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Full text of "School of Library and Information Services [catalog]"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/schooloflibraryi1966univ 



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JNIVERSITY of MARYLAND 

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School of 
Library and Information Service 



1966-1967 











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CATALOG OF THE 

SCHOOL OF 

LIBRARY AND 

INFORMATION 

SERVICES 

1966-67 



THE 
UNIVERSITY 

OF 
MARYLAND 



Volume 22 September 23, 1966 Number 5 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND BULLETIN is published three times in July, 
August and September; twice in January, March, May, June and December; and 
once in February. April. October and November. Published twenty-three times. 
Re-entered as second class mail matter under the Act of Congress on August 24 
1912, and second class postage paid at College Park, Maryland. 



Contents 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



University Calendar, Summer 1966 iv 

Board of Regents v 

Officers of Administration vi 

THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 

Opportunities in Librarianship 1 

Goals and Concepts 1 

Location and Setting 2 

University Resources 2 

Research and Development Programs 3 

Colloquium 3 

ADMISSIONS AND STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Admission Requirements 4 

Transfer of Credit 4 

Part-time Study 4 

Special Non-Degree Students 5 

Foreign Students 5 

Degree Requirements 5 

Grades 5 

Academic Counseling 6 

Placement and Credential Services 6 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Tuition and Fees 7 

Awards and Financial Assistance 7 

Fellowships 7 

Counseling Assistantships 

Student Loan Funds 8 

Part-Time Work 8 

Living Expenses 8 

CURRICULUM 

Required Core Courses 9 

Electives 10 

Faculty 13 



ill 



University Calendar, 1966-67 

FALL SEMESTER, 1966 

SEPTEMBER 

12-16 Monday-Friday — Fall Semester Registration 
19 Monday — Instruction begins 

NOVEMBER 

23 Wednesday, after last class — Thanksgiving recess begins 
28 Monday, 8:00 A. M. — Thanksgiving recess ends 

DECEMBER 

21 Wednesday, after last class — Christmas recess begins 

JANUARY 

3 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Christmas recess ends 
16 Monday — Pre-exam Study Day 
17-24 Tuesday-Tuesday — Fall Semester Examinations 

SPRING SEMESTER, 1967 

JANUARY 

30-Feb. 3 Monday-Friday — Spring Semester Registration 

FEBRUARY 

6 Monday — Instruction begins 

22 Wednesday — Washington's Birthday, holiday 

MARCH 

23 Thursday, after last class — Easter recess begins 
28 Tuesday, 8:00 A. M. — Easter recess ends 

MAY 

10 Wednesday— AFROTC Day 

24 Wednesday — Pre-exam Study Day 

25-June 2 Thursday-Friday — Spring Semester Examinations 

30 Tuesday — Memorial Day, holiday 
JUNE 

3 Saturday — Commencement Exercises 

SUMMER SESSION, 1967 

JUNE 

26-27 Monday-Tuesday — Registration, Summer Session 

28 Wednesday — Instruction begins 
JULY 

4 Tuesday — Independence Day, holiday 
8 Saturday — Classes (Tuesday schedule) 

AUGUST 

18 Friday — Summer Session Ends 

SHORT COURSES, SUMMER, 1967 

JUNE 

12-17 Monday-Saturday — Rural Women's Short Course 

AUGUST 

7-11 Monday-Friday — 4-H Club Week 

SEPTEMBER 

5-8 Tuesday-Friday — Firemen's Short Course 

tv 



Board of Regents 

and 

Maryland State Board of Agriculture 

CHAIRMAN 

Charles P. McCormick 

McCormick and Company, Inc., 414 Light Street, Baltimore, 21202 

VICE-CHAIRMAN 

Edward F. Holter 

Farmers Home Administration, Room 412 Hartwick Building, 
4321 Hartwick Road, College Park, 20740 

SECRETARY 

B. Herbert Brown 

The Baltimore Institute, 10 West Chase Street, Baltimore, 21201 

TREASURER 

Harry H. Nuttle 
Denton, 21629 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

Louis L. Kaplan 

The Baltimore Hebrew College, 5800 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, 21215 

ASSISTANT TREASURER 

Richard W. Case 

Smith, Somerville and Case, 1 Charles Center — 17th Floor, 

Baltimore, 21201 

Hon. Mary Arabian 

Municipal Court of Baltimore City, Baltimore, 21201 

Dr. William B. Long 
Medical Center, Salisbury, 21801 

Thomas W. Pangborn 

The Pangborn Corporation, Pangborn Blvd., Hagerstown, 21740 

Thomas B. Symons 

7410 Columbia Ave., College Park, 20740 

Judge William C. Walsh 

Liberty Trust Building, Cumberland, 21501 



Officers Of The University 

Central Administrative Officers 

PRESIDENT 

Wilson H. Elkins.— B.A., University of Texas, 1932; M.A., 1932; B.Litt., Oxford Uni- 
versity, 1936; D.Phil., 1936. 

