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Full text of "School of Nursing Catalog 1946-1947, 1949-1954"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/schoolnursing46unse 



Year 1948 missing 



MARYLAND ROOW 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 




BULLETIN 1946 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 




BULLETIN 1946 




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SCHOOL OF NURSING 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of Nursing 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 

Night Superintendent of Nurses 

Assistant Night Superintendent of Nurses 

Director of Education 

Instructor in Sciences 

Instructor in Nursing Arts 

Instructor in Surgical Technique and 

Supervisor of Operating Pavilion 

Instructor in Dietetics 

Instructor in Massage 

LECTURERS FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Anatomv and Phvsiologv 

Wilfred H. Townshend, Jr., A.B..M.D. 

Bacteriology 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D.,D.Sc. 

William E. Evans, Jr., Ph.D. C. Jelleff Carr, Ph.D. Ruth Musser, M.S. 

Chemistry 

Glenn S. Weiland, Ph.D. 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL.B. Ann Virginia Brown, A.B. 

Pathology 

Milton S. Sacks, B.S.,M.D. 

Medicine 

Meyer W. Jacobson, M.D. 

Surgery 
Clyde F. Karns," B.S.,M.D. 

Obstetrics 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 

Gynecology 

Beverley C. Compton, A.B..M.D. 

Pediatrics 

A. Robert Marks, A.B.,M.D. Miles E. Drake, Ph.D.. M.D. 

Urologj 

W. Houston Toulson, M.Sc.,M.D. 

Psychiatry and Neurology 

Affiliation at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital 

Skin and Venereal Diseases 

Harry M Robinson. Jr., B.S.,M.D. 

Ophthalmology 

F. Edwin Knowles, Jr., M.D. 

Otology 

Frederick T. Kyper, D.Sc.M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgerv 

Allen F. Voshell, A.B.'.M.D. 

Social Service 

City Health Department 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The University of Maryland School of Nursing was established in 
the year 1889. Since that time it has been an integral part of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, coming under the same government. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being morning 
prayers. 

The University of Maryland Hospital is a general hospital containing 
435 adult beds and 70 bassinets. It is equipped to give young women a 
thorough course of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing. 

PROGRAMS OFFERED: The program of study of the school is planned 
for two groups of students: (a) the three-year group and (b) the five- 
year group. 

The three-year program is designed to meet the requirements for the 
Diploma in Nursing, and comprises the work of the first, second, and 
third hospital years. The requirements for admission to the five-year 
program of the School of Nursing are the same as for other colleges. 
(A special catalog will be sent upon request of the Registrar, University 
of Maryland, College Park, Maryland.) 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION: A candidate for admission to the 
School of Nursing must be a graduate of an accredited high school or 
other recognized preparatory school, and must present evidence that she 
has completed satisfactorily the required amount of preparatory study. 
Preference will be given to students who rank in the upper third of the 
graduating class in their preparatory schools. 

Candidates are required to present 16 units for entrance. 

Required: English (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; mathematics, 2 units; his- 
tory, 1 unit; science, 2 units; foreign language, 1 unit (preferred). 

Elective: Fine Arts, trade and vocational subjects are acceptable. 

In addition to these requirements, students must meet other definite 
requirements in regard to health, age, and personal fitness for nursing 
work. 

The preferable age for students registered for the three-year course 
is 20 to 35 years, although students may be accepted at the age of 18. 
Women of superior education and culture are given preference, pro- 
vided they meet the requirements in other particulars. A personal inter- 
view with the Director of the School is required whenever possible. 

Application forms may be secured from the Director of the School of 
Nursing, University of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

REGISTRATION WITH MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EXAMIN- 
ERS OF NURSES: The Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses 
requires all students entering schools of nursing in Maryland to register 
at the beginning of their course with the Board in order to be eligible 
to examination and license on completion of this course. This registra- 
tion is accomplished after the applicant has been accepted into the 
School of Nursing. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of dis- 
missing or retaining her at the end of her term of probation are left to 
the decision of the Director of the School. Misconduct, disobedience, 
insubordination, inefficiency, and neglect of duty are causes for dismissal. 

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL: Students accepted for the spring term 
are admitted in March, and those for the fall term in September. Admis- 
sion to the five-year course occurs in September. 

HOURS OF DUTY: During the probation period the students are 
engaged in class work for the first six months with supervised prac- 
tice in the hospital. For the remainder of their period of training they 
are on a forty-eight hour weekly schedule. The period of night duty is 
approximately five to six months during the three years. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



The first four months of the probation period are devoted to theoret- 
ical and practical instruction given entirely in the lecture and demon- 
stration rooms of the training school, hospital, and medical school labora- 
tories. During the last two months of the probation period the students 
are placed on duty in the hospital wards for instruction in bedside 
nursing, and are expected to perform the duties assigned to them by 
the Director of the School. At the close of the first semester the students 
are required to pass satisfactorily both the written and practical tests, 
attaining a grade of 75%. Failure to meet this requirement will be suffi- 
cient reason to request the withdrawal of the student from the school. 

SICKNESS: A physician is in attendance each day. Ill students are 
cared for gratuitously. The time lost through illness in excess of two 
weeks, during the three years, must be made up. Should the authorities 
of the school decide that because of time lost the theoretical work has 
not been sufficiently covered to permit a student to continue in any 
year, it will be necessary for her to continue her work with the next 
class. 

VACATIONS: Vacations are given between May and October. A period 
of four weeks is allowed during each of the first and second years, and 
ten days during the third year. 

EXPENSES: A fee of $50.00, payable on entrance, to be applied against 
:he cost of uniforms after the probation period is required from all 
students; plus student activity fee of $5.00. Each student receives her 
board, lodging, and a reasonable amount of laundry from the date of 
entrance. During her probation period she provides her own uniforms 
and shoes at a cost of approximately $55.00. After the probation period 
all uniforms and shoes are supplied by the hospital. Books are furnished 
at the expense of the student. Her personal expenses during the course 
of training and instruction will depend entirely upon her individual 
habits and tastes. 

GRADUATION: The Diploma in Nursing will be awarded to those who 
have satisfactorily completed the full term of three years, and have 
successfully passed the final examinations. 

SCHOLARSHIP: The Janet Hale Memorial Scholarship of $250.00 
given by the University of Maryland Nurses' Alumnae Association, is 
awarded to the student having the highest record in scholarship to 
pursue a course in administration, supervisory, or public health work at 
Teachers College, Columbia University, New York. 

AWARDS: There are two awards of $50.00 each known as the Edwin 
and Leander M. Zimmerman, and the Elizabeth Collins Lee prizes. The 
Woman's Auxiliary Board of the University of Mai viand presents the 
Alumnae Pin and a one year membership in the Association, for prac- 
tical nursing and executive ability. An award of $25.00 is given by 
Mrs. John L. Whitehurst for the highest average in executive ability. 
The Mary K. Waltham prize of $25.00 is awarded to the nurse who 
shows the most human understanding in the attention given to the pa- 
tients on the wards. The Flora Hoffman Tarun Memorial Prize of $25.00 
is awarded for leadership, loyalty, and school spirit. The Sarah Finkel- 
stein Memorial Prize of $25.00 is awarded to the nurse who has excelled 
in pediatrics. A prize of $25.00 is awarded by Dr. Cyras Horine for neat- 
ness in uniform and personal appearance. An award of $10.00 is given 
by Mrs. Charles A. Reif Schneider to the nurse who has consistently 
maintained the best professional appearance and conduct toward pa- 
tients and hospital personnel. 

A number of undergraduate prizes are awarded to the members of 
different classes for outstanding ability in the class room and on the 
wards. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 









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10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Anatomy and Physiology 105 Hours 

Anatomy is studied with the aid of skeletons, demonstrations, charts 
and models, and appropriate lectures. 

The general principles of physiology are studied with the aid of 
numerous physiological experiments which the students perform. 

The above instruction is given by a member of the Faculty of the 
Medical School. 

Charting 4 Hours 

Chemistry 90 Hours 

A course designed to introduce the student to scientific methods of 
technique, observation, and reasoning. It embraces the chemistry of 
everyday life, and is developed by considering the vital relation of 
chemistry to the problems of physiology, pathology and actual nursing. 

Diet Therapy 30 Hours 

In this course the principles of feeding in various diseases are dis- 
cussed, diets formulated, food values computed, and practical exper- 
ience afforded in calculating, planning and serving of special diets. 

History of Nursing 30 Hours 

The origin of nursing and its development from ancient to modern 
times. 

Hygiene 30 Hours 

Special emphasis is put on the nurse's responsibility in regard to the 
hygiene of the patients and her teaching function as well as the respon- 
sibility for her own health. 

Introduction to Medical Nursing 30 Hours 

The most important medical diseases are presented and studied. The 
histories and clinical findings, signs, and symptoms are discussed and 
treatment outlined. 

Introduction to Surgical Nursing 30 Hours 

The most important surgical diseases are presented by specialists. The 
nursing care correlates the theoretical instruction with the nursing- 
technique and procedures. 

Massage 12 Hours 

The history of massage, its physiological effect, and therapeutic appli- 
cation. 

Materia Medica 30 Hours 

Practical problems in weight, measures, calculations in making solu- 
tions, methods of handling and preserving drugs, and the method of 
administration of common medicines. 

Microbiology 50 Hours 

The general aspects of microbiology with special emphasis on the 
relation of bacteria and protozoa to the production of disease. 

Nursing Arts 320 Hours 

This course consists of classes and demonstrations of the principles 
and practice of elementary nursing technique. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 11 

Nutrition and Cookery 90 Hours 

This course deals with the composition and nutritive value of food 
and principles of nutrition. 

Pathology 16 Hours 

The opportunity is given for the student to become acquainted with 
the most conspicuous changes in the organs of the body as they are 
found in the commonest type of diseases. Diseases are discussed and 
followed by demonstration of pathological findings. 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 40 Hours 

This course is designed to include those phases of pharmacology neces- 
sary for the intelligent use of drugs in the treatment of disease. 
Methods of administration of drugs, their therapeutic effect and the 
symptoms and treatment of poisoning constitute the course of lectures. 
Laboratory exercises and demonstrations parallel the lecture material. 

Professional Adjustments I 15 Hours 

A study of the principles of ethics as applied to personal and profes- 
sional conduct. To inculcate ideals and motives for proper self-conduct 
in nursing. 

Psychology 30 Hours 

Designed to help the student meet the various social and nursing 
problems that confront her during her course. 

Sociology 30 Hours 

SECOND YEAR 
Medical and Surgical Nursing 60 Hours 

The nursing classes present the nursing care of patients with emphasis 
on special treatment connected with the nursing care and the impor- 
tance of observation of signs and symptoms. 

Obstetrics 60 Hours 

Consideration of normal pregnancy, labor, puerperium, including 
obstetrical emergencies and problems. The nursing care of the mother 
and child, the conduct of a normal delivery and the care of the new- 
born infant are demonstrated. 

Pediatrics 60 Hour> 

Consideration of the growth, development and nutrition of the 
normal child as well as the medical diseases of children, including acute 
infectious diseases. 

Psychiatrj 105 Hours 

Affiliation at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital for a period of 
twelve weeks. 

THIRD YEAH 
Advanced Nursing Arts 60 Hours 

Administration, supervision of wards, and attendance at medical and 
surgical clinics. 

Professional Adjustments 11 SO Hours 

This course is designed to anticipate BODie of the problems which will 
confront the student:- after graduation, and to familiarize the student- 
with the different fields of nursing. 

Public Health Nursing 20 Hour* 

This course is given by the City Department oi Public Health, and 
lectures by all the departments of the public health are provided. 



12 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SUMMARY OF CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 



Probation Period 

Hours 



Anatomy and Physiology 

Charting 

Chemistry 

History of Nursing 



105 

4 

90 

30 

Hygiene 30 

Massage 12 

Materia Medica 30 



Hours 

Microbiology 50 

Nursing Arts 320 

Nutrition and Cookery 90 

Pathology 16 

Professional Adjustments I . . 15 

Psychology 30 

Sociology 30 

Total 852 



Diet Therapy 

Introduction to Medical 
Nursing 



Junior Term 

30 Introduction to Surgical 

Nursing 30 

30 Pharmacology and Thera- 
peutics 40 

Total . ^^AS^ 



Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Obstetrics 



SECOND YEAR 

60 Pediatrics 60 

60 Psychiatry 105 

Total 285 



Advanced Nursing Arts 

Professional Adjustments II 



THIRD YEAR 

. 60 Public Health Nursing 



20 



30 



Total 110 



FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training, the University 
offers a" combined Academic and Nursing program leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or pre-hospital period), consisting 
of sixty-eight semester hours, are spent in the College of Arts and 
Sciences of the University. During this period the student receives an 
introduction to the general cultural subjects which are considered funda- 
mental in any college training. At least the latter of these two years 
must be spent in residence at College Park in order that the student 
may have her share in the social and cultural activities of college life. 
The last three years are spent in the School of Nursing in Baltimore. 



DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science and the Diploma in Nursing are 
awarded to students who complete successfully the prescribed combined 
academic and nursing program. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 13 



SCHOOL OF DIETETICS 



14 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 15 

SCHOOL OF DIETETICS 
FACULTY 

Director of Dietetics 

Administrative Dietitian 

Therapeutic Dietitian 

Teaching Dietitian 

Dining Room Dietitian 

Main Kitchen Dietitian 

All faculty members are members of the American Dietetic Associa- 
tion. 

The program for teaching student nurses is under the instruction of 
the Teaching Dietitian and the Therapeutic Dietitian. 

NUTRITION AND COOKERY: The lectures on nutrition present the 
modern concepts regarding the constituents of an adequate diet, the 
chemistry and mechanics of the digestion, absorption, and metabolism 
of foods, food requirements at various ages, food economics, and the 
latest information on the role of vitamins in human nutrition. The 
laboratory work is practical experience, under supervision, in the prep- 
aration and service of typical hospital dietaries based on the funda- 
mental principles of cookery. 

Teaching Dietitian Nutrition: 30 Hours Cookery: 60 Hours 

DIET THERAPY: These lectures on diet therapy form the basis of 
understanding the necessary modifications of the normal diet in disease. 

Teaching Dietitian Diet Therapy: 15 Hours 

PRACTICE OF DIET THERAPY: 1. Training derived from instruction 
in the practical application of nutrition and diet in disease. The plan- 
ning, weighing, preparation, and service of special diets is carried out 
under supervision. 

Therapeutic Dietitian 336 Hours 

2. Under instruction and supervision, experience is gained in the setting 
up of trays, and service of all diets in the floor kitchens, including the 
special diets not served directly from the special diet kitchen. 

Administrative Dietitian 49 Hours 

PEDIATRICS: I. Formula Room: The application of principles of ster- 
ile technique to the preparation of all infant formulae under adequate 
supervision and instruction. 

Teaching Dietitian 112 Hours 

2. Pediatric Service: Preparation and service of all diets served in the 
Pediatric Service. 

Teaching Dietitian 49 Hours 

3. Pediatric Lectures: Attendance on lectures giving the preparation and 

use of diets in the feeding of infants and children in health and diseases. 

Teaching Dietitian % Hours 



MARYLAND ROOM 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 




BULLETIN 1947 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 




BULLETIN 1947 




University Hospital 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 

Superintendent of Nurses and Director of School of Nursing 

Assistant Superintendent of Nurses 

Night Superintendent of Nurses 

Assistant Night Superintendent of Nurses 

Director of Education 

Instructor of Sciences 

Instructor in Nursing Arts 

Instructor in Surgical Technique and 

Supervisor of Operating Pavilion 

Instructor in Dietetics 

Instructor in Massage 

LECTURERS FROM THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Anatomy and Physiology 

Wilfred H. Townshend, Jr., A.B., M.D. 

Bacteriology 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D. 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., D.Sc. 

William E. Evans, Jr., Ph.D. C. Jelleff Carr, Ph.D. Ruth Musser, M.S. 

Chemistry 

Glenn S. Weiland, Ph.D. 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL.B. Ann Virginia Brown, A.B. 

Pathology 
Milton S. Sacks, B.S., M.D. 

Medicine 

Meyer W. Jacobson, M.D. 

Surgery 

Clyde F. Karns, B.S., M.D. 

Obstetrics 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D. 

Gynecology 
Beverley C. Compton, A.B., M.D. 

Pediatrics 
A. Robert Marks, A.B., M.D. Miles E. Drake, Ph.D., M.D. 

Urology 

W. Houston Toulson, M.Sc, M.D. 

Psychiatry and Neurology 

Affiliation at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital 

Skin and Venereal Diseases 

Harry M. Robinson, Jr., B.S., M.D. 

Ophthalmology 

F. Edwin Knowles, Jr., M.I). 

Otologv 

Frederick T. Kyper, D.Sc, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgery 

Allen F. Voshell, A.B., M.D. 

Social Service 

City Health Department 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

The University of Maryland School of Nursing was established in the 
year 1889. Since that time it has been an integral part of the University of 
Maryland, coming under the same government. 

The school is non-sectarian, the only religious services being morning prayers. 

The University of Maryland Hospital is a general hospital containing 435 
adult beds and 70 bassinets. It is equipped to give young women a thorough 
course of instruction and practice in all phases of nursing. 

PROGRAMS OFFERED: The program of study of the school is planned 
for two groups of students: (a) the three-year group and (b) the five-year 
group. 

The three-year program is designed to meet the requirements for the Diploma 
in Nursing, and comprises the work of the first, second, and third hospital 
years. The requirements for admission to the five-year program of the School 
of Nursing are the same as for other colleges. (A special catalog will be sent 
upon request of the Registrar, University of Maryland, College Park, Mary- 
land.) 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION: A candidate for admission to the 
School of Nursing must be a graduate of an accredited high school or other 
recognized preparatory school, and must present evidence that she has com- 
pleted satisfactorily the required amount of preparatory study. Preference 
will be given to students who rank in the upper third of the graduating class 
in their preparatory schools. 

Candidates are required to present 16 units for entrance. 

Required: English (I, II, III, IV), 4 units; mathematics, 2 units; history, 
1 unit; science, 2 units; foreign language, 1 unit (preferred). 

Elective: Fine Arts, trade and vocational subjects are acceptable. 

In addition to these requirements, students must meet other definite re- 
quirements in regard to health, age, and personal fitness for nursing work. 

The preferable age for students registered for the three-year course is 20 
to 35 years, although students may be accepted at the age of 18. Women of 
superior education and culture are given preference, provided they meet 
the requirements in other particulars. A personal interview with the Director 
of the School is required whenever possible. 

Application forms may be secured from the Director of the School of 
Nursing, University of Maryland, Baltimore-1, Maryland. 

REGISTRATION WITH MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
OF NURSES: The Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses requires 
all students entering schools of nursing in Maryland to register at the be- 
ginning of their course with the Board in order to be eligible to examination 
and license on completion of this course. This registration is accomplished after 
the applicant has been accepted into the School of Nursing. 

The fitness of the applicant for the work and the propriety of dismissing 
or retaining her at the end of her term of probation are left to the decision of 
the Director of the School. Misconduct, disobedience, insubordination, 
inefficiency, and neglect of duty are causes for dismissal. 

ADMISSION TO THE SCHOOL: Students accepted for the spring term 
are admitted in March, and those for the fall term in September. Admis- 
sion to the five-year course occurs in September. 

HOURS OF DUTY: During the probation period the students are engaged 
in class work for the first six months with supervised practice in the hospital. 
For the remainder of their period of training they are on a forty-eight hour 
weekly schedule. The period of night duty is approximately five to six months 
during the three years. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 



The first four months of the probation period are devoted to theoretical 
and practical instruction given entirely in the lecture and demonstration 
rooms of the training school, hospital, and medical school laboratories. Dur- 
ing the last two months of the probation period the students are placed on 
duty in the hospital wards for instruction in bedside nursing, and are expected 
to perform the duties assigned to them by the Director of the School. At the 
close of the first semester the students are required to pass satisfactorily both 
the wiitten and practical tests, attaining a grade of 75%. Failure to meet this 
requirement will be sufficient reason to request the withdrawal of the student 
from the school. 

SICKNESS: A physician is in attendance each day. Ill students are cared 
for gratuitously. The time lest through illness in excess of two weeks, during 
the three years, must be made up. Should the authorities of the school decide 
that bscause of time lost the theoretical work has not been sufficiently covered 
to permit a student to continue in any year, it will be necessary for her to con- 
tinue her work with the next class. 

VACATIONS: Vacations are given between May and October. A period of 
four weeks is allowed during each of the first and sacond years, and ten days 
during the third year. 

EXPENSES: A fee of $50.00, payable on entrance, to be applied against the 
ccst of uniforms after the probation period is required from all students; 
plus student activity fe? of $5.00. Each student receives her board, lodging, 
and a reasonable amount of laundry from the date of entrance. During her 
probation period she provides her own uniforms and shoes at a cost of approx- 
imately $55.00. After the probation period all uniforms and shoes are supplied 
by the hospital. Books are furnished at the expense of the student. Her per- 
sonal expenses during the course of training and instruction will depend entirely 
upon her individual habits and tastes. 

GRADUATION: The Diploma in Nursing will be awarded to those who have 
satisfactorily completed the full term of three years, and have successfully 
passed the final examinations. 

SCHOLARSHIP: The Janet Hale Memorial Scholarship of $250.00 given by 
the University of Maryland Nurses' Alumnae Association, is awarded to the 
student having the highest record in scholarship to pursue a course in adminis- 
tration, supervisory, or public health work at Teachers College, Columbia 
University, New York. 

AWARDS: There are two awards of $50.00 each known as the Edwin and 
Leander M. Zimmerman, and the Elizabeth Collins Lee prizes. The Woman's 
Auxiliary Board of the University of Maryland presents the Alumnae Pin and 
a one year membership in the Association, for practical nursing and executive 
ability. An award of $25.00 is given by Mrs. John L. Whitehurst for the 
highest average in executive ability. The Mary K. Waltham prize of $25.00 
is awarded to the nurse who shows the most human understanding in the atten- 
tion given to the patients on the wards. The Flora Hoffman Tarun Memorial 
Prize of $25.00 is awarded for leadership, loyalty, and school spirit. The Sarah 
Finkelstein Memorial Prize of $25.00 is awarded to the nurse who has excelled 
in pediatrics. A prize of $25.00 is awarded by Dr. Cyrus Horine for neatness 
in uniform and personal appearance. An award of $10.00 is given l>.\ Mrs. 
Charles A. Reif Schneider to trie nurse who has consistently maintained the best 
professional appearance and conduct toward patients and hospital personnel. 

A number of undergraduate prizes ;iro awarded to the members of different 
classes for outstanding ability in the class room and on the wards. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 




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10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Anatomy and Physiology 105 Hours 

Anatomy is studied with the aid of skeletons, demonstrations, charts and 
models, and appropriate lectures. 

The general principles of physiology are studied with the aid of numerous 
physiological experiments which the students perform. 

The above instruction is given by a member of the Faculty of the Medical 
School. 

Charting 4 Hours 

Chemistry 90 Hours 

A course designed to introduce the student to scientific methods of technique, 
observation, and reasoning. It embraces the chemistry of everyday life, and 
is developed by considering the vital relation of chemistry to the problems of 
physiology, pathology and actual nursing. 

Diet Therapy 30 Hours 

In this course the principles of feeding in various diseases are discussed, 
diets formulated, food values computed, and practical experience afforded in 
calculating, planning and serving of special diets. 

History of Nursing 30 Hours 

The origin of nursing and its development from ancient to modern times. 

Hygiene 30 Hours 

Special emphasis is put on the nurse's responsibility in regard to the hygiene 
of the patients and her teaching function as well as the responsibility for her 
own health. 

Introduction to Medical Nursing 30 Hours 

The most important medical diseases are presented and studied. The 
histories and clinical findings, signs, and symptoms are discussed and treat- 
ment outlined. 

Introduction to Surgical Nursing 30 Hours 

The most important surgical diseases are presented by specialists. The 
nursing care correlates the theoretical instruction with the nursing technique 
and procedures. 

Massage 12 Hours 

The history of massage, its physiological effect, and therapeutic application. 

Materia Medica 30 Hours 

Practical problems in weight, measures, calculations in making solutions, 
methods of handling and preserving drugs, and the method of administration of 
common medicines. 

Microbiology 50 Hours 

The general aspects of microbiology with special emphasis on the relation 
of bacteria and protozoa to the production of disease. 

Nursing Arts 320 Hours 

This course consists of classes and demonstrations of the principles and 
practice of elementary nursing technique. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 11 



Nutrition and Cookery 90 Hours 

This course deals with the composition and nutritive value of food and 
principles of nutrition. 

Pathology 16 Hours 

The opportunity is given for the student to become acquainted with the 
most conspicuous changes in the organs of the body as they are found in the 
commonest type of diseases. Diseases are discussed and followed by demon- 
stration of pathological findings. 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 40 Hours 

This course is designed to include those phases of pharmacology necessary 
for the intelligent use of drugs in the treatment of disease. Methods of adminis- 
tration of drugs, their therapeutic effect and the symptoms and treatment of 
poisoning constitute the course of lectures. Laboratory exercises and demonstra- 
tions parallel the lecture material. 

Professional Adjustments I 15 Hours 

A study of the principles of ethics as applied to personal and professional 
conduct. To inculcate ideals and motives for proper self-conduct in nursing. 

Psychology 30 Hours 

Designed to help the student meet the various social and nursing problems 
that confront her during her course. 

Sociology 30 Hours 

SECOND YEAR 

Medical and Surgical Nursing 60 Hours 

The nursing classes present the nursing care of patients with emphasis on 
special treatment connected with the nursing care and the importance of ob- 
servation of signs and symptoms. 

Obstetrics 60 Hours 

Consideration of normal pregnancy, labor, puerperium, including obstetrical 
emergencies and problems. The nursing care of the mother and child, the con- 
duct of a normal delivery and the care of the new-born infant are demonstrated. 

Pediatrics 60 Hours 

Consideration of the growth, development and nutrition of the normal child 
as well as the medical diseases of children, including acute infectious diseases. 

Psychiatry 105 Hours 

Affiliation at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital for a period of twelve 
weeks. 

THIRD YEAR 

Advanced Nursing Arts 60 Hours 

Administration, supervision of wards, and attendance at medical and surgical 
clinics. 

Professional Adjustments II 30 Hours 

This course is designed to anticipate some of the problems which will confront 
the students after graduation, and to familiarize the students with the different 
fields of nursing. 

Public Health Nursing 20 Hours 

This course is given by the City Department of Public Health, and lectures 
by all the departments of the public health are provided. 



12 UNIVERSITY" OF MARYLAND 



SUMMARY OF CURRICULM 

FIRST YEAR 

Probation Period 

Hours Hours 

Anatomy and Physiology 105 Microbiology 50 

Charting 4 Nursing Arts 320 

Chemistry 90 Nutrition and Cookery 90 

History of Nursing 30 Pathology 16 

Hygiene 30 Professional Adjustments 1 15 

Massage 12 Psychology 30 

Materia Medica 30 Sociology 30 

Total 852 



Junior Term 

Diet Therapy 30 Introduction to Surgical 

Introduction to Medical Nursing 30 

Nursing 30 Pharmacology and Thera- 

peutics 40 

Total 115 



SECOND YEAR 

Medical and Surgical Nursing . 60 Pediatrics 60 

Obstetrics 60 Psychiatry 105 

Total 285 

THIRD YEAR 

i 

Total 



Advanced Nursing Arts 60 Public Health Nursing 20 

Professional Adjustments II 30 



FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 

In addition to the regular three-year course of training, the University 
offers a combined Academic and Nursing program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science and a Diploma in Nursing. 

The first two years of the course (or pre-hospital period), consisting of 
sixty-eight semester hours, are spent in the College of Arts and Sciences of the 
University. During this period the student receives an introduction to the 
general cultural subjects which are considered fundamental in any college train- 
ing. At least the latter of these two years must be spent in residence at College 
Park in order that the student may have her share in the social and cultural 
activities of college life. The last three years are spent in the School of Nursing 
in Baltimore. 

DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 

The degree of Bachelor of Science and the Diploma in Nursing are awarded 
to students who complete successfully the prescribed combined academic and 
nursing program. 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 13 



School of Dietetics 



14 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




SCHOOL OF NURSING 15 



SCHOOL OF DIETETICS 
FACULTY 

Director of Dietetics 

Administrative Dietitian 

Therapeutic Dietitian 

Teaching Dietitian 

Dining Room Dietitian 

Main Kitchen Dietitian 

All faculty members are members of the American Dietetic Association. 
The program for teaching student nurses is under the instruction of the Teach- 
ing Dietitian and the Therapeutic Dietitian. 

NUTRITION AND COOKERY: The lectures on nutrition present the modern 
concepts regarding the constituents of an adequate diet, the chemistry and 
mechanics of the digestion, absorption, and metabolism of foods, food require- 
ments at various ages, food economics, and the latest information on the role of 
vitamins in human nutrition. The laboratory work is practical experience, under 
supervision, in the preparation and service of typical hospital dietaries based on 
the fundamental principles of cookery. 

Teaching Dietitian Nutrition: 30 Hours Cookery: 60 Hours 

DIET THERAPY: These lectures on diet therapy form the basis of under- 
standing the necessary modifications of the normal diet in disease. 

Teaching Dietitian Diet Therapy: 15 Hours 

PRACTICE OF DIET THERAPY: 1. Training derived from instruction in 
the practical application of nutrition and diet in disease. The planning, weigh- 
ing, preparation, and service of special diets is carried out under supervision. 

Therapeutic Dietitian 336 Hours 

2. Under instruction and supervision, experience is gained in the setting up 
of trays, and service of all diets in the floor kitchens, including the special diets 
not served directly from the special diet kitchen. 

Administrative Dietitian 49 Hours 

PEDIATRICS: I. Formula Room: The application of principles of sterile 
technique to the preparation of all infant formulae under adequate supervision 
and instruction. 

Teaching Dietitian 112 Hours 

2. Pediatric Service: Preparation and service of all diets Berve lint be Pediatric 
Service. 

Teaching Dietitian 49 Hours 

3. Pediatric Lectures: Attendance on lectures giving the preparation and use 
of diets in the feeding of infants and children in health and di» 

Teaching Dietitian 8 Hours 



Year 1948 missing 



<A U 



ITY of 






Volume 1 OCTOBER 1948 Number 7 

THE SCHOOL OF 

NURSING 



4F t 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1949—1950 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar 5 

General Administrative Board 3 

Board of Regents 3 

Membership and Accreditation 5 

Organization of University of Maryland 3 

Faculty 

Department of Nursing Education 6 

Assistants in Administration . 6 

Lecturers 6-7 

Faculty in Nursing 8 

Committees 8 

Department of Nursing Service, Staff 9 

General Information 

Program of Study , 10 

Objectives 10 

Facilities for Education 10 

Resident Facilities , 10 

Library Facilities 10 

Fees and Estimated Expenses , 11 

Health Service * 11 

Extra-Professional Program 11 

Requirements for Admission ♦ 12 

A Basic Professional Course * 13 

B. Five-Year Combined Arts and Sciences and Nursing 13 

Curriculum 14 

Admission Procedure - 15 

Subject Requirements 15 

Fees 16 

Description of Courses , 19-22 

Policies 22 




T I O N 



THE SCHOOL OF 

NURSING 

ISSUE 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1949—1950 

Volume 1 OCTOBER 1948 Number 7 

<yl University of 

MARYLAND 

P UBLICATION 

i- published three times during April, twice during May. once In August, October, and 
December, and three timea in January, February end March. 

Entered at the Post Office in College Park. Maryland, aa Becond class mail matter 
under the act ..f Congress of August 24, 1912. 




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ORGANIZATION 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Harry Clifton Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc, President and Executive Officer 
BOARD OF REGENTS 

AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE ferm 

Expires 
William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman, 100 West University Parkway, 

Baltimore 1949 

Stanford Z. Rothschild, Secretary, 109 East Redwood Street, 

Baltimore 1952 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, 120 West Redwood Street, Balti- 
more 1953 

E. Paul Knotts, Denton, Caroline County 1954 

Peter W. Chichester, 103 West Second Street, Frederick, Md 1951 

Harry H. Nuttle, Denton, Caroline County 1950 

Philip C. Turner, 2 East North Avenue, Baltimore 1950 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, 4101 Greenway, Baltimore 1956 

Charles P. McCormick, McCormick & Company, Baltimore 1948 

Millard E. Tydings, Senate Office Building, Washington, D. C 1951 

Edward F. Holter, Middletown, Md. 1952 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer 
of the Board. 

The State Law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the last Friday in each month, 
except during the months of July and August. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Chairman 

Dr. Maurice Pincoffs, Assistant to the President for Medical 

and Nursing School, Baltimore Division 

Miss Preinkert, Secretary 

Dean Appleman Dean Eppley Dr. Long 

Dr. Bamford Mr. Fogg Dean Mount 

Dean Benjamin Miss Gipe Dean Pyle 

Mr. Benton Colonel Griswold Dean Robinson 

Mr. Bbigham Mr. Haszard Dean Stamp 

Mr. Brown Dean Howell Dean Steinberg 

Dr. Brueckner Dr. Huff Dean Symons 

Dr. Burnett Dr. Hoffsommeb Mr. Weber 

Mr. Cobey Dr. Kabat Dr. White 

Dr. Corbett Miss Kellar Dean Wylie 

Dean Cotterman Director Kemp Dr. Zucker 

EDUCATIONAL COUNCIL 

The President The Registrar Deans of Colleges 

Beads op Bducai ional Depari bents 

S 




The University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

4 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



MEMBERSHIP AND ACCREDITATION 

1. The University of Maryland, which incorporates the School of Nursing 
with ail of the other Schools of the University, is a member of the 
Association of American Colleges, and is accredited by the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

2. The School of Nursing is accredited by the Maryland State Board of 
Examiners of Nurses and other states that reciprocate with the State 
of Maryland. 

3. The hospital, which is the teaching laboratory for the students of the 
School of Nursing, is approved by the American College of Surgeons, the 
American Medical Association-Residents and Interns, the American Hos- 
pital Association, and the Maryland Hospital Association. It is also a 
participant in the Blue Cross Plan. 

The University of Maryland has the following educational organizations: 



At Baltimore 

The School of Dentistry 
The School of Law 
The School of Medicine 
The School of Nursing 
The School of Pharmacy 
The College of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies 

At College Park 

The College of Agriculture 

The College of Arts and Sciences 



The College of Business and 

Public Administration 
The College of Commerce 
The College of Education 
The College of Engineering 
The College of Home Economics 
The Graduate School 
The Department of Military 

Science and Tactics 
The Department of Physical 
Education and Recreation 
The Summer School 
Each school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and 
members of its faculty; each Faculty Council controls the internal affairs 
of the group it represents. 



PROPOSED CALENDAR FOR 1949 



January 3 
January 20 
February 14 
February 14- 
February 22 
March 25 
April 13 

April 21 
May 29 
May 30 
June 4 
July 4 
September 5 
September 6 



Monday, 9 A.M. 
Thursday 
Monday 
19 Monday-Saturday 
Tuesday 
Friday 
Wednesday, after last 

class 
Thursday, 9 A.M. 
Sunday 
Monday 
Saturday 
Monday 
Monday 
Tuesday 



Christmas recess ends 
Inauguration Day 
Admission of spring class 
Orientation week 
Washington's Birthday, holiday 
.Maryland Day 
Easter recess begins 

Easter recess ends 
Baccalaureate exercises 
Memorial Day, holiday 
Commencement 
independence Day. holiday 
Labor Day, holiday 

Admission of fall class 



6 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

FACULTY, DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION 

Florence Meda Gipe, R.N., M.S., Director of the Department of Nursing 

Education and Nursing Service. 
Margaret Hayes, R.N., M.S., Associate Director, Director of Student 

Guidance. 
Marie P. Zec, R.N., B.S., Assistant Director, Nursing Education, Instructor, 

Nursing Arts. 
Eva Bradley, R.N., B.S., Supervisor, Biological Sciences. 
Mary E. Grotefend, R.N., M.S., Instructor, Social Sciences, Coordinator of 

Student Experience in Out-Patient Department. 
Cecilia Zitkus, A.B., R.N., Instructor, Nursing Arts. 

