terry, Ben Vereen-as 
well as jingles, commercials, and special material 
for shows. On trumpet, toured with Burt 
Bacharach, Henry Mancini, Bette Midler, and Lou 
Rawls. Has performed with Count Basie, Tony 
Bennett, Woody Herman. Lena Home, Frank 
Sinatra, Diana Ross, and Dionne Warwick. Free- 
lance performer in theaters and recording studios. 
Former chairman of the National Association of 
Jazz Educators Composition Contest editor of Billy 
Taylor's Improvisation Videotape: special mention 
in Duke Ellington's book Music Is My Mistress, 
honored by downbeat magazine for "making PCPA 
one of the best sources of jazz education in the 
country." Voting member of the National Academv 
of Recording Arts and Sciences (Grammys). 



132 



Michael Stairs 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Organ 

Artist Diploma, Curtis Institute of Music 

BM, Westminister Choir College 

Studied organ with Alexander McCurdy; piano 

with Mathilde McKinney and Vladimir Sokoloff; 

composition with Warren Martin and Matthew 

Colucci. Associate organist of the John 

Wanamaker court organ; organist/choirmaster at 

the Church of the Redeemer, Bryn Mawr. 

Susan Starr 

Professor 
Piano 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 
Studied with Eleanor Sokoloff and Rudolf Serkin. Con- 
cert pianist experience includes performances in re- 
cital and as soloist with orchestras throughout the 
USA and abroad. Over forty performances with the 
Philadelphia Orchestra with which she made her debut 
at the age of six. Numerous recordings on RCA and 
Orion Labels. Winner of 1 962 second prize Silver 
Medal in Second Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow. 
Appeared in command performance at the White 
House for President Jimmy Carter. 

Patricia Stasis 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Certificate, Curtis Institute of Music 
Certificate, Conservatory of Music, Munich, 
Germany 

Has performed with the Tanglewood and Marlboro 
Music Festivals singing under Eugene Ormandy, 
Leonard Bernstein, Pablo Casals, Maurice 
Abravanel, Joseph Primavera, Max Rudolf, and 
Seigi Ozawa. Has participated in master classes 
with Martial Singher, Phyllis Curtin, Pierre Bernac, 
Sir Richard Lewis, and Maria Callas. Received the 
Lotte Lehmann Award for outstanding achieve- 
ment at the Music Academy of the West, Santa 
Barbara, CA. Winner of the International Music 
Competition of the German Radio, Munich. 

Marshall Taylor 

Senior Lecturer 

Saxophone 

BME, Wheaton College 

MM, Northwestern University 

Additional studies at Conservatoire National 
Superieur de Musique, Paris; and Universite de 
Paris on a Fulbright Fellowship 
Studied with Theodore Varges, Russell H. Platz, 
Fred Hempke, Marcel Mule, and Henry Schumann. 
Has performed in recital throughout the USA and 
Europe. Former member of U.S. Military Academy 
Band; formerly on faculty of Ithaca College. Has 
taught at Temple University. 



Craig Thomas 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Jazz Contrabass, Electric Bass 
BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 
Studied with Robert Cerulli, Roger Scott, Eddie 
Gomez, Rufus Reid, Dennis Sandole (composition). 
Accompanist to many artists including Buddy Rich, 
Mel Lewis, and "Philly" Joe Jones, Freddie 
Hubbard, Lee Koenitz, Ted Curson, Bobby Watson, 
Anita O'Day, Mose Allison and Billy Eckstine. Has 
recorded on Acoustical Concepts, Inner City and 
Optimism labels with "Abstract Truth," "52nd 
Street," and Michael Pedicin, Jr. Studio musician 
for Music Minus One, Inc. Contributing bassist for 
"Standing in the Shadows of Motown, the Life 
and Music of James Jamerson." 

Pat Thomas 

Assistant Professor 

Instructor 

Modern Dance Technique 

Trained with Martha Graham. Taught and per- 
formed with Alvin Ailey; performed with Yuriko 
Dance Company and the Swedish Modern Dance 
Company. Has performed and taught in Japan, 
Hong Kong, Malaysia; taught in Spain and in 
Israel where she performed with the Bat Sheva 
Dance Company. Visited China in 1987 as dance 
consultant. 

Adeline Tomasone 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Flute 

BM, Curtis Institute of Music 

Studied with Murray Panitz, Kenton F. Terry, and 
Julius Baker. Solo flutist of Opera Company of 
Philadelphia, Davidsbund Chamber Players, The 
Performance Organization, Bach Chamber Consort, 
and Mozart Society of Philadelphia; member of 
Fairmount Woodwind Quintet with Young Audi- 
ences, Inc. Regular substitute with the Philadel- 
phia Orchestra. Theater and studio work in Phila- 
delphia and New York. Solo appearances with the 
Philadelphia Orchestra, Lansdowne Philharmonic, 
and Bricktown Philharmonic. Conducts clinics and 
workshops throughout region. Former member of 
Philly Pops and Delaware Symphony. 

Dan Tomasone 

Lecturer 
Trombone 

Alexandra Toussaint 

Assistant Professor 

Acting Studio/Audition Techniques/Rehearsal and 

Performance 

BS, Temple University 

MA, California State University 

Extensive experience in acting, directing, and 
teaching theater in California and Philadelphia. 
Performances include the roles of Simmone in 
Marat/Sade at the Wilma Theatre; Holga in After 
the Fall at the Walnut Street Theatre; as Bobbie in 
Bern Here Tonight at the Theatre Center Philadel- 
phia, and as the title role in Sister Mary Ignatius 
Explains It All for Youal the Blushing Zebra. 



Joanne Tulli 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Modern Dance, Labanotation, Effort/Shape 
BA,SUNYatBrockport, 

MFA, Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts 
Performed with Garth Fagan's Bucket Dance 
Theatre, Ann Vachon's Dance Conduit, Philadel- 
phia Dance Company, Great Chazy and the Ballet 
des Jeunes of Philadelphia. Reconstructed Doris 
Humphrey's Life of the Bee and Air for the G String 
for Consort, the Dance Company of PCPA. Has 
performed Sydney, Australia, Buenos Aires, Paris, 
and Rio de Janeiro. 

Mark Valenti 

Senior Lecturer 

Jazz Piano 

BM, Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts 

Studied with Benjamin Whitten. Appears in area 

clubs. Recipient of the 1 982 PCPA Jazz Award. 

Performed at the White House for Mrs. Bush. 

Connie Vandarakis 

Senior Lecturer 
Anatomy, Kinesiology 
BS, Exercise Physiology, Northern Illinois 
University 

M.ED., Exercise Physiology 
Candidate Ed.D., Temple University, Sports 
Medicine and Dance. 
Has researched areas of sports medicine, 
curriculum, and dance. Performed with indepen- 
dent artists in Philadelphia and Chicago. 

Paul Wagar 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Speech for Actors/Acting for Dancers and Opera 
Singers 

Studied at the University of Toronto and the Weber- 
Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art, London. Private 
study with Vivian Matalon. Coartistic director of the 
Philadelphia Area Repertory Theatre. Former company 
member of the Royal Shakespeare Company and the 
New Shakespeare Company, London; and the Strat- 
ford Festival, Canada. Founding member of the Ameri- 
can Repertory Theatre, London. Past artistic director of 
the Toronto Repertory Theatre. 

Vivian Wagner 

Assistant Professor 

BM, Curtis Institute of Music 

Studied with Richard Bonelli and Euphemia Giannini 

Gregory; coached with Leo Rosenek, Vladimir Sokoloff, 

and Martial Singher. Extensive solo performances in 

USA and abroad. Has been master-teacher of operatic 

principals of opera companies in Germany. Recipient 

of the Whitney Award for Excellence of the Boston 

Conservatory of Music. 



133 



Dennis Wasco 

Senior Lecturer 
Jazz Trumpet 

BM, Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts 
Studied trumpet with Vincent Penzarella, Seymour 
Rosenfeld, Roger Blackburn, Carmine Caruso and 
Donald S. Reinhardt; studied jazz improvisation 
with Al Stouffer, Denis Sandole, Michael Pedicin, 
Jr. and Vincent Trombetta. He toured nationally 
with the orchestras of Henry Mancini, Thad Jones- 
Mel Lewis, Burt Bacharach, and Si Zentnor. Has 
performed in numerous showroom orchestras, 
theater orchestras, and musicals. Recordings in- 
clude I Am In Love Again. Patti Labelle; All Things 
in Time, Lou Rawls; 1982, The Stylistics; My Favor- 
ite Person, The Ojays; Life Is A Song Worth Sing- 
ing, Teddy Pendegrast; City Song, Michael Pedicin, 
Jr., Heavy Vibes, Vince Montana, and the 
soundtrack for the Prime Time television show. 

Barbara Washington-Grant 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Voice for Actors 

BS, MS, Juilliard School 

Performances with the New York Philharmonic 
under Bernstein, the San Francisco Orchestra un- 
der Ozawa, and the Symphony of the New World. 
Recordings for the Strada East label. Formerly 
soprano staff soloist at New York's Riverside 
Church; featured staff soloist for Radio City Music 
Hall. Has taught at Delaware State College. 

Kariamu Welsh-Asante 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

African Dance 

BA, MA, SUNY Buffalo 

DA, NYU 

Author of African Culture: Rhythms of Unity, two 

volumes of poetry, numerous articles on the African 

aesthetic and various short stories. Senior Fulbright 

Scholar at the University of Zimbabwe. Presently, 

Director of the Institute of African Dance, Research 

and Performance and Temple University. 

David Wetherill 

Adjunct Professor 
French Horn 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music 
Studied with Mason Jones. Co-principal horn of 
the Philadelphia Orchestra. Frequent soloist with 
area symphonies, and active clinician and per- 
former in horn workshops throughout the USA. 
Guest artist at festivals, including Marlboro, Saco 
River, and Les Arcs in France. Former principal 
horn, Teatro alia Scala in Milan; former solo horn, 
Ensemble Intercontemporain in Paris, directed by 
Pierre Boulez. 



Christopher Whelan 

Senior Lecturer 
Make-up 

BA, Allentown College 
MFA, Pennsylvania State University 
Extensive experience in make-up for theater, film, 
and television; credits include design and execu- 
tion of make-up for KYW's "Evening Magazine," 
taking the show's host, Ray Murray, through differ- 
ent stages of aging, from age thirty to eighty. Has 
acted in over sixty stage productions, twelve films, 
and numerous television shows, including the 
mini-series "George Washington." Scenic design 
credits include works for Glassboro State College 
Opera Company and the Curtis Institute Opera 
Department; and world premiere of the opera 
Rappaccini's Daughter by Sam Dennison and the 
musical Philly's Best. 