VICE PRESIDENT, BALTIMORE CAMPUSES 

Albin O. Kuhn— B.S.. University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1939; Ph.D., 1948. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

R. Lee Hornbake — B.S., California State College, Pennsylvania, 1934; M.A., Ohio 
State University, 1936; Ph.D., 1942. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AFFAIRS 

Walter B. Waetjen — B.S.. Millersville State College, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1942; 
M.S., University of Pennsylvania, 1947; Ed.D., University of Maryland, 1951. 

VICE PRESIDENT FOR GRADUATE STUDIES AND RESEARCH 

Michael J. Pelczar, Jr.— B.S., University of Maryland, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 
State University of Iowa, 1941. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT 

Frank L. Bentz, Jr.— B.S., University of Maryland, 1942; Ph.D., 1952. 

ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
Robert A. Beach, Jr., A.B., Baldwin-Wallace College, 1950; M.S. Boston Uni- 
versity, 1954. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE, RESEARCH 

Justin Williams — A.B., State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas, 1926; M.A., State 
University of Iowa, 1928; Ph.D., 1933. 

ASSISTANT, PRESIDENT'S OFFICE 

Robert E. Kendig — A.B., College of William and Mary, 1939; M.A., George Wash- 
ington University, 1965. 

EXECUTIVE DEAN FOR STUDENT LIFE 

Leslie R. Bundgaard— B.S., University of Wisconsin, 1948; M.S., 1949; Ph.D., 
Georgetown University, 1954. 

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

C. Wilbur Cissel— B.A., University of Maryland, 1932; M.A., C.P.A., 1939. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

James T. Frye— B.B.A., University of Georgia, 1948; M.S.B.A., 1952; C.P.A., 1954. 

COMPTROLLER AND BUDGET OFFICER 

Harry D. Fisher— B.S., University of Maryland, 1943; C.P.A., 1948. 

DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATIONS 

G. Watson Algire— B.A., University of Maryland, 1930; M.S., 1931. 

vi 



ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND REGISTRAR 

James P. Hill— B.S.. Temple University, 1939; Ed.M., 1947; Ed.D., University of 
Michigan, 1963. 

DIRECTOR OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

I. Logan Schutz — B.S., University of Maryland, 1938; M.S., 1940. 

DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

William W. Cobey — A.B., University of Maryland, 1930. 

DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

George W. Fogg — B.A.. University of Maryland, 1926; M.A., 1928. 

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL 

James D. Morgan — B.S., University of Maryland, 1949; M.B.A., 1950. 

DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 

PLANT 

George O. Weber — B.S., University of Maryland, 1933. 

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR AND SUPERVISING ENGINEER, PHYSICAL PLANT 

(Baltimore) 

George W. Morrison — B.S., University of Maryland, 1927; E.E., 1931. 

Emeriti 
PRESIDENT EMERITUS 

Harry C. Byrd — B.S., University of Maryland. 1908: LL.D., Washington College, 
1936; LL.D., Dickinson College, 1938; D.Sc, Western Maryland College, 1938. 

DEAN OF WOMEN EMERITA 

Adele H. Stamp — B.A., Tulane University, 1921; M.A., University of Maryland, 
1924. 

DEAN OF MEN EMERITUS 

Geary F. Eppley— B.S., University of Maryland, 1920; MS.. 1926. 

Deans of the Schools and Colleges 

DEAN OF AGRICULTURE 

Gordon M. Cairns— B.S., Cornell University, 1936; M.S., 1938; Ph.D., 1940. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Charles Manning— B.S., Tufts College, 1929; M.A., Harvard University, 1931; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina, 1950. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 
Donald W. O'Connell— B.A., Columbia University, 1937; M.A., 1938; Ph.D., 1953. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

John J. Salley— D. D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1951; Ph.D., University of 
Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 1954. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Vernon E. Anderson — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1930; M.A., 1936; Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Colorado, 1942. 

vii 



DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Robert B. Beckmann — B.S., University of Illinois, 1940; Ph.D., University of Wis- 
consin, 1944. 

