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Full text of "School of Pharmacy Catalog 1993-1996,1999-2007"

Years 1997-1998 missing 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/schoolpharm93unse 



IVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 



School of Pharmacy 

19934995 

Catalog 



Entry-Level 
Doctor of Phari 
(Pharm.D.) 




School of Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy , 1841-1 904) 

Entry -Level Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) 
1 993-95 Catalog and 1 34th Announcement 
for the Professional Degree Program 
Volume 57, Number I , November 1993 



_^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

AT BALTIMORE 

School ot Pharmacy 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

20 North Pine Street 

Baltimore, MD 2 120M 180 

Admissions/Student Affairs 
(410) 706-76S3 

or 
1-800-852-2988 (Toll Free) 

Dean's Office (410)706-7650 

Financial Aid (UMAB) (410) 706-7347 

Public Affairs (410)706-5893 



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Pharmacy (BS.l'l. Docioroj I'hartnaey ii'harm.D.) and a inumiing edu- 
cation frrograms are accredited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical 
Education. The school is a member of the American Association of Colleges 
ofPhamuicy. 

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INIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMOR 



School of Pharmacy 

19934995 

Catalog 



Entry-Level 
Doctor of Pharmacy 
(Pharm.D.) 



Contents 



INTRODUCTION 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



Academic Goals 2 

THE SCHOOL AND ITS 
ENVIRONMENT 

The School of Pharmacy 5 

The University of Maryland at 

Baltimore 11 

Baltimore 15 

ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 

Application Procedures 16 

International Students 18 

International Pharmacists 19 

Licensure Requirements 19 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Fees and Expenses 1993-94 20 

Determination of In-State 

Residency 21 

Financial Aid 21 

Scholarships and Loans 22 

Student Veterans 24 



Academic Sessions 53 

Registration Policies 53 

Grading System 54 

Scholastic Honors 54 

Academic Status Policies 56 

Reduced Academic Load 

Policies 57 

Academic Dismissal 57 

Academic Integrity 58 

Program Completion and 

Employment 58 

ADMINISTRATION AND 
FACULTY 

University ot Maryland System 59 

University of Maryland at 

Baltimore 59 

School ot Pharmacy 60 

POLICY STATEMENTS 73 

CAMPUS MAPS 78 



ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF 
PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) 
PROGRAM 



Program Description 25 

Curriculum Pathways and 

Electives 29 

Program Curricula 31 

Course Descriptions 34 



Introduction 



This catalog describes the academic pohcies and curriculum for the four-year 
entry-level Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) program that began in the fall of 
1993. This is an entirely new program developed by the faculty after exten- 
sive analysis of the current programs, and discussion and input from practi- 
tioners regarding the needs of the profession. The new curriculum has 
inherent flexibility which allows a wide range of choice for students. Most 
courses do not run an entire semester but are presented in shorter time frames 
so that the students can focus on three or four subjects rather than six or seven 
courses. This innovation allows more time for in-depth discussion of content 
areas. Other innovations include the optional pathways which offer avenues 
for specialization within an area of interest, such as pharmacotherapy or com- 
munity practice, and the expanded opportunities to take electives — 21% of 
the curriculum. 

The University of Maryland's new four-year entry-level Pharm.D. 
degree requires the prior completion of at least 60 semester credit hours in 
pharmacy prerequisites. The prepharmacy courses may be taken at any accred- 
ited two or four-year institution. The entry-level Pharm.D. program requires 
the successful completion of a minimum of 132 semester hours including 100 
didactic credits and 32 experiential credits. 

The current Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy and the Post B.S. in Phar- 
macy Doctor of Pharmacy programs are being consolidated into the entry- 
level Doctor of Pharmacy program. No new students will be admitted to these 
programs. All information regarding these programs is listed in the School 
of Pharmacy 1991-93 catalog (Vol. 56, No.l ) and will remain in force for 
students while those programs are being offered. 

ACADEMIC GOALS 

The broad goals and objectives of the entry-level Pharm.D. program are 
encompassed within the strategic plan adopted by the school's faculty in 
August 1989: 

The School of Pharmacy seeks to provide individuals with the knowl- 
edge aryi skills necessary to hefrin pharmacy practice , and in so doing 
accept and perform professional responsibilities ivith competence. 
Graduates should have the ability to adapt their practice to the chang- 
ing health care system, and should be prepared to engage in a continu- 
ing program of {:)rofessional development. 

The professional cunicula will be innovative arid flexible , based 
on strong basic sciences , have extensive clinical content taught by prac- 
tice-based faculty , and emphasize the development of problem-solving 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



and collaborative skills . The opportunity for advanced professional and 
clinical education will he made available . 

The school seeks to create an educational community that 
extends beyond traditional classroom sites and offers students and 
faculty a variety of learning envirtmments . These will include cultural 
and interprofessional pro-ams which broaden the experiences of our 
graduates . 




In the past, the school has been very successful in meeting these goals, 
as noted by the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education during its 
recent accreditation visit in February 1992. 

Curricular change within the school has been prompted, in part, by the 
adoption of the concept of pharmaceutical care by the practice of pharmacy. 
In the words of the AACP Commission to Implement Change in Pharma- 
ceutical Education: 

Pharmaceutical care focuses pharmacists' attitude, behaviors, 
commitments, concerns, ethics, functions, knowledge, responsibilities 
and skills on the provision of drug therapy with the goal of achieving def- 
inite outcomes toward the improvement of a patient's quality of life. 
These outcomes of drug use are: I) cure of a disease; 2) elimination or 
reduction of symptoms; 3) arresting or slowing a disease process; 
4) prevention of disease; 5) diagnosis of disease; and 6) desired alter- 
ations in physiological processes, all with minimum risk to patients. 

Historically the major patient-oriented, professional functions of 
pharmacy have involved preparing the drug product and providing it to 
the patient. These continue to be vital components. But, in response to 
the increasing effectiveness , potency, preciseness, risk and cost of drug 



INTROnUCTION 



therapy and the increasing use of drugs in diagnosis , pharmacy has gone 
beyond those functions . 

Thus the scope of contemporary pharmacy activities inchides: 

• selecting the drug product dosage form and source of supply ; 

• determining the dose and dosage schedule; 

• preparing the drug product for patient use and providing it to 
the patient; 

• providing drug information to patients and others ; 

• participating in the process of drug use decisions ; 

• monitoring patients to maximize compliance and to detect 
adverse events; and 

• monitoring patients to enhance therapeutic outcomes. 




The central goal of the entry-level Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum is to 
provide our graduates competency in the knowledge, attitudes, values and 
skills necessary to provide, coordinate and manage primary pharmaceuti- 
cal care in collaboration with patients and their families, prescribers, and 
other health care providers or care givers, in a variety of practice settings. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



The School and Its Environment 



THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Historical Background 

The University of Maryland, School of Pharmacy, which celebrated its 150th 
anniversary in 1991 , has a rich and distinguished heritage. Incorporated as the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy on January 27, 1841, it gave its first lectures 
in November of that year. It is the oldest pharmacy school in the South and 
the fourth oldest in the country. Primarily an independent institution until 
1904, the Maryland College of Pharmacy then became the department of 
pharmacy of the University of Maryland. In 1920, the University of Maryland 
in Baltimore merged with the Maryland State College at College Park to form 
the state university. Today, it is one of seven professional schools which form 
the University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMAB). 

Throughout its history, the School of Pharmacy has been a local and 
national leader for the profession of pharmacy. It was a founding member of 
the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, which was established to 
formulate uniform standards for the graduation of pharmacy students. The 
school was instrumental in the development of the American Council for 
Pharmaceutical Education, the national accreditation organization for 
schools of pharmacy. 

In 1970, through the efforts of the school and the Maryland Board of 
Pharmacy, Maryland became the first state to replace the unstructured intern- 
ship program with a professional experience program incorporated in the 
school's curriculum. This set the national standard for professional pharmacy 
education. Likewise in 1980, Maryland became the first School of Pharmacy 
to establish a Center for the Study of Pharmacy and Therapeutics for the 
Elderly, now the national model for pharmacy geriatric education. 

The school moved to Pharmacy Hall, a seven-story facility on Pine 
Street, in 1982. Situated at the west entrance to the UMAB campus. Phar- 
macy Hall houses most of the classroom and lecture facilities, research labo- 
ratories, conference rooms and administrative offices for the School of 
Pharmacy. Pharmacy Hall also houses Food and Drug Administration per- 
sonnel working in conjunction with the Pharmaceutical Sciences \ Pharma- 
ceutics Program. The Pharmacy Practice and Science Department and the 
Pharmaceutical Sciences Department's Pharmacokinetics-Biopharmaceutics 
Laboratory are located about two blocks away in the five-story Allied Health 
Building which opened in 1992. Located at 100 Penn Street, it is diagonally 
across from the Maryland Pharmacists Association, which is housed in the 
Kelly Building at 650 W. Lombard Street. 



THE SCHOOL AND ITS ENVIRONMENT 



Commitment to Diversity 

The school strives to achieve a broad racial, sexual and ethnic balance in its 
enrollment. To achieve this objective it gives every consideration to minor- 
ity student applications. The current diversity of student population is 
reflected in 1993 enrollment statistics: 13% African American, 27% Asian, 
55% Caucasian, 2% Hispanic, and 3% International (foreign) students. 

Community and Professional Service and Research Support Programs 

In addition to its degree programs, the University of Maryland School of Phar- 
macy offers several community service and research support programs. 

The School of Pharmacy Academic Computing Laboratory is located 
on the third Hoot oi Pharmacy Hall. It has sixteen 486 computers with VGA 
monitors for professional student and general use. There are two laser print- 
ers in the lab. The school has 303 computers — 271 IBM PC-type and 32 
Apple type — and 215 printers including 60 laser printers and one color laser. 
Most of these computers are hooked up to a Novell Local Area Network 
(LAN) to share files, software and to use electronic mail. The Swain Phar- 
macy Practice Laboratory is equipped with state of the art computers and 
pharmacy software for educational use. 

The Biomedicinal Chemistry NMR Center houses a G.E. 300 MH: 
nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. The superconducting magnet, the 
heart of the instrument, is permanently immersed in a vacuum-jacket reser- 
voir of liquid helium ( — 260°C) and allows the detection and accurate deter- 
mination of protons, "C,"P and other nuclei of biological importance. The 
first instrument of its kind on the UMAB campus, the NMR has opened up 
many new areas of research within the school, and greatly increasing the num- 
ber of inter-school collaborative ventures. 

The Center on Drugs and Public Policy is a cooperative program of the 
Scht)ol of Pharmacy and the Policy Sciences Graduate Program, under the 
auspices of the University of Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore. The goal 
of the center is to contribute to informed debate of policy issues related to drug 
use and abuse in our society. In addition to conducting research on major drug 
policy issues, the center organizes conferences and workshops and serves as a 
consultant on drug issues to organizations in the private and public sectors. 
Fellowships or externships are available to those from industry, state and local 
agencies, foreign governments or universities who want a campus-based expe- 
rience in drug-related policy research as well as an orientation to relevant 
agencies and organizations based in the Washington, P.C. and Baltimore areas. 

The Center for the Study of Pharmacy and Therapeutics for the 
Elderly serves as the local point ot all geriatric education, service and research 
activities within the school. It provides continuing education programs both 
on the state and national levels. Funding from federal and private sources 
allows the center to encourage and support relevant research by faculty and 
graduate students from all .school departments. The Center is administratively 
responsible for the Elder-I lealrh Program and rbe Parke-Davis Center tor the 



Education of Elderly. The Parke-Davis Center for the Education of Elderly 
develops educational materials for use by the Elder-Health and Elder-Ed pro- 
grams. The Elder-Health Program trains pharmacy students and retired phar- 
macists about the social and psychological aspects of drug use among the 
elderly as well as the therapeutic goals of treatment for prescribed and over- 
the-counter medications. They then give presentations for community groups 
of elderly. 




The Computational Chemistry Laboratory is used for the study of bio- 
chemical systems via mathematical models. The goal of such studies is to allow 
for an understanding of the relationship of the 3-dimensional structure and 
dynamics of biological molecules to their physiological function. Such knowl- 
edge allows for a detailed understanding of the molecular basis of disease 
which may be used for the rational design of therapeutic agents. These 
approaches greatly increase the efficiency of the drug discovery process lead- 
ing to significant savings of both time and money, which may ultimately be 
passed on to the consumer. 

The Drug Development Facility, established as part of a three year $7. 1 
million collaborative agreement with the Food and Drug Administration, is 
one of the most modern industrial and pharmaceutical technology research 
and manufacturing facilities iti the country encompassing both state-of-the- 
art research facilities and a GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) laboratory. 
Under the FDA contract, experimental clinical products are manufactured 
and tested for bioequivalence. In addition to FDA research, the Drug Devel- 
opment Facility can accept contracts from outside to develop and manufac- 
ture products for clinical studies. This Facility serves as an important resource 
for research as well as a teaching tool for advanced students. 

The Maryland Poison Center serves as the regional poison center for 
the state of Maryland. As an emergency telephone service, it provides toxic- 
ity and treatment information on a 24-hour basis to the general public and to 
health professionals. Staffed by pharmacists and registered nurses, the center 



THE SCHOOL AND ITS ENVIRONMENT 



handles over 54,000 poison-related calls each year. It is an American Associ- 
ation of Poison Control Center's certified regional poison center. University 
of Maryland at Baltimore health professional students can apply for part-time 
paid positions with the center. 

The Mass Spectrometry Laboratory determines the structure of 
unknown chemicals and provides quantitative measurements of drugs and 
chemicals from a variety of sample sources. The laboratory's focus is on con- 
ducting both basic and applied research, increasing analytical services on the 
University of Maryland at Baltimore campus and supporting expanded mass 
spectrometry-related research activities in the larger scientific community. 

The Mental Health Program of the School of Pharmacy is a joint ven- 
ture with the Developmental Disabilities Administration and Mental 
Hygiene Administration of the state of Maryland. Its primary goal is to 
upgrade all aspects of pharmacy practice within the state's mental health facil- 
ities. The program also serves as a site for pharmacologic and administrative 
research in mental health, a testing ground for the development of innova- 
tive strategies in mental health pharmacy practice and a training resource for 
mental health-related issues. Members of the program's faculty serve at nine 
mental health sites around the state. 

The Office of Substance Abuse Studies is responsible for the school's 
drug and alcohol abuse programs, including administration of the Student 
Committee on Drug Abuse Education (SCODAE), the operation of the drug 
abuse information telephone service and the publication of a quarterly 
newsletter, PharmAlert. SCODAE is a volunteer organization of pharmacy 
students who, with faculty support and guidance, are committed to the devel- 
opment of rational attitudes about drugs by serving as a source of accurate, 
unbiased drug information. Pharmacy students present drug education lec- 
tures to a variety of groups, from elementary school children to health and 
education professionals. The office administers UMAB's interprofessional 
Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program and is instrumental in the oper- 
ation of the Pharmacists Rehabilitation, which is jointly sponsored by the 
Maryland Pharmacists Association, the Maryland Society oi Hospital Phar- 
macists and the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. 

Student Qovemment 

Student government activities are coordinated by the school's Student Gov- 
ernment Alliance (SGA). All professional students belong to the SGA. 
Through its officers and committees, the SGA sponsors numerous social, ser- 
vice and educational events. The executive committee of SGA includes the 
presidents of all school organizations. This committee meets periodically with 
school administrators to discuss important issues. At the campus level, the 
University Student Government Association (USGA) c(X)rdinates student 
government activities. Students are represented by senators and officers 
elected by the UMAB schools. 




Lecture Series 

The School oi Pharmacy currently has three endowed lectureships and a spe- 
cial symposium: 

Francis S. Balassone Memorial Lecture. The Maryland Pharmacists 
Association, the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association and the school 
sponsor this lectureship as a memorial to Francis S. Balassone, a 1940 gradu- 
ate of the school, a past president of the Alumni Association, a distinguished 
former faculty member, and a past president of the National Association of 
Boards of Pharmacy. 

Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture. This lectureship was estab- 
lished in 1969 by Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez as a memorial to her late husband, 
Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, dean of the University of Maryland School of Phar- 
macy from 1926 to 1948, and a distinguished educator and leader in pharmacy 
in Maryland, the United States and internationally. 

Ellis GroUman Lecture in Pharmaceutical Sciences. In 1983, Mrs. 
Evelyn GroUman Glick funded a lecture program as a memorial to her brother, 
Ellis GroUman, a pharmacy school graduate in the class of 1926. Each year 
nationally recognized researchers in the pharmaceutical or related basic sci- 
ences are selected to present this lecture. 

The Peter P. Lamy Symposium was inaugurated in 1992 in recognition 
of Dr. Lamy's work as the Parke-Davis Professor and Chair in Geriatric Phar- 
macotherapy. Dr. Lamy was responsible for obtaining the first endowed chair 
in the School of Pharmacy in 1990 underwritten by a gift from the Warner- 
Lambert Company to create the Parke-Davis Chair in Geriatric Pharma- 
cotherapy. Dr. Lamy is an internationally-recognized authority on geriatrics 
and gerontology. 

Endowed Chairs 

The Emerson Professorship in Pharmacology was endowed in 1927 as a 
Chair in Biological Testing and Assay by Captain Isaac Emerson, President of 
the Emerson Drug Company. The first chair was filled by Dr. Marvin Thomp- 



THE SCHOOL AND ITS ENVIRONMENT 



son who was a pharmacologist at the Food and Drug Administration at the 
time. Dr. Clifford W. Chapman, a pharmacologist from the Canadian 
National Laboratories was appointed to the Chair in 1938. Dr. Casimer Ich- 
niowski and Dr. Nairn Khazan were the third and fourth appointees to the 
Chair. In 1988, Dr. Gerald M. Rosen, professor and chairman, pharmacology 
and toxicology, was appointed Emerson Professor. In 1992, Dr. Rosen was 
named an Eminent Scholar by the Maryland Higher Education Commissicm. 
The Parke-Davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy was established 
in 1990 by a $1 million gift from Warner-Lambert Company on the eve of the 
125th Anniversary of Parke-Davis and the School of Pharmacy's 150th 
Anniversary. The chair recognizes the scientific contributions in the area of 
geriatrics and gerontology of Peter P. Lamy, Ph.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), appointed 
Parke-Davis professor in 1991. As the Parke-Davis Professor, Dr. Lamy was 
named an Eminent Scholar by the Maryland Higher Education Commission. 







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Alumni Association 

The Alumni Association ot the University t)f Maryland Scht)ol ot Pharmacy, 
established in 1926 to foster an interest in the school, encourages fellowship 
among its members, and promotes superior scholarship in its students and 
graduates. Each year the association sponsors various activities including the 
fall meeting, and the spring banquet honoring the graduating seniors and the 
50-year class. The Alumni Association awards eight scholarships based on 
need to deserving students. Three of these scholarships are named in memory 
of William J. Lowry, Henry G. Seidman and Alex Weiner. The Alumni Asso- 
ciation contributes to production and distribution of the quarterly Rx 
Newsletter. The Alumni Association plays a leadership role in the fund rais- 
ing activities of the school by serving as callers in the Alumni Volunteer 
Phonathon and as members of the David Stewart Associates and the Uni\'er- 
sity's Presidents Club. 



SCHOOL OF pharma(.:y 



The David Stewart Associates 

The school traces its beginnings to a man with a vision — David Stewart. Civic 
leader, chemist and pharmacist, Stewart was instrumental in founding the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy in 1841 and, in 1884, the college elected him 
to the first chair in pharmacy in the United States. In his honor the school 
has named its major annual giving club — The David Stewart Associates. 
Alumni, friends and faculty who contribute $1 ,000 to the school annually are 
automatically enrolled. During FY'93, the prestigious David Stewart Asso- 
ciates had 76 members. 

Members who pledge to give $10,000 over a five-year period are eligi- 
ble for membership in the University of Maryland System Presidents Club. 
Many of our members are in both giving clubs. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore is the founding campus of Mary- 
land's public university system and a thriving center for life sciences research 
and community service. Seven graduate and professional schools educate 
research scientists and many of the region's health care, law and social work 
practitioners. 

With $110 million in sponsored program support, UMAB is one of the 
fastest growing biomedical research centers in the country. The university is 
ideally configured to tackle complex health care, public policy and societal 
issues. Our urban location and unique combination of strengths create oppor- 
tunities to address regional problems in a comprehensive way. The solutions 
can have global implications. AIDS, aging, schizophrenia, hypertension, lead 
poisoning, cancer, child abuse and homelessness all are subjects of multidis- 
ciplinary research, scholarship and community action. 

New partnerships among university components and with the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Medical Center and new Veterans Affairs Medical Center 
are strengthening interdisciplinary endeavors in both research and teaching. 
Our locatiori, within the Baltimore-Washington-Annapolis triangle, maxi- 
mizes opportunities for collaboration with government agencies, health care 
institutions and life sciences industries. 

Health Sciences Library 

The Health Sciences Library is distinguished as the first library established by 
a medical school in the United States, and is a recognized leader in state-of- 
the art information technology. The Health Sciences Library is the regional 
medical library for 10 southeastern states, the District of Columbia, Puerto 
Rico and the Virgin Islands, as part of the biomedical information network of 
the National Library of Medicine. 

Serving all schools on campus and UMMS, the library contains more 
than 300,000 volumes, including 2,900 current journal titles, and is ranked in 
size among the top 25 health sciences libraries in the country. 

THE SCHOOL AND ITS ENVIRONMENT • 11 



The library's online catalog allows you to look for materials by title, 
author, subject, keyword, call number, series, meeting and organization name. 
In addition to giving information on library holdings, the system can deter- 
mine whether the material has been checked out of the library. The online 
catalog can be accessed from any computer terminal on the UMAB campus 
that is linked to the campus network, or from any dial access terminal. 

The library supports several computerized search services: MaryMed 
Plus, HSL Current Contents®, CD-ROM LAN, Micromedex CClS, and a 
Mediated Searching Service. Information specialists provide assistance in 
using library services. Training seminars are held throughout the year. 

Computer Resources 

Microcomputer support for faculty, staff and students, as well as mainframe 
research and instructional computing on the IBM 4381, are provided by 
Health Informatics and Computer User Services, both units of Information 
Services at UMAB. Computers in Technology Assisted Learning (TAL) 
Centers in the Information Services Building, the Health Sciences Library 
and elsewhere across campus are available for use by the campus community 
and for training in applications packages. 

Programming languages such as FORTRAN and C, as well as statistical 
analysis packages like SAS, SPSS-X and BMDP are available for the main- 
frame computer. Free worldwide electronic mail accounts, via the Profes- 
sional Office System (PROFS), enable faculty, staff and students to exchange 
notes, files and docuinents with others both at UMAB and internationally via 
Bitnet. 

Instructional courses and training classes are available in WordPerfect, 
Lotus, dBase and graphics, among others. Students, faculty and researchers are 
able to use Information Services' resources at every step of their work, from 
collection of information through preparation for final presentation, includ- 
ing desktop publishing, ct)lor printing and plotting, overheads and co\ot 
slides. 

The IBM 4381 system is accessible from the User Area, computers 
attached to the campus network and by dial-up modem trom either office or 
home. Staff consultants can help with first aid, program debugging and appli- 
cations support. 

Student Health Services 

Student .ind Employee Health provides comprehensive care to University ot 
Maryland at Baltimore students. The office, staffed by family physicians and 
nurse practitioners, is open from 8 a.m. until 4:30 p.m., Monday through Fri- 
day, and until 7 p.m., Monday through Thursday, for emergencies. Patients 
are seen by appointment only. 

Gynecological services, nicluding heairh maintenance (PAP smears, 
etc.), family planning and routine prohleins, arc pun ulcii h\ the fannly physi- 
cians or nurse practitie)ners. 

12 • SCHOOL ov i'harmac:y 



All full-time students are required to have health insurance. An excel- 
lent insurance policy is availahle through the campus. The cost ot most care 
provided at Student and Employee Health is paid for through the student 
health tee. 

Hepatitis B is an occupational illness for health care providers. Immu- 
nization against Hepatitis B is required for medical, dental, dental hygiene, 
nursing, medical technology and Pharm.D. students. The series of three 
immunizations is given through Student and Employee Health. 




Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center provides professional individual and group counsel- 
ing to UMAB students. Some of the problems that students seek help with 
include: stress, relationships, drugs or alcohol, eating disorders, loss of a loved 
one and stressful changes in school or home life. 

Students are always seen by a professional — social worker, psychologist, 
psychiatrist or addictions counselor. Costs associated with seeing a therapist 
usually are covered by health insurance; however, no one is ever denied ser- 
vices based on ability to pay. Students are seen by appointment and students' 
class schedules can be accommodated in scheduling appointments. All Coun- 
seling Center services are completely confidential. 

Parking and Transportation 

On campus parking is available to students. Commuters may park in the Lex- 
ington Garage (Lexington and Pine Streets) between 6 a.m. and 1 1 p.m. The 
garage operates on a first-come, first-served basis. Commuting students must 
obtain a parking permit from the Parking and Commuter Services Office, 
then pay the established daily rate when parking in the garage. 

Students who live in on-campus housing pay for parking by the semes- 
ter or year and are guaranteed 24-hour parking in a garage adjacent to their 
residence facility. For more information about parking on campus, write 



THE SCHOOL AND ITS ENVIRONMENT 



Parking and Commuter Services, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Balti- 
more, Maryland 21201 or call 410 706-6603. 

Public transportation makes the campus accessible by bus, subway and 
light rail. More than a dozen MTA bus routes stop in the campus area. The 
Baltimore Metro runs from Charles Center to Owings Mills. Stops closest to 
campus are at Lexington Market and Charles Center. A new Light Rail line 
connects northern Baltimore County with Oriole Park at Camden Yards. The 
UniversityCenter stop is at Baltimore and Howard Streets. 




Living in Baltimore 

Baltimore's a fun, friendly city with many affordable and convenient hiiusing 
options. The brochure Living In Baltimt)re describes on- and off-campus 
options for UMAB students; it is available through most UMAB admissions 
offices or by calling the Residence Life Office at 410 706-7766. 

On-campus living options include furnished university-owned apart- 
ments and dormitory style accominodations plus unfurnished apartments in a 
half-dt):en privately owned loft district buildings on campus. The Baltimore 
Student Union and Pascault Row Apartments are the two uni\'ersity owned 
on-campus housing complexes. 

Many students choose to live in neighborhoods surrounding the UMAB 
campus. A wide range of rooms, apartments and home rentals are available 
throughout the metropolitan area. The Student Life Office, located in the 
Baltimore Student Union, keeps a listing of available rooms and apartments. 

Athletic Center 

The campus Athletic Center, on the tenth floor ot the Pratt Street Garage, is 
equipped with a squash court; two handball/racquetball courts; two basketball 
courts which are also used for volleyball; and a weight room with two 15- 
station universal gyms, stationary bikes and rowing machines. Men's and 
women's locker rooms each have a sauna and showers. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Men's haskethall, co-ed intramural basketball and volleyball teams 
compete throughout the tall and spring semesters. Squash and racquetball 
tournaments also are held in the facility. 

BALTIMORE 

In addition to professional opportunities, the city of Baltimore offers a stimu- 
lating environment in which to live and study. Several blocks from the cam- 
pus is the nationally acclaimed Inner Harbor area, where Harborplace, the 
National Aquarium, the Maryland Science Center and other facilities share 
an attractive waterfront with sailboats, hotels, restaurants and renovated 
townhouses. The new Baltimore Metro and Light Rail system connect the 
downtown area to the outskirts of the city. 

Baltimore boasts lively entertainment, world class museums, fine music 
and professional theater. For sports fans, Baltimore features Orioles baseball 
(the new stadium is two blocks from campus) and league-winning lacrosse. 
The nearby Chesapeake Bay offers unparalleled water sports and the seafood 
for which the region is famous. 



THE SCHOOL AND ITS ENVIRONMENT 



Admissions Information 



The University of Maryland actively seeks to enroll students with diverse 
backgrounds in order to make the educational experience more meaningful 
for each student. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

To obtain Pharm.D. prL^gram applications and other information write: 
School of Pharmacy 
University of Maryland at Baltimore 
20 North Pine Street 
Baltimore, MD 21201-1 180 
ATTN: Admissions Information 

Pharm.D. applicants may call the School of Pharmacy's Office of Student 
Affairs at (410) 706-7653 or 1-800-852-2988 (toll free) with specific ques- 
tions regarding the school or the application process. Application forms are 
typically available in September for the next academic year, which begins 
each fall. Applicants should submit: (1) a completed application, (2) sup- 
porting documents and (3) a $40 application fee directly to: 

Office of Records and Registration 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

62 1 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore, MD 21201-1575 



Those seeking advanced degrees (M.S. and Ph.D.) through the school 
must apply to: University of Maryland Graduate School, 5401 Wilkens 
Ave., Baltimore, MD 21228. For information on specific graduate pro- 
grams within the school, write: 

Graduate Programs - * specify discipline * 

University of Maryland 

School of Pharmacy 

20 North Pine Street 

Baltimore, MD 21201-1180 

*Please specify the pharmacy graduate program to which you wish to 
apply: biomcdicinal cheiiiisfry, pharmacology and toxicology, pharma- 
ceiirics, phaniiacy .Klmini^rraiion or insiiturional pharmacy- 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 




Application deadliiies 

February 1 Application 

April 1 All supporting documents (official 

transcripts and PC AT scores) 

Admissions Process 

To be considered for admission, applicants must take the Pharmacy College 
Admission Test (PCAT) and forward their scores to the school. Applications 
for the PCAT exam are available from the school's Student Affairs Office. 
Although the PCAT is given in October, February and April, serious appli- 
cants should complete the October and/or February exams. An admissions 
committee of faculty and students reviews PCAT results and official tran- 
scripts. Applicants with strong PCAT and/or academic credentials are invited 
to interview with faculty and students. During the interview, influential fac- 
tors, such as the applicant's professional and social awareness, verbal and writ- 
ten communication skills, integrity, maturity and motivation, are assessed. 
Following the interview, the committee makes admission decisions based on 
the applicant's academic achievement, scores on the PCAT and qualities 
evaluated during the interview. Academic achievement and/or high scores on 
the PCAT do not, in themselves, ensure acceptance. While a minimum grade 
point average (GPA) of 2.5 ( A=4.0) is required for application consideration, 
the average GPA of Fall 1 993 entering students was approximately 3 .4- Aver- 
age PCAT scores of admitted students ranged in the 75th to 85th percentile 
in each of the five areas of the exam. Because of multiple applications for each 
available position in the entering class, applicants with GPAs below 2.8 have 
an extremely low probability of admission. 

Applicants must present evidence (via official transcripts) of having 
successfully completed the required prepharmacy program, or being able to 
complete the prepharmacy course work before the start of classes in the fall. 



ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 



Prerequisites 

A minimum of 60 semester hours of pharmacy prerequisites is required for 
admission into the entry-level Pharm.D. program. At least one semester of 
this course work must be taken at an accredited institution in the United 
States. To enroll in prepharmacy course work, students must apply directly to 
an accredited college or university, not to the School of Pharmacy. Most insti- 
tutions have designated prepharmacy programs and advisors. The School of 
Pharmacy does not provide any specific information regarding course content andlor 
requirements for admission into these prepharmacy programs. 

Prerequisites for admission into the entry-level Pharm.D. program are: 

Course Minimum Number of 

Semesters Required 

English 2 

Math (Precalculus/Calculus I) Up to Calculus I 

Zoology or Biology 1 

General Chemistry 2 

Organic Chemistry 2 

Physics 2 

Humanities and Social Sciences About 18 hours to a 

minimum total ot 60 hours 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

Students who are not citizens or permanent residents ot the United States 
must submit the results of the TOEFL (Test oi English as a Foreign Language), 
certified official copies of transcripts, a statement of financial support, a sup- 
plementary information sheet and a summary of educational experiences. 
These must be submitted with the application and the $40 application fee to 
the Office of Records and Registration. International students are also 
required to take the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT). Therefore 
it is essential that international students start the admissions process early. 

The school does not accept applicants who have attended only a fcir- 
eign educational institution. The school, due to its small size, cannot ade- 
quately certify international credentials and relies on the evaluation 
performed by other institutions. In addition, experience shows that interna- 
tional students benefit from taking courses at other U.S. instituticMis before 
entering our program. International students should be familiar with the rules 
and regulations of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, which grants 
admission to the United States. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



INTERNATIONAL PHARMACISTS 



Individuals who have received their pharmacy degrees from non-U.S. insti- 
tutions have two options to become licensed pharmacists in the U.S.' They 
can complete the Foreign Pharmacists Equivalency Examination which is 
given once a year by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. Passage 
of this exam and completion of other requirements allows the international 
pharmacists to complete state licensure exams. For further information about 
this process, contact NABP at (708) 698-6227. 

International pharmacists are also eligible to apply to the school's entry- 
level Pharm.D. program and then upon graduation from that program become 
eligible to complete state licensure exams. Credit may be given for equivalent 
course work previously completed with a grade of "C" or better. Credit may 
be awarded after an evaluation of the course and an assessment of student 
knowledge by the coursemaster. Based on the structure of the curriculum, 
international pharmacists would enter the first professional year of the four- 
year Pharm.D program. Admission is based on the evaluation of applicants 
credentials by the admissions committee. 




LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS 

Completion of the entry-level Pharm.D. degree satisfies the educational 
requirement lor all state boards of pharmacy in the U.S. Graduates are eligi- 
ble to take state licensing exams in all states. Information for licensure as a 
pharmacist in Maryland is available from the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, 
4201 Patterson Avenue, Baltimore, MD 212 15-2299. 



ADMISSIONS I N F O R M .A T 1 O N 



Financial Information 



FEES AND EXPENSES 1993-94 



Tuition and Fees 




Per Year 


Entry Level Pharm.D. 








In State 


$4,500 




Out-of'State 


9,500 


Per Credit Hour 




135 


Instructional Resources Fee 




96 


Clinical Clerkship (3rd & 4th years) 




300 


Liability Insurance 




19 


Supporting Facilities Fee 




194 


Student Activities Fee 




50 


Student Health Fee 




75 


Academic Service Fee 




10 


Other Expenses 






Application Fee (nonrefundable) 




40 


Nonrefundable Deposit 




200 


(upon Acceptance for Admission) 






Late Registration Fee 




35 


Diploma Fee 




35 


Books and Supplies, approximately 




600 


Housing 


Approximately $3,500-5,000 



The university reserves the right to make such changes in tees and other 
changes although every effort is made to keep the cost to the student as low 
as possible. 

Health Insurance 

The university believes that it is important tor all students to have health 
insurance. Thus, health insurance coverage is required of all full-time (nine 
or more semester hours) professitinal school students. Students will he billed 
for health insurance unless they provide proof of similar coverage to Family 
Medicine Specialists (Student and Employee Health). It documentation is 
provided, the cost of the premium is waived. The cost of health insurance 
varies depending on the type of coverage. In 1993, "student only" coverage 
costs $74 1 ; "student and dependent," $ 1 ,549 and "student and family," $ 1 ,928 
per year. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE RESIDENCY 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore Policy fur Student Residency Classifi- 
cation for Admission , Tuition and dxarge-Differential Purposes changed effective 
with the fall 1991 semester. There are several significant changes in the cri- 
teria for determining eligibility for in-state status. Students currently classi- 
fied as nonresidents are encouraged to review the new policy. Copies of the 
policy are available at the Registrar's Office, room 326, Baltimore Student 
Union, 410 706-7480. 

FINANCIAL AID 

Student financial aid programs are centrally administered by the University 
of Maryland at Baltimore, Student Financial Aid. These programs are 
designed to help students who otherwise would be unable to attend the uni- 
versity. To qualify for aid, students must apply annually and meet certain eli- 
gibility requirements. Students are encouraged to complete their financial 
aid application by February 15. Aid packages often include a combination of 
loans, grants, scholarships and work-study designed to meet the student's 
need. Students must complete the required Financial Aid application forms, 
which are available from: 

Student Financial Aid 

Baltimore Student Union 

Room 334 

621 W.Lombard Street 

Baltimore, MD 21201 




FINANCIAL INFORMATION • 21 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOANS 

School of Pharmacy Scholarships 

Through the generous gifts ot alumni, triends and professional associations, 
the school provides additional financial aid to its students. Students do not 
apply for these awards. Most awards are given to those students who can doc- 
ument unmet financial need through UMAB's Student Financial Aid; others 
are given to students from a certain geographical area. 
The following scholarships ha\'e been established: 

Alumni Association Scholarships. The Alumni Association awards 
eight scholarships based on need to deserving students. Three of these schol- 
arships are named in memory of William J. Lowry, Henry G. Seidman and 
Alex Weiner. 

Marilyn I. Arkin Scholarship Fund. The family and friends of Marilyn 
I. Arkin, pharmacist, the daughter of Ann and Morris Arkin and a member o{ 
the class of 1975, established this scholarship as a memorial in 1988. It pro- 
vides support for professional students in the School ot Pharmacv. 




H. J. (Jack) Custis, Jr., Memorial Scholarship Fund. In memory ot 
H. J. (Jack) Custis, Jr., class of 195 1 , a fund has been established for the pur- 
pose of awarding scholarships on the basis of reasonable need and academic 
ability to students in the professional program on the Baltimore campus t)f the 
School of Pharmacy. Students eligible for the Custis Memorial Scholarship 
shall be residents of one of the nine Eastern Shore, Maryland Counties. 

Lsadore M. and Irene R. Fischer Memorial Scholarship Fund. The 
families of lsadore M. and Irene R. Fischer have provided a scholarship fund 
to support a professional or graduate student demonstrating academic excel- 
lence in the educational programs of the University of Maryland Schiiol of 
Pharmacy. While financial need can be a consideratiini, the scholarship 
award may be made solely on academic performance. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMAOY 



Charles L. Henry Memorial Scholarship. The Charles L. Henry 
Memorial Scholarship Fund has been provided for Pharm.D. students in the 
School of Pharmacy requiring financial assistance. 

J. Gilbert Joseph Scholarship. In memory of her brother, J. Gilbert 
Joseph, a former student of the School of Pharmacy, the late Miss Jeanette 
Joseph provided a generous bequest to endow scholarships to be awarded to 
qualified students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who 
are in need of financial assistance. 

Frederick William Koenig Memorial Scholarship. In memory of her 
husband, Frederick William Koenig, a practicing pharmacist for 50 years, the 
late Mrs. Valeria R. Koenig has bequeathed a sum of money to endow a schol- 
arship to be awarded annually. The recipient of the award will be selected on 
the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 

Dr. Dean E. Leavitt Memorial Scholarship Fund. In honor of Dr. Dean 
E. Leavitt, associate dean for administration and professional services, 1976- 
1989, the family and the faculty established a fund to support a scholarship 
covering the final year of pharmacy school for students who have attained at 
least a cumulative average of 3.0, who have shown superior aptitude and 
enthusiasm in the course sequence in management, and who have demon- 
strated, as Dean Leavitt did, a commitment to the qualities of health and 
humanitarianism, both personally and professionally. 

A. M. Lichtenstein Scholarship. In memory of her husband, A. M. 
Lichtenstein, distinguished alumnus of the School of Pharmacy class of 1889, 
the late Mrs. Francina Freese Lichtenstein bequeathed a sum of money to 
endow a scholarship to he awarded annually to a resident of Allegheny 
County, Maryland. The recipient of the award is to be selected on the basis of 
financial need, character and scholarship. 

Aaron and Rosalie Paulson Scholarship Fund. Mr. Aaron A. Paulson, 
class of 1924, and his late wife, Rosalie, provide the school with an annual gift 
to support a first professional year student with demonstrated financial need. 

Plough Pharmacy Student Scholarships. The Plough Foundation, cre- 
ated by Abe Plough, founder of Plough, Inc., and the School of Pharmacy 
have provided funds, the income from which will provide support for phar- 
macy students. The funds are awarded on the basis of financial need, acade- 
mic achievement, leadership and citizenship. 

Arthur Schwartz Memorial Scholarship Fund. The family and friends 
of Arthur Schwartz, B.S. Pharm. 1979, Ph.D. in Pharmacy Administration 
1987, have established an endowed scholarship fund to honor his memory. 

Loan Funds 

Rose Hendler Memorial Fund. L. Manuel Hendler and family have 
established a loan fund in memory of Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. 
Loans from this fund are available to qualified students of the second and third 
years and are made upon the recommendation of the dean. 



F 1 N .A. N C: I A L INFORMATION 



Louis T. Sabatino Memorial Student Loan Fund. In honcir and mem- 
ory of her late brother, Louis T. Sabatino, class ot 1939, Mrs. Marie Sabatino 
DeOms has established this fund to provide loans to deserving students. 

Benjamin Schoenfeld Memorial Pharmacy Loan Fund. The family of 
Mr. Benjamin Schoenfeld has established a loan fund as a memorial to him. 
This fund is available to qualified needy students. Loans are made upon the 
recommendation of the dean. 

STUDENT VETERANS 

New students who are eligible for educational benefits through the Veterans 
Administration should forward to the Office of Student Affairs a completed 
VA Form 22-1995 (Request for change of Program or Place of Training). Vet- 
erans who have not used any of their VA educational benefits should forward 
a completed VA Form 22-1990 (Application for Program of Education or 
Training) and a copy of DD 214 (Separation Papers) directly to the Office of 
Student Affairs of the School of Pharmacy. 




SCHOCII, OF ^ilARM.^CY 



Entry-Level Doctor of Pharmacy 
(Pharm^D.) Program 

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The new Entry-Level Pharm.D. program is divided into six levels: Funda- 
mentals, Basic Science, Pharmaceutical Science, Integrated Sciences and 
Therapeutics, Experiential Learning and a Curriculum-Practice Interface. 
The following describes the academic purpose of each level. 

Level I ' Fundamentals 

Students entering the Doctor of Pharmacy program bring a wide diversity of 
education and life experiences. Level I includes courses to address these diver- 
sities by introducing students to the concept and scope of pharmaceutical 
care, pharmacy practice in general, the variety of disciplines that will con- 
tribute to their pharmaceutical education and skills, and scientific principles 
and concepts fundamental to subsequent curricular experiences. 

Level II - Basic Science 

During Level II of the curriculum, students build on the fundamentals of Level 
I through a comprehensive examination of basic biological, chemical, physi- 
cal, social and behavioral sciences. These elements provide the foundation for 
understanding pharmaceutical science and the complexities of drug action 
and use. 

Level III: Pharmaceutical Science 

The provider of pharmaceutical care must possess a detailed and comprehen- 
sive understanding of the physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial fac- 
tors impacting on the outcomes of drug therapy in specific patients with 
specific diseases. Level III addresses pharmaceutical science content areas as 
they relate to the care of specific patients in the total health care environ- 
ment. 

Level TV: Integrated Sciences and Therapeutics 

This forum addresses the extensive interweaving of basic and clinical science 
as well as the interrelated bodies of knowledge associated with the disciplines 
involved in total pharmaceutical care. Students build upon their basic and 
pharmaceutical science background as they actively participate in a variety of 
didactic and laboratory experiences to design, implement, manage and mon- 
itor individualized plans for pharmaceutical care. Students learn to appreci- 
ate that the successful outcomes of drug therapies relate to complex physical, 
chemical, biological and psychosocial interactions within human systems, 
and therefore require individualized attention to patients during the design 

• ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) • 25 



LEVEL SIX 
.■^^ 44 CURRICULUM'PRACTICE 




LEVEL FOUR - 
INTEGRATED SOENCE 
AND T>4ERAPEUT)CS 



and delivery of pharmaceutical care. This application of integrated science to 
specific patients with specific diseases is presented within the broader context 
of public health, epidemiology, prescriber education, disease prevention and 
health promotion issues. 

Three progressive components are used to present each topic. The first 
component reviews the drugs and biologicals used to treat specific disease 
processes and emphasizes comparative features underlying the choice of agent 
(Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics). Chemical properties, such as 
solubility and stability, that impact on the choice and use of the products, are 
discussed (Biomedicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutics). The availability and 
comparative advantages of drug dosage formulations and delivery systems are 
considered as they relate to the optimum use of drug products during acute or 
chronic care (Biopharmaceutics). 

The second component illustrates how the links between the scientific 
knowledge of the disease, available drug products and the variables underly- 
ing a particular patient's condition are important to developing the most 
appropriate therapeutic plan. Methods for the choice of drug products, defin- 
ition of specific goals of therapy including the means to assess whether these 
goals are being achieved, and active intervention steps to ensure successful 
outcomes of drug therapy are developed (Therapeutics). Methods for moni- 
toring, identifying and responding to untoward consequences of drug therapy 
are identified (Toxicology and Adverse Drug Reactions). The choice and 
design of specific acute and chronic drug therapy, the impact of a variety of 
patient-related variables on dosage regimens, and the modification of dosage 
regimens in response to changing patient needs, are developed (Clinical Phar- 
macokinetics). Students practice and develop skills in counseling patients 
about their therapeutic plans in particular, and providing health promotion 
education in general (Counseling and Education). 

The third component links the knowledge base of the first two compo- 
nents with appropriate ongoing methods for drug use review, medical audits, 
and cost considerations. The emphasis is on identifying specific interventions 
to improve prescribing patterns and reduce the cost of health care (Drug Use 
Evaluation). 

Level V: Experiential Learning 

The Experiential Learning Program of the curriculum offers structured learn- 
ing and training activities during which students interface directly with a 
variety of pharmacy practitioners in a variety of practice settings and envi- 
ronments. These activities, supervised by academic or preceptor faculty mem- 
bers, allow students to discover and practice application of accumulated 
factual knowledge and gain further integrative competence and confidence as 
they meld knowledge, skills and attitudes into pharmaceutical care behaviors 
underlying practice in a broad range of health care environments. An innov- 
ative feature of the curriculum is that experiential learning activities are 
linked to all eight semesters and are organized into six phases beginning with 

ENTRY-LEVEL LX:)CTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) • 27 



an early introduction to pharmacy practice settings and culminating with 
extensive elective options. 

Phase 1 : Introduction to Professional Pharmacy Practice. This expe- 
rience introduces the student to pharmacy practice settings, activities, and 
career opportunities. Activities in the first year of the curriculum provide stu- 
dents with an early exposure to cognitive and distributive pharmacy practice 
in community, institutional and non-traditional/specialty practice settings. 

Phase 2: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care. During the second and 
third years of the curriculum, students observe and participate in the deliver^' 
of pharmaceutical care to patients in the context of total health care over 
time, including health care transitions. These activities provide the opportu- 
nity for students to link the health care/pharmaceutical care needs of patients 
with the material they are receiving in their didactic curriculum. 

Phase 3: Distributive Services. Activities during this phase enable the 
student to competently perform the technical functions of drug dispensing 
and distribution in institutional and community pharmacy settings. 

Phase 4: Pharmaceutical Care. Students obtain experience in the 
delivery of pharmaceutical care in institutional and community pharmacy 
practice settings. These experiences enable the student to learn and perform 
entry-level pharmaceutical care activities in the context of delivery of total 
pharmaceutical services. 

Phase 5: Informational Services. Students learn to provide drug infor- 
mation in the context of the delivery of pharmaceutical care in institutional, 
community, and specialty practice settings. 

Phase 6: Elective Experiential Rotations. Elective experiential rota- 
tions provide students opportunities to pursue their own areas of interest by 
gaining in-depth experiences in specialty practices, non-traditional forms of 
pharmacy practice, management, research, etc. Elective experiential options 
are closely linked to student curriculum pathways. 

A total of 32 credits of experiential learning experience (1500 clock 
hours) is required for the degree. All students complete 24 credits ( 1 1 16 clock 
hours) of required rotations in independent and chain community pharmacy 
settings, hospital pharmacy, acute and chronic pharmaceutical care, ambula- 
tory clinics and informational services. These rotations are supplemented 
with a minimum of 8 credits (384 clock hours) of elective experience in a vari- 
ety of specialty, traditional and non-traditional settings including, for exam- 
ple, the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health. 
All required and most elective rotations are designed to be completed within 
four weeks. 

Successful completion of the experiential learning program is accepted 
by the Maryland Board of Pharmacy as meeting the internship require- 
ments necessary for the licensure examination. With thoughtful personal, 
academic and financial planning, students are able to design a series of rota- 
tions to meet specific individual needs and curriculum pathway clmices. Pre- 

28 • SCHOOL OF riiARMAt:V 



ceptors at rotation sites have faculty rank in the school. They are selected by 
the school and practice sites must achieve certain requirements to be accepted 
as a preceptor site. Student performance is evaluated by both the preceptor 
and the school. Experiential rotations are not permitted at a site where stu- 
dents are now working or have worked for payment or where the preceptor is 
a relative. 




Level VI: Curriculum - Practice Interface 

The sixth and final level of the curriculum contains a variety of educational 
experiences for the students about to enter practice. Required and elective 
content areas provide a curricular-based interface with pharmacy practice 
that builds on the preceding didactic and experiential components of the cur- 
riculum. The "capstone" nature of this interface will reflect the acquisition 
and appreciation of information that is on the cutting edge of pharmacy prac- 
tice, that represents closing options for individual curricular pathways or that 
contributes to preparing students for a post-graduate education. 

It is expected that the learning at the interface will be under continual 
change and development. One goal of this level is to allow each senior stu- 
dent, following completion of his or her experiential components, time to 
consider his or her individual practice in the context of the total health care 
environment. An important part of this interface, therefore, will be the 
opportunity for students to reflect interactively upon their educational expe- 
riences with fellow students, faculty and practitioners. 

CURRICULUM PATHWAYS AND ELECTIVES 

The central theme of the curriculum is basic or primary pharmaceutical care 
which encompasses the educational experiences common to all students in 
the program. All students must complete the required curriculum necessary to 



ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF PH.^RM.'\CY (PH.'\RM.U.) 



prepare for the competent performance of entry-level pharmaceutical care in 
a variety of practice settings. To supplement the required curriculum, more 
than 21% (28 credits) of the four-year curriculum is reserved for didactic and 
experiential electives. This elective portion of the curriculum provides stu- 
dents the opportunity for flexible programming of their curriculum experi- 
ence, or "curriculum pathway," in order to enhance their general practice of 
pharmaceutical care, to focus on a particular area of practice, or to prepare for 
post-graduate studies. 

Students may select freely from elective options to design their path- 
way, or may choose one of several "model pathways." These models are 
designed to assist students in achieving common educational objectives in 
areas such as differentiated practice, pharmacotherapy, management or grad- 
uates studies. Students can choose one of the differentiated practice path- 
ways for practice in a community or institutional activity or a setting of their 
choice. The pharmacotherapy pathway will provide courses for students 
interested in entering post-graduate residencies or fellowships for eventual 
board certification in pharmacotherapy. The management pathway provides 
background for management-oriented careers or tor additional post-graduate 
training. Students choosing the research pathway will be better prepared for 
entry into graduate school or for post-graduate fellowships. Other model path- 
ways may be developed in response to changing practice needs or student 
interest. 

Faculty pathway coordinators, who design and maintain the integrity of 
the pathways, and faculty advisors will serve as consultants to students tor 
information on career opportunities resulting from a particular pathway. Stu- 
dents have absolute free choice in choosing a pathway. Students not choos- 
ing a model pathway may select electives from any pathway as part ot their 
elective options as long as the necessary prerequisites are met. 




SCHOOL OF I'HARMAOY 



PROGRAM CURRICULA 

Summary of Entry -Level Pharm.D. Program 



Course Work Minimum Semester Credits 

Didactic 100 credits 

Required 80 

Elective . 20 

Experiential 32 credits 

Required 24 

Elective 8 



Total 132 credits 

Course Work By Semester^ 

Semester One Credits 

PHAR 5 11: Biochemistry 1 2 

PHAR 512: Cell Biology 2 

PHAR 513: Drug Chemistry 2 

PHAR 514: Human Biology 1 3 

PHAR 515: Personal Management 2 

PHAR 516: Pharmacy Practice & Education 3 

PHAR 517: Study Design and Analysis _J^ 

Total 16 

Semester Two 

PHAR 521: Biochemistry II 3 

PHAR 5 2 2 : Context of Health Care 3 

PHAR 523: Ethics in Pharmacy Practice 1 

PHAR 524: Human Biology II 3 

PHAR 525: Immunology 2 

PHAR 526: Physical Chemistry 2 

PHPC 527: Introduction to Professional Practice 1 

DIDACTIC ELECTIVES _J 

Total 17 

Semester Three 

PHAR 531: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 2 

PHAR 533: Microbiology 1 2 

PHAR 534: Human Biology 111 3 

PHAR 535: Pharmaceutics 3 

PHAR 536: Pharmacology 1 2 

PHAR 537: Principles of Drug Action 2 

PHPC 532: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care I 1 

DIDACTIC ELECTIVES _J. 

Total 17 

'This outline is one suggested plan of study for electives. Electives can be taken during 
most fall, winter, spring and summer semesters. 

ENTRY- LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) • 31 



Semester Four 

PHAR 541: Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics 

PHAR 542: Clinical Chemistry 

PHAR 543: Microbiology II 

PHAR 544: Medicinal Chemistry 

PHAR 545: Practice Management 

PHAR 546: Pharmacology II 

DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 

Total 



Semester Five 

PHAR 550: Medical Information Analysis 
PHAR 551: Drug Use Review 
PHAR 552: Principles of Human Nutrition 
PHAR 554: Integrated Science and Therapeutics I 
PHAR 555: Integrated Science and Therapeutics II 
PHAR 556: Integrated Science and Therapeutics III 
DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 
Total 



Semester Six 

PHAR 564: Integrated Science and Therapeutics IV 3 

PHAR 565: Integrated Science and Therapeutics V 3 

PHAR 566: Integrated Science and Therapeutics VI 2 

PHPC 562: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care II 1 

DIDACTIC ELECTIVES _6 

Total 15 



1 


idki 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Semester Seven 

PHPC 570: Community Distributive Services' 
PHPC 571: Hospital Distributive Services^ 
PHPC 572: Institutional Pharmaceutical Care I 
PHPC 573: Institutional Pharmaceutical Care II 
PHPC 574: Community Pharmaceutical Care I 
PHPC 575: Community Pharmaceutical Care II 
PHPC 576: Ambulatory Clinic' 
PHPC 577: Informational Services' 
Total 



Semester Eight 

PHAR 580: Pharmacy Law 
PHAR 581: Senior Colloquium 
EXPERIENTIAL ELECTIVES^ 
DIDACTIC ELECTIVE COURSES 
Total 



Grand Total 



132 minimum credits 



'Taken concurrently with Pharmaceutical Care Rotations 

^Students complete these rotations at various times during the 3rd and 4th 

year, but register for them in these semesters. 




ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

FIRST- YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

PHAR 5 1 1— Biochemistry I (2)— Fall Semester 

PHAR 521 — Biochemistry II (3) — Spring Semester. A course ot study 
which builds on the principles of cell biology and genetics with a systematic 
consideration of the chemical components and requirements of living systems 
from the molecular to the cellular level. These fundamentals of biochemical 
structure, function, and energetics provide a platform for comprehension of 
pharmaceutical biotechnology, and for understanding determinants of dis- 
ease, the pathobiochemistry of organ systems, mechanisms of drug action and 
adverse reactions, and novel drug delivery systems. 

PHAR 5 12 — Cell Biology (2) — Fall Semester. Introductory appreciation of 
the cell, the hmdamental unit of the body. The integration of cell structure 
and molecular functions is developed with discussions of topics such as the 
history of modern biology; the basic principles of cellular cytoarchitecture and 
organization; membrane functions; biochemical structure, functions and 
energy conversion; cell-to-cell signaling; the flow of genetic information from 
DNA to RNA to proteins; cell division; human and Mendelian genetics; and 
human diversity. 

PHAR 513 — Drug Chemistry (2) — Fall Semester. A study of the principles 
of organic chemistry that comprise basic elements of pharmaceutical science. 
The emphasis is on the relationship between molecular structure and chemi- 
cal, physical, and biophysical properties of systems that arise from molecular 
interactions. The course provides a platform for comprehension of pharma- 
ceutical concerns such as the stability of drugs and drug products, the confor- 
mation of bioactive proteins, the basis for drug-receptor interactions, the 
structure of biological membranes, and major drug classes. 

PHAR 514— Human Biology I (3)— Fall Semester 
PHAR 524— Human Biology II (3)— Spring Semester 
PHAR 534— Human Biology III (3)— Fall Semester— Second Year. A con- 
sideration of the human body as an integrated, functioning tirganism with 
emphasis on how organs work individually and in harmony during the regula- 
tion of complex body functions necessary to establish and maintain homeo- 
stasis, and mechanisms underlying disordered organ functions and homeostasis. 
The anatomy, histology and physiology of the human body is organized by 
organ systems to include the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endo- 
crine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproduc- 
tive systems. 



SCHOOL OF 



PHAR 515 — Personal Management (2) — Fall Semester. An introduction 
to the basic elements of social and administrative science underlying the prac- 
tice of pharmacy. The student is introduced to State and Federal laws includ- 
ing those related to negligence, standards of practice, and dispensing. 
Organizational theories of management and leadership styles are contrasted. 



PHAR 516 


: PHARMACY PRACTICE AND EDUCATION 


T 




^ 


T 


VII. APPLICATIONS OF CRITICAL 
THINKING AND PROBLEM 
RESOLUTION 

VI. COMMUNICATION 


















V. PHARMACY EDUCATION 




® 




IV. ETHICS 

III. INFORMATICS 

II. FUNDAMENTALS OF CRITICAL 
THINKING 


1 




1 


(i) 


(i) 


(m) 


1. PHARMACY, PRACTICE AND 
EDUCATION 



PHAR 516 — Pharmacy Practice and Education (3) — Fall Semester. This 
prefatory course introduces the new Doctor of Pharmacy student to the sci- 
ence and profession of pharmacy. The evolution and implications of pharma- 
ceutical care and the philosophical basis for the pharmacy curriculum are 
discussed. Students are introduced to skills necessary for success during the 
four year curriculum through the opportunity to critically evaluate problems, 
discuss ethical dilemmas, develop and apply computer and literature retrieval 
skills, and practice verbal and written communication skills. The importance 
of independent and cooperative learning activities is emphasized. 

PHAR 517 — Study Design and Analysis (2) — Fall Semester. Students are 
introduced to the pivotal role of study design and statistical analysis consid- 
erations in the design and evaluation of basic, clinical, epidemiological and 
social science research. The course focuses on the proper design of studies 
with emphasis on threats to internal validity and generalizability. A variety of 
descriptive and inferential statistical procedures and methods are surveyed 
with emphasis on the interpretation of the results of research. 



ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) 



PHAR 522 — Context of Health Care (3) — Spring Semester. Students 
actively develop a contemporary definition of health care and critically ex- 
amine the health care system with special emphasis on relevant legislation, 
traditional and nontraditional providers of health care, the organization 
and financing of health care delivery, and the dynamics of pharmaceutical 
care within the system. The social, legal and professional implications of 
informatics and computer proliferation in our society is discussed with special 
emphasis on pharmacy practice. 

PHAR 523 — Ethics In Pharmacy Practice (1) — Spring Semester. Intro- 
duction to the principles of ethical thinking. The philosophy of ethics and 
role of formal codes of professional conduct are discussed in the context of 
resolving conflicting ethical principals. 




PHAR 525 — Immunology (2) — Spring Semester. The natural and 
acquired protective mechanisms of the immune system are discussed with top- 
ics ranging from the structure, function, and specificity of antibodies; B-lym- 
phocyte and T-lymphocyte functions; initiation and control of immune 
responses; histocompatibility; and immune-mediated disease. The course is 
designed to provide the student with sufficient knowledge of humoral and cel- 
lular immunity to understand the role of the immune system in disease, the 
production and use of vaccines and related biologicals, and the rapidly grow- 
ing areas of transfusion, transplant and tumor immunology. 

PHAR 526 — Physical Chemistry (2) — Spring Semester. A study of 
selected principles ot physical chemistry that comprise basic elements ot phar- 
maceutical science. The emphasis is placed on the relationship between mol- 
ecular structure and the physical and biophysical properties of systems that 
arise from molecular interactions. The goal of the course is to apply the prin- 
ciples of physical chemistry to the practice of pharmacy. 



iCHOOL OF PliARMACY 



PHPC 527 — Introduction to Professional Practice ( 1 ) — Spring Semester. 

Students observe cognitive and distributive pharmacy practice in community, 
institutional and non-traditional/specialty practice settings, and analyze the 
types of services provided and the personnel involved in the delivery of those 
services. Experience is gained in the basic elements of the technical aspects of 
drug distribution. These activities are closely linked to and are an extension 
of PHAR 516: Pharmacy Practice and Education. 

SECOND- YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

PHAR 531 — Pharmaceutical Chemistry (2) — Fall Semester. A presenta- 
tion of the basic chemical principles underlying the activity, absorption, 
metabolism, excretion, physico-chemical properties and design of drug mole- 
cules, culminating in a discussion of drug classes. 

PHPC 532: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care I ( 1 ) — Fall Semester. Stu- 
dents observe the delivery of pharmaceutical care to patients in the context 
of delivery of total health care over time, including health care transitions. 
Students have regularly scheduled encounters, structured by a pharmacy prac- 
titioner, with selected patients and prepare periodic health care status reports 
on their patients, including an assessment of their pharmaceutical care needs. 

PHAR 533— Microbiology 1 (2)— Fall Semester 

PHAR 543 — Microbiology^ II (2) — Spring Semester. A systematic study of 
microbial morphology, biochemistry- and physiology. Major classes of patho- 
genic bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites are surveyed with emphasis on 
mechanisms of pathogenicity, virulence and resistance. Microbial genetics is 
discussed, including the role of this area in the development of modem mol- 
ecular biology and biotechnology. The course prepares the student for study 
of the etiology and consequences of infectious disease, and the use of antibi- 
otics and other biologicals for their treatment. 

PHAR 535 — Pharmaceutics (3) — Fall Semester. The application of funda- 
mental principles and basic science knowledge to the multidimensional prob- 
lems of the formulation, development, testing, production, distribution, and 
administration of safe, effective, stable and reliable drug delivery systems. 
These systems, ranging in sophistication from tablets and capsules to biode- 
gradable implants, are discussed using a problem-based approach that focuses 
on the critical determinants for traditional and less-traditional routes of drug 
administration. 

PHAR 536— Pharmacology I (2)— Fall Semester 

PHAR 546 — Pharmacology II (3) — Spring Semester. A systematic con- 
sideration of the molecular, cellular and organismic mechanisms of drug 
action, organized by major drug classes. This course of study provides knowl- 

ENTR Y- LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PH. ARM. D.) • 37 



edge of the mechanisms of drug action underlying their use in the treatment 
of specific and general disease processes. 

PHAR 537 — Principles of Drug Action (2) — Fall Semester. A study of the 
chemical and biological concepts which apply to the characterization, evalu- 
ation and comparison of all drugs. Topics such as dose-response and receptor 
theory, receptor transduction mechanisms, pharmacologic selectivity, phar- 
macogenetic drug tolerance and dependence, drug allergy, drug resistance and 
chemical mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and teratogenesis are discussed at the 
molecular and cellular level. The physical, biological and chemical principles 
underlying drug absorption, distribution, biotransformation and excretion are 
discussed from the molecular to the organ level. 

PHAR 541 — Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics (2) — Spring Semes- 
ter. The student learns how the processes ot drug absorption, distribution, 
metabolism and excretion are coupled with dosage and the important param- 
eters of clearance, volume of distribution and bioavailability, to determine the 
concentration of a drug at its sites of action in the body. The quantitative rela- 
tionship between dose and effect is developed as a framework with which to 
interpret measurements of drug concentrations in biological fluids. 

PHAR 542 — Clinical Chemistry (2) — Spring Semester. Principles of ana- 
lytical chemistry, clinical chemistry, enzyme assays, electrophoresis, radioactiv- 
ity, magnetic resonance, biotechnology-based diagnostics and biosensors, and 
immunoassay are examined. Emphasis is on the application of these methods 
to the determination of drug concentrations in chemical and biological sys- 
tems, and to health promotion and assessment. Students also have opportu- 
nities to examine patient data and use commercially available diagnostic kits. 

PHAR 544 — Medicinal Chemistry (3) — Spring Semester. A ct)mprehen- 
sive study of the chemistry of drug products. The course outline follows the 
pharmacological classification of drug molecules, and includes discussion of 
chemical properties (physical and organic), stability, solubility, mechanisms of 
action where appropriate, and structure-activity relationships. Where possible, 
quantirarivo computer designed studies of drug development are mentioned. 

PHAR 545 — Practice Management (2) — Spring Semester. Management 
principles are provided to construct a practical framework for the operational 
management of a business of pharmacy. Elements addressed in this course 
include: controllable and uncontrollable variables in a free market economy, 
work flow analysis, accounting, budget development, purchasing, inventory 
control, quality assurance and third party reimbursement issues. The course 
also examines the current practical developments related to human resources 
management through integrating information on organization behavior, psy- 
chology, economics and law. 

38 • SCHOOL OI- PHARMACY 




THIRD-YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

PHAR 550 — Medical Information Analysis (1) — Fall Semester. A course 
designed to familiarize students with the process of information collection, 
retrieval, analysis and interpretation. A variety of topics surrounding drug 
information are covered including the drug approval process, role of drug 
information in the health care system, the biomedical publishing process, 
adverse drug reaction management, quality assurance and formulary manage- 
ment. The course also further develops and refines verbal and written com- 
munication skills through a variety of exercises. 

PHAR 55 1 — Drug Use Review ( 1 ) — Fall Semester. An examination of the 
review of physician prescribing, pharmacist dispensing, and patient use of 
drugs. A framework for this course is centered around the five steps of drug use 
review which include: determining optimal drug use through the process of 
criteria development; measuring or observing how drugs are actually used; 
comparing actual with optimal use and noting any differences; developing and 
implementing methods for effecting any change that is needed; and monitor- 
ing the results of the program. 

PHAR 552 — Principles of Human Nutrition (1) — Fall Semester. The 

basic principles of human nutrition are presented to prepare students to man- 
age specialized nutritional support, provide appropriate dietary counseling for 
healthy people in different stages of the life cycle as well as for people with 
various diseases, and answer nutrition related questions. These principles are 
expanded and reinforced during the duration of Integrated Science and Ther- 
apeutics. 



ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) 



INTEQRATED SCIENCE AND THERAPEUTICS 
Pharmaceutical Care 



^ ^^ ^ 



24. 
23. 

22. 
21. 




System Intervention 
Prescriber Intervention 
Population Intervention 
Individual Patient 

Intervention 
Due Assessment 
Adverse Event Analysis 
Patient Outcome 

Assessment 
Patient Education 
Health Promotion Plan 
Due Criteria 
Development of a Care 

Plan 
ndices of Toxic Effects 
ndices of Therapeutic 

Effect 
Therapy Options 
Financial Variables 
Population Variables 
Agent Variables 
Biopharmaceutics 
Applied Kinetics 
Applied Chemistry 
Applied Pharmacology 
Patient Variables 
Nutrition 
Problem Definition tSi 

Assessment 



SCHOOL OF 



PHAR 554, 555, 556 — Integrated Science and Therapeutics I, II, 
(3, 3, 2)— Fall Semester 



III 



PHAR 564, 565, 566— Integrated Science and Therapeutics IV, V, VI 
(3, 3, 2) — Spring Semester. Basic and clinical science faculty interact with 
students during a variety of didactic and laboratory experiences as students 
learn to design, implement and monitor pharmaceutical care plans for specific 
patients with specific diseases. Methods for the choice of drug product, defin- 
ition of the specific goals of therapy including the means to assess whether 
these goals are being achieved, and active intervention steps at the patient, 
presciber, health care system and population levels to ensure successful out- 
comes of drug therapy are developed. The courses are organized according to 
the major physiological systems of the human body, and the disease states 
commonly associated with them and encountered and observed by the phar- 
macy practitioner in a variety of community and institutional practice set- 
tings. A goal of these courses is to prepare our graduates to be better able to 
integrate new scientific knowledge into the successful pharmaceutical care of 
patients and the reduction of the cost of health care to patients and society. 
The knowledge and behaviors acquired during these courses prepare the stu- 
dent for the community and institutional pharmaceutical care rotations of the 
experiential learning program of the curriculum. 

PHPC 562: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care II (1) — Spring Semester. 

A continuation of PHAR 532 as students continue to follow their patients 
with periodic encounters, and develop pharmaceutical care plans with special 
attention to the needs of health care transitions. These experiential activities 
are closely linked to the didactic activities in the Integrated Science and 
Therapeutics series of year three of the curriculum. 




ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.O.) 




FOURTH-YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

PHPC 570 — Community Distributive Services (3) 

PHPC 571 — Hospital Distributive Services (3). These rotations are ordi- 
narily taken after the successful completion of the third year. One rotation 
may he taken during the Winter Session of the third year hy full-time students 
in good academic standing. 

Each rotation is a four week structured program of intensive skills devel- 
opment in the distributive aspects of community and institutional pharmacy 
practice to enable the student to competently perform the technical functions 
of drug dispensing and distribution. Students also learn the operational 
aspects of new drug distribution technology, the roles and methods of super- 
vision of support personnel including methods for assuring drug distribution 
accuracy, and participate in the assessment and coordination of support per- 
sonnel activities. 

PHPC 572 — Institutional Pharmaceutical Care I (3) — Prerequisite: 
PHAR 571: Institutional Distributive Services. 

PHPC 573— Institutional Pharmaceutical Care II (3) — Prerequisite: 
PHAR 571: Institutional Distributive Services. Each four-week rotation 
allows students to obtain extensive experience in the development and imple- 
mentation of pharmaceutical care plans including identification and assess- 
ment of drug therapy problems, establishing, implementing and monitoring 
plans, patient counseling, and intervention. Institutional pharmaceutical 
care sites are primarily those in which clinical and distributive services are 
linked to total pharmaceutical care. Pharmacy practitioners at these sites 
are primarily involved with delivery of patient-oriented services. Students 
participate in both the distributi\e and clinical aspects of these services with 
an emphasis on the processes, skills, ;ind knowledge required to promote drug 



SCHt')OL OH PHARMACY 



therapy planning, intervention, and monitoring of patients in the context of 
a pharmacy service program. 

PHPC 574 — Community Pharmaceutical Care 1 (3) — Prerequisite: PHAR 
570: Community Distributive Services. 

PHPC 575 — Community Pharmaceutical Care II (3) — Prerequisite: PHAR 
570: Community Distributive Services. Each four-week rotation allows stu- 
dents to obtain extensive experience in the development and implementa- 
tion of pharmaceutical care plans including identification and assessment of 
drug therapy problems, establishing, implementing and monitoring plans, 
patient counseling, and intervention. Community pharmaceutical care sites 
are primarily community pharmacies where clinical and distributive services 
are provided and preceptors have implemented pharmaceutical care service 
activities. Students participate in both the distributive and clinical aspects of 
these services with an emphasis on optimizing drug therapy regimens, provi- 
sion of prescription and non-prescription drug therapy, monitoring for drug 
response and toxicity, patient counseling, and triage in the context of phar- 
macy services. 

PHPC 576 — Ambulatory Clinic ( 1 ). Students learn to assess patient's needs 
for drug therapy, assess current drug therapy, perform appropriate pharma- 
cotherapy-oriented physical assessments, order appropriate laboratory tests, 
initiate and/or change drug therapy regimens, and conduct appropriate 
patient follow-up. Time is devoted to issues pertaining to applications of prac- 
tice management concepts and skills. These activities run concurrently with 
the Pharmaceutical Care rotations (PHPC 572, 573, 574, & 575). 

PHPC 577 — Informational Services (2). Students learn how to conduct 
timely and accurate literature searches and evaluate sources of drug informa- 
tion. Students develop their own personal information library, have regularly 
scheduled responsibilities in an information center, participate in a regularly 
scheduled recitation session with a journal club format, and subscribe to an 
affordable abstracting service with specific assignments to review selected 
articles. This experience enables the student to provide drug information for 
the purposes of establishing accurate pharmaceutical care plans, for the per- 
formance of drug use evaluations, and for formulary decision making. These 
activities run concurrently with the Pharmaceutical Care rotations (PHPC 
572, 573, 574, & 575). 

PHAR 580 — Pharmacy Law (2) — Fall Semester. An examination of the 
legal and regulatory issues pertaining to drugs and devices and the practice of 
pharmacy. Students learn the various laws and regulations which would gov- 
ern their usual daily activities in a variety of practice sites. 



ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) 



PHAR 581 — Senior Colloquium (1) — Spring Semester. Students deliver 
oral presentations to share some aspect of their educational experience, prac- 
tice aspirations, or career goals with their student peers and the faculty. This 
forum facilitates discussions fostering a critical examination of each student's 
formal education in the context of the practice of pharmaceutical care. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

The elective didactic (PHMY) and experiential (PHEX) courses currently 
offered by the School of Pharmacy are described below. In general, higher 
course numbers indicate courses with important prerequisite requirements, 
and are designed for later years of the curriculum. Prerequisites for most elec- 
tives include consent of the instructor and the student's advisor. 

PHMY 510 — Advanced Educational Opportunities ( 1 ) — Var. terms. This 
elective program provides students who may be interested in graduate school 
or research careers with knowledge and information about various advanced 
educational opportunities in the curriculum. Aspects of careers which require 
advanced study are described by individuals in those career areas, and by stu- 
dents currently enrolled in them. Students enrolled in this course receive 
diverse perspectives relating to goals, training, functions, settings, and oppor- 
tunities in research in the pharmaceutical sciences and pharmacy practice 
areas. 

PHMY 518 — Drug Abuse Education (1-3) — Fall and Spring Semesters. 

Practice and training in the dissemination of drug information, especially drug 
abuse information, to the public, linked to the activities of the Student 
Committee on Drug Abuse Education (SCODAE). Students complete a ten- 
hour training session, observe community education programs presented by 
SCODAE, present several programs, and prepare a written report on a timely 
topic in the area of chemical dependence. 

PHMY 521 — History of Pharmacy (1) — Fall Semester. A course wiiich 
explores the historical development of pharmacy practice and medicines. 

PHMY 522 — Business Plan Development (2) — Fall Semester. An elective 
course for students interested in ownership or management with emphasis on 
the practical problems associated with establishing a new business or expand- 
ing an existing enterprise. Location and market analysis, target marketing, 
revenue and expense projections, and estimation of capital requirements are 
among the topics covered. 

PHMY 523 — Advanced First Aid (3). Advanced first aid and emergency 
care including CPR. 



SCHO(.")L 0\ 



PHMY 524 — Computers and Their Applications to Pharmacy (2) — Fall 
Semester. An advanced course in using computer software. Students com- 
plete a series of computer-based projects that illustrate how software can he 
used to enhance various aspects of pharmacy practice. 

PHMY 528 — Selected Topics in Geriatrics and Gerontology (1-3). This 
course provides an educational experience through the investigation of the 
areas of geriatrics and gerontology with the school's Center for the Study of 
Pharmacy and TTierapeutics for the Elderly. Includes Elder-Visitation during 
which students select an elderly person living in the community and follow 
that person. Guided discussions in school address problems/solutions to elder 
health care. 




PHMY 529 — Special Group Studies (var. 1-5). Repeatable up to 12 cred- 
its. An omnibus course permitting experimentation with new or different sub- 
ject matter and/or instructional approaches. 

PHMY 537 — Clinical Aspects of Chemical Dependence (2) — Fall Semes- 
ter. This course familiarizes students with the clinical aspects of chemical 
dependence. Special emphasis is placed on the pharmacology of commonly 
abused psychoactive substances and the role of pharmacological supports in 
the treatment of addiction. 

PHMY 539 — Special Projects (var. 1-3). Repeatable up to 12 credits. Inde- 
pendent investigations consisting of library' or laboratory' research, seminars, 
or other assignments appropriate to the problem investigated. 

PHMY 541 — Introduction to the Poison Center (1). The Maryland Poison 
Center, a division of the School of Pharmacy, provides emergency poison 



ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) 



information 24 hours a day to the general public and health professionals. The 
center serves an educational function for students at UMAB. Pharmacists 
play an extremely important role in the Poison Center's operation. This 
course provides students the opportunity to observe and be involved in a clin- 
ically oriented pharmacy practice setting early in their education. Students 
learn about the Poison Center's operation and resources and the potential for 
pharmacist participation in this area of patient care. The course consists of 
discussion sessions, activities in the Maryland Poison Center, role playing, 
and laboratories on toxicology resources and communication skills. Students 
present a home management and a hospital management drug overdose case. 




PHMY 542 — Cosmetics Preparations (2) — Fall and Spring Semesters. 

This course is designed to stimulate student thought in the field of cosmetic 
science and technology. Upon completion ot the course, the student will be 
able to discern among the various health benefit claims made by cosmetic 
preparations, and help consumers select appropriate products. Historical per- 
spectives, as well as modern concepts of cosmetic formulation, composition, 
manufacture, promotion, and utilization are presented. During laboratory ses- 
sions, ingredient functionality and manufacturing processes are discussed, and 
students prepare representative cosmetic formulations. 

PHMY 543 — Honors Seminar in Pharmacy Administration (1) — Fall 

Semester. A survey of current literature in the general area of pharmacy prac- 
tice and administrative science. Each week, a recently published paper related 
to the economic, social, behavioral or education aspects ot pharmacy is dis- 
cussed and evaluated. Special student research projects may also be under- 
taken. 



SCHOOL Ol 



PHMY 550 — Adverse Drug Reactions (2) — Fall Semester. Focus is on the 
clinical manifestations and incidence of drug reactions, systems affected, dif- 
ferentiation among idiosyncratic reactions, hypersensitivity reactions, exten- 
sions of pharmacologic action and assessment of drug reaction literature. 

PHMY 55 1 — Recent Advances in Pharmacology ( 1 ) — Fall Semester. The 

objective of this course is to present advances in pharmacology and toxicol- 
ogy. Sessions emphasize experimental and clinical findings, their interpreta- 
tion and significance in relation to basic and applied aspects of pharmacology 
and toxicology. Attention is also given to experimental design and method- 
ology of the studies in question. 

PHMY 552 — Pharmacology and Aging ( 1 ) — Spring Semester. This course 
presents advances in our understanding of variations in drug response in the 
aging population. The course is designed to give students an appreciation for 
the basic physiological and biomedical changes which normally occur with 
aging, and how these changes relate to altered pharmacodynamic and phar- 
macokinetic responses following drug administration. Basic and clinical phar- 
macologic studies are used to support the conclusions presented. 

PHMY 553 — Consumer Education Program for Older Adults (2) — Fall 
and Spring Semesters. The urgent need for pharmacists be become more 
involved with the health care of the elderly is well documented. This course 
trains students to educate the elderly about drugs and drug taking. Students 
benefit from the didactic and applied aspects of the course, since they must 
first learn about the special needs of the elderly and then actually interact with 
the elderly both in large groups and on a one-to-one basis. 

PHMY 554 — Health Education Seminar (2). Health education is the sci- 
entific process designed to promote the health of individuals and groups using 
educational strategies to achieve voluntary behavioral change. The objective 
of the course is to prepare students to become effective health educators to 
patients, other health practitioners and/or the community. The theoretical 
and conceptual frameworks upon which the discipline is based are fully devel- 
oped. Students learn the techniques of behavioral and educational diagnosis 
and their application in the development of educational intervention. 

PHMY 555 — Novel Drug Delivery (2). A study of specialized formulations, 
dosage forms and drug delivery systems. The goal of the course is to enable stu- 
dents to make decisions about the appropriate use of novel drug delivery 
systems from an integrated science and practice perspective, basing the deci- 
sions on the physical, chemical, therapeutic, and economic attributes of these 
systems. 



ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) 



PHMY 556, 557— Advanced Pharmacology I, II (2,2)— Fall and Spring 
semesters. This course expands and extends the pharmacology material 
learned in the required courses PHAR 536 &. 546. Discussion of the assigned 
topics and review of original papers represent a two-hour weekly session. 
These sessions include graduate students in Pharmaceutical Sciences/Phar- 
macology and Toxicology. 

PHMY 560 — The Pharmacist in the Critical Care Setting ( 1 ). Identifies 
and discusses the role ot the pharmacist in various critical care settings. The 
student will be able to see how critical care pharmacy has evolved to comple- 
ment the medical and nursing management of the critically ill patient. 

PHMY 561 — Advanced Therapeutics Seminar (3). An advanced course 
dealing with complex drug therapy decision-making utilizing case presenta- 
tions and current literature. Requires active student participation in resolu- 
tion of therapeutic controversies. 

PHMY 562 — Clinical Pharmacokinetics (2) — Spring Semester. Provides 
the student with the didactic trainiiig and skills necessary to conduct clinical 
pharmacokinetic consultation. 

PHMY 563 — Pharmacotherapeutic Issues in the Critically 111 Patient (2). 

This course is designed as an elective seminar for students interested in the 
area of critical care pharmacotherapy. Topics include a wide scope of disease 
states and drug issues frequently encountered in an ICU setting. The presen- 
tation of these topics will identify the the pharmacologic aims and contro- 
versies in the management of a particular topic, while simultaneously 
underscoring the complexities of drug therapy in the critically ill patient 
which may lead to untoward reactions or suboptimal care. 

PHMY 564, 565— Institutional Pharmacy I and II (2, 2)— Fall and Spring 
Semesters. Fundamentals of institutional pharmacy practice and administra- 
tion with emphasis on hospital and nursing homes. Includes physical facili- 
ties, standards, purchasing, fc^rmulary implementation, record keeping, drug 
distribution and ccmtrol systems. 

PHMY 566 — Orthotics Seminar (1) — Spring Semester. This course intro- 
duces students to the management of patients with orthopedic problems and 
prepares them with entry level skills to counsel and tit orthopedic appliances 
(orthoses). Fitting and educational techniques are demonstrated and students 
are trained in fitting a range of both rigid and flexible orthoses. 

PHMY 567 — Advanced Cardiac Life Support (2) — Spring Semester. This 
course focuses on the role oi the pharmacist in the setting ot cardiac arrest. A 
lecture format covers the pathophysiology, epidemiology, therapeutic goals 

48 • SCHOOL OK PHARMACY 



and treatment modalities in cardiac arrest as described by the Standards and 
Guidelines developed by the National Conference on Cardiopulmonary 
Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiac Care. Topics include the role of the 
pharmacist on the cardiac arrest team, an in-depth discussion of the role of 
pharmacologic intervention, techniques of basic and advanced cardiac life 
support and post-resuscitative care. 




PHMY 570 — Current Topics in Infectious Disease ( 1 ) — Spring Semester. 

This course is intended to provide a forum for discussion of current and con- 
troversial aspects of infectious disease therapy. Each student selects a new or 
controversial areas of infectious disease therapeutics and prepares a one-hour 
lecture/discussion of that topic. Each student is expected to read selected 
background material and contribute to the discussion of the topic. Audiovi- 
sual aids and/or handouts are encouraged. 

PHMY 57 1 — Parenteral Therapy (2) — Spring Semester. A comprehensive 
review of all aspects of parenteral therapy including planning, organizing, and 
implementing an IV admixture program, preparation of sterile products, basic 
concepts of fluid balance and dosage state, blood products, parenteral nutri- 
tion, and chemotherapy and biotechnology products. 

PHMY 574, 575 — Pharmacotherapeutics I, II (2, 2). Pharmacotherapeu- 
tics I and 11 are courses in advanced therapeutic decision-making which par- 
allel the therapeutic topics offered in the Integrated Science and Therapeutics 
modules during the third year of the curriculum. The courses require students 
to formulate therapeutic decisions based upon case materials and emphasize 
the process of decision-making in the presence of multiple patient and agent 
variables. As the number of cumulative therapeutic topics increases, the com- 
plexity of the decision making increases. Students are expected to incorporate 



ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) 



data from the primary literature as part of the therapeutic decision making 
process. 

PHMY 580 — Drugs and Public Policy (2) — Spring Semester. An exami- 
nation of public policy issues related to drug use in our society. Cases, small 
group discussions and outside experts will be used to analyze contemporary 
issues effecting pharmacy and health care. 

PHEX 550 — Parenteral Nutrition (3). A clinical experience designed to 
provide students with knowledge and experience in the design and miinitor- 
ing of parenteral nutrition therapy. 

PHEX 551 — Drug Information Clerkship (2). A clerkship designed to 
familiarize students with resources, develop their ability to search primary, 
secondary and tertiary sources, retrieve, analyze and interpret the medical lit- 
erature, and to refine written and verbal communication skills. 

PHEX 552 — Poison Information (3). A clerkship in the Maryland Poison 
Center providing students experience in providing poison information and 
consultation in clinical toxicology. 

PHEX 558 — Ambulatory Care (1-3). This experiential rotation supple- 
ments PHPC 576: Ambulatory Clinic of the required curriculum. Students 
gain additional experience working in an interdisciplinary ambulatory health 
care delivery system with practicing clinical pharmacists and participating in 
the evaluation, implementation and monitoring of ambulatory clinic drug 
therapy. 




50 • SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



PHEX 559 — Research (1-3). Students, in collaboration with a faculty spon- 
sor, actively pursue a research project. The project may be in any of the areas 
of expertise of the faculty which include biological, pharmacological, chemi- 
cal, social, administrative, management and clinical science. The emphasis of 
the course is on the design and implementation of research methodology, and 
allowing students to obtain hands-on experience with research techniques. 

PHEX 560 — Inpatient Medicine (3). An experiential rotation designed to 
provide students with extensive experience in dealing with the drug therapy 
problems of hospitalized patients in general medical areas. 

PHEX 562 — Clinical Pharmacokinetics Clerkship (3). An experiential 
rotation providing education and training on adaptive control of drug ther- 
apy by integration of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pathophysiology 
and patient data. 



PHEX 563 — 586 (2 credits each) — Variable terms. Elective experiences in 
pharmacy subspecialty areas approved and designed by a site preceptor and the 
student's advisor. 

PHEX 563 — Administration 

PHEX 564— Cardiology 

PHEX 565 — Critical Care/Shock Trauma 

PHEX 566— Critical Care/MlCU 

PHEX 567 — Diabetes Care Management 

PHEX 570 — Food and Drug Adminsitration 

PHEX 571 — Gastrointestinal Surgery 

PHEX 572 — Geriatric Pharmacy Services 

PHEX 573— Home Health Care 

PHEX 574 — Infectious Disease 

PHEX 575— Infectious Disease/HIV 

PHEX 576— Oncology 

ENTRY-LEVEL DOCTOR OF PHARMACY (PHARM.D.) • 51 




PHEX 577 — Oncology/Infectious Disease 

PHEX 580— Oncology/TPN 

PHEX 581— Oncology/Research 

PHEX 582— Pediatrics 

PHEX 583— Radiopharmacy 

PHEX 584 — Chemical Dependence Treatment 

PHEX 585— Chemical Dependence Research 

PHEX 586— Veterinary Medicine 

PHEX 589 — Special Studies (2-3) — Repeatable up to 12. Omnibus course 
permitting development and experimentation with new experiential elec- 
tives or additional subspecialty practice area elective rotations. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Academic Information 



ACADEMIC SESSIONS 

The School of Pharmacy operates on a four semester calendar. The fall term, 
four months long, begins immediately after Labor Day and runs to the Christ- 
mas recess. A three week Winter minimester in January allows students to 
avail themselves of tutorial ser\'ices or elective courses. The spring term, four 
months long, begins the last week in January and extends to just before Memo- 
rial Day. Full-time students enrolled in Spring do not pay tuition and fees for 
the UMAB courses taken during the Winter minimester. Student must pay 
additional winter minimester tuition at other UM campuses. Students taking 
didactic courses at UMAB or other UM institutions must pay summer session 
tuition and fees. 

REGISTRATION POLICIES 

Cancellation of Registration 

Students who register and subsequently decide not to attend the School of 
Pharmacy must provide written notice to the Office of Student Affairs before 
the first day of class. If this office has not received a request for cancellation 
by 4:30 p.m. on the day before classes begin, the university will assume that 
students plan to attend and that they accept their financial obligation. 

Change in Registration 

A special add/drop form used for all changes in registration should be obtained 
from the Office of Student Affairs. Students must consult with their academic 
advisor and obtain his/her signature on the add/drop form. The completed 
form must be returned to the Office o{ Student Affairs. There is no charge for 
a change in registration. 



:^<^ 



/'-: V^ <«^ ^^ 



W.m 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



Students may not add a course after the first week of classes or drop a 
course after the midpoint oi a particular course without written permission 
from the Office of Student Affairs. The grade of "F" is given for courses 
dropped after the midpoint in the course. 

Late Registration 

A late registration fee is charged to students who fail to complete registration 
by the specified time for regular registration (usually the day before the first 
day of classes). 

Withdrawal from the University 

Students forced to withdraw from the university before the end of a semester 
are eligible for partial refunds depending upon the date of withdrawal. To 
ensure such refunds, students must file withdrawal forms in the school's Office 
of Student Affairs. Failure to complete these forms will result in failing grades 
in all courses and forfeiture of the right to any refund. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The School of Pharmacy uses the following grading system: 

Grade 

A 

B 

C 

D 

P 

F 

I 



WD 

When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the grade achieved in the repeated 
course replaces all previous grades in the same course. 

SCHOLASTIC HONORS 

Academic excellence is recognized during the fall and spring honor convoca- 
tions. During the fall ceremony, academic achievement awards are given to 
students in all classes based on performance the preceding year. The leaders 
of student organizations are also recognized at this time. The Rho Chi Honor 
Society presents its annual book award to the student(s) having the highest 
academic marks. The School of Pharmacy Achievement Awards are pre- 



set itK)L OF PHARMACY 



Interpretation 


Point Value 


Excellent 




4 


Good 




3 


Fair 




2 


Poor but Passing 




1 


Pass 







Failure 







Incomplete 


Mustb 


e replaced 




bydef 


nite grade 




within one year 


Withdrawal 


No grade is assigned 



sented to individuals who have brought honor to the school by their career 
achievements. 

In the spring, the school honors its graduates. Those in the first tenth 
of the class graduate with "high honors" and those in the second tenth of the 
class with "honors." The faculty presents the achievement awards to members 
of the graduating class at the Spring Honors Convocation: 

School of Pharmacy Gold Medal for General Excellence is awarded to the 
candidates who have attained the highest general average. 

Certificates of Honor are given to the three students having the next high- 
est general averages. (Only courses taken at the University of Maryland 
School of Pharmacy are considered in awarding these two honors.) 

Andrew G. DuMez Award. In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean 
and professor of pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez provided a gold medal 
which is awarded for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma-Cole Award. This award, 
in memory of Dr. B. Olive Cole, former acting dean, is given for proficiency 
in pharmacy administration. 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize. The Kappa Chapter of 
the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega (AZO) fraternity 
provides a prize which is awarded for proficiency in pharmacology. 

Maryland Society of Hospital Pharmacists Award. MSHP honors annually 
the student who has been outstanding in the area of hospital pharmacy. 

William Simon Memorial Prize. In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, who 
was a professor of chemistry in the School of Pharmacy for 30 years, a gold 
medal is awarded for superior work in the field of biomedicinal chemistry. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank J. Slama Scholarship Award. Mrs. Lillian Slama, widow 
of the late Dr. Frank J. Slama, a former professor of pharmacognosy, has pro- 
vided a fund, the income of which provides a plaque to be awarded for supe- 
rior work in the field of biopharmacognosy. 

Frank J. Slama Award by the School's Alumni Association. In memory and 
tribute to the late Dr. Frank J. Slama, class of 1924, a former professor and head 
of the department of pharmacognosy, for his loyalty and service of over half a 
century to his profession, to the School of Pharmacy and to the Alumni As- 
soc iaticMi, the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association provides an annual 
award to a member of the graduating class who has excelled in extra- 
curricular activities. 

ACADEMIC INFCTRMATION • 55 



Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize. In memory of her hushand, 
Manuel B. Wagner, and her son, Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School 
of Pharmacy, the late Mrs. Sadie S. Wagner, together with her daughter, Mrs. 
Phyllis Wagner Brill Snyder, provided a fund, the income of which is awarded 
for meritorious academic achievement in pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 



iff'f f 



John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize. In memory ot her late brother. Dr. 
John F. Wannenwetsch, a distinguished alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, 
Mrs. Mary H. Wannenwetsch provided a fund, the income of which is 
awarded to a student who has exhibited exceptional performance and promise 
in the practice of community pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize. In appreciation of the assistance 
which the Maryland College of Pharmacy extended to him as a young man, 
Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, the income from which is awarded 
annually by the faculty assembly to the student who has done exceptional 
work throughout the course in pharmacognosy. 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize. The late L. S. Williams left a trust 
fund, the incotne of which is awarded to the senior having the highest general 
average throughout the course in basic and applied pharmaceutics. 

ACADEMIC STATUS POLICIES 

Students are responsible for their own academic progress. Conferences about 
course work should be arranged with coursemasters as soon as a problem arises. 
Each student is assigned an academic advisor, who should be consulted about 
program planning and/or academic problems. Each class is assigned a class 
advisor who not only helps coordinate the overall activities of the class, but 
also functions as an academic counselor on issues affecting the class as a whole. 

56 • SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



The academic status of each student is reviewed at the end of each 
semester hy the school's student affairs committee. The committee's recom- 
mendations and decisions are subject to the approval of the faculty assembly. 
To remain in good standing, students must maintain a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 or higher. Students who fail to maintain this average will be 
placed on probation during the next semester. Students with an "F" on their 
records will also be placed on probation. 

Students who have been on probation for one semester and then obtain 
a probationary average for a second semester will have the following options, 
if allowed to continue in the program: ( 1 ) to continue in School of Pharmacy 
on a reduced load (less than 9 hours), or (2) to continue in school on a full 
load (9 hours or more) with the understanding that academic dismissal is 
mandatory should their cumulative grade point average still be below 2.0 at 
the end of the following semester. Students who fail one or more courses are 
eligible for academic dismissal. Students must have a cumulative grade point 
average of, at least, 2.0 in all required courses of the first two years in order to 
enter into the required program of the third professional year. Students can- 
not enter the third year while on probation or with an "F" in a required course. 
Students must maintain a cumulative grade average of 2.0 to become eligible 
for graduation. 

REDUCED ACADEMIC LOAD POLICIES 

Students who are on reduced load must complete their outstanding course 
work on a two-for-one basis, i.e., a maximum of two semesters to complete the 
equivalent of one semester on full load. An average of, at least, 2.0 must be 
earned in the courses students take while on reduced load. Failure to maintain 
this average in any one semester will result in academic dismissal. Students on 
reduced load must take advantage of tutorial assistance, if available. Failure to 
take advantage of tutorial assistance will be noted by the student affairs com- 
mittee during its deliberation of students appeals. Students cannot enter their 
third or fourth professional year on reduced load. Students in the second pro- 
fessional year on a reduced load may take third and fourth professional year 
electives but may not take third and fourth year required didactic or experi- 
ential courses. 

ACADEMIC DISMISSAL 

Failure to meet the school's academic or professional standards will result in 
academic dismissal. To appeal academic dismissal, students must write to the 
student affairs committee; students have the right to present their case in per- 
son before the committee. The decision on the appeal is forwarded by the 
committee to the faculty assembly. If the appeal is denied, students have the 
right to appeal directly to the dean. The dean's decision on academic dismissal 
is final. The academic dismissal appears on the student's permanent record 

AC.-KDEMIC INFORMATION • 57 



following the dean's decision. All appeals must he completed hefore the 
heginning of the next semester. Students who have been academically dis- 
missed once may petition the admissions committee for reinstatement after 
they have completed some form of remediation. Students who have been aca- 
demically dismissed twice are not eligible for reinstatement. 

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 

Students entering the profession of pharmacy are expected to have high stan- 
dards of conduct. The school and university have drafted several policy state- 
ments (listed in the hack of this catalog) which reflect expected standards of 
behavior. 

Students engaging in academic dishonesty will be eligible for discipli- 
nary action by the school's student grievance and discipline committee. The 
following definitions are provided to describe the most common types of aca- 
demic dishonesty: 

Cheating - using unauthorized notes, study aids or information from 
another individual during an examination. 

Plagiarism - submitting work that, in part or in whole, is not entirely the 
student's own without attributing credit to correct sources. 

Fabrication - presenting data that were gathered outside the guidelines 
defining the appropriate methods of collecting and generating data. 

Falsification ot records - altering documents affecting academic records; 
forging signatures; or falsifying any school or university document. 

Aiding or abetting dishonesty - providing material or information to 
another person with the knowledge that it will be used inappropriately. 

PROGRAM COMPLETION AND EMPLOYMENT 

Employment opportunities for our B.S. and post-B.S. Pharm.D. graduates 
have been excellent, with almost all having jobs as soon as they graduate. Cur- 
rently, 92% of our students complete the program within the normal lime. 



PHARMACY 



Administration and Faculty 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SYSTEM 

Board of Regents 

Margaret Alton 

The Honorable Mary Arabian 

Richard O. Berndt 

Roger Blunt 

The Honorable Benjamin L. Brown 

Earle Palmer Brown 

Charles W. Cole, Jr. 

Frank A. Gunther, Jr. 

Ilona M. Hogan 

Ann Hull 

Henry R. Lord 

George V. McGowan 

Franklin P. Perdue 

Michael F. Seelman 

Constance M. Unseld 

Robert L. Walker, Ex Officio 

Albert N. Whiting, Ph.D. 

Administration 

Donald N. Langenberg, Ph.D., Chancellor of the University 

George L. Marx, Ph.D., Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs 

John K. Martin, Vice Chancellor, Advancement 

Donald L. Myers, M.B.A., Vice Chancellor, General Administration 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 

Errol L. Reese, D.D.S., President 

Cheryl T. Samuels, Ph.D., Acting Vice President, Academic Affairs 
James T. Hill, Jr., M.P.A., Vice President, Administrative Services 
T. Sue Gladhill, M.S.W., Vice President, Governmental Affairs 
Joann A. Boughman, Ph.D., Vice President, Research and Dean, 

Graduate School 
Marion J. Ball, Ed.D., Vice President, Information Services 
Fred Brooke Lee, B.A., Vice President, Institutional Advancement 
Morton I. Rapoport, M.D., President and Chief Executive Officer, 

University of Maryland Medical System 

Richard R. Ranney, D.D.S., M.S., Dean, Dental School 
Donald G. Gifford, J.D., Dean, School of Law 

ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 



Donald E. Wilson, M.D., Dean, School ot Medicine 
Barbara R. Heller, Ed.D., Dean, School of Nursing 
David A. Knapp, Ph.D., Dean, School of Pharmacy 
Jesse J. Harris, D.S.W., Dean, School of Social Work 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Administration 

David A. Knapp, Ph.D., Dean and Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
R. Gary HoUenbeck, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Academic Programs and 

Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Robert S. Beardsley, Ph.D., Associate Dean for Student Affairs and Admin- 
istration and Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Grady Dale, Jr., Ed.D., Director, Student Services 
Jacquelyn S. Lucy, M.A., M.Ed., Director, Public Affairs 
David M. Carrera, B.S., Director, Annual Programs and Alumni Relations 
Edward Thrush, B.S., Director, Computing Services 
Mary Joseph Ivins, Administrator, Financial Affairs 
Carolyn O. Footman, Executive Administrative Assistant to the Dean 

Faculty 

Alfred Abramson, R.Ph., B.S.P., Pharmacy Management, University of 
Maryland; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and 
Science; Director, Pharmacy Practice Laboratory 

Bruce D. Anderson, Pharm.D., Clinical Toxicology, Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy and Science; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy 
Practice and Science and Assistant Director, Maryland Poison Center 

Larry L. Augsburger, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmaceutics, University ot Maryland; 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Robert S. Beardsley, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacy Administration, University of 
Minnesota; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science and Asso- 
ciate Dean for Student Affairs and Administration 

Ralph N. Blomster, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacognosy, University of Connecti- 
cut; Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Gary G. Buterbaugh, Ph.D., Pharmacology and Toxicology, University ot 
lovva; Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Patrick S. Gallery, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of 
Calift)rnia; Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Judy L. Curtis, Pharm.D., Mental Health, University of Texas; Pharmacy 
School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Richard N. Dalby, Ph.D., Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, University of 
Kentucky; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Grady Dale, Jr., Ed.D., Psychology, University of Northern Colorado; Phar- 
macy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Direc- 
tor, Student Services 

60 • SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Russell DiGate, Ph.D., Molecular Biology, University of Rochester; Assis- 
tant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

George E. Dukes, Jr., Pharm.D., Clinical Pharmacy, University of Texas at 
Austin and University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio; 
Professor and Chairman, Pharmacy Practice and Science Department 

Christine U. Eccles, Ph.D., Toxicology, Johns Hopkins University; Asso- 
ciate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Natalie Eddington, Ph.D., Pharmacokinetics, University of Mar\4and; Assis- 
tant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Emmeline Edwards, Ph.D., Neuropharmacology, Fordham University; Asso- 
ciate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Donald O. Fedder, R.Ph., Dr.P.H., Public Health Education, Johns Hopkins 
University; Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Rebecca Finley, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Oncology, University of Cincinnati; Phar- 
macy School Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Paula A. Funk Orsini, Ph.D., Health Sciences Research, Ohio State Uni- 
versity; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Joseph Gallina, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Pharmacy Practice Management, Univer- 
sity of California; Clinical Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and 
Science; Director, Pharmacy Services, University of Maryland Medical 
System 

Mona L. Gold, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Ambulatory Care and Adult Internal Med- 
icine, University of Maryland; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Phar- 
macy Practice and Science 

Ronald D. Guiles, Ph.D., Physical Chemistry, University of California at 
Berkeley; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Erkan Hassan, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Critical Care, University of Maryland; 
Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Robert J. Mickey, Ph.D., Biochemistry, City University of New York; Assis- 
tant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

R. Gary HoUenbeck, Ph.D., Pharmaceutics, Purdue University; Associate 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences and Associate Dean for Academic 
Programs 

Christine M. Kearns, Pharm.D., Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics, 
University ot North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Pharmacy School Assistant 
Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Robert A. Kerr, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Ambulatory Pharmacotherapy and 
Instructional Systems Design, University of California; Associate Profes- 
sor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Kwang Chul Kim, Ph.D., Cell Biology, Ohio State University; Associate Pro- 
fessor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

William J. Kinnard, Jr., R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacology, Purdue University; 
Professor, Pharmacv Practice and Science 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 



Wendy Klein-Schwartz, Pharm.D., Clinical Toxicology, University of Mary- 
land; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Director, Mary- 
land Poison Center 

David A. Knapp, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacy Admmistration, Purdue Univer- 
sity; Dean and Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Director, Cen- 
ter for Drugs and Public Policy 

Joan S. Korek, Pharm.D., Mental Health, University of Texas at Austin and 
University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio; Pharmacy 
School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Cynthia L. LaCivita, Pharm.D., Oncology, University of Maryland, Phar- 
macy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Peter P. Lamy, R.Ph., Ph.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), Biopharmaceutics, Philadelphia 
College of Pharmacy and Science; Parke-Davis Professor of Geriatric Phar- 
macotherapy, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Director, Center for the 
Study of Pharmacy and Therapeutics for the Elderly 

James Leslie, Ph.D., Chemistry, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland; 
Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Raymond C. Love, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Mental Health, University of Maryland; 
Pharmacy School Assistant Professor and Vice-Chair, Pharmacy Practice 
and Science; Director, Mental Health Program 

Alexander D. MacKerell, Jr., Ph.D., Biochemistry and Computational 
Chemistry, Rutgers University; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical 
Sciences 

David A. Mays, Pharm.D., Drug Information Services, Mercer University; 
Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Mary Lynn McPherson, Pharm.D., B.C.P.S., Ambulatory Care and Geri- 
atrics, University of Maryland; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, 
Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Robert J. Michocki, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Family Medicine, University of Mary- 
land; Pharmacy School Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

David B. Moore, R.Ph., M.P.A., Health Care Management, Cornell Uni- 
versity; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Sci- 
ence 

J. Edward Moreton, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacology, University of Mississippi; 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Becky A. Nagle, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Clinical Pharmacy, University of Ken- 
tucky; Pharmacy School Assistant Prt)fessor, Pharmacy Practice and Sci- 
ence 

Marvin L. Oed, R.Ph., B.S.P., Pharmacy Practice, University of Maryland; 
Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; 
Director, Professional Experience Program 

Francis B. Palumbo, R.Ph., Ph.D., Health C^are Administration, University 
of Mississippi; J.D., University o{ Baltimore Law Onter; Professor, Phar- 
macy Practice and Science 



Karen Plaisance, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Pharmacokinetics and Infectious Dis- 
eases, State University of New York at Buffalo; Associate Professor, Phar- 
macy Practice and Science 

James E. Polli, Ph.D., Pharmaceutics, University of Michigan; Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Sovitj Pou, Ph.D., Organic Chemistry, University of Oregon; Research Assis- 
tant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Babette Prince, Pharm.D., Drug Information Services, Duquesne University; 
Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Kevin Reynolds, Ph.D., Bioorganic Chemistry, University of Southampton, 
Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

William G. Reiss, Pharm.D., Pharmacokinetics, State University of New 
York at Buffalo; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Megaly Rodriguez de Bittner, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Ambulatory Care, Univer- 
sity of Mar^'land; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice 
and Science 

David S. Roffman, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Cardiovascular Therapeutics, Univer- 
sity of Maryland; Associate Professor and Vice Chair, Pharmacy Practice 
and Science 

Gail Rosen, Pharm.D., BCNSP, Nutrition Support, University of Maryland; 
Clinical Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Karl-Heinz A. Rosier, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of 
Munich, Germany; Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Ralph F. Shangraw, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmaceutics, University of Michigan; 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Marilyn K. Speedie, R.Ph., Ph.D., Microbial Biochemistry, Purdue Univer- 
sity; Professor and Chairman, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Stuart M. Speedie, Ph.D., Pharmaco-informatics, Purdue University; Profes- 
sor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Anthony C. Tommasello, R.Ph., M.S., Substance Abuse and Chemical 
Dependence, University of Maryland; Pharmacy School Associate Profes- 
sor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Director, Office of Substance Abuse 
Studies 

Myron Weiner, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of 
Mar\-land; Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Jeremy Wright, R.Ph., Ph.D., Biomedicinal Chemistry, University of Lon- 
don; Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

David Young, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Ph.D., Pharmacokinetics and Applied Math- 
ematical Modelling, University of Southern California; Assistant Profes- 
sor, Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Julie A. Zito, Ph.D., Social and Behavorial Pharmacy, University of Min- 
nesota; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Ilene H. Zuckerman, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Geriatrics and Ambulatory Care, 
University of Maryland; Pharmacy School Associate Professor, Pharmacy 
Practice and Science 

ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY • 63 



Adjunct Faculty 

Kenneth G. Bassler, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Yale H. Caplan, Ph.D., Profes.sor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

C. Jelleff Carr, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Keith K. H. Chan, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Harold E. Chappelear, B. S. P., Senior Advisor to the Dean and Professor, 

Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Mark Chasin, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Ho Chung, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Lee T. Grady, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Victoria Hale, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Edward M. Jackson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Joseph Jackson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
James W. King, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Deanne E. Knapp, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Harvey J. Kupferberg, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Don Kyle, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
John W. Levchuk, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Karen L. Marquis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Keith Marshall, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Dev K. Mehra, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
David G. Pope, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Stuart C. Porter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
George Provanzano, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Robert Reid, M.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Michael G. Simic, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Byoung J. Song, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Frank C. Tortello, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Katherine R. Zoon, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Clinical Associate Professors 

Patrick Birmingham, B.S.P., St. Joseph's Hospital 

Steve Cohen, B.S.Pharm., M.S., Howard County General Hospital 

Thomas Sisca, Pharm.D., Easton Memorial Hospital 

Clinical Assistant Professors 

Tracy Aber, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

Charles Ballow, Pharm.D., Millard Fillmore Hospital 

Julie Baltz, Pharm.D., National Cancer Institute 

Marybeth Barry, B.S.Pharm., Northern Pharmacy 

Christopher J. Bero, Pharm.D., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 

Barbara Berquist, B.S.Pharm., University of Maryland Medical System 

Colette Boyle, Pharm.D., Veterans Affairs Medical Center - Ft. Howard 

James Caldwell, Pharm.D., Anne Arundel General Hospital 

Karim Calis, Pharm.D., National Institutes of Health Clinical Center 

64 • SCHOOL Ol- rilARMACY 



Kevin Callahan, Pharm.D., Easton Memorial Hospital 

Thomas Cantu, Pharm.D., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Jerry John Castellano, Pharm.D., The Medical Center of Delaware 

Igor Cerny, Pharm.D., Food and Drug Administration Division of Drug 

Marketing, Advertising and Communications 
Mark Chamberlain, B.S.P., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Wen-Kuang Chen, B.S.P., Group Health Association 
John Conrad, B.S.P., Belair Apothecary 
Deborah Cooper, Pharm.D., Pharmacy Consultant 

Linda M. Cortese, B.S.Pharm., M.Sc, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Donna M. Cronin, Pharm.D., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 
James Culp, B.S.P., Howard & Morris Pharmacy 
Sarah Donegan, Pharm.D., Frederick Memorial Hospital 
George Dydek, Pharm.D., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Michael S. Edwards, Pharm.D., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Fran Favin, Pharm.D., Good Samaritan Hospital 
Robert Feroli, Pharm.D., Johns Hopkins Hospital 
Monte B. Festog, Pharm.D., Washington County Hospital Association 
Madlyn Finger, B.S.P., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Laurie Fromm, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Gary Frost, Pharm.D., Johns Hopkins Hospital 
Cindy Gendron, Pharm.D., Suburban Hospital 
Donald C. Goble, Pharm.D., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Bruce Gordon, Pharm.D., Northwest Hospital Center 
David Green, Pharm.D., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Laurence Green, Pharm.D., National Institutes of Health Clinical Center 
Robert Gregory, Pharm.D., Group Health Association 
Deborah L. Greiner, Pharm.D., Kaiser Permanente, Mid-Atlantic Region 
Franklin GroUman, B.S.Pharm., National Naval Medical Center 
Michael Gum, Pharm.D., Dorchester General Hospital 
Karl Gumpper, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Cynthia J. Halas, Pharm.D., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 
Andrea Hershey, Pharm.D., VA Medical Center - Baltimore 
William Hill, B.S.P., Hill's Drug Store 

Jeff Hout, Pharm.D., Pharmacy Consultant/Rombro Health Services 
Van Doren Hsu, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
RoUey E. Johnson, Pharm.D., Francis Scott Key Medical Center 
John Jordan, M.S., VA Medical Center - Baltimore 
Edmund Kasaitis, Pharm.D., North Arundel Hospital 
Dee Knapp, Ph.D., Food and Drug Administration 
Kathrin Kucharski, Pharm.D., Good Samaritan Hospital 
Vincent LaCroce, Pharm.D., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 
Raymond T. Lake, M.S., Health Infusion 
Carlton Lee, Pharm.D., Johns Hopkins Hospital 
Laura Lees, Pharm.D., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY • 6 



Nicholas Lykos, B.S.P., Lykos Pharmacy 

Alonzo Mable, B.S.P., Group Health Association 

Claudia Manzo, Pharm.D., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Brian P. Martin, M.Sc, Team Care, Inc 

Robert Martin, Jr., B.S.P., Potomac Valley Pharmacy 

Murray Mease, Pharm.D., Team Care, Inc. 