Lisa Denise White 

Senior Lecturer 
Jazz Dance 

BFA, Philadelphia College of Performing Arts 
Dance studies with the Dance Theatre of Harlem, 
Philadelphia Dance School, and the Faye Snow 
Dance Studio of Philadelphia. Has performed at 
the New Freedom Theatre of Philadelphia. Has 
taught the Graham technique of Modern dance at 
the New Freedom Theatre. 

Benjamin Whitten 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Piano 

BM, MM, Peabody Conservatory of Music 

Studied with Austin Conradi, Leon Fleisher, and 
Emerson Meyers. Has appeared with orchestras 
throughout the USA, Canada, Panama, South 
America, and Europe. Recipient of the Tiffany 
Scholarship, the Paul Thomas Award, the Mason 
and Hamlin Award; designated as a Danforth 
Foundation Associate. Current faculty member of 
Wilmington Music School and West Chester 
University. Named Teacher of the Year by the 
Pennsylvania Music Teachers Association in 1970 
and 1 979. Serves on the executive board of the 
Music Teachers National Association and National 
Scholarship Foundation. 



H. German Wilson 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Acting Studio/Rehearsal and Performance 
Actor, singer, dancer, teacher; was the first Black 
Director for the Berkshire Theater Festival, the first 
director for the Eakins Workshop (an outreach 
program of the Philadelphia Museum of Art), 
drama teacher at the Yale University International 
High School. Mr. Wilson has performed locally, as 
well as in New York. New Jersey, Tennessee, and 
toured with the Fisk Jubilee Singers throughout 
Europe. In 1986, Mr. Wilson directed to critical 
acclaim Do Lord Remember Me at the Black Play 
Festival. He was Artistic Director for the Kopia 
Theater and presently teaches a drama workshop 
at Community College of Philadelphia. He recently 
co-founded Venture Theater with Black to Play or 
Othello's Occupation as its first production, featur- 
ing Mr. Wilson as Ira Aldridge and directed by 
Walter Dallas. 

William P. Zaccagni 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Jazz Saxophone/Jazz Ensemble 

Studied at Temple University with Ron Reuben and 
privately with vince Trombetta and Harold Karabell. 
Active performer and arranger in the Philadelphia and 
Atlantic City areas. Recordings on CBS, Atlantic, and 
Philly International labels. Has toured with Burt 
Bacharach and Anthony Newley. 



134 



I UNIVERSITY 
OF THE ARTS 



DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 



n n 



Division of Humanities 

Robert Ackerman 

Director 
215-875-1077 

The Humanities Division at The University of the 
Arts is responsible for approximately one-third of 
each student's requirement for graduation, reflect- 
ing the University's conviction that the Humanities 
are essential for the education of artists, design- 
ers, and performers. The aims of the division are 
to develop students' powers of critical thinking 
and their understanding of the history and criti- 
cism of the creative arts, to introduce them to 
philosophic and scientific modes of thought, and 
to the study of human cultures and societies-in 
sum, to refine students' perceptions of both their 
inner world and the outer world and to help make 
them both intellectually responsible and creative. 
The Humanities Division represents a common 
ground in the curriculum where students from both 
colleges meet. It thus offers a unique forum for 
artistic and academic exchanges. 

Faculty 

Robert Ackerman, Director 

Stephen Berg, Professor 

Yongming Cai, Senior Lecturer 

Kent Christensen, Associate Professor 

Cathryn Coate, Senior Lecturer 

Robert Crites, Senior Lecturer 

Lawrence Curry, Associate Professor 

Nancy Davenport, Associate Professor 

Francis Devlin, Senior Lecturer 

John DeWitt, Associate Professor 

Mary Ellen Didier, Senior Lecturer 

Richard Farnum, Assistant Professor 

Katherine Finney, Senior Lecturer 

Anne Marie Flanagan, Senior Lecturer 

Ronald Hays, Senior Lecturer 

Nancy Heller, Assistant Professor 

Dorine S. Houston, Senior Lecturer 

Linnet Jones, Senior Lecturer 

Anne Karmatz, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Leonard Kress, Senior Lecturer 

Sharon Lefevre, Senior Lecturer 

Sherry Lyons, Adjunct Professor 

Mary Martin, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Martin Novelli, Adjunct Professor 

Camille Paglia, Associate Professor 

Diane Perkins, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Ruth Perlmutter, Adjunct Professor 

Gabriela Roepke, Senior Lecturer 

Ward Stanley, Professor 

Patricia Stewart, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

David Taf ler, Associate Professor 

Anita Tiambeng, Senior Lecturer 

Fabian Ulitsky, Associate Professor 

Susan Viguers, Associate Professor 

Joanne Walsh, Senior Lecturer 

Stanley Ward, Adjunct Assistant Professor 

William Webster, Associate Professor 

Carla Weinberg, Adjunct Associate Professor 

Burton Weiss, Adjunct Professor 

Lily Yeh, Professor 

Toby Silverman Zinman, Professor 



Humanities Requirements 

Please note that humanities requirements differ 
between the two colleges and that the curriculum is 
now being reviewed. Students are expected to meet 
with their advisors regularly and are responsible for 
knowing and fulfilling their humanities requirements. 

Currently, all students at The University of the 
Arts must take Language and Expression and 
Introduction to Modernism. 

Freshmen at PCAD take two semesters of 
English composition (HU 110A, HU HOB); fresh- 
men at PCPA take one semester of English compo- 
sition (HU 1 10A). Based on transcripts, SAT score, 
TSWE score on the verbal text of TOEFL (Test of 
English as a Foreign Language), and initial essay 
assignments, students may be placed in HU 008 or 
HU 009. These courses do not satisfy the Lang- 
uage and Expression requirements. Students will 
be given Language and Expression credit for HU 
109B, an English composition course offered in the 
second semester for all HU 009 students. 

Freshmen from both colleges take two semes- 
ters of Introduction to Modernism (HU 103A & B). 
Students in HU 008 (English as a Foreign Lang- 
uage) and HU 009 begin the Introduction to 
Modernism sequence in the second semester of 
their program at the University. 

Studies in the Humanities are divided into four 
categories: Language and Literature, History and 
Social Studies, Art History, and Philosophy and 
Science. Students must satisfy the credit total for 
each college as indicated below. In addition to the 
required and elected humanities courses, students 
will also be taking discipline history courses in 
their majors. 

HU110A&B 

Language and Expression (PCAD) 6 credits 

HU110A 

Language and Expression (PCPA) 3 credits 

HU103A&B 

Intro, to Modernism (PCAD, PCPA) 6 credits 

HU151 

Language of Art History (PCAD) 3 credits 

Art History (PCAD) 6 credits 

History and Social Studies (PCAD) 6 credits 

Language and Literature (PCAD) 6 credits 

Philosophy and Science (PCAD) 6 credits 

Humanities Electives (PCAD) 6 credits 

Sophomore level courses (PCPA) 6 credits 

Junior level courses (PCPA) 6 credits 

Senior level courses (PCPA) 9 credits 



Electives 

Approximately one-third of the credit hours 
required in the Humanities Division for all students 
are electives, to be chosen from among the offer- 
ings in any of the categories. This furthers the op- 
portunity for visual and performing arts students to 
study common interests, fostering the exchange of 
ideas for collaboration and growth. There is also 
an independent study program to permit upper- 
class students to work with a faculty member on a 
special project. 

Normal Progress 

To make normal progress toward graduation, 
PCAD students should register for 6 Humanities 
credits per semester; PCPA students should 
register for 3 Humanities credits, excepting spring 
semester of freshman year and one semester of 
senior year when 6 credits are required. Students 
may register for more credits provided they have 
received permission from their department chair or 
school director. 

Transfer Requirements 

The University of the Arts will accept transfer 
credit for Humanities courses completed else- 
where, after review, provided that the course 
work completed is determined to be equivalent 
to University of the Arts offerings, is from an 
accredited college or university, and a grade of 
"C" or better is earned. Students are required 
to present official transcripts of courses taken 
at other institutions as well as course bulletins 
in order for evaluation of transfer credits to 
take place. Contact the Office of the Registrar 
for further information. 

Once they have matriculated, students in PCAD 
may transfer up to 15 credits in the Humanities; 
students in PCPA may transfer up to 9 credits. 
Students who wish to take Humanities credits at 
other colleges must secure prior written approval 
from the Director of the Division of Humanities. 
Such courses may not duplicate courses already 
taken for credit at The University of the Arts. 



137 



Humanities 
Course Descriptions 

HU008 

Language and Expression 

3 credits/semester: fall or spring 
Note: Credits do not count toward graduation 
This course prepares students for whom 
English is not a native language to produce the 
kinds of writing expected of them on the col- 
lege level, and to improve their reading, study, 
and test-taking skills. The concepts of para- 
graph unity, coherence, and outlining are 
introduced through the chief methods of com- 
position development. Further, the course 
provides a review of those principles of English 
grammar that present the greatest difficulty to 
non-native speakers. Standard English punctu- 
ation practice is also stressed. Five essays and 
a series of shorter written assignments are 
required. Attendance is mandatory. Grades in 
Hll 008 will be assigned on a pass/no grade 
basis. A student who successfully completes 
the course enters HU IIOA. 

HU009&HU109B 
Language and Expression 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
Note: HU 009 credits do not count toward 
graduation; HU 109B credits count toward gradu- 
ation. These courses are designed to help stu- 
dents improve reading, writing, and study skills. 
The emphasis is on the technical aspects of 
writing, specifically grammar, punctuation, 
spelling, and paragraph construction along with 
reading comprehension, vocabulary, sentence 
structure, logical relationships, and usage. 
Students may work on particular problem areas in 
the Learning Resource Center. Grades in HU 009 
will be assigned on a pass/no grade basis. 
Students completing HU 009 enter HU 109B, credit 
for which counts toward graduation. PCAD 
students successfully completing HU 109B will 
enter HU 1 10B in the following semester. 

