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Full text of "The Scotish minstrel : a selection from the vocal melodies of Scotland, ancient and modern"


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THE GLEN COLLECTION OF SCOTTISH MUSIC 

Presented by Lady DOROTHEA Ruggles-Brise to 
the National Library of Scotland, in memory of her 
brother, Major Lord George Stewart Murray, 
Black Watch, killed in action in France in 1914. 



28th January 1927. 



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Warehouse Jfy? pC Princes Street. 



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

National Library of Scotland 



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PREFACE 



TO THE 



SCOTISH MINSTREL. 



In presenting the Scotish Minstkel to the Public, we trust that we have 
amply fulfilled the engagements into which we entered in the Prospectus, — not 
only by the careful selection of the Airs, but also by the addition of Accompani- 
ments for the Piano-Forte, composed expressly for the work, and in a style which, 
it is hoped, will be found to support the voice without overwhelming it. As this 
improvement formed no part of our original plan, the Lovers of Scotish Song 
must be satisfied of our anxious desire to render it as generally acceptable as pos- 
sible. With regard to the Music and Poetry, we can truly say that is national, 
as we have scrupulously avoided the insertion of any airs or verses, however 
beautiful, that are not of Scotish origin. 

The Scots have been often accused of claiming the Irish music as their own, 
and though we wish to act fairly by them, we cannot but doubt the exclusive 
right which, in many instances, has been asserted in favour of the sister country. 
Burns says, " The wandering minstrels, harpers, and pipers, used to go fre- 
quently errant through the wilds of Scotland and Ireland, and so some favourite 
airs might be common to both. 1 ' From this intercourse, the itinerant minstrels 
of either country might widely disseminate their tunes, and each nation might 
gradually mould them to its own peculiar character. Of this many instances, we 
think, may be traced. The air adapted in this collection to Burns 1 song, " The 
gloomy night is gathering fast? which we carefully noted from the singing of an 
aged Highland woman several years ago, is very like, in the second strain, to a 
well-known Irish tune. If it be of Irish origin, the Highlanders have altered it 
to their own scale, which gives it quite a Scotish character ; but may not the 
Irish have taken the same liberty ? The similarity of " / Med ns'er a laddie but 
ane? to the air, claimed by the Irish, " My lodging is on the cold ground? is also 
very striking ; yet this air has long been considered in Scotland to be of native 
growth. The air adapted to " Lord Ronald came to his lady's bower? which has 
never, that we are aware of, been committed to writing till now, and which ap- 



_i 



iv PREFACE TO THE SCOTISH MINSTREL. 

pears to be formed from the same materials, has been from time immemorial 
known among our peasantry ; and " The widow's waiV seems to have been con- 
structed from it. The curious in these matters may amuse themselves with tracing 
several others, in which the ground- work will be found the same, while the super- 
structure varies in its features according to the distinguishing characteristics of 
the two countries. We think, therefore, that this point can never be satisfactorily 
determined; and if we have inserted any disputed airs, we must just make our 
apology in the words of an old song, and say, 

" Ireland is a fine countrie, 
And the Scots to them are kin." 

Besides the songs familiar to every Caledonian, many hitherto unpublished will 
be found in this collection,* which, we doubt not, will be highly relished by 
those who prefer the simple " breathings of nature 11 to the laboured combina- 
tions of art. Not a few of these wild flowers have been gathered from the peasantry 
of our country. Several of them, from their extreme simplicity, and the scale 
from which they are framed, must satisfy every one acquainted with the charac- 
teristics of Scotish music, that they are the compositions of minstrels of a remote 
age. Many of the Jacobite songs and airs were taken from the withered lips of 
auld himmers and carles, whose bluid yet warms at ilie remembrance of Prince 
Charlie, -f- 

According to the plan of this work, several airs have been arranged to the 
simple stanzas of olden time, in preference to the more polished verse of modern 
days ; for this we need make no apology to him who feels that 

" Each simple air his mother sung 
Placed on her knee, when helpless young, 
Still vibrates on his ear !" 



* For many very important contributions of this kind, we have been indebted to several cor- 
respondents, who have sent us their offerings with no restriction, but that their names should be 
concealed. 

-f- Our obligations have been particularly great, in this way, to old Alister M'Alpine, an 
eccentric, but worthy character, well known in the " west countrie ;" who sings snatches of 
these Jacobite relics, when they happen to burst on his fast-decaying memory, with a degree of 
enthusiasm which we scarcely remember to have seen equalled. It is much to be regretted, that 
some person had not committed his songs to writing before the encroachments of time had so 
far impaired his recollection ; we feel happy, however, in having been the means of preserving 
from unmerited oblivion what yet remains, as in a few short years, in all human probability, 
they would have no longer been in existence. 



PREFACE TO THE SCOTISH MINSTREL. v 

But, besides our predilection for old rhymes, we fear our good taste will be called 
in question for admitting so many lilts and rants into the collection ; and some 
may even reckon them silly, and perhaps vulgar. We appeal, however, to all true 
Scotish hearts, if these ditties, with all their defects, have-not a nameless charm, 
an undefinable attraction, associated, as they often are, with our earliest and 
fondest recollections, and 

" Intwined with every tender tie, 
Memorials dear of youth and infancy." 

Some beautiful verses from Leyden, Fergusson, Tannahill, Gall, the Ettrick 
Shepherd, &c. will be found in these volumes, which were never before united to 
music ; and many of the best songs of Burns, and other well-known lyric poets, 
adorn their pages. 

It may appear extraordinary to some of the unqualified admirers of Burns, 
that we should exclude any of his standard songs from this collection. In some 
instances this has arisen from accidental circumstances not worth explaining, and 
in others from design ; for though we deeply feel his beauties, and exult in him 
as a countryman, yet we have made it an invariable rule to prefer dulness to wit, 
if it bordered on profanity, and doggerel rhyme to all the witchery of poesy, when 
the bard could not " claim the palm for purity of song." A wise philanthropist 
has said, " Let who will make the laws, but let me make the ballads. 1 ' 1 Convinced 
of the force of this remark, and of the influence, good or evil, which the union of 
poetry and music must have, we have been most anxious to preserve our pages 
unsullied by any thing likely to offend against delicacy or decorum. As the hours 
of recreation are the most critical for morals, it is of the utmost importance that 
virtuous feelings be excited in the mind by those exercises of which that recreation 
consists. When disengaged from the active pursuits of business, and during the 
hours of relaxation and festivity, no higher virtues can be brought before our 
view than those of friendship, love, patriotism, hospitality, and good humour ; 
in no form can they be introduced more acceptable than in that of song ; and 
they never appear more delightful than when chanted to such artless and simple 
music as awakens the feelings and penetrates at once to the heart. 

That these untutored effusions, which come more immediately under the deno- 
mination of National Melody, possess, in an eminent degree, the power of making- 
deep and powerful impressions, none we believe will have the hardihood to deny ; 
however little they may be relished by persons destitute of musical feeling on the 
one hand, or on the other by those who, lost in the labyrinths of musical science, 
can derive gratification only from suspensions, fugues, and other mechanical con- 
trivances — the dry and elaborate pedantries' of art. To the first description of 



v i PREFACE TO THE SCOTISH MINSTREL. 

persons we shall make no reply ; but to those who affect to despise these artless 
strains on account of their extreme simplicity, we do not hesitate to give it as our 
opinion, that, while many of the laboured productions of art shall gradually be 
growing antiquated, and at length be lost in the shifting revolutions of fashion, — 
so long as human passions and human feelings remain the same, the simple effu- 
sions of nature will be fondly cherished and listened to with rapture. 

We beg, however, not to be misunderstood on this subject, as none can have 
a greater relish than ourselves for many of the beautiful compositions of classical 
composers ; and none, we presume, have received higher gratification from those 
charming specimens of melody, united to the most exquisite and powerful har- 
mony, that have been given to the world by a Haydn, a Mozart, and a Beeth- 
oven. We only desire to advocate the cause of simplicity and nature, particularly 
in music united to poetry ; for we are perfectly aware, that the human voice is 
wonderfully supported by a chaste instrumental accompaniment, and that when 
good harmony is attached to pleasing melody, the effect is truly enchanting. 

The opinion, that our melodies are more indebted to the feelings of nature 
than the exertions of art for their existence, appears, we think, to be founded on 
just grounds. Music and song are natural to mankind — they have one common 
origin — both of them proceed from the native sympathies and susceptibilities of 
the heart ; and according as the heart is affected with joy or sorrow, they will be 
o-ay and sprightly in the one case, or sad and plaintive in the other, and will 
express all those varieties of emotion with which the mind may be affected by the 
prosperities and adversities of life. 

The primary scale of music has been ever the same throughout the habitable 
globe ; and although the music of each country might possess a character peculiar 
to itself, varying according to the different manners and dispositions of its inhabi- 
tants, yet its general features must be nearly the same ; and it is only when so- 
ciety has attained some degree of refinement, and music has assumed somewhat of 
the character of a science, that those more artificial modes of composition can find 
place. Thus it is very evident, that the fourth and seventh in the major mode, 
and the second and sixth in the minor mode, were not introduced until music 
came to be cultivated as a science ; and the flat seventh in the major mode, which 
gives such a tender and impassioned expression to so many of our melodies, 
although now in some measure ancient, was certainly not to be found in the 
music of very remote ages. 

For the amusement of those who may be curious to trace the antiquity of our 
airs, we shall subjoin a few observations and quotations. — A late writer on 
Scotish music remarks, that " The excellence and sweetness of the Scotish 
melodies has been widely felt and frequently acknowledged. How so much 



PREFACE TO THE SCOTISH MINSTREL. vii 

sweetness came to be infused into the strains of a rude people, compelled to con- 
tend with a barren soil, a tempestuous climate, and frequently involved in the 
horrors of anarchy and civil discord, are questions which have been often put, and 
considered to militate against the opinion of their being very ancient. By whom, 
or under what circumstances, a great number of the Scotish melodies were com- 
posed, it is now impossible to ascertain ; and to approximate by inference, that 
a very considerable number of them are ancient, is perhaps all that ever will be 
attainable on the subject.'" — Dr Johnson says, " A Scotchman must be a very 
sturdy moralist who does not love Scotland better than truth : he will always love 
it better than inquiry ; and if falsehood flatters his vanity, will not be very diligent 
to detect it." — We have no wish to deny this charge on our nationality, as we 
indeed love Scotland, though, we hope, not better than truth ; we therefore shall 
proceed to inquiry. On Mr Tytler's inference, that the songs of " Waly, waly? 
" O, laddie, I maun lo'e thee,'"'' and " Hap me with thy petticoat? from their 
artless simplicity, belong to an age prior to the reign of James I., Ritson observes, 
" There is in fact no bound to conjecture ; and it would be just as easy, and 
possibly just as true, to fancy that all the Scotish songs and tunes, as now extant, 
were sung and played every day before Fingal, as he sat in his great chair after 
dinner, ' drinking the blude-red wine ;' " and again, " Scotch traditions are to be 
received with great caution.'" — We may remark, that though Tytler's inference 
cannot be satisfactorily established, still it is consonant with probability. But it 
will be proper to fix a time before which music may be termed ancient. Taking Dr 
Busby as sufficient authority, it is defined thus in his Dictionary : — " The epi- 
thet ancient, when applied to the term music, is not, as when conjoined with the 
word literature, to be referred to the productions of the classical Greeks and Ro- 
mans. The eleventh century of the Christian era arrived before the appearance 
of Guido's scale. To the age of De Muris (the fourteenth century) we are indebted 
for the introduction of the bass, tenor, and treble cliffs ; and half of the seven- 
teenth century had elapsed before the art was attained of composing in a plurality 
of real and distinct simultaneous parts. It is therefore chiefly to the composers 
of the early part of the eighteenth century that the expression ancient music pro- 
perly relates, and indeed it seldom alludes to productions of an earlier date." — 
The justness of the preceding definition is supported by Dr Burney, when treat- 
ing of the introduction of the recitative into the Italian music : — " Till this time," 
says he, " musicians were chiefly employed in gratifying the ear with the ' con- 
cord of sweet sounds,' without respect to poetry, or aspiring at energy, passion, 
intellectual pleasure," &c. 

Claudio Montevarde, who was, as it is generally thought, the first composer of 
the musical drama called Opera, published a set of madrigals in 1638, in the 



viii PREFACE TO THE SCOTISH MINSTREL. 

preface to which he says, that " he is the first who has attempted to express the 
livelier passions." Still it is not single melody ; and in the compositions of Italian 
masters of the present day, we frequently see prefixed to particular movements, 
and even to whole pieces of music, the term Alia Scozzese ; which does not 
always signify that the style is directly Scotish, but that it is so far of a Caledoilian 
cast, or tinge, as to remind us of the Scotish music. If the Italians had 
originally been possessed of this kind of style, would they have made this open 
acknowledgment? Certainly not; and their employing the term is evidence 
sufficient that they are conscious of its not being their own invention. Carlo 
Gesualdo, Prince of Venosa, who died in 1614, and who appears to have been 
esteemed as the first musician of his day, is candidly acknowledged by Tassoni 
to have been an imitator of our King James I. All the Scotish historians 
agree in James' being an admirable performer as well as composer. They, how- 
ever, may be suspected of partiality to their king ; the testimony of an illustrious 
foreigner is therefore much to be prized: — " Noi ancora possiamo connumerar, 
tra nostri, Jacopo Re di Scozia, che non pur cose sacre compose in canto, ma 
trova da se stesso, una nuova musica, lamentevole e mesta, differente da tutte 
Taltre. Nel che poi e stato imitato da Carlo Gesualdo, Principe di Venosa, che in 
questa nostra eta, ha illustrata anch 1 egli la musica con nuove rnirabili inventioni." 
See Tassoni " Pensieri Diversi" lib. 10. — It would therefore be unnecessary to 
dilate upon the vague hypothesis that has assigned an Italian origin to our 
Scotish airs. Before hazarding any opinion upon their origin, it will be proper 
to ascertain if there are sufficient documents to"warrant designating any of them 
ancient. 

Allan Ramsay published his Tea-Table Miscellany in 1724, and a Collection 
of Tunes or Airs, for the songs in that work, was published in 1725 ; and they 
are described in the preface as " having an agreeable gayety and sweetness, that 
makes them acceptable wherever they are known ; and what farther adds to the 
esteem we have for them, is their antiquity, and being universally known." This 
is certainly sufficient to entitle them to the appellation of ancient ; but, as this is 
advancing about one quarter into the eighteenth century, we shall refer to earlier 
documents. 

We have seen two MS. Collections,* which consist principally of Scotish airs, 
written for the Viol de Gamoa. The first is dated, Glasgow, 1683, and the 
second, 1692. They contain nearly the same airs, and are evidently in the 
hand-writing of the same person. The names attached to several of them are 
different from those by which they are now known ; which plainly proves, that 

* In the possession of Mr Andrew Blaikie, engraver in Paisley. 



PREFACE TO THE SCOTISH MINSTREL. ix 

other songs were sung to them at that period : for instance, " Nancy's to the 
greenwood gane," is called " Toxo to spin ,•" " My mither's aye glow'ring o'er me," 
" A health to Bettie ;" " Lochaber no more," " King James 1 march to Ireland ,•" 
" Tweedside," " Doun Tweedside." There are many other well-known tunes, a 
few of the most popular of which we shall mention, viz. — " Allan Water,'''' 
" Where Helen lies,"" " For lack of gold she left me," " Hand awd Jrae me, 
Donald" " Maggie, I must lo'e thee,'''' and " The last time I came o'er the muir."" 
" Kathrine Ogie" was sung by Abel in 1686 ; " Waly, waly," is in an antique 
Medley-book, 1666; " Leslies march" 1 ' 1 was known in 1644; " Tak your auld 
cloak about ye" is mentioned in Othello, written about 1611; " O'er the hills and 
Jar awa',''' and " Brose and butter,'' 1 were both popular before the Restoration ; 
" John Anderson,' 1 '' and " Kind Robin lo^es me" are said to have been used as 
chants in the Catholic church. " John Anderson," from its compass, simplicity, 
and chasteness, might have had the honour of being chanted in that service, and 
accompanied by the " kist fu 1 o 1 whistles ;" but it is fully as probable, that even 
John was an associate of the profane ballads of his day, along with other vagrants 
of the olden time. The fact we believe is, that instead of the secular music being 
any way indebted to the music of the church, the Reformers seized upon the most 
popular national airs as fit companions to their satirical songs upon the Papists. 
" John Anderson" may then be considered prior to 1590 ; " The banks of Heli- 
con," and " The wooing of Jock and Jenny," may be dated at 1586 ; the air of 
" Whip megmorum" mentioned by Skinner in " Tullochgorum" is about the 
same age ; and the battle of Harlaw, in 1411, gave birth to a famous pipe-tune, 
which was a great favourite till the middle of the 17th century. It is provoking to 
search, and search in vain, for tunes which appear to have been great favourites 
with minstrels, pipers, poets, and the populace, from the 15th to the end of the 
16th century. " Hunts up" " Hey trix cum trixie" and " The day it dawes," 
noticed familiarly by Douglas, Dunbar, and Sempil, are no longer known, unless 
they exist under other titles. " Gilderoy" is commemorative of the outlaw 
M'Gregor, executed in the reign of James V. " Johnny Armstrong" was a 
famous freebooter who suffered in the same reign. In " Scotland^ Complaynt" 
the shepherds have a dance named Johnny Ermstrang. It is likely that these are 
coeval with the events they record. Of " The flowers of the Forest," commemo- 
rative of the battle of Flodden, 1513, the Editor of the " Minstrelsy qf the 
Scotish Border" states, that the first and fourth lines of the first stanza are old, 
as well as the tune. The old sone- beg-an thus : 

" I've heard a lilting at the ewes milking." 

• •••«» 

" The flowers of the Forest are all wede away." 



x PREFACE TO THE SCOTISH MINSTREL. 

The rest of the song was written by a lady of Roxburghshire. Another lady fa- 
voured him also with a line of the old song, which runs thus : 

" I ride single on my saddle ; 

For the flowers of the Forest are a' wede away." 

" The Souters of Selkirk" is another, which takes its origin from the fatal field of 
Flodden. Tytler relates the peculiar circumstances of the Selkirk souters ; but 
Ritson seems to have had considerable scruples of conscience, and discredits it, 
because some wag at Aberdeen told Dr Johnson that the Scots learned the art of 
making- slwesjrom Cromwell's army. " Hey tutti tatti" is said to have been the 
march played to Robert Bruce's troops at the battle of Bannockburn. This has 
been doubted; because Barbour mentions nothing but the blowing of horns. 
Other instruments, however, besides horns were in use prior to this period. 
Bromton, an Irish chronicler in the reign of Henry II., says the Scots had the 
lyre, the tympano, and choro. Now the choro, or chorus, is found to be " a 
musical instrument made of a skin, with two brass pipes — the one to be blown 
into, the other to let out the sound ;" and the bagpipe is an instrument of great 
antiquity among the northern nations. Though there is nothing but tradition to 
rest on, the want of instruments will not hold good as an objection. 

" The bonnie Erie o 1 Morray"* and many other old songs and ballads, we have 
been obliged to exclude, for the present, from the pages of the Scotish Minstrel, 
for want of room ; but, from the liberal contributions that have been sent us, we 
have a store of materials, which are now in preparation for a Supplementary 
Volume. There are some Scotch bards to whom we have not had the courage 
to make any application ; but if they would twine a wreath for the Minstrel, 
proud would he be to wear it. We now send him forth, with all his imperfections 
on his head, like other Minstrels, to wander through the mountains of his native 
land— to traverse the green wilds of Erin, and the sequestered vales of Cambria ; 
and, we trust, to be hospitably received " 'mong merry England's cultured fields." 

* Slain hy Huntly in 1592. 



INDEX TO VOLUME FIEST. 



-i-"A bonnie boat came o'er the sea, . 
Again rejoicing nature sees,. 
A Highland lad my love was born,- 
Allan needna speak to me, 



AUTHORS. 

..Unknown, ..,...._. 

~Burns, 

.Ditto, . 
-Unknown, - 



An' oh, my Eppie, my jewel, my Eppie,~2>;«o, 

Annan waters wading deep, , Ditto, 

As on a rock, past all relief, Ramsay, ~ 

As o'er the Hieland hills I hied, ^.Cameron, 

At morning sun out o'er the lea, -.-Anderson, . 

Awa, Whigs, awa, — ™- , Unknown, - 



AIRS. PAGE 

-Charlie yet, 88 

-I wish my love were in a mire, -~~ 53 

-White Cockade, 21 

-Fife, and a' the lands about it, 97 

-Eppie Adair, 70 

-Annan Water, 35 

-Peggy, I must love thee, 14 

-Haughs of Cromdale,- 106 

-Lassie, art thou sleeping, — 72 

-Awa, Whigs, awa, 8 



Baloo loo, lammy, now baloo, my dear, —.Unknown,- 

Betty early gone a maying, Ramsay,. 

Blink over the burn, my sweet Betty, Robert Allan- 

Braw, braw lads on Yarrow braes, -—Burns, — ... — 

Busk ye, busk ye, my bonnie bride,- Ramsay,. 



By yon roaring lin, . 



— Unknown, - 



-The Cradle Song, ~- 



93 

-There's my thumb I'll ne'er beguile thee, 40 

25 
86 
46 
98 



-Blink over the burn,- 
-Gala Water, 



-Busk ye, busk ye,. 

-Love is the cause of my mourning,- 



Cauld blaws the wind frae north to south,~John Hamilton, Up in the morning early, . 



76 



Farewell, my dame, and my bairnies twa,-Unknown, 

Farewell to Lochaber, Ramsay, ~ 

Fare thee well, thou first and fairest, Burns,- 

Fare thee well, thou first and fairest, Ditto, 

For lack of gold she's left me, Dr Austin, . 

Frae the friends and land I love, Unknown, ~. 



-Gaelic air, 30 

-Lochaber no more, 14 

Bory Dall's port, 1st set, 38 

2d set, . 38 

For lack of gold, 6 

Carron-side, 1 06 



Gat ye me, gat ye me, — , Burns, — 

Go bring to me a pint o' wine, Ditto, . 

Go bring to me a pint o' ale, ~~. Crawford,. 



-The Lass of Ecclefechan, - 

-My bonnie Mary, 

-Annan Water, 



.102 

. 37 
34 



INDEX TO VOLUME FIRST. 



John Anderson, my jo, John, 
Joy of my earliest day,™ 

Is there for honest poverty, 

It fell about the Martinmas time 

I've heard them lilting at the ewes milking,~Mm Home, 

I've seen the smiling of fortune beguiling,_]fer?\s Cockhurn,- 
I wish I kend my Maggie's mind, -Unknown, 



AUTHORS. 

.Burns,~ 
-.Unknown,. 
-.Burns,- 
—Unknown,. 



AtRS. 

-John Anderson, my jo, 
-I'll never leave thee, 
-For a' that, and a' that, 

— Get up and bar the door, . 

—Flowers of the Forest,™ 

— Flowers of the Forest,-. 

— Tammy, 



Land of my fathers, — 

Lochiel ! Lochiel ! beware of the day,. 

Loud blaw the frosty breezes,- 



-Leyden,~~- —Land of my fathers,. 

~Thomas Campbell, — Lochiel's March,. 
~Burns, Morag, - 



My heart is sair, I darena tell, Unknown,. 

My lady's gown there's gares upon't, Ditto, 

My luve's in Germany,™—™ — Ditto, 

My wife's a winsome wee thing,™™™— .Saras,. 

Now closed for aye thy coal-black een, — Anderson, 



-Somebody,. 



~Ye Jacobites by name, ™™™™ 
Iy Wife's a wanton wee thing, 

-The Widow's Wail,. 



O Bothwell bank, thou bloomest fair,- 

O hark, ye lads, and I will tell ye, — 

Oh ! Charlie is my darling, . 

Oh! hame, hame, hame wad I be,- 

Oh ! what had I ado for to marry, - 

O Geordie reigns in Jamie's steed,— 

O lay thy loof in mine, lass,. 

O leeze me on my spinning-wheel,™™ 

O Logie o' Buchan, O Logie the laird,. 

O Mary ! I had known thee long, 

Mary, sweetest maid, farewell, 



O meikle thinks my luve o' my beauty,. 
O merry may the maid be, 



O poortith cauld and restless love, . 
O raging fortune's with'ring blast, . 
O send Lewie Gordon hame,- 
O stately stood the baron's ha',. 
O this is no my ain lassie, — -— 
O ! thou hast seen the lily fair,. 



O some will tune their mournfu' strains, 
O, weel's me on my ain man,. 
O wert thou in the cauld blast,. 



-Pinkerton,— 
-Unknown,*. 
-Ditto, . 
-Ditto, 
-Ditto, ■ 
-Ditto, . 
-Burns,. 
-Ditto, . 
-.Lindsay, . 
-Wilson, . 
-Boswell, 
~Burns,~ 
-Sir J. Clerk,- 
-Burns,. 
-Ditto, . 
.Geddes,- 
-Unknown,* 
.Burns, . 
-John Sim,- 
-Unknown,. 
-Ditto, 
.Burns,—— 



Bothwell Bank,. 
Johnnie Ogle, . 



-Charlie is my Darling,. 
-Gaelic air, — — . 



-Hooly and Fairly,. 
-For a' that, and a' that, 



PAGE 

42 
22 
50 
29 

_ 54 

- 90 

- 45 

42 

82 

5 

77 

6 

80 

90 



12 

- 64 
74 
86 
18 
26 
51 
84 
68 
2 



-Bess and her Spinning-wheel, , 

-Logie o' Buchan, . 

-Sweet Annie frae the sea-beach came, 41 

-Maid of Isla, 

-My tocher's the jewel, 

-The Miller, 

-I had a horse, I had nae mair, 

-Tarn Lin, 

-Lewie Gordon, 

-Widow, are you waking. 



-The Banks of Spey, . 

-Aikin Drum, , 

-Landlady count the lawin',. 

—Lochiel's awa to France,™. 



31 

36 

100 

8.9 

2 

44 

52 

9 
26 

103 
33 

104 



INDEX TO VOLUME FIRST. 



O wha will ride, and wha will rin, . 
O Willie was a wanton wag, - 



AUTHORS. AJES. 

.Unknown,~~~~~. — — Leith-wynd, - .......... 

. Walkinshaw, ..-.Willie was a wanton wag, 



PAGE 

— 73 
— 101 



Prince Charlie he's cum owrefrae France,- Unknown,. 



-Highland Laddie,. 



17 



Quhair will lay my hede, . 



-Ditto, 



-Frenet Ha',. 



28 



Rising o'er the heaving billow, Ditto, 

Rob Roy frae the Hielands cam, Ditto, . 

Roy's wife of Aldivalloch. ■»..... ..,■ ....Mrs Grant, ™ 



-The Maid of Isla,— ~ 
-Rob Roy Macgregor,. 
-Ruffian's Rant, ; 



30 

1 

66 



Sair, sair was my heart, — ~ Lockhart, ■ 

Sensibility, how charming,.™., , Burns, 

She's fair and fause that causes my smart,-Z>2ffo,-. 

Shrilly shriek'd the raging wind,-. Unknown, 

Son of the mighty and the free,— —_ .. Ditto, _. 

Sweet Annie frae the sea-beach came, Dr Hoadley,~ 

Sweet fa's the eve on Craigie-burn wood,~Burns,~ 



-The Lass of Caledonia, . 



-Death of Monteith, 

-Dirge of a Highland chief, . 
-Sweet Annie, . . — 



-Craigie-burn wood,— 



24 

92 
81 

48 
78 
41 
69 



The carle he cam o'er the craft, . 
The Campbells are comin',— - — 



The Catrine woods were yellow seen, 
The last of our steers on our board,- 
The Iawland lads think they are fine, 
The luve that I hae chosen,. 
The lovely moon had climb'd, 
The moon had climb'd the highest hill, 
The tailor fell through the bed,. 
There's high and low, there's rich and poor,. 

There grows a bonnie brier bush, — 

There lived a man in our town 
There was a lass, they ca'd her Meg, 
The chevalier being void of fear, 



~~~Unknoivn,~ 

Ditto, — -. 

— -Burns,- 
— ~Scott, — — . 
~~~Ramsay, ~ 

Unknown,. 

■Ditto, . 

■Lowe, . 



Unknown, 

Burns,- 
•Unknown,- 

Htto, 

.Ditto, , 

.Ditto, 



-The Carle he cam o'er the craft, 

-The Campbells are comin',-. — 

-The Braes of Ballochmyle, 

-Baddich na brigan, 

-Highland Laddie, — . 



-The Lowlands of Holland, . 
-Mary's Dream, . 
-Ditto, . 



-The Ploughman,. 
-The Brier Bush, 
-Aikin Drum, 



Thy braes were bonnie, Yarrow stream,-£og-aw, 



-Duncan Davidson, , 
-Killiecrankie,. 
-Busk ye, busk ye,. 



10 

32 
94 
70 
20 
85 
62 
63 
66 
60 
22 
.102 
10 
58 
47 



Up amang yon cliffy rocks, . 



-Dudgeon,- — .. —Maid that tends the goats, . 



56 



Will ye go, lassie, go,- 

Will ye go to Inverness, „ 

Will you go to SherifFmuir,. 
Whar hae ye been a' day, . 



~Tannahill, 
-Unknown, 
-Ditto, 
-Macniell, 



-Braes o' Balquhither, . 
-Hieland Laddie, 



Will you go to SherifFmuir, 
My boy Tammy, — . 



- 49 
-108 

- 18 

- 61 



INDEX TO VOLUME FIRST. 



"What ails this heart o' mine,- 
When I think on this world's pelf, — ~ 
When royal power was hunted down, 
With waefu' heart and sorrowing e'e. 
Wilt thou go, my bonnie lassie,-™~~~ 



AUTHORS. 

Miss Blamire,~ 

Unknown, 

Ditto, ~ 

Tannahill,~ 

Unknown,- 



Ye banks and braes, and streams aro\mc\,~Burns, 

Ye banks and braes o' bonnie Doon, Ditto, 

Ye'll mount, gudeman, — ........Unknown, 

You meaner beauties of the night, Ditto, 



-The Blathrie o't,-. 
_Earl Marischal,- 



With waefu' heart, . 

The Braes aboon Bonaw, . 



Kath'rine Ogie, 
Caledonian Hunt's Delight, 
I'll mak you fain to follow me, 
Queen Marie, 



PAGE 

13 

74 

16 

4 



57 
.„ 65 
-~ 94 
„.105 



ROB ROV MCGREGOR. 




Rob Roy fyae the High—lands eam,Anel to theLaw_land bor_dcr, To 



g^-ir r r u\ti±j- 



■ . ■ 



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i ■ a 



2 " " " ' 9^ 

steal a _wa_ a gay La _ die To haud liis house in or_ dcr. And 



a 



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1 1 1 1 i rr ^ r i r i i f n i I 



he earn oer the Lough o' Linn, Twenty men his arms did car _ ry, Him_ 



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^^ 



fe f ^f I i i i 



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sel gacd in to fetch her out, In_sist_ing she would - mar _*ry . 




se 



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Oh will ye gae wi' mcfhc says, 

And will ye he my honey? 
And will ye he my wedded wife? 

I loc'yc best o' ony.'' 
I winna gae wi' you} she says, 

Ye ne'er tan, be m> honey: 
I winna be your wedded wife 

Ye loV me lor mi mone a ! 

Rut je sal g H ng.wi' me" he saiil, 
And n.ic mair words about it; 

And ..sfn* ye'li no gangf wi' your will. 
Ye sail gang without it'' 

He set her on a glide black steed., 
Himsel lap on aliint Ik r, 

And he's awa t„ „„ Hirland r.ilK 

"Wharc her I ri end's canna find hit. 



'Rob Roy was my laither ca'ci , 

M'.' Grcgor was his name , Lady, 
He le<l a hand.o' heroes bauld, 

An' r am here- the -same , Lad> . 
Be content, lie content-, 

B< content, and hide, Lady; 
For thou art my wedded wife 

Cntil thy dying day , 'Laely. 

He was a hedge unto his friends, 

A heckle to his faes, Lady, 
And e\'ery anc that duTst him wr.iiiy, 

They harl gude cause to rue , L .>h , 
lm as bauld, I'm as bauld , 

Tm as haul el, ami mair. I.ad\ ; 
\nel he that dares disjui.re my w ore! , 

Sal feel my g"Uelo clayinoW , Lad\ ." 



2 



O BAGIJVG F0Jt7TjVE , S WlTHEBIJVG BLAST. 

Air, Tarn Lin. 



Slow 




igfe e^-^f-f^ j 



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i 



O rag„, ing for _ tune's with' ring- Mas* Has laid my leaf full 



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ippi 



low-! O rag_ing for —tone's wirli'ring; blast Has laid my leaf full low! 



My stem was fair, my bod was green, But luckless fortunes northern storms 



My blossom sweet did blow' 
The dew fell fresh, the sun rose mild, 
And marie my branches grow. : 



Laid a' my blossoms low: 
But luckless fortunes northern storms 
Laid a' mv blossoms low. 



O LOGIE O' BUCHAJV. 




j j l U J N Ui' ^W 



r 



O Lo_gie o' Buch_an, O Lo_gic the Laird, Tliey liae 



'Xl'ff P 



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£ 



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pTO^M j j l^ 



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ta'en a_«a Ja_mie that delv'd in the yard; "Wha play'd on the pipe wi' the 



M#N# 



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i_ol sae sma; They hae ta'en a _wa Ja _ mie, the flow'r o» them a'. 





Chorus 



fPIP 



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pipp 



o" T 

He said, "think na lang> las_sic, riio' I gan^r a_wa*,'He saidj'think na liny, 



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£ 




Umid! 









5 4 * 



las _ sic, tho' T gang- a _wa; The sim _mer is com _ in , cauld 



Sandy has owsen, has gear, and has kyc, 

A house and a haddin, and siller forby; 

But Id fak my ain lad,wi' his staff in his hand, 

Before Id ha'c him wi» his houses and land. 

He said,- 'think na lang,lassie, tho' I gang awa, 
For I 11 come and see thee in spite n» tin m a'." 

My Daddy looks sulky, my Minny looks sour, 
They frown upon Jamie because he is poor: 
Tlio' I lo'e them as mccI as a Daughter can do, 
And hlythe were their lassie, gin they wad lo'e you. 

He said, think na lang, lassie, tho' I gang awa; 

For 1 II come and see thee in spite o> (hem a'." 



I sit on my creepie, and spin at my wheel, 
And think on (he Laddie that lo'cd me sae weel; 
He had bnt ae saxpence,hc hrak it in twa, 
And he gied me the ha'f o't when he gaed awa . 
But simmer is coming, cairtd winter's awa, 
And he'll come and sop me in spite o» them a'. 



The braes aboojt bonaw. 



• ivi \y 




Chorus . 



H^H^ 



7~rr •• -' » — »r— f — ■ a . * 

Wilt thou go, my bon_nie Las_sie, Wilt thou go, my braw Lassie, 



^gff 



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fe- > > R 



^^ 



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Mi 



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Wilt thou go, say ay or no, To the braes a_boon Bo_haw, Las_sie. Tho' 



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Don—aid hac nae mic_klc frasc, Wi' law—land speeches fine, Las_sic, What 



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When simmer days deed a' the braes 111 hunt the roe, the hart, the doe, 
Wi 1 blossom'd broom,' sac fine, Lassie,' The ptarmigan, sac sliy, Las.sie, 

At milking- shcel well join the reel, For duck and drake 1 11 beat the brake. 
My flocks shall a' be thine, Lassie. Nae want shall thee come nigh, Lassie. 

Wilt thon go, &-c. Wilt thou go, grr . 



For front and par, wi' eanny rare, 

I'll, wiley, skim tlie flic, Lassie; 
Wi? sir— like chcar I'll please my dear, 
Then eome awa wi' me, Lassie, 
"Yes, I'll go, my bonnie. Laddie, 
Yes, I'll go, my braw Laddie •, 
Tlk joy and carc,w-i' thee I'll "share, 

*Maiig" the braes aboon Bonaw , Laddie. 



The voujvg highland rover. 




Loud hlaws the fros_ty breez_es, The snavrs the mountains 




EgES 



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mM M 1 m m 



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o_ver; Like -win—ter on me sei — zes, Since my young High— land 



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rtl^I 



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er he strav, May Hea— ven he his war_den! Rc_turn him safe to- 



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Ul- J . J'rftj-trj., | pi 



fea^ 



fair Strath — spey, And bon _ie Cas _ tie — G-or _ .Ion. 



^^ 



LI l [j-t 



The trees now naked groaning, 

Shall soon with leaves be hinging; 

The birdies dowie_ moaning. 

Shall a' be blyfhely singings 
And every flower be springing. 

Sac I'll rejoice the lee— lang day, 
"When, by his mijjbty "Warden, 
My youth's returned to fair Strathspey, 
And bonie Castle Gordon. 



6 



EON LJMK OF GOLD. 



SI. v.l\ 




For lack of G/.lii she's left me, Oh! And of all (hat's dear berclt me, 



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V CT^nir -j jnijiin 



Oil! For AfJi_<>]s Duke she mo forsook, And to endless < xr< has lef r me, OIi! A 



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star an'l g-ar-ltrhavt more art Than youth, a true and faith— ftil heart; For 



H— r 



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emp— t)' ti_tles we must part; And for flitt'rino; show shcslcJt tne. Oh.' 



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No cruel fair shall ever move, 
My injnr'd heart again to love? 
. Thro' distant climates 1 mnst rove, 

Since Jcanie she has left me, Oh! 
Ye . jiovtVs above, I to yonr care 
Pranmit my lovely, charming' fair ^ 
Yonr choicest blessing's he her share, 
Tho' she's forever left me, Oh! 

My: lady's GOhjr There's gaees ipo^Y. 



in m ■ !« r.( 
tunc . 



/■!." -.-..A . * 1. At _J- _ M-1 '.-.- --.^ 



-»- 3: ■ J. rJ. • • • -4- • ■ " -a- • -*• , 

My I.a_dy's g-ov«Tj there's gares np— on ? t, And gv>w-_dcn (1™ rs sae 




rare upon'f; But Jenny's simple Jir_ke„_ct , 6, I think mickle mair mpnlTt. My 






■* ■' f 1 g I I ^ 

La_dy-'s white, my La _d\'s rod, And kith anil kin o' Cas_sil_lis blade; She 



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Chorus . 



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his h.iitJi lands and tocher glide, By Lords and-Knig-hts my LajI)S wood. My 



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tf'iii.r Ui.iu.i f hrr ' ^ 



La_dy\ frown there's gates ap_on't, And fj OW-<len ilow'rs sae rare up-on't; But 




St - N 




Jcimy's S im_ple Jir_kcn_et, O, I think mic.kle mair ap_on'f. 




J II I I = 



Out owre yon muir, oaf owre yon moss, 
Whare g-or-cocks thro' the heather pass, 
Tliere wons aald Colin's bonnic lass, 
A lily in a wilderness . 
My Lady's gown, &c. 



Sat sweetly move her g-enty limbs, 
Like masie notes o» lovers' hymns; 
The diamond dew in her cen sae. blue 

Like laughing- love sae play fit' swims. 
My Lady's g-own, &c. 



My Lady's dink, my Lady'* drcst 
"Wii gowden flowers around, her waist* 
But. the bonniest flower in a' the west 
Is the Lassie that I l,,e the best. 
My Lady's gown, Arc. 



8 



AWA, WHIGS, AWA. 



Jacobite. 





^m 



fe- r* fr-r =fc 



*—r 



±£i±££^M 



liloom'il sae fresh and fair, And bo_nie were our ro_scs; But Whig's cam 



^ 



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j^LL^jte ^^Rp^fP |^^ 



owre us like ir< st in Ji 



Anri with _ er'd a' our Pn-Mesi 



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I gjg£a r 



Our antient Crown's fa'n in the dust, 

T"> 1 blind them wi* the stowr.e oV, 

And write their names in his black buik, 
_.Wha gae the -Whigs tbe power o*t. 
Awa Whig's, awa, Arc. 

Our sad decay, in Tiirk and State, 

Surpasses my desoriving - ; 
The Whig's cam our as like a flight 

And we hae done wi' thriving; 

Awa Whigs, awa, &c. 

Crrim Vengeance lang has taen a nap, 
But we may see him w.uikcn? 

Wae's me! to see that royal heads 
Am:_ hunted like a maukin, 

Awa,Whigs, »wa, &:<■ 



This is jvo jut aijt lassie. 





d! ken I my ain Las _ sic, Kind love is in i 



ict e e . ft 1 1 



She's 





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P 



f^ 



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« -»—* ■ 



_ny, blooming, straight, and tall, And lang' lias liaen my licart in_thral,And 



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I 



it charms my ve _ ry saul, Tiie kind blink that's in her e'e. 



g — r? rn 



life 



^ 



f==f 



I sec a form, I sec a face 
That wee) may wi' the fairest |>lace, 
But wants, to mc, the witching 1 grace, 
The kind blink tliats in her e'e. 
This is no, <^-e. 



A thief sac patiky is my Jean, 
To steal a blink by a' unseen; 
Bu< gleg as light is lo-vers' cen, 
VVhcu kin<i love is in ':!■(: e'e. 
This is no, Arc . 

It "■ may escape the courtly sparks, 
It may escape the learned darks; 
But weel the watchful lover marks 
The kind love that's in tin e'e. 
This is no, .Ve . 



K, 



•/HE CAR IK HE CAM OER THE CRAE7 




^H ^-H-nM^ ^ 



The carlo Ik. fame oer the craft, And his beard new shu—ven, 



&^- ^ttt^ r r r 



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t-r, t\tf i j ^ y 



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Glowrd a( me as lie'd been daft I The carle trows that I'll hae him. 




v *t.n ^ i M 



J j ;■ 



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H'>w t j_m, T win_na hae him; Na, for _ sooth , I'll no hae him, 




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New hose and new shoon, And his beard new sha _ ven . 



j TTJ m r r r j r r ^ 



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T 



The carle has nae faut but ane, 

Kor he has lands and dollars plenty; 
•Rut, waes me! he is Saxty_ane, 

An' I am little mair than twenty. 
Howt awa! 1 winna hae him ; 

Na , forsooth , I winna hae him ; 
What signifies his dirty rigg-s 

An' cash, wi' sic a man wi' them. 

nrxcAJf DAy^iDsox. 



-€"#-#-€-•€» 




There was 



lass, they ca'd her Meg, And 



li 





f ;■ r, j r_ 1 1 r . i I _fl 



Dun — —can ciud _ na win} Fur 






i 



i i r -r -r -r --n 



i 



wad him knock, And ay she shook the tern _ per _ pin. 



As o'er the moor they lightly foor, 'We will big- a wee, wee house , 

A burn was clear, a glen was g-reen; And we will live like king- and queen; 

Upon the banks they eas'd their shanks, Sac blythe and merry's we will b< , 

And ay .she set the wheel between: When ye set by the w^heel At c'< n * 

A weel, says he, 'then let it be, A man may drink and no be drunk , 

T like the omen unco weel, A man may fight and no be slain, 

I ve been yoxrr scorn frae e'en to morn, A bonny lass 'may chancre her mind, 

Now, turn iyc I ike a spinnin wheel '.' And e'en tak Duncan Davidson , . 



I ' ' 



THE WIDOWS WAIL. 



f^ii\^\ l \ l ^mm^ 

-< Nowclos'd for aye thy coal-black een, That fondlygaz'd onmc,iyWilly, An<i 

' AiMu i f f- j |H f r iT3- > 




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r ■ J • J r l w > — 



1 



IS 



m 



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life—less lic-s that man— ly form, I aye was fain to see , my Wil— lie. Ah! 

J~1 J—1 J" 



j j ;~t 




t-fU. f f- ' lH: fjf.f^j^ J g l 



luck—less hour, th on strave for hamc Last night across tlie. Clyde,-dcar "Willie, This 



1 




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te 



^^ 



i 



m 



morn a stiffen'd corse brought hamc, A— lakel'trs hard to bide, O "Wil— lie . 



ifei= 



The owlet hooted sair yestreen, 

And thrice the soot it fell, dearWilly; 

The tyke cam late, and howl d aloud, 

It seem'd the dying knell o' "Willy. 
Oeep were the snaw-s,keen were my Maes, 

The bairns oft cried for thee_thcir"Willy, 
I trembling said, he'll soon be here, 

The wee thing's ne'er clos'd e'e, foi Willy. 

And when I saw the thick sleet fa', 

A blcczing fire I made for "Willy; 
Then watch'd, and watch'd, as it grew dark, 

And I grew mair afraid for "Willy. 
I thought I heard the pony's foot, 

Ami ran thy voice to hear, ah, "Willy, 

The wind blew- hollow, but nac sound 

M> sinking heart did chocr,_0 Willy. 



The clock struck ane, _thc clock struck twa, 

The clock struck three and four,_noWilly, 
1 thought. I heard the, pony's foot, 

And flew to ope the door to Willy. 
The pony neigh'd_ but thou wert lost J 

T Sank upon the snaw, for "Willy; 
Thj wraith appear*! e'en where I lay, 

And whisner'd thou wert drown'd _0 Willy. 

The moon was up, in vain I sought 

The stiffen'd corse o' thine, lost Willy, 
'Twill soon, soon mingle wi' the dust, 

And near it sae will mine,_0 "Willy. 
Gae dry your tears, my bairnies five, 

Gac dry your tears o' sorrow, dearies, 
Your father's cares are at an end, 

And sae will mine ere morrow, dearies.. 



The klaThrie o'T. 




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"When I think on " this warld's pol'i • And tlie 



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lit _ tic wee sha 



n't I hac to my _ self, 



And 



PP^ 



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p 




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£ 






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how the 'Lass that wants it is by the Lads for _"ijof, May tht 



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ii£ 



iHu 



* i - i 4 ' V * . ■ J 

shame fa' the g;ear and the hlath _rie o't, 



F^W 



Jnckie -was the laddie that held the pleng-h, 

But now he's got g-owd and gear enengh; 

He thinks nae mair of me that wears the plaiden <-oat : 

May the shame fa' the g-c ar and the hlathrie o't. 

Jenny was the lassie lh.it marked the byre, 

Bat now she is c lad in hcr/silken attire, 

And Jnckie says he lo'es her",and swears he's meforg-ot: 

May the shame fa' the g-ear and the blathr je tit . 



But a' Ihis shall never danton me, 

Sae lang- as I keep my/fancy free] 

For the lad thats sae inconstant, he's no worth a groat; 

May the shame fa' the gxar and the blathrie o't. 



14 




peggy i must' lote Thee. 



m 



'son a rock, past all relief, Theshipwreck'd Co— lin, spy—ing His 



w i j rifJ+H^i ^[^ji^-^m 




M 



M 



m 



i 



^ 



■ * * — » 



native soil, oer_come with grief, Half sunk in waves and dy_ing. With 



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si 



the next morning sun he spies A ship, which gives unhop'd sur_prise; New 

i tJX — f: , — , _ _^iC 



gffrfc r^ 



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P 



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hie springs lip, he lifts his eyes "With joy, and waits her mo — tion. 



■ _ I ■ 



m^m 



m 



m 



^ 



-&-&••&-&•■&•■&••&••&■ 



So when by her, whom long I lov'd, 

[ scorn'*! was, and deserted} 
Low with despair my spirits mov\l 

To he forever parted: 
Thus droop'd I, till diviner grace 

I found in Peggy's mind and face; 
Ingratitude appeard then base, 

For virtue more engaging. 

FAREWELL TO LOCHABER. 



<§"€"<g"^"€"<§"<3"*'- 



A 




m jn | j.i-ji|< I m p i J fir 



Fare -well to Lnch.a.ber, and farewell my Jean,"Whcreheartsome , vvit U 




15 




'i jjjjiM j inir n iiijnihni 



%mm 



thee I have mojiy days been; For Loch.a.ber no more, Lnch.a-ber no more, We'll 



& 



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lie rc.tnrn to Lnthj.bcr no mure. These tears that I shed, they are 




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*' for my dear, And no for the dangers at^tenrLinjj; on weir} Tho 1 borneon rough 

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seas to a far bloody shore, May— be| to re_turn to Loeh_a_bcr no more. 

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Tho' hurricanes rise, and rise ev'ry wind, 
They'll ne'er make a tempest like that in my mind. 
Tho' loudest of thtrnder on louder waves roar, 
That's naithingf like leaving my love on the shore. 
To leaVe the behind me my heart is sair pain'd ; 
By ease that's inglorious no fame can be g-ain'd; 
And beauty and love's the reward of the brave, 
And I must deserve it before I can crave. 

Then g-lory, my Jt any, maun plead my excuse; 
Since Honour commands me, how can I refuse? 
Without it I ne'er can have merit for thee, 
And without thy favour I'd better not be . 
I pit then, my lass, to win honour and fame, 
And if I shouldelMiKcto come gloriously hame, 
A heartl will bringf thee with love running o cr, 
And then I'll leave thee and Lochaber no more. 



IK 



HVf'H WL4EFV HEART AJTD SORROWING EE. 





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sail a _ wa ! O 'twas a fa _ ta) day to mey.' That day he 




lie R'r_»ifk Law! Hnw joy__less now secmd all l>c_liind! I 



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The night came on -with heavy rain, 

Loud, fierce,andwild, the tempest blew; 
In mountains roll'd the awful main _ 

Ah, hapless maid! my fears how true; 
The landsmen heard their drowning? cries , 

The wreck was s'een "with dawning day; . 
\ly love was found, and now he lies 

Low in the gloomy Isle of "May. 
A 



O Boatman, kindly waft me o'er . 

The cavern'd rock shall he my home; 
'Twill ease mybtrrthen'd heart, to pour 

Its sorrows o'er his grassy tomb: 
With sweetest f low'rs Til deck his grave, 

And tend them fhro'fhe langsomeyear; 
Til water them, ilk morn and eve, 

With deepest sorrow's warmest tear. 



PRIJTCE CHARLIE HF\S CFM OWRE FRAE FRA,VCF. 

Jacobite. 



17 



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Char-lie lies cum owre frac Franrc, In Scot-land to |.r.._ 




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claim his d..d_die, May Hcav_en still his cause advan ce, and shield him 




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Hic_ land plai— die. O my bon_ nie Hie— land Lad —die! My 



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hand _ some char— ming- Hie — land Lad —die! May Heaven still 



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anse ad_vanec, and shield him in his Hie — land jdai— die. 



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First when he ram to view otrr land, 

The graccfu 1 looks o' the Princely laddie 

Maile a' our true Scots hearts to warm, 
And blythe to wear the tartan (daidie. 
O, mybonie T &c. 



But when Geordie heard the news, 
How he. was cum afore his daddie, 

He thirty thousand pound wad g-ic 
To catch him in his Hieland plaii 
O, my bonie, &v. 



But tho 1 the hieland f'ouks are puir, 

Yet, O their hearts are leal and steady; 

An' thcre^s no ane amang them a" 1 

That wad bctrav their Hieland I,addie. 
O, mv home, &c. 



18 



WILL YOV GO TO SHF.RIFF.MVIR. 