Nasir Mian, Pharm.D., Greater Southeast Community Hospital 

Rita Mitsch, Pharm.D., Franklin Square Hospital 

John Ominski, B.S.P., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Eleanor O'Rangers, Pharm.D., VA Medical Center - Baltimore 

Michele Overtoom, Pharm.D., Pharmacy Consultant/Neighborcare 

Pharmacy 
Richard Parker, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 
Margaret Peoples, Pharm.D., Kaiser Permanente 
Marilyn Pitts, Pharm.D., Greater Southeast Community Hospital 
Gregory Pochan, Pharm.D., Franklin Square Hospital 
John Ricci, B.S.P., Technicare, Inc. 

Gail Rosen, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Carol Baker Rudo, Pharm.D., Veterans Affairs Medical Center-Baltimor 
James Joseph Rybacki, Pharm.D., Dorchester General Hospital 
Kevin Schnupp, Pharm.D., Liberty Medical Center 
Jay Sherr, Pharm.D., Springfield Hospital 
Matthew Shimoda, Pharm.D., P & R Corp. Ingleside Pharmacy 
Lynn Shumake, M.S., University of Maryland Medical System 
Debbie Simon, Pharm.D., Union Memorial Hospital 
Dominic Solimando, B.S.P., M.A., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Elinore Suk Chung, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Cassandra Tancil, Pharm.D., Greater Baltimore Medical Center 
Christopher Thomas, Pharm.D., Francis Scott Key Medical Center 
Michele D. Foster Thomas, Pharm.D., Union Memorial Hospital 
Richard Tsao, Pharm.D., Harbor Hospital 

Olga Tsidonis, Pharm.D., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 
Sara Turk, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Beth Vanderheyden, Pharm.D., University ot Maryland Medical System 
Uene Verovsky, Pharm.D., Levendale Hebrew Geriatric Center 
Paul Vitale, Pharm.D., Anne Arundel General Hospital 
Jo Wallin, Pharm.D., Sinai Hospital 
Sonya Ware, Pharm.D., Shady Grove Adventist Hospital 
Pamela Waring, B.S.P., Group Health Association 
D. Raymond Weber, Pharm.D., Easton Memorial 1 lospital 
Nina Weidle, Pharm.D., Good Samaritan Hospital 
Paul Weidle, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Phillip Weiner, B.S.P., Weiner's Pharmacy 
Lawrence Westfall, Pharm.D., HealthCare Decisions 
Anne M. Wiland, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 



Jacquelyn Gardner Wilson, Pharm.D., Great Oaks Center 
Eileen Wu, Pharm.D., Montgomery General Hospital 
Beverly Yachmetz, Pharm.D., Health Connections, Inc. 

Clinical Instructors 

Stephen J. Adamczyk, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy =11 69 

Kenneth Aiello, B.S.P., Peoples Drug Store 

Calvin Alt, B.S.P., Health Care Professionals 

Marsha Alvarez, B.S.P., Food and Drug Administration 

Paul Antoszewski, B.S.P., Halethorpe Pharmacy 

Michael Appel, B.S.P., Howard and Morris 

John Bailey, B.S.P, REVCO*1225 

Edwin Balcerzak, B.S.P., VA Medical Center - Outpatient Clinic 

John Balch, B.S.P., Bedford Road Pharmacy 

Kathleen Ballman, B.S.P., M.S, Anne Arundel Medical Center 

Jay Barbaccia, Pharm.D., Washington Hospital Center 

Lee Barker, B.S.P., M.B.A., Safeway Pharmacy 

John Batdorf, B.S.P., Medical Arts Pharmacy 

Richard Baylis, B.S.P., Maryland Pharmacists Association 

Gerald Beachy, B.S.P., Beachy's Pharmacy 

Jeffrey Beck, B.S.P., Thrift Drug 

John Beckman, B.S.P., Beckman's Greene Street Pharmacy 

Brian Berryhill, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Stephen Bierer, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy =1200 

Frank Blatt, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy *1040 

Barry Bloom, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Thomas Bolt, B.S.P., The Medicine Shoppe 

Gene Borowski, B.S.P., Village Pharmacists 

Pamela Bozek, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

Lynette Bradley, B.S.P., CVS/Peoples Drug Store =1795 

Thomas Brenner, B.S.P., York Hospital 

Steven Buckner, B.S.P., Magiros Pharmacy 

Patrick Burke, B.S.P., Chestnut AID Pharmacy 

Kelly Keelan Caccamisi, B.S.P., K-Mart Pharmacy =3711 

Douglas Campbell, B.S.P., The Medicine Shoppe 

Robert H. Campbell, B.S.P., Madison Park Pharmacy 

Majorie Carl, LCSW, Baltimore County Department of Health 

Leon Catlett, B.S.P., Eakles Drug Store 

David R. Chason, B.S.P., Good Samaritan Hospital 

Fred Chatelain, B.S.P., M.S., Alexandria Hospital 

Fred Choy, M.S., R.Ph., Critical Care America 

Thomas Chuen, M.S., Greater Southeast Community Hospital 

Gerald L Cohen, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 

David Cowden, B.S.P., CVS/Peoples Drug Store =1435 

James Crable, B.S.P., The Finan Center 

ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 



Terry Crovo, B.S.P., Medical Center of Dundalk 
Wayne Crowley, B.S.P., M.B.A., Giant Pharmacy 
Hedy Cylus, B.S.P., Fenwick Apothecary 

Larry Davis, B.S.P., University of Virginia Health Sciences Center 
Traci Davis, R.Ph. , CVS/Peoples Drug 
Morrell Delcher, B.S.P., Maryland General Hospital 
Dolores Dixon, B.S.P., University of Maryland Cancer Center 
Joseph Dorsch, Jr., B.S.P., Voshell's Pharmacy 

Thomas Dowling, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Patricia Draper, B.S.P., Edward's Pharmacy 
Janice Dunsavage, B.S.P., Sinai Hospital 
Augustine R. Durso, B.S.Pharm., Curaflex, Inc. 
Thomas Evans, B.S.P., Fallston Hospital 
Kenneth Ey, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center 
Darlene Fahrman, B.S.P., Rite Aid #3758 
Neil Feldman, B.S.P., New Windsor Pharmacy 
Sally Felton, B.S.Pharm., Pharmacy Consultant 
Glenn Feroli, B.S.P., Carroll County General Hospital 
Jerome Fine, M.S., Hallmark Healthcare 
Harry Finke, B.S.P., Hunt Valley Pharmacy 
Barry Flannelly, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 
Anthea Francis, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 
Jeffrey P. Franklin, B.S.P., VA Medical Center (Ft. Howard) 
Louis Friedman, B.S.P., Marcus Pharmacy 

Joseph Gallelli, Ph.D., National Institutes of Health Clinical Center 
Martin Garza, B.S.Pharm., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
David Gerrold, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Nancy Gilbert-Taylor, B.S.P., Fuller Medical Center Pharmacy 
Harvey Goldberg, B.S.P., Freedom Drug 
Leonard Goldberg, B.S.P., Dofield Pharmacy 
Millard Gomez, B.S.P., Holy Cross Hospital 
Thomas Goolsby, B.S.P., REVCO #1075 
Charles Graefe, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 
Robert Grossman, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy #1054 
Douglas Haggerty, B.S.P., The Medicine Shoppe 
John Hale, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy #2585 

Mayer Handelman, B.S.P., Woodhaven Pharmacy and Medical Equipment 
Jon (Wes) Hann, B.S.P., REVCO 
Harold Harrison, B.S.P., Frostburg Hospital 
Roger Heer, B.S.P., Valley Pharmacy- 
Frank Henderson, B.S.P., Klein's of Bel Air 
Jerry Herpel, B.S.P., Deep Creek Pharmacy 
J. Todd Holland, B.S.P., Booneshoro Pharmacy 
Raymond Hollis, B.S.P., Shady Grove Adventist Hospital 
Stephen Hospodavis, B.S.P., Steve's Pharmacy 

68 • SCHOOL OF- rH.-XRM.-XCY 



M. Neal Jacobs, B.S.P., Belair Professional Pharmacy 

Thomas Johnson, Jr., B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy -1175 

Carolyn Johnson, B.S.P., Warm Spring Clinic (USPHS) 

George Jones, B.S.P., Malcolm Grow Medical Center 

Ray Juta, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 

John Kamberger, B.S.P., Harford Memorial Hospital 

Albert Katz, B.S.P., Arundel Pharmacy 

Larry D. Kelley, B.S.P., Nationwide Pharmacy Center 

Jerold Kempler, B.S.P., Mail Order Pharmacy 

James Kenny, B.S.P., Virgina/Marv'land Regional Vetemar\- College 

Daniel Keravich, M.S., National Institutes of Health 

Edward Kern, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Crystal King, B.S.P., MGH Pharmacy 

Larissa Kitenko, B.Sc, Peninsula Regional Medical Center 

Dale Klemm, B.S.P., Drug Emporium 

David Knauer, B.S.P., Francis Scott Key Medical Center 

Jay Krosnick, B.S.P., ASCO Healthcare, Inc. 

John Kudrick, B.S.P., Family Pharmacy 

Scott Kuperman, B.S.P., Grain Towers Pharmacy 

Earl Labatt, M.A., VA Medical Center - Washington, DC 

Steve Lauer, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Louise Leach, B.S.P., Northwest Hospital Center 

James Leedy, B.S.P., Family & Community Health Apothecar\' 

Capt. Melvin Lessing, B.S.P., Food and Drug Administration Office of OTC 

Evaluation 
John Levchuk, B.S.P., Office of Compliance 
Mark Levi, B.S.P., Medical Arts Pharmacy 
Bonnie Levin, Pharm.D., Greater Laurel-Beltsville Hospital 
Janice Liao, Pharm.D., University- of Mar>-land Medical System 
Joseph Libercci, B.S.P., Park Avenue Pharmacy 
Glenn Lichtman, B.S.P., Holabird Pharmacy 
David Liebman, B.S.P., D.P.A., Kayes AID Pharmacy 
Michelle Lippert, B.S.P., TTie Pharmacy at Fairmount Hill 
Heidi Louie, Pharm.D., Univ^ersiry of Maryland Medical System 
Jacquelyn S. Lucy, M.A., M.Ed., UMAB School of Pharmacy 
Heidi Lucking, B.S.P., Garrett County Memorial Hospital 
Marie Mackowick, B.S.P., Crownsville Hispital Center 
James Mallonee, B.S.P., Mercy Medical Center 
Tamara Marek, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Susan Mayhew, Pharm.D., University of Mar^'land Medical System 
John McArthur, B.S.P., Alaska Area Native Health Ser\'ice 
Stephanie McDaniel, B.S.P., Peoples Drug Store =1500 
Bernard McDougall, B.S.P., McDougall's Pharmacy 
Linda McFadyen, B.S.P., Bon Secours Hospital 



ADMINISTR.MION AND FACULTY 



William Ment, Ph.D., ¥ood and Drug Administration, Baltimore 

(Lab Research) 
Jack Mentzer, B.S.P., Church Hospital Corporation 
Penny Miles, B.S.P., CVS/Peoples Drug Store *1458 
David Miller, B.S.P., Maryland Pharmacists Association 
Harvey Miller, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy #352 
Terry Minton, Maj., B.S.P., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Martin Mintz, B.S.P., Northern Pharmacy & Medical Equipment 
Kimherly Moore, B.S.P., Paradise Pharmacy 
Jeffrey Moyer, B.S.P., The Chambershurg Hospital 
Timothy Muth, B.S.P., Syncor Medical Services Group 
Louis Myers, B.S.P., Harbor Hospital Center 
Linda Nadal-Hermida, B.S.P., Drug Emporium 
Leon Nelson, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 
John R. Newcomb, B.S.P., Nationwide Pharmacy 
Joseph Nusbaum, B.S.P., Ambulatory Care Pharmacy 
Michael J. Orsini, B.S.P., University of Maryland Medical System 
Helen Osborn, B.S.P., Montgomery General Hospital 
Richard Ottmar, M.S., Sacred Heart Hospital 
Joseph Pariser, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 
Daniel Pastorek, B.S.P., Kay Cee Drugs 
David Patterson, B.S.P., Memorial Hospital 
Robert Patti, B.S.P., Hanover General Hospital 
Martin Paul, B.S.P., Jacksonville Pharmacy 
Carol Paulick, B.S.P., St. Agnes Hospital 
James Pellenbarg, B.S.P., Drug Counter 

Beulah Perdue, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
David Perrott, B.S.P., Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital 
Mark Pilachowski, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 
Bonnie Pitt, B.S.P., Frederick Memorial Hospital 
Paul Polansky, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Howard Pollack, B.S.P., Eastpoint Medical ("enter Pharmacy 
Douglas M. Pryor, M.B.A., Franklin Square Hospital 
Jacob Raitt, B.S.P., Weiner's Pharmacy 
Patricia Richards, B.S.P., Group Health Association 
Laura Rickles, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Arthur Riley, M.S., Washington Heights Medical Center Pharmacy 
Michael D. Roberts, B.S.P., National Rehabilitation Hospital 
Michael Roberts, B.S.P., Annapolis Professional Pharmacy 
Jeffrey Rodkey, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy *335 
Leon Rosen, B.S.P., Kaufmann's of Kenilworth 
Dennis Rosenbloom, B.S.P., Schmitts Rexall Drugs 
Richard Rumrill, M.S., Howard County C^eneral I lospiral Pharmacy 
David Russo, B.S.P., Medicine Shoppe 
Ellen Safir, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

70 • Sl'lUHM- Ol- PHARMACY 



Brian Sanderoff, B.S.P., Sappe's Pharmacy 

Ronald Sanford, B.S.P., Vitalink Pharmacy Services 

Daniel Satisky, B.S.P., MacGillivray's Pharmacy 

Angelica Schneider, B.S.P., NeighborCare Pharmacy 

Kenneth Schneider, B.S.P., Safeway 

Joseph Schuman, B.S.P., Mar>'land Rehabilation Center 

Donald A Schumer, B.S.P., Pen-Dol Pharmacy 

Gregory Shaeffer, B.S.P., Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 

Brent Sharf, B.S.P., Bon Secours Hospital 

Winette Sherard, B.S.P., Walter P. Carter Center 

Bertram Shevitz, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Ronald Showacre, B.S.P., Southgate Professional Pharmacy 

Robert Sinker, B.S.P., Potomac Village Pharmacy 

Dennis Smith, B.S.P., Greater Baltimore Medical Center 

John C. Smith, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Robert Snively, B.S.Pharm., Stockley Center 

Jennifer Snyder-Rowan, B.S.P., Thrift Drug 

Gary Sobotka, Pharm BS, Peoples Drug Store 

Joseph Sokol, Jr., B.S.P., Twin Knolls Pharmacy 

Raymond Spassil, M.S., Memorial Hospital Pharmacy 

Maria Surgent, B.S.P., Calvert Arundel Pharmacy 

William Tabak, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Peter Tam, B.S.P., Calvert Memorial Hospital 

Richard Tarr, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy #1074 

Lawrence Taylor, B.S.P., REVCO #2707 

J. Bradley Thomas, B.S.P., The Medicine Shoppe 

Jodie Thomas, B.S.P., The Medicine Shoppe 

Nancy Thomas, B.S.P., Sibley Memorial Hospital 

Vito Tinelli, Jr., B.S.P., Chestertown Pharmacy 

Kathleen Truelove, B.S.P., The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

John VanWie, B.S.P., Safeway Pharmacy 

Rebecca A. Viola, B.S.P., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Dorothy Wade, B.S.P., National Pharmaceutical Council 

Ken Walters, B.S.P., Sheppard Pratt Hospital 

Richard Wankel, B.S.P., Howard and Morris 

Nina Watson, B.S.P., Kimborough Community Army Hospital 

Donald Way, B.S.P., North Arundel General Hospital 

C. Edwin Webb, Pharm. D., M.P.H. American Association of Colleges of 

Pharmacy 
Joann N. Wehnert, B.S.P., Nanticoke Memorial Hospital 
Michael Weinstein, B.S.P., The Apothecary 
Debra S. Weintraub, Pharm. D., Suburban Hospital 
Lewis E. Williams, B.S.P., York Hospital 
Thomas Williams, B.S.Pharm., Medical Center of Dundalk 
Thomas Wilson, B.S.P., Cape Drug 

ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY • 71 



Deborah Winkel, M.A., Barre-National, Inc. 

Jane Wuenstel, B.S.P., Washington Adventist Hospital 

Ellen Yankellow, B.S.P., Romhro Health Services 

Martin Yankellow, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Irvin Yospa, B.S.P., Family Pharmacy of Hampstead 

Jonas J. Yousem, B.S.P., Wilde Lake Pharmacy 

Faramarz Zarfeshanfard, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Policy Statements 



FACULTY, STL'DENT AND INSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ACADEMIC INTEGRITY' 

Preamble 

The academic enterprise is characterized by reasoned discussion between stu- 
dent and teacher, a mutual respect for the learning and teaching process, and 
intellectual honest>- in the pursuit of new knowledge. By tradition, students 
and teachers have certain rights and responsibilities which they bring to the 
academic community-. While the following statements do not imply a con- 
tract ber^veen the teacher or the institution and the student, they are never- 
theless conventions which should be central to the learning and teaching 
process. 

I. Faculty Rights aiid Responsihilities 

A. Faculty- members shall share with students and administrators the respon- 
sibility for academic integrit\". 

B. Faculty- members shall enjoy freedom in the classroom to discuss subject 
matter reasonably related to the course. In turn, they have the responsi- 
bilit>- to encourage free and honest inquiry- and expression on the part of 
students. 

C. Faculty members, consistent with the principles of academic freedom, 
have the responsibility- to present courses that are consistent with their 
descriptions in the catalog of the institution. In addition, faculty' mem- 
bers have the obligation to make students aware of the expectations in 
the course, the evaluation procedures and the grading policy. 

D. Faculty members are obligated to evaluate students fairly, equitably and 
in a manner appropriate to the course and its objectives. Grades must be 
assigned without prejudice or bias. 

E. Faculty- members shall make all reasonable efforts to prevent the occur- 
rence of academic dishonesty- through appropriate design and adminis- 
tration of assignments and examinations, careful safeguarding of course 
materials and examinations, and regular reassessment of evaluation pro- 
cedures. 

F. When instances of academic dishonesty are suspected, faculty- members 
shall have the responsibilit\- to see that appropriate action is taken in 
accordance with institutional regulations. 

II. Student Rights and Responsihilities 

A. Students share with faculty members and administrators the responsibil- 
ity for academic integrity. 

B. Students have the right of free and honest inquiry and expression in their 
courses. In addition, students have the right to know the requirements 

POLICY ST.ATEMENTS • 73 



of their courses and to know the manner in which they will he evaluated 
and graded. 

C. Students have the obligation to complete the requirements of their 
courses in the time and manner prescribed and to submit to evaluation of 
their work. 

D. Students have the right to be evaluated fairly, equitably, and in a timely 
manner appropriate to the course and its objectives. 

E. Students shall not submit as their own work any work which has been pre- 
pared by others. Outside assistance in the preparation of this work, such 
as librarian assistance, tutorial assistance, typing assistance or such spe- 
cial assistance as may be specified or approved by the appropriate faculty 
members, is allowed. 

F. Students shall make all reasonable efforts to prevent the occurrence of 
academic dishonesty. They shall by their own example encourage acad- 
emic integrity and shall themselves refrain from acts of cheating and pla- 
giarism or other acts of academic dishonesty. 

G. When instances of academic dishonesty are suspected, students shall 
have the right and responsibility to bring this to the attention of the fac- 
ulty or other appropriate authority. 

III. Institutional Responsibility 

A. Constituent institutions of the University of Maryland System shall take 
appropriate measures to foster academic integrity in the classroom. 

B. Each institution shall take steps to define acts of academic dishonesty, to 
ensure procedures for due process for students accused or suspected of acts 
of academic dishonesty, and to impose appropriate sanctions on students 
found to be guilty of acts of academic dishonesty. 

C. Students expelled or suspended for reasons of academic dishonesty by any 
institution in the University of Maryland System shall not be admissible 
to any other System institution if expelled, or during any period of sus- 
pension. 

Approved, November 30, 1989 by the Board of Regents. 

CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE OF STUDENT RECORDS 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Baltimore to adhere to the 
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment). As such, 
it is the policy of the university ( 1 ) to permit students to inspect their educa- 
tion records, (2) to limit disclosure to others of personally identifiable infor- 
mation from education records without students' prior written consent and 
(3) to provide students the opportunity to seek correction of their education 
records where appropriate. Each school shall develop policies to ensure that 
this policy is implemented. 



SCHOOL OI 



SCHEDULING OF ACADEMIC ASSIGNMENTS ON DATES OF 
RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCE 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Baltimore to excuse the 
absence(s) of students that result from the observance of religious holidays. 
Students shall be given the opportunity, whenever feasible, to make up, 
within a reasonable time, any academic assignments that are missed due to 
individual participation in religious observances. Opportunities to make up 
missed academic assignments shall be timely and shall not interfere with the 
regular academic assignments of the student. Each school/academic unit shall 
adopt procedures to ensure implementation of this policy. 

ELIGIBILITY TO REGISTER AT UMAB 

A student may register at UMAB when the following conditions are met: 
(1) the student is accepted to UMAB, (2) the student has received approval 
from the unit academic administrator and (3) the student has demonstrated 
academic and financial eligibility. 

REVIEW OF ALLEGED ARBITRARY AND CAPRICIOUS GRADING 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Baltimore that students be 
provided a mechanism to review course grades that are alleged to be arbitrary 
or capricious. Each school/academic unit shall develop guidelines and proce- 
dures to provide a means for a student to seek review of course grades. These 
guidelines and procedures shall be published regularly in the appropriate 
media so that all faculty and students are informed about this policy. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POSITION ON ACTS OF 
VIOLENCE AND EXTREMISM WHICH ARE RACIALLY, 
ETHNICALLY, RELIGIOUSLY OR POLITICALLY MOTIVATED 

The Board of Regents strongly condemns criminal acts of destruction or vio- 
lence against the person or property of others. Indi-viduals committing such 
acts at any campus or facility of the university will be subject to swift campus 
judicial and personnel action, including possible expulsion or termination, as 
well as possible state criminal proceedings. 

SERVICE TO THOSE WITH INFECTIOUS DISEASES 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Baltimore to provide educa- 
tion and training to students for the purpose of providing care and service to 
all persons. The institution will employ appropriate precautions to protect 
providers in a manner meeting the patients' or clients' requirements, yet pro- 



POLICY STATEMENTS 



tecting the interest of students and faculty participating in the provi-sion of 
such care or service. 

No student will be permitted to refuse to provide care or service to any 
assigned person in the absence of special circumstances placing the student at 
increased risk tor an infectious disease. Any student who refuses to treat or 
serve an assigned person without prior consent of the school involved will be 
subject to penalties under appropriate academic procedures, such penalties to 
include suspension or dismissal. 

HUMAN RELATIONS CODE SUMMARY 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore has a Human Relations Code for use 
by the entire campus community. The code represents UMAB's commitment 
to human relations issues. The specific purpcises of the code include: 

1 . Prevention or elimination of unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, 
color, creed, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, age, ancestry or national 
origin, physical or mental handicap, or exercise of rights secured by the First 
Amendment of the U.S. Constitution; and 

2. Establishing a timely, effective grievance procedure as an alternative to 
more lengthy formal processes for resolution of human relations issues. 

A Human Relations Committee was created to oversee the code. It is 
comprised of campus faculty, administrators and students and is advisory to 
the president o{ the campus. The committee may institute educational pro- 
grams and provide an open forum on human relations issues. In addition, the 
committee is charged with maintaining a mediation, investigation and hear- 
ing process for specific complaints of discrimination brought by students, fac- 
ulty or staff. The code describes the particulars of the hearing process. It is the 
intent of the code to provide a grievance procedure for an individual on cam- 
pus who wants a cross-section of the campus community to investigate and 
mediate a problem without having to resort to complaints to external agen- 
cies such as the Maryland Commission on Human Relations, complaints 
under personnel rules or lawsuits. 

Copies of the Human Relations Code are available in the dean's office, 
the student affairs and USGA offices in the Baltimore Student Union, and 
the human resources management and affirmative action offices in the admin- 
istration building. 

DISCLAIMER 

No provision ot this publication shall be construed as a contract between any 
applicant or student and the University of Maryland at Baltimore. The uni- 
versity reserves the right to change any admission or advancement require- 
ment at any time. The university further reserves the right to ask a student to 
withdraw at any time when it is considered to be in the best interest of the 
university. 

76 • SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Student Right-te-Knew and Campus Security Act Request 

The Student Righl-toKnow and Campus Seiunt> Act (Public Uw 101-542). signed into federal law November 8. 1990, 
requires thai the Univetsity of Manland at Baltimore make readily available to its students and prospective students the 
infonnation listed below. 

Should you wish to obtsiin any of this information, please check the appropriate space(s). fill in your name, mailing address 
and UM.AB school name, tear off this form and send it to: 

University Office of Student Affairs 
Attn: Student Right-to-Kno« Request 
L niversil\ of Maryland at Baltimore 
Suite .iih. Baltimore Student Union 
621 \^ est l>ombard Street 
Baltimore. MD 21201-1.57.S 



Complete and return this portion 

Financial Aid 

Costs of .Attending the liniversity of Manland at Baltimore 

Refund Policy 

Facilities and Services for Handicapped 

Pnxedures for Review of School and Campus .Accreditation 

Completion/Graduation Rates for Undergraduate Students 

Loan Deferral under the Peace Corps and Domestic Volunteer Servii 

Campus Safety and Security 

Campus Crime Statistics 



UMAB School and Program 



Campus Maps 




Francis Scott 
Key Bridge 



TO REACH THE CAMPUS 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore is located in UniversityCenter, a newly dcsifjnated 

downtown Baltimore neighborhood, six blocks west of the Inner Harbor. 

Directions 

From 1-95: Take Rte. 395 (downtown Baltimore) and exit onto Martin Luther King, Jr., Blvd., 

staying in right lane. At fourth traffic light, turn right onto Baltimore St.; turn left at second 

traffic light onto Paca St. and immediately into the Baltimore Grand Garage (visitor parking). 

Bus Access 

MTA buses numbered 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 1 1, 20, 55, and 56 all stop in the campus area. 

Subway Access 

The Baltimore Metro runs from Charles Cxnrer to Owings Mills. Stops closest to campus are at 

Lexington Market and Charles Center. 

Light Rail 

A new light rail line connects Park and Ride locations at Timonium, Lulherville, Falls Road 

and Mt. Washington in northern Baltimore with the new Oriole Park at Camden Yards and 

continues .south of Baltimore to Glen Burnie. The line passes two blocks east of the campus; 

the UniversityCenter stop is at Baltimore Street. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



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MK 








II 



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Academic and Patient Care 
Facilities 

19 Administration Building 
737 West Lombard Street 



Athletic Center 
646 Penn Street 
Baltimore Student I 



(Walter P ) Carter Center 

630 West Fayette Street 

Davidge Hall 

522 West Lombard Street 

Dental School 

666 West Baltimore Strret 



VP VlEitors Parking PP Patient Parking SP Student Parking 



Environmental Health and Safety 

Building 

714 West Lombard Street 

James T Frenkil Building 

16 South Eutaw Street 

Greene Street Building 

29 South Greene Street 

Health Sciences Facility (future) 



) West Redwood Street 



Law School and tylarshall Law Library 

500 West Baltimore Street 

Lombard Building 

511 West Lombard Street 

rylaryland Bar Center 

520 West Fayette Street 

tyledical Biotechnology Center 

(future home) 

fvledical School 

Frank C Bressler Research Building 

655 West Baltimore Street 

Medical School Teaching Facility 

10 South Pine Street 

Nursing School 

655 West Lombard Street 

Parsons Hall 

622 West Lombard Street 

Pascault Row 

651-655 West Lexington Street 

Pharmacy School 

20 North Pine Street 



Ronald f^/lcDonald House 

635 West Lexington Street 

Social Work School 

525 West Redwood Street 

State ryledical Examiner's Building 



2 405 West Redwood Street Building 
16 701 West Pratt Street Building 

1 1 University Health Center 

120 South Greene Street 
25 University of f^aryland IVIedical 

22 South Greene Street 

3 University of Maryland Professional 
Building 

419 West Redwood Street 

32 Veterans Affairs Medical Center 

Baltimore and Greene Streets 

Cultural and Civic Facilities 



44 Lexington Market 

43 Market Center Post Office 

47 Old Saint Paul's Cemetery 

45 Onole Park at Camden Yarc 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



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SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 
1995-1996 Catalog 



_^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



School ot Pharmacy 

(Maryland College of Pharmacy: 1841 - 1904) 

Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 

1995-96 Catalog and 135th Announcement 
for the Professional Degree Program 

Volume 58, Number 1, September 1995 

School of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland at Baltimore 

20 North Pine Street 

Baltimore, MD 21201-1180 

Admissions: (410)706-7653 

or 1-800-852-2988 (Toll Free) 
Admissions - Nontraditional Pathway: (410) 706-0761 
Dean's Office: (4 1 0) 706-7650 

Financial Aid (UMAB): (410) 706-7347 

Public Affairs: (410)706-5893 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. The School 
of Pharmacy's Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) programs and continuing education programs are accredited by the 
American Council on Pharmaceutical Education. For additional information, contact ACPF. .311 VC Superior .'it.. 
Chicago. IL 60610 (312-664-3575). The school is a member of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore is actively committed to providing equal educational and employment opportu- 
nity in all of its programs. It is the goal of the university to assure that women and minorities are equitably represented 
among the faculty, staff and administiation of the university so that its work force reflects the diversity of MaryLind's pop- 
ulation. 

All employment policies and activilies of the University of Mary hind at lUltimore shall he consistent with federal and state 
laws, regulations and executive orders on nondiscrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, age ancestry or national 
origin, sex, sexual orientation, handicap, marital status and veteran status. Sexual harassment, as a form of sex discrimi- 
nation, is prohibited among the workforce of the university 



III 



1995-1996 

Catalog for the 

Doctor of Pharmacy Program 



Contents 



INTRODUCTION 

Goals of the Profession of 

Pharmao' 2 

Goals of the School's Doctor of 

Pharmac}- Curriculum 2 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

The School and Its History- 5 

Commitment to Diversity 5 

Compliance with ADA Legislation . . .5 

Facilities 6 

Communit)' and Professional Service 
and Research Support Programs . . .7 

Student Government 9 

Lecture Series 9 

Endowed Chairs 10 

Alumni Association 11 

Da\ id Stewart .Associates 11 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
AT BALTIMORE 

The Campus 12 

Health Sciences Librar\' 12 

Computer Resources 14 

Student and Employee Health 15 

Counseling Center 15 

Athletic Center 16 

Parking and Transponation 16 

Living in Baltimore 16 

The City of Baltimore 17 

Close Proximit}- to 

Washington, D.C 17 

APPLICATION AND 
ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 

Application Procedures 18 

Admissions Process 19 

Prerequisites 20 

International Students 20 

International Pharmacists 21 

Licensure Requirements 21 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

Fees and Expenses 22 

Health Insurance 11 



Determination of In-State 

Residenc)' 23 

Financial Aid 23 

School of Pharmacy Scholarships . . .23 

Loan Funds 25 

Student Veterans 25 

PHARM.D. PROGRAM 

Description 26 

Curriculum Pathways and 

Electives 30 

Summai)' of Coursework 32 

Course Descriptions 35 

NONTRADITIONAL PATHWAY 

Description 51 

Admissions Process 52 

Program Requirements 52 

Course Descriptions 53 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 

Academic Sessions 60 

Registration Policies 60 

Grading System 61 

Scholastic Honors 61 

Academic Status Policies 63 

Academic Status Criteria 64 

Academic Dismissal 64 

Academic Integrit)' 65 

ADMINISTRATION AND 
FACULTY 

University of Maryland 

Board of Regents 66 

System Administration 66 

University' of Maryland at 
Baltimore 66 

School of Pharmacy 

Administration 67 

Faculty 67 

Adjunct Faculty 71 

Clinical Associate Professors 72 

Clinical Assistant Professors 72 

C'linical Instructors 75 

POLICY STATEMENTS 82 

CAMPUS MAPS 89 



Introduction 



In 1994, the School of Pharmacy consohdated its two professional entry-level pro- 
grams (the B.S. in Pharmacy and post-B.S. Pharm.D. programs) into a single Doc- 
tor of Pharmacy program. This program was developed by the facult)' after 
extensive analysis of pharmacy practice and education, with discussion and input 
from practitioners regarding the needs of the profession. Thus, the University of 
Maryland no longer offers the B.S. in Pharmacy and the traditional 2-year post- 
B.S. Pharm.D. program. Future pharmacists now gain entry into the pharmacy 
profession by completing the school's four year Doctor of Pharmacy program. 

The school's Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum has inherent flexibility, allow- 
ing for change and restructuring of courses throughout the four year program. Most 
courses do not run an entire semester but are presented in shorter time frames so 
that the students can focus on three or four subjects rather than six or seven courses. 
This innovation allows more time for in-depth discussion of content areas. Other 
innovations include the optional pathways which offer avenues for specialization 
within an area of interest, such as pharmacotherapy or communit)' practice, and 
the expanded opportunities to take electives — 21 percent of the curriculum. 

As a part of the 1994 curriculum revision, the school developed a nontradi- 
tional pathway so that licensed pharmacists in the region could earn the Doctor of 
Pharmacy degree. The goal of this pathway is to enhance the ability ot pharmacists 
to provide pharmaceutical care within their current practice setting. Information 
on the nontraditional pathway is included toward the end of this catalog. Pharma- 
cists interested in pursuing this pathway, however, are encouraged to read other sec- 
tions of the catalog dealing with important school policies and procedures. 



GOALS OF THE PROFESSION OF PHARMACY 

Pharmacists are responsible lor the drug-related needs ol patients. The overall goal 
of every pharmacist is to assist patients, families and other health care providers in 
improving the health care outcomes of patients. Pharmacists advise, guide and help 
patients through the increasingly complex world of medications — whether in insti- 
tutional or community practice settings or in the patient's own home. Consistent 
with our vision of pharmacy practice, the focus of our curriculum is to prepare well- 
trained, patient-oriented health care providers. 



GOALS OF THE SCHOOL'S 

DOCTOR OF PHARMACY CURRICULUM 



The goals and objectives of the Pharm.D. program arc consistent with the school's 
strategic plan: 



School of Pharmacy 




The School of Pharmacy seeks to provide individuals with the knowledge and skills 
necessary to begin pharmacy practice and, in so doing, accept and perform profes- 
sional responsibilities with competence. Graduates should have the ability to adapt 
their practice to the changing health care system, and should be prepared to engage 
in a continuing program of professional development. 

The professional curricula will be innovative and flexible, based on strong basic 
sciences, have extensive clinical content taught by practice-based faculty, and empha- 
size the development of problem solving and collaborative skills. The opportunity for 
advanced professional and clinical education will be made available. 

The school seeks to create an educational community that extends beyond tradi- 
tional classroom sites and offers students and faculty a variety of learning environ- 
ments. These will include cultural and interprofessional programs which broaden 
the experiences of our graduates. 

Curricular change within the school has been prompted, in part, by 
the adoption of the concept of pharmaceutical care by the practice of pharmacy. 
In the words of the AACP Commission to Implement Change in Pharmaceutical 
Education: 

Pharmaceutical care focuses pharmacists ' attitude, behaviors, commitments, con- 
cerns, ethics, functions, knowledge, responsibilities and skills on the provision of drug 
therapy with the goal of achieving definite outcomes toward the improvement of a 
patient's quality of life. These outcomes of drug use are: 1) cure of a disease; 2) elim- 
ination or reduction of symptoms; 3) arresting or slowing a disease process; 4) pre- 
vention of disease; 5) diagnosis of disease; and 6) desired alterations in physiological 
processes, all with minimum risk to patients. 

Historically the major patient-oriented, professional functions of pharmacy 
have involved preparing the drug product and providing it to the patient. These 
continue to be vital components. However, in response to the increasing effective- 



ness, potency, preciseness, risk and cost of drug therapy and the increasing use of 
drugs in diagnosis, pharmacy has gone beyond those functions. 

Thus the scope of contemporary pharmacy activities includes: 

• providing drug information to patients and others; 

• participating in the process of drug use decisions; 

• monitoring patients to maximize comphance and to detect adverse 
events; 

• monitoring patients to enhance therapeutic outcomes; 

• selecting the drug product dosage form and source of supply; 

• determining the dose and dosage schedule; and 

• preparing the drug product for patient use and providing it to the 
patient. 

The central goal of the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum is to provide our 
graduates competency in the knowledge, attitudes, values and skills necessary to 
provide, coordinate and manage primary pharmaceutical care in collaboration with 
patients and their families, prescribers and other health care providers or care givers, 
in a variety of practice settings. 




4 School of Pharmacy 



The School of Pharmacy 



THE SCHOOL AND ITS HISTORY 



The School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore has a rich and dis- 
tinguished heritage. The school was first incorporated as the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy on January 27, 1841. The first classes were conducted in November of 
that year. It is the oldest pharmacy school in the South and the fourth oldest in the 
countn,'. Primarily an independent institution until 1 904, the Maryland College of 
Pharmacy then became the department of pharmacy of the University of Maryland. 
In 1 920, the University of Maryland in Baltimore merged with the Maryland State 
College at College Park to form the state university. Today, the school is one of 
seven professional schools which form the University of Maryland at Baltimore 
(UMAB). 

Throughout its history, the School of Pharmacy has been a local and national 
leader for the profession of pharmacy. It was a founding member of the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, which was established to formulate uniform 
standards for the graduation of pharmacy students. The school was instrumental 
in the development of the American Council for Pharmaceutical Education, the 
national accreditation organization for schools of pharmacy. 

In 1970, through the efforts of the school and the Maryland Board of Phar- 
macy, Maryland became the first state to replace the unstructured internship pro- 
gram with a professional experience program incorporated in the school's 
curriculum. This set the national standard for professional pharmacy education. In 
1980, Maryland became the first School of Pharmacy to establish a Center for the 
Study of Pharmacy and Therapeutics for the Elderly, now the national model for 
pharmacy geriatric education. In 1994, Maryland again became a benchmark for 
the nation by implementing its pace setting new Pharm.D. program. 



COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY 



The school strives to achieve a broad racial, sexual and ethnic balance in its enroll- 
ment. To achieve this objective every consideration is given to minority student 
applicants. The current diversity of student population is reflected in 1995 enroll- 
ment statistics: 15 percent African American, 25 percent Asian, 52 percent Cau- 
casian, 3 percent Hispanic, and 3 percent International students. 



COMPLIANCE WITH ADA LEGISLATION 



In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the School of 
Pharmacy examines all aspects of our programs and services to assure accessibility 



The School of Pharmacy 




to qualified students with disabilities. From recruitment to commencement, we 
recognize that we must strive to create an environment that respects student dif- 
ferences while challenging each person to perform to their optimal ability. Modi- 
fications to meet the needs of our diverse student population include offering 
applications, brochures, course materials and examinations in alternate formats; 
and modifying the length of time for completion of degree requirements. Equally 
as important, we review organizational activities that would prohibit participation 
by students with disabilities, and provide services for these students to assure their 
rights and protection under the law. With increased use of computer technolog)', 
we are able to make information more accessible and are better able to serve stu- 
dents with disabilities. 



FACILITIES 



The school moved to Pharmacy Hall, a seven-stor\' tacilit)' on Pine Street, in 1 982. 
Situated at the west entrance to the UMAB campus. Pharmacy Hall houses most 
of the classroom and lecture facilities, research laboratories, conference rooms and 
administrative offices for the School of Pharmacy. Pharmacy Hall also houses a 
Food and Drug Administration GMP(Good Manufacturing Practices) facilit}' 
capable of producing drugs for human consumption. 

The pharmacy practice and science department and the pharmaceutical sci- 
ences department's Pharmacokinedcs-Biopharmaceutics Laboratory are located 
two blocks away in the five-story Allied Health Building which opened in 1992. 
Located at 1 00 Penn Street, it is located diagonally across from the Maryland Phar- 
macists Association offices in the Kelly Building at 650 West Lombard Street. 
School staff and faculty are also located in the Century Building at 506 West 
Fayette Street. 



School of Pharmacy 



COMMUNITY AND PROFESSIONAL 

SERVICE/RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAMS 

In addition to its degree programs, the School of Pharmacy, University of Mary- 
land at Baltimore offers several community service and research support programs. 

The School of Pharmacy Academic Computing Laboratory is located on the 
third floorof Pharmacy Hall. It has 18 computers for professional student and gen- 
eral use. There are two laser printers in the lab. The school has 303 computers — 
271 IBMs and 32 Macintosh — and 215 printers including 60 laser printers and 
one color laser. Most of these computers are hooked up to a Novell Local Area Net- 
work (LAN) to share files, software and to use electronic mail. Additional com- 
puters are located in the Swain Pharmacy Practice Laboratory, equipped with state 
of the art computers and pharmacy software for educational use. 

The Biomedicina! Chemistry NMR Center houses a G.E. 300 MHZ 
nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. The superconducting magnet, the heart 
of the instrument, is permanently immersed in a vacuum-jacket reservoir of liquid 
helium (-260oC) and allows the detection and accurate determination of pro- 
tons, 13C,3 IP and other nuclei of biological importance. The first instrument of 
its kind on the UMAB campus, the NMR has opened up many new areas of 
research within the school, and greatly increasing the number of inter-school col- 
laborative ventures. 

The Center on Drugs and Public Policy is a cooperative program of the 
School of Pharmacy and the Policy Sciences Graduate Program, under the auspices 
of the University of Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore. The goal of the center 
is to contribute to informed debate of policy issues related to drug use and abuse in 
our society. In addition to conducting research on major drug policy issues, the cen- 
ter organizes conferences and workshops and serves as a consultant on drug issues 
to organizations in the private and public sectors. Fellowships or externships are 
available to professionals from industry, state and local agencies, foreign govern- 
ments or universities who want a campus-based experience in drug-related policy 
research as well as an orientation to relevant agencies and organizations based in the 
Washington, D.C., and Baltimore areas. 

The Center for the Study of Pharmacy and Therapeutics for the Elderly 
serves as the focal point of all geriatric education, service and research activities 
within the school. It provides continuing education programs both on the state and 
national levels. Funding from federal and private sources allows the center to 
encourage and support relevant research by faculty and graduate students from all 
school departments. The center is administratively responsible for the Elder- 
Health Program and the Parke-Davis Center for the Education of Elderly. The 
Parke-Davis Center for the Education of Elderly develops educational materials for 
use by the Elder Health and Elder-Ed programs. The Elder-Health Program 
informs pharmacy students and retired pharmacists about the social and psycho- 
logical aspects of drug use among the elderly as well as the therapeutic goals of treat- 
ment for prescribed and over-the-counter medications. The students and retirees 
use the knowledge to give presentations to elderly members of the community. 

T he Computational Chemistry Laboratory is used for the study of bio- 
chemical systems via mathematical models. The goal of these studies is to allow for 

The School of Pharmacy 7 



an understanding of the relationship of the three-dimensional structure and 
dynamics of biological molecules to their physiological function. Such knowledge 
allows for a detailed analysis of the molecular basis of disease which may be used 
for the rational design of therapeutic agents. These approaches greatly increase the 
efficiency of the drug discovery process leading to significant savings of both time 
and money, which may ultimately be passed on to the consumer. 

The Drug Development Facility, established as part of an ongoing multi- 
million dollar collaborative agreement with the Food and Drug Administration, is 
one of the most modern industrial and pharmaceutical technology research and 
manufacturing facilities in the country encompassing both state-of-the-art research 
facilities and a GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) laboratory. Under the FDA 
contract, experimental clinical products are manufactured and tested for bioequiv- 
alence. In addition to FDA research, the Drug Development Facility accepts con- 
tracts from outside to develop and manufacture products for clinical studies. This 
Facilit)' serves as an important resource for research as well as a teaching tool for 
advanced students. 

The Mass Spectrometry Laboratory determines the structure of unknown 
chemicals and provides quantitative measurements of drugs and chemicals from a 
variety of sample sources. The laboratory's focus is on conducting both basic and 
applied research, increasing analytical services on the University of Maryland at 
Baltimore campus and supporting expanded mass spectrometry-related research 
activities in the larger scientific community. 

The Maryland Poison Center serves as the regional poison center for the 
state of Maryland. As an emergency telephone service, it provides toxicity and treat- 
ment information on a 24-hour basis to the general public and to health profes- 
sionals. Staffed by pharmacists and registered nurses, the center handles over 
54,000 poison-related calls each year. It is an American Association of Poison Con- 
trol Center certified regional poison center. University of Maryland at Baltimore 
health professional students work within the center. It serves as an educational site 
for both pharmacy students and medical residents. 

The Mental Health Program of the School of Pharmacy is a joint venture 
with the Developmental Disabilities Administration and Mental Hygiene Admin- 
istration of the state of Maryland. Its primar)' goal is to upgrade all aspects of phar- 
macy practice within the state's mental health facilities. The program also serves as 
a site for pharmacologic and administrative research in mental health, a testing 
ground for the development of innovative strategies in mental health pharmacy 
practice and a training resource for mental health-related issues. Members of the 
school's faculty serve at nine mental health sites around the state. 

The OfFice of Substance Abuse Studies is responsible for the .school's drug 
and alcohol abuse programs, including administration of the Student Committee 
on Drug Abuse F^ducation (SCODAE), the operation of the drug abuse informa- 
tion telephone service and the publication of a quarterly newsletter, PharmAlert. 
SCX)DAE is a volunteer organization of pharmacy students who, with faculty sup- 
port and guidance, are committed to the development of rational attitudes about 
drugs by serving as a source for accurate, unbiased drug information. Students pre- 
sent drug education lectures to a variety of groups, from elementar)' school children 



School of Pharmacy 



to health and education professionals. The office administers the campus' inter- 
professional Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program and is instrumental in 
the operation of the Pharmacists Rehabilitation Committee, which is jointly spon- 
sored by the Maryland Pharmacists Association, the Maryland Society of Hospital 
Pharmacists and the School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Student government activities are coordinated by the school's Student Govern- 
ment Alliance (SGA). Through its officers and committees, the SGA sponsors 
numerous social, service and educational events. All professional students belong 
to the SGA. The executive committee of SGA includes the presidents of all school 
organizations. This committee meets periodically with school administrators to 
discuss important issues. At the campus level, the University Student Government 
Association (USGA) coordinates student government activities. Students are rep- 
resented by senators and officers elected by the UMAB schools. 



LECTURE SERIES 



The School of Pharmacy supplements its regular curriculum with special lectures 
and symposia. 

Francis S. Balassone Memorial Lecture. The Maryland Pharmacists Associ- 
ation, the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association and the school sponsor this lec- 
tureship as a memorial to Francis S. Balassone, a 1940 graduate of the school, a past 
president of the Alumni Association, a distinguished former faculty member, and 
a past president of the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. 

Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture. This lectureship was established in 
1969 by Mrs. DuMez as a memorial to her late husband. Dr. Andrew G. DuMez. 
Dr. DuMez served as dean of the University of Mar}'land School of Pharmacy from 




Dr. Ralph Shangraw 



The School of Pharmacy 




Dr. Peter P. Lamy 

1926 to 1948, and was a distinguished educator and leader in pharmacy in Mary- 
land, the United States and internationally. 

Ellis GroUman Lecture in Pharmaceutical Sciences. In 1983, Mrs. Evelyn 
GroUman Glick funded a lecture program as a memorial to her brother, Ellis GroU- 
man, a pharmacy school graduate in the class of 1926. Each year nationally recog- 
nized researchers in the pharmaceutical or related basic sciences are selected to 
present this lecture. 

The Peter P. Lamy Symposium was inaugurated in 1992 in recognition of 
Dr. Lamy's career as an internationally-recognized authority on geriatrics and 
gerontology. This symposium provides an opportunity to discuss critical issues in 
the care of the nation's elderly. 

Dean's Colloquium. The Dean's Colloquium brings together students, fac- 
ulty, and nationally recognized scientists and clinicians to discuss contemporary 
issues of relevance to pharmacy and health care. These seminars provide unique 
opportunities for interaction and exchange of new information on topics related to 
pharmacy practice and science. 



ENDOWED CHAIRS 



The Emerson Professorship in Pharmacology was endowed in 1927 as a chair in 
Biological Testing and Assay by Captain Isaac Emerson, president of the Emerson 
Drug Company. The first chair was filled by Dr. Marvin Thompson who was a 
pharmacologist at the Food and Drug Administration at the time. Dr. Clifford W. 
Chapman, a pharmacologist from the Canadian National Laboratories was 
appointed to the chair in 1938. Dr. Casimer Ichniowski and Dr. Nairn Khazan 
were the third and fourth appointees to the chair. In 1988, Dr. Gerald M. Rosen 
was appointed Emerson Professor. Because of his appointment, Dr. Rosen was 
named an Eminent Scholar from the Maryland Higher Education Commission. 



School of Pharmacy 



The Parke-Davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy was established in 
1 990 by a $ 1 milHon gift from Warner-Lambert Company on the eve of the 1 25th 
Anniversary of Parke-Davis and the School of Pharmacy's 150th Anniversary. The 
endowment will underwrite the school's continuing commitment to geriatric phar- 
macotherapy as exemplified by the accomplishments of the late Peter P. Lamy, the 
first holder of the chair. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The Alumni Association of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, estab- 
lished in 1926, encourages fellowship among its members, and promotes superior 
scholarship in the University of Maryland students and graduates. Each year the 
association sponsors a spring banquet honoring the graduating seniors and the 50- 
year class. The Alumni Association also awards eight scholarships based on need to 
deserving students. Three of these scholarships are named in memory of honored 
alumni: William J. Lowry, Henry G. Seidman and Alex Weiner. Additionally, the 
Alumni Association sponsors the quarterly Rx Newsletter, and plays a leadership role 
in the fund raising activities of the school. Many members participate in the annual 
phonathon and are generous donors to the David Stewart Associates and the Uni- 
versity System President's Club. 



DAVID STEWART ASSOCIATES 



The School of Pharmacy traces its beginnings to a man with a vision — David Stew- 
art. Civic leader, chemist and pharmacist, Stewart was instrumental in founding 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy in 1841 and, in 1884, the college elected him 
to the first chair in pharmacy in the United States. In his honor the school has 
named its major annual giving club the David Stewart Associates. Alumni, friends 
and faculty who contribute $1 ,000 to the school annually are enrolled. The mem- 
bership within David Stewart Associates now exceeds 75. For more information 
please contact the development office at (410) 706-8475. 



The School of Pharmacy 



University of Maryland at Baltimore 



THE CAMPUS 



The University of Maryland at Baltimore is the founding campus of Maryland's 
public university system and a thriving center for life sciences research and com- 
munity service. Six professional schools and a graduate school educate research sci- 
entists and many of the region's health care, law and social work practitioners. 

With $114 million in sponsored program support, UMAB is one of the 
fastest growing biomedical research centers in the country. The university is ideally 
configured to tackle complex health care, public policy and societal issues. Our 
urban location and unique combination of strengths create opportunities to 
address regional problems in a comprehensive way. The solutions can have global 
implications. AIDS, aging, schizophrenia, hypertension, lead poisoning, cancer, 
child abuse and homelessness all are subjects of multidisciplinar)' research, schol- 
arship and community action. 

New partnerships among university components and with the Universit)' 
of Maryland Medical System and Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center are 
strengthening interdisciplinar)' endeavors in both research and teaching. Our loca- 
tion, within the Baltimore- Washington-Annapolis triangle, maximizes opportuni- 
ties for collaboration with government agencies, health care institutions and lite 
sciences industries. 



HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY 



The Health Sciences Library is distinguished as the first library established by a 
medical school in the United States, and is a recognized leader in state-of-the art 
information technology. The Health Sciences Library is the regional medical 
library for 10 southeastern states, the District of ('olumbia, Puerto Rico and the 
Virgin Islands as part of the biomedical information network of the National 
Library of Medicine. 

Serving all schools on campus and UMMS, the library contains more than 
300,000 volumes, including over 2,900 current journal tides, and is ranked in size 
among the top 25 health sciences libraries in the country. 

The library's online catalog allows users to look for materials by title, author, 
subject, keyword, call number, series, meeting and organization name. In addition 
to giving information on library holdings, the system can determine whether the 
material has been checked out of the library. The online catalog can be accessed 
from any computer terminal on the UMAB campus that is linked to the campus 
network, or from any dial access terminal. 



School of Pharmacy 



The library supports several computerized search services: 

CD-ROM LAN — Available in the Health Sciences Library and through the cam- 
pus network, the LAN contains the following databases: IPA (International Phar- 
maceutical Abstracts), Bioethicsline, HAPI (Health and Psychosocial 
Instruments), PsycLIT (database of psychological literature from the last 17 years), 
CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), SWAB 
(social work abstracts), MicroCat (Maryland Union List of book/journal materi- 
als), Computer Select (information, including full-text of articles, concerning com- 
puters), VICTOR (University of Maryland at Baltimore online catalog) and Books 
in Print. 

HSL Current Contents — recent citations from sections of the print Current Con- 
tents publications (Life Sciences; Clinical Medicine, Physical Sciences, Social and 
Behavioral Sciences and Engineering). 

MaryMed Plus — User-friendly access to the full Medline database. It is available 
for use in the library, through dial-in or over the campus network. Free passwords 
are available for students. 

Mediated Searching Service — Working with users, database searches are con- 
ducted by trained information specialists who have access to over 200 databases. 

Micromedex CCIS — The Current Clinical Information Service provides full-text 
drug and clinical care information. This database is available in the Health Sciences 
Library and through dial-in or network access across the campus. 

Information specialists assist with search service selection and research project 
planning. Seminars offered throughout the year acquaint students, faculty and staff 
with databases, services and information access and management possibilities. 




University of Maryland at Baltimore I 3 




COMPUTER RESOURCES 



Computing support tor faculty, staff and students is provided for microcomputer, 
workstation and mainframe computer users by Academic Computing/Health 
Informatics (ACHI) and by the Computing and Instructional Development Ser- 
vices (CIDS). Both are units of UMAB's Information Services (IS). CIDS is part 
of the Health Sciences Library's (HSL) Information and Instructional Services. 

UMAB students and faculty are able to use IS resources at each step in their 
research, learning and teaching; this may include data collection, results analysis 
and document preparation, including desktop publishing, color printing and 
preparation of overheads or color slides. Free electronic mail accounts enable the 
UMAB community to exchange notes, files and documents with others at the uni- 
versity and internationally via either BITNET or Internet. Access to many campus 
information sources and the Internet is provided through a campus gopher server 
named UMABNET. Microcomputers are located in several Technology Assisted 
Learning (TAL) centers and in user areas in both the IS building (100 North 
Greene Street) and the HSL (111 South Greene Street). Centrally located systems 
in IS and HSL are accessible via the campus ethernet and by dial-up modems from 
either office or home. TAL Onters are available for use by the campus community 
and for application program training. 

CIDS and A('HI support training that ranges from microcomputer literacy 
and microcomputer boot camp to more advanced classes for word processing, 
graphics, desktop publishing, multimedia and statistical application programs. 
Training for access to the Internet, network resources, and e-mail packages is also 
available. For information, call 706-HELP. 



School of Pharmacy 



STUDENT AND EMPLOYEE HEALTH 



Student and Employee Health provides comprehensive care to UMAB students. It 
is located in suite 160 of the University of Maryland Professional Building, 419 
West Redwood Street. The office, staffed by family physicians, nurses and nurse 
practitioners, is open for regular appointments from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Mon- 
day through Friday. Students can also be seen until 7 p.m., Monday through 
Thursday, and Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to noon (for emergencies only), at University 
Family Practice, 29 South Paca Street. 

Patients are seen by appointment only (call 328-6009), although true emer- 
gencies can be seen on a walk-in basis. A doctor can be reached after hours and on 
weekends by calling 328-6790 or 328-5 1 40. 

Gynecological services, including health maintenance (Pap smears, etc.), 
family planning and routine procedures, are provided by appointment with either 
the family physicians or the nurse practitioners. Birth control pills are available at 
a reduced cost for students receiving their GYN care through Student and 
Employee Fiealth. 

All full-time students are required to have health insurance. An excellent 
insurance policy is available through UMAB that provides wide coverage, includ- 
ing obstetrical care. The cost of most of the care provided at Student and Employee 
Health is paid for through the student health fee. 

Hepatitis B is an occupational illness for health care providers. It has serious 
consequences and can even be fatal. Immunization against hepatitis B is required 
for medical, dental, dental hygiene, nursing, medical technology and PharmD stu- 
dents. The series of three immunizations is given through Student and Employee 
Health. 



COUNSELING CENTER 



The Counseling Center provides professional individual and group counseling to 
UMAB students. Some of the problems that students seek help with include: stress, 
relationships, drugs or alcohol, eating disorders, loss of a loved one and stressful 
changes in school or home life. 

Students are always seen by a professional — social worker, psychologist, psy- 
chiatrist or addictions counselor. Costs associated with seeing a therapist usually 
are covered by health insurance; however, no one is ever denied services based on 
ability to pay. Students are seen by appointment (328-8404) and students' class 
schedules can be accommodated in scheduling appointments. All Counseling Cen- 
ter services are completely confidential. The Counseling Center is located in the 
Baltimore Student Union, 621 West Lombard Street, Suite 218. 



University of Maryland at Baltimore 



ATHLETIC CENTER 



The UMAB Athletic Center, on the tenth floor of the Pratt Street Garage, is 
equipped with a squash court; two handball/racquetball courts; two basketball 
courts which are also used for volleyball; and a weight room with two 15-station 
universal gyms, stationary bikes and rowing machines. Men's and women's locker 
rooms each have a sauna and showers. 

Men's basketball, co-ed intramural basketball and volleyball teams compete 
throughout the fall and spring semesters. Squash and racquetball tournaments also 
are held in the facility. 



PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION 



On-campus parking is available to students. If you commute, you will first have to 
get a parking permit (the cost is $1), which allows you to park on the UMAB cam- 
pus, but does not guarantee you a space. Commuters can park at the Lexington 
Garage and Koesters Lot (Lexington and Pine Streets) at the current student rate 
of S3. 50 per day on a first-come, first-served basis. If spaces are unavailable, stu- 
dents will be directed to other lots. 

Students who live in on-campus housing pay for parking by the semester or 
year and are guaranteed 24-hour parking in a garage adjacent to their residence 
facility. For more information about parking on campus, write Parking and Com- 
muter Services, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 
or call 410-706-6603. 

UMAB sponsors the "UMAB Caravan, " a shuttle bus service that transports 
students from designated areas on campus to the main parking facilities and into 
the neighborhoods that are located south, east and west of campus. The service is 
free to students, faculty and staff, but you must show your UMAB ID to ride. Call 
the office of student affairs for times and routes at 706-71 1 7. 

Public transportation makes the campus accessible by bus, subway and light 
rail. Eight MTA bus routes stop in the campus area. The Baltimore Metro runs 
from Charles Center to Owings Mills. Stops closest to campus arc at Lexington 
Market and Charles Center. A new Light Rail line connects northern Baltimore 
County with Oriole Park at C'amden Yards and then south of Baltimore to Glen 
Burnie. The UniversityCenter stop is at Baltimore Street. MARC" commuter train 
service runs from Camden Station, 301 West Camden Street. 



LIVING IN BALTIMORE 



Baltimore's a fun, friendly city with many affordable and convenient housing 
options. The brochure Living In Baltimore describes on- and off-campus options 
for UMAB students; it is available through most UMAB admissions offices or by 
calling the office of student life at 410-706-7766. 



School of Pharmacy 



On-campus living options include furnished university-owned apartments and 
dormitory style accommodations plus unfurnished apartments in a half-dozen pri- 
vately owned loft district buildings on campus. The Baltimore Student Union and 
Pascault Row Apartments are the two university-owned on-campus housing com- 
plexes. 

Many students choose to live in neighborhoods surrounding the UMAB cam- 
pus. A wide range of rooms, apartments and home rentals are available throughout 
the metropolitan area. The office of student life, located in the Baltimore Student 
Union, keeps a listing of available rooms and apartments. 



THE CITY OF BALTIMORE 

In addition to professional opportunities, the city of Baltimore offers a stimulating 
environment in which to live and study. Several blocks from the campus is the 
nationally acclaimed Inner Harbor area, where Harborplace, the National Aquar- 
ium, the Maryland Science Center and other facilities share an attractive waterfront 
with sailboats, hotels, restaurants and renovated townhouses. The new Baltimore 
Metro and Light Rail system connect the downtown area to the outskirts of the city. 
Baltimore boasts lively entertainment, world class museums, fine music and 
professional theater. For sports fans, Baltimore features Orioles baseball (the new 
stadium is two blocks from campus) and league-winning lacrosse. The nearby 
Chesapeake Bay offers unparalleled water sports and the seafood for which the 
region is famous. 



CLOSE PROXIMITY TO WASHINGTON, D.C. 

UMAB is located 50 miles north of the nation's capital — home for many national 
professional organizations, including the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy and the American Pharmaceutical Association. The school's close prox- 
imity to the District of Columbia offers numerous opportunities for students and 
faculty to participate in health care policy and research. Many students complete 
their experiential rotations with these organization and associations. A center for 
world economic, political and cultural developments, Washington also provides a 
wealth of research sources such as the Library of Congress and the National Library 
of Medicine. 

There are countless site seeing opportunities in the city of monuments, 
memorials and museums. Visitors frequent historic landmarks such as the Capitol 
building, the White House and Ford's Theater, or spend hours strolling through 
the Smithsonian Museums or the National Zoo. There is a lot to see and do in 
Washington, and a reliable public transportation system to get you around. 



University of Maryland at Baltimore 



Application and 
Admissions Information 



APPLICATION PROCEDURES 



Application forms will be available in September 1 995 tor the 96-97 academic year. 
To obtain an application and other information write: 
School of Pharmacy 
University of Maryland at Baltimore 
20 North Pine Street 
Baltimore, MD 2 1 20 1 - 11 80 
ATTN- ADMISSIONS 

B.S. Pharmacists interested in receiving applications to the nontradi- 
tional pathway should write: ATTN-NONTRADITIONAL PATHWAY on the 
envelope. 

Applicants may also call: 
(410) 706-7653 or 
(410) 706-0761 for the nontraditional pathway (for B.S. pharmacists only) 

Applicants must submit: (1) a completed application, (2) supporting docu- 
ments and (3) a $40.00 application fee, directly to: 
Office of Records and Registration 
University of Mar)'land at Baltimore 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, MD 21201 



Those seeking advanced degrees (M.S. and Ph.D.) through the school must 
apply to: University ofMaryland Graduate School, Baltimore, 5401 Wilkens 
Ave., Baltimore, MD 21228. For information on the school's master of sci- 
ence (M.S.) or doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) graduate programs please write: 

Graduate Programs - * specific discipline * 

University ofMaryland 

School of Pharmacy 

20 North Pine Street 

Baltimore, MD 21201-1 180 

*Please specify the pharmacy graduate program to which you wish to apply: 
biomedicinal chemistry, pharmacology and toxicology, pharmaceutics or 
pharmacy administration. 



School of Pharmacy 




Ann Bonaparte assists a student with application 



ADMISSIONS PROCESS 



(Applicants for the nontraditional pathway please refer to the admissions section 
following the description of the pathway) 

Application deadlines for admission are: 
February 1 , 1 996 Application 

March 1, 1996 All supporting documents 

To be considered for admission to the program, applicants must take the 
Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) and forward their scores to the school. 
Applications for the PCAT exam are available from the school's student affairs 
office. The PCAT is given in October, February and April, however applicants 
must complete the October and/or February exams to be consideered for fall 
admission. 

An admissions committee comprised of faculty and students reviews PCAT 
results and official transcripts to make admissions decisions. Applicants with strong 
PCAT and academic credentials are invited to interview with faculty and students. 
During the interview, factors such as professional and social awareness, verbal and 
written communication skills, integrity, maturity and motivation are assessed. Fol- 
lowing the interview, the admissions committee makes a decision based on the 
applicant's academic achievement, scores on the PCAT and qualities evaluated dur- 
ing the interview. Academic achievement and/or high scores on the PCAT do not, 
in themselves, ensure acceptance. 

While a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 (A=4.0) is required for 
application consideration, the average entering GPA of the fall 1995 first year 
Pharm.D. students was 3.5. Average PCAT scores of admitted students were above 
the 75th percentile in each of the five areas of the exam. Admission is competitive, 
and applicants with GPAs below 2.9 have an extremely low probability of 
acceptance. 



Applications and Admissions Information 



Applicants must present evidence (via official transcripts) of having com- 
pleted the prepharmacy coursework with grades of at least a "C", or being able to 
complete the prepharmacy coursework before the start of classes in the fall. 



PREREQUISITES 

A minimum of^ 60 semester hours of pharmacy prerequisites is required for admis- 
sion into the Pharm.D. program. At least one semester of this coursework must be 
taken at an accredited institution in the United States. To enroll in prepharmacy 
course work, students must apply directly to an accredited college or university, not 
to the School of Pharmacy. Most institutions have designated prepharmacy pro- 
grams and advisors. The School of Pharmacy does not provide any specific information 
regarding course content and/or requirements for admission into these prepharmacy pro- 
grams. Prerequisites for admission into the Pharm.D. program are: 

Minimum Number of 



Course 


Semesters Required 


English 


2 


Math (Precalculus/Calculus 1) 


Up to Calculus 1 


Zoology or Biology 1 


General Chemistry 


2 


Organic Chemistry 


2 


Physics 


2 


Humanities and Social Sciences 


About 1 8 hours to a 
minimum total of 60 hours 




INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 



Students who are not citizens or permanent residents ot the United States must sub- 
mit the results of the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), certified offi- 
cial copies of transcripts, a statement of financial support, a supplementary 
information sheet and a summary of educational experiences. These must be sub- 
mitted with the application and the $40 application fee to the office of records and 
registration. International students are also required to take the Pharmacy College 
Admissions Test (PCA'l). Therefore it is essential that international students start 
the admissions process early. 

The school does not accept applicants who have attended only a foreign edu- 
cational institution. The school, due to its small size, cannot adequately certify 
international credentials and relies on the evaluation performed by other institu- 
tions. In addition, experience shows that international students benefit from tak- 
ing courses at other U.S. institutions before entering our program. International 



School of Pharmacy 



students should be familiar with the rules and regulations of the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service, which grants admission to the United States. 



INTERNATIONAL PHARMACISTS 



Individuals who have received their pharmacy degrees from non-U. S. institutions 
have two options to become licensed pharmacists in the United States. They can 
complete the Foreign Pharmacists Equivalency Examination, which is given once 
a year by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. Passing this exam and 
completing other requirements allows international pharmacists to complete state 
licensure exams. For further information about this process, contact NABP at (708) 
698-6227. 

International pharmacists are also eligible to apply to the school's Pharm.D. 
program and then upon graduation from that program become eligible to complete 
state licensure exams. Credit may be given for equivalent coursework previously 
completed with a grade of "C" or better. Credit may be awarded after an evalua- 
tion of the course and an assessment of student knowledge by the coursemaster. 
Based on the structure of the curriculum, international pharmacists enter the first 
professional year of the four-year Pharm.D program. Admission is based on an eval- 
uation of applicant credentials by the admissions committee. 
International pharmacists are encouraged to take the PCAT exam to assess back- 
ground knowledge. 



LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS 



Completion of the Pharm.D. degree satisfies the educational requirement for all 
state boards of pharmacy in the United States. Graduates are eligible to take state 
licensing exams in all states. Information for licensure as a pharmacist in Maryland 
is available from the Maryland Board of Pharmacy, 4201 Patterson Avenue, Balti- 
more, MD 21215-2299. 



1^* 


r^s^ 


■4*ll7 


Im^^^^^ 


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Applications and Admissions Information 



Financial Information 



TUITION AND FEES 



The following table lists the fees and expenses for the 1 995-96 academic year. Some 
of the fees(*) do not apply to nontraditional pathway students. Nontraditional 
pathway students are charged per credit hour regardless of number of hours taken. 



Tuition: 


Full-time 


Part-Time 


Full Time (9 or more cr.) Resident 


$5,591 




Nonresident 


11,585 




Part Time - Per Credit Hour Resident 




212 


Nonresident 




382 


Fees: 






Student Government Association 


IS 


8 


Transportation 


20 


10 


Student Activities 


SO 


50 


Supporting Facilities 


199 


68 


Clinical Clerkship(for experiential courses) 


300 


300 


Other Expenses: 






Application Fee (nonrefundable) 


40 


40 


Nonrefundable Deposit 


200 


200 


(upon Acceptance for Admission) 






Late Registration Fee 


40 


40 


Diploma Fee 


40 


40 


Liability Insurance 


17 


17 


Disability Insurance * 


IS 


15 


Hepatitis B vaccine * ( 1 st Year only) 


140 


140 


Continuing Education Certification (Nontrad only) 


100 


100 


Late Payment of Tuition and Fees 


100 


100 



The university reserves the right to make such changes in fees and other changes 
although every effort is made to keep the cost to the student as low as possible. 



HEALTH INSURANCE 

The university believes that it is important for all students to have health insurance. 
Thus, health insurance coverage is required of all full-time students. Students will 
be billed for health insurance unless they provide proof of similar coverage to the 
office of student and employee health. If documentation is provided, the cost of the 
premium is waived. The cost of UMAB health insurance varies depending on the 
type of coverage. For the 1995/96 academic year, the cost per semester for student 



School of Pharmacy 



only coverage is $400; student and spouse, $960; student and child $760; and stu- 
dent and family is $ 1 ,200 per year. 



DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE RESIDENCY 

An initial determination of residency status for admission and tuition is made by 
the University of Maryland at Baltimore office of records and registration when a 
student's application for admission is under consideration. The determination 
made at that time, and any determination made thereafter, shall prevail for each 
semester until the status is changed. Students classified as in-state residents are 
responsible for notifying the University of Maryland at Baltimore office of records 
and registration in writing, within 1 5 days of any change in their circumstances 
which might in any way affect their classification at UMAB. Copies of the univer- 
sity's policy on in-state residency status are available from that office. 



FINANCIAL AID 

Student financial aid programs are centrally administered by the University of 
Maryland at Baltimore office of student financial aid. These programs are designed 
to help students who otherwise would be unable to attend the university. Aid pack- 
ages for full-time students often include a combination of loans, grants, scholar- 
ships and work-study designed to meet the student's need. Most nontraditional 
pathway students do not qualify for financial aid due to their part-time status and 
relatively secure financial situation. To qualify for aid, students must apply annu- 
ally and meet certain eligibility requirements. Students are encouraged to com- 
plete their financial aid application by February 15th. Students must complete 
the required Financial Aid application forms, which are available from: 

Student Financial Aid 

Baltimore Student Union 

Room 334 

621 West Lombard Street 

Baltimore, MD 21201 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY SCHOLARSHIPS 

Through the generous gifts of alumni, friends and professional associations, the 
school provides additional financial aid to its full-time students. Students do not 
apply for these awards. Most awards are given to those students who can document 
unmet financial need through UMAB's Student Financial Aid; others are given to 
students from a certain geographical area. 
The following scholarships have been established: 

Marilyn I. Arkin Scholarship Fund. The family and friends of Marilyn I. 
Arkin, daughter of Ann and Morris Arkin and a member of the class of 1 975, estab- 

Financial Information 23 




Dr. David A. Knapp. Dean. School of Pharmacy 

lished this scholarship as a memorial in 1 988. The scholarship provides support for 
professional students in the School of Pharmacy. 

H.J. (Jack) Custis Jr., Memorial Scholarship Fund. In memory of H.J. 
(Jack) Custis Jr., class of 1 95 1 , a fund has been established for the purpose of award- 
ing scholarships on the basis of reasonable need and academic ability to students in 
the professional program on the Baltimore campus of the School of Pharmacy. Stu- 
dents must be residents of one of the nine Eastern Shore, Maryland coimties to be 
eligible for the Custis Memorial Scholarship. 

Isadora M. and Irene R. Fischer Memorial Scholarship Fund. The families 
of Isadore M. and Irene R. Fischer have provided a scholarship fund to support a 
professional or graduate student demonstrating academic excellence in the educa- 
tional programs of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. While finan- 
cial need can be a consideration, the scholarship award may be made solely on 
academic performance. 

Charles L. Henry Memorial Scholarship. The Charles L. Henry Memorial 
Scholarship Fund has been provided for Pharm.D. students in the School of 
Pharmacy requiring financial assistance. 

J. Gilbert Joseph Scholarship. In memory of her brother, J. Gilbert Joseph, 
a former student of the School of Pharmacy, the late Miss Jeanette Joseph provided 
a generous bequest to endow scholarships to be awarded to qualified students who 
have maintained a superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial 
assistance. 

Frederick William Koenig Memorial Scholarship. In memory of her hus- 
band, Frederick William Koenig, a practicing pharmacist for 50 years, the late Mrs. 
Valeria R. Koenig has bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship to be 
awarded annually. The recipient of the award will be selected on the basis of finan- 
cial need, character and scholarship. 

Dr. Dean E. Leavitt Memorial Scholarship Fund. In honor of Dr. Dean E. 
Leavitt, associate dean for administration and professional services, 1 976-1 989, the 
family and the faculty established a fund to support a scholarship covering the final 

24 School of Pharmacy 



year of pharmacy school for students who have attained at least a cumulative aver- 
age of 3.0, who have shown superior aptitude and enthusiasm in the course 
sequence in management, and who have demonstrated, as Dean Leavitt did, a com- 
mitment to the qualities of health and humanitarianism, both personally and pro- 
fessionally. 

A.M. Lichtenstein Scholarship. In memory of her husband, A.M. 
Lichtenstein, distinguished alumnus of the School of Pharmacy class of 1889, the 
late Mrs. Francina Freese Lichtenstein bequeathed a sum of money to endow an 
annual scholarship to a resident of Allegheny County, Maryland. The recipient of 
the award is to be selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 

Aaron and Rosalie Paulson Scholarship Fund. Mr. Aaron A. Paulson, class 
of 1924, and his late wife, Rosalie, provide the school with an annual gift to sup- 
port a first professional year student with demonstrated financial need. 

Plough Pharmacy Student Scholarships. The Plough Foundation, created 
by Abe Plough, founder of Plough Inc., and the School of Pharmacy contributed 
funds to an endowment which provides financial support to pharmacy students. 
The funds are awarded on the basis of financial need, academic achievement, lead- 
ership and citizenship. 

Arthur Schwartz Memorial Scholarship Fund. The family and friends of 
Arthur Schwartz, BS Pharm 1979, Ph.D. Pharmacy Administration 1987, have 
established an endowed scholarship fund to honor his memory. 



LOAN FUNDS 



Rose Handler Memorial Fund. L. Manuel Hendler and family have estab- 
lished a loan fiind in memory of Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. Loans from 
this fund are available to qualified students of the second and third years and are 
made upon the recommendation of the dean. 

Louis T. Sabatino Memorial Student Loan Fund. In honor and memory of 
her late brother, Louis T. Sabatino, class of 1 939, Mrs. Marie Sabatino DeOms has 
established this lund to provide loans to deserving students. 

Benjamin Schoenfeld Memorial Pharmacy Loan Fund. The family of Mr. 
Benjamin Schoenfeld has established a loan fijnd as a memorial to him. This fund 
is available to qualified needy students. Loans are made upon the recommendation 
of the dean. 



STUDENT VETERANS 



New students (including nontraditional pathway students) who are eligible for 
educational benefits through the Veterans Administration should forward a com- 
pleted VA Form 22-1995 (Request for change of Program or Place of Training) to 
the office of student affairs. Veterans who have not used any of their VA educa- 
tional benefits should forward a completed VA Form 22-1990 (Application for 
Program of Education or Training) and a copy of DD 214 (Separation Papers) 
directly to the office of student affairs of the School of Pharmacy. 

Financial Information 25 



Doctor of Pharmacy 
(Pharm.D.) Program 



DESCRIPTION 



The tour year Pharm.D. program is divided into six levels: Fundamentals, Basic 
Science, Pharmaceutical Science, Integrated Sciences and Therapeutics, Experien- 
tial Learning and a Curriculum-Practice Interface. The following describes the aca- 
demic purpose of each level. 



LEVEL I: FUNDAMENTALS 



Students entering the Doctor of Pharmacy program have diverse educational and 
life experiences. Level I includes courses to address these diversities by introducing 
students to the concept and scope of pharmaceutical care, pharmacy practice in 
general, informing them of the variety of disciplines that will contribute to their 
pharmaceutical education, and providing the skills and scientific principles and 
concepts fundamental to subsequent curricular experiences. 



LEVEL II: BASIC SCIENCE 



During Level II of the curriculum, students build on the fundamentals of Level 1 
through a comprehensive examination of basic biological, chemical, physical, social 
and behavioral sciences. These elements provide the foundation for understanding 
pharmaceutical science and the complexities of drug action and use. 



LEVEL III: PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCE 



I'he provider of pharmaceutical care must possess a detailed and comprehensive 
understanding of the physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial factors 
impacting on the outcomes of drug therapy in specific patients with specific dis- 
eases. Level III addresses pharmaceutical science content areas as they relate to the 
needs of patients in the total health care environment. 



LEVEL IV: INTEGRATED SCIENCES AND THERAPEUTICS 

This forum addresses the extensive interweaving of basic and clinical science as well 
as the interrelated bodies of knowledge associated with the disciplines involved in 

26 School of Pharmacy 







Dr. Praihant Chikhale 

total pharmaceutical care. Students build upon their basic and pharmaceutical sci- 
ence background as they actively participate in a variety of didactic and laboratory 
experiences to design, implement, manage and monitor individualized plans for 
pharmaceutical care. Students learn to appreciate that the successful outcomes of 
drug therapies relate to complex physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial 
interactions v^'ithin human systems, and therefore require individualized attention 
to patients during the design and delivery of pharmaceutical care. This application 
of integrated science to patients with specific diseases is presented within the 
broader context of public health, epidemiology, prescriber education, disease pre- 
vention and health promotion issues. 

Three progressive components are used to present each disease. The first 
component reviews the drugs and biologicals used to treat specific disease processes 
and emphasizes comparative features underlying the choice of agent (Pharmaco- 
dynamics and Pharmacokinetics). Chemical properties, such as solubility and sta- 
bility, that impact on the choice and use of the products, are discussed 
(Biomedicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutics). The availability and comparative 
advantages of drug dosage formulations and delivery systems are considered as they 
relate to the optimum use of drug products during acute or chronic care (Biophar- 
maceutics). 

The second component illustrates how the links between the scientific 
knowledge of the disease, available drug products and the variables underlying a 
particular patient's condition are important to developing the most appropriate 
therapeutic plan. Methods for the choice of drug products, definition of specific 
goals of therapy including the means to assess whether these goals are being 
achieved, and active intervention steps to ensure successful outcomes of drug ther- 
apy are developed (Therapeutics). Methods for monitoring, identifying and 
responding to untoward consequences of drug therapy are identified (Toxicology 
and Adverse Drug Reactions). The choice and design of specific acute and chronic 
drug therapy, the impact of a variety of patient-related variables on dosage regi- 
mens, and the modification of dosage regimens in response to changing patient 



Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 



27 



needs, are developed (Clinical Pharmacokinetics). Students practice and develop 
skills in counseling patients about their therapeutic plans in particular, and pro- 
viding health promotion education in general (Counseling and Education). 

The third component links the knowledge base of the first two components 
with appropriate ongoing methods for drug use review, medical audits and cost 
considerations. The emphasis is on identifying specific interventions to improve 
prescribing patterns and reduce the cost of health care (Drug Use Evaluation). 



LEVEL V: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING 



Experiential learning is a series of structured learning and training activities during 
which students work under the supervision of experienced preceptors (pharmacy 
practitioners who have faculty rank) and academic faculty in a variety of health care 
settings. Students obtain and apply knowledge and skills necessary for successful 
delivery of pharmaceutical care and develop competence, confidence and maturity 
as responsible professionals. An innovative feature of the program is that experien- 
tial learning activities occur throughout the curriculum and are linked to didactic 
courses. A total of 32 credits in experiential courses (approximately 1 ,600 clock 
hours) are required for the degree. All students must complete at least 24 credits 
(1,100 clock hours) of experience devoted to provision of pharmaceutical care 
directly to patients. Successful completion of the experiential learning portion of the 
schools curriculum is accepted by the Maryland Board of Pharmacy as meeting the 
internship requirements to sit for the NABPLEX licensure examination. 
Experiential learning is organized into six phases. 

Phase 1: Introduction to Professional Pharmacy Practice. This early prac- 
tice experience introduces students to the professional responsibilities of pharma- 
cists in a variety of practice environments, including community, hospital and 
specialty settings. Students will also examine the spectrum of career opportunities 
available to todays pharmacist and begin developing basic practice skills. 

Phase 2: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care. During the second and third 
years of the curriculum, students observe and participate in the delivery of phar- 
maceutical care to patients. Students follow, over time, the changing needs of 
patients within the context of the total health care system. Through direct patient 
encounters and discussion sessions, students learn to assess health status, commu- 
nicate effectively, and determine pharmaceutical care needs from a holistic per- 
spective. These activities are linked to material students receive in the didactic 
curriculum and specifically apply patient assessment skills taught as part of the 
Human Biology (Anatomy, Physiology, Pathophysiology) sequence. 

Phase 3: Distributive Services. Activities during this phase enable the stu- 
dent to competently and proficiently perform the technical lunctions of drug dis- 
pensing and distribution in institutional and community pharmacy settings. 
Students learn to receive, interpret, and verify the appropriateness of prescription 
orders. Students learn to efficiently dispense a variety of prefabricated and com- 
pounded medications, recognizing the role of technology and ancillary personnel 
in the drug distribution process. 



School of Pharmacy 



i 



Experiential Learning Map 




Phase 4: Pharmaceutical Care. Students obtain experience in the delivery of 
pharmaceutical care in a variety of practice environments, including community- 
based and acute care hospital pharmacies and ambulatory primary care and inter- 
disciplinary clinics. Through daily encounters with patients and other health care 
providers, students learn to collect patient-specific data, identify and assess drug- 
related problems, develop monitoring plans and measure outcomes of therapy. 
Further, students learn to educate patients and health care professions regarding 
the appropriate use of drugs. 

Phase 5: Informational Services. Activities during this phase (which occurs 
simultaneously with Phase 4) require the student to provide drug information in 
the context of delivering pharmaceutical care. Students learn to receive a question 
in a comprehensive fashion, thoroughly analyze and research questions, and pro- 
vide appropriate answers to other health care providers and to patients and their 
families. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 29 



Phase 6: Elective Experiences. Elective rotations allow students to pursue 
their own areas of interest. Electives in general practice environments enable stu- 
dents to develop greater skill, proficiency and confidence. Electives in specialty 
pharmacotherapeutic practice areas, alternative forms of advanced practice man- 
agement, and research afford opportunities to explore a variety of practice options. 
This phase is linked to a senior colloquium. 

Student performance during all six phases is evaluated by both preceptor and 
academic faculty. Experiential rotations are not permitted at a site where a student 
is working for pay or where any other conflict of interest situation may exist. 



LEVEL VI; CURRICULUM - PRACTIC^ INTERFACE 

The sixth and final level of the curriculum contains a variety of educational expe- 
riences for the students about to enter practice. Required and elective content areas 
provide a curricular-based interface with pharmacy practice that builds on the pre- 
ceding didactic and experiential components of the curriculum. The "capstone" 
nature of this interface reflects the acquisition and appreciation of information that 
1) is on the cutting edge of pharmacy practice, 2) represents closing options for 
individual curricular pathways or 3) contributes to preparing students for a post- 
graduate education. 

It is expected that the learning at the interface will be under continual change 
and development. One goal of this level is to allow each senior student, following 
completion of his or her experiential components, time to consider his or her indi- 
vidual practice in the context of the total health care environment. An important 
part of this interface, therefore, will be the opportunity for students to reflect in- 
teractively upon their educational experiences with fellow students, faculty and 
practitioners. 



CURRICULUM PATHWAYS AND ELECTIVES 

The central curricular theme, primary pharmaceutical care, encompasses the edu- 
cational experiences common to all students in the program. All students must suc- 
cessfully complete the required core curriculum which prepares them for 
competent performance of basic pharmaceutical care in a variety of professional 
and practice settings. To supplement the required core curriculum, more than 21 
percent (28 credits) of the four year curriculum is reserved for didactic and experi- 
ential electives. This elective portion of the curriculum provides students with an 
opportunity for flexible programming of their educational experience. In collabo- 
ration with their academic advisors, students use electives to develop a personal phui 
of study that is consistent with their personal interests and career goals. These plans 
of study are used to enhance their general practice of pharmaceutical care, to focus 
on a particular area of practice or to prepare for post-graduate studies. 

Students may select freely from elective options to design their personal plan 
of study, or may choose one of several model pathways which have been designed 
by faculty to enhance students' preparation for common areas of interest. Ihe 

30 School of Pharmacy 



model pathways generally account for 16 to 18 credits out of the 28 elective cred- 
its required for degree completion. Therefore, selection of a model pathway still 
provides considerable flexibility in selection of additional electives. Four model 
pathways have been developed by faculty: 

Advanced Pharmacy Practice 

Goal: To prepare students to implement pharmaceutical care in a variety of prac- 
tice settings. This pathway provides a series of didactic and experiential courses 
designed to enhance competence in delivery of pharmaceutical care in general prac- 
tice, enhance competence in delivery of health care to special populations (such as 
geriatrics), enhance skills and knowledge in special pharmaceutical products, 
enhance business and managerial skills needed to successfully implement new ser- 
vices, and to give students experience in applying these professional practice, busi- 
ness and managerial skills in a variety of advanced practice settings. 

Pharmacotherapy 

Goal: To enhance the ability of students to independently optimize, implement 
and monitor drug therapy in patients with complex health care problems. This 
pathway offers a series of didactic seminar courses in pharmacotherapy and 
advanced therapeutics coupled with advanced clinical experiences. The clinical 
experiences involve direct drug therapy management of patients in general medical 
and sub-specialty environments. Students completing this pathway are encouraged 
to pursue post-Pharm.D. training in the form of residencies and fellowships and to 
eventually pursue specialty board certification in pharmacotherapy. 

Management 

Goal: To provide students with management skills and knowledge to enhance their 
opportunities to enter management career pathways in corporate pharmacy, to 
develop entrepreneurial capabilities, and prepare them for acceptance into post- 
Pharm.D. management residencies and/or MBA programs. Students take a series 
of didactic and experiential courses in personal management, practice manage- 
ment, organizational behavior, financial reporting and analysis, marketing and 
experiences working with managers in health care settings. 

Research 

Goal: To expose students to research and better prepare them for graduate studies 
or post-graduate fellowships. Students selecting this pathway take courses in 
advanced educational opportunities, advanced seminar courses in selected scien- 
tific areas, research experiences working directly with faculty scientists, and a senior 
colloquium. 

Faculty pathway coordinators, who design and maintain the integrity of the 
pathways, and faculty advisors who have expertise in each pathway area, serve as 
consultants to students for information on career opportunities resulting from par- 
ticular pathways. Students have freedom of choice in selecting a pathway. Students 
not choosing to take all courses in a specific pathway, can select elective courses 
from multiple pathways as part of their personal "plan of study" provided they com- 
plete appropriate prerequisites. 

Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 31 



Summary of Pharm.D. Program 
COURSEWORK 



MINIMUM SEMESTER CREDITS 



Didactic 



80 Required 
20 Elective 



1 00 credits 



Experiential 

24 Required 
8 Elective 



32 credits 



Total 

COURSE WORK BY SEMESTER' 
SEMESTER ONE 



132 credits 



CREDITS 



PHAR 511: Biochemistry 1 


2 


PHAR 5 12: Cell Biology 


2 


PHAR 5 1 3: Drug Chemistry 


2 


PHAR 5 14: Human Biology 1 


3 


PHAR 5 1 5: Personal Management 1 


PHAR 5 1 6: Pharmacy Practice & Education 


3 


PHAR 5 1 7: Study Design and Analysis 


2 


TOTAL 
SEMESTER TWO 


15 


PHAR 521: Biochemistry II 


3 


PHAR 522: Context of Health Care 


3 


PHAR 523: Ethics in Pharmacy Practice 1 


PHAR 524: Human Biology II 


3 


PHAR 525: Immunology 


2 


PHAR 526: Physical Chemistry 


2 


PHPC 527: Intro, to Professional Practice 1 


DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 


2 



TOTAL 



'This outline is one suggested plan of study for electives. Electives can be taken dur- 
ing most fall, winter, spring and summer semesters. 

32 School of Pharmacy 



SEMESTER THREE 



PHAR S3 1 : Pharmaceutical Chemistry 




PHAR 533: Microbiology 1 




PHAR 534: Human Biology III 




PHAR 536: Pharmacology 1 




PHAR 537: Principles of Drug Action 




PHAR 541 : Biopharm and Pharmacokinetics 




PHPC 532: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care 1 1 


DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 


2 


TOTAL 
SEMESTER FOUR 


17 


PHAR 542: Clinical Chemistry 1 


PHAR 543: Microbiology II 




PHAR 544: Medicinal Chemistry 




PHAR 545: Practice Management 




PHAR 546: Pharmacology II 




PHAR 535: Pharmaceutics 




DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 





TOTAL 



17 





Dr. Gary Buterbaugh 



Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 33 



SEMESTER FIVE 



PHAR 550: Medical Information Analysis 1 


PHAR 55 1 : Drug Use Review 1 


PHAR 552: Principles of Human Nutrition 1 


PHAR 554: Integrated Science/Therapeutics 1 


4 


PHAR 555: Integrated Science/Therapeutics II 


4 


DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 


4 


TOTAL 
SEMESTER SIX 


15 


PHAR 564: Integrated Science/Therapeutics III 


4 


PHAR 565: Integrated Science/Therapeutics IV 


4 


PHPC 562: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care II 1 


DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 


6 


TOTAL 
SEMESTER SEVEN 


15 


PHPC 570: Community Distributive Services' 


3 


PHPC 571: Institutional Distributive Services' 


3 


PHPC 572: Pharmaceutical Care P 


3 


PHPC 573: Pharmaceutical Care IP 


3 


PHPC 574: Pharmaceutical Care IIP 


3 


PHPC 575: Pharmaceutical Care IV' 


3 


PHPC 576: Ambulatory Clinic' 1 


PHPC 577: Informational Services' 


2 


TOTAL 
SEMESTER EIGHT 


21 


PHAR 580: Pharmacy Law 


2 


PHAR 581: Senior Colloquium 1 


EXPERIENTIAL ELECTIVES' 


8 


DIDACTIC ELECTIVE COURSES 


4 


TOTAL 
GRAND TOTAL 


15 
1 32 minimum credits 



'Taken concurrently with Pharmaceutical Care Rotations 

' Students complete experiential rotations at various times during year, but register 

for the rotations in the semesters listed. 



School of Pharmacy 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



FIRST YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHAR 5! I— Biochemistry I (2)— Fall Semester (Reynolds) 
PHAR 521 — Biochemistry II (3) — Spring Semester (Reynolds) 
A course of study which builds on the principles oi cell biology and genetics with 
a systematic consideration of the chemical components and requirements of living 
systems from the molecular to the cellular level. These fundamentals of biochemi- 
cal structure, function and energetics provide a platform for comprehension of 
pharmaceutical biotechnology, and for understanding determinants of disease, the 
pathobiochemistry of organ systems, mechanisms of drug action and adverse reac- 
tions and novel drug delivery systems. 

PHAR 5 1 2— Cell Biology (2)— Fall Semester (Digate) 
Introductory appreciation of the cell, the fundamental unit of the body. The inte- 
gration of cell structure and molecular functions is developed with discussions of 
topics such as the history of modern biology; the basic principles of cellular cytoar- 
chitecture and organization; membrane functions; biochemical structure, func- 
tions and energy conversion; cell-to-cell signaling; the flow of genetic information 
from DNA to RNA to proteins; cell division; human and Mendelian genetics; and 
human diversity. 

PHAR 5 1 3— Drug Chemistry (2)— Fall Semester (Gallery) 
A study of the principles of organic chemistry that comprise basic elements of phar- 
maceutical science. The emphasis is on the relationship between molecular struc- 
ture and chemical, physical and biophysical properties of systems that arise from 
molecular interactions. The course provides a platform for comprehension of phar- 
maceutical concerns such as the stability of drugs and drug products, the confor- 
mation of bioactive proteins, the basis for drug-receptor interactions, the structure 
of biological membranes, and major drug classes. 

PHAR 5 14— Human Biology I (3)— Fall Semester (Eccles) 
PHAR 524 — Human Biology 11 (3) — Spring Semester (Buterbaugh) 
PHAR 534— Human Biology III (3)— Fall Semester, 
Second Year (Kerr) 

A consideration of the human body as an integrated, functioning organism with 
emphasis on how organs work individually and in harmony during the regulation 
erf complex body functions necessary to establish and maintain homeostasis, and 
mechanisms underlying disordered organ functions and homeostasis. The 
anatomy, histology and physiology of the human body is organized by organ sys- 
tems to include the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardio- 
vascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 




PHAR 5 1 5 — Personal Management ( I ) — Fall Semester (Kinnard) 
An introduction to the basic elements of social and administrative science under- 
lying the practice of pharmacy. The student is introduced to state and federal laws 
including those related to negligence, standards of practice, and dispensing. Orga- 
nizational theories of management and leadership styles are contrasted. 

PHAR 516 — Pharmacy Practice and Education (3) — 
Fall Semester (Zuckerman) 

This prefatory course introduces the new Doctor of Pharmacy student to the sci- 
ence and profession of pharmacy. The evolution and implications of pharmaceuti- 
cal care and the philosophical basis for the pharmacy curriculum are discussed. 
Students are introduced to skills necessary for success during the four year curricu- 
lum through the opportunity to critically evaluate problems, discuss ethical dilem- 
mas, develop and apply computer and literature retrieval skills, and practice verbal 
and written communication skills. The importance of independent and coopera- 
tive learning activities is emphasized. 

PHAR 5 1 7 — Study Design and Analysis (2) — Fall Semester (Dukes) 
Students are introduced to the pivotal role of study design and statistical analysis 
considerations in the design and evaluation of basic, clinical, epidemiological and 
social science research. The course focuses on the proper design of studies with 
emphasis on threats to internal validity and generalizability. A variety of descrip- 
tive and inferential statistical procedures and methods are surveyed with emphasis 
on the interpretation of the results of research. 

PHAR 522— -Context of Health Care (3)— -Spring Semester (Palumbo) 
Students actively develop a contemporary definition of health care and critically 
examine the health care system with special emphasis on relevant legislation, tradi- 
tional and nontraditional providers of health care, the organization and financing 
of health care delivery, and the dynamics ot pharmaceutical care within the system, 
riie social, legal and professional implications ot inh)rmatics and computer prolif- 
eration in our society is discussed with special emphasis on pharmacy practice. 

36 School of Pharmacy 



PHAR 523 — Ethics In Pharmacy Practice ( I ) — Spring Semester (Love) 
Introduction to the principles of ethical thinking. The philosophy of ethics and role 
of formal codes of professional conduct are discussed in the context of resolving 
conflicting ethical principals. 

PHAR 525 — Immunology (2) — Spring Semester (Hayashi) 
The natural and acquired protective mechanisms of the immune system are dis- 
cussed with topics ranging from the structure, function and specificity of antibod- 
ies; B-lymphocyte and T-lymphocyte functions; initiation and control of immune 
responses; histocompatibility; and immune-mediated disease. The course is 
designed to provide the student with sufficient knowledge of humoral and cellular 
immunity to understand the role of the immune system in disease, the production 
and use of vaccines and related biologicals, and the rapidly growing areas of trans- 
fusion, transplant and tumor immunology. 

PHAR 526 — Physical Chemistry (2) — Spring Semester (Guiles) 
A study of selected principles of physical chemistry that comprise basic elements of 
pharmaceutical science. The emphasis is placed on the relationship between mole- 
cular structure and the physical and biophysical properties of systems that arise 
from molecular interactions. The goal of the course is to apply the principles of 
physical chemistry to the practice of pharmacy. 

PHPC 527-lntroduction to Professional Practice (I) — 
Fall/Spring Semesters (Oed) [Register during Spring Semester- 1st Year] 
Students observe the practice of pharmacy in community, institutional, and spe- 
cialty practice environments. Student analyze the types of services provided in each 
setting and the personnel involved in the delivery of those services. Students learn 
the basic elements of pharmaceutical care, including obtaining patient histories and 
prescription dispensing. An important goal of this course is for students to identify 
and assess career options in pharmacy practice. These activities are closely linked to 
PHAR 516: Pharmacy Practice and Education and to a career pathway workshop. 



SECOND YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHPC 532 — Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care I (I) — Fall/Spring 
Semesters (Rodriguez deBittner) [Register during Spring Semester-2nd Year] 
Students observe the delivery of pharmaceutical care to patients over time. Partic- 
ular attention is paid to assessing the changing needs of patients as health transi- 
tions occur. Under the supervision of an experienced pharmacy practitioner, 
students have regularly scheduled encounters with patients. Students learn how to 
effectively collect information from a variety of sources, including the patient, and 
prepare periodic health status reports. As students obtain knowledge and skills in 
didactic courses (pharmaceutics, pharmacology, human biology), they learn to 
explicidy apply such knowledge and skills to their patients. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 



PHAR 533 — Microbiology I (2) — Fail Semester (Blomster) 
PHAR 543 — Microbiology II (2) — Spring Semester (Blomster) 
A systematic study of microbial morphology, biochemistry and physiolog)'. Major 
classes of pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites are surveyed with 
emphasis on mechanisms of pathogenicity', virulence and resistance. Microbial 
genetics is discussed, including the role of this area in the development of modern 
molecular biology and biotechnology. The course prepares the student for study 
of the etiology and consequences of infectious disease, and the use of antibiotics 
and other biologicals for their treatment. 

PHAR 53 1 — Pharmaceutical Chemistry (2) — Fall Semester 

(MacKerell) 

A presentation of the basic chemical principles underlying the activity, absorption, 
metabolism, excretion, physico-chemical properties and design of drug molecules, 
culminating in a discussion of drug classes. 

PHAR 535 — Pharmaceutics (3) — Spring Semester (Augsburger) 
The application of fundamental principles and basic science knowledge to the mul- 
tidimensional problems of the formulation, development, testing, production, dis- 
tribution and administration of safe, effective, stable and reliable drug delivery 
systems. These systems, ranging in sophistication from tablets and capsules to 
biodegradable implants, are discussed using a problem-based approach that 
focuses on the critical determinants for traditional and less-traditional routes of 
drug administration. 

PHAR 536— Pharmacology I (2)— Fall Semester (Weiner) 

PHAR 546 — Pharmacology 11 (3) — Spring Semester (Weiner) 

A systematic consideration of the molecular, cellular and organismic mechanisms 

of drug action, organized by major drug classes. This course of study provides 

knowledge of the mechanisms of drug action underlying their use in the treatment 

of specific and general disease processes. 

PHAR 537 — Principles of Drug Action (2) — Fall Semester 

(Moreton/Hickey) 

A study of the chemical and biological concepts which apply to the characteriza- 
tion, evaluation and comparison of all drugs. Topics such as dose-response and 
receptor theory, receptor transduction mechanisms, pharmacologic selectivity, 
pharmacogeneric drug tolerance and dependence, drug allergy, drug resistance and 
chemical mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and teratogenesis are discussed at the mole- 
cular and cellular level. The physical, biological and chemical principles underly- 
ing drug absorption, distribution, biotransformation and excretion are discussed 
from the molecular to the organ level. 

PHAR 541 — Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics (3) — 
Fall Semester (Eddington) 

In this course, the student learns how the processes of drug absorption, distribu- 
tion, metabolism and excretion are coupled with dosage and the important para- 

38 School of Pharmacy 



meters of clearance, volume of distribution and bioavailability, to determine the 
concentration of a drug at its sites of action in the body. The quantitative relation- 
ship between dose and effect is developed as a framework with which to interpret 
measurements of drug concentrations in biological fluids. 

PHAR 542 — Clinical Chemistry (I) — Spring Semester 

(Undie/Michocki) 

Principles of analytical chemistry, clinical chemistry, enzyme assays, electrophore- 
sis, radioactivity, magnetic resonance, biotechnology-based diagnostics and 
biosensors, and immunoassay are examined. Emphasis is on the application of these 
methods to the determination of drug concentrations in chemical and biological 
systems, and health promotion and assessment. Students also have opportunities 
to examine patient data and use commercially available diagnostic kits. 

PHAR 544 — Medicinal Chemistry (3) — Fall/Spring Semesters 

(Wright) [Register during spring semester] 

A comprehensive study of the chemistry of drug products. The course outline will 
follow the pharmacological classification of drug molecules, and will include dis- 
cussion of chemical properties (physical and organic), stability, solubility, mecha- 
nisms of action where appropriate, and structure-activity relationships. Where 
possible, quantitative computer designed studies of drug development will be 
mentioned. 

PHAR 545 — Practice Management (3) — Spring Semester (Abramson) 
Management principles are provided to construct a practical framework for the 
operational management of a business of pharmacy. Elements addressed in this 
course include: controllable and uncontrollable variables in a free market economy, 
work flow analysis, accounting, budget development, purchasing, inventory con- 
trol, quality assurance and third party reimbursement issues. The course also exam- 
ines the current practical developments related to human resources management 
through integrating information on organization behavior, psychology, economics 
and law. 



THIRD YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHAR 550 — Medical Information Analysis (I) — Fall Semester (Mays) 

A course designed to familiarize students with the process of information collec- 
tion, retrieval, analysis and interpretation. A variety of topics surrounding drug 
information are covered including the drug approval process, role of drug infor- 
mation in the health care system, the biomedical publishing process, adverse drug 
reaction management, quality assurance and formulary management. The course 
also further develops and refines verbal and written communication skills through 
a variety of exercises. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 




Dr. Magaly Rodriguez deBittner 

PHAR 55 I — Drug Use Review (I) — Fall Semester (Rodriguez deBittner) 
An examination of the review of physician prescribing, pharmacist dispensing and 
patient use of drugs. A framework for this course is centered around the five steps 
of drug use review which include: determining optimal drug use through the 
process of criteria development; measuring or observing how drugs are actually 
used; comparing actual with optimal use and noting any differences; developing 
and implementing methods for effecting any change that is needed; and monitor- 
ing the results of the program. 

PHAR 552 — Principles of Human Nutrition ( I ) — Fall Semester, (Rosen) 
This required course builds on materials in earlier coursework including Funda- 
mentals, Basic Science and Pharmaceutical Science. The course focuses on the 
preparation of pharmacists to deliver pharmaceutical care services related to 
patients' nutritional needs. The course prepares the student to understand princi- 
ples of nutrition in relation to contemporary public health issues and to treatment 
of diseases and physiologic processes. The materials taught in this course are applied 
and further developed in subsequent modules in the Integrated Science and Ther- 
apeutics course sequence and in Longitudinal Care II. 

PHAR 554, 555 — Integrated Science and Therapeutics (4,4) — 

Fall Semester (D.ilby/Plaisancc) 

PHAR 564, 565 — Integrated Science and Therapeutics (4,4) — 

Spring Semester (Love/Buterbaugh) 

Basic and clinical science faculty interact with students during a variety of didactic 

and laboratory experiences as students learn to design, implement and monitor 

pharmaceutical care plans for specific patients with specific diseases. Methods for 

the choice of drug product, definition of the specific goals of therapy, including the 

means to assess whether these goals are being achieved, and active intervention steps 

at the patient, prescriber, health care system and population levels to ensure suc- 



School of Pharmacy 



cessful outcomes of drug therapy are developed. The courses are organized accord- 
ing to the major physiological systems of the human body, and the disease states 
commonly associated with them and encountered and observed by the pharmacy 
practitioner in a variety of community and institutional practice settings. A goal of 
these courses is to prepare our graduates to be better able to integrate new scientific 
knowledge into the successful pharmaceutical care of patients and the reduction of 
the cost of health care to patients and society. The knowledge and behaviors 
acquired during these courses prepare the student for the community and institu- 
tional pharmaceutical care rotations of the experiential learning program of the cur- 
riculum. 

PHPC 562 — Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care II (I) — Fall/Spring 
Semesters (Rodriguez deBittner) [Register during Spring Semester-Third Year] 
This course is a continuation of PHAR 532: Longitudinal Care I. Students have 
periodic encounters with previously assigned patients. Students learn to assess drug 
therapy problems and develop pharmaceutical care plans. Particular attention is 
given to the needs of patients during health transitions. These experiential activi- 
ties are closely linked throughout the third year to the didactic activities in the Inte- 
grated Science and Therapeutics series of courses. 



FOURTH YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHPC 570 — Community Distributive Services (3) 
PHPC 571 — Institutional Distributive Services (3). 

(Register during Fall Semester- Fourth Year) 

These required professional practice experiences may be taken anytime after the 
successful completion of the second year. These rotations may be completed dur- 
ing the summer following the second year, during the winter session of the third 




Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 4 1 



year, or during the summer following the third year. Each rotation is a four-week, 
full-time structured program of intensive skills development related to the distrib- 
utive aspects of communit)' and institutional pharmacy. Students will learn to com- 
petently and efficiently perform the technical functions of drug dispensing. 
Students learn to effectively use technology as a tool in drug distribution. The roles 
of support personnel and methods of supervision are explored. Mechanisms for 
assuring the quality and accuracy of the drug distribution process are emphasized. 