HU110A&B 

Language and Expression 

3 credits/semester: fall and spring 
These courses offer concentrated training and 
practice in expository and argumentative writing. 
HU 1 10A (for all PCAD and PCPA students) 
concentrates on critical thinking and writing about 
literature. HU 1 10B (for PCAD students) is an 
introduction to literature combined with further 
work in composition. A research paper completes 
the spring semester's work. Students who are 
required to register for these courses must satis- 
factorily complete HU 1 10A or HU 109B before 
registering for HU 11 0B. All PCAD students must 
satisfactorily complete HU 1 1 0B before gradu- 
ation. HU 1 10B must be taken in the semester 
following completion of HU 1 10A. 



HU101&102 

Art and Civilization of the Western World 

3 credits/semester 

This course sequence offers a historical survey of 
western culture, organized as a sequence of 
discrete "Golden Ages." For each "Golden Age," 
e.g., Classical Greece, Renaissance Florence, 
culture is presented as a coherent whole, empha- 
sizing interrelationships among visual art, archi- 
tecture, music, drama, literature, science, philo- 
sophy, social thought, and religion. Students are 
encouraged to see art in the context of the culture 
in which it was produced, as an expression of the 
distinctive "world view" of the age. Materials 
include literary and philosophical texts, slides of 
visual arts, and recorded music. 

HU103A&B 
Introduction to Modernism 

3 credits/semester 

A course with an explicitly multi-arts viewpoint 
that explores the historical and cultural inher- 
itance of the West over the last two centuries. 
The first semester concentrates on the period 
1776-1914 and examines the complex movements 
known as romanticism and realism; the second 
semester covers the next half century of high 
modernism and its consequences. 
Required of all freshmen. 

Language and Literature 

HU130A&B 
French I 

3 credits 

Students study the basic elements of French 
grammar through conversation and drills derived 
from readings of easy modern prose and from a 
cultural reader. 

HU131A&B 
German I 

3 credits 

HU132A&B 
Italian I 

3 credits 

This course covers conversation about everyday 
Italian life and culture and basic grammar through 
reading of Italian prose. 

HU151 

Language of Art History 

3 credits 

This course provides an introduction to the 
language of art history, emphasizing concepts of 
style, iconography, and historical context. A basic 
vocabulary is developed to permit students to 
describe and analyze works of art. Required of all 
students in PCAD. 

HU201 
Lyric Poetry 

3 credits 

A survey of lyric poetry from medieval times to the 

twentieth century. 



HU210A&B 
American Writers 

3 credits 

The first semester examines the major ideas and 
trends in nineteenth-century American literature, 
including works by Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, 
Dickinson, and James. The second semester 
focuses on twentieth-century American writers 
and includes works by Wharton, Lewis, 
Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Steinbeck. 

HU212 

Introduction to Mythology 

3 credits 

This course begins by defining mythmaking 
(a creative process essential to all societies, past 
and present) and by analyzing the different 
approaches to myth. It moves on to examine 
creation myths from around the world and, finally, 
a selection of myths from three different cultures: 
Greek, Norse, and Native American. 

HU216 

The Short Story 

3 credits 

A study of the short story from Poe to the present 
Samplings from the British, the American, and the 
European, with particular attention to the major 
authors who reinvented the genre. At the end of the 
semester, students will look at developments in 
contemporary fiction, the antistory, the new wave, the 
surreal, the minimal, the funny, the mythic. 

HU218 

Superheroes: From Beowulf to Spiderman 

3 credits 

This course examines the most important heroes 
of popular culture in the Middle Ages — Beowulf, 
Roland, Siegfried, and King Arthur. What do these 
heroes and the epics in which they appear reveal 
about their culture? How do they compare to 
modern popular superheroes? 

HU219 

Children's Literature 

3 credits 

This course investigates the anonymous oral 
traditions of world literature, which continue to 
nurture the imagination and sense of identity of 
children today, and the modern tradition of child- 
ren's literature. The course focuses on children's 
literature as an introduction to the principles and 
forms of art and to the rule of the imagination in 
child development. 

HU230A&B 
French II 

3 credits 

Open to students who have completed French I 
or have had two or more years of high school 
French. Students read modern French short stories 
and a novel, La Princesse de Cleves, by the 
eighteenth-century writer Mme. de la Fayette. 



138 



HU232A&B 
Italian II 

3 credits 

Open to students who have completed Italian I or 

have had two or more years of high school Italian. 

HU310 

The Stories of Chekhov 

3 credits 

Anton Chekhov is among the world's greatest 
writer of short stories. His presentation of human 
relationships is profoundly humane and revealing. 
The readings will include most of Chekhov's best 
stories, excerpts from his letters, some critical 
interpretations, and supplementary material on 
family life. We will consider the literary merits of 
his stories and explore what goes on between the 
people in them. 

HU311 
Greek Drama 

3 credits 

Plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and 
Aristophanes are examined to understand their 
own integrity as works of art and to develop an 
appreciation of the extraordinary accomplishment 
of Greek drama. 

HU312 

British and American Modernist Literature 

3 credits 

The poet Ezra Pound declared to the writers of 
his time that they should "make it new." This 
course will examine the success of modernist 
literary innovation by reading selected works by 
such writers as Joyce, Eliot, Lawrence, Woolf, 
Hemingway, Stein, and W.C. Williams. Attention 
will also be given to the broader social and cul- 
tural influences on modernist thought. 

HU313 

Poetry Writing Workshop: Composition and 

Theory 

3 credits 

Students write poems that are brought into class, 
discussed, criticized, and put through some of the 
stages of revision that would improve the poems 
and help the students to bring them to a further 
degree of excellence. Principles governing the de- 
cision to change a poem in various ways, the 
study of poems by American and English poets, 
the reading of some criticism, concentration on the 
nature of and on some of the basic principles of 
craft. Theory involves, primarily, sound, content, 
meaning, and purpose of student poems and of 
poetry in general. The poet's sense of an audience 
also figures in the discussion. 

HU314 

Literature and Film: Images of Vietnam 

1950-1980 

3 credits 

Using a combination of films (documentary and 
entertainment) and readings (fiction, memoirs, 
history), this course explores the involvement of 
the United States in Vietnam from the early 1950's 
tothelate 1970's. 



HU315A 
Modern Drama 

3 credits 

A study of the modern theater from the end of 
the nineteenth century to the present. Students 
will read some of the world's most famous play- 
wrights: Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Shaw, 
Pirandello, Lorca, Brecht, and Beckett. Three 
theater trips. 

HU315B 
Contemporary Drama 

3 credits 

A study of the experimental developments in 
today's theater, both on Broadway and off, from 
Waiting for Godot Xo the present moment. 
Students will read some of the most famous 
playwrights of our time: Genet, Beckett, lonesco, 
Albee, Pinter, and Shepard, as well as some not so 
famous. Theater trips. 

HU316 

American Playwrights 

3 credits 

A study of the American theater in the past fifty 
years, looking at the works of such authors as 
O'Neill, Miller, Williams, Albee, and Shepard. 
Theater trips as well as showings of filmed plays. 

HU317A 
Romanticism 

3 credits 

A study of the Romantic movement in England, 
including the major poets (Blake, Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats), several novelists 
(including Bronte's Wuthering Heights and Mary 
Shelley's Frankenstein), and samplings from the letters 
and essays. Some of the predominant Romantic 
themes — the artist as outcast, revolution, man's 
relation to nature — will be addressed. 

HU320A 

Western Literary Masterpieces I: Ancient 
through Renaissance 

3 credits 

A selection of the greatest literary works of 
ancient Greece through the Renaissance. The 
course focuses on the perspectives and values 
those works reveal: what questions the different 
cultures asked; how they approached and defined 
human potential, fate, reality; and, finally, how 
they defined art and the artist's role — enter- 
tainer, recorder, shaper, conscience, or hero. 

HU320B 

Western Literary Masterpieces II: 

Neoclassic, Romantic, and Modern 

3 credits 

A continuation of Humanities 320A, focusing on 
the same issues but from the seventeenth through 
the twentieth centuries. Readings include works 
by such writers as Moliere, Voltaire, Austen, 
Goethe, and others, and end with two twentieth- 
century writers, D. H. Lawrence and James Joyce, 
who represent two significantly different modern 
traditions. 



HU411A 

Renaissance Literature Exclusive of 

Shakespeare 

3 credits 

Works by Boccaccio, Machiavelli, Erasmus, 
Rabelais, Cervantes, Jonson, Calderon, and others 
are read to explore the remarkable contribution 
of these writers and to develop an understanding 
and appreciation of the Renaissance. 

HU411B 
Shakespeare 

3 credits 

This course examines the dramatic works of the 
supreme writer of the English Renaissance — 
Shakespeare. A selection of his comedies, 
histories, tragedies, and romances are read. The 
course focuses on the plays not only as literary 
accomplishments but also as theatrical ones — 
performances existing in three-dimensional space. 
Thus the course is concerned both with the 
parameters of the original Renaissance stage and 
with modern translations and transformations 
of the plays. Required of all students in the School 
of Theater Arts. 

HU412 

American Modernism 

3 credits 

In reading and discussing key works of three 
American novelists- Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and 
Faulkner-the student considers to what extent and 
how they reflect such modernist concerns as style, 
language, narrative point of view, myth, psych- 
ology, and history. In addition, students will lead 
discussions of selected short fiction by 
Hemingway and Faulkner supported by research 
into criticism conducted at a major research 
library, and will finish the course with an essay on 
one additional major work by the writers studied. 

HU414A 
Contemporary Fiction 

3 credits 

A study of the contemporary novel as represented by 
an international selection of authors from North and 
South America, Eastern and Western Europe. 
Students will read some of the newest, best, and most 
exciting fiction written in recent years; these novels 
are often experimental, often difficult, never dull. This 
is the course for people who like to read. 

HU414B 

Studies in the Novel: The Big, Fat Famous 

Novel 

3 credits 

We will read three of the world's best and most 
important novels: Tolstoy's War and Peace. 
Melville's Moby Dick, and Joyce's Ulysses. Each 
provides great pleasure to the serious reader and 
much material for intense discussion. Each novel 
will have the equivalent of its own little course, 
about one month long and requiring one paper. 



