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Full text of "School catalog, 1889-1890"



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http://www.archive.org/details/schoolcatalog8889penn 




49583 



THE 



Pennsylvania Museum 



AND 



Ochool of industrial Art. 



PHILADELPHIA. 



^. ,^.<F^ 



-^ CIRCULAR ^ 

OF THE 

Committee on Instruction, 

1889-90. 



CIvASS-ROOMS, 

1336 Spring Gardibn Stree^t, 

Philadelphia. 




/> 




THE 



Pennsylvania Museum 



Ochool of Industrial Art 



PHILADELPHIA. 



-Ji- CIRCULAR *ir- 

OF THE 

Committee ON Instruction, 

i889-£0. 



CLASS-ROOMS, 

1336 Spring Garden Street, 
Philadelphia. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

Historical Sketch 7 

Officers 4 



Committees 



5 



Faculty 6 

Location 14 

Tlie Associate Committee of Women 14 

Courses of Study. 

Regular Course — General Statement 16 

Lists of Exercises and Studies. 

General Course — Industrial Drawing 29 

Decorative Painting and Applied Design ... 32 

Modeling Class 34 

Advanced Drawing Class 31 

Special Courses — General Statement 20 

Lists of Exercises and Studies. 

Teachers' Class 35 

Weaving and Textile Design 36 

Chemistry and Dyeing 43 

Carving 45 

School Year 24 

Hours of Study 24 

Fees 25 

Requiremeirts for Admission 24 

" " Graduation 17 

Examinations 26 

Materials for Study 25 

Lectures 27 

Discipline 27 

Roll of Students 46 

Evening Classes 24 

Teachers' Cotu-se 17 

Graduate Course 25 

Employment for Graduates 27 



OFFICERS FOR 1S89. 



President, 
WILLIAM PL ATT PEPPER. 

Vice-Presidents, 
FREDERIC GRAFF. THEODORE C. SEARCH. 

Treasurer, Secretary and Curator, 

J. H. DINGEE, Jr. DALTON DORR. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 

ex-officiis. 
The Governor of the State. The Mayor of the City. 

BY APPOINTMENT. 

Thomas Cochran, Appointed by the State Senate. 

Charles H. Cramp, Appointed by the House of Representatives. 

Theodore C. Search, Appointed by Select Council 

F. Williams Wolf, Appointed by Common Council. 

A. Loudon Snowden, Appointed by the Commissioners of Fairmount Park. 

ELECTED BY THE MEMBERS. 
To serve for three years : 

Henry C. Gibson, Frederic Graff, 

Stuart Wood, " Isaac Norris, M.D. 

To serve for two years : 

J. H. Dingee, ■ Crawford Arnold, 

William Wood, S. G. Thompson. 

To serve for one year : 

John Struthers, Thomas Dolan, 

William Platt Pepper, Thomas Hockley. 



ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF ^A/^OMEN TO THE BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES. 

Chairman, 
MRS. E. D. GILLESPIE. 



Secretary, 
MISS BERTHA LEWIS. 

Mrs. Matthew Baird, 
Mrs. C. C. Bartol, 
Miss Colahan, 
Miss Mary Cohen, 
Mrs. E. E. Denniston, 
Mrs. Wm. H. Eisenbrey, 
Miss Elizabeth Gratz, 
Mrs. Horace B. Hare, 
Mrs. John Harrison, 
Mrs. Joseph Harrison, 
Mrs. G. Craige Heberton, 
Mrs. Thomas Hockley, 
Mrs. H. S. Huidekoper, 



Treasurer, 
MRS. CRAWFORD ARNOLD. 



Miss Zell. 



Mrs. Chas. B. Keen, 
Miss Magee, 
Mrs. DeCourcy May, 
Mrs. James Mifflin, 
Mrs. Byron P. Moulton. 
Mrs. Geo. R. Preston, 
Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 
Mrs. John Sanders, 
Mrs. F. R. Shelton, 
Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith, 
Mrs. W. Hinckle Smith, 
Mrs. Wm. Weightman, Jr. 
Mrs. Howard Wood, 



Honorary Members. 
Mrs. Bloomfield Moore, Mrs. H. C. Townsend, 

Mrs. Matthew Simpson, Mrs. Caspar Wistbr, 

Mrs. Seth B. Stitt, Mrs. Robert K. Wright. 



COMMITTEE ON INSTRUCTION 

Theodore C. Search, Chairman, Stuart Wood, 
Frederic Graff, 
Isaac Norris, M.D., 
William Wood, 
Thomas Hockley, 



Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, 
Mrs. Thomas Roberts, 
Mrs. Charles B. Keen, 
Mrs. John Harrison, 



Mrs. E. E. Denniston. 



COMMITTEE ON MUSEUM. 

Isaac Norris, M.D., Chairman, Mrs. Frederic R. Shelton, 
John Struthers, Mrs. G. Craige Heberton, 

Mrs. E. D. Gillespie, Mrs. William Weightman, Jr., 

Mrs. Aubrey H. Smith, Mrs. Joseph Harrison. 



FACULTY. 



Principal, 

L. W. 'MlLLEK, 

From ?\Iass. Normal Art School and School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. 

Vice-Principal, 

Howard F. Stratton, 

Graduate (1S82) of The Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. 

Instructors in Drawing Classes, 

Maria L. Holt. 

Albert P. Willis. 

Professor of Sculpture, 

John J. Bdyi.k, 

Pupil of Dumont, Paris. 

Head Master of Textile Department, 

E. A. PilSSKLT, 

Graduate of the Government Advanced Weaving School, Reichenberg, Austria, 

Department of Chemistry and Dyeing, 
Professor RoscoE L. Chase, S.B., 

(iraduate Mass. Institute of Technology. 

Instructor in Applied Design, 
Myrtle D. Goodwin, 

From The Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art. 

Instructor in Applied Design — Evening Class, 

Paul Rosenzwev, 

From L'Ecole des Arts et Metiers, Paris. Designer of si.xteen years' experience with 
Eddystone Alanufacturing Co. 

Instructor in Different Branches of Practical Classes, Textile Department, 
E. W. France. 

Instructor in Wood Carving, 

John Scott. 
6 




Incense Burner in Wrought Iron in the collection at Memorial Hall. From a pen-and-ink 
drawing by Fanny C. L. Smith. 



THE 

Pennsylvania Museum 

AND 

School of Industrial Art. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

The Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art 
was incorporated on the twenty-sixth day of Februar)-, 
1876, for the purpose, as stated in its charter, of establishing 
"for the State of Pennsylvania, in the City of Philadelphia, 
a Museum of Art in all its branches and technical applica- 
tions and with a special view to the development of the Art 
Industries of the State, to provide instruction in Drawing", 

7 



Painting, Modeling, Designing, etc., through practical 
schools, special libraries, lectures and otherwise. The 
institution to be similar in its general features to the South 
Kensington Museum of London." 

The purpose of the institution as thus defined is distinctly 
industrial. The collections at Memorial Hall, where the 
Museum is located, embrace examples of art work of every 
description ; but as the city already possesses, in the Penn- 
sylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, an institution devoted 
to the advancement of the Fine Arts, it was determined by 
the founders to make the collections of the Pennsylvania 
Museum as largely as possible illustrative of the application 
of Art to Industry, and the instruction in the School has 
constant reference to a similar purpose. 

The institution owes its origin to the increased interest in 
Art and Art Education awakened by the Centennial Exhibi- 
tion of 1876. 

Pending the incorporation of the institution, a fund of fifty 
thousand dollars was subscribed with which to make pur- 
chases at the Exhibition. In the selection of objects, the 
trustees had the benefit of the advice of the foreign commis- 
sioners to the Exhibition, and, in several instances, the insti- 
tution was the recipient of valuable gifts from individual ex- 
hibitors. Around the nucleus thus formed the Museum has 
grown by purchase, gift and bequest to its present propor- 
tions, numbering in its collections upward of ten thousand 
objects. 

The major part of the collection of the products and man- 
ufactures of British India, shown at the Centennial Exhibi- 
tion, was presented to the Museum by the British Govern- 
ment at the close of that Exhibition. It occupies the whole 
of the west corridor at Memorial Hall. 

The Moore memorial collection of objects of Art, presen- 
ted to the Museum by Mrs. Bloomfield H. Moore as a me- 
morial of her late husband, occupies the entire east corridor. 
It contains exquisite examples of Lace, Embroidery, Fans, 
Jewelry, Pottery and Porcelain, Metal Work, Enamels, 
Carved Work in Ivory and in Wood, Tapestries and Pictures. 



The Museum also possesses several smaller collections, 
sufficiently complete in themselves to be regarded as fairly 
representative of the departments to which they belong. Of 
these, the Caspar Clark collection of Persian metal work. 
Pottery and Textiles, the Vaux collection of Ancient Pottery, 
and the Castellani collection of Textiles are perhaps the most 
important. 

In addition to its actual possessions, the Museum is con- 
stantl)' receiving accessions in the form of loans of a more or 
less permanent character, by which the element of freshness 
is secured, and popular interest in the collections continually 
renewed. 