"Will you go to Sherilimuir, Bauld Jolin n* Innisfure, Thereto seethe 





no-hle Mar.And his Highland Laddies. A 1 tlic true men o'thcno r th,Angtrs,Huntly 





and Scaforth, Scouring' on to cross theFortli, Wi' their -white cock—a -dies . 




There you'll sec the banners flare, 
There you'll hear the hag-pipes rair, 
And the trumpets deadly blan . 
Wi' the cannons rattle. 



There you'll see the hauld M° Craws', 

Camerons,and Clanronald's raws, 

And a' the clans, wi? loud huzzas, 
Rushing to the battle. 



Out HAME, HAME, HAME WAD I BE. 



Jacobite. 




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Ob! hame, hame, hamc- wad I be ; Hame, hame, to m> 



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in conn— trie; The green leal o 1 loy— al tys be — gun for to faj The 



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bon _ nie white rose il is with'- -ring a _ wa 




leal o' (lie land, a' wtia ven _ tur'd [<■ save, Th< green grass is 



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^r(.w_irig", al_as, on Their grave! They Hvtl and they 'fic<! wi' rruc If'y^_al_ 



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lit, And l.no- will be mourntl in their ain conn -trie. 




Oh. Hame, Lame, fain wad 1 | )t , 

Hame, hame to my ain iountric: 

Oh! there 'mang the glens to wander my lane, 

And greet in the gloamiii' for those wha art ganc. 

Of battles triumphant to me, dinna tell 

My Donald he conquered my Donald he fell! 

Ye may rejoice but my sorrow forgic, 

Wi' me they will mourn in my ain eountrie. 

Oh. Hame, hame, to (ell whan we're glad, 

Oh] Hainc, hame, to sigh whan we're sad! 

Hame frat a w-arld oT fell cruelty; 

Hide me, ye mountains, frae a" freacherie . 

There s nought now frae ruin our eountrie can sa\t, 

Traitors deserting, and fallen the brave 

Wi' hopes a' withered wi' tears in their ce 

The wand rers n turn to their ain eountrie. 



20 



/HE LAWLAXD LADS 1HIJCK THEY ARE FhYE, 




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The Lavr_ land lads think they are fine; But Oh, theyre vain and 



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womlrnns gau_dy! How much un— like that grace— fu 1 mien, And manly looks of my 



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High— 1'an'd; Lsd_die. O my ■ bon _ nie, him — nie .High— land Lad _ die! 



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O my hand — some High— land Lad _ die! "When I was sick and 



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like to die, He row'd me in his High - land plai _ die. 



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If I were free,at will to chuse, 

To he the wealthiest Lawland Lady, 

I'd tak young- Donald in his trews, 
His bannct blue, and belted plaidy. 
O my tinniiy,tc. 

Nae greater joy Til e'er pretend, 

Than that his love prove true and steady- 
Like mine to him,which ne'er can end, 

While Heaven preserves my Highland Laddie, 
t) my bonny, &<;, 



A HlGHl.AXD J.AD \IV LOrtl h'AS BOhW 



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held in srorn; But lit still was faith _ In' to his clan, My 

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Gal _ lant braw John High_land_ man! Sing, hey, my braw John 



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Hijjh _ land _ man ] Sing-, ho, my braw John High _ lanil _ man! There's 



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not a lad in a' the Ian' < an match wi' braw Jolm Hiu;h_land -man . 




Wi' his philabcg and tartan plaid, 
And glide claymore down by liis side, 
The Ladies licarts he did tr.epan, 
My gallant braw John Highlandman. 
SingyJiej , Ar< . 



They banish d him beyond the sea; 
Brit ere the bud was on the tr< e, 
A'hiwn my cheeks the pearls rnn, 
F.nibracing my John Higiilandman . 
Sinjf,hey, &<-. 



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3f>r OF ,V/r EARLIEST' DAY'S. 



Air, 111 never leave thee. 




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Joy of my e; r _ licst day, How •(.shall I leave thecl 



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Thrme of my fond ■_ est lays, How canst tlion bticvc mi! grieve inr 



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i. .11 stray, Ma __ ry, he _ licve me, 

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Thy Ik art will mourn that day Thotrdtdst de_ ceive me. reive mo 



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Hide nut the strug'g'Hnjr tear" 

Fain would I borrow 
A . twilight of hojie, to cheer 

From thy soft sorrow • 
Tho' clouds obscure our northern sky, 

Oark ning' its gleaming, 
Still will the waudrcr turn his eye 

Wlierc light was streaming. 

THERE GROWS A BOJTJfJE BRIER BUSH. 

Jacobite. 




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There grows a bonnie brier biisb in our kail-yard, And white are the 



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blossoms o't in our kail yard. T^ike wee liil white c<>c:kauds,for our loyal hicland 



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lads, And the lass_es lo'e tlie bon _ nie bus.li in our kail yard, 



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Ru1 were they a' true, that were Car awa ? 
Oil! were, tliey a' true, dial wire- far awa? 
They drew up wil glakit Kny lisbers at Carlisle ha', 
Anil forgot auld Men's, when far awa. 

Ye'll come nac mair, Jamie, when ah xe'ave been; 
Ye'll come nar mair,Jamir, to Allicdl's green; 
Ye loed owre wee I the dancin at Carlisle ha', 
And forgot the In. land bills, that were far awa. 

'He's comin frac the North that's to lanoy me; 
He's comin frae the North that's to lancy me; 
A feather in bis bannet, a ribbon at his knee; 
He's a bonny bicland laddie, and y-' ; u be na lie'.' 

I ne'er loed a dance but on Athnll!s jjrctn,' 

I necr loed a lassie but my dorty Jean; 

Sair, sair against my will, did 1 bide sae lang awa, 

And my heart was ay in Atholl's green at Carlisle ba 1 .' 



* * * ■•■* .* * • * 



# # * 



Tlie brier hush was bonny ance i n our kail-yard; 

The brier busb was bonny ance in our kail-yard; 

A blast blew oure the bill, that g-ac Atboll's flowers a chill, 

And the blooms. Mawn all the bonny bush in our kail-yard. 



24 



JWr JC4T1VE CALF.T>OJ*"IA. 



IvftS 




Sair,sairwas my licarl when T parjred frac my Jean; An'sair,sair I 



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sig-hd,while»he fears stood in my e en; For my d;iddieisbuf poQr.an'my for—runt is ahf 








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sma* It far", me leave my native Ca.Ie.do.ni_a . "When I f liink on days now jxanc, an'sse 



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hapf^iys T l*ae l>een.,Wrnle wanHVing" wi'mydear^licrc the primrose J>1 awsunsecn', Im 




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7 — "-"- — ' ' •" ^ r r f — t 

wae toJeavemv lassie, an'daddie's rot a.va ,Or>n leave the liqalfhfcr'brecze o'Calcdoji'La. 



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But wherever I wander, still happy be my Jean, 

Nae eare disturb her bosom, where peace lias ever been; 

Then, tho 1 ills on ills befa' me, for her I'll bear them a', 

Til-.' aft I'll heave a si-jfli for Caledonia. 

But should riches e'er be mine, anil my Jcanie -still )>c true, 

Then blaw,ye favVinfr breeze, till my native land T view-; 

Then I'll kneel on Scotia's shore-while the heartfelt (ear shall fa; 

And never leave mv Jean, nor P.ilcdonia. 



BLI.KK OVER I'HE BVRJf,MY SWEET BEl'l'V. 



c 25 




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bnrn.love, fo me;, O langf faae 1 look'<l, my <lca-r Bct_ty, To 



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get hat a hlink o» thine e'e. The birds are a' s|>ort —irig- a _ 



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round as, And sweet_ly they siny on the tree; But the voice o' my 



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hon_nie sweet Bet— ty, I trow, is far dear_er tra- - me, 



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The ring-lets , my lovely young Betty, 

That ware o'er- thy bonilie e'e-brce, 
I'll twine wi» the flowVs o* the Mountain, 

That blossom sae sweetly, like thee. 
Then come o'er the hum? my sweet Betty, 

r»me/»ver the hum, love, to me; 
O sweet is the bliss, my dear Betty, 

To live in the hlink- o* thine cc. 



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oll'HOV HAST' SEEJV fHF LIIY FAIR? 




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O: thou hast seen the li_ly fair, All bathd in nior _ nine 1 



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•lew? And thou hast seen the love_ly rose, Just o]> _ninjj to tl 



ie view, 



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The li ^_ ly ' bath'd in mor_nint> 'lew, The rose so fair to see. Are 



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But soon before time's withering' blast, 

The rose an<l lily fade; 
Nor ev'n will beatify such as thine 

Outlive ils dark'nino; shade. 
Yet there is that within thy breast 

"Will ruthless time defy, 
A mind will bloom when beauty fades, 

Will flourish in yon sky. 



.._-». --=».-**. -«»•-?•—>•- ps— >.-J^~r'"^"P>"v» 



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H001.Y - A.VP FAIRLY 




Oh! ~hat had I a_do for to mar.ry, My wife she drinks 

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naething- but sack and ca_na_ry; I to her friends com_plaind right 



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O, gin my wife wou'd drink hoo_ly and fair—ly: Hoo_ly and fair 

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hoo_]y and fair_ly, C),g-in my wife wou'd drink lu>o_]y and fair_ly ! 

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First slip drank Crnmmie, and syne she drank Garie ; 
Now she lias druken my bonny jj-rey niairie*, 
Thar parried me thro' fhe dub and the lairic; 
0,g-in my wife wou'd drink hooly and fairly! 

She lias druken her sfoekins, sae lias she her shorn, 
And she has druken her bonny new g-ijwn : 
Her wee bit dud sark, that Cfi'erd her fu' rarelx; 
0,gin my wife wou'd drink hooly and fairl) ! 

If shed drink hilt her ain thing's I wad na much fare, 
But she drinks my claiths that I canna well spare; 
To fhe kirk and the market I gang- fu' barely, 
f*,K'i n m y w ife wou'd drink hooly and fairly! 

The vera grey mittens that g-acd on my hands, 
To her neebonr wife she lias laid them in pawns; 
My bane-headed staff, that I lo'ed sae dearly, 

t),g-in my wife wou'd drink ho.oly and fairly! 

If there's any siller she maun keep the purse; 
If I seek but a bauhce, she'll seauld and she'll curse J 
She g-ang-s like a queen, I scrimped and sparely; 
0,g-in my wife wou'd drink hooly and fairly! 

I never was g-iven to wrangding- nor strife, 
Nor e'er did refuse her the comforts of life; 
K er it come to a war fm ay for a parley; 

f),g-iri my wife wou'd drink hooly and fairly! 

A pint w-i' her cummers I wad her allow; 
But when she sits down she fills herscll fou, 
And when she is fou she's uneo ramstairic; 

";0, g-in my wife wou'd drink hooly and fairly! 

Anil when she conies hame she lays on tlie lads, 
She ca's the lasses baith limmers and jads, 
And I, my ain sell, an auld doited Carlie; 

0,gin my wife wou'd drink hooly and fairly! 



C JH 



FREJTF.T Hj\\ 



Old Ballad. 




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Qnhair will I lay my hcde, Qnliair lay my ho _ die 





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downef Qnliair_JVir na am T doid , Sin' wan_drin I hone lu.wnj 1 O '. 



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Ala — rfo, z-c war fair _ or Than o - n y £fowd or ^ear! O, 



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'O ! hlythsonie was the time 

That I liae spent wi' thee; 

Aft kiss'd that cheik o» thine, 
As zc sat '>n my knee! 

But eanld fhoxr art now,hairnie, 
0,dull thy hlinkin e'e! 

Quhairfor do I lirir farry, 



And eanna win to thee: 



?" 



He sat downe on a stane, 
His liame -was far awa; 

He sicht an'made a mane, 
An' sicht, O, Frenet Ha! 




geT up Ajrn bar The door. 



29 



Old Ballal. 




1,1 (: | I p j 4=^ 



It fell a bout the Martin _ mas 



time, Ami a 



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ffay t lm c it was 



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then , O , 



When nur (fuM _ wife got 




pud _ ding's to mak And she's boil'l them in tlie' l^an, O 



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The wind sae canld blew south and north, 
And blew into the floor, O J 

Quoth our goodman to our goodwife, 
Get up and bar the door, O'.' 



And first they ate the white puddings, 
And then they ate the black, O; 

Tho'mu< kle thought the goodwife to hersel, 
Yet ne'er a Word she spak , O . 



My hand is in my hus*i[~skap, Then says the tane unto the tifher, 

G-oodman, as ye may sec,0, "O now I'm uneo dry, O; 

An it shou'd nae be barr'd this hundred year, Tlie amrie door Its stanninwidc, 

Its no be barr'd for me, O '. Gae see what ye can spy, O'.' 

They made a paction 'tween them twa, 'O here's a bottle o> "Whisky In" 

They made it firm and surc,0, Just ready ..^"o my han' O; 

That the first who shou'd speak the forcmostworrt,- Ye's ^drink to -me, and Ise drink to you, 

Shou'd rise and bar the door, O. And soon we'll foom the Can, O'. 

Then by there came two gentlemen, Then up started our g-oodman, 

At twelve o'clock at night, O, And an angary man was he, O , 

And they could neither see house nor hall, "He's pay for't wi' a broken crown. 



Nor coal nor candle' light, O. 

Now, whether is this a rich man's house ? 

Or whether is it a poor, O? 
But never a word w-ad ane o' them speak ■ 

For barring of the door, O . 



That pries my Barley brie, O'.' 

Then up and started our goodwife, 
Gied three skips on the floor, O, 

Goodman, youVe spoken the foremost word. 
Get tip and bar the door, O', 



-Lt_ 



30 



EA JREJfEEL MY DAME AJfD MY BAWDIES TWAl 

JrfcnbitC. 

_N__e2 Cs I i k 




Farcwccl myDamc and my Hairnios twalFarcwoel to a' I lo'e sac dear.' 



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Wlia wad— na U|>,ati' fur s Oiar_lic draw, An' try the brunt o» doad_lie weir. 



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^TV -TV TV "TV -TV "TV* -TV -1v -TV 

* *^# #' "'# * * ■ # * 
Here's to Charlie, an' wcel may he be; 

Up, thou Pijier, an' londlie blaw; 
The Clans are a' kilted to the knee, 

An 1 soon Ihey will drive the wliie's awa. 

Our glens are dee]), an' our hills are stcc]>, 
Their airy summits are eocrd wi' snaw, 

An' the white rosr that waves in Charlie's bonnet, 
It never will wither, it never will la'. 

7 HE MAID OF IS LAY. 




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Rising- o'er the heaving billow, Evening gilds the o_eean's swell, 



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wing-d with joyj'Twas for her (he cheering- smile aye Beam'd with rapture in 



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Not the tempest raving- round mc , 

I\,ig-ht ning-'s flash, or thunder's roll; 
Not the ocean's rag-e could wound me, 

"While her Imag-e fill fl my soul. 
Farewell days of purest pleasure. 

Long- your loss my heart shall mourn; 
Farewell hours of bliss, the measure, 

Bliss that never can return. 
Cheerless o'er the wild heath wand'ring-, 

Cheerless o'er the wave- worn shore, 
On the past with sadness pond'ring-, 

Hope's fair visions charm no more. 



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M.4RTT, SWEEl'EST JMAID, FAREWELlI Same Air. 



(Ui)O Mary, sweetest maid, farewell! 

My hopes are flown, for a's to wreck; 
Heaven guard your love, and healyourhear 
Tho' mine, alas J I fear,maun break. 

(Shc)Dearest lad,what ills betide? 

Is "Willie to his love untrue? 
Pledg-ed this morn to be your bride, 
Ah.haeye? hae ye taen the rue? 

(He) Ye canna wear a rag-g-ed g-own, 

Or beggar wed wi' nought ava ; 
My Kye are drown'd , my house is down, 
My last sheep lies aneath the snaw. 

(She)Tell na me o' storm or flood; 

Or sheep a'smoor'd ayont the hill; 
For Willie's sake I "Willie loe'd, 

Tho' p oor y e a re my "Willie still . 

The half of the second strain must 



(He) Ye canna thole the wind an' rain, 

Nor wander friendless far frae hame, 
t, Cheer, cheer your heart, some richer swain 

"Will soon bl.of" out-lost "Willie's name. 

(She) I II tak my bundle in my hand, 

And wipe the d'ew.drap frae my eej 
Til wander wi' ye o'er the land, 
I 11 wander wi'ye o'er the sea, 

(He) Pardon, love,'twas but a snare, 

The flocks are safe, we needna part ; 
Id forfeit them,and ten times mair 
To clasp thee,Mary,to my heart. 

(She)How couldye wi' my feeling-s sport, 

Or doubt a heart sae w-arm and true; 
I should wish mischief on ye for t , 

But cann a wish ought ill to you . 

only bo sung- to the additional Song. A 



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bon_nie L.bch_le _ven, -And saw three bon_nie perch _es play, 



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Great Argylc he jxoes before, 
Hr maks v his cannons 'and grins to roar, 
"Wi* sound o' trumpet, pipe, and drum, 
The Campbells are romin^ Oho, Oho! 

The Campbe lis , &r. 

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Tlie Campbells they are a' in arms, 
Their loyal faith and truth to show; 
Wi' banners rattling - in the wind, 
The Campbell's are comin',Oho, Oho! 
The Campbells, <S-e . > 



0, WEF.VS ^IF. OJV MY AIJT MAJS\ 



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Air, Landlady count theTL,airn. 




0,wcels mc on my ain man,my ain man, my ain man] O Wcels me <-\n m\ 



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Rin, Jcanie, bring the Kebbuck )>cn, 
An' fin' ancath the spreckl rl hen J 
Meg-, rise and sweep about the fire , 
Syft cry on Johnnie frae (he- byre: 

For wcels mc on my ain man! 

My ain man, my ain man; 

For wcels mc on my ain gnde man] 

I see him rinnin hamc 



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GO, BRIJTG TO ME A PIJCT O' ALE . 



Air, Annan Water, 




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My Mitlicr greets to part wi' mc, 

Rut langcr here to bide I (anna ; 
The Lassie's wae T too rart see, 

Tlio 1 ne'er a word she says, my Annie. 
Fareweel, fareweel,a' I lo'e dear! 

Grits my heart,and maist I falter: 
Mae rest, nac joy will light on me, 

Till I return to Annan Water'.^ 



Z5 

.AMYAX Mf'A'fER. Sanie \ir 

Old Ballad. 
Annan Water'* wading deep, 

An'I my love Annie** wond'rous bonnic; 

And I am laifh she suld wcot her feet, 

Because I Inve lier best of ony. 

"Gar saddle me the bonny black? 

Gar saddle tunc, anil make him ready; 

For I will down the Gatehope^slack, 

And a' to see my bonny Lady.** 

He has loupen on the bonny black, 

He stirrVl him wi? the spur right sairly; 
But, or he wan the Gatehope—slack, 

I tliink the steed was wae and weary. 
He has loupen on the bonny gray. 

He rade the right gate and the ready; 
I trow he wad neither stint nor stay, 

For he was seeking his bonny Lady 

he has ridden o\* re field and fell, 

> Thro' ninir and moss, and mony a mire; 

His spurs o 1 steel were sair to bide, 

And frac her fore-feet flew' the fitc . ' 
"Now .bonny grey, now- play your parti 

Gin ye lie the steed that wins my deary, 
Wi' corn and hay yc'se be fed for .iy e, 
And never spur sail mak ye wearii-V 

The grey was a marc, and a right gtide nun , 

But whan she wan the Annan Water, 
She could na lia'e ridden a furlong inair, 

Had a thousand marks been wadded at her. 
"O boatmen, boatmen, pit aff jour boat! 

Pit aff your boat for gowden monk! 

1 cross the drumlie stream the night, 

Or never mair I see my honey?' 

O I was sworn sae late yestreen, 

And not by ae aifh, but by many; 
And for a' the gowd in fair Scotland, 

I dare na tak ye through to Annie'. 
O he has poxr'd aff his drappcrpy coat, 

The silver buttons glanced bonny" 
The waistcoat bursted aff his breast, 

He was sae full o' melancholy. 

He has ta'en the ford at that stream tail, 

I wot he swam baith strong and steady; 
But the stream was braid, and his strength did fail, 

And he never saw his bonny Lady; 
' O wae betide the frush saugh wand! 

And wye betide the bush o' brier, 
If brake into my true love's hand 

When his strength did fail, and his limbs did fire. 

And wae betide ye, Annan Water, 

This night that ye are a drumlie river! 
For over thee I'll build a bridge , 

' That ye never mair true love may sever?' 



36 



MT TOCHERS fHE 3E1TEL, 




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mei_kle in love wi' the sil_ler, He ean_na hae love to spare for me 

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Yotir proffer o' love's an airlc— penny, 

My tocher's the bargain ye wad by; 
Bnt an ye be crafty,- I am cunnin, 

Sae ye wi' anither your fortune matin try. 
Ye're like to the fimmer o' yon rotten wood, 

Ye're like to the bark o' yon' rotten tree, 
Yc'll slip frae me like a knotless thread,- 

And ye'll crack your credit wi' mae nor mc . 



.>/r BO.MVZX MARY", 




Go bring' to me a 



pint t}' wine, And fill it in a 




sil_vcr tas_sie, Tliaf I may drink, be_fore I go, A ser _ vice 





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The trumpets sound, the banners fly, 

The glitf'ring- spears are ranked ready- 
The shouts o' war are heard afar , 

The battle closes, deep and bloody ! 
It's not the roar e>> sen, or shore, 

Wad mak me langer wish to tarry • 
Nor shouts o< war, tliats heard afar, 

It's leaving thee, my Bonnie Mary. 



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F.4BE fllEE VTEEL % tHOV FIRST' AJTD FAIREST 1 . 



Slow and 
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Df ( |i in fieart—wrung tears 1 11 pledge thee, Warring' siglis and groans 1 II wage tliee. 



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Wha can say, that fortune grieves him, 
While a ray of hope she leaves him? 
But nae chcerfa 1 twinkle lights me, 
Dark despair around benights me. 
Had wc never lov'd sac kindly, 
Had we never lnv'd sae blindly, 

Never met or never parted, 

Wc had nc n er been broken-hearted . 

fare Thee wf.el, Thov first" ajvd fairest! g'.'su. 



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Thine be il_k» joy and treas-urc, Peace, en— joy— ment, love, and picas _nrc. 




I'll ne'er blame my |>ar_tial fan— cy* Nae— thinjj could re_sist my Nan — ry; 




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Wha can say that Fortune grieves hit 
While a ray of. hope she leaves him: 
Rut nae cheerful twinkle lights me^ 
Dark despair around benights me. 
Fare thee wed <, Arc . 

Had we never lov d sac kindly* 
Had we never lov'd sae blindlv^ 

Never met . or never parted i 

We had ne'er been broken—hearted. 
Fart theO;v>veel^ Arc. 




VLL JfEER BEGUILE 7'fIEE. 



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"Dearest maid! nay, do not fly mo 5 
Lei your pride no more deny me; 
Never doubt ynur faithful Willie; 
There's my thumb, I'll ne'er beg-uile thee . 
Oh, dear lassie! tis but daffin 
Tohaudyour wooer ay niff naffin, 
That, na,na,I hate if vilely; 
Oh,say yes, and f 11 ne'er beg-uile thee." 



SWEEt AJ/IYIE FEAE THE SEA-BEACH CAME. 



41 




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Sncct Annie frae the sca-bcach camc,Wlicre Jiitk.y spccld Ihcvcvstls 




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side; Ah! wha can keep t^eir hcaf^TfVhwrjc , When Jocky's tost aJiuon the tide 



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vhen ilk lass a_bout him thrangs, He'll think on An_nic his faith-Ju 1 ain. 



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Blaw saft, ye gales, round Jocky's head. 

And g-ar jour waves be calm and still; 
His hameward sail with breezes speed. 

And dinna a 1 my pleasure spill. 
What tlio' in> Jocky's far avayj 

Yet he will braw in siller sliinc: 
III keep my heart anither day, 

Since Jocky may again be mine. 

O MARY! I HAD KJVOh'JV THEE LCATG. Same Air. 

O Mary! 1 had known thee long-, 



Amid the g-ay, the thoughtless throng-. 
Where mien loaves modesty behind, 
And manner takes the place of mind: 
Where woman, tho' delig-hrful still, 
Quits Nature's ease for Fashion's skill, 
Hides, by the g-audy g-loss of art, 
The. simple- beauty of her heart. 



And born to lift our souls to heaven, 
Strives for the gfaze dcs-jMscd when g-iven, 
Forgets her being^s godlike power 
To shine the wonder of an hour: 
Oft had I sig-h'd to think that thou, 
An Angel fair, could stoop so low; 
Regret rose from thy causeless mirth 
That Heaven could thus be stain'd by Eartli 

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John Anderson,my jo, John, 

"We elanib the hill the gither, 
And mony a canty dayi John, 

WAc had wi' ane an j titer; 
Now we maun totter down, John; 

Tut hand-in-hand we'll go, 
And -sleep'thc gither at the foot, 

John Anderson, my jo. 



LAXD OF MY" FATHERS, 



.Music by Smith. 



With Si' 11 "' 1 
* F'.ling 




Land of my Fathers! though no mangrove here Ocr thy blue streams her 




41 






flexile branches rear.* Nnr sca_ly palm her fin-ger'n scions shoot, Nor lus_cious 




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Protld of his laws, tenacious of his right, 
And vain of Scotias old uneoncprcr'd might: 
Dear native vallies! may ye long' retain 
The charter\l freedom of the mountain swain; 
Long, mid your sounding- glades, in union sweet, 
May rural innocence and beauty meet? 
And still he duly heard, al twilight calm, 
From every cot the peasant's chaunted psalm! 

it 
Then,'Jedworth, though thy ancient choirs shall fade, 
And time lay bare each lofty colonnade, 
Fr'>m the damp roof the massy sculptures die, 
And in their vaults thy rifted arches lie," 
Null in these vales shall Angel harps prolong, 
By Jeds pure stream a sweeter cVning song 
Than long processions, once, with mystic zeal, 
Pourd to the harp and solemn organ's peal. 

■% The old Abbey at Jedburgh. 



44 



LEM'lE GORDON. 



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Oh lion' my High— land_man ! Oh my bon_nie High _ land _ man ! 
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Oh hnn! my High _land_man ! Oh my bon_nie Hig-h^Jand _man ! 
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Weel won'd I my trtie love ten A_manp ten thotr_sand High_land _men 



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Oh! to see his tartan— trews, 
Bonnet blue, and laig*h— heel'd shoes; 
Philabeg" aboon his knee*, 
That's the lad that I'll g-ang- wi; 
Oh hon! Sec. 



The Princely yotith that I do sing:, 
Is fitted for to be a king-; 
On his breast he wears a star, 
You'd take him for the god of -war. 
Oh hon ! <fce. 



Oh! to see this Princely One, 
Seated on a royal throne', 
Disasters a' would disappear; 
Then beg-ins the Jnb'lee year. 
Oh hon! &c. 



TA.MMY 



■45- 




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woaii'_ rons nice, If she'll neifli _ er hae me nor Tam _ my. 



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I've spier d her anee ,1 ve spierd her twice, Rut if she's a f uil, and -Hg-htlies me, 



And still she says she canna; 
Til try her a train, and that maks thrice, 

And thrice, they say, is canny. 
Wi' him she'll hae a chaise and pair, 

Wi» me she'll hae shanks— nagrtrie ; 
He s anld and Mark, I'm young- and fair; 

She'll surely ne'er tak Tammy. 



I'se e'e-n draw np wi' Nancy? 
There's as guid fish into the sea 

As e'er cam out, I fancy. 
And tho' I say't that shou'dna say't, 

I'm nwrc crtrid a match for Majj-oie; 
Sae m.ik np yonr mind without delay, 

Are ye for me, or Tammy? 



46 



BISK TrEiMSKYE. 




m r r I rr gk-fJUfl f ^ 



Da-n—cing, -while lav'_roeks sins' in t'ie morningjj There learn fraetlrr— tics 




To wcstlin breezes Flora fields, 

And when the beams are kindly -warming-, 
Rlythness appears o'er all the fields, 

And nature looks more* fresh and charming. 
I^earn frae the burns that trace the mead , 

Tho' on their banks the roses blossom, 
Vet hastily they flow to Tweed, 

And pour their sweetness in his bosom . 



THE FLOWER OF YARROW. 



Thy braes were bunny, Yarrow stream, 

When first >m .them I met my lovers 
Thy braes, how dreary, Yarrow 'stream, 

When now thy waves his body cover ! 
For ever bow, O Yarrow stream! 

Thou art to me a stream of sorrow; 
For never on thy hanks shall I 

Behold my love, the flower of Yarrow. 

He promised me a milk-white steed 

To bear me to his father's bowers', 
He promised me a little page 

To s'jnire me to his father's towers ; 
He promised me a wedding 1 — ring-, 

The wedding-— day -was fixed to— morrow; 
Now he is wedded to his grave, 

Alas! his watery grave's in Yarrow. 

Sweet were his words when last we met, 

My passion I as freely told him; 
f'lasp'd in his arms, I little thought 

That I should never more behold him. 
Scarce was he gone, I saw his ghost, 

It vanished with a shriek of sorrow! 
Thrice did the water wraith ascend, 

And gave a doleful groan thro' Yarrow! 

His mother from the window looked, 

"With all the longing of a mother; 
His little sister, weeping, walked 

The greenwood pa(h to meet her brother. 
They sought him east, they sought him west, 

They sought him all the forest thorough; 
They only saw (he cloud of night," 

They only heard the roar of Yarrow, 

k 
No longer from thy window lo<'k 9 

Thou hast no son, thou tender mother; 
No longer walk, thou lovely maid, 

Alas! thou hast no more a brother; 
No longer seek him east or west, 

And search no more the forest thorough, 
For, -wandering in the night so dark, 

He fell a lifeless corse in Yarrow. 

The tear shall never leave my cheek, -" 

No other youtli shall be my marrow; 
I II seek thy body in the stream, 

And then with thee I 11 sleep in Yarrow! 
The tear did never leave her cheek, 

No other youth became her marrow, 
She found his body in the stream, 

And now -with him she sleeps in Yarrow! 



47 

Same. Air. 



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DF.Al'H OF MOJTTE^Th.* 




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fv^cr does the spi rir warn, When we sam dethe mann mane. 



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"l feir, I feir me,gnde Sir John, 
Ve are nae safe wi'me^ 
What wat nald fill my hcart,gin ye 
Sh&nd in my castle dee. " 

Yc need nae I eii ,my tadye dcir, 
I'm ay safe when wi' thee, 

And gin J marrn nae wi» thee live, 
I here wad wish to dee .' 

flifi man earn rtinning to the ha' 

Wi' wallow cheek belyvej 
* Sir John Mont ci!h,yoTrr faes are near, 
And ye mann flee or strive * 



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What corxnt syne lead the'erucl knichti 11 

"Three spiermen to yonr anev 
T redd yc,f lie, my master deir, 
Wi' spied, or ye'll be slain!' 

"Tak ye this gown, my dear Sir John, 
To hide yonr shining rr. . ; 1 ■, 
A boat waits at the hinder port, 
Owre the braid loch to sail. 

Oh! whatten a piteons shriek was yon, 
That songhed rrpon my eir?" 
'Nae piteous shriek,I trow, Ladye, 
Brit the rough blast ye heir! 



i They socht the castle till the morn, 

Whan they were bown to gae; 
They saw the boat tnrn'd on the Loch 
. Sir Johns corse on the brae, 

^ Supposed to be thefanse Monteith ,, -who betrayed the renowned Wallace. 



fHE BRAES 0' HALQll'tHER. 



49 




I will twine thee a how'r 

By tlie clear siller fountain, 

And I'll cover it o'er 

Wi' the flowVs vfl the mountain. 
Will yc y'"i &-< . 

I will rangre thro' the wilds, 

And the deep p-Iens sac dreary, 

And return wi' their spoils 
To the bciwV o' my deary. 
Will ye cpci, A-c. 

When the rude wintr\ *wn? 

Idly raves round our dwelling*. 
And the roar ol the lin 

On the nio'ul hrcczc is swelling; , 
Will ye go, $-c. 



So merrily we'll sinw- 9 

As the storm rattles wor us, 
'Till the dear Kneeling 1 ring 

Wi' the light— lilting r horns 
Will ye g-o, fro. 

Now the summer is in prime, 

Wi' the (lowers richly hlooriiiny, 
And the wild mountain thyme 
A' the moorlands perfuming'. 
Wi 1 1 ye y'o, <&rc . 

To our dear native scenes 

I-et us journey tog'etln r. 

Where glad innocence reigns 

\V1 tng- the braes <»' Balqu hither . 
Will ye gr», &x. 



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FOB A* THA'f, AND A' I HAT. 



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but the jf'i'n _ ea Mamp, The man's the gowil for a' that 



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What tlm' on h.imclx fare we dine, . 

"Wear hnddin jrr< } , an' a' that; 
Gii fools their silks, an* knaves their wine, 

A man's a man for a* that; 
For a 1 that, an 1 a 1 that, 

Their tinsel show, an 1 a' that? 
The honest man, though e'er sae pour, 

Is chief o 1 men L for a 1 that. 

Ye see yon birkie, ca'd a lord, 

Wha struts, an' stares, an 1 a 1 that; 
Tli" 1 hundreds worship at his word, 

He's but a roof for a* that: 
For y that, an" a 1 that, 

Hi^ ribband, star, an" a 1 that. 
Tin man of independent mind 

fin look in 1 laugh at a' that. 



A Kiiiy can inak a belted Knight, 

A Mar<(tiis, Duke, and a 1 that; 
But an honest man's alio on his might, 

Guile faith, he mauna fa" 1 that, 
For a 1 -that, an' a 1 that, 

Their dignities, an' a 1 that, 
The pith o' sense, an 1 pride ni worth, 

Are highi r ranks then a 1 that. 

Then let us pray that emne it may, 

As come it will for a" that, 
That sense an* worth, o'er a' the earth, 

May bear the grce, an 1 a' that. 
For »i that, an 1 a 1 that, 

It's coming yet, for a 1 that, 
That man to man, tin warld oer, 

Shall brothers be for a' that. 



51 
O GF.ORDIE BE1G*VS fJV SADIE'S STE.4d! 

Stine Air. 

Geordie reigns in Jamie's stead! 

I'm griev'd, but scorn to slia' that; 

1 11 no cast down, nor hang my head, 

On Rebel Whigs for a' that. 
And a' that, and a' that. 

And thrice as micklc as a' that, 
I'll no ca,st down, nor hang my head, 

On Rebel Whigs for a' that. 

But still 111 trust in Providence, He wears a broad Sword by his sidi , 
And ay 111 laugh at a' that, He kens wed how to draw (hat; 

And sing he's owre the hills the night, The T^i^ii and the Highland plaid, 
That I lo'e weel for a' that. Tin shoulder belt, and a' that. 

And a' that, &c. And a 1 that, <V< . 

He's far beyond ICillabrae the night A bonnet bound wi' ribbons blue, 
That 1 lo'e weel lor a' that: The white cockade, and a' that, 

He wears a Pi^to] on his side, He wears, that owre the hills this night. 
That males me blj th for a 1 that. That 111 gae wi', for a 1 that. 

And a 1 that, &c. And a' that, Arc. 

The Highland Coat, and Philabcg, The Whigs they think that "Willie's mine, 
The Tartan trews, and a' that, But 'deed they in.iuii.i fa' that 5 

He wears, that's owre the hills the night, The} think our hearts will be east down. 
That I'll go w-i', for a' that. But well be Myth for a 1 that. 

And a' that, &o . And a 1 that. Ace. 

For a' your powdcr'l perri_wigs, 

And a^ your muslin <-rav.it s, 
And a' your fifteen hundred marks, 

You'll no be King for a' that. 
And a 1 that, and a' thai, 

And thrice as mickle' as a'- that, 
He's coming down ahoon Dunkeld, 

"Will be our King for a' that. 



52 



O StA'tELY STOOD 1HE BARONS HA\ 




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Rut wac,wae was the h< .*\ v mane, 

Gacd thro' that Castle ha', O, 
When gloamin cam, ac simmers een , 

Young' Ronald ius awa, O. 
The-v sought him cast , they sought him west. 

O north and south they sought him, 
And noble was the offered boon 

To them that -wad hae brought him. 

The X*ady pined, her cheek grew wan. 

The wound was past a' cui-iii*, 
And the bowers whar first she lostcred him 

"Were jiast her hearts eiidurin\ 
Her lovin Tord wi 1 tender eare 

Took !i< r to wander far, O, 
And iIk only thought ere dried her ee, 

Fbw abooii the niornin star.O! 



Her feckless frame could little bide, 

Slow turned the tardy wheels, O, 
They saw a nut— brown, bonny boy, 

Fast riimin at their heels, O. 
"Stay, Faither, Mither,stay for me! 

Ill never never leave- ye; 

It was na me that gaed awa, 

Twas the gypsies took me frae ye" 

Now, tell wha may, their joy that day, 

Wha ne'er thought joy to meet, O; 
Fresh roses budded on her cheek., 

And her smile it dimpled sweet, O. 
Frae green wood bowers, and stately towers, 

Nae mair they wandered far,0, 
And their gratefu' lays, o' joy and praise, 

Flew aboon the mornin star, O. 



53 

JLGJklff AE.yolCUVG SATIRE. 

Air t -wish my loTe were In a mire. 





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hlaw, In vain to me the vi'_ lets spring; In vain to me, in 

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glen or shaw, The ma vis and the lint — white sing. 



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■ The merry ploughboy cheers his team, 

Wi' joy thetentie seedsman stalks; 
Bat life to me's a dreary dream, 

A dream of ane that never wanks . 
The shepherd stceks his fanlding slap, 

And o'er the moorlands whistles shill, 
Wi'wiM, uneqTral,wand'ring step 

1 meet him on the dewy hill. 



But when the lark, 'tween light and dark 

Blyth waukens by the daisie's side, 
And mounts and sing's, on flirt'ringwing-, 

Awae worn ghaist, Ihameward glide. 
Come, winter, wi' thine angry howl, 

And raging bend the naked tree, 
Thy gloom will soothe my cheerless sou I 

When Nature all is sad like ni<- . 

A 



.54 



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The flowers of The forest 9^ sn*r mu* 

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cm lilt — inff af the twi _ milk _ inj 



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Lass_es a' lilt_ing- be_fi>re dawn of day; But now they arc 
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At e'en, in the gloaming, nac younkers are roaming 
'Boat stacks, with the lasses at bogle to play; 
Bet ilk main! sits dreary, lamenting her deary — 
The flowers of the Forest are weded away. 

Dool and wae for the order sent onr lads to the border; 
The English for ance by guile wan the dayi 
The flowers of the Forest, that fought aye the foremost, 
The prime of our land arc eauld in the clay. 

We'll hear nae mair lilting at the ewe-milking, 
Women and bairns are heartless and wae; 

Sighing and moaning on ilka green .loaning 

The flowers of thcFnrcsl arc ^wc'lc awaA • 



UP AMAXG V6>,V CLIFFY ROCKS. 




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Here's a hroteh -I n<*<r shall tync 'Till he's f.iir_ ly mar_ ried to me: 



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Drive a_wa, ye drone, time, And bring' a _bont our bri_dal — day, 



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"Sandy he'rds a flock o' sheep, 
Aften does he blaw the whittle 
In a strain sae saftly sweet, 
l.immies listning dare-nae bleat . 
Hr's as fleel's the mountain roe,. 
Hardy as the highland heather, 
Wading' thro' the winter snow, 
Keeping- ay his flocksthctrether; 

Hut a plaid wi'barc knees 

He braves the bleakest norlin blast. 



"Rrawly he can dance and sing- 
Canty glce.or highland crTinach} 
Vain <an ever match his fling 
At a reel, or round a ring: 
Wightly can he wield a rung-; 
In a brawl he's ay the bang-ster ; 
A' his praise can ne'er be song 
By the lang-cst winded sangstcr: 

Sangs that sing o'Sandy 

Seem short, rim' f hey were e'er sae lang.' 



HIGUL.4.YD M*4RTT. 



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ry; For there I took the last fare—'weel Of my sweet Higlrifland Ma _ ry, 



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Birl oil! fell death's untimely frost, 

That hi^it my flower sae earl\ ! 
N(iw greens the sod, and ratilds the clay, 



That wrajis my Highland Mary 



And mouldering now in silcnl iln-.t, 
Tliat heart that lo'ed rnc dearly! 

Hut still within try bosom's core 
Shall live rny Highland Mary. 



5H 



TRAJfEJTT' Ml IE. 



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fast as he could g ac ? man; While tren'—ral Cope did ' faunf and 



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I h< brave Lochiel, as I heard tell, 
Led r^mcrnns on in clouds, man; 

The morning fair, and clear the air, 
They loosVl wi' devilish thnds, nun . 

Down guns /hey 'Iirtw, and swr.rds they drew 
And sor.n did chace them aff , man; 

i)n Seafi.n Trails they haft their ehafts, 
\nd jj-art thrm rin like daft, man. 



The bluff dragoons swore,blood and 'oonsj 

They'd make the rebels run, man , , ■ 
And yet they flee when them thty see, 

And winna fire a gnn, man: 
They ttrrn'd their back, the foot they- brake, 

Snch terror seiz'el them a\ man; 
Some they roared, and somethey grat, 

And some for fear die) fa', man . 



59 



The Volunteers prick'd up their ears , 

Ami vow gin they were crouse, man; 
Bnt when the bairns saWt torn to parn's't, 

They were na worth a lousc,man; 
Maist feck gade hame: O, fy for shame . 

They'd better sfayd awa^man, 
Than wi' cockade to make parade, 

And do nac good at a',man . 

Monteith the great, in a great fright, 

TJn'wares did ding him o'er, mitt, 
Yet wad na stand to bear a hand, 

But aff foil fast did scour, man, 
O'er Sontra hill , e'er he stood still, 

Before he tasted meat, man; 
Troth,he may brag of his swift nag, 

That bare him af f sae fleet, man . 



He made sic haste, sae spurd his beast, 

Twas little there he saw, man; 
To Berwick rade,and falsely said, 

The Scolds were rebels a', man: 
Bnt let that end, for well 'tis kend 

His use and wont to lie, man; 
The Te <guc is naught, he never faughf., 

When he had room to flee, man . 

And Caddell drcst amang the rest, 

With gun and good claymore, man, 
On gelding grey he rode that way, 

With pistols set before, man: 
The cause was good , he d spend his blood 

Before lliat he would yield, man; 
But the night before he left the core, 

Ami nt-vc-r fae'd the field, man. 



And Simpson, keen to clear the een 

Of rebels far in wrang,ma.n, 
Did never strive wi' pistols five, 

But gallop 1 *! wi the thrang, man; 
He turn'd his back, and in a crack 

Was cleanly out o'sight, man, 
And thought it best, it was nae jest 

Wi' Highlanders to fight, man. 

'Mantjst a' the gang, nane bade the bang 

Bat twa,and ane was tane, man ; 
For Campbell rade, but Myrie stay'd, 

And sair he paid thekain, man; 
Fell skelps he got was waur than shot, 

Frae the sharp-edgd claymore, man; 
Frae mony a spout came running out 

His rceking-het red gore, man , 



But gaLlant Ki'ger, like a sodger, 
Stood, and bravely fought-, man; 

I'm wa'e to tell, at lasthe fell, 

But mae down wi' him brought, man : 

At point of death,wi' his last breath, 
(Some standing round in ring, man;) 

On's back lying flat, he wav'd his hat 
And cryd, God save the King, man, 

Some Highland rogues, like hungry dogs, 

Neglecting to pursuc,nian. 
About they fae'd, and in great haste 

Upon the booty flew, man: 
And thcy,as gain for a' their pain, 

Are deck'd wi' spoils of war, man; 
Fu'bald can tell, how her nainsell 

Was ne'er sae pra before, man . 



But (yard'ner brave did still behave 

Like to a hero bright, man", 
His courage true, like him were few 

That still despised flight, man ; 
For King, and laws, and country's cause, 

In honour's bed he lay, man; 
His life* but not his conrage, fled , 

While he had breath to draw, man . 



At the thorn-tree, which you may see 

Be-west the meadow mill, man," 
There mony slain lay on the plain," 

The clans pursuing still, man: - 
Sic unco hacks, and d-eadly whacks, 

I never saw the like, man, 
Lost hands and heads cost them their dead, 

That fell near Preston-dyke, man. 



And Major Bowie, that worthy .ioul , 

Was brought down to the ground, man; 
His horse being shot , it w as his lot 

For to get mony a wound, man; 
Lieutenant Smith, of Irish birth, 

Frae Whom he cali'd for aid, man, 
Being full of dread, lap o'er his head, 

And wadna be g-ainsaid, man. 



That .tl'ternoon, whena'was done, 

I gaed to see the tray, man; 
Bnf had I wist what after past, 

1 d better stay'd away,man; 
On St'aton sands, wi' nimble hands , 

They pick'd my pockets bare, man; 
Hut I wish ne'er to drie sic fear, 

For a' the sum and mair, man . A 



60 



'tHE PLOVGHJtiAiY. 



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Tln.lt'-- high and low, there's rich and puir, There's trades and crafts a. 



P^F 



g=^ 



^El 



M 1 f i ^ rr^% = jgite=p 




-» «— — .-- -— r- 

new, man; But east and west his trade's the hest, That kens to ra' the ph>U£h,man. 



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A 



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m 



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Chorus 



o 



is. ■. 



j-j i 'J JV-r-L-J^ 



■ « 

Thcii,oome,weel speed my plotigliman lad, And hey my mcr_ry plough .*man; Of 



His dreams are sweet upon his bed, 
His cares are light and few, man; 

His mother's blessing's on his head, 

That tents her weel, the plough-man 
Then, come, weel speed, &c. 

The l.irk s,:c sweet, that starts to meet 
The morning fresh and new, man; 

Blythe tho' she be, as blythe is he 

That sings as sweet, the plough- man. 
Then, come, weel speed, &x. 

All fresh and ffay, at dawn of day 
Their labours they renew, man; 

Heaven bless the seed, and bless the soil, 

And Heaven bless the plough— man! 

Then, come, weel speed, &e. 



,V/V FU\" 'fi4JMJMY\ 



61 




"Whar hae ye liccn a'day, my boy Tam_my ? Whar hae ye been a' day, 



■ E^-r^F -lUf 



^i 



I'V'J i r 




hoy- Tam_my? 'I've been by burn and fli)w'_ry brae, mca_dow green and 



fc^ 



^Hj^t 




N F* h fe 



■ n=«: 



J.U J.rl 



PSfW 



i I i— «. 



tountain grey coin-tin o' this young- thing- just come frae' her Mam_my.' 




"And whar gat ye lliat young thing, my boy Tammy.'"' 
I gat her down in yonder howe , 
1 Smiling- on a broomy knowe, 
Herding ac wee T„anib and Ewe for her (.our Mjirnnv,'- 

What said ye to the bonny bairn, my boy Tammy?" 

I hae a»housc, if cost me dear, 

I ve waltk o' jilenishen and gear, 
Yese get it a',war't ten times mair, gin ye will leave your M.imnn J . 

The smile gade aff her bonny face_i'l manna leave my Mammy ! 

She's gi'en me meat, she's gi'en me rlaise, 

She's been my comfort a' my days, 
My Father's death brought mony waes I < anna leave my Mammy." 

We'll tak her hame and mak her fain, my ain kind-hearted Lammy, 

We'll gi'e her meat, we'll gi'e her elaes, 

We'll be her comfort a' her days;' 
The wee thing gi'es her hand, and saysJ'There, gang and ask my Mammy." 

..Has she been to kirk wi> thee, my boy Tammy?" 
She has been to kirk wi''me, 
And the tear was in her ee, 
But Oh! she's but a young thing just come frae her Mammy! 



62 



MEET'S DRE.4M. 



Old Set. 




t^-^j-gji^ m 



The love_Iy moon had climh'd the hill, "Where ea_gles big a_ 

fl ) _ , . . n i 



IP 



S 



p^fe Aiflj j 



boon the Dee; And, like the looks of a love _ ly dame, Brought joy f< 



r J I r c-L-iJ ' Lr r f " r '^ p 




She lifted np her wankening een, 

To see from whence the voice might be, 
And there she saw young Sandie stand, 

Pale, bending on her his hollowee! 
"O Mary, dear, lament nae mair, 

I'm in. death's thraws an< aththe sea; 
Thyweeping' makes me sad in bliss, 

Sac, Mary , weep nae mair for me-. 

"The wind slept when we left the bay, 

Bnt soon it waked and raised the main, 
And God,he bore us down the deep, 

"Wha strive wi' him, bnt strive in vain! 
Hestreteh'd his arm and took menp, 

Tho 1 laith I was togangfout thee: 
I look frae Heaven aboon the storni, 

Sae, Mary, weep nae mair £>">r me." 



mart's dream. 



63 



Modern Set. 



m^mm 





The moon had climh'd the high-est hill, Whirh ri_ses o'er" the 



-^j y^r-r— rf-p ^a 



She from her pillow gently rais\l 

Her head, to ask who there might he; 

She saw young Sandy shiVring stand, 
With visage |>al_e and hollow e 1 e; 

"O Mary, dear, cold is my (lay, 
It lies beneath a stormy sea; 

Far, far from thee, I sleep in death, 
So, Mary, weep no more for me. 



"Three stormy nights and stormy days, 

"We toss'd upon the raging main? 
And long we strove our hark to save; 

But all our striving was in vain. 
F.v'n then, when horror chill d my blood,' 

My heart was fill'd with love for thee. - 
The storm is past, and I at rest; 

So, Mary, weep no more lor me. 



"O maiden, dear, thyself prepare, 

We soon shall meet upon that shore 

Where love is free from doubt and care, 
And thou and I shall part no more. 1 ' 

I_oud crow'd the cock, the shadow fled, 
No more of Sandy could she see, 

But soft the passing spirit said, 

"Sweet Mary, weep no more for me. 11 



64 



O BO'I II h' F.I.I. B.UVK. 




t±±± 



O, Botlu-»e]l bank, thou bloom _ est fair; But, ah! thou- 



M-ttit'7. I =»E 



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My lino and I wad sif at e'< n , While daisies, and prim _ r<> _ sc • 



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mixt Wi' blue hells, in my locks lie fixt . O, Both _well 



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j-f-r j- i T- r ^ w j i b 



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hank, thou blciftm— est fair; But, ah; thou mak st my heart fu' 



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Sad he left me a(- dreary day, 

And hal»lic inn* sleeps in the clay, 

Without ae siph his death to moan, 

Without ae flow V his grave to crown 

O whither is my loyrr pone; 

Alas! I fear he'll ne'er return. 

O, Roth-well baTik,tbou hloomest fair? 

But, ah! thou mak'st my heart fu' sair. 



YE BA«YKS A.YD BRAES O' BOJVJVIE DOOJS 
^ ~ li Tenor. ^ .. 



65. 



W 




Ye hanks and braes o' bon nie Doon, Hiw can ye bloom sac fresh and 




Ye banks and braes o" bon.nie Doon, Him can ye bloom sae fresh and 

mm 




fair ? How can ye chan(,yc lit_tlc birds. And I sae wea_rie fit' o' careTThoult 




Fair? How can ye chant,ye lit.flc birds. And I sae wea_rie fn' C care? Thou 1 !! 