139 



HU415A&B 

Contemporary Poetry 

3 credits 

This course consists of the reading and 
interpretation of major poets — Eliot, Stevens, 
Williams, Whitman, Bishop, for example — and 
some important contemporary poets such as 
Kinnell, Levertov, and Wright. Foreign poets in 
translation are also part of the course: Milosz, 
Pavese, Hikmet, Akhmatova, to name four. Prose 
by most of the poets concerning poetry is included 
as an important part of understanding and inter- 
preting the readings. Several of the poets have 
written important criticism. Analysis of each poet's 
style and why the poet has developed it form part 
of the course. Aesthetic theory and the function of 
poetry as a social force will also be considered. 

HU417 
Lyric 

3 credits 

A study of how contemporary song lyrics 
developed from the tradition of lyric poetry and 
folk ballads. Line-by-line analysis of famous lyric 
poems from literary history. Popular songs of the 
past fifty years are used in the discussion of the 
problems and challenges of putting words to 
music, with special attention paid to Bob Dylan. 
Other artists include Billie Holiday, Simon and 
Garfunkel, the Mamas and the Papas, the Rolling 
Stones, Led Zeppelin, and Stevie Wonder. There is 
a substantial writing requirement: students may 
elect to study poetry, librettos, or song lyrics or to 
write original song lyrics of their own. 

HU418 

Literature and Opera: 20th Century 

3 credits 

A study of twentieth-century opera's treatment of 

major literature. 

HU419 
James Joyce 

3 credits 

A seminar on the works of James Joyce (1 882- 
1 941 ), a key figure in literary modernism, and 
generally on the subject of modernism in all the 
arts. Close attention will be paid to Dublinersand 
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, with brief 
consideration given to Joyce's play Exiles and to 
his poetry. Most of the seminar will be devoted to 
a study of Ulysses. 

HU420 

On the Nature of Poetry and Art 

3 credits 

An exploratory course on the nature of poetry 
and art in which a variety of texts will be used — 
literature, philosophy, art, letters, criticism. We 
will contend with some major figures, including 
Wallace Stevens, Rilke, Eliot, Giacometti, Monet, 
and van Gogh. Contemporary artists such as 
Sidney Goodman, Warren Rohrer, Ray Metzger, 
and Tom Chimes will be discussed; some may 
themselves join in our discussion. 



Ait History 

HU240 

Ancient Art 

3 credits 

An investigation of the art and architecture of the 
ancient world, concentrating on the classical art of 
Greece and Rome, but also considering the arts of 
Mesopotamia and Egypt. 

HU241 
Medieval Art 

3 credits 

The sculpture, architecture, painting, and decor- 
ative arts of Europe from the early Christian period 
in the third century A.D. to the proto-Renaissance 
in Italy in the fourteenth century, observing the 
emergence and flowering of a northern European 
mystical Christian vision separate from the 
monumental classical vision of Greece and Rome. 

HU242A 

Northern Renaissance Art 

3 credits 

The painting of the late Gothic illuminators 
and the fourteenth-century German and Flemish 
Mannerists such as Cranach, Brueghel, and Bosch. 
Students investigate the complex symbolism of 
northern iconography, the new techniques de- 
veloped, and the historical background of a style 
often called Northern Realism. 

HU242B 

Italian Renaissance Art 

3 credits 

The major figures in the artistic centers of Italy 
from Giotto in the fourteenth century to the early 
work of Michelangelo at the end of the fifteenth 
century. The architects, sculptors, and painters of 
Florence are the focus, but artists in Venice, 
Padua, and Rome are discussed as well. 

HU243 
Baroque Art 

3 credits 

The works of the major European artists of the 
seventeenth century: Bernini, Rubens, Velasquez, 
Rembrandt, Poussin, and Vermeer. Through the 
genres of landscape, still life, and portraiture, all 
mature by the seventeenth century, other artists 
such as Hobbema, Ruisdael, Zurbaran, and Hals 
are also studied. 

HU244 

Mythology in Oriental Art 

3 credits 

An introduction to the symbolism of mythology in 
Oriental art. The course investigates myths in the 
major Oriental cultures, their basic patterns, 
functions, and meanings. 



HU245A&B 

History of Western Architecture 

3 credits 

In the first semester, this course surveys the de- 
velopment of Western architecture from the 
ancient world of the Greeks and the Romans 
through the Renaissance and from the Renais- 
sance to the post-modern architecture of today. 
In the second semester, emphasis is on the 
twentieth century. This course should be taken in 
sequence, as the second semester is dependent 
upon knowledge of the first semester's work. 

HU246 

Nineteenth-Century Painting and Sculpture: 

1776-1900 

3 credits 

Painting and sculpture made in the modern age 
in the West are examined in an international 
context. Emphasis is on the works of the major 
French, English, German, and American artists. 
The variety of subjects these artists explored and 
the new styles they developed as they responded 
to the world of the nineteenth century will be 
among the topics discussed. 

HU247 
Modern Art 

3 credits 

At the beginning of the twentieth century, artists 
responded to new technological forces and the 
pressures of mass culture in styles such as cubism, 
constructivism, and surrealism — styles that are still 
being explored by ourcontem-poraries. The course 
surveys the period 1880-1980, emphasizing the 
continuity of the modem artist's situation and role. 

HU248A 
Film History 

3 credits 

A survey of the history of film. Films to be shown 
will be selected from the following categories: 
early film forms (Lumiere, Griffith, and De Mille); 
Dada and Surrealist influences (Leger, Bunuel, 
Marx Brothers, and Resnais); the impact of 
Constructivism and the Machine Aesthetic 
(Eisenstein, Vertov, and Chaplin); German 
Expressionists' influence on Hollywood (Ford, 
Welles, Wyler, and Hitchcock); modern European 
and American films (Bergman, Godard, Kubrick, 
and Altman); and avant-garde art influences on 
new American cinema (Deren and Brakhage). 

HU248B 

Issues in National Cinemas: Political and 

Critical 

3 credits 

The course selects films from modern European 
and emerging national cultures that demonstrate 
both their interaction with postmodern politics, 
theory and culture, and the development of an 
alternative discourse to Hollywood commercial 
filmmaking. Films are selected from the following: 
1920s Soviet cinema; Italian Neo-Realism; 
anthropological documentaries; French New 
Wave; postwar/holocaustal cinema in Europe; 
other national cinemas (Spain, Hungary, Japan, 
etc.); colonialist struggles in films from India, 
Egypt, Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Senegal, Cuba; 
and new women filmmakers. 



140 



HU2S1A&B 
History of Design 

3 credits 

This course sequence investigates the develop- 
ment of design in the nineteenth century (first 
semester) and its growth and development in the 
twentieth century (second semester). All areas of 
design — architecture, fine art, applied and indus- 
trial art, the crafts, and graphic art — will be 
covered. This course should be taken in sequence, 
as the second semester is dependent upon 
knowledge of the first semester's work. 

HU2S6A&B 

History of Nineteenth- and Twentieth- 
Century Photography 

3 credits 

Objectives: to provide an introduction to the sig- 
nificant photographers and their work in the 
history of the medium, to describe technical de- 
velopments and their impact, to discuss the major 
visual and aesthetic trends in the development of 
photography and their relationship to art in gen- 
eral, and to describe the larger social context in 
which photography has developed. 

HU342 
Art of China 

3 credits 

Painting, sculpture, architecture, and decorative 
arts from the Neolithic period (sixteenth century 
B.C.) to the Ching dynasty (eighteenth century 
A.D.). Special em-phasis is placed upon Shang 
bronze ware, H'an and T'ang sculpture, and Sung 
and Ching pottery. The various art styles are 
related to their historical, religious, and social 
background, with particular emphasis on the 
impact of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism 
on Chinese art and architecture. From time to time, 
Eastern and Western cultures will be compared 
to understand better the similarities and differ- 
ences between the two. 

HU343 
Art of Venice 

3 credits 

An emphasis on light an apparent spontaneity of 
organization, and a delight in richness and sensuality 
guided the development of painting in Venice from 
Bellini through Tiepolo. The course presents Venetian 
painting from the mid-1 5th to the later 1 8th century, 
pausing to focus especially on the art of Titian, 
Veronese, and Tintoretto, and themes peculiar to 
Venetian art the female figure poesia; Venetian light 
and landscape; portraiture; courtiers, humanists, and 
beauties; the confraternity narratives; and the fresco 
decoration of the Venetian villas. 

HU345 

Modern Architecture 

3 credits 

The course investigates modem architecture, its 
theoretical premises and the social context that gener- 
ated it Students will also inquire into modem archi- 
tecture's legacy; post-modem architecture. 



HU347 

African, Pre-Columbian, and Native 

American Art 

3 credits 

Artistic, religious.sociological, and geographic 
aspects of societies in sub-Saharan Africa will 
be studied in order to establish continuity as well 
as distinction between their art forms. Black 
American folk art, an extension and transform- 
ation of African art, will also be analyzed. The 
several aspects of pre-Columbian and Native 
American art that emphasize stylistic distinctions 
and trends will be studied chronologically. 

HU348 

American Art from the Colonial Period to 

World War II 

3 credits 

A survey of American art, architecture, and 
design, emphasizing the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries. The material covered is divided into a 
series of sections or themes and is considered in 
relation to tradition. Each section or theme is 
studied through the work of the major artists who 
best represent it. 

HU351 

The History and Aesthetics of Electronic 

Cinema 

3 credits 

The course traces the history of video as an art 
form from the early 1 960s to the present. Basic 
film concepts are reviewed in their application to 
emerging new electronic formats. Video art is 
examined in all of its aspects as computer art, 
installation, and sculpture. The survey will explore 
the variety of styles, genres and forms which 
constitute the distinctive achievement of Amer- 
ican video art. The videotapes and documentation 
of artists' projects will be examined and placed 
within the social and cultural context in which 
they were produced. The market forces and the 
political/psychological systems shaping the 
audience and creating an increasingly problematic 
role for artists will be an important consideration. 

HU353A 
Impressionism 

3 credits 

The nineteenth-century style known as Impres- 
sionism is often considered to be the foundation of 
European modern art. The course chronologically 
investigates Impressionism in its historical and 
cultural context. The technical and conceptual 
philosophies that underlie its development will 
also be considered. 

HU353B 
Post-Impressionism 

3 credits 

Post-Impressionism will be chronologically inves- 
tigated with respect to its historical, cultural, and 
aesthetic context. The technical and philosophical 
concepts that underlie Post-Impressionism's 
development will also be explored. Although it is 
not a prerequisite, the student would do well to 
take HU 353A first. 



