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HAROLD B. LEE LlBRATOt 

BRIGJ^ vM YObNG UNIVERSITY 

PROVO.UTAH 



i 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2011 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 



http://www.archive.org/details/scotchritemasonr02blan 



Scotch Rite 



Ksxtnipi^ 



lllu^imttk 



THE COMPLETE RITUAL 



OF THB 



Ancient AND Accepted Scottish Rite, 

PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED. 

By A SOVEREIGN GRAND COMMANDER, 33 ^ 

WITH AN HISTORICAL SKETCH OP THE ORDER, INTRODUCTION 
AND CRITICAL ANALYSIS OP EACH DEGREE 



-by- 



President J. Blanchard OF Wheaton College. 

OVER FOUR HUNDRED QUOTATIONS PROM STANDARD 

MASONIC AUTHORITIES CONFIRM THE ACCURACY 

OP THE RITUAL AND SHOW THE CHARACTER 

OP MASONIC TEACHING AND DOCTRINE. 

VOLUME 2 

NINETEENTH TO THIRTY-THIRD DEGREE INCLUSIVEo 



1905. 



Entered According to Act of Congress In the year 1904 
By EZRA A. COOK, 
In the Office Of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



D. 0. 






PUBLISHER'S PREFACE 

SECOND VOLUME. 

This Second Volume is simply a continuatioii of the 
First one. The magnitude of the work^ (aggregating 
over One Thousand PageS;,) rendered a division into 
two Volumes desirable. The Introduction, Historical 
Sketch and Preface found in the First Volume are for 
the entire Work. 

Attention is again called to the fact that the First 
Three Masonic Degrees, termed the ^^Blue Lodge De- 
grees/^ are not given in this work, because those degrees 
are common to all the different Masonic Eites, and are 
very fully and accurately given in Freemasonry Illus- 
trated, as advertised in the back part of this Volume. 
The reader will however find the "'Secret WorV of 
those degrees given in the last Chapter of this Volume. 

The Publisher. 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Preface to Second Volume 3 

The Conclave or Celestial City 11 

"To Denote the Idea of Being Locked up in Seclusion." 

Note 196 11 

CHAPTER XXXIII.— Nineteenth Degree, or Grand Pontiff 12 

"Founded on the Mysteries of the Apocalypse." Note 197.. 12 

High Degrees Connected with Temple of Zerubbabel. Note 198 12 

Rob. Morris's "Royal Solomon Mother Lodge." Note 199.. 13 

Opening Ceremonies, Grand Pontiff 14 

Members Called "True and Faithful Brothers." Note 200.. 14 

"Hoschea. The Word of Acclamation." Note 201 15 

CHAPTER XXXIV.— Initiation, Grand Pontiff 16 

"Legebns are D/i'awn from the Book of Revelations." Note 202 16 

Allusions "to the Tribes of Judah and Benjamin." Note 203 17 

The Symbolism of Numbers. Note 204 20 

"Babylon. The Ancient Capital of Chaldea." Note 205 22 

Obligation Degree of Grand Pontiff 24 

"I am Alpha and Omega." Note 206 24 

Qualifications of Members of Grand Consistory. Note 207.. 24 

"No Prirvate Piques or Quarrels." Note 208 25 

Mackey on Masonic Penalties. Note 209 25 

Sign, Grand Pontiff Degree 26 

Token, Grand Pontiff 26 

"The Serpent was a Symbol of the Universe." Note 210.. 28 

Lecture, or Doctrine, Grand Pontiff 29 

St. John, "One of the Patrons of Our Lodges.'.' Note 211... 30 

The Apocalypse Borrowed from the Ancient Mysteries. Note 212 31 

All that 'is Venerable Dates from Jerusalem. Note 213.... 32 

Closing Ceremonies, Grand Pontiff 33 

Philosophical Analysis, Degree of Grand Pontiff 34 

Idolatry the Parent of all Sin 34 

The Lodge Master Personates Christ 35 

The Purpose to Inspire Awe and Horror 36 

Masonry the Image of the Romish Beast 37 

Character of Dr. Dalcho 38 

CHAPTER XXXV.— Twentieth Degree, Grand Master of All Sym- 
bolic Lodges 39 

Resemblance of Masonry to Mysteries of Adonis. Note 214 39 

Symbolism of the Number Nine. Note 215 40 

"Let there be Light and there Was Light." Note 216 40 

"Wisdom Was Represented by Yellow." Note 217 40 

Tetragrammaton. "Title Given by the Talmudists to the 

Name of God." Note 218 41 

Opening Ceremonies, Grand Master of All Symbolic Lodges 42 

"PhilosophicalS/pirit of the System of Freemasonry." Note219 42 

CHAPTER XXXVI.— Initiation, Grand Master of All Symbolic 

Lodges 45 

**In Scotch Masonry ad vitam Has its Broadest Scope. ' ' Note 220 45 

Solomon, "the Type or Representative of Wisdom." ^Note 221. 45 

^'Justice, One of the Four Cardinal Virtues." Note 222 47 

'♦Truth is a Divine Attribute." No. 223 48 

Eamsay the Probable Inveiitor of the Degree. Note 224.... 48 



CONTENTS. b 

Page 

First Sign, Grand Master of All Symbolic Lodges 40 

Second and Third Signs .'.... 50 

Sign of Introduction and Token 51 

Token of Introduction, Grand Master of all Symbolic Lodges 52 

Pass Word, Jeckson, Refers to Pretender, Chas. Edward. Note 225 52 

Ma«onic "Proficiency" in Charity. Note 226 53 

"Hypocrisy and Deceit are Unknown among Us." Note 227 56 

"Tracing Board, the Same as Floor-clcth." Note 228 56 

Floor-cloth, Canvassoii.which Emblemsiare Inscribed. Note 229. 56 

Symbolism of the Triangle. Note 230 57 

The Square, "a Symbol of Morality." Note 231 57 

Intemperance, "a Subject of Masonic Penalties." Note 232 57 

"The Ri^ht Hand the Symbol of Fidelity." Note 233 57 

Discourse, by Grand Orator 58 

Word Vengeance "used Symbolically." Note 234 59 

Masonic Obligations are Oaths. Note 235., 59 

Character of the Rite of Misraim. Note 236. 59 

' "The Word Prince is not Attached as a Title. ^' Note 237.. 60 

Sovereign, "an Epithet J\.pplied to Certain Degrees." Nbte238.. 60 

"Pontifie means Bridge Maker, Bridge Builder." Note 239. 61 

Cordon, Masonic De-coration, in English called Collar. Note 240 . . 61 

Rapid Growth of the Scotch Rite. Note 241 .. < 62 

"Connection Between Freemasonry and Politics." Note 242 63 

Closing Ceremonies, Grand Master of All Symbolic Lodges 64 

Refers to "Temples of Solomon, Zerubbabel and Herod." Note 243 64 

Formerly Conferred "the Right to Organize Lodges." Note 244 64 

DHAPTER XXX VI I. — Twenty-First Degree ;Ncacliite or Prussian Knight 67 

This Degree "Traced to the Tower of Babel." Note 245 67 

* 'Legend of the Degree Describes the Travels of Peleg. ' ' Note 246 67 

"Frederick the Great was Certainly a Mason." Note 247.. 68 

"ArkofNoah. One of the Three Sacred Structures." Note 248.. 68 

Noachites, a name Applied to Freemasons. Note 249 69 

"The Meetings are Called Grand Chapters." Note 250 69 

Secrecy and Silence. "Essence of all Masonic Character." Note 251 70 

Opening' Ceremonies, Noachite or Prussian Knight 72 

CHAPTER XXXVIII.— Initiation, Noachite or Prussian Knight 74 

"The Rituals Speak of the Lofty Tower of Bubel." Note 252. . 75 

Obligation, Patriarch Noachite 75 

Sign of Order, Noachite or Prussian Knight 76 

Sign of Introduction, Noachite or Prussian Knight 77 

Second Sign, Noachite or Prussian Knight 78 

Discourse by Orator 79 

"Nimrod as One of the Founders of Masonry." Note 253... 79 

Closing Ceremonies, Noachite or Prussian Knight 83 

CHAPTER XXXIX.— Twenty-Second Degree or Prince of Lihanus.. 84 

Legend and Purpose of the Degree. Note 254 84 

Herodom. "Meaning * * is Apparently Unknown." Note 255. . '84 
"Reference to the Mystical Association of the Druses." 

Note 256 85 

Aholiab, "A Danite of Great Skill." Note 257 86" 

The Degree Dedicated to the Lebanon Mountains. Note 258 86 

Opening Ceremonies, Prince of Libanus 87 

"Lectures Relate to the Cedars of Lebanon." Note 259 87 

CHAPTER XL.— Initiation, Prince of Libanus 88 

"Formed Colleges on Mount Lebanon." Note 260 88 

Obligation, Knight of the Royal Axe, or Prince of Libanus 92 

Sign and Answer, Prince of Libanus 93 

Token, Prince of Libanus 94 

History of the Degree 94 

Closing Ceremonies, Prince of Libanus 100 

Historical Analysis, 20th. 21st and 22nd Degrees 101 

Freemasonry a Universal Religion 101 

Satan the Masonic God 102 

Puerilites of the Mass the Pagoda and Lodge 103 

Hum Drum Platitudes on Labor 104 

CHAPTER X LI.— Twenty-Third Degree or Chief of the Tabernacle.. 105 

Pecgratiops of Xx)dge Room . , . .' ..,,... 105 



6 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Members "are Called Levites. ' * Note 261 105 

'Clothing and Decorations of the High Priest ... 106 

"The Presiding Officer Represents Aaron. Note 262 106 

Opening Ceremonies, Chief of the Tabernacle 107 

"Primitive Existence Contained in the Letter Yod." Note 263. 108 

CHAPTER XLIL— Initiation Chief of the Tabernacle 109 

"Description of the Setting up of the Tabernacle." Note 264 109 

"Dathan, A Reubenite." Note 265 110 

"Abiram was a Reubenite, the Son of Eliab." Note 286.. 110 

Preparation of Candidate, Chief of the Tabernacle 112 

Levites, "Represented in some of the High Degree." Note 267 112 

Obligation, Chief of the Tabernacle 114 

Sign, Chief of the Tabernacle 115 

Token and Pass Word, Chief of the Tabernacle 115 

Uriel, "An Archangel Mentioned only in 2 Esdras." Note 26S 115 

"Relate to the Establishment of the Priesthood." Note 269 116 

Closing Ceremonies, Chief of the Tabernacle 117 

Philosophical Analysis, Chief of the Tabernacle 118 

Lands Men in Pagan Worship 118 

Finite Man and the Infinite God 119 

Satan Both Imitates and Resists Christ 120 

CHAPTER XLIII. — Twenty-Fourth Degree or Prince of the Tabernacle 121 

"The Lodge is Called a Hierarchy." Note 270 .' 121 

Opening Ceremonies Prince of the Tabernacle 123 

"The Presiding Officer Represents Moses." Note 271 123 

CHAPTER X LI v.— Initiation, Prince of the Tabernacle 126 

"Refer to the Building of the Tabernacle." Ncte 272 126 

"The Book of the Law is that Sacred Book." Note 273 127 

The Triangle, Square and Compasses 128 

"Square of the Ancient Charges of Freemasonry." Note 274. 128 

"ItLiesontheOpen Word that Surmounts the Altar." Note 275. 128 

The Three Lights, Two Columns and Plumb 129 

"Three was Deemed the Most Sacred of Numbers." Note 276 129 

"The Plumb Line is Emblematic of Regular Rule." Note 277 129 

The Level, Blazing Star and Rough Stone 130 

"InFreemasonry the Level is a Symbolof Equality." Note 278... 130 

"Like the Religion it Embodies is Universal." Note 279.. 130 

"Emblematic of Man in His Natural State." Note 280 130 

The Perfect Cube 131 

"The Cube is a Symbol of Truth, of Wisdom, of Moral 

Perfection." Note 281 131 

**The Purifying Power of Fire is Naturally Deduced." Note 282. . 133 
"Four Principles of Matter — Fire, Air, Earth and Water." 

Note 283 135 

"This Secret Worship was Termed the Mysteries." Note 284 136 

"The Ceremonies of Initiation were all Funereal." Note 285 136 

Sign of Recognition, Prince of the Tabernacle ^ 138 

Grand Sign, Prince of the Tabernacle 139 

Closing Ceremonies, Prince of the Tabernacle 140 

Signs and Hieroglyphics 140 

Philosophical Analysis, Prince of the Tabernacle 141 

Zodiacal Signs a Heathen Invention 141 

Masonic Baptism a Heathen Rite 142 

Freemasonry Simple Heathenism 143 

Governed by the Terrors of a Secret Clan 144 

CHAPTER XLV.— Twenty-Fifth or Knights of the Brazen Serpent. 145 

"The Teaching and Moral of the Degree is Faith." Note 286 145 

Moses, "A Man of Marvelous Gifts." Note 287 146 

"Joshua, The High Priest." Note 288 146 

"A Mason Always Travels from West ^to East." Note 289.. 146 

Tau Cross, "Intended to Typify the Sacred Name." Note 290 147 

Opening Ceremonies, Knights of the Brazen Serpent 148 

"The Lord Sent Fiery Serpents Among the Peiople." Note 291 . 148 
"Scottish Masons Make Mt. Sinai a Symbol of Truth." 

Note 292 148 

CHAPTER XLVI.— Initiation Knight of the Brazen Serpent 151 

"Instructions are the Uses of the Brazen Serpent." Note 293. . 151 

** With the Cross it is feVVdVnVly'a Symbol of Christ*. ''* ' Note*294 3103 



CONTENTS. 7 

Page. 

Obligation, Knights of the Brazen Serpent 154 

Sign of Order and Recognition, Knights of the Brazen 

Serpent 155 

Token, Answer, Pass Word and Sacred Word 156 

I. N. R^I. *'Jesusof Nazareth the King of the Jews." Note 295.. 156 

Closing Ceremonies, Knights of the Brazen Serpent 157 

Philosophical Analysis, Knights of the Brazen Serpent 158 

The Goodness and Severity of God 158 

False Lights on the Coast of Christendom 158 

"Satan's Igrnes Fatui, to Swamp Men Eternally" 160 

Quotes the Bible as Satan Did to Deceive Men 161 

All Religion but Holiness and Justice 162 

CHAPTER XLV II. —Twenty-Sixth Degree or Prince of Mercy 163 

"It Is a Christian Degree in Its Construction," Note 296.. 163 

Tessera or Mark 164 

"Tesseroe, or Pledges of Friendship were Used at Rome." 

Note 297 164 

Opening Ceremonies, Prince of Mercy 165 

"It is a Highly Philosophical Degree." Note 298..'. 165 

CHAPTER XLVIII.— initiation Prince of Mercy 167 

Preparation of Candidate, Prince of Mercy 167 

''Allusions are to the Three Covenants of Mercy," Note 299. . 167 
"Probation, The Interval Between the Reception of One 

Degree and the Succeeding." Note 300 168 

"Lustration, A Religious Rite Practiced by the Ancients." 

Note 301 168 

"Doorof the Middle Chamber was in the Right Side." Note 302.. 170 

Obligation Prince of Mercy 172 

"Light is a Symbol of Knowledge." Note 303 172 

Signs of Entrance and Character, Prince of Mercy^ 173 

Signs of Help and Order, Prince of Mercy 174 

Token, Pass Word and Sacred Words, Prince of Mercy.... 175 

Lecture, Prince of Mercy 175 

"The Form in Which Dr. Anderson Spells Giblim." Note 304... 175 

"Ameth, Properly Emeth.'* Note 305 175 

Closing Ceremonies, Prince of Mercy 179 

Philosophical Analysis, Prince of Mercy 180 

Usurps the Prerogatives of Christ 180 

"Liars Have Need of Good Memories" 181 

Renewing the Plagues of Egypt on American Soil 182 

CHAPTER XLIX. — Twenty- Seventh Degree or Commander of the 

Temple 183 

Titles of Officers, Decorations of Room, Apron, Etc. Note 306. . . 183 

Opening Ceremonies, Commander of the Temple 185 

CHAPTER L. — Initiation, Commander of the Temple 187 

Styled "Knight Commander of the Temple." Note 307 187 

"The French Word Elu Means* Elected." Note 308 189 

Obligation, Commander of the Temple 190 

Sign of Recognition and Answers, In and Out of Court.... 191 

Signof Order, Token and Answer, Commander of the Temple 192 

History, by Grand Commander 194 

l*^ "Does Not Deserve to be Classed in the Scottish Rite." Note 309. 194 

I Origin of Teutonic Knights. "Humble but a Pious One." Note310 196 

"Teutonic Order, A Religious Order of Knights." Note 311 197 

Closing Ceremonies, Commander of the Temple 199 

Degree "Contains Neither Symbols or Allegories." Note 312 199 

• Philosophical Analysis. Commander of the Temple 200 

Masonic Contempt for This Degree 200 

Napoleon and Romish Inquisition 201 

Vile Enough for the Scottish Rite 202 

CHAPTER LI.— Twenty-Seventh Degree, or Knights of the Sun.. 203 

"Most Learned and Philosophical of the Scottish." Note 313. . 203 

"The Presiding Officer is Styled Father Adam." Note 314.. 203 

"The Cherubim were Purely Symbolic." Note 315 204 

Opening Ceremonies, Knights of the Sun 206 

"Is Strictly Philosophical and Soi<-ntific." Note 316 206 

Freemasonry a Perpetuation of Sun Worship." Note 317.. 206 

Opening Prayer, Knights of the Sun . , 207 



8 CONTENTS. 

Page 

Sign and Answer, Knights of the Sun 207 

CHAPTER LI I.— Initiation, Knights of the Sun 208 

Preparation of Candidate, Knights of the Sun 208 

Also Called "Key of Masonry or Chaos Disentangled." Note 318 208 

"Object of Freemasonry * * is Search for Truth." .Note 319. . 209 

Gabriel, "The Name of One of the Archangels." Note 320.. 211 

Michael, "The Chief of the Seven Archangels." Note 321.. 215 
"In that Degree is Man Seeking after Divine Truth*." 

Note 322 216 

Obligation, Knights of the Sun 217 

Sign, Answer and Token, Knights of the Sun 218 

History, by Michael the Orator 219 

"I am Alpha and Omega." Note 323 219 

"In All these M>^siteries Wei Find a Singular Unity." Ntote224. . . 219 

Ceres, "The Goddess of Agriculture." Note 325 220 

"The Entered Apprentice is but a Rough Ashler." Note 326 221 

Profane, "Means Before or Outside of the Temple." Note 327. 221 

Hoodwink, ' 'An Emblem of the Darkness of His Soul. ' ' Note 328 . 221 

"A Candidate in Search of Masonic Light." Note 329 222 

"Light is an Important Word in the Masonic System." Note 330. 223 

The Rite of Circumambulation. Note 331 223 

"Lodge Must be Supported by Three Grand Shafts." Note 332. .. 224 

"A Sacred Regard for the Number Three." Note 333 224 

Signification of the Letter G. Note 334 225 

"The Sun is the Stymbol of Sovereignty:" Note 335 225 

"Labors and Fate of the Widow's Son of Phcenicia." Note 336 226 

Closing Ceremonies, Knights of the Sun 228 

Philosophic Analysis, Knights of the Sun 229 

Invented by the Guerrilla General, Albert Pike 220 

Sets Aside the Bible as Obsolete 230 

Lodges Have Supernatural Power 231 

"But Rather Darkness Visible." 232 

CHAPTER LIIL— Twenty-Ninth Degree, or Knights of St. Andrew 233 

"Sometimes Known by the Name of Grand Master of 

Light." Note 337 233 

' History of the Chevalier Ramsay. Note 338 234 

CHAPTER LI v.— Initiation, Knights of St. Andrew 236 

First Sign and First Token, Knights of St. Andrew 236 

"Degree Connects it with the Crusades." Note 339 236 

Second Sign and Second Token, Knights of St. Andrew 237 

Third Sign, that of Astonishment and Horror 237 

Fourth Sign, and Answer, Knights of St. Andrew 238 

Third Token, Knights of St. Andrew 238 

Fifth and Sixth Signs, Knights of St. Andrew 239 

Seventh Sign and General Token, Knights of St. Andrew.. 240 

Pass W^ords, Knights of St. Andrew 240 

"Ardarel, A Word in the High Degrees." Note 340 240 

"Casmaran, The Angel of Fire. " Note 341 240 

"Furlac, A Word in the High Degrees." Note 342 240 

Pass Word Nekemah, "Hebrew Signifying Vengeance." 

Note 343 241 

"The Assembly is Termed a Grand Lodge." Note 344 241 

Philosophical Analysis, Knights of St. Andrew j^ 243 

Ramsay's Fraud on the French 243 

Masonic Facts are Falsehoods 244 

CHAPTER LV.— Thirtieth Degree, Grand Elect Knight Kadosh 245 

This Degree "First Invented at Lj'ons in France." Note 345 245 

"Dieu le Veut, God Wills It. The W^ar Cry." Note 346 247 

"Ordo ab Chao, Order Out of Chaos." Note 347 248 

Opening "Ceremonies, Grand Elect Knight Kadosh 249 

"The History of the Destruction of the Templars." Note 348 249 

"Philip IV. Surnamed le Bel or the Fair." Note 349 249 

Spes mea in Deo est. "The Motto of the Thirty-Second." 

Note 350 251 

CHAPTER LVI.— Initiation, Grand Elect Knight Kadosh 257 

"Allusions are to the Ancient Order of Knights Templars." 

Note 351 257 



CONTENTS. 9 

Page. 

First Oath aud Candidate Stabbing the Skulls 26 > 

Second Oath, Knight Kadosh 264 

"Areopagus, The Third Apartment in a Council of Kadosh." 

Note 352 265 

Third Oath Knight Kadosh 269 

Frederick the Great and His Freemasonry.' Note 353 270 

Oheb Eloah and Oheb Karobo, "Supports of the Ladder." 

Note 354 272 

Emuneh, "A Significant Word in the High Degrees." 

Note 355 272 

Fourth Oath. Knight Kadosh 284 

Sign of Kadosh 287 

Sign of Order and Token, Knight of Kadosh •: 288 

"Pharaxal, A Significant Word ia the High Degrees." 

Note 356 .'. 288 

Discourse, by Knight of Eloquence 289 

Closing Ceremonies, Grand Elect Knight Kadosh 303 

"Humanizes the Old Lesson of Vengeance." Note 360 303 

Closing Prayer, Knight Kadosh 304 

Philosophical Analysis, Grand Elect Knight Kadosh 306 

The "Ne plus ultra" of Masonic Falsehood 306 

The Ritual Tinkered, Added to, and Amended 307 

"Nothing but Vengeance is spoken of." 308 

Christians Ferociously Condemned as Bigots 309 

Sham Pretence of a Universal Religion 310 

CHAPTER LVII. — Thirty-fiirst Degree, or Grand Inspector Inquisitor 

Commander 311 

"Is Simply Administrative in its Character." Note 361.... 311 

Tetractys, "Signifies Literally the Number Four." Note 362. 312 

Opening Ceremonies, Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander 317 

"Simply a Judicial Power of the Higher Degrees." Note 363 317 

Opening Prayer, Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander 320 

First Sign and Answering Sign 321 

CHAPTER LVIII.— Initiation, Grand Inspector Commander 324 

"The Members are Styled, Most Enlightened." Note 364 324 

Moses "Was Initiated in All the Knowledge of the Wise 

Men." Note 365 332 

Sign and Answering Sign 341 

Token and Sacred Word, Grand Inspector Inquisitor Com- 
mander 342 

Discourse by Advocate 343 

Triple Triangle 345 

"Worshipping, as Lord of All, the Source of Golden Light." 

Note 366 • 346 

Mysteries "Annually Celebrated in Hqaor of Osiris." 

Note 367 346 

Bel is the Contracted Form of Baal." Note 368 346 

Each Stone of the Temple Contained "Five Equilateral 

Triangles." Note 369 346 

Closing Ceremonies, Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander 363 

Statutes for Tribunals of the Thirty-first Degree 365 

Philosophical Analysis Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander 371 

Filled with Vain Repetitions 371 

Republican Appointment of a Masonic Rebel 372 

Claims t<a Rule Judicially the Masonic Order 373 

The Ways of the Lodge are Movable 374 

CHAPTER LIX. — Thirty-second Degree, or Sublime Prince of the 

Royal Secret ." 375 

"Was the Highest or ne plus ultra of Masonry." Note 370. 375 

Page. 

Diagram of Consistory Lodge Room 377 

"Aholiab, A Skillful Artificer of the Tribe of Dan." Note 371 . . 378 

Mah, "A Component Part of a Significant Word." Note 372 378 
Malachi, "A Significant Word in the Thirty-second Degree." 

Note 373 379 

"Ezra, The Celebrated Jewish Scribe." Note 374 379 

Thirty-second Degree Camp 380 



10 CONTENTS. 

Page 

"The Ark of the Covenant." Note 375 381 

"Argent, French for Silver." Note 376 382 

Opening Ceremonies, Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret.. 385 

Instituted by Council of Emperors of East an* West. 

Note 377 385 

CHAPTER LX.— Initiation, Sublime Prince of the Ro»yal Secret 391 

"The Assembly is Called a Sovereign Consistory." Note 378. 391 
Hiram Abif, "The Celebrated Architect of King Solomon's 

Temple." Note 379 399 

Obligation, Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret 414 

Layer, "Used to Cleanse the Neophite." Note 380 416 

Initiatory Prayer, Thirty-second Degree 417 

Sign, Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret 421 

"Salix, A Significant Word in the High Degrees." Note 381 422 

"Tengu, A Significant Word in the High Degrees." Note 382 422 

Initiatory Prayer, Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret 423 

"Token Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret 425 

''Watchwords, Used in the Thirty-second Degree." Note 383. 426 

Dove, "This Bird was the Diluvian Messenger." Note 384.. 431 

"Legend of the Phoenix is a Familiar One." Note 385 431 

"Freemasonry and Alchemy Have Sought the Same Results." 

Note 386 436 

"Dove Was Always Considered a Sacred Bird." Note 387 437 

The Double Headed Eagle a Symbol. Note 388 437 

"Members of the Persian Court Belong to the Mystic Order." 

Note 389 433 

Mysteries of the Persian God Mithras. Note 390 439 

Kabbala Embraces "Mystical Interpretations of Scripture." 

Note 391 442 

Closing Ceremonies, Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret 448 

Philosophical Analysis, Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret 449 

CHAPTER LXI. — Thirty-third Degree, or Sovereign Grand Inspector 

General 459 

"Ultimate Degree of the Ancient and Accepted Rite." 

Note 392 459 

"A Chaste Disposal of Symbolic Oruaments." Note 393 460 

Opening Ceremonies, Sovereign Grand Inspector General..... 461 

No Historical Allusions, Being Purely Administrative, Note 394 463 

Opening Prayer, Sovereign Grand Inspector General 463 

Sign of Order, Sovereign Grand Inspector General 464 

CHAPTER LXII. — Initiation, Sovereign Grand Inspector General... 465 

"The Protector and Conservator of the Order." Note 395... 465 

First Obligation, Sovereign Grand Inspector General 466 

Active Members Wear a Collar, Honorary a Sash. Note 396. 467 

Second Obligatipn, Thirty-third Degree 468 

Skeleton Seizing Candidate, While Taking Obligation 470 

Final Obligation, Thirty-third Degree 472 

Sign of Order and First Sign, Thirty-third Degree 474 

Ring, "On the Inside a Delta Surrounding the Figures 33." 

Note 397 474 

Second Sign and Sign of Entrance, Thirty-third Degree 475 

Lecture, Thirty-third Degree 476 

Closing Ceremonies, Sovereign Grand Inspector General 479 

Philosophical Analysis, Sovereign Grand Inspector General 481 

CHAPTER LXI 1 1.— Emblems and Secrets of Thirty-three Degrees.. 48e 



k 



The conclavb^^^ 

OR 

CELESTIAL CITY 

Containing an epitome of the twelve degrees of the 
Philosophic Chamber of the Ancient and Accepted Rite. 

The twelve degrees preceding the Rose Croix are^ as 
we have shown, associated with the twelve signs of the 
Zodiac. 

From these fixed signs, the Rite passes to the Sun, 
Moon and the Planets. 

From these the Rite looks to the four elements or 
four components of man, etc., and from these it con- 
siders the. spirit and matter, or infinite and finite of the 
Universe and of man. 

In the Rose Croix Degree, we have seen the son of 
masonry and heard the promise of universal peace and 
joy. Now let us proceed to seek the methods of realiza- 
tion, and learn how to restore the lost Eden and re- 
edify the Celestial City. 

Note 196. — "Conclave. Commanderies of Knights Templars in England 
and Canada are called Conclaves, and the Grand Encampment the Grand 
Conclave. The word is also applied to the meetings in some other of the 
high degrees. The word is derived from the Latin con, 'with,' and clavis, 
'a key,' to denote the idea of being locked up in seclusion, and in this 
sense was first applied to the apartment in which the cardinals are liter- 
ally locked up when met to elect a pope." — Kackey's Encyclopaedia of 
Freemasonry, Article Conclave. 



CHAPTER XXXIII 

Nineteenth Degree or Grand Pontiff.'^' 

MERCURY. .5 

DECORATIONS : — The hangings are blue sprinkled with 
stars of gold; the whole Chapter is lighted by one large 
Spherical Transparency behind the Master's seat in the 
East. 

In the East is a throne, and over it is a blue canopy. 
Around the room are twelve columns as follows: One 
on each side of the Master, one on each side of the War- 
den in the West, four in the North and four in the 
South of the Chapter ; on the Capitals of these Columns 
are the initials of the names of the twelve tribes/"' in 
the following order, beginning on the column on the 
right hand of the Master, and going round by the North, 
West and South, viz: 

JBphraim, Benjamin, Issachar, 

Naphtali, Asher, Dan, 

Manassah, Zebulon, Reuben, 

Simeon, and Gad^ 

Under these in the same order, are the zodiacal signs. 

Note 197.— "Grand Pontiff. The 19th degree of the Ancient and Ao- 
copted rite. The degree is founded on the mysteries of the Apocalypse, 
relatiag to the new Jerusalem, as set forth in the Revelation of St. John, 
xxi. and xxii., which it illustrates and endeavors to explain. The assem- 
bly is styled a chapter; two apartments are required. The presiding 
officer is styled Thrice Puissant Grand Pontiff. The members are called 
Faithful Brothers." — Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Dictionary of Freema- 
sonry,, Article Grand Pontiff. 

Note 198. — "Tribes of Israel. All the twelve tribes of Israel were en- 
gaged in the construction of the first Temple. But long before its 
destruction, ten of them revolted, and formed the nation of Israel; while 
the remaining two, the tribes of Judah and Benjamin, retained possession 
of the Temple and of Jerusalem under the nam.e of the kingdom of Judah. 
To these two tribes alone, after the return from the captivity, was in- 
trusted the building of the second Temple. Hence in the high degrees, 
which, of course, are connected for the most part with the Temple of 
Zerubbabel, or with events that occurred subsequent to the destruction of 
that of Solomon, the tribes of Judah and Benjamin only are referred to. 
But in the primary degrees, which are based on the first Temple, the 
Masonic references always are to the twelve tribes. Hence in the old! 
lectures the twelve original points are explained by a reference to the 
twelve tribes." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Tribes 
of Israel. 



GRAND PONTIFF. 13 

»*n ©am. ^. /^m t \3\ p ^ t 

On the base of each column is the initial in the same 
order of the name of one of the Apostles of Christ, viz : 
John, Peter, Andrew, James, 

Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, Matthew, 

James, Lebbeus, Simon, and Matthias. 

draft: — The tracing board has a mountain in the 
foreground. A four-square city appears descending from 
the sky; below is a representation of Jerusalem,'"' over- 
turned and in ruins. There are twelve gates of pearl, 
three on each side; a great glory in the center gives it 
light. Beneath the ruins of the city lies a serpent with 
three heads bound in chains ; on one side of the draft is 
a high mountain. 

titles: — The Master is styled Thrice Puissant and 
is seated on a throne in the East, and holds a sceptre in 
his hand, on his breast is the High Priest^s Breast Plate. 
There is but one Warden seated in the West with a 
golden staff in his hand. 

There is also an Orator, two Deacons and a Master of 
Ceremonies, and Tyler. The brethren are styled Faith- 
ful and True Brethren. 

DRESS : — The brethren are clothed in white linen robes, 
each with a blue fillet of satin round his head with 
twelve gold stars on it. 

order: — A broad crimson ribbon, with twelve gold 
stars in front, worn from right to left. 

jewel: — A gold medal or square plate, on one side 
of which is engraved the word Alpha, and on the other 
Omega. 

battery: — Is twelve equal strokes. 

Note 199. — "The eastern portion of Jerusalem, known as Mt. Moriah, 
with which, as masons, we are particularly concerned, is fully de- 
scribed under that head; as are the clefts of rocks, the hill west of 
Mt. Moriiih. the Valley of Jehoshaphat, the value of Shaveh and other 
neighboring places under their respective titles. The history of this 
memorable city partakes in its misfortunes of the exaggerations of 
romance. Levelled again and again to the ground; pillaged, burned; 
made the sp ii of every nr;tiori of antiquity, it has yet resisted every 
attempt to blot it from existence and stands, at the present day, with 
a population <^f 125.000, insignificant in comparison with its former 
grandeur, yet rcpre^sentlng the grandest and most important scenes 
recorded in the pages of history, human and divine. In 18GS a lodgo 
was established here under the title of the Royal Solomon M'^^t^?? 
Lodge."— Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Article Jemgal^ffi, 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

Degree of Grand Pontiff.**^* 

Thrice Puissant — Faithful and true brethren Grand 
Pontiff^ I propose to open this Chapter; aid me to do 
so. Brother Junior Deacon, see that we are properly 
tyled. 

Junior Deacon — (Knocks twelve on the door, opens 
it and says : ) Faithful and true brother, this Chapter of 
Grand Pontiffs is about to be opened, take due notice 
and govern yourself accordingly. (Then shuts the 
door.) Thrice Puissant, we are properly tyled. 

Thrice Puissant — How? 

Junior Deacon — By a faithful and true brother with- 
out, armed and vigilant. 

Thrice Puissant — Faithful and true brother Warden, 
what is the hour? 

Warden — The time is foretold to all nations, the Sun 
of Truth has risen over the desert, the last struggle be- 
tween good and evil, light and darkness commences, the 
Cube Stone has become a mystic Eose and the lost word 
is recovered. 

Thrice Puissant — Be grateful to God, my brethren, 
and let us proceed to open this Chapter, that we may 

Note 200. — "Grand Pontiff. (Grand Pontife on Sumblime Ecossais.) 
The nineteenth degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. The 
degree is occupied in an examination of the Apocalyptic mysteries of 
ihe New Jerusalem. Its officers are a Thrice Puissant and one Warden. 
The Thrice Puissant is seated in the east on a throne canopied with 
51ue. and wears a white satin robe. The Warden is in the west, and 
holds a staff of gold. The members are clothed in white, with blue 
fillets embroidered with twelve stars of gold, and are called True and 
Faithful Brothers. The decorations of the Lodge are blue sprinkled 
with srold starss"— -Mackey's Encyclopaedia, of Freemasonry^ Artiel© Grand 
?ontiff« 



GRAND PONTIFF. 15 

labor together for his glory and the improvement of 
mankind. Together my brethren, (all give the sign.) 

Thrice Puissant — ^(Strikes one; .0.) 

Warden — (Strikes one; 0, and so on alternately to 
twelve.) 

All — (Clap twelve with their hands, and cry three 
tim^s;) Hoshea."'"' 

Thrice Puissant — The Sun is up and this Chapter is 
open. 

Thrice Puissant — (Strikes one; 0.) Be seated, faith- 
ful and true brethren. 

Note 201. — "Hcsohea. The word of acclamation used by the French 
Masons of the Scottish Rite. In some of the Cahiers it is spelled Ozee. 
It is, I think, a corruption of the word huzza, which is used by the 
Eng:Iish and American Masons of the same Rite." — Mackey's Encyclo- 
paedia of Freemasonry, Article Hoschea, 



CHAPTER XXXIV 



Nineteenth Degree or Grand Pontiff. 



393 



INITIATION. 

[Master of Ceremony retires and prepares the can- 
didate as a Knight Eose Croix, ^conducts him to the 
door, knocks six and one.] 

Junior Deacon — (Knocks six and one, opens the door 
and says:) Who hails? 

Master of Ceremonies — A Knight Eose Croix, who 
desires to attain the degree of Grand Pontiff. 

Junior Deacon — How long hath he served ? 

Master of Ceremonies — Three years. 

Junior Deacon- — Where? 

Master of Ceremonies — In the ranks of Truth. 

Junior Deacon — How armed? 

Master of Ceremonies — With Charity, Hope and 
Faith. 

Junior Deacon — Against what enemies? 

Master of Ceremonies — Intolerance and o|Tpression. 

Note 202.-— "Grand Pontiff." [Scotch Masonry.]— The first deerree con- 
ferred in the Consistory of Princes of the Royal Secret. Scotok Masonry, 
and the 19th upon the catalogue of that system. Its officers are a Thrice 
Puissant Grand Pontiff and a Warden. The members are termed True 
and Faithful Brothers. The historical lessons are drawn from the Book 
of Revelations. The assembly is styled a Chapter. The hangings are 
blue, sprinkled with gold stars. The members are clothjpd in white 
linen with blue fillets, embroidered with 12 golden stars. .Jewel, a 
square plate of gold having on one side the word Alpha, on the other 
the word Omega. Hours, from the hour foretold to the hour accom- 
plished. The draft of the lodge represents a square city with 12 gates, 
tliree on a side; In the midst a tree bearing twelve manner of fruits," 
V— Morris' g Masonic Dictionary. Article Orr^ni fgntif^ 



INITIATION. , 17 

Junior Deacon — Why doth he now desire to attain 
the degree of Grand Pontiff? 

Master of Ceremonies — That he may be better quali- 
fied to serve the cause of truth and light. 

Junior Deacon — What other weapons does he need 
than Charity, Hope and Faith? 

Junior Deacon — Then let him take his first lesson 
now% and wait with patience until the Thrice Puissant 
is informed of his request, and his will ascertained. 
[Junior Deacon shuts the door, goes to the Thrice Puis- 
sant, and the same questions and answers are given, 
except the last to be patient and wait.] 

Thrice Puissant — Since his desires are commendable, 
faithful and true brother Jui^ior Deacon, let him enter. 
[Junior Deacon opens the door, the candidate enters 
with the Master of Ceremonies who conducts him twelve 
times round the Chapter, halting at one of the columns 
at each circuit. At the fourth column.] 

Master of Ceremonies — JudaV^ shall return again to 
his first estate, when the empire of evil ends ; Light and 
not darkness is eternal ; Truth and not error is immortal. 
(At the third column.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Issachar shall once more be 
free, when sin and suffering are known no longer; far 
in the future unto us, that day of light is now with God, 
Time is a succession of points, each in the center of 
eternity ; evil lasts only during time. The reign of God 
is measured by eternity. (At the ninth column.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Zebulon, shall find peace, as 
ships that come out of great storms, and furl their sails 

Note 203. — '^Judah and Benjamin. Of the twelve tribes of Israel 
who were at various times, carried into capitivity, only two. those of 
Jndah and Benjamin, returned under Zerubbabel to rebuild the second 
Temple. Hence, in the high degrees, which are founded on events that 
occurred at and after the building of the second Temple, the allusions 
are made only to the tribes of Judah and Benjamin." — Mackey's Encyclo- 
pedia of I'reemeisonry, Article Tudsth find Benjamii;, 



18 GRAND PONTIFF. 

and let drop their anchors in quiet harbors. For peace, 
shall be the universal law to all the children of a com- 
mon father. (At the tenth column.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Reuben, like all mankind;, has 
wandered far into the darkness, the steps of the ages 
ring in their stately march down 'he long slopes of time, 
and ever the dawn draws nearer. Men are God's in- 
struments to accelerate its coming work, then my broth- 
er, be patient, wait. (At the eleventh column.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Simeon, shall be reconciled to 
God, when intolerance no longer persecutes and bigotry 
no longer hates ; when man, brother of man shall no lon- 
ger be his torturer, his death, his fate. The waves of 
eternity roll ever nearer to us, on the narrow sands of 
life, that crumble under our weary feet. Those on whose 
ears the roar of the same surges smite, and whom the 
next wave will engulf together, should have in their 
hearts a prayer to God, and not hatred for their brother. 
(At the twelfth column.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Gad, shall overcome at last, 
though a troop of evils long overcame him, as they over- 
come us all. The serpent is still unchained. The giants 
still assail the battlements of Heaven and scarce recoil 
before its lightnings. (At the first column.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Epliraim has strayed from 
home, he shall return in tears and penitence and find 
eternal rest. From God all souls have emanated and to 
him all return. (At the eighth column.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Manasseh, shall be restored to 
sight; We are all blind swimmers in the currents of a 
mighty sea that hath no shore. We see as in a dream 
the effects and not the causes. The simplest things are 
miracles to us, We do not see the flower that is within 



INITIATION. 19 

the seed^ nor the lowering oak enveloped in the acorn; 
nor the odors and colors in the tasteless^ colorless^ in- 
visible air and limpid water and rank dark earth, from 
which the seed extracts them by its mysterious chemis- 
try. When the divine light cometh we shall -see and 
know. (At the second column.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Benjamin, shall be redeemed 
and come back from exile and captivity, for they, like 
pain, poverty and sorrow are blessings. Without them 
there would be scant excellence in human nature, neither 
fortitude nor self-denial, industry nor patience, charity 
nor tolerance, magnanimity nor generosity, heroism nor 
gratitude. (At the seventh column.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Dan, shall obey the new law; 
the law of love. He prayeth best who loveth best, all 
things both great and small; for the great God that 
loveth us, he made and loveth all. (At the sixth col- 
umn.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Asher, shall pluck the fruit of 
the tree of life, that towers above the golden spires and 
overlooks the Jasper walls of the New Jerusalem. (At 
the fifth column.) ' 

Master of Ceremonies — Napthali, believes hopes, 
waits and is patient ; believes that all death is new life, 
all destruction and dissolution re-comibination and re- 
production, and all evil and affliction, but the modes of 
this great genesis that shall not be eternal. Hopes for 
the time when this incessant flux and change shall cease, 
and the new law of love and light rule in all spheres 
and over all existence, and waits with patience the ful- 
fillment of the inviolable promises of God. [At this 
moment a thick veil is thrown over the candidate 
and he is hurried into a small dark room-, so he can take 



20 GRAND PONTIFF. 

the cloth off when he chooses. They make him sit on the 
floor in the middle, and then retire. This room should 
be black, with no furniture. Apertures must be made 
so that without admitting any one, the voice of one 
speaking outside may be heard. It must also be ar- 
ranged so that flashes of lighting may be produced. The 
candidate is left there for about five minutes, when a 
brother says in his hearing :] 

First Brother — All who will not worship the Beast 
with seven heads and ten horns, and upon his horns ten 
crowns, and the mysterious name upon his forehead 
shall be slain, all men, the high and low, the rich and 
poor, freeman and slave shall receive upon their right 
hand or on their forehead, his mark, his name, and the 
number^^* of his name which is 666, or they shall neither 
buy nor sell; for his is power, dominion and authority 
of the Great Dragon. Man, helpless and in darkness, 
wilt thou receive his mark that thou mayest emerge to 
light. 

Second Brother — Pear God, and give glory to him, 
for the hour of his judgment is come^ and worship him 
that made Heaven and Earth, and the sea, and the 
springs of water, for he alone has the true sign. If any 
imian worship the Beast and his image, and receive his 

Note 2Q4. — "Numbers. The symbolism which is derived from numbers 
was common to the P.vthagoioans, the Kabbalists, the Gnostics, and all 
mystical associations. Of all superstitions, it is the oldest and the 
most generally diffused. .\llusions -^re to be found to it in all systems 
of religion; the Jewish Scriptures, for instance, abound in it, and the 
Christian show a share of its influence. It is not, therefore, surprising 
that the most predominant of all symbolism in Freemasonry is that of 

numbers. , , . ^ ^ .,. ^ 

The doctrine of numbers as symbols is most familiar to us because it 
formed the fundamental idea of the philosophy of Pythagoras. Yet it 
was not original with him, since he brought his theories from Egypt 
iind the East, where this numerical symbolism had always prevailed. 
Jamblichus tells us (Vit Pyth., C. 28), that Pythagoras himself admitted 
that he had received the doctiine of numbers from Ornh^^ns. who taught 
that numbers were the most provident beginning of all things in heaven, 
earth, and the intermediate space, and the root of the perpetuity of 
divine beings, of the gods and of dernon^,"«-Maqke7'§ Eticyqlopstedis Qf 
Freemaponry, Article Numl}ers» 



INITIATION-. Si 

mark on his forehead or in his hand^ he shall drink the 
wine of God's indignation and be banished from the 
presence of the Holy Angels and of the Worlds that is 
the Redeemer. Eemorse shall torture them^ and they 
shall have no rest, who worship the beast and his image 
and receive the marks of his name. 

Third Brother — Have patience^ Oh ! thou, who though 
in darkness art still our brother; keep the command- 
ments of God, and this faith in his justice and infinite 
goodness. [There is silence for a little, while.] 

First Brother — The first Angel hath poured his vial 
on the earth and a foul and horrid plague hath fallen 
on all who wear the mark of the Beast and have wor- 
shipped his image. [Light flashes in the room.] 

Second Brother — The second Angel hath poured his 
vial on the Sea, and it hath become like the blood of a 
dead m<an, and everything therein hath died. [Another 
flash.] 

Third Brother — The third Angel hath poured his vial 
upon the rivers and the living springs, and they have 
become blood. [Another flash.] 

Thou art just and righteous Oh God ; the infinite and 
eternal in all thy judgments. For thou hast given them 
blood to drink, who have persecuted their brethren for 
their faith and usurped the power and prerogative of 
judgment, and shed the blood of the virtuous and good. 

First Brother — The fourth Angel hath poured his vial 
upon the Sun, and the wicked are scorched with great 
heat and yet will not repent. [Another flash.] 

Second Brother — The fifth Angel hath poured his vial 
upon those who worship the Beast, his kingdom is 
shrouded in darkness and his followers howl from pain 
and terror and blaspheme, and still do not repent. 
[Another flash.] 

Third Brother. — ^The sixth Angel hath poured out his 
vial upon the great rivers of the Orient, and they are 
dried up and the spirits of falsehood, fraud and evil 
marshall their armies for the great battle to be fought on 



23 CRAl^D POJ^TTlO'f. 

the great day of the Almighty God. Unexpectedly, be- 
fore men see it dawn, that day will come ; see that ye be 
not found unprepared, but wear evermore the armor of 
Charity, Hope and Faith, lest it come suddenly and find 
you naked and defenceless. [Another flash.] 

First Brother — The seventh Angel hath poured his 
vial into the Air. It is done. (Upon this thunder is 
heard without, and frequent flashes light the cell, then 
there are loud noises, voices, etc., and a crash represent- 
ing a city destroyed by an earthquake.) 

First Brother — The Cities of the nations have fallen 
and intolerance, that great Babylon'"''" is no more. The 
chains imposed by fraud upon the human mind, the 
manacles and fetters fastened by force upon free thought 
have fallen. The towers and battlements the bastions 
and the ramparts, that power and fraud, and falsehood 
though impregnable have fallen, and they no longer 
shall be drunk with the blood of the saints and martyrs 
of the Truth. 

Second Brother — Salvation, Glory, Honor and Power 
to the eternal God and Infinite Father. True and right- 
eous are his judgments. Let all his creatures and the 
great voice of the ocean and his thunders cry rejoicing- 
ly. ^The Lord omnipotent reigneth, and sin and evil 
are dethroned. Blessed are they that obey his law and 
trust in his goodness, that they may have right to the' 

Note 205. — "Batylon. The ancient capital of Chaldea, situated on 
both sides of the Euphrates, and once the most magnificent city of the 
ancient world. It was here that upon the destruction of Solomon's 
Temple by Nebuchadnezzar in the year of the world, 3?94. the Jews 
of the tribe of Judah and Benjamin, who were the inhabitants of 
Jerusalem, were conveyed and detained in captivity for seventy-two 
years, until Cyrus, liiug of Persia, issued a .decree for restoring them, 
and permitting them to rebuild their temple, under the superintendence 
of Zerubbabel, the Prince of the Captivity, and with the assistance of 
Joshua the High Priest and Haggai the Scribe. 

Babylon the Great, as the prophet Daniel calls it, was situated four 
hundred and seventy-five miles in a nearly due east direction from Jerusa- 
lem" — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Babylon, 



INITIATION. S3 

Tree of Life, and may enter through the gates into the 
city/^ 

Brother who art in darkness, wilt thou obey that law 
and trust in that infinite goodness and be patient, though 
the appointed time may seem to draw no nearer during 
thy life, nor thy labors and exertions to produce any 
fruit? 

Candidate — I will. 

Second Brother — Wilt thou be neither weary nor dis- 
couraged ;. satisfied to sow the seed and that those who 
come after thee may reap, if God so wills it ? 

Candidate — I will. 

First Brother — Come then with us to the abode of 
light. (The door is opened and the candidate received 
by several brethren and conducted into the Chapter. 
The draft is seen, displayed, and after he enters the 
officers read as follows:) 

Orator — I saw a new Heaven and a new Earth, for 
the first Heaven and first Earth were passed away, and 
there was no more Sea. I saw the Holy City, the new 
Jerusalem coming down from God out of Heaven. 
Henceforth he will dwell with men and be their father, 
and they his obedient and loving children. He will 
wipe the tears from all eyes, and there shall be no more 
death, nor fraud, nor falsehood; there shall be no more 
sin and shame, no remorse and affliction, sickness nor 
death any more, for the ancient wrong and evil have 
passed away forever. 

Warden — He that sits upon the throne saith, ^'1 make 
all things new, write, for these words are true. To him 
that thirsteth I give freely the waters of the Spring of 
Life. He that overcometh shall inherit all things, I will 
be his father and will love my child.'' ' 

Thrice Puissant — In the Heavenly City there shall be 
no temple, for the Lord God Almighty and the Eedeem- 
er are its temple; nor Sun, nor Moon shall be needed 
there, for the primitive light shall shine therein and 
give it light. In that light shall all nations walk, and 



M ORAND PONTIFF. 

there shall all the splendor of the universe have their 
spring and centre. Therein shall be no nighty, wick- 
edness nor falsehood; but the light and everlasting life 
and truth of God shall reign there forever. He is Alpha 
and Omega^''^ the beginning and the end, the first and 
the last, from whom all things come, and to whom all 
return. My brother if you believe in these promises, go 
now to the holy altar and there assume the obligation 
of this degree. (Candidate kneels at the altar, places 
his hands upon the Bible and takes the following obli- 
gation:) 

OBLIGATION DEGREE OF GRAND PONTIFF. 

-in the presence of the Almighty God, and 



believing in justice and mercy, do hereby and hereon 
most solemnly and sincerely promise and swear, that I 
will never reveal any of the secrets of this degree to any 
person in the Vv^orld, except to him or them to whom the 
same may lawfully belong, and then, only when I am 
duly authorized and empowered so to do. 

I furthermore promise and swear that I wdll obey the 
by-laws, rules and regulations of any Chapter of this de- 
gree to which I may belong; and the edicts, laws and 
mandates of the Grand Consistory""^ of Sublime Princes 
and Commanders of the Eoyal Secret, under whose 
jurisdiction it may be holden, as well as those of the 

Note 206. — ''Alpha and Omega. The first and last letters of the 
Greek language, referred to in the Royal Master and some of the higher 
degrees. They are explained by this passage in Revelations ch. xxii., 
V. 13. *I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. the first 
and the last.' Alpha and Omega is, therefore, one of the appellations 
of God, equivalent to the beginning and the end of all things, and 
so referred to in Isaiah xii. 4, 'I am Jehovah, the first and the last.' *' 
— Mackey's Encyclcpaedia of Freemasonry, Article Alpha and Omega. 

Note 207. — "Grand Consistory. The governing body over a State of 
the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite; subject, however, to the 
superior jurisdiction of the Supreme Council of the Thirty-third. The 
members of the Grand Consistory are required to be in possession of 
the thirty-second degree." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, 
i^rticle Grand Consistory, , 



INITIATION. 35 

Supreme Council of the 33rd degree, within whose 
jurisdiction I may reside, so far as the same may come 
to my knowledge. 

I furthermore promise and swear that I will devote 
myself, my heart, my hand, my speech and my intellect 
to the cause of justice, truth and toleration""^ and will 
endeavor to do something for the benefit of my country 
and the world that shall live after I am dead ; and that 
I will henceforth consider only what is right and just, 
and noble, and generous for me to do, and not whether 
any benefit to myself or mine will result therefrom, or 
whether I shall receive therefor thanks or ingratitude. 
All of which I do most solemnly and sincerely promise 
and swear, binding myself under no less a penalty^"*^ 
than that of being held false Knight and faithless sol- 
dier by every true Knight and honest man in Christen- 
dom. So help me God. 

Thrice Puissant — Melchizedek, King of Salem, whose 
name signifies just and equitable King, was the Priest 
of the Most High God ; he met Abram returning from 
the slaughter of the Kings and blessed him, and Abram 

Notes 208. — **The same old. Charges say, *No private piqnes or quarrels 
must be brought within the door of the Lodge, far less any quarrels 
about religion, or nations, or state policy, we being only:, as Masons, 
of the Catholic religion above mentioned; we are also of all nations, 
tongues, kindreds, and languages, and are resolved against all politics, 
as what never yet conduced to the welfare of the Lodge, nor ever 
will.'" — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Toleration. 

Note 209. — The words *So help me God.' refer exclu^vely to the 
withdrawal of divine aid and assistance from the jurator in the case of 
his proving false, and not to the human punishment which society would 
inflict. . .. 

In like manner, we may say of what are called Masonic penalties, 
that they refer in no case to any kind of human punishment; that is 
to say, to any kind of punishment which is to be inflicted by human 
hand or instrumentality. The true punishments of Masonry affect neither 
life nor limb. They are expulsion and suspension only. But those 
persons are wrong, be they mistaken friends or malignant enemies, who 
suppose or assert that there is any other sort of penalty which a Mason 
recreant to his vows is subjected to by the laws of the Order, or that 
it is either the right or duty of any Mason to inflict such penalty on 
an offending brother. The obsecration of a Mason simply means that 
if he violates his vows or betrays his trust he is worthy of such penalty, 
and that if such penalty were inflicted on him it would be but just 
and proper. 'May I die,' said the ancient, 'if this be not true, or if 
I keep not this vow.' Not may any man put me to death, nor is any 
man required to put me to death, but only, if I so act, then would 
I be worthy of death. The ritual penalties of Masonry, supposing such 
to be. are in the hands not of man. but of God. and are to be inflicted 
by God, and not by man." — Mackey's Enoyclopaeclia cf Freemasonry, 
ArtiQle" Penalty, 



26 



GRAND PONTIFF. 



gave unto him the tenth of the spoils. (He anoints him 
with a little oil on the crown of his head and says:) 

Be thou a Priest forever^ after the order of Melchize- 
dek^ virtuous, sincere, equitable, true; minister of jus- 
tice and priest of toleration, be faithful to God, thy duty 
" and thyself, and thus deserve the title of Sublime Pon- 
tiff or Scottish Mason, which you are henceforward en- 
titled to wear. Rise now my brother, and receive the 
sign, token and words of this degree. 

SIGN. 

Extend horizontally the right arm ; 
the hand is also extended, bring 
\ down the three last fingers perpen- 
dicularly. 




Sign, Grand Pontiff Degree, 

TOKEN. 

Each places the palm of his 
right hand on the other's fore- 
head ; one says. Alleluia, the other 
answers Praise the Lord ; the first 
then says, Emanuel, the other, 
Grod speed you, Both say Amen, 




Token, Grand Pontiff, 



INITIATION. 27 

BATTERY I— Twelve equi-timed strokes. 

TO OPEN : — It is the predicted hour. 

TO close: — The hour is accomplished. 

PASS word: — Emanuel. 

SACRED word: — Alleluia. (Every brother now ad- 
vances in turn to the candidate and gives him the 
token.) 

Thrice Puissant — (Invests him with Insignia, say- 
ing:) 

This Roie of white linen, with which I now invest 
you, is emblematical of that equality and purity which 
should characterize one who is consecrated to the service 
of truth and remind us also of the vesture of the 144,- 
000 who refused to wear the mark of the beast upon 
their foreheads. 

This Cordon of Crimson, bordered with white, teaches 
you that the zeal and arcjor of a Knight and Pontiff 
ought to be set off by the greatest purity of morals and 
perfect charity and beneficence. The twelve' stars upon 
it and upon the fillet allude to the twelve gates of the 
new city, and the twelve signs of the zodiac, the twelve 
fruits of the tree of life, the twelve tribes of Israel and 
the twelve Apostles, the initials of whose names appear 
fupon the gates and foundation of the new city, and on 
the twelve columns of the Chapter. 

This Fillet, is the peculiar emblem of your Pontifi- 
cate, and as the slightest contact with earth will soil its 
spotless purity, remember that so the least indiscretion 
will soil the exalted character that you have now volun- 



28 GRAND PONTIFF. 

tarily assumed. Receive this jewel, and let the letters 
upon it and the Cordon, the first and last of the Hebrew 
and Greek alphabet, ever remind you of the love and 
veneration which you owe to that great being; the 
source of all existence, the Alpha and Omega, the first 
and the last, on whose promises we rely with perfect 
confidence, in .whose mercy and goodness we implicitly 
trust, and for the fulfillment of whose wise purposes we 
are content to wait. (Warden shows candidate the 
draft.) 

Thrice Puissant — My brother, after the ceremonies of 
this degree, this painting needs but little explanation. 

The Serpent'''' writhing in chains has to us a peculiar 
signification; it was promised that the offspring of the 
woman should bruise the serpent's head, fulfill thou the 
prophecy. (The candidate is caused to step on the three 
heads of the serpent.) . 

Thrice Puissant — So shall the foot of truth crush 
error! So honesty and honor tram.ples on falsehood, 
so charity treads in the dust intolerance. Go now my 
brother, and listen to the lecture of this degree. (The 
Master of Ceremonies presents him to the Orator who 
delivers [assisted by the Master of Ceremonies] the 
lecture. 

Note 210. — "Serpent. As a symbol, the serpent obtained a prominent 
place in all the ancient initiations and religions. Among the Egyptians 
it was the symbol of Divine Wisdom when extended at length, and the 
serpent with his tail in his mouth was an emblem of eternity. The 
winged globe and serpent symbolized their triune deity. In the ritual 
of Zoroaster, the serpent was a symbol of the universe. In China, the 
ring between two serpents was the symbol of the world governed by 
the power and wisdom of the Creator. The same device is several times 
repeated on the Isiac table. Higgins (Anacel., 1. 521), says that, from 
the faculty which the serpent possessed <5f renewing itself, without the 
process of generation as to outward appearance, by annually casting 
• its skin, it became,, like the Phoenix, the emblem of eternity; but he 
denies that it ever represented, even in Genesis, the evil principle. 
Faber's theory of the symbolism of the serpent, as set forth in his worK 
on the Origin of Pagan Idolatry, is ingenious. He snys that tne 
ancients in part derived their idea of the serpent from the first tempter, 
and hence it was a hieroglyphic of the evil principle. But as the deluge 
was thought to have emanated from the evil principle, the serpent 
becam.e a symbol of the dpluge. He also represented the good principle; 
the idea being borrowed from the winged soraphim which was blended 
with the cherubim who guarded the troe of life,— the seraphim and 
cherubim being sometimes considered as identical.' — Macfeey s tncyglQ- 
paedie^ of tr^emasonryj Article Serpent. 



LECTURE DEGREE OF GRAND PONTIFF OR DOCTRINE OF 

GRAND PONTIFF. 

Query — What are you? 
Answer — I am a Sublime Grand Pontiff. 
Query — Where did you receive this degree? 
Answer — In a place that wants neither sun nor moon 
to light it. 

Query — Explain this to me? 

Ansiver — As the Grand Pontiffs never wanted any 
artificial lights to light them^ in same manner the 
' faTthful and true brothers, the Sublime Grand Pontiffs 
want neither riches nor titles to be admitted into this 
sublime Chapter^ as they prove themselves in their at- 
tachment to masonry^ and faithfulness in their obli- 
gations and true friendship to their brethren. 

Query — What represents the Draft of this Chapter? 
Answer — A square city of four equal sides, with three 
gates on each side, in the middle of which is a tree 
bearing twelve different kinds of fruit; said city is sus- 
pended as on clouds, below is a representation of Jerusa- 
l lem overturned and in ruins. There are twelve gates 
F ' of pearl, three on each side; a great glory in the center 
I gives it light, beneath the ruins of the city lies a serpent 
I with three heads, bound in chains, on one side of the 
^ draft is a high mountain. 

Query — Explain this to me? 

Answer — The square city represents ancient masonry, 
, under the title of Grand Pontiff, that comes down from 
^^ Heaven to replace the ancient destruction (say the tem- 
ple) when the Grand Pontiffs make it appear as 'tis rep- 
resented by the ruins and the chained serpent Avith three 
heads. 



30 GRAND PONTIFF. 

Query— Ko'^ comes masonry fallen to ruins, as ^e 
are so bound together by our obligations? 

Answer — It was so decreed in olden times, as we learn 
by St. John, who we understand was the first mason 
that held a Perfect Chapter. 

Query — ^Where does St. John say this? 

Answer — In his revelation"' where he talks of Ba- 
bylon, and the celestial Jerusalem. 

Query — What signifies the tree with twelve different 
kinds of fruit in the center of the city? 

Answer — It is the tree of life which is placed there 
to make us understand where the sweets of life are to be 
found, and the twelve different kinds of fruit that we 
meet every month to instruct ourselves and sustain one 
another against our enemies. 

Query — What signifies the fillet or veil that the can- 
didate is blinded with ? 

Answer — It procures him entrance into our Chapter 
as it did procure entrance into the celestial Jerusalem to 
those that wore it; thus hath St. John"^ explained him- 

Ncte 211. — "Apocalypse, Masonry of the.. The adoption of St. John 
the Evangelist as one of the patrons of our Lodges, has given rise, 
among the writers on Freemasonry, to a variety of theories as to the 
original cause of his being thus connected with the Institution. Several 
traditions have been handed down from remote periods, which claim 
him as a brother, among which the Masonic student will be familiar 
with that which represents him as having assumed the government of 
the Craft, as Grand Master, after the demise of John the Baptist. I 
confess that I am not willing to place implicit confidence in the correct- 
ness of this legend, and I candidly subscribe to the prudence of 
Dalcho's remark, that 'it is unwise to assert more than we can prove, 
and to argue against probability.' There must have been, however, in 
some way, a connection more or less direct between the Evangelist and 
the institution of Freemasonry, or he would not from the earliest times 
have been so universally claimed as one of its patrons. If it was simply 
a Christian feeling — a religious veneration — which gave rise to this 
(general homage, I see no reason why St. Matthew, St. Mark, or Bt. 
Luke might not as readily and appropriately have been selected as one 
Df the 'lines parallel.' But the fact is that there is something both in 
the life and in the writings of St. John the Evangelist, which closely 
connects him with our mystic Institution. He may not have heen a 
Freemason in the sense in w^hich we now use the term; but it will 
be sufficient, if it can be shown that he was familiar with other mystical 
Institutions, which are themselves generally admitted to have been more 
DF less intimately connected with Freemasonry by derlvinc their exist- 
ence from a common origin."— Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemagoniy, 
Article Apocalypse, Wasonry of the. 



LECTURE. 31 

self? 

Query — What signifies the twelve golden stars on the 
Fillet? 

Answer-— llYi^j represent the twelve angels who 
watched the twelve gates of the celestial city of Jerusa- 
lem, the twelve signs of the zodiac, the twelve fruits of 
the tree of life, the twelve tribes of Israel, and the 
twelve apostles, the initials of whose names appear upon 
the gates and foundation of the new city and on the 
twelve columns of the Chapter. 

Query- — What signifies the blue hangings of the Chap- 
ter and the gold stars thereon? 

Answer — The blue is the symbol of Lenity, Fidelity, 
and Sweetness, which ought to be the character of all 
faithful and true brothers ; and the stars represent those 

Note 212. — '"The whole machinery of the Apocalypse,' says Mr 
Faber, 'from beginniag to end, seems to me very plainly to have been 
borrowed from the machinery of the Ancient Mysteries; and this, if we 
consider the nature of the subject, was done with the very strictest 
attention to poetical decorum. 

'St. John himself is made to personate an aspirant about to be 
Initiated; and, accordingly, the images presented to his mind's eye 
closely resemble the pageants of the Mysteries both in nature and in 
order of succession.' 

'The prophet first beholds a door opened in the magnificent temple 
of heaven; and into this he is invited to enter by the voice of one 
who plays the hierophant, Here he witnesses the unsealing of a 
sacred book, and forthwith he is appalled by a troop of ghastly appari- 
tions, which flit in horrid succession before his eyes. Among these are 
preeminently conspicuous a vast serpent, the well known symbol of the 
great father; and two portentous wild beasts, which severally come up 
out of the sea and out of the earth. Such hideous figures correspond 
with the canine phantoms of the Orgies, which seem to rise out of the 
ground, and with the polymorphic images of the hero god who was 
universally deemed the offspring of the sea. 

Passing these terrific monsters in safety, the prophet, constantly 
attended by his angel hierophant, who acts the part of an interpreter, 
is conducted into the presence of a ' female, who is described as closely 
resembling the great mother of Pagan theology. Like isis emerging 
from the sea and exhibiting herself to the aspirant Apuleius, this 
female divinity, upborne upon the marine wild beast, appears to float 
upon the surface of many waters. She is said to be an open and 
systematical harlot, just as the great mother was the declared female 
principle of fecundity; and as she was always propitiated by literal 
fornication reduced to^ a religious system, and as the initiated were 
made to drink a prepared liquor out of a sacred goblet, so this harlot 
is represented as intoxicating the kings of the earth with the golden 
cup of her prostitution. On her forehead the very name of Mystery is 
inscribed; and the label teaches us that, in point of character, she is 
the great universal mother of idolatry.' " — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of 
Freemasonry, Article. Apocalypse, Masonry of the. 



32 GRAKD PONTIFF. 

masons who have given proof of their attachment to the 
statutes and rules of the order, which in the end will 
make them deserving of entering the celestial Jerusa- 
lem.^^^ 

Query — What is your name ? 

Answer — Faithful and True brother. 

Note 213. — "All that is venerable, all that is universal, all that is 
worth preserving in Masonry, dates from Jerusalem, the Golden City, 
''The City of the Great King.' There is no locality in the world so 
w^orthy of a mason's study as this, and, thanks to the .researches of 
travelers, there is no city of ancient renown that has been so thoroughly 
explored and opened out to public view." — Morris's Masonic Dictionary'-, 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Degree of Grand Pontiff. 

Thrice Puissant — Brother Warden^ what is the hour? 

Warden — Thrice Puissant^ the hour is accomplished. 

Thrice Puissant — What then remains to be done? 

Warden — To work^ to wait and be patieni 

Thrice Puissant — Work then my brethren while it is 
yet day, for the night cometh in which no man can work. 
For what do we wait, brother Warden? 

Warden — For the light of noon-day. 

Thrice Puissant — ^Let us then close this Chapter and 
be patient brother Warden; inform the Knights and 
Pontiffs that I am about to close this Chapter if they 
consent in order that each may go forth into the world 
and do his duty as soldier and priest of Truth, Light 
and Toleration. 

Warden — Brothers Knights and Pontiffs, the Thrice 
Puissant Master is about to close this Chapter if you 
consent that we may each go forth into the world and 
labor to elevate and enoble humanity as true soldier and 
priest of Light, Truth and Toleration. If you consent 
give me the sign. (All give the sign.) 

Thrice Puissant — Eaps as in opening. 

Warden — Eaps as in opening. 

All- — Clap twelve and cry three times, Hoshea. 

Thrice Puissant'—The sun ^UiDbs toward the Zenith 
and thJB Chapter is cloned, 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Nineteenth Degree^ or Grand Pontipe. 

Idolatry the Parent of all Sin — The Lodge Master Personates Christ — The 
Purpose to Inspire Awe and Horror — Masonry the Image of the 
Romish Beast — Character of Dr. Dalcho. 

^'What is the matter with a little by-play of idola- 
try?'' Ans. — The matter is just this: — From kissing 
one's hand to the moon^ in the days of the Patriarch 
Job. {c, 31 J 27 j) to Sun-worship by solemn circumam- 
bulation in a Masonic lodge ; every act of idolatry^ how- 
ever trivial or contemptible, is an expedient to un-God 
our globe, by getting rid of Christ. When the Eternal 
Father brought forth his Son into the world, and said : 
''Let all the Angels of God worship him/' (Heh. 1, 6,) 
one angel refused, and became chief of the devils. And 
all ^^Gentile" or Christless worship is paid to that fallen 
angel, or to some of his legions, (1, Cor. 10:20,) To 
dispense with Christ, is to leave our ruined race with no 
means or mediator, by whom to reach God and Heaven. 
And the lodge dispenses with Christ, by dropping his 
name and person, to take in his enemies; Jews, pagans 
and others; or, by insulting him with false, spurious 
worships. When Aaron told Israel to worship Jehovah, 
by dancing naked around a calf, ( Ex. 82:18,) he at- 
tempted to add a heathen ritual to an orthodox creed: 
and three thousand men that day paid for their idolatry 
with their lives. The sins of men are numberless. Idola- 
try is the one parent of them all ; and lodge worship is 
idolatry. And, of all idolarty, the most daring and 



THE LODGE MASTER TERSONATES CHRIST. 35 

damning, is when sinners imitate and copy the ap- 
proaches of God to men. And this is what is done in 
this 19th degree. 

The lodge master is "Thrice Puissant;" personating 
Christy who has ''all power,'' The master is "seated on 
a throne and holds a Sceptre/^ with the blue canopy of 
the heavens over him. This is Christ's rival, the usurp- 
ing ''god of this world,'' The degree itself, says Mackey, 
{Note 197,) "is founded on the mysteries of the Apoca- 
lypse/' which is "the Revelation of Jesus Christ/' {Rev. 
1,1.) And his lodge members are "clothed in white 
linen robes/^ like attending Angela y. {Rev. 15:6.) And 
on the jewel is engraved "Alpha and Omega," which is 
the title of Christ. And in opening, the Warden says : 
"the Sun of Ttuth has risen.'^ "Christ is the Sun of 
Eighteousness." And ' The Truth and Life." And, 
as in a preceding degree, the grim mockery of 
opening the seals and sounding the trumpets (p. 451,) 
was gone through with, so here follow the vials 
poured out, and the dwelling place of God, the New 
Jerusalem, comes down to men. And after these superla- 
tively impudent mockeries are gone through with, the 
candidate is made to kneel down and swear to conceal 
them from all but Masons of this degree; after which 
the candidate is solemnly anointed into the priesthood of 
Christ, who is "a priest forever after the order of Mel- 
chizcdek." There is nothing more revoltingly 
blasphemous in the Mormon Endowment House, where 
Brigam Young used, as El Shaddai, to personate Al- 
mighty God! And when this horrible fanfaronade is 
gone through with, by men such as are found in ordina- 
ry Masonic lodges, the wretched dupe is told that he is 
^henceforward entitled to wear the sublime title of 
Scottish Mason/ It is noticeable that in this blasphe- 
mous recitative, there are no ascriptions of glory to 
Christ, The ritual runs; (p. ^3.) 

"'Salvation, Glory, Honor and Power to the Eternal 
God and Infinite Father/^ 



36 THE PURPOSE TO INSPIRE AWE AND HORROR. 

The Bible ascription is ; — "Every creature which is in 
Heaven and on the Earth; and under the Earth, and 
such as are in the Sea, and all that are in them, heard 
I saying; blessing and honor and glory and power be 
unto him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the 
Lamb, forever and ever/' 

While the book itself is ''the Revelation of Jesus 
Christ/' this Eite mutilates it by leaving him out of 
such passages as the above and compliments him only 
with a half contemptuous allusion to him as "the Mas- 
ter of Nazareth ;'' and a wooden image of a lamb, lying 
on a book with seven seals; with a further allusion to 
him as "the Word/' 

But the most extraordinary part of this 19th degree 
is its bold allusion to "the Beast and His image/' 

The candidate is being led twelve times around the 
lodge, he is jerked into a small dark room and seated on 
the floor; sitting there he hears a brother say: "All 
who will not worship the Beast with seven heads and 
ten horns, shall be slain;" all men, the high and low, 
the rich and the poor, freeman and slave shall receive 
upon their right hand, or on their forehead his mark, 
etc., or they shall neither buy nor sell." And a second 
brother takes up the strain and adds : — ^"Remorse shall 
torture them and they shall have no rest who worship 
the beast and his im.age ;" and here the matter is 
dropped. The purpose would seem to be to inspire awe 
and horror in the candidate, and leave his mind in abso- 
lute emptiness and confusion. ^ 

Now the secret lodge system of which this Eite is 
the ruling part, is the image of the Eomish beast, which 
was, and is the secret despotism of the world. That 
the seven-headed beast with his harlot rider is Eome, 
the book itself teaches, (Rev, 17, 18.) ^ ''The tvoman 
which thou sawest is that great city which ruleth over 
the Kings of the, Earth/' Thera om be no mistaking 
thi^. No other' city on earth ever olaimetj mS, exercised 
kfldiction gy^r Kings. Pagan Romt wai the Beast^ 



MASONRY THE IMAGE OF THE ROMISH BEAST. 37 

and Popery the religious harlot rider. In this^ without 
exception Protestant commentators agree. 

And the lodge net-work which now covers the Globe, 
differs from Rome in two particulars: It has neither 
fixed government, church or nationality like Eome; 
but lodges are made ^^by them that dwell on the Earth'' 
{Rev. 13, 14,) promiscuously; neither visible govern- 
ment nationality or church, yet controls business and 
religion ! 2nd. — It is flitting as a shadowy image ; 
changing its shapes endlessly, but keeping its diabolical 
priest nature. And the beast and his image are one, 
murderous and false as their master and god Satan, 
who was ^^liar and murderer from the beginning and 
the father of it.^^ {Jno, 8, 44.) And the last we hear 
of them; Beast, False Prophet, Image and their wor- 
shipers, they are cast into a lake of fire hurning with 
brimstone, (Rev, 19, 20.) And whoever comforts him- 
self in the fact that the fire and brimstone are not lit- 
eral, will doubtless find the reality as fearful as its sym- 
bols. 

One would suppose that a scripture like this would be 
the last woven into a Masonic rite, by men supposed to 
be educated and attentive to their own interests. The 
only explanation which can be suggested is that these 
degrees are the work of semi-apostate priests, like those 
swept into the French Eevolution of 1789, manufactured 
at the Jesuits' College of Clermont in 1754-8: — That 
they were sent to this country in 1761 by an ex- Jew, 
Morin, whose religion was money, as the Bite of Per- 
fection : — that Morin appointed sixteen ^^Inspectors 
Generar^ with himself, of whom thirteen were Jews 
also. Dr. Dalcho, the son of a Prussian, born in Lon- 
don, a soldier, settled in Charleston, S. C. ; a Physician, 



38 CHARACTER OF DR. DALCHO. 

afterwards a priest in the Prot. Episcopal Cluireh :—A 
Sovereign Inspector of the Scottish Kite : — helped form 
the first Supreme Council : — A successful Masonic wri- 
ter; became involved in Masonic disputes, and quit Ma- 
sonry in disgust and died out of connection with the 
Order. 

Such were the minds that formed the present Euling 
Kite of the world. They took the old Eite of Perfec- 
tion and the swarms of side degrees which had over run 
Europe^ combined, modified and revised: — added eight 
more to make the present Eite of 33\ which fears not 
God nor regards man. Such men could dabble with 
^'^The beast and his image, as snake-fanciers play with 
snakes; conscious of no motive but to make an impres- 
sion, not knowing they were dabbling with their own 
doom! 

In the closing lecture of this degree we have the key 
to the motive of the contrivers : — Query, — ^^What signi- 
fies the tree with twelve different kinds of fruit in the 
centre of the City/' (p. 30.) 

''Answer — It is the tree of life which is placed there 
to make us understand where the sweets of life are, and 
the twelve different kinds of fruit that we meet every 
month to instruct ourselves, and sustain one another 
against our enemies.'^ Thus from the creation until 
now, the Globe has stood and trees and fruits have grown 
ripened and fallen for a Masonic lodge ! It is difficult 
to determine whether stupidit)^, cunning, sv/indling or 
superstition predominates in this vile compound. And 
though one can understand how sorcerers and jugglers 
can deal with such trash ; the minister of Christ, who 
has ever known the truth, and yet deals in it must sure- 
ly incur ''wrath to the uttermost/' 



CHAPTER XXXV 



Twentieth Degree; Grand Master of all Symbolic 
Lodges or Associate Master ad Vitam. 

[Past Master] also called Grand Master of Wis- 
dom. 

VENUS or adonis. '^^^' "* 

decorations : — The hangings are blue and gold. In 
the east is a throne which you ascend by nine steps, un- 
der a canopy, before it is an altar on which are an open 

Note 214. — "Adonis, Mysteries of. An investigation of the mysteries 
of Adonis peculiarly claims the attention of the Masonic student: first, 
because, in their symbolism and in their esoteric doctrine, the religious 
object for which they were instituted, and the mode in which that 
object is attained, they bear a nearer analogical resemblance to the 
Institution of Freemasonry than do any of the other mysteries or 
systems of initiation of the ancient world; and, secondly^ because their 
chief locality brings them into a very close connection with the early 
history and reputed origin of Freemasonry. For they were principally 
celebrated at Byblos, a city of Phoenicia, whose scriptural name was 
Crebal, and whose inhabitants were the Giblites or Giblemites, who are 
referred to in the 1st Book of Kings (chap. v. 18) as being the stone- 
squarers employed by King Solomon in building the Temple. Hence 
there must have evidently been a very intimate connection, or at least 
certainly a very frequent intercommunication, between the workmen 
of the first Temple and the inhabitants of Byblos. the seat of the 

Adonisian mysteries, and the place whence the worshipers of that rite 
were disseminated over other regions of country. 

These historical circumstances invite us to an examination of the 
system of initiation which was practised at Byblos, because we may 
find in it something that was probably suggestive of the symbolic 
system of instruction which was subsequently so prominent a feature 
in the system of Freemasonry., 

Let us first examine the myth en which the Adonisiac initiation was 
founded. The mythological legend of Adonis is, that he was the son of 
Myrrha and Cinyras, King of Cyprus. Adonis was possessed of such 
surpassing beauty, that Venus became enamored w^ith him, and adopted 
him as her favorite. Subsequently Adonis, who was a great hunter, 
died from a wound inflicted by a wild boar on Mount Lebanon. Venus 
flew to the succor of her favorite, but she came too late. Adonis was 
dead. On his descent to the infernal regions. Proserpine became, like 
Venus, so attracted by his beauty, that, notwithstanding the entreaties 
of the goddess of love, she refused to restore him to earth. At length 
the prayers of the desponding Venus were listened to with favor by 
Jupiter, who' reconciled the dispute between the two goddesses, and 

by whose decree Proserpine was compelled to consent that Adonis should 
spend six months of each year alternately with herself and Venus." — 
Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Adonis, Mysteries of. 



40 GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 

Bible, square and compass, sword, mallet, etc., etc., as in 
a Symbolic lodge. The lodge is lighted by nine''" lights 
of three triangles one within the other, in a candlestick 
with nine branches between the altar and the west on 
the tracing board. Over the Venerable Master in the 
East is a glory surrounding a triangle, in the centre of 
which are the words Fiat Lux/'® In the middle of the 
room surrounding the altar, in the form of a triangle are 
three columns on which are these words : On that in the 
East, Truth, on that in the West, Justice, on that in the 
South, Toleration. The lodge cannot be opened unless 
nine members be present. Besides the nine lights men- 
tioned above, there may be others used in different parts 
of the lodge; but should be arranged in squares and 
triangles. The nine great lights should be of yellow^' ^ 
wax. 

OFFICERS : — The officers are as in a Symbolic lodge ; 
the Orator sits in the North and the Pursuivant guards 
the door within. All wear their hats. 

SASH : — The sash is yellow and sky blue, or two, one 
of each color, crossing each other. 

APRON": — The apron is yellow, lined and bordered 
with sky blue. Upon it in the centre are three equi- 
lateral triangles one within the other, with the initial 
letters of the nine great lights in the corners ; thus in 
the corners of the outer one at the apex, C. •. ; at the 

Note 215. — **Nine. This is one the sacred Numbers. It possesses 

remarkable powers of reproduction, and in the Pythagorean philosophy 

was made the subject of much mysterious dissertation." — Morris's 
Masonic Dictionary, Article Nine, 

Note 216. — "Lux Fiat et Lux Fit, Latin. 'Let there be light, and 
there was light.' A motto sometimes prefixed to Masonic documents." 
Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Lux Fiat et Lux Fit. 

Note 217. — "The natural sun was the symbol of the spiritual sun, 
gold represented the natural sun. and yellow was the emblem of gold. 
But it is evident that yellow derives all its significance as a symbolic 
color from its/connection with the hue of the rays of the sun and the 

Among the ancients, the divine light or wisdom was represented by 
yellow, as the divine heat or power was by red. And this appears to 
be about the whole of the ancient symbolism of this color." — Mackey's 
Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Yellow. 



GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 41 

right hand corner G. *. ; at the left V. *. ; middle tri- 
angle;, at the apex, H. •. ; at the right P. •. ; at the left 
H. •. ; inner one, at the ape^ T. *. ; at the right T. •. ; at 
the left Z. •.. In the centre of the inner one in the 
tetragraminaton^'^ aixd across it from below upwards, 
the words Fiat Lux. 

TRACING board: — The tracing board is an octagon 
with a square raised on each' of five sides, and an equi- 
lateral triangle on each of the three others, with the 
initials of the twenty-nine virtues of a mason in the 
corners of the squares and triangles. In the centre of 
the octagon ar© the nine great lights. 

jewel: — The jewel is gold, like the triangle on th^ 
apron, with the same words and letters, or like the 
tracing board. 

battery: — Is one and two; 00. 

Note 218. "Tetragrammaton. In Greek. It signilBes a word of four 
letters. It is the title given by the Talmudists to the name of God 
Jehovah, which in the original Hebrew consists of four letters, "—r 
Hackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Tetragrammaton, 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

Grand Master of all Symbolic Lodges.^'*' 

Venerable Master — (Knocks one.) Grand Master 
and brethren, the hour has come for this Grand Lodge 
to convene; be pleased to clothe yourselves and repair 
to your stations. 

Venerable Master — Brother Junior Deacon, see that 
the doors are well tyled. (He obeys.) 

Junior Deacon — Venerable Grand Master, the doors 
are duly tyled. 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
ascertain whether all present are Grand Masters. (Sen- 
ior Warden goes around, receives the word from each 
brother and returns to his station.) 

Senior Warden — Venerable Grand Master, all pres- 
ent have proved themselves Grand Masters. 

Venerable Master — Brother Junior Grand Deacon, 
what compose the first masonic square ? 

Note 219.— "Grand Master of aU Symbolic Lodgres. The 20th dTgr^e 
of the Ancient and Accepted rite. This degree affords a thorough 
exemplification of the philosophical spirit of the system of Freemasonry. 
Philosophy and Masonry, being one and the same principle, have the 
same object and mission to attain — the worship of the Great Architect 
of the universe, and the disenthralment of mankind. Here the candidate 
is charged with the responsible duties of instructor of the great truths 
of the universality of Masonry, inspired by an upright and enlightened 
reason, a firm and rational judgment, and an affectionate and liberal 
philanthropy. This degree bears the same relation to Ineffable Masonry 
that the Past Master's degree does to the symbolic degrees. Veneration, 
Charity, Generosity, Heroism, Honor, PatriotisiQ, Justice, Toleration, 
and Truth are inculcated. The body is called a Lodge: the hangings 
are blue and gold. The presiding officer is styled Venerable Grand 
Master, and is seated in the East. A Lodge cannot be opened with 
less than nine members. In the East is a throne, ascended by nine steps, 
and surmounted by a canopy; the Lodge is lighted by nine lights of 
yellow wax. The apron 'is yellow, bordered and lined with blue; the 
sash is of broad yellow and blue ribbon, passing from the left shoulder 
to the right hip; the jewel is a triangle, of gold, on which is engraved 
the initials of the sacred words." — Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Dictionary 
of Freemasonry, Article Grand Master of all Symbolic Lodges, 



OPENING CEREMONIES. 43 

Junior Deacon — Prudence, Temperance, Chastity 
and Sobriety. 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Deacon, 
what compose the second masonic square? 

Senior Deacon — Heroism, Firmness, Equanimity 
and Patience. 

Venerable Master — Brother Grand Secretary, what 
compose the third masonic square? 

Grand Secretary — Purity, Honor, Fidelity and 
Punctuality. 

Venerable Master — Brother Grand Treasurer, what 
compose the fourth masonic square ? 

Grand Treasiirer — Charity, Kindness, Generosity and 
Liberality. 

Venerable Master — Brother Grand Orator, what com- 
pose the fifth masonic square? 

Grand Orator — Disinterestedness, Mercy, Forgiveness 
and Forbearance. 

Venerable Master — Brother Junior Grand Warden, 
what is the first great masonic triangle ? 

Junior Warden — Veneration, Devotedness, and Pa- 
triotism. 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
what is the second great masonic triangle ? 

Senior Warden — Gratitude to God, Love of mankind, 
and confidence in human nature. 

Venerable Master — And the third great masonic tri- 
angle, composed of Truth, which includes Frankness, 
Plain Dealing and Sincerity; Justice which includes 
Equity and Impartiality; and Toleration. 

Venerable Master — (One rap,) Brethren in the 
South, what seek'-ye to attain in masonry? 

Junior Deacon — Light, the light of Knowledge, Sci- 
ence and Philosophy. 

Venerable Master — Brethren in the North, what seek 



44 GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 

ye to attain in masonry? 

Grand Orator — Light, the light of liberty, free 
thought, free speech for, all mankind^ free conscience, 
free action, within law, the same for all. 

Venerable If o^ier— Brethren in the West, what seek 
ye to attain in masonry ? 

Senior Warden — Light, the great Jight of God's di- 
vine truth, eternal as himself ; and of virtue, immortal 
as the soul. 

Venerable Master — Aid me then my brethren to ope:i 
this lodge^ that we may seek the true masonic light. To- 
gether brethren. 

All — (Give the sign.) 

Venerable Master — My brethren, let the great lights 
of the lodge shine. 

Pursuivant — (Advances, lights one of the great 
lights and returns.) Let veneration for the deity burn 
in this lodge as its first great light. 

Senior Deacon — (Lighting another light.) Let the 
light of generosity be lifted up in this lodge. 

Grand Orator — (Lighting another.) Let the light 
of heroism blaze like the day among us. 

Grand Treasurer — (Lighting another.) Let the 
light of honor ever direct our footsteps. 

Grand Secretary — (Lighting another.) Let the light 
of patriotism shine in our souls as in the lodge. 

Junior Warden — (Lighting another.) Let the great 
light of justice burn steadily upon our altars. 

Senior Warden — (Lighting another.) Let the great 
light of toleration dim the fires of persecution. 

Venerable Master — Let the great light of truth, 
(lights it') illumine our souls and complete the great 
triangles of perfection. 

Venerable Master — Together brethren. 

All — (Clap one and two; 00.) Fiat Lux. 

Venerable Master — Brethren the nine great lights 
are burning in our lodge and it is duly open; be 
seated. 



CHAPTER XXXVI 



Twentieth Degree; Grand Master or all Symbolic 

Lodges or Associate Grand Mastbr 

Ad vitam.^''' 

[Past Master] also called Grand Master of Wis- 

DOM 

initiation. 

[The nine great lights having been extinguished, the 
Senior Deacon retires, invests the candidate with the 
collar and jewel of a Grand Pontiff and the jewel of a 
Eose Croix and leads him to the door.] 

Senior Deacon — (Knocks one and two; 00.) 

Junior Deacon — (From within knocks three, 00; 
and opens the door.) Who seeks admission? 

Senior Deacon — A mason, who having attained the 

Note 220.— "Ad Vitam. [Scotch Masonry.]— The principle of life- 
office (ad vitam, for life) has been adopted to a limited extent in 
American Grand Lodges by giving to Past Grand Masters. Past Masters 
of Lodges, life-membership with restricted suffrage. But in Scotch 
Masonry ad vitam has its broadest scope; in some countries the highest 
otf^fer in the institution holding his office for life," — Morris's Masonic 
Dictionary, Article Ad Vitam. 

Note 221. — "King Solomon has been adopted in Speculative Masonry 
as the type or representative of wisdom, in accordance with the char- 
acter which has been given to him in the First Book of Kings (iv. 30-32:) 
'Solomon's wisdom exceeded the wisdom of all the children of the east 
country, and ail the wisdom of Egypt. For he was wiser than all men; 
than Ethan the Ezrahite, and Heman and Chalcoi and Darda, the sons 
of Mahol; and his fame was in all the nations round about.* 

In all the Oriental philosophies a conspicuous place has been given 
to wisdom. In the book called the Wisdom of Solomon^ (vii. 7, 8). but 
supposed to be the production of a Hellenistic Jew, it is said: *I called 
upon God. and the spirit of wisdom came to me. I preferred her before 
sceptres and thrones, and esteemed riches nothing in comparison of her.' 
And farther on in the same book, (vii. 25-27,) she is described as 'the 
breath of the power of God, and a pure influence [emanation] flowing 

from tbe glory of the Almighty the brightness of the- everlasting 

light, the unspotted mirror of the p(fw€r of God, and the Image of his 
goodness.'"— Maoke^'s £xia|yclopaedia of Freemasonry, Aitiole Wisdom. 



46 GRAND MASTER OP ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 

nineteenth degree desires to be here qualified to preside 
over all symbolic lodges that he may still further ad- 
vance in ma-sonry. 

Junior Deacon — Is it not through mere idle curios- 
ity, or for the sake of distinction among his fellows that 
he makes this request? 

Senior Deacon — It is not. 

Junior Deacon — Is he of that number of masons who^ 
having attained this degree, repose thereafter in con- 
tented indolence, indifferent to the evils that demand 
to be redressed? 

Senior Deacon — He is not. 

Junior Deacon — Is he of that class of masons who 
utter beautiful sentiments and press on others the per- 
formance of masonic duty, and with that remain con- 
tent? 

Senior Deacon — He is not. 

Junior Deacon — Is he of that class of masons who 
spare their own purse and levy liberal contributions on 
those of others, for works of charity and the welfare of 
the order? 

Senior Deacon — He is not. 

Junior Deacon — If he be one of these let him speed- 
ily withdraw; for such we have here no room, no need, 
no use; do you vouch for him that he is none of these? 

Senior Deacon — I do. 

Junior Deacon — Then let him wait with patience un- 
til the Venerable Grand Master is informed of his re- 
quest, and his answer returned. (Junior Deacon closes 
the door, goes to the Grand Master, knocks three; 
00, and the same questions are asked and the like an- 
swers returned as before, excepfrthe last.) 

Venerable Master — Let the candidate be admitted. 

Junior Deacon — (Having returned and opened the 
door.) It is the order of the Venerable Grand Master, 
that the candidate be admitted. (Senior Deacon en- 
ters with him and places him in the centre of the tri- 
angle formed by the three columns surrounding the 



INITIATION. 47 

altar and leaves him.) 

Venerable Mfister — My brother you have often knelt 
before the altar of masonry, and you now stand before 
it again, enclosed in a great triangle formed by three 
great columns which support this lodge. What name 
do you read upon the column in the South ? 

Candidate — Toleration. 

Venerable Master — No man has the right to dictate 
to another in matters of belief or faith; no man can 
say that he has possession of truth as he has of a chat- 
tel. When man persecutes for opinion's sake, he 
usurps the prerogative of God. Do you admit the 
truth of these principles? 

Candidate — I do. 

Venerable Master — What name do you read upon the 
column in the West? 

Candidate — ^Justice.^''' 

Venerable Master — Man should judge others as he 
judges himself; believe others honest and sincere as he 
believes himself; find for their actions the excuses that 
he readily finds for his own, and look always for a good 
rather than a bad motive. God made them common to 
all, and he who denies justice to his brother or wrongs 
him in any manner is unfit to live. Do you recognize 
the truth of these principles? 

Candidate — I do. 

Venerable Master — What name do you read on the 

Note 222. — "Justice. One of the four cardinal virties, the practice 
of which is inculcated in the first degree. The mason who remembers 
how emphatically he has been charged to- preserve an upright position 
in all his dealings with mankind, should never fail to act justly to 
himself, to his brethren, and to the world. This is the corner-stone 
on which alone he can expect to erect a superstructure alike honorable 
to himself and to the Fraternity.' In iconology. Justice is usually rep- 
resented as a matron with bandaged eyes, holding in one hand a sword 
and in the other a pair of scales at equipoise. But in Masonry the true 
symbol of Justice, as illustrated in the first degree, is the feet firmly 
planted on the ground, and the body upright." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia 
of Freemasonry, Article Justice. 



48 GRAND MASTER OI' ALL SYMBOLIC lODGES. 



223 



column in the East? 

Candidate — Truth. ' 

Venerable Master — He who lies is a coward; no 
falsehood can be other than evil. To lie expressly, or 
by implication, is base and dishonorable ; without truth 
there can be no virtue, and he who professes an opinion 
he does not entertain, originates a falsehood and is a 
slanderer and deserves to be branded as such. Do you 
recognize the truth of these principles ? 

Candidate — I do. 

Venerable Master — Will you make them hereafter 
the rule of your life, conduct and conversation, letting 
no inducement however stringent persuade you to 
swerve from them ? 

Candidate — I will. 

Venerable Master — Kneel then at the altar and as- 
sume the obligation of this degree. (The candidate 
kneels and contracts the following obligation.) 

OBLIGATION GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES."* 

I. .... .of my own free will and accord, in the pres- 
ence of the Great Architect of the Universe, do hereby 
and hereon solemnly and sincerely swear, and to each 

INote 223. — "Truth. Truth is a divine attribute, and the foundation 
of every virtue. To be good and true, is the first lesson we are 
taught in Masonry. On this theme we contemplate, and by its dictates 
endeavor to regulate our conduct; influenced by this principle, hypocrisy 
and deceit are unknown in the lodge; sincerity and plain dealing dis- 
tinguish us, while the heart and tongue join in promoting the general 
welfare, and rejoicing in each other's prosperity. — Preston." — Macoy's 
Encyclopaedia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article Truth. 

Note 224. — "Grand Master of all Symbolic Lodges. (Venerable Maitre 
de toutes les Loges. The twentieth degree in the Ancient and Accepted 
Scottish Rite. The presiding oflScer is styled Venerable Grand Master, 
and is assisted by two Wardens in the west. The decorations of the 
Lodge are blue and yellow. The old ritual contains some interesting 
instructions respecting the first and second Temple. 

Among the traditions preserved by the possessors of this degree, is 
one which states that after the third Temple was destroyed by Titus, 
the son of Vespasian, the Christian Freemasons who were then in the 
Holy Land, being filled with sorrow, departed from home with the deter- 
mination of building a fourth, and that, dividing themselves into 
several bodies, they dispersed over the various parts of Europe. The 
greater number went to Scotland, and repaired to the town of Kilwinning, 
where they established a Lodge and built an abbey, and where the records 
of the Order were deposited. This tradition preserved in the original 
rituals, is a very strong presumptive evidence that the degree owed 
its existence to the Templar system of Ramsay." — Mackey's Encyclc 
paedia of Freemasonry, Article Grand Master of all Symbolic Lodges. 



Grand Master here present, promise and vow that I will 
never reveal any of the secrets of this degree to any 
person or persons, except to one duly authorized to re- 
ceive them. 

I do furthermore promise and swear that I will here- 
after make these virtues, which compose the five masonic 
squares and three masonic triangles of this lodge, the 
rule and guide of my life, conduct and conversation, 
and will endeavor to extend and increase the practice 
of them among men; and particularly that my steps 
shall ever be guided and directed by the nine great 
lights of a Grand Master, as I shall hereafter be in- 
formed. 

I furthermore promise and swear that I will not rule 
and govern my lodge in a haughty manner, but will 
use my best endeavors to preserve peace and order and 
harmony among the members. To all "these and those, 
I do most solemnly and sincerely promise and, swear, 
binding myself under no less a penalty than that of 
being dishonored and despised by all masons. So help 
me God. 

Venerable Master — Arise my brother, and receive the 
signs, grips and words of this degree. (Candidate 
rises and receives the following:) 

FIRST SIGN. 

Form four squares ; first by placing the 
right hand on the heart, the fingers close 
together, the thumb separate, which makes 
two squares; second by placing the left 
hand on the lips, the thumb separate, 
which makes a third square; third by 
bringing the heels together, the feet open 
on a square. 




50 



GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 



SECOND SIGN. 

Kneel down, place 
the elbows on the 
floor, the head 
downwards and a 
little inclined to the 
left. 




Sdco&d Sign, ^tb Degree. 




THIRD SIGN. 

Cross the arms on the breast, the right 
arm over the left, the fingers extended 
and close together, the thumb forming a 
square, heels touching, which makes five 
squares. 



Third Sign» 20th Degree, 



N. B. — In some rituals only one sign is given instead 
of the first two, and this is to kneel on the right knee, 
the left hand being raised, which forms two squares; 
then place the left elbow on the left knee, fingers extend- 
ed and closed, the thumb forming the square, the head 
downwards, somewhat inclined to the left* 



GRAKD MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 51 



V 




SIGIT OF IN-TRODUCTION. 
The sword elevated, or if no sword is worn, the right 
arm raised before the head as if to ward off a stroke. In 
coming together, cross swords and form the arch of steel. 



TOKEN". 

Take one the other's right 
elbow, with the right hand; 
press it four times; then slide 
the hand along the forearm 
down to the wrist; lastly, press 
the wrist-joint with the first 
finger only. 




TokeQi SOtU DegrQ9t 



52 GRAND MASTEH OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGl^]^. 




TOKEN OP INTRODUCTION. 

[Given after the sign 
of introduction.] 

Take each other^s right 
hand, the first finger on 
the wrist joint; then as 
you retire slide the hand 
along the other's hand 
down to the tip of the 
fingers. 



Token of Introdnction. 

N. B. — Some in the last token squeeze on the other's 
wrist, each drawing the other nine times alternately, 
and repeating each time the word Cyrus. 

battery: — The battery is three strokes, by one and 
two; 00. 

march: — Mne steps/ each forming a square. 

PASS word: — Jekson.^'' 

ANSWER : — Stolkin. 

SACRED WORD : — Eazah-belsijah. 

Venerable Master — (Investing him with the collar, 
jewel and apron.) My brother, as the presiding officer 

Note 225. — "Jekson. This word is found in the French Cahiers of 
the high degrees. It is undoubtedly a corruption of Jacquesson, and 
this a mongrel word compounded of the French Jacques and the English 
son, and means the son of James, that is, James II. It refers to Charles 
Edward the Pretender, who was the son, of that abdicated and exiled 
monarch. It is a significant relic of the system attempted to be intro- 
duced by the adherents of the house of Stuart, and by which they 
expected to enlist Masonry as an instrument to effect the restoration 
of the Pretender to the throne of England. For this purpose they had 
altered the legend of the third degree, making it applicable to Charles 
II., who, being the son of Henrietta Maria, the widow of Charles I., 
was designated as 'the widow's son.* " — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Free- 
masonry, Article Jekson. 



INITIATION. 53 

of a lodge, it will be your duty to dispense light and 
knowledge to the brethren. That duty is not performed, 
nor is that which the old charges require, that at open- 
ing and closing the Master shall give a lecture or por- 
tion thereof for the instruction of the brethren. On the 
contrary that duty is far higher and more important, 
and it behooves the Master to be prepared to perform 
it ; nor should any one accept the office of Master, until 
by acquaintance and familiarity with the history, morals 
and philosophy of masonry^ he is fitted to enlighten and 
instruct his brethren. That you may ever remember 
that duty, you will now proceed symbolically to perform 
it by restoring to us the splendor of our nine great 
lights in masonry. 

Brother Senior Grand Warden, let the great light of 
veneration shine in our lodge. (The Master now goes 
to the East and the Senior Warden conducts the candi- 
date once around the lodge, walking over the eross- 
swords, which lay on the floor between the columns of 
justice and the tracing board, and by the altar of incense 
nip to the north-west light of the triangle, which the 
candidate lights. He is then conducted up to and 
facing the altar of obligation.) 

Venerable Master — The light shines, let us applaud 
iny brethren. 

4W— (Clap three; 00.) Lux Est. 

Venerable Master — (To candidate.) Say after me 
my brother: So let the light of Veneration shine in 
me. 

Candidate — ( Eepeats. ) 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
let the great light of Charity"^^^ shine in our lodge 

Note 226. — "However freemasons may fall short of their professions 
in other things, the most severe criticism cannot deny their proficiency 
J» charity."— Moms'8 Masomo pictipnary, Article Charity, 



54 GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 

(Senior Warden conducts candidate as before^ and he 
lights that light and is conducted back.) 

Venerable Master — The light shines, let us applaud 
my brethren. 

4/Z— (Clap three; 00.) 

Venerable Master — Say after me my brother: So 
let the light of Charity shine in me. 

Candidate — ( Eepeats. ) 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
let the great light of Generosity shine in our lodge. 
(Senior Warden conducts candidate as before and 
causes him to light the third light.) 

Venerable Master — The light shines, let us applaud 
my brethren. 

4ZZ— (Clap three; 00.) 

Venerable Master — Say after me my brother : So let 
the great light of Generosity shine in me. 

Candidate — ( Eepeats. ) 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
let the great light of Heroism shine in our lodge. 
(Senior Warden conducts him and causes him to light 
the fourth light.) 

Venerable Master — The light shines, let us applaud 
my brethren. 

4Z/_(Clap three; 00.) 

Venerable Master — Say after me my brother: So 
may the light of Heroism' shine in me. 

Candidate — ( Repeats. ) 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
let the great light of Honor shine in our lodge. 
(Senior Warden causes him. to light the fifth light.) 

Venerable Master— "Yhe light shines, let us applaud 
my brethren. 

4^;_(Clap three; 00.) 



INITIATION. 55 

Venerable Master — Say after me my brother: So 
•may the light of Honor shine in me. 

Candidate — ( Eepeats. ) 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
let the great light of Patriotism shine in our lodge. 
(Senior Warden conducts and causes him to light the 
sixth light.) 

Venerable Master — The light shines, let us applaud 
my brethren. 

AZ?— (Clap three; 00.) 

Venerable Master — Say after me my brother: So 
may the light of Patriotism shine in me. 

Candidate — ( Eepeats. ) 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
let the great light of Justice shine in our lodge. 
(Senior Warden causes him to light the seventh light.) 

Venerable Master — The light shines, let us applaud 
my brethren. 

AZZ— (Clap three; 00.) 

Venerable Master — Say after me my brother: So 
may the light of Justice shine in me. 

Candidate — ( Eepeats. ) 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
let the great light of Toleration shine in our lodge. 
(Senior Warden conducts and causes him to light the 
eighth light.) 

Venerable Master — The light shines, let us applaud 
my brethren. 

/!//_( Clap three; 00.) 

Venerable Master — Say after me my brother: So 
may the light of Toleratipn shine in me. 

Candidate — ( Eepeats. ) 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 



56 GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 

let the great light of Truth'" shine in our lodge. (Se- 
nior Warden causes iiim to light the ninth light.) 

Venerable Master — The light shines^ let us applaud 
my brethren. 

4ZZ— (Clap three; 00.) 

Venerable Master — Say after me my brother: So 
may the Divine light of Truth shine in me. 

Candidater — ( Repeats. ) 

Venerable Master — Seal now^ and perfect your obli- 
gation as Grand Master of all Symbolic Lodges; repeat 
after me: (Candidate repeats as follows:) 

Venerable Master — And when these great lights 
cease to illumine my soul^ direct my conduct and guide 
(my footsteps^ may I^ false mason and faithless man, 
cease to exist and be remembered only to be despised. 
So help me God. 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
you will now give the candidate an explanation of the 
tracing-board.^"" (Senior Warden conducts him to 
tracing-board.^^^) 

Senior Warden — My brother, behold the five great 

Note 227. — "To be good and true is the first lesson we are taught in 
Masonry. On this theme we contemplate, and by its dictates endeavor 
to regulate our conduct. Hence, while influenced by this principle, 
hypocrisy and deceit are unknown among us, sincerity and plain dealing 
distinguish us, and the heart and tongue join in promoting each other's 
welfare and rejoicing in pach. other's prosperity." — Morris'? Masonic 
Dictionary, Article Truth, 

Note 228. — "Tracing-Board. The same as a Floor-Cloth, which see.** 
— Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Tracing -Board. 

Note 229. — "Floor-Cloth, A frame-work of board or canvas, on which 
the emblems of any particular degree are inscribed, for the assistance 
of the Master in giving a lecture. It is so called because formerly it 
was the custom to inscribe these designs on the floor of the Lodge 
room in chalk, which was wiped out when the Lodge was .closed. It is 
the same as the 'Carpet,' or 'Tracing-Board.' " — Mackey's Encyclodaedia 
of Freemasonry, Article Floor-Clothi 



INlTIATiON. 57 

squares, and three great triangles^''' of masonry com,- 
posed as follows: 

The Square''' at the bottom of the Octagon that sur- 
rounds the Ineffable name, and the seven letters of the 
words with which he created light; of Prudence, Tem- 
perance/'" Chastity and Sobriety. 

First Square on the right; of Heroism, Firmness, 
Equanimity and Patience. 

First Square on the left; of Probity, Honor, Fidel- 
ity"'' and Punctuality. 

Note 230.--"Triangle. There is no symbol mote important in its 
significance, more various in its application, or more generally diffused 
throughout the whole system of Freemasom-y, than the triangle. An 
examination of it, therefore, cannot fail to be interesting to the Masonic 
student. 

The equilateral triangle appears to have been adopted by nearly all 
the nations of antiquity as a symbol of the Deity, in some of his forms 
or emanations, and hence, probably, the prevailing influence of this 
symbol was carried into the Jewish system, where the yod w^ithin the 
triangle was made to represent the Tetragrammaton, or sacred name of 
God. 