In addition also to its standing Exhibition, the Museum 
has been enabled by a bequest of the late Joseph E. Temple 
to hold an Annual Exhibition and competition for the en- 
couragement of Amercan Art Industries and workmen. 
At these Exhibitions a liberal system of prizes is offered, 
which are distributed not only among Exhibitors but among 
the indix'idual workmen whose ingenuity and skill have been 
exercised in the production of the objects displayed. 

The first of these Annual Exhibitions was held in the Fall 
of 1888 and was devoted to Pottery and Porcelain. The 
second, to be held in the Fall of 1889, is to be devoted to 
Pottery, Porcelain and Glass, including Mosaics and Tiles. 
These occasions have already been the means of much en- 
couragement and stimulus to manufacturers and to individ- 
ual workmen, and it is believed that they will accomplish 
in the future a valuable work. 

The purpose of the School is to furnish such instruction 
in Drawing, Painting, Modeling, Carving and Designing as 
is required by designers, superintendents and workmen in 
the various Constructive and Decorative Arts, and to serve 
as a Training School for teachers of these branches. 

It was opened during the winter of 1877-78 in temporay 
rooms in Industrial Art Hall, at Broad and Vine Streets. 
It was afterwards removed to the rooms of the Franklin Insti- 
tute, at 15 South Seventh Street, and again in 1880 to the 
building 1709 Chestnut Street, where it remained until its re- 



lO 

moval, in 1884, to the building which it occupies at present. 
The classes were very small for several years, but the attend- 
ance has increased rapidly since 1884. 

Up to the time of this last removal the work of the classes 
was confined to the general courses in Drawing, Painting 
and Modeling, with constant regard to the needs of the in- 
dustries, it is true, but without attempting to provide in- 
struction in any of the occupations themselves, which it was 
hoped would be directly benefited by the training which the 
students received here. 

The need of providing facilities for such technical instruc- 
tion, however, became apparent very early in the history of 
the School, as it was seen that only by this means could the 
proper direction be given to such purely artistic training as 
the School had to offer, by familiarizing the students with 
the processes by which any industrial application of design 
would have to be made. 

The Committee desires to call especial attention to the 
work accomplished by the Department of Weaving and Tex- 
tile Design. 



ESTABLISHMENT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
WEAVING AND TEXTILE DESIGN. 

The Philadelphia Association of Textile Manufacturers was 
formed in 1882, and among the objects for which it was spe- 
cially created was the fostering of technical education. Its 
members represented the progressive element of the manu- 
facturing community of Philadelphia and vicinity. These 
gentlemen were fully aware of the progress of technical 
schools for the Textile Arts in Germany, France and Eng- 
land, and were persuaded that the United States could not 
hope to maintain the best market for her products unless 
those products combined the highest skill in manufacture 
and the best taste in design. At that time no thorough 
school existed in this country, and it was necessary to begin 
at the foundation of the work, without previous knowledge 
of the exact methods to be adopted, or the means to be 
employed to reach the desired end. 



II 

It was apparent that considerable money must be raised 
to properly lay the foundation for a successful school. The 
sum of $50,000 was fixed upon as the minimum amount 
with which to inaugurate the work, and the Association 
endeavored to obtain this sum from the manufacturers of 
Philadelphia by subscription ; but, as with every public- 
spirited enterprise, a few leading men and firms bore the 
burden of the work, and the subscriptions finally closed at 
$2,S,000, all of which was subscribed with the understanding 
that no call should be made unless the entire ^50,000 was 
secured. This sum was never reached, and the whole enter- 
prise seemed likely to be abandoned. 

At this juncture, a few of the individuals who had been 
actively engaged in the effort to raise the $50,000, despairing 
of success in that direction, concluded to assume the respon- 
sibility of attempting the work without the aid of any sub- 
scriptions. 

The project was made known to the Trustees of The Penn- 
sylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, who very 
kindly placed rooms in their school building at their disposal, 
without charge. Teachers were engaged, two Jacquard 
looms were ordered, and a night class of enthusiastic students 
organized in 1883. The outfit was necessarily limited, but 
was increased without dela}', as experience shov/ed the needs 
to be supplied. Only men of acknowledged skill were en- 
gaged as teachers, a fact which greatly assisted the projectors 
of the enterprise, and won for the School the confidence of 
the community. 

At a meeting of the Philadelphia Textile Association held 
at this time the subject was again discussed, and the Asso- 
ciation decided that it would be wise to sustain the enterprise, 
and recommended the subscribers to the $50,000 fund to 
turn over the amount of their subscription to its use. 

Nearly $30,000 out of the original 535,000 was transferred 
in this way; twenty-five per cent, of which was authorized 
to be paid in for the use of the School in cash. These sub- 
scribers were as follows : 



12 



Thomas Dolan & Co., . 
John & James Dobson, . 
William Wood & Co., . 
William Arrott, .... 
John Yewdall, .... 
Fiss, Banes, Erben & Co., 
Conyers, Button & Co. . 
George & James 

Bromley, 

Seville Schofield, . . . 
Alexander Crow & Son, 
James Smith & Co., . . 
M. A. Furbush & Son, . 



5,000 


00 


John Bromley & Son, . $1 


,000 


00 


5,000 


00 


Thomas L. Leedom, . . 1 


,000 


00 


2,500 


00 


James Doak, Jr., & Co., 


500 


00 


2,000 


00 


Charles Spencer & Co., . 


500 


00 


2,000 


00 


H. Becker & Co., . . . 


500 


GO 


2,000 


00 


Andreas Hartel, .... 


250 


00 


1,500 


00 


S. B. M. Fleisher, . . . 


250 


00 






Grundy Bros. & Campion, 


250 


00 


1,000 


00 


H. W. Butterworth & 






1,000 


CO 


Sons, 


250 


00 


1,000 


00 


Stead & Miller, .... 


100 


00 


1,000 


00 


- 








1,000 


00 


$29,600 


00 



The following sea.son, President Wm. Piatt Pepper, of The 
Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art, under- 
took to raise funds for the erection of a building for the use 
of the School. He succeeded, within a very few days, in se- 
curing the amount needed; the building was completed in 
time for the new school year. 

The leading manufacturers of machinery responded very 
generously to an appeal to supply the institution with the 
very best machinery ; and the evening class of 1884-85 was 
progressive and enthusiastic, acknowledging the great bene- 
fit they derived from their connection with the School. 

In September, 1885, the instructors were regularly en- 
gaged to give their whole time to the School, and a day class 
was organized specially to prepare young men for the higher 
departments of the work, by means of a regular course of 
instruction, extending over a period of three years. 

The season of 1885-86 was prosperous, and proved con- 
clusively that such a school must not only be a great addi- 
tion to a manufacturing community like Philadelphia, but 
an element of strength to the whole country. Friends of the 
enterprise visited the best schools of Europe in the interest 
of this institution, and whenever methods were found supe-- 
rior to our own, they were unhesitatingly put into practice, 
until to-day the management feel that they are entirely ready 
to supply the want that has so long been pressing on the 
country. 



13 

It is no longer incumbent upon anyone to visit Europe 
for technical instruction in Textile Art, as this School is fully 
prepared to supply technical information on all subjects con- 
nected therewith : Designing, Weaving, Dyeing, Finishing, 
Cleansing of raw materials, all being provided for, as shown 
by the curriculum. 

Indeed in several important respects the superiority of 
the School over any of its European rivals is acknowledged. 
These advantages are of two kinds. First, the association 
of the technical instruction with artistic culture is more 
direct and complete than in any European school whose 
mission is so distinctly technical as this. Pupils of the 
Pennsylvania School are provided with opportunities for 
carrying their individual work to completion in a much 
more liberal manner than is allowed by the European 
schools, where the rule is to arrange the work of the weav- 
ing rooms ; to grade the work required by the Course ; to 
adjust all machinery ; to make all warps, etc., at the begin- 
ning of the year, a few designs only being selected from 
among all those produced by pupils, to be executed during 
the year, the students passing from one loom to another, 
assisting with the weaving and other technical processes in- 
volved, at first in those that are simple, and then in the 
more complicated, but still without any work being con- 
secutive in the case of any individual student, and without 
any direct relation between the work executed and his own 
design. ' In the Pennsylvania School, on the other hand, 
the individual student has an opportunity to work out his 
own designs in the fabric. Every step in the process of 
production, from the first sketch to the finished product, 
is his own work. The advantages of this method are 
not only apparent to any intelligent observer, but ample 
testimony to its efficiency has been furnished by pupils who 
have attended some of the best European schools before 
coming here, and who cheerfully testify to the superiority 
of the Pennsvlvania School. 



H 



LOCATION. 

The School is located in the building, 1 336 Spring Garden 
Street, which has been purchased by the Trustees with funds 
provided for this purpose by the Associate Committee of 
Women, and adapted to the needs of the classes in the most 
thorough manner. Ample provision has been made for the 
comfort of students, and every convenience furnished that 
will facilitate the work of the classes. 

The work in each Department or class is carried on in a 
room by itself, so that the annoyances and interruptions in- 
separable from the assembling of large classes and different 
grades of work in a common room are avoided. 

The building contains a Lecture Room ; a Library and 
Reading Room ; a room for Elementary Work from casts 
and models ; a gallery for advanced work from the cast ; 
one for the Life Class ; a room for the Grinding and Prep- 
aration of Colors ; one for the Work in Applied Design ; 
one for Modeling; one for Wood Carving; and a suite of 
rooms for the Class in Weaving and Textile Design. The 
Chemical Laboratory and Dye House are located at 1346 
and 1348 Spring Garden Street. 