HU355 

Dada and Surrealism 

3 credits 

The history of the post-World War I antirational 
movements Dada and Surrealism. Since these 
were literary and political as well as artistic 
movements, attention is given to texts by such 
authors as Artaud, Breton, Freud, Jarry, Rimbaud, 
and Tzara, as well as to works of art. 

HU358 

Romanticism 

3 credits 

Painting, sculpture, and architecture from the late 
eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries in France, 
England, Germany, Spain, and the United States. The 
concepts of Romanticism are discussed as they apply 
to this art and to the contemporary environment of 
social and political revolution. 

HU448 

American Art since 1945 

3 credits 

In 1945, World War II ended and the focus of 
modern art shifted from Paris to New York City. 
The course begins with Abstract Expressionism; 
studies other major American styles, such as pop 
art and minimalism; and concludes with post- 
modernist development such as performance 
and decoration by artists. 

HU450 
Art of India 

3 credits 

Painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 
Indus Valley civilization of the second millennium 
B.C. through the different periods of Buddhist, 
Hindu, and Islamic dominance to the Rajput 
painting of the eighteenth century A.D. The 
different art styles are related to their historical, 
religious, and social background. 

HU452 

Topics in Design 

3 credits 

A seminar in the history of design. Each semester 
the course is taught, a different aspect of design 
history is studied. Individual designers under con- 
sideration have been Wright, Le Corbusier, and 
Aalto; other topics have been particular design 
histories: crafts history, graphic design history, 
industrial design history; and particular styles of 
design: the Arts and Crafts movement Art 
Nouveau, Bauhaus, de Stijl and Constructivism, 
Art Deco, and Post-Modemism. 



141 



HU453 
Ait of Japan 

3 credits 

Painting, sculpture, architecture, and minor arts of 
Japan from the Neolithic period to the eighteenth 
century A.D. The emergence and the development 
of a unique national style from an art world domin- 
ated by Chinese influence. The development of 
painting from the medieval Yamoto-e narrative 
scrolls through the fifteenth century. The evolution 
of various architectural styles from the great 
Buddhist temples of the seventh century to the 
majestic castles of the seventeenth century. In 
sculpture and pottery, the technical improvements 
and the change of aesthetic values from the 
Jomon and Yayoi phases to the porcelains of the 
seventeenth century are analyzed. A brief histor- 
ical and social background of Japan accompanies 
the study of the various art styles. Special atten- 
tion is given to the influence of Zen Buddhism on 
Japanese culture. 

HU456 

Major Artists 

3 credits 

The course concentrates on a single artist and 
his work. Among the artists who have come under 
this intense investigation have been Donatello, 
Michelangelo, Rembrandt, and Picasso. Others 
may be chosen by the faculty for future classes. 
The course has been designed to give students an 
in-depth knowledge of one artist's life and art. 

HU457 

Cubism and Twentieth-Century Art 

3 credits 

Cubism is one of the most important, if not the most 
important, of the foundations of twentieth-century art. 
This course surveys the development of the style from 
its beginnings in the work of Picasso and Braque to 
the dissemination of the style in the later twentieth 
century. Cubism's impact on abstract art, sculpture, 
architecture, design, and, to a certain extent, literature 
is explored. 

History and Social Studies 

HU162 

Individual and Society 

3 credits 

An introduction to the sociological perspective 
that views the "social" as a distinctive aspect of 
the human condition, through an examination of 
patterns of human interaction in modern societies. 
The course seeks to develop a sensitivity to the 
ways in which group norms and roles shape indi- 
vidual behavior and thought as well as an under- 
standing of the structure and function of some of 
the basic institutions of society. Topics will be 
drawn from the following: social solidarity, norms 
and values, socialization, deviant behavior, family 
and kinship, social class, morality, ethnicity, 
religion, and education. 



HU260A 
Human Origins 

3 credits 

An introduction to the history of ideas with 
emphasis on the theory of evolution; an intro- 
duction to the order Primate; and a survey of living 
nonhuman primate species from prosimians to the 
great apes, stressing general characteristics and 
evolutionary trends of the order. 

HU260B 
Human Origins 

3 credits 

An introduction to human biological and cultural 
evolution, a survey of the major evolutionary 
stages in hominid evolution, an introduction to 
Paleolithic technologies, and a discussion of and 
comparison of contemporary Stone Age societies 
with Paleolithic populations. 

HU262A&B 

History of China, History of Japan 

3 credits 

The history of China (first semester) and the 
history of Japan (second semester). In each case, 
the time span is from the earliest days to the 
present, but special emphasis is placed on the 
modern period and relations with the United 
States and other Western powers. Intellectual and 
cultural developments will take precedence over 
political and economic history. 

HU266A 

The Classical World 

3 credits 

A survey of the history of ancient civilization in the 
near East and Europe. The focus is on Greek and 
Roman history, mythology and culture. 

HU26GB 
Medieval Europe 

3 credits 

A survey of the leading themes in the history of 
medieval Europe: the classical inheritance, the 
primacy of the Church, feudalism. 

HU267 

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 

3 credits 

The nature and variation in human culture and 
various explanations of these differences (i.e., 
symbolic, functional, and historical). This survey 
of culture in Western and non-Western societies 
considers religion, mythology, and art; marriage, 
kinship, and group organization; ecological 
adaptation, economic and political organization; 
and the relationship of culture to personality. 
Readings and films will be chosen to illustrate the 
effect of variations of size, environment and 
subsistence and social complexity on cultural 
expression within groups. 



HU268 

Introduction to the Bible 

3 credits 

The main themes of the Bible are explored from 
a modern, critical, nondenominational point of 
view. No knowledge of the Bible is assumed. 
Using historical and literary analysis, continuities 
as well as differences between the Hebrew and 
Christian testaments are examined. 

HU359 

Sociology of Politics 

3 credits 

Interaction of political and social forces with the 
American community and the resultant impact on 
government structure and process are analyzed. 
Factors such as population profiles, "suburbanites," 
elite groups, public opinion, party organization, 
elections, and reform movements are studied. 

HU360A 

Renaissance and Reformation: 1400-1648 

3 credits 

The intellectual and cultural explosion that 
heralded the modern era in Western civilization. 
Political, economic, philosophical, religious, and 
cultural developments will be stressed. 

HU360B 

Age of Science and Enlightenment 1600-1815 

3 credits 

The dramatic intellectual revolution of the age of 
science and the applications of the revolution to every 
province of human experience. The Enlightenment 
and the French Revolution, which are also part of the 
transformation of Europe, are studied from the per- 
spective of their consequences for the modem world. 

HU361A&B 
Criminology 

3 credits 

This course divides the major sociological disci-pline 
of criminology into its major areas. An in-depth study 
of the general causes of crime and the methods of 
studying the offender. Students in the second 
semester study the correctional system, focusing on 
penology and alternatives to incarceration. 

HU362A&B 

American Civilization: 1608-1815 

3 credits 

An in-depth study of the origins of American 
society with an emphasis on the particular poli- 
tical, social, and cultural patterns that shaped 
the course of American development. The first 
semester surveys the process of settlement, 
colonial societies, independence, the growth of 
the egalitarian spirit, and the Civil War. The 
second semester studies American society in 
the modern period. From the perspective of 
today, the course examines the legacy of 
Reconstruction, the Industrial Revolution, the 
Reform Movements, the World Wars, and the 
Cold War. The factors in the past that have 
shaped contemporary society will be stressed. 



142 



HU363 
Modem Culture 

3 credits 

An exploration of various aspects of the condition 
of culture in modern society. Topics include the 
nature and rise of mass or popular culture and its 
relationship to high culture, advertising and the 
cultural critique of capitalism, modernism and the 
avant-garde in the arts, the intellectual's role in 
society, and the relationship between culture and 
politics. As this is a course in sociology, the con- 
nections between culture and society are empha- 
sized in every instance. 

HU364 
Sociology of Art 

3 credits 

An examination of the relationships that exist 
between art and society. The course will focus on the 
social influences that shape the creation and recep- 
tion of artistic works. Topics include the social role of 
the artist art as a socially organized form of work; the 
social institutions of artistic production, transmission, 
and audience reception; and the understanding of art 
in terms of its social context. 

HU365A&B 

History and Culture of Latin America 

3 credits 

The history and culture of Latin America, including 
indigenous as well as European cultural sources. 
National distinctions and the origins of modern 
society in the area will be developed. 

HU369 
Cultural Ecology 

3 credits 

A review of the various cultural adaptations found 
in different environments such as deserts, grass- 
lands, circumpolar regions, tropical and temperate 
forests, islands, and high altitude and urban 
areas. These adaptations include hunting and 
gathering, fishing, and agriculture (shifting, irri- 
gated, and industrial). The attitude toward the 
environment, population growth, and the use of 
labor, technology, energy, and other resources will 
be considered. 

HU373A&B 
Comparative Religion 

3 credits 

A study of the world's major religions through 
their historical development, beliefs, sacred 
literature, and the works of contemporary writers. 
The first semester is concerned with Eastern 
religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and 
Taoism; the second semester deals with Judaism, 
Christianity, and Islam. 

HU393 
African-American Culture 

3 credits 

An examination of the distinctive qualities of 
African-American culture; the effects of slavery on 
family life; contribution of African-Americans in 
the arts and culture. 



HU462 

American Social Values 

3 credits 

The cultural values of any society provide the 
fundamental principles around which it is organized 
and patterned; at the same time they justify the so- 
ciety by investing it with meaning and purpose toward 
which its members orient their actions. This course 
attempts to understand the nature and meaning of 
American society at the highest level of generality 
through an examination of some of its central value 
orientations. These include individualism, equality, 
achievement, activism, practicality, progress, materia- 
lism, freedom, democracy, and secular rationalism. 
The origin and meaning of some of these orientations 
are developed as well as their consequences both for 
the quality of American society as a whole and for the 
character of individuals trying to live their lives in it 
today. 

HU464 

The Holocaust 

3 credits 

The Holocaust is a watershed event in modem history. 
This traumatic episode left indelible marks on Western 
society, probably for generations to come. It was 
caused by factors that still exist in the world. This 
course examines the history that led to the Holocaust, 
and will attempt to understand what happened and 
what meaning it has for us today. 