PHPC 572— Pharmaceutical Care I (3) 
PHPC 573— Pharmaceutical Care II (3) 
PHPC 574— Pharmaceutical Care III (3) 
PHPC 575— Pharmaceutical Care IV (3) 

(Register during Fall Semester-Fourth Year) 

Prerequisites: PHPC 570-Community Distributive Services, PHPC 571 -Institu- 
tional Distributive Services, and successful completion of the Integrated Science 
and Therapeutics course series. This series of required professional practice experi- 
ences is designed for the student to obtain extensive experience in the delivery of 
pharmaceutical care in a variety of direct patient care settings. Students gain skill 
through daily one-on-one interactions with patients, care givers, physicians, nurses 
and other health care professionals. Each four week rotation is completed on a full- 
time basis. Of these four rotations, at least one must be completed in an acute care 
hospital setting and one in a community setting. Although each site will differ in 
terms of the patient population, disease acuity, scope of practice, resources and 
availability of patient-specific data, students will take responsibility for drug ther- 
apy outcomes. Students will learn to: 1) collect and record patient specific data, 
2) identify, list and assess drug-related problems, 3) develop and record pharma- 
ceutical care plans, 4) educate patients and health care professionals regarding the 
appropriate use of drugs, and 5) measure and document patient outcomes. These 
activities are closely linked to PHPC 576-Ambulatory Clinic and concurrent with 
PHPC 577-Informational Ser\'ices. 

PHPC 576 — Ambulatory Clinic (I) (Register during Fall Semester-Fourth 

Year) 

Prerequisites: PHPC 570-Community Distributive Services, PHPC 571 -Institu- 
tional Distributive Services, and successful completion of the Integrated Science 
and Therapeutics course series. This series of required experiences are normally 
taken concurrently with the Pharmaceutical Care rotations (PHPC 572, 573, 574, 
and 575). A total of 16 half-day experiences are required for a total of 64 clock 
hours. Following the pharmaceutical care model, students will conduct patient 
interviews, perform appropriate pharmacotherapy-oricnted physical assessments, 
order appropriate laboratory tests, initiate and/or change drug therapy regimens 
and conduct patient follow-up. 

PHPC 577 — Informational Services (2) (Register during Fall Semester- 
Fourth Year) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PHAR 550-Medical Information Analysis. 
This course must be taken concurrently with the Pharmaceutical ('are rotations 

42 School of Pharmacy 




Dr. Gary HoUenbeck assists David London 

(PHPC 572, 573, 574, and 575). During the course of daily activities on Pharma- 
ceutical Care and Ambulatory Clinic rotations, students learn how to receive drug 
information questions in a comprehensive manner, conduct timely and thorough 
literature searches, evaluate sources of information and provide appropriate 
responses. Students are also expected to subscribe to an affordable abstracting ser- 
vice and develop a personal information library. 

PHAR 580 — Pharmacy Law (2) — Spring Semester (Palumbo) 
An examination of the legal and regulatory issues pertaining to drugs and devices 
and the practice of pharmacy. Students learn the various laws and regulations which 
would govern their usual daily activities in a variety of practice sites. 

PHAR 581 — Senior Colloquium (I) — Spring Semester (Digate) 
Students deliver oral presentations to share some aspect of their educational expe- 
rience, practice aspirations or career goals with their student peers and the faculty. 
This forum facilitates discussions fostering a critical examination of each student's 
formal education in the context of the practice of pharmaceutical care. 



ELECTIVE COURSES 



The elective didactic (PHMY) and experiential (PHEX) courses currently offered 
by the School of Pharmacy are described below. In general, higher course numbers 
indicate courses with important prerequisite requirements, and are designed for 
later years of the curriculum. Prerequisites for most electives include consent of the 
instructor and the student's advisor. Some electives are offered in either the fall or 
spring semesters and some are offered both semesters. Refer to the class schedule 
when making course selections. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 



PHMY 510 — Advanced Educational Opportunities (I) (Gallery) 
This elective program provides students who may be interested in graduate school 
or research careers with knowledge and information about various advanced edu- 
cational opportunities in the curriculum. Aspects of careers which require advanced 
study are described by individuals in those career areas, and by students currently 
enrolled in them. Students enrolled in this course receive diverse perspectives relat- 
ing to goals, training, functions, settings and opportunities in research in the phar- 
maceutical sciences and pharmacy practice areas. 

PHMY 5 1 8— Drug Abuse Education ( I -3) (Tommasello) 
Practice and training in the dissemination of drug information, especially drug 
abuse information to the public, are linked to the activities of the Student Com- 
mittee on Drug Abuse Education (SCODAE). Students complete a 10-hour train- 
ing session, observe community education programs presented by SCODAE, 
present several programs and prepare a written report on a timely topic in the area 
of chemical dependence. 

PHMY 521— History of Pharmacy (I) 

A course which explores the historical development of pharmacy practice and 
medicines. 

PHMY 522— Business Plan Development (2) (Oed) 

An elective course lor students interested in ownership or management ol their own 
pharmacy practice emphasizing the practical problems associated with establishing 
a new business or expanding an existing enterprise. Location and market analysis, 
target marketing, revenue and expense projections and estimation of capital 
requirements are among the topics covered. 

PHMY 523— Advanced First Aid (3) (Melton) 
Advanced first aid and emergency care including CPR. 

PHMY 524 — Computers and their Applications to Pharmacy (2) 

An advanced course in using computer software. Students complete a series ot com- 
puter-based projects that illustrate how software can enhance various aspects of 
pharmacy practice. 

PHMY 528 — Selected Topics in Geriatrics and Gerontology (1-3) 

(Feinbcrg) 

This course provides an educational experience through investigating areas of geri- 
atrics and gerontology with the school's Center for the Study of Pharmacy and 
Therapeutics for the Elderly. Includes elder-visitation, during which students select 
an elderly person living in the community and track their pharmaceutical care 
needs. Guided discussions in school address problems/solutions to elder health care. 

PHMY 529 — Special Group Studies (var. I -5). Repeatable up to 1 2 credits. 
An oninilnis course [icriniitiiig experimentation with ncworditterent subject mat- 
ter and/or instructional approaches. 

44 School of Pharmacy 



PHMY 537 — Clinical Aspects of Drug Dependence (2) (Tommasello) 
This course familiarizes students with the cHnical aspects of chemical dependence. 
Special emphasis is placed on the pharmacology of commonly abused psychoactive 
substances and the role of pharmacological supports in the treatment of addiction. 

PHMY 539 — Special Projects (var. 1-3). Repeatable up to 12 credits. 
Independent investigations consisting of library or laboratory research, seminars or 
other assignments appropriate to the problem investigated. 

PHMY 54 1 — Introduction to the Poison Center ( I ) (Anderson) 
The Maryland Poison Center, a division of the School of Pharmacy, provides emer- 
gency poison information 24 hours a day to the general public and health profes- 
sionals. Pharmacists play an extremely important role in the Poison Center's 
operation. The center serves an educational function for students at UMAB. This 
course provides students the opportunity to observe and be involved in a clinically 
oriented pharmacy practice setting early in their education. Students learn about 
the Poison Center's operation and resources and the potential for pharmacist par- 
ticipation in this area of patient care. The course consists of discussion sessions, 
activities in the Maryland Poison Center, role playing, and laboratories on toxicol- 
ogy resources and communication skills. Students present a home management 
and a hospital management drug overdose case. 

PHMY 542 — Cosmetics Preparations (2) (Augsburger) 
This course is designed to stimulate student thought in the field of cosmetic science 
and technology. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to discern 
among the various health benefit claims made by cosmetic preparations, and help 
consumers select appropriate products. Historical perspectives, as well as modern 
concepts of cosmetic formulation, composition, manufacture, promotion, and uti- 
lization are presented. During laboratory sessions, ingredient functionality and 
manufacturing processes are discussed, and students prepare representative cos- 
metic formulations. 

PHMY 543 — Honors Seminar in Pharmacy Administration ( I ) 

(S. Speedie) 

A survey of current literature in the general area of pharmacy practice and admin- 
istrative science. Each week, a recently published paper related to the economic, 
social, behavioral or education aspects of pharmacy is discussed and evaluated. Spe- 
cial student research projects may also be undertaken. 

PHMY 550— Adverse Drug Reactions (2) (Michocki) 
Focus is on the clinical manifestations and incidence of drug reactions, systems 
affected, differentiation among idiosyncratic reactions, hypersensitivity reactions, 
extensions of pharmacologic action and assessment of drug reaction literature. 

PHMY 551 — Recent Advances in Pharmacology ( I ) (Kim) 

The objective of this course is to present advances in pharmacology and toxicology. 

Sessions emphasize experimental and clinical findings, their interpretation and sig- 

Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 45 



nificance in relation to basic and applied aspects of pharmacology and toxicology. 
Attention is also given to experimental design and methodology of the studies in 
question. 

PHMY 552— Pharmacology and Aging (i) (Werner) 

This course presents advances in our understanding of variations in drug response 
in the aging population. The course is designed to give students an appreciation for 
the basic physiological and biomedical changes which normally occur with aging, 
and how these changes relate to altered pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic 
responses following drug administration. Basic and clinical pharmacologic studies 
are used to support the conclusions presented. 

PHMY 553 — Consumer Education Program for Older Adults (2) (Nagle) 
The urgent need for pharmacists to become more involved with the health care of 
the elderly is well documented. This course trains students to educate the elderly 
about drugs and drug taking. Students benefit from the didactic and applied aspects 
of the course, since they must first learn about the special needs of the elderly and 
then actually interact with the elderly both in large groups and on a one-on-one 
basis. 

PHMY 554— Health Education Seminar (2) (Fedder) 
Health education is the scientific process designed to promote the health of indi- 
viduals and groups using educational strategies to achieve voluntary behavioral 
change. The objective of the course is to prepare students to become effective health 
educators to patients, other health practitioners and/or the community. The theo- 
retical and conceptual frameworks upon which the discipline is based are fully 
developed. Students learn the techniques of behavioral and educational diagnosis 
and their application in the development of educational intervention. 

PHMY 555— Novel Drug Delivery (2) (Hollenbeck) 

A study of specialized formulations, dosage forms and drug delivery systems. The 
goal of the course is to enable students to make decisions about the appropriate use 
of novel drug delivery systems from an integrated science and practice perspective, 
basing the decisions on the physical, chemical, therapeutic and economic attributes 
of these systems. 

PHMY 556, 557— Advanced Pharmacology (2,2) (Moreton/Kim) 
This course expands and extends the pharmacology material learned in the required 
courses PHAR 536 and 546. Discussion of the assigned topics and review of orig- 
inal papers represent a two-hour weekly session. These sessions include graduate 
students in Pharmaceutical Sciences/Pharmacology and Foxicology. 

PHMY 560— The Pharmacist in the Critical Care Setting (I) (Hassan) 

Identifies and discusses the role of the pharmacist in various critical care settings. 
The student will be able to see how critical care pharmacy has evolved to comple- 
ment the medical and nursing management of the critically ill patient. 



School of Pharmacy 




PHMY 561 — Advanced Therapeutics Seminar (3) (Roffman) 
An advanced course dealing with complex drug therapy decision-making utilizing 
case presentations and current literature. Requires active student participation in 
resolution of therapeutic controversies. 

PHMY 562— Clinical Pharmacokinetics (2) (Reiss) 

Provides the student with the didactic training and skills necessary to conduct clin- 
ical pharmacokinetic consultation. 

PHMY 563 — Pharmacotherapeutic Issues in 
the Critically III Patient (2) 

This course is designed as an elective seminar for students interested in the area of 
critical care pharmacotherapy. Topics include a wide scope of disease states and 
drug issues frequently encountered in an ICU setting. The presentation of these 
topics will identify the pharmacologic aims and controversies in the management 
of a particular topic, while simultaneously underscoring the complexities of drug 
therapy in the critically ill patient, which may lead to untoward reactions or sub- 
optimal care. 

PHMY 564, 565— Institutional Pharmacy I and 11 (2, 2) 

Fundamentals of institutional pharmacy practice and administration with empha- 
sis on hospital and nursing homes. Includes physical facilities, standards, purchas- 
ing, formulary implementation, record keeping, drug distribution and control 
systems. 

PHMY 566— Orthotics Seminar (I) (Fedder) 

This course introduces students to the management of patients with orthopedic 
problems and prepares them with entry level skills to counsel and fit orthopedic 
appliances (orthoses). Fitting and educational techniques are demonstrated and 
students are trained in fitting a range of both rigid and flexible orthoses. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 



PHMY 567— Advanced Cardiac Life Support (2) (Roffman) 
This course focuses on the role of the pharmacist in the setting of cardiac arrest. A 
lecture format covers the pathophysiology, epidemiology, therapeutic goals and 
treatment modalities in cardiac arrest as described by the Standards and Guidelines 
developed by the National Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and 
Emergency Cardiac Care. Topics include the role of the pharmacist on the cardiac 
arrest team, an in-depth discussion of the role of pharmacologic intervention, tech- 
niques of basic and advanced cardiac life support and post-resuscitative care. 

PHMY 570 — Current Topics in Infectious Disease (I) (M. Speedie/ 
Plaisance) 

This course is intended to provide a forum for discussion of current and contro- 
versial aspects of infectious disease therapy. Each student selects a new or contro- 
versial area of infectious disease therapeutics and prepares a one-hour 
lecture/discussion of that topic. Each student is expected to read selected back- 
ground material and contribute to the discussion of the topic. Audiovisual aids 
and/or handouts are encouraged. 

PHMY 571— Parenteral Therapy (2) 

A comprehensive review of all aspects of parenteral therapy including planning, 
organizing and implementing an IV admixture program, preparation of sterile 
products, basic concepts of fluid balance and dosage state, blood products, par- 
enteral nutrition, and chemotherapy and biotechnology products. 

PHMY 580— Drugs and Public Policy (2) (Palumbo) 

An examination of public policy issues related to drug use in our society. Cases, 
small group discussions and outside experts will be used to analyze contemporary 
issues effecting pharmacy and health care. 

PHEX 550— Parenteral Nutrition (3) 

A clinical experience designed to provide students with knowledge and experience 
in the design and monitoring of parenteral nutrition therapy. 

PHEX 55 1 — Drug Information Clerkship (2) 

A clerkship designed to familiarize students with resources, develop their ability to 
search primary, secondary and tertiary sources, retrieve, analyze and interpret the 
medical literature, and to refine written and verbal communication skills. 

PHEX 552 — Poison Information (3) 

A clerkship in the Maryland Poison Center providing students experience in pro- 
viding poison information and consultation in clinical toxicology. 

PHEX 560— Inpatient Medicine (3) 

An experiential rotation designed to provide students with extensive experience in 
dealing with the drug therapy problems of hospitalized patients in general medical 
areas. 



School of Pharmacy 



PHEX 56 1 —Ambulatory Care ( I -3) 

This experiential rotation supplements PHPC 576: Ambulatory Clinic of the 
required curriculum. Students gain additional experience working in an interdisci- 
plinary ambulatory health care delivery system with practicing clinical pharmacists 
and participating in the evaluation, implementation and monitoring of ambulatory 
clinic drug therapy. 

PHEX 562 — Clinical Pharmacokinetics Clerkship (3) 

An experiential rotation providing education and training on adaptive control of 
drug therapy by integration of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, pathophys- 
iology and patient data. 

PHEX 563—586 (2 credits each) 

Elective experiences in pharmacy subspecialty areas approved and designed by a site 
preceptor and the student's advisor. 

PHEX 563— Administration 

PHEX 564— Cardiology 

PHEX 565 — Critical Care/Shock Trauma 

PHEX 566— Critical Care/MICU 

PHEX 567 — Diabetes Care Management 

PHEX 570 — Food and Drug Administration 

PHEX 57! — Gastrointestinal Surgery 

PHEX 572 — Geriatric Pharmacy Services 

PHEX 573— Home Health Care 

PHEX 574— Infectious Disease 

PHEX 575— Infectious Disease/HIV 

PHEX 576— Oncology 

PHEX 577 — Oncology/Infectious Disease 

PHEX 580— Oncology/TPN 

PHEX 581— Oncology/Research 

Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 49 




Dr. Madeline Feinberg counsels a patient about her medications 

PHEX 582— Pediatrics 

PHEX 583 — Radiopharmacy 

PHEX 584 — Chemical Dependence Treatment 

PHEX 585 — Chemical Dependence Research 

PHEX 586— Veterinary Medicine 

PHEX 589— Special Studies (2-3). Repeatable up to 12. 
Omnibus course permitting development with new experiential electives or addi 
tional subspecialty practice area elective rotations. 



School of Pharmacy 



Nontraditional Pathway 



DESCRIPTION 



The nontraditional Pharm.D. pathway is a mechanism for Hcensed B.S. pharma- 
cists to earn the Doctor of Pharmacy degree. All graduates will be required to meet 
the terminal performance outcomes of the school's Pharm.D. program. Satisfying 
these terminal objectives takes at least 30 credits of coursework. Since each non- 
traditional student brings to the program a different level of practical experience, 
knowledge and skill developed throughout a practice career, a system of Prior 
Learning Assessment (PLA) has been developed to individualize a program of study 
and award credit(s) (0-10) when appropriate. 

A faculty mentor will work with each student to design a program based on 
input from prior learning assessment. It should be noted that the awarding of credit 
through assessment of prior learning does not exempt a participant from responsi- 
bility for any of the process or knowledge-based outcomes of the program. Experi- 
ential learning will be centered in the pharmacist's own practice site, under the 
supervision of a faculty mentor, and utilizing the pharmacist's own patients. Some 
clerkship experience is required at other sites. The mentor will also work closely 
with each pharmacist to identify an appropriate mix of patients and to develop an 
appropriate experience component that will meet individual and pathway needs. 

Credits in the nontraditional Pharm.D. pathway may be earned by taking 
courses from a menu approved by the faculty, through supervised experiential 
learning, by approved self-study with appropriate assessment and/or through PLA. 
The foundation of the nontraditional Pharm.D. pathway is established in the core 
courses: i.e., the philosophy of the program is developed; the concepts, procedures 
and skills of pharmaceutical care delivery are defined and demonstrated; and a per- 
sonal documentation of prior learning is developed. 

Required courses in the pathway include an in-depth treatment of thera- 
peutics for prevalent diseases specific to the practice site, so that the pharmacists are 
prepared to provide pharmaceutical care services. Candidates will demonstrate the 
ability to manage a practice fiscally and behaviorally; to measure value of service(s) 
and establish fees and reimbursement policies; and to market and promote phar- 
maceutical care services. 

Courses are offered at the University of Maryland at Baltimore campus in 
downtown Baltimore, and selected courses may be offered through distance 
education facilities throughout the state. Classes are planned for the fall, spring 
and summer semesters; however, first year students will always begin in the fall 
semester. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program 



ADMISSIONS PROCESS 



Application Deadline: April 1st 

In order to be considered for admission to the nontraditional pathway, B.S. phar- 
macists (including pharmacists who graduated from international institutions) 
must: 

• Be licensed in Maryland, the District of Columbia, or an adjacent state. 

• Practice in Maryland, the District of Columbia or areas of surrounding 
states so that they have access to the pathway's mentoring system. 

• Provide confirmation that they have access to patients for the purpose 
of meeting pathway requirements. 

Once pharmacists have demonstrated that they meet these three criteria, they 
will be considered for admission. A description oi required documentation and 
other elements of the admissions process will be provided in the application packet. 
Because of the highly interactive nature of the pathway, the school cannot accom- 
modate more than 60 new students each year. 



PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 



In addition to course work, the credit requirements of the nontraditional Pharm.D. 
pathway may be partially met through the following options: 



TRANSFER 



Nontraditional students may transfer up to six (6) credit hours ol previous course 
work toward meeting the pathway requirements. This coursework must have been 
completed after the pharmacists have received their B.S. degrees and must be 
earned at an accredited university. The course work must also relate directly to cur- 
ricular components of the nontraditional Pharm.D. pathway. Identification of 
potential transfer courses is done at the time of admission, or later if appropriate, 
through consultation between the student and the pathway coordinator. (Note: It 
is not possible to obtain additional PLA credit for transfer courses.) 

PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT (PLA) 

The PLA process provides a mechanism through which credit may be earned. To 
be eligible for PLA credit, students must complete the course Prior Learning Assess- 
ment in Pharmacy Practice, have their portfolio evaluated by the PLA panel, and 
have a credit recommendation from the panel approved by the faculty. The PLA 
panel is comprised of school faculty and pharmacy practitioners. A maximum ol 
10 credits may be earned through this process. Credits are partitioned into four 
areas: Practice Management Planning (0-1); Community/Institutional Pharma- 
ceutical Care (0-1); Pharmacotherapeutics (0-4); and Practice Management (0-4). 
These four areas correspond directly to curriculum components. The panel has 
developed assessment instruments for each of these areas. 

52 School of Pharmacy 



All credits awarded by PLA will be confirmed during the Experiential Learn- 
ing Activities us part of the evaluation of the terminal performance objectives. Cred- 
its awarded in Practice Management will be confirmed by the preparation of a set 
of practice management plans, consistent with outcome measures of the experien- 
tial learning course, Practice Management Planning. Credits awarded in Pharma- 
cotherapeutics will be confirmed for each disease topic for which credit was 
received, using the seven explicit learning outcomes that form the basis for the PLA 
evaluation. 

Upon awarding credit, the PLA panel will record a list of therapeutic topics 
to be confirmed as part of the experiential learning activities. Students and their 
mentors will be instructed that confirmation may be accomplished in any of the 
experiential learning courses, but must be completed prior to graduation from the 
program. 

At the time when the student is ready to enter the final experiential learning 
clerkship (Community or Institutional Pharmaceutical Care) this list will be re- 
examined and completion of any disease topic that has not been confirmed will be 
required as part of this course. 



CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 



The university permits a credit by examination process for a course. Information 
about test-out options is provided by each coursemaster. A student who success- 
fully completes the entire course by examination may register for credit by exami- 
nation in the specific area; the current cost to the student is $175 per course. Upon 
approval of the coursemaster, a student who successfully completes a discrete sec- 
tion of the examination may not be required to attend all class sessions and/or mod- 
ules. In this case, the student must still register for the course and the results of the 
examination will be factored into the grade determination. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Pharmacists entering the nontraditional pathway select one of two tracks based on 
the following broad classification: practice in community or organized health care 
settings. Presented below are detailed course descriptions for each course. 



PRINCIPLES OF PHARMACEUTICAL CARE 



PHNT 501 — Principles of Pharmaceutical Care in Community 
Practice (3) (Kerr) 

This course focuses on the processes involved in the delivery of pharmaceutical care 
by community pharmacists to patients with selected common disease states. Learn- 
ing experiences include: development of a personal drug information library and 
provision of answers to questions from other health professionals and patients; eval- 
uation of appropriateness of drug use; assessment of patients' drug therapies includ- 

Nontraditional Pathway 53 



ing therapeutic response and possible adverse drug events; and development of 
action plans for deliver)' of specific patient ser\'ices. 

PHNT 502 — Principles of Pharmaceutical Care in Organized Health 
Care Settings (3) (Finley) 

The processes involved in the delivery of pharmaceutical care in organized health 
care settings are the focus of this course. Through the use of common disease state 
examples (e.g., pain management, pneumonias, lung cancer) students participate 
in a series of class discussions, case studies, selected reading assignments and pro- 
jects which demonstrate processes which are fundamental to the deliver)' of phar- 
maceutical care. These processes include both programmatic (e.g., drug 
information, adverse drug reaction reporting and monitoring, formulary manage- 
ment, DUE, development of process and outcome indicators to apply quality 
improvement strategies to patient care) and patient-specific (e.g., symptom assess- 
ment, database development and interpretation, discharge counseling, monitoring, 
and care plan implementation) efforts which the student can apply in their own 
practice setting 

THERAPEUTICS 

PHNT 503 — Ambulatory Therapeutics in Community Practice (3) 

(Kerr) 

This course addresses the pharmacotherapy of common ambulatory drug therapy 
problems and the development and monitoring of pharmaceutical care plans for 
patients with these problems. Learning experiences include discussions of pharma- 
cotherapy (both prescription and non-prescription), case study analysis, triage deci- 
sion making and development of care plans. These experiences are focused on the 
participant's own pharmacy practice. Topics covered include Gastrointestinal 
Therapeutics, Cardiovascular Therapeutics, Principle of Oncology, Pain Manage- 
ment, Ambulatory Infectious Disease, Osteoporosis and Menopause. 

PHNT 504— Acute Care Therapeutics (3) (Hassan) 

This course addresses the pharmacotherapy problems that occur primarily in acute 
care and organized health care settings, and the development and monitoring of 
pharmaceutical care plans for patients with these problems. Learning experiences 
include discussions of pharmacotherapy, case study analysis, adverse drug reaction 
analysis, discharge and transition of care planning, and development of care plans. 
These experiences are focused on the participant's own pharmacy practice. Topics 
include Gastrointestinal Therapeutics, Cardiovascular Therapeutics, Infectious 
Diseases, Cancer Chemotherapy and Endocrinology. 

PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT 

PHNT 505 — Prior Leaning Assessment of Pharmacy Practice (2) 

(iVkl'iK-rson) 

Ihe objective of the course is to generate a documented compilation ol a candi- 

54 School of Pharmacy 




date's learning experiences and accomplishments - the Prior Learning Assessment 
(PLA) Portfolio - to be used to: identify strengths and weaknesses, individualize the 
learning plan, validate credits that satisfy program requirements, and grant acade- 
mic credit when appropriate. The Portfolio, a requisite for matriculation in the non- 
traditional Pharm.D. pathway, will be developed under the direction of the 
coursemaster. Completion of the Portfolio is a requirement for the course. Evalua- 
tion of the Portfolio for the purposes of individualized curriculum development and 
the awarding of academic credit(s) (0-10) is conducted by a practitioner/faculty 
panel. 

PRINCI PLES OF LI TERAT URE EVALUATJION 

PHNT 506 — Principles of Literature Evaluation (2) 

The goal of this course is to enable practitioners to critically read primary literature 
and apply the knowledge to the pharmaceutical care models developed in their 
practices. 



INTEGRATED PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES 



The scientific foundation of pharmacy practice is growing and changing at an ever 
increasing rate. While it is not possible for anyone to assimilate all of these changes, 
pharmacists must have the ability to apply new knowledge to help solve therapeu- 
tic problems and to comprehend new developments in science related to pharma- 
ceutical care. The integrated pharmaceutical sciences component of the curriculum 
addresses this issue. Either of the following courses may be taken to satisfy this path- 
way requirement. 

PHNT 507 — Integrated Pharmaceutical Sciences Seminar (2) 

The goal of this course is to further educate students in different areas of the phar- 
maceutical sciences and to help them use their scientific knowledge to understand 



Nontraditional Pathway 55 



current issues. It will not provide a pharmaceutical science curriculum identical to 
that experienced by traditional students, but will expand their knowledge of the sci- 
ences and provide in-depth examples of pharmaceutical science topics relevant to 
the student's pharmaceutical care setting. Students research a topic, write a paper 
with a focus on the relevance to their area of practice and present a 30-45 minute 
seminar followed by class discussion. The topics are chosen from a list provided by 
the coursemaster or proposed by the student with coursemaster approval, and are 
driven by topics in current lay and/or scientific literature. 

PHNT 5 1 — Novel Drug Delivery Systems (2) (Hollenbeck/McPherson) 
To enable students to make decisions about the appropriate use of novel drug deliv- 
ery systems from an integrated science and practice perspective, basing the deci- 
sions on the physical, chemical, therapeutic and economic attributes of these 
systems. After completion of this course, the pharmacist will be able to: Describe 
the biophysical rationale and attributes of selected novel drug delivery systems; 
Implement appropriate storage and distribution procedures to insure stability of 
the bioactive agent(s) and stability of the drug release mechanism; Critically eval- 
uate claims made for a novel drug delivery system; Provide a recommendation for 
or against the use of a specific drug delivery system for a specific patient's therapy, 
to a prescriber, on a rational scientific and therapeutic basis; Counsel patients with 
regard to the appropriate use of each delivery system. 



PHARMACOTHERAPEUTICS 



PHNT 540 — Pharmacotherapeutlcs (4) (Vanderhaven) 
Each student in this course is to meet the learning objectives set forth for six units 
to assure breadth of content. These units are in addition to those topics covered in 
the initial core coursework (e.g., Principles of Pharmaceutical Care and Therapeu- 
tics). Other units may be included or developed x.o meet specific individual or path- 
way needs. 

Unitl: ARTHRITIS 

Unit II: NEPHROLOGY 

Unit III: NEUROPSYCH 

Unit IV: HEMA TOLOGY 

Unit V: AIDS 

Unit VI: DERMATOLOGY 

Unit VH: OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Unit VIII: RESPIRA TORY DISEASE 

Unit IX: INFECTIOUS DISEASES II 

UnitX: ONCOLOGYII 



School of Pharmacy 



I 




Studetns Mania Benjamin and Jenifer Fan work w/Preceptor Diane Whi, 

PRACTICE MANAGEMENT 



PHNT 51 I — Practice Management (4) (Fedder) 

Practice Management is composed of four modules: Financial Management, Prin- 
ciples of Management, Marketing and Managing Pharmaceutical Care Services. 
These modules are designed to prepare the student for the practice management 
experiential component and to facilitate the student's ability to provide well- 
rounded management of their practice. These credits may be earned by traditional 
coursework, self-study or other faculty approved modalities identified with the stu- 
dent's advisor. When appropriate, credits in this area may be awarded through the 
PLA process. 



EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING 



Starting early in the required courses, students will develop a representative patient 
population in their practice site to be followed during the program and in the per- 
formance-based evaluation in the final clerkship. Beginning with the initial patient 
identified as a study case, students will learn to triage, develop explicit pharmaceu- 
tical care plans and initiate the patient management process. As they proceed, a lon- 
gitudinal process will be used to monitor and assess their progress in practice. 

Typically a faculty mentor will be assigned to each student to periodically 
assess the student's progress and provide continuous feedback. Some on-site obser- 
vations will be conducted by the faculty mentor or his/her assignee. Since imple- 
mentation of a new service should be cost effective, students will develop a resource 
assessment — e.g., personnel needs, space, equipment — propose a structure for 
compensation, and provide a marketing plan for the practice site. 



Nontraditional Pathway 



While the central philosophy of the experiential learning program is to pro- 
vide for an impact on patients in the pharmacist's own practice, it is anticipated 
that it will not always be possible to completely meet experiential learning objec- 
tives at that site. When it is necessary for exposure to the delivery of pharmaceuti- 
cal care services at other practice sites, every effort will be made to schedule these 
visitations at convenient times. 

PHNT 521— Longitudinal Care (I) (McPherson) 

This experiential course focuses on assessing the health status of a cohort of patients 
in the student's own practice, developing health status reports, and participating in 
the management of pharmaceutical care needs of these patients during health tran- 
sitions. Selected patients have health care problems (such as congestive heart fail- 
ure, AIDS, cancer or problems with aging) that are likely to result in health 
transitions requiring changing pharmaceutical care needs including changes in 
drug therapy, health education, patient counseling and physical environment (e.g. , 
home, long term care, hospital). It is expected that students commit a minimum of 
approximately 45 hours (e.g., an average of about 3 hours per week over a semes- 
ter or 1.5 hours per week over an academic year) to experiential activities in this 
course at their own practice site. Students are expected to apply skills from this 
course in subsequent Pharmaceutical Care experiential coursework. 

PHNT 531 — Practice Management Planning (2) (Fedder) 
Practice Management Planning will focus on the application of management prin- 
ciples to a pharmaceutical care service. The course will provide an opportunity for 
the student to develop and write a plan defining and justifying a pharmaceutical 
care service and an opportunity for implementing the plan. 

PHNT 532— Patient Assessment Skills (I) (Michocki) 
This experiential course focuses on the student acquiring skills necessary to obtain 
general pharmaceutical care data bases and problem-oriented data bases from 
patients. Acquired skills include both history-taking and physical assessment. 
Learning experiences include faculty demonstrations, videos, simulations and 
patient encounters. The course has six to seven four-hour workshop sessions and 
one clinic session with a mentor to practice acquired skills in a supervised environ- 
ment. Students are expected to apply and practice skills from this course in the pro- 
gram's other experiential courses. 

PHNT 534 — Clinic or Institutional Assignment (I) (McPherson) 
Activities in this course include supervised development of pharmaceutical care 
plans, triage decision making, discharge/transition planning and patient counsel- 
ing. Students are assigned to a total of 15 three-hour faculty supervised pharma- 
ceutical care sessions. Students whose area of interest is ambulatory practice are 
assigned to 1 1 three-hour Pharmacotherapy-Medication Refill Clinic sessions and 
four hospital-based three-hour Pharmaceutical Care Rounds sessions. Students 
whose area of interest is in organized or institutional health care are assigned to 1 1 
hospital-based Pharmaceutical Care Rounds sessions and four Pharmacotherapy- 
Medication Refill Clinic sessions. 

58 School of Pharmacy 



PHNT 536 — Drug Information Experience (I) (Mays) 

Pharmacists acquire and apply drug information skills in their own practice. Stu- 
dents will develop and attain their own drug information library, access appropri- 
ate drug information databases, and utilize appropriate pharmaceutical and 
medical literature to prepare drug information reports. Assignments are made 
based upon the needs of the patients in the student's practice and the organizational 
needs of the practice site. 

Students usually enroll in this course concurrently with their Pharmaceuti- 
cal Care and/or Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care experiential course(s). It is 
expected that students commit a minimum of 45 hours to this course spread out 
over one or two semesters (an average of one and a half to three hours per week). It 
is preferable for students to link their drug information activities to their activities 
in the concurrent experiential course(s). 

PHNT 560 — Community or Institutional Pharmaceutical Care (4) 

(McPherson) 

Pharmacists obtain and apply the skills to deliver pharmaceutical care services to 
patients in their own practice. Students develop and implement Triage Plans, Phar- 
maceutical Care Plans, and Transition Plans for a cohort of patients (in addition to 
the patients accumulated during the Longitudinal Care experience) in their own 
practice. Patients selected for plan development and implementation must have at 
least two pharmaceutical care or pharmacotherapy problems. 

Students communicate these plans to other health care professionals, moni- 
tor the response of patients to these plans, make any necessary modifications, and 
assess health outcomes resulting from their plans. It is expected that students com- 
mit a minimum of approximately 1 80 hours (an average of about six hours per week 
over two semesters) to activities related to this course. 

During this course, students will be held accountable for application of phar- 
macotherapy topics acquired through Prior Learning Assessment and the didactic 
Pharmacotherapeutics course. Students completing this course are expected to be 
able to demonstrate the nontraditional Pharm.D. pathway's terminal performance 
objectives related to implementation of pharmaceutical care services in their own 
practice site. 



Nontraditional Pathway 



Academic Information 



ACADEMIC SESSIONS 



The School of Pharmacy operates on a four semester calendar. The fall term, four 
months long, begins immediately after Labor Day and runs to the Christmas recess. 
A three week winter minimester in January allows students to avail themselves of 
tutorial services or elective courses. The spring term, four months long, begins the 
last week in January and extends to just before Memorial Day. Full-time students 
enrolled in spring do not pay tuition and fees for the UMAB courses taken during 
the winter minimester. Student must pay additional winter minimester tuition at 
other UM campuses. Students taking didactic courses at UMAB or other UM insti- 
tutions must pay summer session tuition and fees. 



REGISTRATION POLICIES 



CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION 



Students who register and subsequently decide not to attend the School of Phar- 
macy must provide written notice to the office of student affairs before the first day 
of class. If this office has not received a request for cancellation by 4:30 p.m. on the 
day before classes begin, the university will assume that students plan to attend and 
that they accept their financial obligation. 



CHANGE IN REGISTRATION 



A special add/drop form used for all changes in registration should be obtained 
from the office of student affairs. Students must consult with their academic advi- 
sor and obtain his/her signature on the add/drop form. The completed form must 
be returned to the office of student affairs. There is no charge for a change in reg- 
istration. Students may not add a course after the first week of classes or drop a 
course after the midpoint of a particular course without written permission from 
the office of student affairs. The grade of "F" is given for courses dropped after the 
midpoint of the course. 



School of Pharmacy 



LATE REGISTRATION 



A late registration fee is charged to students who fail to complete registration by the 
specified time for regular registration (usually the day before the first day of classes). 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 



Students forced to withdraw from the university before the end of a semester are 
eligible for partial refunds depending upon the date of withdrawal. To ensure such 
refunds, students must file withdrawal forms in the school's office of student affairs. 
Failure to complete these forms will result in failing grades in all courses and for- 
feiture of the right to any refund. 



GRADING SYSTEM 


The School 
Grade 


of Pharmacy 


uses the following g 
Interpretation 


ading 


system: 


Point Value 


A 




Excellent 






4 


B 




Good 






3 


C 




Fair 






2 


D 




Poor but Passing 






1 


P 




Pass 









F 




Failure 










Incomplete 



Must be replaced 
by definite grade 
within one year 



WD 



No grade is assigned 



When, for any reason, a course is repeated, the grade achieved in the repeated course 
replaces all previous grades in the same course. 



SCHOLASTIC HONORS 



Academic excellence is recognized during the fall and spring honor convocations. 
During the fall ceremony, academic achievement awards are given to students in 
all classes based on performance the preceding year. The leaders of student organi- 
zations are also recognized at this time. The Rho Chi Honor Society presents its 
annual book award to the student(s) having the highest academic marks. The 
School of Pharmacy Achievement Awards are presented to individuals who have 
brought honor to the school by their career achievements. 



Academic Information 



In the spring, the school honors its graduates. Those in the first tenth of the 
class graduate with high honors and those in the second tenth of the class with hon- 
ors. The faculty presents the achievement awards to members of the graduating class 
at the Spring Honors Convocation: 

School of Pharmacy Gold Medal for General Excellence is awarded to the candi- 
date who has attained the highest general average. 

Certificates of Honor are given to the three students having the next highest gen- 
eral averages. Only courses taken at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 
are considered in awarding these two awards. 

Andrew G. DuMez Award. In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, late dean and 
professor of pharmacy, Mrs. Andrew G. DuMez provided a gold medal which is 
awarded for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma-Cole Award. This award, in 
memory of Dr. B. Olive Cole, former acting dean, is given for proficiency in phar- 
macy administration. 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize. The Kappa Chapter of the 

Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega (AZO) fraternity provides a 
prize which is awarded for proficiency in pharmacolog)'. 

Maryland Society of Hospital Pharmacists Award. MSHP honors annually a stu- 
dent who has been outstanding in the area of hospital pharmacy. 

William Simon Memorial Prize. In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, who was 
a professor of chemistry in the School of Pharmacy for 30 years, a gold medal is 
awarded for superior work in the field of biomedicinal chemistry. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank J. Slama Scholarship Award. A fund has been established in 
honor of the late Dr. Frank J. Slama, a former professor ot pharmacognosy. Income 
for the fund provides a plaque to be awarded lor superior work in the field of bio- 
pharmacognosy. 

Frank J. Slama Award by the School's Alumni Association. In memory and trib- 
ute to the late Dr. Frank J. Slama, class of 1924, a former professor and head of the 
department of pharmacognosy, for his loyalty and service of over half a century to 
his profession, to the School of Pharmacy and to the Alumni Association, the 
School of Pharmacy Alumni Association provides an annual award to a member of 
the graduating class who has excelled in extracurricular activities. 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize. In memory of her husband, Manuel 
B. Wagner, and her son, Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School of Phar- 
macy, the late Mrs. Sadie S. Wagner, together with her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wag- 



School of Pharmacy 



ner Brill Snyder, provided a fund, the income of which is awarded for meritorious 
academic achievement in pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 

John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize. In memory of her late brother. Dr. John 
F. Wannenwetsch, a distinguished alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, Mrs. Mary 
H. Wannenwetsch provided a fund, the income of which is awarded to a student 
who has exhibited exceptional performance and promise in the practice of com- 
munity pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize. In appreciation ol the assistance 
which the Maryland College ol Pharmacy extended to him as a young man, Mr. 
Conrad L. Wich provided a fund, the income from which is awarded annually by 
the faculty assembly to the student who has done exceptional work throughout the 
course in pharmacognosy. 

L. S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize. The late L.S. Williams left a trust fund, 
the income of which is awarded to the student having the highest general average 
throughout the course in basic and applied pharmaceutics. 



ACADEMIC STATUS POLICIES 



The student affairs committee, class advisors and coursemasters are all concerned 
with student academic progress. Therefore, student performance in courses and 
clerkships will be monitored on an ongoing basis. Students are ultimately respon- 
sible for their own academic progress and, thus, must take advantage of the school's 
tutorial and advising systems when necessary. Within the school, there are several 
individuals that students should contact as soon as an academic problem arises or 
when a personal problem occurs that interferes with school work. Students should 
take the initiative to arrange a meeting first with their academic advisor and/or the 
coursemaster of a particular course where the problem is occurring. In addition, the 
class advisor, the director of student services, and other members of the faculty and 
administration are available to discuss problems. Experience has demonstrated that 
the more active students are in addressing potential problems, the more successful 
the resolution of those problems. By the same token, faculty members are encour- 
aged to initiate discussions with students who demonstrate academic difficulty. 

Failing grade: Students who fail a course or clerkship are subject to academic dis- 
missal. As soon as a course or clerkship failure is reported to the office of student 
affairs, the student affairs committee will review the situation and will notify the 
student of their eligibility for dismissal. The student will then be asked to appear 
before the student affairs committee to discuss the situation. When appropriate, 
the committee will make recommendations to the faculty assembly regarding aca- 
demic dismissal, academic probation or other action (see "Academic Dismissal" 
section for appropriate procedures). 



Academic Informatii 



ACADEMIC STATUS CRITERIA 



(Nontraditional pathway students see following section) 

GPA below 2.0: At the end of each semester, the student affairs committee will 
review the academic status of all students. Students who fail to maintain a semes- 
ter GPA of 2.0 and have a cumulative GPA below a 2.0 are subject to academic dis- 
missal and will appear before the student affairs committee. As stated above, the 
committee will make recommendations to the faculty when appropriate. Students 
who have semester GPAs below 2.0, but their cumulative GPA is 2.0 or above will 
receive a letter of warning. 

Students on probation: If students on probation earn a GPA below a 2.0 during 
the probationary semester, they are subject to academic dismissal and will appear 
before the student affairs committee (see above). If students on probation earn a 
semester GPA of 2.0 or above, but their cumulative GPA is still below 2.0, they 
will continue on probation. Students will be removed from probation when their 
cumulative GPA is 2.0 or above. Students with a "F" on their record will remain 
on probation regardless of GPA until the failing grade is resolved. Students who are 
placed on academic probation have an option to continue on a reduced load (less 
than 9 hours). Students must have a cumulative GPA ofat least a 2.0 in all required 
courses in the second and third years to enter the third and fourth years of the 
Pharm.D. program , respectively. Students cannot enter the third or fourth year 
while on probation or with an "F" in a required course. Students must maintain a 
cumulative grade average of 2.0 to become eligible for graduation. 



ACADEMIC STATUS CRITERIA 



(Nontraditional Pathway) 

The minimum passing grade for required courses in the Nontraditional pathway is 
a "C". Students may not register for a course or a clerkship if they have received a 
grade below a "C" in a prerequisite for that course or clerkship. The student affairs 
committee will review the situation when a student receives a grade below a "C" in 
a required course or clerkship, an "F " in an elective course, or when the student's 
GPA falls below 2.0. In those situations students may be subject to academic dis- 
missal, academic probation or other action. 



ACADEMIC DISMISSAL 

Failure to meet the school's academic or professional standards will result in aca- 
demic dismissal. To appeal academic dismissal, students must write to the student 
affairs committee; students have the right to present their case in person before the 
committee. The decision on the appeal is forwarded by the committee to the fac- 
ulty assembly. If the appeal is denied, students have the right to appeal directly to 
the dean. The dean's decision on academic dismissal is final. The academic dis- 



64 School of Pharmacy 



missal appears on the student's permanent record following the dean's decision. All 
appeals must be completed before the beginning of the next semester. Students who 
have been academically dismissed once may petition the admissions committee for 
reinstatement after they have completed some form of remediation. Students who 
have been academically dismissed twice are not eligible for reinstatement. 



ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 

Students entering the profession of pharmacy are required to have exemplary stan- 
dards of conduct. Absolute honesty is imperative for a health professional. The 
school and university have policy statements (listed in the back of this catalog) 
which reflect expected standards of behavior. Academic dishonesty will not be tol- 
erated. Academic dishonesty includes: 

Cheating - using unauthorized notes, study aids or information from another 
individual during an examination 

Plagiarism - submitting work that, in part or in whole, is not entirely the stu- 
dent's own; without attributing credit to correct sources 

Fabrication - presenting data that were gathered outside the guidelines defining 
the appropriate methods of collecting and generating data 

Falsification of records - altering documents affecting academic records; forging 
signatures; or falsifying any school or university document 

Aiding or abetting dishonesty - providing material or information to another 
person with the knowledge that it will be used inappropriately 




Dr. Richard Dalby 



Academic Information 65 



Administration and Faculty 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SYSTEM 



Board of Regents 

Lance Billingsley, Chairman 

Margaret Alton 

The Honorable Mary Arabian 

Richard O. Berndt 

Roger Blunt 

The Honorable Benjamin L. Brown 

Earle Palmer Brown 

Nathan A. Chapman Jr. 

Charles W. Cole Jr 

Edwin S. Crawford 

Thomas B. Finan Jr. 

Frank A. Guntherjr. 

The Honorable Harry R. Hughes 

Ann Hull 

Lewis R. Riley, Ex Ojficio 

Malkia Singleton, Student Regent 

Constance M. Unseld 

System Administration 

Donald N. Langcnberg, Ph.D., (^ha)icellorofthe University 

George L. Marx, Ph.D., Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs 

John K. Martin, Vice Chancellor, Advancement 

James Sansbury, Acting Vice Chancellor, Administration and Finance 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE 

David J. Ramsay, D.M., D. Phil., President 

JoannA. Boughman, Ph.D., Vice President, Academic Affairs; Dean, Graduate Studies 

James T. Hill Jr., M.P.A., Vice President, Administrative Services 

T. SueGladhill, M.S.W., Vice President, Governmental Affairs 

Fred Brooke Lee, Vice President, Institutional Advancement 

Morton L Rapoport, M.D., President and Chief Executive Officer, University of 

Maryland Medical System 
Richard R. Ranney, D.D.S., M.S. Dean, Dental School 
Donald G. Gifford, J.D., Dean, School of Law 
Donald E. Wilson, M.D., Dean, School of Medicine 
Barbara R. Heller, Ed.D., Dean, School of Nursing 
David A. Knapp, Ph.D., Dean, School of Pharmacy 
Jessie J. Harris, D.S.W., Dean, School of Social Work 

66 School of Pharmacy 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Administration 

David A. Knapp, Ph.D., Dean and Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

R. Gary Hollenbeck, Vh.T)., Associate Dean, Academic Programs; Associate Professor, 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Robert S. Beardsley, Ph.D., Associate Dean, Student Ajfairs and Administration; 

Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Mary Lynn McPherson, Pharm.D., BCPS, Coordinator, Nontraditional Doctor of 

Pharmacy Pathway 
Mary Franks, MBA, Assistant to the Dean 
Harold Chappelear, B.S., Senior Advisor to the Dean 
Nelhe Pharr-Maletta, MBA, Director, Student Services 
Tim Munn, B.S., Director, Computing Services 
Mary Joseph Ivins, Administrator, Financial Affairs 
Carolyn O. Footman, Executive Administrative Assistant to the Dean 

Faculty 

Alfred Abramson, R.Ph., B.S.P., Pharmacy Management, University of Maryland; 
Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Director, 
Pharmacy Practice Laboratory 

Jane V. Aldrich, Ph.D., Medicinal Chemistry, University of Michigan; Associate 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Bruce D. Anderson, Pharm.D., Clinical Toxicology, Philadelphia College of Phar- 
macy and Science; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and 
Science; Assistant Director, Maryland Poison Center 

Larry L. Augsburger, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmaceutics, University of Maryland; Pro- 
fessor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Roberts. Beardsley, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacy Administration, University of Min- 
nesota; Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Associate Dean, Student 
Affairs and Administration 

Ralph N. Blomster, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacognosy, University of Connecticut; 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Aaron Burnstein, Pharm. D., Clinical Pharmacy, SUNYat Buffalo; Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Gary G. Buterbaugh, Ph.D., Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iowa; 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Patrick S. Gallery, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Cali- 
fornia; Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Prashant J. Ghikhale, Ph.D., Medicinal Chemistry, University of Florida; Assis- 
tant Professor 

Catherine Cooke, Pharm. D., Clinical Pharmacy, Medical College of South Car- 
olina; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Judy L. Curtis, Pharm.D., Mental Health, University of Texas; Pharmacy School 
Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 



Administration and Faculty 




Dr. Emmeline Edwards 

Richard N. Dalby, Ph.D., Pharmaceutics and Drug DeHvery, University of Ken- 
tucky; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Russell J. DiGate, Ph.D., Molecular Biology, University of Rochester; Assistant 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

George E. Dukes Jr., Pharm.D., Clinical Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin 
and University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio; Professor and 
Chairman, Pharmacy Practice and Science Department 

Christine U. Eccles, Ph.D., Toxicology, Johns Hopkins University; Associate Pro- 
fessor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Natalie D. Eddington, Ph.D., Pharmacokinetics, University of Maryland; Assis- 
tant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Emmeline Edwards, Ph.D., Neuropharmacology, Fordham University; Associate 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Donald O. Fedder, R.Ph., Dr.P.H., Public Health Education, Johns Hopkins 
University; Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Madeline Feinberg, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Geriatrics, University of Maryland; Phar- 
macy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Rebecca S. Finley, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Oncology, University of Cincinnati; Phar- 
macy School Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Ronald D. Guiles, Ph.D., Physical Chemistry, University of California at Berke- 
ley; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Stuart T. Haines, R.Ph.,Pharm.D.,C.D.E., Ambulatory Care, University of Texas 
at Austin and University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio; School 
Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Erkan Hassan, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Critical Care, University of Maryland; Pharmacy 
School Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

jun Hayashi, Ph.D., University of Connecticut; Associate Professor, Pharmaceu- 
tical Sciences 



School of Pharmacy 



Robert J. Hickey, Ph.D., Biochemistry, City University of New York; Assistant 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Stephen W. Hoag, Ph.D. , Pharmaceutics, University of Minnesota; Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

R. Gary Hollenbeck, Ph.D., Pharmaceutics, Purdue University; Associate Profes- 
sor, Pharmaceutical Sciences; Associate Dean, Academic Programs 

Christine M. Kearns, Pharm.D., Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics, Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, 
Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Robert A. Kerr, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Ambulatory Pharmacotherapy and Instruc- 
tional Systems Design, University' of California; Associate Professor, Pharmacy 
Practice and Science 

Kwang Chul Kim, Ph.D., Cell Biology, Ohio State University; Associate Profes- 
sor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

William J. Kinnard Jr., R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacology, Purdue University; Profes- 
sor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Wendy Klein-Schwartz, Pharm.D., Clinical Toxicology, University of Maryland; 
Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Director, Maryland Poison 
Center 

David A. Knapp, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacy Administration, Purdue University; 
Dean and Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Director, Center for Drugs 
and Public Policy 

Cynthia L. LaCivita, Pharm.D., Oncology, University of Maryland, Pharmacy 
School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

James Leslie, Ph.D., Chemistry, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland; Associate 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Raymond C. Love, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Mental Health, University of Maryland; 
Pharmacy School Assistant Professor and Vice-Chair, Pharmacy Practice and 
Science; Director, Mental Health Program 

Alexander D. MacKerell Jr., Ph.D., Biochemistry and Computational Chemistry, 
Rutgers University; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

David A. Mays, Pharm.D., BCPS, Drug Information Services, Mercer University; 
Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Mary Lynn McPherson, Pharm.D., BCPS, Ambulatory Care and Geriatrics, Uni- 
versity of Maryland; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice 
and Science; Coordmator, Nontraditional Pharm.D. Pathway 

Robert J. Michocki, R.Ph., Pharm.D., BCPS, Family Medicine, University of 
Maryland; Pharmacy School Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

David B. Moore, R.Ph., M.P.A., Health Care Management, Cornell University; 
Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

J. Edward Moreton, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacology, University of Mississippi; Pro- 
fessor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Daniel Mullins, Ph.D., Pharmacoeconomics, Duke University; Assistant Profes- 
sor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Becky A. Nagle, R.Ph., Pharm.D., BCPS, Clinical Pharmacy, University of Ken- 
tucky; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Administration and Faculty 69 




Dr. Jai Bet Wang 

Marvin L. Oed, R.Ph., B.S.P., Pharmacy Practice, University of Maryland; Phar- 
macy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Francis B. Palumbo, R.Ph., Ph.D., Health Care Administration, Universit)' of 
Mississippi; J.D., University of Baltimore Law Center; Professor, Pharmacy 
Practice and Science 

Karen Plaisance, R.Ph., Pharm.D., BCPS, Pharmacokinetics and Infectious Dis- 
eases, State University of New York at Buffalo; Associate Professor, Pharmacy 
Practice and Science 

James E. Poili, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmaceutics, University of Michigan; Assistant 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

William G. Reiss, Pharm.D., Pharmacokinetics, State Universit)' of New York at 
Buff^alo; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Kevin Reynolds, Ph.D., Bioorganic Chemistry, Universit}' of Southampton, Asso- 
ciate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, R.Ph., BCPS, Pharm.D., Ambulatory Care, Uni- 
versity of Maryland; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice 
and Science 

David S. Roffman, R.Ph., Pharm.D., BCPS, Cardiovascular Therapeutics, Uni- 
versity of Maryland; Associate Professor and Vice Chair, Pharmacy Practice and 
Science 

Gerald M. Rosen, Ph.D., Chemistry, Clarkson College ofTechnolog)'; j.D., Duke 
University School of Law; Emerson Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Ginette Serrero, Ph.D., University of Nice, France; Associate Professor, Pharma- 
ceutical Sciences 

Ralph F. Shangraw, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmaceutics, University of Michigan; Pro- 
fessor Emeritus, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Marilyn K. Speedie, R.Ph., Ph.D., Microbial Biochemistry, Purdue University; 
Professor and Chair, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Stuart M. Speedie, Ph.D., Pharmacoinformatics, Purdue University; Professor, 
Pharmacv Practice and Science 



School of Pharmacy 



Anthony C. Tommasello, R.Ph., M.S., Substance Abuse and Chemical Depen- 
dence, University of Maryland; Pharmacy School Associate Professor, Phar- 
macy Practice and Science; Director, Office of Substance Abuse Studies 

James A. Trovato, Pharm.D., Hematology\Oncology, Purdue University; Phar- 
macy School Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Mona Gold Tsoukleris, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Ambulatory Care and Adult Internal 
Medicine, University of Maryland; Pharmacy School Assistant Professor, Phar- 
macy Practice and Science 

Ashiwel S. Undie, Ph.D., Pharmacology, the Medical College of Pennsylvania; 
Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Jia Bei Wang, Ph.D., Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University 
of Maryland; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Myron Weiner, R.Ph., Ph.D., Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Mary- 
land; Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Jeremy Wright, R.Ph., Ph.D., Biomedicinal Chemistry, University of London; 
Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

David Young, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Ph.D., Pharmacokinetics and Applied Mathe- 
matical Modeling, University of Southern California; Associate Professor, Phar- 
maceutical Sciences and Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Julie Magno Zito, Ph.D., Social and Behavioral Pharmacy, University of Min- 
nesota; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Ilene H. Zuckerman, R.Ph., Pharm.D., Geriatrics and Ambulatory Care, Univer- 
sity of Maryland; Pharmacy School Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and 
Science 

Adjunct Faculty 

Nicholas Bachur, Ph.D., Affiliate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Ronald Burch, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Yale H. Caplan, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

C. JelleffCarr, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Keith K. H. Chan, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Harold Chappelear, B.S., Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Ho Chung, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Barbara Conley, M.D., Affiliate Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and 

Science 
Grady Dale, Ed.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Mark DeCoster, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Merrill Egorin, M.D., Affiliate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
John Fader, J.D., Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
William Figg, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Raymond Genovese, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Lee T. Grady, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Peter Gutierrez, Ph.D., Affiliate Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
James W. King, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Michael E. Kleinberg, M.D., Ph.D., Affiliate Assistant Professor 
Richard Kline, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 



Administration and Faculty 



Deanne E. Knapp, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Harvey J. Kupferberg, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Don Kyle, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

John W. Levchuk, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Karen L. Marquis, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Keith Marshall, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Antonia Mattia, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Dev K. Mehra, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Frank Milio, Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Gregof)' F. Payne, Ph.D., Affiliate Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Robert Pinco, J.D., Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

David G. Pope, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Stuart C. Porter, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Edward Rudnic, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Rajen Shah, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Michael G. Simic, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

David Sisson, Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Byoung J. Song, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Mary Stuart, Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Frank C. Tortello, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

David Van Echo, Affiliate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Katherine R. Zoon, Ph.D., Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Clinical Associate Professors 

Patrick Birmingham, B.S.P., NeighborCare Pharmacies 
Steve Cohen, B.S. Pharm., M.S., Howard County General Hospital 
Joseph Gallina, R.Ph., Pharm. D., Pharmacy Practice Management, University of 
California; Clinical Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Direc- 
tor, Pharmacy Services, University of Maryland Medical System 
Rolley E. Johnson, Pharm. D., Johns Hopkins Bayview 
Gail Rosen, Pharm. D., BCNSP, Nutrition Support, University of Maryland; 

Clinical Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Thomas Sisca, Pharm. D., Easton Memorial Hospital 

Clinical Assistant Professors 

Tracy Aber, Pharm. D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Mahnaz Younes Abhari, Pharm. D., Kaiser Permanente Medical Center 
Alfred E. Bacon III, M.D., F.A.C.P., The Medical Center of Delaware 
Charles Ballow, Pharm. D., Millard Fillmore Hospital 
Julie Baltz, Pharm. D., National Chancer Institute 
Robert Berg, Pharm. D., V.A. Medical Center - Perry Point 
Christopher J. Bero, Pharm. D., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 
Colette Boyle, Pharm. D., V.A. Medical Center- Ft. Howard 
Pamela S. Bozek, Pharm. D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Kristi M. Burgess, Pharm. D., The Medical Center of Delaware 
Cassandra E. Burke, Pharm. D., The Medical Center of Delaware 



72 School of Pharmacy 



Demetris M. Butler, Pharm.D., Laurel Regional Hospital 

James Caldwell, Pharm.D., Anne Arundel General Hospital 

Karim Calis, Pharm.D., NIH Clinical Center 

Kevin Callahan, Pharm.D., Easton Memorial Hospital 

Jerry John Castellano, Pharm.D., The Medical Center of Delaware 

Igor Cerny, Pharm.D., FDA Division of Drug Marketing, Advertising and 

Communications 
Elinore Suk Chung, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Cathleen Clancy, M.D., Maryland Poison Center 
John Conrad, B.S.P., Belair Apothecary 
Deborah Cooper, Pharm.D. 

Linda M. Cortese, B.S.P., M.Sc, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Donna M. Cronin, Pharm.D., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 
Jean Dinwiddie, Pharm.D., NeighborCare Pharmacies Inc. 
Robert Dombrowski, Pharm.D., V.A. Medical Center - Baltimore 
Sarah Donegan, Pharm.D., Frederick Memorial Hospital 
George Dydek, Pharm.D., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Robert Feroli, Pharm.D., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Catherine Fields, Pharm.D., Center on Drugs and Public Policy, UMAB 
Carol Frank, Pharm.D., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Gary Frost, Pharm.D., Johns Hopkins Hospital 
Gerard J. Fulda, M.D., F.A.C.S., The Medical Center of Delaware 
Cindy Gendron, Pharm.D., Suburban Hospital 
Shawn Gillikin, Pharm.D., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 
David Green, Pharm.D., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Laurence Green, Pharm.D., NIH Clinical Center 
Robert Gregory, Pharm.D., Group Health Association 
Deborah L. Greiner, Pharm.D., Kaiser Permanente, Mid-Atlantic Region 
Dale Grothe, Pharm.D., NIH Clinical Center 
Michael Gum, Pharm.D., Dorchester General Hospital 
Karl Gumpper, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
Cynthia J. Halas, Pharm.D., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 
Claudia Hale, Pharm.D., HOMEDCO Infusion Company 
Albert W. Helmeczi, R.Ph., M.S., The Medical Center of Delaware 
Andrea Hershey, Pharm.D., Union Memorial Hospital 
Tracy Hicks, Pharm.D., Kirson Infusion Care 
William Hill, B.S.P., Hill's Drug Store 

Van Doren Hsu, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 
John Jordan, M.S., V.A. Medical Center - Baltimore 
Edmund Kasaitis, Pharm.D., North Arundel Hospital 
Mari Kim, Pharm.D., Doctors Community Hospital 
Kathrin Kucharski, Pharm.D., Good Samaritan Hospital 
Vincent Lacroce, Pharm.D., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 
Raymond T. Lake, M.S., Coram Healthcare 
Carlton Lee, Pharm.D., Johns Hopkins Hospital 
Laura Lees, Pharm.D., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Administration and Faculty 73 



Heidi Louie, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

Nicholas Lykos, B.S.P., Lykos Pharmacy 

Claudia Manzo, Pharm.D., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Robert Martin Jr., B.S.P., Potomac Valley Pharmacy 

Nasir Mian, Pharm.D., Greater Southeast Communit}- Hospital 

Rita Mitsch, Pharm.D., Franklin Square Hospital 

Pam Moussavian-Yousefi, Pharm.D., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Deborah Mulhearn, Pharm.D., Kaiser Permanente 

Theresa Ng, Pharm.D., Kaiser Permanente 

Kari Nilsen, Pharm.D., Anne Arundel Medical Center 

Michael Nnadi, Pharm.D., Kaiser Permanente Medical Center 

Joseph Ober, Pharm.D., Advance ParadigM Inc. 

Donna O'Keefe, Pharm.D., Washington County Hospital 

Michele Overtoom, Pharm.D., NeighborCare Pharmacies 

Richard Parker, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Margaret Peoples, Pharm.D., Kaiser Permanente Medical Center 

Beulah Perdue, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

Marilyn Pitts, Pharm.D., Greater Southeast Community Hospital 

John Ricci, B.S.P., Technicare Inc. 

Gail Rosen, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

Bonnie Rosiak, Pharm.D., ASCO Healthcare Inc. 

Carol Baker Rudo, Pharm.D., V.A. Medical Center - Baltimore 

James Joseph Rybacki, Pharm.D., Dorchester General Hospital 

Ellen Safir, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

Kevin Schnupp, Pharm.D., Liberty Medical Center 

Felicia Scott, Pharm.D., Kaiser Permanente 

Jay Sherr, Pharm.D., Spring Grove Hospital Center 

Matthew Shimoda, Pharm.D., P & R Corp. Ingleside Pharmacy 

Lynn Shumake, M.S., University of Maryland Medical System 

Larry Siegel, M.A.S., University of Maryland Medical System 

Debbie Simon, Pharm.D., Union Memorial Hospital 

Robert Snively, B.S.P., Edgehill Drugs Inc. 

Dominic Solimando, B.S.P., M.A., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Donna Soucy, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

Cassandra Tancil, Pharm.D., Greater Baltimore Medical Center 

Christopher Thomas, Pharm.D., Church Hospital 

Michele D. Foster Thomas, Pharm.D., St. Agnes Hospital 

Deborah Thorn, M.B.A., University of Maryland Medical System 

Richard Tsao, Pharm.D., Greater Southeast Community Hospital 

Olga Tsidonis, Pharm.D., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 

Sara Turk, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

Beth Vanderheyden, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

Ilene Verovsky, Pharm.D. 

Paul Vitale, Pharm.D., Anne Arundel General Hospital 

Jo Wallin, Pharm.D., Harbor Hospital 

Sonya Ware, Pharm.D., Shady Grove Adventist Hospital 

74 School of Pharmacy 



D. Raymond Weber, Pharm.D., Easton Memorial Hospital 

Nina Weidle, Pharm.D., Advance ParadigM Inc. 

Paul Weidle, Pharm.D., University of Mar\'land Medical System 

Phillip Weiner, B.S.P., Weiner's Pharmacy 

Fran Favin Weiskopf, Pharm.D., Good Samaritan Hospital 

Lawrence Westfall, Pharm.D., Harbor Hospital 

Anne M. Wiland, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

Pamela Williamson, Pharm.D., C.D.E., Kaiser Permanente 

Jacqueiyn Gardner Wilson, Pharm.D., Great Oaks Center 

Sharon Wilson, Pharm.D., University of Maryland Medical System 

Eileen Wu, Pharm.D., Montgomery General Hospital 

Beverly Yachmetz, Pharm.D., Diabetes Connection 

Clinical Instructors 

Stephen J. Adamczyk, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 1 169 

Stanton Ades, B.S.P., NeighborCare Pharmacies Inc. 

Bijan Ahmadi, B.S.P., Prince Georges Hospital Center 

Kenneth Aiello, B.S.P., CVS 

Isabel Almeida, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Lee Alstrum, B.S.P., Crown Drugs 

Calvin Alt, B.S.P., Health Care Professionals 

Marsha Alvarez, B.S.P., FDA 

Paul Antoszewski, B.S.P., Halethorpe Pharmacy 

Michael Appel, B.S.P., Howard and Morris 

John Asiedu, B.S.P., Kaiser Permanente Medical Center 

Edward Ayanbiola, B.S.P., Greenbelt Professional Pharmacy 

John Balch, B.S.P., Pharmacare of Cumberland 

Michael Ball, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins/Pharmaquip 

Kathleen Ballman, B.S.P., M.S, Anne Arundel Medical Center 

Lee Barker, B.S.P., M.B.A., Safeway Pharmacy 

Phyllis Bartilucci, B.S.P., Physicians Memorial Hospital 

John Batdorf, B.S.P., Medical Arts Pharmacy 

Richard Baylis, B.S.P., Maryland Pharmacists Association 

Gerald Beachy, B.S.P., Beachy's Pharmacy 

Dave Becker, B.S.P., CVS # 1488 

John Beckman, B.S.P., Beckman's Greene Street Pharmacy 

James Joseph Bellay, B.S.P., Prince George's Pharmacy 

Bruce Benton, B.S.P., Edgehill Drugs Inc. 

Brian Berryhill, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Stephen Bierer, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy* 1200 

Johnnie Bingham, B.S.P., Kaiser Permanente Medical Center 

Frank Blatt, B.S.P., NeighborCare/Powell's Pharmacy 

Ruth Blatt, B.S.P., NeighborCare Pharmacies Inc. 

Barry Bloom, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Arnold Blaustein, B.S.P., Associated Prescription Services 

Thomas Bolt, B.S.P., The Medicine Shoppe 



Administration and Faculty 



Gene Borowski, B.S.P., Village Pharmacists 

Cynthia Boyle, B.S.P., Thrift Drug 

John Braaten, B.S.P., Twin Knolls Pharmacy 

Lynette Bradley, B.S.P., CVS #452 

Thomas Brenner, B.S.P., York Hospital 

Barry Bress, B.S.P., NeighborCare Pharmacies Inc. 

Steven Buckner, B.S.P., Magiros Pharmacy 

Patrick Burke, B.S.P., Chestnut AID Pharmacy 

Alvin Burwell, B.S.P., Alexandria Pharmacy 

Kelly Keelan Caccamisi, B.S.P., K-Mart Pharmacies 

Douglas Campbell, B.S.P., The Medicine Shoppe 

Robert H. Campbell, B.S.P., Madison Park Pharmacy 

Majorie Carl, LCSW, Baltimore County Department of Health 

Thomas Carroll, B.S.P., NMC Home Care 

Leon Catlett, B.S.P., Eakles Drug Store 

Mark Chamberlain, B.S.P., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

David R. Chason, B.S.P., Good Samaritan Hospital 

Fred Chatelain, B.S.P., M.S., Alexandria Hospital 

Wen-Kuang Chen, B.S.P., Group Health Association 

Fred Choy, M.S., R.Ph., Caremark 

Thomas Chuen, M.S., Greater Southeast Community Hospital 

Gerald I. Cohen, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 

David Cowden, B.S.P., CVS #1435 

James Crable, B.S.P., The Finan Center 

Karen Cranford, B.S.P., CVS #1515 

Laura Cranston, B.S.P., National Association of Chain Drug Stores 

Daniel L. Crerand, B.S.P., Family Health Apothecary Inc. 

Terry Crovo, B.S.P., Medical Center of Dundalk 

Wayne Crowley, B.S.P., M.B.A., Giant Pharmacy 

Hedy Cylus, B.S.P., Fenwick Apothecary 

Traci Davis, R.Ph., CVS 

Morrell Delcher, B.S.P., Maryland General Hospital 

Dolores Dixon, B.S.P., University of Maryland Cancer Center 

Joseph Dorsch Jr., B.S.P., Voshell's Pharmacy 

Patricia Draper, B.S.P., Edward's Pharmacy 

Janice Dunsavage, B.S.P., Capital Health System Hospital 

Augustine R. Durso, B.S. Pharm., IV Tx 

Innocent Egbunine, B.S. P., Kaiser Permanente Medical Center 

Amy Elbers, B.S. P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Kenneth Ey, B.S. P., East Baltimore Medical Center 

Beth Fabian, B.S. P., K-Mart Pharmacy 

Darlene Fahrman, B.S. P., Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Denise Farmer, B.S. P., Kaiser Permanente Medical Center 

Neil Feldman, B.S. P., New Windsor Pharmacy 

Philip Fiastro, B.S. P., Weis Pharmacy # 128 

Barry Flannelly, B.S. P. .Johns Hopkins Hospital 

76 School of Pharmacy 



Anthea Francis, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Jeffrey P. Franklin, B.S.P., VA Medical Center - Ft. Howard 

Kate Frazer, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Louis Friedman, B.S.P., Marcus Pharmacy 

David Gerrold, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Nancy Gilbert-Taylor, B.S.P., Fuller Medical Center Pharmacy 

Harvey Goldberg, B.S.P., Freedom Drug 

Leonard Goldberg, B.S.P., Dofield Pharmacy 

Marvin Goldberg, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy # 1158 

MUard Gomez, B.S.P., Holy Cross Hospital 

Thomas Goolsby, B.S.P., Medicine Shoppe 

Karen Anderson Grace, B.S.P., HOMEDCO Infusion Company 

Charles Graefe, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Gary Greenberg, B.S.P., Edgehill Drugs, Inc. 

Franklin GroUman, B.S.P., NCI - Navy Medical Oncology Branch 

Robert Grossman, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy #1054 

Robert Gunn, B.S.P., Careline of Maryland Inc. 

Douglas Haggerty, B.S.P., The Medicine Shoppe 

John Hale, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy #2585 

Mayer Handelman, B.S.P., Woodhaven Pharmacy and Medical Equipment 

Stuart Hankin, B.S.P., Northern Nursing Home Pharmacy 

Jon (Wes) Hann, B.S.P., REVCO 

Mahtab Hariri-Salehi, B.S.P., University of Maryland Medical System 

Roger Heer, B.S.P., Valley Pharmacy 

Frank Henderson, B.S.P., Klein's of Bel Air 

Jerry Herpel, B.S.P., Deep Creek Pharmacy 

Joseph High, B.S.P., National Cancer Institute 

J. Todd Holland, B.S.P., Boonesboro Pharmacy 

Paul Holley, B.S.P., Tuxedo Pharmacy 

Brad Homman, B.S.P., Naval Hospital Patuxent River 

Stephen Hospodavis, B.S.P., Steve's Pharmacy 

Thomas Jackson, B.S.P., St. Mary's Hospital 

Robert Johnson, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Thomas Johnson Jr., B.S. P., Giant Pharmacy # 1175 

Ramon Juta, B.S. P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 

John Kamberger, B.S. P., Harford Memorial Hospital 

Robert R. Kantorski, B.S. P., Ritchie Pharmacy 

Albert Katz, B.S. P., Arundel Pharmacy 

Larry D. Kelley, B.S. P., Nationwide Pharmacy Center 

James Kenny, B.S. P., Virginia/Maryland Regional Veterinary College 

Daniel Keravich, M.S., NIH 

Edward Kern, B.S. P., Giant Pharmacy 

Lori Keys, B.S. P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Crystal King, B.S.P., MGH Pharmacy 

David King, B.S. P., Georgetown Infusion Center 

Larissa Kitenko, B.Sc, Peninsula Regional Medical Center 



Administration and Faculty 



David Knauer, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center 

Jay Krosnick, B.S.P., ASCO Healthcare Inc. 

Edmond Kucharski, B.S.P., Carroll County Hospital 

John Kudrick, B.S.P., Family Pharmacy 

Scott Kuperman, B.S.P., Crain Towers Pharmacy 

Earl Labatt, M.A., VA Medical Center - Washington, D.C. 

Steve Lauer, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Gary Lawrence, B.S.P., Lawrence Pharmacy 

Louise Leach, B.S.P., Northwest Hospital Center 

Weiraymond Lee, B.S.P., CVS # 1444 

Laura Lehman, Pharm.D., Union Memorial Hospital 

Mark Lenes, B.S.P., NorthWest HealthCare 

Melvin Lessing, B.S.P., FDA Office of OTC Evaluation 

John Levchuk, B.S.P., Office of Compliance 

Mark Levi, B.S.P., Medical Arts Pharmacy 

Bonnie Levin, Pharm.D., Laurel Regional Hospital 

Joseph Libercci, B.S.P., Park Avenue Pharmacy 

Glenn Lichtman, B.S.P., Holabird Pharmacy 

David Liebman, B.S.P., D.P.A., Kayes AID Pharmacy 

Tim Lubin, B.S.P., NeighborCare Pharmacies Inc. 

Heidi Lucking, B.S.P., Garrett County Memorial Hospital 

Alonzo Mable, B.S.P., Group Health Association 

Marie Mackowick, B.S.P., Crownsville Hospital Center 

Peter Tabi Mbi, B.S.P., K-Mart Pharmacy #3167 

John McArthur, B.S.P., Alaska Area Native Health Service 

Stephanie McDaniel, B.S.P., CVS # 1500 

Mark McDougall, B.S.P., McDougall's Pharmacy 

Helen McFarland, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Colleen McGowan, B.S.P., Marrion Merrell Dow 

Mary Mease, B.S.P., Ogden BioServices 

Janet Mighty, B.S.P., Mercy Medical Center 

Charles Mihalik, B.S.P., Maryland General Hospital 

Penny Miles, B.S.P., CVS #1458 

Harvey Miller, B.S.P., Rite Aid #352 

David Miller, B.S.P., Maryland Pharmacists Association 

Martin Mintz, B.S.P., Northern Pharmacy and Medical Equipment 

Kimberly Moore, B.S.P., Paradise Pharmacy 

Lynn Steele Moore, M.T., Medical Center ol Delaware 

Jeffrey Moyer, B.S.P., Waynesboro Hospital 

Charles Muendlein, B.S.P., Lykos Pharmacy 

Wendy Munroe, B.S.P., Health Outcomes 

Kevin Musto, B.S.P., Edgehill Drugs Inc. 

Timothy Muth, B.S.P., Syncor Medical Services (iroup 

Louis Myers, B.S.P., Harbor Hospital Center 

Linda Nadal-Hermida, B.S.P., K-Mart Pharmacy 

Cecilia Nathan, B.S.P., Liberty Medical Center 



School of Pharmacy 



Leon Nelson, B.S.P., Rite Aid 

John R. Newcomb, B.S.P., Nationwide Pharmacy 

Joseph Nusbaum, B.S.P., Ambulatory Care Pharmacy 

Sandra Oliver, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

John Ominski, B.S.P., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Michael J. Orsini, B.S.P., University of Maryland Medical Systems 

Helen Osborn, B.S.P., Montgomery General Hospital 

Richard Ottmar, M.S., Sacred Heart Hospital 

Mercy Owoh, B.S.P., Kaiser Permanente Medical Center 

Joseph Pariser, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy 

Daniel Pastorek, B.S.P., Kay Cee Drugs 

Sailesh Patel, B.S.P., Horizons Professional Pharmacy 

David Patterson, B.S.P., Memorial Hospital 

Robert Patti, B.S.P., Hanover General Hospital 

Martin Paul, B.S.P., Jacksonville Pharmacy 

Carol Paulick, B.S.P., St. Agnes Hospital 

Normand Pelissier, B.S.P., Church Hospital 

James Pellenbarg, B.S.P., Drug Counter 

David Perrott, B.S.P., Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital 

Mark Pilachowski, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Bonnie Pitt, B.S.P., Frederick Memorial Hospital 

Howard Pollack, B.S.P., Towson Pharmacy 

David Posner, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy # 1053 

John Pycha, B.S.P., Woodhaven Pharmacy 

Jacob Raitt, B.S.P., Weiner's Pharmacy 

Patricia Richards, B.S.P., Group Health Association 

Stephen Riggin, B.S.P., MacGillivray's of Paca 

Arthur Riley, M.S., Washington Heights Medical Center Pharmacy 

Carol Ritchie, B.S.P., The Thomas B. Finan Center 

Michael D. Roberts, B.S.P., National Rehabilitation Hospital 

Michael Roberts, B.S.P., Annapolis Professional Pharmacy 

David Rochlin, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy # 1074 

Jeffrey Rodkey, B.S.P., Rite Aid #335 

Leon Rosen, B.S.P., Kaufmann's of Kenilworth 

Dennis Rosenbloom, B.S.P., Rexall Pharmacy 

Richard Rumrill, M.S., Howard County General Hospital 

Cyrus Samet, B.S.P., Bon Secours Hospital 

Brian Sanderoff, B.S.P., Sappe's Pharmacy 

Daniel Satisky, B.S.P., MacGillivray's Pharmacy 

Angelica Schneider, B.S.P., NeighborCare Pharmacy Inc. 

Kenneth Schneider, B.S.P., Safeway Pharmacy 

Joseph Schuman, B.S.P., Maryland Rehabilitation Center 

Brian Schumer, B.S.P., Penn-Dol Pharmacy 

Donald A. Schumer, B.S.P., Penn-Dol Professional Pharmacy 

Gregory Shaeffer, B.S.P., The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 

Brent Sharf, B.S.P., Bon Secours Hospital 



Administration and Faculty 



Kelly Shaner, B.S.P., The Pharmacy at Fairmont Hill 

Winette Sherard, B.S.P., Walter P. Carter Center 

Bertram Shevitz, B.S.P., Rite Aid 

Robert Sinker, B.S.P., Potomac Village Pharmacy 

Dennis Smith, B.S.P., Greater Baltimore Medical Center 

John C. Smith, B.S.P., Giant Pharmac)' 

Sue Smith-Walls, B.S.P., Edgehill Drugs, Inc. 

Jennifer Snyder-Rowan, B.S.P., Thrift Drug 

Gary Sobotka, B.S.P., CVS 

Joseph Sokol Jr, B.S.P., Twin Knolls Pharmacy 

Raymond Spassil, M.S., Memorial Hospital 

Samuel Speedone, B.S.P., Frostburg Hospital 

Carol Stevenson, B.S.P., Fallston Hospital 

Jerry Stewart, B.S.P., Memorial Hospital 

Gary Ross Stout, B.S.P., Safeway Pharmacy # 1423 

Maria Surgent, B.S.P., Calvert Arundel Pharmacy 

William Tabak, B.S.P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Karen Tafoya, B.S.P., Southgate Professional Pharmacy 

Peter Tarn, B.S.P., Calvert Memorial Hospital 

Richard Tarr, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy #1074 

James Tauer, B.S.P., Crownpoint Indian Hospital 

Lawrence Taylor, B.S.P., REVCO #2707 

J. Bradley Thomas, B.S.P., The Medicine Shoppe 

Jodie Thomas, B.S.P., The Medicine Shoppe 

Vito Tinelli Jr., B.S.P., Chestertown Pharmacy 

Brian Trentler, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Penelope Trikeriotis, B.S.P., Giant Pharmacy #1211 

Kathleen Truelove, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Leila Valencia, B.S.P., NeighborCare Pharmacies Inc. 

John VanWie, B.S.P., Safeway Pharmacy 

Wayne VanWie, B.S.P., Safeway Pharmacy #1281 

Rebecca A. Viola, B.S.P., Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Doris R. Voigt, B.S.P., Kimbrough Army Community Hospital 

Dorothy Wade, B.S.P., Nat'l Pharmaceutical Council 

Ken Walters, Pharm.D., Sheppard Pratt Hospital 

Richard Wankel, B.S.P., Howard and Morris 

Pamela Waring, B.S.P., Group Health Association 

Robyn Warnick, B.S.P., V.A. Medical Center - Ft. Howard 

Jasper Watkins IH, B.S.P., Walter Reed Army Medical Outer 

Donald Way, B.S.P., North Arundel General Hospital 

C. Edwin Webb, Pharm.D., M.P.H. American Association of Colleges of 

Pharmacy 
David Weetman, B.S.P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 
Joann N. Wehnert, B.S.P., Apple Drug 
Michael Weinstein, B.S.P., The Apothecary 
Debra S. Weintraub, Pharm.D., Suburban Hospital 



School of Pharmacy 



Robert Whalen, B.S.P.. Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Thomas Wieland, B.S.P., Maxor Pharmacy 

Stephen Wienner, B.S.P., Medical Arts Pharmacy 

Lewis E. Williams, B.S.P., York Hospital 

Thomas Wilson, B.S.P., Cape Drug 

Thomas Williams, B.S. Pharm., Medical Center of Dundalk 

Deborah Winkel, M.A., Barre-National/AXL Laboratory 

Jane Wuenstel, B.S. P., Washington Adventist Hospital 

Ellen Yankellow, B.S. P., Choice Drug of Maryland 

Martin Yankellow, B.S. P., Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Irvin Yospa, B.S. P., Family Pharmacy of Hampstead 

Deirdre Younger, B.S. P., Health Center Pharmacy 

Jonas J. Yousem, B.S. P., Wilde Lake Pharmacy 

Faramarz Zarfeshanfard, B.S. P., Johns Hopkins Hospital 




Administration and Faculty 8 1 



Policy Statements 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT BALTIMORE MISSION 
STATEMENT 

The University of Maryland at Baltimore (UN4AB) aspires to advance knowledge 
in health care, law, social welfare and related disciplines through research, teaching 
and service; to promote partnerships and develop interdisciplinary/interprofes- 
sional programs that address critical issues in these areas; to assist in the integration 
and transfer of new knowledge; and to play a significant role in shaping health care, 
legal and social services for Maryland and the mid-Atlantic region. UMAB's prin- 
cipal goal is to become a center of focused excellence in professional, graduate and 
continuing education and to promote excellence in research and scholarship, both 
basic and applied. 

Located in downtown Baltimore, UMAB is the public institution in Mary- 
land responsible for providing caring and competent ptofessionals in dentistry, law, 
medicine, nursing, pharmacy and social work. It also offers combined degree pro- 
grams and is developing other interprofessional joint degree programs. Along with 
its three major partners (the University of Maryland System, the Baltimore Veter- 
ans Affairs Medical Center, and the Medical Biotechnology Center), UMAB is one 
of the fastest growing biomedical research centers in the nation and plays an impor- 
tant role in strengthening the infrastructure of the regional economy. 

As a constituent institution of the University of Maryland System, UMAB 
practices affirmative action, cooperates with other educational segments in Mar\'- 
land, collaborates with other UMS institutions to provide citizens access to high 
quality educational services and serves the educational, economic and cultural 
needs of Maryland. 

UMAB and UMBC administer the programs of the University ot Maryland 
Graduate School, Baltimore (UMGSB), one of the UMS_ two principal centers tor 
research and doctoral level training. While specific criteria for achieving excellence 
vary from school to school, UMAB expects its faculty to teach, to conduct research, 
and to practice their professional skills through clinical service, community inter- 
action and scholarship. 



FACULTY, STUDENT AND INSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 

Preamble 

IIk- academic enterprise is characterized by reasoned discussion between student 
anci teacher, a mutual respect for the learning and teaching process, and intellec- 
tual honesty in the pursuit of new knowledge. By tradition, students and teachers 
have certain rights and responsibilities which they bring to the academic commu- 
nity. While the following statements do not imply a contract between the teacher 



School of Pharmacy 



or the institution and the student, they are nevertheless conventions which should 
be central to the learning and teaching process. 

I. Faculty Rights and Responsibilities 

A. Faculty members shall share with students and administrators the respon- 
sibility for academic integrity. 

B. Faculty members shall enjoy freedom in the classroom to discuss subject 
matter reasonably related to the course. In turn, they have the responsi- 
bility to encourage free and honest inquiry and expression on the part of 
students. 

C. Faculty members, consistent with the principles of academic freedom, 
have the responsibility to present courses that are consistent with their 
descriptions in the catalog of the institution. In addition, faculty members 
have the obligation to make students aware of the expectations in the 
course, the evaluation procedures and the grading policy. 

D. Faculty members are obligated to evaluate students fairly, equitably and 
in a manner appropriate to the course and its objectives. Grades must be 
assigned without prejudice or bias. 

E. Faculty members shall make all reasonable efforts to prevent the occur- 
rence of academic dishonesty through appropriate design and adminis- 
tration of assignments and examinations, careful safeguarding of course 
materials and examinations, and regular reassessment of evaluation 
procedures. 

F. When instances of academic dishonesty are suspected, faculty members 
shall have the responsibility to see that appropriate action is taken in accor- 
dance with institutional regulations. 

II. Student Rights and Responsibilities 

A. Students share with faculty members and administrators the responsibil- 
ity for academic integrity. 

B. Students have the right of free and honest inquiry and expression in their 
courses. In addition, students have the right to know the requirements of 
their courses and to know the manner in which they will be evaluated and 
graded. 

C. Students have the obligation to complete the requirements of their 
courses in the time and manner prescribed and to submit to evaluation of 
their work. 

D. Students have the right to be evaluated lairly, equitably, and in a timely 
manner appropriate to the course and its objectives. 

E. Students shall not submit as their own work any work which has been pre- 
pared by others. Outside assistance in the preparation of this work, such 
as librarian assistance, tutorial assistance, typing assistance or such special 
assistance as may be specified or approved by the appropriate faculty 
members, is allowed. 

F. Students shall make all reasonable efforts to prevent the occurrence of aca- 
demic dishonesty. They shall by their own example encourage academic 

Policy Statements 83 



integrity and shall themselves refrain from acts of cheating and plagiarism 
or other acts of academic dishonesty. 
G. When instances of academic dishonesty are suspected, students shall have 
the right and responsibility to bring this to the attention of the facult)' or 
other appropriate authority. 

III. Institutional Responsibility 

A. Constituent institutions of the University of Maryland System shall take 
appropriate measures to foster academic integrity in the classroom. 

B. Each institution shall take steps to define acts of academic dishonest}', to 
ensure procedures for due process for students accused or suspected ot 
acts of academic dishonest)', and to impose appropriate sanctions on 
students found to be guilty of acts of academic dishonesty. 

C. Students expelled or suspended for reasons of academic dishonesty by 
any institution in the Universit)' of Maryland System shall not be admis- 
sible to any other UMS institution if expelled, or during any period of 
suspension. 



CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE 
OF STUDENT RECORDS 



It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Baltimore to adhere to the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment). As such, it is the pol- 
icy of the university (1) to permit students to inspect their education records, (2) 
to limit disclosure to others of personally identifiable information from education 
records without students' prior written consent and (3) to provide students the 
opportunit)' to seek correction of their education records where appropriate. Each 
school shall develop policies to ensure that this policy is implemented. 



SCHEDULING OF ACADEMIC ASSIGNMENTS 

ON DATES O^ RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCE 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Baltimore to excuse the absence(s) 
of students that result from the observance of religious holidays. Students shall be 
given the opportunity, whenever feasible, to make up, within a reasonable time, any 
academic assignments that are missed due to individual participation in religious 
observances. Opportunities to make up missed academic assignments shall be 
timely and shall not interfere with the regular academic assignments of the student. 
Each school/academic unit shall adopt procedures to ensure implementation of this 
policy. 



School of Pharmacy 



ELIGIBILITY TO REGISTER AT UMAB 



A student may register at UMAB when the following conditions are met: (1) the 
student is accepted to UMAB, (2) the student has received approval from the unit 
academic administrator and (3) the student has demonstrated academic and finan- 
cial eligibility. 



REVIEW OF ALLEGED ARBITRARY AND 

CAPRICIOUS GRADING 

It is the policy of the Universit)' of Maryland at Baltimore that students be provided 
a mechanism to review course grades that are alleged to be arbitrary or capricious. 
Each school/academic unit shall develop guidelines and procedures to provide a 
means for a student to seek review of course grades. These guidelines and proce- 
dures shall be published regularly in the appropriate media so that all faculty and 
students are informed about this policy. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POSITION ON 

ACTS OF VIOLENCE AND EXTREMISM WHICH ARE 

RACIALLY, ETHNICALLY, RELIGIOUSLY OR 

PO LITICALLY MOTIVATED 

The Board of Regents strongly condemns criminal acts of destruction or violence 
against the person or property of others. Individuals committing such acts at any 
campus or facility of the university will be subject to swift campus judicial and per- 
sonnel action, including possible suspension, expulsion or termination, as well as 
possible state criminal proceedings. 



SERVICE TO THOSE WITH INFECTIOUS DISEASES 



It is the policy of the University of Maryland at Baltimore to provide education and 
training to students for the purpose of providing care and service to all persons. The 
institution will employ appropriate precautions to protect providers in a manner 
meeting the patients' or clients' requirements, yet protecting the interest of students 
and faculty participating in the provision of such care or service. 

No student will be permitted to refuse to provide care or service to any 
assigned person in the absence of special circumstances placing the student at 
increased risk for an infectious disease. Any student who refuses to treat or serve an 
assigned person without prior consent of the school involved will be subject to 
penalties under appropriate academic procedures, such penalties to include sus- 
pension or dismissal. 



Policy Statements 



HUMAN RELATIONS CODE 



Article I — Purpose 

A. The University of Maryland at Baltimore (UMAB) is committed to the prin- 
ciples of free inquiry. It is also committed to human service. These commit- 
ments imply respect for all people, irrespective of any personal characteristics, 
and evaluation and advancement of individuals on the basis of their abilities 
and accomplishments with regard to all university matters. 

UMAB affirms its commitment to a policy of eliminating unlawful discrim- 
ination on the basis of race, color, creed, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, age, 
ancestry or national origin, physical or mental handicap or exercise of rights secured 
by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. UMAB also is com- 
mitted to eliminating unlawful sexual harassment, which is recognized as sex dis- 
crimination. UMAB will not condone racism, bigotry or hatred in any form 
directed to any individual or group of individuals under any circumstances. 

B. UMAB establishes this Human Relations Code consistent with the policies of 
the Board of Regents of the University of Maryland System. The specific pur- 
pose of this Code is to prevent of eliminate discrimination which is unlawful. 
This goals is to be accomplished through educational programs and through 
existing grievance procedures. 

Article 11 — Scope of the Code 

A. This Code prohibits unlawful discrimination by the university, or by those 
using university facilities, with respect to employment, student placement ser- 
vices, promotion, or the award of academic or economic benefits on the basis 
of race, color, creed, sec, sexual orientation, martial status, age, ancestry or 
national origin, physical or mental handicap, or the exercise of rights secured 
by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. The code does not 
apply to potential students, potential employees and to business relations 
between the university and other individuals or organizations. 

B. Nothing is this Code shall be construed to prohibit adoption of requirements 
cleanliness, neatness, uniforms, or other prescribed standards when uniformly 
applied for admittance to any facility for participation in clinical education or 
clinical activities, or when a standard is required in the interest of public rela- 
tions or to avoid danger to the health, welfare or safety of any individual, 
including students, employees, or the public. 

C. Exceptions 

1 . The enforcement of federal, State, or Baltimore City laws and regulation 
does not constitute prohibited discrimination for the purposes of this 
Code. Separate housing or other facilities for men and women, mandatory 
retirement age requirements, variations in benefit packages based on mar- 
ital status, and religious and ethnic/cultural clubs are not prohibited. 

2. This Code is not to be construed to alter the methods by which promo- 
tions in academic rank may be achieved or by which salaries of faculty or 
employees may be determined. However, if in the course of any grievance, 
it is alleged that discrimination has resulted in unfair application of stan- 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



dards of promotion or salary change, the appropriate fact finder may make 
a report to the campus authority responsible for making a final decision in 
the matter. The report will be advisory. 

D. Specific activities subject to the Code. 

The Code shall apply to the UMAB community in relation to activities 
including: 

1. All educational, athletic, cultural and social activities occurring on the 
campus or at another location under UMAB's jurisdiction. 

2. All services rendered by the campus to students, faculty and staff, such as 
job placement programs and off-campus listings of housing. 

3. University sponsored programs occurring off-campus, including cooper- 
ative programs, adult education, including education and seminars. 

4. Subject to limitations stated previously, employment relations between 
UMAB and all of its employees, including faculty. 

5. The conduct of UMAB employees and their colleagues, supervisors or sub- 
ordinates who are employed by UMAB's affiliates (e.g., UMMS). 
Although UMAB cannot directly control the behavior of affiliates' 
employees, UMAB will work with its affiliates to eliminate action by their 
personnel contrary to this code. 

E. In the event of any questions about the applicability of the Code to a specific 
issue presented in a grievance, the UMAB president shall make the final deci- 
sion concerning the scope of the Code. 

Article III — Administrative Matters 

This Code shall be effective July 1 , 1987, or, if later , upon receipt of final approval 
(a) from the Chancellor of the University of Maryland System and, (b) with respect 
to form and legal sufficiency, from the Office of the Attorney General. This Code 
is subject to modification by the President with the approval of the Office of the 
Attorney General as to form and legal sufficiency. With regard to all issues, the 
Code shall be interpreted to be consistent with Borad of Regents policies, with laws 
and regulations applicable to the university, and with the principles that final deci- 
sions with respect to academic promotions, establishment of salaries, and grading 
and evaluation of students shall be made by the academic community and not pur- 
suant to this Code. (Last modified 7/93) 



Policy Statements 



STUDENT SEXUAL HARASSMENT 



UMAB policy prohibits sexual harassment of students by colleagues or faculty. 
Using the definition established by the United States Equal Employment Oppor- 
tunity Commission, sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, 
unwelcome requests for sexual behaviors, and other behavior of a sexual nature. 
Proven harassment can result in disciplinary action including suspension or expul- 
sion. Questions about peer or faculty behavior that may constitute sexual harass- 
ment may be directed to the Associate Dean of Student Affairs and Student 
Administration or to the Director of Student Services. Additional information on 
the definition, examples and remedies for sexual harassment are contained in the 
campus publication. The Student Answer Book. 

No provision of this publication shall be construed as a contract between any 
applicant or student and the University of Maryland at Baltimore. The university 
reserves the right to change any admission or advancement requirement at any time. The 
university further reserves the right to ask a student to withdraw at any time when it is 
considered to be in the best interest of the university. 



School of Pharmacy 



TO REACH THE CAMPUS 



The university is located in downtown Baltimore, six blocks west of the 
Inner Harbor and two blocks north of Oriole Park at Camden Yards in the 
UniversiryCenter district. 

Directions 

From 1-95: Take Rte. 395 (downtown Baltimore) and exit onto Martin Luther 
King Jr. Blvd., staying in right lane. At fourth traffic light, turn right onto Balti- 
more St. Turn left at second traffic light onto Paca St. 
(get into right lane) and enter the Baltimore Grand Garage (on your right). 

Bus 

MTA routes 1, 2, 7, 8, 11, 20, 35 and 36 serve the campus. 

Subway 

The Baltimore Metro runs from Charles Center to Owings Mills. Stops nearest the 
university are at Lexington Market and Charles Center. 

Light Rail 

Light rail connects park and ride locations in northern Baltimore County and Ori- 
ole Park at Camden Yards, then continues south to Glen Burnie. The 
UniversiryCenter stop is two blocks east of campus on Baltimore Street. 

Train 

MARC commuter service runs from Camden Station, 301 W. Camden Street. 




Campus Maps 



UniversityCenter Area, University of Maryland at Baltimore 





1 ^ns 




Isi^^iiil 




VP Visitor? Parking OP Oencal Patient Parking PP Patient Parlong SP Student Parking PO Parking Office 



Patient Care Facilities 






Dunning Ha 

636 West L 

East Hall 

S20 West Lombard Street 

Environmental Health 

and Safety Building 

714 West Lombard Street 



I South Greene Street 



Law Schiool and Marshall 

Law Library 

500 West Baltimore Street 



Maryland Bar Center 
520 West Fayene Street 
Medical Biotechnology Center 
721 West Lombard Street 



655 West Baltimore Street 
Medical School Teaching 

10 South Pine Street 



Pascault Row 
65 1 -655 West L 



20 North Pine Street 



Ronald McDonald House 
635 West Lexington Street 
Social Work School 
52S West Redwood Street 
SDte Medical Examiner's 
Building 






Whitehurst Hall 

624 West Lombard Street 

405 West Redwood 

Street Building 

701 West Pratt Street 

Building 

University Health Center 

1 20 South Greene Street 

University of Maryland 

22 South Greene Street 
University of Maryland 
Professional Building 
419 West Redwood Street 
Veterans Affairs Medical 



Cultural and Civic Facilitie 



48 Dr Samuel D, Harris 
National Museum of 
Dentistry (opening 1996) 

44 Lexington Market 

43 Market Center Post Office 
4 7 Old Saint Pauls Cemetery 

45 Oriole Park at Omden Yards 
34 Westminster Hall 

Parking Facilities 

VP Baltimore Grand Garage 

DP Dental Patient Parking Lot 

(dental patients) 
SP Lexington Garage 



transporters) 
P Public Parking Facilities 

Assigned University Parl<ing 

A Koesters Lots 

B Pearl Garage/Parking Office 

C Penn Street Garage 

D Pratt Street Garage 

£ Other assigned parking area 



( 



School of Pharmacy 



student Right-to-Know and 
Campus Security Act Request 

The Sludciit Hi^ilit-to-Kium and CaTiipus Security Act (Public Law 101-542), signed 
into federal law N(iveini)er8. 1990. requires that the University of Maryland at Balti- 
more make readily available to its students and prospective students the information 
listed below. 

Should you wish to obtain any of this information, please check the a|)propriate 
space(s). fill in your name, mailing address and UMAB school name, tear off this form 
and sen<i it to: 

University Office of Student Affairs 
Attn: Student Right-to-Know Request 
University of Maryland at Baltimore 
Suite 336, Baltimore Student Union 
621 West Lombard Street 
Baltimore, MD 21201 



Complete and return this portion 




□ Financial Aid 




D Costs of Allendin- the Universily of Marylaml at Bal 


imore 


D Refund Policy 




D Facilities ami Services for Handicapped 




D Procedures l,)r Kc\ leu (ilScliool and Campus \c, m 


liUilion 



D Cornpleli(.n/(;raduali()M Kales for L'ndergraduale Students 

D Loan Defeiial under the Peace Corps and Domestic Volunteer Services Act 

D Campus SalriN and Security 

D Campus Crime Statistics 

Name 




UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

MORE 



Years 1997-1998 missing 



I 






Doctor of Pharmacy 1999 - 2001 Catalog 

versity of Maryland • School of Pharmacy 




1999-2001 Catalog 

for Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 

Volume 60, Number 1 
August 1999 

University of Maryland 
School of Pharmacy 
20 N. Pine St. 
Baltimore, MD 21201-1180 

Program Information: 410-706-7653 

or 800-852-2988 (Toll Free) 
Admissions Office Pharni Dhelp@rx.umaryland.edu 

Nontraditionai Pathway Info 410-706-0761 

Dean's Office 410-706-7650 

Financial Aid (UMB) 410-706-7347 

Public Affairs 410-706-5893 

Web site ivu'w.phiirnuny.umaryland.edu 



The University of Maryland is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. The School of Phar- 
macy's Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) programs and continuing education programs are accredited by the American 
Council on Pharmaceutical Education. [For additional information, contact ACPE, 311 W. Superior St. . Chicago. 11. 
60610 (312-664-3575).! The school is a member of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

The University of Maryland is actively committed to providing equal educational and employment opportunity in all of 
its programs. It is the goal of the university to assure that women and minorities are equitably represented among the fac- 
ulty, staff and administration of the university so that its workforce reflects the diversity of Maryland's population. 



All employment policies and activities of the University of Maryland shall be consistent with federal and state laws, regu- 
lations and executive orders on nondiscrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, age, ancestry national origin, sex, 
sexual orientation, handicap, marital status and veteran sittrus. Sexual harassment, as a form of sex discrimination, is 
prohibited among the workforce of the university. 

Produced by the I Imversity of Maryknd Office of Publications »''" ^1 



I 



1999-2001 Catalog 

University of Maryland 
School of Pharmacy 

Doctor of Pharmacy Program 



MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN 



Dear Students and Colleagues: 

Health-care delivery in todays society has been transformed. New medical tech- 
nologies, new drugs, and new drug delivery systems are paving the way to a 
healthier world. Patients, who once had little say in their own health care, now 
have not only a desire but also the means to better understand their conditions 
and their medications. The Internet is providing everyone access to a wealth of 
information. And pharmacists — whether in community or hospital practice, the 
pharmaceutical industry, or government or nonprofit organizations — are playing 
a major role in developing new and innovative medicines, managing patient drug 
therapy, and helping patients understand and manage the plethora of informa- 
tion available about the medicines they take. 

Pharmacy education is adapting to the demands of the 
changing health-care climate. A new philosophy has emerged 
with the goal of achieving outcomes that lead to the improve- 
ment of a patient's quality of life. In short, pharmacists 
educated to meet today's and tomorrow's health needs are 
concerned about how medications affect patients and the 
quality of life derived from those medications. 

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has 
developed a curriculum that emphasizes problem-solving and 
critical thinking, and changes the focus from teaching to learning. Through inno- 
vative learning experiences — including flexibility in course structure, optional 
pathways offering concentrations in specific areas of a student's interest, 
expanded opportunities for electives, and shorter time-frames for coursework — 
Maryland students learn to practice as patient-oriented health-care providers who 
can work as part of a multiprofessional health-care team. Students have expanded 
use of information technology and the Internet which provides additional tools 
to enhance their learning. 

Highlights of our strategic plan appear on page two. Our core goals embrace 
not only education but also research and scholarly efforts to make greater contri- 
butions to the discovery, development and use of medicines. The cross-cutting 
goals are intended to look beyond our own horizons to develop outreach pro- 
grams and to support the practice of pharmacy in general. 

I hope you find this catalog helpful as you browse through the course offerings 
and explore other information about our School of Pharmacy and the University of 
Maryland campus. For more current information, see our web site: www.phannacy. 
umaryland.edu or write me at dknapf@rx.umaryland.edu. 




David A. Knapp, PhD 

Dean 

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 



Contents 



THE UNIVERSITY 

OF MARYLAND 3 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 8 

DOCTOR OF PHARMACY 

(PHARMD) PROGRAM 14 

NONTRADITIONAL 

PATHWAY 24 

APPLICATION AND 

ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 27 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 32 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION 36 

ADMINISTRATION 

AND FACULTY 48 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

POLICY STATEMENTS 62 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 76 

AREA AND CAMPUS MAPS 98 

STUDENT RIGHT-TO-KNOW AND 

CAMPUS SECURITY ACT REQUEST 102 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 
STRATEGIC PLAN 

Through its education, research and service programs, the University of Marj'land 
School of Pharmacy strives to improve the health and well-being of society by 
aiding in the discovery, development and use of medicines. Specifically, the goals 
and objectives of the School of Pharmacy include the following: 

Core Goals 

1 . Educate pharmacists as lifelong learners through an excellent doctor of 
pharmacy curriculum, postdoctoral residency and fellowship programs 
and curricular-based adult education programs. 

2. Strengthen the School's research and scholarly efforts in order to make 
greater contributions to the discovery, development and use of medicines. 

3. Prepare graduates for careers in independent investigation in the pharma- 
ceutical, clinical, social and administrative sciences through outstanding 
graduate education programs. 

4. Provide cutting-edge clinical and population-based pharmaceutical care 
services to meet individual and communit)' needs while supporting our 
education and research efforts. 

Cross-cutting Goals 

5. Serve as leaders for creativity and innovation tor the profession ot pharmacy 
in Maryland. 

6. Improve the academic/work environment for students, staff and faculty 
of the School. 

7. Extend the reach of the School by continuing to build international rela- 
tionships in professional and graduate education, research and service. 

8. Improve the School's information technology in order to enhance all of 
its programs. 

GOALS OF THE DOCTOR OF PHARMACY CURRICULUM 

The goals and objectives of the PharmD program are consistent with the School's 
strategic plan: 

• The School of Pharmacy seeks to help individuals gain the knowledge and skills 
necessary to begin pharmacy practice, and in so doing, accept and perform pro- 
fessional responsibilities with competence. Graduates should have the ability to 
adapt their practice to the changing health-care system and should be prepared 
to engage in a continuing program of professional development. 

• The professional curricula will be innovative and flexible, based on strong basic 
sciences, have extensive clinical content taught by practice-based faculty and 
emphasize the development of problem solving and collaborative skills. The curric- 
ula also provided the opportunity for advanced professional and clinical education. 

• The School seeks to create an educational community that extends beyond tradi- 
tional classroom sites and offers students and faculty a variety of learning 
environments. These will include cultural and interprofessional programs which 
broaden the experiences of our graduates. 

2 School of Pharmacy 



The University of Maryland 



The University of Maryland is the founding campus of Maryland's public univer- 
sity system and a thriving center of life sciences research and community service. 
Six professional schools and a graduate school educate research scientists and 
many of the region's health-care, law and social work practitioners. 

With $146 million in sponsored program support in 1998, the campus is one 
of the fastest-growing biomedical research centers in the country. The University is 
ideally configured to tackle complex health-care, public policy and societal issues. 
Our urban location and unique strengths create opportunities to comprehensively 
address regional problems. Often, our solutions have global implications. AIDS, 
aging, schizophrenia, hypertension, lead poisoning, cancer, child abuse and home- 
lessness all are subjects of collaborative multidisciplinary research, scholarship and 
community action at the University. 

New partnerships among University components and with the University 
of Maryland Medical System and Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center 
are strengthening interdisciplinary endeavors in both research and teaching. Our 
proximity to Baltimore, Washington and Annapolis maximizes opportunities 
for collaboration with government agencies, health-care institutions and life 
sciences industries. 



HEALTH SCIENCES AND HUMAN SERVICES LIBRARY 

In 1998, the new state-of-the-art Health Sciences and Human Services Library 
opened at 601 West Lombard Street. The new facility tripled the floor space of 
the old library. In addition to its seating capacity of over 900, the library has three 
microcomputer teaching labs, a distance education center, over 50 public access 
workstations, 165 workstations and 40 small group study rooms. Although fully 
wired and networked, the building also provides comfortable couches and chairs, 
a cafe and beautiful ceremonial and historical rooms. 

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library is distinguished as the first 
library established by a medical school in the United States, and is a national model 
of state-of-the art information technology. The HS/HSL is the regional medical 
library for 10 southeastern states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the 
U.S. Virgin Islands as part of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. 

Serving all schools on campus and the University of Maryland Medical Sys- 
tem, the library contains more than 325,000 volumes, including over 2,300 
periodicals. It is among the 25 largest health sciences libraries in the country. 

In addition to traditional services such as reference support and interlibrary 
loan, the HS/HSL offers an array of services including: 

• Electronic access to the online catalog and over a dozen research 
databases including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Aidsline, International 
Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Science Citation Index Expanded, Social 
Work Abstracts and others in support of campus curricula and programs. 

The University of Maryland 3 



• Electronic access for photocopy requests, interlibrary loans and book 
requests. 

• Online access to the reference desk hsl@uniaryland.edu and the com- 
puter help desk help@umaryland.edu 

• An HS/HSL home page www.umaryland.edu/hshsl pTovidin^ access to 
the library's full range of information and services. 

• An array of educational resources covering communication, computing, 
database and information management topics. 

• Consultation services to help find, use and manage online information 
resources more effectively. 

• Help in integrating information skills into curricula and courses. 

• Access to both Mac and DOS/Windows-based microlabs in the HS/HSL. 
To contact the library, call 410-706-7996 or write to hsl@umaryland.edu. 



UNIVERSITY COMPUTER RESOURCES 



Two Information Services units — Academic Computing/Health Informatics and 
Computing and Instructional Development Services — provide comprehensive 
microcomputer and mainframe computing support for faculty, staff and students. 

IS resources for research, teaching and learning include an information com- 
mons area in the Health Sciences and Human Services Library. The commons 
offers 37 Windows-based machines and access to e-mail, databases, the World 
Wide Web, word processing, desktop publishing, spreadsheet and other software, 
as well as color printers and resources for preparing overheads or color slides. 

The campus community has access to free e-mail accounts to communicate 
with others at the University and internationally by the Internet. The campus 
network, UMnet, also provides access to HS/HSL resources. 

Computer help is available at 410-706-HELP (4357) or via e-mail, at 
help@umaryland.edu. Training workshops are available on a variety of computing 
information topics. Class schedules are published in the fall and spring. There are 
charges for some of the classes. Call 410-706-4763 for information. The campus 
community may use TAL Centers for application program training. Call the help 
desk for additional information on campus microcomputer locations, training, 
network resources and e-mail packages. 



