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Full text of "Scottish arms : being a collection of armorial bearings, A.D. 1370-1678, reproduced in facsimile from contemporary manuscripts, with heraldic and genealogical notes"

SCOTTISH ARMS" 

UEING 



A COLLECTION OF ARMORIAL BEARINGS 

A.D. 1370-1678 



Reproduced in Facsimile from Contemporary Manuscripts 



WITH HERALDIC AND GENEALOGICAL NOTES 



\ / 

By R. R. STODART. 







VOLUME SECOND. 



EDINBURGH: WILLIAM PATERSON 

i88i. 



<*:■ 



\M 






I. 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE, 



C, A.D. 1369. 



PLATE A. 

Arms of the King of Scotland shewn to be David II. by the Bruce 
coat on the cappiline ; in this and other instances the herald has omitted 
the colour on the field external to the tressure, from which it would seem 
that the foreign herald considered it to be a bordure flory. 

The lion rampant and double tressure flory appear on the seal of 
Alexander II. 

On a seal of Alexander III., 1265, there is a crown showing four 
leaves like the strawberry leaf. 

John Baliol, in 1292, used two shields ; the dexter has the orle his 
paternal bearing, the sinister a lion rampant. 

Edward Baliol, c. 1350, places the shield of Scotland, again without 
the tressure, on the dexter, and Baliol on the sinister side. 

The orle was used by Hugh de Baliol, who died before 1228 ; on the 
seal of his father Eustace, c. 1 190, is a shield charged with an escar- 
buncle. Glover's Roll gives the arms of John de Baliol gules, an orle 
argent; and of his son Hugh, who adds for his mother, the lady of Gallo- 
way, in the corner an escutcheon azure charged with a lion rampant 
argent crowned or. Eustace, according to the same authority, bore 
azure, crusilly an orle or ; he was son of the elder Eustace. 

Charles's Roll gives Alexander gules, an orle argent, also argent, an 
orle gules ; Ingram gules, an orle ermine ; and William or, an orle azure, 
a label of five points gules. 

At the siege of Caerlaverock in 1300, Alexander de Baliol, brother of 
King John, bore argent, an orle gules. The existing family of the 
Marquis de Bailleul, in Normandy, claim community of origin with the 
Baliols of England and Scotland, but do not appear to be able to trace 
their ancestry beyond the year 1370 ; they bear, parted per pale ermine and 
gules. The tressure appears on the seal used by the national party in 
Scotland after 1296. 

Arms of David II. are here represented ; a seal of his Queen, Mar- 
garet Logie or rather Drummond, shows two lions as the supporters 'of 
Scotland, 1372. Robert II. used as crest a lion statant gardant : his 
Queen, Euphemia Ross, in 1375, places two lions on her seal as sup- 
porters. 

James I. and James II. have lions gardant as supporters ; in 1439 
the unicorn, as a supporter on a seal, appears for the first time on 
that of Queen Joan I3eaufort, but there is reason to believe that an 
example of two unicorns as supporters-, not later than the reign of Robert 
III., is the stone with the royal arms at Rothesay Castle. Two unicorns 
without collars or chains are the supporters of James, Archbishop of St 
Andrews, Duke of Ross, son of James III., in 1500. 



4 ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 

The crown of James II. seems to be ornamented with fleurs-de-lis 
and trefoils alternately, (?) strawberry leaves; his Queen, Mary of Gueldre, 
uses an open crown of strawberry leaves and pearls. 

An Act of Parliament, 22nd Feb. 1471, ordained that in time to come 
there should be no double tressure about the king's arms, but that he 
should bear whole arms of the lion without any addition. This act, 
although not repealed, seems hardly to have been carried out. 

Soon after, the present badge of the thistle was adopted ; on an altar- 
piece at Holyrood, to which the date 1485 is assigned, the background is 
tapestry semd of thistles, and a thistle is the mint-mark on coins of 
James IV. ; a golden thistle as a badge was among the jewels of James 
III. at his death. 

Previous badges were St Andrew on his cross, a fleur-de-lis, an 
annulet, a saltire, and a star. 

Margaret Tudor, consort of James IV., had as motto, " In God is mi 
traist," and is represented fondling a unicorn in her lap. James V., in 
1 54 1, used two unicorns as supporters, but during the minority of his 
daughter Mary two lions again appear, and were still used in 1564. 

She afterwards carried two unicorns gorged with crowns, and 
chained ; the crown is adorned with fleurs-de-lis and crosses patde ; the 
badge is a thistle crowned ; a collar, partly composed of thistles, sur- 
rounds the shield ; the crest is a lion sejant aff"rontd, holding a sword and 
sceptre ; motto, " In defens." 

In 1558 an Act of Parliament directs that all documents which had 
previously passed in the Queen's name alone, shall pass in name of the 
said King and Queen Dauphin, viz., Francis and Mary, King and Queen 
of Scots, Dauphin and Dauphiness of Viennois, «&c, and all the seals to 
bear their arms during the said marriage. 

In 1578 occurs the motto, " Nemo me immune lacesset" the last word 
being altered to lacessit in 1595. 

A motto used by Queen Mary and James VI. is " Salvum fac popu- 
lum tuum Domine" and in 1588 the supporters are lions. 

Queen Anne of Denmark, however, has as dexter supporter a unicorn 
gorged with a crown and chained, and a savage holding in his exterior 
hand a club erect, or at other times a dragon on the sinister side for Den- 
mark. 

James VI., after he became King of England, added the imperial 
crown on the head of the unicorn, and the crown with which he is gorged 
is composed of lilies and crosses patde. 

We now come to the official entry made in 1672 by Lyon King of 
Arms : — " The most high and mighty Monarch Charles the Second gives 
as the soveraigne atchievement of his antient kingdome of Scotland, Or, a 
lyon rampant gules armed and langued azure within a double tressur 
flowered and counterflowered with flowers-de-lis of the second ; encircled 
with the order of Scotland, the same being composed of rue and thistles 
having the Image of St Andrew with his crosse on his brest y^unto 
pendent. Above the shield ane Helmet answerable to his Majesties high 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE, 5 

qualitie and jurisdiction, with a mantle or, doubled Ermine adorned with 
ane Imperiall Crowne, beautified with crosses patee and flowers-de-lis, 
surmounted on the top for his Majesties crest of a Lyon sejant, full- 
faced gules crowned or, holding in his dexter paw a naked Sword proper, 
and in the sinister a Scepter, both erected and paleways; supported be two 
Unicorns argent. Crowned with Imperiall and goarged with open 
Crownes ; to the last chains affixed, passing betwixt their fore-leggs and 
reflexed over their backs or ; he on the dexter imbraceing and beareing up 
a banner of cloath of gold charged with the Royall Armes of Scotland, 
and he on the sinister another Banner azure charged withe a St Andrew's 
crosse argent, both standing on ane compartment placed underneath, 
from which issue two thistles, one towards each side of the escutcheon ; 
and for his Majesties Royall mottos, in ane escroll above all, In defence ; 
and under, in the Table of the compartement. Nemo 'rne impune lacessit^ 

The badges are " a thistle of gold crouned," and " the white cross of 
St Andrew on a blew field." There is next entered His Majesty's 
achievement as King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland : first 
and fourth, Scotland ; second, France and England quarterly ; third, 
Ireland : the shield encircled with the orders of St Andrew and the 
Garter ; crest of Scotland, with the motto, " In defence," above it. Sup- 
porters — on the dexter the unicorn as before, but the banner he holds is 
azure charged with St Andrew's cross argent ; and on the sinister the 
English lion holding a banner argent, charged with a cross, called St 
George, gules ; motto below the shield, " Dieu et mon droit" 

After James VI. inherited the crown of England, the Great Seal 
was altered ; in England the first and fourth quarters England and 
France, the second Scotland, and the third Ireland, and the supporters 
were the lion of England on the dexter, and the unicorn of Scotland on 
the sinister side ; in Scotland a separate Great Seal was used, the arms 
of that country occupying the first and fourth quarters, France and Eng- 
land the second, and Ireland the third. The Act of Union provided that 
the ensigns armorial of the United Kingdom shall be such as Her 
Majesty shall appoint, and that one Great Seal shall be used for the king- 
dom of Great Britain. It was settled that in the first and fourth quarters 
were to be the arms of England impaling Scotland, in the second France, 
and in the third Ireland. The supporter on the sinister side to be the 
unicorn, not crowned, but gorged with a crown composed of fleurs-de-lis 
and crosses patde. 

This, however, did not apply to the Great Seal to be used in Scot- 
land in matters relating to private rights or grants, to the Privy Seal, and 
other seals, in which almost always the Scottish arms have retained the 
first place. 

The present Great Seal of Scotland is— first and fourth, Scotland ; 
second, England ; third, Ireland ; with the unicorn as supporter on the 
dexter side. 

B 



6 ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 

PLATE B. 

Earl of Carrick. John Stewart, afterwards Robert III., was 
created Earl of Carrick 22nd June 1368, so this and the preceding 
shield fix the date of this part of the armorial. A seal of his, 1369, 
has a demi-lion issuing from a fess checquy, crest as here, and two 
savages as supporters. 

After his father became King, the Earl bore Scotland, with a 
label of three points. 

1 1 is remarkable that the lion and tressure of Scotland are here 
given during the lifetime of David II. 

Earl of Douglas. A seal, c. 1378, of William, Earl of Douglas and 
Mar, agrees with this ; but before the Countess succeeded to the Earl- 
dom of Mar, the arms on his seals are Douglas alone. 

As the Earl of Mar is given separately further on, it would' 
seem that the Earl of Douglas must have quartered Mar before the 
death of his brother-in-law. 

Earl of Moray. 

Earl of Mar. 

Earl of March. For the following valuable notice of the heraldry of 
the great family of Dunbar, I am indebted to Archibald Hamilton 
Dunbar, younger, of Duffus, Esq., who has long devoted much time 
and ability to the investigation of the history of his family. The 
result, it is to be hoped, may some day be published, as in all that 
has already been written many mistakes have been discovered, and 
much new information has been obtained. 

The representatives of the first five recorded generations of the 
family bore Celtic names. 

I. Crinan the Thane was born in the century before the Conquest. 

[He seems to have been the same person as Crinan the Thane in 
Athol, who was hereditary lay Abbot of Dunkeld, and father of King 
Duncan I.] 

II. Maldred, son of " Crinan the Thane," married Aldgitha, daughter of 

Uchtred, Earl of Northumberland, and grand-daughter of -^thelred, 
King of England. [Maldred seems to have been brother, as well as 
neighbour, of " the gracious Duncan," who was King of Cumbria for 
about sixteen years before he succeeded his maternal grandfather, 
Malcolm II., as King of Scotland on the 25th November 1034]. 

III. GosPATRic the Earl, son of Maldred, was confirmed in the Earl- 
dom of Northumberland in 1067 by William the Conqueror ; but 
was "deprived" in 1072, when King Malcolm [III. Canmore] gave 
him " Dunbar, with the adjacent lands in Lothian," which, with a 
large extent of land in England and Scotland, passed to his posterity 
from father to son for eleven generations. As surnames came into 
use, the family gradually took their name from Dunbar. 

Gospatric's descendants, as earls under various designations, 



r 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 7 

kept the Marches between England and Scotland for about three 
hundred years, and did homage to the Kings of England for the 
lands they held in Northumberland. The Earls made grants of 
land to the Church at Durham, Coldingham, Melrose, and Kelso, &c., 
and generally sealed the charters conveying the lands with the figure 
of a knight on horseback, fully armed, having a drawn sword in the 
right hand, and a shield either on the left arm or suspended from the 
neck ; each Earl intending the mounted figure on his seal to be a 
representation of himself. Many of the charters, with the impres- 
sions of the Earls' seals still attached to them, are preserved to this 
day. Gospatric's son — 

IV. "GosPATRicus COMES FRATER DoLFiNi," sccoud Earl, in 1 1 15 
appears second of " the seven Earls of Scotland " who gave assent 
[" assensum proebeo "] to the foundation charter granted to Scone by 
Alexander I., and he is styled " Gospatric de Dunbar " by David I., 
and " Gospatricus Comes " by Henry the Earl. He is represented 
on his seal having a short shield, and his horse is standing or walk- 
ing to sinister. He died between the 26th December 1135 and the 
i6th August 1 139. His son — 

V. " Gospatricus comes filius Gospatrici comitis fratris Dolfini," 

third Earl, founded the Nunnery of Coldstream. He is represented 
on his seal having a very long shield, his horse is walking to 
sinister. His secretum is an antique gem ; subject — a man milking 
a goat. He died in 1166. His son — 

VI. " Waltheuus " or " Waldeuus comes," fourth Earl [Waltheof in 
English, Guall6ve in French], is represented on his seal wearing a 
conical helmet with nasal ; his shield is suspended from his neck, his 
horse canters to sinister. The " Chronica de Mailros " records his 
death — 

" anno m°.cMjcmj°. ***** ^Dljut ©aalDeuuji corner De minbar." 

His son — 

VII. " Patricius comes filius Waldeui comitis," fifth Earl, married 
in 1 184 Ada, daughter of William, King of Scotland. His seals 
show a lion rampant on his shield, his horse gallops to sinister. On 
his seals and in his later charters he styles himself " Patricius comes 
de Dunbar." His secretum is an antique gem ; subject — the head of 
a lady in profile. After having held the Earldom for fifty years, he 
resigned in favour of his son, and died 31st December 1232. His son — 

VIII. " Patricius comes de Dunbar," sixth Earl, granted charters dur- 
ing his father's lifetime, styling himself " Patricius filius Patricii 
Comitis de Dunbar." One of these charters was confirmed on the 
30th November 1222 by Alexander II. His seals show a lion 
rampant on his shield, his horse gallops to sinister. After he 
succeeded to the Earldom, his seals on the 14th and i8th April 1248 
(&c.) show a lion rampant on his shield, and his horse gallops to 
dexter; secretum — on a triangular shield a lion rampant. In con- 



8 ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 

firming the charter of the 14th, Alexander II. on the 20th April 1248 
styles him " Patricium Comitem de Dunbar nepotem nostrum." The 
Earl used another secretum — an antique gem ; subject — a standing 
figure. He joined the Crusade of Louis IX. of France in 1248, and 
dying the same year, was succeeded by his son Patrick, seventh Earl. 
William, younger son of the fifth Earl. Seal — on or before the 30th 
November 1222 — a lion standing over a Wyverrt that is seizing its 
throat, both to sinister ; secretum — an antique gem ; subject — a 
mounted figure, the horse gallops to sinister. 

IX. "Patricius comes de Dunbar, seventh Earl [sometimes " Patricius 
Comes filius Patricii fil. patricii Comitis de Dunbar"]. Seal, upon 
the 4th November 1261, on a shield a lion rampant surrounded by 
thirteen roses ; in the spaces between the shield and the legend are 
dexter a serpent, sinister a dragon. On the 29th May 1279 his seal 
represents him on horseback, his horse gallops to sinister ; he has a 
lion rampant on his shield, and above his helmet a crescent as crest. 
He used several other seals like this last ; one of them has a cross 
over the crescent; although the cross is smaller than the letters of the 
inscription, it happens to be at the beginning of the legend, and may 
be meant for the cross generally placed in that position. Secretum — 
on a triangular shield a lion rampant contournd. Another secretum — 
an antique gem ; subject — a lion seizing a stag. He died 24th 
August 1289, and was succeeded by his son Patrick, eighth Earl. 

" Alexander filius Comitis de Dunbar, miles," younger son of 
Patrick, seventh Earl, on the 21st September and 26th November 
1288, and 7th June 1289, sealed receipts for his fee with — on a shield 
a lion rampant within the Royal tressure ; between the shield and the 
legend on each side are two roses or stars. 

Lady Cecilia Dunbar, daughter of Patrick, seventh Earl, married about 
1290 James, High Steward of Scotland ; her son Walter, the High 
Steward, married, in 1315, as his second wife, Margaret, daughter of 
King Robert Brus, and their son became Robert II. ; consequently 
Lady Cecilia Dunbar's forefathers were ancestors of H. M. Queen 
Victoria. 

X. " Patricius de Dunbar, Comes Marchie," eighth Earl [sometimes 

"Patricke de Dunbar, Counte de la Marche"], was one of the 
claimants of the Crown. Seal, 5th and 6th June 1291, — on a shield a 
lion rampant within a bordure charged with eight roses. In July 
1300 he was present at the siege of Caerlaverock. The Roll of the 
siege styles him " Conte de Laonois " [Earl of Lothian], and blazons 
his arms, " Gules a lion argent within a bordure of the last, with 
roses of the field." He seems to have been the first to style himself 
"Earl of March." He died loth October 1308, aged sixty-six. His son — 
XL "Patricius de Dunbar, Comes Marchie," ninth Earl [subsequently 
also fourth Earl of Moray] ; in July 1300, when sixteen years of age, 
was present with his father at the siege of Caerlaverock, and bore 
gules a lion argent within a bordure of the last, with roses of the 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 9 

field, and a label azure for difference. On the 6th April 1320, he was 
one of the Scottish barons who sent the letter to the Pope, and he 
sealed .with — on a shield a lion rampant within a bordure charged 
with eleven roses. He married his cousin. Lady Agnes Ranulph, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Ranulph, first Earl of Moray. As Scotland 
was then under interdict, the marriage was solemnised in England ; 
and afterwards. Pope John XXII. granted a dispensation for it on 
the i6th January 1323-4. " Patricke de Dunbar, Counte de la 
Marche " upon the 13th May 1334 sealed with — on a shield couchd, a 
lion rampant within a bordure charged with thirteen roses, crest on a 
helmet between two demi-lions gardant, a tower embattled, issuing 
therefrom a lady with flowing hair vested, holding in each extended 
hand a coronet ; supporters — two wild hairy men visible to the waist; 
below the shield a dragon. The lady may be intended for the Earl's 
mother, who defended Dunbar Castle in 1296, and the two coronets 
may be intended for " Dunbar " and " March." This seal appears to 
be earlier, by eleven years, than any other connected with Scotland, 
on which either a crest or supporters are associated with family arms. 
After the 17th October 1346, Earl Patrick assumed the additional 
title of " Moray " in right of his wife. On the 24th May 1367 
" Patricius de Dunbar, Comes Marchie et Morauie," " apud Castrum 
nostrum de Dunbar," appended to a charter his secretum and what 
he called " sigillum nostrum magnum." Representations of them 
are given in H. Laing's "Ancient Scottish Seals," Vol. II., Plate I., 
Nos. I and 2. In both these examples the bordure is charged with 
eleven roses. After having been in harness about sixty-seven years, 
and after having held the earldom fifty-eight years, he resigned in 
favour of his son George ; his resignation was confirmed by David IL 
on the 25th July 1367. Earl Patrick seems to have survived some 
years. 

" Agnes Comitissa Marchie et Moravie," the celebrated " Black 
Agnes of Dunbar," wife of Patrick de Dunbar, ninth Earl, success- 
fully defended her husband's castle of Dunbar against the English 
for nineteen weeks in the spring of 1338. At the death of her 
brother, John Ranulph, third Earl of Moray, on the 17th October 
1346, she succeeded to his great estates, including Annandale and the 
Isle of Man, upon which she and her husband assumed the additional 
title of " Moray." On the 24th May 1367 she appended her seal to 
her husband's charter ; seal — four shields disposed as a cross, the base 
points meeting in the centre ; on the upper shield is a lion rampant 
within the Royal tressure ; on the dexter and lowest shields a lion 
rampant within a bordure charged with eight roses for Dunbar ; on 
the sinister shield three cushions within the Royal tressure for 
Ranulph ; in each of the four spaces between the shields is a coronet 
over a rose. 

The Chapter of Dunbar. Seal— under a Gothic canopy a lady, having 
a scourge in her right hand and a book in her left ; upon each side is 



lo ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 

on a shield a lion rampant within a bordure charged with eight roses, 
the dexter shield having over all a label of five points ; below the 
figure is a monk kneeling. The Collegiate Church of Dunbar was 
founded on 24th February 1342-3 by Patrick de Dunbar, ninth Earl, 
possibly on the birth, or at the instance, of his eldest son, which may 
account for the label on the dexter shield. In 1392 some change 
was made in the establishment. The workmanship of the seal seems 
to be of the later date. 
'* Patricius de Dunbar, miles, et Isabella sponsa ejusdem " 
appended their seals to a charter on the 2nd January 1351. Dexter 
seal — on a shield a lion rampant within the Royal tressure ; sinister 
seal — on a shield a lion rampant within the Royal tressure, impaling 
three [square] cushions within the Royal tressure. Dunbar seems 
to have been the lady's maiden name, from the fact of the legend 
on her seal being " Sigillvm Isabelle de Dvnbar " (all the 
letters are precise and perfect). Both the tressures on the sinister 
shield are entire, neither of them being cut by the impaling line, 
which differ from the examples, sixty years earlier, on the Indenture 
between Florence, Count of Holland, and Robert Brus, dated 14th 
June 1292. [" National MSS. of Scotland," Part II., No. vi.] 

XII. "Georgius de Dunbar, Comes Marchi^," tenth Earl, Seals, 27th 
March 1371 and 4th April 1373, — on a shield couchd, a lion rampant 
surrounded by sixteen roses ; crest on a helmet, a horse's head 
bridled issuing from a coronet, showing three long and two short 
points, each terminating in a fleur-de-lis or cross ; supporters — two 
lions sejant gardant coud, before two trees. He held the earldom 
forty-eight years, and died in 14 16. His son — 

XIII. " Georgius de Dunbar, Comes Marchie," eleventh Earl, Seal on 
the 9th December 1424, — on a shield couchd, a lion rampant within a 
bordure charged with eight roses ; crest on a helmet, a horse's head 
bridled issuing from a coronet, showing three long and two short 
points, each terminating in a fleur-de-lis or cross ; supporters — two 
lions sejant gardant coud, both having one fore-foot holding the 
coronet, behind each a tree. This Earl, although instrumental in 
obtaining the release of James I. in 1424, was nevertheless attainted 
on the loth January 1434-5 for his father's rebellion, which had 
taken place thirty-four years previously. 

Lady Elizabeth Dunbar, daughter of George, tenth Earl, was con- 
tracted to marry the Duke of Rothesay [eldest son of Robert III.], 
whose disregard of his engagement drove her father into rebellion 
in 1400, and brought attainder on her brother in 1434-5. 

CoLUMBA DE Dunbar, M.A., BiSHOP OF MoRAY, SOU of Gcorgc, tenth Earl, 
was Dean of Dunbar in 1411, and was provided to the See of Moray 
by Pope Martin V. on the 3rd April 1422. On the outer wall of the 
Cathedral at Elgin, above the great window which is over the western 
door, there are three coats of arms, which were probably placed there 
by Bishop Dunbar when the Cathedral was rebuilt after the great 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE. n 

fire. 1st, in centre — on a shield a lion rampant within the Royal 
tressure, for James I., King of Scotland ; 2nd, a little lower to dexter 
— on a shield three pillows within the Royal tressure, for Thomas 
Dunbar, Earl of Moray; 3rd, to sinister — on a shield couchd a 
lion rampant within a bordure charged with eight roses, behind the 
shield a pastoral staff in pale, for Bishop Columba de Dunbar, being 
his arms and " baculum pastorale." The Bishop died in his palace at 
Spynie in 1435, and was buried in the Dunbar aisle in the Cathedral 
at Elgin ; part of the mitre remains on the head of his effigy which 
is upon his tomb there, and a small shield which is on its breast 
above the robes shows traces of a lion rampant within a bordure. 

Sir David Dunbar of Cockburn, said to be a son or grandson of 
George, tenth Earl. Seal, 12th December 1452, — on a shield couchd, 
a lion rampant within a bordure charged with eight roses or stars ; 
crest on a knight's helmet, a horse's head issuing from a coronet, 
showing four long and three short points. 

Dunbar of Kilconquhar and [Mochrum] Loch, according to Sir David 
Lindsay's MS., bore gules, a lion rampant argent within a bordure of 
the last, charged with eight roses of the field. These Dunbars 
were descendants and heirs male of the attainted Earl of March, and 
the Marquis of Bute was supposed to be their heir of line ; but Lord 
Bute, who takes an interest in such matters, having investigated the 
case, is satisfied that he is not the heir of line. 

XIL John Dunbar, Earl of Moray, fifth Earl, younger son of Patrick, 
Earl of March and Moray, by his wife " Black Agnes," married 
[Dispensation of Pope Urban V., dated nth July 1370] his cousin 
Marjorie, daughter of Robert, then High Steward and shortly after- 
wards King of Scotland. On the 9th March 1372-3 her father, Robert 
IL, gave a new grant of the Earldom of Moray " to Our chosen son 
John of Dunbar and to Marjorie his spouse, our dearest daughter," and 
to the heirs of their bodies, whom failing, to George Dunbar, Earl 
of March, and his heirs whomsoever. Earl John's seals, 4th April 
1373, &c. — on a shield couchd, three cushions within the Royal tres- 
sure ; crest on a helmet, a stag's head and neck issuing from a 
coronet, showing five points ; supporters— two lions sejant gardant, 
each having one fore-foot holding the coronet. He died before the 
23rd July 1393. 

"The Lady Marjorie," wife of John Dunbar, fifth Earl of Moray, and 
daughter of Robert H. Seal, ist May 1390— on a shield a lion 
rampant within the Royal tressure. 

XHL Thomas Dunbar, sixth Earl of Moray, son of Earl John. Seal, ist 
May 1390 [during his father's life] — on a shield couchd three cushions 
within the Royal tressure, a label of three points for difference ; 
crest on a helmet, a stag's head and neck issuing from a coronet ; 
supporters — two lions sejant gardant. On the 22nd November 1396 
he used the same seal with the label, although his father had died 
three years previously. 



12 ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 

Lady Euffame Dunbar, daughter of Earl John, married Alexander 
Cumyne. [Indenture, 28th May 1408.] Thomas Commyn, of Alter, 
who seems to have been their son, sealed upon the 7th September 1476, 
with — on a shield couchd two [square] cushions in chief, a garb in 
base, within the Royal tressure; the cushions and tressure apparently 
for his mother. 

XIV. Thomas Dunbar, seventh Earl of Moray, son of Thomas, sixth 
Earl, used a seal two inches in diameter in 1422 — on a shield three 
pillows within the Royal tressure. This seal appears to be the 
original from which was copied the coat of arms on the dexter shield, 
above the window over the western door of the Cathedral at Elgin. 
He seems to have died between 1427 and 1442. His cousin — 

XIV. James Dunbar, eighth Earl of Moray, son of Alexander Dunbar of 
Frendraught, and grandson of Earl John, is said to have been mur- 
dered, and was called " the late Earl of Moray," on the 26th April 
1442. 

Lady Jonet Dunbar, daughter of James, eighth Earl, styled herself 
" Countess of Moray" on the 28th September and 8th October 1454, 
when widow of James Crichton, and during the lifetime of her 
brother-in-law Archibald Douglas, also in 1455, '58, '70, etc. ; and 
sealed with — on a shield quarterly, first, three cushions within the 
Royal tressure for Dunbar, Earl of Moray ; second, a lion rampant 
for Crichton ; third, a saltire and chief ; fourth, a fess chequd be- 
tween three roses for Eraser of Frendraught. But in a resignation 
to the King, on the 2nd October 1462, she styles herself simply 
" Jonat de Dunbar Dfia de frendraucht." 

Lady Elizabeth Dunbar, daughter of James, eighth Earl, and wife of 
Archibald Douglas; seal 22nd February 1449, — on a shield quarterly, 
first and fourth, three cushions within the Royal tressure for Dun- 
bar, Earl of Moray ; second and third, ermine a man's heart, and on 
a chief three stars for Douglas. On the 19th May 1455, when widow 
of Archibald Douglas, " Pretensus Comes Moravie," she styled her- 
self " Countess of Moray," at the same time that her sister was assum- 
ing the title. 

XV. Sir Alexander Dunbar of Westfield, Knight, son of James, eighth 
Earl, signed a reversion on the 8th March 1488. Seal — on a shield 
couchd, a bar between three cushions within the Royal tressure; crest 
on a knight's helmet, a [wolf's?] head. He died loth March 1497-8. 
His effigy, on his tomb in the Dunbar aisle, in the Cathedral at 
Elgin, has three cushions on its breast. 

Isabel, widow of Sir Alexander Dunbar of Westfield, and daughter of 
Alexander Sutherland of Duffus ; seal on the 12th June 1502, — on 
a shield two [oblong] cushions in chief, a star in base. 

Sir James Dunbar of Cumnock, Knight, eldest son of Sir Alexander of 
Westfield, married [charter, 21st June 1474] Euphemia, eldest 
daughter and co-heir of Patrick Dunbar of Cumnock and Mochrum 
[supposed offshoot from the Earls of March]. Sir James appended 



ARMORIAL BE GELRE, 13 

his seal — on a shield a lion rampant — to the marriage contract of his 
daughter Christian, who married Alexander Innes of that ilk, [con- 
tract 4th December 1493]. Sir James was the first heritable sheriff 
of Elgin and Forres [charters, 26th and 27th May 1498]. He died 
20th April 1504. His wife Euphemia survived him. 

Beatrice Dunbar, of Cremond. Seal, 4th September 1497 — three 
[square] cushions within the Royal tressure, a boar's head couped in 
fess point for difference. 

Sir John Dunbar of Mochrumpark, second son of Sir Alexander of West- 
field, married Margaret, second daughter and coheir of Patrick 
Dunbar of Cumnock and Mochrum [charter, 21st June 1474]. He 
married, secondly, Jonet Stewart [charter, 13th March 1497]. 

Archibald Dunbar of Baldoon, son of Sir John's second marriage, is 
represented by Dunbar Douglas, Earl of Selkirk. 

Gavin Dunbar, Archbishop of Glasgow, younger son of Sir John's 
second marriage, on the 8th July 1524 was "provided" Archbishop to 
the See of Glasgow by Pope Clement VH. On the 21st August 
1528 he was appointed High Chancellor of Scotland. On the 29th July 
1538, at the request of King James V., he received Inchaffray " in ' 
commendam " from Pope Paul HI. Seal — beneath a canopy St 
Kentigern holding a fish in his right hand, and a pastoral staff in his 
left ; in the lower part of the seal are Archbishop Gavin Dunbar's 
arms — on a shield three pillows within the Royal tressure, a crozier 
in pale behind the shield. Secretum — the same arms with crozier in 
pale, and a fish below the shield. He died 30th April 1547. The 
Archbishop is often confused with his uncle Gavin Dunbar, who was 
Bishop of Aberdeen from 5th November 1518 till 9th March 1531-2. 

Sir John Dunbar of Mochrumpark, who seems to have been grandson 
of the above Sir John's first marriage, sealed in 1564 with — on a 
shield three cushions. He died loth December 1578, leaving five 
daughters coheirs, of whom the eldest, Grisell, had married her cousin, 
Alexander Dunbar younger of Conze, fear of Mochrumpark, [contract, 
17th November 1564]. 

" Dunbar of Mochram," emblazoned— argent three cushions within the 
Royal tressure, a star in fess point for difference, gules, has been 
added [evidently an afterthought] to Sir David Lindsay's MS., possi- 
bly at the instance of a descendant of the above marriage. 

Mochrum Castle, now a ruin, has at the north-west corner, upon the 
north gable — on a shield a pillow between the initials I. D. in chief, 
two pillows in base. And upon a more modern part of the ruin — on 
a shield three [square] cushions. 

Alexander Dunbar of Kilbuiack, third son of Sir Alexander of West- 
field, married, about 1480, Janet Sutherland, who seems to have been 
daughter of John, seventh Earl of Sutherland. His eldest sou- 
James Dunbar of Conze, on the i8th August 1526, and 31st October 1545, 
sealed with— on a shield three pillows, a star in fess point for difference. 
The star was probably for his mother, as the modern system of dif- 



14 ARMORIAL BE GELRE, 

ferencing with a mullet for third son seems to have been unknown in 
the north of Scotland at that time. 

George Dunbar of Asliesk, Heritable Mair of Moray, younger son of 
James of Conze, built the Castle of Asliesk, and on the centre stone, 
over his fireplace in " the Hall," he placed the date 1587, and in relief 
— on a shield three cushions, with a chevron humetty in fess point for 
difference ; and his initials G. D. in base ; impaling a chevron, differ- 
enced by a crescent between three stars ; and the initials M. A. in 
base, for his wife Margaret, daughter of Anderson of Chapelfield and 
Pittenseir. The chevron humetty was probably for George's mother, 
Isobel Brodie, second wife of James Dunbar of Conze. These arms 
and initials were repeated over the castle door, and below them, on 
the same stone, were those of 

Alexander Dunbar, elder son of George of Asliesk. On a shield three 
cushions ; impaling three garbs, for his wife Jonet, daughter of 
Thomas Cwmyng of Alter [marriage contract, 30th December 1583]. 
Alexander predeceased his father at midnight, 31st May 1600. 
George died 13th August 1607, and was buried in his son's grave. 
Arms upon their tombstone between their initials — on a shield three 
cushions. 

Mr James Dunbar of Newtoun, younger son of George of Asliesk, lost 
his first wife, Margaret Mackenzie, grand-daughter of the Earl of 
Athol, on the 12th December 1604. Arms upon her tombstone, 
between their initials — on a shield three cushions, a stag's head and 
neck couped in fess point for difference [instead of impalement], 

Mr Patrick Dunbar, twenty years Rector of Duffus, younger son of 
Patrick Dunbar of Conze died 28th August 1629. Arms upon his 
tombstone — on a shield three cushions ; impaling ermine a man's 
heart, and on a chief three stars for his wife, Elspet Douglas, who 
seems to have been daughter of James Douglas of Dipill. 

Gavin Dunbar, Bishop of Aberdeen, fourth son of Sir Alexander of 
Westfield, Archdeacon of St Andrews, and Clerk Register, was pro- 
vided to the See of Aberdeen by Pope Leo. X. on the 5th November 
1518. It was Bishop Dunbar who had the Cathedral at Aberdeen 
ceiled with wood, and the ceiling decorated with coats of arms. On 
an illumination in one of the Cathedral books, his arms are emblazoned 
between two bears ; but the Bishop does not seem either to have 
used or to have had right to supporters. He died on the 9th March 
1531-2. His arms — three pillows within the Royal tressure — are on 
his seals ; and, with the addition of a mitre and his initials, are on 
the Old Bridge of Dee, and on the canopy of his tomb over his effigy 
in " Bishop Gavin Dunbar's Aisle," in the Cathedral at Aberdeen. 
The Bishop is often confused with his nephew, Gavin Dunbar, who 
was " provided " to the Archbishoprick of Glasgow on the 8th of July 
1524, and died on the 30th of April 1547. 

David Dunbar of Durris, fifth son of Sir Alexander of Westfield, died 
23rd February 152 1-2. His son — 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 15 

Alexander Dunbar of Durris, like his first cousin, James Dunbar of 
Conze, sealed in 1526 with— on a shield three pillows, a star in fess 
point for difference. The star was probably for his mother. Neither 
Alexander, nor any of his forefathers for four hundred years before 
him, was a third son. 

Mr Patrick Dunbar, Chancellor of Aberdeen and Caithness, sixth son 
of Sir Alexander of Westfield. Died 8th September 1525, leaving 
descendants, among whom are said to have been the Dunbars of Ben- 
netfeild or Benagefeild. 

Alexander Dunbar, Prior of Pluscarden, is supposed to be a descend- 
ant of Mr Patrick. The Prior's son — 

Patrick Dunbar of Sanquhar, styled himself " Baron of Sanquhar," 
and, on the 8th September 1568, gave a charter to his wife Elizabeth, 
daughter and coheir of Ogilvy of Durn. Seal, two inches in diameter! 
— on a shield three pillows. 

Mr John Dunbar of Bennethfeild died 2nd December 1590. His wives. 
Mar. and Issob. Dunbars, died 3rd November 1570 and 4th Decem- 
ber 1603. His son Nicol died 31st January 1651, and Nicol's wife, 
Griss. Maver, died 21st July 1648. The above is recorded on a 
stone, built into the west wall of the Dunbar Aisle, in the Cathedral at 
Elgin. Above the inscription are two shields; on the dexter shield are 
three cushions impaling three boar's heads erased ; the impaling line 
extends through the chief only, and three buckles in relief, slightly 
in bend, are between the lower charges. This suggests that possibly 
the mother of Mr John's first wife may have beeij an Urquhart, and 
that the mother of his second wife may have been a Leslie. On the 
sinister shield are three cushions, impaling a star in chief, a crescent 
in base — probably for Nicol Dunbar and his wife Grissel Maver. 

John Dunbar of Bennethfeild, and his wife Agnes Mackenzie, alive 17th 
May 1629, marked their burial place by an inscription, on a tablet 
built into the south wall, inside the only aisle now remaining, of the 
Cathedral of Rosemarkie at Fortrose. Above the inscription between 
their initials are their arms — On a shield three cushions ; impaling a 
stag's head cabossed, a star between the attires. 

Mr David Dunbar, Dean of Moray, on the nth January 1555 gave to 
his son, Alexander Dunbar of Craighead, a charter of the lands of 
Boath, and on the 24th July 1556 a charter of Petwhyn. Seals — on 
a shield three cushions within the Royal tressure [the Dean's official 
seal ?] 

Mr Alexander Dunbar, Sub-chantor and Dean of Moray [son of a 
former Dean Alexander], also styled of West Grange and Burgie, one 
of the Senators of the College of Justice, married [contract, loth 
February 1561] Katherine Reid, sister-german to Walter Reid, the 
last Abbot of Kinloss, and niece of Robert Reid, Bishop of Orkney, 
who was formerly Abbot of Kinloss. The Dean's official seal, ist 
September 1586 — on a shield three cushions within the Royal tressure. 
He died 13th July 1593. See Robert of Burgie his third son. 



1 6 ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 

Mr Thomas Dunbar of West Grange, Dean of Moray, second son of 
Mr Alexander, married Grisel, daughter of Mr Robert Crighton of 
Eliok, advocate [contract, nth July 1591]. Arms between their ini- 
tials — on a shield three pillows, one and two in chief; a lion rampant 
in base; impaling quarterly, first and fourth, a lion rampant; second 
and third, three crowns. Above the shield, instead of a crest, is a 
cherub's head between two wings displayed. Supporters, two ducks' 
heads erased, [but possibly they are not meant for supporters]. 

Alexander Dunbar of West Grange, son of Mr Thomas, married — first 
Jean, daughter of Sir John Campbell of Cawdor [contract, i ith March 
1624] ; and secondly, Jean, daughter of Sir Alexander Cockburn of 
Langton [contract, i6th May 1632]. Below the arms of his father 
and mother already described, upon the same stone, are, between ini- 
tials, his arms — on a shield three pillows, one and two in chief ; a 
lion rampant in base ; impaling three cocks for his second wife, Jean 
Cockburn. Supporters — two ducks' heads erased. [A repetition of the 
above]. 

Robert Dunbar of Burgie, Subchantor of Moray, third son of Dean 
Alexander, had on the centre stone over his fireplace at Burgie, within 
a garter, between the letters A. D. — on a shield party per fess three 
cushions, two and one below the letter M. in chief ; a roebuck's 
head between the letters K. R. in base ; being the arms and initials 
of his father and mother, Mr Alexander Dunbar and Katherine Reid ; 
and below, outside the garter, R. D., his own initials ; all the above 
in relief; the date, 1602, is cut into the stone. This Robert Dunbar 
of Burgie married — first, in or before 1609, Isobel, daughter and co- 
heir of Sir John Sharpe of Houston, Knight, advocate. Upon a 
stone at Burgie is a monogram of their initials, R.D.I.S., and below — 
on a shield three cushions ; impaling a dexter hand holding a dagger. 
Under the shield is the date 162 1 — all in relief 

Sir Robert Dunbar of Grangehill, Knight, married Grisell, daughter of 
Alexander Brodie of that ilk. Arms above their initials, and the date 
1666 — on a shield three cushions ; impaling on a chevron, between 
three birds, as many stars ; crest on a helmet, a wreath of laurel ; 
supporters — dexter a greyhound, sinister a boar. 

Archibald Dunbar of Newtoun and Thundertoun. Seal — on the 8th 
July 1670 — on a shield, quarterly, first and fourth, a lion rampant 
for Dunbar ; second and third, three cushions for Ranulph : above the 
shield are his initials A.D. His elder son — 

Robert Dunbar of Newtoun and Thundertoun, succeeded 3rd May 
1689, and used two seals — one a lion rampant; the other — on a shield 
three cushions, a buckle in fess point for difference. Helmet, mantl- 
ing and wreath, no crest. The buckle from the arms of his mother, 
Elizabeth, youngest daughter and coheir of Walter Hacket of Mayen ; 
her arms were — on a shield tierced fessways : first, a lion passant ; 
second, on a bend three buckles, the centre one being on a raised 
shield ; third, three piles. The buckles were probably placed on the 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 17 

Racket coat for her mother Janet, elder daughter of George Leslie of 
Burdsbank, grandson of George, fourth Earl of Rothes. The centre 
buckle may have been placed on a raised shield, because Janet Leslie's 
mother, Margaret Stirling, daughter of the Laird of Craigbarnet, also 
bore three buckles. 
Mr Archibald Dunbar of Thundertoun, younger son of Archibald of 

Newtoun. Seal — a lion rampant. 
James Dunbar of Boath. Seal, 1681, — on a shield three cushions, with 
helmet, mantling, and wreath ; no crest. Above the helmet are his 
initials, L D. 
Alexander Dunbar of Westfield, Heritable Sheriff of Moray. Seals, 
24th October 1692 and 19th September 1693 — on a shield three 
cushions, and on the 26th May 1701 — on a shield quarterly, first and 
fourth, a lion rampant within a bordure charged with eight roses ; 
second and third, three [square] cushions within the Royal tressure ; 
helmet and mantling; crest — on a wreath, between the -words Sub 
Spe, a dexter hand apaumde reaching at two earls' coronets tied 
together ; supporters — two lions rampant. 
Sir James Dunbar of Mochrum was created a baronet on the 29th 
March 1694 by King William IIL, who assigned to him, in his 
patent, two white doves Imperially crowned for supporters, with 
Candoris prcBmiiim honos for motto. This seems to be the only 
known instance in Scotland of supporters being granted in a patent 
of baronetcy. 
Alexander Dunbar of Bishopmill, upon his chimney-piece, between 
initials and the date 1696 — on a shield three cushions ; impaling on a 
cross indented, between four roses, a crescent in fess point, for his 
wife, Margaret Aytoun. 
Elizabeth Dunbar, only daughter of Sir William Dunbar of Hempriggs, 
Bt., married, as his second wife, and survived. Sir Robert Gordon of 
Gordonstoun, third Baronet. In 1705 she placed above his tomb, 
over their initials — on a shield quarterly, first and fourth, the arms 
of the Earl of Huntlie ; second and third, the arms of the Earl of 
Sutherland, for her husband ; impaling first and fourth Dunbar, 
second and third Ranulph, for herself. The dexter and sinister halves 
of the shield have each over all — on a shield the arms of a Nova 
Scotia baronet; crest— a cat sejant ; mottoes — dexter, Sanscrainte; 
sinister, Sub spe ; supporters — dexter, a greyhound; sinister, a 
savage holding a club. 
Robert Dunbar of Grangehill. Seal, 28th January 17 16 — three pillows 
within the Royal tressure, helmet, wreath, and mantling; crest — a 
lion's head erased; motto [under the shield] — Sub spe; supporters 
— dexter, a greyhound ; sinister, a boar. [The impression is broken 
in fess point, where there may have been a difference.] 
LuDOVic Dunbar of Moy succeeded, on the death of his cousin Robert, 
to the representation of Westfield, and to the heritable sheriffship of 
Elgin and Forres. Seal, i8th April 1721 — a lion rampant. Although 

£ 



1 8 ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 

the sheriffship had been two hundred and twenty-six years in the 
family, he sold it to the Earl of Moray in 1724 for ^^2000. 

The Rev. Thomas Dunbar [one of the Westfield family], Vicar of Kelve- 
don in Essex, was buried in the chancel of the church there, 7th 
February 1728. Arms upon his tombstone — on a shield quarterly, 
first and fourth Dunbar, second and third Ranulph ; crest — ^a dexter 
hand apaumde reaching to two earls' coronets tied together. 

The Dunbars in Holland, descended from Dunbar of Windyhills, bear, 
three [square] cushions, each of the upper ones supported in his fore- 
paws by a lion combatant gardant ; helmet, mantling, and wreath ; 
crest — 2i [square] cushion. 

In conclusion, the matriculations of Dunbar Arms, recorded in the 
Lyon and Ulster Registers, speak for themselves. 

Had space permitted many more Dunbar coats might have been 
added, and references to the originals of all the above examples, with the 
legends of each seal and secretum, would have been inserted. 

It seems necessary to remark that, in " A System of Heraldry," " by 
Alexander Nisbet, Gent," published in 1722, there are several erroneous 
statements about the Arms of the Dunbars, and at page 273 there are mis- 
takes in the blazon of the Dunbar Coat ; unfortunately all the errors are 
repeated in the second edition, published in 1804. 

Ranulph. Thomas Ranulph. Seal — on a shield three pillows ; secretum 
— an antique gem. The pillows are squares pendent by the corners. 
[Liber de Melros, vol. ii., plate HI. No. 5, attached to No. 23 
Appendix.] It was probably this Thomas, or his father, who used 
the same or a similar seal in 1292, as one of the executors of the 
Lady Dervorgoyle. 

Thomas Ranulph. Seal — on a shield three cushions within the Royal 
tressure. The cushions are tasselled and pendent by the corners. 
The shield is surrounded by compartments. In each of the four 
principal divisions there is a lion rampant. 

Sir Thomas Ranulph, Knight, was created Earl of Moray, with remain- 
der to the heirs male of his body, by King Robert Brus, his mother's 
brother, on or before the 29th October 131 2. No. 264 of the " Regis- 
trum Episcopatus Moraviense " records the grant, which is undated. 
The Earl also styled himself " Dominus Mannie et Vallis Anandie." 
Froissart's MS. records that the Earl bore ''Argent a trots oreilles 
de guelles." Froissart probably had the authority of eye-witnesses, 
and wrote about a century and a-half before Sir David Lindsay's 
time. Some of the printed English editions, including that of 1525, 
reproduce the blazon as above, but where the word " oreilles'' is trans- 
lated, it is invariably rendered "pillows'' Upon the death of his 
uncle Robert I., on the 7th June 1329, the Earl became Regent of 
Scotland, and he died on the 20th July 1332. 

Thomas Ranulph, second Earl of Moray, succeeded his father, and was 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 19 

killed three weeks afterwards at the battle of Dupplin, on the 12th 
August 1332. 

John Ranulph, third Earl of Moray, " Dominus Mannie et Vallis 
Anandie," succeeded his brother. Froissart records that his arms were 
" Argent a trots oreilles de guellesr The Earl was killed at the 
battle of Neville's Cross on the 17th October 1346. With him all 
the heirs male of the body of the first Earl failed, and the estates 
were inherited by his sister, 

Lady Agnes Ranulph, the celebrated " Black Agnes of Dunbar," wife 
of Patrick Dunbar, Earl of March, ninth Earl [see page 9]. 

" Ranulph," almost invariably thus spelt in old charters and on seals, is 
often erroneously spelt 'Randolph" in modern days. Neither Queen 
Elizabeth's minister Randolph, nor an English family of the name 
[Hasted's Kent: Canterbury, 1790, vol. iii., p. 64], appear to have 
any connection, either by arms or descent, with the Scottish Ranulphs. 

Earl of Kincardine. Arms of the Isle of Man at this time held by 
William Montacute, Earl of Salisbury. 

There was no Earl of Kincardine till the seventeenth century. 

Earl of Orkney. Arms of Sinclair ; William Sinclair did not become 
Earl of Orkney till 1379, and at this time Erngisl Suneson was 
titular earl, his deceased wife having been daughter and coheir of Earl 
Malise. In 1364 Thomas de St Clair was ballirus regis Norvagie in 
Orkney. 

Earl of Ross. Arms of Alexander Stewart, Earl of Buchan, who 
married Euphemia, Countess of Ross, 1382. 

John Edmonston. Sir John of that Ilk, 1359-81. The crest a camels 
head ; the Ednam family bore two camels as supporters ; and on a 
stone at Duntreath, c. 1600, engraved in Seton's " Law and Practice of 
Heraldry in Scotland," the shield of Sir James of Duntreath is repre- 
sented as resting on the hump of a camel. Mr Laing describes the 
crest on the seal of Sir William of Duntreath in 1470 as a horse's (?) 
head issuing from a ducal coronet ; and at a later period a swan's 
head and neck was used, also issuing from a coronet. 



PLATE C. 

t 

Jean de Lindsay. (?) Sir John of Craigie and Thurston, whose daughter 

and heir, Margaret, married Wallace of Riccarton. 
Henri de Preston. Sir Henry afterwards of Formartin. 
Alexandre de Ramsay of Dalhousie. 
David de Lindsay, afterwards Earl of Crawford, 1398, son-in-law of 

Robert II. 

The genealogy of the house of Lindsay has been so well illustrated 

by the Earl of Crawford and Balcarres, its present learned chief, in the 

" Lives of the Balcarres," that it is almost unnecessary here to do 

more than refer to that work. 



20 ARMORIAL DE GELRE, 

Walter de Lindsay was settled in the county of Roxburgh early 
in the twelfth century: his descendants soon divided into several 
branches, produced a chancellor, bishops, two chamberlains of Scot- 
land in the thirteenth century, and another in the fourteenth. As 
stated above, they attained to an earldom now the premier earldom of 
Scotland, and intermarried with royalty ; and in the next century, 
David, Earl of Crawford, was Duke of Montrose, 1488. 

Mr Seton has given in the " Law and Practice of Heraldry in 
Scotland " a coloured plate showing the differencing of the arms, and 
the family having had the good fortune to number among its de- 
scendants four Lyon Kings of Arms, figures largely in all the 
heraldic collections. 

The de Limesi, barons by tenure soon after the Conquest ended 
in the direct male line on the death of Hugh de Limesi in the reign 
of King John, his cousin, David de Lindsay, being one of his heirs. 
The bearing of Limesi was an eagle displayed ; and Segar's Roll 
gives for Richard de Limesay gules, an eagle displayed or. 

The early Rolls of Arms in England give various persons with 
the surname Lindeseie, Lyndeshaye, Lindeseye, &c., bearing or, an 
eagle displayed sable, the same debruised of a baton compony, azure, 
and gules ; or, an eagle purpure, the same debruised of a baton com- 
pony, argent, and azure ; also gules, three eagles displayed or. 

The seals of Sir Walter and of Simon de Lindsay in Scotland in 
the twelfth, and of Sir David in the thirteenth century, have an eagle 
with wings expanded, not on a shield. 

The earliest strictly heraldic seal is that of Sir Walter, 1292 — ^an 
orle vair ; this again refers us back to England, where in Charles' 
Roll and in Glover's Roll there are Walter de Lindesey, gules, an 
orle vair ; William de Lindeshie, gules, semde of crosslets or an orle 
vair in Charles' Roll ; and the same in a Roll of the reign of Edward 
n. for Sir Gilberd de Lyndeseye of the County of Huntingdon. 

The orle remained as late as 1450 the bearing of a branch of the 
Scottish house, as shown by the seal of Philip Lindsay of the Haugh 
of Tannadice. 

The eagle and baton compony are given in Mr Seton's table for 
Lindsay of Wauchopedale. But the Lindsays in the northern king- 
dom generally adopted a fess checquy ; the seal of Sir William, in 
1293, is described by Mr Laing as ermine three bars, but it may 
rather be a shield checquy. That of Sir Alexander of Crawford, 
1304, is certainly a fess checquy. On the seal of John, Bishop of 
Glasgow, 1333, are two shields, the one being ermine three bars, or, 
as I incline to think, checquy, the other an orle vair debruised of a 
bendlet. 

Sir David of Crawford, 1345, placed the shield with the fess 
checquy on the breast of an eagle displayed ; and in Hutton's 
" Sigilla " another seal of his is described with the fess within a 
bordure charged^ with eight buckles ; crest, a key ; supporters, two 
lions. 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE, 21 

The crest of Sir James of Crawford, 1371, was a demi-swan, or 
a swan's head and neck with a wing; to this, in 1390, Sir William 
of Byres added a coronet, from which the crest issues. 

The supporters of Sir Alexander of Glenesk, 1371, were those 
ever since borne by the elder branch— two lions sejant gardant ; and 
in 1488, those of the Earls of Lindsay appear on the seal of David, 
Lord Lindsay of the Byres, two griffins. 

In the time of the first Earl of Crawford, Abernethy was 
quartered, and the Duke of Montrose added for that title an escut- 
cheon over all — argent, a rose gules. 

The swan with the motto "Endure forth" is given in the MSS. of 
the sixteenth century for the Earls of Crawford, but Pont, in 1624, and 
later authorities, have an ostrich proper holding a key in its mouth. 

The ostrich feather here held by the swan as the crest of David 
de Lindsay is to be seen on the seal of David, Earl of Crawford, 
1446; and in a MS. of the latter part of the following century, there 
is on either side of the shield an ostrich feather ; and also as a badge, 
three times repeated, a dog's head with a horse shoe in his mouth. 
Le Seigneur Patrick (Hepburn), Sir Patrick de Hepborne, in 1371, 

appended his seal to the Act settling the succession to the Crown. 
Gavthier Lesly. Walterus de Leslie also signed the act of settlement. 
The bend ermine and the tinctures differ from those afterwards 
adopted. 
Le Sire de Keith. William de Kethe appended his seal to the same 
Act, but Mr Laing describes the crest as a stag's head ; the stag's 
head is on seals in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, and was 
always borne by the Earls Marischal. 

There is a seal of Sir Robert Keith, Marischal of Scotland, 13 16, 
with the chief paly of six, but earlier seals of the family — for instance 
that of Adam de Keth — appended to a deed of homage to Edward L, 
1292, are not heraldic. 

George, Earl Marischal, d.s.p. 1778, and in 1782 George Keith 
of Northfield, was served heir male of his ancestor. Sir Robert, Great 
Marischal of Scotland ; he descended from the second son, the eldest 
being the first Earl Marischal. After this he assumed the style of 
Marischal. 

Robert Keith, Bishop of Fife, and Primus of the Epispopal 
Church in Scotland, had, about 1750, written a "Vindication" of the 
claim of his grand-nephew, Robert, to the succession in opposition to 
Keith of Ravelston, setting forth his descent from Alexander Keith, 
who had a charter of Pittendrum and Pitblae in 1513 from his father, 
William, Earl Marischal. Robert, who was Lieutenant-Colonel of 
the 3rd Foot Guards, d.s.p. 1780, when his cousin, Katherine Keith, 
widow of Stuart Carmichael of Bonnington, was served heir general 
to him ; she was the only child of Bishop Keith. 

George of Northfield left a son James, C-aptain in the 117th 
Regiment, who, d.s.p. 1799, when his sister Katherine, wife of Robert 



22 ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 

Gentleman, Surgeon of the 13th Regiment of Foot, was served heir 
general. 

In 1 80 1 Alexander of Ravelston, co. Edinburgh, and of Dun- 
nottar, co. Kincardine, the latter being the historical seat of the Earls 
Marischal, and acquired by purchase by his father, was recognised by 
the Lyon King of Arms as heir male, and allowed the chief coat and 
supporters. His present representative is the Rev. William Alex- 
ander Keith of Pogbie, in East Lothian, whose uncle, Sir Alexander 
of Ravelston and Dunnottar, was appointed Knight Marischal of 
Scotland, and knighted in 18 19. 