HU493 

Middle Eastern Art and Culture 

3 credits 

An introduction to the art and culture of the Middle 
East through the perspective of anthropology and art 
history. The course examines design, symbol, and 
techniques of Middle Eastern art, particularly painting, 
architecture, ceramics, glassware, textiles, and metal 
work. These arts are examined in their social, cultural, 
and historical context, which will include: the role of 
the artist and craftsman in Middle Eastern society, the 
influence of Islam on ritual and symbol, the influence 
of environment on materials and architecture, urban- 
rural traditions, trade patterns and market organiza- 
tion, diffusion of design and materials. 



Philosophy and Science 

HU 181 A 

Child and Adolescent Psychology 

3 credits 

This course is developmentally oriented and 
focuses upon Erikson's psychosocial stages of life 
from birth to adolescence. Major topics include 
pregnancy, the birth process, and the physical, 
intellectual, emotional, and social development of 
the child. Family life and parent-child relationships 
are also examined, with particular attention given 
to the impact of our social institutions upon 
parents and children. 

HU181B 

Adult Psychology 

3 credits 

This course is developmentally oriented and focuses 
upon Erikson's psychosocial crises from adolescence to 
death. Major topics include career choice, human 
sexuality, love, marriage, values, mental health and 
mental illness, aging, and death. 

HU270A 

Introduction to Aesthetics 

3 credits 

An introduction to the philosophy of art After 
a brief examination of analytic philosophical methods 
and the history of aesthetics, we consider some of 
the fundamental problems in aesthetics, such as the 
intention of the artist, the physical object/aesthetic 
object distinction, and the nature and comparison of 
different kinds of media. The relationship between 
language and art will be central to the course. 

HU274A 

Introduction to Philosophy 

3 credits 

A course specifically tailored to students with no 
experience in reading philosophy. Several basic 
issues in philosophy are considered, including 
freedom, God, morality, death, mind, appearance, 
and reality. In addition to brief readings of primary 
sources, we read discussions of these issues plus 
innovative fiction illustrating salient points. 

HU282A 

Fundamentals of College Mathematics 

3 credits 

An introduction to the fundamental mathematical 
principles and operations used in undergraduate 
courses in the physical and social sciences. Topics 
include sets, logic, probability, statistics, number 
theory, algebra, and geometry. 

HU282B 
Calculus 

3 credits 

An introduction to calculus with emphasis on the 
applications of differential and integral calculus 
to the physical and social sciences. Prerequisite: 
HU 282A, equivalent college-level mathematics, or 
precollege advanced algebra and geometry. 



143 



HU285A 
Life Science 

3 credits 

The study of life as it evolved from unicellular 
organisms to humans. Special emphasis on 
behavior, instinct and learning, aggression and 
human nature, and ecology. 

HU285B 
Physical Science 

3 credits 

An investigation of astronomy, geology, and other 
physical sciences, including the origin of the universe 
and solar system and the nature of physical science, 
matter, and energy. This course provides a background 
for understanding the problems of the impact of 
science on human values. 

mi 3io 

Greek Philosophy: Thales through Aristotle 

3 credits 

We examine fragments from pre-Socratic philos- 
ophers, following which we consider the writings of 
Rata, including three or four dialogues and the 
Republic. Finally, we read selections from Aristotle's 
writings on physics, the soul, and aesthetics. 

Ml 372 

Continental Philosophy and Existentialism 

3 credits 

Continental philosophy examined as a Western 
alternative to the analytic method. Following some 
historical background, the concentration is on the 
works of Jean-Paul Sartre; readings from both his 
philosophic works as well as his literary works. 

HU374 

Personality and Creativity 

3 credits 

Through readings of works of major theorists on the 
nature of personality and on creativity, the course 
poses two major questions: "What do major theorists 
have to say about the human personality?" and "What 
do major theorists have to say about what it means to 
be a creative person?" There are a number of ways of 
answering these questions and it is not the purpose 
of the course to choose the "best" answer, but rather, 
to put the student in a better position to make his/her 
own decisions. 

HU382 

Social Psychology 

3 credits 

A survey of major social problems today and an 
analysis of society's resistance to implementing 
the necessary painful solutions. Students will 
study the current status of major social institu- 
tions and their increasing failure to meet and 
satisfy human needs. Some of the other areas that 
will be studied are mental health and mental 
illness, human values, love and marriage, dreams, 
and preventive programs. 



HU383 

Personality and Adjustment 

3 credits 

The study of personality, the patterns of behavior 
and predispositions that determine how a person 
will perceive, think, feel, and act. The inner life of 
men and women, the quality of their character, 
their adjustment to their social milieu, and their 
potentialities for self-fulfillment are all explored. 
Special attention is given to adjustment problems 
of artists in work and in love. 

HU384 

Abnormal Psychology 

3 credits 

Human development and abnormal psychology: 
ego defenses, emotional disorders, therapeutic 
theories, and treatment techniques. Clinical 
diagnosis and classification of mental disorders. 
Prerequisite: HU 1 81 A or HU1 81 B. 

Ml 388 

Perception 

3 credits 

The structure and function of the senses of vision, 
audition, olfaction, gustation, touch, temperature, 
kinesthesis, time, and the brain and nervous system 
are considered as they relate to perception. 

HU478 
Aesthetics Seminar 

3 credits 

An advanced course in the philosophic problems 
related to works of art and discourse about works 
of art. Students will review the analytic method of 
philosophic inquiry and will discuss the philosophy 
of Wittgenstein and other twentieth-century 
philosophers interested in the philosophy of 
language. A central text will be Languages of Art 
by Nelson Goodman. 

Ml 480 

Psychology of Creativity 

3 credits 

This course examines the problems involved in 
defining and attempting to measure creativity. The 
course is developmentally oriented, focusing on 
relationships between creativity and normal 
growth and development, and intelligence and 
personality. Problems that the artist encounters 
with productivity are explored, as well as the 
values of society toward creativity and the artist. 

HU481A&B 
Physics 

3 credits 

An introductory college physics course. The first 
semester covers kinematics, dynamics, energy, 
structural analysis, and waves; the second semes- 
ter concentrates on a study of light, electricity, and 
magnetism. Both semesters will include frequent 
references to architecture, design, and the fine 
arts. A background in algebra is required. 



Related Arts 

Ml 293 

Dance and Expressive Culture 

3 credits 

Dance is woven into the mythology, theater, 
music, poetry, and literature of many cultures. 
The course considers dance as it has influenced 
and has been influenced by these forms of 
creative expression in the Western world. 

HU342 

Mass Media and the Arts 

3 credits 

The purpose of this course is to develop an 
understanding of mass media and popular culture, 
primarily in the United States since the 1890s. Various 
forms of mass media will be defined and the shared 
techniques by which these forms seek to communi- 
cate will be analyzed. Finally, the values, both 
aesthetic and social, embodied in both these media 
and popular culture will be examined in relation to 
social and economic change. 

Ml 432 

Vienna and Berlin: 1900-1925 

3 credits 

At the beginning of the twentieth century, Vienna 
and Berlin were important centers during one of 
the richest periods in cultural and artistic history 
of the Western world. Much of the science and art 
of this century was given its focus and thrust by 
the men of genius working in these two cities. In 
this course, students study the works of Einstein, 
Freud, Mahler, Schoenberg, Wittgenstein, Kafka, 
and the German Expressionists. This is an inter- 
disciplinary course involving the visual, musical, 
and literary arts, as well as philosophy. 

HU494 

Aestheticism and Decadence 

3 credits 

A study of the rise and fall of decadent late romantic 
literature and art in the nineteenth century. The 
readings are from the Marquis de Sade, Poe, 
Baudelaire, Balzac, Gautier, Huysmans, Swinburne, 
Pater, and Wide. Slide lectures on Romantic, Pre- 
Raphaelite, and Symbolist art from Delacroix to Klimt 
Course restricted to juniors and seniors and requires 
permission of the Director of Humanities. 

HU497 

Women and Sex Roles 

3 credits 

An interdisciplinary course combining history, 
psychology, literature, and art which investigates 
the connection between theories of gender and 
the arts. Uses material from high art to Hollywood. 

HU999 
Independent Study 

3 credits 

3 hours 

An independent course of study is offered that 

considers a particular issue of interest to student 

and one or more faculty that is not covered in a 

regular course. Prior approval by the Director of 

Humanities is required. 



144 



Graduate Courses in the 
Humanities 

PCAD students in the graduate program are required 
to complete the graduate seminar sequence. These 
courses permit discussion of contemporary issues in 
the arts on an interdisciplinary graduate level. 

GR691A 

University Graduate Seminar Structure and 

Metaphor 

3 credits 

GR691B 

University Graduate Seminar Art and 

Society 

3 credits 

GR791A&B 

University Graduate Seminar Criticism 

3 credits 

PCPA students in the graduate program are required to 

complete the graduate humanities sequence. 

MU523A&B 

Graduate Studies in Humanities 

2 credits 

This two-semester course may take several 
approaches depending on the needs and interests 
of the class: 1 ) the survey of a particular period, 
emphasizing ideas, currents, and tendencies 
influencing the various arts of that period; 2) the 
study of a particular artist, with attention to the 
oeuvre and chief critical studies of that artist; and 
3) the study of a particular style or stylistic 
development and its manifestation in several arts. 
Required of all graduate music majors. 



145 



Humanities Faculty 



Robert Ackerman 

Director: Humanities 

BA, College of the City of New York 

MA, PhD, Columbia University 

Awards: ACLS Fellowship; NEH Fellowship; 

Fellow, Institute for Advanced Study 

Publications: J.G.Frazer: His Life and l/IM(1987); 

numerous articles and reviews on the history of 

classical scholarship, the history of anthropology, 

and mythology. 

Stephen Berg 

Professor 

Language and Literature 

BA, State University of Iowa 

Awards: Guggenheim Fellowship in Poetry, Frank 
O'Hara Memorial Prize, NEA Fellowship in Poetry, 
Rockefeller Fellowship, PCA Venture Fund 

Publications: The Daughters: Nothing in the Word, 
Clouded Sky by Miklos Radnoti (trans.); Grief. 
Poems and Versions of Poems; Oedipus the King 
by Sophocles (trans, with Diskin Clay); With 
Akhmatova at the Black Gates: Variations Founder 
and coeditor of The American Poetry Review. 

Yongming Cai 

Senior Lecturer 

Philosphy and Science 

PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Kent Christensen 

Associate Professor 

BA, Columbia University 

MA, University of Connecticut 

Authority on opera and recorded vocal music. 