STUDENT AND EMPLOYEE HEALTH 



Student and Employee Health provides comprehensive health care to students. 
The office is located at the University Family Practice, 29 South Paca Street. 
Staffed by family physicians and nurse practitioners, the office is open Monday 
through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 
and Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to noon. 

Patients are generally seen by appointment (by calling 410-328-6645), 
although true emergencies can be seen on a walk-in basis. Doctors can be reached 



School of Pharmacy 



after hours and on weekends at 410-328-8792. The doctor on call will arrange 
for examination and care of students needing after-hours care. 

Gynecological services, including health maintenance (Pap smears, etc.), 
family planning and routine procedures, are provided by either the family physi- 
cians or the nurse practitioners. Birth control pills are available at a reduced cost 
for students receiving their GYN care through Student and Employee Health. 
Students' families also may receive care at this office through Family Medicine 
Associates, the clinical practice of the School of Medicine's Department of 
Family Medicine. For an appointment, call 410-328-6645; lor information call 
410-328-8792. 

All full-time students must have health insurance. An excellent insurance pol- 
icy providing wide coverage, including obstetrical care, is available through the 
University. The cost of most of the care provided at Student and Employee 
Health is covered largely by the student health fee. 

Hepatitis B is an occupational illness for health-care providers. It has serious 
consequences and can even be fatal. Immunization against Hepatitis B is required 
for pharmacy, medical, medical technology, dental, dental hygiene and nursing 
students. The series of three immunizations is given through Student and 
Employee Health. 

The staff of Student and Employee Health maintain strict confidentiality; no 
medical or other information is given to any source without the student's written 
permission. 



COUNSELING CENTER 

The Counseling Center provides professional individual and group counseling to 
students. Some of the more common problems that face students include stress, 
relationships, drugs or alcohol, eating disorders, loss of a loved one and difficult 
changes in school or home life. 

Students are always seen by a professional — social worker, psychologist, psy- 
chiatrist or addictions counselor. Costs associated with seeing a therapist usually 
are covered by health insurance; however, no one is ever denied services based on 
inability to pay. Students are seen by appointment at 410-328-8404, and the cen- 
ter can accommodate students' class schedules in scheduling appointments. All 
Counseling Center services are completely confidential. The center is in the Bal- 
timore Student Union, 621 West Lombard Street, Suite 218. 



PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION 



Campus parking is available to students. Commuting students must get a parking 
permit (cost: $1), which permits parking on the campus but does not guarantee a 
parking space. Commuters can park at the Lexington Garage and Koester's open lot 
(Lexington and Pine Streets), at the current student rate ($3.50/day) on a first-come, 
first-served basis. If spaces are unavailable, students will be directed to other lots. 



The University of Maryland 



Students who live on campus pay for parking by the semester or year and are 
guaranteed 24-hour parking in a garage adjacent to their residence faciUty. For 
more information about campus parking, write Parking and Commuter Services, 
University of Maryland, 622 W. Fayette St., Baltimore, MD 21201 or call 410- 
706-6603. 

The campus also sponsors a "Caravan" shuttle bus service that transports stu- 
dents from designated areas on campus to the main parking facilities and to 
several nearby neighborhoods. The service is free to students, faculty and staff 
with University ID. Call the University's Student Services office for the schedule 
and routes (410-706-7117). 

Public transportation makes the campus accessible by bus, subway and light 
rail. A number of Mass Transit Authority bus routes serve the campus. For more 
information, call the MTA at 410-539-5000. The Baltimore Metro Subway runs 
between Charles Center and Owings Mills. The trip takes about 25 minutes. 
Stops closest to campus are at Lexington Market and Charles Center. For more 
information, call the MTA number above. The Light Rail line runs from north- 
ern Baltimore County to points south of the city including Glen Burnie and BWI 
Airport. The University stop is three blocks east of campus, at Baltimore and 
Howard Streets. The Maryland commuter train service (MARC) runs from 
Camden Station, 301 West Camden Street, at Howard St. For information, call 
800-325-7245. Amtrak trains run from Penn Station, 1500 N. Charles Street at 
Mt. Royal Avenue. For information, call 800-523-8720. 



LIVING IN BALTIMORE 

Baltimore is a fun, friendly city with many affordable and convenient housing 
options. The brochure University Housing Options, which describes on- and off- 
campus student housing, is available from the Housing Office in room 122 of the 
student union, or by calling 410-706-7766. 

On-campus housing includes two University complexes — the Baltimore 
Student Union and Pascault Row Apartments — featuring apartments and dormi- 
tory style rooms as well as unfurnished apartments in a half-dozen privately 
owned loft-district buildings around the campus. 

Many students choose to live in neighborhoods near the campus. A wide 
range of rooms, apartments and home rentals are also available throughout the 
Baltimore metropolitan area. For more information about available rooms and 
apartments, stop by the Housing Office, call 410-706-8087 or visit www.UMB- 
Apartment-Guide. com. 



THE CITY OF BALTIMORE 

In addition to professional opportunities, Baltimore offers a stimulating environ- 
ment in which to live and study. Several blocks from the campus is the nationally 
acclaimed Inner Harbor area, where Harbor place, the National Aquarium, the 

6 School of Pharmacy 



Maryland Science Center and other facilities share an attractive waterfront with 
sailboats, hotels, restaurants and townhouses. The Baltimore Metro, Light Rail, 
and buses link downtown with the suburbs. 

Baltimore boasts lively entertainment, world-class museums, fine music and 
professional theaters. For sports fans, Baltimore features Orioles baseball with 
Camden Yards stadium being only two blocks from campus. Ravens football, 
whose stadium is next to Camden Yards, and the Baltimore Thunder league- 
winning lacrosse. The nearby Chesapeake Bay offers unparalleled water sports 
and the seafood for which the region is famous. 



CLOSE TO WASHINGTON, DC 



The campus is located 50 miles from the nation's capital — home to many profes- 
sional organizations, including the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 
and the American Pharmaceutical Association. The School's proximity to the 
District of Columbia offers numerous opportunities for students and faculty to 
participate in health-care policy and research programs or activities. Many stu- 
dents complete their experiential rotations with these organizations. An economic, 
political and cultural center, Washington also affords researchers access to some of 
the world's best libraries, including the Library of Congress and the National 
Library of Medicine. 

Washington also offers countless sightseeing opportunities. Visitors to the city 
of monuments, memorials and museums frequent such historic landmarks as the 
Capitol, the White House and Ford's Theater, or explore the Smithsonian's muse- 
ums or the National Zoo. Washington is also served by an excellent public 
transportation system. 



The University of Maryland 



The School of Pharmacy 



THE SCHOOL AND ITS HISTORY 



The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has a rich and distinguished 
heritage. First incorporated as the Maryland College of Pharmacy on January 27, 
1841, it is the oldest pharmacy school in the South and the fourth oldest in the 
country. Primarily an independent institution until 1904, the Maryland College 
of Pharmacy then became the department of pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland. In 1920, the University of Maryland in Baltimore merged with the 
Maryland State College at College Park to form the state University. Today, the 
School is one of the seven professional schools of the University of Maryland. 

Throughout its history, the School of Pharmacy has been a local and national 
leader in the profession of pharmacy. It was a founding member of the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the professional organization established to 
formulate uniform standards for the graduation of pharmacy 
students. The School was also instrumental in the formation of the American 
Council for Pharmaceutical Education, the national accreditation organization 
for schools of pharmacy. 

In 1970, through the efforts of the School and the Maryland Board of Pharmac)', 
Maryland became the first state to replace unstructured internships with a profes- 
sional experience program incorporated in the School's curriculum, setting a 
national standard for professional pharmacy education. In 1980, Maryland became 
the first School of Pharmacy to establish a Center for the Study of Pharmacy and 
Therapeutics for the Elderly, now the national model for pharmacy geriatric educa- 
tion. In 1993, Maryland again set a new benchmark for the nation by implementing 
a pace-setting Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program. 



COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY 



The School strives to achieve racial, sexual and ethnic diversity in its enrollment. To 
achieve this objective every consideration is given to minority student applicants. 
The 1999 enrollment statistics reflect the diversity of the student population: 49% 
Caucasian, 27% Asian, 15% African-American, 6% International, 2% Hispanic 
and 1% Native American. 



COMPLIANCE WITH ADA LEGISLATION 



in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the School 
examines all aspects of its programs and services to ensure accessibility to quali- 
fied students with disabilities. From recruitment to commencement, the School 



School of Pharmacy 



strives to create an environment that respects individual differences while 
challenging students to perform to their optimal ability. Modifications tailored 
to the needs of the diverse student population include applications, brochures, 
course materials and examinations offered in alternate formats and modifying 
the length of time to complete degree requirements. Equally important, the 
administration reviews organizational activities that would prohibit participa- 
tion by students with disabilities and provides services for these students to 
ensure their rights and protection under the law. With increased use of computer 
technology, the School makes information more accessible and is better able to 
serve students with disabilities. 



FACILITIES 

The School moved to Pharmacy Hall, a seven-story facility on Pine Street, in 
1982. Situated at the west entrance to the campus, Pharmacy Hall houses class- 
rooms and lecture facilities, research laboratories, conference rooms and 
administrative offices for the School of Pharmacy. Pharmacy Hall also houses a 
GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) facility capable of producing drugs for 
human consumption. The Pharmacy Learning Center opened in 1999 and 
houses teaching laboratories, a lecture hall, classrooms, seminar rooms, a student 
lounge, a web-based instructional development facility and faculty offices. The 
building is wired for Internet access. Projection systems enable presenters to make 
Power Point presentations and utilize Web sites in their lectures. 

Some members of the Pharmacy Practice and Science Department are located 
two blocks away in the five-story Allied Health Building, which opened in 1992. 
Located at 100 Penn Street, it is located diagonally across from the Maryland 
Pharmacists Association offices in the Kelly Building at 650 West Lombard 
Street. School staff and faculty are also located in the Century Building, at 
506 West Fayette Street, the Greene Street Building (100 N. Greene St.), and the 
University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute on Lombard Street. 



COMMUNITY AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICE AND RESEARCH 
SUPPORT PROGRAMS 

In addition to its degree programs, the School offers several community service and 
research support programs. The School's Academic Computing Laboratory is 
located on the third floor of Pharmacy Hall. It has 1 8 computers for professional 
student and general use, as well as a laser printer. The School has 303 computers — 
271 IBMs and 32 Macintosh — and 215 printers, including 60 laser printers and 
one color laser. These computers are linked to a Local Area Network (LAN) to 
share files, software and to use electronic mail. Additional computers are located in 
the Swain Pharmacy Practice Laboratory, equipped with state of the art computers 
and pharmacy software for educational use. 



The School of Pharmacy 



The Biomedicinai Chemistry NMR Center houses a G.E. 300 MHZ nuclear 
magnetic resonance spectrometer. The superconducting magnet, the heart of the 
instrument, is permanently immersed in a vacuum-jacket reservoir of liquid helium 
(-260°C) and allows the detection and accurate determination of protons, '^C,"P 
and other nuclei of biological importance. The NMR was the first instrument of its 
kind on campus that opened up many new avenues of research within the School, 
greatly increasing the number of inter-school collaborative ventures. 

The Center on Drugs and Public Policy contributes to informed debate of 
drug policy issues in our society. In addition to conducting research on major 
drug policy issues, the center organizes conferences and workshops and serves as 
a consultant on drug issues to organizations in the private and public sectors. 
Fellowships or externships are available to professionals from industry, state and 
local agencies, foreign governments, or universities who want a campus-based 
experience in drug-related policy research as well as an orientation to relevant 
agencies and organizations based in the Baltimore- Washington area. 

The Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging serves as the focal point 
of all of the School's geriatric education, service and research activities. It provides 
continuing education programs on both the state and national levels. Federal and 
private funding supports the center's efforts to foster relevant research by faculty 
and graduate students from all School departments. The Center administers the 
Elder-Health Program, which informs pharmacy students and retired pharma- 
cists about the social and psychological aspects of drug use among the elderly, as 
well as the therapeutic goals of treatment for prescribed and over-the-counter 
medications. The students and retirees then take this knowledge and provide pre- 
sentations to elderly members of the community. 

The Computational Chemistry Laboratory is where mathematical models are 
applied to the study of biochemical systems. The goal of these studies is to better 
understand the relationship between the three-dimensional structure and dynamics 
of biological molecules and their physiological function. Such knowledge allows for 
detailed analysis of the molecular basis of disease, a rational basis for the design of 
therapeutic agents. These approaches greatly increase the efficiency of the drug 
discovery process and can lead to significant savings of both time and money, of 
which may ultimately be passed on to the consumer. 

The Mass Spectrometry Laboratory houses equipment used to determine the 
structure of unknown chemicals and provide quantitative measurements of drugs 
and chemicals from a variety of sample sources. The laboratory's focus is on both 
basic and applied research, increasing analytical services on the University of 
Maryland campus and supporting expanded mass spectrometry-rclated research 
activities in the larger scientific community. 

The Maryland Poison Center serves as the regional poison center for the state 
of Maryland. As an emergency telephone service, it provides 24-hour toxicity and 
treatment information to the general public and to health professionals. Staffed by 
pharmacists and registered nurses, the center handles over 54,000 poison-related 
calls each year. It is certified by the American Association of Poison Control Cen- 
ters as a regional poison center. University of Maryland health professional 



School of Pharmacy 



students wotk within the center. It serves as an educational site for both pharmacy 
students and medical residents. 

The Mental Health Program of the School of Pharmacy is a joint venture 
with the Developmental Disabilities Administration and Mental Hygiene 
Administration of the state of Maryland. Its primary goal is to upgrade all aspects 
of pharmacy practice within the state's mental health facilities. The program also 
serves as a site for pharmacologic and administrative research in mental health, a 
testing ground for the development of innovative strategies in mental health 
pharmacy practice and a training resource for mental-health-related issues. Mem- 
bers of the School's faculty serve at nine mental health sites around the state. 

The Office of Substance Abuse Studies conducts research and community 
service in the field of substance abuse and dependence. OSAS is also responsible 
for the School's drug and alcohol abuse programs, including administration of 
the Student Committee on Drug Abuse Education (SCODAE), operation of a 
drug-abuse information telephone service and publication of the quarterly 
newsletter PharmAlert. SCODAE is a volunteer organization of pharmacy stu- 
dents who, with faculty support and guidance, are committed to the 
development of rational attitudes about drugs by serving as a source for accurate, 
unbiased drug information. SCODAE students present drug education lectures 
to a variety of groups from elementary school children to health-care providers. 

University Pharmaceuticals of Maryland, Inc., a for-profit corporation, is a 
subsidiary of the Pharmaceutical Education Development Corporation, a not-for- 
profit foundation created by the School of Pharmacy. UPM is a contract resource 
organization that offers a modern GMP facility and an analytical/bio-analytical 
laboratory for dosage form design and evaluation. UPM offers a broad range of 
services in the drug development and approval process: preformulation and 
formulation development, excipient testing, process optimization and feasibility 
studies. UPM's staff provides consultant services in dosage form design (solid, 
liquid, semi-solid, inhalation), regulatory affairs (NDA, INDA, and ANDA) and 
analytical development (assay, dissolution, bio-assay). UPM's Education division 
provides outcome-based staff development programs and educational experiences 
for pharmacists and pharmaceutical scientists in industry, government and 
other universities. 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

The School's Student Government Association coordinates all student government 
activities. Through its officers and committees, the SGA sponsors numerous 
social, service and educational events. All professional pharmacy students belong 
to the SGA. The executive committee of SGA includes the presidents of all of the 
School's organizations. The committee meets periodically with School administra- 
tors to discuss issues affecting students. At the University level, the University 
Student Government Association coordinates the student government activities of 
the seven professional schools. USGA representatives are elected by the students of 
all seven schools. 



The School of Pharmacy 



LECTURE SERIES 



The School supplements its reguhir curticulum with the following special lectures 
and symposia: 

Francis S. Balassone Memorial Lecture. The Maryland Pharmacists Associa- 
tion, the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association and the School sponsor this 
lectureship as a memorial to Francis S. Balassone. A 1940 graduate of the School, 
he was president of the Alumni Association, a distinguished former faculty member 
and a past president of the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. 

Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture. This lectureship was established in 
1969 by Mrs. DuMez in memory of her husband. Dr. Andrew G. DuMez. dean 
of the School of Pharmacy from 1926 to 1948, Dr. DuMez was a distinguished 
educator and leader in pharmacy in Maryland, the United States, and interna- 
tionally. 

Ellis Grollman Lecture in Pharmaceutical Sciences. Mrs. Evelyn Grollman 
Glick funded a lecture program in memory of her brother, Ellis Grollman, in 
1983. Dr. Grollman was a 1926 graduate of the School. Each year a nationally 
recognized researcher in the pharmaceutical or related basic sciences is invited to 
present this lecture. 

Peter P. Lamy Lecture. The Peter P. Lamy Lecture was inaugurated in 1992 
in recognition of Dr. Lamy's career as an international authority on geriatrics 
and gerontology. This lecture provides an opportunity for pharmacists to discuss 
critical issues in the care of the nation's elderly. 

Dean's Colloquium. The Dean's Colloquium brings together students, fac- 
ulty, and nationally recognized scientists and clinicians to discuss contemporary 
issues of relevance to pharmacy and health care. These seminars provide unique 
opportunities for interaction and exchange of new information on topics related 
to pharmacy practice and science. 



ENDOWED CHAIRS 



The Emerson Professorship in Pharmacology was endowed in 1927 as a chair in 
Biological Testing and Assay by Captain Isaac Emerson, president of the 
Emerson Drug Company. The first chair was filled by Dr. Marvin Thompson, a 
pharmacologist at the Food and Drug Administration at the time. Dr. Clifford 
W. Chapman, a pharmacologist from the Canadian National Laboratories was 
appointed to the chair in 1938. Dr. Casimer Ichniowski and Dr. Naim Khazan 
were the third and fourth appointees to the chair. In 1988, Dr. Gerald M. Rosen 
was appointed Emerson Professor, which in turn led to Dr. Rosen's being named 
an Eminent Scholar by the Maryland Higher Education Commission. 

The Parke-Davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy was established in 
1990 with a $1 million gift from the Warner-Lambert Company on the eve of 
the 125'*' Anniversary of Parke-Davis and the School of Pharmacy's 150''' 
Anniversary. The endowment will underwrite the School's continuing commit- 
ment to geriatric pharmacotherapy as exemplified by the accomplishments of the 



School of Pharmacy 



late Peter P. Lamy, the first holder of the Parke-Davis Chair. Dr. Bruce C. Stuart 
is current holder of this chair. 



OFFICE OF EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 



The Office of External Affairs works directly with the dean, Board of Visitors, 
alumni, friends, supporters and current students in advancing the School of 
Pharmacy. Funding programs, activities, scholarships and capital projects are all 
priorities of the office. Initiatives such as the Annual Fund and the Invest in 
Excellence Campaign (the School of Pharmacy's $6 million capital campaign) are 
two development initiatives that are carrying the School into the next century. 

Within the division of External Affairs, the Office of Alumni Affairs/Public 
Relations supports the goals of External Affairs and those of all other departments 
through media relations, advertising, promotion and publishing the School's 
semi-annual magazine. News Capsule. For more information about the Office of 
External Affairs, visit rx2.umaryland.edu/Aliimni/. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The mission of the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association is to strengthen and 
enhance the School by fostering communications, social interactions and a sense 
of pride in the School. Each year the association sponsors a spring banquet 
honoring the graduating class and the 50-year class. The Alumni Association also 
awards eight need-based scholarships to deserving students and plays a leadership 
role in the School's fund-raising activities. Many members participate in the 
annual phone-a-thon and are generous donors to the David Stewart Associates, 
the major giving club for alumni, friends and faculty who contribute $1,000 or 
more annually to the School. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^Km ^ 1. w 


z 




m 



/Madeline Feinberg, PharmD, coumels a patient. 



The School of Pharmacy 1 3 



Doctor of Pharmacy 
(PharmD) Program 



DESCRIPTION 



The four-year Doctor of Pharmacy program is divided into six levels: Fundamen- 
tals, Basic Science, Pharmaceutical Science, Integrated Sciences and Therapeutics, 
Experiential Learning, and a Curriculum-Practice Interface. The academic focus 
of each level is described below: 



LEVEL I: FUNDAMENTALS 



Students entering the PharmD program have diverse educational and life expe- 
riences. Level I addresses these diversities with introductory courses covering 
the concept and scope of pharmaceutical care, pharmacy practice in general, 
the variety of disciplines that will contribute to pharmaceutical education, and 
provides the skills and scientific principles and concepts fundamental to subse- 
quent curricular experiences. 



LEVEL II: BASIC SCIENCE 



During Level II of the curriculum, students build on the fundamentals ot Level I 
through a comprehensive examination of basic biological, chemical, physical, 
social and behavioral sciences. These elements provide the foundation for under- 
standing pharmaceutical science and the complexities of drug action and use. 



LEVEL III: PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCE 



Level III addresses pharmaceutical science content areas as they relate to the 
needs of patients in the total health-care environment. The provider of pharma- 
ceutical care must possess a detailed and comprehensive understanding of the 
physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial factors affecting the outcomes of 
drug therapy in specific patients with specific diseases. 



LEVEL IV: INTEGRATED SCIENCES AND THERAPEUTICS 

Level IV addresses the extensive interweaving of basic and clinical science as well 
as the interrelated bodies of knowledge involved in total pharmaceutical care. 

1 4 School of Pharmacy 



Students build upon their basic and pharmaceutical science background as they 
actively participate in a variety of didactic and laboratory experiences to design, 
implement, manage and monitor individualized plans for pharmaceutical care. 
Students learn to appreciate that the successful outcomes of drug therapies 
depend on complex physical, chemical, biological and psychosocial interactions 
within human systems, and that successful outcomes require individualized 
attention to patients during the design and delivery of pharmaceutical care. This 
application of integrated science to patients with specific diseases is presented 
within the broader context of public health, epidemiology, prescriber education, 
disease prevention and health promotion issues. 

Three progressive components are used to present each disease. The first com- 
ponent reviews the drugs and biologicals used to treat specific disease processes 
and emphasizes comparative features underlying the choice of agent (Pharmaco- 
dynamics and Pharmacokinetics). Chemical properties, such as solubility and 
stability, that determine the choice and use of the products, are discussed 
(Biomedicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutics). The availability and comparative 
advantages of drug dosage formulations and delivery systems are considered as 
they relate to the optimum use of drug products during acute or chronic care 
(Biopharmaceutics) . 

The second component illustrates how the links between the scientific knowl- 
edge of the disease, available drug products and the variables underlying a 
particular patient's condition are important to developing the most appropriate 
therapeutic plan. Methods for the choice of drug products, definition of specific 
goals of therapy, including how to assess whether these goals are being achieved 
and active intervention steps to ensure successful outcomes ot drug therapy, are 
developed (Therapeutics). Methods for monitoring, identifying and responding 
to untoward consequences of drug therapy are identifi.ed (Toxicology and Adverse 
Drug Reactions). The choice and design of specific acute and chronic drug 
therapy, the impact of a variety of patient-related variables on dosage regimens 
and the modification of dosage regimens in response to changing patient needs, 
are developed (Clinical Pharmacokinetics). Students develop skills as they 
practice counseling patients about their therapeutic plans in particular and 
providing health education in general (Counseling and Education). 

The third component links the knowledge base of the first two components 
with appropriate ongoing methods for drug use review, medical audits and cost 
considerations. The emphasis is on identifying specific interventions to improve 
prescribing patterns and reduce the cost of health-care (Drug Use Evaluation). 



LEVEL V: EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING 



Experiential learning is a series of structured learning and training activities 
during which students work under the supervision of experienced clinical and 
academic faculty in a variety of health-care settings. Students obtain and apply 
knowledge and skills necessary for successful delivery of pharmaceutical care and 
develop competence, confidence and maturity as responsible professionals. An 

Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 1 5 



Experiential Learning Map 



Elective Experiences 

Minimum of 4 Rotations 



Pharmaceutical Care 

Community 
Institutional 
Clinics 
Alternative Practice 



Information 
Services 




Distributive Services 

Community 
Institutional 



Longitudinal Care II 
Longitudinal Care I 



Introduction to 
Pharmacy Practice 



innovative feature of the program is that experiential learning activities occur 
throughout the curriculum and are linked to didactic courses. A total of 32 credits 
in experiential courses (approximately 1,600 hours) are required for the degree. All 
students must complete at least 24 credits (1,100 hours) of experience devoted to 
pharmaceutical patient care. Successful completion of the experiential learning 
portion of the Schools curriculum is accepted by the Maryland Board of Pharmacy as 
meeting the internship requirements to sit for the NAPLEX licensure examination. 

The Experiential Learning portion of the PharmD curriculum is organized 
into six phases: 

Phase 1: Introduction to Professional Pharmacy Practice. This early practice 
experience introduces students to the professional responsibilities of pharmacists 
in a variety of practice environments, including community, hospital and spe- 



School of Pharmacy 



cialty settings. Students will also examine the spectrum of career opportunities 
available to today's pharmacist and begin developing basic practice skills. 

Phase 2: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care. During the second and third 
years of the curriculum, students observe and participate in the delivery of 
pharmaceutical care to patients. Students follow the changing needs of a patient 
for two years within the context of the total health-care system. Through direct 
patient encounters and discussion sessions, students learn to assess health status, 
communicate effectively and determine pharmaceutical care needs from a holistic 
perspective. These activities are linked to the material covered in the didactic 
curriculum, specifically applying the patient assessment skills taught as part of the 
Human Biology (Anatomy, Physiology, Pathophysiology) sequence. 

Phase 3: Distributive Services. Activities during this phase develop students' 
competency and proficiency in the technical functions of drug dispensing and 
distribution in institutional and community pharmacy settings. Students learn to 
receive, interpret and verify the appropriateness of prescription orders. Students 
learn to efficiently dispense a variety of manufactured and compounded medica- 
tions and to recognize the role of technology and ancillary personnel in the drug 
distribution process. 

Phase 4: Pharmaceutical Care. Students gain experience in the delivery of 
pharmaceutical care in a variety of practice environments, including community- 
based and acute-care hospital pharmacies as well as ambulatory primary care and 
interdisciplinary clinics. Through daily encounters with patients and other 
health-care providers, students learn to collect patient-specific data, identify and 
assess drug-related problems, develop monitoring plans and measure therapy out- 
comes. Further, students learn to educate patients and health-care professionals 
about the appropriate use of drugs. 

Phase 5: Informational Services. Activities during this phase, which occurs 
simultaneously with Phase 4, require the student to provide drug information in 
the context of delivering pharmaceutical care. Students learn to receive a question 
in a comprehensive fashion, thoroughly analyze and research questions and 
provide appropriate answers to other health-care providers and to patients and 
their families. 

Phase 6: Elective Experiences. Elective rotations allow students to pursue 
their own areas of interest. Electives in general practice environments enable 
students to develop greater skill, proficiency and confidence. Electives in specialty 
pharmacotherapeutic practice areas, alternative forms of advanced practice 
management and research afford opportunities to explore a variety of practice 
options. This phase is linked to a senior colloquium. 

Student performance during all six phases is evaluated by both clinical and 
academic faculty. Experiential rotations are not permitted at a site where a student 
is working for pay or where any other conflict of interest situation may exist. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Progran 



LEVEL VI: CURRICULUM-PRACTICE INTERFACE 

The sixth and final level ot the curriculum contains a variety of educational 
experiences for the students about to enter practice. Required and elective 
content areas provide the curricular-based interface with pharmacy practice that 
builds on the preceding didactic and experiential components of the curriculum. 
The capstone nature of this interface reflects the acquisition and appreciation of 
information that: 

• is on the cutting edge of pharmacy practice, 

• represents closing options for individual curricular pathways or 

• helps prepare students for a post-graduate education. 

Students learning at the interface are expected to be under continual change 
and development. One goal of this level is to allow all senior students, following 
completion of their experiential components, time to consider individual practice 
in the context of the total health-care environment. An important part of this 
interface, therefore, will be the opportunity for students to reflect interactively 
upon their educational experiences with fellow students, faculty and practitioners. 



CURRICULUM PATHWAYS AND ELECTIVES 

The central curricular theme, primary pharmaceutical care, encompasses the 
educational experiences common to all students in the program. All students must 
successfully complete the required core curriculum which prepares them for 
competent performance of basic pharmaceutical care in a variety of professional 
and practice settings. To supplement the required core curriculum, students take 
more than 2 1 percent (28 credits) of the four-year curriculum from the didactic 
and experiential electives. This portion of the curriculum provides students with 
an opportunity for flexible programming of their educational experience. In 
collaboration with their academic advisors, students use electives to develop a Plan 
of Study that is consistent with their personal interests and career goals. Students' 
Plans of Study are used to enhance their general practice of pharmaceutical care, to 
focus on a particular area of practice or to prepare for post-graduate studies. 

Students may select freely from elective options to design their Plan ol Study or 
may choose one of several model pathways designed to enhance their preparation 
for common areas of interest. The model pathways generally account for 16 to 18 
of the 28 elective credits required for the degree. Therefore, students' selection of 
a model pathway still provides them considerable flexibility in selection of 
additional electives. Faculty have developed the following four model pathways: 

Advanced Pharmacy Practice 

Goal: lo prepare students to implement pharmaceutical care in a variety ot practice 
settings. This pathway provides a series of didactic and experiential courses 
designed to enhance competence in delivering pharmaceutical care in general 
practice; delivering health-care to special populations such as the elderly; enhancing 
knowledge of special pharmaceutical products, business and managerial skills 



School of Pharmacy 



needed to successfully deliver new services, and providing experience in applying 
these professional and managerial skills in a variety of advanced practice settings. 

Pharmacotherapy 

Goal: To enhance students' ability to independently optimize, implement 
and monitor drug therapy in patients with complex health problems. This 
pathway offers a series of didactic seminar courses in pharmacotherapy and 
advanced therapeutics, coupled with advanced clinical experiences. The clinical 
experiences involve direct drug therapy management of patients in general medical 
and sub-specialty environments. Students completing this pathway are encouraged 
to pursue post-PharmD training in residencies and fellowships and to eventually 
pursue specialty board certification in pharmacotherapy. 

Management 

Goal: To prepare students for management careers in corporate pharmacy, to 
develop entrepreneurial capabilities and to prepare students for post-PharmD 
management residencies and/or MBA programs. Students take a series of didactic 
and experiential courses in personal management, practice management, organi- 
zational behavior, financial reporting and analysis, marketing, and experiences 
working with managers in health-care settings. 

Research 

Goal: To expose students to research and better prepare them for graduate studies 
or post-graduate fellowships. Students selecting this pathway take courses in 
advanced educational opportunities, advanced seminar courses in selected scien- 
tific areas, research experiences working directly with faculty scientists and a 
senior colloquium. 

Faculty pathway coordinators, who design and maintain the integrity of the path- 
ways and faculty advisors with expertise in each pathway area, serve as consultants 
to students for information on career opportunities resulting from a particular 
pathway. Students have freedom of choice in selecting a pathway. Students not 
choosing to take all courses in a specific pathway, can select elective courses from 
multiple pathways as part of their personal Plan of Study provided they complete 
the appropriate prerequisites. 



COMBINED PHARMD/MBA PROGRAM 

The School offers a combined PharmD/MBA program with the University 
of Baltimore Merrick School of Business for students who wish to pursue 
the Master's in Business Administration degree. The combined program allows 
pharmacy students to take MBA courses as part of their professional curricidum. 
While in pharmacy school, PharmD students may complete 21 of the 51 credit- 
hours required in the MBA program. PharmD students must apply to the MBA 
program; admission is not guaranteed. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



Students wishing to apply to the MBA program must adhere to UB procedures 
and deadlines. Students must also request that the University of Maryland's Office 
of Records and Registration send their official University of Maryland transcript 
and that the School of Pharmacy Office of Student Affairs send a copy of their 
prepharmacy transcripts to UB. Students applying to this combined program need 
the equivalent of a bachelor's degree (i.e., either a degree or completion of four 
years of college). The grade point average for an entering MBA student is 3.0; 
however, a lower GPA may be offset by a higher score on a standardized test (e.g., 
GMAT, PCAT). 



COMBINED PHARMD/PHD PROGRAM 



The School offers a combined PharmD/PhD program to prepare comprehensively 
trained individuals with an interdisciplinary perspective on teaching and scientific 
research. The program will fiinction as a cooperative effort between the PharmD 
curriculum and the graduate curricula of the departments of Pharmaceutical 
Sciences and Pharmacy Practice and Science. The PharmD and PhD phases of the 
program will run concurrently with minimal disruption of the academic content 
or sequencing of the PharmD component. This will permit combined degree 
students to progress normally in the PharmD program and graduate with their 
class. To achieve this goal, students may take open vacation periods as well 
as Research Pathway electives and other elective options within the PharmD 
program and apply them toward the requirements of the PhD component. 
Students already in the PharmD program may be considered for admission to the 
combined degree program. The greatest potential benefits are for students who 
enter the combined program at an early stage. Combined degree students can 
expect to complete their core graduate coursework and be ready for advancement 
to candidacy for the PhD degree by the time they complete the PharmD 
program. Students may complete the requirements for the award of both the 
PharmD and PhD degrees in seven years. 

Consideration for admission to the combined program is contingent upon 
satisfying the admission requirements of the University of Maryland Graduate 
School. A bachelor's degree is generally required for admission to the graduate 
program. Notwithstanding any measures used in determining admission to the 
PharmD program, the criteria for evaluation of applications to the PharmD/PhD 
program will include: the quality of the applicant's academic record, standardized 
test scores (GRE and PCAT), letters of recommendation, interviews held with 
students, and compatibility between the students' career goals and the objectives 
of the combined program. The current minimum requirements for admission 
include an acceptable baccalaureate degree with a GPA of 3.0 or better, GRE 
scores of 1600 or better, and, where applicable, TOEFL scores of at least 600. 



School of Pharmacy 



Summary of Doctor of Pharmacy Program 

COURSEWORK MINIMUM SEMESTER CREDITS 



Didactic 


100 credits 


80 Required 




20 Elective 




Experiential 


32 credits 


24 Required 




8 Elective 





Total 132 credits 

COURSEWORK BY SEMESTER 

The following outline is one suggested Plan of Study for electives. Electives can 
be taken during most fall, winter, spring and summer semesters. 



SEMESTER ONE 


CREDITS 


PHAR 511: Biochemistry 1 


2 


PHAR 5 12: Cell Biology 


2 


PHAR 5 13: Drug Chemistry 


2 


PHAR 5 14: Human Biology 1 


3 


PHAR 5 1 5: Personal Management 1 


PHAR 5 1 6: Pharmacy Practice and Education 


3 


PHAR 5 1 7: Study Design and Analysis 


2 


TOTAL 
SEMESTER TWO 


15 


PHAR 521: Biochemistry II 


3 


PHAR 522: Context of Health Care 


3 


PHAR 523: Ethics in Pharmacy Practice 1 


PHAR 524: Human Biology II 


3 


PHAR 525: Immunology 


2 


PHAR 526: Physical Chemistry 


2 


PHPC 527: Introduction to Professional Practice 1 


DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 


2 



TOTAL 17 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



SEMESTER THREE 



PHAR 530: Microbiology/Antibiotics 1 




PHAR 531: Pharmaceutical Chemistry 




PHAR 534: Human Biology III 




PHAR 536: Pharmacology 1 




PHAR 537: Principles of Drug Action 




PHAR 541: Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics 




DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 




TOTAL 
SEMESTER FOUR 


17 


PHAR 540: Microbiology/Antibiotics II 1 


PHAR 542: Clinical Chemistry 1 


PHAR 544: Medicinal Chemistry 


3 


PHAR 545: Practice Management 


3 


PHAR 546: Pharmacology II 


3 


PHAR 535: Pharmaceutics 


3 


PHPC 532: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care 1 1 


DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 


2 


TOTAL 
SEMESTER FIVE 


17 


PHAR 552: Principles of Human Nutrition 1 


PHAR 553: Population Based Medical Info. Analysis 


2 


PHAR 554: Integrated Science/Therapeutics 1 


4 


PHAR 555: Integrated Science/Therapeutics II 


4 


DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 


4 



TOTAL 



22 School of Pharmacy 



SEMESTER SIX: 



PHAR 564: Integrated Science/Therapeutics I 



PHAR 565: Integrated Science/Therapeutics IV 



PHPC 562: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care II 



DIDACTIC ELECTIVES 



TOTAL 
SEMESTER SEVEN: 



PHPC 570: Community Distributive Services 



PHPC 571: Hospital Distributive Services 



PHPC 572: Pharmaceutical Care I 



PHPC 573: Pharmaceutical Care II 



TOTAL 
SEMESTER EIGHT: 



PHAR 580: Pharmacy Law 


2 


PHAR 581: Senior Colloquium 1 


PHPC 574: Pharmaceutical Care III 


3 


PHPC 575: Pharmaceutical Care IV 


3 


PHPC 576: Ambulatory Clinic' 1 


PHPC 577: Informational Services' 


2 


EXPERIENTIAL ELECTIVES^ 


8 


DIDACTIC ELECTIVE COURSES 


4 



TOTAL 
GRAND TOTAL 



24 



132 minimum credits 



'Taken concurrently with Pharmaceutical Care Rotations 

^Students complete experiential rotations at various times during year, but register 

for the rotations in the semesters listed. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



Nontraditional Pathway 



DESCRIPTION 



The Nontraditional PharmD Pathway is a mechanism for licensed BS pharmacists 
to earn the Doctor of Pharmacy degree. All graduates will be required to meet the 
terminal performance outcomes of the School's PharmD program. Satisfying 
these terminal objectives takes at least 30 credits of coursework. Since each non- 
traditional student brings to the program a different level of practical experience, 
knowledge and skill developed throughout a practice career, a system of Prior 
Learning Assessment (PLA) has been developed to individualize a program of 
study and award credit(s) (0-10) when appropriate. It should be noted that the 
awarding of credit through PLA does not exempt a participant from responsibilit)' 
for any of the process or knowledge-based outcomes of the program. 

Experiential learning will be centered in the pharmacist's own practice site, 
under the supervision of a faculty mentor, and utilizing the pharmacist's own 
patients. Some clerkship experience is required at other sites. The mentor will 
also work closely with each pharmacist to identify an appropriate mix of patients 
and to develop an appropriate experience component that will meet individual 
needs and satisfy pathway requirements. 

Credits in the NTPD may be earned by taking courses from a faculty- 
approved menu, through supervised experiential learning, by approved self-study 
with appropriate assessment and/or through PLA. The foundation of the NTPD 
is established in the core courses: i.e., the philosophy of the program is developed 
and the concepts, procedures and skills of pharmaceutical care delivery are 
defined and demonstrated. 

Required courses in the pathway include an in-depth treatment of therapeutics 
for prevalent diseases, so that the pharmacists are prepared to provide pharmaceutical 
care services. Candidates will demonstrate the abilir\' to manage a practice fiscally 
and behaviorally, to measure value of service(s) and establish fees and reimbursement 
policies and to market and promote pharmaceutical care services. 

Courses are offered at the University of Maryland campus in downtown 
Baltimore, and selected courses may be offered through distance education facilities 
throughout the state as well as other University System of Maryland campuses. 
Classes are planned for the fall, spring and summer semesters; however, first year 
students will always begin in the fall semester. 

In the experiential learning component of the pathway, students will develop a 
representative patient population in their practice site to be followed during the 
program and in the performance-based evaluation in the final clerkship. Beginning 
with the initial patient identified as a study case, students will learn to triage, 
develop explicit pharmaceutical care plans and initiate the patient management 
process. As they proceed, a longitudinal process will be used to monitor and assess 
their progress in practice. 



School of Pharmacy 



A faculty mentor assigned to each student will meet regulady with the student 
to assess progress and provide continuous feedback. Since implementation of a 
new service should be cost-effective, students are required to develop a resource 
assessment (e.g., personnel needs, space, equipment), propose a structure for 
compensation, and provide a marketing plan for the practice site. 



PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 



In addition to coursework, the credit requirements of the NTPD may be partially 
met through the following three options: 



TRANSFER 



Nontraditional students may transfer up to six credit-hours of previous course- 
work to meet the pathway requirements. This coursework must have been 
completed after the pharmacists received their BS degrees, must have been earned 
at an accredited university, and must relate directly to curricular components of 
the NTPD. Potential transfer courses are identified when a candidate is being 
evaluated for admission, or later if appropriate, through consultation between the 
student and the pathway Director. (Note: It is not possible to obtain additional 
PLA credit for transfer courses.) 



PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT (PLA) 



Through the Prior Learning Assessment process, students may earn credit for the 
knowledge and experience they bring to the program. To be eligible for PLA 
credit, students must complete the course PLA in Pharmacy Practice, have the 
PLA panel evaluate their portfolio and have the faculty approve a credit recom- 
mendation from the panel. The PLA panel is comprised of school faculty and 
pharmacy practitioners. Students may earn a maximum of 10 credits in four 
areas: Practice Management Planning (0-1), Community/Institutional Pharma- 
ceutical Care (0-1), Pharmacotherapeutics (0-4) and Practice Management (0-4). 
These four areas correspond directly to curriculum components. The panel has 
developed assessment instruments for each of these areas. 



CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

The University permits a credit by examination process for a course. Information 
test-out options is provided by each coursemaster. Students who successfully 
complete the entire course by examination may register for Credit by Examina- 
tion in the specific area. Students pay a per-course fee, based on residency status. 
Upon approval by the coursemaster, students who successfully complete a 

Nontraditional PharmD Pathway 25 



discrete section of the examination may not be required to attend all class sessions 
and/or modules. In this case, students must still register for the course, and the 
results of the examination will be factored into the grade determination. For 
more information, call 410-706-0761. 



EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING 

Starting early in the required courses, students will develop a representative 
patient population in their practice site to be followed during the program and 
in the performance-based evaluation in the final clerkship. Beginning with the 
initial patient identified as a study case, students will learn to triage, develop 
explicit pharmaceutical care plans, and initiate the patient management process. 
As they proceed, a longitudinal process will be used to monitor and assess their 
progress in practice. 

Typically each student's faculty mentor will periodically assess the student's 
progress and provide continuous feedback. Some on-site observations will be 
conducted by the faculty mentor or his/her assignee. Since implementation of a 
new service should be cost-effective, students will develop a resource assessment 
(e.g., personnel needs, space, equipment), propose a structure for compensation 
and provide a marketing plan for the practice site. 

While the central philosophy of the experiential learning program is to provide 
tor an impact on patients in the pharmacist's own practice, it is anticipated that it 
will not always be possible to completely meet experiential learning objectives 
at that site. When it is necessary for exposure to the delivery of pharmaceutical 
care services at other practice sites, every effort will be made to schedule these 
visitations at times convenient for the student. 




vl Kim Mciicr study togcllui in //'< sliiiUnl louiiii^c 



School of Pharmacy 



Application and 
Admissions Information 



APPLICATION PROCEDURES 



Applicants must follow the procedure below to apply to the PharmD, Nontradi- 
tional Pathway, or either of the School's graduate programs. Application forms 
are typically available in August for the following academic year. E-mail ques- 
tions to PharmDhelp@rx.nmaryland.edu. 



PHARMD PROGRAM 



Request an application and admissions information from www.pharmacy. 
umaryland.edu, call 410-706-7653/800-852-2988, or write: 

Office of Admissions 
University of Maryland 
School of Pharmacy 
20 N. Pine St. 
Baltimore, MD 21201-1180 

Submit a completed application by the deadline: 
February 1 Application 
March 1 Transcripts and PCAT scores 

Submit the required nonrefundable application fee. Make check payable 
to: University of Maryland. 

Take the Pharmacy College Admission Test in October or January and 
forward the scores to the School. Applicants can get a PCAT application 
at the phone number or address above. 

Submit official transcript(s) from all institutions attended. Prepharmacy 
coursework must be completed before the start of classes in the fall 
semester of application with a grade of C or better. 

Have a minimum GPA of 2.5. 



NONTRADITIONAL PHARMD PATHWAY 



To be considered for admission to the Nontraditional Pathway, BS pharmacists, 
including pharmacists who graduated from international institutions, must 
complete the application and admission requirements listed below. Once phar- 



Application and Admissions Information 



macists have demonstrated that they meet those criteria, they will be considered 
for admission. A description of required documentation and other elements of 
the admissions process will be provided in the application packet. Because of the 
highly interactive nature of the pathway, the School cannot accommodate more 
than 60 new students each year. 

The admissions procedure is as follows: 

• Request an application from www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu, call 
410-706-0761 or write: 

University of Maryland 
School of Pharmacy 
Nontraditional Pathway 
20 N. Pine St. 
Baltimore, MD 21201-1180 

• Submit a completed application by the deadline: 

February 1 Application 

March 1 All supporting documents 

• Submit the required nonrefundable application fee. Make check payable 
to: University of Maryland. 

To be eligible to apply, applicants: 

• Must be licensed in Maryland, the District of Columbia, or an adjacent 
state. 

• Must practice in Maryland, the District of Columbia or areas of 
surrounding states (in order to have access to the pathway's mentoring 
system). 

• Must provide confirmation of access to patients to meet pathway 
requirements. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Applicants seeking master's or doctoral degrees in pharmaceutical sciences or 
pharmacy administration must apply to the School's Graduate School depart- 
ments. Interested applicants need to review the University of Maryland Graduate 
School catalog, which presents the information about the MS and PhD pro- 
grams. For information about the graduate program of your choice, write to 
either of the following departments: 

Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Program 
University of Maryland 
School of Pharmacy 
20 N. Pine St., 4''' Floor 
Baltimore, MD 21201-1 180 



School of Pharmacy 



Pharmacy Administration Graduate Program 

University of Maryland 

School of Pharmacy 

100 N. Greene St., &^ Floor 

Baltimore, MD 21201-1180 



ADMISSIONS PROCEDURES FOR THE PHARMD PROGRAM 

Applicants for the Nontraditional Pathway please refer to page 27. 
An admissions committee comprised of faculty, alumni and students reviews offi- 
cial transcripts and PCAT results to make admissions decisions. Applicants with 
strong academic credentials and PCAT scores are invited to interview with faculty, 
alumni and students. During the interview, the applicant is assessed on factors such 
as professional and social awareness, verbal and written communication skills, 
integrity, maturity and motivation. Following the interview, the admissions 
committee makes a decision based on applicants' academic achievement, PCAT 
scores and qualities evaluated during the interview. Academic achievement and/or 
high PCAT scores do not, in themselves, ensure acceptance. 

While a minimum GPA of 2.5 (A=4.0) is required for admissions consideration, 
the average entering GPA of the fall 1999 first year PharmD students was 3.5. 
Average PCAT scores of admitted students were above the 80''' percentile in each of 
the five areas of the exam. Competition for admission is high, and applicants with 
GPAs below 2.9 have an extremely low probability of admission. 

Applicants must present evidence (via official transcripts) of having completed 
the prepharmacy coursework with grades of C or better. 



PREPHARMACY COURSEWORK 



Applicants must complete a minimum of 63 semester hours of coursework of 
pharmacy prerequisites for admission into the PharmD program. At least one 
semester of this coursework must be taken at an accredited institution in the 
United States. To enroll in prepharmacy coursework, applicants must apply 
directly to an accredited college or University, not to the School of Pharmacy. 
Most institutions have designated prepharmacy programs and advisors. The School 
of Pharmacy does not provide any specific information regarding course content and/ 
or requirements for admission into these prepharmacy programs. Prerequisites for 
admission into the PharmD program are as follows: 



Application and Admissions Information 



TYPICAL # OF TYPICAL # OF 

COURSE SEMESTERS CREDIT-HOURS 



English (Comp/Lit) 






Calculus 






Statistics 






Biology 






Microbiology 






General Chemistry 




8 


Organic Chemistry 




8 


Physics 




8 


Humanities/Social Sci. 




18 


TOTAL 




63 minimum 


INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 





Students who are not citizens or permanent residents of the United States must 
submit the results of the TOEFL, certified official copies of transcripts, a state- 
ment of financial support, a supplementary information sheet and a summary of 
educational experiences. These must be submitted with the application and the 
application fee to the Office of Records and Registration. International students 
are also required to take the PCAT Therefore, it is essential that international stu- 
dents start the admissions process early. 

The School does not accept applicants who have attended only a foreign educa- 
tional institution. The School, due to its small size, cannot adequately certify 
international credentials and relies on the evaluation performed by other institu- 
tions. In addition, experience shows that international students benefit from taking 
courses at other U.S. institutions before entering the PharmD program. Interna- 
tional students should be familiar with the rules and regulations of the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service, which grants admission to the United States. 



INTERNATIONAL PHARMACISTS 



Individuals who have received their pharmacy degrees from non-U. S. institutions 
have two options to become licensed pharmacists in the United States. They can 
take the Foreign Pharmacy Graduate Equivalency Examination, which certifies 
the applicant for the Board examination. Those who pass this examination, and 
meet the other requirements of the State in which they wish to practice, are eligi- 
ble to take the national licensing exam. Individuals taking this approach would 
not need to attend the School of Pharmacy. For more information, write or call 
the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy Foundation, Foreign Pharmacy 
Graduate Examination Committee, 700 Busse Highway, Park Ridge, IL 60068; 
847-698-6227. 

International pharmacists are also eligible to apply to the School's PharmD 
program and then upon graduation become eligible to complete state licensure 



School of Pharmacy 



exams. Credit may be given for equivalent coursework previously completed with 
a grade of C or better. Credit may be awarded after an evaluation of the course 
and an assessment of student knowledge by the coursemaster. Based on the struc- 
ture of the curriculum, international pharmacists typically enter the first or 
second professional year of the tour-year PharmD program. Admission is based 
on an evaluation of applicant credentials by the admissions committee. Interna- 
tional pharmacists are encouraged to take the PCAT exam to assess background 
knowledge. 



LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS 



Completion of the PharmD degree satisfies the educational requirement for all 
state boards of pharmacy in the United States. Graduates are eligible to take state 
licensing exams in all states. For more information about licensure as a pharma- 
cist in Maryland, graduates may contact: 

Maryland Board of Pharmacy 
4201 Patterson Ave. 
Baltimore, MD 21215-2299 
410-764-4755 



r-^M 







Dr. Stuart Haines interviews a patient in an ambulatory care clinic. 



Application and Admissions Information 



Financial Information 



TUITION AND FEES 



Below are listed the tuition and fees for the 1999-2000 academic year. Non- 
traditional Pathway students are charged tuition per credit-hour regardless of 
number of hours taken. 

Tuition Full-time Part-time NTPD 

Full-time (9 or more credits) Resident $ 6,983 Per Credit 

Nonresident 14,442 

Part-time per credit-hour Resident 273 273 

Nonresident 491 491 

Fees 

Student Government Association 
Transportation 
Student Activities 
Supporting Facilities 

Other Expenses 

Clinical Clerkship (experiential courses) 

Application Fee (nonrefundable) 

Late Registration Fee 

Diploma Fee 

Liability Insurance 

Disability Insurance 

Hepatitis B Vaccine ( I st year only) 

Continuing Education Certification 

Late Payment of Tuition and Fees 

The University reserves the right to make changes in fees and other charges, although 
every effort is made to keep the cost to the student as low as possible. 



15 


15 


15 


23 


23 


23 


50 


50 


50 


288 


288 


288 


300 


300 


300 


50 


50 


50 


40 


40 


40 


45 


45 


45 


II 


II 


11 


24 


24 




140 


140 


140 

100 


100 


100 


100 



I 



School of Pharmacy 



HEALTH INSURANCE 



University or equivalent health insurance coverage is required of all full-time 
students. Students will be billed for health insurance unless they provide proof of 
similar coverage to the Office of Student and Employee Health. If students provide 
documentation, the cost of the premium is waived. The cost of health insurance 
varies depending on the type of coverage. For the 1999-2000 academic year, the 
cost for student-only coverage is $971; student and spouse, $2,330; student and 
child, $1,844; and student and family, $2,912. 



DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE RESIDENCY 

The University's Office of Records and Registration makes an initial determination 
of residency status for admission and tuition when students apply for admission. 
The determination made at that time, and any determination made thereafter, shall 
prevail for each semester until the student changes the status. Students classified as 
in-state residents are responsible for notifying the Office of Records and Registra- 
tion in writing, within 1 5 days of any change in their circumstances which might in 
any way affect their classification at the University. Students may obtain a copy of 
the University's policy on in-state residency status from the office listed above. 



FINANCIAL AID 



Student financial aid programs are centrally administered by the Office of Student 
Financial Aid. These programs are designed to help students who otherwise would 
be unable to attend the University. Aid packages for full-time students often 
include a combination of loans, grants, scholarships and work-study designed to 
meet students' needs. Most Nontraditional Pathway students do not qualify for 
financial aid due to their part-time status and relatively secure financial situation. 
To qualify for aid, students must apply annually and meet certain eligibility 
requirements. Students are encouraged to complete their financial aid applica- 
tion by February 15. Students must complete the required Financial Aid 
application forms, which are available from: 

Student Financial Aid 
University of Maryland 
Baltimore Student Union 
Room 334 
621 W.Lombard St. 
Baltimore, MD 21201 



Financial Information 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY SCHOLARSHIPS 

Through the generous gifts of alumni, friends and professional associations, the 
School provides additional financial aid to its fiill-time students who are in need 
of financial support. Students do not apply for these awards. Students who 
receive most awards are those who can document unmet financial need through 
the Student Financial Aid process. Some scholarships support students from 
certain geographical areas. The School has established the following scholarships: 

April Adams Memorial Scholarship. The students, faculty and friends of 
April Adams established this scholarship as a lasting tribute to April, Class of 
1999. The scholarship, symbolizing April's dedication and love of pharmacy, will 
be awarded to deserving students in her name. 

Marilyn I. Arkin Scholarship Fund. The family and friends of Marilyn I. 
Arkin, daughter of Ann and Morris Arkin and a member of the class of 1975, 
established this scholarship as a memorial in 1988. The scholarship provides 
support for professional students in the School of Pharmacy. 

H.J. (Jack) Custis Jr. Memorial Scholarship Fund. In memory of H.J. 
(Jack) Custis Jr., Class of 1951, a fund was established to award scholarships 
on the basis of reasonable need and academic ability to students in the profes- 
sional program of the School of Pharmacy. Students must be residents of one 
of the nine Eastern Shore, Maryland counties to be eligible for the Custis 
Memorial Scholarship. 

Isadora M. and Irene R. Fischer Memorial Scholarship Fund. The families 
of Isadore M. and Irene R. Fischer have provided a scholarship fund to support a 
professional or graduate student demonstrating academic excellence in the educa- 
tional programs of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. 

Charles L. Henry Memorial Scholarship. The Charles L. Henry Memorial 
Scholarship Fund has been provided for PharmD students in the School ot 
Pharmacy requiring financial assistance. 

J. Gilbert Joseph Scholarship. In memory of her brother, J. Gilbert Joseph, a 
former student of the School of Pharmacy, the late Miss Jeanette Joseph provided a 
generous bequest to endow scholarships for qualified students who have main- 
tained a superior scholastic average and who are in need of financial assistance. 

Frederick William Koenig Memorial Scholarship. In memory of her hus- 
band, Frederick William Koenig, a practicing pharmacist for 50 years, the late 
Mrs. Valeria R. Koenig has endowed a scholarship to be awarded annually to a 
student selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 

Dr. Dean E. Leavitt Memorial Scholarship Fund. In honor of Dr. Dean E. 
Leavitt, associate dean for administration and professional services, 1976-1989, 
the family and the faculty established a fund to support a scholarship covering 
the final year of pharmacy school for students who have attained a minimum 
cumulative average of 3.0, who have shown superior aptitude and enthusiasm 
in the course sequence in management, and who have demonstrated, as Dean 
Leavitt did, a commitment to the qualities of health and humanitarianism, both 
personally and professionally. 



34 School of Pharmacy 



A.M. Lichtenstein Scholarship. In memory of her husband, A.M. Lichtenstein, 
distinguished alumnus of the School of Pharmacy class of 1889, the late Mrs. 
Francina Freese Lichtenstein bequeathed a sum of money to endow an annual 
scholarship to a resident of Allegany County, Maryland. The recipient of the award is 
to be selected on the basis of financial need, character and scholarship. 

Aaron and Rosalie Paulson Scholarship Fund. Established by Mr. Aaron A. 
Paulson, class of 1924, and his late wife, Rosalie, this endowed scholarship 
supports a first professional year student with demonstrated financial need. 

Plough Pharmacy Student Scholarships. The Plough Foundation, created by 
Abe Plough, founder of Plough Inc., and the School of Pharmacy contributed 
funds to an endowment in support of pharmacy students. Funds are awarded on 
the basis of financial need, academic achievement, leadership and citizenship. 

Joseph Sokol Memorial Scholarship. In memory of Joseph Sokol, Class of 
1973, the family and friends established this scholarship to provide support for 
deserving students who have financial need. 

Arthur Schwartz Memorial Scholarship Fund. The family and friends of 
Arthur Schwartz, BS Pharm 1979, PhD Pharmacy Administration 1987, have 
established an endowed scholarship fund for a graduate student in Pharmacy 
Administration to honor his memory. 



LOAN FUNDS 



Rose Hendler Memorial Fund. L. Manuel Hendler and family have established 
a loan fund for needy students in memory of Mrs. Rose Hendler. 

Louis T. Sabatino Memorial Student Loan Fund. In honor and memory of 
her late brother, Louis T Sabatino, Class of 1939, Mrs. Marie Sabatino DeOms 
has established this fund to provide loans to deserving students. 

Benjamin Schoenfeld Memorial Pharmacy Loan Fund. The family of Mr. 
Benjamin Schoenfeld, Class of 1924, has established a loan fund as a memorial to 
him. This fund is available to qualified needy students. Loans are made upon the 
recommendation of the dean. 

Burroughs Welcome Emergency Loan Fund. The Burroughs Welcome 
Company established a fund to provide short-term (two months) loans to 
students in financial need. 



STUDENT VETERANS 



New students, including Nontraditional Pathway students, who are eligible for 
educational benefits through the Veterans Administration should forward a 
completed VA Form 22-1995: Request for Change of Program or Place of Training 
to the Office of Student Affairs. Veterans who have not used any of their VA 
educational benefits should forward a completed VA Form 22-1990: Application 
for Program of Education or Training and a copy of DD 214: Separation Papers 
directly to the Office of Student Affairs of the School of Pharmacy. 



Financial Information 



Academic Information 



ACADEMIC SESSIONS 



The University of Maryland School of Pharmac)' operates on a four-semester calen- 
dar. The fall term, four months long, begins the last week of August and runs to the 
Christmas recess. A three-week winter minimester in January allows students to 
avail themselves of tutorial services or elective courses. The four-month spring term 
begins the last week in January and extends to just before Memorial Day. While the 
School does not offer summer-term courses, students may take approved elective 
courses at other schools within the University, or at other institutions. Full-time 
students enrolled for the spring semester do not pay tuition and fees for campus 
courses they take during the January minimester. Students must pay additional 
minimester tuition at other Universit)' System of Maryland campuses. 



REGISTRATION POLICIES 



CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION 

Students who register and subsequently decide not to attend the School of 
Pharmacy must provide written notice to the Office of Student Affairs on or before 
the first day of class. If this office has not received a request for cancellation by 
5:00 p.m. on or before the first day of instruction, the University will assume that 
students plan to attend and that they accept their financial obligation. 



CHANGE IN REGISTRATION 

Students should obtain and return the completed Add/Drop Form, used for all 
changes in registration, to the School's Office of Student Affairs. Students are 
not charged for a change in registration. Students may not add a course after the 
first week of classes or drop a course after eight weeks into the semester. Students 
will receive the grade of F for courses dropped after the eighth week of classes 
without approval. 



LATE REGISTRATION 

Students who fail to complete registration by the specified time for regular 
registration pay a late registration fee. 

36 School of Pharmacy 



WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

Students who withdraw from the University before the end of a semester are eUgi- 
ble for a partial refund, depending upon the date of withdrawal. To ensure the 
refund, students must file withdrawal forms in the School's Office of Student 
Affairs. Students who fail to complete these forms will receive failing grades in all 
courses and forfeit their right to any refund. 



GRADING SYSTEM 


The School of Pharmacy 
Grade 


uses the following grading system 
interpretation 


Point Value 


A 




Excellent 




4 


B 




Good 




3 


c 




Fair 




2 


D 




Poor but Passing 




1 


P 




Pass 







F 




Failure 








Incomplete Must be replaced 

by definite grade 
within one year 



WD Withdrawal No grade is assigned 

When, for any reason, a student repeats a course, the grade achieved in the repeated 
course replaces all previous grades in the same course. 



SCHOLASTIC HONORS 



The School recognizes academic excellence during the fall and spring honor con- 
vocations. During the fall ceremony, students receive academic achievement 
awards in all classes based on performance the preceding year. The School also rec- 
ognizes leaders of student organizations at this time. The Rho Chi Honor Society 
presents its annual book award to the student(s) having the highest GPA. The 
Society also awards certificates to students with GPAs above 3.25. 

In the spring, the School honors its graduates. Those in the top tenth of the 
class graduate with high honors and those in the second tenth of the class graduate 
with honors. The faculty presents the following academic achievement awards to 
members of the graduating class at the Spring Honors Convocation: 



Academic Information 



School of Pharmacy Gold Medals for General Excellence. The students who 
receive this award have attained the highest general average in the entry-level 
program and in the Nontraditional Pathway. 

The Excellence in Pharmaceutical Care Award. The Nontraditional Pathway 
preceptors and mentors give this award to a student who has excelled in his/her 
practice setting. 

Andrew G. DuMez Award. In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, former dean 
and professor of pharmacy, Mrs. DuMez provides a gold medal, awarded to a 
student for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 

Epsilon Alumnae Chapter, Lambda Kappa Sigma-Cole Award. A student 
receives this award, in memory of Dr. B. Olive Cole, former acting dean, for 
proficiency in pharmacy administration. 

Kappa Chapter, Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize. The Kappa Chapter of the 
Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega fraternity provides a prize 
which is awarded to a student for proficiency in pharmacology. 

William Simon Memorial Prize. In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, a 
professor of chemistry in the School for 30 years, a student is awarded a gold 
medal for superior work in the field of biomedicinal chemistry. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank J. Slama Scholarship Award. A fund has been established 
in honor of the late Dr. Frank J. Slama, former professor of pharmacognosy. A 
student receives this award for superior work in the field of biopharmacognosy. 

Frank J. Slama Award by the School's Alumni Association. In tribute to 
Dr. Frank J. Slama, Class of 1924, a former professor and head of the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacognosy, for over half a century of loyalty and service to his 
profession, to the School and to the Alumni Association, the School's Alumni 
Association gives this award to a member of the graduating class who excelled in 
extracurricular activities. 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize. In memory of her husband, 
Manuel B. ^X';lgnc^, and her son, Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School, 
the late Mrs. Sadie S. Wagner, and her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner Brill 
Snyder, fund a prize for a graduating student for meritorious academic achieve- 
ment in pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 

John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize. In memory of her brother, Dr. John 
F. Wannenwetsch, a distinguished alumnus of the School, Mrs. Mary H. Wan- 
nenwetsch funds a prize for a graduating student who has exhibited 
exceptional performance and promise in the practice of community pharmacy. 



School of Pharmacy 



The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize. In appreciation of the assistance 
which the Maryland College of Pharmacy extended to him as a young man, Mr. 
Conrad L. Wich established a fund, the income from which is awarded annually 
by the faculty assembly to the student who has done exceptional work through- 
out the course in pharmacognosy. 

L.S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize. A bequest provided by the late L.S. 
Williams funds the L.S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize, given to the student 
having the highest general average throughout the course in basic and applied 
pharmaceutics. 



ACADEMIC STATUS POLICIES 



Students' performance in didactic and experiential learning courses is continually 
monitored. Students are responsible for their academic progress and should take the 
initiative to meet their academic advisor and/or the coursemaster(s) when academic 
problems occur. The director for student services, the class advisor, faculty and 
administration are available to help students meet the Schools academic standards. 
Experience has demonstrated that the earlier and more actively students recognize 
and address potential problems, the greater their likelihood of avoiding academic 
difficulties. By the same token, faculty members are encouraged to initiate discus- 
sions with students whose performance appears likely to result in a failing grade. 

To remain in acceptable academic standing and to be eligible for graduation, 
students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in required courses. 
Students with a cumulative GPA below 2.0 or a failing grade in a didactic or 
experiential learning course are subject to academic dismissal. 

At the end of each semester, the associate dean of student affairs reviews the 
academic status of all students in the PharmD program. Students with a failing 
grade in any course are subject to academic dismissal as soon as the failing grade 
is submitted in writing to the Student Affairs Office. Students who do not 
achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in their required courses are subject 
to academic dismissal. 

Students with a semester GPA below 2.0 but maintain a cumulative GPA of 
2.0 or greater will receive a letter of academic warning from the associate dean of 
student affairs. The Chair of the Student Affairs Committee and students' acad- 
emic advisors also receive a copy of this letter. 

The associate dean of student affairs will send, via certified mail, a notification 
letter and a copy of the Academic Status Policies and Procedures to students subject 
to academic dismissal. The letter will indicate that the student will be dismissed 
from the School unless the he/she appeals to the Student Affairs Committee 
requesting to be placed on academic probation. The letter will state the time and 
place of the academic review hearing with the Student Affairs Committee (typically 
within seven calendar days of the letter's date). The Chair of the Student Affairs 
Committee and student's academic advisors also receive copies of the letter. 



Academic Information 



Students subject to academic dismissal have the right to appeal to the Student 
Affairs Committee. Students may present their case in person before the committee 
or submit a written appeal. Students may submit any documents that they deem 
pertinent. Students who do not appeal will be dismissed from the School. 

At least seven calendar days before any Student Affairs Committee academic 
review hearing, the committee will distribute a confidential memo to the faculty 
listing all students to be reviewed. The memo will state the time and place of the 
hearing, stress the confidential nature of the information and request that 
faculty provide the committee with pertinent information on students' academic 
performance and ability. Any faculty member may provide written comments to 
the committee or request permission to appear at any student's hearing. 

Academic advisors and other faculty members may attend academic review 
hearings and present pertinent information. The committee will consider pre- 
pharmacy grades, prior academic performance in the School, and personal issues 
in its deliberations. 

At the conclusion of the academic review hearing, the committee will deliberate 
on each case and determine each student's academic status. The committee decides 
by a simple majority vote to either academically dismiss students, place them on 
academic probation or gather more information. If placed on academic probation, 
students will be allowed to continue in the program but under specific terms 
oudined by the committee, such as taking remedial courses to strengthen specific 
knowledge or skills. If the committee decides to gather more information, it must 
complete its review and make a final decision within five calendar days of the 
original hearing. The committee will submit its decision in writing to the students, 
dean, and the students' academic advisors within seven calendar days of the 
academic review hearing. 

Students have the right to appeal the decision of the Student Affairs Commit- 
tee directly to the dean. Students must submit appeals in writing and state the 
basis for the appeal. Students must complete all appeals before the beginning of 
the next semester. The dean's decision is final. 

Students on academic probation must meet with their academic advisor and 
the associate dean of student affairs to develop a plan of action to resolve all 
pertinent academic issues. While on probation, students must earn a GPA of 2.0 
or greater during each semester. If students on probation earn a semester GPA of 
2.0 or greater, but the cumulative GPA or the required-course GPA remains 
below 2.0, students will remain on academic probation. Students will be removed 
from probation when their cumulative GPA and required-course GPA is 2.0 or 
greater. Students with a failing grade on their record will remain on probation 
until they receive a passing grade. 

Students who are academically dismissed may petition the Admissions 
Committee for readmission after they have completed some form of remediation. 
Students who have been academically dismissed twice from the School are not 
eligible for readmission. 



School of Pharmacy 



i 



ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 



STUDENT HONOR CODE POLICY AND PROCEDURES 



Students entering the profession of pharmacy are required to exhibit exemplary 
standards of conduct. Absolute honesty is imperative for a health professional. 
On May 14, 1998, the Student Government Association adopted the following 
Honor Code: 

I. Statement of Philosophy 

The students of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy recognize that 
honesty, truth, and integrity are values central to the School's mission as an insti- 
tution of higher education. Therefore, the Student Government Association has 
assembled current policies and procedures involving academic integrity into this 
"Honor Code" of behavior. The code described in this document articulates the 
responsibilities of Doctor of Pharmacy students, graduate students, faculty and 
administration in upholding academic integrity, while at the same time respect- 
ing the rights of individuals to the due process offered by administrative hearings 
and appeals. All persons enrolled in any course or program offered by University 
of Maryland School of Pharmacy and all persons supervising the learning of any 
student are responsible for acting in accordance with the provisions of this policy. 

Student Responsibilities 

• Understanding the types of conduct which are deemed unacceptable 
and, therefore, are prohibited by this policy. 

• Refraining from committing any act of cheating, plagiarizing, facilitat- 
ing academic dishonesty, abusing academic materials, stealing or lying. 

• Reporting every instance in which the student has a suspicion or knowl- 
edge that academic conduct which violates this policy or its spirit has 
taken place to the faculty member responsible for instruction or to a 
member of the Student Discipline and Grievance Committee. 

Faculty Responsibilities 

• Understanding the procedures of this policy relative to how faculty are 
to handle suspected instances of academic dishonesty. 

• Developing an instructional environment that reflects a commitment to 
maintaining and enforcing academic integrity. 

• Handling every suspected or admitted instance of the violation of the 
provisions of this policy in accordance with the current School and 
University procedures. 

II. Academic Integrity 

In attempt to maintain academic integrity, the Student Government Association 
has outlined a code of conduct (an Honor Code) which describes acceptable 

Academic Information 41 



behavior for students in all its academic settings. This code has been developed 
using University (as stated in the University's Student Answer Book) and School 
(as stated in the School's catalog) policies. Elements of this code can be catego- 
rized into six broad areas. 

1 . Cheating. Definition: Using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, 
information, notes, study aids or other devices, or obtaining unauthorized 
assistance from any source for work submitted as one's own individual 
efforts in any class, clinic, assignment, or examination. Examples of cheating 
include, but are not limited to, the following actions: 

a. Copying from another student's paper or test, or receiving assistance 
from another person during an exam or other assignment in a manner 
not authorized by the instructor. 

b. Possessing, buying, selling, removing, receiving, or using at any time 
or in any manner not previously authorized by the instructor a copy 
or copies of any exam or other materials (in whole or in part) 
intended to be used as an instrument of evaluation in advance of 
its administration. 

c. Using material or equipment not authorized by the instructor during 
a test or other academic evaluation, such as crib notes, a calculator or 
a tape recorder. 

d. Working with another or others on any exam, take home exam, 
computer or laboratory work, or any other assignment when the 
instructor has required independent and unaided effort. 

e. Attempting to influence or change an academic evaluation, grade or 
record by deceit or unfair means, such as: (1) damaging the acade- 
mic work of another student to gain an unfair advantage in an 
academic evaluation; or (2) marking or submitting an exam or other 
assignment in a manner designed to deceive the grading system. 

f Submitting, without prior permission, the same academic work 
which has been submitted in identical or similar form in another 
class or in fulfillment of any other academic requirement at the 
University. 

g. Permitting another to substitute for oneself during an exam or any 
other type of academic evaluation. 

h. Gaining an unfair advantage in an academic evaluation by receiving 
specific information about a test, exam or other assignment. 

2. Plagiarism. Definition: Representing, orally or in writing, in any aca- 
demic assignment or exercise, the words, ideas, or works of another as 
one's own without customary and proper acknowledgment of the 
source. Examples: 

a. Submitting material or work for evaluation, in whole or in part, 
which has been prepared by an individual(s) or commercial service. 

b. Directly quoting from a source without the customary or proper 
citation source. 

d. Downloading material from Web sites without appropriate docu- 
mentation. 



School of Pharmacy 



3. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty. Definition: Helping or attempting 
to help another person commit an act of academic dishonesty. Examples: 

a. Providing assistance to another during an exam or other assignment 
in a manner not authorized by the instructor. 

b. Acting as a substitute for another in any exam or any other type of 
academic evaluation. 

c. Providing specific information about a recently given test, exam or 
other assignment to another student who thereby gains an unfair 
advantage in an academic evaluation. 

d. Permitting one's academic work to be represented as the work 
of another. 

e. Preparing for sale, barter, or loan to another such items as unauthorized 
papers, notes or abstracts of lectures and readings. 

4. Abuse of Academic Materials. Definition: Destroying or making inac- 
cessible academic resource materials. Examples: 

a. Destroying, hiding, or otherwise making unavailable for common 
use library, computer or other academic reference materials. 

b. Destroying, hiding, or otherwise making unavailable another's 
notes, experiments, computer programs or other academic work. 

5. Stealing. Definition: Taking, attempting to take, or withholding the 
property of another, thereby permanently or temporarily depriving the 
owner of its use or possession. Examples: 

a. Unauthorized removal of library materials, examinations, computer 
programs, or any other academic materials, including obtaining 
advance access to an examination through collusion with a University 
employee or otherwise. 

b. Taking another's academic work, such as papers, computer programs, 
laboratory experiments or research results. 

6. Lying. Definition: Making any oral or written statement which the 
individual knows to be untrue. Examples: 

a. Making a false statement to any instructor or other University 
employee in an attempt to gain advantage or exception. 

b. Falsifying evidence or tesdfying falsely, such as in a Student Grievance 
Committee hearing. 

c. Inventing or counterfeiting data, research results, research procedures, 
internship or practicum experiences or other information. 

d. Citing a false source for referenced material/data. 

III. Honor Pledge 

In order to address the first two areas, cheating and plagiarism, the School has 
developed an honor pledge statement that has been used by many faculty to 
reinforce the importance of academic integrity. This pledge statement will be used 
in the following manner: Work assigned for classes, clinics, internships, and all 
other types of instruction offered at the School of Pharmacy may be accomplished 
in either of two ways: (1) as "individual" work for which the student will sign a 
pledge statement indicating that the work was completed independently, without 



Academic Informatic 



giving or receiving assistance from another; or (2) as "collaborative" work, which 
may be completed in collaboration with others as directed by the instructor and for 
which no pledge statement is required. All work is considered to be individual work 
unless the instructor specifies otherwise. For all "individual" work, instructors may 
require students to sign the following pledge statement: 

"On my honor, I have neither given nor received aid on this assignment." 

Student's signature: Date: 

Thus, students will state that the work that was submitted is their own and 
will be held accountable if evidence appears that is contrary to this statement. 
Students are reminded that neither the presence nor the absence of a signed 
pledge statement will allow students to violate established codes oi conduct as 
described above. 

IV. Disciplinary Procedures 

As stated below, the Student Discipline and Grievance Committee will be respon- 
sible for implementing and monitoring aspects of this code for Doctor of 
Pharmacy students. A separate set of procedures is in place for graduate students. 
They should contact their graduate program director for further information. 
PharmD students who are found guilty of a violation of academic integrity stan- 
dards will be subject to penalties deemed appropriate by the Student Discipline 
and Grievance Committee as stated in the committee's policies and procedures. It 
is the committee's duty to protect honest students from being taken advantage of 
by those who behave dishonestly. The committee will ensure any accused student 
of certain rights: to be informed in writing of the charges, to hear evidence 
presented, to question witnesses and to present witnesses. The committee shall 
maintain confidentiality regarding names of persons involved in honor cases. 
The principles and problems raised by cases, however, may be discussed with 
appropriate administrative and faculty representatives. 



STUDENT DISCIPLINE AND GRIEVANCE POLICIES 
AND PROCEDURES 



I. Purpose 

The Student Discipline and Grievance Committee ("Committee") is established 
in the School of Pharmacy to foster self-governance by the student body. The 
Committee hears and attempts to solve problems or complaints ("Grievances") 
that involve professional students. Grievances against graduate students or faculty 
are handled under separate policies and procedures. 

Most formal grievances are brought directly to the Committee. However, 
every effort will be made to informally resolve grievances outside of the 
Committee. Students will be encouraged to consult their class advisers, Student 
Government Association advisor, coursemasters, or the associate dean for 
student affairs regarding the informal resolution of problems. 



School of Pharmacy 



II. Committee Composition 

The Student Discipline and Grievance Committee, a sub-committee of the Stu- 
dent Affairs Committee, is composed of seven voting members: four students and 
three faculty members. The student members of the Committee will include the 
Student Government Association (SGA) president, the second- and third-year 
class presidents, and the senior student member of the Student Affairs Commit- 
tee. If a grievance is made against a Nontraditional Pathway (NTPD) student, a 
member of the NTPD advisory board will replace the most senior 
student member of the Student Affairs Committee. Faculty members include the 
SGA faculty advisor and the third- and fourth-year class advisors. The SGA 
president chairs the Committee. The associate dean of student affairs serves as an 
ex-officio member. In the event that a grievance is filed against a NTPD 
student, the NTPD director will serve as an ex-officio member of the Committee. 
All members of the Committee must be present at formal hearings. Members 
of the committee who cannot attend the hearing or must recuse themselves due to 
a conflict of interest will notify the chair immediately. In the event that a commit- 
tee member cannot attend a formal hearing, the Committee Chair shall appoint a 
replacement. Each student member of the Committee unable to attend will be 
replaced by an elected officer in the SGA or a member of the NTPD advisory 
board. Each faculty member of the Committee unable to attend will be replaced 
by a faculty member, preferably a member of the Student Affairs Committee. 

III. Preliminary Evaluation 

Grievance must be submitted in writing to the SGA President, the SGA advisor or 
the associate dean of student aftairs. Within five days of receipt of a written griev- 
ance, the SGA President, the SGA advisor, the associate dean of student affairs and 
either the most senior student member of the Student Affairs Committee or a 
member of the NTPD advisor board (as applicable) will review the facts presented 
and determine if the matter is grievable under this policy. If two or more individu- 
als during the preliminary evaluation believe the matter is grievable, a formal 
hearing will be called by the Committee Chair. If the majority believe the matter is 
not grievable, the associate dean of student affairs will counsel the Grievant on 
alternatives. 

iV. Grievance Procedure 

Once the Grievance is determined to be grievable, the Respondent will be sent a 
letter from the Grievance Committee Chair and the associate dean of student 
affairs stating: 1) that a formal grievance has been filed, 2) the deadline for 
submission of a written rebuttal and a proposed date(s) for the formal hearing, 
and 3) that advice and counsel should be sought from the academic advisor. 
Along with the letter, the respondent will be provided with a written copy of the 
grievance and this policy. The Respondent will be given up to 10 days to provide 
a written response to the Committee Chair. The Committee will hold a formal 
hearing no more than five days after the deadline for receipt of the Respondent's 
written response. 



Academic Information 



Prior to the hearing, the Grievant's allegations and any supporting information 
will be provided to the Respondent for review. Likewise, the Respondent's allega- 
tions and evidence shall be provided to the Grievant for review. The associate dean 
of student affairs will facilitate this exchange of information. If feasible, supporting 
evidence will be made available to both parties no less than three days before the 
scheduled hearing. 

The formal hearing is an internal academic process; legal counsel will not be 
permitted to represent either the Grievant or the Respondent. The Grievance is 
presented to the Committee by the Grievant or by a representative of the dean's 
office, in the presence of the Respondent. The presenter of the Grievance may 
call witnesses to present relevant information. The witnesses supporting the 
Grievant may be questioned by the Respondent and Committee members. 

The Respondent has the right to refuse to appear before the Committee and 
the right to remain silent during the hearing. Refusal to appear will not be taken 
as an admission of guilt. The Respondent has the right to: 1) present a statement 
on the Respondent's behalf at the hearing, 2) present witnesses having relevant 
information pertaining to the Grievance and 3) present relevant evidence in the 
form of written or tangible materials. The witnesses supporting the Respondent 
may be questioned by the Grievant and Committee members. 

The hearings will not be open to the public. All witnesses will be excluded from 
the hearing room until they are called to testify. All witnesses will be asked to 
affirm that any information they are presenting, including any written materials, is 
accurate and complete to the best of their knowledge and belief 

Upon completion of the hearing, the Committee will meet in closed session to 
determine whether the Grievance has been proven by the preponderance of the 
evidence; that is, whether on the basis of the evidence, it is more likely than not 
that the Grievance is a correct allegation. 

The Chair will remind the Committee that it is to be free of bias concerning 
all aspects of the case in question. Members who wish to excuse themselves from 
the voting due to possible bias may do so. 

The method of voting shall be by secret ballot. To sustain the grievance, a 
majority vote of both the faculty and student committee members is required. All 
other questions before the Committee may be decided by a simple majority vote. 
If the vote is that a Grievance is not sustained, the case is closed. A record of the 
case will be kept in the Committee's files until the Grievant and Respondent leave 
the University. If a Grievance is sustained, the Committee will decide on a course 
of action. 

V. Course of Action 

Following a vote sustaining a Grievance against a Respondent, the Committee 

must take one of the following courses of action: 

1. Prepare a disciplinary letter stating that the Respondent acted with 
impropriety. This letter is not entered into the student's file but is 
retained in the Committee's file until the student has left the School. 
The letter will be sent to the Respondent within three days of the 
Committee's hearing. A copy of said letter will be sent to the Grievant. 



School of Pharmacy 



2. Prepare a temporary letter of censure to remain in the students file for at 
least one year. The Respondent and Grievant will be informed of the 
course of action in writing within three days of the Committee's action. 

3. Prepare a letter of censure to remain in the student's file permanently. 
The Respondent and Grievant will be informed of the course of action 
in writing within three days of the Committee's action. 

4. Recommend to the Student Affairs Committee that the Respondent be 
placed on disciplinary probation, not to exceed one year. 

5. Recommend to the Student Affairs Committee that the Respondent be 
suspended from the School for a period of time not to exceed one year. 

6. Recommend to the Student Affairs Committee that the Respondent be 
dismissed from the School. 

In addition to the actions stated above, the Committee may place other 
requirements on the Respondent that relate to the case (e.g., to make restitution 
or repairs when property is damaged, to seek counseling for emotional issues). 

VI. Appeal to the Dean 

A Respondent or Grievant may appeal any recommended action to the dean. The 
appeal must be made in writing and must be filed in the dean's office. The appeal 
should describe the basis for the appeal. The appeal must be based on new evi- 
dence or relevant facts not produced in the hearing, a claim of inadequate 
consideration of specific evidence, a claim that a rule or regulation of the Univer- 
sity or School applied in the case is not applicable or a claim that the disciplinary 
action is unduly severe or lenient. 

Afi:er reviewing the Grievance Committee's report, the recommendation from the 
Student Affairs Committee and any appeal(s) from the Respondent or Grievant, the 
dean will make a final decision to accept the recommendation or remand the matter 
for reconsideration to the Grievance Committee. The dean will generally make 
a final decision within 14 days after receiving the Student Affairs Committee's 
recommendation and the Grievance Committee's report. If the appeal is denied, the 
dean's action is final. 




Mr. Fred Abnimson assists Bruce Cao and Flora Dasgitpia tn the computer lab. 

Academic Information 47 



Administration and Faculty 



University System of Maryland Board of Regents 

Lance W. Billingsley 

Nathan A. Chapman Jr., Chairman 

Edwin S. Crawford 

Thomas B. Finan Jr. 

Michael C. Gelman 

Louise Michaux Gonzales 

The Honorable Steny H. Hoyer 

Leronia A. Josey 

Clifford Kendall 

Jeong H. Kim 

Admiral Charles R. Larson, USN (Ret.) 

Lillian Hobson Lincoln 

Andrew D. Miller 

David H. Nevins 

William T Wood 

Henry A. Virts, DVM, ex ojficio 



System Officials 

Donald N. Langenberg, PhD, Chancellor 

John K. Martin, Vice Chancellor, Advancement 

Charles R. Middleton, PhD, Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs 

Joseph F. Vivona, Vice Chancellor, Administration and Finance 

University of Maryland 

David J. Ramsay, DM, DPhil, President 

Joann A. Boughman, PhD, Vice President, Academic Affairs; Dean, 

Graduate Studies 
James T. Hill Jr., MPA, Vice President, Administrative Services 
T. Sue Gladhill, MSW, Vice President, External Affairs 
Morton L Rapoport, MD, President and Chief Executive Officer, 

University of Maryland Medical System 
Richard R. Ranncy DDS, MS, Dean, Dental School 
Karen H. Rothenberg, Interim Dean, School of Law 
Donald E. Wilson, MD, MACP Dean, School of Medicine 
Barbara R. Heller, EdD, RN, FAAN, Dean, School of Nursing 
David A. Knapp, PhD, Dean, School of Pharmacy 
Jessie J. Harris, PhD, Dean, School of Social Work 



School of Pharmacy 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Administration 

David A. Knapp, PhD, Dean and Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Robert S. Beardsley, PhD, Associate Dean, Student Affairs and 

Administration; Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
William Cooper, MBA, Associate Dean, Administration 
Myron Weiner, PhD, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs; 

Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Margaret Hayes, MS, Director, Student Services and Career Development 

and Enhancement Services 
Mary Joseph Ivins, Director, Financial Affairs 
Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, BCPS, Director, Nontraditional Pathway; 

Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Sciences 
Tim Munn, BS, Director, Computing Services 
Richard E. Rumrill, MS, Director, Experiential Learning; Assistant Professor, 

Pharmacy Practice and Sciences 
Carolyn O. Footman, Executive Administrative Assistant to the Dean 

Board of Visitors 

George S. Barrett 
James C. Boylan, PhD 
Michael G. Bronfein 
Alan Cheung, PharmD, MPH 
Russell B. Fair, RPh 
Michael S. Frost 
Jere E. Goyan, PhD 
William M. Heller, PhD 
Donald M. Kirson 
Patricia Lion Krongard 
Henri Manasse, PhD 
Ernest Mario, PhD 
Martin B. Mintz, PhD, FASCP 
James A. Miller, PhD 
Richard P Penna, PharmD 
Robert G. Pinco, JD 
Thaddeus Pruss 
Leonard Rodman 
Gordon Sato, PhD 
David R. Savello, PhD 
Stephen C. Schimpff, MD 
Matthew Shimoda, PharmD 
Alex Taylor, BPharm 
George C. Voxakis, PharmD 
Clayton L. Warrington, BSP 
Patrick J. Zenner 

Administration and Faculty 



Faculty 

Alfred Abramson, RPh, BSR Pharmacy Management, University of Maryland; 

Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Director, Pharmacy 

Practice Laboratory 
Jane V. Aldrich, PhD, Medicinal Chemistry, University of Michigan; Professor, 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Bruce D. Anderson, PharmD, Clinical Toxicology, Philadelphia College of 

Pharmacy and Science; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; 

Assistant Director, Maryland Poison Center 
Larry L. Augsburger, RPh, PhD, Pharmaceutics, University of Maryland; 

Shangraw Professor of Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics; Professor, 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Robert S. Beardsley, RPh, PhD, Pharmacy Administration, University of 

Minnesota; Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Associate Dean, 

Student Affairs and Administration 
Ralph N. Blomster, RPh, PhD, Pharmacognosy, University of Connecticut; 

Professor Emeritus, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Mary Borovicka, PharmD, Psychiatry, University of Toledo; Assistant Professor, 

Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Cynthia Boyle, PharmD, University of Maryland; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy 

Practice and Science; Assistant Director, Experiential Learning 
Nicole Brandt, PharmD, Geriatrics, University of Maryland; Assistant Professor, 

Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Gary G. Buterbaugh, PhD, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iowa; 

Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Prashant J. Chikhale, PhD, Medicinal Chemistry, University of Florida; Assistant 

Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Andrew Coop, PhD, Opioid Chemistry, University of Bristol; Assistant Professor, 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Judy L. Curtis, PharmD, Mental Health, University of Texas; Assistant Professor, 

Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Richard N. Dalby, PhD, Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, University of 

Kentucky; Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Russell J. DiGate, PhD, Molecular Biology, University of Rochester; Associate 

Professor, Chairperson, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Bethany DiPaula, PharmD, Psychiatry, University of Maryland; Assistant 

Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Thomas C. Dowling, PhD, Clinical Science, University of Pittsburgh; Assistant 

Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, Pharmacokinetics, University of Maryland; Associate 

Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Emmeline Edwards, PhD, Neuropharmacology, Fordham University; Associate 

Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Donald O. Fedder, RPh, Dr PH, Public Health Education, Johns Hopkins 

University; Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 



School of Pharmacy 



Hamid Ghandehari, PhD, Pharmaceutics/Novel Drug Delivery Systems, 

University of Utah; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Ronald D. Guiles, PhD, Physical Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley; 

Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Stuart T. Haines, RPh, PharmD, CDE, Ambulatory Care, University of Texas 

at Austin and University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio; 

Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Erkan Hassan, RPh, PharmD, Critical Care, University of Maryland; Associate 

Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Jun Hayashi, PhD, University of Connecticut; Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical 

Sciences 
Stephen W. Hoag, PhD, Pharmaceutics, University of Minnesota; Assistant 

Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
R. Gary Hoilenbeck, PhD, Pharmaceutics, Purdue University; Associate Professor, 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Robert A. Kerr, RPh, PharmD, Ambulatory Pharmacotherapy and Instructional 

Systems Design, University of California; Associate Professor, Pharmacy 

Practice and Science 
Kwang Chul Kim, PhD, Cell Biology, Ohio State University; Associate Professor, 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Wendy Klein-Schwartz, PharmD, Clinical Toxicology, University of Maryland; 

Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Director, Maryland 

Poison Center 
David A. Knapp, RPh, PhD, Pharmacy Administration, Purdue University; 

Dean and Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Raymond C. Love, RPh, PharmD, Mental Health, University of Maryland; 

Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; Director, Mental Health 

Program; Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry 
Alexander D. MacKerell Jr., PhD, Biochemistry and Computational Chemistry, 

Rutgers University; Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
David A. Mays, PharmD, BCPS, Drug Information Services, Mercer University; 

Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, BCPS, Ambulatory Care and Geriatrics, 

University of Maryland; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; 

Director, Nontraditional PharmD Pathway 
Robert J. Michocki, RPh, PharmD, BCPS, Family Medicine, University of 

Maryland; Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
David B. Moore, RPh, MPA, Health Care Management, Cornell University; 

Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
J. Edward Moreton, RPh, PhD, Pharmacology, University of Mississippi; 

Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Daniel Mullins, PhD, Pharmacoeconomics, Duke University; Associate Professor, 

Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Francis B. Palumbo, RPh, PhD, Health Care Administration, University of Mis- 
sissippi; JD, University of Baltimore Law Center; Professor, Pharmacy 

Practice and Science 



Administration and Faculty 



Karen Plaisance, RPh, PharmD, BCPS, Pharmacokinetics and Infectious 

Diseases, State University of New York at Buffalo; Associate Professor, 

Pharmacy Practice and Science 
James E. PoUi, RPh, PhD, Pharmaceutics, University of Michigan; Associate 

Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Francoise Pradel, PhD, Health Policy and Administration, University of North 

Carolina at Chapel Hill; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
William G. Reiss, PharmD, Pharmacokinetics, State University of New York at 

Buffalo; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Magaly Rodriguez deBittner, RPh, BCPS, PharmD, Ambulatory Care, University 

of Maryland; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
David S. Roffinan, RPh, PharmD, BCPS, Cardiovascular Therapeutics, University 

of Mar)'land; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Gerald M. Rosen, PhD, Chemistry, Clarkson College of Technolog)'; JD, Duke 

University School of Law; Emerson Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Richard Rumrill, MS, Pharmacy, University of Florida; Assistant Professor, 

Pharmacy Practice and Science; Director, Experiential Learning 
Ginette Serrero, PhD, University of Nice, France; Associate Professor, 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Paul Shapiro, PhD, Pharmacology/Signal Transduction, University of Vermont 

College of Medicine; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Gary H. Smith, PharmD, Drug Information and Infectious Diseases, Universit)' 

of California; Professor and Chairperson, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Rakesh Srivastava, PhD, Cancer Biology, University of Guelph, Ontario, 

Canada; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Bruce C. Stuart, PhD, Economics, Washington State University; Parke-Davis 

Professor of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Anthony C. Tommasello, RPh, MS, Substance Abuse and Chemical Dependence, 

University of Maryland; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science; 

Director, Office of Substance Abuse Studies 
James A. Trovato, PharmD, Hematology and Oncology, Purdue Universit)'; 

Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Mona Tsoukleris, RPh, PharmD, Ambulatory Care and Adult Internal Medicine, 

University of Maryland; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Ashiwel S. Undie, PhD, Pharmacology, the Medical College of Pennsylvania; 

Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Jia Bei Wang, PhD, Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University 

of Maryland; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Myron Weiner, RPh, PhD, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Maryland; 

Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences; Associate Dean, Academic Affairs 
Sheila Weiss, PhD, Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University; Assistant Professor, 

Pharmacy Practice and Science 
Angela Wilks, PhD, Biochemistry, University of Leeds, England; Assistant 

Prolessor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 
Jeremy Wright, RPh, PhD, Biomedicina! Chemistry, University of London; 

Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 



School of Pharmacy 



Julie Magno Zito, PhD, Social and Behavioral Pharmacy, University of 
Minnesota; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Ilene H. Zuckerman, RPh, PharmD, Geriatrics and Ambulatory Care, University 
of Maryland; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Adjunct Faculty 

Clinical Assistant Professor 

Mahnaz Younes Abhari, PharmD, Georgetown University Hospital 

Ayotunde Adekoya, PharmD, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Marsha Alvarez, PharmD, Program Support Center 

Maria Apostolarios, PharmD, Otsuka America Pharmaceutical 

Susan Arnold, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Hector Ayu, MBA, Kmart Pharmacy 

Lee Barker, MBA, Safeway Pharmacy 

Phyllis Bartilucci, MS, Civista Medical Center 

Denise V. Baugh, MBA, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Megan Ellen Bayliff, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Trent Beach, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Maryam Behta, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 

Robert Berg, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Anthony Bixler, BSP, York Apothecary, Inc. 

Lawrence E. Blandford, PharmD, Advance ParadigM Clinical Services 

Mark D. Boesen, PharmD, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy 

Joseph T. Botticelli, MS, St. Joseph's Medical Center 

Stephen P. Boykin, MS, VA Medical Center 

Barry Bress, MHA, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Daria A. Brown, PharmD, Columbia Arlington Hospital 

Brian Dale Buck, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 

Demetris M. Butler, PharmD, Laurel Regional Hospital 

James B. Caldwell, PharmD, Anne Arundel Medical Center 

Kevin Callahan, PharmD, Shore Health System 

Paul K. Cernek, PharmD, HealthAmerica 

David R. Chason, MBA, Good Samaritan Hospital 

Fred Chatelain, MS, INOVA- Alexandria Hospital Pharmacy 

Fred Choy, MS, Millenia Healthcare Corporation 

Deborah B. Cooper, PharmD, Advance ParadigM Clinical Services 

Gena Wood Cramer, PharmD, Center for Health Information, Inc. 

Robert DeChristoforo, MS, NIH Clinical Center 

Morrell C. Delcher, MBA, Mercy Medical Center 

Howard Dickter, PharmD, Union Hospital of Cecil County 

Robert Dombrowski, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Joseph Dorsch Jr., MBA, Voshell's Pharmacy 

Babette Duncan, PharmD, Advance ParadigM Clinical Services 

Janice Dunsavage, MAS, Pinnacle Health Hospitals 

Heather D. Dworski, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Administration and Faculty 53 



Alfred FallavoUita Jr., MS, NIH National Cancer Institute 

Kerri Ross Farrelly, PharmD, Center for Health Information, Inc. 

Madeline Feinberg, PharmD, Chase Braxton Clinic 

Richard Fejka, MS, NIH Clinical Nuclear Pharmacy 

Robert Feroli, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Jerome Fine, PharmD, HMIS, Inc. 

Michelle Forrest-Smith, PharmD, Universit)' of Maryland Medical System 

Robert J. Fuentes, MS, Medlmmune, Inc. 

John S. Gibson, MS, National Naval Medical Center 

Mary Giesey, MBA, North Arundel Hospital 

Shawn Giilikin, PharmD, Penn State Geisinger Health System 

Barry Goldspiel, PharmD, NIH Clinical Center 

Patricia E. Grunwald, PharmD, Frederick Memorial Hospital 

Karl F. Gumpper, BSP, Children's National Medical Center 

Andrew S.T. Haffer, PharmD, Alpharma 

Cynthia J. Halas, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Charles L. Hall Jr., MS, National Naval Medical Center 

Jon Hann, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

Elham Hekmat, PharmD, Georgetown University Hospital 

Andrea G. Hershey, PharmD, Union Memorial Hospital 

William Hill, BSR Hill's Drug Store 

Jann Burks Hinkle, BSP, American Pharmaceutical Association 

A. Herbert Holmes Jr., PharmD, Severn Healthcare 

Charles V. Hoppes, MPH, Food and Drug Administration 

Jon D. Horton, PharmD, York Hospital 

Kendra Huseman, PharmD, Naval Medical Clinic 

Anthony Ihenatu, PharmD, Bon Secours Hospital 

Amy Ives, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Tep M. Kang, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Deanna L. Kelly, PharmD, Maryland Psychiatric Research Center 

Mark Kern, PharmD, Mercy Medical Center 

Masoomeh Khamesian, PharmD, Howard County General Hospital 

Hannah Kim, PharmD, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists 

Mari Kim, PharmD, Doctors Community Hospital 

Tina S. Kim, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Joan Korek, PharmD, Astra Pharmaceuticals 

David A. Kotzin, MS, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Kathrin Kucharski, PharmD, Good Samaritan Hospital 

Cynthia LaCivita, PharmD, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital 

Vincent Lacroce, PharmD, Penn State Geisinger Health System 

Betsy T. Le, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Dan Le, PharmD, Franklin Square Hospital Center 

Louise Leach, BSP, Northwest Hospital Center 

Carlton K. Lee, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Laura Lees, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Laura R. Lehman, PharmD, Union Memorial Hospital 



School of Pharmacy 



Melvin Lessing, MS, Food and Drug Administration 

Louis E. Levenson, MAS, Kernan Hospital 

Bonnie Levin, PharmD, Laurel Regional Hospital 

David Liebman, DPA, Kayes AID Pharmacy 

Susan M. Lizarralde, PharmD, Penn State Geisinger Health System 

Joseph Loetell Jr., PharmD, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Heidi Louie, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 

Mitchell D. Lucy, MS, Malcolm Grow Medical Center 

Alonzo Mable, MS, Kaiser Permanente 

Scott M. Mark, PharmD, Children's National Medical Center 

Julianna T. Marten, PharmD, Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital 

Robert Martin Jr., BSP Potomac Valley Pharmacy, Inc. 

Robert Massey, MSA, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Herbert G. Mathews IIL PharmD, Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital 

Robert J. McAuley, MS, Pfizer, Inc. 

Andrea McDonald, PharmD, INFUCOR 

Nasir Mian, PharmD, Greater Southeast Community Hospital 

Rita Mitsch, PharmD, Franklin Square Hospital Center 

Blanca Morales, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Jill A. Morgan, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 

Joseph M. Morrissey, MS, Howard County General Hospital 

Pam Moussavian-Yousefi, PharmD, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Wendy Munroe, PharmD, MedOutcomes, Inc. 

John Ness, PharmD, Fallston General Hospital 

Teresa Ng,PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Bao-Anh Nguyen-Khoa, PharmD, Center for Health Information, Inc. 

Mary Ann Niesen, PharmD, Fort Defiance Indian Health Service 

Michael Nnadi, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Godwin Odunze, MS, DC Chartered Health Center 

Donna L. O'Keefe, PharmD, Washington County Hospital 

Richard Ottmar, MBA, Sacred Heart Hospital 

Michele Overtoom, PharmD, Deaton Long Term Care Pharmacy 

Larry Owens, PharmD, York Hospital 

Victoria C. Paoletti, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Jane A. Paranych, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Richard D. Parker Jr., BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Kalpna Patel, MS, Giant Pharmacy 

Carol Paulick, MBA, St. Agnes Health Care 

Norene P. Pease, MBA, Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

Normand Pelissier, MBA, Church Hospital 

David Perrott, BSP, Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital 

Mark D. Peters II, PharmD, Center for Health Information 

Wallace Pickworth, PhD, NIDA, Addiction Research Center 

Alfred E. Pilong Jr., MS, Kent General Hospital 

Bonnie L. Pitt, MAS, Frederick Memorial Hospital 

Marilyn R. Pitts, PharmD, Greater Southeast Community Hospital 

Administration and Faculty 



Patricia A. G. Powers, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Douglas Pryor, MBA, Maryland General Hospital 

Frank Pucino Jr., PharmD, NIH Clinical Center 

Jacob Raitt, PhD, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Jeffery Allen Reitz, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Arthur Riley, MS, Washington Heights Medical Center Pharmacy 

Michael D. Roberts, MS, National Rehabilitation Hospital 

Carol Rudo, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

David Russo, MBA, The Medicine Shoppe 

James Joseph Rybacki, PharmD, The Clearwater Group 

Ellen Safir, PharmD, Good Samaritan Hospital 

Mark R. Sanford, MBA, University of Maryland Medical System 

Howard R. Schiff, BSP, Maryland Pharmacists Association 

Edward Schowalter III, PharmD, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Felicia Scott, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Brent Sharf, BSP, Bon Secours Hospital 

Matthew G. Shimoda, PharmD, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Lawrence Siegel, MAS, University of Maryland Medical System 

Ralph A. Small Jr., BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Jeffrey A. Snyder, PharmD, Malcolm Grow Medical Center 

Peter Tarn, MS, Calvert Memorial Hospital 

Cassandra G. Tancil, PharmD, Greater Baltimore Medical Center 

Christopher E. Thomas, PharmD, Church Hospital 

Jennifer K. Thomas, PharmD, Carroll County Hospital 

John D. Thomas, PharmD, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Richard Tsao, PharmD, Greater Southeast Community Hospital 

Sara C. Turk, PharmD, Good Samaritan Hospital 

Nancy D. Tzeng, PharmD, Sinai Hospital of Baltimore 

Paul Vitale, PharmD, Anne Arundel Medical Center 

Laura Von Hagel, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 

Jo Lynne Wallin, PharmD, Harbor Hospital 

J. Kenneth Walters, PharmD, Sheppard Pratt Hospital 

Ricke J. Weickum, PharmD, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Anne M. Wiland, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 

Sharon D. Wilson, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 

Thomas Wilson, PharmD, Cape Apothecary 

Eileen Wu, PharmD, Montgomery General Hospital 

Beverly Yachmetz, PharmD, Diabetes Connection 

Ellen Yankellow, PharmD, YES Pharmacy Services, Inc. 

Donald K. Yee, BSP Kaiser Permanente 

Clinical Associate Professor 

Daniel Ashby, MS, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Patrick Birmingham, MAS, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Karini Calis, PharmD, NIH Clinical Center 

Joseph Gallina, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 



School of Pharmacy 



Gordon Ireland, PharmD, Shore Clinical Foundation 
Roliey Johnson, PharmD, Johns Hopkins Bayview Campus 
Thomas Sisca, PharmD, Shore Health System 
Phillip Wiener, PharmD, Wieners Home Health Care 

Clinical Instructor 

Stephen J. Adamczyk, BSP Giant Pharmacy 

Jemilar Adelakun, BSP, Kaiser Permanente 

Kenneth Aiello, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

Virna Ignacio Almuete, BSP, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Michael Appel, BSP, Howard and Morris Pharmacy 

Richard Baylis, BSP, Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center 

Gerald Beachy, BSP, Beachy's Pharmacy 

David Becker, BSP, CVS Pharmacy 

John Beckman, BSP, Beckman Greene Street Pharmacy 

James Joseph Bellay, BSP, Prince George's Pharmacy 

Thomas L. Bennett, BSP Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Brian Berryhill, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Stephen Bierer, BSP Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Alisa E. Billington, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Frank Blatt, BSP, Professional Arts Pharmacy 

Ruth Blatt, BSP NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Michael N. Blazejak, BSP, Franklin Square Hospital Center 

Barry Bloom, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Thomas Bolt, BSP, The Medicine Shoppe 

Gene Borowski, BSP, Village Pharmacists 

John Braaten, BSP, Twin Knolls Pharmacy 

Lynette Bradley, BSP, CVS Pharmacy 

Thomas Brenner, BSP, York Hospital 

James L. Bresette, PharmD, Chief Redstone Indian Health Center 

Keith Broome, BSP, OptionCare of Cumberland 

Patrick Burke, BSP, Chestnut AID Pharmacy 

Karen Burton, BSP, Kaiser Permanente 

Alvin Burweli, PharmD, Alexandria Pharmacy 

Douglas Campbell, BSP, The Medicine Shoppe 

Kelly Cantwell-McNelis, BSP, Christiana Care Health System 

Robert Chang, BSP, Maryland Department of Health & Mental Hygiene 

Arnold E. dayman, BSP, American Pharmaceutical Services 

Thomas Closson, BSP, Severn Healthcare 

Gerald Cohen, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Kimberly A. Compton, BSP, University of Maryland Medical System 

David Cowden, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

James M. Crable, BSP, Thomas B. Finan Center 

Daniel Crerand, BSP, Family Health Apothecary, Inc. 

Terry Crovo, BSP, Pharmacy at MCD 

Wayne Crowley, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Administration and Faculty 



Daria Davis-Gaffney, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Randy Delker, BSP, HMIS, Inc. 

Charles R. Downs, PharmD, Washington County Hospital 

Patricia Draper, BSP, Edwards Pharmacy 

Christie A. Dunne, BSP Weis Pharmacy 

Augustine Durso, BSP, IV TX of Maryland 

Mark Ey, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Beth Fabian-Fritsch, BSP, Kaiser Permanente 

Darlene Fahrman, BSP, Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Samia H. Farah, BSP VA Medical Center 

Lou Feldman, BSP, USPHS Santa Fe Indian Hospital 

Philip Fiastro, BSP Weis Pharmacy 

Anthea Francis, BSP, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Sharon Galzarano, BSP, CVS Corporate Headquarters 

David C. Gerrold, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Robert Gerstein, BSP, Weis Pharmacy 

Sandra Geyser, BSP, Syncor Pharmacy Services 

Nancy Gilbert-Taylor, BSP, Fuller Medical Center Pharmacy 

John Gladys, BSP, St. Mary's Hospital 

Harvey Goldberg, BSP, Freedom Drug 

Leonard Goldberg, BSP, CVS Pharmacy 

Marvin Goldberg, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Millard Gomez, BSP, Holy Cross Hospital 

Thomas Goolsby, BSP, Weis Pharmacy 

Charles Graefe, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Gary J. Greenberg, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Ben Grismore, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Robert Grossman, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Maria T. Guintu, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

Douglas Haggerty, BSP, Target Pharmacy 

Mayer Handleman, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Robert J. Haupt, BSP Eckcrd Pharmacy 

Frank Henderson Jr., BSP, Klein's Pharmacy 

Gerard Herpel, BSP, Deep Creek Pharmacy 

William A. Hess, BSP, Food and Drug Administration 

Joseph High, BSP NIH National Cancer Institute 

Karen Hoffman, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Paul Holly, BSP Tuxedo Pharmacy 

Carol Holquist, BSP, Food and Drug Administration 

Angelique K. Hooper, BSP, Anchor Pharmacy 

Stephen Hospodavis, BSP, Steve's Pharmacy 

Tarik S. Ideis, BSP Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Thomas Jackson, BSP, St. Mary's Hospital 

Julie S. Johnson, BSP, Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Mitchell A. Johnston, BSP VA Medical Center 

Ramon Juta, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 



School of Pharmacy 



Donna Kadlec, BSP, VA Tech Veterinary Hospital 

Bennett Kantorow, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Robert Kantorski, BSP, Ritchie Pharmacy 

Albert Katz, PharmD, Arundel Pharmacy 

Timothy T Kefauver, BSP, VA Medical Center 

Larry D. Kelley, BSP, Nationwide Pharmacy Center 

Edward Kern, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Brenda J. Kiliany, BSP, Food and Drug Administration 

David King, BSP, Georgetown Infusion Services 

Larissa Kitenko, PharmD, Peninsula Regional Medical Center 

I. Dennis Klein, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

David Knauer, BSP, Johns Hopkins Bayview 

Mary E. Kremzner, PharmD, Food and Drug Administration 

Jay Krosnick, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Edmond J. Kucharski, BSP, Carroll County Hospital 

Scott Kuperman, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Lisa Lansberry, PharmD, Giant Pharmacy 

Stephen Lauer, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Weiraymond Lee, BSP, CVS Pharmacy 

Neil Leikach, BSP, Catonsville Pharmacy 

Dizza Levy, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Joseph Libercci, BSP, Park Avenue Pharmacy 

Mark Lichtman, BSP Drug City Pharmacy 

Larry P. Lim, BSP, Food and Drug Administration 

Timothy Lubin, BSP NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Marie Mackowick, PharmD, Crownsville Hospital Center 

Alexandra L. MacLeod, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

Peter Tabi Mbi, BSP The Medicine Shoppe 

Jeanne J. McCIellan, BSP Greater Baltimore Medical Center 

Kimberly McCullough, BSP NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Mark McDougall, BSP McDougall's Drug Center 

Marilyn McEvoy, BSP HMIS, Inc. 