Bishop Keith, in his "Vindication," altogether denies the pedi- 
gree of the Ravelston family. 

The old seals, except one, have the chief paly of six. Sir David 
Lindsay, in both the Keith coats he gives, has argent, a chief paly 
of six or and gules. Soon after, this was changed to a chief gules 
charged with three pallets or, and this is the blazon in the Lyon 
Register. 
Gavthier Haliburton. The seal of Walter de Haliburton — three 
mascles on a bend — is appended to the Act of Settlement, 1371. In 
the fifteenth century the Lords of Dirleton quartered three bars for 
Cameron and a bend for Vaux. William, in 1466, seals with a fess 
between two mascles in chief and a man's heart in base. 

The surname is taken from lands in Berwickshire, and the 
well-authenticated pedigree goes back to the early years of the 
twelfth century. 

Marjory Douglas, Duchess of Rothesay, married Walter de 
Haliburton, 1403. 

Walter de Halyburton of Dirleton, Treasurer, married the Coun- 
tess of Ross, daughter of Robert, Duke of Albany. 

See W for Haliburton of Pitcur. 

Sir Walter Scott was allowed, as heir of line of the Haliburtons 
; of Newmains, to quarter the arms, and took one of the old supporters 
of the baronial family — a moor proper banded and cinctured argent, 
holding in his exterior hand a flaming torch reversed proper, to be 
borne on the sinister side, that on the dexter being the mermaid of 
the Scotts ; he also took the Haliburton motto, " Watch weel." 
Thomas Erskine. Sir Thomas Erskine of that ilk, one of the hostages 
for the payment of the ransom of David II.; the label is borne 
because his father, Sir Robert, was alive. Mr Laing describes the seal 
of that Sir Robert which is appended to the Act of Settlement as a 
pale ; crest — a griffin's head and wings issuing from a coronet ; the 
seal of Sir Thomas, 1364 — a pale, with a label of five points ; crest — 
a griffin's head and wings, with a sprig in the beak ; supporters — 
two griffins. His younger brother. Sir Nicholas of Kinnoull, 1370, 
has the pale engrailed as a difference ; crest — a dragon's head and 
wings ; supporters — two demi-savages. 

The crest on another seal of Sir Robert is a boar's head, 1357. 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 23 

In the sixteenth century Lord Erskine had as crest a hand holding a 
cutlass ; motto — " Je pense plus ; " and the supporters were griffins, 
which supporters were also borne by the Earls of Mar, Earls of 
Kellie, and Erskines of Dun. 

Sir John of Dun, a.d. 1400, on his seal, has the pale charged 
with a cross crosslet fitchde ; crest — a griffin's head issuing from a 
coronet. 

The seal of Sir Charles of Cambo, Baronet, Lyon King of Arms, 
1668, is interesting as proving that the present official arms were not 
used before 1673, the date on the Lyon Office Seal. It is first and 
fourth, the augmentation granted to the first Earl of Kellie ; second 
and third, the pale charged with a crescent for difference; in an 
escutcheon over all, the Nova Scotia badge ; crest — a demi-lion ; 
legend — Sigillum Officii Leonis, anno Domini 1663. 

Several of the Kings of Arms of Scotland sealed official docu- 
ments with their paternal arms, but Sir James Balfour used an 
official seal — a saltire, and on a chief a fleur-de-lis supported by two 
lions rampant ; legend— Sigii/um Officii Leonis Regis Armorum. 

Sir Charles Erskine entered his arms at the beginning of the 
Register. The arms of office — argent, a lyon sejant full-faced gules, 
holding in his dexter paw a thistle slipped vert, and in the sinister a 
shield or inescutcheon of the second ; on a chief azure, a St Andrew's ,■ 

cross as the first, impaled with his paternal bearing ; quarterly first 
and fourth gules, an imperial crown within a double tressure \ 

counterfiowered or ; second and third argent, a pale sable ; as a ; 

difference from his brother-german, the Earl of Kellie, a crescent ; 

argent in the coeur point ; crest — a garb or banded azure lying on its ' j 

side, and thereon a cock standing in a crowing posture proper, sup- : 

ported by two sportsmen vested proper, he on the dexter holding a ] 

bended bow and arrow, he on the sinister a golf club ; motto — ^ 

Excutit inde canit. See C and L ii. ►**"** % 

PLATE D. 0- ''*'"' i 

Le Sire de Seton, ' 

I consider myself fortunate in having obtained from the author \ 

of " The Law and Practice of Heraldry in Scotland," George Seton, 

Esquire, advocate, than whom no one is better qualified to treat the \ 

■ subject, the following notice of his family : — ] 

The Norman family of Say, barons by tenure in England from ■ 

the reign of William I. to that of John, bore, quarterly or and gules. ^ 

A branch settled in Scotland, and the elder line ended in Sir Hugh, : 

whose sister and heir, Orabilla, widow of Reginald de Warren," made 

a grant to the Church and Abbot of Scone in 1247. \ 

The Setons are believed to descend from that house, and retain \ 

the armorial tinctures, while taking for bearings three crescents. ' 



I 



24 ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 

Nisbet states, as a reason for this assumption, " that their ancient 
territories and lands in East Lothian were formed by the Forth into 
three great bays like half moons." It is much more probable, how- 
ever, that, being the symbols of Mussulmen, these charges were 
adopted by the family, as by other Christian conquerors, to com- 
memorate some victory over the Turks or Saracens. 

Alexander de Setun witnessed a charter by Gillemur, son of 
Gilleconel, to the Church of Lesmahagow in 1144. 

The earliest Seton seal is that of Sir Alexander, c. 12 16, bearing 
three crescents and a label of three points. On the later seal of 
another Alexander Seton, attached to the celebrated letter of the 
Scottish barons to the Pope in 1 320, the three crescents are placed on 
a bend. 

The son and successor of Sir Christopher Seton, ninth of the 
family on record (who married Christian Bruce, sister of Robert I.), 
placed the double tressure round his paternal crescents on account of 
his royal descent, as on his seal in 1337 ; and Nisbet specially refers 
to the presence of the tressure in the Seton achievement on the 
double ground of " maternal descent and merit." It is said that he 
also obtained from the king a coat of augmentation, viz. : — ^gules, a 
sword * in pale proper, pomelled and hilted or, supporting an imperial 
crown within a double tressure of the last, to perpetuate the services 
rendered to his country by himself and his progenitors. 

This coat, however, is not to be found on any seal used by the 
successive representatives of the family, nor does it appear in any 
known heraldic MS. Sir George Mackenzie mentions that it was 
borne in his time (before 1680) ; and Nisbet, who had the best oppor- 
tunities of knowing, from personal observation, and because his 
father had been agent of the Earl of Winton, says that it was to be 
seen cut in stone on the old house of Seton. 

George, third Lord Seton, married Lady Janet Stewart, daughter 
and heir of John, Earl of Buchan, Constable of France, grandson of 
Robert II., in whose right he claimed the earldom ; and on that 
account his descendants have always quartered the feudal arms of 
Buchan, azure, three garbs or. This assumption is thus referred to in 
the MS. History of the Cumings of Ernsyde, compiled in 1622 ; and 
although the alleged motive is erroneous, the statement forms a 
curious corroboration of the fact : " Being also requisitt to vnderstand 
y* reasone why y^ Lord Seattoune, now E. of Wintone, weareth in y* 
six Bear sheawes — thrie in everie cross of his bagge — I being in the 
Palace of Seattoune, ffamiliar w*" my old Lord, demandat at his Lo: 
for what cause the Hous of Seattoune weare y= Cumings' armes in y' 
maner ? My Lord answered me y' his predicessors gatt the lands 
and lordship of Troup in Buchan, fra y^ Earle of Buchane, Cuming ; 
soe, as ane tockin of perpetuall band of freindship, y^ Lo: Seattoune, 

* Sir Christopher Seton's two-handed sword, figured in Dr Wilson's " Archseology of Scotland," is in 
the possession of the writer of this statement. 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 25 

att y* time, adioyned y« six sheawes to his own armes, q"' remaines 
w* y* Hous, as memorie of auld kyndnes, and not y' y lands wes 
gevin be alliena°ne to tack any pairt of y<= Cumings' armes ; and soe, 
if auld love and kyndnes should be respected, it is ane great motive 
and occasione to profes a good will and frindship to remaine betwixt 
the said Surnames." (Quoted in Sir Richard Maitland's " House of 
Seytoun," p. 96.) 

Robert, eighth Lord Seton, on being created Earl of Winton, 
was allowed an additional coat of augmentation, viz., azure, a star of 
twelve points argent, within a double tressure flowered and counter- 
flowered or. On a large detached stone in Seton Church, believed to 
have formerly surmounted the principal doorway of Seton Palace, 
the full Winton arms are sculptured in high relief, the only charges in 
the inescutcheon being the star and Royal tressure, as on the seal of 
George, third Earl, in 1608. The /////^W inescutcheon appears on a 
damask napkin in the possession of the writer, bearing the name of the 
maker — " John Ochiltrie, weaver in Edinburgh," and exhibiting the 
armorial ensigns of George, fifth Earl of Winton, under the following 
legend : — Insignia George IX. de Seton, Comitis de IVinton, Domini 
de Seton, i']i2. Over the shield is an earl's coronet surmounted by 
helmet, crest, and motto ; and behind, two batons in saltire, in allu- 
sion to the office of Master of the Royal Household formerly held by 
the family. The supporters hold banners, of which the dexter is 
charged with the arms of Seton, and the sinister with a circle and 
triangle interlaced, surrounded by the word Indissoluble, the device 
adopted by George, fourth Lord Seton, on the ensign of the ship 
" Eagle," which he equipped to avenge himself against an attack by 
the Dunkirkers. In the four corners are interlaced crescents and 
other devices, with legends, the whole being within a bordure 
charged with crescents and fleurs-de-lis. 

The seal of Robert, Lord Seton, in 1600, presents a variation of 
marshalling ; the crescents of Seton being there quartered with the 
garbs of Buchan, and the whole surrounded by the Royal tressure. 

Supporters. — While the seal of William, Lord Seton, 1384, 
exhibits two lions sejant gardant, as supporters, on that of his grand- 
son, George, third Lord, c. 1440, they are represented as rampant 
gardant. According to Nisbet, George, fifth Lord, who fell at 
Flodden, used a mertrick * and a lion, but the supporters carried by 
the Earls of Winton were two foxes (or mertricks), proper, collared 
and chained or, each collar charged with three crescents gules. In 
the sixteenth century, the collars, as given in the MSS., were gules 
charged with five plates. 

Crest. — The crest given in this armorial appears on the seal of 
William de Seton, c. 1384, but does not seem to have become heredi- 
tary ; William, first Lord, c. 1400, used a crescent between two 

* Martin, in his " Description of the Western Isles," 1703, says that ""the mertrick, a four-footed 
creature about the size of a big cat, is pretty common in the isle of Harris." 

G 



26 ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 

plumes of feathers issuing from a coronet, as sculptured on a stone 
over the south-east door of Seton Church, now almost entirely effaced, 
but minutely described by Nisbet in a genealogical MS. in the 
Advocates' Library. In W. the crest is a serpent gliding among 
foliage. Another MS. of the sixteenth century has a crescent 
between two branches, but the established crest of the Winton family 
was a dragon or wyvern vert, spouting fire, wings elevated, and 
charged with a mullet argent, issuing from a ducal coronet. Some- 
times a scroll with the war-cry " Set on " issues from the mouth. 
Motto, " Zet fordward," or " Hazard, zet fordward." Below the shield, 
Invia virtuti via nulla (Ovid., " Met.," xiv. 113), and on scrolls pass- 
ing over the middle of the supporters, Intaininatis fulget honoribus 
(Hon, " Carm.," iii. 2, 18). 

The wyvern crest was used by Roger de Quincy, Earl of Win- 
chester, and is believed by Nisbet to have been adopted by the 
Setons with the title of Winton, on account of their relation to the 
family of De Quincy. 

Of the cadets of this family were — 

(i.) Alexander, Earl of Dunfermline, Lord High Chancellor of 
Scotland, 1605, at whose houses of Pinkie and Fyvie, and also at 
Dunfermline, are examples of his taste for heraldic decoration. His 
lordship's mother was Isobel, daughter of Sir William Hamilton of 
Sanquhar ; and their composed coat is cut in several places at Fyvie — 
a fess charged with three cinquefoils, and in base three crescents, all 
within the double tressure. Afterwards, argent, on a fess gules three 
cinquefoils of the field, was granted as an augmentation to be borne 
in the second and third quarters for the title of Dunfermline ; sup- 
porters — two horses at liberty argent, maned and tailed or. 

(2.) The Setons of Barns, co. Haddington, bore the sword 
supporting the imperial crown between their crescents, because, says 
Sir George Mackenzie, they "got the land which was disponed with 
the arms." In 1806, Lieut.-Colonel James Seton, representative of 
Barns, was allowed to carry the quartered coat and supporters of the 
Earls of Dunfermline as heir male. 

(3.) The Viscounts of Kingston placed the wyvern, as a coat of 
augmentation, in the second and third quarters. 

(4.) The Setons of Meldrum, co. Aberdeen, quartered Mel- 
drum, as descended from the heiress of that family ; and to Sir Alex- 
ander of Pitmedden, one of their cadets, was granted, in 1675, as an 
augmentation to be borne in the centre of his paternal coat, a man's 
heart distilling drops of blood ; and for crest, a banner displayed in 
bend proper, with the motto " Insignibus astans," on account of his 
father having been killed at the Bridge of Dee, being shot through 
the body by a cannon ball, while defending the king's standard. In 
1684, the crest and motto were altered to a soldier from the middle 
bearing up the royal banner bendways displayed proper, and " Sustento 
sanguine signa," — a deerhound and an otter being granted as 
supporters. 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 27 

(5.) Seton of Cariston, co. Fife— or, three crescents within the 
Royal tressure gules ; in the centre an otter's head sable for Balfour. 
The first of this family, John, younger brother of George, seventh 
Lord Seton, Queen Mary's faithful adherent, charged one of the 
crescents with a bezant, as on his seal, and also as represented on the 
roof of Samson's Hall at Seton. 

The seventh Lord " repaired the forepart of the house of Seton, 
and especially that room called Samson's Hall (40 feet in height), 
which he adorned with a roof of curious structure, whereupon are 
twenty-eight large achievements, being those of Scotland, France, 
Lorraine, and the noble families that were allied to his family, 
curiously embossed and illuminate — the most exact pieces of 
armories that are to be met with," — Nisbet. 

George, second of Cariston, laid aside the bezant and adopted the 
otter's head for his mother, Isobel Balfour, heiress of Cariston. The 
family sometimes bore Seton undifferenced and quartered with 
Balfour gules, on a chevron or, between two otters' heads erased, 
in chief, and a fleur-de-lis, in base, of the second, an otter's head 
erased of the field.* 

The late John Riddell remarked that "the house of Seton or 
Winton, on account of its great connections and ramifications, besides 
the antiquity of its descent, would seem now to be the noblest in 
Scotland." 

The Earls and Marquesses of Huntly, Dukes of Gordon, Earls 
of Aboyne, Sutherland, and Eglinton, were all Setons by paternal 
descent. The Seton coat has always been quartered by the Gordons, 
descended from the marriage of Alexander Seton and Elizabeth 
Gordon, heiress of her family. 

The Sutherland family also long bore Seton as a quartering, and 
took the arms of Sutherland alone in the time of the fifteenth Earl. 

On the death, in 1749, of George, the attainted Earl of Winton, 
the male representation devolved on his cousin Sir George, third 
baronet of Garleton, who d.s.p. 1769, and then on Ralph Seton, who 
died unm. at Newcastle-on-Tyne in 1782. Ralph's nephew, John, last 
of that branch, died in London, 1796, leaving an only child, Mrs 
Mary Catherine Broadbent. 

The Earl of Eglinton and Winton is believed to be the heir 
male of the Setons. 

See W for Seton of Touch. 
Robert Erskine. Sir Robert of that ilk already named ; the crest differs 

from those on his seals given by Mr Laing. 
Jean d'Abernethy. John, younger son of Sir George of Saltoun, in 
East Lothian. The seals of Alexander de Abernethy, 1292, Lau- 

* In Sir David Lindsay's Register, Balfour of Cariston is thus blazoned :— Argent, on a chevron 
sable, an otter's head erased of the field, between two otters' heads erased of the second, and a fleur-de-lis 
in base azure. 



28 ARMORIAL DE GELRE, 

rence, c. 1320, and Sir George, elder brother of this John, the last 
appended to the Act of Settlement, 1371, all have the ribbon plain ; 
the engrailing may be a mark of cadency for the younger son. 

However, the ribbon in the seal of William, Lord Abernethy, 
1535, is described by Mr Laing as showing engrailing. 

This coat is one of those most frequently to be met with in Scot- 
land, although the surname is not a common one, being quartered by 
the descendants of the three coheiresses of the elder line, who 
married Stewart, Lindsay, and Leslie. 

"The Frasers of Philorth," printed for private circulation in 
1879 by Lord Saltoun, contains an account of this family, which his 
lordship represents as heir of the marriage in 1596 of Alexander 
Fraser of Philarth and Margaret, daughter of George Abernethy, 
Lord Saltoun. 

The Frasers, Lords Saltoun, although inheriting their peerage 
from the Abernethies, do not quarter the arms and retain the sup- 
porters of Fraser. 

A crest used in the sixteenth century was a demi-falcon rising ; 
at other times a crow or a parrot feeding on a bunch of cherries. 

Jean Stuart. Probably Sir John of Darnley, who died c. 1368; his 
grandfather. Sir John of Bonkyl, in 1296, sealed with a fess checquy 
surmounted of a bend. The seal of Alan Stuart, c. 1 190, is the first 
in which the fess checquy appears. 

Alexandre Stuart. Probably the son of Robert IL, who was Earl of 
Buchan, but was, in 1373, known as Lord of Badenoch. 

Le Sire de Sandilans. 

Anderson. Annand (?) 

Barry of six gules and or ; no name, but undoubtedly Drummond. 

Robert de Colville. Robert de Colville, of Oxnam and Ochiltree, was 
the head of the family in Scotland at this time. See W. 



PLATE E. 

Le Sire de Sinclair. The bearing of St Clair of Herdmanston, co. 
Haddington, represented by Lord Sinclair. 

Le Comte de Fife. 

Archibaud de Douglas. Archibald, Lord of Galloway, afterwards Earl 
of Douglas. 

Mr Laing gives two of his seals, one appended to the confirma- 
tion of the Act of Settlement, 1373 ; arms of Douglas, the field plain 
apparently ; crest — ^a peacock's head and neck issuing from a tower, in 
the beak an inscribed scroll ; supporters — two savages. The other, 
when he was Earl, has Douglas in the first and fourth, a lion rampant 
crowned for Galloway in the second and third quarters, and three 
mullets for Moray of Bothwell, in an escutcheon of pretence, being the 
earliest example in Scotland of the arms of an heiress so carried. It 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE, 29 

has been frequently repeated that this Archibald, Earl of Douglas, 
married Johanna, daughter and heir of Thomas Moray, Lord of 
Bothwell, and in consequence added the three stars of Moray to his 
arms. This is not the case : the seal of William de Douglas, with- 
out date, has one mullet ; the seal of Sir William, in 1296, is three 
mullets on a chief. 

Home, of Godscroft, describes a seal of William in 1259, which 
he had seen, as apparently three mullets in chief. William, first 
Earl of Douglas, added the heart, which appears in 1343 on his seal. 
Mr Joseph Bain, F.S.A. Scot, has discovered evidence showing that 
Douglas married the widow, not the daughter, of Moray — dispensa- 
tion, July 1 361, for the marriage of Sir Archibald Douglas, knight, 
of the diocese of St Andrews, and Johanna de Moravia, widow, of 
the diocese of Glasgow, relict of Sir Thomas de Moravia, knight. 
There is a charter in 1371 to Sir Archibald and his heirs, of all right 
to lands, offices, &c., which by the death, without heirs of their 
bodies, of his wife Johanna de Moravia, might fall to the king. 

Sir Thomas de Moravia must have been too young at the time 
of his death to be the father of the Countess, and there seems some 
ground for believing that his wife had been a lady of his own name, 
and probably a near relative. 

Mr Bain sends me the following description of a shield in Both- 
well Church : — " Impaled, dexter side, three stars in chief, and three 
in the body of the shield two and one surrounded by the tressure ; 
sinister, three stars two and one." This seems to indicate a marriage 
of two Morays. 

There is reason to conclude, from similarity of arms and from 
their proved relationship, that the Moray and Douglas families 
descend in the male line from a common ancestor. 
Le sire de Comyn. This is probably the Richard Comyne who had 
charters from David II., of Develly, with the office of forester of 
Tarnaway, 1367-8, and of an annual rent from the lands of Carnousie ; 
Sir Richard witnessed several charters of the Regent Duke of Albany. 

The surname is taken from Comines in Flanders ; Baudouin de 
Comines went to the Holy Land in 1202, and his arms in the Salle 
des Croisdes at Versailles are — or, an inescutcheon gules charged 
with a cross vain To this family belonged Philippe de Comines, the 
historian, who died in 1509, leaving an only child, Jeanne, wife of 
Rend de Brosse, Comte de Penthi^vre. 

Another family of the name in Artois, bore — or, an inescutcheon 
within an orle of roses gules ; when the Armorial G£ndral of France 
was compiled, 1696-17 10, the name seems to have entirely disappeared 
from the province where it originated. 

Robert de Comyn was sent by William the Conqueror to govern 
Northumberland 1068, but perished the following year when the 
palace of the Bishop of Durham was burnt ; his nephew, Richard, a 
baron by tenure as lord of Northallerton, married Hexilda of Athole, 



30 ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 

grand-daughter of King Donald Bane, and had a son, William, Earl 
of Buchan, jure uxpris. William had by his first marriage Richard, 
ancestor of John Lord of Badenoch, claimant of the crown of Scot- 
land, whose male line ended on the death of his grandson John, 1325; 
Walter Earl of Menteith, jure uxoris ; and by the second marriage 
Alexander Earl of Buchan, whose son John, Earl of Buchan, d.s.p. 

c. 1313- 

Charles's Roll has — Comin, gules, three garbs or ; and Comyn, 
azure, semde of estoiles or three garbs argent banded gules. A Roll 
of the time of Edward II. gives for Sir John Comyn of Northumber- 
land, argent, crusilly three garbs gules. 

In Scotland one garb is the charge on the seal of Sir William 
Cumin before 1282 ; his son John used three soon after, as did the 
Earl of Buchan in 1291 ; Walter added a bend over all ; and in 
1306, John, son of the Earl of Buchan, had a label of three points. 

Mr Riddell says, that on the seal of William, Earl of Buchan, 
attached to a charter to the Church of St Kentigern, Glasgow, in the 
reign of Alexander II., there is a garb as crest, but the description 
does not certainly mean this ; perhaps, rather, one garb on the 
shield. 

Sir James Balfour says, the Earl of Menteith had the field argent 
and the garbs gules. 

This great house was ruined by its adherence to the party of 
the Baliols, and only two branches seem to have survived the down- 
fall. Cuming of Altyre, co. Moray, has been seated there since the 
middle of the fifteenth century at any rate ; the seal of Thomas of 
Altyre, 1476, has two cushions in chief and a garb in base, all within 
a double tressure ; crest — a talbot's head. This is a curious instance 
of composed arms, as the coat of his mother Euphemia, daughter of 
John Dunbar, Earl of Moray, almost extinguishes the paternal garbs. 

Porteus, and other heralds, say that Altyre bore a fleur-de-lis or 
in the centre as a difference ; the arms were not registered till the 
time of George Gumming of Altyre, c. 1750 : azure, three garbs or ; 
crest— a lion rampant or holding in his dexter paw a dagger proper ; 
motto — " Courage ; " supporters — two horses argent. This coat, 
quartered with Penrose and Gordon, was again recorded, in 1795, by 
Alexander Penrose Cuming Gordon of Altyre and Gordonston. 

The second family is Cuming of Inveralochy and Culter ; the 
latter estate was erected into a barony, called Culter-Cuming, 15 13. 
Sir William of Inveralochy was Lyon King of Arms 1512-28, having 
previously been Marchmont Herald. 

Inveralochy is said by Porteus, and other heralds, to have borne 
a bordure engrailed or, and they assign to Culter as his difference a 
chevron or ; Sir Alexander of Culter registered arms, c. 1677, azure, 
three garbs within a bordure or ; crest — a garb proper ; motto — 
" Courage." Pont gives as a motto used by Cuming early in the 
seventeenth century, Solatium vitce, and Porteus has a blazon for Sir 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 31 

John, added apparently to the MS., Cuming within a bordure ermine 
and partd sable. 

Alexander, younger of Culter, was created a baronet 1695, with 
remainder to his heirs male ; the title became dormant 1793, on the 
death of Sir Alexander, third baronet, and has lately been assumed 
by a gentleman whose case has been criticised in an article in the 
" Genealogist." 

It is not unlikely that he may be descended from Thomas, uncle 
of the first baronet, who went abroad in 167 1, and had a certificate of 
his descent 3 December 1727, being then resident at Cracow. 

Alexander Earl of Buchan, granted Inveralochy to Jurdan 
Comyn, pro homagio et seruicio suo, without any statement of rela- 
tionship, in 1277, or soon after. Two ostriches as supporters were cut 
on a stone at Culter. 
Le Comte de Ross. 

Le Comte de Moray, The arms of the Earl of Sutherland are after- 
wards given — azure, three mullets argent, being the usual bearing of 
his kinsmen, the family, not the Earls, of Moray, so perhaps the 
names have been transposed. Gules, three mullets or, the recognised 
Sutherland coat comes nearer to this assigned to Moray. 

Mr Riddell, in his " Stewartiana," argues that the Murrays of 
Touch Adam have the best claim to the male representation of the 
Lords of Bothwell, and founds partly on armorial evidence. A seal 
of William, in 1463, has three mullets within the double tressure, 
and two lions as supporters. 

The Murrays of Tullibardine bore a chevron between three 
mullets; but a seal of Sir William, 1501, has three mullets within 
the double tressure, and also lions as supporters. The Murrays of 
Balvaird, Lords Scone, Lords Balvaird, Viscounts Stormont, and 
Earls of Mansfield, descended from a younger son of this Sir William, 
have always carried the tressure. 

The Murrays of Abercairney long bore a chevron between three 
mullets ; about 1730 William Moray of Abercairny registered arms, 
three mullets within a double tressure, and two eagles proper as sup- 
porters. The gradual assimilation of the arms of the different 
families of Murray is one of the most curious examples of changes in 
coat armour in Scotland. The Earl of Dysart and Murray of Glen- 
doick both were allowed the tressure, although they were cadets of 
Ochtertyre, who never bore it having branched off from the house of 
Tullibardine at the time that the chevron was used. In Dumfries- 
shire the Cockpool Murrays, and also other families in the south, 
bore a saltire plain or engrailed with three mullets on a chief ; Sir 
David Lindsay gives this, but a seal of Cuthbert of Cockpool, in 
1477, has the three mullets within a tressure, and this with differ- 
ences was borne by the Earl of Annandale. The tressure was allowed in 
1792 to John Murray of Murraythwaite, descended from an early cadet 
of Cockpool. Another example, in the south, of change is to be found 



32 ARMORIAL DE GEL RE. 

in the arms of the Elibank family. Mr Laing gives several seals of the 
Murrays of Blackbarony, 1501 to 1588, with the saltire ; the fetter- 
lock makes its first appearance on the seal of John in 1554, who still 
retained the saltire and placed the added charge in base. The seal 
of Andrew of Blackbarony, 1565, is a fetterlock and a chief charged 
with three mullets, which is now the family coat, but cadets still 
used the saltire at a later period. 

Gideon, first of Elibank, in 160 1 seals with the fetterlock and 
chief charged with three mullets and in honour point a roundle ; 
Porteus gives another coat as borne by him, or by his son before he 
was raised to the peerage — azure, on a chevron between three stars 
argent, a fetterlock between two hunting horns sable. Lord Eli- 
bank had the three mullets within the tressure, with a martlet in 
the centre for difference. 

In the Lyon Register descendants of the first lord are allowed 
the tressure, but Murrays descended from his younger brothers have 
the Blackbarony coat with differences. Changes have also been 
made by branches of the Philiphaugh Murrays, some of whom 
even dropped the hunting horn, which is the distinctive charge in 
the coat of that family, and the seventeenth century MSS. give 
various altered coats assumed and discontinued by cadets, the whole 
forming a perplexing mass of contradictions. 

Le Comte de Carrick. 

Le Comte d'Athol. 

Le Comte de Strathern. Robert IL was Earl of Strathern during 
the lifetime of David IL, and this is another example of Scotland 
having been borne by the Stewarts before their accession. 

The seal of his son David Earl of Strathern, 1374, has the 
paternal fess checquy between two chevronels for Strathern, the 
whole within the Royal tressure. The father's coat, as here given, 
is another example of a composed coat, being argent, Scotland, one 
chevronel for Strathern, but left uncoloured, and over all the Stewart 
fess ; a seal of his, in 1369, has the paternal arms only. 

(?) Earl of Lennox, incomplete ; there should be four roses. 
The representation of the great house of Lennox has been con- 
tested by Haldane of Gleneagles and Napier of Merchistoun, but 
Isobel, Duchess of Albany and Countess of Lennox, had a daughter 
Isobel, wife of Sir Walter Buchanan of that Ilk, and mother of Maurice 
Buchanan, and her representative, if any exist, must be senior coheir, 
if there are no legitimate descendants in the male line of the duchess. 

Le Comte de Strathern. Two chevronels are on the seal of Malis 
Earl of Strathern, 1280; that of Earl Gilbert, c. 1198, bears nine 
billets, five, three, and one. 

Le Comte de Sutherland, 1357, three mullets on the seal of William 
Earl of Sutherland. 

Blair. The original coat ; Sir James Balfour gives for Blair of Bal- 
thayock — or, a chevron between three torteaux, but adds that it 
should be sable, a fess (?) argent between three plates. 



ARMORIAL DE GELRE. 33 

Le Comte d'Angus. Seal of Malcolm, Earl of Angus, 1225, a Hon 
passant gardant. Sir David Lindsay gives gules, a cinquefoil or, as 
the arms of the ancient earls, which appears to be a mistake. 

Maud, daughter and heir of Earl Malcolm, married Gilbert de 
Umfraville who died in 1245, and their son was Gilbert, Earl of 
Angus; his seal, a.d. 1290, is a cinquefoil within an orle of ten 
cross crosslets. Gilbert de Umfraville, last Earl of Angus of this 
family, d.s.p. 1381. 

Fouls. Probably the arms of Auchinleck ; the bearings do not resemble 
any known to have been borne for Fowlis or Foulis in Scotland. 

Le sire de Ros. At this time Thomas de Ros, Baron of Hamlake, was 
the representative of the great house to which belonged William de 
Ros, a competitor for the crown of Scotland in 1296. Three water 
bougets were his arms, and gules, three water bougets argent, is the 
blazon in the Caerlaverock Roll. 

It does not, however, seem very likely that in 1370 this family 
of Ros would be included in a Scotch roll of arms, as their connection 
with that country had long ceased. 

Godfrey de Ros of Tarbart may be the person intended ; I have 
no evidence for the arms he bore, but his younger brother John had 
a charter from Robert, Earl of Strathern, afterwards Robert IL, of 
Halkhead, co. Renfrew. His descendants, as vassals of the Stewarts, 
added a chevron checquy placed between their three water bougets, 
but the tincture of the field is or, possibly an alteration to make the 
coat more resemble that of the overlord. 

Hugh Ros of Kilravock, co. Nairn, was a cotemporary of God- 
frey, and the bearing of this family also was water bougets. A water 
bouget with three stars in chief is the seal of Muriel, widow of Sir 
William de Roys, lord of Kylrauoke, c. 1328. In 1493 the sigillmn 
Hugonis Rois baronis has a boar's head couped for Chisholm between 
three water bougets. In 1526 Hugh Rose of Kilravock uses the 
three water bougets only. Arms registered by Hugh of Kilravock 
1672-78— or, a boar's head couped gules between three water bougets 
sable ; crest — a harp azure ; motto — " Constant and true." To this 
family belongs Field-Marshal the Lord Strathnairn. 
Hugh, Baron of Kilravock, sat in Parliament 1481. 
A genealogy of this family, written 1683-84 by Mr Hew Rose, 
minister of Nairn, was printed, with additions and illustrations by 
Cosmo Innes, Esq., for the Spalding Club, in 1848. 

? Craig. See W. 



II. 



ARMORIAL DE GILLES LE BOUVIER 
BERRY ROI D'ARMES. 

A.D. 1450-55. 



PLATE 1 

First line — 
Earl of Buchan. 
Earl of Crawford. 
Earl of the Isles. John, Earl of Ross and Lord of the Isles ; the 

field should be gules, the lions argent, and the tressure probably or. 

Second line — 
Earl of Carrick. 
Earl of Fife. 
Earl of Strathern. 

Third line — 
Earl of Lennox. 
Earl of Sutherland, but probably meant for Earl of Ross, the bearin g 

of that family being gules, three lions rampant argent. John, Earl 

of Sutherland, at this time was husband of Margaret, daughter of 

Alexander, Earl of Ross and Lord of the Isles. 

Earl of Mar. 

Fourth line — 
Earl of Douglas. 
Earl of Angus. The lymphad comes in place of the heart ; a mistake 

apparently. 
Earl of Orkney. 



PLATE 2. 

First line — 

Earl of March. 

Earl of Moray, Archibald Douglas. The saltire appears to have been 
added over the unfinished coat of Randolph, Earl of Moray. Can 
this have anything to do with the saltire quartered by the Crichtons 
of Frendraught, descended from the marriage of Janet, Countess of 
Moray (elder sister of Elizabeth Dunbar, Countess of Moray, wife of 
Archibald Douglas above named?) The seal of her son William, 
Lord Crichton, 1 471, is a saltire quartering a lion rampant. 
Earl of Ormond, Hugh Douglas. 
Second line — 

The Lord of Swinton : see G. David I. granted Swinton, co. 
Berwick, to Ernulf, styled miles meus in the charter ; he took his 
surname from his lands, and as Ernulf de Swinton witnessed a 
charter of Earl Cospatrick to the nuns of Witehoh. Swinton, which 



38 ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 

as early as the reign of Robert II. is styled a lordship in crown 
charters, remained in the direct line of this family till sold by the 
late Robert Hepburne Swinton to a cousin of his own name, whose 
heirs possess it. The barony of Cranshaws was their property from 
1 40 1 till it was sold in 1695. 

Sir John Swinton was Earl of Mar in right of his wife Margaret, 
formerly wife of Archibald, Earl of Douglas, and the family became 
connected by marriage with the Royal House of Stewart. John 
Swinton fell at the battle of Verneuil in 1424. In 1389 he, as Sir 
John de Swyntoun, dominus de Mar, seals with a chevron between 
three boars' heads ; crest, a boar's head ; supporters, two lions. 
John Swinton of Swinton sat in parliament 1560. Sir Robert 
represented Berwickshire, 1612-21 ; Sir Alexander, 1644-45, ^"^^ he 
was also Sheriff of the county. John, of that Ilk, sat in parliament 
during the Protectorate, was a judge and member of the council in 
Scotland ; his son, Sir John, was a member of the last parliament of 
Scotland and of the first British parliament. John of Swinton was a 
Senator of the College of Justice, 1782-99, and Alexander of Mersing- 
ton held the same high office, 1688-1700. Sir John Swinton, a cadet, 
served abroad with the rank of colonel, and was drowned near Good- 
win Sands. 

Lord Mersington's first wife was a daughter of Home of Hutton- 
hall, by a daughter of the old family of Ker of Mersington, and in 
consequence of this alliance he bore as a difference on the chevron 
of his paternal coat the unicorn's head erased of Ker, making its 
tincture vert. His eldest son, Colonel Charles of Mersington, left a 
daughter and heir, Elizabeth, 1732. 

Catherine Swinton, heiress of Lochtoun, married Mr Adam 
Waddel, minister of Whitsome, and died in 1748, leaving issue. 

Nisbet says that Sir John, the head of the family in his time, 
" of late has added to his arms for supporters two swine as relative 
to the name," but the arms are not entered in the Lyon Register. 
The Lord of Lindsay. 
The Lord of Seton. 
Third line — 
The Lord of Darnley. The first quarter for the Earl of Lennox, in 
L., has the azure field within a bordure gules, charged with eight 
buckles or. This is perhaps the older and more heraldically correct, 
as the tressure argent, adorned with buckles or, separates the 
gules from the azure. 

Gilles le Bouvier gives also the armes of Le sire d'Aubigny in 
Berry ; first and fourth, France within a bordure gules, charged with 
eight buckles or ; second and third, or, a fess checquy azure and 
argent, over all a bendlet gules. 

The seals of Sir John of Bonkle, 1296, and of Sir John of 
Darnley, 1426, are a fess checquy surmounted of a bendlet, and the 
same was used by Alexander of Castlemilk, 1512 ; but the seal 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 39 

appended by his mother, Isobel Norvel, to the same deed, has the 
fess over the bendlet (thus agreeing with the arms given on page 4 
for le Sieur de Chastelmont, no doubt Castlemilk) as the coat of her 
husband, William of Castlemilk, who died in 1495 or 1496. The 
seals of the Darnley Lennox family vary : some have the fleurs-de- 
lis without any bordure, some have Stewart within a bordure en- 
grailed or a plain bordure charged with eight buckles ; the Dukes of 
Lennox bore France within a bordure engrailed. 
The Lord of Montgomery. Here, in L., and various MSS., the 
field of the first and fourth quarters is gules, but in the entries of 
the arms of the Earl of Eglinton, and of cadets of his family, it is 
azure. Sir David Lindsay and some other authorities, make the 
field of the second and third azure, but in the Lyon Register it is 
gules. 

In 1630 a curious agreement was made between Alexander, Earl 
of Eglinton, and Hugh, Viscount Montgomery of Ardes, by which 
the latter, being most willing that he and his heirs should in all 
time hereafter acknowledge the respect and duty which they owe to 
the honourable house of Eglinton, from which they are descended, 
contracts that they shall deliver to the said Earl and his heirs, being 
of the surname of Montgomery, " one faire horse of the value of 
thirty poundes," within the space of a year after the heir and heirs of 
the said Viscount shall have entered into possession of their manors, 
&c. The indenture is reproduced in facsimile in Mr Eraser's " Me- 
morials of the Montgomeries ; " it is ornamented with portraits of 
the peers, and representations of their arms, crests, and badges, and 
of a horse. The Eglinton coat is gules in the first and fourth, 
azure in the second and third, quarters. Viscount Montgomery's 
arms are — parted per pale gules and azure a sword argent, hilted 
and pommelled or, and a tilting spear of the fourth in saltire between 
three fleurs-de-lis in chief and flank, and three annulets stoned in 
base of the last. 
The Lord of Polloc. The dolphin, Scottice pook or pollok, is in- 
troduced as a canting charge doubtless, and is not to be met with 
elsewhere. 

The seal of Robert de Polloc, c. 1200, was a boar passant, which 
afterwards became the crest of the Polloks of Over Pollok, or that 
Ilk. 

A seal of John Pollok, 1453, is a saltire with a lion dormant in 
chief, and three hunting horns stringed in flank and base. Robert 
Pollock of Over Pollock, or of that Ilk, registered arms 1672-78— 
vert, a saltire or between three bugles in fess and base argent gar- 
nished gules ; crest — a boar passant shot through with a dart. proper; 
motto — Audacter et strenue. This coat, quartered with Crawfurd of 
Kilbirny, and with the supporters of the Crawfurd family, was again 
recorded in 1852 by the late Sir Hew Crawfurd-Pollok, Baronet, 
heir of line and of entail of the Pollok family. 



40 ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 

Crawfurd, in his "History of Renfrew," 1710, states that Sir 
Robert Pollok, Baronet, then bore supporters two ratch hounds ; in 
Nisbet's " Heraldry " they are described as hounds proper, but en- 
graved with collars. 

The engraving of the Pollok arms, in the work last named, re- 
presents them as marshalled in a way which has led to a very ludi- 
crous blunder in our own time. First and fourth, Stewart of Darn- 
ley ; second and third, Mure ; over all, in an escutcheon of pretence, 
the paternal coat. 

When arms were granted, in 1847, to Sir Frederick and Sir 
George Pollock, the three fleurs-de-lis azure, borne by the Darnley 
Stuarts, were taken as the coat of the family, and allowed with differ- 
ences to these gentlemen, who thus bear arms which have no connec- 
tion with their name, but fortunately have a Pollock crest and motto. 

Peter, son of Fulbert, had Upper Pollok from the High Steward 
of Scotland, and took his surname from his lands towards the close 
of the twelfth century. Pieres de Pollok, of the county of Lanark, 
and Johan Pollok of Forfarshire, in 1296 swore fealty to Edward I. 

Robert Pollok sat in parliament for the burgh of Renfrew, 
1669-73, ^nd Sir Robert of that Ilk for the county, 1700 till the 
Union, and afterwards in the first British parliament. He was 
created a baronet in 1703, and the patent contains an unusually 
detailed statement of the antiquity and services of his family ; the 
title expired on the death of his grandson in 1783, and the estates 
eventually passed to the Crawfurds. 

Peter de Polloc held lands in Morayshire ; his daughter, Muriel, 
Lady of Rothes, married before 1226 Walter de Mortach or Mur- 
dach, and had a daughter Eva de Mortach, Lady of Rothes ; all of 
these persons appear in the Chartulary of Moray as benefactors to the 
Church. 
Fourth line — 
The Lord of Biggar, Fleming. 
The Lord of Hamilton. 
The Lord of Kilmaurs, Cunningham. 



PLATE 3. 

First line — 
The Lord of Duchal, Lyle. 
The Lord of Rowallane, Muer. 
Gourlay of Kincraig (?) 

Second line — 
Oliphant of Kellie. L., the bordure engrailed; the seal of Sir William, 

in 1449, has a bordure engrailed. 

There is a notice of this branch of the Lords Oliphant in Wood's 

" East Neuk of Fife," and there has recently been printed, for private 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 41 

circulation, " The Oliphants in Scotland." The Oliphants held Kellie 
from 1360 till 1613; the younger line being in possession from about 
1380 till 1563. 

In 1520 Elizabeth Cunynghame obtained a divorce from John 
Swintone of that Ilk, because her former husband, Sir John Oliphant 
of Kellie, was alive. 

Gray. The bordure appears on seals before the date of this col- 
lection. 

Ogilvy of Auchterhouse. 
Third line — 

RUTHVEN. 

The Lord of Lewes, Macleod. Other representations of this coat 
are given with supporters. Torquil Macleod had a charter from 
David II. of four davochs of the lands of Assynt ; his descendants, 
known as the Siol Torquil, held Lewes, first under the Lords of the 
Isles, and afterwards of the Crown. In 151 1 it was erected into a 
barony by charter in favour of Malcolm, son and heir of Rory 
Macleod ; in 1 591, on the resignation of Torquil Macleod of Lewes, 
a Crown charter of the barony of Assynt and others was granted to 
Colin Mackenzie of Kintail. Margaret, daughter and coheir of Tor- 
quil Macleod of Lewes, married Sir Rory Mackenzie of Coigeach, 
and was ancestress of the Earls of Cromartie, and other families who 
quarter the burning mountain. In 1571 a Crown charter of the 
barony of Lewes, in favour of Torquil and the heirs male of his body, 
names Gillecallum Garwe Macleod of Raasay as the next in order 
of succession. 

In 1779 his descendant, John of Rasay, registered arms as heir 
male of Lewes; the crest and supporters are as in W. ; motto — ''Luceo 
non uro ;" two crosses patde fitchde gules are added in the dexter and 
sinister chief points. 

A previous entry in 1762 is contradicted by the statement of the 
descent of the Rasay family. John Macleod of Colbecks, in the 
Island of Jamaica, as representer of John, only brother-german of 
Roderick, last of Lewes, had been allowed — or, on a pedestal a 
mountain vert inflamed proper, in a dexter canton the arms of the 
Isle of Man ; crest — an eagle displayed in the midst of flames of fire 
proper; motto, above the crest — " Luceo non uro;'" below the shield, 
I ruke while I see ; supporters — two eagles proper. This is evidently 
founded on the coat given from the Sunderland Hall MS. 

The Macleods have a pretension to descend from the old Lords 
of the Isle of Man, and began, apparently, early in the eighteenth 
century to add the arms of Man to their coat. 

When Sir George Mackenzie of Tarbat registered arms in 1674 
he added the burning mountain of the Macleods to his bearings, but 
not the arms of Man ; those, however, were borne as a quartering by 
him as Viscount Tarbat, 1685. 

When Roderick Macleod, second of Cadboll, registered arms, 

L 



42 ARMORIAL DE BERRY, 

c. 1725, he was allowed to quarter the arms of the Isle of Man, and 
had also the rare distinction of a compartment, an antique crown or 
below the shield. 
Lyon Lord Glammis. The seal of David, Lyon of Braky 1506, has a 
lion rampant within a double tressure, and this coat, still borne by 
the Earl of Strathmore, is to be found in various MSS. 

Sir James Balfour gives a bend sinister engrailed or over all, 
with the date 1423, and Porteus says a bend engrailed. 

Etherington Martyn, quoting Rose's MS. as authority, gives for 
Lyon a bend or charged with three roses gules, surmounting the lion 
and no tressure. W. has for crest a lady's head within a garland, 
but in Esplin's collection the present crest appears, within a garland 
of bay leaves a lady from the waist upwards holding in her hand a 
thistle. One MS. of the latter part of the sixteenth century has a 
castle within a garland. The supporters, registered 1672-78, are a 
unicorn argent armed and unguled or, and a lion parted per fess or 
and gules. In older MSS. the lion is sometimes azure, sometimes 
gules. 

John Lyon was clerk and secretary to David II., had a charter 
from Robert II. the second year of his reign of the thanage of 
Glammis as a free barony : he was Great Chamberlain of Scotland 
1377-82, and in the ninth year of Robert II. has crown charters, in 
which he is described as dilectus filius noster and knight. Sir John 
married a daughter of the King. In the printed pedigrees of this 
family are omitted the marriages of John, son and heir of Alexander 
second Lord Glammis, to Elizabeth, daughter of Andrew Lord Gray, 
and of Elizabeth, sister of the first Earl of Kinghorn, in 1586 to 
William Ker, alias Kirkaldy of Grange. 
Fourth line — 
The Lord of Macneill (?) There is no resemblance between this 
bearing and those recorded. The first entry in the Lyon Register 
is Lachlan of Tearfargus, descended of the Gigha family— quarterly 
first and fourth, azure, a lion rampant argent ; second, argent, a 
sinister hand couped fessways in chief gules, and in the base waved 
azure a salmon naiant of the first ; third, or, a galley, her oars in 
saltire gules on a chief of the second three mullets of the first. This 
coat was recorded in 1840 by Sir John M'Neill, G.C.B., with a 
bordure gules and two Persian lions for supporters, and after- 
wards by his brother Lord Colonsay, with a bordure ermine and 
two staghounds as supporters. The M'Neills of Colonsay are a 
younger branch of the M'Neills of Taynish and Gigha, and their 
pedigree is proved and recorded up to Torquill M'Neill of Taynish, 
keeper of Castle Swen 1449. 

In 1806 Roderick M'Niel of Barra, chief of that surname, 
recorded — quarterly, first, vert, a lion rampant or ; second, argent, 
a castle proper standing on the sea in base ; third, or, a lymphad 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 43 

sable sail furled ; fourth, or, a dexter hand couped erect within an 
orle of nine fetterlocks gules ; crest and motto the same as those of 
the Colonsay family, namely, an arm in armour from the shoulder, 
the hand grasping a dagger proper; motto — '' Vincere vel mori;" 
supporters — two lions proper. 

In 1824 Roderick MacNeil of Barra, son of the last named 
Roderick, matriculated the arms in his own name, when the crest 
was altered to a rock proper as anciently borne. 
MACLEOD OF THAT Ilk. See W. The arms were registered about 
1730, when the supporters are described as regardant gules ; motto 
— " Murus aheneus ; " device — Hold fast. 

David II. granted part of Glenelg to Malcolm, son of Turmode 
Maclode ; the family held lands in Skye and Harris of the Lords of 
the Isles till the forfeiture of that house, when they had crown 
charters in 1498. 

The chief has been successively styled, of Glenelg, of Harris, of 
Dunvegan, laird of Macleod, or of that Ilk. 

Glenelg, and afterwards Dunvegan, were held as free baronies. 

Many cadets of Macleod settled on the continent, and there is 
at least one existing branch in Holland. In 1741, Norman, of the 
Bernera family, lieutenant-colonel in the service of the States 
General, had a certificate from the Lord Lyon of his descent and 
right to arms. To the castle of the paternal coat were added, 
to indicate descent from a daughter of Sir James Macdonald of Sleat, 
in chief a lion rampant and a hand holding a cross crosslet fitchde, 
and in base a lymphad. 
Lord Forbes. The bears' heads are borne couped and muzzled^ 
Sir David Lindsay, and another MS. of the sixteenth century, give 
the muzzles sable ; the latter has a similar bear's head as crest, 
two bears as supporters, and the motto, " Grace me gyd." Esplin, 
in 162 1, has the heads muzzled gules ; crest — a buck's head or ; sup- 
porters — two bloodhounds argent collared gules. Porteus makes 
the bloodhounds proper. Other authorities have a lion and a 
savage, and a greyhound and a savage ; two lions as supporters are 
cut in stone at Druminor. The blazon in the Lyon Register of the 
arms of William Lord Forbes, 1672-78, is — azure, three bears' heads 
couped argent muzzled gules ; crest — a stag's head attired with ten 
tynes proper ; supporters — two bloodhounds collared gules ; motto — 
" Grace me guide." Sir John Skene has left a note of a charter of 
Alexander III., 1271-72, of the tenementum de Forbeys to Duncan 
Forbeys. 

In 1306 Robert Chival and William Comyn claimed the lands 
of Johan de Forbes from the King of England. John de Forbes was 
sheriff of Aberdeenshire 1373. Lord Forbes is Premier Baron of 
Scotland. 



44 ARMORIAL DE BERRY, 

P L A T E 4. 

First line — 

The Lord of Graham. Arms borne by Henry de Graham at the 
siege of Caerlaverock — gules, a saltire argent on a chief of the second 
three escallops of the field ; these bearings were used on his seal by 
John Graham of Mackesswyn, 1355. One escallop is on the seal of 
Henry de Graham, c. 1230. That of Sir Nicholas, c. 1250, has the 
simple bearing, a chief charged with three escallop shells ; the same 
is used by Patrick in 1292, and on either side of the shield is a boar's 
head, while on the seal of Sir Nicholas there are several boars' heads. 
A seal of William (date unknown) has a boar's head alone; in 1320 
Sir John of Abercorn had a boar's head in the shield, along with 
the chief and escallops and three boars' heads, as exterior ornaments 
or devices. 

In 1292 David uses as seal a shield semde of cross crosslets 
fitchde three escallops. 

Robert of Kinpont, in 1433, uses as crest a stag's head cabossed, 
and for supporters two lions gardant. An early crest, a hound's 
head, is on the seal of Walter Graham ; and the second Earl of Mon- 
trose bore, as crest, a peacock's head. Mr Laing so describes it, but 
in the later part of the sixteenth century, the supporters are a falcon 
and a stork, and the crest is a falcon's head. W. has a stork's head. 
David de Graham had a charter of lands in Forfarshire from 
William the Lion ; Henry de Graham was in curia regis at Edin- 
burgh 1189-96. 

The Lord of Leslie. Three buckles on a bend are on the seal of Sir 
Norman Leslie, 1292. 

The Lord of Bouquenel. (?) Buchanan. The seal of George Buchanan 
of that Ilk, 1557, is three boars' or bears' heads erased ; that of John 
Buchanan, 1585, has a chevron between three similar heads. 
■ Second line — 

Wemyss of Rires. 

Stuart of Castlemilk. Arms registered, 1672-78, by Sir Archibald 
Stuart of Castlemilk, Baronet, with three lines of chequers on the 
fess. See the Lord of Darnley. 

The male line of this family, after existing as a separate branch 
for upwards of four centuries, expired on the death of Andrew Stuart 
of Castlemilk and Torrance, i8th May 1801. 

Murray of Cockpool. (?) 
Third line — 

Carlyle of Kinmount. The saltire and chief charged with three 
mullets, added by the Lords Carlyle, are for Torthorwald, being the 
bearing on the seal of David de Torthorald, 1 292. Mr Laing describes 
the charges on the chief as roundles. 

Moffat. (?) 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY, 45 

Macdowal. 

Fourth line — 

Crichton of Sanquhar. An interesting example of a composed coat. 
William de Crichton acquired part of Sanquhar by marriage with 
Isobel de Ros in the time of Robert I. ; the water bouget indicates 
this alliance, and at a later period, on the seal of Robert Lord Crich- 
ton, 1509, the lion is quartered with three water bougets for Ros. 

Stewart. The coat given in L. for Stewart of Dalswinton. 

Dunbar. 



PLATE 5. 

First line — 

Ker. (?) 

Bruce. 

Herries of Terregles. The heads of the families of Herries and Col- 
ville married coheiresses named Lindsay, and while the Colvilles 
have ever since quartered that coat, this is the only known example 
of its being borne by Herries. 

King David IL, in the twenty-ninth year of his reign, granted the 
barony of Terregles to Sir John Heryz, and it remains in the posses- 
sion of a descendant. The name appears in charters about the 
middle of the twelfth century, and in 1296 William de Heriz, of the 
county of Dumfries, swore fealty to Edward L The seal of Archi- 
bald Herries of Maidenpaup, 1561, brother and heir male of William 
Lord Herries, is a mullet between three hedgehogs ; his great-grand- 
son sold that estate in 1629. Herries of Terraughty ended in an 
heiress, who married Sir John Maxwell of Cowhill. 

A branch which held Barnbarroch, in the parish of Colvend, for 
several generations, ended in an heiress in the end of the seventeenth 
century. 

Of the Mabie family were John, 1520; Robert, 1531; Sir Robert, 
father of Richard, 1604 ; John, 1622, son of Richard ; John, 1632-47, 
son of John ; Richard, 1652 ; John, 1661 ; William, 1704 ; John, 
mentioned by Nisbet as bearing the chief coat of the family, but Por- 

'' teus gives a crescent azure as a difference; 1717, John of Auchen- 
franko was served heir male of his cousin, John of Mabie. 

About the end of the sixteenth century several cadets were settled 
in Edinburgh as merchant burgesses ; of these, William was founder 
of the families of Harthwaite and Halldykes, to which belonged 
Robert, merchant in Rotterdam, who registered arms in 1747 with a 
crescent in the centre for difference ; he purchased Halldykes from his 
elder brother, and died in 1791, leaving issue. 

Sir Robert, knighted in 1774, a partner of the firm of Coutts, 
son of the seller of Halldykes, was father of the Right Hon. John 
Charles Herries, Chancellor of the Exchequer, whose son is Charles 
John Herries of St Julians, co. Kent. 