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break niv heart thouwarlvling bird. That »-an. tons thro' the flowery thjnrn; Thou 



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break my heart,thonwarbIing bird. That waiutons thro' the flowery tliom: Thou 




r g^i n 



rr^ m iifl f r ricrrri' 



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mind st me o' dc_part_cd joys, De_par_tcd nt_vcr to re_txrrn. 



ttf^n nnjAiiiJUJH 



T=T 



mind st me o' de_part_ed joys, De_par_ted ne_ver to re_furn 




Oft have I rov'd by bdnnie Doon, 

To see the rose and woodbine twine J 
Where ilka bird sang- o' its luve, 

And fondly sac did I <>\ mine, 
Wi' . lightsome heart I |>u<l a rose, 

Fw' sweet, upon its thorny tree^ 
And my fa use lover staw my rose, 

But, ah! lie left the thorn wi' me. 



f>6 



THE TAILOR FKLt fHRO* THE BED. 




The Tav-.l«>r foil thro' the bed, thimble and a*, The Taulor loll 





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thru* the bed* thim— Wc and a\ The . hlan_kcts were thin, and the 



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b=fe 



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stu ets they were sma'; The Tai-lor fell thru' the bed, t liim hlc- aTid a'. 



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Afore it -was lii>'ht, the Tailor he raise, 
Afore it was light, he pat on his clahhs! ._, • 
"The blankets are thin, the sheetst^-thcy arc sma\ 
■^i And I canna pet rest, so 111 eVn gang mal 

Loud rair'd the Turkic, when she gaed ben, 
*"Sie » like triek, -wha-eYr di<l ken. 
The warkV no done, and the Tailor's awa^ 
He's all wi* his shears, his thimble, and a'.' 

FOY^'.S H'IFE OF ALDITALLOCH. 




kiil.i i r nU.i j :: U i 



Roy's "Wife of Al_di._v.Jl_lueh, Koys "Wife of Al_cTi-val _loeh, 



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im 






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how she cheat_ed me, As I came o'er tl>' braes •>' Bal— loehf Sh 



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67 




vow'd, She swore, She wad be mine, She said she loed fnc best of .o_*iyj llu* 



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oil. Hie lie— kit l.iiili_less rincan. She's ta'en the carle, and left f»tr Joltttnu.'. Old 

"i^a l_* : jx 




A little quicker. 




\ i mil J '- ri i-i B I i- 



Roy's Wife of Al _di _ vjl _ loch , Roy's Wife ol 



Al _ «li _ val _ loch. 




Wat ye how .she cheat_cd me, As I came o'er the braes o'. Bal_loth? 




M 



y ,Ji E'ku' i^p 



O she was a canty quean, • . 

And >weel ■ could dance the Highland watlochj 
How happy I, had she been mine, 

Or I'd been Roy of Aldivailocfj ! 
Oil, Roy's Wife, &c . 



i 



^u j i i p m 



Her hair sae fair, her een sae clear, 

Her wee bit motr .sac-, sweet and bonnie; 

To me she ever will be dear, 

Tho' she's f,,r ever It If her Johnnie. 
Oh, Boy's Wife, &% . 



68 



BESS ^JVD HER SPIJV^/JVG-WHEEL. 



Sliwly 




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fiPPPP 



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O leeze mc on my spin _m'ng_whcel, And leeze me on my rock and 



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recl,Frae tap'to tae that deeds me hien , And haps me fiel and warm at e'en. Ill 



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fig 



Mm 



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set me down and sing - and spin, While laig'h descends the simmer sun. Blest 



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wi' con_tcnt, and milk and meal, O leeze me on my spin_ning— wheel 



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On ilka hand the burnics trot, 
And meet below my theekit cot; 
Tlie sceiited birk and hawthorn white 
Across the pool their arms unite; 
Alike to screen the birdie's nest, 
And little fishes caller rest: 
The snn blinks kindly in the biel' 
Wh< re,blythc,l torn my spinnin wheel . 



On lofty aiks the cushats wail, 
And echo cons the doolfu' talc; 
The lintwhitcs in the hazel braes, 
Delighted, rival ithers lays. 
The 'craik amang the claver hay, 
The pai trick whirrin o'er the lea, 
The swallow jinkin rotmd my shicl, 
Anra*c me at my spinnin wheel . 



Wi' sma* to sell , and less to buy, 
Aboon distress, below envy< 
O wha -wad 'leave this humble state. 
For a» the pride of a' the great ? 
Amid their flairing,idlc toys , , 
Amid their cumbrous, dinsomc joys, 
Can they the peace and pleasure feel 
Of Bessy, at her spinnin wheel. 



( K.4 1GIF.-RI HJV WOOD. 



Slew with 
Exyrcssioi 







Swf'el fa's the eve on Craig' j- ic — burn wood, And blytlie .t _ 



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>w; Bui a] the pride o' Craig _ ie - btmu_wood , Can 



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>ield me nouglrt hut sor _ row. 



tin- 



spread _ in 



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jun ;a firJ.-hft^ 



Leave* hikI flowers, I hear the wild birds sing _ nig* But |>lca — sur 



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they hae nanc fur me, "While care my heart is wring _ in u- . 




Fain, lain would 1 my griefs impart, 

Yet dare na for your ang'er; 
Rut secret love will break my licart. 

If I coneeal it langor.' 
H thou refuse to pity uic, 

II tliou shall love another. 
When yon green luave'-s (ade frae The tree. 

Around my grave they'll wither. 



70 



F.PPIF. ADAIR* 




Jj J IJJJ J U^ J l JJ ggpili 



An'oh,my ~Ej>i>ie, My jewel, my Epvie,WJia trad na be hap_py "Wi' 



*tfi r i.-prrt-i 



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^ i mJifHzM r JiJifH B 



K|i_pie A_dairT By love. and lij beau_ ty, By law and by du/_ty, 111 



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PJ J | J juJiMiff ,J J | J , li jj 



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oy_er be true to my E)>_|>ie A dair. Mis -i. for — tunc \\onld fake mo, And 



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up 



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ffiiil — ty fears shake me, II I sliguld for_sa£e ye, My Kp- p 



ic A_dair. 



: t-f^i-t-' 



Efiv m — r^ ^gf 



gppjfi 



liuJ »h\ 1'iims alliim it." 
YeVc no nmv l<> learn it 5 
Y(Hir merit ("ulirms it, 
Sae glide and ^r ('air. 
The lassie that's peerless, 
CV rivals is (earless; 
H.'ll ne'er lo'e but ane. 
Thai loYs Eppic Adair. 



•j,.- *.-v».->.-2».-^.-f=».-^.-5» 



^.,>.->..-; J .,^.-^.^.-?=>. s ^ : -^-.^-te-.^-.«^-«-'^--'^--^--'^--4']--#-.<35-'<=-.ft-"#-- 



'I' HE FOE AT. 



Air, Baddich na brig-an. 



The last of onr steers on our lu.ard has been spread^JVWffheJast flask of 
\nimati -n T\ 

A V^ 




71 




The rain is descending, the wind rises loud. 
And the moon her red beacon has veil'd with a cloud: 
'Tis (he hctter, my mates; lor the Warder's .lull eye 
Shall in confidence slumber, nor dream we are nigh. 
Our steeds are impatient! I hear m\ blythe £'rey! 
There is life in his hoof—eUIng, and hope in his neigh; 
Like the Hash ol a meteor, the glance of his mane 
Shall marshal your march through the darkness and rain. 
The drawbridge has tiro|>|>\l , and the bugle has blown; 

One pledge is to quaff yet then mount and be gone. 

To their honor and peace, that shall rest with the slain, 
To thrir health and their "l<c, that see Teviot again! 

NT.B.The last four lines of the PoetM to |„ sunjr to the second strain of thcMeh.dx , repct< .1. 



72 



aT MOBjnjTG si;j>r on' o'ef The lea. 



Air, Lassie are ye sleeping, 




J j t , ;• irH J I g J' i ■ i r 



A( m<>r_irinir sun "lit o'er tlic lea, When bir_dics ehaunt their 



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£-Zj— JLU* 



"C C'tt-tlH 



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notes sac liie,'Wlicn vcr_diiro glad_dens ev'_ry e'e, 'Tis then I meet my ain Jo. 



:»mr Ur l r: 



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mj 1 1 f n m $a 




Chorus, 



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N-f3 tk _ *_ 



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My lovc_.ly Jean, my ain Jean, My ain Jean, my «*in Jean* O 



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there 



meet my ain Joan, My ain my on _ ly ain J< 



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CP^ 



When fjnwrots paint the meadows green, 
When dew hang's an the scented hcan, 
"When hums thchee the- leaves atw-ccn, 

'Tis then 1 meet my ain Jo. 
My lovely Jean, my ain Jean, 
My ain Jean, my ain J: an; 
O then 1 meet my ain Jean, 
My ain, my <>fiK ain Ji>. 



"When trees are deckel in simmer sheen. 
When ilka bud in beauty's seen, 
Wlicn nature smiles in every .scene, 

'Tis then I meet my ain Jo. 
My lovely Jean, my ain Jean, 
Mv ain Jean, my ain Jean; 
O then I meet my ain Jean, 

Mv ain my only ain Jo. 



■ Wliar dmvn the' glen the burnic rows, 
An' sporting 1 plays between the how cs , 
"Wliar lam'ics frisk out— o'er the knowes, 

'Tis there 1 meet my ain Jo . 
Mv lovely Jean,, my ain Joan, 
. My ain Jean, my ain Jean; 
'Tis there I meet my ain Joan, 
My ain my only ain Jo. 



The chiefs reTi'bjt from jt^ir. 

Air, Leit h "W-\ >i 



7/5 




O wha will ride: and wha will rinfAnd wha will s^il f I ■ r M,,r.\ml 




#^##f 




I^Mill 



ha will go to [s_ la kill, "Where we wen wont to her O 




^^^dkidi 




^^ 



4 UTi 



Hil 



O. lor ea _ gle's wines," he cried, 'To hear me to her side. 



w& 



m 



"A hlink shines <m m\ stately tow'r, 

O.'thal I there might he, 
Wharc Mary tents her infant son, 

And weeps and prays lor me!" 
The wind was hush'd, the waves were still, 

Fast flew- the dashing' oar, 
His bounding heart niaist hurst it hands, 

As they drew near the shore. 

Had eagle's wings been lent him now, 

Vlair swilt they eon Id na he; 
But, ok. the sight that met him there, 

Was soon enough to see. 
His Bahie, in a hireling's arms, 

Waild out its Mather's name; 
His men and maidens durst nae speak, 

Nor tell the news for shame. 



"Wharc, wharc's my Mary: 'L_ loud lie tried- 

''What means this heavy gloom? 
False she is not Oh! is she dead: 

III 'lie upon her tomb. 
No voice replied afl still as death 

Yet tears ay fill'd their ee. 
And ay the wailing bahie tried, 

'Mamie crime back to me.' 

Speak, I command, auld Donald speak,' 1 
Sob*, kepit Donald's breath; 
The nurse, unbidden, told the tale, 
That scaired him like a wraith. 
Now- shame burns on his manly * heck. 

Grief rankles at his heart. 
The morrow ne'er will bring relief. 
The past's a poisoned dart, 

\ 



74 



ZOHjriE OGLE. 




M \ 



m I m 



Old Ballad. 



to 



1 



O hark ye, Lads, and I v.i]l tell 



ye 



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Of 







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kin _ tra Lad and a kin _ tra Lass, Wha seven lany years they 



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f-H-f F 



jp f¥^ ^ H^ gf=t^B iliig 



were in court _ ship * And mo „ny fine thing's 'tween rhem rf i< i j> 



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JS 



=S5 



Sip 



f 



I 



Hut when the Mitlior eame to know it, 

Shc'said, "jc disobedient .Son, 
I've p-i'en ye schulin,and g-icnye learnin, 

Andwouldye to yere ruin run r 



Hts ffane to find his luvc sac dear. 
And said, "Lirve-, luve, if winna rl", 

E'e-ausc that Mither's sac unwillin 
That ever 1 srrd marry you . 



"Tve gi'en yc schulin, and v< re learnin, 
And edication o' f lie best, 
Andwouldye marry anc sar mean, 

And <|iiite bereave me o' my rest:' 



The bonny c'rcatiirc,ivi' sweet behaviour, 
While fears cam trinklin to flit jjrund. 

Said, "Bairns mnst obey their liarents, 
Because- they are by Scripture boTrnd . 



'There's nac Coae h,luvc, em the- sh<ire, hive , 

Veil- a Be.at, luve, e>n the tide, 
Anel in a Ship, luve rrpon the sca,Iuvc, 
Wi' nane but Johnie Ogle wael I ride." 



-=-<=-^- 



EARL MAR1SCHAL. 



In Iff ,51. 




& ^i-H& £i fm 



"When rc>vali>owcr was hunted down, And Cromwell bore Hie hclI,Sir, How 



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psp 



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safe and semnd lay Se of _lanels crown, Be_had,Im £>aun to tell, Sir. 



On 



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&& 



fair Kin_ear_dinc's rock _v coas t, T here's few- that <lin_lla ken, yet, Dun. 

~z j- a J J 



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t_ter Cas_tlc, bald and strong, Stands tow-'r_ing oer Hie main', yet 



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There Keith, Karl Marise hal,w-arlike wight, The Crown, the Sceptre \ Sword, and a', 
Sac noble and sac loyal, The lint she happit round them, 

He gat the guardln' o' thc-m a", .And, a' unktild to Ogilvic, 

An Id Scotia's ensigns royal. Safe in the sack she hound them. 



When irms like his could ill he spared, 
And he fought for the Stewart, 

I He gac them ow-re to Ogilvie, 
A trusty and a true heart . 



A simple lass upon her back, 
Willi*. uten fear or danger. 

Soon brought them t<> the minister 
Qf Kinncff, girid James Granger, 



Siring to the stronger still maun yield, 
The rebels ruled the nation, 

Brave Ogilvie and a' his men, 

They ex.uld na keep their station. 



Aneath the pulpit's sel they're laid, 
To mak the secret faster, 

As low as lay the royal head, 

Short sync their rightfu' master. 



His Laely, w-i' a manly heart, 

She tuik it a' upon her. 
To save from skaith her Captain dear, 

And eke her Country's honr»r. 



The darkest nifjht will wear awa } 

Monk £>ae the bowls a row, man, 
A old monarchy was up again, 

A nei Round- heads down, I trow, m. in 



The Marisehal he -cam frae- the wars, 
Sae blythe was he that day. Sir. 

When Ojrilvic gac back his trust. 
In spite o' a> the fray, Sir. 



7ft 




rp /.v The .MORjrrjvG early. 



it=t =£^ 



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Cauld bl.iws the wind frac north to south, And drift is dri _ving 



k^i'i r j -i i r f'ffirr.fn f 



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sair_ lyj The *,hccp arc coTrring" in flit 7 * hen^n, O sirs! its win-tor. fair_ly . New 



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np in The mor^nin^s no for mc^ T T p in the mor_ ning* ear_ly$ Td r'ather £"ac 



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trp_pQE_less t<» my hed, Than rise in the mor_ ning" car _Iy. 

'fiir M ffr irM vfn;; 



1 ,'ind rairs the blast aniang' the ■woods, 

The branches tirlin barely, 
Amang the chimley taps ft fluids, 

And frost is nippin sairly . 
Vow up in the morning's no for me, 

Up in the morning' early*, 
To sit a 1 the night I'd rather agree, 

Than rise in the morning early . 



The sun peeps o'er the southlan' hill , 

Like ony tim'rous c.arlic; 
Just blinks a wee, then sinks again, 

And that we find severely. 
Now np in (hie mo miner's no for me, 
..» Up in the morning early; 

When snaw blaws into the chimley cheek, 

Wha'd rise in the morning early. 



Nac linfics lilt on hedge or hrrsh , 

Poor things, they suffer sairly; 
Tn canldrife fjoarters a 1 the night, 

A 1 day they feed but sparely. 
Now up in the morning's no for me, 

Up in the morning early} 
Mac fate ran be wanr, in winter time. 

Than rise in the morning early. 



a ^ : s 



r — r—r. 




SOMEBODY. 

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77 



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M\ heart is sair, T dare ria fell, My heart is sair f<>r 



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Some — bo _*iy ; ' could , wake a win _ fcr nig-ht Kor rhe .sake 



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Sninc — l>o -p.dy. Oh honl for Snmp.l>"_r|}! Oh he- 



for Some- bo—rfl 



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I could range rhe world a _ round , For the sake o* Some_bo_dy, 



How aft Ivo wander'rl by the l.urn, 

At g-loamin' hour,wi' Somebody ^ 

And listened to the tale o' love, 

Sac sweetly told by Somebody . 

Oh hem ! for Somebody! 

Oli licy! for Somebody] 

Wintrd wi' joy the moments flew, 

Sae blest was I wi» Somebody. 



But now the tear-drap dims my ee. 

Whene'er ! think o' Somebody; 
For weel I l>*e the honm'e lad 

Tint's far awa, my .Somebody. 
Oh lion!', for Somebody] 
~ Oh liey! lor Somebody! 
While I live I'll ne'er forget 

The parting- look o' Somebodj . 



Ye powers, that smile on virtuous love, 

O, sweetly smile on Somebody? 
Fr.ie ilka danger keep him free?. 

And send me safe my Somebody. 
Oh hon! for Smnchoidyl 
Oh hey! for Somebody] 
The-y Mini love fan only say 
What I el do for Somebody. 



78 



DIRGE OF A HIGHLAND CHIEF, 

h'lio pas Executed after thy defeat of Prince (nettles. 




fH Mi iy.;) j.,.j-N. . i ijfi 



me 



Son of the <nigh_,ty and the free I.ovM lea_dcr »f the 

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faith _ful brave, Was it for high — rank'd chief! like thee To 



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fill a name— less grave? Oh! hadst thou slum _ ber'd with the 



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.lain, Had g-lo _ ry's death — bed been thy lot, F.'en tho' on red Cul _ 

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SE 



y. 1 Verse. 



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lo — denV )>lain, "We then had mournM thee not. 



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dark — ly closet tliy morn <>f fame, That morn whose sun— beams 



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fair; Re — venge a _ lone may breathe thy name, Tl 



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watch _word of des _ pair. 



"Yet, oh ! if gal _ lant 



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en n<ib led death like thine, Then glo _ r\- 




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mark'd thy par — ting hour, 



Last 



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Ocr thy own bowers tlic sunshine falls, . On thy blue hills no bugle— sound 

But cannot cheer their lonely gloom; Is mixing with the torrent's roar: 

Those beams that gild thy native walls t T nmark'd.thc red deer sport around 

Are sleeping- on thy tomb. . Thou lead's! the eha.ee no more. 

Spring on thy inoiintains laughs the while, Thy gates arc clos'd , thy halls are still, 

Thy green woods wave in vernal air, Those halls where swcll'd thechoral strain; 

Hut the lov'd scenes may vainly smile , They hear the wild winds murmuring shrill, 

Not e'en thy dust is there. And all is hush'd again. 

Thy bard his pealing harp has broke; 

His /ire, his joy of song, is past; 
One lay to mourn thy fate he woke. 

His saddest, and his last. 
No other theme to him is dear 

Than lofty deeds of thine: 
Hush'd be the strain thou ean'st not hear, 

Last of a mighty line. 



so 



^/r LUTE'S IJST GERMANY. 



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zjr~- — ■ -1 — 

TVIy Lnves in Ger_ma_ny; Send liim hame, Send liim hame; My 



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I.nvc's in Ger_ma_ny, Send liim hamet My Luves in Ger_ma_ny, Fight 



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ing - fop Roy_al_ty; Ho may ne'er his Jean _ ie see; Send liim 



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He's brave as brave fan be, 

- Send bim hame-, send lrim hame; 
He's brave as brave tan be, 

Send bim hame. 
He's brave as brave ean lie, 
Ho wad ratber fa' tban flee; 
But his life is dear to me, 

Send him bame, send him hame; 
Ob! his life is dear f<> me, 

Send him- bame. 

"Our faes are ten tr> three, 

Send him hame, send him hame; 
Our faes arc ten to rhree, 

Send him hame. 
Our faes are ten to three, 
He in aim either fa', or floe, 
In the cause , o' Loyalty; 

. c end him hame, send him lwme; 
In the cause o' Loyalty, 

Send him hame!' 



Your Iirve ne'er learnt to lice, 

Ronnie Dame, winsome Dame ? 
Yotiij Iirve ne'er learnt to flee, 

Winsome Dame. 
Your luvo ne'er learnt to flee, 
Rnt he. fell in Germany, 
Kio'lifine; brave for Loyalty, 

Mournfn' Dame, bonnic Dame, 
Kiohfino- brave for Loyalty, 

Mournftr' Dame? 

'He'll ne'er come- ow re the sea, 

Willie's-slain, Willie's slain? 
He'll ne'er come nwr< the sea, 

Willie's pane! 
He'll ne'er come mvrt the sea, 
To his Love and ain Cotmfrio — 
This warld's nae mair for me, 

Willie's g-ane, Willie's ganc ! 
This warld's nae mair for me 

Willie's slain !" ' 



SHE'S FAIR +Ajrb F.4USE. 



81 



Slowly 




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A rocif ■ earn 





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trc lint ivarld s g-car, Sac let the Ix.n — me lass £*'«ni£ 



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WlutVr ye l>e that unman love. 

To tliis be never hliinl, 
Nae lei-lie 'tis flio' liikli she prove/, 

A uiidjjii ha.Ot l>y kind: 
O woman, lovely woman lair! 

An Angel form's IjVii in Ihy share, 
Twail lieen oVr liieikU In UfUn thee mair. 

1 mean an Anj»<l miml. 



S2 



LOCH 1 F. L\S h \4 /?, V/.A y; . 



Wizard 




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T.,orh_iel! Loehiel!- beware of the day When the Low_lands shall 



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meet thee ■ in hat _tlc ar_ray! For a field of the dead rush_es red on my 

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.sig-ht, And the clans of iCtrl_)o_den are sraffcr'd in fight: They rally, they 



f=te t t— tft^ 



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hjeed, for their kiT]g-_dom and crown ! Woe, woe to the ri „ ders that 



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trample them down! Proud Cnm_ber_land pranees, inj;al_ting' the slain, And their 



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hoof— beaten bo_sr ms are trod to the plain. Weep, Al_bin! to death and cap 






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ti\_i_/y led! Oh,wccp.'but thy fears cannot number Ihc dead; For a mcr_< i_ kss 

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sword on Cul— lo_dcn shall wave; OiLlb-fit-n'itliaf reek&.-with (lie blood off flic brave 



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LOCHIF.LV — .- 
G-o, preach to the coward, thou death— telling" st er. 
Or, if gory Calloden so dreadful appoar, 
Draw, dotard, around thy old wavering sight, 
This mantle, to cover the phantoms of fright; 

"WIZARD. v 

Ha! laugli'st thou, Loehiel, my vision to scorn? 
Proud bird of the mountain, thy plume shall be torn! 
Why flames the far summit? why shoot to tho blast 
Those embers, like stars from the firmament cast f 

Heaven's fire is around thee, to blast and to burn} 
Return to thy dwelling"! all lonely, return ! 
For the blackness of ashes shall mark where it stood , 
And a wild mother scream o'er her famishing- brood.. 

LOCHIF.L. 
False Wizard, avaunt ! I have marshall'd my Clan: 
Their swords are a thousand, their bosoms are one! 
They are true to the last of their blood and their breath, 
And like reapers descend to the harvest of death. 

Then welcome be Cumberland's steed to the shock , 
Let him dash his proud foam like a wave on the r.nk; 
Hut woe to his kindred, and. woe to his cause, 
When Albin her claymore indignantly draws , 

Lochiel shall exult, or in death be laid low, 

With his back to the field, and his feet to the foe! 

And leaving- in battle no blot on his name, 

Look proudly to heaven from his death-bed of fame. 



84 



O LAY Thy loof /„v mijve, lass, 




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O lay tliy loof in mine,Lass, in mine, Lass, in minc^-iss, And 



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swear' on tliy white hanH,L.as>;, ( That thou wilt be my ain. A slave to love's un_ 



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bound— e/l sway, He aft lias w roiig-ht me mei_kle irae; But now lie i* my 





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dead— lie f.K , O*-— less thoii l»c iny un. O I*y thy loof in mine, I^ass 9 



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minc,T...ass, in minr,T..ass, Anrl swear on thy white hanH,L,ass, That thou wilt he my ain 



There's nionic a lass has broke my rest, 
That for a blink I ha'e ln'ed best; 
But thou art queen within iny breast, 
For ever to remain. 
O lay thy loof. &c. 



The lawlajtds of hollajvd. 



85 




The luve that I hae chosen, I 11 therewith be content, The 



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saut sea will he froz_en Be — Tore that 1 re pent; Rt 




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pent it will I ne_ver Un — til the day I <lee, Tho' the 



My luve lies in the salt sea, 

And I am on the side, 
Enough to break a young- thing's heart 

Wha lately was a bride; 
Wha lately was a bonny, bride, 

And pleasure in her e'e; 
But the lawlands o' Holland 

Hae twined my love and me. , 

New Holland is a barren place, 

In it there grows nac grain, 
Nor ony habitation, 

Wherein for to remain; 
But the sugar canes are plenty, 

And the wine rt rap's frae the tree; 
But the lawlands o' Holland 

Hae twined my love and me. 



My luve he built a bonnie ship, 

And sent her to the sea, 
Wi 1 seven— score brave mariners 

To bear her companie; 
Threescore g-aed to the bottom, 

And threescore died at sea, 
And the lawlands o' Holland 

Hae twined my luve and me. 

My luve has built anither ship, 

And se-tft her to the main, 
He had but twenty mariners, 

And a' to bring- her hame; 
The stormy clouds did roar again, 

The raging waves did. rout, 
And my ltrve, and his bonnie ship, 

Turn'd widdershins about. 



h6 



GALA WATER. 



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Braw, braw lads on Yar _ row liracs, Ye wan _ der 



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through the bloom — ing- heath _ er; But Yar _ row braes, nor 

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Ft— trick shaws, Can match the lads o' Ga — la— wa — tcr , 



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But there is ane, a secret ane, 

Alxion them a' T loe him better, 
And 1*11 be his, and he'll be mine, 

The bonny lad o' Gala— water. # 

\ 
Altho' his.daddie was nae laird, 

And tlid' T hae nae meikle tocher, 
Yet rich in kindest, truest love, 

"We'll tent nnr flocks by Gala-water. 

Tt ne'er was wealth, it ne'er was wealth, 

That coft contentment, peace, or pleasure; 

Tbe bands and bliss o' mutual love, 

O! that's the chief est warld's treasure. 



-:--?»•'-—?• ~5*> 



CHARLIE IS My DARLING. 



Jacobite. 




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Oh! Char_lie is my dar-Iing, my dar_Hng-, my ■ dar_ling-;Oh. 



87 



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Char_lie is my dar_ling, The young Che_va_lier: 'Twas on a Mun _day 



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jor_ning, right ear_ly in the year, "When Char-lie came to our town, the 



w% M i r «Lir luJ i ! L i ui 





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dar_ ling; Oli! Char_lie is my dar_-ling, The young' Che-va_lier. 



s m i rrri ^^ 



E^e-j tyAl 



As lie came marching' tip the street, 
Tlie pipes play'd loud and clear, 

And a' the folk came running out 
To meet the Chevalier . 

Wi' hieland bonnets on their heads, 
And claymores bright and clear, 

They came to fight for Scotland's right 
And the young Chevalier. 

They've left their bonny hielands hills, 
Their wives- and bairriies dear, 

To draw the sword for Scotland's Lord, 
The young Chevalier,., 

Oh! there were mony beating hearts, 
And mony hopes and fears; 

And mom were rile- prayers put up . 
For the yriuli'ltf Chevalier. 



88 



CHARLIE Y°F.T. 



Morril V. 



ftj ' ill iJig h\ ^{N 



A bonnie boat fame o'er the sea, It brought mickle joy to my 



Igg 



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kim— mer and tne; An' wha has it brought? I wat, ye ken, It 



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cres; 

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brought the King, ami the wale o' men. O its Charlie yet, An<) it ^ 



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Char-lie yet, We -1 !! hac m 



T 

o— ny braw ilays wi' our C)iar_li 



e yet , 



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P J • J IN 



O.Jie was\ lang o' comiiijf hame, 
But weelwe kerr'-wlia was to blame; - 
But sin' that lie 1 * come we'll dance and sing', 
And drink a health lo.our rigMlu' King-. 
O its Charlie yet, &c . . 



The pibreoch is sounding, the Clans are out, 
An' there'll be brulzies bauld and stout; 
But, I trow-, we'll ne'er flinch frae Charlie's side, 
He s worth a crown and a kingdom beside. 
O its Charlie yet, <Stc. 



() POOR frill >.U LD A,YD R ESI LESS LOfK. 



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O poortifh cauM and resiles* love,Yc»Te<.k my peace Uctween jc;Y«» 



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why should fate sic plea sure have, life's dearest bands an_twining-? O 



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»hy sae sweet a flow'r as love De_pcnd on for _ tune's sliin_ing , i > 



This warlds wealth when I ihink on, 
Its pride, and a' the lave o't ; 

Kie, fie on silly coward man, 

That he should be the slave <Jt . 
O why, &c. 

Her een sae bonny bine betray 
How she repays .my passion! 

But prudence is her o'erword ay, 
She talks of rank and fashion . 
O why, &< . 

O wha can prndence think upon, 
And sic a lassie by him? 

O wha can prudence think upon, 
And sae in love as I am : 
O why, &ci" 

How blest the humble cottars fate, 
He wooes his simple dearie; 

The silly bodies, wealth and state, 
Can never make them eerie. 
O why, &< . 



90 



MTt" WIFE'S A WIJVSOME WEE T~HIJVG. 




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My Wife's a win _ some -wee thing-, She is a hand _ 



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, And ' neist my heart I U wear her, For fear my Jew— .cl tine . 



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O. leo2?e me on my wee thing - , 
My boTinie blithsome wee thing, 
Sae'lang's T hae my wee thing' 

III think my lot divine.. 
Tho' warld's care we share o't, 
And may sae mcikle mair o't, 
Wi' her I'll hlithly hear it, 

And ne'er a word repine . 

iVe seejt -The smilmtg of fori'ujve. 

2 rt Set. 



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I've seen the smi — ling- tut for_tune l>e_g-uil_ing", Ive felt all its 



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fa_vours, and- found its de_cay; Sweet whs its hlcss_ings, Kind its c.i_ 




rcss_ing. But now'tis fled, fieri far a_«ay, 1 



ve s<-tn 



the Ko_rcst a_ 



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£fay; So hon^ny was their bloom_ing* 9 their scent the air j)cr_ frx_min£", But 

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now 'hey are with _ er _ cd and weed _ ed a _ way . 



^i^ees 



Ive seen the morning' with gold the hills adorning, 

And loud tempest storming before the mid day; 
Ive sec-n Tweed s silver streams shining in- the sunny beams, 

G-row drumly and dark as he row'd on his way. 
O fickle f .rtune 1 why this cruel sporting! » 

O why still perplex us, poor sons of a day. - 
No more yotrr smiles ran cheer me, no more your frowns can fi ,.r 

For the flowers of the T~nrc_st are withered away. 



92 



sewsiBiLtTY' now cm4H.\ii*\'c,l 







S«Mi_s.i-.lii — H _ty, how char- mingl TIiott, my frjepd,ean».f truly 



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telljRut distress, -with horrors arming - , Thou hast aljso known too well. Fairest 



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flow'r, hc_hold the li_ly Bloom_ing - in the sun.ny ray! Lot rlie 



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blast sweep oer the val_ley. See it pros _ trafc on the flay! Let the 



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9 3 — 3 — *^-5 r. ■ » &• ■ ' 

hlast sweep o'er the val,_ley, See it pros_trate on the clay' 



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Hear the woodlark charm the forest, 

Telling- oer his little joys: 
Hapless bird] a prey, the surest , 

To each pirate of the skies . 
Dearly bought the hidden treasure 

Finer feeling can bestow; 
Chords that vibrate sweetest pleasure. 

Thrill the deepest notes of woe . 



CRADLE SOJVG. 



95 



Pi III I ¥l l l|| J Hi J j, j J I 



S lowly 




Brt-lrt loo, lam-my, now l>a — loo, my dear; Now, ba — la loo' 



A- 



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E=F=F 







lam — my, ,ain min — nie is here: "What ails my wee hair— — nief what 



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ails it this night \ "What ails my wee lam — my is hair— nie no riglit- 

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Ba la loo, lammy; now baloo, my dear; 
Does wee lammy ken that it's daddies no here: 
YeVe rockin fu' sweetly on mammies warm knee, 
But daddie's a rockin uj>on the saut sea. 

Now hush— a— ba, tammy; hush — a, my <learj 

Now hush— a— ba, l.immy; ain minhie is here; 

The wild wind is ravin, and mammie's heart's sair; 

The wild wind is ravin, and ye dinna care. 



Sing, ba la loo, lammyi sing baloo, my dear, 
Sing, ba la loo, I am my, ain minnie is here; 
My wee hairnie's dozin', its dozin now fine, 
And, oh! may its wauk'nin be blyther than mine. 



34 



TllF. BRAES O* BAI.LOCH..MVLF. 




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Fa_rfer| groves Ma Jr ri — a sang, Hcr_sel in lie au — ty's Moom the while; And 




Tow in \<>ur winf rv beds , ye flowers, 
Acrain ye'll flourish fresh and fair; 

Ye birdies dumb, ifi with'ring bowers, 
Again ye'll ' harm the vocal air . 

But here, alas! for '-f^i ,nae mair , 

Shall birdie 'harm , or floweret smife; 

Fareweel the bonnie banks of Ayr, 

' Farewce I, f arcwerl ! sweet Ballochmylc! 



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}'F y LL MOTW/'-GUDF MAJT. 

Air, 111 makyoa fain to follow me. 

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low' n the Loch side, Then un'mang* the hills, and thro 1 muir and hcath_er, AnrJ 



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join great Arjjyle, wlicre loyal men gather. In—deed, honest Lui kic, I thinJcycVc n 







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true Loyal tie; Had the Prince ne'er a_nitlujer, lie ;iyc will hae me; 



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"About Charlie Stnart we ne'er could agree*, 
But, dearie, for ance he eottnsell'd by mc ; 
Tak nac pairt at a', hide quietly at hamc, 
And ne'er heed a Campbell, McDonnell, or Graham'.' 

Na , na,gndewifcj tor that winna do, 
My Prince is in need, his friends are hut few: 
I aye lo'ed the Stuarts, I'll join them the. day, 
Sap p'c me my hoots, for my hoots I* \*Hl i'ha,e J 

'Oli! saftly frii(f(man,I think ye're gane mad , ••' 
I hae nae the heart to pfin on your Coekanele •. 
The Prince, as ye pa' him, will never, succeed: 
Ye-'U lose yotir esta,te,and may he ytmr head'. 

Come, cheer ye, my dear, and dry 'up your tears, 

I hae- .my hopes, and I hae my fears ; 

Rut I'll raise my men, and a' that is g-iven, 

To aid ,thc g-ude cause, then leave it to Heaven. 

But, haste ye now, haste ye, for I maun he g-aun , 
The mare's at the yett, the bugle is blawh; 
Gie me my hannet, it's far in the day, 
I'm no .jEeir a Cup, there's nae time to stay? 

Oli! tak hut ane-, it, may do ye- gudc'',' 

But,\\nat ails the womanrshe surely is wud; ... * 

Sin's lifted the kettle, but somehow it rotiped 

On the leg-s o' the Laird, vlia roar'd and wha loupe d 

I'm brent! I'm brent! how cam it this way? 

I fear I'll no ride for mony a eiay, 

Send aff the men , and to Prince- Charles say, 
My heart is wi' him, but I'm tieel by the tae'. 

The wily Wife fleet h'd,and the Laird did nae see 
The smile on her cheek tfirp'ihe tear in her ee — 
Had I kent the g-ude—man wad hae had siccen pain, 
The Kettle for me sud hae coirpe'd ils lane!" 
This Lady Iras' one of the Home's of "Wcdderhurn . 



" A 



96 



whaT ails This hf.arT e>> mine? 



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What ails thiv heart o' mine? "What means tliis waliry cc? What 



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gars me aye turn CanM as death, "When T tak leave o' thee? "Wlit 



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change o> fimk, and change o' place, May gar thy fan _ ey jee 



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Then I 11 sit down and moan, 

Just l>y yon spreading 1 tree, 
And gin a leaf fa 1 in my lap, 

1 11 ra t a word frae thee. 
Sync I'll gang" to the ImwV, 

Which thou fli' roses tied; 
'Twas there, l>y many a blushing" bud, 

T strove my love to -hide . 

* 
I'll doat on ilka spot 

Wliarc I hae been wi* thee; 
I'll ca' to mind some fond love— tale, 

By cv'ry burn and tree. 
"Tis hope that cheers the mind, 

Tho 1 lovers , absent be, 
And when I think I sec thee still, 
Al think Iin-srill with thee. 



FIFE,AJTD ,V THE LAJVDS ABOUT IT. 



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Al_Ian need na sjjeak to me, For nae Fife Laird T 



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e'er will tak; If I was spar d to cross the sea, I m 

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I'll no gang- to spend my life,-- 

Far frae a' my frien's in Fife; 
If sice an a thing- I e'er can do, 

I maun lo'e mair than I lo'e you. 
Fife, and a' the lands about it, 

Fndesiring- I can see} 
Mony a Laird,ye need na doubt it, 

A' his lands for Ijfe wad g-ie . 



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LOrE IS /HE CAVSE O* MY JMOUBJflJVG. 




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lane_ly the las _ sic- rlir] mourn; She lnok'd tju -to Hea_vcn, her 



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Ja _ mie was dear. I'm thrany a' the day, I'll do like the 



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I strive to look chearlirl , but canna be gay; 
Wi' lads and wi' lasses nae langer I play; 
At bogle,when ramping, I think they're gaun mad, 
The loader they laugh, the mair I am sad . 
Far sweeter to me to gang down t^e langglen, 
'Manf heather and whins to yon bonie den, 
Where the mavis does sing-, and the wild rose does blaw, 
And a' thing- reminds me o' him thats awa, 

Should he ne'er come back 

A' joy it will wither, 

And for his ; dear sake 

I'll think o» nae ither- 
Bat ay in the gloaming afore the night fa^ 
I'll pray for' my Jamie, my love, that's awa', 
The catrse o' my mourning. 



100 



T'HE MILLER. 




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O nif-r . ry may the maid be That mar_ries with the 



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Mil_lei-, For foul day and fair day He's ay hring_ing till her; He' 

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ay a ]>en _ ny in his ptrrsej For din_ner and for sup_per, And 



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gin she please a good fat cheese, -And lumps o' yel _low but_ter. 



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When Jamie first did woo -me, 

I speir'd whatwas his calling: 
"Fair maid, says he, O rome and see; 

Te're -welcome-to my dwalling." 
Tho' I was shy, ye*- 1 could spy 

The truth of what'he told me, 
And that his house was warm and < oulli, 

And room in it to hold me . 

Behind the door a bag of meal, 
And in the kist was plenty 

Of good hard cakes, his mither bakes, 
And bannocks -were na scanty; 

\ good fat sow, a sleeky cow 
Was standing in the byre ; 

While lazy pnss -with mealy mouse 
» Was playing at the fire. 



G-pod sig-ns are these 1 , my mither says, 

And bids me tak the miller; 
For foul -day ftnd fair day 

He's ay bringing till her; 
For meal and mant she does na want, 

Nor ony thing thats dainty, 
And now and then a keekling- hen 

To lay her eggs in plenty. 

In winter,when the wind and rain 

Blaws o'er the house and byre, 
He sits beside a clean liearth-stane, 

Before a ronsing fire: 
His canty wife has a' things right, 

A supper warm and sappy; 
Wha'd be a King, a petty thing, 

When a Miller lives sae happy? 



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liajr, Ami vow! but Wil_lie he was braw. And at his shoul _ der 



He was a man without a (lag*, 

His heart was frank -without a flaw; 

And ay, whatever Willy said, 

If was still hadden as a law. 

His hoots they were made of the jay, 
"When he went to the weapon— shaw; 

P|»"n the tfre'ii n.me durst him hrajf, 
The lient a ane amanir them a*. 

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I' HE L.4SS OF FC( LEFFi H.4JW 



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G.m yc mc,Ogatyc mf, O g-at yc me wi'. naething? Rock and reel, and 



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sninnin vhrd.a mickle quarter bason. l'i\ e at_tonr my Gut< lit r lias af^ucli hulls 



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O, hand yinir limt'ia now, ljiickic Kaing', 
O, hand \ncir tmtf>iic and jamicr; 

! held the gate till jnn I met, 
Sync 1 hegan t.» .vander.; 



1 tint my "whistle and my "-any, 
I tint my peace and- pleasure; 

Jiuf your green j^ral'l, now-, Luck ie Lalny, 
Wa<l airt me to mv treasure. 



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A IK IN DRV.M. 



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I*\<1 m man in mir town , And his n.imc was Aik — in Dnim : And 



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_ ijer, a so _ ger, a so _ g-cr, And he wad 




Aim! Iiis ctt.it -was n' the g-udc saut meat, 
Tlit gude saut meat, the gude saut meat; 
Ami a waistcoat <>' the hagyis— bag-, 

Ay wore Aikin Drum. 
<)' tin guile lang kail, and thcAtholc brose, 
■\i they made his trews and hosc$ 
And he luikct wcel,as ye may suppose. 

Ami his name Mas Aikin Drum. 

\ml his liaiinit was made n'liyo crust, 
<)' pye crust, o 1 pyc crust, 
\nd his banner was made o' pye crust, 

Built liaith thii k anil rnon ; 
And he played upon a razor, 
A razor, a razor, 
And he player] upon a razor, 
And whiles upon the kame. 



And lie locjil we'd the crappit heads, 
The crappit heads,' and sing-it. heads, 
And he lend w i el the crappit heads, 

And jifngit In ads-, and a\ 
And he Ifted wcel the ait cake, 
The ait lake, the ait cake; 
And hi loVd well the ait lake, 

And' scons and bannocks a'. 

But,waes me. lie- turned sutler, 

A silver, a sogerj 

l'ut,wacs me! |ie turned soger, 

And he was man I'd ;iu a . 
Bout him the t'arls were g-.ibhin, 
For him the laddies sabhin, 
And a' the lassies grcetin, 

For Aikin Drum's aw'a. 



•<S- •€— «T- ■€-•€- -C- ■€- <»• 



THE ATTAINTED SCOTlSH NOBLES, Samt 



Air. 



O some will turn their mourniu' strains, 

To tell o' hamc— made sorrow- 
And if they cheat you o 1 yuur tears, 

They'll dry afore the morrow. 
O some will sing their airy dreams, 

~Wi' veritj they're sporting-, 
My sang's o' nae sic thieve] ess themes, 

But wakin trui misfortune. 



Ve Scottish Nobles, ant and a', 

For loyalty attainted, 
A nameless Bardy's wac to see 

Your sorrows uulanit nted 5 
For, il your Fathers ne'er had fought 

For heirs of ancient royalty, 
Ye're down llie day that might hae lion 

At the to]j o' honours tree a'. 



For fair hereditary right, 

For conscience sake, they stoutly stood; 
And lor the Crown, their valiant sons, 

Themselves have shed their injured blood. 
And if their Fathers ne'er had fought, 

For heirs of ancient royalty, 
They're down tin day that might a' been 

At the top of honour's tree a\ 



104 



o'.verT Thou /„v The cauld blast. 




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Air, Lochiels awa to France. 



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O! wert . thou in the caul d blast, On >"on_der lea, on 



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be my bo _ s<>m, To share it a 1 , to share it a'. 




Or -were 1 in the wildest waste, 

Sae bleak and bare, sac bleak and bare; 
The desart were a paradise, 

II thou wert there, if thoti wert Ihere. 
Or were I monarch of the globe, 

Wi' thee to reign, wi' thee to reign; 
The brightest jewel o' my crown 

Wad be my Jean, wad be my Jean. 



QVEF.jr .MARIE. 



105 




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You mean _er hean_tics of tlie night, Which poor_ly sat _ is 



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fie our. eyes, More )>y your num_l>cr than your light , Like com — mon 



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peo_ple of the skies, What are ye 'when the moon doth rise 



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Ye violets that first appearc , 

By your purple mantles known, 

Like proud virgins of the ye arc- , 

As if the spring- were all your own, 
What are ye v)icn the rose is hlnwn.f 



You glane-ing Jewels of the east, 
Whose estimation fancies raise, 

Pearls, rubies, , sapphires, and the rest 
Of glittering gems, what is your praise 
When the hrig-ht diamond shews his rays. 



Ye wand'ring chaunters of the wood , 
That fill the ayre wi' natures layes, 

Making your feelings understood 

In accent weak What is your praise 

When Philomel her voyce shall raiser 



But, ah! poor light , |fem,voycc,and sound, 
What .re ye if my MaTy shine ? 

Moon, diamond, flowers, and Philomel , 
Light , lustre, scent, and music k tine , 
And yield to merit more divine. 



There rose and lily, the hale spring, 

Around her face for sweetness speed. 

The diamond darkens in the ring? 

When she appears, the moon looks dead. 
As when Sol lifts his radiant head. 



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FRAE THE FRIENDS AJVD LAJVD I LOVE. 



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Frac (lie friends and land I liwe.Drh'n l>v for—tunes fcl_l-y spite : 

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Nc _vcr mair maun hope to find F.'ase frae foil, re He I frac cart; 



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_l>rance wracks the mind, Fleas _iircs Inn un_veil dc _ spair. 



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Brightest climes shall mirk appear, 

Desart ilka blooming 1 shore; 
Till the Kates, nac mair severe, 

Friendship, Ijove, and Peat c, restore. 
Till revenge, -wi' laurcll'd head, 

Bring' our hanish'd hi me again; 
And ilk loyal, lionnie lad, 

Cross the sc-as,and win his ain. 

0„V I'HE RESTORATION OF THE FORFEITED ESTATES 1784. 




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As oVr theHighland hills T hied, The Camcrons in ar.ray 1 spied; Loch — 



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va_l.oirr, faith, and loy_al_ty, That sliinc in Scot—. fish -sto_ry. 



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No more the trumpet calls to arms, 
Ay.-aki.nfj battles fierce alarms; 
But every heroes bosom warms 

With song's of exultation. 
While brave Lochicl at length regains, 
Thro 1 toils of -war, his native plains, 
And won by glorious wounds, attains, 
His high paternal station. 



M'.' I. cod, M'J Donald, join the strain, 
M'. TMicrson, Fraser, and M'.- Lean, 
Thro all jour bounds let gladness reig'n, 

Botii prince and patriot praising »• 
Whose generous bounty richly pours 
The streams of plenty round vour shores. 
To Scotia's hills their pride restores,. 

Her faded honours raising. 



Let now the voice of joy prevail, 
And echo wide Irom hill to vale> 
Ye warlike Clans, arise, and hail 

Your laurell d Chief's returning. 
Oir ev'ry mount ain,cvry isle, 
Let peace in all her lustre smile, 
\nd discord ncer her day defile 

With sullen shades of mourning'. 



Let all the joyous hancjuet share, 
Nor eer Jet Gothic grandeur dare, 
With scowling brow, to overbear 

A vassals rights invading; 
Let freedoms conscious sons disdain 
To croud his fawning timid train, 
Nor even own his haughty reign, 

Their dignity degrading. 



Ye northern Chiefs, whose rage,tmbroke, 
Has still repcll'd the tyrant., shock, 
Mho ncer ha\e bowd beneaih her yoke 

With servile base prostration ; 
Let each now train his trusty band, 
'G-ainst foreign foes alone to stand, 
With undivided heart and band 

For freedom, king" and nation. 



108 



H1ELAJTD LADDIE. 






I.i-. !>•" 



"Will ye g-fi fe> In_ver_ness, Be,n_nie lad_die, Hie_land Iarl_diej? 



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ere yr'll see the Hie_land dress, Be>n_nie Iad_die, Hie_ land lael_die 



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Fhi_la_heg; ^nd hem —net blue, Bon_nie lad_die, Hie_lanel lad_die. 



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Fe,r (he I.k! rhaf wears the trew, Bem_nie- lad_die, Hie_]atid lad_<!it 



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Geordie sits in Charlie's (hair, 
Bonnie laddie, Hieland laddie" 

H.id I my will, he'd nn sit there, 
Bonnie laddie, Hieland laddie-. 



And thn' rieeu our sky may lower, 
Bonnie laddie, Hieland laddie, 

It's only like an April shower, 
Bojinic laddie, Hieland laddie. 



\i\r reflect on sorrows past, 

Bonnie laddie, Hieland laddie; 

Charlie will he King; at last, 

Bonnie laddie, Hieland laddie. 



Time and tide eome round to a^ 
Bonnie laddie, Hieland laddie; 

And upstart pride will g-et a fa', 
Bonnie ladelie, Hieland laddie. 



Keep Tip your heart, for Charlie fig'ht, 
Bonnie laddie, Hieland laddie; 

And,ee.me what may,yr've de>ne- what s- right, 
Bonnie lade lie, Hieland laddie. 

r.sr> OF VOLUME FIRST. 



§e#Ti§M nxitsT&SiL 

A SELECTION 
frojoi the 

W©€ Mo MELODIES ©I S€OTLASTO 

AMJSA®©EB F©IR THE 

**r J£ ^4^1 # Jr ® JOT Js 



■II- 



.A. SMITH. 



Ent' 1 at Slat: HalL 




Price 8 ■? 



i£©m©\cn:R©ia 



Published & So7d iy HOB 7 - PURDIE at his t Music & Musical Instrument 
Warehouse ^ W /O Jrinccs Street . 



INDEX TO VOLUME SECOND. 



A better mason than Lammikin, 
About zule quhen the wind blew cule, 
A cock laird, fu' cadgie, 
Ah ! Chloris, could I now but sit, 
All lovely on the sultry beach, — 
A lass that was laden wi' care,~-~ 



An house there stands on Leader-side,-. 

And ye sal walk in silk attire,-. 

A rosebud by my early walk, . 

Argyle is my name,- 

As I stood by yon roofless tow'r, . 



AUTHORS 

- Unknown, 
JDitto, 
■.Thomson, — 
■.Dun. Forbes, . 
^Wallace, ~ — ~. 

■.Thomson, 

~ Unknown, — 

JDitto, 

-Burns,~ 



AIRS. 

-Lammikin, 

- Young Waters,. 