'The equilateral triangle,' says Bro. D. W. Nash (Freem. Mag., Iv. 
294,) 'viewed in the light of the doctrines of those who gave it currency 
as a divine symbol, represents the Great First Cause, the creator and 
container of all things, as one and indivisible, manifesting himself la 
an infinity of forms and attributes in this visible universe.' 

Among the Egyptians, the darkness througn which the candidate for 
Initiation was made to pass was symbolized by the trowel, an important 
Masonic implement, which in their system of hieroglyphics has the form 
of a triangle. The equilateral triangle they considered as the most 
perfect of figures, and a representative of the great principle of ani- 
mated existence, each of its sides referring to one of the three depart- 
ments of creation, the animal, vegetable, and mineral." — Mackey's Ency- 
clopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Triangle. 

Note 231. — **In the very earliest catechism of the last century, of the 
date of 1725, we find the answer to the question. How many make a 
Lodge? is 'God and the Square, with five or seven right or perfect 
Masons.' God and the Square, religion and morality, must be present 
in every Lodge as governing principles. Signs at that early period were 
to be made by squares, and the furniture of the Lodge was declared to 
be the Bible, Compass and Square. 

In all rites and in all languages where Masonry has penetrated, the 
square has preserved its primitive signification as a symbol of morality. 
— Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Square. 

Note 232. — "The WorshipfulmJ^aster is required publicly to declare, in 
the ceremony of his installation, that he will 'guard against intemper- 
ance and excess.* The Junior Warden is charged to see that the brethren 
*do not convert the purposes of refreshment into' intemperance and 
excess.' Finally, this vice is made a prominent subject of masonic pen- 
alties." — Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Article Temperance. 

Note 233. — "Noel (Diet. Fab.) says that there was an ancient marble 
at Rome consecrated to the god Fidius, on which was depicted two 
figures clasping each other's hands as the representatives of Honor and 
Truth, without which there can be no fidelity nor truth among men. 
Masonry borrowing its ideas from the ancient poets, also makes the 
right hand the symbol of Fidelity." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Free- 
masonry, Article Fides. 



58 GRAND MASTER OP ALL SYMBOLIC LODGEkS. 

Upper Square on the right; of Disinterestedness, 
Mercy^ Forgiveness and Forbearance. 

Upper Square on the left; of Charity, Kindness, Gen- 
erosity and Liberality. 

Triangle on the right; of Gratitude to God, love of 
mankind^ and confidence in human nature. 

Triangle on the left; of Veneration, devotedness and 
patriotism; Veneration of God, Devotedness to God, 
family and friend and ardent love for our country. 

Triangle at the top ; of Truth, which includes Frank- 
ness, Plain dealing and sincerity; Justice which in- 
cludes Equity and Impartiality and Toleration. 

Venerable Master — Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
you will now conduct the candidate to the post of 
Honor. (Senior Warden seats him on the right of the 
master.) 

Venerable Master — Brother Grand Orator, you have 
the floor. 

DISCOURSE BY GRAND ORATOR. 

My brother, as Grand Master of all Symbolic Lodges, 
it is your especial duty to aid in restoring masonry to 
its primitive purity. You have become an instructor. 
Masonry long wandered in error. Instead of improving 
it degenerated from its primitive simplicity and re- 
trograded toward a system, distorted by stupidity and 
ignorance, which, unable to construct a beautiful ma- 
chine made a complicated one. Less than two hundred 
years ago its organization was^imple and altogether 
moral ; its emblems, allegories ana ceremonies easy to be 
understood, and their person and object readily to be 
seen. It was then confined to a very small number of 
degrees. 

Innovators and inventors overturned that primitive 
simplicity. Ignorance engaged in the work of making 
degrees and trifles and gewgaws ; and pretended myster- 



236 



IK'lTIATIOKr. S9 

ies^ absurd or hideous^ usurped the place of masonic 
truth. 

The picture of a horrid vengeance/'* the poniard and 
the bloody head appeared in the peaceful temple of 
masonry without sufficielit explanation of their sym- 
bolic meaning. Oaths'"' ' out of. all proportion wilh 
their object shocked the candidate and then became ri- 
diculous^ and were wholly disregarded. 

The rituals, even of the respectable degrees, copied 
and mutilated by ignorant men, became nonsensical 
and trivial, and the words so corrupted that it has 
hitherto been found impossible to recover many of them 
at all. Candidates were made to degrade themselves 
and to submit to insults not tolerable to a man of spirit 
and honor. Hence it was that practically the largest 
portion of the degrees claimed by the Ancient and Ac 
cepted Eite, and the Eites of Perfection and Misraim 
fell into disuse, were merely communicated, and their 
rituals became jejune and insignificant.* 

Note 234. — "The word is nsed symbolically to express the universally 
recognized doctrine that crime will inevitably be followed by its penal 
consequences. It is the dogma of all true religions; for if virtue and 
vice entailed the same result, there would be no incentive to the one and 
DO restraint from the other." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, 
Article Vengeance. 

Note 235. — **The engagements of masonry, commonly styled obligations 
or vows, are of a nature scarcely to be distinguished from the definition 
of an oath, although the word oath does not occur in the Blue Lodge 
ritual." — Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Article Oath, 

Note 236. — "Misraim, Rite of. This rite was introduced into France 
near the commencement of the present century. It made considerable 
progress, and, in 1817 application was made on the part of its friends 
to the Grand Orient, to accept it as a legitimate branch of Masonry. 
The application was denied, partly on the ground that the antiquity of 
the rite had not been proved, and partly because of the 90 degrees 
which its ritual comprised 68 were already included in the French sys- 
tem. The rite of Misraim is interesting and instructive, but many of 
its degrees are too abstruse to be popular. The initiation is a reproduc- 
tion of the ancient rite of Isis, and represents the contests of Osiris 
and Typhon, the death, resurrection, and triumph of the former, and 
the destruction of the latter. There are 90 degrees, divided into four 
series — symbolic, philosophical, mystical and cabalistic and again divided 
into seventeen classes. 

The traditions of this system are full of anachronisms, historical 
events and characters, separated by hundreds of years, being made to 
figure on the same scene, at the same time. The work entitled 'De 
r Ordre Maconnique de Misraim,* published at Paris, in 1835. by Mons. 
Marc Bedarride, purporting to give the history of the Order, is a mere 
romance, and full of puerilities. Nevertheless, many of the degrees 
H-e highly interesting and instructive." — Macoy's EncycloBaedia and Dic- 
tionary of Freemasonryv Article Misraim, Rite of. 



60 GRAND MASTER OP ALL SYMBOLIC LODCrES. 

Lofty titles^ arbitrarily assumed, and to which the 
inventors had not condescended to attach any explana- 
tion that should acquit them of the folly of assuming 
temporal rank, power and titles of nobility, made the 
world laugh and the initiates feel ashamed. Some of 
the titles we still retain, but they have, with us, mean- 
ings entirely consistent with that spirit of equality 
which is the foundation and peremptory law of its be- 
ing; of all masonr)^ 

The Knight, with us, is he who devotes his hand, his 
heart, and his brain to the science of masonry, and pro- 
fesses himself the sworn soldier of truth. The Prince*'^ 
is he who aims to be chief, first, leader, among his 
equals, in virtue and good deeds. 

The Sovereign^'" is he who, one of an order whose 
members " are all Sovereigns, is supreme only because 
the law and constitutions are so which he administers, 
and by which he, like every brother, is governed. 

The titles Puissant, Potent, Wise and Venerable, in- 
dicate that power of virtue, intelligence and wisdom, 
which those ought to strive to attain who are placed in 

Note 237. — "Prince. The word Prince is not attached as a title to 
any Masonic office, but is prefixed as a part of the name to several 
degrees, as Prince of the Royal Secret, Prince of Rose Croix, and Prince 
of Jerusalem. In all of these instances it seems to convey some idea of 
sovereignty inherent in the character of the degree. Thus the Prince of 
the Royal Secret was the ultimate and. of course, controlling degree 
of the Rite of Perfection, whence, shorn, however, of its sovereignty, 
it has been transferred to the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. The 
Prince of Rose Croix, although holding in some Rites a subordinate 
position, was originally an independent degree, and the representative 
of Rosicrucian Masonry. It is still at the head of the French Rite." — 
Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Prince. 

Note 238. — "Sovereign. An epithet applied to certain degrees which 
were invested with supreme power over inferior ones; as Sovereign Prince 
of Rose Croix, which is the highest degree of the French Rite and of 
some other Rites, and Sovereign Inspector-General, which is the con- 
trolling degree of the Ancient and Accepted Rite. Some degrees, orig- 
inally Sovereign in the Rites in which they were first established, in 
being transferred to other Rites, have lost their sovereign character, 
but still improperly retain the name. Thus the Rose Croix degree of 
the Scottish Rite, which is there only the eighteenth, and subordinate 
to the thirty-third or Supreme Council, still retains everywhere, except 
in the Southern Jurisdiction of the United States, the title of Sovereign 
Prince of Rose Croix." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article 
Sovereigrn. 



INITIATION. 61 

high office by the suffrage of their brethren, and all 
other titles and designations have an esoteric meaning, 
consistent with modesty and equality, and which those 
who receive them should fully understand. 

As Master of a lodge, it is your duty to instruct your 
brethren that they are all so many constant lessons, 
touching the lofty qualifications which are required of 
those who claim them, and not merely idle gew-gaws 
worn in ridiculous imitation of the times when the 
Nobles and the Priests were masters and the people 
slaves, and that in all true masonry, the Knight, the 
Pontiff,"'^ the Prince, and the Sovereign, are but the 
first among their equals, and the Cordon,''*'' the cloth- 
ing and the jewel but symbols and emblems of the vir- 
tues required of all good masons. The Mason kneels 
no longer to present his petition for admittance, or to 
receive the answer ; no longer to a man as his superior, 
who is but his brother, but to his God, to whom he ap- 
peals for the rectitude of his intentions, and whose aid 
he asks to enable him to keep his vows. No one is de^^— 

Note 239. — "What is the meaning of 'pontiff'? 'Pontiff* means bridge 
maker, bridge builder. Why are they called in that way? Here i3 
the explanation of the fact: In the very first years of the existence of 
Rome, at a time of which we have a very fabulous history and but 
few existing monuments, the little town of Rome, yot built on seven 
hills, as is generally supposed — there are eleven of them now; then 
there were within the town less than seven, even — that ,,little town 
had a great deal to fear from *n enemy which should take one of the 
hills that were out of town — the Janiculum — because the Janiculum 
is higher than the others, and from that hill an enemy could very easily 
throw stones, fire, or any means of destruction into the town. The Janic- 
ulum was separated from the town by the Tiber. Then the first neces- 
sity for the defence of that little town of Rome was to have a bridge. 
They had built a wooden bridge over the Tiber, and a great point of 
Interest to the town was, that this bridge should be kept always in 
good order, so that at any moment troops could pass over. Then, with 
the special genius of the Romans, of which we have other instances, they 
ordained, curiously enough, that the men who were a corporation to 
take care of that bridge should be sacred; that their function, necessary 
to the defence of the town, should be considered holy; that they should 
be priests; and the highest of them was called 'the high bridge maker/ 
So it happened that there was in Rome a corporation of bridge makers 
— pontifices — of whom the head was the most sacred of all Romans: 
because in those days his life and the life of his companions was deemed 
necessary to the safety of the town.' 

And thus it is that the title of Pontifex Mf^ximus, assumed by the 
Pope of Rome, literally means the Grand Bridge Builder."— J^Ifickey'a 
Enoyolopaedift of Freemasor.ry, Article Pontiff. 

Vote 240.«-*Cor4en. The iv^agoGle ^eeoration. whieh In Eiigtlati in ealtec^ 
the collar, Is styled by tbe French Masons the Cgr491l»"«!-Mack^y ? '^Acy- 



62 GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 

graded by bending his knee to God at the altar, or to 
receive the honor of knighthood as Bayard and Du 
Quesclin knelt. To kneel for other purposes^ masonry 
does not require. 

As Master of a lodge, you will therefore be exceed- 
ingly careful that no candidate in any degree be re- 
quired to submit to any degradation whatever, as has 
been too much the custom in some of the degrees, and 
take it as a certain and inflexible rule to which there is 
no exception, that masonry requires of no man, any- 
thing to which a Knight and gentleman cannot honor- 
ably and without feeling outraged or humiliated, sub- 
mit. 

x\s Master, you will teach those who are under you, 
and to whom you will owe jour office^ that the decora- 
tions of many of the degrees are to be dispensed with, 
whenever the expense would interfere with the duiies 
of Charity, Eelief and Benevolence ; and to be indulged 
in only by wealthy bodies that will thereby do no wrong 
to those entitled to their assistance. The essentials of 
all the degrees may be procured at slight expenses, and 
it is at the option of every brother to procure or not to 
procure, as he pleases, the dress, decorations and jew- 
els of any degree other than the 14^ 18°, 30° and 
32°. ^ 

As Master of a lodge^ Council or Chapter, it will be 
your duty to impress upon the minds of your brethren 
all views of the general plan and separate parts of the 
Ancient and Accepted Kite;"'' of its spirit and design, 
its harmony and regularity of the duties of the officers 
and members; and of the particular lessons intended to 
be taught by each degree; especially you are not to al- 
low any assembly of the body over which you may pre- 
side to close without recalling to the mind of the breth- 

Note 241. — "The Scotch Rite, during' a few years past has experienced 
a vast expansion through this country. Consistories of the 32d grade 
have been established in several States; boolss of Constitutions have 
been published; Eituals have been prepared by the leading Dilnds; of 
the society and men of high political and social distinction pjj- ced in 
prominent positions."— Morris's Masonio Dictionary, i^Tticb Scotch Ma- 
sonry. 



INITIATION. 63 

ren the masonic virtues and duties which are repre- 
sented upon the tracing-board of this degree ; that is an 
imperative duty. 

Urge upon your brethren the teaching and the un- 
ostentatious practice of the morality of the lodge with- 
out regard to times^, places, religions, or peoples. 

Urge them to love one another, to be devoted to one 
another, to be faithful to the country, the government 
and the laws, to serve the country is to -pay a dear and 
sacred debt. 

To respect all forms of worship^ to tolerate all 
politicar*' and religious opinions, not to blame, still 
less to condemn the religion of others, to fraternize with 
all men, to assist all who are unfortunate; and to 
cheerfully postpone their own interests to that of the 
order. To make it the constant rule of their lives, to 
think well, to speak well, and to act well. To place the 
sage above the soldier, the noble or the Prince ; and to 
take the wise and good as their models. To see that 
their profession and practice, their teachings and con- 
duct do always agree. To make this also their motto, 
^^Do that which thou ought to do, let the result be what 
it wiU.^^ 

Such, my brother, are some of the duties of that 
office which you have sought to be qualified to exercise; 
may 3^ou perform them well, and in so doing gain honor 
for yourself and advance the great cause of masonry, 
humanity and progress. 

ITote 242. — "Politics. There is no charge more frequently made against 
Freemasonry than that of its tendenc^^ to revolution, and conspiracy, and 
to political organi^iations which may affect the peace of society or inter- 
fere with the rights of governments. It was the substance of all 
B .rruel's and Robison's accusations, that the Jacobinism of France and 
Germany was nurtured in the Lodges of those countries; it was the 
theme of all the denunciations of the anti-Masons of our own land, 
that the Order was seeking a political ascendancy and an undue influence 
over the government; it has been the unjust accusation of every enemy 
of the institution in all times past, that its object and aim is the 
possession of power and control in the affairs of state. It is in vain that 
history records no instance of this unlawful connection between Free- 
masonry and politics; it is in vain that the libeller is directed to the 
Ancient Constitutions of the Order, which expressly forbid such con- 
nection; the libel is still written, and Masonry is again and again 
cfuidemn^d as a ix)litical club," — JiJackey's Encyclopaedi«L of Freenjasonry, 
Article JPoUtics, 



^v- 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Grand Master of all Symbolic Lodges.'*' 

Venerable Master— Bvothev Senior Grand Warden, 
have you anything in the West to offer before this lodge 
of Grand Masters ? 

Senior Warden — Nothing, Venerable Master. 

Venerable Master — Brother Junior Grand Warden, 
have you anything in the South to offer before this 
lodge of Grand Masters? 

Junior Warden — Nothing, Venerable Master. 

Venerable Master — Brother Orator, have you any- 
thing in the North to offer before this lodge of Grand 
Masters ? 

Orator — Nothing, Venerable^** Master. 

Venerable Master — Has any Grand Master anything' 
to offer to this degree for the benefit of a brother ma- 
son? (No answer.) 

Note 243. — "Grand Master Ad-Vitam or Grand Master of all Symbolic 
Lodges. [Scotch Masonry.] — The second degree conferred in the Con- 
sistory of Princes of the Royal Secret, Scotch Masonry,, and the 20th 
upon the catalogue of that system. The presiding officer is styled Grand 
Master and represents Cyrus Artaxerxes; there are two Wardens. The 
hangings of the Lodge are Blue and Yellow. The historical instructions 
relate to the construction of the three temples of Solomon, Zerubbabel 
and Herod, with the establishment of a fourth, or spiritual structure, 
which will outlast the ravages of time. The lights are nine. Jewel, a 
triangular plate of gold showing the word Secret." — Morris's Masonic 
Dictionary, Article Grand Master Ad-Vitam or Grand Master of all 
Symbolic Lodges. 

Note 244 — "Venerable Grand Master of all Symbolic Lodges. The 
twentieth degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. See Grand 
Mastei of all Symbolic Lodges. The Dictionnaire Maconmque says that 
this degree was formerly conferred on those brethren in France who, in 
receiving it. obtained the right to organize Lodges, and to act as Masters 
or Venerables for life, an abuse that was subsequently abolished by the 
Grand Orient. Ragon and Vassal both make the same statement. It 
may be true, but they furnish no documentary evidence of the fact. 
And examination of an old MS, French ritual of the degree, when it 
formed part of the Rite of Perfection, which is in my possession, shows 
nothing in the oatt^ctiism that renders this theory of Its origin iraprob- 
jroie/*— Mackey's Jin^y^lopaedia of rreemaggnry, ^rtiol^ Venerable Qx9>M 



I 



CLOSING CEREMONIES. 65 

Venerable Ma^fer— Brother Senior Grand Warden, 
what is the hour ? 

Senior Warden — The world waits for the light, Ven- 
eraole Master. 

Venerable Master — Then it is time to close, that the 
great light of this lodge may be borne into and illumine 
the world. Together brethren. 

All — (Give the first sign.) 

Venerable Master — (Knocks three; 00.) 

Senior Warden — (Knocks three; 00.) 

Junior Warden — (Knocks three; 00.) 

All— {Cla^ three; 00.) Lux Est. 

Venerable Master — Wherever the nine great lights 
are, there is this lodge. Let the great light of Venera- 
tion go forth and shine in the lodge, (Pursuivant 
takes that light and retires.) 

Venerable Master — Let the great light of Charity go 
forth into and inspire the world. (Junior Deacon takes 
that light and retires.) 

Venerable Master — Let the great light of Generosity 
go forth into and ennoble the world. (Senior Deacon 
takes that light and retires.) 

Venerable Master — Let the great light of Heroism go 
forth into and burn in the spirits of men. (Secretary 
takes that light and retires.) 

Venerable Master — Let the great light of Honor go 
forth into the world and baseness skulk and hide from 
its presence. (Treasurer takes that light and retires.) 

Venerable Master — Let the great light of Patriotism 
go forth and shine in the world, (Orator takes that 
light and retires.) 

Venerable Master — Let the great light of Justice go 
forth and blaze upon the altars of all men's hearts, 
(Junior Warden takes that light and retires.) 



66 GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 

Veneraile Master — Let the great light of Tolera^tion 
go forth and dim the fires of persecution. ( Senior War- 
den takes one of the lights and retires.) 

Venerable Master — I bear the light of Truth into the 
world to overcome falsehood and error^ and this lodge 
is closed until the light returns. (He retires with the 
light and the remaining brethren follow^ which closes 
the lodge.) 



CHAPTER XXXVII 

Twenty-First Degree; ISToachite or Prussian- 
Knight/'' 




ORIGIN/ 

The most ancient order of JSToachite''*^ known, are 

Note 245. — "Noachite, or Prussian Knight. (Noachite ou Chevalier 
Prussien.) 1. The twenty-first degree of the Ancient and accepted Scot- 
tish Rite. The history as well as the character of this degree is a 
very singular one. It is totally unconnected with the series of Masonic 
degrees which are founded upon the Temple of Solomon, and is traced to 
the tower of Babel. Hence the Prussian Knights call themselves 
Noachites, on* Disciples of Noah, while they designate all other Masons 
as Hiramites, or Disciples of Hiram. The early French rituals state that 
the degree was translated in 1757 from the German by. M, de Beraye, 
Knight of Eloquence in the Lodge of the Count St. Gelaire, Inspector 
General of Prussian Lodges in France. Lenning gives no credit to this 
statement, but admits that the origin of the degree must be attributed 
to the year above -qamed. The destruction of the tower of Babel consti- 
tutes the legend of the degree, whose mythical founder is said to have 
been Peleg, the chief builder of that edifice. A singular regulation is 
that there shall be no artificial light in the Lodge room, and that the 
meetings shall be held on the night of the full moon of each month. 

The degree was adopted by the Council of Emperors of the East and 
West, and in that way became subsequently a part of the system of the 
Scottish Rite. But it is misplaced in any series of degrees supposed to 
emanate from the Solomonic Temple. It is, as an unfitting link, an 
unsightly interruption of the chain of legendary symbolism substituting 
Noah for Solomon, and Peleg for Hiram Abiff. The Supreme Council for 
the Southern Jurisdiction has abandoned the original ritual and made 
the degree a representation of the Vehmgericht or Westphalian Franc 
Judges. But this by no means relieves the degree of the objection of 
Masonic incompatibility. That it was ever adopted into the Masonic 
system is only to be attributed to the passion for high degrees whifh 
prevailed in France in the middle of the last centui'y." — Mackey's Ency- 
clopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Noachite, or Prussian K ight. 

Note 246. — "The legend of the degree describes the travels of Peleg 
from Babel to the north of Europe, and ends with the following narra- 
tive: 'In trenching the rubbish of the salt-mines of Prussia was found 
in A. D. 553, at a depth of fifteen cubits, the appearance of a triangular 
building in which was a column of white marble, on which was written 
in Hebrew the whole history of the Noachites. At the side of this 
column was a tomb of freestone on which was a piece of agate inscribed 
with the following epitaph: Here rest the ashes of Peleg, our Grand 
Architect of the tower of Babel. The Almighty had pity on him because 
he became humble.' 

This legend, although • wholly untenable on historic grounds, is not 
absolutely puerile. The dispersion of the human race in the time of 
Peleg had always been a topic of discussion among the learned. Long 
dissertations had been written to show that all the nations of the 
world, even America, had been peopled by the three sons of Noah and 
their descendants. The object of the legend seems, then, to have been 
to impress the idea of the thorough dispersion. The fundamental idea of 
the degree is, under the symbol of Peleg, to teach the crime of assump- 
tion and the virtue cf humility. 

2. The degree was also adopted into the Rite of Mizraim. where it 
Is the thirty-fifth."— Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article 
Noachite, or Prussian Knight, 



68 NOACHITE OR PRUSSIAN KNIGHT. 

now called Prussian Knight Servants of the White and 
Black Eagle, which we gather from the German trans- 
lation by Berage, Knight of Eloquence and Lieutenant 
Commander of the Council of Noachite in France, and 
Grand Master General Commander. The Most Illus- 
trious Frederick ^*^ of Brunswick, King of Prussia was 
a patron of the order, as also his ancestors for 300 years. 
This degree was established by the Prussians in order to 
commemorate the discovery of the ancient trophies 
while digging for salt mines, and to perpetuate the 
building of the tower of Babel by the descendants of 
ISToah. The Ark""'" and Dove illustrate the mercy of 
the Lord in the preservation of jSToah and his family, 

Note 247. — * 'Frederick the Great was certainly a Mason. But Carlyle, 
In his usual Siucastie vein, adds: 'The Crown Prince prosecuted his 
Masonry at Reinsberg or elsewhere, occasionally, for a year or two, but 
was never ardent in it, and very soon after his accession left off alto- 
gether.... A Royal Lodge was established at Berlin, of which the new 
king consented to be patron; but he never once entered the palace, and 
only his portrait (a welcomely good one, still to be found there) presided 
over the mysteries of that establishment.' 

Now how much of truth with the sarcasm, and how much of sarcasm 
without the truth, "^there is in this remark of Carlyle, is just w^hat the 
Masonic world is bound to discover. Until further light is throwai upon 
the subject by documentary evidence from the Prussian Lodges, the 
question cannot be definitely answered. But what is the now known 
further Masonic history of B'rederick? 

Bielfeld tells us that the zeal of the Prince for the Fraternity induced 
him to invite the Baron Von Oberg and himself to Reinsberg, where, in 

1739, they founded a Lodge, into which Keyserling. Jordan, Moolendorf, 
Quels, and Fredersdorf (Frederick's valet) were admitted. 

Bielfeld is again our authority for stating that on the 20th of June, 

1740, King Frederick — for he had then ascended the throne — held a 
Lodge at Charlottenburg, and, as Master in the chair, initiated Prince 
William of Prussia, his brother, the Margrave Charles of Brandenburg, 
and Frederick William, Duke of Holstein. The Duke of Holstein "was 
seven years afterwards elected Adjutant Grand Master of the Grand 
Lodge of the Three Globes at Berlin. 

We hear no more of Frederick's Masonry in the printed records until 
the 16th of July, 1774, when he granted his protection to the National 
Grand Lodge of Germany, and oflBcially approved of the treaty with the 
Grand Lodge of England, by which the National Grand Lodge was estab- 
lished" — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Frederick the 
Great. 

248. — "Ark of Noah. One of the three Sacred Structures; it was 
made of cypress or pine (gopher) wood. The planks, after being put 
together, were protected by a coating of pitch, laid inside and outside, 
to make it water-tight. The Ai*k consisted of a number of small com- 
partments arranged in three stories, A window, 18 inches broad, was 
made in the roof, extending, perhaps, its whole length. There was a 
door in the side. The whole structure was 450 long, 75 feet broad, and 
45 high. The Temple of Solomon was the same height as the Ark. bi^t 
only one-fifth 'ji« long." — Morris's Masonio Dictionary, Article Ark cf 
Koah. 



KOACHtTfi OR PRUSSIAl^ KNIGHT. 69 

when all the rest of mankind were destroyed. The 
pagans called this degree by the name of Pilaus^ the 
name of their Deity; but the Knights of our day ac- 
knowledge no other God but the Great Architect of the 
Universe, and find it their chief happiness to worship 
him and keep his commandments. In the times of the 
crusades the Knights of the different orders were initi- 
ated into this degree by the Christian Princes in order 
to conquer the Holy Land which was invaded by the 
infidels. Those masons that were descended from Sol- 
omon were most attached to the Noachites'*^ and were 
initiated into their order and admitted Prussian 
Knights, and according to the mysteries of masonry, 
since which time none are admitted to this degree un- 
less they have received all the degrees of Ancient Craft 
Masonry. 

decorations: — A Grand Chapter must be held in 
"a retired place, on the night of the full moon. The 
place is lighted by a large window or opening so ar- 
ranged as to admit the rays of the moon, which is the 
only light allowed, at as early an hour of the night as 
practicable. The presiding officer sits facing the 
moonlight, and the Knights in front of him and on 
either hand, in no particular place or order. 

OFFICERS^"'' — There are seven officers, viz: 

First — Knight Lieutenant Commander. 

Second — Knight Official or Grand Inspector. 

Note 249. — "This name is applied to freemasons as the successors, in 
piety and virtue, of that eminent 'preacher of righteousness,' Noah." — 
Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Article Noachidae, 

Note 250. — *'In the modern ritual the meetings are called Grand 
Chapters. The officers are a Lieutenant Commander, two Wardens, an 
Orator, Treasurer, Secretary, Master of Ceremonies, Warder, and Stand- 
ard Bearer. The apron is yellow, inscribed with an arm holding a sw^ord 
and the Egyptian figure of silence. The order is black, and the jewel 
a full moon or a triangle traversed by an arrow. In the original ritual 
there is a coat of arms belonging to the degree, which is thus emblaz- 
oned: Party per fees; in chief, azure, seme of stars, or a full moon, 
argent; in base, sable, an equilateral triangle, having an arrow sus- 
pended from its upper point, barb downwards." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia 
of Freemasonry, Article Noachite, or Prussian Knight. 



70 KOACHITE OR PHrJSSXAN KICIGHT. 

Til inl — Knight Introductor. 

Fourth — Knight Orator. 

Fifth — Knight of Chancery or Grand Secretary. 

Sixth — Knight of Finance or Grand I'reasurer. 

Seventh — Knight Captain of the Guards. 

The members are called Prussian Knights. 

dress: — Blacky with swords, spurs and bhick masks. 
All the officers wear the jewel of the order, fastened to 
the button hole of the waist coat. 

SASH : — Black, worn from right to left. 

jewel: — Silver moon, full, or a golden triangle 
traversed by an arrow, point downwards, suspended 
from a collar ; on the jewel is an arm upraised holding 
a naked sword and around it the motto. Fiat Justitia, 
Ruat Coeluniv 

APRON AND gloves: — Ycllow ; on the upper part of 
the apron is a naked arm upraised, holding a naked 
sword, and under it a human figure erect with wings, 
v/ith the forefinger of the right hand upon his lips, and 
the other hand hanging by his side holding a key, being 
the Eg}^ptian figure of silence.''" 

Note 251. — "Secrecy and Silence. These virtues constitute the very 

essence of ail Masonic character; they are the safeguard of the Institu- 
tion, giving to it all its security and perpetuity, and are enforced bj' 
frequent admonitions in all the degrees, from the lowest to the highest. 
The Entered Apprentice begins his Masonic career by learning the duty 
of secrecy and silence. Hence it is appropriate that in that degree 
which is the consummation of initiation, in which the whole cycle of 
Masonic science is completed, the abstruse machinery of symbolism 
should be employed to impress the same important virtues on the mind 
of the neophyte. 

The same principles of secrecy and silence existed in all the ancient 
mysteries and systems of worship. When Aristotle was asked what 
thing appeared to him to be most diflicult of performance, he replied, 
*To be secret and silent.' 

*If we turn our eyes back to antiquity, ''• says Calcott, *we shall find 
that the old Egyptians had so great a regard for silence and secrecy in 
the mysteries of their religion, that they set up the god Harpocrates, 
to whom they paid peculiar honor and veneration, who was represented 
with right hand placed near the heart, and the left down by his side, 
covered with a skin before, full of eyes.' 

Apuleius, who was an initiate in the mysteries of Isis, says: *By m 
peril will I ever be compelled to disclose to the uninitiated the thlngj- 
that I have had intrusted to me on condition of silence.* 

Lobeck, in his Aglaophamus, has collected several examples of the 
reluctance with w^hich the ancients approached a mystical subject, and 
the manner in which they shrank from divulging any explanation or fable 
which had been related to them at the mysteries, under the seal of 
secrecy and silence." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article 
Secrecy and Silence, 



NOACHITE OR rRU.SSIA>T K:NriGnT. . 71 

draft: — Eepresents the firmament with full moon 
and stars, on which the eye may rest. There are nine 
wax candles^ in three rows in front of the altar, but 
not lighted. In the West is a representation of Noah's 
Ark, with a dove holding an olive leaf in his beak 
flying to the window whence it was let out. In one 
part of the Chapter is an Urn made of an agate stone, 
and in another part a representation of the Tower of 
Babel and near it a coffin with a human figure in it. 

battery: — Three equi-timed strokes (0 0). 

ARMORIAL BEARINGS : — FiTst — Blue, with silver moon 
surrounded with gold stars. 

Second — Black, with the triangle and the gold dart. 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

Twenty-First Degree; Noachitr or Prussian' 

Knight. 

Lieutenant Commander — Knight Official, the full 
moon is midway between the horizon and the zenith, 
and the hour for this Grand Chapter to convene has 
arrived, let the Knight Captain of the Guards post the 
Sentinels that no spy may gain admission among us. 

Knight Official — Knight Captain of the Guards, you 
will see that the Sentinels are posted, that no spy may 
gain admission among us. (Captain of the Guards re- 
tires for a short time and returns.) 

Captain of Guards — Sir Knight Official, the Sentinels 
are posted, and we are in security. 

Knight Official — Illustrious Lieutenant Commander, 
the Sentinels are posted, and we are in security. 

Lieutenant Commander — Sir Knight Official, you 
will now examine every Knight present and receive 
from each the pass-word, that we may know that all 
present are Prussian Knights. (Knight Official re- 
ceives the pass-word from each Knight.) 

Knight Official — Illustrious Lieutenant Commander, 
all have the pass-word. None but true Knights are 
present. 

Lieutenant Commander — Sir Knight Official, are you 
a Prussian Knight? 

Knight Official — I am. 

Lieutenant Commander — How were you received a 
Puissant Knigh't? 



OPENING CEREMONIES. 73 

Knight Official — By the light of the full moon, like 
our ancient brethren initiated in the temple of Belu^. 

Knight Commander — Do you know the names of the 
sons of Noah? 

Knight Official — I know three of them. 

Lieutenant Commander — What are they? 

Knight Ofpxial — Shem^ Ham and Japheth. 

Lieutanant Commander — Give me the sign? 

Knight Official — (Gives it.) 

Lieutenant Commander — Give me the pass-word. 

Knight Official — (Gives it>) 

Lieutenant Commander — (Three knocks; 000.) All 
rise. Together, Sir Knights. 

All — (Eaise their arms toward Heaven, sword in the 
right hand turn towards the moon, then drop their 
arms and face the Lieutenant Commander.) 

Lieutenant Commander — I declare this Grand Chap- 
ter open. Be seated^ Sir Knights, 



CHAPTER XXXVIII 

Twenty-First Degree; Noachite or Prussian 

Knight. 
J. 

initiation. 

[The Knight of Introduction after preparing the 
candidate with a white apron and white gloves leads him 
to the door and knocks three equal strokes.] 

Captain of Guards — (From within knocks one and 
opens the door.) Who desires to enter this Grand 
Chapter ? 

Introductor — The Knight Introductor, with a Master 
Mason of Hiram; and who has received the degree of 
Grand Master of all Symbolic lodges. 

Captain of Guard — Give me the sign, grip and pass- 
word of that degree. 

Candidate — (Gives the sign, pass grip and pass- word, 
Tubal Cain.) 

Captain of Guard — The sign, grip and word are cor- 
rect. You will wait a time with patience and I will 
inform the Illustrious Lieutenant Commander of your 
request. (Shuts the door, goes to the Knight Official 
and knocks three.) 

Captain of Guard — Sir Knight official, there is in the 
ante-room the Knight Introductor with a Master Mason, 
descendant from Hiram, and Grand Master of all Sym- 
bolic lodges, clothed in white apron and white gloves 
who desires to enter. 

Knight Official — (Announces the same to the Lieu- 
tenant Commander. Order is obeyed.) 



INITIATION. 75 

Lieutenant Commander — What does he desire Sir 
Knight Captain of the Guards? 

Captain of Guard — To be advanced to the degree of 
Noachite or Prussian Knight. 

Lieutenant Commander— ^'^iv Knights, a Perfect Ma- 
son of Hiram is desirous of becoming a Prussian 
Knight ; do you consent that he shall be received among 
us? 

All — (Eise, draw their swords and com.e to a present.) 

Lieutenant Commander — Sir Knight, Captain of the 
Guards, let this Perfect Mason of Hiram be admitted. 
(Captain of the Guards opens the door, the Introductor 
enters with candidate and conducts him up to the tower 
of Babel in the North.) 

Lieutenant Commander — My brother, behold the re- 
mains of Peleg the Projector of the tower of Babel.'''' 
He forgot that he was mortal and therefore also forgot 
what was due to future generations. He built to gratify 
his own vanity and vain glory, without regard to the 
common welfare and popular will, and therefore his 
work remained unfinished, for the confusion of opinions 
arose. 

Peleg w^as overpowered, fled to the desert, and died 
repenting, while his divided people were scattered over 
the face of the earth to form dissimilar nations of various 
tongues; may his example profit you. Sir Knight of 
Introduction, you will now conduct the candidate to the 
altar. (Introductor conducts him to the altar, where he 

Note 252. — "It is the name of that celebrated tower attempted to be 
Ijuilt on the plains of Shinar, A. M. 1775, about one hundred and forty 
years after the deluge, and which, Scripture informs us, was destroyed 
by the special interposition of the Almighty. The Noachite Masons date 
the commencement of their order from this destruction, and much tradi- 
tionary information on this subject is preserved in the degree of 'Patri- 
arch Noachite.' At Babel, Oliver says that what has been called Spurious 
Freemasonry took its origin. That is to say, the people there abandoned 
the worship of the true God, and by their dispersion lost all knowledge 
of his existence, and the principles of truth upon which Masonry is 
founded. Hence it is that the rituals speak of the lofty tower of Babel 
as the place where languages was confounded and Masonry lost."— » 
M.acke|y's Encyclopaedia cf Freemasonry, Arxicl^ Bal?«l» 



76 NOACHITE OR PRUSSIAN KNIGHT. 

makes three genuflections and kneels upon his left knee, 
when the Lieutenant Commander leaves the throne, ap- 
proaches the candidate and extends to him the hilt of 
his sword which he takes in his right hand, the Lieu- 
tenant Commander holding the blade.) 

Lieutenant Commander — Do you promise and agree 
that you will be just and righteous, and in all things 
strive to emulate and equal that Patriarch from whom 
we take the name of Noachite ? 

Candidate — I do. 
- Lieutenant Commander — Do you promise to avoid 
idleness, to live honestlj^, to deal fairly by all men, and 
discourage strife and contention ? 

Candidate — I do. 

Lieutenant Commander — Do you promise that you 
will be neither haughty nor vain-glorious, nor obsequi- 
ous to the great, nor insolent to your inferiors? 

Candidate — I do. 

Lieutenant Commander — Do you promise that you 
will be humble and contrite before the Deity, and ever 
bear in mind the fate of Peleg and his followers, who 
endeavored to build a tower, whereby they might climb 
beyond the reach of another deluge and defy the omnipo- 
tence of God ? 

Candidate — I do. 

Lieutenant Commander — Repeat after me then the 
solemn obligation of a Patriarch Noachite or Prussian 
Knight. 

OBLIGATION PATRIARCH NOACHITE. 

I .upon the sacred word of a Master Mason and 

Knight of Rose Croix, do most solemnly promise and 
vow, that I will faithfully keep the secrets of this de- 
gree, and will reveal them to no person in the world, 
unless to one who shall be legally authorised to receive 
them. So help me God, 



NOACHITE OR PRUSSIAN KKIGHT. 77 

lAeutenant Commander — Arise my brother and receive 
the sign, token and words of this degree* 




SIGN OF ORDER. 

Raise the arms to heaven, the face 
toward the East^ where the moon 

riises. 



Sign of Order, Noacbit0 
Degree, 



SIGN OP INTRODUCTION. 

One raises three lingers of the 
right hand, the other seizes those 
fingers with his right hand, and 
says, Frederick the Second. He 
then presents his three fingers, 
which the first one seizes in the 
game manner, saying Noah, 




Sign oX latroductioD, Noacliite 
Degree* 



78 



NOACHITE OR PRUSSIAN KNIGHT. 




SECOND SIGN. 

Seize one the first linger 
of tlie other's right hand and 
press it with the thumb and 
first finger, saying Shem. 

The other gives the same 
token, £<^ying Ham, then the 
first gives the same token, 
saying Japheth. 



Second Sign of Introduction. 



battery: — Three slow strokes; 0. 

MARCH : — Three steps of a Master. 

PASS word: — Peleg, Peleg, Peleg. 

SACRED WORD : — Shem, Ham, Japheth. 

Lieutenant Commander — (Invests him with the 
apron, collar and jewel, causes him to kneel on both 
knees when he strikes him on the right and left shoulder, 
and on the head with the flat of his sword, saying:) 

By virtue of the authority vested in me, by this grand 
Chapter, I do constitute art'd create you a Mason Noa- 
chite, and Prussian Knight, and devote you hence-for- 
ward to the cause of every one who hath been wronged 
by the great, or oppressed by the powerful ; of the widow, 
the orphan, the poor, the distressed and the destitute. 
Arise Sir Knight, and soldier of suffering humanity and 
be armed for the combats that await you. (Raises him 
up, the Knight Official buckles on his spurs, and the 
Lieutenant Commander hands him a sword.) 

Lieutenant Commander — You are now prepared to do 



INlTlATIOlSr. 79 

the duties of a true Knight. (Knight Official seats him 
and the Lieutenant Commander takes his station.) 

Lieutenant Commander — Sir Knight Orator, you have 
the floor. 

DISCOURSE BY ORATOR. 

My brother, we read that the descendants of Noah 
resolved to build a tower so high as to prevent the 
Almighty from again destroying the world by a flood 
and to get themselves a name in the world. They chose 
for their purpose the plains of Shinar, in Asia. Ten 
years after the foundation was laid, the Lord looking 
down upon earth and beholding the pride and audacious 
attempt of the people. He descended to confound their 
project by causing a confusion of languages among the 
workmen so that they could not understand one another ; 
whence it was called Babel. Sometime after, Nimrod"' 
established a distinction among men, and founded a 
city, and called it Babylon. Tradition says, the dedica- 
tion was at the full of the moon so the festivals of this 
degree are held in the month of March, at the full of the 
moon. Tradition further informs us that after the lan- 
guages were confounded at the building of the tower of 
Babel, the workmen separated and dispersed into differ- 
ent countries. The architect of the tower traveled into 
Germany where he arrived after a long and tedious 
journey, living upon roots and other vegetables. He 

Note 253.— "Nimrod. The legend of the Craft in the Old Constitutions 
refers to Nimrod as one of the founders of Masonry. Thus in the York 
Manuscript we read: 'At ye making of ye Toure of Babell there was 
Masonrie first much esteemed of, and the King of Babilon yt was called 
Nimrod was A mason himselfe and loved well Masons.' And the Cooke 
Manuscript thus repeats the story: *And this same Nembroth began the 
tower of babilin and he taught to his werkemen the craft of Masonrie, 
and he had with him many Masons more than forty thousand. And he 
loved and cherished them well.' The idea no doutft sprang out of the 
Scriptural teaching that Nimrod was the architect of many cities; a 
statement not so well expressed in the authorized version, as it is in tke 
improved one of Bochart, which says: 'From that land Nimrod went 
forth to Asshur, and builded Nineveh, and Rehoboth city, and Calah, 
and Reson between Nineveh and Calah, that is the great city.'"— 
Mackey'g Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Nimrod. 



80 NOACHITE OR PRUSSIAN KNIGHT. 

fixed his residence in that part now called Prussia, where 
he erected a dwelling to shelter himself from the in- 
clemency of the weather, and where he also erected many 
monuments. 

In the year 1553, in digging for salt mines, the work- 
men found the ruins of a triangular edifice 15 cubits 
deep. In the centre of this edifice they found many 
trophies of antiquity : An urn of agate, and many mar- 
ble columns with hieroglyphics engraven thereon. 

The origin of this order, my brother, was long before 
the era of Hiram or Solomonian Masonry ; as every one 
knows that the tower of Babel was built long before the 
temple of Solomon, and in former times it was not 
necessary that a candidate should be a Master Mason to 
be qualified to receive this; for in the times of the cru- 
sades the Knights of the different orders in Europe were 
initiated into this degree by the Christian Princes to 
conquer the Holy Land which was invaded by the Infi- 
dels, as v^ere also the masons descendant from Hiram. 
You are especially charged in this degree, to be mod- 
est and humble, and not vain-glorious nor filled with 
self-conceit. Be not wiser in your own opinion than the 
Deity, nor find fault with his works, nor endeavor to 
improve upon what he has done. 

Be modest also in your intercourse with your fellows, 
and slow to entertain evil thoughts of them, and reluc- 
tant to ascribe to them evil intentions. 

When a mason hears of any man who hath fallen into 
public disgrace, he should have a mind to commiserate 
his mishap and not to make him more disconsolate. To 
envenom a name by 'libels that already is openly tainted 
is to add stripes with an iron rod to one that is flayed 
with whipping, and to every well tempered mind will 



I 



IKITIATIOlSr. 81 

seem most inhuman and diabolical. 

Even the man who does wrong and commits errors, 
often has a quiet home^ a fireside of his own, a gentle 
loving wife, and innocent children who, perhaps do not 
know of his past errors and lapses, past and long repented 
• of, or if they do, do love him the better, because being 
mortal, he hath erred, and being in the image of God, he 
hath repented. 

That every blow at this husband and father, strikes 
full upon the pure and tender bosoms of the wife and 
those daughters is a consideration that doth not concern 
or stay the hand of the base and brutal informer. 

My brother, if men weighed the imperfections of 
humanity, they would breathe less condemnation. Ig- 
norance gives disparagement a louder tongue than knowl- 
edge does ; wise men had rather know than tell. If we 
even do know vices in men we can scarce show ourselves 
in a nobler virtue than in the charity of concealing them, 
if that be not a flattery, persuading to continuance and 
it is the basest office man can fall into, to make his 
tongue the defamer of the worthy man. 

There is but one rule for a mason in this matter : If 
there be virtues, and he is called upon to speak of him 
who knows them, let him tell them forth impartially, 
and if there be vices mixed with them let him be content 
the world shall know them by some other tongue than 
his; for if the evil doer deserves no pity, his wife, his 
parents or his children, or other innocent persons who 
love him, may. 

Where we want experience, charity bids us think the 
best and leave what we know not to the searcher of 
hearts. For mistakes, suspicions and envy often injure 
a clear fame; and there is least danger in a charitable 



82 KOACHITE OR PRUSSIAN KNIGHT. 

construction. 

And finally the mason should be humble and honest 
and modest toward the Great Architect of the Universe, 
and not impugn his wisdom nor set up his own imper- 
fect sense of right against His providence and dispensa- 
tions, nor attempt too rashly to explore the mysteries 
of God^s infinite essence and inscrutable plans and of 
that great nature which we are not made capable to 
understand. 

Let him not spend his time in building a new tower 
of Babel ; in attempting to change that which is fixed by 
an inflexible law of God^s enactment, but let him, yield- 
ing to the Superior Wisdom of Providence, be content 
to believe that the march of events is rightly ordered by 
an infinite wisdom, and leads, though we cannot see it, 
to a great and perfect result. 

Let him my brother be satisfied to follow the path 
pointed out by that providence, and to labor for the 
good of the human race in that mode in which God has 
chosen to enact that that good shall be effected. And 
above all, let him build no tower of Babel under the 
belief that, by ascending he will mount so high that God 
will disappear, or be superseded by a great monstrous 
aggregation of material forces, or a mere glittering logi- 
cal formula; but evermore standing humbly and rever- 
ently upon the Earth, and looking with awe and confi- 
dence toward Heaven, let him be satisfied that there is a 
real God, a person and not a formula, a father and a 
protector, who loves and sympathizes and compassion- 
ates ; and that the eternal ways by which He rules the 
world are infinitely wise no matter how far they may be 
above the feeble comprehension and limited vision of 
man. 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

NoACHiTE OR Prussian Knight. 

Lieutenant Commander — (Three knocks; 000.) Sir 
Knight Official^ the moon is passing from ns^ the hour 
for this Grand Chapter to close has arrived, give notice 
to the Sir Knights that our labors are about to end. 

Knight Official — (One knock; 0.) Brethren and 
Knights, prepare to close this Grand Chapter; the light 
by which we work is about to be obscured. Let us go 
forth to imitate in our conduct and conversation the 
righteous Patriarch, and thus become true Noachites. 

Lieutenant Commander — True brethren, let us go 
forth and perform these duties. Sir Knight Official 
give notice to the Knights that this Grand Chapter is 
darkened. 

Knight Official — Knights and Brethren, this Grand 
Chapter is darkened and its labors ended. 

Lieutenant Commander — Together, Sir Knights. 

All — (Give the sign.) Peleg, Peleg, Peleg. 

Lieutenant Commander — The light has departed, 
farewell. 



CHAPTER XXXIX 

Twenty-Second Degree ; Knight of the Eoyal Axe 
OR Prince of Libanus."'* 

MARS. 3 

origin: — This degree was established, and added 
thereto, on different occasions. When the cedars of 
Lebanon were cut down for holy purposes, the Sldonians 
were zealous for all holy enterprises. The descendants 
of Japhet cut the cedars for all the holy purposes of the 
temple of Solomon. They were furnished under the 
direction of Prince Herodim.""^ The same nation floated 
the timbers by sea to Joppa, for the temple and other 
buildings at Jerusalem. Solomon was so pleased with 
the fidelity of the Sidonians that he built him a house 

Note 254. — "Knight of the Royal Axe, or Prince of Libanus. The 
22(1 degree of the Ancient and Accepted rite. The legend of this degree 
informs us that it was instituted to record the memorable services 
^'endered to Masonry by the mighty cedars of Lebanon, as the Sidonian 
architects cut down the cedars for the construction of Noah's ark. 
Our ancient brethren do not tell us how the Israelites had the wood 
conveyed to them from the land of promise to the mountains In the 
wilderness. They say, however, that the descendants of the Sidonians 
were employed in the same place, in obtaining materials for the con- 
struction of the ark of the covenant; and also, in later years, for building 
Solomon's Temple; and, lastly, that Zerubbabel employed laborers of the 
same people in cutting cedars of Lebanon for the use of the second 
temple. The tradition adds that the Sidonians formed colleges on Mount 
Libanus, and always adored the G. A. O. T. U."— Macoy's Encyclopaedia 
and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article Knight of the Royal Axe. 

Note 255. — "Heredom. In what are called the 'high degrees of the 
continental Rites' there is nothing more puzzling than the etymology of 
this word. We have the Royal Order of Heredom, given as the ne plus 
ultra of Masonry in Scotland, and in almost all the Rites the Rose 
Croix of Heredom, but the true meaning of the word is apparently 
unknown. Ragon, in his Orthodoxie Maconnique, (p. 91,) asserts that it 
has a political signification, and that it was invented between the years 
1740 and 1745, by the adherents of Charles Edward the Pretender, at 
the Court of St. Germain, which was the residence, during that period, 
of the unfortunate prince, and that in their letters to England, dated 
from Heredom, they mean to denote St. Germain."— Mackey's Encyclo- 
paedia of Freemasory, Article Heredom. 



iNiTiATio:Nr. 85 

of cedar at Lebanon, whither he used to repair yearly to 
visit Prince Herodim. The descendants of the zealous 
craftsmen furnished timber from the same mountains 
for the construction of the second temple; by order of 
Cyrus, Darius and Xerxes under the guidance of Zerub- 
babel. 

This celebrated nation formed in the earliest days a 
college for instructing the people and worshipped the 
Great Architect of the Universe. We are indebted to 
these patriarchs for much knowledge we possess of the 
mysteries of this degree. 

DECORATIONS I — Bodies of this degree are styled col- 
leges/'^ There are two apartments. The first is a plain 
room without any fixed number of lights and represents 
a carpenter's workshop on Mount Lebanon. The second 
is hung with red and lighted by 36 lights, arranged by 
sixes, and each'^six by twos. It represents the Council 
room of the round table. In the center of the room is a 
round table around which the brethren sit. On the altar 
is an open Bible, square and compass and an ajce. 

officer: — Are a Chief Prince, styled Thrice Puis- 
sant, a Senior and Junior Warden, and a Senior and 
Junior Deacon. 

order: — Broad, rainbow colored ribbon, worn as a 
collar; it may be worn as a s^sh from right to left, and 
lined with purple. 

JEWEL : — A golden hatchet, on the top of it a golden 
crown. On the top or end of the handle are the letters 
"N". \ and S. •. initials of Noah and Solomon. On one side 
of the handle the letter L. •. initial of Lebanon; and on 

Note 256.— "The places of meeting in this degree are railed 'Colleges.' 
Thi3 degree is especially interesting to the Masonic scholar in conse- 
quence of its evidewt reference to the mystical association of the Druses, 
whose connection with the Templars at the time of the Crusades forms 
a yet to be investigated episode in the history of Freemasonry."— 
Mackey's Enc7clopae4ia of freemasonry, Article Knieht of the Royal 



86 PRINCE OF LIBANUS. 

that side of the blade, the letters A. -.0. -.D. -.Z. -.N. •. and 
E. \ initials of Adoniram, Cyrus, Darius, Zerubbabel, 
Nehemiah and Ezra. 

On the other side of the handle the letter S. •. initial 
of Sidonias, and on that side of the blade the letters S. *. 
H. -.J. '.M. '.A. '. and B, \ initials of Shem, Ham, Japhet, 
Moses, Aholiab''' and Bezaleel. 

apron: — White, lined and bordered with purple, on 
the middle a round table is embroidered on which are 
mathematical instruments and plans enrolled; on the 
flap is a serpent with three heads. 

TRACING BOARD : — Vicw of the mountains and forests 
of Lebanon;"'' the summit of the mountains covered 
with snow and of the temple erected of its cedars and 
pines. 

workshop: — The Senior Warden presides and is 
styled Master Carpenter, he and all the brethren wear 
frocks or blouses and aprons. 

battery: — Is two; 00. No particular one in the 
workshop. 

Note 257. — "Aholiab was associated with Moses and Be^leel in the 
construction of the Tabernacle in the wilderness. While Bezaleel 
designed and executed the works of art required. Aholiab attended to 
the textile fabrics. He was a Danite of great skill as a weaver and 
embroiderer. Exodus xxv. It is a curious coincidence that both Aholiab 
and Hiram Abif were of the tribe of Dan." — Morris's Masonic Dictionary, 
Article Aholiab. 

Note 258. — "The forests of the Lebanon mountains only could supply 
the timber for the Temple. Such of these forests as lay nearest the 
sea were in the possession of the Phoenicians, among whom timber was 
in such constant demand, that they had acquired great and acknowledged 
skill in the felling and transportation thereof; and hence it wa« of 
such importance that Hiram consented to employ large bodies of men 
in Lebanon to hew timber, ns well as others to perform the service of 
bringing it down to the seaside, whence it was to be taken along t^.o 
coast in floats to the port of Joppa, from which place it could be easily 
taken across the country to Jerusalem. 

The ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite has dedicated to this moun- 
tain its twenty-second degree, or Prince of Lebanon. The Druses now 
Inhabit Mount liCbanon, and still preserve there a secret organization." 
— Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Lebanon, 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

Knights of the Eoyal Axe or Prince of Libanus/'" 

Chief Prince — (Knocks one ; 0.) My brethren the day 
star is risen in the East. It is time to arouse the work- 
men that they may prepare for their labors. Brother 
Senior Grand Warden^ are all the Princes present? 

8enio7' Warden — Thrice Puissant^ they are. 

Chief Prince — Announce to them by brother^ 
through the Junior Grand Warden^ that I am about to 
open this College^ that directions may be given to the 
workmen. 

Senior Warden — Brother Junior Grand Warden^ the 
Thrice Puissant is about to open this College that direc- 
tions may be given to the workmen. 

Junior Warden — Brethren^ you will please take notice 
that the Thrice Puissant is about to open this College 
that direction may be given to the workmen. 

Chief Prince — Brother Junior Grand Warden^ arouse 
the workmen by the usual alarm. 

Junior Warden — (Sounds the bell twice; 00.) 

Senior Warden — (Sounds the bell twice; 00.) 

Chief Prince — ^( Sounds the bell twice; 00.) To- 
gether brethren. 

All — (Give the sign.) 

Chief Prince — The cedars upon Mount Lebanon wait 
to be fitted and this College is open. 

Note 259. — 'Trince of Lebanus, or Knight of the Royal Axe. [Scotch 

Masonry.] — The fourth degree conferred in the Consistory of Princes of 
the Royal Secret, Scotch Masonry, and the twenty-second upon the cata- 
logue of that system. Its historical lectures relate to the Cedars of 
Lehanon, which formed so important a part of the materials for con- 
structing the temples of Solomon and Zerubbabel. (See Cedars.) The 
presiding officer is styled Most Wise. The apron is white. It displays 
a round-table, on which appears various architectural instruments and 
drawings. The jewel is a gold axe, surmounted by a gold crown. On 
one side of the handle are the letters A. B. D. C. D. X. Z. A., and on the 

blade L. S. On the other side of the hnndle are the letters S. N. S. C. 
I. M. B. E., and on the blade S." — Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Articl© 

Vrincd of Lebanus, or Knight of the Rcyal Axe. 



CHAPTER XL 

Twenty-Second Degree ; Knight of the Eoyal Axe 
OR Prince of Libanus/'' 

INITIATION. 

[The candidate is prepared by the Senior Deacon as a 
Prussian Knight ot Eose Croix, with sword, etc., and 
brought to the door of the second apartment in which 
the officers and brethren are seated round the table, on 
which are plans and mathematical instruments and 
knocks two; 00.] 

Junior Deacon — (Opening the door.) Who comes 
here ? 

Senior Deacon — A Worthy Prussian Knight and 
Knight of the Eose Croix, who desires to obtain the de- 
gree of Prince of Libanus. " 

Junior Deacon—^HsiS he received all the preceding 
degrees ? 

Senior Deacon — He has. 

Junior Deacon — Has he proved himself a true 
Knight? 

Senior Deacon — He has. 

Note 260. — "Knight of the Royal Axe. (Chevalier de la royale Hache.) 

The twenty-second degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, , 
called also Prince of Libanus, or Lebanon. It was instituted to record 
the memorable services rendered to Masonry by the 'mighty cedars of i 
Lebanon.' The legend of the degree informs us that the Sidonians j 
were employed in cutting cedars on Mount Libanus or Lebanon for the 
construction of Noah's ark. Their descendants subsequently cut cedars 
from the same place for the ark of the covenant; and the descendants of 
these were again employed in the same oflBces, and in the same place, 
in obtaining materials for building Solomon's Temple. Lastly, Zerub- 
babel employed them in^^-cutting the cedars of Lebanon for the use of 
the second Temple. This celebrated nation formed colleges on Mount 
Lebanon, and in their labors always adored the Great Architect of the 
Universe. I have no doubt that this last sentence refers to the Druses, 
that seciet sect of Theists who still reside upon Mount Lebanon and in 
the adjacent pnrts of Syria and Palestine, and whose mysterious cere- 
monies have attracted so much of the curiosity of Eastern travellers." — 
J^ackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemsisonry, Article Knigjit pf the Royal 



INITIATIOK". 89 

Junior' Deacon — What further claims has he to this 
privilege ? 

Senior Deacon — The claim of birth and rank in Ma- 
sonry. 

Junior Deacon — Let him wait a time with patience 
until the College is informed of his request. (Junior 
Deacon shuts the door.) 

Chief Prince — Brother Junior Deacon^ who seeks ad- 
mission to the College ? 

Junior Deacon — A Worthy Prussian Knight and 
Knight of the Rose Croix^ who desires to obtain the 
degree of Prince of Libanus. 

Chief Prince — ^Has he received all the preceding de- 
grees ? 

Junior Deacon — He has. 

Chief Prince — Has he approved himself a true 
Knight? 

Junior Deacon — He has. 

Chief Prince — What further claims has he to this 
privilege ? 

Junior Deacon- — The^claim of birth and rank in Ma- 
sonry. 

Chief Prince — The claim is not sufficient, but let him 
be admitted. (Junior Deacon opens the door and the 
Senior Deacon conducts candidate to the table.) 

Chief Prince — Is it your desire my brother^ to obtain 
the degree of Prince of Libanus? 

Candidate — It is. 

Chief Prince — We know the ground on^ which you 
claim it, but birth is not regarded here, and rank in Ma- 
sonry does not of itself suffice. We are all workmen in 
our several vocations. You see us now engaged in pre- 
paring plans for the laborers and studying the calcula- 
tions of astronomy. None can by our constitutions, be 
admitted to the high privileges of this degree unless he 
hath first wrought one year in the workshop, and ob- 
tained the unanimous suffrages of the workmen. 

Is your desire for this degree sufficient to induce you 
to lay aside your insignia, your sword and jewels for a 



90 l^RINCE OF LIBANUS. 

time and join the sons of labor ? 

Candidate — It is. 

Chief Prince — Go then my brother, obtain their suf- 
frages and return to us. (Candidate withdraws with 
the Senior Deacon and goes to the door of the first apart- 
ment and gives three or four knocks, the door is opened 
c'.nd they enter. The workmen are hewing, sawing, 
planing, etc., and the master workmen copying designs, 
from a tracing board. As the candidate enters he gives 
one loud rap and the workmen all stop.) 

Master Carpenter — Whom have you there brother 
Senior Deacon ? 

Senior Deacon — A Knight of Rose Croix and Prussian 
Knight, who desires your suffrages that he may obtain 
the degree of Prince of Libanus. 

Master Carpenter — Our suffrages are given to those 
who work. Hath he yet learned to work? 

Senior Deacon — He has not, but desires to do so, and 
for that came hither. 

Master Carpenter — Doth he acknowledge the dignity 
of labor ; and that it is no curse but a privilege for man 
to be allowed to earn his sustenance by the exercise of 
his strong arms and sturdy muscles ?- 

Senior Deacon — He does. 

Master Carpenter — Does he admit that the honest 
laboring man, upright and independent is in nature's 
heraldry the peer of kings, and that no labor, but idle- 
ness, is disgraceful? 

Senior Deacon — He does. 

Master Carpenter— Art thou willing to eat only what 
thou earnest, patiently to receive instructions and to 
recognize and treat these humble workmen as your 
brethren and equals ? 

Candidate — I am. 

Master Carpenter — Then as you were divested of your 
outer apparel upon your first entry into a Masonic lodge, 
divest yourself now of j^our insignia and jewels, and 
put on the apron of a workman. (Candidate puts off 
his regalia, rolls up his shirt sleeves, puts on a car- 



INITIATIOI^. 91 

penter's apron and proceeds^ as directed, to saw a long- 
plank in two^ lengthwise.) 

Master Carpenter — My brother, the saw, the plane and 
the hewing axe, (showing them) are the working tools 
of a Prince of Libanus. 

The Saw symbolizes that steady patience and perse- 
vering determination by which the resolute man makes 
his way to the object of his endeavors, through all ob- 
stacles and teaches us that Masons laboring for the im- 
provement of the world and the great cause of human 
progress, must be content to advance, certainly, though 
never so painfully and slowly, toward success and as 

The Plane cuts down the inequalities of surface, it 
is symbolical of Masonry which cuts off the prejudices 
of ignorance and the absurdities of superstition, and 
aids to polish and civilize mankind. 

The Axe is a great agent of civilization and improve- 
ment. It is the troops armed with that weapon that 
have conquered barbarism. Under its blows the prime- 
val forests disappear and the husbandman displaces the 
hunter. Settled society and laws, and all the arts that 
refine and elevate mankind, succeed the rude barbarism 
of early ages. The axe is nobler than the sword my 
brother. (He is then made to use the plane, and a 
brother brings him a piece of dry bread and a cup of 
water.) 

Master Carpenter — Eat my brother of the laborer's 
food, it is thine own, for thou hast earned it and no one 
suffers because thou dost eat. (He is then made to use 
the axe.) 

Master Carpenter — Brethren, this Knight by his ready 
acquiescence to our customs, has shown a true apprecia- 
tion of the dignity of labor and has cheerfully conformed 
to our customs. 

We may require him to toil with us a year, or, at our 
option, we may at once give him our suffrages. If no 
one wishes otherwise, we will proceed to vote upon his 
request to be admitted among the Princes of Libanus. 
(The vote is taken by ballot and declared clear.) 



92 PRIKCE OF LIBAKUS. 

Master Carpenter — My brother^ you have been duly 
elected to receive this degree. Brother Senior Deacon, 
you will now invest the brother with his insignia and 
jewels and conduct him to the second apartment. (Sen- 
ior Deacon invests him and conducts him to the door of 
the second apartment. Meanwhile the brethren retire 
and dress themselves with the insignia and Jewels of 
this degree.) 

Senior Deacon — (Two knocks; 00.) 

Junior Deacon — (Opening the door.) Who comes 
here? 

Senior Deacon — A Knight of the Rose Croix and 
Prussian Knight who, having wrought cheerfully in the 
workshop and learned the use of the saw, the plane and 
the axe, has received the suffrages of the workmen and 
demands to be received a Prince of Libanus. (Junior 
Deacon shuts the door and says:) 

Junior Deacon — Thrice Puissant, it is a Knight of 
Eose Croix and Prussian Knight, who, having wrought 
cheerfully in the workshop and learned the use of the 
saw, the plane and axe, has received the suffrages of the 
workmen and demands to be received a Prince of Li- 
banus. 

Chief Prince — Let him be admitted. (The three 
principal officers now take their stations; the Junior 
Deacon opens the door and the Senior Deacon enters 
with the candidate and conducts him to the altar.) 

Senior Deacon — Thrice Puissant, I present to you a 
Knight Rose Croix, who has toiled in the workshop and 
received the unanimous suffrages of his brethren. 

Chief Prince — My brother, djo j^ou still persist in your 
desire to enter this association of laborers? 

Candidate — I do. 

Chief Prince — Are you not deterred by the hazard of 
such toil and fare as you experienced in the workshop ? 

Candidate — I am not. 

Chief Prince — Kneel then at this altar and contract 
your obligation. (Candidate kneels on both knees with 
his hands upon the axe and Bible and takes the follow- 



INITIATION. 



93 



ing obligation.) 

OBLIGATION KNIGHT OF THE ROYAL AXE. 

I .... of my own free will and accord, in the presence 
of the Grand Architect of the Univer&e, and this Illus- 
trious College of Princes of Libanus^ do hereby and here- 
on most solemnly and sincerely promise and swear that 
I will never communicate the secrets of this degree to 
any person or persons unless it be to one lawfully enti- 
tled to receive the same. 

I furthermore promise and swear that I will ever 
hereafter use my best endeavors to elevate the character 
of the laboring classes and improve their condition, to 
disseminate the blessings of education among their chil- 
dren and to give to themselves their due and proper 
social and political weight. All of which I promise and 
swear under the penalty of exposure on the highest 
pinnacle of Mount Libanus, there miserably to perish in 
its perpetual snows. So help me God. 

(Chief Prince raises him and invests him with the 
following signs:) 

SIGN. 



Make the motion of 
lifting an axe with 
both hands, and strik- 
ing as if to fell a tree. 

ANSWER. 

Eaise both hands to 
the height of the fore- 
head, the fingers ex- 
tended, and then let 
the hands fall, thus 
indicating the fall of 
a tree. 





Sign, Prince of 
JLibauus. 



Answer to Sign, 
Prince of Libanufl. 



94 PRINCE OF LIBANUS. 




TOKEN. 



Seize each other's hands and 
cross the fingers as a sign of good 
faith. 



battery: — Two equi-timed strokes; 00. 

march: — Three cross steps. 

PASS WORDS : — Japhet, Aholiab, Lebanon. 

SACRED WORDS : — Noah^ Bezaleel, Sadonias. 

Chief Prince — (Invests him with the collar^ apron and 
jewel; explains the initials upon the jewel, and says:) 
The serpent with three heads upon the flap of the apron 
is Idleness^ the body from which issue the three vices 
symbolized by the heads; Drunheness, Impurity and 
Gaming, by which so many youths have been lost and 
so many great nations have sunk into ignoble imbecility 
and shameful bondage. 

Chief Prince — Brother Senior Deacon^, you will now 
conduct the candidate to the post of honor. (Senior 
Deacon seats him on the right of the Thrice Puissant 
who delivers the history.) 

HISTORY. 

My brother, sympathy for the great laboring classes, 
respect for labor itself and resolution to some good work 
in our day and generation, these are the lessons of this 
degree^ and they are purely masonic. 



INITIATION. 95 

Masonry has made a working man and his associates 
the heroes of her principal legend and herself the com- 
panion of Kings. The idea is as simple and true as it 
is sublime; from first and last masonry is work. It 
venerates the Great Architect of the Universe. It com.- 
memorates the building of a temple. Its principal em- 
blems are the working tools of masons and artisans. 
It preserves the name of the first worker in brass and 
iron as one of its pass-words. The master is the over- 
seer who sets the craft to work and gives them proper 
instructions. 

Masonry is the apotheosis of work. It is the hands 
of brave, forgotten men that have made this great popu- 
lous, cultivated world a world for us. It is all work and 
forgotten work. 

The real conquerors, creators and eternal proprietors 
of every great and civilized land are all the heroic souls 
that ever were in it, each in his degree. All men that 
^ever felled a forest tree or drained a marsh, or contrived 
a wise scheme, or did or said a true or valiant thing 
therein. Genuine work alone, done faithfully, that is 
eternal, even as the Almighty founder and world-builder 
himself. 

All work is noble. A life of ease is not for any man, 
nor for any God. The Almighty Maker is not like one 
who in old, immemorial ages, having made his. machine 
of a universe, sits ever since and sees it go. 

Man's highest destiny is not to be happy, to love 
pleasajit things and find them. 

His only true unhappiness should be that he cannot 
work and get his destiny as a man fulfilled. The day 
passes swiftly over and the night cometh wherein no 
man can work. That night once come, our happiness 
and unhappiness are vanished and become as things that 



96 PRINCE OF LIBANUS. 

never were. But our work is not abolished and has not 
vanished. It remains, or the want of it remains for 
endless times and eternities. It is in onr influences 
after death that we are immortal. Labor is the truest 
emblem of God, the Architect and Eternal Maker; 
noble labor which is 3^et to be the King of this Earth, 
and sit on the highest throne. Men without duties to do 
are like trees planted on precipices from the roots of 
which all the earth has crumbled. 

N'ature owns no man who is not also a martyr. She 
scorns the man who sits screened from all work, from 
want, danger, hardship, the victory over which is work, 
and has all this work and battling done by other men. 

And yet there are men who pride themselves that 
they and theirs have done no work, time out of mind. 

The chief of men is he who stands in the van of men, 
fronting the peril which frightens back all others, and 
if not vanquished would devour them. 

Hercules was worshipped for twelve labors. The 
Czar of Russia became a toiling shipwright and worked 
with his axe in the docks of Saardam, and something 
came of that. Cromwell worked, and Napoleon and 
effected somewhat. There is perennial nobleness and 
even sacredness in work. Be he never so benighted 
and forgetful of his high calling, there is always hope 
in a man that actually and earnestly works. In idleness 
alone is their perpetual despair. Man perfects himself 
by working. Jungles are cleared away, -fair seed-fields 
rise instead, and stately citi.es, and withal, the man him- 
self first ceases to be a foul unwholesome jungle and 
desert thereby. Even in the meanest sort of labor the 
whole soul of man is composed into a kind of real har- 
mony the moment he begins to work. Labor is life; 
from the inmost heart of the worker rises his God-given 



INITIATION. 97 

force, the sacred celestial life-essence breathed into him 
by Almighty God and awakens him to all nobleness as 
soon as work fitly begins. 

By it, man learns patience, courage, perseverance, 
openness to light, readiness to own himself mistaken, 
resolution to do better and improve. Only by labor 
will man continually learn the virtues. 

Let him who toils complain not, nor feel humiliated. 
Let him look up and see his fellow workmen there in 
God's Eternity ; they alone surviving there. Even in the 
weak human memory they long survive, as saints, as 
heroes, and as gods they alone survive, and people the 
lUnmeasured solitudes of time. It was well to give the 
earth to man as a dark mass, whereon to labor. It was 
well to provide rude and unsightly materials in the ore 
bed and the forests for him to fashion into splendor and 
beauty. 

It was well, not because of that splendor and beauty, 
but because the act creating them is better than the 
things themselves. Because exertion is nobler than en- 
joyment, because the laborer is greater and more worthy 
of honor than the idler, masonry stands up for the 
nobility of labor. It is Heaven's great ordinance for 
human improvement. It has been broken down for ages 
and masonry desires to build it up again. It has been 
broken dowm because men toiled only because they must, 
submitting to it as in some sort, a degrading necessity 
and desiring nothing so much on earth as to escape from 
it. They fulfill the great law of labor in the letter ; but 
break it in the spirit, they fulfill it with the muscles, but 
break it with the mind. 

Masonry teaches that every idler ought to hasten to 
some field of labor, manual or mental, as a chosen and 
coveted theater of improvement, but he is not impelled 



98 PRINCE OF LIBANUS. 

to do SO under tlie teachings of an imperfect civilization. 
On the contrary he sits down, folds his hands, and 
blesses and glorifies himself in his idleness. It is time 
that this opprobrium of toil were done away. To be 
ashamed of toil, of the dingy workshop and dusty labor- 
field, of the hard hand, stained with service more honor- 
able than that of war ;_of the soiled and weather-stained 
garments on which mother nature has stamped, midst 
sun and rain, midst fire and steam, her own heraldic 
honors; to be ashamed of these tokens and titles, and 
envious of the flaunting robes of imbecile idleness and 
vanity is treason to nature, impiety to Heaven, a breach 
of heaven's great ordinance. Toil of brain, heart or 
hand is the only true manhood and genuine nobility. 
Labor is man's great function, his peculiar distinction 
and his privilege. From being an animal that eats and 
drinks only, to become a' worker, and with the hand of 
ingenuity to pour his own thoughts into ihe moulds of 
nature, fashioning them into forms of grace and fabrics 
of convenience and converting them, to purposes of im- 
provement and happiness, is the greatest possible step 
in privilege. 

What is there glorious in the world that is not the 
product of labor? What is history but its record? 
What are the treasuries of genius and art but its work ? 
What are cultivated fields but its toils ? The busy ma'rts, 
the rising cities, the enriched empires of the world are 
but the great treasure-houses of labour. The pyramids 
of Egypt, the castles, and towers and temples of Europe, 
the buried cities of Italy and Mexico, the canals and 
railroads of Christendom are but tracks all round the 
world of the mighty footsteps of labor. Without it 
antiquity would not have been; without it there would 
be no memory of th^ past and no hope for the future. 



INITIATION. 99 

Even utter indolence reposes on treasures that labor at 
some time gained and gathered. 

He who does nothings and yet does not starve, has 
still his significance, for he is a standing proof that 
somebody has at some time worked. But not to such 
does masonry do honor. It honors the worker, the toil- 
er, him who produces and not alone consumes, him who 
puts forth his hand to add to the treasury of human 
comforts and not alone to take away. It honors him 
who goes forth amid the struggling elements to fight his 
battle and who shrinks not, with cowardly effeminacy, 
behind pillows of ease. It honors the strong -muscle 
and the manly nerve, and the resolute and brave heart, 
the sweating brow, and toiling brain. 

It honors the great and beautiful offices of humanity, 
ananhood's toil and woman's task, fraternal industry and 
maternal watching and weariness, wisdom teaching and 
patience learning; the brow of care that presides over 
the state and many handed labor that toils in workshop, 
field and study, beneath its mild and beneficent sway. 

To aid in securing to all labor, permanent employ- 
ment and its just reward ; to help to hasten the coming 
of that time when no one shall suffer from hunger or 
destitution^ because, though willing and able to work, 
he can find no employment, or because he has been over- 
taken by sickness in the midst of his labor is one part of 
your duties as a Knight of the Royal Axe, and if we can 
succeed in making some small nook of God's creation 
more fruitful and cheerful, a little better and more 
worthy of Him, or in making some one or two human 
hearts a little wiser, more manly, hopeful and happy, 
we shall have done work worthy of ma^ons^ aiid (iQceptf^- 
ble to our Father in Heaven, 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Knight of the Royal Axe or Prince of Libanus. 

Chief Prince — (Knocks one.) Brother Senior Grand 
Warden^ what is the hour? 

Senior Warden — Thrice Puissant, the sun has set. 

Chief Prince — It is time then to call the workmen 
from their labors that they may rest; announce to the 
Princes that this College is about to be closed. 

Senior Warden — Brother Junior Grand Warden, the 
Thrice Puissant is about to close this College of Princes 
of Libanus. You will communicate the same to the 
brethren. 

Junior Warden — Brethren, the Thrice Puissant is 
about to close this College of Princes of Libanus. 

Chief Prince — Brother Junior Grand Warden, you 
will call the workmen from their labors by the usual 
alarm. 

Junior Warden — (Sounds the bell twice.) 

Senior Warden — (Sounds the bell twice.) 

Chief Prince — (Sounds the bell twice.) Together 
brethren. 

All — (Give the sign and answer.) 

Chief Prince — The cedars of Mount Lebanon are 
felled and this College is closed. 



i 



HISTORICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Twentieth, Twenty-First and Twenty-Second 

Degrees. 

Freemasonry a Universal Religion — Satan the Masonic God — 
Puerilities of the Mass, the Pagoda and Lodge — Hum Drum 
Platitudes on Labor 

The Twentieth Degree; Grand MiteTER of All 
Symbolic Lodges ; or Associate Master 
Ad Vitam 
Is another of the Philosophical degrees. 

^Thilosophy and Masonry being one and r]ie same 
principle, have the same object and mission to attain — 
the worship of the Great Architect of the Universe, and 
the disenthrallment of^mankind/^ Mackey. (See Note 
219.) 

Dr. Machey has no superior, if equal, in the thou- 
sands of Masonic writers. And no one can read him 
without believing him sincere. In his article ''Puerility 
of Freemasonry'' {Encyc, p. 618,) he evinces candor, 
strength and learning. He says: — ^^Is it possible that 
scholars of unquestioned strength of intellect and depth 
of science, who have devoted themselves to the stud}'' of 
Masonry and given the result of their learning in 
thousands of volumes, have been altogether mistaken?"* 
{Encyc, p. 618.) 

Let every reader who wishes to know accurately what 
Masonry is memorize and ponder Dr. Maolcey's words 
above given. Its object and mission are '''the worship 
of the Great Architect of the Universe/' Masonry is, 
and claims to be received as a Universal Religion, and in 
this all Masonic writers worth quoting, agree. And 
MaCkey, and the rest, scout ^^Oliver's theory'' that 
"Christ is that Great Architect,'"* as "the narrowest 
Sectarian view/' {Encyc. p. 547.) 

The proofs afforded by this degree that it belongs to 
the Satanic and not to the Christian religion are: 

1st. It is throughout, like a Shaker's dance, Mormon 
Endowment or Popish Mass; a simple human invention 
or contrivance. 

2nd. The long catalogue of moral virtues are simple 
sham pretences. Benedict Arnold and Aaron Burr were 



102 SATAN THE MASOKIC GOB. 

not only Masons, but Masons who were never censured 
by the craft in any lodge. Yet they were profligate in 
morals, and "concerning every good work, reprobate/' 

3nd. This twentieth degree is one compact mass of false^ 
hood and false pretences. Its password, ^^Jeckson,'^ or ''Jaq- 
uesson, (French for the "Son of James") Mackey admits 
(Note 225,) to be proof that Ramsay invented it, to over- 
turn the Protestant throne of William and Mary, and re- 
store the Stuarts who were Papists, who held that Kings 
were not bound to keep their word ("Patriotism and 
Truth,") and that killing Protestant rulers by assassina- 
tion was a virtue. This, was attempted by intelligent and 
capable Papists in the Gunpowder Plot and vindicated by the 
doctrine of the Douay. 

4th. This degree was modified by Mitchell, Dalcho, and 
others, as the Orator^s speech shows, to explain away and 
actually declare previous degrees, which still stand in the 
33° Rite^ to be ^'trifles, gew gaws and absurd or hideous 
mysteries," (read page 58,) to accommodate them to a 
democratic coimtry and taste. 

But remember and read over and again, (Note 219,) 
Mackey's authoritative declaration that the "object and mis- 
sion" of the whole thing is the worship of the Grand Architect 
of the Universe; a religion whose God is the devil, "the God of 
this world,'* who is proHounced by Christ "a liar from the be- 
ginning, and the father of it." 

Twenty-First Degree; Noachite or Prussian 

Knight. 

^^The history as well as character of this degree is a 
very singular one/^ (MacJcey in Note 245.) Language 
needs stronger words than ^Tuerile'* and ^^contempti- 
ble" to characterize it. Masons themselves despise it. 
MacJcey says, in the above note, ^^that it was ever admit- 
ted into the Masonic system is only attributable to the 
passion for high degrees which prevailed in Franee/^ 
* * "This degree was adopted into the Rite of Mis- 
raim, where it is the thirty-fifth." Which Eite of 
Misraim Bedarride (Note 236,) quoted approvingly by 
Macoy, says : — ^'is full of puerilities/' and even Machey, 
with every earthly motive to praise it, says : ''It is not 
absolutely puerile." (Note 246.) 

Whoever runs his eye over its ritual and the notes 
will see that its name is derived from Noah, and its 



PUERILITIES OF THE MASS, THE PAGODA AND LODGE. 103 

substance from the tower of Babel, ages later. It was 
said to be dug up out of salt mines, A. I). .1553 ; and the 
early French writers admit that it originated in 1757. 
{Note 2Jf-5,) CarlyU, whose great popularity rested 
largely on his known and wonderful fidelity to fact, says 
that Frederick the Great of ^Prussia, from whom the 
degree is called ''Prussian Knight,'' while Crown Prince 
was in a lodge a year or two, and ^^socn left off alto- 
gether,^^ and that his picture alone ever presided in a 
lodge. {Note ^^7.) But Frederick, and Voltaire, who 
lived at his court, hated the Bible, and the only con- 
ceivable motive for writing such a degree, was to make 
the Bible history contemptible, by its twaddling legend 
of the Tower of Babel and the travels of Peleg, which so 
nearly resemble the travels of Nephi in the Booh of 
Mormon. 

But if we constantly recur to the authentic utterance 
of Dr. Machey, that 'Hhe mission and object of Masonry 
is the worship of the Great Architect of the Universe/' 
or ''God of this world'' and then consider for a moment 
the nature of the worships now paid to him around our 
globe; we shall see that the endless ''piieriliius'' of 
those worships, so far from being an objection; are a 
double advantage and help to the end sought. The 
frivolity of Masonry keeps sensible but uninformed men 
from fearing it, and brings thousands under its devilish 
-magnetism, who think it must be a harmless thing, and 
Iso venture into it for worldly advantage; while others 
believe in its mysterious power because its legends and 
forms are contemptible ! The mightiest powers on earth 
to manage mind, are in the contemptible "puerilities^^ of 
the mass, the pagoda and the lodge. How insane then 
the talk of the little secrecy of temperance lodges. Poi- 
son enough can be injected through the capillary tube 
of a rattlesnake's tooth, to break down the blood of a 
giant. Who can analyze or measure the invisible, 
intangible essence, by which contagious disease is 
transmitted, or by which the eye of a snake charms 



104 HUM DRUM PLATITUDES ON LABOR. 

birds^ and even men ? And yet does anyone doubt their 
reality or power? The man who enters a secret organi- 
zation^ where the foot of Christ never trod^ enters on 
ground which devils, inhabit, and which angels of light 
shrink from, and from that instant his moral sight 
grows dim, and his conscience grows weak, and he wor- 
ships he knows not what. 

Twenty-Second Degree ; Knight of the Royal Axe 
OR Prince of Libanus. 

The notes show that the Masonic writers are stumped 
and puzzled by this degree. It has no mark of French 
or European origin, and is probably one of* the eiglit 
which the Jew, Morin and his Inspectors added to the 
twenty-five of the Eite of Perfection, which Morin 
brought over to Charleston; and, as Americans were 
generally laborers at that day, this degree was fashioned 
to flatter them, and increase the sale of the 33° Eite. 
Indeed, the bulk of the degree consists of an average 
piece of stump-oratory, made up of the hum drum plati- 
tudes-en labor, written by men who knew only the 
theory of toil. 

But the degree is. steady to the one ''mission and ob- 
ject'' (Machey) of Masonry, ^^the worship of the god of 
this world.'^ No matter what subject is handled, or 
romance invented, this is never forgotten or omitted. 
Hence we are told (p. 88,) that the Sidonians ^Worship- 
ed the Great iVrchitect of the Universe.'' And the 
candidate, who at last is allowed a short oath, is made 
to swear, "in the presence of the Great Architect of the 
Universe,'' that "he will never communicate the secrets 
of this degree," which consist mainly of an average 
stump-speech on labor. So help hinv God! Thus binding 
himself by the oath of God to conceal this worship of 
the devil. The only possible explanation, why the eyes 
of Americans are not opened by such paltering, is, that 
the god of this world blinds the mind of those who 
practice his worship; as the serpent blinds the eyes of 
charmed animals to all objects but itself. {2 Cor. S; 14 
and Jf, 4,) 



CHAPTER XLI 

Twenty-Third Degree or Chief of the Taber- 



nacle.'"' 



^UPftER. IX 

decorations: — Lodges in this degree are styled Hie- 
rarchies. The hangings are white, supported by red and 
black columns, by twos, placed here and there according 
to taste. In the eastern part of the room, a sanctuary is 
separated from the rest of the room by a balustrade and 
a crimson curtain in front of the balustrade looped on 
eacE^side. In the East of the Sanctuary is a throne, to 
which you ascend by seven steps. Before the throne is 
'a table covered with a crimson cloth; on it is a roll of 
the book of the law, and by that a poniard. Above the 
throne is a representation of the ark of the covenant, 
crowned with a glory, in the center whereof is the 
Tetragrammaton in Hebrew characters, and on either 
side of the ark are the sun and the moon. To the right 
of the fir&t table, and more to the West, is the horned 
altar of sacrifices. To the left, and more to the West, 
the altar of perfumes. In the West are two chandeliers, 
each with five branches, and in the East, one with two 

Note 261.=— * 'Chief of the Tabernacle.. The twenty-third degree in the 
Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. It commemorates the institution of 
the order of the priesthood in Aaron and his sons Eleazar and Ithamar. 
Its principal ofiRcers are three, a Sovereign Sacrificer and two High 
Priests, now called by the Supreme Councils of America the Most Excel- 
lent High Priest and Excellent priests, and the members, of the 'Hier- 
archy' or 'Court' as the Lodge is now styled, are called Levites. The 
apron is white, lined with deep scarlet and bordered with red, blue, and 
purple ribbon. A golden chandelier of seven branches is painted or 
embroidered on the centre of the apron. The jewel, which is a thurible, 
is worn from a broad yellow, purple, blue, and scarlet sash from the 
left shoulder to the right hip." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, 
Article Chief of the Tabernacle. 



106 



CHIEF. OF THE TABERNACLE. 



branches. During an initiation, there is a dark apart- 
ment with an altar in the centre of it, near which are 
placed a light and three skulls. In frpnt of the altar is 
a human skeleton. 

OECiCERS : — The presiding officer sits upon the throne. 
He represents Aaron' "" the High Priest or Sovereign 
Grand Sacrificator. The Wardens sit in front of the 
altar and represent his two sons, Eleazar and Ithamar. 
They are styled Excellent Priests and all the other mem- 
bers, Worthy Levites. There are also two Deacons and 
a Captain of the Guards. 

CLOTHING : — The High Priest wears a large red tunic, 
over which is placed a shorter one of white 
without sleeves ; on his head is a close mitre 
of cloth of gold, on the front of which is 
painted or embroidered a Delta enclosing 
the Ineffable name in Hebrew characters. 
Over the dress he wears a black sash with 
silver fringe from which hangs by a red 
rosette a dagger; the sash is worn from left 
to right. Suspended on his breast is the 
Breast Plate. 

The Wardens have the same dress except 
the Delta, on the mitre, and the Breast Plate. 
The Deacons, Captain otthe Guards and the 
Levites wear a white Tunic, cinctured with 
a red belt fringed with gold. From this belt, 
Chief of ^Tab- by a black rosette, is suspended a censer of 
""''' gree. ^^" silver, which is the jewel of this degree. 

APRON : — White, lined with deep scarlet and bordered 
with red, blue and purple ribbon. In the middle is the 
seven-branch candlestick, and on the flap a myrtle tree 
of violet color. 

battery: — ^^Seven, by 00 00 00 0. 

Note 262.— "In the degree of *Chief of the Tabernacle,* which is the 
23d of the Ancient and Accepted Rite, the presiding officer represents 
Aaron and is styled 'Most Excellent mgh Priest.' In the 24th degree 
of the same Rite, or 'Prince of the Tabernacle,' the second officer or 
Senior Warden also personates Aaron,'" — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Free- 
masonry, Article Aaron. 




OPENING CEREMONIES 

Chief o^ the Tabernacle, 

High Priest— {Knocks two and says:) Eleazar, my 
son, what is the hour ? 

Eleazar — My father, it is the hour to replenish the 
fire that burns continually upon the altar of burnt offer- 
ing, and to prepare for the morning sacrifices. 

High Priest — Brother Junior Deacon, what is the 
first care of the Chiefs of the Tabernacle when about 
to convene? 

Junior Deacon — To see that the Tabernacle is duly 
guarded, that none may approach thereto, save those to 
whom its care and services are entrusted. 

High Priest — Attend to that duty and inform the 
Captain of the Guards that we are about to open this 
assembly, to carry forth the ashes from the altar, and to 
prepare for the morning sacrifice, and instruct him to 
see that none approach save those appointed for that 
service lest they die. (Junior Deacon attends to order.) 

Junior Deacon — Most Excellent High Priest, the Tab- 
ernacle is duly guarded and none can approach but 
those who have the proper pass-word. 

High Priest — Eleazar, my son, are all present Chiefs 
of the Tabernacle? 

Eleazar — My father, all present have been initiated 
in the first degree, and know the sacred name of the 
God of Israel of which the letters only can be pro- 
nounced. 

High Priest — ^What is that name? 

Eleazar — The ineffable, at which the fallen afigels 



108 CHIEF OF THE TABERNACLE. 

tremble. 

High Priest — Will you give it to me? 

Eleazar — I cannot, it is forbidden to pronounce it, 
except once each year by the High Priests, and in con- 
formity to the ancient usage. 

Eigli Priest — Pronounce the letters then with Itha- \ 
mar. 

Eleazar— Yodr' 

ItJiamar — He. 

Eleazar — ^Vau. 

Ithamar — He. 

High Priest — Great is Adonai. Ithamar, my son, 
give notice to the Levites that I am about to open this 
assembly, that they may prepare to discharge the duties 
for which they have been set apart. 

Ithamar^-^(As Junior Warden.) My brethren, the^ 
Most Excellent High Priest is about to open this assem- 
bly of Chiefs of the Tabernacle. You will take due 
notice and prepare to discharge your appropriate duties. 

High Priest-— Together brethren, 

All — (Give the sign.) 

High Priest — (Two knocks; 0.) 

Eleazar — (Two knocks; 0.) 

Ithamar — (T'wo knocks; 0.) 

High Priest — (One knock; 0.) I declare this assem- 
bly opoli. 

Note 263.— "Basnagre, (lib., 111., c. 13,) while treating of the Days- 
teries of the name Jehovab among tde Jews, says of this letter. 

"The yod in Jehovah is one of those things which eye hath not seen, 
but which has been concealed from all mankind. Its essence and matter 
are incomprehensible; it is not lawful so much as to meditate upon it. 
Man may lawfully revolve his thoughts from one end of the heavens to 
the other, but he cannot approach that inaccessible light, that primitive 
existence, contained in the letter yod; and indeed the masters call the 
Iptter thought or idea, and prescribe no bounds to its efficacy. It was 
this letter which, flowing from the primitive light, gave being to 
emanations."— Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Artido Yod, 



CHAPTER XUI 



Twenty-Third Degree; or Chief of the Tab- 
ernacle/'* 



INITIATION. ' 

[The candidate represents Eliasaph, the son of Lael. 
the son of Levi. The Senior Deacon, who represents 
Moses, prepares him, by bandaging his eyes, and leads 
him to the door and knocks seven; 00 00 00 0.] 

Junior Deacon — [Kepresenting Joshua, opens the 
door and says :] who comes there ? 

Senior Deacon — Eliasaph, the son of Lael, the son of 
Levi, who desires to be prepared to the service of the 
people of the Lord in the Tabernacle of the congrega- 
tion and to make an atonement for the children of 
Israel. 
I Junior Deacon — Is this an act of his own free will 

rnd accord? ^ 

^ Senior Deacon — It is. 

Junior Deacon — Is he duly pr^3pa^ed and worthy to 
receive so great an honor? 
Senior Deacon — He is. 
Junior Deacon — By what further right does he ex- 

Ncte 264.—" Chief of the Tahernacle. The 23d degree of the An- 
Ancient and Accepted rite. This is the first of a series of three degrees 
giving a full description of the setting up of the Tabernacle in the 
wilderness, its form, materials, furniture, etc., the sacredotal and sacri- 
ficial ceremonies performed by the Priests in their worship of the Deity, 
as described in the instructions delivered to Moses in Exodus xxix and xl. 
The Ceremonies of this degree commemorate the institution of the order of 
the High-Priesthood in Aaron and his sons Eleazar and Ithamar." — 
Maooy'g Encyclopaedia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article Chief of 
the Tahemacle. 



I 

110 CHIEF OF THE TABERNACLE. | 

if 
I 

pect to obtain so great a privilege ? I 

Senior Deacon — Because the Lord has given him and ^ 
those numbered with him, as a gift to Aaron and his ' 
sons fjom among the children of Israel; and he and his 
brethren have been taken by the Lord instead of^ll the 
first-born among the children of Israel. 

Junior Deacon — Let him wait a time with patience 
until the Most Excellent High Priest is informed of his 
request and his answer returned. (Junior Deacon closes 
the door, goes to the East, knocks six and one, the High 
Priest answers them and the same questions are asked, 
and the like answers returned as before.) 

High Priest — Since he comes endowed with these 
necessary qualifications, let him be conducted to the 
cell of probation and purification. (Junior Deacon goes 
to the door, opens it and repeats this order and the Sen- 
ior Deacon conducts him to the darkchamber and seats 
him on the floor in front of the altar and skeleton. 

Sender Deacon — My brother, I leave you for a while, 
and after I retire remove the bandage from your eyes 
and await with patience and fortitude whatever shall 
befall you. (He then retires and the candidate removes 
the bandage. After a little while a loud crash of thun- 
der is heard near the door of the apartment followed by 
a profound silence and then in the profound stillness, 
one cries with a loud voice:) 

First Voice — Korah, Dathan''^'' and Abiram^*"* and^ 
their company have put fires in their censers and laid 

Note 265. — "Dathan. . A Reubenite who, with Korah and Abiram, 
revolted against Moses and unlawfully sought the priesthood. In the 
first chapter of the Book of Numbers, where the whole account is given, 
it is said that as a punishment the earth opened and swallowed them 
up. The incident is referred to in the Order of High Priesthood, an 
honorary degree of the American Rite, which is conferred upon the 
installed High Priests of Royal Arch Chapters." — ^Mackey's Encyclopaedia 
of Freemasonry, Article Dathan. 

Note 266. — "Abiram.. The.mames of Korah, Dathan and Abiram are 
introduced into High Priest Masonry. Abiram was a Reubenite, the son 
of Eliab, who, with Dathan and On, men of the same tribe, and Korah, 
a Levitc, organized a conspiracy against Moses and Aaron, terminating 
in their swift ruin: Numbers xy and xxvi."— Morris's Iffasoniq Dictionary, 
Article AbirAm* 



INITIATION. Ill 

incense thereon and stood in the door of the Tabernacle, 
before the Lord, and the Lord hath done a new thing, 
for the earth hath opened her mouth and hath swal- 
lowed them up, for their presumption, v/ith all that ap- 
pertained to them and they have gone down alive into 
the chasm and the earth has closed upon them and they 
have perished from among the congregation. (Anotlier 
crash of thunder.) 

Second Voice — Flee children of Israel, for there hath 
come a fire from the Lord and consumed the two hun- 
dred and fifty men who offered incense. (Another 
crash of thunder.) 

Third Voice — The children of Israel have murmured 
against the Lord, and against Moses and Aaron for the 
death of Korah and his conipmy, and he hath sent the 
plague upon them and many thousands liave died there- 
of; and the whole people is about to be destroyed. 
(After a profound silence, a light is silently introduced 
into the room, at the bottom of the door, and closed 
again, and a gong is sounded loudly by the door, then 
another crash of thunder, when chains are rattled to- 
gether and dashed on the floor, and groans and cries 
are heard as of persons in great agony ; then the wicket 
is opened.) 

First Voice — Hast thou repented of thy sins? 

Candidate — I have. 

Second Voice — Pray then to the God of Israel for 
mercy and forgiveness, lest he consume thee with fire 
as he hath consumed Nadab and Abihu, the sons of 
Aaron the High Priest. 

Third Voice — (After a^ few minutes.) Hast thou 
bowed thee to the earth and prayed? (If not answered' 
in the affirmative, he is ordered to do so. Then the 
Senior Deacon enters.) 

Senior Deacon — My brother, hast thou heard of the 
awful punishment with which God has visited those 
who not being duly qualified have presumptuously 
intermeddled with holy things? Take heed that thou 



113 



CHIEF OF THE TABERNACLE. 



do not so likewise, for as God has said that no stranger 
not of the seed of Aaron shall approach to offer incense 
before the Lord that he be not dealt with as Korah and 
his companion, even so, if thou approach our mysteries, 
except with a pure heart, thy sins repented of and the 
sincere desire to serve God and thy fellow .man, will 
their fate or a worse overtake thee. Dost thou now dare 
to proceed ? 

CandUaie-—! do. (Senior Deacon siprinkles him 
with water and cuts off a lock of his hair.) 

Senior Deacon — I sprinkle thee with pure water in 
token of that purity of heart and blamelessness of life 
which must hereafter characterize thee as a Levite"" 
without guile, and as I sever 'from thy head this lock 
of hair, even so must thou divest thyself of every selfish 
and sordid feeling and devote thyself hereafter to the 
service of God and the welfare, happiness 
and improvement of mankind. (He then 
clothes him in a white tunic and white 
drawers, puts sandals on his feet and a 
white cloth over his head, covering his eyes 
so as to prevent him from seeing, and leads 
him to the door of the assembly and 
knocks seven; 00 00 00 0. The door is 
opened, he is admitted, the Junior War- 
den meets him, opens his tunic and makes 
the sign of the cross upon his breast.) 

Junior Warden — Upon thy entrance in- 
to this holy place, thou art marked with 
the sign of the cross, which, pointing to 
the four quarters of the compass, is a sym- 

Preparation of Can- 
didate, Chief of the 
Tabernacle Degree. 

Note 267, — "Levites. Those descendants of Levi who were employed 
In the lowest ministerial duties of the Temple, and were thus subordin- 
ate to the priests who were the lineal descendants of Aaron. They 
wefe represented in some of the high degrees." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia 
of Freemasonry, Article Levites, 




INITIATION. 113 

^bol of the Universe of which God is the soul, and it 
teaches you how insignificant is man, and how contin- 
ually he should humble himself in the presence of that 
great feeing who knows his inmost thoughts. (The, Sen- 
ior Deacon now conducts him three times around the 
room, keeping the altar on his right, while the High 
Priest reads:) "* 

High Priest — ^0 mighty and inscrutable being, we 
bow down before Thee as the primitive creator, that 
with a thought didst from thyself utter all the worlds ! 
Eternal Father, of whose thoughts the Universe is but 
a mode ; infinite in attributes, of which each is infinite, 
incorruptible, coeval with time and co-extensive with 
space, the ancient, absolute and sole original existence; 
whose laws of harmony guide the motions of the sun 
and stars. Thou art the all, and in Thee all things ex- 
ist. (At the end of the third circuit, the Senior Dea- 
con halts with him in the East.) 

High Priest — Whom do you bring hither, brother 
Senior Deacon ? 

Senior Deacon — Eliasaph, the son of Lael, whom God 

has given as a gift to thee, and to thy sons from among 

the children of Israel to do the service of the children 

^■of Israel in the Tabernacle of the congregation and to 

*make atonement for the children of Israel. 

High Priest — Hath he prayed in the silence and 
darkness of the cell of probation and purification? 

Senior Deacon — He has. 

High Priest — Hath he heard the thunder of the Lord ; 
1 the roar of the earthquake, and repented of his sins ? 

Senior Deacon — He has. 

High Priest — Hath he been sprinkled with the water 
of purification, and passed through the other necessary 
ceremonies to prepare him to receive the mysteries? 



114 CHIEF OF THE TABERNACLE. 

Senior Deacon — He has. 

High Priest — Hast thou been warned that thou must 
enter here and seek to know our mysteries with a pure 
heart and a sincere desire to serve God and thy fellow- 
men? 

Candidate — I have. 

High Priest — Art thou willing henceforward to de- 
vote thyself to that service ? 

Candidate — I am. 

High Priest — Brother Senior Deacon, you will now 
conduct the candidate to the West and cause him to 
approach the altar by seven ^teps, where he will kneel 
with his wrists crossed upon the bible, square and com- 
pass. (Senior Deacon does so and the members sur- 
round him with their arms crossed on their breasts, 
when he contracts the following obligation: 

OBLIGATION CHIEF OF THE TABERNACLE. 

I . . . . promise and swear never to reveal the secrets 
of this degree to any person or persons except he has 
received all Ijhe preceding degrees, and not unto him 
6t them unless lawfully entitled to receive the same. 

To all of which I do most solemnly swear, binding 
myself under no less a penalty than that of having the 
earth open under my feet and being swallowed up alive, 
like Korah, Dathan and Abiram. So help me God. 

High Priest — My brother, what now dost thou de-^ 
sire ? 

Candidate — Light. 

High Priest — Light is the gift of God, and commonj 
to all men. Brother Senior Deajcon, bring thisj 
brother to light. (Senior Deacon removes the cloth.)-" 

High Priest — Be thou henceforth a son of light ^ 
Arise my brother and receive the signs, tokens and] 
words. 



INITIATIOK. 



115 




SIGN. 



Advance the left foot ; make with the 
right hand the motion of taking the 
Censer, which is supposed to be in the 
left hand. 



Sign, Chief of the 
Tabernacle. 



TOKEN. 



Seize each other by the left elbow 
with the right hand, bending the 
arm so as to form a kind of circle. 




Token,. Chief of TaberDacle. 

battery: — Seven strokes, by six and one, or thus; 
00 00 00 0. 
PASS word: — ^Uriel.'" 

Note 268. — ** An archangel, mentioned only in 2 Esdras. Michael 
Glycas, the Byzantine historian, says that his post is in the sun, and 
that he came down to Seth and Enoch, and instructed them in the 
length of the years and the variations of the seasons. The book of 
Enoch describes him as the angel of thunder and lightning. In some 
of the Hermetic degrees of Masonry, the name, as representing the angel 
of fire becomes a significant word." — Mackey's EncycloDaedia of Free- 
masonry, Article Uriel, 



116 CHIEF OF THE TABERNACLE, 

answer: — The Tabernacle of revealed truth. 

SACRED WORD >Jehovah; never pronounced but spelled* 

High Priest — I accept and receive you my brother, as 
a Levite and Chief of the Tabernacle''' and consecrate 
and devote you henceforth to the service of the children 
of light, and I now invest you with the tunic and belt, 
the jewel and apron of this degree. 

The jewel or censer of silver is ever to remind you to 
offer up unceasingly to God, the incense of good deeds 
and charitable actions, dictated by a pure and upright 
heart. The three colors, crimson, blue and purple, with 
which the white apron is bordered are symbols: 

Eed, of the splendor and glory of God, Blue of his 
infinite perfection, and the Purple of his infinite maj- 
esty and power. 

The seven branch candlestick, upon the apron, repre- 
sents what were anciently known as the seven planets 
or principal heavenly bodies, viz : Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, 
the Sun, Moon, Venus, Mercury and the Seven Angels, 
that the Hebrews assigned to their government, viz : 

To Saturn Michael. 

To Mars Awriel. 

To Moon Saphiel. 

To Jupiter Gabriel. 

To Sun .Zerachiel. 

To Venus Hamaliel. 

The myrtle tree of violet color, embroidered on the 
flap of the apron is a symbol of the immortality of the 
soul. 

High Priest — Brother Senior Deacon, you will now 
seat the brother among the Levites. 

Note 269.— * 'Chief of the Tabernacle. [Scotch Masonry.]— The fifth 
degree conferred in the consistory of Princes of the Royal Secret, Scotch 
Masonry, and the twenty-third upon the catalogue of that system. The 
hangings are white. The historical lectures relate to the establishment 
of the priesthood In the family of Aaron. The officers are three in 
number, a Sovereign Sacrificer and two High Priests. The members are 
styled Levites. The assembly is termed a hierarchy. The apron is 
white, lined with scarlet and trimmed with a ribbon of crimson, blue 
and^ purple. It displays a golden seven branched candlestick : on the 
movable parf Is a violet-colored myrtle. The jewel is a pot of incense. 
Opening hour, the instant of coming to the sacrifice; closing, the consum- 
mation of the sacrifice. "~Morrifl*» Masonic Pictionary, Article Chief of 
the Tabernacle* 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Chief of the Tabernacle. 

High Priest — Eleazar, my son^ what is the hour ? 

Eleazar — The sacrifices are concluded, and the fire 
burns brightly upon the altar of burnt offering. 

High Priest — What now remains to be done? 

Eleazar — To mediate in silence and prepare for the 
duties of the morrow. 

High Priest — That we may retire and do so, let this 
Hierarchy be now closed. Together brethren. 

All — (Give the Sign and Battery as at opening.) 

High Priest — I declare this Hierarchy closed. 



ml 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Twenty-Third Degree^ or Chief of the Taber- 
nacle. 

Lands Men in Pagan Worship — Finite Man and the Infinite God — Satan 
Both Imitates and Resists Christ. 

In this and the two following degrees, we are taken 
back to the Old Testament, where Eamsay, Jesuits, and 
Jews were at home; and the stupendous realities and 
truth of God redeemed the Bite from contempt and dis- 
gust, even though used as Simon the sorcerer wished 
to use the Holy Ghost, for gain. For there is sublimity 
in the name and works of God, even when used in blas- 
phemy and sacrilege. Nadab ajid Abihu fall dead by 
the fiery eye flash of God, while using God's instituted 
worship, as these Masons use his word for worldly ad- 
vantage, and we see here acted over what impressed us 
so solemnly in our childhood when we read and saw 
pictured in the old ''New England Primer'' 

*'Proud Korah's troop" 
**Was swallowed up." 

And we can endure the home made earth-quakes and 
manufactured thunder of this degree, for the sake of 
some glintings of Bible history, which show the fearful 
doom which awaits all impudent cozeners with the 
word and worship of God. The reader need only glance 
at the Ritual and Notes to get the whole drift of the 
degree, which, on page 116, lands us in the pagan 
worship of the heavenly bodies by the "branch candle- 
stick which is God's symbol of a church of Christ. 
{Rev. i, 20.) 

But let us glance at the philosophy of this degree. 