M 



46 ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 

William, younger brother of Sir Robert, recorded arms in 1789, 
with a bordure wavy gules as his difference ; he was a merchant and 
banker at Ostend. 
Second line — 

Jardine of Applegarth. The field or instead of argent. 

KiRKPATRiCK OF Closeburn. The colours reversed. 

Kennedy. 

Third line — 

Cathcart. a seal of Alan de Cathcart of the thirteenth century is of an 
oval shape, and bears the virgin and child. 

The present arms, three cross crosslets fitch^e, each issuing from 
a crescent, are cut on a stone in Paisley Abbey, c. 1350 ; supporters 
— two lions. 

The seal of Alan Lord Cathcart, 1450, has the same bearings. 
Crest — the bust of a female affrontde ; supporters — two women. 

In 151 1 John of Glendowys uses a fess between three cross 
crosslets fitchde, in the honour point a man's heart ; his wife, Sybilla, 
daughter of Sir Alan Cathcart of Carleton, at the same time bore a 
stag's head contournde between three similar crosses. The heart in 
the centre of the shield, between three crosses as in 1350, is still borne 
by the Carleton family, but the difference assigned to them in various 
Funeral Escutcheons is a bordure nebuly. 

The bearings of the Lords Cathcart have been varied ; about 
1580 two pelicans valuing themselves are the supporters. Crest — a 
pelican in her piety. Motto — " I hope to speid." See W. 

Maclellan of Bomby. 

Maghie. (?) Porteus has for Maghie of Balmaghie — sable, three leopards 
heads argent or or. Stacie gives Maghie of , surgeon — vert, a 

lance argent between three leopards' heads or. 

The name of Gilmychel MacEth, of the county of Dumfries, 
appears on the Ragman Roll 1296, and the following year King 
Edward thanks Gille Michel MacGethe, and others, for services ren- 
dered in Scotland ; 1339, Michael Mageth was admitted to the King's 
peace by Edward IIL 1424-5 John Maggy had an English safe-con- 
duct as a retainer of David Menzies. Balmaghie, for many genera- 
tions the seat of the family, was erected into a barony, and Sir John, 
who died in 1658, was knighted ; his son, Alexander of Balmaghie, 
married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Colonel William Stewart of 
Castle Stewart. 
Fourth line — 

Campbell of Loudoun. 

Campbell. (?) 

Flokart. 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 47 

PLATE 6. 

First line — 

Blackwood. 

Maxwell of Calderwood. About this time a saltire within a plain 
bordure appears on a seal of John Maxwell of Calderwood. 

Sempill of Eliotstoun. In 1535 these bearings are found on the seal 
of William Lord Sempill, with a stag's head as crest, and two hounds 
as supporters ; afterwards the chevron was borne checquy. 
Second line — 

Home of Dunglas. The tinctures differ from those of the recognised bear- 
ings, and it would be interesting, if this is to be relied on, to know 
that the Homes claiming descent from the great house of Dunbar, 
Earl of March, originally bore gules, a lion rampant argent, being the 
Dunbar tinctures, although all the Homes have long had the field vert. 
The seals of Alexander Home 1437, Sir Alexander 1450, and 
Alexander Lord Home i486, all have the lion of Home in the first 
and fourth quarters, and the papingoes of Pepdie in the second and 
'third. The seal of Alexander, afterwards second lord, is the earliest 
example of the inescutcheon of Landell, an orle, which is the bearing 
of John de Laundel on his seal, c. a.d. 1224. 

The crest of a deer's or fawn's head is on seals 1430 to i486 ; in 
1542, George Lord Home uses a deer couchant ; and c. 1565, the pre- 
sent crest, a lion's head, is given in W ; it issues from the wreath, is 
surrounded by flames, and the motto is "Avise la Jin." A later MS. 
has the lion's head surrounded by branches, and the motto ''Ala fin 
attendesT 

The seal of Alexander, first earl, has the present motto, "True 
to the end," 1605. Two parrots, or falcons, were borne as supporters 
by Sir David, first of Wedderburn, and others of the family ; and in 
1450 two lions, the supporters of the Earls of Home, are on the seal 
of Sir Alexander ; in the sixteenth century they were sometimes gules, 
sometimes argent. Sir Patrick Home of Polwarth, baronet, regis- 
tered arms 1672-78 ; he had very singular supporters — two battering 
rams gules, but when the Barony of Polwarth was conferred, these 
were altered to two lions regardant argent. 

The printed pedigrees omit to notice the dispute as to the suc- 
cession to the Earldom of Home, which occurred after the death of 
James, second Earl in 1633. His father, Alexander, first Earl, had 
entered into a contract with his kinsman, John Home of Colding- 
knows, whereby they mutually entailed their estates, including the 
Earldom of Home, on one another failing heirs male of their respect- 
ive bodies. This contract was reduced at the instance of the second 
Earl, who was childless and had two sisters, on the ground that 
Coldingknows had sold part of his estate, and incurred debts as a 
burden on the remainder. On the Earl's death, James of Colding- 



48 ARMORIAL BE BERRY, 

knows, the heir male, grandson of John above named, took proceed- 
ings against the coheiresses, Lady Doune and Lady Maitland, and 
got the decree of reduction reversed in March 1634, on the ground 
that the object of the tailzie was " for preservation of the honour of 
the house of Hume, and the antient dignity and estate thereof, and 
that it might remain with the name of Hume," 

In various services in 1633 and 1635, he is designed James 
Home of Coldingknows only, and it was not till May 1636 that he 
obtained recognition as Earl of Home. 

John Home, first of the Coldingknows line, married Margaret, 
only child of Andrew Ker, younger of Cessford. The Homes of 
Bassendean are the nearest cadets. 

Melville (?) L gives argent, a fess gules. 

Livingston. 

Third line — 

Livingston of Callendar, The tressure is usually vert. 

Menzies of Enoch (?) 

Murray of Gask. 
Fourth line — 

Wardlaw of Torry. 

Livingston of Drumry. Sir Robert figured about this time, sat in the 
General Council 1440, and in Parliament 1457. The tressure is again 
made azure. 



->. 



PLATE 7. 

First line — 

SiBBALD OF BaLGONY. 

Colville. 

Rutherford. 
Second line — 

Turnbull. 

The legend as to the origin of this surname and the arms 
belonging to it is, that the founder saved Robert L when attacked by 
a wild bull in Stirling Park. 

Mr Jervise, in his " Memorials of Angus and Mearns," cites 
Walter de Trembley, who held the lands of Delany in the Mearns in 
1263, Robert de Trembleye of the same district, who signed the Rag- 
man Roll, Robert de Tremblay in Fife, c. 1280, and Robert and John 
of Tremblay, who were on an inquest 1342, as probable ancestors of 
the Turnbulls. It is not unlikely that from them may have descended 
some of the Trimbills, Trombills, Trumbills, or Turnbulls in Fife ; 
but it is certain that the Angusshire family of Turnbull of Stricka- 
throw was founded by a cadet of the Turnbulls of Bedrule, co. Rox- 
burgh. In 1315 Robert I. granted part of Philiphaugh, co. Selkirk, 
Willelmo dicto Turnebull ; in the thirty-fourth year of his reign 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 49 

David II. confirms a charter of lands in Innerdovat, co. Fife, held by 
the deceased Robert Trymblay, and resigned by his daughter and 
heir, Cecilia. It seems clear, then, that in the south Turnbull was 
originally a sobriquet, while north of the Forth Tremblay was pro- 
bably a name of locality. 

Robert III. confirmed a charter by Robert Turnbull to Gregory 
Kingissone of part of Innerdovat. 

Grange or East Barnes, and Turnbull's Beath in Fife, were old 
possessions of the family, the former line ending in coheiresses about 
1772; Mr John Trimbill was vicar of Cleish 1507; to the same 
family probably belonged William of Pittencriefif, near Dunfermline, 
whose son, William of Airdrie, in the east of Fife, left a daughter and 
heir, Elizabeth, wife of Sir John Preston of Penicuik. 

George, bailie of Cupar, sat in Parliament for the burgh 1661, 
and died the next year, leaving issue. 

Philiphaugh was in possession of a Turnbull three hundred 
years after the original grant ; John was Sheriff of Selkirkshire in 
1360; William of Philiphaugh, 1426. In 1467 John Turnbull was 
directed to retour the rents of barons in that county ; Adam of 
Philiphaugh, 1483-1509; Ralph, father of John, who had sasine, 
1524; William of Philiphaugh, 1624. Before this, part of Philip- 
haugh had been carried, by the marriage of Elizabeth Turnbull, a 
coheiress, to the family of Murray. Porteus gives for Turnbull of 
Philiphaugh — vert, a bull's head erased argent. Bedrule was pos- 
sessed by George Turnbull before the middle of the fifteenth century; 
George of Bedrule married Janet, daughter of Sir Andrew Kerr of 
Fernihirst, and died in 1528, leaving a son. Sir Thomas. Sir David 
Lindsay mentions " auld Badreule " as at the Raid of the Reidswire, 
"with all his Trumbills at his back." In 1668 Thomas was served 
heir to his father in the barony of Bedrule, which soon afterwards 
passed into other hands. 

To this family belonged William, Bishop of Glasgow, founder of 
the University there, who died in 1454. Peter Turnbull of Strick- 
athrow, co. Forfar, descended from Bedrule, died soon after the 
Restoration, leaving three sons — 

I. John, his successor, who registered arms, 1672-78 — argent, 
three bulls' heads erased sable armed vert, being the Bedrule arms, 
within a bordure indented of the second for difference, and died in 
1693 ; his descendants were seated at Strickathrow, and afterwards at 
Dalladies and Muirton, nearly to the middle of the nineteenth 
century. 

II. James of Smiddyhill, who also registered arms; four of his 
descendants succeeded him in that estate. 

III. Mr Peter, minister at Laurencekirk, whose only. son James, 
in 1696, also recorded arms. . 

Minto was confirmed by charter of David II. to Walter Turn- 
bull ; John of Minto granted a charter in favour of his nepos Sir 

N 



so ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 

William Stewart of Jedworth, which was confirmed in 1390; after 
his death in 1423, his son, Walter Turnbull, objected to this dis- 
inheritance on the ground that his father suffered from leprosy, and 
the result of the dispute was a division of the lands between the 
claimants. John Turnbull sold the barony of Minto after 1655. 

After the failure of the Bedrule and Minto families in the direct 
line, the Turnbulls of Know claimed the chiefship ; John was of 
Know, 1652; John of Know descended from Turnbull of Minto, 
registered arms, 1672-78 — argent, an ear of rye vert (probably to 
indicate a maternal descent from Riddell) between three bulls' heads 
erased sable armed of the second. The crest is a bull's head cabossed. 
Nisbet mentions a seal of Turnbull of Minto, 1455, as one bull's 
head cabossed ; another seal, 1439, however, has a head erased as 
afterwards borne. Besides the branches mentioned there were many 
others, forming at one time a powerful border clan. On the roll of 
landlords on the middle march, 1587, are the laird of Bedroule and 
George Turnbull of Halroule. There had been a "great break" 
between the Rutherfords and Turnbulls in Teviotdale, for which, in 
1478, Parliament are to provide a remedy. 

In October 1565 the Earl of Bedford, in a letter to Sir William 
Cecil, mentions Trumbull the prophecier, and that Captain Cockburn 
can tell " what the Queen of Scots saith of his prophecies." 

Persons of the name settled in France bore argent, three bulls' 
heads couped sable armed and langued gules, but the Tournebu or 
Turnebu in Normandy, who have been claimed as of Scottish origin, 
had for arms argent, a bend azure. In Berry, a family of Tourne- 
boeuf bore, azure, three bulls' heads or. 

Sir William Trumbull of Easthampstead, co. Berks, Secretary 
of State and Ambassador, who died in 17 16, bore argent, three bulls' 
heads erased sable breathing fire proper ; his grandfather, a native 
of Craven, co. York, acquired property in Berkshire about 1630. Sir 
William's marriage to Lady Judith Alexander, daughter of Henry, 
Earl of Stirling, connected him with a Scotch family ; their grand- 
daughter and heir married Hon. Colonel Martin Sandys, and is 
represented by Arthur W. J. W. Blundell Trumbull Sandys Roden 
Hill, Marquess of Downshire. William Turnbull was Abbot of Mel- 
rose 1504, and of Cupar 1510-26. 
Sandilands of Calder. 
Lauder of Bass. 
Third line — 
DuNDAS OF DuNDAS. Towards the close of the twelfth century Dundas, 
in West Lothian, was granted by Waldev son of Cospatric, to Helias 
son of Huctred, to be held for half a knight's service. The descend- 
ants of Helias took their surname from their lands, which were 
inherited by the present James Dundas, Esquire, by whom they have 
recently been sold. 

The wording of the charter gives no countenance to the theory. 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 51 

which, however, is not in itself improbable, that the Dundases descend 
from a younger son of the house of Dunbar. 

In 1467 Duncan of Dundas was appointed to make retour of 
rents in Haddington ; the lairds sat in Parliament 1469-87, and in 
1560. In 1669 George of that Ilk had a Crown charter, erecting all 
his lands into a free barony, to be called the barony of Echlin. 

In the middle of the fifteenth century the family of Fingask in 
Perthshire branched off, which at one time set up a claim to be chief 
of the name, and although this altogether broke down, its representa- 
tive, Thomas of Fingask, co. Stirlingshire, in 1769 obtained a Royal 
'Warrant for supporters — a lion and an eagle both proper, and was 
allowed to add a double tressure flowered counterflowered gules to 
his coat. The difference originally borne by Fingask was a crescent ; 
Sir John of Fingask was knighted in 1633, when the Earldom of 
Ancrum was conferred on his cousin-german ; he sold the Perthshire 
estate, which had been erected into a barony. 

John of Baldovie, co. Forfar, his son and successor, registered 
arms, 1672-78, being the lion rampant within a bordure indented 
gules. In the next generation Thomas, a merchant in Edinburgh, 
acquired lands in Stirlingshire, which were, by Crown charter, erected, 
in 1730, into the barony of Fingask, and in 1758 he was served heir 
general of his grandfather Sir John ; his eldest son, Thomas, was 
Lyon Depute 1744-54, and obtained for his father a concession of 
arms, as head of the family, with two lions as supporters, which, in 
1762, was reduced by decree of the Court of Session at the instance 
of Dundas of that Ilk, who was recognised as head of the family, with 
the sole right to the chief coat. 

They have long borne two lions gules as supporters, and as a 
compartment below the shield a salamander in flames. 

Dundas of Carronhall represents Fingask, of which the Earl of 
Zetland is a cadet. 

Duncan Dundas of Newliston was Lyon King of Arms in the 
latter half of the fifteenth century. To Robert Dundas, third of 
Arniston, were granted, about 1680, as supporters, a lion gules and 
an elephant proper ; the latter to indicate that his grandfather Sir 
James, first of Arniston, was eldest son of the second marriage of 
George of that Ilk with Katherine, daughter of Lawrence Lord 
Oliphant ; this branch, which has produced so many judged and 
lawyers, and of which the Viscounts Melville are cadets, bears as 
difference a bordure ermine. 
Mowbray of Barnbougle. 
Crichton. 

Fourth line — 
Ramsay of Dalhousie. 
Crichton of Cairnes. . 

bickerton of luffness (?) 



52 ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 

PLATE 8. 

First line — 
Lord Borthwick. These, with marks of cadency for the younger 
branches, have always been the bearing of all of the name. The seal 
of William Lord Borthwick, 1522, has a horse's head for crest and 
two lions as supporters ; but in the reign of Mary, and ever since, 
the crest has been a moor's head, with the motto, ''Qui conduit" or 
''Qui conducit," and two angels as supporters. 

From John Borthwick of Crookston, who sat in Parliament 
1457, descended William of Crookston, who registered arms 1673, 
with a crescent as a difference ; crest — an eagle volant with a St 
Andrew's cross on his breast ; motto — " Fide et spe." 

Notable persons of the name were Mr George, archdeacon of 
Glasgow, one of the envoys to England to treat for the liberation of 
James L ; Robert, gunner and founder of artillery, who, for his 
services, had a charter of Ballencrieff in East Lothian from James IV. 
in 1 5 10, which was held by his descendants for several generations ; 
Mr David of Lochhill, king's advocate, who sat in Parliament 
1574-79; William, depute marischal 1538; and Mr Mark, justice 
depute 1595. 
Hepburn of Hailes. The Bannatyne " Miscellany," Vol. IIL, and 
" Adversaria," contain some interesting charters and documents 
which correct errors in the published pedigrees of the Earls of Both- 
well. 

The seal of William Hepburn, son of Sir Patrick of Waughton, 
1558, has the chevron between three mullets. 

Mr Laing's collection contains seals of several of the chief line, 
and of cadets, the oldest being that of Patrick de Hepborne, 
1 37 1, the chevron charged with a rose and two lions within a bor- 
dure engrailed. A Funeral Escutcheon gives the name of the first 
wife of the last Earl of Bothwell, Anna Rustig, of the house of 
Seminarva van Adresall, adding that she was here in Scotland at 
Court. 

The Hepburns are said to be from England ; in Northumber- 
land Hebborne of Hebborne bore argent, three cups sable, in each a 
flame of fire proper. 

Several members of the Hepburn family figure in France, and 
there the arms were altered both as to arrangement and tincture ; 
azure, on a chevron between two lions rampant confronts in chief, 
and three spur rowels one and two in base or, three roses gules. 
Ker of Samuelston. The arms of this family, given by Lindsay and 
other authorities, are a unicorn salient and not gorged ; Porteus says 
a unicorn's head. David H. confirmed a charter of Samuelston, by 
William Earl of Douglas, to Richard Ker. 

In 145 1 William Earl of Douglas gives a charter of Hutton- 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 53 

hall to George of Samuelston and the heirs male of his body, his 
three natural sons and the heirs male of their bodies, whom failing to 
Andrew Ker of Auldtounburn, his two brothers and the heirs male of 
their bodies ; this would seem to point at a relationship between the 
Samuelston and Auldtounburn families. The latter bore unicorns' 
heads in their shield, and it is to be observed that the Hamiltons of 
Samuelston took a mascle or, one of the bearings of Ker of Cess- 
ford, as crest. George Ker of Samuelston had a daughter 
Nicholas, who married, first, Alexander Lord Home, Great Chamber- 
lain of Scotland ; secondly. Sir Alexander Ramsay of Dalhousie. 
From certain contracts and charters, &c., 1497- 1 555, it would seem 
that George Ker married a second wife, Marion Sinclair, formerly 
wife of George Home of Wedderburn, and had a son, James Ker, 
who held Samuelston, or part of it, although Lady Home is gene- 
rally designed heiress ; his last appearance is in 1554, when he 
ratifies his resignation of his rights in Samuelston to Janet Home, 
Lady Samuelston, wife of Sir John Hamilton, the grand-daughter 
and heiress of Nicholas Lady Home, 
Second line — 

Towers of Dalry. (?) 

Lauder of Bass or Biel. 

COCKBURN OF LaNGTON. 

Third line — 
Forrester of Corstorphine. 
Logan OF Restalrig. 

DiSHINGTON OF ArDROSS. 

Fourth line — 

(?) Hop Pringle. 

Harcarse — a name of locality in Berwickshire. Sir David Lindsay gives 
this coat with the field sable and the charges argent. The seal of 
Robert Harechas, sheriff of Perth 1305, is three fleurs-de-lis sur- 
mounted of a bend. Adam de Harcarres was abbot of Newbottle 
1216, afterwards of Melrose, and died 1245. In 1296, Roger, 
Thomas, and Marjory de Harkars of Berwickshire, and Alisandre de 
Harcars of the county of Fife, did homage to Edward L, and the 
lands of the last named were restored to him. Alan de Harecarres 
occurs as a witness in the reign of Alexander H., and Robert de Har- 
carse 1 29 1. Robert Harkers had a charter of the barony of ,Keillar 
from Robert L, and John de Harkers, in 1329, has a gift from the 
king. 

David n. grants the barony of Preston, in Dumfriesshire, to 
Thomas Harkars, and in the same reign Alan de Harkers witnessed 
a charter of Patrick, Earl of Dunbar, at Dunse. 

The surname seems to have at an early period become rare ; in 
1448, David Harcase Armiger is a witness in Fife ; I45"9, safe-con- 
duct to James Harkes, merchant ; in 1605, James Harcas sat in par- 
liament ; a little later persons of the name held property at Aberlady. 

o 



54 ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 

Dalzell. This is the only instance in which the club, which is of curious 
design, appears. The seals of Sir William and Marion Dalzyell, 
1392, have a naked man with arms extended. The coat is elsewhere 
given from F with the man hanging on a gibbet, an allusion no 
doubt to an absurd legend that the founder of the family rescued the 
body of a kinsman of Kenneth II. who had been hanged by the 
Picts. Another allusion to this story is the supporters, if they can 
be so called, granted 1685 to General Thomas Dalzell of Binns — two 
pavilion poles. These were dropped in 1772, when Sir Robert 
Dalzell of Binns was recognised as heir male of the family of Men- 
teith, and allowed their supporters. 

The seal of Isabella Dalzell, 1529, has a naked man with arms 
extended, and the Lyon Register has never admitted the gibbet as a 
bearing of any of the name. 

The surname is undoubtedly taken from Dalzell in Lanarkshire, 
the original seat of the family. 

Sir Robert of Glenae, who was created a baronet in 1666, was 
son of Sir John of Newton and Glenae, younger son of the first Earl 
of Carnwath, and Agnes Nisbet his wife. 

Hugh de Dalzell was sheriff of Lanark in 1288. 

In 1296 Thomas de Dalielle of that county did homage to 
Edward I., and Robert sat in Parliament 1368. The usual pro- 
nunciation of the name is shown in an Act of Parliament, 1627, to 
naturalise " Sir Robert Dyell, gentleman of His Majesty's Privy 
Chamber," afterwards Earl of Carnwath. 

According to a funeral entry, the paternal grandmother of General 
Thomas Dalzell was a Law of the same family, as the Archbishop of 
Glasgow. 

PLATE 9. 

First line — 

(?) Baillie of Lamington. 

Scott of Balwearie. 

normanville. 
Second line — 

Maxwell of Pollok. The Maxwells of Pollok bore an annulet stoned 
on the saltire, as on the seal, about 1400, of Sir John, where there 
are supporters — two lions (?) ; two apes were afterwards borne. The 
arms of John Maxwell of Pollok, on his seal, in 1503, are a saltire 
charged with an annulet. The seal of Patrick Maxwell of Newark, 
1532, has the saltire with an annulet in chief and a bird in base. . 

Nether Pollok was given, about the year 1270, by Sir Aymer de 
Maxwell to his younger son John ; the lands were erected into a 
barony 2nd February 1672. 

Sir John Maxwell represented Renfrewshire in Parliament 1593- 
161 7, and Sir George, 1649-50. 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 55 

Sir John, Lord Justice-Clerk 1699-1702, was created a baronet 
in 1682, with remainder to the heirs male of his body ; but being 
childless, and having no brother, obtained a second patent on his 
own resignation in 1707, extending the limitation to his other heirs 
of tailzie whomsoever. On the death of Sir John Maxwell, the last 
heir male of the family, in 1865, the estates and representation 
passed to his nephew, William Stirling of Keir, who assumed the 
surname of Maxwell and the baronetcy. As he did not take the 
estate under the old entail, it may be a question whether he had a 
valid right to the title. Sir William had the distinction of being the 
only commoner who ever was a Knight of the Thistle. 

" Memoirs of the Maxwells of Pollok," by W. Fraser, were 
printed for private circulation 1863. 
Abercrombie. This coat is again represented with the chevron gules 
and the heads sable. Sir David Lindsay makes all the charges 
azure. 

The seal of George of Pitmedden, 1537, has a chevron between 
three boars' heads erased. 

Sir J. Balfour gives for Abercrombie of Pitelpie — or, a chevron 
between three boars' heads couped azure. 

Pont has two blazons for Abercrombie of that Ilk — argent, a 
chevron gules between three boars' heads erased azure or sable. 
Crest — an oak tree fructed proper, sometimes placed on a burning 
mount. Motto — " Tace." 

The seal of Sir Robert of that Ilk, 1493, has two lions gardant 
as supporters. 

In 1674 Sir Alexander of Birkenbog, baronet, registered — 
argent, a chevron gules between three boars' heads erased azure; 
motto — " Mercie is my desire." In 1792 his descendant, Sir George, 
registered the same, with a falcon proper as crest, and over it the 
motto, "Petit alta ;" supporters — two greyhounds argent collared 
gules. His pedigree is given back to Alexander of Birkenbog, 
falconer to Charles I. 

Richard Abercrombie of Abercrombie and Balcormo, co. Fife, 
was dead in 1270, leaving a son and heir, William. 

In 1296 William and John, both of that shire, did homage to 
Edward I. 

Sir R. occurs before 1 300. 

Alexander was Sheriff of Perth in 1370 ; the barony of Murthly, 
in that county, was long in the possession of the family, and was sold, 
in 161 5, by Thomas of that Ilk, and his son Alexander. 

In 1441 Thomas of Abercrombie sat in the General Council, was 
on a commission on the Laws 1449, and a Lord Auditor 1450. In 
1470 the Lord of Abercromby sat in Parliament, and in 1^78 Alex- 
ander of that Ilk was a member of the Commission on the Laws. 

In the reign of James IV. Mr David was clerk to the King, 
dean of Aberdeen, and sub-dean of the Royal Chapel. 



.K 



56 ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 

In 1493 Sir Robert of that Ilk granted Balcormo, by charter, to 
his younger son William, whose daughter and heir, Helen, married 
Peter Arnot ; and their descendant, Hugo Arnot, still holds the 
estate, which belonged to his ancestor before 1270. 

Thomas Abercrombie sold Abercrombie in 1627. 

At a very early period the name is met with in the north ; John 
in 1330 acts for the burgh of Cullen ; Alexander, before 1350, pur- 
chased half of the lands of Ardhunyner in the Garioch ; in 1362 he 
possessed Pethmalchy and Harthill. 

In 1512 these and other lands, including Pitmedden, were united 
and erected into the free barony of Pitmedden for George Aber- 
crombie. Various misfortunes overtook the family in the sixteenth 
century : Alexander of Ley was killed, it was believed, by witchcraft 
in 1509; Alexander of Pitmedden was shot dead by the Gordons in 
1583; Alexander of Pitmedden was accused of bigamy in 1587, and 
his place of Pitmedden burnt the following year. 

The published pedigrees are not quite satisfactory, but it is pro- 
bable that Birkenbog is the head of the Abercrombies in the north. 

Skeith, in Banffshire, was for several generations the property of 
a separate branch. Mr Jervise says it was sold in 1720 by Alex- 
ander, who left a son, James, merchant in Cullen. 

The funeral escutcheon of George, who purchased Tullibody, and 
died in 1699, leaving that property to a younger son of Birkenbog, 
who was ancestor of the Lords Abercromby and Dunfermline, 
makes him descended from Skeith. There is, however, a curious 
note appended : — " Done conforme the persons concernedes direction 
not being of a sure information on the father's side." 
Maculloch. 

Third line — 
Meldrum. See W for arms and supporters of Meldrum of that Ilk, co. 
Aberdeen. 

The seal of William de Melledrum, 1292, has three pallets, and' 

. this bearing again appears in that of William Meldrum of Fyvie, 

1468 — parted per pale, the dexter side parted per fess, in chief three 

pallets and in base three unicorns' heads couped for Preston ; the 

-sinister side has an otter salient. 

Sir George of Fyvie, in 1547, uses — first and fourth, a demi- 
otter issuant from water in base; second and third, Preston. 

The seals of Alexander of Seggie, 1449; David, canon of Dun- 
keld and official of St Andrews, 1495; William, 1532; and Thomas, 
official of Brechin, 15 14, all have the otter salient, with additional 
charges and slight variations. 

William, Bishop of Brechin, in 1500 used an otter salient, with 
a mullet in sinister chief point quartering a chevron charged. 

The only entry in the Lyon Register is for Mr George of 
Crombie, 1672-78 — first and fourth, argent, a demi-otter issuing from 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 57 

a bar wavy sable ; second and third, Preston ; all within a bordure 
engrailed sable. 

The coat, however, is registered several times as a quartering by 
the families of Urquhart and Seton, and the otter is crowned or ; the 
crown appears in 1495 on the seal of the Canon of Dunkeld. 

The Urquharts of Meldrum at first placed Meldrum in the first and 
fourth quarters, Seton in the second and third ; but in 1741 resumed 
their paternal coat, and took as crest a demi-otter sable crowned with 
an antique crown or, holding betwixt his paws a crescent gules, to 
indicate representation of the Meldrums of that Ilk and Setons of 
Meldrum. 
' Sir Philip de Meldrum, c. 1220, witnessed a charter of William, 

Earl of Buchan, to the Priory of St Andrews ; 1262, Sir Philip and 
Agnes Cumyn, his spouse. In 1278, Sir Philip and Sir William wit- 
ness the foundation charter of the Church of Turriff ; William was 
sheriff of Aberdeenshire 1290, and afterwards, in 1296, he swore 
fealty to Edward I., and his lands were restored. The same year 
David, of the county of Fife, also submitted to the English king ; 
in 1278, Alexander de Meldrum is named in the chartulary of Dun- 
fermline. 

Sir Philip was sheriff of Banff 1337 ; William sat in a general 
council 1364 ; William was sheriff of Aberdeen 1348. 

Meldrum of Seggy, in Fife, bore three otters passant sable, 
according to some authorities ; James of Seggy was a senator of the 
College of Justice 1575-88; Sir David of Seggy was father of Mr 
William 1622. 

George Meldrum of Crombie left three coheiresses in 1705 : Jean 
of Crombie, wife of James Duff; Helen, wife of Abercromby of Glass- 
augh ; and Isabella, wife of Alexander Ogilvie, advocate. 
Crawford. 

Dalrymple. Nisbet describes a seal of James de Dalrymple of Inglis- 
toun and Annetistoun 1402, appended to an obligation to his superior. 
Sir Robert Stewart of Durrisdeer — eight lozenges in saltire with a 
buckle in chief, which he considers to be taken as a mark of vassalage ; 
crest — a hart's head; supporters — two lions gardant. Porteus gives the 
arms of Dalrymple of Lacht as — or, a saltire engrailed sable, perhaps a 
mistake for lozengy ; he also gives Dalrymple of Stair — or, on a 
saltire azure nine lozenges of the field. The arms of Sir James of 
Stair, baronet, are given as registered ; his crest was a rock proper, 
with the motto, " Quiescam." The supporters of the first viscount and 
first earl were two storks each with a serpent in its beak, but after- 
wards two lions have been borne, and the motto altered to " Firm." 

The surname is taken from the barony of Dalrymple, co. Ayr, 
which, after being held for at least three generations, was. alienated 
about 137 1 by Malcolm and Hugh de Dalrymple to John Kennedy of 
Dunure, who in 1375 had a gift of the relief payable from the lands of 
the late Arthur de Dalrymple. 



58 ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 

Stair was acquired in 1450 by William Dalrymple, by marriage 
with Agnes Kennedy ; it was erected into a barony for Sir James in 
1669. He was son of James Dalrymple of Stair, by Janet, daughter 
of Fergus Kennedy of Knockdow ; James was younger son of James 
of Stair, by Isabel Kennedy of the Bargeny family. His elder brother, 
John of Stair, was father of James of Stair, who d.s.p. There is a 
missing charter of Robert HI., confirming to Duncan Dalrumpill the 
office of Toshia Daroche in Nithsdale. He was probably ancestor of 
the families of Lacht, Inglistoun, Waterside, &c. James of Lacht 
1398; in an action, 1478-83, between Christian Grierson, Lady Lacht, 
andjohn Dalrymple, mention ismadeof landsheldof Stewartof Rossyth; 
1492, Robert, Prior of the Carmelites at Queensferry; Morris in Water- 
side, 1558; Malcolm in Waterside, 1585; Malcolm of Waterside, 1616; 
Malcolm of Enoch and John of Schalloch, 162 1 ; John of W^aterside, 
1630, and his brother Malcolm. William, last of Waterside, died unm. 
in March 1760; his sisters and coheirs were Agnes, wife of Mr Alex- 
ander Orr, minister of Hoddam, and mother of Alexander Orr, who 
sold the estate in 1782 ; Elizabeth, wife of William Murray of 
Murraythwaite ; Susan, wife of Dugald Maxwell of Cowhill. This 
family bore Dalrymple as Stair within a bordure engrailed gules. In 
1369 John Dalrymple held land in Edinburgh ; John was provost of 
the burgh 1392 ; John sat in parliament as its commissioner 1445 — 
he is designed " the king's merchant," and was an official of the 
mint ; for several generations this was one of the leading burgess 
families of Edinburgh. 

In 1602 William, then a boy at Ayr School, was kidnapped by 
the Mures, kept away from home for several years, and made to 
change his name. This was to prevent him giving evidence as to the 
slaughter of Sir Thomas Kennedy ; having returned, he was mur- 
dered on Girvan sands and his body thrown into the sea. 

It would seem that William Dalrymple belonged to the Stair 
family, as an attempt was made to get John, laird of Stair, to abstain 
from prosecuting the guilty parties. 
Fourth line — 



Cochrane. Crawfurd gives the arms of John de Cochran of that Ilk and 
Pitfour, 1519, from his seal — three boars' heads erased. A later 
modification of the coat is given from W. A third bearing, given in 
several MSS., is — ermine, on a chief gules a boar's or stag's head 
between two mullets argent. 

When Sir William was created Lord Cochrane, the arms con- 
firmed to him by Sir James Balfour, Lyon, in 1648, were — ermine, 
on a chief gules a stag's head between two mullets or ; crest — a demi- 
lion crowned; supporters — two leopards or. This was altered in 
1668 by Sir Charles Erskine, Lyon, to — argent, a chevron gules 
between three boars' heads erased azure armed of the second ; crest — 
a horse passant argent ; motto — " Virhite et labore;" supporters — two 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 59 

greyhounds argent collared azure. In the registration for William, 
Earl of Dundonald, 1672-78, the same person, the boars' heads are 
armed and langued of the field, and the supporters are collared or 
and leashed gules. Thomas, Earl of Dundonald, registered arms 
1774, quartering Blair of that Ilk as heir male of that family, and the 
boars' heads of Cochrane are, on this occasion, azure langued gules. 

The Cochranes of Barbachlaw in West Lothian, of whom Nisbet 
gives a short notice, bore, in 1614, a boar's head erased and in chief 
three mullets; but as registered, 1672-78, by Alexander of Barbach- 
law, the mullets are disposed chevron ways, the field argent, 
charges azure. 

It is from this family that the Cochrans of Ashkirk claim descent, 
and they called their property near Musselburgh, and afterwards a 
farm on their Roxburghshire estate, Barbachlaw. In 1795 arms 
were registered by Archibald of Ashkirk in Musselburgh, and in 
18 1 3 by his son, Archibald of Ashkirk in Roxburghshire, and of Bar- 
bachlaw in Mid-Lothian; the coat and crest, however, rather re- 
semble those of the Earl of Dundonald. 

Cochrane of Dumbreck, co. Aberdeen, bore — ermine, on a chief 
gules a stag's head erased or between two mullets argent. Of this 
family Mr Walter was provost of Aberdeen, and his son Walter sat 
in parliament for the city 1693. 

From a second son of Barbachlaw descended the family, founded 
by a merchant burgess of Edinburgh, which possessed Rochsoles, co. 
Lanark, for five generations, 

Marion, daughter and heir of John Cochrane of Struthers, co. 
Lanark, married James Whyte of Stockbriggs, and died in 1771. 

Margaret, only child of John Cochrane of Ravelrig in Mid- 
Lothian, married, in 1755, David Ross, a senator of the College of 
Justice, with the title of Lord Ankerville. 

The surname is taken from Cochrane in Renfrewshire. Waldeve 
de Cochrane witnessed a charter in 1262; William de Coughran, of 
the county of Lanark, swore fealty to Edward I. in 1296; David II. 
granted Pitfour and other lands to Roger de Cochrane, and for a 
time Pitfour was the property of a separate branch of the family. 
Lee in Renfrewshire and Ascog in Bute belonged to Cochranes 
during the whole of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. 

Thomas of Cochran of Cousland had the Earldom of Mar t>y gift 
of James III., but was hanged, and forfeited. 

George sat in parliament for Ayr 1585-97. The family of that 
Ilk ended in an heiress, Elizabeth, whose husband, Alexander Blair, 
assumed the surname and arms of Cochrane during the lifetime of 
his father-in-law ; their son was the first peer. 

In 167 1 Barbachlaw and his other lands were united and erected 
into a free barony for Alexander Cochrane of Barbachlaw, with a 
singular arrangement : failing heirs male of his own body, the estate is 
settled on William the second, and Thomas the third sons of William 



6o ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 

Lord Cochrane, there being no relationship Ixjtwccn the families. The 
heirs of tailzie are bound, under penalty of forfeiture, to " take upon 
them and bear the Sir-name of Cochrane, with the style and armes 
of Barbachlaw." 
MoNiPENNY. These bearings are given in L ; the seal of William, 1467, 
is the same, with a peacock in his pride for crest, and two ladies as 
supporters. Seals of John of Pitmilly 1467, and David of Pitmilly 
1546, have not the dolphin quartering, nor is it used by various 
other persons of the name whose seals are given by Mr Laing. 

Thomas of Kinkcll, 1415, has a chevron between the three cross 
crosslets issuing from crescents ; crest — a bird. 

In 1449 Thomas has a stag's head as crest. 

Porteus says Pitmilly sometimes bore a star argent in chief, 
sometimes a bordure engrailed argent. 

William I^rd Monypcnny sat in parliament as a peer 147 1 ; his 
son, Alexander Lord Monipenny, settled in I'rance, where the first 
lord had grants of land from Louis XL, and left no male issue. 

Pitmilly in Fife was held, it is said, from the thirteenth century 
by the Monypennys ; the last of the line, 1869, left the estate to a 
namesake, younger son of a Kentish family, said to be of Scottish 
origin. 



PLATE 10. 

First line — 
Crawfurd of Grf,nnan. 

Rait, A cross engrailed is the bearing on the seal of Sir Gervase de I^it 
1292 ; an early seal of John de Rait has a hunting horn, and that of 
Mr David Rait, 1591, has a cross invecked. 

W. gives quarterly sable and azure a crescent argent. 

The coat here represented was matriculated 1672-78 by William 
of Hallgreen ; Mr William of Pitforthie, a cadet at the same time 
has a hunting horn of the field stringed gules on the cross. 

The surname is taken from localities, and probably was assumed 
in different parts of the country by persons not related to one another. 
Rait in Nairn, Rait in Perth, Raith in Fife, and Raith in Ayrshire, 
may all have given a name to residents if not to owners. 1291, Sir 
Gerva.se de Rathe, Constable of Inverne.ss ; 1292, IL de Rathe; 
1292-97, Sir Andrew de Rathe ; the legman Roll contains the names 
of Sir Gervase de Rate, Gervase I^t, and Sir Andrew de Rat of the 
county of Inverness, and Koj^cr de Rath of Ayrshire 1296. 

In 1332 John de Rate, the father, enters into an agreement with 
the Abbot of Scone; Sir Alexander, 1335-69; Thomas de Rath, 
1371 ; John de Rath, 1398. 

Thomas de Rate had charters in the fortieth year of his reign 
from David II. of Ures in Kincardineshire, to be held in free barony, 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY, 6i 

and of Balgillo in Forfarshire ; another of the barony in the first year 
of Robert II., and again to him, designed dilectus scuti/ernoster, and 
Margaret, his spouse, in the twelfth year of the reign of the same 
king. He was iVwA seven years later, when the superiority was 
granted to Sir Alt a.mkK i Lindsay. 

Hugh lie JNiih w.e. .i|)|)(>iiii((l coroner of the sheriflfdom of Ayr 
by Sir John Lindsay, and li.h I i * lown charter of confirmation second 
Robert II. 

In 1492 Alexander Rnit possessed lands in Rait. 

David of Diuumagaa .ic(|uiicd Ilallgrccn, and had a charter 
147 1, which was confirmed in 1478. This property gave a designation 
to his descendants, till it was sold in 1724 by William Rait of Hall- 
green, who married Isobel, sister and heir of James Douglas of 
Bridgeford. 

Futhes and Drumtochty, in 1440, belonged to John Rait; 1445, 
Henry, son of John; 1492, Robert of Drumtochty; 1491, Elizabeth, 
Lady of Futhes, is said, by Mr Jervise, to have married Hew Calder, 
and to have left a son, Alexander Galder of Drumtochty. 

Branches of the Hallgrcen family were seated at Cononsyth, 
Bryanton, Pitforthy, Findlaystoun, &c., and the representation is 
claimed by Rait of Anniston, co. Forfar. James was Abbot of 
Culross 1530. Archibald went to Poland in 1650, and in 1676 had 
a birth-brief showing his descent through Raits of Lentush, co. 
Aberdeen, from Hallgreen. 

Mr James, advocate, acquired Edmonstone, near TTdlnburgh, of 
which he had a charter in 1630 to him and Eliza Foullcr, his wife; 
their son, James of Edmonstone, married a (huit-hler of il.iy of 
Monkton, and was dead in 1667, leaving two (l.nij'Iih 1 ., Anna .md 
Elizabeth. The elder married John Wauchope, a < n.iior of the 
College of Justice, with the style of LokI Lihuonstonc, and died in 
1729. Her arms, registered c. 1672, and displayed at her funeral, are 
the undiffercnccd coat. 

MONlI'IiNNY OI' PnMlLLY. (?) 

Second line — 
Rattray. 

BoSWIiLL. 

Glen. 

Third line — 
Sandilands of Calder. (?) 

WiSHART. 

PLATE 11. 

First line — 
William Ckawi'oru. M. Michel gives the seal of I^bert de Crawfurd, 
1406— a fess ermine with two mullets in chief; crest — a mullet 
between two horns ; supporters — two lions gardant. 

Q 



/ 



62 ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 

William Auckinleck. This coat was registered 1672-78 by Gilbert 
Auchinleck of that Ilk, co. Forfar, and a hundred years later, with a 
bordure gules for difference, by James Macvicar Affleck of Eding- 
hame. It is cut in stone at Woodhill, with the addition of a hunt- 
ing-horn in base, probably executed early in the seventeenth century. 

In 1809 Alexander Boswell of Auchinleck, co. Ayr, was allowed 
by Lyon to quarter Auchinleck as descended from Marion Auchin- 
leck, wife of George Campbell of Loudoun. 

Affleck of Dalham, co. Suffolk, baronet of Great Britain, claims 
descent from Auchinleck of that Ilk in Forfarshire, and bears the 
arms, crest, and motto as registered by Gilbert. 

In 1296 Nicol de Achtheleg, of the county of Ayr, and Patrik de 
Aghlek, of the county of Lanark, swore fealty to Edward I. 

The lairds of Auchinleck sat in the general council 1441, and in 
parliament 1469-78-81-87, 

In 1296 Matheu le Naper de Aghelek, of Forfarshire, swore 
fealty to the King of England, and ten years later John de Aghelek 
also did homage for lands in the same shire ; can John have been the 
son of Matthew, and have assumed a surname from his lands ? 

About 1445 Sir John and James Auchinleck married Elizabeth 
and Giles Melville, sisters and coheiresses of Glenbervie ; the elder 
sister and her husband managed to retain the greater part of the estate ; 
their eldest son James married Giles Ross, and left a daughter and 
heir Elizabeth, as to whose rights and legitimacy there were suits, 
which were decided in her favour, and she carried the barony of Glen- 
bervie to the house of Douglas by her marriage to Sir William, 
younger son of Archibald Earl of Angus ; their descendants bore 
argent, a cross embattled sable for Auchinleck, and this coat is given 
in L. for Auchinleck of that Ilk, and was also borne by Auchinleck of 
Balmanno, co. Perth, whose representative in 1630 was served heir 
male of Mr John, second son of Sir John above named, and uncle of 
the heiress, he being descended from a brother of Sir John. 

The cross has been said to have been the arms of Balmanno of 
that Ilk, assumed in consequence of marriage with the heiress ; there 
seems no evidence of this, as the cross was the coat taken by the 
descendants of the heiress of Glenbervie, while the marriage with 
Balmanno is said to have been contracted by the younger son, whose 
descendant became heir male. 

Of the Balmanno family were George, who married Mary, sister 
of James Earl of Morton, the regent, and of David Earl of Angus, 
and was shot dead, 1581, by William Bickerton of Cash; George, 
1581-97 ; William, father of Sir George, a senator of the College of 
Justice 1626 to c. 1639 ; Sir William of Balmanno 1648, and Mr 
Archibald his brother, who is said by Sir Patrick Lyon of Carse to 
have married Anna, daughter of Arnot of Woodmill, and to have left 
a daughter Anna, heiress of the family, who married John Carnegie 
of Kinnell. 



ARMORIAL DE BERRY. 63 

To return to the Forfarshire family: 1364, Gilbert of Auchin- 
leck has a payment from the Crown; 1441, James of that Ilk; 
1495-1508, Hugh of that Ilk ; 1558-69, Gilbert of that Ilk ; Robert 
of that Ilk died in 1610, when his son Gilbert was served heir to him; 
1665, Gilbert, heir to his father or grandfather Gilbert, in the barony 
of Auchinleck, registered arms, died 1692 ; Gilbert his son died 1722, 
leaving a son, Gilbert, who sold the estate soon after. 

EdingTiame came into the possession of the Affleck family about 
1670. In the sixteenth century there were Auchinlecks of Cumledge, 
CO. Berwick, descended from Archibald, a younger son of Balmanno ; 
Auchinlecks of Schethine in Aberdeenshire ; Auchinlecks of Tweedie, 
CO. Lanark. Auchinleck in Ayrshire was lost by recognition, and 
granted to the ancestor of the Boswells, who have since held it. 

William de Modreville. (?) The seal of John Finlay, alias Motherwell, 
vicar of Eastwood, c. 1550, is described by Mr Laing as a saltire can- 
tonned with four roses or cinquefoils. 

In 1296 Adam de Moderual, of the county of Lanark, swore 
fealty to Edward I. 

In the latter part of the sixteenth century persons of the name of 
Moderwell occur, connected with Renfrew, and Philip, a bailie of the 
burgh, was killed in 1556. 
Second line — v»*'*** f^ 

John Sempill. &, f^'^ \ 

Alexander Magney. (?) ^' \!^<fj .5 

AbERCROMBIE. </:..?». 10 



III. 



ROLL OF ARMS, 



BY 



SIR ROBERT FORMAN, 

LYON KING OF ARMS. 

C, A.D. 1562. 



R 



Lauder of Bass. L. 

*Hepburne of Wauchton. 

CocKBURNE OF Langtone, as L., omitting the quartering of Vipont. 

ScoTTE OF BuLCLEUCHE ; or, on a bend azure a crescent between two 

mullets of the field. 
*Ker of Phernihirst. 
Jhonstone of Lochewoode, as L., Jhonstoun of that Ilk, but with the 

cushions pendant by the corner. 
Cranstone of that Ilk. L., both feet of the cranes rest on the ground. 
Douglass of Drumlanrick, L., the hearts uncrowned. 
Touris of Inverleith. L., crescents instead of mullets, and no marking 

of tinctures ; the seal of George Touris of Inverleith, a.d. 1632, has 

mullets. 
Prestoune of Craigmiller. L. 

Naper of Merchistoune. L., Napier alone without the blank quarters. 
Froster of Corstorphin. L. 
Dalmahoy of that Ilk. L. 
Sandelands of Calder. L. 

Lauder of Hatton. L., the beak only of the griffin is gules. 
Craufurd of Haining. L. 
*Menteith of Kerss. L., first and fourth, gules, a bend checquy argent 

and sable; second and third, azure, three round buckles or. The field 

of the Menteith coat is so invariably or, that gules can only be looked 

on as an error in colouring. 
Logane of Restalrick. L., in the second and third quarters the field 

is sable, the eagle argent. 
Herring of Gilmertoune, L., an additional cinquefoil on the bend in 

chief. 
Sainct Clair of Rosling. L., no mullet on the cross. 
Pennicuke of that Ilk. L. 
Wardlaw of Vamstoune, as Wardlaw of Richartoune, L., with the 

mascles argent. 
Fairlie of Braied. L., a lion rampant debruised of a ribband sinister, 

tinctures not marked. 
Creightoune of Bruntstoune. L., ermine, a lion rampant azure. 
Clepen of Carslogen. L., argent, a lion rampant gules crowned or. 
Fausyde of that Ilk. L. 
Campbell of Loudoune. L. 
* Murray of Blackbarony. 
Giffart of Shriffhall. L., ermine, three bars gules, a bordure of the 

last. 
Steuarte of Craigiehall. L. 87, no buckles in chief. 



68 FORMAN'S ROLL, 

Balfour of Monquhanie. L., argent on a chevron sable an otter's 

head couped of the field, in base a saltire couped of the second. 
•Hepburne of Quhitstoune. 

BiNNINGE OF THAT IlK. L. 

Balfoure of Carrestoune. L. 

ScRYMGEOUR OF DiDHOUPE. L., or, a lion rampant gules holding in his 
dexter forepaw a sword bendways argent. 

Ramsay of Dalhousie. L. 

Wallace of Cragie. L., in the first and fourth quarters the field is or 
and the lion gules. 

Blair of Adamtoune. L., argent, on a saltire engrailed sable nine 
mascles of the field. 

Mureheide of Lauchope. L., argent, on a bend azure a mullet between 
two acorns or. 

Kneland of that Ilk, L., the hare is or. 

*Gresonne of Lage. This family has twice changed its bearings. The 
seal of Robert Grierson of Lag, 14 18, has a lion rampant gardant 
crowned. Sir David Lindsay, and other authorities, give what may 
be called an Annandale coat — gules, a saltire and chief argent, the 
latter charged with three cushions of the field. Forman is the earliest 
authority for the present arms, which were registered 1672-78 by 
Robert of Lag, substituting a mullet for the crescent on the fess. 

*Edzar of that Ilk. Nisbet describes the arms of the family of Edgar, 
cut on a stone at their house of Wedderlie, co. Berwick, as a lion 
rampant quartering three water bougets for Ross of Sanquhar, sup- 
ported by two greyhounds. These arms are not recorded, but the 
silver lion in a field sable with differences is recorded, 1672-80, by 
two cadets. Admiral Edgar, the last of the direct line of Wedderlie, 
used on his seal the lion rampant without the quartering, with the 
supporters. 

The surname is met with at an early period in Nithsdale and in 
the Merse, and may have become the surname of the descendants of 
any person of the name of Edgar. It is conjectured that the lion 
rampant indicated descent from, or dependence on, the Earls of 
Dunbar and March ; perhaps connection by marriage, as Sir Patrick 
Edgar, who held lands in Lennel in 1272, married Mariota de Home. 
Robert I. granted several charters to Edgars or Edzars, chiefly 
of lands in Dumfriesshire, one being to Richard of half the barony 
of Sanquhar, with the place thereof, the other half being held by 
William de Crichton. 

Donald Edzear had a charter from David II. of the captainship 
of the Clan Macgowin. Wedderlie certainly was held by the 
Edgars in 1376, and was sold in 1733 by John, whose son, Rear- 
Admiral Alexander Edgar, died in 1817, leaving an only child, Sophia 
Bathia, who married, first, Captain Robert Campbell, R.N. ; second, 
Alexander Tait, LL.D. 

The representation in the male line has been claimed by several 
families. 



FORMAN'S ROLL. 69 

In 1873 there was published "An Account of the Sirname of 

Edgar," by Captain Lawrence-Archer, a descendant through a female. 

John of Wedderlie sat in parliament for Berwickshire 1681, 

Edward Edgar for Edinburgh 1640, and Alexander for Haddington 

1 696- 1 707. 

Ramsay of Culluthie. L., in the second and third quarters mascles 
argent instead of lozenges or. 

Ogilvey of Findlatour. L., first and fourth, argent, an eagle dis- 
played sable ; second and third, argent, a lion passant gules. 

Mertyne of Medope. L. 

Carnagie of Kinhaird. L. 

MONCREIFFE OF THAT IlK. L. 

Menzies of Castellhill. As L., Menzies of Enouch. 
DuRiE OF THAT Ilk. L., azure, a chevron between three crescents argent. 
WooDE OF BoLNETOUNE. As L., Wod of Blairtouu. 
Brechinge. L., the piles are in point. 

LouELL OF Ballumbie. L., the bar wavy surmounts the piles which are 
in point, and is narrower. 

FOUILLES OF CoLINGTOUNE. L. 

Iruing of Drume. L. 

Haddoune of Gleneiggies. L., the saltire in the second quarter is en- 
grailed, a mistake which has been frequently repeated ; the saltire is 
for Lennox, and plain. An early seal of Ranulf de Haudene has as 
his paternal coat a saltire between four stars ; the stars being dropped 
and the saltire engrailed, the bearing became identical with that of 
Colquhoun. 

Shaw of Sauchie. L. 

*Weymies of that Ilk. 

Weymies of Rereis. L., first and fourth, a lion rampant within a bor- 
dure, no tinctures marked ; second and third, argent, a bend azure. 

CoLVEiLL OF Ester Vymeis. L. 

Lundey of Balgonie. L., in the first and fourth quarters, gules, three 
pallets argent, instead of paly of six gules and argent. 

Anstruther of that Ilk. L., the piles are in point. 

Meldrum of Fyvie. L. 

Murray of Tullebardin, as L., Murray of Balvaird. 

*Balfour of that Ilk. 

Innes of that Ilk. L., in the first and fourth quarters the field is gules, 
the heads argent. 

Scotte of Baluerey. L., the field is or. 

Ingleis of Lochend. L. 

Kenedey of Blanquhain. L., in the first and fourth quarters the 
crosses are gules, and in the second and third the lion is not 
crowned. 

Ross OF Montgreane. L., the field is argent. 

Calhoune of Lusse. L. 



70 FORMAN'S ROLL, 

AucHiNLECK OF THAT Ilk. L., the CFOSs is represented as if counter- 
compony argent and sable. 

•Dalzeill of that Ilk. 

BosuELL OF Balmonto. L., first and fourth, or, a Hon rampant gules ; 
second and third, argent, on a fess sable three cinquefoils of the field. 

*Chartreis of Emptsfeilde. L. 

*Chartreis of Lonefenan. L. 

These Charteris coats are given nearly the same by Sir David 
Lindsay, but there is reason to believe that alterations have been 
made on his MS. Amisfield is possibly an addition ; at any rate it 
is on one of the smaller shields, inserted in the centre of the four 
which usually occupy a page, and it has the tressure, which did not 
then belong to that family. The other was originally Hempesfelde, 
but a line has been drawn through this word and Kinfaunis added 
below in a more modern hand. The great family of Charteris of 
Kinfauns, Lumphannan, and Canglour, on which latter estate, which 
is in Stirlingshire, there was a family mansion named Charteris Hall 
or House anciently, certainly carried the Royal tressure, as appears 
from many seals. In 1584 John Charteris of Kinfauns formally 
adopted Henry Lindsay, afterwards Earl of Crawford, who had 
married Beatrix Charteris, and made over to him the whole of his 
great estate in fee, making it a condition that he should assume the 
surname and arms of Charteris of Kinfauns only. This agreement 
was ratified by Parliament three years later, and Henry was styled 
Charteris, fiar of Kinfauns, although John Charteris lived on into the 
seventeenth century. Sir James Balfour, the MS. called Workman's, 
and other authorities, give the plain fess for Amisfield and the 
tressure to Kinfauns, and the Lyon Register, c. 1672, contains an 
entry of the arms of Sir John Charters of Hempsfield — argent, a fess 
azure. 