~A Cock Laird, 

-.Gilderoy, 

-Strephon and Lydia, 

~Sae merry as we twa hae been, 

-Leader Haughs and Yarrow, — 

-The Siller Crown, 

-The Shepherd's Wife, 



'ohn, Duke of Argyle,~Baimocks o' Barley-meal, . 
Burns, Cumnock Psalms, 



PAGE 

9* 
30 
41 
18 
101 
52 
90 
25 
20 
34 
86 



Balow, my boy, lie still and sleep, — 
Behind yon hills where Lugar flows, . 
Beneath a green shade, 
Bonny lassie, will ye go,- 



But lately seen, in gladsome green, - 
By Pinkie House oft let me walk, „. 
By yon castle wa' at the close of the &a.y, -Burns, 



-Unknown,. 
-Burns,—— 
Blacklock, 
-Burns, — ». 
-Ditto, -. 
-Mitchell 



-Lady Ann BothwelTs Lament, — 
-My Nannie, 0, , — — 



-The Braes of Ballandine,-. 
-Birks of Aberfeldy,- 
-The Winter of Life,. 
-Pinkie House, . 



-There'll ne'er be peace, 



73 
69 
48 
70 
26 

49 
88 



Carl, an the king come, . 
Culloden muir, Culloden field,. 



.Unknown,* — ~ — -Carl, an the King come,. 

-Anderson, The Highland Watch,-. 



21 

28 



Dance to your daddie,— , — --.Unknown. 

Duke Hamilton was as fine a lord,-. Ditto, 



•Dance to your Daddie, 
-Duke Hamilton, 



14 
58 



Fareweel, fareweel, my gallant hearts,~—.Di«o, . 
Farewell, thou stream that winding flows,~2?«rra.5,-. 



-Charlie's Farewell, . 



Nancy's to the Greenwood gane, 



22 
85 



Gilderoy was a bonnie boy, ^——Unknown, 

Gin living worth could win my heart, —Ditto, 



Gilderoy, . 



—-.The Waefu' Heart, 



19 

44 



INDEX TO VOLUME SECOND. 



Hail to the chief,-* 

He's a terrible man, John Tod, 

He's lifeless among the rude billows 
Here's a health to those far away,. 
Here's a health to them that's awa, 
Her daddy forbad, her minnie forbad, 
Hersell be Highlandland shentleman, 
. Hey Donald, how Donald, 
Hey, the dusty miller, 
How blithe was I each morn to see, Crawford. 




-Gaelic air, . 

ohn Tod, — — — . -. 

The Muckin' o' Geordie's Byre,- - 

-Here's a health to them that's awa,. 

Ditto, ~~ _ 

Jumpin' John,™™. — . — ~ : 

Turnimspike,. » — 



Donald Couper,. 
The Dusty Miller, . 
Broom of Cowdenknowes.. 



PAGE 
14 

64 
93 
13 
13 
54 
38 
38 
54 
45 



h(L. 



I hae nae kith, I hae nae kin, ™™ — Unknown, — 

I hae laid a heiring in sa't, — -™ZK<fo, . 

I've heard the muircock's early craw, Ditto, . 

It fell on a day, a bonny summer day, ~~Ditto, 
It was in and about the Martinmas time,~Ditto, 
I will awa wi' my love,-. — —- ~ Ramsay,* 



-I hae nae kith, , S6 

-Lass, gin ye lo'e me, tell me now, 76 

-Katy Bairdie, , ... QO 

-Bonny house o' Airly, ™-, -,.,™- 2 

-Barbara Allan, ™— 80 

-O'er Bogie, — ™ g 



Keen blaws the wind, 



.Tannahill,~ 



-Bonnie Dundee,. 



Let us haste to Kelvin grove,—™ ™— —JbAre Sim,. 

Life, what art thou, , , — , ^Fergusson, 

Like yonder lovely turtle dove, Unknown, i. 

Lord Ronald came to his lady's bower, Robert Allan, 

Loud roar'd the tempest, J. B., 



~0 the Shearin's no for you,. 
Life, what art thou,-. 
Lovely Lass of Monorgan, 
Lord Ronald, 



-Laddie, bide near me,™- ™ . 



32 
33 
57 
62 
10 



Mark yonder pomp of costly fashion,. ,„Burns,~ 

Mount and go,™— , Unknown, 

My Patie is a lover gay,™™ -™-™.™i?awiio?/,^ 



-De'il tak the wars, . 
— Mount and go, — . 
—Corn Rigs, . 



78 
74 
24 



O check, my love, the falling tear, 
Of all the Scotish northern chiefs,. 
gae to the kye wi' me, Johnny,. 
Oh ! dinna ask me gin I lo'e ye, 



Oh ! hey, hey, the east nuik o' (Fife, 
Oh ! 'tis a heart-stirring sight to view, 

Oh ! I am come to the low countrie, 

O, lassie, wilt thou go to the Lomond, 

O, lassie, I maun lo'e thee, 

O saw ye bonnie Leslie,. 

! see that form that faintly gleams, 



John Sim,~ 

.Unknown,. 

Ditto, 

Dunlop,~ 

Unknown,. 

-Hogg, 

..Burns,. 

.W. Chalmers, 
^Unknown, — 
~Burns, 
~Miss Keith, 



The Northern Lass, , -_ 66 

Sir James the Ross, ™— ™™_ 30 

Gae to the kye wi' me, — — , — 46 

Comin' through the rye, . 5 

.The East Nuik of Fife,™™ 42 

The Covenanters' Tomb, ™.™™ 98 

■The Highland Widow's Lament,— — - 70 

-O ye sal be my my ain, Jo, — 29 

-O, Lassie, I maun lo'e thee,—— 82 

-The bonnie Collier Lassie,™— 17 

-Oscar's Ghost,— — — ™™-„™— — 7 



INDEX TO VOLUME SECOND. 



3 



AUTHORS. 

O silent and sad the minstrel sat,™.™ Robert Allan, ~. 

O speed, Lord Nithsdale, speed ye fast, ^Unknown, 

O stay, sweet warbling woodlark, stay,— Barns, 
0, Tibbie, I hae seen the day,~~~~ — —.Ditto,. 

O wake thee, O wake thee, Sangster,„ 

O waly, waly, up yon bank, — ™~ Unknown, 

where are you going, sweet Robin, Ditto, 



AIRS. 

She rose and loot me in, . 
Lord Nithsdale, — ™. — „. 

Loch-erroch-side, 

Invercauld's Strathspey, 

~™My bonnie Bird,, 

.Waly, waly, 
Hallow Fair.. 



PAGE 

92 

40 

66 

102 

42 

1 

84 



Peggy, now the king's come,- 



.Ramsay,. 



-Carl, an the King come, . 



21 



Sir John Cope trode the north right far, -Unknown, — — Johnny Cope, ~~ 

-A- Should auld acquaintance be forgot, ~ — .Burns,- ~ — - A.uld langsyne, . 

Stay, my charmer, can you leave me, Ditto, ~ — Gaelic air,~ 



96 

82 

74 



Tarry woo', O tarry woo',~ 

The bride came out of the byre, — 

The gloomy night is gath'ring fast, 

The lazy mist,. 

The pearl of the fountain, 

The tither morn, when I forlorn, 

There came a young man,- 

There was a battle in the north,. 

There's auld Rob Morris, 

Thickest night surrounds my dwelling,. 

Thou cauld gloomy Feberwar, ™™~ 

Thou hast left me ever, Jamie,™- 

Tho' simmer smiles on bank and brae, ™ 
'To thee, loved Dee, thy gladsome vales,. 
True-hearted was he,. 
'Twas in that season of the year,. 



-Ramsay,. 
.Unknown,, 

.Burns, 

-Blacklock, — 
.Monro, ™— 
,Dr Riddell,- 
^Unknown, - 
.Ditto, . 
.Burns,- 

.Ditto, 

.Tannahill,. 
.Burns, 



Tannahill,. 
Unknown, 
Burns,. 
Hewitt, 



-Tarry Woo', ™™™—™, 4 

Woo'd and married and a',~ , 56 /?- 

Gaelic air,™™™™-. »™„™™™. 65 

~The lazy mist, , ™. 8 

..The Maid of Glenconnel, „. 1 

-The tither morn,™-™-™™-™.. 37 

-The brisk young Lad, , 77 

-Auld Rob Morris, _™™™™™„ 60 

-Strathallan's Lament,™™—™. 46 

-Thou cauld gloomy Feberwar,™™™™ 67 

-Saw ye Joonnie comin' ? - 53 

-Gaelic air, , . 78 

Jockey the blithest, 12 

Bonnie Dundee, . — ~™~ — , „„ 6 

Roslin Castle, ™™™~ — -™™™~™„™. 72 



Up and warn a', Willie,- 



.* Unknown, ™™~ 



-Up and warn a', Willie, . 



86 



Wee Willie Gray, and his leather waller-Saras,. 
With broken words and downcast eyes, -Ramsay,-. 

Will ye gang to the Hielands, , — Unknown, 

Whare hae you been sae braw, XaA,-— Burns, - 
Whare live ye, my bonnie lass, — ™ — ^-Unknown,. 

What's a' the steer, kimmer, — -™- Ditto, . 

What saftening thoughts resistless, start,~Gall, . 
What will I do gin my hoggie die, — ^.Unknown,* 



-We Willie Gray, 98 

-Woe's my heart that we should sunder, 50 

-Leezie Lindsay, ™_ „-. ™-100 

-Braes o' Killiecrankie, 2 

-.My Collier Laddie,- „™ 34 

-What's a' the steer, kimmer,™ 16 

-Roslin Castle, 72 

-What will I do gin my hoggie die, 22 



4 INDEX TO VOLUME SECOND. 

AUTHORS. AIES. PAGE 

When France had her assistance lent, — -Unknown, ~, Auld Wife ayont the Fire,-—™- 81 

When I left thee, bonnie Scotland, -™ — Ditto, „The Wanderer's Return, ™._ 97 

When sets the sun o'er Lomond's height,~.RoZ>e?-/ Allan, ™ The Highland Lassie, „„™„™ 89 

When trees did bud and fields were green,~Unknown, Down the Burn, Davie, 6l 

When wild war's deadly blast was blawn,~Burns, ..Mill, Mill, 0,-~~~~™. — — ™™™~. 26 

Where floated crane and clam'rous gu\l,~Hogg, .— -~™.Iona,~™~~ ~™. 62 

White was the rose in his gay bonnet, ^^^t/nfaott'B,--.,,*,,^.., ..Carlisle Yetts,— ~~, „-. 50 



() HUL\\ K41Y. 




down yon hraej An.) wa_ly h> yon ri _vcr side, Where- I 




mv love -wont (n g-ac! O wa _ ly, wa _ \y\ love is Ixm _ iiie, A 





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lit J. tie while when it 



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O wherefore should I busk my head? 

whirrinrr should , T kamo my hair? 
For my fame love has me forsook, 

And says he'll never lue me inair . 
Now Arthur's seat shall he m\ bed , 

1 he grey mist will m> rovering- Ik; 
.Saint Anton's well shall be u.a drink, 

Since my fau.se loir's forsaken me. 



Tis not the frost that freezes fill, 

Nor blawing- snaws inc lemen< ii ; 
Tis not sir; cauld that makes me erj, 

But my love's heart grown 'auld to mi . 
<> Mart'mas wind, when wilt thou bjaw, 

And shake the preen leaves all the lit •'? 
<> y title death, when wilt thou Come' 



And t^k a lifr that 



w-earies uu 



II 




THE BRAES O' KILLIECRAJTKIE. 

Battleof Killiecrankie fong-ht 1689. 






"Wliarc Mac a e hoc n sac bra\\,l.id ?Wharc liac -\ c been sac hrankicO? Wliarc liac ye 



3 




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been s.ie c .tntic,0; Anyehad seen what I liac seen, I'tli' braes ■<>' Kii_!ie_eran_kio, O. 



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I fanplif at lanil , I (uiohl at sea, 
At hanic I (aiioht my Awnlic, O; 

But I mot the l)c\il and Dundee, 
On 1h' hracs (>' Killtccrankic, O. 
An' yc harl been, &e. 



The liaulil Pitinr (ill in a lifr, 
An'Clavrrs a~at a < l.inUie, O ; 

Or I li..<l fed an' Allude oled 

On th 1 bra os <>' Killieervinkie, O. 
An 1 \c had been, A-e. 



The BOJTJTY HOUSE O'AIRLIE. 

Jacobite. 




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at 'lis _ juitc- R( _ Ihccm Ar_t>yle and Air—lie, That there 

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Arw'-ylt he has taen a hundred <>' his men, 

A hundred men and liff\, 
And hes awa, nnv>n ptc.qii shaw, 

To plunder the bonny house o' Airlie. 

Tlie lady looked iwr the liie Castle wa'," 

Anil oh! h«t she sighed sairly,. 
When she saw Arg - } le, and a" his nun. 

Come to plunder the Imnin (muse o' Airlie. . 

Come down to me" said proud Arg'\le; 

"Come ilnwn to me, Lady Airlie, 
Or I swear by the sword I hand in my bandit 
I win n;i leave a stanin statu in- Airlie?' 

Ill no entn down, ye proud Arfifyle, 

Until that ye speak uiair fairly, 
Th" 1 ye swear by the sword that ye hand in your hand. 

That ye winna leaxe a stanin stane in Airlie . 

Had my ain Lord been at his hame, 

But lie's awa wi 1 Charlie, 
There's no a Campbell in a' Arfi'} le, 

Dare hae ti d ui rhe h-niiy green o' Airlie. 

'But since we can hand out riae mair. 

My hand 1 oiler lairlx; 
OhJ lead me- down 1 * > yonder glen, 

That T may n at see the hurnin o' Airlie? 

He's ta<n her by the trembliny band. 

But he's no tane her fairlx , 
For he led her up to a hie hill tap, 

^\here she saw the btirnin o' Airlie. 

Clouds o' smoke, and flames sae hie, 

Soon kit the w..\ but l lrt r(|\; 
And she laid her. down on that lull t.i die, 

Whan she saw the hiirnin o' Airlie . 



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MTicn 'tis card_ed, mwl, and spun, Then the work is> liaf_lens done; 



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Sing",my bonny harmless sheep, 

That feed upon the mountains steep, 

Bleatiiigr sweetly, as ye y'o , 

Thro 1 the -winters frost and snow, 

Hart, and hi nd, and fallow dr er, 

No by hall so Dsv/u' arc: 

TYac kingf s to him that hands the -plow, 

Are all obliged to tarry woo', 



Howh^ppy is the shepherds life, 
Far frae courts, and free of strife, 
While the ^immers bleat and bae, 
And the lambkins answer m.n ; 
No such music to his ear: 
Of thief or fox he has no fearj 
Si u rdy kent and colly true, 
W< II defend the tarry woo*. 



He lives content and envies none; 
Not even a monarch on his throne, 
Tlin'hc the royal sceptre sways, 
Has- not sweeter holidays. 
AVho^i be a kin^f, can ony tell, 
When a shepherd sing's sae Veil: 
Sing's sac well, and pays his dae, 
With honest heart and ta'rrv woo'. 



oh! dijwa ask. ME GI.V I LlfE YE. 



5 



Air Comin thro tjierye. 



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Olil'iin— na ask me gin I lo'e yc, Deed I <l.ir_ 11,1 tell} 




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Din— na ask me yin I lo'e ye. Ask il <" your_ act. 



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Hin _ 11. t look sac aft af mc, For oh, ye w eel may trow, That 




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when yc look sac sair .. at me, I dar _ na look a) you. 




An' "when ye're t»aun to the town, 
An' mony '<* braw lass see, 

O, Jamie, (liana look at them, 
For fear ye mini iia me: 

For wcel I ken there's mony a ant 
That weel migfit fancy thee; 

Then Jamie kccj> me in your hiiiul 
Wha Iocs hut only thee ♦ 



li 



I'RVF.-HF.AltTET) WAS HE, 'fHF. SAP SWAfJV C 'fHF YARROW, 

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Trtie_hcart_cd was he, The sad swain o» the Var_row, And (air an (lie 



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Scodand all 'i_\cr? T<>e_<(ualy"ung' Jessie you seek i( in vain ; Grace, head _ty, and 



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Oh! fresh is (he rose' in the g-ay dewy morning*, 

Anel sweet is (he lily at evening- close! 
But in -the fair presence o? lovely young' Jessie, 

Unseen is the- lily, unheeded the rose. 
Love sits in her smile a wizzard ensnaring-, 

Enthron'd in her e'e-n he delivers his law, 
And still to her charms she alime is a strang-er! 

Her modest demeanour's (he jewel of a'. 



7 



-The braes o' gle.^iffer. 

Keen blaws die wind o'er the hracs o» Gleniffcr, 

Tlie auld castle's turrets arc cover d wi' snm; 
How chang'd frae the time when 1 met wi* my lover 

Ainanff the broom bushes by Staiilcy_gTceii shaw . 
The wild flow'rs o' simmer -were spread a' sae bonny, 

The Mavis sang- sweet frae the green birken tree; 
But far to the camp they hae march'd my dear Johnny, 

An' now it is -winter wi' nature an' me . 



Then ilk thing around us was hlythsome an' cheery; 

Then ilk thing around us was bonny an' braw; 
Now naething- is heard but the -wind -whistling- dreary, 

An' naething is seen but the wide—spreading- snaw . 
The trees are a' hare, an' (lie birds mute an' dowic, 

They shake the eauld drill frae their wing's as they fltcj 
An' cliirp out their plaints, seeming- wae for my Johnn3 ; 

'Tis winter wi' them, an' 'tis winter wi' me. 



S.mif Air. 



•-#• 



Yon cauld sleety cloud skiffs alang the bleak mountain, 

An' shakes the dark firs on the stey rocky brae, 
Wliilc down the deep glen bawls the .snaw— flooded fountain, 

That murmur'd sac sweet to my .laddie an' mc: 
'Tis no its loud roar on the wintry win' swelling; 

It's no the cauld blast brings the tears i' my e'e,- 
For, O ! gin I saw but my bonny Scotch callan, 

The dark days o' winter were simmer to me. 



>-!^"^'-=*-& "&•-&- 



Slow 



OSCAR'S GHOST'. 



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O, sec that form that faint— ly gleams! 'Tis Oscar come to (hear 



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dreams'' On wing's of wind he- flies a— way; O stay.my love— ly Os_ear, stay ! 



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Wake Ossian, last of Kingal's line, 

And mix thy tears and sighs with mine ; 

Awake the harp to doleful lays, 

And soothe my soul w-ith Oscar's praise. 

The shell is ceas'd in Oscar's hall, 
Since gloomy K.crbar wrought his fall ; 
Tlie roe on Morven lightly bounds, 
Nor hears the cry of Oscar's hounds. 



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The lazy .mist'. 




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The forests arc leafless, the meadows are hriwn , 
And a'l the gav foj>)>rry of summer is Down; 
Apart Jo* me wander, apart let me mtisc, 
N.u fiMiek Time is flying - , how keen Kale pursues. 

How long' I havi? !ivd \yut how much liv<l in vain, 

How little of life's scanty s]ian may remain j 

What aspects old Time in his progress has worn! 
What ties ernel Fate in my bosom has lorn ! 

How foolish," or worse, 'till our summit is gaind 

And downward how weekend, how- darkend, how paind. 

Tift is not w^>rtli having' with all it ran give, 

FVi*- something beyond it poor man sure must live, 



VLI o"er bogie, 



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T will, a _wa wi my love, I will a.wi wi' her} Tim' 



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'ct Bo_g-ic, uVr Bo _ ffic, Ocr Bu _ t>ie wi' her, Tho' 




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If T can gx-t hut lier consent, 
I flinna rare a strac 

Tho' ilka ane be discontent, 
Aw a' wi' her I'll jrae . 
Til o'er Bogie, &r . 



Sicccn a warks they hae wi' sil I < r, 
And wi' a yrand deseent, 

But Bet count-, cousin to the I„aird 
So they may be content* 
And 1 11 o'er Bogie, Afec, 



For now she's mistress o' my heart, 
And wordy o' my hand, 

And weel I Wat we shanna part 
For siller e.r for land. 
I'll o'er Bogie, &c . 



My Cncle he detes threaten me-. 
My Aunty luiks fn' sour, 

Tho' naething can they sa> a\ a* 
But that the lassie's jmir. 
And I'll oVr Boyi, A-- . 



10 



Lorn RG.4tfn The Tf.mpf.s'T. 



Air_Laddie, bide nccr nie. 




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T-otid roard the tcm_pcst,thc night was dc_sccnd_ing-, A_lnnc to tfir 



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beach was the fair mai_den wcn_ding; She eyed the dark w«c thro' its light-loaming - 



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_verj And chill grew her heart. 



she thought <:n lit r Lu_veT, 



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r.,ong" Ims she wnndcril , Jicr maiden heart fearing;^ 
Wild rolls nor eye, but no bark is appearing^ 
Vo kind star of light thro' the dark sky is beaming', 
And far is the cliff where the beaeon is gleaming . 

In vain for th\ l<>\< flic beacon— flame's burning", 
Anil vain is thy gaze to desfrry liim returning-^ 
Vo longer Ik stri\cs 'gainst the billows 1 rnde motion. 
For heavy they roll o'er his bed of the ocean. 

Ah! where is my child gone, long, long' does she tarn ' 
Fond mother, forbear, thoii'rt not beard by thy Mary, 
For sound is her sleep on the dark weedy pillow, 
Her bed the cold sand, and her sheet the rude billow . 




Tl IF. MAID OF GLFJVCOjrjVFL. 

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The pearl of the foUi»— fain, the rose of the val _ ley. Arc 



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11 




sparkling" and love_ly, are stainless and mild ; The pearl sheds its ray'neath the 




rflark wa_tcr g-ai_Iy, The rose opes its blos_som to bloom <>ii the wild. The 



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pearl and the rose are the em_l>lems of Ma_ry, The Maid i»f Glen_ 




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con _ Del, once love_ly and g"ay; A false lo _ vcr w oo'd her — Ye 



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sols be wa_ry — Nuw scalhd is the- blos__som, now ■ limmd is the 

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Yon have seen her, wluii morn brightly dawnd on the mountain, 

Trij> blythely alorjfr, singing" sweet t<> the galej 
At noon, with her lambs, by the side of yon fountain; 

Or wonrfing-, nt eve, to her home in the vale. 
With the flowers of the willow := t ree blent is her tresses, 

hfow, woe _worn and pale, in the glm she is seen 
Bewailing* the can.se of her rueful distresses, 

How fondly ho V»w'd .and how false he has been . 



12 



To Thee, Lor'o dee. 




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To thee, lo\-'d Dcr, thy g-ladsomc vales, "Where late with care_less 



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st <4>s I rany*<i$ Tlio' prosit with rare, and sunk in woe>, To thee I 



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T love thee, Dee, thy hanks &" gJacles, Tin 

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mcnt , _ ry there niy !><»- som tear; For there he rov\l 



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broke my heart, Yet to that heart, OhJ still how dear. 



Ye shades that eoho'd to his vows, 

And saw me once supremely blest 
Oh yield me now a peaceful g-rave, 

And give a forlorn maiden rest! 
And shonld the fal>e one hither stray, 

No veng-efr/1 spirit bid him fear; 
But tell him, tho' he broke my heart, 

Yet to that heart he still was dear. 



HERE'S A HEALTH TO THOSE EAR AWAY. 



13 




Here's a health to those far a-way, "Who are gune to war's fa-tal jdain; Here', a 



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health to those who were here t'other day, Tint who ne'er ma\ he with us a-gain, oh! never] 



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Iced is ilu somm that flows, "When perhaps we are saying" farewell, for ev-er. 



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Hi res a health to those far awa\ , 

"Who are g'one to war's fatal plain; 
Here's a health To those who were here t'other Hay, 

Hut win* ne'er may he with us ayain, oh never, 
Xli«>' those whom we tejiffcrTy love 

Our tears M this moment mav claim I 
A halm to our sorrow this truth sure must prove, 

They'll live in the records oJ fame, for evti . 



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HEEE'S Ji HEAL'fH ID THE.U IH.rfs .4h\4. Same Air. 



Hon . a health to them that's a.\. 

Here's a health to them that's a«a; 



Heres a health to them thats awa; 

Herts a healtli to them That's awa; 



And vha winna wish glide link to the < ..use. Here's a health to Charlie the chief o' the clans, 

May never glide luck he their fa! Hinny. 
Its glide to he NlCtr\ and wise; 

Its glide to he honest and true; 
Its glide to he aff wi' the auld love, 

Before we be on wi' the new, Hinny. 



Aliho' that his hand he but sma, Hinny. 
Hcrc\ freedom to him that would read; 

Here's freedom to him that would write; 
There's nane ever fear'd that the tru tit should be heard 

But the} whom the truth would indite, Hinny. 

15 



14 




THE BAIRJTIFS SAJTG- 

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Danee toymrr daddy m\ honnie la_dy,DaTice toyom-daddj myweebitlamb 



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Ye sal gel ,i slii) _py, and a lit tl( fishy, and a lit_tle dishy, foryoxrr snpjile- tam 





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D.m'o to -\*'Tir «l.trl__dy my bonnie la-jfy, Dance toytjTrr dadd^ m^ <lautit lamb. 



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//^4/Z. 7*0 TZ/tf CHIEF. 




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Hail'tn tlie Chief -who in triumph ad_van_ces, H'lifmr'd and hlessM be ilir 



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cv_er glrcen vine! Long may the tree in bis ban_ncr that jjlan-Ces, FIotit— ish,thc 




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Chorus. \ I" 1 h fi 

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of our -line! TT< av'n send it hal>*_py dew, Earth lend it 



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sap a.new, Gai_Iy to hour- geon, and broadly to gTOW, While eviry highland gic n 



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nds our shout back a_gen, Roderigh Vich Al_pine dhu, J 

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Ours is no sapling', chance- sown by tbe fountain, 

Blooming at Beltane, in "Winter to lade; 
Wben the whirlwind has stripp d evry leaf on the monntain, 
The more shall Clan-Alpine exult in her shade. 

Moorjd in the rifted rook, 

Proof to the tempests shock; 
Firmer he roots him the ruder it blow; 

Menteith and Breadalbane, then, 

Y.t ho his jiraise agcn, 
"Roderigh Vich Alpine dhu, ho! icroe! 



Proudly our pibroch has thrilld in Glen Kruin, 
And Banoehars groans to our slogan replied; 
Glen Loss and Ross-dhxr, they are smoking in ruin, 

And the best of Loc h-Lomond lie dead on her side. 
Widow and Saxon maid 
Long shall lament our raid, 
Think of Clan-Alpine with (car and with woe; 
Lennox and Le\en glen 
Shake, when they hear agen, 



'Roderigh Vich Alpine dhu, ho; ieroe 



J" 



Row, Vassals, row, for the pride of the Hielands; 

Stretch to your oars for the ever green pine. 
O. that the rose-bud that graces yon islands, 

Wire wreathed in a garland around him to twine; 
O that some seedling gem, 
Worthy such noble stem, 
Honoured and blessed, in their shadow might grow. 
Loud should Clan Alpine then 
Ring from her inmost glen, 
"Roderigh Vich Alpine dhu, ho! ieroe!''' 



16 



V'/J.r/\S A'TtlE S'/'EEU, KI.W.MF.F? 



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What's a 1 the steer, K.immer?"What's a' the steer? Charlie he is landed, An; 



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haitli, heU soon he here. The win' was at his hark , Carle, Thewin'was at his 



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hear't, Kim-mcr, 1 '■' right g'lad fo liearV ; I hae a glide hraid Clajumorr . And 



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for his sake I'll wear't. J>in' Char—lie he is Iand_ed, "We haV nae mair to 

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g-anc, like Al_ex „an_der, To spread her con .-quests r.ir_fher. To 



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sec her is to love her, And lo-ye hut her for cv _ cr; 

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Tlioii arl a Qaccn, fair Lesley, 

Thy Subjects we before thee} 
Tli tjii art divine, fair Leslcj, 

The- hearts of men adore thee. 
The diel he ( olt'dna skaith thee, 

Or au^rhf that wad belancr thee} 
He'd look into thy bonnic face, 

And say,* 1 canna wrang* thee. 

The Towers aboon will tent thee, 

Misfortune sha'na steer (lice; 
Tliou'rt like thcmsels sac lovely, 

That ill they'll ne'er let near thee, 
Return ag-ain, fair Lesley, 

Return to Caledonie ! 
That we may brag" we hae a Lass , 

There s n.ine ayain sac honnie. 



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Ah! Chloris, could I now Uut sit As on.cnn.ccrn'il, 



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<fi<l a'i _ mire, And prais'd the 'com _ ing dav, I lit — (1 



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thought that ri _ sing fire Won d take my rest a _ way 



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Your (harms, in harmless childhood lay, 

As metals in the mine ; 
A$re from no face takes more away. 

Than youth coni eal'd- in thine; 
But as your charms, insensibly , 

Tu their perfection press d^ 
*» > love as unperceivd did fly, 

And cenrcrd in my breast. 



My passion with your beauty grew 1 

Wliiie Cupid at my heart, 
Still ajf liis mother favoured ymr, 

Threw a new. flaming* dart. 
Kach gloried in their wanton part , 

To make a lover, he 
Employd the utmost of his ai 1 ; 

To make a beatrfy, she • 



Gl LDF R(n\ 



-1 



19 



Same Air. 



Gihlcroy was a bonny boy, 

Had roses (ill his shoon; 
His stocking* were of silken soy, 

Wi' garters banging down: 
It was, I wccne, a comlie sight, 

To sec sac trim a boy 
He was my joy and heart's delight, 

My winsome Gilderoy. 

Oh! sic twa charming een be bad, 

Breath sweet as ony rose; 
He never «orc a Highland plaid, 

But costly silken clothes: 
He gain'd the luve of auld and young, 

Nane e'er to him was coy; 
AJ»! wac is me. I mourn the day, 

For my dear Gilderoy. 

My Gilderoy and 1 were born 

Baitb in ae toun thegither; 
We scant were seven years beforn 

We gan to luve ilk itlier; 
Our daddies and our mammies they 

Were (ill! I wi' meikle joy, 
To think upon the bridal-day 

Of me and Gilderoy. 

For Gilderoy, that hive of mine, 

Wi' joy, 1 freely bought 
A wedding"- sark of bolland fine, 

Wi' dainty ruffles wrought: 
And be gied me a wedding-ring, 

Which 1 rcceiv'd wi' joy? 
N"ae lad nor lassie e'er could sing 

Like me and Gilderoy. 

Oh. that he still bad been content 

Wi' nic to lead bis life; 
But, ah! his manfu' heart was benl 

To stir in feats of strife. 
And he, in mony a ventVous deed, 

His courage bauld wad try, 
Ami this now g'ars my heart to bleed 

For my dear Gilderoy. 



My Gi''' er ">'» baitb far and near, 

Was fcar'd in ev'ry town, 
And bauldly bare awal the gear 

Of mony a law land loun: 
For man to man durst meet him nane. 

He was so brave a boy; 
At length wi' numbers he was tane, 

My winsome Gilderoy. 

The Queen of Scots possessed nought 

That my love lef ine want; 
For cow and ewe he brought to me,' 

And een -when they were scant. 
All these did honestly possess, 

He never did annoy, 
Who never fatld to pay rbeir cess"** 

To mv love Gilderoy. 

"Wae worth Hie loans that made the laws 

To bang a man for gear, 
To 'reave of life for sic a cause 

As stealing linrse. or mare; 
Had not their laws been made sae strii k 

I ne'er bad lost my joy; 
"Wi' sorrow ne'er bad wat my cluck 

For mv dear Gilderoy. 

Gif Gilderoy had done amiss, 

He might bae banish't been; 
Ab! what sair cruelty is this," 

To bang sic handsome men. 
To bang the flower o' Scottish land, 

Sae sweet and fair a' boy; 
Nae lady had sae fair a band 

As thee, my Gilderoy. 

Of Gilderoy sae feard were they, 

Wi' irons bis limbs they strung, 
To F.dinborow led him there 

And on a Gallows hung. 
They hung him high aboon the rest, 

He was sae bauld a boy I 
There died the youth whom I loed best. 

My handsome Gilderoy. 



And when of me bis leave he tttik. 

The tears they wat my ee, 
I gied Iii in sic a parting luik, 



Sune as he yielded up bis breath, 

1 bare his corse away; 
Wi' tears, that trickled for bis death, 
My benison gang wi' thee! I wash'd his comlie clay; 

Now speed thee weil, mine ain dear heart, And si<ker,in a grave right deep, 

For ganc is all my joy; I laid the dear-lued boy 

My heart is rent, sith we maun part, And now for ever I maun weep 

My handsome Gilderoy! My winsome Gilderoy. 

*'fhis cess is well known by the name of Rlai k Mail, and was paid by the Inhabitant- 

to the Freebooters, as a compensation for sparing' their cattle, it. 

T A noted freebooter hanged by ordel: of James the «5" f . |{ 



20 



A BO is '■: HID R > • M > F.ARLV M\IL ft. 

Air-Shepherd Wife. 





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lunL, S.ic g-eiUly bent its thor_ny stnlki All on a rtfw_y mor_ning-. E 

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twi< e the shades o' dawn are fled, In a' its crim_soii glo_ry spread; And, 



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Wifhin the bush, her covert nest 

A little linnet fondly prest? 

Tlio dew sat ehilly on her breast, 

S*e early in the morning-. 
She soon shall see her tender brood 
The pride, the pleasure n' the wood, 
Amang rhe fresh green leaves hedewd, 

Awake the early morning- . 



So thou, dear bird , young- Jeany fair. 
On trembling- string" or voeal air, 
Shalt srweofly pay the tender rare, 

That tents thy early morning-. 
So thou sweet rose— bud, young- and g-ay. 
Shalt beauteous blaze upon the 'lay, 
And bless the Parent's evening- ray 

That watehd t lr v early morning-. 



o 



P£GGi; Jfiojr The king's co.me. 



21 



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Pi g_gj , now the king's come, Fcjj—gy^ now the king's conic* 




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Thou may dance, and I shall sing, Pcg_gy, since the king's come, Nae 



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m^ir the hawkics shalt thou milk, But change thy f >1 -^ i -rf en coat for 

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silk., And be a la_nV of tlint Ilk, Now, Pe£-r_j**y, since the kind's < umc • 

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..«« <-><-. .§-. -ji. -g-c— <'<-■<-:-■ 



CARL, AY THE KIJVG CO.ME. 



Same Air. 



Chorus . 
Carl, an the king come, 
Carl, an the king come, 
Thou shalt dance.and I will sing, 
Carl, an the king come . 



I trow,wc swapped f"r the warse:, 
Wi gac the hoot and better horse, 
And that we'll fell 'them at the .cross , 
Carl, an the- king come. 
Carl, an, etc. 



An somebodie were come again, 
Then somehodie maun cross the main; 
And every man shall hae his ain , 
Carl, an tricking- < ome . 
Carl, an, &< . 



Oog-gie, an the king come, 
foggic, an the king come, 
I s'- be fou,and thou'se he ((i"m , 
Cog£rie,an the king come . 
Cogg-ie, an, &.r- . 



2 L 2 



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CHAR LIF.\S FARF.WELL. 



Jat ul.itc 



Fare _T\-eel , fare _ wcel, my gal _ lant lit arts 



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woel tn Sc:nr_la)nrl, aye sac dfar; I w-oep for flic ills that 



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>n thee s la*'ii. Ami a' tlu Wang's that (hou maun bear, 



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O Scotland. fhourt but a rcckJcss name! O jrin my grave were Pnllodcn fi< 1<I , 
A r'rtrt <.•.>, fate tffcii Kl h lij xej "Wham dnrpt~thc--Ho'wcrs o' rhi\alrie-! 

The bonniest spot in ~a' Tliristcndom "O Scotland! Scotland! that I should live, 
Is the hannt of gnilt and troachcriej To monrn the wrangs o' thine an' thee! 

O fare thee weel, fhoxi honnic Scotland, 

Thy .stay and prop I wishd to be 5 
Rtit thee an' thine T will ne'er f org-c t , 

Tho' 1 am banish'd far frae thee . 

WHAT WILL I DO GIX MY HOGG IE DIE? 

fs h i 1 j j j a\ 1 j \ T<\\ \ ^m 

^ §i I 4 S 1 B j "'" I 'll 

What will I do gin my Hog;_gic die? My joy, my pride, «iv 




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h.iu-lcl ery'd frae the Cas_tle to', The blit_ter frae the bog- pie; The 



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tori re _ Jdy'd uj> - "n the liill. • trem _ bled f.»r my Hog_gie. When 



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day did daw', and cotks did ' r.n\ , The mnm.W it was fog—git'; An 



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nn_c<> tjkr l.,|> <>\r the dyke, And matst ha*, kill'd my Hu t r_ 1 ,i 



24 



ro/?vV EJGGS. 







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My Pa— tic is a lo_ _ver g"ay, His mind is lie _ ver 



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mud _ ciy, His breath is sweet — er than new ha> , His 



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lace is fair and run" — —fly- His shaj>e is hand _ some 



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mid — die size, He's state_Iy in his wj'. king'. The shining <>l liis 



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n sur _ |>rize; 'Tis heav'n to hear him taw _ kiilcr 



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Last night 1 met him on the Imm k 

Where yell im turn was grow ing • 
There mony a kindly wnnl he sj>akc, 

That set my heart a growing". 
He aftcn vow il he wad be mine, 

And looM me befct of ony ; 
That ens nit like to sing si-nsyne, 

**0 corn- rig-fifs are bonny. 



T'HF. SILLER CROhW. 



25 




And ye sail walk in silk at _ tire, And sil_lcr hae f> 



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niHir, O wha wdd buy a silk_en g-owir, Wi' a poor bro _ ken 



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heart: Or, "what's ' to me a sil— ler crown, G-in frae my lovt? I part ? 

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The mind whase every "wish is pure, 

Kar dc-arer is to me{ 
And c r cr Im fore'f to break my faith, 

I'll lay me down and die: 
For T hae pledfre-d my virgin troth 

Brave Donald's fate to share. 
And he has Jfi'en to me his heart 

"Wi' a' its virtues rare. 



His g-entle manners wan my heart, 

He , g-ratefti', took the tfift; 
Cou'd I hot think to seek it bark. 

It wou'd be wairr than theft . 
For langx-st life can ne'er re|>ay 

The love he bears to me, 
And e'er I'm fore'd to break my iroth, 

III lay me down and die. 



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j he in.xfEr: of life. 




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Bot lafe_Iy seen, in gladsome green, The -woods rejoic'd the 




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day} Thro' gcn_tle show-Vs the laughing flowVs In donlile pride, »tr 



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gay. But now our joys are fled, On'win_ter h"lasts,'a _ wa'i Yet 



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maid_cn May, in rirh ar_ray, A — gain shall bring them a*. 



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Rut my white powe , nae kindly thowe 

Sliall melt the snaw-s of age; 
M\- 'runk of eild , hut boss or bield , 

Sinks in Time's wintry rage. 
Oh I 3£C^ has weary days., 

And nights o' sleepless pain; 
Th'oa golden time o' yonfhfo' prime, 

Why rom'st tbon not again? 



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I' HE SOLDIER'S EE71 AW. 

Air_Mill Mill O. 



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Mlien wild wars dead ly bla'st was blawn. And g-entle pc-arc re_tirrn_ 



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27 



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j n lt Wi'mo_nv a sweet hihe fatherless , And mo_nv a wi-<l"W mottrning . I 

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left the lines and ten_ted fielrl , Where lang I'd licen a lod_ger, My 




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hum_blc kmp — sack a' my wealth, A poor and hon_est sod_ger 



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A leal, light heart was in my breast - 

My hand unstain'd wi' plunder; 
And for fair Scotia, hame again, 

I cheery on did wander, 
I thought upon the banks of Coil, 

I thought upon my Nancy J 
I thought npon the witching smile 

That caught my youthful fancy. 

At length I reaeh'd the bonny gl^n, 

Where early life I sported ; 
I pass'd the mill, and trysfing thorn, 

Where Nancy aft I courted: 
Wha spied I but my ain dear maid , 

Down by her mother's dwelling; 
And rurn'd me round to hide the flood 

That in my een was swelling. 

Wi' alter'd voice, quoth I , 'sweet lass, 

Sweet as yon hawthorn's blossom, 
O: happy, happy may he be, 

That's dearest to thy bosom. 
My purse is light, Ive far to gang, 

And fain wad be a lodger; 
Ive servd my Icing' and country lang.; 

Take pity on a sodger'. 



Sae wistfully she gaz'd on me, 

And lovelier was than ever; 
Quo' shc^'a sodger ance I lo'ed, 

Forget him shall I never: 
Our humble cot and hamely fjre, 

Ye freely shall partake o't- 
That gallant badge, the dear cockade, 

Ye're welcome for the sake o't'.' 

She gaz'd, she reddend like' a rose, 

Syne pale as ony lily, ■ 
She sank within my arms, and cried, 

"Art thou my ain dear Willy*"' 
By him who made yon sun and sky, 

Bv whom true love's regarded, 
I am the man , and thus may still , 

True lovers be rewarded ! 

The wars are o'er and Im come hame, 

And find thee still true— hearted : 
Tho' poor in gear,.we're rich in love, 

And mair we.'se ne'er be parted'. 
Quo' slitt'my Grandsire left me goud, 

A mailin plenish'd fairly J 
And come, my faithful sodger lad, 

ThouVt welcome to it dearly!' 



For gold the merchant ploughs the main, 

The farmer ploughs the manor!, 
But glory is the sodger's prize, 

The sodger's wealth is honour. 
The brave poor' sodger ne'er despise, 

Nor count him as a stranger, 
Remember he's his country's stay. 

In day and hour of danyer . 



<2S 



CCLLODEJV MJJJE. 



Air -The Itighlaiid Watch. 





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mcnijfr'li On thee the Htjn no— bly fell. And with fibo dead was nTrmberd;On 



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thee (lie d<"ar_est blood was shed, By num— bers doul>_ led fair — ly; On 





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flicf- f Ti*^ Clans of Scot-land bled For their dear Hoy_al Char_lie. 



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Thy broad brown sward tliat day was dy'd , 

Tlie howes were clotted o'er J 
Krom gaping wounds incessant flow'd 

The red, red— reeking pore: 
Thou drank'st the precious blood of those 

"Who fought that day fu'sairly, 
A glorious day for Scotland's foes , 

Eventful for Prince Charlie 1 

Ohl Charlie, noble, gallant youth, 

Thy memory Scots revere; 
They lovd thee with the warmest truih, 

Their heartswere all sincere: 
But traitor knaves, with brib'ry base, 

Made death's darts fly fu' rarely, 
And Scotland langwill mind the place 

She lost her Hoyal Charlie. 



fHE LQMO.VD. 



29 




'O, Las _ sie, -wilt thou go To the Lo _ mond wi' me? The 



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vsild thyme's in bloom, . And the flnw'i 



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flic lea; Will thou 



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fct'o, my dear - est lover I will ev _ cr con _ st^iit |>rov< , 111 




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ranye each hill anrl jrrove On the Lo _ mond wi' tliee 



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() young" men are fickle, 

Nor trusted to be, 
An<l many a native g^m 
Siiines fair on the lee: 

7 hou mav see some lovely flower 
Of a more attractive power, 
And may take her to thy bower, 
On the Lomonrl wi' thee. 1 ' 



The hynd shall forsake, 

On the mountain, the doc; 
The stream of the fountain 
Shall cease for to flow; 
Benlomond shall bend 
His liit>h brow to the sea, 
F.re 1 take to niy bower, 

Any flower, love, but thec. 



She's taken her mantle, 
lie's taken his plaid; 
He colt her a ring. 

And lie made her his bride: 
They're far o'er yon bills 
To spend their happv (lays, 
And range the woody glens 
'Viang thr I.i'jiii.nd Rraes . 



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SIR 3 AMES The /toss. 




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Of all fiie Scottish northern chiefs, Ol high and mighty name, The 



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bra _vest was Sir James, the Ross, A Knight of mei_kle fame. His 



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growth was like a youthful Oak That crowns the motrn —tains brow, Awl 



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-ing, o'er his shoul -ders bro,id , His lorks o' ye] -low flew 



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The < 'Int'ltaiii ill the lir^vc (Inn Ro-.s, 

A linn undau ntcd band; 
Five hundred Warriors drew the sword 

Beneath his high command. 
In Moody fight thrice had he stood 

Against the Knglish keen, 
Kre two— and— twenty op'ning springs 

This blooming youth had seen . 

********* 

,V()r.V(7 WATERS. Old Ballad. 




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The Qtiein liriki dwrc Hit- cats— tic wa% Bc_held baith dale and down, And 



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His fuolmen they did rin "before^ 
His horsemen radt behind, 

And mantel *o' the burning ffowd 
Did keep him frae the wind. 

Growdon graith'd his horse before. 

And siller shod behind; 
The horse zoung Waters rade upon, 

"Was fleeter than the wind. 

But then spack a wylie Lord, 
Until the Queen said he, 
"O tell qulias the fairest face 



Rides in tl 



le companie 



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For a' that she conld do or sa\, 

Appcas'd he wadna be" 
Bot, lor the words which she had said, 

Zoung- "Waters he- m^iiTi diet 

The-j hae tarn Zoung- Waters, and 

Pat fetters on his feit; 
They hae taen Zoung Waters, and 

Thrown him in dungeon deep. 

' Aft I hae ridden thru Stirling- toune 
In the wind hot nnd the wc-jt, 
Bot I neir rade thru Stirling- toune 
Wi' fetters 41 my feit . 



'Ive seen Lord, and I've seen Laird, "Alt I hae ridden thrn Stirling toune 

And knichts o' high degree, In the wind hot and the rain. 

But a fairer face than zoung Waters' Bot I neir rade thru Stirling- fount 

Mine eyne did never see. Neir to return againV 



Out then spack the- jealous king, 

(An<l an angry man was he,) 
O if he had been twice as fair, 
Zou might hae excepted, mel" 



They hae tarn to the heiding- hill 
His zoung son in his cradle, 

And they hae taen to the hcidiiu? hill 
His horse bot and his s-*ddl< . 



'Zoiire neither Laird nor Lord! she says, They hae taen to the heiding- hill 
'But the King- that wears the crown; His Lady fair to see! 

Ther is not a knicht in fair Scotland And lor the words the Queen had sp. k. 
But to thee maun bow down.' Zoung Waters he did di, ! 

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KELTIC GROrE. 



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Air_ Kelvin Water 



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T-rt ns haste to Krl_yin grove, bonnic . las.sie O, Through its 




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II iis pride, Paints the ho} _ low rfin _ glf 



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lo, Where the mid _ night fai _ ries glide, hon_nic ')las_sic, O 



We will wander by the Mil), bonnic -lassie, O, 
To'fhe cove beside the rill,bonnie lassie, O?' 

Where the glens rebound the rail 

Or (he lofty water-fall, 
Through the mountain's rocky hall, bonnie laisic,0. 

Then we'll tip to yonder glade, bonnie lassie, O, 
Wlicre so oft beneath its shade, bonnie lassie, O, 

With the songsters in the grove 

"We have told our tale of love, 
Ami have sportive garlands wove, bonnie lassie, O . 

Ah! I soon must bid adieu, bonnie lassie, O, 
To this fairy scene and you, bonnie lassie, O, 

To the streamlet winding clear, 

To the fragrant scented brier, 
Even to thee, of all most dear, bonnie lassie, O. 

For the frowns of" fort line lowV, bonnie lassie, O, 
On fhv lover at this hour, bonnic lassie, O, 
Fro the" golden orb of d:«y 
Wake the -warblers from the s-pray, 
From this land T must away, bonnic lassie, O. 

And when on a distant shore, bonnie lassie, O , 
Should I fall mid'st battle 1 * roar, bonnie lassie, O, 

Wilt thou, Ellen, when you hear 

Of thy lover on his bier, 
To his mem'ry drop a tear, bonnie lassie, O. 



LIFE! n'H.4'1' \ART fHOl? 



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Music I'V Smiili 



With 
Mcl.im holy, 

Expression 




Lift! what art thou.' 1 a va_ric_jra_ted scene, Or minjjlcif lit; 11 ' <•»" 





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whore sweet and hitter jointly flow. Fair have I 



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ec/i fli\ morn in smiles ar — ray di With crim __ son blush l»e_ 



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paint the eastern sky, Rut now- tlie <l.mn creeps muurii _ lui ocr flic 




4 




MY COLLIER LADDIE. 

LA 



^-^iW^H- i i UMMtim 



Wharc live yc, my bon_nie lass: And fell mo wlia* they oa' yc: 



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jj — p-r- * ' t •' ■ — r — ** — r - *rf* . 

M\ name' she says, is Miss_fress Jean, And I Iol_low- the Ooll_ier laddie. 



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.See yon not yon hills and dales, 

The sTin shines on sac brawlic! 

They a' arc mine, and they shall be thine, 
G-in ye'll leave yfurr Collier laddie. 
Th' y a' are, &e . 



Ye shall gang in g;t\ atlirc, 
Wee] buskif up sac- jj-andy , 

And anc to waif on everj hand, 

O-in ye'll leave your Collier laddie. 
And ane to wait, Are. 



If yo bad a» the sun shines on, 

And the earth eonreals sae lowly-, 

Id turn my bark on yon and it a', 

Anil be true to my Collier laddie 1 . 
I il turn, <tr. 

J R GYLE IS MY JVAME. 



Lively 







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Argryle is my namr- an<ly<.u may think it strango, T> live *t a Court, yet 



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secret thoughts nae giiile does remain. My King- and my Orvtmtry* faes T liav< 




35 




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fac'd; In ei_tv <t hat _ tie I ne'er was disgrac'd; T do ev_ry thing for my 



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coun — fry's weal, And 111 feast up_ on ban —nocks o' bar— ley meal. 



I will cpiickly lay Mown my sword and my jrun, 

An' put m J blue bonnet an' my plaidy "", 

WT my silk tartan hose an 1 leather- heel d shoon, 

An' then 1 shall look like a sprightly loon . 

An' whan 1m sae dressd frae tap to tae, 

To meet my dear Maggy 1 vow I will gae, 

Wi' swagger and hanger hung down to my heel, 

An' 111 least upon bannocks o' barley meal. 

1 11 buy a ric h present to gie to my dear, 
A ribbon o' green f<»r Maggy to Veai , 
An' mony thing brawer than that, 1 declare, 
Gin she'll gang wi' me to Paisley fair. 
An' when we're married 111 keep her a cow, 
An' Maggie will milk when I gae at the plow; 
We'll live a the winter on beef an' lang kail, 
An' we'll feast Tipon bannocks o' barley meal . 

Gin Maggy should chance to bring me a son , . 
He's light for, his King, as his daddy's done; 
We'll hie him to Flanders some breeding to learn, 
An' then hame to Scotland, an' get him a farm. 
An' there we will live thro' our industry, 
An' wha'll be sae happy's my Maggy an' me? 
We'll a' grow as fat as a Norway seal, 
Wi' our feasting on bannocks o' barley meal. 

Then, fare-ye-weel, Citizens, noisy men, 
Your rattling o' coaches in Drnry-lane, 
Ye bucks o' Bear-garden, I bid ye adieu, 
For drinking an' swearing I leave it to you. 
Im fairly resolv'd for a country life, 
An' nae langer will live in hurry and strife, 
111 aff to the Highlands as hard's I can reel, 
An' 111 whang at the bannocks o' barley meal. 



•V 




/ HA.F. JCAF. /CI7'H 9 / HAF J>\4E Kl»\\ 



Jacobite. 