DEAN OF FACULTY— UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY 
Homer W. Schamp. Jr. — A.B., Miami University, 1944; M.Sc, University of Michi- 
gan, 1947; Ph.D., 1952. 

ACTING DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF HOME ECONOMICS 
Erna Chapman — B.S., University of Maryland, 1934; M.S., University of Maryland, 
1936. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LAW 

William P. Cunningham — A.B., Harvard College, 1944; LL.B., Harvard Law School, 
1948. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SERVICES 
Paul Wasserman— B.B.A., College of the City of New York, 1948; M.S. {L.S.), 

Columbia University, 1949: M.S. (Economics) Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan, I960. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND DIRECTOR OF MEDICAL 

EDUCATION AND RESEARCH 
William S. Stone— B.S., University of Idaho, 1924; M.S., 1925; M.D., University of 

Louisville, 1929; Ph.D., (Hon.), University of Louisville, 1946. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Marion Murphy — B.S., University of Minnesota, 1936; M.P.H., University of Michi- 
gan, 1946; Ph.D., 1959. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Noel E. Foss— Ph.C, South Dakota State College, 1929; B.S.,1929; M.S., Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 1932; Ph.D., 1933. 

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION, RECREATION AND 
HEALTH 

Lester M. Fraley — B.A., Randolph-Macon College, 1928; M.A., 1937; Ph.D., Pea- 
body College, 1939. 

DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

Verl S. Lewis — A.B., Huron College, 1933; M.A., University of Chicago, 1939; 
D.S.W., Western Reserve University, 1954. 

DEAN OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 

Ray W. Ehrensberger— B.A., Wabash College, 1929; M.A., Butler University, 1930; 
Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1937. 

Directors of Educational Services and Programs 

DIRECTOR, AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

Edward W. Aiton— B.S., University of Minnesota, 1933; M.S., 1940; Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland, 1956. 



Vlll 



DIRECTOR. AGRICULTURE EXPERIMENT STATION 

Irvin C. Haut— B.S., University of Idaho, 1928; M.S., State College of Washington, 
1930; Ph.D.. University of Maryland, 1933. 

DIRECTOR, COMPUTER SCIENCE CENTER 

William F. Atchison — A.B., Georgetown College, 1938; M.A., University of 
Kentucky, 1940; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1943. 

DIRECTOR. COUNSELING CENTER 

Thomas Magoon — B.A., Dartmouth, 1947; M.A., University of Minnesota, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1954. 

DIRECTOR, GENERAL EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Gayle S. Smith— B.S., Iowa State College, 1948; M. A., Cornell University, 1951; 
Ph.D., 1958. 

DIRECTOR. INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH 

Robert E. McClintock — B.S., University of South Carolina, 1951; M.A., George Pea- 
body College, 1952; Ph.D., 1961. 

DIRECTOR OF LIBRARIES 

Howard Rovelstad— B.A., University of Illinois, 1936; M.A., 1937; B.S.L.S., Colum- 
bia University, 1940. 

DIRECTOR OF NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE 

L. Eugene Cronin — A.B., Western Maryland College, 1938; M.S., University of Mary- 
land, 1943; Ph.D., 1946. 

DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL AND SUPPORTING SERVICES, UNIVERSITY 

HOSPITAL 
George H. Yeager — B.S., University of West Virginia, 1925; M.D., University of 

Maryland, 1929. 

DIRECTOR, HEALTH SERVICES 

Lester M. Dyke— 5.5., University of Iowa, 1936; M.D., 1926. 

DIRECTOR OF THE SUMMER SESSION 

Clodus R. Smith— B.S., Oklahoma State University, 1950; M.S., 1955; Ed.D., Cornell 
University, 1960. 

HEAD, DEPARTMENT OF AIR SCIENCE 

Vernon H. Reeves — B.A., Arizona State College, 1936; M.A., Columbia University, 
1949. 



IX 



The School Of Library And 
Information Services 



The university of Maryland school of library and information 
Services offers a curriculum which deals with those areas central to the 
practice of librarianship. Culminating in the M.L.S. degree, the program 
is designed to provide a comprehensive foundation for entering library 
service. 