Helen Bahr, R.N., B.S., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing. 
Jean Bloom, B.S., R.N., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing. 
Helen W. Taylor, B.S., R.N., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical 

Nursing — Evening. 
Kathryn Williams, B.S., R.N., Clinical Instructor, Operating Room 

Technique. 
Dorothy Filbert, R.N., Clinical Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing. 
Frances T. Reed, R.N., B.S., Clinical Instructor, Nursing of Children. 
Anna Holmes, R.N., M.P.H., Supervisor, Public Health Nursing 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Jeanne Wieman Secretary to Director of Nursing 

Jeanne Lowenthal Secretary 

Clara McGovern, R.N Supervisor, Records 

Simone Hurst Librarian 

Edith Mutch, R.N Librarian 

Martha Mallon, R.N Director, Nurses' Residence 

LECTURERS 

James G. Arnold, Jr., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery. 

A. Maynard Bacon, Jr., B.S., M.D., Lecturer in Pediatrics. 

Ruth Baldwin, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Harry C. Bowie, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Surgery and Surgical Anatomy. 

J. Edmund Bradley, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

Otto C. Brantigan, B.S., M.D., Professor of Surgical Anatomy and 

Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Ruth E. Broadbelt, Instructor in Lettering. 
Ann Virginia Brown, A.B., Instructor in Biological Chemistry. 
T. Nelson Carey, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Beverley C. Compton, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor in Gynecology. 
Edward F. Cotter, M.D., Assistant Professor of Medicine, Instructor in 

Neurology. 
R. Adams Cowley, M.D., Fellow in Surgery. 
L. Kathryn Dice, Ed.D., Instructor in Psychology. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 7 

Francis G. Dickey, M.D., Associate Professor in Medicine. 

Everett Diggs, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

William K. Diehl, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

Miles Drake, M.S., M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Jerome Fineman, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

Moses Gellman, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor in Orthopedic Surgery. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology. 

Mary L. Hayleck, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 

John F. Hogan, M.D., Associate Professor in Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Clewell Howell, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor in Pediatrics. 

Harry C. Hull, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Meyer W. Jacobson, M.D., Associate Professor in Medicine. 

F. Edwin Knowles, Jr., M.D., Associate Professor in Ophthalmology. 

Vernon E. Krahl, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Gross Anatomy. 

Frederick P. Kyper, M.D., D.Sc, Associate Professor in Rhinology, 

Laryngology, and Bronchoscopy, Instructor in Otology. 
Arnold F. Lavenstein, M.D., Instructor in Pediatrics. 
Howard B. Mays, M.D., Associate Professor in Genito-Urinary Surgery, 

Instructor in Pathology. 
John H. Morrison, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor in Obstetrics. 
Ruth Musser, M.S., Instructor in Pharmacology. 
Henry L. Rigdon, M.D., Associate Professor in Surgery, Assistant Professor 

in Surgical Anatomy. 
Harry M. Robinson, Jr., B.S., M.D., Assistant Professor of Dermatology, 

Associate Professor in Medicine. 
Milton S. Sacks, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine, Head of Clinical 

Pathology, Associate Professor in Pathology. 
J. King B. E. Seegar, Jr., A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor in Obstetrics. 
Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL.B., Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
Grace Shaw, Instructor in Physical Therapy. 

E. Roderick Shipley, A.B., M.D., Assistant Professor in Surgery. 
Frank J. Slama, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Head of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

Department. 
R. Dale Smith, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Gross Anatomy. 
Wilfred H. Townshend, Jr., A.B., M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Myron Tull, A.B., M.D., M.P.H., Lecturer in Hygiene and Public Health. 
Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D., Professor of Gross Anatomy. 
Henry F. Ullrich, M.D., D.Sc, Associate Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 
Allen F. Voshell, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 
William E. Weeks, M.D., Associate Professor in Pediatrics. 
Glenn S. Weiland, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry. 
Gibson J. Wells, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Pediatries. 
J. Carlton Wich, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor in Pediatrics. 
George H. Yeager, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 



8 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

FACULTY IN NURSING 

Executive Committee of the Faculty 

Florence Meda Gipe, Director of the School of Nursing, Chairman 

Helen Bahr 

Eva F. Darley 

Margaret Hayes 

Marie P. Zec 

Advisory Committee to the School of Nursing 

Louis A. M. Krause, Chairman Representative of School of Medicine 

Virginia Conley President, Nurses' Alumnae Association 

Edgar F. Long Chairman, Committee of Admissions 

Mrs. Charles Reifschneider Representative of General Community 

Harold Sayles Acting Superintendent, University Hospital 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Member, Board of Regents 

Huntington Williams Director, Baltimore City Health Department 

Mrs. Nathan Winslow Member, Woman's Board 

Boyd Wylie Dean, School of Medicine 

George Yeager Member, Surgical Staff 

FACULTY STANDING COMMITTEES 

Florence Meda Gipe, Chairman Executive Committee 

Marie P. Zec, Chairman Committee on Curriculum 

Edgar F. Long, Chairman Committee on Admissions 

Margaret Hayes, Chairman Committee on Staff Education 

Frank Slama, Chairman Committee on Records and Grading 

Margaret Hayes, Chairman Committee on Student Affairs 

Harold F. Cotterman, Chairman Committee on Scholarship 

and Student Loans 

Mrs. Ida Robinson, Chairman Committee on Library Affairs 

Marie P. Zec, Chairman Committee on Nursing and Allied Arts 

W. H. Townshend, Jr., Chairman Committee on Health Services 

Helen Bahr, Chairman Committee on Clinical Instruction 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON CURRICULUM 

Florence M. Gipe, Chairman Director, University of Maryland 

School of Nursing 

Sister M. Florence Supervisor of Instruction 

Mercy Hospital and University of Maryland School of Education 

Mary Shearer Director, School of Nursing, Sydenham Hospital 

Margaret Newcomb Director, School of Nursing 

Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital 

Ruth Moubray Guidance Counsellor and Executive Secretary 

Maryland State Nurses Association 
Anna Perch Supervisor, Baltimore City Public Health Department 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 9 

STAFF, DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE 

Florence Meda Gipe, R.N., M.S., Director of the Divisions of Nursing 

Education and Nursing Service. 
Eva Darley, R.N., Associate Director, Nursing Service. 
Martha Hoffman, R.N., Assistant Director, Nursing Service — Evening. 
Armita Taylor, R.N., Assistant Director, Nursing Service — Night. 
Grace Ann Knowles, R.N., Assistant Director, Nursing Service — Night. 
C. Lorraine Neel, R.N., Supervisor, Nursing Service. 
Mary Saulsbury, R.N., Supervisor, Nursing Service — Day. 
Eleanor Slacum, R.N., Supervisor, Nursing Service — Afternoon. 
Mary Catherine Byrnes, R.N., Supervisor, Eleventh Floor, Private. 
Virginia Stack, R.N., Supervisor, Tenth Floor, Private. 
Margaret Riffle, R.N., Supervisor, Ninth Floor, Private. 
Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N., Supervisor, Operating Rooms. 
Elizabeth Gooch, R.N., Supervisor, Central Supply Room. 
Flora Streett, R.N., Supervisor, Obstetrical Department. 
June Geiser, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Pediatric Department. 
Ruth Ann Young, R.N., Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, 

Fourth Floor. 
June S. Mohler, R.N., Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, 

Third Floor. 
Florence Wong, R.N., Supervisor, Special Clinics, Second Floor. 
Edith R. Lillard, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Accident Room. 
Edith Miller, R.N., Supervisor, Out-Patient Department. 
Virginia E. Gubisch, R.N., Head Nurse in Health Office. 




Clinical Teaching 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

The present School of Nursing offers a program of study, instituted in 
1924, to two groups: to those who desire to complete their work in approxi- 
mately thirty-six months, and to those who desire the five year combined 
academic study and specialization in nursing. Those who complete the 
latter course successfully receive the degree of Bachelor of Science with a 
major in nursing as well as a diploma in nursing. 

OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

In attempting to anticipate the future professional needs of its graduates, 
the University of Maryland School of Nursing carefully selects young 
women to educate them to become professional nurses who will administer 
sympathetic and safe nursing care to the sick, and who will teach the 
principles of health and prevention of disease needed in an ever-changing 
society. 

FACILITIES FOR EDUCATION 

The University of Maryland Hospital, a general hospital, has a capacity 
of 435 beds and 70 bassinets. The wards and Out-patient Department afford 
valuable opportunities for the clinical experience of the student nurse as 
well as for the study of family and community problems. The classroom, 
laboratories, and library of the School of Medicine are available for instruc- 
tional purposes. Clinical experience in Psychiatric Nursing is provided at 
Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital; in Communicable Disease Nursing at 
Sydenham Hospital; and a limited number of affiliations in Public Health 
Nursing with the Baltimore City Health Department. 

RESIDENT FACILITIES 

Student nurses reside in Louisa Parsons Hall. The residence is under 
the direction of a graduate registered nurse. Plans for a new Nurses 
Residence and Recreational Center have been approved for the near future. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The School of Nursing Library is an integral part of the University of 
Maryland library system, and is under the Director of Libraries of the 
University. Both scientific and recreational collections of books are pro- 
vided in the library which is conveniently located on the first floor of the 
Louisa Parsons Hall. 

The facilities of the Medical, Dental, Pharmaceutical, and Law School 
Libraries are available to the students in the School of Nursing. Additional 
facilities are provided at the main branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 
which comprises the public library system for the City of Baltimore; the 
Peabody Library, which contains a large collection of non-circulating rare 
books; the Maryland Historical Society Library; and the Library of Con- 
gress, which conducts an inter-loan service to the major libraries of the 
country. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 11 

FEES AND ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

Fixed Fee $50.00 

Student Activity Fee 5.00 

Library Fee 2.00 

Textbooks 60.00 

Uniforms 65.00 

These costs are approximate and may fluctuate because of changing living 
costs. Throughout the course students are provided maintenance which in- 
cludes room, board, and laundry of uniforms. At the present time a limited 
number of students are allowed the privilege of living at home, permission 
for which is granted by the Director of Nurses. Students' uniforms will be 
obtained after admission to the School of Nursing. Shoes, stockings and 
other personal items are furnished by the students. Expenses such as meals, 
carfare, and incidentals which the student incurs during periods of affiliation 
or field trips are borne by the student. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The School of Nursing maintains a Health Service for the students under 
the general direction of a Committee on Health Services. Periodic health 
examinations are provided for each student. 

Vaccination against Typhoid Fever and Smallpox are required of all 
students before admission to the School of Nursing. Medical care is pro- 
vided for student nurses. Dental case is not provided in the Health Service, 
but care is furnished by the Dental School of the University of Maryland at 
a minimal fee to the student. 

Time which is lost due to illness in excess of fourteen days during the 
three year period, is required to be made up. 

EXTRA PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

The student nurses have a student government organization the function 
of which is to assist in the government of the school in cooperation with the 
faculty, and to plan recreational activities. 

Upon her admission each new student is met by one of the older students 
who acts as her big sister. This is a helpful relationship in which the older 
student assists the new one with advice and suggestions based on her own 
experience in the School of Nursing. 

Recreational facilities are utilized to the utmost. The "Y" pool is rented 
for Tuesday nights. Here the students enjoy the relaxation of a cool swim 
or the hilarity of sport in the water after a busy day. During the winter 
season, basketball is played in the gym of the church next door. In the 
warmer months, badminton in the court is substituted. Parties for tennis 
and other sports are made up from time to time and held in the parks or 
other surrounding facilities. A dance or a big party is held about once a 
month. The nurses dining room is used for informal dances and a downtown 
hotel ballroom for formal ones. The adjacent Schools of Medicine, Phar- 
macy, and Dentistry cooperate in these dances and add to the general 
pleasure. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Baltimore City is a center of culture and education. It offers much stimu- 
lation to the visitor and the inhabitant in the way of drama, music, art, 
lectures, libraries, and the like. The Student Government Organization 
plans trips to various functions and points of interest. It buys blocks of 
tickets for special plays and concerts, and sells them to student nurses at 
cost because they may not know until the last minute whether they can go. 

In cooperation with the Director and the faculty, the students make rules 
and administer them in regard to discipline, house regulations, and con- 
ventions. This not only makes for a better spirit of democracy, but prepares 
the student for coming leadership and participation in the community. 

All of these activities help the students to realize their profession. Inter- 
est, relaxation, responsibility, and cooperation are thus fostered and form 
a vital part of the student's life. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Evidence of personal stability for nursing in relation to physical health, 
emotional stability, and general qualifications of personality, cultural de- 
velopment and maturity must be submitted, and a personal interview with 
the Director of the School of Nursing or one of her assistants is required. 
If the student is too far distant from the University the interview is given 
by a member of the National League of Nursing Education in that area. 

Graduates of accredited secondary schools will be admitted by certificate 
upon the recommendation of the principal. In selecting students, more 
emphasis will be placed upon good marks and other indications of probable 
success in nursing rather than upon a fixed pattern of subject matter. 

English 4 units required for all divisions of the University. 

Mathematics 2 .units — One unit each of algebra and plane 

geometry is desirable. 

History 1 unit, 2 units are desirable. 

Foreign language 1 unit, 2 units are desirable (Latin suggested). 

Science 

Biology 1 unit 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Physics (suggested) 1 unit 

Psychometric tests, which are given by the National League of Nursing 
Education, to determine suitability for nursing are taken by prospective 
students. Notice and instructions will be sent to the applicant upon review 
of the credentials by the Committee on Admission. A fee of approximately 
$5.00 is to be paid by the applicant for these tests. The fee is paid directly 
to the League. i"7 

Applicant should be-ib^35 years of age. 

All inquiries concerning admission to the School of Nursing should be 
addressed to the Director of the School of Nursing who will furnish you, 
upon request, the necessary forms which must be filed with the University 
of Maryland. 



THE SCHOOL OF XURSIXG 



13 




CURRICULUM 

BASIC PROFESSIONAL COURSE (Three- Year Course) 

The curriculum covers a period of three years after 
which time a diploma in Nursing is awarded by the 
University of Maryland upon recommendation by the 
School of Nursing. The pre-clinical period consists 
of the first six months and is devoted primarily to 
the study of the sciences basic to nursing, the principles 
and practice of nursing, and the supervised practice of 
skills learned in the classroom. The students who meet 
the requirements both in scholastical and clinical work, 
will be accepted into the School of Nursing as clinical 
students. 

Following the preclinical period students are assigned 
within a division for five hours of clinical practice and 
two fifty minute periods of class per day, including 
meal hours. One free day a week is given, and careful 
planning makes it possible to give this day off without 
class interference. At the present time plans are being 
made to institute a forty hour week. 

The Executive Committee may, at any time, termi- 
nate a student's course if she fails to meet the stand- 
ards of the School of Nursing or the University of 
Maryland. 

A three-year Graduate Nurse is pictured at upper left. 
FIVE-YEAR COMBINED ARTS AND SCIENCES AND NURSING 

The first two years of this curriculum comprising 
a minimum of 60 semester hours exclusive of hygiene 
and physical activities, are taken in the College of 
Arts and Sciences at College Park and the professional 
training is taken in the School of Nursing of the 
University of Maryland in Baltimore. 

In addition to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing may, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Director of the School of Nursing, be 
granted at the end of the professional training. 

A student may enter this combined curriculum with 
advanced standing but the second year, consisting of a 
minimum of 30 credits, exclusive of physical training, 
must be completed in College Park. To qualify for the 
combined degree the student must complete the re- 
quired work at College Park before beginning the pro- 
fessional training in Baltimore. 

In order to receive the Bachelor of Science degree the 
student must fulfill the grade requirements oi the 
university. 

A five-year Graduate Nurse is pictured at lower right 




* — Semester — \ 


/ 


// 


3 


3 


3 




.... 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CURRICULUM 
Arts-Nursing Curriculum 
Freshman Year 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 

Soc. 1 — Sociology pf American Life 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 

Chem. 11, 13— General Chemistry 

L. S. 1, 2— Library Methods 

Modern Language 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 

Physical Activities 

Total 17 17 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature 3 3 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology .... 4 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 3 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... 3 

Modern Language 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total -. 17 17 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE 
Undergraduate Schools: Applicants for admission to the College of Arts 
and Sciences for Pre-Nursing Course should communicate with the Director 
of Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Applicants from Secondary Schools: Procure an application blank from 
the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested and ask your 
principal or headmaster to enter your secondary school record and mail 
the blank to the Director of Admissions. 

To avoid delay, it is suggested that applications be filed not later than 
July 1 for the fall semester, and January 1 for the spring semester. 
Applications from students completing their last semester of secondary 
work are encouraged. If acceptable, supplementary records will be sent 
upon graduation. 

Applicants from Other Colleges and Universities: Secure an application 
blank from the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested 
and ask secondary school principal or headmaster to enter secondary school 
record and send the blank to the Director of Admissions. Request the 
Registrar of the College or University attended to send a transcript to 
the Director of Admissions, College Park, Maryland. 

Time of Admission: New students should plan to enter the University at 
the beginning of the fall semester if possible. Students, however, will 
be admitted at the beginning of either semester. 



THE SCHOOL OF XURSIXG 15 

ADMISSION OF FRESHMEN 

Admission by Certificate: Graduates of accredited secondary schools of 
Maryland or the District of Columbia will be admitted by certificate upon 
the recommendation of the principal. Graduates of out-of-state schools 
should have attained college certification marks, such marks to be not less 
than one letter or ten points higher than the passing mark. 

Veterans and other mature persons who are not high school graduates 
may qualify for admission to the freshman class by passing prescribed tests 
comparable to those employed by state authorities to establish high school 
equivalence. 

SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS 

In selecting students more emphasis will be placed upon good marks and 
other indications of probable success in college rather than upon a fixed 
pattern of subject matter. 

English 4 units required for all divisions of the University. 

Mathematics 

For all colleges one unit each of Algebra and 
Plane Geometry is desirable. Deviation may be 
allowed for certain curricula. 

Social Science; Natural 

and Biological Science. . 1 unit from each group is required; two are 
desirable. 

Foreign Languages Those who will follow the professions, enter 

journalism, foreign trade or service, study the 
humanities or do research, should have a good 
foundation in one or more, but none is required. 

Electives Fine Arts, trade and vocational subjects are 

acceptable. 

Transfer Students: Only students in good standing as to scholarship and 
conduct are eligible to transfer. Advanced standing is assigned to transfer 
students from accredited institutions under the following conditions: 

1. A minimum of one year of resident work of not less than 30 semestn 
hours is necessary for a degree. 

2. The University reserves the right at any time to revoke advanced 
standing if the transfer student's progress is unsatisfactory. 



16 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



RESIDENTS, NON-RESIDENTS 



Fees for Undergraduate Students 

Maryland Residents 

Fixed Charges 

Athletic Fee 

Special Fee 

Student Activities Fee 

Infirmary Fee 

Post Office Fee 

Advisory and Testing Fee 



First 


Second 




Semester 


Semester 


Total 


$82.00 


$83.00 


$165.00 


15.00 




15.00 


10.00 




10.00 


10.00 




10.00 


5.00 




5.00 


2.00 




2.00 


1.00 




1.00 



Total for Maryland Residents $125.00 



$83.00 $208.00 



Residents of the District of Columbia, 
Other States and Countries 

Tuition Fee for Non-Resident Students. $63.00 



$62.00 $125.00 



Total for Non-Resident Students $188.00 *$145.00 $333.00 



Board and Lodging 

Board $170.00 $170.00 

Dormitory Room $40— $45 $40— $45 



$340.00 



Total for Board and Room $210—215 $210—215 $420—430 



The Fixed Charges Fee is not a charge for tuition. It is a charge to help defray the 
cost of operating the University's physical plant and other various services which ordinarily 
would not be included as a cost of teaching personnel and teaching supplies. Included in 
these costs would be janitorial services, cost of heat, electricity, water, etc., administrative 
and clerical cost, maintenance of buildings and grounds, maintenance of libraries, cost of 
University publications, Alumni Office, the University Business and Financial Offices, the 
Registrar's Office, the Admissions Office, and any other such services as are supplemental 
and necessary to teaching and research are supported by this fee. 

The Athletic Fee is charged for the support of the Department of Intercollegiate 
Athletics. All students are eligible and encouraged to participate in all of the activities of 
this department and to attend all contests in which they do not participate. 

The Special Fee is used for improving physical training facilities and for other Uni- 
versity projects that have direct relationship to student welfare, especially athletics and 
recreation. This fee now is allocated to a fund for construction of a stadium, a new 
combination coliseum and auditorium, and to constructing a new swimming pool, as soon 
as the fund is sufficient and materials are available. 

The Students Activities Fee is a mandatory fee included at the request of the Student 
Government Association. It covers subscriptions to the Diamondback, student paper, of 
$1.50 per year, the Old Line, literary magazine, of $.75 per year, and the yearbook ; class 
dues, including financial support for the musical and dramatic clubs. 

* Students entering the University for the second semester will pay the following addi- 
tional fees: Athletic. $7.50; Special, $5.00; Student Activities, $8.00; Infirmary, $2.50- 
Post Office Fees, $1.00; Advisory and Testing Fee, $.50. 




An Old Wood Cut 

An old wood cut of Maryland's origi- 
nal Medical School Building, the oldest 
in the United States, from which 
classes have been graduated continu- 
ously since the building's erection 
in 1812. 




Public Health Affiliation 




Nurses at Maryland's Original Medical School 




NURSING ARTS AS TAUGHT AT THE 
SCHOOL OF NURSING, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 19 

LABORATORY AND OTHER FEES FOR FIVE YEAR STUDENTS 
Special Fees 

Matriculation Fee for undergraduates, payable at first registration 

in the University : $10.00 

Diploma Fee for Bachelor's degree, payable just prior to 

graduation 10.00 

Cap and Gown Fee, Bachelor's degree 2.50 

Laboratory Fees Per Semester Course 

Bacteriology $10.00 Speech $1.00 

Botany 5.00 Zoology — 

Chemistry — Introductory 3.00 

Introductory 4.00 All other 6.00 

All other 10.00 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 110 Hours 

Professor of Anatomy, assisted by a nurse instructor. 

The anatomy of the human body is taught by lectures, demonstrations, 
and exercises on anatomical material. Nearly every organ, organ system 
and region of the body is demonstrated in actual dissections of the human 
cadaver. A rich and interesting collection of skeletal material is available; 
the muscles are shown in a dissected "muscle man"; the circulatory system 
is demonstrated in a dissection of a cadaver in which colored materials have 
been injected into the blood vessels. In addition, many beautiful anatomical 
preparations made by the curator of the department are shown and studied; 
fresh organs of cattle, sheep and pigs, and occasionally of man. Fresh beef 
hearts are dissected by the students. 

Physiology is taught in combination with anatomy, mostly by lectures 
supplemented by drawings, charts, models and some experiments. 

CHEMISTRY. 60 Hours 

Professor of Chemistry, assisted by a nurse instructor. 

The fundamental principles of chemistry which are available both in the 
practice of nursing and in the comprehension of other sciences are studied. 
The content includes selected topics in general, organic and biological 
chemistry. Whenever possible, practical applications and laboratory ex- 
periments are integrated with the subject matter. 

MICROBIOLOGY. IS Hours 

Professor of Bacteriology, assisted by a nurse instructor. 

The lectures and laboratory periods arc devoted to the study of the 
essential relation of Microbiology to diagnosis, treatment, prevention of 
disease, and nursing care. Emphasis is placed upon the important patho- 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

genie species. This includes: their mode of entrance into the body, their 
portal of exit, their method of transfer, the tests most helpful in determin- 
ing their presence, methods of immunization, and a good working knowledge 
of the various methods used in their destruction. 

NUTRITION, FOODS AND COOKERY. 45 Hours 

Teaching Dietitian. 

The modern concept regarding the constituents of an adequate diet, the 
chemistry and mechanics of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of foods, 
food requirements of various ages, food economics, and the latest informa- 
tion on the role of vitamins in human nutrition are considered. The labora- 
tory work is practical experience, under supervision, in the preparation and 
service of typical hospital dietaries based on the fundamental principles 
of cookery. 

MENTAL HYGIENE. 15 Hours 

PSYCHOLOGY. Instructor in Psychology. 30 Hours 

This course is designed to give the student some of the basic concepts of 
dynamic psychology. How people are related to each other so that the 
student will be helped with her own adjustments and with her understanding 
of other people are also considered. Interrelationship of mind and body, 
principles of study habits and personality development are stressed. 

SOCIOLOGY. 45 Hours 

Nurse instructor, under the supervision of Sociology Department, 
College Park. 

Attention is given to an analysis of the American social structure as it 
relates to nurses and nursing, and also includes the family; metropolitan, 
small town, and rural communities; population distribution, composition and 
change; and general social organization. 

PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS. 15 Hours 

Director of the School and Guidance Counsellor. 

To give the student a general understanding and appreciation of effective 
living is the aim of this course. This includes an understanding of pro- 
fessional relationships, personal responsibility, and ethical principles in 
order to help the student adapt herself to her professional responsibilities. 

PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS. 30 Hours 

Professor of Pharmacology, assisted by a nurse instructor. 

Those phases of pharmacology necessary for the intelligent use of drugs 
in the treatment of disease are treated in this course. Methods of adminis- 
tration of drugs, their actions and therapeutic effects, and the symptoms 
and treatment of poisoning constitute the course of lectures. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 21 

NURSING ARTS. 200 Hours 

Assistant Director of Nursing Education and instructors. 

An introduction to the study of the ill patient and his needs by means of 
a consideration of the methods of creating and maintaining a desirable 
environment for the patient and his family are studied. Personal Hygiene, 
Bandaging, and Massage are correlated with basic physical and mental care 
which is required by the patient. This study of nursing care is involved by 
simple diagnostic procedures. The development of Nursing Care plans by 
each student is stressed. Recognition of opportunities for health teaching; 
application of scientific principles studied in biological, physical, chemical 
and social sciences are related to the nursing care of patients. The develop- 
ment of nursing skills is expected by the assignment of students after 
classroom demonstration and practice of procedure to care of ill patients. 
Lectures, laboratory demonstration, practice and hospital experience are 
included. 

MEDICAL AND SURGICAL NURSING. 300 Hours 

Supervisor of Clinical Instruction and assistants. 

This course is a survey of the treating of disease by medical or surgical 
methods and of considering the individual in health and in sickness. Clinical 
manifestations of disease are emphasized, as well as their relation to social, 
economic and psychological control in the hospital and in the community. 
Observation and demonstration at the bedside are arranged, and experience 
includes related teaching in diet therapy, pharmacology, nursing arts and 
public health nursing. 

OBSTETRICAL NURSING. 60 Hours 

Clinical Instructor, Department of Obstetrics, and associates. 

The management and treatment of the normal and the abnormal phases of 
pregnancy, parturition and puerperium; and the treatment of the normal 
and abnormal conditions of the newborn infant are studied. Clinical con- 
ferences are conducted in which the history, diagnosis, treatment and 
nursing care of the mother and her infant are presented and discussed. 
Consideration is also given to the socio-economic relationship to obstetrical 
nursing. 

NURSING OF CHILDREN. 80 Hours 

Clinical Instructor, Department of Pediatrics, and associates. 

The normal child, his behavior and the representative diseases of child- 
hood in relation to the socio-economic factors are considered. Nursing 
practice, nursing care studies, conferences, and clinics are supplementary 
features of the nursing of children. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

NURSING AND HEALTH SERVICE IN THE FAMILY. 45 Hours 

Instructor of Public Health Nursing. 

This includes the principles of health needs of the community, public 
health administration and activities. The principles of public health nursing 
in relation to individual, family and community health are emphasized. 

SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS OF NURSING. 45 Hours 

Associate Director of Nursing and others. 

The aim of this course is to develop a knowledge and an appreciation of 
the role of the nurse, both personal and professional, in the community, so 
that she may more easily adapt herself to it, and become a useful citizen 
through active participation in plans and programs for both health and 
community welfare. 

POLICIES OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1. It is requested that students maintain a satisfactory record in health 
(both physical and mental), in clinical, and in theoretical work in order 
to remain as a student in the School of Nursing. 

2. An annual report of the achievement of the student is given to the 
student and a copy is sent to her parents or guardian. The minimum 
passing grade for individual course is D, but the student must maintain 
a general average of C or above. 

3. A fee of $5.00 is charged for reexamination in a course. 

4. If a student does not pass a specific clinical service, she is permitted to 
repeat that service on her own time. If she has had other difficulties, in 
most cases, she may be asked to withdraw from the School of Nursing. 

5. When a student is not meeting the standards of the School, both she and 
her parents or guardian will be notified. Under circumstances beyond 
her control she will be permitted to bring her record to a satisfactory 
level of achievement. 

6. Students who do not complete satisfactory records with other affiliating 
agencies, such as Psychiatry, Contagious Diseases, and Public Health will 
not be recommended for State Board Examinations until evidence of 
passing these subjects is given in writing by those in charge of these 
particular courses. 

7. Students may be absent from class only upon approval of the instructor 
teaching that particular class. No student should absent herself from 
class at any time unless she has at least a "B" average. Instructors and 
not the Nursing School Office may grant special privileges for classes, 
and are, in turn, responsible for the content of course covered. 




CLASS ROOM INSTRUCTION 




RECREATION 



SANTA FILOMENA* 

OR 

THE LADY WITH THE LAMP 

By HENRY WADSWORTH LONGFELLOW 

(Dedicated to Florence Nightingale, "The Angel of Mercy of the Crimea," 1820-1910) 

(Louisa Parsons, founder of Maryland's School of Nursing, graduated from the 
Nightingale School in London) 



Whene'er a noble deed is wrought, 
Whene'er is spoken a noble thought, 
Our hearts, in glad surprise, 
To higher levels rise. 

The tidal wave of deeper souls 
Into our inmost being rolls, 
And lifts us unawares 
Out of all meaner cares. 

Honor to those whose words or deeds 
Thus help us in our daily needs, 
Any by their overflow 
Raise us from what is low! 

Thus thought I, as by night I read, 
Of the great army of the dead 
The trenches cold and damp, 
The starved and frozen camp. 

The wounded from the battle plain, 
In dreary hospitals of pain, 
The cheerless corridors, 
The cold and stony floors. 



Lo, in that house of misery, 

A lady with a lamp I see 

Pass through the glimmering room, 

And flit from room to room. 

And slow, as in a dream of bliss, 
The speechless sufferer turns to kiss 
Her shadow, as it falls 
Upon the darkening walls. 

As if a door in heaven should be 
Opened and then closed suddenly, 
The vision came and went, 
The light shone and was spent. 

On England's annals, through the long 
Hereafter of her speech and song, 
That light its rays shall cast 
From portals of the past. 

A lady with a lamp shall stand 
In the great history of the land, 
A noble type of good, 
Heroic womanhood. 



Nor even shall a wanting here. 
The palm, the lily, and the spear, 
The symbols that of yore 
Saint Filomena bore. 



* Santa Filomena, patron Saint of nurses. In Pisa, Italy, a painting by Sabatelli repre- 
sents the Saint as a beautiful, nymph -like figure, floating down from heaven, attended by 
angels bearing the lily, palm, and javelin. In the foreground are shown the sick and maimed, 
healed by Filomena. 



24 



For Further 


Information 


, Address: 


DIRECTOR OF 


NURSING 
AND 


EDUCATION 


NURSING SERVICES 


Redwood and Greene Streets 


Baltimore 1 




Maryland 




; ■-!•' 



The School 
of 

NURSING 

CATALOG 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1950-1951 

LIBRARY 



IXVERCI 4 



or 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar 5 

General Administrative Board 3 

Board of Regents 3 

Membership and Accreditation 5 

Organization of University of Maryland 3 

Colleges, List of 5 

Faculty 

Department of Nursing Education 6 

Assistants in Administration 6 

Lecturers 6-7 

Faculty in Nursing 7 

Committees 7-8 

Department of Nursing Service, Staff 8 

General Information 

Program of Study 9 

Objectives 9 

Facilities for Education 9 

Resident Facilities _ 9 

Library Facilities 9 

Fees and Estimated Expenses 10 

Health Service 10 

Extra-Professional Program 10 

Requirements for Admission 11 

A. Basic Professional Course 12 

B. Five-Year Combined Arts and Sciences and Nursing 12-13 

Curriculum 18-19 

Admission Procedure 13-14 

Subject Requirements 14 

Fees 16,17 

Description of Courses of Instruction 19-22 

Policies 22 




The School of 

NURSING 

CATALOG 



c^> 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1950 



1951 



I.Ml'O U'l'A N T 

The provisions of tins publication are not to t>»' regarded as an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University of Maryland. The University 
reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at an) time within 
the student's term of residence. The University further reseves the liuht at 
any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it considers such action to tu- 
rn the best interests of the University, 






- 
J2 








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ORGANIZATION 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Harry Clifton Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc, President and Executive Officer 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE Term 

Expires 

William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman, 100 West University Parkway, 

Baltimore 1958 

Stanford Z. Rothschild, Secretary, 109 East Redwood Street, 

Baltimore 1952 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, 120 West Redwood Street, Balti- 
more 1953 

E. Paul Knotts, Denton, Caroline County 1954 

Peter W. Chichester, 103 West Second Street, Frederick, Md 1951 

Harry H. Xuttle, Denton, Caroline County 1950 

Philip C. Turner, 2 East North Avenue, Baltimore 1950 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, 4101 Greenway, Baltimore 1956 

Charles P. McCormick, McCormick & Company, Baltimore 1957 

Millard E. Tydings, Senate Office Building, Washington, D. C. 1951 

Edward F. Holter, Middletown, Md 1952 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer 
of the Board. 

The State Law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the last Friday in each month. 
except during the months of July and August. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Chairman 
MISS PREINKERT, Secretary 



Dean Bam ford 


Dean Fraley 


Miss Preinkert 


Dean Benjamin- 


Dean Foss 


Dean Pvi k 


Mr. Benton 


Miss Gipe 


Dean Robinson 


Dr. Bishop 


Mr. Haszard 


Dean Smith 


Mr. Brigham 


Dean Howell 


! u an Stamp 


Dr. Brieckner 


Dr. Huff 


Dean Steinberg 


President Byrd 


Dr. Hoffsommer 


Dean Symons 


Mr. Cissej i 


Miss Kei.i.ar 


Mr. Weber 


In \.\ Cotter man 


Director Kemp 


Dr. W'iiiit 


Dean EPPLEY 


Dr. Long 


Dr. WYLIE 


Dr. Faber 


Dean Mount 


Dr. Zucker 


Mr. Fogg 


Col. Pitcheord 
EDUCATIONAL COUNCIL 





The President, Dean <»i the FACULTY, Chairman, Deans <>e COLLS 
Chairmen op Academic Divisions, Heads of Educationai Departments, 
Director of Admissions, Registrar. 

3 




The University of Maryland Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland 

4 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 5 

MEMBERSHIP AND ACCREDITATION 

1. The University of Maryland, which incorporates the School of Nursing 
with all of the other Schools of the University, is a member of the 
Association of American Colleges, and is accredited by the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

2. The School of Nursing is accredited by the Maryland State Board of 
Examiners of Nurses and other states that reciprocate with the State 
of Maryland and is in Group I with the Interim Classification of the 
National League of Nursing Education. 

3. The hospital, which is the teaching laboratory for the students of the 
School of Nursing, is approved by the American College of Surgeons, the 
American Medical Association-Residents and Interns, the American Hos- 
pital Association, and the Maryland Hospital Association. It is also a 
participant in the Blue Cross Plan. 

The University of Maryland has the following educational organizations: 



At Baltimore 

The School of Dentistry 
The School of Law 
The School of Medicine 

At College Park 

College of Agriculture 
College of Arts and Sciences 

College of Business and Public 
Administration 

College of Education 

Glenn L. Martin College of Engi- 
neering and Aeronautical 
Sciences 



The School of Nursing 
The School of Pharmacy 
The College of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies 



College of Home Economics 
College of Military Science 
College of Physical Education, 

Recreation and Health 
College of Special and Continua- 
tion Studies 
Summer School 
Graduate School 



Each school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and 
members of its faculty; each Faculty Council controls the internal affairs 
of the group it represents. 