A priest, which word first meant an aged and vea- 



FINITE MAN AND THE INFINITE GOD. 119 

erable man, or father, came to be the man who was a 
day'^i man or intercessor between the family or tribe 
and God. When our race had run down so that "the 
earth was filled with violence/' like the South before 
our slavery war, and had become so corrupt that a 

|i Universal Deluge did not cleanse it ; then Gold insti- 
tuted a pictorial and pantomime worship suited to the 
ignorance of grown-up babes, with the strength and 
passions of men. 

But sin and corruption was not all that kept men 
from God. God was infinite and men infinitesimal. 
The blind worm beneath the sod knows as much of the 

! solar system, and the infinity beyond as a finite sinner 

' knows of the Infinite God. "Touching the Almighty 
we cannot find him out,'' (Job, 37, 23,) is literal verity. 

j But Christ was and is "God manifest" to man, or ''more 
humanof' He ''spake/' and the worlds came. He 
"spake'' to Adam and Eve. Without ceasing to be 
God, he became man, our Prophet, Priest, and King: 
and we know, and can know of God, only what we are 
taught by Christ. And as sin is certain ruin and law 
has no mercy in itself, however "holy, and just and 
good;" Christ, being the same yesterday, to-day and 
forever;" "Eternity, past, present and to come," he 
^ould and did become our Wisdom, Righteousness, 
tSanctification and Redemption. How sin came we 
know not; God if He will may explain that to us in 
Eternity. But we very well know there is sin. And 
the Bible being true, (and if it is not. Masons insult us 
by quoting it,) we know there are devils, and their 
chief is Christ's adversary, rival and antagonist. And 
he is as Christ called him the usurping "Prince of this 
world": and the God of its false worships. And God 
gave by Moses, a law which any one can see is per- 
fect; because that supreme love to God and equal love 
to man would and will perfect our globe, is just as 



120 SATAN BOTH IMITATES AND RESISTS CHRIST. , 

plain as that two halves of an apple make the whole of 
it. And He gave by Moses, not only a perfect law, but 
a perfect Gospel in every lamb on their altars. And 
he gave a human priesthood to apply that law, and ex- 
plain that Gospel. And every one of those priests was 
a fingerpost pointing to Christ. And when they be- 
came corrnpt, Christ Himself came in person. And 
when we crucified Him, He sent ^'another Comforter,'' 
a sweet and Holy Presence or Spirit, whom we could 
not, can not kill; and the chart of the world shows w^hat 
that Hioly Spirit has done, and is doing among the 
nations. 

Now this devil has followed, copied, imitated and re- 
sisted Christ from Eden until nov/! He was a ser- 
pent in. Eden and he has crawled after Christ ever 
since, aping and imitating his methods. He turned 
rods to serpents in Egypt. He has inspired prophets, 
sometimes hundreds to Christ's one ! And since He is 
now come, and ^'hath an unchanging priesthood,^^ we 
need no priest but Him, since He is ready to come at 
call, and the Holy Spirit will show him to us. So 
since Christ there are no priests but usurpers. Every 
Masonic priest is a deviFs counterfeit. When Christ 
began to exercise divine power here, the devil met 
Him and claimed through Him the world's worship. 
That he has been at ever since, and Fl'eemasonry and 
its spawn are the last hope of the devil. He shifts his 
forms, he hides under aliases and changes the fashions 
of his worships. And as Machey says: ^The mission 
and object of Masonry is ''worship'' and it is not the 
worship of Christ. ■ The ^"^Gentiles" (nations without 
Christ) all worship devils. (1 Cor. 10, 20.) The is- 
sue is now joined, and when Christianity throws off the 
worship of Satan the Gospel will subdue the world; 
and 

"Attending Angels, Flioiit for joy: 
"And the bright armies sing 
"Mortals, behold the sacred seal 
•'Of your descending King. 
Glory to God I 



CHAPTER XLIII 

. Twenty-Fourth Degree; or Prince of the 

Tabernacle."'' 

INITIATION. 

SATURN. T;.^ 

decorations: — This lodge is styled a Hierarchy, 
and consists of two apartments. 

FIRST APARTMENT : — ^Proceeds directly into the second 
and is called the vestibule^ where the brethren clothe 
themselves; it is furnished at all points like a Master's 
lodge, but instead of a Bible a roll of parchment repre- 
senting the book of the ^ law lies on the altar. The 

Hebrew letter •> in the east instead of the G. 

SECOND apartment: — Is circular, made so by hang- 
ings. The decorations of this vary as will be stated 
hereafter, according to the three points of reception. In 
the centre is a candlestick with seven branches, each 
holding seven lights. 

dress: — -Blue silk tunic, the collar of which is deco- 
t'ated with rays of gold representing a glory, and the 

f' Wote 270. — "Prince of the Tabernacle. (Prince du Tabernacle,) — 
I'he twenty-fourth degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. In 
^iie old rituals the degree was intended to illustrate the directions given 
Xbr the builf^ing of the tabernacle, the particulars of which are recorded 
In the twenty-fifth chapter of Exodus. The Lodge is called a Hierarchy, 
and its officers are a Most Powerful Chief Prince, representing Moses, 
and three Wardens, whose style is Powerful, and who respectively repre- 
sent Aaron, Bezaleel, and Aholiab. In the modern rituals of the United 
^States, the three principal officers are called the Leader, the High Priest, 
and the Priest, and respectively represent Moses, Aaron, and Ithamar, 
his son. The ritual is greatly enlarged; and while the main idea of the 
degree is retained, the ceremonies represent the initiation into the mys- 
teries of the Mosaic tabernacle. 

The jewel is the letter A, in gold, suspended from a broad crimson 
ribbon. The apron is white, lined with scarlet and bordered with green. 
The flap is sky-blue. On the apron is deleted a representation of the 
tabernacle. 

This degree appears to be peculiar to the Scottish Rite and its modifi- 
cations. I have not met with it in any of the other Rites." — Mackey's 
Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Prince of the Tabernacle, 



122 PRINCE OF THE TABERNACLE. 

body of it is sprinkled with stars of gold. Upon the 
head is a close crown, encircled with stars and sur- 
mounted by a Delta. 

SASH : — Watered scarlet, worn as a collar ; if a sash, 
from left to right. 

'^-t^pron: — White, lined with deep scarlet and bor- 
dered with green, the flap sky bMe. In the middle of 
the apron is a representation of the first tabernacle 
built by Moses. 

jewel:— rs the letter |^ or the letter A/, in gold, 
worn from a collar of crimson ribbon.c 

TITLES : — The Master is styled Thrice Puissant and 
represents Moses. There are three Wardens styled 
Puissant. First Warden represents Aaron, the High 
Priest, and sits in the West; the Second Warden repre- 
sents Bezaleel, and sits in the South; the Third War- 
den represents Aholiab, and sits in the North ; the can- 
didate represents Eleazar, son of Aaron. There are 
besides these two Deacons. 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

Prince of the Tabernacle."* 

Thrice Puissant — Puissant Warden in the North, I 
am about to open this Hierarchy of Princes of the 
Tabernacle, that we may take council for the welfare of 
the order. Are we well quartered so that none save 
those who are entitled to do so can approach the Tab- 
ernacle ? 

AhoUab — ^Thrice Puissant, the Tabernacle is guarded 
on all sides, and we are in security. 

Thrice Puissant — ^Puissant Warden in the West, are 
all present Princes of the Tabernacle? 

Aaron — All are Princes of the Tabernacle, Thrice 
Puissant, and have seen the perfection of the holy 
mysteries of the Hebrews. 

Thrice Puissant — What are the duties of a Prince of 
Ihe Tabernacle? 

Aaron — To labor incessantly for the glory of God, 
fhQ honour of his country and the happiness of his 
l>rethren. 

Thrice Puissant — Puissant Warden in the North, 
whom do you represent? 

Note 271. — '*The presiding oflBcer represents Moses, and is called Most 
Puissant Leader. The second officer represents Eleazar, the High-Priset, 
the son of Aaron. The candidate represents Phinehas, the son of Eleazar the 
High-Priest. Two apartments are required when conferring the degree. 

The hangings are red and black. The jewel is the le'Cler i^, suspended from 
« violet colored watered ribbon'. This degree is most intimately connected 
with, and should be considered a continuation of, that of the Chief of the 
Tabernacle. The especial duties of a Prince of the Tabernacle are to 
ilabor incessantly for the glory of God, the honor of his country, and the 
happiness of his brethren; to offer up thanks and prayers to the Deity in 
lieu of sacrifices of flesh and blood." — Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Dic- 
tionary of Freemasonry, Article Prince of the Tabernacle. 



124 PRINCE OF THE TABERNACLE. 

Alioliab — I represent Aholiab, who aided in tlie 
building of the first Tabernacle. 

Thrice Puissant — How did he labor upon the Taber- 
nacle of the Lord? 

Aholiab — ^As an engraver, beautifying the vessels 
thereof, and as an embroiderer in blue and purple, and 
scarlet and fine linen* 

Thrice Puissant — What does his occupation teach you 
in morals ? 

Aholiab — To engrave upon my heart and ever recol- 
lect the laws of God and the statutes of righteousness, 
virtue and truth, and to make my life beautiful with 
the embroidery of good actions. 

Thrice Puissant — Puissant Warden in the South, 
whom do you represent? 

Bezaleel — I represent Bezaleel, who aided in the 
building of the first Tabernacle. 

Thrice Puissant — How did he labor upon the Taber- 
nacle of the Lord ? 

Bezaleel — In gold, silver and brass, in the cutting of 
stones and in carving wood. 

Thrice Puissant — What does his occupation teach 
you in morals ? 

Bezaleel — Ever to strive to attain perfection, and to 
be patient and persevering in every good work. 

Thrice Puissant — Puissant Warden in the West, 
Most Excellent High Priest, what is your duty in the 
Tabernacle? 

Aaron — To offer up prayers and thanks to the Deity, 
in lieu of sacrifices, and to aid you with my counsel 
and advice. 

Thrice Puissant — It is time to proceed to discharge 
our duties ; aid me Princes to open this Hierarchy. To- 
gether. 



OPENING CEREMONIES. 



125 



All — (Give the second sign.) 

Thrice Puissant — (Seven knocks; 00 00 00 0.) 

Aaron— (SeYen knocks; 00 00 00 0.) 

Bezaleel—{SeYen knocks; 00 00 00 0.) 

Aholiai~(SeYen knocks; 00 00 00 0.) 

Thrice Puissant — I declare this Hierarchy opened. 



I 



CHAPTER XLIV 

Twenty-Fourth Degree; or Prince of the Taber- 

272 

NACLE. 
INITIATION. 

[The candidate is prepared by the Senior Deacon in 
a white tunic without ornaments or insignia, and con- 
ducted into the vestibule and up to the altar, without 
ceremony.] 

Senior Deacon-^BrotheT Eleazar, thou hast been 
chosen to be anointed, consecrated and sanctified to 
minister unto the Lord, in the Priest's office. But be- 
fore thou canst enter upon the mysteries of consecra- 
tion, thou must in the most solemn manner give as- 
surances that no unworthy motive prompts thee to seek 
to know those ancient mysteries which were instituted 
among the Patriarchs and the knowledge of which is 
indispensable to him who would become a Priest in 
Israel. Kneel therefore and place thy hand on the book 
of the law, and make true answers to such questions as 
shall be asked thee. (Candidate obeys.) 

Note 272.— "Prince of the Tabernacle. [Scotch Masonry.]— The sixth 
degree conferred in the Consistory of Princes of the Royal Secret, Scotch 
Masonry, and the twenty-fourth upon the catalogue of that system. The 
historical instructions refer to the building of the tabernacle. The 
assembly is termed a hierarchy. The officers are, a Most Powerful Chief 
Prince, representing Moses, and three Wardens, entitled Powerful, repre- 
senting Aaron, Aholiab and Bezaleel. The apron is white, lined with 
crimson— the movable part sky-blue. It displays, in red, a view of the 
tabernacle. The jewel is the letter A, of gold, suspended from a crim- 
son ribbon. Hours of work, from the first hour of tho organization of the 
hierarchy to the last hour of life,"— Woms's Muom Pfotioiiary, Artiowr 
Prince of the T&henuicle, ^ ! 



INITIATION. 127 

First — Dost thou now, representing Eleazar, the son 
of Aaron, solemnly declare that in seeking to know the 
hidden ancient mysteries, thou art not actuated by any 
spirit of idle curiosity or the pride of knowledge, but 
by a sincere desire thereby to be the better able to serve 
God, your country and your brethren, and more effect- 
ually to labor for the reformation of mankind? 

Candidate — I do. 

Second — In the character of a Chief of the Taber- 
nacle, hast thou earnestly striven to discharge all the 
duties required of thee, and to live worthily, act justly 
and fear God? 

Candidate — I have. 

Third — Hast thou, while a Chief of the Tabernacle, 
done wrong to any one without making reparation as 
far as in thy power ? 

Candidate — I have not. 

Fourth — Dost thou solemnly swear, upon the holy 
book of the law,''^' and with thy heart open before God, 
and all its thoughts legible to him, that these answers 
are true and sincere, without equivocation or mental 
reservation ? If thou dost ; say, I swear and kiss the 
book of the law. 

Candidate — (Kissing the book.) I swear. (Senior 
Deacon raises him and orders him to wash himself in 
the brazen sea, after which he gives him an explanation 
of the furniture of the lodge.) 

Senior Deacon — I am charged my brother, to explain 
to" you the meaning of the several symbols with which 
you are now surrounded. 

Note 273. — "Masonlcally, the Book of the Law is that sacred book 
which is believed by the Mason of any particular religion to contain the 
revealed will of God; although, technically, among the Jews the Torah. 
or Book of the Law, means only the Pentateuch, or five books of Moses. 
Thus, to the Christian Mason, the Book of the Law is the Old and New 
Testaments; to the Jew, the Old Testament; to the Mnsselman, the 
Koran; to the Brahman, the Vedas; and to the Parsee, the Zendavesta." 
— Mackey's E^ncyclopsedia of Freemasonry, Article Book of tbQ X*«^W. 



128' 




Tije Triangle, 



PRINCE OF THE TABERNACLE. 

THE TRIANGLE :— With the letter 

Yod in the center, suspended in the 
East, is an emblem of the Deity and 
of equity, because its sides are equal 
and it is the first perfect figure that 
can be formed with straight lines. 



THE SQUARE. '" 

Upon the altar is an emblem of 
rectitude of intention and action, 
and obedience to constituted author- 
ity. 



li!ii.!iiiTiiiTii,T,hT.l.T>i.r,i1.i.liT\ 




Square. 



27C 



THE compasses: 

Of command of the motion of the 
heavenly bodies, of harmony and ofj 
eternity. ^ ^ | 



THe Compassef » 



Within the square ^«^f , \l^^%^i"Xees ^e r^^^^^^ ^" ^ great light, and tWl 
must at all times, aud in ^^J^ P^^^i^'j^^ "^^d by this light to do his duty to' ( 

cente? Of the lodge, its points being towards ^he^^^es ^^ ^.^^^^g.ribingl 
m?de to represent a gradation Its lesson is e^^ .^ ^^^,1 

Sfpassions-a sublime inculc^^^^^^^ at hs Tn- 

more prominent Part. It tf^^^^g.^to ^^^res to his station, that rising U 
stallation 'that he ^^ou^^ ^im^t^ hi^s^^d^^^^ ^^^ ^.^ regrettea.' "-Mom. < 



INITIATION, 129 

THE THREE LIGHTS:"' — On the East^, West and 
South of the altar^ represent the summer ^olstice^ and 
the vernal and autumnal equinoxes. 

THE TWO columns: — Represent those erected by 
Enoch to perpetuate the history of the times before the 
flood. 



THE PLUMB. "^ 

Is a symbol of decision^ firmness and inde- 
pendence ; of truth and straightforward sim- 
plicity. 
Plumb. 



Note 276. — "Three. Everywhere among the ancients the number' 
three was deemed the most sacred of numbers. A reverence for its mystic 
cal virtues is to be found even among the Chinese, who say that num- 
bers begin at one and are made perfect at three, and hence they de- 
note the multiplicity of any object by repeating the character whicl^ 
stands for it three times. In the philosophy of Plato, it was the image 
,vf the Supreme Being, because it includes in itself the properties of the 
mo first numbers, and because, as Aristotle says, it contains within 
itself a beginning, a middle, and an end. The Pythagoreans called it 
:>erfect harmony. So sacred was this number deemed by the ancients 
:hat wo find it -designating some of the attributes of almost all the 
Cods. The thunder-bolt of Jove was three-forked; the sceptre of Neptune 
.vas a trident; Cerberbus, the dog of Pluto, was three-headed; there 
were three Fates and three Furies; the sun had three names, Apollo, Sol, 
and Liber; and the moon three also, Diani, Luna, and Hecate. In all 
incantations three was a favorite number, for, as Virgil says, *numero 
Deus imparl gaudet,' God delights in an odd number." — Mackey's Ency- 
dopgedia of Freemasonry, Article Three. 

* Note 277. — "In the scriptures the Plumb-Line is emblematic of regular 
rule; hence, to destroy by line and plummet, as in Amos vii.. is under- 
stood, a regular and systematic destruction. Such had nearly been the 
fate of the Masonic institution in the United States, conse^ent upon 
political anti-Masonry, 1826-1836."— J^orris,' a JiIasQilic Dictionary, ArticlQ 



130 



PRINCE or THE TABERNACLE. 




THE LEVEL 



278 



Is a symbol of equality and equa- 
nimity and teaches us that all men 
are equal in the sight of God and in 
the mysteries. 



THE BLAZING STAR 



279 



The Blazing Star. 



Eepresents Sirius^ the dog star, 
announcing the approach of the 
inundation of the Nile^ to the 
fore-fathers of the Hebrews when 




The Rough Stone. 



THE ROUGH STONE. 

Eepresents the profane, who 
are ignorant of its mysteries. 

Note 278. — "Level. In Freemasonry, the level is a symbol of equality; 
not of that social equality, which would destroy all distinctions of rank 
and position and beget confusion, insubordination and anarchy, but of 
that fraternal equality which, recognizing the fatherhood of God, admits 
as a necessary corollary, the brotherhood of man. It, therefore, teaches 
us that, in the sight of the Grand Arohitest of the Universe, his 
ereatures, who are at an immeasurable distance from him, move upon 
the same plane; as the far-moving stars, which though millions of 
miles apart, yet seem to shine upon the same canopy of the sky. In 
this view, the level teaches us that all men are equal, subject to the same 
infirmities, hastening to the same goal, and preparing to be judged by 
the same immut^^able law." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, 
Article Level. 

Note 279. — "Blazing Star. The blazing star must not be considered 
merely as the creature which heralded the appearance of T. G. A. O. 
T. U., but the expressive symbol of that Great Being himself, who is 
described by the magnificent appellations of the Day Spring, or Rising 
Sun; the Day Star; the Morning Star, and the Bright, or Bluzing Star. 
This, then, is the supernal reference of the Blazing Star of Masonry.- 
attached to a science which, like the religion it embodies, is universal 
and applicable to all times and seasons, and to every people that ever 
did or ever will exist on our ephemeral globe of earth." — Macoy's Ency- 
clopoedia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article Blazing Star. 

Note 280. — " In Speculative Masonry we adopt the ashlar in two dif- 
ferent states, as symbols in the Apprentice's degree. The Rough Ashlar, 
or stone, in its rude and unpolished condition, is emblem«tir' of man in 
his natural state — ignorant, uncultivated, and vicious."— Mackey's Ency- 
clopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Ashlar* 



&. 




INITIATION. 131 

THE PERFECT CUBE."'' 

Is a symbol of the enlightened, to 

whom they are known. (Senior Dea- 

„ , , ^ ^ con now blinds him and leads him to 

The Perfect Cube. 

the door of the second apartment, which is now hung 
with scarlet; and around in front of the hangings are 
twelve columns, each having painted on it in brilliant 
letters, one of the signs of the zodiac, which follow each 
other in regular order as follows:) 

Thrice Puissant — As Moses in the East, clothed with 
all the insignia, between the columns, on which are the 
siffns TaurusS and Aries. T 

Aaron — In the West, between the columns on which 
are the sign-s Libra=^ and Scorpio. TTi 

Bazaleel — In the South, between the columns on which 
ar'e the signs CapricornusV3 and Aquarius..^ 

Aholiab — In the North, between the cohmms on which 
are^tIie signs Cancer^ and Leo. ft In the centre of the 
room, by the chandelier, is a triangular altar, to which 
candidate is now led when the Senior Deacon knocks 
seven; 00 00 00 0. 

Junior Deacon — (Opening the door.) Who seeks 
admission to this inner chamber of the mysteries ? 

Senior Deacon — Eleazar, the son of Aaron, who hav- 

ng been appointed to minister unto Geftl in the Priest's 

office, desires first to know the mysteries and receive 

the indispensable degree of Prince of the Tabernacle. 

Junior Deaco^i — Has he attained the degree of Chief 
of the Tabernacle ? 

Senior Deacon — He has. 

Junior Deacon — In that character has he earnestly 

Note 281. — "Cube. The cube is a symbol of truth, of wisdom, of 
moral perfectiou. The New jGrusulem promised \>\ thc^ Apoculj^pse is 
equal la length, breadth, and height," — Macoy^ Encyclogeeclia and Dic« 
tiooary ai Freemasouxy, Article Cuhe* 



132 PRINCE OF THE TABERNACLE. 

\ 

striven to discharge all the duties required of him, and 
to live worthily, act justly, and fear God? ; 

Senior Deacon — He has. 

Junior Deacon — Has he, while such, done wrong to 
any one, without afterwards making reparation as far 
as has been in his power ? 

Senior Deacon — He has not. 

Junior Deacon — Eleazar, art thou actuated in seek- 
ing to know the mysteries by a sincere desire to bej 
thereby better able to serve God, your country and your| 
brethren, and more efficiently to labor for the great 
good of man? 

Candidate — I am. 

Junior Deacon — Art thou not induced to come hithePv. 
through idle curiosity, or the pride of knowledge and a 
desire to become superior to thy brethren and fellows? 

Candidate — I am not. 

Junior Deacon — Brother Senior Deacon, by what 
further right does he expect to gain admission here? 

Senior Deacon — By the sacred word. 

Junior Deacon — Has he the sacred word? 

Senior Deacon — He has. 

Junior Deacon — Let him give it. 

Senior Deacon — He cannot, except with our assist- 
ance. 

Junior Deacon — Let him begin then. 

Candidate — Yod: 

Senior Deacon — He. 

Junior Deacon — Vau. - 

Candidate — He. 

Junior Deacon — The word is right, let him wait un- 
til the Thrice Puissant is informed of his request. 
(Junior Deacon closes the door, goes to the center of 
the circle and gives the battery. The ^Thrice Puissant 
an§;wers it and the same questions are asked and the 
like answers returned, as at the door,) 



INITIATION. 133 

Thrice Puissant — Brother Junior Deacon^, has the 
candidate the sacred word? 

Junior Deacon— -lie has^ Thrice Puissant. 

Thrice Puissant — You will retire and let him enter 
and be received in due form. (Junior Deacon goes to 
and opens the door.) 

Junior Deacon— It is the order of the Thrice Puis- 
sant, that he enter and be received in due form* 
(Senior Deacon enters with him and conducts him 
within the circle, then the Junior Deacon stops him, 
bares his right arm, holds a lighted candle near enough 
to it to cause him to feel the heat, and says:) 

Junior Deacon — I test thee by fire"'^ and let this 
present pain ever remind you that he who rashly as- 
sumes to perform office for which he is unfit, deserves 
the fate of Nadab and Abihu, w^ho were consumed by 
fire from heaven when they offered strange fire before 
the Lord in the wilderness of Sinai. (Senior Deacon 
then conducts him slowly three times around the 
room.) 

Thrice Puissant — And the Lord spake unto Moses, 
saying : Bring the tribe of Levi near and present them 
before Aaron the Priest, that they may minister unto 
him, and they shall keep his charge and the charge of 
,^ the whole congregation before the ^Tabernacle of the 
congregation, to do the service of the Tabernacle. And 

Note 282. — "The purifying power of fire is naturally deduced from this 
symbol of the holiness of the element. And in the high degrees of Masonry, 
as in the ancient institutions, there is a purification by fire, coming 
down to us insensibly and unconsciously from the old Magian cultus. In 
the Mediaeval ages there was a sect of 'fire philosophers' — philosophi per 
ignem — who were a branch or offshoot of Rosicrucianism, with which Free- 
masonry has so much in common. These fire philosophers kept up the 
veneration for fire, and cultivated the 'fire-secret,' not as an idolatrous 
belief, but modified by their hermetic notions. They were also called 
'theosophists,' and through them, or in reference to them, we find the 
theosophic degrees of Masonry, which sprang up in the eighteenth cen- 
tury. As fire and light are identical, so the fire, which was to the 
Zoroastrians the symbol of the Divine Being, is to the Mason, under the 
equivalent idea of light, the symbol of Divine Truth, or of the Grand 
Architect." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Fire- Wor- 
ship. 



IM PRINCE OF THE TABERNAGLE. 

they shall keep all the instnimenis of the Tabernacle of 
the congregation, and the charge of the children of 
Israel, to do the service of the Tabernacle. And thou 
shalt give the Levites tinto Aaron, and to his sons ; they 
are wholly given unto him, out of the children of is- 
tael. And thou shalt appoint Aaron and his sons ; and 
they shall wait on their Priest's office, and the stranger 
that Cometh nigh shall be put to death. (Candidate 
halts in the South in front of Bezaleel, who pours a 
small quantity of water on his head.) 

Bezaleel — Thou hast reached the South, I test thee 
with water, the second test. Let it ever remind thee 
that none but the pure of heart can be admitted to the 
Holy Tabernacle in the heavens. (Senior Deacon con- 
ducts him slowly three times around the room.) 

Aaron — ^^At the door of the Tabernacle of the con- 
gregation, I wiir meet with the children of Israel and I 
will sanctify the Tabernacle of the congregation and 
the altar; I will sanctify also both Aaron and his sons 
to minister to me in the Priesfs office, and I will dwell 
among the children of Isra^^l and I will be their God, 
and they shall know that I am the Lord their God that 
brought them forth out of the land of Egypt, that I 
might dwell among them, I the Lord their God. (Can- 
didate halts in the West in front of Aaron, who causes 
him to kneel on some sand and gravel.) 

Aaro7i — Thou hast reached the West, I test thee with 
earth. It is the common mother, and to it, our frail 
bodies return. It is well to kneel upon its bosom when 
we implore the mercy and forgiveness of God. Let the 
beneficence of the earth, which produeeth liberally and 
generously, even for the unworthy, teach thee generos- 
ity and that the open hand is a fit companion of the 
pure heart. (Senior Deacon then conducts him slowly 
three times around the room.) 



I 



INITIATION. 135 

Bezaleel — Ye shall do no unrighteousness in judg- 
ment.. Tiiou shalt not respect the person of the poor, 
nor honor the person of the mighty. In righteousness 
shalt thou judge thy neighbor. Thou shalt not hate 
thy brother in thy heart. Thou shalt not seek revenge, 
nor bear ill-will against the children of thy people, but 
thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself. (Candidate 
halts in the East at the station of the Thrice Puissant. 
The members with fans make a wind about him while 
he is thus addressed:) 

Thrice Puissant — Thou hast reached the East; I test 
thee with air/'' the life of all men; the free inestimable 
gift of God. Like him, it is mighty, but invisible ; like 
him it blesses us ever. Be thou liberal and generous as 
the air, for it God freely gives thee light and air, and 
asks in return nothing but gratitude and whispered 
thanks, thou mayest well afford to share thy plenty with 
thy destitute, afflicted and unfortunate brethren. 

Thrice Puissant — Brother Senior Deacon, whence 
come you? 

Senior Deacon — Out of darkness. 

Thrice Puissant-^And whither go you? 

Note 283. — ''Elements. It was the doctrine of the old philo«;cphles, 
sustained by the authority of Aristotle, that there were four principles of 
matter — fire, air, earth, and water — which they called elements. Modern 
science has shown the fallacy of the theory. But it was also taught by 
the Kabbalists, and afterwards by the Rosicrucians, who, according to 
the Abbe de Villars (Le Gcmte de Gabalis)," peopled them with super- 
natural beings called, in the nre, Salamanders; in the air. Sylphs; in the 
earth. Gnomes; and in the water. Undines. From the Rosicrucians and 

the Kabbalists, the doctrine passed over into some of the high degrees 
of Masonry, and is especially referred to it the Ecossais or Scottish 
Knight of St. Andrew, originally invented by the Chevalier Ramsay. 
In this degree we find the four angels of the four elements described as 

Ardarel, the angel of fire; Casmaran, of air; Talliaad, of water; and 
Furlac, of earth; and the signs refer to the same elements." — Mackey's 
Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article i;iements. 



136 PRINCE OF THE TABERN-ACLE. 

Senior Deacon — To the East, the place of light and 
cradle of the mysteries/^* 

Thrice Puissant — Thou art already there, what is 
thy desire? 

Senior Deacon — That this candidate may go the way 
that we have gone before him. 

Thrice Puissant — The soul is immortal, but for the 
body, life comes only out of death.""^ If he would see 
the light, conduct him to the holy altar and let him 
there assume the obligation. Senior Deacon conducts 
him to the West and causes him to advance by six (6) 
equal and one (1) long step, when he kneels and with 
his hands upon the book of the law, contracts the fol- 
lowing obligation. 

OBLIGATION PRINCE OF THE TABERNACLE. ' 

I. . . .do solemnly promise and swear, never to reveal 
the secrets of this degree to any person or persons, ex- 
cept he has received all the preceding degrees, and not 
unto him or them unless lawfully entitled to receive the 
'Same. 

I furthermore promise and swear that I will stand to 
and abide by the laws, statutes and regulations of this 

Note 284. — "Mysteries, Ancient. Each of tho Pagan gods, says War- 
burton (Div. Leg,, I., ii. 4), had, besides the public and open, a secret 
worship paid to him, to which none were, admitted but those who had been 
selected by preparatory ceremonies cal)td Initiation. This secret worship 
was termed the Mysteries. And th*^ is supported by Strabo (lib. x., 
cap. 3), who says that it was common, both to the Greeks and the 
Barbarians, to ^perform their religious ceremonies with the observance of 
a festival, and that they are sometimes celebrated publicly and some- 
times in mysterious privacy. Noel (Diet, de la Fable) thus defines them: 
Secret ceremonies which were practiced in honor of certain gods, and 
whose secret was known to the initiates alone, who were admitted only 
after long and painful trials which it was more than their life was 
worth to reveal." — Mackey's Encyclopeedia of Freemasonry, Article Mys- 
teries, Ancient, 

Not© 285. — "The ceremonies of initiation were, all funereal in their 
character. They celebrated the death and the resurrction of some cher- 
ished being, either the object of esteem as a hero, or of devotion as a 
god. ^'Subordination of degrees was instituted, and the candidate was .|1 
subjected to probations, varying in their character and severity; the ij 
rites were practiced in the darkness of night, and often amid the gloom 
of impenetrable forests or subterranean caverns; and the full fruition 
of knowledge, for which so much labor was endured, and so much danger 
incurred, was not attained until the aspirant, well tried and thoroughly 
purified, had reached the place of wisdom and of light." — Mackey's En- 
cyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Mtysteries, Ancient. 



i:n'itiatio]S'. - 137 

Hierarchy of Princes of the Tabernacle^ also the stat- 
utes and regulations of the Supreme Council and Sov- 
ereign Grand Consistory of the United States of Amer- 
ica, their territories and dependencies and of the Grand 

Consistory of the State of so long as I remain 

within its jurisdiction. 

To all of which I do most solemnly swear, binding 
myself under no less a penalty that to be consumed with 
fire from heaven, like Nadab and Abihu and that my 
ashes should be flung into the air and blown to the four 
corners of the earth by the wind. So help me God, 
(After the obligation he is brought to light and the 
Thrice Puissant takes in his left hand a small vessel of 
perfumed oil and says:) 

Thrice Puissant — I will sanctify the Tabernacle of 
the congregation and the altar, I will sanctify also both 
Aaron and his sons to minister to me in the Priest^s 
office. In the Tabernacle of the congregation, without 
the veil, which is before the testimony, Aaron and his 
sons shall order it from evening to morning before the 
Lord. It shall be a statute forever unto their genera- 
tions on behalf of the children of Israel, and thou 
shalt anoint Aaron and his sons and consecrate them 
that they may minister unto me in the Priest's office. 
(He then pours oil on his head, saying:) 

Thrice Puissant — Eleazar, son of Aaron, I do anoint 
thee and consecrate thee to the service of truth and vir- 
tue, w^hich is the service of the Lord, to minister unto 
him and unto thy fellow men in this world, which is 
his truest tabernacle and temple. (He then takes a 
small vessel filled with red liquid, and with a small 
brush saying:) 

Thrice Puissant — With the blood of a ram slain for 
a burnt offering, I touch the tip of thy right ear, 
(touching it) the thumb of thy right hand, (touching 
it) and the great toe of thy right foot, (touching it) 



138 



PRINCE OF THE TABERNACLE. 



and with th'e same blood I sprinkle thy garments, 
(sprinkling them) and do sanctify thee and them^ 
Thine ear is hereafter to be ever open to the cry of 
distress, the prayer of want, the moan of suffering, the 
supplication of the penitent and the call of duty. Thy 
hand is henceforth to be opened wide in charity and 
ready to labor in every good work. And thy feet are to 
stand firmly wherever duty places thee, however dan- 
gerous the post f nor ever to slide upon the slippery 
paths of temptation. Arise my brother Eleazar. (Can- 
didate rises and the Thrice Puissant invests him with ■ 
the following signs, grip and words, and with the in- ' 
signia and jewel.) 




SIGN OF RECOGNITION. 

Place the right hand open over the eyes, 
as if to protect them from a strong light, 
the left hand on the breast, then raise the 
right hand to the left shoulder, and bring| 
it down diagonally to the right side. This 
is called the sign of the scarf. 



Sign of Recognition, 
iPrince ol the Tabernacio 



INITIATION. 



139 




GRAND SIGN. 

Place both hands open upon the 
head, join the two thumbs and the 
two forefingers by their extremities 
so as to form a; triangle. 

N. S.— The token, battery and 
word, are the same as in the preced- 
ing degree. 



Grand Sign, Prince 
of the Tabernacle. 

MARCH : — Six equal steps and one longer, total seven 
steps. 

Thrice Puissant — Brethren, behola a new Prince of 
the Tabernacle, to be instructed and prepared to fulfill 
all his duties as a Prince of well doers in this Taber- 
nacle of clay, that he may be raised on the great day of 
account, a shining monument of God's glory in the 
tabernacle^ not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. 
^ (Thrice Puissant resumes his station and if there is 
uo business, closes the Hierachy.) 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Prince of the Tabernacle. 

Thrice Puissant — Puissant Warden in the West^ what 
is the hour ? 

Aaron — Thrice Puissant, it is time for the evening 
sacrifices. 

Thrice Puissaiit — If so, it is time to close this Hier- -I 
archy. Together Princes. 

All — (Give the Grand Sign.) 

Thrice Puissant — Knocks seven; (00 00 00 0.) 

Aaron — (Knocks seven; 00 00 00 0.) 

Bezaleel— (Knocks seven; 00 00 00 0.) 

4/io/ia&— (Knocks seven; 00 00 00 0.) 

Thrice Puissant — I declare this Hierarchy of Princes 
of the Tabernacle closed. 

Signs Hieroglyphiques, Princes du Tabernacle 

AAAAAAVVVV^ 

^ t> c (1 e f if h i k I 



A AAA AAA WW 

q r 



wi r» « P <l r St u V 4' 



y ? 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Twenty-Fourth Degree or Prince of the 
Tabernacle. 

'Zodiacal Signs a Heathen Invention — Masonic Baptsim a Heathen Rite — • 
Freemasonry Simple Heathenism — governed by the Terrors of a Secret 
Clan. 

Proofs afforded by this degree that Freemasonry is 
vulgar, debased heathenism: 

Proof First, Its oath (which makes the Mason) is 
sworn on the ''Holy Book of the Law/' which, Mackey 
says, "Masonically/' means the Sacred Book of any and 
every religion on earth. (See Note 273.) This in- 
cludes not only the Books of Curious Arts (Acts 19, 19) 
and the "Book of Mormon/' which sanctions polygamy 
and despotism, but the Gree Gree-Eitual, sworn upon 
in African lodges, which practice whoredom, human 
sacrifice and cannibalism. 

Proof Second. The second apartment of the lodge- 
room of this degree is surrounded with twelve pillars, on 
phich are painted the twelve signs of the Zodiac, with 
Ian officer stationed between two signs; as Moses be- 
tween Taurus and Aries; the Bull and the liam, and 
so on. And these signs, used in consecrating a priest 
of all the religions of the world, have a religious, net 
an astronomical, significance. These signs were in- 
vented by Egyptian priests who practiced brute-worship 
and brutalized Egypt till it became, as the Bible pre- 
d'icted: ''the basest of the kingdoms'' (Ezek. 29, 15), 
as it is at this day. The Egyptians worshiped the ani- 



142 MASONIC BAPTISM A HEATHEN RITE. 

mals whose, names they gave to the twelve signs of the 
Zodiac, and transferred them to the heavens, and wor- 
shipped them still. McClenachans hook of the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite, page 558, says: "This 
-^ite (Baptism) has come to ns by legitimate transmis- 
sion * * * jj^ ^j^g simple sense in which it was 
used in the land watered by the Nile, before the build- 
ing of the^Pyramids.^^ And "The Ceremony of Bap- 
tism'' occupies twenty-one pages in this "Book of the 
Eite.'' If this does not identify Masonic baptism with 
the religion of Egyptian brute-worship, language has no 
meaning. 

Proof Third. Commenting on The Three Lights, 
{Ritual, p, 129, Note 276) Mackey says: "The sun 
has three names, and the moon three also. And in all 
incantations, three was a favorite number.'' Incanta- 
tion was raising devils by magic. And seeking knowl- 
edge and power from devils is worshiping them. If 
Dr, Mackey intended to identify Masonry with sun, 
moon and demon worship, the above is the language he 
would use. 

Proof Fourth. Macoy (Note 279) gives Christ's 
appellations: "Morning Star," "Rising Sun," "Day 
Star," etc., to Satan, the God of all Gentile or heathen 
worships: under the title of the G. A. 0. T. U,, who is 
neither Father, Son, nor Holy Ghost, but the "prince," 
and "god of this world." 

Proof Fifth. And Mackey, the lexicographer, and 
jurisconsult of Masonry, expressly declares it to be mag- 
ical or heathen 'worship, thus : "In the high degrees 
of Masonry, as in the ancient institutions, there is a 
purification by fire coming down to us insensibly and 
unconsciously from the old Magian cultus." (Note 
282.) "Cultus" is the Latin for ivorship. These 
proofs might be extended indefinitely. And if they do 
not establish, by Masonic authorities, that Freemasonry 






l^REEMASONRY- SIMPLE HEATHENISM. 143 

is "^^vulgar, debased heathenism/' then Egyptian brute- 
worship, sun and moon-worship, fire-worship and all the 
rest, are not heathenism. To call it "philosophy'^ is to 
ilisult civilization, reason and religion. 

The uniform, universal declaration of Masonic writ- 
ers that '''Masonry is the religion in which all mankind 
agree/' and that dictum of Dr, MacJcey, that ''The mis- 
sion and ohject of Masonry is the worship of the Great 
Architect/' etc., who is neither Father, Son nor Holy 
Ghost^ settles it : if authority can settle anything ; tjiat 
Freemasonry is simple heathenism. And "A heathen 
man,'' by Christ's word, was to be an outcast from the 
church (Matt. 18^ i7j, and reason, observation and 
common sense affirm the same. 

Hence this twenty-fourth degree employs the names 
of the men of God, and the terms of the Bible, to conse- 
crate priests for the devil ! And .as there are no human 
priests since Christ, "who hath an unchangeable priest- 
hood" {Heh. 7, ^^), to make a priest of any one religion, 
is to make a counterfeit. But this degree makes a 
universal priest ! A priest of all the religions on earth ! 
And if this degree has done its full work in him, his 
heart contains all the priestly depravity from Cain in 
Eden to the Mormon at Salt L^ke. And history as 
well as theory proves it. And wKen Aaron Burr brow- 
beat into a duel and shot the friend of Washington; 
and Benedict Arnold burnt and pillaged towns and 
villages which, as an American officer, he had sworn to 
protect with his own life, they both showed what moral 
monsters Masonry can make of men. And the sole 
reason why the Episcopalian, Baptist and Methodist 
clergymen of Chicago who are high Masons, sworn full 
of oaths, are not Burrs and Arnolds in religion, is, that 
they do not understand the system to which they belong, 



144 GOVERNED BY THE TERRORS OE A SECRET CXAK*. 

and are held back by the influence of surrounding 
Christianity. In our mills and workshops there are 
plenty of honest, sworn dupes, like the assassins of ; 
Morgan, who believe it right to murder when they are ; 
ordered to do so ! 

This ^Trince of the Tabernacle/^ who and wh^t is 
he? He is a man whose conscience is so full of oaths, 
that, like the liver of a calomel patient, which no medi- 
cine can affect, no sacred obligation can bind him; and ; 
so leaves him to be lured by, the interest, or governed ■ 
by the terrors of his secret clan! If we would know 
the true nature of priestism, we must look in Africa, 
where the lodges reduce their theory to practice. '; 

But our high priest is in the heavens, at the right 
hand of God, ''wherefore he is able to save them to the 
uttermost who come unto God hy Him, seeing He ever 
liveth to make intercession for them'' (Heh. 7, 25.) 
^Thanks be to God for His unspeakable gift/'(^ Cor. i 
9, 15.) 



CHAPTER XLV 



Twenty-Fifth Degree ; or Knights of the Brazen 

Serpent." '" 

North or TFinter. 

. .decorations : — This lodge is styled the Court of Sinai. 
The hangings are red and blue. Over the throne in the east 
is a transparency, on which is painted a burning bush^ 
and inlhecontio the word HIjT- The lodge is illumiftat- 
rd ' by seven 1 ights extcnddlig from East to West, the centra 
a burning bush, one being a large globular light repre- 
senting the Sun. Over these lights are suspended the 
signs of Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, the Sun, Venus, Mer- 
cury, the Moon/ Around the lodge are twelve columns, 
each having on its capital one of the zodiacal signs, 
commencing in the East with Taurus and going round 
by the North, West and South in regular order. In 
the North is a painting representing Mount Sinai, with 
the tents of the Israelites in the foreground. Over the 

Note 286. — "Knigrht of the Brazen Serpent. The 25th degree of the 
incient and Accepted Rite. The history of this degree is founded upon 
he events described in the Book of Numbers xxi. 6-9. The body is 
Ityled the Council, and represents the camp of the Israelites in the 
jrilderness. after the death of Aaron. The camp, standards, and taber- 
lacle, with its court, are arranged as in the 23d and 24th degrees, 
[n the East is a transparency on which is painted a cross, with a serpent 
soiled round it and over the arms. The teaching and moral of the degree 
Is Faith. The presiding officer represents Moses, and is styled 'Most 
?uissant Leader.' The candidate is called *A Traveler.' The hangings 
►f the council are red and blue. The jewel is a tau cross, of gold, sur- 
lounted by a circle — the Crux Ansata — round which a serpent is en- 
__ (vined, suspended by a red ribbon. The legend states that this degree 
was founded during the time of the crusades in the Holy Land, as a 
military and monastic order, and gave it the name it bears, in allusion 
to the healing and saving virtues of the brazen serpent among^ the 
Israelites in the wilderness — it being part of the obligation of the 
Knights to receive and gratuitously nurse sick travelers, protect them 
against the attacks of the infidels, and • escort them safely through 
Palestine." — Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Ar- 
ticle Knig^ht of the Brazen Serpent. ' 



146 KNIGHT OF THE BRAZEN SERPENT. 

seat of the presiding officer is a winged globe, encircled 
by a serpent. On each side of him is a short column 
on which is a serpent, his body coiled in folds and his 
head and neck erect above the folds. 

TITLES : — The presiding officer represents Moses""^^ and 
is styled Most Powerful Grand Master. He sits in the 
East. The Senior Warden represents Joshua""' and sits 
on his right and is styled Commander of the Host. The 
Junior Warden represents Aaron, and sits in the West 
and is styled Lieutenant Commander. The Orator rep- 
resents Eleazar, sits in the North and is styled High 
Priest. The Secretary is styled Registrar; sits on the 
right of Joshua. The Treasurer sits on the left of the 
presiding officer. There are also a Senior and Junior 
Deacon. The brethren are styled Knights. The can- 
didate represents a Traveller."'^ 

"Note 287. — "He proved himself therein a man of marvelous gifts, 
raised up by Divine Providence for a special purpose, and received into 
a closer communion with the invisible world than was vouchsafed to 
any other in the Old Testament. He confronted Pharaoh, and by a 
series of ten plagues finally conquered his obdurate heart. Then he led 
forth Israel as a flock, two millions strong, passing through the Red 
Sea and on to Mount Sinai. Remaining there for a year, he received 
the Commandments, constructed the Ark, the Tabernacle and the sacred 
furniture and established order and method amongst the mighty host 
under his charge. Oppressed with two prime difficulties, the reluctance 
of the people to submit to his guidance and the impracticable character 
of the country to be traversed, he bore their murmurs patiently, only in- 
flictingl penalties when absolutely needed, and through forty years of 
journeyings brought them at last to the dividing river in full view of 
the Promised Land. There, upon the top of Mount Nebo, he satiated 
his gaze with a lingering view of the country he should never tread 
and then, B. C 1451, was taken to his reward at the age of 120 years."— 
Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Article Moses. 

Note 288. — "Joshua. The high priest who, with Zerubbabel, the Prince 
of Judah, superintended the rebuilding of the Temple after the Babylon- 
ian captivity. He was the high priest by lineal descent from the ponti- 
fical family, for he was the son of Josadek, who was the son of Seraiah, 
who was the high priest w^hen the Temple was destroyed by the Chal- 
deans. He was distinguished for the zeal with which he prosecuted ^the 
work of rebuilding, and opposed the interference of the Samaritans. — 
Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Joshua. 

Note 289. "Travel. In the symbolic language of Masonry, a Mason 

always travels from west to east in search of light— he travels from the 
lofty tower of Babel, where language was confounded and Masonry lost, 
to the threshing-floor of Oman, the Jebusite, where language was re- 
stored and Masonry found."— Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, 
Article Travel, 



KNIGHT OF THE BRAZEN SERPENT. 1^7 

SASH : — Crimson ribbon, worn from right to left with 
the words virtue and valor painted or embroidered there- 
on where it crosses the breast. 

jewel: — A tau cross'^' of gold surmounted by a circle 
round which is a serpent entwined, with the ineffable 
name engraved on it. Worn suspended from a white 
ribbon. 

apron: — White, bordered with black and sprinkled 
with black tears; on the flap, a triangle in a glory, in the 
centre the Hebrew letter n 

battery: — Is nine, five (5) slow, three (3) quick 
and one (1) by itself. 

Note 290. — "Being placed in the center of a triangle and circle, both 
emblems of the Deity, it would appear that it was originally intended 
to typify the sacred name, as the author probably of eternal life; being 
tripled in the Christian system, because the life to come, according 
to the light of revelation, is superior to the elysium of the heathen; or 
perhaps in allusion to the three heavens mentioned by Stv Paul. It has 
been referred to the three great lights of Masonry, expressive of the 
rreative, preserving, and destroying power of God." — Macoy's Encyclo- 
paedia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article Tau Cross. 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

Knights of the Brazen Serpent.'"' 

Most Powerful Grand Master — Brother Princes of 
the Tabernacle and Knights of the Brazen Serpent^ if 
the day and the hour have arrived^ I propose to open 
here a Court of Sinai. """ Be clothed and await, each 
in his station, the customary order. (The brethren are 
clothed and the officers take their stations.) 

Most Powerful Grand Master — Brother Junior Dea- 
con, it is our first duty to see that we are secure from 

Note 291. — "Knight of the Brazen Serpent. (Chevalier du Serpent d' 
Airain.) The twenty-fifth degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish 
Rite. The history of this degree is founded upon the circumstances re- 
lated in Numbers ch. xxi., ver. 6-9: *Aud the Lord sent fiery serpents 
among the people, and they bit the people; and much people of Israel 
died. Therefore the people came to Moses, and said. We have sinned; 
for we have spoken against the Lord, and against thee: pray unto the 
Lord that he take away the serpents from us. And Moses prayed for the 
people. And the Lord said unto Moses, Make thee a fiery serpent, and 
set it upon a pole: and it shall come to pass that every one that is 
bitten, when he looketh upon it shall live. And Moses made a serpent of 
brass, and put it upon a pole; and it came to pass, that if a serpent 
had bitten any man, when he beheld the serpent of brass, he lived.' In 
the old rituals the Lodge was called the Court of Sinai; the presiding ofl5- 
cer was styled Most Puissant Grand Master, and represented Moses; 
while the two Wardens, cr Ministers, represented Aaron and Joshua. 
The Orator was called Pontiff; the Secretary, Grand Graver; and the 
candidate a Traveler. In the modern ritual, adopted in this country, 
the Council represents the camp of the Israelites. The first three officers 
represent Moses, Joshua, and Caleb, and are respectively styled Most 
Puissant Leader, Valiant Captain of the Host, and Illustrious Chief of 
the Ten Tribes. The Orator represents Eleazar; the Secretary, Ithamar; 
the Treasurer, Phinehas; and the candidate an intercessor for the people. 
The jewel is a crux ansata, with a serpent entwined around it." — 
Mickey's Encyclopaedia of Treemasonry, Article Knight of the Brazen 
Seprent. 

Ifote 292. — * 'Sinai. A mountain of Arabia between the horns of the 
Red Sea. It is the place where Moses received the Law from Jehovah, 
and where he was directed to construct the tabernacle. Hence, says 
Linning, the Scottish Masons make Mt. Sinai a symbol, of truth. Of 
the high degrees the twenty-third and twenty-fourth of the Ancient and 
Accepted Rite, of the Chief and the Prince of the Tabernacle, refer in 
their rituals to this mountain and the Tabernacle there constructed."-— 
Mackety^s F^cyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Sinai. 



OPENING CEREMONIES. 149 

intrusion. See that the Guards are set, and inform 
them that we are about to open this Court, and allow 
none who are not entitled to approach. (Junior Dea- 
con retires, enters again, gives the alarm, which is 
answered from without, and says:) 

Junior Deacon — Most Powerful Grand Master, the 
Guards are posted and duly instructed; we are secure 
against intrusion. 

Grand Master — Brother Lieutenant Comtmander, are 
all present Knights of the Brazen Serpent ? 

Lieutenant Commander — All present are Knights of 
the Brazen Serpent, Most Powerful. 

Grand Master — Brother Commander of the Host, 
what is the hour ? 

Commander of Host — Most Powerful Grand Master, 
it is the break of day. 

Grand Master— li that be the hour it is time to open 
this Court. You will please inform the Lieutenant 
Commander and he the Knights, that all may have due 
notice thereof. 

Commander of S"o5f— Lieutenant Comm^ander, it is 
the pleasure of the Most Powerful Grand Master that 
this Court of Sinai be now opened. You will please 
inform the Knights, that, having due notice thereof, 
they may assist jn opening the same. 

Lieutenant Cornrnavder — (Three knocks.) ' Knights 
and Masons, you will please take notice that the Most 
Powerful Grand Master is about to open this Court of 
Sinai. You will please take due notice thereof and aid 
him in so doing. 

Grand Master — -Let the seven mystic lights dispel the 
darkness of this Court. 

Lieutenant Commander— {\A^\\img the first light 
nearest him.) The Moon shines in our Court and over 



150 KNIGHT OF THE BRAZEN SERPENT. 

it presides the arch-angel SapJiael, the messenger of 
God. (Lights the next one.) 

Mercury shines in our Court and over it presides the 
arch-angel Raphael, the healing influence of God. 
(Lights the next, one.) 

Venits shines in onr Court and over it presides the 
arch-angel Ilamaliel, the merciful kindness of God. 
(He then takes his station and the Commander of the 
Host lights the light nearest the East^ saying:) 

Commander of Host — Saturn shines in our Court 
and over it presides the arch-angel Michael, the sem- 
blance and image of God. (Lights the next one.) 

Jupiter shines in our Court and over it presides the 
arch-angel Gabriel, the strength and mightiness of God. 
(Lights the next one.) 

Mars shines in our Court and over it presides the 
arch-angel Auriel, i\ie light and fire of God. (The 
Grand Master advaiices and lights the center one, say- 
ing:) 

The Sun, type of the principle of good^ and light, and 
feeble, and imperfect image of the Deity shines in our 
Court and over it presides the arch-angel Zerachiel, the 
rising of God, the sun of righteousness. (Then takes 

his station.) 

Grand Master — Together, -brethren. 

All — (Give the sign.) 

Grand Master — (Knocks five (5), three (3) and one; 
00000 000 0.) 

Commander of Host — (Knocks five (5), three (3) 
and one; 00000 000 0.) 

Lieutenant Commander^— (Knocks five (5), three (3) 
and one; 00000 000 0.) 

Grand Master — I declare this Court of Sinai duly 
opened. 



CHAPTER XLVI 



'WENTY-FlFTH DEGREE ; OR KnIGHT OF THE BrAZEN 

Serpent/'' 

INITIxiTION. 

[The candidate represents a traveller and is dressed in 
ilain clothes without insignia. He is loaded with 
jhains by the Senior Deacon^ who conducts him to the 
ioor, knocks five slow, three quick and one.] 

Junior Deaoow — (Opening the door.) Who comes 
lere? 

Senior Deacon — One of the people of Israel, to an- 
Lounce to the Most Powerful Grand Master a great 
dsf ortune that has befallen the people and to implore 
it his hands relief and assistance. 

Junior Deacon — Who is this applicant, and by what 
ight does he claim admission here ? 

Senior Deacon — He is one of the tribe of Eeuben^ 
[oaded with chains in token of the penitence of the 
people who flee in terror before the venomous serpents 

Note 293.— "Knight of the Brazen Serpent. [Scotch Masonry.]— The 

[ghth degree conferred in the Consistory of Princes of the Royal Secret, 
kotch Masonry, and the twenty-sixth upon the catalogue of that sys- 
jem. The historical instructions are, the use of the Brazen Serpent 
irected by Moses in the camp of Israel, that whoever had been bitten and 
oked thereon might live. — Numbers xxi. The assembly is termed the 
mrt of Sinai. The hangings are red and blue. There is one light. 
The officers are Most Powerful Grand Master, representing Moses; two 
Wardens, entitled Ministers, represent Aaron and Joshua; an Orator, 
termed Pontiff; the Secretary, called Grand Graver; and an Examiner. 
A transparency, representing the Burning Bush, and the Sacred Name 
of four letters, is in the east; a conical mount, representing Sinai, in the 
center. Jewel, a golden serpent twined about a triple tau cross, stand^ 
Ing upon a triangle, with the sacred name; it is suspended from a white^ 
ribbon. Apron, white, strewed with black tears; on the movable part, 
a triangle in a glory; within it, the Hebrew letter H. Hours of work, 
open at one, close at seven." — Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Article Knight 
of the Brazen Serpent, 



152 KNIGHT OF THE BRAZEN SERPENT. 

that Adonai hath sent to punish them. 

Junior Deacon — Wait a time with patience nntil the 
Most Powerful GTrand Master is informed of his request 
and his answer returned. (Junior Deacon closes the 
door, goes to the altar, knocks five, three and one; 
Grand Master answers it and the same questions are 
asked and like answers returned as at the door. 

Grand Master — Let him be admitted. (Junior Dea- 
con opens the door, Senior Deacon enters with him, 
conducts him in front of the Grand Master and causes 
him to kneel.) 

Grand ilf a^ier— Brotlier Senior Deacon, whom do you 
bring hither thus loaded with chains ? 

Senior Deacon— One of the tribe of Eeuben, sent m 
behalf of the people, who dare not come before you^ 
Adonai being angered with them. 

Grand ifa^fer— Disobedient race; have they again 
tempted his anger ? ^\ 

Senior Deacon — Most Powerful Grand Master, the 
soul of the people was m^uch discouraged because of 
their journeying in the wilderness, and they spake 
against Adonai, calling him the power of evil and against 
you, saying, why hath Moses brought us up out of 
Egypt to die in the wilderness ? There is no bread itor 
any water, and our souls loathe this unsubstantial 
manna. We go to and fro, lo now almost these forty 
years, and as Aaron hath died in the desert, so also 
shall we all die here. Let us trust in Adonai no longer. 
Let us call on the great gods to deliver us from this 
bondage of misery, and as they cried aloud unto these 
gods, lo Adonai sent venomous serpents among them, 
who darted among the people, curling round and biting 
them, and by their venom many of the people of Israel 
hath already died, and those that remain have repented 
and say we have sinned, for we have spoken against ^ 
Adonai and his servant Moses, And they said unto me, ^ 



INITIATIOlSr. 153 

put heavy chains upon thy neck in token of our peni- 
tence^ and go for us unto Moses our leader;, and be- 
seech him to pray unto Adonai that he take away the 
serpents from us^ and I have done as they desired. 

Grand Master — Hast thou (to candidate) also mur- 
mured and called upon the false gods. \ 

Senior Deacon — (For candidate.) I have not^ but 
because I refused and withstood the people;, and rebuked 
them in the name of Adonai;, they sought to slay me, 
but repenting they sent me hither because I had not 
sinned like them. 

Grand Master — Thou has done well. Arise ! Relieve 

him of his chains and give him a seat of honor, forr that 

he hath not forgotten his duty to his 

God. I will now retire and pray unto 

the God of Israel again to forgive and 

save his people that he hath chosen. (He 

retires and the Senior Deacon relieves 

the candidate of his chains and gives 

him a seat. After a while the Grand 

Master enters, bringing with him a ser- 

Sferpeni and Crass, pent of brass cutwined round a tau cross 

witFhis head elevated above it, and after taking his seat 

says:) 

Grand Master — I have prayed for the people, and 
Adonai hath said unto me; ijiake.thee an image of a 
venomous serpent and set it upon a pole and it shall 
come to pass that every one that is bitten, when he look- 
eth upon it shall live. Take thou, therefore, Eleazar 
the High Priest, this serpent"''* and cross and place it 
upon a pole and set it in the middle of the camp; and 

'Note 294. — "In the Templar and in the Philosophic degrees — such as 
the Knight of the Brazen Serpent, where the serpent is combined with 
the cross — it is evidently a symbol of Christ; and thus the symbolism of 
these degrees is closely connected with that of the Rose Croix." — 
Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Serpent. 




1S4 KNIGHT^ OF THE BRAZEN SEHPEKT. 

make proclamation that tliOwSe who look upon it^ confess- 
ing their gins and having faith in the Most High God, 
though they have been bitten by the venomous serpents, 
shall not die, but live, for Adonai is the God of mercy. 
(Eleazar takes the serpent and retires, and after a time 
returns and says:) 

Orator — (As Eleazar.) Most Powerful Grand Mas- 
ter, great is Adonai, the God of mercy, for he hath had 
mercy on his people, Israel and every one that hath be- 
held the serpent, owning his sin and doing homage to 
the Most High is healed and liveth, and the -plague of 
the serpent is stayed. 

Grand Master — Praise ye the Lord, Adonai, my chil- 
dren, the supporter of the heavens and the earthy for 
he is great and his mercy endureth forever, and he hath 
forgiven his people Israel. 

Lieutenant Commander — Most Powerful Grand Mas- 
ter, what shall be done with the brazen image of the 
serpent and the cross w^hich thou didst cause to be set 
up before the people ? 

Grand Master — I give it you, my brother^ that it may 
be evermore a symbol of faith, repentance and mercy, 
which are the great mysteries of man^s destiny^ and lest 
the knowledge of its true symbolic meaning should be 
lost, let us kneel and swear, in the presence of tjie Most 
High God, faithfully to l^ep the secrets of this degree. 
(All kneel, including the candidate, and take the follow- 
ing obligation:) 

OBLIGATION KNIGHTS OF THE BRAZEN SERPENT. 

I do solemnly promise and swear, before the 

Most High God, that I will never reveal the secrets of 
this degree of Knights of the* Brazen Serpent to any 
person or persons, unless he shall have taken all the 
preceding degrees in a regular and constitutional man- 
ner. 



licii^iATioK". 



15, 



To all of which I do most solemnly swear, binding 
myself under no less a penalty than that of having my 
heart eaten by the most venomous of serpents and left 
thus to perish most miserably, from which may the 
Almighty Creator of the Universe guide and defend me. 
Amen. (All rise and are seated.) 

Orand Master — My brother, approach and receive the 
signS;, tokens and words of this degi^ee. 



SIGN OF ORDER. 

Incline the head downwards, and point 
to the ground with the forefinger of right 
hand. 




Sign of Order, KnigHtu 
of the Brazen Serpent. 



SIGN OF RECOGNITION. 

Form a cross upon yourself. 




Sign of Eecognltion, 

Knights of Brazen 

Serpent. 



KNIGHT OF THE BRAZEN SERPENT. 



TOKEN. 




Place yourself on the right 
of the brother^ and take his 
left wrist with yonr kft haiid. 



ANSWER. 

He then takes your right 
wrist with his right hand. 

Token Knights of the 
Brazen Serpent. 

BATTERY : — Nine strokes, five slow, three hurried, and 
one by itself; 00000 000 0. 

march: — Nine serpentine steps. 

HOURS OF LABOR : — The Court is opened at one o'clock 
and closed at four o'clock. 

PASS WORD : — I. r.N. -.R. -.1. •.''' letfered only. 

COVERED word: — Johanncs Ralp. 

SACRED word: — Mosesj this word must be spelled. 
(Moses died 1451 B. :.C. :.) (Grand Master now invests 
him with the apron, collar and jewel of the degree.) 

Grand Master — I now accept and receive you a Knight 
of the Brazen Serpent, and invest you with the apron, 
collar and jewel of the degree. You will now be con- 
ducted to our brother orator, who will deliver the history. 
(Grand Master takes his station and the Senior Deacon 
conducts the candidate to the Orator, who may either 
read the twenty-first chapter of Numbers, from which 
the degree is taken, or make such comments thereon as 
he thinks proper.) 

Note 295. — "I. N. R. I., i. e., Jesus Nazarenus Rex ludaeorum. Jesus 
of Nazareth, King of the Jews, the inscription which was placed upon 
the cross of the Savior. In the Philosophical Lodge they represent Fire, 
Salt, Sulphur, and Mercury. In the system of the Rosicrucians they have 
a similar use. 'Igrne Natura Renovatur Integra' — *by fire nature is per- 
fectly renewed.' This idea is also found in the degree of 'Knights 
Adepts of the Eagle or the Sun.' '" — Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Dictionary 
of Freemasonry, Article I. N. R. I. 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Knights of the Brazen Serpent. 

Grand Master — Brother Lieutenant Commander, 
■ what is the hour ? 

; Lieutenant Commander — Most Powerful Grand Mas- 
^ ter, the twilight, after sunset. 

Grand Master — Then it is time to close this Court, 
: Brother Commander of the Host, give notice that this 
: Court of Sinai is about to be closed, in order that the 
: brethren may rest from their labors. 
I. Commander of Host — Brother Lieutenant Com- 
rmander, inform the brethren that the Most Powcrriul 
Grand Master is about to close this Court of Sinai, that 
the brethren may rest from their labors. 

Lieutenant Commander — Brethren, the Most Power- 
ful Grand Master is about to close this Court of Sinai, 
that you m'ay rest from your labors. 

Grand Master — Knocks five, three and one; 00000 
^000 0.) 

Commander of Host — (Knocks five, three and one;- 
00000 000 0.) 

Lieutenant Commander — (Knocks five, three and 
one; 00000 000 0.) 

Grand Master — Together, brethren. 

All — (Give the sign.) 

Grand Master — T declare this Court of Sinai closed. 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Twenty- Fifth Degree, or Knights of the 
Brazen Serpent. 

The Goodness and Severity of God — False Lights on the Coast of Christen- 
dom — * 'Satan's Ignes Fatui, to Swamp Men Eternally" — Quotes the 
Bible as Satan Did to Deceive Men — All Religion but Holiness and 
Justice. 

In discussing these degrees, why use harshness and 
severity? The wisdom from above is ^^pure/^ ^^peace- 
able/^ ^'^gentle/^ "full of mercy/^ Paul himself was 
"gentle/^ as a nurse among children. And Moses^ but 
especially Christy was "meek.^^ Ans.: In dealing with 
teachers of false religion^ and corrupters of the true, 
the severity of Christy the prophets and apostles knew 
vo bounds but the limits of language. Thus Peter: 
"Thy money perish with thee V' Paul : "Thou child 
of the devil V^ John : "Serpents^ and the seed of ser- 
pents !" Christ uttered the same words. And Moses, 
who was ruler and law-giver, as well as teacher, said of 
a dealer in "wonders^^ and false mysteries: Though 
thine own brother, son, daughter or "wife of thy 
bosom,'^ whoever should entice into m'an-made religious 
rites, like this Scottish Eite: "thou shalt surely kill 
him ; thine hand shall be first upon him to put him to 
death; and, afterwards, the hand of all the people.'^ 
(Deut. 13, 1-9.) And though in warring against 
demon- worships, the Christians' weapons are "not car- 
nal, but spiritual,'' the treatment of sorcerers by Paul 
and Peter, and the fate of Ananias and Sapphira, show 
what estimate God puts on Ramsay and his Jesuits, 
Morin and his Jews^ and their abettors, who framed 



FALSE LIGHTS ON THE COAST OF CHRISTENDOM. 159 

this 33° degree rite^ for money and worldly advantage. 
A high Masonic authority says : ^^If history speaks cor- 
rectly, Morin and his coadjutors found the manufactur- 
ing of Masonic degrees and the sale of Masonic dignities 
a very profitable and lucrative undertaking. They pur- 
sued it diligentlj^, making all the money they could 
from the traffic.^' (Folgers Ancient and Accepted 
Scottish Rite, p, 38.) This is high Masonic testim'ony 
concerning the founding of this Rite, which now rules 
the Masonic world. And there is nothing like it in 
the catalogue of human crimes and sins. The guilt of 
wreckers and sea-thieves who hold out false lights to 
lure ships on rocks, to drown passengers in order to get 
their goods, is slight, compared with that of the invent- 
ors and sellers of these Masonic degrees. Christ is 
come a light into the world. ^And here are thirty -three 
false lights hung out along the whole coast of Chrisfem- 
dom, by men whose fathers sold Christ for thirty pieces 
of silver, to lure men on the ^^slippery rocks" of perdi- 
tion. Let none say this is exaggeration. Dr, MacTcey, 
in his ^^Eitualist,'^ the authoritative liturgy of the lodges, 
says that the Entered Apprentice is ^^seeking the new 
birth, and asking that light which restores fallen man 
to his Maker ;'^ which light, he says, ^^the lodge alone 
can give !" And he refers to the same thing in Note 
289 of this degree. ^^A Mason always travels from west 
to east in search of light/^ ^^The shock of entrance is 
the symbol of 'The New Birth,^ " which, he says, the 
Apprentice ^^appears before our portals seeking." Every 
time the blinder falls, which is thirt3^-three times in 
these degrees, this same thing is repeated. The blinded 
.and bewildered candidate is brought to the "light," 
discovers the ''word/' etc.; both which are Satan^ as an 



160 ^'satan's ''Ignes Fatui, to swamp men eternally^' ^ 

angel of light, personifying or symbolizing Christ, who 
only is the true ''Light'' and the true ''Word/' who "was 
with God and who was God." {Johnl^ 1.) And we do 
not slander the fram'ers of these e33 degrees in saying 
they made them for money. Folger is good Masonic 
authority, and he says it. See his book of this rite, p. 
38, already cited. Were these Jews framing degrees to 
bring men to Christ? No! A thousand times No! 
Then these degrees are Satan's ignes fatui, to swamp 
men eternally in hell. And it is of such false worship- 
ers of whom the Psalmist says: "Surely thou didst set 
them in slippery places." {Ps. 73, 18.) And these de- 
grees are those places into which these false coast lights 
are drawing life's voyagers. The only escape from this 
dire conclusion is to suppose that the Holy Ghost goes 
into the lodges, as Dr, Oliver supposed, and takes the 
names of Christ which the ritual uses, and converts men 
to Christ. But whoever heard of a Christian revival in 
a lodge? Or of village lodges joining in a village 
revival ? No : Voltaire, who was a Mason, did not lead 
prayer-meetings, nor do lodge-m'asters love and worship 
Christ. 

This very twenty-fifth degree, which makes ''KnigMs 
of the Brazen Serpent/' the lodge uses for purposes of 
idolatry, as the children of Israel did, who buriit in- ^ 
cense to it {2 Kings 18, ^), and which Hezekiah de- 
stroyed. Read on page 157 the finishing touches, when ] 
this ''Knight of the Brazen Serpent" is made. Nine \ 
strokes; five slow, three hurried, and one by itself, are 
struck with mallets. Nine steps are taken like the ; 
waving motions of a snake, and the pass-word given him - 
is I. N, R. /m which are the initials in Latin of : Jesu^ 



QUOTES THE BIBLE AS SATAN DID TO DECEIVE MEN. IGl 

of Nazareth, King of the Jews, and this, ages before 
there was any Latin tongue. And he who cannot see 
in this conjuring, every mark and' feature of devil- 
worship, has already been blinded by idolatry. 

But why do these degree-makers, grade after grade, 
follow and employ the Sacred Scriptures ? The answer 
is : for the same purpose for which the Booh of Mormon 
does the same thing. That foul imposition contains 
whole chapters of the Bible ; sometimes quoted literally 
and sometimes as in these degrees, mixed with Mormon 
gibberish. They quote the Bible as Satan did to Christ, 
to deceive men. They quote it while they hate it, and 
would destroy it if they could. Did Aaron Burr and the 
traitor Arnold love the Bible? Does Albert Pike love 
it? Some ten years ago the Grand Orient lodge of 
France, as is well known, erased from their ritual the 
name of God and tlie immortality of man, and though 
some of the lodges went through the farce of excommu- 
nicating that lodge and its adherents, others did not. 
And Masonic prints now declare the standing of those 
atheist Masons good ! 

And why should they not? The standard Masonic 
authorities, cited in the notes of the preceding degrees, 
boast their origin from the heathen mysteries; from 
astrology; from ^^incantations,'' and all that the Bible 
calls demon-worship. The lower degrees drop the name 
of Christ from Scriptures used in their lodge lectures, 
to invite and draw in the Jews and Christ-hating 
classes. And the higher degrees only admit Him when 
the lodge-dupes have become hardened by their idola- 
^ tries and mockeries; and then only admit Him on a 
level with heathen teachers; and worship, or rather 
insult him, by the use of human skulls^ cross-bones, and 



162 ALL RELIGION BUT HOLINESS AND JUSTICE. 

crossed swords^ hoodwinks oaths, blasphemies and sworn 
secrecy, and concealed ceremonies which His Word and 
example forbid! 'And then, having established and 
set abroad a system of known antagonism and contempt 
towards Christ and the Christian religion, they then 
follow the holy solemnities and sublimities of the Bible, 
as wolves follow lambs to destroy them and eat them; 
to save their ^*^cunningly devised fables'^ and ^^doctrines 
of devils'^ from the world's loathing and contempt. 

Let the authoritative teaching of Dr, Maclcey be con- 
tinually borne in mind, that : ^Hhe mission and object of 
Masonry is the worship of the Great Architect of the 
Universe/' It follows that the lodges must have some- 
thing for their dupes to do, called worship. And what 
could wicked men and devils invent craftier or better 
suited to deceive the simple, than this very scheme of 
^Hhe Ancient Scottish Bite/' which now rules the rites 
of the world. It seizes and appropriates all of religion 
but its holiness and justice; and all of Christ but his 
truth and his atonement. It mixes things sacred with 
things profane, till the whole compound is profanity; 
and quoting the Bible as. if it believed it true, which 
notoriously it does not, it has furnished a dark system, 
which angels flee from and which devils inhabit. It 
keeps its initiates under the power and mesmerism of 
Satan, and by nightly worships and military drills, it is 
preparing them for the war and bloodshed wliich are yet 
to precede the binding of Satan for the prophetic thou- 
sand years. But let it be remembered: ^'Our help 
is in the name of the Lord which made heaven and 
earth'' (Ps. 121^, 8) and that He is mightier than 
Satan, stronger than ^'the strong man armed/' {Lulm 



CHAPTER XLVII 

Twenty-Sixth. Degree; or Prince of Mercy.'*' 

west or spring. 

DECORATIONS I — Lodges of this degree are called Chap- 
ters. The hangings are green, supported by nine col- 
umns, alternately white and red, upon each of which is 
a chandelier holding nine lights. The canopy over the 
throne is green, white and red. Before the throne is a 
table covered with cloth of the same color. Instead of 
a gavel, the presiding officer uses an arrow, the plume 
of which is red on one side and green on the other. 
The spear is white; the point gilded. Before the altar 
is a statue representing Truth, clad in the same colors. 
It is the palladium of the order. The altar in the center 
is of a triangular shape, the top being a gilded plate in 

Note 296. — "Prince of Mercy. (Prince du Merci.) — The twenty-sixth 
degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, called also Scottish 
Trinitarian or E,cossais Trinitaire. It is one of the eight degrees which 
were added on the organization of the Scottish Rite to the original 
twenty-five of the Rite of Perfection. 

It is a Christian degree in its construction, and treats of the triple 
covenant of mercy which God made with man; first with Abraham by 
by circumcision; next with the Israelites in the wilderness, by the in- 
termediation of Moses; and lastly, with all mankind, by the death and 
sufEerings of Jesus Christ. It is in allusion to these three acts of 
mercy that the degree derives its two names of Scottish Trinitarian and 
Prince of Mercy, and not, as Ragon supposes, from any reference to the 
Fathers of Mercy, a religious society formerly engaged in the ransoming 
of Christian captives at Algiers. Chemin Dupontes (Mem. Sur V Ecoss, 
p. 373), says that the Scottish rituals of the degree are too full of the 
Hermetic philosophy, an error from which the French Cahiers are 
exempt; and he condemns much of its doctrines as 'hyperbolique plais- 
anterle.' But the modern rituals as now practiced are obnoxious to no 
such objection. The «yrobollc development of the number three of 
course constitutes a large part of its lecture, but the real dogma of thp 
degree Is the importance of Truth, juid to this all Its ceremonies 

»re direeted."— Mftckey'8 Encyclopeeaift «t freemasonry, Article ?rlRQQ cl 
Meroyi 



164 PRINCE OF MERCY. 

tlic sriape of aDelta orT which'iii glitte-rixig stones is the 
inclTiiblc name mn^. 

officers: — The officers are a Chief Prince, styled 
Most Excellent. Two Wardens, styled Excellent. Two 
Deacons, a Sacrificer and Guard of the Palladium. The 
other members are styled Princes. 

dress: — The Chief Prince wears a tri-colored tunic, 
green, white and red, and a crown surmounted with nine 
points. The other members wear a white tunic. 

order: — All wear the order, which is a broad tri- 
colored collar, green, white and red. 

APRON : — Bed, with a white border. In the middle of 
it is an equilateral triangle, embroidered with gold, in 
the center of which is the jewel ; the flap sky blue. 

JEWEL : — An equilateral triangle of gold, in the center 
of which is a heart of gold, on the heart are engraved 
the letters n\ 

BATTERY :— Fifteen, by three, five and seven; 000 

00000 0000000. 

march: — Three equal steps, commencing with the 
left foot. 

AGE : — Eighty-one years. 

TESSERA OR MARK:''' — Givcu to the candidate, is a 
ij^mall fish of silver or ivory, on one side of which is the 

1 word rCitV and on the other, in the Rose Croix cipher, 
the pass'word of the degree 




Note 297. — "It was the custom, says the Scholiast, when a guest had 
been entertained, to break a die in two parts, one of which parts was 
retained by the guest, so that if at any future period he required 
assistance, on exhibiting the broken pieces of the die to each other, 
the friendship was renewed. Platus, in one of his comedies, gives us an 
exemplification of the manner in which these tesserae or pledges of 
friendship were used at Rome, whence it appears that the privileges 
of this friendship were extended to the descendants of the contracting 
parties. Poenulus is introduced, inquiring for Agorastocles, with whose 
family he had formerly exchanged the tessera." — Mackay's Encyclo- 
paedia of Freemasonry, Article Mark. 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

Prince of Mercy.'*' 

Most Excellent — Excellent Senior Warden, I am 
about to open a Chapter of Princes of Mercy. Are all 
present entitled to remain? 

Senior Warden — Most Excellent, all present are of 
the faithful. 

Most Excellent — Brother Junior Deacon, the first duty 
of a Chapter of Princes of Mercy, when assembled? 

Junior Deacon — To see that the Chapter is duly 
guarded, Most Excellent. 

Most Excellent — Attend to that part of your duty and 
inform the Sentinel that we are about to open this 
Chapter of Princes of Mercy and direct him to tyle ac- 
cordingly. (Junior Deacon retires, returns again, 
closes the door, gives the alarm, which is answered from 
without, then takes his station.) 

Junior Deacon — Most Excellent, the Sentinel is at 
his post and duly instructed. 

Most Excellent — Brother Senior Warden, you will 
please inform our brother Junior Warden and he the 

Note 298. — "Prince of Mercy, or Scotch Trinitarian. The 26th degree 
of the Ancient and Accepted Rite. It is a highly philosophical degree 
and its ritual very impressive; its title clearly designates its character 
and intention. The body is styled a Chapter. The hangings are gre n. 
supported by 9 columns, alternately white and red. upon each of which 
Is a chandelier, holding 9 lights. Near the altar Is a statute of white 
marble, the figure of a virgin, covered with thin gauze. This represents 
Truth, and the palladium of the Order of the Princes of Mercy. The 
presiding officer is styled Most Excellent Chief Prince. The jewel is an 
equilateral triangle of bars of gold, with a flaming heart, of gold, in 
the center. On the heart are the letters I. H. S.. and on the respective 
sides of the triangle, W. on the right, F. on the left, and H. on the 
bottom." — Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article 
Prince of Mercy, 



166 OPENING CEREMONIES. 

* 

Princes, that this Chapter is about to be opened, that 
they may take due notice thereof and govern themselves 
accordingly. 

Senior Warden — Brother Junior Warden, you will 
please take notice and inform the Princes that this 
Chapter is about to be opened, that they may take due 
notice thereof and govern themselves accordingly. 

Junior Warden — Princes, this Chapter is about to be 
opened ; you will take due notice thereof and govern 
yourselves accordingly. \ 

Most Excellent — Together, Princes. 
All — (Give the sign.) 
Junior Warden — (Knocks three; 000.) 
Senior Wardeii — (Knocks five; 00000.) 
Most Excellent— (Knocks seven; 0000000.) 
All — (Clap hands three, five and seven.) 
Most Excellent — I declare this Chapter duly opened 






CHAPTER XLVIII 



Twenty-Sixth Degree ; or Prince of Mercy, 



299 



INITIATION. 

(The candidate is prepared by the Sen- 
ior Deacon in a plain white robe, reaching 
from the neck to the feet, barefooted, 
hoodwinked so as to prevent his seeing, 
with a rope passed three times around 
his body. He then leads him to tlie door 
of the Chapter and knocks three.) 

Guard of Palladium — (From within, 
knocks five.) 

Senior Deacon — (From without, knocks 
seven.) 

Guard of Palladium^ — (Opening the 

Preparation of Can, door.) Who COUICS here? 
didate. Prince of n * -r^ a i n i • i 

Mercy Degree. Seuior Deacon — A brother who wishes 
to receive the degree of Prince of Mercy. 

Guard of Palladium — Has he passed the regular 

Not© 299, — "The seventh degree conferred in the Consistory of Princes 
of the Royal Secret, Scotch Masonry, and the twenty-fifth upon the cata- 
logue of that system. Its historical allusions are to the three covenants 
of mercy, made by God with man, viz. : those with Abraham, Moses and 
Jesus Christ; hence the name. The assembly is termed a Chapter. The 
hangings are green. The officers are, a Chief Prince, whose title is Most 
Excellent, representing Moses; the Senior Warden, representing Aaron; 
the Junior Warden, Eleazar; the Sacrificer and Guard of the Palladium. 
The apron is red, trimmed with white fringe; it displays two crossed 
arrows. Jewel, an equilateral triangle of gold, a golden heart in the 
center, inscribed with the Hebrew letter H. Hour of work, eventime. 
Age. 9x9. The lights are eighty-one." — Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Arti- 
cle Prince of Mercy, or Scotch Trinitarian. 




168 MINCE OF MERCY. 

term,s of probation'''" and undergone the necessary tests 
and trials? 

Senior Deacon — He has. 

Guard of Palladium — Let him wait a time with 
patience, until his request is made known to the Most 
Excellent Chapter of Princes of Mercy. (Guard of the 
Palladium closes the door, goes to the East, where the 
same questions are asked and like answers received as 
at the door.) ' 

Mo^t Excellent — Is he duly and truly prepared to 
receive this degree? 

Guard of Palladium — He is. 

Most Excellent — You will retire and let him be ad- 
mitted after he shall have washed'"* his hands' in pure 
water. (Guard retires to preparation room.) 

Guard of Palladium — It is the order of the Most 
Excellent that he be admitted, after he shall have washed 

Note 300. — Probation. "The interval between the reception of one 
degree and the succeeding one is called the probation of the candidate, 
because it is during this period that he is to prove his qualification for 
advancement. In England and in this country the time of probation be- 
tween the reception of degrees is four weeks, to which is generally added 
the further safeguard of an open examination in the preceding degree. 
In France and Germany the probation is extended to one year. The time 
is greatly extended in the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. The 
statutes of the Southern Supreme Council require an interval of two 
years to be passed between the reception of the fourteenth and the 
thirty-second degrees. An extraordinary rule prevailed in the constitu- 
tions of 1762, by which the Rite of Perfection was governed. According 
to this rule, a candidate was required to pass a probation from the time of 
his application as an Entered Apprentice until his reception of the twenty- 
fifth or ultimate degree of the Rite, of no less than six years and nine 
months. But as all the separate times of probation depended on symbolic 
numbers, it is not to be presumed that this i^egulation was ever practi- 
cally enforced." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Proba- 
tion. 

Note 301. — "Lustration, A religions rite practiced by the ancients 
and which was performed before any act of devotion. It consisted in 
washing the hands, and sometimes the whole body, in lustral or conse- 
crated water. ' It was intended as a symbol of the internal purification of 
the heart. It was a ceremony preparatory to initiation in all the Ancient 
Mysteries.. The ceremony is practised with the same symbolic import in 
some of the high degrees of Masonry, So strong was the idea .of a con- 
nection between lustration and initiation, that in the low Latin of the 
Middle Ages lustrar© meant to initiate. Thus Du Cange (Glossarium) 
cites the expression 'lustrare religlone Christianorum' as signifying *to 
initiate into the Christian religion.' " — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Free- 
masonry, Article Lustration. 



INITIATION. 169 

his hands in pure water. (Senior Deacon causes him 
to wash his hands in pure water, leads him ^ and con- 
duets him nine times around the Chapter while the 
Most Excellent reads:) 

First Round — Thus saith the holy book, there is but 
one Supreme God, the single, imperishable, infinite, 
omnipotent, excellent, perfect, invisible God; omnipres- 
ent the universal substance and soul of the world. 

Second Round — Jesus of Nazareth, born of a Virgin 
without sin, was chaste and holy. He descended into 
Hell, he arose again and ascended to Heaven, he 
charged his disciples to teach his pure doctrines and 
gave them the gift ^ of miracles. He will appear again 
at the end of the world and a new creation and a new 
age of innocence shall commence. 

Third Round — The stars shall salute him at his. nativ- 
ity, the running waters shall become clear as crystal, 
the winds breathe softly and the sky be pure and serene, 
the tortures of the wicked shall be suspended, all ven- 
omous reptiles and beasts of prey disappear, the sick 
and infirm shall become well and strong, and all man- 
kind unite in orisons of glory. 

Fourth Bound — The mountains shall melt and tor- 
rents of metal flow from their bosoms, through which 
all souls shall pass, that thus parting with the defilement 
of their sins, they may be fitted for the bliss that awaits 
them. A new earth, more beautiful, more fertile, more 
delicious than the first, shall become the home of 
restored mankind. 

Fifth Round — He is love. King of the living and 
dead ; the supremely pure, holy and wise, he is three and 
one, for his essence illuminates, warms and makes fruit- 



170 PRINCE OF MERCY. 

ful at once. Seated in the middle chamber/''^ between 
light and darkness he presides over initiates, crowned 
with the sun of truth and justice, and bearing the gavel ' 
of gold, eternal, living, victorious and intelligent. 

Sixth Round — The fields shall produce bountifully 
without labor; calamity be unknown and a vast golden 
palace more brilliant than the sun receive and be the 
home, of the just forever. Then the Supreme Being 
shall come from his dwelling on high, administer divine 
justice, pronounce his decrees and establish his immor- 
tal laws. 

Seventh Round — The actions of each shall be weighed 
in the unerring scales and final sentence pronounced on 
each, according to his deserts. The irreclaimable depart 
to the lower hemisphere of darkness, remorse and pain. 
The just return to the bosom of the Deity to enjoy 
eternal happiness in the realm of light and love. 

Eighth Round — Thus was it promised unto Judah: 
^^The Sceptre shall not depart from Judah, nor a law 
giver from between his feet until Shiloh come, and unto 
him shall the gathering of the people be. 

^^Unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given, and 
the government shall be upon his shoulders, and his 
name shall be Wonderful, Counselor, the Mighty God, 
the Everlasting Father, the Prince of Peace.'' 

Ninth Round — "In the beginning was the Word, and 
the Word was with God, and the Word was God. All 

Note 302. — ''The door for the middle cham'ber was in the right side 
of the house, and they went up with winding stairs into the middle 
chamber, and out of the middle into the third. 

These chambers, after the Temple was completed, served for the 
accommodation of the priests when upon duty; in them they deposited 
their vestments and the sacred vessels. But the knowledge of the 
purpose to which the middle chamber was appropriated while the Temple 
was in the course of construction, is only preserved in Masonic tradi- 
tion. This tradition is, however, altogether mythical and symbolical in 
its character, and belongs to the symbolism of the Winding Stairs, — » 
Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Middle Qhamher, 



iNiTiATio:sr. 171 

things were made by him. In him was life;, and that 
life was the light of mankind; the true lights which 
lighteth every man that cometh into the world. And 
the Word became incarnate and dwelt among men^ and 
they beheld his glory; and the glory of the first born 
of the father, full of benevolence and trnth/^ (After 
this round he halts in front of the Junior Warden.) 

Junior Warden — Brother Senior Deacon, whom have 
you here? 

Senior Deacon — A brother, who, having passed 
through the necessary terms of probation and undergone 
the tests and trials, now anxiously desires to see the 
great light and to be received among the Princes of 
Mercy. 

Junior Warden — Brother Senior Deacon, dost thou 
vouch for him, that he will devote himself to the teach- 
ings of this degree? 

Senior Deacon-^1 do. 

Junior Warden — Since thou art his security, let him 
see to it that he bring no shame upon thee by making 
false thy pledge in his behalf. You will now conduct 
him to our brother Senior Warden. (Order is obeyed 
and same questions are asked l)y Senior Warden, who, 
after same answers had been given, orders him con- 
ducted to Most Excellent, who asks the same questions 
and receives the same answers when he continues:) 

Most Excellent — Brother Senior Deacon, you will now 
conduct the candidate to our Senior Warden, who will 
place him near the great light by the proper steps. 
(He conducts him to the Senior Warden, who causes 
him to advance to the altar by three steps, commencing 
with the left foot, where he kneels and contracts the 
following obligation:) 



173, PRINCE OF MERCY. 

OBLIGATION PRINCE OF MERCY. 

I do promise and swear, in the presence of the 

Great Architect of the Universe, that I will never reveal 
the secrets of this degree to any person or persons what- 
ever, unless he shall have taken all the preceding 
degrees in a regular and constitutional manner. 

I do furthermore promise and swear that I will never 
confer or assist in conferring this degree upon any per- 
son unless by virtue of a Patent or warrant of consti- 
tution emanating from a Sovereign or Deputy Grand 
Inspector General or a regular constituted consistory of 
Princes of the Eoyal Secret, 32nd degree, to whose 
constitutions and regulations I now swear fealty and 
allegiance, and then only after I shall have been in- 
formed of the pure life and irreproachable manner and 
morals of the candidate. 

And should I violate this, my obligation, I consent to 
be condemned, cast out and despised by the whole uni- 
verse, and may the Supreme Architect of the Universe 
guide, guard and protect me to fulfil the same. Amen. 

Most Excellent — My brother, what now dost thou 
desire ? 

Candidate — Light/**^ 

Most Excellent — My brother. Senior Deacon, bring 
this new brother to light. (Senior Deacon removes the 
bandage.) 

Most Excellent — My brother, behold the darkness is 
passed and the true light now shineth. You have 
before this been brought to light in masonry. When 

Note 303.— ."Light. Light is a symbol of knowledge. May every 
Mason strive incessantly for light, and especially for the light eternal! 
^v'hen a society is assembled anywhere to do good, they require an 
influential person to communicate the light of experience, instruct them, 
and point out the way they should go, or bring light to them. This m-y 
be done, symbolically, by suddenly lighting up a dark room with torches. 
He who thus introduces the light into the lodge must be a worthy man 
and experienced in the craft." — Mackey'a Encyclopeedia and Dictionary oi 
Freemasonry, Article Lightt 



INITIATION*, 



173 



the Worshipful Master, with the aid of the brethren, 
first made you a mason, and your attention was directed 
to the three great lights upon the altar. On being 
brought to light in this degree, you see before you the 
luminous Delta with three equal sides, in all ages the 
representative of Deity, the trinity of wisdom, power 
and harmony. You will now approach the East and be 
invested with the signs, token and words of this degree. 
(All are now seated; the Senior Deacon conducts him 
to the East and he is invested with the following signs.) 




SIGN OF ENTRANCE. 

Place the right hand open, so as to form 
a triangle above the eyes as if to be pro- 
tected against a strong light. 



^^ign of Entrance, 
Prince of Mercy. 



SIGN OF CHARACTER. 



Form a triangle with the two thumbs, 
and the two forefingers ; join them by the 
extremities, place the hands in front of, 
and touching the body. Prince of Mercyf 




174 



\ 



PRINCE OF MERCY. 




Sign of Help, 
Prince of Mercy, 



SIGN OF HELP. 



Cross both arms above the head^ the 
hands open, palms outwards and say: To 
me, the children of Truth. 



SIGN OF ORDER. 



stand up, the right hand resting on the 
hip. 




Sign of Order. 
Prince of Mercy. 



^: 



INITIATION-e 175 




TOKElSr. 



Place both hands, each on the 
other's shoulders, press them slight- 
ly thrice and say, Gomel. 



battery: — Fifteen strokes, by three, five and seven. 

march: — Three equal steps, commencing with the 
left foot. 

AGE :— Eighty-one years. 

PASS v^^ord: — Gomel. 

COMMON words: — Ghiblim'°* and Gabaon. 

SACRED WORDS : — Jehovah, Jachin. 

SUBLIME word: — Ednl-pcn-cagu, that is, do as you 
would be done by. (After he is invested with the above 
he is seated in front of the table facing the East, and 
listens to the following lecture:) 

LECTURE PRINCE OF MERCY. 

Most Excellent — Brother Senior Warden, are you a 
Prince of Mercy? 

Senior Warden — I have seen the Delta, and the holy 
name upon it, and an Afneth'"*^ like yourself, in the 
triple covenant of which we bear the mark. 

Note 304.— "Ghiblim. The form in which Dr. Anderson spells Giblim. 
In the Book of Constitution, ed. 1738, page 70, it is stated that in 
1360, 'John de Spoulee, caU'd Master of the Ghiblim,' rebuilt St. 
George's Chapel. " — Mackey's Enclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article 
Ghihlim. 

Note 305. — **Ameth. Properly, Emeth, which see.** [See Note 99.]— 
Haokey's Encyclopsedia of Freemasonry, Article Ameth. 



176 PRINCE OF MERCY. 

Most Excellent— What is the first of the three cov- 
enants of which we bear the mark? 

Senior Warden — That which God ni,ade with Noah^ 
when he said, I will not again curse the earth any more 
for man's sake, neither will 1 smite any more every- 
thing living, as I have done. While the earth remain- 
eth, seed time and harvest, and cold and heat, winter 
and summer, and day and night shall not cease. I 
will establish my covenant with you, and^with your seed 
after you, and with every living creature. All mankind 
shall no more be cut off by the waters of a flood, nor 
shall there any more be a flood to destroy the earth. 
This is the token of my covenant; I do set my bow in 
the clouds and it shall be for a token of a covenant 
between me and every living creature on the earth. 

Most Excellent — Wliat is the second of the three 
covenants ? 

Senior Warden — That which God made with Abraham 
when he said, I am the absolute, uncreated God. I will 
make my covenant between me and thee, and thou shalt 
be the father of many nations, and kings shall come 
from thy loins. I will establish my covenant between 
me and thee, and thy descendants after thee, to the 
remotest generations for an everlasting covenant, and 
I will be thy God and their God, and will give thee the 
land of Canaan for an everlasting possession. 

Most Excellent — What is the third covenant? 

Senior Warden — That which God made with all men 
by his prophets, when he said, I will gather all nations 
and tongues, and they shall come and see my glory. I 
will create a new heavens and a new earth, and the for- 
mer shall not be remembered nor come into mind. The 



INITIATION. 177 

Snii shall no more shine by day, nor the moon by night, 
but the Lord shall be an everlasting light and splendor. 
His spirit and his word shall remain with men forever. 

Most Excellent — What is the symbol of the triple 
covenant ? 

Senior Warden — The triple triangle. 

Most Excellent — What are the symbols of the purifica- 
tion necessary to make ns perfect masons ? 

Senior Warden — Lavation, with pure water, because 
to cleanse the body is emblematical of purifying the 
soul. Unction, or anointing with oil, because thereby 
we are set apart and dedicated to the service and priest- 
hood of the beautiful, the true and the good. And 
robes of white, emblems of candor, purity and truth. 

Most Excelle7it — My brethren and Princes, let us 
purify this our newly adopted brother and devote him 
to the service of God and virtue. (Most Excellent 
knocks three, all rise and form a circle round the can- 
didate at the altar, and the Senior Deacon brings a cup 
of pure water, when the Most Excellent pours a small 
quantity upon the head of the candidate.) 

Most Excellent — I pour this water upon thy head as 
a symbol of the purification of the soul by suffering and 
sorrow, by which parting with the stains of sin and the 
sordidness of vice it becomes fit to return to its eternal 
home in the bosom of the Father who loveth all the 
children he hath made. (Senior Deacon brings per- 
fumed oil in a cup, and the Most Excellent, dipping his 
finger in it, makes with it a tau cross upon the forehead 
of the candidate.) 

Most Excellent — By this sign I do devote thee hence- 
forward to the cause of Truth. (Senior Deacon unveils 



178 PRINCE OF MERCY. 

the statue of Truth.) 

' Most Excellent — Behold the Palladium of this order, 
an emblem of purity and truth. Truth which here we 
worship, truth, the antagonist of error, fraud and false- 
hood, and of which you are now the servant. (Senior 
Deacon now clothes him in a white tunic and invests 
him with the apron, collar and jewel.) 

Most Excellent — (Continuing.) My brother, the 
colors of this degree are green, white and red ; the green 
is an emblem of the immortality of God, the soul and 
virtue; the white of sincerity, candor and purity; the 
red of zeal, fervour and courage. 

By the holy name upon the Delta, I charge thee to 
be true, sincere, merciful and tolerant; and as I press 
the point of this arrow against thy heart, so may eter- 
nal truth there penetrate and enter and abide forever; 
and as the arrow flies straight to its mark, so be thou 
ever frank, honest and straightforward in all thou sayest 
and doest, remembering that in this world thou art 
being prepared for that which is to come. And so I 
receive thee as one of the faithful and a Prince of Mercy, 
and 1 present thee with this tessera or marJc, which thou 
wdlt hereafter wear in evidence that thou art entitled to 
the privileges and honors of this degree. (Most Excel- 
lent returns to his station and all are seated.) 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Prince of Mercy. 

Most Excellent — Brother Senior Vv^arden, what is the 
hour ? 

Senior Warden — Past midnight^ Most Excellent. 

Most Excellent — Since it is past midnight^ the hour 
of rest has arrived. Brother Junior Warden, what of 
the night? 

Junior Warden — Most Excellent, the clouds have 
broken, and the stars begin to appear. 

Most Excellent — Brother Senior Warden, what re- 
mains for us to do? 

Senior Warden — To watch and pray. Most Excellent. 

Most Excellent — Since that alone remains, it is my 
pleasure that this Chapter be now closed. This you will 
please communicate to the Junior Warden, and he to 
the brethren, that they may have due notice thereof and 
govern themselves accordingly. 

Senior Warden — Brother Junior Warden, it is the 
pleasure of the Most Excellent that this Chapter be now 
closed. You will please communicate the same to the 
brethren, that they may have due notice thereof and 
govern themselves accordingly. 

Junior Warden — Brethren, it is the pleasure of the 
Most Excellent that this Chapter be now closed. You 
will please take due notice thereof and govern yourselves 
accordingly. 

Most Excellent— (Knocks seven; 0000000.) 

Senior Warden — (Knocks five; 00000.) 

Junior Warden — (Knocks three; 000.) 
M Most Excellent — I declare this Chapter closed. 

IK 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Twenty-Sixth Degree; or Prince of Mercy. 

Usurps the Prerogatives of Christ — "Liars Have Need of Good Memories" 
— Renewing the Plagues of Egypt on American Soil, 

To be able to comprehend the nature and power of 
these degrees^ we should keep steadily in mind their 
"object and mission/^ which is to break down the wor- 
ship of Christy and establish that of Satan. The very 
title of the degree does this. The word "Prince'^ 
(Latin: princeps) means: chief, supreme, the first, or 
highest one. Christ is the only one who ever exercised 
divine power on earth. Therefore He only is First, or 
Prince. Christ gave His life a ransom for sinners, and 
''heater love hath no man than this/' (John 15, 13,) 
Therefore He is "Prince of Mercy,'' and the only one. 
There cannot be many firsts. An earthly prince is first 
in his realm^ So our chief magistrate is the highest, 
or first officer. Christ told Pilate that He came into 
this world to be its king, not an earthly sovereign, yet 
a born king. (Jno. 18, 37,) And as Savior, or pro- 
curer of pardon. He is ''Prince of Mercy/' ''that in all 
things He might have the pre-eminence/' {CoL 1, 18.) 

Now the Senior Warden says : "I am about to open 
a Chapter of Princes of Mercy.'' (P. 166,) This is 
solecism, absurdity and blasphemy, and each in the 
highest degree. It is gross impropriety of language; 
inconsistent with obvious truth ; and indignity offered to 
God. As night-meeting societies, which should, in 
sober earnest, elect and inaugurate Presidents of the 
United States, and attempt to clothe them with presi- 
dential power and prerogative, would be guilty of 
ribald nonsense, mockery - towards the President, and 
swindling imposition on taxed candidates. 

This 36tb degree therefore is a direct insult to and 



^^LIARS HAVE NEED OF GOOD MEMORIES." 181 

asfedult upon Christ; doubtless stimulated and set on by 
the devil, who asked Jesus to worship him, as His 
superior or equal ! We can well believe Dr. Mackey, 
who says {Note 296) : ^'It is one of the eight degrees 
which were added, on the organization of the Scottish 
Rite, to the original twenty-five of the Rite of Per- 
fection.'' Not, like the Knight of the Axe, which is an 
'American stump speech, injected into the body of the 
rite, to please laborers and get their money; but se- 
lected from several thousands invented by Jesuits in 
France to protect Romish priest-power, and called ^^a 
Christian degree.'' (See Note 266, by Mackey.) 

But as if absurdity and contradiction were to prove 
[bottomless, look at the following: In the above Note, 
Mackey says: '''This degree treats of the triple cov- 
enant of mercy made by God with Abraham, Moses and 
Jesus Christ." Now turn forward to page 176, and 
read the answers of the Senior Warden to the Most 
l^xcellent, which declare the three covenants of this 
degree to be made by God with Noah, Abraham and ''^all 
men by His prophets." ^'Liars have need of good 
memories," but these writers' memories are bad andi 
itheir morals worse. 

Now turn back to page 167, and look at the candidate 
in this 26th degree, hoodwinked and still searching for 
■''Light," intc^ which he has been brought over and 
'again, and then say, with our Bible in hand, that ^'the 
god of this world blinds minds." Is it irrational to 
suppose that, while that man's eyes were being blind- 
folded, the devil was blinding his mind, so that Masons 
do not, cannot see the contradictions and gfbsurdities of 
these degrees? When, in all time, and where, in all 
the world, is this blinding done, which the Bible im- 
putes to Satan, unless it is done tlien and there? It 
will not do for them to meet us with denials of the 
truth of the Bible. If the Bible is composed of lies, 
why do they quote it from beginning to end of this 
Scottish Rite? And if the Bible tells the truth when 



182 RENEWING PLAGUES OF EGYPT ON AMERICAN SOIL. 

it says that Satan blinds minds; what minds, if not 
those of his worshipers? And do we not see in this 
how it can be that Masons of apparent candor can say, 
and say truly, they can^ see nothing in lodgery which 
conflicts with the Christian religion ? 

Isaiah (9, 26), predicting Christ's coming, says: 
''The people that walked in darkness have seen a great 
light." Who were those people ^'walking in darkness'' 
but those- very men whose hill-top worships Masons 
truly call ^^lodges," and the worshipers themselves, ^^our 
ancient brethren," and who, as Masons have today, had 
counterfeit ^Trinces of Mercy" of their own make? 

Eead on page 169 the lying promises of this dark 
degree. "A new earth, more beautiful and more fertile, 
shall becom^e the home of mankind !" These blind 
guides, not looking, as Paul did, at "the things not 
seen," promise none but a heaven on earth with good 
crops, etc., etc.; while the Word of God, and the his- 
tory of Palestine, nay, our own history also, show that 
just in proportion as lodge-worships supplant the 
worship of Christ; drought, grasshoppers, potato-rot 
and bugs, with swarms of invisible pests, such as deso- 
lated Egypt and sunk the inhabitants to cattle-worship- 
ing slaves, whose country is mortgaged to a handful of 
London merchants, are slowly renewing the "plagues of 
Egypt" on our own soil; while Charleston, the city 
where this Scottish Eite was planted, and from which 
it has spread over America and Europe, has plucked 
down wrath on our Continent in the shape of treason, 
secession and bloodshed. 

Instead of the heaven of fine soil and good crops 
promised to the "Princes of Mercy," we seem to be in 
great danger of renewing on our prairies the sterility of 
once fertile, but now impoverished, monk-worshiping 
Palestine; until earthquakes rend the earth under u^^, 
and cyclones lay bare its surface; and in the vigorous 
words of the old hymn 

* 'Earth trembles beneath till her mountains give way, 
**And hell shaken her fetters with fear I 



CHAPTER XLIX 



rrwenty-seventh degree^ or commander of the 

Temple/'' 

south or summer. 

DECORATIONS :■— -This lodge is styled a Court. The 
langings are red, ornamented here and there with black 
columns, upon each of which is placed a branch hold- 
fng a light. The canopy and throne are red, sprinkled 
ith black tears. In the centre of the lodge, which is 
circular in its shape, is a chandelier with three rows 
of lights one above the other ; in the lower circle twelve, 
in the next nine, and in the upper one six; making 
twenty-seven in all. Twenty-seven other lights are 
placed upon a round table, around which the Knights 
are seated when the Court is open. 

officers: — The presiding officer is styled Most Po- 
tent Grand Commander, and sits in the East. The 
Wardens are styled Most Sovereign Commanders, and 
the Knights Sovereign Commanders. There is a 
Senior and Junior Deacon. 
DRESS : — The Grand Commander wears a white tunic 

Note 306.— "Commander of the Temple. [Scotch Masonry.]— The ninth 
degree conferred in the Consistory of Princes of the Royal Secret, Scotch 
Masonry, and the twenty-seventh in the catalogue of that system. The 
«ssembly is termed a Court. The hangings are red. The lights are 
twenty-seven. The presiding officer is styled Most Potent, and the two 
Wardens, Most Sovereign Commanders. The title of the members is 
Sovereign Commanders. The apron is flesh-colored, lined and edged with 
black; on it is a key; the movable part displays a Teutonic cross, en- 
circled by a wreath of laurel. The scarf is red, edged with black and 
eustains a Teutonic cross in enameled gold. Jewel, a golden triangle, 
displaying the sacred four-lettered name; it is suspended from a white 
collar edged with red and embroidered with four Teutonic crosses. Hours 
of work, open at 10, close at 4."— Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Article 
Commander of the Temple, 



184 COMMANDER OF THE TEMPLE. 

and over it a knight mantle of red^ lined with ermine; ^ 
on his head he wears a dneal-coronet. 

APRON : — Flesh colored^ lined and edged with ^black, 
on the flap is a Teutonic cross, (which is also the jewel 
of the order) encircled by a laurel wreath, and be- 
neath it, on the apron a key. The cross, wreath and 
key are all black. 

GLOVES : — White, lined and bordered with black. The 
scabbard and belt of the sword are black. 

SASH : — White, edged with red, worn as a collar, and 
the jewel suspended from. it. On each side of the col- 
lar are two black Teutonic crosses, there is also a 
sash, red, bordered with black; worn from right to 
left, from which hangs a gold enameled tau cross. 

jkwel: — The prTncipal jewel is a triangle of gold, on 
which is engraved the sacred name rVijV 



V 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

COMMANDER OF THE TEMPLE. 

Grand Commander — (Three knocks; 000.) Atten- 
tion Commanders. I pray you to assist me to open 
this Sublime Court of Grand Commanders of the Ma- 
sonic Temple. (All rise in their stations, draw swords, 
salute the Grand Commander and stand at a carry.) 

Grand Commander — Brother Junior Deacon, see that 
the doors of this Court are duly guarded and inform the 
Sentinel that we are about to open this Court, that none 
may enter without the words and signs. 
Jg Junior Deacon — (Having obeyed orders and re- 
turned.) Most Potent Grand Commander, the Senti- 
nels are posted and we are in security. 