Helen McFarland, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Steven McMahan, BSR CareLine of Maryland, Inc. 

Michael E McMahon, BSR Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Jennifer McMillin, BSP Frederick Memorial Hospital 

Neo Melonas, BSP, VA Medical Center 

Harvey Miller, BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Martin Mintz, BSR Northern Pharmacy & Medical Equipment 

Jeffrey L. Moyer, BSR Waynesboro Hospital 

Charles Muendlein, BSP, Lykos Pharmacy 

Linda Nadal-Hermida, BSR Kmart Pharmacy 

Leon Nelson, BSR Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Pauline A. Newman, BSR The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Akwasi Nkansah, BSR Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Joseph Nusbaum, BSP, Ambulatory Care Pharmacy 



Administration and Faculty 



Helen Osborn, BSP, Montgomery General Hospital 

Joseph Pariser, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Daniel S. Pastorek, BSP, Kay Gee Drugs 

Ashish Patel, BSP Weis Pharmacy 

David W. Patterson, BSP Health Guard 

Robert Patti, PharmD, York Hospital 

James Pellenbarg, BSP, Twin Knolls Pharmacy 

Maureen A. Pelosi, BSP, Food and Drug Administration 

Janice V. Perry, BSP, VA Medical Genter 

Marsha R. Phillips, BSP Kent & Queen Anne's Hospital 

Mark Pilachowski, BSP, Klein's Pharmac)' 

Sanyi Pin, BSP, Bon Secours Hospital 

Barry Poole, BSP, Food and Drug Administration 

David Posner, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Diane T. Raum, BSP, Safeway Pharmacy 

Carol Ritchie, BSP, Thomas B. Finan Genter 

David H. Rochlin, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Jeffrey Rodkey, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Dennis Rosenbloom, PharmD, Rexall Pharmacy 

Cyrus Samet, PharmD, Bon Secours Hospital 

Brian Sanderoff, BSP River Hill Wellness Genter 

Randolph Schaap, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Edward M. Schairer, BSP, Weis Pharmacy 

Angelica Schneider, BSP, NeighborGare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Joseph Schuman, BSP, Maryland Rehabilitation Genter Pharmacy 

Rizwan A. Shah, MS, Weis Pharmacy 

Kelly K. Shanahan, BSP, Kmart Pharmacy 

Kelly Shaner, BSP, The Pharmacy at Fairmont Hill 

Winette Sherard, BSP, Walter P. Garter Genter 

Chong W. Shin, BSP, University of Maryland Medical System 

Robert Sinker, BSP, Potomac Village Pharmacy 

Deborah Smith, BSP, Kaiser Permanente 

John Smith, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Gary Sobotka, BSP GVS Pharmacy 

Suzanne L. Spurr, PharmD, Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Leila V. Stecklein, PharmD, Kaiser Kensington Pharmacy 

Carol Stevenson, BSP, Metro Pharmacy 

Jerry Stewart, BSP, Memorial Hospital 

Richard Stewart, BSP Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Gary Ross Stout, BSP, Safeway Pharmacy 

Susan Sullivan, BSP, Target Pharmacy 

Susan L. Summers, BSP, GVS Pharmacy 

William Tabak, BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Richard Tarr, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Lawrence Taylor, BSP, GVS Pharmacy 

Karen Thompson, BSP, St. John's Pharmacy 



School of Pharmacy 



Vito Tinelli Jr., BSP, Chestertown Pharmacy 

Dat T. Tran, BSP, CVS Pharmacy 

Penelope Trikeriotis, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Kathleen Truelove, BSP, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Marshall Tsakaris, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Todd Unruh, BSP Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Wayne VanWie, BSP, Safeway Pharmacy 

David J. Vaxmonsky, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Rebecca A. Viola, BSP Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Doris Voigt, BSP, Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Center 

Ruth Ann Walker, BSP NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Terrill Washington, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Marc Weinberg, BSP, Americal Pharmaceutical Services 

Michael Weinstein, BSP, The Apothecary 

Stephen W Wickizer, PharmD, AHCPR 

Stephen Wienner, BSP, Medical Arts Pharmacy 

Dina Wolfe, BSP, Ensign Institutional Pharmacy 

Jane Wuenstel, BSP, Washington Adventist Hospital 

Martin Yankellow, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Irvin Yospa, BSP, Family Pharmacy of Hampstead 

Deirdre Younger, BSP, Health Center Pharmacy 

Jonas J. Yousem, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Faramarz Zarfeshanfard, BSP, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Clifford A. Zarow, MBA, University of Maryland Medical System 

Robert Zepp, BSP, University of Maryland Medical System 



Administration and Faculty 



University of Maryland 
Policy Statements 



No provision of this publication shall be construed as a contract between any applicant 
or student and the University of Maryland, Baltimore. The University reserves the right 
to change any admission or advancement requirement at any time. The University fidr- 
ther reserves the right to ask a student to withdraw at any time when it is considered to 
be in the best interest of University. Admission and cunicidum requirements are subject 
to change without prior notice. 



ELIGIBILITY TO REGISTER 



A student may register at the University when the following conditions are met: 
(1) the student is accepted to the University, (2) the student has received approval 
from the unit academic administrator and (3) the student has demonstrated aca- 
demic and financial eligibility. 



EQUAL OPPORTUNITY 

The University of Maryland is actively committed to providing equal educational 
and employment opportunity in all its programs. It is the University's goal to 
equitably represent women and minorities among its faculty, staff, and administra- 
tion, so that its work force reflects the diversity of Maryland's population. 

All employment policies and activities of the University shall be consistent with 
federal and state laws, regulations, and executive orders on nondiscrimination 
based on race, color, religion, age, ancestry or national origin, gender, sexual orien- 
tation, disability, marital status, and veteran status. The University forbids sexual 
harassment as a form of sex discrimination among the University work force. 



FACULTY, STUDENT AND INSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 

Preamble 

The academic enterprise is characterized by reasoned discussion between student 
and teacher, a mutual respect for the learning and teaching process, and intellectual 
honesty in the pursuit of new knowledge. By tradition, students and teachers have 
certain rights and responsibilities which they bring to the academic community. 
While the following statements do not imply a contract between the teacher or the 
institution and the student, they are nevertheless conventions which should be 
central to the learning and teaching process. 



School of Pharmacy 



Faculty Rights and Responsibilities 

A. Faculty members shall share with students and administrators the 
responsibility for academic integrity. 

B. Faculty members shall enjoy freedom in the classroom to discuss subject 
matter reasonably related to the course. In turn, they have the responsi- 
bility to encourage free and honest inquiry and expression on the part of 
students. 

C. Faculty members, consistent with the principles of academic freedom, 
have the responsibility to present courses that are consistent with their 
descriptions in the catalog of the institution. In addition, faculty mem- 
bers have the obligation to make students aware of the expectations in 
the course, the evaluation procedures and the grading policy. 

D. Faculty members are obligated to evaluate students fairly, equitably and 
in a manner appropriate to the course and its objectives. Grades must be 
assigned without prejudice or bias. 

E. Faculty members shall make all reasonable efforts to prevent the occur- 
rence of academic dishonesty through appropriate design and 
administration of assignments and examinations, careful safeguarding of 
course materials and examinations, and regular reassessment of evalua- 
tion procedures. 

F. When instances of academic dishonesty are suspected, faculty members 
shall have the responsibility to see that appropriate action is taken in 
accordance with institutional regulations. 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 

A. Students share with faculty members and administrators the responsibility 
for academic integrity. 

B. Students have the right of free and honest inquiry and expression in 
their courses. In addition, students have the right to know the require- 
ments of their courses and to know the manner in which they will be 
evaluated and graded. 

C. Students have the obligation to complete the requirements of their 
courses in the time and manner prescribed and to submit to evaluation 
of their work. 

D. Students have the right to be evaluated fairly, equitably, and in a timely 
manner appropriate to the course and its objectives. 

E. Students shall not submit as their own work any work which has been 
prepared by others. Outside assistance in the preparation of this work, 
such as librarian assistance, tutorial assistance, typing assistance or such 
special assistance as may be specified or approved by the appropriate fac- 
ulty members, is allowed. 

F. Students shall make all reasonable efforts to prevent the occurrence of 
academic dishonesty. They shall by their own example encourage acade- 
mic integrity and shall themselves refrain from acts of cheating and 
plagiarism or other acts of academic dishonesty. 



University of Maryland Policy Statements 



G. When instances of academic dishonesty are suspected, students shall 
have the right and responsibility to bring this to the attention of the fac- 
ulty or other appropriate authority. 

III. Institutional Responsibilities 

A. Constituent institutions of the University System of Maryland shall take 
appropriate measures to foster academic integrity in the classroom. 

B. Each institution shall take steps to define acts of academic dishonesty, 
to ensure procedures for due process for students accused or suspected 
of acts of academic dishonesty, and to impose appropriate sanctions on 
students found to be guilty of acts of academic dishonesty. 

C. Students expelled or suspended for reasons of academic dishonesty by 
any institution in the University System of Maryland shall not be 
admissible to any other USM institution if expelled, or during any 
period of suspension. 

Approved November 30, 1989 by the Board of Regents. 



SCHEDULING OF ACADEMIC ASSIGNMENTS 
ON DATES OF RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCE 



It is the policy of the University of Maryland to excuse the absence(s) of students 
that result from the observance of religious holidays. Students shall be given the 
opportunity, whenever feasible, to make up, within a reasonable time, any academic 
assignments that are missed due to individual participation in religious observances. 
Opportunities to make up missed academic assignments shall be timely and shall 
not interfere with the regular academic assignments of the student. Each school/ 
academic unit shall adopt procedures to ensure implementation of this policy. 



CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE 
OF STUDENT RECORDS 



It is the policy of the University of Maryland to adhere to the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment). As such, it is the policy of the 
University (1) to permit students to inspect their education records, (2) to limit 
disclosure to others of personally identifiable information from education records 
without students' prior written consent and (3) to provide students the opportu- 
nity to seek correction of their education records where appropriate. Each school 
shall develop policies to ensure that this policy is implemented. 



REVIEW OF ALLEGED ARBITRARY AND 
CAPRICIOUS GRADING 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland that students be provided a mechanism 
to review course grades that are alleged to be arbitrary or capricious. Each school/ 

64 School of Pharmacy 



academic unit shall develop guidelines and procedures to provide a means for a stu- 
dent to seek review of course grades. These guidelines and procedures shall be 
published regularly in the appropriate media so that all faculty and students are 
informed about this policy. 



SERVICE TO THOSE WITH INFECTIOUS DISEASES 



It is the policy of the University of Maryland to provide education and training to 
students for the purpose of providing care and service to all persons. The institution 
will employ appropriate precautions to protect providers in a manner meeting the 
patients' or clients' requirements, yet protecting the interest of students and faculty 
participating in the provision of such care or service. 

No student will be permitted to refuse to provide care or service to any 
assigned person in the absence of special circumstances placing the student at 
increased risk for an infectious disease. Any student who refuses to treat or serve 
an assigned person without prior consent of the School involved will be subject to 
penalties under appropriate academic procedures, such penalties to include 
suspension or dismissal. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POSITION ON ACTS OF 
VIOLENCE AND EXTREMISM WHICH ARE RACIALLY, 
ETHNICALLY, RELIGIOUSLY OR POLITICALLY MOTIVATED 

The Board oi Regents strongly condemns criminal acts of destruction or violence 
against the person or property of others. Individuals committing such acts at any 
campus or facility of the University will be subject to swift campus judicial and 
personnel action, including possible suspension, expulsion or termination, as well 
as possible state criminal proceedings. 



UNIVERSITY POLICY ON SEXUAL ASSAULT 



I. Purpose and Applicability 

The University System of Maryland and its constituent institutions adopt 
this policy* on sexual assault, consistent with the requirements of (i) section 
484 (f) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by section 486 (c) 
(2) of the Higher Education Amendments of 1992, and (ii) section 1 1-701 
of the Education Article of the Annotated Code of Maryland. This policy 
applies to all students and employees, both faculty and nonfaculty members, 
of the University System of Maryland or its constituent institutions. 

II. Definitions 

The following policy recognizes two levels of sexual assault: 
• Sexual Assault I: By stranger or acquaintance, rape, forcible sodomy, or 
forcible sexual penetration, however slight, of another person's anal or geni- 

University of Maryland Policy Statements 65 



tal opening with any object. These acts must be committed either by force, 
threat, intimidation, or through the use of the victim's mental or physical 
helplessness of which the accused was aware or should have been aware. 
• Sexual Assault II: By stranger or acquaintance, the touch of an unwilling 
person's intimate parts (defined as genitalia, groin, breast, or buttocks, or 
clothing covering them) or forcing an unwilling person to touch another's 
intimate parts. These acts must be committed either by force, threat, intimi- 
dation, or through the use of the victim's mental or physical helplessness of 
which the accused was aware or should have been aware. 

III. Responsibilities of the Chief Executive Officer 

Each chief executive officer oi a constituent institution shall have the follow- 
ing responsibilities pursuant to this policy: (a) identification of the person 
responsible for coordinating the constituent institution's educational pro- 
gram to promote awareness of sexual assault, (b) identification of the person 
who will serve as the initial contact after an alleged sexual assault has oc- 
curred, and (c) adoption of procedures to be followed should a sexual assault 
occur, including the importance of preserving evidence as may be necessary 
to the proof of criminal sexual assault, and to whom the alleged offense 
should be reported. 

IV. Educational Programs to Promote Awareness of 
Sexual Assault 

Each institution in the University System of Maryland shall make available 
to its students, faculty members, and employees programs to promote 
awareness of what constitutes sexual assault, how to prevent it, and what the 
institution's procedures are for handling reports of alleged sexual assault. In 
addition to general educational programs for the campus community, each 
institution shall provide specialized training on the topic of sexual assault 
and the provisions of sexual assault procedures to those individuals who 
might be involved in providing services to or interacting with alleged victims 
so as to ensure timely, accurate, and sensitive assistance to all concerned. The 
USM policy, together with the institution's procedures concerning sexual as- 
sault, shall be distributed to all students, faculty members, and employees 
and shall be posted in appropriate locations at the institution and published 
in appropriate institution and USM publications. 

V. Off-Campus Reporting of Sexual Assaults 

When a report of sexual assault is made to the institution's initial contact, 
that person will encourage the alleged victim to contact law enforcement or 
medical personnel as soon as possible following the incident to receive guid- 
ance in the preservation of evidence needed for proof of criminal assault and 
the apprehension and prosecution of assailants. Campus authorities will as- 
sist in notification of off-campus authorities at the request of the alleged vic- 
tim. Additionally, campus personnel will retain the right to contact law en 
forcement personnel directly where an issue of campus security is involved. 



School of Pharmacy 



Campus personnel will also assist the alleged victim in obtaining medical at- 
tention, if the victim chooses, including providing transportation to the hos- 
pital or other emergency medical facility. Each institution shall designate 
one or more nearby hospitals which are equipped with the Maryland state 
police sexual assault evidence collection kit. 
(Approved by the University System of Maryland Board of Regents, Dec. 1, 1995.) 



POLICY ON SEXUAL HARASSMENT 



I. Policy 

The University of Maryland prohibits sexual harassment of students by col- 
leagues or faculty members. Sexual harassment is an infringement of an indi- 
vidual's right to work and study in an environment free from unwanted sex- 
ual attention and sexual pressure of any kind. It can result in a significant 
human resource drain for the University and hinder the scholastic efforts of 
students. 

11. Definition of Sexual Harassment 

The University has adopted the definition of sexual harassment used by the 
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Unwelcome sexual ad- 
vances, unwelcome requests for sexual favors, and other behavior of a sexual 
nature constitute sexual harassment when: 

• submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term 
or condition of an individual's employment by the University or an indi- 
vidual's participation in a University educational program, 

• submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the 
basis for academic or employment decisions affecting that individual, or 

• such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with 
an individual's academic or work performance, or of creating an intimi- 
dating, hostile, or offensive educational or working environment. 

ill. Examples of Sexual Harassment 

Sexual harassment can include any or all of the following behaviors, as well 
as others which are not listed: 

• harassment through public or private insult, sexually-suggestive com- 
ments concerning a person's body or behavior and sexual demands 

• subtle or overt pressure to comply with demands of sexual activity 

• remarks about another person's clothing, body, sexual activities, sexual 
preferences, or sexual orientation, as well as teasing, jokes, remarks, or 
gestures that are sexual in nature 

• unnecessary touching, pinching, patting, or exposure of another person's 
body 

• unwarranted staring at another person's body 

• unwanted communications of a sexual nature in writing, by telephone, 
or by other means 



University of Maryland Policy Statements 



requests or demands for sexual favors accompanied by implied or overt 
threats about job, grades, clinical assignments, class academic assign- 
ments, recommendations, and so on 
repetition of unwanted invitations for dates 

physical assault of a sexual nature, up to and including attempted or ac- 
tual rape 

Students' Remedies 

Sexual harassment of students by students or faculty or staff members 
will not be tolerated. Proven harassment will result in disciplinar)' action, 
possibly including suspension, expulsion, or dismissal. 
Student questions about peer or faculty behavior that may constitute sex- 
ual harassment and student questions about disciplinary policies should 
be directed to the assistant vice president for Student Affairs at 410-706- 
8323, to the campus manager of affirmative action at 410-706-7302, or 
to the student affairs dean of the school involved. 

A complaint of sexual harassment may be made initially to a school's 
dean, the appropriate disciplinary body of the school, or the assistant 
vice president for Student Affairs. The assistant vice president for Stu- 
dent Affairs should be notified of any complaint filed with another of- 
fice. Investigation of complaints will be made through appropriate 
school judicial bodies whenever feasible. If a complaint involves people 
from more than one school, the assistant vice president for Student Af- 
fairs will work with the deans of the schools involved to develop an ap- 
propriate investigational process. 

Timely reporting of allegations of sexual harassment is crucial. It permits 
effective University intervention to protect students and educate and dis- 
cipline offenders. Incidents of sexual harassment should be documented 
promptly and reported as soon as practical. Reporting within the time 
limits set in a school's judicial policy is strongly encouraged. Reporting 
an incident of harassment more than 30 days after it occurs can hinder 
the ability of the University to investigate the matter. Nevertheless, the 
University will investigate any complaint filed within a reasonable time. 
Institutional investigations of sexual harassment charges often require 
the complainant's identity to be known by the accused. However, com- 
plainants should be aware that the University will not tolerate or con- 
done any form of retaliation against a student complainant whose sexual 
harassment claim is made in good faith. 

The Counseling Center can be usefiil in helping students cope with the 
stress resulting from sexual harassment or participating in campus pro- 
ceedings to investigate sexual harassment charges. Call 410-328-8404 for 
more information about the campus counseling service. 
Through the assistant vice president for Student Affairs, the student af- 
fairs dean of each school, or the managers of affirmative action, sexual 
harassment educational programs for students can be arranged. 



School of Pharmacy 



STUDENT RESIDENCY CLASSIFICATION FOR ADMISSION, 
TUITION, AND CHARGE-DIFFERENTIAL PURPOSES 



I. Policy 

It is the policy of the University System of Maryland Board of Regents to 
recognize the categories of in-state and out-of-state students for purposes of 
admission, tuition, and charge differentials at those constituent institutions 
where such differentiation has been established. The student is responsible 
for providing the information necessary to establish eligibility for in-state 
resident status. 

Students who are financially independent or financially dependent, as de- 
fined herein, shall have their residency classification determined on the basis 
of permanent residency which for purposes of this policy shall be deter- 
mined by the criteria set forth in LA. through E. below. A student will be as- 
signed in-state status for admission, tuition, and charge-differential purposes 
only if the student, or in the case of a financially-dependent student, the stu- 
dent's parent, guardian, or spouse, fulfills all of the following. 

A. For at least 12 consecutive months immediately prior to and including 
the last date available to register for courses in the semester or session for 
which the petition applies, the student, or if the student is financially de- 
pendent, the parent, guardian, or spouse must: 

• own and continuously occupy or rent and continuously occupy living 
quarters in Maryland. There must exist a genuine deed or lease in the in- 
dividual's name reflecting payments or rents and terms typical of those in 
the community at the time executed. People not having such a lease may 
submit an affidavit reflecting payments or rents and terms as well as the 
name and address of the person to whom payments are made which may 
be considered as meeting this condition. As an alternative to ownership 
or rental of living quarters in Maryland, a student may share living quar- 
ters in Maryland which are owned or rented and occupied by a parent, 
legal guardian, or spouse; 

• maintain within Maryland substantially all personal property; 

• pay Maryland income taxes on all earned taxable income, including all 
taxable income earned outside the state; 

• receive no public assistance from a state other than Maryland or from a 
city, county, or municipal agency other than one in Maryland; and 

• have a legal ability under federal and Maryland law to reside perma- 
nently in Maryland without interruption. 

B. For at least 1 1 consecutive months immediately prior to and including 
the last date available to register for courses in the semester for which the 
application applies, the student, or if the student is financially depen- 
dent, the parent, guardian, or spouse must: 

• register all owned motor vehicles in Maryland, and 

• obtain a valid driver's license issued by the state of Maryland, if licensed 
to drive in any other jurisdiction. 



University of Maryland Policy Statements 



C. Within the 12 consecutive months immediately prior to and including 
the last date available to register for courses in the semester or session for 
which the application applies, the student, or if the student is financially 
dependent, the parent, guardian, or spouse must register to vote in 
Maryland, if registered in any other jurisdiction. 

D. A financially independent student classified as in-state loses that status at 
such time as the student no longer meets one or more of the criteria set 
forth in I.A. through C above. A financially-dependent student classified as 
in-state loses that status at such time as the parent, guardian, or spouse on 
whom the status was based no longer meets one or more of those criteria. 

E. In addition, people in the following categories shall be accorded the ben- 
efits of in-state status for the period in which any of the following condi- 
tions apply: 

• a ftiU- or part-time (at least 50 percent) regular employee of the Univer- 
sity System of Maryland 

• the spouse or dependent child of a full- or part-time (at least 50 percent) 
regular employee of the University System of Maryland 

• a full-time active member of the Armed Forces of the United States 
whose home of residence is Maryland or one who resides or is stationed 
in Maryland, or the spouse, or a financially-dependent child of such a 
person 

• for University of Maryland University College, a full-time active member 
of the Armed Forces of the United States on active duty, or the spouse of 
a member of the Armed Forces of the United States on active duty 

• a graduate assistant appointed through the University System of Mary- 
land for the semester or session of the appointment. Except through 
prior arrangement, status is applicable only for enrollment at the institu- 
tion awarding the assistantship 

F. Students not entided to in-state status under the preceding paragraphs 
shall be assigned out-of-state status for admission, tuition, and charge- 
differential purposes. 

II. Procedures 

A. An initial determination of in-state status will be made by the University 
at the time a student's application for admission is under consideration. 
The determination made at that time, and any determination made 
thereafter, shall prevail for each semester or session until the determina- 
tion is successfully challenged in a timely manner. 

B. A change in residency status must be requested by submitting a Univer- 
sity System of Maryland "Petition for Change in Residency Classifica- 
tion for Admission, Tuition and Charge Differential." A student apply- 
ing for a change to in-state status must furnish all required 
documentation with the petition by the last published date to register for 
the forthcoming semester or session for which a residency classification is 
sought. 

C. The student shall notify the institution in writing within 15 days of any 
change of circumstances which may alter in-state status. 

rO School of Pharmacy 



I 



D. In the event incomplete, false, or misleading information is presented, 
the institution may, at its discretion, revoke in-state status and take other 
disciplinary actions provided for by the institution's policy. If in-state sta- 
tus is gained due to false or misleading information, the University re- 
serves the right to retroactively assess all out-of-state charges for each se- 
mester or session affected. 

E. Each institution of the University System of Maryland shall develop and 
publish additional procedures to implement this policy. Procedures shall 
provide that on request the president or designee has the authority to 
waive any residency criterion as set forth in section I, if it is determined 
that application of the criterion creates an unjust result. These proce- 
dures shall be filed with the Office of the Chancellor. 

III. Definitions 

A. Financially Dependent: For purposes of this policy, a financially-depen- 
dent student is one who is claimed as a dependent for tax purposes, or 
who receives more than one-half of his or her support from a parent, le- 
gal guardian, or spouse during the 12-month period immediately prior 
to the last published date for registration for the semester or session. If a 
student receives more than one-half of his or her support in the aggregate 
from a parent, legal guardian, or spouse, the student shall be considered 
financially dependent on the person providing the greater amount of 
support. The dependent relationship must have formally existed by 
legally-contracted marriage or court order recognized under the laws of 
the state of Maryland for at least 12 consecutive months immediately 
prior to and including the last date available to register for courses in the 
semester or session for which the petition applies. 

B. Financially Independent: A financially-independent student is one who 
(a) declares himself or herself to be financially independent as defined 
herein, (b) does not appear as a dependent on the federal or state income 
tax return of any other person, (c) receives less than one-half of his or her 
support from any other person or people, and (d) demonstrates that he 
or she provides through self-generated support one-half or more of his or 
her total expenses. 

C. Parent: A parent may be a natural parent, or if established by a court order 
recognized under the laws of the state of Maryland, an adoptive parent. 

D. Guardian: A guardian is a person so appointed by a court order recog- 
nized under the laws of the state of Maryland. 

E. Spouse: A spouse is a partner in a legally-contracted marriage as recog- 
nized under the laws of the state of Maryland. 

F. Self-generated: Describes income which is derived solely from compen- 
sation for an individual's own efforts as evidenced, for example, by fed- 
eral or state W-2 forms or IRS Form 1099, in which interest income is 
based upon finances created from one's own efforts. For the purposes of 
this policy, grants, stipends, awards, benefits, loans, and gifts (including 
federal and state aid, grants, and loans) may not be used as self-generated 



University of Maryland Policy Statements 



G. Regular Employee: A regular employee is a person employed by the Uni- 
versity System of Maryland who is assigned to a state budget line. Exam- 
ples of categories not considered regular employees are graduate assis- 
tants, contingent employees, if-and-when-needed, and temporaries. 
Approved by the University System of Maryland Board of Regents, Aug. 28, 1990; 
amended July 10, 1998.) 



SMOKING 



Consistent with state law, state regulation, the executive order of the governor of 
the state of Maryland, and in accordance with recommendations of numerous 
governmental and scholarly organizations, the University of Maryland relies upon 
prevention of adverse health effects in its smoking policy. According to this pol- 
icy, nonsmoking employees and students are discouraged to start smoking and 
smokers are encouraged to give up smoking. Furthermore, smoking is prohibited 
in University buildings. 

Elements of the campus smoking policy are as follows: 

A. The smoking of tobacco products is not permitted in any campus build- 
ing, facility, state vehicle, or shuttle bus. This applies to all faculty and 
staff members, students, contractors, visitors, and so on. 

B. Tobacco products will not be available for purchase on campus. 

C. There shall be no smoking in meetings, conferences, or training sessions 
hosted by the University on- or off-campus. In order to accommodate 
smokers as well as nonsmokers, breaks may be requested in meetings last- 
ing longer than one hour. 

D. All employees are expected to bring to the attention of contractors and 
visitors the smoking prohibition policy of the University. Politeness and 
common sense as well as the law should guide employees and students in 
the enforcement of this section. 

E. Potential conflicts resulting from this policy and its implementation are 
to be resolved by the normal channels of the University of Maryland, in- 
cluding the Office of Human Resource Services in conjunction with En- 
vironmental Health and Safety. 

F. The University Health and Safety Committee serves as the campus 
smoking policy implementation committee and is responsible for devel- 
oping policies and lor guiding EHS and other University offices in the 
implementation of the smoking policies and appropriate educational ac- 
tivities. 

G. Anyone found in violation ol this policy should be advised to cease 
smoking immediately, and, if noncompliant, shall be subject to the state 
law. In addition, an employee or student found to be in noncompliance 
shall be subject to administrative and disciplinary action. 

(Approved by the President, ejfective September 1986; revised January 1999.) 



School of Pharmacy 



STUDENT RIGHT-TO-KNOW AND CAMPUS SECURITY ACT 

The Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act (Public Law 101 542), 
signed into federal law Nov. 8, 1990, requires that the University of Maryland 
make readily available to its students and prospective students the information 
listed below. Should you wish to obtain any of the following information, send 
your name, address, school, and program, and a listing of the items of interest to: 

Office of Student Services 

Attention: Student Right-to-Know Request 

University of Maryland 

621 W. Lombard St., Room 302 

Baltimore, MD 21201 

• Financial Aid 

• Costs of Attending the University of Maryland 

• Refund Policy 

• Facilities and Services for Students with Disabilities 

• Procedures for Review of School and Campus Accreditation 

• Completion and Graduation Rates for Undergraduate Students 

• Loan Deferral Under the Peace Corps and Domestic Volunteer Services Act 

• Campus Safety and Security 

• Campus Crime Statistics 

• Student Sexual Orientation Nondiscrimination 

I. Background 

Effective July 1 1, 1997, the University System of Maryland Board of Re- 
gents specifically prohibited discrimination against students on the basis of 
sexual orientation in academic admissions, financial aid, educational ser- 
vices, housing, student programs and activities, and recruitment. The board 
reserved the right to enforce or comply with any federal or state law, regula- 
tion or guideline, including conditions for the receipt of federal funding. 
This University reiterates its commitment to the most fundamental princi- 
ples of academic freedom, equality of opportunity, and human dignity by re- 
quiring that treatment of its students and applicants for admission be based 
on individual abilities and qualifications and be free from invidious discrim- 
ination. 

II. Related Employment Policy 

University students who are also University employees should be aware of 
the "Employee Sexual Orientation Nondiscrimination Policy and Proce- 
dures." 

III. Definition 

Sexual orientation is the identification, perception, or status of an individual 
as to homosexuality, heterosexuality, or bisexuality. 



University of Maryland Policy Statements 



IV. Policy 

Consistent with USM s policy, it is this University's poHcy that: 

• within the University, the educational environment will be free of dis- 
crimination on the basis of sexual orientation, and 

• University students are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of 
sexual orientation against fellow students, University personnel, and 
other people with whom the students interact during the course of their 
educational experiences both on- and off-campus. Students may be disci- 
plined for violation of this policy. 

V. Procedures 

A student's questions about peer or staff or faculty member behavior that 
may constitute discrimination based on sexual orientation and a student's 
questions about disciplinary policies should be directed to the assistant vice 
president for Student Affairs at 410-706-8323, to the campus director of Em- 
ployee Relations and Diversity Initiatives at 410-706-7302, or to the student 
affairs dean of the student's school. A complaint of discrimination based on 
sexual orientation may be made initially to the dean of the complaining stu- 
dent's school, to the appropriate student or school judicial board of the com- 
plaining student's school, or to the assistant vice president. The assistant vice 
president should be notified of any complaint filed with another office. Inves- 
tigation of complaints will be made through appropriate school judicial bod- 
ies whenever feasible. If a complaint involves people from more than one 
school, the assistant vice president will work with the deans of the schools in- 
volved to develop an appropriate investigational process. To determine 
whether alleged conduct constitutes discrimination on the basis of sexual ori- 
entation, the Universit)' will look at the record as a whole and at the totality 
of the circumstances. The determination of whether a particular action is dis- 
crimination will be made from all the facts, on a case- by-case basis. 
Timely reporting of allegations of discrimination based on sexual orientation 
is crucial. It permits effective University intervention to protect students and 
educate and discipline offenders. Incidents of discrimination should be doc- 
umented promptly and reported as soon as practical. Reporting within the 
time limits set in a school's judicial policy is strongly encouraged. Reporting 
an incident of discrimination more than 30 days after it occurs can hinder 
the ability of the school and institution to investigate the matter. Neverthe- 
less, the school and institution will investigate any complaint filed within a 
reasonable time. 

Institutional investigations of discrimination based on sexual orientation 
charges often require the complainant's identity to be known by the accused. 
However, complainants should be aware that the University will not tolerate 
or condone any form of retaliation against a student complainant whose dis- 
crimination claim is made in good fiiith. Deliberate filing of false accusations 
may be the basis for independent disciplinary action against the accuser. 



School of Pharmacy 



VI. Complaints involving Affiliates' Employees 

Many University students will be supervised by employees of the University's 
affiliates and teaching sites during their educational experiences. If a student 
experiences discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in such a set- 
ting, the University will attempt to resolve the issue and will attempt to reas- 
sign the student if a resolution is not feasible. 

VII. Counseling 

The Counseling Center offers assistance in coping with the stress resulting 
from discrimination based on sexual orientation or participation in campus 
proceedings to investigate such discrimination charges. Call 410-328-8404 
for more information about campus counseling services. 

Viii.Educational Programs 

Programs for students about discrimination based on sexual orientation can 
be arranged through the assistant vice president for Student Affairs, the stu- 
dent affairs dean of each school, or the director of Employee Relations and 
Diversity Initiatives. 
(Approved by the President, October 1997.) 




Dr. Magaly Rodriquez deBittner iihtnuti MfLiinc Riidiic about proper patient asiearnent skills. 



University of Maryland Policy Statements 75 



Course Descriptions 



FIRST-YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHAR 5! I— Biochemistry I (2), Fall Semester (Aldrich) 
PHAR 521 — Biochemistry II (3), Spring Semester (DiGate) 
A course of study which builds on the principles of cell biology and genetics with 
a systematic consideration of the chemical components and requirements of 
living systems from the molecular to the cellular level. These fundamentals 
of biochemical structure, function and energetics provide a platform for compre- 
hension of pharmaceutical biotechnology, and for understanding determinants of 
disease, the pathobiochemistry of organ systems, mechanisms of drug action and 
adverse reactions and novel drug delivery systems. 

PHAR 512— Cell Biology (2), Fall Semester (DiGate) 
Introductory appreciation of the cell, the fundamental imit of the body. The 
integration of cell structure and molecular functions is developed with discus- 
sions of topics such as the history of modern biology; the basic principles of 
cellular cytoarchitecture and organization; membrane functions; biochemical 
structure, functions and energy conversion; cell-to-cell signaling; the flow of 
genetic information from DNA to RNA to proteins; cell division; human and 
Mendelian genetics; and human diversity. 

PHAR 5 1 3— Drug Chemistry (2), Fall Semester (Wright) 
A study of the principles of organic chemistry that comprise basic elements of 
pharmaceutical science. The emphasis is on the relationship between molecular 
structure and chemical, physical and biophysical properties of systems that ari.se 
from molecular interactions. The course provides a platform for comprehension 
of pharmaceutical concerns such as the stability of drugs and drug products, the 
conformation of bioactive proteins, the basis for drug-receptor interactions, the 
structure of biological membranes, and major drug classes. 

PHAR 514 — Human Biology I (3), Fall Semester (Buterbaugh) 
PHAR 524 — Human Biology II (3), Spring Semester (Buterbaugh) 
PHAR 534 — Human Biology III (3), Fall Semester Second Year 

(Buterbaugh) 

A consideration of the human body as an integrated, functioning organism with 
emphasis on how organs work individually and in harmony during the regulation 
of complex body functions necessary to establish and maintain homeostasis, and 
mechanisms underlying disordered organ functions and homeostasis. The anatomy, 
histology and physiology of the human body is organized by organ systems to 
include the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, 
lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



PHAR 515 — Personal Management (I), Fall Semester (Cobuzzi) 
An introduction to the basic elements of social and administrative science under- 
lying the practice of pharmacy. The student is introduced to state and federal 
laws including those related to negligence, standards of practice and dispensing. 
Organizational theories of management and leadership styles are contrasted. 

PHAR 516 — Pharmacy Practice and Education (3), Fall Semester 

(Curtis/Anderson) 

This prefatory course introduces the new Doaor of Pharmacy student to the science 
and profession of pharmacy. The evolution and implications of pharmaceutical care 
and the philosophical basis for the pharmacy curriculum are discussed. Students are 
introduced to skills necessary for success during the four-year curriculum through 
the opportunity to critically evaluate problems, discuss ethical dilemmas, develop 
and apply computer and literature-retrieval skills, and practice verbal and written 
communication skills. The importance of independent and cooperative learning 
activities is emphasized. 

PHAR 5 1 7 — Study Design and Analysis (2), Fall Semester (Zito) 
Students are introduced to the pivotal role of study design and statistical analysis 
considerations in the design and evaluation of basic, clinical, epidemiological and 
social science research. The course focuses on the proper design of studies with 
emphasis on threats to internal validity and generalizability. A variety of descriptive 
and inferential statistical procedures and methods are surveyed with emphasis on 
the interpretation of the results of research. 

PHAR 522 — Context of Health Care (3), Spring Semester (Palumbo) 
Students actively develop a contemporary definition of health-care and critically 
examine the health-care system with special emphasis on relevant legislation, 
traditional and nontraditional providers of health-care, the organization and 
financing of health-care delivery, and the dynamics of pharmaceutical care within 
the system. The social, legal and professional implications of informatics 
and computer proliferation in our society is discussed with special emphasis on 
pharmacy practice. 

PHAR 523 — Ethics In Pharmacy Practice (I), Spring Semester (Love) 
Introduction to the principles of ethical thinking. The philosophy of ethics and role 
of formal codes of professional conduct are discussed in the context of resolving 
conflicting ethical principals. 

PHAR 525 — Immunology (2), Spring Semester (Hayashi) 
The natural and acquired protective mechanisms of the immune system are dis- 
cussed with topics ranging from the structure, function and specificity of 
antibodies; B-lymphocyte and T-lymphocyte functions; initiation and control of 
immune responses; histocompatibility; and immune-mediated disease. The 
course is designed to provide the student with sufficient knowledge of humoral 
and cellular immunity to understand the role of the immune system in disease, 



Course Descriptions 



the production and use of vaccines and related biologicals, and the rapidly grow- 
ing areas of transfusion, transplant and tumor immunology. 

PHAR 526— Physical Chemistry (2), Spring Semester (Guiles) 
A study of selected principles of physical chemistry that comprise basic elements 
of pharmaceutical science. The emphasis is placed on the relationship between 
molecular structure and the physical and biophysical properties of systems that 
arise from molecular interactions. The goal of the course is to apply the principles 
of physical chemistry to the practice of pharmacy. 

PHPC 527 — Introduction to Professional Practice (I), Fall/Spring 
Semesters (Rumrill) (Register Spring Semester, First Year) 
Students observe the practice of pharmacy in community, institutional, and specialt)' 
practice environments. Students analyze the types of services provided in each setting 
and the personnel involved in the delivery of those services. Students learn the basic 
elements of pharmaceutical care, including obtaining patient histories and prescrip- 
tion dispensing. An important goal of this course is for students to identify and assess 
career options in pharmacy practice. These activities are closely linked to PHAR 
5 1 6-Pharmacy Practice ajid Education and to a career pathway workshop. 



SECOND-YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHPC 532 — Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care 1(1), Fall/Spring 
Semesters (Rodriguez deBittner) (Register Spring Semester, Second Year) 
Students observe the delivery of pharmaceutical care to patients over time. Partic- 
ular attention is paid to assessing the changing needs of patients as health transi- 
tions occur. Under the supervision of an experienced pharmacy practitioner, 
students have regularly scheduled encounters with patients. Students learn how 
to effectively collect information from a variety of sources, including the patient, 
and prepare periodic health status reports. As students obtain knowledge and 
skills in didactic courses (pharmaceutics, pharmacology, human biology), they 
learn to explicidy apply such knowledge and skills to their patients. 

PHAR 530 — Microbiology/Antibiotics i (3), Fall Semester 

(Wang/Plaisance) 

A study of the major classes of pathogenic bacteria, bacterial infectious diseases and 
antibacterial agents. This course surveys pertinent features of bacterial structure and 
virulence factors, host response and disease manifestations and antibacterial 
drug design, mechanisms, pharmacokinetics and toxicity profile. This course will 
provide the framework for consideration of the therapeutic principles involved in 
treating bacterial disea.ses. 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



PHAR 53 1 — Pharmaceutical Chemistry (2), Fall Semester (MacKerell) 
A presentation of the basic chemical principles underlying the activity, absorption, 
metabolism, excretion, physico-chemical properties and design of drug molecules, 
culminating in a discussion of drug classes. 

PHAR 535 — Pharmaceutics (3), Spring Semester (Augsburger) 
The application of fundamental principles and basic science knowledge to the 
multidimensional problems of the formulation, development, testing, production, 
distribution and administration of safe, effective, stable and reliable drug delivery 
systems. These systems, ranging in sophistication from tablets and capsules to 
biodegradable implants, are discussed using a problem-based approach that 
focuses on the critical determinants for traditional and less-traditional routes of 
drug administration. 

PHAR 536 — Pharmacology I (2), Fall Semester (Moreton) 

PHAR 546 — Pharmacology II (3), Spring Semester (Moreton) 

A systematic consideration of the molecular, cellular and organismic mechanisms 

of drug action, organized by major drug classes. This course of study provides 

knowledge of the mechanisms of drug action underlying their use in the treatment 

of specific and general disease processes. 

PHAR 537 — Principles of Drug Action (2), Fall Semester (Moreton) 
A study of the chemical and biological concepts which apply to the characteriza- 
tion, evaluation and comparison of all drugs. Topics such as dose-response and 
receptor theory, receptor transduction mechanisms, pharmacologic selectivity, 
pharmacogenetic drug tolerance and dependence, drug allergy, drug resistance 
and chemical mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and teratogenesis are discussed at the 
molecular and cellular level. The physical, biological and chemical principles 
underlying drug absorption, distribution, biotransformation and excretion are 
discussed from the molecular to the organ level. 

PHAR 540 — Microbiology/Antibiotics II (I), Spring Semester 

(Wang/Plaisance) 

A study of the major classes of pathogenic fiangi and viruses, the diseases that they 
cause and antifiangal and antiviral agents. This course surveys pertinent features of 
fungal and viral structure, virulence factors, life-cycle, disease manifestations and 
antifungal/antiviral drug design, mechanisms, pharmacokinetics and toxicity 
profile. This course will provide the framework for consideration of the therapeutic 
principles involved in treating fungal and viral diseases. 

PHAR 541 — Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics (3), 

Fall Semester (Eddington) 

In this course, the student learns how the processes of drug absorption, distribution, 

metabolism and excretion are coupled with dosage and the important parameters of 

clearance, volume of distribution and bioavailability, to determine the concentration 

oi a drug at its sites of action in the body. The quantitative relationship between dose 



Course Descriptions 



and effect is developed as a framework with which to interpret measurements of 
drug concentrations in biological fluids. 

PHAR 542 — Clinical Chemistry (I), Spring Semester 

(Serrero/Michocki) 

Principles ot analytical chemistrv', clinical chemistry, enzyme assays, electrophoresis, 
radioactivity, magnetic resonance, biotechnology-based diagnostics and biosensors, 
and immunoassay are examined. Emphasis is on the application of these methods 
to the determination of drug concentrations in chemical and biological systems, 
and health promotion and assessment. Students also have opportunities to examine 
patient data and use commercially available diagnostic kits. 

PHAR 544 — Medicinal Chemistry (3), Fall/Spring Semesters 

(Wright) (Register Spring Semester) 

A comprehensive study of the chemistry of drug products. The course outline 
will follow the pharmacological classification of drug molecules, and will include 
discussion of chemical properties (physical and organic), stability, solubility, 
mechanisms of action where appropriate, and structure-activity relationships. 
Where possible, quantitative computer designed studies of drug development will 
be mentioned. 

PHAR 545 — Practice Management (3), Spring Semester (Abramson) 
Management principles are provided to construct a practical framework for the 
operational management of a business of pharmacy. Elements addressed in this 
course include: controllable and uncontrollable variables in a free market economy, 
work flow analysis, accounting, budget development, purchasing, inventory 
control, quality assurance and third party reimbursement issues. The course also 
examines the current practical developments related to human resources manage- 
ment through integrating information on organization behavior, psychology, 
economics and law. 



THIRD-YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHAR 552 — Principles of Human Nutrition (I), Fall Semester 

(Bergquist) 

This required course builds on materials in earlier coursework including Funda- 
mentals, Basic Science and Pharmaceutical Science. The course focuses on the 
preparation of pharmacists to deliver pharmaceutical care services related to 
patients' nutritional needs. The course prepares the student to understand princi- 
ples of nutrition in relation to contemporary public health issues and to treatment 
of diseases and physiologic processes. The materials taught in this course are 
applied and further developed in subsequent modules in the Integrated Science 
and Iherapeutics course sequence and in Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care II. 



School of Pharmacy 



PHAR 553 — Population Based Medical Information Analysis (2), 
Fall Semester (Mays) 

This course is designed to enhance a student's skills in the areas of information 
collection, retrieval, analysis, and interpretation. A variety of topics surrounding 
the aspects of drug information practice will be presented including the role of 
informational services in health-care. Students will enhance both their written 
and verbal communication skills as they not only are asked to retrieve pertinent 
clinical information, but also then to interpret, document and integrate this 
information into the development of clinical practice guidelines and subseqtient 
outcome measures. 

PHAR 554, 555 — Integrated Science and Therapeutics (4, 4), 
Fall Semester (Hassan/Edwards) 

PHAR 564, 565 — Integrated Science and Therapeutics (4, 4), 
Spring Semester (Buterbaugh/Klein-Schwartz) 

Basic and clinical science faculty interact with students during a variety of didac- 
tic and laboratory experiences as students learn to design, implement and 
monitor pharmaceutical care plans for specific patients with specific diseases. 
Methods for the choice of drug product, definition of the specific goals of ther- 
apy, including the means to assess whether these goals are being achieved, and 
active intervention steps at the patient, prescriber, health-care system and popula- 
tion levels to ensure successful outcomes of drug therapy are developed. The 
courses are organized according to the major physiological systems of the human 
body, and the disease states commonly associated with them and encountered 
and observed by the pharmacy practitioner in a variety of community and insti- 
tutional practice settings. A goal of these courses is to prepare students to better 
integrate new scientific knowledge into the successful pharmaceutical care of 
patients with the goal of reducing the health-care costs to patients and society. 
The knowledge and behaviors acquired during these courses prepare the student 
tor the community and institutional pharmaceutical care rotations of the experi- 
ential learning program of the curriculum. 

PHPC 562 — Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care II (I), Fall/Spring 
Semesters (Rodriguez deBittner) (Register Spring Semester, Third Year) 
This course is a continuation of PHAR 532-Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care I. 
Students have periodic encounters with previously assigned patients. Students 
learn to assess drug therapy problems and develop pharmaceutical care plans. 
Particular attention is given to the needs of patients during health transitions. 
These experiential activities are closely linked throughout the third year to the 
didactic activities in the Integrated Science and Therapeutics series of courses. 



Course Descriptions 



FOURTH-YEAR COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHPC 570 — Community Distributive Services (3) 
PHPC 57! — Institutional Distributive Services (3) 

(Register Fall Semester, Fourth Year) 

These required professional practice experiences may be taken any time after 
successful completion of the second year. They may be completed the summer 
after the second year, the winter session of the third year, or the summer after the 
third year. Each rotation is a four-week, ftill-time, structured program of intensive 
skills development related to the distributive aspects of community and institu- 
tional pharmacy. Students will learn how to competently and efficiently perform 
the technical functions of drug dispensing. Students learn to the use of technology 
as a tool in drug distribution. The roles of support personnel and methods of 
supervision are explored. Mechanisms for assuring the quality and accuracy of the 
drug distribution process are emphasized. 

PHPC 572— Pharmaceutical Care I (3) 
PHPC 573— Pharmaceutical Care II (3) 
PHPC 574— Pharmaceutical Care III (3) 
PHPC 575— Pharmaceutical Care IV (3) 

Prerequisites: PHPC 571 -Institutional Distributive Services and successful 
completion of the Integrated Science and Therapeutics course series. This series of 
required professional practice experiences is designed to provide the student with 
extensive experience in pharmaceutical care delivery in a variety of direct patient 
care settings. Students gain skill through daily one-on-one interactions with 
patients, caregivers, physicians, nurses and other health-care professionals. Each of 
the four required rotations runs for four week on a ftiU-time. At least one rotation 
must be completed in an acute-care hospital setting and one in a community 
setting. Although each site will differ in terms of the patient population, disease 
acuity, scope of practice, resources and availability of patient-specific data, students 
will take responsibility for drug therapy outcomes. Students will learn to: 1 ) collect 
and record patient-specific data, 2) identify, list and assess drug-related problems. 
3) develop and record pharmaceutical care plans, 4) educate patients and health- 
care professionals regarding the appropriate use of drugs, and 5) measure and 
document patient outcomes. These activities are closely linked to PHPC 576 — 
Ambulatory Clinic and concurrent with PHPC 577 — -Informational Services. 

PHPC 576 — Ambulatory Clinic (I) (Register Spring Semester, Fourth Year) 
Prerequisites: PHPC 571 — Institutional Distributive Services and successful 
completion of the Integrated Science and Therapeutics course series. This series of 
required experiences is normally taken concurrently with the Pharmaceutical Care 
rotations (PHPC 572, 573, 574, and 575). A total of 16 half-day experiences is 
required, for a total of 64 hours. Following the pharmaceutical care model, students 
will conduct patient interviews, perform appropriate pharmacotherapy-oriented 



School of Pharmacy 



physical assessments, order appropriate laboratory tests, initiate and/or change drug 
therapy regimens and conduct patient follow-up. 

PHPC 577 — Informational Services (2) (Register Spring Semester, 
Fourth Year) 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of PHAR 553-Population Based Medical 
Information Analysis. This course must be taken concurrently with the Pharma- 
ceutical Care rotations (PHPC 572, 573, 574, and 575). During the course of 
daily activities on Pharmaceutical Care and Ambulatory Clinic rotations, students 
learn how to receive drug information questions in a comprehensive manner, 
conduct timely and thorough literature searches, evaluate sources of information 
and provide appropriate responses. Students are also expected to subscribe to an 
affordable abstracting service and develop a personal information library. 

PHAR 580 — Pharmacy Law (2), Spring Semester (Palumbo) 
An examination ol the legal and regulatory issues pertaining to drugs and devices 
and the practice of pharmacy. Students learn the various laws and regulations 
which would govern their usual daily activities in a variety of practice sites. 

PHAR 581 — Senior Colloquium (I), Spring Semester (Curtis/DiCate) 
Students deliver oral presentations to share some aspect of their educational expe- 
rience, practice aspirations or career goals with their student peers and the faculty. 
Ihis forum fosters a critical examination of each student's formal education in 
the context of the practice of pharmaceutical care. 



DIDACTIC ELECTIVE COURSES 



The elective didactic (PHMY) courses currendy offered by the School of Pharmacy 
are described below. In general, higher course numbers indicate courses with impor- 
tant prerequisite requirements, and are designed for later years of the curriculum. 
Prerequisites for most electives include consent of the instructor and the student's 
advisor. Some electives are offered in either the fall or spring semesters and some are 
offered both semesters. Refer to the class schedule when making course selections. 

PHMY 510 — Advanced Educational Opportunities (I) (Chikhale) 
This elective program provides students interested in graduate school or research 
careers with knowledge and information about various advanced educational 
opportunities in the curriculum. Aspects of careers which require advanced study 
are described by professionals in those career areas, and by students currently 
enrolled in them. The course offers diverse perspectives on goals, training, func- 
tions, settings and opportunities in research in pharmaceutical sciences and 
pharmacy practice. 



Course Descriptions 



PHMY 51 I — Diabetes Disease State Management ( I ) (McPherson) 
Prerequisites: Fourth year status. This course will review the pathophysiologic 
changes associated with diabetes mellitus (Types I and II, impaired glucose toler- 
ance and gestational diabetes), nonpharmacologic management (nutrition and 
exercise), pharmacologic management, complications of diabetes mellitus, princi- 
ples of education (children, adolescents, adults and geriatrics), continuous care 
(skin and foot care, OTC product selection), blood and urine monitoring, special 
population considerations (children, adolescents, geriatrics, visually impaired 
patients), psychosocial aspects of diabetes (dealing with diagnosis, developing 
support strategies, and adherence to regimens), and how to set up a diabetes- 
focused practice. 

PHMY 518 — Drug Abuse Education (I to 3 credits) (Tommasello) 
Practice and training in the dissemination of drug information, especially drug 
abuse information to the public, are linked to the activities of the Student 
Committee on Drug Abuse Education (SCODAE). Students complete a 10-hour 
training session, observe community education programs presented by SCODAE, 
present several programs and prepare a written report on a timely topic in the area 
of chemical dependence. 

PHMY 522 — Business Plan Development (2) 

An elective course tor students interested in ownership or management of their own 
pharmacy practice emphasizing the practical problems associated with establishing 
a new business or expanding an existing enterprise. Location and market analysis, 
target marketing, revenue and expense projections and estimation of capital 
requirements are among the topics covered. 

PHMY 523— Advanced First Aid (3) (Melton) 
Advanced first aid and emergency care, including CPR. 

PHMY 528 — Selected Topics in Geriatrics and Gerontology (1-3) 

(Brandt) 

This course provides an educational experience through investigating geriatrics 
and gerontology at the School's Center for the Study of Pharmacy and Thera- 
peutics for the Elderly. Through an elder-visitation experience, students select an 
elderly person living in the community and track the individual's pharmaceutical 
care needs. Students also participate in guided discussions addressing elder 
health-care problems and solutions. 

PHMY 529 — Special Group Studies (var. 1-5) (Repeatable up to 

12 credits) 

An omnibus course permitting experimentation with new or dillerent subject 

matter and/or instructional approaches. 



School of Pharmacy 



PHMY 529 — Special/Organizational Behavior (3) (Bento) 
Prerequisite: PHAR 515-Personal Management. The study of the effects of 
human behavior on organizational effectiveness. Attention is given to quaUty, 
team work, attitude toward work, satisfaction and commitment, building and 
exercising organizational power, the role of leadership, sustaining motivation, 
participatory decision-making, and the process for change, development and 
continuous improvement. 

PHMY 529— Special/Marketing (3) (Pitta) 

Prerequisite: PHAR 545-Practice Management. Marketing introduces method- 
ologies for identifying changes in the organization's marketplace and adapting to 
them. The course uses the market orientation concept, emphasizing customer 
needs, total integration of the firm, and the profit potential to examine the 
marketing process, and in doing so, will use pharmacy based-examples. 

PHMY 529 — Special/Case Based Management of Infectious Diseases 

1(1) (Plaisance) 

PHMY 529 — Special/Case Based Management of Infectious Diseases 

11(1, 2) (Plaisance) 

Prerequisites: Third year or PHNT 545 & 546. These courses provide third- and 
fourth-year students ajid students in the Nontraditional Pathway with an opportunity 
to critically examine the clinical decisions made in the management of patients with 
infectious diseases. During the first course, students will review the therapeutic deci- 
sions made in the care of a patient encountered during an experiential course and 
review the literature relevant to those decisions. During the second course, students 
will present a case discussion including a thorough review of the standard of care and 
the literature support for the decisions made. 

PHMY 529 — Special/Financial Reporting (3) (Forgione) 
This course is a study of financial reporting, analysis and strategy principles applied 
to for-profit and not-for-profit health-care organizations. Accounting issues related 
to strategic decision-making in health service production, financing, and investment 
will be emphasized throughout the course. Topics include the health-care accounting 
environment, revenue and expense recognition, balance sheet valuations, ratio analy- 
sis, budgeting and control systems, cost accounting, performance measurement, 
variance analysis, cost-volume-profit relationships, and capital budgeting. Special 
attention is given to the financial implications of third-party payment systems and 
measuring the profitability of managed-care contracts. 

PHMY 529— Special/Geriatric Pharmacotherapy (2) (Brandt) 
Prerequisites: Third year status. This course provides advanced discussion of the 
geriatric diseases and different presentations of disease and responses to therapy. 
A case-based approach expands on previous geriatric coursework and allows 
students to apply material to different patient-care settings. Journal club and drug 
information questions are utilized to illustrate concepts. 



Course Descriptions 



PHMY 529 — Special/Geriatric Imperative (2) (Brandt) 
The Geriatric Imperative Minimester is a five-day interdisciplinary course open 
to all University of Maryland students during the first week in January. The 
course presents a wide range of information on the health and well-being of older 
adults through clinical, research and policy presentations. Course content will be 
conveyed through lectures, panel discussions, team and case presentations, role 
play, video tapes and site visits. Students will be required to write an in-depth 
paper on a subject pertaining to geriatrics/gerontology within two months of 
completing the didactic portion of the course. 

PHMY 537 — Clinical Aspects of Drug Dependence (2) (Tommasello) 
This course familiarizes students with the clinical aspects of chemical dependence. 
Special emphasis is placed on the pharmacology of commonly abused psychoactive 
substances and the role of pharmacological supports in the treatment of addiction. 

PHMY 539 — Special Projects (var. 1-3) (Repeatable up to 12 credits) 
Independent investigations consisting of library or laboratory research, seminars 
or other assignments appropriate to the problem investigated.. 

PHMY 541 — Introduction to the Poison Center (I) (Anderson) 
This course provides students the opportunity to observe and be involved in a 
clinically-oriented pharmacy practice setting early in their education. Students 
learn about the Poison Center's operation and resources and the potential for phar- 
macist participation in this area of patient care. The course consists ot discussion 
sessions, activities in the Maryland Poison Center, role playing, and laboratory 
sessions focusing on toxicology resources and communication skills. Students 
present cases on a home-management and a hospital-management drug overdose. 

PHMY 543 — Honors Seminar in Pharmacy Administration (I) (Zito) 
A survey of current literature in the general area ol pharmacy practice and admin- 
istrative science. Each week, a recently published paper related to the economic, 
social, behavioral or educational aspects of pharmac)' is discussed and evaluated. 
Special student research projects may also be undertaken. 

PHMY 550— Adverse Drug Reactions (2) (Michocki) 
Focus is on the clinical manifestations and incidence of drug reactions, systems 
affected, differentiation among idiosyncratic reactions, hypersensitivity reactions, 
extensions of pharmacologic action and assessment ol drug reaction literature. 

PHMY 551 — Recent Advances in Pharmacology (I) (Kim) 
The objective of this course is to present advances in pharmacology and toxicolog)'. 
Sessions emphasize experimental and clinical findings, their interpretation and 
significance in relation to basic and applied aspects of pharmacology and toxicol- 
ogy. Attention is also given to experimental design and methodology of the studies 
in question. 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



PHMY 552— Pharmacology and Aging (I) (Weiner) 

This course presents advances in our understanding of variations in drug 
response in the aging population. The course is designed to give students an 
appreciation for the basic physiological and biomedical changes which normally 
occur with aging, and how these changes relate to altered pharmacodynamic and 
pharmacokinetic responses following drug administration. Basic and clinical 
pharmacologic studies are used to support the conclusions presented. 

PHMY 553 — Consumer Education Program for Older Adults (2) 

(Brandt) 

This course trains students to educate the elderly about drugs and drug-taking. 
Students benefit from the didactic and applied aspects of the course, since they 
must first learn about the special needs of the elderly and then actually interact 
with the elderly both in large groups and one-on-one. 

PHMY 554— Health Education Seminar (2) (Fedder) 
The course prepares students to become effective health educators to patients, other 
health-care practitioners and/or the community. The theoretical and conceptual 
bases of the health education discipline are fully developed. Students learn the 
techniques of behavioral and educational diagnosis and their application to the 
development of educational intervention. 

PHMY 556, 557— Advanced Pharmacology l&ll (2, 2) (Moreton) 
This course expands and extends the pharmacology material learned in the 
required courses PHAR 536 and 546. The course format is the discussion of 
assigned topics and review of original papers in a two-hour weekly session. These 
sessions include graduate students in the Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

PHMY 560— The Pharmacist in the Critical Care Setting (I) (Hassan) 
This course identifies and explores the role of the pharmacist in various critical- 
care settings. The student will be able to see how critical care pharmacy has 
evolved to complement the medical and nursing management of the critically 
ill patient. 

PHMY 561 — Advanced Therapeutics Seminar (3) (Tsoukleris) 
An advanced course dealing with complex drug therapy decision-making, using 
case presentations and current literature. Requires active student participation in 
resolution of therapeutic controversies. 

PHMY 562— Clinical Pharmacokinetics (2) (Reiss/Eddington) 

This course provides students with the didactic training and skills necessary to 

conduct clinical pharmacokinetic consultation. 



Course Descriptions 



PHMY 563 — Pharmacotherapeutic Issues in the Critically ill 
Patient (2) (Hassan) 

This course is an elective seminar for students interested in critical care pharmaco- 
therapy. Topics include a broad scope of disease states and drug issues frequently 
encountered in an ICU setting. Presentations will identify the pharmacologic aims 
and controversies in the management of a particular topic, while simultaneously 
underscoring the complexities of drug therapy in the critically ill patient, which 
may lead to untoward reactions or suboptimal care. 

PHMY 567— Advanced Cardiac Life Support (2) (Roffman) 
This course focuses on the role of the pharmacist in the setting of cardiac arrest. A 
lecture format covers the pathophysiology, epidemiology, therapeutic goals and 
treatment modalities in cardiac arrest as described by the Standards and Guidelines 
developed by the National Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and 
Emergency Cardiac Care. Topics include the role of the pharmacist on the cardiac 
arrest team, an in-depth discussion of the role of pharmacologic intervention, 
techniques of basic and advanced cardiac life support and post-resuscitative care. 

PHMY 574, 575— Pharmacotherapeutics I, II (2, 2) (Roffman) 
Pharmacotherapeutics is a course in advanced therapeutic decision-making which 
parallel the therapeutic topics offered in the Integrated Science and Therapeutics 
modules during the third year of the curriculum. The course require students 
to formulate therapeutic decisions based upon case materials and emphasize 
the process of decision-making in the presence of multiple patient and agent 
variables. As the number of cumulative therapeutic topics increases, the complex- 
ity of the decision making increases. Students are expected to incorporate data 
from the primary literature as part of the therapeutic decision making process. 

PHMY 576— Advanced Topic in Pharmaceutics (2) (Polli) 
Prerequisites: PHAR 535-Pharmaceutics or concurrently enrolled in Pharmaceutics 
or consent of coursemaster. This course will allow students to become familiar with 
advanced topics in pharmaceutics. Different topics will be presented in the form of 
lectures, group discussions of original papers, and laboratories and will include bile 
acid sequestrants, drug dissolution, production methods for inhalation aerosols, 
metered-dose inhaler formulation, tablet compaction, pellet drug delivery, critical 
formulation and manufacturing variables, oral drug absorption, and novel chemical 
approaches for targeted drug delivery. 

PHMY 577— Pharmacoeconomics (3) (Mullins) 

Prerequisites: One undergraduate course in Economics or permission of instruc- 
tor. This course is designed to familiarize students with the economic structure, 
conduct, and performance of the pharmaceutical industry. The course includes 
such topics as prices and profit in the industry, productivity, costs, economies of 
scale, innovation, economic effects of regulation, cost benefit and cost effectiveness 
analysis of pharmaceuticals. 



School of Pharmacy 



PHMY 580— Drugs and Public Policy (2) (Palumbo) 
An examination of public policy issues related to drug use in our society. Cases, 
small group discussions and outside experts will be used to analyze contemporary 
issues effecting pharmacy and health-care. 

PHMY 581— Research Pathway Seminar (I) (Dalby/Weiner) 
The objective of this course is to provide an overview of pharmaceutical and 
other health and life science oriented research by attending research seminars and 
participating in the discussion of those seminars. 

PHMY 582— Advanced Patient Assessment (2) (Haines) 
Prerequisites: successful completion of PHAR 54l-Biopharmaceutics and Pharma- 
cokinetics, PHAR 542-Clinical Chemistry, PHAR 554-55, 564-65-Integrated 
Science and Therapeutics, and PHPC 532-Longitudinal Pharmaceudcal Care I or 
permission of coursemaster. Students will develop advanced patient assessment skills 
that are relevant to the provision of pharmaceutical care. At the completion 
of this course, the student will be able to skillfully: 1) conduct patient interviews, 
2) examine patients to make diagnostic, triage and therapeutic decisions, 3) perform 
simple laboratory tests and 4) develop strategies to assess adherence to prescribed 
therapeutic regimens. 

PHMY 583 — Management of Health Care Systems (3) (Moore) 
Prerequisites: PHAR 515-Personal Management, PHAR-523 Ethics, PHAR 
545— Practice Management, PHPC 570— Community Distribution Rotation, 
PHPC 571-Institutional Distribution Rotation. This course will familiarize stu- 
dents with the different practice settings in integrated health systems ranging 
from community pharmacies to managed care organizations and hospitals. Areas 
that will be covered include pharmacy benefits management, disease state 
management, information management, models of integrated health systems, 
management of the therapeutic process, negotiating and networking, and the 
response of pharmacy practice settings to the changes in these systems. 

PHMY 584— Patient Counseling (2) (Abramson/Beardsley) 
Students will learn key information about the Top 100 prescribed drugs in the 
U.S. The content will focus on information that needs to be communicated to 
patients concerning their therapy. This material will reinforce what students have 
learned in other courses. In addition, students will become familiar with new 
product-specific material that has not been addressed in the curriculum. Periodic 
quizzes will assess student knowledge. The Pharmacy Practice Laboratory will 
also be used to videotape students as they counsel simulated patients. 

PHMY 585— Perspectives of Mental Health (2) (Love) 
This course provides students with an understanding of the mental health system, 
discusses controversies that may face the practicing pharmacist, familiarizes 
students with tools and techniques for studying psychopharmacologic agents and 
helps to define pharmacists roles in providing mental health-care. 



Course Descriptions 



PHMY 586— Journal Club (I) (Buterbaugh) 

This elective course is abilities-based, structured in a journal club format, and 
parallels second year courses. The elective provides a forum in which students can 
practice and enhance oral and written communication skills and literature 
retrieval and evaluation activities while learning new information relating to 
ongoing required coursework. Students select articles from the primary basic or 
clinical research literature and lead discussions of the articles. The discussions 
include study design, informational content and how articles relate to and 
enhance the topics of second-year courses the students are concurrently taking. 

PHMY 587 — Special/Mammal Anatomy and Histology (2) 

(Buterbaugh) 

Prerequisite: PHMY 590-Fetal Pig Anatomy and/or consent of coursemaster. 
This advanced level elective course provides students a structured opportunity for 
a major dissection of two mammalian species. Students observe the location and 
structure of all organs of the body and their relation to each other. Working in 
pairs at their own pace, students systematically dissect an adult, preserved cat and 
a pregnant rat. 

PHMY 590 — Special/Fetal Pig Dissection (I) (Buterbaugh) 
Prerequisite: PHAR 514— Human Biolog)' 1 and/or consent of coursemaster. This 
elective course provides students the opportunity to dissect a mammalian species 
and observe the location and structure of most organs of the body and their relation 
to each other. 

PHMY 591 — Principles and Practice of Modern Compounding (2) 

(Augsburger) 

Prerequisites: PHAR 535-Pharmaceutics. Using a combination of lectures, problem- 
solving workshops and skill-building laboratories, this coiu^e teaches the appropriate 
extemporaneous compoimding of drug preparations in pharmacies. 

PHMY 592— Clinical Toxicology (2) (Klein-Schwartz) 
Prerequisites: Third-year status. Note: This course is highly recommended as 
preparation for PHEX 551-Poison Information Rotation. The clinical toxicolog)' 
course will provide students with an overview of the clinical manifestations, 
assessment and treatment of poisonings with common drug, chemical and bio- 
logical agents. The format includes lectures by faculty and case assignments and 
discussions led by students. Course evaluation includes the discussion sessions, a 
paper on students' choice of toxicology topic, a midterm and a final exam. 

PHMY 593— Care of the Terminally III (2) (Beardsley/McPherson) 
Prerequisites: Third-year status. This course prepares students to interact with 
terminally ill patients through increased understanding of the social and psycho- 
logical aspects of death and dying as well as the palliative pharmacotherapeutic 
management of these patients. 



School of Pharmacy 



PHMY 594— Introduction to Community (2) 

(Rodriguez deBittner/Fedder) 

Prerequisites: PHAR 532-Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care I. This course 
engages students in service-learning through work with the ENABLE Pro- 
gram, relating community needs in West Baltimore City to their future role as 
pharmacists. 

PHMY 595— Herbalism (2) (Blomster) 

This course explores the principles behind the botanical information and folklore 
uses of herbal remedies and provides an overview of alternative medicine as it is 
currently emerging. Alternative medicine therapies are also discussed: their ratio- 
nale, safety, validit)' and current therapeutic use. 

PHMY 596 — Nonprescription Medicine (2) (McPherson) 
Prerequisites: Third-year status. This course is designed to thoroughly familiarize 
the student with OTC medications. Emphasis will be placed on the pharmacol- 
ogy of these drugs, potential disease states in which the drugs will be used, 
self-administration techniques, consideration in selecting a product, triage issues 
and patient counseling. 

PHMY 597— Bereavement (I) (McPherson) 

This course addresses the skills and knowledge needed to serve bereaved individ- 
uals: the theory of attachment, loss and grief as well as how to effectively interact 
with the bereaved. 



Course Descriptions 



EXPERIENTIAL ELECTIVE COURSES 



The experiential elective (PHEX) courses currently offered by the School of 
Pharmacy are described below. In general, experiential electives can be taken for 

either 2 or 3 semester hours of credit. PHEX 5 indicates the 2-hour elective 

while PHEX 5 A indicates the 3-hour elective. For example, a student register- 
ing for a 2-hour Parenteral Nutrition rotation would register for "PHEX 550" 
and "PHEX 550A" for the 3-hour rotation. 

PHEX 540 — Contemporary Pharmacy Practice (2, 3) (Rumrill) 

PHEX 541— Bone Marrow Transport (2, 3) (Travato) 

PHEX 542— Neurology (2, 3) 

PHEX 550— Parenteral Nutrition (2, 3) 

PHEX 551— Drug Information Clerkship (2, 3) (Mays) 

PHEX 552 — Poison Information (2, 3) (Anderson/Klein-Schwartz) 

PHEX 559— Research (2, 3) 

PHEX 560— internal Medicine (2, 3) (Roftman) 

PHEX 561— Ambulatory Care (2, 3) (Haines) 

PHEX 562 — Clinical Pharmacokinetics Clerkship (2, 3) (Reiss) 

PHEX 563— Administration (2, 3) (Moore) 

PHEX 564— Cardiology (2, 3) (Roffman) 

PHEX 565— Critical Care/Shock Trauma (2, 3) (Hassan) 

PHEX 566— Critical Care/MICU (2, 3) (Hassan) 

PHEX 567 — Diabetes Care Management (2, 3) (McPherson) 

PHEX 570— Food and Drug Administration (2, 3) (Rumrill) 

PHEX 571 — Gastrointestinal Surgery (2, 3) 

PHEX 572— Geriatric Pharmacotherapy (2, 3) (Brandt) 

92 School of Pharmacy 



PHEX 573— Home Health Care (2, 3) (McPherson) 

PHEX 574— Infectious Disease (2, 3) (Pkisance) 

PHEX 575— Infectious Disease/HIV (2, 3) 

PHEX 576— Oncology (2, 3) (Travato) 

PHEX 577— Oncology/Infectious Disease (2, 3) 

PHEX 580— Oncology/TPN (2, 3) 

PHEX 581— Oncology/Research (2, 3) 

PHEX 582— Pediatrics (2, 3) 

PHEX 583— Nuclear Pharmacy (2, 3) (Rumrill) 

PHEX 584 — Chemical Dependence Treatment (2, 3) (Tommasello) 

PHEX 585 — Chemical Dependence Research (2, 3) (Tommasello) 

PHEX 586— Veterinary Medicine (2, 3) (Rumrill) 

PHEX 587— Psychiatry (2, 3) (Borovicka) 

PHEX 589— Special Studies (2, 3) - Repeatable up to 12 credits. 

PHEX 589— SPEC/lnvestigational Drugs (2, 3) (Roffman) 

PHEX 589 — SPEC/Pharmacy Benefits Management (2, 3) 

PHEX 589— SPEC/Transplant (2, 3) (Reiss) 

PHEX 590 — Community Pharmaceutical Care (2, 3) (Haines) 

PHEX 591— Hospice (2, 3) (McPherson) 



Course Descriptions 93 



NONTRADITIONAL PATHWAY 



PHNT 500 — Principles of Pharmaceutical Care (3) 

This course focuses on the definitions and processes of Pharmaceutical Care and 
Therapeutics, including the process of therapeutic decision making. Principles of 
common diseases will be covered, including Oncology, Infectious Diseases and 
Cardiovascular Diseases. Students in this course will also learn how to provide 
pharmaceutical care to individual patients (e.g., develop a pharmaceutical care data 
base, develop a plan, and apply therapeutics principles), as well as population- 
based pharmaceutical care (e.g.. Principles of Pharmacoeconomics, Pharmaco- 
epidemiology and Health Education and Promotion). 

PHNT 505 — Prior Leaning Assessment of Pharmacy Practice (2) 

(McPherson) 

The objective of this elective course is to generate a documented compilation of a 
candidate's experiences and accomplishments. The Prior Learning Assessment 
(PLA) Portfolio will be used to grant academic credit in content areas where the 
student has acquired competence through non-sponsored learning. Up to 10 acad- 
emic credits may be awarded through the PLA Process: two credits that parallel the 
Terminal Performance Objectives (applied to the Pharmaceutical Care rotation 
and Practice Management rotation); four credits in Practice Management; and up 
to four credits in Pharmacotherapy. The coursemaster welcomes the opportunity 
to discuss the process and likelihood of credit award with students who may be 
interested in this elective. 

PHNT 51 I— Practice Management (4) (Fedder) 

Practice Management is composed of four modules: Financial Management, Prin- 
ciples of Management, Marketing and Managing Pharmaceutical Care Services. 
These modules are designed to prepare students for the practice management 
experiential component and to build students' practice management abilities. 
These credits may be earned by traditional coursework, self-study or other faculty- 
approved modalities identified with the student advisors. When appropriate, 
credits in this area may be awarded through the PLA process. 

PHNT 512 — Principles of Pharmaceutical Sciences (2) (Hollenbeck) 
This course will enable students to find, comprehend, analyze and apply current 
and new scientific knowledge to support pharmaceutical care by expanding their 
foundation in Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Phar- 
macokinetics and Biopharmaceutics. 

PHNT 520 — Readiness Assessment (I) (McPherson) 
This one-credit self-study course validates student.s' "readiness" to undertake tur- 
ther didactic and experiential coursework in the NTPD Pathway The Readiness 
Assessment consists of two activities. The first is the successful completion of the 
second Module of the Drug Information Clinical Skills Series from ASHP. The 

94 School of Pharmacy 



second is an objective, multiple-choice examination, assessing the content areas 
taught in the Therapeutics sequence. For each content area, anatomy, physiology, 
pathophysiology and pharmacology will be assessed. Students are expected to pre- 
pare for the Readiness Assessment through self-study. The coursemaster will 
suggest options for self-study such as computer-based simulation, readings, 
coursework or continuing education sessions or modules. 

PHNT 521— Longitudinal Care (I) (McPherson) 

This experiential course focuses on assessing the health status of a cohort of 
patients in the student's own practice, developing health status reports and partici- 
pating in the management of pharmaceutical care needs of these patients during 
health transitions. Selected patients have health-care problems, such as congestive 
heart failure, AIDS, cancer or problems with aging, that are likely to result in 
health transitions requiring changing pharmaceutical care needs including changes 
in drug therapy, health education, patient counseling and physical environment 
(e.g., home, long term care, hospital). It is expected that students commit a mini- 
mum of approximately 45 hours (e.g., an average of about three hours per week 
over a semester or 1.5 hours per week over an academic year) to experiential activ- 
ities in this course at their own practice site. Students are expected to apply skills 
from this course in subsequent Pharmaceutical Care experiential coursework. 

PHNT 53 I — Practice Management Planning (2) (Fedder) 
Practice Management Planning will focus on the application of management prin- 
ciples to a pharmaceutical care service. The course will provide an opportunity for 
the student to develop a plan defining and justifying a pharmaceutical care service 
and an opportunity for implementing the plan. 

PHNT 532— Patient Assessment Skills (I) (Michocki) 
This experiential course focuses on the skills necessary to obtain general pharma- 
ceutical care data bases and problem-oriented data bases from patients. Acquired 
skills include both history-taking and physical assessment. Learning experiences 
include faculty demonstrations, videos, simulations and patient encounters. The 
course consists of 10 workshop sessions, offered on three dates. Students are 
expected to apply and practice skills from this course in the program's other expe- 
riential courses. 

PHNT 534 — Clinic or Institutional Assignment (I) (McPherson) 
Activities in this course include supervised development of pharmaceutical care 
plans, triage decision making, discharge/ transition planning and patient counsel- 
ing. Students are assigned to a total of 15 three-hour faculty-supervised 
pharmaceutical care sessions. Students whose area of interest is ambulatory practice 
are assigned to 10 three-hour Pharmacotherapy-Medication Refill Clinic sessions 
and five hospital-based three-hour Pharmaceutical Care Rounds sessions. Students 
whose area of interest is organized or institutional health-care are assigned to 
1 hospital-based Pharmaceutical Care Rounds sessions and five Pharmacotherapy- 
Medication Refill Clinic sessions. 



Course Descriptions 95 



PHNT 536 — Drug Information Experience (I) (Mays) 

Pharmacists acquire and apply drug information skills in their own practice. Stu- 
dents will develop and attain their own drug information library, access appropriate 
drug information databases and utilize appropriate pharmaceutical and medical 
literature to prepare drug information reports. Assignments are made based upon 
the needs of the patients in the student's practice and the organizational needs of 
the practice site. 

PHNT 545— Therapeutics I (3) (McPherson) 

This course focuses on common disease entities and the development of pharma- 
ceutical and other care plans for patients with these problems: pulmonary, neuro/ 
psych, cardiovascular, endocrinology and women's health. Learning experiences 
include discussions of pharmacotherapy, case study analysis, adverse drug reaction 
analysis, discharge and transition of care planning and development of care plans. 
These experiences are focused on the participant's own pharmacy practice. 

PHNT 546— Therapeutics II (3) (Kerr/Ives) 

This course focuses on common disease entities and the development of pharma- 
ceutical and other care plans for patients with these problems. Disease states 
common to the following organ systems will be covered: general care, joint dis- 
ease, oncology, renal disease, gastrointestinal disease and infectious diseases. 
Learning experiences include discussions of pharmacotherapy, case study analysis, 
adverse drug reaction analysis, discharge and transition of care planning and 
development of care plans. These experiences are focused on the participant's 
own pharmacy practice. 

PHNT 547 — Medical Information Analysis (I) (Mays) 
This course is designed to enhance student's skills in the areas of information 
collection, retrieval, analysis and interpretation. A variety of topics surrounding 
drug information will be covered including the role of informational services 
in health-care (including managed care programs), written and verbal communi- 
cation skills, research strategy and process, drug policy management, quality 
assurance, ethics, careers in drug information and basic interpretation/ 
understanding of the use of biostatistics in the medical literature. At the conclu- 
sion of this course, students will be able to: 1) retrieve medical literature 
depending appropriate to the request, 2) evaluate the medical literature and draw 
conclusions necessary to make effective patient interventions/therapeutic deci- 
sions and 3) concisely present clinical findings and answer questions about recent 
medical advances. Students will interact with both their peers and faculty during 
this course in order to fulfill all learning objectives. 

PHNT 570 — Pharmaceutical Care Experience (3) (McPherson) 
This course is designed to help practicing pharmacists build the skills needed to 
deliver pharmaceutical care services to patients. Students develop and implement 
Triage Plans, Pharmaceutical Care Plans and Transition Plans for a cohort of 
patients (in addition to the patients accumulated during the Longitudinal Care 



School of Pharmacy 



experience) in their own practice. Patients selected tor plan development and 
implementation must have at least two pharmaceutical care or pharmacotherapy 
problems. Students communicate these plans to other health-care professionals, 
monitor the response of patients to these plans, make any necessary modifications 
and assess patients' health outcomes of the plans. Students are expected to com- 
mit a minimum of 1 80 hours (an average of about six hours per week over two 
semesters) to activities related to this course. During this course, students will be 
accountable for application of pharmacotherapy topics acquired through Prior 
Learning Assessment and the didactic Pharmacotherapeutics course. Students 
completing this course will demonstrate the Nontraditional Pathway's terminal 
performance objectives related to implementation of pharmaceutical care services 
in their practice site. 



Course Descriptions 



TO REACH THE CAMPUS 



The University is located in downtown Baltimore, six blocks west of the Inner 
Harbor and two blocks north of Oriole Park at Camden Yards in the Universit)' 
district. 

Directions 

From 1-95: Take 1-395 (downtown Baltimore) and exit onto Martin Luther King 
Jr. Blvd., staying in right lane. At fourth traffic light, turn right onto Baltimore 
Street. Turn left at second traffic light onto Paca Street (get into right lane) and 
enter the Baltimore Grand Garage (on your right). 

Bus 

MTA routes 1, 2, 7, 8, 11, 20, 35 and 36 serve the campus. 

Subway 

The Baltimore Metro runs between Charles Center and Owings Mills. Stops 
nearest the University are at Lexington Market and Charles Center. 

Light Rail 

Light rail connects park and ride locations in northern Baltimore County and 
Oriole Park at Camden Yards, then continues south to Glen Burnie. The Univer- 
sity stop is two blocks east of campus on Baltimore Street. 

Train 

MARC commuter service runs from Camden Station, 301 W. Camden Street. 




School of Pharmacy 



University of Maryland 
Baltimore 




Teaching Facility 

685 W Baltimore St H2 

Dt. Samuel D. Hatris 



Nufsing School 
655WLombi/<ISt I 
Pasrault Row 
65Hi65WUxingtoi 



214 N Pine St C2 
Ronald McDonald Hoiue 



State Med Examiner. BIdg 






cSt F5 



WMH 



^anSSfl 



liill 



WHC 



SSSHjgfll 



mm 



519 WFaj-ctreSt F7 
Wcstetn Health Cti 700 
W Lombaid St J3 
WPCC Walter PCartetCt, 

620 W Fayene St E4 
29SP 29 S Paca St J9 

405R 405 W Redwood St BIdg 



502F 



Allied Health BIdg 
100 Penn St K3 
Athletic Centcf Pratt Si 
Garage L4 
Baltimore Dispensary 
100 N Paca St E8 
Biomedical Research 



Dav.dge Hall 

SiiWLombatdSi J7 

Dental School 

666 W Baltimore St F3 

East Hall 

520 W Lombard St 17 



! W Fayene St BIdg 
1 W Pratt St BIdg M3 



Baltimotc Grand Garage 
(visitofs) F9 
Dental Patient 
Parking Lot F4 

B4, C4. C5 
Lexington Garage 
(students) C3 
•Pearl Garage D5 
Parking Office E5 
■Pcnn St Garage 
(visitors) L3 
•Pratt St Gaiage L5 
University Plaza Garage 
(patients) H7 
Public patking lacilities 
•Assigned University 



I Health & I.S/F Law School/Future 



c Student Union HSF 



8C Lombard St J2 
s T Frenkil BIdg 



Homer Gudclsky Building MBC 
Lombard & Greene St5j6 
Health Sciences Facili 



xington Matket 



685 W Baltimotc St H3 



iu.-,t.teei,tbt K7 mCPO Matket Clt. Post Ofific. 

Lombard Building D6 

5 1 5 W Lombard St K7 OSPC Old St, Paul, Cemetery 

MDBarCeniei 11 

520 W Fayette S, E7 qP Ot.olc Park 

at Camden Yatds P9 



MIEMSS MD Inst fot Emetgcncy 
Med Srvcs Systs 
653 W Piatt Si M4 

MBIO Med Biotechnology Ctr 

721 W Lombaid St IQ 



Campus Maps 



NOTES 



School of Pharmacy 



Student RIght-to-Know and Campus Security Act Request 

The Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act (Public Law 101-542), signed 
into federal law Novermber 8, 1990, requires that the University of Maryland make 
readily available to its students and prospective students the information listed below. 

To obtain any of this information, please check the appropriate space(s), fill in your 
name, mailing address and UM school and program name, tear off this form and 
send it to: 

Office of Student Services 

Attention: Student Right-to-Know Request 

University of Maryland 

621 W. Lombard St., Room 302 

Baltimore, MD 21201 



Complete and return this portion 

Financial Aid 

Costs of Attending the University of Maryland 

Refund Policy 

Facilities and Services for Students with Disabilities 

Procedures for Review of School and Campus Accreditation 

Completion and Graduation Rates for Undergraduate Students 

Loan Deferral Under the Peace Corps and Domestic Volunteer 
Services Act 

Campus Safety and Security 

Campus Crime Statistics 

Student Sexual Orientation Nondiscrimination 



Name - 
Address 



UM school and 



Student Right to Know 




'ersity of Maryland School of Pharmacy 



2001-2003 Catalog 




2001-2003 Catalog 

Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 

Pharmaceutical Health Services Research Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Program 

Pharmaceutical Sciences Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Program 

School of Pharmacy 
University of Maryland 
20 N. Pine St. 
Baltimore, MD 21201-1 180 

Program Information: 

PharmD Admissions Office 4 1 0-706-7653 

or 800-852-2988 (Toll Free) 

E-mail: PharmDhelp@rx. umaryland. edit 

Nontraditional Pathway Information 4 1 0-706-076 1 
Pharmaceutical Health Services Research 

(PhD) Program 410-706-0879 

Pharmaceutical Sciences (PhD) Program 410-706-0549 

Dean's Office 410-706-7650 

University Financial Aid Office 410-706-7347 

External Affairs 410-706-5893 

Web site www.pharmacy.timarylarjd.edu 

I he IJntventty oj Maryland n accredited hy the Middle States Afsociation of Colleges and SchooL. The School of Phar- 
macy's Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) and continuing education programs are accredited by the American Council on 
Pharmaceutical Education. For additional information, write ACPE, 31 1 W Superior St.. Chicago. IL 60610 or call 
.112-66'^ 3575 The School is a member of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

The School reserves the right to make changes in requirements for admission, curriculum, standards for advancement and 
graduation, fees, and rules and regulations. 

The University of Maryland School ofPharnmcy is committed to providing eijuiil education and employment opportunity 
in all of its programs. 

I he University and the School of Pharmacy do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, age. ancestry or 
national origin, gender, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability marital status, or veteran status. Exceptions are as 
allowed by law, for example, due to bona fide occupational qualifications or lack of reasonable accommodations for dis- 
abilities. 

Produced by the University of Marybind Office of External Affairs, 2001. 



2001-2003 Catalog 

University of Maryland 
School of Pharmacy 



Message from the Dean 



Dear Students and Colleagues: 

Health care delivery in today's society continues to be transformed. New medical tech- 
nologies, new drugs, and new drug delivery systems are paving the way to a healthier 
world. Patients, who once had little say in their own health care, now have a desire to bet- 
ter understand their medical conditions and their medications. And 
pharmacists — whether in community or hospital practice, the pharmaceutical industry, 
government, or nonprofit organization — are playing major roles in developing new and 
innovative medicines, managing patient drug therapy, and helping patients to better 
understand how to use their medicines. 

Pharmacy has adapted to meet the demands of the changing health care delivery sys- 
tem. Pharmacists are committed to the goal of helping patients achieve desired outcomes 
from their medication therapy that lead to improvement in quality of life. Pharmacists 
play an active part in achieving this goal by contributing their expertise in many ways. 

The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has developed a Doctor of Pharmacy 
curriculum that emphasizes problem solving and critical thinking. While content is criti- 
cally important and essential to education, it changes rapidly. Our 
students rapidly recognize that learning to learn and committing to 
a lifetime of learning are the most important outcomes of pharma- 
ceutical education at Maryland. 

Maryland students learn to practice as patient-oriented health 
care providers who can work as part of a multi-professional health 
care team. The curriculum is innovative and incorporates flexibility 
in course structure. Students have substantial opportunities to 
choose electives, pathways offering avenues for concentration within 
areas of interest, and varied time frames for coursework. To round 
out their education, potential pharmacists can select practice experi- 
ence from hundreds of experiential learning sites throughout the region. 

The mission of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy is to improve the 
health and well being of people through excellence in pharmaceutical education, research 
and scholarship, pharmaceutical care, and public service. In addition to our Doctor of 
Pharmacy program, the School offers graduate programs in Pharmaceutical Health Ser- 
vices Research and in Pharmaceutical Sciences that prepare students for careers in research 
and policy. 

It is our vision that the School of Pharmacy be recognized as an international leader in 
innovation and excellence in education, scholarship, pharmaceutical care, and public ser- 
vice. We strive to: 

• attract and mentor students to attain their fullest potential. 

• recruit and develop faculty members to serve as exemplary role models. 

• foster an environment for learning and productivity that will guarantee the fullest 
contributions of a diverse faculty, staff and student body. 

• collaborate with partners both within and outside the University to achieve this 
vision. 

This catalog serves as a starting point and a reference for information about the School 
of Pharmacy. Our Web site, at www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu, provides additional infor- 
mation as well as current news about the School of Pharmacy. Thank you for your interest 
in the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. 




David A. Knapp, PhD 

Dean 

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 



Contents 



MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN ii 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY . . .2 

History 2 

Mission 2 

Vision 2 

Commitment to Diversity 3 

Compliance with ADA Legislation 3 

Administrative Offices 3 

Lecture Series 5 

Endowed Chairs 6 

Centers and Resource Programs 6 

Facilities 8 

Student Honors and Awards 10 

Student Organizations 11 

Alumni Association 12 

THE UNIVERSITY OF 

MARYLAND 13 

Health Sciences and 

Human Services Library 13 

Student and Employee Health 14 

Counseling Center 14 

Parking and Transportation 15 

Living in Baltimore 16 

The City of Baltimore 16 

Close to Washington, D.C 17 

DOCTOR OF PHARMACY 
(PHARMD) PROGRAM 18 

Curriculum Pathways and Electives 26 

PharmD Program Summary 27 

Nontraditional PharmD Pathway 32 

PharmD Dual Degree Programs 35 

Licensure Requirements 37 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
PROGRAMS 38 

Pharmaceutical Health Services 

Research PhD Program Description . . .38 
Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Department Overview 40 

Pharmaceutical Sciences PhD 

Program Overview 43 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Department Overview 43 

Pharmaceutical Sciences PhD 

Program Description 45 



Graduate Student Organizations 48 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 49 

Tuition and Fees 49 

Health Insurance 50 

Determination of In-State Residency . . . .50 

PharmD Student Financial Aid 50 

School of Pharmacy Scholarships 50 

Loan Funds 53 

Veterans Financial Aid 53 

PhD Student Financial Aid 53 

PHARMD ACADEMIC 

POLICY STATEMENTS 54 

Academic Sessions 54 

Registration Policies 54 

Academic Status Policies 55 

Academic Integrity Policies and 

Procedures 57 

Student Discipline and Grievance 

Committee 61 

Other School Policy Statements 66 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
POLICY EXCERPTS 67 

ADMINISTRATION AND 
FACULTY 75 

PROGRAM COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 90 

PharmD Course Descriptions 90 

Nontraditional PharmD (NTPD) 

Pathway 108 

PhD Program Course Descriptions Ill 

Pharmaceutical Health Services 

Research Ill 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 118 

UNIVERSITY MAP AND 

DIRECTIONS TO THE 

SCHOOL 122 

STUDENT RIGHT-TO-KNOW 

AND CAMPUS SECURITY 

ACT REQUEST 124 



The School of Pharmacy 



HISTORY 



The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has a rich and distinguished 
heritage. First incorporated as the Maryland College of Pharmacy on January 27, 
1841, it is the oldest pharmacy school in the South and the fourth oldest in the 
country. Primarily an independent institution until 1904, the Maryland College 
of Pharmacy then became the Department of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland. In 1920, the University of Maryland in Baltimore merged with the 
Maryland State College at College Park to form the State University. Today, the 
School of Pharmacy is one of six professional schools and a graduate school that 
comprise the University of Maryland in downtown Baltimore. 

Throughout its history, the School of Pharmacy has been a local and national 
leader for the profession of pharmacy. It was a founding member of the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the professional organization established 
to formulate uniform standards for the graduation of pharmacy students. 
The School was also instrumental in the formation of the American Council for 
Pharmaceutical Education, the national accreditation organization for schools 
of pharmacy. 

In 1970, through the efforts of the School and the Maryland Board of Phar- 
macy, Maryland became the first state to replace unstructured internships with a 
professional-experience program incorporated in the School's curriculum, setting 
a national standard for professional pharmacy education. In 1980, Maryland 
became the first School of Pharmacy to establish a Center for the Study of Phar- 
macy and Therapeutics for the Elderly, now the national model for pharmacy 
geriatric education. In 1993, Maryland again set a benchmark for the nation by 
implementing a pace-setting Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program. 



MISSION 



The mission of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy is to improve the 
health and well being of the citizens of Maryland and beyond, through excellence 
in pharmaceutical education, scholarship, pharmaceutical care, and public 
service. 



VISION 



The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy will be recognized as 
an international leader in innovation and excellence in education, scho, 
arship, pharmaceutical care, and public service. 
We will attract and mentor students to attain their fullest potential 



School of Pharmacy 



J 



We will recruit and develop faculty to serve as exemplary role models. 
We will foster an environment for learning and productivity that will 
guarantee the fullest contributions of a diverse faculty, staff, and student 
body 

We will collaborate with partners both within and outside the Univer- 
sity to achieve this vision. 



COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY 

The School seeks an applicant pool and a student body that is diverse in terms 
of race, sex, age, geographic and economic background, religion, and ethnicity. 
The 2001 enrollment statistics reflect the diversity of the student body: 45% 
Caucasian, 27% Asian, 19% African-American, 7% International, 1% Hispanic, 
and less than 1% Native- American. 



COMPLIANCE WITH ADA LEGISLATION 

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the School 
examines all aspects of its programs and services to ensure accessibility to quali- 
fied students with disabilities. From recruitment to commencement, the School 
strives to create an environment that respects individual differences while chal- 
lenging students to perform to their optimal ability. Modifications tailored to the 
needs of the diverse student population include applications, brochures, course 
materials and examinations offered in alternate formats, and modified lengths of 
time to complete degree requirements. Equally important, the administration 
reviews organizational activities that would prohibit participation by students 
with disabilities and provides services for these students to ensure their rights and 
protection under the law. With increased use of computer technology, the School 
makes information more accessible and is better able to serve students with 
disabilities. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 

The Office of Academic Affairs provides leadership and administrative manage- 
ment for instructional resources used in all professional education programs. The 
associate dean for academic affairs is responsible for curriculum, scheduling, 
graduate programs, graduate teaching assistants, liaison with other academic 
units of the University, continuing education, the Office of Experiential Learn- 
ing, the Nontraditional PharmD Pathway, and review of research proposals. The 
director ol continuation studies, the director of educational technology, and the 



The School of Pharmacy 



director of experiential learning assist this office. The associate dean for academic 
affairs meets with the Educational Advisory Committee, composed of members 
of the external professional pharmacy community, to identify and discuss impor- 
tant issues affecting the educational programs at the School and to provide advice 
on those issues. Also, this associate dean coordinates initiatives in the interna- 
tional arena that deal with education and research. 



FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 

The Finance and Administration Office is directed by the associate dean who is 
also the chief financial officer for the School. The office provides leadership and 
oversight of support services necessary for the School to carry out its mission. 
The following units and positions are part of the team that helps deliver support 
services: Facilities and Laboratory Support Services, Computer and Network Ser- 
vices, the Business Office, Operations Manager, and the Senior Staff Team. 



EXTERNAL AFFAIRS 

The Office of External Affairs is responsible for the areas of development (fund 
raising) and alumni/constituent relations for the School of Pharmacy. Currently, 
the office is focused on the campus-wide Invest in Excellence capital campaign. 
Pharmacy's share of this effort is $6 million and carries the theme Pharmacy for a 
New Century, with an emphasis on new buildings and student and faculty sup- 
port. Working closely with the dean, the Board of Visitors, alumni, faculty, and 
staff, the development staff seeks philanthropic support from individuals, corpo- 
rations, and foundations. 

Alumni/constituent relations plans class reunions and other alumni events to 
promote the School to its many constituencies. The office provides leadership to 
the Alumni Association, a dedicated group of graduates who assist with student 
recruitment, engage in grassroots advocacy on behalf of the School, and host the 
annual graduation banquet each spring. 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Office of Student Affairs provides a variety of services to enhance the student 
learning experience and to provide support to students during their academic 
career. The School's student affairs system is under the direction of the associate 
dean for student affairs and the director of student services. The office includes a 
coordinator of recruitment and admissions along with three professional staff 
The office is responsible for recruitment, admission, academic progression, and 
graduation of PharmD students and is involved with veteran affairs, financial aid, 
student leadership development, and counseling programs. Other services 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



include personal counseling, advising and tutoring systems, career development, 
and special programs, such as the Open House and high school mentoring 
programs. 

The office monitors the activities of the School's student organizations that 
operate under the Student Government Association (SGA) umbrella. The SGA, 
as well as each organization, has a faculty advisor who assists in planning and 
organizing the group. The SGA holds biweekly meetings and arranges an impres- 
sive array of activities. 

The School's Student Discipline and Grievance Committee handles issues sur- 
rounding academic integrity and student behavior. The Student Affairs 
Committee addresses academic issues. Both of these committees are composed of 
students and members of the faculty and Office of Student Affairs. The office 
coordinates an extensive career development program for PharmD students and 
attempts to increase student awareness of job opportunities in light of health care 
reform. 



LECTURE SERIES 

The School supplements its regular curriculum with the following special lectures 
and symposia: 

Francis S. Balassone Memorial Lecture. The Maryland Pharmacists Associ- 
ation, the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association, and the School sponsor this 
lectureship as a memorial to Francis S. Balassone. He was a 1940 graduate of the 
School, a past president of the Alumni Association, a distinguished former faculty 
member, and a past president of the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. 

Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture. This lectureship was established in 
1969 by Mrs. DuMez in memory of her husband, Dr. Andrew G. DuMez. Dean 
of the School of Pharmacy from 1926 to 1948, Dr. DuMez was a distinguished 
educator and leader in pharmacy in Maryland, the United States, and around the 
world. 

Ellis Grollman Lecture in Pharmaceutical Sciences. Mrs. Evelyn Grollman 
Click funded a lecture program in memory of her brother, Ellis Grollman, in 
1983. He was a 1926 graduate of the School. Each year a nationally recognized 
researcher in the pharmaceutical or related basic sciences is invited to present this 
lecture. 

Peter P. Lamy Lecture. The Peter P. Lamy Lecture was inaugurated in 1992 
in recognition of Dr. Lamy's career as an internationally recognized authority on 
geriatrics and gerontology. This lecture provides an opportunity for pharmacists 
to discuss critical issues in the care of the nation's elderly. 

Dean's Colloquium. The Dean's Colloquium brings together students, fac- 
ulty members, and nationally recognized scientists and clinicians to discuss 
contemporary issues of relevance to pharmacy and health care. These seminars 
provide unusual opportunities for interaction and exchange of new information 
on topics related to pharmacy practice and science. 



The School of Pharmacy 



ENDOWED CHAIRS 



The School has the following endowed chairs: 

The Emerson Professorship in Pharmacology was endowed in 1927 as a 
chair in Biological Testing and Assay by Captain Isaac Emerson, president of the 
Emerson Drug Company. The first chair was filled by Dr. Marvin Thompson, a 
pharmacologist at the Food and Drug Administration at the time. Dr. Clifford 
W. Chapman, a pharmacologist from the Canadian National Laboratories, was 
appointed to the chair in 1938. Dr. Casimer Ichniowski and Dr. Naim Khazan 
were the third and fourth appointees to the chair. In 1988, Dr. Gerald M. Rosen 
was appointed Emerson Professor. His appointment as Emerson Professor led to 
Dr. Rosen being named an Eminent Scholar by the Maryland Higher Education 
Commission. 

The Parke-Davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy was established in 
1990 with a $1 million gift from the Warner-Lambert Co. on the eve of the 
125th anniversary of Parke-Davis and the School of Pharmacy's 150th Anniver- 
sary. The endowment underwrites the School's continuing commitment to 
geriatric pharmacotherapy as exemplified by the accomplishments of the late 
Peter P. Lamy, the first holder of the Parke-Davis Chair. Dr. Bruce C. Stuart is 
current holder of this chair. 

The Ralph Shangraw Endowed Chair in Pharmaceutical Sciences was 
established in June 1995 by Colorcon and the University of Maryland School of 
Pharmacy in honor of the retirement of Ralph Shangraw. The endowment will be 
used to support a Professorship in Pharmaceutical Sciences until the fund has 
reached full funding and then will support an endowed chair. 



CENTERS AND RESOURCE PROGRAMS 



The Biomedicinal Chemistry NMR Center houses a GE 300 MHZ nuclear 
magnetic resonance spectrometer. The superconducting magnet, the heart of the 
instrument, is permanently immersed in a vacuum-jacket reservoir of liquid 
helium ( — 260°C) and allows the detection and accurate determination of pro- 
tons, '^C.^'P and other nuclei of biological importance. The NMR was the first 
instrument of its kind on campus, and it opened up many new avenues of 
research within the School, greatly increasing the number of inter-school collabo- 
rative ventures. 

The Center on Drugs and Public Policy contributes to informed debate of 
drug policy issues in our society. CDPP research and educational programming 
has provided thought-provoking analysis and focused dialogue on drug use and 
public policy since 1987. The CDPP specializes in providing credible, unbiased, 
and pragmatic solutions for government agencies, the pharmaceutical industry, 
professional organizations, and private businesses on public health issues and 
practices involving medication use and regulatory matters. 

The Drug Information Center provides comprehensive medical information 
to contract affiliated institutions and the general public. The provision of service 



School of Pharmacy 



includes, but is not limited to, patient-specific and adverse drug reaction consul- 
tations, guidelines for use, formulary monograph/review preparation and 
management, and newsletter support. The UMDI and its staff are also charged 
with the education of UMB pharmacy students in the practice of medical litera- 
ture analysis. Students are educated on the proper utilization of online databases 
and search strategies in the hope of making them more proficient in the assimila- 
tion of information. The UMDI also participates in an ongoing Internet Drug 
Information Service, which provides online users the ability to submit questions 
to qualified pharmacy staff These questions are not limited in any way to geo- 
graphic region or subject. The UMDI answers each question on an individual 
basis, usually within three business days, many within hours. 

The ENABLE (Enhancing Neighborhood Action By Local Empowerment) 
Program trains community health workers to assist patients in maintaining con- 
trol of chronic disease states over time. It is funded through state and federal 
funds and is part of the AmeriCorps program. 

The Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging serves as the focal 
point of all of the School's geriatric education, service, and research activities. It 
provides continuing education programs both on the state and national levels. 
Funding from federal and private sources allows the center to foster relevant 
research by faculty members and graduate students from all School departments. 
The center is administratively responsible for the Elder-Health Program, which 
informs pharmacy students and retired pharmacists about the social and psycho- 
logical aspects of drug use among the elderly, as well as the therapeutic goals 
of treatment for prescribed and over-the-counter medications. The students 
and retirees use the knowledge to give presentations to elderly members of the 
community. 

The Maryland Poison Center has been a service program of the University of 
Maryland School of Pharmacy since 1972. The service has grown and changed 
quite a bit over the years. During its first year, the Maryland Poison Center 
received 5,600 calls. In 1998, the center fielded more than 60,000 calls. Despite 
the increase in call volume, the center's commitment to providing the best quality 
poison triage, treatment, education, and prevention services has never changed. 

The Maryland Poison Center is certified by the American Association of Poi- 
son Control Centers (AAPCC) as a regional poison center providing poisoning 
triage, treatment, education, and prevention services to all Marylanders. This ser- 
vice is staffed by pharmacists and nurses who have specialized clinical toxicology 
training 24 hours a day, every day of the year. All of the specialists have been cer- 
tified by the AAPCC as specialists in poison information. On average, each 
specialist has over six years of experience managing poisoning and overdose cases. 
In addition to the knowledge, skill, and experience of the poison specialists, the 
director of the program is board certified in clinical toxicology and the medical 
director is boarded in emergency medicine as well as in medical toxicology and 
additional specialized consultants. 

The Mental Health Program of the School of Pharmacy is a joint venture 
with the Developmental Disabilities Administration and Mental Hygiene 
Administration of the state of Maryland. Its primary goal is to upgrade all aspects 



The School of Pharmacy 



of pharmacy practice within the state's mental health facilities. The program also 
serves as a site for pharmacologic and administrative research in mental health, a 
testing ground for the development of innovative strategies in mental health 
pharmacy practice, and a training resource for mental-health-related issues. 
Members of the School's faculty serve at nine mental health sites around the state. 

The Office of Substance Abuse Studies was created in 1986 at the University 
of Maryland School ot Pharmacy. OSAS has been and continues to be committed 
to the development and distribution of information on substance abuse. In addi- 
tion, it is actively involved in several areas of substance abuse research. OSAS has 
created and supervises numerous programs that focus on prevention and treat- 
ment, as well as investigation of the dynamics of substance abuse. OSAS goals 
and activities: 1) provide information and education about substance abuse and 
its treatment to health care professionals; 2) prevent substance abuse through 
community service programs; and 3) design and implement research on sub- 
stance abuse and chemical dependence. 

University Pharmaceuticals of Maryland, Inc. (UPM) is a resource partner 
for the pharmaceutical industry. UPM provides high-quality drug formulation 
and manufacturing services at competitive prices. The company offers a comple- 
ment of technical and value-added services with one principle objective in 
mind — to rapidly advance pharmaceutical technologies and products on behalf 
of our clients and alliance partners. Services include pre-formulation and formu- 
lation development, drug and excipient analysis and testing, GMP manufacture 
of clinical supplies, bioequivalence and bioavailability studies, distance learning, 
customized training programs, forums and continuing education, manufactur- 
ing process design and optimization, critical variables analysis, and regulatory 
guidance. 



FACILITIES 

The School of Pharmacy has the following facilities located at various sites across 
campus: 

The School moved to Pharmacy Hall, a seven-story facility on Pine Street, in 
1982. Situated at the west entrance to the campus. Pharmacy Hall houses class- 
rooms and lecture facilities, research laboratories, conference rooms and 
administrative offices for the School of Pharmacy. Pharmacy Hall also houses a 
GMP (Good Manufacturing Practices) facility capable of producing drugs for 
human consumption. Some members of the Department of Pharmacy Practice 
and Science are located two blocks away in the five-story Allied Health Build- 
ing, which opened in 1992. Located at 100 Penn St., it is diagonally across from 
the Maryland Pharmacists Association offices in the Kelly Building at 650 W. 
Lombard St. School staff and faculty members are also located in the Century 
Building, 506 W. Fayette St., Greene Street Building, 100 N. Greene St.; and 
the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute on Lombard Street. 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



The Pharmacy Learning Center, opened in 1999, houses teaching laborato- 
ries, student computer facihties, a lecture hall, classrooms, seminar rooms, a 
student lounge, a facility for Web-based instructional development, and faculty 
offices. The building, located at HON. Pine St. is wired for Internet access. Pro- 
jection systems enable presenters to make PowerPoint presentations and utilize 
Web sites in their lectures. 

Pharmacy Computing and Network Services is responsible for the mainte- 
nance of the School of Pharmacy's computer system and network. Computing 
and Network Services is located at HON. Pine St., Room 127. The School's 
switched Ethernet (connected via a Cisco Catalyst 5505 ) network spans five sep- 
arate buildings — Pharmacy Hall, Allied Health, Century Building, 100 N. 
Greene St., and the new Pharmacy Learning Center — totaling 300-plus nodes. 
The connection with the campus is a 100 Mbit full-duplex link to the campus 
Cisco 7513 router as are the connections between the School's five buildings. The 
School runs most of its applications off of Novell NetWare 5 fileservers but also 
uses Windows NT servers for a variety of applications, including the School's 
developing intranet using the School's NDS tree. In addition, the department 
maintains the School's PCs, including Macs and the Silicon Graphics Indy, which 
acts as the School's primary Web server. 