THE ASSOCIATE COMMITTEE OF WOMEN. 

The School is under the immediate supervision, and re- 
ceives the active support, of the Associate Compiittee of 
Women, who act conjointly with the Board of Trustees in 
managing the affairs of The Pennsylvania Museum and 
School of Industrial Art. 

This Committee now numbers thirty women, each and all 
zealously active in promoting the best interests of the corpo- 
ration, with especial reference to the creation and support of 
such an Industrial School in connection therewith, as those 
most competent to judge of the educational needs of the 
city have long desired to see established here. 

The Committee was organized in 1883, and it has (besides 
greatly increasing the list of members, by whose subscrip- 



15 

tions the Institution is largely supported) paid over since that 
time to the Trustees $2'j,/\fiO for carrying on the work of the 
School and advancing- the interests of the whole Institution. 




Porcelain Vase in the collection at Memorial Hall. From a pen-and-ink drawing, by 
Jennie W. WoodhuU, a pupil in the School. 




Peruvian Water Jar in the collection at Memorial Hall. From a pen-and-ink drawing, by 
George F. Goldsmith, a pupil in the School. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



REGULAR COURSE. 

The general course of study embraces Drawing and 
Painting in water colors from models, casts, draperies 
and still life ; Lettering ; Plane and Descriptive Geometry ; 
Projections, with their application to machine construc- 
tion and to cabinet work and carpentry; Shadows, Perspec- 
tive, Modeling and Casting ; Practice in the use of Color, with 
special reference to the needs of designers — especially in tex- 
tiles; Historical Ornament, study from the Living Model 



17 

and Original Design. The Instrumental Drawing is taught 
by means of class lessons or lectures, and lectures are also 
given on Anatomy and Historical Ornament, upon which 
examinations for certificates are based. 



GRADUATION. 

Students completing satisfactory exercises in the enumer- 
ated Subjects of Study for the first year's course (see page 
29) will be eligible for the examinations which are held at 
stated times during the year, and on passing the examina- 
tions will receive the certificate. Pupils who, having re- 
ceived the certificate, also complete either the courses in 
Decorative Painting and Applied Design, Decorative Sculp- 
ture, Textile Design or Chemistry, each of which covers 
two years, will receive the diploma of the School. 

Teachers' Course. 

This course is arranged for the benefit of those who, 
while unable to devote as much time to the work of this 
School as would be required to complete the regular course 
covered by the certificate, are yet desirous of properly 
qualifying themselves either to teach drawing in any ele- 
mentary school or to make a good use of the blackboard 
in teaching other branches. 

Especial attention is paid to this last consideration, and 
classes in blackboard w^ork, under the personal instruction 
of the Principal, meet every Tuesday afternoon for just 
such practice as is particulary desired by kindergarteners 
and primary school teachers. 

Department of Chemistry and Dyeing. 
This department was organized in the Fall of 1887, and 
owing to an insufficiency of room in the school building, ac- 
commodations were obtained at the southeast corner of Broad 
and Spring Garden Streets (1346 and 1348 Spring Garden 
St.) a few doors from the main building. A large laboratory 
has been fitted up with accommodations for some thirty 



i8 

students, and is v/ell supplied with the apparatus, chemicals 
and dyestuffs necessary for carrying on experimental work in 
Chemistry and in dyeing different fabrics. There is also a 
small dye-house in which the yarn used by the Weaving 
Department is cleansed, bleached and dyed, and in this way 
the students obtain a practical knowledge of the art of dye- 
ing. The department is primarily designed to give the 
student that practical knowledge of the subject which will 
enable him to avoid the errors so often made by those who 
have no such knowledge, and also to train his powers of 
observation so that he will be enabled to detect and overcome 
faults in the various methods used in the textile industries. 

With this object in view, the regular day students com- 
mence the study of theoretical chemistry in the first year. 
Lectures and oral exercises are given in the class-room, and 
these are supplemented by work in the laboratory. Each 
student is supplied with a desk and the apparatus necessary 
for carrying on a sufficient number of experiments to 
demonstrate clearly the general principles of Chemistry, 
with especial reference to its practical application to the 
Textile industries. The student is encouraged to make 
original research of the various methods used in chemical 
and manufacturing work with the object of improving them, 
if possible; and as this is done under the eye of an instruc- 
tor who is careful to correct any wrong conclusions, the 
student is so trained in his faculty of observation that, when 
future difficulties arise, he will be able to overcome them. 

In the second term the study of Chemistry is continued 
by means of lectures, and in the laboratory the student 
commences the work of Qualitative Analysis, which is con- 
tinued through the term. 

Lectures are also given on this subject, and especial 
attention is paid to the analysis of those chemicals and dye- 
stuffs most commonly used, as well as the methods of detect- 
ing the dyes present on fibres and the mordants used. The 
laboratory instruction is supplemented as far as possible by 
excursions to manufacturing and chemical establishments, 
where the processes, conducted on a large scale, can be 
seen in practical operation. 



19 

Students who have already studied these subjects, and 
can pass a satisfactory examination therein, may omit this 
part of the course. 

In the second year a brief course in Quantitative Analysis 
is taken up, and various methods of both Volumetric and 
Gravimetric Analysis are taught. This includes the methods 
used for testing acids, alkalies, various chemicals, dyestuffs 
and mordants, such as sumac, indigo, tartar emetic, etc. 

The study of Industrial Chemistry js then taken up and 
carried on for the remainder of the year. Lectures are 
given on the methods of manufacturing various chemicals 
and dyes. The different materials used in Textile industries, 
as cotton, wool, silk, jute, flax, etc., are considered, and the 
differences between them and their behavior towards chemi- 
cals and dyestuffs carefully explained. Having studied the 
raw materials, the different processes to convert them into 
finished cloth are taken up systematically, and the faults 
met with in each, explained. 

Taking, for example, the wool fibre, its source is first 
considered, and then the variations occurring in it, due to 
differences in climate, breed of sheep, and portion of the 
body from which the fibre is taken. 

The method of scouring and the processes of carding 
and spinning, etc., are closely studied. 

The various conditions in which wool is dyed, as in the 
raw state, or in the form of yarn, or as woven into cloth, 
are next taken up, and the methods used in each given. 

And, finally, the methods of finishing the woven cloth 
are undertaken. 

Laboratory Work. 

Particular attention is paid to the work of the students in 
the laboratory in connection with the lectures, and each 
student is obliged to carry on experimental work in the 
methods used for determining the various materials em- 
ployed, whether cotton, wool, silk, etc., and especially to 
detect them when mixed together in cloth or yarn. He 



20 

then takes up each material, and carries on the processes of 
cleansing, bleaching and dyeing. 

The action of the different mordants on the various dyes 
is considered, and their effect on the shade, as well as on 
the fastness of the color, determined. 

The methods of dyeing fast shades, and the process of 
testing dyed fabrics, as to the fastness of their colors towards 
light and scouring, are carried out. 

Besides the experimental work in the small way, there is 
also a dye-house connected with the Laboratory, in which 
the students dye the yarn used in the Weaving Department, 
and in this way a practical knowledge is obtained of the 
subject. During the past year the students have taken the 
yarn in the grease and carried out the entire process of 
scouring, dyeing, and weaving it into cloth original in color 
and design, so that the entire work from the yarn in the 
grease to the woven cloth is now carried on in the School. 

There are two day courses, the first of which forms part 
of the Three Years' Textile Course, and is recommended 
to all who desire to fit themselves thoroughly in Textile 
matters. The first year's work is devoted to drawing, 
designing and weaving ; the second and third years, in ad- 
dition to the studies of the first year, include also Chemistry 
and Dyeing. At the close of the Course the full Diploma 
of the School is presented to all who have satisfactorily 
completed their studies. 

SPECIAL COURSES. 

For those who desire to take up the study of Chemistry 
and Dyeing alone, a Special Course of two years has been 
arranged, and also one for those who desire instruction in 
Designing and Weaving only. 

Special Chemistry Course. 

In this Course the student spends most of his time in the 
Laboratory. The first year is devoted almost entirely to 
Chemistry, which is thoroughly studied. Li the second 



21 

year the time is devoted to scouring, bleaching" and dyeing, 
and for those who desire to fit themselves in the art of dye- 
ing, this Course offers the best opportunity. A special two 
years' Diploma in Chemistry and Dyeing is given to the 
student who satisfactorily completes this Course. 

Special Designing and Weaving Courses. 

It has been found in the practical working of the School 
that a large number of the day pupils were able to complete 
this course in two years by omitting the study of Chemistry 
and Dyeing, and for such as desire not to pursue the last- 
named branches this Course is now arranged. It is in- 
tended to be thorough and complete for the entire Course of 
Textiles. Graduates will receive the special diploma of the 
Department. 

Evening Classes in Chemistry and Dyeing. 

These are held on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Fri- 
day evenings from 7.30 to 9.30 o'clock, from October 14th 
until the middle of April. The Course consists essentially 
of the same topics as are taken up by the day classes, and is 
divided into three parts, each requiring one season's attend- 
ance. Either Course A or C can be taken up first, but in 
order to take up Course B some knowledge of Chemistry 
is required. 