Grand Commander — Most Sovereign Commander in 
the West. What are the duties of a Commander of the 
Temple ? 

Senior Warden — To guard the temple and city of 
' Jerusalem, to succor and assist the helpless and feeble 
and to defend the innocent. 

Grand Commander — Assemble round the altar Sover- 
eign Commanders, that we may Open this Court of Com- 
manders of the temple of Jerusalem. (All form a circle 
round the altar, hold the horizontal point of the sword 



186 COMMANDER OF THE TEMPLE. 

inwards, and repeat after the Grand Commander:) 

All — As these swords point to one common centre, so 
we here, renewing our vows, do devote our swords to 
the cause of God and the cross; our hearts to the glory 
of God and the welfare of man and our hands to assist 
the sick, the suffering and the destitute. So help us God. 
Grand Commander — Let us pray. (All recover and 
return swords, and kneel on the left knee and the Grand 
Commander repeats the following prayer:) 

OPENING PRAYER COMMANDER OF THE TEMPLE. 

Father and creator of the Universe, we implore thy 
beneficence, deign to receive our prayers, and diffuse on 
the members of this order thy precious gifts. We who 
do not cease in our prayers to ask of thee that celestial 
mark that thou didst bestow upon thy people, and which 
thou dost still continue to diffuse daily on those who 
follow thy precepts. We are assembled here in thy 
name to offer thee our hearts and our vows, and thank 
thee for thy favors, praying for a continuation of the 
same goodness until the last generation. Amen. (All 
rise and take their stations.) 

Junior Warden — (Three knocks; 000.) 
Senior Far^Zm— (Twelve knocks; 000000000000.) 
Grand Commander— {Twelve knocks; 000000000000.) 
Sovereign Commanders, I declare this Court of Com- 
manders of the Temple duly opened. 



CHAPTER L 



'Twenty-Seventh Degree, oh Commander of the 

Temple/" 



» 



INITIATION. 

Senior Deacon, prepares the candidate in a white 
mantle with a large black Teutonic cross upon the left 
breast, he then hoodwinks him and conducts him to a 
small room, seats him on a chair in front of a table on 
, which are a light, and a skull and cross-bones, bible 
square and compasses; he then says: 

. Senior Deacon — My brother, you desire to receive the 
degree of Commander of the Temple. Before you can do 
so, you are required to answer certain questions which 
you will find in writing on the table before you. I shall 
leave you alone, and when you hear three distinct knocks, 
you will remove the bandage from your eyes and annex 
your answers to those questions in writing, and sign 
your name at the bottom. Consider the questions well ; 

Note 307. — "Sovereign Commander of the Temple. (Sovereign Com- 
mandeur du Temple.) Styled in the more recent rituals of the Southern 
Supreme Council 'Knight Commander of the Temple.' This is the twenty- 
seventh degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. The presid- 
ing officer is styled 'Most Illustrious and Most Valiant,' the Wardens are 
called 'Most Sovereign Commanders,' and the Knights 'Sovereign Com- 
manders.' The place of meeting is called a 'Court.' The apron is flesh- 
colored, lined and edged with black, with a Teutonic cross encircled by 
a wreath of laurel and a key beneath, all inscribed in black upon the 
flap. The scarf is red bordered with black, hanging from the right 
shoulder to the left hip, and suspending a Teutonic cross in enameled 
gold. The jewel is a triangle of gold, on whiob is engraved the Inef- 
fable Name in Hebrew. It is suspended from a white collar, bound with 
red and embroidered with four Teutonic crosses." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia 
of Freemasonry, Article Sovereign Commander of the Temple. 



188 COMMANDER OF THE TEMPLE. 

let what you will see -apon the table before you, remind 
you that you wdll answer them in the hearing of the 
Deity who knows your thoughts. When you shall have 
answered the questions you will give three distinct 
knocks upon the table and I will return. (He then re^ 
tires and closes the door and gives three knocks. The 
candidate removes the bandage and reads the following 
questions which he answers in writing:) 

First — Have you ever violated any masonic obligation 
without atoning for it by r^entance and reformation? 

Second — Are you willing to aid, assist and comfort 
the sick, the needy and the destitute, to watch with 
them and minister to their wants, and to help to feed, 
to clothe and to protect the widow and the orphan? 

Third — Have you any enmity toward any one that 
you would not readily abandon if you found him sincere- 
ly willing to be reconciled to you? 

Fourth — Would you, if called upon, draw your sword 
in defence of truth, of human freedom and the rights of 
conscience; against falsehood, tyranny and usurped 
power and can you rather choose to die than desert your 
post of duty? (Candidate writes answers as he thinks 
proper, signs his name and gives three knocks on the 
tal)le. Senior Deacon enters, takes the paper, conducts 
him to the door and knocks twelve.) 

Junior Deacon — (From, within knocks twelve; 00000 
0000000.) 

Senior Deacon — (From without knocks three; 000.) 

Junior Deacon — (Opening the door.) What do you 
wish my brother? 

Senior Deacon — To participate in your deliberations. 

Junior Deacon — Are your words agreeable to your: 
thoughts ? 

Senior Deacon— The request of an Elect Mason is: 
most sincere. 

Junior Deacon — Brother Senior Deacon, has he sub-^ 
scribed to the necessary questions? 



INITIATION*. 189 

Senior Deacon — He has. ( Presenting him the paper. ) 

Junior Deacon — You will wait a time with patience 
^ until the pleasure of the Most Potent Grand Comman- 
der be made known. (Junior Deacon then shuts the 
door, goes to the Most Potent Grand Commander and 
hands him the paper which he reads.) 

Grand Commander — Let this brother be admitted. 
(Junior Deacon goes to the door and opens it, when the 
Senior Deacon enters with candidate and advances to 
^ the East, in front of, and facing the Grand Comman- 
der.) 

Grand Commander— Mj brother, are these your an- 
swers ? 

Candidate — They are. 

Grand Commander — Are you an Elu'^® and Grand 
Elect Perfect and Sublime Mason? 

Candidate — I am. 

Grand Commander — Dost thou desire to obtain the 
egree of Knight Commander of the Temple ? 

Candidate — I do. 

Grand Commander — Knowest thou that thou wouldst 
thus embrace a life of toil and hardship, of self-denial 
and of danger? 

Candidate — I do. 

Grand Commander — And dost thou not hesitate and 
falter at the prospect ? 

Note 308. — "Elus. The French word elu means elected; and the 
•degrees, whose object is to detail the detection and punishment of the 
actors in the crime traditionally related in the third degree, are called 
Elus, or the degrees of the Elected, because they referred to those of 
the Craft who were chosen or elected to make the discovery, and to inflict 
the punishment. They form a particular system of Masonry, and are to 
be found in every Rite, if, not in name, at least in principle. In the 
York and American Rites, the Elu is incorporated in the Master's de- 
gree; in the French Rite it constitutes an independent des?rce; and in 
the Scottish Rite it consists of three degrees, the ninth, tenth and elev- 
enth. Ragon counts the five preceding degrees among the Elus, but they 
more properly belong to the Order of Masters. The symbolism of these 
Elu degrees has been greatly mistaken and perverted by anti-Masonic 
writers, who have thus attributed to Masonry a spirit of vengeance, which 
Is not its characteristic. Thpy must l)e looked upon as conveying only 
a symbolic meaning." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article 
Elus. 



190 



COMMANDER OF THE TEMPLE. 



Candidate — I do not. 

Grand Commander — ^Go then, with our brother Sen- 
ior Deacon to the altar and there assume the obligation 
of this degree. (Senior Deacon conducts him to the 
altar, causes him to kneel on both knees, with his hands 
upon the blades of the swords of three of the Knights 
who hold them crossed before him upon the bible, in 
which position he contracts the following obligation:) 
Twenty-seventh Degree, or Commander of thb 

Temple. 




Candidate taking Obligation, Commander of the Temple Degree. 
OBLIGATION COMMANDER OF THE TEMPllE. 

I on my word of honor^ in quality of a Grand 

Elect, Perfect and Sublime Mason, do promise and swear 
in the presence of the Great Architect of the Universe , 
and of this respectable Court, to keep the secrets of this] 
degree which are about to be communicated to me, and 
that I will never be present and assist in conferring of 
this degree on any person except it be in a regular Court 
of ^Commanders of the Temple, or by virtue of a Patent 
from a Supreme Council or from a Sovereign or Deputy l 
Grand Inspector General And in ca§e of perjury, may ; 



INITIATION. 



191 



I be an object of horror to all men and to myself. So 
help me God. (Grand Commander raises him and in- 
vests him with the following signs :) 




SIGN OF RECOGNITION. 

Form on your forehead a cross, with 
the thumb of your right hand, the 
fingers clinched. 



Sign of Recognition 
Commander of thi 
Temple. 



ANSWER. 

Kiss the place where the cross 
was made. (This sign is used in 
the Court only.) 

ANSWER. 

(Out of Court.) Place first 
two fingers of the right hand on 
the mouth, the other fingers closed 
the palm of the hand turned out- ^ 
ward. 




Ajj§W€?, 



192 



COMMANDER OF THE TEMPLE. 




SIGN OF ORDER. 



(In the Court.) Extend your right 
hand on the round table^ thumb separate 
so as to form a square. When standing, 
place the right hand on the body b*elow 
the breast, forming also a square. 



Sign of Order, Com- 
mander of the Temple. 



TOKEN. 



Give three light blows with right 
hand on the other's left shoulder. 



ANSWER. 




Token, Commander of 
the Temple. 



He takes your right hand and 
gives it three light shakes. 

BATTERY : — Tweuty-sevon strokes with the flat of the 
sword, by twelve, twelve and by three. 

PASS v^'ORd: — Solomon. 

SACRED WORD I — I. '.N. '.R. *.!. '.lettered. ( Grand Com- 
mander now causes him to kneel, and with the blade of ^ 



INITIATION. 193 

his sword gives him twelve strokes on the right shoul- 
der, twelve on the left and three on the right, saying:) 

Grand Commander — By authority and power in me 
vested, I hereby constitute, create and dub thee a 
Knight Commander of the Temple of Jerusalem, be 
true, be devout, be brave. (Grand Commander takes 
his station, the members are seated and the Senior Dea- 
con conducts the candidate up to the East.) 

Grand Commander — My brother, these trophies which 
the Court yields to you, and particularly this one (show- 
ing Crown of Laurel) is to crown the acts and benefits 
you have made to the order, to the Court, and to the 
Commanders. We entreat your perserverance, (puts it 
on his head.) 

Grand Commander — This trophy, (showing a palm 
ornamxcnted with five crosses) announces to you the an- 
tiquity of the order, and the faith you must have in the 
Great Architect of the Universe and tow^ard the decrees 
of masonry. (Invests him with it.) 

Grand Commander — This trophy, (showing the 
apron) denotes to you the beneficence and union of the 
members of this Court ; to succor the unfortunate found 
among them. This day my brother, you are to enjoy 
the delights of stopping the tears of the wretched. 
(Invests him with apron.) 

Grand Commander — This trophy, (showing gloves 
etc.,) gives you the force to sustain the rights of mason- 
ry and of men. (Invests him with the gloves, etc.) 

Grand Commander — This expressive trophy, (show- 
ing triangular jewel and collar) of the Court merits your 
attention and. will direct you in the course of your life, 
your movements, your words and actions. It is an 
ocular witness of every thing you promised us^ and 
that the remembrance of your vows will be the consola- 



194 COMMANDER OF THE TEMPLE. 

tion of your last days, is the sincere wish of the mem- 
bers of this Court. (Invests him with them.) 

Grand Commander — ^^Attention Commanders ! Join 
me in applauding our newly admitted Commander 
among us. (All give the battery when Grand Command- 
er takes his seat.) 

Grand Commander — Brother Senior Deacon, you will 
now conduct the Commander to the post of honor. 
(Senior Deacon seats him on the right of the Grand 
Commander who delivers the following:) 

HISTORYi'"' 

When the St. Jean D'Acre, the ancient Ptolemais, on 
the south side of which was Mount Carmel, was besieged 
by the Christian forces for nearly two years under Guy 
of Lusignan, King of Jerusalem, Conrad, Marquis of 
Mont Ferrat, and other princes and leaders from every 
country in Europe, and especially by Henry Sixth of 
Germany, son of Frederic Barbarossa, joined, near the 
end of the siege, by Philip Augustus of France, and 
Eichard Coeur de Leon of England, they were long 
afflicted with famine until they ate the flesh of horses 
with joy. Men of high rank and the sons of great rnen 
greedily devoured the grass ; the starving fought together 
like dogs for the little bread baked at the ovens; they 
gnawed the bones that had already been gnawed by the 
dogs, and noblemen, ashamed to beg, were known to 
steal bread. Constant rains added i:o their miseries and 
Saladin, Sultan of the Saracens, encamped near them 

Note 309. — "Vassal. Ragon, and Clave! are all wrong in connecting th!g 
degree with the Knights Templars, with which Order its owu ritual 
declares that it is not to be confounded. It is without a lecture. Vassal 
expresses the following opinion of this degree: 

'* 'The twenty-seventh degree does not deserve to be classed in the 
Scottish Rite as a degree, since it contains neither symbols nor allegories 
that connect it with initiation. It de'5erv(-s still less to be ranked amongf 
the philosophic degrees. I imagine that it has been intercalated only to', 
supply an hiatus, and as a memorial of an Order once justly celebrated.' "^ 
Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Sovereign Commander of, 
the Temple, 



INITIATION. 195 

with a vast army from every portion of his dominions, 
and all the Great Emirs of Islamism harassed them with 
constant attacks. Sickness also, caused by the rains and 
the intense heat, decimated the Christian forces. The 
wounded German soldiers, whom none of the others 
understood, could not make known their sickness nor 
their necessities. 

Certain German Nobles from the cities of Bremen 
and Lubec, who had arrived at Acre by sea, moved by 
miseries of their countrymen, took the sails of their ships 
and made of them a large tent, in which for a time they 
placed the wounded Germans and tended them with 
great kindness. Forty nobles of the same nation united 
wath tliem and established a kind of hospital in the 
midst of the camp, and this noble and charitable institu- 
tion and association, like the Knights of the Temple and 
of St. John of Jerusalem, soon and incessably, became a 
new hospitaller and military order. This was in the 
year 1191. 

In 1193 Pope Celestin Third, at the request of the 
Emperor Henry Sixth, solemnly approved of the order 
by his Bull of the 23rd of February. He prescribed as 
regulations for the new Knights, those of St. Augustine, 
and for special statutes, in all that regarded the poor and 
the sick, those of the hospitallers of St. John ; in regard 
to military discipline the regulations of the Templars. 
This noble order, exclusively composed of Germans, was 
styled the order of Teutonic Knights of the House of 
'St. Mary of Jerusalem. 

After the destruction of the Templars, they w^ero also 
known as Commanders of the Temple. 

The first name was given them because while the city 
'of Jerusalem was under the government of the Latin 
Christians^ a German had erected there, at his own ex- 



196 COMMANDER OF THE TEMPLE. 

pense, a Hospital and Oratory for the sick of that nation, 
under the protection of, and dedicated to the Holy 
Virgin. 

Their dress was a white mantle with a black cross, 
and they, like the Hospitallers, were required to take 
three solemn vows. Before assuming the habit, they 
were required to swear that they were Germans of noble 
extraction and birth, and to bind themselves for a whole 
life to serve the poor and sick and defend the holv 
places. Ever to adhere to truth, to attend and nurse the 
sick and wounded, and never to recede before the enemy 
were their three solemn vows. 

Truth is the first masonic duty. To leave the path of 
duty is to recede before the enemy, and therefore you 
have taken the three vows of the Teutonic Knights'''' and 
Hospitallers in a still more noble and enlarged spirit. 
The Teutonic Knights soon became one of the Most 
Illustrious of the military and religious orders. The 
three were the chief strength of the army before Acre, 
but the siege advanced slowly where there were neither 
absolute chiefs nor discipline. 

On the 13th of July, 1191, it surrendered. In the year j 
1226, most of the Teutonic Knights went from the Holy ') 
Land to Prussia, the people of which were still Idolaters, ) 
waging war against their Christian neighbors, murdering 

Note 310. — "Teutonic Knights. The origin of this Order was an hum- 
ble but a pious one. During^ the Crusades, a wealthy gentleman of Ger- 
many, who resided at Jerusalem, commiserating the condition of his 
countrymen who came there as pilgrims, made his house their receptacle, 
and afterwards built a hospital, to which, by the permission of the 5 
Patriarch of Jerusalem, he added an oratory dedicated to the Virgin Mary. 
other Germans coming from Lubeck and Bremen contributed to the exten- 
sion of his charity, and erected at Acre, during the third" Crusade, a 
sumptuous hospital and assumed the title of Teutonic Knights, or- 
Brethren of the Hospital of Our Lady of the Germans of Jerusalem.-; 
They elected Henry Walpott their first Master, and adopted for theirs 
government a Rule closely approximating to that both of the Templars = 
and the Hospitallers, with an additional one that none but Germans 
should be admitted into tho Order. Their dress consisted of a white, 
mantle, with a black cross, embroidered In gold."— Mackey s Encyclo* : 
psedia of Freemasonry, Article Teutonic Knights, ; 



imTiATiOK. " 197 

Priests at the foot of the altar and employing the sacred 
vessels for profane use. 

Conrad, Duke of Masovia, called in the Teutonic 
Knights to his assistance and gave them, as a commence- 
ment for their establishment there, the whole Territory 
of Culm, with all lands they should conquer from the 
Infidels. De Daltza, the Grand Master, sent thither a 
Knight called Conrad de Lansburg, who concluded the 
treaty which was signed by three Bishops of that coun- 
try. The Knights tlien entered these northern countries 
and by continued wars acquired in time the entire 
sovereignty of Eoyal and Ducal Prussia, Livonia and 
the Duchies of Cowrland and Semigal; all vast Provin- 
ces and capable of forming a great kingdom. And when 
in 1291, the Sultan stormed and took St. Jean D'Acre, 
the Teutonic Knights''' that survived returned to Eu- 
rope and joined their brethren in Prussia and Livonia. 
Times change and circumstances, but virtue and duty 
remain the same. The evils to be warred against but 
take another shape and are developed in a different form. 

There is the same need now of truth and loyalty as in 
the days of Frederic Barbarossa. The characters relig- 
ious and military, attention to the sick and wounded in 
the Hospital and war against the Infidel in the field, are 
no longer blended, but the same duties to be performed 
in another shape, continue to exist and to environ us all. 

The innocent virgin is no longer at the mercy of the 
brutal Baron or licentious man-at-arms, but purity and 

Note 311. — "Teutonic Order. A religious order of Knights, founded 
In 1190, by Frederick, Duke of Suabia, during a crusade in the Holy 
Land, at the time of the siege of Acre, and intended to be confined to 
Germans of noble rank; hence its name. The rule of the order was 
similar to that of the Templars. The original object of the association 
was to defend the Christian religion against the infidels, and to take 
care of the sick in the Holy Land. As the Order was dedicated to the 
Virgin Mary the Knights called themselves also 'Brethren of the German 
House of Our Lady of Jerusalem. ' The dress of the members was 
black, with a white cloak, upon which was worn a black cross with a 
silver edging. The Grand Master lived first at Jerusalem, but afterward, 
when the Holy Land fell again under the power of the Turks, at Venice, 
and, from 1297, at Marburg. The order was abolished by Napoleon, 
April 24, 1809. The Teutonic cross forms a part of the decorations of the 
27th degree of the Ancient Scotch Rite." — Macoy's EnQyclopeedia and 
Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article Teutonic Order, 



198 COMMANDER OF THE TEMPLE. 

innocence still need protectors. To purity and inno- 
cence everywhere, the Knights Commanders owe pro- 
tection as of old, against bold violence or those more 
guilty, the murderers who by art and treachery seek'to 
slay the soul; and against that grim want and gaunt, 
and haggard destitution that drive too many to sell their 
honor and their innocence for food. In no age of the 
world has man had better opportunity than now, to dis- 
play those lofty virtues and that noble heroism that so 
distinguished the three great military and religious or- 
ders in their youth, before they became corrupt and 
vitiated by prosperity and power. When a fearful 
epidemic ravages a city, and death is inhaled with the 
air men breathe ; when the living scarcely suffice to bury 
the dead, most men flee in abject terror, to return and 
live respectable and influential when the danger has 
passed away. 

But the old Knightly spirit of devotion and disinter- 
estedness and contempt of death, still lives, and is not 
extinct in the human heart. Everywhere a few are found 
to stand firmly and inflinchingly at their posts, to front 
and defy the danger, not for money, or to be honored 
for it, or to protect their own household, but from mere 
humanity and to obey the unerring dictates of duty. 
They nurse the sick, breathing the pestilential atmos- 
phere of the hospital. They explore the abodes of want 
and misery. They perform the last sad offices to the 
dead, and they seek no other reward than the approval 
of their own conscience. These are the true Knights of 
the present age. To the performance of acts of heroism 
like these, you have devoted yourself, my brother, by 
becoming a Knight Commander of the Temple. 

Soldier of the truth and of loyalty, protector of pur- 
ity and innocence, defier of plague and pestilence, nurser 
of the sick and burier of the dead; Knight preferring 
death to the abandonment of the post of duty, welcome 
to the bosom of this order. 



I 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 



Commander of the temple. 



312 



Grand Commander — (Knocks three; 000.) All rise^ 
draw swords and bring them to a carry.) 

Grand Commander — Most Sovereign Commander in 
the West, what is the hour? 

Senior Warden — It is four in the afternoon, Most 
Potent Grand Commander. 

Grand Commander — Since the sun is declining in the 
West, it is time that we should close this Court ; that we 
may not omit, even for one day, our duties in the world. 
Sovereign Commanders, let us assemble around the altar 
that we may close this Court. (All form as in opening 
ceremonies.) 

Grand Commander — Let us be one, Sovereign Com- 
manders, now and hence forward, and let our swords, 
our arms, our hearts, be devoted to the great cause of 
truth, humanity and duty. Let us pray. (All kneel and 
the same prayer is said as at opening, after which all 
rise and take their stations.) 

Grand Commander — (Knocks three; 000.) 
Senior Tfar^Zen— (Knocks twelve; 000000000000.) 
Junior Farden— (Knocks twelve; 000000000000.) 
Grand Commander — Attention Commanders ! As this 
is the hour in which we terminate our operations, I de- 
clare this Court of Grand Commanders of the Temple of 
Jerusalem closed. 

iTote 312. — "Vassal expresses the following: opinion of the degree: 
•The 27th degree does not deserve to be classed in the Scotch Rite as a 
degree, since it contains neither symbols nor allegories that connect it 
with initiation. It deserves still less to be ranked among the philosophical 
degrees. I imagine that it has been intercalated only to supply an 
hiatus, and as a memorial of an Order once .justly celebrated." — Macoy's 
Encyclopagdia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article Sovereign Com- 
mander of the Temple. 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Twenty-Seventh Degree: or, Commander of 

the temple. 

Masonic Contempt for This Degree — Napoleon and the Roman Inquisition. 
—Vile Enough for the Scottish Bite. 

''This degree does not deserve to be classed, in the 
Scottish Eite, as a degree. * * * I imagine that it 
has been interpolated only to supply a hiatus;'^ t. e,, fill 
a gap. {Machey, in Note 309,) The same contempt for 
this 27th degree is expressed in stronger terms by Ma- 
coy, {Note 812.) Its origin is this: the Teutons were 
aboriginal Germans. When Europe was swept into the 
craze of the Crnsades, Germans, in the siege of Acre, 
A. D. 1190, formed a German-speaking, Teutonic order 
of military monks, or priests. They were mendicants, 
and like those orders everywhere gained wealth and 
power, as Popish orders still do by the gifts of the ig- 
norant and superstitious, who are fascinated by their 
dazzling uniform and sanctimonious pretensions. The 
military spirit is not the spirit of Christ, and monasteries 
of monks have ever been remarkable for cunning, idle- 
ness, gluttony, and the most loathsome and detestable 
vices. Napoleon abolished this Teutonic order, or 
lodge, when he overran Germany in 1809; and gave 
their lands to the princes of the German territories, 
which they had so overspread that its annual revenue 
had become 800,000 marks ; as the secret orders of this 
country, now, as a spiritual empire, draw more money 
from the people than the government. This 27th degree \ 
is that old Teutonic, secret order revived! And these i 



NAPOLEON AND THE ROMISH INQUISITION. 201 

'Commanders of the Temple/' here in the United 
States, as you read on page 198, profess to protect 
American girls from seduction, and destitution, and 
'^selling their honor for f ood/^ They are, in short, if we 
take their professions for genuine, a secret lodge, or- 
ganized to purify society and abate the social evil; 
whereas, military monks have ever been vampires of 
lust to the purity of the sex. 

Col, Lemanowslci, who followed Napoleon from a 
captain of a private company to the fall of the Kremlin 
and the retreat from Eussia, was detailed bv him to 
blow up the Inquisition at Madrid, during the Penin- 
sular campaign. The priests met the Colonel with 
sanctity and suavity and opened the doors for their ad- 
mission, where they found nothing amiss, till soldiers 
poured buckets of water on the mosaic marble floor of 
the main hall, when it ran down the crevices in the 
tessellated pavement. Their bayonets opened a pas- 
sage below, where they found men and women, old and 
young, prisoners in the Inquisition. They brought them 
out to the crowd of their friends outside. ^^And,^^ said 
the Colonel, ^^old mustaches, whom I had seen sit down 
on the corpse of a comrade, after a battle, and drink 
from the dead man^s canteen, wept like little children at 
the scene there presented: parents clasping to their 
bosoms sons and daughters, whom they had given up for 
dead ; and old prisoners looking for husbands and wives 
in vain among the crowd, who had died or left the 
country, during the long years of their incarceration in 
the prison of a secret order ! 

Such experiences of Napoleon prepared him to abolish 
the secret Teutonic order of Knighted Priests in 1809; 
which is now renewed as an armed secret order of Free- 
masons, consisting of men, sworn, with their hands on 
sword-blades, to conceal the proceedings of their order, 
So help them Ood! (See page 190.) 



202 VILE ENOUGH FOR THE SCOTTISH RITE. 

But we shall be told.^d it is true, that both Machey 
and Maooy, leading Masonic authorities, dislike and 
scout this 27th degree, as un-Masonic. Well, what is 
the reason of their dislike? They themselves tell us, in 
Notes 309 and 312; because it lacks ''symbols/' ''aU 
legories/" and ''philosophy/" Now the next, or 28th de- 
gree, both these authorities hail as the ''most important, 
interesting,'' and ''by far the most philosophical/' - 
(Note 314.) Turn forward and read the Analysis of the 
28th degree, and you will see what they mean by al- 
legory, *gymbo], and philosophy: they mean the symbols 
and allegories of Masonry, which alone give the true 
"knowledge of God ! V' (Note 319.) Philosophy which 
worships God not in His church on earth, but "in deep 
solitudes and sequestered forests,'' (page 210) along 
with Goths and Druids. (Note 325.) And that 
Masonry is "the purest philosophy," and "the basis of 
all religions," Christianity of course included ! 

And because this 27th degree does not put Christ on 
a level with Joseph Smith, and Christianity with Mor- 
monism; because, in short, it does not, as the 28th de- 
gree does, throughout, put the rabble of pagan gods 
above the God of heaven, and the worship of devils 
above the worship of Christ, Mackey and Macoy deem 
it unworthy to belong to Masonry. 

But surely, surely, this Teutonic degree, with its 
secret signs, tokens, and impudent traffic in the name 
Jehovah on its jewels (page 184) and its prayers, from 
lips used to blasphemy ; surely this grand swindle of the 
young men of America, dubbing them Knights for 
money is vile enough to belong to the Ancient and Ac- 
cepted Scottish Rite) which was manufactured by 
Jesuits, remodeled and sold by Jews. 



CHAPTER LI 



31S 



'WENTY-ElGHTH DEGREE, OK KnIGHTS OF THE SUN 
EAST OR AUTUMN. 

decorations:'"* — No particular hangings are pre- 
scribed. There may be painted on the walls of the 
lodge, landscapes of mountains and forests, designated 
represent nature both in the rude and natural, and 

le refined and cultivated state. The lodge is illumi- 
nated by a Sun placed above the head of the Master, in 

Note 313. — **0f all the high degrees it is, perhaps, the most important 
and the most interesting to the scholar who desires to investigate the 
true secret of the Order. Its old catechisms, now unfortunately too 
much neglected, are full of suggestive thoughts, and in its modern 
ritual, for which we are indebted to the inventive genius of Brother 
Albert Pike, it is by far the most learned ^nd philoaophical of the 
Scottish degrees." — Mackey's Encyclcpaedia of Sreemasonry, Article 
Knight of the Sun, 

Note 314. — "The walls should be painted to represent the open coun- 
try, mountains, plains, forests and fields. The chamber is lighted by a 
single light, a great globe of ground glass, in the South; this represents 
the Sun. The only additional light is from the transparencies. In the 
East is suspended a transparency, displaying the sign of the Macrocosm, 
or of the seal of King Solomon — the interlaced triangles; one white and 
■the other black. In the West is suspended a transparency displaying the 
sign of microcosm, or the pentagram traced on a pure white ground with 
lines of vermilion, and with a single point upward. Many other trans- 
parencies, symbolizing objects of great importance, are appropriately 
arranged around the chamber, particularly the accompanying figures, which 
are placed in the North. On the right "hand of the presiding officer, in 
the East, on a gilt pedestal, is a Caduceus, gilded, the upper part of 
it a cross, surmounted by a globe, and with two serpents twining around 
it, their heads rising above the cross. The ceiling should represent th^ 
heavens, with the crescent m.oon in the West, the principal planets, and 
the stars, in the constellations Taurus and Orion and those near the 
polar star. The presiding officer is styled Father Adam. The Warden 
sits in the West, and is called Brother Truth; there are seven other 
officers, who are styled Brothers Gabriel, Auriel, Michael, Gamaliel, 
Raphael, Zaphiel and Zarakhiel. The collar is a broad white watered 
ribbon: on the right side is painted or embroidered an eye., in gold. The 
apron is of pure white lambskin, with no edging or ornament, except the 
pentagram, which is traced on the middle of it with vermilion. The 
jewel is a medal of gold, on one side a full sun, on the other a globe. 
When the degree is conferred no jewel or apron is worn." — Macoy's Ency- 
clopaedia- and Pictionary of Freemasonry, Article Knight of the Sun, 



204 



KNIGHTS OF THE SUN. 



the centre of a triangle inscribed in a circle. In each^ 
angle of the triangle is the letter S. abbreviations of 
Stella, Sedet, Science; Wisdom, Morality, 

dress: — Adam wears a yellow covered robe. His 
head is covered. In his right hand is a sceptre, on the 
top of which is a golden globe. The handle or extrem- 
ity of the sceptre is gilt. He wears a Snn suspended by 
a chain of gold. No jewel or apron is worn when candi- 
date is being initiated. Brother Truth holds a sceptre 
with a golden eye on the end of it in his hand. The 
cherubim wear the order. 

ORDER : — White watered ribbon, worn across the body, 
at the bottom of which is painted or embroidered an 
eye. 

jewel: — A golden triangle with rays, and in the 
centre an eye. It is suspended from the bottom of the : 
sash. No aprons are worn. The Sjdphs wear a short 
habit or tunic, a brown apron and a blue cap, tied with ; 
a yellow ribbon. 

titles: — The Master is styled Father Adam. There 
is but one Warden. He acts as Introducer and preparer 
when there is a reception [initiation] and is called 
brother Truth. The other members of the Council are 
named Cherubim^ ^^ and there can be only seven cheru- 
bim in a Council. If more than that number are pret^ent, 
the additional brethren, to the number of five, are called 
Sylphs. 

The fixed number of cherubim correspond wilh ihe 

Note 315. — "Josephus says that they resemhle no known creyture. but 
that Moses made them in the form in which he saw them about the 
throne of God; others, deriving their ideas from what ifs said of them 
by Ezekiel, Isaiah, and St. John, describe them as havlnc: the face and 
breast of a man, the wings of an eagle, the belly of a lion, and the legs 
and feet of an ox, which three animals, with man, are the symbols of ^ 
strength and wisdom. But all agree in this, that they had wings, and 
that these wings were extended. The cherubim were purely symbolic. 
But although there is great diversity of opinion as to their exact signifi- 
cation, y<}t there is a very general agreement that they allude to and, 
symbolize the protecting and overshadowing power of the Deity, *'—•. 
Mackey's Encyclopsedia Qf Freemasonry, Article Cheruljun, 



KNIGHTS OF THE SUN*. 



205 



number of angels who governed the number of planets 
known to the ancients^ viz: Michael, Gabriel, Auriel, 
Hamaliel, Raphael, Zarachiel and Saphael, which were 
supposed to preside over and govern the planets Saturn, 
Jupiter, Mars, Venus, Mercury; the Sun and Moon. 
battery:— Six equi-timed strokes; 000000. 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

Knights of the Sun/'' 

Father Adam — Brother Truth, what time is it on 
earth ? 

Brother Truth — Father Adam, it is midnight among 
the profane or cowans, but the Sun''^ is in its meridian 
in this lodge. 

Father Adam — My children, profit by the favor of 
this austere, luminary at present showing its light to us. 

Note 316. — "Knight of the Sun, or Prince Adept. Sometimes known 
by the names 'Ti\Q i*hiiosi pnical Ledge,' 'Prince of the Sun,' 'Key to 
Masonry.' It is the 28th degree of the Ancient and Accepted Rite, and is 
strictly philosophical and scientific. The ceremonies and lecture, which 
are of great length, furnish a history of all the preceding degrees and 
explain in the fullest manner the various Masonic emblems. The great 
object of the degree is to inspire men with the knowledi^e of Heavenly 
Truth, which is the pure source of all perfection, and as this virtue is 
one of the three great tenets of Masonry it deserves commendation. The 
body is styled a Council, and consists of not less than ten members." — 
Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article Knight of 
the Sun. 

Note 317. — "The Master, therefore, in the East is a symbol of the 
rising sun; the Junior Warden in the South, of the Meridian Sun; and 
the^enior Warden in the West, of the Setting Sun. So in the mysteries 
of India, the chief officers were placed in the east, the west, and the 
south, respectively, to represent Brahma, or the rising; Vishnu, or the 
setting; and Siva, or the meridan sun. And in the Druidical rites, the 
Archdruid, seated in the east, was assisted by two other officers — the one 
in the west reoresenting the moon, and the other, in the south, repre- 
senting: the meridian sun. 

This triple division of the government of a Lodge by three officers, rep- 
resentatives of the sun in his three manifestations in the east, south, 
and west, will remind us of similar ideas in the symbolism of antiquity. 
In the Orphic mysteries, it was taught that the sun generated from an 
esrer. burst forth with power to triplicate himself by his own unassisted I 
enersry. Supreme power seems always to have been associated in the 
ancient mind with a threefold division. Thus the sign of authority was 
indicated bv the three-forked lightning of Jove, the trident of Neptune, 
and three-headed Cerberus of Pluto. The government of the Universe 
was divided between these three sens of Saturn. The chaste goddess . 
ruled the earth as Diana, the heavens as Luna, and the infernal regions 
as Hecate, whence her rites were only performed in a place where three 
roads met. 

The sun 3s then presented to us in Masonry first as a symbol of light, 
but then more emphatically as a symbol of sovereign authority."— 
lAackey's Encyolopsuia oi Freemasonry, Article Sunt 



OPENING CEREMONIES. 



207 



which will conduct us in the path of virtue and to follow 
that law which is eternally to be engraved on our hearts, 
and the only law by which we cannot fail to come to 
the knowledge of pure truth. My children^ let us pray. 
(All kneel on the right knee^ raise the right hand, and 
Father Adam repeats the following prayer:) 

OPENING PRAYER KNIGHTS OF THE SUN. 

Bless, our Father, those of us who are now here 
assembled, by giving us those most inestimable of all 
blessings, far above honors and dignities, the priceless 
jewels of charity, friendship, love, justice and truth. 
Aid us in the keeping a perfect observance of all the 
duties which we have in any wise assumed to perform. 
Enable us to abide by the promises which we have made 
to one another, and to thee Eternal, omnipotent and 
merciful Deity, and to thy ineffable name be all praise 
for ever more. Amen. (All rise.) 

Father Adam — ^(Gives the sign:) 



SIGN. 

Place the right hand flat up- 
on the heart, the thumb separ- 
ate, so as to form a square. 

All — (Give the answer:) 

ANSWER. 

Eaise the right hand, and 
with the index, point to heaven. 




iSign, Knights of 
the Sun. 




Answer. 



Father Adam — I declare this Council of Knights of 
the Sun opened. 



CHAPTER LII 

Twenty-Eighth Degree, of Knights of the Sun.'' 



INITIATION. 

(Brother Truth retires and prepares the 
candidate as follows : A bandage over his 
eyes, a sword in his right hand; invests 
him with a ragged and bloody robe, puts 
a mask on his face, fetters binding his 
arms, a crown on his head, a purse in his 
left hand, etc. He then knocks six: 000- 
000, is admitted and stands at the door 
of the lodge.) 



Candidate 

Father Adam — ^Brother Truth, whom do you conduct? 

Brother Truth — A Commander of the Temple, who 
desires to go out of darkness and to see the true light, 
and to know the true light in all its purity, and to ask 
tidings of the times that are promised to man. 

Note 318. — "Knight of the Sun. [Scotch Masonry.]— The tenth degree 
conferred in the Consistory of Princes of the Royal Secret, Scotch 
Masonry, and the twenty-eighth upon the catalogue of that system. It 
is otherwise known as Prince Adept, Prince of the Sun, and Key of 
Masonry, or Chaos Disentangled. The historical instructions embrace the 
lectures and emblems of all the preceding degrees; its grand moral is the 
inculcation of truth. The assembly is termed a Council. Its officers are 
Thrice Perfect Father Adam and Brother Truth; the inferior oflScers are 
named after the seven chief angels. The brethren are termed Sylphs. 
The lodge has one light, shining through a globe of water. The jewel is 
a gold triangle, with rays; in the center an eye. Hour to open, mid- 
night on earth.' — Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Article Knig-ht of thft 
Sun, 




INITIATION. 209 

Father Adam—Wheit more dost thou desire? 

Brother Truth— (For candidate.) To divest myself 
of original sin and renounce the juvenile prejudices of 
error which all men are liable to ; namely the desire of 
all worldly attachments and pride. 

Father Adani'—ATe you prepared to receive instruc- 
tions with humility? 

Brother Truth — (For candidate.) I am. 

Father Adam — My son, you now desire to be instruct- 
ed in the knowledge of pure and holy truth''" and to be 
brought from darkness to light, and to know the pure 
light in all its purity, but before we comply with your 
wishes consult your own heart and mind, and see if you 
feel satisfied to obey her (holy truth) in all things which 
she commands. . If you, in your heart, feel disposed to 
do so, I am sure she is ready to comply with your wishes 
and impart those instructions to you. Mankind are so 
full of error and falsehood that though they search for 
happiness, few have knocked at the door of true light, 
which conducts us to felicity. 

The Knights of the Sun are instructed to go among 
men and to use their best efforts to inspire them with a 
knowledge of truth, which is the pure source of all 
perfection. Again, do you feel satisfied to obey her in 
all things which she commands? 

Note 319. — ''Truth. The real object of Freemasonry, in a philosophi- 
cal and religious sense, is the search for truth. This truth is, there- 
fore, symbolized by the Word. From the first entrance of the Apprentice 
into the Lodge, until his reception of the highest degree, this search is 
continued. It is not always found, and a substitute must sometimes be 
provided. Yet whatever be the labors he may perform, whatever the 
ceremonies through which he may pass, whatever the symbols in which 
he may be instructed, whatever the reward he may obtain, the true end 
of all is the attainment of truth. This idea of truth is not the same 
as that expressed in the lecture of the first degree, where Brotherly Love, 
Relief, and Truth are there said to be the 'three great tenets of a 
Mason's profession.' In that connection, truth, which is called a 
'divine attribute, the foundation of every virtue,' is synonymous with 
sincerity, honesty of expression, and plain dealing. The higher idea of 
truth, which pervades the whole Masonic system, and which is symbolized 
by the Word, is that which is properly expressed to a knowledge of 
God." — Mackey's Encyclopsedia of Freemasonry, Article Tr^tb. 



210 KNIGHTS OF THE SUN'. 

Brother Truth — (For candidate.) I do. 

Father Adam — Brother Truth, conduct this Com- 
mander around our temple of Wisdom to the seven 
Cherubim, and let them in due succession examine and 
try him, that we may know and be satisfied that he is 
fit to dwell among us. (Brother Truth conducts him 
once around the temple while Raphiel says:) 

Raphiel — God is the author of every thing that ex- 
isteth, the eternal, the supreme, the living and awful 
being, f^om whom nothing in the univcrfce is hidden. 
Make of him no idols and visible images, but rather 
worship him in the deep solitudes of sequestered for- 
ests, for he is invisible and fills the universe as his soul, 
and liveth not in any temple. (Brother Tiuth now halts 
in front of Raphiel.) 

Raphiel — Brother Truth, whom do you conduct? 

Brother Truth — A Commander of the Temple who de- 
sires to go out of darkness and to see the true light, and 
to know the true light in all its purity, and to ask 
tidings of the times that are promised to man. 

Raphiel — He cannot pass here! behold! he has the 
bandage of ignorance and prejudice upon his brow. 

Brother Trai/^— Enlightened Raphiel, he is ready to 
cast it off with your assistance. 

Raphiel— {Remoyes the bandage and exhibits the 
three lights.) Henceforth, my brother, follow these 

three lights, indicative of Analysis, 

Synthesis, Analogy ; the instruments 

of thought and look for knowledge 

with a clear and fearless eye, and 

greet truth wheresover you meet her, 

whether on a throng or in a dungeon, Threeiughts. 

triumphant or proscribed. Prove all things and hold 




INITIATION. 211 

fast to the good. (Brother Truth conducts him once 
around the room.) 

Gahriel — Light and darkness are the world's eternal 
ways. God is the principal of everything that exists, 
and the father of all beings. He is the eternal, immov- 
able and self-existent. There are no bounds to his 
powers. At one glance he is the past, the present and 
the future. (Halts in front of Gabriel.''''') 

Gabriel — Brother Truth, whom do you conduct? 

Brother Truth — A Commander of the Temple who 
desires to go out of darkness and to see the true light, 
and to know the true light in all its purity, and to ask 
tidings of the times that are promised to man. 

Gabriel — This brother comes with a sword in his 
hand. He cannot pass till he breaks his weapon under 
his feet. ( Candidate breaks his sword and Gabriel holds 
up a caduceus.) 

Gabriel — In lieu of that sword, in lieu of offensive 

war bring with you among men 
the caduceus of peace, and ex- 
ert yourselves to avert anger 
and bloodshed; blessed are the 
peace-makers, for they are the 
children of God. (Brother 
Truth, again conducts him 
Caduceus. oncc around the room.) 

Auriel — In the beginning man had the word, and that 
word was from God, and out of the living power which 
in and by that word was communicated to man came the 
light of his existence. Let no man speak the word, for 
by it the Father made light and darkness ; the world aiid 
living creatures. (Halts in front of Auriel.) 

Note 320. — "The name of one of the archangels, referred to in some 
or the high degrees." — Mackey's .Encyolopaedia of Freemasonry, Article 
vaDneli 




21S KmOHTS OF THE SUK. 

Auriel — Brother Truth, whom dcLyou conduct? 
Brother Truth — A Commander of the Temple, who 
desires to go out of darkness and to see the true light, 
and to know the true light in all its purity, and to ask 
tidings of the times that are promised to man. 

Auriel — What do I see? This Commander you con- 
duct dares to present himself as a fellow laborer and 
stands clothed in the tattered and impure garb of indo- 
lence and vice. Divest him of that garb. (Brother 
Truth takes off the robe.) 

Brother Truth — Glorious Auriel, the aspirant has cast 
off the disgraceful garb of idleness. 

Auriel — ^Tis well ! His body being relieved from ig- 
nominy, his mind may now discover and fulfill the moral 
meaning of the cone or pyramid; that form of matter 
from which all other figures may be de- 
rived, and which is an emblem of produc- 
tive truth, varied order and economic 
utility. It represents the true mason who 
raises himself by degrees till he reaches 
heaven, to adore the sacred and unuttera- 
ble name of the Great Architect of the 
Cone or Pytapaid.', Universe. If any will not work, neither 
shouTd they eat. (Brother Truth again conducts him 
once around the room.) 

Zarachiel—Mnji was created pure, and God gave him 
truth as he gave him light. He has lost the truth and 
found error. He has wandered far into darkness and 
round him sin and shame hover evermore. The soul 
that is impure and sinful and defiled with earthly stains 
cannot again unite with God, until by long trials and 
many purifications it is finally delivered from the old .: 
calamity, and light overcomes darkness and dethrones 
it in the soul. (Halts in front of Zarachiel.) 




INITIATION. 213 

Zarachiel — Brother Truth;, whom do you conduct? 

Brother Truth — A Commander of the Temple who 
desires to go out of darkness and to see the true lights, 
and to know the true light in all its purit}^, and to ask 
tidings of the times that are promised to man. 

Zarachiel — I cannot permit him to pass, for he wears 
the mask of hypocrisy. (Brother Truth removes the 
mask.) 

Brother Truth — Shining Zarachiel, his mask has fal- 
len and he stands before you, in honesty and innocence. 

Zarachiel — ^^Tis well ! He doth stand approved, and 
may drink of the pure contents of this transparent gob- 
let. Let the perfect purity of its contents be a token of 
the resolution of this hour, blessed are the pure in heart. 
(Candidate drinks, v/hen Brother Truth again conducts 
him once around the room.) 

Hamaliel — Before the world grew old, the primitive 
truth faded out from men's souls. Then man asked him- 
self, what am I and how and whence am I and whither 
do I go? and the soul looking inward upon itself strove 
to learn whether that ^^T^ were mere matter ; its thought 
and reason, its passions and affections mere results of 
material combination or, a material being enveloping an 
immiaterial spirit. (Halts in front of Hamaliel.) 

Hamaliel — Brother Truth, whom do you conduct? 

Brother Truth — A Commander of the Tenrple who de- 
sires to go out of darkness and to see the true light, and 
to know the true light in all its purity, and to ask tidings 
of the times that are promised to man. 

Hamaliel — None but the free can enter into, the gates 
of the Eden, for it is the land of liberty. (Brotlfcr 
Truth takPB off the chains of the candidate.) 



314 KNIGHTS OF THE SUN. 

Hamaliel — Thereafter, my brother, let this globe be 

The^Giobe. " ' (Brother Truth again 

conducts him once around the room.) 

Saphael — God is the first ; indestructable, eternal, un- 
created, indivisible. Wisdom, justice, truth, mercy, with 
harmony and love are of his essence, and eternity and 
infinitude of extension. He is silent, and consents with 
mind, and is known to soul through mind alone. In him 
were all things originally contained and from him all 
things were evolved. (Halts in front of Saphael.) 

Saphael — Brother Truth, whom do you conduct? 

Brother Truth — A Commander of the Temple who 
desires to go out of darkness and to see the true light, 
and to know the true light in all its purity, and to ask 
tidings of the times that are promised to man. 

Saphael — With the haughty crown of vanity and pride 
upon his forehead, how can he hope to inhabit Eden, 
where all are equal sons of the Great Architect of the 
Universe. This arrogant Commander must cast his 
crown to his feet if he wishes to proceed. (Brother 
Truth divests him of his crown.) 

Brother Truth — Saphael, it is done. 

Saphael — Then let him look to this cross, It is the 




INITIATION. 215 

sign of the sacred dogma of equality, 
and with it for a monitor we may yet 
hope for the reign of God on earth. 
The meek shall inherit the earth. 
(Brother Truth again conducts him 
once around the room.) 



Crogi^ 



Michael — In the beginning, the universe was one soul* 
He was the all ; alone with time and space, and infinite 
as they. He had his thoughts : ^^I create worlds'' and lo ! 
the universe and the laws of harmony and motion that 
rule it; the first of a thought of God, and the bird and 
beast, and every living thing but man, and light and air, 
and the mysterious currents, and the dominion of 
mysterious numbers. (Halts in front of Michael.) 

Michael — Brother Truth, whom do you conduct ? 

Brother Truth — ^A Commander of the Temple, who 
desires to go out of darkness and to see the true light, 
and to know the true light in all its purity, and to ask 
tidings of the timos that are promised to man. 

Michael — ^In vain does this man seek to enjoy the 
happiness of Eden on earth; for he clutches in his hand 
the treasure of human avarice. (Brother Truth takes 
the purse from the candidate and hands it to Michael.) 

Brother Truth — Michael,'''' he casts it before you to 
be put into the common treasury. 

Note 321. — "Who is like unto God. The chief of the seven arch- 
angels. He is the leader of the celestial host, as Lucifer is of the in- 
fernal spirits, and the especial protector of Israel. He is prominently 
referred to in the twenty-eighth degree of the Ancitnit and Accepted 
Scottish Rite, or Knight of the Sun." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of FrcQ- 
masonry, Article Michael* 



216 



KNIGHTS OF THE SUN. 




Michael — Then let him wear the sign 
of the ardent dove, to indicate that his 
soul will ever cherish affection for his 
fellow-man. (Invests him with it.) 



Ardent Dove. 

Michael — Brother Trnth, yon will now conduct the 
candidate to Father Adam,''^ (Order is obeyed.) 

Father Adam — My son, dost thou desire to be further 
instructed in these great primitive truths, which are the 
treasures of the archives of masonry? 

Candidate~l do. 

Father Adam — Art thou prepared to give us thy most 
solemn pledge and promise that thou wilt strenuously 
endeavor faithfully to practice that pure morality that 
flows as a result from the great truths that thou hast 
heard ; to repent of ^ and regret thy short-comings, and 
thy errors, and to submit patiently to gentle and brother- 
ly rebuke and reprimand if thou shouldest offend? 

Candidate — I am. 

Father Adam — Go, then, and upon thy bended knees, 
before the altar of truth and the great light, emblem of 
the God of the Patriarchs, prepare to receive the solemn 
obligation of a Knight of the Sun. (Brother Truth 

Note 322. — "It is most probably in this collective sense, as the rep- 
resentative of the whole human race, and, therefore, the type of hu- ^: 
manity, that the presiding officer in a Council of Knights of the Sun, 
the 28th degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, is called 
Father Adam, and is occupied in the investigation of the great truths 
which so much concern the interests of the race. Adam, in that degree, 
is man seeking aftej* divine truth. The Kabbalists and Talmudists have 
invented many things concerning the first Adam, none of which are, 
however, worthy of preservation. See Knight of th© SuR."— MacJfeey'S 
Encygiopsedia of Treemasonry, Article Adam. 



\t 



INITIATION. 217 

conducts him to the altar^ and causes him to kneel on 
both knees.) 

OBLIGATION KNIGHTS OF THE SUN. 

I. .( promise and swear^ in the presence of the 

I Great Architect of the Universe, and of all the brethren 
here present, never to take arms against my country, 
directly or indirectly, in any conspiracy whatever. 

I furthermore promise and swear never to reveal any 
of the secrets of the degree of Knights of the Sun, to 
any person or persons unless duly qualified to receive 
the same, and never give my consent to the admission 
of any one into our mysteries, until after the most 
scrupulous circumspection and full knowledge of his 
life and conversation, and who has given at all times full 
■proof of his zeal and fervent attachment for the order, 
and a submission at all times to the consistory of Prin- 
ces of the Eoj^al Secret. 

I furthermore promise and swear never to confer the 
degree of Knights of the Sun, v/ithout having a permis- 
^sion in writing from the Grand Consistory or from a 
Grand Inspector or Deputy. 

j^ I furthermore promise and swear to redouble my zeal 
ffoi^ all my brethren, Knights and Princes, and should I 
IwillfuUy violate this my obligation, may my brethren 
seize me and thrust my tongue through with a red hot 
iron, to pluck out my eyes and deprive me of smelling 
and seeing, to cut off my hands and expose me in that 
condition in the field to be devoured by the voracious 
animals, and if none can be found, may the lightning of 
heaven execute on me the same vengeance. So may 
God maintain me in righteousness and equity. Amen. 
(Father Adam then raises him and kisses him on the 
forehead, invests him with the collar and jewel, and 
gives him the following:) 



218 




KNIGHTS OF THE SUN. 
SIGN. 

Place the right hand flat up- 
on the hearty the thumb separ- 
ate, so as to form a square. 

ANSWER. . 

Raise the right hand^ and 
with the index^ point to heaven. 




Answer. 



•Sign, Knights of 
the Sun. 




TOKEN. 

Take in your hand^ those of the 
brother and press them gently; kiss 

him on the forehead and say Alpha. 

**' He returns the kiss and says, 
Omega. But this is not much used. 



Token Knijarhts of 
the Sun, 

battery: — Six equi-timed strokes; OOQOOO. 
PASS word: — Stibium. 

Note 323. — ** *I am Alpha and Ome^a, the heginning and the end, the 
first and the last.' These are respectively the first and the last letters 
In the Greek alphabet, corresponding with the English form 'A to Z* or 
the Hebrew 'Aleph to Tau.' " — Morris's Masonic Dictionary^ Article Alpha 
aud Omega. 



^^- 



INITIATION". 219 

Sx^CKED VvOhd: — ^Adonai. 

answer: — Abra or Abrag. That is, a king without 
blot. (After the candidate is invested with the signs^, 
token and words, he is seated in front of Michael (the 
Orator) who delivers the following history:) 

HISTORY. 

My brother, in the ancient mysteries/"* wherever they 
were practiced, was taught that truth of the primitive 
revelation, the existence of one great being, infinite and 
pervading the universe, who was there worshiped with- 
out superstition and his marvelous nature, essence and 
attributes taught to the initiates, while the vulgar at- 
tributed his words to secondary gods, personified and 
isolated from him in fabulous independence. These 
truths were covered from the common people as with a 
veil, and the mysteries were carried into every country, 
that without disturbing the popular beliefs, truth, the 
arts, and the sciences might be known to those who 
were capable of understanding them, and maintaining 
the true doctrine incorruptible, which the people, prone 
to superstition and idolatry, have in no age been able to 
do, nor, as many strange aberrations and superstitions of 
the present day prove, any more now than heretofore. 
For we need but point to the doctrines of so many sects 
'hat degrade the Creator to the rank, and assign to him 
the passions of humanity, to prove that now as always, 
the old truths must be committed to a few or they will 

Note 324. — "As to their origin, Warburton is probably not wrong in 
his statement that the first of which we have any account are those of 
Isis and Osiris in Egypt; for although those of Mithras came into Europe 
from Persia, they were, it is supposed, carried from Egypt by Zoroaster. 

The most important of these mysteries were the Osiric in Egypt, the 
Mithraie in Persia, the Cabiric in Thrace, the Adonisian in Syria, the 
Dionysiac and Elusinian in Greece, the Scandinavian among the Gothic 
nations, and the Druidical among the Celts. 

In all these mysteries we find a singular unity of' design, clearly Indi- 
cating a common origin, and a purity of doctrine as evidently proving 
that this common origin was not to be sought for in the popular theology 
of the Pagan world." — Mackey's Encyclopasdia of Freemasonry, Artici© 
Mysteries, Ancient. 



220 KNIGHTS OF THE SUK. 

be overlaid with fiction and error, and irretrievably lost. 

Though masonry is identical with the ancient mys- 
teries^ it is so in this qualified sense, that it presents but 
an imperfect image of their brilliancy, the ruins only of 
their grandeur and a system that has experienced 
progressive alterations, the fruits of social events and 
political circumstances. Upon leaving Egypt, the mys- 
teries were modified by the habits of the different na- 
tions among whom they were introduced. Though 
originally more moral and political than religious, they 
soon became the heritage as it v/ere of the priests, and 
essentially religious, though in reality limiting the 
sacerdotal power by teaching the intelligent laity the 
folly of the countries into which they were transplanted. 
In Greece they w^ere the mysteries of Ceres,'"^ in Rome, 
the good goddess, in Gaul, the school of Mars, in Sicily, 
the academy of the sciences. Among the Hebrews, they 
partook of the rights and ceremonies of a religion which 
placed all the powers of a government and all the knowl- 
edge in the hands of the priests and Levites. 

The Pagodas of India, the retreats of the Magi of 
Persia and Chaldea, and the pyramids of Egypt were 
no longer the sources at which men drank in knowledge. 
Each people, at all informed, had its mysteries. After a 
time the temples of Greece and the school of P3^thagoras 
lost their reputation and freemasonry took their place. 
Masonry, when properly expounded, is at once the in- 
terpretation of the great book of nature, the recital of 
physical and astronomical phenomenon, the purest] 
philosophy and the place of deposit, where, as in a treas- 
ury, are kept in safety all the great trnths of the primi- 

Kote 325. — "Ceres. Among the Romans the goddess of agriculture, 
but among the more poetic Greeks she was worshiped under the name of 
Demeter, as the symbol of the prolific earth. To her is attributed the in- 
stitution of the Eleusinian Mysteries in Greece, the most popular of all 
the ancient initiations." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Arti- 
cle Ceres. 



INITIATION. 221 

tive revelation^ that form the basis of all religions. In 
the modern degrees^ three things are to be recognized : 

The image of primeval times^, the tableau of the 

efficient causes of the universe, and the book in which 

ire written the morality of all peoples, and the code by 

^which they must govern themselves if they would be 

irosperous. 

The first' "^^ degree represents man, when he had 
|sunken from his original lofty estate, into what is most 
•improperly styled a state of nature. He represents in 
that degree the rough ashler, unfit to form a part of the 
spiritual temple, the" pagan who had lost all the great 
Fprimitive truths of the original revelation. He main- 
Sained the same character in the ancient mysteries. He 
[is emphatically a profane,''^ enveloped in darkness, poor 
and destitute of spiritual knowledge, and emblematically 
naked. 

The material darkness'^*' which is produced by the 

Note 326. — ''Although the Entered Apprentice is but a 'rough ashler/ 
yet he is of good substance and sound at the core. The statue is in the 
block, a figure more graceful than human genius can create. The En- 
tered Apprentice has been judged, by men expert in the selection of 
material, to be 'prepared In heart'; in theory he was a Mason even before 
he entered at the northwest corner of the Lodge. There is nothing in 
Masonic science that can do the work of heart-preparation, and those 
master builders who have attempted, out of inferior materials, to con- 
struct the Freemasons' wall, have ever and egregiously erred. Therefore 
is the Entered Apprentice one already prepared in heart. Nor is this tyro 
in Masonry altogether ignorant of the principles of the society into 
which he desires to penetrate; some exoteric knowledge of Masonry 
he must have had, for, in his petition, he declares that 'he has long en- 
tertained a favorable opinion of the ancient and honorable institution.' " 
—Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Article Entered Apprentice. 

Not© 327. — "Profane. There is no word whose technical and proper 
meaning differs more than this. In its ordinary'- use profane signifies 
one who is irreligious and irreverent, but in its technical adaptation it 
is applied to one who is ignorant of sacred rites. The word is com- 
pounded of the two Latin words pro and fannum, and literally means 
before or outside of the temple; and hence a profanus among the an- 
cients was one who was not allowed to enter the temple and behold 
the mysteries. 'Those.' says Vossius, 'were called profane who were not 
Initiated in the sacred rites, but to whom it was allowed only to stnnd 
before the temple — pro fano — not to enter it and tako part in the 
solemnities.' " — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Profane. 

Note 328, — "The material darkness which is produced by [the hood- 
wink! is an emblem of the darkness of his soul. He is deprived of every- 
thing that has a value, and wherewith he could purchase food, to indi- 
cate his utter destitution of the mental wealth of primitive truth." — 
Pieraon's Traditions, Subject Entered Apprentice, page 39. 



233 KNIGHTS OF THE SUN. 

bandage over his eyes^ is an emblem of the darkness of 
his soul. He is deprived of everything that has a value, 
and wherewith he could purchase food to indicate his 
utter destitution of the mental wealth of primitive truth. 
In this degree he undergoes only physical tests, and re- 
ceives elementary moral instructions. As yet he takes 
upon himself no duty but secrecy. He still remains in 
the dark quarter of the lodge though not in the jSTorth/'' 
but half way towards the East, the place of light. He is 
not exposed to the fearful trials which await the candi- 
date for initiation into the mysteries. He passes through 
no gloomy forests or long labyrinthine caves; he meets 
no hideous spectres ; he is stunned and alarmed by no 
fearful noises, he incurs no danger. 

A few solitary moments in reflection and prayer, a 
short time passed in darkness, a few uncertain steps, a 
few obstacles to overcome are all; and he enters the 
temple of truth and virtue. The journeys and trials of 
the candidate are an emblem of human life. Man en- 
ters, feeble and naked, upon a road full of dangers and 
pitfalls. The ignorance of the fancy, the fiery passions 
of youth, the troubles and agitations of mature age, the 
infirmities of old age are so many evils which assail 
him, and which philosophy alone can aid him against. 
Defenceless in a world of trouble, what would become 
of him without the assistance of his brethren ? 

His obligation is no vulgar oath, such as is adminis- 
tered in the profane world. It is antique and sacred. 
He repeats it without compulsion. The expressions are 

Note 329.— "A candidate in search of Masonic light comes frorn the 
West and presses forward to the East, the place of light, by way of the 
North, *the place of darkness.' This use of the word North is said, in 
the lectures of the Blue Lodge, to be derived from the situation of Jeru- 
salem. It was so far north of the Summer Solstice (latitude 31 degrees, 
46 minutes, 45 seconds, North, that is more than nine degrees North of 
the Summer Solstice), that the rays of the meridian sun could never dart 
into the northern windows of it. "-—Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Article 
North. 



plete. 



INITIATION. 2^3 

energetic, because being yet in darkness, he is on the 
point of passing from barbarism into civilization. It is 
like those of the ancient mysteries, for violating which, 
Alcibrades was exiled and devoted to the furies. 

When he is brought to light''" the allegory is corn- 
He sees around him a band of brothers bound to 
protect and defend him. 

The obligation he has assumed, they and every mason 
in the world have assumed toward him. He is one of 
the brotherhood, bound by its laws and enlisted as a 
soldier against ignorance and vice. The Master, for the 
time entitled to respect and veneration, is still but the 
first among his brethren, who are all his equals. Such 
is masonic law and usage, and such it has been from the 
earliest ages. In his journey, imitating that of life, the 
candidate goes but three times around^ ^^ the lodge 
although life has four seasons. This is because his 
journey also represents the annual devolution of the Sun. 
Had the mysteries originated in the North or West, in 
Rome or Greece, the seasons of the year and of life 

Note 330. — "Light. Light is an important word in the Masonic sys- 
tem. It conveys a far more recondite meaning than it is believed to 
possess by the generality of readers. It is in fact the first of all the 
symbols presented to the neophyte, and continues to be presented to him 
in various modifications throughout all his future progress in his Ma- 
sonic career. It does not simply mean, as might be supjwsed, truth or 
^ wisdom, but it contains within itself a far more abstruse allusion to 
the very essence of Speculative Masonry, and embraces within its capa- 
cious signification all the other symbols of the Order. Freemasons are 
emphatically called the 'sons of light,' because they are, or at least 
are entitled to be, in possession of the true meaning of the symbol; while 
the* profane or uiiitiated who has not received this knowledge are, by a 
parity of expression, said to be in darkless." — Mackey's Encyclopsedia of 
Freemasonry, Article Light. 

Note 331. — "Circumambulation is the name given by sacred archaeolo- 
gists to that religious rite in the ancient initiations which consisted in 
a formal procession around the altar, or other holy and consecrated object. 
The same Rite exists in Freemasonry. 

In ancient Greece, when the priests were engaged in the rite of. sac- 
rifice, they and the people always walked three times round the altar 
while singing a sacred hymn. In making this procession, great care 
was taken to move in imitation of the course of the sun. For this pur- 
pose, they commenced at the east, and passing on by the way of the 
south to the west and thence by -.^e north, they arrived at the east 
again." — Mackey's Encyclopsedia of Freemasonry, Article Circumambula- 
oion, rate of, 



224 KNIGHTS OF THE SUN". 

would have agreed^ and four have been the number in- 
stead of three. But in the East, in ancient times there 
were but three seasons. The three pillars ''" that sup- 
port the lodge are Wisdom, Strength and Beauty. 

The Egyptians and the Hebrews based their civil pol- 
icy upon the v/isdom of the priests, and the power, 
strength or valor of their civil chiefs who were also 
military commanders, and the harmony between these 
(synonymous with beauty among the Egyptians) com-- 
pleted the prosperity of the State. The age of an Ap- 
prentice is said to be three years, because in the ancient 
mysteries three years preparation was required before 
initiation could commence. 

The number three''' belongs in a peculiar manner to 
this degree. The alarm is three raps. There are three 
movable and three immovable jewels; three principal 
officers, three lights, greater and lesser; three journeys 
are made around the lodge. 

In the Fellow Craft degree, the number five succeeds 

Note 332. — "Pillars. Every lodge musi be supported by three grand 
shafts, or pillars — Wisdom, Strength, and Beauty. Wisdom constructs 
the building, Beauty adorns, and Strength supports it; also. Wisdom is 
ordained to discover, Beauty to orname-nt, and Strength to bear. He^ 
who is wise as a perfect Master will not be easily injured by his own., 
actions." — Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Dictionary' of Freemasonry, Article 
Pillars. 

Note 333.— "In all the mysteries, from Egypt to Scandinavia, we find 
a sacred regard for the number three. In the rites of Mithras, the Empy- 
rean was said to be supported by three intelligences, Ormuzd. Mithra, and 
Mithras. In the rites of Hindustan, there was the trinity of Brahma, 
Vishnu, and Siva. It was, in short, a general character of the mysteries 
to have three principal officers and three grades of initiation. 

In Freemasonry the ternary is the most sacred of all the mystical 
numbers. Beginning with the old axiom' of the Roman Artificers, that 
tres faciiint collegium, or it requires three to make a college, they have 
established the rule that not less than three shall congregate to form a I 
Lodge. Then in all the Rites, whatever may be the number of superim- I 
posed grades, there lie at the basis the three symbolic degrees. There 
are in all the degrees three principal, officers, three supports, three greater 
and three lesser lights, three movable and three immovable jewels, three I 
principal tenets, three working-tools of a Fellow Craft, three principal 
orders of architecture, three chief human senses, three Ancient Grand 
Masters. In fact, everywhere in the system the number three is presented 
as a prominent svmboL" — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Ereema^onry, ArticlQ 
Three, 



INITIATION*. 225 

' to three. In this degree the letter G. *.''* represents 
Geometry alone. Its deeper meaning is properly re- 
served for the third. Here the young Fellow Craft is 
the representative of the student of the sciences in the 
school of Pythagoras; and it was there known that 
among the Brahmins^ Gannes was the God of numbers 

*and the patrons of schools and learned societies. With 
us^ too, the letter is the substitute for the Hebraic Yod, 
the initial letter of the Divine name and a monogram 
that expressed the uncreated being, principal of all 
things, and enclosed in a triangle, the unity of God. 

|: The word of a Fellow Craft has an astronomical 

'' meaning that connects masonry with the primitive times. 
Setting the celestial globe for the place where the temple 
was built, and the season of the year when it was com- 
menced, the master's station corresponds with the solar 
rising. The sun^'^ has just shown himself above the 
horizon. The candidate entering by the west door faces 
the day star and is consequently near that star of the 
zodiac which sets as the sun rises. It is the star which 
blesses the husbandman; that brilliant star which the 
Hebrews called Shibboleth, meaning an ear of wheat. 

In the Fellow Craft degree, one point of the compass 
is raised above the square. The latter is an emblem of 
the mechanical world and of obedience. The former 

ITote 334. — "G. The situation of this letter, when alone, is well 
known to all Freemasons. It cannot allude to the name of God alone 
in the German lodges, or it could not be found in the situation in. 
foreign lodges. It has a closer affinity to Geometry, which is so neces- 
sary to an Architect, and geometrical certainty and truth is everywhere 
necessary. — Gadicke." — Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Dictionary of Free- 
masonry, Article G. 

Note 335. — "The heraldic definition of the sun as a bearing fit most 
appositely to the symbolism of the sovereignty of the Master. Thus 
Gwillim says: 'The sun is the symbol of sovereignty, the hieroglyphic 
of royalty; it doth signify absolute authority.' This representation of 
the sun as a symbol of authority, while it explains the refereilce to th*' 
Master, enables us to amplify its meaning, and apply it to the three 
sources of authority in the Lodge, ahd accounts for the respective posi- 
tions of the officers wielding this authority,"— Mackey's Encyclopsedia of 
Freemasoiiry, Article Sun, 



226 KNIGHTS OF THE SUN. 

describes those curves and circles which are figures of 
the celestial movements and is an emblem of authority. 
Thus the meaning is that the candidate has taken ona 
step towards celestial knowledge^ and from obedience 
to command. 

The Fellow Craft passes from the perpendicular to 
the square^ from the column Jachin to the column Boaz 
the perpendicular being a straight line the square two, 
forming a right angle. 

The third line comes in the Masters degree, to com- 
plete the right angled triangle and exhibit the 47th 
problem of Euclid and Pythagoras. 

The third degree commemorates the murder of 
Hiram'''' Abiff (whom it styles the Chief Architect of 
the Temple and one of our three Ancient Grand Mas- 
ters) by three perfidious workmen to whom he refused to 
give the master^s word; the less of that word and the 
substitution of another^ and hints at the resurrection to 
life of the murdered man^, though in fact^ in the York 
rite it relates that he was merely raised to be buried 
again. These were events of ordinary occurrence, so far 
as the mere murder and the discovery of the body, and 
the punishment of the assassins are concerned. Sym- 

Note 336. — "Masonic traditions are full of the life, labors and fate 
of the 'Widow's son' of Phoenicia. That he was an aged man, devoted 
through a long life to architecture and its kindred arts; that he was 
a worshiper of the true God in distinction from his countrymen, who 
were idolaters; that he entered heartily into tbe preparations of a moral 
system of Masonry, of which the rules, tools and language of practical 
building should be the types, the honor of God, and the good of man- 
kind the aim; that as the end of the Temple building drew nigh he 
became more endeared to the hearts of his royal patrons and the multi- 
tude of builders of all degrees; that he fell a victim to his fidelity a 
short time before the completion of that renowned structure, and that 
his death, the discovery of his remains and their final disposition were 
introduced into Symbolical Masonry, to become constituent portions of its 
legends, are admitted as facts by all Masonic historians. The theory 
of the learned Dr. Oliver that these facts were adopted by King Solomon 
and his royal companion as substituts for the mythological legends then 
in use in ^"he Freemasonry of Phoenicia, Hiram taking the place of Osiris 
and his death, disappearance and recovery those of parallel traditions in 
the Egyptian mysteries will be examined under other heads. The theory 
that they are to be considered only as myths is too ill-founded to need 
examination at QMV bands,"— Moms's MasoRiQ PictiQnary, Article Hira-m 






INITIATION. 227 

bolic Masonry, or the first three degrees, sole heir of 
the mysteries, does not tell us the true master^s word. We 
are left to discover it in that rite, in other and modern 
degrees. It is too evident that the degree is corrupted, 
mutilated and but a poor substitute for the last degree 
of the great mysteries. 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Knights of the Sun. 

Father Adam — Brother Truth, what progress have 
men made on earth to come to true happiness? 

Brother Truth — Men have always fallen. Very few 
have struggled and less have knocked at the door of 
this holy place to attain the full light of real truth, which 
we all ought to acquire. 

Father Adam — My dear children, depart and go 
among men. Endeavor to inspire them with the desire 
of knowing holy truth; the pure source of all perfec- 
tion. 

Father Adam — (Puts his right hand on his left 
breast.) 

All — (Raise the index finger of the right hand to 
heaven and clap six; 000000.) 

Father Adam — This Council is closed. 



I 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Twenty-Eighth Degree: or, Knights oe 
THE Sun. 



Invented by the Guerrilla General, Albert Pike — Sets Aside the Bible as 
Obsolete — Lodges Have Supernatural Power — '*But Rather Darkness 
Visible.'* 

This degree, as here given, was invented by Albert 
Pike, (See Note 313.) Pike was the son of a poor shoe- 
maker, born in Boston, 1809; brought up in Newbury- 
port; studied a while in Cambridge College; afterwards 
obtained the honorary A. M. from that institution; 
went to Mexico, was an editor in Arkansas, and Mem- 
phis, Tenn. ; became an ultra Southerner, and Mason; 
obtained, by fraud, from the XJ. S. Treasury, money 
appropriated to Indians, for annuities, schools, etc. ; in- 
itiated some fifty Cherokee and Choctaws in Federal 
Lodge No. 1, in Washington, D. C; became a Con- 
federate General, and fought his Indian brigade against 
Gen. Curtis, at Pea Eidge, where he was defeated by 
the Union troops. His Indians were said to have 
scalped and tomahawked Union soldiers. He sold out 
the Memphis Appeal, left civil occupations, and devoted 
himself to Freemasonry; has translated two volumes of 
Asiatic pagan religion, one of eight, the other of twelve 
hundred pages, from which he has taken the doctrines 
of this 28th degree, which Mackey declares to be 
^^perhaps, the most important of all the high degrees/^ 



230 SETS ASIDE THE BIBLE AS OBSOLETE. 

He has long been the head (Tf the ""Ancient and Ao 
cepted Rite/" And though his Supreme Council re- 
mains in Charleston, whose records and papers for 
fifty-nine years before the war, were all burnt up, 
doubtkss to conceal treason and crimes committed 
against the country, and the laws of war, he himself 
has bought, and resides in the old Blair and Eives 
building, near the Capitol. If such a man has invented 
^'the most important of the high degrees,'' what must 
the others have been ! 

Of this degree, whose present ritual emanated from 
such a mind, Macoy says : ^^It is strictly philosophical, 
and scientific;'' whose .object is ^"^to inspire men with 
the knowledge of heavenly truth, which is the pure 
source of all perfection." (See Note 316.) The Right 
Rev. Episcopal Bishop Fallows, and a Universalist 
Minister, named Rounseville, during Mr. Moody's first 
meetings, in Farwell Block in Chicago, spoke at a 
meeting, called to form a '"Lodge of Intelligence/' in 
Oriental Hall in that city. The Bishop delivered an 
address, and Eounseville a poem on the ""Mission of 
Masonry f' The speech and poem were published in 
the Voice of Masonry; and their doctrine is identical 
with that of this degree, as stated by Macoy, above, 
viz., that Masonry is the only perfect revelation of 
""heavenly truth/' and ""source of all perfection!" i. e., 
the only rule of faith and life; thus completely setting 
aside the Bible as obsolete. To see that this is not 
misstated, or exaggerated, glance through the degree. 
Thus we find on page 207: ^The only law, by which 
we cannot fail to come t© the knowledge of pure truth." 

Page 208 : ^To know the true light in all its purity.'^ 



LODGES HAVE SUPERNATURAL POWER. 231 

Note 319: ^^The higher idea of . truths, which per- 
is properly expressed by a knowledge of God ;" that is to 
say, salvation truth. And on page 212: ^The true 
Mason, who raises himself by degrees, till he reaches 
heaven!!'^ Again on page 213: The candidate seeks, 
and this degree is bringing him to ^^the true light/' 

Now, Christ is ''that true light/' (John, 1, 9.) He 
appeared in ineffable brightness in the transfiguration; 
in ''light above the sun's brightness" to Paul at his con- 
version ; so to John throughout the Apocalypse ; and in 
multitudes of instances, at the death-beds of saints, this 
same supernatural light appears. 

Now, this degree recapitulates the substance, and ob- 
ject of Masonry, up from the Apprentice degree, which 
is seeking and gaining light in the lodge. But Christ 
is not in a secret lodge. He entered no lodge. He 
joined none; but abjures, prohibits, denounces them. 
(Isaiah ^8, 16.) And we know that the devil hated Him; 
tempted Him; shrank from Him; fled from Him. We 
know, too, by simple inspection, that the lodge-god is 
not Christ. Looking at a lodge-procession is enough. 
And yet we know that Masons profess to get, and 
lodges to give: "light!" "light!!" "light!!!'' And, 
whatever. Masons are, they are not fools. Where do 
they get their light, and what is it? We know that 
"the spirits of devils w^ork miracles" {Rev. 16^ IJf.) 
We see, too, that lodges have supernatural power. 
Nothing else perpetuates them through centuries. We 
see, too, that believing Masons have light in their 
countenances. Not that light with which Moses' face 
beamed, from intercourse with God; or Stephen's, from 
a vision of Christ; but the baleful beaming light seen 



332 "BUT RATHER DARKKESS VISIBLE/' 

in the faces of Mormons, conjurers, spirit-worshipers, 
and sleight-of-hand men. As the little child's face 
draws and reflects the light of the countenance of a 
godly mother; every Mason, who believingly, v/orships 
Satan, transformed into an angel of light, reflects the 
light that devils see by! 

*'Yet from those flames, no light 
*'But rather darkness visible. 

Such is Masonry, and such are Masons. May the 
God of light save ^ us from "fellowship with devils.'' 
{1. Cor. 10, 20.) ' 



CHAPTER UII 



Twenty-Ninth Degree; Knight of St. Andrew/" 
OB Patriarch of the Crusade;s, 

ZENITH, 

It is the twenty-ninth grade of the Ancient and Ac^ 
cepted Eite, and the eleventh conferred in a Grand 
Consistory. 

INTRODUCTION : — This is supposed to be the first grade 



Note 337.— ••Grand Scottish Knight of St. Andrew. The 29th degree 
of the Ancient and Accepted rite. It is also called 'Patriarch of the 
Crusades,' in allusion to its supposed origin during those wars, and it is 
also sometimes known by the name of 'Grand Master of Light.' This 
degree is devoted to toleration and freedom of man in the great moral 
attributes. It inculcates equality — representing the poor Knight equal 
to the monarch, and exhibits the requisites of Knighthood; protection 
to the defenseless and innocent; the possession of virtue, patience, and 
firmness— and represents the Knight as the exponent of truth, and one 
alike without fear and without reproach. The assembly is called a 
chapter. Two apartments are reouired. In the first apartment the hang- 
ings are crimson, supported by ^raite columns. During the reception this 
room represents the court of Saladin, the great Sultan of Egypt and 
Syria. The second apartment should be a well-furnished room, deco- 
rated in the eastern style. The presiding officer is styled Venerable 
Grand Master. The Knights are all dressed in crimson robes, with a 
large white cross of St. Andrew on the breast. The jewel is two inter- 
laced triangles, formed by arcs of large circles, with the concave out- 
ward, of gold, and enclosing a pair of compasses open to twenty-five 
^degrees. At the bottom, and to one of the points is suspended a St. 
Andrew's Cross, of gold, surmounted by a Knight's hemlet; on the 
centre of the cross is the letter T, Inclosed in an equilateral triangle, 
and this again in a ring formed by a winged serpent; between the two 
lower arms of the cross may be suspended a key." — Macoy's Encyclo- 
paedia and Dictionary of Freejnasonry, Article Crrand Scottish Knig^ht of 
Bt. Andr^Wf 



334 KNIGHTS OF ST. ANDREW. 

of Kamsay's''' Eite which was introduced about the year 
1738, and was called Eccossais, or Scotch Masonry. It 
is founded on Chivalric Masonry or the Masojiry of the 
Crusades, and gives a history of the events that led to 
the union of the Chivalric orders with Freemasonry. 

The ceremony of reception [initiation] is brieif; the 
instruction full. This grade is preparatory to the 
Kadosh and was introduced into the Ancient and Ac- 
cepted rite by Frederick the Great in 1786. 

In this degree my brother, you are admitted into the 
true Eden or dominion of everlasting truth and fraterni- 
ty. There you learn what perseverance can do, and in 
the repose of your heart and mind you find the ultimate 
result of our Master's doctrine, which for so many, is the 
text of a thousand vain and false theories. It is for that 
very same result that Freemasonry has been assailed, 
both by kingly and priestly usurpers, by Atheists and 
narrow-minded sectarians. This degree my brother, is 
usually conferred by communication. 

Note 338. — "Ramsay, Andrew, Michael, Commonly called the Chev- 
alier Itamsay. He was born at Ayr, in Scotland, June 9, 1668. Hia 
father was a baker, but being a possessor of considerable property was 
enabled to give his sou a liberal education. He was accordingly sent 
to school in his native burgh, and afterwards to the University of 
Edinburg, where he was distinguished for his abilities and diligence. 
In 1709 he was intrusted with the education of the two sons of the Earl 
of Wemyss. Subsequently, becoming unsettled in his religions opinions, 
he resigned that employment and went to Holland, residing for some 
time at Leyden. There he became acquainted with Pierre Poiret, one 
of the most celebrated teachers of the mystic theology w^hich then pre- 
vailed on the continent. From him Ramsay learned the principal tenets 
of t'hat system; and it is not unreasonable to suppose that he was thus 
indoctrinated with that love of mystical speculation which he subse- 
quently developed as the inventor of Masonic degrees, and as the founder 
of a Masonic Rite. In 1710 he visited the celebrated Fenelou, Arch- 
bishop of Cambray, of whose mystical tendencies he had heard, and met 
with a cordial reception. The archbishop invited Ramsay to become his 
guest, and in six months he was converted to the Catholic faith. Fenelon 
procured for him the preeeptorship of the Due de Chateau-Thierry and 
the Prince de Turenne. As a reward for his services in that capacity, he 
was made a knight of the Order of St. Lazarus, whence he received 
the title of 'Chevalier,' by which ho was usually known. He was sub- 
sequently selected by James III., the Pretender, as the tutor of his two 
sons, Charles Edward and Henry, the former of whom became afterwards 
the Young Pretender, and the latter the Cardinal York. For this pur- 
pose he repaired, in 1724, to Rome. But the political and religious 
intrigues of that court became distasteful to him, and in a short time 
he obtained permission to return to France. In 1728 he visited England, 
and became an inmate of the family of the Duke of Argyle."— Mackey's 
Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Ramsay, Andrew, Michael, 



m 



KNIGHTS OF ST. ANDREW. 235 

DECORATIONS : — In this degree^ the lodge is hung with 
red tapestry, supported by white columns. The seats of 
the Master and of the two Wardens are of red cloth 
with gold fringe; those of the Knights are blue. At 
each angle of the hall is a Cross of St. Andrew. In front 
of each cross are four lights in a line, making sixteen 
lights. The total number of lights in this lodge is 
eighty-one, viz. : Two on the altar, seven groups of nine 
and the first sixteen in front of the crosses. 

titles: — This lodge is styled Grand Lodge. The 
Master is called Patriarch and the Knights, Respectable 
Masters. 

clothing: — A red robe. Order a scarf of crimson. 
At the bottom of the scarf is the jewel, fastened by a 
rosette of dark green, edged with red. When a collar 
is worn it must be of green, edged with red. The 
Knights wear a sash of white silk with gold fringe. 

jewel: — Is a compass within three triangles, and 
these within a single triangle. Beneath the grand 
triangle is a reversed square, a poniard in the angle of 
the square. When a collar is worn, the jewel is a cross 
of St. Andrew, . surmounted by a closed crown. In the 
centre and on the crosslet is a pineapple or a J. :. within 
a ^triangle in the middle of a ring. To this ring is su- 
spended a key which hangs between the two inferior 
branches of the cross. At the extremity of the arms 
of the cross are the initials B. *.J. -.M. -.N. •. 



CHAPTER LIV 



Twenty-Ninth Degree; Knights of St. Andrew^ 
OR Patriarch of the Crusades/'" 




INITIATION. 
FIRST SIGN; THAT OF EARTH. 

Wipe your forehead with the back of 
the right hand, the head somewhat in- 
clined forward. 



First Sign, Knight 
of St. Andrew. 

FIRST TOKEN. 

Seize each successively the first, 
then the second, and lastly the 
third joint of the other's index 
finger of the right hand, each 
spelling alternately the word of 
the first degree. (Boaz.) 

FirBt Token, Knigrht of St. Andrew. 

Note 339.— "Patriarch of the Crusades. * One of the asmeis formerly 
given to the degree of Grand Scottish Knight of St. Andrew, the twenty- 
ninth of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. The legend of that 
degree connects it with the Crusades and hence the name; which, how- 
ever is never used officially, and is retained by regular Supreme Coun- 
cils only as a synonym."— Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Articw 
Patriarch of the CrusadeSi 




KKIQHTS OF ST. AKDEEW, 



237 




SECOND SIGN, THAT OF WxVT^E. 

Place the right hand upon the heart; 
extend it horizontally at the height of 
the breast; let it fall on the right side, 
as if to salute with the hand. 



SECOND TOKEN. 



tBnd Sign, Water. 
Seize each successively the first, then the second, and 
lastly the third joint of the other's middle finger, as 
indicated for the index in the first token, each spelling 
the sacred word of the second degree, (Shibboleth.) For 
mode of giving it see page 184, Freemasonry Illustrated. 



THIRD SIGN, THAT OF ASTONISHMENT AND 
HORROR. 

Turn the head to the left, looking down- 
wards; raise both hands clasped to heaven, a 
little towards the right. 




Sign of Horror. 



238 



KNIGHTS OF ST, ANDREW. 




FOURTH SIGN, THAT OF FIRE. 

Join both hands, the fingers inter- 
laced and cover the eyes therewith, 
the palms outwards. 



Sign of Fire# 



ANSWER. 



Give the sign of Air. Extend for- 
ward the right arm and hand at the 
height of the shoulder. 




Answer to Sign of Fire. 



THIRD TOKEN. 



^eize each successively the index finger of the other's 
right hand by the first joint. Each pronounce alternately 
one of the three syllables of the sacred word of the third 
degree, (Mah-hah-bone.) 



KKIGHTS OF ST. ANDREW* 



239 




FIFTH SIGTT, THAT OF ABMIRATIOIT. 

Raise the eyes and hands to heaven, 
the left arm somewhat lower than 
the right, the heel of the left foot 
slightly raised, so that the left knee 
forms a square with the right leg. 



Sign of Admiratioo* 



SIXTH SIGN, THAT OF THE SUN. 

Place the thumb of the right hand upon 
the right eye; raise the index finger so as 
to form a square, then bring it on a line, 
as if to indicate an object in view, saying: 
•*I measure the sun itself.'* 




Sign ot the Soil 



240 



I^KIQhTS of ST. ANDREW. 




SEViiNTH sign; general sign. 
Form, on the breast, a cross of St* Andrew 
with the two arms, the hands upwards. 



General Sign, Knight 
of St. Andrew. 



GENERAL TOKEN. 

Seize one the last joint of the 
index finger of the other^s right 
hand; the first one says Ne the 
other Ka. Then seize the last 
joint of the little finger; the first 
one says Mah, the other, giving 
the whole word, says, Nekamah, 




General Token, Knight of 
St. Andrew. 



pass WORDS; 



ArdareV^'' 
Casmaren*^ 
Talliud or 
Furlac^'' or 



or Ardriel. 



or 



The Angel of Fire. 
'' " Air. 
" ' " Water. 
" " Earth. 



ii 



cc 



Note 340. — "Ardarel. A word in the high degrees, used as the name 
of the angel of fire. It is a distorted form of Adariel, the splendor 
of God." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Ardarel. 

Note 341. — "Oasmaran. The angel of air. Referred to in the degree 
of Scottish Knight of St. Andrew. The etymology is uncertain." — Mackey's 
Enciyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Casmaran. '. 

Note 342. — "Furlac. A word in the high degrees, whose etymology is 
uncertain, but probably Arabic. It is said to signify the angel of the 
earth." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Furlac. 



SACRED WORD. . 

Nehamah,'*^ that of the general token. 

march: — Form a cross of Jerusalem, by three steps 
of an Apprentice, three steps of a Fellow Craft and 
three steps of a Master. 

age: — The square of nine; eighty-one years. 

battery: — Nine strokes, by two, three and four; 00 
>00 0000. 

time to open: — High twelve. 

TO CLOSE : — The beginning of night. 

This my brother, ends the twenty-ninth'** degree. You 
ill at once perceive the necessity of erecting a strong 
Vail around our institution and of trusting its guardian- 
ship to a certain number of tried • and courageous 
Knights, whose learning and power may at all times 
defend it against any assault on the part of its enemies, 
and cause them to tremble on their thrones under their 
Tiaras in their conventicles and even in the very midst 
of their revelries. Such will be the duty of our breth- 
ren, the Knights of Kadosh, such is the object of the 
thirtieth degree. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — To order my breth- 
ren! (Candidate rises and puts himself under the gen- 
eral sign of the twenty-ninth degree:) 

Note 343. — "Hebrew signifying Vengeance, and, like Nakam, a sig- 
nificant word in the high degrees." — Mackey's Encyclopsedia of Free- 
masonry, Article Nekamah. 

Note 344. — "Patriarch of the Crusades, or Knight of St. Andrew. 
[Scotch Masonry.] — The 11th degree conferred in the consistory of Princes 
of the Royal Secret, Scotch Masonry, and the 29th upon the catalogue 
of that system. The assembly is termed a Grand Lodge. The hangings 
are red. In each corner of the room is a St. Andrew's Cross. The 
lights are eighty-one. The master is styled Patriarch; the members 
Respectable Masters. Jewel, a compass within three small triangles, 
enclosed within a large one, beneath which is a square reversed and a 
poniard in the angle. When the collar is worn the jewel is a St. An- 
drew's cross, surmounted by a crown, at the centre of the cross the 
letter J; on the extremities of the cross the letters B. T. M. N. Hour 
to open, high twelve; to close, the first hour of the night. Age, 9x9." — 
Morris's Masonio Dictionary, Article Patriarch of the Crusades, or Knight 
of St, Andrewt 



242 KNIGHTS OF ST. ANDREW. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — To the glory of the 
Grand Architect of the Universe, in the name and under 
the auspices of the Grand Consistory of Sublime Princes 
of the Eoyal Secret, thirty-second degjee of the Ancient 
and Accepted Kite, in and for the Sovereign and Inde- 
pendent State of. , . .,. . . . . ., under the jurisdiction of 

the Supreme Grand Council of Sovereign Grand Inspec- 
tors General of the thirty-third and last degree for the 
northern jurisdiction of the United States, sitting at 
New York, State of New York, and by the powers con- 
ferred on me by Council of Kadosh, No 

I do receive and constitute you in all and each of the 
eleven degrees, the names of which have been to you, 
and the Philosophy of which has also been briefly ex- 
plained to you in order that j^ou may receive the degree 
of Grand Elect Knight Kadosh, for which you have 
petitioned, and upon the condition that you will swear 
faithfully to keep the obligations which you have taken 
in the preceding degrees and which are in the main to 
love science, to practice virtue, to love your brethren, 
and to devote yourself to the happiness of mankind, to 
the best of your knowledge and ability. Do you swear ? ^ 
Candidate — I do. m 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Strikes two, three 
and four; 00 000 0000, with his gavel on his sword, over 
the head of the candidate.) My brother, I will now 
leave you to your reflections. In a few moments you 
will receive the order to appear before the Council. 
Until then this meeting is called off from labor to re- 
freshment. (The Thrice Puissant Grand Master then 
withdraws with the other members of the Council, leav- 
ing the candidate with the Master of Ceremonies.) 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

'WENTY-NlNTH DEGREE : KnIGHT OF St. AnDREW, 

OR Patriarch of the Crusades. 

Ramsay's Fraud on the French. — Masonic Facts are Falsehoods. 

Successful novels are founded on historic truths, and 
their writers commonly strive to state those truths ac- 
curately. But the novel or novels called Masonry are 
founded on falsehoods, intended to pass for truths. 

Ramsay (See Introductionol, V, 1) asProfessorBobi- 
son, who, was familiar with the lodges on the Continent, 
states: intended to deceive the French, who thought 
the London Tavern degrees too coarse, into the belief 
that the first Masons were Crusaders, knights, nobles, 
kings, princes and Troubadours. And, although as 
Cervantes, in his inimitable, and faithful burlesque, 
Don Quixote, has shown, those pretenders called 
knights, took for their lady loves such low wenches 
as they could pick up at the East Cheap inns, which 
Sir Knight Jack Falstaff haunted, and though the 
€hurch of St. Sophia^ Constantinople, was turned into 
a huge brothel, by the thousands of Crusaders, who 
slept there on the graves of dead Christians, while on 
;heir way to Palestine to rescue the tomb of Christ; 
(which Turks still hold). In the face of this general 
demoralization of all Europe, when 

*'Gaily the Troubadour 
Touched his guitar; 
While he was hastening 
Home from the war." 

In the face of these orgies of hell, in the name of 
religion ; this Scotch falsifier and apostate, Eamsay, fol- 
lowed by Jesuits and Jews, has given us the Templar 
Masonry of to-day, with its caps, gauntlets, plumes and 
BwordS; for which industry and Christianity pay the 



244 MAsoisric facts are :palsehoods. 

bills. 

We need not requote Macoy, (Cyc. p. SiS-J^) who 
says: ^'The degrees of this (Scottish) Kite are for the 
most part elaborated from the system invented by Earn- 
say^ who claimed that he found them in Scotland, where 
they were planted by Knights of the Temple and of 
Malta on their return from Palestine. It is needless 
to say that these pretensions have no foundation in 
truth, MacJcey confirms this testimony of Macoy; 
and no Masonic authority dissents from it. And yet 
Masonry founded on this wholesale, fundamental lying, 
which equals, if not exceeds that of Mahomet, and the 
Mormon, is received with open doors by churches called 
Christian, in the United States of America. The pre- 
tended origin in Palestine, furnishes these locusts, 
originally derived from Egypt, a pretext to pollute the 
Bible, by their sham legends, to make shallow in- 
ventions seem sacred, while they destroy the sacredness 
of truth. 

Mackey, in one place attempts to justify this false- 
hood. He justifies the Master Masons degree, in say- 
ing there were three doors of the temple, when in truth -', 
there was but one; by saying it is "symbol,^' and does 
^^not pretend to historic accuracy.^^ But Masonry does 
give this stuff for fact, and thousands today believe it ! ^ 
He says : ^^it is all only symbol, as a lion is a symbol of 
courage.^^ But suppose there is no lion there; that the^-^ 
promised lion proves only an opossum, porcupine, or 
skunk ? 

This is precisely this case. Masonry pretends to be | 
legend, based on facts. But the facts are not facts, but ' 
falsehoods. The temple had but one door. Masonry 
says there were three. Masonry sprung from a London 
grog-shop ; it claims to come- from Palestine. It 
literally ^^makes lies its refuge,^^ and ^^hides under false- 
hood,^^ as did the false religionists in the days of Isaiah. 
'(^5, 15,) But the hail shall sweep away both the 
refugO; and them that make it. {Isaiah, ^^p -^7.) 



CHAPTER LV 



Thirtieth Degree; Grand Elect Knight Kadosh'*' 
OR Knight of the White and Black Eagle. 

titles : — In the first two apartments, which are in- 
tended only as preparation rooms, the lodge is styled 
Council. In the third apartment it is called Areopagus, 
and in the fourth Senate. The President is styled 
Thrice Puissant Grand Master. The two Wardens, 
First and Second Lieutenant Grand Masters. The 
members are called Knights. 

STATED meetings : — The stated meetings of all Coun- 
cils of Kadosh are held on the sixth of January, on Good 
Friday, or the day of Ascension, and on the second of 
November in each year. Five Knights Kadosh form a 
quorum for the dispatch of business. 

banquets : — The banquets of the Knights Kadosh are 
called Agapae, which name indicates that the object is 
to draw closer the bonds of fraternal love. The word 
means Love Feast. 

clothing: — ^N^ot only is the costume in this degTee 
not ridiculously absurd, as in almost all the other degrees. 

Note 345. — '*As to the history of the Kadosh degree, it is said tg have 
been first invented at Lyons, in France, in 1743. where it appeared under 
the name of the Petit Elu. This degree, which is said to have been 
based upon the Templar doctrine heretofore referred to, was afterwards 
developed into the Kadosh, which we find in 1758 incorporated as the 
Grand Elect Kadcsh into the system of the Council of Emperors of the 
East and West, which was that year formed at Paris, whence it descended 
to the Scottish Rite Masons. 

Of all the Kadoshes. two only ai*e now important, viz.: the Philosophic 
Kadosh, which Kas been adopted by the Grand Orient of France, and 
the Knight Kadosh, which constitutes the thirtieth degree of the Ancie^it 
and Accepted Scottish Rite, this latter being the most generally diffused 
of the Kadoshes."— Mackey' 8 Encyclopaedia of FreemaBonry, Artigl© 
Kadosb. 



246 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

but besides, it gives to the assembly a grave and impos- 
ing aspect. However, as it must be rich and elegant, 
and is consequently very costly, it would perhaps be 
wiser to wear a black suit of clothes with white gloves, 
a black sash with silver fringe and a sword. In this 
ease the Knights wear a round black hat, a Teutonic 
Cross on the heart and a ribbon of the degree from the 
left shoulder to the right hip; the poniard suspended 
from the end of the ribbon. ' The officers alone wear 

collars with the jewel. On the front of the ribbon are 
embroidered in red, two Teutonic crosses, a double 
headed eagle and the letters K. :.K. :.H. :. [Knights Ka- 
dosh] embroidered in silver. 

In some Councils all the members wear a collar with 
the jewel. The collar is black, with a Teutonic cross ' 
embroidered in red on both sides. The ribbon and 
collar are edged with silver. The jewel is a Teutonic 
cross, enameled with red, in the centre of which are the 
three initial letters J. :.B. :.M. :. On the reverse of the 
cross is a death's head, transpierced by a poniard. The 
regular costume of the- Knights Kadosh is as follows : 

A white tunic in the shape of a dalmatic, bordered 
with black ; on the breast a red Latin cross, a mantle of 
black velvet, edged with red, and on the left side another 
red Latin cross, a large brimmed black hat with a red 
plume, a Knight's tucker with points, a black belt with 
a golden buckle, on which are engraved the initials J. :. 
B. :.M'. :. tight pantaloons of white cassimere, yellow 
morocco boots with a golden spur on the left heel. A 
sword with a straight silver guard hangs from the belt 
and the poniard from the ribbon. As already stated, 
when collars are worn, the poniard is fastened in the 
sash, which in this case is red. No apron. 

honors: — In an inferior body of the. Scotch Rite, a 



GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 2.47 

Knight Kadosh visitor shall be received by a deputation 
of five knights and five swords. But previous to his ad- 
mission as such^ and in order to ascertain whether he is 
regularly possessed of the thirtieth degree, the following 
ceremony takes place, provided there arc Knights 
' Kadosh present at the time of his visit: 

All those who are not possessed of the 30th degree 
are requested to withdraw. Incense is then burnt. The 
visitor is introduced and all the Knights surround him, 
forming over his head the arch of steel, with the sword 
"that they hold in the left hand, while liolding in the 
right a poniard, which they point at the visitor^s heart, 
thereby indicating that they are ready to strike him if 
he is not really possessed of this degree. The member 
of tha body who possesses the highest dignity then pro- 
pounds to him the questions which are to be found at 
the opening of the Council. After he has answered he 
is requested to give the words, signs and tokens. After 
which he is seated near the throne, and all the members 
of the body wherein this ceremony takes place are re- 
called. ' 

The debates in a Council of Kadosh must be calm and 
dignified. Harsh words and offensive personalities are 
strictly forbidden. The Thrice Puissant Grand Master 
has the privilege, by striking once with the pommel of 
his sword to restore peace ; by striking ^twice to impose 
silence, and by striking thrice to close the debate and 
adjourn the debate to another meeting. 

STANDARDS OF THE KNIGHTS KADOSH! — There are 
two standards of the order. The first is a piece of white 
silk three and a half feet square with a golden fringe. 
On the upper part the words, Dieu Le Veuf*'' are em- 
broidered in gold. In the centre and below these 

Note 346. — Dieu le Veut. God wills it. The war-cry of the old Crn- 
Baders, and hence adopted as a motto in the decrees of Templarism." — 
Mftckey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Dieu 1© Veut. 



248 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH, 

words is a Teutonic cross, embroidered in gold and red 
with the number ^^30'^ in the middle of the cross . Below 
and at the extremity of the standard are the words 
Ardoah Chao'*'' also embroidered in gold. The second 
is a piece of black silk of the same dimensions as the 
first standard with silver fringe. 

All the embroideries must be of silver. The words 
Vincer& aut Mori are embroidered diagonally from the 
upper corner on the left, to the lower corner on the right. 
In the upper right corner is a o-ed Teutonic cross ; in 
the lower left corner is an uncrowned double headed 
eagle with wings open but not spread, and holding a 
Bword in his claws. 

OFFICERS OF A COUNCIL OF KADOSH. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master, 

Orator or Knight of Eloquence, 

Chancellor. 

Treasurer. 

Grand Marshall or Introductor. 

Knight Expert. 

Master of Ceremonies: 

Captain of the Guards, 

Tyler. 

Note 347.— "Ordo aib Chao. Order out of Chaos. A motto of the 33d 
degree, and having the same allusion as lux e tenehris, which see. The 
invention of this motto is to be attributed to the Supreme Council of 
the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite at Charleston, and it is first met 
with in the Patent of Count de Grasse, dated February 1. 1802. When 
De Grasse afterwards carried the Rite over to France and established 
a Supreme Council there, he changed the motto, and, according to Len- 
ning Ordo ab hoc, was used by him and his Council in all the docu- 
ments issued by them. If so, it was simply a blunder. "—Mackey's Sn- 
cyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Or^p ab ChftOi 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

p Grand Elect Knight Kadosh/'' 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (One rap with pom- 
mel of sword.) Sir Knight, First Lieutenant Grand 
Master, are you a Knight Kadosh ? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — I am, Thrice Puis- 
sant Grand Master. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — At what hour does 
the Council open? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — At the beginning of 
night. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — What is your age ? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — A century and more. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Whom do you know? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master— Two wretches. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Their names? 

Note 348,— « 'Knight Kadosh, or Knight of the White and Black Eagle. 

he 30th degree of the Ancient and Accepted rite. There are several de- 
crees known as Kadoshes. The French rituals mention seven: 1. That 

f the Hebrews. 2. That of the first Christians. 3. That of the Cru- 
sades. 4. That of the Templars^ 5. That of Cromwell, or the Puri- 
tans. 6. That of the Jesuits. 7. The Grand Veritable Kadosh, 'apart 
from every sect, free of all ambition, which opens its arms to all men, 
and has no enemies other than vice, crime, fanaticism, and superstiti- 
tlon.' Its ritual furnishes the history of the destruction of the Templars 
by the united efforts of Philip of France and Pope Clement V. In this 
degree, when there is a reception, four apartments are used. In the 
first and second apartments, the Lodge is termed Council; in the third. 
Areopagus; in the fourth, the Senate. The presiding officer is styled Most 
Illustrious Grand Commander. The jewel is a Teutonic cross, and is 
thus described, in heraldic language: 'A cross potent sable, charged 
ivith another cross double potent, or, surcharged with an escutcheon, 
rearing the letters J. B. M.; the principal cross surmounted by a chief, 
izure seme of France.* On the reverse, a skull transpierced by a poniard. 
The stated meetings of all councils of Kadosh are held January 6; on 
jood Friday; on Ascension day, and on November the 2. in each year. 
So one of these is ever, on any account, to be omitted." — Macoy's E,ncy- 
jlopsedia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article Knight Kadosh. 



1 

S50 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Philip'"'' IV, King 
of France, called the Fair, and Bertrand de Goth, known 
as Clement the Fifth, Pope of Eome. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — What is the object of 
our assembling? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — The hope of punish- 
ing crime. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Such being the case, 
as the darkness of night protects our labors and as we 
entertain the hope of punishing crime. Sir Knights, 
First and Second Lieutenant Grand Masters, request the 
officers and Sir Knights on your respective valleys to be 
ready to obey my order. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Officers and Sir 
Knights on my valley, the Thrice Puissant Grand Mas- 
ter requests you to be ready to obey his orders. 

First Lieutenant, Grand Master — Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master, the Knights are all ready to obey your 
orders. ^ 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (One rap with the! 
pommel of sword, rising.) Sir Knights, order! (All 
rise and place themselves under the sign of Order.) To 
the glory of the Grand Architect of the Universe, in the 
name and under the auspices of the Grand Consistory of 
the Ancient and Accepted Eite, in and for the Sovereign 
and Independent State of under the jurisdic- 
tion of the Supreme Council for the northern jurisdiction 
of the United States of America, and by virtue of the 
authority conferred upon me by ... . Council of Kadosh, 
ISTo. . . I declare and pronounce its labors opened. Join 

Nate 340. — "Philip IV. Surnamed *le Bel.* or *tbe Fair,* who as- 
cended the throne of France in 1285. He is principally distinguished in 
history on account of his persecution of the Knights Templars. With 
the aid of his willing instrument, Pope Clement V., he succeeded in ac^-.:^ 
complishing the overthrow of the Order. He died in 1314, execrated hy^ 
his subjects, whose hearts he had alienated by the cruelty, avarice and 
despotism of his administration." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freema- 
sonry, Article Philip IV, 



oPEisrma ceremonies. 251 

me Sir Knights? 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master— {(a'wmg the sign. 
All join and give both the sign and word.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Giving the battery; 
00 00 00 0.) Spes mea in Deo est'"" (All do the same, 
and at the same time.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Be seated Sir 
Knights. Sir Knight Chancellor, is the baluster of 
our last sitting prepared? 

Sir Knight Chancellor — It is, Thrice Puissant. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Please read it. 
(Chancellor reads it.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — ^Sir Knights, First 

and Second Lieutenant Grand Masters, request the 

officers and Sir Knights on your respective valleys, to 

make their observations if any they have, on the balus- 

:er of our last sitting. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Officers and Sir 
Knights on my valley, the Thrice Puissant Grand Mas- 
er requests you to make your observations if any you 
lave, on the baluster of our last sitting. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Officers and Sir 
Xnights on my valley, the Thrice Puissant Grand Mas- 
ter requests you to make your observations if any you 
iave, on the baluster of our last sitting. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight, First 
Lieutenant Grand Master, silence prevails in my valley. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Thrice Puissant 
jrrand Master, silence prevails. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — The baluster of our 
ast sitting is approved and adopted. Sir Knight Mas- 
ter of Ceremonies, please have it signed by the officers. 
'The Master of Ceremonies then takes the minute book 

Note 350. — '*Spes mea in Deo est. (My hope is in God.) The motto 
f the thirty-second degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite." 
^Mackey's Enoiyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Spes mea in Deo est. 