Opportunities in Librarianship 

The growing demands of an information dependent society provide assur- 
ance of a continuing need for well qualified professional personnel. The 
public, governmental, school, academic, research and private organizations 
in which library and information services function as essential ingredients, 
afford diverse career opportunities to seriously motivated men and women. 
In addition to traditional library services, newer avenues are open to imag- 
inative and well prepared graduates. Opportunities to pursue noteworthy 
careers in library service have never been more abundant. Some of these 
opportunities are the result of the emergence of large scale systems and 
units of service. Others have come about because of the mounting need for 
speedy access to information. Variations from manual to automated pro- 
cedures and the increasing specialization of services have created other 
opportunities. In the modern school, the evolving role of the library as an 
information center offers new challenges. 

Goals and Concepts 

Professional competence for each student is the fundamental goal of the 
School. The program is designed to further this aim through the offering 
of a carefully planned course of study at a high standard of scholarship. 
The faculty views library and information activity as involving an integrated 
set of theories and operations based upon a body of conceptual knowledge 
derived from both its practice and from the basic underlying disciplines 
upon which it is constructed — the social sciences, the sciences and the 
humanities. The orientation and the content of the academic program reflect 
this perspective. 

The program of study strives to attain a number of aims : 

1. To foster understanding of the concepts and theories of librarianship, 
including an awareness of the relevance of the contributions of the un- 
derlying supportive disciplines. 

2. To offer each student a sound common base of substantive content and 
learning experience upon which to build the skills and perspectives 
necessary to assure competence in the particular branch of professional 
practice which he elects to pursue. 



School of Library and Information Services 

3. To maintain a climate of values that will foster in each student an 
appreciation of and identification with, the highest standards of pro- 
fessional goals and responsibilities. 

4. To develop in each student a competence which will enable him to 
continue to evaluate and contribute to library theory and practice as it 
evolves during his subsequent professional career. 

5. To afford the opportunity for each student to plan, with faculty guid- 
ance, for concentrated study beyond the basic requirements, which 
would introduce him to the problems and prospects of specialized 
branches of library and information practice. 

By striving for those goals, the School seeks to afford each student the 
opportunity for the fullest personal development in preparation for the 
assumption of his professional responsibilities and for the discharge of 
these responsibilities with distinction. 

Location and Setting 

Located on the College Park campus of the University, the School lies 
between Baltimore and Washington, D.C. and is enriched by the cultural 
advantages of both cities — museums, galleries, theaters, concert halls and 
libraries. More importantly, the area offers students easy access to some of 
the best libraries in the world — the Library of Congress, the National 
Library of Medicine, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Enoch Pratt Free 
Library, the National Agricultural Library, and many other special research 
libraries of the Federal Government — as well as to the exemplary public 
and school library systems of the nearby surrounding area. 

The School is housed on the College Park campus in the McKeldin Library 
with the faculty offices, secretariat, professional library and classrooms 
located on the upper floors. 

University Resources 

The Library of the School of Library and Information Services includes a 
basic collection of books and serials, a substantial number of pamphlets and 
reports in files and current holdings of more than 200 periodicals. In the 
initial stages of a continuing program to acquire comprehensive holdings of 
research materials relating to library services, the Library's acquisitions 
policy incorporates also such related fields as communications and other 
social sciences. 

In addition to the School's Library, students have access to the other 
libraries of the University of Maryland. The general university library, 
McKeldin, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Library, the Chemistry 
Library, the Health Sciences Library, and the Law Library contain more 
than three quarters of a million cataloged volumes, nearly 10,000 current 



University of Maryland 

periodical and newspaper titles and substantial holdings in non-book 
materials. 

The University of Maryland has one of the finest university computing 
science centers in the United States. It contains an IBM 7094, two IBM 
1401's and an IBM System 360 Model 30. The Computer Science Center's 
facilities are used to support research and development programs and are 
available for use by faculty and research staff of the School. 

Research and Development Programs 

The School's concern centers in research as well as teaching. A study of 
library use patterns in the Washington-Baltimore area in cooperation with 
the library systems in the region, is being sponsored by the State of Mary- 
land Division of Library Extension. Under sponsorship of the U.S. Office 
of Education's Educational Research Information Center program, two 
faculty members are developing a programmed method of instruction for 
indexers in the field of educational documentation. In April, 1966, a 
research planning conference on Manpower Needs and Requirements in 
Librarianship and Information Services, was held. This conference, funded 
by the U.S. Department of Labor, forms the basis for the design of a 
large-scale research program into manpower issues in librarianship. 

