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Full text of "School catalog, 1951-1952. Saturday School."

THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM SC 

BROAD and PINE STREETS, 
Phone: PEnnypacker 5-7473 



JUNIOR CLASSES 

EDWARD WARWICK Dean 

WILLARD P. GRAHAM Regisfrar 

JEANNETTE W. STARR Director 

HELEN STEVENSON WEST librarion 

MARY McCARTAN Recorder 

ANN REYNOLDS Properties 

WILLIAM V. WENCE Superinlendeni 



Saturday Junior Classes are for boys and girls 
who love to draw and paint. We believe that 
the right teacher "guides" rather than instructs. 
He is understanding, inspiring. He taps the cre- 
ative force of the child who then rushes into 
action. The teacher will not judge the child's 
sketches by adult standards, but he will sug- 
gest and criticize so that the student can grow 
in power and taste. The student learns to use 
criticism constructively; to work patiently. He 
also learns to choose, to see and to appreciate. 
Students are placed according to age, experi- 
ence, and interest. In each class they learn 
drawing, composition and color. Subject matter 
varies. We build background as well as art ex- 
pression. The primary class paints and models 
its own age world. The next age groups study 
this world more closely. One group meets at 
the zoo. Natural History Museum, or gardens, 
to sketch animals or flowers. One class explores 
the France of Roland and Oliver — horses, 
country, customs. Another studies Medieval 
England — castles, monasteries, Beowulf, Robin 
Hood. Ulysses and his adventures come alive 
as another class studies the Odyssey. The Vi- 
kings challenge still another class as they find 
out about their boats, halls and ways of living. 

Crafts with work in copper, clay, and other 
material engage the interest of many students. 



/[useum School of Art 
lent the Philadelphia 
its Diamond Jubilee 
:h the design of the 
Dgue. The School will 
lond Jubilee in 1952. 



OF ART 



)ELPHIA 



on of Schools of Design 



THE PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM SCHOOL OF ART 

BROAD and PINE STREETS, PHILADELPHIA 2, PA. 

Phone. PEnnypacker 5-7473 



JUNIOR CLASSES 

EDWARD WARWICK Dean 

WILLARD P. GRAHAM fiegis^ror 

JEANNETTE W. STARR Director 

HELEN STEVENSON WEST Libranan 

MARY McCARTAN Recorder 

ANN REYNOLDS Properties 

WILLIAM V. WENCE Superm/endenJ 



Saturday Junior Classes ore for boys and girls 
who love to draw and point. We believe that 
the right teacher "guides" rather than instructs. 
He is understanding, inspiring. He taps the cre- 
ative force of the child who then rushes into 
action. The teacher will not judge the child's 
sketches by adult standards, but he will sug- 
gest and criticize so that the student can grow 
in power and taste. The student learns to use 
criticism constructively; to work patiently. He 
also learns to choose, to see and to appreciate. 
Students are placed according to age, experi- 
ence, and interest. In each class they learn 
drawing, composition and color. Subject matter 
varies. We build background as well as art ex- 
pression. The primary class paints and models 
its own age world. The next age groups study 
this world more closely. One group meets at 
the zoo. Natural History Museum, or gardens, 
to sketch animals or flowers. One class explores 
the France of Roland and Oliver — horses, 
country, customs. Another studies Medieval 
England — castles, monasteries, Beowulf, Robin 
Hood. Ulysses and his adventures come alive 
as another class studies the Odyssey. The Vi- 
kings challenge still another class as they find 
out about their boats, halls and ways of living. 

Crafts with work in copper, clay, and other 
material engage the interest of many students. 



SATURDAY 
MORNING 
SCHOOL 
19511952 



Experimental Design is just what the title indi- 
cates. In the care of an inspiring teacher the 
students cut, paste, draw, letter, erect and 
paint. 

Drawing of the figure is seriously studied by 
one class, and so is water color in another. 

There are two fashion groups. After figure 
study, one of these does fashion sketching, 
while the other studies period costume at the 
Museum and then sketches original costumes 
for today's use. An older group studies illustra- 
tion including various media and special 
problems. 

We feel that experience in all these classes, 
which are specifically designed for children, is 
of Interest and value to alt children, and 
furnishes on invaluable foundation for study In 
the Art School If the student plans an art career. 

Our program is conducted by teachers who 
are trained to work with children up to eigh- 
teen years of age. 



JUNIOR CLASSES 1951-1952 

Supervised and Directed by 
JEANNETTE WOODWARD STARR 



FACULTY' 



Jane E. Bonelli 
Joyce Chibatar 
Janice Clark 
Edward Colker 
Wayne Davis 
Alexander Derkas 
Bette M. Granahan 
Jack G. Hawthorne 
Ruth Heckler 
Martha Huehnergarth 
Jean Michener 



Edirh H. Moerder 
Thomas W, Murray 
Terry G. Oakley 
William H. Oakley 
Lenore Priest 
Robert Ramey 
Chorlotte P. Ridpalh 
Leonard Schwartz 
Emanuel H. Sitberman 
Reba Cohn Weiner 
Robert Wostcolf 




TUITION FEES 

Saturday Junior Class (Age 7 to 18): 

Saturday (9 to 1 2 o'clock) 25 lessons . . $1 5.00 
Fee must be paid at time of registration, 
CALENDAR 

Saturday Morning Junior Classes begin 
Saturday, October 6, 1951 and close 
Saturday, April 26, 1952. 

In session from 9 A.M. to 12 o'clock noon. » 

REGISTRATION 

Saturday Junior Classes: 

Saturday, September 29, from 9 to 12 o'clock. 
There will be no registration the Saturday the 
Junior School starts (Saturday, October 6). 

HOLIDAYS 

Thanksgiving Recess: Saturday, November 24, 

1951. 
Christmas Recess: Saturday, December 22, 1951 

and Saturday, December 29, 1951. 
Washington's Birthday: February 23, 1952. 
Spring Recess: Saturday, April 12, 1952. 



PLEASE NOTE 

Saturday School students may not be called to the telephone. 
The school office can not undertake lo deliver messages to 
students in the Saturday School. Parents who wish lo meet 
their children after the school session must moke those 
arrangements with the child before the child reports to the 
School. We con not make exceotions to this rule. 



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