Course A — Chemistry. 

This Course consists of Chemistry alone. The general 
principles of Chemistry are introduced by a series of lect- 
ures with experiments. At the same time work is com- 
menced in the laboratory, and each student carries on a 
sufficient number of experiments to demonstrate clearly 
the general principles of Chemistry. This Laboratory 
work is continued throughout the term, the student thus 
obtaining a practical as well as theoretical knowledge of 
Chemistry. The acids, bases and salts are considered, and 
the various combinations of chemicals with reference to 



22 

their practical application in the dye-house and in chemical 
manufacturing. The practical principle of actual work by 
the pupil himself is the basis of all effort in the School, and 
in no part of the work is it more fully developed than in 
this. 

No charge is made for chemicals used; but in order to 
cover the expense of chemical breakage, a deposit of five 
dollars must be made, which will be returned at the end of 
the term, on payment of the amount of glass-ware or 
apparatus broken or used up. The amount of the bill 
need not exceed one or two dollars at the most, and de- 
pends on the care of the student in making experiments. 

Course B — Qualitative Analysis. 

For those who desire to continue further in Chemistry this 
Course offers a good opportunity. A systematic course in 
Qualitative Analysis with the methods of detecting impuri- 
ties and adulterations is carried on, and also the method of 
detecting dye-stuffs on dyed fabrics, and the mordants used. 
The metallic elements are first considered, and their com- 
bination with the various acids. Commercial chemicals, as 
acids and the various salts used in dyeing, are analyzed for 
impurities or adulterations. How to detect adulterations 
in dye-stuffs, forms an important part of this Course. A 
moderate supply of apparatus is furnished, but the student 
is advised to supply himself with a full set, which can be 
purchased at the School or elsewhere, or will be furnished 
on the same conditions as in Course A. 

Course C — Dyeing. 

This Course is designed for those who wish to study the 
dyeing of textile fabrics alone. 

The nature of the raw materials used is carefully consid- 
ered, in order to have a proper basis for intelligent action as 
to their subsequent treatment, which includes the various 
methods of cleansing them from all impurities, both before 
and after manufacturing, and the operation of dyeing with 



23 

both acid and fast color. All new dye-stuffs and processes 
are thoroughly investigated with reference to their actual 
practical value in the dye-house. During the past season, 
among the dye-stuffs and processes investigated have been 
the Primuline colors, the Benzidine dye-stuffs, Parapheny- 
line blues, the numerous Alizarines, such as Alizarine blue, 
brown and red, Viridine, Galloflavine, etc. The Course is 
made as practical as possible, and every facility given to the 
student to investigate new processes and dye-stuffs. 

There is no extra charge for yarn, chemicals or apparatus 
used. 

Other Special Courses. 

Special courses in Wood-Carving, Tapestr}' Painting, and 
other branches can usually be arranged to suit the conven- 
ience of the pupil, the fees being the same as the monthly 
fees for the regular course ; viz : SS.OO a month. 




Grecian Helmet. From a pen-and-ink drawing by John J. Bissegger, a pupil in the School. 



24 



School Year. 

The next school year of thirty-six weeks begins the third 
Monday in September (the i6th) and ends at the first of 
June. The evening classes open the second Monday in 
October (the 14th) and close at the middle of April. There 
is a vacation of one week at Christmas. The School is also 
closed on legal holidays and on the Friday following Thanks- 
giving Day. 

Hours of Study — Day Classes. 

The hours of study for the day classes are from nine 
o'clock to one, and from two to four every day in the week 
except Saturday. 

Evening Classes. 

Evening classes in all the branches except Wood Carving 
are in session from the second Monday in October until 
the middle of April, on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays 
and Fridays, from half-past seven to half-past nine o'clock. 
Thursday evening in each week is devoted to lectures. 

Class for Teachers in Public and other Schools. 

Special arrangements are made for the accommodation of 
teachers, as follows: In addition to the facilities afforded 
by the evening classes, persons employed as teachers, in 
either public or private schools, may attend every Tuesday 
and Thursday afternoon, from two o'clock until four, with- 
out extra charge. Particular attention is paid to blackboard 
work, especially to such forms of it as are needed in kinder- 
garten and primary schools ; and every Tuesday afternoon 
is devoted to this kind of practice under the personal in- 
struction of the Principal. 

Requirements for Admission. 

Applicants for admission are expected to be as proficient 
in the common English branches as the completion of the 



25 

Grammar School course would imply. It is also desired 
that pupils should be fairly well grounded in a knowledge 
of free-hand drawing ; but proficiency in this branch is not 
required as a condition for admission, and pupils who are 
deficient in this respect will be given an opportunity, and 
furnished with every facility, for making up such defici- 
ency. Students in the Textile and Chemical Departments 
must also pass an examination in Arithmetic (through per- 
centage). 

Fees. 

All fees are payable in advance, and money once paid 
will in no instance be refjinded, except by special action of 
the Committee. The fee for the day class in any depart- 
ment of the General Course is $40.00 a year. Students 
entering for less than a year pay at the rate of $8.00 a 
month. 

The fee for the evening class is $10.00 a year. 

The fee for the teachers' class is the same as that for 
the evening class. 

Special Courses as Follows : 

Weaving and Textile Design, day class, $100.00 a year; 
evening class, $15.00 a year. Chemistry and Dyeing, day 
class, $100.00; evening class, $15.00 a year. Pupils in the 
Chemical Department — day class — are required to make a 
deposit of $10.00, to cover breakage, which must be settled 
for semi-annually : for the evening Chemistry class, course 
A, this deposit is $5.00. Wood Carving, same as General 
Course. 

Materials for Study. 

Instruments and materials for study must be provided 
by the students. All articles required in any class are for 
sale at the School at less than retail prices, and students 
are expected to purchase them here. 

Graduate Course. 

Graduates from the regular course may continue in the 



26 

School for advanced study without payment of fees, on con- 
dition that they devote a certain amount of time to teach- 
ing in the School or to other Art Work, for the promotion 
of the interests of the Institution. 

Each student is provided with a locker, in which drawing- 
boards and materials are to be placed before leaving the 
class-room. On receiving the ke}' the student must deposit 
fifty cents, which, when the key is returned, will be refunded, 
provided the return is made within one month after the date 
at which the student's term expires ; otherwise the deposit 
is forfeited. 

Students will be furnished with facilities for working at 
the Museum in Memorial Hall when this is desired. 

Certificate Work. 

To be eligible for the examination for the certificate or 
diploma, students must have completed satisfactory exercises 
in the Subjects of Study (see page 29 et seq). The works 
are regarded strictly as exercises, not as results, and stu- 
dents will practice the several kinds of subjects until the 
work required can be performed with facilit}' in a reasonable 
time. 

At least one specimen of each student's work in each 
class will be retained by the School. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Examinations are held semi-annually, in January and 
May, on the results of which, taken in connection with the 
quality of the work done in the class-room and regularity 
of attendance, the standing of students is made to depend. 

Monthly reports of attendance and standing are made 
to parents and guardians, and students whose progress is 
shown by these reports to be unsatisfactory for three 
months in succession will not be allowed to continue their 
studies in the School. 



2/ 



Discipline. 

The discipline of the School is made as simple as possible, 
and students are made to feel that as the requirements are 
definitely stated, and the instruction in each branch given 
at well-known hours, the progress of each is substantially 
in his own hands. 

All students, however, are expected to be prompt and 
regular in their attendance on all the exercises and lect- 
ures of their course, and irregularity in this respect will be 
regarded as sufficient reason for dismissal. 

Polite and orderly conduct is also insisted upon at all 
times, and any damage to School property must be made 
good by the student causing it. No book, chart or other 
educational appliance will be allowed to leave the building 
under any circumstances. 

All work must be put away before the student leaves the 
building. Lost articles may be inquired for of the janitor. 
Students are requested to give prompt notice of change of 
address. 

Lectures. 

Lectures on the Anatomy of the Human and of Animal 
Form as applied to Decorative Art, on Harmony of Color 
and related subjects are given throughout the year. 

Class instruction in the Geometrical branches is given 
every Monday, which all students are expected to attend ; 
and lectures on Original Design, on Art History and on 
Perspective are given by the Principal every Wednesday 
morning from eleven o'clock to half-past twelve, and every 
Thursday evening. All first-year students are expected to 
attend these lectures. 

Employment for Graduates. 

The School does not undertake to find places for gradu- 
ates, but applications for teachers and designers are con- 
stantly being received by the Principal, and students 



28 



desiring employment are requested to notify him to that 
effect. 

No pupil, who has not spent at least one year in the 
School, will be recommended for a position either as teacher 
or designer. 




Candlestick Henri II, in the collection at Memorial Hall, by Janet B. MacAlister, a pupil in 

the School. 



29 




Old Oaken Chair, time of Cromwell. From a pen-and-ink drawing by Vernon H. Bailey, a 
pupil in the School, in the collection at Memorial Hail. 



SUBJECTS OF STUDY. 



GENERAL COURSE. 



INDUSTRIAL DRAWING. 

Class A. 



EXERCISES. 

Freehand Drawing. 

(i) Drawing of Ornament from casts in charcoal, pen-and- 
ink and crayon. 

(2) Model drawing in Charcoal, pen-and-ink and crayon. 