When Colonel Francis Charteris, said to be heir male of Amis- 
field, died, his daughter, the Countess of Wemyss, put up on his 
house in Edinburgh an escutcheon of his alleged arms. Proceedings 
were taken against her ladyship and her husband in the Lyon Court, 
and in August 1732 they were fined and the arms pulled down, as 
they "belong to another family which the said Colonel Francis 
Charteris does noways represent." 

Some twenty years later the Lord Lyon was found more pliable, 
and the coveted Royal tressure was matriculated as part of the arms of 
the Hon. Francis Charteris of Amisfield, second son of the Countess 
of Wemyss, and successor to the estates of his maternal grandfather. 
At the same time the old crest and motto — an arm issuing out of a 
cloud holding a sword aloft proper, '' Nott gladio sed gratid" — were 
changed to a dexter hand holding a dagger paleway proper. This is 
our charter. 

Robert of Amisfield, co. Dumfries, was in parliament 1481 ; Mr 
Thomas of Charteris, Chancellor of Scotland 1288-90, had a grant of 



FORMA N'S ROLL. 71 

the ward of Amisfield ; Sir Thomas had a charter of Kinfauns from 
David II., and was made Chancellor 1340. 

Amisfield was erected into a barony 1613, and was, till recently, 
the property of the heir general of the direct line of the family who 
had assumed the surname of Charteris. 

Douglass of Lochleuin. L., the chief is represented as if the shield 
were parted per fess indented. 

Cheine of Aslonan. L., this coat is unfinished apparently. 

Hendersoune of Fordell. L., the crescent is vert, the field parted per 
pale dancetty sable and argent. 

*Chirnsyd of East Nisbet. Balfour's blazon is azure, three moriscoes' 
heads erased argent ; Pont has or, or argent, three women's heads 
sable attired azure. The surname is taken from a locality in Berwick- 
shire. 

Mr Hugh de Chirnside was official of Teviotdale 1306, and Mr 
Hugh, clerk, probably the same person, is named 1316-24; Hugh, 
1328; Laurence, a merchant, had English safe-conducts 1362-4-5, 
and was custumar of Dunbar 1372 ; his son Thomas was dead in 
1393, when his property fell to the Crown by reason of bastardy. 

John Chirnsyde had a charter from Robert III. of Fowllerland 
in Whitsome, on the resignation of John Nisbet; John, 1428; John 
of Whitsome; Alexander had married before 1479 Elizabeth Nisbet, 
and probably acquired East Nisbet with her; Ninian of East Nisbet 
1530; William of East Nisbet 1567; Sir Patrick, in November 
1615, carried off from Haddington Adam French of Thornydikes, a 
boy of fourteen, confined him at East Nisbet, carried him to Berwick, 
and there married him to his own daughter Jean. 

For this he was prosecuted, but the youthful bridegroom having 
declared that he went of his own free will, the matter was allowed to 
drop. 

Alexander of East Nisbet, son of Sir Patrick, was dead before 
1643, leaving Alexander, who d.s.p., and Captain David, who, in 
1652, was served heir in West Whitsomelaws ; William was in the 
French service 1552; Mr William was parson of Luss 1581 ; Robert 
represented Glasgow in parliament 1593; Robert of Over Possil was 
commissary of Glasgow 1602; Ninian perished when Dunglas Castle 
was blown up. 

Hay of Boyne. L., argent, three inescutcheons gules. 

Hay of Levies. L. 

Douglass of Kilspindie. The simple coat of Douglas with the heart 
uncrowned. 

Leuingstoune of Manerstoune. L. 

LiNDESAY OF CouiNGTOUNE. L., the field vert. 

Mure of Ruallan. L., the tincture of the mullets not marked.. 

Hoppringell of that Ilk. Argent, on a bend sable three round 
buckles or ; apparently a Stirling coat. 

Balfoure of Burley. L. 



72 FORMA N'S ROLL. 

Mackmath of that Ilk. L. I29^ Makknaucht, the tincture of the field 
is not marked; the inescutcheon is gules charged with a cross 

argent. 

♦OuGSTOUNE OF THAT Ilk. In 1 876 Alexander Milne Ogston of Ardoe, 
CO. Kincardine, Esquire, proved his pedigree as heir male of this 
family, and the coat was confirmed to him by the Lyon King of 
Arms, the blazon being — argent, three mascles sable, on a chief of the 
second two lions passant of the first armed and langued gules. This 
is as it appears on seals of the commencement of the sixteenth cen- 
tury, and in the Lyon Register as a quartering of Douglas of 
Tilwhilly. 

The MSS. generally make the shield parted per fess and the 
lions rampant. 

The various bearing of the arms is shown in the illustrations to 
" A Genealogical History of the Families of Ogston from their first 
appearance, circa a.d. 1200." Edinburgh, 1876. Privately printed. 
A careful and accurate work, interesting as showing the vicissitudes 
of an old family which, after its estates had passed away from it by 
marriage and sale, has regained in the present day a position among 
the landowners of the district in which it long flourished. 

The surname is taken from lands in Morayshire. Symon de 
Hogeston entered into an agreement with Andrew Bishop of Moray, 
c. 1230; John de Ogiston was steward to Walter de Moravia 1240; 
Alexander de Ogeston, in 1296, swore fealty to Edward I. 

In 1473 Alexander Ogstoun of that Ilk sold Ogstoun to John 
Innes of that Ilk ; his son and heir, John of Crag, was sheriff of 
Aberdeenshire ; Walter, son of John, took the designation of that 
Ilk, and died 1489, leaving two daughters coheirs — Elizabeth, married 
Sir Adam Hepburn, master of the king's stables, and Janet, (?) married 
George Haly burton of Gask. 

George Ogstoun, cousin-german of these ladies, acquired Auch- 
macludy, co. Aberdeen, by marriage, c. 1550, with Elizabeth Murray; 
William, fourth of Auchmacludy, left a daughter and heir. Christian, 
who married in 1691 Alexander Reid ; from her uncle the existing 
family of Ogston descends. 

David Douglas acquired Tilwhilly in Kincardineshire by 
marriage, c. 1479, with Janet Ogstoun, and their descendants 
quartered Ogstoun. 

Thomas Ogstoun possessed the Kirklands of Fettercairn, c. 
1470 ; these lands were sold by Walter in 161 5. 

Ballenden of Auchenone. L. 

Spreuell of Coldoune. L. 

Glendining of Partounte. L., of that Ilk. 

Leirmound of that Ilk. L., as Dersye. 

Wardlaw of Torrie. L., in the second and third quarters the field is 
argent, the water bougets sable. 

*Tosheavch of Moneyvairde. 



FORMAN'S ROLL, jt, 

*Lasone of Humbie. 

BissET OF THAT Ilk. L., argent, a bend gules. 

Tendell. L. 

*CuMEiN OF Alter. 

Maxswell of Calderuoode. L., the chief argent, three pallets sable. 

Balzie of Lamingtoune. L., sable, eight mullets, three, three and two 

argent. 
Jardin of Apilgirth. L., the stars on the chief are omitted. 
Macklenane of Bombie. L. 

RUTHERFURDE OF THAT IlK. L. 

*RiDDELL. Seal of Patrick de Ridale, c. 1 170, a lion passant ; of his son 
Walter, c. 1175, an eagle with wings expanded. The MSS. give a 
chevron between three boys' heads or holly branches, or ears of rye. 

Walter of that Ilk, in 1566, seals with a chevron between three 
ears of rye. 

The surname is Norman, and is one of those which are on the 
Roll of Battle Abbey ; Ridel seigneur de Mord, near Rouen, bore — 
gules, three lions' heads or. 

Geoffrey Ridell, lord of Wittering, Northants, was a baron by 
tenure and justice of England in the reign of Henry I. ; the descend- 
ants of his daughter and heir, Maud, wife of Richard Basset, assumed 
the surname of Ridell. 

Arms of Sir John Ridel of Bedfordshire, in the reign of Edward 
II. — paly argent and gules, abend sable; of Sir William of Westmore- 
land at the same time — gules, a lion within a bordure indented argent. 

Gervase Riddel settled in Scotland before 11 16, and was sheriff 
of Roxburghshire ; Walter de Riddale had a charter from David I. 
before 1153 certainly, probably considerably earlier, of Whitunes, 
half of Escheto, and Lilislive, &:c., which is the oldest charter to a lay- 
man known to be in existence in Scotland. 

His brother and heir, SirAnsketin, 1155, was the direct ancestor 
of the present Sir Walter Buchanan Riddell of that Ilk, baronet. 

The family early acquired the other half of Lilislive, and the 
whole came to be called Riddell and was erected into a barony ; the 
estate was sold about 1820. A separate branch was founded by 
Hugh, who possessed Cranston, known as Cranston-riddell, before 
1 160. 

Arms registered for Riddell of Riddell — argent, a chevron gules 
between three ears of rye slipped and bladed proper ; crest — a demi- 
grey hound proper ; motto — " I hope to share ; " supporters — two 
greyhounds argent collared gules. The motto is " Hab shar," as 
recorded in 1783 by Walter of Glenriddell, a cadet. In 1765 George 
Riddell, M.D., and his third brother James, of Riddell Lodge, co. 
Berwick, and of Belton in Suffolk, the former representative of Rid- 
dell of Kinglass, in West Lothian, registered the arms of Riddell of 
that Ilk with marks of cadency ; crest — a demi-greyhound argent ; 
motto — " Right to share." In 1775, James, then of Ardnamurchan 



74 FORMAN'S ROLL. 

and Sunart, co. Argyll, Riddell Lodge, Belton, &c., again recorded 
these arms, being granted supporters (although he was not the repre- 
sentative even of his own branch of the family) a female figure, the 
emblem of agriculture, and a male figure, the emblem of honour, and 
an additional motto, " Utile et duke." 

Mr Riddell was created a baronet in 1778 ; and in 1796 — on set- 
ting forth a totally different pedigree, showing that John of Sallowes 
in Norfolk, a descendant of the Ridells of Wittering, sold that 
estate, settled in Scotland in the reign of James VI., and was grand- 
father of James, first of Kinglass — was allowed by the Lord Lyon to 
discontinue the use of the arms, crest, and motto of the Roxburgh- 
shire Riddells, and to bear — or, three piles in point gules surmounted 
of a bend azure, with several quarterings, one of them being Barry 
wavy of six or and gules for Bassett ; crest — a hand issuing from the 
coronet of a French count holding a baton proper; supporters as 
before; mottoes — " De Apulia " and " C/lile et dulce" Very shortly 
before the discarded pedigree had been published in Douglas's 
Baronage. 

The arms of the Bassets, barons of Weldon, descended from 
Maud Riddell, were — or, three piles gules within a bordure sable 
bezantde; of the Bassets, barons of Drayton, also descended from 
her — or, three piles in point gules, a canton ermine. Arms of Riddell 
of Swinburne, in Northumberland — argent, a fess between three rye 
sheaves azure. 
FoRSYTHE OF Nydie. L., the griffins are sable. 

LOCKARTE OF BaR. L. 

*Mackdouell of Garthland. Argent, on a chief sable a mullet on a 

dexter side or. 

Argent, nearly the same as L. Squyare. 

Strange of Pitgarthie. L. 

Haldingtoune of that Ilk. L., the crosslets are sable, and the cross 

is charged with a mullet argent. 
Douglass of Langnuthrie. L. 
CoRSBEY OF THAT Ilk. L., the cross is argent. 
*Balkaskie of that Ilk. 

Syntoune of that. Ilk. L., Symondtoune, no mullet. 
Gules, a saltire argent on a chief of the second three cushions of the 

first pendant by the corner. (?) Greirson. 

Argent, a chevron between three mullets gules. (?) Arnot. 

Chalmer. L., Gathgirth, the field of the first and fourth quarters is gules. 

Heriote of Trabroune. L. 

Murray of Philipehaughe. L. 

*Wansse of that Ilk. 

BissET of that Ilk. As before. 

*Steuarte of Gairnetullie. 

PiTTBLADDO OF THAT Ilk. L., the boar's head is couped. 

•Quhytelaw of that Ilk. A mistake for Whitehead. 



FORMA N'S ROLL. 75 

Steuarte of Garleis. L. 

*Spenss of Varmestoune. Vide post. 

Ramsay of Dunone. L., the crescents are placed in the usual way, i.e., 
with their horns towards the dexter chief. 

Blair of Adamtoune. L. 

*Rosse of Kinfaunis. Three water bougets ; no tinctures given. Sir 
James Balfour gives the f^eld azure, the charges or. 

MoRTiMEiR OF Wambeth. L. (?) Mortimer of Auchinbady, an old 
Banffshire family, whose arms were registered, c. 1680, as paly of six 
argent and azure, a lion rampant sable powdered with tears. George, 
the last owner in the direct male line, died in 17 16, leaving co- 
heiresses, one of whom married David Erskine, a shoemaker; 
another, Thomas Keir, one of the King's trumpeters. 

*Dalrumpell. 

Broune of Fordell. The tincture of the field is altered from sable to 
gules, which is a mistake. 

Adam Brown was killed at the battle of Falkirk 1298 ; the lands 
he held of the Bishop of Aberdeen descended to his grandson. Sir 
John, sheriff of the county of Aberdeen 1328. 

John Brown of Midmar, son of Sir John, was ancestor of George, 
Bishop of Dunkeld 1484-1514, whose arms, illuminated in his Life by 
Abbot Myln, are — sable, a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis argent. 
The bishop granted Fordell, co. Perth, in 1493, to his brother 
Richard, whose descendants bore — azure, a chevron between three 
fleurs-de-lis or. The direct male line ended with John Brown, son 
and heir of Sir John of Fordell and Rossie, Major-General, and re- 
presentative in parliament of the county of Perth, who was mortally 
wounded at Inverkeithing 165 1. 

Antonia Brown of Rossie, co. Fife, Sir John's eventual heiress, 
married Alexander Dunlop of Dunlop, co. Ayr. 

Brown of Finmount, co. Fife, an estate acquired in 1596 and 
sold c. 1 7 10, became heir male; and of this branch, which charged 
the chevron with a crescent sable, descendants exist. 

The families of Horn, Westhorn, Hangingside, and Sir William 
Brown, created a baronet 1699, were cadets of Fordell, and bore the 
field azure, which distinguishes them from the branches of Colstoun. 

*Cairness of Orchattoun. 

Melueill of Raithe. L. 

Balbirney of that Ilk. L. 

Mackculloch of Cardneis. L. " 

HOGGE. L. 

DUDINGSTOUNE OF SOUTHOUS. L. 

*DUNS OF THAT IlK. 

*RiNUE (it should be Reid) of Coustoune (or Colliston). 
*Sainteclaire of Blansse. 
RippET of that Ilk. L. 
*Wallace of Ellersley. 



76 FORMAN'S ROLL, 

Harkes. L., the chevron and fleurs-de-lis are or. 

♦MiCHELL. 

Kempe of Thomestoune. L., there are only one arm and hand. 
Pringell of Burnehouss. L., the field and escallops are or. 
Rentoune of Billie. L. 

WOODE OF CrAIGE. L. 

Woode OF BoNETOUNE. L., no crosslets. , 
Abercrombie of that Ilk. L. 

WiNTOUNE OF THAT IlK. L. 
♦DURHAME OF MONEFEITH of oldc. 

*Ffalconer of Halcartoune. The coat armour of this ancient family, 
whose ancestor, Willelmus Auceps, grants a piece of land near Hal- 
kerton to the Abbey of Arbroath, shortly before the year 1200, has 
undergone various mutations. The seal of Robert le Faulconer of 
the county of Kincardine, appended to his deed of homage to Edward 
I., has a falcon striking a bird. Sir David Lyndsay gives gules, 
three hawks' lures or ; Sir Robert Forman gules, a chevron argent 
between three pairs of wings conjoined in lure or, which has also the 
authority of Sir James Balfour. Another modification appears in an 
addition made to Workman's MS. in ink, without indication of tinc- 
tures, and probably about 1600 — a chevron between three falcons' 
heads erased. In Balfour's time however, if not earlier, another 
alteration took place (L. II. and Font's MS., a.d. 1624) to — or, a 
falcon's head proper, issuing from a heart gules, between three 
mullets azure. This coat, with appropriate marks of cadency, was 
registered 1672-85 by several cadets of the family. Its head pro- 
■ bably altered the coat when created Lord Falconer of Halkerton in 
1647. David, fifth lord, registered in 1733 — azure, a falcon dis- 
played between three stars argent, and on his breast a man's heart 
gules. The funeral entries supply evidence that this was borne by 
Alexander, second lord, who died in 1684, with the addition that the 
falcon is crowned with an antique crown or. 

In Douglas's Peerage, Jane, sister and heir of David, third Lord 
Falconer, is omitted ; she married in 1706 James Forbes of Thorn- 
ton, and had issue ; secondly, James Ouchterlony, bailie of Mon- 
trose. George, brother of the fifth lord, was a merchant in Cadiz 
and in Edinburgh, married Janet, daughter of John Marjoribanks of 
Leuchie ; their son George inherited Carlowrie on the death of his 
uncle, Major-General Alexander Marjoribanks, 13th December 1773, 
died 19th December 1789, and was succeeded by his nephew, David 
of Carlowrie, who married, 1796, Jane, daughter of Robert Stewart 
of Binny. Captain George Falconar of Carlowrie, their son, married 
Frances Georgina, daughter of George Mercer of Gorthie and Dry- 
den, and was father of the present George Mercer (Falconar) Stewart 
of Binny, co. Linlithgow. 

Several members of the family of Falconer held the office of 
Master or Warden of the Mint, and on that account had bezants or 
plates added to their arms as a difference. 



FORMA N'S ROLL. y^ 

Clapen of that Ilk. As before for Clepen of Carslogen. 

*Spens of Varmestoune. The date 1572 is added below. 

The variations and changes in the Spens' coats require a detailed 
account ; Sir David Lindsay gives for the Lathallan family arms 
entirely different from either of the coats in this roll, viz., gyronny of 
eight argent and azure, an inescutcheon gules surcharged of another 
inescutcheon of the first, on which is a lion's head erased sable. Sir 
James Balfour calls the quartered coat the old one of the Wormiston 
family, and describes the charges in the first and fourth quarters as 
" hung locks." The coat with the lion and bend he calls Spens of 
Wormiston " of laite." 

In Laing's Collection of Seals are two of 1431-1444 — fretty 
on a chief indented (or dancetty) three roses or cinquefoils ; this 
appears to be the oldest bearing of the family, and was carried to 
France by cadets who settled there, being now described as lozengy, 
on a chief three roses. 

John Spens of Condie, advocate to Queen Mary, seals with a 
chevron between three boars' heads erased, a thistle stalked and 
leaved being placed on the chevron. 

When the Lyon Register was formed in 1672, two of the Lath- 
allan family registered the coat with the lion and bend, which makes 
its appearance on a seal of David Spens 1549 ; but Spense of Berri- 
hole, although stated to descend from Lathallan, is allowed a boar's 
head erased between two barrulets. In 1764 Thomas Spens of 
Lathallan recorded the bend without the lion, adding two boars' heads 
erased one in chief and one in base ; four years later he again 
entered arms, the lion and bend, and adding a Campbell quartering. 
Finally, in 1780, he once more registered his coat, dropping the bend 
and surrounding the lion with a bordure gules charged with eight 
roses argent, to indicate descent from the Dunbars of Kilconquhar. 

Guthrie of that Ilk. L. 

*Bettoune of Creigh. • 

Ogill of Popill. L., the field is argent and the birds are martlets. 

Streveling of . As Keir in L., the buckles argent. 

Otterbourne of Reidhall. L. 

Blairgaine. As Blair of Angus in L. ; some of the MSS. say Blair of 
Polcack. 

Gresoune, L. ' , 

Ross of Balnagouen. As L., Ross of Montgrenane, for which it must 
be intended, as Balnagowan bore three lions rampant. 

Leuke of that Ilk. L., Lecre ; it should be Leckie. 

Anande of that Ilk. L. 

*Steuarte of Banespick. 

Bruce of Clacmannan. L., the field is argent. 

*Tenand of that Ilk. 

*Turnebull of that Ilk. 

Kenedey of . L., Bargany. 

u 



78 FORMAN'S ROLL. 

LouES OF Maner. L., argent, three laurel leaves vert. 

Hamilton of Silvertounehill. Gules, three cinquefoils argent, a bor- 
dure gyronny of eight ermine and of the field. 

Hamilton of Sanquhair. L., the cinquefoils and tressure argent. 

GoRDOUNE OF LocHiNUAR. L., the bend and boars' heads argent. 

Murray of Tyneures. L., the field and mullets argent. 

Craufurde of Drongane. L. 

Petegreue. L. 

Banantyne of Corhousse. L. 

Sutherland of Duffus. L., the boar's head argent. 

*Wardlaw of Warrestoune. 

•Gaudine of that Ilk. 

Steuarte of Butte. The simple coat of Stewart. 

Steuarte of Ralestoune. L., the lion appears to be gardant. 

Bettoune of Balfour. L. 

Talzifer of . L. 

*Kincaide of that Ilk. L., arms on the seal of Edward, sheriff-depute of 
Edinburgh 1521, and on that of James,younger of Kincaid 1581 — a fess 
ermine between two mullets in chief, and a castle triple towered in base. 
The seal of Robert, son of Stephen, portioner of Broughton 1582, 
has merely a castle triple towered on a mount, being nearly the arms 
of the burgh of Edinburgh. 

John of that Ilk, in 1808, registered the arms as in L. ; crest — 
a castle triple towered, argent masoned sable, and issuing therefrom 
a dexter arm embowed vested in tartan, grasping a drawn broadsword 
proper ; motto — " This I'll defend ; " supporters — two Highlanders 
in tartan armed with steel cuirasses, each holding a Lochaber axe in 
his dexter hand proper. 

John Lennox Kincaid-Lennox of Woodhead, and Kincaid, heir- 
general of Lennox of Woodhead, founded by Donald, natural son of 
Duncan, last Earl of Lennox, who had a charter of the lands of Balle- 
grochy, which was confirmed by Isabella, Duchess of Albany, Countess 
of Lennox 1444, recorded arms in 1833 — first and fourth, Lennox un- 
differenced ; second and third, Kincaid ; crests — two broadswords in 
saltire behind an imperial crown proper, with the motto — " I'll de- 
fend " for Lennox ; that of Kincaid as before ; (the old crest, as regis- 
tered by John of Woodhead 1672-78, was a swan's neck erased 
proper); the Lennox supporters — two savages wreathed about the head 
and middle with oak leaves, holding clubs erect proper. Mr Kincaid- 
Lennox died in 1859, and his eldest daughter and heir married, first, 
George Viscount Strangford ; secondly, Hon. Charles Spencer Han- 
bury, who has assumed the additional surnames of Kincaid-Lennox. 
In 1776 the Right Honourable Alexander Kincaid, provost of 
the city of Edinburgh, His Majesty's printer and stationer for Scot- 
land, who had married Wilhelmina Carolina, daughter of Lord 
Charles Kerr of Cramond, director of Chancery, son of the first 
Marquess of Lothian, recorded a coat composed with that of Kerr, 



FORMAN'S ROLL. 79 

although he was representative of a branch of Kincaid of that Ilk, 
seated at Bantaskine, co. Stirling, as early as 1450 — gules, on a 
chevron argent three stars of the field, in chief two spur rowels or, 
in base a castle of the second masoned sable ; crest — a dexter arm 
from the elbow holding a drawn broadsword proper ; motto — " I 
will defend." Mr Kincaid having died, 21st January 1777, while 
chief magistrate, was interred with great pomp. His funeral was 
attended by the Duke of Buccleuch, the Marquess of Lothian, the 
Earl of Home, and many other persons of rank ; in the procession 
were the macer of the Lyon Court in deep mourning and bareheaded, 
four heralds, four pursuivants, and a man carrying his lordship's rod 
of office, which the senior herald broke, and dropped the pieces upon 
the coffin, saying, " Thus it hath pleased Almighty God to remove 
from this life to a better our worthy chief magistrate, the Right Hon- 
ourable Alexander Kincaid, lord provost of this city, representative 
of the family of Bantaskine." His eldest son, Alexander, succeeded 
him as printer and stationer to the king. 

The surname is taken from lands in Stirlingshire still held by 
the heiress of the family. The laird attended parliament as deputy- 
constable 1534 ; James of that Ilk was knighted c. 1608. It has been 
alleged that the Kincaids were, in the reign of Edward I., and for 
several generations, constables of the Castle of Edinburgh, but this 
is not the case. In the list of governors and constables given in the 
" Extracts from the Records of the Burgh," are William de King- 
horn 1284-92, Sir John de Kingston 1301-5-34, and Thomas King- 
ston 1337 ; these names may have been taken for Kincaid. 

David Kincaid of Coittis, however, was constable in 1542. 
David Kincaid was bailie of Edinburgh 1467, and David again a 
bailie 1493. Branches possessed Warriston, Craighouse, Over Gogar, 
&c., near Edinburgh. John of Warriston was murdered in July 
1600 by a groom, at the instigation of his wife, Jean Livingstone, of 
the Dunipace family, for which she was beheaded and he was broken 
on the wheel. 

The Kincaids of Auchenreoch became united by marriage with 
the family of Buchanan of Carbeth ; Thomas, a cadet of Auchen- 
reoch, was an eminent surgeon in Edinburgh, and died in 1691, leav- 
ing issue ; he had registered arms with three mullets in chief and a 
lozenge gules on the fess ; the crest — a hand holding a bistoury, and 
motto — " Incidendo sano," are professional. In 157 1 there was a feud 
between the lairds of Kincaid and Woodhead, the families now united 
by marriage. On 17th September the Kincaids attacked John 
Lennox, " he being solitar at his prayers beside his dwelling-place 
of Wodheid," and took him off a prisoner to Kincaid, after wound- 
ing and hurting him in several places. 

The Kincaids had also a quarrel with the Stirlings of Craigbar- 
net, and in a fight in Glasgow, in 1563, Malcolm Kincaid had his left 
arm cut off, and afterwards was killed, having in the interim taken 
part in the assault on John Lennox. 



8o FORMAN'S ROLL, 

Murray of Balvairde. Sable, three mullets argent ; the coat generally 

given for Murray of Cowbin. 
Broune of Colstoune. L., viz., sable, three boars' heads couped 
argent, a coat which does not appear to have been long borne by the 
family, but is to be found on the seal, 1590, of William Broun, heir 
of Sir David Broun, vicar of Edzell. The seals of John Broun in 
1528, and Sir David Broun (? the vicar of Edzell) 1547, both con- 
nected with Forfarshire, have a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis. 

David Broun of Colstoun, a.d. 1374, seals with a lion rampant, 
which was also used by Patrick of Colstoun 1574-97. 

As the chevron and fleurs-de-lis were carried by George, Bishop 
of Dunkeld, a native of Dundee, but descended from the Browns of 
Midmar, who died in 15 14, it would almost seem as if the Colstoun 
Brouns, after dropping their lion rampant, and for a time bearing 
three boars' heads, adopted the coat of their namesakes in the north, 
with a change of tincture. 

The coat in the Lyon Register, c. 1672, for Patrick of Colstoun, 
is — ^gules, a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis or ; the dropping of the 
chevron is a modern fancy, which has never been sanctioned by the 
Lyon Court. The writer is indebted to the late Mr Alexander Sin- 
clair for proof of a fact which seems never to have appeared in print, 
that the later Brouns of Colstoun were paternally Hamiltons. 

Two deeds mention Elizabeth, daughter and heir of William 
Broun of Colstoun, and spouse of James Hamilton ; and in 1548, her 
son and successor, John Broun of Colstoun. 

John, son of David Broun, had a charter of Colstoun from 
David IL 

George of Colstoun sat in parliament 1560; Sir William Broun, 
Bart., is the present representative in the male line ; and Lady Susan 
Broun-Bourke of Colstoun, is heir of line. 
Streuelinge of C adder. L., the bend is azure and the buckles argent. 

There has been all along an uncertainty as to the tinctures of the 
arms of the Stirlings, and the entry made about 1672, in the name of 
Sir John Stirling of Keir, seems to show that the puzzle was 
insoluble, even by that accomplished herald Sir Charles Erskine. 
It is — argent, on a bend azure (or rather sable), three buckles or; and 
there is added : " It is to be observed that in the old books this 
bend is found, for the most part, ingrailed and not plane, and when 
plane it is mostly sable, for if it be born plane and azur it is the same 
with the armes of Lesly." The Lyon Office possesses a MS. by one 
of the heralds present at Holyrood House, when Sir George Stirling 
of Keir was knighted, 2nd June 1662. He gives an account of the 
ceremony, aad states that the arms were extracted by Thomas Drys- 
dale, Islay Herald, and were — argent, on a bend engrailed sable 
three buckles or. The arms of eight Stirlings are registered with the 
bend engrailed azure. Drumpellier has the bend sable with buckles 
argent, and in no instance is the bend vert recorded. 



FORMAN'S ROLL. 8i 

" The Stirlings of Keir and their Family Papers," by William 
Fraser, printed for private circulation, gives the history of that 
family. "Comments" on it by John Riddell, advocate, i860, also 
printed for private circulation, go into the representation of the Stir- 
lings of Cadder by Mr Stirling of Drumpellier. Cadder was held 
by the family, c. 1220 ; Sir Alexander, and several others of the name, 
did homage to Edward I. 1292-96. It seems proved that Dominus 
Johannes de Strivelyn, sheriff of Stirling, was the fourth of the race 
who had held that office from the time of Toraldus Vicecomes, wit- 
ness, ante 1 147, to a charter of David I. Andrew of Cadder died in 
1522, leaving an only child, Janet, who married Sir James Stirling 
of Keir, who divorced her 1541, but kept possession of the estates. 
Janet married, secondly, Thomas Bishop of Ochiltree, co. Linlithgow, 
who had a grant of the Manor of Pocklington, co. York, from Henry 
VIII. The writer was the first to point out, in an article in the 
eighth volume of the " Herald and Genealogist," that there were de- 
scendants of the second marriage who, if not extinct, are heirs general 
of Stirling of Cadder. 

In 1818 Andrew Stirling of Drumpellier was recognised by the 
Lyon Court as heir male, and allowed supporters — two bulls proper 
collared and chained or. 

John de Strivelin acquired Rathoran by marriage with Mary, 
aunt of John, Lord of Lome, ante 1338; their grandson, Luke Stir- 
ling, acquired Keir 1448, which was erected into a barony 1473, and 
in 1 49 1 the laird of Keir sat in parliament. 

Cadder was an instance of what is very rare in Scotland — a barony 
held of a subject, viz., of the Bishops of Glasgow. 

The seals of William and John de Stirling, 1292, are three 
buckles on a chief; at the same time Sir John has six stars — three, 
two, and one ; his, the Glenesk family, ended in coheirs, who married 

Lindsay and Robert de Atholia. 

In 1492 William of Cadder uses three buckles on a bend, with 
a swan's head, neck, and wings issuing from a coronet as crest. 

The seals of the early Stirlings of Keir, from 1448 to 1579, are 
all three buckles on a plain bend, but in 1580, and subsequently, the 
bend is engrailed. 

The seal of Sir William, late in the thirteenth century, has two 
lions as supporters. 

Sir John de Stryvelin, who had summons to the parliament of 
England as a Baron in 1342 and d.s.p. 1378, bore — argent, on a chief 
gules three buckles or. Keir is stated, by Nisbet, to have carried as 
supporters two greyhounds, and on a family seal, c. 1700, are two 
savages wreathed about the middle, holding clubs over their 
shoulders ; no registration of arms with supporters exists. 

Stirling of Ardoch, co. Perth, on a seal, a.d. 1666, has two 
savages with clubs. 

Sir George of Glorat, Bart., registered arms, 1672-78, without 



82 FORMAN'S ROLL, 

supporters ; but in Stacie's MS. there is a blazon of his arms with 
the date 167 1 : " He hath assumed since to support his armes two 
heros in armour, bot face and from the knees all naked downward." 
TouRis OF PiLRiGE. Argent, on a bend azure three crescents or. 

•CORRE OF KeLWODE. 

Maitlande of Leithingtoune. L. 

Edmingstoune of that Ilk. L. 

Hay of Naughtoune. L. 

Fentoune of that Ilk. L., the bend is invecked or. 

*Balfoure of Denmylle. 

durhame of grange. l. 

*Durhame of Pitcarrow. 

*Philpe of Ormestoun. This surname makes its appearance in Fife 
about the middle of the fifteenth century. Stevin, burgess of Edin- 
burgh 1467, was bailie of Newburgh 1473, and Sir James was curate 
at Abdie 1481. 

John (Philp) was abbot of Lindores 1522-66, sat in parliament, 
and was a lord of Session ; in 1564 he granted a charter to his 
cousin James Philp of Ormiston and Margaret Forrett his spouse. 

Henry sold Ormiston c. 1630, and left a son, James, who was 
dead in 1655, when his heirs were his sisters — Euphemia, wife of 
John Crytorin in Newburgh ; Agnes, wife of Robert Fleming of 
Woodsyde ; Margaret, wife of James Colquhoun, merchant burgess 
of Edinburgh ; and Mungo Law, son of his sister Janet. 

Ormiston was recovered by another branch of the family. John 
Philp, clerk of Newburgh, was grandfather of Mr John of Ormiston, 
who registered arms, c. 1685 — azure, on a chevron between three 
talbots' heads erased argent two lozenges of the field. 

John of Ormiston d.s.p. before 1704, and his property passed to 
his cousin John Gumming, and then to William Watson of Ormis- 
ton, and Margaret Forbes, wife of Gharles Ramsay. 

To the Ormiston family belonged William, who went to Sweden 
1624, and having had a certificate of gentle birth and descent from 
the families of Forrett of Fingask, Wood of Largo, &c., was ennobled 
1638, and attained the rank of lieutenant-colonel. 

Elizabeth Fleming, wife of Archbishop Burnett, was mater- 
nally descended from the Philps ; the arms ascribed to her in a 
Funeral Escutcheon seem at first to have been a chevron between 
three mascles, and to have been altered to a chevron between three 
talbots' heads couped and charged with as many lozenges. Philp 
was one of the quarters of the first Gountess of Leven, nde Renton, 
for her father's mother. 

David Philp sat in parliament for Gupar 1584; David, M.D., 
acquired the barony of Kippo, in which he was succeeded by his 
brother John, burgess of Gupar, who died in 1658. 

Robert of Kippo was father of David, who had a Grown charter 
of Over Garnbee 1669, and registered arms, 1672-78 — azure, a chevron 



FORMAN'S ROLL, 83 

invecked between three talbots' heads erased or. He married Jean 
Scott, and left a son, William of Over Carnbee, who was succeeded 
by his sister Margaret, wife of John Corstorphine of Nydie. 

There were Philps of Colden for several generations, of Baltilly, 
of Castlebeg, of Byrehills, &c. John of Greenlaw in Mid-Lothian, 
auditor of Exchequer, married Sophia Robertson, of the family, of 
Ladykirk, and died in 1730 ; his son, James of Greenlaw, judge of 
the Court of Admiralty, d.s.p. 1782, leaving three sisters coheirs — 
Barbara; Elizabeth, married John Sivright of Southhouse; and Isobel, 
married John Wood, of the family of Warriston, and was mother of 
John Philp Wood, editor of " Douglas's Peerage," and author of the 
" History of Cramond." 

Pont gives for the surname of Philp — ^gules, on a chevron argent 
between two mullets or a boar's head and a mullet of the field. 

James PKilp of Almericloss, co. Forfar, bailie of Arbroath, 
was father of James, who registered arms, 1672-78 — azure, a chevron 
between three talbots' heads couped argent ; motto — '' Non dormit qui 
custodit." 

His grandson, John, was governor of the Dutch island of St 
Martin in the West Indies, and is in the Lyon Register styled chief 
of the name ; his only child, Susanna, married, in 1741, James 
Wilson, merchant in Glasgow, and they sold Almericloss. In 1771, 
James Wilson of Glanderstoun registered arms, quartering Philp, 
and with the motto of that family. 
*Fraser of Brakie and Kinnell. 
*Balfour of Kirktoune. 
*Balfoure of Ballone. 



I V. 



SUNDERLAND HALL MANUSCRIPT. 



Lord of Lorne. 
Macleod, Lord of Lewes. 
Lord of the Isles. 



V. 



ADDITIONS TO THE 



BOOKE AND REGISTER OF ARMES, 



COMPILED BY 



SIR DAVID LINDSAY, 

LYON KING OF ARMS. 



The Royal Arms of Scotland have not been copied. 
Lord Claud Hamilton of Paisley. Why do the ducal families of 
Hamilton and Abercorn bear in an escutcheon en surtout azure, 
three fleurs-de-lis or, being the Royal arms of France? For the 
Duchy of Chatelleraut, it is said. 

That duchy was conferred in, February 1548, on James, Earl of 
Arran, Regent of Scotland, and confiscated in 1559. 

The writer in an article in the " Herald and Genealogist," Vol. 
IV., p. 97, discussed the claim of the Hamiltons to the title of duke 
in France, and argued that the concession by the Emperor Napoleon 
in. to the present Duke of Hamilton was virtually a new creation. 

In that paper the armorial point was not raised. 

The collection called W., and other authorities, give the arms of the 
Regent and his immediate successors in semi-regal style next to those 
oi the Royal house, and with a series of shields showing by impale- 
ment the family alliances. In none of these is this escutcheon of 
France shown ; it is not given in either of the entries in the Lyon 
Register, by Nisbet, by Sir Robert Douglas, or by Wood. The first 
appearance of it seems to be on the monument erected in Paisley 
Abbey, to James, Earl of Abercorn, styled Due de Chatellerault , who 
died in 1789. 

Chatelleraut gave a surname to a family who bore argent, a lion 
rampant gules within a bordure sable charged with nine bezants. 
After being the property of the Armagnac it, then a viscounty, was 
erected into a duchy in 15 14 for Fran(;:ois de Bourbon-Montpensier, 
who bore France with a baton gules charged with a crescent argent. 
On the death of the Constable de Bourbon, Chatelleraut was given by 
Francis I. to his own younger son Charles, who died unmarried in 
1545 ; this prince bore France with a label argent. 

It would seem as if in later days the Hamilton claimants to the 
title of Chatelleraut had assumed the arms of France because that 
duchy had been for a time held by cadets of the Royal house. 

The label borne by Lord Claud was dropped after the extinction 
in the male line of the Dukes of Hamilton ; Arran is quartered. 
Keith, Lord Dingwall. Robert, brother of William Earl Marischal, 
was Abbot of Deer 1546, and died in 1551, leaving a natural son. Sir 
Andrew of Forsa, who was created Lord Dingwall, 1583, married 
Elizabeth Grip heiress of Finstadt in Sweden, where he resided for 
many years, and d.s.p. in 1597. 

Sir William Keith of Delney, his heir by nomination, had a 
ratification of the barony of Delney 1593, sat in parliament for the 
Marischal, and was a member of the Privy Council. His seal, 1594, 



90 ADDITIONS TO 

is rather remarkable : first and fourth, Keith within a bordure 
engrailed ; second, Randolph, Earl of Moray ; third, a bend between 
three cross crosslets fitchde and as many mullets ; crest — a lion's (?) 
head erased ; supporters — a unicorn and an eagle. 
Lindsay, Sir Jerome of Annatland, Lyon King of Arms. 

Mr Seton's "Law and Practice of Heraldry in Scotland" contains 
notices of the Lyon Kings of Arms, and the "Lives of the Lindsays" 
gives particulars as to the members of that family who have filled 
the ofiice. 
Stewart, Sir William, Lyon King of Arms. 
Lindsay, Sir David of the Mount, Lyon King of Arms. 
FoRMAN, Sir Robert, Lyon King of Arms, compiler of the " Roll of 
Arms," from which facsimiles are given. 

There are several seals of Andrew, Archbishop of St Andrews : 
1501, a camel's head ; 1502-14, quarterly, first and fourth, a chevron 
between three fishes ; second and third, a camel's head erased, 
collared, and campaned ; 1518, the chevron and fish impaling the 
coat with a camel's head. 

It has been said that the fish are for Fisher, but of this there is 
no proof, and it remains uncertain which is the paternal coat ; W. 
places the camel's head in the first and fourth quarters. 

This family is remarkable for its close connection with the 
church ; the earliest notice of the name I find is in 1398, when Patrick, 
Abbot of Kelso, with the unanimous consent of the chapter, grants a 
corrodium to William Forman for his services, &c., that is to say, 
he was to have a room and provisions for life, the same as were 
usually given to a monk ; 14 10, Thomas occurs as a witness with the 
designation esquire; 1428, Adam on an assize at Melrose; 1456, 
William, Canon of Dunkeld ; 1474, Elizabeth, Prioress of North 
Berwick; 1483, James Forman, called Dalrymple ; 1543, William, 
Canon of Holyrood, was accused of heresy ; Adam was the last Prior 
of the Carthusians of Perth. In 1484, after litigation with the Prior 
of St Andrews, Thomas established his right to lodging and main- 
tenance in the abbey for himself, a servant, and two horses, " in all 
nedefull thinges according for a gentle man." 

1466, Nichol Forman was proprietor of Hutton, co. Berwick ; to 
the same family belonged Sir John Forman of Dalvene, who acquired 
Rutherford by marriage with Helen, elder sister and coheir of Richard 
Rutherford of that Ilk, who died in 1502. Sir John was dead without 
issue in 1516 ; his brother Andrew, Archbishop of St Andrews, being 
his heir. This prelate was Prothonotary 1494, Prior of Pittenweem 
1498, Bishop of Moray 1501, Archbishop of St Andrews 1514, Papal 
Legate, Envoy to England, &c. He was also Archbishop of Bourges, 
and Commendator of Dunfermline and Dryburgh, and of Cottingham 
in England — not Coldingham, as often stated — and died in 1522. 

It is probable that Mr Robert Forman, Dean of Glasgow 1507, 
Vicar-general 1508, who succeeded the Archbishop as Prior of Pitten- 



SIR DA VI D LINDSA Y'S M.S. 91 

weem, was his relative; he sat in the General Council at Perth 1513, 
and in Parliament 1526. The Dean about 1535 held half the lands 
of Channelkirk, the holder of the other half being Mr Robert, after- 
wards Sir Robert Forman, Lyon King of Arms, which seems an in- 
dication of relationship. Sir Robert, usually designed of Luthrie in 
Fife, had been Ross Herald 1540, and had a son, John, Rothesay 
Herald 1569, who was alive in 1594. In 1589 Elizabeth had a tack 
of half the teind sheaves of Channelkirk. Early in the sixteenth 
century ladies of the name married Moncriefif of that Ilk, Sinclair of 
Longformacus, and Gourlay of Kincraig ; and at Craii and Pittenweem 
several members of the family occur later, holding official positions. 

RuTHVEN, Earl of Cowrie. 

Stewart, Earl of Orkney. 

Stewart, Earl of Arran. It can only be by mistake that in the fourth 
quarter of the second and third grand quarters the field of the Hamil- 
ton coat is or, not gules. 

Maxwell, Earl of Morton. 

Sir David Lindsay of Rathillet, Lyon King of Arms. 

Stewart, Duke of Lennox. 



VI. 

ILLUMINATED HERALDIC MANUSCRIPT, 

CALLED .WORKMAN'S. 

C, A.D. 1565-6. 



2 A 



A QUARTO volume in the Lyon Office, which has its date pretty nearly 
fixed by the fact that the series of figures of the sovereigns with their 
arms ends with Mary, Queen of Scotland, and her second husband, Henry, 
Duke of Albany. 

The Earl of Bothwell's coat comes in its place, but on the opposite 
leaf is a sketch in ink of his altered bearings as Duke of Orkney. 

The compiler's name is unknown, but a memorandum at the begin- 
ning states that it belonged to James Workman 1623, Joseph Stacie 
1654, and afterwards to Henry Frazer, Ross Herald and painter. 

The original series of arms is painted, but Workman has made 
various annotations, additions of shields in ink, sometimes with the 
tinctures marked, but sometimes mere sketches ; and he, or the subsequent 
proprietors, have also added some shields in colour, which, from their 
execution and position on the back of the leaves, are easily to be dis- 
tinguished from the first collection. 

The arms given are those of Gesper, King of Tharse. Melschar, 
King of Arabe. Balthasar, King of Saba. Julius Cesar, first Empriour. 
Alexander ye Conquerour. Ectour, Prence of Troy. Dauid, King of 
Israeli. Josoue, Duke of Israeli. Judes Machabeus. Charlis ye Mang. 
Athur of Britane. Duke of Savoy. Solara of Piedmont. Duke of 
Rohan (an addition in ink without the name). Duke of Longavell. 
Duke of Saxoun. Duke of Mylane. Duke of Rohan (in ink without the 
name, but in the original series). Godefera, Duke of Bullounze. The 
Empreour of Rome. Ye Armis of France. King of Ingland. King of 
Scotland. King of Garnate. King of Gallitie. King of Nauerne. King 
of Arrogoun. King of Castalze. King of Sicilia (Spain, i.e., Castille and 
Leon quarterly, quartering in the second and third Sicily impaled with 
Arragon ; an addition in ink, no name). King of Alomaine. King of 
Sypre. King of Behame. King of Tole (Toledo). King of Freisland. 
King of Armony (Norway). King of Sueithland. The King of Ongarie. 
King of Grifhound. King of Poulane. Ye Duke of Claue. King of 
Jerusalem. King of Naplis. King of Pole. The King of Cicilla. 
King of Portingall. King of Ireland. Empriour of Rutland. The 
Prince of Orange. The preceding are all shields crowned, but without 
crest or motto. The arms of the Duke of Savoy seem of a later date ; 
the shield is surmounted of three helmets with crests, and surrounded by 
the collar of the order of the Annunciation. 

Arms of Solara, by the same hand as the preceding — bendy of six, 
checquy or and gules and azure ; crest — issuing from a coronet a demi- 
dog collared, and holding in his dexter fore-paw an arrow ; motto^ — " Nil 
obid." The shield encircled with the collar of an order of knighthood. 

A shield in ink, no name, initial I. V., K. B. — a saltire between three 



96 WORKMAN'S MS. 

mullets in chief and flank, and a boar's head couped in base (? Williamson) 
impaling a fess cheque and in base a hunting-horn (? Boyd). 

Home, added in ink, initial G. H., and date 1566, but no name — 
first, argent, three inescutcheons vert ; second and third, argent, three 
papingoes vert ; fourth, vert, a lion rampant argent. 

Arms of Scotland with crests and supporters. 

A series of figures of Kings of Scotland with surcoats, and of their 
consorts wearing skirts, on which their arms are represented. 

John Baliol, with crown, sceptre, and sword, all broken, torn sur- 
coat, and his paternal coat on a split shield. Malcolm Canmore and 
Margaret, Robert the Bruce and Isobel of Mar, Robert the Bruce and " the 
Duke of Hullesteris dochter," the arms being those of Holstein (?) 
David II. and Joan of England, David's son, who died young " callitt 
ye lord of ye illis," shield blank. Robert II. and Euphemia Ross, 
Robert II. and Elizabeth Mure, Robert III. and Annabella Drummond, 
James I. and Jane Beaufort, James II. and Mary of Gueldres, James III. 
and Margaret of Denmark, James IV. and Margaret of England, James 
V. and Magdalene of France, James V. and Mary of Lorraine-Guise, 
Prince of Scotland, with a shield of Scotland. Earl of Ross ; his shield 
has— first and fourth, Scotland ; second, Ross ; third, Brechin. Mary, 
Queen of Scotland, and the Dauphin. Queen Mary and Henry Duke of 
Albany ; his arms are first and fourth. Stewart, Earl of Lennox, as L., 
except that the bordure in the second and third quarters is sable, and 
there is over all in chief a label of three points argent ; second, Ross ; 
third, the arms of the lordship of Man. The Kings hold a sword in 
the right hand and a sceptre in the left, and the Queens a thistle in the 
right and a sceptre in the left hand. The Princes have a thistle in the 
right hand. The Dauphin has the sword, sceptre, and surcoat, but the 
Duke of Albany has no sceptre, and rests his left hand on the shield of his 
arms. 

Next come a series of thirteen shields with coronets, viz. : David, 
Duke of Rothesay — Scotland with a label of three points. Duke of 
Albany, L. Stewart, Duke of Ross, L. Lindsay, Duke of Montrose, 
L., the ribband omitted. Robert, Duke of Albany, Regent, L. Earls of 
Mar, Carrick, Stratherne, Fife, March, Murray, Douglas, and Angus, all 
as L. 

Earl of Arran, Hamilton. The present crest ; supporters — two 
antelopes, each supporting a banner gules, a cinquefoil argent ; no coro- 
net. A series of the alliances of the family in six shields — Hamilton 
impaling Randolph, Earl of Murray ; Leslie, Earl of Ross ; Gordon of 
Strathbogie ; Earl Marischal ; Earl of Morton ; Lord Livingstone. Three 
shields — Hamilton and Arran quarterly, with a coronet, impaling Scotland; 
Bethune of Creich ; Earl of Morton. 

Hamilton, Earl of Arran. 

Sir James Hamilltoune of Eweindaill. In ink, three cinquefoils 
within the Royal trcssure. 

Prince of Ilis. Scotland quartering the arms of the Isles. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 97 

Duke of Chatelherault. Hamilton and Arran quarterly; present 
crest; motto — "Throvch;" supporters — two antelopes gorged with antique 
crowns ; the shield encircled by the collar of the order of St Michael. 

Earle of Angus. Unfinished — first, a lion rampant crowned with 
an antique crown ; second, a lion rampant gules debruised of a ribbon ; 
third, a chief dancetty ; fourth, a fess checquy surmounted of a bend 
couped charged with three buckles ; in base a cross embattled sable ; 
over all in an escutcheon of pretence the paternal coat of Douglas, the 
heart being crowned ; crest — a salamander in flames ; motto — " yamais 
arriere ; " supporters — a savage wreathed about the middle, and a stag 
standing on a compartment of wreathed pales. 

Erl of Huntlie. L., only three fraises in the fourth quarter; crest 
— a stag's head in profile; motto — " Bidand;" supporters — two greyhounds 
collared gules, the collars charged with three buckles (?). 

Erl of Argyle. L., no fire at the masthead of the lymphad ; in 
the Campbell coat the alternate gyrons are argent, but the word " or" is 
added ; crest — a boar's head issuing from the coronet ; motto — " I byd my 
tyme ; " supporters — two lions gardant gules. 

Erl of Mortoun. First and fourth as L. ; second and third, 
argent, on a chief dancetty gules two mullets of the field ; crest — a boar 
passant in front of a tree ; motto — " Lok sikcar ;" supporters — two naked 
savages. 

The Erl of Murro. L., the bendlet is engrailed ; crest — a pelican 
in her piety gules ; motto — " Salvs per Christ ; " supporters — two grey- 
hounds collared gules. 

Erl of Atholl. L., the quarters being reversed in order ; crest — 
a hand holding a key ; motto—" Furth fortoun and fil thy fetteris ; " sup- 
porters — two naked savages chained together with fetterlocks at their 
ankles, he on the sinister side holding in his left hand the chain which is 
attached to his ankle. 

Erl of Boithvell. L., crest — a horse proper saddled and bridled 
gules in front of a tree ; motto — " Keip traist ; " supporters — two lions 
gules : in the upper corner of the leaf is an anchor, the emblem of the 
office of Admiral of Scotland. On the opposite there are added in ink the 
arms of Hepburn, Duke of Orkney— first, Hepburn; second, Orkney; 
third, Liddesdale ; fourth. Vans. 

Erl of Lennvs. First and fourth, France within a bordure engrailed 
sable ; second and third, Stewart within a bordure gules charged with 
eight buckles or ; an escutcheon of pretence, argent, a saltire engrailed 
between four roses gules. This is perhaps the earliest example of the 
mistake so often repeated subsequently of engrailing the Lennox saltire. 
Crest — a bull's head sable horned vert, breathing fire; motto — :"Avand 
Darle ; " supporters^two wolves. An unfinished sketch of later date — 
the shield blank; crest — a two-headed dragon spouting fire .passing 
between the branches of a tree ; . motto — " Dat incremetvm Deus 
Abrahie ; " supporters — two antelopes collared. 

Erl of Ros. First and fourth as Stewart, Earl of Lennox, L., with 

2 B 



98 WORKMAN'S MS, 

a label of three points in chief argent ; second and third, the coat of the 
Earldom of Ross; crest — a wolfs head ; motto — " Spem svccessvs alit; " 
supporters — a unicorn and a wolf. 

Earl of Orkney. A later addition — first and fourth, Scotland 
debruised of a ribbon sable ; second and third, Orkney of old as L. ; 
crest — a king seated on a throne crowned with an antique crown, holding 
a sword in his dexter hand, and having a falcon on his left wrist ; motto — 
" Sic fvit est et erit ; " supporters — a unicorn collared and a griffin. 

Duke of Abynne, as Earl of Ross, but with the arms of the Lord- 
ship of Man in the third quarter ; crest — a demi-eagle proper beaked and 
membered gules ; motto — " Spem svccessvs alit ; " supporters — a lion and 
a bear ; the shield encircled with the collar of and badge of an order, ? St 
Michael. 

Earle of Arrane. An addition — as L., plate 31, the sinister sup- 
porter not gorged. 

Erl of Merchell. Argent, on a chief gules three pallets or; 
crest — a stag's head ; motto — " Veritas vincit ; " supporters — two stags. 

Two Keith shields are imperfectly sketched on the same leaf; the 
one has the chief charged with three pallets, a fess rompu, and in base a 
man's heart ; the other, first and fourth, Keith with a man's heart omitted 
in the fourth quarter; second and third, a fess. 

Earle of Gowre. An addition — as L., plate 29, the crown is in 
front of the man's raised hand ; supporters not gorged with coronets ; the 
ram has a plain collar or. 

Erl of Rothes. L., crest — a griffin's head ; motto — " Graip fast; " 
supporters — two griffins. 

Erle of Mortoun. An addition — as L., plate 29, supporters not 
gorged and chained. 

Erl of Mar, Lord Erskin. L., crest — a hand holding a cutlass ; 
motto — " le pause plvs; " supporters — two griffins. 

Erl of Eglintovn. L., the arms within the Royal tressure or; 
crest — a lady resting her dexter hand upon an anchor ; supporters — two 
wyverns. 

Erl of Mvlntrois. L., crest — a stork's head ; motto — " Non 
oblie ; " supporters — a falcon belled and a stork. 

Erl of Cravfvrd. L., crest — a demi-swan; motto — " Indvre 
fvrth ; " supporters — two lions sejant gardant gules. 

Macdonald. a sketch added in ink without the name — quarterly, 
first, a lion rampant ; second, a dexter hand couped fessways holding a 
cross fitchde ; third, a lymphad without sails, fire at the mast-head, two 
paddles with the broad end elevated ; fourth, a fish floating on the surface 
of water in front of a rock ; crest— a lion's head. 

Erl of Glenkirn. L., crest — a unicorn's head ; motto — " Yovr 
Yovr ; " supporters — two rabbits. 

Earl of Bvchquhan. L., crest — a hand holding a spiked baton; 
motto — " Ivge nocht ; " supporters — two storks. 