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I hae nac kith, I hae nae kin, Nor ane thats rlcar to mr; 



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For the bon_nic lad, that I luc best. He's far a_yont the sea. 



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g-.mc wi' <ne that Was onr ain, And we may riie the day, When 



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() i>in I were a honnic liird , 

Wi' wings that I might flee, 
Then I wad travel ci'er the main, 

My ae true love to see: 
Then I -wad tell a joyfu' tale, 

To ane that's dear to me, 
And sit upon a king's window, 

And sing- my melody. 

The adder lies i' the corbie's nest, 

Aneath the corbie's wing-, 
And the blast that reaves the corbie's brood, 

Will soon blaw hame onr king-. 
Then blaw ye east, or blaw- ye west. 

Or blaw ye o'er the faem , 
O bring- the lad that 1 lo'e best, 

And ane I darena name ! 



I'HF Tn'HF.R JWOJRJV. 



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The titlicr mnrnWhen I for—lorn A_.nc.itli an aik sat moati—iny, I 



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did na trow Id sec my J<> Be— side me £*'ain t lie* y*Ju;ji _ nnng*. Buf 



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trig' LaJ> o'er the rig - , And can_ti _ i\ iliil cheer me, When 







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I, what ret k , Did least c\ _ pcet To see my lad sae n< .ir n», 



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His bonnet he 

A thfinjJ'hf a_jee, 
Like Sodger, s)irush and bonny, 

And I, I wat, 

Wi' pleasure g'rat, 
To lind this Sodcrer Johnie 1 

Fye on the weir ! 

I late and air 
Hae thought, sinee Jock departed; 

But n.nv as glad 

I in w i' nn lad , 
As shortsyiic broken- hc#»-tcd . 



Fu' aft at e'en 

t'jioii the green , 
When a' were blyth ami merry, 

I car'dna by, 

Sac- sari was I, 
In absence o> my dearie; 

Rut now I m blest , 

My minds at res' , 
Sae hanny wi' my Johnie-; 

At tryste an' fair, 

1 se ay be- there, 
And Ik as tant\ , s oiiv . 



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Hoy Don _ aid, how Don _ aid, Hey Dim _ald Cor/_per; He's 



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a_wa to seek a wife, And he's come hame with _ out her. O 



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]il f"oTi_per and his man, Held to a High _ land fair, man, And 



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seek a bon _ nie lass; But fient a ane was there, m^n. 




Hey Donald, how Donald, 

Hey Donald Couper, 
ffr?s gano awa to seek a "Wife, 

And he's eome hame with out her . 

At length hor got a Oarlin gray, 

And she's erme hirplin hame, man; 

And she's fa'en o'er the hnffet— stor.l, 
And hrak her collar— bane, man . 
Hey Donald, A-c . 



..,=5~is~€-*'\-"<:-" >•<-«€-•#««-. 



~-„-^~ 



HER SELL BE HIGHLAND SHEWtLZMAJT. 

Ajr _ Turnim spi ke . 

S N \ N N 



\ir_Turnim spike. 



lively. 




High-land Shen_tlc_man, Be atild as Pofh_well 



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prig, man; And mn-ny al_tcr_ a _t ions seenAmang tc Lawland Whig, man; Fa 



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U la, Fa la la la. Fa la la 1,., Fa la la . 



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First when her to the Lawlands came, 

Nainsell "was trovingcows, man; 
There was nae laws about him then, 
About the preeks,or trews, man. 
Fa la, ic. 
Nainsell did wear the philabeg, 

T< plaid priek't on her shoulder; 
Tc guid claymore hungpe her belt, 
Tf pistol shared wi' ponder. 
Fa la, Src. 
Every t'ing in te Highlands now 

T*e tnrn't to alteration; 
Te sodger dwall a't our toor-sheek, 
An' tat's te great vexation. 

Fa la, Art. 
Scotland be .tnrn't a Ningland now, 

And laws bring on te cadger: 
Nainsell wad dark her for her deeds, 
Buf,oh; she fears te sodger. 

Fa la, Arc. 



Anilher law came after tat, 

Me never saw te like, man; 
Tey mak a lang road on te grand. 

An' ca' him Turnimspike, man. 
Fa la, Arc. ' 
An' wow', she pe a ponny road, 

Like Louden corn-rigs , man; 
Where twa carts may gang on her, 

An' no break ithers legs, man. 

Fa la, Ac. 

Tey sharge a penny for ilka horse. 

In troth, she'll no pe sheaper, 
For nought put-gaen upo' tc grund. 

An' tey gie me a paper. 

Fa la, if. 
Nae doubts, Nainsell maun fra her pursr , 

An' pay him what hims like, man; 
I'll see a shugement on his four.. 

Tat filthy Turnimspike, man! 
Fa la, A< . 



But I'll awa to te Highland hills 

Where neer a anc flare turn her, 

An' no come near her Turnimspike, 
Unless it pe to purn her. 

K. !.,. A. . 



40 



O SPEED, LORD JWT'HSD^l.E, SPEED Y*E F.lS'l'. 

Jacobite . 



\i ftli -\ Ospee<l,Tj(irfi Nithsdalejspcodyo fast,Sin* ye 111..1111 frae jour Poun_trio 



J- r m - r rg r r^ 



j g'jrm-l'Jlfr^ J' r Uife^P^ 



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fleejNac mcr_rv mot fa' to your 'share ; Nae j>i_ty is for thine an' thee. Thy 



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T-.a_dy sits in lane_ly bower, Ami fast the tear fa's frae her e'e; And 



3E 



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If 



^H^Kfe^j ^^^ ^ ^^ 



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»ye she- si&'Fiffj () blaw yc winds.. And boar Lord Kirhsdalt i.ir fr.t^ mc 



1 



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p= f=TTr NH 



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lb-r heart, sae wae, .was like to break, 

Wh?le kneeling- by the taper bright; 
Hut ;k red cfrafi earn to-her rheek, 

At shone the mornintf's rosv light . 
1,'fl Nithscfajes Bark she mot na see, 
Winds si>er| it swiftly <Xt the main: 
"<) ill h< tiil<V<|noth tlTat lair. A oBk , 

"Wh.i si( a comely knight lia<l slain*.' 

Lord Jfil'hsdale Jovd wi' mifkle love; 

But lie thought om his Orvnritric's wrang-; 
And lie u.is dcemd a traitor sync, 

And fore'd, frae a' h< l<t\ d,t<< g-ang-. 
"Oh!l will g-ae to my lov'd Lord, 

He may na smile, 1 tom.h'it i>h •' 
Hut hamc.and ha', and bounie bowers, 

Nae mair will g-lad 7,<ird Vithsdales < < . 



\4 C()rh~L^/ED,FV 9 C.4DGIK. 



41 




A Cock — Laird, fir' cad __ gic, "With Jen _ nv did 





-fc. 



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meet; He tattld her his er — rand, And hmld _ ly did 



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speak: "Gin thot/lt g-ae a — lang- with me, Jen _ ny, ejr/ofh 




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he, Thoii'so he my 



La _ dy, J' i Jen _ n; 



Je n _ n\ 



Sfcr-r: 



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If I gang alang wi' u, 

Ye manna Jail 
To feast me with caddcls, 

And good hackif kail! 
What for a' this nicety, 

Jenny ? ,, <|tioth lie; 
Mayna bannocks <>' hear- meal 

Be as g-und for thee ? 



And I maun hae pinners 

With pearling- set round , 
A skirt of puddy, 

And a Waistcoat of brown.' 
"Am' wi' sic vanities, 

Jenny! fnntll he, 
For kurchis and kirtlcs 

Are fitter for'vthee . 



My lairdship can yield me 

As meikle a year, 
As- barrel us in pottage 

And g-oocl knot kit liter: 
Rnf having nae tenants, 

O Jenny, Jenny, 
To buy otig-ht 1 nc Vr ba\e 

A pennj \ Cfuorli lie . 



4 C 2 



I HE EAS'J .XI IK (V FIFE. 



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(Jli,hev, hey, the east nuiko'Fife! Oti hey,hty,thr east nuiko'Fife ! Oh, 



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hey, hey, the cast nirik o' File ! A weel— far'd Lass,and a can_tyWife. " -A 



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3^BE 



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*n_ty Wife, a ean_ty Wife, A wccJ-faTd I-ass. may be my Wife; G 



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seek them -.share ye'll find them rile, There's wale <>' them in the miik o' File, 



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r.'s 

It's 

It's 

Rut 

And 

And 

II si 

But 



lang-, lanj>-, 'till Saturday at e'en, 
larif>', lang-, 'fill Saturday at e'en, 
lang-, lang', 'till Satttrday at e'en, 

its langf'-r yet 'till Monday morn. 

then her answer she will g'ie, 
,*hen I'll ken if she faneies me; 
te says na', fient a i>rin I eare, 

I'll never sjjcer a Fife Lass mair . 



6 WAKE T'HEEy WAKE THEE, MY BOJTJTIE BtRT>. 



I-.ivel> 



y.'j i i j m Hf r rr i M r rji 

*~i i .■ y~k . _ 1_ _ j » _ _ I - _ &. A -n-n. i ~. \~i J \ ...J . it. «. *■!-»-■ - m 'itin 



O wake thee, Owake thee, my bunnie, bnnnie bird,And sing-thymafin 



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lay] O wake thee, O wake thee, my bon_nie, bnn_nie bird I For the 



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Sun is tip nn Lis way, The foliag-c soughs in the mor_nin)j- breeze, An 




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ainbon_nic bird! Ami sing- thy m.,_tin l^y, For the tap boughs swing, my 



r- r fe h fn i h i rr r , 



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b., n _nie, bon_nic bird, In The sough o' the new spTuntr 





The silvVy clouds, like sheeted ghaists, 

Take their flight o'er the pure bine sky; 
And the laverocks are pillow'd on their downy breasts, 

And are borne with their Anthems on high . 
Then wake thee, O wake thee, my bonnie, bonnie bird] 

O'w'ake while it is day] 
For the night ernes sweet, my bonnie, bonnie bird, 

"When the morning is hail'd ni' thy lay. 



-\ 4 



-The muefv heart. 




Gin I-iv_ine w<i>rth eoli'd win^ ,mv heart, "Von wou'd ti.ic 

I* 



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speak in vain; Bm in the Dnrk —sonic Grave it's laid, Kr_ 




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ver fo rise a _ g-ain . My wae _ fu' heart lies low- wi' 



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heart was that to lose , But I m.mn no re _ pine 



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C7 

"Yet oh! jjin HeaOn in mercy soon, 
Won't grant the boon I crave, 
And tak this life, now naething- worth. 

Sin* Jamie's in his grave . 
Ami see, his g-enfle spirit comes 

To shew me on my w-aj ; _ 
Stirprisd, nac douht , T still am here, 
. S.iir wondring - at nt> stay. 



*1 come, 1 come; my Jamie dear; 

And oh! wi' what g-udc will 
I follow , wharsoeVr ye lead ! 

Ye canna lead to ill: 
She said, and soon a deadly pale 

Her faded check possesf, 
Her war in' heart forg-ot to heat, 

Her sorrows stink to rest . 



•fHF. HROOM OF COWDE.YhWO^'KS. 



4i 



l ji ,. J .| j.jiri n , ij ,j MrH l fe-l i ^ 




Howblythewas I earli mnrn to see My swain tome oer the lull. He lea|>d tlic 



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lmrn and flew to me, 1 met him wi' good will. O the broom, the bon_ny bon _ny 



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broom, The broom of the Cow— dcnknowes, I wish I were wi' my dear swain, Wi' 



£ 



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O the broom, the boii_ny boiv^ny broom 



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I neither wanted ewe nor lamb, 
While his flock near me lay, 

He gat herd in my sheep at night. 
Ami chear'd me a' the day. 
O the broom, &c. 



Hard fate! that 1 should bahish'd b< , 
Gang heavily and mourn, 

Because I lov d the truest swain 
That ever yet was born. 
O the broom, &v , 



He tnnd his i>iv e and ree<l sae sweet, 
The birds stood listening by; 

Kv n tlie dull cattle stood and g'az d, 
C"harmd wi' his melody. 
O the broom, &zc. 



My doggie, and m> little kit, 
That held my wee sotrp whey 5 

My jdaidy, broach, and crooked stir k , 
May now ly useless by. 
O the broom, &c. 



46 



S f'R A Th ALL. 4 .v's L AMEJrf. 



Jacobite , 



ggj Jacobite . 

frjB l I J pV lj I ri | y I, 



Thickest night surrounds my dwelling-; Howling" tempests o'er mc 



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= FFF* 



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AV^JJU r ^T jS l jJ j J.^ j.Jh ^S 






rave. Turbid torrents, "wHn^trj s-\vellinof, Roaring 1 by my lonely cave] Crystal 



^rrj JT3 1 j j p i j- j 4 i i r fl r -^ i 




iniii 



r^^-^rrt 



stream -lets gen - tly flow _ inff, Bu _ sy haunts of base mankind, "Western 



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brcez _'cs, soft- ly blow, ing, Suit not my dis _ tract _ cd mind. 



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In the cattse of rig-lit eng*ag-ed , 

Wrong's injnrious to redress, 
Honour's war we strong-ly wag'ed, 

Rut tlie Heavens denied success . 
Ruin's wheel lias driven o'er iis, 

Kot a hope that dare attend, 
The wide world is all before us 

Rut a world without a friend ! 

GAE YO THE VYE WV ME 9 2M)H*\\YY 




%£#£ 



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m 



"O g-ae to the Kye w-i' me, Johnny, G-ae to the Kye wi' me; 







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g-ae 



to the Kye wi' me John_ny, Anil I'll l>e mcr.ry wi' thee*.' Oh. 



Nfes? 





r rflf r r nn r 1 r i r i 



Las. sic. Im wea _ ry wand _ rin, I've g-acn mair miles tli^n ihrce; lsc 



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g r • gpp 



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I m^r u 1 1 1 1 n J i 



no gan£ the day to the hcr.din, It's iash_ ous and nae_thiii<J to see. "O 



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gae to the Kye wi' me, John _ ny, Gac to tlie Kye wi' mcj O 



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]■ ]■ J J -^^fefe ^ -j - J J' J v SB 



jjae to the Kye wi' me, John _ ny, And III he mer _ ry wi' thee. 



"Oh we'll tak a rest at the shieling, 
Anent the ta|> o' the hill, 

And there's a loch o' niire water 
Whare ye mav drink yere 1 i II . 
Oh jjae, <t< . 



'^mang the ru< ks and the heather 
A I. urn does roaring fa' 

And there the trouties are l.uijio, 
"Die honhiest c\er I saw" 
Oh irae, *.-< . 



4S 



I HE BRAES OF K.U.LF.VDI,\F.. 




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mi iry i ir-n 



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eve. ning" rc^rlinH, to *f is 



vcr Jys i pain; 



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So sad, y( t so 



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v sweei 

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sweet_ly, he war_bled his woe, The -wind ceas'd to breathe, and the 



teflijj^jUUjHli 





Rude winds, with com -passion, could hear him com. 



y-r~rrf^h^^ 



) * plain, Yet Chine, less K cn_.le, was deaf to his strain. 




Hov. happy, he ory'd , my moments onee flew, 
Ere Chloc's bright charms first flash'd "in my view; 
These eyes then with pleasure the dawn could survey, 
Nor smil'd the fair morning- more ohearfnl than they: 
Vow scenes of distress please only my sip;ht , 
Tm tortrrr'd in pleasure , and languish in light. 



PI+YKIF. HOUSE* 



-4-9 







**- 



By Pin _ kic House oft let mc walk, And 



• Sa tFf^ Frr 



W? 





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<1 £ 



gfefr^fli fa tM 






win _ ning talk, F.'cn en _ vy s self rti 



is — arms . 



O let mc, 



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fig* 3. fj 7T 






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hear- ful smiles, that sweet — Iy hold In , wil _ ling chains nij heart. 



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O come, mj love; and bring" a -new 

That gentle turn of mind; 
That gracefulness of air, in you 

By nature's hand design d. 
These lovely as the blushing' rose 

First lighted U]> this flame, 
Which, like the Sun, for ever glows 

Within mv breast the same. 



50 



h\)ES .Ml' HEART' THAT" V'E SHOULD SUJTDER. 



£& 




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r- ?- - r 

"With bro— ken woras.and downcast eyes, Poor Colin spoke his pass_ion 



L^rrUrtf 



f-Cf l -T^UTT- g 



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ten_der,And par-ttnrr with his T.ti-cv cries, Ah'woe's my heart that we sliotild sunder! 



w^mm i 



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To oth_ers T am cold as snow, Rtrf kin— die with fliine eyes like tin —der; From 

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thee with pain Im forc'n" fo'jyo, It breaks my heart' that we should sun— der. 



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55 



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CARLISLE VETTS. 




Se 



Jacobite. 



!=•=■: 



i J j N v fr. J 



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"White was the rose in his fT»y bnn_net, As he f;iul<"f _cd dk 



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in his brooch_ed plaid— ic", His hand wliilk clasp'd the truth o 1 love, O 



m 



im 



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51 




Aty fathers blood's in that flower tap, 

My brother's in that hare— bells blossom; 

This white rose was steeped in my lnvc's blood, 
And 111 aye* wear if in my bosom . 

* 



# 



* 



*####** 
When I came first by merry Carlisle, 

Was ne'er a town sae sweetly seeming" $ 
The white rose flaunted owre the wall, 

The Thistled banners far were streaming! 
When I came next by merry Carlisle, 

O sad, sad seemed the town, and eerie! 
The anld, anld men came oirt and wept, 

O maiden, come ye to seek your dearie ?" 

***** 



* 
* 



* 



***##*#*# 
There's ae drop o' blood trpon my breast, 

And twa in my links o' hair, sae yellow, 
The tane I'll ne'er wash, and the tither nc\r k.ime, 

Birt Til sit and pray aneath the willow. 



\V 



ae, wae upon that ernel heart! 
W T ae, -wae npon that hand sae bloodiej 
Whilk feasts in our truest Scottish bludr, 
And maks sae mony a dolcfu' widnw. 



5 l 2 



SAE MERRY AS WE ThA HAE BEE JT. 




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A Lass that was l.t_den with care, Sat hea_ji_ly onjii r yon th'>rn;I 



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list_en'd a wbile for to hear, When thus she be— pan for trt mourn: When — 



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eVr my dear shep_herd was there, Tbc birds did me_lodiously siny, And 



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ldjjnip—pinsy «in_ter did wear A face that re_sem_bled the spring. Sae 



mcr-ry as we twa hae been 



, Sac mer_ry as we twa hae been; My 

^ 1 "' .fffff.-.f. > ■ 




J'HOI HAST" LEFT" ME EVER*. SAM IE. 



• o 



with 
Expression 




Thou hast left me ev_er! J^_mie; Thou hast left me ev-er! 




Af — ten hast thou vowM that death On-ly should us se_ver, 




Now thou'st left thy lass for aye, I maun see thee nev_er, Ja_mic, 



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.54 



The dvsTy .miller. 




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US 



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Hey, the dtis_ty Mil_ler, And his dus_ty io4; He will 



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a shil_lir>tr» Or lie spend a 4rro.1t. Dus_ty was the cont, Dus — ty 





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the co_lo»ir, Dus_ty was the boat That rowM the dus— ty Mil_ler. 



S 



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Hey, the Dusty Miller, 
Ami his Dusty sack; 

I-eeze inc on the calling' 
Fills the dusty peck. 



Fills the dusty peck, 

' Brings the dusty siller; 
Mony is the groat 

He wins, the dusty Miller. 



yiLMPIJV ZOHJV. 

N— fr- ^n m N — ft--N 




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Her Dad-die for_l>ad, her Min— nie for— had. For—bid —den she 



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wad-na be; She wad - 11a trow't, the bro-w'.st she hrew'd "Wad 



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55 




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taste sae bit — tcr — lie. The lanjv !-*<!, the\ c a* Jum pin 




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John, Aft " sjiicrd the bon _ nie las _ sic; But Fai _ tin r and 



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Mith_er a -greed the^. i>i - tlicr, That nae sic match suit l>c ■ 



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?5 



A cow and a caiif, a ewe and a hauf, 
And thrctty glide shillins and three; 
l A vera g-ude tocher, a cotter-man's dot tiler. 
The lass wi' the bonnie Mack e'e. 
Her Daddie, &c . 

Her Daddie bad her counsel tak. 

But counsel she tuik nane; 
And lang" and sair the lassie rued, 

Sae fuil-like she'd been taen . 
Her Daddie, &( . 



"Oh! lor my Daddic's kindly luik, 

Vly Minnie's kindly care. 

Gin 1 were in their ing"le nuik, 

Id never leave it mair." 

Her Daddie, &r . 



ah 



J+VOD ^JVD M.lRRItZD AJSD .4* 



r.,wi, 




The Bride came out of tie byre, And O as she dighted licr cheeks! 'sirs, 



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I'm to t>e inar_ried the night, And has nei_ther blan_kets nor sheets; Has 



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nci_thcr h!an_kets nor sheets, Nor scarcea co.vcrjet too. The Bride that lias a' 




Out spake (he brides father, 

As lie came in lr.io llie pleugh, 
"O liad yeVe tongiie,my doughter, 
And ye's get gear enough; 
The stirk that stands i'th' tether, 

And our braw hasind yade 
"Will carry ye hamc your corn; 
What wad ye he at, yc jade? " 
Woo'd and marric-<l, <Src. 



Out spake the bride's mifher, 

"What for needs a' this pride! 
I had nae a plack in my pouch 

That night I was a bride; 
My gown was linsy woolsy, 
Ami ne'er a sark but twa, 
And ye hae ribbons and buskins, 
When I had nane ava!' 

Woo'd and married, <fcc. 



Out spake the bride's brithcr 
As he came in wi'the kye, 
"Poor Willie had ne'er a tane yc. 
Had he kent yc as weel as I ; 
Fir you're baith proud and saucy, 
And n.ic for a poor man s uifi ', 
G'n I ranna get a better, 

Ise never <afc anc i' my life." 
Woo'd and married, &' . 



LOVELY I..JSS O* .WOA7)/?6W.V'. 



.■> / 




,.i-[ i j m m i a n ' rj ^ 



lyike v>n _ Her lone _ Iv tur _ tic dove, That coo _ ing 



£ 





mourns its ah*, sent love, To slia — <I\ " trroVes iiium I re _ pair, Aid 



m ■ >- i J JJ 



r r r Mr j i 




vent my hove _ less pas — sion there. Oh: love — lv lass n' Mo — nor — 



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hearl can stay Be _ him!, when you are far a_ —way 



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Ko, no, my Hear, whene'er we part. 
Take with you my poor lileedin".' heart: 
But xise" it kindly, for yon know 
How much it lovH you loiiy ay'o: 
You know to what a ijTcat Hejjrcc, 
Sighing for yon, it wasted me; 
But one sweet smile could well repay, 
The pains and troubles of this day. 



., s 




UPS 



Dl'KE HAMILTON.* 



* 



3t =^ 



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Duke Ham- il- ton was as fine a Lord, Fal lal dc 



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lal tie ral de re, O. For per .son.- al va. . .lour 



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few was there, Could willi his Graee the Duke (om.pare; How 



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was niur_derd yon shall hear, Fal lal dc ral de re, O. 



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T-ord Mohoun and he fell out of late, 

Fal lal, tc. 
About some trifles of the state, 

Fal lal,&:e. 

So high the words between them rose, 

As very soon.it turn'd to blows; 

IT .w it will end there's nobody knows, 

Fallal, &c. 
4 ' Hoke if Hamilton & I s .* of Brandon the duel was fought NovF W'! 1 1712. 



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Lord Mohoun,"who never man could fare. Then bespoke the brave Lord Mohoun, 

Fal lal,<fc< . Fal lal, &c. 

Unless in some dark and private place, I think your Grace is here full soon, 

Fal lal,&rC Fal lal,&c. 

Lord Mohun,who never man could face, I wish your G-race would pn ( it by, 

Unless in some dark and private place, Since blood for blood for vengeance cry, 

He sent a challenge unto his Grace, And loath 1 am this day to die, 

Fal lal,&c. Fal lal, &c. 

Betimes in the morning his Grace arose, Then bespoke the Dokc his Grace, 

Fal lal, &c. Fal lal, &c. 

And straight to Colonel Hamilton goes, Saying,go find out a pr per place, 

Fal lal,<fec. Fal lal, Arc. 

Your company, Sir, I must importune, My Lord, to me the challenge you sent, 

Betimes in the morning,and very soon, To see it out is my intent, 
To meet General M c Cartney&Lord Mohoun, Till my last drop of blood be spent , 

Fal lal,ic. Fal lal,&c. 

The Colonel replies, I am your slave, Then these Heroes swords were dravin, 

Fal lal, Arc. Fal lal, &x. 

To follow your Grace unto the grave, And so lustily they both fell on, 

Fal lal,&c. Fal lal, Arc. 

Then they took Coach without delay, Duke Hamilton thrust with all his might, 

And to Hyde Park by break of day, Unto Lord Mohoun thro' his body quite', 

O there began the bloody fray, And sent him to eternal nigh t , 

Fal lal,&c. Fal lal, &c . 

No sooner out of Coach they light, By this time his Grace had got a wound, 

Fal lal,&c. Fal lal,ic. 

But Mohoun and M'.Cartney came insight, Then on the grass as he sat down 

Fal lal, Arc. Fal lal,&c. 

No sooner out of Coach they light, Base M f .' Cartnoy,as we. find , 

But Mohounand M'Cartney came in sight, Cowardly,as he was inclined, 

O then began the bloody fight, Stabb'd his Grace the Duke behind, 

Fal lal,&c. Fal lal,&c. 

This done the traitor ran away, 

Fal lal, &c. 

And was not heard of for many a day, 

Fal" lal, &c. 

In christian land let's hoar no more 
Of duelling, and human gore} 

The story's told, I say no more, 

But,fal lal, &c. 



60 



AVLD HOB MORE IS, 




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There's auld Rnl) Morris that wins in yon glen, He's the kling o' glide 



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fcl — lows an' wale ' o' auld men 5 He has gowd in liis cof_fers, He has 



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sheep, he has kiiie, -And ale 1>oti _ ny las_sie, liis dar_ liny and mine. 



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She's fresh as the morning, the fairest in May, 
She's sweet as the ev'ning amang the new hay: 
As hlythe an' as artless as the lamhs on the lee, 
And dear to my heart as the light to my e'e. 

But 0I1! she's .in heiress, auld Robin's a laird, 

And my daddie has nought but a cot-house and yard; 

A wooer like me maunna hope to come s\>eed, 

The wounds I must hide that will soon be my dead. 

The day comes to me, but delight brings me nane; 
The night comes to me, but my rest it is gancj 
I wander mv lane, like a night- troubled ^h^ist, 
And 1 sicrli ;.s mv heart it wad burst in niv breast. 



() had she but been of a lower dco/rec, 
I then might ha'e hoii'd she wad sm'ild "til ,on me! 
O, how iiast describing liad then been my bliss, 
\s now my destraction no words can egress. 



DOWJV tHK RURJV DAWE. 



61 




When trees did l.ud, and fields were preen, Ami 





broom bloonVd fair to see, "When lion — nie dai _ sits dc< kd <h< 

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scene, And birds san^*" frae the tree. Blythe Da _ vie wi* 1 a 



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burn, the bon- nfe burn side, And I will fol — low the 

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M'licre gracefti' birks hint*" droonin oer 

The deep pools wavelcss siHe, 
There, shaded frae the simmer sun, 

The wand'rin salmon hide . 
And there the little trontics play 

And shine sae .honnily ; 
'Gang' down, tr'aiiir <imm the honnic burn side. 

And I will follow Thee." 



6 "2 



IOJVA.* 

Old Air _Said to he sung- by the Monks of Iona. 



Slow and 
Sol' in n . 




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"Where floated crane, and clam'rous gull, A_bove the misty shores ofMull,And 








1 lit re, round Cojumbas ruins £Tay, 
Tin-* shades of monks are wont to stray, 
\n*\ simpler forms off nims, that weep. 

Id moonlight by The murmuring* rice]). 



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"When fancy moulds upon the mind 
Light visions on the passing wind, 
And wms, with faultering tongue and sigh, 
The shades o'er memory's wilds that fly. 



That, in that still and solemn hour, 
Might stretcli imagination's p/vwer, 
And restless fancy revel free 
In painful, pleasing luxury. 

LORD RONALD CAME "to HIS LADY^S BOW^R. 

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Lord T?i_nilil < aim to his La_dy's bow'r "When the moon was in her 

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saft_ly stept in his san_d.il shoon, And saft_ly laid him dimn: It's 

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Lord Ronald, stay 'till the early cock 

Sail flap his siller wing - ! 
An 1 saftly ye maun ope the gj"ate, 

■An 1 loose the silken string^ 1 
fc O Kllenore,my fairest lair! 

O Ellenorc, my bride- 
How can ye fear, when my mcrrvmtn a' 

-Arc on the mountain side?' 



The moon was hid, the nigiit was sped, 

But Ellenore's heart was wac, 
She heard the cock flap his siller w iuir'j 

An' she watch'd the mornin ray: 
"Rise up, rise up, Lord Ronald dear, 

The mornin opes it's ee, 
O speed thee t«» thy father's towj-, 

And sale, safe, may thou be.. 

But there was a Pag-e, a little fa use Page, 

Lord Ronald did espy, 
An* 1 he lias told his Baron all, 
Where the hind and hart did lie. 
'"'It is na for thee, but thine, Lord Ronald, 
Thy father's deeds o' weir, 
But since the hind has come to my faul, 
His blood shall dim my spear" 

Lord Ronald kissd fair Ellcnore, 

And press d her lily hand; 
Sic a comely kniglit, and comely d.tnit , 

Ne'er met in wedlocks band : 
But the Baron wateh.it, as lie raisd the lat<h. 

And kiss'd ag"ain his bride ; 
And with his spear, in deadly ire, 

He piere'd Lord Ronalds side. 

The Hie blood fled frae fair Ellcnore's check. 

She- lookd all wan and ghast, 
She leand her down by Lord Ronalds side, 

An** the blood was rinnin fast t 
Slie kissd his lip o' the deadlic hue, 

But Ids lift she coudna stay} 
Her bosom throbrl ac dcadlie throb, 

An 1 their spirits haith fled away. 



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He's a ter_ri_hlc man, John Tod, John Toel;He's, a tcr_ri_ble man, John 



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vc_ra hie road, John Tod, He scolds nn the vo_n hie road 



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The weans a' fear John Tod, John Tod, 
The weans a' fear John Toe! | 
"When 1 1 r s |»,»ssin bv, 
Tlic Milhers will cry, 
Hires an ill wean, 'John Tod, John Tod, 
H< re's an ill wean, John Tod. 



How is lie fending John Tori, John Toel; 
Hdw is lie wendin, John Toelf ■ 
He's scourin the land. 
Wi' his rang' in his hand. 
An' the French wad na frifilitcn John Tod, JnhnTiel, 
An' the French wad na Iriohten JohnTod. 



1 lie Gallants a fear John Tod, John Tod, YcVc sun-brint and batterd JohnToel, Joint Tod, 
The callants a fear John To<l ; VeVe tantit and tatterd John Tod; 

If 1 1 icy steal but a nccit^ "Wi'ye're auld stri]»iicd eotil, 

Tlie laddie he'll whip, . Ye luik maist like a I nil. 

And its unco weel done o' John Tofl, John Tod, But there's nnu.se in Ihc linin, JohnTod,JohnTod, 
Its unco weel done in JoIiiiTmI. Rut there's nonse in lhe linin, JohnToel. 



An' saw ye nae little John Toil, John Tod, He's weel respectit, John Tod, John Tod, 

() saw yc nae little John Toe); He's weel rcsiicctit, John Tod; 

His shoon tliey were re'in, Tho' a terrible man, 

And his feet they were seen; Wed a' g*ane wrang", 

Mm stont does he fjanff on the road John Tod, ff he snd leave xrs, John Tod, John Tod. 

Hut stout does he jjanjj' on the road. If he snd leave us, John Tod I 
15 



'/"HE GLOOMY XIGHT IS GATh'' RISTG F. 1 vy". 

Air. Bulks of Ayr 



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driv '_ intf o'er ilic plain. The linn — f'-r now has left the 




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sul _ terd CO _ vcys moot sc _ cure, While here I wan_e|cr 




Thf' AiiiiiniM mourns her rip'nin 
By early "Winter's ravage turn: 
Across her placid, azure sky, 
She sees The sCoyvlinir tempest fly: ' 
Chill runs my blood to hear if ra\ e , 
I think upon tlie stormy wave-. 
Where many a danger 1 must dare , 
Far from the Ixmnie hanks of Ayr. 



'Tis not the s'nrsjinjf billows' roar, 
'Tis not that fatal, deadly shore; 
Tito* Death in ev'ry shape appear, ' 
Thr- wretched ha\c- no more to fear; . 
Rut round my heart' the tics are bound, 
That heart Transpierced "with m.iny a wound, 
These lib id afresh., those ties I tear, 
To 1< a\t (In honnie banks id Ayr. 



Farewell old Coila's hills and dales, 
Her heathy moors anil windino- vales, 
The scene-s where wretchc-d fancy roves, 
Pursuing past unhappy loves. 
Farewell my friends, fare w ell my foes, 
My peace with these, my lo\e with those, 
The- bursting' tears my heart declare-, 
Farewell the bonnie banks of Ayr. 



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CHECK, MX LOrE, THE FALLING TEAR. 



Air — Northern Lass. 



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O check, my I 



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ivc, Die l;ll_ing' tear, Which dims thy lion 111 c 



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When far awa% rli.it falling' tear Then check, my love, the falling tear- 
Shall aft remember') be; Which dims thy bonny eV; 

The rising' sigh, which swells thy heart, The world may frown, anil friends print false, 
Shall ncVr be lost on me. But 111 be true to thee. 

O STAY\ SWEET' WARBLING WOODLARK, sTAV. f 

Air— Loeherroch Side. 




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O sta;\ , sweet war_bling' won.d_.lark, stay. Nor quit for me the 



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trembling* spray* A homeless Io__ver courts thy l.ty, Tliv soothing" fond complaining;, 



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A_gain, a_g~ain, that ten_der part] That I may catch thy melt_iii£>' art; For 



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sure_Iy that wonld ti>uch her heart, Wha kills mc wi' disclaim— ing-, 



S.ij, was thy little mite unkind, 
Ami heard thee as the careless wind.' 
01i,noU{fht,'but love and sorrow joind, 
Si< 'notes of woe could wauken ! 



Thou tell st of never-ending* care. 

Of speechless grief, and dark despair: - 

For pit\*s sake, sweet bird, n.tc m.iir! 



Or my poor heart is hroktnl 

THOV CAVLD GLOOMY FF.BF.RWAR. 



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Thou cauld gloomy Feb_cr_war, O grin thou w-crt a_wa! 



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GF.ORDTF. 



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Tlierc was a bat_tle in the north, And No_hles there was many? And 






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the} liao kill<l Sir Char-lie H.ij , And they laid the wytc un Geor_dic 



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O he ha*, written a laiig letter, 
Hi s« nt it to his I-aeh ; 

Ye maim c nm up to Knbriioh towu 
To see what words o' Geordie? 

When first she loeik'd the letter on, 
She- was bailh rc-d an rosy; 

Rnf she had na read a word but iv>n, 
Till she wallnwV like a lily. 

"Gar g-ct to me m) glide «re\ steed. 
My meiixie .r g"ac \\i" me; 
For I shall neither eat nor drink-, 
Till Enbiugh town shall see me . 



O she's down on her bended kio t 
I wat she's i»ale anil weary, 

O pardon, pardon, 'noble kino;, 
And g~ic mc l>ae k mi' dearie. 



I hac seven helpless bairns. 

The seventh ne'er saw his elad.lie ; 
O pardon, pardon, noble king', 

Pity a waefu' Lady. 

Gar bid the headin— man mak haste , 

Our king - rcplyd fu 1 lordly: 
'O noble king, tak a' that's mine, 
Bui g-ic me hack my Geordie." 



And she has mountit he r glide fire} steed. The Gordons cam, and the Gordons' ran, 
Hcrmenzic a' gacel wi* hii>; Anel they were stark and steady; 

And she did. neither < at nor drink And ay the word aming- them a' 
Till Enbnigh town did sec n< r . Was, Gordons keep you ready.' 



And first appear H the fatal block, 
And sync the aix to lu ad him , 

And Geordie cximin down flic- stair, 
Anel bands o' aim up<>n him. 

Rut tho' he was ebainel in ((.Iters Strang - , 
O? aim anel steel, sac heavy, 

There was na am in a' the court 
Sac braw a man as Gee. relic. 



An ageel le.rd at the king's right hand, 
Says, ne.blc king', but hear mo; 

Gar her tell de>wn five thousand pound, 
And file her back her dearie. 

Some gac her marks, se.mc gac her crowns, 

Se>mc gac her dollars many, 
Anel she's te ll'd down five thousand, pound, 

Anel she's gotten again her dearie . 



She blinkil blythc in her Gcordic's face, 
S.,ys,"elcar I've be, light thee, Geordie; 

lint their slid been bluidy honks on the green, - 
Or I had tint my laeldie ■!' 



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My Nanny's charming-, sweet, and young; 

Nae arff u' wiles to win ye, O ; 
May ill befa'the flatt'ring tong-ue, 

That wad beg-uile my Nanny, O. 
Her face is fair, her heart is true, 

As spotless as she's bonny, O; 
The op'nin^ g-owan, wet wi' dew, 

Nae purer is than Nanny, O. 



A country lad is my degree, 

And few there be that ken me, O^ 
But what care I'how few they be, 

Im welcome aye to Nanny, O. 
My riches a's my penny fee, 

And I maun g-uide it cannie, O^ 
But warlds gear ne'er troubles inc, 

My thoughts are a' my Naniiy-O. 



Our auld gudeman delights to view 

His sheep and kye thrive bonnie O; 
But I m as blythe that hands his pleugh, 

And has na care but Nanny, O. 
Come weel, come wo, I carena by, 

111 takwhat Hcav'n will sen' me, O? 
Nae ither care in life have I, 

But livc,and love my Nanny, O. 



« 



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THK HIGHLAND H'UHW's LAMENT* 



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rie< "\Vith_otit a pen _ny in my purse, To hu\ a nu.il to me . 



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It was nae sat in the Highland hills, 

Ochon, ochon, ochriej 
Vae w)man in the warld wide 

Site !• ipj'Y was as me . 



I was flic happiest ol a' (he (Ian, 
Sair, sair may T repine 5 

For Donald was the bravest man, 
And Donald lie was mine ■ 



For then I had a score o' kye , 

O'.hon, -ochon, ochric; 
Feeding- "n yn hill sae high , 

And g-n ing milk to me. 



Till Charlie Stuart cam at last, 
Sae far to set us free," 

My Donald's arm was wanted tl>< n 
Fur Scotland and lor me , 



\nd tii<-re 1 'iad threescore o> yowes. Their waefn' fate, wh.it need 1 tell, 

Oeh ih, wIk.ii, ochri'e.J Right to the wrang- did yield 5 

Ski|>i>ino- '.11 the bonnic knowes , M> Donald and his country fill 
Vid < a-. ting won to mi . Cpoh Oull.oden field. 

Ochon, ochon! O Donald', till ! 

Ochon, ochon, nohrie! 
Nae woman in the warld Wide, 

Sae wretched m<w as me. 

BTJRKS OF ABKRFELDY. 







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Bnn_ny las_sie, will yc g'o, Will ye g-o , will }r go, 



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Bon - nv las _ sie, -will ye go 



will ye 




The little birdies hlythely sing-. The hoary cliffs are crownd wi' floors, 

TVhile o'er their head* the haxels hing; White o'er the linns the biirnie poms, 

Or lightly flit, on wanton wing, And, rising, weets wi' misty slmw'rj.. 
In the birks of Abcrfe-Idy. The hirks of Aberfeldy. 

Bcmiiy lassie, &v . Honny lassie, &e. 

The braes ascend like lofty wa's , I-et Fortune's guilts a< random flee. 

The foamy stream deep—roaring- fa's, They ne'er shall draw a wish Irae me. 

O'er— hung wi' fragrant spreading- shavs, Supremely blest wi' love and thee. 
The hirk' of Aberfeldy. I" the hirks of AbirlrbU . 

Bonny lassie, Ar. Bonn\ lassie, &i . 

H 



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ROSLIJV CASTLE. 




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'Twas inthat season of the ye ar^Vht n all things gay and sweet appear, That 



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the mor_iiin£r rav. A _ rose and simer his ru _ ral lav. Of 



o_lin, With the mor_ ning rav , A _ rose and sung- his rn _ ral lay. 



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Nan-ny's rharms the Shepherd sung-, The- hills and dales with Nan _ nj rung, "While 



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RosLlin Oas—ilc 'heard the swain, And e 



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AwaJtc, sweet muse, the breathing spring 
"\ "With rapture- warms, >\ak- and sing; 
Awake and j-'in the vocal throng-, 
Mfi-. bail (he- morning with a song: 
T-i Nanny raise the ehearful lay, 
Ol b:d her haste -nd come away; 
in sweetest smiles he-rsc;! adorn, 
And arfd new graces to the morn, 

W7/.47* SAFl'EJriJVG THOVGH7S RESISTLESS S'lUfi/'. 

Same Air. 

Sac loudly anee, frae Hoslin's brow, 
The martial trump n» grandeur blew, 
Wliile steel-clad vassals went to wait 
Their rhieftain at the portalled gate; 
An' maidens fair, in vestments gay. 
Bestrewed wi' flowers the -warriors waj : 
But now, ah me! how changed the scene. 
Nae troi>hicd ha', nae towers remain. 



What -jftening thoughts resistless start, 
An'pour their influence o'er the heart J 
What mingling scenes around appear, 
To Tiii-injj Meditation dear! 
Whan, wae, "we tent fair Grandeurs fa', 
By It os iin's rained Castle wa'! 
O^what is pomp? an' what is power? 
Tfit sin- phantoms of an hour! 



LJDV .4-WV ROTHWF.Ll?S LAMEJVf. 



73 



Old Ballad. 




Slow 



Ba_low, my b"y, lie still and ■ sleep, If grieves me sair to 



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makes my lieart fn' sad! Ba _ low, my boy, thy Mo _ titers joy, Thy 



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Balow, my darling-, sleep awhile, Balow, my boy, weep not for me, 

And when than wak'st then sweetly smile; Whose greatest grief's in w ranging- thee; 

Already, in thy looks, I see Nor pity her deserved smart, 



Thv Father's smile, thy Father's e'e: 
All. little did I ance believe, 
That sic kind looks cotild sae deceive. 
M.tlnw, balow, &c. 



Who can blame none but her fond heart, 
For too soon trusting, latest finds, 
With fairest tongues are falsest minds. 
Balow, halo\v, &c. 



Balow, my boy, 111 weep for thee! 
Too M..IH, alake . Uioult weep for met 
Thy gTiefs are growing to a sum; 
God gTant thee patience when thev come : 
Tho^ sorrow brings me to[ the Igrave, 
Kind Heaven, on thee will pity have. 
Balow, balow, &c. 



74 



.S/Ln; JMY CHAEAIER, C.4JIT iOV LEAVE ME: 




Gaelic Air. 



nnijiiffi nin'iyinni 



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Stay,-my charm c r! can you leave mej 1 Cni.el. cru_eI,fo de_ reive me! 




"Well yon knnw,liowmii(h you grieve mc; Cruel eliarmer,eanyougo;f >ucl charmer,oanyoTrg'G 



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By my love so ill requited^ 

By the faith you fondly plighted; 

By the pang's of lovers slighted 

Do hot, do not leave me so! 

Do not, do not leave me so! 



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Mount and go, mount and make-you rea_dy O; Mount and go, and 



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lie Sol jlit-rs la-tly O. When the drums do beat, and 'ho cannons 








rat_tlc O, I fight for thy dear sake. Nor heed «-hc shock of battle O. 




Mount ami fifo, mount and make j ou rca-dy O; Mount and go, ^nrt 





lie a Sol_dier's La_dy O. When the vanquish'^ foe Shall -.tic lor j>eace and 
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qni_et, Then home—ward I shall go, And with my love en— joy it. No 



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then re_treat. For we shall gain the hat-tic O. Mount and go, mount and 



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make you rea_dy O; Monnt and go, And he a Sol—dier's La— dy O. 

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LASS, GlJf YE I.OF. ME, YELL ME JV0TT. 




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soon be a so«. An' I can— na come il — ka dav to w< 



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1\< a house on yonder uiuir, lvc a lien «i' a happilj ley', 

r.as-., jiin yc loc mc,tcll mi mm.' L.ass,gin yc lot mc, tell me titrvri 
Thr< r s|i.iitiiks may dance upon the lloo'r, Which ilka day lays mc an epfj", 

And I tanna come ilka day to woo. And 1 canna cotne ilka day to woo. 

I h.*< • 1'iitt^and I hat a henn, I haV a kehhock iq>on my shelf, 

l.a-.s.ii'ii> j< loc mc,tak me now? l.,ass,gin ye lot me, tell me now? 

1 I, .*< three chickens and a fat hen, I downa eat it a' myself. 

\ml I c.nn.i come ony mair to woo. And 1 winna come ony mair to woo. 
H 




THE HH1SK rOVJTG L.4D. 



77 



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There came a young; main to my dad — die's dour, \1j 



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dad _ die's door, mv dad— die's donr^ There came * young" man to my 



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dad— dies door, Came seeking" me t 



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braw young' lad, A brisk jounff lad, a braw- young 1 lad} And 



But I was bakin when he came, 
When lie name, when he came; 
I took him in and gac him a scone, 
To tho-w his frozen mou\ 
And wow hat he, if. 

I set him in aside the hink, 
I g-ae him bread, and ale to drink; 
And what doye think? lie wad na blink, 
Until he was filled fou . 
And won- but he, &c . 



Oac, get je g"one,ye drnnkeh wooir, 
Ye sour—looking-, eauldrife wooer; 
I straightway sjiow'd him to the door, 
Saj ino,'iome nae mair to wo«! 
And wow but he, &r . 

There lay a durJt— dub before the door, 
Before the door, before the door; 
There lay a durk— dub before the door, 
And there fell he, I trow. 
And wow but he, &( . 



Out came the g-uidman, and Iiig-h he shouted, 
Out came the guidwife, and low she louted, 
And a' the town-neighbours were g^ther'd about if , 
And there lay fie 1 trow. 
And wow but he, <fc< . 



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HEY DOJVALDl HOW DONALD 1 . 




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Tho' sitn _ mcr smiles on hank ami brae, And na_turc bids the 



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heart J>c fi'ayi Yet a' the joys o' fldw'_ry May, "Wi' plea — sure nfer ran 



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Hey Dun —aid J How Don— aid! Think ii|>_ on your vo\\,DomldL 



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Mind the hea _ flier Lnnwo, Donald, Wliarc ye vowel fo love n 




The hiieldinij rose ami scented brier, 
The siller Fountain skinkling dear, 
The merry layerjif Is whistling' near, 
WV pleasure ncer can move me-. 
Hcj Donald, Ac. 



I il.wna lock on 1 oil, eir brae, 
I dovina greet where a.' are gay; 
Rut, ' h.'tDA heart \>ilt hr'.il. Ml' w.if, 
Gin Donald (ease to ]o\e me. 
FTcy D maid, orr . 

,MABH yonder pomp of cosTly fashion: 

Air_Deil tak the wars. ^ taf H 





Rut, did you sec my dearest T'lnllis, 

In simplicity's array, 
Ijovo-Iy as yon sweet opening* flower is, 
Shrinking" (rum the* jj-azo of day: 

O tlx u the- heart alarming, 

And all resistless charming', 
In loves <1< liolii | dl litters she (liains the willing^ soul! 

Ambition **A-orrld disown 

The worlds imperial crown } 

Kv'n avarice would denj 

His worshipp'd deity, 
And feel ' thro* every vein Jove's raptures roll. 



so 



BARBARA ALLA.V. 



Old Ballad. 




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It was iu and a_l>.,ut the M..r_ rin_m»s time, When Hie 



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green leaves were a fall _i ng", That Sir John Graham, in the 



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\\<*,t ffun^tric, Fell in love -wiih Bar_l>»ra Al — htn. 



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He sent his man down thro' the town, 
To the place "where slic was dwelling-: 

O haste and feme to my master dear, 
Gin ye be Barbara Allan" 



He turned his face unto the wa% 

And death was with him dealing"; 
'Adictr, adieu, my dear friend* a% 
And be kind to Barbara Allan? 



O hooly, hooly,-raise she d|> , 

To the |daee where he was lyiiig-, 

And when she drew the eurtain by, 
lining man, I think, you're dying"'.' 



And slowly, slowly, raise she up, 

\ . 

" And slowly, slowly, left htm; 

-And sighing", said, she coud not sta\. 

Si nee death of life had reft hi in. 



'O it's Iin siek, and very- very siek, 

And 'tis a' for "Barbara Allan! 
"O the better for me ye's never be, 



She had nae ganc a mile but twa, 

When she heard the deid-bill km Mine". 
And ev'ry jow that the deid-bell grid, 



Tho' jour heart's blood were a spilling. It crj'd, woe to Barbara Alla,n. 

'o fliiina ye mind, young" man,' said she, "O mother, mother, make my bed. 

"When ye the cups was fillinV O make it saft and narrow. 

Thai ye made the healths gae round .fc round, Sinee my love died for me to—day, 
And slighted Barbara Allan." Ill die for him to morrow." 

B 



M 
WELCOME, ROYL4.L CHARLIE. 

Air_Aald Wife ayont the fire. 




When France hart her as_ sis_tanee lent, A roy_al jirin' 



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When he upon (he shore did stand, 
The friends he had within the land 
fame down, and shook him by the hand, 
And weloom'd royal Charlie. 

Wi' '0,ye been lang- in cominif"&:c . 



Tlie dress that our Prinee Charlie hart, 
Was bonnet blue and tartan |>lairt; 
And 0,he was a handsome lart I 

Few eonld e<>m|>are wi' Charlie. 

Buf.O,he was !an-j in < uniinur, A- - 



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o lassie i j*<4Vjr lof ////' a:. 



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lor-thecJOI-afMie l^ona mojIioV throvwha ImethoirheartfiathaTn^MincslaiijJ'bcci) farfwmPi 




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AVLD LAJTG SYWE. 



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p'or auld Jang- syne , my dear, For auld lang- syn^, "We'll 



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We Iwa hit." run afnjyt the braes. 

Anil jiu (I the gowan* fine; 
Hill we've wandcrd mony a weary foot 
Sin' auld lang syne. 

Sin' auld lang sync, my dear. 
Sin' auld lang- sync, 
We've wandcr'l mony a weary Coot 
Sin' auld langf sync. 



What gfui'l the present day can jjii . 

Mai that be yours and mi n< ■; 
Rut litamv o* Irtiv i sx, oe test rt. si 
On ai:!d ian£>' mu , 

On auld lang s\uc, my dear* 
On .mil laiiy sy ik ; 
The blind is cailld 'h-it winn,a warm 
At thoughts o' laiiy syne. 