The Computational Chemistry Laboratory is used for the study of bio- 
chemical systems via mathematical models. The goal of these studies is to better 
understand the relationship of the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of 
biological molecules to their physiological function. Such knowledge allows for a 
detailed analysis of the molecular basis of disease, a rational basis for the design of 
therapeutic agents. These approaches greatly increase the efficiency of the drug- 
discovery process and can lead to significant savings of time and money, which 
may ultimately be passed on to the consumer. 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences facilities are equipped with 
modern chemical instrumentation, including ultraviolet-visible spectrometers, a 
Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer, a 300-MHZ NMR spectrometer, sev- 
eral mass spectrometers, gas and high-performance liquid chromatography 
system, radioactivity counters, high-speed centrifuges, and molecular modeling 
workstations. Laboratories provide facilities for conducting research in organic 
synthesis, microbiology, natural products, molecular biology, fermentation, enzy- 
mology, drug metabolism, computational chemistry, and molecular modeling. 
The department also has one of the most modern industrial and pharmaceutical 
technology research and manufacturing facilities in the country. It has small-scale 
and pilot-scale equipment for the production of liquid, semi-solid, parenteral 
aerosols and solid dosage forms. There is also a state-of-the art analytical facility, 
which is a focal point for basic and applied pharmacokinetic research and which 
plays a major role in enabling faculty members to conduct clinical research in 
hospitalized patients. The laboratory is equipped to handle all phases of a drug's 
absorption and disposition in animals and/or humans. A Good Manufacturing 
Practice facility has also been established in the School. 



The School of Pharmacy 



STUDENT HONORS AND AWARDS 



The School recognizes academic excellence during the fall and spring honors con- 
vocation. During the fall ceremony, students receive academic achievement 
awards in all classes, based on performance the preceding year. The School also 
recognizes leaders of student organizations at this time. The Rho Chi Honor 
Society presents its annual book award to the student(s) having the highest acad- 
emic GPA. The society also awards certificates to students with GPAs above 3.25. 

In the spring, the School honors its graduates. Those in the top tenth of the 
class graduate with high honors and those in the second tenth of the class graduate 
with honors. Faculty members present the following academic-achievement 
awards to members of the graduating class at the spring Graduation Honors 
Convocation. 

Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize, Kappa Chapter. The Kappa Chapter 
of the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega fraternity provides a 
prize that is awarded to a student for proficiency in pharmacology. 

Andrew G. DuMez Award. In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, former 
dean and professor of pharmacy, Mrs. DuMez provides a gold medal, awarded to 
a student for superior proficiency in pharmacy. 

Lambda Kappa Sigma-Cole Award, Epsilon Alumnae Chapter. A student 
receives this award in memory of Dr. B. Olive Cole, former acting dean, for pro- 
ficiency in pharmacy administration. 

The Excellence in Pharmaceutical Care Award. The Nontraditional 
PharmD Pathway preceptors and mentors give this award to a student who has 
excelled in his/her practice setting. 

School of Pharmacy Gold Medal of General Excellence. The students who 
receive this award have attained the highest general average in the entry-level pro- 
gram and in the Nontraditional PharmD Pathway. 

William Simon Memorial Prize. In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, a 
professor of chemistry in the School for 30 years, a student is awarded a gold 
medal for superior work in the field of biomedicinal chemistry. 

Frank J. Slama Award from the School's Alumni Association. In tribute to 
Dr. Frank J. Slama, Class of 1924, a former professor and head of the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacognosy, for over half a century of loyalty and service to his 
profession, to the School, and to the Alumni Association, the School's Alumni 
Association gives this award to a member of the graduating class who excelled in 
extracurricular activities. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank J. Slama Scholarship Fund. In memory of her hus- 
band. Dr. Frank J. Slama, former distinguished professor in the School of 
Pharmacy, Lillian Slama established this scholarship on August 12, 1975. A stu- 
dent receives this award for superior work in the field of biopharmacognosy 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize. In memory of her husband, 
Manuel B. Wagner, and her son, Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School, 
the late Mrs. Sadie S. Wagner, and her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner Brill Sny- 
der, fund a prize to a graduating student for meritorious academic achievement in 
pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 



School of Pharmacy 



i 



John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize. In memory of her brother. Dr. 
John F. Wannenwetsch, a distinguished alumnus of the School, Mrs. Mary H. 
Wannenwetsch funds a prize given to a graduating student who has exhibited 
exceptional performance and promise in the practice of community pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize. In appreciation of the assis- 
tance that the Maryland College of Pharmacy extended to him as a young man, 
Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund. The faculty assembly awards annually the 
income from this fund to a student who has done exceptional work throughout 
the course in pharmacognosy. 

L.S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize. A bequest provided by the late 
L.S. Williams funds the L.S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize given to the stu- 
dent having the highest general average throughout the course in basic and 
applied pharmaceutics. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The School has 18 student organizations. The organizations include fraternities, 
professional pharmacy organizations, an honor society, high school tutoring/ 
mentoring, and social organizations that perform a variety of services and activi- 
ties for the profession and the community. The PharmD student organizations 
operate under the auspices of the Student Government Association. See the list of 
student organizations at ivww.pharmacy.umaryland.edu. 



PHARMD STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

The School's Student Government Association coordinates the student govern- 
ment activities. Through its officers and committees, the ^GA sponsors 
numerous social, service, and educational events. All professional pharmacy stu- 
dents belong to the SGA. The executive committee of the SGA includes the 
presidents of all school organizations. This committee meets periodically with 
School administrators to discuss important issues. At the campus level, the Uni- 
versity Student Government Association coordinates the activities of the graduate 
school and the six professional schools. USGA representatives are elected by the 
students of all seven schools. 



P HARMACY GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

The purpose of the Pharmacy Graduate Student Association (PGSA) of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Pharmacy is: I) to act as an official liaison body 
to communicate graduate student concerns to the pharmaceutical sciences and 
pharmacy administration officials of the School; 2) to provide a platform for dis- 
cussions and suggestions on matters involving graduate students; 3) to 
communicate and support research interests of graduate students of the School; 



The School of Pharmacy 



4) to promote efficient recruitment and orientation of incoming graduate stu- 
dents; 5) to promote a better graduate student life; 6) to represent the interests of 
graduate students as members of campus-wide organizations; and 7) to recognize, 
foster, and reward outstanding leadership among individuals who promote PGSA 
ideals. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The mission of the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association is to strengthen and 
enhance the School by fostering communications, social interactions, and a sense 
of pride in the School. Each year, the association sponsors a spring banquet hon- 
oring the graduating class and the 50-year class. The association also awards eight 
need-based scholarships to deserving students. The association also plays a leader- 
ship role in the School's fund-raising activities. For example, many members 
participate in the annual phone-a-thon and are generous donors to the David 
Stewart Associates, the major giving club for alumni, friends, and faculty mem- 
bers who contribute $1,000 or more annually to the School. 




Stanley I'yles, bSl', (left) teaches a student in a community pharmacy. 
1 2 School of Pharmacy 



I 



The University of Maryland 



The University of Maryland, located in downtown Baltimore, is the founding 
campus of Maryland's public university system and a thriving center of life sci- 
ences research and community service. The six professional schools and a 
graduate school are dedicated to excellence in professional and graduate educa- 
tion, research, public service, and patient care. 

With $255 million in sponsored activities for Fiscal Year 2001, the University 
uses state-of-the-art technological support to educate leaders in health care deliv- 
ery, biomedical science, social services, and law. The campus fosters economic 
development in the state by conducting internationally recognized research 
to cure disease and to improve the health, social functioning, and just treatment 
of the people served. The University is committed to ensuring that the knowl- 
edge it generates provides maximum benefit to society, directly enhancing the 
community. 



HEALTH SCIENCES AND HUMAN SERVICES LIBRARY 

The Health Sciences and Human Services Library (HS/HSL) and the Thurgood 
Marshall Law Library are the central libraries on the University's campus. The 
HS/HSL is distinguished as the first library established, in 1813, by a medical 
school in the United States, and it is a national model of state-of-the art informa- 
tion technology. The HS/HSL is the regional medical library for 10 southeastern 
states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands as part 
of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. 

Located at 601 W. Lombard St., the HS/HSL is designed to centralize library 
and computing resources. One of the dominant architectural features of the 
library is a six-story tower located at the northeast corner of the building. Other 
features include a 30-workstation microcomputer teaching lab, a ceremonial 
room on the top floor of the tower, and floor-to-ceiling windows with a view of 
historic Davidge Hall. 

Collections, including audiovisuals, are located in selected professional 
schools. These special collections are located in the School of Medicine Learning 
Resources Center, Woodward VA Hospital Library, Dental School Independent 
Learning Center, School of Nursing Media Center, and Law School Media Ser- 
vices Library. 

Serving all schools on campus and the University of Maryland Medical Sys- 
tem, the library contains more than 338,477 volumes, including over 2,319 
periodicals. It is among the 25 largest health sciences libraries in the country. 

In addition to traditional services, such as reference support and interlibrary 
loan, the HS/HSL offers an array of services. For more information, call 
410-706-7996 or visit the HS/HSL home page at www.hshsl.nmaryland.edu. 



The University of Maryland 



STUDENT AND EMPLOYEE HEALTH 



Student and Employee Health provides comprehensive health care to students. 
The office is located at the University Family Practice, 29 S. Paca St. Staffed by 
family physicians and nurse practitioners, the office is open Monday, Tuesday, 
and Thursday, from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., and Wednesday and Friday, from 8 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. 

Patients are generally seen by appointment (by calling 410-328-6645), 
although true emergencies can be seen on a walk-in basis. Doctors on call can be 
reached at 410-328-8792. The doctor on call will arrange for examination and 
care of students needing after-hours care. 

Gynecological services, including health maintenance (Pap smears, etc.), fam- 
ily planning, and routine procedures, are provided by either the family physicians 
or the nurse practitioners. Birth control pills are available at a reduced cost for 
students receiving their GYN care through Student and Employee Health. Stu- 
dents' families also may receive care at this office through Family Medicine 
Associates, the clinical practice of the School of Medicine's Department of Family 
Medicine. For an appointment, call 410-328-6645; for information, call 410- 
328-8792. 

All full-time students must have health insurance. An insurance policy provid- 
ing wide coverage, including obstetrical care, is available through the University. 
The cost of most of the care provided at Student and Employee Health is covered 
largely by the student health fee. 

Hepatitis B is an occupational illness for health care providers. It has serious 
consequences and can even be fatal. Immunization against Hepatitis B is required 
for pharmacy, medical, medical technology, dental, dental hygiene, and nursing 
students. The series of three immunizations is given through Student and 
Employee Health. 

The staff of Student and Employee Health maintain strict confidentiality; no 
medical or other information is given to any source without the student's written 
permission. Students are required to provide documentation that they have 
received immunization against several diseases. For a list of diseases, contact Stu- 
dent and Employee Health. 



COUNSELING CENTER 



The Counseling Center provides services to all students and staff and faculty 
members. Services provided include individual counseling, couples counsel- 
ing, psychiatric consultation, and medication management. All services are 
confidential. 

The professional staff includes social workers, a psychologist, psychiatrists, 
and a substance abuse specialist. The Counseling Center is not a training site for 
students. The staff provides free services, including individual and couples coun- 
seling, psychiatric consultation, medication management, assistance with 
substance abuse problems, and up to 16 mental health visits. 



School of Pharmacy 



All students registered at the University pay a student mental health fee as part 
of their tuition and are eligible to take advantage of the Counseling Center's ser- 
vices. Costs associated with seeing a therapist usually are covered by health 
insurance; however, no one is ever denied services based on inability to pay. 

The center tries to accommodate students' class schedules. Students can call 
the center at 410-328-8404 for an appointment. The center is in the Baltimore 
Student Union at 621 W. Lombard St., Suite 218. The hours are 8:30 a.m. to 
5 p.m., Monday through Friday, and two evenings until 7 p.m. Messages left 
on voice mail after normal office hours will be returned the next business day. 
For mental health emergencies after hours, call Student and Employee Health at 
410-328-8792. 



PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION 

Campus parking is available to students. Commuter students must obtain a park- 
ing permit which costs $1. The permit allows for parking on campus but does 
not guarantee a parking space. Commuters can park at the Lexington Garage 
(Lexington and Pine streets) and Koester's open lot (Lexington and Arch streets) 
for $3.50 per day. Parking is on a first-come, first-served basis. When spaces are 
unavailable, students will be directed to other lots. 

Students who live on campus pay for parking by the semester or year and are 
guaranteed 24-hour parking in a garage adjacent to their residence facility. For 
more information about campus parking, write Parking and Commuter Services, 
University of Maryland, 622 W. Fayette St., Baltimore, MD 21201, call 
410-706-6603, or go online to www.parking.umaryland.edu. 

The campus also sponsors a "Caravan" shuttle bus service that transports 
students from designated areas on campus to the main parking facilities and to 
several nearby neighborhoods. The service is free to students, faculty, and staff 
with University ID. For more information about the schedule, call 410-706- 
CVAN (2826), visit www.umbc.edu/transit/caravan/htm, or call the University's 
student services office for the schedule and routes (410-706-7117/7714 
voice/TTD). The Caravan does not run when the University is closed due to 
inclement weather. Call 410-706-8622 for the latest, most reliable information 
on campus closings. 

Public transportation makes the campus accessible by bus, subway and light 
rail. A number of Mass Transit Authority bus routes serve the campus. For more 
information, call the MTA at 410-539-5000. The Baltimore Metro Subway runs 
from Owings Mills to the Johns Hopkins medical institutions. Stops closest to 
campus are at Lexington Market and Charles Center. For more information, call 
the MTA number above. The Light Rail runs from northern Baltimore County 
to Glen Burnie and the BWI Airport. The stop closest to the University is at Bal- 
timore Street. The Maryland commuter train service (MARC) runs from 
Camden Station, 301 W. Camden St., to Washington, D.C. For more informa- 
tion, call 800-325-7245. The Amtrak train stops at Penn Station, 1500 N. 
Charles St. at Mt. Royal Ave. For more information, call 800-523-8720. 



The University of Maryland 



LIVING IN BALTIMORE 



Baltimore is a fun, friendly city with many affordable and convenient housing 
options. The Residence Life Office is structured to provide University students 
and affiliates with the information they need to find suitable living arrangements 
both on campus or off campus. The Residence Life Office is located in Room 
122 of the Baltimore Student Union. For more information, call 410-706-7766 
or visit www.housing.umaryland.edu. 

On-campus housing includes two University complexes — the Baltimore Stu- 
dent Union and Pascault Row Apartments — featuring apartments and 
dormitory-style rooms as well as unfurnished apartments in a half-dozen privately 
owned loft-district buildings on campus. For more information, call the number 
above or visit www.housing.umaryland.edu/oncampu5.ht7n. 

The University's off-campus housing program is a self-service program 
designed to help students and University affiliates identify housing options con- 
venient to the University. Although this program is coordinated by University 
personnel, it is offered only as a convenient way to facilitate the housing search. 
The University does not inspect the properties listed through this program and, 
therefore, strongly encourages individuals to personally do so before signing 
a lease. Finally, the University has no relationship with the property owners, 
landlords, or realtors that list property through this program. For more informa- 
tion about off-campus housing, call 410-706-8087 or visit www.housing. 
umaryland. edu/offcampus. htm. 



THE CITY OF BALTIMORE 



In addition to professional opportunities, Baltimore offers a stimulating environ- 
ment in which to live and study. Several blocks from the campus is the nationally 
acclaimed Inner Harbor area, where Harborplace, the National Aquarium, the 
Maryland Science Center, and other facilities share an attractive waterfront with 
sailboats, hotels, restaurants, and townhouses. The Baltimore Metro Subway, 
Light Rail, and buses link downtown with the suburbs. 

Baltimore boasts lively entertainment, world-class museums, fine music, and 
professional theaters. For sports fans, Baltimore features Orioles baseball. Ravens 
football, and the Baltimore Bayhawks major-league lacrosse team. Oriole Park at 
Camden Yards and the Ravens' stadium are a few blocks from campus. The 
nearby Chesapeake Bay offers unparalleled water sports and the seafood for 
which the region is famous. For more information about Baltimore, visit 
www.livebaltimore.com or www.colltown.org. 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



CLOSE TO WASHINGTON, D.C. 



The campus is located 50 miles north of the nation's capital — home to many 
national professional organizations, including the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy and the American Pharmaceutical Association. The 
School's proximity to the District of Columbia offers numerous opportunities for 
students and faculty members to participate in health care policy and research 
programs or activities. Many students complete their experiential rotations with 
these organizations. An economic, political, and cultural center, Washington also 
affords many researchers access to some of the world's best libraries, including the 
Library of Congress and the National Library of Medicine. 

Washington also offers countless sightseeing opportunities. Visitors to the 
city of monuments, memorials, and museums frequent historic landmarks such 
as the Capitol, the White House, and Ford's Theater, as well as explore the 
Smithsonian Museums or the National Zoo. Washington is also served by an 
excellent public transportation system. For more information about Washington, 
visit www.district-of-columbia.com. 



The University of Maryland 



Doctor of Pharmacy 
(PharmD) Program 



The Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program at the University of Maryland has 
been developed in partnership with practitioners from all areas of pharmacy and 
emphasizes problem solving, critical thinking, patient-focused content, and expe- 
riential opportunities across the breadth of practice. Due in part to this 
innovative curriculum, the School is ranked seventh among the nation's 84 phar- 
macy schools. In addition to the full-time day PharmD program, the School 
offers a Nontraditional PharmD Pathway as a mechanism for licensed, practicing 
pharmacists to earn the PharmD degree. The School uses a rolling admissions 
process. Information about the PharmD program can be viewed on the Schools 
Web site: www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu. 



GOALS OF THE DOCTOR OF PHARMACY CURRICULUM 

The goals and objectives of the PharmD program are consistent with the 
School's strategic plan: 

• The School of Pharmacy seeks to help individuals gain the knowledge 
and skills necessary to begin pharmacy practice, and in so doing, accept 
and perform professional responsibilities with competence. Graduates 
should have the ability to adapt their practice to the changing health 
care system and should be prepared to engage in a continuing program 
of professional development. 

• The professional curricula will be innovative and flexible, based on 
strong basic sciences, have extensive clinical content taught by practice- 
based faculty members and emphasize the development of problem 
solving and collaborative skills. The curricula also will provide the 
opportunity for advanced professional and clinical education. 

• The School seeks to create an educational community that extends 
beyond traditional classroom sites and offers students and faculty 
members a variety of learning environments. These will include cultural 
and interprofessional programs which broaden the experiences of our 
graduates. 



School of Pharmacy 



GENERAL ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 



Admissions and application information for the PharmD Program may be 
obtained by calling 410-706-7653 or 800-852-2988 or by writing to the School 
of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 20 N. Pine St., Room 224, Baltimore, MD 
21201-1180, ATTN: Admissions. For students interested in the Nontraditional 
PharmD Pathway, the address is School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 20 
N. Pine St., Room 224, Baltimore, MD 21201-1 180, ATTN: Nontraditional 
Pathway. 

Inquiries about the admissions process may be sent by e-mail to PharmD 
help@rx.umaryland.edu. The admission, application, and programs information 
for the PharmD programs are as follows: 

Admissions Information 

An admissions committee comprised of faculty members and students reviews 
official transcripts and PCAT results to make admissions decisions. Applicants 
with strong academic credentials and PCAT scores are invited to interview with 
faculty members, alumni, and students. During the interview, the applicant is 
assessed on factors such as professional and social awareness, verbal and written 
communication skills, integrity, maturity, and motivation. Following the inter- 
view, the admissions committee makes a decision based on the applicants' 
academic achievement, PCAT scores, and qualities evaluated during the inter- 
view. Academic achievement and/or high PCAT scores do not, in themselves, 
ensure acceptance. 

While a minimum GPA of 2.5 (A — 4.0) is required for admissions consider- 
ation, the average entering GPA of the fall 2000 first-year PharmD students was 
3.5. Average PCAT scores of admitted students were above the 80th percentile in 
each of the five areas of the exam. Competition for admission is high, and appli- 
cants with GPAs below 2.9 have an extremely low probability of admission. All 
applicants must present evidence (via official transcripts) of having completed the 
prepharmacy coursework with grades of at least a C or better. 



PREPHARMACY COURSEWORK 

Applicants must complete a minimum of 63 semester hours of coursework of 
pharmacy prerequisites for admission into the PharmD program. At least one 
semester of this coursework must be taken at an accredited institution in the 
United States. To enroll in prepharmacy coursework, applicants must apply 
directly to an accredited college or university, not to the School of Pharmacy. 
Most institutions have designated prepharmacy programs and advisors. The 
School of Pharmacy does not provide any specific information regarding course con- 
tent and/or requirements for admission into these prepharmacy programs. 
Prerequisites for admission into the PharmD program are as follows: 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



TYPICAL # OF TYPICAL # OF 

COURSE SEMESTERS CREDIT HOURS 



English (Comp/Lit) 




6 


Calculus 




4 


Statistics 




3 


Biology 




4 


Microbiology 




4 


General Chemistry 




8 


Organic Chemistry 




8 


Physics 




8 


Humanities/Social Sciences 




18 



TOTAL 63 minimum 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENT APPLICANTS 

International student applicants must follow the procedure described above to 
apply for admission to the PharmD program. Additionally, students who are not 
citizens or permanent residents of the United States must submit the results of 
the TOEFL, certified official copies of transcripts, a statement of financial sup- 
port, a supplementary information sheet, and a summary of educational 
experiences. These must be submitted with the application and the application 
fee to the office of records and registration. International students are also 
required to take the PCAT Therefore, it is essential that international students 
start the admissions process early. 

The School does not accept applicants who have attended only a foreign edu- 
cational institution. The School, due to its small size, cannot adequately certify 
international credentials and relics on the evaluation performed by other institu- 
tions. In addition, experience shows that international students benefit from 
taking courses at other U.S. institutions before entering our program. Interna- 
tional students should be familiar with the rules and regulations of the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service, which grants admission to the United 
States. 



INTERNATIONAL PHARMACIST APPLICANTS 



International pharmacists are also eligible to apply to the School's PharmD pro- 
gram and then upon graduation become eligible to complete state licensure 
exams. Credit may be given for equivalent coursework previously completed with 
a grade of C or better. Credit may be awarded after an evaluation of the course 
and an assessment of student knowledge by the coursemastcr Based on the struc- 
ture of the curriculum, incernational pharmacists typically enter the first or 



School of Pharmacy 



second professional year of the four-year PharmD program. Admission is based 
on an evaluation of applicant credentials by the admissions committee. Interna- 
tional pharmacists are encouraged to take the PCAT exam to assess background 
knowledge. 



APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

Applicants must follow the procedure described below to apply to the PharmD. 
Application forms are typically available in August for the following academic 
year. To apply, applicants should follow the procedure below: 

• Request an application from www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu, call 
410-706-7653/800-852-2988, or write to the following address for an 
application and other admissions information: 

School of Pharmacy 
University of Maryland 
20 N.Pine St. 

Baltimore, MD 21201-1180 
ATTN: ADMISSIONS. 

• Submit a completed application and materials by the deadlines: 

March 1 Application 

May 1 Transcripts and PCAT scores 

• Submit official transcript(s) from all higher education institutions 
attended. Prepharmacy coursework must be completed before the start 
of classes in the fall semester of application with a grade of C or better. 

• Submit the required nonrefundable application fee. Make check payable 
to: University of Maryland. 

• Take the Pharmacy College Admission Test in October or January and 
forward the scores to the School. Applicants may request a PCAT appli- 
cation at the phone number or address above. 



PHARMD PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The four-year Doctor of Pharmacy program is divided into six levels: Funda- 
mentals, Basic Science, Pharmaceutical Science, Integrated Sciences and 
Therapeutics, Experiential Learning, and Curriculum Practice Interface. The aca- 
demic focus of each level is described below: 

Level I: Fundamentals 

Students entering the PharmD program have diverse educational and life experi- 
ences. Level I addresses these diversities with introductory courses covering the 
concept and scope of pharmaceutical care, pharmacy practice in general, and the 
variety of disciplines that will contribute to pharmaceutical education. Students 
are provided the skills and scientific principles and concepts fundamental to 

Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 2 1 



subsequent curricular experiences. Students develop professional attitudes and 
behaviors that extend throughout the curriculum. 

Level II: Basic Sciences 

During Level II of the curriculum, students build on the fundamentals of Level I 
through a comprehensive examination of basic biological, chemical, physical, 
social, and behavioral sciences. These elements provide the foundation for under- 
standing pharmaceutical sciences and the complexities of drug action and use. 

Level III: Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Level III addresses pharmaceutical science content areas as they relate to the 
needs of patients in the total health care environment. The provider of pharma- 
ceutical care must possess a detailed and comprehensive understanding of the 
physical, chemical, biological, and psychosocial factors affecting the outcomes of 
drug therapy in specific patients with specific diseases. 

Level IV: Integrated Sciences and Therapeutics 

Level IV addresses the extensive interweaving of basic pharmaceutical and clinical 
science as well as the interrelated bodies of knowledge involved in total pharma- 
ceutical care. Students build upon their basic and pharmaceutical science 
background as they actively participate in a variety of didactic and laboratory 
experiences to design, implement, manage, and monitor individualized pharma- 
ceutical care plans. Students learn to appreciate that the successful outcomes of 
drug therapies depend on complex physical, chemical, biological, and psychoso- 
cial interactions within human systems, and therefore require individualized 
attention to patients during the design and delivery of pharmaceutical care. This 
application of these principles is taught by presenting diseases of different body 
systems within the broader context of public health, epidemiology, prescriber 
education, disease prevention, and health promotion issues. 

Three progressive components are used to present each disease. The first com- 
ponent reviews the drugs and biologicals used to treat specific disease processes 
and emphasizes comparative features underlying the choice of agent (Pharmaco- 
dynamics and Pharmacokinetics). Chemical properties, such as solubility and 
stability, that determine the choice and use of the products, are discussed (Bio- 
medicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutics). The availability and comparative 
advantages of drug dosage formulations and delivery systems are considered as 
they relate to the optimum use of drug products during acute or chronic care 
(Biopharmaceutics). 

The second component illustrates how the links between the scientific knowl- 
edge of the disease, available drug products, and the variables underlying a 
particular patient's condition are important to developing the most appropriate 
therapeutic plan. Methods for the choice of drug products, definition of specific 
goals of therapy, including how to assess whether these goals are being achieved, 
and active intervention steps to ensure successful outcomes of drug therapy, are 
developed (Therapeutics). Methods for monitoring, identifying, and responding 
to untoward consequences of drug therapy are identified (Toxicology and Adverse 



School of Pharmacy 



ll 



Drug Reactions). The choice and design of specific acute and chronic drug ther- 
apy, the impact of a variety of patient-related variables on dosage regimens, and 
the modification of dosage regimens in response to changing patient needs are 
developed (Clinical Pharmacokinetics). Students develop skills as they practice 
counseling patients about their therapeutic plans in particular and providing 
health education in general (Counseling and Education). 

The third component links the knowledge base of the first two components 
with appropriate ongoing methods for drug use review, medical audits, and cost 
considerations. The emphasis is on identifying specific interventions to improve 
prescribing patterns and reduce the cost of health care (Drug Use Evaluation). 

Level V: Experiential Learning 

Experiential learning is a series of structured learning and training activities dur- 
ing which students work under the supervision of experienced clinical and 
academic faculty in a variety of health care settings. Students obtain and apply 
knowledge and skills necessary for successful delivery of pharmaceutical care and 
develop competence, confidence, and maturity as responsible professionals. An 
innovative feature of the program is that experiential learning activities occur 
throughout the curriculum and are linked to didactic courses. A total of 33 cred- 
its in experiential courses (approximately 1,600 hours) are required for the 
Doctor of Pharmacy degree. All students must complete at least 24 credits (1,100 
hours) of experience devoted to pharmaceutical patient care. Successful comple- 
tion of the experiential learning portion of the School's curriculum is accepted by 
the Maryland Board of Pharmacy as meeting the internship requirements to sit 
for the NABPLEX licensure examination. 

The Experiential Learning portion of the PharmD curriculum is organized 
into the six phases described below: 

Phase 1: Introduction to Professional Pharmacy Practice. This early prac- 
tice experience introduces students to the professional responsibilities of 
pharmacists in a variety of practice environments, including community, hospi- 
tal, and specialty settings. Students will also examine the spectrum of career 
opportunities available to today's pharmacist and begin developing basic practice 
skills. 

Phase 2: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care. During the second and third 
years of the curriculum, students observe and participate in the delivery of phar- 
maceutical care to patients. For each course, students follow the changing needs 
of a patient for one year within the context of the total health care system. 
Through direct patient encounters and discussion sessions, students learn to 
assess health status, communicate effectively, and determine pharmaceutical care 
needs from a holistic perspective. These activities are linked to material covered 
in the didactic curriculum. 

Phase 3: Safe Medication Order Processing. Activities during this phase 
develop students' competency and proficiency in the technical functions of drug 
dispensing and distribution in institutional and community pharmacy settings. 
Students learn to receive, interpret, and verify the appropriateness of prescription 
orders and to efficiently dispense a variety of manufactured and compounded 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



Experiential Learning Map 



Elective Experiences 

Minimum of 8 Credits 



Pharmaceutical Care 

Community 
Institutional 
Clinics 
Alternative Practice 



Information 
Services 




Safe IVIedication 
Order Processing 

Community 
Institutional 



Longitudinal Care II 
Longitudinal Care I 



Introduction to 
Professional Practice 



medications. Emphasis is placed on communication, prevention of medication 
errors, the role of technology, and supervision of ancillary personnel in the med- 
ication order process. 

Phase 4: Pharmaceutical Care. Students gain experience in the delivery of 
pharmaceutical care in a variety of practice environments, including community- 
based and acute-care hospital pharmacies, as well as ambulatory primary care and 
interdi-sciplinary clinics. Through daily encounters with patients and other health 
care providers, students learn to collect patient-specific data, identify and assess 
drug-related problems, develop monitoring plans, and measure therapy out- 
comes. Further, students learn to educate patients and health care professionals 
regarding the appropriate use of drugs. 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



Phase 5: Informational Services. Activities during this phase, which occurs 
simultaneously with Phase 4, require students to provide drug information in 
the context of dehvering pharmaceutical care. Students learn to receive a question 
in a comprehensive fashion, thoroughly analyze and research questions, and pro- 
vide appropriate answers ro other health care providers and to patients and their 
families. 

Phase 6: Elective Experiences. Elective rotations allow students to pursue 
their own areas of interest. Electives in general practice environments enable stu- 
dents to develop greater skill, proficiency, and confidence. Electives in specialty 
pharmacotherapeutic practice areas, alternative forms of advanced practice man- 
agement, and research afford opportunities to explore a variety of practice 
options. This phase is linked to a senior colloquium. 

Student's performance during all six phases is evaluated by both clinical and 
academic faculty. Experiential rotations are not permitted at sites where stu- 
dents are working for pay or where any other conflict of interest situation 
may exist. 

Level VI: Curriculum Practice Interface 

The sixth and final level of the curriculum contains a variety of educational expe- 
riences for students about to enter practice. Required and elective content areas 
provide the curricular-based interface with pharmacy practice that builds on the 
preceding didactic and experiential components of the curriculum. The capstone 
nature of this interface reflects the acquisition and appreciation of information 
that: 

• is on the cutting edge of pharmacy practice, 

• represents closing options for individual curricular pathways, or 

• helps prepare students for a post-graduate education. 

Students learning at the interface are expected to be under continual change 
and development. One goal of this level is to allow each senior student, following 
completion of his or her experiential components, time to consider an individual 
practice in the context of the total health care environment. An important part of 
this interface, therefore, is the opportunity for students to reflect interactively 
upon their educational experiences with fellow students, faculty members, and 
practitioners. 

In the curriculum, students are trained to perform well at the patient level as 
well as the health system level. For example, on the patient level, students become 
active participants in the development of patient therapeutic plans. They select 
appropriate dosage forms, routes of administration, and dosage schedules. They 
prepare medications for patient use, counsel patients, maximize patient adher- 
ence to drug therapy, and assess therapeutic objectives. On the system level, 
students participate in medication-use process with other health care providers, 
assist patients in public health education programs, monitor pharmacoeconomic 
and pharmacoepidemiology issues in health care delivery, and participate in the 
formation of health policy. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



CURRICULUM PATHWAYS AND ELECTIVES 

The central curricular theme, primary pharmaceutical care, encompasses the edu- 
cational experiences common to all students in the program. All students must 
successfully complete the required core curriculum, which prepares them for 
competent performance of basic pharmaceutical care in a variety of professional 
and practice settings. To supplement the required core curriculum, students take 
more than 21 percent (28 credits) of the four-year curriculum from the didactic 
and experiential electives. This portion of the curriculum provides students with 
an opportunity for flexible programming of their educational experiences. In col- 
laboration with their academic advisors, students use electives to develop a Plan 
of Study that is consistent with their personal interests and career goals. Student's 
Plan of Study is used to enhance their general practice of pharmaceutical care, to 
focus on a particular area of practice, or to prepare for post-graduate studies. 

Students may select freely from elective options to design their Plan of Study or 
may choose one of five model pathways Aes'igntA to enhance their preparation for 
common areas of interest. The model pathways generally account for 16 to 18 of 
the 28 elective credits required for the degree. Therefore, students' selection of a 
model pathway still provides them considerable flexibility in selection of addi- 
tional electives. 

Faculty pathway coordinators, who design and maintain the integrity of the 
pathways, and faculty advisors with expertise in each pathway area serve as con- 
sultants to students for information on career opportunities resulting from a 
particular pathway. Students have freedom of choice in selecting a pathway. Stu- 
dents, not choosing to take all courses in a specific pathway, can select elective 
courses from multiple pathways as part of their personal Plan of Study, provided 
they complete the appropriate prerequisites. Faculty have developed the following 
five model pathways: 



ADVANCED PHARMAC Y PRA CTICE 

The goal of this pathway is to prepare students to implement pharmaceutical care 
in a variety of practice settings. This pathway provides a series of didactic and 
experiential courses designed to enhance competence in delivering pharmaceuti- 
cal care in general practice and in delivering health care to special populations 
such as the elderly; to enhance knowledge of special pharmaceutical products, 
business and managerial skills needed to successfully deliver new services; and to 
provide experience in applying these professional and managerial skills in a vari- 
ety of advanced practice settings. 



GERIATRIC PHARMACY PRACTICE 



This pathway is designed to prepare graduates to work with older individuals in a 
variety of practice settings or pursue advanced degrees (PhD, MPH) or training 

26 School of Pharmacy 



I 



(fellowships, residencies) in the area ot geriatrics or gerontology. By completing 
this pathway, graduates will learn essential principles to manage medication- 
related issues as well as understand the complexities in caring for the elderly. 
Outcomes are to develop a database of current students and graduates focusing in 
the area of geriatrics. Students selecting this pathway must complete 12 credits: 
the core 5 credits of didactic electives, 4 credits of other geriatric-focused electives 
or special projects, and 3 credits of geriatric-focused geriatric rotations. 



MANAGEMENT 

This pathway is designed to prepare students for management careers in corpo- 
rate pharmacy, to develop entrepreneurial capabilities, and to prepare students for 
post-PharmD management residencies and/or MBA programs. Students take a 
series of didactic and experiential courses in personal management, practice man- 
agement, organizational behavior, financial reporting and analysis, marketing, 
and working with managers in health care settings. 



PHARMACOTHERAPY 

The goal of this pathway is to enhance students' ability to independently 
optimize, implement, and monitor drug therapy in patients with complex health 
problems. This pathway offers a series of didactic seminar courses in pharma- 
cotherapy and advanced therapeutics, coupled with advanced clinical 
experiences. The clinical experiences involve direct drug therapy management 
of patients in general medical and sub-specialty environments. Students com- 
pleting this pathway are encouraged to pursue post-PharmD training in 
residencies and fellowships and to eventually pursue specialty board certification 
in pharmacotherapy. 



RESEARCH 

The goal of this pathway is to expose students to research and better prepare 
them for graduate studies or postgraduate fellowships. Students selecting this 
pathway take courses in advanced educational opportunities and advanced semi- 
nar courses in selected scientific areas. They receive research experiences, working 
directly with faculty scientists, and take a senior colloquium. Students are also 
encouraged to pursue the PharmD/PhD dual degree program (see the "PharmD 
Dual Degree Programs" section). 



PHARMD PROGRAM SUMMARY 

The faculty continue to revise the curriculum based on the dynamics of phar- 
macy education, the needs of practice, and the students. The exact nature of the 

Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 27 



curriculum may vary from class to class. The following describes the PharmD 
curriculum bv semester. 



COURSEWORK 


MINIMUM SEMESTER CREDITS 


Didactic 


99 credits 


79 Required 


20 Elective 


Experiential 


33 credits 


25 Required 


8 Elective 



TOTAL 132 credits 

Coursework by Semester 

The outline below suggests when electives can be taken. Electives can be taken 
during most fall, winter, spring, and summer semesters. The following outlines 
the curriculum for the current and future classes by semester. 



Proposed Transition Curricul 


urn for Fall 2001 -Spring 2003 




For the Class of 2005 




For the Class of 2006 




FALL 200! CREDITS 


FALL 2002 CREDITS 


FIRST-YEAR COURSES 




FIRST-YEAR COURSES 




PHAR 5 1 — Biochemistry 


3 


PHAR 5 1 — Biochemistry 


3 


PHAR 5 1 3— Drug Chemistry 


2 


PHAR 5 1 3— Drug Chemistry 


2 


PHAR 514— Human Biology 1 


3 


PHAR 5 1 4— Human Biology i 


3 


PHAR 5 1 6— Pharmacy Prac & Educ 


2 


PHAR 5 1 6— Pharmacy Prac & Educ 


2 


PHAR 522— Context of Health Care 


3 


PHAR 522— Context of Health Care 


3 


PHAR 523— Ethics in Pharmacy 




PHAR 523— Ediics in Pharmacy 




Practice 


1 


Practice 


1 


PHPC 5 1 0— Intro to Professional 




PHAR 526— Physical Chemistry 


2 


Practice 1 


1 


PHPC 510 — Intro to Professional 
Practice 1 


1 



17 



SPRING 2002 CREDITS 


SPRING 2003 CREDITS 


FIRST-YEAR COURSES 




FIRST-YEAR COURSES 




PHAR 5 1 7— Study Design 




PHAR 520— Molecular Biology 




PHAR 520— Molecular Biology 




PHAR 524— Human Biology II 




PHAR 524— Human Biology II 




PHAR 531 — Pharmaceutical Chemistry 




PHAR 525— Immunology 




PHAR 537— Principles of Drug Action 




PHAR 526— Physical Chemistry 




PHAR 54 1 — Biopharmaceutics/Kinetics 




PHAR 537— Principles of Drug Act 




PHPC 520— Intro to Professional 




PHPC 520— Intro to Professional 




Practice II 


1 


Practice II 




Didactic Electives 


2 


Didactic Electives 








TOTAL 


17 




16 



School of Pharmacy 



a 



FALL 2002 CREDITS 


FALL 2003 CREDITS 


SECOND-YEAR COURSES 


SECOND-YEAR COURSES 


PHAR 530— Microbiology/Antibiotics 1 3 


PHAR 5 17— Study Design 2 


PH AR 53 1 —Pharmaceutical Chem 2 


PHAR 525— immunology 2 


PHAR 532 — Patient Assessment 1 


PHAR 530— Microbiology/Antibiotics 1 2 


PHAR 534— Human Biology III 3 


PHAR 532— Patient Assessment 1 


PHAR 536— Pharmacology 1 3 


PHAR 533— Medicinal Chemistry 1 1 


PHAR 541 — Biopharmaceutics/Kinetics 3 


PHAR 534— Human Biology III 3 


Didactic Electives 2 


PHAR 536— Pharmacology 1 3 




Didactic Electives 2 


TOTAL 1 7 


16 



SPRING 2003 CREDITS 


SPRING 2004 CREDITS 


SECOND-YEAR COURSES 




SECOND-YEAR COURSES 


PHAR 535— Pharmaceutics 


3 


PHAR 535— Pharmaceutics 3 


PHAR 540— Microbiology/Antibiotics 1 


1 


PHAR 540— Microbiology/Antibiotics II 2 


PHAR 542— Clinical Chemistry 


1 


PHAR 542— Clinical Chemistry 1 


PHAR 544— Medicinal Chemistry 


3 


PHAR 543— Medicinal Chemistry II 2 


PHAR 545 — Practice Management 


3 


PHAR 545— Practice Management 3 


PHAR 546— Pharmacology II 


3 


PHAR 546— Pharmacology II 3 


PHPC 532 — Longitudinal Care 


1 


PHPC 532— Longitudinal Care 1 


Didactic Electives 


2 


Didactic Electives 2 


TOTAL 


17 


17 



For the Classes of 2002. 2003. 2004 



SEMESTER ONE 


CREDITS 


PHAR 51 1— Biochemistry 


3 


PHAR 5 1 2— Cell Biology 


2 


PHAR 5 13— Drug Chemistry 


2 


PHAR 5 14— Human Biology 1 


3 


PHAR 5 1 5— Personal Management 1 


PHAR 516 — Pharmacy Practice and Education 


3 


PHAR 5 1 7— Study Design and Analysis 


2 



TOTAL 



16 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



SEMESTER TWO 


CREDITS 


PHAR 521— Biology Chemistry II 


3 


PHAR 522— Context of Health Care 


3 


PHAR 523 — Ethics in Pharmacy Practice 1 


PHAR 524— Human Biology II 


3 


PHAR 525 — Immunology 


2 


PHAR 526^Physical Chemistry 


2 


PHPC 527— Introduction to Professional Practice 1 


Didactic Electives 


2 


TOTAL 
SEMESTER THREE 


17 
CREDITS 


PHAR 530— Microbiology/Antibiotics 1 


3 


PHAR 531— Pharmaceutical Chemistry 


2 


PHAR 534— Human Biology III 


3 


PHAR 536— Pharmacology 1 


3 


PHAR 537 — Principles of Drug Action 


2 


PHAR 541 — Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics 


3 


Didactic Electives 


2 


TOTAL 
SEMESTER FOUR 


18 
CREDITS 


PHAR 535— Pharmaceutics 


3 


PHAR 540— Microbiology/Antibiotics II 1 


PHAR 542— Clinical Chemistry 1 


PHAR 544— Medicinal Chemistry 


3 


PHAR 545— Practice Management 


3 


PHAR 546— Pharmacology II 


3 


PHPC 532 — Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care 1 1 


Didactic Electives 


2 



TOTAL 



School of Pharmacy 



[| 



For all Years 



SEMESTER FIVE 


CREDITS 


PHAR 552— Principles of Human Nutrition 1 


PHAR 553 — Population Based Medical Information Analysis 


2 


PHAR 554 — Integrated Science/Therapeutics 1 


4 


PHAR 555 — Integrated Science/Therapeutics II 


4 


Didactic Electives 


4 


TOTAL 
SEMESTER SIX 


15 
CREDITS 


PHAR 564 — Integrated Science/Therapeutics III 


4 


PHAR 565 — Integrated Science/Therapeutics IV 


4 


PHPC 562— Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care II 1 


Didactic Electives 


6 



SEMESTER SEVEN 




CREDITS 


PHPC 570 — Safe Medication Order Processing in 


1 Community Pharmacy 




PHPC 571— Safe Medication Order Processing in 


1 Institutional Pharmacy 




PHPC 572— Pharmaceutical Care 1 






PHPC 573— Pharmaceutical Care II 






TOTAL 
SEMESTER EIGHT 




12 
CREDITS 


PHAR 580— Pharmacy Law 




2 


PHAR 58 1 —Senior Colloquium 1 


PHPC 574— Pharmaceutical Care III 




3 


PHPC 575— Pharmaceutical Care IV 




3 


PHPC 576— Ambulatory Clinic' 1 


PHPC 577 — Informational Services' 




2 


Experiential Electives^ 




8 


Didactic Electives 




4 


TOTAL 
GRAND TOTAL 


24 
132 MINIMUM CREDITS 



'Students cake concurrently with Pharmaceutical Care Rotations. 

^Students complete experiential rotations at various times during the year but 

register for the rotations in the semesters listed. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharnnD) Prograr 



NONTRADITIONAL PHARMD PATHWAY 



The Nontraditional PharmD (NTPD) Pathway is for Hcensed pharmacists who 
have a Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy degree and seek to earn the Doctor of 
Pharmacy degree. The admission, apphcation, and program information follows. 



ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 



To be considered for admission to the Nontraditional PharmD Pathway, BS 
pharmacists, including pharmacists who graduated from international institu- 
tions, must complete the application and admission requirements listed below. 
Once pharmacists have demonstrated that they meet those criteria, they will be 
considered for admission. A description of required documentation and other 
elements of the admissions process will be provided in the application packet. 
Because of the highly interactive nature of the pathway, the School cannot 
accommodate more than 60 new students each year. 

An admissions committee comprised of faculty and students reviews official 
transcripts and PCAT results to make admissions decisions. 



APPLICATION PROCEDURE 



Applicants must follow the procedure described below to apply to the Nontradi- 
tional PharmD Pathway. Application forms are typically available in August for 
the following academic year. To apply, applicants should follow the procedure 
below: 

• Request an application from www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu, call 
410-706-0761 or write: 

School of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland 

20 N. Pine St. 

Baltimore, MD 21201-1 180 

ATTN: Nontraditional PharmD Pathway 

• Request and submit a completed application by the deadline: 

July 1 Application 

August 1 All supporting documents 

• Submit the required nonrefundable application fee. Make check 
payable to: University of Maryland. 

• Must be licensed in Maryland, the District of Columbia, or an adjacent 
state. 



School of Pharmacy 



Must practice in Maryland, the District of Columbia, or areas of sur- 
rounding states to have access to the pathway's mentoring system. 
Must provide confirmation of access to patients to meet pathway 
requirements. 



PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Nontraditional PharmD (NTPD) Pathway is for licensed pharmacists who 
have a Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy degree and seek to earn the Doctor of 
Pharmacy degree. All graduates will be required to meet the terminal perfor- 
mance outcomes of the School's PharmD program, with at least 30 credits of 
coursework. Since each nontraditional student brings to the program a different 
level of practical experience, knowledge and skills developed throughout a prac- 
tice career, a system of Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) has been developed to 
individualize a program of study and award up to 10 credits when appropriate. It 
should be noted that the awarding of credit through assessment of prior learning 
does not exempt a participant from responsibility for any of the process- or 
knowledge-based outcomes of the program. 

The foundation of the NTPD Pathway is the development of the knowledge, 
skills, and abilities for the delivery of pharmaceutical care. Credits in the NTPD 
Pathway may be earned by taking courses from a faculty-approved plan of study, 
through supervised experiential learning, by approved self-study or electives with 
appropriate assessment, and through PLA. Examples of required pathway courses 
include Principles of Pharmaceutical Care, Principles of Literature Evaluation, 
Medical Information Analysis, Patient Assessment, and in-depth Pharmacothera- 
peutics for prevalent diseases. In Practice Management, candidates will 
demonstrate the ability to assess resources, to fiscally and behaviorally manage a 
practice, to measure the value of service(s), to establish fees and reimbursement 
policies, and to market and promote pharmaceutical care services. 

Courses are offered at the University of Maryland in downtown Baltimore, 
and selected course content may be offered through distance education facilities 
in Maryland. Required classes are planned for the fall and spring semesters; how- 
ever, first-year students will always begin in the fall semester. Unless they have 
been approved for a leave of absence, students will be expected to enroll in at least 
one course each semester. Most students complete the program in three to four 
years; however, all 30 credits must be earned within seven years of initiation of 
coursework. 

Experiential Learning 

Experiential learning will be centered in the pharmacist's own practice site, under 
the supervision of a faculty mentor; one credit of clerkship experience is required 
at other sites. The faculty mentor will work closely with each pharmacist to iden- 
tify an appropriate mix of his or her own patients and to develop an experience 
component that will meet individual needs, satisfy pathway requirements, and 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



benefit patients. Beginning with the initial patient identified as a study case, stu- 
dents will learn to triage, develop explicit pharmaceutical care plans, and initiate 
the patient management process. To monitor progress and provide feedback to 
students, faculty mentors will use performance-based evaluation. 

While the central philosophy of the NTPD experiential learning component 
is to provide for an impact on patients in the pharmacist's own practice, it is 
anticipated that it will not always be possible to completely meet experiential 
learning objectives at that site. When it is necessary for exposure to the delivery of 
pharmaceutical care services at other practice sites, every effort will be made to 
schedule these visitations at convenient times. 



PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to coursework, the credit requirements of the NTPD may be partially 
met through the following three options: 

Transfer Credits 

NTPD students may transfer up to six credit hours of previous coursework to 
meet the NTPD pathway requirements. This coursework must have been com- 
pleted after the pharmacist received his or her BS degree and must have been 
earned at an accredited university. The coursework must also relate directly to 
curricular components of the NTPD pathway. Identification of potential transfer 
courses is done at the time of admission, or later if appropriate, through consulta- 
tion between the student and the NTPD pathway director. (Note: It is not 
possible to obtain additional PLA credit for transfer courses.) 

Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) 

The Prior Learning Assessment process provides a mechanism through which stu- 
dents may earn credit for the knowledge and experience they bring to the 
program. To be eligible for PLA credit, students must complete the PLA course 
and provide their portfolio for PLA panel evaluation and faculty approval of the 
credit recommendation from the panel. The PLA panel is comprised of School 
faculty members and pharmacy practitioners. Students may earn a maximum of 
10 credits through this process. Credits are partitioned into four areas: Practice 
Management Planning (0-1), Community/Institutional Pharmaceutical Care (0- 
1), Pharmacotherapeutics (0-4), and Practice Management (0-4). These tour 
areas correspond directly to curricular components. 

Credit by Examination 

The University permits a credit-by-examination process for a course. Information 
about the test-out option is provided by each coursemaster. Students who suc- 
cessfully complete the entire course by examination may register for Credit by 
Examination in the specific area. Students pay a per-course fee, which varies 
according to residency status. Upon approval of the coursemaster, students who 
successfully complete a discrete section of the examination may not be required 



School of Pharmacy 



J 



CO attend all class sessions and/or modules. In this case, students must still register 
for the course and the results of the examination will be factored into the grade 
determination. For more information, students may call 410-706-0761 . 



PHARMD DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The School offers three dual degree programs for PharmD students who are 
interested in gaining specialized expertise in law, business administration, or 
research. Students apply to these programs in the second year of the PharmD 
program. The dual degree programs have separate admission requirements. The 
programs are briefly described below: 



PHARMD/JD PROGRAM 



The School offers a dual Doctor of Pharmacy/Juris Doctor degree program with 
the University of Maryland School of Law for students who wish to pursue the 
juris Doctor. The PharmD/JD program allows students to gain the requisite 
knowledge in legal skills in a variety of areas. Graduates of this program will be 
prepared for careers in a diverse range of health care and legal areas. PharmD stu- 
dents can use 16 credit hours obtained from the law curriculum to fulfill their 20 
hours of didactic pharmacy electives. Students could complete the dual degree 
program in six years. 

PharmD students must apply to the JD program and meet all admissions cri- 
teria, including submitting results of the LSAT, and adhere to the School of Law's 
procedures and deadlines. Admission is not guaranteed. For more information 
about the JD program, contact the School of Law at 410-706-3492 or e-mail 
admissions@law. umaryland. edu. 



PHARMD/MBA PROGRAM 



The School offers a dual Doctor of Pharmacy/Master of Business Administration 
program with the University of Baltimore Merrick School of Business for stu- 
dents who wish to pursue the Master of Business Administration degree. The 
PharmD/MBA program allows pharmacy students to take MBA courses as part 
of their PharmD curriculum. While in pharmacy school, PharmD students may 
complete 21 of the 51 credit hours required in the MBA program. 

PharmD students must apply to the MBA program; admission is not guaran- 
teed. Students wishing to apply to the MBA program must adhere to University 
of Baltimore (UB) procedures and deadlines. Students must also request that the 
University of Maryland's Office of Records and Registration send their official 
University of Maryland transcript and that the School of Pharmacy Office of 
Student Affairs send a copy of their prepharmacy transcripts to UB. Students 
applying to this dual program need the equivalent of a bachelor's degree (i.e.. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



either a degree or completion of four years of college). The grade point average 
for an entering MBA student is 3.0; however, a lower GPA may be offset by a 
higher score on a standardized test (e.g., GMAT, PCAT). For more information 
about MBA program admissions, contact the program director at the University 
of Baltimore at 410-837-4944. 



PHARMD/PHD PROGRAM 

The School offers dual Doctor of Pharmacy/Doctor of Philosophy programs in 
Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmaceutical Health Services Research to prepare 
comprehensively trained individuals with an interdisciplinary perspective on 
teaching and scientific research. The PharmD/PhD program is a cooperative 
effort between the PharmD curriculum and the graduate curricula of the Depart- 
ment of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Department of Pharmacy Practice and 
Science. The PharmD and PhD phases of the program run concurrently with 
minimal disruption of the academic content or sequencing of the PharmD com- 
ponent. This permits dual degree students to progress normally in the PharmD 
program and graduate with their class. To achieve this goal, students may take 
open vacation periods as well as Research Pathway electives and other elective 
options within the PharmD program and apply them toward meeting the 
requirements of the PhD degree. Students already in the PharmD program may 
be considered for admission to the dual degree program. Dual degree students 
can expect to complete their core graduate coursework and be ready for advance- 
ment to candidacy for the PhD degree by the time they complete the PharmD 
program. Students may complete the requirements for the award of both the 
PharmD and PhD degrees in six or seven years. 

Consideration for admission to the PhD degree program is contingent upon 
satisfying the admission requirements of the University of Maryland Graduate 
School. A bachelor's degree is generally required for admission to the graduate 
program. Applicants to the PhD programs will be evaluated on the following cri- 
teria: the quality of the academic record, standardized test scores (GRE scores of 
1600 or better, PCAT scores, and where applicable, TOEFL scores of at least 
600), letters of recommendation, interviews, compatibility between the students' 
career goals and the objectives of the PhD program, and a GPA of 3.0 or better. 

For more information about admissions to the PhD programs, contact the fol- 
lowing departments: Pharmaceutical Health Services Research in the Department 
of Pharmacy Practice and Science, call 410-706-7613 or e-mail dmuUins@rx. 
umaryland.edu. The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, call 410-706-0549 
or e-mail pscprog@rx.umaryland.edu. 



School of Pharmacy 



LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS 



Students who complete the PharmD degree satisfy the educational requirement 
for all state boards of pharmacy in the United States. Graduates are eligible to 
take state licensing exams in all states. For more information about licensure as a 
pharmacist in Maryland, graduates may contact the Maryland Board of Phar- 
macy at 4201 Patterson Ave., Baltimore, MD 21215-2299 or 410-764-4755. 

International pharmacists who have received their pharmacy degrees from 
non-U. S. institutions have two options to become licensed pharmacists in the 
United States. They can apply to the PharmD Program (see the International 
Pharmacist Applicants section of this catalog) or complete the Foreign Pharma- 
cists Equivalency Examination, which certifies the applicant for the board 
examination. Individuals taking this approach would not need to attend the 
School of Pharmacy. For more information, write or call the National Association 
of Boards of Pharmacy Foundation, Foreign Pharmacy Graduate Examination 
Committee, 700 Busse Highway, Park Ridge, IL 60068, 847-698-6227. 




Dr. Stuart Haines interviews a patient in an ambulatory care clinu. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Prograr 



Doctor of Philosophy Programs 



Applicants seeking advanced degrees, MS and PhD, in pharmaceutical sciences or 
pharmacy administration must apply to the University's Graduate School depart- 
ments. Interested applicants should also review the Graduate School catalog for 
more specific information about the MS and PhD programs. The PhD programs 
in pharmacy practice and science and pharmaceutical sciences are described as 
follows. Interested applicants may apply online at http : I I graduate. umaryland. 
edu/admissions.html or, if necessary, obtain an application form from the depart- 
ment to which they are applying. 

Opportunities are available for postgraduate study: residencies, postdoctoral 
fellowships, and other professional studies. Contact the department for specific 
information. 



PHARMACEUTICAL HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH PHD 
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The graduate program in Pharmaceutical Health Services Research seeks to train 
scholars and researchers in one of four major research areas: economics, epidemi- 
ology, behavioral/social sciences, or policy as it relates to the delivery, use, costs, 
and safety of pharmaceuticals and other health care products. Each student is 
required to select one research area or track of specialization in which they will 
take advanced courses and conduct their dissertation research. 

Graduates of the program will receive training to: 1) design and carry out 
pharmaceutical health services research based on strong training in research 
methodology, statistics, one or more pharmacy specialty areas, and a sound 
understanding of the U.S. health care system; 2) serve as a knowledgeable 
spokesperson to the public and private sectors of health care concerning pharma- 
ceutical health services research, practice research, and pharmacy-related policy 
issues; 3) interact with members of other health, social, and administrative disci- 
plines and initiate and/or collaborate in research endeavors related to 
pharmaceutical and other health services; and 4) be an effective teacher both in 
academic and nonacademic settings. 



PHARMACEUTICAL HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 
PROGRAM OVERVIEW 

The PhD graduate program in Pharmaceutical Health Services Research offers 
advanced training by faculty who are regional, national, and international leaders 
in the fields of pharmacocconomics, pharmacoepidemiology, pharmaceutical pol- 
icy, and the social and behavioral sciences. The specialized curriculum, with an 
emphasis on developing research skills, trains students for leadership roles in 
academia, government, industry, and consulting. 

38 School of Pharmacy 



ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 



Applicants to the Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Health Services 
Research should possess a bachelor's or master's degree from an accredited college 
or university. Applicants without a Bachelor of Science in pharmacy or a Doctor 
of Pharmacy degree will be considered, but, in general, preference will be given to 
candidates with previous pharmacy-related education and/or experience. 

Applicants must satisfy the general requirements of the University's Graduate 
School before consideration for admission to the program. The minimum stan- 
dard for admission to the Graduate School is a B average, or 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, in 
a program of study resulting in the award of a baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited college or university. 



APPLICATION PROCEDURE 



Applications to the graduate program in Pharmaceutical Health Services 
Research should be directed to the following address: Graduate School, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 621 W. Lombard St., Room 336, Baltimore, MD 21201; 
410-706-7131. An online application is available at httpJIgraduate.umaryland. 
eduladm_appinfo.htm. The following forms and/or documents are required for 
processing of an application by the Graduate School: 

• Application for admission (three copies) 

• Official transcripts (two copies) 

• Letters of recommendation (three letters) 

• Results of the Graduate Record Exam 

• Processing fees for international students 

• TOEFL scores 

• Statement of financial status 

• Immigration documents (form 1-20) 

Officially, applications must be received by the Graduate School by July 1 for the 
fall semester, December 1 for the spring semester, and by May 1 5 for admission 
to the summer semester. However, it is preferred that applications be received as 
early as possible. Applicants interested in receiving a teaching assistantship or 
research assistantship must apply by March 1. An international student applica- 
tion must be received six months prior to the semester of expected entrance. 
Contact the department for more information: Pharmacy Administration Gradu- 
ate Program, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 100 N. Greene St., 
6th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201-1 180. 

1. In addition to official transcripts and three letters of recommendation as 
evidence of academic potential, the student is to submit scores from the 
Graduate Record Examination. Graduate Record Examination scores are 
used as part of the date on which admission decisions are based but are 
seldom the sole criteria for admission. 



Doctor of Philosophy Programs 



2. Applicants are encouraged to arrange an interview with the Department 
of Pharmacy Practice and Science for more information. A limited num- 
ber of students who fail to meet these minimum standards may be 
admitted to graduate study as provisional students on the basis of out- 
standing performance on the Graduate Record Examination and on the 
basis of letters of recommendation from competent judges of their per- 
formance as students or of their professional capacity. Provisional 
admissions carry explicit conditions (e.g., minimal grade requirements 
in stipulated courses) that must be met before the student can be 
advanced to full graduate status. Specific conditions for admission as a 
provisional graduate student may be found in the current edition of the 
Graduate School catalog. 



PHARMACY PRACTICE AND SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
OVERVIEW 

The Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science exists for the purpose of pro- 
moting the health and well being of the public by advancing the practice of 
pharmacy and generating and disseminating new knowledge related to pharmacy 
practice and drug use. The department approaches these goals by: 1) preparing 
professional students, graduate students, residents, fellows, and pharmacists for 
the future through a variety of academic, training, and mentoring programs; 2) 
providing an environment conducive to the development of faculty and staff; 3) 
furnishing expertise, support, and leadership to professional, governmental, com- 
munity, and health related organizations and agencies; 4) fostering research into 
the clinical and social sciences related to pharmacy practice and drug use; 5) 
encouraging the development of new and innovative pharmacy practice and role 
models; and 6) providing a structure that supports these efforts. 

The department values excellence in teaching, practice, research, and service, 
and the contributions of its faculty and staff to the department, School, Univer- 
sity, state, profession, and health care community. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

The minimum requirements for a student to receive a doctoral degree in the 
Pharmaceutical Health Services Research Graduate Program are detailed below. 
Individual students might be required to take additional courses as deemed 
appropriate by their curriculum committee. In particular, students without 
strong computer programming skills may need elective courses. 

Required courses include a group of core graduate courses in pharmacoepi- 
demiology, pharmacoeconomics, pharmaceutical policy, and the social and 
behavioral sciences, in addition to research methods, and statistics. Students must 
complete at least 12 credits of advanced courses in their research track beyond 
any core courses. It generally takes two to two-and-a-hah years to complete the 
course requirements. 

40 School of Pharmacy 



I 



While many students come to the program with prior graduate work, the 
department requires that they take the core courses here. When non-core courses 
or the beginning/intermediate statistics requirements are waived, students are 
expected to take other advanced courses to complete the course requirements. To 
allow flexibility and to ensure that students are well prepared in their area of spe- 
cialization, each student is asked to establish a curriculum committee by the end 
of their first semester of study. 

The following outlines the required core course curriculum for this program: 

Core Course Curriculum (33 Credits) 



COURSES 


CREDITS 


PHSR 610— Health Care System 




PHSR 620— Social Behavioral 




PHSR 650 — Pharmaceutical Econ 




PHSR 670— Health Education 




PHSR 704— Pharmacopeia 




PHSR 701— Research Methods 1 




PHSR 702— Research Methods II 




PREV 600 — Intro to Epidemiology 




Statistics 


9 


PHSR 709— Seminar* 


3 


Advanced Cognate 


Coursework 


12 


PHSR 899— Dissertation 


12 



*Graduate seminar is conducted weekly to inform students and faculty about 
new research and current issues. Seminar attendance is mandatory for all gradu- 
ate students while in residency. Additionally, students must register for seminar 
credit in three separate seminars. Students receive one credit for successfully 
preparing and delivering a seminar on an ongoing research project or research 
proposal under the direction of a faculty member. Each student must have at least 
one seminar credit prior to taking his or her general comprehensive examination. 
Furthermore, students must present their dissertation research at least once in a 
graduate seminar. 

Comprehensive Examination 

The purpose of the comprehensive examination is to test students' depth and 
breadth of knowledge in the field of pharmaceutical health services research: the- 
ory, methods, statistics, and their chosen area of specialization. Students are 
expected to be fluent in research techniques, current developments, general 
research methods, study designs, statistical methods, and their professional and 
ethical responsibilities. Students should not only know the basic concepts, but 
also be able to interpret and apply them under various scenarios. 

Doctor of Philosophy Programs 4 1 



Dissertation 

The dissertation is the product of intensive research at the doctoral level, distin- 
guished by its deeper, more comprehensive, professional and scholarly treatment 
of the subject. The doctoral dissertation is expected to represent independent and 
original research in the field of the candidate's graduate study. It must add to 
understanding in the candidate's field. The project must be of sufficient difficulty 
and depth to test the candidate's ability to carry out research independently, and 
it should show a mastery of the skills needed for such research. 

Oral Defense of Dissertation Proposal 

Students must submit the proposal to the dissertation committee for review and 
comment. The student, in consultation with the research advisor, will schedule 
the oral examination to defend the research proposal. 

Final Oral Exam Defense 

After completing the dissertation, the candidate must defend it before the acade- 
mic community. The defense is open to all members of the University graduate 
faculty. Regulations governing the style, format, and how to submit the disserta- 
tion for publication may be obtained from the Graduate School. 

Additional Activities 

• Teaching experience is required during the first year. Doctoral students 
in pharmaceutical health services research are expected to participate as 
fully as possible in opportunities to develop their teaching skills. 

• Experiential learning is required of all students. In general, a student 
does not receive additional credit for experiential learning, but it is a sig- 
nificant part of the program. 

• Participating in professional meetings and organizations is recom- 
mended. Students are encouraged to submit papers to local, regional, 
and national professional meetings. 



FINANC IAL SUPPORT 

Financial support is available to students accepted into the program: graduate 
research assistantships funded by the Graduate School, graduate research assist- 
antships funded by faculty-sponsored projects, and graduate teaching 
a.ssistantships. 



I 



School of Pharmacy 



PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES PHD PROGRAM OVERVIEW 

Graduate students, staff, and faculty are pursuing a wide range of pharmaceutical 
research, such as the underlying biology of disease, mechanisms of drug action, 
drug design, and drug product design and evaluation. Pharmaceutical sciences 
is the largest graduate program on campus and perhaps the largest of its type 
in the United States. This critical mass of graduate students working with over 30 
faculty and staff members, provides a stimulating environment for the pharma- 
ceutical sciences graduate student. 

Components of our multidisciplinary program include the following seven 
informal Research Focus Groups: Drug Design, Macromolecular Structure and 
Function, Cell-Based Gene/Drug Discovery, Pharmacology and Toxicology, 
Neuroscience, Drug Delivery/Metabolism/Pharmacokinetics, and Industrial 
Pharmaceutics Research. These focus groups serve as foci for research collabora- 
tions, as well as ongoing seminar series and graduate student dissertation research 
committees. 



PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences is involved in understanding the 
underlying biology of disease, mechanisms of drug action, drug design, and drug 
product design and evaluation. The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences is, 
by its nature, a multidisciplinary environment. Disciplines of pharmaceutical sci- 
ences can be described in the context of the areas of science that carried an idea 
for a cure, all the way to a vial of tablets in the medicine cabinet. 

Pharmaceutical sciences contribute to the discovery, design, and development 
of drugs. Drug discovery and development is a dynamic process, requiring inte- 
grated efforts across classical scientific disciplines. Hence, the graduate program 
in pharmaceutical sciences uniquely prepares graduates for mankind's greatest 
intellectual and practical challenge: to discover medicines. 



ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 

Admission to the PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences graduate program is contin- 
gent upon satisfying the admission requirements of the Graduate School. In most 
instances, candidates for admission who have earned a BA or BS degree in chem- 
istry, biology, biochemistry, engineering, or pharmacy possess adequate 
preparation for the graduate program. Selected applicants may be invited for a 
personal interview and tour of the facilities. 

Prospective students must take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
General Test and submit the scores as part of the admissions process. Also, since 
entry into the program requires a proficiency in the English language, foreign stu- 
dents must obtain a minimum score of 600 in the TOEFL Examination and/or 
have taken conversational and written English coursework. 

Doctor of Philosophy Programs 43 



Applications for admission to the graduate program will be evaluated on the 
basis of their timely completion and quality of academic transcripts, GRE scores, 
TOEFL scores where appropriate, letters of recommendation, and the student's 
research objectives. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

Applicants for the PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences must send certain materials to 
the University of Maryland Graduate School, while other materials must be sent 
to the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Applicants may review admis- 
sions procedures and requirements of the University of Maryland's Graduate 
School on the Web site or e-mail gradinfo@umaryland.edu or call 410-706-7131 
for more information. Applicants must submit the list of materials which follows 
to the University's Graduate School at: Graduate Admissions and Enrollment 
Services, Baltimore Student Union, Room 336, The Graduate School, University 
of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201-1550. 

• Submit two sets of official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Gen- 
eral Test scores (not copies) and two sets of official Test of English as a 
Foreign Language score (if international applicant) with a minimum 
score of 600 and/or have taken conversational and written English 
coursework. 

• Submit two sets of official transcripts or mark sheets. 

• Submit the required nonrefundable application fee. Make check payable 
to: University of Maryland or use a credit card. 

Applicants must also submit the following to the School of Pharmacy Depart- 
ment of Pharmaceutical Sciences at: Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Program, 
School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 20 N. Pine St., 4th Floor, Balti- 
more, MD 21201-1 180. 

• Submit a Statement of Academic Goals and Research Interests. Discuss 
concisely your academic objectives pertaining to the pharmaceutical sci- 
ences, include contemplated research projects, professional career goals, 
and a description of relevant work experience, as appropriate. Type or 
print neatly. To facilitate your application's review, denote a primary and 
a secondary Research Focus Group (httpsillwww.pharmacy.umaryland. 
edulgraduatelpsclPSC_HomelResearchlRFGs.html) at the top of your 
.statement. 

• Submit three (3) letters of recommendation. A form is available from 
https://www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu/graduate/psc/PSC_Home/ 
Admissions/ admission.htm. 

Master's Degree Students 

• Applicants with a master's degree that did not require a thesis are 
required to submit recent evidence of scholarly work, such as term 
papers or research reports. 

• Applicants are expected to be computer literate. 

44 School of Pharmacy 



International Students 

International students should not plan on leaving their country before obtaining 
official notification of admission to the graduate program from the director of 
graduate admissions and an 1-20 form from the Office Records and Registration. 
The following rules apply: 

• Sufficient funds must be available to support the student for one year. 
Students may obtain the immigration form (1-20) necessary for obtain- 
ing the appropriate visa from the University's Office of Records and 
Registration. 

• Students already studying in the United States who wish to transfer to 
the University of Maryland must also secure proper immigration docu- 
ments in order to request that the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service grant permission to transfer to the University of Maryland. 

• Every international student must report to the Office of Records and 
Registration as soon as possible after arriving at the University. 

• Students from non-English-speaking countries are considered for 
admission only if they have received a total Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) score of 600 (213 on the computer-based score). 
Because TOEFL is given only four times a year throughout various 
parts of the world, it is necessary for the applicant to make arrange- 
ments with the Educational Testing Service, Box 899, Princeton, NJ 
08540, to take the test as soon as study at the University of Maryland is 
contemplated. 

• Graduate students whose work indicates English language deficiencies 
will be required to take remedial English courses. 



PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES PHD PROGRAM 
DESCRIPTION 

The goal of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences graduate program is to 
prepare independent, creative scientists to function well in academe, the pharma- 
ceutical industry, and in government or other agencies. While a master's degree 
program is in place, the primary degree program in pharmaceutical sciences is the 
PhD degree. The pharmaceutical sciences graduate program is administered 
through the Graduate School (www.graduate.nmaryland.edu). 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 



This curriculum ensures that all students gain knowledge and skill areas specific 
to the pharmaceutical sciences, through the core courses. Additionally, the core 
courses are taken during the first year and allow students the opportunity to per- 
form research in faculty laboratories, such that students will be well positioned to 
select a dissertation advisor. Depending upon their specific research interests, stu- 
dents choose from a menu of departmental and campus offerings of courses, 



Doctor of Philosophy Programs 



including technique courses. Departmental course offerings are described in 
detail in the "Program Course Descriptions" section of this catalog. 

A student typically graduates after five years in the PhD program. In the first 
two years, students focus on completing classroom requirements and initial dis- 
sertation research. Early in the third year, students take the comprehensive 
examination, where each student demonstrates mastery of relevant coursework 
and proposes dissertation research. In the last three years, students focus on labo- 
ratory experimentation and the presentation of a dissertation. 

The minimum course requirements of the PhD degree program are as follows: 

Core Course Curriculum 



COURSE 


CREDITS 


PHAR 600 and 601 — Pharmaceutical Drug Design and Development 


3 each 


PHAR 608 — First- Year Rotations 1 


PHAR 708— First- Year Seminar 1 


Two techniques courses 


4 minimum 


Ethics course (e.g., DOCB 605— Scientific Method, CIPP 909— 
Responsible Conduct of Science) 


Minimum three additional courses 


Three seminar presentations 


PHAR 899— Thesis Research 


12 


FACULTY RESEARCH AREAS 



Larry L. Augsburger, pharmaceutics; solid oral dosage form design 

Gary G. Buterbaugh, pharmacology of epileptic seizures 

Andrew Coop, organic and medicinal chemistry; opioid and sigma receptors 

Richard N. Dalby, respiratory drug delivery; metered dose inhalers (MDIs); dry 

powdered inhalers (DPI); nebulizers 
Russell J. DiGate, genetics; DNA topoisomerase III 
Natalie D. Eddington, pharmacokinetics; brain delivery; pharmacodynamic 

relationships 
Hamid Ghandehari, controlled drug delivery; polymers; biomaterials 
Ronald D. Guiles, protein structure, including Heme and human interleukin-5; 

nuclear magnetic resonance 
Jun Hayashi, cell biology; lymphocyte signal transduction 
Stephen W. Hoag, pharmaceutics; controlled release tablets; power technology 
R. Gary Hollenbeck, physical pharmacy; novel drug delivery systems 
Kwang Chul Kim, cell biology; epithelial cell surface mucins (MUCl mucins) 
Alexander D. MacKerell, Jr., computational chemistry; novel inhibitors of HIV 

intcgrase 



School of Pharmacy 



J. Edward Morcton, pharmacology; behavioral and neuropharmacological aspects 

of drug abuse 
James E. Polli, oral biopharmaceutics; bioavailabiliry; intestinal permeability 
Gerald M. Rosen, free radicals in biological systems; host immune response 
Ginette Serrero, cancer; obesity; adipocyte differentiation 
Paul S. Shapiro, signal transduction; mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase 

pathways 
Rakesh K. Srivastava, cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis; Bcl-2 family 

members 
Daniel J. Sussman, signal transduction; proto-oncogene Wnt-1 (int-1) 
Ashiwel S. Undie, signal transduction; phospholipase C-dependent signal trans- 
duction; dopamine 
Jia Bei Wang, neurotransmitter receptors; mu opiate receptor 
Myron Weiner, drug metabolism; cytochrome P450; hepatocytes 
Angela Wilks, protein structure and function; heme proteins; Shigella dysenteriae 



ACADEMIC RESOURCES 

Extramural funding for research is currently in excess of $4 million dollars, and 
ongoing investigations include collaborative projects with other researchers on 
campus and at nearby institutions such as the National Institutes of Health, U.S. 
Food and Drug Administration, the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, and 
the pharmaceutical industry. 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences is equipped with modern chemi- 
cal instrumentation, including ultraviolet-visible spectrometers, a Fourier- 
transform infrared spectrometer, a 300-MHZ NMR spectrometer, several mass 
spectrometers, gas and high-performance liquid chromatography systems, 
radioactivity counters, high-speed centrifuges, and molecular modeling worksta- 
tions. Wet laboratories, cell culture facilities, and computer laboratories are 
designed for research in organic drug synthesis, drug design, gene and protein 
structure and function elucidation, molecular biology, molecular and tissue phar- 
macology, microbiology, drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics, and drug 
product design. 

The department also has one of the most modern industrial and pharmaceuti- 
cal technology research and manufacturing facilities in the country, including a 
Good Manufacturing Practice facility. It has small-scale and pilot-scale equip- 
ment for the production of pharmaceuticals. There is also a state-of-the art 
analytical facility, which is a focal point for basic and applied pharmacokinetic 
research and which plays a major role in enabling faculty to conduct clinical 
research in hospitalized patients. The laboratory is equipped to handle all phases 
of a drug's absorption and disposition in animals and/or humans. 



Doctor of Philosophy Programs 



FINANCIAL SUPPORT 



Financial support is available to students accepted into the program, such that 
students can focus on graduate studies. Support includes a stipend (currently 
$18,000 for year 2001 for Step I pre-candidates and $19,000 for Step II candi- 
dates), tuition, health, and fees. Additional merit awards are given to the 
department's most outstanding students. 

Competitive departmental fellowships are awarded by the department each 
year: Dunning Fellowship, Emerson Fellowship, Slama Graduate Award, and the 
Shangraw/Center for Professional Advancement Scholarship. Additionally, many 
students each year earn external fellowships, through excellence in academics and 
research. 



GRADUATE STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Graduate students play a particularly active role in a number of campus student 
organizations. Additionally, two graduate student organizations within the 
School of Pharmacy and the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences are the 
Pharmacy Graduate Student Association and a student chapter of the American 
Association of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Moreover, depending upon their specific 
research interests, individual students often join national professional societies, 
many of which host meetings and workshops in the mid-Atlantic region. 




Pharmacy itueJetics enjoy the outdo 



48 School of Pharmacy 



Financial Information 



The School's tuition and fees, health insurance, residency status, and financial aid 
information is as follows: 



TUITION AND FEES 



The following lists the tuition and fees for the 2001-2002 academic year. The 
tuition per credit hour rate below is for the Nontraditional PharmD Pathway and 
graduate programs only. Students in these programs are charged this rate regard- 
less of the number of credit hours they take. 



TUITION 



FULL-TIME NTPD GRADUATE 





Full time (9 or more credits) 










Resident 


$ 7,576 






Nonresident 


$15,642 






Per credit hour rate 










Resident 






$296 


$28! 


Nonresident 






$532 


$503 


Fees 










Student Government Association 




15 


$ 15 


$ IS 


Transportation 




27 


$ 27 


$ 27 


Student activities 




50 


$ 50 


$45 


Supporting facilities 




350 


$318 


$318 


Other Expenses 










Clinical clerkship (experiential courses) 




300 


$300 




Application fee (nonrefundable) 




60 


$ 60 


$ 50 


Admission acceptance deposit 










(nonrefundable) 




800 






Late registration fee 




40 


$ 40 


$ 40 


Diploma fee 




50 


$ 50 


$110 


Liability insurance 




II 


$ II 




Disability insurance 




23 






Hepatitis B vaccine (1st year only) 




160 






Continuing education certification 




100 






Late payment of tuition and fees* 




100 


$100 


$100 



*Late payment of tuition and fees is $ 1 00 or 5% of the balance, whichever is less. 

The School reserves the right to make changes in requirements for admission, 
curriculum, standards for advancement and graduation, fees, and rules and regu- 
lations. 



Financial Information 



HEALTH INSURANCE 



University or equivalent health insurance coverage is required of all full-time stu- 
dents. Students will be billed for health insurance unless they provide proof of 
similar coverage to the Office of Student and Employee Health. If students pro- 
vide documentation, the cost of the premium is waived. The cost of health 
insurance varies depending on the type of coverage. For the 2001-2002 academic 
year, the cost for student-only coverage is $1,129; student and spouse, $2,710; 
student and child $2,146; and student and family $3,388. 



DETERMINATION OF IN-STATE RESIDENCY 

The Office of Records and Registration makes an initial determination of resi- 
dency status for admission and tuition when students apply for admission. The 
determination made at that time, and any determination made thereafter, shall 
prevail for each semester until the student changes the status. Students classified 
as in-state residents are responsible for notifying the Office of Records and Regis- 
tration in writing within 15 days of any change in their circumstances which 
might in any way affect their classification at the University. Students may obtain 
a copy of the University's policy on in-state residency status from the office listed 
above. 



PHARMD STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

Student financial aid programs are centrally administered by the Office of Stu- 
dent Financial Aid. These programs are designed to help students who otherwise 
would be unable to attend the University. Aid packages for students often include 
a combination of loans, grants, scholarships, and work-study designed to meet 
students' needs. To qualify for aid, students must apply annually and meet the 
eligibility requirements. Also, students must complete the required financial 
aid application forms and are encouraged to do so by February 15. For more 
information about financial aid and to obtain application forms, call 410-706- 
7347 or write to: Student Financial Aid, University of Maryland, Baltimore 
Student Union, Room 334, 621 W. Lombard St., Baltimore, MD 21201. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY SCHOLARSHIPS 

Through the generous gifts of alumni, friends, and professional associations, the 
School provides additional financial aid to its full-time students who are in need 
of financial support. Students do not apply for these awards. Students who 
receive most awards arc those who can document unmet financial need through 
the student financial aid process. Some scholarships support students from cer- 
tain geographical areas. The School has established the following scholarships: 

50 School of Pharmacy 



April Adams Memorial Scholarship. The students, faculty, and friends of 
April Adams established this scholarship as a lasting tribute to Adams, Class of 
1999. The scholarship, symbolizing her dedication and love of pharmacy, will be 
awarded to deserving students in her name. 

Marilyn I. Arkin Scholarship Fund. The family and friends of Marilyn I. 
Arkin, daughter of Ann and Morris Arkin and a member of the Class of 1975, 
established this scholarship as a memorial in 1988. The scholarship provides sup- 
port for professional students in the School of Pharmacy. 

Caspari Memorial Fund. Alumni and friends of Professor Charles Caspari, 
Jr., former dean of the School of Pharmacy, established this scholarship Novem- 
ber 25, 1917, to support a deserving student who has financial need. 

Centennial Research Fund. This fund was established September 13, 1946, 
with contributions from the Centennial Research Fund campaign launched in 
1941 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the School of Pharmacy. The 
students who receive this fellowship do research in the following fields: pharmacy, 
pharmaceutical chemistry, pharmacology, microbiology, and pharmacognosy. 

H.J. (Jack) Custis, Jr., Memorial Scholarship Fund. In memory of H.J. 
(Jack) Custis, Jr., Class of 1951, a fund was established to award scholarships on 
the basis of reasonable need and academic ability to students in the professional 
program of the School of Pharmacy. Students must be residents of one of Mary- 
land's nine Eastern Shore counties to be eligible for the Custis Memorial 
Scholarship. 

H.A.B. Dunning Fellowship Fund. This fund was first established from 
annual donations beginning in 1930 and endowed in 1963 by bequest to the 
School of Pharmacy from Dr. H.A.B. Dunning, distinguished alumnus of the 
School and prominent Baltimore manufacturing pharmacist. This fellowship is 
open to promising graduate students doing research in pharmaceutical chemistry. 

Isadore M. and Irene R. Fischer Memorial Scholarship Fund. The families 
of Isadore M. and Irene R. Fischer have provided a scholarship fund to support a 
professional or graduate student demonstrating academic excellence in the educa- 
tional programs of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. 

Charles L. Henry Memorial Scholarship Fund. The Charles L. Henry 
Memorial Scholarship Fund has been provided for PharmD students in the 
School of Pharmacy requiring financial assistance. 

L. Louis and Elinor Hens Memorial Scholarship Fund. Established in 
1990 by Mrs. Elinor Hens in memory of her husband, this fund is used to sup- 
port deserving students who have financial need. 

Dr. Paul Jablon Research Award. Mr. Leon Jablon and the late Mrs. Yetta 
Jablon established this award in January 1985 in memory of their son. Dr. Paul 
Jablon. The research award is given to students displaying exceptional promise in 
the field of pharmaceutics. 

J. Gilbert Joseph Scholarship. In memory of her brother, J. Gilbert Joseph, 
a former student of the School of Pharmacy, the late Miss Jeanette Joseph pro- 
vided a generous bequest to endow scholarships to be awarded to qualified 
students who have maintained a superior scholastic average and who are in need 
of financial assistance. 



Financial Information 



Frederick William Koenig Memorial Scholarship. In memory ot her hus- 
band, Frederick WilHam Koenig, a practicing pharmacist for 50 years, the late 
Mrs. Valeria R. Koenig has bequeathed a sum of money to endow a scholarship 
to be awarded annually. The recipient of the award will be selected on the basis of 
financial need, character, and scholarship. 

The Bernard Lachman Memorial Scholarship Fund. The family, friends, 
and colleagues of Bernard Lachman established this fund in 1999 in his memory. 
The scholarship is used to support students who have financial need. 

Dr. Dean E. Leavitt Memorial Scholarship Fund. In honor of Dr. Dean E. 
Leavitt, associate dean for administration and professional services, 1976-1989, 
the family and the faculty established a fund to support a scholarship covering the 
final year of pharmacy school for students who have attained at least a cumulative 
average of 3.0, who have shown superior aptitude and enthusiasm in the course 
sequence in management, and who have demonstrated, as Dean Leavitt did, a 
commitment to the qualities of health and humanitarianism, both personally and 
professionally. 

A.M. Lichtenstein Scholarship. In memory of her husband, A.M. Lichten- 
stein, distinguished alumnus of the School of Pharmacy, Class of 1889, the late 
Mrs. Francina Freese Lichtenstein bequeathed a sum of money to endow an 
annual scholarship to a resident of Allegheny County, Md. The recipient of the 
award is to be selected on the basis of financial need, character, and scholarship. 

The Dr. L. Lavan Manchey Scholarship Fund. This fund was established 
July 8, 1997, in memory of L. Lavan Manchey, PhD, Class of 1926, and winner 
of the Simon Gold Medal for proficiency in practical chemistry in 1928. The 
scholarship is used to support students who have financial need. 

Aaron and Rosalie Paulson Scholarship Fund. Established by Mr. Aaron A. 
Paulson, Class ol 1924, and his late wife, Rosalie, this endowed scholarship sup- 
ports a first professional year student with demonstrated financial need. 

Plough Pharmacy Student Scholarships. The Plough Foundation, created 
by Abe Plough, founder of Plough Inc., and the School of Pharmacy contributed 
funds to an endowment that provides financial support to pharmacy students. 
The funds are awarded on the basis of financial need, academic achievement, 
leadership, and citizenship. 

Leonard Rodman Dean's Scholarship Fund. Established in March 2001 
by Mr. Leonard Rodman, this fund is used to provide scholarship to support 
students who have financial need. 

Milton C. And Elizabeth C. Sappe Scholarship Fund (Formerly the Mil- 
ton Charles Sappe Scholarship Fund). Elizabeth Sappe established this 
scholarship in December 1995. The scholarship is u.sed to support students who 
have demonstrated financial need, high academic standing, and are residents of 
Maryland. 

Joseph Sokol Memorial Scholarship. In memory of Jo.seph Sokol, Class of 
1973, his family and friends established this scholarship to provide support for 
deserving students who have financial need. 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



Arthur Schwartz Memorial Scholarship Fund. The family and friends of 
Arthur Schwartz, BS Pharm 1979, PhD Pharmacy Administration 1987, have 
estabhshed an endowed scholarship fund for a graduate student in Pharmacy 
Administration to honor his memory. 

Dr. Frank J. Slama Fellowship Fund. EstabHshed in April 1996 from the 
estate of Lillian Slama, in memory of her husband, Dr. Frank J. Slama, this fel- 
lowship supports one or more annual award(s) for graduate students studying 
medicinal chemistry and/or pharmacognosy. 



LOAN FUNDS 

Students in financial need may apply for the School loans described below. For 
more information, contact the associate dean for student affairs. 

Rose Hendler Memorial Fund. L. Manuel Hendler and family have estab- 
lished a loan fund in memory of Mrs. Rose Hendler for needy students. Loans 
from this fund are available to qualified students. 

Louis T. Sabatino Memorial Student Loan Fund. In honor and memory of 
her late brother, Louis T. Sabatino, Class of 1939, Mrs. Marie Sabatino DeOms 
has established this fund to provide loans to deserving students. 

Benjamin Schoenfeld Memorial Pharmacy Loan Fund. The family of Mr. 
Benjamin Schoenfeld, Class of 1924, has established a loan fund as a memorial to 
him. This fund is available to qualified needy students. Loans are made upon the 
recommendation of the dean. 

Burroughs-Welcome Emergency Loan Fund. The Burroughs-Welcome 
Co. established a fund to provide short-term (two months) loans to students in 
financial need. 



VETERANS FINANCIAL AID 

New students, including Nontraditional Pathway students, who are eligible for 
educational benefits through the Veterans Administration should forward a com- 
pleted VA Form 22-1995: Request for Change of Program or Place ofTrainingio the 
Office of Student Affairs. Veterans who have not used any of their VA educa- 
tional benefits should forward a completed VA Form 22-1990: Application for 
Program of Education or Training and a copy of DD 214: Separation Papers 
directly to the Office of Student Affairs of the School of Pharmacy. 



PHD STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

For information on financial support, graduate students should contact the grad- 
uate department to which they are applying. 



Financial Information 



PharmD Academic Policy 
Statements 



The School reserves the right to make changes in standards for advancement and 
graduation and rules and regulations. The following academic policy statements 
shall not be construed as a contract between any student and the School: 



ACADEMIC SESSIONS 

The School of Pharmacy operates on a four-semester calendar. The fall term, four 
months long, begins the last week of August and runs to the Christmas recess. A 
three-week winter minimester in January allows students to avail themselves of 
tutorial services or elective courses. The spring term, four months long, begins 
the last week in January and extends to just before Memorial Day. Full-time stu- 
dents enrolled for the spring semester do not pay tuition and fees for campus 
courses they take during the January minimester. Student must pay additional 
minimester tuition at other University System of Maryland (USM) campuses. 
The School does not offer any courses during the summer session. Students may 
take didactic courses at USM institutions but must pay summer session tuition 
and fees at those institutions. 



REGISTRATION POLICIES 



CANCELLATION OF REGISTRAT ION 

Students who register and subsequently decide not to attend the School of Phar- 
macy must provide written notice to the Office of Student Affairs on or before the 
first day of class. If this office has not received a request for cancellation by 5 pm. 
on or before the first day of instruction, the University will assume that students 
plan to attend and that they accept their financial obligation. 



CHANGE IN REGISTRATION 

Students should obtain and return the completed Add/Drop Form, used for all 
changes in registration, to the School's Office of Student Affairs. Students are not 
charged for a change in registration. Students may not add a course after the first 
week of classes or drop a course after eight weeks into the semester. Students will 
receive the grade of Ffor courses dropped after the eighth week of classes without 
approval. 



School of Pharmacy 



LATE REGISTRATION 



Students who fail to complete registration by the specified time for regular regis- 
tration, usually the day before the first day of classes, pay a late registration fee. 
(See the "Financial Information" section of this catalog for fee amount.) 



WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

Students who withdraw from the University before the end of a semester are eligi- 
ble for partial refunds, depending upon the date of withdrawal. To ensure such 
refunds, students must file withdrawal forms in the School's Office of Student 
Affairs. Students who fail to complete these forms will receive failing grades in all 
courses and forfeit their right to any refund. 



GRADING SYSTEM 

When, for any reason, a student repeats a course, the grade achieved in the 
repeated course replaces all previous grades in the same course. The School of 
Pharmacy uses the following grading system: 



GRADE 


INTERPRETATION 


POINT VALUE 




A 


Excellent 


4 




B 


Good 


3 




C 


Fair 


2 




D 


Poor but Passing 


1 




P 


Pass 







F 


Failure 







1 


Incomplete 


Must be replaced by 
definite grade within 
one year 




WD 


Withdrawal 


No grade is assigned 






ACADEMIC STATUS POLICIES 



Students' performance in didactic and experiential learning courses is continually 
monitored. Students are responsible for their academic progress and should take 
the initiative to meet their academic advisor and/or the coursemaster(s) when 
academic problems occur. The director for student services, the class advisor, fac- 
ulty, and administration are available to help students meet the School's academic 
standards. Experience has demonstrated that the earlier and more actively stu- 
dents recognize and address potential problems, the greater their likelihood of 



PharmD Academic Policy Statements 



avoiding academic difficulties. By the same token, faculty members are encour- 
aged to initiate discussions with students whose performance appears likely to 
result in a failing grade. 

To remain in acceptable academic standing and to be eligible for graduation, 
students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in required courses. 
Students with a cumulative GPA below 2.0 or a failing grade in a didactic or 
experiential learning course are subject to academic dismissal. 

At the end of each semester, the associate dean of student affairs reviews the 
academic status of all students in the PharmD program. Students with a failing 
grade in any course are subject to academic dismissal as soon as the failing grade 
is submitted in writing to the Office of Student Affairs. Students who do not 
achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 in their required courses are subject 
to academic dismissal. 

Students who have a semester GPA below 2.0 but maintain a cumulative GPA 
of 2.0 or greater will receive a letter of academic warning from the associate dean 
of student affairs. The chair of the Student Affairs Committee and students' aca- 
demic advisors also receive a copy of this letter. 

The associate dean of student affairs will send a notification letter and a copy 
of the Academic Status Policies and Procedures to students subject to academic 
dismissal. The letter will indicate that the student will be dismissed from the 
School unless he or she appeals to the Student Affairs Committee requesting to 
be placed on academic probation. The letter will state the time and place of the 
academic review hearing with the Student Affairs Committee (typically, within 
seven calendar days of the letter's date). The chair of the Student Affairs Commit- 
tee and students' academic advisors also receive copies of the letter. 

Students subject to academic dismissal have the right to appeal to the Student 
Affairs Committee. Students may present their case in person before the commit- 
tee or submit a written appeal. Students may submit any documents that they 
deem pertinent. Students who do not appeal will be dismissed from the School. 

At least seven calendar days before any Student Affairs Committee academic 
review hearing, the committee will distribute a confidential memo to the faculty, 
listing all students to be reviewed. The memo will state the time and place of the 
hearing, stress the confidential nature of the information, and request that faculty 
provide the committee with pertinent information on students' academic perfor- 
mance and ability. Any faculty member may provide written comments to the 
committee or request permission to appear at any student's hearing. 

Academic advisors and other faculty members may attend academic review 
hearings and present pertinent information. The committee will consider 
prepharmacy grades, prior academic performance in the School, and personal 
issues in its deliberations. 

At the conclusion of the academic review hearing, the committee will deliber- 
ate on each case and determine each student's academic status. The committee 
decides by a simple majority vote to either academically dismiss students, place 
them on academic probation, or gather more information. If placed on academic 
probation, students will be allowed to continue in the program but under specific 
terms outlined by the committee, such as taking remedial courses to strengthen 



School of Pharmacy 



specific knowledge or skills. If the committee decides to gather more information, 
it must complete its review and make a final decision within five calendar days of 
the original hearing. The committee will submit its decision in writing to the stu- 
dents, dean, and the students' academic advisors within seven calendar days of 
the academic review hearing. 

Students have the right to appeal the decision of the Student Affairs Commit- 
tee directly to the dean. Students must submit appeals in writing and state the 
basis for the appeal. Students must complete all appeals before the beginning of 
the next semester. The dean's decision is final. 

Students on academic probation must meet with their academic advisor and 
the associate dean of student affairs to develop a plan of action to resolve all perti- 
nent academic issues. While on probation, students must earn a GPA of 2.0 or 
greater during each semester. If students on probation earn a semester GPA of 2.0 
or greater, but the cumulative GPA or the required-course GPA remains below 
2.0, students will remain on academic probation. Students will be removed from 
probation when their cumulative GPA and required-course GPA is 2.0 or greater. 
Students with a failing grade on their record will remain on probation until they 
receive a passing grade. 

Students who are academically dismissed may petition the Admissions Com- 
mittee for readmission after they have completed some form of remediation. 
Students who have been academically dismissed twice from the School are not 
eligible for readmission. 



ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES 

Students are entering a profession highly trusted by the public. Therefore, stu- 
dents are expected to "maintain the highest principle of moral, ethical, and legal 
conduct." (Oath of a Pharmacist, 1999.) Students and faculty developed the poli- 
cies and procedures described below to help maintain the School's high standard 
of conduct. 



S TUDENT HONOR CODE 

Students entering the profession of pharmacy are required to exhibit exemplary 
standards of conduct. Absolute honesty is imperative for a health professional. 
On May 14, 1998, the Student Government Association adopted the following 
Honor Code: 

I. Statement of Philosophy 

The students of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy recognize that 
honesty, truth, and integrity are values central to the School's mission as an insti- 
tution of higher education. Therefore, the Student Government Association has 
assembled current policies and procedures involving academic integrity into this 
Honor Code of behavior. The code described in this document articulates the 



PharmD Academic Policy Statements 



responsibilities of Doctor of Pharmac}' students, graduate students, faculty, and 
administration in upholding academic integrity, while at the same time respect- 
ing the rights of individuals to the due process offered by administrative hearings 
and appeals. All persons enrolled in any course or program offered by the Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Pharmacy and all persons supervising the learning of 
any student are responsible for acting in accordance with the provisions of this 
policy. 

Students' Responsibilities 

• Understanding the types of conduct which are deemed unacceptable 
and, therefore, are prohibited by this policy. 

• Refraining from committing any act of cheating, plagiarizing, facilitat- 
ing academic dishonesty, abusing academic materials, stealing, or lying. 

• Reporting every instance in which the student has a suspicion or knowl- 
edge that academic conduct which violates this policy or its spirit has 
taken place to the faculty member responsible for instruction or to a 
member of the Student Discipline and Grievance Committee. 

Faculty Responsibilities 

• Understanding the procedures of this policy relative to how faculty are 
to handle suspected instances of academic dishonesty. 

• Developing an instructional environment that reflects a commitment to 
maintaining and enforcing academic integrity. 

• Handling every suspected or admitted instance of the violation of the 
provisions of this policy in accordance with the current School and Uni- 
versity procedures. 

II. Academic Integrity 

In attempt to maintain academic integrity, the Student Government Association 
has outlined a code of conduct (an Honor Code) which describes acceptable 
behavior for students in all its academic settings. This code has been developed 
using University (as stated in the University's Student Answer Book) and School 
(as stated in the School's catalog) policies. Elements of this code can be catego- 
rized into six broad areas: 

1. Cheating Definition: Using or attempting to use unauthorized mate- 
rials, information, notes, study aids or other devices, or obtaining 
unauthorized assistance from any source for work submitted as one's 
own individual efforts in any class, clinic, assignment, or examination. 
Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to, the following 
actions: 

a. Copying from another student's paper or test, or receiving assistance 
from another person during an exam or other assignment in a 
manner not authorized by the instructor. 

b. Possessing, buying, selling, removing, receiving, or using at any time 
or in any manner not previously authorized by the instructor a copy 
or copies of any exam or other materials (in whole or in part) 
intended to be used as an instrument of evaluation in advance of its 
administration. 

58 School of Pharmacy 



I 



c. Using material or equipment not authorized by the instructor dur- 
ing a test or other academic evaluation, such as crib notes, a 
calculator, or a tape recorder. 

d. Working with another or others on any exam, take home exam, 
computer or laboratory work, or any other assignment when the 
instructor has required independent and unaided effort. 

e. Attempting to influence or change an academic evaluation, grade or 
record by deceit or unfair means, such as: 1) damaging the academic 
work of another student to gain an unfair advantage in an academic 
evaluation; or 2) marking or submitting an exam or other assign- 
ment in a manner designed to deceive the grading system. 

f Submitting, without prior permission, the same academic work 
which has been submitted in identical or similar form in another 
class or in fulfillment of any other academic requirement at the Uni- 
versity. 

g. Permitting another to substitute for oneself during an exam or any 
other type of academic evaluation. 

h. Gaining an unfair advantage in an academic evaluation by receiving 
specific information about a test, exam, or other assignment. 

2. Plagiarism Definition: Representing, orally or in writing, in any acad- 
emic assignment or exercise, the words, ideas, or works of another as 
one's own without customary and proper acknowledgment of the 
source. Examples: 

a. Submitting material or work for evaluation, in whole or in part, 
which has been prepared by an individual(s) or commercial service. 

b. Directly quoting from a source without the customary or proper 
citation. 

c. Paraphrasing or summarizing another's work without acknowledg- 
ing the source. 

d. Downloading material from Web sites without appropriate docu- 
mentation. 

3. Facilitating Academic Dishonesty Definition: Helping or attempting 
to help another person commit an act of academic dishonesty. Exam- 
ples: 

a. Providing assistance to another during an exam or other assignment 
in a manner not authorized by the instructor. 

b. Acting as a substitute for another in any exam or any other type of 
academic evaluation. 

c. Providing specific information about a recently given test, exam, or 
other assignment to another student who thereby gains an unfair 
advantage in an academic evaluation. 

d. Permitting one's academic work to be represented as the work of 
another. 

e. Preparing for sale, barter, or loan to another such items as unautho- 
rized papers, notes, or abstracts of lectures and readings. 

4. Abuse of Academic Materials Definition: Destroying or making inac- 
cessible academic resource materials. Examples: 

PharmD Academic Policy Sutements 59 



a. Destroying, hiding, or otherwise making unavailable for common 
use library, computer, or other academic reference materials. 

b. Destroying, hiding, or otherwise making unavailable another's 
notes, experiments, computer programs, or other academic work. 

5. Stealing Definition: Taking, attempting to take, or withholding the 
property of another, thereby permanently or temporarily depriving the 
owner of its use or possession. Examples: 

a. Unauthorized removal of library materials, examinations, computer 
programs, or any other academic materials, including obtaining 
advance access to an examination through collusion with a Univer- 
sity employee or otherwise. 

b. Taking another's academic work, such as papers, computer pro- 
grams, laboratory experiments, or research results. 

6. Lying Definition: Making any oral or written statement which the 
individual knows to be untrue. Examples: 

a. Making a false statement to any instructor or other University 
employee in an attempt to gain advantage or exception. 

b. Falsifying evidence or testifying falsely, such as in a Student Griev- 
ance Committee hearing. 

c. Inventing or counterfeiting data, research results, research proce- 
dures, internship or practicum experiences, or other information. 

d. Citing a false source for referenced material/data. 

III. Honor Pledge 

In order to address the first two areas, cheating and plagiarism, the School has 
developed an honor pledge statement that has been used by many faculty mem- 
bers to reinforce the importance of academic integrity. This pledge statement will 
be used in the following manner: Work assigned for classes, clinics, internships, 
and all other types of instruction offered at the School of Pharmacy may be 
accomplished in either of two ways: (1) as "individual" work for which the stu- 
dent will sign a pledge statement indicating that the work was completed 
independently, without giving or receiving assistance from another; or (2) as "col- 
laborative" work, which may be completed in collaboration with others as 
directed by the instructor and for which no pledge statement is required. All 
work is considered to be individual work unless the instructor specifies otherwise. 
For all "individual" work, instructors may require students to sign the following 
pledge statement: 

"On my honor, I have neither given nor received aid on this assignment." 

Student's signature: Date: 



Thus, students will state that the work that was submitted is their own and 
will be held accountable if evidence appears that is contrary to this statement. 
Students are reminded that neither the presence nor the absence of a signed 
pledge statement will allow students to violate established codes of conduct as 
described above. 



School of Pharmacy 



IV. Disciplinary Procedures 

As stated below, the Student Discipline and Grievance Committee will be respon- 
sible for implementing and monitoring aspects of this code for Doctor of 
Pharmacy students. A separate set of procedures is in place for graduate students. 
They should contact their graduate program director for further information. 
PharmD students who are found guilty of a violation of academic integrity stan- 
dards will be subject to penalties deemed appropriate by the Student Discipline 
and Grievance Committee as stated in the committees policies and procedures. It 
is the committee's duty to protect honest students from being taken advantage of 
by those who behave dishonestly. The committee will ensure any accused student 
of certain rights: to be informed in writing of the charges, to hear evidence pre- 
sented, to question witnesses, and to present witnesses. The committee shall 
maintain confidentiality regarding names of persons involved in honor cases. The 
principles and problems raised by cases, however, may be discussed with appro- 
priate administrative and faculty representatives. 



STUDENT DISCIPLINE AND GRIEVANCE COMMITTEE 



1. Purpose 

The Student Discipline and Grievance Committee ("committee") is established 
in the School of Pharmacy to foster the self governance of the student body. The 
committee hears and attempts to solve problems or complaints ("grievances") 
that involve professional students. Grievances against graduate students or faculty 
members are handled under separate policies and procedures. 

Most grievances are brought directly to the committee. However, some inci- 
dents involving students may be resolved outside the formal grievance process. 
Students and faculty members are encouraged to consult with the director of stu- 
dent services who will serve as an ombudsman for the potential grievants and 
may triage the issues to appropriate parties. These initial meetings will be held in 
confidence to encourage disclosure. Potential grievants (either faculty members or 
students) will receive a list of options that are available to them in order to resolve 
issues (see Appendix A). If desired, potential grievants may request a Preliminary 
Evaluation by members of the committee (see Part IV: Preliminary Evaluation) in 
order to assess whether or not the situation is grievable. Students and faculty 
members may file a formal grievance with the committee at any time for issues 
outlined in Section III: Grievances. 

In certain situations, the dean or any of the associate deans can enforce admin- 
istrative dismissal or probation for just cause in situations involving criminal 
activity, potential injury to members of the School's community, or other actions 
that demand an immediate action. Due to confidentiality issues, the administra- 
tion may not be able to share specific details of the situation until a formal 
grievance is filed with the committee. The committee will review these emer- 
gency situations in a timely manner and will conduct formal hearings to 
determine long-term courses of action for the accused. 



PharmD Academic Policy Statements 



II. Committee Composition 

The Student Discipline and Grievance Committee, a sub-committee of the Stu- 
dent Affairs Committee, is composed of seven voting members: four students and 
three faculty members. The student members of the committee include the Stu- 
dent Government Association (SGA) president, the second- and third-year class 
presidents, and the most senior student member of the Student Affairs Commit- 
tee. If a grievance is made against a Nontraditional PharmD (NTPD) Pathway 
student, an NTPD student will replace the most senior student member of the 
Student Affairs Committee. Faculty members include the SGA faculty advisor 
and the third- and fourth-year class advisors. The SGA president chairs the com- 
mittee. The associate dean for student affairs serves as an ex-officio member. In 
the event that a grievance is filed against an NTPD student, the NTPD pathway 
director will serve as an ex-officio member of the committee. 

All members of the committee must be present at formal hearings. Members 
of the committee who cannot attend the hearing or must recuse themselves due 
to a conflict of interest will notify the chair immediately. In the event that a com- 
mittee member cannot attend a formal hearing, the committee chair shall 
appoint a replacement. Each student member of the committee unable to attend 
will be replaced by an elected officer in the SGA or a member of the NTPD 
advisory board. Each faculty member of the committee unable to attend will 
be replaced by a faculty member, preferably a member of the Student Affairs 
Committee. 

III. Grievances 

A student, a group of students, or a faculty member ("grievant") may bring a 
grievance against a student or a group of students ("respondent") for any act that 
is unethical or causes injury or damage. Grievances may include, but are not lim- 
ited to acts of discrimination based on race, age, gender, ethnicity, religion, sexual 
orientation, marital status, physical or mental handicap; violations of academic 
integrity; violations of University or School policies (see School of Pharmacy cat- 
alog); lewd, obscene, or disruptive behavior on University premises or at 
University-supervised activities; sexual harassment; threatening or abusive com- 
munication to members of the University community; intentionally initiating 
any false report or threat of fire, explosion, or other emergency; violations of 
Baltimore City, state, or federal law. 

IV. Preliminary Evaluation 

A grievance must be submitted in writing to the SGA president, the SGA advisor, 
or the association dean of student affairs. Within five days of receipt of a written 
grievance, the SGA president, the SGA advisor, the associate dean for student 
affairs, and either the most senior student member of the Student Affairs Com- 
mittee or an NTPD student (as applicable) will review the facts presented and 
determine if the matter is grievable under this policy. If two or more individuals 
during the preliminary evaluation believe the matter is grievable, a formal hearing 
will be called by the committee chair. If the majority believe the matter is 
not grievable, the associate dean for students affairs will counsel the grievant on 
alternatives. 

62 School of Pharmacy 



V. Grievance Procedure 

Once the grievance is determined to be grievable, the respondent will be sent a 
letter from the committee chair and the associate dean of student affairs stating: 
1) that a formal grievance has been filed; 2) the deadline for submission of a writ- 
ten rebuttal and a proposed date(s) for the formal hearing; and 3) advice and 
counsel should be sought from the academic advisor. Along with the letter, the 
respondent will be provided with a written copy of the grievance and this policy. 
The respondent will be given up to 10 days to provide a written response to the 
committee chair. The committee will hold a formal hearing no more than five 
days after the deadline for receipt of the respondent's written response. 

Prior to the hearing, the grievant's allegations and any supporting information 
will be provided to the respondent for review. Likewise, the respondent's allega- 
tions and evidence shall be provided to the grievant for review. The associate dean 
for student affairs will facilitate this exchange of information. If feasible, support- 
ing evidence will be made available to both parties no less than three days before 
the scheduled hearing. 

The formal hearing is an internal academic process; legal counsel will not be 
permitted to represent either the grievant or the respondent. The grievance is pre- 
sented to the committee by the grievant or by a representative of the dean's office, 
in the presence of the respondent. The presenter of the grievance may call wit- 
nesses to present relevant information. The witnesses supporting the grievant 
may be questioned by the respondent and committee members. 

The respondent has the right to refuse to appear before the committee and the 
right to remain silent during the hearing. Refusal to appear will not be taken as 
an admission of guilt. The respondent has the right to: 1) present a statement in 
the respondent's own behalf at the hearing; 2) present witnesses having relevant 
information pertaining to the grievance; and 3) present relevant evidence in the 
form of written or tangible materials. The witnesses supporting the respondent 
may be questioned by the grievant and committee members. 