252 . GRAND ELECT KK-IGHT KADOSH. 

from the Chancellor and carries it successively to the 
Thrice Puissant Grand Master, the First and Second 
Lieutenant Grand Masters, and to the Orator. All 
sign their names, after which the Master of Ceremonies 
brings back » the book to the Chancellor and resumes his 
seat.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Sir Knight Master 
of Ceremonies, please ascertain whether there are any 
Sir Knight visitors in the avenues. (Master of. Ceremo- 
nies then leaves the Council and visits the avenues, after 
which he knocks at the door; 00 00 00 0.) 

Captain of Guard — (Seven raps; 00 00 00 0.) Sir 
Knight Second Lieutenant Grand Master, there is an 
alarm at the door of our Council. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight First 
Lieutenant Grand Master, there is an alarm at the door 
of our Council. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master, there is an alarm at the door of our 
Council. ' 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Sir Knight First 
Lieutenant Grand Master, ascertain the cause of it and 
report accordingly. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight Second 
Lieutenant Grand Master, ascertain the cause of it and 
report accordingly. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight Cap-^ 
tain of the Guards, ascertain the cause of it and report 
accordingly. 

Captain of Guard — (Opening the door a little.) Who 
knocks ? 

Master of Ceremonies — (From without.) Master of 
Ceremonies. 






OPENING CEREMONIES. 253 

'Captain of Guard — Sir Knight Second Lieutenant 
Grand Master, it is the Master of Ceremonies. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight First 
Lieutenant Grand Master, it is the Master of Ceremonies. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master, the alarm is caused by the Master of 
Ceremonies who asks admission. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Sir Knight First 
Lieutenant Grand Master, permit him to enter. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight Second 
Lieutenant Grand Master, permit him to enter. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight Cap- 
tain of the Guards, permit him to enter. [Captain of 
the Guards then opens the door and admits the Master 
of Ceremonies. 

Master of Ceremonies — Thrice Puissant Grand Mas- 
ter, there are, (or there are not,) visitors in the ave- 
nues.] 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (If there are visitors) 
Sir Knight, have you convinced yourself that these 
visitors are regular Knights Kadosh? " 

Master of Ceremonies — I have. Thrice Puissant Grand 
Master. 

I Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Such being tKe case, 
'fintroduce them. (Master of Ceremonies retires and 
soon after knocks seven ; 00 00 00 0, at the door of the 
Council.) 

Captain of Guard — (Knocks seven; 00 00 00 0.) Sir 
Knight Second Lieutenant Grand Master, there is an 
alarm at the door of the Council. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight First 
Lieutenant Giand Master, there is an alarm at the door 
of the Council. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master, there is an alarm at the door of the 
Council. 



254 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Sir Knight First 
Lieutenant Grand Master, ascertain the cause of it and 
report accordingly. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight Second 
Lieutenant Grand Master, ascertain the cause of it and 
report accordingly. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight Cap- 
tain of the Guards ascertain the cause of it and report 
accordingly. 

Captain of Guard — '(Opening the door a little.) Who 
knocks ? 

faster of Ceremonies — Master of Ceremonies with 
the Knights visitors. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight First 
Lieutenant Grand Master, it is the Master of Cere- 
monies with the Knights visitors. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master, it is the Master of Ceremonies, with the 
Knights visitors. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Rising.) Open the 
door and introduce our brethren. Order Sir Knights! 
(All rise and place themselves under the sign of ^^or- 
der.^O 

Master of Ceremonies — (Enters with visitors.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — I have the honor to 
introduce to you the Knights visitors. (On entering, 
the visitors salute the Thrice Puissant Grand Master, 
and the First and Second Lieutenant Grand Masters by 
making the sign, after which they face the East, await- 
ing the orders of the Thrice Puissant Grand Master.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Sir Knights, we are 
most happy to receive you this evening and to offer you 
the hospitality of our Council. Your assistance at this 
juncture is invaluable, as we have crimes to punish and 
innocence to protect. Persecution and oppression are 



OPENING CEREMONIES. , 255 

raging. The religious and political rulers of the world 
will not render that justice which they have sworn to 
render, and we cannot endure their encroachments any- 
longer. In order to live up to the oath we have taken, 
and to carry out more effectually the plans adopted by 
the chiefs of the order for the triumph of Liberty, 
Equality and Fraternity, we have resolved to admit 
into our Council a few tried and experienced Grand 
Scotch Knights of St. Andrew, so as to be able by our 
numbers to secure, without the shedding of a drop of 
blood, the rights of Gods children, and thereby to 
fufil the teachings of our beloved Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master. 
Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Join me, Sir Knights ! 
Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Strikes seven; 00 
00 00 0, with his hands.) All do the same at the same 
time! (The visitors during this address, -remain under 
the sign of order. But when it is ended, may return 
:hanks and decline repeating the battery^ through respect 
or the Council and the Thrice Puissant Grand Master. 
Sefore resuixiing their seats the Thrice Puissant Grand 
VTaster orders tlie Master of Ceremonies to conduct to 
lie East any Sovereign Grand Inspector General, and 
le members of the Grand Consistory, if any among the 
asitors, provided said Sovereign Grand Inspector 
jeneral and Sublime Princes wear the regalia of their 
•espective degrees. All brethren above the 30th, if 
lotlied accordingly, must be introduced; the members 
f each degree separately and successively, beginning 
y the inferior degree up to the hisfhest. In such circura- 
s|tances, the address of the Thrice Puissant Grand Mas- 
et is delivered only when all the visitors of the several 
.egrees have been introduced, after which:) 
Thrice PvAssant Grand Master-Be seated Sir Knights, 



256 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

Grand Chancellor then presents the Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master with the ^^order of the day. -' 

Which is attended to in the usual manner. At this 
point the Council shall proceed at once with the busi- 
ness on hand. But in case of reception [initiation] said 
business may be postponed until after the ceremony. ^ 

Then petitions for the eleven intermediate degrees". 
are considered and the brethren state their objections^ 
if they have* any against the candidate or candidates. 
If any objection it shall be disposed of previous to the 
communication. If there is no objection, the Thrice 
Puissant Grand Master, officers and members of the 
Council shall proceed into an adjoining room, in order 
to communicate the intermediate degrees. 



I 



CHAPTER LVI 



?6^ 



Thirtieth Degree ; Grand Elect Knight Kadosh, 
OR Knight oe the White and Black Eagle. 

initiation. 

FIRST apartment: — This apartment is hung with 
black tapestry. A sepulchral lamp is suspended from 
the vault. In the middle is a mausoleum^ above which 
is a coffin. In the coffin lies a Knight, wrapped up in a 
white shroud, his face veiled. On the platform of the 
mausoleum are three skulls. The middle one, wreathed 
with laurel and everlasting flowers, rests on a black 
cushion, the one on the left is surmounted by a Pope's 
triple cro^vn and the one on the right by a regal crown 
adorned with flowers-de-luce, but open, as those of the 
middle ages. 

At the west end of the apartment is a large transpa- 
rency on which are written in flame-colored letters the 
following words : 

''Whoever shall overcome the dread of deaths shall 
merge from the bosom of the earth, and have a right 
to be initiated into the greater mysteries/^ 

Beneath are the initials Jr. B.*. M.\ - 

N. B. — The description we here give of each apartment of this degree 
is that of the real Kadoih. 

Note 351. — "The twelfth degree conferred in the consistory of Princes 
of the Royal Secret, Scotch tlite, and the thirtieth in the catalogue of 
that system. The historical allusions are to the ancient order of Knights 
Templar and its downfall. There are five apartments. The officers are 
Illustrious Grand Commander representing Frederick II. of Prussia, Grand 
Chancellor, Grand Architect, Grand Master of Ceremonies. Grand Treas- 
urer, Grand Secretary, Grand Captain of the Guards and Expert Brother. 
There are three banners, the last representing the Beauseant Jewel, a 
double headed black eagle with gold beaks and claws, holding a golden 
sword. Hour to open, the hour of secrecy and silence." — Morris's Ma- 
Bonio Dictionary, Article Elected Knight of Kftdosh; or, Knight of tho 
White and Black Ea^le, 



258 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

MUSIC. 

When all is ready, the Thrice Puissant Grand Master 
sends a messenger to the Grand Marshal to inform 
him thereof. The candidate is then introduced with 
his eyes uncovered. He wears a gray tunic and carries 
on his right side a poniard suspended from the sword 
belt with which he has been girded. The Thrice Puis- 
sant Grand Master, with his hat over his eyes, makes 
him sit on a stool opposite the mausoleum. [Music 
stops.] 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — To candidate. You ; 
must not leave that seat, otherwise the greatest dangers 
await you. . 

MUSIC. 

A few moments after, he points to the three skulls. 
[Music stops.] 

Thrice Puissant Orand Master — I request you to re- 
flect upon the scene before you. 

MUSIC. 

'Another pause for a few minutes. [Music stops.] . <. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — My brother, these ^^ 
objects conceal a great mystery. Are you prepared to ^ 
undergo the trials which await you? They are fearful, ; 
but there is nothing in them to alarm you if you have 
understood the degrees through which you have 
successively passed. I warn you moreover, that you 
will have to answer very serious questions, and must 
advise you to confine yourself in all your answers to 
these words only, ^'I wish to proceed. ^^ You must collect 
all the powers of your mind, for on yourself alone you 
will have to depend. 

MUSIC, 

[Thrice Puissant Grand Master, then retires slowly, 
leaving cap.didate for a long time of silence and refleQ« 






INITIATION. 259 

tion, when the music stops and the Knight in the coffin 
raises the lid thereof^ sits up and says with a grave and 
solemn voice.] 

Knight in Coffin — Thou who comest hither to disturb 
my rest fear my wrath. What is thy wish ? 

Candidate — I wish to proceed. 

Knight in Coffin — May thy rashness receive its re- 
ward. If thy heart is not pure, thy ruin is certain. 

Candidate — I wish to proceed. 

MUSIC. 

[After these words a great noise is heard from with- 
out. The door is thrown open with a fearful crash. 
The Knight in the coffin resumes his position. Thrice 
Puissant Grand Master enters the room hurriedly with 
a burning torch in his left hand and a dirk raised in his 
right. The music stops. He walks up to the candidate 
and says to him in a threatening voice:] 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Since your wish is to 
proceed; since your rashness prompts you to dare the 
wrath in store for so many centuries^ follow me. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Walking up majestic- 
ally to the mausoleum and kneeling before the skull 
wreathed with the laurel.) Kneel down with me! 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Hitherto you have 
seen in masonry nothing but emblems and symbols. 
Now you must see in it nothing but reality. Are you 
determined to repudiate alt prejudices and to obey, 
without reserve all that you will be commanded to do 
for the good of humanity? 

Candidate— yio^t willingly. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Eising) such bo^n^ 
the case^ I will aflford you the means of proving tiff 
sincerity of your intentions and the extent of your 
knowledge. Bend before these illustrious remains and 
repeat the words of the oath which I will dictate to you,* 
.(Thrige Pjiis^nt Grand Master, poni^r4 m hand, dlG^ 



260 



GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH, 



tates the following oath which is repeated by the candi- 
date.) 

FIRST OATH, KNIGHT KADOSH. 

In the presence of God^ onr Father, and of this noble 

victim, I solemnly promise and swear upon my 

word of honor, never to reveal the mysteries of the 
Knights Kadosh, and to obey all the rules and regula- 
tions of the order. 

I further promise and swear to punish crime and pro- 
tect innocence. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Eise and imitate me. 
(He then stabs the skull crowned with a Tiara and says :) 

Down with imposture, down with crime. (Candidate 
does the same, repeating the same words. Thrice Puis- 
sant Grand Master then passes with the candidate to 
the skull wreathed with laurel, and kneeling down with 
him says:) 




Candidate Stabbing tbe Skulls. 



¥ 



^'Everlasting glory to the immortal martyr of virtue f' 

May his death be a lesson to us. Let us unite to crush 
tyranny and imposture. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Rises^ orders the 
candidate to do the same^ and passing on to the skull 
surmounted with a regal crown, he stabs it, saying:) 

Down with tyranny! Down with crime!" (Candidate 
epeats both the acts and the words.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — My brother, you will 
now read aloud the inscription on the transparency. 
(Candidate reads as follows:) 

''Whoever shall overcome the dread of death, shall 
emerge from the hosom of the earth, and have a right to 
be initiated into the greater mysteries/' 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (With a solemn and 
melancholy voice.) It is not yet too late; reflect on the 
importance of your obligation and on the dreadful conse- 
quences which perjury might bring upon your head. 
Nothing could save you from the punishment which we 
would have full right to inflict. As already stated, we 
have no more to do Vv^ith symbols of more or less signifi- 
cance, it is truth; it is reality we have now before us. 
Our statutes are dreadful ! We demand of you nothing 
contrary to the laws of honor. But if you have discov- 
ered the object we have in view; if you have an idea of 
the end at which we aim, you will easily understand the 
importance of secrecy. You are now bound by your 
word of honor, and you may still retire. But one step 
more, and you are bound to us forever and at the peril 
of your life. (After a little silence.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — What have you de- 
cided? 

Candidate — To proceed. 



262 GRAND ELECT KK"IGIlt KADOSH. 

MUSIC. 

[Thrice Puissant Grand Master^s, torch is extin- 
guished and the door is opened with great force. 

Grand Marshal — (With his hat over his eyes; walks 
in with his sword erect and seizes the candidate by the 
arm.) ''Your rashness is great! You wish to proceed? 
Your doom is sealed! — Punishment awaits you! (He 
hurries him into the second apartment, when the miisic 
stops.) 

SECOND apartment: — This apartment is hung with 
blue tapestry. At the end of the hall there are two 
altars. On one burns spirits of wine and perfumes on 
the. other. This apartment receives its only light from 
the small pans in which burns spirits of wine. The 
President is here called Grand Pontiff. He is clothed 
in a long white robe, wears a long white beard and his 
face is veiled. On his head is a crown of oak leaves. 
He is standing and holds a vase and a shell-formed sil- 
ver spoon wherewith to take the perfumes. 

Grand Pontiff — (To marshal with candidate; in a 
calm and composed voice.) What does that man wish? 

Grand Marshal — He is a Grand Scotch Knight of St. 
Andrew, of Scotland, who, after overcoming the terrors 
of death, goes in quest of truth. 

Grand Pontiff — (To Grand Marshal.) You know Sir 
Knight the importance and holiness of our mysteries. - 
Do you vouch for the discretion of this candidate ? 

Grand Marshal — Grand Pontiff, you may judge by 
the words he will pronounce with me. (Grand Marshal 
and candidate both pronounce aloud the word Nekamah.) 

Grand Pontiff — Since the candidate submits to the 
fearful sentences of the tribunal of the Free Judges; 
since he is determined to go in search of truth, I will 
grant his request. 



INITIATION. ' 363 



MUSIC. 



Knight of Eloquence — (From his concealment behind 
the drapery in a grave tone.) All things whatsoever 
ye would that men should do unto you, do ye even so 
to them. 

Do not unto another, what ye would not should be 
done unto you. 

Worship the Supreme Being. 
Il "Help the destitute. 

Be sincere and shun falsehood. 

Be patient and bear the faults of your brethren. 

Keep your engagements faithfully and remember that 
ne of the chief virtues of a true philosopher is discre- 
tion. 

Suffer with resignation the slings and arrows of 
outrageous fortune. 

Love your brethren Kadosh as yourself. 

Such are the duties of a philosopher, of a true Knight 
Kadosh. (Music stops, and Knight of Eloquence re- 
tires.) 

Grand Pontiff — (To candidate.) You have already " 
been informed that among the Knights Kadosh truth 
and reality take the place of symbols, and even now 
your sagacity will partly raise the curtain, which cannot 
be entirely removed until you have sustained new trials. 
In all the preceding degrees you must have observed 
that the object of Scotch Masonry is to overthrow all 
kinds of superstition, and that by admitting in her bosom 
on the terms of the strictest equality, the members of 
all religions, of all creeds and of all countries, without 
any distinction whatever, she has, and indeed can have, 
but one single object and that is to restore to the Grand 
Architect of the Universe ; to the common father of the 
human race those who are lost in the maze of impostures, 
invented for the sole purpose of enslaving 'them. The 
Knights Kadosh recognize no particular religion, and for 



PI 

264 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

that reason we demand of you nothing more than to 
worship God. And whatever may be the religious forms 
imposed upon you by superstition at a period of your 
life when you were incapable of discerning truth from 
falsehood^ we do not even require you to relinquish them. 
Time and study alone can enlighten you. But remem- 
ber that you will never be a true mason unless you 
repudiate forever all superstitions and prejudices. 

However^ until then^ you will own that we have re- 
quired of you nothing more than to acknowledge with 
us the sole, the only certain and undoubted point admit- 
ted as such by all the human race without exception. 
We mean the existence of a first great cause, whom we 
call God Almighty. Eepeat then with me the usual 
oath of all who wish to proceed further and kneel before 
the altar of truth. (Candidate kneels.) 

SECOND OATH, KNIGHT KADOSH. 

I solemnly and sincerely promxise and swear 

wholly to devote myself to the emancipation of humani- 
ty; to practice toleration/ in political and religious 
matters especially, toward all men. To strive unceasing- 
ly for the happiness of my fellow beings; for the 
propagation of light and for the overthrow of supersti- 
tion, fanaticism, imposture and intolerance. 

I furthermore solemnly promise and swear to help my 
brethren, even at the peril of my life, if they should he 
persecuted for their religion, for the holy cause of lib- 
erty, or as members of the higher masonic bodies. So 
help me God. 

Grand Pontiff — (Having raised candidate and handed 
him the spoon.) My brother, you will now throw in- 
cense in the fire burning on the altar of perfumes. (Can- 
didate obeys.) 

Grand Pi^ntiff — Almighty Father, Holy and Merciful. 
Oh ! Thou, of whom we are the beloved children, accept 



INITIATION. 265 

this incense which we offer thee with our hearts, as a 
token of love and reverence. Ma)^ thy kingdom come 
at last, and with it the end of all fanaticism^, intoler- 
ance, imposture and superstition. Amen. 

Grand Pontiff — And now my brother, proceed with 
courage on the journey which you have so rashly under- 
taken. 

MUSIC. 

(Candidate takes the hand of the Grand Pontiff, bows 
to him, then follows the Grand Marshal who conducts 
him to the door of the Areopagus or third apartment, 
whereat he knocks as a Grand Scotch Knight of St, 
Andrew of Scotland; 00 000 0000 After Knocking, the 
Grand Marshal leaves the candidate in charge of a 
Knight and proceeds to his post in the Areopagus.) 

THIRD APARTMENT : — This apartment is styled Areop- 
agus i'""^ It is hung with black tapestry, strewed with 
red flames. The banner of the Elect hangs over the 
head of the President, whose throne is on a platform 
seven steps high. The President is called Sovereign 
Grand Judge. He is clothed in a long trailing robe. In 
his hand is a long white rod. His face is concealed by 
•a black hood. He wears a red collar without embroidery, 
at -the end of which hangs a medallion bearing the num- 
ber 1. Before the Sovereign Judge is an altar on which 
is a balance, a sword and three black candlesticks with 
three branches each. In each branch burns a candle of 
yellow wax. 

The Areopagus is composed of seven members ; never 
more. They are called Free Judges and are placed in 
a circle on the right and left of the Sovereign Grand 
Judge, Before each Free Judge is a triangular table. 

Note 352. — "Areopagus. The third apartment in a Council of Kndcsh 
is so called. It represents a tribunal, and the name is derived froAi the 
celebrated court of Athens." — Mackey's Euc^rclopaedie of Freemasomy, 
Article Areopagus, 



266 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

on which is a black candle stick with three branches. In 
each branch burns a candle of yellow wax. 

The first and second Free Judges, together with the 
others members of the Areopagus wear a black robe. A 
black hood covers their faces. Each holds a long white 
rod. 

Like the President, they have around their necks a 
red collar, without embroidery, at the end of which 
hangs also a medallion on which is engraved the respect- 
ive number of each.. 

The Grand Marshal is here called the Grand Provost 
of Justice. He wears a black dalmatic, a hemlet with a 
visor, a sword and a poniard. He stands at the door of 
the Areopagus. The candidate wears a black veil. 

Sovereign Grand Judge — (In answer to knocks on 
door.) ' Who knocks? 

Grand Provost of Justice — A Grand Scotch Knight 
of St. Andrew of Scotland who wishes to proceed fur- 
ther and who, relying on the mercy of this dreaded tri- 
bunal, dares to ask admittance among the Knights Ka- 
dosh. His name is .... [give the name of the candidate] 
and hitherto his brethren have found no fault in him. 

Sovereign Grand Judge — ^Permit him to enter. (The 
Grand Provost of Justice then opens the door and takes 
hold of the candidate.) 

Sovereign Grand Judge — Grand Provost of Justice, is 
this man so rash as to dare the rigor of our tribunal? 
Is he so sure of the purity of his intentions, of his love 
for mankind, of his hatred for imposture, intolerance, 
fanaticism and superstition? Or have you neglected to 
inform him that he is now in the presence of those 
terrible Free Judges, whose unflinching justice has 
caused the most powerful to tremble? 

Grand Provost of Justice — Sovereign Grand Judge, 



INITIATION. 2G1 

rhe awe which the very naine of this august tribunal 
causes among men has prompted me to conceal its rigor- 
ous duties from the candidate. But knowing his liberal 
opinions ; havi^g received the oath which he took on the 
holiest remains^ and placing entire confidence in him 
after the reprobation with which I have seen him brand 
powerful, but infamous wretches I thought that I was 
justified in bringing him before his judges. (The Grand 
Provost of Justice then causes the candidate to kneel 
and extend his hand as if to take an oath.) 

Sovereign Grand Judge — Now let him hear with due 
respect the sentence we have to pass upon him. 

Sovereign Grand Judge — First and Second Free 
Judges proceed in silence to collect the votes. You are 
aware that one single negative vote is sufficient for ex- 
clusion. Let no favor or partiality have influence over 
you. (The first and second Free Judges proceed in 
silence to collect the votes, after which they make their 
report in a low voice to the Sovereign Grand Judge.) 

Sovereign Grand Judge— Free Judges, one of you have 
voted in the negative and it is his wish to submit his 
reasons to the Areopagus. Let him state his objections. 

A Free Judge — (Eising.) I have voted in the negative 
Sovereign Grand Judge. I have good reasons to believe> 
nay I know, that the candidate entertains anti-masonic 
opinions; that is to say, intolerant and sectarian princi- 
ples, not only in religious but also in masonic matters. 
I know that his notions of politics and government are 
far from, being liberal and it is now plain to me that the 
rapid progress he has made in the Masonic Hierarchy is 
owing merely to the unwise indulgence and weakness 
of his brethren. He knows nothing of our sublime 
institution and he would almost tax us with absurdity. 
I therefore request that he be commanded and enjoined 



I 



268 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

to lay before us in writings and over his own signaturCj 
his profession of faith, on masonic, religious and politi- 
cal matters. 

All Free Judges — We concur with our colleague. 

Sovereign Grand Judge — (To candidate.) You have 
heard the decision of the Areopagus. We must have 
your profession of faith, on masonic, political and relig- 
ious matters before giving a decision on the fearful 
accusations brought against you. (Rise and obey.) 

Sovereign Grand Judge — Grand Provost of Justice, 
do your duty, 

MUSIC. 

(The Grand Provost of Justice covers the head of the 
candidate and retires with him. When out of the 
Areopagus, the Grand Provost of Justice receives from 
the candidate the required profession of faith, where- 
upon the Grand Provost of Justice after leaving the 
candidate in charge of a Knight, returns to the Areop- 
agus and delivers the profession of faith to the Sover- 
eign Grand Judge, when the music stops and the Sover- 
eign Grand Judge reads aloud the profession of faith.) 

Sovereign Grand Judge — Free Judges, now that 'you 
have heard the profession of faith of the candidate, are 
you satisfied and do you deem him worthy of preceding 
further ? 

All Free Judges — Unanimously. Yes. 

Sovereign Grand Judge- — Grand Provost of Justice, 
introduce the candidate. {Order is executed.) 

Sovereign Grand Judge — The profession of faith 
which you have submitted to this tribunal, is the onlv 
defence which you could oppose to the accusations 
brought against you. Whatever might have been your 
opinions, we have no right to doubt your good faith. 
This profession which you have written and signed with 



IKITIATIOIT. 269 

your own hand will remain forever in our archives. We 
believQ it to be sincere, for we hold you to be a man of 
honor. These reasons, together with the fortitude which 
you have shown in the first trials of this illustrious de- 
gree, have prompted this Areopagus to allow you to 
proceed. But remember that this tribunal shows no 
mercy to traitors and perjurers and that it visits them 
with the severest punishment. Approach ! You must 
take another oath. Kneel down and repeat with me. 
(Candidate kneels down.) 

THIRD OATH, KNIGHT KADOSH. 

[During the taking of this oath the Grand Provost of 
Justice holds the point of his sword to the heart of the 
candidate.] 

I of my own free will and accord, do hereby 

solemnly and sincerely promise and swear to keep faith- 
fully the secrets of the Sublime degree of Knight Ka- 
dosh and strictly to obey the statutes of the order. 
P I further solemnly promise and swear to protect in- 
nocence and to punish crime, to help all in distress, to 
do all in my power to crush oppressors and to defend 
the oppressed. Every Knight Kadosh shall be to me as 
if the ties of blood had united us. 

I further solemnly promise and swear never to clinl- 
lenge a Knight Kadosh to mortal combat, before having 
previously submitted my motives to the Council assem- 
bled in its Areopagus, and if I were in a place wliere no 
Council existed, to take advice of at least two Knights 
Kadosh. 

I furthermore solemnly promise and swear, never to 
slander a Knight Kadosh, and never to cause him any 
prejudice either by word or by action. And should I 
ever infringe or violate any of my obligations I now 
take, I do from this moment accept and consent to un- 



270 GRAND ELECT KmOHT KADOSH. ' 

dergo the sentence which may be pronounced against 
me by this dreaded tribunal, which I hereby acknowl- 
edge as my Supreme Judge. All of which I promise 
to do, under the penalty of death. So help me God. 

MUSIC. 

[Sovereign grand Judge causes the candidate to kiss 
three times the cresslet of his sword which he brandish- 
es three times, exclaiming : Justice ! Justice ! Justice ! 
He then breaks his rod and throws the fragments there- 
of at the feet of the candidate. The Grand Provost of 
Justice then conducts the candidate to the first apart- 
ment, there to await the order to reappear.] 

FOURTH APARTMENT : — -In this apartment, the lodge is* 
styled Senate. The President is called Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master, and represents Frederic''' Second, King 

Note 353. — "The evidence of the connection of Frederick with the 
Institution in his latter days, and of his organization of the Ancieiit and 
Accepted Scottish Rite, are, it must be confessed, derived only from the 
assertions made in the Grand Constitutions of 1786, and from the state- 
ments of the earliest bodies that have received and recognized these Con- 
stitutions. If the document is not authentic, and if those who made 
the statements here have been mistaken or been dishonest, then the proof 
of Frederick's interest and labors In Masonry must fall to the ground. 
Yet, on the other side, the oppugners of the theory that in May, 1786, 
the King signed the Constitutions — which fact alone would be suflBcient 
to establish his Masonic character — have been able to bring forward in 
support of their denial little more than mere conjecture, and, in some 
instances, perversions of acknowledged history. Brother Albert Pike, i?j 
the edition of the Grand Constitutions which he prepared for the use of 
the Supreme Council of the Southern Jurisdiction, and published in 1872. 
has most thoroughly investigated this subject with the learning of a 
scholar and the acumen of a lawyer. While unable to advance any new 
facts, he has collected all the authorities, and has, by the most irre- 
fr;igible arguments, shown that the conclusions of those who deny the 
authenticity of the Constitutions of 1786, and Frederick's connection with 
them, are illogical, and are sustained only by false statements and wild 
conjecture. Brother Pike very candidly says: 

** 'There is no doubt that Frederick came to the conclusion that tho 
great pretensions of Masonry in the blue degrees were merely imaginary 
and deceptive. He ridiculed the Order, and thought its ceremonies mere 
child's play; and some of his sayings to that effect have been preserved. 
But it does not at all follow that he might not at a later day have found 
it politic to put himself at the head of an Order that had become a 
power; and, adopting such of the degrees as were not objectionable, to 
reject all that were of dangerous tendency, that had fallen into the 
hands of the Jesuits, or been engrafted on the Order by the Illuminati. 

*'It is evident that the question of what active part Frederick took 
in the affairs of Masonry is not yet settled. Those who claim him as 
having been, to within a short period before his death, an active patron 
of and worker in the Order, attempt to sustain their position by the 
production of certain documents. Those who deny that position assert 
that those documents have been forged. Yet it must be adrnitted that 
the proofs of forgery that have been offered are not such as in an ordl- 
narjr*^ criminal trial would satisfy a .1nry."— Mackey a hncyclcp dia Of 
S'reemasonry, Article Trederick thd Greati 



INITIATION. 271 

of Prussia. In some lodges the President is styled 
Grand Commander^ in others Great Sovereign. The 
East is hung with black velvet, embroidered with silver 
and strewed with death's heads transpierced with a pon- 
iard. The throne is hung with black velvet, with large 
white stripes and silver fringe. Over the throne is a 
double-headed eagle crowned, with his wings open but 
not spread. He holds a sword in his claws. A death's 
head transpierced with a poniard, is sometimes used 
instead of an eagle. 

The drapery of the canopy is strewed with red Teuton- 
ic crosses and brilliant stars. In the back of the canopy 
is a large Teutonic cross of red cloth. In each side of 
tlie throne is one of the standards of the order. The 
hall is illuminated by five candles of yellow wax. The 
West is hung with red tapestry. Towards the west end 
of the hall is a large mausoleum in the shape of a pyra- 
mid. 

A funeral urn, covered with a black veil, is placed on 
the platform of the mausoleum. It is surrounded by a 
crown of laurel. On the right of the urn is a regal 
crown; on the left a popish tiara. At the upper angle 
of the mausoleum is a vase in which burns spirits of 
wine. On the right and left of the mausoleum there are 
small pans in which perfumes burn and create thick 
smoke which renders surrounding objects almost invisi- 
ble. In the middle of the West, is an altar on which 
are placed a human skull inlaid with silver, a decanter 
of red wine and a loaf of white bread, all of which is 
covered by a white cloth which is removed at a certain 
period of the ceremony. 

Between the East and the altar is the mysterious 
ladder which a black cloth conceals from the candidate 
till the moment specified in the ritual. On each side of 



272 GRAND EMCT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

the mausoleum and a little behind, is stationed a Knight 
armed with an axe. A meeting of five Knights Kadosh 
is called a Council. This mysterious ladder has two 
supporters of seven steps each. The first supporter on 
the right is called Oheh Eloah,"'" 

The second supporter on the left is called Oheh Ear- 
obo. 

The names of the steps, beginning at the bottom on 
first step are as follows, viz : 

Tsedakah, SKor Laban, Mathoc, Emunah/^^ Amal, 
Sagghi, Sabhal. The seventh and last is called Ghemul, 
Binah, Thehunah. 

The steps of the supporter on the left are as follows, 
beginning also at the bottom : 

Astronomy, Music, Geometry, Arithmetic, Logic, 
Rhetoric, Grammar. 

Master of Ceremonies — (Seven knocks on door; 00 
00 00 0.) (Music stops.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Sir Knight First 
Lieutenant Grand Master, who dares thus to interrupt 
our deliberations? ^ 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight Second 
Lieutenant Grand Master, who dares thus to interrupt 
our deliberations? 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight Cap- 
tain of the Guards, inquire who dares thus to interrupt 
our deliberations? 

Note 354. — "This and Ohe"b Karo"bo, Love of our Neig-hbor, arc tho 
names of the two supports of the Ladder of Kadosh. Collectively, they 
allude to that divine passage, 'Thou shalt love the Lord, thy God, with 
all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. This is 
the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it. Thou 
Shalt love thy neighbor as thyself. On these two commandments hang 
all the law and the prophets.' Hence the Ladder of Kadosh is supported 
by these two Christian commandments." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of 
Freemasonry, Article Oheh Eloah. 

Note 355. — "Sometimes spelled Amunah, but not in accordance with 
the Masoretic points. A significant word in the high degrees, signifying 
fidelity, especially in fulfilling one's promises." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia 
of Freemasonry, Article Emunah. 

N. B. — Previous to seating the Knights the Thrice Puissant Grand 
Master puts on the left foot of the candidate the spur of Knighthood. 
All resume their seats with the exception of the candidate and Master 
(pf Ceremonies. 



INITIATION. S73 

Captain of Guard — (Opening the door a little.) Who 
dares thus to interrupt our deliberations? 

Master of Ceremonies — It is a Grand Scotch Knight 
of St. Andrew of Scotland, who after having obtained 
from the illustrious Areopagus leave to proceed further 
craves the Grand Master's high influence for the purpose 
of being admitted into the holy order of which he is the 
supreme chief. 

Captain of Guard — (After closing the door.) Sir 
Knight Second Lieutenant Grand Master, it is a Grand 
Scotch Knight of St. Andrew of Scotland, who after 
having obtained from the illustrious Areopagus leave to 
proceed further, craves the Grand Master's high influ- 
ence for the purpose of being admitted into the holy 
order of which he is the supreme chief. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight First 
Lieutenant Grand Master, it is a Grand Scotch Knight 
of St. Andrew of Scotland, who after having obtained 
from the illustrious Areopagus leave to proceed further, 
craves the Grand Master's high influence for the pur- 
^|)ose of being admitted' into the holy order of which he 
is the supreme chief. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master, it is a Grand Scotch Knight of St. An- 
drew of Scotland, who after having obtained from the 
illustrious Areopagus leave to proceed further, craves 
your high influence for the purpose of being admitted 
into the holy order of which you are the supreme chief. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — What is his name? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — What is his name? 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — What is his name? 

Captain of (?uar^— (Opening the door a little.) What 
name? (Master of Ceremonies gives the candidate's 
name. Captain of the Guards then reports the name to 



2^4: GRAND ILICT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

the Second Lieutenant, he to the First Lieutenant, and 
this officer to the Thrice Puissant.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (To First Lieutenant 
Grand Master.) What right has he ? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — (To Second Lieuten- 
ant Grand Master.) What right has he? 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — (To Captain of 
the Guard.) What right has he? 

Captain of Guard — (To Master of Ceremonies.) What 
right has he? 

Master of Ceremonies — He possesses all the righted 
which he derives from the higher degrees, already con- 
ferred upon him, but the only one which he makes bold 
to appeal to, is that of being a man. His rights are ex- 
pressed by Michtar. 

Captain of Guard— -He possesses all the rights which 
he derives from the higher degrees already conferred 
upon him, but the only one which he makes bold to 
appeal to, is that of being a man. His rights are ex- 
pressed by Michtar. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — He possesses all 
the rights which he derives from the higher degree? 
already conferred upon him, but the only one which he 
makes bold to appeal to, is that of being a man. His 
rights are expressed by Michtar. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — He possesses all the 
rights which he derives from the higher degrees already 
conferred upon him, but the only one which he makes 
bold to appeal to, is that of being a man. His rights 
are expressed by Michtar. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Permit him to enter. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Permit him to enter. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Permit him to en- 
ter. (Captain of the Guards then opens the door and 



IKITIATIO^. 275 

gives admittance to the Master of Ceremonies and the 
candidate, who place themselves in advance of the 
mausoleum.) 

Tlirioe Puissant Grand Master — (To Master of Cere- 
monies.) Since 3^ou have ventured to introduce this 
intruder among us, and were so bold as to give him no 
other title than that of being a man, what do you under- 
stand by that word? 

Master of Ceremonies — By ^^man^^ I understand a be- 
ing divested of the prejudices and superstitions of his 
childhood, who is determined to follow unflinchingly in 
the path of truth. A being whom no puerile considera- 
tion can check in his glorious career. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — If such be the dispo- 
sition of the candidate, let him kneel and behold that 
mausoleum. (Master of Ceremonies causes the candi- 
date to turn toward mausoleum, directs him to kneel 
and to extend his hand toward the urn on which are 
written the letters J.-B.-M.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (To candidate.) 
When your rashness prompted you to enter this awful 
Sanctuary, you were no doubt informed of the danger 
which threatened you, and of the trials which still await 
you. Swear therefore, upon your word of honor, never 
to reveal what you have seen or heard hitherto. Remem- 
ber however, that even now you are at liberty to with- 
draw in peace, if a timid conscience, if prejudices and 
superstition or any other reason, cause you to hesitate, 
but forget not that the slightest indiscretion will cost 
you your life. Are you still willing to proceed? 

Candidate — Yes, and I solemnly take the oath you 
require. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (To candidate who 
is still on his knees.) Since you will proceed^ we must 



276 GBAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH* 

unfold to you the mysteries and real object of Scotch 
Masonry. Eise and be seated. If the degrees which you 
have hitherto received have elicited your attention and 
study^ you must certainly come to the conclusion that a 
great mystery is hidden under the various emblems 
which have been successively presented to you. And 
now shall be fulfilled the promise which has so often 
been made to you. In one word you shall receive the 
true light. Although the degree which is now being 
conferred upon you^ is but the 30th of our Hierarchy, it 
is nevertheless the Ne plus ultra of Masonic knowledge. 
In almost all the rituals of this degree, nothing but 
vengeance is spoken of. But this is an allegory without 
ineaning, for this degree contains all the philosophy of 
our sublime institution, which is nothing more^ nothing 
less, than the actual result of our Thrice Puissant Grand 
Master's philosophy, and philosophy discountenances 
vengeance. Virtue alone and good examples, patience 
and energy in opposing evil can ensure its triumphs. In 
this, no more than in the preceding degrees, have we 
to avenge the death of Hiram Abiff, or even ftie slaugh- 
ter of the Knights Templars^ and the murder of their 
Grand Master. And if the ceremonies of this degree 
recall to our minds the catastrophe resulting in the over* 
throw of an illustrious order, it is true nevertheless that' 
the commemoration of the bloody tragedy of the 11th" 
day of March 1314, has not for its object to perpetuatel 
ideas of vengeance against its perpetrators, which would, 
be absurd and anti-masonic, but to make us feel thel 
necessity of union, the better to resist tyranny and un-j 
mask imposture, and ultimately to substitute for both^^ 
even by force of arms, if necessary, the reign of liberty,^ 
equality arnd fraternity. And indeed, these three word^ 



INITIATION, 277 

contain the whole doctrine of our Thrice Puissant Grand 
Master. Masonry is the history of mankind and we 
must own that our fore-fathers acted wisely when in 
order to illustrate the sublime teachings of our institu- 
tion, they selected the most striking events in that 
history, the better to impress upon our minds the fatal 
results of discord which alone encourages usurpers in 
their bloody and ungodly schemes. For if men, one 
and all, had always been united by the ties of fraternity 

.and consequently by the duties they owe to their breth- 
.ren, would there have been any possibility for the Jewish 

' hierarchs to have murdered our Thrice Puissant Grand 
Master ? For the French and Romish Hierarchs to have 
slaughtered the Knights Templars ? And in later days, 

- the Calvinists of France ? Most undoubtedly not. If then 
we wish order and peace to prevail on earth, we must be 
united; we must have but one will, but one mind. Both 

^ we find in the teachings of Masonry only, and against 

n that compact of unity, tyranny and usurpation, whether 
religious or political, must fall subdued and powerless. 
And now my brother, that by your courage, your resolu- 

: tion to discharge your duty as a nian and as a Knight, 

I you have won our confidence, we will give you a pledge 
of our regard. But you must go through a last and 
necessary trial. Else my brother! 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Sir Knight Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the mysterious 
ladder. (Master of Ceremonies conducts the candidate 
to the ladder, which is then uncovered.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — First and Second 

Lieutenant Grand Masters, officers and Knights, form 

a circle around the mysterious ladder. (Order is obeyed ) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (To candidate.) Mv 

brother, you will now ascend the first step of our mys- 



278 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

terious ladder. (Order is obeyed.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — My brother, the lad- 
der before you has two supporters, the one on the right 
bears the Hebrew words Ohel) Eloah, that is Loving 
God, the one on the left bears the Hebrew words Olieh 
KarolOy that is loving his neighbor. 

There are seven steps on each side; each step has a 
word written upon it. The words on one side of tlie 
ladder are Hebrew, on the other side the words are 
English. The name of the first step on which yon now 
stand is called Tsedakah^ which means Justice, because 
upon justice must be based all our actions; because a 
true Knight Kadosh, even when called upon to punish, 
must not forget that justice is never to be violated. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Strikes one with the 
pommel of his sword. Candidate then ascends the 
second step.) This second step is called Shor-Laban, 
that is White Ox; a figure to teach us that by constant 
and patient labor, and the purity of our intentions only, 
we may hope to witness the success of our cause. 

Thrioe Puissant Grand Master — (Strikes one. Can- 
didate ascends third step.) This step is called Mathoc, 
that is Meekness, This virtue is so valuable in the pro- 
fane world, it is still more necessary in the , Knight 
Kadosh. For it is by this virtue only that we may hope 
to convince our erring brethren, and influence them to 
enter the path of true happiness and liberty. 

Thrice Puissant Grand If o^fer— (Strikes one. Candi- 
date ascends fourth step.) This fourth step is called 
Emunah, that is Fidelity, Steadiness. You easily under- 
stand how precious this quality is in a Knight Kadosh. 
There can be no success for him if he is not faithful to 
his obligations, if he is luke warm in fulfilling his duty. 



INITIATION. 279 

It is with these virtues especially that he will secure the 
triumph of that truth which must be the constant object 
of all his worship, and were truth banished from the 
hearts of all other men it ought ever to be found in the 
heart of a Knight Kadosh. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — ^(Knocks one. Candi- 
date ascends fifth step.) This fifth step is called Amal- 
Sagghi, that is Great Labor. And truly it is only by 
unceasing exertions; by great labor that we can attain 
the object we have in view. And if labor is necessary 
for man in all the walks of life, it is still more so for a 
Knight Kadosh, who neither can, nor must, take any 
rest so long as the welfare of humanity is not definitely 
secured. 

We must have patience in adversity, live in perfect 
union among ourselves; and for that purpose, we must 
be very cautious and never admit among us any one of 
whom we are not sure, or whose will is not free, such as 
religious monks, kings, princes and lords of the world; 
for their ideas of liberty are in opposition to the doc- 
trine of our Thrice Puissant Grand Master. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Strikes one. Candi- 
date ascends sixth step.) This sixth step is called 
"iahhal, that is Burden, to remind us of our task. We 
:iave to undergo many trials ; many dangers threaten us 
and we must never be taken by surprise. We must al- 
ways be united, and for that purpose, we must forgive 
our brethren their errors and their faults if we wish 
them to forgive ours. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Strikes one. Candi- 
date ascends seventh step.) This seventh step is called 
Ghemul, Binah, Thehunah, that is Generosity, Intelli- 
gence and Prudence, And indeed^ mj^ brother^ this mu§t 



m 

280 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

be the last step of perfection. A generous man is al- . 
ways ready to sacrifice himself for the benefit of his . 
brethren. An intelligent man studies the secrets of 
nature^, and draws therefrom all that can promxOte hnman 
happiness. A prudent man does not waste his resources 
and never trusts to hazard. He is very cautious so that 
when the time comes *f or execution^ every circumstance 
may contribute to the success of our holy cause. (A 
pause.) ] 

MUSIC. I 

(After a few moments the music stops.) ' 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — On the other side of 
the ladder are written the names of those sciences which | 
all men sincerely desiring to help their fellow creatures I 
must study. Nothing can be expected from an ignorant ' 
man. He is bound forever to be a dupe and consequent- 
ly a slave. A well informed man is free for education 
has expanded his intellect^ enlarged his mind and has 
borne him^ as it were^ to the very steps of the throne oi 
eternal truth. He seeS;, he understands, he knows. 
Light is given to him. To his brethren he may be a 
guide, a teacher. But an ignorant man is blind. He 
staggers in the dark and falls a victim to imposture and 
tyranny. And what is still worse ; he very soon becomes 
an instrument of oppression to ensnare^his own brethren. 
He knows not the extent of the mischief done by him. 
His conscience speaks not, and, thanks to his, ignorance, 
humanity retrogrades to barbarism and idiocy. Study 
then my brother, study without ceasing, and be always 
guided by the noble ambition of teaching and directing 
your brethren. 

The word written on the last or seventh step, of the 
other side of the ladder, is Grammar; that is the art of 
speaking and writing correctly. He who is unacquaint- 
ed with his own language excites the mirth of others, 
and where ridicule exists, there can be no confidence. 

The word written on the sixth step is Rhetoric, That 



INITIATION. 281 

is, the art of speaking oji any subject, with elegance, 
propriety and force. Rhetoric is the theory of eloquence. 
It is not given to every man to be eloquent, but every 
man should know the rules of eloquence. The power 
of speech is immense, and you certainly know, that in 
all the revolutions, by which the people have attempted to 
reconquer their liberty and their rights, speech has been 
the chief weapon used by their leaders to enlighten and 
guide the masses. The word written on the fifth step 
is Logic. That is the art of making use of reason, in 
our inquiries after truth and in the communication of 
it to others. It is indispensable. For Grammar and 
even eloquence itself would avail nothing if you failed 
to know how to draw conclusions in proof of what you 
assert, victory can be obtained only by the power and 
propriety of reasoning. 

The word written on the fourth step is Arithmetic. 
That is, the science of numbers. It is useless here to 
demonstrate the necessity of this science, for it is the 
A. -.B. '.C. *. of the most common education. 

The word written on the third step is Geometry. That 
is the art of measuring spiice. Space has three dimen- 
sions, length, breadth and thickness. By means of 
^Geometry, the Architect draws his plans, the General 
stations his army, the Engineer selects the spot where to 
make his entrenchments; his fortifications. By the 
means of geometry, geographers can measure the dimen- 
sions of the globe, the extent of the seas, the position of 
the several states, 'empires, kingdoms and provinces of 
this world. With the aid of geometry, astronomers 
have succeeded in making observations and in counting 
the periods of time, the return of seasons of years. In a 
word geometry is the basis of Arithmetic and the princi- 
ples of mathematics. 



flP; 

S82 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

The word written on the second step is Music, That 
is the science of harmony. Not only does harmony 
soften and polish the manners and awaken tender and 
kind feelings in the rudest hearts, but it is also indis- 
pensable in distributing all the works of man. The 
eyes are fascinated by symmetry and the ear by the 
sounds of harmony. It seems ever to invite the mind 
to further investigations in the vast fields of happiness. 

The word written on the first step is Astronomy, That 
is the science of the motion, magnitude and position of 
the celestial bodies. The firmament is an open book, 
on the pages of which is written the word of God, in all 
its majestic splendor. 

With the assistance of astronomy we can observe the 
motions, measure the distances, comprehend the magni- 
tudes and calculate the periods and eclipses of the 
heavenly bodies. The study of astronomy furnishes us' 
with unparalleled instances of the power, wisdom and 
goodness of our Father who dwells in heaven, and in the 
hearts of all good Masons. Astronomy is the religion 
of space, leading man through a starry peristyle, up to fj^ 
the religion of ideas. 

My brother, all these several sciences, as you may 
easily understand, give a full sway to human intelligence 
and elevate it by study and meditation, to the very last 
degree of perfection, to which the genius of man 
can pretend. Ne plus ultra. (As these last words are* 
uttered the ladder is suddenly lowered, and the candi- 
date, supported by two Knights, finds himself on the 
floor.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (To candidate.) This 
sudden fall, so unexpected, is the emblem of the misfor- 
tunes which may strike you, whatever may be the extent 



INITIATION. 283 

of your knowledge and your virtues. Whatever may be 
the degree of elevation to which you may have attained 
among men, a single breath can bring you down to a 
common level. Then you will know the value of sound 
philosophy, such as is taught by Scotch Masonry. Vir- 
tue, which you will have constantly practiced will be 
your refuge and your consolation ; that strength of mind 
which you will find in the store-house of your heart and 
the elements of which we are happy to perceive in you, 
will enable you to suffer nobly the slings and arrows of 
outrageous fortune. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Order, Sir Knights ! 
(All rise and place themselves under the sign of order.) 

MUSIC. 

(Thrice Puissant Grand Master leaves his seat and 
proceeds to mausoleum when music stops.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Sir Knights, form a 
circle in front of the mausoleum. (Order is obeyed.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Sir Knights, on your 
knees! (Members and candidate kneel.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Taking the hand of 
the candidate and pointing to the urn.) Noble victim 
whose name is concealed under the emblem of the S.\ 
Tf. •. of the first three degrees. Oh Thou, whose ashes 
were gathered from the pile on which tWo infamous 
tyrants have, by the most excruciating tortures, termin- 
ated thy glorious life. Oh Thou, whom we have ever 
glorified under the several names of J. •. of B. \ and of 
M,\ Thou, our illustrious Grand Master Jacobus 
Burgundus M'olay. I here invoke thy great name and 
memory. I bring thee a disciple, aye, a disciple who 
will follow thy virtues, thy magnanimity. Be thou a 



S84 GHAK-D ELECT It^lGBtT KADOSH. 

witness to the oath he will now take. May he look with 
horror on the oppressors of humanity and help iis ulti- 
mately to accomplish our noble labor. To punish crime 
and to protect innocence. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — To candidate. Re* 
peat with me! 

FOURTH OATH, Kl^IGHT KADOSH. 

I do most solemnly promise and swear, upon 

my word of honor and upon this urn which recalls to my 
mind the memory of a virtuous raali who fell a victim 
to tyranny and imposture, to be faithful to all my former 
obligations; to pay due obedience to the statutes of the 
Grand Elect Knights Kadosh, and I hereby renew the 
oath which I have taken, as a Knight Rose Croix. 

I furthermore promise and swear constantly to strive 
to reach the true and grand object of a Knight Kadosh. 
To protect innocence and to punish crime, and from this 
day forward to devote myself to the holy cause of 
humanity. 

I furthermore promise and swear to use every means 
in my power to crush tyranny, to unmask and confound 
imposture, to contribute with all my might to the diffu- 
(sion of light and to the propagation of liberal ideas, 
wheresoever I may be. 

I furthermore promise and sweai* to defend the public 
weal ; to consider the oppressed as my brethren, and the| 
oppressors as my enemies. '\ 

I furthermore promise and swear to free my fellow ; 
beings from the disgraceful yoke of tyramly and impos--; 
ture under which they groan, and as much as in me lies,! 
to secure for my brethren, according to their capac-| 
ity and merit, the share to which they are legitimately! 
entitled in the legal sovereignty of the people. | 

I henceforth devote and consign myself to disgrace^, 
and contempt, to the execration and punishment of the^ 
Grand Elect Knights Kadosh, if I ever fail in this mf^ 



I 



INITIATION. 285 

solemn obligation^ or if I ever pass over to despots and 
imposters. God by my witness^ my shield! Amen, 
Amen. Amen. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Rise, Sir Knights. 
(All rise and place themselves under the sign of order.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (To candidate.) 
Let ns do, our duty and perform a solemn ceremony, 
the object of which is more fully to convey to your mind 
the - necessity of ever keeping the sacred ' obligations 
which you have this day taken. (Removes the cloth 
from the altar on which is the skull. ) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — My brother, you are 
now convinced that the degree of Knight Kadosh is the 
apex of the Masonic edifice. It contains all the science 
of Masonry. You are rapidly approaching the end of 
its teachings, and as all in this degree assumes an ap- 
pearance of actual reality, I will, as it is my duty, lay 
your finger on the terrible symbol of human equality. 
(He puts candidate's hand on the skull.) Are these the 
remains of the most powerful, or of the most humble of 
mortals? Who can answer this question? We all en- 
■^r life in the same manner, and before death all rank 
md privileges disappear. This is the truth, acknowl- 
edged and proclaimed by the Knights Kadosh, and in 
4rder never to forget it, they all drink from the same 
fap, from the cup of equality. They all break together 
lie bread of fraternity, the bread which is as necessary 
;o the life of the poor, as to the life of the rich; as well 
;o the life of the strong, as to the life of the weak ; as 
veil to the life of the tyrant, as to the life of the vie- 
im. (Thrice Puissant Grand Master then breaks the 
)read and distributes it among the Knights; then fills 
he cup, drinks and passes it to his neighbor, and he to 
lis till all have drank.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Pointing to the 
egal crown.) This crown my brother, is the emblem 
f hypocrisy and tyranny. It represents the crown of 



286 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

Philip the Faii% King of France, and the crown of all 
those, who under the name of kings and monarchs have 
usurped the power, exclusively belonging to the people 
and for that reason we trample it under foot, and we 
invite you to do the same. (Thrice Puissant Grand 
Master then throws the crown on the floor and tramples 
upon it. The candidate and all the Knights also 
trample on it, when all the Knights brandish their 
poniards and exclaim:) 

All- — Down with tyrants. May thus roll in the dust, 
the crown of every king and potentate. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Passing over to the 
Tiara.) This represents the Tiara of the cruel and 
cowardly Pontiff,' who sacrificed to his ambition the 
illustrious order of those Knights Templars of whom we 
are the true successors. A crown of gold and precious 
stones ill befits the humble head of one who pretends to 
be successor, the Vicar, of Jesus of Nazareth. It is 
therefore the crown of an imposter, and it is in the 
name of him, who said "neither be ye called Masters,^' 
that we trample it under our feet. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (To candidate.) Are 
you disposed to do the same? 

Candidate- — I am. (Thrice Puissant Grand Master 
then throws the Tiara on the floor and tramples upon it, 
the candidate and all the Knights also trample on it, 
when all the Knights brandishing their poniards ex- 
claim:) 

All — Down with imposture! 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (To candidate.) 
You have made good the hopes we entertained of you. 
You have discarded all stupid and vulgar prejudices, 
You now fully deserve to be Knight^(J Kftdosh, 



INITIATION. 287 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Striking the shoul- 
ders of the candidate three times with the fiat of his 
sword.) To the glory of the Grand Architect of the 
Universe^ in the name and under the auspices of the 

Grand Consistory of Sublime Princes of the Eoyal 

Secret^ 32nd degree of the , Ancient and Accepted 

Scottish Eite^ in and for the Sovereign and Independ- 
ent State of ^ under the jurisdiction of the Su- 
preme Council for the northern jurisdiction of the 
United States of America^ sitting at the city of New 
York, State of New York, and by virtue of the author- 
ity vested in me by Council of Kadosh, No. .... 

I receive and constitute you a Knight Kadosh, or 
Knight of the Black and White Eagle, and an active 
member of this Council of Kadosh. (Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master returns to» the throne and takesiiisseat.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (One knock with 
pommel of sword.) Be seated Sir Knights. 

N, B. — Previous to seating the Knights the Thrice Puissant Grand 
Master puts on the left foot of the candidate the spur of Knighthood. All 
resume their seats with the exception of the candidate and Master of 
Ceremonies. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (To candidate.) 
We will now my brother, proceed to give you the signs, 
tokens and words- of the degree of Knights Kadosh. 
(As the Thrice Puissant Grand Master explains the 
signs, the Master of Ceremonies causes the candidate to 
execute the motions.) 

SIGN OF KADOSH. 

Place the right hand on the heart, 
the fingers separated. Let the right 
hand fall on the right knee. Bend 
and grasp the knee; then seize the 
poniard which is suspended from the 
ribbon, raise it to the height of the 
shoulder, as if to strike and say^ Nehanh 
pp oi Kaaosb. A domi, 




288 



QUA^D ELECT Ki^IGHT ^APOSH. 




SIGN OP ORDER. 

Hold the sword in the left hand and 
place the right band extended over the 
heart. 



Sign of Order. 
Knight KadoBh. 

TOKEN. 

^ Place right foot to 
right foot, and knee to 
knee; present the right 
first, the thumb elevat- 
ed, seize the thumb al- 
ternately, let it slip and 
step back a pace, then 
raise the arm as if to 
strike with the poniard. 
In doing this the first 
says, JVekamah'bealim, 
and the other answers, 

, ,^ .,. PTiarash-TcoV 

Token, Knight Kadosh, Second Position. 

BATTERY :— Sevcn strokes, by three, two and one ; OOG 

00 0. 

HOURS OF MEETINGS— The Council opens at the 
bednnino; of nis^ht and closes at daybreak. 

■i?«+^ qt^R "Pharaxal A signifioant word in the high degrees, and 
th^re sa?d i;: the oM ritnafs, to^ signify 'we shall all be united.;, Delan- 
ney gives it\s pharas kol, and says it means 'all is explained. -M*.ck. 
ey's Encyclopeedla of Freemasonry, Article PharaxaU 




\ 



INITIATIO^^. 289 

AGE : — The Knights Kadosh have no age ; they have a 
century or more. 

PASS WORD : — To enter, NeJcam. Answer Menahhem, 
that is Consolator, To retire, Phaal-Kol. Answer 
Pharash'Koh, 

SACRED word: — NeJcamaJi-bealim, Answer PJiarasJi- 
Koh. But more generally N eham^Adonai, Answer 
Pharash-Kol, 

MARCH : — Make three hurried steps, the hands crossed 
on the head. Kneel on one knee. Present the poniard, 
by the handle, to the President, who leaves his seat, 
raises the Knight and conducts him to the East. The 
word Mishtar, which expresses the rights of a Knight 
Kadosh, means that it is the duty of one who is com- 
missioned to execute the decree of the Judge. 

MUSIC. 

, [Thrice Puissant Grand Master leaves his seat and 
introduces the candidate to all the Knights, who shake 
hands with him, and a moment after the music stops 
when Thrice Puissant Grand Master returns to his 
seat.] 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Sir Knight Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the seat of 
honor in the East. (Order is obeyed.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Be seated, Sir 
Knights. Sir Knight of Eloquence, the floor is yours. 
(Knight of Eloquence rises, bows and delivers the fol- 
lowing discourse:) 

DISCOURSE. 

■ Sir Knights, newly initiated. You have just passed 
through a most solemn, instructive and impressive cere- 
mony. You rise from an intellectual repast, which will 
no doubt, furnish rich material for future reflection, 
and I feel confident that you will make a profitable ap- 
plication of the lessons you have received. By virtue of 



290 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

the office which I have the honor to hold in this 
Council, it is my duty as well as my privilege to address 
you on this interesting occasion. Were the task self 
imposed, I should consider that I was rendering myself 
liable to the charge of temerity ; as it is, I approach the 
performance of it with diffidence, surrounded as I am 
by so many bright and honored lights of our Hierarchy ; 
brothers who by their zeal, energy, intelligence and 
well-directed researches, have shed additional lustre 
upon our annals. 

We will not now occupy your attention in the dis- 
cussions of when "or where Masonry first became ai 
distinct organization, neither will we pause to answer 
the cavil of those who insist that all of Masonry is con- 
tained in the first three degrees; nor of those who are 
pleased to call the higher degrees of Scotch Masonry 
side degrees; ornamental degrees. Their argument is 
the old one; that Masonry is unchangeable, and that 
these .degrees, not having been originally a part of the 
system, cannot belong to it. They mistake progress for 
change. When the spirit of God moved upon the face of 
the waters; when the Great Jehovah ordained the crea- 
tion of the world; when the first sun rose to greet with 
its beams, the new morning and the august command 
was uttered: ''Let there be light,'' the lips of deity 
breathed Masonry into existence and it must live" for- 
ever more; for truth is eternal, and the principles of 
truth are the foundation of Masonry. 

Masonry is unchangeable, but it must of necessity in 
the fulfillment of its mission keep pace with the advance 
of civilization, the arts and sciences. It must lead and 
not be lead by them. This is progress ; it is not change. 
Electricity is co-existent with matter. Tt is the samr 
now, and will be to the end of time; as it was at crea 






INITIATION 291 

tion's dawn. 

To our forefathers it was a dread inspiring mysteri- 
ous agent of destruction, and to this day it is compara- 
tively little understood. Your own great philosopher, 
the immortal Franklin, in the eighteenth century, first 
disarmed it of its terrors, reduced it to subjection to the 
will of man, and opened a way for further investigation. 
But it was reserved for our day to improve upon the 
work that he inaugurated, when ; Oh wondrous achieve- 
ment of science; it is become the medium of instant 
communication between the most distant parts of the 
globe. A simple wire, wrought out of the bowels of the 
earth, carries with the velocity of imagination, invisible 
messengers. The pulse beats of London, Paris and St. 
Petersburg can be felt and counted on the shores of the 
Atlantic. 

And is the principle of electricity changed ? No, it is 
not changed, but the arts and sciences have combined 

Jo make it subservient to the wants of man. 

* What is Masonry? Is it not the pursuit of science; 
the practice of virtue, and the teaching of those sublime 
doctrines which tend to bind the whole family of men 
in fraternal union? 

If this definition is correct, it remains for us only to 
proceed to make the application and to trace the means' 
we shall employ in accomplishing its object. It is a 
task that we should all zealously undertake, as we shall 
all be sharers in the glory and prosperity of our united 
labors, if success attend our laudable efforts. I ask your 
indulgence therefore, whilst I address myself to the 
subject, which I shall briefly discuss under three heads. 
The first, presenting general considerations of the 
objects of our institution, will conduct our minds to a 



293 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

proper point, whence our work may go hand in hand 
with our principles. 

The second will treat of the instructions to be given 
to candidates concerning our doctrines and precepts. 

And the third, of the encouragement and recompense 
which await those, who, by their zeal and labors, shall 
prove themselves worthy. 

Truth, Light and Liberty are the natural heritage of 
man. But many who admit the correctness of this ^ 
axiom, in a general sense, exclaim that all cannot un- 1 
derstand the truth, appreciate the light, or make at 
proper use of the liberty which we assert is their birth- • 
right. A large portion of mankind arrogate to them- 
selves the right to maintain in ignorance and slavish de- 
pendence, millions of their fellow creatures, the children 
of the same great parent, created in his own image the 
masterpiece of his handiwork. If those who possessed 
the capacity and power had employed as much talent 
and ingenuity, and expended as much treasure in the 
cultivation of the minds and faculties of their species 
as they have in blinding, deceiving and debasing them, 
the noble family of man could at this day present a 
spectacle of so much happiness, peace and contentment, 
as to be worthy the regard of their creator, who being 
good and just, certainly never intended that they should 
exist in a state of ignorance and misery. The truth of 
this you cannot but acknowledge, since it is the princi- 
ple which gave birth to Masonry. No, we are not born 
to remain in ignorance and misery. Masonry then is 
destined to repair the injuries which society has sus- 
tained from the machinations of its enemies and to 
make out the means whereby man may be restored to 
Ms natural rights and dignity, as an intelligent being. 



IK'ITTATION' 293 

Tlie degree of Kniglit Kadosli ; that is to say, Sacred or 
Holy Knight, which is one of the most elevated in our 
order, presents great facilities for the accomplishment 
we have in view. 

To explain this end, we must direct our attention 
rather to the consideration of what Masonry should be 
in our day, than to what it has been heretofore. We 
must, in a manner, draw a veil over the past, that our 
glimpse of the future may not be prejudiced. 

We will not discuss further the origin or the history 
of Masonry. Each one has liberty to adopt the opinions 
that seem to him most reasonable. To suppose that its 
source was in Egypt or India ; that it sprang from such 
a war ; or such a sect ; that it was the offspring of such a 
revolution, or such a system of astronomy or religion. 

The Knights Kadosh will abandon for the present, 
the charms of erudition, for considerations of more im- 
mediate importance. I mean the application of the 
principles of Masonry to the accomplishment of our de- 
signs, and it is precisely for this purpose that they 
•established such bodies as that which is now convened. 

Already we have decreed our laws and regulations, 
land we are now about to commence our labors. We 
feel the necessity of putting into operation our lofty 
conceptions, but at the outset, the fear that our zeal may 
overrun our prudence calls up in our minds the question 
how are we to take part effectively in these labors? 
WTio will be our guide, our teacher? Strange position 
which reveals in an instant, and notwithstanding our 
willingness, the obstacles and embarrassments which we 
must encounter. What shall we teach our disciples? 
What dogmas, what principles ? In one word, how shall 
we most judiciously co-operate with each other for the 



294 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

welfare of humanity? For you must be aware that this 
is the aim of all our teachings, of all that you have 
obligated yourselves to perform. 

These questions, my bretheren, however important 
and however embarrassing they may be, happily admit 
of an easy and simple solution. Your only difficulty 
will be in the selection, out of the different means which 
may present themselves; and in order to enable you 
more speedily to arrive at that choice^ I have only to re- 
mind you of one thing, and that is, the solemn obliga- 
tion which you have just taken, and which we tacitly re- 
new every time that we reassemble. You have sworn to 
combat fanaticism and superstition. Well, Sir Knights, 
in this obligation you will find the source of all your 
duties, and the possibility of performing them. It con- 
tains the dogmas and morality which you will present to 
those who are worthy of being employed in the noble 
works for which we are associated. To wage war against 
fanaticism and superstition, seems to me to be one of 
the most glorious human efforts of virtue, for it is an 
enterprise fraught with difficulty and encompassed with 
dangers, offering no other recompense than the approval 
of your own conscience, or that of those true brothers 
who find their sweetest enjoyments in the promotion of 
the welfare of their fellows, and for those who can ap- 
preciate such recompense, it is the greatest that can be 
given or enjoyed. 

But w^hat is fanaticism and what is superstition ? will 
perhaps be the question of the newly initiated, and how 
can we combat them without causing disorders in the 
body politic which they infect, without drawing on our 
own heads the direful vengeance of those whose prosper- 
ity depends upon them? What then are fanaticism and 



INITIATION', 295 

superstition ? 

Ah, my brethren^ the heart sickens and pales at the 
mention of those words ; the mind recoils with horror at 
the reflection^ they give rise to. To endeavor to paint 
them-, is to expose ones self to their fury. Merciful 
God ; in thy holy name their blasphemous atrocities have 
been perpetrated. In the sacred name of religion they 
have polluted thy footstool. When they are mentioned 
we should drape our temples in mourning, and draw a 
veil over the name of the eternal. Ah! my brethren, 
vain would be the attempt to calculate the evils which 
they have engendered ; to count the tears or measure the 
blood with which they have deluged this fair earth. Wlio 
can reckon the number of their victims? That which 
astonishes, while it consoles, is the admirable courage 
which you still display in entering the lists against those 
uncompromising foes of human rights, whom no 
earthly power has ever yet been able to subdue. Having 
conceived that there is some hope of success, you are re- 
solved to make the attempt, and you query with your- 
self where are the weapons that you are to employ? 
These weapons exist my brethren ; they are within your 
reach. It remains only for you to seize them and to use 
them with the force of resolution, strengthened only by 
the consciousness that your cause is just. These weapons 
are science, truth and humanity. Fanaticism is the off- 
spring of ignorance. To ignorance, oppose knowledge, 
which springs from enlightened education. Instruct 
the masses; teach them truth. To knowledge add 
virtue, and the universe is saved. 

There are no weapons more sure or' more terrible than 
those which I propose. The veriest despots and tyrants 
tremble before them. Heaven has ordained no others. 



296 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSfi. 

But the monster is also begotten of ambition and fraud. 
VVell^ even against these^ your weapons are the same. 
Your only resources are science and truth. Present un- 
ceasingly to the eyes and ears of all the world the 
melancholy results of deceit and ambition. The history 
of the past, spread as a map before them^ will be your 
faithful ally in the contest. Select there examples and 
facts the most striking. 

History speaks trumpet tongued of the many centu- 
ries of the degradation and misery of our race. History 
will speak for you. Its simple but affecting truths will 
touch the hardest hearts, and confound those of the 
most perverse. Show them countries invaded, devas- 
tated, desolated. Point them out valleys strewn with the 
whitening bones of God's children and mountains 
streaming with human gore. Show them that everlast- 
ing servitude ; the tortures, the scaffold, the fagot or the 
lingering death in the dungeon. There exists still the 
wrecks of nations which bear faithful testimony to these 
frightful episodes, in their history, and whose children, 
even at this day, weep over the ruins of their cities and 
the blackened records of their countries. 

Ask the unfortunate descendents of Idumea of whom 
Israelites is the ancient name. They can, better than 
any others, tell you the cost of i,2:noranee and ambition, 
and to what deplorable excesses they lead. 

Ask them how many millions of lives have been 
sacrificed to them, and at whose orders ? Ask them why 
they burned their infants alive in sacrifice to Moloch, 
the very god of the people whom they had exterminated? 

Ask them why their priests dethroned at will and 
murdered their own Monarchs, and why their Kings as- 
sassinated each other ? 

Demand of them under wh^t «^reumstances the 
brother was obliged to slay his brother, the father, his 
son, his daughter, his wife, his friend, the most tender? 

TT-ndpr what circumci+nncej; they were compelled to 
give whole cities to • '^ e fames and exterminate every 



INITIATION. 297 

living things and butcher the men, the women and the 
helpless infants clinging to the breasts of their mothers ? 

Ask of the ancient Gauls for what reason they also 
burned their women and children as sacrifices to their 
god Teutates, and consulted the destinies of the future 
in their entrails ? 

Come down to more modern ages. Ask what caused 
the division and fall of the Roman Empire? Who mur- 
dered the SaxonS;, the Waldenses, the Albigenses? Who 
massacred the Aborigines of America, and half the 
people of Europe ? 

Listen to that bell; the peals say St. Bartholomew. 
Who caused the best and purest blood of France to rain 
like water over the land? Pass through the streets of 
the city of Paris and ask who has strewed them with 
corpses and gore? Do you see the head of the most 
virtuous of men; of Admiral Coligny? Tell us who 
struck it off? Who sent as a present the most accepta- 
ble to the High Priest of Rome, as a trophy in whose 
infamous revelries celebrated in token of a still more 
infamous victory ? Who- then perpetrated these crimes ; 
these atrocious deeds ? Answer I say ! Is it not ambi- 
tion ? Is it not fanaticism, superstition and ignorance ? 

But my brethren. Heaven has not put entirely out 
of our reach a remedy for evils so grave. He who 
created the sun to give light to the universe, has also 
created reason, the sun of our human system, and fur- 
nish'ed science to guide us through the labyrinth of un- 
speakable diffculties and calamities. To contend against 
this fanaticism Heaven created men of talent, virtue 
and genius, and each age has given birth to a benefactor 
of his race contemporary with the most accursed of its 
enemies. 

Heroes, sages, friends of humanity have appeared 
successively through all descending time, to enlighten, 
to comfort the earth. 

Hail their august names, contemplate their divine 
precepts, their virtues, their sublime actions, and keep 



IJ^i 



298 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 

them unceasingly present to your recollection. The re- 
membrance of them is sufficient to reanimate hope in 
despairing hearts^ and you will prove that the good done 
by them can also be accomplished in our days. 

Quote often the precepts of Zoroaster''^ and Con- 
fucius. Eemind them of the devotion of Codrus and 
Leonidas^ the virtues and maxims of Pythagoras''' 
Sociates, of Plato''" of Epictetus and of Marcus 
Aurelius. Say with Zoroaster : ^"^Love your fellow men 
and succor them; pardon those who have offended 
you.'^ Knights who would be faithful to your obliga- 
tions^ and who feel the importance of their vows to God 
and to virtue^ have painful and arduous duties to per- 
forirj ; they have obstacles to surmount^ errors to con- 
tend with^ subtle adversaries to overthrow ; a war eternal 
to wage against ignorance and fanaticism. A worthy 
Knight may fall into the snare of a traitor, under the 
accusation of an informer; of a hpyocrite, or perhaps 

Note 357. — "The doctrino of pure Zoroastrianism was monotheistic. 
The Supreme Being was called Ahuramazda, and Haug says that Zoroas- 
ter's conception of him was perfectly identical with the Jewish notion of 
Jehovah. He is called 'the Creator of the earthly and spiritual life, the 
Lord of the whole universe, at whose hands are all the creatures.' He 
is wisTlom and intellect; the light itself, and the source of light; the 
rewarder of the virtuous and the punisher of the wicked. 

"The dualistic doctrine of Ormuzd and lAhrimanes, which has falsely 
been attributed to Zoroaster, was in reality the development of a later 
corruption of the Zoroasteric teaching." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Free- 
masonry, Article Zoroaster. 

Note 358. — "He taught the mystical power of numbers, and much of 
the symbolism on that subject which we now possess is derived from 
what has been left to us by his disciples; for of his own writings there 
is nothing extant. He was also a geometrician, and is regarded as hav- 
ing been the inventor of several problems, the most important of which 
is that now known as the forty-seventh problem of Euclid. He was also 
a proficient in music, and is said to have demonstrated the mathematical 
relations of musical intervals, and to have invented a number of musical 
Instruments. Disdaining the vanity and dogmatism of the ancient sages, 
he contented himself with proclaiming that he was simply a seeker after 
knowledge, not its possessor, and to him is attributed the introduction of 
the word philosopher, or lover of wisdom, as the only title which he 
would assume." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Py- 
thagoras. 

Note 359.— "Academy, Platonic. Founded In 1480 by Alarsilius Fi- 
cinus, at Florence, under the patronage of Lorenzo de Medicis. It is said 
by the Masons of Tuscany to have been a secret society, and is supposed 
to have had a Masonic character, because in the hall where its memUers 
held their meetings, and which still remains, many Masonic symbols are 
to be found." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Academy, 
Platonic, 



INITIATION. 299 

i| become the victim of his own generous confidence. He 
should not expect to be exempt from the persecutions 

j which are in reserve for those who are the zealous advo- 
cates of justice ; the sworn enemies of falsehood. Is he 
not^ if true and faithful, entitled to the gratitude, 
homage, friendship and consolation of his brethren? It 
becomes then, for them to prescribe the means they will 
adopt to do honor to his efforts; to crown his successes; 
to proclaim his virtues ; to console him in disgrace and 
comfort him in misfortune ; to visit him in sickness and 
relieve him in distress. And when he shall be no more, 
to strew with flowers and bedew with tears his last 
resting place, retaining a lively recollection of his vir- 
tues, and burying all his imperfections beneath the sod 
that rests upon his bosom. 

In conclusion my brethren, T\Iasonry is the love of 
truth and of humanity. The sun of truth will dissipate 
the clouds of error, that hang like a pall over our fellow- 
men. Live in hope and let your progress be onward. 
Our strength will be found in union. Be frequent in 
your attendance on your lodges. Visit your brethren. 
Be missionaries of virtue and truth. Hide not your 
light under a bushel. Demand, as the price of advance- 
ment, talents and good works. In your Councils be 
orderly, respectful and attentive so that the newly 
initiated may exclaim; ^^that which I have sought, I 
have found Science, Order and Light. I am proud to 
have been received into such a society.^^ 

His heart will be elevated^ his mind will be enlight- 
ened. The sphere of his affection will be enlarged; 
our institutions will have for him a lasting charm. He 
will celebrate our good works, and Masonry, victorious 
over all adverse circumstances, will become the honored 
medium of uniting all mankind in one vast brotherhood. 



fi 

300 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. ! 

Now my brethren^ I must close. I thank you for your 
attention. I have endeavored to touch upon each sub- 
ject of importance to the order. To impress upon your 
minds the chief aim of Scotch Bite Masonry. I desire 
to witness ii^ triumph. I have endeavored to vindicate 
the means. I have reminded you of your obligation*, 
traced your duties, pointed out the enemies against 
whom you have to contend. I have feebly pictured the 
evils caused by ignorance, fanaticism and superstition. 
These evils are great. If they touch your hearts ; if you 
partake of the honor which they inspire, it will be for 
you to work out the means to diminish them. The 
remedy is in your power. Practice in the world the 
precepts you have learned here. The world will recom- 
pense you with its applause, and what is better still, you 
will have the applause of j^our own consciences. 

Among 3^our brethren beware of jealousy and strife. 
Be charitable in your conduct towards them. Be char- 
itable in speaking of them. Forgive their errors and 
pardon their iniquities. If they wrong you, intercede 
kindly with them, remembering that to err is human, to 
forgive divine. And finally keep aloof from uniting , 
yourselves with any sectional, political or sectarian 
religious organization whose principles can in any way 
bias your mind or judgment, or in the slightest degree 
trammel with obligations, the vows which you have just 
made. Eemember that now and henceforth you are the 
champions of justice and human rights. Your battle- 
field is the world at large. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — (Strikes one with 
pommel of sword.) Order, Sir Knights! (All rise and 
place themselves under the sign of order, when the 
Thrice Puissant Grand Master in the name of the Coun- 
cil compliments the Knight of Eloquence on his dir> 
course and sits down.) 



INITIATIOlsr. 301 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Be seated Sir 
Knights! Sir Knights, First and Second Lieutenant 
Grand Masters, inform the Knights on your respective 
valleys that they are permitted to address this Council, 
if they have anything to offer for the good of the order 
and of this body. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knights on my 
valley, the Thrice Puissant Grand Master informs you 
that you are permitted to address this Council if you 
nave anything to offer for the good of the order and. of 
this body. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knights on 
rmy valley, the Thrice Puissant Grand Master informs 
you that are you are permitted to address this meeting 
if you have anything to offer for the good of this order 
and of this body. (Any Knights who v^ish make re- 
marks.) 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knight, First 
Lieatenant Grand Master, silence prevails on my valley. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master, silence prevails. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Sir Knights, First 
and Second Lieutenant Grand Masters, inform the 
Knights on 'your respective valleys that the box of 
fraternal assistance is about to be presented to them. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knights on my 
valley, the Thrice Puissant Grand Master informs you 
that the box of fraternal assistance is about to be pre- 
sented to you. 

Second Lieutenant .Grand Master — Sir Knights on 
my valley, the Thrice Puissant Grand Master informs 
you that the box of fraternal assistance is about to be 
presented to you. (The Master of Ceremonies then pre- 



w 



-=? 



302 GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 



sents the box to each Knight, beginning with the Thrice 
Puissant Grand Master, the First and Second Lieuten- 
ant Grand Masters, Knight of Eloquence and other of- 
ficers. When the collection has been taken, the box is 
returned to the Thrice Puissant Grand Master, who 
sums up the contents which he hands to the Treasurer 
through the Master of Ceremonies.) 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Grand Elect Knight Kodash/'* 

Thrice Puissant Grand Ma5/er-T-( Strikes one with 
the pommel of his sword.) Sir Knight, First Lieuten- 
ant Grand Master, at what hour are the labors of the 
Knights Kadosh adjourned ? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — (Striking one with 
the pommel of sword.) At day break, Thrice Puissant 
Grand Mas.ter. * 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Why do we adjourn 
our labors at day light ? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — The better to con- 
ceal our schemes from the profane, Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — What are those 
schemes ? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master, to punish crime and to protect inno- 
cence ? 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — What do you under- 
stand by punishing crime? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Thrice Puissant 

Note 360.— ''Knigrht Kadosh, formerly called Grand" Elect Knight: Ka- 
dosh (Grand E^u du Chevalier Kadosch). The Knight Kadosh is the 
thirtieth degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, called also 
Knight of the White and Black Eagle. While retaining the general 
Templar doctrine of the Kadosh system, it symbolizes and humanizes the 
old lesson of vengeance. It is the most popular of all the Kadoshes. 

"In the Knight Kadosh of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, 
the meetings are called Councils. The principal officers are, according 
to the recent rituals, a Commander, two Lieutenant Commanders, called 
also Prior and Precepter; a Chancellor, Orator, Almoner, Recorder, and 
Treasurer. The jewel, as described in the ritual of the Southern Supreme 
Council, is a double-headed eagle, displayed resting on a teutonic cross, 
the eagle silver, the cross gold enamelled red. The Northern Council 
uses instead of the eagle the letters J. B. M." — Mackey's Eribyclopaedia 
of Freemasonry, Article Knight Kadosh, 



^ 



304 GRAND ELECT KKIGHT KADOSH. 

Grand Master, it is by resisting oppression and impos- 
ture by all available means, by calling down the hatred 
of the people on the head of tyrants and impostors, by 
undermining and overthrowing their power, even by 
force of arms, that we fulfill the obligation of punishing 
crime. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — -What do you mean 
by protecting innocence? 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Thrice Puissant 
Grand Master, it is by raising mankind from the degra- 
dation in which they are sunken; by diffusing abroad 
the blessings of education ; by bringing our fellow beings 
to the highest degree of civilization to which humanity 
can pretend that we obey the command of our Thrice 
Puissant Grand Master, and that we attain the objects 
which the Knights Kadosh have in view to protect inno- 
cence. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Such indeed are our 
duties. Let us never forget them, either within or with- 
out this temple. Sir Knights, First and Second Lieu- 
tenant Grand Masters, request the members of this 
Council to assist me in adjourning the Senate. 

First Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knights on my 
valley, the Thrice Puissant Grand Master requests you 
to assist him in adjourning this Senate. 

Second Lieutenant Grand Master — Sir Knights on 
my valley, the Thrice Puissant Grand Master requests 
you to assist him in adjourning this Senate. 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Order Sir Knights! 
(All rise and place themselves under the sign 'of order.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — Let us pray Sir 
Knights. 

CLOSING PRAYER^ KNIGHT KADOSH. 

Our JFather, who art in Heaven, in whom we live, 
move and have our being. Oh ! Thou who wiliest that 



CLOSING CEREMON"IES. 305 

man should enjoy all the benefits which Thy munifi- 
cence holds out to him, may thy kindness help ns in re- 
moving the obstacles which tyranny and imposture have 

''set up against thy holy and ever just providence. Oh ! 

j help us in setting our brethren free. In punishing the 
oppressors of humanity, may we never pronounce in vain 
our terrible motto, ISrekam Adonai. Amen, so mote 
it be. 

(Led by the Thrice Puissant Grand Master, all make 
the sign and say, ISTekam Adonai. Then all, led by the 
Thrice Puissant Grand Master strike seven, 00 00 00 ; 
with the hands.) 

Thrice Puissant Grand Master — To the glory of the 
Grand Architect of the Universe, in the name and un- 
der the auspices of the Grand Consistory of the Ancient 
and Accepted Scotch Eite, in and for the Sovereign 
and Independent State of under the Jurisdic- 
tion of the -Supreme Council for the Northern Jurisdic- 
tion of the United States of America, sitting at the City 
of New York and State of New York, and by virtue of 

i^the power in me vested by. . . .Council of Kadosh, No. . 

"I declare its labors adjourned. Sir Knights, you may 
retire in peace. Be ever guided by prudence and swear 
upon this sword not to reveal any of the transactions of 
this day. (Thrice Puissant Grand Master leaves the 
throne, proceeds to the West and presents the hilt of 
his sword which he holds by the blade. All the Knights 
pass successively before the Thrice Puissant Grand Mas- 
ter, extend the right hand over the hilt of the sword and 
say : ^'I swear'' after which all retire in peace and sil- 
ence. 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Thirtieth Degree: Grand-Elect Knight Kadosh; 
OR^ Knight of the White and Black Eagle. 

The **Ne plus ultra" of Masonic Falsehood — The Ritual Tinkered, Added 
to, and Amended — "Nothing but Vengeance is Spolien of." — Christians 
Ferociously Coudenined as' Bigots — Sham Pretence of a Universal 
Religion. 

Kadosh is a Chaldee and Hebrew word^ meaning 
^^Iloly/^ used in Isaiah, 6, Sy applied to God. This is^ 
therefore, the degree of the Holy Knight. It is com- 
mon to receive men into this degree, who have not 
taken all the preceding degrees. Thus, in the degree 
before this, the Grand Master, by mere authority, re- 
ceives candidates into eleven degrees, which they have 
not taken, to enable them to receive the 3Qth, and be- 
come Knights Kadosh. This explains, how men of 
ordinary memories, and business occupations, can take 
33 such degrees, i. e,, they don't take them. 

This degree is called, in its ritual, the ''"Ne pins 
ultra'' (no more beyond) of Masonic knowledge; {page 
276.) ''though but the Thirtieth degree.'' A careful 
reading of the ritual though, will convince thoughtful 
persons, that this statement is true ; and that this degree 
is also the ''Ne plus ultra" of Masonic falsehood, 
fraud, hypocrisy, treason, and general scoundrelism. 
The proofs of this extraordinary indictment are these: 

1. ''It is said to have been invented at Lyons in 
1743," that is, 144 years ago. This makes it "ancient." 
(Note 345.) 



. THE RITUAL TINKERED, ADDED TO, AND AMENDED. 307 

Now, the ritual is the degree, and this ritual, (page 
291.) contains the telephone, which is of yesterday; 
which proves, that this ancient degree has been tinkered, 
added to, and amended, from Ramsay to Albert Pike ! 
This falsehood is a century and a half long. 

2. The candidate is made to trample on the Pope^s 
tiara, which bauble is worn in some fashion by every 
Grand Officer of lodges. This is hypocrisy. 

3. Christ is complimented, and His prohibition: 
^"^Call no man master,'^ is quoted. Yet Masons all have 
^^Masters.^^ This is hypocrisy. 

Jf, This degree, and almost every other, professes to 
war on despotism. Yet Masonry is the completest 
despotism on earth; the edicts of a Grand Lodge must 
be ^^obeyed without examination.^' {Machey Lex.) 
Taxation at discretion, without reason given, has been 
decided lawful by lodge-law. (See Chase's Digest, art. 
Taxation.) Why this very ritual gives the Master 
power to stop and adjourn any debate, by three raps 
with the pommel of his sword ! No slaves on a South- 
ern plantation were ever bound by the laws of property 
to a more abject, cringing obedience to their master, 
than these Masons are to theirs. 

5. The candidate allows the Master, to put his (the 
candidate's) hand, on a human skull, as a '^''terrible 
symbol of human equality;'' and they all drink with 
told: *^This is the apex of the Masonic edifice." (Page 
him "the cup of devils" out of that skull ; and they are 



308 ^^NOTHIK'G BUT VEK-GEA^sTCE IS SPOKEK^ OF/' ' j^ 



-<.^ 



285.) And it is. For it is simple, absolute devil- 
worship. (See i. Cor. 10, 20.) 

6. This degree quotes Christ's law of equal ^^ove to 
our neighbor/' and yet tells the candidate, after he is 
received: ^The slightest indiscretion will cost you 
your life;" that is, they will kill him, if he lets out 
their secrets ; tells the truth, by error, ^^indiscretion,'' or 
mistake. If this is not Masonic scoundrelism, what is 
scoundrelism ? (See this on page 275.) \ 

7. Yet the candidate is told: ^^In almost all the 
rituals of this degree, {and there were seven Kadosli 
rituals, see note 348.) nothing but vengeance is spoken 
of." But this degree is nothing but philosophy, and 
philosophy discountenances vengeance. (Page 276.) 
Now return to page 260, of this degree, and see the 
candidate and his Master, stabbing the dead enemies of 
the lodge! Is not this the meanest 'kind of vengeance, 
such as was practiced on Cromwell, by his enemies? 
Whj^, this degree swears this same candidate, to 
^^punish crime," ^Vhich I promise to do under penalty 
of death." And this, forsooth, is no vengeance, but 
^^philosophy." Is it wonderful, that the Bible through- 
out, calls these false worships, "whoredom?" There 
never was a drab, at East Cheap, in the days of Falstaff, 
or in the Five Points, New York, before Jerry McCau- 
ley, who could hold up her brazen front, and lie wilh 
such impudent coolness, as is practiced in this "Apex 
of Masonic knowledge." 

8. Why, the very basis of the whole Scottish Eite, 



CHRISTIANS FEROCIOUSLY CONDEMNED AS BIGOTS. 309 

that is^ the pretended constitutions of Frederick, 1786, 
are pronounced, by one Masonic historian, 'HJie Grand 
Lie of the order;'' which is endorsed by Folger, and as 
good as endorsed by Mackey himself; (See note 353.) 

'who says: ^"^the question is not yet settled, whether 
there were any such constitutions signed by Frederick, 
or whether Morin forged them. 

9. The Grand Pontiff {page 263,) tells the candidate 
that Scotch Masonry * * * admits to her bosom, on 
terms of the strictest equality, the members of all 

-religions, of all creeds, and of all countries, without 
any distinction whatever. This is bad enough. To put 
beast-worship, child-murder, at the Ganges, and relig- 
ious cannibalism, on a level, is to deny and exclude the 

^ religion which condemns false worships. The prophet 
Daniel would have been excluded, as a ^^scctarian 
bigot,'^ for violating the broad charity of image-wor- 
ship. But even this pretence is false. This degree 

ji. was made and practiced in France, and now in the 
United States. None of the Asiatic, and other heathen- 
isms, so praised by this degree, on page 298, prevailed 
in France, or now exist here. Hence the bigots so 
ferociously condemned are Christians; those who cor- 
rupt and enslave the minds of their little children by 
teaching them the Lord's prayer, and ^'^il^ow I lay me 
down to sleep." This degree, framed in 1748, was in 
its full glory when the street cry in Paris was : ''Tout 
UEveque a la lanterneT {Every bishop to the lamp-^ 



^ 



310 SHAM PHETENSE OF A UNIVERSAL RELIGION. 

post!) Those were Christian bishops, and their crime 
was Christianity. And the fierce and savage denuncia- 
tions of "sectarians/^ who teach men religion to enslave 
them, mean Christians. If not, whom do they mean? 
Even their sham pretence of a universal religion is 
violated by their hatred of Christ. 



CHAPTER LYII 

Thirty-First. Degree, or Grand Inspector Inquisi- 

tTOR Commander.''" 
decorations: — Hangings are white; as also the can- 
opy under which is the throne of the President. There 
are ten gilded columns; one on each side of the Presi- 
dent in the East ; one on each side of the Councilors or 
Inspectors in the West; three on the south side of the 
room and three on the north^ equi-distant from each 
other. 

On the column on the right of the President is in- 
scribed in large letters the word ^^Justitia'' and the at- 
tributes of the first and third degrees. On that upon 
his left the word ''Equitas'' and the attributes of the 
eighteenth and thirtieth degrees^ from the two columns 
springs a Gothic Arch, from the apex thereof is sus- 

Note 861. — "Grand Inquisitor Commander. The 31st degree of the 
indent and Accepted rite. It is not an historical degree, but is simply 
administrative in its character; the duties of the members being to 
examine and regulate the proceedings of the subordinate lodges and chap- 
ters. The meeting is designated a 'Sovereign Tribunal.' and is composed 
of nine oflScers, viz.: A Most Perfect President, a Chancellor, a Treas- 
urer, and six Inquisitors — one being elected to perform the functions of 
Inspecting Inquisitor. The decoration of the Lodge is white, with eight 
golden columns; on the dais above the presiding officer's throne are the 
letters J. E. ; there is also an altar covered with white drapery. In the 
East, on a low seat, is placed a case containing the archives of the 
Order, covered with blue drapery, having on its front a large red cross; 
on the ri^ht of the altar is the table of the Chancellor, on the left that 
of the Treasurer. The floor of the Sovereign Tribunal is covered by a 
painting, the centre of which represents a cross, encompassing all the 
attributes of Masonry. There is no apron; the members w^ear a white 
collar, on which is embroidered a triangle with rays, having in its center 
tbe figures 31, to which is suspended the jewel — a silver Teutonic cross. 
In France the regulations direct a white- apron, with aurore (yellow) flap, 
embroidered with the attributes of the degree." — Macoy's Encyclopaedia 
ftfid Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article Grand Inquisitor Commander, 



312 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

pended over the head of the President^ the Tetractys''" 
of Pythagoras^ thus : -^ *,' and uiider it a naked sword 
and a balance, or . ' . • . \ ^he scales of justice. On 
the column on the right of the Counsellors is inscribed 
the word ''Lenitas'' and the attributes of the second and 
fourteenth degrees, and on the column on their left, the 
word ''Misericordia/' and the attributes of the fourth 
and fifteenth degrees. From these two columns springs 
a Gothic Arch, from the apex whereof is suspended in 
letters of gold the sacred word of the eighteenth degree. 
On the three columns in the South, going from East to 
West, are the busts of Moses, Zoroaster and Minos, with 
the names of each inscribed on his column, and the 
attributes of the ninth, thirteenth and twenty-second 
degrees. On the columns on the North, also going from 
East to West are the busts of Confucius, Socrates and 
Alfred the Great, with the names of each inscribed on 
his column and the attributes of the twenty-fifth, 
twenty-eighth and twenty-ninth degrees. 

In front of the President is an altar, on which are the. 
square and compasses, the plumb and level, a small pair 
of scales, a naked sword, two poniards and the book of 
constitutions. 

Between the throne of the President and the altar is 
a stand upon which is placed the coffer containing the 
record of the Supreme Tribunal. In the centre of the 

Note 362. — '^Signifies literally, the number four, and is therefore syn- 
onymous with the quaternion; but it has been peculiarly aipplied to a 
symbol of the Pythagoreanis, which is composed of ten dots arranged in 
a triangular form of four rows. 

This figure was in itself, as a whole^^ emblematic of the Tetragram- 
maton, or sacred name of four letters (for tetractys, in Greek, means 
four) and was undoubtedly learned byi Pythagoras during his visit to 
Babylon. But the parts of which it is composed were also pregnant 
svimbols. Thus the one point was a symbol of the active principle or 
creator, the two points of the passive principle or matter, the three of 
the world proceeding from their union, and the four of the liberal arta 
and sH^nces which may be said to complete and perfect that world. — 
Mackey's Encyclopaedia of JTieemasonry, ArtiolQ Tetractys, 



GRAND INSPECTOR mQUlSlTOR COMMANDER. 313 

;room are ten lights; in the East ten, and in the west 
ten; each ten being arranged by 1, 2, 3, 4, in the form 
of the Tetractys. 

The altar is covered with a white cloth and on the 
front part thereof, towards the West, is painted or em- 
broidered a pair of golden scales resting on the point of 
a naked sword. 

TITLES, OFFICERS AND THEIR STATIONS ! — The assem- 
bly is styled Supreme Tribunal and is composed of nine 
members and never more. If any more- members are 
present they may be consulted but they cannot vote. 

The presiding officer is styled Most Perfect President 
and sits in the East. 

The Wardens are styled Councilors or Inspectors, 
and sit together in the West. 

The Secretary, Keeper of the Seals and Archives is 
styled Chancellor and sits on the right of the President. 

The Treasurer sits on the left of the President. 

The Advocate is stationed in the South. 

The Defender is stationed in the N"orth. 

The Master of Ceremonies is stationed in front of the 
Counsellor. 

The Pursuivant or Usher, at the door of the Tribunal. 

The Tyler is not included among the nine members, 
composing the Supreme Tribunal and is styled Inquisi- 
tor, he is stationed outside. All the members of the 
Supreme Tribunal except the President, are styled 
Most Enlightened. 

CLOTHING, JEWELS, ETC : — No apron is worn in the 
Supreme Tribunal. In the inferior bodies, the Grand 
Inspectors Inquisitors wear one of entirely white sheep- 
skin, with a Teutonic Cross embroidered in silver on the 
flap. The collar is white. On the breast at the point is 



314 GRAND ELECT, PERFECT AND SUBLIME MASON. 

have been before, and will have more to answer for at 
the great and awful day of judgment^ when the secrets | 
of all hearts shall be disclosed. This degree^ my brother^ 
you are now about to ^receive is the Perfection of 
Masonry. You will be bound to the order by an in- 
dispensable obligation^ which is now unknown to you, 
but when it is communicated I hope it will be perma- 
nently fixed in your recollection. 

My dear brother, demonstrate to us the goodness of 
your heart by a steady pursuit of virtue and a sincere 
love for all good brethren, but particularly for those 
who receive you into their fellowship and have given 
you their support and protection, who are your fellows 
and superiors. What do you say ? 

Candidate — I will. 

Thrice Puissant — My dear brother, as you are now 
desirous of being taught the true pronunciation of God's | 
Ineffable name, are^ou ready to venture your life in the'^ 
defense of that supreme mystery when it shall have been 
entrusted to your care and are you desirous of contract- 
ing 5^our new obligation ? 

Candidate — I am, most sincerely. % 

Thrice Puissant — If you are go, my brother, and wash 1^ 
your hands in the Brazen Sea to prove your innocence 
and that you have not revealed any of your former en- 
gagements; our forefathers used the same ceremony 
when they were "accused of crimes to prove themselves 
guiltless. 

Thrice Puissant — Brother Master of Ceremonies, con- 
duct the candidate to the Brazen Sea. Let him purifv 
his hands and then conduct him to the Altar of Sacri- 
fice. 

Master of Ceremonies — Leads him to the Brazen Sea, 
causes him to wet and wipe his hands, and leads him to 
the Altar of Sacrifice, causes him to recline his head 
against it, takes an axe and holds it suspended over the 
bare neck of the candidate. When he says, before this 
Altar of a broken and contrite spirit, with the fire of 



GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER: 315 

generally prevailed in this country that the Supreme 
Council or Grand Consistory, according to circum- 
stances, should be opened as a Supreme Tribunal to con- 
fer the 31^ When the Supreme Council is to confer said 
degree, it is open in its Consistorial Chamber. 

Illustrous Commander in Chief — (Still in the Consis- 
tory, business having been disposed of.) Sublime 
Princes, let us proceed to the Supreme Tribunal for the 
purpose of disposing of the business of the day. Illus- 
trious Brother First Lieutenant Commander, give orders 
that the procession be formed. 

First Lieutenant — Illustrious Brother Second Lieu- 
tenant Commander, it is the order of the Illustrious 
Commander in Chief that we repair to the Supreme 
Tribunal of Grand Inspectors Inquisitors Commanders. 
Cause the procession to be formed. 

Second Lieutenant — Sublime Prince Grand Master of 
Ceremonies, it is the order of the Illustrious Commander 
in Chief, that we repair to the Supreme Tribunal of 
Grand Inspectors Inquisitors Commanders. Cause the 
procession to be formed. 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Brethren, Sub- 
lime Princes, by order of the Illustrious Commander in 
Chief, we are now to repair to the Supreme Tribunal 
of Grand Inspectors Inquisitors Commanders. Arrange 
yourselves in procession. (The procession is accordingly 
formed. The Grand Master of Ceremonies goes in front. 
Then the Grand Standard Bearer who is followed by the 
Illustrious Commander in Chief, with the Deputy Illus- 
trious Commander in Chief on his left. Then the Grand 
Chancellor and. Minister of State, carrying the coffer 
containing the records of the Supreme Tribunal. Next 
the two Lieutenant Commanders, and then the other 
officers and members. On entering the Supreme Tribu- 



316 GRAND INSPEOTOH INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

nal, the Illustrious Commander in Chief, proceeds to the 
east of a place midway between the throne and the altar, 
where is a stand or small table on which to place the 
coffer containing the records He faces to the West, 
the Grand Chancellor and Minister of State place the 
coffer on the stand and take the right and left respec- 
tively of the Illustrious Commander in Chief and Dep- 
uty, also facing the West. The two Lieutenant Com- 
manders stand opposite the Illustrious Commander in 
Chief, facing the East. The Grand Master of Cere- 
monies is on the ISTorth side facing the South. The 
Standard Bearer is on the South side facing the North. 
The Deputy Illustrious Commander in Chief^ if present, 
stands between the Illustrious Commander in Chief and 
the Minister of State. The other officers and members 
complete the circle, the Coffer being in its centre. The 
Illustrious Commander in Chief is now the Most Perfect 
President. The Lieutenant Commanders are the Chan- 
cellors or Inspectors. The Minister of State, the Advo- 
cate. The Captain of the Guards, the Pursuivant or 
Usher. ) 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander/''' 

Most Perfect President — (Ascending the throne.) 
Most Enlightened Brethren^ the obligations of duty are 
eternal to the good Mason. See Brother Pursuivant^ 
that the doors of this Supreme Tribunal are safely 
guarded and give orders that none be allowed to enter 
without our permission^ that we may tranquilly perform 
our duty. Be seated my brethren. (All the officers now 
take their respective . stations and the members occupy 
the seats on the North and South. Meanwhile the 
Pursuivant goes out, returns, gives the battery which is 
answered without and reports as follows:) 

Pursuivant — Most Perfect President, the doors of the 
Supreme Tribunal are safely guarded. 

Most Perfect President — Then we may safely pro- 
ceed. Most Enlightened Brother Pursuivant what is 
your duty? 

Pursuivant — To execute your orders, coming to me by 
the West and see the judgments of the Tribunal duly 
executed ; to serve and return all processes, and to com- 
pel order, when the Supreme Tribunal is in session. 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother, 
Master of Ceremonies. What is your duty ? 

Note 363.— "Grand Inspector. Inquisitor Commander. The thirty-first 
degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. U is not an historical 
degree, but simply a judicial power of the higher degrees. The place of 
meeting is called a Supreme Tribunal. The decorations are white, and 
the presiding ofiBcer is styled Most iPerfeet President. The jewel of the 
dogree is a Teutonic cross of silver attached to white watered ribbon." 
Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Grand Inspector, Inquisitor 
Oommandert 



^.■- 



318 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

Master of Ceremonies — (Rising.) Most Perfect Pres- " 
ident^ to carry your orders within and without the 
Supreme Tribunal; in case of trial to introduce the ac- 
cused and witnesses, and in case of reception to accom- , 
pany the candidate during the ceremony of reception. 1 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Defender, what is your duty in the Supreme Tribunal ? ^^ 

Defender — (Rising.) To defend all persons charged > 
with offences and tried before this Tribunal, to see that 
no incompetent evidence is admitted against them, nor 
any that is competent in their favor rejected. To pre- 
sent the truth in their defence and to urge all circum- 
stances of extenuation or of justification in their behalf. 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Advocate, what is your duty here ? 

Advocate — (Rising.) To prefer charges against those 
who, under the jurisdiction of this Tribunal, have been 
guilty of offences against Masonic law and duty; to ' 
draft the acts of accusation, prepare the testimony, 
elicit the truth and present the whole case fairly, with- ' 
out misrepresentation or exaggeration to the Supreme 
Tribunal. 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Chancellor, what is your duty ? 

Chancellor— (Baking.) To record the proceedings and 
judgments of the Supreme Tribunal. 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Treasurer, what is your duty here? 

Treasurer — (Rising.) To receive all moneys belong- 
ing to the Supreme Tribunal, to keep the same faith- 
fully, and to pay out all warrants duly signed by the 
proper officers. 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Junior Councilor, what is your duty? 

Junior Councilor — (Rising.) To guard against all 



OPENING CEREMONIES. 319 

violations of Masonic law, to give my advice on all 
proper occasions, to the Most Perfect President and to 
pronounce just and righteous judgments. 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Senior Councilor, what is your duty? 

Senior Councilor — (Rising.) That of my Junior, 
tempering justice with equity and ever remembering 
the dictates of mercy. 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Senior Councilor, what is your duty of the Most Per- 
fect President? 

Senior Councilor — To preside in judgment and de- 
cide the law, to judge justly and to punish sternly, but 
ever remembering the frailty and imperfection of hu- 
man nature, to pardon and forgive while there yet re- 
mains hope of reformation. 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Senior Councilor, what is the duty of all the members 
of this SupremS Tribunal when sitting in judgment? 

Senior Councilor — ^Carefu] investigation of all mate- 
rial facts, natural and charitable constructian of acts 
and motives, calm and deliberate consideration, just 
judgment and utter disregard of persons, influence, 
rank and power. 

Most Perfect President — I recognize my duty. My 
brethren see that you neither forget nor neglect those 
that devolve on you. You are now in the Holy Sanctu- 
ary of eternal Masonic justice and equity. Let us 
promise and most solemnly pledge ourselves to per- 
form, so far as human frailty will permit, the high 
duties that we have agreed to devolve upon us; to be 
ever faithful to the constitution, statutes and regula- 
tions of the order, and to be always and everywhere 
guided by justice and equity. 



320 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

All — (Extending the right hand towards the coffer 
containing the records.) We do solemnly promise and 
swear. 

Most Perfect President — And now my brethren^ let 
us implore the aid, the mercy and the protection of him 
who can alone give ns strength to perform our promises. 
Order my brethren. On yonr knees! (All rise under 
the sign of order as given on page 192, and then kneel.) 

PRAYER. 

Hear us with indulgence, infinite Deity, whose at- 
tributes are infinite yet infinitely harmonious! Thou of 
w^hose essence are justice, equity and mercy, intermin- 
gled into one infinite excellence. Thou of whom all 
thoughts and all actions of men are known, and visible"* 
as thine own ! To whom the infinite past and infinite f u- 
t'fte are one now, and the infinitudes of space in all 
directions are here. Give us the wisdom and the will 
to judge justly, accurately and mercifully. Keep our feet 
from going astray; lead us by th^ hand of truth, close 
up to us all the paths and avenues of temptation. 
Strengthen our good resolves and free us from the em- 
pire of prejudice, partiality, error and passion. Help us 
to perform all our Masonic duties, to ourselves, to other 
men, and to Thee. Let the great flood of Masonic light 
flow in a perpetual current over the whole world and 
make Masonry the creed of all mankind. Pardon us 
when we offend. When we go astray, lead us back to 
the true path and help our feeble efforts to advance tht^ 
cause of liberty and toleration; and when we come to 
be finally judged by Thee, do not thou judge us as in 
our feebleness and passion we may have judged others, 
but forgive us, and take us home to Thee. Amen, 

All — So mote it be. 



OPENING CEREMONIES. 



191 



Most Perfect President — (Eising.) Eise my brethren. 
(All rise under the sign of order.) 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brethren 
Grand Inspectors Inquisitors Commanders. Let us pro- 
ceed to our labors^ that through our exertions our be- 
loved order may prosper and our solemn obligations be 
complied with. Aid me my brethren and enlighten me 
with your counsel. To order, Most Enlightened Breth- 
ren ! 



FIRST SIGN. 

Most Perfect President — (Making the 
first sign.) By crossing both hands, bring 
them to the navel, thumbs crossing each 
other and says Justice. 




First sign. 



ANSWER%G SIGN. 

in— (Make the answering sign.) Cross 
both arms above your head, right outside, 
palms outward, and say Equity. 




Answering SigUo 



322 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

All — So mote it be. 

Most Perfect President — (Gives the battery by one, 
three, four and one; 000 0000 0.) 

A II — ( Give the battery. ) 

Most Perfect President— Mo^t Enlightened Brother 
Senior Councilor, this Supreme Tribunal is now open. 
Let due proclamation thereof be made. 

Senior Councilor — Most Enlightened Brother Junior 
Councilor, this Supreme Tribunal is now open. Let due 
proclamation thereof be made. 

Junior Councilor — Most Enlightened Brother Pur- 
suivant, make proclamation that this Supreme Tribunal 
is now open, and that all who demand its judgment 
may now draw near. 

Pursuivant — (Opening the door.) Hear ye, this 
Supreme Tribunal of Grand Inspectors Inquisitors 
Commanders is now open. Whosoever hath been cited 
to appear or hath complaints or appeal to make or an- 
swer, let him draw near and he shall be heard. (Closes 
the door.) 