PROPOSED CALENDAR FOR 1950-51 

September 6, 1950 Wednesday Admission of fall class 

Dec. 22-Jan. 1, 1951 Friday-Monday Christmas Holidays 

September f>, 1951 Thursday Admission of fall class 



6 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

FACULTY, DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION 

Florence Meda Gipe, R.N., M.S., Director of the Department of Nursing 

Education and Nursing Service 
Frances Orgain, R.N., M.A., Associate Director, School of Nursing 
Margaret L. Hayes, R.N., M.S., Associate Director of Nursing Education 
Marie P. Zec, R.N., B.S., Assistant Director of Nursing Education, In- 
structor of General Nursing 
Eva Bradley, R.N., B.S., M.Ed., Instructor, Biological Sciences 
Mary E. Grotefend, R.N., M.S., Instructor, Social Sciences; Coordinator 

of Student Experience in Out-Patient Department 
Cecilia M. Zitkus, A.B., R.N., Instructor, Nursing Arts 
LaRue Schwallenberg, R.N., B.S., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Sur- 
gical Nursing- 
Lois Schildwachter, R.N., B.S., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical 

Nursing 
Helen W. Taylor, B.S., R.N., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical 

Nursing (Evening) 
Kathryn Williams, B.S., R.N., Clinical Instructor, Operating Room 

Technique 
Martha Baer, B.S., R.N., Clinical Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing 
(Evening) 
f Bessie Neild, R.N., Clinical Instructor, Obstetrical Nursing 

Frances T. Reed, R.N., B.S., Clinical Instructor, Nursing of Children 
IMargaret Stewart, R.N., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Laura Wildman, R.N., B.A., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical 
Nursing 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Jeanne Borges Secretary to Director of Nursing 

Jeanne Fink Secretary 

Clara McGovern, R.N., B.S Supervisor, Records 

Simone Hurst Librarian 

Edith Mutch, R.N Librarian (Evening) 

LECTURERS* 

Charles Bagley, Jr., M.A., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

J. Edmund Bradley, M.D Professor of Pediatrics and Head of Department 

Otto C. Brantigan, B.S., M.D Professor of Surgical Anatomy 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S Professor of Oral Surgery 

LOUIS H. Douglass, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Professor of Surgery 



* The above named may not necessarily give the lectures personally, but in all instances 
the instructors are either appointed <>r named by them. 

i Working for degree and will complete within the next year. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 7 

Frank W. Hatchel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D Professor of Gynecology 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., D.Sc Professor of Pharmacology 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D Professor of Medicine 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL.B Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D Professor of Anatomy 

FACULTY IN NURSING 
Executive Committee of the Faculty 

Florence Meda Gipe, Director of the School of Nursing, Chairman 

Eva F. Darley Margaret Hayes 

Marie P. Zec 

Advisory Committee to the School of Nursing 

Louis M. Krause, Chairman Representative of School of Medicine 

Virginia Conley President, Nurses' Alumnae Association 

Edgar F. Long Chairman, Committee of Admissions 

Mrs. Harry M. Robinson, Jr Representative of General Community 

George H. Buck Director, University Hospital 

Dr. Charles Sylvester Assistant Superintendent, Vocational 

Education of Public Schools 

Robert Riley Director, Baltimore City Health Department 

Mrs. Nathan Winslow Member, Woman's Board 

Boyd Wylie Dean, School of Medicine 

George Yeager Member, Surgical Staff 

FACULTY STANDING COMMITTEES 

Florence Meda Gipe, Chairman Executive Committee 

Marie P. Zec, Chairman Committee on Curriculum 

Edgar F. Long, Chairman Committee on Admissions 

Margaret Hayes, Chairman Committee on Staff Education 

Eva Bradley, Chairman Committee on Records and Grading 

Margaret Hayes, Chairman Committee on Student Affairs 

Harold F. Cotterman, Chairman Committee on Scholarship and 

Student Loans 

Mrs. Ida Robinson, Chairman Committee on Library Affairs 

Marie P. Zec, Chariman Committee on Nursing and Allied Arts 

W. H. Townshend, Jr Committee on Health Service 

Frances Reed, chairman Committee on Clinical Enstruction 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON CURRICULUM 

Florence M. Gipe, Chairman Director, University of Maryland 

School of Nursing 
Sistkk M. Florence Supervisor of Instruction, Mercy Hospital and 

University of Maryland School of Education 
Emi Lanning Director of Nursing Education, Rockville, Maryland 



8 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Ruth Moubray Guidance Counselor and Executive Secretary 

*Edna McNaughton Nursery School, College Park 

Margaret Newcomb Director, School of Nursing, 

Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital 

Anna Perch Supervisor, Baltimore City Public Health Department 

Gladys Wiggin, Ph.D. Professor of Education, College Park 

Florence N. Harvey Director of Nursing, Spring Grove Hospital 

STAFF, DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE 

Florence Meda Gipe, R.N., M.S., Director of the Divisions of Nursing 

Education and Nursing Service. 
Eva Darley, R.N., Associate Director, Nursing Service. 
Martha Hoffman, R.N., Assistant Director, Nursing Service — Evening. 
Ethel Troy, R.N., Assistant Director, Nursing Service — Night. 
Ada Hines, R.N., Assistant Director, Nursing Service — Night. 
C. Lorraine Neel, R.N., Supervisor, Nursing Service. 
Mary Saulsbury, R.N., Supervisor, Nursing Service — Day. 
Charlotte Halter, R.N., Supervisor, Eleventh Floor, Private. 
Virginia Stack, R.N., Supervisor, Tenth Floor, Private. 
Margaret Riffle, R.N., Supervisor, Ninth Floor, Private. 
Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N., Supervisor, Operating Rooms. 
Elizabeth Gooch, R.N., Supervisor, Central Supply Room. 
Flora Streett, R.N., Supervisor, Obstetrical Department. 
Mary Joneckis, R.N., Supervisor, Pediatric Department. 
Ruth Ann Young, R.N., Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, 

Fourth Floor. 
Martha Peake, R.N., Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, Third 

Floor. 
Florence Wong, R.N., Supervisor, Special Clinics, Second Floor. 
Edith R. Lillard, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Accident Room. 
Edith Miller, R.N., Supervisor, Out-Patient Department. 
Dorothy Hunt, R.N., Head Nurse in Health Office. 
Barbara Conway, R.N., Instructor, Play Therapy. 
Anna Mae Slacum, R.N., B.S., Instructor, Play Therapy. 
fELEANOR Slacum, R.N., Supervisor, Nursing Service — Evening 



* University of Maryland 

t Working for decree and will complete within the next year 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 9 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

The present School of Nursing offers a program of study, instituted in 
1924, to two groups: to those who desire to complete -their work in approxi- 
mately thirty-six months, and to those who desire the five year combined 
academic study and specialization in nursing. Those who complete the 
latter course successfully receive the degree of Bachelor of Science and a 
diploma in nursing. 

OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

In attempting to anticipate the future professional needs of its graduates 
and community, the University of Maryland School of Nursing carefully 
selects young women to educate them to become professional nurses who 
will administer sympathetic and safe nursing care to the sick, and who will 
teach the principles of health and prevention of disease needed in an ever- 
changing society. 

FACILITIES FOR EDUCATION 

The University of Maryland Hospital, a general hospital, has a capacity 
of 435 beds and 70 bassinets. The wards and Out-patient Department afford 
valuable opportunities for the clinical experience of the student nurse as 
well as for the study of family and community problems. The classroom, 
laboratories, and library of the School of Medicine are available for instruc- 
tional purposes. Clinical experience in Psychiatric Nursing is provided at 
Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital; in Communicable Disease Nursing at 
Sydenham Hospital; and a limited number of affiliations in Public Health 
Nursing with the Baltimore City Health Department. 

RESIDENT FACILITIES 

Student nurses reside in Louisa Parsons Hall. The residence is under 
the direction of a graduate registered nurse. Plans for a new Nurses 
Residence and Recreational Center have been approved for the near future. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The School of Nursing Library is an integral part of the University of 
Maryland library system, and is under the Director of Libraries of the 
University. Both scientific and recreational collections of books are pro- 
vided in the library which is conveniently located on the first floor of the 
Louisa Parsons Hall. 

The facilities of the Medical, Dental, Pharmaceutical, and Law School 
Libraries are available to the students in the School of Nursing. Additional 
facilities are provided at the main branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 
which comprises the public library system for the City of Baltimore; the 
Peabody Library, which contains a large collect ion of non-circulating rare 
books; the Maryland Historical Society Library; and the Library of Con- 
gress, which conducts an inter-loan service to the major libraries of the 
country. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

FEES AND ESTIMATED EXPENSES FOR THREE YEARS 
IN THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Fixed Fee $50.00* 

Student Activity Fee 5.00 

Textbooks (approximately) 60.00 

Uniforms 70.00 

These costs are approximate and may fluctuate because of changing living 
costs. Throughout the course students are provided maintenance which in- 
cludes room, board, and laundry of uniforms. At the present time a limited 
number of students are allowed the privilege of living at home, permission 
for which is granted by the Director of Nurses. Students' uniforms will be 
obtained after admission to the School of Nursing. Shoes, stockings and 
other personal items are furnished by the students. Expenses such as meals, 
carfare, and incidentals which the student incurs during periods of affiliation 
or field trips are borne by the student. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The School of Nursing maintains a Health Service for the students under 
the general direction of a Committee on Health Services. Periodic health 
examinations are provided for each student. 

Vaccination against Typhoid Fever and Smallpox are required of all 
students before admission to the School of Nursing. Medical care is pro- 
vided for student nurses. Dental care is not provided in the Health Service, 
but care is furnished by the Dental Clinic, second floor of University Hospital. 

Time which is lost due to illness in excess of fourteen days during the 
three-year period, is made up at the discretion of the faculty. 

EXTRA PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM 

The student nurses have a student government organization the function 
of which is to assist in the government of the school in cooperation with the 
faculty, and to plan recreational activities. 

Upon her admission each new student is met by one of the older students 
who acts as her big sister. This is a helpful relationship in which the older 
student assists the new one with advice and suggestions based on her own 
experience in the School of Nursing. 

Recreation facilities are utilized to the utmost. The "Y" pool is used 
for Tuesday nights. Here the students enjoy the relaxation of a cool swim 
or the hilarity of sport in the water after a busy day. During the winter 
season, basketball is played in the "gym" of the church next door. Parties 
for tennis and other sports are made up from time to time and held in the 
parks or other surrounding facilities. A dance or a big party is held about 
once a month. The nurses' dining room is used for informal dances and a 
downtown hotel ballroom for formal ones. The adjacent Schools of Medicine, 
Pharmacy, Dentistry, and Law cooperate in these dances and add to the 
general pleasure. Recently a Glee Club has been organized. 

* Subject to change pending combined recreational program which is now being estab- 
lished in the University of Maryland. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSIXG 11 

Baltimore City is a center of culture and education. It offers much stimu- 
lation to the visitor and the inhabitant in the way of drama, music, art, 
lectures, libraries, and the like. The Student Government Association plans 
trips to various functions and points of interest. 

In cooperation with the Director and the faculty, the students make rules 
and administer them in regard to discipline, house regulations, and con- 
ventions. This not only makes for a better spirit of democracy, but prepares 
the student for coming leadership and participation in community life. 

All of these activities help the students to realize their profession. Inter- 
est, relaxation, responsibility, and cooperation are thus fostered and form 
a vital part of the student's life. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Evidence of personal stability for nursing in relation to physical health, 
emotional stability, and general qualifications of personality, cultural de- 
velopment and maturity must be submitted, and a personal interview with 
the Director of the School of Nursing or School Counselor. If the student 
is too far distant from the University the interview is given by a member 
of the National League of Nursing Education in that area. 

Graduates of accredited secondary schools will be admitted by certificate 
upon the recommendation of the principal. In selecting students, more 
emphasis will be placed upon good marks and other indications of probable 
success in nursing rather than upon a fixed pattern of subject matter. 

English 4 units required for all divisions of the University. 

Mathematics 2 units — One unit each of algebra and plane 

geometry is desirable. 

History 1 unit, 2 units are desirable. 

Foreign language 1 unit, 2 units are desirable (Latin suggested). 

Science 

Biology 1 unit 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Physics (suggested) 1 unit 

Psychometric tests, which are given by the National League of Nursing 
Education, to determine suitability for nursing are taken by prospective 
students. Notice and instructions will be sent to the applicant upon review 
of the credentials by the Committee on Admission. A fee of approximately 
$5.00 is to be paid by the applicant for these tests. The fee is paid directly 
to the League. 

Applicants should be 17-35 years of age. 

All inquiries concerning admission to the School of Nursing should be 
addressed to the Director of the School of Nursing who will furnish you, 
upon request, the necessary forms which must be filed with the University 
of Maryland. 



12 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




CURRICULUM 

BASIC PROFESSIONAL COURSE (Three- Year Course) 

The curriculum covers a period of three years after 
which time a diploma in Nursing is awarded by the 
University of Maryland upon recommendation by the 
School of Nursing. The pre-clinical period consists 
of the first six months and is devoted primarily to 
the study of the sciences basic to nursing, the principles 
and practice of nursing, and the supervised practice of 
skills learned in the classroom. The students who meet 
the requirements both in scholastical and clinical work, 
will be accepted into the School of Nursing as clinical 
students. 

Following the preclinical period students are assigned 
within a division for five hours of clinical practice and 
two fifty minute periods of class per day, including 
meal hours. One free day a week is given, and careful 
planning makes it possible to give this day off without 
class interference. At the present time plans are being 
made to institute a forty hour week. 

The Executive Committee of the Faculty may, at any 
time, terminate a student's course if she fails to meet 
the standards of the School of Nursing or the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

A three-year Graduate Nurse is pictured at upper left. 

FIVE-YEAR COMBINED ARTS AND SCIENCES AND NURSING 

The first two years of this curriculum comprising 
a minimum of 60 semester hours exclusive of hygiene 
and physical activities, are taken in the College of 
Arts and Sciences at College Park and the professional 
training is taken in the School of Nursing of the 
University of Maryland in Baltimore. 

In addition to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing may, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Director of the School of Nursing, be 
granted at the end of the professional training. 

A student may enter this combined curriculum with 
advanced standing but the second year, consisting of a 
minimum of 30 credits, exclusive of physical training, 
must be completed in College Park. To qualify for the 
combined degree the student must complete the re- 
quired work at College Park before beginning the pro- 
fessional training in Baltimore. 

In order to receive the Bachelor of Science degree the 
student must fulfill the grade requirements of the 
university. 

A five-year Graduate Nurse is pictured at lower right. 




THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 13 

PRE-NURSING CURRICULUM 

Arts-Nursing Curriculum r-Semester^ 

Freshman Year I II 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government .... 3 

Chem. 11, 13 — General Chemistry 3 3 

L. S. 1, 2 — Library Methods 1 1 

Modern Language 3 3 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

Hea. 2, 4— Hygiene (Women) 2 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 



Total 17 17 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature 3 3 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 .... 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology .... 4 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 3 .... 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... 3 

Modern Language 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17 17 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE 

Undergraduate Schools: Applicants for admission to the College of Arts 
and Sciences for Pre-Nursing Course should communicate with the Director 
of Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Applicants from Secondary Schools: Procure an application blank from 
the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested and ask your 
principal or headmaster to enter your secondary school record and mail 
the blank to the Director of Admissions. 

To avoid delay, it is suggested that applications be filed not later than 
July 1 for the fall semester. Applications from students completing their 
last semester of secondary work are encouraged. If acceptable, supplemen- 
tary records will be sent upon graduation. 

Applicants from Other Colleges and Universities: Secure an application 
blank from the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested 
and ask secondary school principal or headmaster to enter secondary school 
record and send the blank to the Director of Admissions. Request the 
Registrar of the College or University attended to send a transcript to 
the Director of Admissions, College Park, Maryland. 

Time of Admission: New students should plan to outer the University at 

the beginning of the fall semester. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Two months credit is allowed by the School of Nursing for every thirty 
semester hours in an accredited college or university, depending upon the 
scholastic rating of the individual and her ability to adjust in a hospital 
environment. 

ADMISSION OF FRESHMEN 

Admission by Certificate: Graduates of accredited secondary schools of 
Maryland or the District of Columbia will be admitted by certificate upon 
the recommendation of the principal. Graduates of out-of-state schools 
should have attained college certification marks, such marks to be not less 
than one letter or ten points higher than the passing mark. 

Veterans and other mature persons who are not high school graduates 
may qualify for admission to the freshman class by passing prescribed tests 
comparable to those employed by state authorities to establish high school 
equivalence. 

SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS 

In selecting students more emphasis will be placed upon good marks and 
other indications of probable success in college rather than upon a fixed 
pattern of subject matter. 

English 4 units required for all divisions of the University. 

Mathematics 

For all colleges one unit each of Algebra and 
Plane Geometry is desirable. Deviation may be 
allowed for certain curricula. 

Social Science; Natural 

and Biological Science. . 1 unit from each group is required; two are 
desirable. 

Foreign Languages Those who will follow the professions, enter 

journalism, foreign trade or service, study the 
humanities or do research, should have a good 
foundation in one or more, but none is required. 

Electives Fine Arts, trade and vocational subjects are 

acceptable. 

Transfer Students: Only students in good standing as to scholarship 
and conduct are eligible to transfer. Advanced standing is assigned to trans- 
fer students from accredited institutions under the following conditions: 

1. A minimum of one year of resident work of not less than 30 semesters 
hours is necessary for a degree. 

2. The University reserves the right at any time to revoke advanced 
standing if the transfer student's progress is unsatisfactory. 




An Old Wood Cut 

An old wood cut of Maryland's origi- 
nal Medical School Building, the oldest 
in the United States, from which 
classes have been graduated continu- 
ously since the building's erection 
in 1812. 




Public Health Affiliation 




Nurses af Maryland's Original Medical School 



16 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



RESIDENTS, NON-RESIDENTS 
For Two Years Pre-Nursing at College Park 

Fees for Undergraduate Students 

Fixed Charges 

Athletic Fee 

Special Fee 

Student Activities Fee 

Infirmary Fee 

Post Office Fee 

Advisory and Testing Fee 



Total for Maryland Residents $130.00 



First 


Second 




Semester 


Semester 


Total 


$82.00 


$83.00 


$165.00 


15.00 




15.00 


15.00 




15.00 


10.00 




10.00 


5.00 




5.00 


2.00 




2.00 


1.00 




1.00 


$130.00 


$83.00 


$213.00 



Residents of the District of Columbia, 
Other States and Countries 

Tuition Fee for Non-Resident Students 



$63.00 



$62.00 



$125.00 



Total for Non-Resident Students $193.00 



: $145.00 



$338.00 



Board and Lodging 

Board $170.00 $170.00 $340.00 

Dormitory Room $54-$63 $54-$63 $108-$126 



Total for Room and Board $224-$233 $224-$233 



-$466 



The Fixed Charges Fee is not a charge for tuition. It is a charge to help defray the 
cost of operating the University's physical plant and other various services which ordinarily 
would not be included as a cost of teaching personnel and teaching supplies. Included in 
these costs would be janitorial services, cost of heat, electricity, water, etc., administrative 
and clerical cost, maintenance of buildings and grounds, maintenance of libraries, cost of 
University publications, Alumni Office, the University Business and Financial Offices, the 
Registrar's Office, the Admissions Office, and any other such services as are supplemental 
and necessary to teaching and research are supported by this fee. 

The Athletic Fee is charged for the support of the Department of Intercollegiate 
Athletics. All students are eligible and encouraged to participate in all of the activities of 
this department and to attend all contests in which they do not participate. 

The Special Fee is used for improving physical training facilities and for other Uni- 
versity projects that have direct relationship to student welfare, especially athletics and 
recreation. This fee now is allocated to a fund for construction of a stadium, a new 
combination coliseum and auditorium, and to constructing a new awimminK pool, and a 
student union. 

The Students Activities Fee is a mandatory fee included at the request of the Student 
Government Association. It covers subscriptions to the Diamondback, student paper, of 
$1.50 per year, the Old Line, literary magazine, of $.75 per year, and the yearbook ; class 
dues, including financial support for the musical and dramatic clubs. 

The Infirmary Fee does not include expensive drugs or special diagnostic procedures. 
Expensive drugs will be charged at cost and special diagnostic procedures, such as X-Ray, 
Electrocardiographs, Basal Metabolic Kales, etc., will be charged at the lowest cost prevailing 
in the vicinity. 

* Students entering the University for the second semester will pay the following addi- 
tional fees: Athletic, $7.50; Special, $5.00; Student Activities, $8.00; Infirmary, $2.50; 
Post Office Fees, $1.00; Advisory and Testing Fee, $.50. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



17 



LABORATORY AND OTHER FEES FOR FIVE-YEAR STUDENTS 
Special Fees 

Matriculation Fee for undergraduates, payable at first registration 

in the University $10.00 

Diploma Fee for Bachelor's degree, payable just prior to graduation 10.00 

Cap and Gown Fee, Bachelor's degree 2.50 

Laboratory Fees Per Semester Course 

Bacteriology $10.00 Speech $1.00 



Botany 5.00 

Chemistry 10.0C 



Zoology 8.00 



CURRICULUM 



Biological and Physical Sciences 

Anatomy and Physiology 

Chemistry 

Microbiology 



Social Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 

History of Nursing 

Professional Adjustments I 

Social Foundations of Nursing. 



Medical Sciences 

Elementary Materia Medica 
Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 

Nursing and Allied Arts 



Nursing 

Nutrition, Foods and Cookery... 
Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Circulatory System 

Central Nervous System 

Aseptic Technic 

Dermatology and Venereal 

Diet Therapy 

Endocrine System 

Gastro-Intestinal System 



Total 
Class* Laboratory Hours 



95 
40 
15 



35 



75 
15 

30 
20 
15 
25 
30 
15 
25 



15 
20 
30 



in 



150 
30 



105 
60 
45 



30 
45 
15 
15 
30 



20 

45 



225 
45 
30 



Leeturei by Instructors, Student projects, Seminar papers, Student reporti 



18 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Reproductive System 

Kidney 

Ophthalmology 

Orthopedics 

Respiratory System 

Ward Clinics and Conferences 

Obstetrics and Obstetrical Nursing 

Pediatrics and Pediatric Nursing 

Psychiatry and Psychiatric Nursing 

Public Health and Public Health Nursing. 



Class* 
20 
10 
9 
20 
30 
50 



Laboratory 



Total 
Hours 



60 
90 
92 
30 



* Lectures by Instructors, Student projects. Seminar papers, Student reports. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 105 Hours 

Professor of Anatomy, assisted by a nurse instructor. 

The anatomy of the human body is taught by lectures, demonstrations, 
and exercises on anatomical material. Nearly every organ, organ system 
and region of the body is demonstrated in actual dissections of the human 
cadaver. A rich and interesting collection of skeletal material is available; 
the muscles are shown in a dissected "muscle man"; the circulatory system 
is demonstrated in a dissection of a cadaver in which colored materials have 
been injected into the blood vessels. In addition, many beautiful anatomical 
preparations made by the curator of the department are shown and studied; 
fresh organs of cattle, sheep and pigs, and occasionally of man. Fresh beef 
hearts are dissected by the students. 

Physiology is taught in combination with anatomy, mostly by lectures 
supplemented by drawings, charts, models and some experiments. 

CHEMISTRY. 60 Hours 

Professor of Chemistry, assisted by a nurse instructor. 

The fundamental principles of chemistry which are available both in the 
practice of nursing and in the comprehension of other sciences are studied. 
The content includes selected topics in general, organic and biological 
chemistry. Whenever possible, practical applications and laboratory ex- 
periments are integrated with the subject matter. 

MICROBIOLOGY. 45 Hours 

Professor of Bacteriology, assisted by a nurse instructor. 

The lectures and laboratory periods are devoted to the study of the 
essential relation of Microbiology to diagnosis, treatment, prevention of 
disease, and nursing care. Emphasis is placed upon the important patho- 




NURSING ARTS AS TAUGHT AT THE 
SCHOOL OF NURSING, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 




20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

genie species. This includes: their mode of entrance into the body, their 
portal of exit, their method of transfer, the tests most helpful in determin- 
ing their presence, methods of immunization, and a good working knowledge 
of the various methods used in their destruction. 

NUTRITION, FOODS AND COOKERY. 45 Hours 

Teaching Dietitian. 

The modern concept regarding the constituents of an adequate diet, the 
chemistry and mechanics of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of foods, 
food requirements of various ages, food economics, and the latest informa- 
tion on the role of vitamins in human nutrition are considered. The labora- 
tory work is practical experience, under supervision, in the preparation and 
service of typical hospital dietaries based on the fundamental principles 
of cookery. 

MENTAL HYGIENE. 15 Hours 

PSYCHOLOGY. Instructor in Psychology. 30 Hours 

This course is designed to give the student some of the basic concepts of 
dynamic psychology. How people are related to each other so that the 
student will be helped with her own adjustments and with her understanding 
of other people are also considered. Interrelationship of mind and body, 
principles of study habits and personality development are stressed. 

SOCIOLOGY. 45 Hours 

Nurse instructor, under the supervision of Sociology Department, 
College Park. 

Attention is given to an analysis of the American social structure as it 
relates to nurses and nursing, and also includes the family; metropolitan, 
small town, and rural communities; population distribution, composition and 
change; and general social organization. 

PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS. 15 Hours 

Director of the School and Guidance Counsellor. 

To give the student a general understanding and appreciation of effective 
living is the aim of this course. This includes an understanding of pro- 
fessional relationships, personal responsibility, and ethical principles in 
order to help the student adapt herself to her professional responsibilities. 

PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS. 45 Hours 

Professor of Pharmacology, assisted by a nurse instructor. 

Those phases of pharmacology necessary for the intelligent use of drugs 
in the treatment of disease are treated in this course. Methods of adminis- 
tration of drugs, their actions and therapeutic effects, and the symptoms 
and treatment of poisoning constitute the course of lectures. 



THE SCHOOL OF XURSIXG 21 

NURSING ARTS. 225 Hours 

Assistant Director of Nursing Education and instructors. 

An introduction to the study of the ill patient and his needs by means of 
a consideration of the methods of creating and maintaining a desirable 
environment for the patient and his family are studied. Personal Hygiene, 
Bandaging, and Massage are correlated with basic physical and mental care 
which is required by the patient. This study of nursing care is involved by 
simple diagnostic procedures. The development of Nursing Care plans by 
each student is stressed. Recognition of opportunities for health teaching; 
application of scientific principles studied in biological, physical, chemical 
and social sciences are related to the nursing care of patients. The develop- 
ment of nursing skills is expected by the assignment of students after 
classroom demonstration and practice of procedure to care of ill patients. 
Lectures, laboratory demonstration, practice and hospital experience are 
included. 

MEDICAL AND SURGICAL NURSING. 300 Hours 

Supervisor of Clinical Instruction and assistants. 

This course is a survey of the treating of disease by medical or surgical 
methods and of considering the individual in health and in sickness. Clinical 
manifestations of disease are emphasized, as well as their relation to social, 
economic and psychological control in the hospital and in the community. 
Observation and demonstration at the bedside are arranged, and experience 
includes related teaching in diet therapy, pharmacology, nursing arts and 
public health nursing. 

OBSTETRICAL NURSING. 60 Hours 

Clinical Instructor, Department of Obstetrics, and associates. 

The management and treatment of the normal and the abnormal phases of 
pregnancy, parturition and puerperium; and the treatment of the normal 
and abnormal conditions of the newborn infant are studied. Clinical con- 
ferences are conducted in which the history, diagnosis, treatment and 
nursing care of the mother and her infant are presented and discussed. 
Consideration is also given to the socio-economic relationship to obstetrical 
nursing. 

M RSING OF CHILDREN. 90 Hours 

Clinical Instructor, Department of Pediatrics, and associates. 

The normal child, his behavior and the representative diseases of child- 
hood in relation to the socio-economic- factors are considered. Nursing 
practice, nursing care studies, conferences, and clinics air supplementary 
features of the nursing of children. 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

NURSING AND HEALTH SERVICE IN THE FAMILY. 30 Hours 

Instructor of Public Health Nursing. 

This includes the principles of health needs of the community, public 
health administration and activities. The principles of public health nursing 
in relation to individual, family and community health are emphasized. 

SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS OF NURSING. 30 Hours 

Associate Director of Nursing and others. 

The aim of this course is to develop a knowledge and an appreciation of 
the role of the nurse, both personal and professional, in the community, so 
that she may more easily adapt herself to it, and become a useful citizen 
through active participation in plans and programs for both health and 
community welfare. 

POLICIES OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1. It is requested that students maintain a satisfactory record in health 
(both physical and mental), in clinical, and in theoretical work in order 
to remain as a student in the School of Nursing. 

2. An annual report of the achievement of the student is given to the 
student and a copy is sent to her parents or guardian. The minimum 
passing grade for individual course is D, but the student must maintain 
a general average of C or above. 

3. If a student does not pass a specific clinical service, she is given special 
guidance. If she has had other difficulties, in other situations, she may 
be asked to withdraw from the School of Nursing. 

4. When a student is not meeting the standards of the School, both she and 
her parents or guardian will be notified. Under circumstances beyond 
her control she will be permitted to bring her record to a satisfactory 
level of achievement. 

5. Students who do not complete satisfactory records with other affiliating 
agencies, such as Psychiatry, Contagious Diseases, and Public Health will 
not be recommended for State Board Examinations until evidence of 
passing these subjects is given in writing by those in charge of these 
particular courses. 

6. Students may be absent from class only upon approval of the instructor 
teaching that particular class. No student should absent herself from 
class at any time unless she has at least a "B" average. Instructors and 
not the Nursing School Office may grant special privileges for classes, 
and are, in turn, responsible for the content of course covered. 




CLASS ROOM INSTRUCTION 




RECREATION 




Florence Nightingale Cap 



For Further Information 


, Address: 


DIRECTOR OF 


NURSING 
AND 


EDUCATION 


NURSING SERVICES 


Redwood 


and Greene 


Streets 


Baltimore 1 




Maryland 



<A U 



Jl 










Ml"® * 


\ 


Kxv^ipr^^ 


LG^^r>a^;^^v^:^ 



U B L ^Slgf 



THE SCHOOL OF 

NURSING 






2 r. o 

CJ O fn 



nov 3 



CATALOG 

1954 






ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1951-1952 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Board of Regents and Maryland Board of Agriculture 3 

General Administrative Board 3 

Membership and Accreditation 4 

Calendar — School of Nursing .' 4 

Colleges, University of Maryland 4 

Faculty, Department of Education 5 

Assistant Instructors in Nursing 5 

Assistants in Administration 5 

Lectures 5-6 

Faculty Council 6 

Faculty Standing Committees 6 

Staff, Department of Nursing Service 7 

General Information 

Objectives 8 

Program of Study 8 

Facilities 

Education 8 

Library 8 

Resident 8 

Student Welfare 

Health Service 9 

Student Activities 9 

Scholastic Regulations 10 

Professional Course 11 

Fees and Expenses 12 

Requirements for Admission 12 

Curriculum 16-17 

Clinical Experience 17 

Combined Arts and Sciences and Nursing Course 11 

Fee and Expenses 16-17 

Admission Procedure 13 

Subject Requirements 14 

Curriculum 13 

Description of Courses 18, 19, 20 




T I O N 



The School of 

NURSING 

CATALOG 



^? 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1951 



1952 



I M P O g T A N T 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University of Maryland. The Universitj 

reserves the ritfht to change any provision or requirement at an\ time within 

the student's term of residence. The University further reseVCfl the right at 

any time, to a8k a student to withdraw when it considers such action to be 

in the best interests of the University. 




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ORGANIZATION 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Harry Clifton Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc, President and Executive Officer 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

AND 

MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE Term 

Expires 
William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman, 100 West University Parkway, 

Baltimore 1958 

Stanford Z. Rothschild, Secretary, 109 East Redwood Street, 

Baltimore 1952 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, 120 West Redwood Street, Balti- 
more 1953 

E. Paul Knotts, Denton, Caroline County 1954 

B. Herbert Brown, President, Baltimore Institute, Baltimore I960 

Harry H. Nuttle, Denton, Caroline County 1957 

Philip C. Turner, 2 East North Avenue, Baltimore 1959 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, 4101 Greenway, Baltimore 1956 

Charles P. McCormick, McCormick & Company, Baltimore 1957 

Arthur O. Lovejoy, 827 Park Avenue, Baltimore 1960 

Edward F. Holter, Middletown, Md 1959 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer 
of the Board. 

The State Law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the last Friday in each month, 
except during the months of July and August. 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE HOARD 





President Byrd, Chairman 






Miss Preinkert, Secretary 




Dean Bam ford 


Dean Foss 


Mr. Nystrom 


Dean Benjamin- 


Dean Fraley 


Col. Pitchford 


Mr. Benton 


Dean Gipe 


Miss Preinkkrt 


Dr. Bishop 


Dr. Gwin 


Dean Pyle 


Mr. Brigham 


Mr. Haszard 


I)-;. Ray 


Dr. Brueckner 


Dr. Hait 


Dean Robinson 


Mr. Buck 


Dean Howell 


1 >i \.\ Smith 


President Byrd 


Dr. Hupp 


Dean Stamp 


1 MAN CAIKNS 


Dr. HOFFSOMMEfi 


D kan Steinberg 


Mli. Cissell 


Miss Kki i \i: 


Dean Symons 


Dean Cotterman 


Director Kemp 


Dk. White 


Dean Eppley 


Dr. Long 


Dean Wylie 


Dr. Faber 


Mi;. Morrison 


Dr. Zucker 


Mr. Fogg 


I) KAN .M<H N 1 





EDI CATIONAL COUNCIL 

The President, Dean oi phi Faculty, Chairman, Deans op Co legi 
Chairmen <>k Academic Divisions, Heads of Educational Depart meni 
Director oi Admissions, Registr \k. 

3 



4 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

MEMBERSHIP AND ACCREDITATION 

1. The University of Maryland, which incorporates the School of Nursing 
with all of the other Schools of the University, is a member of the 
Association of American Colleges, and is accredited by the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

2. The School of Nursing is accredited by the Maryland State Board of 
Examiners of Nurses. The graduates of this school of nursing are 
eligible for registration either by examination or by approval of their 
scholastic or personal qualificiations by most of the other states. 

:\. The hospital, which is the teaching laboratory for the students of the 
School of Nursing, is approved by the American College of Surgeons, the 
American Medical Association-Residents and Interns, the American Hos- 
pital Association, and the Maryland Hospital Association. It is also a 
participant in the Blue Cross Plan. 

The University of Maryland has the following educational organizations: 



At Baltimore 

The School of Dentistry 
The School of Law 
The School of Medicine 

At College Park 

College of Agriculture 
College of Arts and Sciences 

College of Business and Public 
Administration 

College of Education 

Glenn L. Martin College of Engi- 
neering and Aeronautical 
Sciences 



The School of Nursing 
The School of Pharmacy 
The College of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies 

College of Home Economics 
College of Military Science 
College of Physical Education, 

Recreation and Health 
College of Special and Continua- 
tion Studies 
Summer School 
Graduate School 



Each school has its own Faculty Council, composed of the Dean and 
members of its faculty; each Faculty Council controls the internal affairs 
of the group it represents. 