The hearings will not be open to the public. All witnesses will be excluded 
from the hearing room until they are called to testify. All witnesses will be asked 
to affirm that any information they are presenting, including any written materi- 
als, is accurate and complete to the best of their knowledge and belief 

Upon completion of the hearing, the committee will meet in closed session to 
determine whether the grievance has been proven by the preponderance of the 
evidence; that is, whether on the basis of the evidence, it is more likely than not 
that the grievance is a correct allegation. The chair will remind the committee 
that it is to be free of bias concerning all aspects of the case in question. Members 
who wish to excuse themselves from the voting due to possible bias may do so. 

The method of voting shall be by secret ballot. To sustain the grievance, a 
majority vote of both the faculty and student committee members is required. All 
other questions before the committee may be decided by a simple majority vote. 

If the vote is that a grievance is not sustained, the case is closed. A record of 
the case will be kept in the committee's files until the respondent leaves the Uni- 
versity. If a grievance is sustained, the committee will decide on a course of 
action. 



PharmD Academic Policy Statements 



VI. Course of Action 

Following a vote sustaining a grievance against a respondent, the committee must 
take one of the following courses of action: 

1. Prepare a disciplinary letter stating that the respondent acted with 
impropriety. This letter is not entered into the student's file but is 
retained in the committee's file until the student has left the School. The 
letter will be sent to the respondent within three days of the Grievance 
Committee hearing. A copy of said letter will be sent to the grievant. 

2. Prepare a temporary letter of censure to remain in the student's file for at 
least one year. The respondent and grievant will be informed in writing 
within three days of the Grievance Committee's action. 

3. Prepare a letter of censure to remain in the student's file permanently. 
The respondent and grievant will be informed in writing within three 
days of the grievance committee's action. 

4. Recommend to the Student Affairs Committee that the respondent be 
placed on disciplinary probation, not to exceed one year. 

5. Recommend to the Student Affairs Committee that the respondent be 
suspended ftom the School for a period of time not to exceed one year. 

6. Recommend to the Student Affairs Committee that the respondent be 
dismissed from the School. 

In addition to the actions stated above, the committee may place other 
requirements on the respondent that relate to the case (e.g., to make restitution 
or repairs when property is damaged, to seek counseling for emotional issues). 

VII. Appeal to the Dean 

A respondent or grievant may appeal any recommended action to the dean. The 
appeal must be made in writing and must be filed in the dean's office. The appeal 
should describe the basis for the appeal. The appeal must be based on new evi- 
dence or relevant facts not produced in the hearing; a claim of inadequate 
consideration of specific evidence; a claim that a rule or regulation of the Univer- 
sity or School applied in the case is not applicable; or a claim that the disciplinary 
action is unduly severe or lenient. 

After reviewing the Grievance Committee's report, the recommendation from 
the Student Affairs Committee, and any appeal(s) from the respondent or griev- 
ant the dean will make a final decision to accept the recommendation or remand 
the matter for reconsideration to the Grievance Committee. The dean will gener- 
ally make a final decision within 14 days after receiving the Student Affairs 
Committee's recommendation and the Grievance Committee's report. If the 
appeal is denied, the dean's action is final. 

VIM. Administrative Issues 

1. Once the grievance process is completed, including any appeal, a record 
of the ca.se will be kept in the dean's office. The names of the grievant 
and respondent and the facts of the case will be kept strictly confidential 
by members of the committee. At the end of each academic year, the 



School of Pharmacy 



chair of the Student Affairs Committee will write an annual report sum- 
marizing the activity of the Grievance Committee. The report will be 
submitted to the dean and the Faculty Assembly. 

2. Grievances will be handled as swiftly as possible. The times set forth in 
this policy are calendar days. Due to the academic schedule, it may not 
be possible to observe the usual deadlines in all cases. If there is good 
cause in the opinion of the committee chair, the deadlines may be 
extended for a reasonable period. Likewise, when the outcome of a mat- 
ter may relate to pending academic action (e.g., graduation), deadlines 
may be sooner, provided that the respondent agrees. A grievance of such 
severity that it might affect the respondents eligibility to graduate will 
be considered on very short notice, with the respondent's consent. Oth- 
erwise, graduation will be deferred pending resolution of the matter. 

3. The committee chair may exclude from consideration repetitive or irrel- 
evant evidence. 

4. Some matters may involve witnesses who are not affiliated with the 
School or evidence which must be obtained from parties other than the 
School and its students and faculty. The School will cooperate with the 
grievants and respondents in requesting that such information be 
brought into grievance procedures as appropriate. Written statements 
are acceptable when personal appearance is impractical. However, no 
grievance process shall be terminated or abandoned due to the inability 
of the School to compel the appearance of a witnesses or presentation of 
evidence. A grievance will be decided on the basis of evidence presented. 
Lack of witnesses or evidence will not create presumptions that the 
testimony and evidence would be favorable to the grievant or the 
respondent. 

5. A grievance may involve facts that are the basis of criminal charges 
against a respondent. The dean will consider a request by a respondent 
to delay committee action, or final decision, pending the outcome of the 
criminal investigation. Such requests will be granted only when consid- 
ered in the best interest of the School. In cases involving felony charges 
directly involving the School, suspension pending outcome of the crimi- 
nal matter may be a condition of delaying the grievance process. 

6. If placed on disciplinary probation, a student may not participate in 
School or University sponsored extracurricular activities or serve as an 
officer in any School or University organization. At the end of the disci- 
plinary probation period, the student will be placed in good standing. If 
suspended, the student may apply to the dean's office for reinstatement 
at the end of the suspension period. A record of the disciplinary proba- 
tion, suspension, or dismissal will be entered in the student's permanent 
transcript and file. 

7. This policy does not apply to academic status within the School. 



PharmD Academic Policy Statements 65 



OPTIONS AVAILABLE TO STUDENTS AND FACULTY 
REGARDING STUDENT GRIEVANCES 

Students and faculty who have witnessed an action by a student that violates the 
School's or University's code of conduct, have a variety of options to pursue. 
Grievances may include, but are not limited to acts of discrimination based on 
race, age, gender, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, marital status, physical or 
mental handicap; violations of academic integrity; violations of University or 
School policies; lewd, obscene, or disruptive behavior on University premises or 
at University-supervised activities; sexual harassment; threatening or abusive 
communication to members of the University community; intentionally initiat- 
ing any false report or threat of fire, explosion, or other emergency; violations of 
Baltimore City, state, or federal law. 

Possible actions that may be taken include the following: 

1. Consulting with the director of student services regarding informal reso- 
lution of problems. 

2. Filing a formal grievance in writing to the SGA president, the SGA advi- 
sor, or the associate dean of student affairs. 

3. Asking another party (student, faculty member, or administrator) to file 
the grievance on your behalf if you feel that you do not want to file the 
grievance but feel compelled to act in this situation. 

4. Speaking at the Discipline and Grievance Committee Hearing, or if you 
do not want to appear, writing a statement to be read at the hearing. 

5. Seeking outside legal counsel and pursuing the case in the local or state 
legal system if you feel that the situation involves criminal or civil action 
against you by the accused. 



OTHER SCHOOL POLICY STATEMENTS 

The School has policy statements relating to other matters, e.g., posting, com- 
puter use, etc., listed on the Web site www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu. 



School of Pharmacy 



University of Maryland 
Policy Excerpts 



No provision of this publication shall be construed as a contract between any applicant 
or student and the University of Maryland, Baltimore. The University reserves the right 
to change any admission or advancement requirement at any time. The University fur- 
ther reserves the right to ask a student to withdraw at any time when it is considered to 
be in the best interest of University. Admission and curriculum requirements are subject 
to change without prior notice. 

The University publishes the full text of the following policies and additional policies 
and procedures in the Student Answer Book. Students who do not receive the Student 
Answer Book each fall should call the Office of Student Services at 410-706-71 17 
(Voice/TTD). The Student Answer Book is online arwww.graduate.umaryland.edu/ 
student/sab/introduction. html. Additional University policies are online at 
www.umaryland.edu/ppm/index.cgi. 



ELIGIBILITY TO REGISTER 

A student may register at the University when the following conditions are met: 
(1) the student is accepted to the University, (2) the student has received approval 
from the unit academic administrator, and (3) the student has demonstrated aca- 
demic and financial eligibility. 



FACULTY, STUDENT, AND INSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES FOR ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 

Preamble 

The academic enterprise is characterized by reasoned discussion between student 
and teacher, a mutual respect for the learning and teaching process, and intellectual 
honesty in the pursuit of new knowledge. By tradition, students and teachers have 
certain rights and responsibilities which they bring to the academic community. 
While the following statements do not imply a contract between the teacher or the 
institution and the student, they are nevertheless conventions which should be 
central to the learning and teaching process. 

I. Faculty Rights and Responsibilities 

A. Faculty members shall share with students and administrators the 
responsibility for academic integrity. 

B. Faculty members shall enjoy freedom in the classroom to discuss subject 
matter reasonably related to the course. In turn, they have the responsi- 
bility to encourage free and honest inquiry and expression on the part of 
students. 



University of Maryland Policy Excerpts 



C. Faculty members, consistent with the principles of academic freedom, 
have the responsibility to present courses that are consistent with their 
descriptions in the catalog of the institution. In addition, faculty mem- 
bers have the obligation to make students aware of the expectations in 
the course, the evaluation procedures, and the grading policy. 

D. Faculty members are obligated to evaluate students fairly, equitably, 
and in a manner appropriate to the course and its objectives. Grades 
must be assigned without prejudice or bias. 

E. Faculty members shall make all reasonable efforts to prevent the occur- 
rence of academic dishonesty through appropriate design and 
administration of assignments and examinations, careful safeguarding of 
course materials and examinations, and regular reassessment of evalua- 
tion procedures. 

F. When instances of academic dishonesty are suspected, faculty members 
shall have the responsibility to see that appropriate action is taken in 
accordance with institutional regulations. 

il. Student Rights and Responsibilities 

A. Students share with faculty members and administrators the responsibility 
for academic integrity. 

B. Students have the right of free and honest inquiry and expression in 
their courses. In addition, students have the right to know the require- 
ments of their courses and to know the manner in which they will be 
evaluated and graded. 

C. Students have the obligation to complete the requirements of their 
courses in the time and manner prescribed and to submit to evaluation 
of their work. 

D. Students have the right to be evaluated fairly, equitably, and in a timely 
manner appropriate to the course and its objectives. 

E. Students shall not submit as their own work any work which has been 
prepared by others. Outside assistance in the preparation of this work, 
such as librarian assistance, tutorial assistance, typing assistance or such 
special assistance as may be specified or approved by the appropriate fac- 
ulty members, is allowed. 

F. Students shall make all reasonable efforts to prevent the occurrence of 
academic dishonesty. They shall by their own example encourage acade- 
mic integrity and shall themselves refrain from acts of cheating and 
plagiarism or other acts of academic dishonesty. 

G. When instances of academic dishonesty are suspected, students shall 
have the right and responsibility to bring this to the attention of the fac- 
ulty or other appropriate authority. 

III. Institutional Responsibilities 

A. Constituent institutions of the University System of Maryland shall take 
appropriate measures to foster academic integrity in the classroom. 



School of Pharmacy 



B. Each institution shall take steps to define acts of academic dishonesty, 
to ensure procedures for due process for students accused or suspected 
of acts of academic dishonesty, and to impose appropriate sanctions on 
students found to be guilty of acts of academic dishonesty. 

C. Students expelled or suspended for reasons of academic dishonesty by 
any institution in the University System of Maryland shall not be 
admissible to any other USM institution if expelled, or during any 
period of suspension. 

Approved November 30, 1989, by the Board of Regents. 



SCHEDULING OF ACADEMIC ASSIGNMENTS 

ON DATES OF RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCE 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland to excuse the absence(s) of students 
that result from the observance of religious holidays. Students shall be given the 
opportunity, whenever feasible, to make up, within a reasonable time, any academic 
assignments that are missed due to individual participation in religious observances. 
Opportunities to make up missed academic assignments shall be timely and shall 
not interfere with the regular academic assignments of the student. Each school/ 
academic unit shall adopt procedures to ensure implementation of this policy. 



CONFIDENTIALITY AND DISCLOSURE 

OF STUDENT RECORDS 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland to adhere to the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act (Buckley Amendment). As such, it is the policy of the 
University (1) to permit students to inspect their education records, (2) to limit 
disclosure to others of personally identifiable information from education records 
without students' prior written consent, and (3) to provide students the opportu- 
nity to seek correction of their education records where appropriate. Each school 
shall develop policies to ensure that this policy is implemented. 



SERVICE TO THOSE WITH INFECTIOUS DISEASES 

It is the policy of the University of Maryland to provide education and training to 
students for the purpose of providing care and service to all persons. The institution 
will employ appropriate precautions to protect providers in a manner meeting the 
patients' or clients' requirements, yet protecting the interest of students and faculty 
participating in the provision of such care or service. 

No student will be permitted to refuse to provide care or service to any 
assigned person in the absence of special circumstances placing the student at 
increased risk for an infectious disease. Any student who refuses to treat or serve 
an assigned person without prior consent of the school involved will be subject to 

University of Maryland Policy Excerpts 69 



penalties under appropriate academic procedures, such penalties to include 
suspension or dismissal. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND POSITION ON ACTS OF 
VIOLENCE AND EXTREMISM WHICH ARE RACIALLY, 
ETHNICALLY, RELIGIOUSLY, OR POLITICALLY MOTIVATED 



The Board of Regents strongly condemns criminal acts of destruction or violence 
against the person or property of others. Individuals committing such acts at any 
campus or facility of the University will be subject to swift campus judicial and 
personnel action, including possible suspension, expulsion, or termination, as 
well as possible state criminal proceedings. 



STUDENT RESIDENCY CLASSIFICATION FOR ADMISSION, 
TUITION, AND CHARGE-DIFFERENTIAL PURPOSES 



I. Policy 

It is the policy of the University System of Maryland Board of Regents to 
recognize the categories of in-state and out-of-state students for purposes of 
admission, tuition, and charge differentials at those constituent institutions 
where such differentiation has been established. The student is responsible 
for providing the information necessary to establish eligibility for in-state 
resident status. 

Students who are financially independent or financially dependent, as 
defined herein, shall have their residency classification determined on the 
basis of permanent residency which for purposes of this policy shall be deter- 
mined by the criteria set forth in I.A. through E. below. A student will be as- 
signed in-state status for admission, tuition, and charge-differential purposes 
only if the student, or in the case of a financially dependent student, the stu- 
dent's parent, guardian, or spouse, fulfills all of the following. 
A. For at least 12 consecutive months immediately prior to and including 
the last date available to register for courses in the semester or session for 
which the petition applies, the student, or if the student is financially de- 
pendent, the parent, guardian, or spouse must: 

• own and continuously occupy or rent and continuously occupy living 
quarters in Maryland. There must exist a genuine deed or lea.se in the 
individual's name reflecting payments or rents and terms typical of 
those in the community at the time executed. People not having such 
a lease may submit an affidavit reflecting payments or rents and terms 
as well as the name and address of the person to whom payments are 
made which may be considered as meeting this condition. As an alter- 
native to ownership or rental of living quarters in Maryland, a student 
may share living quarters in Maryland which are owned or rented and 
occupied by a parent, legal guardian, or spouse; 

School of Pharmacy 



• maintain within Maryland substantially all personal property; 

• pay Maryland income taxes on all earned taxable income, including 
all taxable income earned outside the state; 

• receive no public assistance from a state other than Maryland or from 
a city, county, or municipal agency other than one in Maryland; and 

• have a legal ability under federal and Maryland law to reside perma- 
nently in Maryland without interruption. 

B. For at least 1 1 consecutive months immediately prior to and including 
the last date available to register for courses in the semester for which the 
application applies, the student, or if the student is financially depen- 
dent, the parent, guardian, or spouse must: 

• register all owned motor vehicles in Maryland, and 

• obtain a valid driver's license issued by the state of Maryland, if li- 
censed to drive in any other jurisdiction. 

C. Within the 12 consecutive months immediately prior to and including 
the last date available to register for courses in the semester or session for 
which the application applies, the student, or if the student is financially 
dependent, the parent, guardian, or spouse must register to vote in 
Maryland, if registered in any other jurisdiction. 

D. A financially independent student classified as in-state loses that status at 
such time as the student no longer meets one or more of the criteria set 
forth in LA. through C above. A financially dependent student classified as 
in-state loses that status at such time as the parent, guardian, or spouse on 
whom the status was based no longer meets one or more of those criteria. 

E. In addition, people in the following categories shall be accorded the ben- 
efits of in-state status for the period in which any of the following condi- 
tions apply: 

• a full- or part-time (at least 50 percent) regular employee of the Uni- 
versity System of Maryland 

• the spouse or dependent child of a full- or part-time (at least 50 per- 
cent) regular employee of the University System of Maryland 

• a full-time active member of the Armed Forces of the United States 
whose home of residence is Maryland or one who resides or is sta- 
tioned in Maryland, or the spouse, or a financially-dependent child of 
such a person 

• for University of Maryland University College, a full-time active 
member of the Armed Forces of the United States on active duty, or 
the spouse of a member of the Armed Forces of the United States on 
active duty 

• a graduate assistant appointed through the University System of 
Maryland for the semester or session of the appointment. Except 
through prior arrangement, status is applicable only for enrollment at 
the institution awarding the assistantship 

F. Students not entitled to in-state status under the preceding paragraphs 
shall be assigned out-of-state status for admission, tuition, and charge- 
differential purposes. 

University of Maryland Policy Excerpts 71 



II. Procedures 

A. An initial determination of in-state status will be made by the University 
at the time a student's application for admission is under consideration. 
The determination made at that time, and any determination made 
thereafter, shall prevail for each semester or session until the determina- 
tion is successfully challenged in a timely manner. 

B. A change in residency status must be requested by submitting a Univer- 
sity System of Maryland "Petition for Change in Residency Classifica- 
tion for Admission, Tuition and Charge Differential." A student apply- 
ing for a change to in-state status must furnish all required 
documentation with the petition by the last published date to register for 
the forthcoming semester or session for which a residency classification is 
sought. 

C. The student shall notify the institution in writing within 15 days of any 
change of circumstances which may alter in-state status. 

D. In the event incomplete, false, or misleading information is presented, 
the institution may, at its discretion, revoke in-state status and take other 
disciplinary actions provided for by the institution's policy. If in-state sta- 
tus is gained due to false or misleading information, the University re- 
serves the right to retroactively assess all out-of-state charges for each se- 
mester or session affected. 

E. Each institution of the University System of Maryland shall develop and 
publish additional procedures to implement this policy. Procedures shall 
provide that on request the president or designee has the authority to 
waive any residency criterion as set forth in section I, if it is determined 
that application of the criterion creates an unjust result. These proce- 
dures shall be filed with the Office of the Chancellor. 

ill. Definitions 

A. Financially Dependent: For purposes of this policy, a financially depen- 
dent student is one who is claimed as a dependent for tax purposes, or 
who receives more than one-half of his or her support from a parent, le- 
gal guardian, or spouse during the 12-month period immediately prior 
to the last published date for registration for the semester or session. If a 
student receives more than one-half of his or her support in the aggregate 
from a parent, legal guardian, or spouse, the student shall be considered 
financially dependent on the person providing the greater amount of 
support. The dependent relationship must have formally existed by 
legally contracted marriage or court order recognized under the laws of 
the state of Maryland for at least 12 consecutive months immediately 
prior to and including the last date available to register for courses in the 
semester or session for which the petition applies. 

B. Financially Independent: A financially independent student is one who 
(a) declares himself or herself to be financially independent as defined 
herein, (b) does not appear as a dependent on the federal or state income 
tax return of any other person, (c) receives less than one-half of his or her 



School of Pharmacy 



support from any other person or people, and (d) demonstrates that he 
or she provides through self-generated support one-half or more of his or 
her total expenses. 

C. Parent: A parent may be a natural parent, or if established by a court order 
recognized under the laws of the state of Maryland, an adoptive parent. 

D. Guardian: A guardian is a person so appointed by a court order recog- 
nized under the laws of the state of Maryland. 

E. Spouse: A spouse is a partner in a legally contracted marriage as recog- 
nized under the laws of the state of Maryland. 

F. Self-generated: Describes income which is derived solely from compen- 
sation for an individual's own efforts as evidenced, for example, by fed- 
eral or state W-2 forms or IRS Form 1099, in which interest income is 
based upon finances created from one's own efforts. For the purposes of 
this policy, grants, stipends, awards, benefits, loans, and gifts (including 
federal and state aid, grants, and loans) may not be used as self-generated 
income. 

G. Regular Employee: A regular employee is a person employed by the Uni- 
versity System of Maryland who is assigned to a state budget line. Exam- 
ples of categories not considered regular employees are graduate assis- 
tants, contingent employees, if-and-when-needed, and temporaries. 

Approved by the University System of Maryland Board of Regents, Aug. 28, 1990; 
amended Nov 27. 2000.) 



STUDENT RIGHT-TO-KNOW AND CAMPUS SECURITY ACT 



The Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act (Public Law 101 542), 
signed into federal law Nov. 8, 1990, requires that the University of Maryland 
make readily available to its students and prospective students the information 
listed below. Should you wish to obtain any of the following information, send 
your name, address, school, and program, and a listing of the items of interest to: 

Office of Student Services 

Attention: Student Right-to-Know Request 

University of Maryland 

621 W. Lombard St., Room 302 

Baltimore, MD 21201 

• Financial Aid 

• Costs of Attending the University of Maryland 

• Refund Policy 

• Facilities and Services for Students with Disabilities 

• Procedures for Review of School and Campus Accreditation 

• Completion and Graduation Rates for Undergraduate Students 

• Loan Deferral Under the Peace Corps and Domestic Volunteer Services Act 



University of Maryland Policy Excerpts 



Campus Safety and Security 

Campus Crime Statistics 

Student Sexual Orientation Nondiscrimination 



STUDENT SEXUAL ORIENTATION NONDISCRIMINATION 



I. Background 

Effective July 11, 1997, the University System of Maryland Board of 
Regents specifically prohibited discrimination against students on the basis 
of sexual orientation in academic admissions, financial aid, educational ser- 
vices, housing, student programs and activities, and recruitment. The board 
reserved the right to enforce or comply with any federal or state law, regula- 
tion or guideline, including conditions for the receipt of federal funding. 
This University reiterates its commitment to the most fundamental princi- 
ples of academic freedom, equality of opportunity, and human dignity by 
requiring that treatment of its students and applicants for admission be 
based on individual abilities and qualifications and be free from invidious 
discrimination. 

II. Related Employment Policy 

University students who are also University employees should be aware 
of the "Employee Sexual Orientation Nondiscrimination Policy and 
Procedures." 

III. Definition 

Sexual orientation is the identification, perception, or status of an individual 
as to homosexuality, heterosexuality, or bisexuality. 

IV. Policy 

Consistent with USM's policy, it is this University's policy that: 

• within the University, the educational environment will be free of dis- 
crimination on the basis of sexual orientation, and 

• University students are prohibited from discriminating on the basis of 
sexual orientation against fellow students. University personnel, and 
other people with whom the students interact during the course of their 
educational experiences both on- and off-campus. Students may be disci- 
plined for violation of this policy. 



School of Pharmacy 



Administration and Faculty 



University System of Maryland Board of Regents 

Nathan A. Chapman, Jr., Chairperson 

Lance W. Billingsley 

Thomas B. Finan, Jr., Treasurer 

Patricia S. Florestano 

Louise Michaux Gonzales, Assistant Treasurer 

Nina Rodale Houghton 

The Honorable Steny H. Hoyer, Secretary 

Leronia A. Josey 

Clifford M. Kendall 

Admiral Charles R. Larson, USN (Ret.), Vice Chairperson 

Bruce L. Marcus 

The Honorable Hagner R. Mister, ex officio 

David H. Nevins 

Saleem A. Rasheed, Student Regent 

The Honorable James C. Rosapepe 

The Honorable Joseph D. Tydings 

William T Wood, Assistant Secretary 

University System of Maryland Officials 

Donald N. Langenberg, PhD, Chancellor 

John K. Martin, Vice Chancellor, Advancement 

Charles Middleton, PhD, Vice Chancellor, Academic Affairs 

Joseph Vivona, Vice Chancellor, Administration and Finance 

University of Maryland 

David J. Ramsay, DM, DPhil, President 

Malinda B. Orlin, PhD, Vice President, Academic Affairs; Dean, Graduate 

School 
James T. Hill, Jr., MPA, Vice President, Administration and Finance 
T. Sue Gladhill, MSW, Vice President, External Affairs 
Donald E. Wilson, MD, MACP, Vice President, Medical Affairs; Dean, School 

of Medicine 
Morton I. Rapoport, MD, President and Chief Executive Officer, University of 

Maryland Medical System 
Richard R. Ranney, DDS, MS, Dean, Dental School 
Karen H. Rothenberg, JD, MPA, Dean, School of Law 
Barbara R. Heller, EdD, RN, FAAN, Dean, School of Nursing 
David A. Knapp, PhD, Dean, School of Pharmacy 
Jessie J. Harris, PhD, Dean, School of Social Work 



Administration and Faculty 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



Administration 

David A. Knapp, PhD, Dean and Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Robert S. Beardsley, PhD, Associate Dean, Student Affairs; Professor, Pharmacy 
Practice and Science 

WilHam Cooper, MBA, Associate Dean, Administration and Finance 

R. Gary Hollenbeck, PhD, Associate Dean, Academic Affairs; Associate Profes- 
sor, Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Cynthia Boyle, PharmD, Director, Continuation Studies; Assistant Director, 
Experiential Learning; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Margaret Hayes, MS, Director, Student Services and Career Development and 
Enhancement Services 

Mary Joseph Ivins, Director, Business Services 

Tim Munn, BS, Director, Computer and Network Services 

Virginia Rees, BA, Assistant Director, External Affairs 

Nancita Rogers, MS, Director, External Affairs 

Richard E. Rumrill, MS, Director, Experiential Learning; Assistant Professor, 
Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Barbara G. Zirkin, EdD, Director, Educational Technology; Associate Professor, 
Pharmacy Practice and Science 

Carolyn O. Footman, Executive Administrative Assistant to the Dean 



Board of Visitors 

Robert Adams, MS 
George S. Barrett, PhD 
Alan Cheung, PharmD, MPH 
John M. Coster, PhD, RPh 
PaulT. Cuzmanes,JD, PhD 
Leonard J. DeMino, RPh 
Russell B. Fair, RPh 
William M. Heller, PhD 
Robert Henderson, PD 
Neal Janey, JD 
Donald M. Kirson 
Calvin Knowlton, PhD 
Henri Manasse, PhD 
Ernest Mario, PhD 



Martin B. Mintz, PD, FASCP 
James A. Miller, PD 
Richard P Penna, PharmD 
Robert G. Pinco,JD 
Leonard Rodman 
Gordon Sato, PhD 
David R. Savello, PhD 
Stephen C. Schimpff MD 
Matthew Shimoda, PharmD 
Alex Taylor, BS, Pharm 
George C. Voxakis, PharmD, 

Chairperson 
Clayton L. Warrington, BSP 
Ellen Yankcllow, PharmD 



School of Pharmacy 






Faculty 

Alfred Abramson, BSP, RPh, Pharmacy Management, University of Maryland; 
Director, Pharmacy Practice Laboratory; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Prac- 
tice and Science. 

Bruce D. Anderson, PharmD, DABAT, Chnical Toxicology, Philadelphia Col- 
lege of Pharmacy and Science; Director of Operations, Maryland Poison 
Center; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Larry L. Augsburger, PhD, RPh, Pharmaceutics, University of Maryland; 
Shangraw Professor of Industrial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutics; Professor, 
Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Kenneth S. Bauer, Jr., PhD, PharmD, RPh, Clinical Pharmacology, University 
of Pittsburgh; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Robert S. Beardsley, PhD, RPh, Pharmacy Administration, University of Min- 
nesota; Associate Dean, Student Affairs; Professor, Pharmacy Practice and 
Science. 

Ralph N. Blomster, PhD, RPh, Pharmacognosy, University of Connecticut; Pro- 
fessor Emeritus, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Rachel A. Bongiorno, PharmD, Drug Information Services, Northeastern Uni- 
versity; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Cynthia Boyle, PharmD, University of Maryland; Director, Continuation Stud- 
ies; Assistant Director, Experiential Learning; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy 
Practice and Science. 

Nicole Brandt, PharmD, CGP, Geriatrics, University of Maryland; Assistant 
Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Gary G. Buterbaugh, PhD, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Iowa; 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Andrew Coop, PhD, Opioid Chemistry, University of Bristol; Assistant Profes- 
sor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Richard N. Dalby, PhD, Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, University of 
Kentucky; Associate Professor and Vice Chair, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Russell J. DiGate, PhD, Molecular Biology, University of Rochester; Professor, 
Chairperson, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Bethany DiPaula, PharmD, BCPP, Psychiatry, University of Maryland; Assistant 
Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Thomas C. Dowling, PhD, PharmD, Clinical Pharmaceutical Science/ 
Nephrology, University of Pittsburgh; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice 
and Science. 

Natalie D. Eddington, PhD, Pharmacokinetics, University of Maryland; Associ- 
ate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Donald O. Fedder, DrPH, BSP Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, The 
Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University; Professor, 
Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Hamid Ghandehari, PhD, Pharmaceutics/Novel Drug Delivery Systems, Uni- 
versity of Utah; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 



Administration and Faculty 



Ronald D. Guiles, PhD, Physical Chemistry, University of California at Berke- 
ley; Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Stuart T. Haines, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, CACP, FASHP Ambulatory Care, 
University of Texas at Austin and University of Texas Health Science Center at 
San Antonio; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Jun Hayashi, PhD, University of Connecticut; Associate Professor, Pharmaceuti- 
cal Sciences. 

Stephen W. Hoag, PhD, Pharmaceutics, University of Minnesota; Associate Pro- 
fessor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

R. Gary Hollenbeck, PhD, Pharmaceutics, Purdue University; Associate Dean, 
Student Affairs; Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Robert A. Kerr, PharmD, RPh, Ambulatory Pharmacotherapy and Instructional 
Systems Design, University of California, San Francisco; Professor and Vice 
Chair, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Kwang Chul Kim, PhD, Pharmacology, Ohio State University; Professor, Phar- 
maceutical Sciences. 

Wendy Klein-Schwartz, PharmD, MPH, Clinical Toxicology, University of 
Maryland; Coordinator for Research and Education, Maryland Poison Cen- 
ter; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

David A. Knapp, PhD, RPh, Pharmacy Administration, Purdue University; 
Dean and Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Cherokee Layson-Wolf, PharmD, Community Pharmacy, University of Mary- 
land; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Erik R Lillehoj, PhD, Immunology, Wayne State University School of Medi- 
cine; Research Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Raymond C. Love, PharmD, BCPP, FASHP, Mental Health, University of 
Maryland; Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry; Associate Professor 
and Vice-Chair, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Alexander D. MacKerell, Jr., PhD, Biochemistry, Rutgers University; Associate 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

David A. Mays, MBA, PharmD, BCPS, Drug Information Services, Mercer 
University; Director, Drug Information Center; Associate Professor, Pharmacy 
Practice and Science. 

Mary Lynn McPherson, PharmD, BCPS, CACP, Ambulatory Care and Geri- 
atrics, University of Maryland; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and 
Science. 

Robert J. Michocki, PharmD, BCPS, Ambulatory Care and Geriatrics, Univer- 
sity of Maryland; Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

David B. Moore, MPA, RPh, Health Care Management, Cornell University; 
Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

J. Edward Moreton, PhD, RPh, Pharmacology, University of Mississippi; Pro- 
fessor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Jill A. Morgan, PharmD, BCPS, Pediatrics, University of Illinois at Chicago; 
A.ssistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

C. Daniel Mullins, PhD, Pharmacoeconomics, Duke University, Associate Pro- 
fessor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 



School of Pharmacy 



Jason M. Noel, PharmD, Rutgers University; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy 
Practice and Science. 

Francis B. Palumbo, PhD, RPh, Health Care Administration, University of 
Mississippi; JD, University of Baltimore Law Center; Director, Center on 
Drugs and Public Policy; Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Karen I. Plaisance, PharmD, RPh, BCPS, Pharmacokinetics and Infectious Dis- 
eases, State University of New York at Buffalo; Associate Professor, Pharmacy 
Practice and Science. 

James E. Polli, PhD, RPh, Pharmaceutics, University of Michigan; Associate 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Francoise G. Pradel, PhD, Health Policy and Administration, University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and 
Science. 

Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, PharmD, RPh, BCPS, CDE, Ambulatory Care, 
Community Pharmacy Practice, Diabetes Management, University of Puerto 
Rico, University of Maryland; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and 
Science. 

David S. Roffman, PharmD, RPh, BCPS, Cardiovascular Therapeutics, Univer- 
sity of Maryland; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Gerald M. Rosen, PhD, Chemistry, Clarkson College of Technology; JD, Duke 
University School of Law; Emerson Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Richard Rumrill, MS, FASHP, Pharmacy, University of Florida; Director, Expe- 
riential Learning; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Ginette Serrero, PhD, University of Nice, France; Professor, Pharmaceutical 
Sciences. 

Paul Shapiro, PhD, Pharmacology/Signal Transduction, University of Vermont 
College of Medicine; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Gary H. Smith, PharmD, FASHP, FCCP, Drug Information and Infectious 
Diseases, University of California; Professor and Chair, Pharmacy Practice and 
Science. 

Rakesh Srivastava, PhD, Cancer Biology, University of Guelph, Ontario, 
Canada; Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Bruce C. Stuart, PhD, Economics, Washington State University; Parke-Davis 
Professor; Director of the Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging, 
Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Daniel J. Sussman, PhD, Biochemistry, Johns Hopkins University; Research 
Assistant Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Anthony C. Tommaselio, PhD, RPh, Substance Abuse and Chemical Depen- 
dence, University of Maryland; Director, Office of Substance Abuse Studies; 
Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

James A. Trovato, PharmD, BS, RPh, BCOP, Hematology and Oncology, 
Purdue University; Assistant Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Mona Tsoulderis, PharmD, BCPS, Ambulatory Care and Asthma Management, 
University of Maryland; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Ashiwel S. Undie, PhD, Pharmacology, the Medical College of Pennsylvania; 
Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 



Administration and Faculty 



Jia Bei Wang, PhD, Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, University 
of Maryland; Associate Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Myron Weiner, PhD, RPh, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Mary- 
land; Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Sheila R. Weiss, PhD, Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University; Assistant Pro- 
fessor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Angela Wilks, PhD, Biochemistry, University of Leeds, England; Assistant 
Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Catherine B. Willmore, PhD, RPH, Medical College of Virginia; Instructor and 
Research Specialist, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Jeremy Wright, PhD, RPh, Biomedicinal Chemistry, University of London; Pro- 
fessor Emeritus, Pharmaceutical Sciences. 

Julie Magno Zito, PhD, Social and Behavioral Pharmacy, University of Min- 
nesota; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Barbara G. Zirkin, EdD, Johns Hopkins University; Director Educational Tech- 
nology; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Ilene H. Zuckerman, PharmD, RPh, Geriatrics and Ambulatory Care, Univer- 
sity of Maryland; Associate Professor, Pharmacy Practice and Science. 

Adjunct Faculty 

Clinical Professor 

Thomas Sisca, PharmD, Shore Health System 

Clinical Associate Professor 

Daniel Ashby, MS, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Patrick Birmingham, MAS, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Karim Calis, PharmD, NIH Clinical Center 

Joseph Gallina, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 

Rolley Johnson, PharmD, Johns Hopkins Bayview Campus 

Carlton K. Lee, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Douglas J. Scheckelhoff, MS, Children's National Medical Center 

Phillip Weiner, PharmD, Weiner's Home Health Care 

Donald K. Yee, BSP, Kaiser Permanente 

Clinical Assistant Professor 

Rasha S. Abouelkheir, BSP Walgreens 

Stephen J. Adamczyk, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Virna I. Almuete, BSR The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 

Marsha Alvarez, PharmD, Program Support Center 

Linda W. Anderson, PhD, Christiana Care Health System 

Michelle Andoll, JD, Maryland Board of Pharmacy 

Virginia L. Apyar, BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Mahiyar Arjomand, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Maria Apostolarios, PharmD, Otsuka America Pharmaceutical 

Susan Arnold, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 



School of Pharmacy 



David M. Arrington, PharmD, Suburban Hospital 
Hector Ayu, MBA, Kmart Pharmacy 
Lee Barker, MBA, Safeway Pharmacy 

Cynthia E. Barlow, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 
Phyllis Bartilucci, MS, Civista Medical Center 
Britt C. Bayles, PharmD, National Naval Medical Center 
Megan E. Bayliff, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 
Richard Baylis, BSP, Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center 
Trent Beach, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 
Gerald Beachy, BSP, Beachy's Pharmacy 
David Becker, BSP CVS Pharmacy 
John Beckman, BSP, Beckman Greene Street Pharmacy 
Robert Berg, PharmD, VA Medical Center 
Michael Berndt, MS, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Brian Berryhill, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 
Stephen, Bierer, BSP Wal-Mart Pharmacy 
Alisa E. Billington, BSP, Woodhaven Pharmacy 
Mary C. Binghay, PharmD, Shady Grove Adventist Hospital 
Anthony Bixler, BSP, York Apothecary, Inc. 
Frank Blatt, PharmD, Oak Dale Pharmacy 
Ruth Blatt, BSP NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 
Michael N. Blazejak, BSP, Franklin Square Hospital 
Barry Bloom, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 
Thomas Bolt, BSP, The Medicine Shoppe 
Gene Borowski, BSP, Village Pharmacists 
John Braaten, BSP, Twin Knolls Pharmacy 
Lynette Bradley, PhD, CVS Pharmacy 
Thomas Brenner, BSP, York Hospital 
James L. Bresette, PharmD, IHS Office of Public Health 
Barry Bress, MHA, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Jeffrey Brewer, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 
Eric L. Brooks, BSP Wal-Mart Pharmacy 
Keith Broome, BSP, Pharmacare of Cumberland 
Daria A. Brown, PharmD, Columbia Arlington Hospital 
Brian D. Buck, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 
Patrick Burke, BSP Chestnut AID Pharmacy 
Royce A. Burruss, MBA, Homecall Pharmaceutical Service 
Alvin Burwell, PharmD, Alexandria Pharmacy 
Demetris M. Butler, PharmD, Laurel Regional Hospital 
Sherry L. Butler, BSP, Metro Pharmacy 
James B. Caldwell, PharmD, Anne Arundel Medical Center 
Kevin Callahan, PharmD, Shore Health System 
Kelly Cantwell-McNelis, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 
Thomas P. Cargiulo, PharmD, University of Maryland Drug Treatment Center 
Mark Chamberlain, PharmD, University of Maryland Drug Information 
Service 



Administration and Faculty 



Leo Chan, BSP, Food and Drug Administration 

Robert Chang, BSP, Maryland Department of Health & Mental Hygiene 

David R. Chason, MBA, Good Samaritan Hospital 

Fred Chatelain, MS, INOVA-Alexandria Hospital Pharmacy 

Fred Choy, MS, Millenia Healthcare Corporation 

Eugene R. Cierniak, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Johanna M. Clark, BSP, Center for Health Information, Inc. 

Nancy Clark, PharmD, Spring Grove Hospital Center 

Lou Cobuzzi, MS, VA Medical Center 

Gerald Cohen, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Kimberly A. Compton, BSP, Food and Drug Administration 

Catherine Cooke, PharmD, Pfizer, Inc. 

Deborah B. Cooper, PharmD, AdvancePCS 

Teresa E. Corbo, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Kimberly B. Couch, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

James M. Crable, BSP, Finan Center 

Judy L. Grain, PharmD, Shore Health System 

Daniel Crerand, BSP, Family Health Apothecary, Inc. 

Terry Crovo, BSP, Ensign Pharmacy at Good Samaritan Hospital 

Wayne Crowley, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Hedy Cylus-Gleiman, BSP, CVS ProCare Pharmacy 

Dinesh V. Dave, MS, Shoppers Pharmacy 

Robert DeChristoforo, MS, National Institutes of Health 

Rhea-Marie del Rosario, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Morrell C. Delcher, MBA, Mercy Medical Center 

Randy Delker, PharmD, HMIS, Inc. 

Karl D. Dickson, BSP Walgreens 

Robert Dombrowski, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Joseph Dorsch, Jr., MBA, Voshell's Pharmacy 

Charles R. Downs, PharmD, Washington County Hospital 

Patricia Draper, BSP, Edwards Pharmacy 

Leilani D. Drayer, BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Babette S. Duncan, PharmD, AdvancePCS Clinical Services 

Janice Dunsavage, MAS, Pinnacle Health Hospitals 

Quynh N. Duong, PharmD, Y & S Pharmacy Services 

Joseph C. Dupuis, MBA, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Augustine Durso, BSP, IV TX of Maryland 

Jeffrey Edwards, BSP, Greater Baltimore Medical Center 

Jeffrey E. Ensor, PharmD, Greater Baltimore Medical Center 

Eugene Erb, PharmD, Shore Memorial Hospital 

Michael J. Evanko, BSP VA Medical Center 

Mark Ey, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Darlene Fahrman, BSP, Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Alfred Fallavollita, Jr., MS, NIH National Cancer Institute 

Samia H. Farah, BSP VA Medical Center 

Richard J. Faris, MS, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 



School of Pharmacy 



Cynthia Feinberg, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Madeline Feinberg, PharmD, Chase Braxton Clinic 

Richard Fejka, MS, NIH Clinical Nuclear Pharmacy 

Robert Feroli, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 

Philip Fiastro, BSP Weis Pharmacy 

Jerome Fine, PharmD, HMIS, Inc. 

Aliya Fouzi, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 

Anthea Francis, BSP The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 

Catherine E. Fronc, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Albert T. Fuch, Jr., BSP Weis Pharmacy 

Robert J. Fuentes, MS, Medlmmune, Inc. 

Dwayne J. Gallagher, PharmD, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 

Howard J. Gampel, BSP, CVS Pharmacy 

Nahid Gazy, PharmD, Kmart Pharmacy 

Valerie J. George, BSP, Weis Pharmacy 

David Gerrold, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Robert Gerstein, BSP Weis Pharmacy 

Sandra Geyser, BSP, University of Maryland Medical System 

Mary Giesey, MBA, North Arundel Hospital 

Nancy Gilbert-Taylor, BSP, Fuller Medical Center Pharmacy 

Donald J. Glenn, MPH, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Harvey Goldberg, BSP, Freedom Drug 

Marvin Goldberg, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Barry Goldspiel, PharmD, NIH Clinical Center 

Alan Goldstein, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Thomas Goolsby, BSP, Weis Pharmacy 

Bruce M. Gordon, PharmD, BD Healthcare Consulting 

Gail M. Goshey, BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Charles Graefe, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Ben Grismore, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Patricia E. Grunwald, PharmD, Frederick Memorial Hospital 

Maria T. Guintu, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

Karl F. Gumpper, BSP, Children's National Medical Center 

Douglas Haggerty, BSP, Target Pharmacy 

Cynthia J. Halas, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Mayer Handleman, BSP NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Jon Hann, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

Michael C. Hawk, BSP Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Elham Hekmat, PharmD, Georgetown University Hospital 

Frank Henderson, Jr., BSP Klein's Pharmacy 

Peggy Dimetra Papageorge Henkle, BSP, Weis Pharmacy 

Gerard Herpel, BSP Deep Creek Pharmacy 

Andrea Hershey, PharmD, Union Memorial Hospital 

William A. Hess, BSP, Food and Drug Administration 

William Hill, BSP Hill's Drug Store 

Andrea Hoguet, PharmD, VA Medical Center 



Administration and Faculty 



A- Herbert Holmes, Jr., PharmD, Severn Healthcare 

Carol Hoiquist, BSP, Food and Drug Administration 

Angelique K. Hooper, BSP, Anchor Pharmacy 

Charles V. Hoppes, MPH, Food and Drug Administration 

Jon D. Horton, PharmD, York Hospital 

Stephen Hospodavis, BSP, Steve's Pharmacy 

David W. Houston, Jr., BSP Anchor Pharmacy 

Anthony Ihenatu, PharmD, Bon Secours Hospital 

Amy Ives, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Thomas Jackson, BSP, St. Mary's Hospital 

Christopher W. James, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Robert A. Jasinski, BSP, City Pharmacy of Elkton 

Sandra A. Jaskulski, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Julie S. Johnson, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Mitchell A. Johnston, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

John T. Jordan, Jr., PharmD, Peninsula Regional Medical Center 

Ramon Juta, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Timothy T. Kafauver, BSP, VA Medical Center 

Christine Kahley, PharmD, York Hospital 

Behnam Kamrad, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Tep M. Kang, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Bennett Kantorow, BSP VA Medical Center 

Robert Kantorski, BSP, Ritchie Pharmacy 

Albert Katz, PharmD, Arundel Pharmacy 

Ronald E. Kavanagh, PharmD, Food and Drug Administration 

Laura Keefer, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 

Charles 'W. Kelly, BSP, Craig's Drug Store, Inc. 

Deanna L. Kelly, PharmD, Maryland Psychiatric Research Center 

Ed Kern, BSP Weis Pharmacy 

Mark Kern, PharmD, Mercy Medical Center 

Masoomeh Khamesian, PharmD, Howard County General Hospital 

Brenda J. Kiliany, PharmD, Food and Drug Administration 

Brian Y. Kim, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

Hannah Kim, PharmD, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists 

Mari Kim, PharmD, Doctors' Community Hospital 

Tina S. Kim, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

David King, BSP, Georgetown Infusion Services 

Larissa Kitenko, PharmD, Peninsula Regional Medical Center 

Ronald P. Kleiman, BSP, Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Dennis Klein, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Robert Kline, BSP, Atlantic General Hospital 

David Knauer, BSP, Johns Hopkins Pharmaquip 

Joan Korek, PharmD, Astra Pharmaceuticals 

David A. Kotzin, MS, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Tamara Kozlowski, PharmD, Carroll County Hospital 

Mary E. Kremzner, PharmD, Food and Drug Administration 



School of Pharmacy 



Jay Krosnick, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Edmond J. Kucharski, BSP, Carroll County Hospital 

John A. Kudrick, MS, McKesson Bioservices 

Scott Kuperman, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Vincent Lacroce, PharmD, Penn State Geisinger Health System 

Lisa Lansberry, PharmD, Giant Pharmacy 

Judy L. Lapinski, PharmD, CVS Pharmacy 

Betsy T. Le, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Dan Le, PharmD, Franklin Square Hospital Center 

Louise Leach, BSP, Northwest Hospital Center 

Alice Lee, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Laura Lees, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 

Laura R. Lehman, PharmD, Union Memorial Hospital 

DeAnna D. Leikach, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Neil Leikach, BSP, Catonsville Pharmacy 

Louis E. Levenson, MAS, Kernan Hospital 

Mark A. Levi, BSP, Epic Pharmacies, Inc. 

Bonnie Levin, PharmD, Laurel Regional Hospital 

Dizza Levy, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Joseph Libercci, BSP, Park Avenue Pharmacy 

Mark Lichtman, BSP, Drug City Pharmacy 

David Liebman, DPA, Kayes AID Pharmacy 

Larry P. Lim, PharmD, Food and Drug Administration 

Steven D. Lowery, PharmD, Pharmacare of Cumberland 

Timothy Lubin, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Mitchell D. Lucy, MS, Malcolm Grow Medical Center 

Nancy B. Mabie, BSP, U.S. Pharmacopeia 

Alonzo Mable, MS, Kaiser Permanente 

Marie Mackowick, PharmD, Crownsville Hospital Center 

Alexandra L. MacLeod, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

JefFery Maltese, BSP, Shoppers Pharmacy 

Laura K. Mark, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 

Scott M. Mark, PharmD, Children's National Medical Center 

Paul Marra, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

JuliannaT. Marten, PharmD, Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital 

Brian R. Martin, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Robert Martin, Jr., BSP, Potomac Valley Pharmacy, Inc. 

Todd E. Martino, PharmD, Giant Pharmacy 

Robert Massey, MSA, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Herbert G. Mathews IH, PharmD, Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital 

Peter T. Mbi, BSP The Medicine Shoppe 

Robert J. McAuley, MS, Pfizer, Inc. 

Mark McDougall, BSP McDougall's Pharmacy 

Helen McFarland, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 

Earle G. McFerren, BSP Eckerd Pharmacy 

Gina McKnight-Smith, PharmD, MBA, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 



Administration and Faculty 



Michael F. McMahon, BSR Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Neo Melonas, BSP, VA Medical Center 

Henry E. Merritt, PharmD, National Naval Medical Center 

Nasir Mian, PharmD, Reston Hospital Center 

Harvey Miller, BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Katherine D. Mills, PharmD, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 

Martin Mintz, BSP, Northern Pharmacy & Medical Equipment 

Rita Mitsch, PharmD, Franklin Square Hospital Center 

Laurie Mohler, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Joseph M. Morrissey, MS, Howard County General Hospital 

Pam Moussavian-Yousefi, PharmD, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Jeffrey L. Moyer, BSP, Waynesboro Hospital 

Charles Muendlein, BSP, Lykos Pharmacy 

Linda Nadal-Hermida, BSP, Kmart Pharmacy 

Leon Nelson, BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Matthew Nelson, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

John Ness, PharmD, Fallston General Hospital 

Pauline Newman, BSP, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 

Teresa Ng, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Nicole T. Nguyen, BSP, Shoppers Pharmacy 

Bao-Anh Nguyen-Khoa, PharmD, Center for Health Information, Inc. 

Mary Ann Niesen, PharmD, Crownpoint Healthcare Facility 

Akwasi Nkansah, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Ronald A. Nosek, Jr., MS, National Naval Medical Center 

Joseph Nusbaum, BSP, Ambulatory Care Pharmacy 

Godwin Odunze, MS, DC Chartered Health Center 

Donna L. O'Keefe, PharmD, Washington County Hospital 

Helen Osborn, BSP, Montgomery General Hospital 

Richard Ottmar, MBA, Western Maryland Health System 

Heather A. Owens, PharmD, Pharmaquip/Rx Express at Bayview 

Larry Owens, PharmD, York Hospital 

Victoria C. Paoletti, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Jane A. Paranych, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 

Joseph Pariser, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Richard D. Parker, Jr., BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Daniel S. Pastorek, BSP, Shoppers Pharmacy 

Ashish Patel, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

Kalpna Patel, MS, Giant Pharmacy 

Mira M. Patel, BSP, The Medicine Shoppe 

David W. Patterson, BSR Health Guard 

Robert Patti, PharmD, York Hospital 

Carol Paulick, MBA, St. Agnes Health Care 

James Pellenbarg, BSP, Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Maureen A. Pelosi, BSP Food and Drug Administration 

David Perrott, BSP, Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital 

Janice V. Perry, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

86 School of Pharmacy 



Lynn J. Peterson, BSP, CVS Pharmacy 

Wallace Pickworth, PhD, NIDA, Addiction Research Center 

Mark Pilachowski, BSP, Kleins Pharmacy 

Sanyi Pin, BSP, Bon Secours Hospital 

Bonnie L. Pitt, MAS, Frederick Memorial Hospital 

Marilyn R. Pitts, PharmD, Greater Southeast Community Hospital 

Barry Poole, BSP, Food and Drug Administration 

David Posner, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Patricia A.G. Powers, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Cathy A. Prenger, PharmD, CVS Pharmacy 

Douglas Pryor, MBA, Maryland General Hospital 

Frank Pucino, Jr., PharmD, National Institutes of Health 

Jacob Raitt, PhD, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Ashok A. Ramkissoon, BSP, HomeCall Pharmaceutical Services, Inc. 

Blanca Ratzlaff, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Diane T. Raum, BSP, Safeway Pharmacy 

Robert F. Reinke, BSP, Greater Baltimore Medical Center 

Jeffery A. Reitz, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Earl W. Rhoads, BSP The Medicine Shoppe 

Carol Ritchie, BSP, Thomas B. Finan Center 

Kim Z. Robbins, BSP, Happy Harry's Pharmacy 

Michael D. Roberts, MS, National Rehabilitation Hospital 

David Rochlin, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Jeffrey Rodkey, BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Amilcar Rodriguez, MS, National Naval Medical Center 

Luis F. Rosado, BSP, Target Pharmacy 

Dennis Rosenbloom, PharmD, Rexall Pharmacy 

Wendy M. Rosenthal, PharmD, MedOutcomes, Inc. 

Annette M. Rowden, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 

Carol Rudo, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

David Russo, MBA, Russo's Pharmacy 

James J. Rybacki, PharmD, The Clearwater Group 

Cyrus Samet, PharmD, Suburban Hospital 

Margaret A. Sanbower, BSP, Weis Pharmacy 

Brian T. Sanderoff, BSP, Your Prescription for Health 

Mark R. Sanford, MBA, University of Maryland Medical System 

Joseph J. Scalese III, BSP Weis Pharmacy 

Randolph Schaap, BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Edward Schairer, BSP, Weis Pharmacy 

Howard R. Schiff, BSP, Maryland Pharmacists Association 

Angelica Schneider, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Kevin A. Schnupp, PharmD, Maryland General Hospital 

Joseph Schuman, BSP, Maryland Rehabilitation Center Pharmacy 

Brian Schumer, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Rizwan A. Shah, MS, Weis Pharmacy 

Kelly Shanahan, BSP, Kmart Pharmacy 



Administration and Faculty 



Brent Sharf, BSP, Bon Secours Hospital 

Matthew G. Shimoda, PharmD, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Chong W. Shin, BSP, University of Maryland Medical System 

Scott A. Shoop, PharmD, Christiana Care Health System 

Lawrence Siegel, MAS, Carroll County Hospital 

Cheryl Simmons-Gray, PharmD, Kaiser Permanente 

Robert Sinker, BSP, Potomac Village Pharmacy 

Melissa Skarbelis, BSP, Wal-Mart Pharmacy 

Jann B. Skelton, MBA, Medica 

Ralph A. Small, Jr., BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Billy R. Smith, MA, Monarch Pharmaceuticals, Inc. 

Donald Smith, PharmD, USPHS YK Delta Regional Hospital 

John Smith, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Gary Sobotka, BSR CVS Pharmacy 

Dominic A. Solimando, Jr., MA, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Suzanne L. Spurr, PharmD, Wal-Mart Pharmac)' 

James R. Staffa, BSP, Shoppers Pharmacy 

Leila V. Stecklein, PharmD, Kaiser Kensington Pharmacy 

Carol Stevenson, BSP, Metro Pharmacy 

Jerry C. Stewart, BSP, Western Maryland Health System 

Howard C. Stoops, BSP, Syncor Pharmacy Services 

Gary R. Stout, BSP, Safeway Pharmacy 

Susan Sullivan, BSP, Target Pharmacy 

Susan L. Summers, BSP, CVS Pharmacy 

Suzanne Suter-Lowe, BSP, Rite Aid Pharmacy 

William Tabak, BSP Rite Aid Pharmacy 

Richard Tarr, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Lawrence Taylor, BSP, CVS Pharmacy 

Eloise Thibault, PharmD, American Pharmaceutical Association 

Christopher E. Thomas, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

Keith R. Thomasset, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Karen Thompson, BSP, St. John's Pharmacy 

Donna L. Topping, PharmD, The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Lisa Townsend, PharmD, Hill's Drug Store 

Dat T. Tran, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

Hieu T. Tran, PharmD, Kent General Hospital 

Penelope Trikeriotis, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Kathleen Truelove, BSP The Johns Hopkins Hospital 

Marshall Tsakiris, BSP, Giant Pharmacy 

Richard Tsao, PharmD, Greater Southeast Community Hospital 

Sara C. Turk, PharmD, Good Samaritan Hospital 

Nancy D. Tzeng, PharmD, Johns Hopkins Bayview 

Tracy M. Valani, PharmD, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center 

Beth Vanderheyden, PharmD, University of Maryland Medical System 

Wayne VanWie, BSP, Safeway Pharmacy 

David J. Vaxmonsky, BSP, Happy Harry's Pharmacy 

88 School of Pharmacy 



Michael A. Veltri, PharmD, Johns Hopkins Children's Hospital 

Rebecca A. Viola, BSP, Walter Reed Army Medical Center 

Paul Vitale, PharmD, Anne Arundel Medical Center 

Doris Voigt, BSP, Kimbrough Ambulatory Care Center 

J. Kenneth Walters, PharmD, Sheppard Pratt Hospital 

Terrill Washington, PharmD, VA Medical Center 

D. Raymond Weber, PharmD, Kent and Queen Anne's Hospital 

Marc R. Weinberg, BSP, Super Fresh Pharmacy 

Michael Weinstein, BSP, The Apothecary 

Sandra S. Werking, PharmD, Mercy Medical Center 

Stephen W Wickizer, PharmD, AHCPR 

Thomas Wleland, BSP, Safeway Pharmacy 

Stephen Wienner, BSP, Mt. Vernon Pharmacy 

Anne M. Wiland, PharmD, Universiry of Maryland Medical System 

Donna C. Williams, BSP, Alpharma 

Thomas Williams, PharmD, Wellspan Pharmacy 

Rene L. Williamson, PharmD, Kaiser Permanence 

Sharon D. Wilson, PharmD, Universiry of Maryland Medical System 

Thomas Wilson, PharmD, Cape Apothecary 

Dante R. Winter, BSP CVS Pharmacy 

Rudy Winternitz, BSP, Brookville Pharmacy 

Eileen Wu, PharmD, Montgomery General Hospital 

Beverly Yachmetz, PharmD, Diabetes Connection 

Ellen Yankellow, PharmD, Y&S Pharmacy Services, Inc. 

Martin Yankellow, BSP, Weis Pharmacy 

David M. Yoder, PharmD, HomeCall Pharmaceutical Services, Inc. 

Eric J. Yospa, BSP, Family Pharmacy of Hampstead 

Deirdre A. Younger, BSP, Health Center Pharmacy 

Jonas J. Yousem, BSP, NeighborCare Pharmacies, Inc. 

Catherine C. Yu, PharmD, Food and Drug Administration 

Faramarz Zarfeshanfard, BSP, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System 

C. Alex Zarow, MBA, Kent General Hospital 

Robert Zepp, BSP, Universiry of Maryland Medical System 

Clinical Instructor 

William R. Chester, PharmD, Safeway Pharmacy 

Seth A. Cohen, PharmD, CVS Pharmacy 

Chi Duong, PharmD, Santa Fe Indian Hospital 

William Ehrlich, PharmD, Johns Hopkins Bayview 

Robin Garner-Smith, PharmD, Care Apothecary 



Administration and Faculty 



Program Course 
Descriptions 



PHARMD COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



DIDACTIC REQUIRED COURSES 



PHAR 510— Biochemistry (3) 

A course of study which builds on the principles of cell biology and genetics with 
a systematic consideration of the chemical components and requirements of liv- 
ing systems from the molecular to the cellular level. These fundamentals of 
biochemical structure, function, and energetics provide a platform for compre- 
hension of pharmaceutical biotechnology, and for understanding determinants of 
disease, the pathobiochemistry of organ systems, mechanisms of drug action and 
adverse reactions, and novel drug delivery systems. 

PHAR 5 1 3— Drug Chemistry (2) 

A study of the principles of organic chemistry that comprise basic elements of 
pharmaceutical science. The emphasis is on the relationship between molecular 
structure and chemical, physical, and biophysical properties of systems that arise 
from molecular interactions. The course provides a platform for comprehension 
of pharmaceutical concerns such as the stability of drugs and drug products, the 
conformation of bioactive proteins, the basis for drug-receptor interactions, the 
structure of biological membranes, and major drug classes. 

PHAR 514— Human Biology I (3) 

A consideration of the human body as an integrated, functioning organism with 
emphasis on how organs work individually and in harmony during the regulation 
of complex body functions necessary to establish and maintain homeostasis, and 
mechanisms underlying disordered organ functions and homeostasis. The 
anatomy, histology, and physiology of the human body is organized by organ sys- 
tems to include the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, 
cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive 
systems. 

PHAR 516 — Pharmacy Practice and Education (2) 

This prefatory course introduces the new Doctor of Pharmacy student to the 
science and profession of pharmacy. The evolution and implications of pharma- 
ceutical care and the philosophical basis for the pharmacy curriculum are 
discussed. Students are introduced to skills necessary for success during the four- 
year curriculum through the opportunity to critically evaluate problems, discuss 



School of Pharmacy 



ethical dilemmas, develop and apply computer and literature-retrieval skills, and 
practice verbal and written communication skills. The importance of indepen- 
dent and cooperative learning activities is emphasized. 

PHAR 5 1 7— Study Design and Analysis (2) 

Students are introduced to the pivotal role of study design and statistical analysis 
considerations in the design and evaluation of basic, clinical, epidemiological, 
and social science research. The course focuses on the proper design of studies 
with emphasis on threats to internal validity and generalizability. A variety of 
descriptive and inferential statistical procedures and methods are surveyed with 
emphasis on the interpretation of the results of research. 

PHAR 520— Molecular Biology (3) 

This course is an integrated Cell and Molecular Biology course. It is designed to 
thoroughly introduce the student to the mechanisms of DNA replication, recom- 
bination, repair, transcription, protein synthesis, and gene regulation and signal 
transduction. The course focuses on the relationship of these processes to current 
pharmaceutical interventions and those of the future. At the conclusion of this 
course, the student will also be able to describe, in detail, the mechanisms of 
DNA metabolism, protein synthesis, gene regulation, and signal transduction. 
The student will also be able to describe and indicate the basis for current diag- 
nostic tests that incorporate modern Cell and Molecular Biology techniques. 

PHAR 522— Context of Health Care (3) 

Students actively develop a contemporary definition of health care and critically 
examine the health care system with special emphasis on relevant legislation, tra- 
ditional and nontraditional providers oi health care, the organization and 
financing of health care delivery, and the dynamics of pharmaceutical care within 
the system. The social, legal, and professional implications of informatics and 
computer proliferation in our society is discussed with special emphasis on phar- 
macy practice. 

PHAR 523— Ethics in Pharmacy Practice (I) 

Introduction to the principles of ethical thinking. The philosophy of ethics and 
role of formal codes of professional conduct are discussed in the context of resolv- 
ing conflicting ethical principals. 

PHAR 524— Human Biology II (3) 

A consideration of the human body as an integrated, functioning organism with 
emphasis on how organs work individually and in harmony during the regulation 
of complex body functions necessary to establish and maintain homeostasis, and 
mechanisms underlying disordered organ functions and homeostasis. The 
anatomy, histology, and physiology of the human body is organized by organ sys- 
tems to include the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, 
cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. 



Program Course Descriptions 



PHAR 525— Immunology (2) 

The natural and acquired protective mechanisms of the immune system are dis- 
cussed with topics ranging from the structure, function, and specificity of 
antibodies; B-lymphocyte and T-lymphocyte functions; initiation and control of 
immune responses; histocompatibility; and immune-mediated disease. The 
course is designed to provide the student with sufficient knowledge of humoral 
and cellular immunity to understand the role of the immune system in disease, 
the production and use of vaccines and related biologicals, and the rapidly grow- 
ing areas of transfusion, transplant, and tumor immunology. 

PHAR 526— Physical Chemistry (2) 

A study of selected principles of physical chemistry that comprise basic elements 
of pharmaceutical science. The emphasis is placed on the relationship between 
molecular structure and the physical and biophysical properties of systems that 
arise from molecular interactions. The goal of the course is to apply the principles 
of physical chemistry to the practice of pharmacy. 

PHAR 530— Microbiology/Antibiotics I (2) 

A study of the major classes of pathogenic bacteria, bacterial infectious diseases 
and antibacterial agents. This course surveys pertinent features of bacterial struc- 
ture and virulence factors, host response and disease manifestations and 
antibacterial drug design, mechanisms, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity profile. 
This course will provide the framework for consideration of the therapeutic prin- 
ciples involved in treating bacterial diseases. 

PHAR 531 — Pharmaceutical Chemistry (2) 

A presentation of the basic chemical principles underlying the activity, absorp- 
tion, metabolism, excretion, physico-chemical properties, and design of drug 
molecules, culminating in a discussion of drug classes. 

PHAR 533— Medicinal Chemistry 1(1) 

A comprehensive study of the chemistry of drug products. The course outline 
will follow the pharmacological classification of drug molecules, and will include 
discussion of chemical properties (physical and organic), stability, solubility, 
mechanisms of action where appropriate, and structure-activity relationships. 
Where possible, quantitative computer designed studies of drug development will 
be mentioned. 

PHAR 534— Human Biology III (3) 

A consideration of the human body as an integrated, functioning organism with 
emphasis on how organs work individually and in harmony during the regulation 
of complex body functions necessary to establish and maintain homeostasis, and 
mechanisms underlying disordered organ functions and homeostasis. The 
anatomy, histology, and physiology of the human body is organized by organ sys- 
tems to include the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, 
cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. 



School of Pharmacy 



Ai 



PHAR 535— Pharmaceutics (3) 

The application of fundamental principles and basic science knowledge to the 
multidimensional problems of the formulation, development, testing, produc- 
tion, distribution, and administration of safe, effective, stable, and reliable drug 
delivery systems. These systems, ranging in sophistication from tablets and cap- 
sules to biodegradable implants, are discussed using a problem-based approach 
that focuses on the critical determinants for traditional and less-traditional routes 
of drug administration. 

PHAR 536— Pharmacology I (3) 

A systematic consideration of the molecular, cellular, and organismic mechanisms 
of drug action, organized by major drug classes. This course of study provides 
knowledge of the mechanisms of drug action underlying their use in the treat- 
ment of specific and general disease processes. 

PHAR 537— Principles of Drug Action (2) 

A study of the chemical and biological concepts which apply to the characteriza- 
tion, evaluation, and comparison of all drugs. Topics such as dose-response and 
receptor theory, receptor transduction mechanisms, pharmacologic selectivity, 
pharmacogenetic drug tolerance and dependence, drug allergy, drug resistance 
and chemical mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and teratogenesis are discussed at the 
molecular and cellular level. The physical, biological, and chemical principles 
underlying drug absorption, distribution, biotransformation, and excretion are 
discussed from the molecular to the organ level. 

PHAR 540 — Microbiology/Antibiotics II (2) 

A study of the major classes of pathogenic fungi and viruses, the diseases that they 
cause and antifungal and antiviral agents. This course surveys pertinent features 
of fungal and viral structure, virulence factors, life-cycle, disease manifestations 
and antifungal/antiviral drug design, mechanisms, pharmacokinetics, and toxic- 
ity profile. This course will provide the framework for consideration of the 
therapeutic principles involved in treating fungal and viral diseases. 

PHAR 541 — Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacokinetics (3) 

In this course, the student learns how the processes of drug absorption, distribu- 
tion, metabolism, and excretion are coupled with dosage and the important 
parameters of clearance, volume of distribution, and bioavailability, to determine 
the concentration of a drug at its sites of action in the body. The quantitative 
relationship between dose and effect is developed as a framework with which to 
interpret measurements of drug concentrations in biological fluids. 

PHAR 542— Clinical Chemistry (I) 

Principles of analytical chemistry, clinical chemistry, enzyme assays, electrophore- 
sis, radioactivity, magnetic resonance, biotechnology-based diagnostics and 
biosensors, and immunoassay are examined. Emphasis is on the application of 
these methods to the determination of drug concentrations in chemical and bio- 



Program Course Descriptions 



logical systems, and health promotion and assessment. Students also have oppor- 
tunities to examine patient data and use commercially available diagnostic kits. 

PHAR 543— Medicinal Chemistry II (2) 

A comprehensive study of the chemistry of drug products. The course outline 
will follow the pharmacological classification of drug molecules, and will include 
discussion of chemical properties (physical and organic), stability, solubility, 
mechanisms of action where appropriate, and structure-activity relationships. 
Where possible, quantitative computer designed studies of drug development will 
be mentioned. 

PHAR 545— Practice Management (3) 

Management principles are provided to construct a practical framework for the 
operational management of a business of pharmacy. Elements addressed in this 
course include controllable and uncontrollable variables in a free-market econ- 
omy; work flow analysis; accounting and budget development; purchasing and 
inventory control; quality assurance; and third-party reimbursement issues. The 
course also examines the current practical developments related to human 
resources management through integrating information on organization behav- 
ior, psychology, economics, and law. 

PHAR 546— Pharmacology II (3) 

A systematic consideration of the molecular, cellular, and organismic mechanisms 
of drug action, organized by major drug classes. This course of study provides 
knowledge of the mechanisms of drug action underlying their use in the treat- 
ment of specific and general disease processes. 

PHAR 552 — Principles of Human Nutrition (I) 

This required course builds on materials in earlier coursework including Funda- 
mentals, Basic Science, and Pharmaceutical Science. The course focuses on the 
preparation of pharmacists to deliver pharmaceutical care services related to 
patients' nutritional needs. The course prepares the student to understand princi- 
ples of nutrition in relation to contemporary public health issues and to 
treatment of diseases and physiologic processes. The materials taught in this 
course are applied and further developed in subsequent modules in the Integrated 
Science and Therapeutics course sequence and in Longitudinal Pharmaceutical 
Care II. 

PHAR 553 — Population Based Medical information Analysis (2) 

This course is designed to enhance a student's skills in the areas of information 
collection, retrieval, analysis, and interpretation. A variety of topics surrounding 
the aspects of drug information practice will be presented, including the role of 
informational services in health care. Students will enhance both their written 
and verbal communication skills as they not only are asked to retrieve pertinent 
clinical information, but also then to interpret, document, and integrate this 
information into the development of clinical practice guidelines and subsequent 
outcome measures. 

94 School of Pharmacy 



PHAR 554 — Integrated Science and Therapeutics I (4) 
PHAR 555 — Integrated Science and Therapeutics II (4) 
PHAR 564 — Integrated Science and Therapeutics III (4) 
PHAR 565 — Integrated Science and Therapeutics IV (4) 

Basic and clinical science Faculty interact with students during a variety of didac- 
tic and laboratory experiences as students learn to design, implement, and 
monitor pharmaceutical care plans for specific patients with specific diseases. 
Methods for the choice of drug product, definition of the specific goals of ther- 
apy, including the means to assess whether these goals are being achieved, and 
active intervention steps at the patient, prescriber, health care system, and popu- 
lation levels to ensure successful outcomes of drug therapy are developed. The 
courses are organized according to the major physiological systems of the human 
body, and the disease states commonly associated with them and encountered 
and observed by the pharmacy practitioner in a variety of community and insti- 
tutional practice settings. A goal of these courses is to prepare students to be able 
to better integrate new scientific knowledge into the successful pharmaceutical 
care of patients with the goal of reducing the health care costs to patients and 
society. The knowledge and behaviors acquired during these courses prepare the 
student for the community and institutional pharmaceutical care rotations of the 
experiential learning program of the curriculum. 

PHAR 580— Pharmacy Law (2) 

An examination of the legal and regulatory issues pertaining to drugs and devices 
and the practice of pharmacy. Students learn the various laws and regulations 
which would govern their usual daily activities in a variety of practice sites. 

PHAR 581 — Senior Colloquium (I) 

Students deliver oral presentations to share some aspect of their educational expe- 
[ rience, practice aspirations, or career goals with their student peers and the 
faculty. This forum fosters a critical examination of each student's formal educa- 
tion in the context of the practice of pharmaceutical care. 



EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING REQUIRED COURSES 

PHPC 510 — Introduction to Professional Practice 1(1) 
PHPC 520 — Introduction to Professional Practice 11 (I) 

Students observe the practice of pharmacy in community, institutional, and spe- 
cialty practice environments. They analyze the types of services provided in each 
setting and the personnel involved in the delivery of those services. Students 
experience the basic elements of safe medication order processing and pharma- 
ceutical care. An important goal of the course is for students to identify and assess 
career options in pharmacy practice. Activities include laboratory exercises, a 
career pathway workshop, and Web-based assignments. 



Program Course Descriptions 



^ 



PHPC 532 — Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care 1(1) 

Students observe the delivery of pharmaceutical care to patients over time. Partic- 
ular attention is paid to assessing the changing needs of patients as health 
transitions occur. Under the supervision of an experienced pharmacy practitioner, 
students have regularly scheduled encounters with patients. Students learn how 
to effectively collect information from a variety of sources, including the patient, 
and prepare periodic health status reports. As students obtain knowledge and 
skills in didactic courses (pharmaceutics, pharmacology, human biology), they 
learn to explicitly apply such knowledge and skills to their patients. (Register 
Spring Semester, Second Year) 

PHPC 562 — Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care II (I) 

This course is a continuation of PHAR 532 — Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care 
I. Students have periodic encounters with previously assigned patients. Students 
learn to assess drug therapy problems and develop pharmaceutical care plans. Par- 
ticular attention is given to the needs of patients during health transitions. These 
experiential activities are closely linked throughout the third year to the didactic 
activities in the Integrated Science and Therapeutics series of courses. (Register 
Spring Semester, Third Year) 

PHPC 570 — Safe Medication Order Processing in Community 
Pharmacy (3) 

PHPC 571 — Safe Medication Order Processing in Institutional 
Pharmacy (3) 

Students may take these courses after successfully completing the second 
year. PHPC 570 (Community) and PHPC 571 (Institutional) are required, 
three-credit professional practice experiences which target the inter-related 
elements of safe medication order processing, drug distribution, patient interac- 
tion, supervision of pharmacy technicians, use of technology, and practice 
administration/personnel management. In both the community and institutional 
setting, under the supervision of clinical faculty, students will be challenged to 
develop skill, competence, and efficiency in processing medication orders for dis- 
tribution to and safe use by patients. (Register Fall Semester, Fourth Year) 

PHPC 572 — Pharmaceutical Care I (3) 
PHPC 573— Pharmaceutical Care II (3) 
PHPC 574— Pharmaceutical Care III (3) 
PHPC 575— Pharmaceutical Care IV (3) 

This series of required professional practice experiences is designed to provide the 
student with extensive experience in pharmaceutical care delivery in a variety of 
direct patient care settings. Students gain skill through daily one-on-one interac- 
tions with patients, caregivers, physicians, nurses, and other health care 
professionals. There are four month-long, full-time required rotations. At least 
one rotation must be completed in an acute-care hospital setting and one in a 
community setting. Although each site will differ in terms of the patient popu- 
lation, disease acuity, scope of practice, resources, and availability of 



School of Pharmacy 



patient-specific data, students will take responsibility for drug therapy outcomes. 
Students will learn to: 1) collect and record patient-specific data; 2) identify, list, 
and assess drug-related problems; 3) develop and record pharmaceutical care 
plans; 4) educate patients and health care professionals regarding the appropriate 
use of drugs; and 5) measure and document patient outcomes. These activities 
are closely linked to PHPC 576 — Ambulatory Clinic and concurrent with 
PHPC 577 — Informational Services. Prerequisites: PHPC 571 and successful 
completion of the Integrated Science and Therapeutics course series 

PHPC 576— Ambulatory Clinic (I) 

This series of required experiences is normally taken concurrently with the Phar- 
maceutical Care rotations (PHPC 572, 573, 574, and 575). A total of 16 
half-day experiences is required, for a total of 64 hours. Following the pharma- 
ceutical care model, students will conduct patient interviews, perform 
appropriate pharmacotherapy-oriented physical assessments, order appropriate 
laboratory tests, initiate and/or change drug therapy regimens and conduct 
patient follow-up. (Register Spring Semester, Fourth Year) Prerequisites: PHPC 
571 and successful completion of the Integrated Science and Therapeutics course 



PHPC 577— Informational Services (2) 

This course must be taken concurrently with the Pharmaceutical Care rotations 
(PHPC 572, 573, 574, and 575). During the course of daily activities on Phar- 
maceutical Care and Ambulatory Clinic rotations, students learn how to receive 
drug information questions in a comprehensive manner, conduct timely and 
thorough literature searches, evaluate sources of information, and provide appro- 
priate responses. Students are also expected to subscribe to an affordable 
abstracting service and develop a personal information library. (Register Spring 
Semester, Fourth Year) Prerequisite: Successful completion of PHAR 553. 



DIDACTIC ELECTIVE COURSES 

The elective didactic (PHMY) courses currently offered by the School of Phar- 
macy are described below. In general, higher course numbers indicate courses 
with important prerequisite requirements, and are designed for later years of the 
curriculum. Prerequisites for most electives include consent of the instructor and 
the student's advisor. Some electives are offered in either the fall or spring semes- 
ters, and some are offered both semesters. Refer to the class schedule when 
making course selections. 

PHMY 510 — Advanced Educational Opportunities (I) 

This elective program provides students interested in graduate school or research 
careers with knowledge and information about various advanced educational 
opportunities in the curriculum. Aspects of careers which require advanced study 
are described by professionals in those career areas and by students currently 

Program Course Descriptions 97 



enrolled in them. The course offers diverse perspectives on goals, training, func- 
tions, settings, and opportunities in research in pharmaceutical sciences and 
pharmacy practice. 

PHMY 5 I I — Diabetes Disease State Management (I) 

This course will review the pathophysiologic changes associated with diabetes 
mellitus (Types I and II, impaired glucose tolerance, and gestational diabetes), 
nonpharmacologic management (nutrition and exercise), pharmacologic man- 
agement, complications of diabetes mellitus, principles of education (children, 
adolescents, adults, and geriatrics), continuous care (skin and foot care, OTC 
product selection), blood and urine monitoring, special population considera- 
tions (children, adolescents, geriatrics, visually impaired patients), psychosocial 
aspects of diabetes (dealing with diagnosis, developing support strategies, and 
adherence to regimens), and how to set up a diabetes-focused practice. Prerequi- 
site: Fourth-year status. 

PHMY 512 — Case Based Management of Infectious Diseases 1(1) 
PHMY 513 — Case Based Management of Infectious Diseases II 

(1.2) 

These courses provide third- and fourth-year students and students in the Non- 
traditional Pathway with an opportunity to critically examine the clinical 
decisions made in the management of patients with infectious diseases. During 
the first course, students will review the therapeutic decisions made in the care of 
a patient encountered during an experiential course and review the literature rele- 
vant to those decisions. During the second course, students will present a case 
discussion, including a thorough review of the standard of care and the literature 
support for the decisions made. Prerequisites: Third-year status or PHNT 545 
and 546. 

PHMY 514 — Teaching Preparation and Skills (I) 

The course is a basic introduction to instructional activities in general and teach- 
ing at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy in particular. The first two 
days consist of a series of presentations on teaching-related topics. The instructors 
will develop a short interactive lecture on diabetes management to demonstrate 
each aspect of the teaching and presentation development process. There will be 
frequent in-class activities requiring student interaction. During these, students 
will begin to develop their own topic for presentation on the last day of class. 
Teaching Preparation and Skills is an unusual modular course originally devel- 
oped for nontraditional PharmD students. It was intended to improve their 
ability to make in-class presentations. However, since the ability to create and 
deliver a lecture or seminar is fundamental to many students and faculty mem- 
bers within the School, it is now frequently attended by graduate students and 
new faculty members. In addition to teaching participants how to make presenta- 
tions in general, it focuses on using presentation technology available in the 
School of Pharmacy. 



School of Pharmacy 



PHMY 515 — Contraception: Principles and Practice (I) 

Instruction in this course focuses on the development of skills related to inter- 
viewing, evaluating, and counseling patients regarding contraception. At the 
completion of this course, the student should be able to state the advantages and 
disadvantages of the commercially available contraceptive options, effectively 
counsel patients on the use of contraceptive products, and determine the most 
appropriate contraceptive method(s) for a specific patient. Students are encour- 
aged to practice newly acquired skills during patient encounters on experiential 
rotations. Prerequisites: Completion of Human Biology III (PHAR 534), Phar- 
macology I (PHAR 536), Principles of Drug Action (PHAR 537), and 
Longitudinal Care I (PHPC 532) or permission of coursemaster. 

PHMY 516— Geriatric Imperative (2) 

The Geriatric Imperative Minimester is a five-day interdisciplinary course open 
to all University of Maryland students during the first week in January. The 
course presents a wide range of information on the health and well-being of older 
adults through clinical, research, and policy presentations. Course content will be 
conveyed through lectures, panel discussions, team and case presentations, role 
play, video tapes, and site visits. Students will be required to write an in-depth 
paper on a subject pertaining to geriatrics/gerontology within two months of 
completing the didactic portion of the course. 

PHMY 517 — Geriatric Pharmacotherapy (2) 

This course provides advanced discussion of the geriatric diseases and different 
presentations of disease and responses to therapy. A case-based approach expands 
on previous geriatric coursework and allows students to apply material to differ- 
ent patient-care settings. Journal club and drug information questions are utilized 
to illustrate concepts. Prerequisite: Third-year status. 

PHMY 518— Drug Abuse Education (1-3) 

Practice and training in the dissemination of drug information, especially drug 
abuse information to the public, are linked to the activities of the Student Com- 
mittee on Drug Abuse Education (SCODAE). Students complete a 10-hour 
training session, observe community education programs presented by 
SCODAE, present several programs, and prepare a written report on a timely 
topic in the area of chemical dependence. 

PHMY 520— Organizational Behavior (3) 

The study of the effects of human behavior on organizational effectiveness. 
Attention is given to quality, team work, attitude toward work, satisfaction and 
commitment, building and exercising organizational power, the role of leader- 
ship, sustaining motivation, participatory decision-making, and the process for 
change, development, and continuous improvement. 



Program Course Descriptions 



PHMY 521— Financial Reporting (3) 

This course is a study of financial reporting, analysis and strategy principles 
applied to for-profit and not-for-profit health care organizations. Accounting 
issues related to strategic decision-making in health service production, financ- 
ing, and investment will be emphasized throughout the course. Topics include 
the health care accounting environment, revenue and expense recognition, bal- 
ance sheet valuations, ratio analysis, budgeting and control systems, cost 
accounting, performance measurement, variance analysis, cost-volume-profit 
relationships, and capital budgeting. Special attention is given to the financial 
implications of third-party payment systems and measuring the profitability of 
managed-care contracts. 

PHMY 522 — Business Plan Development (2) 

An elective course for students interested in ownership or management of their 
own pharmacy practice, emphasizing the practical problems associated with 
establishing a new business or expanding an existing enterprise. Location and 
market analysis, target marketing, revenue and expense projections, and estima- 
tion of capital requirements are among the topics covered. 

PHMY 523— Advanced First Aid (3) 

Advanced first aid and emergency care, including CPR. 

PHMY 524— Marketing (3) 

Marketing introduces methodologies for identifying changes in the organization's 
marketplace and adapting to them. The course uses the market-orientation con- 
cept, emphasizing customer needs, total integration of the firm, and the profit 
potential to examine the marketing process, and in doing so, will use pharmacy- 
based examples. Prerequisite: PHAR 545 — Practice Management. 

PHMY 525 — Comprehensive Pediatric Care (2) 

Comprehensive pediatric care is a two-credit course offered in the spring semester 
for third- and fourth-year students in the entry-level Doctor of Pharmacy Pro- 
gram. This elective course is designed to prepare students to optimize medicine 
use in pediatric patients in the ambulatory or institutional setting. The course 
will cover cognitive and physiological development, psychosocial factors affecting 
medicine use, pharmacist role, regulatory issues, and pediatric pharmacotherapy 
for various disease states. 

PHMY 528 — Selected Topics in Geriatrics and Gerontology (1-3) 

This course provides an educational experience through investigating geriatrics 
and gerontology at the School's Center for the Study of Pharmacy and Therapeu- 
tics for the Elderly. Through an elder-visitation experience, students select an 
elderly person living in the community and track the individual's pharmaceutical 
care needs. Students also participate in guided discussions addressing elder health 
care problems and solutions. 



School of Pharmacy 



PHMY 529— Special Group Studies (1-5) 

(Repeacable up to 12 credits) An omnibus course permitting experimentation 
with new or different subject matter and/or instructional approaches. 

PHMY 537 — Clinical Aspects of Drug Dependence (2) 

This course familiarizes students with the clinical aspects of chemical depen- 
dence. Special emphasis is placed on the pharmacology of commonly abused 
psychoactive substances and the role of pharmacological supports in the treat- 
ment of addiction. 

PHMY 539— Special Projects (1-3) 

(Repeatable up to 12 credits) Independent investigations consisting of library or 
laboratory research, seminars, or other assignments appropriate to the problem 
investigated. 

PHMY 541— Introduction to the Poison Center (I) 

This course provides students the opportunity to observe and be involved in a 
clinically oriented pharmacy practice setting early in their education. Students 
learn about the Poison Center's operation and resources and the potential for 
pharmacist participation in this area of patient care. The course consists of dis- 
cussion sessions, activities in the Maryland Poison Center, role playing, and 
laboratory sessions focusing on toxicology resources and communication skills. 
Students present cases on a home-management and a hospital-management drug 
overdose. 

PHMY 543 — Honors Seminar in Pharmacy Administration (I) 

A survey of current literature in the general area of pharmacy practice and admin- 
istrative science. Each week, a recently published paper related to the economic, 
social, behavioral, or educational aspects of pharmacy is discussed and evaluated. 
Special student research projects may also be undertaken. 

PHMY 550 — Adverse Drug Reactions (2) 

Focus is on the clinical manifestations and incidence of drug reactions, systems 
affected, differentiation among idiosyncratic reactions, hypersensitivity reactions, 
extensions of pharmacologic action, and assessment of drug reaction literature. 

PHMY 551 — Recent Advances in Pharmacology (I) 

The objective of this course is to present advances in pharmacology and toxicol- 
ogy. Sessions emphasize experimental and clinical findings and their 
interpretation and significance in relation to basic and applied aspects of pharma- 
cology and toxicology. Attention is also given to experimental design and 
methodology of the studies in question. 

PHMY 552— Pharmacology and Aging (I) 

This course presents advances in our understanding of variations in drug 
response in the aging population. The course is designed to give students an 



Program Course Descriptions 



appreciation for the basic physiological and biomedical changes which normally 
occur with aging and how these changes relate to altered pharmacodynamic and 
pharmacokinetic responses following drug administration. Basic and clinical 
pharmacologic studies are used to support the conclusions presented. 

PHMY 553 — Consumer Education Program for Older Adults (2) 

This course trains students to educate the elderly about drugs and drug-taking. 
Students benefit from the didactic and applied aspects of the course, since they 
must first learn about the special needs of the elderly and then actually interact 
with the elderly both in large groups and one-on-one. 

PHMY 554— Health Education Seminar (2) 

The course prepares students to become effective health educators to patients, 
other health care practitioners, and/or the community. The theoretical and con- 
ceptual bases of the health education discipline are fully developed. Students 
learn the techniques of behavioral and educational diagnosis and their applica- 
tion to the development of educational intervention. 

PHMY 556— Advanced Pharmacology I (2) 
PHMY 557— Advanced Pharmacology II (2) 

This course expands and extends the pharmacology material learned in the 
required courses PHAR 536 and 546. The course format is the discussion of 
assigned topics and review of original papers in a two-hour, weekly session. These 
sessions include graduate students in the pharmaceutical sciences. 

PHMY 560 — The Pharmacist in the Critical Care Setting (I) 

This course identifies and explores the role of the pharmacist in various critical- 
care settings. The student will be able to see how critical-care pharmacy has 
evolved to complement the medical and nursing management of the critically ili 
patient. 

PHMY 561 — Advanced Therapeutics Seminar (3) 

An advanced course dealing with complex drug therapy decision-making, using 
case presentations and current literature. Requires active student participation in 
resolution of therapeutic controversies. 

PHMY 562 — Clinical Pharmacokinetics (2) 

The course will extend the student's knowledge of clinical pharmacokinetics, 
develop the student's skills in providing pharmacokinetic drug monitoring during 
PharmD rotations, and prepare students for post-graduate work in clinical phar- 
macology research. Emphasis is placed on the application of these principles to 
clinical practice and clinical research. 



School of Pharmacy 



PHMY 563 — Pharmacotherapeutic Issues in the Critically III 
Patient (2) 

This course is an elective seminar for students interested in critical care pharma- 
cotherapy. Topics include a broad scope of disease states and drug issues 
frequently encountered in an ICU setting. Presentations will identify the phar- 
macologic aims and controversies in the management of a particular topic, while 
simultaneously underscoring the complexities of drug therapy in the critically ill 
patient, which may lead to untoward reactions or suboptimal care. 

PHMY 567— Advanced Cardiac Life Support (2) 

This course focuses on the role of the pharmacist in the setting of cardiac arrest. 
A lecture format covers the pathophysiology, epidemiology, therapeutic goals, 
and treatment modalities in cardiac arrest as described by the Standards and 
Guidelines developed by the National Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resusci- 
tation and Emergency Cardiac Care. Topics include the role of the pharmacist 
on the cardiac arrest team, an in-depth discussion of the role of pharmacologic 
intervention, techniques of basic and advanced cardiac life support, and post- 
resuscitative care. 

PHMY 574— Pharmacotherapeutics I (2) 
PHMY 575— Pharmacotherapeutics 11 (2) 

Pharmacotherapeutics is a course in advanced therapeutic decision-making which 
parallels the therapeutic topics offered in the Integrated Science and Therapeutics 
modules during the third year of the curriculum. The course requires students to 
formulate therapeutic decisions based upon case materials and emphasize the 
process of decision-making in the presence of multiple patient and agent vari- 
ables. As the number of cumulative therapeutic topics increases, the complexity 
of the decision-making increases. Students are expected to incorporate data from 
the primary literature as part of the therapeutic decision-making process. 

PHMY 576 — Advanced Topics in Pharmaceutics (2) 

This course will allow students to become familiar with advanced topics in phar- 
maceutics. Different topics will be presented in the form of lectures, group 
discussions of original papers, and laboratories and will include bile acid seques- 
trants, drug dissolution, production methods for inhalation aerosols, 
metered-dose inhaler formulation, tablet compaction, pellet drug delivery, critical 
formulation and manufacturing variables, oral drug absorption, and novel chem- 
ical approaches for targeted drug delivery. Prerequisites: PHAR 535 — 
Pharmaceutics or concurrently enrolled in Pharmaceutics or consent of course- 
master. 

PHMY 577 — Pharmacoeconomics (3) 

This course is designed to familiarize students with the economic structure, con- 
duct, and performance of the pharmaceutical industry. The course includes such 
topics as prices and profit in the industry, productivity, costs, economies of scale, 
innovation, economic effects of regulation, and cost benefit and cost effectiveness 



Program Course Descriptions 



analysis of pharmaceuticals. Prerequisite; One undergraduate course in econom- 
ics or permission of instructor. 

PHMY 580— Drugs and Public Policy (2) 

An examination of public policy issues related to drug use in our society. Cases, 
small group discussions, and outside experts will be used to analyze contempo- 
rary issues affecting pharmacy and health care. 

PHMY 581— Research Pathway Seminar (I) 

The objective of this course is to provide an overview of pharmaceutical and 
other health- and life-science-oriented research by attending research seminars 
and participating in the discussion of those seminars. 

PHMY 582 — Advanced Patient Assessment (2) 

Students will develop advanced patient assessment skills that are relevant to the 
provision of pharmaceutical care. At the completion of this course, the student 
will be able to skillfully: 1) conduct patient interviews; 2) examine patients to 
make diagnostic, triage, and therapeutic decisions; 3) perform simple laboratory 
tests; and 4) develop strategies to assess adherence to prescribed therapeutic regi- 
mens. Prerequisites; Successful completion of PHAR 541 — Biopharmaceutics 
and Pharmacokinetics, PHAR 542— Clinical Chemistry, PHAR 554-55, 
564—65 — Integrated Science and Therapeutics, and PHPC 532 — Longitudinal 
Pharmaceutical Care I or permission of coursemaster 

PHMY 583— Management of Health Care Systems (3) 

This course will familiarize students with the different practice settings in inte- 
grated health systems ranging from community pharmacies to managed care 
organizations and hospitals. Areas that will be covered include pharmacy benefits 
management, disease state management, information management, models of 
integrated health systems, management of the therapeutic process, negotiating 
and networking, and the response of pharmac)' practice settings to the changes in 
these systems. Prerequisites; PHAR 523 — Ethics, PHAR 545 — Practice Manage- 
ment, PHPC 570 — Safe Medication Order Processing in Community Pharmacy 
Rotation, and PHPC 571 — Safe Medication Order Processing in Institutional 
Pharmacy Rotation. 

PHMY 584— Patient Counseling (2) 

Students will learn key information about the Top 100 prescribed drugs in the 
United States. The content will focus on information that needs to be communi- 
cated to patients concerning their therapy. This material will reinforce what 
students have learned in other courses. In addition, students will become familiar 
with new product-specific material that has not been addressed in the curricu- 
lum. Periodic quizzes will assess student knowledge. The Pharmacy Practice 
Laboratory will also be used to videotape students as they counsel simulated 
patients. 



School of Pharmacy 



PHMY 585— Perspectives of Mental Health (2) 

This course provides students with an understanding of the mental health sys- 
tem, discusses controversies that may face the practicing pharmacist, familiarizes 
students with tools and techniques for studying psychopharmacologic agents, 
and helps to define pharmacists' roles in providing mental health care. 

PHMY 586— Journal Club (2) 

This elective course is abilities-based, structured in a journal club format, and 
parallels second-year courses. The elective provides a forum in which students 
can practice and enhance oral and written communication skills, literature 
retrieval, and evaluation activities, while learning new information relating to 
ongoing required coursework. Students select articles from the primary, basic, or 
clinical research literature and lead discussions of the articles. The discussions 
include study design, informational content, and how articles relate to and 
enhance the topics of second-year courses the students are concurrently taking. 

PHMY 587— Mammal Anatomy and Histology (2) 

This advanced-level elective course provides students a structured opportunity for 
a major dissection of two mammalian species. Students observe the location and 
structure of all organs of the body and their relation to each other. Working in 
pairs at their own pace, students systematically dissect an adult, preserved cat and 
a pregnant rat. Prerequisite: PHMY 590 — Fetal Pig Anatomy and/or consent of 
coursemaster 

PHMY 590— Fetal Pig Dissection (I) 

This elective course provides students the opportunity to dissect a mammalian 
species and observe the location and structure of most organs of the body and 
their relation to each other. Prerequisite: PHAR 514 — Human Biology I and/or 
consent of coursemaster. 

PHMY 591 — Principles and Practice of Modern Compounding (2) 

Using a combination of lectures, problem-solving workshops, and skill-building 
laboratories, this course teaches the appropriate extemporaneous compounding 
of drug preparations in pharmacies. Prerequisite: PHAR 535 — Pharmaceutics. 

PHMY 592— Clinical Toxicology (2) 

The clinical toxicology course will provide students with an overview of the clini- 
cal manifestations, assessment and treatment of poisonings with common drug, 
chemical, and biological agents. The format includes lectures by faculty mem- 
bers, case assignments, and discussions led by students. Course evaluation 
includes the discussion sessions, a paper on students' choice of toxicology topic, 
a midterm, and a final exam. Prerequisite: Third-year status. Note: This course 
is highly recommended as preparation for PHEX 551 — Poison Information 
Rotation. 



Program Course Descriptions 



PHMY 593— Care of the Terminally III (2) 

This course prepares students to interact with terminally ill patients through 
increased understanding of the social and psychological aspects of death and 
dying as well as the palliative pharmacotherapeutic management of these 
patients. Prerequisite: Third-year status. 

PHMY 594 — Introduction to Community (2) 

This course engages students in service-learning through work with the ENABLE 
Program, relating community needs in west Baltimore City to their future role as 
pharmacists. Prerequisite: PHAR 532 — Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care L 

PHMY 595 — Herbalism and Alternative Medicine (2) 

This course explores the principles behind the botanical information and folklore 
uses of herbal remedies and provides an overview of alternative medicine as it is 
currently emerging. Alternative medicine therapies are also discussed: their ratio- 
nale, safety, validity, and current therapeutic use. 

PHMY 596 — Nonprescription Medicine (2) 

This course is designed to thoroughly familiarize the student with OTC medica- 
tions. Emphasis will be placed on the pharmacology of these drugs, potential 
disease states in which the drugs will be used, self-administration techniques, 
consideration in selecting a product, triage issues, and patient counseling. Prereq- 
uisite: Third-year status. 

PHMY 597— Bereavement (I) 

This course addresses the skills and knowledge needed to serve bereaved individ- 
uals: the theory of attachment, loss, and grief, as well as how to effectively interact 
with the bereaved. 



EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING ELECTIVE COURSES 

The experiential learning elective (PHEX) courses currently offered by the School 
of Pharmacy are described below. In general, experiential electives can be taken 

for either 2 or 3 semester hours of credit. PHEX 5 indicates the 2-hour elective 

while PHEX 5 A indicates the 3-hour elective. For example, a student register- 
ing for a 2-hour Parenteral Nutrition rotation would register for "PHEX 550" 
and "PHEX 550A" for the 3-hour rotation. 

PHEX 540 — Contemporary Pharmacy Practice (2, 3) 

PHEX 541— Bone Marrow Transport (2, 3) 

PHEX 542— Neurology (2, 3) 



School of Pharmacy 



PHEX 550— Parenteral Nutrition (2, 3) 

PHEX 551 — Drug Information Clerkship (2, 3) 

PHEX 552 — Poison Information (2, 3) 

PHEX 559— Research (2, 3) 

PHEX 560— Internal Medicine (2, 3) 

PHEX 561— Ambulatory Care (2, 3) 

PHEX 562 — Clinical Pharmacokinetics Clerkship (2, 3) 

PHEX 563— Administration (2, 3) 

PHEX 564— Cardiology (2, 3) 

PHEX 565— Critical Care/Shock Trauma (2, 3) 

PHEX 566— Critical Care/MICU (2, 3) 

PHEX 567 — Diabetes Care Management (2, 3) 

PHEX 570 — Food and Drug Administration (2, 3) 

PHEX 571 — Gastrointestinal Surgery (2, 3) 

PHEX 572 — Geriatric Pharmacotherapy (2, 3) 

PHEX 573— Home Health Care (2, 3) 

PHEX 574— Infectious Disease (2, 3) 

PHEX 575— Infectious Disease/HIV (2, 3) 

PHEX 576— Oncology (2, 3) 

PHEX 577— Oncology/Infectious Disease (2, 3) 

PHEX 580— Oncology/TPN (2, 3) 

PHEX 581— Oncology/Research (2, 3) 



Program Course Descriptii 



PHEX 582— Pediatrics (2, 3) 

PHEX 583— Nuclear Pharmacy (2, 3) 

PHEX 584 — Chemical Dependence Treatment (2, 3) 

PHEX 585— Chemical Dependence Research (2, 3) 

PHEX 586— Veterinary Medicine (2, 3) 

PHEX 587— Psychiatry (2, 3) 

PHEX 589— Special Studies (2, 3) (Repeatable up to 12 credits.) 

PHEX 589— SPEC/lnvestigational Drugs (2, 3) 

PHEX 589 — SPEC/Pharmacy Benefits Management (2, 3) 

PHEX 589— SPEC/Transplant (2, 3) 

PHEX 590 — Community Pharmaceutical Care (2, 3) 

PHEX59I— Hospice(2, 3) 

NONTRADITIONAL PHARMD (NTPD) PATHWAY 

The NTPD Pathway requires 30 credits, including five credits of electives. 
Course numbers do not reflect prerequisite sequencing of courses. 

PHNT 500 — General Principles of Pharmaceutical Care (3) 

This course focuses on the definitions and processes of pharmaceutical care and 
therapeutics, including the process of therapeutic decision-making. Principles of 
common diseases will be covered, including oncology, infectious diseases, and 
cardiovascular diseases. Students in this course will also learn how to provide 
pharmaceutical care to individual patients (e.g., develop a pharmaceutical care 
database, develop a plan, and apply therapeutics principles), as well as popula- 
tion-based pharmaceutical care (e.g., principles of pharmacoeconomics, 
pharmacoepidemiology and health education and promotion). 

PHNT 505 — Prior Leaning Assessment of Pharmacy Practice (2) 

The objective of this elective course is to generate a documented compilation of a 
candidate's experiences and accomplishments. The Prior Learning Assessment 
(PLA) Portfolio will be used to grant academic credit in content areas where the 
student has acquired competence through non-sponsored learning. Up to 10 aca- 
demic credits may be awarded through the PLA process: two credits that parallel 

1 08 School of Pharmacy 



the Terminal Performance Objectives (applied to the Pharmaceutical Care rota- 
tion and Practice Management rotation); four credits in Practice Management; 
and up to four credits in Pharmacotherapy. The coursemaster welcomes the 
opportunity to discuss the process and likelihood of credit award with students 
who may be interested in this elective. 

PHNT 51 I — Practice Management (4) 

Practice Management is composed of four modules: financial management, prin- 
ciples of management, marketing, and managing pharmaceutical care services. 
These modules are designed to prepare students for the practice management 
experiential component and to build students' practice management abilities. 
These credits may be earned by traditional coursework, self-study, or other fac- 
ulty-approved modalities identified with the student's advisor. ^X'^^en appropriate, 
credits in this area may be awarded through the PLA process. 

PHNT 5 1 2 — Principles of Pharmaceutical Sciences (2) 

This course will enable students to find, comprehend, analyze, and apply current 
and new scientific knowledge to support pharmaceutical care by expanding their 
foundation in pathophysiology, pharmacology, pharmaceutical chemistry, phar- 
macokinetics, and biopharmaceutics. 

PHNT 521— Longitudinal Care (I) 

This experiential course focuses on assessing the health status of a cohort of 
patients in the student's own practice, developing health status reports, and par- 
ticipating in the management of pharmaceutical care needs of these patients 
during health transitions. Selected patients have health care problems, such as 
congestive heart failure, AIDS, cancer, or problems with aging that are likely to 
result in health transitions requiring changing pharmaceutical care needs, includ- 
ing changes in drug therapy, health education, patient counseling, and physical 
environment (e.g., home, long-term care, hospital). It is expected that students 
commit a minimum of approximately 45 hours (e.g., an average of about three 
hours per week over a semester or 1.5 hours per week over an academic year) to 
experiential activities in this course at their own practice site. Students are 
expected to apply skills from this course in subsequent pharmaceutical care expe- 
riential coursework. 

PHNT 531— Practice Management Planning (2) 

Practice Management Planning will focus on the application of management 
principles to a pharmaceutical care service. The course will provide an opportu- 
nity for the student to develop a plan defining and justifying a pharmaceutical 
care service and an opportunity for implementing the plan. 

PHNT 532— Patient Assessment Skills (I) 

This experiential course focuses on the skills necessary to obtain general pharma- 
ceutical care databases and problem-oriented databases from patients. Acquired 
skills include both history-taking and physical assessment. Learning experiences 



Program Course Descriptions 



include faculty demonstrations, videos, simulations, and patient encounters. Stu- 
dents are expected to apply and practice skills from this course in the program's 
other experiential courses. 

PHNT 534 — Clinic or Institutional Assignment (I) 

Activities in this course include supervised development of pharmaceutical care 
plans, triage decision-making, discharge/transition planning, and patient coun- 
seling. Students are assigned to a total of 15 three-hour, faculty-supervised 
pharmaceutical care sessions. 

PHNT 536 — Drug information Experience (I) 

Pharmacists acquire and apply drug information skills in their own practice. Stu- 
dents will develop their own drug information library, access appropriate drug 
information databases, and utilize appropriate pharmaceutical and medical litera- 
ture to prepare drug information reports. Assignments are made based upon the 
needs of the patients in the student's practice and the organizational needs of the 
practice site. 

PHNT 545— Therapeutics I (3) 

This course focuses on common disease entities and the development of pharma- 
ceutical and other care plans for patients with these problems: pulmonary, 
neuro/psych, cardiovascular, endocrinology, and women's health. Learning expe- 
riences include discussions of pharmacotherapy, case-study analysis, adverse drug 
reaction analysis, discharge and transition of care planning, and development of 
care plans. These experiences are focused on the participant's own pharmacy 
practice. 

PHNT 546— Therapeutics II (3) 

This course focuses on common disease entities and the development of pharma- 
ceutical and other care plans for patients with these problems. Disease states 
common to the following organ systems will be covered: general care, joint dis- 
ease, oncology, renal disease, gastrointestinal disease, and infectious diseases. 
Learning experiences include discussions of pharmacotherapy, case-study analy- 
sis, adverse drug reaction analysis, discharge and transition of care planning, and 
development of care plans. These experiences are focused on the participant's 
own pharmacy practice. 

PHNT 547— Medical information Analysis (I) 

This course is designed to enhance the student's skills in the areas of information 
collection, retrieval, analysis, and interpretation. A variety of topics surrounding 
drug information will be covered, including the role of informational services in 
health care (including managed care programs), written and verbal communica- 
tion skills, research strategy and process, drug policy management, quality 
assurance, ethics, careers in drug information, and basic interpretation/under- 
standing of the use of biostatistics in the medical literature. At the conclusion of 
this course, students will be able to: 1) retrieve medical literature appropriate to 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



the request; 2) evaluate the medical literature and draw conclusions necessary to 
make effective patient interventions/therapeutic decisions; and 3) concisely pre- 
sent clinical findings and answer questions about recent medical advances. 
Students will interact with both their peers and faculty members during this 
course in order to fulfill all learning objectives. 

PHNT 570 — Pharmaceutical Care Experience (3) 

This course is designed to help practicing pharmacists build the skills needed to 
deliver pharmaceutical care services to patients. Students develop and implement 
Triage Plans, Pharmaceutical Care Plans, and Transition Plans for a cohort of 
patients (in addition to the patients accumulated during the longitudinal care 
experience) in their own practice. Patients selected for plan development and 
implementation must have at least two pharmaceutical care or pharmacotherapy 
problems. Students communicate these plans to other health care professionals, 
monitor the response of patients to these plans, make any necessary modifica- 
tions, and assess patients' health outcomes of the plans. Students are expected to 
commit a minimum of 180 hours (an average of about six hours per week over 
two semesters) to activities related to this course. During this course, students 
will be accountable for application of pharmacotherapy topics acquired through 
Prior Learning Assessment and the didactic Pharmacotherapeutics course. Stu- 
dents completing this course will demonstrate the Nontraditional PharmD 
Pathway's terminal performance objectives related to implementation of pharma- 
ceutical care services in their practice site. 



PHD PROGRAM COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



PHARMACEUTICAL HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 

PHSR 6 1 — Pharmacy, Drugs, and the Health Care System (3) 

This course examines the principle components of the U.S. health care system, 
with special emphasis on their relationship to the provision of drugs and phar- 
macy services. 

PHSR 620 — Social and Behavioral Aspects of Pharmacy 
Practice (3) 

The fields of medical sociology, psychology, social psychology, and interpersonal 
communication will be studied as they relate to the pharmacy practice system 
which involves patients, pharmacists, physicians, nurses, and other health care 
professionals. 

PHSR 650 — Pharmaceutical Economics (3) 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the economic structure, 
conduct, and performance of the pharmaceutical industry. The course includes 
such topics as prices and profits in the industry, productivity, cost, economies of 

Program Course Descriptions 1 1 I 



scale, innovation, economic effects of regulation, cost benefit and cost effective- 
ness of pharmaceuticals, and efficiency of drug delivery systems. Prerequisite: 
One undergraduate economics course or permission of the instructor. 

PHSR 670 — Principles of Health Education, Health Promotion and 
Disease Prevention (3) 

Health education is a scientific process designed to achieve voluntary behavioral 
changes to improve health status. Health promotion utilizes health education to 
promote heakh and prevent disease. The PRECEDE Model is used to demon- 
strate the analytical process to explore health problems and identify and assess the 
behavioral and non-behavioral factors associated with them in order to develop 
and evaluate interventions. This course addresses health education at the level of 
the individual, the family, and the community at large. Because the relationship 
between practitioner and patient is often a major determinant of outcome, health 
promotion in the clinical setting is given emphasis. 

PHSR 704 — Pharmacoepidemiology (3) 

An introduction to the field of pharmacoepidemiology, which uses quantitative 
research methods to examine questions of benefit or risk in regard to the use of 
marketed medications. The course is intended to offer useful techniques to med- 
ical and health researchers who wish to assess the utilization, effectiveness, and 
safety of marketed drug therapies. Prerequisites: Introduction to Biostatistics and 
Introduction to Epidemiology. 

PHSR 701— Research Methodologies I (3) 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts of scientific 
research in pharmacy practice and administrative science. Topics to be discussed 
include the scientific method and problem-solving processes, social science mea- 
surement, and several specific methods of research. Co-requisite: Introduction to 
Biostatistics. 

PHSR 702— Health Services Research (3) 

This course is being revised and the new syllabus will be formalized by fall 2001. 
Prerequisite: Introduction to Biostatistics (multivariate regression) or permission 
of the instructor. 

PHSR 708— Special Problems (1-6) 

This course involves students working with faculty members in numerous 
research or on a problem. Can be used to finish a cognate area with prior 
approval by curriculum committee. It can be undertaken for credit when initi- 
ated under the supervision of the student's research mentor or another faculty 
member. The student must register for PHSR 708. If the student opts to take 
that course, he or she should provide a one-page document which details the 
objective of the research and the deliverable expected from the project before the 
semester commences. This can be taken for a maximum of six credits per semes- 
ter. Non-Dissertation Research Special Problems - used for all Cognate Areas. 