Most Perfect President — (Strikes one.) Most En- 
lightened Brethren, be seated. 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Chancellor, arise and let us proceed to open the coffer 
containing the records of the Suprejae Tribunal, and to 
take therefrom such as may be needed for our present 
labors. (The Most Perfect President and Chancellor 
leave their seats and proceed to the coffer, each holding 
a key thereof, it having two locks. They open it and 
take out the record book of the Sovereign Tribunal and 
any other books or papers needed and return to their 
scats; the Chancellor carrying the book or books and 
papers.) 

Most Perfect President— {^\t\\^^ one.) Most En- 



i 



OPENING CEEEMONIES. 323 

lightened Brethren, listen to the reading of the record 
of the last session of the Supreme Tribunal. Brother 
Chancellor, read the record! (Chancellor reads.) 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened -Brethren, 
if there be anything in the record to be added to or 
diminished, be pleased to make it known. (If any error 
or omission is pointed out, it is corrected and the record 
is then signed by the Most Perfect President and 
Chancellor. Then, if there be any papers to be acted 
on, they are read and considered.) 

Most Perfect President — The record of our last ses- 
sion is. approved and duly signed, all communications 
are disposed of and we may now proceed to other busi- 
ness. 



CHAPTER LVill 



Thikty-First Degree, or Grand Inspector Inquisi- 
tor Commander.'"* 

initiation. 

Most Perfect President — (Strikes one.) Most En- 
lightened Brethren^ Grand Inspectors Inquisitors Com- 
manders^ the Grand Consistory of Sublime Princes of 
the Eoyal Secret^, has been pleased to designate the 
Grand Elect Knight Kadosh, A .... B, as worthy to re- 
ceive the important degree of Grand Inspector Inquisi- 
tor Commander^ and to become a member of this Su- 
preme Tribunal of the 31st degree of the Ancient and ^ 
Accepted Rite of Masonry. But yet his initiation can*'^ 
not proceed^ if any lawful objection be made. If you 
consent to confer upon him the said degree and to admit 
him as a member here, inform me by giving the sign of 
affirmation. (All who favor it raise the right hand 
above their head.) 

Most Perfect President — If any do not consent, let 
them inform me by giving the negative sign. (This 

ITote 364. — "The thirteenth degree conferred in the Consistory of 
Princes of the Royal Secret, Scotch Masonry, and the thirty-first upon 
the catalogue of that system. It is otherwise termed Grand Inquiring 
Commander. It has no historical allusions, being simply administrative 
in its character. The assembly is entitled a Sovereign Tribunal. The 
hangings are white. The oflScers are the Most Perfect President, the 
Wardens, who are termed Inspectors; the Secretary, who is called Chan- 
cellor. The members are styled Most Enlightened. There is no apron 
worn In the Tribunal, but when visiting Inferior bodies, the members 
wear a white apron, with the Teutonic cross. Jewel, a silver Teutonic 
cross. A white collar is worn, showing a triangle, with the figures 31 in 
the center." — Morris's Masonic Dictionary, Article Grand Inspector, In- 
quisitor Commander J or Order of Five Brethren. 



iK"ITIATIO^. 325 

sign is made by stretching the right arm to the front, 
the hand open and raised upwards as if repelling a per* 
son. If there be no objection, or if any objection be 
made and overruled the Master proceeds.) 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
-Master of Ceremonies, repair to the ante-chamber of the 
Supreme Tribunal and if the Grand Elect Knight 
Kadosh whom we have determined to receive here, be in 
attendance and you are satisfied of his identity, and of 
his proficiency in all the degrees from the first to the 
thirtieth inclusive, prepare him in such manner as our 
usages require, bring him with you to the door of this 
Supreme Tribunal and apply for his admission here by 
the proper alarm. (The Master of Ceremonies with- 
draws and meets the candidate who is clothed in the 
insignia and jewel of a Knight Kadosh. He examines 
him in all the preceding degrees from the first up to the 
thirtieth inclusive. He then blindfolds him and con- 
ducts him to the door and gives the alarm of the 30th 
degree, 00 00 00 0.) 

Pursuivant — Most Enlightened Brother Junior Coun- 
cilor, the alarm of a Knight Kadosh resounds at the 
door. 

Junior Councilor — Most Enlightened Brother Senior 
Councilor, ihe alarm of a Knight Kadosh resounds at 
the door. 

Senior Councilor — Most Perfect President, the alarm 
of a Knight Kadosh resounds attthe door. 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Senior Councilor, order the Junior Councilor to see 
from whom the alarm proceeds. 

Senior Councilor — Most Enlightened Brother Junior 
Councilor, order the Pursuivant to inquire from whom 
the alarm proceeds. 

Junior Councilor — Most Enlightened Brother Pursui- 



S26 GRAND IN'SPECTOR mQtTlSITOR COMMAKMR. 

vant\, open and inquire from whom the ahxrm proceed.^. 

Pursuivant — (Opening the door.) Who approaches 
the Supreme Tribunal^ and what is his desire? 

Master of Ceremonies — It is the Master of Ceremonies 
having in charge a Knight Kadosh, who seeks to obtain 
the 31st degree^, and whom having examined and finding 
him duly qualified, virtuous, upright, eminent, he asks 
permission to introduce into this Supreme Tribunal. 

Pursuivant — (Closing the door.) Most Enlightened 
Brother Junior Councilor, it is the Master of Ceremo- 
nies having in charge a Knight Kadosh, who seeks to ob- 
tain the 31st degree, and whom having examined and 
finding him duly qualified, virtuous, upright, eminent, 
he asks permission to introduce into this Supreme Tri- 
bunal. 

Junior Councilor — Most Enlightened Brother Senior 
Councilor, it is the Master of Ceremonies having in 
charge a Knight Kadosh, who seeks to obtain the 31st" 
degree, and whom having examined and finding him 
duly qualified, virtuous, upright, eminent, he asks per- 
mission to introduce into this Supreme Tribunal. 

Senior Councilor — Most Perfect President, it is the 
Master of Ceremonies having in charge a Knight Ka- 
dosh, who seeks to obtain the 31st degree, and whom 
having examined and finding him duly qualified, virtu- 
ous, upright, eminent, he asks permission to introduce 
into this Supreme Tribunal. 

Most Perfect President — What is his name? 

Senior Councilor — ^What is his name ? 

Junior Councilor — What is his name? 

Pursuivant — (Opening the door.) What is his name? 
Master of Ceremonies — -It is the Kni2:ht Brother, 
A....B. (The Pursuivant, Junior and Senior Coun- 
cilors repeat the same.) 

Most Perfect President — ^What is his occupation? 



INTIATIOI^. 327 

(The Senior and Junior Councilors and Pursuivant 
repeat^ each in his turn.) 

, Master of Ceremonies — That of [liquor dealer] useful 
and honorable^ as all work is in this world. (The 
Pursuivant, Junior and Senior Councilors repeat the 
answers successively.) 

Most Perfect President — Hath he, by sufficient service 
and patient obedience as a Mason learned the first lesson 
in the art of governing? (The Senior and Junior 
Councilors and Pursuivant repeat the question.) 

Master of Ceremonies — He hath. He has learned to 
govern himself. (The Pursuivant, Junior and Senior 
Councilors repeat the answer.) 

Most Perfect President— Is he true and trustworthy? 
Is he honest, temperate, of equal temper, charitable of 
judgment and of merciful impulses? (The Senior and 
Junior Councilors and Pursuivant repeat the question.) 

Master of Ceremonies — He is a Knight Kadosh, and 
his brethren have thought him not unworthy to be ad- 
mitted here. (The Pursuivant, Junior and Senior 
Councilors repeat the answer.) 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Senior Councilor give orders that the Most Enlightened 
Brother Master of Ceremonies and the Knight Kadosh, 
so vouched for be allowed to enter. 

Senior Councilor — ^Most Enlightened Brother Junior 
Councilor, give orders that the Most Enlightened Broth- 
er Master of Ceremonies and the Knight Kadosh, so 
vouched for be allowed to enter. 

Junior Councilor — Most Enlightened Brother Pursui- 
vant, allow the Most Enlightened Brother Master of 
Ceremonies and the Knight Kadosh, so vouched for to 
enter. 

Pursuivant — It is the order of the Most Perfect 



328 GRAND IK'SPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

President that yon be allowed to enter. (The candidate 
enters^ conducted by the Master of Ceremonies who leads 
him toward the East^, and halts in front of the Presi- 
dent. The door is then closed.) 

Most Perfect President — My brother, you desire to 
take upon yourself an arduous and most responsible 
office. There is but one infallible, unerring judge. All 
human judgmxCnt is at best uncertain. The errors of the 
judge have consequences as serious as those of the 
crimes of other men, and they must often, however inno- 
cent and unintentional, produce when they are made 
known by that unrelenting censor. Time, regret and 
sorrow and sometimes remorse. It is not wise to seek 
to judge our fellow men. It is a stern duty and an un- 
w^elcome task, to be performed when it cannot in any 
wise be honorably avoided, and never a privilege to be 
desired and coveted. 

Woe unto that man who assumes the power of judg- 
ment, and so to some extent usurps the prerogative of 
God, if he be not himself dispassionate, upright, impar- 
tial, just. Does your heart tell you that only proper 
motives lead you to seek that power and that you may 
with safety to yourself, take it into your hands? 

Candidate — It does. 

Most Perfect President — It is well my brother, if in- 
deed you be not deceived. Go with your guide; heed 
well the lessons and the warnings you will receive and 
return again to me. (The Master of Ceremonies con- 
ducts him six times around the room halting in turn be- 
fore each of the six columns in the North and South, 
and addressed by a brother at each as follows: 

AT THE COLUMN OF ALFRED! — I was the jUSt KinSf 

Alfred, of Saxon England. I framed wise laws, made 
upright judges, independent of my will and that of the 



INITIATION. 329 

people; and caused just and speedy judgment to be 
given. 

In all my realm, justice and right were sold to none, 
denied to none, delayed to none. 

I slept little, I wrote much, I studied more, I reigned 
only to bless those over whom I had dominion. I have 
vanished into the past and many ages have marched in 
solemn procession by my grave. Yet I still live in the 
memory of men. They call me "Great King,'' '^wise law 
giver,'' "just judge." Follow then my example, or fear 
to sit in judgment on thy fellows. 

AT THE COLUMN OF SOCRATES: — I was Socrat^s tho 
Athenian. I knew the holy mysteries and reverenced 
God in nature. In the sacred groves of Athens, I 
taught that God was one and the soul of man immortal, 
I taught obedience to the laws and decrees of the people 
,of Athens and the Council of five hundred. 

When I sat in the Court of the Areopagus, I swore 
by the paternal Apollo, by Ceres and by Jupiter the 
King, that I would give sentence uprightly and accord- 
ing to law, or when the law was silent, to the best of 
my judgment, and that I would not rec£ive gifts, nor 
should any other for me, nor receive bribes from my 
ovv^n passion, prejudice or affection, nor allow any other 
person to do the like by any means, whether direct or 
indirect, to prevent justice in the court. 

And when by an unjust judgment the same court 
condemned, I refused to flee away and escape, lest I 
should bring the laws into disrepute, holding the good 
citizen bound to submit to even the unjust judgment 
of the State. If thou wouldst fain become a judge of 
others, first prepare thyself by learning to obey the laws. 

AT THE COLUMN OF CONFUCIUS :— I was Confucius, 
who read and interpreted to the people of Ancient 
China^ the great laws engraved by the finger of God, in 



330 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

everlasting letters upon the pages of the many leaved 
book of nature. I said to them^ desire not for your coun- 
try any other benefit than justice. The great law of duty 
is to be looked for in humanity. Justice in equity ;| 
to render to every man that to which he is entitled. He | 
who would stand above the ordinary level of men, must i 
be exempt from prejudice, self-conceit and obstinacy,- 
and be governed by the mandates of justice alone. ^ 
Cultivate justice and piety, which great toward your 
parents and relations, should be greater toward your 
country. 

Hear much, reflect much and say nothing superfluous. 
Let doubt of guilt be acquitted and presumption of in- 
nocence solid proof. So I taught, and my influence 
lived after me and was good and gave good fortune to 
my country, and yet controlled its destinies. That is 
the noblest recompense of human virtue. Do thou 
strive so to live and act, to obey and govern, and thou 
too mayst live in the good opinion of men after thou 
art dead and thy influences may make thee too a King 
over the minds of men. 

AT THE COLUMN OE MINOS I — I was Minos, the law 
giver of Crete, I taught the Cretans that the laws which 
I enacted were dictated by Zeus the father, for all true 
and righteous laws and all human justice are but the de- 
velopments of that eternal and infinite justice, that is of 
the essence of the Deity, he who assumes to judge his 
brethren, clothes himself with a power like that of God. 
To usurp a jurisdiction is to invade the territory of his 
prerogative. Act so that men may praise thy moderation, 
thy inflexibility, thy equity and thy integrity. And yet 
regard not alone the opinion and the judgment of the 
living, but seek the approval of those who shall live 
hereafter, whose verdict will be more just, even if more 



INITIATION". -331 

severe. Woe unto thee, if being thyself vicious or crimi- 
nal, thou dost assume to judge others and still more if 
thou givest corrupt judgment. For then will thy mem- 
ory be execrated, and in all time, it shall be the bitterest 
reproach to an unjust judge to call him by thy name. 

AT THE COLUMN OF ZOROASTER: — I was Zoroaster, 
whose words became law to the Persians. I said, "He 
is the best servant of God, whose heart is upright, who 
is liberal, with due regard to what is just to all men; 
who turns not hi^ eyes towards riches and whose heart 
wishes well to every thing that lives.'^ So act towards 
all men that when they die, thou shalt not have to re- 
gret their death, because thou hast done them wrong and 
can no longer make reparation. He alone is just who is 
charitable and merciful in his judgments and he alone 
is wise who thinks well and not evil of other men. 

Attempt not to break through the laws of providence, 
aor impiously presume to correct the ways of God. Nor 
.neasure the ocean of his wisdom with the tape-line of 
Ay little conceptions. 

Neither cringe nor fawn, nor depend meanly; but 
£nd thy happiness within thyself. Satisfy thine own 
conscience and fear neither the outrages of fortune, nor 
the injuries of enemies. Crime is not to be measure! 
by the issue of events, but by the bad intentions of the 
doer. Study therefore the dominion of thyself and 
quiet thine own commotions, and hold it the noblest 
ovation, to triumph over thy passions. Let the long 
train of thy trophies be within thee, and not without, 
and when thou sittest in judgment on others, let malice 
be manacled m^ envy fettered behind thy judgment seat. 



333 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

AT THE COLUMN OF MOSES — I was Moses/'' the lead- 
er and lawgiver of the Israelites. I was initiated into... 
the mysteries and wisdom of ancient Egypt^ and that 
wisdom dictated the statutes by which Israel was gov- 
erned. I said unto the people, ^Thou shalt not wrest the 
judgment of thy poor in his cause. 

^^Thou shalt take no gift, for the gift blindeth the 
wise, and perverteth the words of the righteous. 

^^Ye shall do no unrighteousness in judgment. Thou 
shalt not respect the person of the poor, nor honor the 
person of the mighty. 

^^Ye •shall hear the small as well as the great. Ye 
shall not fear the face of man, for the judgment is 
God's.^^ (Candidate halts before the Councilors.) 

Senior Councilor — Thou hast heard the words of the 
great sages, lawgivers and philosophers of antiquity. 
Eemember now the sacred word of the 18th degree. 
Hear the voice of one whom all Christendom regards 
as the greatest lawgiver that has ever come among men; 
and listen reverentially to his teachings. 

^^If ye forgive not men their trespasses, neither will 
your Heavenly Father forgive your trespasses. But if 
ye forgive men their trespasses, your Heavenly Father 
will also forgive you. With what judgment ye judge, 
ye shall be judged, and with what measure ye mete, it 
shall be measured to you again. 

^^If thy brother trespass against thee, go and tell him ]f 
his fault between thee and him alone. If he shall hear 

Note 365. — "Moses. Moses was learned in all the wisdom of the 
Egyptians; he was initiated in all the knowledge of the wise men of tI^.^t 
nation, by whom the learning .of antiquity had been retained and held 
sacred; wrapped up from the eye of the wicked and vulgar in symbols 
and hieroglyphics, and communicated to men of their own order cuily, 
with care, secrecy, and circumspection. This secrecy is not in any wise 
to be wondered at, when we consider the persecution which would have 
followed a faith unacceptable to the ignorance of the nations who were 
enveloped in superstition and bigotry." — Macoy's Lncyclojpaedia and Dic- 
tionary of Freemasonry^ Article Mo^es, 



INITIATION. 333 

thee, thou hast gained thy brother. Judge not according 
to the appearance, but judge righteous judgment. 

^^If thy brother trespass against thee, rebuke him, and 
if he repent, forgive him, and if he trespass against 
thee seven times in a day, and seven times in a day 
turn again to thee saying ^I repent' thou shalt forgive 
him. 

"^'Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain 
mercy.'^ 

Go now my brother, to the East, the seat of that jus- 
tice which also is a ray of the great light separated from 
the others by the prism of Masonry. (Candidate is con- 
ducted to the East.) 

Most Perfect President — Be seated my brother. You 
have heard the lesson of immortal wisdom, once uttered 
by mortal lips that have long since mouldered into dust. 
Through those lips God spake unto men, for from him 
alone cometh all wisdom. You desire to become a mem- 
ber of this Tribunal and a Supreme judge in Masonry. 
The Grand Consistory of Sublime Princes of the Eoyal 
Secret, satisfied of your capacity and qualifications; of 
your impartiality and justice has, in its wisdom, granted 
your request. When you shall have been received 
among us it will devolve on you to administer the high 
justice of the order, and in that the purest equity must 
be your guide. In every case submitted to your judg- 
ment, and whether the matters and the parties be Ma- 
sonic or profane, you must hear affably, deliberate calm- 
ly and yield to no other influences than those of Justice 
and Equity, of Lenity and Mercy; the four sacred 
words that with their splendor light every Supreme 
Tribunal of Gr^nd Inspectors Inquisitors Commanders. 

You will not suspect, we trust, that to your title of 
Inquisitor will be attached that odious meaning which 
has made the name so fearful and detestable in all the 



334 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

countries in which toleration has found a domicile. In 
the name we bear, it means one who seeks and searches 
for, inquires after and investigates the truth, and the 
truth alone. j 

The punishment must ever be proportionate to th^ 
offence, and some must not be punished for doing thing^ 
for which others are not so much as called to account.' 
In punishing also, we must guard against passion and 
remember that there is no such thing in Masonry as 
vindictive justice. 

When you maintain a cause in argument, in any form* 
whatever; in the court, the market, or the fireside, youl 
are never to forget, or offend against, the rules of cour-| 
tesy and charity, or overpass the boundaries of modera-| 
tion. There must be in your argument neither heat nor^ 
bitter words. If you have maturely reflected and are sat-S' 
isfied that the grounds you take are wholly right, main-| 
tain with firmness and express with frankness your own| 
opinion, but not too positively or scornfully towards 
your antagonist, nor with the use of any words that canf 
justly wound his feelings or startle his self respect. Sug-| 
gestion often convinces more than assertion. And aj 
modest and courteous demonstration will succeed when; 
rude and positive logic will always fail. 

Ever remember that being human, you must oJ 
necessity often err. That those who hold differen1|| 
opinions entertain them as honestly as you do your own,"^^ 
And that you have no right to deny or doubt theirj 
sincerity. Especially never harshly denounce an opinion: 
that more experience and a more thorough investiga-r 
tion may some day compel you to adopt. And therefore 
always treat your opponents as if it were certainly at 
some time to happen, that their opinions could become 
your own. 



INITIATION. 335 

If in his progress upward to this degree, the Mason 
has not learned wisdom, he has already advanced too far. 
And it is the doctrine of Masonry that no man is truly 
wise who is not kind and courteous; charitable in his 
construction of men's motives, lenient and merciful, 
and distrustful of his own ability to resist the allure- 
m.ent of temptation and the mighty influences of preju- 
dice and passion. Remember that you represent the or- 
der; that you must maintain its dignity and glory, pre- 
serve its constitutions and act by its laws. And that all 
those things are committed to your fidelity. You are 
neither to be subordinate nor subservient, nor haughty, 
nor domineering, and ever to bear in mind that ''quod 
non vetat lex, hoc vetat fieri piidor/' What law's letter 
does not prohibit is often forbidden by propriety and fit- 
ness of things. 

My brother, no one should assume a Masonic* obliga- 
tion unless he is convinced that he possesses sufficient 
resolution and moral strength to enable him faithfully 
to keep and perform it. It is unfortunately too true, 
that no cause of insincerity, prevarication and falsehood 
has been more powerful than the practice of administer- 
ing oaths; and that attempts to strengthen the obliga- 
tions of morality and duty, by-^oaths with exaggerated 
penalties, are generally found to hSve no tendency but 
fo relax them. 

You may judge by what you have heard, what are the 
duties which you will assume as a Grand Inspector 
Inquisitor Commander, and in what spirit and manner 
you must discharge them. Do you feel that it is in your 
power so to perform those duties ? 

Candidate — (Rising.) I do. 

Most Perfect President — Are you ready to endeavor 
to renounce all passions and overcome all weaknesses 



ii 



m 



336 GRAND INSPECTOR mQUISITOR COMMANDER. | 

that Gould lead you to do acts of injustice and giv^l> 
hasty aiid inconsiderate judgment? 

Candidate-^-1 am. 

Most Perfect President— X)o you believe that you can 
sacrifice your pride of opinion and love of self respect^? 
to maintain the holy cause of justice and equity? -* 

Candidate— 1 do. |' 

Most Perfect President — Go then to our holy altar, in £ 
charge of our Most Enlightened Brother, the Master off 
Ceremonies and there kneel with sincerity and reverence/:, 
with no thought in your heart and no word on your lips 1 
but those of soberness and truth. (Master of Ceremon-' 
ies conducts him, to the altar, causes him to kneel on the- 
right knee, and places in his left hand the scales of jus- 
tice, laying his right hand on the book of constitu-| 
tions.) 

Most Perfect President — (Striking one and rising.) 
Order my brethren ! Form the circle around the candi- 
date. (All rise and suround the candidate, extending 
their left hands over him while they hold their swords f^ 
in the right, and all repeat with him the responses ; il| 
after which the Most Perfect President leaves his seat 
and meets the candidate.) .^i 

Most Perfect President — Kneeling at this altar of Ma- 1| 
sonry in token of humility and reverential awe of Deity ;|| 
do you, upon these emblems of justice, equity, up-V^ 
rightness and the law's dread vengeance, most solemnly, 
and sincerely swear that you will never reveal any o^ 
the secrets of Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander tafi 
any person and under any circumstances in the world, 
unless duly permitted to do so by a Consistory of Sub- 
lime Princes of the Eoyal Secret.^ 

Candidate and All — I do. 

Most Perfect President — Do you furthermore promiee 



IKITIATIOK. 337 

and swear that you will scrupulously observe and cause 
to be observed, the constitutions, statutes and regula* 
tions of this Supreme Tribunal so long as you remain a 
member thereof; that you will with zeal and energy 
propagate the doctrines of the Ancient and Accepted 
Rite of Masonry, and labor for its diffusion and pros- 
perity, and that you will not consent to the admission of 
any person to the high degrees of the Eite who is not an 
intelligent man, of respectable acquirements and infor- 
mation, and of virtue and honor? 

Candidate and All — I do. 

Most Perfect President— 'Rake your right hand to- 
wards heaven. Do you most solemnly and sincerely 
swear, that you will carefully examine all cases in which 
you may be judge; listen attentively to every argument 
that may be urged therein and faithfully and impartial- 
ly weigh both evidence and argument, being neither 
careless nor indifferent, partial nor prejudiced; nor 
wearying of investigation, with no other purpose than 
that of giving a true, just, equitable and merciful judg- 
ment? 

Candidate and All — I do. 

Most Perfect President — Do you solemnly and sin- 
cerely swear that you will never sit in judgment in any 
case where you may entertain feelings of enmity or ill- 
will toward a party therein, or any feelings of prejudice 
or dislike ; nor in any case where from any cause what- 
ever you doubt whether you can hear patiently, consider 
calmly, and decide impartially? 

Candidate and All — I do. 

Most Perfect President — Do you solemnly and sin- 
and swear that you will never allow rank and power, in- 
fluence or money to sway your judgment, and that be- 
fore you as a judge, all men shall stand on one common 
level, to be condemned if guilty; to be acquitted if 
innocent ? 



338 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

Candidate and All — I do. 

Most Perfect President — Do you solemnly and sincere- 
ly swear that you will as a judge lay aside all pride of .| 
opinion^ obstinacy and self will, and be governed [ 
absolutely by the dictates of law, justice equity and J 
your own conscience, so far as the frailty of your na- 
ture will permit ? 
- Candidate and All — I do. 

Most Perfect President — Do you solemnly and sin- 
cerely swear that you will usurp no doubtful power ; that ? 
you will strain no law so as to make it cover cases to 
which it does not plainly apply; that you will presume 
every man innocent until he is proven guilty, and that * 
you will give to every one accused the benefit of all reas- 
onable doubt, and of a charitable and natural construc- 
tion of his actions ; and remember that the Masonic law i 
seeks punishment as a means only, and not as an end?! 

Candidate and All — I do. 

Most Perfect President — Eepeat then with me. (Can- 
didate and all repeat the following:) f1 

All this I do swear, expecting that God will so judge -Ji^, 
me, as I judge others, and consigning myself to the con- ^; 
tempt of my brethren and to their just and terrible an- I 
ger, to be visited upon my unprotected head, if I should | 
willfully or through indifference violate this my solemn 
oath and obligation. So help me God. 

All — Forgive us our tresspasses, 0! Father, as we 
forgive those that trespass against us. 

Most Perfect President — Witness the solemn oath|| 
my brethren, and let it be recorded. 

All — We witness it. 

Chancellor — And I record it. (As the last words are 
uttered, light is given to the candidate, the scales of 
justice are taken from him and placed on the altar.) 



INITIATION'. . 339 

Most Perfect President — -(Taking the candidate by 
the hand. (Eise my brother.) (Candidate rises and all 
the brethren sheath their swords.) 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Master of Ceremonies^ do your duty. (Master of Cere- 
monies divests the candidate of all his decorations and 
lays them on the altar.) 

Most Perfect President — Sir Knight^ we divest you of 
all your decorations, because the degree which you are 
now entering is above those you have already received, 
and in it you enter the judicial branch and leave the 
military branch of the order. Most Enlightened Broth- 
er Master of Ceremonies, teach the candidate the march 
of the Grand Inspectors Inquisitors Commanders and 
then bring him to me. 

Most Perfect President — To your places Grand In- 
spectors Inquisitors Commanders! (The Most Perfect 
President, officers and members, return to their places. 
The Master of Ceremonies places the candidate under 
the sign of order. Then he causes him to step off one 
step to the front with the right foot, and then bring his 
feet together so as to form a square, at the same time 
uncrossing and crossing his arms. Then he steps off 
with the left foot one step and forms the square again, 
uncrossing and crossing his arms, and so on by alterna- 
tion until he reaches the foot of the throne.) 

Most Perfect President — (Invests him with the collar 
and jewel of the order.) I invest you with the w^hite 
collar and jewel of this degree. See that the purity of 
the former and the lustre of the latter be never sullied 
or dimmed by your injustice, inhumanity or impurity. 
Return to the altar my brother, and kneel. 

Most Perfect President — Order Most Enlightened 
Brethren! (All rise under the sign of order. Candidate 
goes to the altar and kneels.) 



340 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMAND.h:r. 



Most Perfect President — (Laying both hands on the -^ 
candidate's head.) To the glory of the Grand Architect ; 
of the Universe, in the name and tinder the auspices of 
the Grand Consistory of Sublime Princes of the Eoyal 
Secret, 32nd degree of the Ancient and Accepted Rite > 
of Masonry, for the State of , under the jurisdic- 
tion of the Supreme Council of Sovereign Grand In- 
spectors General, 33rd degree for the ISTorthern Juris- * 
diction of the United States of America, sitting at New 
York, and by virtue of the powers conferred on me by 
this Supreme Tribunal of Grand Inspectors Inquisitors 
Commanders, I do receive and constitute, create and 
acknowledge you a Grand Inspector Inquisitor Comman- 
der of the 31st degree of that rite, and a member of this 
Supreme Tribunal. 

Arise Most Enlightened Brother. Take for a moment 
the two poniards which lie before you. They are . 
weapons that you have carried before in Masonry, and 
we yet retain them because they were anciently given 
to the candidate that with one he might punish perjury 
and with the other protect innocence. 

Put them down my brother ! They do not belong to 
a Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander, who is a 
Judge and not a soldier. The moral force of the law and 
the Tribunal is more potent than a thousand daggers. 
Perjury like any other crime, is punished by law, or by 
the general contempt and execration, and innocence is 
not now protected by the poniard. 

Most Enlightened Brother Master of Ceremonies, this 
newly received Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander 
has laid aside forever the steel which is symbolic of 
violence. Give him therefore, the signs, words and 
tokens of the degree. Be seated my brethren. (The 
Most Perfect President returns to the throne and takes 



INITIATION. 



341 



his seat. All the members seat themselves and the 
Master of Ceremonies gives the candidate the signs, 
words and tokens of the degree, as the same axe ex- 
plained by the Most Perfect President.) 




SIGN. 



Cross both hands over the navel, the 
left over the right. 



'^*^ 



First Sign, 



ANSWER. 



Cross them over the head, the fingers 
extended and separate, and the palms up- 
ward. 




Aaswering Sigiu 



343 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 




TOKEN. 

Place right foot to right foot, and 
right knee to right knee, take eadi 
other by the left hand, and with the 
right hand strike a gentle blow on the 
other's right shoulder. 



Token. 

SACRED word: — One says justice the other answers 
equity. Both together say : So mote it be. 

BATTERY : — Nine. By one, three, four and one. 

Master of Ceremonies — Most Perfect President, the 
signs, words and tokens are made known to our newly 
initiated brother. • 

Most Perfect President — Order Most Enlightened 
Brethren Grand Inspectors Inquisitors Commanders! 
(All rise under the sign of order.) 

Most Perfect President — I do hereby proclaim the 
Most Enlightened Brother A .... B, a Grand Inspector 
Inquisitor Commander 31st degree of the Ancient and 
Accepted Rite of Masonry, regularly made and created, 
and I do commend him as such to all Freemasons of 
that Rite over the surface of the globe and require them 
to receive and acknowledge him as such. Most Enlight- 
ened Brother Master of Ceremonies, conduct our newly 
proclaimed brother to the seat of honor. (Master of 
Ceremonies conducts him to the right hand of the 
President.) 



INITIATION. 343 

Most Perfect President — Be seated my brethren. (Or- 
der is obeyed.) 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Advocate^ be pleased further to instruct this our newly 
received brother^ in regard to the principles of this de- 
gree. (Advocate rises and delivers the discourse.) 

DISCOURSE BY ADVOCATE. 

My brother, this degree was instituted when anarchy 
reigned among the rites of Masonry. It was evidently 
indispensible to establish a special body that should see 
to the maintenance of principles and the regularity of 
Hasonic forms. 

The Tribunal of Grand Inspectors Inquisitors Com- 
manders was thus created, and invested with the power, 
as it was charged with the duty of visiting the different 
bodies and inspecting their work; of taking care that 
caution should be observed in the selection of candi- 
dates ; of compelling a strict observance of the ritual in 
the higher degrees. To these powers were added by 
degrees, that of judging differences between the breth- 
ren and of trying those guilty of offences against Ma- 
sonic law. 

These powers and this jurisdiction are now defined, 
and the mode of proceeding regulated by the supreme 
authority. 

To hear patiently, to weigh deliberately and dis- 
passionately, and to decide impartially; these are the 
chief duties of a judge. After the lessons you have re- 
ceived, I need not further enlarge upon them. You will 
be ever eloquently reminded of them by the furniture 
upon our altar, and the decorations of our Tribunal. 

The book of constitutions will remind you of your 
obligations, and that he alone who faithfully observes 
the law has a right to enforce it upon others. 



344 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

In the scales of justice you are to weigh the facts and 
the law alone, nor place in neither scale personal friend- 
ship, or personal dislike, neither fear nor favor, and 
when reformation is no longer to be hoped for, you are 
to smite -relentlessly with the sword of justice, ever re- 
membering that as you judge here below, so you will be 
yourself judged hereafter by one who has not to submit 
like an earthly judge, to the sad necessity of inferring 
the motives, intentions and purposes of men, (of which 
all crime essentially consists) for the uncertain and 
often unsafe testimony of their acts and words, as men 
in thick darkness grope their way, with ' hands out- 
stretched before them, but before whom every thought, 
feeling, impulse and intention of every soul that now is, 
or ever was, or ever will be on earth, is, and ever will be 
through the whole infinite duration of eternity, present 
and visible. 

The square and compasses the plumb and level are 
well known to you as a Mason. Upon you as a judge, 
they peculiarly inculcate uprightness,, impartiality, care- 
ful consideration of facts and circumstances, accuracy 
in judgment, and uniformity in decision. 

As a judge, too, you are to bring up square work, 
and square work only. Like a temple erected by the 
plumb, you are to lean neither to one side nor to the 
other. Like a building well squared and levelled, you are 
to be firm and steadfast in your convictions of right and | 
justice. 

Like the circle swept by the compasses, you are to be 

true. The peculiar and principal symbol of this degree 

is the Tetractys of Pythagoras, suspended in the East. 

Where ordinarily the sacred word or letter 

'.*. glitters, and like it, representing the Deity. 

{// / Its nine external points from the Triangle, 



INITIATION. 345 

the chief symbol in Masonry, with many of the 
meanings of which you are familiar. 

To us its three sides represent the three principal 
attributes* of the Deity, which created, and now as ever 
support, uphold and guide the Universe in its eternal 
movement; the three supports of the Masonic temple, 
itself an emblem of the Universe. Wisdom, or the 
infinite divine intelligence; strength or power, the 
infinite divine will; and beauty, or* the infinite divine 
harmony; the eternal law, by virtue of which the 
myriads of suns and worlds flash ever onward in their 
ceaseless revolutions, without clash or conflict in the 
infinite space, and change and movement, are the law 
of all created existence. 

To us, as Masonic judges, the triangle figures for the 
pyramids, which planted firmly as the everlasting hills 
and accurately adjusted to the four cardinal points, 
defiant of all assaults of men and time teach us to stand 
firm and unshaken as they, when our feet are planted 
upon the solid truth. 

It includes a multitude of geometrical figures, all 
having a deep significance to Masons. The triple trian- 
gle is peculiarly sacred, having 
ever been among all nations, a 
symbol of the Deity. Prolong- 
ing all the external lines of the 
hexagon, which also it includes, 
we have six smaller triangles, Triple Triangle - 

I whose bases cut each other in 

the central point of the Tetractys, itself always the sym- 
bol of the generative power of the universe, the Sun. 




346 GRAND IKSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

Brahama''' Osiris/'' Apollo^ BeV^ and the Deity him- 
self. 

Thus too> we form twelve still smaller triangles^ 
three times three of which compose the Tetractys itself. 

I refrain from enumerating all the figures that you 
may trace within it; but one may not be passed unnot- 
iced. The Hexagon itself faintly images to use a cube, 
not visible at the first glance, and therefore the fit em- 
blem of that faith in things, which, tliough invisible are 
nevertheless real, and the existence of which may be 
proved by reason and logic. The first perfect solid and 
reminding you of the Cubical Stone''' that sweated - 

Note 366. — **In the Vedic hymns all the powers of nature are per- 
Bonified, and become the objects of worship, thus leading to an appar- - 
eut polytheism. But, as Mr. J. F. Clarke (Ton Great Religions, p. 90), f 
remarks, *behind this incipient polytheism lurks the original monotheism; | 
for each of these gods, in turn, becomes the Supreme Being.' And Max I, 
Muller says (Chaps, i. 2), that *it would be easy to find in the numerous^ 
hymns of the Veda passages in which almost every important deity is j 
represented as supreme and absolute.' This most ancient religion — J. 
believed in by one-seventh of the world's population, that fountain fromf' 
which has flowed so much of the stream of modern religious thought, T 
abounding in mystical ceremonies and ritual prescriptions, worshipping, t 
as the Lord of all, 'the source of golden light,' having its ineffable name, I 
its solemn methods of initiation, and its symbolic rites — is well worth ^. 
the serious study of the Masonic scholar, because in it he will find much 
that will be suggestive to him in the investigations of the dogmas of his 
Order. "—Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Brahmanism. 

Not© 367, — "The Osirian mysteries consisted in a scenic representa- 
tion of the murder of Osiris by Typhon, the subsequent recovery of his 
mutilated body by Isis, and his deification, or restoration to immortal 
life. Julius Firmicus, in bis treaties On the Falsity of the Pa^an Re- ' 
ligionSp thus describes the object of the Osirian mysteries: 'But in those 
funerals and lamentations which are annually celebrated in honor of I 
0.«iris, the defenders of the Pagan rites pretend a physical reason. They ^ 
call the seeds of fruit, Osiris; the earth, Isis; the natural heat, Typhon; ' 
and because the fruits are ripened by the natural heat and collected for ^ 
the life of man, and are separated from their natural tie to the earth, -^^ 
and are sown again when winter approaches, this they consider is thei 
death of Osiris; but when the fruits, by the genial fostering of the:* 
earth, begin again to be generated by a new procreation, this is the> 
finding of Osiris.' This explanation does not essentially differ from thatj? 
already given in the article Egyptian Mysteries. The symbolism is In- 
deed precisely the same — that of a restoration or resurrection from death 
to life." — Mackey's F,nayclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Osiris, Mys- 
teries oft "^ _^ 

Note 368. — "Bel, is the contracted form of Baal, and was worshiped 
by the Babylonians as their chief deity. The Greeks and Eomans so con- 
sidered and translated the word by Zeus and Jupiter. It has, with Jah 
and On, been introduced into the Royal Arch system as a representative 
of the Tetragrammaton, which it and the accompanying words have?, 
sometimes ignorantly been made to displace." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia ofv. 
Freemasonry, Article Bel. 

Note 369. — **Every stone of the temple was formed into a square, con- 
taining five equilateral triangles, each equilateral triangle being equal to 
a cube, and each side and base of the triangles being equal to a plumb f 
line." — Macey's Encyclop dia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article 
Cubical Stone, 



lisfiTiATlON. 347 

blood, and of that deposited by Enoch, it teaches justice, 
accuracy and consistency. 

The infinite divisibility of the triangle, teaches the 
infinity of the universe, of time, of space and of the 
Deity, as do the lines that diverging from the common 
centre ever increase their distance from each other, as 
they are infinitely prolonged. 

As they may be infinite in number, so are the at- 
tributes of Deity, infinite and as they emanate from one 
centre and are projected into space, so the whole uni- 
verse has emanated from God. 

Eemember also, my brother, that you have other du- 
ties to perform than those of a judge. You are to in- 
quire into and scrutinize carefully the work of the 
subordinate bodies in Masonry. 

You- are to see that recipients of the higher degrees 
are not unnecessarily multiplied ; that improper persons 
are carefully excluded from membership, and that in 
their life and conversation, Masons bear testimony to 
the excellence of our doctrines, and the incalculable 
value of the institution itself. 

You are to inquire also into your own heart and con- 
duct, and keep careful watch over yourself that you go 
not astray. If you harbor ill-will and jealousy; if you 
are hospitable to intolerance and bigotry, and churlish 
to gentleness and kind affections, opening wide your 
heart to one, and closing its portals to the other, it is 
time for you to set in order your own temple, or else 
you wear in vain the name and insignia of a Mason, 
while yet uninvested with the Masonic nature. 

Everywhere in the world there is a natural law, that 
is, a constant model of action, which seems to belong to 
the nature of things; to the constitution of the universe. 
This fact is universal. In different departments we call 



848 GRAND INSPECTOR INQtJISITOR COMMANDER* 

this mode of action by different names^ as the law of ; 
matter^ the law of mind^ the law of morals^ and the 
like. We mean by this, a certain mode of action, which ; 
belongs to the material, mental or moral forces; thev 
mode in which commonly they are found to act and 
which it is their ideal to always act. The ideal laws of 
matter, we only know from the fact that they are always 
obeyed. To us the actual obedience is the only evidence 
of the ideal rule; for in respect to the conduct of the 
material world, the ideal and the actual are the same. 
The laws of matter we learn only by observation and ; 
experience. Before experience of the fact, no man could ^ | 
foretell that a body falling towai*ds the earth would 
descend sixteen feet the first second, twice that the next, 
four times the third, and sixteen times the fourth. No 
mode of action in our consciousness anticipates this 
rule of action in the outer world. The same is true of all 7 
the laws of matter. The ideal law is known because it; 
is a fact. The law is imperative. It must be obeyed;^ 
without hesitation. Laws of crystallization, laws of 
proportion in chemical combination; neither in these 
nor in any other law of nature is there any margin left, 
for oscillation or disobedience. Only the primal willf 
of God works in the material world, and no secondary,! 
finite will. 

There are no exceptions to the great general law of 
abstraction, which binds atom to atom in the body of a 
ratifier, visible only by aid of a microscope; orb to orb,i 
system to system; gives unity to the world of things,; 
and rounds^ these systems of worlds to a universe. 4 

At first there seem to be exceptions to this law, as'^ 
in growth and decomposition and in the repulsions of 
electricity, but at length all these are found to be espec- 
ial cases. of the one great law of attraction, acting in 



iNiTiATioisr. 349 

various modes. The variety of effect of this law, at first 
surprises the senses, but in the end, the unity of cause 
astonishes the cultivated mind. Looked at in reference 
to this globe, an earthquake is no more than a chink that 
opens in a garden walk in a dry day in summer. 

A sponge is porous, having small spaces between the 
solid parts. The solar system is only more porous, hav- 
ing larger room between the several orbs. The universe 
yet more so, with spaces between the systems, as small 
compared to infinite space, as those between the atoms 
that compose the bulk of the smallest invisible anim^rl- 
cule, of which millions swim in a drop of salt water. 
The same attraction holds together the animalcule, the 
sponge, the system and the universe. Every particle of 
matter in that universe is related to each and all the 
other particles, and attraction is their common bond. 
In the spiritual world; the world of human conscious- 
ness, there is also a law and ideal mode of action, for the 
spiritual forces of man. The law of justice is as univer- 
v^al an one as the law of attraction though we are very 
far from being able to reconcile all the phenomena of 
lature with it. The lark has the same right, in our 
fiiew, to live, to sing, to dart at pleasure through the 
ambient atmosphere, as the hawk has to ply his strong 
wings in the summer sunshine, and yet the hawk 
pounces on and devours the harmless lark, as it devours 
the worm, and as the worm devours the animalcule. And 
so far as we know, there is nowhere, in any future state 
of animal existence, any compensation for this apparent 
injustice. Among the bees, one rules while the others 
obey; some work while others are idle. With the small 
ants, the soldiers feed on the proceeds of the workmen's 
labor. The lion lies in wait for and devours the ante- 
lope, that has apparently as good a right to life as he. 



350 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

Among men, some govern, some serve. Capital^coin- 
mands and labor obeys. And one race superior in intel- 
lect, avails itself of the strong muscles of another that 
is inferior. And yet, for all this, no one impeaches the 
justice of God. No doubt all these varied phenomena 
are consistent with one great law of justice, and the : 
only difficulty is that we do not, and no doubt we can- \ 
not, understand that law. It is very easy for some 
dreaming and visionary theorist to say that it is most | 
evidently unjust for the lion to devour the deer, and 
for the eagle to tear and eat the wren, but the trouble is 
that we know of no other way, according to the frame, 
the constitution and the organs which God has given •■ 
them, in which the lion and the eagle could manage to , 
live at all. Our little measure of justice is not God's 
measure. His justice does not require us to relieve the || 
hard-working millions of all labor; to emancipate the ^l' 
serf or slave, unfitted to be free, from all control. No 
doubt underneath the little bubbles which are the lives, 
the wishes, the wilk and the plans of ten hundred mil- | 
lions or more of human beings on this earth, (for bub- 
bles they are, judging by the space and time they occupy 
in this great and age-outlasting sea of human-kind). 
No doubt, underneath them all resides one and the 
same eternal force, which they shape into this or the 
other special form. And over all the same paternal pro- 1 



vidence presides, keeping eternal watch over the little |^ 
and the great, and producing variety of effect, fromj 
unity of force. ^ 

It is entirely true to say that justice is the constitu- 
tion, or fundamental law of the moral universe ; the law 
of right, a rule of conduct for man, (as it is for every 
other living creature). In all his moral relations, no 
doubt all human affairs, (like all other affairs) must be 
subject to that, as the law paramount. And what is right 



I 



I 



INITIATION. 351 

agrees therewith and stands^ while what is WTong con- 
flicts with it and falls. The difficulty is what we ever 
erect our notions of what is right and just^ into the law 
of justice^ and insist that God shall adopt that as his 
law; instead of striving to learn by observation and re- 
flection what his law is, and then believe that law to be 
consistent with his infinite justice, whether it corre- 
sponds with onr limited notion of justice, or does not so 
correspond. We are too wise in our own conceit, and 
ever strive to enact our own little notions into the uni- 
versal laws 'of God. It might be difficult for man to 
prove, even to his own satisfaction, how it is right or 
just for him to subjugate the horse and ox to his ser- 
vice, giving them in return" only their daily food, w^hich 
God has spread out for them on all the green meadows 
and savannahs of the w^orld. Or how it is just that we 
should slay and eat the harmless deer, that only crop 
the green herbage, the buds and the young leaves and 
drink the free running water that God made common 
'o all ; or the gentle dove, the innocent kid/" the many 
rther living things that so confidently trust to our pro- 
jection. Quite as difficult perhaps, as to prove it just 
pT one man's intellect, or even his wealth, to make an- 
Ither's strong arms his servants, for daily w^ages or for 
-. bare subsistence. 

To find out this universal law of justice is one thing; 
to undertake to measure off something, wdth our own 
little tape-line, and call that God's law of justice, is an- 
Dther. 

The great, general plan and system, and the great 
general laws enact-ed by God, continually produce what, 
to our limited notions^ is wrong and injustice, w^hich 
hitherto men have been able to explain to their own 
satisfaction, only by the hypothesis of another existence, 
in which all inequalities and injustices in this life will 
3e remedied and compensated ior. To our ideas of Ju.s-^ 



352 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

tice, it is very unjust that the child is made miserable 
for life by deformity or organic disease, in consequence 
of the vices of its father, and yet that is part of the 
universal law. 

The ancients said that the child was punished for the 
sins of its father. We say that its deformity, or disease, 
is the consequence of its father's vices, but so far as 
concerns the question of justice, or. injustice^ that is 
merely the change of a word. 

It is very easy to lay down a broad general principle, 
embodying our own idea of what is absolute justice, and 
insist that everything shall conform to that. To sajy 
all human affairs must be subject to that, as the law 
paramount, and what is right agrees therewith and 
stands; what is wrong conflicts and falls. Private 
cohesions of self-love^ of friendship or of patriotism, 
must all be subordinate to this universal gravitation ti- 
ward the eternal right. 

The difficulty is that in this universe of necessities, 
God created; of sequences; of cause and effect, and of 
life evolved from death; this interminable succession 
and aggregate of cruelties, will not conform to any such 
absolute principle or arbitrary theory, no matter in what 
sounding words and glittering phrases it may be embod- 1 
ied. • I 

Impracticable rules in morals are always injurious, ' 
for, as all men fall short of compliance with them, they i 
turn real virtues into imaginary offences against a 
forged law. 

Justice as between man and man, and as between man , 
and the animals below him, is that which, under, an 
according to the God created relations existing between | 
them, and the whole aggregate of circumstances sur- 
rounding them^ is fit anfl right, and proper to be done, 



INITIATION. 353 

with a view to the general as well as to the individual 
interest. It is not a theoretical principle by which the 
very relations that God has created and imposed on ns, 
are to be tried^ and approved or condemned. 

God has made this great system of the universe and 
enacted general laws for its government. Those laws 
environ everything that lives, with a mighty net-work 
of necessity. He chose to create the tiger, with such 
organs that he cannot crop the grass, but must eat 
other food or starve. 

He has made man carniverou^also, and the smallest 
singing bird is as much so as the tiger. In every step 
that we take, in every breath we draw, is involved the 
destruction of a multitude of animated existence, each, 
no matter how minute, as much a living creature as our- 
selves. He has made necessary among mankind, a divi- 
sion of labor, intellectual and moral. He has made 
necessary the varied relations of society and dependence ; 
of obedience and control. What is thus made necessary 
<^annot be unjust, for if it be, then God, the great law- 
giver, is himself unjust. 

The evil to be avoided, is the legalization of injustice 
;ind wrong, under the false plea of necessity. 

Out of all the relations of life grow duties, as natur- 
ally and as undeniably, as the leaves' grow upon the 
trees. If we have4he right, created by God's law of neces- 
sity, to slay the lamb^ that we may eat and live, we have 
no right to torture it in so doing, because that is in no 
wise necessary. We have the right to live, if we fairly 
can, by the legitimate exercise of our intellect, and hire 
or buy the labor of the strong arms of others, to till our 
ground, to toil in our manufactories; but we have no 
right to over-work or under-pay them. 

It is not only true that we may learn the moral law 



354 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

of justice ; the law of right, by experience and observa- 
tion, but that God has given us a moral faculty, our 
conscience, which is able to perceive this law directly 
and immediately, by intuitive perception of it. And it is 
true that man has, in his nature, a rule of conduct 
higher than he has ever yet come up to ; an ideal of na- 
ture that . shames his actual history, because man has 
ever been prone to make necessity; his own necessity, 
the necessities of society, a plea for injustice. But this 
notion must not be pushed too far. For if we substi- 
tute this ideality for actuality, then it is equally true, 
that we have within us an ideal rule of right and wrong, 
to which God himself, in his government of the world, 
has never come and against which he (we say it reven- 
entially) every day offends. We detest the tiger and the 
wolf, for their rapacity and love of blood, which are 
their nature. 

We revolt against the law, by which the crooked 
limbs and diseased organism of the child, are the fruits 
of the father's vices. We even think that a God, omnip- 
otent and omniscient, ought to have permitted no pain, 
no poverty, no servitude. Our ideal of justice is more 
lofty than the actualities of God. It is well as all else 
is well. 

He has given us that moral sense, for wise and benifi- 
cent purposes. We accept it, ^s a significant proof of' 
the inherent loftiness of human nature, that it can ascer-' 
tain an ideal so exalted, and we should strive to attain 
it, so far as we can do so consistently with the relations! 
which he has created, and the circumstances which sur- 
round us and hold us captive. 

If we faithfully use this faculty of conscience; if ap- 
plying it to the existing relations and circumstances wo 
develop it and all its kindred powers, and deduce the; 
duties that out of these relations and those circum- 



INITIATION. 355 

stances^ limited and qualified by them, arise and become 
obligatory .."upon ns, then we learn justice; the law of 
right; the divine rule of conduct for human life. But 
if we undertake to define and settle the mode of action, 
that belongs to the indefinitely perfect nature of God 
and to set up an ideal rule beyond all human reach, we- 
soon come to judge and condemn his work, and relations 
which it has pleased him in his infinite wisdom to create. 
A sense of justice belongs to human nature and is a 
part of it. Man can find a deep, permanent and instinct- 
ive delight in justice, not only in the outward effects, 
but in the inward cause, and by his nature love this law 
of right; this reasonable rule of conduct, this justice, 
with a deep and abiding love. Justice is the object of 
conscience, and fits it as light fits the eye and truth the 
mind. Justice keeps just relations between men. It 
holds the balance between nation and nation; between 
a man and his family, tribe, nation and race; so that 
his absolute rights and theirs do not interfere, nor their 
ultimate interests ever clash, nor the internal interests 

if the one prove antagonistic to those of all, or of any 

>ther one. This we must believe, if we believe that God 
just. We must do justice to all, and demand of all. 

;t is a universal human debt ; a universal human claim. 

iut we may err greatly in defining what that justice is. 

^he temporary interests, and what to human views are 
the rtghts of many, do often interfere and clash. The 
life interests of the individual, often conflict with the 

lermanent interests and welfare of society; and what 

Lay seem to be the natural rights of one class or race, 

ttk those of another. 
It is not true to say that one man, however little, must 

lot be sacrificed to another, however great; to a major- 
ity, or to all men. That is not only a fallacy, but a most 



356 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

dangerous one. Often one man, and many men, must be 
sacrificed, in the ordinary sense of the term, to the in- 
terest of the many. It is a comfortable fallacy to the 
selfish; for if they cannot, by the law of justice, be sac- 
rificed for the common good, then their country has no 
right to demand of them self-sacrifice; and he is a fool 
who lays down his life, or sacrifices his estate, or even 
his luxuries, to ensure the safety or prosperity of his 
country. According to that doctrine, Curtius was a 
fool, and Leonidas an idiot, and to die for one's country 
is no longer beautiful and glorious, but a mere absurd- 
ity. Then it is no longer to be asked that the common 
soldier shall receive, in his bosom, the sword or bayonet 
thrust, which otherwise would let out the life "of the 
great commander, on whose fate hang the liberties of 
his country, and the welfare of millions yet unborn. 

On the contrary, it is certain that necessity rules in 
all the afl^airs of men, and that the interest, and even 
the life of one man, must often be sacrificed to. the in- 
terest and welfare of his country. Some must ever lead 
the forlorn hope. The misrfbnary must go among sav- 
ages, bearing his life in his hand. The physician must 
expose himself to pestilence, for the sake of others. The 
sailor, in the frail boat upon the wide ocean, escaped 
from the foundering and burning ship, must step calm- 
ly into the hungry waters^ if the lives of the passengers 
can be saved, only by the sacrifice of his own: The 
pilot must stand firm at the wheel, and let the flames 
scorch away his own life, to ensure the common safety 
of those whom the doomed vessel bears. The mass of men 
are always looking for what is just. All the vast ma- 
chinery which makes up a State — a world of States — 
is, on the part of the people, an attempt to organize, 
not that ideal justice which finds fault with God's ordi- 



INITIATION. 35? 

iiiMices, but thflt practical justice, which may be attained 
in the actual organization of the world. The minute 
and wide-extending civil machinery, which makes up the 
law and the courts, "with all their officers and imple- 
ments, on the part of mankind, is chidfly an effort to re- 
duce to practice the theory of right. 

Constitutions are made to establish justice. The 
decisions of Courts are reported, to help us judge more 
wisely in time to com.e. The nation aims to get to- 
gether the most just men in the State, that they may in- 
corporate into statutes, their aggregate sense of what is 
right. 

The people wish law to be embodied in justice, ad- 
ministered without passion. Even in the wildest ages, 
there has been a wild, popular justice. But always mixed 
with passion and administered with hate; for justice 
takes a rude form with rude men, and becomes less 
mixed with hate and passion in more civilized com- 
munities. Every progressive state revises its statutes and 
revolutionizes its constitution from time to time, seek- 
ing to come closer to the utmost, possible, practical jus- 
tice and right, and sometimes, following theorists and 
dreamers, in their adoration of the ideal, by erecting 
into law positive principles of theoretical right, works 
practical injustice and then has to retrace its steps. 

Literary men, always look for practical justice, and 
desire that virtue should have its own reward, and vice 
its appropriate punishment. They are ever on the side 
of justice and humanity, and the majority of them have 
an ideal justice better than the things about them. 
Juster than the law, for the law is ever imperfect, 
not attaining even to the utmost practicable degree of 
perfection. And no man is as just as his own idea of 
possible and practicable justice. His passions and his 



35S GRAND INSPECTOH INQUISITOR COMMANMtJ. 

necessities ever cause him to sink below his own ide«il. 
The ideal Justice^ which men ever look up to and strive 
to rise toward, is true, but it will not be realized in this 
world. Yet we majst approach as near to it as practica- 
ble, as we should do toward that ideal democracy that 
now floats before the eyes of earnest and religious men-; 
fairer than the Eepublic of Plato or Moore's Utopia, or 
the golden age, or fabled memory ; only taking care that 
we do not, in striving to reach and ascend to the im- 
possible ideal^ neglect to seize upon and hold fast to the 
possible actual. To aim at the best, but be content with 
the best possible, is the only true wisdom. To insist on 
the absolute right, and throw out of the calculation the 
important and all-controlling element of necessity, is 
the folly of a mere dreamer. 

In a world inhabited by men with bodies, and 
necessarily with bodily wants and animal passions, the 
time will never come when there will be no want, no 
oppression, no servitude, no fear of man, but only love. 
That can never be, while there are inferior intellects, 
indulgence in low vice, improvidence, indolence, awful 
visitations of pestilence and war and famine, earth- 
quake and volcano, that must of necessity cause men to 
want, serve, suffer and fear. 

But still, the plowshare of justice is ever drawn 
through and through the field of the world, uprooting 
the savage plants. Ever we see a ^continual and progres- 
sive triumph of the right. The injustice of England, 
lost her America, the fairest jewel of her crown. 

The injustice of the French aristocracy and clergy, 
bore them to the ground more than the revolution of 
1789 did, and exiled them to foreign lands, there to pine 
away and die; their fate a warning to bid mankind be 
just 



INITIATION. 359 

We intuitively understand what justice is better than 
we can depict it. What it is in a given case depends so 
much on ciircumstances, that defin^itionis of it are 
wholly deceitful. Often it would be unjust to society 
to do what would, in the absence of that consideration, 
be pronounced just to the individual. General proposi- 
tions of man's right to do this or that are ever fallacious, 
and not unfrequently it would be most unjust to the 
individual himself, to do for him what the theorist, as a 
general proposition, would say was right and his due. 

We should ever do unto others what, under the same 
circumstances, we ought to wish, and have the right to 
wish, they should do unto us. 

There are many cases, cases constantly occurring, 
where one man must take care of himself, in preference 
to another, as where two struggle for the possession of 
a plank that will save one but cannot uphold both. Or 
where assailed he can save his own life, only by slaying 
his adversary. So one must prefer the safety of his 
country to the lives of her enemies, and sometimes to 
insure it to those of her own innocent citizens. 

The retreating general may cut away a bridge behind 
him to delay pursuit, and save the main body of the 
army, though he thereby surrenders a detachment, a 
battalion, or even a corps of his own force, to certain 
destruction. 

These are not departures from justice, though like 
other instances where the injury or death of the individ- 
ual is the safety of the many, where the interest of one 
individual class or race, is postponed to that of the pub- 
lic, or of the superior race. They may infringe some 
dreamers ideal rule of justice. 

But every departure from real, practical justice,'is no 
doubt attended with loss to the unjust man, though the 
loss is not reported to the public. Injustice, public or 



360 GRAND INSPECTOR IK-QUISITOR COMMANDER. 

private, like every other sin and wrong, is inevitably 
followed by its consequences. The selfish, the grasping, 
the inhuman, the fraudulently unjust; the ungenerous 
employer and the cruel master, are detested by the great 
popular heart, while the kind master, and liberal employ- 
er, the generous, the humane and the just, have the 
good opinion of all men, and even envy is a tribute to 
their virtues. Men honor all who stand up for truth 
and right, and never shrink. The world builds monu- 
ments to its patriots. Four great statesmen, organizers 
of the right, embalmed in stone, look down upon the law- 
givers of France, as they pass to their hall of legisla- 
tion ; silent orators to tell how nations love the just. How 
we revere the marble lineaments of those just judges, 
Jay and Marshall that look so calmly towards the living 
bench of the Supreme Court of the United States ! What 
a monument Washington has built in the heart of 
America and all the world, not because he dreamed of 
an impracticable, ideal justice, but by his constant efforts 
to be practically just. But necessity alone, and the 
greatest good of the greatest number, can legitimately 
interfere with the dominion of absolute and ideal justice. 

Government should not foster the strong at the ex- 
pense of the weak, or protect the capitalist and tax the 
laborer. The powerful should not seek a monopoly of 
development and enjoyment. Not prudence only and 
the expedient for to-day should be appealed to by states- 
men, but conscience and the right. Justice should not 
be forgotten in looking at interest, nor political morality 
neglected for political economy. We should not have 
national housekeeping instead of national organization 
for the basis of right. 

We may well differ as to the abstract right of many 
things; for every such question has many sides, and few 



INITIATION. 361 

men look at all of them ; many only at one. But we all 
readily recognize cruelty, unfairness, inhumanity, par- 
tiality, over-reaching, hard-dealing, by their ugly and 
familiar lineaments. 

We do not need to sit as a court of errors and appeals 
to revise and reverse God's providence, in order to know 
and to hate and despise them. There are certainly great 
evils of civilization at this day, and many questions of 
humanity long adjourned and put off. The hideous 
aspect of pauperism; the debasement and vice in our 
cities tell us, by their eloquent silence, or in inarticulate 
mutterings, that the rich and the powerful and the 
intellectual, do not their duty by the poor, the feeble 
and the ignorant. And every wretched woman that 
lives, heaven scarce knows how, by making shirts at 
^sixpence each, attests the injustice and inhumanity of 
man. 

There are cruelties to slaves, and worse cruelties to 
animals, each disgraceful to their perpetrators, and 
-equally unwarranted by the lawful relation of control 
and dependence which it has pleased God to create. 

In human affairs, the justice of God must work by 
human means. Men are the instruments of God's 
principles. Our morality is the instrument of his justice, 
which, incomprehensible to us, seems to our short vision, 
' often to work injustice, but will at some time still the 
oppressor's brutal laughter. All the justice we mature 
will ble^ us here and hereafter, and at our death we 
shall leave it, added to the common store of human kind- 
ness. And every Mason, who, content to do that which 
is possible and practicable, does and enforces justice, 
may help deepen the channel of human mortality in 
which God's justice runs. And so the wrecks of evil 
that now check and obstruct the stream^ may be the 



363 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

Booner swept out and borne away by the restless tidej 
of omnipotent right. Let ns my brother^ in this as in^ 
all else^ endeavor always to perform the duties of a good ^ 
Mason and a good man. '= 

Most Perfect -President — (Striking one.) Grand In-^ 
spectors Inquisitors Commanders^ members of this Su- ^ 
preme Tribunal, if any one has any remarks to offer, to j 
enforce the obligations of justice and equity, or for the 
good of Masonry, the Supreme Tribunal will be pleased 
to hear him. (If there is no answer.) 

Senior Councilor — Most Perfect President, silence 
prevails. 

Most Perfect President — Grand Inspectors Inquisitors 
Commanders, the box of fraternal assistance will now 
be presented to you. (Collection is taken.) 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother ' 
(Chancellor, read the minutes of this day^s proceedings. ■ 
[(Chancellor reads the minutes.) 

Most Perfect President — Grand Inspectors Inquisitors 
Commanders, if any one has any observation to make in 
regard to the minutes now read, he has permission to do 
so. 

Senior Councilor — Most Perfect President, silence 
prevails. 

Most Perfect President — The minutes of this day's 
labor, as recorded during our present sitting, are adopt- 
ed. (Chancellor puts record with other books and papers 
in the coffer.) 

Chancellor — ^Most Perfect President, I await your 
pleasure. (The Perfect President goes to the coffer^ 
and with the Chancellor locks it.) 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander. 

Most Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brother 
Senior Councilor, what is the hour for rest for true 
Masons ? 

Senior Councilor — Most Perfect President, the hour 
when all their duties are performed. 

Most Perfect President — Has that hour arrived my 
brother ? 

Senior Councilor — ^^As nearly as in this life it ever 
comes to mortals, since none perform all their duties, 
and our Masonic labors end only at the grave. 

Most Perfect President — Most true, my brother. Ee- 
mains there yet any complaint unheard, wrong unre- 
dressed or known offence unpunished, that requires 
action from this Tribunal? 

Senior Councilor — None, Most Perfect President. 

Most Perfect President — It is permitted then that this 
Supreme Tribunal shall be closed, that we may return 
to the Sacred Asylum of Sublime Princes of the Royal 
Secret. Join me my brethren in the conclu(Jing cere- 
mony. Order Grand Inspectors Inquisitors Command- 
ers! (All rise under the sign of the order.) 

Advocate — (Striking one.) From all errors and mis- 
takes in opinion and conclusion: 

Senior Councilor — (Striking three.) From all impa^ 
tience and inattention to evidence and argument; from 
all petulance and peevishness, all carelessness and in- 



364 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

difference; from all harsh and uncharitable constrnc- 
tions of act or motive : 

Senior Councilor — (Striking four.) From all partial- 
ity and prejudice^ from all obstinacy and pride of opin- 
ion, and all wilful adherence to error ; from all usurpa- 
tions of power and unwarrantable assumptions of juris- 
diction ; from all improper influences that prevent man's 
judgment : 

Most Perfect President — (Striking one.) From all 
false judgment and intentional injustice^, keep us free, 
our Father, who art to judge us at the end of our earthly 
pilgrimage. 

All — And as we judge others, so do thou in mercy 
judge us. Amen. 

Most Perfect President — (Making the first sign.) 
'^Justice.'' 

All — (Making the answering sign.) ^^Equity.^' 

All— 'So mote it be. 

All— (Lei by Most Perfect President, give the bat- 
tery.) 

iilost Perfect President — Most Enlightened Brethren, 
Grand Inspectors Inquisitors Commanders, let us now 
form the procession and proceed to the Sacred Asylum 
of Sublime Princes of the Eoyal Secret. (The Most 
Perfect President then leaves the throne and the pro- 
cession is formed as in opening, and the brethren pro- 
ceed to the Grand Consistory. If the newly admitted 
brother is at once to receive the 32^, he remxains in the 
hall with a brother until the consistory is prepared to 
receive him. Otherwise he is allowed to retire.) 



Statutes for the Government of all Tribunals 
OF THE Thirty-First Degree. 

Article I. 

1. Every Tribunal of the 31st degree^ when sitting 
in judgment, shall be composed of ten members, and no 
morO;, not including the Advocate and Defender, 

2. When trying a case, in which a Sovereign Prince 
of the Royal Secret is a party, all the members must 
have attained the 32nd degree, and in all other cases, at 
least five must have attained it viz : President, Council- 
ors, Secretary and Treasurer, and the others must have 
attained the 31st degree. 

Article II. 

1. Tribunals of the 31st degree have exclusive juris- 
diction to hear, try and determine all offences against 
Masonic law, or the statutes, constitutional provisions, 
rules and regulations of the Supreme Council of the 33rd 
degree, committed by brothers who have attained any 
degree above the 18th, and of appeals from all judg- 
ments of all Chapters of Eose Croix within their juris- 
diction. But as to offences committed by Knights of the 
Eose Croix, attached to regular Chapters, and for the 
punishment thereof, the statutes of such Chapters have 
made provision, their jurisdiction shall be concurrent; 
and in such cases, the body first having possession of 
the case shall proceed and the other desist. 

2. The Tribunals of the 31st degree, shall also have 
jurisdiction in all cases ordered by the Chapters to be 



366 GRAND mSPECTOR TOQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

transmitted to them for trial, and to decide all questions 
certified to them by the Chapters and by Councils of 
Princes of Jerusalem and Lodges of Perfection, their 
decision being in all cases final and conclusive. 

Article III. 

1. Any Mason knowing of the commission, by a bro- 
ther of rank above the 18th degree, of any offence against 
Masonic law, may make known the fact to any Grand 
Inspector Inquisitor Commander, by communication in 
writing, stating the offence, its nature and circumstances 
and the time of its commission, which shall be delivered 
by such Commander to the Illustrious Ad\^ocate, who 
shall prepare and prefer the act of accusation. 

2. Each Commander shall also in like manner make 
known to the Illustrious Advocate every violation of 
Masonic law within his knowledge, and the Advocate 
shall prepare and prefer acts of accusation in all such 
cases, and in every case where the facts come otherwise 
to his knowledge. 

3. Upon the act of accusation being preferred, the 
Chancellor shall issue a citation under the seal of the 
Tribunal, which shall be served by copy in writing by 
the Pursuivant, or by any other Mason at a distance, to 
whom the Chancellor may direct and transmit it, by 
which the accused shall be cited to appear before the 
Tribunal, at a certain time and place, and answer the 
charge. The nature of such charge shall not be specified, 
but a copy of the act of accusation shall be delivered to 
the accused in person, whenever he applies for it. 

4. If it is known that the accused is not to be found 
or when the citation is returned that he is not found, a 
copy thereof shall be put up in the place where he last 
resided, in the lodge room of the Council, or other Ma- 
sonic body of which he was last a member, or in any 



INITIATION. 367 

lodge room, if he was a member of none, or if there be 
no such room, then in any public place, and ike facts 
returned upon the citation. 

5. The day fixed for appearance shall be at least ten 
days after the actual or constructive service. 

6. Upon the day fixed, if the accused appear, he shall 
make full answer to the charge, stating, if he pleases, 
any extenuating circumstances, and detailing the facts 
as particularly as he pleases. 

The Defender is charged with the duty of preparing 
his defence. 

7. And if he does not appear, or when he has an- 
swered, a day shall be fixed for trial, and wriiften 
evidence may in the meantime be taken on both sides. 

8. The testimony of persons not Masons must be 
given on oath, and that of Masons upon their highest 
Masonic obligations, and either may be taken in writing 
or orally. 



I 



Article IV. 

1. ' At the time fixed for trial, unless the Tribunal 
grants further delay, '^as it may do at its discretion, the 
testimony taken in WTiting shall be read, and the wit- 
nesses heard, the accused having the right to be present, 
fully to examine and cross-examine the witnesses, and 
to be heard by himself or the defender, or both. He 
or his defender shall also have the right to conclude the 
argument. 

~ 2. After the case is heard, argued and submitted, 
-the accused and witnesses shall withdraw, and the 
Tribunal shall deliberate. 

3. After deliberation the members shall vote upon 
the different specifications in the act of accusation, each 
member voting in turn, beginning with the youngest 
member, and the officers following according to rank, 
from lowest to highest. The Advocate and Defender 
shall vote. 



368 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

4. Two-thirds of those present shall concur^ to find 
the accused gnilty of any specification. 

5. The punishment shall be fixed by a like vote, a 
majority determining its nature and extent. 

6. The accused shall then be called in, and informed 
of the result. If he be found guilty, the sentence shall 
be communicated . by the Chancellor, to all Masonic 
bodies of which he is a member, and the punishment 
shall be imposed according to the sentence, and the 
laws, statutes and regulations governing the case. 

7. If the trial proceeds in the absence of the accused, 
the Defender shall represent him, and perform all the 
duties of Council for him to the best of his ability. 

Article V. 

1. Appeals from judgment of Chapters of Eose 
Croix, shall be sent up in writing, with all the papers, 
a simple notice of appeal being alone necessary to ^give 
the Tribunal jurisdiction. 

2. Every appeal shall be suspensive. 

3. If the appeal be on the facts, the Tribunal shall 
try it de novo. If it involve only a question of law, 
they shall decide it, and affirm, reverse, demand or grant 
a new trial, or altogether quash and annul, as may be 
proper and in accordance with Masonic law. 

4. In case the Tribunal tries the case de novo, the 
proceedings at the trial shall be the same as in cases of 
original jurisdiction. 

5. Any Subordinate body may submit a question or 
questions to the Tribunal for its decision, upon order to 
that effect, and the Tribunal shall take jurisdiction, up- 
on a certificate of the Recorder or Secretary of such 
inferior body, stating the question and its reference, 
shall decide, and transmit a certificate of its decision, 
and upon the decision of such questions, that of the ma- 



miTiATioiT. 369 

jority shall stand as the decision of the whole, and no 
dissent be made known; but any Commander who dis- 
sents may present his opinion in writing, with the rea- 
sons for it, and have it filed fpr reference. 

6. A record of all such decisions, and of the decision^ 
on points of Masonic law, shall be kept by the Chancel- 
lor in a book for that purpose, under appropriate head- 
ings. 

Article VI. 

1. No trial whatever for offences shall be had in any 
<])onsistory of Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret. 

3. The Tribunals of the 31st degree shall also have 
a jurisdiction to issue mandates, to require Subordinate 
bodies to proceed to judgment or otherwise, to do what- 
ever acts they ought to do in order to give to a3rother 
his Masonic rights, as also mandates requiring them to 
desist from proceeding in proper cases, and mandates to 
bring up their proceedings, when alleged to be against 
law, to be examined and affirmed, or quashed, as law 
and right may require. 

I 3. They shall also have jurisdiction to issue m'an- 
f dates, to bring before them questions^ of right to office 
in Subordinate lodges and bodies, and to hear and deter- 
mine the same. 

4. And mandates to suspend, or supersede any judg- 
' ment or action of such inferior body. 

5. The said Tribunal shall usurp and assume to 
themselves no powers not granted by these statutes, or 
not following as necessary incidents or corollaries from 
the powers hereby granted. 

6. They may act as Tribunals of conciliation or de- 
■' cision, in all matters of difference; dispute or dissension 



370 GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR COMMANDER. 

between Masons of the same or different degrees^ when 
such matters are either referred to them by subordinate 
bodies, or by the parties themselves, or one of them, or 
by other Masons, and shall examine into and weigh the 
facts, merits, and give and enforce snch judgment and 
decision as shall in their view be just, right and equita- 
ble in the premises. 

Article VII. 

1. All mandates and process of the Tribanal shall 
be signed by the Chancellor and sealed with the seal of 
the Tribunal. 

3. A record shall be faithfully kept of all the pro- 
ceedings and judgments of the Tribunal, and all deposi- 
tions and other papers shall be filed and carefully pre- 
served. 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Thirty-First Degree; or, Grand Inspector 
Inquisitor Commander. 

Filled With Vain Repetitions — Republican Appointment of a Masonic 
Rebel — Claims to Rule Judicially the Masonic Order — The Ways of 
the Lodge Are Movable. 

This degree covers sixty pages, so dull, prolix, and 
humdrum, that they remind .one of the ^"^vain repeti- 
tions'' of the heathen, which Christ forbade. Nineteen 
pages are filled by the ^^Illustrious Advocate,'' with a 
tedious compound dessertation on the metaphysics of 
^^justice," '^ideal,'^ and ^^actual," leading nowhere, and 
teaching nothing. Indeed, knowing that Masons who 
run lodges are neither fools, nor blockheads, but sly, keen 
men; one would be at a loss for the motive which has 
produced such solemn humbuggery, but for the fact that 
ipickpockets practice similar arts to amuse the crowd, 
while feeling for their purses; and Mormons and other 
celigious impostors teach wonderful things, to awe the 
'gnorant, and keep them still, while devils mesmerize 
them. 

In this thirty-first degree, for which the writers give 
neither date nor origin, nine men erect themselves into 
a ^'^Sovereign Tribunal," or Supreme Court, to rule 
Masons! Their "Advocate'^ (page 343) speaks of it as 
"created,'^ but says not when, where, or by whom. 
Who could "^^create" them into a tribunal, when there 
was no higher power to create them; and in Masonry, 
no appeals to the people are ever made. Mackey and 
Macoy simply remark : ^'It is not a historical degree." 

Unless the nine got together^ and initiated themselves 



3^2 REPtJBLICAl^ APPOINTMEINI' Of A MASOKIO REBEL. 

into this degree, they must have been appointed by the 
Jew Inspector Morin, who was appointed by the ^Toiin- 
cil of Emperors/' at Paris, in 1761, to inspect lodges in 
the New World, confer their degrees^ and report tc 
them. Morin set up for himself, and his employers 
denounced him as an ^^audacious juggler/' recalled his 
patent, and appointed a weak Brother Martin in his 
place. Little cared Morin for that. He appointed six- 
teen other Inspectors, thirteen of whom were Jews. 
These created a degree of Inspectors, which is this 31st 
degree ! And when Morin had made money enough by 
the sale of Masonic degrees and dignities, he disap 
peared from history, and Masonic writers say they know 
not where he lived, or when he died ! But his work 
lived' after him. His ^"^Inspectors,"' in 1801, became 
the present Supreme Council, Sou.thern Jurisdiction, 
Charleston, S. C. ; added eight degrees to the twenty- 
five committed by "^'the Emperors'' to Morin; altered, 
stretched, and modified the twenty-five, and made ''The 
Ancient, Accepted Scottish Rite'' of thirty-three de- 
grees, which now rules the Masonic world; of which 
Albert Pike, of Washington is now (1887) Sovereign 
Grand Inspector General, with a salary of $1,000 a 
month, ''ad vitamf (for life) with access to Masons 
of both parties in Congress, who gave his son a clerk- 
ship under Hayes' (Eepublican) administration; with 
a salary of $2,000 a year. Gen. Pike was a rebel se- 
cessionist. 

If these facts, taken wholly from the highest Masonic 
authorities, are true, the ^^ Ancient, Accepted Scottish 
Eite" is as liable to indictment for swindling, getting 
money under false pretenses, and gambling practices, as 
mock auctions, lotteries, Faro Banks, and Three Monte 
men. And if the Masonic charters granted by Congress 






CLAIMS TO RULE JUDICIALLY THE MASONIC ORDER. 373 

and the State Legislatures, can be withdrawn, the laws 
will treat the lodges as they are now handling the in- 
stitutions of M'ormonism. The two institutions are 
morally and legally the same. 

The jewel of this thirty-first degree is a ^^Teutonie 
cross ;^^ the jewel of an order, or degree, which both 
Mackey and Macoy say was unfit to be put into the 
Ancient and Accepted Saottish Rite; and that it was 
only admitted to fill up a gap. And the members who 
are judges, wear no aprons, which are badges of labor. 
They are above it. (Note 361.) 

But these are trifles. Here in this thirty-first degree 
w^e have a ''Sovereign Trihunalf' or Supreme Court; 
meeting in magnificent court-rooms, with court officers, 
/^Advocate," and ^'Defender;'' claiming to rule, judi- 
cially, the Masonic order ; and aspiring to rule all secret 
orders ; which draw more, far more monev from the 
people of the United States, than the Civil Govern- 
ment. It administers its own oaths;- issuing its own 
decrees; and swearing its subjects to obey them, on pain 
of death; and that in the preceding degree, {Knight of 
\Kadosh) which claims to be softened and modified 
from the seven old Kadoshes which breathed, says the 
ritual : ^'Nothing but vengeance ;'^ and our own Court, 
and Legislative records show, not only "breathed 
vengeance,'^ but executed it. And so powerful have 
these secret lodges become, at times, and so dire their 
secret "vengeance,'' that every nation in Europe has, at 
times, suppressed them in self-defense. And now, 
England and Sweden, and Denmark live by sufferance 
of the lodges; adopting the compliance which the devil 
demanded of Christ, viz,, practicing their secret wor- 
ships ! 

This is sufficiently horrible. But if this were all, the 



374 THE WAYS OF THE LODGE ARE MOVABLE. 

National Christian Association never would have ex- 
isted. This very degree^ as indeed do all the others^ 
pretends to honor Christ, by quoting His words, an(^ 
lauding Him as a human law-giver, (see page S32) an(S 
yet fills its pages with the teachings of Brahma, OsirisB^^ 
Apollo, and Bel, (see Page 346, and the degrees gen| I 
erally). as equally authoritative with Christ's. It laudsi. 
Moses, on the same page with Christ, (332) and, in 
a degree or two back, assails Moses' teachings withi 
a savage bitterness equal to that of the coarsest infider 
the United States ever produced. The Bible says of^ 
the harlot: ^^Her ways are movable, that thou canst 
not know them.'' (Prov, 5, 6,) And false religion is 
the ^^Great whore that sitteth on many waters." And 
Masonry, or the secret lodge system, is the ^^image'^ of 
that beast. And the ways of the lodge are ^^movable," 
like those of the ^^mother of harlots !" This is what callr 
on every child of God, on every patriot, every philan- 
thropist, who does not wish to see the religion of Egypt 
transferred from the Nile to the Mississippi, to rise, 
and call on God for deliverance from this ''Ancient and 
Accepted Rite/' wjiich, in this thirty-first degree; and in] 
all its degrees, puts the mysteries of Osiris on a levelj 
with the revelations of Jesus Christ ! ! ; 



CHAPTER LIX 



|Thirty-Second Degree, or Sublime Prince of the 

EoYAL Secret/'" 



I 



DECORATIONS : — Bodies of this degree are styled Con- 
sistories. The lodge is held in a high place, the second 
story of a building at least. The hangings are black, 
strewed with tears of silver, skeletons, etc., death's heads 
and cross bones. 

In the East is a throne, to which you ascend by seven 

Note 370. — "Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret. The 32nd degree of 
the Ancient and Accepted rite, and for many years, or until the institu- 
tion of the 33d degree, this was the highest degree, or ne plus ultra of 
Masonry. The body is styled a Consistory, and should be held in a 
building of two stories. The officers are, a Thrice Illustrious Commander, 
First and Second Lieutenants, a Minister of State, a Grand Chancellor, a 
Grand Treasurer, a Grand Secretary, and a Grand Captain of the Guard. 
In the East a throne, elevated on seven steps, which is the seat of the 
Thrice Illustrious Commander, who wears a robe of royal purple, and 
he and the Lieutenants, wear swords. The collar of this degree is black, 
lined with scarlet, and in the center, at the point, a double-headed eagle, 
of silver or gold, on a red Teutonic cross. The apron is of white satin, 
with a border of gold lace, one inch wide, lined with scarlet; on the 
flap is a double-headed eagle, on each side of which is the flag of the 
country in which the body is located, the flag of Prussia and the Beause- 
-ant of the Kadosh degree; on the apron is the camp of the Crusaders, 
, which is thus explained; it is composed of an enneagon, within which is 
' inscribed a heptagon, within that a pentagon, and in the center an 
equilateral triangle, within which is a circle. Between the heptagon and 
pentagon are placed five standards, in the designs of whigjl are five let- 
ters, which form a particular word. The first standard is purple, on 
which is emblazoned the ark of the covenant, with a palm, tree on each 
side; the ark has the motto Laus Deo. The second is blue, on which is a 
lion, of gold, couchant, holding in his mouth a golden key, with a collar 
of the same metal on his neck, and on it is the device, Ad majorem Dei 
gloriam. The third is white, and displays a heart in flames, with two 
wings; it is surmounted by a crown of laurels. The fourth is green, and 
bears a double-headed black eagle, crowned, holding a sword in his right 
claw, and a bleeding heart in his left. The fifth bears a black ox. on a 
field of gold. On the sides of the enneagon are nine tents, with flags, 
representing the divisions of the Masonic army; on the angles are nine 
pinions, of the same color as the flag of the tent that precedes it. The 
hall of the Consistory is hung with black, strewed with tears of silver. 
The jewel is a double-headed white and black eagle, resting on a Teu- 
tonic cross, of gold, worn attached to the collar or ribbon. ^The mem- 
bers are called Sublime Princes of the Royal Secret. The moral of the 
degree teaches opposition to bigotry, snperstitition, and all the passions 
and vices which disgrace human nature." — Macoy's Encyclopaedia and 
Pictionary of Freemasonry, Article Sublime Prince of the Royal Secreti 



376 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

steps. It is a chair of state, lined with black satin like 
the hangings, but strewed with flames, not tears. 

Before ti-^e throne is an altar covered with black satin, 
strewed with tears. In front of the altar, the black cov- 
er falls to the floor and on it are painted or embroidered 
a death's head and two cross bones. Over the death's 
head is the letter J.\ and under the cross bones the let- 
ter M.\ 

On this altar are the books of constitution and stat- 
utes of the order, a naked sword, a sceptre and a balance. 
In the West are the two Wardens. In front of each is 
a table covered with crimson cloth, lined and edged 
with black and strewed with tears. The cover of each 
table hangs to the floor in front, and on each cover, in 

front, the four letters N. -.K. \ M. -.K. •., each two if 

in Hebrew, being read from right to left. On each ta- 
ble are two naked swords, crossed. ■ The hall is divided 
into two parts, by a railing or balustrade. The East ^s 
in the rear of this, and the West in front of it. In the 
West is a representation of the camp of the Princes. 

OFFICERS AND TITLES: — The Master is styled Sov- 
ereign of Sovereigns, Great Prince, or which is more 
usual and far better. Illustrious Commander in Chief. 
He is said to represent Frederick the Second, King of 
Prussia. The two Wardens are styled Lieutenant Com- 
manders. The Orator, Minister of State. 

Besides these officers, there are a Grand Chancellor, a 
Grand Secretary, a Grand Keeper of the Seals, and Ar- 
chives, a Grand Treasure];, a Grand Architect, or En- 
gineer, a Grand Hospitaller, and Surgeon, a Grand 
Standard Bearer, a Grand Master of Ceremonies, a 
Grand Captain of the Guards, and a Grand Tyler. In 
some localities, there are also an Illustrious Deputy 
Commander in Chief and an Assistant Grand Tyler. 
The Grand Secretary, Grand Chancellor and Grand 
Keeper of the Seals and Archives, are sometimes sepa- 
rate officers, and sometimes the three offices are combined 
in one^ that of Grand Chancellor. 



377 



In the Consistory tHe Officers are seated as follows 

EAST. 



Chancellor. 



^\\, Conunwijjeir^ 



A*^ 



>' 



Treaaurer. /^ 



^ 



Grand Chaneellor. 
Grand Secretary: 
Grand Hospltallei^ 



Orator 



8i X 



'VX Secretary. 
V 



Grand Treasurer. 
Grand Keeper of Seals. 
Grand Architect. 



> 




OrftUd Master of Ceremonl« 



First UeqteiuuiLt Commander. 



Second I4eatenant Commander. 



Grand Standard Bearer. 



A OQ 

A^ 

22 

3oS 



^55 



Sis 




to o 



1^ 



Grand Captain of Guards. 



3?8 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE HOYAL SECRET. 

And on the outside of the door is the Grand Tyler, or 
in his absence, the Assistant Grand Tyler, thus the 
number of officers in that body would be sixteen, but 
the Secretary and Keeper of the Seals and Archives be- 
ing generally replaced by the Grand Chancellor and the 
Assistant Grand Tyler, being appointed only to supply 
the Grand Tyler when absent, are not counted among 
the officers, whose number is not to exceed thirteen, as 
will be seen hereafter. 

There are also in the hall, west of the officers, on the 
right and left, fourteen members clothed in red, with- 
out aprons, and each having on his breast, suspended 
from a black ribbon, worn as a collar, the jewel of one 
of the degrees, to wit, numbering these members from 
one to fourteen, they wear respectively the jewels of 
the 30th, 28th, 25th, ^21st, 19th, 18th, 16th, 14th, 13th, 
10th, 8th, 7th, 5th and 3rd degrees. 

The first five are the Standard Bearers of the corps, 
that encamp around the Pentagon ; and the last nine are 
the Commanders of the corps, that encamp around the 
ISTonagon, in the. camp hereafter described: 
The names of the first five are as follows : 
1st: Bezaleel, for the standard, "T. 

2nd. Aholiab,'^' for the standard, ^'E 

3rd. Mah'^' Shim^ for the standard, "N.'' 

4th. Garimont, for the standard, ''G.'' 

5th. Amariah, for the standard, ^^U.'' 

The names of the others are: _, 

Note 371. "Aholiab. A skilful artificer of the tribe of I>an who was 
aDDointed together with Bezaleel, to construct the tabernacle in the 
wifdernlss an^d the ark of the covenant. "-Mackey's Encyclopedia of 
Freemasonry, Article Aboliab. 

Note 372.— "It is a component part of a significant word in Masonry. 
The combinktion mahhah, literally 'what! the,' is ^q]^Y,^,\Tt:/t'h7s iSI 
to the Hebrew method of ellipsis to the question. What! is this the 
1 y "— Mackey's Encyclopgedia of Freemasonry, Article Mah. 



ccrry ^? 






SUBLIME PRINCE 01^ THE EOYAL SECRET. 379 



1st. Malachi/^' for the tent, ^^S." 

^2nd. Zerubbabel;, for the tent, ^'A 

3rd. Nehcmiah, for the tent, ^^L 

4th. Johaben, for the tent, ^^I 

5th. Phaleg, for the tent, ^ ^^X.^^ 

6th. Jehoiada, for the tent, ^ ^^N 

7th. Aholiab, for the tent, ^^0.^' 

8th. Joshua, for the tent, ^^N. 

9th. ^Ezra,"* for the tent, ''V 

These fourteen names must certainly appear arbitrary 
and without meaning. The rituals and other Masonic 
works say nothing of the meaning and reason why these 
names were selected. All that is to be done is to study 
and perhaps that reason will be found. 

But we have no right to leave out these or other names 
or words, because tl^ese, as a slender thread, may lead 
us to the discovery of what we are now ignorant of. 
Otherwise the names and words, being left out, the real 
oieaning would never be discovered. However, for a 
;*^ception, in ample form, there should be present twen- 
ty-seven officers and members, including the fourteen 
Standard Bearers and Commanders above mentioned. 
IHE CAMP : — Is a nonagon enclosing a heptagon, that 

Note 373. — "Malachi or Malachias. The last of the prophets. A sig- 
nificant word in the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite." — Mackey's 
EncSrclopsedia of Freemasonry. Article Malachi or Malachias. 

Note 374. — "Ezra. There are two persons named Ezra who are 
'ecorded in Scripture. 1. Ezra, a leading priest among the first colonists 
vho came up to Jerusalem with Zerubbabel, and who is mentioned by 
'"Jehemiah; and 2, Ezra, the celebrated Jewish scribe and restorer of the 
aw, who visited Jerusalem forty-two years after the second Temple 
lad been completed. Calmet, however, says that this second Ezra had 
'isited Jerusalem previously in company with Zerubbabel." — Mackey's 
Sncyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Ezra, 



380 



gtJBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 




enclosing a pentagon^ 
that an equilateral 
triangle^ and that a 
circle. On the side of 
the nonagon are nine 
^ tents with a flag^ pen- 
non^ and letter to each^ 
*" Each tent represents 
an entire camp^ and 
the several sides of 
the nonagon are thus 
assigned by our pres- 
ent rituals^ to the Ma- 
sons of the several degrees, from the first to the eight- 
eenth as follows : 

8. Flag and pennon white, sprinkled lightly with 
crimson. That tent indicates the camp of the Knights 
Eose Croix, Knights of the East and West, and Princes 
of Jerusalem, 18th, 17th and 16th degrees. The Com- 
mander Malachi. 

A. Flag and pennon light green. That tent indi- 
cates the camp of the Knights^f the East or Sword, 
15th degree. The Commander Zerubbabel. 

L. Flag and pennon red. That tent indicates the 
camp of the Grand Elect Perfect and Sublime Masons, 
14th degree. Commander Nehemiah. 

I. Flag and pennon black and red. That tent indi- 
cates the camp of the Knights of the Eoyal Arch and 
Grand Master Architects, 13th and 12th degrees. Cofn- 
mander Joabert or Johaben. 

X. Flag and pennon black. That tent indicates the 
camp of the Sublime Knights Elected, Illustrious Elect 
of Fifteen and Elected Knights of Nine,. 11th, lOth and 
9th degrees. Commander Phaleg. 



SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 381 

N. Flag and pennon red and black in lozenges. That 
tent indicates the camp of the Intendants of the Build- 
ings 8th degree. Commander Jehoiada. 

0.* Flag and^-pennon^ red and green. That tent in- 
dicates the camp of the Provost and Judges, and Inti- 
mate Secretaries 7th and 6th degrees. Commander 
Aholiab. 

N. Flag and pennon green. That tent indicates the 
camp of the Perfect Masters and Secret Masters, 5th 
and 4th degrees. Commander Joshua. 

/. Flag and pennon blue. That tent indicates the 
camp of the Masters, the Fellow Crafts and Apprentices 
of Symbolic Masonry and Volunteers, 3rd, 3nd and 1st 
degrees. Commander Ezra. 

On each of the external angles of the pentagon, is a 
great staiidard, each designated by a letter, and each 
supposed to indicate the camp of a corps of Masons, 
occupying a side of the pentagon. The standards are 
described as follows, in the language of Heraldry, and 
indicate the following degrees : 

T. Purple. On it is the Ark'"" of the Covenant, in 
gold, between two palm trees, vert, and two lighted 
torches or candlesticks, gold motto at the base, ''Laus 
Deo/' Around this standard are stationed the Knights 
Kadosh, and the Grand Scottish Knights of St. Andrew, 
30th and 29th degrees. Standard Bearer is Bezaleel. 
^ E. Azure. On it is a lion couchant in gold, holding 
in his mouth a key in gold, and a gold collar around his 
neck, with the figures 525 on the collar. Motto at the 

Note 375. — "The Ark of the Covenant or of the Testimony was a chest 
originally constructed by Moses at God's command. (Exod. xxv, 16,) in 
which were kept the two tables of stone, on which were engraved the 
ten commandments. It contains, likewise, a golden pot filled with 
manna, Aaron's rod, and the tables of the covenant. It was at first 
deposited in the most sacred place of the tabernacle, and afterwards 
placed by Solomon in the Sanctum Srinrtori ni < f the Temple, and wls 
lost upon the destructi( u of that building by the Chaldeans. The later 
history of this ark is, buried in obscurity," — Mackey's Encyclopedia of 
Treemasonry Article Ark of the Covenant. 



382 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

base, Custos Arcani, and in some rituals, Ad Major em 
Dei Gloriam. The latter is the motto of the Jesuits. 
Around this standard are stationed the Knights of the 
Sun, the Commanders of the Temple and the Princes of 
Mercy, 28th, 27th and 26th degrees. Standard Bearer 
is Aholiab. 

N. Argent/ ^^ On it is a flaming heart, gules, wings 
sable, crowned with laurel, vert. Motto at the base 
Ardens Gloria Surgit. Around this standard are sta- 
tioned the Knights of the Brazen Serpent, the Princes 
of the Tabernacle and the Chiefs of the Tabernacle, 
25, 24th and 23rd degrees. Standard Bearer is Mah- 
Shim. 

G. Vert.* On it is an eagle, with two heads displayed, 
sable armed, gold; ensigned with an imperial crown of 
gold, resting on both heads; holding in his dexter claw 
a sword, point in base; in his sinister claw a bloody 
heart. Motto at the base, Corde, Gladio Potens. Around 
this standard are stationed the Princes of .Libanus and 
the Knights Noachite or Prussian Knights, 22nd and 
21st degrees. Standard Bearer Garimont^ 

U. Or.f On it is an ox statant, sable. Motto at 
base. Omnia Tempus Alit. Around this standard are 
stationed the Masters ad vitam and the Grand Pontiffs, 
20th and 19th degrees. Standard Bearer Amariah. 

At the angles of, and inside the triangle are supposed 
to be encamped the Princes of the Eoyal Secret and the 
Grand Inspectors Inquisitors Commanders, with such 
Knights of Malta as, having proved themselves true and 
faithful, may have been received among us.^ At each 
corner of the triangle is one of the following birds: 
A raven, a dove and a phoenix. 

CLOTHING, JEWEL, ETC : — The Jllustrious Commander 

Note 376.— "Argent. French for silver. An heraldic term used in 
describing coats of arms, thus: The arm of the Company of Freema- 
sons in the reign of King Henry IV. 'Aznre, on a chevron, between 
three castles, Argent."— Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Dictionary of Tree- 
masonry, Article Argent. 

*In Heraldry a green color. ^ 

*0r, in Heraldry, means gold or gold color. 



i 



SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 383 

in Chief is clothed in the modern costume of Eoyalty, of 
crimson stuff. He is armed with a sword and shield. 
On the table, in front of him, lie his sceptre and a bal- 
ance. The Lieutenant Commanders are also armed with 
sword and shield, and wear their hats. The other of- 
ficers, and at least six members, should be clothed in 
crimson, and remain in the eastern portion of the Con- 
sistory. Neither the officers nor members, when in cos- 
tume, wear any apron, but only the collar, to which is 
suspended the je\Vel of the order. The collar is black, 
edged with silver ; on the point is embroidered in red a 
teutonic cross, and in the centre of the cross an eagle, 
with two heads of silver. The collar is lined with 
scarlet silk, and on the lining is embroidered a teutonic 
cross, in black. The girdle is black, with silver fringe, 
and on the front of it is embroidered a red cross. The 
jewel is a teutonic cross of gold. The apron is white, 
lined and edged with red. On the flap is embroidered 
a red cross, relieved with silver around the edges. In 
the middle of the apron is embroidered the plan of the 
camp of the Princes. 

Accordi'ig to tfce constitutions of llSQr, Art. XI, the 32nd degreo is not 
to be conferred, unless three Senior Grand Inspectors General are present. 

The diploma of a Sublime Prince of the Eoyal Secret 
is styled Patent; and the charter of the Consistory, The 
Constitutions. 

STATED MEETINGS : — The stated meetings of a Consis- 
tory shall be held on the 21st of March, 25th June, 21st 
September and 27th December in each year. 

OFFICERS OF A CONSISTORY. 

1. Illustrious Commander in Chief. 

2. Illustrious Deputy Commander in Chief. 

3. First and Second lieutenant Commanders. . 

4. Grand Minister of State. 

5. Grand Chancellor. 

6. Grand Treasurer. 



384 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

7. Grand Secretary. 

8. Grand Keeper of Seals and Archives. 

9. Grand Hospitaller and Surgeon. 

10. Grand Architeect and Engineer. 

11. Grand Master of Ceremonies. 
13. Grand Standard Bearer. 

13. Grand Captain of the Guards. 

14. Grand Tyler. 

15. Assistant Grand Tyler. 

When the Illustrious Commander in Chief addresses 
a subordinate officer^ or a member^ and when such offcer 
or member addresses the Illustrious Commander in 
Chief, the officer or member will rise and salute with his 
sword; bring it to the carry, then to the present and 
then, dropping the point to the ground, to the right and 
a little in front of himself, the arm fully extended down- 
wards; in which position he remains until the colloquy 
is concluded, and then comes again to the present and 
then to the carry. 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

Sublime Pri:n"ce of the Eoyal Secret.'" 

Illustrious Commander in Chief — (Strikes one with 
pommel of his sword.) 

First Lieutenant Commander — (Strikes one with 
pommel of his sword.) 

Second Lieutenant Commander — (Strikes one with 

Note 377. — "This is the thirty-second degree of the Ancient and Ac- 
cepted Rite. There is abundant internal evidence, derived from the ritual 
and from some historical facts, that the degree of Sublime Prince of the 
Royal Secret was instituted by the founders of the Council of Emperors 
of the East and West, which body was established in the year 175S. It 
Is certain that b^foro that period we hoar nothing of such a degree in 
any of the Rites. The Rita of Hertdom or of Perfection, which was that 
instituted by the Council of Emperors, consisted of twenty-five degrees. 
Of these the twenty -fifth, and highest, was the Prince of the Royal Se- 
cret. It was brought to America by Morin, as the summit of the High 
Masonry which h«' introduced, and f.-r the prop;igat'on of which he had 
.'oceived his P; tent. In the subsequent exton>H>n of the Scottish Rite 
aboir the begiiininj, of the present century, oy il^e addition of eight new 
Uogrees to the original twenty-five, the Subliine Prince of the Ro>al Se- 
Ci'et be?ame the thirty-second, 

Hodirs .if thi thirty-second degree are caller* C«.ns'«*ori"S, and where 
there is a sup.^rintending body erected by the Supreme Council for the 
government of the inferior degrees in a State or Province, it is called a 
Grand Consistory. 

The clothing of a Sublime Prince consists of a collar, jewel, and apron. 

The collar is black edged with white. 

The jewel is a Teutonic cross of gold. 

The aprdii is white edged with black. On the flap are embroidered six 
flags, three on each side the staffs in saltier, and the flags blue, red, and 
yellow. On the centre of the flap, over these, is a Teutonic cross sur- 
mounted by an All-seeing eye, and on the cross a double-headed eagle not 
crowned. On the body of the apron is the tracing-board of the degree. 
The most important part of the symbolism of the degree is the tracing- 
board, which is technically called 'The Camp.' This is a symbol of deep 
import, and in its true interpretation is found that 'royal secret' from 
which the degree derives its name. This Camp constitutes an essential 
part of the furniture of a Consistory during an initiation, but its expla- 
nations are altogether esoteric. It is a singular fact, that notwithstand- 
ing the changes which the degree must have undergone in being trans- 
fer^red from the twenty-fifth of one Rite to the thirty-second of another, 
no alteration was ever made in the Camp, which retains at the present 
day the bame form and signification that were originally given to it. 

The motto of the degree is 'Spes mea in Deo est,' i. e., My hope is in 
God." — Mackey's Encyclopaedist of Freem^sonry* Article SuTjliWie PrinCQ 
of the Royal Secret. 



1 

386 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE RQYAL SECRET. 

pommel of his sword.) 

Illiistrious Commander in Chief — Valiant Captain of 
the Guards^ see that the Sentinels are stationed, and ad« 
vise them that we are about to open this Grand Consis- ;' 
tory, that they may allow no one to approach, who hath '^ 
not the words and signs of a Prince of the Royal Secret. 
(The Captain of Guards goes out, executes the orders of]: 
the Illustrious Commander in Chief, returns and salutes 
on entering.) 

Captain of Guards — Illustrious Commander in Chief, ' 
the Sentinels are stationed and duly instructed; we are 
secure against intrusion. I 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Princes, First and 
Second Lieutenant Commanders, it is not enough for us ^ 
to be protected, we must also be certain that none but| 
friends are gathered under our colors. Visit the several I 
camps, inspect the several corps of the army, and satisfy! 
yourselves that no spy or enemy has intruded himself | 
among us. Order Sublime Princes ! (AH rise under the J^ 
sign of order. The two Lieutenant Commanders leave 
their stations and proceed from West to East, one on the 
right the other on the left, to receive the pass-word from 
each member present, including the Illustrious Com- 
mander in Chief, after which they return to their sta- 
tions.) 

Second Lieutenant Coijimander — Sublime Prince, 
First Lieutenant Commander, there is no spy or enemy 
in my camp. 

First Lieutenant Commander — Illustrious Command- 
er in Chief, there is no spy or enemy among us. We 
have met none but friends and brethren, ready to act as 
Ropn as the signal is given. 

Commander in Chief — Be seated my brethren. (All 
resume their seats.) 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince, Valiant Fir^t 
Lieutenant Commander^ at what hour are we to act? 



OPENING CEREMONIES. 387 

First Lieutenant Commander — At the fifth hour after 
sunset, Illustrious Commander in Chief. 

Commander in Chief — And for what reason, Sublime 
Prince, can we not act before ? 

First Lieutenant Commander — Illustrious Command- 
er in Chief, because if our actions were premature, our 
enemies might learn and defeat the plans we have 
formed for the regeneration of humanity. (At this mo- 
ment, a brother in the ante-room strikes five blows on a 
drum ; one by itself, and four at equal distances, and in 
quick succession, imitating the report of a cannon.) 

Illustrious Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince, 
Second Lieutenant Commander, what^s the hour? 

Second Lieutenant Commander — Illustrious Com- 
mander in Chief, the gun has just fired, and tells us that 
five hours have elapsed since sunset. 

Commander in Chief — ^Then the hour for action has 
come, and as all is ready in both your camps. Sublime 
Princes, Valiant First and Second Lieutenant Com- 
manders, inform your brave companions, that I shall 
proceed to perform my duty. 

First Lieutenant Commander — Valiant Companions 
, of my camp, the Illustrious Commander in Chief in- 
I forms you that he is about to proceed to perform his 
I duty. 

Second Lieutenant Commander — Valiant Compan- 
ions of my camp, the Illustrious Commander in Chief, 
informs you that he is about to proceed to perform his 

Commander in Chief — (Eising.) Order Sublime 
Princes! (All rise under the sign of order.) 

Commander in Chief — (Striking one with the pom- 
mel of his sword.) Salix, 

First Lieutenant Commander — (Strikes one.) Noni. 

Second Lieutenant Commander— ( Strikes one. ) 
Tengu, 



iti 



388 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

All — (Led by Commander in Chief give sign, and 
say three times:) Laus Deo. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince, Captain of 
the Guards, advance and receive the watch-word of the 
day. (The Captain of Guard advances to the throne 
and receives from the Illustrious Commander in Chief 
the watch-word of the day, and the response. He then 
goes round and gives the watch-word to each member, 
each returning him the answer.) 

Captain of Guard — Illustrious Commander in Chief, 
all the members present have the watch-word. , 

Com\mander in Chief — Attention Sublime Princes! | 
Present swords! (All bring their swords to a present ^ 
with the Commander in Chief.) 

Commander in Chief — To the glory of the Grand .| 
Architect of the Universe, in the name and under the 
auspices of the Supreme Council of the 33rd degree, for 
the Northern Jurisdiction of the United States of 
America, sitting in the valley of New York, and by vir- 
tue of the powers in me vested, as Commander in Chief 
of this Grand Consistory of Sublime Princes of the 
Royal Secret, 32nd degree of the Ancient and Accepted 

Rite, for the State of , I do hereby declare this 

body to be in session, for the advancement of the in- 
terests of humanity and the cause of virtue. 

Commander in Chief — Carry swords ! Together my 
brethren! (Led by the Commander in Chief, all bring 
their swords to a carry and pass them under left arm, 
point to the rear, and give the battery with their hands, 
after which they again bring their swords to a carry, 
then to a present and sheath them.) 

Commnnder in Chief — Be seated Sublime Princes. 
Sublime Grand Chancellor, are you prepared to read the 
baluster of the last session of this Grand Consistory ? ^ 



OPENING CEREMONIES. 389 

Commander in Chief — (If answered affirmatively.) 
Valiant Princes, First and Second Lieutenant Com- 
manders, request the Sublime Princes in your respective 
camps, to listen attentively to the reading of the baluster 
of the last session of this Grand Consistory. 

First Lieutenant Commander — Sublime Princes of 
my camp, the Illustrious Commander in Chief requests 
you to listen attentively, to the reading of the baluster 
of the last session of this Grand Consistory. 

Second Lieutenant Commander — Sublime Princes of 
my camp, the Illustrious Commander in Chief requests 
you to listen attentively, to the reading of the baluster 
of the last session of this Grand Consistory. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince, Grand Chan- 
cellor, read the baluster of the last session of this Grand 
Consistory. (Baluster is read.) 

Commander in Chief — ^Sublime Princes, First and 

Second Lieutenant Commanders, inform the Sublime 

Princes of your respective camps, that this Grand Con- 

; sistory will listen to, and act upon any remarks they 

• may have to offer, in relation to the baluster which has 

I now been read. 

First Lieutenant Commander — Sublime Princes of 
my camp, the Illustrious Commander in Chief informs 
you that this Grand Consistory will listen to and act 
upon, any remarks you may have to offer, in relation to 
the baluster which has now been read. 

Second Lieutenant Commander — Sublime Princes of 
my camp, the Illustrious Commander in Chief informs 
you that this Grand Consistory will listen to, and act 
upon, any remarks you may have to ofEer, in relation to 
the baluster which has just been read. 