PROPOSED CALENDAR FOR 1951-52 

September 6, 1951 Thursday Admission of fall class 

Dec. 22-Jan. 1, 1952 Friday-Monday Christmas Holidays 

September 3, 1952 Wednesday Admission of fall class 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSIXG 5 

FACULTY, DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION 

Florence Meda Gipe, R.N., M.S., Dean, School of Nursing 

Frances Orgain, R.N., M.A., Associate Dean, School of Nursing 

Margaret L, Hayes, R.N., M.S., Associate Director of Nursing Education 

Mary E. Grotefend, R.N., M.S., Instructor, Social Sciences 

Eva M. Bradley, R.N., M.Ed., Instructor, Biological Sciences 

Martha Baer, B.S., R.N., Clinical Coordinator in Public Health Nursing 

Eva Darley, R.N., B.S., Associate Director of Nursing Service 

Bessie Neild, R.N., Clinical Instructor, Obsterical Nursing 

Margaret Paulonis, R.N., B.S., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical 

Nursing 
Frances T. Reed, R.N., B.S., Clinical Instructor, Nursing of Children 
Lois Schildwachter, R.N., B.S., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical 

Nursing 
Elizabeth Singleton, R.N., B.S., Counselor, School of Nursing 
LaRue Schwallenberg, R.N., B.S., Supervisor of Clinical Instructors 
Helen W. Taylor, B.S., R.N., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical 

Nursing (Evening) 
Kathryn Williams, B.S., R.N., Clinical Instructor, Operating Room 

Technique 
Dorothy Wisener, R.N., Head Nurse, Health Office 
CECILIA M. Zitkus, A.B., R.N., Instructor, Nursing 

ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS IN NURSING 

Margaret Bagley, R.N., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Carol M. Hosfeld, R.N., Clinical Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 
Elva Lantz, R.N., Head Nurse, Premature Nursery 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Florence Alexander, R.N. Direc-or, School of Nursing Dormitory 

Jeanne Borges Secretary to Dean. School of Nursing 

Jeanne Fink Secretary 

Clara McGovern, R.N., B.S .....Supervisor, Records 

SlMONE Hurst Librarian 

LECTURERS* 

Charles Bagley, Jr., M.A., M.I) Professor of Neurological Surgery 

J. Edmund Bradley, M.D. Professor of 1'' dial rics and Head of Department 
Otto C. Brantigax, B.S., .M.D. Professor of Surgical Anatomy 

•The above named may not necessarilj rive the lectun illy, but in nil instances 

the instructors are recommended by them ( 



6 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Brice M. Dorsey, D.D.S Professor of Oral Surgery 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Frank W. Hatchel, M.D. Professor of Bacteriology 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D Professor of Gynecology 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., D.Sc Professor of Pharmacology 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D Professor of Medicine 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL.B Professor of Biological Chemistry 

Eduard Uhlenhuth, Ph.D Professor of Anatomy 

FACULTY COUNCIL 

Florence Meda Gipe, Dean, School of Nursing, Chairman 

Frances Orgain Mary E. Grotefend 

Eva F. Darley Margaret Hayes 

Advisory Committee to the School of Nursing 

Louis M. Krause, M.D., Chairman Representative of School of Medicine 

Flora M. Street, R.N. President, Nurses' Alumnae Association 

Gladys Wiggin, Ph.D. Professor of Education 

Mrs. Harry M. Robinson, Jr Representative of General Community 

George H. Buck, Ph.B Director, University Hospital 

Charles Sylvester, Sc.D. Assistant Superintendent, Vocational 

Education of Public Schools 

Robert Riley, M.D. Director, State Department of Health 

Mrs. Nathan Winslow Member, Woman's Board 

Boyd Wylie, M.D Dean, School of Medicine 

George Yeager, M.D Member, Surgical Staff 

Mrs. Clyde Clapp Representative of the General Community 

FACULTY STANDING COMMITTEES 

Florence Meda Gipe, R.N., M.S., Chairman Executive Committee 

Frances Orgain, R.N., M.A., Chairman Committee on Curriculum 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Chairman Committee on Admissions 

Eva F. Darley, R.N., B.S., Chairman Committee on Staff Education 

Harold F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Chairman Committee on Scholarship and 

Student Loans 
Eva Bradley, R.N., M.Ed., Chairman Committee on Records and Grading 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 7 

Margaret Hayes, R.N., M.S., Chairman Committee on Nursing 

W. H. Townshend, Jr., M.D Committee on Health Service 

LaRue Schwallenberg, R.N., B.S Committee on Clinical Instruction 

STAFF, DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE 

Eva N. Darley, R.N., B.S., Associate Director, Nursing Service 
Martha Hoffman, R.N., Assistant Director, Nursing Service — Evening. 
Nancy A. Cochran, R.N., Assistant Director, Nursing Service — Night 
Grace Ann Knowles, R.N., Assistant Director, Nursing Service — Night 
C Lorraine Neel, R.N., Supervisor, Nursing Service — Day 
Eleanor Slacum, R.N., B.S., Supervisor, Nursing Service — Evening* 
Mary Saulsbury, R.N., Supervisor, Nursing Service — Evening 
Phyllis Zimmerman, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Eleventh Floor, Private 
Virginia Stack, R.N., Supervisor, Tenth Floor, Private 
Margaret Riffle, R.N., Supervisor, Ninth Floor, Private 
Eleanor Vomesteck, R.N., Supervisor, Ninth Floor, Semi-Private 
Elizabeth Aitkenhead, R.N., Supervisor, Operating Rooms. 
Elizabeth Gooch, R.N., Supervisor, Central Supply Room. 
Flora Streett, R.N., Supervisor, Obstetrical Department. 
Mary Joneckis, R.N., Supervisor, Pediatric Department. 
Thelma Grove, R.N., Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, Fourth 

Floor 
Norma Shriver, R.N., Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Nursing, Third 

Floor 
Florence Wong, R.N., Supervisor, Special Clinics, Second Floor. 
Edith R. Lillard, B.S., R.N., Supervisor, Accident Room. 
Edith Miller, R.N., Supervisor, Out-Patient Department. 
Mildred C. Ridges, B.S., Instructor, Play Therapy 

* Absent on leave for study 



8 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

In attempting to anticipate the future professional needs of its gradu- 
ates and community, the University of Maryland School of Nursing care- 
fully selects young women to educate them to become professional nurses 
who will administer sympathetic and safe nursing care to the sick, and 
who will teach the principles of health and prevention of disease needed 
in an everchanging society. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY 

The present School of Nursing offers a program of study, instituted in 
1924, for two groups: to those who desire to complete their work in approxi- 
mately thirty-six months, and to those who desire the five year combined 
academic study and specialization in nursing. Those who complete the 
latter course successfully receive the degree of Bachelor of Science and a 
diploma in nursing. 

FACILITIES FOR EDUCATION 

The University of Maryland Hospital, a general hospital, has a capacity 
of 435 beds and 70 bassinets. The hospital units as well as the Out-Patient 
Department afford valuable opportunities for clinical experience which 
includes a study of family and community relations. There is under con- 
struction a psychiatric division and additional facilities, including medicine, 
surgery, pediatrics and obstetrics areas of the hospital. Clinical experi- 
ence in Psychiatric Nursing is provided at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hos- 
pital and the Springfield State Hospital. Public Health Nursing experience 
is available with the Baltimore City Health Department. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

The School of Nursing Library is an integral part of the University of 
Maryland library system, and is under the Director of Libraries of the 
University. Both scientific and recreational collections of books are pro- 
vided in the library which is conveniently located on the first floor of the 
Louisa Parsons Hall. 

The facilities of the Medical, Dental, Pharmaceutical, and Law School 
Libraries are available to the students in the School of Nursing. Additional 
facilities are provided at the main branch of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 
which comprises the public library system for the City of Baltimore; the 
Peabody Library, which contains a large collection of non-circulating rare 
books; the Maryland Historical Society Library; and the Library of Con- 
gress, which conducts an inter-loan service to the major libraries of the 
country. 

RESIDENT FACILITIES 

All students reside in Louisa Parsons Hall which is under the direction 
of a graduate registered nurse. The residence, in addition to student rooms, 
contains the library, the main reception room and living room with tele- 
vision set, radio, piano and other provisions for comfort and entertaining 
guests. In addition there is provided a kitchen and a laundry. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 9 

HEALTH SERVICE 

The School of Nursing maintains a Health Service for the students under 
the general direction of a Committee on Health Services. Periodic health 
examinations are provided for each student. 

Vaccination against Typhoid Fever and Smallpox are required of all 
students before admission to the School of Nursing. Medical care is pro- 
vided for student nurses. Dental care is not provided in the Health Service, 
but care is furnished by the Dental Clinic, second floor of University Hospital. 

Time which is lost due to illness in excess of fourteen days during the 
three-year period, is made up at the discretion of the faculty. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The student nurses have a student government organization the function 
of which is to assist in the government of the school in cooperation with the 
faculty, and to plan recreational activities. 

Upon her admission each new student is met by one of the older students 
who acts as her big sister. This is a helpful relationship in which the older 
student assists the new one with advice and suggestions based on her own 
experience in the School of Nursing. 

Recreation facilities are utilized to the utmost. The "Y" pool is used 
for Tuesday nights. Here the students enjoy the relaxation of a cool swim 
or the hilarity of sport in the water after a busy day. During the winter 
season, basketball is played in the "gym" of the church next door. Parties 
for tennis and other sports are made up from time to time and held in the 
parks or other surrounding facilities. A dance or a big party is held about 
once a month. The nurses' dining room is used for informal dances and a 
downtown hotel ballroom for formal ones. The adjacent Schools of Medicine, 
Pharmacy, Dentistry, and Law cooperate in these dances and add to the 
general pleasure. Recently a Glee Club has been organized. 

Baltimore City is a center of culture and education. It offers much stimu- 
lation to the visitor and the inhabitant in the way of drama, music, art, 
lectures, libraries, and the like. The Student Government Association plans 
trips to various functions and points of interest. 

In cooperation with the Director and the faculty, the students make rules 
and administer them in regard to discipline, house regulations, and con- 
ventions. This not only makes for a better spirit of democracy, but prepares 
the student for coming leadership and participation in community life. 

All of these activities help the students to realize their profession. Inter- 
est, relaxation, responsibility, and cooperation are thus fostered and form 
a vital part of the student's life. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOLASTIC REGULATIONS 

Grading 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the following 
symbols: A, B, C, and D, passing; F, failure; I, incomplete. 

Mark A denotes superior scholarship; mark B, good scholarship; mark C, 
fair scholarship; and mark D, passing scholarship. 

In computing scholastic averages, values in "points" are assigned to the 
following grades: A=4; B=3; C=2; D=l; F=0. 

A scholastic average of C is required for advancement and graduation. 
Students who have not obtained passing marks will be required to take a 
re-examination in the subject failed — or, if indicated, repeat the course. 
If a student does not pass a specific clinical service, she is given special 
guidance. 

Attendance 

Students may be absent from class only upon approval of the instructors 
responsible for the course. No student should absent herself from class at 
any time unless she has at least a "B" average. 

Report 

Reports of the achievement of the student is given to the student and a 
copy sent to her parents or guardian. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



11 



COMBINED ARTS AND SCIENCES AND NURSING COURSE 

The first two years of this curriculum comprising 
a minimum of 60 semester hours exclusive of hygiene 
and physical activities, are taken in the College of 
Arts and Sciences at College Park and the professional 
training is taken in the School of Nursing of the 
University of Maryland in Baltimore. 

In addition to the Diploma in Nursing, the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing may, upon the recom- 
mendation of the Director of the School of Nursing, be 
granted at the end of the professional training. 

A student may enter this combined curriculum with 
advanced standing but the second year, consisting of a 
minimum of 30 credits, exclusive of physical training, 
must be completed in College Park. To qualify for the 
combined degree the student must complete the re- 
quired work at College Park before beginning the pro- 
fessional training in Baltimore. 

In order to receive the Bachelor of Science degree the 
student must fulfill the grade requirements of the 
university. 

A Graduate Nurse of the combined program is pic- 
tured at the upper left. 




BASIC PROFESSIONAL COURSE (Three- Year Course) 

The curriculum covers a period of three years after 
which time a diploma in Nursing is awarded by the 
University of Maryland upon recommendation by the 
School of Nursing. The pre-clinical period consists 
of the first six months and is devoted primarily to 
the study of the sciences basic to nursing, the principles 
and practice of nursing, and the supervised practice of 
skills learned in the classvoom. The students who meet 
the requirements both in scholastical and clinical work, 
will be accepted into the School of Nursing as clinical 
students. 

Following the preclinical period students are assigned 
within a division for five hours of clinical practice and 
two fifty minute periods of class per day, including 
meal hours. One free day a week is given, and careful 
planning makes it possible to give this day off without 
class interference. At the present time plans are being 
made to institute a forty hour week. 

The Executive Committee of the Faculty may, at anj 
time, terminate a student's course if she fails to meet 
the standards of the School of Nursing or the Univer 

sity of Maryland. 

A three-year Graduate Nurse is pictured at the lower right. 




12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

FEES AND ESTIMATED EXPENSES FOR THREE YEARS 
IN THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Fixed Fee $50.00* 

Student Activity Fee 5.00 

Textbooks (approximately) 60.00 

Uniforms 70.00 

Nursing tests, National League of Nursing Ed 5.00 

Graduation Fee 15.00 

These costs are approximate and may fluctuate because of changing living 
costs. Throughout the course students are provided maintenance which in- 
cludes room, board, and laundry of uniforms. Students' uniforms will be 
obtained after admission to the School of Nursing. Shoes, stockings and 
other personal items are furnished by the students. Expenses such as meals, 
carfare, and incidentals which the student incurs during periods of affiliation 
or field trips are borne by the student. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION— SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Evidence of personal stability for nursing in relation to physical health, 
emotional stability, and general qualifications of personality, cultural de- 
velopment and maturity must be submitted, and a personal interview with 
the Director of the School of Nursing or School Counselor. If the student 
is too far distant from the University the interview is given by a member 
of the National League of Nursing Education in that area. 

Graduates of accredited secondary schools will be admitted by certificate 
upon the recommendation of the principal. In selecting students, moir 
emphasis will be placed upon good marks and other indications of probable 
success in nursing rather than upon a fixed pattern of subject matter. 

English 4 units required for all divisions of the University. 

Mathematics 2 units — One unit each of algebra and plane 

geometry is desirable. 

History 1 unit, 2 units are desirable. 

Foreign language 1 unit, 2 units are desirable (Latin suggested). 

Science 

Biology 1 unit 

Chemistry 1 unit 

Physics (suggested) 1 unit 

Psychometric tests, which are given by the National League of Nursing 
Education, to determine suitability for nursing are taken by prospective 
students. Notice and instructions will be sent to the applicant upon review 
of the credentials by the Committee on Admission. A fee of approximately 
$5.00 is to be paid by the applicant for these tests. The fee is paid directly 
to the League. 

The school is open to all, regardless of race, color, or creed. Applicants 
should be 17-35 years of age. 

All inquiries concerning admission to the School of Nursing should be 
addressed to the Director of the School of Nursing who will furnish you, 
upon request, the necessary forms which must be filed with the University 
of Maryland. 

* Subject to change. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSLXG 13 

ARTS AND SCIENCES AND NURSING CURRICULUM 

t — Semester — « 
Freshman Year I 11 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government 

Chem. 11, 13 — General Chemistry 

L. S. 1, 2 — Library Methods 

Modern Language 

Speech 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 

Hea. 2, 4 — Hygiene (Women) 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 — Composition and World Literature 3 3 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 3 3 

Zool. 1 — General Zoology 4 .... 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology .... 4 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 3 .... 

Econ. 37 — Fundamentals of Economics .... 3 

Modern Language 3 3 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17 17 

ADMISSION PROCEDURE— COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Undergraduate Schools: Applicants for admission to the College of Arts 
and Sciences for the Nursing Course should communicate with the Director 
of Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

Applicants from Secondary Schools: Procure an application blank from 
the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested and ask your 
principal or headmaster to enter your secondary school record and mail 
the blank to the Director of Admissions. 

To avoid delay, it is suggested that applications be filed not later than 
July 1 for the fall semester. Applications from students completing their 
last semester of secondary work are encouraged. If acceptable, supplemen- 
tary records will be sent upon graduation. 

Applicants from Other Colleges and Universities: Secure an application 
blank from the Director of Admissions. Fill in personal data requested 
and ask secondary school principal or headmaster to enter secondary school 
record and send the blank to the Director of Admissions. Request the 
Registrar of the College or University attended to send a transcript to 
the Director of Admissions, College Park, Maryland. 

Time of Admission: New students should plan to enter the University at 

the beginning of the fall semester. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Two months credit is allowed by the School of Nursing for every thirty 
semester hours in an accredited college or university, depending upon the 
scholastic rating of the individual and her ability to adjust in a hospital 
environment. 

ADMISSION OF FRESHMEN 

Admission by Certificate: Graduates of accredited secondary schools of 
Maryland or the District of Columbia will be admitted by certificate upon 
the recommendation of the principal. Graduates of out-of-state schools 
should have attained college certification marks, such marks to be not less 
than one letter or ten points higher than the passing mark. 

Veterans and other mature persons who are not high school graduates 
may qualify for admission to the freshman class by passing prescribed tests 
comparable to those employed by state authorities to establish high school 
equivalence. 

SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS 

In selecting students more emphasis will be placed upon good marks and 
other indications of probable success in college rather than upon a fixed 
pattern of subject matter. 

English 4 units required for all divisions of the University. 

Mathematics 

For all colleges one unit each of Algebra and 
Plane Geometry is desirable. Deviation may be 
allowed for certain curricula. 

Social Science; Natural 

and Biological Science. .1 unit from each group is required; two are 
desirable. 

foreign Languages Those who will follow the professions, enter 

journalism, foreign trade or service, study the 
humanities or do research, should have a good 
foundation in one or more, but none is required. 

Slectives Fine Arts, trade and vocational subjects are 

acceptable. 

Transfer Students: Only students in good standing as to scholarship 
and conduct are eligible to transfer. Advanced standing is assigned to trans- 
fer students from accredited institutions under the following conditions: 

1. A minimum of one year of resident work of not less than 30 semesters 
hours is necessary for a degree. 

2. The University reserves the right at any time to revoke advanced 
standing if the transfer student's progress is unsatisfactory. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSIXG 15 

RESIDENTS, NON-RESIDENTS 

For Matriculants at College Park 

First Second 

Fees for Undergraduate Students Semester Semester Total 

Fixed Charges $82.00 $83.00 $165.00 

Athletic Fee 15.00 .... 15.00 

Special Fee 15.00 15.00 

Student Activities Fee 10.00 10.00 

Infirmary Fee 5.00 5.00 

Post Office Fee 2.00 2.00 

Advisory and Testing Fee 1.00 1.00 

Total for Maryland Residents $130.00 $83.00 $213.00 

Residents of the District of Columbia, 
Other States and Countries 

Tuition Fee for Non-Resident Students S75.00 $75.00 $150.00 

Total for Non-Resident Students $205.00 :|: $158.00 $363.00 

Board and Lodging 

Board $170.00 $170.00 $340.00 

Dormitory Room $54-$63 $54-$63 $108-$126 

Total for Room and Board $224-$233 $224-$233 $448-$466 

The Fixed Charges Fee is not a charge for tuition. It is a charge to help defray the 
cost of operating the University's physical plant and other various services which ordinarily 
would not be included as a cost of teaching personnel and teaching supplies. Included in 
these costs would be janitorial services, cost of heat, electricity, water, etc., administrative 
and clerical cost, maintenance of buildings and grounds, maintenance of libraries, cost uf 
University publications, Alumni Office, the University Business and Financial Offices, the 
Registrar's Office, the Admissions Office, and any other such services as are supplemental 
and necessary to teaching and research are supported by this fee. 

The Athletic Fee is charged for the support of the Department of Intercollegiate 
Athletics. All students are eligible and encouraged to participate in all of the activities of 
this department and to attend all contests in which they do not participate. 

The Special Fee is used for improving physical training facilities and for other Uni- 
versity projects that have direct relationship to student welfare, especially athletics ami 
recreation. This fee now is allocated to a fund for construction of a stadium, a new 
combination coliseum and auditorium, and to constructing a new swimming pool, and a 
student union. 

The Students Activities Fee is a mandatory fee included at the request of the Student 
Government Association. It covers subscriptions to the Uiamondback, student paper, of 
$1.50 per year, the Old Line, literary magazine, of $.75 per year, and the yearbook ; class 
dues, including financial support for the musical and dramatic clubs. 

The Infirmary Fee does not include expensive drugs or special diagnostic procedures. 
Expensive drugs will be charged at cost and special diagnostic procedures, such as X-Kay. 
Electrocardiographs, Basal Metabolic Rates, etc., will be charged at the lowest cost prevailing 
in the vicinity. 

* Students entering the University for the second semester will pay the following addi- 
tional fees: Athletic. $7.50; Special, $5.00; Student Activities, $8.00; Infirmary. $2.50; 
Post Office Fees. $1.00; Advisory and Testing Fee, $ &0 



16 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



LABORATORY AND OTHER FEES FOR ARTS AND SCIENCES 

STUDENTS 

Special Fees 

Matriculation Fee for undergraduates, payable at first registration 

in the University $10.00 

Diploma Fee for Bachelor's degree, payable just prior to graduation 10.00 

Cap and Gown Fee, Bachelor's degree 2.50 



Laboratory Fees Per Semester Course 

Bacteriology $10.00 

Botany 5.00 

Chemistry 10.0C 



Speech $1.00 

Zoology 8.00 



PROFESSIONAL NURSING CURRICULUM 



Biological and Physical Sciences 

Anatomy and Physiology 

Chemistry 

Microbiology 



Total 
Class* Laboratory Hours 



95 
40 
15 



15 
20 
30 



105 
GO 
45 



Social Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Social Foundations of Nursing. 
Introduction to Social Work 



45 
45 
30 

45 



Medical Sciences 

Elementary Materia Medica 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 



35 



10 



20 
45 



Nursing and Allied Arts 

Introduction to Nursing 

Nutrition, Foods and Cookery... 
Medical and Surgical Nursing. 

Circulatory System 

Central Nervous System 

Aseptic Technic 

Dermatology and Venereal 

Diet Therapy 

Endocrine System 

Gastro-Intestinal System 



75 
15 

30 
20 
15 
25 
30 
15 



150 
30 



250 

45 

300 



• Lectures by Instructors, Student projects. Seminar papers, Student reports. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



17 



Reproductive System 

Kidney 

Ophthalmology 

Orthopedics 

Respiratory System 

Ward Clinics and Conferences 

Obstetrics and Obstetrical Nursing 

Pediatrics and Pediatric Nursing 

Psychiatry and Psychiatric Nursing 

Public Health and Public Health Nursing. 



Class* 
20 
10 
9 
20 
30 
50 



Laboratory 



Total 
Hours 



GO 
90 
92 
30 



CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 

Pre-Clinical Period 24 weeks 

Clinical Period 

Medical Nursing 24-26 

Surgical Nursing 32-34 



Operative Aseptic Technique 8 

Diet School 4 

Pediatric Nursing 13 

Obstetric Nursing 13 

Pyschiatric Nursing 13 

—Public Health Nursing 8-9 

Vacation 12 

Total 151-156 



weeks 
weeks 
weeks 
weeks 
weeks 
weeks 
weeks 
weeks 
weeks 
weeks 



* Lectures by Instructors, Student projects, Seminar papers. Student reports 
** Required of degree Btudents only. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 105 Hours 

Department of Anatomy, with Nurse Coordinator 

The anatomy of the human body is taught by lectures, demonstrations, 
and exercises on anatomical material. Nearly every organ, organ system 
and region of the body is demonstrated in actual dissections of the human 
cadaver. A rich and interesting collection of skeletal material is available; 
the muscles are shown in a dissected "muscle man"; the circulatory system 
is demonstrated in a dissection of a cadaver in which colored materials have 
been injected into the blood vessels. In addition, many beautiful anatomical 
preparations made by the curator of the department are shown and studied; 
fresh organs of cattle, sheep and pigs, and occasionally of man. Fresh beef 
hearts are dissected by the students. 

Physiology is taught in combination with anatomy, mostly by lectures 
supplemented by drawings, charts, models and some experiments. 

CHEMISTRY. 60 Hours 

Department of Chemistry, with Nurse Coordinator 

The fundamental principles of chemistry which are available both in the 
practice of nursing and in the comprehension of other sciences are studied. 
The content includes selected topics in general, organic and biological 
chemistry. Whenever possible, practical applications and laboratory ex- 
periments are integrated with the subject matter. 

MICROBIOLOGY. 45 Hours 

Department of Bacteriology, with Nurse Coordinator 

The lectures and laboratory periods are devoted to the study of the 
essential relation of Microbiology to diagnosis, treatment, prevention of 
disease, and nursing care. Emphasis is placed upon the important patho- 
genic species. This includes: their mode of entrance into the body, their 
portal of exit, their method of transfer, the tests most helpful in determin- 
ing their presence, methods of immunization, and a good working knowledge 
of the various methods used in their destruction. 

NUTRITION, FOODS AND COOKERY. 45 Hours 

Teaching Dietitian. 

The modern concept regarding the constituents of an adequate diet, the 
chemistry and mechanics of digestion, absorption, and metabolism of foods, 
food requirements of various ages and food economics in human nutrition 
are considered. The laboratory work is practical experience, under super- 
vision, in the preparation and service of typical diets. 



THE SCHOOL OF XURSIXG 19 

PSYCHOLOGY. Department of Psychology. 45 Hours 

This course is designed to give the student some of the basic concepts of 
dynamic psychology. How people are related to each other so that the 
student will be helped with her own adjustments and with her understanding 
of other people are also considered. An attempt is made to minimize 
didactic lectures and to stress informal discussions of day-to-day relation- 
ships. 

SOCIOLOGY. 45 Hours 

Nurse instructor, under the supervision of Sociology Department, 
College Park. 

Attention is given to an analysis of the American social structure with 
special emphasis on the relation to nurses and nursing, and also includes 
the family; metropolitan, small town, and rural communities; population 
distribution, composition and change; and general social organization. 

PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS 45 Hours 

Department of Pharmacology, with Nurse Coordinator 

Those phases of pharmacology necessary for the intelligent use of drugs 
in the treatment of disease are treated in this course. Methods of adminis- 
tration of drugs, their actions and therapeutic effects, and the symptoms 
and treatment of poisoning constitute the course of lectures. 

INTRODUCTION TO NURSING. 

Associate Director of Nursing Education and Instructors. 

An introduction to the total nursing care of patients and the scientific 
principles involved. The nurse studies the well person and how to main- 
tain health, the ambulatory patient and his needs, the patient confined to a 
bed in the hospital or in the home. In all cases, the family and the com- 
munity from which the patient came and in which he is functioning while 
receiving care are evaluated. Each student is encouraged to spend much 
time and effort on understanding specific patient and in planning how to 
meet and help them meet their needs. Procedures necessary for this care 
are taught in the classroom or with the patient when it seems advisable. 
Time and opportunity for experiencing patient care are arranged at regular 
intervals. 

MEDICAL AND SURGICAL NURSING. 

300 Hours and Clinical Instruction 
Department of Medicine and Surgery and Associates. 

This course is a survey of the treating of disease by medical or surgical 
methods and of considering the individual in health and in sickness. Clinical 
manifestations of disease are emphasized, as well as their relation to social, 
economic and psychological control in the hospital and in the community. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Observation and demonstration at the bedside are arranged, and experience 
includes related teaching in diet therapy, pharmacology, nursing and public 
health nursing. 

OBSTETRICAL NURSING. 60 Hours and Clinical Instruction 

Clinical Instructor, Department of Obstetrics, and associates. 

The management and treatment of the normal and the abnormal phases of 
pregnancy, parturition and puerperium; and the treatment of the normal 
and abnormal conditions of the newborn infant are studied. Clinical con- 
ferences are conducted in which the history, diagnosis, treatment and 
nursing care of the mother and her infant are presented and discussed. 
Consideration is also given to the socio-economic relationship to obstetrical 
nursing. 

NURSING OF CHILDREN. 90 Hours and Clinical Instruction 

Clinical Instructor, Department of Pediatrics, and associates. 

The normal child, his behavior and the representative diseases of child- 
hood in relation to the socio-economic factors are considered. Nursing 
practice, nursing care studies, conferences, and clinics are supplementary 
features of the nursing of children. 

PUBLIC HEALTH. 

Specialists in Public Health 

Lectures by specialist in public health, including administration, sanita- 
tion, epidemiology, and related areas. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. 

Associate Dean, School of Nursing 

Principles and practices of public health nursing in a generalized family 
health program, including history of public health and public health nursing 
as related to present practices. 

SOCIAL FOUNDATIONS OF NURSING. 30 Hours. 

Associate Director of Nursing Education and Associates. 

The aim of this course is to develop a knowledge and an appreciation of 
the role of the nurse, both personal and professional, in the community, so 
that she may more easily adapt herself to it, and become a useful citizen 
through active participation in plans and programs for both health and 
community welfare. 



For Further Information Address: 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

University of Maryland 

Redwood and Greene Streets 

Baltimore 1 Maryland 






r» 



THE SCHOOL OF 

NURSING 

CATALOG 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1952 - 1953 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 
Calendar 

University of Maryland 2 

Summer Session School of Nursing 2 

Board of Regents and Maryland Board of Agriculture 3 

Colleges, University of Maryland 3 

General Administrative Board 4 

Faculty — School of Nursing 4 

Administrative Officers — School of Nursing 5 

Assistants in Administration 5 

Lecturers 5 

Faculty Committees 7 

Administrative Staff — University Hospital _ 8 

Staff, Department of Nursing Service, University Hospital 9 

General Information 

History, School of Nursing _ 10 

Membership and Accreditation 10 

Facilities for Instruction 11 

Library Facilities 11 

Requirements for Admission 12 

Fees and Expenses 

Basic Professional Nursing Program (Four-year) 15 

Basic Nursing Program (Three-year).... 16 

Scholastic Regulations 

Grading _ 17 

Transfer Students 18 

Conferring of Degrees 18 

Living Arrangements 19 

College Park Campus 19 

Baltimore Campus 20 

Student Health and Welfare 20 

Scholarships and Loans 21 

Counselling Program - 22 

Basic Professional Nursing Program 26 

Basic Nursing Program 40 




T I O N 



The School of 

NURSING 

CATALOG 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1952 - 1953 

IMPORTANT 



The provisions of this publication arc not to be regarded a s an Irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University of Maryland. The I Diversity 
reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within 
the student's term of residence. The University further reserves t lie right at 
any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it considers such action to be 
in the best interests of the University* 

LIBRARY 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



195 2 


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1 








...... 



EASTER SUNDAYS : April 13, 1952; April 5. 1953; April 18. 1954. 

CALENDAR — 1952-1953 

COLLEGE PARK 



1952 

September 16-19 
September 22 
October 16 
November 26 
December 1 
December 20 

1953 

January 5 
January 20 
January 20 
January 21-28 



February 3-6 
February 9 
February 23 
March 25 
April 2 
April 7 
May 14 
May 30 

May 28-June 6 
May 31 
June 6 



First Semester 



Tuesday-Friday 

Monday 

Thursday 

Wednesday after last class 

Monday, 8 a. m. 

Saturday after last class 



Monday, 8 a. m. 
Tuesday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday-Wednesday, inc. 



Registration, first semester 
Instruction begins 
Convocation, faculty and students 
Thanksgiving recess begins 
Thanksgiving recess ends 
Christmas recess begins 



Christmas recess ends 
Inauguration Day, holiday 
Charter Day 
First semester examinations 



Second Semester 



Tuesday-Friday 

Monday 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Thursday after last class 

Tuesday, 8 a. m. 

Thursday 

Saturday 

Thursday-Friday, inc. 

Sunday 

Saturday 



Registration, second semester 

Instruction begins 

Washington's Birthday holiday 

Maryland Day 

Easter recess begins 

Easter recess ends 

Military Day 

Memorial Day, holiday 

Second semester examinations 

Baccalaureate exercises 

Commencement exercises 



Summer Session, 1953 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



June 9 
July 19 



Monday 
Saturday 



Instruction begins 
Instruction ends 



ORGANIZATION 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Harry Clifton Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc, President and Executive Officer 

BOARD OF REGENTS Term 

Expires 
William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman, 100 West University Parkway, 

Baltimore 1958 

Dr. Louis L. Kaplan, Secretary, 1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 1961 

J. Milton Patterson, Treasurer, 120 West Redwood Street, Balti- 
more 1953 

E. Paul Knotts, Denton, Caroline County 1957 

B. Herbert Brown, President, Baltimore Institute, 12 W. Madison 

St., Baltimore 1960 

Harry H. Nuttle, Denton, Caroline County 1957 

Philip C. Turner, 2 East North Avenue, Baltimore 1959 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, 4101 Greenway, Baltimore 1956 

Charles P. McCormick, McCormick & Company, Baltimore 1957 

Arthur O. Lovejoy, 827 Park Avenue, Baltimore 1960 

Edward F. Holter, Middletown, Md 1959 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for 
terms of nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer 
of the Board. 

The State Law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of 
Maryland shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the third Friday in each month, 
except during the months of July and August. 

Each school has its own Advisory Board, Council, or Committee composed 
of the Dean and members of its faculty, which controls the internal affairs 
of the group it represents. 