(3) Drawing of Pieces of Furniture, Chairs, Tables, etc. 



30 

(4) Studies of Drapery in crayon, pen-and-ink, wash, etc. 

(5) " Objects of Industrial Art from the Museum. 

(6) " Flowers and Foliage from Nature, in char- 
coal, pen-and-ink and water color. 

(7) Lettering. 

(8) Analysis of Plants for the purpose of Design. 

(9) Original Designs, from natural forms. 

(10) Studies in Historic Ornament. 

(11) Design applied to Surface Decoration, flat or in relief. 

Instrumental Drawing. 

(12) Exercises with Instruments (construction of plane 
♦ figures, line shading, etc.). 

(13) Plans and elevations of buildings and machinery. 

(14) Descriptive Geometry (intersections and developments). 
(»5) Perspective. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

(i) Plane Geometrical Drawing. 

(2) Projections. 

(3) Descriptive Geometry. 

(4) Perspective. 

(5) Model Drawing. 

(6) Drawing from Memory. 

(7) Historical Ornament, a written paper, illustrated by 

drawings. 

(This class attends lectures once a week on Geometry in all its applications 
to Drawing ; and once a week on Perspective, on the Principles of Design, on 
Historical Ornament, or some other subject directly related to the work of the 
class-room.) 



31 




Head Modeled by Winifred E. Ketcliain, a pupil of the School. 



ADVANCED DRAWING CLASS. 

Class B. 

This class is for the thorough study of the figure from 
the cast and from the living model. Students are admitted 
to this class only after completing the courses described on 
pages 29 and 30, or, in the case of those who do not desire 
to complete the course, or who have received their prelimi- 
nary training in other institutions, on passing a satisfactory 
examination in drawing the human figure, either from life 
or from the cast. 

The Life class works from the Draped Model, and each 
pose is arranged with as much reference to the study, either 
of historical costume or of beauty of decorative effect, as 
of the figure itself 

This class is under the personal instruction of the Prin- 
cipal. 



32 




Original Design by Mary L. Price, a pupil in the School. 

DECORATIVE PAINTING AND 
APPLIED DESIGN. 

Class C. 



EXERCISES. 



(i) Enlargement and reduction of colored ornament, from 
Plates and from Actual Fabrics, Carpets, Wall 
Papers, etc. 

(2) Exercises with Instruments. Drawing of Geometrical 

Patterns from Plates and Fabrics. (For students 
who have not taken the Certificate of Class A.) 

(3) Grinding and Preparation of Colors. 

(4) Studies in Color Harmony, consisting of Original De- 

signs treated in different schemes of color. 



(5) Studies of Plants and Flowers from Nature. 

(6) " " Groups, Draperies, etc. 

(7) " " Objects from the Museum. 

(8) Original Designs for Body Brussels and Ingrain 

Carpets, Smyrna Rugs, Turcoman Curtains, Up- 
holstery Goods, Wall Papers, Oil Cloths, Linoleum, 
Lace, Embroidery, etc. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

(i) Time Sketch in water colors of flowers or a group of 
objects. 

(2) Exercises in Color Harmony, in water colors. 

(3) Paper on the Origin and Chemistry of Pigments. 

(4) " " Principles of Design in Surface Decoration. 

(5) Description of Lithography, Engraving and Etching, 

Porcelain and Pottery Decoration, Fresco Painting, 
Mosaic Work, Inlays, Colored Glass Work. 

(This class attends the lectures on Harmony of Color, on Historic Orna- 
ment, and on Principles of Decorative Design.) 

To earn the Diploma the Student must devote two years to the work of this 
class in addition to completing the work of class A. 




Original Design, by S. M. Eckert, a pupil in the School. 



34 




Tiles designed and modeled by pupils of the School. 



MODELING CLASS. 



Class D. 



EXERCISES. 



In Clay. 

(i) Studies of Ornament from casts. 

(2) " " Details of Human Figure from casts. 

(3) " " Animal from casts. 

(4) " " Ornament from prints and photographs. 

(5) " " the Living Model. 

(6) Original Designs for Wood or Stone Carving, and for 

Stucco work. 

(7) Original Designs for Ornament in Terra Cotta. 

(8) Anatomical Studies of the Human Figure. 

(9) Designs for Work in Cast or Wrought Metal. 

10) Designs for Furniture or Cabinet work with carved 
enrichments. 

EXAMINATIONS. 
(i) Paper on Historical Schools of Sculptured Ornament. 
(2) Paper on Principles of Design as applied to Sculptured 
Objects. 



35 

(3) Time Sketch in Clay of Ornament from cast or print. 

(4) Paper on Anatom}- of the Human Figure. 

(This class attends lectures on Human and Animal Anatomy, on the Prin- 
ciples of Constructive and Decorative Design, and on Historical Ornament.) 

To earn the Diploma the Student must devote two years to the work in this 
class in addition to completing the work of class A. 



TEACHERS' CLASS. 

(For those employed as Teachers in either Public or Private Schools.) 



EXERCISES. 



Freehand "Work. 
(i) Drawing of Ornament from the cast. 

(2) " from models. 

(3) " Pieces of Furniture, as chairs, tables, etc. 

(4) Foliage from Nature. 

(5) Analysis of Plants for the purpose of Design. 

(6) Elementary Design. 

(7) Studies of Historic Ornament. 

(8) Applied Design. 

(9) Drawing from Dictation. 

(10) Modeling, with special reference to the work of the 

Kindergarten. 

Instrumental W^ork. 

(11) Plane Geometrical Drawing. 

(12) Elements of Projection. 

(13) Element of Perspective. 

EXAMINATIONS, 
(i) Model Drawing. 

(2) Drawing from Dictation. 

(3) Plane Geometrical Drawing. 

(4) Elements of Projection. 

(5) Elements of Perspective. 

(6) Drawing on the Blackboard. 



36 




Original Design for Lace, by Nellie Slater, a pupil of the School. 



DEPARTMENT OF WEAVING AND 
TEXTILE DESIGN. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 



For pupils who have not been in attendance at the School, 
the Course in Textile Design (including Chemistry and 
Dyeing) covers three years ; but upon the satisfactory evi- 
dence being furnished of the Student's proficiency in the 
work of the first year's General Course, he may complete 
the Course in Textile Design in two years. 

First Year's Course. 

Squared Designing Paper for the different Textile Fabrics. 

Weaves for Textile Fabrics and the Methods of their 
Construction. 

Foundation Weaves. 

Tlic Plain or Cotton Weave. — Construction. Influence of 
the Twist of the Yarn. Fancy Effects Produced by using 
Threads of Different Sizes, or by the Combination of Two 
or More Colors. 



?>7 

Tivills. — Construction. Influence of the Twist of the 
Yarn upon tlie Various Textures. Division of Twill 
Weaves. Combination of Two or More Colors for Pro- 
ducing Different Effects. 

Satins. — Methods and Rules for Constructing the Va- 
rious Satin-Weaves. Influence of the Twist of the Yarn 
Upon Fabrics Interlaced with Satin-Weaves. 

Draiving-in of the Warp in the Harness. — Description of 
the Operation. Principle of a Drawing-in Draft. Methods 
Used for Preparing Drawing-in Drafts. Division of Draw- 
ing-in Drafts. Straight Drawing-in Drafts. Fancy Draw- 
ing-in Drafts. Drafting of Drawing-in Drafts from Weaves. 
Preparing the Harness-Chain by Fancy Drawing-in Drafts. 
Rules for Estimating the Number of Heddles Required 
for Each Harness, a. For Straight Drawing-in Drafts, b. 
For the Various Fancy Drawing-in Drafts. The Reed, 
and Rules for Calculations. 

Derivative Weaves. 

From the Plain or Cotton Weave. — Common Rib-Weaves. 
Common Basket- Weaves. Fancy Rib-Weaves. Fancy 
Basket-Weaves. Figured Rib-Weaves. Effects Produced 
by using Two or More Colors in Warp and Filhng of Fa- 
brics Interlaced Upon Rib and Basket- Weaves. Oblique 
Rib-Weaves. Combination of Common and Oblique Rib- 
Weaves. 

From the Regular Twill Weave. — Broken-Twills. Using 
Two or More Colors for Producing Various Effects upon 
Fabrics Interlaced with Broken-Twills. Steep-Twills of 
63° Grading or Diagonals. Steep-Twills of 70° Grading. 
Steep-Twills having a Grading of 75°. Reclining-Twills 
or Twills having a 27° Grading. Curved-Twills. Skip- 
Twills. Combination of Two Different Common Twills to 
Steep-Twills of 63° Grading. Corkscrew-Twills. En- 
twining-Twills. Twills having Double Twill-Effects. Twill 
Weaves Producing Checkerboard Effects. Combination of 
Warp and Filling Effects from a 45° Twill Weave after a 
Given Motive. Fancy Twill Weaves. Pointed-Twills. 