Second Lieutenant Commander — (If there are no re- 



390 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

marks.) Sublime Prince, First Lieutenant Command- 
er, silence prevails prevails in my camp. 

First Lieutenant Commander — Illustrious Command- 
er in Chief, silence prevails in both camps. 

Commander in Chief — Such being the case, the balus- 
ter of your last session is adopted. (The Grand Chan- 
cellor signs the records and the Grand Master of Cere- 
monies presents it to the Illustrious Commander in 
Chief for his signature, after which the Illustrious Com- 
mander in Chief orders the' Grand Master of Ceremonies 
to visit the avenues and ascertain whether there be any 
brethren visitors; if any, they are introduced with the 
usual forms and ceremonies. Then the Grand Chancel- 
lor lays before the Illustrious Commander in Chief the 
''Order of the Day/* which is disposed of as in other 
degrees.) 






CHAPTER LX 

Thirty-Second Degree, or Sublime Prince of thb 

Royal Secret/'' 

initiation. 

When the Grand Consistory is prepared to proceed with the reception, 
a message to that effect is sent by a brother to the Grand Master of Cer- 
emonies, who is with the candidate. The Grand Master of Ceremonies 
then gives the alarm of a Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander at the 
door, 000 0000 0. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince, First Lieu- 
tenant Commander, ascertain the cause of that alarm. 

First Lieutenant Commander — Sublime Prince, Cap- 
tain of the Guards, ascertain the cause of that alarm. 
p Captain of Guard — Opening the door. What is the 
cause of that alarm? 

Master of Ceremonies — The Grand Master *f Cere- 
monies desires to gain admission, to present to the lUus- 
^ trious Commander in Chief a worthy Grand Inspector 

Note 378. — * 'Sublime Prince of the Rosral Secret. [Scotch Masonry.] 
— The fourteenth degree conferred in the Consistory of Princes of the 
Royal Secret, Scotch Masonry, and the thirty-second upon the catalogue 
of that system. The assembly is called a Sovereign Consistory. The 
historical allusions are to the origin of masonry in general, and embrace 
an explanation of the preceding degrees. The officers are a Sovereign 
Grand Commander, representing Frederick II,, of Prussia; two Illustrious 
Liutenant Grand Commanders, Minister of State, Grand Chancellor. Grand 
Treasurer, Grand Secretary, Grand Architect. Grand Standard Bearer, 
Grand Captain of the Guards, Grand Master of Ceremonies, Expert Brother, 
Sentinel and two Guards, The hangings are black, strewed with tears. 
Tfiie apron is white, lined and trimmed with red, displaying the tracing- 
board of this degree; the movable part has a double-headed eagle. Jewel. 
a Teutonic Cross. The tracing-board is complicated. The outer figure 
is a nonagon; within this a heptagon; within this a pentagon; within 
this an equilateral triangle, and within the last a circle. On the linos 
of the pentagon are five standards, U. G, N. E, T., being respectively, 
golden yellow, green, white, azure, and purple. The sides of the nonagon 
represent the divisions of the masonic army, with the letters I. N. 0. N 
X. I. L, A. S, Hour of departure, fifth hour after sunset," — Morris's 
Masonic Dictionary, Article Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret. 



392 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

Inquisitor Commander^ who desires to receive the last 
secrets of the Ancient and Accepted Eite of Masonry. 

Captain of Guard — Sublime Prince^ First Lieuten- 
ant Commander, the alarm is caused by the Grand Mas- 
ter of Ceremonies, who desires to gain admission, to 
present to the Illustrious Commander in Chief a worthy 
Grand Inspector Inquisitor, who desires to receive the 
last secrets of the Ancient and Accepted Eite of Ma- 
sonry. 

First Lieutenant Commander — Has he well consid- 
ered and understood the lessons which he has received 
in the preceding degrees. Valiant Captain of the Guard ? 
Captain of Guard — Illustrious Grand Master of Cere- 
monies, has he well considered and understood the les- 
sons which he has received in the preceding degrees ? 
Master of Ceremonies — ^He has. 
Captain of Guard — Sublime Prince, First Lieutenant 
Commander, he has. 

First Lieutenant Commander — Is he willing to unite, 
with all his heart, in the great cause in which we are 
now engaged? 

Captain of (?mrcZ— Illustrious Grand Master of Cere- 
monies, is he willing to unite with all his heart, in the 
great cause in which we are now engaged ? 
Master of Ceremonies — He is. 

Captain of Guard— Suhlime Prince, First Lieuten- 
ant Commander, he is. 

First Lieutenant Commander — ^Does he know that 
none are wanted here, except earnest and sincere men, 
who are not selfish, and whose philanthropy is not a 
mere name but a practical reality, and is he such an one? 
Captain of (?^ar^— Illustrious Grand Master of Cere- 
monies, does he know that none are wanted here, 
except earnest and sincere men, who are not selfish, and 
whose philanthropy is not a mere name, but a practical 
reality, and is he such an one? 



INITIATION. 393 

Master of Ceremonies — He doeS;, and he is; I vouch 
;.. lor him. 

Captain of Guard — (Closing the door.) He does 
and he is. The Sublime Prince, Grand Master of Cere- 
monies vouches for him. 
iH First Lieutenant Commander— lllu^tiious Command- 
'^er in Chief, the alarm is caused by the Sublime Prince, 
Grand Master of Ceremonies, who desires to gain ad- 
mission, to present to you a worthy Grand Inspector 
Inquisitor Commander, who desires to receive the last 
Secrets of the Ancient and Accepted Eite of Freema- 
sonry; one who has well considered and understood the 
lessons he has received in the preceding degrees; who 
is willing to unite with all his heart in the great cause 
in which we are engaged ; who knows that we want none 
but earnest and sincere men, who are not selfish, and 
whose philanthropy is not a mere name, but a practical 
reality, and for whom the Sublime Prince, Grand Mas- 
ter of Ceremonies vouches, that he is such a man. 

Commander in Chief — We rely with great confidence 
upon the assurances of the Sublime Prince, our Grand 
Master of Ceremonies, in regard to the qualifications 
and merits of the brother whom he brings with him. 
Sublime Princes, Grand Hospitaller and Engineer, you 
will now retire and prepare this Grand Inspector In- 
quisitor Commander, to receive the last secrets of the 
Ancient and Accepted Rite of Masonry. (They go out 
and invest the candidate with the decorations and jewel 
of the 31st degree, and place a poniard in each of his 
hands. They also tie a cord around his body, and con- 
duct him to the door, one holding the end of the cord, 
the other having a hand upon his shoulder.) 

Master of Ceremonies — (Knocks 000 0000 0; and 
then retires behind the candidate and two brothers.) 



394 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

Commander in Chief — Who knocks, Sublime Prince, 
First Lieutenant Commander? 

First Lieutenant Commander — Who knocks. Valiant 
Captain of the Guard? 

Captain of Guard — ( Opening the door. ) Who knocks ? 

Master of Ceremonies — We conduct the Grand In- 
spector Inquisitor Commander, whom the Illustrious 
Commander in Chief has promised to enter. (Grand 
Captain of the Guards then shuts the door.) 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Princes, I am will- 
ing to see this brother introduced among us, because we 
cannot enlist too many champions of our sacred cause. 
The Sublime Prince, our Grand Master of Ceremonies 
has vouched for him in such terms as our usages re- 
quire, and we are therefore authorized to believe that he 
will do Masonry good service, in the war which she is 
waging against the ancient enemies of the human race. 

Captain of Guard — Eemove the barrier, and let the 
Grand M'ast^ of Ceremonies enter with the brother. 
(The door is opened, the candidate is introduced and 
made to halt in front of the Illustrious Commander in 
Chief, between the camp and the two Lieutenant Com- 
manders.) 

Commander in Chief — Who is this that comes, as if 
reluctantly, or as a criminal, into this holy sanctuary? 

Master of Ceremonies — It is a lover of wisdom, and 
an apostle of liberty, equality and fraternity, as under- 
stood by true Masons. He seeks to unite with those 
who labor for the emancipation of mankind. 

Commander in Chief — What has he done hitherto to- 
ward that mighty work? 

Master of Ceremonies — He has advanced in regular 
gradation, from the degree of Entered Apprentice to 
that of Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander, and in 



INITIATION". 395 

all^ his merits and his good works have obtained him 
the approbation and good opinion of his brethren. 

Commander in Chief — By what principles, above all 
others, does he now profess to be governed? 

Master of Ceremonies — By those of justice and equity. 

Commander in Chief — What is it he now desires ? 

Master of Ceremonies — To be admitted a Prince of 
this Grand Consistory, that he may the more effectually 
aid in the great struggle for which Masonry is prepar- 
ing, the second war against the giants, in which the lib- 
erty and happiness of humanity are at stake. 

Commander in Chief — What means does he possess, 
and with what arms is he supplied, that can render him 
an efficient soldier in our ranks? 

Master of Ceremonies — He has courage and pure in- 
tentions. 

Commander in Chief — Are they enough ? 

Master of Ceremonies — No ! He needs further instruc- 
tions to have the veil finally removed, that has so long 
interposed between him and the true Masonic light; to 
attain the summit of the mountain up whose slopes he 
I commenced to toil as an Entered Apprentice, and above 
all, the aid of him in the hollow of whose hand are 
victory and disaster, and who alone can give us strength 
to overcome. 

Commander in Chief — We rejoice to receive the an- 
swers. My brother your motives are worthy of all praise, 
and if you are sincere; if you adopt as your own what 
the Grand Master of Ceremonies answered in your name, 
your claim to be admitted among us is legitimate and 
valid. Have you heard and understood all that he has 
answered for you, before and since your entrance here ? 

Candidate — I have. 
' Commander in Chief — And do you adopt and now 



396 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

reiterate the same in all its parts, in the spirit as well as 
in the letter, as fully as if dictated by your heart and 
every sentence had been uttered by your own lips ? 

Candidate — I do. 

Commander in Chief — Then your hopes of admission 
here, and of ultimate victory in the great contest that 
approaches are well founded. We are satisfied as to the 
purity of your motives and that you possess the requisite 
resolution and courage ; but you are aware that more is 
needed, in him who would be invested with the highest 
rank, and take upon himself the responsibilities of Com- 
mand. To wear that honor worthily arid perform 
efficiently the duties it imposes, you must possess in- 
tellect, the talent to command and ample information. 

We demand of you that proof. My brethren, free 
this aspiring brother from his bonds, and bid him lay h 
his poniard on the altar. (The candidate places his two I 
poniards on the altar, the cord is taken off and the two ^ 
brothers retire to their places, the Grand Master of 
Ceremonies remaining alone with the candidate.) 

Commander in Chief— My brother, the cause to which 
you desire to devote yourself is a noble one. Their de- 
votion to it, has made all the great patriots and 
philanthropists, of all ages of the world illustrious, and 
their names and memories the richest inheritance of the 
human race. It is most honorable in you to seek to follow 
their example, and so to be the benefactor of your kind. 

His is a poor ambition who does not long to do some 
good, that shall last beyond the limits of his own brief 

If you have learned all that the Ancient and Accepted 
Rite has offered you the means of learning, you are pre- 
pared We must know that you have at least endeavor- 
ed to do so. Have you learned the first lesson? Have 



A 



iisriTiATiois^ 397 

you fitted yourself to command^ by first learning how to 
obey? Are you ready now^ and always hereafter^ to 
obey the lawful orders of this Grand Consistory and its 
Illustrious Commander in Chief for the time being ; and 
to peril your life in the great battle that is to be fought 
against the enemies of God^ and the foes of human 
liberty and human progress? Do you dare to do and 
suffer, and have you a hand to burn, like Scaevola, for 
your country or your friend ? Can you, and do you an- 
swer these questions in the affirmative? 

Candidate — I can and I do. 

Commander in Chief — Then let your vows be sacred, 
and your promises made upon the altar of your heart. 

Go now and study the symbolism of this degree, and 
learn its meaning, that you may be prepared to do what 
further we shall require of you. Sublime Prince Grand 
Master of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the camp 
of the Masonic army, and halt first at the quarters occu- 
pied by the Masons of the symbolic degrees. (The Grand 
Master of Ceremonies conducts the candidate to the 
tent numbered nine.) 

Master of Ceremonies — My brother, the 32nd degree 
of the Ancient and Accepted Rite, which we are now 
conferring on you, is the military organization, as the 
31st degree is the judicial organization, of the order. 

The camp which you are entering and its several 
parts are all symbols, the meaning of which we will 
hereafter endeavor to explain to you. 

As you pass around and through this symbolic camp, 
we will give you the necessary, explanations as to its 
external features, and recall briefly to your mind the 
characteristics of the several degrees, whose standards 
float over the camp, to aid you in hereafter understand- 
ing the esoteric meaning of the whole. You will then 



398 



SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 



perhaps see that whatever in Masonry seems arbitrary 
incongruous; mere empty words, and idle images and 
pictures, has in reality a profound meaning; that a great 
idea i&- embodied in this degree, of which its organiza- 
tion, and the disposition and details of the camp are the 
utterances, scientifically and skillfully arranged, and 
that in every thing it proceeds with precision and order 
to develop the idea, and insure the success of the noble 
and holy cause for which it is armed and organized. 
The external lines of the camp form a nonagon, or a 

figure f geometry 
with nine equal sides. 
You perceive that on 
each side of the nona- 
gon is a tent, with a 
^ flag and pennon that 
each flag and its pen- 
" non are of a different 
color from the others, 
and that each tent is 
designated by a letter. 
Each represents a 
camp, and the several 

sides of the nonagon are thus assigned by our rituals, to 
the Masons of the different degrees, from the first to the 
eighteenth, of which each Commander in turn will give 
you an explanation. 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander Ezra, 
be pleased to communicate to our brother, the esoteric 
explanation of the tent No. 9. 

Ezra — You are now at the ninth tent, the letter of 
which is I. •. Its flag and pennon are blue, and here are 
said to be encamped the Apprentices, Fellows Crafts and 
Masters of the Blue or Symbolic degrees, and the volun- 
teers. The commanding officer represents Ezra, 




^ 



INITI-ATIOK. 399 

THE FIRST DEGREE : — Shows jou man^ such as nature 
has made him, with no other resources than his physical 
strength. But each symbol and ceremony of Masonry^ 
has more than one meaning; one enveloped as it were, 
within the other, and all not developed or made known 
at once. The inmost meaning of the first degree is man 
subjugated and struggling toward freedom, blinded by 
superstition, destitute of knowledge, defenceless, and 
with the chains of despotism round him. 

He knocks timidly at the door of Masonry, is received, 
sworn to secrecy and made to stand upright in the mid- 
dle of the lodge, as a man ; as a man ! 

It is his first lesson. Before then he was half naked, 
and half clad, neither barefoot nor shod, half free- 
man and half serf. 

THE SECOND DEGREE : — Shows the ncccssity and holi- 
ness of labor, and consequently of knowledge. Man 
perceives here that to supply his physical wants, his 
organs are but the instruments of intellect, the* expan- 
sion of which, or knowledge can alone constitute him a 
freeman and a king over creation. 

THE THIRD DEGREE : — Teaches us that our inviolable 
destiny is death, but at the same time, in the ceremony 
and in the very name of Hiram it shadows forth the great 
doctrine of another life, and the immortality of the soul. 
The word Hiram'^^ in Hebrew, means, "He who was, or 
shall be raised alive or lifted up,^^ and it also symbolizes 

Note 379. — "Hiram Abif. There is no character in the annals of 
Freemasonry whose life is so dependent on tradition as the celebrated 
architect of King Solomon's Temple. Profane history is entirely silent 
in respect to his career, and the sacred records supply us with only very 
unimportant items. To fill up the space between his life and his death, 
we are necessarily compelled to resort to those oral legends which have 
been handed down from the ancient Masons to their successors. Yet, 
looking to their character, I should be unwilling to vouch for the authen- 
ticity of all; most of them were probably at first symbolical in their 
character; the symbol in the lapse of time having been converted into 
a myth, and the myth, by constant repetition, having assumed the formal 
appearance of a truthful narrative. Such has been the case in the history 
of all nations." — Macke^r's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Hiram 
Abif, 



400 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET* 

the people, rising from the death of vassalage and ig- 
norance, to the life of freedom and intelligence. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the next tent 
(Order is obeyed:) 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander 
Joshua, be pleased to communicate to our brother the 
esoteric meaning of the tent No. 8. 

Joshua — The tent which you have now reached is the 
eighth, the letter of which is N. \ Its flag and pennon 
are green, and here are supposed to be encamped the 
Secret Masters and Perfect Masters, or the Masons of 
the 4th and 5th degrees. The commanding officer rep- 
resents Joshua. 

THE FOURTH DEGREE I — Teachcs truth and consequent- 
ly the existence of one God, and the relations existing 
between man and his Heavenly Father. 

THE FIFTH DEGREE : — Tcachcs US the love of God for 
the human race, and the magnitude of divine attributes. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the next tent. 
(Order is obeyed.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander Aho- 
lidb, be pleased to communicate to our brother the 
esoteric meaning of the tent No. 7. 

Aholiab — The tent which you have now reached is 
the seventh, the letter of which is 0. •. Its flag and pen- 
non are red and green. Here are supposed to be en- 
camped the Intimate Secretaries and Provosts and 
Judges, or the Masons of the 6th and 7th degrees. The 
commanding officer represents Aholiab. 

THE SIXTH DEGREE: — Develops and fully proves the 
sublime and consoling doctrine of the immortality of 
the soul. 



INlTIATlOlSr. 401 

THE SEVENTH DEGREE : — Teacties justice as the neces- 
sary consequence of the relations between God and man, 

Commander in Chief — Hnblime Prince, Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the next tent. 
(Order is obeyed.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander Je- 
hoiada, be pleased to communicate to our brother the 
esoteric meaning of the tent No. 6. 
Ill^ Jehoiada — The tent which you have now reached is 
the sixth, the letter of which is N. :. Its flag and pen- 
non are red and black, in lozenges. Here is supposed 
to be encamped the Intendants of the Building, or the 
Masons of the 8th degree. The commanding ofScer 
represents Jehoiada. 

THE EIGHTH DEGREE : — Tcachcs the ncccssity of order, 
without which, society cannot exist. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the next tent. 
(Order is obeyed.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander Paleg, 
,, be pleased to communicate to our brother the esoteric 
^ meaning of the tent No. 5. 

jPa/egr— The tent which you have now reached is the 
fifth, the letter of which is X. :. Its flag and pennon are 
black. Here are supposed to be encamped the Knights 
Elect of Nine, the Illustrious Elect of Fifteen, and the 
Sublime Knights Elected. The commanding officer 
represents Paleg. 

THE NINTH DEGREE : — Teachcs US that no one has the 
right to take the law into his own hands. That the 
interests of society require that the administration of 
justice should be entrusted to a certain number of pure 
and upright men, for the benefit of all, and that true 
Masonry discountenances all acts of violence. 

i 



402 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

THE TENTH DEGREE : — Teaches that it does not consist 
with the good of society^ that all should pretend to com- 
mand;, and that the administration of order, or the 
executive power, like that of jtistice, or the judicial 
power, must be confided to a few of the wisest and most 
experienced of the citizens. 

THE ELEVENTH DEGREE I — Tcachcs US that the laws 
which are to govern a community must be elaborated^ 
or the legislative power exercised, by the most able and 
honest citizens, and that to such men only it belongs, to 
represent the people in the legislative assemblies, there 
to maintain the rights and freedom of the people. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the next tent. 
(Order is obeyed.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander Joa- | 
bert, be pleased to communicate to our brother the 
esoteric meaning of the tent No. 4. 

Joahert — The tent which you have now reached is the 
fourth, the letter of which is I.:. Its flag and pennon 
are black and red. Here are supposed to be encamped 
the Grand Master Architects and the Knights of the 
Eoyal Arch, or the Masons of the 12th and 13th degrees. 
The commanding officer represents Johaben. 

THE TWELFTH DEGREE I — Tcachcs that by labor alone 
we can obtain happiness, for our fellow beings and our- 
selves, and that to whatever degree of civilization man- 
kind may attain, a true Mason will never cease to labor, 
that he may thereby make more complete the condition 
of his brethren. 

THE THIRTEENTH DEGREE! — Tcaches the utility of 

study, as the only means of drawing nearer to our 
Heavenly Father, and practicing true religion, the ob- 
ject of which is to attain a knowledge of the perfections 



INITIATION. 403 

and "unbounded munificence of God^ and thereby to be- 
come more and more perfect, by imitating his kindness 
in onr relations with our brethren. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime ^Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the next tent. 
(Order is obeyed.) 

Master of Ceremonies— ■lllvLsinou^ Commander Nehe- 
miah, be pleased to communicate to our brother the 
esoteric meaning of the tent No. 3. 

Nehemiah — The tent you have now reached is the 
third, the letter of which is L. •. Its flag and pennon are 
red. ' Here are supposed to be encamped the Grand 
Elect Perfect and Sublime Masons of the 14th degree. 
The Commanding officer represents Nehemiah. 

THE FOURTEENTH DEGREE! — You receive the reward 
of your labors. You were admitted to the sacred vault 
where you saw the end of all mystic forms^ which the 
ignorance of mankind has made necessary. You then 
saw the future destiny of Freemasonry, that is of man, 
who enters upon the inheritance given him by his 
, Heavenly Father. God is no longer to be feared, but to 
' be loved with all the heart, mind and strength. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the next tent. 
(Order is obeyed.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander Zerub- 
babel, be pleased to communicate to our brother the 
esoteric meaning of the tent No. 2. 

Zeruihabel — The tent which yovi have now reached is 
the second, the letter of which is A. Its flag and pen- 
non are light green. Here are supposed to be encamped 
the Knights of the East, or of the Sword, or the Masons 
of the 15th degree. The commanaing officer represents 
ZerubbabeL 



404 SUBLIME PRIK^CE 0^ THE ROYAL SECRET. 

THE FIFTEENTH DEGREE:- — Teaches hope and faith 
in the new Era which dawns upon mankind, when men 
will be emancipated from dead forms and ceremonies, 
and when the whole power of man's intellect will be ex- 
erted to obtain a perfect knowledge of truth^ and of the 
laws that flow from it. 

Commander in (7/^t>/^^^Snblime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the next tent. 
(Order is obeyed.)' 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander Ma- 
lachi, be pleased to communicate to our brother the 
esoteric meaning of the tent No. 1. 

Malachi — The tent which you have now reached is 
the first, the letter of which is S. •. Its flag and pennon 
are white, sprinkled lightly with crimson. Here are 
supposed to be encamped the Princes of Jerusalem, the 
Knights of the East and West, and the Knights Eose 
Croix de Herodem, or the Masons of the 16th, 17th and 
18th degrees. The commanding officer represents Ma- 
lachi. 

THE SIXTEENTH DEGREE: — Tcachcs that cvcry re- 
ligion, of mere forms and ceremonies and external prac- 
tices, must eventually crumble to pieces, for it is a i 
dead body without a soul, and that the Masonry of the 
Ancient and Accepted Kite, founded on the simple and 
pure doctrine of love, toleration and reason, must be 
eternal, because it is true and a reality, and being posi- 
tively that which the Master from Nazareth taught, and 
every true child of our Heavenly Father may well adopt 
and profess it. | 

THE SEVENTEENTH DEGREE ! TcachcS that CVCry gOOd 

and intelligent Mason must look upon himself as a 
pioneer, preparing the way for greater and better men 
to come after him, and that he must be content to work 



INITIATION. ^ 405 

and do his duty^ whether the results of his labor are 
manifest and visible during his life, or not; to sow 
no matter who reaps. Soldier of truth, he must always 
march straight onward, following the route which she 
indicates, to every loyal man. Death alone must make 
him pause. 

Age gives no discharge from her service, and every 
true Mason may be certain, that if he manfully toils and 
fights in her cause, he will, whether the effect of his 
labors be seen by his mental eyes or not, leave to others 
who come after him, a noble heritage, ever to increase, 
as Mason follows Mason, in uninterrupted succession un- 
til men shall succeed each other in this world no longer. 

THE EIGHTEENTH DEGREE: — Illustrates, by example, 
the truth of this doctrine of accumulation of intellectual 
wealth by inheritance, for in it are exhibited all the 
subi'me truths, the axioms of ethics and philosophy, dis- 
covered and uttered by all former intellects, v»hose 
names, shining in the past, are so many resplendent 
proofs of the perfectibility of mankind, gathered and 
combined, in the sublime teachings of the Master from 
Nazareth, who was the possibility of the race made real. 

He passed away in doing good, and we are rich with 
the splendid inheritance he left us. His death teaches 
us civil and religious toleration, and that, short as is cur 
mental vision, and limited as our knowledge of the 
great mysteries of God and nature must ever be, Ave 
must never persecute, or ever become a stranger, to our 
brethren, because the opinions which they enunciate, 
conflict with those that we entertain, or are accustomed 
to hear. For in this degree the new law of love is 
taught, and the chief pillar among the three, with which 
are here replaced the ancient pillars of the temple, is 
charity, which not only relieves the wants, but is tolerant 



406 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

of the errors and mistaken opinions of other men. The 
degree is open to men of all creeds, who believe in the 
fundamental doctrines of the Ancient and Accepted 
Eite of Masonry. Every man who endeavors to teach 
at all, has a mission to perform. God tolerates him and 
allows him to teach, and we may well do the same. 

For after all, the will of God governs, and the doc- 
trine that is true will prevail, while what is false will 
not. What is persecuted grows, but if error be com- 
batted, with no other weapons than those of Masonry, 
the total regeneration of humanity will come in God's 
good time. 

Master of Ceremonies — Yon have now passed around 
the nonagon, and a full explanation has been given you 
of each tent by its commander. Within this you per- 
ceive is traced a heptagon, or a figure of geometry with 
seven equal sides, and within that a pentagon, or one 
with five equal sides. On each of the external angles 
of the pentagon is a great standard, designated by a 
letter and supposed to indicate the camp of a corps of 
Masons, occupying externally a side of the pentagon. I 
will now conduct you to the fifth standard. 

Master of Ceremonies — Amariah, be pleased to com- 
municate to the candidate the esoteric meaning of the 
fifth standard of the pentagon. 

Amariah — My brother, the fifth standard, before 
which you now stand, has for its letter, U. \ Its armorial 
bearings are thus described in the language of Her- 
aldry: Or,* An ox-statant. Sable. Motto at the base. 
Omnia Tempns Alit, Time gives growth and strengtli 
to all things. Here are supposed to be encamped the 
Grand Pontiffs and Masters, ad vitam, or the Masons of 
the 19th and 20th degrees. The commanding officer 
represents Amariah. 

fOr, iu Heraldry, means gold or gold color. 



INITIATION. 407 

THE NiNTEENTH DEGREE: — Teaches US that, as true 
apostles of the doctrine of civil and religious toleration, 
we must, as it were, bridge the abyss that divides us 
from our brethren, who adhere to the old law and 
ceremonial observances of the past, and win them over 

to us by kindness and reason. When man is no longer 
a slave, we must appeal to his heart and intellect, if we 

would bring about the reign of peace, harmony and 
science. There are no other means by which an intelli- 
gent man can be convinced, however he m.ay be com- 
pelled. 

THE TWENTIETH DEGREE: — Tcaches US the necessity 
of caution, in addition to energy and daring, that those 
who tread upon and live by the propagation of false 
creeds, may Hot defeat our plans for the emancipation 
of human intellect. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the 4th stand- 

^ard. (Order is obeyed.) 

r Master of Ceremonies — Garimont, be pleased to com- 

■municate to the candidate the esoteric meaning of the 

I fourth standard. 

I Garimont — The standard which you have now reached 
is the fourth, the letter is G. *. Its armorial bearings : 
vert; an eagle, with two heads displayed, sable, armed 
or ensigned with an imperial crown, or resting on both 
heads, holding in his dexter claw a sword, point in base; 
in his sinister claw a bloody heart. Motto at the base 
Corde Gladio Potens, Mighty of heart and with the 
sword. Here are supposed to be encamped the Noachites 
or Prussian Knights, and the Knights of the Royal Axe, 
or Princes of Libanus, or the Masons of the 21st and 
22nd degrees. The commanding officer represents 

! Garimont, 



408 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

THE TWENTY-FIRST DEGREE: — Teaches jovL to strive 
earnestly to learn the means necessary to vindicate the 
power of truths in bringing together all God's children, 
whatever their religious and political opinions. That 
means to raise man to the consciousness of what he is, 
and will soon become; what he ought to be. 

THE TWENTY-SECOND DEGREE : — Teachcs you "that even 
after succeeding in that object, you would still need to 
be ever watchful and always on the alert, to bar the way 
of entrance against sectarianism. 

Commiander in Chief — Sublime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the third stand- 
ard. (Order is obeyed.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Mah Shim, be pleased to com- 
imunicate to the candidate the esoteric meaning of the 
third standard. 

Mah-Shim — ^My brother, the standard which you have 
now reached is the third, its letter is N. *. Its armorial 
bearings: Argent, A flaming heart, gules, winged, 
sable, crowned with laurel, vert. Motto at the base 
Ardens Gloria Surgit. Inflamed with glory, it ascends. 
Here are supposed to be encamped the Chiefs of the 
Tabernacle, the Princes of the Tabernacle, and the 
Knights of the Brazen Serpent, or the Masons of the 
33rd, 24th and 25th degrees. The commanding officer 
represents Mah-Shim. 

THE TWENTY-THIRD DEGREE : — Tcachcs that after firm- 
ly establishing the institution of the^ Ancient and Ac- 
cepted Eite, we should profoundly study the doctrine of i 
the master from Nazareth, and expound to our brethren, 
of the old law its practical and sublime lessons. Thej 
old law has not effected the happiness of mankind, noi 
have the old philosophies. 



imTiATioN. 409 

liHE TWENTY-FOURTH DEGREE :— Teaches how arduous 
is the task of a true Mason^ who endeavors to oppose 
sectarianism, for the sectarian will always obstinately 
maintain his own, narrow and exclusive creed, as the 
absolute and only truth, and such creeds will long con- 
tinue to hold a large portion of mankind in bondage. 

THE TWENTY-FIFTH DEGREE : — Teachcs US to maintain 
the doctrine of liberty, equality and fraternity, as the 
only means of gathering around us the intelligent and 
good men of every lineage, creed and opinion, to repel 
and defeat the encroachments of idle theorists and 
kingly and priestly usurpers. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the second 
standard. (Order is obe)^ed.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Aholiab, be pleased to com- 
municate to the candidate the esoteric meaning of the 
second standard. 

Aholiab — My brother, the standard which you have 

? now reached is the second. Its letter is E. *. Its armo- 

kiieil bearings: Azure. A lion couchant, or holding in his 

t mouth a key, or and collared, or with the figure 525 on 

the collar. Motto at the base, Custos Arcani. -Keeper 

of the secret. Here are supposed to be encamped the 

Princes of Mercy, or Scottish Trinitarians, the Grand 

Commanders of the Temple and the Princes Adept, or 

Knights of the Sun, or the Masons of the 26th, 27th and 

28th degrees. The commanding officer represents 

Aholiab. 

THE TWENTY-SIXTH DEGREE I — Tcachcs US how a sin- 
cere and lasting alliance may be effected betv/een the 
three intellectual classes of men: The disciples of the 
natural law and of philosophy ; those of the law of Moses, 
and the other ancient faiths, and those who follow the 
doctrine of the Ancient and Accepted Eite, or the law 



410 SUBLIME PR1N*CE OF THIS KOYAL SECRET. 

taught by the Grand Master from Nazareth. However 
crude, defective and erroneous men^s opinions may be, 
they will always listen to the voice of mercy, benevo- 
lence and affection. 

THE TWENTY-SEVENTH DEGREE: — ^Tcachcs that the 

noblest reward, of him who has proved himself the 
apostle and champion of universal peace and tolerat^'u; 
who has aided fraternity to overcome and annihilate all 
formulas that stood in his way, will be to enjoy the 
fruits of his toil, among those v/ho were once divided, 
but by his exertions have been brought to remember 
that they are brethren. Knowing this, the Mason's 
thirst for knowledge increases, and he learns that only 
by profound study, can he solve the great problem of the 
ultimate destiny in store for humanity. 

The twenty-eighth degree solves that problem and 
show^s the ultimate result of the doctrine of our Master ; 
of that doctrine which is the way, the truth and the life. 
It is, that mankind are at last to become one single 
peaceful family, whose father and head is the eternal 
God, infinite in love. 

Commander in CJiief — Sublime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the first stand- 
ard. (Order is obeyed.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Bezaleel, be pleased to com- 
municate to the candidate the esoteric meaning of the 
first standard. 

Bezaleel — My brother, you have now reached the first 
standard. Its letter is T. :. Its armorial bearings; pur- 
ple, the ark of the covenant, or between two palm trees, 
vert, and two lighted candlesticks. Motto at the base, 
Laus Deo; praise be to God. Here are supposed to be 
encamped the Grand Scottish Knights of St. Andrew, or 
Patriarchs of the Crusades and the Knights Kadosh, or 



INITIATION. 411 

the Masons of the 29th and 30th degrees. The com- 
manding officer represents Bezaleel. 

THE TWENTY-NINTH DEGREE : — Tcaclies JOU hoW mUch 

can be effected in a righteous cause by perseverance. 
When the Ancient and Accepted Eite of Masonry shall 
have accomplished its mission, men will rest in the true 
Edeno in a realm where peace and fraternity will reign. 

THE THIRTIETH DEGREE I — Tcachcs US to organize that 
army of tried and veteran MasonS;, that is to defend the 
rights of mankind against unlimited regal despotism, 
sacerdotal usurpation and intolerance, and the monopo- 
lies of rank, caste and privilege, and cause these usurpers 
to trembie, like the Babylonian king, when (according 
to the legend) an awful hand wrote the word of judg- 
ment on the wall of his banquet chamber. 

Master of Ceremonies — My brother, you have now 
passed around the pentagon, and a full explanation has 
been given you of each Standard Bearer. 

Enclosed in this pentagon you observe an equilateral 
triangle. At its angles, it is said, are encamped the 
Princes of the Royal Secret, the Grand Inspectors In- 
quisitors Commanders and such Knights of Malta, as 
having proved themselves true and faithful, have been 
accepted and received among us. Within the triangle 
is a circle, in which are said to be the quarters of the 
Sovereign Grand Inspectors General, of the 33rd degree, 
who serve as Lieutenant Commanders, under the Most 
Puissant Sovereign, Grand Commander. It is said in 
some rituals, and appears in most of the engraved trac- 
ing boards, that within the circle is a cross, sometimes 
with five arms of equal length, on which were to be the 
quarters of the five Princes, who, as Lieutenant Com- 
manders, were in turn to be second in command, and 
whose standards float at the five angles of the pentagon. 



413 SUBLIME PRINCE OP THE ROYAL SECRET. I 

I 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince Grand Master if 
of Ceremonies, let the candidate advance in front of the 
camp and face the East. (Order is obeyed.) 

Commander in Cliief—lsiY brother, if yon have as^ 
snmed in good faith the obligations of the preceding ^ 
degrees, the general features of which have now been i 
summarily recited to you, and if you have studied and i 
understood the doctrines which they teach, and the prin- 1 
ciples which they inculcate, you are entitled to our re- 1 
gard and esteem, and are fitted to do the duties of a | 
good Mason, for you have bound yourself to do all that ' 
virtue, honor and manhood can require, and you have 
learned all that ancient and modern philosophy can 
teach in regard to the great mysteries of God and the 
universe. 

Eemember what you have been told in regard to the 
tracing-board or camp of this degree, that you may the 
better understand the explanation to be hereafter given, 
if in the test which you are to undergo, you prove your- 
self worthy to receive it. 

First, however, as some evidence that you have not 
forgotten the teachings of the previous degrees, in the 
w^ork of which we should examine all candidates, you 
must show that you remember that of the one through 
which you have so recently passed. 

Commander in Chief — Why come you hither with 
weapons unfit for a judge, emblems of rude violence? 
For what purpose do you bring hither two poniards ? 

Candidate — I was told that one was intended to pun- 
ish perjury and the other to protect innocence. 

Commander in Chief — And you were also told that 
perjury was no longer punished by the dagger, but by^' 
the law and general contempt, and that innocence was 
now protected otherwise than by the poniard. Have 
you again assumed them of your own accord ? 



INITIATION. 413 

Candidate — I have not, they were placed in my hands ? 

Commander in Chief — It is well. Give them to our 
brother, the Grand Master of Ceremonies. They suit 
a Prince of the Eoyal secret no better than they suit a 
judge. (Candidate takes them from the altar and gives 
them to the Grand Master of Ceremonies.) 

Commander in Chief — What was placed in your left 
hand when you assumed the obligation of the 31st de- 
gree? 

Candidate — A pair of scales. 

Commander in Chief — What lesson was it meant to 
teach you? 

Candidate — That in all my judgments and opinions of 
men, I should be guided solely by justice and equity. 

Commander in Chief — What is the pass-word of the 
31st degree? 

Candidate — There is none. 

Commander in Chief — What are the sacred words. 

Candidate — Justice and equity. 

Commander in Chief — ^What words follow these two? 

Candidate — So mote it be. 

Commander in Chief — Give the token of that degree 
to the Sublime Prince Grand Master of Ceremonies? 
(It is given.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander in 
Chief, the token is correct. 

Commander in Chief — ^Eeceive from our brother the 
Grand Master of Ceremonies, in lieu of the weapons 
which you have given up, that of a Knight and Prince 
of Masonry, especially appropriate for one who is to 
command. (Grand Master of Ceremonies hands the 
candidate a sword.) 

Commander in Chief— -(Hhmg.) Order my brethren ! 
Sublime Prince Grand Master of Ceremonies, conduct 



414 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

the candidate to the altar. (All rise under the sign of 
order. The Illustrious Commander in Chief, leaves his j 
seat and meets the candidate at the altar.) 

Commander in Chief — My brother, if yon would ad- 
vance further, you must assume the obligation of this 
degree. That you may be certain that we are all bound 
to you, by ties as strong as those that will bind you to 
us, kneel at our altar, lay your hands and sword upon 
the book of constitutions and repeat after me: 

OBLIGATION. 

I of my own free will and accord, in the pres- 
ence of the Grand Architect of the Universe and of this 
Grand Consistory of Sublime Princes of the Eoyal Se- 
cret, and faithful guardians of the sacred treasure, do 
hereby and hereon, most solemnly and sincerely swear, 
under all the penalties of my former obligations in Ma- 
sonry, that I will never, directly or indirectly, reveal or 
make known, to any person or persons whomsoever, any; 
even the least, of the secrets of this degree, unless to 
one duly qualified and entitled to receive them, and to 
such persons only, as I shall find to be after due and 
strict trial. 

I furthermore vow and swear, that I will punctually^ 
obey all due signs and summonses, handed or forwarded " 
to me, by the regular officer or officers of this Grand 
Consistory, so long as I remain within its jurisdiction, 
sickness, great distance, my duty to my family, or other 
over-ruling cause alone excusing me. 

I furthermore vow and swear, always to conform to, 
and obey the statutes and regulations of the order, and 
to demean and behave myself, as one should who has 
been deemed worthy to be honored, with so high a de- 
gree, that no part of my conduct may in the least reflect 
discredit on the Grand Consistory, or disgrace myselt. 



INITIATION. 415 

I furthermore vow and swear, never to visit or recog- 
nize any spurious, irregular, illegitimate or clandestine 
body pretending to te Masonic, if I know it to be such, 
but will always denounce and discountenance all such, 
and to hold no Masonic intercourse with any member or 
members of any such bodies, and may God keep me just, 
equitable and charitable. Amen ! Amen ! Amen ! Amicn ! 

Commander in Chief — Eise my brother, you have 
still a solemn duty to perform, by certain journeys, 
symbolical of the warfare you are ever hereafter to 
wage, against the chief foes of human progress. You will 
thus give- us the most solemn pledge of your sincerity 
and resolution, and prove to us that you recognize God 
as our common father, and all men his children. 

Commander in Chief — (After returning to his sta- 
tion.) Be seated Sublime Princes. (All are seated ex- 
cept the candidate and Master of Ceremonies.) 

Commander in Chief — My brother, be prepared. Re- 
member that we shall accept each journey as your most 
solemn pledge, given to us in the sight of God, that the 
enemy of humanity, against whom you symbolically 
march, you will ever hereafter actively and energetically 
(war against, with all lawful weapons and by all legiti- 
mate means. (At this moment five guns are heard fir- 
ing.) 

Commander in Chi^f — My brother, you have heard 
the signal. The hour has come when you must march 
upon the first of those campaigns, which every true Ma- 
son and Prince must ever be ready to make, for the re- 
lief of his suffering brethren. You are inexperienced, 
and will need a guide, and we entrust you to our tried 
brother, the Grand Master of Ceremonies, who has been 
with you from the beginning. (Illustrious Commander 
in Chief, now leaves his seat and goes to the candidate.) 

Commander in Chief — Give your sword to the Grand 



416 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 



Master of Ceremonies my brother. A sword is a com- | 
mon weapon, worn alike by oppressors and their victims. | 
Before we return yours, it and yourself must be purified, 
for a Prince and Commander in Masonry must have | 
none but pure motives, nor ever use his weapon, except ^ 
to protect the weak and the oppressed, and to keep with- 
in the bounds of law, if not of justice and equity, those 
who still retain usurped powers. Do you swear and 
swear so only to use it? 

Candidate — I do. (In the meantimie a laver""®® is set 
on a table in front of the nonagon, and filled with pure 
water, and a napkin of white linen is laid near the laver. 
The Illustrious Commander in Chief takes the right 
hand of the candidate and dips it in the water and then 
wipes it with the napkin, after which he also dips the 
hilt of the sword in the water, wipes it, and returns it 
to the candidate.) 

Commander in Chief— {To candidate.) My brother, 
you are now purified, by your oath and by this water, 
which, with all our Ancient and Oriental Masters, was 
an emblem of purity, both of body and soul. Your sword 
is also without spot or stain, because the arm that wields 
it will henceforward be guided by justice and true hono 
alone. Eemember that if you, at any time hereafter,^ 
act unworthily, as a Mason and a Knight, by striking a 
blow in an unjust cause, or failing when it is your dutf 
to strike a blow in a just one, you will be guilty of 
violating your solemn oath. 

And we now warn you, that many eyes will hereafte 
be upon you, and will watch jealously, to see how you 
keep and perform that and your other obligations. (The 

Note 380. — **In the ancient mysteries the laver with its pure water ^J 
was used to cleanse the neophyte of the impurities of the outer world, 
and to free him from the imperfections of his past or sinful life. It 
is a necessary article in many of the higher degrees, for the ahlution^. 
of the candidate in his progress to a higher and purer system of j 
knowledge."— Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Pictipnary of Freemasonry ,j 
Article Lavey» 



INITIATION. 417 

^Illustrious Commander in Chief resumes his seat, and at 
this moment a gun is fired.) 

Commander in Chief — Order, Sublime Princes ! (All 
rise.) Draw swords! Carry swords! Present swords! 
Salute! Proceed on your journey my brother with the 
kind brother whose experience will guide you. During 
your journey we will pray for you. (Candidate com- 
mences his journey.) ^ 

PRAYER. . 

Kind and indulgent Father of the great family of 
man. Supreme Intelligence; author of light and life, 
aid us in our efforts to make this world more worthy of 
Thee, and bless with thy favor our brother who marches 
to restore to light those who have forgotten Thee, and 
thy truth. For thy infinite love Thou bearest to thy 
suffering children, aid him and us in our warfare against 

' ignorance ; against those who mislead, impose upon and 

' deceive thy people, and make the light of knowledge 
shine in all the corners of the earth. Amen! Amen! 

I Amen! Amen! 

f- Commander in Chief — Attention, Sublime Princes! 

I Eecover swords ! Eeturn swords ! Be seated ! 

t Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander in 
Chief, the candidate has returned in' safety from his first 
.'campaign. 

Commander in Chief — My brother, we have already 
informed you that these journeys are the symbols of the 
several struggles to be made by Masonry, in the accom- 
plishment of its holy mission, and by you as one of her 
soldiery. The first enemy th^t we have to contend 
against is ignorance. It is the child of despotism and 
the capital of the demagogue. 

It has, in most countries, degraded the masses of 
maiakind to a level with the beasts of burden ; has niade 



418 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

them bow their necks to wear the yoke, and hug the 
chains and manacles that dishonor them. It is the po- 
tent auxiliary of tyrants and hypocrites, by which they 
keep in bondage the souls and bodies of the children of 
God, who need but education to inform them that they 
are not of an inferior stock, nor born to toil, that power 
and craft may live in luxury, and rank and privilege be 
paid and pensioned by* the public. 

Let us then labor to eradicate ignorance, and to ex- 
pose those who deceive and delude the people, and our 
Father in Heaven will smile upon our efforts. (At this 
moment a second gun is fired.) 

Commander in Chief — The signal is again given. 
Courage, my brother, and march upon your second 
campaign. We will in silence offer up our prayers for 
your success. (The candidate is again conducted, by the 
Grand Master of Ceremonies, three times round the 
camp, and again halts, facing the Illustrious Com- 
mander in Chief.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander in 
Chief, the candidate has returned in safety from his 
second campaign. 

Commander in Chief — The second formidable enemy, 
against which Masonry has to contend, is superstition, 
side by side with which ever marches its twin-brother 
fanaticism. Superstition is the offspring of ignorance, 
and nothing has more contributed to the degradation of 
our race. By its influence alone, nations once resplend- 
ent with civilization, and from which, as centres, science 
and arts, and all that enlightens and elevates man, flowed 
abroad into all the countries of the world, are now 
sunken in stupid somnolence and asphyxia, or have 
become almost idiotic. 

The spirit of fanaticism still lives, and is active and 



INITIATION. 419 

vigorous everywhere. It seems almost to be an essential 
element of human nature. 

Against those ancient enemies of the lights we make 
war^ panoplied with the armour of the doctrine of the 
great teacher of Nazareth^, which is the doctriie of Ma- 
sonry. 

. These doctrines must ultimately conquer, all intelli- 
gences, and Masonry will eventually rule the world, 
because its only arms are charity and persuasion and 
that intelligent logic, of which your sword is the sym- 
bol, and because it rebukes and disallows intolerance 
and persecution. (At this moment a third gun is fired.) 
Commander in Chief — The signal is again given. De- 
part my brother, on your third campaign, while we 
again pray in silence for your success. (The candidate 
is again conducted three times around the camp, and 
halted again facing the Illustrious Commander in 
Chief.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander in 
i Chief, the candidate has returned in safety from his 

third campaign. 
I Commander in Chief — My brother, if you had actual- 
I ly, instead of symbolicall}^, undertaken this third cam- 
paign, for the purpose of measuring your strength 
against despotism and ambition, you would not have re- 
turned to us in safety. For while despotism, upon its 
ancient thrones, guarded by ignorance, superstition, 
fanaticism, privilege and 'rank, is too formidable to be 
so overthrown, it is, at the same time, timid and coward- 
ly, and therefore merciless. It forgives no attempt 
against itself. The influence that will ultimately over- 
throw it must gain ground by slow and imperceptible 
degrees. The tree of liberty grows everywhere, watered 
by the blood of patriots. Alone you can do little, nor is 
it now in the power of Masonry to lead revolutions^ and 



k 



420 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

by arms establish free institutions. When we widen too 
much the circle of our exertions^, we simply invite our i 
initiates to do nothings because what we tell them they 
are to do is impracticable. Our object on the contrary 
is to effect some practical good, within the limits of that 
circle in which our influences mav be felt. When men 
and nations are fitted to be free, they will be so, and 
a great living example of freedom, based on law and 
order, is, in its calm, silent dignity of strength and 
peace, the mightiest antagonist of despotism, and arbi- 
trary power. We must take care that we do not make 
the object of our order unreal and chimerical. (At this 
moment a fourth gun is fired.) 

Commander in Chief — The signal is given again. De- 
part my brother, on your fourth campaign, while we 
again pray in silence for your success over the enemy, 
even baser than the former, against which you are now 
to march. (The candidate is again conducted three 
times around the camp, and halted, facing the Illus- 
trious Commander in Chief.) 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander in 
Chief, the candidate has returned in safety from his 
fourth campaign. 

Commander in Chief — My brother, among the ene- 
mies of true fraternity, one of the most potent is the 
love of wealth and greediness for gain. 

The desire for a competency and even for wealth, to 
be liberally and generously used, is laudable and the 
parent of many virtues, but carried to excess and made 
the sole object of a man's life, it is hostile to the best 
interest of humanity; closes the hand and heart and 
sets self-interests in opposition to the large and benevo- 
lent plans of Masonry, which it regards as visionary 
expeniiive ancl absurd ; wherefore this inordinate longing 



IJ^ITIATIOK^. 



421 



after wealth is an enemy against which Masonry has to 
contend. (At this moment a fifth gun is fired.) 

Commander in Chief — The last signal is now given^ 
you must make your fifth and last campaign against the 
most obstinate enemy of all, after which, your struggles 
being over, and victory having crowned you with its 
laurels, their purity unstained by a single drop of 
blood, you will take possession of your patrimony, re- 
conquered for yourself and your brethren, and Gcd will 
bless your labors, and through them advance the cause 
of true Masonry. 

We shall soon meet again, but before you set forth, I 
will give you certain signs and words whereby we mav 
recognize each other, and whereby you will be enabled 
to detect such traitors as, after their defeat, may attempt 
to introduce themselves to you ; and among your breth- 
ren you must be cautious and prudent. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, give to the candidate the sign, pass-word 
and sacred word of the 32nd degree. (It is done as 
follows:) 




SIGN. 



Place the right hand open on the 
heart; extend it forward, the palm 
downwards and then let it fall by the 
right side. 



Sign Sublime 
Prince of the 
Royal Secret, 



4S2 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

PASS words: — One says Phaal-Kol, which means 
separated. The other answers Pharash Kol^ which 
means reunited. Then the first says Nekam Makah 
w^hich means blow or calamity or revenue. Both then '" 
pronounce together the word Shaddai^ which means the 
strongs the mighty^ a name of deity. 

SACRED WORDS — The first is Salix''' the answer to 
which is Noni, and then both together say^ Tengu.'"" 
The first two words are formed by the letters designat- 
ing the tents on the sides of the nonagon, and the third 
by those of the standard of the pentagon. 

Master of Ceremonies— Illustrious Commander in 
Chief, the candidate has the sign, pass-word and sacred- 
words, of the 32nd degree. 

Commander in Chief — My brother, before you set 
forth on your first campaign, we purified your heart by 
the solemn oath which you took between our hands and 
we also purified your hand and sword by water, the em- 
blem of purity. Our object then was to bind you to act 
upon the principles of justice and equity, and not upon 
those of revenge and cruel reprisals against unrighteous 
enemies. You were to vindicate the rights of man and 
you have done so. ^ God has smiled upon your exertions 
for he has so far given you the victory, and the holy 
land of our inheritance is in sight. You are now to take 
posession of it, but full in your way stands a three-fold 
enemy that cannot be avoided, but must be met and 

Note 381. — "Salix. A significant word in the high degrees, invented, 
most probably, at first for the system of the Council of Emperors of 
the East and West, and transferred to the Ancient and Accepted Scottish 
Rite. It is derived, say the old French rituals, from the initials of a 
part of a sentence, and has, therefore, no other meaning." — Mackey's 
Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Salix. 

Note 382. — "Tengu. A significant word in the high degrees of the 
Scottish Rite. The original old French rituals explain it, and say that 
it and the two other words that accompany are formed out of the 
initials of the words of a particular sentence "which has reference to the 
*Sacred treasure' of Masonry." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, 
Aticle Tengu. 



1NITIATI0K-. 423 

overcome. To succeed in that contest, you ne^d to be 
still further purified, by fire and incense. Do you con- 
sent to submit to this trial? 

Candidate — I do. (In the meantime the table and 
laver will have been removed, and replaced by a pan 
containing burning coals and a censer containig incense. 
The Illustrious Commander in Chief then leaves his 
seat and goes to the pan containing burning coals.) 

Commander in Chief — (At altar of incense.) Ad- 
vance my brother! (Candidate and Grand Master of 
Ceremonies advance to the altar when Illustrious Com- 
mander in Chief throws on the burning coals a few 
grains of incense, and while it burns he passes the right 
hand of the candidate five times over the fire; candi- 
date holding his sword in his left hand.) 

Commander in Chief — This arm is purified and de- 
voted to justice and equity for ever. Give me your 
sword! (Takes sword from candidate and passes it five 
times over the fire.) 

Commander in Chief — This weapon is also purified 
and devoted like its master. May God bless them, if 
they are guided by Justice and honor. May both be 
disgraced if their deeds are unholy.) 

Commander in Chief — Order, Sublime Princes ! (All 
rise.) Draw swords! Carry swords! Present ?words! 
Salute ! Depart now my brother on your last campaign, 
and we will offer up our prayers for your success. 

PRAYER. 

Our Father, who are in Heaven, have mercy on our 
weakness. If it be thy will that we should direct and 
guide our brethren, preserve us from anger, vanity, 
temerity and error. Let us not fall into temptation, 
and seek to usurp those powers that belong in common 
to all thy children, and which we have so long struggled 



424 SUBLIME MINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

to restore to their hands. Let no criminal action; no 
base word, evil thought, or unholy feeling ever defile 
the temple which we have bnilded to Thee in our hearts. 
Enable ns, with the aid of this candidate, to prevail 
against the selfishness, the apathy and the indifference 
of the world around ns, and to overcome the same in 
our own natures, and so remove the last and greatest 
obstacle to the final triumph of the new land of love, 
and the universal dominion of the true principles of 
Masonry. Amen! Amen! Amen! Amen! Amen! 

Commander in Chief — Be seated my brethren! (The 
three circuits being completed, the Grand Master of 
Ceremonies halts with the candidate facing the throne. 

Master of Ceremonies — Illustrious Commander in 
Chief, the candidate has returned in safety from his fifth 
and last campaign. 

Commander in Chief — My brother, we congratulate 
you upon your safe return among us. The three-fold 
enemy against whom you last marched, is found in Ma- 
sonry, in our own bosoms as well as in the world. We 
incur no personal hazard in encountering this triune 
evil spirit, but it is the more obstinate and almost un- 
conquerable, because it is passive, stationary and inert. 
It is tte spirit of selfishness, apathy and indifference. 
Could we but overcome it, and substitute in its place 
zeal, ardour and disinterestedness, the victory over the 
giant wrongs and injustices, would be certain and 
speedy. 

It is difficult to rouse even Masons to energetic action. 
It is difficult to convince them that there is anything 
in Masonry beyond the mere work of the lodge. If, 
remembering your pledge now given us, you do not fall 
into this apathy — indifference, but are faithful to your 
obligations. Masonry will profit by your labors and the 
result of your experience. Sublime Prince Grand Mas- 



INITIATION. 



425 



ter of Ceremonies, invest the candidate with the token, 
battery, etc., of this degree. 

TOKEN. 

Seize the sword with the 
right hand ; unsheath it and 
carry it up to the right side, 
the hilt resting on the right 
hip, the point upwards. 
Place the right foot behind 
the left, so as to form a 
square, leaving a small dis' 
tance between the feet thus 
arranged. ' Eaise the left 
1 ,, c vv -D . **v -o > arm, the hand open and ex- 

"oken, Sublime Prince of the Roys 1 , -T t . i. , i 

Secret. i3t Position. tended, as if to rcpulsc an 

attack. Seize each other's left hand, the fingers inter- 
laced. Then draw close to- each other and embrace. 
One says Hochmah, (that is wisdom or philosopljy) and 
the other answers Tsedakah, that is, truth. Justice and 
equity. (In some rituals^ these two words are said to be 
the sacred and pass of the degree.) 




BATTERY. 

Is five strokes, by one and four: 
0000. 




Token, 2nd Position, 



•426 SUBLIME pri:nce of the royal secret. 

HOURS OF LABOR : — The hour for the marching of the 
army is the fifth after the setting of the Sun. 

MARCH : — The march is five steps^, starting alternately 
with the right and left foot, and bringing the feet to- 
gether at each step. 

WATCH- words:"'' — There are seven watch words, one 
for each day in the week, and seven other words are 
given in answer to each watch-word, and are as fol- 
lows: 

Monday, watch-word, Darius, answer, Daniel. 

Tuesday, watch-word, Xerxes, answer, Habakkuk. 

Wednesday, watch-word, Alexander, ans. Zephaniah. 

Thursday, watch-word, Philadelphus, answer, Hag- 
gai. 

Friday, watch-word, Herod, answer Zachariah. 

Saturday, watch-word, Hezekiah, answer^, Malachi. 

Sunday, watch-word, Cyrus, answer Ezekiel. 

(The manner in which the watch- words are to be 
given and the answers received, has already been stated 
at the opening. During the explanations given by the 
Illustrious Commander in Chief, the Grand Master of 
Ceremonies causes the candidate to execute the move- 
ments.) 

Commander in Chief — Be seated my brother, while 
we endeavor to explain to you the esoteric meaning of 
the camp, or tracing-board of this degree. However, 
before we proceed to give you those explanations, we 
deem it necessary to call your attention to the two most 
prominent systems in the Ancient and Accepted Eite. 
The first was promulgated in 1762, by nine commission- 
ers appointed by the Council of Emperors of the East 
and West, and by the Council of the Princes of the 
Eoyal Secret. The first named body was created at 
Paris in 1758, the latter instituted in 1759, at Bor- 
deaux, by said Council of Emperors. 

Note 383 "Watchwords. Used in the thirty-secoM degree of the 

Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite because that degree has a military 
form, but not found in other degrees of Masonry." — Mackey's Encyclo^ 
paedia of Freemasonry, Article Watchwords, 



INITIATION. 427 

Up to 1762 the great number of Scottish degrees had 
created much confusion^ hence the necessity of settling 
the regulations of the ^'Masonry of Perfection/' Such 
was then the name borne by our EitC;, and of classify- 
ing the degrees of the system adopted by the Council of 
Emperors of the East and West. Those regulations, 
consisting of thirty-five articles, and the list of de- 
grees, twenty-five in number ; the last of which was the 
Sublime Commander of the Royal Secret, were promul- 
gated on the 21st of September, 1762. 

The camp before you was evidently made for that 
system. Adapted to our present one, it is arbitrary. Now 
in 1786, Frederick Second, King of Prussia, who ac 
cording to many was at the head of the order in Eu- 
rope, framed, or rather approved it is said, a new con- 
stitution of our rite in eighteen articles, changing the 
name of Rite of Perfection into that of Ancient and 
Accepted Scottish Rite, and adding eight new degrees 
to the old system thus extending the number of degrees 
to thirty-three, the last of which is Sovereign Grand 
Inspector General. My brother, we here give you a 
I full list of the degrees of each system : 

In 1762. In 1786. 

1. Entered Apprentice. Entered Apprentice. 

2. Fellow Craft. Fellow Craft. 

3. Master Mason. Master Mason. 

4. Secret Master. Secret Master. 

5. Perfect Master. Perfect Master. 

6. Intimate Secretary. Intimate Secretary. 

7. Intendant of the Building. Provost and Judge. 

8. Provost and Judge. Intendants of the Building. 

9. Elected Knight of Nine. Elected Knight of Mine. 

10. Elected Knight of Fifteen. Elected Knight of Fifteen. 

11. Chief of the Twelve Tribes. Sublime Knight Elected. 

12. Grand Master Architect. Gj-and Master Architect, 

13. Boyal Arch, Boyal Arch. 



428 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

14. Ancient Grand Elect. Ancient Grand Elect. 

15. Knights of the Sword. Knights of the East. 

16. Prince of Jerusalem. Prince of Jerusalem. 

17. Knights of the E. and W.Knights of the East and West. 

18. Knights of Kose Croix. Knights of Eose Croix. 

19. Grand Pontiff. Grand Pontiff. 

20. Grand Patriarch. Gr. Mas. of all Symbolic. 

21. Grand Master of the Key.Noachite or Prussian Kni'ts. 

22. Knight of the Royal Axe.Kt. of R. A. or Pr. of Libanus. 

23. Prince Adept. Chief of the Tabernacle. 

24. Com. of the W. & B. Eagle. Prince of the Tabernacle. 

25. Com, of the Royal Secret. Kjiight of the Brazen Serpent. 

26. Prince of Mercy. 

27. Sov. Com. of the Temple. 

28. Knights of the Sun. 

29. Gr. Scotch Kt. of St. Andrew. 

30. Gr. Elect Knight Kadosh. 

31. Gr. Ins. Inq. Commander. 

32. Sub. Pr. of Royal beeret. 

33. Sov. Gr. Inspectors General. 
EXPLANATION OF CAMP: — We read in almost all the 

rituals of this degree, that Frederic the Second, or the 
Great King of Prussia, being at the head of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity on the continent of Europe, projected 
a league of the union of the brethren, Companions, 
Knights, Princes and Commanders of Masonry, for^ 
the purpose of rescuing Jerusalem and the Sepulchre 
of Jesus of Nazareth from the hands of the Turks, bj^ 
a new crusade, in which it was his intention to com- 
mand in person. It is said that he prepared a plan, by 
which the army was to encamp, which is the same now 
represented to you, and which is also perpetuated on 
the tracing-board and apron of this degree. 

But it is not at all probable that Frederic the Great 
ever thought seriously of invading Palestine, and wag- 
ing a new crusade. He was far too busily engaged in 1?! 
the affairs of his own kingdom, alid too much of a 



jt 



INITIATION. 439 

philosopher to have thought of so chimerical a project. 
Nor had he any control whatever over the Masonic fra- 
ternity, elsewhere than in Prussia, nor even was he 
Grand Master of Masons there, and if he had intended 
a crusade, he was too accomplished a general ever to 
have fixed upon such a plan, for a real encampment. It 
is contrary to all rule. It would be wholly impracti- 
cable in the field, and it. is entirely evident that it is 
Merely an imaginary plan, never meant to be put to 
actual use. 

It is equally evident that if Frederic had expected to 
gather any army of Masons, which he could not se- 
riously have done, the number of Masons of the dif- 
ferent degrees would not have been so proportioned as 
to admit of their encamping by the plan proposed. Of 
some of the degrees there would have been but a hand- 
ful, and the Apprentices, Fellow Crafts and Masters, 
to whom only one of the nine sides of the nonagon is 
assigned, would have outnumbered all the rest. 

The camp being therefore, impracticable, and even 
absurd as an actuality, we must either conclude that 
I the inventor was a man of no sense, or that it is an alle- 
gory and a symbol. We are certain of the latter. 

The camp, which is so prominent a feature in this 
degree, must originally have had a meaning, for it can- 
not be supposed that a man of intellect ever seriously 
occupied himself with making a beautiful figure on pa- 
per, arranging it as a camp and adopting arbitrary let- 
ters and names without any deeper meaning than that 
which you have thus far discovered. It is an elaborate, 
complicated and intricate symbol. Its meaning was 
no doubt originally explained, only orally, and that 
alone would be reason and cause sufficient .why that 
meaning should in time be lost. For that cause alone 
has cost Masonry the true meaning of many, even 



430 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

of its simpler symbols and substituted^ strained, un- 
natural and common place interpretations in their 
place. 

The figure is a five-armed cross^ enclosed by a circle, 
that by a triangle, that by a pentagon, that by a hepta- 
gon, and that by a nonagon. On the lines of the nona- 
gon, are the camps of those from the 19th to the 30th 
degrees inclusive. On the triangle, those of the 31st 
and 32nd degrees. It is evident that the distribution of 
these degrees is now nearly arbitrary. While eighteen 
degrees occupy the nonagon, being double the number 
of its sides, twelve occupy the pentagon and two the 
triangle. It is true that Knights of Malta are added 
to make three bodies for the triangle, but this is evi- 
dently a mere make-shift, for they are not Masons, 
and to introduce them destroys the whole idea at once. 

The seventeen sides of these three figures in no way 
suit the present number of the degrees. Then again, 
there are no camps at all on the heptagon, and so it be- 
comes a perfectly useless part of the figure. The dis- 
crepancies in the rituals, as to the distribution of the 
first eighteen degrees, show that the arrangement is 
arbitrary, and there is no attempt made to connect the 
letters of the camp, or of the standards, in any way, 
with the degrees to which they are assigned. They 
would seem to have been taken at random, like the 
names of the Commanding officers, which offer the 
most singular and incongruous mixture. 

As if further to increase the difficulty, the rituals dif- 
fer as to the standards to which the respective letters 
Y. -.E. -.N. \G. -.U. -.are to be assigned. These devices 
of these standards are not apparently connected with 
the degrees in either arrangement, nor is any attempt 
made to explain their meaning, or show from whence 
part of them came. Then we are told of three birds. 



lOTTIATION. 431 

one In each corner of the triangle; a Raven^ a Dove"* 
and a Phoenix/'^ No one vouchsafes to tell us vi^here 
they came from; or the palm-trees on each side of the 
ark; or the m.eaning of the inflamed or winged heart; 
or of the five armed cross in the circle. And if any at- 
tempt to explain these things has been made^ it' is pain- 
ful to a man of intellect to read the miserable and triv- 
ial stuff to which sensible men are expected respectful- 
ly to listen. The reason for selecting geometrical fig- 
ures is obvious. The circle is unity, and it with others 
represent the five sacred Masonic numbers, 1, 3, 5, 7, 
and 9. 

We have deeply studied these emblems, reflected up- 
on them, and made many researches in the hope of 
fathoming their meaning. What we have discovered 
we propose to communicate to you. It is our own dis- 
covery. We have not received it by tradition. Besides 
the cause already mentioned, there is we believe, an- 
other that has lead to the intentional denatu-realiza- 
tion of this symbol, and that has probably destroyed 
the possibility of ever receiving the whole meaning. 
Whether the partial explanation we shall give you is 

Note 384. — "This bird was the diluvian messenger of peace, and 
hovered over the retreating waters like a celestial harbinger of safety. 
Thus a lunette floating on the surface of the ocean, attended by a dove 
with an olive branch in its mouth, and encircled by a rainbow, form 
a striking and expressive symbol which needs no explanation. If Free- 
masonry has allowed this bird to occupy a high situation amongst its 
hallowed symbols, the reasons for such an appropriation are fully com 
peteiit to justify the proceeding. The dove was an agent at the 
creation, at the deluge, and at the baptism of Christ." — Macoy's Ency- 
clopaedia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article Dove, 

Note 385. — "Phoenix. The old mythological legend of the Phoenix is 
a familiar one. The bird was described as of the size of an eagle, with a 
head finely crested, a body covered with beautiful plumage, and eyes 
sparkling like stars. She was said to live six hundred years in the 
wilderness, when she built for herself a funeral pile of aromatic woods, 
which she ignited with the fanning of her wings, and emerged from the 
flames with a new life. Hence the phoenix has been adopted universally 
as a symbol of immortality. ITiggins (Anacalypsis, ii. 441,) says that 
the phoenix is the symbol of an ever-revolving solar circle of six hun- 
dred and eight years, and refers to the Phenician word phen, which 
signifies a cycle. Aumont, the first Grand Master of the Templars after 
the martyrdom of De Molay, and called the 'Restorer of the Order.' 
took, it is said, for his seal, a phoenix brooding on the flames, with the 
motto, 'Ardet ut vivat' — She burns that she may live." — Mackey's Ency- 
clopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Phoenix. 



432 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET, 

right or not, you must yourself judge. It is not given 
you as sacramental. 

Prior to 1786 at least, the Ancient and Accepted Eite 
consisted of only twenty-five degrees. The first eighteen 
were the same as at present. That you may fully under- 
stand what is to be. said hereafter, we subjoin, the de- 
grees above the eighteenth, as they then existed. 

1762. 

19. Grand Pontiff, Master ad vitam. 

20. Grand Patriarch, Noachite. 

21. Grand Master of the Key of Masonry. 

22. Prince of Libanus, or Knight of Eoyal Axe. 

23. Prince Adept. 

24. Commander of the White and Black Eagle. 

25. Commander of the Royal Secret. 

1786. 

19. Grand Pontiff. 

20. Grand Master ad vitam. 

21. Noachite or Prussian Knights. 

22. Prince of Libanus. 

23. Chief of the Tabernacle. 

24. Prince of the Tabernacle. 

25. Knight of the Brazen Serpent. 

26. Prince of Mercy. 

27. Grand Commander of the Temple. 

28. Knight of the Sun. 

29. Grand Scotch Knight of St. Andrew. 

30. Knight Kadosh. 

31. Grand Inspector Inquisitor Commander. 

32. Sublime Prince of the Royal Secret. 

In other words, our 19th and 20th degrees were then 
in one, the 19th. Our 21st was the 20th; our 22nd was 
then the 22nd; and our 28th was then the 23rd; our 



miTiATioi^. 433 

30th or a degree like it, was then the 24th; our 32iid 
was then the 25th, and there was no degree above that; 
and our 23rd, 24th, 25th and 26th, as well as the 33rd 
were not then known. The 27th was a detached degree, 
and the 29th was part of another system. The regula- 
tions and constitutions, said to have been made at Bor- 
deaux, by the Princes of the Royal Secret in 1762, give 
the list of the degrees and require 81 months; that is 
9 times 9, by 1, 3, 5, 7, to be occupied in obtaining 
them. They are divided into seven classes of 3, 5> 3, 
3, 5, 3, 3, degrees respectively; the time required for 
obtaining the degrees, in" each class respectively 9 and 
15, or three times five months. The regulations term 
these the mysterious numbers, and there is in article 
two a paragraph in regard which is translated as fol- 
lows: 

^^All these degrees, in which one must be initiated in 

a mysterious number of months, to arrive in succession 

at each degree, form the number of 81 months; 

8+1=9; as 8 and 9 express 89, and as 9 times 9=81; 

all of which are perfect numbers and very different 

from 1 and 8 which make 9 and 1 and 8 compose 18, 

I for these are imperfect numbers, and this combination 

[is imperfect/^ But a true Mason, who has completed 

' his time, gathers at last the Masonic rose. 

Now taking the numbers of the different figures of 
the camp: Of the circle, or unity, the triangle, pent- 
agon, heptagon and nonagon, we have 1+3+5+7 
+9, which added together make 25, the number of de- 
grees in 1762, and placing the Commanders of the 
Royal Secret in the circle, it leaves one degree for each 
side of all the right hand figures. Thus the number of 
degrees corresponds with the figures; the heptagon 
ceases to be useless, and the arrangement of the de- 
grees ceases to be arbitrary. 

We conclude, at once, that this tracing-board was 



434 SUBLIME PHIKCE OF THE ROYAt SECRET. 



settled when there v/ere but twenty-five degrees, prior 
to 1786, and we see at once that cause, additional to 
tim.e and the treachery of memory which has lost us 
the full explanation of this collection of symbols. It is 
that after the degrees had been increased to the 33rd, 
the figures had too few sides, and it became necessary 
to rearrange the degrees, and distribute them anew 
among the camps. This displaced the letters; assigned 
one letter to more than one degree ; displaced the stand- 
ards and caused the disuse of the heptagon, and made 
the whole arrangement arbitrary and inexplicable. This 
is the key to the mystery ; ^j if it be not, we do not 
believe there is any key, and with this key we proceed 
to unlock that mystery as far as we can ; knowing that 
we can only partially do so, and only hoping to put 
others and more learned investigators on the right 
track and so be instrumental in the ultimate entire de- 
velopment of these interesting symbols. We again ob- 
serve that the degrees of the two scales are identical up 
to the 18th degree assuming as a reasonable supposition, 

that the lower degrees 
were originally assign- 
ed to the lines of the 
cam^p furthest from 
the centre, because tha 
is natural, because the 
general feature would 
in all probability not 
be changed in the re- 
arrangement w h i c h rj 
the increased numberi^i 
of the degrees made 

necessary, we at once find that the nonagon, offering u^ 




1 



initiatio:n'. 435 

nine sides^ accommodates the first nine degrees, begin- 
ning with the Apprentice and ending with the Elect of 
Nine, and that the heptagon^ completing with its seven 
sides the number 16, accommodates those from the 
tenth to the sixteenth, or Prince of Jerusalem inclusive^ 
and thus, as the regulations do, puts these Princes at 
the head of the Masons of those sixteen degrees, and 
this agrees with the regulations of 1762, which de- 
clares them to be the Most Valiant Chiefs of the Eeno- 
vated Masonry, and gives them control over all lodges 
of the Eoyal Perfection and Council of Knights of the 
East. See constitutions of 1762, Art. 31. Above the 16 
degrees then, by the system of 1762, are the following 
which we number as they stand in both scales : 

17. Knights of the East and West. 17 

18. Sovereign Prince of Eose Croix. 18 

19. Grand Pontiff and Master ad vitam 19 and 20 

20. Grand Patriarch, Noachite. 21 

21. Grand Master of the Key of Masonry. 

22. Prince of Libanus, or Knight of Eoyal Axe. 22 

23. Sovereign Prince Adept or Knight of the Sun.28 
" 24. Grand Commander of the Black Eagle. 30 

25. Sovereign Prince of Eoyal Secret. 32 

Now it is obvious that the five sides of the pentagon 
accommodate the five degrees from the 17th to the 21st 
inclusive, and if we assign the Princes of the Eoyal 
Secret to the circle, as we must do to make the number 
correspond, we have for the triangle the three following 
degrees. 

22. Prince of Libanus or Knight of Eoyal Axe. 

23. Sovereign Prince Adept or Knight of the Sun. 

24. Grand Commander of the Black Eagle. 

To have placed an inferior degree on the triangle and 
one of these three on the pentagon, and thus further 



436 StJBLlME PRINCE 01? tHE ROYAL SECRET. 

from the centre, would have been to disarrange and in 
terrupt the regular order and succession of the degrees. ' 
From circumference to centre and this we do not think^ 
the inventors of the symbol would have done, even if 
it required a little forcing to make the emblems corres-: 
pond; because one irregularity of that kind would have 
destroyed the harmony and symmetry of the whole 
system, and the idea on which it was framed. Now to 
the triangle three birds are assigned, apparently in the 
present system without any meaning. 

We have seen an attempt to explain them, or give 
them a symbolical meaning, the success of which, if it 
aimed at being common place and trivial, was most 
encouraging. The Eaven is the Black Eagle of the \ 
24th degree ; that is the Kadosh or Knight of the White 
and Blacky of which degree the old jewel was a Black 
Eagle. 

That fabulous bird, the Phoenix, of , which only one, 
it is said, existed at a time, was in Arabia, sacred to 
the Sun, and an emblem of that Orb. It was said to 
burn itself upon a funeral pile when it grew old, and to 
spring in renewed youth from its own ashes, and hence 
it figured in Alchemy' ^^ th^t search after the Elixer 
that was to give immortality. Of course it was pecul- 
iarly appropriated to the degree of Knight of the Sun, 
or Prince Adept, which originally was an Alchemical 
degree, as the very word ^^Adept^' and its pass-word. 

Note 386. — "Freemasonry and alchemy have sought the same results, 
(the lesson of Divine Truth and the doctrine of immortal life,) and they 
have both sought it by the same method of symbolism. It is not, there- 
fore, strange that in the eighteenth century, and perhaps before, we 
find an incorporation of much of the science of alchemy into that of 
Freemasonry. Hermetic rites and Hermetic degrees were common, and 
their relics are still to be found existing in degrees which do not abso- 
lutely trace their origin to alchemy, but which show some of its traces "S 
in their rituals. The 28th degree of the Scottish Rite, or the Knight K 
of the Sun, is entirely a hermetic degree, and claims its parentage in 
the title of 'Adept of Masonry,' by which it is sometimes known."— 
Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Alchemy, 



INITIATION. 437 

^^Stibiums or Antimony/' supposed to be the universal 
solvent show and as appears also by its old ritual and 
lecture. 

The Dove'" was a sacred bird in Syria, and the only 
one employed for religious purposes, among the He- 
brews. One was, according to the legend, sent out three 
different times with intervals of seven days between 
each mission by Noah from the Ark, as well as by 
Deucalion, and Noah is the first sacred word of the 
32nd degree or Prince of Libanus. 

We do not say that these explanations are correct, 
but they are at least reasonable and probable. 

To each angle and side of the pentagon, as we have 
seen, is assigned a standard, designated by a letter and 
a particular device. The rituals differ however as to 
the letters belonging to the particular standards. They 
give them in these two ways. 

T, \ The Ark and Palm Tree. The Lion and Key. 

E. '. The Lion and Key. The Inflamed Heart. 

N. \ The Inflamed lleart. The Eagle with 2 Heads. 

O, '. The Eagle with 2 heads.'^^ The Black Ox. 

Note 387. — "In the Arkite rites, which arose after the di«;persion of 
Babel, the dove was always considered as a sacred bird, in commeuiura- 
tion of its having been the first discoverer of land. Its name, which in 
Hebrew is ionah, was given to one of the earliest nations of the 
earth; and, as the emblem of peace and good fortune it became the 
I bird of Venus. Modern Masons have commemorated the messenger of 
' Noah in the honorary degree of *Ark and Dove,' which Is sometimes 
conferred on Royal Arch Masons." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Free- 
masonry, Article Noah. 

Note 388. — **The double-headed eagle was probably first introduced 
as a symbol into Masonry in the year 1758. In that year the body call- 
ing itself the Council of Emperors of the East and West was estab- 
lished in Paris, The double-headed eagle was likely to have been 
assumed by this Council in reference to the double jurisdiction which 
it claimed, and which is represented so distinctly in its title. Its ritual, 
which consisted of twenty-tive degrees, all of which are now contained 
in the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, was subsequently established 
In the city of Berlin, and adopted by the Grand Lodge of the Three 
Globes. Frederick II., king of Prussia, who was the head of the 
Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, is said to have merged this body 
into his own Rite, adding to Its twenty-five degrees eight more, so as 
to make the thirty-three degrees of which that Rite is now composed. 
The double-headed eagle was then adopted as the symbol of the thirty- 
third and ultimate degree. The whole Rite being considered as a repre- 
sentative of the Holy Empire, as is indicated by the titles of two of 
Its ofl3cers, who are still called the Secretary and the Treasurer of the 
Holy Empire, the double-headed eagle, which was the ensign, as it has 
been seen, of that empire, was appropriately adopted as the symbol of 
the governing degree of the Rite." — Mackey'a Encyclopaedia Qi Free- 
masonry, Article Fagle, Double-Heacled. 



438 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

U.\ The Black Ox. The Ark and Palm Trees. 

Applying these devices to the five degrees, 17th, 18th/ 
19th, 20th and 21st degrees, the Lion and Key would 
seem to be appropriate enough to the 21st degree, or 
the Grand Master of the Key of Masonry. ' 

The crowned double-headed Eagle, which is the arms 
of Prussia, to the 20th degree, or the Noachites or 
Prussian Knights. 

The Ark of the Covenant, of which the High Priest 
had the especial charge, to the 19th degree or Grand 
Pontiff and Master ad Vitam. 

The inflamed winged heart, emblematical of the suf- 
ferings and glory of the Master from Nazareth, to the 
18th decree, or Sovereign Prince of Rose Croix, and the 
Ox an Egyptian and Jewish symbol, displayed on one 
of the Standards of the four principal tribes to the 
17th degree, or Jewish Knights of the East and West. 

It is likely that these devices have a still deeper 
meaning and a mysterious reference to an ancient re- 
ligion and its mysteries, but we have, as to this, our- 
selves succeeded in obtaining but a few hints, and we 
can therefore communicate no more to you. They will 
perhaps, give you the key to the esoteric meaning of 
these symbols and you cannot do better than to occupy 
your time and exercise your intellect in discovering 
that meaning. 

The Ancient Persian''^ mysteries were sacred to the 

Note 389. — "From the statement of this Persian Mason it appears 
that nearly all the members of the Persian Court belong to the mystic 
Order, even as German Masonry enjoys the honor of counting the emperor 
and crown prince among its adherents. The appearance of this Moham- 
medan Mason in Berlin seems to have excited a little surprise among 
some of the brethren there, and the surprise would be natural enough 
to persons not aware of the extent to which Masonry has been diffused 
over the earth. Account for it ss one may, the truth is certain that tbi^ 
mysterious Order was established in the Orient many ages ago. Nearly 
all of the 'old Mohammedan buildings in India, such as tombs, mosques, 
etc., are marked with the Masonic symbols, and many of these structures, 
still perferct, were built in the time of the Mogul Emperor Akbar, who 
died in 1605. Thus Masonry must have been introduced into India from 
Middle Asia by the Mohammedans hundreds of years ago," — Mackey'g 
Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Persia, 



INITIATION. 439 

God, Mithras''' ''Deo Soli Invicto Mithrae"" to the sun 
god Mithras the Invincible, also called the Mediator, 
the fertilizer of deserts, the slayer of the dragon, and 
of evil spirits. He was worshipped among the Ethiopi- 
ans and Egyptians in Greece, after the time of Pompey 
at Eome. He is represented in the sculptures as a 
young man mxounted on the Equinoctial Bull, and 
plunging into its flank a sword, whose hilt terminated 
at the upper end in two heads of an Eagle or a Hawk. 
He is represented as at the mouth of a cavern, with a 
figure on each side bearing a lighted torch. He is ac- 
companied by Eorosch, the Celestial Raven, and the dy- 
ing bull is consoled by Taschtar-, the dog-star, the har- 
binger of his resurrection. The bull was regarded as a 
symbol of the power that produces vegetation and life. 
He makes, the Zendavesta said, "the grass to grow abun- 
dantly and gives all fruitfulness to the earth/^ Hence 
the motto of the standard on which he figures ''Omnia 
Tempus Alit/' So in Egypt, Mnevis, the black Ox of 
Heliopolis, was dedicated to Osiris and they wor- 
,shipped a black Bull, which they called Onuphis, 
\ The lion, the sign of the Summer Solstice, and 
domicile of the Sun was the symbol of that orb. The 
figures in the mithriac monuments, and the second de- 
gree of the Prussian mysteries was called the degree of 
the Lion. The initiates were called Eagles, Hawks and 
Eavens. In a very curious Eoman marble, the drawing 

Note 390. — "Mithras, Mysteries of. There are none of the Ancient 
Mysteries which afford a more interesting subject of investigation to 
the Masonic scholar than those of the Persian god Mithras. Instituted, 
as it is supposed, by Zeradusht or Zoroaster, as an initiation into the 
principles of the religion which he had founded among the ancient 
Persians, they in time extended into Europe, and lasted so long that 
traces of them have been found in the fourth century, *With their 
penances,' says Mr. King (Gnostics, p. 47,), 'and tests of the courage 
of the candidate for admission, they have been maintained by a con- 
stant tradition through the secret sor-ietics of the Middle Ages and the 
Rosicrucians down to the modern faint reflex of the latter — the Free- 
masons."— Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Mithra^i 
Mysteries ofi 



1 

440 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. ] 

1 

of which was published by Gronovius in his Latin edi- | 
tion of Agostini, representing Mithras, with one foot 
on the body and the other between the horns of ^a Bull, 
are seen a Lion's head and two palm trees just putting 
out their leaves, a Eaven and an Eagle on a palm tree 
holding a thunderbolt in his claws. It is this thunder- 
bolt which has been, in our symbol, corrupted into a 
sword, with a crooked and wavy blade. 

Mithras himself was often represented with the head 
of a lion. 

The palm tree was not only an emblem of virtue ^d 
truth, but it was also consecrated to the celestial move- 
ments, and above all, the annual revolutions of the 
Sun. 

Among the Hebrews, it will be remembered, the lion 
was borne on the crimson standard of the tribe of 
Judah. The Ox, on the green standard of Ephraim. 
The Eagle on the green standard of Dan, and the ship 
on the purple standard of Zebulon. Perhaps the Ark 
of the Covenant is really the Ark of the Deluge, or the 
ship of Zebulon. 

The inflamed winged heart is probably the winged 
globe or sun, a common symbol in Egyptian temples 
and an emblem of immortality. 

The figure 525 on the golden collar of the lion had 

originally, no doubt, a meaning connected with the 

number of degrees or perhaps with an Epoch in the 

annals of Masonry, but for the present at least, that 

• meaning is lost. 

Nor have we been able to discover the origin of the 
several letters which designate the tents of the nonagon 
and the standards of the pentagon. Others possessed of 
more extensive learning may hereafter succeed in do- 
ing so, and also in unveiling the hidden meanings of 
the names of the commanding officers. We might pre- 
tend to do so, and give you, as others have done^ arbi* 



INITIATION-. 441 

trary and perhaps unmeaning explanations, without 
any warrant but that of our own imagination. There has 
been too much of that in Masonry, and we prefer to be 
satisfied with the little that we know, and to leave the 
rest for future investigation. 

It will be noticed that the seven watch-words for the 
different days of the week, all of them names of per- 
sons, correspond with the number of sides of the hepta- 
gon, and that if they were assigned to command there, 
they would make the number of commanders complete. 
These seven names are curiously enough, those of three 
Persian kings, Darius, Xerxes and Cyrus. The Mace- 
donian conqueror Alexander, Ptolemy Philadelphus, 
one of his successors, Herod, the tributary Roman king 
in Judea, and Jewish king, Hezekiah, while all the an- 

^swers are the names of Jewish prophets. The name of 
Herod and those of Xerxes and Ptolemy Philadelphus 
seem wholly out of place in Masonry. 

The names of the Commanders of the nonagon ; one 

? Phaleg goes back to the building of the tower of Babel ; 

^ one Aholiab, to the building of the first tabernacle, one 

|Joshua, is the name of the successor of Moses, one 

f Johaben, is fictitious, one Jehoiada, is that of the Jew- 
ish High Priest, in the time of Jehoash and Athaliah, 
and three, Zerubbabel, Ezra and Nehemiah, refer tp the 
rebuilding of the temple, while the one remaining is 
the name of the last prophet. 

Of the names of the five Chiefs of the standards, 

Uwo Bezaleel and Aholiab, were those of the Architects 
of the tabernacle of the desert, Mahuzen or Masshin, 
v/hich means in Latin, ^^^Haesintantes'^ that is, hesitat- 
ing, it is not the name of a person. Amariah was a 
common Jewish name, or if it be Emerk, the meaning 
is not known, and Garimont or Guarimond, was the 

^Patriarch of Jerusalem, between whose hands the first 



1 

i,' 

442 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 

Templars took their oaths. 

We may also observe, without any attempt to explain, 
that the name of Aholiab appears twice, once as a Com- 
mander of the nonagon and once as a Standard Bearer 
of the pentagon. The words of the degree offer quite 
as singular a mixture and among them is one that ma y 
perhaps be found to have a peculiar significance. It is 
a Hebrew word, ^^Hochmah.^' The word means ^Wis- 
dom^' and particularly the wisdom of the Deity, or in 
the Kabbala,^^^ the second ^^Dephirah^ or Emanation 
from the Deity, the same as the mind, wisdom and word 
of Plato. This is perhaps an indication that the camp 
is altogether a Kabbalistic or Gnostic symbol, and if 
so, its meaning is to be found in the Kabbalistic writ- 
ings, in which, so far, we have sought for it in vain, but 
we know the general meaning of the symbol, and one of 
the lessons, at least, which it was intended to teach us 
and to all Masons. The key to that is found in two > 
words of the degreee, wh^ch we have already given you. 

Phaal-Kol, it is said, -means '^separated.^' Separated 
as Masons have been for many years, by intestine dis- 
sensions, the jealousies of rival rites, and the efforts of 
illegitimate bodies to exercise usurped powers. Separat- 
ed as mankind has been for ages by differences of re- 
ligions belief, by the ambition and interests of kingsj 
by natural lines or mere imaginary boundaries thaP 

Kote 391.— "The Kabbala may be defined to be a system of phil- 
osophy which embraces certain mystical interpretations of Scripture, and 
metaphysical speculations concerning the Deity, man, and spiritual beingsJ 
In these interpretations and speculations, according to the Jewish doctors, 
were enveloped the most profound truths of religion, which, to be com- 
prehended by finite beings, are obliged to be revealed through the 
medium of symbols and tillegories. Buxtorf (Lex. Talm.) defines th( 
Kabbala to be a secret science, which treats in a mystical and enig- 
matical manner of things divine, angelical, theological, celestial, and 
metaphysical; the subjects being enveloped in striking symbols andj 
secret modes of teaching. Much use is made of it in the high degrees,^ 
and entire Rites have been constructed on its principles. Hence it 
demands a place in any general work on Masonry. "—Mackey s Encyclo-; 
paedia of Freemasonry, Article Kabbala. » 



'initiation. 443 

have ma4e one people haters of another, and kept tiie, 
world miserable with wars. Separated as men have been 
from truth and knowledge, by the arts and crafts of a 
scheming and selfish priesthood. Separated as man has 
been from his God by his passions and his vicqs^ as well 
as his ignorance. 

And Pharash-Kol, it is said, means reunited. That 
union of Masons, of all rites and degrees, of which the 
camp is the apt and fitting symbol, to accomplish the 
great ends of Masonry, to heal all dissensions within, 
and produce peace and harmony without, to reconcile 
all rites and make toleration and charitable judgment 
universal; to elevate the masses of mankind and to 
teach them their true interests, to substitute equality 
and brotherhood in the place of despotic power and 
usurped privilege ; to dethrone anarchy and license and 
canonize law and order, and in the place of smoking 
altars of fanaticism and superstition, of bigotry and 
sectarianism, to set up those of true Masonry, garland- 
ed with flowers and sending up toward Heaven, mingled 
with the perfumes of their incense, the thanks and 
gratitude of the human race to a beneficent father, who 
loveth all the children he has made. 
. That my brother is the Jerusalem of which the army 
of Masonry hopes to take possession; the heritage 
which our father intended his children to enjoy. No 
particular spot on this earth, but the blessings of free 
thought, free conscience and free speech, everywhere 
common as. the light and air, and everywhere good gov- 
ernment, edudation and order. 

The place of rendezvous of the army, you will find in 
all the rituals of this degree to be at Naples, Ehodes, 
Cyprus, Malta and Joppa. But they are merely sym- 



444 SUBLIME PRINCE OE ^HE HOYAL SECRET. 

bolical of the different periods of the world's progress 
towards that fortunate and happy state. The revolt of 
intellect against forms, under the lead of Luther, wa^ 
the firing of the first gun, the assertion of America, of 
the principle proclaimed by the French philosophers ofj 
the 18th century, that all human government derives 
its authority from the will of the people, was the sec- 
ond and the proclamation in France of the doctrines 
of liberty, equality and fraternity was the third. Th( 
roar of the others will be heard in God's good timej 
and every man may do something to accelerate tin 
coming of the day of final victory and triumph. Fori 
nothing that is done in this world is without its re- 
sults, and every man may effect something in his own, 
sphere and immediate circle. The whole globe is the; 
field of our labors, but each runs his furrow and sows 
the good seed in his own little corner of it, and every, 
one who does a brave deed, or says a wise thing, helps 
the coming of the great day and final enfranchisement 
of humanity. Wherever Masonry is practiced and hon- 
ored, there let Masons organize for the relief of their 
less fortunate brethren. 

The doctrines of Masonry are on the lips of many, 
but in the hearts of few. He who would teach it, must, 
first practice it, and let his example, his generosity, his 
charity and his toleration commend it to the considera- 
tion of others. 

Commander in Chief — (Striking one.) Sublimi 
Prince Grand Master of Ceremonies, conduct our bro- 
ther to the throne, there to be received and constitutei 
and to be invested with the regalia of this degree. 

Commander in Chief — Order my brethren! (All ris( 
under the sign of order and form themselves in a circL 
around the candidate, who has been conducted by flv( 
steps to the foot of the throne, where he kneels. Thj 



INITIATION. 445 

members draw their swords, pass them to their left 
hands and direct the points towards the heart of the 
candidate, replacing the right haUd in its former posi- 
tion. 

Commander in Chief — In the name of God, and un- 
der the auspices of the Supreme Council of Sovereign 
Grand Inspectors General, 33rd and last degree of the 
Ancient and Accepted Eite for the jurisdiction of the 
United States of America, sitting at New York, State 
of New York, with the consent and sanction of the 
Sublime Princes of the Eo3^al Secret here present, and 
by virtue of the powers with which I am vested as II- 
ustrious Commander in Chief of this Grand Consis- 
;ory, I do receive and constitute you a Sublime Prince 
of the Eoval Secret and faithful guardian of the Sacred 
Treasure, to the end that you may have and enjoy all 
:he rights, franchises and privileges and prerogatives 
appertaining to the degree and dignity now conferred 
on you. (Illustrious Commander in Chief then strikes 
with the blade of his .sword five light blows on the 
shoulder of the candidate.) 
Commander in Chief — Eise my brother. ! 
Commander in Chief — Sublime Princes, Carry 
Bwords ! Eeturn Swords ! 

Commander in Chief — Eeceive the collar or sash. Its 
color is an emblem of sorrow and mourning for the 
miseries and sufferings of humanity. You have worn 
the same color in other degrees and are familiar with it. 
We yet wear it because our efforts have not yet se- 
cured the happiness of our brethren, and .the higher 
we ascend in Masonry, the more we feel and deplore the 
miseries of the people. 

Eeceive also and wear this Teutonic cross of gold, 
the jewel of the order. -Deserve it by your services, 
fbich yoii Bball hereafter render to the good cause in 



4:4:6 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL ^RET. J 

which you now claim to be a chief and leader. Sublime ;| 
Prince Grand Master of Ceremonies^ conduct this the ^^ 
youngest of the Princes under the banner of the order, ^f 
and let his brethren look upon him and he upon them. • j 
(Candidate is conducted by the Grand Master of Cere- r 
monies under the banner and placed fronting the ]~ 
brethren.) l|j 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Princes of this Eoyal ||l 
Grand Consistory, I proclaim our Illustrious brother |j 
A. '.B. -.a Sublime Prince of the Eoyal Secret, 3:3nd 
degree of the -Ancient and Accepted Rite, and an hon- 
orary member of the Grand Consistory for the State of 
.... and I require you and all Sublime Princes of the 
Eoyal Secret everywhere to acknowledge and recognize 
him as such. 
83— Second Masonic PASSMAN" 

Commander in Chief- — Sublime Prince Grand Master 
of Ceremonies, conduct the candidate to the seat of 
honor. (Grand Master of Ceremonies conducts candi- 
date to left hand of Illustrious Commander in Chief.) 

Commander in Chief — I congratulate you my bro- 
ther, for myself and in the name of this Grand Con- 
sistory on your reception as a Sublime Prince of the 
Eoyal Secret, and on your admission as a member of our 
body, and I beg you to accept our*sincere assurances of 
brotherly affection and esteem. 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Princes, return 
sw^ords ! Be seated ! 

Commander in Chief — Siiblime Prince Grand Minis- 
ter of State, you have the floor. (Grand Minister of 
State delivers an address.) 

Commander in Chief — (Strikes one with the Pommel 
of his sword.) 

First Lieutenant Commander— (Strikes one.) 

Second Lieutenant Commander — (Strikes one.) 

Command'er in C7m*^/— Sublime Princ<^s A^aliant Firstj 
and Second Lieutenant Commanders^ inform your brav^ 



INITIATION. 417 

companions that this Grand Consistory will listen to^, 
and act upon any remarks they may have to offer for the 
interest of this body^ or of the order in general. 

First Lieutenant Commander — ^Sublime Princes and 
companions of my camp^ the Illnstrions Commander in 
Chief informs yon that this Grand Consistory will listen 
to^ and act npon any r^arks yon hay have to offer for 
the interest of this body or of the. order in general. 

Seco7id Lieutenant Commander — Sublime Princes and 
companions of my camp^ the Illustrious Commander in 
Chief informs you that this Grand Consistory will listen 
to and act upon any*remarks you may have to offer for 
the- interest of this body or of the order in general. 

Second Lieutenant Commander — (If no one re- 
sponds.) Sublime Prince First Lieutenant Commander, 
silence prevails in my camp. 

First Lieutenant Commander — (If no one rises to 
speak.) Illustrious Commander in Chief, silence pre- 
vails in both camps. 

Commander in , Chief — Sublime Princes, Valiant 
First and Second Lieutenant Commanders inform your 
!)rave companions that the box of fraternal assistance is 
'^bout to be presented to them. 

I First Lieutenafit Commander — ^Sublime Princes and 
Companions of my camp, the Illustrious Commander in 
Chief informs you that the box of fraternal assistance is 
about to be presented to you. 

Second Lieutenant Commander — Sublime Princes 
and companions of my camp, the Illustrious Commander 
in Chief informs you that the box of fraternal assistance 
is about to be presented to you. (The Hospitaller then 
takes the box of fraternal assistance to each member, 
beginning with the Illustrious Commander in Chief, 
First and Second Lieutenant Commanders, etc.) 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Prince Hospitaller, 
you will hand the contents of the box to the Grand 
Treasurer, 






CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Sublime Prince of the Eoyal Secret. 

Commander in Chief — (Strikes one with pommel of 
his sword.) 

First Lieutenant Commander — (Strikes one with 
pommel of his sword.) 

Second Lieutenant Commander — (Strikes one with 
pommel of his sword.) 

Commander in Chief — Sublime Princes, let us not 
like ungrateful children be thankless to our Heavenly 
Father, for the many blessings which, in his loving kind- 
ness, he has bestowed upon us. The poorest of us enjoy 
a thousand blessings, and is quit of a thousand calami- 
ties, the former of which God could have denied him 
and the latter cast upon him. He has enabled us to^do 
some good, and by his aid we may hope to do still more 
and we appear nearest to him, when we confer benefits 
on all men. Let love, gratitude and adoration ever 
burn brightly towards our Father in Heaven, on the 
altar of our hearts, and as words are powerless to ex- 
press all that we ought to feel toward him, let us adopt 
the expressive symbol of our ancient brethren and offer 
him the perfumes of the purest incense. 

Commander in. Chief — Order Sublime Princes, and 
under arms! (All rise, draw their swords and come to 
a carry, the Illustrious Commander in Chief then passes 
his sword under his left arm, the point to the rear, and 
downwards, leaves his seat and proceeds towards the 
altar of perfumes which must always be prepared for 
the occasion,) 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Thirty-Second Degree ; oR;, Sublime Prince of the 

KoYAL Secret. 

The French Revolution — Jacobins Like Chicago Anarchists — Lodge and 
Romish Despotism — Denials that Masonry is a Religion — Proof that 
Masonry is a Religion — Made Twofold More the Child of Hell — Free- 
masonry Confessedly Deistic — Deism is Practical Atheism — Adopts the 
Motto of the Jesuits— **They Sbal] Be Booted Up." 

This degree originated thirty years before the French 
Eevolntion of 1789^ and was active in producing it. 
The lodge-theory was that of the anarchists of today^ 
that;, if institutions or religion, and government were 
abolished;, human passions, like fluids^, would find their 
level in universal peace and happiness. Communists 

^guillotined their king^ and hung their bishops to lamp- 
posts ; proclaimed "^^liberty and equality ;'^ and put their 
religious creed over the gate of their cemetery: ''There 
is no God! Death is an eternal sleep/' The last de- 
gree of their system required the candidate to stab his 

I brother, or nearest friend, as a traitor to the lodge, and 

' amid the brother's groans, and pleadings for his life, 
they laid the candidate's gloved hand on the beating 
heart of a lamb. And, if he stabbed, they removed the 

vj)linder, and swore him to vengeance against Church 
and State. This was ''The Royal Secret/' This ex- 
plains the vengeance sworn in this and other degrees of 
that day. {See Rohison's Conspiracy, p. 299.) But, in 
this country, and at this day, this degree is senseless, 
and worthless. Its bluster about freeing the people, is 
meaningless, and itself not worth reading. 

But how happens this once "Ne plus ultra'' degree to 
be so prolix and stupid as to be scarce worth reading ? 



450 JACOBINS LIKE CHICAGO ANARCHISTS. 

The answer is this : when formed by Jacobin Jesuits, 
in 1754, in the Jesuits' College of Clermont, Paris, it 
was "the Military Organization'' as the candidate was 
told. (See page 397,) It then crowned the Eite of 
Perfection of 25 degrees, which was adopted by ^^the 
Council of Emperors/' four years later; that is, in 1758. | 
(See note 377.) The Jacobins, like the Chicago anar- 
chists lately hung were then -secretly swearing to do what 
they afterwards did, viz,, wage war on the government. ^ 
Hence this 32nd grade was not called a degree, but an 
"organization/' as it was. But when adopted by Morin's 
Sovereign Inspectors, at Charleston, S. C, in 1801, no 
war was then contemplated^ but by Aaron Burr, and 
he was soon tried by Jefferson, for his life. The coun- 
try was then peaceful, and satisfied and pleased with 
their free constitution, adopted in 1789, only twelve 
years before. Of course, no fighting was contemplated. 
True French sympathizers elected Jefferson that year; 
but the French revolution had reacted, and the Monroe 
doctrine was soon adopted, to keep the United States 
free from foreign entanglements. Masonry now did not 
mean fight, but money ^ and false worship. 

What then were Dalcho, Mitchell and Provost to do ? 
They had resolved on an "Ancient and Accepted Scot- 
tish Eite,'' to rule the false worships of Masonry 
throughout the world. They adopted a scale of thirty- 
two degrees; and placed this Military degree at the 
head: because, it had been, as the notes and ritual say: 
"the Ne Phis Ultra degree/' and it would not do to 
leave it out. They therefore stretched it, and stuffed it 
into its present shape, prolix enough. Hence the hotch- 
potch flummery of a camp of nine sides, with stupid 
Masomc explanatious for every comer, 



i 



LODGE AND ROMISH DESPOTISM. 451 

But the one "^^mission and object^^ (Maekey) of Ma- 
sonry is kept steadily in view; which is the worship of 
the god of this world, who is Satan, as the ''Orand 
Architect of the Universe/' and to accomplish this by 
inventing ^^a religion in which all mankind agree ;^^ and 
this, by putting all earth's religions upon a level, and 
uniting them together in Masonic worship, which is 
boldly avowed in rituals, lexicons, and philosophical 
degrees. This is, (in Revelation, IS, IJf,) called: the 
image of the beast, made by ^^them, that dwell on the 
earth;'' that is, everybody; every creed, and no creed; 
all who join secret lodges. But this world-religion 
must have some form and shape, to hold together; and 
be taxed; hence, it takes the form, or image, of the 
beast. Lodge despotism is as absolute as Eomigh 
despotism, and is the image of it ; and it is made, as we 
have seen, by the lamb-dragon beast, which is Popery; 
^Hhat great city, (Rome) which reigneth over the kings 
of the earth/' {Rev, 17, 18.) 

Note now the profound craft, by which this is to be ac- 
complished, viz,. Masonry promises men salvation by 
I ceremonies invented by men, administered by priests, 
and inhabited by devils. This is the sum and substance 
of all the false religions on earth, and will ultimately 
unite them against Christ. (See Rev. 20^.) But the 
only opponents Masonry dreads, is Christ, who refused 
to worship Satan, and his followers. If there were no 
Christians in lodges, Masonry would not live an hour. 
Hence, though Christ is wholly omitted, in the lower 
degrees, He is taken into the lodges, made by Jesuits 
and Jews, as a tool of incantation, but He is not per- 
mitted to be worshiped there, except by worships which 
are paid to devils. In the next and last degree, of the 
world's ruling rite, the SSrd^ Christ i^ twir-p o^]]o(] ''nvr 



452 DENIALS THAT MASONRY IS A RELIGION. 

Sovereign/' (See pp. 476-7.) but none are baptized in 
His name, nor do they celebrate His death. The bread 
is eaten and the wine drunk from human skulls, in 
honor of devils, not Christ; and though Christ is called 
sovereign, they trample on His law. Why, then, do 
they pay Him these empty compliments? Plainly, to 
draw in ignorant, weak, and worldly Christians, and 
this is what they achieve. ^ 

Nothing is more common, than the denial that Free* 
masonry is a religion. This denial is made by many 
Masons, and by all Jack-Masons, who bear the burdens 
of the lodge, while claiming merit for not joining it. 
But the many distinct avowals, that ''Masonry is a re- 
ligious institution'' made by the highest Masonic au- 
thorities, have been given in their own words. The 
diabolical craft of the system appears in this; that 
while ^^traditions,'^ which are man-made religions, cru- 
cified ^*^the Son of Gpod,'^ they worship the cross, the 
tool by which they tortured Him, to make believe they 
were opposed to His crucifixion and torture, as if the 
assassin should kneel before the dagger, with which he 
stabbed his victim. N'or is this all, or the worst: 
claiming that they unite all religions in one, they re- 
nounce and exclude the God and religion of the Bible, 
as ^^bigoted^' and narrow. They work only in Christian 
lands, not in barbarous and savage countries; and they 
denounce as ^^bigoted'^ the religion of the lands where 
they work. And to crown their falsehood with felony, 
they steal and falsely appropriate the principles knd 
fruits of the Gospel of Christ. The quotations which 
we give below, not only prove that Masonry claims to be 
a religion, but the true religion, and that its thistles pro- 
duce figs, that its heathen ritual regenerates, sancti- 



PROOF THAT MASONRY IS A RELIGIOK'. 453 

fies, and saves men. To begin with the Entered Ap- 
prentice : 

^^There he stands without our portals^ on the threshold 
of this new Masonic life, in darkness, helplessness and 
ignorance. Having been wandering amid the errors, 
and covered over with the pollutions of the outer and 
profane world, he comes inquiringly to our doors, seek- 
ing the new birth, and asking a withdraw^d of the veil 
which conceals divine truth from his uninitiated sight. 
* * * There is to be not simply a change for the 
future, but also an extinction of the past ; for initiation 
is, as it were, a death to the world, and a resurrection 
to a new life.'' Mackey's Ritualist, pp, 22-3. 

This is Satan's travesty and burlesque of Bible con- 
viction of sin, and seeking religion. The Fellow Craft 
is still compassing Mt. Sinai. Then follows the new 
birth, or regeneration, not ^^by the Holy Ghost," but 
by the third, or Master's degree : 

^^This has very properlv been called ihQ sublime degree 
of a Master Mason, as well for the solemnity of the 
ceremonies which accompany it, as for the profound 
lessons of wisdom which it inculcates. The important 
design of the degree is to symbolize the great doctrine 
of the resurrection of the body, and the immortality 
of the soul; and hence it has been remiarked-by a learned 
v/riter of our Order, that the Master Mason represents a 
man saved from the grave of iniquity, and raised to the 
faith of salvation." — MacJcey's Ritualist, p. 109. 

Then follows the Masonic lying-in, in w^hich the 
devil acts as midwife. The hoodwink falls, the lodge 
claps and stamps, and the weary, badgered and be- 
fooled candidate experiences such a ^change of heart/' 



454 MADE TWOFOLD MORE TliE CHl D OF HELL. 

as Saul and Judas Iscariot did after Satan entered 
them. (See 1 Sam, 16, IJ^; and Jno. 13, 27.) 