We twa hae naidlcd in the burn ( 
Frac morning' sun 'till dine; 
Rut seas between us braid hae roar'd 
Sin' auld lang' syne. 

Sin' anld lang sync, my dear, 
Sin' auld lanjx sync; 
Rut seas between us braid hae roar d 
Sin' auld lang syne. 



We 1\aa hae seen thi simmer sun. 

And thought it aye would shine: 
Rut monv a cloud has come between. 
Sin' auld biny syiie , 

Sin' auld laiiy syne^my di .it, 
Sin' auld lang syne; 
Rut mony a <h<ud has come between, 
Sin' auld lany syne. 



Bnt still my heart beats warm to thee, 

And sac to me docs thine; 
Blest be the iiow'r that still his l< rt 
The frien's o* lanfif sync. 

O' auld lang syne, my dear, 
O . auld lany syne; 
Blest be the pow-Y'that still has left 
The frien's o' laiig' syne. 



S4 



SWEET FOR I JT. 




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Orwhere are you truing sweet RobinSWharmaksyou saeproud an'saeshyn 



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ance sawthcday,Httle, Robin, My friendship ye dirljia de_ny. But win_jfer a — g-ain 




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is ret (rrningvAnVeafhcr bairh stormy an' sneir,G-inyewiH rome bark again,Rc>bin, 111 



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feed yotrwi'ihoolins mysel. Oli! where are yon g-oingf,sweef RobiniWbaf maks yon sat 



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proud an* sac; sJy .^ I a?u <• s sw the day,lit_tlc Robin , My friendship ye did_na dc_ny 



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When Simmer comes in, litrle Robin 

Forgets a 1 his friends an' his rare; 
Awl tn the fields flics sweet Robin, 

To wander the groves here an 1 there. 
Tho'ye be my debtor, fause burdic, 

On you I shall never lay blame, 
For Ivehad *<, dear friends as Robin, 

A\ h « affon has servd me The same. 
Oh! where, &< . 



I ance had a lover like Robin, 

Wlia lang for my hand did implore; 
At leng-fh he took flight, just like Rohir, 

And him I ne'er saw any more. 
B-nt should the stern blast o' misfori uric 

Return him, as winter brings thee; 
Tho' slighted by baith,li tt le Robin,, 

Yet I baifh yoar fau'fs can forgie. 
Oli' where, Ace . 



FA RF.WELL,THO V S 77? EA M, 7HA T WIJVDIJVG FLOJi 'S 



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Air Nancy's to the greenwood gfane. 




Fare — "well, thou stream, that wind — lii£J 



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rnund E— li_zas dwell _ ing; O mem', rv! spare llie cru _ c 



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throes "Willi _ in this bo _ som swell _ ing-. Con _ dc-mnd to drag- a 



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(ire in cy'_ ry vein, Nor dare dis i» close my an _ guish . 



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Love's veriest wretch, unseen^ unknown, 

I fain my griefs would cover: 
The bursting- sigh, th'unwcetiiig' gToan, 

Betray the hapless lover. 
I know tlmu doom's! me to despair, 

Nor wilt, nor canst relieve me: 
But oh! Eliza, hear one prayer, 

For s.Mys sake,for{five moj 



The musie of thy voice I heard, 

Nor wist while it enslav'd me; 
I saw thine eyes, yc^t nothing" (card 

'Till (ears no more had savd me: 
Tli' unwary sailor thus aghast. 

The wheeling' torrent viewing-, 
'Mid circling- torrents sinks, at last, 

In overwhelming- ruin. 



SG 



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iAS I Sl'OOD BY TOJV ROOFLESS TOWER. 



Air. .Cumnock Psalr 




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i _ >y hwer, And tells the mid _ night moon I 



The winds were l.iirl, fhr sir was still, 
Tlic stars they shot alang (he sky; 

The fod was howfing- on the lull. 

And fhr -distant echoing" (Hens rc-ply. 

The- burn, adown its hazelly palh, 
Was rushing- by *lio rnin'd wa', 

Hasting- to join the- sweeping- N T ifh, 

■\Vhasr- ronring-s seem'cl to rise- and fa'. 

The eauld blae norfh was streaming- forth 
Her lights, w i' hissing-, eerie din ; 

Athort the- lift they start and shift. 
Pike Portliness favors-, tint as win. 



Now, looking- over firth and faiild, 

Her horn the palc-fac'd f !, r ,thi a rearll, 

AVhcn,lo.! in form nl Minstrel aiild, 

A stern and stalwart p-haist appearrf- 9 

And Jrae his harp sir strains did flow, 

Might rousd (he slumbcringdcad to hear; 

Biif,oh! it was a talc of woe; 
As ever met a Briton's car. 

He sang-, wi ? joy, his former day; 

He weeping wail'l his latter times-., 
Rnt w-hat he said, it was nac- play, 

I w-inna vcnttrrV in my rhymes-. 



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VP AJ*~D WARJf A\ h'lLL/E. 



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Jacobite 

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r T ]> anrl \*^rn *\ Wi-I _ lie, "Warn, warn a': To hear my cmi — ' 



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"Warn, "warn a*; For Lords and Lairds were there bed ccii", Ane J vnw'buf thoj^rebraw, Willie. 



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Hut when The standard was set up, 

Right litre e the Mind did Maw, "Willie; 
The royal nit upon the tap 

Dow ii to the ground did fa' Willie w 
Up and warn a', Willie, 
Warn, warn a*. 
Then second— sighted Sandy said, 
We'd do nae gude at a', Willie . 

But when the army joined at Perth, 

The bravest e'er yc saw, Willie, 
We didna doubt the rogues to rout, 
Restore our kin if, an* a?, "Willie . 
Up anebwarn a*, Willie^ 
Warn, warn a* 
The pipers plnj d frac right t e ► ]< ft 
..O whirry whigs awa , "Willie . 

But when we mare lid to She rra— muir, 
Anef there the rebels saw , Willie ; 
Brave- Argylc attaekd our right, 

Our flank, and front, anef a} Willie. 
Up and warn a', "Willie, 
Warn, warn a^ 
Traiteir Huntly soon gave way, 

Seaforth, St Clair, anef a* Willie. 



But brave C^loncrary on our riyJtt, 

The rrhtls left did d.iu . Willie. ; 
He there the greatest slaughter madr , 
That ever Donald saw, Willie, 
Up anef warn a^ Willie, 
Warn, warn a*, 
Anef Whi.tfam turnd hin\re»«iHf fur If ir, 
And fast die) rin awa, Willie- . 

h\>r he- ea'd Us a Highland nwb, 

And soon beef stay us .i\ Willie; 
But we chased hiin back te» Stirlinif brio-, 
Dragoons,and foot, anef .1^ Willie. 
Up anej warn a", Willie, 
Warn, warn a\ 
At booth we rallied on a bill 

And briskly updid draw,Willif . 

Bin when Aryylo die! view our line, 

And them in order saw, WTlIb , 
He strcigdit gae-ef to Dumb lane again,' 
Ami back bis b ft diel draw, "Willie. 
T r p and \urn a', Willie, 
Warn, warn ■**; 
Thru we to Aiiebtexairrfer. march <(, 
To wait, a better la', Willie J 



Now if -\ ( .spier wha wan the eiay, 

I v« relief you what I saw, Willie; 
We baith did fight, anef baith did beat, 
Anel baith efid rin awa , W r i1lic , 
Up and Warn a\ Willie, 
"Warn, Warn <*\ 
feir seee»nrf_sigliteef Sanely said, 

We\f do nae g*U'!e at a\ Willie. 



I HER E 9 LL J^TEKER BE PEACE YlLL 3AMIE COMES HAME. 



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May, I heard a man s i"«', fho' his hca<l if wa 



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ffray, And as he was sing_injf, the tears drain came, There'll 



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Be __ ver be |>eace 'till Ja — mie comes hante 



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T|u Church is in ruins, the State is in jars, 
Delusions, oppressions, and murderous warsj 
We dare na wcel sayt , Imt mc ken wha^s to blame i 
There 1 !! never be peace till Jamie conies hamc. 

Mv seven braw sons for Jamie- drew sword, 
Anil now T prcct round their fjrei n beds in the yird; 
It brak the sweet luiart of my laithfit' allld dame; 
There 1 *!! never be peace till Jamie comes hame. 



Vow life is a burdfen that bows me down, 

Sin I tint my bairns, and he tint his crown; 

Rut till my last moments my words are the same, 

There 1 !! never be peace till Jamie comes hame. 



The lovely mjlid of ormadale. 



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wave $ When peace and love possess, the grove^ .And .-echo sleeps with_in its;cavc. 



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Led: by love's soft en_dcar_ing' charms, 1 stray the nath_less wind_ing vale, And 



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hour that gives tome The loverly maid of Or_ma_dalc. 



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Her eyes outshine the star of night, 

Her checks the morning; s rosy line, 
And jiure as flower in summer shade, 

Low bending- in the jicarly d< w: 
Vor flower s<i fair and lovely l>ure, 

Shall fates dark wintry winds assail; 
'As angel smile she aye a\ ill be 

Dear to the- bowers of Ormadalc. 

Let fortune soothe ,the heart of (are. 

And wealth to all its votaries give; 1 ' 
Re mine the rosy smile- of love. 

And in its blissful arms to live: 
I "Would resign fair India's wealth, 

And sweet Arabia's s|»ic\ gale, 
For balmy eve and S'cotian bower, 

With thee, lov'l maid of Ormadalc . 



,90 



Sprightly. 



.MARCH, A^YD OJT »Y» CHARLIE. m 

Air, K.aity Bairdy. 

S ' * - ^ 



I ve heard the muircorfe s earlyeraw,Ive seen the morning's ro»s.syr|aw,BTrt 



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Hiis is hlith_esf o' them a'. To march a_wa wi' Char _ lie. Our 

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Scot _tish flag's like streamers wave, It's Charlie's scl that loads th< brave; Wha 



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win_ru flinfli, nor fenr a g'rn vr ■ But stan' or fn'_w*l' niiar_li'e, 

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There's no a traitor in his Clan, 
Tlicres no a heart, there's no a han', 
Rut when the note o' weir is blawn, 

Will start, an' on wi' Charlie. 
Its wha rlaur now on Charlie frown. 
Or tread our northern thistle down, 
For Scotland's right, an' Scotland's Crown, 

We'll owre the hills wi' Charlie. 



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*01d Morris. 
Kaity Bairdy has a cow, 
Black and white about the moii, 
Was na that a dainty cow, 

Dance Kaity Bairdy. 
Kaity Bairdy has a cat, 
That can fell baith mouse and rat, 
Was na that a dainty cat, 

Dance Kaity Bairdy. 



LEADER HAIGHS A.Vn YARROW. 

K 




An' house there stands on I,cad_cr side, Sur_monnf_in' my- de_ 




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scrivin, Wi' rtioms sae rare t and win— dows fair, Sae cu _ rious — ly tun -tain _ing' 



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stands as sweet on Lead_er side, As New_ark does on "\ar_row; 



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A mile below, wha lists to ride, 

Will hear the mavis singing', 
Into S'. Leonard's banks she'll hide, 

Sweet birks her head o'er- hinging; 
The lintwhite loud, and progTie proud, 

Wi' tunefu' throats and marrow, 
Unto St Leonard's banks they sing'. 

As sweetly as in Yarrow. 



For Rockwood, Ringwood, Spotty, Shay, 

Wi' sight and- scent pursue her, 
Till, ah! her pith begins to flag, 

Nae cunnin can rescue her: 
Oer dub and djke, o'er seugh and sykc , 

She'll rin, the fields a' thorough, 
Till faild she fa's in Leader— haughs, 

And bids fareweel til -Yarrow, 



The Burnmill bog, and Whiteslade shaws, Sing Krlington and Cowdenknowes, 

The fearfri hare she haunteth; Where Homes had ance command in, 

Brighaugh and Braidwoodshiel she knaws, And Drygrange wi' the milk white ews, 

And Chapel -wood frequent eth; 'Twixt Tweed and Leader standin: 

Yet when she irks, to Kaidsly birks The burds that flee thro' Redpath trees, 

She rins, and signs for sorrow, And Gledswald banks ilk morrow . 

That she should leave sweet Leader haugtis. May chant and sing sweet Leader-h.iut.hv 

And canna win to Yarrow. And bonny howms o' Yarrow. 



What sweeter music wad ye hear, 

Than hounds and beigles cryin? 
The started hare rins hard wi' fear, 

Upon her spied relying; 
Puir beast, her strength it gaes at length, 

Nae bieldin can she borrow 
In Sorrel's fields, Cleekman or Hags 

And langs to be in Yarrow. 



Rut Minstrel — burn can ne'er assuag'c 

His grief while life endureth, 
To see the changes o' this age, 

That fleeting time procureth : 
For mony a plate stands in hard cave, 

Whare blyth fowk kend nae sorrow*, 
Wi' Homes that dwalt on Leader- side, 

And Scott's that dwalt on Yarrow. 



9 l 2 



S/LF.JV7' AJTI> S.4D THE MINS7REL S.4T. 

Air, She rose and let me in. 




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O si_lcnt arid sari (lie min_strel sat, And thought on the days of 



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yore 5 He "was nld^yet lie Invd liis na_li\c l.tixU TJk»' his liar|> could charm no more. 



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In youth he had stood by the "Wallace side. 

Ami stint) in King' Robert's hall, 
When Kdward vow'd with his Knglish host 

Scotland to hold in thrall. 
Rut the Wallace ■wight was dead and gone, 

And Robert was on his death— bed, 
And d.irk was the hall where the minstrel sung 

Ol chiefs that for Scotia bled. 



* * * :. * * * * * * 

Rut olt, as twilight stole o'er the steep, 
And the woods of his native vale, 

Would the minstrel wake his harp to weep, 
And si£)h to the mountain £> - alc-. 



93 

UK's LIFELESS AMAJfG fHE BIDE BILLOWS. 

Air_The mackiri£f of Creordie's Byre. 




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He's life- less a _ mane the rude bil_lows, My fears . and my 



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sii>hs are in vain; The heart that beat warm for his Jean _ie, Will 



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ne'er beat fur mor _ tal a _ gain. My lane now I am i' , tlie 



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Ami the day— light is yriev _ ous to me; The lad — die that 



Ye tempests, sae boistVously raffing, 

Rage on as ye list _ or he still _ 
Tliis heart ve sae after) hae sickened, 

Is nae mair the sport o" yere "vwill . 
Now heartless, 1 hope net 1 fear not 

High Heaven have pit} on me . 
My soul all dismayed and distracted, 

Yet bends to thy awful decree. 



$4 



LiAMJHtKIJV*. 



Old Ballad. 




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A bet_ter ma —son than Lam_mi_kin Ne'er builded wi' the 




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t.ine; He build _ed Earl Ro-herts house, But wa_gcs he gat nane.'Comt 



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gie to me, Earl Ro_bert, now, Come gie to me my byre; Come 



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gic to me, Earl Ro_|>ert, now, Or I'll burn your bouse vii' Tyre 




Sen zc winnac gie my wages. Lord, 

Ze sail hae cause to rue.' 
\nd syne he b reived a black revenge, 
And syne he vow'd a vow. 
***** ***** 
'Vow bide at hame, my lnvc, my life, 

I warde ye bide at hame: 
O gang- nac to this day's hunting-, 
"To leave me a' my lane?' 

"Zcstreen'e, zestreene, I dream't my bower 
O' red red bludc was f n' : 
G-in ye gang- to this black hunting, 
I sail hae cause to rue'.' 
'Qnha luiks to dreams, my winsome dame? 
Ze hae nae cause to fearc. 
And syne he's kisf her comely theek, 
And syne the starting tear; 



95 



And syne he's ganc to the guid g-reenwoodc, 

And she to her painted bower, 
And she's gard steels doors , windows , yetts , 

Of castcllc,ha', and tower. 
They steeked doors, they steeked yetts, 

Close to the cheek and chin; 
They steeked them a' but a little wicket, 

And Lammikin crap in . 

"Now quharis the Ladye o' this Castelle, 

Nurse tell to Lammikin ?"' 
'She's sewing up infill her bowir;' 

The fals Nursie sung 1 . 
Lammikin nipped the tunnie babe, 

Qnhile lond fals Nursic sung; 
Lammikin nipped the bonnie habe, 

Quhile hich the red blade sprung. 

"O jrentil Nxirsie! please my bairn, 

O please him wi' the keys',' 
1 U "II no be pleased, gay ladye, 

Gin Id sit on my knees." 
fc 'Gude g-entil Nursie, please my babe 5 

O please him wi' a knife." 
' He winna be pleased, mistress myne, 

G-in I wad lay down my life.' 

"Sweet Nnrsie, lond, lond cries my bairn, 

O please him wi' a belli' 
He winna be pleased, gay ladye, 

Till ye com down yonrsel .' 
And qnhen she saw the red, red blade, 

A loud scrich scriched she, 
O monster, monster spare my bairn, 

Wha never skaithed thee! 

"O spare, gif in yere bluidy briest, 
Alhergs not heart o' stane ! 

spare ! and ye sail hae o' gowd 

Quhat ze can Carrie hame?' 
Dame, I want not your gowd' he said- 
Lame,! w'dnf not your fee; 

1 hae been wranged by your Lord , 

Ze sail black vengeance drie.' 

Earl Robert he came hame at night, 

And a' was dark around; 
But when he came to his castelle, 

Owre miekle light he found. 
O lang, lang, may Earl Robert rue, 

He paid nae masons hyre, 
Ladye and Heir he saw nae mair, 

His castelle rockit wi' fyre. 



91, 



SfOHJTjVy COPE. 



Jacobite. 





^Ull^u-^ZJ i a Jti 



drums do beat; O f\e Cope rise in the morn _ in£J I 



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Ho wrote a challenge from Dunbar, 
Come fijflit mo,Charlie,an ye daur; 
If it be not by the chance of war, 
1 11 give yon a merry morning? 
Hey, Jolinny Cone, Are. 

When Cli.irlie lookd the letter upon, 
He drew bis sword the scabbard" from, 
"So Heaven restore me to my own, 

"I 1! meet you, (ope, in the morning. 
Hey, Johnny Cope, Are. 

It was, upon an afternoon,, 

Sir Johnny marrli'd to "Preston town, 

Me .says, my lads come lean you down, 

And we'll fight the hoys in the morning'.' 
Hry, Johnny Cope, Are'. 

Rut win n he saw the Highland lads, 

WP tartan trews and white coekads , 

Wi' swords, and gfnns.and rung's, and gauds, 

O Johnny, he took wing in the morning. 

Hey, Johnny Cope, Arc. 
K ■ 



O then he flew into Dunbar, 
Crying' for a man of war; 
He thought to havepass'd fur a rustic tar, 
And gotten aws in the morning, 
Hry, Johnny Cope, Arc. 

Sir Johnny into Berwick rade, 
Just as the deil had been his giiidc, 
Gicn him the warld he would na stayd 
To foughten the boys in the morning. 
Hoy, Johnny Cope, Arc. 

S,.ys the Bcrwiek'ers unto Sir John, 
"O what's become of all >"iir men?" 
In faith, says lie,J dinna ken, 
I lrft tin m a' this morning! 
Hci, Johnny Cope, Arc. 

Smvs lyord Mark Car, ye are na blate, 
T'» bring' us the new s o' yimt defeat, 
I think you deserve the back <>' tlie gate ; 
Got nut o' my sight this morning!' 
Hey, Johnny Cope, Are. 



IHK WAES OF SCOTLAND* 



.9 7 



Jacobite. 





When 1 lell thee, bon_nie Scotland, <> th»u "*ert lair to *ccj 



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Fresh as a bon_nie briiic in the morn, "When she ncnin wetl dec! be. 





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When I (viu< hack to thec S<<>« _lni\'t , Up— i 



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JVkiv morn lair, 



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|>on— nic- Irt.ss ^at at our town end, K<ui»_iny her yel _^ low hair. 



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"Oh liey! <>h hey! sitngf the bonnie lass, 
"Oh hey J and wae is me! 
Thc-re's sieean sorrow in Scotland, 

As ecu did never see. 
Oil hey oil hey, tor my lathe r anld 1 

Oli hey , lor my mither dear! 
And m\ lie-art will burst tor the bonnie lad 
Wha Wit me- lane some here. 



I wander a' nit>ht 'iimiiit the lamls 1 own'd, 

When a' folk are asleep. 

And I lie o\r m\ father and milhers j>ra\e-, ^ 
An hour or twa to weep. 

fatherless and mitherlcss, 

Without a ha' or hallle , 

1 niaun -wander tliroijjjli m\ dear Sentland, 

And hide a traitor's blame. 



<*s 



Lively 




WEE WILLI E GRAY* 



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Wee Willie Gray, anil "his lcath_er waLlet; Peel a «it-lnw wand, V 



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be him boots anil jack_et; The rose ti|>_ on ihr brier will hi him frouse ami 



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loul)_let, Tin' rose ii|>_on the brier will be him trousc anil dnnb — let. 



Wee "Willie Gra> , ami his leather wallet J 
Twice a lily— flower will be him sark anil cravat; 
Feathers of a flee wail leather uj> his bannct. 
Feathers of a lice wail feather u|> his hannet. 



7 HE C0VEJ<\4 JT7ERS' TOMK. 




Oh 'tis a heart — stir _ rine sioht to Mew r Far to ilic 



51 




M<fl:l | fH3=l 



V< St _ \\'AT( 



1 stretch _ing- blue, That frontier ridge, Tvhicli erst etc -lied Tli'in- 




mm n i i in i 

be seen in Scotland. — For a trne accotmt 



*Many of the Martyrs tom'bs are still to 
B of their sufferings during the times of the persecution. See Woodrow-s Hist: 



9<* 







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Far inland, where the mountain ursi 
Otrlni'ks the waters of the; west, 
And 'midst the moorland wilderness. 
Dark 'innss— elcughs l'>rm a drear recess , 
Curt .tin* I with e c as< less mist s,w hit h feed 
The- sources nl iIk Clydc'and Twe ecf; 
There injured Scotland s patriot hand, 
For Faith and Freedom made their stand; 



The human hloodhounds of the earth. 
To hunt the peasant from his hearth: 
T\ rants! could not misfortune teach, 
That man has rights heyond your roach? 
Thought ye the torture, and the stake, 
Could that intrepid spirit Weak; 
Which e\en in w-omans hrcast withstood 
The terrors of tlic iir. an. I flood? 



When traitor kings, who basely sold 
Their country's fame for Gallic gold, 
Too abject oer the free to reigns 

Warn'd by a lathers fate in vain 

In bigot fury trampled down 

The race who oft preserved their crown 

Thero,worthy of bis masters, came 
The despots' champion, bloody Graham. 



Yes .though the sceptics toiig-uc deride 

Those martyrs who lor conscience died; 
Though modish history blight their lame , 
And sneering courtiers hoot the- name 
Of mcn,who dared alone- be- free 

Amidst' a nation's sla\ery, 

Yet long for them the- poet's lyre 
Shall wake its notes ol heavenly lire. 



Their names shall nerve the patriots hand, 

Upraised to save a sinking land; 

An I piety shall learn to burn 

With holier transports o'er their urn! 

Sequestcrd haunts.' so still — so lair, 

That holy Faith might worship there, 

The shaggy g-c rsc and brown heath wave 
Oer man\ a nameless -warrior's grave . 



100 



LF.F.ZIF LINDSAY*. 




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Will ye gang to the Hic_lands, T,ee _zie Land _saj I Will y< 



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Hie _ lands, T J ec_zie Lind_say/ My pride and my dar_lino- t<> l> 






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O ye are the bonniest maiden. 

The flower o 1 ihe west eountrie; 

O gang to tlie Highlands, Leczie Lindsay, 
My pride and my darling- to he. 



I\e goud an' I ve gear, Lcczii Linrfsay, 
And a heart that lo.es onl\ hut thee; 

They a 1 shall he thine, Leezie Lindsa-\, 
Gin ye my lovd darling -will he. 



•-=»"=» 



She has gotten a ffim n o' green Satin. 

And a bonny blythc bride is she, 
\nd sin's ..II wt" T.ord Ronald Maf Donald, 
His iiritlt .uid his darling to be. 
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LEEZIE LIJTDSA V. 



"When sung' by 2 Voices. 



- W'i II > t gang to the Hi< lands, Leeyie Lindsay? 'Oh,Le ezi< •, lass, ye maim ken little, 

\\illj< yanu to the Hi< lands ni'mc' Syn ye dinna ken me, 

Willy/ gang to tlie Hielands,Leezir Lindsay?, For I am Lord Ronald Mae Donald, 
Mi pride and ihy darling to he? A Chieftain o» liigli degree .' 



'To gang to the flic lands wi 1 yon, Sir, 
I dinna ken how that may be, 

For I ken nae the road I am gaeino. 
Nor yet wha 1m g-ann wi\' 



'Oh,ifycVe the Laird o» Mar Donald, 

A great ane 1 ken ye mann be; 
But how ean a ehieftain sae mighty 
Think <>' a puir lassie like me," 



S"lie has gotten a gown o' green Satin, 
She has kilted it tip to her knee. 

And she's ifftrr Lord R.>nald Mae Donald, 
His bride and his darling to be. 



Sl'KEPHOA- AJfD L\ Dl.J. 



101 




All lo-ve_lv «n the sul _ try heath, Ei _ pir - inf 




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Stre — phnn lay, No hand the cor_diaI draiiyht hi reach , \"< 



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fix thy swim — ming- eye, Or smooth th 

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face of death , 

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f'ar distant from the mournful scene 

Thy parents sit at ease, 
Thy I.ydia rifles all the plain. 

And all the spring", t<> please. 
Til fated youth! hy fault of friend, 

Not force of hie, deprcss'd, 
Thou fall\t,'alas! thyself, thy kind, 

Thy. .country , unredressed . 




. 



102 



(\7IBHIF.yI HJIE SF.EiY INF. DJIV. 




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O, -Tib— hie, I hae seen the day, Ye wad — na been sac sliy? Fui 



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sfircc-n I met ytvn on the moor, Ye s|>ak na but jraed by like s-fonre; Ye 



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Im poor ^ But fient a Itai 



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Repeal 

the Oho* 



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I doubt na, lass, but ye may think, 
Reeause ye hae tlie name o' clink, 
That ye can please me at a "wink, 
"Whene'er ye like to fry. 
O Tibbie, I hae,&e. 

Bui sorrow tak him that's sac mean, 
Alrho'his pouch o* coin were clean, 
Wha follows ony saucy <|nean 

That looks sae proud and high, 
O Tibbie, I hae,&c. 



Xltho' a lad were e'er sae smart, 

IT that he want the yellow dirt, 

Ye'Il cast your head anifher airt , 

And answer him fu' dry. 

O Tibbie, I hac,&e. 

Bin* if he hae the name o' gear, 
Ye'll fasten to him like a brier, 
Tho' hardly lie, for sense or lear, 
Be better than the kyc. 
O Tibbie, I hae,&c. 



Bnt, Tibbie, lass, tak my advice, 
Your daddie's gear maks you . sae nice. 
The deil a ane wad spier your price, 
Were ye as poor as 1 . 

O Tibbie, T hae, &r . 



KM) OK VOl.UMK SKCONI). 



ITZS-H llllfia 

A SELECTION 

fr©iM. itlie 

MELODIES ©F iC@Tl.ipi) 

^JVCTEJVT & MODE AIT. 

AKJKA^GE© FO]& THE 

1>S Hi 3?03HTB 



SY- 



R.A.SMITH. 




«-**"?-»*- Price 8/f 

Published ' &SoId ly HoB^I'URDIE at 7ns JWusie & Musical Instrument 

Warehouse ._ V^O Tnnees Street . 



INDEX TO VOLUME THIKD. 



■£~ And are ye sure the news is true,-. 



As I was a-walking by yon river side, 
Auld Robin, the laird o' muckle land,~~-.Di7/o, 
Ay wakin', oh ! wakin' ay and wearie, — Ditto, 
A wee bird came to our ha' door, Glen, 



Bessy's beauties shine sae bright, - 
Blithe was the time, 



AUTHORS. 

Jean Adam, ~~ 
■Unknown, 



.. ~~..Ramsay, . 

*~~Tannahill,~ 

Blithe, blithe, and merry was she, ™~™~.B«r;u,.. 

Bonnie wee thing, canny wee thing, Ditto, 

Brave Lewie Roy, , , Tannahill,*. 

By Logan streams, that rin sae deep,~~~~Mayne, 



AIRS. PAGE 

-There's nae luck about the House, 10 

-He's dear, dear to me, 2 

-Jamie o' the Glen, ~™„„ „100 

-Ay Wakin', oh,~_ „ 12 

-Johnny Faa, ~~ Ql 

Bessy's Haggis, „™™^_„ 5 

Mor nighean a Ghiobarlan,~_- .„ 8 

Andrew wi' his Cutty Gun, ~~ 33 

Bonnie wee thing, , . , ., 58 

Brave Lewie Roy, 102 

Logan Braes,~~~~~~~~~~™— ~™™™ 1$ 



Can aught be constant as the sun,- 
Charlie cam to our lord's castle, - 



-Unknown,* 
-Ditto, — ~- 



Come boat me o'er, come row me o'er, — Ditto, ~~ ~~~ 
Comin' through the craigs o' Kyle, Jean Glover,. 



Dumbarton's drums beat bonny, O, Unknown 

Edina ! aft thy wa's hae rung, Gall, 



■ Farewell, ye dungeons dark and strong, „Bwrns,- 

Fortune, frowning most severe, «... Tannahill,~ 

Fy, buckle your belt an' braid sword on,~Unknown,~ 



Gie me a lass wi' a lump o' land,. 



-Ramsay, . 



Gill Morice was an earl's son,~~™~— ^-Unknown,* 

Haud awa, bide awa, Robert Allan, - 

Happy's the luve that meets return, ~~~~~Crawford,~-~~ 



-Twine weel the Plaiden, ™— — — ™™. 8 

-Charlie came to our Lord's Castle, Q4- 

26 
52 



-O'er the Water to Charlie, . 
-O'er the Muir amang the Heather, 

-Dumbarton Drums, . 

-The Flowers of Edinburgh, . 

-Macpherson's Farewell,. 
-Bonnie winsome Mary, . 



.- Wha'll be King but Charlie,. 



—Gie me a Lass, . 
-Gill Morice, 



-~Haud awa frae me, Donald,. 
™Mary Scott, 



25 

24 

- 46 
.105 

- 26 
.106 

- 13 
. 1 



INDEX TO VOLUME THIRD. 



Here awa, there awa, . 

Here's to the king, sir, 

He's o'er the hills, that I lo'e weel, 

Hey how, Johnny lad,- 

How pleasant the banks, . 

How sweet this lone vale, . 



AUTHORS. 

.Unknown, 

-Ditto, . 
■.Ditto, 
-Robert Allan,, 
-Barns, — ~~-™ 
-•/. Erskine,~~. 



AIRS. PAGE 

Wandering Willie, .„ ™™,™™ 10 

Hey Tutti, Tatti, „ 55 

He's o'er the Hills, 94. 

Hey how, Johnny lad, 108 

The Dairy Maid, ™.™ 34 

.Lord Breadalbane's March, .... .,102 



I dreamed I lay,.. 

I lo'e nae a laddie but ane, 

I'm wearin' awa, John,.. 



In simmer when the hay was mawn,. 
In the garb of old Gaul,,. 
In the hall I lay, I lay at night,-. 
It was a' for our rightfu' king, —. 



-Burns,* 
.Unknown,. 
-Ditto, 
-Burns,- 

-Erskine, . 

.Ossian, . 

-Unknown, 



-The Dream, 14 

.1 lo'e nae a Laddie but ane, ™- 69 

-Hey Tutti, Tatti, - .. .„ 54 

-In Simmer when the Hay was mawn,-104 

-The Highland Character, 5ft Cj 

..The Maid of Selma,™™™™ 



-Adieu, for evermore, my Dear, . 



38 
If 



Keen blab's the wind o'er Donocht-head,~.Pzc7tm'n,o> 



-Donocht-head, 



~~ 96 



Maid of my heart, a long farewell, 
Musing on the roaring ocean, 
My sheep I've forsaken, ™™~. 



Unknown,. 
Bums,* 
Elliot, . 



-Maid of my Heart,- 
-Drummion Dubh,- 
-My Apron, Dearie,- 



■~ 54 

45 



Nae mair we'll meet again, my love,™™.&'m, . 
Not a drum was heard, nor a funeral note, Haily. 
Now nature hangs her mantle green, Burns,. 



Robidh donna gorach, _-. , 6 

Burial of Sir J. Moore, „ 76 

Lament of Mary, Queen of Scots, 53 



O bonnie was yon rosy brier, 
Of a' the airts the win' can blaw, 
O false Sir John a wooing came,- 
O fare ye weel, my auld wife, 
O gin my love were yon red rose 
Oh, Billy, Billy, bonny Billy,- 
Oh, was not I a weary wight, 
O heard ye yon pibroch sound 
O, how can you gang, lassie,- 
0, I hae seen great anes, 
O Kenmure's on and awa, Willie,™ 
O, lady, twine no wreath from me, 
O mirk, mirk, is the midnight hour, 
O, my love is like a red, red rose, 
On Ettrick banks ae simmer night, 
O rattlin', roarin' Willie, 



Burns, 
Ditto, 
■Unknown, 
Ditto, 
*itto, 
.Ditto, 
Ditto, 
■Thomas Campbell 

Tannahill, 

Mrs Hamilton,. 
Unknown 
Scott, 
■Burns,. 
Ditto, 
Unknown, 
Ditto, . — 



bonnie was yon Rosy Brier,-™ 94 

Miss Admiral Gordon,—™™.... IS 

May Colvin, ™ . 92 . 

My Auld Wife,- , 66 

The Red, Red Rose,.™™™- 74 

Battle o' Both well Brig, 62 

-Massacre of Glencoe, ™ 48 

-0, how could ye gang sae to grieve me, 98 

Todlin Hame, ™ , — ; ~ 43 

Kenmure's on and awa,™- 81 

The Laird 0' Cockpen, — ', ; 36" 

Lord Gregory, . -™™. 4 

Low down in the Broom, 85 

Ettrick Banks, 84 

Rattlin', roarin' Willie, ~~~ - — 34 



INDEX TO VOLUME THIRD. 



#- 0, sweet sir, for your courtesie,— . — 

0, this is no my ain house, -. 

wash that drap frae aff your cheek, 

0, wat ye wha's in yon town, 

whare hae you been, Lord Ronald,.-. 

Rise up, rise up, Lord Douglas, — ~ 

Romantic Esk ! what sweets combine, . 

See, spring her graces wild disclose, - 

Shall monarchy be quite forgot, 

Simmer comes, and in her train, — — . 
Since all thy vows, false maid,-. 



AUTHORS. 

. Unknown, 

Ditto, — , 

Ditto, ~ 

Burns, -...~.~..... 

-Unknown,* 



-Ditto, . 
Malt, 

~~John Crawford, . 
— Unknown, , — , 



-My Jo Janet, ..— — . 

-This is no mine ain House,- 
-Lady Kenmure, -~ 
-O, wat ye wha's in yon Town,-. 
Lord Ronald, my Son,- 



PAGE 

~- 20 

- 41 

42 

82 



-John Sim, 
-Cromlech, . 



-The Douglas Tragedy, — — , 86 

-Ey, gar rub her o'er wi' Strae,— — 40 

-Honny Jane,—. —. 89 

-In Days of Yore, — . — 66 

-Simmer comes, — — — — ,— — — — . 97 
-Cromleck's Lilt,™ ... ., , „ 21 



The auld Stuarts back again, „ — . Unknown, 

The bonniest lass in a' the world, —. — , — Ditto, : 

The day returns, my bosom burns, Burns, 

The do'e flew east, the do'e flew west, — Hogg, 

The gypsies came to our lord's yett, Unknown 

The laird o' Cockpen, 

The lass of Patie's mill, 

The last time I came o'er the muir, 

The moon's o'er the mountain, 

The soldier may toil, 

The tears I shed must ever fall, — 

The weary pund, the weary pund, 

The widow can bake. 

The winter it is past, 

Ditto, 

There's cauld kail in Aberdeen, 

There's nought that ever met the eye, — Anderson, — 

There was ance a May, Lady Home. 

Thou art gane awa, thou art gane a\\a,~Unknown, — 
Thou ling'ring star ! with less'ning Tay,~Burns, 

Tune your fiddles, tune them sweetly, Skinner, ~ 

'Twas past one o'clock, « -— . — —Unknown, 

'Twas wearing gay and late at e'en, ~~Gall, 



Ditto, 
Ramsay, 
-Ditto, 

■Robert Allan, — 
Thomas Campbell. 
Cranston, 
Unknown, 
Ditto, 
Ditto, 
Ditto, 
Ditto, 



The auld Stuarts back again,™ 70 

The bonniest Lass in a' the World, 56 

The Day returns, , , 13 

Sir David Grasme, — „ 49 

Johnny Faa, —. — — — — 90 

The Laird o' Cockpen, 36 

-The Lass of Patie's Mill, — 29 

-The last time I came o'er the Muir,- 32 
—Ho ro Mhari dhu',— —. — „ — — — 22 

-Alloa House, . , „ „ 46 

Forbes' Farewell, — , 101 



-The Weary Pund o' Tow, 

-Wap at the Widow, my Laddie, 
-The Winter it is past, 

-Ditto,—. 2d Set, 

-There's cauld Kail in Aberdeen,— 
-The bonniest Lass in a' the Warld, 



88 
2 
14 
15 
61 
56 



-An' werena my Heart light I wad die, 17 

-Thou art gane awa,——. . 60 

-0, Mary, dear departed Shade, 72 

-Marquis of Huntly's Reel, - — 9 

-Cauld Frosty Morning, — 74 

-Dainty Davie, — — , — . , 68 



Ullin, Carril, and Ryno,— . 
Up wi' the carls o' Dysart,- 



~Ossian, 
-Unknown, 



-Song of Selma, . 
-Hey ! ca' thro',-. 



57 
22 



INDEX TO VOLUME THIRD. 



AUTHORS. 

What beauties does Flora disclose, Crawford,* 

When braving angry winter's storms, Burns,- 

When fragrant winds at eve blew saft,~~James Scadloclc,. 
When I hae a saxpence under my thumb,~Unknown,« 

When merry hearts were gay, Maeniell, 

When the sheep are in the fauld, Lady A. Lindsay, . 

Wilt thou be my dearie,. Burns, ™~, 

Will ye go to the ewe-bughts, Mai\on,~~Unknoivn,- 
Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, Burns,*. 



-Tweedside, ~„~~„,™™™. 

-Neil Gow's Lament for Abercairney,. 
-Ettrick Banks, . 
-Todlin Hame, ... 



PAGE 

™ 65 



-Donald and Flora, ~.... 

.Auld Robin Gray, .~™_™ 
-Wilt thou be my Dearie,.... 
-The Ewe-bughts, Marion,. 
•Ditto, „ . 



84 
42 
28 
30 
64 
37 
37 



Young Jamie lo'ed me weel,-~ 



Ye gallants bright, I red you right, 



~Lady A. Lindsay, — Auld Robin Gray, , 

~Burns, . „ — Beware o' bonnie Ann,. 



30 
44 



AKIRY SCOT'!'. 




Hap_py's the liivc that meets re - turn; Rut mine meets un_h 



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Yar_ row's fair- est flow_ er! 'Mang" cir _ ding- bills that fifiiard her 



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hame, Tlie bnn_ny lochs clear wa.- ters gleam, And there lives she, whor 



93 



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rj - hrirm 




nane can mar _ row 



, Ma - ry Scott, tlic flnW 6' Yar _ row. 



** i r i fr r 1 ] =r=^=^-^ pi=^pri'Tn^ 



When tender pity fills her ee, She's heard my vows; hut a's in vain; 

The dewy" bloom's less fair to see; Her hive 1 never can obtain; 

But when she smiles, the beaming" light She kens my truth, she sees my tears, 



Is morning breaking - thro' the nigiit . 
There is a charm, there is a spell, 
And nane e'er had it but her sel , 
Its cast owre me, in dool and sorrow, 
For Mary Scott, the flower o' Yarrow. 



But nae hope my an|£fuish cheers. 
Tho' sad's my fate, 111 ne'er complain; 
Wha luves her ne'er can hive ag"ai"h: 
Oh. -where's the maid Ui.it e'er could marrow 
Mary Scott, the flower o' Yarrow . 

C 



HE'S DEAF DEAF TO ME. 



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1 ic bun in tlie lowlands where .they shear- the sheep. But 111 write a letter, an" 1 send it to him, 
An*«l> in thcjiighl ands where they pu'the htsrfherj An 1 tell him he's dearer to me than ony, 
I U< n a bonny laddie that b'es me weel, An 1 that I ve ay been sorry, sin 1 he gaed awa*. 

Hut Ik's fir far awa^tliat I lo'e far better. Tho' he's far far awa', yet hc'Vi dear dear to me. 

II winter were? past , an' the simmer come in, 
"When daisies an 1 roses spring* sae fresh an' bonny, 
Then I will change my silks for a plaiden coat, 
An 1 awa f*5i the lad that is dear dear to me. 

fHE WIDOW CAJV BAKE. 



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that's the best pate To win a young- wi .rfnw, my lad _di< 



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The widow she's youfhfu', and nane can compare 
Wi' her that I ken.; she has a g-ood.' skair . 
Of every thing- lovely, she's witty and fair. 

And has a rich jointure, my laddie. 
What could you wish better your fortune to crown, 
Than a widow, the bonniest toast in the town, 
"Wi' nacthing- but draw in your stool and sit down, 

And sport wi' the widow,my laddie? 

Tlien till 'er, and kill 'er wi' courtesie dead, 
Tho' stark love and kindness be a'ye can plead, 
Be beartsome and airy, and hope to succeed 

Wi a' bonny gay widow, my laddie. 
Strike, iron while 'tis het, if ye'd have it to wald, 
For fortune ay favours the active and banld, 
But ruins the wooer that's tbowLess and cauld, 

Cnfit for the widow, my laddie. 



LORD GREGORY. 





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I»<>rd G-reg-ory, mind'st thon not the grove, 

By bonnie Irvine_sidc, 
V3iere first I own'd that virgin— love 

I lang,Iang had denied. 
How often didst thon pledge and vow, 

Thon wotild'st for ay be mine, 
And my fond heart,itsel' sae trtre, 

It ne'er mistrnsted thine . 



Hard is tliy heart, T^ord Gregory, 

And flinty is thy breast; 
Thoir dart of Heav , n,that flashest by, 

O wilt thotr' give me rest! 
Ye mustering thtrnders from above^ 

Tour willing- vietim see! 
Birf spare,and pardon' my false love, 

His -wrongs to Heav n and me. 



BESSY'S BEAVflES SHIJTF.SAE BRIGHI-. 





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Bessy's heart is warm and true, Bessy's tocher is. but scanty, 

Busy working ay I find her; Yet her face and soul discovers 

At making haggis, saps, or broo, Those enchanting sweets in plenty 

There's no ane, that I ken, dings her. Maun entice a thousand lovers. 

My dear Bessy, when the roses 'Tis not money, but a woman 

Leave thy cheek, as thou grows aulder, Of a temper kind and easy, i 
The guid sense thy mind discloses, That gives happiness uncommon; 

Will keep love from growing caulder. Petted things can nought but teazc \' 



J\ AF. MAIR WE^LL MEET"* AGAIJV, MV LOTE. 

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Yet mcm'ry oft will fondly brood, on yon burn— side, 
Oer haunts which we sae aft hae trod, by yon burn— side; 

Still <li< walk wi' me thonlt share, 

TJio' tliy fool can never mair 
Rend to earth flio yowan fair, down by yon burn— side. 

Now far remov'd frae ev'ry care, 'boon yon born — side, 
Thou bloom'st, my love, an anjjcl fair, 'boon yon burn— side; 
And, if angels pity know, 
Sirre the tear for me will flow*, 
Who must lingx-r here below-, down by yon burn — side. 



m\MB.4R7'OJT's- DRUMS BEAT BOJVJVIE O. 



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A Soldier has honor and bravcTy, O ; 
Unacquainted with rug-ties and their knavery, O; 

Ho minds no other tiling-. 

But his true love and his king-, 
And all other rare wad he slavery, O. 
Then I'll he the Captain's lady, O, 
Farewell a' my friends and my Daddie, O; 

I must stay nae mair at home, 

But follow wi' the drum. 
And whenever it heats I'll he ready, O . 



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Than fare yc wecl, -w ha saw mc aft, 

Sae My the, baith late an? early! 
An 1 farewcel scenes o 1 former joys 

That cherish life sac rarely! 
Ill hail Lochaber's valleys gfreen, 

Where mony a rill meanders; ; 
I'll hail wi'-joy its birken bowers, 

For there my Mary wanders. 



9 



7T.VE VOVB FIDDLES. 

Air Marquis of Huntlys Reel. 



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Dance wi' life, and be not saw_cy, Shy, nor me _ lan_cho_ ly . 



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Lay aside yorrr sour grimaces. 
Clouded brows and drnmly laces; 
Look about, and sec (heir Graces, 

How they smile delig-hted I 
We'll extol our noble master, 
Sprung' from many a brave ancestor; 
Heaven preserve him from disaster] 

So we pray in dnty. 
We'll extol, &x. 



Youth, solace him with thy pleasure, 
In refin'd and worthy measure; 
Merit, gain him choicest treasure 

From the Royal Donor. 
Famous may he be in story, 
Full of days and full of glory .• 
To the grave,when old and hoary. 

May he go with honour.. 
Famous may, 4c." 



Gordons join our hearty praises, 
Honest, tho' in homely phrases; 
Love our ehearful spirits raises , 

Lofty as the lark is; 
F.choes waft our wishes daily 
Thro' the grove and thro' the alley, 
Sound o'er every hill and valley, 

Blessings on our Marquis. 
Echoes wait, Are. 



10 



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Thro' (he langr muir I h* ■ foilpwd my Willie; 
. Tliro' the lang nrair I ha ■ follhw < him hame 
Whatever betide us, nought vljall divide us, 
Love now reward s a 5 my sorrow 3i\d pain, 

Here a\^a^ there awa, here aw j, Willie} 

Here aw a, there awa, here awn harm : 

Come, I v ove, believe m^i'aithinfj ean g'rieve nu'; 

I Ika thing^jrieascs when Willie's at hame. 

.-^-#. -^.-^.-^. -=■». --a. ->.-=».-s».-». *.-5=».-s».-#.-#.^- <S-«l- •€-•€- •«?-«?• .<s..<g-.^- ■#-«-^"#- •€-<«««»«- • 

-THERE'S XAE LI CK .4BOI ■■■?' 7°HE HOUSE. 

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Rise up and mak a (lean fire—side, 

Put on the muekle oat ; 

Oir little Kate her cotton gown, 

And Jock his Sunday's coat; 

And mak their shoon as lilac k as slaes, 

Their hose as white as smw; 

It's a' to please my ain Giu'iman, 

For he's been langawa. 

There- aictwa hens upd' the bank, 

"S been fed this month and mair, 

Mak haste and thraw their necks about, 

That Colin weel may fare: 

And spread the table neat and clean, 

Gar ilka thing" look braw, 

It's a' for love of my Gudoman, 

For he's been lang awa . 

O trie me down mybigonets, 

My bishop— satin gown , 

F,,r I matin tell the Bailie's wire 

That Colin's Come to town. 

My Sunday's shoon they maun gae on, 

My hose o' pearl blue, 

Its a' to please my ain Gudeman, 

For he's baith leal and true . 



Sac true's his words, sae smooth's his speeih. 

His breath like caller air; 

His very foot has music in't, 

When he comes up the stair. 

And will I see his face again! 

And will I hear him speak! 

Im downright dizzy wi' the thought _ 

In troth, I'm like to greet. 

The cauld blasts o' the. winter wind 

That thrilled thro' my heart, 

They're a' hi awn bye, I hae him safe, 

Till deatli we'll never part . 

But what .puts parting in my head? 

It may be far awa; 

The present moment is our ain, 

The neist w T e never saw-. 

Since Colin's weel, Imweel content , 

I hae nae mair to crave - } 

Could I but live to mak him blest, 

I'm blest aboon the lave. 

And will I see his face again? 

And will I hear him speak? 

I m downright dizzy wi? the thought i. 

In troth I'm like to greet . 



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thinking- n' my dearie! Ay w'aliin'oh! When first she -cam to town. They 

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He r Minnie- leu >. hi r. better} 

I !■.'< the lass myscl, 

Rnf,wacs me I I eartna g-' t Jier. 
A\ u akinV'h ! Are. 



Inanely nig-ht comes on , 

A' the lave arc sleeping'; 
I rhink irpo! her scorn, 

"And hleer my < en wi' greeting-. 
Ay vakin', oh ' &rv . 



Whin T sleep 1 dream, 

When 1 wairk T'm eerie , 

Rest T e.iiina get 

For thinking- o' m> Dearie. 
Ay imJtiu^eiJh'J &e. 



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robes, than crowns and globes, Heav'n gave me more_it made tlice mine. 

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"While <lay and night can bring delight, 

Or nature aught of pleasure give; - 
While joys above, my mind can move, 

For thee, and thee alone, I live. 
"When that grim foe of life below, 

Comes in between to make us v*""*} 
The Iron hand that breaks our band. 

It wrecks my bless_.it breaks my heart. 



14 



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*uo_ny hi<»«v. Listening- »o 'lie wild birds sin^^inir, by a filling rryMrtf stce.uti. 



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Such was my life's deceitful morning ; 

Such the pleasures I enjoy 'd ; 
But Linjr or noon, loud tempests, storming, 

A my flowery bliss destroy 'd . 
Tlio' fickle Fortune has deceiv'd me, 

She promis'd fair-, and perform d but ill; 
Of mony a joy and hope bereav'd me , 

I bear a heart shall support me' still. 



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The rose upon tlie brier, by the wafer runnin clear, 
May have charms for the linnet or the bee - , 

Their little loves are blest, and their little hearts at rest, 
But my true love is parted lrae me. 

My love is like the sun, that in the sky does run. 

Forever so constant and true} 
But his is like the moon that, wanders u]> and down 

And every month it is new. 

All you that are in love, and cannot it remove,' 

I pity the pains you endure; 
For experience makes me Know, that your hearts are lull of 

A woe that no mortal can cure . 



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Herded sheep, or gath_er'd slaes,Wi' my dear lad, on I.,o_gan braes. But, 



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dray Lad maun face his faes , Far, far frae mean' Lo_£ran braes. 



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\ae m.iir at Logan kirk will he 
At ween the preaching- meet wi' me ; 
Meet wi' me, or when its mirk, 
Convoy me hame frae I,ogan kirk. 

I \\ eel may sing thae days arc ganc 

Frae kirk an' fair I come alane, 
While mv dear lad maun face his facs^ 
Kar, 1 ar f r*ac me and Logan braes. 

At cVn,whcn hope amaist is gane, 
1 danncr out , or sit alane, 
Sit alane, beneath the tree 
Where aft he kept his tryst wi'mc. 
o! contl I see thae days again, 
My lover skaithless, an' my ain! 
BelovTl by friends, rcvcr'l by faes, 
We'd live in bliss on Logan braes. 