Colloquium 

During the fall and spring semesters, students meet in colloquium weekly 
with distinguished members of the library and information professions and 
with leaders in related fields of research and study. Because of the fortui- 
tous location of the School, it is possible to bring to the campus outstanding 
individuals in the forefront of practice and research to complement the 
formal curriculum. 

The School's Library on its opening day. 



Admissions and Student Affairs 

Admission Requirements 

New students are admitted at the beginning of the fall, spring, and summer 
sessions. Because the number of students who can be admitted is limited, 
applications should be filed as early as possible. Closing dates for applica- 
tions are as follows: by July 15 for the fall semester, by December 15 for 
the spring semester, and by May 15 for the Summer School. 

In assessing students for admission, the School weighs a combination of 
factors: undergraduate record, verbal and quantitative aptitude test scores 
on the Graduate Record Examination, letters of personal recommendation, 
and impressions gained from personal interviews. 

Applicants must hold a bachelor's degree from a college or university of 
recognized standing. Undergraduate preparation should emphasize a broad 
arts and science base with strength in the humanities, the social sciences 
and the physical or biological sciences. One year of college-level foreign 
language or demonstration of language competence is also required. 

After all admissions credentials have been received by the School, a profes- 
sional conference with a faculty member may be required. When applicants 
live at a distance from the University, interviews may be arranged with 
authorized representatives of the School at other locations. 

Full instructions relating to admission procedures are contained in the 
admissions material sent to each applicant. 

Requests for information and admissions materials should be directed to: 

School of Library and Information Services 
McKeldin Library 
University of Maryland 
College Park Maryland 20740 
Telephone: 301—927-3800, Ext. 7385 

Transfer of Credit 

Credit not to exceed six semester hours for course work at other recognized 
institutions may be applied towards the Master's degree only when such 
course work has been taken after the student has been admitted to the 
University of Maryland School of Library and Information Services. 

Part-Time Study 

A number of qualified part-time students are admitted to the program. 
Typically, such students are enrolled as degree students and pursue a 
minimum of two courses a semester. Classes are conducted during the 
regular day-time hours. The student is expected to complete the M.L.S. 
degree within three calendar years from his first registration in the School. 



University of Maryland 

Special Non-Degree Students 

Under certain circumstances admission is open to special, non-degree stu- 
dents with particular purposes for pursuing specific courses. Such students 
must offer satisfactory credentials for admission. Credits will not count 
toward the M.L.S. degree. 

Foreign Students 

One of the requirements for admission of foreign students to the University 
of Maryland is satisfactory proficiency in English. Applicants from non- 
English speaking countries are required to take an English test at the 
American Embassy or Consulate. Whenever feasible, arrangements will 
also be made for a personal interview with a representative of the School. 
Citizens of non-English speaking countries who may already reside in the 
United States can arrange for an English test to be held on campus. 

Foreign students are accepted only on a full-time basis at the University 
of Maryland and should estimate their educational and living expenses at 
approximately $200 a month or a minimum of $2,400 a year, including the 
expenses of two semesters and one Summer School session. 

Foreign student applicants must submit to the University's Office of Inter- 
national Education Service and Foreign Student Affairs a statement of 
financial ability to meet expenses. This statement should include the follow- 
ing points: 

1. Who is responsible for the student's educational and living expenses. 

2. How payment is to be made (by the student, the family, the govern- 
ment, a private agency or some other means). 

3. Regulations of the student's government regarding the securing of 
dollar exchange (amount, time, etc.). 

When all admission precedures have been satisfactorily completed through 
the Office of International Education Services and Foreign Student Affairs, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740, the student will 
receive the necessary immigration document for securing the proper visa 
for entry into the United States. 

Degree Requirements 

The Master of Library Science degree will be awarded to those students 
who successfully complete within three years from first registration in the 
School a program of 36 semester hours with an average of "B." There is no 
thesis or comprehensive examination required. 

Grades 

The grades "A," "B," and "C" are defined as "outstanding," "good," and 
"adequate," respectively. Grades "D" and "F" indicate failure to achieve a 



School of Library and Information Services 

satisfactory level of performance. "D" permits the student to repeat the 
course; "F" does not allow such a repetition. If "F" is given for a core 
course, the student is subject to immediate suspension, since without the 
required course, the degree cannot be awarded. 

Academic Counseling 

Each student is assigned a faculty advisor for academic counseling. Ad- 
visory relationships are informal, however, and students are urged to con- 
sult freely with any or all members of the faculty on matters relating to their 
education and future plans. 