Earl of Caithness. Name obliterated — first, azure, a lymphad, sails 
furled, within a double tressure or; second and third, or, a lion rampant 



WORKMAN'S MS. 99 

gules; fourth, azure, a three-masted ship or, the mainsail argent; over all, 
dividing the quarters, a cross engrailed sable; crest — a demi-cock rising 
gules ; motto — " Comit thy verk to God ; " supporters — two griffins. 

Lord Leveston. An addition in ink — first and fourth, Livingstone ; 
second and third, Callendar ; in an escutcheon of pretence over all a tree 
growing out of a mount in base within a bordure charged with eight 
cinquefoils ; motto — " Si je puis." 

Erl of Svitherland. L., crest — a stag's head proper ; motto — " Bvt 
siccar ; " supporters — a greyhound collared gules and a horse. 

Earle of Hume. An addition in ink — first and fourth, a lion 
rampant ; second, three papingoes ; third, three inescutcheons ; an escutch- 
eon of pretence over all charged with a saltire (?). Crest — a lion's head 
between two olive (?) branches issuing from an antique crown ; motto — 
" Rex ditat, Dens beat ■" supporters — two lions. 

Erl of Mvnteith. First and fourth, Graham ; second and third, 
Stewart with a chevronel gules, representing the rafters of a roof; crest — 
a falcon's head; motto — " Richt and ressovn;" supporters— two lions 
gardant. 

Sir Thomas Erskine. Sketch added in ink of arms of S. T. A. — 
first and fourth, on a chief a crown ; second and third, a pale charged with 
a crescent, all within a bordure charged with the Royal tressure. 

Wilson of Absonner, 1627. Sketch added in ink — argent, on a 
pale between two mullets in chief gules, a sword erect, and in base a 
crescent. 

Lord Fleming. First and fourth, or, a chevron between three 
(?) heads erased gules within the Royal tressure ; second and third, azure, 
six fraises three and three argent; crest— a goat's head; motto — " Lat 
the deid schaw ; " supporters — two stags. 

Lord Zester. First and fourth, sable, three fraises argent ; second 
and third, gules, three bars ermine; over all in an escutcheon of pretence, 
argent, three inescutcheons gules ; crest — a goat's head ; motto — " Spair 
qvhan zov hes novgt ;" supporters — two savages or two stags; there has 
been an alteration, and it is uncertain which is intended to be the final 
arrangement ; on the dexter side the savage is most distinct, and on the 
sinister the stag. 

Four added sketches in ink of Ker of Cessford, Ker of Fernihirst, 
Hay of Yester, and Livingstone of Callendar. 

Lord Levinstovn. As L., Lord of Callendar; crest — a de'mi- 
savage wreathed with leaves and with branches behind his shoulders, hold- 
ing in his dexter hand a club in bend sinister. The spelling of the motto 
has evidently been a difficulty to the compiler, and he has tried three 
ways: "Cevs ave plvis;" "Cevs ave plase;" "Seys a pais." Supporters — 
two naked savages holding clubs over their shoulders, and on each side 
of the shield two serpents entwined and erect. 

Lord Hvme. L., crest— a lion's head erased with branches behind 
and on either side; mottoes — ''A la fine attendes ;". "Avyeslafiuef' 
supporters — two lions. 



loo WORKMAN'S MS, 

Lord Setoun. L., crest — a serpent spouting out fire from his 
mouth and tail with branches behind him ; motto — " Hazard zit fordvart," 
the first word added in a later hand ; supporters — two mertrixes collared 
gules, the collars charged with four plates ; to each collar is attached a 
strap or ribbon ending in a ring, which rests on the ground in front of 
the hind feet. 

Lord Lindsay (of the Byres). L., crest — a swan rising from the 
head of a griffin ; mottoes — " le ante " and " I leif bvt drid ; " supporters 
—two griffins. 

Lord Innemrath. L., the garb in the first and fourth quarters is 
blotted out, and the lymphad in the second and third has fire at the mast- 
head only; crest — a unicorn's head; motto — " Qvhadder vil ze;" sup- 
porters — two does. 

Lord Drvmond. Or, three bars wavy gules; crest — a dog's head, 
to which is added in ink a crown, resembling an antique crown, from 
which the head issues ; a note above says, " Creast is a dog passant 
now;" motto — "Gang warly;" supporters — two naked savages on a 
grassy compartment semde of caltraps. 

Lord Borthvik. L., crest — a moor's head proper banded argent and 
sable, the band having long floating ends ; supporters — two angels. The 
dexter supporter seems to be intended for a female, and has a short tunic 
of a grey colour, tight at the waist, bare arms and legs, red petticoat 
reaching to the knee ; the sinister supporter is male, tunic loose, and it and 
the skirt both red, arms vested sable, legs bare. Motto — " Qvy condy." 

Six unfinished ink sketches of the arms of Egypt, Turkey, Prester 
John, Persia, Morocco, Tartary, a later addition. 

Lord Boyd. L., crest — a dexter hand with thumb and two fingers 
pointing upwards, the others folded down ; a note added, " Two fingers is 
cut off." Behind the crest are several branches placed so as to resemble 
a fan. Motto — " Confedo', " supporters — two squirrels. 

Lord Methven. L., the Stewart quarter has a label of three points 
gules in chief ; the lion in the escutcheon of pretence is argent ; crest — a. 
square tower placed with one of the angles in the centre, conical roof, with 
a flagstaff and flag flying on the summit ; motto — " Pas fordvard ; " 
supporters — a wyvern and a greyhound collared gules. 

Lord Sinclar. Quarterly — each quarter azure, a lymphad or with 
two masts and white sails ; in an escutcheon over all, argent, a cross 
engrailed sable ; crest — a demi-cock displayed ; motto — " Faight ; " 
supporters — two griffins. 

Lord Gray. L., crest — an anchor; motto — "Fast;" supporters 
— two lions gardant proper. 

The seal of Andrew Gray of Broxmouth, 1424, gives a lion rampant 
crowned, with a swan's head and neck issuing from a coronet for crest. 
That of his son, Andrew Lord Gray, 1449, has a lion rampant within a 
bordure engrailed, being the coat ever since borne by the family. Two 
years later his seal has the crest used by his father, and for supporters 
two lions gardant. 

An illuminated MS. of the early part of the reign of James VL 



WORKMAN'S MS. loi 

shows a curious variation ; the crest is a lady's head with long flowing 
hair and a straggling wreath, the whole being rather suggestive of the 
appearance of Ophelia after the loss of her reason. The supporters are 
two wild cats, and the motto is " Anchor fast," the first word being repre- 
sented by the figure of an anchor. 

Esplin, 162 1, gives what have latterly been the crest, motto, and 
supporters of this noble family, viz., an anchor, "Anchor fast, anchor," and 
two lions gardant gules. 

Lord Olyphant. L., crest — 2. unicorn's head with foliage behind 
it ; motto — " A tovt povoyre a tovt povoire; "^supporters — two elephants. 

Lord Creichtovn (of Sanquhar). L., crest — z. wyvern spouting 
flame, in the centre of which protrudes a barbed tongue ; motto — " God 
send grace ; " supporters — two lions. 

Lord Drifven. L., crest — a ram's head; motto — " Deid schav;" 
supporters — a ram and a goat. 

Lord Okiltre, as Lord Avyndale. L., a label of three points gules 
in chief in the Stewart quarter; crest— a white dog(?) statant spotted sable; 
motto — " Forvard ; " supporters— two wyverns spouting fire. 

Lord Ogilby. L., the lion is rampant; crest — a (dove ?) bird of a 
yellow green colour, bill open and slightly curved; moVto—'' A ffynes ;" 
supporters — two slate-coloured bulls collared with red ropes or torses, 
he on the dexter gardant. 

The crest on the family seals, from a.d. 1440 to that of James, first 
Lord Ogilvy of Airiie, 1506, is a lady's head. An illuminated MS. later 
in date than the one now quoted from, gives a bull's head with a torse 
round the neck. The MS. called King's and Nobility's Arms has a bird 
like a crow. 

Lord Elfinstovn. L., the boars' heads couped ; crest (has evidently 
been altered) — two swords, one erect, the other in bend sinister, are partially 
visible ; over them is drawn in ink the figure of a lady from below the 
middle, issuing from rocks or waves (?), holding in her left hand, which is 
raised, a branch ; motto — " Cavs cavsit ;" supporters — two savages 
wreathed about the head and middle with foliage. 

Lord Ros. First and fourth, or, a chevron checquy sable and 
argent between three water bougets of the second ; second and third, 
gules, three crescents argent within a bordure of the second, charged with 
eight roses of the field ; crest — a fox courant ; motto — " Thynk on ; " 
supporters — two falcons. The crest was soon after changed to a falcon's 
head. 

Lord Maxvel. L., crest — a stag couchant before a holly bush ; 
motto — "I byd ye fairvardla;" supporters — two stags proper attired azure. 

Lord Sempil. L., the field is or and the horns are stringed sable; 
crest — a stag's head ; motto — " Keip traist ;" supporters — two grey- 
hounds collared gules. 

Lord Somervel. L., the cross crosslets seven in number, and 
argent; crest — a wyvern on a wheel ; motto — " Feir God in Ive;" sup- 
porters — two brown dogs, with long hair and large -ears, collared gules. 

2 c 



I02 WORKMAN'S MS. 

A MS. a few years later in date gives for supporters two frogs ; crest — a 
frog sitting in front of three ostrich feathers. 

Lord Saltovn. L., crest — a Cornish chough; motto — '' Psalvs per 
Christvm:" supporters— two falcons. A little later the crest is a demi- 
falcon rising, and was altered to a parrot feeding on a bunch of cherries 
before 1624. 

Lord Forbes. L., crest — a stag's head ; motto — " Grace me gyd ;" 
supporters — a lion gules and a naked savage. A MS. not many years 
later gives two bears argent muzzled sable as supporters, and for crest 
a bear's head as in the arms. Esplin in 1621 calls the supporters two 
bloodhounds argent collared gules. 

Lord Glammes. L., crest — a lady's face within a chaplet, from 
which issue trefoils; motto — "In te dne speraviy A MS. soon after 
gives for crest a castle within a chaplet; supporters — a unicorn and a 
lion. 

*LoRD Denistoun. a later edition. 

Lord Heres. First and fourth, Maxwell, in chief a label of three 
points gules ; second and third, Herries ; crest — a stag's head erased 
gules ; motto — " Dominvs dedit ; " supporters — a savage and a hedgehog. 
Another MS. puts Herries in the first and fourth quarters ; crest — a stag's 
head proper; motto — " Dvrvfn patientia frango ;" supporters — a hedge- 
hog and a stag. 

Lord Lindores. Created in 1600. An addition, name not given — 
Leslie quartering Abernethy, on an escutcheon of pretence a castle ; crest 
— a demi-angel ; motto — " Stat promissa fides T supporters— two griffins. 

Lord of Lowdon. Created 1601. Added in ink — ^gyronny of eight 
gules and ermine ; crest — a phoenix ; motto — " I byde my tyme ; " sup- 
porters — two stags. 

Lord Cathkart. L., crest — a dexter hand between two branches 
proper holding a crescent gules ; motto — " I hoip to speid ;" supporters — 
two parrots. 

Lord Cairleill. First and fourth, gules, a cross or ; second and 
third, or, a cross gules ; over all in an escutcheon of pretence, argent, a 
saltire azure ; crest — two dragons' heads addossde ; motto — " Hvniilitate ," 
supporters — two peacocks proper. 

Another MS. gives a demi-peacock for crest. The cross flory gules 
in a field argent given by Sir David Lindsay, seems thus for a time to be 
disused; but in Esplin's MS., 1621, there is gules, a cross flory or, for 
Carlyle ; quartering or, a cross gules, for Corsbie. 

Lord Cammel of Glenarfet. An addition — first and fourth, 
Campbell, gyronny of eight sable and argent ; second, Lome ; third, 
Stewart ; crest — a castle tripled towered gules, the side towers have 
conical roofs, from that in the centre issues a doe's head ; supporters — 
two does. 

Lord Lovat. First and fourth, argent, three antique crowns gules ; 
second and third, azure, three fraises argent ; crest — a stag's head between 
two axes bendways, blades turned outwards, foliage resembling holly 



WORKMAN'S MS. 103 

leaves on long stalks; motto — "I am redde;" supporters — two stags 
sejant in front of trees. 

*Wrquhard of that Ilk. An addition. This name has been very 
frequently mistaken for Wishart. Seal, in 1505, of Alexander, sheriff- 
depute of Elgin, has a boar's head couped in chief, and two keys, wards 
outwards, in base. Porteus gives for Urquhart of Cromarty — or, three 
boars' heads erased gules ; and for Urquhart of Badyar — ^gules, on a fess 
or between two keys in pale, and a boar's head erased, three stars sable. 
Badyar evidently stands for Burdsyards, the representer of which family, 
Duncan of Burdsyards, Captain of Foot, registered in 1766 — or on a fess 
azure between three boars' heads erased gules, two keys in saltire of the 
field. 

Adam Urquhart of Meldrum, co. Aberdeen, registered arms, 1672-78, 
as heir of the Meldrums of that Ilk, and Seton of Meldrum, bore 
Meldrum and Seton quarterly, thus dropping his paternal coat entirely, 
but taking for crest the boar's head erased or. In 1741, William of Mel- 
drum, having become heir male of Cromarty, recorded the simple coat — 
or, three boars' heads erased gules langued azure, was allowed two grey- 
hounds proper, collared gules and leashed or, as supporters ; and to indi- 
cate his representation of the Meldrum and Seton families, took for crest 
a demi-otter sable, crowned with an antique crown or, holding a crescent 
gules between his paws. 

Sir Thomas Urquhart, in his extraordinary genealogy of his family, 
has traced them step by step back to Adam, which is probably meant as a 
satire on extravagant claims to antiquity. 

Gylleroch de Urchard witnessed an agreement, in 1233, between 
Andrew, Bishop of Moray, and Sir Alan the Usher, as to the churchlands 
of Urchard. 

The Urquharts were hereditary sheriffs of Cromarty, at any rate, from 
the time of Adam de Urchard, sheriff in the reign of David II. ; he was 
son of William de Urchard, and direct ancestor of Sir Thomas, who sold 
the barony of Cromarty, but it was repurchased by Sir John, who became 
heir male. His son Jonathan again sold it in 1684, and about the middle 
of last century the estate was for a time again recovered by a descendant 
of its ancient possessors. 

The tutor of Cromarty sat in parliament 1600- 1608, and Adam 
Urquhart of Meldrum represented Aberdeenshire 1665-78. 

Arms of Sir Adrian de Damman of Flanders, knighted 2nd May 1602. 

Arms of Lord Colville of Culross. An addition in ink, rough and 
unfinished. 

*L0RD OF Lvis. 

*LoRD Makgregour. Seal of Patrick Macgregor of Ardenconnel 
1 50 1 — first and fourth, a bull's head couped ; second and third, two clubs 
raguly in saltire. 

John Murray of Lanrick was recognised as chief of the clan, and 
created a baronet in 1795 as Sir John Macgregor, alias Murray of 
Lanrick and Balquhidder, registered arms the same year, the crown rest- 



I04 WORKMAN'S MS. 

ing on the point of the sword which is hilted and pommelled or ; there is 
a second motto below the shield, '■'Ard challick" In 1801 the motto 
was changed to " Srioghal ma dhream" and '' Ard choille." He is called 
representative of the family, but Sir Robert Douglas, in his " Baronage," 
makes Duncan Murray or Macgregor representer of Sir John's branch, 
and other families contested its claim. See Skene's " Highlanders of 
Scotland." 

*LORD OF LORNE. 

The armis of O'Neill of Irland, an addition. 
♦Lord of Sanctt Johnne. 
♦MakCloyd of y^ Ilk. 

*L0RD OF YE IlLIS. 

Robert Lord Melville. A later addition, the title having been 
created in 1616. First and fourth, Melville of that Ilk ; second and 
third, Melville of Raith, both as L. ; crest — a crescent argent ; motto — 
" Denique coehim ; " supporters — an eagle and a ratch-hound. 

Lord of Halybvrtovn. As L,, Lord of Dyrltoun. Crest — a moor's 
head banded between two branches ; motto — " Wache weill ; " supporters 
—two moors with bands argent and sable round their heads and waists. 

Rutherfourd of y^ Ilke, now of Edgerstoun. L. 

Hereis, Lord of Terriglis. L. 

Lord Ross of Halkatt. L. 

Carlyle, Lord Carlyll. L. 

Creichtoun, Lord Creichtoun. L. 

Monypeny, Lord Monypenny. L. 

*Angus of ye Auld. 

The Lord of ye Ile of Man. L. 

Lord Bissart of Bewfort. L. 

Carlyle, Lord Carlyll. L., 63. 

Ye Lord of Lorne of Auld. L. 

Lord Gordoun. L. 

Lord Gyffert of Auld. L. 

BoYis of Dryvisdaill of Auld. L. 

Lord of Nyddisdaill of Auld. L., added on the margin. 
" Edgar's coatte." 

Seres, Lord of Dwnde of Auld. L. 

Lord Chissam of Auld. L. 

Douglas, Lord of Niddisdaill. L. 

CoLUYLL, Lord of Ouchiltrie. L. 

Erskyn, Lord of Breching. L. 

M ORWELL, Lord of Lawderdale. L. 

Lord Sowlis of Liddisdale. L. 

The Lord of Galloway of Auld. L. 

The Lord of Garreoch of Auld. L. 

Ye Lord of Annanderdale. L. 

SiNCLARE, Lord Synclare. L. 

Ffraseir, Lord Fraseir. L. 



WORKMAN'S MS. . ^"^X^^ 105 

K c " 

Ffraseir, Lord of Lowate. L. *^ '^i/?' '5 

Wauss, Lord of Dyrltoun of Auld. L. iw""*"" 

Lord Durward of Auld. L, 

Lord Landellis of Auld. L. 

Lord Lyle. L., crest — a cock proper ; motto — " An I may ; " sup- 
porters — two wild cats gardant. 

Arms of the Company of Painters. The coats which follow till 
Lowis are all additions, and uncoloured. 

Sir John Ramsay, Knight, of the Eist Barnes. Parted per pale, on 
the dexter an arm issuing from the dexter side of the shield, the hand 
holding a sword erect piercing a heart, and supporting on the point the 
crown of Scotland ; on the sinister, an eagle displayed with two heads 
charged on the breast with a crescent ; helmet, mantling, and wreath, but 
no crest; motto — '' Hcec dextra vindex principis et Patrice;" sup- 
porters — a unicorn and a stag, both collared. 

Sir Hew Hereis, Knight, of Cousland. First and fourth, an arm 
issuing from the exterior side of the shield, the hand holding a sword 
erect supporting on its point the crown of Scotland ; second and third, a 
thistle slipped and leaved between three hedgehogs ; crest — a hedgehog ; 
motto — " Ferendo et feriendo; " supporters — a lion and a savage wreathed 
about the middle. 

Sir Rot. Grahme of Scotstoun, Knicht. First and fourth, two bars 
wavy, on a chief three escallops ; second and third, three roses ; crest — 
a stork's head; supporters — two falcons, only the one on the sinister 
being drawn. 

S^- Andrew Ker of Hietoun, Knycht. A chevron charged with three 
mullets, in base a stag's head erased ; motto— " Fordward in the name of 
God ; " supporters — two savages. 

gR. Patrick Barclay of Towye, Knycht. Azure, a chevron or 
between three crosses patde (?) argent; motto — "Honor est amor;" sup- 
porters — two hounds collared. 

S^- Thomas Ker of Hirth, Knycht. This gentleman's descent has 
not been ascertained ; perhaps the chief added to the arms may be allusive 
to his possession of St Kilda or Hirta, of which he had a Crown charter yth 
March 1610— a chevron charged with three mullets, in base a unicorn's 
head erased ; a chief parted per pale, on the dexter side a crescent, and on 
the sinister a three-masted vessel with sails furled floating on the sea ; 
motto — " The Lord direct my wayes ; " supporters — two savages. 

S^ George Dowglas of Ridhouse, Knycht. A chief charged with 
two mullets, in base a lion's head erased, and in the honour point a cres- 
cent, probably as a mark of cadency ; supporters — two griffins, only the 
one on the sinister side being drawn. 

S^- James Crichtoun of Ruthvine, Knycht. A lion rampant and 
a chief charged with three mascles. 

Sir Claud Hamilton. Hamilton and Arran quarterly, over all an 
escutcheon of pretence charged with two (?) obliterated ; crest — a three- 
masted ship with sails furled ; motto — " Ad port am." 

2D 



io6 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Sir John Ogilvy. Or, a lion passant gardant gules, on his breast 
an inescutcheon charged with a mullet ; the lion is placed on a terrace of 
three platforms or steps; motto — " Fideliter." 

Sir Colyn Cambell of Ardkindles, Knycht. Gyronny of eight, 
in the centre a mullet ; motto — " Set on." 

Sir Alex. Hamilton (Innerwick). A fess checquy between three 
cinquefoils, in honour point a round buckle. 

Sir James Elphiston of , Knycht. On a chevron 

between three boars' heads erased a round buckle ; motto — " Cause 
causit." 

Sir James Crychton. First and fourth, a lion rampant; second 
and third, a saltire and chief; motto — " Immobiliter" 

Sir Mark Ker. A chevron charged with three mullets, in base 
a unicorn's head erased, in chief a label of three points ; motto — " God in 
a gud cause." 

S^- Hary Lindesay of Carristoun, Knycht. First and fourth, a 
lion rampant; second and third, a fess checquy; in an escutcheon of pre- 
tence, a fess within the Royal tressure, being Charteris of Kinfauns. 

S^- Neill Mtgumry of Langschaw, Knycht. An annulet gemmed 
with three stones between three fleurs-de-lis, all within the Royal tressure; 
motto — " Garde bien ; " supporters — two wyverns. 

Sir David Murray. A crescent, with a cross patde between the 
horns, between three mullets, all within the Royal tressure ; supporters — 
two ladies, only she on the sinister side being drawn. 

Sir Robert Hamilton. A crescent with a mullet above it between 
three cinquefoils ; motto — " Fear God." 

Preston of Craigmiler. Argent, three unicorns' heads couped 
sable armed or ; crest — a unicorn's head erased ; motto — " Pour dien /aire ;" 
supporters — two lions. There is added below, in a later hand, " Lord 
Dingwall, the crest in a prince's croune." 

Braug of Mooresk (? Aquhorsk), the last word almost illegible, and 
the whole entry in a different hand. Two barrulets between two towers 
in chief, and three crescents, two and one in base ; crest — a crescent. A 
member of this little-known family — Colonel Sir William Brag, Broge, or 
Broig — made some figure in the service of the States General early in the 
seventeenth century. His arms, as given in Font's MS. 1624, have three 
barrulets ; crest — a hand holding a sword ; motto — " Honneur ou mort /' 
supporters — on the dexter a man in armour, and on the sinister a horse 
saddled and bridled. His daughter and heiress, Mary, wife of Captain 
John Menteith, a younger son of the Randiford family, having left no sur- 
viving issue, his fortune was inherited in 1636 by his niece, Janet Broig, 
wife of David Menteith, an officer in Broig's regiment, younger son of 
Menteith of Lochend. Arms registered, 1672-78, by Charles Bragge of 
Netherauquhask — sable, two barrulets engrailed between as many towers, 
triple towered in chief argent and three crescents in base or ; motto — 
" Fidelis et const ans." 

Sir William Levingtoun of Culter, Knycht. First and fourth, 
three gillyflowers ; second and third, Callendar ; on an escutcheon of pre- 



WORKMAN'S MS. 107 

tence a moor's head couped, in chief over all a label of three points ; sup- 
porters — two savages ; motto — '' Si Dieu piaist." 

Sir James Ballenden of Bruchton, Knycht. A stag's head 
erased between three cross crosslets fitchde ; motto — "Sic itur ad astra" 
supporters — two ladies. 

Sir John Ramsay of Dahousie, Knycht. An eagle displayed with 
two heads ; supporters — two stags. 

Sir Andro Melvill of Garvok, Knycht. An eagle displayed be- 
tween three crescents. 

Sir (David ?) Wod of Craig, Knycht. Much tampered with ; the 
christian name has been written over something else ; the name in full 
and the motto, " Prowyde," are added below the shield, all in the same 
hand, evidently of a later date. Parted per bend sinister azure and 
argent, a tree eradicated vert with a hunting-horn sable hanging from the 
lower branches ; supporters — two savages wreathed round the middle. 

Sir James Sempill of Bei-treis, Knycht. A chevron checquy 
between two hunting-horns stringed in chief and a gillyflower in base. 

This is the son and heir of the marriage contracted in 1564 between 
John Sempill, called " the dancer," younger son of Robert Lord Sempill, 
and Mary Livingstone, known as " the lusty " one of the Queen's Maries, 
on which John Knox reflects so severely. The Queen provided for the 
young couple, who thus founded the Beltreis family, several members of 
which were authors of poems, satires, and songs. 

Sir James, knighted in or about 1600, was Envoy to England towards 
the close of the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and author of " The Packman's 
Pater Noster, a Pick-Tooth for the Pope ;" the gillyflower in base was to 
commemorate his mother, the foundress of the fortunes of this line ; and 
in 1672, when his grandson, Francis Sempill of Beltreis, registered arms, 
the third hunting-horn of the paternal coat was resumed in base and three 
gillyflowers placed in chief, the crest being a hand holding a pistol; motto 
— " In loyaltie." The family expired in the male line about 1809. 

Sir James Scot, of Fausyd, Knicht. A pheon point upwards 
between three lions' heads erased. 

Sir John Hume of North Berwick, Knycht. As Lord Hume, L. ; 
supporters — two lions. 

Sir John Grahame of Natheines, Knycht. As Earl of Montrose, 
L., with a label of three points in the centre; supporters — a hound 
collared and a falcon. 

Sir Robert Deniston of Montjoye, Knycht. A bend between 
a unicorn's head erased and a cross crosslet fitchde. He was Conservator 
of Scots Privileges, and seems to have been connected with Fifeshire ; 
Christian Gibson, his widow, married secondly (James ?) Shoner or 
Schoneir, and died in 1642 ; she was mother of Mr James Shoner of Caski- 
berryan, in the parish of Kinglassie, who married Anna, daughter of 
Robert Forbes of Rires, and had fourteen children. The son and heir, 
Robert Shoner of Caskiberryan, married in 1659 Margaret, daughter of 
Robert Brown of Finmount, and had issue ; he sold the estate about 



io8 WORKMAN'S MS. 

1680, and this somewhat peculiar name seems to have disappeared. 
Sophia Schooner, wife of James Pringle of Whytbank, is stated to have 
been a Danish lady and maid of honour to Queen Anne, consort of James 
VI. No arms have been discovered as borne by this name in Scotland. 

On the next page is inscribed " These be ye four knychtes of Walter, 
Erie of Balcleugh ": — 

Walter Lord Scott of Buccleuch, was created Earl of Buc- 
cleuch 1 6th March 16 19. 

Sir Walter Scot of Gowdelands, Knight. 

Sir Rot. Scott of Heining, Knight. Both shields blank. 

Sir Jhone Scot of Newbrough, Knight. On a bend between an 
arrow bendways point upwards in chief, and a lion's head erased in base, 
a star of six points wavy pierced between two crescents ; crest — a stag's 
head ; motto — " Pacem amo." 

Sir Adam Gordone of Park, Knight. Three boars' heads couped, 
in the centre a crescent charged with a crescent ; crest — a crescent argent 
charged with a crescent sable. 

S^ Bruce of Airth, Knt. A saltire and a chief charged with a 
mullet on the dexter side ; crest — a horse's head bridled ; motto — " Do 
Weill and doutt nolt;" supporters — two savages wreathed about the 
head and middle. 

Sir ( Drummond). Three bars wavy, in chief a mullet ; crest 

— a dog's head; motto — '' Uiuit post funera wiriius;" supporters — two 
savages wreathed about the middle. 

Sir Georg Campbell of Coobath (?). Glenorche is added in 
another hand, but this is a mistake. Gyronny of eight gules (?) and 
ermine ; crest — an eagle displayed ; supporters — two stags. 

Sir Jhon Maxweill of Pook, Knight. Argent, on a saltire sable 
an annulet stoned ; crest — a. stag's head surrounded by holly branches ; 
motto — " I am readye ;" supporters — two apes, that on the sinister side 
collared. The four coats just described are twice drawn. 

At the top of the next page is written " Anno dnj 1602 wer creat thir 
Knychts," seven in number: — 

Sir Jhon Hamilton of Kinclewye, Knyt. Hamilton and Arran 
quarterly. 

Sir Andro Leslye of Lumbenye, Knyt. Leslie quartering a lion 
rampant, over all a label of three points in chief; motto — " Qui cadif' 
(illegible.) 

Sir Adrian Damman of Bysterwelt, Knycht. Shield blank. 

Sir Robert Hackheid of Pitfirine, Knyt. Arms represented as 
a chief dancetty, charged with a lion passant. 

Sir Archibald Murray of Darnhall, Knycht. As F. Blackbarony. 

Sir John Schaw of (illegible), Knight. A spear erect between 
three covered caps. 

(Name illegible) Kennedy. A lion rampant quartering three cross 
crosslets fitchde, with an indication of a chevron between them. 

Sir Mark Ker of Litilden, Knyt. Shield blank. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 109 

Sir George Hume of Broxmouth, Knycht. Shield blank. 

Sir Robert Ker of Ankram, Knycht. A chevron charged with 
three mullets, in dexter chief a crescent. 

Sir Patrick Hume of Ayto, Knyt. Shield blank. 

Sir George Mushet of Burnbank, Knycht. Shield blank. 

S'*- W*^- Drummond of Rickarton, Knycht. Shield blank. 

S"^- Jhone Drumond of Borland, Knycht. Shield blank. 

S'^- Alex^- Setoune of Tul, Knycht. Shield blank. 

S^- Georg Touris of Garntoune, Knycht. Shield blank. 

S^- Georg Preston of Craigmiller, Knycht. Shield blank. 

S^- James Dundas of Craigtoun, Knyt. Shield blank. 

S^- Robert Hamilton of Esterlieys, Knyght. Shield blank. 

Arms of Great Britain within a garter. 

Sir George Hamilton of Greinla, Knyght. Hamilton with a 
label of four points in chief. 

The xxv day of Apryle 1604 were creat these honorable Lords — Lord 
James Hamiltoun, Lord Abercorn, Lord James Elfinston of Bamerinoch, 
Lord Colvill, Lord of Culross, John Murray, Lord Tullibardin. 

Sir Jhon Murray of Philiphaugh, Knyght. L. 

Sir John Bruce of Kencavill. As L., Clackmannan; motto — 
" Balnevi." 

Sir Robert Colvill of Debentries (?) L. 

Sir Robert Foster of Strahenrie. As L. 85, the horns stringed 
gules. 

The leaf on which are the four preceding shields is marked " Lord 
Colvill's Knyghts ; " below is added in ink in a different hand — 

Levistoun of Denipes. Livingstone of Wemyss as L., quartering 
azure, a lion rampant, or a lion rampant azure. 

The next leaf contains four shields, and is marked " New Knychts," 
" Lord Abercorn's Knychts." 

Sir Robert Dalzell of that Ilk, K. L. 

Sir Alex^- Drummond of Medop, Knycht. Drummond without 
any mark of cadency. 

Sir Georg Hamilton of Grenla. Hamilton without any mark of 
cadency. 

Sir Jhon Henderson of Fordal, Knycht. L., three piles only, 
and issuing from the dexter side of the shield. 

Below is a note : " Ther nobill men wer creat in Hawroudhous the 
xxv day of Apryle befor ther nobill men, the chancelor for the tyme tein 
vis generall, videlicet, the Lord Abercorne, Lord Balmerinoch, Lord Tilli- 
bardine, Lord Coluill of Culross." 

Jon Graham of Grogar, Knycht. A cross crosslet fitchde issuing 
from a crescent, on a chief three escallops, all within the Royal tressure. 

Sir Dawid Heryng of Lethendie, Knycht. L., a rose before the 
upper lion. 

Sir Wm. Graham of Claypote; Knyt. A chief charged with three 
escallops, and issuing therefrom three piles, in base a .rose, all within the 

2 E 



1 1 o WORK MA N'S MS. 

Royal tressure ; motto — " Non crescunt rosce absqtie spinis ;''' supporters 
— two stags. 

Sir Robert Grahame of Morphie, Knycht. A chevron between 
three escallops, on the chevron a mullet. 

Sir Wilzeam Graham of Balargus, Knyt. As Claypote, no motto 
or supporters. 

Note. — The first day of May anno 1604 yeir, being tuysday at even, 
the chancelor being Wice de Rege for the tyme, knychtit thir nobillmen, 
videlicet, Sir Jhon Graham of Grogre, Knyt ; Sir Dawid Hering of 
Lethendye, Knyt; Sir William Graham of Claypote, Sir Robert Graham 
of Morphie, Knychts. 

Sir David Murray of Gosferd, Knyt, Lord of Scone, barroun 
and barrouneatt, and of our soverane lords parliament. A cross patde 
between two crescents in fess between three hearts, each charged with a 
mullet, all within the Royal tressure. Crest — a stag at gaze in front of 
two trees ; motto — " Meliora spero ; " supporters — a savage wreathed 
about the head and middle, and a lion. At Perth the sevint day of July 
1604, in presence of Vice de Roy and the rest of the nobilitye, videlicet, 
Angus, Sutherland, Arroll, Mortoun, Mershell, Lithcow, Hoyme, Flemyng, 
Drumond, Lauderdale, w' mony other nobilmen and barouns, wes Sir 
Dauid Murray creat Lord, Sir Dauid Murray Knyt, of Gosfurd, Lord of 
Scone, barroune and barrouneet, of our soverane lords parliament, and 
after being creat requestit for his twa knyts, qulk wer receauid efter the 
formes of Knytheid, S' Andro Balfour of Balemouth, S' Jhon Moncreif. 

Sir Andro Balfour of Balethmouth, Knycht. A chevron charged 
with an otter's head erased, in base a mullet ; crest — an otter's (?) head ; 
motto — " Frward, nee temere, nee timide ;'^ supporters — two ladies. 

Sir Jhon Moncreif of Kilmouth, Knycht. A lion rampant and a 
chief ermine; crest — a pelican's head; motto — " Viresco vulnere ;" sup- 
porters — two lions. 

(Cranstoun). Arms without the name. Three cranes ; crest — a 
crane's head ; motto — " Thovs vant, or I vant ;" supporters — a lady and a 
stag. 

It may be remarked on these added coats that they exhibit, in many 
instances, as Herries, Ramsay, and Lord Scone, a wide departure from 
the simple character of older Scottish heraldry ; not only have coats of 
augmentation come into fashion, but it seems to be thought that every 
knight almost is to carry supporters. 

The next part of this collection consists of the arms of the minor 
barons and gentry ; six shields on a page, coloured, without crest or 
motto in the original MS., but there are numerous additions. The paging 
is given, and it will be understood that when there are six shields on a 
page they are of the oldest date, when there are fewer they may probably 
be more modern. 

I. Lowis OF Menar. L., argent, three laurel leaves vert. 

Irwin of ye Drum. L. 

Banais of Hawhill. L. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 



1 1 1 



•ACHMOWTE OF YT IlK. 

Balfour of yt Ilk. F. 

Innes of yt Ilk. L., in the first and fourth quarters the field is 
gules and the heads or. 

2. Arms in ink of Joseph Stacie, an Englishman who was Ross 
Herald 1663-87. 

*Pentland ; " of yt Ilk" is added in a later hand. The history of 
this coat is, that Sir Gideon Murray, first of Elibank, married Margaret 
Pentland, whom an annotator of Scotstarvit describes as " a miller's 

daughter." She and her sisters — Sarah, wife of Lorimer, and 

Isabella, who married James Wauchope in Templehouse, without issue, 
— possessed part of the temple-lands of Crichton, co. Edinburgh, not far 
from Pentland. The name is not unknown at an early period, for we find 
in 1392 Sir John de Pentland, chaplain of St Giles' Church, Edinburgh, 
and in 1438 Laurence Pentland, prior of the Carmelites at Tullylum, near 
Perth, but there never was any family of Pentland of that Ilk. Sir 
Gideon Murray had a gift, in 1596, of the Provostry of Crichton for life. 
The arms of Pentland make their appearance as a quarter in the funeral 
escutcheons of the descendants of Margaret, with the occasional variation 
that the fess is altered to a bend, and the crescents to cinquefoils. The 
coat was granted in 181 1 to George Pentland, who is styled " of that Ilk," 
although at that time, and long before, the estate of Pentland belonged to 
the family of Gibson. There are traces of persons of the name of Pent- 
land, resident at Crichton, early in last century, and in 1573 Captain 
John Pentland was banished for the slaughter of Ninian Liddell of Hal- 
kerstoune, whose property was adjacent to Crichton. 

3. Erskin of Dun. As L., Erskine, Lord of Brechin, the pale 
being charged with a cross crosslet fitchde. 

*Makcalla. 

*Umfrastoun of yt Ilk. 

Scott of Balvere. L. 

*Dasoun. 

Inglis of Lochend. L. 

4. * Rogers' Arms. 

Forbes of Pitsligo. In ink unfinished — on a chevron or between 
three bears' heads couped as many acorns. 

5. Uanse of yt Ilk. Apparently argent, a bend gules charged in 
chief with a mullet; this coat has been partially painted over, making, the 
bend azure charged with a mullet or in the fess point. 

Bissett of yt Ilk. L., argent, a bend gules. 

*BoEG OF YT Ilk. (Boog or Boge.) 

Rynd of ye Carse. L., or on a bend sable three escallops argent, 
in chief a mill-rind of the second. This name is in Lyndsay's MS., and 
elsewhere, by mistake written Reid. Alexander Rind, the representative 
of the family about 1672, being then Procureur dX Amsterdam, registered 
the arms as given by Sir David Lyndsay, and which appear on the seal of 
James Riende, 1478. The family was one of antiquity in Forfarshire, 



1 1 2 WORK MA N 'S MS. 

and received charters from Robert I. and David II. ; they figure in feuds 
with the Ogilvies, Guthries, and other neighbours. 

♦SiTSARF OF YT Ilk. The lands from which this family took its 
name lie in the barony of North Berwick, and remained in their hands 
at the end of the seventeenth century. Cadets possessed Quarrelsyde, 
Collegehead, which passed to an heiress about 1715, and Ruchlaw, co. 
Haddington, at least as early as the beginning of the seventeenth century. 
Their lands were erected into a barony by Crown charter, 24th August 
1700, and were inherited by Martha, wife of Francis Buchan, who 
assumed the surname and arms of Sydserff. An entail was executed in 
1 77 1, and the estate now belongs to Thomas Buchan Sydserff of Ruchlaw. 

Archibald, a merchant in Edinburgh, sat in parliament during the 
Civil War, suffered losses and imprisonment, and was knighted in 
December 1660. 

Thomas Sydserff, Dean of Edinburgh, was consecrated Bishop of 
Brechin 1634, and translated to Galloway the following year; at the 
Restoration he was the only surviving Scottish bishop, and died in 1663, 
leaving a large family, of whom Sir Thomas fought under Montrose. 

Several of the younger branches of this family bore three fleurs-de- 
lis, with appropriate differences. 

Lord of Gartaly Stewart. P., only two mullets in chief. 

6. Two coats in ink without names. A lion rampant charged on 
the shoulder with a crescent within a bordure engrailed. A chevron 
charged with a crescent between two acorns. 

7. *GuiLD of that Ilk. 

FoRMANE of YT Ilk. First and fourth, a camel's head erased cam- 
paned, this is not painted ; second and third, sable, a chevron between 
three fishes haurient. Notes on the margin make the field in the first 
and fourth sable, and the bell or ; the quartering is said to be Fisher, and 
the field marked azure. 

Panther of yt Ilk. The seal of Patrick Panter, Abbot of 
Cambuskenneth, is engraved in the Chartulary printed for the Gram- 
pian Club, and differs from this coat ; it has on a fess between three 
mullets as many roundles (?). The arms registered about 1672, by 
William Panton alias Panther of Blackhouse, and Captain George Panton 
alias Panther, who are both stated to descend from the family of Pitmed- 
den, are — or, an eagle displayed sable, in chief a rose gules between two 
mullets of the second. This almost looks like an attempt to attach the 
old Aberdeenshire family of Panton to a Forfarshire race of Panters or 
Painters, who rose to considerable eminence in the fifteenth and sixteenth 
centuries. 

Finlaw de Pantre was in the service of David II. 

David Paneter had a charter, 20th March 1407, from the Regent Duke 
of Albany, of the lands of Cragoch and Ardoch, in the barony of Logic, 
CO. Forfar. 

Andrew Paneter was bailie of Montrose 1389, and married Janet 
Stewart ; Andrew Panter, burgess of Montrose, and William of Craw- 



WORKMAN'S MS. 1 1 3 

mond, had a Crown charter, 23rd February 1400, of parts of Inghane, 
Little Carcary, Balnamone, and Kynnarde, equally between them on the 
resignation of Anna Portare. 

David Panter, 141 1, held part of the lands of Kinnaird, which he is 
said, without proof, to have acquired by marriage with a lady of the 
name of Kinnaird. 

Walter Painter was Abbot of Arbroath 141 1 to about 1450; in 1452 
John Panter was bailie of Montrose. 

The arms of the Abbot in the chapter-house are a fess charged with 
three roundles (?), in chief the head of a crozier between two mullets, in 
base a rose. 

David Penneter or Panter, burgess of Montrose, probably married 
a Scot, related to Robert Scot, burgess of Arbroath, who, 4th January 
15 19, granted a charter to the abbot and monks of Arbroath, founding a 
chaplainry for the singing of masses for the souls of his relatives, includ- 
ing the said David, his wife and children, especially Mr Patrick, late 
Secretary to the King. 

This Patrick, Rector of Fetteresso, was Secretary to the King 1505 ; 
Abbot of Cambuskenneth 1510-17; Ambassador to France, and died in 
Paris, 1 5 19. By a feu-charter, dated loth August 15 16, he conveyed 
Newmains Wallis and other lands, " dilecto meo David Painter juniori " 
(probably his son), whom failing to David Painter senior, his own 
brother, whom failing to his sister's son, William Painter or Lamb, whom 
he describes as " nunc vero filio meo adoptiuo," &c., and the heirs male 
of their bodies, his own nearest heirs male bearing his name and arms ; 
and lastly, to his nearest heirs whomsoever, binding them to assume and 
bear the surname and arms of Painter. This is a very early instance of a 
man who may be described 2(.s 2i parvenu showing an anxious desire to found 
a family. 

The abbot had a natural son, David, and daughter, Catherine, by 
Margaret Crichton, Countess of Rothes, who were legitimated in 15 13. 

David had the vicarage of Carstairs on the resignation of Alexander 
Painter 1539, was Secretary of State, Ambassador to France, Bishop of 
Ross, 1545, Commendator of Cambuskenneth about 1552; he died in 1558. 
He had shortly before, by three charters in 1556-57, conveyed the exten- 
sive lands of Ferindonald, Ardmanach, Arderseir, Duglie, &c., to his 
uterine brother, whom he also nominated his executor, Robert Leslie, 
ancestor of the Leslies of Findrassie. 

The question occurs, what are the charges on the fess ? Mr Fraser, 
in his Chartulary of Cambuskenneth, the late Mr Jervise, and Mr Henry 
Laing, in his " Scottish Seals," all describe them as roundles. A supposi- 
tion has been hazarded that they represent " manchets," and are allusive 
to the office of panetarius. I took them at once, from the painting here 
reproduced, to be morions, and on farther search find that the. heralds 
Porteus and Frazer both blazon them " squire's helmets," but the former 
gives an alternative blazon, " loaves of bread." Stacie calls them garbs, 
which is obviously wrong. 

2 F 



114 WORKMAN'S MS. 

The Aberdeenshire family which bore the eagle, and whose name is 
always Panton, Pantone, or Pantoun, first appears in 1396- 1398- 1402, 
Oliver and David de Pantone. William of Pantone 1436. James Pan- 
ton of Pitmedden and Tulymade 1448, dead 1451. John of Pitmedden 
1487. Descendants long held Pitmedden, and cadets possessed Tuly- 
made, Blackhouse, Craig, Hilton, and held Haddo on wadset, at the close 
of the fifteenth and early in the sixteenth century. In the eighteenth 
the name disappears from among the landowners, and is now of rare 
occurrence. 

There is no available evidence as to their original coat, but it seems 
probable that they bore an eagle, and added to it the rose and mullets when 
they took the alias Panther. 

Zards of yt Ilk. L., 129^. 

Petbladdo of yt Ilk, L. 

*Hert of yt Ilk. See another coat for the name, p. 146. 

Michael Hertt of Lanark is a witness in 1316. Ltber de Calchou. 

The Harts were a family of Edinburgh burgesses, Edward sitting in 
parliament for the burgh in 1586 ; Andrew was printer to the king in the 
early part of the seventeenth century. Mr William Haert or Heart of 
Livilands, was advocate to James VI. 

In 1773 this coat was allowed to Alexander Hart of Baltully, co. Fife, 
said to be descended from Robert Hart, who was killed at the battle of 
Otterburn. The style of *' that Ilk," in this and many other cases, is a 
mere complimentary addition. 

8. HovPE. L. 

9. HiRTOUN OF YT Ilk. L., Myrctoun, but the bearing is repre- 
sented as annulets. 

The Myretons, Myretouns, or Mortons were an old and considerable 
Fifeshire family, who took their surname from the lands of Myretoun in 
the parish of Kemback, co. Fife, which remained in their possession till 
the middle of the seventeenth century. Having acquired by marriage the 
more valuable estate of Cambo, near Crail, they made it their residence, 
and took their usual designation from it. 

Galfrid de Merton occurs c. 1250. In 1364 William de Miretoun, as 
heir of the late Alexander de Cambow, has a pension. Three roundles 
appear on the seal of his successor, Malcolm de Miretoun, Lord of Cambow, 
1377- John, Dean of Glasgow, was Treasurer of Scotland 1431-33. 

From 1560 to 1646 the heads of the family frequently sat in parlia- 
ment. Sir Thomas Myrtoun of Cambo was knighted and named a 
member of the Privy Council in 1641 ; commanded a regiment and lost 
his life at Kilsyth 1645. His son. Sir Patrick, sold all the family estates, 
Cambo being parted with in 1668 ; this was brought about by his own 
and his father's losses in the public service, which reduced him to such 
distress that, in 1651, he had a protection granted him from the action of 
his creditors. 

His son, Sir Robert, entered into a curious armorial transaction with 
a kinsman, Andrew Myrtoun, who had flourished as a merchant burgess 



WORKMAN 'S MS. 115 

of Edinburgh, and seems to have been ambitious of refounding the decay- 
ing house. 

In 1686 Andrew, admitted to be descended from the Cambo family, 
registered arms — or, three torteaux within a bordure wavy parted per pale 
sable and azure ; crest — two arms issuing from a cloud drawing an anchor 
out of water proper; motto — " Undique fultus." 

His career seems to have been chequered, for in 1689 he was sen- 
tenced to imprisonment for non-payment of custom on his goods ; and in 
1704 cited before parliament in connection with an inquiry into the public 
accounts, when it came out that he had made ;;^i 2,000 profit on a loan of 
;^36,ooo to the Admiralty. 

Andrew Myretoun acquired the estates of Gogar and Leny, which 
were erected into a barony in his favour in 1701, and at the same time he 
was created a baronet, an honour which expired on the death of his son, 
Sir Robert, in 1774, without male issue. 

The newly-created baronet got his arms changed to — argent, a chevron 
between three roundles sable; crest — a pine tree fructed proper; motto — 
" Virtutis prcemmm." 

This coat, recorded in November 1701, did not yet satisfy Sir 
Andrew Myretoun, and in January following he prevailed on Sir Robert 
Myretoun to execute a deed by which he did, "upon certain grave and 
weighty considerations and motives, renounce, overgive, and convey to 
and in favour of Sir Andrew Myretoun of Gogar, baronet, my right and 
title to the coat of arms and ensign armoriall belonging to the said 
familie of Myretouns of Cambo, with power to the said Sir Andrew to 
procure the same confirmed to him by the Lyon King of Arms, and there- 
after to bear and use the same as his own proper coat armorial." No 
further registration of arms took place, although this renunciation was, at 
a later period, recorded in the books of the Lyon Court. 

QuHiTHEDE OF YT Ilk. F., the field is or. A family of Whitehead 
of Park flourished in West Lothian, and in 1585 Philip, Sheriff-Depute, 
sat in parliament. The coat, with some alteration, was registered about 
1672 for Alexander Whythead of Isles of Alio, with a singular crest — 
a man issuing from water laying hold of a highland mantle ; motto — 
'' Abyssus circumdabat me." 

*RoBERTOUN OF YT Ilk ; should be Robertson. A seal, 1438, of 
Robertson of Strowan, has three wolves' heads on a fess, and for crest, a 
wolf statant. 

The coat, as here given, appears on the seal of John, Treasurer of 
Ross, 1589. When the arms were registered in 1672 by Alexander of 
Strowan, they were simply three wolves' heads ; the crest, a hand holding 
an imperial crown, with the motto, " Virtutis gloria merces" and a 
" Nota — Strowan and his predecessors, since their taking of y^ Murtherer 
of K. James y^ ist, have always born a Monstruous Man chained and 
lying under y** escutcheon." 

This is an addition in a later hand ; there are no .supporters, but a 
serpent and a dove seem to have been assumed by the family about 1822 (?) 



1 1 6 WORKMAN'S MS. 

♦Mertoun of yt Ilk. See Hirtoun. 

•Blakstok of yt Ilk. The name is rarely met with, and no family 
owning lands of the same name has been traced. 

10. Stewart of Rosaith. L., the bordure is gules and the 
buckles or. 

Stewart of Garless. L, 

11. Ye S^- of Buit. The plain coat of Stewart. 
Stewartt of Cragy. L., 124. 

Stewart of Reilstoun. L. 

Stewartt of Dalswyntoun. L. 

Stewartt of Gorme. L., the heads resemble those of a horse. 

Olefantt of . Apparently Newton has been blotted out, 

and Kelly written above. L., 75. 

12. Lord Glen. In ink. First and fourth, a lion rampant; second 
third, three pelicans (?). 

*Freanch. French of Thornydikes in the Merse, and of French- 
land in Dumfriesshire, an extinct family. 

13. FiNTOUN OF YT IlK. L. 
BiKERTOUN OF YT IlK. L. 

Dunbar of yt Ilk. L., 82. 

Broun of yt Ilk. Gules, a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis or ; 
" argent " is added on the margin, and " Carslut " as a designation. 

The coat given is that of Broun of Colstoun ; the arms of the 
Carslueth family, in a birthbrief, issued 8th July 1728, to Thomas Broun, 
an officer in the military service of the King of France, were — argent, a 
chevron gules between three fleurs-de-lis azure. 

Kyle of that Ilk. L., a note states that the charges are "candel- 
stiks or kylles." 

Chalmer of yt Ilk. L., 119, with a fleurs-de-lis gules in base 
added in ink. 

15, The four coats on this page are on a larger scale, by a different 
hand, and seem to be additions at a later date. 

Betoun of Creich. L. 

Sutherland of Duffus. L., the boar's head seems to be proper. 

Lawderdalle of yt Ilk. L., 61, the field sable. 

Wardlaw of Waristoun. F. 

17.* Cornwell of Ballanefard. The writer compiled a genealogy 
of this Linlithgowshire family, which appeared in the " Miscellanea Genea- 
logica et Heraldica," and was reprinted for private circulation 1877. 
They were seated at Bonhard early in the fifteenth century, and the direct 
line ended on the death of Elizabeth, heiress of Bonhard, wife of Sir 
Alexander Dalmahoy, Bart., in 1763. 

Robert de Cornewall witnessed a charter of Hugh, Bishop of St 
Andrews, c. 1180; the seal of William de Cornall, c. 1230, is a sheaf of 
corn; Mr Richard Cornell was Archdeacon of Dunkeld 1406. 

John Cornwall of Bonhard was killed at Flodden ; his son Peter put 
up the arms with the date 1527 on a stone in the house of the family in 



WORKMAN'S MS. 117 

Linlithgow, as here represented ; crest — a Cornish kae hatching on the 
face of a rock ; motto — " Ve big ye se varle." 

Nicholas of Bonhard sat in parliament 1592-99, and was provost of 
Linlithgow ; Walter of Bonhard represented the county in parliament 
1625; Walter of Bonhard was impoverished by the failure of the Darien 
scheme, having taken shares in the company. 

From a younger son appears to have descended James Cornwall of 
Bonhard Lodge, a Commissioner of Excise in Scotland, whose grandson 
James is now superintendent of travelling post-offices in the presidency of 
Bombay. 

*HucHESTOUN OF YT Ilk. Altered to Hudsone. 

Gardin of that Ilk. F., Gaudine. 

*Davesoun. On the seal of Mr John Davidson, Parson of New- 
lands 1536, are a stag trippant, his neck pierced by an arrow in bend 
sinister, in base a cinquefoil. 

Tailzefeir of yt Ilk. L. 

*Carncors of yt Ilk. The seal 1554, of John Carncors of Coums- 
lie, CO. Roxburgh, has the stag's head couped with a mullet between the 
attires. Andrew Cairncross of Cumsley, registered c. 1672 — argent, a 
stag's head erased, between the attires a cross crosslet fitchde surmounted 
of a mullet, all gules. 

About the same time, Patrick Cairncross of Balmashanner, co. 
Forfar, recorded — azure, a stag's head erased argent attired of ten tynes or, 
between the attires a cross crosslet of the third. 

These lands had for about two centuries given a designation to his 
ancestors, who probably descended from Duncan de Caryncros, witness to 
a charter of a Maule of Panmure, an^e 1325. 

In 1528 Nicol Cairncross sat in parliament as Deputy of the 
Constable of Scotland. The same year Robert Cairncross was Lord 
High Treasurer, being Abbot of Holyrood ; in 1539 he was Bishop of 
Ross and Abbot of Fearn, and died in 1545. His seal has a stag's head 
couped without any other charge. 

In the south Colmslie, Calfhill, Hilslop, and other lands were long 
in the possession of the Cairncrosses, of whom was Alexander, Bishop of 
Brechin 1683, Archbishop of Glasgow 1684, and Bishop of Raphoe from 
1693 till his death in 1701, when his estate of Manderston, in Berwick- 
shire, was inherited by his nephew, George Home of Whitfield, ancestor 
of the present George Home of Whitfield, who quarters the coat of Cairn- 
cross — argent, a stag's head, erased gules, betwixt the attires a cross 
crosslet fitchde of the last. This is as it is given by Nisbet for the 
archbishop, but in a seal engraved in "An Inquiry as to the Armorial 
Insignia of the City of Glasgow," printed in 1866 for private circulation, 
by A. Macgeorge of Glenarn, Esq., the mullet appears as in the recorded 
arms of the Colmslie branch. 

19. KiNCAiD of ye Touris (?). The last word has a line drawn through 
it, and " Ilk " is added in a different hand. L., there are three mullets in 
chief. 

2 G 



1 1 8 WORKMAN'S MS. 