IT 

AJ*"D WERE JV14 _MY HEART LIGHT I WAD DTE, 

Old Ballad. 





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?11 — a-.— day, Come down the green g-atc,an<l come here a_way. 



When bonny young Jnhnnyram o'er the sea, They said I had neither cownurcanf 

He said he saw nai thing -sae lovely as me; Nor dribbles of drink rins thro' the draff, 

Hehechf me baith rings andmony bra' things : Nor pickles of meal rins thro' the mill e'e: 

And werc-na my heart light I wad die. And were-na my heart light I wad die. 

Hehadawee titty that loed na me, • His titty she was baith wylie and slee, 

Because I was twice as bonny as she; She spy'd me as I came o'er the lee, 

She rais'd sic a p'other'twixt him and his mother, And then she ran in and made a loud din, 
That werc-na my heart light I wad die . Believe your ain e'en, an ye trow na me. 

The day it was set, and the bridal to be, His bonnet stood ay fir' round onhisbrow; 

The wife took a dwam, and lay down to die; His auld ane looks ay as well as some's new, 

She main'd and she graindont of dolour and pain, But now he lit s't wear onygate it will hing. 
Till he vowd he never wad see me again. And casts himsel dowie trpo' the eorn-bing . 



His kin was for ane of a higher degree, 
Said, what had he to do with the like o' me? 
Albeit I 'was bonny, I was— na for Johnny: 
And were-na my heart light I wad die. 



And now he gaes drooping about the dj lies, 
And a'. he dowdo is to hund the tykes • 
The live-lang night he neer steeks his e'e, 
And were-na my heart light I wad die . 



Were I young for thee,as I hae been, 
We should hae been galloping down on yon green, 
And linking- it on the lily-white lee; 
And,wow,gin I were but young for thee! 



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w iih 
K.xpr< ssion. 



IT HUS A* FOR Ol R RIGHTFIP KfJVG. 

N ' ( Jacobite. 

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Now a' is done that men ean do , 

And at.is don»*in--TK«in : 
Mv l<»ve and native land, fareweel, 

For T mann cross 1 the™ main, 

^ My Dear, 

For I maim eross tli^- main . 

Hi fnrnd liim riglit and round about, 

All on flic Irish shore, 
,\n<{ g*ave his bridle— reins a shake, 

With, adieu for e-vermore, 
, My Dear, 

Adieu for evermore ' 



The sodg-er frae the war retirrns, 
The sailor frae the main ; 

Brit I hae parted frae my love, 
And ne'er to meet again, 

My Dear, 
And ne'er to meet again. 

When, day is g*ane, and nig'hf is eome, 
And a' are houn 1 ' to sleep, 

I think on them wha're far awa, 
The lee_lang- nigiit, and weep. 
My Dear, 
The leo_lang* nig'ht, and weep. 



OF A" 'J'lIF .h/RT'S 1HF W1JV> CAJV If LAW. 




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O bl»w,ye we.stlin 1 win's, bhw saff 

Amang the leaf a- trees; 
Wi' gentle breath, frac mtiir an' rlal< 

Bring 1 hame the laden bees; 
An' bring - the lassie back to me. 

That's ay sac neat an' clean .* 
Ae blink o' her war! banish care, 

Sac charming- is my Jean. 

What sighs an' vows, amang" the knowes, 

Ha'e past atween lis tw.t ' 
How fain to meet, who wac to part, 

That day she gade awa ! 
The pow'rs aboon can onl> ken, 

To whom the heart is seen, 
That nane can be- sac dear to me 

As my sweet lovely Jean. 



20 



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it eeking in the flfaw well clear, 

What if I shond fa' in? then 
Syne a' my kin -will say and swear 
I drown 'd mysell for sin, then V 
^l;«idthc better by the brae, 

Janet, Janet; 
Haudtlie better by the brae, 
My jo Janet'. 

"Good Sir, for your conrtesie, 

Coming- thro' Aberdeen , then, 
For the love yon bear to me, 

Buy me a pair of sheen, then', 
't'l'iirt the auld, the new are dear, 

Janet, Janet; 
- A pair may pain ye ha'f a year, 
My jo' Janet . 



"BTrt what if dancing- on the green, 
And skipping like a maukin , 
If they should see my floated sheen, 
Of me they will be tawking'? 
'Dance ay laigh, and late at e'en, 

Janet, Janet} - 
Syne a' their fatits will no be seen, 
My jo Janet', 

"Kind Sir, for yotir conrtesie, 

"When ye gae to the cross, then, 
For the love ye bear to me, 

Buy me a pacing horse, then'? 
'Pace npo' yotir spinning— wheel, 
Janet, Janet; 
Pane npo' yonr spinning- wheel , 
My jo Janet . 



CFO.M LET'S LI LI. 



'21 



Old Ballad. 




Since all thy vows, false maid, are blown to 





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In _ to some wil ,_ der _ ness My grief I will 



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Some gloomy place I'll find. 

Some doleful shade, 
■Where neither sun nor wind 

F. er entrance had: 
Into that hollow cave, 
There will I sigh and rave, 
Because thou dosf behave 

So faithlessly. 

Wild frnit shall be my meat; 

1*11 drink the spring-; 
Cold earth shall be my seat : 

For covering 
I'll have the starry sky 
My head to canopy, 
Until my sonl on high 

Shall spread its wing. 



I 11 have no funeral fire, 

Nor tears for me ; 
No grave do I desire, 

Nor obsequie . 
The courteous red — breast,he 
With leaves will cover me, 
And sing my elegy 

With doleful voice. 

And when a ghost I am , 

I'll" visit thee, 
O thou deceitful dame, 

Whose cruelty 
Has kill'd the kindest heart 
That e'er felt Cupid's dart, 
And never can desert 

From loving thee. 



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And the Kim _ mors o' L;*r_o-r>, And flir- Las . sr s o* J.*C'_\<-n, 



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"Well live a' our days; 

And' them that comes behin\ 
T^ct them do the like, 

And spend ihc gear (hey win . 
Hcy.'ca' thro', far ■; ■;■ 



We hae tales to tell, 

And we hae sangs to sing; 
We hae pennies to spend, 

And we hae pints to bring. 
Hcylca' thro", &c . 






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Ruf ne'er shall young- Connor rcfurn on the billow, 

T^ovely maiden, he's in the sea, 
Ho ne'er shall awake from his green sea = -weed pillow. 

Fairest Mora, to come to tliee . 
From the dark hill of Ullin she views from afar^ 
His fleeting- form vanish with morning-'s bright star, 
And, in sad'ning- despair, 
Gives her sig-hs to the air, 
O Conner, lovd Conner, return to me! 

The hall of tby Conner is dark now, and dreary, 

Sad it echoes to minstrelsy: 
The tempest is hllsh'd, and the morning- is cheery, 

Liovely Mora, it smiles to thee.. 
Rut ne'er to the eye of the maid comes deltg-ht; 
She hails not the morning-, but flies from its light; 
Oor the wide wat'rv waste 
■Still a ling-'ring- look casts. 
And sig-bs,"o. my Conner, return to m< .' 



24 



S I u w i .-. h «/ 




* M .4CPHER SOJT'S FARE WE LL. 

Farewell, ye dungeons dark and strong-, The wretch's des_tin_ 



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«hat is death hnt parting breath? 

On many a bloody plain 

1 ve dard his face, and in this place 

I scorn him yet again J 
" Sae rantingly, Arc. 



I ve liv'd a life of sturt and strife; 

I die by treacherie: 
It burns my heart I must depart, 

And not avenged be , 
Sae rantingly, Arc . 



T T ntie these hands from off my hands, 
And bring to me my sword ; 



Now, farewell light, thou sunshine bright, 



And all beneath the sty. 



And there's no a man in all Scotland, May coward shame distain his name, 



But I'll brave him at a word. 
Sae rantingly, Arc . 



The wretch that dare not die 
Sae rantingly, Arc . 



^- -jfc A noted freebooter At celebrated player on the fiddle, which they say he broke in 
a rage just before he was hanged,because none of his Clan came to his rescue. 



T'f/F FLOWERS O" FDIVRI RGH. 



25 



Vl ,li n. til lln i< ,<v lij#- Mliill 111/ 




K— dl— na! alt thywa\ hac rung" The hamely sang-% (liymtn^Mrt*!*; 




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hsj)_]iy, could he ance but rear Ae verse th.its wor_ thy o* thy t*r 



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O lccze me on thy bonny Dames, 
A spotless list <>' dearest names, 
Whase peerless charms , ance on a day, 
First fi*art me tune the rustic lay; 
1-ang kent for %\it an* beauty rare, 
Are famed Kdina's daughters fair. 



Nor are thy Sons less dear to Fame, 

Or far afield, or. here at -hame^ 

Alike their glory's kent afar, 

Or in the senate, or in war . . 

O may they never bare the steel, 

Save for their King" an' Country's weal! 



Sweet maids! whan simmer docks the green, Kdinai mays} Thou never tine 



Leave yc the dinsome busy scene, 
An* 1 to the sylvan meadows stray. 
As eVnin' skirts the lee— langday; 
Or trace the vale, romantic, sweet, 
Wharc health an 1 her S{ Rernard meet. 



The name o' worth, which now is thine. 
r^-ang may thy Sons the wreath retain, 
The x<v-reath which merit maks their ain", 
0,]ang may modest worth adorn 
Thy Daughters, fair as simmer morn. 



26 



O'ER T'HE WATER To CHARLIE. 



Jacobite. 



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Lively 




Come, boat 'mc oVt*, como, row mc ocr, Crime^boat me nVr to 



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Charlie; 111 trie John Ross an_offh_er baw_bce, To boat mc o'er to Char_lic. 



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I lo'e weel my Charlies name, 

Tho' some there lie abhor him: 
Ruf O, to see auM nielt g-ann limn , If I had twenty thousand lives, 



I swear and vow, by moon and strfrs. 
And sun that shines So early! 



And Charlie's faes before him. 
Well o'er, &c. 



Id die as aft for Charlie. 
We'll o'er, &e . 



GlE JHE A LASS WP A LUMP O' LAJSTD. 



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(iie- ine a lass wi' a lirmj> o 1 land, And we for life shall 



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gang the — gith-cr; Tin.' daft or -wise, I'll ne_ver demand; Or black, or 



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a— bout her is ktl—lin£ 

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Gio me \ lass wi' a lump pi land. 

And in my bosom I'll hug- my treasure} 
Gin I had ante her gear in my hand, 

Should love turn dowf, it -will find pleasure. 
I.augh on wha likes, but there's my hand, 

I hate with poortith, tlio' bonny, to meddle} 
Unless they bring cash, or a lump of land, 

They se ne'er get me to dance to their fiddle. 

There's mciklc good love in, ban<ls and bags, 

And siller and gow d s a sweet complexion J 
For beauty, and wit, and. virtue, in rags, 

Have tint the art of gaining al lection '. 
Line tips his arrows with woods and parks, 

And castles and riggs, and muirs and meadows? 
And naething can match our modern sparks, 

But well—tocher'd lasses, or jointur'd widows. 



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When me r_ rv hearts >trt £ay, Careless of aught Ktrt play, Poor Flora 



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slijit a_wav,SaH — ning to Mo_ra. T-oeisc flow'd her yellowliair, Quirk hcavel her 



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ho'_se>m . I.tir, And thus to the trou_blcd air She ven_ted her sor_ri 

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L.ouel howls flic northern Mast , 
Bleak is the dreary waste; 
Haste tlicc.O Donald haste, 

Haste tf. thy Flora! 
Twice twelve leing months nrc r?er. 
Since, in a foreign shore, 
Yon proinis'd to fight n<> more, 

But- meet me in Mora. 

'Where now is Donald -dear? 
M.iids cry with taunting smcr; 
Say, is he still sincere, 

To his lov'd Flora? 

Parents upbraid my moan; 

Kae h heart is turn d to stone 

Alii Flora," thouVl now alone, 
Friendless, in Mora! 

Come, 'then, oh come away* 

Donald, no longer stay — 
Wlicre can my rover stray 

From his dear Flora. __ 
Ah! sure he ncVr could he 
False to his vows and me — 
O heaven! is ne>t yonder he i 



Bounding' in Mora! 



|v 



Never, O wretched fair!' 
Sigh'el the sad messenger} 
Never shall Donald mair 
Meet his lov'el Flora! 
Ooldas yon mountain snow, 
Donald , thy love, lies low [ 
He sent me to soothe thy woe. 
Weeping in Morn. 

Well fought our valiant slain. 
On Saratoga's plain; 
Thrice Heel the- hostile train 

From British g'lory. 
But ah! the>> our foes did lice , 
Sad was each victory! 
Youth, lovc,anel loyalty, 

Fell, far from Mora. 

Here, take this lovejw rought plaid, 
Donald expiring said, 
Give it to yon dear maiel, 

Drooping in Mora. 
Tell her, O Allan, tell, 
Donate) thus bravely fell, 
And, in his last farewell, 

He thought on his Fleira! 






Mute stood the trembling fair, 
Speechless with wild despair, 
Then, striking he-r bosom bare, 

Sighed out, "Pe.or Flora! : 
Ah Donald! ah well a day !" 
Was all the fond heart could say, 
At length the sounel dice! away 

Feeblv on Mora . 



The lass of peaT^s mill. 



29 




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TJie lass of Pen^tys mill, So bon_ny, blythe, and pay, In 



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midst lier locks did play, And spa 



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her een, 



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Without the help of art, 

Like flow'rs which^gracc the wild, 
She did her sweets imp-art 

"Whene'er she spoke or smild. 
Her looks they were so mild, 

Free from affected pride, 
She me to love begfuil'd; 

I wish'd her for my bride. 

o! had I all the wealth 

Hopetonn's hijjh mountains fill 
Insur'd lonjr life and health, 

And pleasure at my will. 
Id promise and fulfil, 

"That none but bonny she, 
The lass of Peaty's mill, 

Should share the same witli me. 



»() 




AVLD ROBTJV GRAY". 



Old Set. 



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When the sheep arc in the fauld and the ky at hamc , And 



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a' the wea_ry Vi-arld tw rest are crane, The wacs of my heart la' in 



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Mi«m^(rv true my ee, Wliilc my grurfc.man lies sound by *n<-' 



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AILD EORI.V GRAY". 



Modern Set. 







\oung Jamie lo'ed me wed, And sought me fur Ids hridc,Bu> saving a 



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crown , he had nac^ tiling be — side ; To make the crown x jxiund my 



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had na been jrane a week but on_ly twa,"W~hen my P'a — thcr brake bis 



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rin,and "iir Cow, was stown a « wa I My Moth — ^r she fell si» k , and m\ 



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mic at the .sea, And auld Ro— bin Gray came a court _ iny me 



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My Father coudna work, and my Mother co,udna spin; 
T toil.d day and night,but their bread I Loudna win; 
Auld Rob maintain'! them baitli, and,w i' tears in his ee, 
Said, Jenny) for their sakes,'0 marry me? 
My heart it said,na; I look'd for Jamie back; 
But the wind it blew higdi,and the ship it was a wre< k; 
The slii|> it was a wreck! why didna Jenny die ? 
Oh! why was I spared to crv,wacs me! 

My Father ur g-ed me sair; my Mother didna speak, 

But she look'd in my fate till my heart was like to break; 

So they fified him my liand.tho' my heart was at the sea , 

And auld Robin G-r'ay is a if tide man to me . 

I hadna been a wife a week but only four, 

Wben sittijijj- sae mournfully at my win door, 

I saw my Jamie's w-raitli for I < ou'lna think it he. 

Till he said I in come liainc for to marry thee. 

sair did we greet, and mickle did we say; 

We took but ae kiss, and we tore ourselves away; 

1 wisli I were deadlbut I'm no like to die-; 
And why do I live to say, wacs me! 

I fifangf like a g-}iaist,and I earena to spin; 

I darena think on Jamie, for that wad be a sin; 

Rut I 11 do my best a gudewife to be, 

F.r auld Robin Gray is kind to .me . 



•IMF. LAS1' 'Jl.ME 1 CAME O'ER T'HE MllR. 




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e last time I came, o'er the moor, I left my love be hind 



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mc; Ye pow'rs! what pain do I en — dure, When soft i_de as mind me! Soon 




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the rud— dy morn dis— play'd The . bcam.ing day en_-.sTj_._ing, I 



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met be time my lovcij_ly maid, In fit re treats for woo_ing. 



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In all my soul there's not one place 

To let a rival enter: 
Since she excels in every grace, 

In her my love *hall center: 
Sooner the seas shall cease to flow, 

Their waves the Alps shall cover, 
On Greenland ice shall roses grow, 

Before I cease to love her. 



The next time I gang' o'er the mo"or, 

She shall a lover find me; 
And that my faith is firm and pure, 

Tho' I left her behind me: 
Then Hymen's sacred bonds shall chain 

My heart to her fair bosom? 
There, while my being does remain, 

My love more, fresh shall blossom. 



BLY"fH*\ BI.YTHF A. V7> MF.RRV M'AS SHE. 



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Chorus. 



Air__ Andrew wi'his cutty gtin. 



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Blythe, blythe, and mer—ry was she, Blythc was she Inn and lien; 



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Blythe by the banks or F.rn, And blythe in GIcn_tur_if Glen. By 



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Ougli—.tor_tyre grows fiie aik, On Yar_row banks the bir_ken shaw; But Phe_mi< 



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_nicr lass Than braes of Yar_row cy_ or saw, 



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Her looks were like a flow'r in May,'' 
Her smiles were like a Simmer morn; 

She tripped by the banks of Karn, 
As light's a h\t<i upon a thorn. 
Blythe, liIytFie, 4e . 

Her bonny fare if was as 'meek 

As ony lamb upon a lea; 
The evening sun was ne'er sac sweet 

As was the blink o' Phemie's e'e. 
Blythe, blythe, 4c. 

The"- Tic-land hills I've ,wander'd wide," 
And o'er' the Law lands i hae been; 

But Phcmie was the blythest lass 
That ever, trod the dewy green. 
Blythe, blythe, Ac 



34 



R.rftLlJC, ROARIJf WILLIE. 



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O Raffling roarin Willie, O he held tn the fair, An' for to sell bis 



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fid_dle, An' buy some ofh_er wart; But par_tinjj' wi' his fid_dlo, The saut tear 



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Hin't ltis.ee, And Rat_tlin, roar_in Wil_lie YcVr wd.ctimc liamc to me. 



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') Willie, come sell yorrr fiddle, 
O sell yoxrr fiddle sae fine; 

O Willie, eome sell yonr fiddle, 
And liny- a jn'nt o' wine: 

J T I should sell my f i<ldle , 

The \»arld wnnld think I was mad, 

For mony a rantin day 



As I nam l>y Croehallan , 

I cannily kcekit ben, 
Rattlin, roarin Willie, 

Was sitfin at yon boord— en'; 
Sittin at yon boord— en', 

And amanjj g-iiid comjianie; 
Rattlin, roarin Willie, 

Ye're welcome hame to me. 



My fiddle and I hae had. 



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7 HE BA^KS OF YHE DEJ OJV. 



Gaelic Air. 




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Do _ von, With {jreen — sj>rcad__ ing bush — cs and flow'rs bloom — . injj 



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fair! But the bon_«i_est flowY on the hanks of the Devon Was once a sweet 

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morn as it 



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show - er, That steals on the eve_ ningr each leal to re _ nt-i 




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O spare the dear blossom, ye orient breezes* 

With chill, hoary wing", as ye usher the dawn! 
And far be thou distant, thou reptile, that seizes* 

The verdure and pride of the garden or lawn! 
Let Bourbon exult in his gay, gilded lilies. 

And Kngland, triumphant, display her proud rose; 
A fairer than either adorns the green vallies, 

Where Devon, sweet Devon, meandering flows. 



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The la/bd o* cock pest. 




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The Laird' o' Coekpcn, he's proud an' "he's great, His mind is taen 



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T)i>iin 1>V the dyke— side a Lady did dwell. Mistress Joan was makin the elder-flower wine. 
At his table head He thought shod look well, '^An'what briiigsthe Laird at sic a like time?" 
M'. PHshs ac daughtcE-w' Clavcrso— ha Lee, She pat aff her aprin,and on her silk g-own, 

A pennyless lass, wi' a lang- pedigree. Her mntehwi'red ribbons, and gaed awa down. 

His wig was weel— pouthord,and as guid as new; An'whcn she ram ben, he honed fn' low, 
His waisteoat was white, his coat it was bine; An' what 'was his errand, he soon let her know; 
He pnt on a ring-, a sword and cncJkf hat, Amazed "was the Laird , when the- Ladyc sHid.n.j, 

An' wlia could refuse the Laird wi' a'that. An' wi' a laigh eurtsie, she turned awa . 

He took the grey mear, an' rade eannily, Dumfunder'd he was, nae sigh did hegic; 

An' ra]>t at the yett o' ClaveiNse-ha Lec^ He mounted his mear; he rodb eannily, 

"Gac tell mistress Jean to come spec di I H ben, And aften he thought, as he gaed tliro'thoglcn. 

She's wanted to speak to the Laird o' Cockpen'' She's daft to refuse the Laird o' Coekpcn .. 

Yhk cvpjress wreaTh. 



O, Lady, twine no wreath for me. 
Or twine it of the .cypress trcei 
Too licvly glow the lily's lig'ht, 
The varnish'd holly's all too bright! 

The May — flower and the eglantine, 
May shade a hrow less sad than mine. 
Rot, Lady, weave no wreath for me, 
Or weave it of the cypress tree] 

Let dimpled mirth his temples twine 
With tendrils of the laughing- vine ; 
The manly oak , the pensive y ew , 
To patriot and to sage be due : C 



Same Air. 

The myrtle bough bids lovers live. 
Rut" that Matilda will not give; 
Their, Lady, weave no wreath for me. 
Or twine it of the cypress tree! 

Let merry F.ngland proudly rear 

Her boasted roses bought so dear; 

Let Albyn bind her bonnet blue, 

"With heath and harc=hell dipt in dew.. 

\ 

On favor^l Erin's crest be seen, 
The flower she loves of emerald green; 
Hut, Lady, twine no wreath for me, 
Or twine At of the cypress tree! 



HILL YE GO TO THE EWE-BIGHT'S MARIOS' 



3 7 




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Will ye go to the ewe_bughts, Mi-rion, And wear to the 



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nae half sae sweet as thee. The sun shine* sweet my 




Ma — rion, But nae half sae sweet as thee. 



Marion's a bonny lass, 

Anil the Myth blink's in her e'e; 
And fain wad I marry my Marion, 
- &in Marion 'wad marry me. 

1 ve nine milk ewes, my Marion, 

A cow and a brawny quey; 

111 giV them a' to my Marion 

Jtlst on her bridal day. 

And ye's get a green sey apron, 

And waistcoat of the London brown; 

And vow! but ye will be vap'ring, 
"Whene'er ye gang" to the town, 

Im young and stout, my Marion, 

Nane dances like me on the green. 

And gin yc forsake me, Marion, 
111 e'en draw up wi' Jean. 



'WILL YE GO TO THE tSDIES. 

Same Air. 
Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, 

And leave auld Scotia's shore? 

Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, 

Across th' Atlantic's roar: 



O sweet grows the lime and the orange, 

And the apple on the pine; 
But a' the charms o' the Indies, 
jk Can never equal thine. 

f 

$ O plight me your faith, my Mary. 

X And plight me your lily white hand 

T. O plight me your faith, my Mary! 
I Before I leave Scotia's strain!. 

t c 

t 



38 



The maid of seljha. 



SIMM 




f^Hrtw^ft fe 1 1 1 M rn 



r r" " ' ^ — r- 

In (lie Ji:. 1 1 I lay, I lay in night, mine ryes half—elos'd, lialf. 



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closd with sleep — -Soft mu_sic came to mine ear, Soft mu_sir eame to mine 



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It was the maid of Sel_ma! Her breast was white '.as the 



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Ixi _ som of a Swan, Trcm — bling' on swift *ol _ lin^j waves; Snc 



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rais'd the night _]>' s»ing^ For she knew that my soul 



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voice; She came on my tronb — lc<l soul, Ijikc a beam on the 



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lark Iieav _ lng 1 o _ cean, 



"Wlien it hursts from a cloud and 



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briSTht— ens the loam _y sirle of a wave. 



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rm'_ ry of joys that are past, plea - sant ami mourn_fnl to the 



40 







ROMAJfflC ESK. 

Air, Fy, g-ar rub her o'er wi' strac. 



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Rojnan tic Esk. what sweets combine To fleck ilk hank and bowV o' 



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thine! ForDowthe sun, -wi' chcer_fu' rays, Glows saft o'er a thy wood— y braes . 



m r r 1 1 J p nim r^^^v^^n 




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♦ it—' — i r f 

"Wtaare mo-nyj na— tive wild flower's seen, 'Mang birks , and briers, and i — vy 



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yj ' tf i i f i n i nfl^u-Wp 



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green. An* a' the woodland chorlsts sing Or glee some flit on wan -ton wing. 



Save -where the Untie, mournfully, 
Sabs sair ancath the rowan tree, 
To see her nest, an' young anes a', 
By thoughtless reaver borne awa . 
Return, return the mourner's care, 
An'ease the bosom o' despair, 
Nor cleed your little heart in steel, 
For nature bad 1 the lintie feel. 



How fresh and fair, o 1 varied hue, 
Ilk tufted haunt o' sweet Buccleugh! 
"What bliss ilk green retreat to hail, 
"Where Melville Castle cheers the vale", 
An'Mavisbank, sae rtiral gay, 
Looks b*nny down the woodland brae! 
But doubly fair ilk darling scene 
That screens the liowers o'Hawthorndeaii. 



Now tent the Pentlands, westlins seen, 

Oersyread wi' flowery pastures green} 

"Where, stretching wide, the fleecy ewes 

Rin bleating round the sunny knowes. 

An' mony a little siller rill 

Steals gurgling down its mossy hillj 

An' vernal green is ilka tree, 

On bonny braes o' "Woodhouselee . 



41 




Yhis is jvo my aijt house. 



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Jacobite. 



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O, this is do my ain house, I ken by the big— gin ni; For 




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bow—kail thrave at my door cheek, And thristles on the rig— gin of. A 



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Carle came wi' laek o' grace, Wi' un _ Co gear and mi — co lace; Am 



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sin' he claim d my dad — dy's place; I dow— na bide the trig— gin (ft , 



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Wi' routli o' kin, and roirth o' reek* Then was it dink, or was it donee. 

My daddy's door it wadna steek '■, For ony cringing - foreign goose, 

But bread and cheese werr^his door— ehc-ek, To claucht my daddy's wee bit house, 



And girdle— cakes the riggin o't. 

0,this is no my ain house, &c. 



\? 



And spoil the hamely triggin at 
0,this is no my ain house, &< 



My daddy biggd his housie weel, 
By dint o' head, and dint r& heel, 
By dint o' arm, and dint o' steel, 
And muckle weary priggin o't . 

C),this is no my ain house, &c. 



Say, was it foul, or was it fair, 
To crime a hunder mile and mair, 
For to ding out my daddy's heir, 

And dash him wi? the whiggin ot? 
0,this is no my ain house, &< . 



4 C J 



M->w with 
Expression 



L^DIT KFJVMr/tE. 



Jacohite. 



iftMjir I j,j i n- j hi HUi 



*0 wash that drap frab aiff your (IkcK, Sae like flic her— ri 



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d; An' wash that 



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(trap frac aff your limv, 'Mang' ra__vcn locks maist hid.' 



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"I wadna wash th*t drap awa. 
That is ancafh my cc, 
I wadna wash that frac my hrow, 
For a that cartli cou'd g-ir . 

'> ' "When merry fid, and guilty hands 

Profan'd the haly rude, 
Twas a' that pity had to spare, 

Twa draps' rv' KmnmTire's hludr ■ '' 





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\,\ ; O po_ver:_ ty parts g-ood <<>m_pa _ ny. Tod _ lin liamc, 



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Tod_lin harm. Oh! ''iinl-na my hue crnne toil— "lilt Jum< 



|h*4J^jh^ 




fcUf-^-ii 



But 1 minrl the Imo when things win nae s.,< , 

Welcome I wa«( and ay hidden f<> sta\ 

Ahinow I am wed to a sad druken man, 
And he'll no mend, do a' that I ran. 
Todlin name, &c. 

Be warned, ye maids, and tak my advice, 
Before that ye wed he canny and nice? 
Ye may hae your plagues I for wha has nae < arc:) 
But an ill-married wife has surely far mail ! 
Todlin hame, &c. 



•-^•-~ "=»•-">•-?>•-?>• 



Be sure your lad's jruid, and keeps the- kirk weel, 
Frac Ma.rkets and Fairs was ne'er seen ro'r'ecl; 
If active, and honest, and never seen fon. 
Repentance, like mine, will no fa' to you . 
Todlin hame-, <tc. 



•<=><-■ 



JMY AIJV FIRESIDE, 



V 



,S.nru' Air. 



0,1 hae seen great anes, and sat in great ha's , 
Mang Lords, and mang Ladies, a' covered wi'braw s; 
At feasts made for Princes, wi' Princes Ive been, 
Wliar the grand shine o' splendor has dazzled my < ' n . 
But a sight sae deligbtf ul, I trow, I ne'er spied , 
As the bonny blyfhe blink o' my ain fireside . 

Ancc mair, Heaven he praised: round my ain heartsonte fugle, 

Wi' the friens o' my youth, I cordially mingle; 

Nae force now upon me, to seem wae or glad; 

I may laugh when I m merry, and sigh when I'm sad . 

My ain fireside, my ain fireside, 

O sweet is the blink ©Vmy ain fireside. 



\ae false-hood to dread, nae malice to fear, 
But truth tt> delight me, and kindness to cheer; 
O' a' roads t<> pleasure - that ever were tried, 
There's lune half sure as anc's ain fireside. 
My ain fireside, my ain fireside, 
O sweet is the blink o' my ain fireside. 



44 



BE VTA RE O* BO^WJVIE A JT^V. 




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Ye gal _lahfs bright, I redd yon right, Bc_wai 



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bon _ nie Aim; Her come _ ly face sae fir' <>' grace, Your 



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Youth, grace, and love, attendant move, 

And pleasure leads the van; 
In a' their charms and. conquering- arms, 

They wait on bonnic Ann., 
The captive hands may chain the hands, 

But love enslaves the man; 
Ye gallants bra-w, I redd yon a". 

Beware o> bonnie Ann . 



AMYJVfJL. 



45 



Air_ My Apron Dearie. 




.Through regions remote, in vain do T rove, AlasJ'tis too late at thy fate to repine; 

And hid tlie wide ocean, secure me from love; Poor shepherd! Amynta no more can he thine; 

O fool, to imagine that might ran suhdue Thy tears are all fruitless, thy wishes are vain". 

A love so well founded, a passion so true ! The moments neglected return not again. 

O what had my youth with amhition to do! O what hard my youth with amhition to do] 

Why left I Amynta! why hroke T my vow! Why left I Amynta! why hroke I my vow! 
Ogn\c me my sheep, and my sheep hook restore, Ogive me my sheep, and my sheep hook rcstori 

And 1 11 wander from love and Amynta no more. And 111 wander from love and Amvnta no m< 



re. 

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46 



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like the cloirrfs of car_ly day, Soon my sor_rows fled a _w ay, "When 



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bloom_in£ r s"w*eet 9 aivf sinil _iii£' g*<*\* T met my ,"win._sf»n>c Ma — 



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Wha ran sit wi' odoomy brow, 
Blest wi' sir a charming" lassie. 
Native scenes, 1 think on you, 
Vet the change 1 • anna rue : 
Wand'ringf many a weary mile , 
Fortune scem'd to low'r the while ; 
But now she's fficn me, for the toil , 
My honnie winsome Marv. 



Tho' our riches are hut few, 
Faithful love- is aye a treasure^ 
Ever chiary, kind and true, 
Vane hut her I e'er ean loc. 
Wear me, a' ye- Powers above,! 



Pow'rs of sacred truth and love! 
While I live I'll constant prove 
To my dear winsome Mary . 



The soldier .*/vn Toil. 



Air_ Alloa House. 




The soldier may toil on the Sim_heat_en plain, And the ma_ii— ner 

£L ,1 — --. z± — .^-i- — S. 





When Nature is Imslifi to her deepest repose, 

When the moon — h< ams appear on. each mountain to sleep; 
Then the slave is forgetful to number his woes,. - 
The jj-uilty to tremble, the wretched to weep . 
Why then cannot silence my quiet restore* 
VVliv ily my short slumbers, nor visit me more? 
Ah! slumber could once ev'ry tumult bcjruilc, 
And in every soft dream was my Emily's smile. 

Return, ye loved visions, all powerful to please J 

I\ct me wake to the woes of rt-membrance no more; 
Not (he ma^fic of sound can my bosom appease, 
Oh, Then the best solace of sorrow restore; 

T.et me dream of live joys I delighted to weave, 
When Hope could each frown of my fortune relieve, 
Winn the spirit of rapture my bosom bcg-uilod, 
And Fancy, untrue as my Emily, smiled . 



4S 



OH, OJTOCHRI OH I 

Massacre of Glencoe \69\. 





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On my knees I prayed in vain, 

Oluonnc hri,&< .■. 
They wad naerest tilla'were slain, 

Ohymorhri, &c 
But tho'fwas done in de.id o' night, 

Olv>nochri, <fcc. 
OJ t \was seen hy heav'ns light, 

Oh/>norhri,&' . 



A* was peace in onrwild Glen, 

Olyinochri, &c. 

Till entered by these cruel men, 

Olyinochri, &c. 

These high hills were nae defence, 

Oluonochri,&c. 

Tiny spar'd not age nor innocence, 
Oh.onochri, &c. 



4:9 



SIR DAVID GR.EME. 



Old Ballad. 




The do'c flew easr-? The do'e flew w est, The do'e flew far a_yont the 





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fell, An' sair at e'en she scem'd dis._trcst. But wh t pcr—plcxVl her con d na tell, 

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And aye she cried, curdoe>, curdoo, 
An' ruffled a' her feathers fair, 

An' lookit sad, an' wad na bnw 

To taste the sweetest finest %^re, ., 

The Lady pined, an' sair did blame, 
She didna blame the bonnie do'c, 

But sair- she blamed Sir David Graeme, 
Wha now to her had broke- his vow. 



The Lady to her window hied, 

Thai opened. o'er the banks o'Tync, 
An' 0,alatkj she said, ah sighed, 

".Sure evrry heart is blythc but mine. 

Wharc hae ye been my bonnic do'e, 

That I hae icd wi' bread and wine; 
As reiving' a'. this country throuffh, 



Oh! 



vc this faose luve o' mine. 



He swore by moon an' stars sae brig-ht , 
An' by their bed o' grass sae green , 

To meet her there onLammas nig-hf, 
Whatever dang-ers lay between . 

To risk his fortune and his life, 

To bear her frac- her Father's ha'; 

To g"i'c her a' the lands o'Drife, 

An' wed wi' her for gude an' a'. 

The day arrivc-d , the evening* came, 
The Lady looked wi' wistful e'e, ' 

But,0, alack; her noble Graeme, 

Frac e'en to morn,she could na see. 

An' ilka day she sat an' grat, 

An' ilka nig-ht she sat an'wToug-ht, 
Ay wig-hten this, and blaming- that, 

But b9 the cause she never thought . 

The Sun had drunk frac Reider fells,.. 

"His beverag-e o' the morning' dewj. 
The w-ild fowl slumbered in the dells, 

The heather hung- its bells o' blue . 

The lambs were skipping - on the brae, 
In airy notes the shepherd sung-; 

The laverock hail'd Hit jocund day- 
Till ilka thicket sweet I j rung". 



The do'e sat .on the window tree, 
An' held a lock o' yellow hair; 

She perclied upon the Lady's knee, 
An' carefully she placed it there . 

VVha can this mean, it is' the same, 
Or en.se my senses me beguile; 
This lock belonged to Da\id Graeme, 
-The flower <>' a' the British isle. 

It isna cut wi' sheers or knife, 
But frac his haffits torn aw T a 1 

I ken he lo'ed me as his life, 
But this I canna read ava." 

The do'e flew east, the do'c flew west, 
The do'c flew far ayont the (fell, 

An' back she cam wi' panting" breast 
At ringing- o' the castle hell . 

She lighted on the hally tap, 

An' c ried/curdoo' an' hung" he-F winy; 
Then flew- into the Ladys lap, 

An' there she dropped a diamond riot; 

What can this mean: it is the- same, 
Or ense my senses me- beguile- 1 

This ring 1 jjfavr' to David Graeme, 

The, bravest Knight in Britain's lsl< V 



50 



The highland character. 



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heafh_cov_erd moun_tains of Seo_tia -we comcj Where the Ro_mans en_ 



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lea_vourd our coun_try to gain, But our An_ocs_tnrs fought, and tjicy 



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,i\\s, That, like our An_ces_tors of old, we stand by free_doms causej We'll 



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brave_ly fight, like he_roes l>riglif,for lio_nonr and ap_i>lausc, And dc — 



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fy flic French, with all their arts, to al _ tcr nur law j 



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No effeminate customs our sinews unbrace} 
No luxurious tables enervate our race} 

Our loud-sounding- pipe breathes <hc true martial strain, 
So do we the old Scotish valour retain . 
Such our lovc-,<Src. 

We're tall as the oak on the mount of the vale, 
And swift as the roe which the hound doth assail; 
As the full moon in. autumn our shields do appear} 
Minerva would dread to encounter our spear. 
Such otrr love,«SL-c. 

As a storm in the ocean when Boreas blows, 
So are we enraged when we rush on our foes ; 
We sons of the mountains, tremendous as rocks, 
Dash the force of our foes with our thundering- strokes . 
Such our love, etc-. 

Quebec and Cape Breton, the pride of old France, 
In their troops fondly boasted till we did advance; 
But when nur claymores they saw tis produce, 
Their conraffe did fail, and they sued for a truce-. 
Such our lovc,«£rr« . 



In our land may the fury of faction long- cease; 
May our councils be wise, and our commerce increase, 
And in Scotia's cold climate may each of. 'lis find, 
That our friends still prove true and our beauties prove kind . 
Then well defend our liberty, our country,and our laws, 
Ami teach our late posterity to fig-lit in Freedom's cause, 
That they, like our Ancestors hold , for honour and applause, 
May defy the French, with all their art.s to alter our law s . 



5 l 2 



O'ER 7HE MUIR AMAJTG IHE HEATHER. 




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CJoinin thro' flic < raigs o' Kj lo,A_mang the bonnie lilonmin heather, 



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Oor flic muir a_mang <hr hca_ther. O'er the muir a_matig flic hpa _ thcr? 







.Says 1, my dear, whare is fliy hame . 

In moor or 'fale-, p'ray,te II mo whether; 
She says, I tenf thac flrrry flocks 

That feed amano fhe blooming heather . 
Orr the muir amang the- heather, 

O'er the muir am a rig- flic heather; 
She says, I font tliac'fleery Chirks 

That feed amang flic bloominghcathcr ! 

Wc sat iff- down upon a hank, 

Sac warm and sunny was the weather ; 
She left her flocks at large to rove 

Amano; the bonnic blooming heather. 
Oct the mnir' amang the heather, 

Ocr the mnir amang the heather, 
S'hf left her Clocks at large to rove 

Amang fhe bonnic blooming heather . 
C 



"While thus we sat she sung' a sang, 

Till echo rang a mile and farther, 
And ay the hurden rfl the sang, 

"Was, o'er fhe muir amang- the heather. 
Oer the muir amang the' heather, 

Ocr the- mnir amang the heather, 
Anel ay fhe burden o' the sang 

Was'.'ei'er the muir amang the heather'' 

She channel my heart, anel ay sinsyne , 
I could na think on ony ithcr; 

By sea and sky! she shall be mine! 

The bonnie lass amang the heather. 

Oe-r the muir amang the heather, 

tf'er.flic muir amang the heather; 

By -sea and sky! she shall be mine! 
* The bonnic lass amang the heather. 



55 

LAMENT" OF MARY, QVEEJV OF SCO'/S, <>» the APPROACH of SPKlM 



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Now na _turc hang's her man_t]c green On ll _ ka blooming 



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free, And spreads her sheets o' <lais— ies "white Out owre tlie £fras _ sy lea. 



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(f«w Hioehns cliears the crystal streams, 

And glads the azure skies; 
But nought ran glad the weary wight 

That fast in durance lies. 



And I m the sovrcign o' Scotland, 
And mony a trailor there; 

Yet here 1 lie in foreign hands 
And never-ending - care. 



Now laverocks wake the merry morn, 

Aloft on dewy wing-; 
The merle, in his noontide bow-'r, 

Makes woodland echoes ring. 



But as for thee, thou false woman, 

My sister and my fae , 
Grim vengeance, yet, shall whet a sword, 

That thro' thy soul shall g-ae. 



The mavis mild,wi' many a note, 
Sings drowsy day to rest; 

In love and freedom they rejoice, 
Wi'oare nor thrall opprest . 

Now blooms the lily by the hank, 
The primrose down the brae; 

The , hawthorn's budding in the glen, 
And milk-white is the slac. 



The weeping blood in woman's breast 

Was never known to thee; 
Nor th'balm that draps,on wminds of woe, 

Frae woman's pitying ce. 

My son; my soul may kinder stars 

Upon thy fortune shine; 
And may those pleasures gild thy reign. 

That ne'er wad blink on mine ! 



The meanest hind in fair Scotland 
May rove their sweets amarjf ; 

But I, the Queen of a' Scotland, 
Maun lie in prison Strang. 



God keep thee frae thy mother's faes, 

Or turn their hearts to thee; 
And where thou meet'st thy mother's friend, 

Remember him foi mc! 



I was the Queen o' bonnie France, 
"Where happy I hae been ; 

Fit' lightiy raise T in the morn, 
As blythe lay down at e'en. 



O; soon, to me, may summc-r suns 
Nae mair light up the morn! 

Nae mair, to nit, the autumn winds 
Wave o'er the yellow corn . 



And in the .narrow house o' death 

Let winter round me rave; 
And the next flow'rs that deek the spring 

Bloom on my peaceful grave. 



C 



54 



MUSIJfG OJV* r'HF. ROARI+YG OCF.AJ<\ 

Air_Drirmion Dnl.lj. 

■a- 





vides my love and mo; 



Hope and fears alternate 'tsiltow, 
Yielding- late t*> natures' law," 

Whispering spirits, round mj pillow, 
Talk of him that's far m.i. ; 



Ye whom sorrow never wnfmcted, 
Y"e who never shed a tear, 

Care untroubled, joy surrounded, 
G-audy day to you is dear. 



Grn'l' nijilit, do thou befriend me*, 

■Ddwiiy sleep, thy curtain draw; 
Spirits liind,ag-ain attend me, 
Talk of him that's far awa . 

/ ! M WE A fi/JV" A WA , 2/OHJV. 



t^ith tender] 

F.cling 



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I'm wear in a _ wa, John., Like Snaw- _ wreathes in 



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thaw, John, Im wear_in a _wa To the land o' the leal. There's 



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nae snr—row there, John,. There's nei_lher cauld nor care, J' -lui ; Xl> 



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day's ay fair I' the land <>' the .Leal, 



iisa 



Our bonnie bairns there, John, 
She was" baith gnid and fair, John; 
And oh! we grndg d her sair 

To the land o' the leal . 
But sorrows sel wears past, John, 
And Joy's a comin fast, John, 
The Joy that's ay to last, 

In the land o' the leal. 



Sae dear's that Joy was >ioughr, John, 
Sac free the battle fought, John,' 
That siufu' man ter brought 

To the land o' the leal. 
Oli! dry your glisr'ning ee, John, 
My sau.1 land's to be free, John, 
And Angels beckon me 

To the land o' the- leal." 



.-i».-3».-3>.-3».-:;, 



Oh! hand ye leal and trtre , John, 
Your day its wearin thro^ John, 
And 111 welcome yon 

To the land o' the leal. 
Now fare ye weel, my ain John, 
This warld's cares are vain, John, 
We'll meet, and we'll be fain, 

In the land o' the leal.. 



jjebe's To The 

Here's to rlie -iting, Sir , 
Ye ken wha I mean; Sir, 
And to every honest man 
That will do't again . 

Chorus. 
Fill, fill your bumpers high! 
£)rain, drain your glasses dry. 
Ont upon them^fy! fy! 
That winna do't again . 

Here's to the Chieftains 
Of the gallant Hieland clans ; 
They hae done mair than anrc, 
And will do't again. _ Fill, tr . 



KIJVG, SIR. Same Air. 

When you hear the trumpet sounds, 
Tutri, taifi, to the drums; 
Up your swur.ds , and down your guns, 
And to-*he louns again ._Fill,&c. 

Here is to the king o» Swede, 
Fresh laurels crown his head,. 
Shame fa' every sneaking blade 

That winna do't again. Fill,&c. 

But to mak a' things right, now, 
He that drinks maun fight, too, 
To shew kis hearl's trprio-ni too , 

And that he'll dot again. Fill, «*•< . 

C 



S6 




7 HE BOJfJS*lEST LASS IJV A> THE WARLD. 



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The bonniest lass in a' the Tvarld, Ive of ten heard them 



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tell_in£f, She's up. the hill, she's down the glen, She's in yon lone_ly 



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dwell _ing. But nane could bring her t<i my mind, "Wlia lives but in tlie 



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Now lassies a' keej> a g-ude heart, 

Nit e'er envie a comrade, 
"For he yeVe e'en black, blue, or grey, 

"V't're bonniest aye to some lad. 
The tender heart, the cheering smile, 

The trutli that ne'er will falter, 
Are charms that never can beguile, 

And time can never alter. 



-There's jtoughT ThaT ever met The eve. s ; ,meAi. 



There's nought 'that ever met the eve, 

In land or on the ocean, 
Or soared unto the Heav'n high, 

That filld wi' sic emotion^ 
As she, sae rare, sae sweet and fair, 

"Without a peer to equal; 
W her nane dare ere to compare, 

She's bonniest in the warl. 



As pp'ning day,in summer morn, 

Rcsplended in its beaming; 
As Borealis illumes the night, 

In all its beauties streaming. 
As the fairy queen in airy dreams, 

In fancy draws nae par'llel; 
So bonnie Bell in beauty seems 

The Peer o' a 1 the warl . 



51 



Plaintive 



SOJTG OF SKL.MA. 

Second iVoicc. 



— ' ^ . .>ccon n ivoicc . am i i — 



miin,Carri],andRy-nr>, "Voi-cg of the days of old, lyt mo 







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vc sons nf song-, in what hall of the clouds Is ynur restf, do you 



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touch the Shadowy harji, Rob'd with raorninu- mist ,■ where the ris_in<j- Sun comes 



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forth from his green -head— ed waves j* from his {{Teen head_ed waves ; 



on Ms green _hca<l_ccl waves f Irom his {{Teen head_ea wives ; 



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Bon_nie wee thing, can_ny wee thing', Love—ly wee thing, wert thou mine, 



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I wad wear thee in my bo_ som,- I^cst my Jcw_.cl I should tine. 



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"Wish_ ful _ly T look, and Ian _guish,In that bon_nie face <>' thine; 



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And m}' heart it stoimds wi* an _ guish, Ijcst my wee thing - be- na mine. 



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Wit and grace, and love and beauty, 

In ac constellation shine? 
To adore thee is. my dirty. 

Goddess o' this soul o' mine. 
Bonnie wee thing, Ac. 

,.-5>-^.^.^.-= > .^.-e&.^.«5-.«s-.€"«£"<S"€"<§"€- 



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LORD JROJK4LD MY SOJV*. 



Old Ballad. 



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O whare hae ye been, Lord Ronald, my son? O whare hae ye 



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been Lord Ro_nald, my son? I hae been to the wild -wood, O make my -bod 



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soon, For I m wea_ry wi' the lion— tin, and fain wad lie down, 

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vVkare gat ye ye're dinner, Lord Ronald, my son? 
Whare gat ye ye're dinner, my bonny young- man?" 
I dined wi' my true luvc; Mither mak my bed soon, 
For Im sick, and Im weary, and lain wad lay down. 

'Svhat got ye to dinner, Lord Ronald, my soni 
What got ye to dinner, my bonny young man? 

'l got eels boiled in broo; Mither mak my bed soon, 
For Im sick at the heart, and lain wad lay down! 

"And whar's a' ye're blood — hounds, Lord Ronald, m\ s"nr 
O- whar's a' ye're blood-hounds, my darling young nun? 

'O they swcil'd, and they died, and so will I soon, 
For life is a burden, that I maun lay dnwn'. 

Ivc rocket your cradle, Loi d Ronald, my son, 

I ve rocket your cradle. Lord Ronald, my son; 

* 

My heart it was light, and the tears they ran down, 
But oh! they were sweet, and they dried again soon. 



lVe made jeVe bed saftly, Lord Ronald, my son, 
I've made ye're bed saftly, Lord Ronald, my" son;. 
Gin it be deadly poison, that makes ye lie down, 
They're happm* yc now, that will follow jc s< 



.1" 



60 



THOV AR? GA.XF AWA FRAK .\1F,MARV. 





Tlinn art g-ane a-wa, Thou art-ganc a _wa , TIiott art g-ane a_ 



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What e'er he said,or might pretend, 

That stole that heart of thine, Mary, 
True lovc,lm siirc,was ne'er his end, 

Or nae sir love as mine, Mary. 
1 spoke sincere, nor flafter'd much, 

Ha.) no tin-worthy thoughts, Mary; 
\iiih?.f ion, -wealth, nor naefhing- sur h ; 

\o, T lovd only thee, Mary. 

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Tho'youve been false, yei -while I live 

No other maid I'll -woo, Mary; 
Till friends forget, and 1 forg-ive, 

Thy wrongs to them and me, Mary. 
So then,farewell, of this he sure. 

Since you've been lalsc to me, Mary; 
For all the -world, I'd not endure 

Hall what I've done for tliee, Mary. 



7'H KEF'S CAILD KAIL LV ABERDEEN 



61 




There's cauld Kail in A_ber_dccn, There's castocks in Stra'bogie, Ami 





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m'nn rtnd (en, thc^rcblyfho rtii'l htin, That hand them frae the cn_crie # Nru 



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hand ye frae flic f'o_gic lads, O bide ye frae the <" _ gie, I'll 



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tell ye true, ye'll never rue, 



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Young "Will was braw and weel put on, 

Sae blyfhe was bo and vogie, 
And he got bonny Mary Don, 

The flower o' a Strathhogie . 
Wha wad bac thought, at wooin time , 

He'd e'er forsaken Mary] 
An' taen him to (he tipydin trade, 

Wi' boozin Rob and Harry. 

Sair Mary wrought, sair Mary grat, 

She scarce could lift the -ladle, 
Wi' pithless feet, 'tween ilka greet, 

She'd rofk (he borrow'd cradle. 
Her weddin' plonishin was g-ano. 

She never thought to borrow ; 
Her bonny fare was waxin wan, 

And "Will wrought a' the sorrow. 