38 

Derivative Weaves from Satins. — Double Satins. Granite 
Weaves. Combination of Different Systems of Weaves 
into One Weave. Figured Effects Produced by the Fancy 
Arrangement (of Two or More Colors) upon Fabrics In- 
terlaced with Derivative Weaves, 

Weaves for Single Cloth Fabrics of a Special Construction 
and Peculiar Character. — Honeycomb Weaves. Imitation 
Gauze (Plain and Figured). Combination of Weaves for 
Fabrics constructed with One System of Warp and Two 
Systems of Filling. Combining Two Systems of Filling to 
One Kind of Warp for Increasing the Bulk of a Fabric. 
Figuring with Extra Filling upon the Face of Fabrics In- 
terlaced with their own Warp and Filling. Principles of 
Swivel Weaving. Explanation and Illustration of a Swivel 
Loom. Combination of Weaves for Fabrics constructed 
with Two Systems of Warp and One System of Filling. 
Two Systems of Warp and One System of Filling for 
Producing Double-Faced Fabrics. Using an Extra Warp 
as Backing for Heavy- Weight Worsted and Woolen Fa- 
brics. Figuring with E^xtra Warp upon the Face of Fa- 
brics Otherwise Interlaced with the Regular Warp and 
Filling. Principles of Lappet Weaving. Explanations and 
Illustrations of the Lappet Loom. Tricot Weaves. 

Double Cloth. 

Description and object of making double cloth fabrics. 
Rules for designing double cloth fabrics. Double cloth 
weaves designed with warp and filling, one end face to alter- 
nate with one end back. Warp, one face, one back, filling, 
two face, one back. Warp, two face, one back. Filling, one 
face, one back. Warp and filling, two face, one back. Warp 
and filling, two face, two back. Warp, two face, two back, 
filling, two face, one back. Warp and filling, three face, 
one back. Double cloth weaving without stitching both 
Cloths. Principle of constructing seamless bags, hose and 
similar fabrics. Double cloth fabrics in which the design 
is produced by the stitching being visible upon the face of 
the fabric. Worsted coatings. Matelasses. Quilts (plain 



39 

pique fabrics and figured pique fabrics). Rib fabrics. Three- 
ply fabrics. Four-ply fabrics, etc. 

Analysis of Textile Fabrics. 

Methods and rules in practical use for ascertaining the 
Weight per Yard and Ends per Inch, in Warp and Filling 
for the Finished Fabrics from a given sample. Ascertain- 
ing the Weave. Ascertaining Raw Materials used in the 
construction of textile fabrics. Ascertaining the Texture 
required in Loom for a given fabric sample. Ascertaining 
the Arrangement of Threads in a sample, according to their 
Color and Counts for the Warp and Filling. x-\scertaining 
the Sizes or Counts of the Yarns necessary for the Repro- 
duction of a given sample. Ascertaining the Weight of the 
Cloth per yard from Loom. Ascertaining the Process of 
Finishing necessary. (Ascertaining the Shrinkage of a 
Fabric during Finishing, with an Explanation of the Rela- 
tions between Finished Width and Length of a Fabric and 
its Width and Length from Loom.) 

Miscellaneous Yarn Calculations. 

Dressing of warps by hand, and calculations for same ; 
Beaming. 

The hand-loom analyzed and explained, with reference 
to the various ''witches'' and " dobbys" in use. 

Practical work on hand-looms for cotton, woolen and 
worsted fabrics. 

Principles of the cam loom and of the roller loom, with 

reference to the best manner of adapting these to fancy 

work. 

Instrwnental Drawing. 

Exercises with instruments ; construction of plane fig- 
ures ; line shading, etc. 

Freehand Drawing. 

Enlargement and Reduction of Designs ; Analysis of 
Plants for the purpose of use in Design for Textile Fabrics; 
Work in Color ; Lectures on Color Harmony. 

Students must pass satisfactorily the Course of Freehand 
Drawing: to be admitted into the Second Year's Course. 



40 

Second Year's Course. 

Pile Fabrics. 

Pile Fabrics Produced by the Filling. — Velveteens, Fustians, 
Corduroys. Chinchillas, Whitneys, Plain and Figured. 
Chenille for the Manufacture of Curtains and Rugs. Che- 
nille as Produced in the Manufacture of Fringes. 

Pile Fabrics in ivhich the Pile is Produced by a Separate 
Warp in addition to the Ground Warp. — Description of the 
Structure of Warp Pile Fabrics. Terry and Velvet Pile. 
Velvet and Plush Fabrics. Figured Velvet. Astrakhans, 
their various methods of construction. Tapestry Carpets. 
Brussels Carpets. Double-Faced Carpets. 

Double Pile Fabrics. — Principle of their Construction. 
Methods of Operation for Producing Double Pile Fabrics 
and Cutting the same on the Loom during Weaving. 

Turkish Tozvclings and Similar Fabrics. 

Smyrna Carpets and Rugs. Two-Ply Ingrain Carpet. 

Gauze Fabrics. 

Principle of Construction of Gauze Fabrics. Combina- 
tion of Plain and Gauze Weaving. Jaquard Gauze. 

The Jacqtiard Machine, as Necessary for Figured Work. 
History of the Jacquard J\Iachi)u\ The Jacquard Maclnne, 
General Arrangement and Application. Illustration of the 
different parts of the Jacquard Machine. Method of Opera- 
ion, etc. The Jacquard Harness. The Comber-boardst 
Tying-up of Jacquard Harness. Straight-through Tie-up. 
Straight-through Tie-up for Repeated Effects, in one Re- 
peat of the Design. Straight-through Tie-up of Jacquard 
Loom, having Front Harness attached. Centre Tie-up. 
Straight-through and Point Tie-up Combined. Straight- 
through Tie-up in Two Sections. Tying up a Jacquard 
Harness for Figuring Part of the Design with an Extra 
Warp. Straight-through Tie-up in Three Sections. Point 
Tie-up in Three Sections. Combination Tie-up in Two 
Sections. Straight-through Tie-up in Four Sections. 
Tying-up of Jacquard Looms with Compound Harness 
attached. Tying-up Jacquard Looms for Gauze Fabrics. 



41 

Modifications of tlie Single Lift Jacquani Macliine. — Dou- 
ble Lift Single Cylinder Jacquard Machine. Double Lift 
Double Cylinder Jacquard Machine. Substitution of Tail- 
cords for Hooks, etc. 

Tying-np of facqnard Harness for Tivo-ply Ingrain 
Carpet, etc. — General Description of the Construction of the 
Fabric. Straight-through Tie-up. Point Tie-up. 

Stamping of Jacquard Cards ; with reference to the 
Designs. 

Lacing of Jacqiiard Cards. 

Squared Designing Paper for the different Textile Fabrics 
executed on the facqiiard Machine. Selection for Designing 
Paper for Single Cloth. For Double Cloth. For Two-ply 
Ingrain Carpet, etc., etc. Colors used for Painting Textile 
Designs. 

Sketching of Designs for Textile Fabrics to be executed on 
the Jacquard Machine. Methods of Setting the Figures. 
Size of Sketch Required. Enlarging and Reducing Figures 
for Sketches. Transferring of the Sketch to the Squared 
Designing Paper. Outlining in Squares. Rules for Out- 
lining in Squares Inside or Outside the Drawing Outline. 
Illustration of a Sketch. Outlining on Q Paper. Finished 
Design. Fabric Sample (Single Cloth). Designs for Dam- 
ask Fabrics to be executed on a Jacquard Loom, with 
Compound Harness attached. Designs for Two-ply In- 
grain Carpet. Designs for Dress goods, Figured, with 
Extra Warp. Designs for Figured Pile Fabrics. 

Study of the Crompton and Knowles Harness Looms of 
the latest makes, single and double beam. Methods of set- 
ting up and timing of their various parts. Box motions and 
chain building explained. Rules and calculations for change 
gears, also such as to ascertain desired speed of shafting and 
size of pulley required for a given speed of loom. Practical 
weaving with these looms of worsted and woolen fabrics of 
every description. 

The Jacquard Machine. Principles of construction and 
method of operation of the single-lift machine ; the various 
modifications, such as double-lift single cylinder, double- 



42 

lift double cylinder ; laying out of comber boards, and 
figuring for various changes in texture ; tying up of harness 
for single cloth. 

The study of the Bridesburg Clipper Loom, timing 
of its various parts, and practical work with the same, with 
special reference to its use in connection with the double- 
lift double cylinder Jacquard machine for damask table 
covers, etc. The study of the Ingrain Carpet Machine and 
various tie-ups for the same. The Ingrain Carpet Hand 
Loom and the Murkland Power Carpet Loom analyzed and 
explained ; practical work with these looms. Card-stamp- 
ing for the different fabrics, as damask table covers, dress 
goods, upholstery, ingrain carpets, etc. Card lacing. 
Study of cut pile fabrics. — Velvets, Plush, Tapestry and 
Brussels Carpets ; double-faced Brussels Carpets. Astra- 
khans, cut ; uncut; figured in Terry and velvet. Chenille 
Rugs, Curtains, etc. Gauze fabrics, plain ; figured. 

Instnuncntal Drazuing. 

Plans for machinery, mill buildings, etc. Illustrating 

process of weaving. Illustrating sectional cuts of Textile 

fabrics, etc. 

Freehand Drawing. 

Sketching for the different fabrics on Jacquard work. 

Tools Required in Practical Department by Each Scholar. 
One small monkey-wrench ; one screw-driver (medium 
size) ; one pair plyers ; one pair scissors ; one pair overalls 
and jacket. 



43 




Candlestick in the collection at Memorial Hall. From a pen-and-ink drawing by 
Janet B. iNIacAlister, a pupil in the School. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND 
DYEING. 