Karen Ciark-Schock 

Senior Lecturer 
Art Therapy 
BA, Rosemont College 
MS, Hahnemann University 
Registered art therapist; program coordinator, 
Paoli Memorial Hospital, 1977-89; teaching facul- 
ty, Hahnemann University; cofounder Intraspect, a 
personal and professional development company. 

Cathryn Coate 

Senior Lecturer 
Language and Expression 
BA, University of Denver 
MSW, University of Pennsylvania 

Douglas Collins 

Senior Lecturer 

Language and Expression 

BA, SUNY 

MA, University of North Carolina 

Robert Crites 

Senior Lecturer 

Art History 

BFA, The Ohio State University 

MFA, University of Delaware 



Lawrence Curry 

Associate Professor 
History and Social Studies 
BA, MA, University of Pennsylvania 
Editor: The Bulletin of the Montgomery County 
Historical Society, The Valley Forge Journal 
Publications: "Disruption of the New Deal Coali- 
tion"; "Political Consequences of the Canadian 
Campaign, 1775"; "Early Anti-Slavery Movement 
in Pennsylvania"; "Keeping the Poor: A History of 
the Montgomery County Institution District"; 
Mirror of the Republic. 

Nancy Davenport 

Associate Professor 

Art History 

BA, MA, Bryn Mawr College 

PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Publications: "Armand Desforges, a 19th C. Art 
Dealer," Gazette des Beaux Arts, 1982; "Theroigne 
de Mericourt as Liberty, the Person and the 
Symbol," The Valley Forge Journal, 1982; "Notes 
on Gericault's Portraits of the Insane," Source, 
1983; "Le Dernier Appel des Condamnes: History 
Painting at Mid-Century," Gazette des Beaux Arts, 
1987; "At Work for the Company: CI. Muller's 
Projects for the Louvre," Bulletin de la societe de 
I'histoire de I'art Francais, 1987; "Napoleonic 
Allegory, CI. Muller's Vive L'Empereur, 30 mars, 
1814," Consortium on Revolutionary Europe 
Proceedings, 1987. 

Francis Devlin 

Senior Lecturer 
Language and Expression 
BA, LaSalle University 
MA, UCLA 

John F. DeWitt 

Associate Professor 

BA, Northeastern University 

MA, PhD, University of Connecticut 

Three collections of poems: Designs For/On Ahti, 

Animals, and Finger Food, poems have also 

appeared in numerous magazines. Winner of 

Wallace Stevens Poetry Prize. Invited to two NEH 

summer seminars; served as a consultant to the 

Pennsylvania Department of Higher Education. 

Mary Ellen Didier 

Senior Lecturer 

History and Social Studies 

BA, University of Wisconsin 

MA, University of Chicago 

Professional interests: archaeologist with research 

in cultural process in eastern United States and 

Near East, lithic technology, and interdisciplinary 

research between the sciences and archaeology. 



146 



Richard Farnum 

Assistant Professor 

History and Social Studies 

AB, Princeton University 

PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Publications: "The American Upper Class and Higher 

Education, 1880-1970," in Harold Bershady, ed., 

Studies in American Democracy, 1 987; "Prestige in the 

Ivy League: Democratization and Discrimination at 

Penn and Columbia," in Paul Kingston and Uonel 

Lewis, eds.] The High Status Track Studies of Elite 

Schools and Stratification, 1987. 

Katherine Finney 

Senior Lecturer 
Language and Expression 
BA, Smith College 
M Ed, Harvard University 
MA, Temple University 

Anne Marie Flanagan 

Senior Lecturer 
Language and Expression 
BA, MA, Temple University 

Ronald E. Hays 

Senior Lecturer 
Art Therapy 

MS, Hahnemann Medical College 
Experience: assistant professor and director, 
Creative Arts in Therapy Education, Hahnemann 
University; consultant, Arts in Special Education 
Project of Pennsylvania; past president, Associ- 
ation for Care of Children's Health. 

Nancy Heller 

Assistant Professor 

Art History 

AB, Middlebury College 

MA, PhD, Rutgers University 

Assistant professor, University of Maryland; 
Smithsonian Fellow, Hirshhorn Museum and 
Sculpture Garden. 

Publications: Women Artists: An Illustrated History 
(1988); The Regionalists, with Julia Williams (1 982). 

Dorine S. Houston 

Senior Lecturer 
Language and Expression 
BA, MA, Temple University 

Linnet Jones 

Senior Lecturer 
Language and Expression 
BA, University of London 

Anne Karmatz 

Adjunct Associate Professor 
Language and Literature 
BA, University of Pittsburgh 
MS, University of Pennsylvania 
MA, Villanova University 

Dean of women, Penn State University, 
Delaware County Campus 



Leonard Kress 

Senior Lecturer 

History and Social Studies 

MA, University of Illinois 

Sharon Lefevre 

Senior Lecturer 
Language and Expression 
BA, Princeton University 
MA, MPhil, Columbia University 

Sherry J. Lyons 

Adjunct Professor 

Director: Art Therapy 

BA, University of Pennsylvania 

MS, Hahnemann Medical College 

Assistant professor, Hahnemann University and 

Hospital; registered art therapist, Ashbourne 

Day School, 1 967-72; lecturer and author on art 

therapy with children; consultant for Arts in 

Special Education Project of Pennsylvania. 

Mary Martin 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
History and Social Studies 
BA, Macalester College 
MA, Washington University 
Experience: coordinator of Middle East Center, 
University of Pennsylvania 
Publications: articles on pastoral and agricultural 
strategies in Turan, Iran, for UNESCO Man and the 
Biosphere Project #1 1 : The Ecology of Settlement, 
Heresies, 1978; "Ecological Consequences of 
Sedentarization of Nomads," (with F Darling in The 
Careless Technology); "Conservation at the Local 
Level," in Desertification and Deue/opmenf (Academic 
Press); "Case Studies of Traditional Marketing," in 
Proceedings of 3rd International Conference on Goat 
Production and Disease; "City and Country Rural 
Textile Production," catalog for the Safavid-Qujar 
Exhibit, Textile Museum, Washington, DC; "Peasants 
and Revolution in Class, Faith and Ideology in Revo- 
lutionary Iran and the Middle-East"; "Smallholder 
Management of Mixed Agricultural Resources in 
Desert Regions — Problems and Prospects," in 
Proceedings of the Second International Conference 



Martin Novelli 

Adjunct Professor 
Language and Literature 
BS, St. Joseph's University 
MA, Purdue University 
PhD, JD, Temple University 

Former associate dean of academic affairs at PCA; 
editorial board, The American Poetry Review, fiction 
reviewer, Philadelphia Inquirer, author, "Re-Visions," 
radio documentary series on American history. 



Camille A. Paglia 

Professor 

BA, Harpur College, SUNY Binghamton 

M Phil, PhD, Yale University 

Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Designate; Yale 

University graduate fellowship. Taught at 

Bennington College, Wesleyan University, and 

Yale University. 

Publications: Sexual Personae, 1989; numerous 
essays, reviews, and encyclopedia articles on 
literature, psychology, art history, and popular 
culture from Renaissance to the present. 

Diane D. Perkins 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Language and Literature 
BA, MA, Temple University 
Supervisor of composition program. 
Temple University 

Ruth Perlmutter 

Adjunct Professor 
Art History 

BA, New York University 
MA, PhD, University of Pennsylvania 
Publications: "Hollywood and the Jew," Film 
Reader 5, 1982; "West German Women's Films," 
Film Criticism, 1984-85; "Hitchcock's Rear Win- 
dow," Journal of Film and Video, 1985; "Bette 
Gordon's Working Girls," Postscript, 1986; "Woody 
Allen's Zelig According to Bakhtin," Quarterly 
Review of Film Studies, 1987; "Edgar Reitz's 
Heimat," Wide Angle, 1987; "Fassbinder's Bitter 
Tears," Cinema Journal. 

Gabriela Roepke 

Senior Lecturer 

Literature/Opera Literature/Introduction and 

Contemporary Theater 

Studied in Santiago, Paris, and at the University of 
North Carolina. Author and producer of over fifteen 
original plays in Latin America, the United States, and 
Spain. Numerous articles in publications, including: 
San Diego Opera Magazine, Opera News, New York 
City Opera Spotlight, and The Opera Magazine. 
Lectures for New York City Opera Guild. Former faculty 
member of the Juilliard American Opera Center 
former visiting lecturer at New York's New School for 
Social Research, and the Society for Ethical Culture. 
Recipient of two Fulbright fellowships, the Roland Holt 
Playwright Award, and a Guggenheim fellowship. 

Ward M. Stanley 

Professor 

Art History 

BA, University of Hawaii 

MA, University of Pennsylvania 

Past president, PCA Faculty Council, 1980-81; 

founder of Design History Forum, 1 983 

Awards: Fulbright Exchange Professor in England, 
1973-74; UICA Grant, 1968; PCAD Venture Fund, 
1985. 



147 



Patricia Stewart 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Art History 

BA, University of Pennsylvania 

Graduate study at Columbia University, University 

of Pennsylvania 

Curator, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; 

editor, Arts Exchange. 

Publications: articles and reviews in Art Express, 

Art in America, Arts, Art Exchange. 

David Tafler 

Associate Professor 

Art History, Photography/Film/Animation, Art 

Education 

BA.Harpur College, SUNY 

MFA, Columbia University 

MA, University of Wisconsin 

PhD, Columbia University 

Anita Tiambeng 

Senior Lecturer 
Language and Expression 
BA, Beaver College 
MA, Temple University 

Fabian Ulitsky 

Associate Professor 

Philosophy and Science 

BA, M Ed, Temple University 

Licensed clinical psychologist in private practice; 

director, group process and group psychotherapy 

Master of Science program. Graduate School of 

Hahnemann University. 

Publications: "Interfaces of Creativity," Art 
Psychotherapy, an international journal, 1979. 

Susan T. Viguers 

Associate Professor 
Language and Literature 
BA, BrynMawr College 
MA, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
PhD, Bryn Mawr College 
Publications: With Child, Harcourt Brace 
Jovanovich, 1986. Articles include "Nonsense and 
the Language of Poetry," Signal 42, 1983; 'The 
Presenter of the Battle of Alcazar," The Explicator, 
1985; "Fairytales, Authorship and Aesthetic Res- 
ponse," The Journal of Aesthetic Education, 1986; 
"Cornelia Meigs," Writers for Children, ed. Jane 
Bingham, 1987; "Staging as a Key to Meaning in 
The Alchemist," Theatre Survey, 1987; "The 
Separation of Art and Reality in George Peele's 
Araygnement of Paris and David and Bethsabe," 
CIA Journal, 1 987, book reviews in The Journal of 
Aesthetics and Art Criticism, 1983, and Philosophy 
and Literature, 1984. 