•Or of yt Ilk. Probably Orde of that Ilk, co., Banfif. The coat has 
no resemblance to that recorded in 1731 for the Lanarkshire family of 
Orr, except that the crosses appear on a chief in the latter ; the earlier 
owners of Orde were named Davidson, and took the surname from their 
lands, c. 1400. 

♦Wastoun of yt Ilk. 

•Russell of yt Ilk. The heiress married Ramsay, and their 
descendants, seated at Russell, quartered the coat which is entered in the 
Lyon Register in 1672, and afterwards by cadets. Other Russells in 
Scotland seem to have desired to attach themselves, so far as bearing 
similar arms would do so, to the ducal family of Bedford. 

In 1759 James Russel of Russel alias Longridge, in Clydesdale, 
physician in Edinburgh, had a grant of arms — argent, a lion rampant 
gules, with a chief and other charges ; and a few years later a similar coat 
was granted to the ancestor of the family of Russell of Aden. 

John, son of Robert Russel of Duncanlaw, made a grant to the 
House of Soltre ante 1220. 

John Russel, an Englishman, married the Countess of Menteith, 
c. 1258. 

Henry Russel witnessed an early charter of Angus filius Dovenaldi 
to the monks of Paisley. 

In 1291 Robert Russel, burgess of Berwick; and in 1296 he or a 
namesake belonging to Berwickshire did homage to Edward I. 

Robert I. confirmed to John de Carrick, son of William called 
Russell, the lands of Darsquen in Dumfriesshire, and Robert Russell had 
a charter from David II. of Sympleland in the same county. 

Mr John Russell was Justice Depute in 1588, and during the 
sixteenth and seventeenth centuries several persons of the name repre- 
sented St Andrews and Pittenweem in parliament. 

Seal of Gilbert Russey (?) of Thornton, 1292 — a lion rampant 
charged with three chevronels. 

*Masoun of yt Ilk. This coat occurs twice among the earliest 
entries in the Lyon Register, but the name was certainly not taken from 
land. . . 

*DiK OF THAT Ilk. Another of the complimentary additions, con- 
verting a personal name into a local one. 

23. *MURRAY OF CoLBEN. 

Spens of Aberdeen. P., Warmiston. 

Ramsay of Dunoun. L., the crescents are or and the eagle is all sable. 

Blair of Adamtown. L. 

Wallange of Lochene. L., \oob. 

Mortymer of Babreich. L., the lion is not armed and langued 
gules. 

23. (Crombie). Name obliterated, but the coat is elsewhere given for 
Crombie. 

Balfour of Carristoun. Argent, a chevron between two otters' 
heads erased sable in chief, and a leaf vert in base. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 119 

BoRTHiuK OF Crukstoun. L., 73, the eagle's head couped. Cruk- 
stoun is scored out, and Collelaw written above it. The coat given by Sir 
David Lyndsay was recorded c, 1672 for William Borthwiek, M.D., re- 
presenter of the family of Gordonshall, co. Fife. 

CoLQUHOUN OF Luss. L., a series of the seals of this family is en- 
graved in " The Chiefs of Colquhoun and their Country," by William 
Fraser. 

One as early as 1475 has two hounds as supporters, which continued 
to be borne. 

It may be remarked that argent, a saltire engrailed sable, is also the 
coat of Haldane of Gleneagles. The Earl of Seafield is heir general, and 
inherits the baronetcy conferred in 1625 on Sir John Colquhoun of Luss ; 
the estates have descended under an entail to Sir James Colquhoun, now 
of Luss, baronet, who represents the second son who survived of the 
marriage, in 1702, of Anne, only child of Sir Humphrey Colquhoun, with 
James Grant of Pluscardine. 

It would appear to be in Sweden that we must look for an heir male. 
Hugh Cahun revealed the conspiracy headed by Charles de Mornay in 
September 1574, and lost his life in spite of a promise of pardon, 

Walter, fourth son of Alexander Colquhoun of Luss, by Helen 
Buchanan, his wife, went to Sweden in 1629 ; his descendants were called 
Caun-Scotus till, in 1689, Jacob was ennobled under the name of 
Canonhjelm, and at a later period another of the family as Gahn of 
Colquhoun. 

In 1 78 1 Henry Cahun, vulgo Gahn, physician to the Admiralty in 
Sweden, had a formal recognition from his kinsman the laird of Luss, 
and registered arms. The saltire, perhaps by an error of the Swedish 
heralds, had been converted, into a cross ; a lion rampant sable was added 
in the dexter canton, being the Buchanan bearing, to indicate the genera- 
tion to which the founder of the Swedish line belonged. 

* Ramsay of Russell. 

Carrutheris of Mouswald. L. 

24. Three coats added in ink. . 
(Oliphant), S. W. O. Gules, a mullet between three crescents argent; 

crest— a unicorn's head issuing from a crescent argent ; motto — " In vir- 
tute qiiies." 

The tinctures are supplied by the entry of the funeral of Sir Williarn 
Oliphant of Newton, Lord Advocate, who was buried in the Greyfriars' 
Church, Edinburgh, April 1628. 

*Ballewaird of that Ilk, or rather, Balvaird of Glentarkie, being 
one of Sir William Oliphant's quarters displayed at his funeral, his 
mother having been a Gibb of Carriber, and her mother a Balvaird ; the 
tinctures are supplied from the Lyon Register 1672. 

Carsane. a fess between three mascles in chief, and in base a cres- 
cent between two mullets. 

25. *GiB of yt Ilk. The two last words struck out and Carriber 
added. 



I20 WORKMAN'S MS. 

*DoG OF YT Ilk. 

GouRLAY OF THAT Ilk. L., the coat of Gourlay of Kincraig, as re- 
gistered c. 1672 for Sir Thomas, is sable, an eagle displayed argent, which 
appears in K. This coat, with two eagles argent for supporters, was con- 
firmed in 1865 to the Rev. William E. C. Austin-Gourlay of Kincraig, co. 
Fife, as representative of this baronial family. 

Seal of Henry de Gourlay, 1286 — an orle fretty. 

Cairnis of Orcherton. F. 

Melvill of Raith. L. 

DuRHAME of YT Ilk, as Durward, L. 

26. *PouRVES. This coat, the tinctures being altered, was allowed 
to Sir William Purves, who was created a baronet 1665. 

The seal of William Purves of Mospennoch, co. Peebles, c. 1230, has 
a hunting-horn. 

Steinsone, in ink — argent, a chevron between two (cocks' ?) heads 
couped in chief, and a fleur-de-lis in base gules, on a chief of the second 
three mullets of the field. 

Lawsone of Boghall. a saltire and chief, the latter charged with 
three garbs. 

27. Knowis of YT Ilk. L., these are the arms of a family of Knows, 
Knox, Knollis, of that Ilk, in the parish of Deer, co. Aberdeen, quite dis- 
tinct from Knox, co. Renfrew. 

Its most distinguished member was William Knollis, Preceptor of 
Torphichen and Lord of St John, Treasurer of Scotland, and Master of 
the Royal Household. He was Preceptor in 1468, and held the high 
office of Treasurer as late as 1492, sitting in parliament as a lord, and 
generally taking precedence next to the earls. This coat appears on his 
seal A.D. 1470. 

George Knollis married Christian, daughter of Sir Archibald Edmon- 
stone of Dunbreath, widow of John Lord Ross, who was killed at Flod- 
den, but they were divorced on the plea of consanguinity. 

It is not a little remarkable that Sir Robert Knolles, who served 
under the Black Prince with distinction, and died at a very great age in 
1407, bore the same arms, as shown by his seal and representations in 
the churches of Harpley and Withyam. He is generally said to have 
been from Cheshire and of obscure origin, but if we may trust to armorial 
evidence, there is a probability that Scotland may claim this successful 
soldier of fortune. He left no descendants, although the Earls of Banbury 
claim to derive their origin from him, and quartered his coat with their 
own, which was dissimilar. 

*FowLERtouN OF YT Ilk. Thcsc arms, the heads being erased, 
appear on the seal of William Fulertoun of Ardo 1575. 

The seal of Fullarton of Fullarton in Ayrshire, a little earlier, has a 
fess charged with three ermine spots. 

There were two families styled of that Ilk — Fullarton of Fullarton 
and Corsbie, co. Ayr, and Fullarton of Fullarton, near Meigle, co. Perth. 

Robert I. granted a charter, in the twenty-first year of his reign, of these 



WORKMAN'S MS. 121 

Perthshire lands, to Galfrido de Foullertoun, as fowler to the King's 
Household at Forfar. — NisbetQ). 

Thomas Foullartoun has charters of lands, co. Ayr, from David 11. 

Sir Adam de Foulertoun, of the county of Ayr, lived at the accession 
of Robert II., and held the lands of Foulertoun as heir of his deceased 
father, Alan de Foulertoun. 

The Ayrshire Fullartons often took the designation of Corsbie. In 
Forfarshire Fullerton of Kinnaber, a branch of the other family of that 
Ilk, held a good position for many generations, and bore two mullets on 
the fess. Nisbet calls the heads those of the otter, and in 1696 William 
Fullertoune of that Ilk, co. Ayr, entered in the Lyon Register a simple 
coat of — argent, three otters' heads erased gules, which, with differences, 
was matriculated by several cadets of his line, while none of the Forfar- 
shire and Perthshire families have ever recorded arms. 

Porteus, Snowdoun Herald, seems to have despaired of clearing up 
all this confusion, for he has Fullerton of Corsbie, i.e., of that Ilk, Ayr- 
shire — argent, a fess and three boars' heads gules ; aliter, three otters' 
heads erased ; aliter, three wolves' heads erased ; in the accompanying 
painting in Workman's MS. they rather resemble dogs' heads. 

The Fullartons of Dunnone ended in an heiress towards the end of 
the fifteenth century. 

Fullarton of Kilmichael, in the island of Arran, has been seated there 
since 1329, and bears a crescent between three otters' heads. 

Kynarde of yt Ilk. L., the saltire and crescents are argent, but 
" or " is written over them. These charges appear on the seals of William 
de Kinnard 1402, and of Reginald de Kynarde a.d. 1425 ; but that 
appended by Radulfus de Kinard to a deed of homage to Edward I. 
in 1296 has a saltire and four cross crosslets fitchde. The barony of 
Kinnaird, co. Perth, was sold in 1618 by John Kinnaird to Sir John 
Livingstone, ancestor of the Earls of Newburgh. 

Ranald Kinnaird and Marjory Kirkaldie, his spouse, had a charter 
from Robert III. of the barony of Inchture, co. Perth. Their descendant, 
Sir George Kinnaird of Inchture, registered, about 1672, the above coat, 
with the saltire and crescents or, quarterly with Kirkaldie ; when raised to 
the peerage 1682, he dropped the Kirkaldie quartering, and had a grant 
of "ane honourable additament and coat of augmentation," to be borne in 
the first and fourth quarters — or, a fess wavy between three mullets 
gules. 

*Wyntoune of Strakmartein. About 1672 Patrick Wintone of 
Strickmartine, co. Forfar, registered — argent, a chevron between three 
turtle doves azure. This coat is entirely different from that given for the 
name by Lindsay and Forman, and rather resembles that on the seals of 
persons of the name of Winchester early in the sixteenth century, where a 
chevron and two birds in chief are borne with other charges. 

Persons of the name figure as owners of land in several counties in 
the fourteenth century, and in 1417 David de Wyntoun, Lord of Handot. 

ScHERES OF YT Ilk, L. Sir David Lyndsay makes this family Lords 

2 H 



122 WORKMAN'S MS. 

of Dundee, a title for which there seems no ground. In 1408 the Duke 
of Albany confirms a charter of sale of lands near Dundee by Sir Patrick 
Gray to Robert de Seres, a burgess of Dundee. Towards the close of the 
century a family of Seres of Cragnathro, co. Forfar, occurs. 

*TowNis OF THAT Ilk. Sir Robert of Toynge, Treasurer of the 
Queen's Household 1329, is the most conspicuous person of a name that 
may be identified with this. 

29. Facunar of yt Ilk. L., there is an indication of a chevron 
between the three hawks' lures. 

*SwYFT. James II., soon after his accession, gives to John Swyft, 
burgess and bailie of Edinburgh, security for ^430 advanced by him; and 
the Chartulary of St Giles' contains frequent notices of the family. 

Clapen of Clulogane. L., the crown is an antique one, and there 
is no label. 

Bruchen. (Wischart added in a different hand). Argent, three piles 
in point gules. 

Mr H. Laing describes the charges on the seal of David de Brechin, 
appended to his deed of homage 1292, as three pales; but that attached 
to the Baron's letter to the Pope, a.d. 1320, has three piles in point. 

The arms were quartered by the Maules of Panmure, with the 
field or. 

MuNCURE OF YT Ilk. L., the field argent. 

♦WiNDRAME OF YT Ilk. The arms on the monument of John 
Wynram, Prior of Portmoak, 1582, are a ram with a garb in dexter chief. 
The surname does not appear to be a local one, but persons of the name 
possessed Wiston, co. Lanark; Nether Liberton, near Edinburgh; Currie- 
hill, also in Mid-Lothian. Wiston was carried by an heiress into the 
family of Lockhart of Cleghorn. George Winram was a senator of the 
College of Justice in the reign of Charles II., and was mortally wounded 
at the battle of Dunbar, being also colonel of a regiment. 

30. GUTHRY OF YT IlK. L. 

31. *KiNG. The arms and pedigree of King of Barra, co. Aberdeen, 
and of Lord Eythen, have recently been the subject of much discussion in 
Notes and Queries. No arms registered for the name till c. 1750. 

Carnis. First and fourth, gules, three martlets argent ; second 
and third, azure, three leopards' faces or. 

The seal, a.d. 1455, of William de Cairnis, Vicar of Glammis, has a 
star of six points, with three birds on a chief 

David II. grants to John Cairns the Peill of Linlithgow, he being 
obliged to build it for the King's coming ; and in the thirty-fifth year of 
the same reign, William de Carnys and Duncan, his son and heir, have a 
charter as to the holding of their lands of Whitburn. 

The name is probably derived from Cairns in the stewartry of Kirk- 
cudbright, where there were Cairns of Orchardton, whose coheirs married 
Kirkpatrick, Maxwell, and Kennedy about the middle of the sixteenth 
century ; Cairns of Tor ; Cairns of Barnebachill, &c. 

Mr Richard Cairns of Pilmure registered, c. 1672 — gules, three 



* 



^»1» 



?>> 






i V^^^'S ^ 






WORKMAN'S MS, 123 

martlets argent, a fleur-de-lis for difference. He was succeeded by his 
nephew, William Borthwick. The coat here quartered is given by Le 
Bouvier for Maligny, ? Maghie. 

Meluile. Gules, a fess between three crescents argent. 

These charges are found on the seal of John Melville of Raith, co. 
Fife, 1412; and of Nicholas Melville, date not known. The arms of this 
family, whose ancestor, Galfrid de Malevile, is witness to a charter in 
1 165, have varied much. 

The seal of Robert de Maleuyn, appended to a deed of homage to 
Edward I. in 1292, has a lion rampant. The high position of the family 
is shown by no less than twelve of its members, one of them, a knight, 
taking the oath of fealty in 1296. 

In H. M. Record Office there is a seal of an early date of James 
Maleuil, the charges being a garb surmounted of a fess. 

The chief line, seated on the barony of Melville, co. Edinburgh, 
ended, late in the fifteenth century, in Agnes, Lady of Melville, mother of 
John, first Lord Ross of Hawkhead. Their descendants have always 
quartered for Melville — gules, three crescents argent within a bordure of 
the second, charged with eight roses of the first, and retained the Melville 
estate till 1760. 

Richard de Maleuille, of the county of Fife, 1296, was probably 
ancestor of the Raith family, who, in the sixteenth century, dropped the 
crescents, thus reducing the coat to argent, a fess gules, as given by Sir 
David Lyndsay. 

When raised to the peerage in 1616, or perhaps earlier, the old coat 
of Melville of that Ilk was quartered with this, being placed first and 
fourth; in the Lyon Register, 1673, this is entered by George Lord 
Melville, and with a difference by his brother, James of Cassingray. 

At the same time two cadets of Raith are allowed the old coat with- 
out the Raith quarter ; but Melville of Auchmoor, apparently also a Raith 
cadet, has the fess gules, charged with three crescents, and differenced. 

The seal of Richard Melville, 1526-68, is a fess charged with a 
mullet. 

But there is a third coat : in 1449 Robert Melville seals with three 
cushions, and in 1473 George Melville with a fess between three cushions, 
and charged with two mullets. 

In 1685 Melville of Carnbee, co. Fife, records — or, three cushions 
gules, each charged with a crescent argent, all within a bordure of the 
second, charged with eight roses of the first. From this family derive 
the existing Barons Melville von Carnbee in Holland. 

In 1773 Major-General Robert. Melville of Strathkinnes, descended 
from a younger son of Sir John of Carnbee, was allowed to revert to the 
coat of Melville of that Ilk, with a crescent for difference, so that it may 
be said that in this family arms are hardly indicative of descent ; and also, 
it might almost be thought that Melville of Carnbee was a Dunbar, of the 
stock of the Earls of Moray. 

On the monument of Sir John Melville of the Carnbee family, at 



124 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Inch, near Downpatrick, are cut his arms — the shield defaced, with two 
birds as supporters, with the date 1628, and initials I. M. and A. R. 

Younger of yt Ilk. This replaces another name which has been 
obliterated, and is in a different hand. Argent, three piles sable, each 
charged with an annulet of the field ; on a chief gules a crescent or between 
two cinquefoils of the first. 

Younger is not a local name. 

Spens of Wilmestoun. As F., 1572, the field or. 

*GUTTRE OF LOUNAN, 

32. *RiCHESOUN. There is added in another hand " of Smyttone." 
The seal, 1566, of Mr Robert Richardson, Commendator of St Mary's 
Isle, and High Treasurer of Scotland, has nearly these bearings, the 
saltire being on the field instead of on a fess. Patrick of Drumsheugh, 
1507, uses two arrows in saltire, points upwards. The seal of Sir James 
of Smeaton, 1627, is a saltire between a bull's head erased in chief and a 
crescent in base. 

His grandson, Sir James of Smeaton, Bart., recorded, c. 1678 — or, on 
a fess azure between a bull's head couped in chief and a lymphad in base 
sable, a saltire argent. 

The same is given in 1661 in Porteus' MS., and also another 
Richardson coat — parted per fess argent and azure, a lion counter- 
changed ; this seems to have been taken as a model for a crest for Sir 
James in 1678 — a lion rampant parted per fess or and azure, holding in 
his forepaws a laurel garland. 

On this page is an unfinished coat without a name — on a fess 
between three mascles or a mullet. 

33. Mercer of Mekilour. L., a cross patde gules, in place of the 
mullet in base. 

This is one of those families the origin, development, and variations 
of whose arms deserve some study. 

Walter, son of Alan the Steward, granted Tullicoultry to Alcunus 
Meser, whose son and successor, of the same name, resigned them into 
the King's hands 19th June 1261. 

Bernard le Mercer, burgess of Perth, did homage to Edward I. 
1296. 

John Mercer, burgess of that burgh, and several times provost, made 
a large fortune; married before 1328 Ada Murray of the Tullibardine 
family; was, in 1355, commissioner from Perth to treat for the liberation 
of David II. ; sat in the general council 1364 and 1376 ; and acted as re- 
ceiver of revenue while the office of Chamberlain was vacant. He had 
charters of Meikleour and Aldie 1362-64. 

The seal of his son, "Andrew Mercer, Lorde of Mekylhour," 
appended to his award, 1385, in a dispute submitted to his decision 
between Robert, Earl of Fife and Menteith, and John of Logy, has a 
chevron between three mullets. 

These were the bearings at that time of Sir Andrew's mother's 
family, and it is probable that by him they were carried with a variation 
of tincture. His crest is a peacock's head. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 125 

The same coat, with a label of three points for difference, was borne 
by Robert Mercer of Innerpeffry, a cadet, on his seal 1454-65 ; but in the 
former year Andrew of Inchbrakie uses a fess charged with three roundles 
between two cross crosslets fitchde in chief, and a mullet in base, the 
latter evidently the Murray charge retained ; while the character of the 
bearings was otherwise changed entirely. The roundles, besants, or 
plates evidently allude to the wealth acquired by commerce by the founder 
of the family. 

David of Innerpeffry, 1483, retains the chevron, but entirely drops the 
mullets, and has in their place three cross crosslets fitchde ; a bird's head 
is the crest. 

George, Abbot of Inchaffray 1469, uses a chevron between two in- 
distinguishable charges in chief and a mullet in base. 

The seal of Robert of Balleif, 1468, is a fess charged with three 
roundles, with other charges obliterated. 

But Sir James Balfour gives a blazon for Balleif in 1453 — or, on a 
fess between three crosses patde gules three plates. 

In an illuminated MS. added to Sir James Balfour's, are given — 
Aldie, argent, on a fess gules between three cross crosslets fitchde sable as 
many mullets of the field ; this coat, I incline to think, is Tulloch under a 
wrong name, for farther on is given — Meikleour, or, on a fess gules 
between two cross crosslets fitch^e of the second in chief and a mullet 
azure in base, three plates. 

In 1504 Sir Henry Mercer of Meikleour seals with the arms which 
have the high authority of Sir David Lindsay, and in 1565 Laurence of 
Meikleour had added a third cross patee in chief. This appears cut at 
Aldie with the date 1569 ; crest — the head and neck of a stork with a 
serpent in its mouth; motto — "Thi grit pool;" supporters — two naked 
men holding in their exterior hands clubs resting on the ground. 

About 1672 Mrs Grizel Mercer of Aldie registered the arms without 
supporters, and with a cross patde or for crest, and the motto " Crux 
Christi nostra corona!' The same arms, with marks of cadency, were 
entered about that time for cadets, with differences and variations of crest, 
none of them having the stork's head. 

It has been suggested that the crosses patde may have been assumed 
to commemorate a Barclay alliance, and the motto of Mrs Grizel Mercer 
is also that of some families of Barclay. Sir Andrew Mercer's wife, Janet, 
is supposed to have been a Barclay. 

Nisbet describes the arms of Sir Lawrence Mercer in his time, which 
closely resemble the coat described as cut for Sir Laurence in 1569; the 
motto he spells " Ye gret pule," and the supporters have helmets on their 
heads. 

In 1 48 1 Sir Lawrence Mercer sat in parliament, and many members 
of the family afterwards sat for the county and burgh of Perth. 

The lands of Meikleour and many others were erected into a free 
barony in favour of Andrew Mercer, by Crown charter, 21st March 

1444-5- 

21 



126 WORKMAN'S MS. 

The family estates have passed by marriage to the families of 
Nairne, Elphinstone, and Flahault ; and Emily Jane, Dowager- 
Marchioness of Lansdowne, Baroness Nairne in her own right, is the 
present owner of Aldie and Meikleour. 

The male representative is probably William Lindsay Mercer of 
Huntingtower, co. Perth, whose father, Major William Drummond 
Mercer of Huntingtower, in 1864, registered the arms of 1672, with the 
addition of a canton gules charged with a boar's head couped or, for 
Chisholm ; the founder of his branch was Robert Mercer of Newton 
(younger son of Sir Laurence of Meikleour), who married in 1527 Helen, 
daughter of Edmund Chisholm of Cromlix; crest — the head and neck of 
a stork holding in the beak a serpent writhing proper, with the motto 
" Ye gret pule" above it, and below the shield "Crux Christi nostra 
coronal 

Mr Graeme Reid Mercer of Gorthy, co. Perth, is next in succession, 
and by his investigations much of the information here given has been 
obtained. 

Dannalstoun. L., this coat has been quartered by Maxwell of 
Calderwood, seal a.d. 1470, and was allowed in 1828 to James Dennistoun 
of Colgrain ; the supporters of the family had been granted, 1 771, to James 
of Colgrain, with the coat recorded, c. 1672, by his ancestor, William of 
Colgrain, viz. : argent, a bend sable between a unicorn's head erased of 
the second in chief, and a cross crosslet fitchde azure in base. Colgrain 
was in the possession of William de Danilston in 1377, when he and his 
elder brother. Sir Robert, Sheriff of Lennox and Keeper of Dumbarton 
Castle, witness a charter of their father, Sir John, who styles himself 
Lord of Fynlauistoun, Danyelston, and Kylmoloog. Sir Huwe de 
Danilston did homage to Edward L 1296, and in 1357 Robert, son of Sir 
John de Danyelston, was a hostage for the payment of the ransom of 
David n. 

BONAR OF ROSSEE, L. 

Fentoun of Baky. Argent, three crescents gules, being entirely 
different from the Fentoun coats in Lindsay and Forman. The crescents 
are on the seal, 1292, of Sir William de Fentun, Lord of Beaufort, which 
he had acquired by marriage with Cecilia Byset, and of Janet, daughter 
and coheir of Walter de Fen ton of Bakie, co. Forfar, 1448-72-89; the 
seal of 1448 has the addition of a label of three points. Three persons 
of the name took the oaths to Edward L 1292-96, and John de Fenton 
is one of the barons who signed the letter to the Pope 1320. 

John de Fenton was Sheriff of Forfar 1261. 

Elizabeth, sister and heiress of John Fenton of that Ilk, in East 
Lothian, married, c. 1525, Whitelaw of that Ilk, and Fenton passed by 
marriage of Isobel Whitelaw to her husband, Andrew Kerr of Fenton. 
The seal of William Fenton, 1450, is a chevron between three crescents. 

Karcady of ye Grange. L., argent, two mullets in chief and a cres- 
cent in base gules. The bearings on the seals of James de Kirkaldi 1357, 
and Elizabeth Kirkaldi 1582, are two crescents and a mullet, while that 



WORKMAN'S MS. * 127 

of James Kyrkelde, 1546, has a fess between two stars in chief and a 
crescent in base. The Kirkaldy coat, entered in the Lyon Register as a 
quartering by Sir George Kinnaird, is gules, three stars argent ; about 
the same time Sir John Kirkaldy of Grange, baronet, recorded gules, a 
chevron argent between three stars in chief and a crescent in base or. 
The writer may be allowed to refer to the fate of the descendants of the 
gallant Sir William Kirkaldy, as first traced in a paper on the Kerrs of 
Fernihirst, contributed to the " Genealogist." His only child, Mary Kir- 
kaldy, married, in 1561-2, Sir Thomas Kerr of Fernihirst, and died in about 
six years ; their second son, William Kerr, took the name and designation 
of Kirkaldy of Grange, and married, in 1586, Elizabeth, daughter of John 
Lord Glammis, Lord Chancellor of Scotland. The son of this marriage 
seems to have transferred Grange to the heir male of the Kirkaldys, and 
^resumed his paternal surname ; on the death of Andrew Lord Jedburgh 
in 163 1, the right to that title passed to this Alexander Kerr, but the 
estate being ruined, he never assumed it ; in 1654 his son, John Kerr, 
established his status as heir male of Fernihirst by three different services, 
but still does not appear to have claimed the peerage. On his death 
without issue, the descendants of the ill-fated Kirkaldy seem to have 
become extinct, and the barony of Jedburgh was confirmed in 1670 to the 
nearest heir male. 

John Kircaldie of Grange was created a baronet 14th May 1664, with 
remainder to the heirs male of his body. The Exchequer Rolls, 1331, 
contain a payment to John de Kirkcaldy. 

Stewart of Bowkill. L., the bend is engrailed. 

34. Blyth. Or, a fess checquy vert and argent between in chief a 
mascle between two crescents, and in base three garbs, tinctures not given. 
Richard Blyth, 1567, represented Dundee in parliament. 

*Cars of Mounkounhall. a fess engrailed or between two 
mullets in chief argent and a crescent in base of the second, a bordure 
engrailed also of the second. The Carses of Cockpen and Fordel, co. 
Edinburgh, made some figure in the seventeenth century, one of them 
being knighted. 

The arms recorded by him in 1673, as Sir Mark Carse of Fofdel- 
carse, are different ; argent, on a saltire vert between four cross crosslets 
fitchde gules, five crescents of the field. Stacie gives the other coat, making 
the field azure, and calling the fess a bar. 

35. Betoun of Balfour. As F., Betoun of Creich. 
Ogill of Popill. L., the birds resemble martlets. 

Mr Laing gives the seal, 1538, of Patrick Ogil of Hawtreewood, one 
bittern passant. 

Popill, in Haddingtonshire, was in the possession of James of Ogil 
before 1480; Mr David Ogill of Popill registered arms c. 1672— argent, 
on a fess gules three cocks passant or, in middle chief a crescent of the 
second. 

DiscHiNTOUN OF Ardros. L., thcsc are the bearings on the seal of 
William de Dyscingtoune, 137 1, appended to the act settling the succession 



128 WORKMAN'S MS. 

to the Crown. He had shortly before inherited a third of the baronies of 
Ardross and Currie from his kinsman, John Burnard ; was steward of the 
King's Household and Sheriff of Fife. William sat in several parliaments. 
The arms were quartered by Hamilton of Kilbrackmont, descended from 
a coheiress. 

Sprewll of Cowden. L., argent, a chevron between three purses 
or cushions gules. 

Wardlaw of Torre. L., the second and third quarters are or, three 
water bougets sable. 

The seal of Walter, Archbishop of Glasgow 1368, is on a fess 
between three mascles as many crosses. 

The coat given by Sir D. Lyndsay is on the seal of Sir Henry Ward- 
law 1444, and was registered c. 1672 by Sir Henry Wardlaw of Pitreavie, 
Bart. 

TOSHACH OF MONYVAIRD. F. 

36. WiLSONE OF Kroglyne. Argent, a chevron gules between two 
mullets in chief of the second, and a crescent azure in base. MS. note, 
Wilson of Absounyer — argent, on a pale gules a sword proper issuing 
out of a crescent argent ; crest — a fox's head or. 

The latter coat does not appear in the Lyon Register, but that given 
for the family of Croglin, co. Dumfries, is repeatedly entered, from 1672 
onwards, with variations. The French herald. Marc Vulson de la 
Colombi^re, belonged to a family of Scottish origin settled in Dauphin^, 
and bore — argent, a chevron between three mullets gules ; crest — a hand 
holding a spiked club; motto — "Pour bienf aire T supporters— two savages 
wreathed about the head and middle with ivy, holding clubs ; he states 
that these supporters were borne of old by his ancestors in Scotland, but 
I have not found evidence of any family bearing, or in such a position as to 
entitle them to bear, supporters. 

In 1 77 1 Alexander Wilson of Glanderston, co. Renfrew, the head of 
a family owning land in that county for several generations, registered 
this coat with differences, and was allowed supporters — a savage wreathed 
round the middle with oak, resting one hand on a club proper, and a 
negro holding a hatchet erect proper, wreathed about the head and middle 
argent. 

Wilson of Finzeauch, in Aberdeenshire, c. 1672, registered — sable, a 
wolf salient or, in chief three estoiles argent. 

Crokcat, a Frenchman. Argent, a chevron azure between two 
mullets of the second in chief, and a crescent in base gules. 

This name may be of French origin, but appears in Scotland in the 
thirteenth century. 

In 1296 Huwe Croket of Kameslank, and William Croketa of 
Kylbride, both in Lanarkshire, swore fealty to Edward I. Andrew 
Croket was rector of Kilbucho and Corry, and chaplain to Sir James 
Douglas of Dalkeith, by whom he was named executor in his wills made 
in September 1390 and December 1392. In Edinburgh there was, in the 
seventeenth century, a wealthy burgess family, of whom Elizabeth, 



WORKMAN'S MS. 129 

daughter and heir of Thomas Crokat of Johnstounburn, co. Haddington, 
married, in 1733, Andrew Broun of Braid, near Edinburgh. 

37. Grantt. L., the crowns are antique, as now borne. 

Arbothnott. L,, the same bearings appear on a seal 1493, with 
dragons as supporters, which continued the supporters when this existing 
family was raised to the peerage 1641. 

A cadet, in 1 493, has the crescent on a fess. The Laird of Arbuth- 
nott sat in parliament 1487-91. 

A fabulous antiquity has been claimed for this family, but it is 
certain that before the middle of the thirteenth century they were seated 
on the lands they still hold, and from which they took their name. Alwin 
de Aberbutennauth witnessed a charter of Christian Corbet to the church 
at St Andrews c. 1240. 

*Red. There is added in a different hand Reid of Barskiming. 
Crest — a pheon ; motto — " Virtute et fide." A stag's head erased was the 
bearing of Robert Reid, Bishop of Orkney and Abbot of Kinloss, Lord 
President of the Court of Session, as on his seal a.d. 1550; his book 
stamp, with the date 1558, makes the head couped, and below it is the 
motto, " Moderate." His father fell at Flodden, and was of the family 
of Reid of Aikenhead, co. Clackmannan. The bishop was the founder of 
Edinburgh College. 

John Reed has a charter of lands near Cardross from David H., and 
the same king grants the Forest of Lochyndorbe to Symon Reed, con- 
stable of Edinburgh Castle. 

Barskimming, co. Ayr, was acquired by William Rede c. 1370, and 
in that county several branches of the family long held lands of consider- 
able extent. 

Tendalle. L., Sir James Balfour gives for Tindaill, anno 1489 — 
azure, two mascles in fess or. On the seal of John Tendel, baker, 
burgess of Perth, 1580, are — a chevron between two roses in chief and a 
baker's peel bearing three manchets in base, the chevron charged with a 
mullet. He left two daughters, both unmarried, in 1623, and the name 
seems almost to have disappeared. In 1296 Robert le Tyndale, parson 
of Grand Dalton, co. Dumfries, swore fealty to Edward L In 1492 John 
of Tendale held the lands of Over Cullen, and other persons of the sur- 
name are to be met with during the fifteenth century. 

Cheyn of yt Ilk. L., 129^^, the bend or. The seal of Sir Reginald 
le Chen, appended to his deed of homage to Edward I., is sem6e of cross 
crosslets fitch^e a bend ; his son, of the same name, at the same time, 
charges the bend with three escallops; and in 1320 Reginald- le Chein 
appends his seal to the Barons' letter to the Pope with three eagles dis- 
played on the bend, Mr Laing says ; but they rather resemble crosses 
patde. 

Sir Reginald was Sheriff of Kincardine 1264, and Great Chamberlain 
of Scotland 1267-69; Henry was Bishop of Aberdeen 1281-1328. 

Marion, daughter and heir of Sir Reginald Cheyne of Inverugie, 
brought great estates in marriage, c. 1350, to John, younger son of Sir 

2K 



I30 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Edward Keith, Great Marischal of Scotland ; and her seal, a.d. 1390, 
exhibits the bend charged with three mullets. A younger son acquired 
Essilmont in Aberdeenshire by marriage with Janet Marshall, and 
founded a family which long held that estate along with Straloch and 
Meikle Arnage. In 1678 George Cheine of Essilmont entered his coat 
in the Lyon Register as — quarterly, first and fourth, azure, a bend 
between six crosses pat6e fitch6e argent ; second and third argent, three 
leaves slipped vert for Marshall ; crest — a cross as in the arms ; motto — 
" Patientia vincii." This family were, in the fifteenth century, sometimes 
designed of that Ilk, 

Robert II., in the seventh year of his reign, granted a charter of con- 
firmation of the lands of Essilmont and Meikle Arnage to William 
Marshall, son of Malcolm Marshall, on the resignation of his said father. 
Essilmont passed from the possession of the Cheynes about 1685, but a 
branch remains in Shetland, and several cadets, in the seventeenth 
century, with duly accredited birthbriefs, went to try their fortunes on the 
Continent. 

Rattray. L., the crosses argent, on the seal of Silvester de Rattray 
1465, are six cross crosslets fitchde — three, two, and one ; seals of persons 
of the name exhibit great variations. 

That of John, Bailie of Aberdeen 1504, has a fess between three cross 
crosslets fitchde in chief, and an ermine spot in base ; while Alexander, in 
1628, uses a chevron between three roses, and charged with a rose between 
two mullets. Silvester of Rattray sat in parliament 1481. 

The name is taken from the barony of Rattray, co. Perth, of which 
the Athole family took violent possession about 1520, and assassinated 
Patrick Rattray, the heir of the family. His brother regained possession 
of parts of the estate, including Craighall, which was erected into a barony 
in the seventeenth century, and is known as Craighall-Rattray. 

Its present owner descends from a daughter of the family, the 
printed genealogies of which are incomplete and unsatisfactory. 

In 1 77 1 Thomas Rattray of Craighall registered as his arms — azure, 
three cross crosslets fitch6e or. 

An addition to Stacie's MS. mentions that Rattray of that Ilk bore 
for supporters two serpents or adders, tails nowed proper, and gives the 
arms as azure, a fess between three cross crosslets fitch^e or. The 
supporters, although not allowed in 1771, were granted in 181 7 to the 
heir of entail, James Clerk-Rattray of Craighall-Rattray, as two serpents 
nowed proper. 

38. Kairinis. Or, three birds azure, on a chief gules an acorn 
between two mullets of the first. 

(No name.) Argent, three lilies slipped and leaved proper. 

*CowsTANE. Sir Ralph Costein is witness to a charter, c. 1200, to 
the church of St Mary at Stirling. 

A family of the name of Couston held some position in the shires of 
Clackmannan and Perth, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

*MuscHiT OF YT Ilk. Ermine spots or mushetors are the field or 



WORKMAN'S MS, 131 

charge in all the coats for this name, and thus the arms are canting. 
William de Montefixo signed the barons' letter in 1320, and twenty-four 
years previously David and Richard Muschet, both of the shire of Angus, 
swore fealty to Edward I. 

In the reign of David II. the Montfitchet or Mushet family lost part 
of their lands by forfeiture, but branches of the race possessed Tolgarth, 
Craighead, Kincairne, Burnbank, &c., and for a time the head of the 
name was styled of that Ilk ; Alexander Muschet sat in parliament for 
Stirling 1467-79, and John for the same place in 1585. The Craighead 
family remained seated there till nearly the close of last century, and the 
Callechat branch expired in the male line on the death in 1755 of David 
Mushet, when the estate passed to his sisters, Margaret and Elizabeth 
(Mrs Craig.) 

The only registration of arms is, c. 1680, Robert Mushet, Lieutenant 
in the military service of the States General, under the Prince of Orange, 
a second son of Craighead, which family derived from a second son of 
Mushet of that Ilk — ermine, two chevrons gules, a bordure azure charged 
with eight crescents argent. 

This name, now of rare occurrence, has had rather an unpleasant 
notoriety since the murder of his wife in the King's Park, Edinburgh, in 
October 1720, by Nichol Muschett of Boghall, who was hanged for the 
crime. 

39. Dalzell of yt Ilk. L., there are spots of blood on the man's 
skin. 

*EwART, QuHiTELAW OF YT Ilk. The name is written over another 
word, which might be Quaret. Vert, two swords in a saltire hilts to the 
dexter, and another fessways hilt to the sinister, in chief an animal's (? 
boar's) head contournd, and in base a heart, all argent. This seems to be 
the foundation of a coat, not registered in Scotland, borne by a family of 
Ewart, formerly of Mulloch, co. Kirkcudbright, one of whom sat in 
parliament 1678. 

The coat assigned, in Frazer's Funeral Escutcheons, to Ewart of 
Bodsbeck is — argent, on a chief vert three boars' heads erased of the f^eld. 

Maule of Panmure. L., Sir William de Maul did homage to 
Edward I. 1291. Thomas Maule of Panmure sat in parliament 1360. 
The " Registrum de Panmure," compiled in 1733 by the Hon. Harry Maule 
of Kelly, and printed for private circulation 1874, under the editorship of 
the late John Stuart, LL.D., gives a full account of this family both in 
France and Scotland, and contains most valuable armorial illustrations. 

This is one of the few instances where families of the same name in 
these countries bore similar arms. The seal of Petrus de Maulia, w//^5 
a.d. 1224, is — parted per pale a bordure charged with nine escallops ; at a 
later period sometimes eight or twelve. The tinctures of the coat thus 
borne in France were — parted per pale argent and gules, on a bordure sable 
escallops argent or or; supporters — two savages wreathed about the 
middle with leaves, two lions proper, two storks, two apes. 

In Scotland Willelmus Masculus witnessed a charter of Earl Henry, 



1 32 WORKMAN'S MS. 

son of David I., ante 1 152 ; the Panmure and Brechin estates were 
acquired by marriage, and in 1646 Patrick Maule of Panmure was 
created Earl of Panmure. 

The seal of Sir William Maule, a.d. 1296, is parted per pale with 
eight escallops on the bordure, and some of his descendants bore that 
number, others nine. 

It is said, but apparently without authority, that the supporters, 
originally savages, were altered to greyhounds, as always borne since 1646, 
in the reign of James VI. Several cadets of the Panmure family settled 
on the Continent. 

Hawdin of Glenneges. L., two eagles or falcons as supporters 
are added in ink, also the motto, " Suffer, suffer." These supporters, 
long borne by the family, were not recorded when Mungo Haldane of 
Gleneagles entered arms, c. 1672, but have recently been confirmed to the 
heir male, Alexander Haldane, Esquire, barrister-at-law. The estate has 
passed, by a special destination, to the Earl of Camperdown, and the heir 
of line is James Gordon-Oswald of Scotstoun, Esq. 

Bernard de Hauden made a grant from his lands of Hauden to the 
religious house of Soltre between 1 190 and 1230. 

In 1296 Bernard de Hauden, co. Roxburgh, Ayelmer and Eymer, 
CO. Edinburgh ; Rauf, parson of Whitsome, co. Berwick; and Robert, also 
of Berwickshire, did homage to Edward I. 

John Haldane of Gleneagles sat in parliament 1478-85, and his 
descendants have since very frequently represented the county of Perth. 
His marriage, c. 1460, to Agnes, daughter and coheir of Murdac Men- 
teith of Rusky, whose mother, Margaret, was daughter and coheir of 
Duncan, Earl of Lennox, greatly aggrandised the Haldane family. The 
MS. entitled Gentlemen's Arms, contains a curious variation of the coat 
-»-azure, an eagle displayed or, surmounted of a saltire engrailed gules. 
It has been said that the Haldanes acquired their Perthshire estate by 
marriage with the heiress of Gleneagles of that Ilk. 

MoFFETT OF YT Ilk. L., Nicol de Moffat was Bishop of Glasgow 
1268-70. Robert and Thomas de Moffet, both of the county of Dumfries, 
did homage to Edward I. a.d. 1296. 

Robert I. grants a charter to Adam Moffat of the lands of Knocks and 
Crocks in Eskdale, and to Thomas Moffat of Glencrofts and Swegill, in 
the same district. In the following reign we find grants of lands forfeited 
and wadset by the Moffats. 

In the sixteenth century they were among the unruly clans on the 
west march, and although various persons of the name possessed Gran- 
toun, Hewck, Auldtoun, &c., seem not to have had a chief with the 
designation of that Ilk. The lands granted by Robert Bruce to Adam 
Moffat were still in the family in the seventeenth century. 

ScHAW OF Sauche. L., a naked savage is sketched in ink as one of 
the supporters. 

Nisbet gives the arms, and for supporters two savages wreathed 
about the middle with laurel, for Sir John Shaw of Greenock, Bart., heir 



WORKMAN'S MS, 133 

male of Sauchie, and they were recorded in 1812 by his heir of entail, Sir 
Michael Shaw-Stewart of Blackhall and Greenock, Bart., but immediately 
afterwards, at his request, the dexter supporter was altered to a lion. 

Earl Cathcart is heir of line. 

The seal of James de Schaw, 1409, has three covered cups. 

James Shaw of Sauchie sat in parliament 1467, and afterwards ; 
Fergus, Symund, and William del Schawe, all of Lanarkshire, did homage 
to Edward I. 1296. 

James Shaw of Sauchie was Ambassador to Edward IV. 1471, 
Governor of Prince James, and Governor of Stirling Castle, 

George, Abbot of Paisley, was Lord High Treasurer of Scotland 
1494-96. Robert was Abbot of Paisley and Bishop of Moray 1524-27 ; 
his seal, a.d. 1498, is three covered cups. 

40. Forbes of Tochone. L., these arms were recorded in 1674 by 
Sir Alexander Forbes of Tolquhone, with supporters two greyhounds 
proper collared gules, and are borne quartered with Leith by his repre- 
sentative. Rev. William Forbes-Leith of Whitehaugh, co. Aberdeen. 

The unicorns' heads are for Preston ; Henry de Preston acquired the 
barony of Formartin in the reign of Robert HL, and a coheiress brought 
Tolquhoun to her husband, John de Forbes, c. 1420. It was sold in 17 16 
by William Forbes, who had, in 1706, married Anne, daughter and heir 
of John Leith of Whitehaugh, whose ancestor, John Leith of Montgarie 
or Quhythauch, had a patent of arms, dated 17th January 1688, which is 
not recorded — argent, five fusils in fess sable, 

Pettres. The leaf is torn and the lower part of the shield gone ; 
the arms appear to be argent, a lion passant gules, surmounted of a sword 
paleways, on a chief sable a boar's head couped between a mullet and a 
crescent argent. 

41. Wemes of yt Ilk. L., first and fourth, or, a lion rampant 
gules within an orle sable ; second and third, argent, a lion rampant 
within an orle sable — said, in a note on the margin, to be for Mortimar. 

The seal, 1544, of Sir John Wemyss of that Ilk, is quarterly, in each 
quarter a lion rampant ; crest — a swan's head. Nisbet says that the 
second lion has been quartered since 1423. 

Sir Michael de Wymes and David de Wymes, both of the co. of Fife, 
did homage to Edward I. in 1296. David deWemys signed the letter to 
the Pope 1320. 

Gamel, Bishop of St Andrews in 1261, confirmed a charter by Sir 
John, son of Michael de Wemys, of the Church of Wemys, to the Hospi- 
tal of Soltre. An earlier charter by John de Methkill, of the said Church 
of Wemys, to the same house, certainly granted before 1240, is considered 
to be by an ancestor of the Wemyss family who possessed Methkill or 
Methill, and are supposed to have taken a surname from it first, and after- 
wards from Wemyss, which became their chief seat. 

David de Wemyss was Sheriff of Fife a.d. 1339. 

The laird of Wester Wemyss sat in parliament 1488, and in 1628 the 
head of the family was raised to the peerage ; on the death of David, 

2 L 



134 WORKMAN'S MS. 

second Earl of Wemyss, 1679, the title and estates passed to his younger 
daughter, ancestor of the Earl of Wemyss and March ; the elder is repre- 
sented by the Duke of Sutherland ; Wemyss of Bogie became heir male. 
The Wemyss estates are held by Mr Erskine- Wemyss, cousin of the earl. 

The arms registered by the second Earl, c. 1672, are — or, a lion ram- 
pant gules, quartering, argent, a lion rampant sable, said to be for Glen ; 
crest — a swan ; supporters — two swans proper. These arms, with suit- 
able differences, were entered by cadets of the Wemyss family about the 
same time. 

Before 1700 the second and third quarters were dropped and the 
supporters altered to two lions gardant sable, but the swans were resumed. 
Contradictory accounts have been given as to the coat quartered with 
Wemyss, but there can be no doubt that it is Inchmartine. The seal of 
Johnde Hincmartin, appended to the barons' letter of 1320, is — billettde a 
lion rampant. Sir John Wemyss married Isabel, daughter and coheir of 
Sir Alan Erskine by Isabel de Inchmartine, Lady of Inchmartine. 

Wemes of Rerese. L., the orle gules is changed to a tressure 
flowered counterflowered sable. The seal of Thomas Wemyss of Rires, 
1455, is — a lion rampant quartering a bend, said to be for Bisset. David 
II. confirmed to David Weems and his wife a charter of the lands of 
Rires, granted by Duncan, Earl of Fife, before 1353. Rires was given to 
a younger son of the family in the beginning of the fifteenth century, and 
the heiress of this branch married a cadet of Forbes of Pitsligo ; their 
descendant, Arthur Forbes of Rires, registered arms c. 1672, being first 
and fourth, Wemyss ; second and third, Forbes. 

CoLUiLLE. L., the cross moline is on the seal of Eustacia Colvile 
1316, with the addition of four cross crosslets fitchde, the bearing of her 
deceased husband, Reginald le Chein. 

Robert de Colvil, Lord of Oxenham and Ochiltree, 1324, also seals 
with a cross moline. 

The Lindsay quarter appears on the seal of James Colvil of East 
Wemyss 1547. 

The coat of Philip de Coleuile in Charles' Roll of Arms, 1250-95, is — 
argent, a cross patonce gules, an example of close similarity in bearings 
between Scotch and English families of the same name. 

A seal of Sir Robert, 1453, has two lions as supporters, and in 161 1 
a savage and a stag or antelope were used. 

Philip de Coleuille is witness to a charter of King Malcolm 11 60. 

Thomas of Colevill witnessed a charter of William the Lion to the 
burgh of Ayr. 

Thomas de Coleuile, of the county of Dumfries, swore fealty to 
Edward I. in 1296. 

Robert Colvill had a charter of the barony of Ochiltree from David 
II. Sir Robert of Ochiltree sat in parliament 1469, 

The family, in 1604, attained to a peerage, which they still hold. 

The printed Colville pedigrees abound in mistakes, and among many 
omissions, say nothing of the marriage, in the fourteenth century, to a co- 



WORKMAN'S MS. 135 

heiress of Sir James de Lindsay, thus leaving the quartering of that coat 
unaccounted for. Robert of Hilton, who married Margaret Logan, and 
was dead in 1503, is made the same person as his son and successor, who 
married Elizabeth Arnot, and fell at Flodden. 

William, Abbot of Culross 1531-36, is omitted, as is the marriage of 
Margaret, heiress of Oxnam, to Andrew Kerr of Fernihirst, in or before 
1509. 

LuNDY OF Balcony. L., the first and fourth, gules, four pallets 
argent. 

Anstruder of that Ilk. L., Henry de Anystrother confirms, 
c. 1300, a grant to the church of St Mary of Dryburgh made by his 
deceased father, Henry. The father has no surname, but in the family 
pedigrees is identified with Henry, son of William de Candela dominus 
de Aynstroyir, who confirms a grant, without date, made by his late 
father to the Abbey of Balmerino. 

In 1287 Willelmus de Aynestroche had sasine of lands in Tynedale 
in Northumberland, held by his late father in c^///^ of Alexander III.; he 
was dead before 28th June 1288, when his son Henry was found to be his 
heir in a fourth of the manor of Hetherington in Tynedale. In the writ 
directed to the escheator, and in the inquisitio, the surname is Heynstrother 
and Aynstrother. Can the Strothers of Newton in Tynedale be a branch 
of the same family ? 

In 1291 Dominus Henricus de Anstrether, and in 1296 Henry de 
Aynestrothere, swore fealty to Edward I. 

In 1270 Sir William of Aynestrother was one of a jury. 

None of this family sat in parliament before 1665. 

Sir James was Master of the Household to James VI., and had a 
gift of the heritable office of carver to the king. 

Sir William was created a Knight of the Bath 1603. 

The arms were registered with supporters — two falcons wings ex- 
panded proper armed gules, jessed and belled or — by Sir Philip Anstruther 
of that Ilk, c. 1672. 

Meldrum of Fyffe. L, 

42. MouTRAY of Sifeild, in ink, with the initials R. M. As Mowl- 
tarer, L. 73, the chevron or. This family is frequently confused with the 
Moubrays. 

Adam de Multref, burgess of Berwick, swore fealty to Edward I. 
1292. 

David II., in the thirty-sixth year of his reign, grants lands in the 
barony of Restalrig to Robert Multrere, burgess of Edinburgh. . 

John Multrar represented the. burgh of Ayr in parliament 1463. 
The Mowtrays held Seafield and lands at Markinch before the middle of 
the fifteenth century, which were sold in 1631 ; the representatives of the 
family possessed Rescobie, near Dunfermline, till after 1800 ; and about 
1676 John Moultrie of Rescobie recorded the arms as given by Sir David 
Lindsay, altering the boar's head from erased to couped; crest — a mermaid 
proper ; motto — " Nunquam nonjidelis" 



136 WORKMAN'S MS. 

A cadet settled in America in 1729, and was ancestor of the Rev. 
Gerard Moultrie, vicar of South Leigh, co. Oxford, who claims to be heir 
male of Seafield. 

Murray of Balwaird. L., two lions as supporters are added in 
ink, and a mermaid for crest. Below is a sketch in ink of the same arms 
and supporters, the only difference being a crescent below the cross patee ; 
crest — a demi-lion holding a battle-axe; motto — "E auspice phira 
teutare." 

BoswELL OF Balmuto. L., the arrangement of the quarters re- 
versed ; two greyhounds collared added in ink as supporters, and a falcon 
as crest. 

The seal, without date, of Eustace de B6iswel has a saltire and a 
chief charged with a boar's head couped. 

In the older entries the lion and ribbon are said to be for Abernethy, 
but apparently without reason ; Balmuto was acquired about the begin- 
ning of the fifteenth century by marriage with Marion Glen, descended 
from Robert Glen and his wife Margaret, natural daughter of Robert I. ; 
it seems probable that the coat is indicative of this illegitimate descent 
from royalty. 

Robert de Boseuille witnessed a charter of William the Lyon. 

In 1296 three persons of the name, all called William, and belonging 
to the county of Roxburgh, swore fealty to Edward I. 

Several of the family represented the burghs of Kinghorn and Kirk- 
caldy in parliament in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

In 1722 Balmuto was sold to a cadet, whose heir, through female 
descent, possesses it, and has registered the arms as given by Sir David 
Lyndsay, with a bordure engrailed sable for difference. 

David, last of the old Balmuto family, died in 1770, and is represented 
by William David Reid, Esq. 

Murray of Tullibardine. L., a savage and a stag are added in ink 
for supporters. 

Chartreis of Hemsfield. L., 126. 

Chartres of Kinfaunis. L., 122. 

Douglas of Lochlewin. L., the chief much broader and indented. 

*Wryght of Langsyd. John Wrycht was Constable of Falkland 
1407. 

Robert Wright, physician in Rome, descended from a Stirlingshire 
family, obtained a birthbrief in 1732, his arms being the above with a 
thistle in the centre. 

44. *RoGEER of yt Ilke. William Rogers, a musician, one of the 
favourites of James III., had a charter of the lands of Traquair 1469, 
which he sold nine years later to James, Earl of Buchan. The seals of 
this person, given in Mr Laing's Catalogue of Seals, are not looked upon 
as authentic. 

William Roger sat in parliament for the burgh of Ayr 1593. 

The other coat given in this MS. is that which has been borne by 
various persons of the name without sanction, till granted, with a differ- 
ence, in 1838 to William Rodger, merchant in Glasgow. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 137 

Douglas. A pen and ink sketch of the arms of the Lochleven 
family, with a crescent in base; motto — " Ut vita sic mors;" letters 
S. G. D., evidently Sir George of Helenhill, who aided Queen Mary to 
escape from Lochleven. 

*Carvod. Garwood of that Ilk, co. Lanark. Margaret Garwood was 
of the household of Queen Mary, who bequeathed some of her jewels to 
her; she married, nth February 1567, John Stuart of Tullypowries. 

45. Skrymyscor of Dauchop. L., these bearings are on the seal, 
A.D. 1444, of John Scrymgour, with a lion's gamb holding a sword for 
crest. 

In 1298 William Wallace granted a charter to Alexander dictus 
Skirmischur of lands in Dundee, and of the constabulary of the castle, for 
his services as standard-bearer. 

The office of constable was hereditary, and in 1484 its holder sat in 
parliament, as many of his descendants did later. Dudhope, the family 
property, was erected into a barony 1527. 