The University has the following educational organizations: 

At Baltimore 

The School of Dentistry The School of Pharmacy 

The School of Law The College of Education 

The School of Medicine (Baltimore Division) 

The School of Nursing 

At College Park 

College of Agriculture College of Home Economics 

College of Arts and Sciences Graduate School 

College of Business and Public College of Military Science 

Administration College of Physical Education, 
College of Education Recreation and Health 

Glenn L. Martin College of Engi- College of Special and Contimia- 
neering and Aeronautical ^ lon Studies 

Sciences Summer School 

3 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Chairman 



Dean Bamford 
Mr. Benton 
Dr. Bishop 
Mr. Brigham 
Dr. Brueckner 
Mr. Buck 
President Byrd 
Dean Cairns 
Mr. Cissell 
Dean Cotterman 
Dean Devilbiss 
Dean Eppley 
Dr. Faber 
Mr. Fogg 



Miss Preinkert, Secretary 

Dean Foss 
Dean Fraley 
Dean Gipe 
Dr. Gwin 
Mr. Haszard 
Dr. Haut 
Dean Howell 
Dr. Huff 
Dr. Hoffsommer 
Miss Kellar 
Director Kemp 
Dr. Long 
Mr. Morrison 
Dean Mount 



Dr. Nystrom 
Col. Pitchford 
Miss Preinkert 
Dean Pyle 
Dr. Ray 

Dean Robinson 
Dean Smith 
Dean Stamp 
Dean Steinberg 
Dean Symons 
Dr. White 
Dean Wylie 
Dr. Zucker 



EDUCATIONAL COUNCIL 

The President, Dean of the Faculty, Chairman, Deans of Colleges, 
Chairmen of Academic Divisions, Heads of Educational Departments, 
Director of Admissions, Registrar. 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

H. C. Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc President of the University 

Florence M. Gipe, R.N., M.S., Ed.D Dean 

Virginia C. Conley, R.N., B.S., M.A Assistant to the Dean 

(Baltimore Division) 

Margaret Hayes, R.N., M.A. Assistant to the Dean 

(College Park Campus) 

Alma H. Preinkert, M.A Registrar 

Edgar F. Long, Ph.D Director of Admissions 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS 
Florence Alexander, R.N Assistant in Administration- 
Supervisor of Nurses' Residence 

Margaret S. Bagley, R.N Supervisor of Nursing Records 

Ann M. Hall, R.N Secretary to the Dean 

Ethel M. Troy, R.N Senior Assistant in Administration — afternoon 

Dorothy Wisener, R.N Assistant in Student Health 

SCHOOL OF NURSING FACULTY 

Florence M. Gipe, R.N., Ed.D., Dean 

Martha Baer, 1 R.N., B.S Instructor, Community Nursing 

Eva Bradley, R.N., M.Ed Instructor, Applied Physical and 

Biological Sciences 



i Certified Public Health Nurse 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 5 

Virginia Conley, R.N., B.S., M.A. Instructor, Fundamentals of Nursing 

Elizabeth Cochran, B.S Assistant Professor of Nutrition 

Eva Darley, R.N., B.S Associate Professor, Nursing Service 

Florence M. Gipe, R.N., M.S., Ed.D Professor of Nursing, and Dean 

Mary Grotefend, 1 A.B., R.N., M.S Assistant Professor in Nursing 

(Social Sciences) 

Margaret Hayes, R.N., M.S Assistant Professor and Advisor of 

Student Affairs (College Park Area) 

Carol Hosfeld, R.N., B.S Assistant Instructor, Clinical Division 

Marguerite Hydorn, R.N., B.S Instructor, Maternal and Child Health 

Pauline Kummer, R.N., M.N., M.A Professor of Pediatric Nursing 

Margaret Paulonis, R.N., B.S Instructor, Clinical Nursing 

Frances Reed, R.N., M.Ed Instructor in Nursing of Children 

LaRue Schwallenberg, R.N., B.S Instructor of Medical and 

Surgical Nursing 

Elizabeth Singleton, R.N., B.S Instructor and Advisor of Student 

Affairs (Baltimore Area) 

Eleanor Slacum, R.N., B.S. Associate Professor and Associate Director 

of Nursing Service Psychiatry 

Kathryn Williams, B.S., R.N Associate Professor, Operating 

Room Nursing 

Kathryn A. Wohlson, 1 A.B., R.N., M.N., M.S Associate Professor, 

Community Nursing 

Ellen Louise White, B.S., R.N. Assistant Instructor, 

Fundamentals of Nursing 

Ceceilia Zitkus, R.N., A.B Instructor, Fundamentals of Nursing 

, 2 Professor of Psychatric Nursing 

PART-TIME INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 

• James C. Arnold, Jr., M.D Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery 

Charles Bagley, Jr., M.A., M.D Professor of Neurological Surgery 

William L. Bailey, M.A Visiting Professor of Sociology 

Charles Barnett, A.B., M.D Associate in Pathology 

J. Edmund Bradley, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Head of 

Department 

Otto C. Brantigan, B.S., M.D Professor of Surgical Anatomy 

Unn Virginia Brown, A.B Instructor in Biological Chemistry 

T. Nelson Carey, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Beverly C. Compton, A.B., M.D Assistant Professor of Gynecology 

Edward F. Cotter, M.D Assistant Professor of Medicine, 

Associate in Neurology 

Raymond Cunningham, A.B., M.D Instructor in Anatomy and 

Proctology, Assistant in Surgery 



- To be appointed 



6 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

William K. Diehl, M.D Assistant Professor of Gynecology 

Everett S. Diggs, B.S., M.D. Assistant Professor of Gynecology 

1 Brice Dorsey, D.D.S Professor of Oral Surgery, School of Dentistry 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D. Professor of Obstetrics, and Head of the 

Department 

Charles Reid Edwards, M.D Professor of Surgery and Acting Head of 

the Department 

Jacob E. Finesinger, M.D Professor of Psychiatry, and Head of the 

Department 

William Fitzpatrick, B.S., M.D... Assistant in Psychiatry 

Louise C. Gareis, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Angelina Guido, A.B., M.D Resident in Ophthalmology 

Frank Hachtel, M.D Professor of Bacteriology, and Head of the 

Department 

William Helfrich, A.B., M.D. Instructor in Medicine 

J. Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D Professor of Gynecology and Head 

of the Department 

\ Meyer W. Jacobsen, M.D Associate in Medicine 

Theodore Kardash, B.S., M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

F. Edwin Knowles, Jr., M.D Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology 

and Head of the Department 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., D.Sc Professor of Pharmacology and 

Head of the Department 

\ Frederick Kyper, M.D., D.Sc Associate Professor in Otolaryngology 
Rebekah R. Liebman, Ed.D Instructor in English 

\ Edna McNaughton, M.A Professor of Nursery School and 

Kindergarten Education 

Kenneth Mansfield, M.D : Assistant in Obstetrics 

Wilbur C. Martin, B.S., M.D Assistant Professor in Obstetrics 

Ruth Musser, M.S Instructor in Pharmacology 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, D.S., M.D Professor of Medicine and Head of the 

Department 

^ Harry M. Robinson, Jr., B.S., M.D Assistant Professor of Dermatology, 

Associate in Medicine 

v Milton Sacks, M.D Associate Professor of Medicine, Head of Clinical 

Pathology, Associate in Pathology 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL. D. Professor of Biological Chemistry and 

Head of the Department 

J. King Seegar, Jr., A.B., M.D Assistant Professor in Obstetrics 

Gladys Sellew, R.N., Ph.D Visiting Professor of Sociology 

X William B. Settle, M.D Assistant Professor of Surgical Anatomy 

and Associate in Surgery 
E. Roderick Shipley, A.B., M.D. Instructor in Surgery 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 7 

▼ Frank J. Slama, B.S., M.S., Ph.D Head of Botany and Pharmacognosy 

Departments 

Edwin W. Stewart, Jr., M.D Associate in Surgery 

Edward Uhlenhuth, Ph.D Professor of Anatomy, Head of the 

Department 

Allan F. Voshell, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopedic Surgery, 

Chief of Orthopedic Surgery Clinic 

* Raymond B. Vanderlinde, A.B., Ph.D Assistant Professor of 

Biological Chemistry 
John H. Young, M.D Instructor in Urology 

FACULTY AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

Executive Committee 

Dr. Florence M. Gipe, Chairman Miss Virginia C. Conley 

Mrs. Kathryn A. Wohlsen Miss Margaret L. Hayes 

Miss Eva Bradley Mrs. Eva F. Darley 

Inter-Relations Committee 

School-Hospital-Medical Staff 

Mr. George Buck, Chairman Dr. Louis Douglass 

Dr. Florence M. Gipe Mrs. Eva F. Darley 

Dr. Maurice Pincoffs Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger 

Dr. Reid Edwards President Student Council 
Dr. Edmund Bradley 

Admissions, Guidance, and Adjustment 

Dr. Edgar Long, Chairman Mrs. Mary Grotefend 

Dr. Florence M. Gipe Mrs. Elizabeth Singleton 

Miss Eva Bradley Mrs. Ellen Chrissinger 

Miss Virginia Conley Mrs. Anna Hall, Secretary 

Miss Margaret Hayes Dr. Mary K. Carl 

Educational Standards, Policies, and Coordination 

Dr. Florence M. Gipe, Chairman Miss Virginia Conley 
Mrs. Kathryn Wohlsen Miss Margaret Hayes 
Miss Elizabeth Cochran Miss Pauline Kummer 
Miss Eva Bradley * 

Coordination of Clinical Nursing 

Mrs. Kathryn Wohlsen, Chairman Miss Marguerite Hydorn 

Miss Martha Baer Miss Frances Reed 

Miss Virginia Conley Miss LaRue Schwallenberg 

Miss Elizabeth Cochran Miss Eleanor Slacum 

Mrs. Eva Darley Miss Cecilia Zitkus 



* Professor — Psychiatric Nursing — to be aDDointed 



8 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Libraries 

Mrs. Ida Robinson. Chairman Miss Elizabeth Cochran 

Dr. Florence M. Gipe Miss Eva Bradley 

Miss Margaret Paulonis President, Student Government 

Miss Marguerite Hydorn Association 

Publications and Catalogues 

Miss Virginia C. Conley, Chairman Miss Margaret Paulonis 

Miss Margaret Hayes Mrs. Elizabeth Singleton 

Miss Carol Hosfeld Miss Marguerite Hydorn 

Public Functions and Public Relations 

Dr. Florence M. Gipe, Chairman Miss Margaret Hayes 

Miss Eva Bradley Mrs. Elizabeth Singleton 

Miss Virginia Conley Student Nurse Representative 

Religious Life 

Mrs. Elizabeth Singleton, Chairman Miss Margaret Paulonis 

Mrs. Florence Alexander President of Student Council 

Miss Carol Hosfeld 

Scholarship and Student Aid 

Dr. Harold Cotterman, Chairman Miss Flora Street 

Dr. Florence M. Gipe Dr. George Yeager 

Miss Virginia C. Conley Mr. George Buck 

Miss Margaret Hayes Mrs. Maurice Robinson 

Mrs. Elizabeth Singleton Mrs. Nathan Winslow 

Student Life 

Miss Margaret Paulonis, Chairman Miss Agnes Valeikis 

Miss Carol Hosfeld Dr. W. H. Townshend 

Miss LaRue Schwallenberg Mrs. Ellen Chrissinger 

Miss Ellen White Student Nurse Representatives (2) 

Miss Marguerite Hydorn 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF— UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
HOSPITAL 

George H. Buck, Ph.B Director of University Hospital 

James Dack, M.A Assistant Director of University Hospital 

Kurt Nork, B.S., M.A Assistant Director of University Hospital 

Eva F. Darley, R.N., B.S Associate Director of Nursing Service 

Martha Hoffman, R.N... ..Assistant Director of Nursing Service — afternoon 

Hilda Jones, R.N Assistant Director of Nursing Service — night 

Eleanor Slacum, R.N., B.S Associate Director of Psychiatric Nursing 

Jane Laib, R.N Instructing Supervisor of Red Cross Aides 

Lorraine Neel, R.N. Supervisor of Auxiliary Personnel 






THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 9 

DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE 

Eva Darley, R.N., B.S., Associate Director, Nursing Service 

Eleanor Slacum, R.N., B.S., Associate Director, Nursing Service, 

Psychiatry 

Mary A. Brislen, R.N Supervisor, General Nursing — night 

Mary Cruickshank, R.N Head Nurse, Obstetrics 

Dana Day, R.N., B.S Head Nurse, Out-Patient Department 

Elva Dean, R.N Head Nurse, Central Supply Room 

Mildred Fisher, R.N Head Nurse, Out-Patient Department 

Britta Fris, B.S., R.N Head Nurse, Pediatrics 

Ella Gooch, R.N Supervisor, Central Supply Room 

Thelma Grove, R.N Supervisor, Medicine and Surgery 

Dorothy Herbert, R.N Head Nurse, Nursery 

Martha Hoffman, R.N Assistant Director, Nursing Service — afternoon 

Mary Ireland, R.N Head Nurse, Delivery Room 

Phyllis Johnson, R.N Head Nurse, Obstetrics 

Hilda Jones, R.N Assistant Director, Nursing Service — night 

Alva Lantz, R.N Head Nurse, Premature Nursery 

Jane Laib, R.N Instructing Supervisor, Red Cross Aides 

Anne Lutz, R.N Head Nurse, Operating Room 

Rita Malek, R.N. Head Nurse, Operating Room 

Lenora McKenzie, R.N Head Nurse, Operating Room 

Edith Miller, R.N Supervisor, Out-Patient Department 

Lorraine Neel, R.N Supervisor, Auxiliary Personnel 

Ivey Reiter, R.N Head Nurse, Medicine and Surgery 

Margaret Riffle, R.N Supervisor, Semi-Private Services 

Mary Saulsbury, R.N Supervisor, Nursing Service Office — evening 

Phyllis Z. Scharp, R.N., B.S Head Nurse, Medicine and Surgery 

Norma Shriver, R.N Supervisor, Medicine and Surgery 

Anna Slacum, R.N., B.S Head Nurse, Children's Play Division 

Virginia Stack, R.N Supervisor, Private Services 

Flora Streett, R.N Supervisor, Obstetrics 

Philomenia Tamboscia, R.N Head Nurse, Formula Room 

Helen Taylor, R.N., B.S Head Nurse, Operating Room 

Agnes Valeikis, R.N Supervisor, Pediatrics 

Eleanor Vomiestock, R.N Head Nurse, Medicine and Surgery 

Kathryn Williams, R.N., B.S Supervisor, Operating Room 

Florence Wong, R.N. Head Nurse, Special Clinics 

Elizabeth Young, R.N Head Nurse, Out-Patient Department 



10 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The school of nursing of the University of Maryland, the second school 
of nursing to be founded in Maryland, was organized in 1889 by Louisa 
Parsons, a student of Florence Nightingale, and a graduate of the St. 
Thomas Hospital School, London. Miss Nightingale, because of her in- 
terest in Miss Parson's new American school, designed the present gradu- 
ate nurse's cap. 

The original curriculum, two years in length, was extended in 1902 to 
three years. For a generation, well prepared graduates of the growing 
school nursed in the community, founded schools in Maryland and other 
states, and served in their professional organizations. In World War I 
graduates of the school went with the Medical Unit of the University of 
Maryland- working on foreign soil with the same surgeons under whom 
they had studied in the University Hospital. In 1920 the school of nursing 
became a separate unit in the University, although it functioned as a 
Hospital School. 

In 1926, during the period of grading of schools of nursing by the 
nursing profession through its appointed committee, the University of 
Maryland institute a five-year program. The student after completing two 
years of academic work in the College of Arts and Sciences and three 
years in the School of Nursing received the Bachelor of Science degree 
and the Diploma of Graduate in Nursing. 

Recent trends in nursing created in Maryland, as in other states, a 
demand for a program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing. 
The faculty, therefore, advised the President and Board of Regents of 
the University to inaugurate such a plan to replace the existing five- 
year curriculum. On May 26, 1952, the four-year program was publicly 
announced by the President of the University. A Dean was appointed and 
members of the faculty were accorded academic status. Through this action, 
the Nursing School became a degree-granting institution. The School of 
Nursing, being a part of the State University which is also a Land Grant 
College, receives the funds for operation from the University. A separate 
budget prepared by the Dean and members of the faculty is administered 
and controlled by them. 

During the present period of national transition in schools of nursing, 
the University of Maryland is obliged to offer two programs in basic 
nursing education: the four calendar year program, leading to a B.S. 
degree in Nursing, and the three-year diploma course inaugurated in 1902. 
Both programs are planned in light of their objectives and of community 
needs. 

MEMBERSHIP AND ACCREDITATION 

The University of Maryland, which incorporates the School of Nursing 
with all of the other schools of the University, is a member of the Asso- 
ciation of American Colleges and is accredited by the Middle States Associ- 
ation of Colleges and Secondary School. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 11 

Both programs in Nursing, the three and five (now four-year program) 
are approved by the Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses; and 
by the National Nursing Accrediting Service for the five-year interim 
accreditation. 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

Facilities of instruction of the college students in the degree program 
are: the various colleges of the University of Maryland at College Park, 
the professional schools of the University — Dentistry, Law, Medicine, 
Pharmacy, the University Hospital, and the college of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies on the Baltimore campus. 

In addition to these, the School of Nursing makes use of the following 
Clinical Nursing Facilities: 

1. The University of Maryland Hospital — a general hospital with 
approximately a 700-bed capacity. 

a. Medical Nursing 

b. Surgical Nursing 

c. Pediatric Nursing 

d. Obstetric Nursing 

e. Out-Patient Nursing — over 300,000 patient visits were made in 
the Out-Patient Department in 1951 

2. Springfield State Hospital (Psychiatric Nursing) 

3. Baltimore City Health Department (Public Health Nursing) 

4. University of Maryland Nursery School, College Park 

5. Baltimore City Hospitals (Communicable Disease Nursing) 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

Libraries are located at both the College Park and Baltimore divisions 
of the University. In addition to the general library, volumes on the 
College Park campus are shelved in the Chemistry, Entomology and Mathe- 
matics Departments, the Graduate School, and other units. 

The general library is a depository for publications of the United States 
Government, and numbers some 75,000 documents in its collection. 

The University Library System is able to supplement its reference 
service by borrowing materials from other libraries through Inter-Library 
Loan or Bibliofilm Service, or by arranging for personal work in the 
Library of Congress, the United States Department of Agriculture Library, 
and other agencies in Washington. 

The School of Nursing Library is an integral part of the University of 
Maryland Library System, and is under the Director of Libraries of the Uni- 
versity. Both scientific and recreational collections of books are provided in 
the library which is conveniently located on the first floor of Louisa Parsons 
Hall. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The facilities of the Medical, Dental, Pharmaceutical, and Law School 
Libraries are available to the students of the School of Nursing. Addi- 
tional facilities are provided at the main branch of the Enoch Pratt Free 
Library, which comprises the public library system of the City of Balti- 
more; the Peabody Library which comprises a large collection of non- 
circulating books; the Maryland Historical Society Library. 

ADMISSION OF FRESHMEN 

Graduates of accredited secondary schools will be admitted by certifi- 
cate upon the recommendation of the principal. The admission require- 
ments of the School of Nursing are practically the same as the other 
schools of the University, except that no foreign language is required. 
Emphasis will be placed on indications of probable success in nursing 
rather than upon a fixed pattern of subject matter. The following distri- 
bution of subject matter is, desirable: 

English 4 units, required for all divisions of the University 

Mathematics 2 units, one each of Algebra and Plane Geometry 

is desirable 

History 1 unit, two units are desirable 

Foreign Language 

(substitute) 1 unit, two units are desirable 

Science 

Biology 1 unit 

Chemistry .1 unit 

Physics 1 unit 

The school is open to those American citizens who can qualify for admis- 
sion. Foreign students may be admitted if approved by the Committee on 
Admissions. Applicants should be 17 to 40 years of age. Evidence of per- 
sonal fitness for nursing in regard to health, personality, and moral char- 
acter must be submitted. A personal interview with the Dean of the School 
of Nursing, her assistants, or Student Advisor is required. 

Prospective students for the diploma program are required to take the 
Pre-Nursing and Guidance Test Battery given by the Department of Meas- 
urement and Guidance, of the National League for Nursing to determine 
potentialities for nursing. Directions for this Pre-Nursing Test will be 
sent following review of the applicant's creditentials by the Committee on 
Admissions. A fee of five dollars for the test is paid directly to the National 
League for Nursing, 2 Park Avenue, New York, New York. Degree stu- 
dents are exempted from taking this test, but are required to take the bat- 
tery of tests administered by the Psychology Department, University of 
Maryland. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 13 

Application Procedure 

Students for both programs are admitted to the School once yearly in 
September, during the regular college admission week. It is advised that cre- 
dentials and applications be submitted well in advance of the admission date, 
so that applicants may receive assistance in planning high school and college 
programs. Students with advanced college standing are transferred to the 
Baltimore campus on the first Tuesday following the Fourth of July. Ap- 
plication form and complete information regarding entrance requirements 
may be obtained from the office of the Dean of the School of Nursing, 
University of Maryland, Baltimore 1, Maryland. 

Registration 

All persons are required to register in person on or within the day or days 
announced in the school calendar. The registration procedure consists of 
(1) filing a registration blank at the Registrar's office, (2) receipt of bill 
at the Registrar's office, and (3) the payment of bill (fees and expenses) at 
the financial office. 

Students who register late are required to pay a late registration fee of 
five dollars. The last day of registration with fee added to the regular 
charges is Saturday of the week in which registration begins. The offices 
of the Registrar and Comptroller are open daily from 9: A.M. to 4:00 P.M. 
and Saturday from 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 Noon. To avoid late registration fee, 
payment may be made by mail, however, the envelope must be postmarked 
not later than midnight on the date of registration. 

Students cannot receive credit in courses for which they do not register, 
nor are they permitted to attend classes without course cards. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration and students 
should come prepared to pay the full amount of the charges. Checks and 
money orders should be made payable to the University of Maryland for 
the exact amount of charges. No student will be admitted to classes until 
such payment has been made. 

In cases where a student has been awarded a scholarship, the amount of 
such scholarship or grant will be deducted from the bill. 

The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and 
other expenses as may be found necessary, although every effort will be 
made to keep the costs to the student as low as possible. 

No degree will be conferred, nor any diploma, certificate, or transcript of 
a record issued to a student who has not made satisfactory settlement of 
his account. In event of dismissal or resignation, the general rules of the 
University are applicable. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

The charges are approximate and may fluctuate because of changing 
economic conditions. Student uniforms are obtained during the first year 
in the School of Nursing. Expenses such as meals, carfare, and incidentals 
which the student incurs during periods of affiliation or field trips are borne 
by the student. 

DESCRIPTION OF FEES 

The Fixed Charges Fee is not a charge for tuition. It is a charge to help 
defray the cost of operating the University's physical plant and other various 
services which ordinarily would not be included as a cost of teaching per- 
sonnel and teaching supplies. Included in these costs would be janitorial 
services, cost of heat, electricity, water, etc., administrative and clerical 
cost, maintenance of building and grounds, maintenance of libraries, cost 
of University Publications Alumni Office, the Admissions Office, and any 
other such services as are supplemental and necessary to teaching and 
research are supported by this fee. 

The Athletic Fee is charged for the support of the Department of Inter- 
Collegiate Athletics. All students are eligible and encouraged to participate 
in all the activities of this department and to attend all contests in which 
they do not participate. 

The Special Fee is used for University projects that have direct relation- 
ship to Student welfare, especially athletics and recreation. This fee, now 
allotted to a fund for construction of a new combination Physical Education 
Building, and Auditorium, and to constructing a swimming pool and student 
union. 

The Student Activities Fee is a mandatory fee included at the request of 
the Student Government Association. It covers subscription to the Diamond- 
back, student newspaper; the Old Line, literary magazine; the Terrapin, 
yearbook; class dues; and includes financial support for the musical and 
dramatic clubs. 

The Infirmary Fee does not include expensive drugs or special diagnostic 
procedures. Expensive drugs will be charged at cost and special diagnostic 
procedure, such as x-ray, electrocardiographs, basal metabolic rates, etc., 
will be charged at the lowest cost prevailing in the vicinity. 

Health Fee — payable on the Baltimore Campus, helps to defray the costs 
of maintenance of the health service. This includes routine examinations 
and medical care for the student body. Special treatments, medications, 
and examinations are not included in this service. 

Students entering the University at College Park for the second semester 
will pay the following additional fees: Athletic, $7.50; Special, $7.60; Student 
Activity, $8.00; Infirmary, $2.50; Post Office Fees, $1.00; Advisory and 
Testing Fees, $.50. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



15 



Second Semester 
$83.00 



FEES FOR NURSING STUDENTS 
(DEGREE STUDENTS) 

College Park Campus, Per Year 

First Semester 

Fixed Charges $ 82.00 

Athletic Fee 15.00 

Special Fee 15.00 

Student Activity Fee 10.00 

Use of Student Union, Physical Education, Post Office and 

Similar Facilities 15.00 

Infirmary Fee 5.00 . . . 

Advisory and Testing Fee 1.00 . . . 



Total 

$165.00 

15.00 

15.00 

10.00 

15.00 
5.00 
1.00 



$143.00 $83.00 $226.00 
Board and Lodging 

Dormitory Room $60-$70 $60-$70 $120-$140 

Board $170.00 $170.00 $340.00 



Total, Room and Board $230-$240 

Baltimore Campus, Per Year 

First Semester 

Fixed Charges $ 82.00 

Health Fee 20.00 

Post Office Fee 2.00 

Student Activity Fee 10.00 



'$230-$240 

Second Semester 
$83.00 



$460-$480 

Total 
$165.00 

20.00 
2.00 

10.00 



$114.00 



=$83.00 



$197.00 



Board and Lodging 

Board and Lodging are provided on the Baltimore Campus in exchange 
for nursing service as a working scholarship. 



SPECIAL FEES 

(Degree Students) 

Application Fee $ 5.00 

Matriculation Fee — payable at time of first registration in the 

University 10.00 

Diploma Fee for Bachelors Degree 10.00 

Cap and Gown Fee for Bachelors Degree 2.50 



• Students entering the University for the second semester will pay the following addi- 
tional fees : Athletic, $7.50 : Special, $5.00 ; Student Activities. $8.00 ; Infirmary. $2.50 ; 
Post Office Fees. $1.00; Advisory and Testing Fee. $.50. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Miscellaneous Fees and Charges 

Fee for part-time students per credit hour 10.00 

The term "part-time" is interpreted to mean undergraduate 
students taking 6 semester credit hours or less. Students carrying 
more than 6 semester hours pay the regular fees. 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, includ- 
ing the filing of class cards and payment of bills, on the regular 
registration days.) Those who do not complete their registration 
during the prescribed days will be charged a fee of $5.00. 

Fee for Change in Registration 3.00 

Transcript of Record Fee 1.00 

Textbook and Supplies 

Costs of textbooks and classroom supplies vary with the course, but will 

average on the College Park Campus (per semester) 35.00 

Baltimore Campus (28 months) 40.00-60.00 

Uniforms (approximate cost to student) 85.00 

Laboratory Fees 

A laboratory fee, to cover costs of materials used, is charged in laboratory 
courses. These fees vary with the course and can be ascertained in any 
case by inquiry of the Dean of the School. 

Field Work 

Students will be responsible for lunch and car fare when they are assigned 
to outlying districts during Public Health Field Work. 

FEES FOR NURSING STUDENTS 

(Diploma Students) 

First Year 

Fixed Charges $18.00 

Health Fee 20.00 

Post Office Fee 2.00 

Student Activity Fee 10.00 



ond Year 


Third Year 


Total 


$18.00 


$18.00 


$ 54.00 


20.00 


20.00 


60.00 


2.00 


2.00 


6.00 


10.00 


10.00 


30.00 



$50.00 $50.00 $50.00 $150.00 

Board and Lodging 

Board and lodging are provided in exchange for nursing service as a 
working scholarship. 

Miscellaneous Fees and Charges 

Application Fee $ 5.00 

Diploma Fee 15.00 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 17 

Textbooks and Supplies 

Textbooks (approximate cost to student for three years) 40.00 
Uniforms (approximate cost to student for three years) 95.00 

Testing 5.00 

Psychometric tests, which are given by the National League 
for Nursing to determine protentialities for nursing, are 
taken by prospective students. Notice of the time and place 
of testing will be sent to the applicant upon review of her 
credentials by the Committee of Admissions. A fee of $5.00 
is paid by the applicant directly to the Department of Measure- 
ment and Guidance, National League for Nursing — 2 Park 
Ave. New York, N. Y. 

Total for three years $310.00 

Two months affiliation with the Baltimore City Health Department in 
Public Health Nursing is offered as an elective in the third year. Students 
who desire this experience will be responsible for their own room, board, 
and laundry during the two month period. Students who are unable to 
live with their family or other responsible person may obtain maintenance 
in the dormitory for a small charge. ($75.00 for two months period). 
Carfare and incidental expenses amounting to approx. $25.00 for this service 
must be borne by the student. 

Students entering the School of Nursing beginning Sept. 1952 will not 
be offered Public Health Nursing as an elective. Students who desire this 
field work are encouraged to enroll in the four-year program. 

SCHOLASTIC REGULATIONS 
Grading: 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the following 
symbols: A, B, C, D, passing, F, failure, I, Incomplete. Mark A denotes 
superior scholarship; mark B, good scholarship; mark C, fair scholarship; 
and mark D, passing scholarship. 

In computing scholastic averages, numerical values are assigned as 
follows: A-4; B-3; C-2; D-l; F-0. 

A scholastic average of C is required for graduation and for junior 
standing. The C average will be computed on the basis of the courses 
required by each student's curriculum. The average of transfer students 
and those seeking combined degrees will be computed only on the courses 
taken in residence in the University of Maryland and in satisfaction of the 
non-curriculum requirements of the college granting the degree. An over-all 
average will also be computed to include all courses taken in the University 
as a basis for the award of honors and such other use as may be deemed 
appropriate. 

Students who have not obtained a passing mark will be required to take 
a re-examination in the subject failed; or, if indicated, to repeat the course. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

If a student does not pass a specific clinical assignment, she is given special 
guidance. 

The University reserves the right to request at any time the withdrawal 
of a student who does not or cannot maintain the required standard of 
scholarship, or whose continuance in the University would be detrimental 
to her health, or to the health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory 
to the authorities of the University. 

Attendance: 

According to University regulations, excessive absence from any class is 
penalized by failure in that course. Students may be absent from class 
only upon approval of the instructor for the course. No student should 
absent herself from class at any time unless she has at least a "B" average. 

Reports: 

Written reports of grades are sent by the Registrar to parents or 
guardians of minor students at the close of each semester. 

Vacation, Absences: 

Four weeks vacation is granted each year during the clinical period of 
instruction. Time lost through illness or other causes during the clinical 
period in excess of three weeks is required to be made up. 

Admission with Advanced Standing 

Advanced standing is assigned to transfer students from accredited 
Universities and Colleges upon the following conditions: 

1. Applicant meet the requirements for admission. 

2. The character of theoretical instruction at previous college should 
facilitate fitting the applicant into the professional program. 

3. Only courses in which the applicant has received a grade of "C" will 
be considered for credit. 

4. A minimum of one year of resident work of not less than 30 semester 
hours is necessary for a degree. 

5. The University reserves the right at any time to revoke advanced 
standing if the transfer student's progress is unsatisfactory. 

Students having had two years of academic college work in an accredited 
college and in good standing as to scholarship and conduct are eligible to 
transfer. 

Conferring of Degrees 

No baccalaureate degree will be awarded to a student who has less than 
one year of resident work in this University. The last thirty semester 
credits of any curriculum leading to a baccalaureate degree must be taken 
in residence at the University of Maryland. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 19 

An average of C (2.0) is required for graduation. The C average will 
be computed on the basis of the courses required by each student's cur- 
riculum. The average of transfer students and of those seeking combined 
degrees will be computed only on the courses taken in residence in the 
University of Maryland in satisfaction of the non-professional curriculum 
requirement of the college granting the degree. An overall average will 
also be computed to include all courses taken in the University as basis for 
the award of honors and such other uses as may be deemed appropriate. 

Each candidate for a degree must file in the office of the Registrar, eight 
weeks prior to the date he expects to graduate, a formal application for a 
degree. Candidates for degrees must attend a convocation at which degrees 
are conferred and diplomas awarded. Degrees are conferred in absentia 
only in exceptional cases. 

Transcript of Records 

Students and alumni may secure transcript of their scholastic records 
from the Office of the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy; for 
each additional copy there is a charge of $1.00. Checks should be made 
payable to the University of Maryland. Transcripts of records should be 
requested at least one week in advance of the date when the records are 
actually needed. No transcript of a student's record will be furnished any 
student or alumnus whose financial obligations to the University have not 
been satisfied. 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 

Dormitories — College Park 

All freshmen except those who live at home are required to room in the 
dormitories. Students are required to live in the University's Women's 
dormitories or locally with relatives. 

1. Room Reservations. All new students desiring to room in the dormi- 
tories should request room application card on their application for admis- 
sion. The Director of Admissions will refer these to the offices of the Dean 
of Women. Application cards or blanks will be sent to applicants and 
should be returned promptly. A fee of $15.00 will be requested which will 
be deducted from the first semester charges when the student registers. 
A room is not assured until notice is received from the Dean concerned. 
Room reservation fees will not be refunded if the request is received later 
than August 15 for the first semester. 

2. Applications for rooms are acted upon only when a student has been 
fully admitted academically to the University. 

3. It is understood that all housing and board arrangements which are 
made for the fall semester are binding for the spring semester. 

Equipment: 

Students assigned to dormitories should provide themselves with sufficient 
single blankets, at least two pairs of sheets, a pillow, pillow cases, towels, 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

a laundry bag, a waste paper basket, a desk blotter, and some bureau 
scarves. The individual student must assume responsibility for all dormi- 
tory property assigned to him. 

Each student will be furnished a key for his room for which a deposit of 
$1.00 will be made. This deposit will be returned in exchange for the key 
at the end of the year. 

Laundry : 

The University does not provide laundry services and each student is 
responsible for his or her own laundry. There are several reliable laundry 
concerns in College Park; or if the student prefers, he may send his laundry 
home. Students may, if they wish, do their own laundry in the laundry 
room in each dormitory, not including bed linen. 

Personal baggage is sent via the American Express and marked with a 
dormitory address will be delivered when the student concerned notifies 
the College Park express office of his arrival. 

Meals : 

All students who live in permanent University dormitories must board 
at the University Dining Hall. 

Residence Hall — Baltimore 

Louisa Parsons Hall, the student dormitory of the School of Nursing, 
offers comfortable living accommodations for the nursing students. It 
is under the general supervision of a registered graduate nurse. Linens, 
blankets (students are requested to bring their own bedspreads) curtains 
are provided as part of the general furnishings of the rooms. 

All students of the School of Nursing are required to live in the nurses' 
dormitory, except during certain affiliations when they reside in the nurses' 
dormitories associated with the various hospitals. No special permission 
for living out is given unless permission is approved by the Nursing School 
Faculty. 

STUDENTS HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Student Health — College Park Campus 

The University recognizes its responsibility for safeguarding the health 
of the student body and takes every possible precaution towards this end. 
All new undergraduate students will be given a thorough physical examina- 
tion at the time of their entrance to the University. A well equipped in- 
firmary is available for the care of the sick or injured student. A small fee 
is charged but does not include expensive drugs and special diagnostic 
procedures. 

Student Health — Baltimore Campus 

The School of Nursing, in cooperation with the University of Maryland 
Hospital, maintains a health service under the general direction of an 
appointed physician and nurse to provide medical care for the student body. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 21 

A physical examination by University physicians is required of all new 
students as a part of their matriculation in this area, and is repeated each 
year. 

The Health Office is maintained for the examination and treatment of 
the students. Hospital care is provided for the student for a limited time 
only. Reasonable rates will be charged for longer periods of hospitaliza- 
tion. Special services, not considered routine, will be paid for by the 
student. Dental work is not provided gratuitously. 

Consultation with specialists, special nursing, X-ray examinations other 
than chest, special medications, and other services not considered routine, 
are not furnished by the Health Office. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 
General Assembly Scholarships 

These scholarships are available to the undergraduate nursing student of 
the University of Maryland at College Park. 

The scholarships are for fixed charges only, and are awarded by members 
of the Legislature, three for each Senator, and one for each member of the 
House of Delegates. These scholarships may be awarded by a member 
of the House of Delegates or a Senator only to persons in the county or 
legislative district of Baltimore which the Delegate or Senator represents. 
Awards of such scholarships are subject to approval by the Faculty Com- 
mittee on Scholarship and by the Director of Admissions as to qualifications 
for admission. 

W. K. Kellogg Foundation Loan Fund 

This loan fund was first established at the University of Maryland School 
of Nursing in 1942 with money granted by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 
The interest paid on the loans, together with the principle of the loan, as 
it is repaid, will be used to found a rotating loan fund. Loans will be made 
on the basis of need, character and scholastic attainment. Applications for 
W. K. Kellogg Loans may be obtained from the office of the Dean of the 
School of Nursing. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

The University recognizes its responsibility for the welfare of students 
not solely in their intellectual growth, but as human personalities whose 
development along all lines, including moral and religious, is included in 
the educational process. Pastors representing the major denominational 
bodies assume responsibility for work with students of their respective 
faiths. A new chapel, one of the most beautiful structures of its kind, for 
use of all faiths, is on the College Park campus. Church attendance is 
encouraged. 

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION 

The University recognizes the importance of the physical development of 
all students and besides the required physical education for freshmen and 



22 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

sophomores sponsors a comprehensive inter-collegiate and intramural 
program. Students are encouraged to participate in competitive athletics 
and to learn the skill of games that may be carried on after leaving college. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

The association of students in organized bodies for the purpose of carrying 
on voluntary student activities in orderly and productive ways is recognized 
and encouraged. All organized student activities are under the supervision 
of the Student Life Committee at College Park, and the Student Council in 
Baltimore. 

Clubs and Societies: Many clubs and societies with literary, art, cultural, 
scientific, social, and other special objectives are maintained in the 
University. A number of honorary fraternities and sororities are estab- 
lished and recognized at the University. 

For details of these student organizations, clubs, and societies, refer to 
the Catalogue of General Information. 

UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER 

The services in the Dean's office are closely coordinated with the activities 
of the University Counseling Bureau, maintained by the Department of 
Psychology. This Bureau is provided with a well-trained technical staff 
and is equipped with an extensive stock of standardized tests of aptitude, 
ability, and interest. Assistance is available in diagnosing, reading, and 
study deficiencies. By virtue of payment of the "Annual Advisory and 
Testing Fee", students are entitled to the services of the University Counsel- 
ing Bureau without further charge. 

COUNSELING— BALTIMORE CAMPUS 

The School of Nursing, in accordance with its educational philosophy, 
strives for the growth and development of the individual. The Guidance 
program is administered to assist the student to understand better herself 
and her potentialities, and to help her attain her fullest capabilities through 
self-direction. The program includes: Orientation, Individual Inventory, 
Individual Counseling, Group Guidance, and Informational Services. 