He's rcelin' hame ae -winter night, 

Some later nor the gloaming 
He's tean the rig, he's miss'd the brig", 

And bogie's orjre him foamin'. 
"Wi' broken banes, out our the stanes, 

He creepit up Stra'bogie, 
And a the night he pray'd wi' might 

To keep him frae the coo-ie. 

Now Mary's heart is light again, 

She's neither sick nor si11> ; 
F"or auld or young nae sinfu' tongue 

Could e'er entire her Willie. 
And aye the sang thro Bogie ratio-, 

f had ye frae the cogin, 
The weary gill's the sairrst ill 

On braes o' f.iir Stra'b •g'ii . 



The b^Ti'ie of boTmwell brig.* 

Fought 16' 79. 




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toun, >"■ r Hiatus the thing thai ean — na be. For T am sworn to 





So F.arlstotin rose in Hie morn, 

An' mounted hy the hreak o' clay* 
An' he has joined our Scottish lads, 

As they were marching- out the waj . 
"Wow farcweel Faither, fareweel Mither, 
An' fare ye weel my Sisters three; 
Art' fare ve weel, sweet Karlstonn, 
For thee again I'll never see ! 
* This Battle was fought on the 22"? June 1670. after a brave resistance; the 



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So they're am to Bothwell — hii I , 

An' waly they rode honnily! 
When the Duke r>> Monmouth saw !hem cumin. 
He radc to view their companie. 
"Ye're welcome, Lao's' 1 then MonmoUtli said, 
"Ye're welcome, hrave Scots Lads, to 
And sae are ye, hrave F.arlstou-i, 

The foremost <»' your companie . 

"Rnl yield your weapons am an' a', 

O yield your weapons, Lads, to m< ; 
For g-in ye yield your weapons up, 

Yc'se a g-ae hame to your- conntric'.' 
Out up then spak a Lennox lad, 
And waly he spak honnily! 
"I winna yield my weapons up 
To you or ony man 1 seeV 

Then he set up the flag- »' red, 

A' set ahout wi' bonny blue. 
"Sin 1 ye'll no cease, and be al peace, 

See that ye stand hy i'her trucJ' 
They stell'd their cannons on the height, 

And shower'd their shot down in the how, 
An 1 beat our Sects lads even down; 

Thick they lay slain on every know el 

As e'er ye saw the rain down fa', 

Or yet the arrow frae the bow, 
Sae our hrave lads fell even down, 

An' (hey lay slain on ever} knowe ! 
"O, hand your hand" then Monmouth cry'd, 
"trie quarter to yon men for me!' 
But wicked Clavers swore an oath , 

His cornet's death reveng-'d sud be. 

"O, baud your hand'' he cry'd ag-ain, 
"If ony thing- you'll do for me; 
Hand up your hand, you cruel Graham 

Else a rebel to our king ye'll be." 
Then wicked Clavers furn'd about, 

I wot an angry man was he; 
And he has lilted up his. hat, 

And cry'd, "God bless his Majestic!" 

Then he's awa to London Town, 

Ay, e'en as fast as he can drcc; 
Fause witnesses he's ta'en wi' him , 

And ta'en Monmouth's head frae his bodic. 
Alang- the brae ayont the brig, 

Mony brave men lie cauld and still; 
But lang- we'll mind, and sair we'll rue, 
The bludie battle <>' Rothwell-hill . 
ammunition of the Presbyterians failing-, they were forced to retreat havi'.n 
700 dead upon the field. 



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W7/.7* 7*7/0/' /?/<; . WV DEARIE. 




Wilt (lion h'e my rlear_ic? When sr,r _ row -wring's !dy 



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Tassie, say thou loes me, 
Or if lliou wilt na ho my ain , 
Say na fhoti'lt refuse me; 
If it winna, canna be, 
Thou for thine may chxise me , 
Let me, Lassie, <iTtickly die, 
Trusting- that thou lo'es me. 
Tassie, let me quickly die, 
Trusting- that fhou loVs mo . 



YWEEDSIDE. 



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na tare and fan_cy ex- ceed. No ,.dai_ sy, nor -sweet blush_ing 





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Tlie warblers are heard in the grove, 

The linnet ,the lark, and the thrush, 
The blackbird, and sweet— cooingdove, 

With music enchant every bush. 
Come, let us go forth to the mead, 

Lets see how the primroses spring; 
We'll lodge in some village on Tweed, 

And love, while the feathcr'd folks sing. 



'Tis she does the virgins excel, 

No beauty with her may compare; 
Love's grraces around her do dwell; 

She's fairest,where thousands arc fair. 
Say, charmer, where do thy flocks stray ? 

Oh! tell me at noon where they feed? 
Is it on the sweet- winding Tay, 

Or pleasanter banks of the Tweed ? 



66 



O FARE YE WE EL, MY AVLD WIFE. 



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strerer -op .. , sturt and strife; The maut's a_hnon the meal flic night wi' some. 



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And fare ye weel, my pyke staff. 

Sing- bum, bibery, bum; 
And fare ye weel, my pyke_staff, 

Sing- bum . 
And far' ye weel, my pyke_ staff, 
Vac m.iir wi'. you, my wife, I'll baff; 
Tlir maut's aboon . the meal the nig-ht 

"Vyi 1 some . 



SHALL MONARCHY BE QJJIT'E FORGOT". 




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thing': Are Scots _ mens hearts now grown so told, the veil so o'er their 



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ind, Tliat they can nev_er once rc_flect On anlil lang _ syne? 



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In days of yore ye were renown d -, 

Conspicuous was your fame ; 
All nations they did honour you, 

Your loyalty proclaim. 
Ye did your ancient rights mantain, 

And liberty defend, 
And scorn^l to have' it said, that you 

On Kngland wou'd depend . 

But now, alas ! your case is changd, 

You're wretched and forlorn; 
"The hardships now impos d on you, 

By slaves are only borne . 
Oh,Calcdoni oh,Caledon! 

It grieves me sair, to think 
That thy sad story written is 

With blood, instead of ink.. 



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How oft have our forefathers bled 

In Liberty's defence' 
And shall we have it stol'n away 

By Ocrman Influence? 
The price of so much Scot ish blood 

Shall we consent to tine? 
And will we not, alas! reflect 

On auld lang—sync ? 

When 1 great Sir William Wallace liv'd, 

And his accomplices , - 
Scotland he undertook to free, 

^Wlien she was in distress . 
Likewise Sir James, the black Douglas, 

Who liv'd in Brace's reign; 
These men spard not their blood to spill, 

Kor auld lang_syne . 



Scotland, what will become of thee, 

When Kngland sits thy judge? 
Thy banish'd Prince, so long from home,. 

O; where is thy refuge? 
To ruin thee, 'tis plainly seen, 

Must be their black design; 
And will you not, alas, reflect 

On auld lang—sync ? 



Sir John the Gra nic , of lasting fame, 

Shall never be forg'ot; 
He was an honour; to his name, 

A brave and valiant Scot . 
The- g-re-at Montrose, the brave Dundee, 

Were heroes in their time; 
They spar'd not ev'n their mother's sons 

For auld lang_syne . 



Thc-n. let the ever glorious name- 

Of Wallace lead you on; 
Wallace, to save his Country, oft 

F.ngag'd near ten to one : 
Then, rouse, my valiant Scotish lads, 

Behave yourselves like men, 
And Scotland yet again shall see 

Her auld lang_syne . 



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DAIJfTY DATIK. 



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there he -wad eon — ten _ ted crack, Bo— nie dain_ty Da— vie 



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He gat his wark- looms a' in tune, 
To ca' some rackets- in his shoon, 
Tho' wj' a lang day's wark_ sair dung-, 
He was as sfiff?s a reisted rrmg. 
His Meg set by her spinnin— wheel, 
(Whilk helps the heavy time to steal 
.Aw a,) an' sturdily did hook 
The parritch— kettle on the crook; 
While Dainty Davie, &c. 



/ LOF. JVA'A LADDIE Hit AJVE. 



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I loe na a lad_Hie but ane, He Iocs m a las_sie but me; 



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A-il-lin to mak' me his ain, An* his ain I am wil_lin to he. He 



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vowd that bed ev_er be true, And 1 plighted my troth yes— treen. 



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I^et ithers brag" weel o' their gear, 

Their land, and their lordlie degree, 
I carena for ought but my dear, 

For he's ilka thing lordlie to me. 
His words mair than sugar are sweet, 

His sense drives ilk fear far aw-a; 
I listen, poor fool! and I greet; 

Yet how sweet are the tears as thc\ I'a' 



Dear lassiej'he cries wi' a jeer, 

' Ne'er heed what the auld anes will sa\; 
Tho' we've little to brag" o' .ne'er fear, 

What's gowd to a heart- that is wae? 
Our laird has baith honours and wealth, 

Yet seel how he's dwining wi' care; 
Now we, tho' weVe naithing but health, 

Are cantie and leal evermair. 



'O Menie! the heart that is true, 

Has something mair costlie than g~ear; 
Ilk e'en, it has naething to rue; 

I'lk morn, it has naething to fear. 
Ye warldlings, gae hoard up your store," 

And tremble for fear ought ye tyne : 
Guard your treasures wi' lock, bar, and door, 

True love is the guardian o' mine. 



'0 



The avld sTiarTs back again. 



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"Die ayld Stuarts back a-gain, The auld Stuarts back again;Lct 



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Give ear unto my loyal sang, There ye might sec the noble Mar, 

A 1 ye that ken tbe right frae wrang, Wi' Athol , Huntly, and Traquair, 

And a' that look and think if lang Seaforth, Kilsyth, and Anldebair, 

For anld Stuarts 'hack again . And mony mae , whatreck again . 

Were ye wi' me to chase the rae, Then what are a' their westland crews.' 

Out — owre the hills and far away, We'll gar the tailors tack again; 

And saw the lords 'wore lh< re fliaf day, Can they foresfand the tartan trews, 

To bring the Stuarts bad again. And anld Stuarts back again. 

•'~~>-^--&--^-©'-©>^--#'-&-^'-^'-^'-&'^'^'*-^-^-«€-'^->€-<--^-'€--#-««-€~«-'^-.#-'#-'e-' 

GLEJTARA. Gaelic Air. 




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ments f<ir his dear; And her Sire, and the people, are calld to her bier. 



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Glenara came first with the mourners and slirond, 
Her Kinsmen, they follow 'd, btrt mwirnd not aloud: 
Their plaids all their bosoms were folded around; 
They mareh'd all in silence .they looked on the ground. 

In silence they reach'd over mountain and moor, 
To a heath where the oak-tree grew lonely and hoar: 
'Now here let us place the grey stone of her cairn: 
Why speak ye no word? — said Glenara the stern. 

And tell me, I charge you. ye clan of my spouse, 
Why fold je your mantles? why cloud ye your brows?' 1 

So spake the rude chieftain no answer is made, 

But each mantle, unfolding;, a dagger display'd . 

I dreamt of my lady, I dreamt of her shroud', 
Cried a voice from the Kinsmen, all wrathful and loud; 
'And empty that shroud, and that coffin did seem, 
Glenara I Glenara ! now read me my dream I' 



O! 



pale grew the cheek of that chieftain I ween, 



When the shroud was unclos'd and no lady was seen, 
When a voice from the Kinsman spoke louder, in scorn, 
'Twas the youth who had lovM the fair Ellen of Lorn. 

"I dreamt of my lady, I dreamt of her grief, 
I dreamt that her lord >vas a barbarous chief; 
On a rock of the ocean fair Ellen did seem, 

Glenara! Glenara! now read me my dream'' 

i 

In dust, low the traitor has knelt to the jrround , 
And the desert reveal'd, where his lady was found; 
From a rock off the ocean that beauty was borne; 
Now joy to the house of fair Ellen of Lorn . 



72 



fHOV LIJTG'RIJrG ST.iJf. 



m flN-n nil i ^ jiuJbtz^i 



Thou lingring star! with less'nihg ray, That lov\t to gTeet the 





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ear_ly room, A-g"ain thou ushers't in tlie day My Ma_ry from my soul was torn. 



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O ■ Ma— ry, dear depar_ted shade! "Wliere is tliy place of bliss_ful rest? Seest 

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thou thy h>_ver low— ly laid? Hear'st thou the groans that rend his breast? 




That sacred hour can 1 forget! 

Can I forget the hallow d grove, 
Wliere, by the winding Ayr, -we met: 

To live one day of parting love! 
fvternity cannot efface 

Those records dear of transports past! 
1h\ Image, at our last embrace! 

Ah! little thought we 'twas our last. 



Ay gtirgiinjf kiss'd his pebbled shore, 

Oerhung with wild woods thickening green; 
The fragrant birch and hawthorn hoar, 

Twin'd amorous round the rapturd scene: 
The flowers sprung wanton to be prest, 

The birds sung love on every- spray, 
Till too, too soon, the glowing west 

Proclaim'd the speed of winged day. 



StiR o'er these scenes my mem'ry wakes, 

And fondly broods, with miser care; 
Time but th'impression, stronger makes, 

As streams their channels deeper wear. 
My Mary, dear departed shade! 

"Where is thy place of blissful rest? 
Seest thou thy lover lowly laid ? 

Hear'st thon the groans that rend his breast? 



ff*4l P *4K4 FBAF, ,*/£% POAUID. 



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What <>are I for »• your . wealth, An 



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My Jamie is a g'allanf youth, 

I lo'e hut him alane, Donald, 
And in bonnie Scotlands isle, 

Like him there is nane, Donald . 
Hand awa, bide awa, 

Haud awa frae' me, Donald, 
What care I for a' your wealth, 

An' a' that ye can tjie, Donald. 



He wears nae |>laid, or tartan hose, 

Nor garters at liis knee, Donald, 
Bnt, oh, lie wears a faithfu' heart, 

And love blinks in his cc, Donald. 
Sae, Haud awa, bide awa, 

Come nae mair at e'en, Donald; 
I wadna break my Jamie's heart, 

To be a hieland Queen, Donald. 



74 



O G/JV MY- LOVE WERE VO»V BED HOSE. 




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O grin my love were yon red msc, tlia) gfrnus upnn the Castlewa', An 1 



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T mysel a drap o' dew, , Dnwj nn that red rose I wad fa . O my love's 



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bonnie, bonnie, bonnie , O my love's bonnie and fair to see^Sae bonnie tlie 



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Oivirc my love yon liliai fair, 

Wi' purple blossoms ro the spring-, 

An' 1 a bird to shelter there, 

"When wearied on m> little wing. 
O my love's, &•<■ . 



Howl wad mourn when it was torn 

By .Autumn wild an' Winter rude ; 

But I wad sing on wanton wing - , 

■When youthfu'May its bloom renew d. 
O my love's, &c. 



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CJkVLD FROSTY .MORJV1JVG. 

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vember blaws o_ver the plain, I heard the kirk_hclL re_i>eat the load warning, As. 

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-lent night, Sad lv to muse on the cause ol m\ (tain. 



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Cauld shone the silver moon, heedless ol sorrow, 

Stars, dimly twinkling, were lost in her beam, 
The fair sun, preparing to rise on the nmrrow, 

Ne'er shone more lovely on fountain or stream. 
Not sun, moon, and stars, bright shining by night or 

Nature all hoary, or blooming all fresh and gay, 
E'er from the *ad heart its sorrow can charm away, 

While restless it seeks for sweet slumber in vain. 



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Mnsjo by R, A, Smith. 



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on, In the grave where a Rrt _ ton has laid him. 



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Cone, fresji and go_ry; We carv'd not a 'line, we rais'd not a 



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"With animated Feeling 




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MY DEAR HIELAND LADDIE 0. 



Slow and 
Tender. 

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Blythe was the time when lie fcc'd wi' my Fa _ tlier, O ; 

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vowd to lie mine, my dear Hie _ land Lad _ die, O". 



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Itnt ah! wars me] \ri' their seidg-cring- sae g-audy, O, 
Tlie Laird's wys'd aw a my braw Hieland\ Laddie , O; 
Misty are the glens, and the dark hills sae- cloudy, O, 
That aye- seemd sae blythe wi' my dear Hieland Laddie, O, 

Thr hlae-berry banks now are lane some an' dreary, O; 
Muddy are the streams that' giish'd down sae elearly, O; 
Silent are the rocks that echoed sae gladly, O, 
The wild-melting" strains o» my <\v<\t Hieland Laddie, O . 

He pu'd me the craw berry, rijie- frac the boggy fen; 
He |>n«l me the strawberry, -red frae the foggy glen; 
He im'd me the rowan,frac the wild steep sae giddy, G j 
S*e loving an' kind was my dear Hieland Laddie, O. 

Kareweel, my ewes! and farcWccl my dng-g-ic, O. 
Farcweel, ye kjiowes, now sae cheerless an' serogg-ic , O. 
Kareweel, Glenfeoch J my Mammy an' my Daddic, O. 
1 nurni Ira' yon a' for my dear Hieland Laddie, O. 



KFJTAWRF.'S OJV AJTD AH\4. 



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O Kenmure's on and i.vi, WilJic, O Kcnnmre's n and a _ 



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Here's Kenmiirc's health in, Wine, "Willie, 

Here's Kenmure's health in Winc^ 
There ne'er was a coward <>' Kenmure's hliidr 

Wor yet o 1 Gordon's line. 
O Kenmure's lads are men, Willie, 

O Kenmure's lads are men; 
Their hearts and swords arc- metal true , 

Arul that their fae s shall ktn . 

There's a rose in Kenmure's eap, Willie, 

There's a ruse in Kenmure's tap; 
He'll steep it red in rueldie hearts blude 

Afore the battle drap. 
His Lady's cheek btcw red , Willie, 

His Laclys cheek grew red, 
When she saw his steely iups put • >ii , 

Anil saw his battle blade . 

They'll live, or die wi' fame, Willie, 

They'll live, or die wi' fame; 
But soon,wi' sounding- victorip, 

May Kenmure's Lord come liame. 
Here's liim that's far aw a, Willie, 

He-rc-'s him that's far awa, 
And here's the flower that 1 1 <'e best, 

The- rose- that's like the snaw. 



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WHEJT BRAVING ANGRY WUVTER^S STORMS. 




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rise, Far .ill their shade my Feg—gy's (harms Firsf blest my wond'ring-cyes 

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Rlcst be the wild-sequester d shade, 

And blest the day and hour, 
Where # Fego^\ charms I first stirveyd, 

When first I felt their powr. 
T|ie tyrant death,with grim confront, 

May seize my fleeting- breath, 
But tearing- Pegfgy from my soul 

Atust be a stronger death. 

o, waT ye wha's ijv yojv* Towjri 




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dou_bly wcl — com e be the spring", The sea _ son to my Jean_ie dear] 




The sun blinks blythe in yon town, 

Amang" the broomy braes sae green; 
But my delight in yon town, 

And dearest pleasure, is my Jean. 
Without my fair, not a' the charms 

O' Paradise could yield me joy; 
But g"ie me Jeanie in my arms, 

And welcome* Lapland's dreary sky.; 
My cave wad be a lovers bow'r, 

Tho' raffing' winter rent 'the airj 
And she a lovely little flower, 

That I wad tent and shelter there. 
O, wat ye wha's, &"c. 



0,swcet is she in yon town, 

The sinking" sun's g"ane down upon; 
A fairer tlian's in yon town, 

His setting- bfams ne'er shone upon . 
If angry fate is sworn my foe, 

And suffering" I am doom'd to bear; 
I,carclcss,<(uit aught else below, 

But spare me, spare me, Jeanie cleart 
For while life's dearest blood is warm, 

Ac thought frae her shall ne'er dcpa'i t : 
And she, as fairest is her form, 

She has the truest,kindest heart . 
0,wat ye wha's, &c. 



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F.'fTRICK BAJfKS. 




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liamo,'F met my las_sie, braw and fight ,WhiIcwand'ring- thro'thc mist her lane. 



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ne_vor,fill this hap_py hour , A ean_ny meet _ing could I find . 



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I said, my lassie will v g.» 

To the hieland hilTs thfecarse to learn, 
I'll gic ye baith a tow and ™r, - 

When ye come (<> Hie brig 1 <>' Earn. 
At I.eith, auld meal fumes in, ne'er fish, 

And herring's at the Broomiclaw; 
Cheer up your heart, my bonny lass, 

There's gear to win we never saw-. 



All day,when we ha'e wrought eneugh, 

When winter frosts, and snaw begin, 
Soon as the sun gaes west the loch, 

At night when ye sit down to spin, 
I'll screw my pipes, and play a spring-, 

III clear my voice, and sing" a sang-; 
I'll tak my bulk , and read to thee, 

And winter nights will no be lang. 



WHEJf FRAGRAJfT WIJTDS AT EVE BLEW SAFT. 

Same Air. 



V hen fragrant winds at eve blew saft, 

And nature cheer d each rural sc enc , 
My lowly Cot with joy I left, 

* To meet my Mary on the green. 
The linnet sung,upon the bush, 

His farewell to the setting" sun j 
Far down the glen, the speckled thrush 
Took up the Strain ere he had done. 
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The zephyrs shed their balmy breath , 

And kiss'd the flowerets on their wax. 
While Levcrn's limpid strcam,bcneath, 

Was glancing in the sunny ray. 
My heart rejoie'd, as 'neath the shade 

With Mary nature's charms I view d. 
'Till nig'ht with silent footsteps sped, 

And ev'ry fragrant flow'r bedewd . 




MY LOVE IS LIKE A BED FED FOSE. 



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O, my love is like a red, red rose, That's newly sprung' in June. O, my 




love is like a me_lo_die That swect_ly play'd in tune. As lair art thou, my 



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bon_nie lass, So deep in love am I; And I -will love thee still, my ' dear, 'Till 



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the seas gang - dry. Till a' the seas ganjf dry my dear, 1 TU1 a" 1 th 



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lry, And I will love thee still, my dear, 'Till a' the seas g"ang dry. 



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Till a' the seas fjanff dry, my dear. 

And the rocks melt wi' the sun? 
And 1 will love thee still, my dear, 
"While the sands of life shall run. 
But, fare thee weel, my onlv lovej 

O fare thee weel awhile! 
And I will come ag~ain, my love, 
Tho' 'twere ten thousand mile. 

Tli"' 'twere ten thousand mile, my love, 
Thn' 'twere ten thousand mile; 
And I will come ajjain, my love, 
Tho' 'twere ten thousand mile. 



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The douglas Tragedy, 



Old Ballad. 




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daugh_tcr of mine Was mar_ried to a Lord un _dcr night 



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''Rise tip, rise up, my seven sons bold, 
And pat on your armour so bright; 
And take better care of your youngest sister. 
For your cldcst's awa the last night. 

He's mounted her on a milk_white steed, 

And himself on a dapple grey, 
With a bugle horn hung down by his side, 

And lightly they rode away. 

Lord "William lookit o'er his left shoulder. 

To see what he could see, 
And there he spierl her seven brethren bold, 

Come riding' over the lee. 

"Light down, light down,. Lady Marg-aret',' he said, 
"And hold my steed in your hand, 
T T ntil that against your seven hrethren bold 
And your Father I make a stand?' 

She held his steed in her milk_white hand , 

And never- shed a tear, 
r T ntil that she saw her seven brethren fa'. 

And her Father who lovd her. so dear . 



87 



"O hold your, hand Lord William! she said 
"For your strokes they are wondrous sair^ 
True lovers I can get mony a ane , 

But a Father I never can get mair'.' 

O she's- tat n oat her handkerchief, 
It was <>' the Holland sae fine, 
And ay she dighted her Father's bloody wounds, 
f That were redder far than the "Wine. 

'O chuse, Ochuse, Lady Margaret,' he said, 

'O, whether will ye gang or hide?' 
"Til gang, I'll gang; Lord William',' she said; 
— . For ye ha'e left me nae other guide'.' 

He's lifted her on her milk-white sit cd , 

And himself on his 'daj)|>le grey, 
With a Bugle horn hung down h'y his side, 

And slowly they haith ratle away . 

O' they rade ; on, and on the ratle, t _ 

"And . a?. ,\iy the light o' the moon, 
Until they cam to yon wan wafer, 
And there they lighted down . 

They lighted down to tak a drink, 

Of the spring that ran sae clear, 
And down the stream ran his gutle hearts hliidt , 

And sair she gaun to fear. - 

O they rade on, and on the rade}'^ 

And fair and clear ^shone the moon, 

And weary they cam to his mither's: lluur, 
And there they lighted them down. 

Lord William was dead lang ere midnight, 
Lady Margaret lahg "ere day 

And all true lovers, that gang thegither, 
May they hae mair lock tlra-n 4hey. 

Lord William was huried in St Marie's kirk, 

Lady Margaret in Marie's quire, 
Out o' the lady's grave grew a honny red rose, 

And out o' the knight's a hricr 

But hye and rade the Black Douglas, 

And vow hut he -was rough! 
For he pned up the honny hrier, 

Ami flang it in St Marie's loch. 



S8 



THE WF.ABY PCJVD O* TOV* 



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Fore she spin "her tow. 



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There sat a bottle in a bol'e, 

Bcy<m( the ingle low; 
And ay she took the tither sook, 

To drouk the stotrrie tow, -r , 
The weary pund, Arc . 

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Qnofh I ,"for shame, ye dirty dame, 
Grae spin your tap o' tow !" 

She took the rock, and wi' a knock 
She hrak it o'er my pow. 
The wrary pund, Arc , 

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If my wife and thy wife 

Were in a hoat thegither. 

Sixty mile- from ony shore , 

Wi' nanc to steer the rudder. 
The weary pnnd, Arc. 

And if the boat was bottomless. 

And naebody to row, 
Wr neVr would wish them back again 

To spin the pi<kle row. 
The w-eary pund, arc. 



ROXji'lF. JEAM'. 



89 



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See, Spring her ^ra_ces •wild rlis_close, Birds sweet _ly 



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\>ay, While joy en_liv_ens all the scene; Down by yon shad _ ed 



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Ye Kelburn groves! by Spring- attir'd ; 

Where zephyrs sport amang the f low'rs, 
Yotir fairy scenes iVe oft admir'd, 

While jocund pass'd the sunny hours •. 
But doubly happy in your bowrs,. 

When fragrance scents the dewy e'en; 
T wander where ynnr streamlet pours, 

To meet and hail my bonny Jean. 



T,er G-r^ndcur rear her lofty domej 

L."et ma-d Asyibition kingdoms spoil-, 
Through foreign lands let Av'rice roam, 

And for his prize unceasing toil v 
Rive me fair Nature's vernal smile, 

The shelterd grove and daisied green, 
I'll happy (read my native soil, 

To meet and hail my bonny Jean . 

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''Will ye g-ae wi' mePsay* Johnny Faa, They wandered high, they -wandered low, 
"Will ye gae wi' me, my dearie.' 1 They wandered late and early, 

And I will swear, by the staff of my spear, Until they came to that wan water, 

"Your Lord shall nac mair come near ye." And by this time she was weary: 

'Gae tak irae me my silk manteel, *Aftcn hae 1 rode that wan water, 

Anil bring- to me my plaidie; And my Lord Oassilis beside me, 

For I will travel the warld owre, And now I maun set in my white feet and wade, 
Alang wi' the Gypsie Laddie. 1 And carry the Gypsie Laddie! 

C *Johnie Kaa King of the Gypsies was hanged in 1624- . 



SI 



By and by (Mine hame this noble Lord,. He « irnlcrcH high, he w andere d low, 

AikI spicring for his Ladie; He wandered late ami earl> , 

Ane did try, and anitlier did reply, Until lie calh to that wan water, 
'Sites aft wi' the Gypsie Laddie' And there lie spied his Ladie. 

"Gac saddle to me the Mack he says,. They were fifteen valiant men, 
"■The brown rides ne'er sae spec-die-; Rlark, but very bonnv. 

And Twill neither eat nor drink. And they lost a' their lives for ane. 
Till I bring hame my Ladle'.' The Karl o» Cassili's Ladie. 

HUES ME, FOR PRIJVCE CHARLIE. Same Air. 

A wee bird came to our ha' door, "On hills th.it are by rignt his ain, 

He warbled sweet and clearlie, He roams a 'lonely strantrerj " 

And aye the o'crcome <>' his sang, Oh ilka hand he's prcss'd by want, 

Was^Waes me, for Prince Charlie. On ilka side by danger: 

Oh! when I heard the honnie honnie bird. Yestreen I met him in a glen, 

The tears earn drappin rarely; My heart near burstcd f.iirlv; 

I took my bannct aff my heael, For sadly chang'd indeed was be; 

For weel I lo'cd Prince Charlie. Oh! waes me,for Prince Charliej 

Quo' I,'my bird, my bonnic,bonnie bird, "Dark night came on, the tempest howl' I 

Is that a tale ye borrow! Out owre the hills and vallics; 

Or is't some weirels ye've learn't by 'rote? And whar was't that your Prince' la\ dow n 

Or a lilt o' eiool an 1 sorrow?' "Wha's hame should been a.Pala<< ? 

Oh! no, no, no 1 ,' the wee birel sang, He row') him in a highland— plaid, .. 

"ivc flow'n sin' mornin' early; Which etiver'd him but sparely, 

But sic a iday o' win' an' rain; And slept beneath a bush o' broom ;_ 

Oh! waes mc,for Prince Charlicl Oh! Waes me, for Prinee CUarliel" 

But now the bird saw some red coats, ' 
And he shook his wings wi' ang-er* 
"Oh! this is no a lanel for me, ' 
I 11 tarry here nae langcr; 1 ' 
A while he hover d on the wing, 

F.re he departed fairly; 
But weel I mind the farewell strain, 
'Twas, Waes me, for Prince Charlie ■ ." 



92 



MAY" COLrijT. 



Old Ballad. 




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OI false Sir John a w*>o_Jhngf came To a mai'I of tie an — ty 



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rare; M^y C'ol_vin was this La_fIyVnamc , Her Fa_thcr's on_Iy heir. 



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He wood her butt, he wood her ben, 

He woo'd her in the ha', 
rintill he got this Lady's ronseit 

To mount, and to ride m, 



'Cast aff, cast aff, my May Oolvin, 

All, and your embroidered shnne; 
For they are o'er g<>- d,and oer rostly, 
To rot in the salt sea foam'.' 



He went down to her Father's bower, 
"Where a' the steeds did stand, 

And he's tane ane o' the best steeds 
That was in her Fathers hand . 



'0,turn ye about, O false Sir John, 
And ltiik to the leaf o' the tree; 
For it never became a gentleman 
A naked woman to see.' 



And he's pot on, and she's got on, 
And fast as they could flee, 

TJntill they came to a lonesome parr, 
A- rock by the- side of the sea . 



He turnd himself straight round about. 

To ltiik to the leaf o' the tree; 
So swift as May Colvin was 

To throw him into the sea. 



'Loup aff the steed',' says false Sir John; "O help! O help! my May Colvin; 

"Your bridal here yon see; O help! or else I'll drown; 

For I have drowned seven young Ladies, I'll tak ye hame to your Fathers bower. 

The eight ane yon shall be. And set yon down safe and sonnd'.' 



'Past aff, cast aff,my May Colvin, 

All, and your silken gown; 

For 'tis o'er good, and o'er costly, 

To rot in the salt sea foam. 



Nne help, nae help, yon false Sir John; 

Nar hclp,tho'I pity thee, 
Tho 1 sev< n knightsdatig-hters you have drown'd, 

But the eight shall not be me,' 



So she went on her Father's steed, 

As swift as she could flee; 
And- she came hame to her Father's bow'r 

Afore the break o'day. 



O BOJVJVY* WAS YOJV ROSY* BRIER. 



93 




haunt '>' man; And hon_nic she, and ah, how dear! It sha_dod frae the 



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All in its rude and prickly bower, 

That crimson rose, how sweet and fair; 
But love is far a sweeter flow'r, 

Amid life's thorny path o' care . 
The pathless wild, and wimpling" burn, 

Wi' Chloris in my arms, be mine; 
And I the warld, nor wish nor scorn, 

Its joys and griefs alike resign . 



94 



CHARLIE CAM TO OUR LORD'S CASTLE . 



Jacobite. 





c»'$ An' Char—lie sat in imr Lord's chair, "Wi» hon_nct on, an' 




His plaid was hound wi' siller belt, 

An' to his knee cam dnwn, 
He lookd like nane hot Scotland's King-, 
Sae worthy o' the Crown . 

And wi' him our brave Lord mann gae , 
For him he's cleneh'd his brand, ■ 

An' be' it weel, or be it wae, 
The word is, fair Scotland . 



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he's owre The hills That i loe weel. 



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He's owre the hills that I loe weel, He's owre the hills w< 



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11 get his wel _ come hame. My Fa — ther's gane to 



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fight for him; My Bri_thers wlrt — na hide at hame; My Mi _ ther 



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greets, an<l prays for them, And 'deed she thinks they're no to Maine. 

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The Whigs may scoff, and the Whigs may "Jeer; 
But ah! that love maun be sincere, 
Which still keeps true whatever betide. 
An 1 for his sake leaves a' beside. 
He's owre, &x. 

His right these hills, his right these plains, 
O'er hicland hearts secure lie reigns^ 
What lads ere did our laddies will do; 
Were I a laddie T'd follow him too. 
He's owre, <Sro . 

.Sac noble a look, sac princely an air, 
Sac g-allanf and bold, sae young anrl sac fair. 
Oh! did ye but see him, ye'd do as we've done; 
Hear him but ante, to his standard you'll run . 
He's ow re, & c . 



Then draw the claymore for Charlie then; fight 
For your Country, Religion, and a' that is right ; 
Were, ten thousand lives now given to me, 
I d die as aft, for ane o' the three ! 
He's owre, «tc . 



96 



The jhuvsTbel. 




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"(Taiild is the night, O, let me in! 

An' dinna let your minstrel fa'; 
An' dinna let his grinding — sheet 

Be nae thing but a wreath o' snaw, 

"Full ninety winters hae I seen, 

An' \>}-\ie<i -where gorcocks whirring Mew; 
An' niony a day ye've dancd, I ween, 

Tot lilts which frae my drone I blew" 

My F.j>l>ie wak'd, and soon she cry'd, 
'Get uj> gudeman, and let him in; 

For, weel ye ken, the winter night 
Was short when he began his din'. 

My Epi>ies voice, O vow, its sweet! 

F. en t.ho' she bans anil scaulds a— wee; 
But when its tund to sorrow's tale, 

O, liaitli. its doubly dear to me. 

C'o'me in,auld carle, 111 steer my fire, 

'' I ll^make it bleeze a bonnie flame; 
Your>bluid is thin, yeVe tint the gate,. 

You should nae stray s"ae far frae hame. 

"Nae bame ha'e i'' the minstrel said, 
'*Sa"d |>arty strife o'erturn'd my ha'; 

And, weeping, at the eve of life, 

I wander thro' a wreath o' snawl* 



SI.MMEE COMES. 



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Sim_mer comes, and in her train Flo_ra dan ces o'er the plain. 



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Derk — ing- all a_ round a _ g-ain,- "With her va_ried Sce_nc_ry. 



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briyht—cr sun and w-jrai-cr sljow'r, Blooms in vir_gin mo_dc s^ty . 



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Here the g-owan lifts its head, 

As if afraid some foot would tread. 

Back into its native lied, 

All its lowly finery. 
There atrain the heath-bell blue, 
Forms its cup of azure hue, 
As if to sip the silver dew, 

That falls at eve refreshingly . 

And when evening- comes so still, 
How sweet to hear, from yonder hill, 
The gurgling sound of rapid rill, 

Fall on the ear harmoniously! 
How sweet to hear from yonder grove. 
The mavis tune his note to love, 
While, bless'd with thee, I fondly rove 

Alono- the Jflen sae cheerily! 



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0,HOW COILD YE GAJVG SAE to GRIEVE ME? 

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l>rok_cii my heart; For I nc_vcr, ne_vcr thought yc war! leave me! 



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iMAID OF .WV HEART, A L(KYG FAREWELL 1 . 




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Maiil of my heart, a l°rig rare _ well! The Bark is 

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Thy artless "grace, thy open truth, 
Thy form that breathed of love and youth; 
Thy voice, by Nature framed to suit 
The tone of love's enchanted lute; 
Thy dimpling- check and deep— blue eye, 
"Where tender thought and feeling' lie; 
Thine eye— lid like the evening- cloud, 
That comes the star of love to shroud; 
Each -witchery of soul and sense. 
Enshrined in Ang-cl innocence, 

Combined to frame the fatal spell 

That blest and broke my heart ! Farewell ] 



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AVLD ROB, The laird. 



Air, Jamie o' the Gl< 



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Auld Rob tlie laird o 1 miic — kle land. To woo me was nae 



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My minnic grat like daft, and rair'd, I could na bide tlie billy clasl 



. To gar me wi 1 her will comply; 
Hut still I wailna hae the laird, 

Wi' a' his onsen, shee)i, and kve. 
A lad sac I rank, &< . 

Ah! «hat arc silks anil satins brawf 
What's "a 1 his warldly gear to me: 

They're da(t tliai cast tlietnsels awa, 
M I, ere nae content or love can he. 
A lad sae frank, &c. 



Came hourly Crae the gawky laird. 
Ami sac, when minnie g-ied consent, 
Wi' Jamie to the kirk repair'd. 
A lad sac frank, &c. 

Now ilka simmer's day sae lang', 

And winter's, clad wi' frost and snav 

A tunelu' lilt, and bonnie sang', 

Aye keep dull care and strife awa. 
A lad sae frank, -fcc . 




time can past delights re_eall, Ami par-, feci? In —vers fhect a_j>ain. 1 



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those they lovd, their steps shall tread , And death shall join to jiart-no more . 



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Tho* boundless oceans roll between, 
ft certain, that liis heart is near, 

A conscious transport g-lads the scene, 
Soft is the sigh, and sweet the tear. 

Ken, when hy Death's cold liand remov'd , 
We mourn the tenant of the tomb, 

To think, that e'en in death he lov'd, 

Can cheer the terrors of the g-loom . 

But bitter, bitter is- the tear 

Of her, who slig-hfed rftVc bewails, 

No hopes her gloomy prospects cheer, 
No pleasing" melancholy hails . 



Hers arc- the pangs of wounded pride-, 
Of blasted hope, -and withe rd joy; 

The prop she lean'!" on piercd her side, 
The- flame she- fe-d burns to destroy. 

In vain docs memory renew 

Thij.- scenes once tiugd in transports dy 
The sail reverse soon meets the view, 

And turns the thoughts to agony. 

K'en conscious virtue cannot cure 

The pang to every feeling' Hue: 

Ungenerous youth! thy boast how poor. 
To win a heart and break it too. 



■Hope, from its only anchor -torn, 
Neglected, and neglecting all, 
Friendless, forsaken, and forlorn, 

The tears I shed must ever fall. . 



10i> 



BRAVE LEWIE ROY. 



Gaelic Air. 




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Brave J..cw_ie Roy vras the flowV of our Highlandmen, Tall as the 



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Kil_ Ian _glcn, Dear_er llian life to his love_ly Ncen_voiu<h 

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Lnnc was liis biding, tlie cave of his hiding, 

"When forcd "to retire with our gallant ..Prince Charley, 

Tho* manly and fearless, his hold heart was cheerless, 
Away from the I-.ady he aye lovd sae dearly. 



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how sweet' This lojve vale. 




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How sweet this lone vale! and how sooth_ing to feel _ ing', Ton 



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ping', An<l the sweets of the vale are all Kha'dow'd wrth gldom. 



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*How sweet this lone vale! all the beauties ol nature, 

In varied features, is here to he seen; 
The lowly—spread hush, and the oak's tow'ring' stature, 

Is mantled in foilag'c ol gay lovely green. 
Ah! here is the spot, /o li, how sad recollection. 

It is the retreat ol my Mary no more; 
How kind, how sincere, was the maiden's affection, 

Till memory cease, I the loss must deplore. 

*How sweet this lone vale to a heart lull of sorrow . 

The wail of distress I unheeded can pour; 
My bosom o'erchargM may he lighter to— marrow, 

By shedding- a flood in the thick-twisted bjavyeV, 
O Mary, in silence thou calmly reposes, ■' ^ 

The hustle of life gives no trouble to thee; 
Bemoaning my Mary, life only discloses 

A wilderness vacant of pleasure to me. 



f These two verses written, by the late John Hamilton ol Edinburgh 



104 



/JV SIMMER WHEN THE HAY WAS MAWJV. 



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field, Wliile filo_Ver blooms white o'er the lea. And ro_ses hi aw inil_ka hield 

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Blyihc Bes_sie in the milking - shicl, Says 'I'll he wed, come o't what will 'Ocit 



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It's ye hae wooers -mony ane,^ 

And lassie ye're hut young ye ken; 
Then waif a-wee , and cannie wale- 

A routhie hutt, a roufhic hen . 
There's Johnie o' the. Buskie-glcn , 

Fu' is his ham, fu' is his hyr< ; 
Tak' this frae me, my bonnic hen, 

Its plenty beets the lovers' lire? 

For Johnie o' the Buskic.odcn , 

I dinna care a sing*le flic - ; 
He lo'es sae weel his craps and kye , 

He has nae love to spare for me. 
But hlythe's the blink e>' Bobie's e'e, 

And weel I wat he lo'es me dear; 
V Mink i>> him I wad na g-ic 

For Biw.1iie_g'Ion and a' his- gear'.* 
C 



'O thoughtless lassie, life's a faught, 

The canniest gate the strife is sair; 
Rnt ay fu' han't is fechtin best, 

A hungry care's an unco care . 
But some will spend, and some will spare. 

And wilfu'folk matin hae their will; 
Syne, as ye brew, my maiden fair, 

Keep mind,that ye maun drink the jill . 

t4 gear will buy me rig's r>' land, 

And gear, will bny me sheep and kyc-; 
But the tender heart o' Icesome love, 

The gowd and siller canna buy. 
We may be poor, Rohie and I , 

Light is the burden love lays on; 
Content and love brings peace and joy, 

What mair hae Queens upon a throne. 



FV, FICKLE YXWR BELT JiJV 3 BRAID SWOFD 0J\ i 

Jacobite. 



105 




Fyc,bnc_kle your licit an' braid sword on, An* tak ye til' 



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ha _ ly rude; An' a _wa to the Clans, for they maun rise, To 



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ht lor their ain heart's hluTTe. (), there's a lijfht on Bm_lc-_di\ 



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tap; Irs a hl\thc, hlytlic- li^-lii i c> njcl But there matin l>< mao "to 



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wc] _ come li.mx Our Prince to his ain Corfu _ trie , 



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Our g-udc aul-l -wile has climh'd U)i the hill, 
An' a blythe auhl borlie is she: 

She has lig-htcd a Jieat for Charlie's sake , 
An' mcrric nt a' will be. 

An' heres a sword, an' a trusty ane, 
Wi' a trusty hand I'll draw; 

It'll never be shcathd, it'll never wear rust, 
, 'Till we drive the whig\s awa. 



Then buckle, buckle, Clansmen, an' on , 

Our flairs" like our thistles wave $ 
Buckle, bu< kle, buckle, an' on , 

For Prince Cuarlic,or a crrave. 
• Charlie's baith our kith an' kin, 

An' by him we'll stand or fa'; 
Charlie claims but a kinsman's lolp, 

On, on, my brave Clansmen, a'. 



106 



GIL MORICE. 



Old Ballad. 





il Morice was an carls son, His name it waxed wide; It was nac for his 



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livd on Carron side; But it was for a la_dy gay That liv'd on Car_ron side 

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"Where will I get a bonny hoy, 

That will win hose and shoon; 
That will "gae to Lord Barnard's ha', 

And hid his lady com.' 
Ye maun rin this, errand, Willie; 

Antl ye maun rin wi' speed;' 
When other hoys gae on their feet. 

On horsehaek ye sail ride. 1 ' 

'Oh no! Oh n«! my master dear! 
I dare nae for my life; 

I 11 nae gae to the bauld haron's, 

For to tryst furth his wife? 
"My bird,Willic, my boy,Willie; 

My dear Willie}' he said, 
"How can ye strive against the stream? 

For I sail he obcy'd." 

'But, Oh my master dear!' he cry'd, 
'In greenwood yeVe your lain; 
Gie o?er sic thoughts, I wou'd ye red, 
For fear ye shou'd he ta'en'. 
"■Haste, haste, I say, gae to the ha', 
Bid her come here wi' speed: 

II ye refuse my high command, 

I'll gar thy body bleed. 

"Gae hid her tak this gay mantel, 

'Tis a' goud but the hem; 
Bid her cum to the good green wood, 

And bring' nane but her lain : 
And there it is, a silken sark , 

Her ain hand scwd the sleeve; 
/And bid her cum to Gil Morice, 

Speer nac bauld barons leave'. 

c 



'Yes; I will gae your black errand, 

Tho' it be to thy cost; 
Sen ye by me will nae be warnd, 

In it ye sail find frost . 
The baron he's a man of might. 

He ne'er could 'bide a taunt, 
As ye will see before it's nighty . 

How sma' ye'll hac to vaunt. 

'Now, sen I maun your errand rin, 

Sae sair against my will, 
Is inak a vow, and keep it trucj 

It sal be done for ill'. 
And when he came to broken brigg, 

He bent his bow and swam; 
And when he came to grass growing-, 

Set down his feet and ran. 

And when he came to Bernard's ha 1 , 

Wau'd neither chap nor ca'; 
Bot set his bent bow 'to his breast, 

And lightly lap the wa'. 
He wau'd tell nae man his errand, 

Tho' twa stood at the gate; 
Bot straight into the ha' he cam, 

Whair. grit folks sat at meat. 

'Hail! hail! my gentle sire and dame. 

My message winna wait; 
Dame, ye maun to the green wood gang, 

Before that it be late; 
Ye're bidden tak this gay mantel, 

'Tis a' groud but the hem; 
Y.>u maun gae to the gudc green wood 

Ev'n by your sell alane. 



107 



'And there it is, .< silken nark, 

Your ain hanil sewTl (lie sleeve: 
Ye maim gae. speak to Gil Morice 

Spcir nae hauld baron's leavel 
The lady stamped wi' licr foot, 

And winked wi' her eye; 
But a' that she coud say or do, 

Forbidden he wad nac be. 

"It's surely to my bowV— woman; 

It ne'er could be to me?' 
'I brought it to Lady Barnard, 
I trow that ye b<- she'. 
Then up and spake the- wylie imrsc, 
Tiie bairn upon her knee, 
"If it be come frae Gil Morice, 
It's dear welcome to me'' 

*Yc Kid, ye lciel, ye filthy nurse, 

Sac louds I hear ye lie; 
I brought it to Lady Bernard: 

1 trow ye be na she.' 
Then up and spake the hauld baron, 

An angry man was he ; 
He's ta'cn the table wi' his foot, 

In flinders gart a' flee. 

'Gac bring a robe of yon eliding, 

That hings upon the pin; 
And III gae to the good green wood, 
.And speak with \oiir lcnian.' 
*'0,bide at hanvc now, lord Barnard. 
, I warn ye bide at bamei 
Ne'er wytc a man tor violence, 
That ne'er wyte ye wi' nane.' 

Gil Morice sits in good green wood, 

He whistl'd and he sang; 
\0" what means a' these folks coming. 

My mother tarries langV 
When Lord Barnar<l to greenwood came, 

Wi meikle dule and care; 
There first he saw youngGil Morice 

Kerning bis yellow hair. 

Nae wonder, sure, Oh Gil Morice, 

My lady lo'edye weel, 
The fairest part of my body 

Is blacker than thy heel. 
Yet nevertheless, now Gil Morice, 

FVir a' thy great beauty, 
Ye's rue the day ye e'er was born; 

Thy head sail gae wi' me 1 

Now he has drawn his trusty brand, 

And slait it on the strac: 
And thro' Gil Morice fair body 

He's gard cairld iron g'ae. 
And he has ta'cii Gil Morice' head, 

And set it on a spear; 
Thc-nrearicst man in a' his train 

Has trot that head to bear. 



And he has ta'en Gil Morice up, 

Laid him across his steed, 
And brought him to his painted bow'r, 

And laid him on a bed. 
The lady on the castle wa' 

Beheld haith dale -on! down, 
Anil there she saw Gil Morice' head 

Come trailing to the town. 

"Far tnair I loe that bloody head, 

Bot and that vcllow hair* 
Than Lord Barnard, and a' his. lands, 

As they lie here and there. 
Oft have I by th\ cradle s^t , 

And loudly seen.theesU t p; 
But now- fil go about thy g'raVe, 

The sa't- tears for to -weep." 

Aiid-s\iic she kissd his bloody cheek, ■ 
Anel sync his hlnod-y ehi.o; ' 
"Better I lo'e, mv son Morice, 
Than a' my kith and kin!'' 
'Away, away, ve ill woman I 

An ill death mait ye ilie; 
Gin I had ken'el he'd been your son, 
He'd ne'er been slain lor me.? 

"Upbraid me- not, my bi.nl Barnard, 

Upbraid me not, for shame! . 
Wi' that same- spear. *> pierce mv heart; 

And put me qut o' pun. 
Since naitliing but Git'Morice* head 

Thy jealous rage cou 1*1 "quell. 
Let tli.ii same hand now take her life, 

That ne"ei to idee did ill . 

"To me nae after elays~"nor nights' 
Will e'er be salt or kind; 
I'll lill the air \e itli heavy sighs, 
And greet till I am blind." 
'F.lioiigh o' blood byhic's been spilt; 
Seek not your eleath frae me; .„ 
I rather it hael been myscll, 
Than either him or thee". 

'With waetu'wae I hear your plaint; 

Sair, sair I rue the deed, 
That e'er this cursed hanel of' mine 

Did gar his body bleed. 
Dry up your tears, my winseime elame , 

Ye neer <an hpal the wound; 
You see his head upon my spear, 

His heart's blood on the ground . 

I curse the hanel that did the etccel ; 

The heart that thought the ill; 
The feet that bore me wi' sic speed 

The comely youth te> kill;. 
I'll aye lament for Gil Morice, 

As gin he were my ain; 
I'll ne'er forget the dreary elay -■ 

On which the youth was slain ' 



10 s 



HEY HOH\ yOH^fF, LAD, 




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Hey how, my John _ ie, lad, You've brought the "fear in_to my e'e; 



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Hey how, my John —ic, lad, Vc did — na keep your tryst wi> me. Hric 



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yc for._got the birk _cn bush, Whare wild flowers bloom'd sac bonnilie,When 



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Ye eam'na Johnie to the fauld; 

Ye eam'na to the trysting' tree? 
I tri™'l na love wad turn sae caiild , 

That ye sae soon wad lig-htlieme. 
I |>»«1 . the rose sae swe-ct an' fine, 

The fairest (lower on a' the lea; 
Tho.' fresh an' fair, it wither'd syne , 

Ken like the love ye ]>romisd me. 

Ye said ye lo'cd but me alane, 

Nor rotid ye kerj> your fanry free, 
An' g"in that I wad be your ain, 

The ehains o' love wad lig-htsome be. 
O, gin ye had sineerely lovd« 

They lightsome aye bad been to me; 
Bur sin' that ye hae faithless r/rnv'd , 

1*11 vtrivc to keen my .heart a wee. 

KND OF VOLUME THIRD. 



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