Placement and Credential Services 

The University of Maryland Placement and Credential Services helps degree 
candidates and alumni find positions. While students may register and meet 
with campus recruiters without charge, there is a $5.00 fee for either or 
both of two additional services, the credential and the resume/referral. 
Registration for these services must be made within one year of the award- 
ing of the M.L.S. degree (preferably before the degree is awarded), and 
the fee is good for one year's service. Whether or not a student is actively 
seeking placement, it is recommended that his credential file be assembled 
before he leaves the School. 



Around the conference table in the Dean's office. 



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Financial Information 



Tuition and Fees 

The tuition for study at the graduate level at the University of Maryland 
is $24.00 per credit hour. In addition, there is a $10.00 fee which must 
accompany the application to the Graduate School. This is not refundable, 
but takes the place of the matriculation fee when the applicant is accepted. 
An additional fee of $25.00 is charged all late applicants. Other fees ap- 
plicable to graduate students are: 

Infirmary Fee — 

Academic year $ 5.00 

Auxiliary Facilities Fee 3.00 

Vehicle Registration 5.00 

Graduation Fee — Masters Degree 10.00 

Awards and Financial Assistance 

The School offers a number of library work-study and faculty assistant- 
ships on a competitive basis each year. Information about these should be 
requested directly from the School of Library and Information Services. 
A few stipends are offered by Maryland public libraries and other organiza- 
tions, which normally entail an obligation to accept employment for a stipu- 
lated period after receipt of the degree. Details about these grants are also 
available from the School. 

Fellowships 

A number of fellowships have been established by the University. The 
stipend for the University Fellows is $1,000 for nine months and the re- 
mission of all fees except the graduation fee. University Fellows can carry 
full graduate programs and satisfy residence requirements in the normal 
time. Applications for these fellowships may be obtained from the Office of 
the Graduate School. 



Residence Counseling Graduate Assistantships 

A limited number of assistantships are available to men and women gradu- 
ate students to act as supervisors and counselors in undergraduate residence 
halls. To qualify, students must receive full status in the Graduate School, 
must have outstanding leadership qualities and be single. Remuneration 
for all residence assistantships is $2,400 per academic year and remission of 
Graduate School fees. Further information about these assistantships may 
be obtained from the Office of the Director of Housing. 



School of Library and Information Services 

Student Loan Funds 

Loan funds are available to graduate students of the University of Maryland 
up to $ 1 ,000 per year, but it must be pointed out that the demand for such 
funds exceeds the supply. Applications and full details may be obtained 
from the Director, Office of Student Aid, North Administration Building, 
University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740. 

Part-Time Work 

It must be emphasized that graduate professional study will place heavy 
demands upon the student's time and energy. While some supplementing 
of resources through part-time employment may be possible for the excep- 
tional student, it is not feasible to undertake a full-time program of pro- 
fessional study unless substantially full time throughout the year is devoted 
to it. For those planning a part-time work and part-time study program, 
information about opportunities for library positions in the area can be 
obtained from the office of the School of Library and Information Services. 

Living Expenses 

The University cannot provide housing for graduate students. Board and 
lodging are available in many private homes in College Park and vicinity 
with costs varying from about $105 to $140 a month. Apartments at vary- 
ing rentals are also available in the area. A list of available accommodations 
is maintained by the University's Housing Bureau. 





Convocation welcoming the school's 


first class. 










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Curriculum 



The curricular offering of the School is a 36-hour course of study, leading 
to the M.L.S. degree, normally to be completed in two semesters followed 
by a summer session, or the equivalent period of part-time study over a 
more extended period. 

Because of the diverse backgrounds of the students and the need for com- 
mon understanding of the environment and functions of library and infor- 
mation services, two-thirds of the work leading to the M.L.S. degree is 
predetermined. The student, guided by his advisor, then chooses among a 
wide range of elective courses in order to build a purposeful program fitted 
to his needs and aspirations. 

The following, all three-hour courses, make up the required program under 
a typical sequence begun in the fall term: 

FALL SEMESTER 

Communication and Libraries 

Introduction to Data Processing for Libraries 

Introduction to Reference and Bibliography 

Organization of Knowledge in Libraries I 

Elective 

SPRING SEMESTER 

Organization of Knowledge in Libraries II 
History of Libraries and their Materials 
Library Administration 

(Choice of one) 
Literature and Research in the Sciences 
Literature and Research in the Social Sciences 
Literature and Research in the Humanities 

Elective 

SUMMER SEMESTER 

Two Elective Courses 

REQUIRED CORE COURSES (All 3-hour courses) 

L 200. Introduction to Data Processing for Libraries. 