Campus Building, University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 



BASIC PROFESSIONAL 

NURSING PROGRAM 

LEADING TO THE 

DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 

SCIENCE IN NURSING 



26 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Florence Meda Gipe, R.N., Ed.D., Dean 
Faculty and Teaching Staff of the College Park Area 

Thomas G. Andrews, Ph.D Professor and Head of Psychology 

Cecil R. Ball, M.A Associate Professor of English 

Franklin L. Burdette, Ph.D Professor of Government and Politics 

Franklin D. Cooley, Ph.D Associate Professor of English 

Herbert Crossman, Ph.D Assistant Professor of History 

Nathan L. Drake, Ph.D. Professor and Head of Chemistry 

John E. Faber, Jr., Ph.D Professor and Head of Bacteriology 

Florence M. Gipe, R.N., B.S., M.S., Ed.D Professor of Nursing Education 

and Dean 

Margaret L. Hayes, R.N., M.S. Assistant Professor of Nursing 

Education — College Park Area 

Harold E. Hoffsomer, Ph.D Professor and Head of Sociology 

Norman E. Phillips, Ph.D Professor and Head of Zoology 

W. L. Strausbaugh, M.A. Assistant Professor of Speech 

i Janet A. Wessels, Ph.D Assistant Professor in Physical Education, 

Recreation and Health 

, M. Gordon Zeeveld, Ph.D Associate Professor of English 

Gladys A. Wiggin, Ph.D Professor of Education, Chairman of Curriculum 

^ Faculty and Teaching Staff in Clinical Area, see page 4. 

BASIC PROFESSIONAL NURSING PROGRAM LEADING TO THE 
DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

The goal of professional nursing today, is the promotion of those 
principles of living which bring about a healthy society. Formerly the 
student nurse spent most of her time learning and carrying out the tech- 
niques and skills concerned with the care of the sick. While she still must 
be able to master these skills and techniques, her energies must be directed 
largely toward learning to give the patient and his family, in the different 
areas in which she lives and works, nursing care in its entirety. 

The Combined Academic and Professional Nursing Program leading to 
a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing consists of forty-eight calendar 
months. It is designed to provide those educational experiences which 
will prepare young women not only for progressive hospital nursing, but 
for community nursing as well. 

The main objective, however, for this curriculum is to prepare care- 
fully selected young women for professional nursing. This aim proposes 
that the student will live in an educational environment which promotes 
the growth and development of the student as a person and as a citizen. 
In addition to learning to reach and maintain good health for herself, the 
student is given opportunity to learn to promote health programs for 
others. Upon the completion of certain prescribed learning experiences, 
the graduate should be able to fill first level positions in professional nursing. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 27 

The first year of the student's learning experience is spent on the Col- 
lege Park campus, and is devoted largely to a general academic and 
cultural program, including physical, biological, and social sciences. Funda- 
mentals of nursing care with some practical application of body mechanics 
is given. Field trips are made to community health and social agencies, 
so that the student will acquire early in her work a philosophy of positive 
health. 

Beginning the second week of June, or at the end of the first academic 
year, the student receives a six-week orientation period at the University 
Hospital, Baltimore campus. During this period, she is introduced to 
patient care in the hospital and out-patient department as field experi- 
ence required with the course Nur. Ed. 7, Introduction to Nursing. During 
this period, Nursing 104, Applied Nutrition, is given. A review of frac- 
tions and decimals is given also. 

At the close of the summer session, the student receives a vacation until 
the beginning of the second academic year at College Park. 

During the second year, the student continues the study of the bio- 
logical sciences and social sciences, including the Social Aspects of Nursing. 
At the end of this year, she receives the month of June for her vacation. 

In July, the student returns to the Professional School in Baltimore to 
begin her work in Medical and Surgical Nursing, Nur. 101-102. Follow- 
ing these courses, her clinical experience is arranged in sequence. Classes 
and clinical assignments are so arranged that theory and practice are 
given concurrently. 

The following program is typical; however, clinical experience in nurs- 
ing will be scheduled according to a planned rotation. 

Curriculum 

t — Semester — \ 
Freshman Year j jj 

Eng. 1, 2 — Composition and American Literature 3 3 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 3 .... 

G. & P. 1 — American Government .... 3 

Zoology 2, 3 — Fundamentals of Zoology 4 4 

Chemistry 11, 13 — General Chemistry 3 3 

Sp. 18, 19 — Introductory Speech 1 1 

Nur. Ed. 3 — History of Nursing 2 

Nur. Ed. 7 — Introduction to Nursing .... 2 

Physical Activities 1 1 

Total 17 17 



* Students having had two years of approved college elsewhere, and meeting other 
requirements for admission, will be admitted to the Baltimore campus with advanced stand- 
ing, providing they can be fitted into the curriculum. 



28 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Summer Session (Six Weeks) 

Nur. Ed. 7 — Laboratory Experience 

Nur. 104 — Applied Nutrition 

Sophomore Year 

En?. 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 

H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization 

Psych. 1 — Introduction to Psychology 

Bact. 1 — General Bacteriology 

Zoology 14, 15 — Human Anatomy and Physiology* 

Sp. 23 — Parliamentary Law 

Nur. Ed. 8 — Social Aspects of Nursing 

Nur. Ed. 9 — Professional Adjustments 

Physical Activities ; 

Total 

Junior Year 

Nur. 101, 102 — Medical and Surgical Nursing (Intra. Social Case Work) 

Nur. 103 — Pharmacology 

Nur. 105 — Obstetrical Nursing 

Nur. 106 — Health Organization 

Nur. 107— Health Guidance 

Nur. 108 — Applied Psychology 

Nur. 151 — Pediatrics 

Total Semester Hours 

Senior Year 

Nur. 151 — Pediatric Nursing 

Nur. 152 — Psychiatric Nursing 

Nur. 153a — Public Health Nursing 

b — Communicable Disease Nursing 

Nur. 154 — Ward Management 

Nur. 155 — Foundations of Professional Nursing 

Electives 

Total Semester Hours 



-Semester — ^ 
/ // 



\Term 



16 



14 



* Special arrangements can be made by the School of Nursing for transfer students who 
have not been able to obtain this course in other colleges. 

t The word "Term" is used in the clinical area to substitute for semester, and is thought 
of as six calendar months. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 29 

Distribution of Four-Year Program in Terms of Calendar Months 

First Year 

Months 

College Park Campus 9 

Baltimore Campus (clinical area) IV2 



Total 10y 2 

Second Year 

College Park Campus 9 

Baltimore Campus (clinical area) 2 

Total 11 

Third Year 
Baltimore Campus (clinical area) 
Medicine and Surgery- 
Applied Nutrition 1 

Operating Room and Accident Service 2 

Fundamentals of Patient Care, Medicine and Surgery, Out- 

Patient Department, with Integration of Community Nursing.... 6 
Obstetrical, Pediatric, Psychiatric Nursing (alternating) 

(approximately) 2 

Vacation 1 

Total 12 

Fourth Year (including 2.5 additional months) 
As total for 28-month required clinical experience** 

Obstetrical, Pediatric, Psychiatric* (alternating) 7 

Public Health (field experience) 2 

Communicable Diseases 2 

Ward Management 2V-z 

Vacation 1 

Following the completion of all graduation requirements, students will be 
granted a B.S. degree in Nursing and will be eligible for the examination 
for registration of nurses. 

* Obstetrical, Pediatric, Psychiatric Nursing equal in distribution — 3 months. 
** Legal requirement for Nurse Registration in Maryland. 

THE PROGRAM IN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION 

Because the University feels that it is vital for every student to under- 
stand this country better, it has established a very comprehensive program 
of American studies. Work in American Civilization is offered at three 
distinct academic levels. The first level is required of all freshmen or 
sophomores at the University of Maryland and is described below. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Courses in American Civilization Program Required of All Freshman 

and Sophomores 

All students (unless specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) are 
required to take twelve semester hours of English, three semester hours of 
Sociology (Soc. I — Sociology of American Life), three semester hours of 
government (G. & P. 1 — American Government) and six semester hours of 
history (H. 5, 6 — History of American Civilization). 

These several courses are planned as parts of a whole that is designed 
to acquaint students with the basic facts of American history, with the 
fundamental patterns of our social, economic, political and intellectual 
development, and with the riches of our cultural heritage. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

All undergraduate women students classified academically as freshman 
or sophomores, who are registered for more than six semester hours of 
credit, are required to enroll in and successfully complete four prescribed 
courses in physical education for a total of four semester hours of credit. 
The successful completion of these courses is a requirement for graduation. 
These courses must be taken by all eligible students during the first two 
years of attendance at the University, whether they intend to graduate or 
not. Transfer students who do not have credit in these courses, or their 
equivalent, must complete them or take them until graduation, whichever 
occurs first. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Bact. 1. General Bacteriology (4) — Second semester, Sophomore year. 
Two lecture and two laboratory periods a week. The physiology culture, 
and differentiation of bacteria. Fundamental principles of microbiology in 
relation to man and his environment. Laboratory fee $10.00. 

Professor John E. Faber, Jr., and Staff 

Chem. 11, 13. General Chemistry (3, 3) — First and second semesters, 
Freshman year. Two lectures and one three hour laboratory period a 
week. Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. 

Professor Nathan L. Drake, and Staff 

Eng. 1, 2. Composition and American Literature (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters, Freshman year. Required of freshmen. Both courses offered 
each semester, but may not be taken concurrently. Prerequisite, three 
units of high school English. Grammar, rhetoric, and the mechanics of 
writing, frequent themes. Readings in American Literature. 

Associate Professor Cecil R. Ball, and Staff 

Eng. 3, 4. Composition and World Literature (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters, Sophomore year. Prerequisite Eng. 1, 2. Eng. 3, 4 or Eng. 5, 6 
or an acceptable combination of the two are required of sophomores. Credit 
will not be given for more than 6 hours of work in 3, 4 and 5, 6. Practice 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 31 

in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign classics being 
read in translation. Associate Professor Franklin D. Cooley, and Staff 

English 5, 6. Composition and English Literature (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters, Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2. Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 or 
an acceptable combination of the two are required of sophomores. Credit 
will not be given for more than 6 hours of work in 3, 4 and 5, 6. Practice 
in composition. An introduction to major English writers. 

Associate Professor W. Gordon Zeeveld, and Staff 

G. & P. 1 — American Government (3) — Second semester, Freshman year. 
This course is designed as the basic course in government for the American 
Civilization program, and it or its equivalent is a prerequisite to all other 
courses in the department. It is a comprehensive study of governments in 
the U. S. — national, state, and local, and of their adjustment to changing 
social and economic conditions. Professor Franklin L. Burdette, and Staff 

H. 5, 6. History of American Civilization (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters, Sophomore year. Required for graduation of all students who 
entered the University after 1944-1945. Normally to be taken in the 
sophomore year. Assistant Professor Herbert Crosmon, and Staff 

Nur. Ed. 3. History of Nursing (2) — First semester, Freshman year. 
This course is designed to give an understanding of the development in 
nursing from the earliest times to the present. Emphasis is placed upon 
the nature and pattern of nursing as it progressed through the different 
periods, and as it was related to the education of women. 

Professor Florence M. Gipe 

Nur. Ed. 7. Introduction to Nursing (3) — Second semester, Freshman 
year. Lecture and laboratory. A basic introductory course in the prin- 
ciples and practices of nursing and health teaching. Emphasis is placed 
upon the routines and techniques used in nursing in the home, in accident 
nursing, and in the routine care of the chronically ill. The principles of 
posture and body mechanics which are basic to health are applied throughout 
the course. Assistant Professor Margaret L. Hayes 

Introduction to Patient Care — (Field experience for Nur. Ed. 7) 6 weeks, 
Freshman year, summer session. Planned experience in the actual situation 
affords the student the opportunity to analyze the patient's hospital needs, 
and to plan and execute a program of nursing care which meets the needs 
of all individuals concerned. Assistant Professor Margaret L. Hayes 

Nur. Ed. 8. Social Aspects of Nursing (2) — Second semester, Sophomore 
year. A course designed to acquaint the students with the factors to be 
considered in the health or sickness of the individual as they effect the 
family and community relationships. The role of the nurse in modern 
concept of nursing in world health and social developments is interpreted. 
The general principles of Sanitary Science, and their application to food, 
milk, water, sewage, and garbage disposal are brought out by discussion 
and field trips. Assistant Professor Margaret L. Hayes 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Nur. Ed. 9. Professional Adjustments (2) — First semester, Sophomore 
year. This course is intended to help students understand and appreciate 
the professional aspects of nursing; to give guidance and instruction in 
professional conduct and relationships, and in the development of sound 
physical, mental and social habits. 

Assistant Professor Margaret L. Hayes 

Nur. Ed. 9. Professional Adjustments (2) First semester, Sophomore 
year. This course is intended to help students understand and appreciate 
the status and requirements of a profession with emphasis upon the 
present status of nursing and future opportunities in the nursing field. 
Guidance and instruction in professional conduct, relationships and in the 
development of sound physical, mental and social habits are stressed. 

Assistant Professor Margaret L. Hayes 

P. E. 2-4. Basic skills of Sport and Rhythms (1, 1) — Three hours a week; 
first and second semesters, Freshman year. Required of all freshmen 
women. Instruction and practice in fundamentals of sports, rhythms, and 
body mechanics. Assistant Professor Janet Wessell 

P. E. 6-8. Selected sports and dance (1) — Three hours a week, first and 
second semesters, Sophomore year. Sophomores may elect from the fol- 
lowing: archery, badminton, basketball, bowling, fencing, folk and square 
dancing, modern dance, social dance, golf, hockey, rifle, softball, speedball, 
tennis, and volleyball. Assistant Professor Janet Wessell 

Psych. 1. Introduction to Psychology (3) — First and second semesters, 
Sophomore year. (Not open to freshmen). A basic introductory course, 
intended to bring the student into contact with the major problems con- 
fronting psychology and the more important attempts at their solution. 

Professor Thomas G. Andrews, and Staff 

Soc. 1. Sociology of American Life (3) — First semester, Freshman year. 
Sociological analysis of the American social structure; metropolitan, small 
town, and rural communities; population distribution, composition, and 
change; social organization. 

Professor Harold C. HofFsommer, Ph.D. and Staff 

Speech 18, 19. Introductory Speech (1, 1) — First and second semesters, 
Freshman year. This course is designed to give those students practice in 
public speaking. Speech 18 prerequisite for Speech 19. Laboratory fee 
$1.00 for each semester. 

Assistant Professor W. L. Strausbaugh, and Staff 

Speech 23. Parliamentary Law (1) — First Semester, Sophomore year. 
A study of the principles and application of parliamentary law as applied 
to all types of meetings. Thorough training in the use of Robert's Rules of 
Order. Assistant Professor W. L. Strausbaugh, and Staff 

Zool. 2, 3. Fundamentals of Zoology (4, 4) — First and second semesters, 
Freshman year. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Zoology 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 33 

1 or 2 is a prerequisite for Zoology 3. Students who have completed 
Zoology 1 may register for Zoology 3 but not Zoology 2. A thorough study 
of the anatomy, classification, and life histories of the representative 
animals. During the first semester emphasis is placed on invertebrate forms 
and during the second semester upon vertebrate forms including the frog. 
Laboratory fee $8.00 each semester. 

Professor Norman E. Phillips, and Staff 

Zool. 14, 15 — Human Anatomy and Physiology (4, 4) — First and second 
semesters, Sophomore year. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a 
week. Prerequisite, one course in zoology. Zoology 14 is a prerequisite for 
Zoology 15. For students who desire a general knowledge of human anatomy 
and physiology. Laboratory fee $8.00 each semester. 

Professor Norman E. Phillips, and Staff 

Nursing 101-102 — Integrated Medical and Surgical Nursing (10 semester 
hours) Term I and II, junior year. 

Designed to help the student acquire a knowledge and understanding of 
the causes, symptoms, treatments, and general control of diseases, and an 
appreciation of the common factors involved in complete nursing care. The 
pharmacological and dietary aspects are integrated throughout each area. 
Those procedures that are necessary to insure safe and skilled nursing 
care are studied, discussed, evaluated, and applied in relation to each con- 
dition. Didactic instruction, clinical instruction, and student activity through 
related experiences are given concurrently. The psychosomatic, economic, 
and social factors are considered throughout. The responsibility of the 
professional nurse as a key person in the entire health team is stressed. 

Time in clinical area: 270 days 

Instructor LaRue Schwallenberg and teaching staff 

Clinical Area: University Hospital, clinics, and homes 

Nursing 103 — Pharmacology (3 semester hours) Term I, junior year. 

Designed to give the student an understanding and an appreciation of the 
principles of drug therapy. The chemical and physiological action of drugs 
is studied in the classroom, the laboratory, and on the hospital wards. 
Emphasis is given on the properties, the action, the therapeutic, and the 
toxic effects of drugs. Newer chemotherapeutic and antibiotic agents are 
considered throughout the course. 

Ruth Musser, Instructor in Pharmacology, and Instructor Eva Bradley 

School of Pharmacy 

Nursing 104 — Applied Nutrition (3 semester hours) Term I, junior year. 

To develop in the student nurse an appreciation of the science of nutrition 
and dietetics and its relation to personal, community and world-wide health. 
Twenty-eight days of planned experience is given in the therapeutic diet 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

kitchen, University Hospital. Students are taught to assist patients on the 
wards and in the Out Patient Department to plan their diets in relation to 
their general condition. 

Assistant Prof. Elizabeth Cochran 

Nursing 105 — Obstetric Nursing (8 semester hours) Term II, junior year. 

To develop in the student the ability to give sympathetic, safe, and 
scientific nursing care during the reproduction cycle as it pertains to the 
family life of the patient. This instruction includes knowledge and skill 
in regards to the managing and teaching of patients during the ante-partum, 
delivery, and post-partum periods. 

Time in obstetrical area: 90 days 

Marguerite Hydorn, Instructor, and teaching staff 

Obstetrical clinic in Out Patient Department, homes, and University 

Hospital 

Nursing 106 — Health Organization (2 semester hours) Term I, junior year. 

To acquaint the student with the general administration of health agencies 
and to give her an appreciation of how they function on local, national, 
and international levels. 

Dr. Huntington Williams, Commissioner of Health, Baltimore City, and 
Staff 

Nursing 107 — Health Guidance (3 semester hours) Term II, junior year. 

Designed to assist the student to apply certain principles and methods of 
teaching which will enable her to give intelligent individual and group 
instruction in healthful living. The dynamic approach is considered 
throughout the course so that effective student and patient relationships 
may be brought about. 

Associate Prof. Kathryn Wohlsen and assistants. 

Nursing 108. Applied Psychology (3 semester hours) Term I, Junior 
year. This course is designed to give the student some of the basic con- 
cepts of dynamic psychology. Emphasis is placed upon the personal rela- 
tionships of individuals with one another and with groups, so that the 
student may be helped in her own personal adjustments and in gaining 
a better understanding of others. Prof. Jacob E. Finesinger and others 

Nursing 151 — Pediatric Nursing (8 semester hours) Term II, junior 
year extending into senior year. 

Planned to assist the student to develop a profound interest in the well 
and sick child, so that she may acquire the ability to meet the total nursing 
needs of children, physical, emotional, and mental, on the various age levels, 
and to develop skill in nursing children who acquire acute conditions com- 
mon to childhood. In this area is included observation and experience in 
the Nursery School, College Park; the Child Growth and Development 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 35 

Clinic, College Park; Child Guidance Clinic, University Hospital; in the 
Out Patient Department, University Hospital; the division for exceptional 
children, Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital; and the Depart- 
ment of Pediatrics, University Hospital, which is a department having an 
average of more than seventy-five patients per day. In this area the 
student has active participation in planning and evaluating her learning 
experiences. 

Time in area: 90 days 

Prof. Pauline Kummer, Miss Frances Reed, and assistants 

Nursing 152. Psychiatric Nursing (8 semester hours) Term II, senior 
year. 

To develop a sympathetic attitude and a sense of responsibility toward 
furthering a positive mental health program on local, national, and inter- 
national levels, so that many of the psychiatric disorders may be prevented 
or cured in their early stages. Appreciation, knowledge, and skill in caring 
for the total nursing needs of patients who have developed severe mental 
disorders also will be stressed. 

Time in learning area: 90 days 

Prof, of Psychiatric Nursing and associates 

Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital 

Nursing 153. Public Health Nursing (8 semester hours) Term I and II, 
senior year. 

To develop in the student an appreciation and an understanding of and 
skill in dealing with patients and their families in their homes and the 
various areas of the community. Their relation to the wider community is 
considered. This includes the state, national, and international com- 
munity. Two months field experience with the Baltimore City Health De- 
partment is included and as a supplement to this course, two months' 
experience in Communicable Disease Nursing at the Baltimore City Hos- 
pital will be given. 

Associate Prof. Kathryn Wohlsen 

Nursing 154. Ward Management (4 semester hours) Term II, senior 
year. 

This course considers the elementary principles of ward administration 
and teaching, and the interrelationships of the hospital departments. It 
deals with the position of the head nurse, staff nurse, and other members 
of the nursing team and their relationships in the hospital and nursing 
school. Methods of ward instruction and supervision and the evaluation 
of clinical work are included. 

Prof. Gladys Sellew, and others 



36 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Nursing 155. Foundations of Professional Nursing (2 semester hours) 

Term I and II, senior year. 

A learning experience in which to gain a knowledge of those social and 
economic trends which influence professional nursing. Community and 
world-wide responsibility for professional nursing, World Health Organiza- 
tion, nursing organizations, national and international, are included. 

Prof. Florence M. Gipe, Margaret Hayes, Virginia Conley 

Electives (2 semester hours) Term II, senior year. 

Designed to assist those students to gain more knowledge and experience 
in the special learning area of their choice. Special assignments, field 
trips, and seminars will be utilized so that the student's experiences may be 
extended to the degree of her expectancy. 




Original and Present Medical School Building (1812) 




The Importance of Drug Therapy is stressed throughout in both programs. 



BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 

LEADING TO A 

DIPLOMA IN NURSING 



40 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1952 

September 10 
September 15 
November 26 
November 27 
December 1 
December 20 
December 25 



CALENDAR— 1952-1953 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



January 1 
January 5 
February 22 
March 25 
April 2 
April 5 
April 7 
May 30 
May 31 
June 6 
July 4 
September 7 
September 9 
September 14 



Wednesday 

Monday 

Wednesday after last class 

Thursday 

Monday 8 A. M. 

Saturday after last class 

Thursday 



Thursday 

Monday 8 A. M. 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Thursday after last class 

Sunday 

Tuesday 8 A. M. 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Saturday 

Saturday 

Monday 

Wednesday 

Monday 



Registration, payment of fees — all students 

Instruction begins* 

Instruction suspended* 

Thanksgiving, holiday 

Instruction resumed* 

Instruction suspended* 

Christmas, holiday 



New Year's Day, holiday 

Instruction resumed 

Washington's Birthday, holiday 

Maryland Day 

Instruction suspended* 

Easter Sunday, holiday 

Instruction resumed* 

Memorial Day, holiday 

Baccalureate Exercises 

Commencement Exercises 

Independence Day, holiday 

Labor Day, holiday 

Registration, payment of fees — all students 

Instruction begins* 



•First year students. 

BASIC NURSING PROGRAM (THREE-YEAR) 

This is a basic nursing program which consists of three calendar years 
and leads to a diploma in nursing. Upon completion of the course, the nurse 
will be eligible for the State Board examination for the registration of 
nurses and be prepared to accept a position as staff nurse in hospitals and 
clinics. The aims, however, differ from the college program. 

In attempting to anticipate the future needs of students who select the 
diploma course in nursing, the University of Maryland School of Nursing 
carefully selects young women who are high school graduates, and edu- 
cates them to become proficient nurses who can meet the modern nursing 
standards of progressive hospitals and clinics. While pursuing this course, 
it is expected that the student will gain a knowledge of her own health 
needs, those of her immediate environment, as well as the community, and 
the world in general. 

The program is arranged so that preparation includes experience with 
a wide variety of patients of different ages and in various stages of illness 
in the hospital and out-patient department. All areas of the curriculum 
emphasize the importance of considering the physical, the psychological, 
and the sociological factors affecting the health of the individual. 

As an introduction to nursing, the student begins her work with a two 
weeks orientation in the field of community health. Field excursions are 
made to various health and social agencies. Following this, the student 
studies the physical, biological, social and health sciences. On medical 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 41 

and surgical wards the preventative and curative aspects of nursing are 
intensely stressed. 

Throughout the entire program, the student learns how to administer nurs- 
ing care to patients and to groups through guided experience on the medical, 
surgical, pediatric, and obstetric divisions of the hospital and the out- 
patient department. Clinical experience in psychiatric nursing is gained 
at the Springfield State Hospital. Home visits are made in the community 
for observation only. 

SUMMARY OF CLASSES AND CLINICAL EXPERIENCES 
Biological and Physical Sciences 

Anatomy and Physiology 

Chemistry 

Microbiology 

Social Sciences 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Social Foundations of Nursing 

History of Nursing 





Labora- 


Total 


Class 


tory 


Hours 


90 


30 


120 


40 


20 


60 


15 


30 


45 






45 






45 







30 






30 



Medical Sciences 

Orientation to Medical and Surgical 

Nursing .... 20 

Elementary Materia Medica .... 20 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 35 10 45 

General Nursing and Nursing Specialties 

Nursing Fundamentals* .... 100 

Nutrition, Foods, and Cookery .... .... 60 

Medical and Surgical Nursing .... 300 

Obstetrics and Obstetrical Nursing .... 120 

Pediatrics and Pediatric Nursing .... 120 

Psychiatry and Psychiatric Nursing .. . 120 

Health Organization with Introduction to 

Community Nursing** .... 45 

Written and Oral English 30 30 



• Nursing skills and techniques formerly taught in Nursing Arts .-in- m>w taught in 

Medical and Surjfical Nursing. 

** Home visits are made with each student as observation only. 



42 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

CLINICAL EXPERIENCE 

Pre-clinical Period 24 weeks 

Clinical Period 

Medical Nursing 24-28 weeks 

Surgical Nursing 30-34 weeks 

Operating Room Nursing 6 weeks 

Emergency Service 2 weeks 

Out-Patient Department 4 weeks 

Pediatric Nursing 13 weeks 

Obstetric Nursing 13 weeks 

Psychiatric Nursing 12 weeks 

Public Health Nursing** 8 weeks 

Vacation 12 weeks 

Total*** 152-156 weeks 



** Now offered as an elective. Beginning September, 1952, students entering the Diploma 
program will not be offered this experience. Students desiring the Health field work are 
encouraged to enroll in the four-year program. 

*** Legal requirements for registration of nurses who are graduates of three-year Diploma 
program. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
Anatomy and Physiology — 120 hours (90 hrs. lecture, 30 hrs. labtoratory) 

Lectures, laboratory, and demonstration. Similar to Zool. 14, 15. Provides 
for a general knowledge of human anatomy and physiology with practical 
application at the bedside. 

Dept. of Anatomy, Medical School, Instructor Eva Bradley, Clinical 
Instructors, and others. 

Microbiology — 45 hours (15 hrs. lecture, 30 hrs. laboratory) 

The lecture and laboratory periods are devoted to the study of the essential 
relation of microbiology to diagnosis, treatment, prevention of disease, and 
nursing care. Emphasis is placed upon the important pathogenic species. 
This includes mode of entrance into the body; portal of exit; method of 
transfer; tests most helpful in determining their presence, methods of 
immunization, and a good working knowledge of the various methods used 
in their destruction. 

Instructor Eva Bradley, and Clinical Instructors. 

Chemistry — 60 hours (40 hrs. lecture, 20 hrs. laboratory) 

The content includes selected areas of general, organic, and biological 

chemistry, as it relates to the practice of nursing and the application of 

related sciences. 

Prof, of Chemistry, Dept. of Chemistry, Medical School, Instructor 

Eva Bradley, and Clinical Instructors. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 43 

Sociology — 45 hours 

As given in Sociology 1. 

Prof. Harold C. Hoffsommer 

Dept. of Sociology, University of Maryland 

Psychology — 45 hours 

As given in Nursing 108. 

Dr. Jacob Finesinger and associates. 

Medical and Surgical Nursing — 300 hours 

As given in Nursing 101-102, Integrated Medical and Surgical Nursing. 
Instructor LaRue Schwallenberg, Mrs. Wohlsen, Miss Paulonis, Miss 
Waters, Mrs. Grotefend, Miss Baer, and others. 

Obstetrics and Obstetrical Nursing — 120 hours 

As given in Nursing 105, Obstetrical Nursing. 

Marguerite Hydorn, Instructor, medical lecturers, and others. 

Pediatrics and Pediatric Nursing — 120 hours 

As given in Nursing 151, Pediatric Nursing. 

Prof. Pauline Kummer, Miss Reed, Prof. McNaughton, and others. 

Social Foundations of Nursing — 30 hours 

As given in Nursing 155. 

Prof. Florence M. Gipe, Assistant Prof. Margaret Hayes, and Virginia 

Conley. 

History of Nursing — 30 hours 

As given in Nur. Ed. 3. 
Prof. Florence M. Gipe 
Assistant Prof. Mary Grotefend. 

Nursing Fundamentals — 100 hours 

As given in Nur. Ed. 7. 

Cecilia Zitkus, Virginia Conley, Ellen White. 

Pharmacology — 15 hours (35 his. lecture, 10 his. laboratory) 
As given in Nursing L03. 
Ruth Musser, Instructor Eva Bradley. 

Nutrition — 60 hours (L'O his. lecture, 40 his. laboratory) 

As given in Nursing 104. 
Assistant Prof. Elizabeth Cochran 



44 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Psychiatry and Psychiatric Nursing — 120 hours 

As given in Nursing 152, Psychiatric Nursing. 
Prof, of Psychiatric Nursing and associates. 

Health Organization with Introduction to Commuity Nursing — 45 hours 

As given in Nursing 106, Public Health. 

Written and Oral English — 30 hours 

A review of the techniques and skills needed in the presentation of 
written and oral material. 
Dr. Rebekah Liebman. 






For Further Information Address: 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

University of Maryland 
620 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore 1 Maryland 




A UNIVERSITY OF N 

YCAND 





1 



™g^ 



JUNE, 1953 




0? jr^SlHG 

• OF i;^*^ 



The School of 

NURSING 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1953-1954 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
BALTIMORE. MARYLAND 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Calendar 

College Park Division 2 

Baltimore Division 3 

Board of Regents and Maryland State Board of Agriculture 5 

Colleges, University of Maryland 5, 6 

General Administrative Board 6 

Administrative Officers 7 

Faculty Committees 8 

Map— College Park 10, 11 

Staff, School of Nursing 12 

Part-time Instructional Staff 12 

Faculty and Special Committees, School of Nursing 13 

Administrative Staff — University of Maryland Hospital 14 

Department of Nursing Service 14, 15 

School of Nursing, General Information 16 

Objectives 16 

History 16 

Membership and Accreditation 17 

Facilities for Instruction 17 

Library Facilities 17 

Admission Requirements 18 

Freshmen Students 18 

Transfer Students 19 

Application Procedure 19 

Registration 19 

Fees and Expenses 20 

Degree Students 21 

Laboratory and other Fees 22 

Definition of Residence and Non-Residence 22 

Special Fees 23 

Diploma Students 24 

Scholastic Regulations 24 

Grading 24 

Junior Requirements 25 

Requirements for Graduation 25 

Conferring of Degrees 25 

Eligibility for State Registration 26 

Living Arrangements 26 

College Park Campus 26 

Baltimore Campus 27 

Student Health and Welfare 27 

Scholarships and Loans 28 

Counseling Program 29 

Basic Professional Nursing Program Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of 

Science in Nursing 32 

Course Requirements of the University 35 

Basic Nursing Program Leading to a Diploma in Nursing 42 




The School of 

NURSING 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 



1953 - 1954 



(TV9 



IMPORTANT 

The provisions of this publication are not to be regarded as an irrevocable 
contract between the student and the University of Maryland. The University 
reserves the right to change any provision or requirement at any time within 
the student's term of residence. The University further reserves the right at 
any time, to ask a student to withdraw when it considers such action to be 
in the best interests of the University. 



CALENDAR 1953-1954 

College Park Division 
First Semester 



1953 

September 16-18 
September 21 
October 15 
November 25 
November 30 
December 19 



Wednesday-Friday 

Monday 

Thursday 

Wednesday after last class 

Monday, 8 a.m. 

Saturday after last class 



Registration, first semester 
Instruction begins 
Convocation, faculty and students 
Thanksgiving recess begins 
Thanksgiving recess ends 
Christmas recess begins 



1954 



January 4 


Monday, 8 a.m. 


Christmas recess ends 


January 20 


Wednesday 


Charter Day 


January 21-28 


Thursday-Thursday, inc. 


First semester examinations 




Second Semester 


February 3-5 


Wednesday-Friday 


Registration, second semester 


February 8 


Monday 


Instruction begins 


February 22 


Monday 


Washington's birthday, holiday 


March 25 


Thursday 


Maryland Day 


April 15 


Thursday after last class 


Easter recess begins 


April 20 


Tuesday, 8 a.m. 


Easter recess ends 


May 13 


Thursday 


Military Day 


May 27- June 4 


Thursday-Friday, inc. 


Second Semester examinations 


May 30 


Sunday 


Baccalaureate exercises 


May 31 


Monday 


Memorial Day holiday 


June 5 


Saturday 


Commencement exercises 




Summer Session, 1954 (Baltimore Campus) 


June 7 


Monday 


Instruction begins 


July 17 


Saturday 


Instruction ends 



CALENDAR— 1953-1954 



Baltimore Division 



1953 








September 


9 


Wednesday 


Registration, payment of fees, 
diploma students 


September 


14 


Monday 


Instruction begins 


November 


25 


Wednesday after last clas< 


3 Instruction suspended 


November 


26 


Thursday 


Thanksgiving, holiday 


November 


30 


Monday 


Instruction resumed 


December 


19 


Saturday after last class 


Instruction suspended 


December 


25 


Friday 


Christmas, holiday 


1954 








January 1 




Friday 


New Year's Day. holiday 


January 4 




Monday 


Instruction resumed 


February 


-> - 
5-5 


Wednesday-Friday 


Registration, second term — 
degree students 


February '. 


11 


Monday 


Washington's birthday, holiday 


March 25 




Thursday 


Maryland Day, holiday 


April 15 




Thursday 


Instruction suspended 


April 18 




Sunday 


Easter Sunday, holiday 


April 20 




Tuesday 


Instruction resumed 


May 30 




Sunday 


Baccalaureate exercises 


May 31 




Monday 


Memorial Day. holiday 


June 5 




Saturday 


Commencement exercis 


July 5 




Monday 


Independence Day, holiday 


July 6-9 




Tuesday-Friday 


Registration, payment of fees, 
degree students 


September 


6 


Monday 


Labor Day, holiday 


September 


8 


Wednesday 


Registration, payment oi Eees,« 
diploma student- 


September 


13 


Monday 


Instruction begin- 



1953 : 1954 : 1955 


JULY 1953 


JANUARY 1954 


JULY 1954 


JANUARY 1955 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TW T F S 


12 3 4 


12 


12 3 


1 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


1112 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 1112 13 14 15 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 2122 


26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 




31 




30 31 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


S M TWT F S 


S M T WT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


1 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


13 14 15 16 17 1819 


16 1718 19 20 2122 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


28 


29 30 31 


27 28 


30 31 








SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S M T WT F S 


S M TWTF S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TW T F S 


.... 12 3 4 5 


.. 12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 


.. .. 12 3 4 5 


6 7 8 9 1011 12 


7 8 910111213 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 1415 1617 18 19 


14 15 1617 1819 20 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


13 1415 16 17 18 19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 28 29 30 


28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 . . 


27 28 29 30 31 .... 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


12 3 


12 3 


12 


12 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


4 5 6 7 8 910 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


18 19 20 2122 23 24 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


17 18 19 20 2122 23 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 .. 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 

31 

NOVEMBER 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


MAY' 


S M T WT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


1 


..123456 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


910 1112 13 14 15 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


15 16 17 18 1920 21 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


16 1718 19 20 2122 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


29 30 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


28 29 30 


29 30 31 




DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


S M TW T F S 


S M TWT F S 


S M T WT F S 


.... 12 3 4 5 


.... 12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 


12 3 4 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


5 6 7 8 910 11 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


12 13 14 15 1617 18 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


27 28 29 30 31 ... . 


27 28 29 30 


26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 


26 27 28 29 30 . . . . 