Awards: Katharine E. McBride Fellow, 1971; 
Whiting National Foundation Fellow in the 
Humanities, 1974-75; Lilly Pennsylvania Fellow, 
1977-80; University of Pennsylvania, 1977-80; 
Philadelphia College of Art Venture Fund Award, 
1983,1987. 



Joanne E. Walsh 

Senior Lecturer 

Language and Expression 

BA, College of Mt. St. Vincent 

MA, Marquette University 

Editor, Pappas Visiting Fellow publications, 1984, 

1985, 1986 (Penn Publications). 

Stanley Ward 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Language and Literature 
BA, Duke University 
MA, PhD, Harvard University 
Editor, Philadelphia Gay News. 

Publications: work in journalism and two volumes of 
poetry, Crookshank, 1981, and Virgil's Lovers, 1983. 

William Webster 

Associate Professor 
Philosophy and Science 
BM, Curtis Institute of Music 
BA, University of Iowa 
PhD, University of Pennsylvania 

Designer and builder of fine houses, one of which 
was featured in Fine Homebuilding Annual, 1988. 
Publications: reviews in Journal of Aesthetics and 
Art Criticism, referee for above journal. 

Carla Weinberg 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Language and Literature 

Doctorate in Foreign Language and Literature, 

University of Pisa, Fulbright Grantee, 1964-65 

Publications: "Guido Gozzana a cent'anni, dalla sua 

nascita," Atti del Convegno, Florence, 1985; "Due 

Autografi di G. Mazzini," The Italian Quartedy, 1987 

Translations: "The Falling Tower," artists' 

statement by Anne and Patrick Poirer, PCA Gallery, 

1979; "Art-sound," essay by Germano Celant, 

published by Soundings, Neuberger Museum, NY, 

1981. 

Awards: Lilly Fellow in Medieval History, 1982-83 

Burton Weiss 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Philosophy and Science 

BA, MA, PhD, Princeton University 

Associate professor of psychology, Drexel University. 
Interests and research primarily in the areas of physi- 
ological and comparative psychology. 



Lily Yen 

Professor: Painting, Foundation, Humanities 
BA, National Taiwan University 
MFA, University of Pennsylvania 

Lecturer: "Contemporary American Art," Beijing, 
Central Institute of Fine Arts, and Zhejiang Insti- 
tute of Art. China; Rutgers University; University of 
Pennsylvania; Walpack Center, NJ 
Exhibitions: Please Touch Museum, University City 
Science Center, Marian Locks Gallery, Philadel- 
phia; J.B. Speed Art Museum, Louisville, KY; 
Reading Museum, Reading, PA 

Awards: "Response Competition," Please Touch 
Museum, 1982; PCA Venture Fund 
Coordinator: art exchange program between PCA 
and the Tianjin Fine Art College, Tianjin, China 

Toby Silverman Zinman 

Professor 

Language and Literature 

BA, MA, PhD, Temple University 

Publications: articles primarily on contemporary 

drama and fiction in Modem Drama, Modem 

Fiction Studies, American Theater, and others on 

the works of Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter, Sam 

Shepard, among others 

Lectures: papers presented at professional 

conferences on topics in contemporary drama of Sam 

Shepard, Tom Stoppard, Iris Murdoch, Samuel Beckett, 

and Ernest Hemingway 

Series of public lectures for the Philadelphia 

Drama Guild 

Grants and Awards: director, NEH summer 

seminar for high school teachers, 1989. 1991; NEH 

Summer Seminar, Columbia University, 1987, 

1984; NEH Panel on the Arts, Washington, DC, 

1986; Professor of the Year, Rutgers University, 

1974; Doctoral Fellowship, Temple University, 

1967-70; scholarship, University of London, 1969 



148 



I UNIVERSITY 
OF THE ARTS 



ADMINISTRATION AND 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



n n 



The University of the Arts 



Administration 

Peter Solmssen, AB. JD 
Virginia Red, BA MA, M Mus. 
Patricia M. Woldar. BA. MPA 

Stephen Jay, BM, MM 

Stephen Tarantal, BFA, MFA 

Robert Ackerman, BA, MA, Phd. 

Barbara Elliott 

John Musto, BA 

John Klinzing, BS, MA Ed.D. 

Janet B. DeVries, BA 

Marcia Atcheson 

Louis J. Mayer, BS.CPA 

Stephen Bloom. MA, MSLS 



President 

Provost 

Assistant Provost. 
Acting Registrar 

Dean. Philadelphia College 

of Performing Arts 

Dean, Philadelphia College of 

Art and Design 

Director, Division 

of Humanities 

Director of Admissions 

Director of Financial Aid 

Dean of Students 

Director of Planning 

Director of Development 

Director of Finance 

Director of University Libraries 



The University of the Arts 
Board of Trustees 

Dorrance H. Hamilton, Chairman 

Peter Solmssen, President 

I. Gary Bard 

Mary Louise Beitzel 

Irvin J. Borowsky 

Nathaniel R. Bowditch 

Ira Brind 

Edward Cantor 

W. HerbertCrowder.lll 

Eleanor Davis 

Philip J. Eitzen 

Anne F. Elder 

John C. Goodchild, Jr. 

Frederick S. Hammer 

Marvin D. Heaps 

Stephen R. Holstad 

Judith Jamison 

Barbara J. Kaplan 

The Honorable Bruce W. Kauffman 

Raymond Klein 

Harold E. Kohn, Esq. 

Berton E. Korman 

Irving S. Kosloff 

William G. Krebs 

Thomas V. Lef evre 

Al Paul Lefton, Jr. 

Elaine Levitt 

Seymour G. Mandell 

Noel Mayo 

Francis J. Mirabello. Esq. 

Ronald J. Naples 

Adolf A. Paier 

John C. Pemberton, Jr. 

Ronald Rubin 

Dr. Hubert J. P. Schoemaker 

Jay T. Snider 

Ambassador Daniel J. Terra 

Harry Waldman 

Harriet G. Weiss 

George A. Weymouth 

Albert E. Wolf 

Life Trustees 

H. Ober Hess, Esq. 
Sam S. McKeel 
John W. Merriam 

Emeritus Trustees 

Schuyler G. Chapin 
Bodine Lamont 
Sondra Myers 
Ronald K. Porter 
William L Rafsky 
Roger L. Stevens 
PhilipH.Ward.lll 
Dorothy Shipley White 

Ex Officio Trustees 

The Honorable Augusta A Clark 
The Honorable Vincent J. Fumo 
The Honorable Joan L. Specter 



151 



Location 

Travel Directions 

The Office of Admissions of the University is 
located in Haviland Hall on the Northwest corner of 
Broad and Pine Streets. If you have any questions, 
please feel free to call the Office of Admissions for 
assistance at 21 5-875-4808. 

By Bus 

Greyhound/Trailways Bus Terminal — see map. 

By Train 

From Amtrak 30th Street Station — Transfer to 
Commuter Train to the Penn Center/Suburban 
Station — see map. Taxi service is available from 
30th Street Station to Center City. 
From New Jersey — PATCO Hi-Speed Line to 
15th & Locust Streets — see map. 

By Airplane 

From Philadelphia International Airport — Follow 
signs to concourse to Airport Express Train. Trains 
leave every 30 minutes. Depart train at Penn 
Center/Suburban — see map. 
Limousine or Taxi service ($20-30) from airport is 
available from the baggage claim area to the Hilton 
Hotel, Center City — see map. 

By Car 

From North travel south on the NJ Turnpike to 
Exit 4 Camden/Philadelphia, follow signs to 
Ben Franklin Bridge Philadelphia — see map. 

From South travel north on 1-95 to Philadelphia's 
Broad Street exit (Rt 291 N). Travel north on Broad 
Street for about 2.5 miles — see map. 

From East travel to the Ben Franklin Bridge 
Philadelphia, take I-676 west to Broad Street 
exit — see map. 

Travel to the Walt Whitman Bridge Philadelphia, 
take I-76 west to South Street exit — see map. 

From West travel east on the PA Turnpike to exit 
24 (1-76 east Schuykill Expressway) travel east on 
Expressway (approx. 30 minutes) to South Street 
exit Make a left and cross the South Street Bridge. 
Travel to Broad Street — see map. 



1 Fairmount Park 

2 Philadelphia Museum of Art 

3 Rodin Museum 

4 Logan Circle 

5 Please Touch Museum 

6 Franklin Institute/Science Museum 

7 Academy of Natural Sciences 

8 Philadelphia Visitors Center 

9 Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts 

10 Penn Center/Suburban Station 

11 Amtrak 30th Street Station 

12 City Hall 

13 Greyhound/Trailways Bus Terminal 

14 Reading Terminal Market 

15 The Gallery Mall/Market East Station 

16 Franklin Square 

17 Liberty Bell 

18 Rittenhouse Square 

19 Philadelphia Art Alliance 

20 Patco Hi-Speed Line to NJ 

21 Hilton Hotel 

22 Academy of Music 

23 Shubert Theater 

24 Proposed site of new Philadelphia Orchestra Hall 
25YMAVHA 

26 Philadelphia International Airport 

27 Thomas Jefferson University Hospital 

28 Forrest Theater 

29 Walnut Street Theater 

30 Washington Square 

31 Independence Hall 

32 South Street Scene 



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The University of the Arts 

Campus Map 

1 Furness Hall 

2 Haviland Hall 

3 Anderson Hall 

4 31 3 South Broad 

5 Wagman Hall 

6 309 South Broad 

7 Merriam Theater 

8 Arco Park 

9 Delancey House 

10 Fifteen Hundred Pine 

11 Drake Theater 



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The University of the Arts 

Office of Admissions 
320 South Broad Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19102 
215-875-4808 



The University of the Arts is accredited by the 
Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools, 
the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the National 
Association of Schools of Art and Design, and the 
National Association of Schools of Music. 

The University of the Arts gives equal consideration 
to all applicants for admission and financial aid 
regardless of race, color, sex, religion, national or 
ethnic origin, or handicap. Direct inquiries to the 
Office of Personnel, The University of the Arts, 
320 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102 
215-875-4838.