Survey and analysis of the potential of machines, punch cards, computers and 
systems analysis in relation to library functions and procedures. 

L 202. Introduction to Reference and Bibliography. 

A systematic approach to bibliographic control of recorded knowledge and the 
methods of securing information from various types of sources. 



School of Library and Information Services 
L 204. Communication and Libraries. 

Communication processes are treated and the library's role as part of the larger 
social context is explored. 

L 206. Organization of Knowledge in Libraries, I. 

Introduction to basic principles of subject cataloging, alphabetical and syste- 
matic. 

L 207. Organization of Knowledge in Libraries, II. 

Introduction to basic principles of author/title and descriptive cataloging and to 
problems of implementation and logistics. 

L 209. History of Libraries and their Materials. 

The development of publication forms and institutions set against the historical 
framework and the cultural forces within which such advances were made. 

L 211. Library Administration. 

An introduction to administrative theory and principles and their implications 
and applications to managerial activity in libraries. 

(CHOICE OF ONE OF L 213, L 215, L 217) 

L 213. Literature and Research in the Sciences. 

Bibliographic organization, influences of major contributions to the literature, 
information structure and trends in the direction of research in the principal 
scientific disciplines. 

L 215. Literature and Research in the Social Sciences. 

Bibliographic organization, influences of major contributions to the literature, 
information structure and trends in the direction of research in the principal 
fields of the social sciences. 

L 217. Literature and Research in the Humanities. 

Bibliographic organization, influences of major contributions to the literature, 
information structure and trends in the direction of research in the principal 
humanistic disciplines. 

ELECTIVES (all 3-hour courses, except for L 290, the last listing.) 
L 220. Public Library in the Political Process. 

Seminar in the principal influences which affect the patterns of organization, 
support and service patterns of public libraries based upon theoretical and case 
studies. 

L 222. Children's Literature and Materials. 

A survey of literature and other media of communication and the criteria in 
evaluating such materials as they relate to the needs, interests and capability of 
the child. 

L 224. Construction and Maintenance of Index Languages. 

This course treats the making of classification schedules, subject heading lists 
and thesauri and those considerations relating to the revision and extension of 
existing ones. 

10 



University of Maryland 
L 225. Advanced Data Processing in Libraries. 

Analysis of retrieval systems and intensive study of machine applications in the 
acquisition, analysis, coding, retrieval and display of information. 

L 227. Seminar in Documentation and Information Systems and 
their Testing and Evaluation. 

A survey of recent developments in the processing, arrangement, and retrieval 
of information, and in the procedures used in their evaluation. 

L 228. Analytical Bibliography and Descriptive Cataloging. 

Concentrates on the techniques and theories appropriate to the study of biblio- 
graphic morphology and bibliographical description. 

L 231. Research Methods in Library and Information Activity. 

The techniques and strategies of research and their implications for the defini- 
tion, investigation and evaluation of library problems. 

L 233. Governmental Information Systems.* 

Analysis of the organization of the information structure and the publication and 
dissemination programs of the U.S., federal, state and municipal governments. 

L 235. Problems of Special Materials. 

Discusses advanced principles and practices for all technical services (in partic- 
ular cataloging) applicable to maps, serials, music, audio-visual items, etc. 

L 244. Medical Literature. 

Survey and evaluation of information sources in medicine, with emphasis upon 
the bibliographic organization of the field. 

L 245. Legal Literature. 

Survey and evaluation of information sources in law, with emphasis upon the 
bibliographic organization of the field. 

L 249. Seminar in Technical Services. 

Treatment of special administrative problems related to acquistion, cataloging 
and classification, circulation, and managerial controls. 

L 251. Introduction to Reprography. 

A survey of the processes and technology through which materials are made 
available in furthering library and information services, ranging from printing 
to microforms. 

L 253. Seminar in the Academic Library.* 

A seminar on the academic library within the framework of higher education, 
treating problems of programs, collections, support, planning and physical plant. 

L 255. Seminar on Manuscript Collections. 

Analysis of the methods and philosophy of handling special papers and docu- 
mentary material in a research library. 

L 259. Business Information Services.* 

Survey and analysis of information sources in business, finance, and economics 
with emphasis upon their use in problem solving. 

* Not offered in 1965/66 

// 



School of Library and Information Services 

L 261. Seminar in the Special Library and Information Center. 