EASTER SUNDAYS: April 5, 1953: April 18, 1954 



ORGANIZATION 
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Harry Clifton Byrd, B.S., LL.D., D.Sc, President and Executive Officer 

BOARD OF REGENTS 

AND 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF AGRICULTURE Term 

Expires 

William P. Cole, Jr., Chairman, 100 West University Parkway, Baltimore 1958 

B. Herbert Brown, 12 W. Madison St., Baltimore 1960 

Edmund S. Burke, Cumberland 1959 

Edward P. Holter, Middletown 1959 

Louis L. Kaplan 1201 Eutaw Place, Baltimore 1961 

E. Paul Knotts, Denton, Caroline County 1954 

Arthur O. Lovejoy, 827 Park Avenue, Baltimore 1960 

Charles P. McCormick, Light and Barre Sts., Baltimore 1957 

Harry H. Nuttle, Denton, Caroline County 1957 

C. Ewing Tuttle, 1114 St. Paul St, Baltimore 1962 

Mrs. John L. Whitehurst, 4101 Greenway, Baltimore 1956 

Members of the Board are appointed by the Governor of the State for terms of 
nine years each, beginning the first Monday in June. 

The President of the University of Maryland is, by law, Executive Officer of 
the Board. 

The State law provides that the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland 
shall constitute the Maryland State Board of Agriculture. 

A regular meeting of the Board is held the third Friday in each month, except 
during the months of July and August. 

Each school has its own Advisory Board, Council, or Committee composed 
of the Dean and members of its faculty, which controls the internal affairs of 
the group it represents. 

The University has the following educational organizations: 

At Baltimore 

School of Dentistry School of Nursing 

School of Law School of Pharmacy 

School of Medicine 

5 



At College Park 



College of Agriculture 

College of Arts and Sciences 

College of Business and Public 
Administration 

College of Education 

Glenn L. Martin College of Engi- 
neering and Aeronautical 
Sciences 



College of Home Economics 

Graduate School 

College of Military Science 

College of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health 

College of Special and Continuation 
Studies 

Summer School 



GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

President Byrd, Chairman Miss Preinkert, Secretary 

Mr. Morrison 



Mr. Algire 
Col. Ambrose 
Deax Bamford 
Mr. Bextox 
Dr. Bishop 
Mr. Brigham 
Dr. Brueckner 
Mr. Buck 
President Byrd 
Dean Cairns 
Mr. Cissell 
Deax Cotterman 
Deax Devilbiss 
Dean Ehrensberger 



Deax Eppley 
Dr. Faber 
Mr. Fogg 
Deax Foss 
Deax Fraley 
Deax Gipe 
Dr. Gwin 
Mr. Haszard 
Dr. Haut 
Deax Howell 
Dr. Huff 
Dr. Hoffsommer 
Dean Loxg 
Mrs. Low 



Deax Mount 
Dr. Nystrom 
Miss Preixkert 
Deax Pyle 
Deax Robinson 
Deax Smith 
Deax Stamp 
Deax Steinberg 
Mr. Weber 
Dr. White 
Dean Wylie 
Dr. Zucker 



EDUCATIONAL COUNCIL 

The President, Dean of the Faculty, Chairman, Deans of Colleges, Chair- 
men of Academic Divisions, Heads of Educational Departments, Director of 
Admissions, Registrar. 

6 



OFFICERS OF THE ADMINISTRATION 

H. C. Byrd, LL.D., D.Sc, President of the University 

Harold F. Cotterman, Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty 

Ronald Bamford, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 

Gordon M. Cairns, Ph.D., Dean of Agriculture 

Leon P. Smith, Ph.D., Dean of College of Arts and Sciences 

J. Freeman Pyle, Ph.D., Dean of College of Business and Public Administration 

, Dean of School of Dentistry 

Wilbur Devilbiss, Ed.D., Dean of College of Education, Director of Summer School 
S. S. Steinberg, B.E., C.E., Dean of College of Engineering 
M. Marie Mount, M.A., Dean of College of Home Economics 
Roger Howell, LL.B., Ph.D., Dean of School of Law 
H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Dean of School of Medicine 

Joseph R. Ambrose, Col. U.S.A.F., Dean of College of Military Science and Pro- 
fessor of Air Science and Tactics 
L. M. Fraley, Ph.D., Dean of College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 
Florence M. Gipe, Ed.D., R.N., Dean of School of Nursing 
Noel E. Foss, Ph.D., Dean of School of Pharmacy 

Ray W. Ehrensberger, Ph.D., Dean of College of Special and Continuation Studies 
Geary F. Eppley, M.S., Dean of Men, Director of Student Welfare 
Adele H. Stamp, M.A., Dean of Women 
Edgar F. Long, Ph.D., Dean of Students 
G. Watsox Algire. M.S., Director of Admissions 
Alma H. Preinkert, M.A., Registrar 

Paul E. Nystrom, Director of Instruction, College of Agriculture 
James M. Gwin, Ph.D., Director of the Agricultural Extension Service 
Irvin C. Haut, Ph.D., Director of Agricultural Experiment Station 
James M. Tatum, B.S., Director of Athletics 
George O. Weber, B.S., Business Manager 
George W. Morrison, B.S., Associate Business Manager 
Charles L. Benton, M.S., C.P.A., Director of Finance and Business 
W. J. Huff, Ph.D., D.Sci., Director of the Engineering Experiment Station 
George H. Buck, Ph.B., Director, University Hospital 
Howard Rovelstad, M.A., B.S.L.S., Director of Libraries 
Harry A. Bishop, M.D., Medical Director 
George W. Fogg, M.A., Director of Personnel 
Frank K. Haszard, B.F.S., Director of Procurement and Supply 
Harvey L. Miller, Col., U. S. M. C. (Ret.), Director of Publications and Publicity 
David L. Brigham. B.S., General Alumni Secretary 
Douglas M. Peck, Lt. Col. U. S. A. F., Commandant of Cadets 

CHAIRMEN OF THE ACADEMIC DIVISIONS 

Dr. Charles E. White, Professor of Chemistry, Chairman. The Lower Division 
Dr. John E. Faber, Professor of Bacteriology, Chairman, The Division of Biological 

Sciences 
Dr. Adolph E. Zu( ker, Professor of Foreign Languages, Chairman, The Division of 

Humanities 
Dr. Wilbkrt J. llni , Professor of Chemical Engineering, i hairman, The Division of 

Physical Sciences 
Dr. Harold C. Hoffsommf.r. Pi i Sociology, Chairman, Tin Division of 

Social Sciences 

7 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Admission, Guidance, and Adjustment 

Chairman Reid; Messrs. Cairns, Eppley, Gustad, Hodgins, Long, Quigley, 
Robinson, Schindler, Manning, Weigand, White; Mmes. Crow, Preinkert, 
Stamp. 

Coordination of Agricultural Activities 

Chairman Cairns; Messrs. Ah alt, Bopst, Brueckner, Carpenter, Cory, Cox, 
Foster, Gwin, Haut, Holmes, Jull, Kuhn, Magruder, Nystrom. 

Council on Intercollegiate Athletics 

Chairman Eppley; Messrs. Ambrose, Cory, Faber, Reid, Tatum; President 
of the Student Government Association and the Chairman of the Alumni 
Council, ex-officio. 

Educational Standards, Policies and Coordination 

Chairman Cotterman ; Messrs. Bamford, Cairns, Devilbiss, Drake, Hahn, 
Hoffsommer, Kuhn, Martin, Shreeve, L. P. Smith, Strahorn, Wylie; Mmes. 
Mitchell, Wiggins. 

Special and Adult Education 

Chairman Ehrensberger; Messrs. Ambrose, Brechbill, Burdette, Drazek, 
Manning, Reid. 

Honors Programs 

Chairman Cotterman; Messrs. Devilbiss, Hoffsommer, Smith, Zucker. 
Libraries 

Chairman Martin; Messrs. Aisenberg, Brown, Foster, Hackman, Hall, 
Invernezzi, Parsons, Reeve, Rovelstad, Slama, Spencer; Mmes. Harman, Ida 
M. Robinson, Wiggin. 

Publications and Catalog 

Chairman Cotterman ; Messrs. Ball, Bamford, Crowell, Devilbiss, Fogg, 
Foss, Gwin, Haut, Howell, Miller, Pyle, Smith, Wylie. Zucker; Mmes. E. 
Frothingham, Mount, Preinkert. 

Public Functions and Public Relations 

Chairman Pyle; Messrs. Ambrose, Brigham, Cook, Cory, Ehrensberger, 
Eppley, Fogg, Foss, Gewehr, Howell, Miller, Morrison, Randall, Reid, Shreeve, 
Weber, Wylie; Mmes. Mount, Preinkert, Stamp. 

Religious Life Committee 

Chairman Shreeve; Messrs. Daiker, Gewehr, Hamilton, Randall, Reid, 
Scott, White; Mmes. Bryan, McNaughton. 

Scholarships and Student Aid 

Chairman Cotterman; Messrs. Eppley, Long, Reid, Steinmeyer; Mmes. 
Mount, Stamp. 

Student Life 

Chairman Reid; Messrs. Allen, Eppley, James, Kramer, Peck, Quigley, 
Strausbaugh, Tatum, White; Mmes. Binns, Harman, Preinkert, Stamp and 
the President of the Student Government Association and the President 
of the Men's League and the President of the Women's League. 

8 



1ttUv&Mit<t<>6'Mt*Mfa«K(< 



Born* - N / 




COLLEGE PARK CAMPUS 

1953 



misfry(C) 




Engineering 



OossroOTS (J) 



Armory (Arl 




Ritchie Coliseum - 
(Col) 



'~~1 I 





INDEX 



A Arts and Sciences 

Ar Armory 

B Music 

BB Chemistry Annex 

1 B Administration 

C Chemistry (new) 

Col Coliseum 

D Dairy 

DD Psychology 

DW Dean of Women 

E Agronomy, Botany, Physics 

F Horticulture 

G Gymnasium 

FF Mathematics 

GG Mathematics 

H Home Economics 

HH Seminar 

I Agric, Eng. and Industrial Education 

J Engr. Classroom Bldg. 

K Zoology 

L Library 

M Morrill Hall 

N Geography 

O Symons Hall (Agric.) 

P Poultry 

Q Business and Public Administration 

R Classroom Building 

S Eng. Lab. Building 

T Education 

U Chem. Engineering 

V Wind Tunnel 

W Women's Field House 

X Animal Husbandry Pavilion 

Y Mathematics 

Physics 



PorV.nq 
LotV 



Sororities Not Shown — 
Alpha Chi Omega 
Alpha Xi Delta 

Fraternities Not Shown 
Alpha Epsilon Pi 
Pi Alpha 

Phi Kappa Gamma 
Tau Epsilon Phi 
Zeta Beta Tau 




Tennis CourU __^,- 



IFire S«r E»i Bldg 



? tf 





12 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

STAFF, SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Florence M. Gipe, R.N., Ed.D., Dean 

Martha Baer, R.N., B.S Instructor, Community Nursing 

Ruth Dyson, M.A Assistant Professor, Nutrition 

Jean Cohn, R.N., B.S Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Virginia C. Conley, R.N., M.A Assistant Professor and Assistant to the Dean 

Eva F. Darley, R.N., B.S Associate Professor, (Nursing Service) 

Florence M. Gipe, R.N., Ed.D Professor of Nursing and Dean 

Mary Grotefend, R.N., M.S Assistant Professor, Social Sciences 

Margaret Hayes, R.N., M.S Assistant Professor and Advisor of 

Student Affairs (College Park Division) 

Carol Hosfeld, R.N., B.S Assistant Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Marguerite Hydorn, R.N., B.S Instructor, Maternal and Child Health 

Pauline Kummer, R.N., M.N., M.A Professor, Pediatric Nursing 

Magaret Paulonis, R.N., B.S Instructor, Clinical Nursing 

Frances Reed, R.N., M.Ed Instructor. Nursing of Children 

LaRue ScHvvallenberg, R.N., B.S Assistant Professor, Medical and 

Surgical Nursing 

Mabel Simmont, R.N., B.S Instructor, Applied Physical and 

Biological Sciences 

Elizabeth Singleton, R.N., B.S Advisor of 

Student Affairs (Baltimore Division) 

Eleanor Slacum, R.N., B.S Associate Professor, (Psychiatric Nursing) 

Ethel M. Troy, R.N., B.S Instructor, Surgical Nursing 

Kathryn Williams, R.N., B.S Associate Professor, Operating Room Nursing 

Kathryn Wohlsen, R.N., M.N., M.A Associate Professor, Community Nursing 

Ellen White, R.N., B.S Assistant Instructor, Fundamentals of Nursing 

♦Cecilia Zitkus, R.N., A.B Assistant Professor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

— — 1, Professor, Psychiatric Nursing 

ASSISTANTS IN SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Florence Alexander, R.N Supervisor of Student Dormitory 

Ellen T. Chrissinger, R.N Assistant in Student Health 

Ann M. Hall, R.N Administrative Assistant 

Evelyn M. Weeks Records Secretary 

PART-TIME INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF 

J. Edmund Bradley, M.D Professor of Pediatrics and Staff 

Brice Dorsey, D.D.S Professor of Oral Surgery and Staff 

Louis H. Douglass, M.D Professor of Obstetrics and Staff 

Charles R. Edwards, M.D Professor of Surgery and Staff 

Jacob E. Finesinger, M.D Professor of Psychiatry and Staff 

Maurice Greenhill, M.D Associate Professor, Psychiatry 

1 to be apiK)lnted. 

♦Will complete Master's Degree August. 1053. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 13 

Frank Hachtel, M.I) Professor of Bacteriology and Staff 

J.Mason Hundley, Jr., M.A., M.D Professor of Gynecology and Staff 

John C. Krantz, Jr., Ph.D., D.Sc Professor of Pharmacology and Staff 

Rebekah R. Liebman, Ed.D Instructor, English 

Edna McNaughton, M.A Professor of Nursery School and 

Kindergarten Education and Staff 

Maurice C. Pincoffs, B.S., M.D Professor of Medicine and Staff 

Emil G. Schmidt, Ph.D., LL.D Professor of Biological Chemistry and Staff 

Gladys Sellew, R.N., Ph.D Visiting Professor, Nursing 

Frank J. Slama, Ph.D Professor of Pharmacognosy 

Edward Uhlenhuth, Ph.D Professor of Anatomy and Staff 

Huntington Williams, M.D., Dr. P.H Professor of Hygiene and Public 

Health and Staff 



FACULTY AND SPECIAL COMMITTEES, SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Executive Committee 
Dr. Gipe, Chairman ; Misses Hayes, Conley, Mrs. Darley, Mrs. Wohlsen. 

Inter-Relations Committee 

School-Hospital-Mcdical Staff 
Dr. Gipe, Chairman; Air. Buck, Drs. Pincoffs, Edwards, Bradley. Douglass, 
Finesinger, Mrs. Darley, President of Student Council. 

Admissions, Guidance, and Adjustment 
Mr. Algire, Chairman; Dr. Gipe, Misses Hayes, Conley, Mrs. Grotefend, Mrs. 
Singleton, Mrs. Chrissingcr, Mrs. Hall, Dr. Carl. 

Educational Standards, Policies and Coordination 
Dr. Gipe, Chairman; Misses Conley, Hayes, Kummer, Mrs. Wohlsen. 

Coordination of Clinical Nursing 
Mrs. Wohlsen, Chairman; Misses Baer, Conley, Hydorn, Reed, Sch Wallen- 
berg, Slacum, Zitkus, Mrs. Darley. 

Libraries 
Mrs. I. Robinson, Chairman; Dr. Gipe, Misses Paulonis, Hydorn. Sinimont, 
Reed, President of Student Government Association. 

Publications and Catalogues 
Miss Conley, Chairman; Misses Hayes, Kummer, Mrs. Singleton. 

Public Functions and Public Relations 

Dr. Gipe, Chairman; Misses Conley, Hayes, Hosfeld, Mrs. Singleton, 

Student Nurse Representative. 



14 



UNIVERSITY 01 : MARYLAND 



Religious Life 
Mrs. Singleton, Chairman; Mrs. Alexander, Misses Hosfeld, Paulonis, 
President of Student Council. 

Scholarship and Student Aid 
Dr. Cotterman, Chairman; Dr. Gipe, Misses Conley, Hayes, Street, Mrs. 
Singleton, Mrs. M. Robinson, Mrs. Winslow, Dr. Yeager, Mr. Buck. 

Student Life 
Miss Paulonis, Chairman; Misses Hosfeld, Schwallenberg, White, Hydorn, 
Valeikis, Mrs. Chrissinger, Dr. Townshend, Student Nurse Representatives (2). 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF— UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

HOSPITAL 

George H. Buck, Ph.B Director, Univerity Hospital 

James Dack, M.A Assistant Director, University Hospital 

Kurt Nork, M.A Assistant Director, University Hospital 

Eva F. Darley, R.N., B.S Associate Director, Nursing Service 

Martha Hoffman, R.N Assistant Director, Nursing Service, afternoon 

Hilda Jones, R.N Assistant Director, Nursing Service, night 

Eleanor Slacum, R.N., B.S Associate Director, Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Jane Laib, R.N Instructing Supervisor, Red Cross Aides 

Lorraine Neel, R.N Supervisor, Auxiliary Personnel 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE 

Eva Darley, R.N., B.S., Associate Director, Nursing Service 
Eleanor Slacum, R.N., B.S., Associate Director Psychiatric Nursing Service 

Mary A. Brislix, R.N Supervisor, General Nursing — night 

Mary Cruickshank, R.N Head Nurse, Obstetric Service 

Dana Day, R.N., B.S Head Nurse, Out Patient Department Service 

Elva Deax, R.N Head Nurse, Central Supply Room Service 

Anna De Haven, R.N Head Nurse, Operating Room Service 

Kathryn Donnelly, R.N Head Nurse, Operating Room Service 

Mildred Fisher, R.N Head Nurse, Out Patient Department Service 

Ella Gooch, R.N Supervisor, Central Supply Room Service 

Thelma Grove, R.N Supervisor, Medical and Surgical Service 

Dorothy Herbert, R.N Head Nurse, Obstetric Service 

Martha I toi i man, R.N Assistant Director, Nursing Service, afternoon 

Mary Ireland, R.N Head Nurse, Delivery Room Service 

Phyllis Johnsox, R.N Head Nurse, Obstetric Service 

Hilda Jones, R.N Assistant Director, Nursing Service — night 

Helen T. King, R.N., B.S Head Nurse, Operating Room Service 



THE SCHOOL OF NL'RSIXG 



15 



Alva Lantz, R.N Head Nurse, Premature Nursery 

Jane Laib, R.N Instructing Supervisor — Red Cross Aides 

Anne Lutz, R.N Head Nurse, Operating Room Service 

Rita Malek, R.N Head Nurse, Operating Room Service 

Edith Miller, R.N Supervisor, Out Patient Department Service 

Lorraine Neel, R.N Supervisor, Auxiliary Personnel 

Elizabeth O'Shea, R.N Head Nurse, Surgical Service 

Mary Paupalos, R.N Head Nurse, Medical Service 

Ivery Reiter, R.N Head Nurse. Medical Service 

Margaret Riffle, R.N Supervisor, Semi- Private Services 

Mary Saulsbury, R.N Supervisor, Nursing Service Office — evening 

Phyllis Z. Scharp ; R.N., B.S Head Nurse, Medical-Surgical Service 

Norma Shriver, R.N Supervisor, Medical-Surgical Service 

Elizabeth Sites, R.N., B.S., Head Nurse, Psychiatric 

Out-Patient Department Service 

Virginia Stack, R.N Supervisor, Private Services 

Flora Street, R.N Supervisor, Obstetric Service 

Agnes Valeikis, R.N Supervisor, Pediatric Service 

Eleanor Vomastack, R.N Head Nurse, Medical-Surgical Service 

Katiiryn Williams, R.N., B.S Supervisor, Operating Room Service 

Ruth Wolfram, R.N., B.S Head Nurse. Obstetric Service 

Florence Wong, R.N Head Nurse. Special Clinics 

Elizabeth Young, R.N Head Nurse, Out-Patient Department Service 

Theresa Ziemak. R.N Head Nurse, Emergency Room Service 




Helping a sick youngster to feel like smiling again is a challenging nursing goal. 



16 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Florence M. Gipe, R.N., Ed.D. 

The School of Nursing of the University of Man-land offers both general 
and fundamental education for students who wish to prepare for professional 
work in the broad field of nursing activities. 

Two curriculums are available; one, a four-year curriculum leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing; the other, a three-year curriculum upon 
the completion of which the student is awarded a diploma in Nursing. 

The objective of the four-year curriculum is to aid the student to develop 
habits in critical and constructive thinking, as well as skills in nursing, which 
will continue to influence her growth and learning, and will enable her to 
assume the responsibility of a professional nurse and of a useful member of 
her community. 

The objective of the three-year program is to acquaint the student with 
the understanding, skills and attitudes which will qualify her to assist in 
planning and conducting total nursing care of patients, as well as to develop 
competence as a member of a health team under supervision in hospitals, clinics 
and in homes. 

History 

The School of Nursing of the University of Maryland, the second school 
of nursing to be founded in Maryland, was organized in 1889 by Louisa Parsons, 
a student of Florence Nightingale, and a graduate of the St. Thomas Hospital 
School, London. Miss Nightingale, because of her interest in Miss Parsons' 
new American school, designed the present graduate nurse's cap. 

The original two year curriculum was extended in 1902 to three years. For 
a generation, graduates of the growing school served in the community, founded 
nursing schools in Maryland and other states, and participated in their pro- 
fessional organizations. In World Wars I and II, graduates of the school 
served on foreign soil with the Medical Units of the University of Maryland. 

In 1920 the school of nursing became a separate unit of the University, 
although it continued to be administered as a hospital school. 

In 1926 the University of Maryland instituted a five year combined academic 
and nursing program. The establishment of this type of program was in 
keeping with the trends in nursing education at that time. The student, after 
completing two years of academic work in the College of Arts and Sciences 
and three years in the School of Nursing, received the Bachelor of Science 
degree and the diploma of graduate in nursing. 

Recent trends in nursing created in Maryland, as in other states, a demand 
for a four year program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nurs- 
ing. The faculty advised the President and Board of Regents of the University 
to inaugurate such a program to replace the existing five year plan. On May 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 17 

26, 1952, the four year program was publicly announced by the President of 
the University. A Dean was appointed and members of the faculty were ac- 
corded academic status. Through this action the Nursing School became a 
degree-granting institution. The School of Nursing, being a part of the State 
University which is also a Land Grant College, receives funds for operation 
from the University. 

Membership and Accreditation 

The University of Maryland, which incorporates the School of Nursing 
with all of the other schools of the University, is a member of the Association 
of American Colleges and is accredited by the Middle Atlantic Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

Both programs in Nursing, the three and live (now four year program), 
are approved by the Maryland State Board of Examiners of Nurses, and by 
the National Nursing Accrediting Service for the five year interim accreditation. 

FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION 

Facilities for instruction used by the School of Nursing include: the 
various colleges of the University of Maryland at College Park, the professional 
schools of the University, Dentistry, Law, Medicine and Pharmacy, and the 
College of Special and Continuation Studies on the Baltimore campus. 

In addition to these, the School of Nursing makes use of the following 
facilities: 

University of Maryland Hospital: General hospital of oOO beds, providing 
medical, surgical, pediatric, and obstetric services. 

Out-Patient Department: Clinics for all services housed in the Old Uni- 
versity Hospital building. An average of 500 patients are treated daily. 

Psychiatric Institute: Recently constructed addition to the University 
Hospital with facilities for 105 patients, the psychiatric out-patient department 
and Child Guidance Clinic. 

University of Maryland Nursery-Kindergarten School: Unit operated by 
the College of Education to provide training and experience for students 
interested in nursery-kindergarten school education. 

Springfield State Hospital: Hospital of 2900 beds located in Sykesville, 

Maryland for the care and treatment of mentally ill patients. 

Baltimore City Health Department: Agenc) providing health teaching and 

nursing care of patients in their homes. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES 

Libraries are located at both the College Park and Baltimore divisions 

of the Universities. In addition to the general library, volumes on the 



18 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

College Park campus are shelved in the Chemistry, Entomology, and Mathe- 
matics Departments, and Graduate School, and other units. 

The general library is a depository for publications of the United States 
Government, and numbers some 75,000 documents in its collection. 

The University Library System is able to supplement its reference 
service by borrowing materials from other libraries through Inter-Library 
Loan or Bibliofilm Service, or by arranging for personal work in the Library 
of Congress, the United States Department of Agriculture Library, and other 
agencies in Washington. 

The School of Nursing Library is an integral part of the University of 
Maryland Library System, and is under the. Director of Libraries of the Uni- 
versity. Both scientific and recreational collections of books are provided in 
the Library which is conveniently located on the first floor of Louisa Parsons 
Hall, the student dormitory. 

The facilities of the Medical, Dental, Pharmacy and Law School Libraries 
are available to the students of the School of Nursing. Additional facilities are 
provided at the main branch of the Enoch Pratt Library, which comprises the 
public library system of the City of Baltimore; the Peabody Library which 
comprises a large collection of non-circulating books; and the Maryland 
Historical Society Library. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Freshmen Students 

Graduates of accredited secondary schools will be admitted by certificate 
upon the recommendation of the principal. The admission requirements of 
the School of Nursing are much the same as of the other schools of the Uni- 
versity. In selecting students more emphasis will be placed upon indications 
of probable success in nursing rather than upon a fixed pattern of subject 
matter. The following distribution of subject matter is desirable: 

English 4 units, required for all divisions of the University 

Mathematics 2 units, one each of Algebra and Plane Geometry 

is desirable 

History 1 unit, two units are desirable 

Foreign Language 1 unit, two units are desirable 

Science 

Biology 1 unit 

( Ihemistry 1 unit 

Physics 1 unit 

The school is open to those American citizens and foreign students who 
qualify for admission. Applicants should be 17 to 45 years of age. Evidence of 
personal fitness for nursing in regard to health, personality, and moral character 
must be submitted. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 19 

Transfer Students 

Any student in good standing as to scholarship and conduct is elegible to 
transfer from an accredited college or university. Advanced standing is assigned 
to transfer students from such accredited institutions under the following 
conditions: 

1. Students who have had two years of college work in other approved 
schools may be admitted to the Junior year of the four year curriculum 

providing they have completed the courses prerequisite to the studies 
in the clinical area, such as Biology, Chemistry, Bacteriology, and 
Human Anatomy and Physiology. 

2. Students admitted to the Junior year of the four year curriculum must 
have completed the equivalent of the American Civilization Program of 
the University of Maryland. 

3. The University of Maryland reserves the right at any time to revoke 
advanced standing if the transfer student's progress is unsatisfactory. 

4. Transfer students to the three year diploma program will be required 
to spend a minimum of one calendar year in the School of Nursing. 

Application Procedure 

Registration for classes is held once yearly for both the four and the 
three year programs. 

Four Year Program 

Applications for admission to the four year program should be submitted 
to the Director of Admissions, University of Maryland, College Park, not 
later than July 1, for the fall semester. 

Three Year Program 

Applications for admission to the three year program at the University 
Hospital should be submitted to the Dean, School of Nursing, University of 
Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland. 

On the basis of a Pre-Nursing and Guidance Test given under the direction 
of the Department of Evaluation and Guidance of the National League for 
Nursing to determine potentialities for nursing, prospective students will be 
advised of their potentialities for this field. This test is required of all students. 
Directions for this Pre-Nursing Test will be sent following review oi the 
applicants credentials by the Committee on Admissions. A fee oi five dollars 
for the test is paid at the time of testing. 

Registration 

All persons are required to register in person on or within the da\ or days 
announced on the school calendar. The registration procedure consists oi (1) 
filing a registration blank at the Registrar's' Office, (2) receipt of bill at the 
Registrar's Office, and (3) the payment oi bill (fees and expenses) at the 
financial office. Students who register late are required to pay a late registration 



20 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

fee of five dollars. The last day of registration with fee added to the regular 
charges is Saturday of the week in which registration begins. The offices of the 
Registrar and Comptroller are open daily from 9:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. and 
Saturday from 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 Noon. To avoid late registration fee, pay- 
ment may be made by mail. The envelop must be postmarked not later than 
midnight on the date of registration. 

In order to attend classes and v to receive credit for courses, students en- 
rolled in degree programs are required to register. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. Students should 
come prepared to pay the full amount of the charges. Checks and money 
orders should be made payable to the University of Maryland for the exact 
amount of charges. No student will be admitted to classes until such payment 
has been made. In cases where a student has been awarded a scholarship, the 
amount of such scholarship or grant will be deducted from the bill. 

The University reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other 
expenses as may be found necessary, although every effort will be made to 
keep the costs to the student as Ioay as possible. 

Xo degree will be conferred, nor any diploma, certificate, or transcript of a 
record issued to a student who has not made satisfactory settlement of his 
account. 

In the event of dismissal or resignation, the general rules of the University 
in regard to refund of fees arc applicable. 

The charges are approximate and may fluctuate because of changing 
economic conditions. Student uniforms are obtained during the first year in the 
School of Nursing (Baltimore Campus). Expenses such as meals, carfare, 
and incidentals which the student incurs during periods of affiliation or field 
trips are borne by the student. 

EXPLANATION OF FEES 

The Fixed Charges Fee is not a charge for tuition. It is a charge to help 
defray the cost of operating the University's physical plant and other various 
services which ordinarily would not be included as a cost of teaching personnel 
and teaching supplies. Included in these costs would be janitorial services, cost 
of heat, electricity, water, etc., administrative and clerical cost, maintenance of 
building and grounds, maintenance of libraries, cost of University Publications, 
Alumni Office, the University Business and Financial Offices, the Registrar's 
Office, the Admissions Office, and any other such services as are supplemental 
and necessary to teaching and research. 

The Athletic Fee is charged for the support of the Department of Inter- 
Collegiate Athletics. All students are eligible and encouraged to participate 
in all the activities of this department and to attend all contests in which they 
do not participate. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



21 



The Special Fee is used to pay interest on and amortize the cost of con- 
struction of the Student Union Building and the combination building used as 
an Auditorium for Physical Education and Indoor Athletics. 

The Student Activities Fee is a mandatory fee included at the request of 
the Student Government Association. It covers subscription to the Diamond- 
back, " student newspaper; the Old Line, literary magazine; the Terrapin, 
yearbook; and class dues, and includes financial support for the musical and 
dramatic clubs. 

The Infirmary Fee does not include expensive drugs or special diagnostic 
procedures. Expensive drugs will be charged at cost and special diagnostic 
procedures, such as x-ray, electrocardiograms, basal metabolism study, etc., 
will be charged at the lowest cost prevailing in the vicinity. 

The Health Fee is payable on the Baltimore campus. It helps to defray 
the costs of maintenance of the health service. This service includes routine 
examinations and medical care. Special treatments, medications, and exam- 
inations are not included in this service. 

Students entering the University for the second semester will pay the 
following additional fees: Athletic, $7.50; Student Activities, S8.00; Special, 
S20.00: Infirmary. $2.50; Advisory and Testing Fee, $1.00. 

FEES FOR NURSING STUDENTS 
(DEGREE STUDENTS) 



Fees for Undergraduate Students First 

Maryland Residents (College Park Div.) Semester 

Fixed Charges S 82.00 



Athletic Fee 

Student Activities Fee . . . 

Special Fee 

Infirmary Fee 

Advisory and Testing Fee 



15.00 

10.00 

40.00 

5.00 

1.00 



$153.00 



Residents of the District of Columbia 
Other States and Countries 



Semester 
Tuition Fee for Non-Resident Students $ 75.00 



Total for Non-Resident Students $22K.(X) 



Second 
Semester 

$ 83.00 



$ 83.00 

Semester 

$ 75.00 



Total 

$165.00 

15.00 

10.00 

40.00 

5.00 

1.00 



1236.00 

Total 

$150.00 



$158.00 



$386.00 



Board and Lodging 

Board $180.00 

Dormitory Room $65-|75 

Total, Room and Board ~$245-$255 



$180.00 
$65-$75 



»2454255 



50.00 
$130-1150 



22 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



LABORATORY AND OTHER FEES 



Laboratory Fees Per Semester Course 

Agricultural Engineering $ 3.00 

Bacteriology $10.00 and 20.00 

Botany 5.00 

Chemical Engineering 8.00 

Chemistry 10.00 

Education (Depending on Labora- 
tory) . . 41.00, $2.00, $3.00, S5.00, 6.00 

Practice Teaching 30.00 

Dairy 3.00 

fttetrical Engineering 4.00 

Entomology 3.00 

Home Economics — 

(Non-Home Ec. Students) 
Practical Art, Crafts, Tex- 
tiles and Clothing 3.00 

Foods and Home Man'ment, each . . 7.00 



Horticulture $ 5.00 

Industrial Education 5.00 

Journalism S3.00 and 6.00 

Mechanical Engineering 3.00 

Music (Applied Music only) 30.00 

Physics — 

Introductory 3.00 

All Other 6.00 

Psychology 4.00 

Office Techniques and 

Management 7.50 

Speech — 

Radio and Stagecraft 2.00 

All Other 1.00 

Statistics 3.50 

Zoology 8.00 



DEFINITION OF RESIDENCE AND NON-RESIDENCE 

Students who are minors are considered to be resident students if at the 
time of their registration their parents have been domiciled in this State for at 
least one year. 

The status of the residence of a student is determined at the time of his 
first registration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him 
unless, in the case of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents 
of this State by maintaining such residence for at least one full year. However, 
the right of the minor student to change from a non-resident status to resident 
status must be established by him prior to the registration period set for any 
semester. 

Adult students are considered to be residents if at the time of their registra- 
tion they have been domiciled in this State for at least one year provided such 
residence has not been acquired while attending any school or college in 
Maryland or elsewhere. 

The word domicile as used in this regulation shall mean the permanent 
place of abode. For the purpose of this rule only one domicile may be main- 
tained. 

Residents of Maryland, Other States and The District of Columbia 
Baltimore Division, Per Year 

First Semester 

Fixed Charges $95.00 

Health Fee 20.00 

Post Office Fee 2.00 

Student Activity Fee 10.00 

Total, all students $127.00 



Second Semester Total 

$95.00 SI 90.00 

20.00 

2.00 

10.00 



95.00 



$222.00 



THE SCHOOL OF XURS1XG 23 



Board and Lodging 



Board and lodging are provided on the Baltimore Campus in exchange for 
nursing service as a working scholarship. 

SPECIAL FEES 

(Degree Students) 

Matriculation Fee — payable at time of first registration in the 

University $10.00 

Application Fee — for students transferring from other schools to the ^ 

University of Maryland in Junior Year -#^tf~ - 

Diploma Fee for Bachelors Degree 10.00 

Cap and Gown Fee for Bachelor's Degree 2.50 

Miscellaneous Fees and Charges 

Fee for part-time students per credit hour 10.00 

The term "part-time - ' is interpreted to mean undergraduate students 
taking 6 semester credit hours or less. Students carrying more than 
6 semester hours pav the regular fees. 

Late Registration Fee *^~ 

(All students are expected to complete their registration, including 
the filing of class cards and payment of bills, on the regular 
registration days). Those who do not complete their registration 
during the designated time will be charged a fee of S5.00 

Fee for Change in Registration 3.00 

Transcript of Record Fee 1.00 

Textbook and Supplies 

Cost- of textbooks and cla-sruom supplies vary with the course, but 

will average on College Park Campus, (per 35.00 

Baltimore Campus f 28 months ) 40.00 

Uniforms (approximaae cost to student ) 85.00 

Testing 

Psychometric repared by the Xational League for Nursing 

determine potentialities for nursing. Notice of time and place of 

noting will be sent to the applicant upon review of her credentials *-& 

by the Committee oi Admissions $£88/ ' 

Field Work 

Students will be responsible for lunch and car fare when they are assigned 
to outlying district- during Public Health Field Work. 



ACCREDITED BY THE NATIONAL 
NURSING ACCREDITING SERVICE. 



24 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



FEES FOR NURSING STUDENTS 
(Diploma Students) 



Fixed Charges 
Health Fee .... 
Post Office Fee 
Student Activity 



Fee 



$35.00 
. 20.00 
. 2.00 
. 10.00 



$35.00 

20.00 

2.00 

10.00 



$35.00 

20.00 

2.00 

10.00 



S105.00 

60.00 

6.00 

30.00 



$67.00 



$67.00 



$67.00 



$201.00 



Board and Lodging 

Board and lodging are provided in exchange for nursing service as a 
working scholarship. 