The direct line of the family ended in John, Earl of Dundee, and 
Viscount Dudhope, who died 1668, when the office of heritable standard- 
bearer was granted to Gharles Maitland of Hatton, and has descended to 
the Earl of Lauderdale. It was granted by charter of Robert I. to Nicoll 
Skyrmieschour. 

The Scrymgeours of Gartmoir and Bowhill in Fife, although they 
used the same crest, bore a different coat — gules, two swords in saltire 
points downward argent, hilted and pomelled or, in base a sinister hand 
couped pointing downwards proper. See Plate 112. 

Ramsay of Kulluthie. L., the boar's head is or and the other 
charges mascles ; this quarter is for Kinloch. 

William Ramsay of Golluthie became Earl of Fife by marriage with 
the Gountess Isabella, ante 1357. 

The heiress of Golluthie married David Garnegie of Panbride c. 
1560. 

The seal of William, Earl of Fife, has an eagle displayed surmounted 
of a bendlet engrailed. 

Ogilby of Finlater. First and fourth, argent, an eagle- dis- 
played sable ; second and third, argent, a lion passant gardant gules. 

Garnegy of Kinayrd. L., the field or and the eagle beaked and 
membered gules; the older coat is given Plate 1 1 1. See " History of the 
Garnegies, Earls of Southesk," by William Eraser, 1867. Printed for 
private circulation. 

The family take their name from the lands of Garnegie, co. Forfar, 
held by them from an early period till 17 16; they were erected into a 
barony 1663. 

Duthac de Garnegy acquired part of Kinnaird 1401 by wadset, and in 
1409 had a Grown charter. Kinnaird was erected into a barony 1542. 

David Garnegie of Golluthie sat in parliament 1585. 

Seal of John Garnegie of Kinnaird, 1479-89 — an eagle standing on a 
barrel, in chief two mullets ; the same were borne on the seals of Sir 

2 M 



138 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Roberf Carnegie of Kinnaird 1551, and of Katherine Carnegie 1580, In 
1 59 1, the eagle with a covered cup on its breast, as in Sir David Lyndsay's 
MS., is on the seal of Sir John Carnegie of Kinnaird. 

The barrel was evidently allusive to the tenure of Kinnaird of the 
Crown " for the serwise of the kepeing of the Kyngis ale sellar within the 
Schirefdome of Forfare." 

This tenure was altered in 1667, and Kinnaird is still the property of 
the representative of the family, the Earl of Southesk. 

The field is given or by Forman, and in all the entries in the Lyon 
Register, but nearly all the manuscripts have it argent. 

MuMCREiF OF YT Ilk. L., the field is or. 

Sir John de Moncref did homage to Edward I. at Perth 1296, and 
two others of his family took the oaths the same year. 

In 1456 Malcolm of Moncreiff was a Lord Auditor, and the lairds of 
Moncreiff sat in parliament 1596, and frequently later. 

Sir John, second baronet, sold the barony of Moncreiff to the ancestor 
of the present proprietor, Thomas Moncreiff, clerk of exchequer, who had 
a Crown charter 24th May 1667. 

The baronetcy and representation vest in the Rev. Sir Henry Well- 
wood-Moncreiff, Bart., elder brother of Lord Moncreiff. 

The arms were registered in 1673 by Sir John of that Ilk, Bart., with 
supporters — two men armed cap-k-pied, bearing pikes on their shoulders 
proper; and again in 1771, quarterly with Wellwood, by Sir Harry 
Moncreiff-Wellwood, Bart. 

Martyne of Medop. L., the chevron between three crescents are. 
on the seal of Mr Andrew Martyn, Canon of Aberdeen a.d. 1481, with an 
eagle's head for crest (?). 

George Martin, bailie of Edinburgh in 1497, uses the same, with 
a lozenge on the chevron, and as crest a demi-eagle. 

Three persons of the name registered these arms with differences 
1672-78, one of them being a descendant of Medhope, and another from 
the family which possessed Gibliston, co. Fife, from about 1500 to 
1670. 

Henry Martin was a member of the committee for dooms 1469 ; 
Andrew sat in parliament for Anstruther-Easter 1641-46; Robert, clerk 
of justiciary, was forfeited for high treason 1685, but restored after the 
revolution ; and Thomas was keeper of the Privy Seal at the Union. 

John Mairtine, burgess of Edinburgh, had two charters from David 
II. ; William Martin was custumar of Edinburgh 1329-32. 

46. *Harratt. Above the shield is sketched a boar's head erased, 
apparently as crest. The arms differ from those of Heriot, and the name 
may have been a local one taken from Harwood, co. Roxburgh. 

Henry Herwart witnesses two charters to the monks of Dryburgh 
c. 1330. 

In 1454 William Harwode, a churchman, is named in the Muni- 
menta de Metros. 

Keith of Craig. A sketch in ink — first and fourth, a lion passant 
gardant placed upon an embattled base ; second and third, Keith. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 139 

The arms registered, 1692, by Major Robert Keith of Craig were — 
argent, on a chief embattled gules three pallets or, a bordure embattled of 
the second ; the chief is plain in the quartered coat registered 1769 by the 
representative of the family, Robert Keith, envoy to the Empress of 
Russia, to whom supporters were granted by Royal warrant. 

The lion might have been brought in by the marriage of Robert of 
Craig to Agnes Ogilvie c. 1530. 

47. Menzies of yt Ilk. The last two words scored out and 
" Enoch " written after in a different hand, L. 

Robert de Maneriis, in 1232, witnessed a charter of Alexander IL; 
and in 1248 sat in curia regis. Robert de Meyners, 1250, witnessed a 
charter of Alexander III., to whom he was councillor and guardian. 

The barony of Enoch is in Dumfriesshire, and remained in the pos- 
session of the family till 1704. Weem in Perthshire became, however, 
the seat of the head of the family, which latterly has been styled of that 
Ilk. James of that Ilk was in parliament 1560. 

Robert I. granted the barony of Durrisdeer in Dumfriesshire to Sir 
Alexander de Meyners and Egidia Stewart, his wife. 

The arras registered 1672-78 by Sir Alexander Menzies of that Ilk, 
Bart., are — argent, a chief gules, and in 1734 supporters were granted to his 
heir Sir Robert — two savages wreathed about the head and middle with 
laurel. What appears to be the older coat with the field ermine was 
allowed, 1672-78, to Gilbert Menzies of Pitfoddels, near Aberdeen, with 
two greyhounds argent collared gules as supporters. 

Thomas de Meineris, who signed the barons' letter in 1320, sealed 
with a chief indented, and in 1431 the bearing on the seal of Sir David 
Meneris seems to be a chief fretty. 

Similarity of name and arms point to a common origin for the 
Menzies in Scotland and the Manners of Etal in Northumberland, repre- 
sented by the Duke of Rutland, who at first bore — or, two bars azure a 
chief gules. 

Robert de Meygneris was sheriff of Edinburgh 1328, and the high 
office of Great Chamberlain was held by Sir Robert of Meyners 1249-51 ; 
he died in. 1266. 

DuRY OF YT Ilk. L., azure, a chevron between three crescents 
argent. Two branches of this family recorded arms 1672-78, and in 
both cases the blazon is — azure, a chevron argent between three crescents 
or, with a suitable difference for the cadet. Captain George Durie seems 
to be recognised as head of the family, as he has the chief coat. In the 
MS. an eagle's head erased is sketched at the side of the shield, and may 
be meant for the crest. An old carving in stone of the arms has two 
savages wreathed with laurel as supporters. Andrew Durie, Abbot of 
Melrose 1527, Bishop of Galloway 1541, died 1558. 

George Durie, Archdeacon of St Andrews, was Abbot or Commenda- 
tor of Dunfermline 1530-63, and in the latter year is a party to a tack of 
the office of bailie of the regality of Dunfermline to David Durie of that 
Ilk. 



I40 WORKMAN'S MS, 

Sir Malise de Douery lived in the reign of Robert I. 

Janet, daughter and heir of Robert Durie of that Ilk, is said to have 
been forced by James V. to marry his favourite, Henry Kemp of Thomas- 
toun, who assumed her name ; their grandson sold Durie about 1612. 

WoD OF Blartoun. L., Blairtoun is in Aberdeenshire, and be- 
longed to the Woods of Fettercairn and Balbegno, hereditary ushers of 
the king's chamber from the reign of James III. These bearings, with a 
cross crosslet fitch^e in chief, appear on seals of 1527-28. 

WiSHETT OF Pettarro. L., or, three piles gules. The motto, 
" Mercy I desyre," and two horses as supporters, are added. 

A recently published " Life of George Wishart " contains a genea- 
logy of this family, the best that has appeared. 

John Wischard was sheriff of Mearns before 1238. 

William was Bishop of Glasgow and afterwards of St Andrews 
1270-78, and had been Chancellor of Scotland. 

Sir John Wischard, and three others of the name connected with the 
^hires of Kincardine and Forfar, took the oath, a.d. 1296, to Edward I. 

Pittarrow was the designation of the family before the end of the 
fourteenth century, and the laird sat in parliament 1471. James of 
Pittarrow was Justice-Clerk 1513, and Sir John was Comptroller 1562, 
both sitting in parliament. James sold Pittarrow in 1631. 

The representative of the family. Colonel George Wishart of Clifton- 
hall, was created a baronet 1707, with an unusual remainder, in terms of 
which the title vests in the eldest son of the late Lady Clinton. William 
Thomas Wishart of Foxhall, in 1769, established his right to the chief 
arms of the family. Argent, three piles in point gules ; crest — z. demi- 
eagle, wings expanded proper; motto — " Mercy is my desire;" supporters 
— two horses argent, saddled and bridled gules. 

A branch of the family seated at Logic from an early period, pro- 
duced Robert, Bishop of Glasgow 1272-1316, and John Wishart was also 
bishop there; and they called their lands Logic- Wishart, and had a crown 
charter of erection of the barony of Wishart 1540, which gave them the 
style of that Ilk. The arms registered by John of Logie-Wishart, or that 
Ilk, describe the piles as passion nails distilling drops of blood. 

A seal, 1463, gives three piles and a canton. 

A family of the same name, but of doubtful descent, acquired Logic 
late in the seventeenth century, and held it for several generations ; to it 
belonged George, Bishop of Edinburgh, and Captain Patrick Wishart, 
both of whom registered arms. 

LuvELL OF Banluby. L., the piles are longer and are surmounted 
of a barrulet wavy. 

A detached seal of Richard Lovel bears, crusilly a lion rampant. 
Henry of Balumbie, 1568, has the three piles surmounted of as many 
barrulets wavy, but in 1557 his son and heir apparent, John, uses the piles 
in point, and over them two barrulets wavy. 

The Lovels were lords of the barony of Hawick and part of Esk- 
dale, but lost these estates by forfeiture in the reign of David II. ; it was 



WORKMAN'S MS. 141 

to this family that Richard Lovel, whose seal is described above, belonged. 
Henry Lovel, their ancestor, lived in the time of William the Lion. 
Richard was summoned to the English parliament as a baron 1348, and 
the coat he bore was — or, semde of cross crosslets a lion rampant azure. 

In 1267 Thomas of Lovel witnessed a charter to the Maison Dieu of 
Brechin. Ballumbiewas alienated about 1570. James Lovel represented 
Dundee in parliament 1568. 

ScHEELL. The coat given by Sir D. Lyndsay for Rowll, bend in- 
vecked. In 1296 four persons of the name of Roule, belonging to Rox- 
burghshire, swore fealty to Edward I. Roger de Rwle was killed in 1268. 

Nisbet gives some notes on the name. The Rules of Peilwalls, co. 
Berwick, ended in coheirs about 1665. 

48. *FouLER. Mr William Fowler, rector of Hawick 1587, was 
secretary and master of requests to Queen Anne, Consort of James VI. 
and I., and in 161 1 had a grant of the manor of Moyglasse in Ulster, 
which he sold in 161 5 ; his sister was mother of William Drummond of 
Hawthornden, the poet, and he seems to have been of a family of merchant 
burgesses of Edinburgh. 

The Secretary left a son and heir, Captain Ludovick, who inherited 
Deanhouse and other lands in the barony of Restalrig, which passed by 
marriage with his daughter to George Logan of Burncastle. 

A somewhat fabulous birthbrief was issued in 1759 to Lieutenant- 
Colonel John Fouller, styled of Foullertoun, co. Edinburgh, tracing his 
descent through John Fouller, called son of the Queen's Secretary, to 
John, Dean of Guild of Edinburgh, in the reign of James III. 

49. *Bauchquhane. It has been alleged that the family of Buchan 
descended from a younger son of an Earl of Buchan, and retained the 
garb as their bearing, which theory does not agree with the facts. 

1 207-28 Richard de Buchan, clerk of the Bishopric of Aberdeen ; 
1 29 1 Mr Thomas de Boughan, burgess of St John's town, swore fealty to 
Edward I.; and in 1296 Thomas de Boghan, of the county of Edinburgh, 
also took the oaths ; the seal of the latter has a flower-like ornament not 
on a shield. 1358 John de Buchan is named in the Exchequer Rolls, and 
in 1 39 1 Walter de Bochane was Archdeacon of Shetland. 

David II. grants a charter of the lands of Rotherstoun and fishings 
in the Dee, which had belonged to John Buchan. 

Andrew de Buchan, scutifer, witness to a charter of Sir Alexander 
Forbes of that Ilk in 1436, is probably the Andrew who, in 1445, was 
owner of the estate of Auchmacoy, still held by the family. 

The shield here represented is the oldest authority for the arms. 
Sir James Balfour has — argent, a lion's head erased azure, and in an addi- 
tion to Font's MS., made probably after the Restoration, there is given 
for Buchan of Auchmacoy — or, three lions' heads erased sable langued 
gules. The first appearance of the garb is in the Lyon Register 1694, 
for Colonel John, a younger son of Auchmacoy — argent, a garb azure 
banded or between three lions' heads erased sable langued gules, a bor- 
dure embattled of the second. 

2 N 



142 WORKMAN'S MS. 

John, advocate, descended of Auchmacoy, in 1720 is allowed to 
increase the armorial evidence for descent from the Earls of Buchan, by 
a grant of— azure, a lion's head erased between three garbs, all within a 
bordure or. 

It was not till 1830 that the coat of the head of the house was regis- 
tered, by James of Auchmacoy, when the garbs are allowed no place — 
argent, three lions' heads erased sable langued gules, quartering Hamilton 
of Bargeny ; supporters — a heron with an eel in its beak proper, which 
resembles the supporters of Stewart, Earl of Buchan, and an antelope 
argent collared gules, the collar charged with three cinquefoils ermine, 
being one of the supporters of Lord Bargeny. 

•Chapmane. These bearings are on the seal of David Chepman, 
appended to a deed, 1480, in the Colstoun charter chest. 

The name appears among the burgesses of note, who were burgh 
magistrates of Aberdeen, Lanark, Stirling, Perth, Haddington, and other 
places during the fourteenth century. 

William was provost and custumar of Aberdeen 1330 ; and Duncan, 
burgess of Aberdeen, had a charter of Rotherstoun on the Dee from 
David n. 

Simon, burgess of Lanark 1359, bailie 1369, in 1364 had a wadset of 
the lands of Baads and Brierybanks from John Livingstone of Drumry, of 
which David H. granted a charter of confirmation, 22nd August of the 
thirty-eighth year of his reign. 

A charter of confirmation of Robert H., of lands in the burghs of 
Stirling and Dumbarton, and in the city of Glasgow, in favour of John 
Palmer, clearly indicates the origin of the name from the occupation of a 
trader, and in some cases its personal and temporary use, as it narrates 
that the properties had been disponed to him by his father Gregory, called 
Chepman. 

The name is associated with the introduction of printing into Scot- 
land ; in 1507 James IV. granted a licence to Walter Chepman and 
Andrew Myllar to print the Acts of Parliament and Service books, &c. 
They are both designed burgesses of Edinburgh, but Chepman was a 
writer to the signet, one of the clerks of the King's Secretary, and pro- 
prietor of Everland, in the barony of Cramond-regis, from which he took 
his designation. He had a charter of Kingsmeadow in Cramond, 8th 
December 1526. 

A charter of foundation of a chaplainry in the Church of St Giles', 
Edinburgh, by him, 26th August 1513, supplies the names of his deceased 
wife, Marion Kerketill, and of Agnes Cockburn, then his spouse ; another 
deed of the same nature, 12th August 1528, was witnessed by his nephew, 
Mr John Chepman, who was a burgess, writer to the signet, and proprie- 
tor of the lands of Schelis; David Chepman, and William Chepman. The 
last is probably son of the granter, and identical with William Chepman, 
notary and writer to the signet, who, in 1541, presented Thomas Scone 
to the chaplainry founded by Walter. 

Walter, whose name I have not met with before 1496, was dead 20th 



WORKMAN'S MS. 143 

November 1537, when his nephew, Mr John, granted a similar charter to 
the Church of St Giles', in which his wife, Isobel Henderson, is named, 
and David, Thomas, and Robert Chepman are witnesses. He seems to 
have hoped to found a family, as he reserves the patronage of the 
chaplainry to himself, the heirs male of his body, his heirs male whomso- 
ever bearing the name of Chepman, his eldest heir female, &c., the 
chaplain to be one of his own name, if any should be found fit ; if not, a 
relative not bearing the name to be preferred to a stranger. 

Hendersoun "of Fordell, a baron," is added; also the crest — a hand 
holding a mullet surmounted of a crescent ; motto — " Sola virtus nobi- 
litat ;" supporters — two martins; the arms differ from those in L., 
the crescent being vert, and the charges being three piles issuing from 
the dexter side of the shield. The arms of this family have never been 
recorded. Porteus gives the crest as a star or issuing from a crescent 
argent, and calls the supporters mertriks proper. 

The seal, 1497, of Mr James Henrison, who acquired part of Fordel 
151 1, has three piles issuing from the sinister side, and a chief ermine 
charged with a crescent. In the MSS. and funeral escutcheons the varia- 
tions in this coat are very numerous, 

James, first of Fordel, was King's Advocate 1494, Justice-Clerk 1507, 
sat in parliament, and perished at Flodden ; he is stated to have been of 
a Dumfriesshire family, and in that quarter we find William Henryson, 
Chamberlain of Lochmaben Castle 1372-76. Fordel remains the pro- 
perty of the heir general of the Hendersons. 

Edward Henryson was a Lord of Session 1566, and father of Sir 
Thomas Henryson or Henderson of Chesters, who sat on the bench of 
that court 1622-38. 

*Makgill. These bearings are on the seal, 1569, of Mr Thomas 
Machill, Canon of Dunkeld ; and, with the addition of a mullet for differ- 
ence, on that of Helen Magil, wife of Simon Currie, 1588. 

James Macgill, Provost of Edinburgh 1570-72, was father of Sir 
James, Lord Clerk Register 1554, and of David of Nisbett and Cranstoun- 
riddell. King's Advocate and Lord of Session 1582, who died 1596, 
David, his son, was also a judge, and father of James, afterwards Vis- 
count Oxfurd, who was raised to the bench 1629, Mr Robert Macgill of 
Foord was a Lord of Session 1649. 

The arms registered 1678 by Robert Viscount Oxford are those here 
represented. Crest — a phoenix proper; motto — " Sine fine; " supporters — 
a horse at liberty argent, maned and hoofed or, gorged with a viscount's 
coronet, thereto a chain affixed, also or, and a bull sable colla^red and 
chained or. David Macgill of Rankeillour registered the same arms 
1672-78, with a martlet argent for crest ; motto — " In dotnino confido; " 
and in 1771 Arthur Macgill of Kemback, co. Fife, as heir male of both 
families, was allowed the arms, crest, and motto of Rankeillour, with the 
supporters, the horse being collared or. His descendant possesses Kem- 
back, and represents the family. 

*Adamson. The crest — a crescent or or gules, and motto — " Virtute 



144 WORKMAN'S MS. 

crescit" are added. The arms are on the seal of John Adamson, 
appended to a charter 1529. 

The family were considerable burgesses of Edinburgh at this time, 
and William acquired Craigcrook, in the parish of Cramond, 1542, which 
was held by his descendants till the Restoration. A younger branch held 
Cowthropple, in the parish of Prestonpans, and added a bordure gules for 
difference. 

The Adamson coat was, in 1765, allowed to John Adam of Mary- 
burgh, who does not appear to be a descendant. Arms entirely different 
had been granted in 1756 to William Adam of Maryburgh, one of a 
family of architects — vert, a Corinthian column with capital and base in 
pale proper between two cross crosslets fitchde in fess or; crest — the 
original of a Corinthian column proper ; motto — " Divino Palladis arte" 

William and John Adamson of Edinburgh sat in parliament fre- 
quently from 1504 to 1571, the former being Depute-Marischal ; Henry 
and James represented the burgh of Perth 1581-1617, and George sat for 
Dunbar 1640-50; Mr John was principal of the College of Edinburgh 
1623, and Patrick, Archbishop of St Andrews 1576-91 ; John Adamson 
was Prior Provincial of the preaching Friars in Scotland 1519. 

*Trollop, probably the same name as Troup, which is local in Banff- 
shire. Hamelin de Troupe was among those accused of high treason in 
August 1320 at Scone; he was sheriff of Banff 1328. 

A family of the name possessed Balnecraig, co. Aberdeen, for several 
generations till late in the seventeenth century. 

John Trollop had a charter from Robert I. of the lands of Forteviot, 
CO. Perth, and David II. granted those of Glenapp in Ayrshire to John 
Troupe. 

Richard Trolhope, claviger, and Katherine Ker, his spouse, had a 
charter in 1564 of lands in Newbottle. 

It is a coincidence worth noting that the family of Trollope, in the 
north of England, bore stags as their arms at an early date. 

50. Hay of Mury. Added in ink, with the initials J. H., probably Sir 
John, who died in 1703 — a woolpack between three inescutcheons. 

Haye of Bowme. L. 
Haye of Leys. L. 

51. *EcFURD, a local name taken from Eckford near Kelso. 
Alexander de Hecford witnessed a charter of Alan, son of Roland, 

Lord of Galloway, and Constable to the Abbey of Kelso a.d. 1206. 

Richard le fiz Geffrey de Ekford, of the co. Roxburgh, did homage to 
Edward I. 1296. 

*Sleuman. This name became altered to Slowane, or Aslowane, or 
Sloane, and a family of Slowane possessed Garroch, in the stewartry of 
Kirkcudbright. Sir Hans Sloane bore arms founded on this coat. 

*Criche. 

*Bard. Sir James Balfour gives — argent, a tiger passant regardant 
proper ; and in another place adds — gazing in a mirror. 

William Baird of Auchmedden left a MS. genealogy of his family, 
dated 1770, which has been published in 1857, ^"d again in 1870. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 145 

The seal of Andrew Baird of Laverocklaw, 1533, has a fess between 
three mullets in chief, and a bear (?) statant in base. 

That of George of Ordinhnivas has the mullets on the fess, and a 
boar statant in base, ante 1557, while his son Walter placed them in chief. 
Sir James of Auchmedden registered 1672-78 — gules, a boar passant or. 

Posso in Peeblesshire passed by marriage to the family of Naesmyth ; 
and, 1672-78, James Naesmyth of Posso registered arms, quartering Baird. 
See L. R. 

Thomas acquired Ordinhnivas in marriage with Janet Maitland pro- 
bably about 1480, and his descendant, Lilias, heiress of Ordinhnivas, 
married, in 1578, Gilbert Baird of Auchmedden. 

The heir general is Francis Garden Fraser of Findrack, co. Aber- 
deen ; Alexander Baird, resident in New Zealand, is heir male of the 
older family, while Sir James Gardiner Baird, Bart., appears to be heir 
male of Auchmedden. 

Richard Bard made a grant to the house of St Machutus c. 1240. 

In 1296 Duncan Bard of Stirlingshire, Fergus de Bard, John and 
Nicol Bard, all of the co. Lanark, swore fealty to Edward I. 

Andrew Baird sat in parliament for Banff 1633-40. 

Chirnsyde (?). A coat much obliterated, apparently argent, three 
mens' heads erased proper banded. 

*Alane. Sir James Balfour gives — parted per bend indented argent 
and gules, a crescent counterchanged. Porteus says a crescent and star 
counterchanged. In the Lyon Register, from 1672 onwards, coats 
founded on this are met with. 

1490, Henry Alane was Clerk of Accounts of the King's Household. 

1498, Henry Alane, Archdeacon of Dunblane. 

In July 1572, Robert Allane of Corsfurd, co. Lanark, was one of the 
persons charged with being art and part in the murder of King Henry 
and the two Regents ; the family remained in possession of Corsfurd 
and Holmfoot for several generations. 

52. Leslie of Glesche. L. Colonel Leslie's " Historical Records 
of the family" contain no notice of this branch. 

Hay of Fudye. L. 

*Pattoun. Added in ink, a fleur-de-lis between three crescents. 
Porteus makes the field azure and the charges argent. 

Mr Roger Pattone of Ferrochie, co. Aberdeen, ancestor of the existing 
family of Paton of Grandholm, registered 1672-78 — azure, three crescents 
argent ; and at the same time Mr Alexander of Kinaldie entered the same, 
with a sword in pale in the centre. 

James Paton of Middle Ballilisk, co. Perth, Bishop of Dunkeld 1571, 
died 1596. 

Hay of Dalgatie. Argent, a fraise azure between three inescutch- 
eons gules ; motto — " Subjugo ;" initials, D. A. H. Sir Alexander 
Hay of Dalgatie, co. Aberdeen, was father of Sir William, who was 
executed in 1650. 

After the Restoration orders were given that his body, bones, and 

2 o 



146 WORKMAN'S MS, 

head, along with those of the Marquess of Montrose, be gathered and 
honourably buried at His Majesty's expense. 

To this family belonged William, Bishop of Moray 1688, who left a 
daughter and heir, Jean, wife of John Cuthbert of Castlehill. 

53. NoRVELL OF YT Ilk. L., Nomianvell — sable, on a bend argent 
three martlets of the field. Seal of John de Normanvill, c. 1220 — three 
birds; of Walran de Normanvill, a.d. 1250 — a bird and a chief charged 
with two birds. The arms registered 1682, for the family of Norvell of 
Boghall, CO. Linlithgow, are — sable, on a bend argent cottised or three 
martlets azure. George Norvell of Boghall married his cousin Marjory, 
daughter of David Lord Falconer, and left a daughter and heir, who 
married Captain Swindell ; their son, who assumed his mother's name, 
sold the estate. 

Hugh de Normanville sat tn curia regis 1208; 1259, Thomas de 
Normanville, present at an inquest, and owner of Padevinan, co. Lanark, 
had been removed from the King's Council in 1255. Robert did homage, 
1371, to Robert H., and in 1296 no less than four members of this 
family, one of them a knight, swore fealty to Edward L 

William Norvel represented Stirling in parliament 1568-86. The 
Normanvilles of Gargunnock ended in an heiress, Marion, who married 
Hepburn, and had issue ; her seal, 1491, has three martlets on a fess. Sir 
Robert was Sheriff of Stirling 1391, and probably father of John of 
Gargunnock 1408. 

Isobel Norvel, lady of Cardonald, widow of William Stewart of 
Castlemilk, in 151 1 seals with three martlets, two and one. 

Douglas of Kilspinny. The chief coat of Douglas, with the heart 
uncrowned. 

Levinstoun of Manerstoun. L. 

TuRNOUR. The arms obliterated. 

Lindsay of Covintoun. L., a baronial and knightly family seated 
at Covington, co. Lanark, from before 1366 till the end of the seven- 
teenth century; The seal, 1519, of John of Covington makes the fess 
countercompony, and has the addition of a mullet in sinister chief. 

Mure of Rowallane. L., the mullets argent, " supported be two 
moors," added in a different hand. 

The seals of Richard and William Mure, appended to their deeds of 
homage to Edward L, are not armorial, but that of William More, Lord 
of Abercorn 1357, has a fess charged with three mullets, and for sup- 
porters two savages. 

Sir William of Rowallan registered, 1672-78, the coat as in L,, with 
a savage's head for crest, the motto, '' Durum patientia frango^'' and for 
supporters, two blackamoors proper. Sir Percy Cunningham Fairlie, 
Bart., is heir of line of this ancient family, but the estates have passed 
under a special limitation in an entail to the Earl of Loudoun. 

The direct male line became extinct in 1700. An account of the 
family, compiled about 1657 by Sir William Mure of Rowallane, was 
published in 1825. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 147 

Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Adam of Rowallane, was first wife of 
Robert II. ; John of Rowallane sat in parliament 1560. 

54. Stirling of Cawder. L. 

Callender of yt Ilk. L., Malcolm was thane of Callendar 1238. 
Sir Aiwyn was also thane. 

1282, Richard was Constable of Stirling Castle. 

In 1296 Sir John and Alwyn swore fealty to Edward I. 

Patrick de Callender left a daughter and heir, Christian, who 
married William de Livingstone, and they had charters from David II. 
of Callender and Kilsyth, which gave titles of peerage to their descendants 
and remained in their possession till lost by forfeiture in 17 16. 

Patrick was Abbot of Cambuskenneth in the early part of the 
fifteenth century. 

Ludovick Callender of Dorrater, co. Stirling, an estate which had been 
in possession of his ancestors at least from 1480, died in 1695, and was 
succeeded by his grandson, Ludovick Wilson, who assumed the surname. 

The principal family of the name is said by Nisbet to have been 
Callender of Mainers, traceable to the beginning of the sixteenth century, 
from which descended John, resident in Kincardine, who registered arms 
1672-78 — sable, a bend checquy argent and gules between six billets of 
the second. 

Walter, a younger son of Mainers, had a charter of Bordy 1585. It 
is probably from this line that the Callenders of Bothkennar descended, 
of whom was Sir John Callander of Westertown, Bart., 1798-1812, whose 
heir general is the present Henry Callander of Prestonhall, Westertown, 
Elphinstone, Crichton, &c. 

John Callander, blacksmith and locksmith to James VI., was ancestor 
of John who acquired Craigforth, co. Stirling, about 1685; his descendant, 
John of Craigforth, advocate, registered arms 1764 — sable, a bend 
checquy or and gules between three billets of the second, and is repre- 
sented by George Frederick William Callander of Craigforth, and of 
Ardkinglas in Argyllshire. 

55. Glendonwyng of yt Ilk. L., Adam de Glendonwyn is stated 
to have had a charter of lands in Roxburghshire from John Macgill of 
that Ilk (Maxwell is probably the name, there were no Macgills of that 
Ilk) in the reign of Alexander III. 

Adam of Roxburghshire was forfeited by David II. 

Matthew, Bishop of Glasgow, died 1408. Sir Symon sat in parlia- 
ment 1469. Bartholomew, Sheriff of Dumfriesshire, who was killed by 
Lindsay of Wauchope before 1505, seems to have been the last styled of 
that Ilk, but the printed pedigrees of this family are unsatisfactory. 

His brother Ninian was of Parton, in the stewartry of Kircudbright, 
1512 ; and in 1587 the Glendinnings are named as one of the unruly clans 
on the West March. 

Agnes, heiress of Parton, married James Murray, who assumed her 
surname ; their son, Robert Glendoning of Parton, took the additional 
surname of Neilson, having married Mary, daughter and heir of Robert 



148 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Neilson of Barncalzie, and their second son and eventual heir assumed 
the designation of William Glendonwyn of Glendonwyn. 

He left three daughters — i. Mary Lady Gordon of Letterfourie ; 
2. Xaveria Basilia of Parton, died unmarried 1858, having settled the 
property on her nephew, Frederick James Scott, who assumed the sur- 
name of Glendonwyn — Parton has been sold, but Sir Robert Glendonwyn 
Gordon, Bart., is heir general of the family, and has still the estate of 
Cowgarth in the stewartry ; 3. Ismene Magdalene (Mrs Scott), left issue. 

The arms of Glendonwyn have never been registered. Nisbet 
describes a coat cut in Parton church, with the date 1598, as having the 
cross as here represented, with a goat's head in the first quarter, a sword 
bend sinister ways in the second, a boar's head in the third, and a fess 
checquy in the fourth ; supporters were carried — a knight with a lance, 
and an angel holding a twig of laurel. 

Cheseme of yt Ilk. L., an old family, taking its surname from the 
lands of Chisholme, co. Roxburgh. In 1296 Richard de Cheseholme of 
that county, and John de Chesolm of Berwickshire, swore fealty to 
Edward I. In 1853 John Scott-Chisholme of Stirches and Whitehaugh, 
the representative of the family, registered arms — gules, a boar's head 
and neck couped argent, quartering Scott, and was allowed supporters — 
two knights in armour, the one resting on a shield of the arms of Chis- 
holme, the other holding a lance with a pennon of the same arms. 

In the fourteenth century a member of this family settled in the 
north, and by marriage with Margaret del Ard acquired extensive lands in 
Inverness and Ross-shire. 

Weyland Chisholm had his lands of Comer, in Strathglass, erected 
into a barony 1513. Alexander of Comer registered arms 1760 — ^gules, a 
boar's head couped or langued azure ; supporters — two savages wreathed 
about the head and middle with laurel, and holding oak batons over their 
shoulders, all proper. The Comer family latterly styled themselves of 
that Ilk, or " The Chisholm." The seal of Sir Robert de Chesholme, 
1362, has a fess between three boars' heads couped and charged with as 
many cushions. That of Richard, a.d. 1292, has one boar's head couped 
contournde, and the same appears on the seal of William Chisholme of 
Kinkell 1592. Muriel Chisholm, wife of Alexander Sutherland of 
Dufifus, 1435, bore a boar's head erased and a chief, and her descendants 
sometimes carried Chisholme as a quartering, sometimes a boar's head 
erased composed into one coat with the Sutherland mullets and the cross 
crosslets fitchde of Cheyne. Another eminent northern family, the Roses 
of Kilravock, carry a boar's head couped gules between their three water 
bougets, to indicate descent from the marriage, in 1364, of Hugh de Ros 
and Janet, daughter and heir of Sir Robert Chesholme, governor of 
Urquhart Castle. 

James and William, both Bishops of Dunblane, and holding the see 
from 1487 till 1564, carried a boar's head erased. Another William Chis- 
holm succeeded as Bishop of Dunblane 1564. 

Glene of yt Ilk. L., Robert Glen married Margaret, natural 



WORKMAN'S MS. 149 

daughter of Robert I. In 1328 a legacy left by the Queen is paid to 
Colban del Glen, who appears later as holding the multures of Estchel, 
probably Eshiels, near Peebles, and within a few miles of the lands of 
Glen, from which the family probably took their name. In 1332 Roger 
del Glen renders the accounts of the provosts of Peebles at Scone. John 
del Glan and Sarah of Glen swore fealty to Edward I. 

John Glen had a charter of Balmuto, co. Fife, from Robert I., which 
passed by marriage to the Boswells ; he and his wife, Margaret Bruce, 
had a charter of Nether Pittedie from David II. 

Alexander Glen was in parliament as sergeant 1545, and James, 
George, and Andrew Glen represented the burgh of Linlithgow frequently 
from 1625 till 1664. From this family probably descended the Glens of 
Longcroft, co. Linlithgow, whose heiress was Elizabeth, Countess of Dal- 
housie. 

*Pebillis of Dufarmling. Master John of Peebles was in parlia- 
ment 1368, William of Peebles sat for that burgh in 1468, and Oliver 
Peebles for Perth 1572-96. 

In 1 291 Warin de Pebles, burgess of Berwick, took the oaths to 
Edward I. Sir Robert of Peebles, a churchman, was Great Chamberlain 
of Scotland 1327-29. 

William Peebles had lands in Forfarshire from David II. 

James de Paiblis de eodem acts as procurator, in 1437, ^or Alexander 
of the Weyndis. 

A family of Peebles, designed of Chapelhill, and burgesses of Perth, 
held lands of the Abbot of Scone in the fifteenth century, and far on in 
the sixteenth. It was probably to them that Mr Alexander Peebles, 
advocate, belonged, who acquired Middleton, co. Edinburgh, and Skir- 
ling in Peeblesshire, and left an only child, Catherine, who married in 
162 1 Sir John Hamilton of Trabroun, younger son of the first Earl 
of Haddington. The coat given in Porteus' MS. for Pebeles is — argent, 
a chevron engrailed sable between three papingoes vert membered gules ; 
that here represented probably was borne by Mr Alexander, and the cinque- 
foil may have been taken in memory of his mother, Isabel Balneaves, 
an heiress. 

*ToMSOUN OF YT Ilk. Gourlabauk is added in a different hand. 
These were the bearings of Henry Thomson, Lyon King of Arms, 1504-12; 
he held the lands of Kellar, Farnyslaw, &c., in the barony of Dirleton, 
and d.s.p., leaving a widow, Christina Douglas, and a nephew and heir, 
John Thomson. The designation of that Ilk is complimentary, and the 
Thomsons were one of the clans on the West March described as unruly 

1587- 

The Thomsons of Gourlabanks, in East Lothian, ended in an heiress, 

Marion, who married James Millar, and was dead in- 1634, leaving a son, 

James Millar of Gourlabanks, who registered arms 1672-78, quartering 

for Thomson — argent, a stag's head cabossed attired with ten tynes gules, 

on a chief azure a cross crosslet fitchde or between two spur rowels of the 

field. 

2P 



ISO WORKMAN'S MS. 

The numerous Thomson coats in Scotland are all founded on the bear- 
ings here represented ; the most conspicuous family of the name were the 
Thomsons who possessed Duddingstone, near Edinburgh, for five genera- 
tions, till sold by Sir Patrick about 1668; his father had been created 
a baronet 1636. They bore — argent, a stag's head cabossed gules attired 
azure, on a chief engrailed of the last a crescent between two mullets. 

Sir William Thomson, Town Clerk of Edinburgh, was knighted 
soon after the Restoration, and left issue. 

The seal, 1591, of Alexander, burgess of Edinburgh, gives a stag's 
head cabossed, and a chief charged with a crescent between two mullets. 

Sir James Balfour gives Thomson of Gourlabank with a cross crosslet 
and no spur rowels. 

*SCHEWALL OF YT IlK. 

56. Ahterlonye of Kellye. An old Forfarshire family, of which 
there is a notice by its then representative, John Ochterlony of Guynd, 
1682, printed in the " Spottiswood Miscellany." Kelly, sometimes called 
Ochterlony, was acquired by marriage with a Stewart, hence the quarter- 
ing ; in the genealogy she is said to have been a daughter of Stewart of 
Rosyth in Fife, but is not to be found in any account of that family, and 
was more probably heiress of the Stewarts of Kelly. 

Sir William sold Kelly in 1614, but his heirs remained seated at 
Guynd, which, on the death of John Ochterlony 1843, was inherited by 
his nephew, James Pierson. 

Sir Charles Ochterlony, baronet, calls his estate of Balmadies, which 
was purchased in 1830, Ochterlony. 

John Ochterlony of Guynd, and two of his kinsfolk, registered arms 
1672-78, when the Stewart quartering was dropped (an arrangement 
which appears on a seal 1533), and the bordure charged with buckles 
composed with the paternal coat ; in all three cases the bordure is gules, 
although the field is azure. Guynd has four buckles and as many escallops 
alternately or. 

Between 1226 and 1239 Walter, son of Turpin, exchanged the lands 
of Othirlony, which had belonged in heritage to his ancestors, for those 
of Kenny, belonging to the Abbey of Arbroath, and had a charter of them, 
which in 1351 was confirmed by the Abbot to his descendant, John de 
Outhirlowny. In 1296 Wautier de Doghterloueny swore fealty to 
Edward I. 

John Ochterlony of Kelly, depute-marischal, sat in parliament 1526. 

57. *GuLANE. There is added, or Culane of old, sometime an 
hearalde 1663. 

John Cullen was appointed Islay Herald 5th January 1661, and died 
in or before July 1667. 

The seal of John Cullen of Knavane 151 7, has — on a bend between 
two boars' head couped a cinquefoil (? rose) between two buckles ; 
Knavane is in Aberdeenshire, and was acquired by Andrew Culane, 
burgess of Aberdeen, who had a charter a.d. 1440. Alexander was 
Provost of Aberdeen 1590, and represented the city in parliament 1597. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 151 

George Cullen in 1652 was deputy from Aberdeen to the English 
parliament. 

The coat recorded, 1763, by William Cullen of Saughs, M.D., 
Professor of Medicine in the University of Edinburgh, representer of a 
family of some antiquity in Lanarkshire, is — azure, a close helmet argent 
(a maternal difference for Roberton) between two boars' heads erased in 
chief and a cinquefoil in base or. His son, Robert of Ormiston Hill, co. 
Edinburgh, an estate acquired by the father, was a senator of the College 
of Justice 1796-18 10. A younger branch possessed Parkhead, co. 
Lanark. 

In Linlithgowshire, John Gillon of Wallhouse, descended from a 
family who held these lands by grant 1572, from James, Lord of Torphichen, 
registered 1676 — ^gules, on a saltire argent five martlets volant of the 
field ; and in 1824 his descendant, William Downe Gillon of Wallhouse, 
was allowed supporters — two ravens proper. 

*GouRLAY. Sir D. Lyndsay and Sir J. Balfour give argent, three 
martlets gules, for Gourlay of Kincraig. 

The position of this family in the thirteenth century is shown by the 
fact, that the oaths to Edward L were taken in 1296 by no less than 
eight of its members — five in the county of Edinburgh, one in Roxburgh, 
one in Berwick, and William de Gourlay of Bagally, co. Forfar. 

Ingelram de Gourlay is said to have witnessed a charter of William 
the Lion ; Hugh, son and heir of the late Sir Hugh, confirms the gift made 
by his predecessor, Olyver, son of Kylvert, from his lands of Southhall 
and Northhall, co. Haddington, to the monastery of Newbottle. 

These lands were granted in the reign of David H., on the forfeiture 
of Hugh Gourlay of Beinston, to Adam Hepburn. In 1293 William, son 
and heir of the late William Gourlay, makes a gift to the same monastery. 

It is stated that lands in Fife, including part of Kincraig, were 
acquired by the marriage of John Gourlay with a coheiress of Bickerton, 
but there seems no proof of this. 

In the fifth year of the reign of Robert IL, William de Gourlay, son 
and heir of Joanna de Erthe of Walchton, resigns the lands of Drem, 
inherited from her. 

Simon Gourlay had charters from David II. of the coronership of 
Fife, and of Adomstoun and Caprounflatts, co. Haddington. Alderston 
remained in possession of the family at the close of the fifteenth century ; 
at that time Lamelathen, near Dundee, was also the property of a Gourlay; 
at a later period Gourlays of Dargo, co. Forfar, flourished. The name is 
found among persons of position in Dundee in the seventeenth century. 
Robert, Provost of Stirling 1330, seems to have left descendants there 
and in Menteith, where they were landowners in the seventeenth century. 
But it is in Fife that the head of the family remained, seated at Kincraig, 
which was a free barony holding of the Crown ; Sir Thomas Gourlay of 
Kincraig registered arms 1672-78 — sable, an eagle displayed argent armed 
and beaked gules ; and the same coat, with a difference, was allowed to 
James Gourlay, merchant in Dantzic. 



152 WORKMAN'S MS. 

In 1865 supporters — two eagles argent armed and beaked gules — 
were granted to the Rev. William Austin-Gourlay of Kincraig. 

Another coat is found in some MSS. — an eagle surmounted of a 
bend gules charged with three crescents ; but this is the bearing of a branch 
of the Ramsays. 

*DuFF. In 1330 the Abbot of Arbroath confirmed to David dictus 
Duffus, son and heir of John, called Duffus, a charter of lands at Inver- 
cullen. 

In 1341 Brokynus Duff was on an inquest at Aberdeen, and the 
next year Machabeus Duff, burgess of Cullen, sat on another at Banff. 

In 1404 David Duff and Agnes de Camera, his wife, daughter and 
heir of Matilda de Maldavate, had a Crown charter of confirmation of the 
lands of Maldavate and Baldavy in Cullen, resigned by the said Matilda 
and Agnes. 

In 1493 John Duff of Darbruche has a suit against Sir James Ogilvie 
of Deskford for disturbing his tenure of his lands of Fyndachtyfield, and 
carrying off his charters, when Andrew Duff became surety for him, and 
produced a charter of Robert I., granted the second year of his reign. 
Darbruche remained in the possession of the Duffs of Maldavate till 
1627. 

These are indications of the origin of the now widespread family of 
Duff, to which, in recent times, a descent from the Earls of Fife has been 
ascribed ; of this there is no proof, and the arms and locality afford no 
support to the theory. 

In 1676 Alexander Duff of Keithmore, "lineally descended and now 
representer of the family of Craighead," registered arms — vert, a fess 
dancetty ermine between a buck's head cabossed in chief and two escal- 
lops in base or; no crest ; motto — " Virtute et operaT A note is added : 
" There is good reason to believe that he is not the representer of Craig- 
head." Craighead is said to descend from Muldavit. 

Alexander's eldest son, Alexander of Braco, who sat in parliament 
from 1689 till his death in 1705, is represented as heir general by the 
Right Hon. Mountstuart Elphinstone Grant-Duff of Eden, M.P. 

William Duff of Braco in 1723 registered the same arms with a 
hart's head proper for crest, and had a grant of supporters — two savages 
wreathed about the head and middle with laurel, holding branches of trees 
in their hands proper. 

His uncle and heir male, William, was father of the first Earl 
Fife. 

Duff of Drummuir, co. Banff, according to a funeral escutcheon, bore — 
a buck's head between three escallops ; crest — a heart ; mottoes — above the 
crest, " Kind heart," and below the shield, "Be true and ye shall never rue." 
Catherine, daughter and heir of Adam of Drummuir, married Alexander 
Duff, a cadet of Keithmore ; and their grandson, Archibald of Drummuir, 
in 1737 registered — vert, on a fess dancetty argent three mullets gules, in 
chief a deer's head cabossed surmounted of a pheon, and in base a pheon 
point upwards between two escallops or; a canton of the second charged with 



WORKMAN'S MS. 153 

a lion rampant of the third. This canton is the earliest heraldic indication 
of the claim to descent from the Earls of Fife. Supporters — a savage 
holding a club, and a stag proper attired and chained or ; crest and mottoes 
as above. 

*DiKESOUN OF YAT Ilk. Rcsembles the coat given in L. for Dickson 
of Ormiston, co. Peebles. 

The seal of Charles Decksoune, 1481, is a lion (?wehr wolf) passant 
and a chief charged with a crescent between two mullets. 

Isabel Dyxcoun, in 1527, has merely three mullets. 

Adam Dicson was Sheriff-Depute of Peebles 1388. 

The Dicksons of Winkstone, near Peebles, were a family of position 
in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. John sat in parliament for 
Peebles 1567-8, and another John 1612-17. John of Winkstone, Provost 
of Peebles, was assassinated there in 1572. 

Robert III. granted a charter to Robert Dyckison of Hethonfields in 
the same county, and during the Duke of Albany's regency Malcolm 
Fleming of Biggar gave a wadset of Oliver Castle lands to Robert Dick- 
son. The Dicksons of Smithfield, also close to Peebles, were seated there 
in the fifteenth century, if not earlier, and ended in an heiress, who 
married John Lord Hay of Yester as his second wife. Her son, John 
Hay of Smithfield, was the first of a separate branch of the Hays still re- 
presented in Peeblesshire by Sir Robert Hay, Bart., but Smithfield passed 
by marriage to James, twelfth Earl of Morton. 

The arms of the Smithfield Dicksons, as given in a funeral escutcheon 
of Hay, were — ^argent, three mullets and a chief gules. 

In Berwickshire, Thomas Diksone of the Tour of Eccles, Patrick 
(called the laird), and others of the name, were charged with treason, along 
with the Duke of Albany, 1479. The Dicksons of Belchester, Bughtrig, 
and other families in that district, claim to descend from the Keiths, Earls 
Marischal, and this was sanctioned by three entries in the Lyon Register 
between 1672 and 1694 — a chief charged with three pallets being added 
to the Dickson mullets. 

Leirmound of YAT Ilk. L., Learmonth of Dairsie, co. Fife. 

These arms are on various seals of the early part of the sixteenth 
century, and one of Sir James Learmonth of Balcomie has also a crest — a 
hand holding a cornucopia. 

The name is derived from the lands of Learmonth in Berwickshire. 
Ersiltoun remained in the family till the close of the fifteenth century. 
In 1479 William of Leirmonth of Berwickshire was charged with treason. 
In Fife, Dairsie and Balcomie were the property of two branches of the 
Learmonths who attained to distinction ; James, afterwards Sir James of 
Balcomie, sat in parliament 1524 and frequently later, and was ambassador 
to England 1543; Sir John of Balcomie also had a seat in parliament, 
and Sir James was a Lord of Session in 1627. Patrick of Dairsie, and 
his descendants, sat in parliament almost regularly from 1560 till 1600.' 

The coat was registered 1672-78 by George Learmonth of Balcomie, 
representer of the family of Dairsie, quartered with — azure, on a bend 

2 Q 



154 WORKMAN'S MS, 

argent three roses gules, for Balcomie ; it has also been said to be for 
Dairsie of that Ilk. 

Balcomie certainly gave a surname to a family who held it at an 
early period, but there is no trace of a marriage between them and the 
Learmonths, and an interval elapsed between the disappearance of the 
Balcomies and the acquisition of the estate by James Learmonth of Clatto 
in 1526. The quartering remains unexplained, as there is no known 
marriage by which it could be introduced. Balcomie passed from the 
hands of the Learmonths in 1683, the last owner dying in 1696. 

The Learmonths of Dairsie held the office of bailie of the regality of 
St Andrews, north of the Forth, from early in the fifteenth century till 
1606; and were also custumars and searchers of the port of St Andrews. 
The Russian family of Lermontoff claims descent from the Learmonths of 
Scotland. 

*Ker. This, indistinctly written, has been quoted as Bog. 

It seems an early attempt to compose the two Ker coats, and I have 
failed to discover by what branch of the family it was borne. 

The writer may perhaps be allowed to refer to his series of articles on 
the origin, descent, and arms of this powerful border clan contributed to 
the " Herald and Genealogist," " Genealogist," and " Miscellanea Genea- 
logica et Heraldica." 

Johannes Ker, venator apud Swynhope, near Peebles, c. 1190, is 
the first of the name found as yet in Scotland. 

Richard Ker held lands in Eliston, co. Roxburgh, in the reign of 
Alexander II., and Thomas Kaurr was Sheriff of that county in 1264. 
Nicol, Henry, William, and Andrew swore fealty to Edward I. Mr 
John de Carr was Keeper of the Privy Seal to David II., and in 1357 John 
Kerr, of the forest of Selkirk, had a charter of part of the lands of Auld- 
tounburn, which gave a designation to his descendants for a hundred 
years, till they took that of Cessford. 

Andrew Kerr, the first styled of Cessford, was a Warden of the 
Marches, and sat in parliament 1469 ; his younger son, Thomas, was of 
Fernyhirst in 1476, and founded that branch represented by the Marquess 
of Lothian. 

Ker of Samuelston bore a unicorn salient, and unicorns' heads were 
taken by Cessford about the time that Samuelston passed with Nicholas 
Ker to her husband, Alexander Lord Home, in 1497. The mascles were 
apparently added in consequence of marriage with Elizabeth de St 
Michael, an heiress, and it is probable that the Fernyhirst family added 
a stag's head in base to the chevron, charged with three mascles, about 
1530, in consequence of the marriage of Sir Andrew Kerr with Margaret 
Colville, coheiress of her family ; although there was no issue of this alli- 
ance, the Kerrs retained Oxnam and other lands of the Colvilles. The 
chevron charged with three mullets was first borne in a field azure, and 
this tincture was retained by the Carre de Luzancey in Brittany, 
descended from Robert Carre, who was in the military service of the 
King of France early in the sixteenth century. Probably before 1600 the 



WORKMAN'S MS, 155 

Cessford family changed the field to vert, and Fernyhirst made it gules 
about the time that the stag's head in base, which was afterwards dropped, 
was added. 

The Kerrs at first held most of their lands of the Earls of Douglas ; 
can the mullets be allusive to this tenure ? 

58. Stirling of Keir. L. 

59. *KiLGOUR. A local name in Fife ; the place is near Falkland, 
and in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries a family of Kilgour pos- 
sessed Nuthill. 

*MoRESouN OF Darse ; or Prestongrang, 1643, is added. 

John Morison, bailie and treasurer of Edinburgh, who died in 1615, 
was called " the rich ; " he married Katherine Preston, daughter of the 
Lord President of the Court of Session, and had a large family. His 
grandson, Sir John of Dairsie, co. Fife, was father of Sir George of 
Dairsie ; this family made alliances by marriage with houses of rank. 

Mr Alexander, a younger son of the bailie, acquired Prestongrange 
in East Lothian 1628, and was a Senator of the College of Justice 1626. 
His son. Sir Alexander of Prestongrange, registered arms 1672-78 — 
argent, three moors' heads couped proper. Henry, writer to the signet, 
a cadet of Dairsie, at the same time registered the coat with the three 
heads on one neck. The last of the Prestongrange family was George of 
Little Chalfield, Wiltshire, who d.s.p. 1788, his heirs being Elizabeth, 
Countess of Sutherland, and George, Earl of Glasgow. 

In 1673 George Morison of Bognie, co. Banff, founder of a family 
still existing, was granted arms almost identical with those in this MS. 

*HiLL. Colonel John Hill, who was concerned in the massacre of 
Glencoe, and Colonel Scipio Hill of Waughton, who was created a 
baronet of Scotland in 1707, were both Englishmen. The burgh of 
Queensferry was represented in parliament by Robert Hill 1643-49, and 
by James Hill I08i. 

A small family, at least as early as 1450, possessed lands at Niddrie, 
in the county of Edinburgh, and had the designation of Hill of that Ilk ; 
they were seated there after the middle of the seventeenth century. The 
hill or mount in their arms was vert. 

Ninian Hill, a citizen of Glasgow, acquired the lands of Lambhill 
and Garbraid, co. Lanark, by marriage with Helen, sister and coheir of 
George and Thomas Hutcheson, who founded the hospital in Glasgow 
which bears their name by deed dated i6th December 1639. 

Ninian Hill of Lambhill, son and heir of Ninian and Helen, in 1676 
registered the arms here represented. 

Hugh Hill of Lambhill died 1737, leaving a daughter, Mary of 
Lambhill, who married Robert Graham of Kilmanan, and left issue. In 
1819 Laurence Hill, writer in Glasgow, was served heir male of the 
family, and had a son and heir, Laurence Hill of Barleylawn, New Forest, 
Hants. 

*Arneill. 

*CoKE. A surname which appears pretty early in various parts of 



156 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Scotland. Robert I. grants Culmalow, in Aberdeenshire, to Alexander 
Cook ; Michael Cook, in that county, is mentioned in a charter of David 

II. 

It is in the east of Fife that the name seems to have become that of an 
established family ; John Cook of Balcasky, and John and Richard Cook, 
both of Abercromby, are all witnesses to a charter of John de Dundemor to 
the Priory of the Isle of May in 1260, and Malcolm Cook gave a charter 
to that house of his land of Cranebriggis. 