SCHEDULE OF STUDIES. 



First Year. 
Theoretical Chemistry, 
Lectures and laboratory practice. 
The elementary substances. 
Chemical changes. 
Non-metallic elements. 
Theory of atoms and molecules. 
Application of the atomic weights. 
Chemical equations and their interpretation. 



44 

Acids, bases and salts. 

Metallic elements. 

Sodium, Potassium, Silver, Calcium, Barium, Strontium, 
Lead, Magnesium, Zinc, Cadmium, Aluminum, Chromium, 
Manganese, Iron, Cobalt, Nickel, Copper, Mercury, Tin, 
Gold, Platinum, 

Qualitative analysis. 

Detection of metallic elements. 

Detection of acids. 

Analysis of various salts. 

Second Year. 
Dyeing. 
Industrial and Organic Chemistry as applied to dyeing. 
Lectures and laboratory work. 
Textile fibres. 

Wool, Cotton, Linen, Silk. 

General properties and action of chemical agents. 
Affinity for different coloring matter. 
Wool scouring. 
Cotton bleaching. 
Linen bleaching. 
Silk bleaching. 
Theories of dyeing. 
Mordants and their application. 
Artificial coloring matter. 
Natural coloring matter. 
Application to different fibres. 
Dyeing fast colors. 



45 




Bronze Lamp Stand in the collection at iMemorial Hall. From a drawing by 
Vernon H. Bailey, a pupil in the School. 



CARVING CLASS. 



Course of Study. 

(i) Selection, Sharpening and Care of Tools. 

(2) Bosses and Scrolls from Casts and Models. 

(3) Intaglios and Mold Sinking. 

(4) Ornament from Prints and Drawings. 

(5) Original Designs for Panels, Carved Enrichments for 

Furniture and Cabinet Work, Picture Frames, 
Easels, etc. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS. 
1888-89. 



ADULPH, ALBER'J' J. 
ALLEN, FRAXKLLX 
ANTON, NELLIE 
ARTHUR, MARY 
ASPDEN, NEWTON J. 
ATWATER, THEODORA 
BAILEY, VERNON H. 
BARNES, JAMES P. 
BARINGHURST, REV. GEORGE 
BARR, WILLIAM 
BIRD, H. M. 
BISSEGGER, JOHN 
BEDFORD, CORNELIA E. 
BELL, THOMAS S. 
BOCK, RICHARD C. A. 
BOLEY, JOHN 
BOND, WILLIAM E. 
BOTTOMLEY, CHARLES S. 
BOWEN, SAMUEL 
BR EADY, EDWIN K. 
BRIGGS, NELLIE 
BROOKS, JAMES E. 
BROWN, MRS. N. C. S. . 
BURT, JOHN 
CAMPBELL, ANGIE L. 
CAMPBELL, ARCHIE 
CAMPBELL, JOHN J. 
CAMPBELL, PETER 
CARLL, S. 

CAROLAND, MAY R. 
CARSON, JOHN 
CHADWICK, ROBERT 
CHARLTON, WILLIAM J 
COLESBERRY, J. BENNETT 
CONVERSE, C. A. 
COOPER, PAULINE 
CRAWSHAW, ALEXANDER G. 
CRAWSHAW, JOSEPH 
DAVIDSON, HARRY O. 
DAVIS, JOHN AI. 
DEIGNAN, ELLA 
DEMOLL, CARL G. 
DETWILER. FOREST 
DICKSON, WILLIAM 

DOAK, willia:\i a. 



DORISS, JOHN W. 
DUDLEY, HOWARD 
EASTWICK, C. J. 
ECKERT, SUSAN M. 
EINSTEIN, MRS. HENRIETTE 
ELLINGER, LIZZIE. 
ELMORE, MRS. AGNES 
EMERICK, J. M. 
ENSINGER, HOWARD G. 
EVERETT, WM. S. 
EYSTER, J. H. 
FARRAR, WM. 
FAWKNER, FRED. L. 
FETHERSTON, FLORENCE C. 
FERRIDAY, HARRY M. 
FINCKEL, CONYERS B. 
FITZGERALD, JOHN C. 
FITZGERALD, SMITH 
FLEMING, JAMES B. 
FOGLE, JACOB 
FRITZ, JACOB 
GALLER, VICTORIA 
GARDINER, MARIE E. 
GARNER, FRANK A. 
GAVEY, WILLIAMS. 
GIBBONEY, A. FRANK 
GIRARD, ELLIE 
GREEN, MRS. LYDIA L. 
GOLDSMITH, GEORGE F. 
GREENHALZT,JE. 
GREENHALZT, GEORGE 
GRIFFITHS, MRS. A. T. 
HAINES, JOHN N. 
HALL, EDWIN 

HALLO WELL, ELIZABETH M. 
HANLON, JOSEPH 
HARRIS, MARGARET 
HARRISON, GEORGE L. 
HARRISON, CHARLES C. 
HARRISON, HARRY W. 
HARTSHORNE, ANNA C. 
HARVEY, ALICE 
HARVEY, GEORGE H 
HAYES. J. J. 
HEAI.D, WALTER 



47 



HERRGEIST, CHARLES W . 

H ILL, THOMAS 

HIXCHMAX, GERTRUDE 

HOLT, MARLA. L. 

HOLT, WILLL\M F. 

HOPPER, CHARLES 

HOGAN, MARY H. 

HOSEV, THOMAS 

HUNT, FREDERIC S. 

IVES, J. E. 

JACKSON, X. WARE 

JACOBS, ERNEST J. 

JAMES, MARY A. 
•JAUD, HARRY 

KAUFMANN, GEORGE F. 

KELLEY, LAURA 

KESSLER, FERDINAND 

KEW, WALTER B. 

KEYS, JOHN L. 

KING, ELLEN 

KNEEDLER. HARRY M. 

KNIGHT, HARRY B. 

KREIDER, JOSEPH G. 

KUDER, FRED. 

LACHENMEYER, PAUL 

LAUSCH, MAX. 

LENTZ, OLIVER G. 

LETCH WORTH, SALLIE H. 

LEVERING, M. E. 

LITTLEWOOD, BEXJAMIX 

LOWXES, ANNA 

MacALISTER, JANET B. 

MacINTIRE, MRS. LUCY P. 

MAGINXISS, MAUD 

INIALCOLM, JOHN 

MARSDEX, FRED. 

MASOX, A. HAMILTON 

MAYER, FRED. E. 

MAYMAX, JOSEPH 

McCALL, ANXETTA G. 

McCARTY, F. 

McCOXNELL, JOHN J. 

McMENAMIN, THOS. 

]MERCER, SARA 

MEYERS, WILLIAM 

MILLER, J. HIBBERD 

]\IITCHELL, A. J. 

MITCHELL, JEANE E. 

MOIR,J. 

MOLITOR, JOHX 
MORAX, MAY 
MORRIS, JOSEPH, JR. 
MUIR, AUGUSTA E. 
XARDI, C. E. 
XEFF, J. THORNLEY 
NEUBER, JOHXF 
NEWLIN, ARCHIE 
NEWMAN. O. B. 
NEWMAX, REINHOLD 
'NICHOLS. WALTER S. 



O'NEILL, MAUD 
OTT, CHARLES 
PAGE, H. P. 
PAGETT, WM. W. 
PARKER, MIXERYA 
PARKES, ALFRED 
PATTON, WILBER F. 
PEALE, HARRY. JR. 
PIPER, JOHX 
PLUMMER, EVELYX E. 
PHILLIPS, ALBERT C. 
PRESTON, W. B. 
PRICE, FRAXK 
PRICE, MARY L. 
PRICE, SUE M. 
PRICHARD. E. SYDNEY 
PRIOR, EDWARD 
PRIOR. JOHX 
POOL, HARRY 
POSTELMAN, GEORGE 
PURDY, BELLE B. 
QUAY. HARRY E. 
RAWLIXS, MARY B. 
REBER, HARRY 
RICE, WILLARD M., 3d. 
ROBERTS, WM. H. 
ROGERS, HARRY T. 
ROGERS, THOMAS 
ROWLAND, WILLIAM 
RUSSELL, HEXRY R. 
RUSSELL, i\IARY C. 
SAUERWEX, FRANK 
SCATCHARD, BARTOX 
SCHLEGEL, OTTO 
SCHWARTZ, ALBERT F. 
SCHOEXFELD, ERXEST 
SCHUERLE. HARRY A. 
SEEBURGER, FRAXK 
SEVERXS, A. LIXCOLN 
SHAW, ALEXANDER 
SIMON'S, A. C. 
SLATER, XELLIE 
SMITH, A. D. 
SMITH. EMMA A. 
SMITH, HARVEY X. 
SMITH, FAXNY C. L. 
SO^NIERS, MAE E. 
STEAD, SAML'EL 
STEEL, WARXER J. 
STEEL, CHARLES F. 
STEVEN'S, FLORRIE G 
STOHR, JODOK, JR. 
SWIFT, MARY 
SWOBODA, HARRY 
SWORD, MARY 
SUXDSTROM, CARL 
TILGHMAX, E. S. 
THATCHER. EARL 
THIELE, THOMAS M. 
TOY, ELIAS, JR. 