School of Pharmacy 



PHSR 709— Graduate Seminar (I) 

This course is a weekly seminar involving graduate students, department faculty, 
and participants outside the department. Must be repeated for a total of three (3) 
credits. 

PREV 600 — Principles of Epidemiology (3) 

A comprehensive treatment of the concepts and methods of chronic disease epi- 
demiology. Topics include the classification of statistical associations and the 
methods for distinguishing between causal and non-causal associations. Case- 
control, cohort, and experimental studies are considered in some detail. The 
course involves the presentation by students of epidemiological papers, including 
those linking lung cancer to cigarette smoking. Co-requisite/Prerequisite: PREV 
620 or an Introduction to Biostatistics equivalent. 

PREV 6 1 9 — Computer^Aided Analysis of Research Data (2) 

Provides the student with comprehensive experience in the application of epi- 
demiological and biostatistical methods available in the Statistical Analysis 
System (SAS). Hands-on experience in weekly workshops is gained by conduct- 
ing analyses of existing data designed to answer a research question. A third credit 
can be earned through a term project. Co-requisite/Prerequisite: PREV 620, pre- 
viously or concurrently, and consent of instructor. 

PREV 620 — Principles of Biostatistics (3) 

This course is designed to develop an understanding of statistical principles and 
methods as applied to human health and disease. Topics include research design; 
descriptive statistics; probability; distribution models; binomial, Poisson and nor- 
mal distributions; sampling theory; and statistical inference. Prerequisite: 
Knowledge of college algebra required. Calculus recommended. 

PREV 670 — Psychiatric Epidemiology (2) 

This elective critically reviews the methods and major substantive issues in psy- 
chiatric epidemiology. Topics include epidemiology of schizophrenia, depression, 
and dementia; and possible etiologic significance of socioeconomic status, stress- 
ful life events, social supports, crowding, and housing. Study designs used in 
conducting psychiatric epidemiological research are reviewed through lectures, 
seminars, and readings of current literature. Prerequisite: PREV 600 or consent 
of instructor. 

PREV 700 — Cardiovascular Epidemiology (3) 

Is taught in a seminar format in which each student, with faculty guidance, 
chooses a current problem in cardiovascular epidemiology and, following a pre- 
sentation of the problem, outlines an approach to the problem that is discussed in 
class. Afi:er incorporating relevant feedback, the student gives a formal presenta- 
tion and submits a term paper that represents a comprehensive review of the 
topic. Prerequisite: PREV 600 or consent of instructor. 



Program Course Descriptions 



PREV 701— Cancer Epidemiology (3) 

Is taught in a seminar format in which each student, with faculty guidance, 
chooses a current problem in cancer epidemiology and, following a presentation 
of the problem, outlines an approach to the problem that is discussed in class. 
After incorporating relevant feedback, the student gives a formal presentation and 
submits a term paper that represents a comprehensive review of the topic. Prereq- 
uisite: PREV 600 or consent of instructor. 

PREV 720— Statistical Methods (4) 

Course provides instruction on the specific statistical techniques used in the 
analysis of epidemiological data. Topics include treatment of stratified and 
matched data, detection of interaction, conditional and unconditional logistic 
regression, survival analysis, and proportional hazards models. Prerequisites: 
PREV 600, PREV 620, and consent of instructor. 

PREV 749 — Infectious Disease Epidemiology(3) 

Consists of lectures, seminars, and reading assignments designed to promote an 
understanding of infectious disease epidemiology, with particular emphasis on 
modes of transmission (contact, contaminated vehicles, vector-associated, and 
airborne), interventions and approaches to disease control (smallpox, measles, 
typhoid, influenza, and hospital infections), infections of public health impor- 
tance in Maryland, and use of the laboratory in infectious disease epidemiology. 
Prerequisite: PREV 600 and a basic knowledge of medical microbiology. 

PREV 758— Health Survey Research Methods (3) 

This course leads students through the steps in survey research, from developing 
and administering a survey questionnaire to analyzing the data. The final results 
of the survey are presented in a paper. Prerequisite: PREV 620 or consent of 
instructor. 

PREV 801 — Advanced Statistical Analysis (3) 

This course includes maximum likelihood methods and likelihood ratio tests; 
topics in logistic regression analysis; Poisson regression analysis; survival analysis, 
including Cox proportional hazards modeling and parametric modeling; topics 
in matrix algebra; and longitudinal data analysis, including the multivariate linear 
model, profile analysis, growth curve analysis, GEE methods, and random effects 
models for repeated measures analysis. Prerequisites: PREV 619 and PREV 720 
or consent of instructor. 

PREV 803 — Clinical Trials and Experimental Epidemiology (3) 

This course presents a rigorous overview of the experimental method as applied 
in therapeutic evaluations and of causal associations between risk factors and clin- 
ical outcomes. The history of the experimental method and its clinical 
applications are studied in detail. Guest speakers of unique expertise and experi- 
ence in clinical trials also are drawn upon. Prerequisites: PREV 600 or equivalent; 
at least one semester of statistics, and consent of the instructor. 



School of Pharmacy 



Food and Drug Law Seminar (3) UMB School of Law 

This seminar considers the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a case study of 
an administrative agency that must combine law and science to regulate activities 
affecting public health and safety. The class is designed both for students who 
expect to become involved in food and drug matters and for those who are inter- 
ested in the interplay of law and science. Topics to be discussed may include: 
history of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration; food law, misbranding, and 
economic issues; nutritional policy and health claims; regulation of carcinogens, 
food additives, and color additives; drug regulation; drug approval process; break- 
through drugs and ethics of drug testing; medical device regulation; and 
regulation of biotechnology. Course requirements include a seminar paper, which 
may be written for certification. 

Courses at Other University System of Maryland 
Institutions/Schools 

These courses may be taken in consultation with and with the approval of your 
advisor. See the appropriate university catalog or Web site for complete informa- 
tion regarding these courses. 

UMBC = University of Maryland, Baltimore County 
UMCP = University of Maryland, College Park 

ECON 600 — Policy Consequences of Economic Analysis (3) (UMBC) 

ECON 601— Macroeconomic Analysis I (3) (UMCP) 

ECON 601— Microeconomic Analyses (3) (UMBC) 

ECON 603— Microeconomic Analysis I (3) (UMCP) 

ECON 604— Microeconomic Analysis II (3) (UMCP) 

ECON 605— Benefit-Cost Evaluation (3) (UMBC) 

ECON 61 I— Advanced Econometric Methods I (3) (UMBC) 

ECON 612— Advanced Econometric Methods II (3) (UMBC) 

ECON 621— Quantitative Methods (3) (UMCP) 

ECON 622— Quantitative Methods (3) (UMCP) 

ECON 623— Econometrics I (3) (UMCP) 

ECON 624— Econometrics II (3) (UMCP) 



Program Course Descriptions 



ECON 626— Empirical Econometrics (3) (UMCP) 

ECON 641 — Economics of Government Policy Toward Business (3) 
(UMBC) 

ECON 661 — Macroeconomics of Public Finance (3) (UMBC) 

ECON 661— The Corporate Firm (3) (UMCP) 

ECON 662 — Industry Structure, Conduct, and Performance (3) 
(UMCP) 

ECON 663— Antitrust Policy and Regulation (3) (UMCP) 

ECON 703— Advanced Macroeconomics I (3) (UMCP) 

ECON 704— Advanced Macroeconomics II (3) (UMCP) 

ECON 723— Time Series Econometrics (3) (UMCP) 

POLI 610 — American Political Institutions and Public Policy (3) 
(UMBC) 

POLI 615— The American Political Arena (3) (UMBC) 

POLI 625— The Theories of Public Administration (3) (UMBC) 

POLI 626 — The American Judiciary and Public Policy (3) (UMBC) 

POLI 640— Health Law (3) (UMBC) 

POLI 652— Politics of Health (3) (UMBC) 

POSI 603— The Theory and Practice of Policy Analysis (3) (UMBC) 

POSI 606 — The Politics and Administration of Program Evaluation 
(3) (UMBC) 

POSI 612— Ethics and Public Policy (3) (UMBC) 

POSI 618 — issues in Health Care Finance and Service Delivery (3) 
(UMBC) 

POSI 619 — Organizational Behavior in Health Care Institutions (3) 
(UMBC) 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



PSYC 635— Community Psychology (3) (UMBC) 

PSYC 645— Social Psychology (3) (UMBC) 

PSYC 651— Cognitive Development (3) (UMBC) 

PSYC 665— Drugs and Behavior (3) (UMBC) 

PUAF 620— Political Analysis (3) (UMCP) 

PUAF 640 — Microeconomic Theory and Policy Analysis (3) (UMCP) 

PUAF 641 — Macroeconomic Theory and Policy Analysis (3) (UMCP) 

PUAF 650— Normative Analysis (3) (UMCP) 

PUAF 702— Regulatory Analysis (3) (UMCP) 

PUAF 732— Welfare, Health Care and Affirmative Action (3) 
(UMCP) 

PUAF 735— Health Policy (3) (UMCP) 

PUAF 745— Human Health and Environmental Policy (3) (UMCP) 

PUAF 671— Public Sector Finance (3) (UMCP) 

SOCY 602— Intermediate Procedures of Data Analysis (3) (UMCP) 

SOCY 651— Sociology of Health and Illness Behavior (3) (UMBC) 

SOCY 652— Health Care Organization and Delivery (3) (UMBC) 

604 — Biological Bases of Behavioral Development (3) (UMBC) 



Program Course Descriptions 



ELECTIVE COURSES 



POSI 607 — Statistical Applications In Evaluation Research (3) 
(UMBC) 

PREV 619 — Computer-Aided Analysis of Research Data (2) 
(UMBC) 

PUAF 754 — Operations Research Methods for Policy Analysts (3) 
(UMCP) 

SOCY 630— Sociology of Aging (3) (UMBC) 

SOCY 654— Comparative Health Systems (3) (UMBC) 

SOCY 656 — Comprehensive Health Planning for the Elderly (3) 
(UMBC) 

SOCY 670 — American Social Institutions and the Aged (3) 
(UMBC) 

SOCY 671 — Health and Related Social Conditions in Old Age (3) 
(UMBC) 



PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES 



PHAR 600 — Principles of Drug Design and Development I (1-3) 
PHAR 601 — Principles of Drug Design and Development II (1-3) 

Describes the interrelationship among disciplines of the pharmaceutical sciences 
and establishes the basic theoretical background essential to the drug design and 
development process. Emphasizes ability development; content progresses, begin- 
ning with traditional drug design and optimization of drug structure, continuing 
with principles of pharmacology, pharmaceutics, biopharmaceutics, pharmacoki- 
netics, and drug metabolism. Also covers integrative competency in the final 
module. This is a two-semester course divided into seven integrated modules. 
These modules relate the various disciplines within the pharmaceutical sciences 
to the drug design and development process. 

PHAR 602 — Biopharmaceutics/Pharmacokinetics (3) 

Focuses on drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion coupled 
with dosage and the parameters of clearance, volume of distribution, and 
bioavailability. These processes determine the concentration of drug at the site of 
action in the body. Covers the quantitative relationship between dose and effect 



School of Pharmacy 



as a framework to interpret measurement of drug concentrations in biological flu- 
ids, and pharmacokinetic principles using mathematical processes and descriptive 
parameters that describe the time course of drugs in the systemic circulation and 
the relationship of drug concentrations to observed effect. 

PHAR 608 — Introduction to Laboratory Research (I) 

Students become familiar with research conducted by departmental faculty mem- 
bers. Rotations through the laboratory of a faculty member help students in their 
selection of a doctoral dissertation project. The rotation includes library work 
and an opportunity for participation in the experimental aspects of research. Stu- 
dents must take at least one laboratory rotation. Students meet with the chairs of 
all Research Focus Groups before selecting a rotation site. 

PHAR 610 — Pharmaceutical Formulation/Unit Processes (4) 

Addresses the rational design and formulation of dosage forms, and the processes 
and equipment in their large-scale manufacture. Consideration is on how the 
interplay of formulation and process variables affects both the manufacturability 
of the dosage form and its performance as a drug delivery system. 

PHAR 620 — Modern Methods of Drug Delivery (3) 

Focuses on the rationale for existing and future drug delivery systems. Students 
explore underlying physical, chemical, and biological basis for each system and 
identify benefits and drawbacks. Examples of delivery systems include inhalation 
aerosols, transdermal patches, microspheres, implants, and tablets. Emphasis is 
on the biopharmaceutics, and transport properties and barriers associated with 
each method of delivery. The course also stresses written and oral presentation 
skills through student presentations and paper critique sessions. 

PHAR 628 — Bioanalytical Separation Techniques (3) 

Covers theory and applications of separation techniques used for low molecular 
weight compounds, such as most drugs, or for larger biopolymers, such as pro- 
teins and DNA. Also covers the separation of chiral compounds, and assay 
requirements and techniques for the sensitive and accurate measurement of drugs 
and metabolites in biological matrices, with emphasis on pharmacokinetics and 
biopharmaceutical applications. 

PHAR 638 — Pharmacometrics and Experimental Design (3) 

Covers the theoretical and practical application of statistics and experimental 
design to help students use tools in research problems. The class discusses 
and uses computer programs to analyze data representing actual experimental 
situations. 

PHAR 639 — Spectrometric Methods of Pharmaceutical 
Analysis (3) 

Introduces students to spectrometric techniques for the elucidation of molecular 
structure and to the analysis of pharmaceutically important materials. The 



Program Course Descriptions 



methodologies covered include ultraviolet, visible, infrared, nuclear magnetic res- 
onance, and mass and fluorescence spectrometry. The class includes discussions 
of physical principles, instrumentation involved, exercises in the interpretation of 
spectrometric data, and examples of applications. 

PHAR 648 — Basic Techniques for Pharmacology Research (3) 

Covers practical and theoretical aspects of basic pharmacology experimental 
methods. The course includes laboratory experiments to exemplify the tech- 
niques discussed in the lectures. Students write and submit reports in a selected 
pharmacology journal format. Topics include tissue culture, radioisotopes, signal 
transduction, radioligand binding, drug metabolism, protein and nucleic acid 
identification and quantification, electrophysiological, and in vivo techniques. 

PHAR 653 — Advanced Pharmacology I (4) 
PHAR 654— Advanced Pharmacology 11 (4) 

Pharmacodynamics is the study of the biochemical and physiological effect of 
drugs on biological systems. The course covers mechanisms by which pharmaco- 
logical agents interact with the living organism to provide the student with a 
rational basis for investigations in biomedical research. Topics include the phar- 
macodynamics of drugs influencing the central and peripheral nervous system, 
and the endocrine, renal, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems. Lectures supple- 
ment weekly conferences and discussion groups. 

PHAR 70! — Theoretical Aspects of Liquid Dosage Forms (3) 

Collates physical-chemical principles associated with liquid behavior used for 
pharmaceutics. Emphasis is on the rationalization of behavior in terms of inter- 
molecular forces. These forces manifest themselves as the cohesive forces within 
homogeneous liquid systems and interaction (adhesive) forces between phases. 
Solutions, suspensions, and emulsions are obvious examples of dosage forms 
whose formulation and analysis require a knowledge of the physical and chemical 
behavior of liquids. Fewer examples of the necessity for a foundation in liquid 
theory can be found on liquid-solid interactions: drying, absorption, filtration, 
wetting, and dissolution. Emphasis is on quantitative relationships in all areas. 
Students solve problems to apply these relationships to real systems to show their 
relevance and utility. This course provides background necessary for the design of 
experiments, the interpretation of results, and the promulgation of new theory 
regarding pharmaceutical systems that involve liquids. 

PHAR 702 — Theoretical Aspects of Solid Dosage Forms (3) 

A survey of the performance and processing of solid dosage forms. As most phar- 
maceuticals are prepared from powders, emphasis is on identifying, measuring, 
and controlling those properties that decide the processing characteristics of pow- 
dered materials. 



School of Pharmacy 



PHAR 708 — Introduction to Pharmaceutical Sciences Seminar (I) 

Includes presentations by graduate students, faculty members, and guest speak- 
ers. Students make an oral presentation on a preselected topic agreed upon by the 
instructor. Topics include medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, pharmacology 
and toxicology, and pharmacokinetics. 

PHAR 709 — Focus Group Seminar Series (I) 

Presentation and critical review of progress in research and surveys of recent 
developments in pharmaceutical sciences. 

PHAR 729— Principles of Drug Action (3) 

Advanced study of the principles of drug action, carcinogenesis, immunology, the 
molecular view of pharmacology, and theoretical principles and practical applica- 
tions of molecular modeling. A computer laboratory is associated with molecular 
modeling aspect. 

PHAR 747 — Advanced Pharmacokinetics (3) 

A detailed study of the principles of drug transport, distribution, biotransforma- 
tion, binding, and excretion, with emphasis on quantitative aspects and 
measurement of these processes. 

PHAR 751— Drug Design (3) 

Applications of chemical and biological principles to the rational design of drugs. 
Topics include targets of biologically active molecules, approaches to studying lig- 
and and target interactions, overview of drug discovery, agents acting on specific 
targets, combinatorial chemistry, computation chemistry, and structure-activity 
relationships. 

PHAR 801— Physical Pharmacy (3) 

Covers aspects of physical chemistry that relate to pharmaceutical systems. It is a 
logical extension of PHAR 701, with a primary focus on disperse heterogeneous 
systems. The design or formulation of a dosage form involves the resolution of a 
particular set of problems. Pharmaceutical scientists in the industry involved with 
these activities must bring to each situation the basic skills necessary to address 
the set of problems. Students experience resolving problems in terms of basic 
principles. Topics include colloids, rheology, surface chemistry, emulsions, sus- 
pensions, complexation, and distribution phenomena. 

PHAR 858— Special Topics (1-6) 

Students examine an issue of pharmaceutical importance through readings, dis- 
cussions, and limited investigations. The student and instructor decide the 
research problem and amount of credit before the start of the study. 

PHAR 899 — Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-3) 



Program Course Descriptions 



TO REACH THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

School of Pharmacy 
University of Maryland 
20 N. Pine St. 
Baltimore, MD 21201 
410-706-7650 
800-852-2988 

Directions 

From 1-95: Take 95 to exit Rte. 395 (downtown Baltimore) Martin Luther King 
Jr. Blvd. (MLK). Stay in the right lane after exiting onto MLK. At the fourth traf- 
fic light, turn right onto Baltimore Street. (The School is on the left at the corner 
of MLK and Baltimore Street.) Turn left at the 2nd traffic light onto Paca Street 
(get into right lane) and enter the Baltimore Grand Garage on your right. There 
is limited metered parking on the streets around the School. 



] — ETT 



7^=nii 



'4 Saratoga St, 




7/a-n 



► Baltimore St. ► 



School of Pharmacy 



University of Maryland 
Baltimore 




Athletic Center ( 
Pratt St. Garage) L4 
Baltimore Student Union 
621 W, Lombard St. K6 



HSF 

HSFII* 

HS/HSL 

HGB 



Hayden-Hams Hall 

(Dental School) 

666 W. Baltimore St. F3 



Health Sciences and Human 

Services Library 

601 W. Lombard St. L6 



STC 
SMEX 

UMFM 
UMMC 



USB 

VAMC 

WPCC 



100NE 
100NG 



Maryland Inst, for Emergency 

Medical Services Systems 

653 W. Pratt St. M4 

Maryland Phannacists 

Association 

650 W. Lombard St. J4 

Medical Biotechnology 

Center 

721 W. Lombard St. K2 

Medical School Teaching 

Facility 

685 W. Baltimore St. H2 



Old St. Paul's Cemetery 12 
Pascault Row 

651-665 W. Lexington St. D3 
Pharmacy Hall 



20 r 



I St G2 



Shock Trauma Center 

Lombard & Penn Sts. 14 

State Medical Examiners 

BIdg. 

1 1 1 Penn St. L4 



Univ. of MD Professional 
BIdg. 419 W. Redwood St. 19 
University Plaza H7 



Walter P. Carter Center 
630 W. Fayette St. E4 
Westminster Hall 
529 W. Fayette St. F7 
ICON. EutawSt. E9 
100N. Greenest. E6 
405 W. Redwood St, BIdg. 19 
410W. Fayette St. E9 
502 W. Fayette St. BIdg. E8 
701 W. Pratt St. BIdg. M3 



Dr. Samuel D. Hams Natl 

Museum of Dentistry 

31 S. Greene St. J7 

East Hall 

520 W. Lombard St. J7 

Environmental Health & 

Safety BIdg. 

714W. Lombard St. J2 

Gray Lab 

520 W. Lombard St. (rear) J7 

Greene St. BIdg. 

29 S Greene St. 17 



JTFB 
LS-MLL 



LSB- 
MCPO 



Law School-Marshall Law 
1 1 1 S. Greene St. K7 



Lexington Market C7-9 



Lombard St BIdg J5 
Market Center Post Office 



PARKING 

PCS Parking and Commuter Services 

Office 622 W. Fayette St. E5 

□ Employee. O Student. <[> Visitor. Q Patient 



§^ 

on 
on 
n 

DO 

a 

DO 



Baltimore Grand Garage F9 
Dental Patient Parking Lot F4 
Koesters Lots 04, C5 
Lexington Garage 03 
Pearl Garage E5 
Penn St Garage L3 
Pratt St. Garage L5 
University Plaza Garage 
(underground) H7 
PUBLIC PARKING 

• under construction 



Campus Map 



STUDENT RIGHT-TO-KNOW AND CAMPUS SECURITY ACT 



The Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act (Public Law 101-542), 
signed into federal law November 8, 1990, requires that the University of 
Maryland make readily available to its students and prospective students the 
information listed below. 

To obtain any of this information, check the appropriate space(s), fill in your 
name, mailing address, and school and program name, tear off this form and 
send it to: 

Office of Student Services 

Attention: Student Right-to-Know Request 

University of Maryland 

621 W. Lombard St., Room 302 

Baltimore, MD 21201 



Complete and return this portion 

Financial Aid 

Costs of Attending the University of Maryland 

Refund Policy 

Facilities and Services for Students with Disabilities 

Procedures for Review of School and Campus Accreditation 

Completion and Graduation Rates for Undergraduate Students 

Loan Deferral Under the Peace Corps and Domestic Volunteer 
Services Act 

Campus Safety and Security 

Campus Crime Statistics 

Name 



Address . 



School and Program 



School of Pharmacy 



L 



.^1^ 



^^Pj University of Maryland 



2003 - 2005 Catalog 




2003-2005 Catalog 

Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 

Pharmaceutical Health Services Research Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Program 

Pharmaceutical Sciences Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Program 

School of Pharmacy 
University of Maryland 
20 N. Pine St. 
Baltimore, MD 21201-1180 

Program Information: 

PharmD Admissions Office 4 1 0-706-7653 

or 800-852-2988 (Toll Free) 
E-mail: PI)armDhelp@rx. umaryland.edu 

Nontraditional PharmD Pathway Information 410-706-0761 

Pharmaceutical Health Services Research 

(PhD) Program 410-706-0879 

Pharmaceutical Sciences (PhD) Program 410-706-0549 

Dean's Office 410-706-7650 

University Financial Aid Office 410-706-7347 

Development Office 4 1 0-706-5893 

Web site www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu 

The Uuwemiy of Maryland is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools. The School of Phar- 
macy's Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) and continuing education programs are accredited by the American Council on 
Pharmaceutical Education. For additional information, write ACPE. 311 W. Superior St.. Chicago. IL 60610 or call 
.? 12-664-3575. The School is a member of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. 

The School reserves the right to make changes in recjuirements for admission, curriculum, standards for advancement ami 
graduation, and rules and regulations. 

NOTE: Notwithstanding any other provision of this or any other University publication, the University reserves the right 
to make changes in tuition, fees and other charges at any time such changes are deemed necessary by the University and the 
University System of Maryland Board of Regents. 



The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy is committed to providing eqiiiil education and employment opportunity 
in all of its programs. 

The University and the School of Pharmacy do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, age, ancestry or national 
origin, gender, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability marital status, or veteran status. Exceptions are as allowed by 
law. for example, due to bona fide occupational qualifications or lack of reasonable accommodations for disabilities. 

Produced by the University of Maryland Ofiice of External Affairs, 200.1 



2003-2005 Catalog 

University of Maryland 
School of Pharmacy 



I 



Message from the Dean 



Drugs play a key role in modern health care to help people get and stay well. 
Pharmacy is the profession that works with patients and their physicians to make 
the best use of medications. The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 
offers several programs to prepare individuals for the practice of pharmacy or for 
independent basic or clinical research. Whether you are interested in becoming a 
pharmacist, obtaining a residency in pharmacy practice or a clinical specialty, or 
pursuing graduate studies in the pharmaceutical sciences, pharmaceutical health 
services research, or the clinical sciences, the School provides the gateway to 
unparalleled education and unlimited possibilities. 

Our Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program emphasizes problem-solving 
and critical thinking and qualifies the graduate for national and state licensing 
exams. Maryland students learn to practice as patient-oriented healthcare 
providers who can work as part of a multi-professional health care team. The cur- 
riculum is innovative and flexible. PharmD students can 
choose from many electives, explore pathways that focus on 
areas of interest, and seize opportunities to work closely with 
members of our large and excellent faculty. To round out 
their education, students elect practice rotations from among 
hundreds of preceptors working in every imaginable setting 
in which pharmacy is the focus. 

In addition to our PharmD program, we offer graduate 
programs in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmaceutical 
Health Services Research. Our PhD students develop the knowledge and skills 
necessary to conduct independent research. Our graduates go on to direct the 
discovery, development and delivery of medications for safe and effective therapy 
as well as to improve pharmaceutical outcomes and geriatric care. They find 
careers in academia, the pharmaceutical industry, and government institutions. 

The mission of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy is to improve 
the health and well being of people through excellence in education, scholarship, 
pharmaceutical care and public service. It is our vision to be an international 
leader in these endeavors. 

This catalog serves as a starting point and a reference for information about 
the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy. The content of this catalog may 
also be found on our Web site at wvvw.pharmacy.umaryland.edu, where you will 
find the latest information, as well as news and other features about our School. 
Please visit our website to supplement this catalog. 




David A. Knapp, PhD 

Dean 

University of Maryland School of Pharmacy 



Contents 



MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN ii 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY . . .2 

History 2 

Mission 2 

Vision 2 

Commitment to Diversity 3 

Compliance with ADA Legislation 3 

Administrative Offices 3 

Departments 5 

Lecture Series 6 

Endowed Chairs 7 

Centers and Resource Programs 7 

Student Honors and Awards 9 

Student Organizations 11 

Alumni Association 11 

The University of Maryland 13 

DOCTOR OF PHARMACY 
(PHARMD) PROGRAM 15 

Curriculum Pathways and Electives 23 

PharmD Program Summary 25 

Nontraditionai PharmD Pathway 26 

PharmD Dual Degree Programs 27 

Licensure Requirements 29 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 
PROGRAMS 30 

Pharmaceutical Health Services 

Research PhD Program Description . . .30 
Pharmaceutical Health Services Research 

Program Overview 30 

Pharmaceutical Sciences PhD 

Program Overview 34 

Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Department Overview 34 

Pharmaceutical Sciences PhD 

Program Description 37 

Graduate Student Organizations 39 

FINANCIAL INFORMATION 40 

Tuition and Fees 40 

Health Insurance 41 



Determination of In-State Residency ... .41 

PharmD Student Financial Aid 41 

School of Pharmacy Scholarships 41 

Loan Funds 44 

Veterans Financial Aid 44 

PhD Student Financial Aid 44 

PHARMD ACADEMIC 

POLICY STATEMENTS 45 

Academic Sessions 45 

Registration Policies 45 

Academic Status Policies 46 

Academic Integrity Policies and 

Procedures 48 

Student Discipline and Grievance 

Committee 52 

Other School Policy Statements 57 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
POLICY EXCERPTS 58 

ADMINISTRATION AND 
FACULTY 66 

PROGRAM COURSE 
DESCRIPTIONS 83 

PharmD Course Descriptions 83 

Nontraditionai PharmD (NTPD) 

Pathway 102 

PhD Program Course Descriptions 104 

Pharmaceutical Health Services 

Research 104 

Pharmaceutical Sciences Ill 

UNIVERSITY MAP AND 

DIRECTIONS TO THE 

SCHOOL 115 



The School of Pharmacy 



HISTORY 



The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has a rich and distinguished 
heritage. First incorporated as the Maryland College of Pharmacy on January 27, 
1841, it is the oldest pharmacy school in the South and the fourth oldest in the 
country. Primarily an independent institution until 1904, the Maryland College 
of Pharmacy then became the Department of Pharmacy of the University of 
Maryland. In 1920, the University of Maryland in Baltimore merged with the 
Maryland State College at College Park to form the State Universit)'. Today, the 
School of Pharmacy is one of six professional schools and a graduate school that 
comprise the University of Maryland in downtown Baltimore. 

Throughout its history, the School of Pharmacy has been a local and national 
leader for the profession of pharmacy. It was a founding member of the American 
Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the professional organization established 
to formulate uniform standards for the graduation of pharmacy students. 
The School was also instrumental in the formation of the American Council for 
Pharmaceutical Education, the national accreditation organization for schools 
of pharmacy. 

In 1970, through the efforts of the School and the Maryland Board of Phar- 
macy, Maryland became the first state to replace unstructured internships with a 
professional-experience program incorporated in the School's curriculum, setting 
a national standard for professional pharmacy education. In 1980, the School 
established a Center for the Study of Pharmacy and Therapeutics for the Elderly, 
now the national model for pharmacy geriatric education. In thel990s, Maryland 
again set a benchmark for the nation by implementing a pace-setting Doctor of 
Pharmacy (PharmD) program. 



MISSION 



The mission of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy is to improve the 
health and well being of the citizens of Maryland and beyond, through excellence 
in pharmaceutical education, scholarship, pharmaceutical care, and public 
service. 



VISION 



The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy will be recognized as 
an international leader in innovation and excellence in education, schol- 
arship, pharmaceutical care, and public service. 
Wc will attract and mentor students to attain their fullest potential. 
We will recruit and develop faculty' to serve as exemplary role models. 



School of Pharmacy 



We will foster an environment for learning and productivity that will 
guarantee the fullest contributions of a diverse faculty, staff and student 
body. 

We will collaborate with partners both within and outside the Univer- 
sity to achieve this vision. 



COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY 



The School seeks an applicant pool and a student body that is diverse in terms of 
race, sex, age, geographic and economic background, religion, and ethnicity. The 
2003 enrollment statistics reflect the diversity of the student body: 38 percent 
Caucasian, 36 percent Asian, 17 percent African-American, 7 percent Interna- 
tional, 2 percent Hispanic, and less than 1 percent Native-American. 



COMPLIANCE WITH ADA LEGISLATION 

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the School 
examines all aspects of its programs and services to ensure accessibility to quali- 
fied students with disabilities. From recruitment to commencement, the School 
strives to create an environment that respects individual differences while chal- 
lenging students to perform to their optimal ability. Modifications tailored to the 
needs of the diverse student population include applications, brochures, course 
materials and examinations offered in alternate formats, and modified lengths of 
time to complete degree requirements. Equally important, the administration 
reviews organizational activities that would prohibit participation by students 
with disabilities and provides services for these students to ensure their rights and 
protection under the law. With increased use of computer technology, the School 
makes information more accessible and is better able to serve students with 
disabilities. 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES 



ACADEMIC AFFAIRS 



The Office of Academic Affairs provides leadership and administrative manage- 
ment in all professional education programs. The associate dean for academic 
affairs provides oversight of professional curricula, including pathways, experien- 
tial learning, and joint degree programs, and is responsible for: scheduling, edu- 
cational technology, appointment of graduate teaching assistants, liaison with 
other academic units of the University, and continuing professional education. 
The associate dean for academic affairs is also responsible for program assessment 
and meets with the Educational Advisory Committee, composed of members of 
the external professional pharmacy community, to identify and discuss important 

The School of Pharmacy 3 



issues affecting the educational programs at the School and to provide advice on 
those issues. Also, this associate dean coordinates initiatives in the international 
arena that deal with pharmacy education. The School's Student Discipline and 
Grievance Committee handles issues surrounding academic integrity and student 
behavior. 



FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 



The Finance and Administration Office is directed by the associate dean, who is 
also the chief financial officer for the School. The office provides leadership and 
oversight of support services necessary for the School to carry out its mission. 
The following units and positions are part of the team that helps deliver support 
services: Facilities and Laboratory Support Services, Computer and Network Ser- 
vices, the Integrated Business Services, and the Dean's office staff. 

DEVELOPMENT 

The Development Office is responsible for identifying and raising funds from 
private sources to include individuals, corporations and foundations. Working 
closely with the Dean, the Board of Visitors, alumni, and faculty, fundraising 
efforts are focused on garnering support for student scholarships and faculty 
support. 

ALUMNI LIAISON 

The position of Alumni Liaison provides school-based support to the Alumni 
Association as it plans Reunion Weekend, the Alumni Golf Tournament, the 
Graduation Banquet and other activities to promote the School to its constituen- 
cies. The Alumni Association also assists with the student admissions process and 
provides academic scholarships to eight students per academic year. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The Assistant to the Dean is responsible for producing School and alumni publi- 
cations and for disseminating to the public relevant news and information 
regarding the activities of its faculty, students, and alumni. 



STUDENT AFFAIRS 



The Office of Student Affairs provides a variety of services to enhance the student 
learning experience and to provide support to students during their academic 
career. The School's student affairs system is under the direction of the associate 
dean for student affairs and the director of student services. The office includes a 
coordinator of recruitment and admissions along with three professional staff 
The office is responsible for recruitment, admission, and graduation of PharmD 



School of Pharmacy 



students and is involved with veteran affairs, financial aid, student leadership 
development, and counseling programs. Other services include personal counsel- 
ing, advising and tutoring systems, career development, and special programs, 
such as the Open House. 

The office monitors the activities of the School's student organizations that 
operate under the Student Government Association (SGA) umbrella. The SGA, 
as well as each organization, has a faculty advisor who assists in planning and 
organizing the group. The SGA holds biweekly meetings and arranges an impres- 
sive array of activities. 

The Student Affairs Committee addresses academic issues. Both of these com- 
mittees are composed of students and members ol the faculty and Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs. The office administers the career development program for PharmD 
students and attempts to increase student awareness of job opportunities. For 
more information about the Office of Student Affairs, see www.pharmacy.umary- 
land. edu/StudentAjfairs/. 



DEPARTMENTS 



PHARMACEUTICAL HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH 



The Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research mission is to 
focuses on behavioral sciences, pharmacoeconomics, pharmacoepidemiology, and 
pharmaceutical policy teaching, service, and community outreach. To help the 
department reach its goals are The Center on Drugs and Public Policy and The 
Office of Substance Abuse Studies. (See descriptions under Centers and Resource 
Programs in this catalog.) Additionally, the department values excellence in 
teaching, research, service, and the contributions of its members to the depart- 
ment, School, University, state, profession, and health care community. 



PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES 



The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences mission is to advance the field of 
Pharmaceutical Science through state-of-the-art research and discovery in the 
areas of cellular and chemical biology, neuroscience, pharmacology, and biophar- 
maceutics and drug delivery. This multidisciplinary research develops new 
methodologies for drug discovery that identify targets for drug development, 
develops new pharmacotherapeutic agents and develops and optimizes new drug 
delivery systems. Pharmaceutical Sciences is committed to the innovative educa- 
tion of graduate and professional students through a scientifically integrated pro- 
gram to become outstanding pharmaceutical scientists and pharmacists. 
Furthermore, the department is committed to serve the needs of the School, Uni- 
versity, and community. 



The School of Pharmacy 



PHARMACY PRACTICE AND SCIENCE 



The Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science promotes the health and well 
being of the public by advancing the practice of pharmacy and generating and dis- 
seminating new knowledge related to pharmacy practice and drug use. The 
department approaches these goals by: 1 ) preparing professional students, gradu- 
ate students, residents, fellows, and pharmacists for the future through a variety of 
academic, training, and mentoring programs; 2) providing an environment con- 
ducive to the development of facult}' and staff; 3) furnishing expertise, support, 
and leadership to professional, governmental, community, and health-related 
organizations and agencies; 4) fostering research into the clinical and social sci- 
ences related to pharmacy practice and drug use; 5) encouraging the development 
of new and innovative pharmacy practice and role models; and 6) providing a 
structure that supports these efforts. The department values excellence in teach- 
ing, practice, research, and service, and the contributions of its faculty and staff to 
the department. School, University, state, profession, and health care communit)'. 



LECTURE SERIES 

The School supplements its regular curriculum with the following special lectures 
and symposia: 

Francis S. Balassone Memorial Lecture. The Maryland Pharmacists Associ- 
ation, the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association, and the School sponsor this 
lectureship as a memorial to Francis S. Balassone. He was a 1940 graduate of the 
School, a past president of the Alumni Association, a distinguished former faculty 
member, and a past president of the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy. 

Dean's Colloquium. The Dean's Colloquium brings together students, fac- 
ulty members, and nationally recognized scientists and clinicians to discuss con- 
temporary issues of relevance to pharmacy and health care. These seminars 
provide unusual opportunities for interaction and exchange of new information 
on topics related to pharmacy practice and science. 

Andrew G. DuMez Memorial Lecture. This lectureship was established in 
1969 by Mrs. DuMez in memory of her husband. Dr. Andrew G. DuMez. Dean of 
the School of Pharmacy from 1926 to 1948, Dr. DuMez was a distinguished educa- 
tor and leader in pharmac)' in Mar\'land, the United States, and around the world. 

Ellis Grollman Lecture in Pharmaceutical Sciences. Mrs. Evelyn Grollman 
Glick funded a lecture program in memor)' of her brother, Ellis Grollman, in 1983. 
He was a 1926 graduate of the School. Each year a nationally recognized researcher 
in the pharmaceutical or related basic sciences is invited to present this lecture. 

Peter P. Lamy Lecture. The Peter P. Lamy Lecture was inaugurated in 1992 
in recognition of Dr. Lamy's career as an internationally recognized authority on 
geriatrics and gerontology. This lecture provides an opportunitv' for pharmacists 
to discuss critical issues in the care of the nation's elderly. 

Paul A. Pumpian Lecture Fund. This lectureship was established in 1993 by 
Mr. Pumpian, a former professor at the School. The lecture brings distinguished 
leaders to the School to discuss healthcare policy issues affecting the nation. 

6 School of Pharmacy 



ENDOWED CHAIRS 



The School has the following endowed chairs: 

The Emerson Professorship in Pharmacology was endowed in 1927 as a 
chair in Biological Testing and Assay by Captain Isaac Emerson, president of the 
Emerson Drug Company. The first chair was filled by Dr. Marvin Thompson, a 
pharmacologist at the Food and Drug Administration at the time. Dr. Clifford 
W. Chapman, a pharmacologist from the Canadian National Laboratories, was 
appointed to the chair in 1938. Dr. Casimer Ichniowski and Dr. Naim Khazan 
were the third and fourth appointees to the chair. In 1988, Dr. Gerald M. Rosen 
was appointed Emerson Professor. His appointment as Emerson Professor led to 
Dr. Rosen being named an Eminent Scholar by the Maryland Higher Education 
Commission. 

The Evelyn GroUman-Glick Professorship in the Pharmaceutical Sciences 
was established in April 2003 through the bequest of the late Evelyn Grollman. 
In 1983, Evelyn Grollman established a Lecture Fund in honor of her brother, 
Ellis Grollman, a 1926 graduate of the School. The endowed professorship will 
be used to recruit an eminent pharmaceutical scientist to further strengthen the 
School's research program. 

The Parke-Davis Chair in Geriatric Pharmacotherapy was established in 
1990 with a $1 million gift from the Warner-Lambert Co. on the eve of the 
125th anniversary of Parke-Davis and the School of Pharmacy's 150th Anniver- 
sary. The endowment underwrites the School's continuing commitment to geri- 
atric pharmacotherapy as exemplified by the accomplishments of the late Peter P. 
Lamy, the first holder of the Parke-Davis Chair. Dr. Bruce C. Stuart is current 
holder of this chair. 

The Ralph Shangraw Endowed Chair in Pharmaceutical Sciences was 
established in June 1995 by Colorcon and the University of Maryland School of 
Pharmacy in honor of the retirement of Ralph Shangraw. The endowment will be 
used to support a Professorship in Pharmaceutical Sciences until the fund has 
reached full funding and then will support an endowed chair. 



CENTERS AND RESOURCE PROGRAMS 



The Biomedicinal Chemistry NMR Center houses a GE 300 MHZ nuclear 
magnetic resonance spectrometer. The superconducting magnet, the heart of the 
instrument, is permanently immersed in a vacuum-jacket reservoir of liquid helium 
(-260°C) and allows the detection and accurate determination of protons, '^C, ^'P 
and other nuclei of biological importance. The NMR was the first instrument of 
its kind on campus, and it opened up many new avenues of research within the 
School, greatly increasing the number of inter-school collaborative ventures. 

The Center on Drugs and Public Policy contributes to informed debate of 
drug policy issues in our society. CDPP research and educational programming 
has provided thought-provoking analysis and focused dialogue on drug use and 
public policy since 1987. The CDPP specializes in providing credible, unbiased. 



The School of Pharmacy 



and pragmatic solutions for government agencies, the pharmaceutical industry, 
professional organizations, and private businesses on public health issues and 
practices involving medication use and regulatory matters. 

The Drug Information Center provides comprehensive medical information 
to contract affiliated institutions and the general public. The provision of service 
includes, but is not limited to, patient-specific and adverse drug reaction consul- 
tations, guidelines for use, formulary monograph/review preparation and man- 
agement, and newsletter support. The UMDI and its staff are also charged with 
the education of UMB pharmacy students in the practice of medical literature 
analysis. Students are educated on the proper utilization of online databases and 
search strategies in the hope of making them more proficient in the assimilation 
of information. The UMDI also participates in an ongoing Internet Drug Infor- 
mation Service, which provides online users the ability to submit questions to 
qualified pharmacy staff. These questions are not limited in any way to geo- 
graphic region or subject. The UMDI answers each question on an individual 
basis, usually within three business days, many within hours. 

The ENABLE Community Health Worker Program recruits and trains com- 
munity residents to be Community Health Workers (CHWs). They receive 
intense training in chronic illness, case management, resource identification, and 
community outreach. Once trained, they are placed in local clinics and schools, 
identify clients in need, win their clients' trust, identify their symptoms, teach 
them preventive measures, and make sure clients keep regular doctors' appoint- 
ments and follow treatment regimens. The mission of ENABLE CHW is to serve 
community residents, to enable them to improve their health outcomes through 
home-based individual care, case management, education, monitoring, and 
follow-up. 

The Peter Lamy Center on Drug Therapy and Aging serves as the focal 
point for geriatric research, education, and service within the University of Mary- 
land School of Pharmacy. The center is dedicated to improving drug therapy for 
aging adults through innovative research, education, and clinical initiatives. The 
center produces new scientific knowledge with practical applications for improv- 
ing outcomes of pharmaceutical care for elderly patients. The center provides stu- 
dents, practitioners, and other caregivers with up-to-date and accessible 
information on best practices in geriatric pharmacotherapy. The center also 
works to strengthen the tie between education and practice by giving faculty 
members and pharmacy residents opportunities to apply principles of pharma- 
ceutical care to older patients in various settings. 

The Maryland Poison Center has been a service program of the University of 
Maryland School of Pharmacy since 1972. The service has grown and changed 
quite a bit over the years. During its first year, the Maryland Poison Center 
received 5,600 calls. In 1998, the center fielded more than 60,000 calls. Despite 
the increase in call volume, the center's commitment to providing the best quality 
poison triage, treatment, education, and prevention services has never changed. 

The Maryland Poison Center is certified by the American Association of Poi- 
son Control Centers (AAPCC) as a regional poison center providing poisoning 
triage, treatment, education, and prevention services to all Marylanders. This ser- 



School of Pharmacy 



vice is staffed by pharmacists and nurses who have specialized clinical toxicology 
training 24 hours a day, every day of the year. All of the specialists have been certi- 
fied by the AAPCC as specialists in poison information. On average, each special- 
ist has more than six years of experience managing poisoning and overdose cases. 
In addition to the knowledge, skill, and experience of the poison specialists, the 
director of the program is board certified in clinical toxicology and the medical 
director is boarded in emergency medicine as well as in medical toxicology and 
additional specialized consultants. For more information, call 800-222-1222. 

The Mental Health Program of the School of Pharmacy is joint venture with 
the Developmental Disabilities Administration and Mental Hygiene Administra- 
tion of the state of Maryland. Its primary goals are to improve and maintain all 
aspects of pharmacy practice within the state's mental health facilities and provide 
leadership in the field of psychiatric pharmacotherapy for state programs and 
facilities. The program also serves as a site for pharmacotherapeutic and adminis- 
trative research in mental health, a testing ground for innovative strategies in 
mental health pharmacy practice and a training resource for mental health-related 
issues. Members of the School's faculty serve at eight mental health sites around 
the state. 

The Office of Substance Abuse Studies (OSAS) was founded in 1986. Its 
mission is to improve programs of substance abuse treatment and prevention and 
to explore the intersection of substance abuse and pharmacy practice in our soci- 
ety — how do the problems of substance abuse impact the practice of pharmacy 
and how can the profession of pharmacy help solve the problems of substance 
abuse. OSAS is rooted in a long history of providing a range of informational and 
educational services to health professionals. We offer programs of prevention and 
community service, and engage in active research in the quest for new knowledge 
in the field of addictions. Academic courses, field placements, and exposure to 
research projects are available for students in all years of the pharmacy program. 
OSAS offers opportunities for graduate studies through the Department of Phar- 
maceutical Health Sciences Research. 



STUDENT HONORS AND AWARDS 

The School recognizes academic excellence during the fall and spring honors con- 
vocation. During the fall ceremony, students receive academic achievement awards 
in all classes, based on performance the preceding year. The School also recognizes 
leaders of student organizations at this time. The Rho Chi Honor Society presents 
its annual book award to the student(s) having the highest academic GPA. The 
society also awards certificates to students with GPAs above 3.25. 

In the spring, the School honors its graduates. Students who graduate in the 
top 4 percent of their class, graduate with Summa Cum Laude honors, the next 5 
percent Magna Cum Laude, and the next 6 percent Cum Laude. Faculty mem- 
bers present the following academic-achievement awards to members of the grad- 
uating class at the spring Graduation Convocation. 

The School of Pharmacy 9 



Alpha Zeta Omega Fraternity Prize, Kappa Chapter. The Kappa Chapter 
of the Maryland Alumni Chapter of the Alpha Zeta Omega fraternity provides a 
prize that is awarded to a student for proficiency in pharmacology. 

Andrew G. DuMez Award. In memory of Dr. Andrew G. DuMez, former 
dean and professor of pharmacy, the DuMez award is given to a student for supe- 
rior proficiency in pharmacy. 

Lambda Kappa Sigma-Cole Award, Epsilon Alumnae Chapter. A student 
receives this award in memory of Dr. B. Olive Cole, former acting dean, for pro- 
ficiency in pharmacy administration. 

The Excellence in Pharmaceutical Care Award. The Nontraditional 
PharmD Pathway preceptors and mentors give this award to a student who has 
excelled in his/her practice setting. 

School of Pharmacy Academic Excellence Awards. The students who 
receive this award have attained the highest general average in the entry-level pro- 
gram and in the Nontraditional PharmD Pathway. 

William Simon Memorial Prize. In honor of the late Dr. William Simon, a 
professor of chemistry in the School for 30 years, a student is awarded a prize for 
superior work in the field of biomedicinal chemistry. 

Frank J. Slama Award from the Schools Alumni Association. In tribute to 
Dr. Frank J. Slama, Class of 1924, a former professor and head of the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacognosy, for over half a century of loyalty and service to his pro- 
fession, to the School, and to the Alumni Association, the School's Alumni 
Association gives this award to a member of the graduating class who excelled in 
extracurricular activities. 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank J. Slama Scholarship Fund. In memory of her hus- 
band, Dr. Frank J. Slama, former distinguished professor in the School of Phar- 
macy, Lillian Slama established this scholarship on August 12, 1975. A student 
receives this award for superior work in the field of biopharmacognosy. 

Wagner Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence Prize. In memory of her husband, 
Manuel B. Wagner, and her son, Howard J. Wagner, both alumni of the School, 
the late Mrs. Sadie S. Wagner, and her daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Wagner Brill Sny- 
der, fund a prize to a graduating student for meritorious academic achievement in 
pharmaceutical jurisprudence. 

John F. Wannenwetsch Memorial Prize. In memory of her brother. Dr. 
John F. Wannenwetsch, a distinguished alumnus of the School, Mrs. Mary H. 
Wannenwetsch funds a prize given to a graduating student who has exhibited 
exceptional performance and promise in the practice of community pharmacy. 

The Conrad L. Wich Pharmacognosy Prize. In appreciation of the assis- 
tance that the Maryland College of Pharmacy extended to him as a young man, 
Mr. Conrad L. Wich provided a fund. The faculty assembly awards annually the 
income from this fund to a student who has done exceptional work throughout 
the course in pharmacognosy. 

L.S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize. A bequest provided by the late 
L.S. Williams funds the L.S. Williams Practical Pharmacy Prize given to the stu- 
dent having the highest general average throughout the course in basic and 
applied pharmaceutics. 



School of Pharmacy 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



The School has 20 student organizations, including fraternities, professional 
pharmacy organizations, honor societies, a high school tutoring/mentoring pro- 
gram, and social organizations that perform a variety of services and activities for 
the profession and the community. The organizations operate under the auspices 
of the Student Government Association. Further information is available at: 
httpdiwww.pharmacy. umaryland. edulstudentorgl default, htm. 



PHARMD STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION (SGA) 

The SGA promotes the professional development of students through the process 
of self-government. The SGA strives to develop academic achievement, to 
encourage communication between faculty and students, to coordinate activities 
within the School, to promote educational programming, to enhance profes- 
sional and social interests, and to encourage community service. All students 
belong to the SGA. The Executive Council of the SGA is composed of SGA offi- 
cers, presidents of organizations, class officers, and the yearbook editor; and in 
the Council is vested the executive, legislative, and judicial power of the SGA. 
The Council meets periodically with School administrators to discuss important 
issues. At the campus level, the University Student Government Association 
(USGA) coordinates the activities of the Graduate School and the six professional 
schools. USGA representatives are elected by the students of all seven schools. 



PHARMACY GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 



The purpose of the Pharmacy Graduate Student Association (PGSA) of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland School of Pharmacy is: 1) to act as an official liaison body to 
communicate graduate student concerns to the pharmaceutical sciences and 
pharmacy administration officials of the School; 2) to provide a platform for 
discussions and suggestions on matters involving graduate students; 3) to com- 
municate and support research interests of graduate students of the School; 4) to 
promote efficient recruitment and orientation of incoming graduate students; 5) 
to promote a better graduate student life; 6) to represent the interests of graduate 
students as members of campus-wide organizations; and 7) to recognize, foster, 
and reward outstanding leadership among individuals who promote PGSA ideals. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



The mission of the School of Pharmacy Alumni Association is to strengthen and 
enhance the School by fostering communications, social interactions, and a sense 
of pride in the School. Each year, the association sponsors a spring banquet hon- 
oring the graduating class and the 50-year class. The association also awards eight 



The School of Pharmacy 



need-based scholarships to deserving students. The association also plays a leader- 
ship role in the School's fund-raising activities. For example, many members par- 
ticipate in the annual phone-a-thon and are generous donors to the David 
Stewart Associates, the major giving club for alumni, friends, and faculty mem- 
bers who contribute $1,000 or more annually to the School. For more informa- 
tion, visit the Alumni and Friends Web site at www. pharmacy. umaryland. 
edulalumnil. 




Students listen to a lectu 
12 School of Pharmacy 



I 



The University of Maryland 



The University of Maryland, located in downtown Baltimore, is the founding 
campus of Maryland's public university system and a thriving center of life sci- 
ences research and community service. The six professional schools and a gradu- 
ate school are dedicated to excellence in professional and graduate education, 
research, public service, and patient care. 

With $305 million in sponsored activities for Fiscal Year 2002, the University 
uses state-of-the-art technological support to educate leaders in health care deliv- 
ery, biomedical science, social services, and law. The campus fosters economic 
development in the state by conducting internationally recognized research to cure 
disease and to improve the health, social functioning, and just treatment of the 
people served. The University is committed to ensuring that the knowledge it gen- 
erates provides maximum benefit to society, directly enhancing the community. 

Below are places, campus departments, phone numbers, and Web addresses 
that may be of interest: 



NAME 


PHONE 


WEB ADDRESS 


About Baltimore 




www.livebaltimore.com 
www.colltown.org. 


Counseling 
Center 


410-328-8404 


http:l/graduate.umarylar)dedulcour)seling 


Dual Degree 

PhamdD 

Programs 




www.pharmacy.umaryland.eduladmissionsl 
pharmd.htm 


Financial Aid 


410-706-7347 


www.umaryland.edulfinl 


Health Sciences and 
Human Services 
Library 


410-706-7996 


www.hshsl.umaryland.edu 


Housing On/ 
Off-campus 


410-706-7766 


www.housing.umaryland.edu 


Parking and 
Commuter Services 


410-706-6603 


www.parking.umaryland.edu 



Pharmaceutical 
Health Services 
Research 
Department 



410-706-0133 



www.pharmacy.umaryland.edulPHSRI 



Pharmaceutical 

Sciences 

Department 



410-706-1560 



www.pharmacy.umaryland.edulpscl 



The University of Maryland 



NAME 


PHONE 


WEB ADDRESS 


Pharmacy Practice 
and Sciences 
Department 


410-706-7613 


www.pharmacY.umarYland.edulPPSI 


Records & 
Registration 


410-706-4053 


httpJIadmincomp. umaryland. edulorrl 
index.html 


School of Pharmacy 
Calendar of Events 




www.pharmacy.umaryhnd.edulappslcalendarl 


School of Pharmacy 
Faculty Web Sites 




www.pharmacy. umaryland.edu/facult// 


School of Pharmacy 
Student Affairs 
(PharmD) 


410-706-7653 


www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu/StudentAffairsl 


School of Pharmacy 
Dean's Office 


410-706-7651 


www.phanvacy.umaryland.edulDeansI 


Student 
Answer Book 




www.umaryland.edulstudentlsabl 



Student & 
Employee Health 
Appointment 
Doctor on-call 



410-328-6645 
410-328-8792 



www.umaryland.edu/healthl 



Washington, DC 



wv/w. district-of<olumbia. com 



I 



School of Pharmacy 



Doctor of Pharmacy 
(PharmD) Program 



The Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program at the University of Maryland has 
been developed in partnership with practitioners from all areas of pharmacy and 
emphasizes problem solving, critical thinking, patient-focused content, and expe- 
riential opportunities across the breadth of practice. Due in part to this innova- 
tive curriculum, the School is ranked seventh among the nation's 84 pharmacy 
schools. In addition to the full-time day PharmD program, the School offers a 
Nontraditional PharmD Pathway as a mechanism for licensed, practicing phar- 
macists to earn the PharmD degree. The School uses a rolling admissions process. 
Information about the PharmD program can be viewed on the School's Web site: 
www. pharmacy, umaryland. edu. 



GOALS OF THE DOCTOR OF PHARMAC Y CUR RI CULUM 

The goals and objectives of the PharmD program are consistent with the School's 
strategic plan: 

• The School of Pharmacy seeks to help individuals gain the knowledge 
and skills necessary to begin pharmacy practice, and in so doing, accept 
and perform professional responsibilities with competence. Graduates 
should have the ability to adapt their practice to the changing health 
care system and should be prepared to engage in a continuing program 
of professional development. 

• The professional curricula will be innovative and flexible, based on 
strong basic sciences, have extensive clinical content taught by practice- 
based faculty members and emphasize the development of problem 
solving and collaborative skills. The curricula also will provide the 
opportunity for advanced professional and clinical education. 

• The School seeks to create an educational community that extends 
beyond traditional classroom sites and offers students and faculty 
members a variety of learning environments. These will include cul- 
tural and interprofessional programs which broaden the experiences of 
our graduates. 



GENERAL ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 



Admissions and application information for the PharmD Program may be obtained 
by visiting the PharmD Prospective Student Web site at: http://www.pharmacy 
. umaryland. edul admissions! . 

Inquiries about the admissions process may be sent by e-mail to PharmD- 
help@rx.umaryland.edu. The admission, application, and programs information 
for the PharmD programs are as follows: 

Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 1 5 



Admissions Information 

An admissions committee comprised of faculty members and students reviews 
official transcripts and PCAT results to make admissions decisions. Applicants 
with strong academic credentials and PCAT scores are invited to inter\'iew with 
faculty members, alumni, and students. During the interview, the applicant is 
assessed on factors such as professional and social awareness, verbal and written 
communication skills, integrity, maturity, and motivation. Following the inter- 
view, the admissions committee makes a decision based on the applicants' aca- 
demic achievement, PCAT scores, and qualities evaluated during the interview. 
Academic achievement and/or high PCAT scores do not, in themselves, ensure 
acceptance. 

While a minimum GPA of 2.5 (A=4.0) is required for admissions considera- 
tion, the average entering GPA of the fall 2003 first-year PharmD students was 
3.5. Average PCAT scores of admitted students were above the 80th percentile in 
each of the five areas of the exam. Competition for admission is high, and appli- 
cants with GPAs below 2.9 have an extremely low probability of admission. All 
applicants must present evidence (via official transcripts) of having completed the 
prepharmacy coursework with grades of at least a C or better. 



PRE-PHARMACY COURSEWORK 



Applicants must complete a minimum of 63 semester hours of coursework of 
pharmacy prerequisites for admission into the PharmD program. At least one 
semester of this coursework must be taken at an accredited institution in the 
United States. To enroll in pre-pharmacy coursework, applicants must apply 
directly to an accredited college or university, not to the School of Pharmacy. 
Most institutions have designated prepharmacy programs and advisors. The 
School of Pharmacy does not provide any specific information regarding course 
content and/or requirements for admission into these prepharmacy programs. 
Prerequisites for admission into the PharmD program are as follows: 

TYPICAL # OF TYPICAL # OF 

COURSE SEMESTERS CREDIT HOURS 



English (Comp/Lit) 






Calculus 






Statistics 






Biology 






Microbiology 






General Chemistry 




8 


Organic Chemistry 




8 


Physics 




8 


Humanities/Social Sciences 




18 



TOTAL 63 minimum 

16 School of Pharmacy 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENT APPLICANTS 



International student applicants must follow the procedure described above to 
apply for admission to the PharmD program. Additionally, students who are not 
citizens or permanent residents of the United States must submit the results of 
the TOEFL, certified official copies of transcripts, a statement of financial sup- 
port, a supplementary information sheet, and a summary of educational experi- 
ences. These must be submitted directly to PharmCAS. International students 
are also required to take the PCAT. Therefore, it is essential that international 
students start the admissions process early. 

The School does not accept applicants who have attended only a foreign edu- 
cational institution. The School, due to its small size, cannot adequately certify 
international credentials and relies on the evaluation performed by other institu- 
tions. In addition, experience shows that international students benefit from tak- 
ing courses at other U.S. institutions before entering our program. International 
students should be familiar with the rules and regulations of the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service, which grants admission to the United States. 



INTERNATIONAL PH ARMACIST APPLICANTS 

International pharmacists residing in the United States are eligible to apply to the 
School's PharmD program and then upon graduation become eligible to com- 
plete state licensure exams. International pharmacists cannot be admitted directly 
from another country. 

The structure of the Maryland program dictates that you must enter the first 
or second year of our four-year Doctor of Pharmacy program. You will probably 
be exempted from some courses within the curriculum based on your experi- 
ences and knowledge base. However, the manner in which all remaining courses 
are linked and sequenced, you cannot be admitted into the third or fourth year. 
Thus, you should plan at least a three-year commitment to earn the PharmD 
degree. 

If you would like to be considered as an applicant for the program, you will 
need to complete an application by March 1st for admission the following Fall 
semester. It would be helpful to the admissions committee if you could take the 
PCAT exam since it identifies the relative strengths and weaknesses of our appli- 
cants. It assists in structuring an individualized educational program for you. 

To request an application please visit our Web Site at www.pharmacy. 
umaryland.edu/admissions/pharmd d^nd follow the application procedures for 
International Pharmacist. 

Please note that if you are an International Pharmacist you do not apply to 
PharmCAS. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



TRANSFER APPLICANTS 



Periodically, the School of Pharmacy allows a selected number of students to 
transfer into Maryland's program from another school or college of pharmacy. 
The school limits the privilege to those students who have a valid reason for 
requesting transfer and who have evidence of satisfactory academic performance 
(at least a 3.0 professional GPA). Due to space limitation, the school cannot 
accept a large number of transfer students and only admits for the Fall semester. 
Due to complexity of the program a determination will be made by the Admis- 
sion Committee as to which year you will be accepted into the program. 

In order to consider your request for transfer, please follow the application pro- 
cedures for transfer student at www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu/admissions/pharmd. 
Please note that if you are an International Pharmacist, you do not apply to 
PharmCAS. 



APPLICATION PROCEDURE 



Applicants must follow the procedure described below to apply to the PharmD. 
Program. 

• Applicants must apply directly to PharmCAS at www.pharmCAS.orghy 
the following deadlines: 

Early Decision Applicants September 1 

Regular Applicants March I 

• Submit the Maryland Residency Form and the $20.00 nonrefundable 
processing fee to the following address: 

Admissions Committee 

School of Pharmacy 

University of Maryland 

20 North Pine Street 

224 Pharmacy Hall 

Baltimore, Maryland 21201-11 80 

• Complete the Online Supplement Information Sheet, which can be 
located at www.pharmacy. umaryland.edu/admissions/application. 

• Pre pharmacy coursework must be completed before the start of classes 
in the fall semester of application with a grade of C or better. 

• Take the Pharmacy College of Admission Test in October or January 
and forward the scores to PharmCAS. 



PHARMD PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 



The four-year Doctor of Pharmacy program is divided into six levels: Fundamen- 
tals, Basic Science, Pharmaceutical Science, Integrated Sciences and Therapeutics, 
Experiential Learning, and Curriculum Practice Interface. The academic focus of 
each level is described below: 

1 8 School of Pharmacy 



Level I: Fundamentals 

Students entering the PharmD program have diverse educational and hfe experi- 
ences. Level I addresses these diversities with introductory courses covering the 
concept and scope of pharmaceutical care, pharmacy practice in general, and the 
variety of disciplines that will contribute to pharmaceutical education. Students 
are provided the skills and scientific principles and concepts fundamental to sub- 
sequent curricular experiences. Students develop professional attitudes and 
behaviors that extend throughout the curriculum. 

Level II: Basic Sciences 

During Level II of the curriculum, students build on the fundamentals of Level I 
through a comprehensive examination of basic biological, chemical, physical, 
social, and behavioral sciences. These elements provide the foundation for under- 
standing pharmaceutical sciences and the complexities of drug action and use. 

Level III: Pharmaceutical Sciences 

Level III addresses pharmaceutical science content areas as they relate to the 
needs of patients in the total health care environment. The provider of pharma- 
ceutical care must possess a detailed and comprehensive understanding of the 
physical, chemical, biological, and psychosocial factors affecting the outcomes of 
drug therapy in specific patients with specific diseases. 

Level IV: Integrated Sciences and Therapeutics 

Level IV addresses the extensive interweaving of basic pharmaceutical and clinical 
science as well as the interrelated bodies of knowledge involved in total pharma- 
ceutical care. Students build on their basic and pharmaceutical science back- 
ground as they actively participate in a variety of didactic and laboratory 
experiences to design, implement, manage, and monitor individualized pharma- 
ceutical care plans. Students learn to appreciate that the successful outcomes of 
drug therapies depend on complex physical, chemical, biological, and psychoso- 
cial interactions within human systems, and therefore require individualized 
attention to patients during the design and delivery of pharmaceutical care. This 
application of these principles is taught by presenting diseases of different body 
systems within the broader context of public health, epidemiology, prescriber 
education, disease prevention, and health promotion issues. 

Three progressive components are used to present each disease. The first com- 
ponent reviews the drugs and biologicals used to treat specific disease processes 
and emphasizes comparative features underlying the choice of agent (Pharmaco- 
dynamics and Pharmacokinetics). Chemical properties, such as solubility and sta- 
bility, that determine the choice and use of the products, are discussed 
(Biomedicinal Chemistry and Pharmaceutics). The availability and comparative 
advantages of drug dosage formulations and delivery systems are considered as 
they relate to the optimum use of drug products during acute or chronic care 
(Biopharmaceutics) . 

The second component illustrates how the links between the scientific 
knowledge of the disease, available drug products, and the variables underlying 
a particular patient's condition are important to developing the most appropri- 

Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 19 



ate therapeutic plan. Methods for the choice of drug products, definition of 
specific goals of therapy, including how to assess whether these goals are being 
achieved, and active intervention steps to ensure successful outcomes of drug 
therapy, are developed (Therapeutics). Methods for monitoring, identifying, 
and responding to untoward consequences of drug therapy are identified (Toxi- 
cology and Adverse Drug Reactions). The choice and design of specific acute 
and chronic drug therapy, the impact of a variety of patient-related variables 
on dosage regimens, and the modification of dosage regimens in response to 
changing patient needs are developed (Clinical Pharmacokinetics). Students 
develop skills as they practice counseling patients about their therapeutic plans 
in particular and providing health education in general (Counseling and 
Education). 

The third component links the knowledge base of the first two components 
with appropriate ongoing methods for drug use review, medical audits, and cost 
considerations. The emphasis is on identifying specific interventions to improve 
prescribing patterns and reduce the cost of health care (Drug Use Evaluation). 

Level V: Experiential Learning 

Experiential learning is a series of structured learning and training activities dur- 
ing which students work under the supervision of experienced clinical and acade- 
mic faculty in a variety of health care settings. Students obtain and apply 
knowledge and skills necessary for successful delivery of pharmaceutical care and 
develop competence, confidence, and maturity as responsible professionals. An 
innovative feature of the program is that experiential learning activities occur 
throughout the curriculum and are linked to didactic courses. A total of 33 cred- 
its in experiential courses (approximately 1,600 hours) are required for the Doc- 
tor of Pharmacy degree. All students must complete at least 24 credits (1,100 
hours) of experience devoted to pharmaceutical patient care. Successful comple- 
tion of the experiential learning portion of the School's curriculum is accepted by 
the Maryland Board of Pharmacy as meeting the internship requirements to sit 
for the NABPLEX licensure examination. 

The Experiential Learning portion of the PharmD curriculum is organized 
into the six phases described below: 

Phase I: Introduction to Professional Practice. This early practice experi- 
ence introduces students to the professional responsibilities of pharmacists in a 
variety of practice environments, including community, hospital, and specialty 
settings. Students will also examine the spectrum of career opportunities available 
to today's pharmacist and begin developing basic practice skills. 

Phase II: Longitudinal Pharmaceutical Care. During the second and third 
years of the curriculum, students observe and participate in the delivery ot phar- 
maceutical care to patients. For each course, students follow the changing needs 
of a patient for one year within the context of the total health care system. 
Through direct patient encounters and discussion sessions, students learn to 
assess health status, communicate effectively, and determine pharmaceutical care 
needs from a holistic perspective. These activities are linked to material covered 
in the didactic curriculum. 



School of Pharmacy 



1 



Experiential Learning Map 



Elective Experiences 

Minimum of 8 Credits 



Pharmaceutical Care 

Community 
Institutional 
Clinics 
Alternative Practice 



Informational 
Services 




Safe Medication 
Order Processing 

Community 
Institutional 



Longitudinal Care II 
Longitudinal Care I 



Introduction to 
Professional Practice 



Phase III: Safe Medication Order Processing. Activities during this phase 
develop students' competency and proficiency in the technical functions of drug 
dispensing and distribution in institutional and community pharmacy settings. 
Students learn to receive, interpret, and verify the appropriateness of prescription 
orders and to efficiently dispense a variety of manufactured and compounded 
medications. Emphasis is placed on communication, prevention of medication 
errors, the role of technology, and supervision of ancillary personnel in the med- 
ication order process. 

Phase rV: Pharmaceutical Care. Students gain experience in the delivery of 
pharmaceutical care in a variety of practice environments, including community- 
based and acute-care hospital pharmacies, as well as ambulatory primary care and 
interdisciplinary clinics. Through daily encounters with patients and other health 
care providers, students learn to collect patient-specific data, identify and assess 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Progran 



drug-related problems, develop monitoring plans, and measure therapy out- 
comes. Further, students learn to educate patients and health care professionals 
regarding the appropriate use of drugs. 

Phase V: Informational Services. Activities during this phase, which occurs 
simultaneously with Phase IV, require students to provide drug information in 
the context of delivering pharmaceutical care. Students learn to receive a question 
in a comprehensive fashion, thoroughly analyze and research questions, and pro- 
vide appropriate answers to other health care providers and to patients and their 
families. 

Phase VI: Elective Experiences. Elective rotations allow students to pursue 
their own areas of interest. Electives in general practice environments enable stu- 
dents to develop greater skill, proficiency, and confidence. Electives in specialty 
pharmacotherapeutic practice areas, alternative forms of advanced practice man- 
agement, and research afford opportunities to explore a variety of practice 
options. This phase is linked to a senior colloquium. 

Student's performance during all six phases is evaluated by both clinical and 
academic faculty. Experiential rotations are not permitted at sites where students 
are working for pay or where any other conflict of interest situation may exist. 

Level VI: Curriculum Practice Interface 

The sixth and final level of the curriculum contains a variety of educational 
experiences for students about to enter practice. Required and elective content 
areas provide the curricular-based interface with pharmacy practice that builds on 
the preceding didactic and experiential components of the curriculum. The cap- 
stone nature of this interface reflects the acquisition and appreciation of informa- 
tion that: 

• is on the cutting edge of pharmacy practice, 

• represents closing options for individual curricular pathways, or 

• helps prepare students for a post-graduate education. 

Students learning at the interface are expected to be under continual change 
and development. One goal of this level is to allow each senior student, following 
completion of his or her experiential components, time to consider an individual 
practice in the context of the total health care environment. An important part of 
this interface, therefore, is the opportunity for students to reflect interactively 
upon their educational experiences with fellow students, faculty members, and 
practitioners. 

In the curriculum, students are trained to perform well at the patient level as 
well as the health system level. For example, on the patient level, students become 
active participants in the development of patient therapeutic plans. They select 
appropriate dosage forms, routes of administration, and dosage schedules. They 
prepare medications for patient use, counsel patients, maximize patient adher- 
ence to drug therapy, and assess therapeutic objectives. On the system level, stu- 
dents participate in medication-use process with other health care providers, 
assist patients in public health education programs, monitor pharmacoeconomic 
and pharmacoepidemiology issues in health care delivery, and participate in the 
formation of health policy. 



School of Pharmacy 



CURRICULUM PATHWAYS AND ELECTIVES 

The Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum encompasses educational experiences com- 
mon to all students in the required components of the program. In addition, 
more than 21 percent of curricular time is reserved for didactic (20 credits) and 
experiential (8 credits) electives to provide students the flexibility to tailor indi- 
vidual plans to meet their career goals. Students develop an individual Plans of 
Study using courses offered at the School of Pharmacy, or at other University of 
Maryland System institutions, working in conjunction with academic advisors, 
preceptors, and other faculty. To assist students in designing their plan, the 
faculty has developed "curricular pathways" that organize electives in a logical 
sequence to better prepare students in particular areas of practice. In collabora- 
tion with their academic advisors, students use electives to develop a Plan of 
Study that is consistent with their personal interests and career goals. Student's 
Plan of Study is used to enhance their general practice of pharmaceutical care, to 
focus on a particular area of practice, or to prepare for post-graduate studies. 

Students may select freely from elective options to design their Plan of Study or 
may choose one of five model pathways designed to enhance their preparation for 
common areas of interest. The model pathways generally account for 1 6 to 1 8 of 
the 28 elective credits required for the degree. Therefore, students' selection of a 
model pathway still provides them considerable flexibility in selection of addi- 
tional electives. 

Faculty pathway coordinators, who design and maintain the integrity of the 
pathways, and faculty advisors with expertise in each pathway area serve as con- 
sultants to students for information on career opportunities resulting from a par- 
ticular pathway. Students have freedom of choice in selecting a pathway. 
Students, not choosing to take all courses in a specific pathway, can select elective 
courses from multiple pathways as part of their personal Plan of Study, provided 
they complete the appropriate prerequisites. Faculty have developed the following 
five model pathways: 



ADVANCED PHARMACY PRACTICE 



The goal of this pathway is to prepare students to implement pharmaceutical care 
in a variety of practice settings. This pathway provides a series of didactic and 
experiential courses designed to enhance competence in delivering pharmaceuti- 
cal care in general practice and in delivering health care to special populations 
such as the elderly; to enhance knowledge of special pharmaceutical products, 
business and managerial skills needed to successfully deliver new services; and to 
provide experience in applying these professional and managerial skills in a vari- 
ety of advanced practice settings. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



GERIATRIC PHARMACY PRACTICE 



This pathway is designed to prepare graduates to work with older individuals in a 
variety of practice settings or pursue advanced degrees (PhD, MPH) or training 
(fellowships, residencies) in the area of geriatrics or gerontology. By completing 
this pathway, graduates will learn essential principles to manage medication- 
related issues as well as understand the complexities in caring for the elderly. Out- 
comes are to develop a database of current students and graduates focusing in the 
area of geriatrics. Students selecting this pathway must complete 12 credits: the 
core 5 credits of didactic electives, 4 credits of other geriatric-focused electives or 
special projects, and 3 credits of geriatric-focused geriatric rotations. 



MANAGEMENT 

This pathway is designed to prepare students for management careers in corpo- 
rate pharmacy, to develop entrepreneurial capabilities, and to prepare students for 
post-PharmD management residencies and/or MBA programs. Students take a 
series of didactic and experiential courses in personal management, practice man- 
agement, organizational behavior, financial reporting and analysis, marketing, 
and working with managers in health care settings. 



PHARMACOTHERAPY 

The goal of this pathway is to enhance students' abilit)' to independently optimize, 
implement, and monitor drug therapy in patients with complex health problems. 
This pathway offers a series of didactic seminar courses in pharmacotherapy and 
advanced therapeutics, coupled with advanced clinical experiences. The clinical 
experiences involve direct drug therapy management of patients in general medical 
and sub-specialty environments. Students completing this pathway are encouraged 
to pursue post-PharmD training in residencies and fellowships and to eventually 
pursue specialty board certification in pharmacotherapy. 



RESEARCH 



The goal of this pathway is to expose students to research and better prepare 
them for graduate studies or postgraduate fellowships. Students selecting this 
pathway take courses in advanced educational opportunities and advanced semi- 
nar courses in selected scientific areas. They receive research experiences, working 
directly with faculty scientists, and take a senior colloquium. Students are also 
encouraged to pursue the PharmD/PhD dual degree program (see the "PharmD 
Dual Degree Programs" section). 



School of Pharmacy 



i 



PHARMD PROGRAM SUMMARY 



The faculty continue to revise the curriculum based on the dynamics of phar- 
macy education, the needs of practice, and the students. The exact nature of the 
curriculum may vary from class to class. The following describes the PharmD 
curriculum by semester. 



COURSEWORK 


MINIMUM SEMESTER CREDITS 


Didactic 


99 credits 


79 Required 


20 Elective 


Experiential 


33 credits 


25 Required 


8 Elective 



TOTAL 



1 32 credits 



Coursework by Semester 

The coursework by semester below outlines the required components of the cur- 
riculum. Electives can be taken during most fall, winter, spring, and summer 
semesters. 

The total and minimum semester credits for didactic and experiential courses 
are listed in parentheses. 



FALL FIRST YEAR COURSES 




SPRING FIRST YEAR COURSES 


PHAR 510 Biochemistry 


3cr. 


PHAR 517 Study Design 2 cr. 


PHAR 513 Drug Chemistry 


2cr. 


PHAR 520 Molecular Biology 3 cr. 


PHAR 514 Human Biology 1 


3cr. 


PHAR 524 Human Biology II 3 cr. 


PHAR 5 1 6 Pharmacy Prac & Educ 


2cr. 


PHAR 53 1 Pharmaceutical Chem 2 cr. 


PHAR 522 Context of Health Care 


3cr. 


PHAR 537 Principles Drug Action 2 cr. 


PHAR 523 Pharmaceutical Ethics 


1 cr. 


PHPC 520 Intro to Prof Practice II 1 cr. 


PHAR 526 Physical Chemistry 


2cr. 




PHPC 510 Intro to Prof Practice 1 


1 cr 




TOTAL REQUIRED 17 ( 


16/1) 


Total required 13(12/1) 



FALL SECOND YEAR COURSES 



SPRING SECOND YEAR COURSES 



PHAR 525 Immunology 2 cr. 

PHAR 530 Micro/Antibiotics I 2 cr. 

PHAR 532 Practice Management I 2 cr. 

PHAR 533 Medicinal Chemistry I I cr. 

PHAR 534 Human Biology III 3 cr. 

PHAR 536 Pharmacology I 3 cr. 

PHAR 54! Biopharmaceut/Kinetics 3 cr. 



PHAR 535 Pharmaceutics 3 cr. 

PHAR 540 Micro/Antibiotics II 2 cr. 

PHAR 542 Clinical Chemistry I cr. 

PHAR 543 Medicinal Chemistry II 2 cr. 

PHAR 544 Practice Management II 2 cr. 

PHAR 546 Pharmacology II 3 cr. 

PHPC 532 Longitudinal Care I I cr. 



Total required 16(1 6/0) 

Students will also register iorJune-Nov 
Phase VI rotations 



Total required 14(13/1) 

Students will also register for Dec-May 
Phase VI rotations 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



25 



FALL THIRD YEAR COURSES 


SPRING THIRD YEAR COURSES 


PHAR 552 Nutrition 1 cr. 


PHAR 564 ISAT III 4 cr 


PHAR 553 Medical Info Analysis 2 cr. 


PHAR 565 ISAT IV 4 cr 


PHAR 554 ISAT 1 4 cr 


PHPC 562 Longitudinal Care II 1 cr 


PHAR 555 ISAT II 4 cr 




Total required 11(11/0) 


Total required 9(8/1) 


Students will also register for June-Nov 


Students will also register for Dec-May 


Phase III and Phase VI rotations 


Phase III and Phase VI rotations 



FALL FOURTH YEAR COURSES 



SPRING FOURTH YEAR COURSES 



Students will register for june-Nov 
Phase III, IV, and VI rotations 



Students will register for Dec-May 
Phase III, IV V and VI rotations 
PHAR 580 Pharmacy Law 
PHAR 58 1 Senior Colloquium 



2cr 
I cr 



Total required 



3 (3/0) 



Phase Descriptions 



PHASE III ROTATIONS- 
6 CREDITS 



PHASE IV ROTATIONS - 
13 CREDITS REQUIRED 



PHPC 570 Med Process Community 3 cr 
PHPC 57 1 Med Process Institution 3 cr 



PHASE V ROTATION 
2 CREDITS 



PHPC 572 Community Pharm Care 3 cr 
PHPC 573 Institution Pharm Care 3 cr 
PHPC 574 General Pharm Care 3 cr 
PHPC 576 Ambulatory Care I cr 

PHASE VI ELECTIVE ROTATIONS - 
8 CREDITS MIN. 



PHPC 577 Information Services 



2cr 



Various PHEX courses 



NONTRADITIONAL PHARMD PATHWAY 



The Nontraditional PharmD (NTPD) Pathway is offered for Hcensed pharma- 
cists who have a Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy degree and seek to earn the 
Doctor of Pharmacy degree. The final appUcants were admitted in Fall 2002. The 
School has implemented a phase-out plan for the final pathway graduation in 
May 2006. All graduates will be required to meet the terminal performance out- 
comes of the School's PharmD program, with at least 30 credits of coursework, 
which develops the knowledge, skills, and abilities for the delivery of pharmaceu- 
tical care. Credits in the NTPD Pathway may be earned by taking courses from a 
faculty-approved plan of study, through supervised experiential learning, and by 
approved self-study or electives with appropriate assessment. 



School of Pharmacy 



EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING 



Experiential learning will be centered in the pharmacist's own practice site, under 
the supervision of a faculty mentor; one credit of clerkship experience is required 
at other sites. The faculty mentor will work closely with each pharmacist to iden- 
tify an appropriate mix of his or her own patients and to develop an experience 
component that will meet individual needs, satisfy pathway requirements, and 
benefit patients. Beginning with the initial patient identified as a study case, stu- 
dents will learn to triage, develop explicit pharmaceutical care plans, and initiate 
the patient management process. To monitor progress and provide feedback to 
students, faculty mentors will use performance-based evaluation. For more infor- 
mation, students may call 410-706-0761. 



PHARMD DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The School offers three dual degree programs for PharmD students who are 
interested in gaining specialized expertise in law, business administration, or 
research. Students apply to these programs in the second year of the PharmD 
program. The dual degree programs have separate admission requirements. The 
programs are briefly described below: 



PHARMD/JD PROGRAM 



The School offers a dual Doctor of Pharmacy/Juris Doctor degree program with 
the University of Maryland School of Law for students who wish to pursue the 
Juris Doctor. The PharmD/JD program allows students to gain the requisite 
knowledge in legal skills in a variety of areas. Graduates of this program will be 
prepared for careers in a diverse range of health care and legal areas. PharmD stu- 
dents can use 16 credit hours obtained from the law curriculum to fulfill their 20 
hours of didactic pharmacy electives. Students could complete the dual degree 
program in six years. 

PharmD students must apply to the JD program and meet all admissions cri- 
teria, including submitting results of the LSAT, and adhere to the School of Laws 
procedures and deadlines. Admission is not guaranteed. For more information 
about the JD program, contact the School of Law at 410-706-3492 or e-mail 
admissions@law. umaryland. edu. 



PHARMD/MBA PROGRAM 



The School offers a dual Doctor of Pharmacy/Master of Business Administration 
program with the University of Baltimore Merrick School of Business for stu- 
dents who wish to pursue the Master of Business Administration degree. The 
PharmD/MBA program allows pharmacy students to take MBA courses as part 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 



of their PharmD curriculum. While in pharmacy school, PharmD students mav 
complete 20 of the 48 credit hours required in the MBA program. 

PharmD students must apply to the MBA program; admission is not guaran- 
teed. Students wishing to apply to the MBA program must adhere to University 
of Baltimore (UB) procedures and deadlines. Students must also request that the 
University of Maryland's Office of Records and Registration send their official 
University of Maryland transcript and that the School of Pharmacy Office of Stu- 
dent Affairs send a copy of their prepharmacy transcripts to UB. Students apply- 
ing to this dual program need the equivalent of a bachelor's degree (i.e., either a 
degree or completion of four years of college). The grade point average for an 
entering MBA student is 3.0; however, a lower GPA may be offset by a higher 
score on a standardized test (e.g., GMAT, PCAT). For more information about 
MBA program, contact the Advising Center at the University of Baltimore at 
410-837-4944. For information about the admissions process, contact the Office 
of Graduate Admissions at 410-APPLYUB. 



PHARMD/PHD PROGRAM 



The School oflfers dual Doctor of Pharmacy/Doctor of Philosophy programs in 
Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmaceutical Health Services Research to prepare 
comprehensively trained individuals with an interdisciplinary perspective on 
teaching and scientific research. The PharmD/PhD program is a cooperative 
effort between the PharmD curriculum and the graduate curricula of the Depart- 
ment of Pharmaceutical Sciences and the Department of Pharmaceutical Health 
Services Research. The PharmD and PhD phases of the program run concur- 
rently with minimal disruption of the academic content or sequencing of the 
PharmD component. This permits dual degree students to progress normally in 
the PharmD program and graduate with their class. To achieve this goal, students 
may take open vacation periods as well as Research Pathway electives and other 
elective options within the PharmD program and apply them toward meeting the 
requirements of the PhD degree. Students already in the PharmD program may 
be considered for admission to the dual degree program. Dual degree students 
can expect to complete their core graduate coursework and be ready for advance- 
ment to candidacy for the PhD degree by the time they complete the PharmD 
program. Students may complete the requirements for the award of both the 
PharmD and PhD degrees in six or seven years. 

Consideration for admission to the PhD degree program is contingent upon 
satisfying the admission requirements of the University of Maryland Graduate 
School. A bachelor's degree is generally required for admission to the graduate 
program. Applicants to the PhD programs will be evaluated on the following cri- 
teria: the quality of the academic record, standardized test scores (GRE scores of 
1600 or better, PCAT scores, and where applicable, TOEFL scores of at least 
600), letters of recommendation, interviews, compatibility between the students' 
career goals and the objectives of the PhD program, and a GPA of 3.0 or better. 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



I 



I 



For more information about admissions to the PhD programs, contact the fol- 
lowing departments: Department of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research 
call 410-706-7613 or e-mail phsr@rx.iimaryland.edu. The Department of Phar- 
maceutical Sciences, call 410-706-0549 or e-mail pscprog@rx.umaryiand.edu. 



LICENSURE REQUIREMENTS 



Students who complete the PharmD degree satisfy the educational requirement 
for all state boards of pharmacy in the United States. Graduates are eligible to 
take state licensing exams in all states. For more information about licensure as a 
pharmacist in Maryland, graduates may contact the Maryland Board of Phar- 
macy at 4201 Patterson Ave., Baltimore, MD 21215-2299, call 410-764-4755, 
or E-mail: mdbop@dhmh. state. md.us. 

International pharmacists who have received their pharmacy degrees from 
non-US institutions have two options to become licensed pharmacists in the 
United States. They can apply to the PharmD Program (see the International 
Pharmacist Applicants section of this catalog) or complete the Foreign Pharma- 
cists Equivalency Examination, which certifies the applicant for the board exami- 
nation. Individuals taking this approach would not need to attend the School of 
Pharmacy. For more information, write or call the National Association of Boards 
of Pharmacy Foundation, Foreign Pharmacy Graduate Examination Committee, 
700 Busse Highway Park Ridge, IL 60068, 847-698-6227. 




Pharmacy Practice Lab director Fred Abramsoii and student Maricl Sinko 
review a prescription. 



Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) Program 29 



Doctor of Philosophy Programs 



Applicants seeking advanced degrees, MS and PhD, in pharmaceutical sciences or 
pharmaceutical health services research must apply to the University's Graduate 
School departments. Interested applicants also should review the Graduate 
School catalog for more specific information about the MS and PhD programs. 
The PhD programs in pharmaceutical health services research and pharmaceuti- 
cal sciences are described as follows. Interested applicants may apply online at 
http://graduate.umaryland.edu/admissions.html o\:, if necessary, obtain an applica- 
tion form from the department to which they are applying. 

Opportunities are available for postgraduate study: residencies, postdoctoral 
fellowships, and other professional studies. Contact the department for specific 
information. 



PHARMACEUTICAL HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH PHD 
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The graduate program in Pharmaceutical Health Services Research seeks to train 
scholars and researchers in one of four major research areas: pharmacoeconomics, 
pharmacoepidemiology, behavioral sciences, or pharmaceutical policy as it relates to 
the delivery, use, costs, and safety of pharmaceuticals and other health care prod- 
ucts. Each student is required to select one research area or track of specialization in 
which they will take advanced courses and conduct their dissertation research. 

Graduates of the program will receive training to: 1) design and carry out 
pharmaceutical health services research based on strong training in research 
methodologies, statistics, one or more pharmacy specialty areas, and a sound 
understanding of the U.S. health care system; 2) serve as a knowledgeable 
spokesperson to the public and private sectors of health care concerning pharma- 
ceutical health services research, practice research, and pharmacy-related policy 
issues; 3) interact with members of other health, social, and administrative disci- 
plines and initiate and/or collaborate in research endeavors related to pharmaceu- 
ticals and other health services; and 4) be an effective teacher both in academic 
and nonacademic settings. 



PHARMACEUTICAL HEALTH SERVICES 
RESEARCH PROGRAM OVERVIEW 



The PhD graduate program in Pharmaceutical Health Services Research offers 
advanced training by faculty who are regional, national, and international leaders 
in the fields of pharmacoeconomics, pharmacoepidemiology, pharmaceutical pol- 
icy, and the behavioral sciences. The specialized curriculum, with an emphasis on 
developing research skills, trains students for leadership roles in academia, gov- 
ernment, industry, and consulting. 



School of Pharmacy 



ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 



Applicants to the Doctor of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Health Services 
Research should possess a bachelor's or master's degree from an accredited college 
or university. Applicants without a Bachelor of Science in pharmacy or a Doctor 
of Pharmacy degree will be considered, but, in general, preference will be given to 
candidates with previous pharmacy-related education and/or experience. 

Applicants must satisfy the general requirements of the University's Graduate 
School before consideration for admission to the program. The minimum stan- 
dard for admission to the Graduate School is a B average, or 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, in 
a program of study resulting in the award of a baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited college or university. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

Applications to the graduate program in Pharmaceutical Health Services 
Research should be directed to the following address: Graduate School, Univer- 
sity of Maryland, 621 W. Lombard St., Room 336, Baltimore, MD 21201; 410- 
706-7131. An online application is available at http : I I graduate. umaryland. 
eduladm_appinfo.htm. The following forms and/or documents are required for 
processing of an application by the Graduate School: 

Application for admission (three copies) 

Official transcripts (two copies) 

Letters of recommendation (three letters) 

Results of the Graduate Record Exam 

Processing fees for international students 

TOEFL scores 

Statement of financial status 

Immigration documents (form 1-20) 
Officially, applications must be received by the Graduate School by July 1 for the 
fall semester, December 1 for the spring semester, and by May 1 5 for admission 
to the summer semester. However, it is preferred that applications be received by 
January 15 for the fall semester. Applicants interested in receiving a teaching 
assistantship or research assistantship must apply by March 1 . An international 
student application must be received six months prior to the semester of expected 
entrance. Contact the department for more information: Pharmacy Administra- 
tion Graduate Program, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 515 West 
Lombard Street, Second Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201-1180. 

1. In addition to official transcripts and three letters of recommendation as 
evidence of academic potential, the student is to submit scores from the 
Graduate Record Examination. Graduate Record Examination scores are 
used as part of the date on which admission decisions are based, but are 
seldom the sole criteria for admission. 

2. Applicants with completed applications are encouraged to arrange an 
interview with the Department. A limited number of students who fail 
to meet these minimum standards may be admitted to graduate study as 

Doctor of Philosophy Programs 3 I 



provisional students on the basis of outstanding performance on the 
Graduate Record Examination and on the basis of letters of recommen- 
dation from competent judges of their performance as students or of 
their professional capaciu'. Provisional admissions carry' explicit condi- 
tions (e.g., minimal grade requirements in stipulated courses) that must 
be met before the student can be advanced to full graduate status. Spe- 
cific conditions for admission as a provisional graduate student may be 
found in the current edition of the Graduate School Catalog. 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 



The minimum requirements for a student to receive a doctoral degree in the 
Pharmaceutical Health Services Research Graduate Program are detailed below. 
Individual students might be required to take additional courses as deemed 
appropriate by their curriculum committee. In particular, students without 
strong computer programming skills may need elective courses. 

Required courses include a group of core graduate courses in pharmacoepidemi- 
ology, pharmacoeconomics, pharmaceutical policy, and the social and behavioral 
sciences, in addition to research methods, and statistics. Students must complete at 
least 12 credits of advanced courses in their research track beyond any core courses. 
It generally takes two to two-and-a-half years to complete the course requirements. 

Although many students come to the program with prior graduate work, the 
department requires that they take the core courses here. When non-core courses 
or the beginning/intermediate statistics requirements are waived, students are 
expected to take other advanced courses to complete the course requirements. To 
allow flexibility and to ensure that students are well prepared in their area of spe- 
cialization, each student is asked to establish a curriculum committee by the end 
of their first semester of study. 

The following outlines the required core course curriculum for this program: 

Core Course Curriculum (33 Credits) 



COURSES 


CREDITS 


PHSR 6 1 0— Health Care System 




PHSR 620— Social Behavioral 




PHSR 650 — Pharmaceutical Econ 




PHSR 670— Health Education 




PHSR 704 — Pharmacopeia 




PHSR 701— Research Methods 1 




PHSR 702— Research Methods II 




PREV 600 — Intro to Epidemiology 





School of Pharmacy 



COURSES 


CREDITS 


Statistics 


9 


PHSR 709— Seminar* 


3 


Advanced Cognate 


Courseworl< 


12 


PHSR 899— Dissertation 


12 



*Graduate seminar is conducted weekly to inform students and faculty about 
new research and current issues. Seminar attendance is mandatory for all gradu- 
ate students while in residency. Additionally, students must register for seminar 
credit in three separate seminars. Students receive one credit for successfully 
preparing and delivering a seminar on an ongoing research project or research 
proposal under the direction of a faculty member. Each student must have at least 
one seminar credit prior to taking his or her general comprehensive examination. 
Furthermore, students must present their dissertation research at least once in a 
graduate seminar. 

Comprehensive Examination 

The purpose of the comprehensive examination is to test students' depth and 
breadth of knowledge in the field of pharmaceutical health services research: the- 
ory, methods, statistics, and their chosen area of specialization. Students are 
expected to be fluent in research techniques, current developments, general 
research methods, study designs, statistical methods, and their professional and 
ethical responsibilities. Students should not only know the basic concepts, but 
also be able to interpret and apply them under various scenarios. 

Dissertation 

The dissertation is the product of intensive research at the doctoral level, distin- 
guished by its deeper, more comprehensive, professional and scholarly treatment 
of the subject. The doctoral dissertation is expected to represent independent and 
original research in the field of the candidate's graduate study. It must add to 
understanding in the candidate's field. The project must be of sufficient difficulty 
and depth to test the candidate's ability to carry out research independently, and 
it should show a mastery of the skills needed for such research. 

Oral Defense of Dissertation Proposal 

Students must submit the proposal to the dissertation committee for review and 
comment. The student, in consultation with the research advisor, will schedule 
the oral examination to defend the research proposal. 

Final Oral Exam Defense 

After completing the dissertation, the candidate must defend it before the aca- 
demic community. The defense is open to all members of the University graduate 
faculty. Regulations governing the style, format, and how to submit the disserta- 
tion for publication may be obtained from the Graduate School. 

Doctor of Philosophy Programs 33 



Additional Activities 

• Teaching experience is required during the first year. Doctoral students 
in pharmaceutical health services research are expected to participate as 
fully as possible in opportunities to develop their teaching skills. 

• Experiential learning is required of all students. In general, a student 
does not receive additional credit for experiential learning, but it is a sig- 
nificant part of the program. 

• Participating in professional meetings and organizations is recom- 
mended. Students are encouraged to submit papers to local, regional, 
and national professional meetings. 

FINANCIAL SUPPORT 

Financial support is available to students accepted into the program: graduate 
research assistantships funded by the Graduate School, graduate research assistant- 
ships funded by faculty-sponsored projects, and graduate teaching assistantships. 



PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES PHD PROGRAM OVERVIEW 

Graduate students, staflf, and faculty are pursuing a wide range of pharmaceutical 
research, such as biotechnology-related pharmaceutical science research involving 
molecular biology; macromolecular structure, dynamics and drug design; phar- 
macology and neuroscience; and novel drug and gene delivery. Pharmaceutical 
sciences is the largest graduate program on campus and perhaps the largest of its 
type in the United States. This critical mass of graduate students working with 
over 30 faculty and staff members, provides a stimulating environment for the 
pharmaceutical sciences graduate student. 

Components of our multidisciplinary program include the following three 
informal Research Pathways: Cellular & Biological Chemistry, Pharmacology & 
Neuroscience, and Biopharmaceutics & Drug Delivery Technology. The mission 
of each Research Pathway is to foster individual and collaborative research, fac- 
ulty growth, and a graduate student education which provides a strong, broad 
background in the drug development process along with intensive expertise in a 
focal research area of the pharmaceutical sciences. For more complete description 
of the graduate program, see www.pharmacy.umaryland.edu/graduate/psc. 



PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT OVERVIEW 

The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences is involved in understanding the 
underlying biology of disease, mechanisms of drug action, drug design, and drug 
product design and evaluation. The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences is, 
by its nature, a multidisciplinary environment. Disciplines covered include cell, 
molecular and structural biology; organic chemistry to computer-aided rational 
drug design, comprising the core of the drug discovery/drug design and the struc- 

34 School of Pharmacy 



rural biology initiative; pharmacology and neuroscience, including molecular, 
biochemical, and behavioral approaches probing pharmacodynamic questions in 
carcinogenesis, respiratory biology, drug addiction, Parkinson's Disease and other 
neurodegenerative diseases, schizophrenia and other psychiatric diseases, and 
epilepsy; and pharmacokinetics, drug transport, industrial pharmaceutical 
research, and novel drug/gene delivery. 

Pharmaceutical sciences contribute to the discovery, design, and development 
of drugs. Drug discovery and development is a dynamic process, requiring inte- 
grated efforts across classical scientific disciplines. Hence, the graduate program 
in pharmaceutical sciences uniquely prepares graduates for mankind's greatest 
intellectual and practical challenge: to discover medicines to discover medicines 
and to delivery them to patients. 

ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 



Admission to the graduate program is contingent upon satisfying the admission 
requirements of the Graduate School. In most instances, candidates for admis- 
sion who have earned a BA or BS degree in chemistry, biology, biochemistry, psy- 
chology, chemical engineering, or in pharmaceutical science possess adequate 
preparation for the graduate program. 

A completed Application Form, official test scores (not copies), official tran- 
scripts, and other supporting documentation are required. Completed appli- 
cations received before January 15 will be notified of our decision in early 
February, and will be preferentially processed over later applications. Selected 
applicants may be invited for a personal interview and tour of the campus and 
facilities. Applications are accepted for Fall Only. 

Applications for admission to the graduate program are evaluated on the basis 
of the following: 

• Quality of academic performance 

• Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores 

• TOEFL or lELTS scores (for international applicants) 

• Three (3) letters of recommendation (mailed to the Department of 
Pharmaceutical Sciences) 

• A "Statement of Academic Goals and Research Interests" that is com- 
patible with faculty research projects (mailed to the Dept. of Pharma- 
ceutical Sciences) 

The (GRE) General Test scores must be submitted as part of the admissions 
process. International students must obtain at least a score of 600 in the TOEFL 
Examination or 7.0 in the lELTS. 



APPLICATION PROCEDURE 



Applicants for the PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences must send certain materials to 
the University of Maryland Graduate School, while other materials must be sent 
to the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Applicants may review admis- 

Doctor of Philosophy Programs 35 



sions procedures and requirements of the University of Maryland's Graduate 
School on the Web site or e-mail gradinfo@umaryland.edu or call 410-706-7131 
for more information. Applicants must submit the list of materials which follows 
to the University's Graduate School at: Graduate Admissions and Enrollment 
Services, Baltimore Student Union, Room 336, The Graduate School, University 
of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201-1550. 

• Submit one set of official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General 
Test scores (not a copy) and two sets of official Test of English as a Foreign 
Language score (if international applicant) with a minimum score of 600 
and/or have taken conversational and written English coursework. 

• Submit two sets of official transcripts or mark sheets. 

• Submit the required nonrefundable application fee. Make check payable 
to: University of Maryland. 

Applicants must also submit the following to the School of Pharmacy Depart- 
ment of Pharmaceutical Sciences at: Pharmaceutical Sciences Graduate Program, 
School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 20 N. Pine St., 4th Floor, Balti- 
more, MD 21201-1180. 

• Submit a Statement of Academic Goals and Research Interests. In your 
"Statement of Academic Goals and Research Interests," please discuss 
concisely your academic objectives pertaining to the pharmaceutical sci- 
ences and your professional career goals. Include a description of rele- 
vant work experience as appropriate. To facilitate review of your 
application, please denote a research pathway (see Programs) at the top 
of your Statement. 

• Submit three (3) letters of recommendation. A form is available from 
www. pharmacy, umaryland. edulAdmissionslrecommend.pdf. 

International Students 

International students should not plan on leaving their country before obtaining 
official notification of admission to the graduate program from the director of 
graduate admissions and an 1-20 form from the Office Records and Registration. 
The following rules apply: 

• Sufficient funds must be available to support the student for one year. 
Students may obtain the immigration form (1-20) necessary for obtain- 
ing the appropriate visa from the University's Office of Records and 
Registration. 

• Students already studying in the United States who wish to transfer to 
the University of Maryland must also secure proper immigration docu- 
ments in order to request that the Immigration and Naturalization Ser- 
vice grant permission to transfer to the University of Maryland. 

• Every international student must report to the Office of Records and 
Registration as soon as possible after arriving at the University. 

• Students from non-English-speaking countries are considered for 
admission only if they have received a total Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) score of 600 (250 on the computer-based score). 
Because TOEFL is given only four times a year throughout various 
parts of the world, it is necessary for the applicant to make arrange- 

36 School of Pharmacy 



ments with the Educational Testing Service, Box 899, Princeton, NJ 
08540, to take the test as soon as study at the University of Maryland is 
contemplated. 
• Graduate students whose work indicates English language deficiencies 
will be required to take remedial English courses. 

PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES PHD PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The goal of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences graduate program is to 
prepare independent, creative scientists to function well in academia, the phar- 
maceutical industry, and in government or other research institutions. The phar- 
maceutical sciences graduate program is administered through the Graduate 
School (www. graduate, umaryland.edu). 

ACADEMIC PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 



The graduate program is "mentor-driven" - a plan of study is individualized and 
dependent on the student's and mentor's specific research interests. Each student 
develops their educational experience with the advice of his/her mentor and an 
Advisory/Thesis Committee. The awarding of the degree is contingent on the 
candidate's successful defense of a dissertation based on independent original 
research. Graduates will be educated with the knowledge and skills to direct the 
discovery, development and delivery of medications for safe and effective therapy. 
Departmental course offerings are described in detail in the "Program Course 
Descriptions" section of this catalog. 

A student typically graduates after five years in the PhD program. In the first 
two years, students focus on completing classroom requirements and initial dis- 
sertation research. Early in the third year, students take the comprehensive exam- 
ination, where each student proposes dissertation research and defends the 
proposal orally and in writing. In the last three years, students focus on labora- 
tory experimentation and the presentation of a dissertation. 

The minimum course requirements of the PhD degree program are as follows: 

Core Course Curriculum 



COURSE 


CREDITS 


PHAR 600 and 601 — Pharmaceutical Drug Design and Development 


3 each 


PHAR 608— First- Year Rotations 1 


PHAR 708— First- Year Seminar 1 


Two techniques courses 


4 minimum 


Ethics course (e.g., DOCB 605— Scientific Method, CIPP 909— 
Responsible Conduct of Science) 


Minimum three additional courses 


Three seminar presentations 


3 


PHAR 899— Thesis Research 


12 



Doctor of Philosophy Programs 



FACULTY RESEARCH AREAS 



Larry L. Augsburger, pharmaceutics; solid oral dosage form design 

Adrian H. Batchelor, X-ray crystalography 

Gary G. Buterbaugh, pharmacology of epileptic seizures 

Andrew Coop, organic and medicinal chemistry; opioid and sigma receptors 

Richard N. Dalby, respiratory drug delivery; metered dose inhalers (MDIs); dry 

powdered inhalers (DPI); nebulizers 
Russell J. DiGate, genetics; DNA topoisomerase III 

Natalie D. Eddington, pharmacokinetics; brain delivery; pharmacodynamic rela- 
tionships 
Hamid Ghandehari, controlled drug delivery; polymers; biomaterials 
Ronald D. Guiles, protein structure, including Heme and human interleukin-5; 

nuclear magnetic resonance 
Jun Hayashi, cell biolog)'; lymphocyte signal transduction 
Stephen W. Hoag, pharmaceutics; controlled release tablets; power technology' 
R. Gary Hollenbeck, physical pharmacy; novel drug delivery systems 
Kwang Chul Kim, cell biology; epithelial cell surface mucins (MUCl mucins) 
Alexander D. MacKerell Jr., computational chemistry; novel inhibitors of HIV 

integrase 
J. Edward Moreton, pharmacology; behavioral and neuropharmacological aspects 

of drug abuse 
James E. Polli, oral biopharmaceutics; bioavailability; intestinal permeability 
Gerald M. Rosen, free radicals in biological systems; host immune response 
Paul S. Shapiro, signal transduction; mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase 

pathways 
Rakesh K. Srivastava, cell growth; differentiation and apoptosis; Bcl-2 family 

members 
Peter Swaan, cell biology; computational chemistry; drug bioavailability; drug 

delivery 
Ashiwel S. Undie, signal transduction; phospholipase C-dependent signal trans- 
duction; dopamine 
Jia Bei Wang, neurotransmitter receptors; mu opiate receptor 
Myron Weiner, drug metabolism; cytochrome P450; hepatocytes 
Angela Wilks, protein structure and function; heme proteins; Shigella dysenteriae 



ACADEMIC RESOURCES 



Extramural funding for research is currently almost five million dollars and ongo- 
ing investigations include collaborative projects with other researchers on campus 
and at the FDA, NIH, Johns Hopkins University, Walter Reed Army Institute of 
Research, and the pharmaceutical industry. Projects include biotechnology- 
related pharmaceutical science research involving molecular biology; macro- 
molecular structure, dynamics and drug design; pharmacology and neuroscience; 
and novel drug and gene delivery. 



School of Pharmacy 



I 



1 



The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences has one of the most modern indus- 
trial and pharmaceutical technology research and manufacturing facilities in the 
country. It has small-scale and pilot-scale equipment for the production of aerosols, 
parenterals, liquid, semi-solid, and solid dosage forms. There is a state-of-the art 
analytical facility for basic and applied pharmacokinetic research and clinical 
research in hospitalized patients. The laboratory is equipped to investigate all 
phases of drug absorption and disposition in animals and/or humans. A Good Man- 
ufacturing Practice facility exists for small-scale manufacturing pharmaceuticals. 

FINANCIAL SUPPORT 



Financial support is available to students accepted into the program, such that 
students can focus on graduate studies. Support includes a stipend (currently 
$19,000 for year 2003 for Step I pre-candidates and $20,000 for Step II candi- 
dates), tuition, health, and fees. Additional merit awards are given to the depart- 
ment's most outstanding students. 

Competitive departmental fellowships are awarded by the department each 
year: Dunning Fellowship, Emerson Fellowship, Slama Graduate Award, and the 
Shangraw/Center for Professional Advancement Scholarship. Additionally, many 
students each year earn external fellowships, through excellence in academics and 
research. 



GRADUATE STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



Graduate students play a particularly active role in a number of campus student 
organizations. Additionally, two graduate student organizations within the 
School of Pharmacy and the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences are the 
Pharmacy Graduate Student Association and a student chapter of the American 
Association of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Moreover, depending upon their specific 
research interests, individual students often join national professional societies, 
many of which host meetings and workshops in the mid-Atlantic region. 




Pharmacy students discuss group project. 



Doctor of Philosophy Programs 



Financial Information 



The School's tuition and fees, health insurance, residency status, and financial aid 
information is as follows: 



TUITION AND FEES 



The following lists the tuition and fees for the 2003-2004 academic year. The 
tuition per credit hour rate below is for the Nontraditionai PharmD Pathway and 
graduate programs only. Students in these programs are charged this rate regard- 
less of the number of credit hours they take. 



TUITION 


FULL-TIME 


NTPD 


GRADUATE 


Full time (9 or more credits) 










Resident 


$ 9,773 






Nonresident 


$20,444 






Per credit hour rate 










Resident 






$380 


$314 


Nonresident 






$694 


$562 


Fees 










Techology 




60 


$ 10 


$ 10 


Student Government Association 




15 


$ 15 


$ 15 


Transportation 




28 


$ 28 


$ 28 


Student activities 




54 


$ 54 


$ 46 


Supporting facilities 




425 


$351 


$351 


Other Expenses 










Clinical clerkship (experiential courses 


) $ 


315 


$315 




Supplemental Application fee 




20 




$ 50 


Admission acceptance deposit 










(nonrefundable) 




800 






Late registration fee 




40 


$ 40 


$ 40 


Diploma fee 




55 


$ 55 


$110 


Liability insurance 




22 


$ 22 




Disability insurance 




2! 






Hepatitis B vaccine ( 1 st year only) 




105 






Continuing education certification 




100 






Late payment of tuition and fees* 




100 


$100 


$100 



* Late payment of tuition and fees is $100 or 5% of the balance, whichever is less. 
NOTE: Notwithstanding any other provision of this or any other University publica- 
tion, the University reserves the right to make changes in tuition, fees and other 
charges at any time such chan