'The Shock of Entrance is then the Symbol of the 
disruption of the candidate from the ties of the world, 
and his introduction into the life of Masonry. It is the 
symbol of the agonies of the first death, and of the 
throes of the new birtR/' — MacJcei/s Ritualist, p, 2Jf. 

This change is not imaginary, but real. The testi- 
mony of Christ, concerning such priest-made proselytes 
is : ''They become twofold more the child of hell, than 
leforer {Math. 23, 15.) Witness Saul's attempt to 
murder David and Jonathan, and Arensdorf s miurder 
of Haddock, of Sioux City. But not all Masons ex- 
perience thia fearful change of heart. The ^ average 
of Masons who attend lodge-meetings regularly, is only 
one in five. Only those, who believe in and practice 
lodge-worship, become "possessed'^ by the god of the 
lodge. After Morgan's murder, three-fourths of the 
lodges of the United States gave up their charters. 
The remaining one-fourth, deliberately became acces- 
sories to the horrible inhuman murder of Morgan, be- 
fore or after the fact. They relished, and adhered to 
Masonic "work,'' or worship; and "their foolish hearts 
were blinded." 

Of the fact that Masons who are thus bewitched with 
sorcery, regard and believe it to be a religion^ the proof 
is abundant. Thus their ablest writer says : 

"Speculative Masonry is the application and sancti- 
fication of the working tools and implements, the rules 
and principles of operative Masonry, to the veneration 
of God and the purification of the heart. The specula- 
tive Mason is engaged in the construction of a spirit- 
ual temple in. his heart, pure and spotless, fit for the 



FREEMASONRY CONFESSEDLY DEISTIC. 455 

dwelling place of Him who is the author of purity." — 
Machey's Ritualist, p. 39. 

What is professing religion, if this is not? Then 
also the same writer says of the Shock o'f Enlighten- 
ment, or Eite of Illumination : 

^This mental illumination,' — this spiritual light, 
which, after his new birth, is the first demand of the 
new candidate, is but another name for Divine Truth,— 
the truth of God and the soul,— the nature and essence 
of both, — which constitute the chief design of all Ma- 
sonic teaching." — Machey's Ritualist, p, SS. 

We add the following, not because needed to prove 
Masonry a religion, but to show that it is organized 
deism : 

^'^Every important undertaking in Masonry is both 
begun and completed with prayer. The prayers given 
in the hand-books of the Blue Lodge, are such, as all 
Masons, whatever their religious faith, may unite in. 
In the orders of knighthood the prayers are, as a matter 
of course, strictly and intensely Christia^. In the third 
L degree a sublime prayer, adapted from the 14th chapter 
of Job, is made in American lodges an essential part 
of the ritual of Eaising." — Morris' Dictionary Art. 
Prayer. 

it is evident from the above quotations that Free- 
masonry claims to he a religion. 

Kow let Masonic authorities tell us what kind of a 
religion it is. 

"The truth, is, that Masonry is undoubtedly a re- 
ligious institution, — its religion being of that universal 
kind in which all men agree, and which, handed down 
through the long succession of ages, from that ancient 
priesthood who first taught it, embraces the great tenets 
of the existence of God, and of the immortality of the 



456 DEISM IS PRACTICAL ATHEISM. 

soul; tenets, which by its peculiar symbolic languages, 
it has preserved from its foundation, and still continues 
m the same beautiful way to teach. Beyond this for 
its religious faith, we must not and cannot go/' — 
MacJcey's Masonic Jurisprudence, page 95, 

''The religion then, of Masonry, is pure theism, on 
which its different members engraft their own peculiar 
opinions, but they are not permitted to introduce them 
into the lodge, or to connect their truth or falsehood 
with the truth of Masonry/' — Macheys Lexicon, Art. 
Religion, 

"All the ceremonies of our order are prefaced and 
terminated with prayer, because Masonry is a religious 
institution and because we thereby show our depend- 
ence on, -and our faith and trust in God." — MacJcey's 
Lexicon, Art, Prayer. — 

''This is the scope and aim of its ritual. The Master 
Mason represents man when youth, manhood, old age, 
and life itself have passed away as fleeting shadows, 
yet raised from the grave of iniquity, and quickened 
into another and better existence. By its legend and all 
its ritual it is implied that we have been redeemed from 
the death of sin and sepulchre of pollution !" — Machey's 
Ritualist, p, 109. 

These and the like quotations might be continued to 
any extent and from different authors. But these will 
suffice to settle the question with all rational and in- 
telligent readers. And if once the ministry and churches* 
of this country can be possessed of these facts, there 
will be raised to God one general cry ; as when President 
Lincoln called the American people to unite in prayer 
for deliverance from the curse of the slavery war. Deism 
is practical atheism. For the infinite God cannot be 
reached by finite minds, but only through a merciful 
Mediator. 



' • ADOPTS THE MOTTO OF THE JESUITS. 457 

But the key to the importance of this 33nd degree, is 
its Motto: ''Ad majorem Dei gloriam/' Note 370. 
This is the motto of the Jesuits ; who, with the apostate 
Ramsay, made these French degrees, falsely called Scot- 
tish. This motto was adopted by their founder, Igna^ 
tins Loyola; and is still the motto of the order which he 
founded, in an underground chapel of the Holy Martyrs 
in 1534, seventeen years after Luther nailed his Theses 
to the church door at Wittenberg, in 1517. The reforma- 
tion' had only fairly begun, and this underground, 
secret order of Jesuits met the Eeformation, and has 
turned it back. Some principalities in Germany, once 
Protestant, are now under Popish prindes ! That order 
now rules Popedom, though once prohibited by it, as 
Masonry is now. The reader will find the above motto 
on page IJf, of the introduction, and the founding of the 
order on page 9 of the ''History pf the Society of Jesus,'' 
Baltimore, 1878. And on pages 13 and 13 he says, that 
.^ in the village of Lasorta, near Rome, while praying, he 
I was '^dazzled by a brilliant light ;^^ and ^^the entire 
J history of the order,'' says the historian^ ^^is but a de- 
1 velopment of that vision.'^ 

? Now, if that light had been from God, as was that 
which shone around Paul, at his conversion, Loyola's 
life would have borne thfe same fruit which Paul's did, 
instead of the ignorance, superstition, and persecution 
which has tracked Papacy ever since; and now fur- 
nishes saloon-keepers for our cities, and carries their 
votes to license pauperism, crime, blasphemy, and woe. 
But if that light was from Satan, who is Christ's rival 
and counterfeit, then we should expect the fruits, which 
we see follow the Papacy everywhere. Then that supor- 
natural light was Masonic light, whose fruits are the 



458 



"they shall be rooted up/^ 



same. And our Savior has told us: '''By their fruits 
ye shall Jcnow them/' These lodges are not of God's 
plantings and we have the word of Christy that 'Hhey 
shall be rooted up/' (Math. 15, IS,) Let ns look to 
Him for the fulfillment of that srlorious nromise. 



CHAPTER LXI 



TtoRTY-THiRD Degree, or Sovereign Grand Inspec- 
tor GENERAL.' "" 

Oeeicers of the Supreme Council 33rd Degree 
Ancient and Accepted Eite. 

1st. The Most Puissant Sovereign Grand Command- 
er. 

2nd. The Puissant Lieutenant Grand Commander. 

3rd. The Illustrious Grand Orator and Minister of 
State. 

4th. The Illustrious Grand Chanc'ellor, Grand Secre- 
tary General of the H. \ E. *. and Keeper of the Seals 
and Archives. 

5th. The Illustrious Grand Treasurer General of the 
H.-. E.-. 

6th. The Illustrious Grand Master General of Cere- 
monies. 

7th. The Illustrious Grand Marshal General. 

8th. The Illustrious Grand Standard Bearer. 

Note 392. — * 'Sovereign Grand Inspector General. The 33rd and ulti- 
mate degree of the Ancient and Accepted rite. It is not certainly known 
when or where this grade originated. The theory which ascribes it t » 
the King of Prussia has long since been discarded by intelligent Masons. 
The number of Inspectors in a kingdom or republic must not exceed 
nine. These organized in a body, constitute the Supreme Council, which 
claims jurisdiction over all the Ineffable and Sublime degrees. The pre- 
siding officer is styled Sovereign Grand Commander. The sash is white, 
edged with gold, and suspended from the right shoulder to the left hip. 
At the bottom is a red and white rose, and on the part crossing th« 
breast is a delta, with rays transversed by a poniard, and in the center 
the number 33. The jewel is a black, double-headed eagle, crowned, and 
holding a sword in his claws. The beak, claws, crown and sword are 
of gold. Th^^ m')tto of the degree is 'Deus meumque jus,' 'CJod and my 
right.' " — Macoy's Encyclopaedia and Dictionary of Freemasonry, Article 
Sovereign Qrftnd Inspector Geneyal, 



460 SOVEREIGN GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL. 

9th. The Illustrious Grand Captain of the Guards. 

There shall be appointed a Grand Seneschal who must 
be a Deputy Inspector General but not a Constituent 
of this Supreme Council. 

decorations:''' — Hangings purple with skeletons, 
death's heads, cross bones, etc., painted or embroidered 
thereon. In the East a magnificent throne; over it a 
purple canopy trimmed with gold. Beneath the canopy 
is a transparency representing a delta, in the centre of 
which are seen the ineffable characters, near the centre 
of the room is a quadrangular pedestal covered with 
scarlet cloth, on which rests a naked sword. On the 
north side of the council chamber is a skeleton erect, 
holding the white banner of the order, opposite which, 
in the South is a flag of the country. Over the inter- 
ior portion of the entrance is a blue scarf bearing the 
device ''Deus Meumque Jusf On the East is a candela- 
bra with five branches, in the West one with three 
branches, in the North one with a single branch, and in 
the South another with two branches 5+3-|-l+3 (11) 
lights. 

The sword above mentioned rests on an open Bible 
the point of the sword pointing towards the southeast. 
The members are all seated on the south side of the 

room. The Council Chamber is shaped thus : ^^^.Si^^, 
The candidate does not wear any regalia ***^'^ "** 
or jewel tunics or gowns. The Master of Ceremonies 
carries a burning torch in his riglit hand during the first 
section of the ceremonies. 

Note 393. — "Decorations. A lodge room ought, besides its necessary 
furniture, to be ornamented with decorations which, while they adorn 
and beautify it, will not be unsuitable to its sacred character. On this 
subject Dr. Oliver, in his Book of the Lodge (ch. v., p. 70), makes the 
following judicious remarks: 'The expert Mason will be convinced that 
the walls of a Lodge room ought neither to be absolutely naked nor too 
much decorated. A chaste disposal of symbolical ornaments in the right 
places, and according to propriety, relieves the dullness and vacuity of 
a blank space, and, though but sparingly used, will produce a striking 
impression, and contribute to the general beauty and solemnity of the 
scene,' "— J»Iackey's Encyclopaedia of Freeniasoni<y, Article Decorations. 



OPENING CEREMONIES 

Sovereign Grand Inspector General/'* 

Most Puissant Sovereign Grand Com, — (Drawing his 
sword.) Puissant Lieutenant Grand Commander, are 
you satisfied that all within this sacred asylum are 
Grand Inspectors General? 

Puissant Lieutenant Grand Com. — Most Puissant 
Sovereign Grand Commander, I will assure myself. 

Puissant Lieut. Grand Com. — Illustrious Grand Mas- 
ter General of Ceremonies, satisfy yourself that all pres- 
ent have been exalted to the . last degree of Sublime 
Masonry. (The Grand Master General of Ceremonies 
passes around the Council Chamber and being satisfied 
that all present are Grand Inspectors General, causes 
the Grand Seneschal to secure the door. 

Grand Master General of Ceremonies — Puissant Lieu- 
tenant General Commander, none but Chiefs of Exalted 
Masonry are present. This Sacred Asylum is secure 

Ncte 394. — "The only degree conferred in the Supreme Comicil, Scotch 
Masonry, and the thirty-third and last upon the catalogue of that sys- 
tem. It has no historical allusions, being purely administrative. There 
is no apron. The jewel is the black, double-headed eagle of Prussia, with 
golden beaks, crowned with an imperial crown of gold, and holding a 
naked sword in its claws. The badge is a white sash, four inches broad, 
edged with gold fringe, having at the bottom a red and white rose, and 
on the breast, a golden triangle, surrounded by the sun, and displaying 
within, the figures '33.' On each side of the triangle, at the distance of 
two inches, is a naked dagger. The motto of the degree is Deus meumque 
jus — God and my right. The assembly is termed a Supreme Council. 
The lights are eleven. The hangings are purple. The oflScers are: Most 
Puissant Sovereign Grand Commander, representing Frederick II., of 
Prussia; Puissant Lieutenant Grand Commander, Secretary General, 
Treasurer General, Grand Minister of State, Grand Master of Cere- 
monies, Grand Captain of the Guard, Grand Marshal and Grand Standard 
Bearer. Hours of work, from the time when the word of thtr order is 
given until the morning sun begins to illume the Council." — Morris's 
Masonic Dictionary, Article Sovereign Grand Inspector General. 



462 sovEREiGisr grand inspector general. 

and the Grand Seneschal is carefully guarding our por- 
tals. 

Puissant Lieut, Grand Com. — Most Puissant Sover- 
eign Grand Commander, all present are Supreme Chiefs 
of Exalted Masonry and- we are well secured by the 
Grand Seneshal. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — 'Tis well. From 
whence came you? 

Puissant Lieut. Grand Com. — From the cradle, pass- 
ing through life towards our common lot — the grave. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand CoJn. — Your duty? 

Puissant Lieut. Grand Com. — To aid the suffering of 
humanity upon the road of life. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — What is'^the hour ? 

Puissant Lieut. Grand Com. — It is the hour for this 
Supreme Council to devote to its duties. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — And those duties 
are to God, our country and the order. Illustrious 
Grand Master General of Ceremonies receive the watch- 
word. (The Grand Master General receives the watch- 
word.) "Deus Meumque Jus/' and the answer, My God 
and my Eight from each member, and standing at the 
altar pronounces it aloud. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — ^^My God and My 
Eight. ^' The watch-word being correct and our Sacred 
asylum secure, I proclaim by the mystic numbers, that 
this Supreme Council of the thirty-third and last degree 
of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite for the 
United States of America, its territories and dependen- 
cies, will open for the glory of God. Let us implore his 
assistance in our struggle for justice and right. (Strikes 
00000 000 00 ; with the hilt of his sword, which he 
then .sheaths.) 

Puissant Lieut. Grand Com.— (Strikes 00000 000 
00 ; in the same manner.) 



OPENING CEREMONIES. 463 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Peers and Illus- 
trious Brethren to order! (All rise under sign of order.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Let us pray. (x\ll 
kneel facing East.) 

OPENING PRAYER. 

Almighty God; Father of light and life and love, 
who from thy throne above bestowest thine innumerable 
blessings upon the human race, we implore thy bounte- 
ous mercy upon this assemblage. Impart to us the 
knowledge of thy word. Protect this Council and its 
work. Grant us strength to continue our journey through 
life in the propagation of truth and justice, that we may 
be enabled to benefit those oppressed by the workers of 
iniquity, enlighten the ignorant, strengthen the weak, 
and comfort the suffering. And to Thee the most 
powerful, the most holy the everlasting Adonai, be the 
honor and glory forever and forever. Amen. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com, — Order, Peers and 
Illustrious Brethren! (All rise under sign of order.) 



SIGN OF ORDER. 



Left hand over the heart, fingers ex- 
tended and close together. 



Sign of Order. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — (With pommel of 
sword; 00000 000 00.) 



464 SOVEREIGl^ GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL. 

Puissant Lieut. Grand Com. — (In same manner^ 
00000 000 00.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Peers and Illus- 
trious Brethren^ this Supreme Council of the thirty- 
third and last degree for the United States of America^ 
its territories and dependencies is now open in the name 
of God. Be seated. (Business is transacted and minutes 
are here read.) 



f^ 



CHAPTER LXII 



Thirty-Third Degree, or Sovereign Grand Inspec- 
tor General/'' 

initiation. 

The candidate is prepared by 
being divested of his shoes and 
hat; clothed in a black robe with- 
out sword or regalia; a lighted 
taper in his right and a black 
cable tow around his neck, the 
ends of which are held by the 
Illustrious Grand Master General 
of Ceremonies, at the proper time. 
The Illustrious Grand Marshal 
retires to the Chamber of Eeflec- 
tion, and all being ready he strikes 
on the door of the Council Cham- 
Preparation of Candidate, ber 
33rd Degree. 
Note 395. — * 'Sovereign Grand Inspector General, The thirty-third and 
last degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite. The Latin Con- 
stitutions of 1786 call it 'Tertius et trigesimus et sublimissimus gradus,' 
1. e., the thirty-third and most sublime degree'; and it is styled 'the 
Protector and Conservator of the Order.' The same Constitutions, in 
Article I. and II., say: 

*' 'The thirty-third degree confers on those Masons who are legitimately 
invested with it, the quality, title, privilege, and authority of Sovereign 
[Supremorum] Grand Inspectors General of the Order. 

" 'The peculiar duty of their mission is to teach and enlighten the 
brethren; to preserve charity, union, and fraternal love among them; 
to maintain regularity in the works of each degree, and to take care 
that it is preserved by others; to cause the dogmas, doctrines, institutes, 
constitutions, statutes, and regulations of the Order to be reverently 
regarded, and to preserve and defend them on every occasion; and, 
finally^ everywhere to occupy themselves in works of peace and mercy.' 

"The body in which the members of this degree assemble is called 
a Supreme Council. 

"The symbolic color of the degree is white, denoting purity. 
"The distinctive insignia are a sash, collar, jewel, Teutonic cross, 
decoration, and ring. 

"The sash is a broad, white-watered ribbon, bordered with gold, 
bearing on the front a triangle of gold glittering with rays of gold, 
which has in the center the numerals 33, with a sword of silver, directed 
from above, on each side of the triangle, pointing to its center. The 
sash, worn from the right shoulder to the left hip, ends in a point, and 
Is fringed with gold, having at the junction a circular band of scarlet 
and green containing the jewel of the Order." — Mackey's Encyclopaedia 
Qt Freemasonry, Article Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 




466 SOVEREIGN GRAND USTSPECTOR GENERAL. 

///. Grand Marshal— 00000 000 00.) 

Ill Grand Capt, of Guard — Puissant Lieutenant 
Grand Commander, there is an alarm at the door of the 
Council. 

Puissant Lieut. Grand Com. — ^Most Puissant Sover- 
eign Grand Commander, there is an alarm at the door 
of the Council. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Illustrious Grand 
Master General of "Ceremonies, ascertain who dares to 
interrupt our labors. 

Grand Master Gen. of Cer, — (Opening door.) Who 
dares to interrupt our labors? 

Grand Marshal — (Outside.) Brother , a 

Sublime Prince of the Eoyal Secret, who is sincerely 
devoted to God, his country, and otrr holy order; griev- 
ing for the sufferings of humanity, he humbly solicits 
admission into this Supreme Council, where he hopes^ 
with the assistance of Divine Wisdom, to accomplish his 
duty to God and his brethren. 

Grand Master Gen. of Cer. — (Closing the door.) 
Puissant Lieutenant Sovereign Grand Commander, the 
alarm was made by our Illustrious Grand Marshal, on 

behalf of brother ,'a Sublime Prince of the 

Eoyal Secret, who is sincerely devoted to God, his 
country and our holy order ; grieving for the sufferings 
of humanity, he humbly solicits admission into this 
Supreme Council, where he hopes with the assistance of 
divine v/isdom, to Accomplish his duty to God and his' 
brethren. 

Puissant Lieut. Grand Com. — Most Puissant Sover- 
eign Grand Commander, the alarm was made by our 

Illustrious Grand Marshal on behalf of brother , a ^^ 

Sublime Prince of the Eoyal Secret, who is sincerely J 
devoted to God, his country and our holy order; griev-F 



imTiATioisr. 467 

ing for the sufferings of humanity, he humbly solicits 
admission into this Supreme Council, where he hopes 
with the assistance of divine wisdom, to accomplish his 
duty to God and his brethren. 

Most Puissant Sov. Orand Com. — Admit him. 
Grand Master Gen. of Cer. — (Opening door.) It is 
the order of the Most Puissant Sovereign Grand Com- 
mander that the Illustrious Prince of the Royal Secret 
be admitted into the presence of this Supreme Council 
of Exalted Masonry. (Music plays, and the candidate 
is led into the Supreme Council by the Grand Master 
General of Cerem.onies and the Grand Marshal General 
who holds the cable tow in his left hand. The candidate 
holding taper in right hand with head bowed is under 
the sign of the Good Shepherd and placed in the West. 
Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — My brother your 
devotion to God, your country and our holy order, your 
grief for the sufferings of humanity, are your titles of 
admittance to this Council. Illustrious Grand Master 
I --General of Ceremonies, conduct the brother by five, 
[ three, one and two journeys, that he may travel and re- 
l fleet upon his duties to God and his brethren. (The 
Grand Master General of Ceremonies conducts him in 
silence five times around the Chamber and stops in the 
West.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Sublime Prince^ 
this your "first journey in this degree is to remind you 
of your first step in the Masonic career. Then you were 
weak, helpless and in darkness. Ever remember that, 
when called upon to conduct those whom you have left 
behind ; that you were once like them, weak and helpless. 
Eeflect that from God we came and to him we must re- 
turn. All our thoughts, all our actions must have but 
one object; the glory of our heavenly Father. He is 



468 SOVEREIGN GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL. 

the first of all. The great uncreated creator; origin of 
nature. Be not proud of thy exaltation, for misfortune 
can most easily attack the great. Brother^ being assured 
that you are devoted to your country, behold its flag. 
Are you prepared to take an obligation to protect and 
defend this emblem of your nation? 

Candidate — ( Answers. ) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Then, with your 
right hand upon this sword and your left holding this 
flag, repeat after me your 

FIRST OBLIGATION. 
SOVEREIGN GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL.'®* 

■ In the name of God our Heavenly Father ; in his pres- 
ence and that of these Illustrious Princes of Exalted 
Masonry, I do solemnly promise and vow to be true and 
faithful to my country and its ^flag, and that I will de- 
fend both with my purse, my sword and with my life ! 
So help me God. Amen. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Corrii. — As a token of your 
fidelity, salute with a kiss this emblem of knightly 
hoiiour. (Candidate kisses sword.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Kneel my brother. 
You have proved your right to the crown I now place 
upon your brow. True 'tis but a wreath of oak leaves, 
but it is to a Mason more priceless than the diadems of 
kings. It is the civic ci;own of the Roman Eepublic, 

Note 396. — "The collar is of white-watered ribbon fringed with gold, 
having the rayed triangle at its point and the swords at the sides. By 
a regulation of the Southern Supreme Council of the United States, the 
collar is worn by the active, and the sash by the honorary members of 
the Council. 

"The jewel is a black double-headed eagle, with golden beaks and 
talons, holding in the latter a sword of gold, and crowned with the 
golden crown of Prussia. 

"The red Teutonic cross is affixed to the left side of the breast. 

"The decoration rests upon a Teutonic cross. It is a nine-pointed 
star, namely, one formed by three triangles of gold one upon the other, 
and interlaced from the lower part of the left side to the upper part 
of the right a sword extends and in the opposite direction is a hand 
of (as it is called) Justice. In the center is the shield of The Order, 
azure charged with an eagle like that on the banner, having on the 
dexter side a Balance or, and on the sinister side a Compass of the 
second, united with a Square of the -second."— Mackey's Encyclopaedxft 
of Freemasonry, Article Sovereign Grand Inspector General, 



J INITIATION. 469 

which was only awarded to those who had saved the 
life of a fellow creature. By becoming a Mason^ you 
have also become a benefactor of mankindo * 

Most Puissant Sov, Grand Com. — (To Grand Master 
General of Ceremonies.) Let the second journey be 
made. (The Grand Master General of Ceremonies con- 
ducts him thrice around, while the Most Puissant Sover- 
eign Grand Commander repeats:) 

Most Puissant Sov, Grand Com. — Let us worship, i^ 
all humility and veneration the. divine wisdom, of him 
who so bountifully regulates the universe. We must 
ever glorify labor ; for by its means only can you obtain 
that true light which you foresaw in the doctrine of him 
who gave" his life for the glory of his father and the 
emancipation -of his brethren. 

Behold the banner of our beloved order! Are you 
prepared to swear fidelity to this banner and our order ? 

Candidate — I am. (Music plays. The Grand Master 

of Ceremonies leads him to the North, where a skeleton 

I- with a wreath of cypress in one hand and the banner of 

' the order in the other and a skull with wine in are now 

unveiled and the taper is taken from candidate. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Then^ take in one 
hand this skull, from this emblem of mortality, while 
with the other you support the flag of our beloved order 
and repeat after me. (Candidate obeys). 

^ SECOND OBLIGATION. 

m In presence of the Supreme Architect of the World 
*and calling on these Illustrious brethren present as 

witnesses, I — ' do solemnly and sincerely swear, 

without prevarication or mental reservation, that I will 
he for ever faithful to the banner of the order, will 
follow it wherever it leads and will always defend it; 
allowing no danger to deter me therefrom, 



470 



SOVEREIGN- GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL. 



I furthermore solemnly swear that I will hold true 
allegiance to the Supreme Council of the United States 
of America, its territories and dependencies. And that 
I will never acknowledge any body or bodies of men as 
belonging to the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Eite, 
claiming to be such, except such as hold allegiance to 

this Supreme Council^ or 
those who recognize this 
Council. To all these I 
do most solemnly swear, 
calling upon the Most 
High God to ratify my 
oath. And should I 
knowingly or willfully 
violate the same, may 
this wine I now drink, 
become a deadly poison 
to me, as the hemlock 
juice drank by Socrates. 
(Drinks wine out of 
iskuU.) And may these 
'cold arms forever encir- 
cle me. Amen. (Skeleton's arms enfold him.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Your third journey 
reminds you, that in the high office you are now about 
to fulfill, you must never fail to fulfill your duty to G od, 
your brethren and our order. Even now, though you 
know it not, you need the aid of your brethren, as others 
in time will require your assistance. 

That torch which a brother holds before you, you will 
be called upon to bear for the benefit of others who 
seek light. 

Your head is uncovered — ^your feet bare, to remind 
you that you must ever be prepared to assist brethren 




iisriTiATioisr. 471 

in need^ and free them from the yoke of oppression, 
which is symbolized by the black cabletow around your 
neck. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Kneel ! Once again 
I crown you; now with this wreath of cypress^ emblem 
of death and of immortality. 

Most Puissant Sov, Grand Com. — Conduct the broth- 
er upon his third journey. (Candidate is led once 
around.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — The object of all 
the degrees of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite, 
is light, wisdom, tolerance, freedom, courage. As a 
proof that you possess that courage which you may be 
called upon to exert against your enemies ; and that you 
hold danger and even death in contempt, we now call 
upon you, as a proof that you will never hesitate to 
obey the orders of those who have sworn that ''Justice'' 
shall rule the world, to plunge your hand into this vase 
of molten lead and pluck forth this golden ring. (The 
Most Puissant Sovereign Grand Commander drops the 
ring into the vase of mercury and the candidate snatches 
it out.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — ^Tis well ! No harm 
awaited you. You knew it. But remember, all the 
ceremonies of Masonry are but faithful representations 
of the realities of life; and that you may be ever ready 
to lay down your life for the triumph of the principles 
of our Eite. Illustrious Grand Master General of 
Ceremonies, let the brother make the last journey. 
(Candidate is led twice around the room.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — The object of this 
last trial was to teach you that no consideration; no 
danger must stop you, when justice and the rights of 
your brethren require your assistance. Your Masonic 



473 SOVEREIGN GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL. 

labors; the liberal ideas you entertain; your devoted- 
ness and zeal for the propagation of our doctrines^ en- 
title you to the high dignity with which we are about to 
invest you. (Candidate stops in the West.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com, — Sublime Prince, the 
Ancient and Accepted Rite recognizes and adopts none 
of the religions of the world. We respect the creeds of 
all men, because God alone is the Supreme Judge of his 
children. Each of our brethren has full right to main- 
tain his own faith and worship our Heavenly Father, 
according to the dictates of his own conscience. What 
is your religion? 

Candidate^ ( Answers. ) i 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Sovereign Grand 
I^spector Grand Orator, place upon the altar of Ma- 
sonry the sacred book of our brother's religion. (This 
is done.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — And now, if of 
your own free will you voluntarily assume the last and 
•most serious obligation of our order, advance and kneel 
at the sacred altar of Masonry, resting your hands upon 
the book of your religion. (This is done.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — To order Sovereign 
Grand Inspectors! Draw Swords! 

Lieutenant Grand Com. — (Repeats order. All form 
around altar pointing swords at candidate's breast.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com.— Sublime Prince, 
repeat after me and the brethren. 

OBLIGATION SOVEREIGN GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL. 

In the pre-sence of Almighty God and of the Illus- 
trious members of this Supreme Council 33rd degree for 
the United States of America, its territories and ^de- 
pendencies 1 , a Sublime Prince of the Royal 

Secret, do hereby solemnly promise and swear, on the 
holy book of mj religion^ never directly, or indirectly 



to reveal the secrets and mysteries of the 33rd and last 
degree of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Eite to 
any but a brother, legally and lawfully possessed of this 
dignity; and to obey and cause to be obeyed, the con- 
stitution, statutes and regulations of the order. 

I furthermore solemnly promise and swear to be true 
and faithful to God, our common parent; to the holy 
order of which I have the honor of being a member, and 
to my beloved country. 

I furthermore solemnly promise and swear, faithfully 
and punctually to fulfill all the obligations which I have 
taken in each of the degrees I have received, and strict- 
ly to comply with the duties imposed upon me as a 
Sovereign Grand Inspector General of the 33rd degree. 
Unceasingly to protect and defend the rights of my 
fellow beings, even at the peril of my life, and to use 
the authority in me vested with charity and equity, and 
f6r the glory of God and our order. 

I furthermore solemnly promise and swear, faithfully 
to comply with my present obligation, waiving all 
equivocation or mental reservation, and the hope of be- 
ing at any time relieved of the same, by any power 

whatsoever, under the penalties which I , of 

my own free will and accord impose upon myself ; name- 
ly that of being disgraced among my fellow beings, to 
suffer the most cruel remorse of the soul. And may 
God heap upon my head the punishment in store for 
perjurers and all such as may violate their sacred obli- 
gations toward him. So help me God. Amen. Amen ! 
Amen! 

Most Puissant Sov, Grand Com, — ^o^ my brother, 
salute with a kiss the sacred book of your religion. (He 
obeys.) Take this sword and remember to use it only 
against the enemies of our order and your country, and 



474 



SOVEREIGN^ GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL. 



whenever you may be called upon to defend the lights 
of humanity. 

Receive this ring'^^ (hands it to him) which is a sign 
of the Alliance you have this day made with us. You 
are forever bound to God, our order, and your country. 
Let your motto be ''Deus Meumque Jus/' "My God and 
my Eight.'' 

I will now communicate to you the secrets of this the 
last degree. 




SIGN OE ORDER. 



Place the left hand over the heart. 



Sign of Order. 

EIRST SIGN. 

Kneel on left 
knee, cross the arms 
over the breast, then 
draw the sword, 
hold the point in 
the left hand and 
cross it with that of 
the opposite Inspec- 
tor and give the 

Note 397. "The ring is of plain gold one-eighth of an inch wide, and 

having on the inside a delta surrounding the figures 33, and inscribed 
with the wearer's name, the letters S. -.G. -.1. -.G. •., and the motto of th<^ 
Order 'Deus meumque Jus.' It is worn on the fourth finger of the left 

liand.'' Mackey's Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry, Article Sovereign Grand 

Inspector General. 




First Sign S. G. I. G. 



I 



INITIATION. 



475 



First Pass Word— ''Be Molay.'^ 
Anstver — "Hiram Abiff/^ 
Second Pass Word — "Frederick/^ 
Anstver — "Of Prussia/' 




SECOND SIGN. 

Disengage swords, retain point in left 
hand, fall on both knees, kiss blade three 
times and give the 

Sacred Words— ^'Michay Macha^ Bea- 
lirriy Adonai.^^ 

^'Who is like unto Thee, oh God." 



Second Sign. 

SIGN OF ENTRANCE. 

Cross the arms on the breast^ the head 
bowed down. 

Battery. 00000 000 00. 
This is the decoration of the Sovereign 
I Grand Inspector General, the insignia of the 
" high office conferred on you by your breth- 
ren. 

Most Puissant Sov, Grand Com, — Puissant 
Sovereign Lieutenant Commander, pro- ^^^^C^^ 

^''^■n of Entranca 

claim our beloved brother to be a Sovereign Grand In- 
spector General, 33rd and last degree and honorary 
member of this Supreme Council. 

Puissant Lieut. Grand Com. — I proclaim our beloved 

brother and Sublime Prince . to be a Sovereign 

Grand Inspector General 33rd and last degree and an 
honorary member of this Supreme Council of the United 
- States of America, its territories and dependencies. 




476 SOVBREIGN GRAND INSMCTOH GEl^EML. 

Most Puissant Sov, Grand Com. — Illustrious Grand 
Master General of Ceremonies^ conduct to the seat of 
honor the Sovereign Grand Inspector General. (Candi- 
date is seated on the right of the Most Puissant Sover- 
eign Grand Commander.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Peers and Illus- 
trious brethren, let us award the honors of this exalted 
dignity to our latest created Grand Inspector General. 
(All salute candidate by 00000 000 00.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Be seated and 
listen to the lecture of the last degree. 

LECTURE.. 

Illustrious Grand Minister of /Stofe— -Illustrious 
brethren, by this time you will have learned that our ob- 
ject is not to rebuild the material temple of Solomon, but 
a moral temple, wherein truth and love shall dwell, and 
wherein must live as one brotherhood all those, who, 
having but one common parent, will abide by the laws 
of eternal equity and justice. We have not to avenge 
the murder of Hiram Abiff, for he represents that eternal 
wisdom, which ignorance and lust of power and false- 
hood had concealed from us, but we must go on, in search 
of those laws by which the moral world is regulated. 

We have not persecuted the unfortunate nation of 
Judah, for having sentenced to death our beloved 
Sovereign, Jesus of Nazareth, the Apostle of the duties 
and rights of man, but we must crush forever supersti- 
tion, fanaticism and intolerance. They, and not the | 
children of Israel were gnilty. Let us show them no 
mercy, and thereby secure the blessings of liberty of 
conscience. Each child of God must worship his father, 
according to his own conscience and enjoy those 
prerogatives of the heart and mind of which God alone 
is the Supreme Judge. 



INITIATION. . 477 

We have not to avenge the murder of Jacques de 
Molay and the Templars^ but we must never allow^ if 
in our power to prevent it any living man to possess 
sufficient power to accomplish another such a crime. 

No man has a right to usurp a power which belongs 
to God alone. No man is above his brother^ except by 
intellect^ charity, good deeds and education. 

To no man has God given authority to replace and 
represent him on earth, and all those who pretend to be 
his ministers and representatives must not be believed. 

Our ignoranbe and selfishness alone give these usurp- 
ers the power, which they wield for th$ gratificat ion o f 
their impious schemes. 

' Our order is instituted to stop such encroachment and 
to prevent the renewal of the tragedy which ended in 
the murder of those Knight Templars, whose virtues 
and moral power caused such terror to the political and 
religious usurpers of that age, which is ever presented 
to our minds by the battery of this degree: five, three, 
one and two^; significant to Sovereign Grand Inspectors 
of the year of the murder of those victims of intolerance 
kingcraft and priescraft, 5312. 

We abhor the doctrine which teaches the murder of 
kings and priests, but as long as the weakness of man- 
kind renders their usurpation unavoidable, we must pre- 
vent their exercising their power to oppress mankind, 
and endeavor by degrees to enlighten our brother men 
and prepare their minds for the enjoyment of those 
rights and privileges which our Heavenly Father has 
guaranteed to his beloved children. 

We have not to reconquer, by murder and bloodshed, 
that land, which the life and death of our Puissant 
Sovereign, Jesus of Nazareth made holy, but we have to 
reconquer our rights, and to substitute truth for error; 



478 



SOVEREIGN GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL. 



liberty and justice for despotism and iniquity. Then, 
and then only, shall we have reconquered the "Holy 
Land/^ the only true Holy Land that is the patrimony 
of love, intelligence and charity, which our father has 
given us. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — The Illustrious 
brethren can now offer any observations they wish for 
the benefit of this Supreme Council and our beloved 
order. (The business is now transacted.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com, — Illustrious Grand 
Master of Ceremonies present to the Sovereign Grand 
Inspectors General the box of fraternal assistance. 
(Collection is taken.) 



CLOSING CEREMONIES 

Sovereign Grand Inspector General. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com, — Puissant Sovereign 
Lieutenant Grand Commander^ your duty? 

Lieutenant Grand Com. — To combat for God, for my 
country and for the sacred principles of our holy order ! 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — ^What is the hour ? 

Lieutenant Grand Com. — The morning sun lights our 
Council. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Since the morning 
sun has risen and shines over our Council, let us arise^ 
also Illustrious Brethren, and diffuse the light of knowl- 
edge over those minds darkened by ignorance. (Strikes 
000. All rise under" the sign of order.) 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Puissant Sovereign 
Lieutenant Grand Commander, inform the Illustrious 
I brethren that I am about to close this Supreme Council 
I by the mystic numbers. 

Lieutenant Grand Com. — Peers and' Illustrious breth- 
ren, take notice that the Most Puissant Sovereign Grand 
Commander is about to close this Supreme Council by 
the mystic numbers. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — (Strikes with sword 
00000 000 00.) 

Lieutenant Grand Com. — (Repeats the same.) 

Most Puissant Sov, Grand Com. — Let us pray. 



480 CLOSING CEREMONIES. 

Oh thou whose power o'er moving worlds presides, 
Whose voice created and whose wisdom guides! 
On darkling man, in pure effulgence shine. 
And cheer the clouded mind with light divine. 
*Tis thine alone to calm the pious breast 
With silent confidence and holy rest. 
Father, from thee we spring to thee we tend 
Path, Motive, Guide, Original and End. 

Response — Amen. Amen. Amen. 

Most Puissant Sov. Grand Com. — Illnstrions brothers 
retire again to the busy haunts of life, do your duty and 
prove to the world that we are worthy of our missions. 
This Supreme Council is closed. God be with us no^ 
and forever. 



PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 

Thirty-Third Degree^ or Sovereign Grand Inspec- 
tor General. 

Apex to Falsehood, Fraud and Ambition — Denies the Inspiration of the 
Bible — Fought Like Wolves Over a Carcass — Southern Lodges Worked 
up the Rebellion — Conclusion. 

The origin of this degree is hidden; concealed, 
doubtless, lest its motive should appear with its birth, 
and its antiquity prove a burlesque. The thirty-first 
degree gave us a ''Sovereign Tribunal/' and this second 
degree beyond, gives us another, a ''Supreme Council/' 
whose jurisdiction is to be final and Universal in the 
world of Masonry. It is based (Note 395.) on Con- 
stitutions of 1786, which a Masonic French historian, 
[Kloss, who knew, pronounces "the Grand Lie of the 
'. order r (Folgers Ancient and Accepted Scottish Bite, 
^page 60, Doc.) But whether invented to furnish an- 
;• other degree, to sell ; or to keep the supreme control in 
Charleston, S. C, it is all one. It is a brief apex to 
falsehood, fraud, and imposition. In previous degrees 
the Savior is given no more exalted title than ''the 
Master from Nazareth.'' But in this degree. He is 
once called "our beloved Sovereign/' (page -476.) and 
once "our Puissant Sovereign, Jesus of Nazareth/' 
(page 477.) which phrases used in an ordinary lodge, 
would make the speaker liable to be rapped down. No 
Jew would use such words of Christ, unless moved by 
what caused that Jew to hail Him as his Master, and 
kiss Him in the warden, viz., money. 

Those who glance through the ritual of the present 



483 DENIES THE INSPIRATION OF THE BIBLE. 

ruling rite^ falsely called ^^Scottish/^ will see that this 
thirty-third degree has been preceded by a degree, 
called, and intended to be, the last, or ^^ultimate'^ of 
Masonry; from the Master Mason^s or third degree, up. 
This 33rd degree may continue to be *^^ultimate," till 
its framer, Albert Pike, dies; who is now, in 1888, 
seventy-nine years old. And it may, indeed, prove to 
be '^^the last/^ For the deluge of dark orders from the 
mouth of the dragon, is a sign that the return of Christ 
is near. {Bev, 12, 12.) But if the accursed system 
continues to vex the earth, and destroy souls, this rite 
of 33rd degrees will fade out, and give way to other in- 
ventions. These degrees have been altered and added 
to, by Pike, who has translated the Zendavesta (page 
439) as seen in the 32nd degree, of which this 33rd is a 
mere elongation, and filling out. No other Mason has 
ever translated the Zend, but Pike. 

In these last degrees of the rite, the drag-net of 
antiquity is drawn over all the old, lost nations; and 
alchemy, sun-worship, the worship of beasts and birds, 
trees, etc.^, are given on pages 435-42, as the sources of 
the mysteries of Masonry. And the mysteries and sym- 
bols of the Bible, are drawn from these, instead of The 
Holy Ghost, by whom inspired men ''spake as they 
were moved f {2 Pet. 1, 21.) And having thus denied 
the source of the Bible as coming from God, Pike pro- 
deeds fo put the worship of ^the black ox,^^ ^^phoenix,^^ 
etc., etc., which has sunk Egypt from the list of nations ; 
on a level with the worship of our Savior, Christ; in 
Europe and America ! There are his words : p. 443 "The 
great ends of Masonry'^ are, "to reconcile all rites, and 
make charitable judgment and toleration universal;'^ 
* * * and in the place of the smoking altar of fan- 
aticism and superstition, of bigotry and sectarianism, to 
set up those of true Masonry.'^ Etc., etc. ! This is ex- 
plicit: to destroy Christianity, nnd make Masonry the 
religion of the Globe ! 



FOUGHT LIKE WOLVES OVER A CARCASS. 483 

This is not enough. He excuses the Jews for murder- 
ing our Savior^ Christ; who is nothing but a French 
*^' Apostle of the rights of man;^^ (page 477) and^ on the 
next page, he declares : ^To no man has God given the 
right to represent Him on earth ;^^ not even the man 
Christ Jesus. And, on the same page: "^^We have not 
to reconquer, by murder and bloodshed, that land made 
holy by our Puissant Sovereign, Jesus of Nazareth.^^ 
Here he not only insults Christ by making Him a Ma- 
sonic ^Tuissant Sovereign,^^ but he justly brands the 
conquest of Palestine, by the Crusaders, as ''murder and 
bloodshed/' while this whole fabric of the 33rd rite is 
professedly based on those wery. Crusades, and derives 
from them its honors, titles, and eclat ! Surely, ^ Vhom , 
the gods will destroy, they first make mad.'' 

But the force of this 33rd degree by no means lies in 
the stupid quackery of its learning. In it 

"More is meant, than meets the eye." 

Note 392 explains the object of this otherwise weak 
degree. It was made to reduce the 'governors of the 
Masonic world to ''nine'' men, meeting in the little 
slave-holding city of Charleston, S. C, with Albert 
Pike for their "Sovereign Commander.'' This was the 
world's first Supreme Council, opened by Mitchell and 
Dalcho, in 1801. But this 33rd degree, with Pike at its 
head, did not then exist ; and it was weak and wavering. 
Twelve years later, i. e,, in 1813, a ''Supreme Council," 
Northern Jurisdiction, was located in New York, and 
wolves never fought over a carcass more savagely, than 
these secret swindlers of the people quarreled over the 
spoils of lodgery. If the reader consults Folger's 
History of the Scottish Eite, from page 15 onward, he 
will see, and say, that the wolves, not the Masons, suf- 
i'er by the comparison. While this fight between rival 



■^! 



484 SOUTHERN LODGES WORKED UP THE REBELLION. 

bodies in New York and Boston was raging, the slave- 
holders sprung this 33rd degree upon them. Its motto: 
''Deus et Meumque Jus/' was Albert Pike's, on his 
sign at Washington, D. C, on his Southern Jurisdiction 
building, near the Avenue ; and as Note 293 says : ^^It 
claims jurisdiction over all the ineffable and sublime 
degrees.^^ And though made within the memory of 
men now living, we read, in the same Note by Macoy : 
^'^It is not certainly known, when or where this degree 
originated;" that is to say, its origin is concealed. 
This is the most infamous Masonic act, next to burning 
their records of fifty-nine years before the war, to hide 
treason. But slavery then ruled the country, and this 
33rd Charleston degree ruled the lodge. x\nd the South- 
ern lodge-rooms worked up the most unjustifiable and 
infamous war on record. The Southern people were 
dragooned into it, by leaders secretly sworn to obey 
Masonic leaders, or have their throats cut. 

But that red sea of blood is crossed. And if the 
American ministry and churches can be rescued from 
the lodge-worships of Satan, tlie god of war; we shall 
take a long stride towards the Millenium of ''Peace on 
earth, and good will to men/' 

CONCLUSIOK 

Americans! We have spoken in faithfulness. Let 
us part in peace. No candid person can look, though 
slightly, over these pages, and not see: 

1. That the notes, all taken from the highest Ma- 
sonic authorities, prove the truth of the ritual. 

2. That ''the Ancient, Accepted Scottish Rite" is a 
tissue of fearful falseliood ; that it is French, not Scotch ; 
modern, not ancient; that it insults Christ, as Byron 



COK-CLtJSIOK-. 485 

did his wife, by seating a harlot by her side; that its 
higher degrees were invented by Jesuits and Jews; 
that its oaths are sinking our Court-houses into popular 
contempt; and that by boldly avowing respect for, and 
citing with equal reverence, the gods of idolatry, and 
the God of the Bible, it denies all that Christ and His 
apostles taught concerning heathenism; and pours a 
steady stream of villification on Christianity, and on 
Christ, its author; as ^'bigoted,^^ and ^^sectarian," be- 
cause they teach that men must "be born again,'' or 
they cannot see the kingdom of heaven; that, while it 
lauds liberty, it establishes absolute subjugation of man 
to man; treading on crowns and tiaras, of kings and 
priests, it seats its rulers on "thrones,'' clothes them 
with "royal purple," and puts candidates on their knees 
before them ; and makes swarms of priests, who' are 
Counterfeit, contemners, and rivals of Christ. And 
by teaching salvation by its priests; and superseding, 
and setting aside the laws of God, and the laws of the 
land, in favor of its own, it shields all vice ; destroys all 
virtue; and by honoring the gods of heathenism, and 
establishing their secret worships, they are putting in 
operation causes in the United States, and in Europe, 
which have ruined the old nations of Asia, 

and their decay- 
Has dried up realms to deserts. 

But we know that Jesus Christ will yet reign on this 
earth ; and that to Him every knee shall bow, and every 
tongue confess to the glory of God, the Father. Amejst. 



CHAPTER LXIII 



Masonic Secrets Illustrated. 
The Emblems and Secrets of Thirty-three De- 
grees.* 
preparation for first or entered apprentice degree. 

The candidate having satisfactorily answered the 
questions given on pages 95-6 and paid the initiation 
fee, is prepared for initiation as follows: 
The Deacons or Stewards strip him to his shirt and 
drawers, and his drawers must be ex- 
changed for a pair furnished by the lodge 
which fasten with strings. The left 
leg of these is rolled up above the knee. 
If his shirt does not open in front it is 
turned around, and if there are m^kal 
buttons or studs on it they are removed. 

The left sleeve of his shirt is rolled up 
above the elbow, and the left side of his 
^ shirt is tucked in; so that the left leg, left 
» foot, left arm and left breast are bare. A 
slipper is put on his right foot, a hoodwink 
Candidate duly and over his cycs, and a Small rope called a 

truly prepared. En- , , . . . -, i . i 

tered Apprentice cable tOW IS put OnCe arOUUCl lilS BeCtt. 
Pe^ree, 

*As the first three Masonic degrees, termed Blue Lodge or An- 
cient Craft Masonry, are common to all the various Masonic Rites, 
and are fully and accurately given in "Freemasonry Illustrated," 
which is also published by Ezra A. Cook, at 40cts. for paper covered 
and 75cts. for cloth bound volume of three degrees (376 pages) ; 
only the emblems and secrets of the first three degrees are given 
liere. 




TAKING ENTERED APPRENTICE OBLIGATION. 487^ 




Candidate taking Entered Apprentice Obligation. 3ee page 107, 



*^ Every Mason is under an oHigation to obey the 
laws of the lodge and the Grand Lodge. * * * 
It is the obligation which makes the Mason, and the 
difference between one Mason and another, consists 
simply in the fact that one keeps his obligations better 
than another, 

''An obligation is an essential part of a degree/' — 
Morris's Dictionary, Art. Obligation, 



488 SHOCK 01* ENLIGHTEKME^T. FIRST DEGREE 




Shotk of EnligMenment or Rite of Illumination, Entered Apprentice Degree 



DUE-GUARD OF AIT ENTERED APPRENTICE. 

Hold out left hand^ with palm iip^ a lit- 
tle in front of the body, height of hips; 
next place right hand horizontally over 
the left, two or three inches aboye it. 
^ [See cut.J 



Pne-Gaard. Entered 
Apprentice, 




ENTERED APPRENTICE SIQK, '^VORD AND GRIP- 489 



SIGN OF AN ENTERED APPRENTICE. 
Made from due-guard by dropping left 
hand to side, and at same time raise right 
arm, with hand still open, and draw hand 
quickly across the throat, the thumb be- 
ing next to the throat, then hand drops to 
side. [See cut. j 




Sign of Entered 
Appreutice. 



ENTERED APPRENTICE SCGN WITHOUT DUE GUARD. 

Draw open right hand across the throat, thumb next 
to throat. 



ENTERED APPRENTICE GRIP. 




Entered Apprentice Grip. 

of each other's fore-finger. 



Grasp hands as in ordi- 
nary hand -shaking, and 
press ball of thumb hard 
against the knuckle -joiiit 



ENTERED APPRENTICE WORD. 

Boaz, which is the name of the grip. For mode of 
giving this ''word" see page 113. 

'•THE WORKING TOOLS OF AN ENTERED APPRENTICE 

Are the Twenty-four Inch Gauge and Common Gaveh 



u. 



THE TWENTY-FOUR INCH GAUGE 
|^J» i I I J t 



T »l 11 I 



i 



r-TTT 



ID 



Is an instrument used by operative masons to measure 
and lay out their worj^; but v/e, as Free and Accepted 
Masons, are taught to make use of it for the more uobla 



490 ENTERED APPRENTICE WORKING TOOLS. 

and glorious purpose of dividing our time. It being divi- | 
ded into twenty-four equal parts, is emblematical of the ^ 
twenty-four hours of the day, which we are taught to 
divide into three equal parts; whereby are found eight 
hours for the service of God and a distressed worthy 
brother, eight for our usual vocations, and eight for 
refreshment and sleep/' — Mackey's Eitualist^ page 38„ 

^'the common gavel 




Is an instrument made use of by operative ma- 
sons to break off the corners of rough stones, the better 
to fit them for the builder's use ; but we^ as Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons^ are taught to make use of it for the 
more noble and glorious purpose of divesting our hearts 
and consciences of all the vices and superfluities of life; 
thereby fitting our minds as living stones for that 
spiritual building, that house not made with hands, 
eternal in the heavens." — Mackey's Eitnalist, page 38. 

^ JEWELS OF A LODGE. 

*'A Lodge has six Jewels; three of these are immova- 
ble and three movable. 

''The immovable jewels are the Square, Level and 
Plumb. 



^Tr».!.i.T.i,T.i.T.i.T.r.lht.iit^ 
Square. 




Level. 



Pluml?, 



JEWELS OF A LODGE. 



491 



*'The Square inculcates morality; the Level equal- 
ity; and the Plmnh^ rectitude of conduct. 

''They are called immovable jewels, because thej^ are 
always to be found in the East, West and South parts 
of the Lodge, being worn by the officers in those respec- 
tive stations." — Mackeifs Bitualist^ page 57. 

'^THE MOVABLE JEWELS 

Are the Bough Ashlar, the Perfect Ashlar and thb 

Trestle-Board.'^'^ 




ill 
ii: 



• "iiiif ' 



Rough Ashlar. Perfect Ashlar. Trestle-Board. 

*'The rough ashlar is a stone as taken from the quarry 
in its rude and natural state. 

^'The perfect ashlar is a stone made ready by the hands 
of the workmen, to be adjusted by the working tools of 
the fellow craft. 

*'The trestle-board is for the master vrorkman to draw 
his designs upon. 

''By the rough ashlar we are reminded of our rude 
and imperfect state by nature; by the perfect ashlar, 
that state of perfection at which we hope to arrive by 
a virtuous education, our own endeavors, and the bless- 
ing of God;and by the trestle-board we are also remind- 
ed that, as the operative workman erects his temporal 
building agreeably to the rules and designs laid down 
by the master on his trestle-board, so should we, both 
operative and speculative, endeavor to erect our spirit- 
ual building agreeably to the rules and designs laid 
down by the Supreme Architect of the Universe, in 
the great books of nature and revelation, which are our 
spiritual, moral, and Masonic trestle-board," — Macke^fs 
Bitualist^ ^ago 5<S» 



w 



492 



THE POIITT WITHIN A CIRCLE. 




The Point within a 
Circle. 



"Lodges were anciently dedicated to King Solomon, 
[who was said to be our first Most Excellent Grand Master] 
but Masons professing Christianity dedicate theirs to St. 
John the Baptist and St. John the Evangelist, who 
were two eminent patrons of Masonry; and since their 

time, there is represented, in every 
regular and well-governed lodge a 
certain point within a circle, the 
point representing an individual 
brother, the circle the boundary 
line of his conduct to God and 
man, beyond which he is never to 
suffer his passions, prejudices, or in- 
terest to betray him, on any occa- 
sion. This circle is embordered by 
two perpendicular parallel lines, representing those 
saints, who were perfect parallels in Christianity, as well 
as in Magonry ; and upon the vertex rests the Holy Scrip- 
tures, which point out the whole duty of man. In going 
around this circle we necessarily touch upon these two 
lines, as well as upon the Holy Scriptures; and while a 
Mason keeps himself thus circumscribed, it is impossi- 
ble that he should err/' — Sickels's Monitor^ page 50. 

PREPARATION^ POR FELLOW CRAFT DEGREE, 

Candidate is prepared much the same 
as in the first degree. The right leg, right 
arm, right breast, and right foot being 
bare, a slipper on left foot and the cable 
low twice around his naked right arm 
near shoulder. 

A small white apron with bib turned 
up and he is "duly and truly prepared'' to 
be made a Fellow QxdU 

f^jiWAUoo FellQW Craft De|ree» 





tSLLOW CHAM DtB-GtTAHD AND SIGN. 493 

*1ncreased privii-^33 
and honors thus encAi*^ 
cling the profession of Fel- 
low Craft, weightier and 
more numerous responsi- 
bilities are superadded. 

Powerful obligations, 
impelling him to be secret 
obedient^ honest and 
charitable, guide and re- 
strain him. * * * 

^'He is subject to the 
discipline of his mother- 
lodge, and to all the 
penalties of Maseiiry/' — 
Morrises Dictionary^ Art. 
Fellow Craft 




Candidate taking Fellow Craft 
Obligation. 



DUE-GUARD OF A FELLOW CRAFT, 

Hold out right hand, palm down, 
height of hips, and raise left hand to 
point perpendicularly upward, fore- 
arm forming a right angle with arm. 
[See cut. j 



Oa© Guard, Fellow 
Craft. 

SIGlsr OF A FELLOW CRAFT. 

Made from due-guard by dropping left 
hand carelessly to side while raising right 
hand to left breast, fingers a little 
crooked; then draw hand quickly across 
the breast ; then drop hand to side. [See 




Sign of a Fellow 
Craft. ^. ^ 




.494 FELLOW r^AFT GRIPS AKD WOtlKlKC^ TOOLS. 

PASS GRIP OF A FELLOW CRAFT. 
Grasp right hands as in ordi- 
nary hand shaking and press 
Pass Grip of Fellow Craft ball of thumb hard between 
knuckles of first and second fingers. 

PASS OF A FELLOW CRAFT — Shibboleth; the name of the 
grip. 

GRIP OF A FELLOW CRAFT. 

Grasp right hands in the 
usual way and press thumb 
on knuckle joint of second 
finger. 

THE WORKING TOOLS OF A FELLOW CRAFT 




44 



^tiitiiiTiiJii.liJil.Ti 



Plumb. 



iii^i'T'iJ't^ 




Square. 



Level 



Are the Plumh^ the Square^ and the Level. 

*'The Plumb is an instrument made use of by operative 
masons to raise perpendiculars; the Square^ to square 
their work; and the Levels to lay horizontals; but we, as 
Free and Accepted Masons, are taught to make use of 
them for more noble and glorious purposes; the plumb 
admonishes us to walk uprightly in our several stations 
before God and men, squaring our actions by the square 
of '^irtue, and remembering that we are traveling upon 
the level of time to that undiscovered country from 
whose \ourne no traveler *'eturns."-Jfacie/5 Mitp^ 7% 



KASTEE mason's FEEPAR>'«tON AND DUB-GUABIX 49^ 



PREPARATION' OF CANDIDATE, MASTER 

mason's degree. 

The candidate is stripped, as in previous 
degrees, but in this ^''Sublime Degree^^ 
both breasts, both arms both feet and 
legs are bare. He is hood-winked dud 
the cable-tow is put three times arouBd 
his body. ^, 



preparation of Candidate 
Maater Masca'e Degree 






Candidate taking Master Mason's Obligation. See page 



DUE-GUARD OF A MASTER MASON. 

ExtenJ. both hands, in front of the body^ 
height of hips, palms down, thumbs nearly 
touching each other. [See cutj 



£^e-Gaard, MaA- 
^Mason« 



:m 



496 HA£TBB MAms'S SmS^ FASS ©BIF AHD REAL GRIP. 



mum OP A MASTER MASON. 

Made from due-guard, by dropping left 
hand and drawing right hand across the 
bowels to the right, thumb toward the body, 
height of hips. [See cut.] 



Sign of a Master 
Mason. 

PASS GRIP OF A MASTER 
MASON. 

Grasp hands naturally and 

Pass Grip of a Master Mason. prCSS thumb b e t W 6 6 D 

knuckles of second and third fingers. 

STRONG GRIP OF A MASTER MASON OR LION'S PAW# 






Hands joined as shown in cut, thumb and fingefl 
pressing hard on hand and wrist of each other. 
PASS OF A MASTER MASON Tubal Cain; name of grip, 

^'THE COMPASSES 

A Are peculiarly consecrated to this de- 
gree, because within their extreme 
points, when properly extended, are 
emblematically said to be inclosed the 
principal tenets of our profession, and 
hence the moral application of the Compasses, in the 
third degree, is to those precious jewels of a Master 
Mason, I riendship. Morality, and Brotherly Love*"— 
Mackeifi Bitualist, page 110. 



THE WORKING TOOLS Of A MASTER MASON. 497 




Are all the implements of mar 
sonry indiscriminately, but more 
especially the Trowel. 
^^The Trowel is an instrument made use of by Opera- 
tive Masons to spread the cement which unites a build- 
ing into one common mass; but we, as Free and Accep- 
ted Masons, are taught to make use of it for the more 
noble and glorious purpose of spreading the cement of 
brotherly love and affection; that cement which unites 
us into one sacred band, or society of friends and broth'^^ 
ers, among whom no contention, should ever exist, 
but that noble contention or rather emulation; of who 
can best work and best agree." — Mackey's Bit. p. IIL 

The Tragedy of The Third Degree. 

PIAYIKG murder A2^D EESURRECTIOiT IN TEN" SCENES. 




SoBNiB I.—Playinq Murdbb- Assault l)y **c7w&e^a" on tho Candidate, 
/ alias **Grand Master Hiram Abiff." 



498 




60ENE 



II: PLAYING MURDER -*Jubela» draws 24 Inch gauge ftcroeshifl throat. 




asm&lUi ?tAYlNa MURDER-^As^ault by«*JwK.o" on th« Candidate. 




499 



^^""^ 'il^"^*' MnRDER.-.-J„B.io" etrft« him with tie s,na«onleftb«Ml 




scKNJtv, FUinNaMuaDE«_A«»mtb,»,B«M»" 



SB tbe OaadlM*. 



500 



ttAttXTS MtTftftSB A'St) M6lTElirg§« 




SCEND VI; PLAYING MURDER.-" Jubelum" kills him with the Setting Maul and tumbles him 
Into the Canvas. 



GRAH"D HAILING SIQIT OF DISTRESS. 






First Position. Second Position, Third Position. 

Scene VII: Platincj Distbbss.— Mourning for "onr Grand Master Hiram 
Abiff." 

Raise hands and arms as shown in first cut, and if in 
the ceremony of '^raising" or in the dark, the words in 
brackets may be used, otherwise not. [0 Lord.] Bring 
arms from first to second position, [My God,] bring 
arms to third position [is there no help for the widow's 
Sou?] bring Qxm^ to side. 



PLATINIS MOimNTNG AKD RESTTRRBCTION. 



501 



in the dark, when in distress, the words are ^^0 Lord, 
my God is there no help for the widows son?'' 
In the cevemony of ^''raising^^ after the second at- 
tempt and failure to raise the body, first by the 
Entered Apprentice's Grip and then by the Fellow 
Craft's when this sign is given the words are, "0 Lord 
my God! Lord my God! Lord my God! I fear the 
Master's word is forever lost," 




SoEN2 VIII: Plating Dibtbess. -Procession Singing Dirge for "our Grand 
Master Hiram Abiff." 




SoBiTB IX; PLATiNa Restirrection— Praying at Mock BesurrecUQ^a 
q( Q^dldAt'e alias ''qvh; Qra&d Master Eiram A^l$^" 



503 FIVE FOIKTS OF FELLOWSHIP AKD THREE STEPS. 




FIYE POINTS OF FELLOWSHIP. 

Foot to foot, knee to knee, breast to 
breast,hand to back and cheek to cheek, 
or mouth to ear, when they whisper 
Mah'hah'bone^ which is the Master's 
word. 



Scene X: Playing Resurrection— Candidate Raised on the Five PointB 
of Fellowship. 

EMBLEMS^^^^ OF THE MASTER MASOK's DEGREE. 
''the three STEPS 

Usually delineated up- 
on the Master's carpet, 
are emblematical of 
the three principal 
stages of human life, 
viz: youth, manhood^ 
and age^. In youth as 
Entered Apprentices, 
we ought industrious- 
ly to occupy our minds 
in the attainment of 
useful knowledge; in 
manhood, as Fellow Crafts, we should apply our knowl- 
edge to the discharge -of our respective duties to God, 
our neighbor, and ourselves; that so in age, as Master 
Masons, we may enjoy the happy reflection consequent 
on a well-spent life, and die in the hope of a glorious 
immortality. 

Note 383.— "Under the term Emblems, writers include those conveying 
both the esotery andexotery of Ma804ic J^nowledge."— i/i?rri«'« DiQtiOfHirf^ 






lEMBLEMS MASTER MASOK^S DEGREE, 503 

'•THE POT OF INCEKSE 

Is an emblem^^^ of a pure heart, which is 
always an acceptable sacrifice to the Deity ; 
and as this glows with fervent heat, so 
sliould our hearts continually glow with 
gratitude to the great and beneficent Au- 
thor of our existence, for the manifold 
blessings and comforts we enjoy. 

''the bee hive 

Is an emblem of industry, and 
recommends the practice of that 
virtue to all created beings, from 
the highest seraph in heaven to 
the lowest reptile of the dust [etc. 

"the book: or coi^stitutioks guarded by the tyler's 

SWORD 

Reminds us that we should be ever 
w a t c h f u 1 and guarded in our 
thoughts, words and actions, partic- 
ularly when before the enemies of 
Masonry; ever bearing in remem- 
brance those truly Masonic virtues, silence and circum- 
spection. 

''the sword pointing to a naked heart 

Demonstrates that justice will 
sooner or later overtake us; and al- 
though our thoughts, words and 
actions may be hidden from 
the eyes of man, yet that 

NoTiffi384»^'*Everyihing in the esotery of the society is written down, or 
engraved upon durable objects by Symbols. Each of these has a public 
and private meaning, the latter communicated only by suitable restrictions 
to pT'oper persons. These Symbols form a large part of the universal to- 





504 



EMBLEMS MASTER MASOK S DEGBEE. 



41 



ALL-SEEIKG EYE, 



Whom the Sun 
Moon and Stars 
obey, and under 
whose watchful 
care even comets 
perform their 
stupendous revo- 
lutions, pervades 
the inmost re- 
cesses of the hu- 
man heart, and 
will reward us according to our merits. 




(fc 





<^ 



i^r 



THE AinCHOR A:N^D ARK 

Are emblems of a well-grounded 
hope^ and a well-spent life. They 
are emblematical of that divine 
ark^ etc. 

''the FORTY-SEVENTH PROBLEM OE EUCLID. 

This was an invention of our ancient 
friend and brother, the great Pythagoras, 
who, in his travels through Asia, Africa 
and Europe, was initiated into the several 
orders of priesthood, etc. 

THE HOUR GLASS 

Is an emblem of human life. Be- 
hold! how swiftly the sands run, 
and how rapidly our lives are draw- 
ing to a close ! etc. 

''the SCYTHE 

Is an emblem of time, which cuts the 
brittle thread of life, and launches 
us into eternity. Behold! what 
havoc the scythe of time makes 
among the human race! If by chance 
we should escape,'^ [etc. See p. 311/j 
— Bickeh'e Monitor, pages 113^X19^ 




THItlD AND FOURTH DEGREES, 



505 




IHB SETTIi^G MAUL, SPADE A^D COFFIK. 

"The second class 
of emblems are not, 
monitorial^ and 
therefore their truQ 

interpretation can 
Only be obtained within the tyled recesses of the lodge, 
^hey consist of the Setting Maul, the Spade, the 
tJoflSn, and the Sprig of Acacia. They afford subjects 
of serious and solemn reflection to the rational and 
contemplative mind.^''—Mackei/''s Bitualist^ page 131. 

FOURTH^ OR SECRET MASTER'S DEGREE. 



PREPARATION OF CANDIDATE. 

The candidate is prepared as a Mas- 
ter Mason with an apron tied over his 
ej^es, and a square on his forehead^ 
Master of Ceremonies then leads him 
to the door of the lodge and knock 
seven times ; 000-000-0. 

TOKEN OF A SECRET 
MASTER. 

First give the Mas- 
ter's Grip, and then 
slip the hand to 
feach other's elbow, 
andl balance seven 
times; at the same 
time bring the foot 
and knee in contact. 
Pass Word — Zi- 
Za. (resplendent.) 
Sacred W or d — 
Adonai. Token 




Preparation of 
Candidate. 




506 



SECRET MASTER AND PERFECT MASTER. 




SIGN OF SILENCE. 

Sign — Is that of silence, which is 
made by placing the first two fingers 
of the right hand on the lips, which is 
answered by the first two fingers of the 
left. 

FIFTH OR PERFECT MASTER^S DEGREE- 
PREPARATION OF CANDIDATE. 

Zerbal proceeds to the 
Ante-chamber, and having 
prepared the candidate as a 
^ Secret Master, leads him by 
: Sign of Silence, the grccn cord, which he 
puts around his neck, to the door of the 
lodge, and there knocks four, 

SIGN OF RECOGNITION. 
PERFECT mastery's DEGREI 





Preparation at 

Candidate. 

Advance each the toes of the 
flPight foot until they meet; 
bring the right knees together, 
place one hand on the others 
heart, then bring the hand to- 
wards the right side and form 
a squarCc 



Sign of Becognition. 



PERFECT MASTER S DEGREE. 



507 



SIGN OF ADMIRATION. 

Raise the hands and eyes to 
heaven, then let the arms fall 
across the abdomen and look 
downwards. 




Sign of Admiration. 




TOKEN. 

Place one the left hand on the 
other's right shoulder, seize each 
other's right hand, the thumb 
separate. 



First Tokeiu 



508 



:f>ERFECT MASTER^S DEGREE. 




Second Token, 



SECOND TOKEN. 

Interlace the 
forefingers of 
the right hands., 
thumbs upright, 
pressing against 
each other, form- 
ing a triangle. 



/ 




THIRD TOKEN. 

Clinch each other as in Mas- 
ter's grip, carry left hand be- 
tween each other's shoulders, and 
press four times hard with the 
fingers in the back, and give the 
Master's Word [mah-hah-bone]. 



Third Token. 



battery: — Four equi-timed strokes; 0000 
march: — Make a square by walking four steps and 
bring the feet together at each step. 
PASS word: — Acacia. 
SACRED word: — JeJiovaJh. 



INTIMATE SECRETARY S DEGREE. 



509 




INTIMATE secretary's SIGN. 

Raise the right hand^ then draw it 
from the left shoulder to the right hip, 
thus indicating the fall of a scarf. 

Cross the arms horizontally, raise 
them to the height of the breast and 
then let them fall towards the hilt of 
the sword, while raising the eyes to 
heaven. 



Sign Intimate Secretary. 




TOKEN. 

Join right hands; the first 
one turns the other's hand* and 
says, BeritJi, the other revers- 
ing the hand again says, Neder, 
then the first one resuming the 
first position, says, Shelemoth. 

These three words might be 
interpreted: Promise of a 

complete alliance. 



Token Intimate Secretary. 

PASS word: — Joahert (the name of the candidate). 
Ansrver — Zerhal (the name of the Captain of the 
Guards). 

SACRED WORD ; — J. '^E, \H. \0. \V. \A. \H. •. 



510 provost and judge. 

Seventh Degree or Provost and Judge. 

GRIP. 




Grip of Provost and Judge. 



Lock the two little fin- 
gers of the right hands 
with the forefinger^ one 
of the other^ and give 

seven light blows with the thumb of the right hand 

on the palm of the same. 



"V' 



^} 







SIGN, PROVOST AND JUDGE. 

Place the two first fingers of the right 
hand on the nose. 



ANSWER. 

Place the first finger of 
the right hand on the top of 
the nose^ and the thumb of 
- the same under the chin, 
forming a square. 
3ign» Proyosrand JudgoJ 



PASS word: — Tito, Civi, Ky. 

SACRED -woii'D:—Jachina% which is the 
plural of the word Jacliin. 

GRAND words: — Izrcicli-Jah, Jehcvah, 
HiraMj StolMn, Geometrass and Architect. 




^Answer to SigUi 



INTENDANT OF THE BUILDING. 



511 



Eighth Degree or Intendant of the Building. 




SIGN OF surprise. 



Place the thumbs on the temples, the 
hands open so as to form a square^ step 
backwards two paces, step forward two 
paces, then place the hands over the eyes 
and say, Ben Korim, 



SIGN OF ADMIRATION, 

INTENDANT OF THE 

BUILDING. 



Interlace the fingers of 
both hands, turn the 
palms upw^ards, let the 
hands fall on the waist, 
look upwards and say, 

Sign of Surprise, 
Jnteudant of Building. 





Sign of Admiration. 



SIGN OF GRIEF. 
INTENDANT OF THE BUILDING. 

Place the right hand on the heart, 
the left on the hip, balance thrice with 
the knees; one says Ja% the other says 
J ah. 



Sign of Grief, 






512 



EIGHTH AND NINTH DEGREESo 




TOKEN^ INTENDANT OF BUILD- 
ING. 

Strike one with the right 
hand over the other's heart; 
pass the right hand under the 
left arm, then seize the right 
shoulder with the left hand; 
one says Jachinai, the other^ 
Jiidah. 

Ninth Degree, or Master 
Elect of Nine. 

sign master elect of nine. 

First one raises the poniard 
and makes the motion of strik- 
ing the other on the forehead ; 
the other places his hand on his 
forehead as if to examine the 
supposed w^ound. 
Second raises the arm, strikes at the other's breast as 
if with a poniard, and says, Nekam 



Token, Intendant of Building, 




ANSWER. 



Place your right 
hand on your heart 
and say Nehah. 




Aosvver, 



Sjl^n, Master Elect of Nin^, 



NINTH AND TENTH DEGREES. 



513 



TOKEN. 

Clinch the fingers of 
your right hand, and 
at the same time ele- 
vate your thumb. The 
second seizes your 
thumb with the right 
hand, at the same time 
elevating his thumb; 
signifying the nine 
elected, eight close together and one by itself. 

PASS WORD : — Begoal-Kohl, 

SACRED word: — Nekamj answer, Nelcah. 

SIGN, MASTER ELECT OF FIFTEEN. 

Place the point of the poniard under the chin, and 
draw it downward to the waist, as if in the act of rip- 
ping open the abdomen. 




Token. 




ANSWER. 

Give the sign of an 
Entered Apprentice, with 
the fingers clinched and 
the thumb extended„ 




gjgu, Master Elect 



Aiis,\ or 



514 



TENTH AND ELEVENTH DEGKEES. 




TOKEN^ MASTER ELECT OF 
EIETEEN. 

Interlace each other^s fin- 
gers of the right hand. 

PASS WOED : — Elignam 
or Eliam. 

SACRED word: — Zerhalj 
answer^ Be^ijah: ^ 



Eleventh Degree or Sub- 
lime Knights Elected. 

sign, sublime knights 

ELECTED. 



Token. 



.4Jross the arms on the breast^ the fingers clinched, 
and the thumbs elevated. 




Sign, Sublime . , 
,KniglitJl§cW(J. moth. 



TOKENS, SUBLIME 
KNIGHTS ELECTED. 

First — Present to 
each other the thumb 
of the right hand, the 
fingers clinched. One 
seizes the thumb of 
the other and reverses 
thrice his wrist. One 
says Berith, the other 
one says Neder; the 
first then ^savs Shele- 




First Token, 



SIGNS, ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH DEGREES. "515 




Second Token, 



Second — Take one 
the right hand of the 
other, and with the 
thumb strike thrice on 
the first joint of the 
middle finger. 

PASS word: — Stolkin; (running of Water.) 

SACRED word: — AdofiaL 

Twelfth Degree or Grand Master Architect. 



SIGN, GRAND MASTER ARCHITECT. 

Slide the right hand into palm of the 
left as if holding a pencil in one hand, 
and in the other a tracing board ; make 
the motion of tracing a plan on the 
palm of the left hand, every now and 
then directing the eyes toward the 
Grand Master as if drawing by dicta- 
tion. 




Sign Grnnd Master. 
Architect. 



TOKEN. 



,v 



Join right hand to the other's 
left, interlacing the fingers; 
place the left hand on the hip, 
the brother will do the same 
with his right hand. 

PASS word: — Rah-hanaim. 

SACRED WORD : — Adofiai. 




ToUeu 



516 



THIRTEENTH OR ROYAL ARCH DEGREE. 




FIRST SIGN, ROYAL ARCH. 

Admiration; raise the hands to 
heaven, the head leaning on the left 
shoulder; fall on the right knee. 



First Sign, Royal Arch. 

SECOND SIGN. 

Adoration; fall on both knees. 




Second Sign, Royal Arcb. 




ROYAL ARCH TOKENS. 

Place your hands beneath the other's 
arms, as if to help him to rise, saying 
at the same time, Be of Good Cheer. 

The other returns the token, saying 
Jaiulum, 



"Smm, . 



GRAND ELECT PERFECT AND SUBLIME MASON. 517 




SIGN OF OBLIGATION. 



Place the right hand on the left side of 
the abdomen and draw it quickly and 
horizontally across the body to the right 
side. 



Sigii of Obligation 
G. E. P. and S. Mason. 



FIKST TOKEN. 

Join thv3 right hands, re- 
verse them thrice. Th.e first 
brother says, ^^Bcrith'^ the 
second sa3^s, ^^Neder/^ the 
first then says/^Shelemo'h.'' 




First Token Grand Elect, Perfect 
and Sublime Mason. 



WORDS. 

First Pass Word — Shibboleth, 
First Covered Word — Jabnlum, 



518 GRAND ELECT, PERFECT AND SUBLIME MASON. 




SIGN OF FIRE. 



Eaise the right hand open to the left 
cheek the palms outward, at the same time 
grasping the elbow with the left hand. 



sign of Fire, 




SECOND TOKEN. 

Give the Master's Grip, 
one says, can you go fur- 
ther? 



Second Token. 
ANSWER. 

The other slips his hand along the 
other's forearm up to the elbow. 
Each then places his left hand on 
the other's right shoulder and bal- 
ance thrice, the legs crossed from 
the right. 




Answer, Second ToSsea* 



GRAND ELECT^ PERFECT AND SUBLIME MASON. 519 



WORD. 



^ Second Covered Word — Makobim, Interpreted/^That's 
he! He is dead/' 

Second Pass Word — El-Hhanan. 



SIGN OF ADMIRATION. 

Raise both hands opened to heaven, 
the head inclined^ the eyes directed up- 
wards, afterward place the first two 
fingers of the right, hand on "the lips. 




Sign of AdmiratioD, 

THIRD TOKEN. 

Seize each other's right hand, grasp each 
other's right shoulder with the left hand 
and then pass left hands behind each 
other's back as if tp bring one another 
closer. 



WORD. 




Third Token. 



Third Covered Word — Adonai. 
Third Pass Word — Bea Makeh, Bamearah, interpre- 
ted, ^^Thank God we have found." 



520 GRAND EJECT PERFECT AND SUBLIME MASON. 

FIFTH SIGN. 

Interlace all your fin- 
gers^ hands raised over 
the head^ palms outward 
(this sign serves to call 
a brother.) 

SIXTH SIGN. 

Admiration (see p.516) . 

ANSWER. 

Look over your shoul- 
ders alternately. 

\ SEVENTH SIGN. 

Clap your hands on 
your thighs. 

EIGHTH SIGN. 

Fifth Sign. Put your hands^ shut^ 

to your mouth, as if to pull out your 
tongue, then place on your heart. 

NINTH SIGN. 

Raise right hand as if you had a 
poniard in it to strike^a brother^s 
forehead, to show that vengeance is 
completed. 

FIRST TOKEN. 





Answer. 




Eighth Sign. 

That of Intimate 
Secretary, B. -.N". 
:.S, t. which sig- 
nifies promises of 
a complete alli- 
ance (see p.348.) 

SECOND TOKEN. 

Circumspeciiofi : 





Token of Circumspection, 



Ninth Sign. 

advance 
hands recipro- 
callyfirst to the 
master token, 
thento the 
wrist, then to 
the elbow, and 
th e wo r d is 
Gabaon. 



FOUKTEENTH A'ND FIFTEENTH DEGEEBS. 



521 




Token of Resistance and 
Remembrance. 



THIRD TOKEN. 

Defiance, Resistance and Re- 
memlrance. Advance reciprocally, 
the hands ,as in the fourth degree^ 
drawing them to each other three 
times; then place the left hand on 
the brother's back^ then on his neck^ 
as if to raise him. 

PASS WORDS. 

There are three principal ones: 
the first is Shibboleth, three times 
with an aspiration. The second is 
■ El-Hanan. The third is most 
essential to be known, and is Bea- 
Maheh, Bamearah, which is inter- 
preted, ^^thank God we have found 
it.'^ 

COVERED WORDS. 

The first is Guiblim or Jabulum, The second is 
Makobim, v/hich, interpreted : "That's he ! He is dead V' 
The third is Adonai, Supreme Lord of all. 



Fifteenth Degree, or Knights of the 
East or. Sword. 

SIGN. 

Eaise the right hand to the left shoul- 
der and move it downward to the right 
hip, with a serpentine motion as if to rep- 
resent the motion of the waters of a river; 
then draw the sword and bring it to the 
guard as if to fight. 




Sign Knights of the East or Sword. 



523 



XNIGHTS OF THE EAST OR SWORD, 




TOKEN". 

Seize mutually 
the left^hands, the 
arms, lifted and ex- 
tended as if to re- 
pulse an attack; at 
the same time make 
with the right hand 
the motion of clear- 
ing the way; then 
point the swords to 
each other's heart. 



Token. 



ONE SAYS Judah, THE OTHER ANSWERS Benjamin. 
PASS word: — laaborou hammain, or liberty oy 

PASSAGE. 



GRAND word: — SJiaM, Shalom, Abi, 
in Latin Restoravit pacem patri. He 
restored peace to his' country. 

SACRED WORD : — Raph-c-dom. 

Sixteenth Degree or Princes of 
Jerusalem. 

sign"^ princes of jerusalem. 

Present yourself boldly with your 
left hand resting on your hip^ as if 
ready for a combat. 




Sign Princes 
of Jerusalem. 



PRINCES OF JERUSALEM. 



523 



ANSWER. 



Extend the arm at the height of 
the shoulder^ as if to begin the com- 
bat, the right foot forming a square 
with the toe of the left. 





TOKEN. 



Answer 



Join right hands, placing the 
thumb on the joint of little finger; 
with the thumb strike on that joint 
5 times, by 1, by 2 and by 2, at same 
^ime join right feet by the toes so 
as to form a straight line, touch the 
knee. Lastly place the left hand 
open on the shoulder, one of the 
other. One says twenty, the other 
twenty-three. 



Token, 



battery: — Five, in some Councils five times five. 

MARCH : — One slow step on the tip of the toes, some- 
times five are made under the sign thus : Slide the left 
foot forward, bring up the right foot to the toe of the 
left, make a short pause and so on until the five steps 
are made. 



524 



KNIGHTS OF THE EAST AND WEST. 



Seventeenth Degree or Knights of the^ast and 

West, 
preparation of candidate. 




Master of Ceremonies prepares candidate in an ante- 
room hnng with red and lighted bj^ seven lights by 
clothing him with a long white robe^ and brings him 
barefooted to the door of the Council. 

sign, knights of the 

east and west. 

Look at your right 
shoulder and say, J.&- 
Uddon. , 

ANSWER. 

Look at left shoul- 
der and say, Jubulum. 

FIRST TOKEN. 

Place left hand in 
each other's right 
hand^ closing the fin- 

bign and Answer, gers, Firei Tc^k^n, 





SEYEKTEEKTH AKD EIGHTEENTH DEGREES. 



KOK 



n2 



SECOND TOKEN. 

A touches B's left 
^ shoulder with right 
^ hand and B, answering 
'^i j touches A's right shoul- 
der with left hand. 

SIGN ON ENTERING 
COUNCIL. 

Touch Tyler's fore- 
head, when he answers 
by putting his hand on 
your forehead. 

PASS word: — Jubic- 
lum. 

SACRED word: — Ab- 
addon. _ 

Second Token. Sign on Entering Council, 





Eighteenth Degree or Sovereign Prince of Rose 

Croix. 




sign of the good shepherd. 

Cross the arms on breast, 
with hands extended and 
eyes raised to heaven. 

sign of reconciliation. 

Raise right hand and 
with index finger point up- 
ward. 

ANSWER. 

Point dov/nward with in- 
dex finger of right hand. 




Sign of the Good Shepherd. 



Sign of Reconciliation. 



526 



SOVERElt-tK PRIKCE OP ROSE CROIX. 



Eighteenth Degree or Sovereign Ppince of Rose 

Ceoix. 




SIGN OP HELP, SOVEREIGN PRINCE OF 
ROSE CROIX. 

Cross the legs, the right behind the lef i 



8ign of Help, 



ANSWER. 

Same, except left leg behind the right. 

TOKEN, SOVEREIGN PRINCE OF ROSE 
CROIX. 

Give the sign of the Good Shepherd; 
face each other; bow; place reciprocal- 
ly crossed hands on breast and give the 
fraternal kiss and pronounce the pass- 
word. 

PASS word: — Immanuel. 




ABBwer* 



NIKETEEKTH AND TWENTIETH l>E(iKEES. 527 

Nineteenth Degree or Grand Pontiff. 



SIGN OF GRAND PONTIFF. 

Extend horizontally the right arm; 
the hand is also extended; bring 
down the three last fingers perpen- 
dicularly. 

TOKEN. 

Each places the palm of his right 
hand on the other's forehead; one 
says, Alleluia, the other answers. 
Praise the Lord; the first then says, 
Immanuel, the other, God speed you. 
Both say, Amen. 




Sign, Grand Pontiff Degree. 

Twentieth Degree or Grand 
Master of all Symbolic Lodges. 



FIRST SIGN, grand MASTER. 





Token, Grand Pontiff. 

Form four squares; first by placing the 
right hand on the heart, the fingers 
close together, the thumb separate, 
which makes two squares; second by 
placing the left hand on the lips, the 
thumb separate, which makes a third 
square; third, by bringing the heels 
together, the feet open on a square. 

First Sig^, Grand Master's Degree. 



528 GRAKD MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 



SECOND SIGN. 

Kneel down, place 
the elbows on the 
floor, the head 
downwards and a 
little inclined to the 
left. 




jSecoua Sign, 20tli Degree. 




THIRD SIGN. 

Cross the arms on the breast, the right 
arm over the left, the fingers extended 
and close together, the thumb forming a 
square, heels touching, which makes five 
squares. 



Third Sign, 20th Degree. 

N. B,—ln some rituals only one sign is given instead 
of the first two, and this is to kneel on the right knee, 
the left hand being raised, which forms two squares; 
then place the left elbow on the left knee, fingers extend- 
ed and closed, the thumb forming the square, the head 
downwards, somewhat inclined to tho left. 



M 



GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 529 




SIGN OF INTRODUCTION. 
The sword elevated, or if no sword is worn, the right 
arm raised before the head as if to ward off a stroke. In 
coming together, cross swords and form the arch of steel. 



TOKEN. 

Take one the other's right 
elbow, with the right hand; 
press it four times; then slide 
the hand along the forearm 
down to the wrist; lastly, press 
the wrist-joint with the first 
finger only. 




Token. 20th Degree. 



530 



GRAND MASTER OF ALL SYMBOLIC LODGES. 



TOKEN OF INTRODUCTION. 

[Given after the sign 
of introduction.] 

Take each other's right 
hand, the fiiet finger on 
the wrist joint; then as 
you retire slide the hand 
along the other's hand 
down to the tip of the 
fingers. 




Token oontroduction. 



i\^ B. — Some in the last token squeeze on the other's 
wrist, each drawing the other nine times alternately, 
and repeating each time the word Cyrus. 

battery: — The battery is three strokes, by one and 
two ; 00. 

march: — Nine steps, each forming a square. 

PASS word: — Jekson. 

answer: — Stolkin. 

SACRED word: — Razah-belsijab 



NOACmTE OR PRUSSIAN KNIGHT- 531 

lAeiitenant Comnicmder — Arise my brother and receive 
the sign, token and words of this degree* 




SIGN OP ORDER. 

Raise the arms to heaven, the face 
toward the East, where the moon 
rises. 



Sign of Order, Noachite 
Degree. 



SIGN OF INTRODUCTION. 

One raises three fingers of the 
right hand, the other seizes those 
fingers with his right hand, and 
says, Frederick the Second. He 
then presents his three fingers, 
which the first one seizes in the 
name manner, saying Noah, 



I 




Sign of Introduction, Noachite 
Degree* 



532 TWENTY-FIRST AND TWEKTY-SECONI^ DEGREE?^.. 



SECOND SIGN, PRUSSIAN 
KNIGHT. 




Seize one the first finger 
of the other's right hand and 
press it with the thumb and 
first finger, saying Shem. 

The other gives the same J 
token, saying Ham; then the | 
first Ogives the same token, 
saying Japheth. 

PASS word: — Peleg, Pe- 
leg, Peleg. 

SACRED word: — Shem, | 
Ham, Japheth. | 

Second Sign of Introduction. 

Twenty second Degree, or Prince of Libanus. 

sign j prince of libajnus. 
Make the motion of lifting an axe with both hands, 
and striking as if to fell a tree. 




ANSWER. 



/ 



r 



Raise" both hands to |,^^^^ 
the height of the fore- 
head, the fingers extend- 
ed, and then let the hands 
fall, thus indicating the 
fail of a tree. 




Sign, Prince of 
Libanus. 



Answer to Si^, 
Princo of Libanun 



TWEXTY-SECOND AND TWENTY-THIRD DEGREES. 533 




TOKEN. 

Seize each other's hands aiid 
cross the fingers as a sign of good 
faith. 

PASS words: — Japhet, Aholiab, 
Lebanon. 

SACRED words: — Noahj Beza- 
leel, Sadonias. 



Token. 

Twenty-third Degree, or Chief of the Tabernacle. 

HIGH PRIEST. 

The High Priest wears a large red tunic, over which 
is placed a shorter one of white without sleeves; on his 
head is a close mitre of cloth of gold, on the front of 
which is painted or embroider- 
ed a Delta, enclosing the Ineffa- 
ble name in Hebrew characters. 
Over the dress he wears a black 
sash with silver fringe from, 
which hangs, by a red rosette, a 
dagger; the sash is worn from 
left to right. Suspended on his 
breast is the Breast Plate. 

DRESS OF CANDIDATE. 

A white tunic and white 
\drawers, sandals on his feet and 
a white cloth over his head, 
covering his eyes, so as to pre- 
vent him from seeing. 

High Priest, Preparation of Can- 

Chjef of Taber- didate, Chief of the 

nacle Degree, " Tabernacle Degree. 





534 



CHIEF OF THE TABERNACLE. 



\ 




SIGN, CHIEF OP THE TABERNACLE. 

Advance the left foot; make with the 
right hand the motion of taking the 
Censer, which is supposed to be in the 
left hand. 



Sign, Chief of Tabernacle, 



TOKEN. 



Seize each other by the left elbow 
with the right hand, bending the 
arm so as to form a kind of circle. 




Token, Chief of Tabernacle. 

battery: — Seven strokes, by six and one, or thus: 
00 00 00 0. 



PASS word: — Uriel. 



TWENTY-FOURTH AND TWENTY-FIFTH DEGREES. 535 







M 



SIGN" OF RECOGNITION. 

Place the right hand 
open over the eyes, as 
if to protect them from 
a strong light, the left 
hand on the breast, 
then raise the right 
hand to the left shoul- 
der, and bring it down 
diagonally to the right 
side. This is called 
the sign of the scarf. 




Sign of Recognition, 
Prince of the Tabernacle. 



Grand Sign, Prince 
of the Tabern^acle. 



GRAND SIGN, 



Place both hands open upon the head, join the two 
thumbs and the two forefingers by their extremities so 
as to form a triangle. 

. iV. £. — The token, battery and word are the same as 
in the preceding degree. 



Twenty-fifth Degree, or Knights of 
Brazen Serpent. 

sign of order, knights of the brazen 

SERPENT. 

Incline the head downwards, and point 
to the ground with the forefinger of right 
hand. 



Sign of Order, Knights 
of the Brazen Serpent. 




536 



KNIGHTS OF THE BRAZEN SERPENT. 



SIGN OF EECOGNITIOH. 

Form a cross upon yourself. 




Sign of Recognition, 

Knights of- Brazen 

Serpent. 




TOKEN, 



Place yourself on the right 
of tlie brother, and take his 
left wrist with your left hand. 



ANSWER. 



He then takes your right 
wiist with his right hand. 



Token, Knigiits ot Brazen Serpent 



PASS word:— I/.N/.R/.I.-., lettered only. 

COVERED word: — Johanncs Balp. 

6ACRED word:— ilToses; this word must be spelled. 



PRIKCE OF MEKCY. 



637 




PREPARATION OP CANDIDATE. 

The candidate is prepared by the Senior 
Deacon in a plain white robe, reaching 
from the neck to the feet, barefooted, 
hoodwinked, so as to prevent his se^i^g, 
with a rope passed three times around his 
body. 



Preparation of Can- 
didate, Prince of 
Mercy Degree. 

SIGN OF ENTRANCE. 

Place the right hand open, so as to form 
a triangle above the eyes, as if to be pro- 
tected against a strong light. 





Sign of Entrance, 
Prince of Mercy. 



SIGN OP CHARACTER. 

Form a triangle with the two thumbs, 
and the two forefingers; join them by the 
extremities, place the bands in front of, and 
touching the body. 



Sign of Character, 
Prince of Mercy. 



538 



PRINCE OF MERCY. 



SIGN OP HELP. 



Cross both arms above the head, the 
hands open, palms outwards and say: 
To me, the children of Truth. 





Sign of Help, 
Prince of Mercy, 



SIGN OP ORDER. 



Stand up, the right hand resting on 
the hip. 



Sign of Order. 
Prince of Mercy. 

TOKEN. 

Plaee^both hands, each on the 
Other's shoulders, press them slight- 
ly thrice and say, Gomel. 

PASS word: — Gomel, 

COMMON words: — Ghiblim and 
Gabaon. 

sacred words: — Jehovah, Jachin. 

SUBLIME word: — Ed^il-peu-caguy 
that is, do as you would be done by- 




Token. 



COMMANDER OF THE TEMPLE, 539 

TwENr. -SEVENTH DeGREE, OR CoMMANDEB OP THE 

Temple. 




Candidate taking Obligation, Commander of the Temple Degree. 

SIGN OF RECOGNITION. 

Form on your forehead a cross, with 
the thumb of your right hand, the 
fingers clinched. 

ANSWER. 

Kiss the place 
where the cross 
was made. (This 
sign is used in the 
Court only.) 

ANSWER. 

(Out of Court.) 
Place first two fin- 
gers of the right 
handon the mouth, 
the other fingers 

closed, the palm of the hand, 

turned outward. 

Answer. 




Sign of Recognition, 
Commander of the 
Temple. 




540 



COMMAKDER OF THE TEMPLE, 




SIGN OF OEDER. 

(In the Court.) Extend your right hand 
on the round table, thumb separate so as 
to form a square. When standing, place 
the right hand on the body below the 
breast, forming also a square. 



SigQ of Order, Com- 
mai^der of the Temple. 



TOKEK. 



Give three light blows with 
right hand on the other's left 
shoulder. 



ANSWER, 



He takes your right hand and 
gives it three-light shakes. 




Token, Commander Of 
the Temple, 



PASS word:— ^Solomon. 

SACRED word: — I.-,N.-.R.-.I.*., lettered. 



KNIGHTS OF THE SUK 



541 




Twenty-eighth Degree, or 
Knights of the Sun, 

SIGN, knights of THE SUN. 

Place the right hand flat up- 
on the heart, the thumb sepa- 
rate, so as to form a square. 

ANSWER. 

Raise the right hand, and 
with the index, point to heaven. 




Sign, Knights of 
the Sun. 



Answer. 



PREPARATION OF CANDIDATE. 

Brother Truth prepares the candidate as follows: A 
bandage over his eyes, a sword in his right hand; in- 
vests him with a ragged and bloody robe, puts a mask 
on his face, fetters binding his arms, a crown on his 
head, a purse in his left hand, etc. 



TOKEN, KNIGHTS OF THE 

SUN. 




Take in your hand those 
of the brother and press 
them gently; kiss him on 
the forehead and say Al- 
pha. Ho returns the kiss 
and says Omega. But 
this is-not much used. 

PASS word;— Stibium. 




Candidate^ 



'rpken, Knight^ or the S^u* 



543 knights of st. andrew. 

Twenty-ninth Degree, or Knights of St. Andrew, 




, FIRST sign; that of earth. 

Wipe your forehead with the back 
of the right hand, the head somewhat 
inclined forward. 



First Sign, Knight 
ol St. Andrew. 



FIRST TOKEN. 

Seize each successively the 
first, then the second, and last- 
ly the third joint of the other's 
index finger of the right hand, 
each spelling alternately the 
word of the first degree. 
(Boaz.) 




First Tokeot Knigbt of St, Andrew. 



KNIGHTS OF ST. AJ^DEEW. 



543 




2nd Sign, Water. 



SECOND SIGN, THAT OF WATER. 

Place the right hand upon the heart; 
extend it horizontally at the height of 
the breast; let it fall on the right side, 
as if to salute with the hand. 



SECOND TOKEN. 



Seize each successively the first, then the second, and 
lastly the third joint of the other's middle finger, as 
indicated for the index in the first token, each spelling 
the sacred word of the second degree, (Shibboleth,) For 
mode of giving it see page 184, Freemasonry Illustrated. 



TUinp SIGN, THAT OF ASTONISHMENT AND 
HORROR. 

Turn the head to the left, looking down- 
wards; raise both hands clasped to heaven, a 
little towards the right. 




Sign of Horror, 



544 



KNIGHTS OF ST, ANDREW. 




FOUETH SIGN, THAT OF FIEE. 

Join both hands, the fingers inter- 
laced and cover the eyes therewith, 
the palms outwards. 



Sign of Firew 



ANSWER. 



Give the sign of Air. Extend for- 
ward the right arm and hand at the 
height of the shoulder. 




Answer to Sign of Fire. 



THIRD TOKEN. 

w^eize each successively the index finger of the other's 
right hand by the first joint. Each pronounce alternately 
one of the three syllables of the sacred word of the third 
^egr^e, (Mah-h^h-bone.) 



KNIGHTS OF ST. ANDREW. 



545 




FIFTH SIGN, THAT OF ADMIRATIONT. 

Raise the eyes and hands to heaven, 
the left arm somewhat lower than 
the right, the heel of the left foot 
slightly raised, so that the left knee 
forms a square with the right leg* 



Sign of Admiratioa. 



SIXTH SIGN, THAT OF THE SUN. 

Place the thumb of the right hand upon 
the right eye; raise the index finger so as 
to form a square, then bring it on a line, 
as if to indicate an object in view, saying: 
"I measure the sun itseif,'* 




Sign of tlie Sun. 



546 



KNIGHTS OF ST* ANDREW. 




SEVENTH sign; GENERAL SIGN, 

Form, on the breast, a cross of St. Andrew 
with the two arms, the hands upwards. 



General Sign, Knight 
of St. Andrew. 



GENERAL TOKEN, 

Seize one the last joint of the 
index finger of the other's right 
hand; the first one says Ne^ the 
other Ka, Then seize the last 
joint of the little finger; the first 
one says Mah^ the other, giving 
the whole word, says Nekamah. 




Cfeneral Token, Knight o2 
St. Andrew. 



PASS WORDS. 

Ardarel^ or Ardriel^ The Angel of Fire. 

CaBmareUy or 
Tallmd^ ox 



u 



ii 



(( 



u 



l« 



(( 



Air. 
" Water, 
'' Eanh 



GRAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH* 



547 



Thirtieth Degree; Grand Elect Knight Kadosh, or 
Knight of the White and Black Eagle. 




Candidate Stabbing the Skolls. 




SIGN OF KADOSH. 

Place the right hand on the heart, 
the fingers separated. Let the right 
hand fall on the right knee. Bend and 
grasp the knee; then seize the poniard, 
which is suspended from the ribbon, 
raise it to the height of the shoulder, 
as if to strike, aud say Nekam Adonai. 



Sign o( EadoJBlL 



548 



GKAND ELECT KNIGHT KADOSH. 



Thietieth Degree, or Grand Elect 
Knight Kadosh. 



SIGN OF ORDER. 



Hold the sword in the left hand and 
place the right hand extended over the 
heart. 





Sign of Order. 
Knight Kadosh. 



TOKEN. 

Place right foot to 
right foot, and knee to 
knee; present the right 
first, the thumb elevat- 
ed, seize the thumb al- 
ternately, let it slip and 
step back a pace, then 
raise the arm as if to 
strike with the poniard. 
In doing this the first 
says, Nekamah'healim^ 
and the other answers, 
Pharash'koL 



Token, Knight Kadosh, Second Position. 



PASS word: — To enter, Nekam, 

answer: — Menahhem^\ki2X\'^ Consolator. To retire, 
Phaal-JcoL 

Ai!jswi^n:-—Pharash-koh. 

SACRED wonDi—JVekamaf: bealim. 

answek:— PA^raA-.^oAy but more generally, Mhim- 
Adonai, 

answer; — Fharash'koL 



6Ba:nd inspector, inquisitor commander. 549 



FIRST SIGTN. 



Cross both hands, bring them to the 
navel, thumbs crossing each other, and 
say Justice. 





First Sign, 



ANSWERING SIGN. 

Cross both arms above your head, right 
outside, palms outward, and say Equity. 



Answering Sign. 

TOKEN, GRAND INSPECTOR INQUISITOR 
COMMANDER. 

Place right foot to right foot, and 
right knee to right knee, take each 
other by the left hand, and with the 
right hand strike a gentle blow on the 
other's right shoulder, 

SACRED word: — One says Justice, 
the other answers Eqi^ity. Both to^ 
gether say, So mote it lie. 




T^kent 



550 SUBLIME PRINCE OF THE ROYAL SECRET. 




Camp, Sublime Prince of the Royal 
Secret. 



SIGN. 



Place the right hand open on the 
heart; extend it forward, the palm 
downwards and then let it fall by the 
right side. 




Sign Sublime 
Prince of the 
Boyal Secret, 



SUBLIME PRINCE OF TttE ROYAL SEClEiET. 



.551 



TOKEN. 




Token, Sublime Prince of theRoye 1 
Secret, Ut Position. 




Token, 2nd Positioa. 



Seize the sword with the 
right hand ; unsheath it and 
carry it up to the right side, 
the hilt resting on "che riglit 
hip, the point upwards. 
Place the right foot behind 
the left, so as to form a 
square, leaving a small dis- 
tance between the feet thus 
arranged. Raise the ^^left 
arm, the hand open and ex- 
tended, as if to repulse an 
attack. Seize each other's 
left hand, the fingers inter- 
laced. Then draw close to 
each other and embrace. 
One says Hochmah, (that is 
wisdom or philosophy,) and 
the other answers Tsedakah, 
that is, truth, justice and 
equity. (In some rituals 
these two words are said to 
be the sacred and pass of 
the degree.) 

BATTERY. 

Is five strokes, by one and 
four; 0000. 



552 



SOVEREIGlsr GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL. 




Preparation of Candidate* 
33rd Degree. 



Thirty-third Degree, or Sovereign Grand 



PREPARATION OF CANDIDATE, SOV- 
EREIGN GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL. 

The candidate is prepared by be- 
ing divested of his shoes and hat; 
clothed in a black robe without 
sword or regalia; a lighted taper in 
TnFright hand and a black cable tow 
around his neck, the ends of which 
are held by the Illustrious Grand 
Master General of Ceremonies at 
the proper time. The Illustrious 
Grand Marshal retires to the Cham- 
ber of Reflection, and 
all being ready he 
strikes on the door of 
the Council Chamber. 

SIGN OP ORDER. 

Left hand 
over the 
heart, fingers 
extend'dand 
close togeth- 
er. 



Sign of Order. 
PENALTY, 33d DEGREE. 

And should I knowingly 
or willfully violate the 
same, may this wine I now 
drink, become a deadly 
poison to me, as the hem- 
lock juice drank by Soc- 
rates. (Drinks wine out of 
skull.) And may these 
cold arms forever encircle 
me. Amen. (Skeleton's 
arms enfold him.) 





Skeleton Seizing Candidatewhcn 
Taking Oath mST^ 



SOVEREIGN GRAND INSPECTOR GENERAL* 



553 




FIRST SIGN. 

Kneel on the left 
knee, cross the arms 
over the breast, then 
draw the sword, 
hold the point in the 
left hand and cross 
it with that of the 
opposite Inspector 
and give the First Sign, s. G. I. Q. 

First Pass Word~''jyQ Molay." 
Answer — "Hiram Abiff." 
Second Pass TFot'c?— "Frederick.** 
Answer — "Of Prussia.'* 




Second Sign. 



SECOND SIGN. 

Disengage swords, retain point in left 
hand, fall on both knees, kiss blade three 
times and give the 

Sacred Words — ^'Micha^ Macha^ Bea- 
lirn^ Adonai.^^ 

"Who is like unto Thee, oh God." 



SIGN OF ENTRANCE. 



Cross the arms on the breast, th« head 
bowed down, 

battery. 00000 000 00. 




ISigu Qt Jgutir^g^, 



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Supreme Lodge of the World, with the Secret work added 

and fully illustrated. Cloth, 75q Paper cover, 35q, 



REVISED ODD-FELLOWSHIP ILLUSTRATED. 

Revised and Amended Ritual of the Initiatory, Lodge, En- 
campment and Rebekah rituals. An exact copy of the late 
official "Charge Books" issued by the Sovereign Grand 
Lodge, with the secret work accurately given and profusely 
illustrated. In use all over America. 

Cloth, $1.50; Russia, $2.00. paper covers 75c. 

REVISED ILLUSTRATED REBEKAH RITUAL 
Revised and Amended Official '* Ritual for Rebekah Lodges, 
Published by the Sovereign Grand Lodge L 0. O. ¥./' with 
the Unwritten (secret) work added and the official ** Ceremo- 
nies of Instituting Eebekah Lodges and Installation of Of- 
ficers of Rebekah Lodges.'' Price 35 cts. 

EXPOSITION OF THE GRANGE. 
Edited by Rev. A. W. Geeslin. Illustrated with engravings, 
showing lodge-room, signs, signals, etc. Price 35 cts. 

TEMPLE OP HONOR ILLUSTRATED. 
A full and complete illustrated ritual of /^The Templars of 
Honor and Temperance,'' commonly called the Temple of 
Honor, a historical sketch of the order and an analysis of its 
character. A complete exposition of the Subordinate Temple, 
and the degrees of Love, Purity and Fidelity, by a Templar 
of Fidelity and Past Worthy Chief Templar. Price 35 cts. 

RITUAL KNIGHTS of LABOR ILLUSTRATED 
The Complete Illustrated Ritual of the Order, including the 
*' Unwritten Work," and a brief history of the Order; also 
an article on Anarchism by John V. Farwell, etc. 35 cts. 

UNITED SONS OP INDUSTRY ILLUSTRATED. 
A full and complete illustrated ritual of the secret trades- 
union of the above name, giving the signs, grips, passwords, 
etc. Price 25 cts. 

REVISED RED MEN ILLUSTRATED 
revised, illustrated Ritual of the Improved Order of Red 
Men, comprising the Adoption Degree, Warrior's Degree 
and Chiefs Degree, with the Odes, etc.clotli, 75 Paper 35c 

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA 
Complete revised Official Ritual of the Beneficiary and Fra- 
ternal Degrees, with unwritten or secret work, installation, 
funeral ceremonies, odes and hymns. Price 35 cts. 

THE FORESTERS ILLUSTRATED.— The complete illus- 
trated Ritual of the Foresters, with Installation Ceremp- 
pies. Paper cover, 35 cents each 



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Date Due 



All library items are subject to recall at any time. 









OCT 2 2004 






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Brigham Young University 







BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 



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