Miscellaneous Fees and Charges 

Application fee $ *^b? 

Graduation fee 1 5.00 

Textbooks and Supplies 

Textbooks (approximate cost to study for three years) 40.00 

Uniforms (approximate cost to student for three years) 100.00 



z? 



Testing 

Psychometric tests, which are prepared by the National League for 
Nursing to determine potentialities for nursing, are taken by pro- 
spective students. Notice of the time and place of testing will 
be sent to the applicant upon review of her credentials by the Com- 
mittee of Admissions. A fee of $5.00 is paid by the applicant at 
the time of testing. 

Total for three vears $366.00 






SCHOLASTIC REGULATIONS 
Grading 

The scholastic standing of a student is recorded in terms of the following 
symbols: A, B, C, D, passing F, failure, I, Incomplete. Mark A denotes 
superior scholarship; mark B, good scholarship; mark C, fair scholarship; and 
mark D, passing scholarship. 

In computing scholastic averages, numerial values are assigned as follows: 
A-4, B-3, C-2, D-l, F-0. 

A scholastic average of C is required for graduation and for junior 
standing. The C average will be computed on the basis of the courses required 
by each student's curriculum. The average of transfer students and those 
seeking combined degrees will be computed only on the courses taken in 
residence in the University of Maryland and in satisfaction of the non- 
curriculum requirements of the college granting the degree. An over-all 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 25 

average will also be computed to include all courses taken in the University as a 
basis for the award of honors and such other use as may be deemed appropriate. 

Students who have not obtained a passing mark will be required to take 
a re-examination in the subject failed, or if indicated, to repeat the course. 

If a student does not pass a specific clinical assignment, she is given 
special guidance. 

The University reserves the right to request the withdrawal of a student 
who does not or cannot maintain the required standard of scholarship, or whose 
continuance in the University would be detrimental to her health, or to the 
health of others, or whose conduct is not satisfactory to the authorities of the 
University. 

Attendance 

According to University regulations, excessive absence from any class is 
penalized by failure in that course. Students may be absent from class only 
upon approval of the instructor for the course. 

Reports 

Written reports of grades are sent by the Registrar to parents or guardians 
of minor students enrolled in the four year program. 

Students enrolled in the three year program will be informed of their 
progress by the Dean of the School of Nursing. 

Vacation, Absences 

Four weeks vacation is granted each year during the clinical period of 
instruction. Time lost through illness or other causes during the clinical 
period in excess of three weeks is required to be made up. 

Junior Requirements 

A student must acquire a minimum of 64 credits exclusive of the require- 
ments in physical education and introductory nursing subjects with an average 
grade of at least C in the freshman and sophomore years before transferring to 
the clinical area. 

Requirements for Graduation 

For graduation each student enrolled in four year program must acquire 
a minimum of 12S semester hour credits in academic subjects other than 
physical activities. The physical activities requirement is four semester hours in 
addition to the above requirements. 

Conferring of Degrees 

The baccalaureate degree will be awarded only to the student who has 
had one year or more of resident work in the University oi Maryland The last 
thirty semester credits of any curriculum leading to a baccalaureate degree must 
be taken in residence at the University. 



26 UXIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

An average grade of C (2.0) is required for graduation. The C average will 
be computed on the basis of the courses required by each student's curriculum. 
The average grade of transfer students and of those seeking combined degrees 
will be computed only on the courses taken in residence in the University of 
Maryland in satisfaction of the non-professional curriculum requirement of the 
college granting the degree. An overall average will also be computed to 
include all courses taken in the University as basis for the award of honors 
and such other uses as may be deemed appropriate. 

Each candidate for a degree must file a formal application for the degree 
in the Office of the Registrar eight weeks prior to the date he expects to 
graduate. Candidates for degrees must attend commencement exercises at which 
degrees are conferred and diplomas awarded. Degrees are conferred in absentia 
only in exceptional cases. 

Eligibility for State Registration 

Upon the successful completion of either the diploma or the degree 
program, graduates will be eligible for admission to the examination for 
registration to practice nursing in Maryland, which is given by the Maryland 
State Board of Examiners of Nurses. 

Transcript of Records 

Students and alumni may secure transcript of their schohlastic records from 
the Office of the Registrar. No charge is made for the first copy; for each 
additional copy there is a charge of §1.00. Checks should be made payable 
to the University of Maryland. Transcripts of records should be requested at 
least two weeks in advance of the date when the records are actually needed. 
Transcripts of students' records will be furnished only to those students or 
alumni whose financial obligations to the University have been met. 

LIVING ARRANGEMENTS 

Dormitories-College Park 

All freshmen except those who live at home are required to room in the 
dormitories. Students are required to live in the University's dormitories or 
locally with relatives. All living accommodations must be approved by the 
Dean of Women. 

All new students desiring to room in the dormitories should request a 
room application card on their application for admission. The Director of 
Admissions will refer these to the offices of the Dean of Women. Application 
cards will be sent to applicants and should be returned promptly. A fee of 
$15.00 will be requested which will be deducted from the first semester charges 
when the student registers. A room is not assured until notice is received from 
the Dean concerned. Room reservation fees will not be refunded if the request 
is received later than August 15 for the first semester. 

Applications for rooms are acted upon only when a student has been fully 
admitted academically to the University. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 27 

It is understood that all housing and board arrangements which are made 
for the fall semester are binding for the spring semester. 

Equipment 

Students assigned to dormitories should provide themselves with single 
blankets, at least four sheets, a pillow, pillow cases, towels, a laundry bag, a 
waste paper basket, a desk blotter, and bureau scarves. The individual student 
must assume responsibility for all dormitory property assigned to her. 

Each student will be furnished a key for her room for which a deposit of 
$1.00 is made. This deposit will be returned in exchange for the key at the end 
of the year. 

Baggage 

Personal baggage sent via American Express and marked with a dormitory 
address will be delivered when the student notifies the College Park express 
office of her arrival. 

Laundry 

Students ma}' use facilities provided in each dormitory although there are 
no facilities for the laundering of bed linen. 

Meals 

All students who live in permanent University dormitories must take meals 
at the University Dining Hall. 

Residence Hall — Baltimore 

Louisa Parsons Hall, the student dormitory of the School of Nursing, offers 
comfortable living accommodations for the nursing students. It is under the 
general supervision of a registered graduate nurse. Bed linens, blankets, and 
curtains are provided as part of the general furnishings of the room. Students 
are requested to bring their own bedspreads. 

All students of the School of Nursing are required to live in the nurses' 
dormitory, except during certain affiliations when they reside in the nurses' 
dormitories associated with the various hospitals. 

STUDENTS HEALTH AND WELFARE 
Student Health— College Park Campus 

The University recognizes its responsibility for safeguarding the health of 
students and takes every possible precaution toward this end. All new 
undergraduate students will be given a thorough physical examination at the 
time of their entrance to the University. A well equipped infirmary is available 
for the care of the siek or injured student. A small fee is charged but does 
not cover the cost of expensive drugs and special diagnostic procedures. 

Student Health — Baltimore Campus 

The School of Nursing, in cooperation with the University o\ Maryland 
Hospital, maintains a health service under the general direction iy\ an appointed 



28 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

physician and nurse to provide medical care for the students. 

All new students receive a physical examination including chest x-ray and 
blood studies as a part of their matriculation in this area. This examination is 
repeated annually or more often if indicated. 

Hospital care is provided for the student for a limited time. Reasonable 
rates will be charged for longer periods of hospitalization. Special treatments 
and medications, not considered routine, will be paid by the student. Dental 
work is not provided. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

General Assembly Scholarships 

The scholarships are available to the undergraduate nursing students of 
the University of Maryland at College Park. 

The scholarships are for fixed charges only, and are awarded b}^ members 
of the Legislature, three for each Senator, and one for each member of the 
House of Delegates. These scholarships may be awarded b) r a member of the 
House of Delegates or a Senator only to persons in the county or legislative 
district of Baltimore which the Delegate or Senator represents. Awards of 
such scholarships are subject to approval by the Faculty Committee on 
Scholarships and by the Director of Admissions. 

W. K. Kellogg Foundation Loan 

This loan fund was first established at the University of Maryland School 
of Nursing in 1942 with money granted by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation. 
The interest paid on the loans, together with the principle of the loan, as it is 
repaid, will be used to found a rotating loan fund. Loans will be made on the 
basis of need, character, and scholastic attainment for study in the clinical area. 
Applications for W. K. Kellogg Loans may be obtained from the Office of the 
Dean of the School of Nursing. (Not available to freshmen students). 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES 

The University recognizes its responsibility for the moral and spiritual 
welfare of students. Pastors representing the major religious denominations 
assume responsibility for work with students of their respective faiths. An 
interdenominational chapel is on the College Park campus. Church attendance 
is encouraged. 

There are churches of the various denominations nearby the Baltimore 
campus of the School of Nursing. Pastors of the different religious faiths are 
available to the students for guidance. 

Worship services are conducted by and for the student nurses each Sunday 
morning. 

ATHLETICS AND RECREATION 

The University recognizes the importance of the physical development of 
all students. In addition to the required physical activities for freshmen and 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 29 

sophomores in the college program, a comprehensive inter-collegiate and 
intramural athletic program is sponsored by the University. 

On the Baltimore campus facilities are made available to the students for 
basketball, skating, bowling, swimming and other physical and recreational 
activities. 

EXTRA-CURRICULAR STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Many student clubs and societies with literary, art, cultural, scientific, social 
and other special objectives are maintained in the University. A number of 
honorary fraternities and sororities are established and recognized at the 
University. 

All organized student activities are under the supervision of the Student 
Life Committee at College Park, and the Student Council in Baltimore. 

UNIVERSITY COUNSELING CENTER 

The services in the Deans office are closely coordinated with the activities 
of the L T niversity Counseling Bureau, maintained by the Department of 
Psychology. This Bureau has a well trained technical staff, and is equipped 
with an extensive stock of standardized tests of aptitude, ability, and interest. 
Assistance is available in diagnosing reading and study difficulties. Students 
are entitled to the service- of the University Counseling Bureau without charge. 

COUNSELING — BALTIMORE CAMPUS 

The guidance program is administered to assist the student to understand 
herself, and to help her to make effective use of her abilities through self- 
direction. The program includes: orientation, individual inventory, individual 
counseling, group guidance, and informational services. 




Campus Building, University of Maryland 
College Park, Maryland 



BASIC PROFESSIONAL NURSING 

PROGRAM LEADING TO THE 

DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF 

SCIENCE IN NURSING 



32 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

BASIC PROFESSIONAL NURSING PROGRAM 

The Basic Professional Nursing Program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Nursing is designed to prepare carefully selected young 
women for professional nursing. This proposes that the student will live in 
an educational environment which will contribute to her growth and develop- 
ment as a person and as a citizen. Upon the completion of the program, which 
is forty-eight months in length, the graduate should be able to fill first level 
positions in professional nursing. 

The first year is spent on the College Park campus. This portion of the 
program is largely an academic and cultural one. Courses in physical, biological 
and social sciences are given. In addition, certain specified courses related to 
the social aspects of nursing are taught by a professional nurse who resides 
on the campus and also acts as a counselor to the students. 

At the end of the first academic year, the student receives a six-weeks 
orientation to the University Hospital on the Baltimore Campus and other 
community health agencies. A basic introductory course in the principles 
and practice of nursing is given with planned experience in the hospital and 
Out-Patient Department. Applied nutrition is given also. 

At the completion of this orientation period, the student is on vacation 
until beginning the academic year at College Park. 

During the second year, the student continues the study of biological and 
social sciences. Included in this year is a study of the health needs of the 
child in Nursing Problems with Children. 

The student returns to the clinical division in Baltimore in July. The 
following two years are spent in the study of nursing in the various clinical 
areas such as medicine, surgery, pediatrics, obstetrics, psychiatry, public 
health, and communicable diseases. Clinical experience and theory are closely 
correlated to give the student an understanding of total nursing care of the 
patient. 

Learning experiences are provided to help the student develop a sym- 
pathetic understanding of human nature which will enable her to deal help- 
fully with the patient, his family and with co-workers in her own and related 
agencies. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



33 



CURRICULUM 

Freshman Year 

Eng. 1, 2— Composition and American Literature 

Soc. 1 — Sociology of American Life 

G. & P. 1— American Government 

Zoology 2, 3— Fundamentals of Zoology 

Chemistry 11, 12— General Chemistry 

Sp. 18, 19— Introductory Speech 

Nur. 3— History of Nursing 

Nur. 7— Introduction to Nursing 

Physical Activities 

Total 

Summer Session (Six Weeks) 

Nur. 7— Introduction to Nursing (Laboratory Experience) 

Nur. 104— Nutrition 

Sophomore Year 

Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 — Composition and World or English Literature 

H. 5, 6— History of American Civilization 

h. 1— Introduction to Psychology 

t. 1— General Bacteriology 

Zoology 14, 15 — Human Anatomy and Physiology 

Sp. 23— Parliamentary Law 

Nur. 8 — Social Aspects of Nursing 

Nur. 9— Nursing Problems with Children 

Physical Activities 

Tot;:! 



/—Semester- 
I 11 





3 


4 


4 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 






2 


1 


1 



17 



Term" 



Junior Year 

Nur. 101, 102— Medical and Surgical Nursing (Including S 

Case Wdk) 

Nur. 103 Pharmacology 

Nur. 105 — ObsU trie Nursing 

Nur. 106— Health Organization 

Nur. 107—1 [ealth Guidance 

Nur. 108— Applied Psychologj 

Nur. 151—1 'edial ric Nursing 



// 



Total Sen* 



16 



34 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Term 

Senior Year I II 

Nur. 151 — Pediatric Nursing 5 .... 

Nur. 152— Psychiatric Nursing .... 8 

Nur. 153a— Public Health Nursing 8 .... 

b— Communicable Disease Nursing 

Nur. 154— Ward Management 2 2 

Nur. 155 — Foundations of Professional Nursing 1 1 

Electives .... 2 



Total Semester Hours *- 16 13 

DISTRIBUTION OF FOUR-YEAR PROGRAM 

First Year 

Months 

College Park Campus 9 

Baltimore Campus (Clinical Area) V/z 

Total 10^ 

Second Year 

College Park Campus 9 

Baltimore Campus- (Clinical Area) Introduction to Nursing 2 

Total 11 

Third Year 
Baltimore Campus (Clinical Area) 
Medicine and Surgery 

Applied Nutrition 1 

Operating Room and Accident Service 2 

Fundamentals of Patient Care, Medicine and Surgery, Out-Patient 

Department, with Integration of Community Nursing 4 

Obstetric Nursing* 3 

Pediatric or Psychiatric Nursing* 1 

Total "Tl - 

Fourth Year 

Pediatric or Psychiatric Nursing* 5 

Public Health Nursing 2 

Communicable Disease Nursing 2 

Ward Management 2 l / 2 

Total ~ny 2 



♦Obstetric, Pediatric, Psychiatric Nursing experience — 3 months each. 

One month vacation is given during each clinical year, making a total of 28 months 
in the clinical area in the School of Nursing— a legal requirement ol the .Maryland State 
Board ol Examiners of Nurses. 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 35 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY 
Freshmen and Sophomores, American Civilization Program 

All students (unless specific exceptions are noted in printed curricula) are 
required to take twelve semester hours of English, three semesters hours of 
Sociology (Soc. 1 - Sociology of American Life), three semester hours of 
government (G. & P. 1 - American Government) and six semester hours of 
history (H. 5, 6 - History of American Civilization.) 

These several courses are planned as parts of a whole that is designed to 
acquaint students with the basic facts of American history, with the fundamental 
patterns of our social, economic, political and intellectual development, and 
with the riches of our cultural heritage. 

Physical Education 

All undergraduate women students classified academically as freshmen or 
sophomores, who are registered for more than six semester hours of credit, 
are required to enroll in and successfully complete four prescribed courses 
in physical education for a total of four semester hours of credit. The suc- 
cessful completion of these courses is a requirement for graduation. These 
courses must be taken by all eligible students during the first two years of 
attendance at the University, whether or not they intend to graduate. Transfer 
students who do not have credit in these courses, or their equivalent, must 
complete them or take them until graduation, whichever occurs first. 

Course Descriptions 

Bact. 1. General Bacteriology (4) — Second semester, Sophomore year. 
Two lecture and two laboratory periods a week. 

The physiology, culture, and differentiation of bacteria. Fundamental 
principles of microbiology in relation to man and his environment. Laboratory 
fee S10.00. Faber and Staff 

Chem. 11, 13. General Chemistry (3, 3) — First and second semesters, 
Freshman year. Two lectures and one three hour laboratory period a week. 
Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. Drake and Staff 

Eng. 1, 2. Composition and American Literature (3. 3) — First and second 
semester-. Freshman year. Required of freshmen. Both courses offered each 
semester, but may not be taken concurrently. Prerequisite, three units ^i high 
school English. 

Grammar, rhetoric, and the mechanics oi writing, frequent thi 
Readings in American Literature. Ball and Staff 

Eng. 3, 4. Composition and World Literature (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters, Sophomore year. Prerequisite Eng. 1. 2. Eng. 3, 4 or Eng. 5, 
an acceptable combination of the two are required of sophomores. Credit will 
not be given for more than '• hour- of work in 3, 4 and 5, <k 



36 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Practice in composition. An introduction to world literature, foreign 
classics being read in translation. Cooley and Staff. 

Eng. 5, 6. Composition and English Literature (3, 3) — First and second 
semesters, Sophomore year. Prerequisite, Eng. 1, 2. Eng. 3, 4 or 5, 6 or an ac- 
ceptable combination of the two are required of sophomores. Credit will not 
be given for more than 6 hours of work in 3, 4 and 5, 6. 

Practice in composition. An introduction to major English writers. 

Zeeveld and Staff. 

G. & P. 1. American Government (3) — Second semester, Freshman year. 

This course is designed as the basic course in government for the American 
Civilization program, and it or its equivalent is a prerequisite to all other 
courses in the department. 

It is a comprehensive study of governments in the U. S. — national, state, 
and local, and of their adjustments to changing social and economic conditions. 

Burdette and Staff. 

H. 5, 6. History of American Civilization (3, 3) — First and second semes- 
ters, Sophomore year. Required for graduation of all students who entered the 
University after 1944-1945. Normally to be taken in the sophomore year. 

Crossmon, and Staff. 

Nur. 3. History of Nursing (2) — First semester, Freshman year. 

This course is designed to give an understanding of the development of 
nursing from the earliest times to the present. Emphasis is placed upon the 
nature and pattern of nursing as it progressed through the different periods, 
and as it was related to the education of women. Gipe. 

Nur. 7. Introduction to Nursing (2) — Second semester, Freshman year. 

A course designed to develop an understanding and appreciation of the 

concepts of professional nursing. Hayes. 

Introduction to Nursing — (Laboratory experience for Nur. 7) 6 weeks, 
Freshman year, summer session. Planned experience in the clinical situation, 
affords the student the opportunity to analyze the patient's needs, and to plan 
and execute a program of nursing care which meets the needs of all individuals 
concerned. Hayes 

Nur. 8. Social Aspects of Nursing (2) — Second semester, Sophomore year. 

A course designed to acquaint the students with the factors to be considered 
in the health or sickness of the individual as they effect the family and com- 
munity relationships. The role of the nurse in the modern concept of nursing in 
world health and social developments is interpreted. Hayes 

Nur. 9. Nursing Problems with Children (2) — Second semester, Sophomore 
year. 

This course is designed to help the student gain an understanding and ap- 
preciation of the health needs of the child in relation to his physical, mental, 
emotional, and social development. Kummer and Assistants 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 37 

P. E. 2, 4. Basic Skills of Sport and Rhythms (1, 1)— Three hours a week: 
first and second semesters, Freshman year. Required of all freshmen women. 

Instruction and practice in fundamentals of sports, rhythms, and body 
mechanics. Wessell 

P. E. 6, 8. Selected Sports and Dance (1, 1) — Three hours a week, first 
and second semesters, Sophomore year. 

Sophomores may elect from the following: archery, badminton, basketball, 
bowling, fencing, folk and square dancing, modern dance, social dance, golf, 
hockey, rifle, softball, speedball, tennis, and volleyball. Wessell 

Psych. 1. Introduction to Psychology (3) — First and second semesters, 
Sophomore year. (Xot open to freshmen). 

A basic introductory course, intended to bring the student into contact 
with the major problems confronting psychology and the more important at- 
tempts at their solution. Andrews, and Staff 

Soc. 1. Sociology of American Life (3) — First semester. Freshman year. 

Sociological analysis of the American social structure: metropolitan small 
town, and rural communities; population distribution, composition, and change; 
social organization. Hoffsommer and Staff 

Speech 18, 19. Introductory Speech, (1, 1) — First and second semesters. 
Freshman year. 

This course is designed to give students practice in public -peaking. 
Speech 18 is prerequisite for Speech 19. Laboratory fee SI. 00 for each semester. 

Strausbaugh and Staff 

Speech 23. Parlimentary Law (1) — First semester, Sophomore year. 

A study of the principles and application of parliamentary law as applied to 
all types of meetings. Thorough training in the use of Robert's Rules of Order. 

Strausbaugh and Staff 

Zool. 23. Fundamentals of Zoology (4. 4)— First and second semest 
Freshman year. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. Zoology 1 
or 2 is a prerequisite for Zoology 3. Students who have completed Zoology 1 
may register for Zoology 3 but not Zoology 2. 

A thorough study of the anatomy, classification, and life histories of the 
representative animals. During the first semester emphasis is placed on in- 
vertebrate forms and during the second semester upon vertebrate forms includ- 
ing the frog. Laboratory fee S8.00 for each semester. Phillips and Staff 

Zool. 14, 15. Human Anatomy and Physiology (4, 4) — First and second 
semesters, Sophomore year. Two lectures and two laboratory periods a week. 
Prerequisite, one course in zoology. Zoology 14 i< a prerequisite for Zoology 15. 

For students who desire a general knowledge of human anatomj 
physiology. Laboratory fee $8.00 each semester. Phillips and Staff 

Nursing 101, 102. Medical and Surgical Nursing (5, 5) — Term T and II, 
Junior year. 



38 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Designed to help the student acquire a knowledge and understanding of 
the causes, symptoms, treatments, and general control of diseases, and an ap- 
preciation of the common factors involved in complete nursing care. The 
pharmacological and dietary aspects are fused throughout each area. Those 
procedures that are necessary to insure safe and skillful nursing care are studied, 
discussed, evaluated, and applied in relation to each condition. 

Schwallenberg and Assistants 

Nursing 103. Pharmacology (3) — Term I, Junior year. 

Designed to give the student an understanding and an appreciation of the 
principles of drug therap} r . The chemical and physiological action of drugs is 
studied in the classroom, the laboratory, and on the hospital wards. Em- 
phasis is given on the properties, the action, the therapeutic, and the toxic 
effects of drugs. Musser and Assistants 

Nursing 104. Nutrition (3) — Term I, Junior year. 

To develop in the student nurse an appreciation of the science of nutrition 
and dietetics and its relation to personal, community and world-wide health. 
Students are taught to assist patients on the wards and in the Out-Patient 
Department to plan their diets in relation to their general condition. 

Dyson 

Nursing 105. Obstetrics Nursing (8) — Term II, Junior year. 

To develop in the student nurse the ability to give sympathetic, safe, and 
scientific nursing care during the reproductive cycle as it pertains to the family 
life of the patient. This instruction includes knowledge and skill in regard to 
the managing and teaching of patients during the ante-partum, delivery, and 
post-partum periods. Hydorn and Assistants 

Nursing 106. Health Organization (2) — Term I, Junior year. To acquaint 
the student with the general administration of health agencies and to give her 
an appreciation of how they function on local, national, and international levels. 

Dr. Huntington Williams, Commissioner of Health, Baltimore City, and 
Staff. 

Nursing 107. Health Guidance (3) — Term II, Junior year. 

Designed to assist the student to apply certain principles and methods of 
teaching which will enable her to give intelligent individual and group instruc- 
tion in healthful living. The dynamic approach is considered throughout the 
course so that effective student and patient relationships may be brought about. 

Wohlsen and assistants 

Nursing 108. Applied Psychology (3) — Term I, Junior year. 

This educational experience is designed to supplement and implement nurses' 
basic knowledge of psychology and sociology. Through lectures, discussions, 
and observations focussed on patient and nurse behavior, nurses can become 
more aware of the importance of, and can be helped to develop, positive nurse- 
patient relationship. Greenhill and assistants 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 39 

Nursing 151. Pediatric Nursing (8) — Term II, Junior year extending into 
senior year. 

Planned to assist the student to develop an understanding of infants and 
children so that she may acquire the ability to help meet their total nursing 
needs, physical, emotional and mental. Kummer, Reed, and assistants 

Nursing 152. Psychiatric Nursing (8) — Term II, Senior year. 

To develop a sympathetic attitude and a sense of responsibility toward 
furthering a positive mental health program on local, national, and international 
levels, so that many of the psychiatric disorders may be prevented or cured 
in their early stages. Appreciation, knowledge, and skill in caring for the total 
nursing needs of patients who have developed severe mental disorders also 
will be stressed. Prof, of Psychiatric Nursing and assistants 

Nursing 153. Public Health Nursing (8)— Term I and II, Senior year. 

To develop in the student an appreciation and an understanding and 
skill in dealing with patients and their families in their homes and the various 
areas of the community. Their relation to the wider community is considered. 
This includes the state, national, and international community. Two months 
field experience with the Baltimore City Health Department is included and 
as a supplement to this course, two months' experience in Communicable 
Disease Nursing is given. Wohlsen and assistants 

Nursing 154. Ward Management (4) — Term II, Senior year. 

This course considers the elementary principles of ward administration and 
teaching, and the interrelationships of the hospital departments. It deals with 
the position of the head nurse, staff nurse, and other members of the nursing 
team and their relationships in the hospital and nursing school. Methods of 
ward instruction and supervision and the evaluation of clinical work are 
included. Sellew. and others 

Nursing 155. Foundations of Professional Nursing (2) — Term I and II, 
Senior year. 

Designed to assist the student to acquire a knowledge of those social and 
economic trends which influence professional nursing, World Health Organiza- 
tion, nursing organizations, national and international, are included. 

Gipe, Hayes, Conley 

Electives (2)— Term II, Senior year. 

Designed to assist students to gain more knowledge and experience 
in the special learning area of their choice. Special assignments, field trips, and 
seminars are planned. 




School of Medicine 
(This building, erected in 1812, is still in use.) 



BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 

LEADING TO A 

DIPLOMA IN NURSING 



42 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

BASIC NURSING PROGRAM 

The basic nursing program leading to a diploma in nursing, which is 36 
months in length, is given at the School of Nursing on the Baltimore campus. 

As an introduction to nursing, an orientation to community health is pro- 
vided through conferences and observation in various local agencies. The 
program during the first year also includes the stud}' of the physical, biological, 
social, and medical sciences and the application of these sciences in nursing. 
Concurrent with the study of these sciences, a basic introductory course in 
the principles and practices of nursing is given. 

The following two years are spent in the study of nursing in the various 
clinical fields, such as medicine, surgery, obstetrics, pediatrics, and psychiatry. 
In all areas clinical experience and theory are closely correlated. Experience 
in the out-patient department and visits to community agencies are provided 
as part of the clinical experience. All students have instruction and field ex- 
perience in public health nursing through an affiliation with the Baltimore City 
Health Department. Instruction and experience in psychiatric nursing is 
obtained through an affiliation with the Springfield State Hospital. 

Throughout the curriculum the importance of considering the physical, 
psychological, and sociological factors affecting the health of the individual 
is stressed. Emphasis is placed on the cause and prevention of illness both 
from the individual and community standpoint. 

While pursuing this course it is expected that the student will gain a knowl- 
edge of her own health needs, those of her immediate environment as well 
as the community and the world in general which will enable her to contribute 
as a competent member of the health team. It is also anticipated that the 
student will recognize those values which promote good social relationships and 
effective citizenship. 

CURRICULUM* 



First Year 

Anatomy and Physiology 

Chemistry 

Microbiology 

Psychology 

Sociology 

History of Nursing 

Materia Medica 

Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

Introduction to Nursing 

*Th.- above program is typical, however, classwork and clinical experience arc given 
concurrently, and arc scheduled according to a planned rotation. 

Twenty-eight days <»f vacation is given annually to students enrolled In the three- 
year curriculum. 



ss 


Lab- 


Total 


Clinical 




oratory 




Experience 

(Weeks) 


60 


60 


120 




40 


20 


60 




15 


30 


45 




45 




45 




45 




45 




30 




30 




20 


10 


30 




35 


10 


45 




55 


145 


200 


24 



THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 



43 



Class 



Lab- Total Clinical 



Nutrition, Foods and Cookery 

Written and Oral English 

Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Second Year 

Medical and Surgical Xursing (con't) 

Medical Nursing , 

Surgical Nursing 

Operating Room Nursing 

Out- Patient Department 

Emergency Room 

Diet Therapy 

Obstetric Nursing 

Pediatric Nursing 

Third Year 

Psychiatric Nursing 

Health Organization 

Public Health Nursing 

Social Foundations of Nursing 





oratory 


Experience 
(Weeks) 


20 


15 


35 


30 




30 


40 




40 



15 



3d 



260 





24-28 




30-34 


90 


6 


100 


4 


20 


2 


40 


4 


120 


13 


125 


13 


120 


12 


15 




(.0 


8 


30 





COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Anatomy and Physiology — 120 hours (60 hrs. class: 60 hrs. laboratory) 

Lectures, laboratory, and demonstration. Provides for a general knowledge 
of human anatomy and physiology with practical application at the bedside. 

Dept. of Anatomy, Medical School, and Simmont 

Microbiology — 45 hours (15 hrs. class; 30 hrs. laboratory) 

The lecture and laboratory periods are devoted to the study of tin 
sential relation oi microbiology to diagnosis, treatment, prevention oi disease 
and nursing care. Emphasis is placed upon the important pathogenic species. 
This includes mode oi entrance into the body, portal of exit, method oi transfer, 
tests most helpful in determining their presence, methods oi immunization, and 
a working knowledge of the various methods used in their destruction. 

Dept of Bacteriology, Medical School and Simmont 

Chemistry — 60 hours (40 hrs. class; 20 hrs. laboratory) 

The content includes selected area- <^i general, organic and biological 
chemistry as it relates to the practice of nursing and the application oi related 
sciences. Dept. of Chemistry, Medical School and Simmont 

Sociology — 45 hours 

This course includes the sociological analysis of the American social struc 



44 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

ture; metropolitan small town, and rural communities; population distribution, 
composition and change, social organization. 

Dept. of Sociology, University of Maryland 

Applied Psychology — 45 hours 

This educational experience is designed to supplement and implement 
nurses' basic knowledge of psychology and sociology. Through lectures, dis- 
cussions and observations focussed on patient and nurse behavior, nurses can 
become more aware of the importance of, and can be helped to develop, positive 
nurse-patient relationship. Greenhill and assistants 

Medical and Surgical Nursing — 300 hours 

Designed to assist the student to acquire knowledge, understanding, tech- 
niques and skills that are required when giving nursing care in hospitals, clinics 
and in the home. Special consideration is given to advanced techniques that are 
required in medical school hospitals. In the course content are fused allied 
subjects such as nutrition, pharmacology, mental hygiene, economics and sociol- 
ogy. Principles of biological and physical sciences are coordinated throughout 
by the clinical instructors. Health teaching as a comprehensive aspect of 
patient care is also included. Schwallenberg and Assistants 

Obstetric Nursing — 120 hours 

To develop the ability to give sympathetic, safe and planned nursing 
care during the reproductive cycle as it pertains to the family life of 
the patient. This instruction includes knowledge and skill in regard to the 
managing and teaching of patients during the ante-partum, delivery, and post- 
partum periods. Hydorn and Assistants 

Pediatric Nursing — 125 hours 

Planned to assist the student to develop an understanding of infants and 
dhildren so that she may acquire the ability to help meet their total nursing 
needs, physical, emotional and mental. Kummer, Reed and Assistants 

History of Nursing — 30 hours 

This course is designed to help the student gain an understanding of the 
development of nursing from the earliest times to the present. Emphasis is 
placed upon the nature and pattern of nursing as it progressed through the 
different periods, and as it was related to the education of women. Gipe, Conley 

Social Foundations of Nursing — 30 hours 

Designed to assist the student to acquire a knowledge of those social and 
economic trends which influence professional nursing. Community and world- 
wide responsibility of professional nursing in nursing organizations, national 
and international, in the World Health Organization are included. 

Gipe, Hayes, Conley 



THE SCHOOL OF XURSIXG 45 

Introduction to Nursing — 200 hours 

An orientation to basic principles of planned nursing care including those 
standards of behavior which are necessary for students as individuals and as 
professional nurses. Paulonis and Assistants 

Pharmacology — 45 hours (35 hrs. class; 10 hrs. laboratory) 

Designed to give the student an understanding and a knowledge of the 
principles of drug therapy. The chemical and physiological action of drugs is 
studied in the classroom, the laboratory and on the hospital wards. Emphasis 
is placed on the properties, the action, the therapeutic and toxic effects of 
drugs. Newer chemotherapeutic and antibiotic agents are considered through- 
out the course. Musser 

Written and Oral English — 30 hours 

Designed to assist the student to acquire those techniques and skills needed 
in the presentation of written and oral materials. Liebman 

Nutrition — 35 hours 

To develop an appreciation of the science of nutrition and dietetics and 
its relation to personal, community and world wide health. Twenty-eight days 
of planned experience is given in the therapeutic diet kitchen, University 
Hospital. Students are taught to assist patients on the wards and in the Out- 
Patient Department to plan their diets in relation to their condition. Dyson. 

Psychiatric Nursing — 120 hours 

To develop a sympathetic attitude and a sense of responsibility toward 
furthering a positive mental health program on local, national, and international 
levels, so that many of the psychiatric disorders may be prevented or cured in 
their early stages. Appreciation, knowledge and skill in caring for the total 
nursing needs of patients who have developed severe mental disorders will be 
stressed. Three months affiliation with the Springfield State Hospital is 
included. Teaching Staff, Springfield State Hospital 

Public Health Nursing — 60 hours 

To develop an appreciation and an understanding and skill in dealing with 
patients and their families in their homes in the various areas of the community. 
Two months field experience with the Baltimore City Health Department is 
included. Wohlsen and Assistants 

Health Organizations — 15 hours 

To acquaint the student with the general administration of health 
and to give her an appreciation ^i how they function on local, national and 
international levels. 

Dr. Huntington Williams, Commissioner ni Health, Baltimore ( ity and Staff, 
Kathryn Wohlsen. 




The Importance of Drug Therapy is stressed throughout in both programs. 



k ^m f . 



*'*»v>. 



1| 




A well prepared nurse must have knowledge and experience in all 
phases of community health. 



For 


Further 


Information Address: 




DEAN OF THE 


SCHOOL 


OF NURSING 




University of Man 


rland 






620 West Lombard 


Street 




Baltimore 


1 




Mary 


land 



SEPARATE CATALOGS 

At College Park 

Individual catalogs of colleges and schools of the UniYersity of 
Maryland at College Park may be obtained by addressing the Director 
of Publications, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland. 

These catalogs and schools are: 

1. General Information 

2. College of Agriculture 

3. College of Arts and Sciences 

4. College of Business and Public Administration 

5. College of Education 

6. Glenn L. Martin College of Engineering and Aeronautical 
Sciences 

7. College of Home Economics 

8. College of Military Science 

9. College of Physical Education, Recreation and Health 

10. College of Special and Continuation Studies 

11. Summer School 

12. Graduate School 

At Baltimore 
Individual catalogs for the professional schools of the University 
of Maryland may be obtained by addressing the Deans of the respec- 
tive schools at the University of Maryland, Lombard and Greene 
Streets, Baltimore 1, Maryland. These professional schools are: 

13. School of Dentistry 

14. School of Law 

15. School of Medicine 

16. School of Pharmacy 

17. School of Nursing 

At Heidelberg 

The catalog of the European Program may be obtained by addressing 
the Dean, College of Special and Continuation Studies, College Park, 
Maryland. 



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