48 



TRIPLER, LOUISA. 
TRUITT, J. P., JR. 
ULLMAN, JOHN J. 
VAN GUNTEN, CHARLES J. 
VOGDES, MARY 
VOSBURG, CORNELLA. V. 
WALDRON, WILLL-\iM K. 
WALENTA, EDMUND J. 
WALGE^IUTH, FRANCIS F. 
WARREN, CORA 
WARREN, EVA 
WARREN, WILLIAM C. 
WASHINGTON, ELIZABETH 
WAYMAN, ADOLPH 
WEED, A. N. 



WEEDER, FRANK 
WEIHAN.MAYER, H. 
WEISEL, DEBBIE D. 
WHITTINGTON, FRED. O. 
WILBRAHAM, JOANNA 
WILKINSON, HOWARD M. 
WILLIS, ALBERT P. 
WILSON, AMANDA M. 
WOLF, SARAH E. 
WOODHEAD, ARTHUR 
WOODHULL, JENNIE W. 
WOODWARD, ESTELLE 
YERKES, JENNIE L. 
VOUDS, MAUD A. 
ZELLERS,J. W. 




Chrysanthemum.s, from- Nature ; by Lydia L. Green, a pupil in the School, 



49 



A Partial List of Former Students of the School, 
with their Present Occupations. 



ADOLPH, ALBERT J., Designer, Carlile & Joy. 

BANES, J. W., with Erben, Search & Co. 

BARR, WILLIAM, Dyestuff salesman, Davis & Walton. 

BEATTY, JOHN R., Woolen and Cotton l\Ianufacturer. 

BECK, ROBERT K., Designer, John A. Lowell, Boston, Mass. 

BERG, KATF. H. W., Decorative Painter. 

BICKHAM, S. A., with Thomas Wood & Co. 

BILSON, C. R., Designer, DeKosenko & Hetherington, Philadelphia. 

BIRD, CLINTON H., Woolen Manufacturer, Bethlehem, Pa. 

BISSEGGER, J. J., Draughtsman, Cope & Stewardson. 

BLACK, W. A., Designer, Carey Bros., Philadelphia. 

BROOKS, JAMES E., Ink INIanufacturer. 

BROOM, HARRY, Dyeing, Firth & Foster Bros. 

BURT, JOHN, Boss Dyer, M. A. Furbush & Sons. 

BUTTERWORTH, SAMUEL, Member firm France & Butter^vorth , Woolen Manufacturers, 

Philadelphia. 
CAMPBELL. PETER, Dyeing. 

CAMPBELL, ARCHIE, Boss Dyer, Ivins, Dietz & Magee. 
CAlNIPBELL, J. ADDISON, Woolen Manufacturer, Manayunk. 
CUMMINGS, HELEN N., Decorative Painter, Philadelphia. 
CARROLL, BENJAMIN, Designer, Philadelphia. 
CHADWICK, ROBT., J. & J. Dobson, Philadelphia. 
CHALK, Wj\I. GEORGE, Designer, Philadelphia. 
CHUBB, AMY, Designer, John B. Bierck & Co. 
DIEZ, JOHN, Designer, Philadelphia. 

DODD, HARRIET J., Decorative Painter, J. E. Newton, Philadelphia. 
ENGEL, GEO. W., Designer, Philadelphia. 

EVANS, GERALD, Designer, Tr^-mby, Hunt & Co., Philadelphia. 
FARLEY. ROBERT, Overseer Weaving Department, Philadelphia. 
FIRTH. EDWARD, with Firth & Foster Bros. 

FITZGERALD. SMITH, Foreman wool sorting. Craven & Deamley. 
FOSTER, J. W., with Firth & Foster Bros. 
FOSTER, FRANK, with Firth & Foster Bros. 
FROMUTH, AUGUST, Designer, J. & J. Dobson, Philadelphia. 
FRY, J. W. B., Architect, Philadelphia. 
GADSBY, H. C, Treasurer Hope Mills, of North Carolina. 
GLEDHILL, JOSEPH, Designer, Philadelphia. 
GOODWIN, HOWARD R., Designer, Philadelphia. 

GOODWIN, MYRTIE D., Teacher Penna. Museum and School Industrial Art. 
GRAY, W. F., Designer, Philadelphia. 
HALL, T. L., Designer, Philadelphia. 
HALLOWELL, ELIZABETH M., Teacher of Drawing. 
HARRIS, W. J., with T. A. Harris. 

HARVEY, GEO. H., Carpet Manufacturer (firm of Harvey & Co.), Philadelphia. 
HAYES, J. J., Boss dyer, West Jersey Dyes Works. 
HAYS, FRANK, Architect, Philadelphia. 
HENRY, JAMES. Designer, Leedom, Bristol. 
HILL, EUGENE H., Designer, Philadelphia. 
HILL, JOSEPH E., Teacher of Drawing, Philadelphia. 
HOLT, MARIA L., Teacher Penna. Museum and School Industrial Art. 
HOLT, THOMAS, Superintendent, Frank Leake, Philadelphia. 
HOLT, WILLIAM, Designer, Berkey, Gay & Co., Grand Rapids. 



50 

HOPFER, CHAS., Designer, Philadelphia. 

HUQUENELE, ADELE, Teacher of -Drawing and Painting, Philadelphia. 
HOSEY, THOS., Dyeing, Wm. Wood & Co. 
IVINS, WM., Jr., Carpet Manufacturer. 

JACOBS, GEARY, Woolen Manufacturers, Jacobs Bros., Portland, Oregon. 
JUNGKURTH. JOHN W., with Thomas Wood & Co. 
KELLY, JOHN, Designer, Philadelphia. 

KETCHAM, WINIFRED E., Designer, Keystone Watch Case Co., Philadelphia. 
KNEEDLER, HARRY M., Manufacturer, 
KNIGHT, HARRY B , Dyestuff salesman, F. Bredt & Co. 
KRAYER, J. FREDERICK. Designer, Denver, Col. 
LANG, WM., Designer, Philadelphia. 

LATHROP, BESSIE, Teacher Modeling and Designing, School for Deaf Mutes, North- 
ampton, Mass. 
LAWSON, DAVID, Designer, Philadelphia 

LETCHWORTH, SARAH H., Teacher of Drawing, Friends' School, Moorestown, N. J. 
LEVERING, JOHN, with Erben, Search & Co. 
LITTLEWOOD, BENJ., Boss dyer, Wm. Wood & Co. 
LUDELL, HAROLD, Designer, Philadelphia. 
LUTZ, EDWIN G., Designer (General), Philadelphia. 
MAGEE, JAMES S., Carpet Manufacturer, Philadelphia. 
MALCOLM, JOHN, Dyeing, Quaker City Dye Works Co. 
MARTIN, WM. S., Designer, Philadelphia. 

MASON, A. HAMILTON, Swift Manufacturing Co., Columbus, Ga. 
McGUIGAN, JOHN, with Thos, Dolan & Co. 
McKEE, VEAGH, Designer, Philadelphia. 
MERCER, FRED T., Draughtsman, Philadelphia. 
MELLON, WM. S., Designer, Philadelphia. 
MERCER, W. HARRY, Designer (Furniture), Philadelphia. 
NEWLIN, ARCHIE, Teacher of Drawing. 
OGIER, VICTOR, Designer, Philadelphia. 
PENNELL, JOSEPH, Artist, London, England. 
PHILLIPS, A. C, Finishing, Joseph Boncroft & Sons. 
PRICE, S. M., Teacher of Drawing, Friends' Select Schools. 
PUGH, GEO. W., Designer, Philadelphia. 
RAMBO, H. E. Carpet Manufacturer, Philadelphia. 
REDDIE, ARCHIBALD F., Designer, McCallum & Sloan. 

REINECKE, WM., Dyeing, with Wm. R. Diller & Co. ; 

RICE, R. A., Superintendent. j 

RICORDS, JENNIE T., Designer, Ketterlinus & Co., Philadelphia. \ 

ROGERS, WM. H., Overseer Weaving Department, John G. Carruth & Co., Philadelphia. s 

SCHEMLE, HARRY A., Pearl button-maker. ,1 

SCHLESINGER, ALFRED R., Designer Furniture, Berkey, Gay & Co., Grand Rapids. "I 

SHAW, ALEXANDER, Color mixer -j 

SHINLE, JOHN, Designer, Philadelphia. j 

SKEEN, JOHN, Designer, Philadelphia. 
SMITH, THOMAS, Designer, Bromley, Philadelphia. 
SOMERS, MAE E., Decorative Painter, Philadelphia. 
STEWART, JAMES T., Manufacturer, Philadelphia. 
STONE, THOMAS, Designer, Potoneska Mill, New Bedford, Mass. 
STRATTON, HOWARD F., Teacher Penna. Museum School of Industrial Art. 
TITHER, JAMES T., Designer and Superintendent, Media, Pa. 
VAN GELDER, PETER, Designer, Philadelphia. 
WALTON, JOHN P., Designer, Philadelphia. 
WATSON, AGNES M., Artist. Philadelphia. 
WATT, THOS. E., Designer, Bromley & Bros. 
WILLIS, ALBERT P., Decorator, McGregor & Son. 
WOODWARD, ESTELLE, Teacher of Drawing. 
YUNDT, CHARLES, Designer, Philadelphia. 



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