A seminar on the development, the uses, the objectives, the philosophy and the 
particular systems employed in special library service. 

L 263. Literature of the Fine Arts.* 

Consideration and evaluation of the resources of the fine arts, emphasizing 
bibliography and services contained in fine arts libraries. 

L 264. Seminar in the School Library. 

Special problems in the organization and programs unique to the library of the 
modern school. 

L 265. Information Systems Design. 

A workshop oriented seminar designed to cover problems of implementation 
and management of various types of conventional and advanced information 
handling systems. 

L 269. Library Systems. 

Evolution and current patterns of regional library development, considering the 
economic, legal, service and management problems associated with library 
systems as well as the significance of state and federal programs and national 
information networks. 

L 271. Advanced Reference Services. 

Theoretical and administrative considerations, analysis of research problems, 
and directed activity in bibliographic method and search techniques in large 
collections. 

L 273. Resources of American Libraries.* 

Considers distribution and extent of library resources, means of surveying col- 
lections, mechanisms of inter-institutional cooperation in building collections, 
and means of developing research collections in special subject fields. 

L 275. Storytelling Materials and Techniques. 

Literary sources are studied and instruction and practice in oral techniques 
are offered. 

L 277. International and Comparative Librarianship.* 

Comparative analysis of the organization and development of libraries and their 
programs in different nations and cultures. 

L 290. Independent Study. (1-3) 

Prerequisite, consent of instructor. Designed to permit intensive individual study, 
reading or research in an area of specialized interest under faculty supervision. 

* Not offered in 1965/66 



12 



The Faculty 

Administrative Officer 

WASSERMAN, Paul, Professor and Dean of the School of Library and Information 
Services 

B.B.A., College of City of New York, 1948; M.S.(L.S.), Columbia University, 
1949; M.S., Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1960. 

Faculty 

BERGEN, Daniel P., Assistant Professor 

A.B., University of Notre Dame, 1957; A.M., University of Chicago, 1961; M.A., 
University of Notre Dame, 1962. 

BOHNERT, Lea M., Adjunct Lecturer 

B.A., University of Chicago, 1942; M.A., University of Chicago, 1947. 

BUNDY, Mary Lee, Associate Professor 

B.E., State University of New York at Potsdam, 1948; MA. University of Denver, 
1951; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1960. 

COLSON, John C, Assistant Professor 

B.A., Ohio University, 1950; M.S. in L.S., Western Reserve University, 1951. 

DUBESTER, Henry J., Adjunct Lecturer 

B.S.S., College of the City of New York, 1939; M.A., Columbia University, 1946. 

FANG, Josephine R., Adjunct Lecturer 

Absolutorium, University of Vienna, 1947; Ph.D., University of Graz, 1948; M.S.. 
in L.S., Catholic University of America, 1954. 

KENNER, Frances Choate, Adjunct Lecturer 

A.B., Washington University, 1939; M.S., Columbia University, 1952. 

MILLS, Jack, Visiting Lecturer 

A.L.A., (Associate of Library Association of Great Britain), 1945; F.L.A. (Fellow 
of Library Association of Great Britain), 1950. 

PELLOWSKI, Anne, Adjunct Lecturer 

B.A., College of St. Teresa, 1955; M.S., Columbia University, 1959. 

PERREAULT, Jean M., Lecturer 

B.S., Rockhurst College, 1952; M.A., Marquette University, 1957; MA. (L.S.), 
University of Wisconsin, 1959. 

THACKSTON, Frances V., Librarian and Lecturer 

B.A., Duke University, 1944; M.S., University of North Carolina, 1959. 

WALSTON, Claude, Adjunct Lecturer 

B.S.E.E., University of South Carolina, 1946; M.S.E.E., University of Wisconsin. 
1950; Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1953. 

WASSERMAN, Paul, Professor and Dean of the School 

B.B.A., College of City of New York, 1948; M.S.(L.S.), Columbia University, 
1949; M.S., Columbia University, 1950; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1960. 

13 




Coffee Hour for faculty and students. 






THE UNIVERSITY is the rear guard and the 

advance agent ety. It lives in the 

. the pr< id the future. It is the 

of knowledge; it draws upon 
this dc| to throw light upon the 

ent; it prepares people to live and make 
a living in the world of today; and it 
should take the lead in expanding the 
intellectual i jientific 

frontiers, thus helping mankind to go forward 
— alv d the promise of a 

better tomorrow. 



ivcrsity" 
the inaugural address of 

College I iryland.