James Cook represented Pittenweem in parliament 1649, ^'^d he or a 
namesake again in 1685-86. John Cook, bailie of Pittenweem, registered 
arms 1675 — gules, on a bend or two cinquefoils azure, on a sinister 
canton argent a crescent surmounted of a cross crosslet fitchfee of the 
field. His descendants possessed the estate of Newburn, and are well 
known as clergymen of the Church of Scotland and members of the legal 
profession. The cinquefoils appear to have been taken from the coat of 
an English family of the same name. A seal in 160 1 has a plain cross, 
and another coat is given from this MS., having unmistakable reference 
to cooking. 

♦Gairdner. Colonel Gardiner, who was killed at Prestonpans, was 
of a family seated at Torwoodhead, co. Stirling. 

60. FoKARTTE. L., in 1458 Patrick Fokert was ambassador to the 
King of Castile, and in 1467 Thomas sat in parliament for Edinburgh; 
he was dean of guild, and others of the name at later dates figure as 
magistrates of the capital. 

Henry, Abbot of Kelso, before 12 18 granted to Richard, son of 
Solph, the lands of Folcariston, in Lesmahago, co. Lanark, as held by his 
father and ancestors. 

Adam de Folkarton, 1 240, was probably his son, and his descendants 
figure as Folkerts or Fokkarts of Fokkartoun, till the beginning of the 
sixteenth century, when Elizabeth, the heiress, was wife of James 
Carmichael of Balmedie. 

CUNYNGHAME OF BeLTOUNE. L. 

CuNYNGHAME. The pall charged with a mascle or. 

CuNYNGHAME OF CuNYNGHAMEHEiD. L., an old cadet of Kilmaurs, 
branching off at the beginning of the fifteenth century. 

William of Cunynghameheid sat in parliament 1560, and was father 
di David, Bishop of Aberdeen, whose seal 1599 ^^^ the arms here given, 
quartering two garbs to indicate descent from the marriage, in 1491, of 
Robert of Cunynghamehead, to Margaret Mure of Polkelly, an heiress of a 
family which quartered the garbs of Gumming ; supporters — two conies. 

This family sometimes bore the shakefork between a mullet in chief 
for Mure, and two garbs gules in flank for Gumming ; then the shakefork 
alone, quartering Mure and Gumming; and in 1698 Sir William, third 
baronet, was allowed, Nisbet says, to carry — first and fourth, the shakefork 
with a mullet in chief; second and third. Mure quartering Gumming; and 
for supporters, a cony and a falcon proper. On his death, in 1724, the title 



WORKMAN'S MS. 157 

became extinct and the estate was sold ; the Fullartons of Fullarton, and 
Hamiltons of Westport, were coheirs. 

An attempt has been made to derive the Marquess of Conyngham 
from Alexander, younger brother of Sir William, the first baronet ; the 
dates render this impossible. 

Alexander, the settler in Ireland, was in 1611 a clergyman, with a 
cure ; the first baronet of Cunynghamhead was proved, in a suit as to his 
liability for debts incurred during his minority, to have been born in 
November 1601. 

61. *Alizon. William Alison, provost of Jedburgh, represented 
that burgh in parliament 1542-43, and Robert Alison in 1585. 

*LiTHCOW OF YAT Ilk. In K. this is given for Lithgow of Dry- 
grange, near Melrose. Robert de Lythcw, notary public 1452, occurs in 
the chartulary of Melrose, and in 1534 James Lithqw was a monk there. 

The name, which is of course one of locality, appears in the fourteenth 
century; John Lithcu 1329, and William de Lythcu witnessed a charter 
at Perth 1376; in 1341 Richard de Lythqu, clerk, was one of the 
custumars of Linlithgow. 

Towards the close of the fifteenth century, persons of the name held 
the lands of Weltoun, in West Lothian. In 1582 Patrick Lithgow, 
sergeant, attended parliament. 

The estate of Drygrange seems to have been alienated by the Lith- 
gows early in the eighteenth century, after two hundred years of 
possession. 

Otterburn of Redhall. L., a seal of Mr John Otterburn has 
three otters' heads couped, and in 1524 Adam of Auldhame and Redhall, 
provost of Edinburgh, afterwards knighted, uses a chevron between three 
otters' heads erased. 

He was King's Advocate, Ambassador to England, a Lord of 
Session, and a member of the Privy Council. Allan Otterburn was 
secretary to Murdoch, Duke of Albany. Nicholas Otterburn, clerk of the 
rolls, sat in parliament 1458, and John, official of Edinburgh, 1467-69. 
Anna, daughter and heir of Sir Thomas of Redhall, in the parish of 
Colinton, married, in 1614, Sir James Hamilton of Innerwick, and' left 
descendants. 

The name is taken from Otterburn, in the parish of Morebattle, co. 
Roxburgh, and is met with there in 1455, and subsequently. 

Mr Nicholas, vicar of St Giles' Church, Edinburgh, and secretary to 
James II., in 1478 founded masses to be sung there; Gilbert Otterburn 
of Suthek is one of the witnesses to the deed of gift. Thomas, brother 
of Mr Nicholas, left issue, from whom Sir Adam probably descended. 

CuNYNGHAME OF Glengarnock. L., of this old family Humphrey 
sat in parliament 1481, and John in 1560. 

William, fiar of Glengarnock, married Isobel, only child of 
Michael Scott of Inverteil, fiar of Balwearie; their son, Sir James, dis- 
posed of his Ayrshire estate, arranged in 16 15 his claim to inheritance 
through his mother, and settled in Ireland, where he had a grant of land. 

2 R 



158 WORKMAN'S MS. 

CuNYNGHAME OF PowMAis. L., Alexander was in parliament 1481, 
and Robert was knighted six years after. The family retained their 
barony of Polmaise-Cunyngham till late in the seventeenth century. 

CuNYNGHAME OF Barnes. L., John having erected and maintained 
a lighthouse on the Isle of May, obtained a charter of his lands of West- 
barns, Isle of May, and others erected de novo into the barony of West- 
barnes, which was ratified 1645. 

Nicol C. had a charter of Barnes, co. Fife, in 1376, which remained 
in the possession of his descendants till about 1740. 

62. Kennedy of Bargany. L., the motto, "In Gode hope," is 
added above the shield. 

The head of the powerful Ayrshire family to which the Marquess of 
Ailsa belongs. 

The seal of John of Dunure, in 137 1, has two lions as supporters. 
The Lords Kennedy bore two swans, and this family a lady and a wyvern, 
both proper, which, in 1837, were confirmed to Hew Fergusson Kennedy 
of Bermane and Finnarts, co. Ayr, the heir male of this baronial house, 
with the coat here given ; crest — a fleur-de-lis issuing from two oak 
leaves; motto — " Fuimus." 

Bargany was alienated, and the elder line failed about 1640. Gilbert 
Kennedy had a charter of Bennane 1367. 

*ScHiL. James Shiell, dempster, sat in parliament 1587, and 
Archibald Shiels represented the burgh of Peebles in the last Scottish 
parliament. 

63. Cranstoun of yat Ilk. L., motto added, " Yous vant or I 
vant." A name taken from the property of the family in the county of 
Edinburgh. 

An early seal of Andrew de Cranistoun, probably of the thirteenth 
century, has a crane passant ; that of William de Craniston, 1426, bears 
three cranes ; the heads of the family bore supporters, a lady and a buck, 
before they were raised to the peerage in 1609. 

Thomas de Cranystoun makes a grant to the house of the Holy 
Trinity at Soltray before 1249, ^"^^ Aelured de Cranston occurs as a 
witness 1175-80. 

Sir William of that Ilk sat in parliament 1439 and afterwards, as did 
his successors frequently. 

The direct line ended in coheiresses, the eldest of whom, Sarah, 
married, before 1581, William, younger son of John Cranstoun of Moris- 
ton. William, third lord, sold Cranstoun. The title became dormant on 
the death of Charles Frederick, eleventh lord, in 1869. If a descendant 
in the male line of the Moriston family exist, he is next heir. 

That family had subsisted for several generations before the inter- 
marriage with the elder line ; in 1669 Anna, wife of James Pringle of 
Haltree, was charged to enter heir of line of her father, Alexander of 
Morriston, and Lord Cranstoun to enter as heir male ; three years later 
the estate was apprised by Mr Mark Ker. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 159 

Nisbet says, the seal in 159 1, of John of Moriston, was — quarterly, first 
and fourth, three cranes ; second and third, three crosses pat^e. 

Douglas of Drumlanrig. L., the heart is not crowned. 

The seal of James of Drumlanrig, 1537, is — first and fourth, three 
mullets ; second and third, a man's heart, and on a chief three crosses 
patde (? crosslets fitchde). In 1545 he carried Douglas quartered with five 
cross crosslets fitchde, for Mar. 

There is a seal, 1627, of William of Drumlanrig, on which there is 
Mar first and fourth, Douglas second and third; the bordure is not shown 
in any of these. 

James, Earl of Douglas and Mar, who fell at Otterburn, granted 
Drumlanrig to his natural son, Sir William, who had a charter of the 
barony of Hawick, co. Roxburgh, from Archibald, Earl of Douglas, which 
was confirmed in 1407. 

James of Drumlanrig sat in parliament 1543 and subsequently, and 
many of his descendants sat as free barons. 

Sir William was created a peer 1628 ; William, third Earl of Queens- 
berry, registered arms 1672-78, as given by Sir David Lyndsay — that is, 
Douglas with the heart crowned gules, quartering Mar, all within a bor- 
dure engrailed gules ; in 1682 he was created marquess, and had a Royal 
Warrant for the addition of the Royal tressure on a bordure or to his 
arms. 

Pringill of Burnhous. L., the bend is azure, and a buck and a 
greyhound as supporters are added in ink. Burnhouse and Torsonce 
were the same family. 

On the seal of David Hop Pringille, 1445, is a bend engrailed 
charged with three escallops, and the same bearings appear in 1537 on the 
seal of John Hoppringil of Smalhame. 

Porteus gives : Hoppringle of that Ilk, argent, on a bend engrailed 
sable three escallops or ; Galashiels, argent, on a saltire engrailed sable 
five escallops or. (In the account of the family in the Appendix to 
Nisbet's Heraldry, it is stated that the saltire was often carried plain.) 
Blackwater, argent, a buck's head cabossed azure. The Pringles of New- 
hall, Stitchill, Greenknow, &c., bore azure, three escallops or, with suitable 
marks of difference for the cadets. 

The Clifton and Haining families placed the three escallops on a 
chevron, and the bend does not appear in the Lyon Register at all. 

Adam Pryngle sat in the general council 1364 ; William Hoppringle 
represented Lauder in parliament 1587-1612; George of Torwoodlee sat 
for Selkirkshire 1617, and James of Whitebank 1633. 

In 1673 Alexander of Whytbank registered the arms given by Porteus 
for Galashiels, and in 1828 his representative, Alexander of Whytbank and 
Yair, was allowed as supporters, two pilgrims habited proper, which had 
occasionally been borne, as shown on old family seals ; he was repre- 
senter of Robert Pringle, scutifer to the Earl of Douglas 1408. He pro- 
bably descended from Roger Pringle, who had a charter of the lands of 



i6o WORKMAN'S MS. 

Whitsome from Robert I. Robert de Hoppryngil witnessed a donation 
to the House of Soltre before 1270. 

The Pringles of Torsonce, who can be traced from a.d. 1407 till their 
extinction 1769, were styled of that Ilk as early as 1480, and Nisbet gives 
their arms — argent, on a bend sable three escallops or ; with supporters 
— a deer and a greyhound argent, both collared sable, the collars charged , 
with three escallops or. Pringle of Lees, a cadet of Torsonce, bore a bend 
between three escallops. 

Sir James Pringle of Galashiels is, in the published accounts of the 
family, said to have had two daughters, coheirs on the death of their 
brother in 1650 ; there were four — Jean, wife of Hugh Scott, and ancestress 
of the Scotts now of Gala ; Isabel, wife of Sir John Murray of Philiphaugh ; 
Margaret, wife of Mr Thomas Campbell ; and Anna, wife of Mr James 
Hamilton. 

The derivation of the name from pelerin, or pilgrim, seems fanciful. 

Margaret Hop Pringle was prioress of Coldstream 1489, was suc- 
ceeded by Isabella 1513-38, and she by Janet, the last prioress. 

QuHiTLAW OF YT Ilk. L., the boars' heads are erased, and are so 
on the seals of John de Quhytlaw 1430, David Quhitlaw 151 1, and 
Marian Quhytlaw 1633; that of Mr Archibald, sub-dean of Glasgow 1494, 
has one boar's head. Johan de Whitelowe, of the county of Edinburgh, 
swore fealty to Edward I. 1296. 

Mr Archibald, above named, was Secretary of State, Ambassador to 
Spain, Auditor of Exchequer, &c. As he was one of the king's repre- 
sentatives at a general council of the church at Perth in 1457, his career 
was long as well as distinguished, and he afterwards sat in parliament. 

In 1586 Peter Whitelaw sat for Perth. 

Patrick Whitelaw of that Ilk fought on the Queen's side at Lang- 
side, was forfeited 1568, and had died before 1579, when the benefit of 
the pacification was allowed to his three daughters, who were coheirs of 
their great-grandfather, John Fenton of that Ilk. The history of these 
ladies is remarkable : Margaret, the eldest, married Sir Alexander Hamil- 
ton of Innerwick, who divorced her 1589, and she married, three months 
afterwards, Sir John Ker of Jedburgh, Hirsel, and Littledean, who had 
just divorced his former wife, Julian Home of the Wedderburn family. 
Isobel, the second, married Andrew Kerr, brother of the Earl of Lothian, 
who possessed Fenton jure uxoris, and was divorced 1596; she then 
married William, younger son of James Ker of Corbethouse ; in 1603 she 
granted a charter to her son George, of her third share of the Whitelaw 
lands. Mary, the youngest daughter, married Hercules Stewart, bastard 
brother of Francis, Earl of Bothwell, and was charged with adultery with 
William Home, the king's stabler, whom she married after a divorce had 
been obtained in 1592. 

Hercules was forfeited, but his daughter and heir, Margaret, was 
restored in 1633, and had a ratification 1641, when Patrick Whitelaw of 
that Ilk protested that this should not prejudice the right he had pur- 
chased and acquired to part of the Whitelaw estates. 



WORKMAN'S MS. i6i 

Nisbet calls this Patrick heir male of the family, and ancestor of 
Jean, heiress of Whitelaw, who married Walter Burnside, and bore the 
Whitelaw arms — sable, a chevron or between three boars' heads couped 
argent ; crest — a crescent ; motto — " Gradatim plena" 

Symontoun OF YT Ilk. L.; the sword is sometimes between two 
mullets, and here the lower mullet, after being drawn, has been painted 
over. Symington, in Lanarkshire, was granted by Robert I. to Thomas, 
son of Richard, i.e., Thomas Dickson of Hesilside ; the mullets were the 
bearing of Dickson, and the sword may have been of the nature of an 
augmentation, allusive to the valour of this founder of the family. They 
took their surname from the barony. John Symington of that Ilk was 
Sheriff of Lanarkshire 1476. The Symingtons continued to hold Sym- 
ington, and their older estate of Hesilside, till the middle of the seven- 
teenth century, and were heritable captains of Douglas Castle, and bailies 
of the barony of Douglas. 

KiLPATRiK OF Closburn. L. ; the motto, " I mak sure," is added. 
On the seal of Roger, 1435, are two lions gardant as supporters, and 
Nisbet says their tincture was gules ; a seal of Sir Thomas, in 1498, has 
also supporters — two lions sejant gardant, and for crest — a swan's head 
and neck. It is said that a swan used to appear on the loch which 
surrounds the old castle of Closeburn, before the death of any member of 
the family. 

On an early seal of John de Kirkpatrick are the saltire and chief 
without the cushions. 

Ivone de Kirkpatrick had a charter of Closeburn from Alexander II. 
in 1232, which was held by his descendants till the sale in 1783. 

John and Sir Roger de Kirkepatrik, both of Dumfriesshire, swore 
fealty to Edward I. in 1296. Sir Thomas in 13 19 had a charter of 
Briddeburg as a free barony. Roger in 1357 engaged to pay the ransom 
of David IL, and his son and heir, Unfred, was one of the hostages. The 
barons of Closeburn sat in parliament 1481, and frequently afterwards. 
Sir Roger was one of the witnesses, 1 141-71, of a charter of Robert, son 
of Robert de Brus, lord of Annandale. 

In 1673 Thomas of Closeburn registered arms — ^argent, a St 
Andrew's cross azure, on a chief of the second three cushions or ; crest — a 
hand holding a dagger distilling drops of blood ; motto — " I make sure." 
There are no supporters recorded, but Stacie, Ross Herald, about the 
same time gives these bearings with the addition, "supported be two 
talbots hounds ar, as he was of old a barron." The late Dr Ramage 
notes a seal of Roger 1445, with two talbots for supporters. An old 
motto used by the family was " Tich and I perse." 

On the 1 6th May 1791, John Kirkpatrick of Culloch, in the stewartry 
of Kirkcudbright, merchant in Ostend, registered arms — argent, a saltire 
azure between three "stars, one in chief and two in flank gules, on a chief 
of the second three cushions or; crest — a dexter armed hand holding a 
dagger in pale distilling drops of blood from its point, all proper ; motto 
— " I mak sicker." 

2 s 



1 62 WORKMAN'S MS. 

His descent is stated for three generations in detail, his great grand- 
father, Thomas Kirkpatrick of Knok, being said to be paternally descended 
from the house of Closeburn. Extended researches, both made officially 
and by private individuals, have as yet failed to establish the alleged 
descent. William Kirkpatrick of Malaga, younger brother of John of 
Culloch, was father of the Countess of Montijo, mother of Eugdnie, 
Empress of the French, and of the Duchess of Alva. 

It seems not improbable that Thomas Kirkpatrick, who was in not 
of Knok, descended from a branch of the Closeburn family seated at 
Kirkmichael from 1454 till 162 1. 

The stars added to difference the coat may have been allusive to the 
marriage of John of Culloch to Janet, daughter of Thomas Stothert of 
Arkland, heiress of Tarscrechan. 

64. *Hewcysoune. These bearings are cut on the monument, 1687, 
of Alexander Howison, dean of guild, Aberdeen, and have been borne, 
but not registered, by the Howisons of Braehead, co. Edinburgh, who 
hold their estate per servitium lavacri. Their oldest charter, dated 19th 
April 1465, is in favour of James, son and heir of John Howison, 
burgess of Edinburgh, and shows that he previously held lands in the 
parish of Cramond. 

In 1588 Dundee was represented in parliament by a person of the 
name, and in 1645 Andrew sat for Kilrenny. In Aberdeen the name is 
found among the burgess families early in the fifteenth century. 

Hamilton (?). Azure, a heart between three cinquefoils argent; 
initials — G.H. ; motto — " Savit throw Cryst." 

Leillei. An unfinished coat — quarterly, first, blank; second and 
third, a lily ; fourth, an animal passant like a sheep (?). 

Adam Lillay or Lily, bailie of Peebles 1369. 

In 1327 are mentioned the lands near Peebles, which formerly 
belonged to Thomas de Lillay. 

65. Murray of Cask. L., the chevron between three mullets are 
the bearings on the seal of William de Moravia of Tullibardine 1292, 
ancestor of the Duke of Athole. 

In 1 501 Sir William of Tullibardine used three mullets within the 
Royal tressure ; crest — a peacock's head supported by two arms ; and for 
supporters — two lions. 

Sir David of Tullibardine sat in the general council 1442, William 
of Tullibardine in parliament 147 1 and later, and most of their successors, 
till raised to the peerage 1604. 

Maxwell of Calderwood. L. ; the seal of John of Calderwood, 
1470, has a saltire within a bordure, quartering a bend for Dennistoun ; 
that of Robert of Calderwood, 1508, makes the bordure countercompony. 
This was recorded about 1672, and in 1793 Sir William Maxwell of 
Calderwood, Bart., was allowed, " as lineal heir male of the Maxwells of 
Pollock," to carry the arms of that family — argent, on a saltire sable an 
annulet or, in the first and fourth quarters ; second, argent, a saltire sable 
within a bordure countercompony of the second and first ; third, argent, 



WORKMAN'S MS. 163 

a bend azure ; crest — a stag's head proper ; mottoes — " I am ready," 
" Think on ;" supporters — an ape chained and a stag proper. The crest 
formerly used was a man's head. 

Calderwood has been the seat of this branch of the Maxwells for 
nearly five hundred years. 

Sir John was a lord auditor 1450, and sat in parliament. 

Baillie of Lamentoun. L. ; Sir James Balfour and Porteus reduce 
the number of mullets to nine. William Baillie of Lamington registered 
1672-78 — azure, nine stars (of six points wavy), three, three, two, and one 
or. Some branches of the family, as Jerviswood, retained the field sable. 
The seal of Sir John in 1292 has only six stars. The head of the family 
had assumed as supporters, before Nisbet wrote, two boars' proper. 

David II. in 1368 grants a charter of the barony of Lamington to 
Sir William Baillie ; an attempt has been made, without evidence, to trace 
the Baillies to a son of the Royal Baliols, and, with more probability, to a 
daughter of Sir William Wallace. 

In 1331 the Exchequer Rolls mention the sale of the ward of William 
de Bailliff, probably the same person. 

William of Lamington sat in parliament 1481. 

Sir William, last of the direct line, settled his estate on his son-in- 
law, Edward Maxwell, commendator of Dundrennan, younger son of 
John Lord Herries, obliging him and the heirs of the marriage to assume 
the name and arms of Baillie. 

This marriage took place 1577, and in a deed 1582, the baron of 
Lamington designs Maxwell, fiar of Lamington, dilecto meo filio legali 
et adoptivo. In 1581 an act of parliament was passed excusing Maxwell 
from assuming the surname, but obliging his son and heir to fulfill the 
condition. 

The heir general of the Lamington family is Sir Charles Ross of 
Balnagowan, but the estate has descended to Alexander Lord Lamington. 

On the tombstone of Edward Maxwell, and Margaret Baillie, his 
wife, in the church of Terregles, are two shields : the first, the Maxwell 
saltire with nine mullets, three in chief and three iri each flank for Baillie, 
and a hedgehog in base for Herries ; the other has the nine mulldts, 
three, three, two, and one, with a plain chief, as the wife's arms. 

Jardan of Apilgirth. L.; in Font's MS. the crest, a heron -hold- 
ing in her beak a laurel, is given ; but that usually borne is a spur rowel, 
with the motto, " Cave adsum," which were registered in 1706 by Sir 
John Jardine, Bart., with supporters — a horse at liberty, and a man in 
armour with a scymetar at his side, all proper. 

Umfrid de Jardyne witnessed a charter of Robert de Brus to the 
monastery of Arbroath 1 1 78-80. 

Umfrey du Gardin, of the county of Dumfries, did homage in 1296 
to Edward I. 

David II. gives a charter, c. 1330, to William de Gardine, of the 
barony of Hartside, co. Lanark, which remained in the possession of the 
Applegirth family till about 16 17. Applegirth was erected into a barony 
in 1672. 



1 64 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Alexander of Applegirth sat in parliament 1572, and in 1503 John 
was dempster of parliament. 

The barony of Kirkanders, in the stewartry of Kirkcudbright, was 
for a considerable time possessed by the Applegirth Jardines ; they some- 
times had the designation " of that Ilk," and the family seat is still called 
Jardine Hall. 

Makcellene of Bumby. L.; David II. granted a charter to Gilbert 
M'Lelan of his lands. 

The family possessed Bombie in the fifteenth century, and James V. 
granted a charter of that property as a barony to Thomas Maclellan. 

Sir Robert sat in parliament 162 1, and was created Lord Kirkcud- 
bright 1633. 

RuiTHERFURD OF YT Ilk. L. ; the inescutcheon seems to be voided 
or, or charged of another or, and neither in this representation, nor in that 
given by Sir D. Lindsay, has the charge the proportion of an orle ; this, 
however, is probably due to carelessness as to proportion, as the same is 
found in the coats of Landale and Baliol. 

The seal of William Rothirford (? the parson of Liliesleaf, who swore 
fealty to Edward I.) has a bull's head cabossed with a man's head affrontde 
between the horns. 

In 1554 David Ruthirfurd uses a fess charged with three martlets, 
between a mullet in chief and a boar's head erased in base. 

In 1296 Sir Nicholas de Rotherford, and three others of the name, 
all located in the shires of Roxburgh and Berwick, did homage to 
Edward I. 

The surname is taken from a locality near Kelso, and appears as 
early as the reign of William the Lion, when Gregory de Rutherford wit- 
nessed a charter of Roger Burnard to the monastery of Melrose. 

Katherine Rutherford, towards the end of the fifteenth century, 
married James Stewart of Traquair, and became heiress of Rutherford, in 
consequence of which the Traquair family quartered the arms. 

Rutherford of Edgerston, the heir male, is represented by Lord Sin- 
clair and Mr Oliver- Rutherfurd of that place, as coheirs of line, and by 
Henry Rutherfurd of Fairnington, as heir male. 

The coat recorded, 1672-78, by John of Edgerston is — ^argent, an 
orle gules, in chief three martlets sable beaked of the second. 

The inescutcheon voided or, remained the bearing of the family 
seated at Hundolie, near Jedburgh, from the beginning of the fifteenth 
century ; the heiress married Sir James Ker, and her descendant, the 
Marquess of Lothian, inherits the estate and representation. 

66. CoKBURNE OF Ormestoune. Sir D. Lindsay gives — argent, 
three cocks within a bordure gules ; here it is — argent, a fess checquy 
azure and of the field between three cocks gules, which was registered, 
1672-78, by Adam of Ormiston. The fess checquy was undoubtedly 
borne to indicate descent from the marriage of John de Cockburn with 
Janet, daughter and heir of Alexander Lindsay of Ormiston, in the reign 
of David II. 



WORKMAN'S MS, 165 

Nisbet says they bore two lions as supporters, and Craufurd gives 
another variation of the arms — three cocks within a bordure compony 
azure and argent ; while Porteus says a bordure checquy. 

William of Ormiston sat in the general council 1440 ; Sir John was 
Justice-Clerk 1591, and sat in parliament; Adam was Justice-Clerk 1692, 
Treasurer-Depute 1699, and again Justice-Clerk 1705-10. 

*Setoun of Touch. Sir Alexander Seton married in 1408 Eliza- 
beth, heiress of the great house of Gordon, and sat in parliament as Lord 
Gordon in 1437 ^^^ subsequently. 

Their son and successor, Alexander, Earl of Huntly, resigned his 
earldom and a great part of his estate, and obtained a charter 20th 
January 1449, preferring his son by his third wife, Elizabeth Crichton, to 
his eldest son by Giles, daughter and heir of John Hay of Touch, Tulli- 
body, and Enzie. 

This son, Alexander Seton, inherited his mother's property and parts 
of the original Gordon estate, co. Berwick ; he was designed Master of 
Gordon and Lord Gordon even after his disinheritance in 1449. 

The direct male line ended on the death of James Seton of Touch in 
1742, but the estate and heritable office of armour-bearer and squire of the 
body to the King of Scotland have descended to Sir Henry James Seton- 
Steuart, Bart. 

Sir Henry Seton of Abercorn became heir male ; and his descendant, 
Sir Bruce Maxwell Seton, Bart., has, in the opinion of the late John 
Riddell, advocate, a good claim to the barony of Gordon. 

Two greyhounds as supporters are on a seal of uncertain date of 
Seton of Touch, with a boar's head erased as crest, and the motto, "Ford- 
wards ours ; " the arms are those here represented. These bearings, with 
the supporters, were used at the funeral of Mrs Seton of Touch 1725, the 
boar's head being couped, and the Hay tinctures altered to the usual 
argent and gules, and were so recorded in 177 1. 

67. Ormistoun of yatt Ilk. L., the seal of John de Ormistun 
appended to a charter of his lands of Lessedwyn to the Abbey of Melrose 
in 1306, has an eagle displayed. Alan de Hormiston witnessed a charter 
in the reign of Alexander H. In 1288 Henry de Ormistoun had been killed 
and his goods forfeited for felony. 

In 1296 John de Ormeston of the county of Roxburgh, Henry of the 
county of Edinburgh, Alice of the same county, and Alice, wife or widow 
of Alan de Ormeston, also of Edinburgh, swore fealty to Edward I. 

Robert II., in the seventh year of his reign, ratified a charter by Sir 
James Douglas of Dalkeith of part of the lands of Drumcross to Andrew 
de Ormystoun. 

James Ormiston of that Ilk, and several of his kinsfolk, were forfeited 
as accomplices in the murder of King Henry, and the barony of Ormiston 
remained in the possession of Ker of Cessford, although claimed by a 
James Ormiston as late as 1585. 

In 1592 several of the Ormistons were forfeited for treason along 
with Francis, Earl of Bothwell. 

2T 



1 66 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Adversity seems to have driven the descendants of this turbulent 
race to adopt more safe and profitable pursuits; in 1693 arms are re- 
gistered by Joseph Ormistoun, merchant in Kelso, and then merchant in 
London, and in 1697 he and William Eliot obtained an Act of the Privy 
Council for establishing a manufactory of silk. 

Henderside, near Kelso, the property of the Ormstones for several 
generations, passed by marriage into the family of Waldie. 

TwEDiE OF Drumelzier. L.; the arms are cut in stone at Drumel- 
zier Castle, with a bull's head as crest, and the motto, " Thol and 
think." 

Mr Laing describes the seal used in 151 1 by John of Drumelzier as 
a saltire couped and a fess (? chief) charged with a mullet ; crest — a wolf's 
head. The Tweedies of Oliver bore the saltire engrailed, but the chief is 
omitted altogether on stones there where the arms are cut with the dates 
1649 and 1734; the crest is a boar's head couped; motto — " Tholl and 
think on." 

John de Tuedy lived in the reign of Alexander III. ; in 1296 Fynlay 
de Twydyn del counte de Lanark swore fealty to Edward L ; Robert L, 
in 1326, granted a charter of the barony of Drumelzier to Roger, son of 
Fynlay, on the resignation of Sir William Eraser. James of Drumelzier 
married a daughter of Sir James Douglas of Dalkeith and Lady Agnes 
Dunbar. William of Drumelzier sat in parliament 1560; Gilbert Tweedie 
represented the burgh of Peebles 1579, and James of Drumelzier the 
county in 1608. The elder line sold their estates and disappeared before 
1630. 

Oliver was held by a branch of the Tweedies from the Preceptors of 
Torphichen from 1489, if not earlier, and was granted by charter in 1565 
to William Tweedie by James, Lord of Torphichen ; on the death, in 
1837, of Laurence Tweedie of Oliver, his property was inherited by his 
nephew, George Tweedie Stodart, father of the present proprietor, and 
Tweedie of Quarter became heir male. 

LoKERTT OF YE Lee, L. Sir James Balfour gives the same, but 
Porteus says they sometimes bore an engrailed bordure or. The seal of 
Andrew Loccart, 141 o, is a fess between three fetterlocks, and the Lock- 
harts of Barr in Ayrshire carried a bend sable charged with three fetter- 
locks or. The Cleghorn family, believed to be a branch of Lee, originally 
bore the three boars' heads with a crescent, but afterwards (Porteus and 
Lyon Register, 1672-78) dropped the crescent, and carried — ^azure, three 
boars' heads erased argent. 

Nisbet says the Lockharts of Lee altered their coat either to per- 
petuate the belief that an ancestor accompanied Sir James Douglas when 
he left Scotland to take the heart of Robert L to Jerusalem, " or to make 
their arms more univocal to the name." This modern coat — argent, a 
man's heart proper within a fetterlock sable, on a chief azure three boars' 
heads erased of the field — ^was registered with supporters by John Lock- 
hart of Lee 1735, and was used on a seal, 1661, by Sir George of Carn- 
wath, but with the heads couped. In 1798 two wild harts proper as 



WORKMAN'S MS. 167 

supporters were granted to Allan Lockhart of Cleghorn, the last heir male 
of his line, being, perhaps, an attempt at a variation of the pun upon 
heart. 

Stephen Lockard witnessed a charter of Richard de Morville before 

1 153- 

Malcolm possessed lands in Ayrshire 1164, and was father of Symon 
Locarde, who founded Symonstoune, in Lanarkshire. 

Sir Symon possessed Symonstoune 1273; Malcolm of the county of 
Ayr, and Cristin of Peeblesshire, in 1296 swore fealty to Edward I., who 
restored to the latter lands in that county and in Linlithgowshire, and 
also lands in Edinburgh to Margaret, widow of Stephen Loccarde. 

Adam was Sheriff of Peebles 1359. 

The first styled of Lee was Sir Simon, c. 1315-30 ; transactions with 
the monks of Newbotle connect him with William, son of Malcolm, who 
had an annual rent from the lands of Kynnard, and probably also with 
Sir Stephen, who possessed Craig, now Craiglockhart, in the reign of 
Alexander II L 

Stephen sat in parliament 1485, William in 1505, John in 1567, 
George of Barr in 1572, and James of Lee 1607; Barr was granted by 
charter of Robert III. to Andrew, and remained in the family till nearly 
the end of the seventeenth century. 

Cleghorn has been the seat of a separate branch of the family since 
about 1440. 

*Marjoribanks. a name taken from their lands in Dumfriesshire. 
Robert of that Ilk was succeeded by Mr Thomas of Ratho, who was 
Provost of Edinburgh 1540, sat in parliament, was (1549) a Lord of Session 
and Lord Clerk Register; he seems to have alienated the old family 
property. His descendant, Thomas of Balbairdie, co. Linlithgow, 
registered arms 1672-78, as representative of Marjoribanks of that Ilk — 
argent, a mullet gules, on a chief sable a cushion or. 

He acquired the barony of Bathgate 1664, and lands to which the 
name of Marjoribanks was given by charter 1696, and they were erected 
into a barony. Alexander Marjoribanks, Esq., Edinburgh, represents 
this line. A younger son of the Lord Clerk Register was grandfather 
of John, bailie of Leith and of Edinburgh, who in 1653 acquired Leuchie, 
CO. Haddington; his son, Joseph of Leuchie, registered arms 1672-78 — 
argent, on a chief gules a cushion between two spur rowels of the field, 
and in 1819 supporters were granted to Sir John Marjoribanks, Bart., as 
representer of Leuchie. 

Elphinstoun of yt Ilk. L., the chevron is engrailed. 

The seal of John de Elfiestun,. 1292, is a boar's head couped with 
a fleur-de-lis in chief. Elphinstone, in East Lothian, ^ave a name to this 
family ; the original estate having passed to the family of Johnstone by 
marriage, Petindrich, which had been granted by charter 1397 to William 
de Elphinstone, and other lands in the county of Stirling, were, by 
Crown charter 1503, erected into the barony of Elphinstone in favour of 
Sir John, whose son, Alexander, was created a peer. 



1 68 WORKMAN'S MS, 

Three persons of this name belonging to the counties of Edinburgh 
and Berwick, swore fealty to Edward I. in 1296. In 147 1 William 
Elphinstone, Chancellor of Scotland, afterwards Bishop of Aberdeen, sat 
in parliament. 

The first lord had a grant of the lordship of Kildrummie, co. Aber- 
deen, which was erected into a regality, and the family for a time styled 
themselves Lords Kildrummie. 

The crest on the seal of Robert Lord Elphinstone 1564, was a sword 
bendways ; in several MSS. it is a sword with a hand about to grasp it, 
or perhaps having dropped it ; in the reign of James VL the present 
crest was adopted. 

*Rentoun of yt Ilk. A coat entirely different from that given by 
Sir D. Lyndsay and Sir R. Forman for Renton of Billy. 

The seal of John de Renton, 1430, has a lion rampant, and that of 
John Renton, a year earlier, is described by Mr Laing as "a chevron 
between three buckles (?);" perhaps the charges may have been towers, as in 
this representation. The arms registered, 1672-78, by John of Lammerton 
are — argent, a lion rampant within a bordure azure. Nisbet says the 
lion was carried with alterations of tincture and additions, to show that 
they held of the Earls of March. 

The name is taken from Renton in the Merse. John de Rainton or 
Rayneton was custumar of Berwick 1327-32 ; Robert de Ren tun witnessed 
a charter of Herbert, Abbot of Kelso, c. 1225 ; Billy was the seat of the 
family in the fifteenth century, and Lammerton and Mordington still 
belong to a descendant in the female line. 

Sir Thomas, physician to George I., of the Berwickshire family, is 
said in the Appendix to Nisbet's Heraldry to have carried — azure, a lion 
rampant argent, on a chief gules (?) three stars ; he died in 1740. Agnes, 
first Countess of Leven, is affiliated by genealogists to the Billy family, 
but the accounts of her descent are contradictory. 

Her lordship's father, William, seems to have been a citizen of 
Dundee, and is complimentarily designed "of that Ilk," and "of Billy;" her 
mother's name was Alexander, and she is erroneously called sister of the 
Earl of Stirling. 

The Renton coat assigned to the Countess is — argent, a lion rampant 
azure charged on the shoulder with a buckle or escallop, a bordure 
engrailed of the second. 

FiERNYE OF YT Ilk. L., the fess is sable. A name taken from a 
locality in Fife. William de Ferny occurs in 1390; his descendants 
held the various offices of keeper of Falkland forest, constable of Cupar, 
and mair of fee of Crail. Ferny was alienated early in the seventeenth 
century, and the heiress married Lovell of Ballumbie. 

The arms are cut in stone on a monument at Cupar of the fifteenth 
century. 

The coat given here is exactly that of Fermor, Earl of Pomfret, in 
England, and a family of Farmer, in England, bore the same, with three 
anchors or on the fess ; anchors are the bearing of Ferme or Fairholme 



WORKMAN'S MS. 169 

in Scotland, so it would seem that these southern families, with a sur- 
name certainly derived from an occupation, have wished to make out a 
Scottish descent. Sir George Fermor of Easton Neston, ancestor of the 
Lords Pomfret, was, in 1591, allowed by Cooke, Clarenceux, to omit the 
anchors from his shield. 

*Meik. These arms were registered about 1680 by Patrick Meik of 
Ledcassie, co. Perth, without the water in base, and with the boar's head 
argent ; and in 1693 very nearly the same were allowed to Alexander 
Mikieson of Hill, also in Perthshire. 

Patrick of Ledcassie, now Carsie, was grandson of Thomas of that 
place, who died in 1654, aged seventy, and grandfather of Patrick, also of 
Ledcassie, which he sold in 1745. 

The Rev. George Meik, minister of Redgorton 1713-56, uncle of the 
the last laird of Leidcassie, was ancestor of the present James Meik, Esq., 
his representative, and of Thomas Meik, C.E., Edinburgh. 

The family appear as holding lands from the Abbots of Cupar from 
the middle of the fifteenth century; William Mek, in 1457, had a tack of 
part of Cowbyr ; others of the name of Meik or Meyk held lands con- 
tinuously in Cupar, Arthurston, &c. In 152 1 Patrick Meyk contracted 
his son Andrew in marriage to the sister of Den John Hugone of Cupar. 

William Meek, in 1664, acquired Fortisset, co. Lanark, which re- 
mains in the possession of his descendants. 

69. Taite of Pirn. L. ; Thomas dictus Tayt occurs in the Exche- 
quer Rolls 1329 ; Robert IIL granted a charter of Pren, co. Peebles, to 
John Tait; and 1441 George Tayt, in a charter, designs himstU cfomtnus 
de le Pryne. 

George Tait, last of the direct line, died in or before 1677, leaving 
two daughters, Margaret and Anne ; the elder married Alexander Hors- 
brugh of that Ilk, and was succeeded in Pirn by her son William, and her 
daughter Janet. On the death, unmarried, of the latter in 1732, her half- 
brother, John Horsbrugh, inherited Pirn, which is the property of his 
descendant, who has no blood of the ancient owners. 

William Tait of Pirn, in Mid-Lothian, descends from ancestors 
seated there for several generations. 

A younger son of the old family settled in Sweden. Jacob, Private 
Secretary to King Eric XIV., having in 1632 made proof of his gentle 
birth, was recognised as noble. He bore three stars argent On the chief, 
and for crest, a hart's head with a star between the attires. 

Hakkett of Petferrane. L. ; the arms are registered with the 
chief argent and the lion gules ; supporters — two falcons proper. Richard 
Haketwas on an inquest c. 1240, Donald Haket 1328; David possessed 
Lumfennan in the reign of David II. ; Robert was, 1372, appointed 
Sheriff of Kinross for life; in 1399 Philip acquired Pitferrane, which in 
1677 was erected into a free barony. John Halkett sat in parliament for 
Kirkaldy 1593, and many of the lairds of Pitfirrane after 1649. 

The family is represented by Sir Peter Arthur Halkett, Bart, (pater- 

2U 



I70 WORKMAN'S MS, 

nally Wedderburn), as heir of line, and by John Cornelius Craigie-Hal- 
kett-Inglis of Cramond, apparently as heir male. 

The owners of Pitfirrane had, by gift in 1565, the singular privilege 
of selling and exporting coal free of custom or export duty; this right was 
ratified in 1706-7, and purchased by government in 1788. 

*Blanerne, the arms of Lumsdaine of Blenearn, co. Berwick. The 
seals of Adam de Lumsden, 1430, and of Thomas, 1431, have a bend 
charged with two mullets, while that of Gilbert de Lumsden, 1430, is a 
bend sinister engrailed between three mullets, two in chief and one in 
base. Mr Alexander, parson of Flisk, uses, in 1485, a chevron charged 
with three mullets, in base a rose ; and in 1576 the bearings of Mr 
Thomas, parson of Kinkell, are a chevron charged with three mullets. 

Sir D. Lindsay gives Lumsden of Conland, co. Fife — argent, a 
chevron sable between two wolves' or hounds' heads couped gules in chief, 
and an escallop vert in base. 

Nisbet says, the earn perching on a salmon was added after a 
marriage with the heiress of Blenearn of that Ilk, but there seems no 
proof of such a marriage. Thomas de Blanerne of Berwickshire swore 
fealty to Edward L in 1296. 

The coat, as painted in 1604 at Falahill, had the two mullets in chief 
and only a buckle on the chevron. 

The family take their name from lands in Berwickshire, which were 
sold in 1607, but repurchased by a descendant, and are now in the pos- 
session of Mr Sandys-Lumsdaine of Lumsdaine, Blenearn, and Innergellie. 

In 1296 Adam and Rogier de Lummesden of Berwickshire swore 
fealty to Edward I. ; there was a charter, in 1322, of the lands of Blen- 
earn to Gilbert de Lumesden. 

In 1349 an English safe-conduct was granted to Thomas de Lummes- 
den, vallettus comitis de Fife ; he was probably founder of the family in 
Fife which ended in Margaret Lumsden of Conland, who married Robert 
Lundin of Balgonie about 1544. 

Robert, younger son of Thomas of Conland, had a charter of lands 
in Cushnie, co. Aberdeen, 1472, and founded a family still seated there. 

The arms registered by Sir James of Innergellie, co. Fife, 1672-78, are 
— azure, a chevron or between a wolf's head couped and a buckle in chief, 
and in base an escallop argent ; supporters — a lion gules and a boar proper ; 
crest — an earn devouring a salmon. A little later Alexander of Cushnie 
recorded — azure, a buckle or between two wolves' heads in chief and an 
escallop in base argent ; but on a panel at Cushnie are carved the arms 
of R. L. and E. R., 1618 — a chevron between two wolves' heads couped and 
an escallop ; the lady's name was Reith, and her arms are a cross 
engrailed. 

Ker of Cesfurd. Vert, on a chevron argent three mullets gules, in 
base a unicorn's head erased of the second. 

Carmichell of yt Ilk. L. ; the fess wreathed appears on seals of 
members of this family early in the fifteenth century. 

They took their name from Carmichael, co. Lanark, which they held 



WORKMAN'S MS. 171 

of the Earls of Douglas. George, Treasurer of Glasgow, sat in parliament 
1475-82, and was elected Bishop 1482, but died before consecration. John 
of that Ilk, and John of Meadowflat, sat in parliament 1560. 

In 1647 Sir James was created a peer, and the dormant titles are 
claimed by Sir James Robert Carmichael, Bart. 

*Edingtown of yt Ilk. These arms, with the heads couped, were 
registered, 1672-78, by George of Balbarton, the representative of Edington 
of that Ilk, but the lands had been lost from which the name was taken. 

The early seals of the family differ entirely from the coat given here. 
Adam de Edington used a chief charged with three birds ; Richard, c. 
1450, a chevron between three birds; and Gilbert, in 1453, a bend charged 
with three mullets, and in sinister chief a hunting-horn. 

70. *Blakytar of Tillialane, Sir D. Lindsay gives Blackadder 
of that Ilk, CO. Berwick ; the second and third quarters are for Edmon- 
stone, heiress of Tulliallan, who married Patrick Blackadder c. 1480. 

Robert, Archbishop of Glasgow, who died in 1508, has the chevron 
charged with three roses on his seal 1491, 1500; and the same bearings 
are used in 15 19 by Robert, commendator of Coldingham. The Tulli- 
allan branch at first carried a mullet in base as a difference, as shown on 
the seal of John of Tulliallan 1547, and of Roland, a younger son, who 
was sub-dean of Glasgow 1529. A representation of the archbishop's 
arms in the Cathedral of Glasgow gives two animals as supporters, which 
might be horses or foxes. 

Robert of Blackadder was in parliament 1464. Robert, last of 
Blackadder, fell at Flodden, and left two coheiresses, Beatrix and Mar- 
garet, who married John and Robert, younger sons of Sir David Home 
of Wedderburn ; from the former descended the Homes who long pos- 
sessed Blackadder, and quarter the arms. 

Tulliallan became heir male, and in 1529 John Blackadder had a 
charter of that estate as a barony ; in 1626 Sir John was created a baronet 
with a grant of the barony of Blackadder in Nova Scotia, with remainder 
to his heirs male whomsoever. Financial embarrassment led to a judicial 
sale of the property, and his descendants not assuming the title, John 
Blackadder, tailor in Edinburgh, of illegitimate descent, in 1734 managed 
to carry through a service as heir to the first baronet, and made an 
unsuccessful claim to the estate, which ended in his being convicted of 
perjury. 

It is incorrectly stated that Marion Blackadder, wife of Laurence 
Oliphant of Condie, was heiress of Tulliallan. ^ 

The baronetcy remained dormant, although there seems np doubt 
that Mr John, minister of Troqueer, who died a prisoner in the Bass 
1686, was heir to it, and left a large family, the male line of which is 
extinct- 

*Broun of Hartryk. The Brouns of Hartree, co. Lanark, have 
been erroneously stated to bear three fleurs-de-lis on the chief, which is in 
some MSS. made gules ; their seals show the charges to be mullets, and 
Crawfurd accounts for the change of bearing by saying " the author of 



172 WORKMAN'S MS. 

this house being a depender of Douglas, Earle of Morton, obtained both 
the lands and coat in favour of him." He might have added that there 
was a connection by alliance as well as by vassalage. In 1424 James 
Douglas, Lord of Dalkeith, granted a charter of confirmation of the lands 
of Hertre to Richard Broun, and his heirs by Elizabeth de Tuede, his 
spouse, described as grand-daughter of the granter, her father, the Baron 
of Drumelzier, having married the daughter of the Lord of Dalkeith. 
The Brouns were seated at Hartree in 1376 or earlier, and retained the 
property till about 1630. 

Roger, younger son of the late Richard of Hartree, had Cultermains 
from James, Earl of Douglas, in 1440, and that estate descended to John, 
who sold it in 1817, and left a son, the late John Brown, W.S. 

From the Hartree family also descended John Broun of Gorgie 
Milne, near Edinburgh, who, in 1674, registered arms — azure, a fess vair 
between three fleurs-de-lis argent, thus reverting to the better-known 
Broun charge and dropping the Douglas mullets ; his descendants for a 
time possessed the barony of Braid, and the present representative is 
Archibald Broun of Johnstounburn, co. Haddington, advocate. 

71. Foster of Corstorphin. L.; a fess gules is added between the 
three hunting-horns ; a ratchhound and a greyhound, both collared gules, 
for supporters ; a dog's head for crest, and the motto, " Hunter bla vy 
horn." 

Esplin, Marchmont Herald, gives the arms of the first Lord Forres- 
ter, making the fess sable, and the crest, a hunting-horn argent stringed 
gules. Other variations are met with, and the arms of this family have 
not been registered. 

On the seal, 1400, of Adam of Corstorphine are— a chevron and three 
hunting-horns, but Archibald of Corstorphin has the three horns only, 
with a dog's head as crest, which were also used by James of Corstorphine 
1547. Nisbet says that he saw a seal of Archibald of Corstorphine, 1482, 
with two dogs as supporters. 

Adam dictus Forrester, burgess of Edinburgh 1362, was the founder 
of the family, and acquired a great estate ; he was knighted, and held 
offices of dignity. 

His son. Sir John, Master of the King's Household and Great 
Chamberlain, had Corstorphine, a part of which had been acquired by his 
father from William More of Abercorn ; Sir John founded the collegiate 
church of Corstorphine. Members of this family, from the founder 
inclusive, sat in the general councils and in parliament. 

Walter was Bishop of Brechin 1401 till about 1 421, and was Lord 
Clerk Register. 

The Forresters of Skippnich, Garden, and Torwoodhead were an 
eminent family, and were hereditary keepers of the forest of Torwood. 
Sir Duncan was comptroller in the reign of James IV. His daughter 
Margaret married Alexander of Corstorphine, and in 1636 their descendant, 
George, first Lord Forrester, had a charter of Torwoodhead and other lands 
united into a barony ; but at this time the original family of Torwood- 



. WORKMAN'S MS. 173 

head was represented by James Forrester. The printed pedigrees omit 
the Master of Corstorphine, son of the first Lord who, in 1636, was 
married to the widow of Mr Alexander Keith ; he must have died child- 
less before 1 651, when Lord Forrester, on his own resignation, obtained a 
re-grant of his titles and estates in favour of the heirs male of the marriage 
of his fourth daughter, Jane, with James Baillie, the heirs male of the 
marriage of his fifth daughter, Lilias, with William Baillie, &c. The title 
has descended under this limitation to the Earl of Verulam, but the 
Earl of Glasgow represents Helen Lady Ross, eldest daughter and co- 
heir of George, first Lord Forrester. 

The burgh of Stirling was often represented in parliament by 
Matthew, Duncan, and Robert Forrester between 1468 and 1587. 

Walter was a member of the King's Council 1398-99. 

Dalmhoy of yt Ilk. L. ; these arms were registered by Sir 
Alexander Dalmahoy, with two serpents nowed as supporters, which had 
been long carried. The name is taken from their lands in Mid-Lothian ; 
in 1296 Alexander de Dalmahoy of that county, and Henry de Dalmahoy 
of Linlithgowshire, swore fealty to Edward L 

Alexander had all his lands united into the free barony of Dalmahoy 
1598; Sir John was Sheriff of the county, and sat in parliament, 1639. 
The baronetcy, conferred in 1679 on John Dalmahoy of that Ilk, became 
extinct on the death of Sir John Hay Dalmahoy, clerk, fifth baronet 
loth October 1800. 

Sir John of that Ilk is said to have married a daughter of Sir 
Bernard Lindsay, brother of the Earl of Crawford. Her father, Bernard 
Lindsay, was of Lochhill in Mid-Lothian, and his father, Thomas 
Lindsay, was Snowdon Herald and searcher general of Leith ; Thomas 
seems unaffiliated, and in the funeral escutcheons of the Dalmahoys two 
different Lindsay coats are assigned to their ancestress. 

In the funeral escutcheons the official baton which the Dalmahoys 
bore as under masters of the King's Household is represented, but it is not 
recorded in the Lyon Register. 

Sir Alexander de Dalmahoy, c. 1265, granted permission to the 
monks of Newbottle to pass freely through his lands of Dalmahoy 7 he 
and his son Alexander, about the same date, are witnesses to a charter in 
favour of that monastery. 

Sandelandis of Caulder. L. ; there are added in ink : crest — a (?) 
boar's head ; " motto — " I traest a better;" supporters — a lady and a savage. 
These differ from the entry in the Lyon Register for Walter Lord Tor- 
phichen 1672-78, when the crest is an eagle displayed proper; motto — 
" Spero meliora;'" supporters — two .lions or. The seal of Sir James, 
Lord of Torphichen and St John, had a chief charged with a label of three 
points ; but he more generally used the coat of the Lord of St John, as 
given in this MS., which is quartered by the Lords Torphichen. Two 
savages have also been used as supporters. The additions here are 
valuable, as being the only MS. authority found for the old crest and 
motto of the Calder family, before their succession to Torphichen, when 

2 X 



1 74 WORKMAN'S MS. 

they took the eagle crest borne by the Lord of St John. Nisbet describes 
a seal of Sir Alexander of Calder 1466, with the crest, the head and neck 
of a horse, but here it is a head without neck, and like that of a boar ; Mr 
Riddell calls it a camel's head. 

Sir James of Calder sat in parliament 1487, and John of Calder 
in 1560. 

The barony of West-Calder was given to Sir James de Sandilands by 
William, Earl of Douglas, in free marriage with his sister, Eleanor, 
Countess of Carrick 1335; it remains the property of Lord Torphichen, 
heir general of the old Douglases. 

Lauder of Haltoun. L. ; there is added as crest, a tower, with the 
motto, " l^ivii post funera virtus." Afterwards the griffin in the arms 
was borne holding a sword in its fore-paw, supporting a saracen's head 
proper ; crest — a demi-griffin issuing from a tower ; motto — " Strike 
alike." 

Alan Lauder possessed Hatton, in the county of Edinburgh, early in 
the reign of Robert IL; the laird sat in parliament 1471, and sub- 
sequently. Mr Richard, last of Hatton, who died 1675, having no male 
issue, settled that barony and other lands, all de novo erected into a free 
barony 1660, on his younger daughter, Elizabeth, and her husband, Hon. 
Charles Maitland, afterwards Earl of Lauderdale, they and their successors 
being bound to take the surname and carry the arms of Lauder of Hatton. 
The elder daughter, Jean, married in 1650 Sir Thomas Elphinstone of 
Calderhall, and left issue. 

The printed pedigrees of the Landers are very misleading. 

In the remarks on the Ragman Roll in Nisbet's Heraldry, Henry 
de Laudere is said to have taken the oaths, but this is not so ; the name 
is Henry de Larder. 

The name is taken from Lauder in Berwickshire, and a family long 
remained there with the designation of Lauder of that Ilk ; Robert, last 
of the direct line, was dead in 1658, leaving an only child, Isobel Lauder 
of that Ilk, wife of Alexander Home, bailie of Lauder; in 1683 she was 
dead, leaving three daughters, among whom the Lauder property was 
divided. 

William, called "of the Dails," burgess of Lauder, living in 1517, 
had a charter of some lands in 1542, from Robert Lauder of the Bass, 
who styles him dilectus consanguineus, and was ancestor of John Lauder 
of Newington, merchant in Edinburgh, who, as " descended of the old 
family of Lauder of that Ilk," registered arms 1672-78 — ^gules, a griffin 
salient argent, in dexter canton a tower or ; crest — a balance equilibriated 
or; motto — " Mediocriajirma.'" He acquired Fountainhall 1 681, which 
was erected into a barony the next year, and was created a baronet. In 
1699 his son. Sir John, a senator of the College of Justice, had a patent 
of arms with two lions argent as supporters ; in the coat the tower was 
omitted, and a bordure argent substituted as a mark of difference. The 
crest and motto were also altered. 

The griffin segreant appears on very old seals, and in 1425 Sir 



WORKMAN'S MS. 175 

Robert of the Bass bore the Royal tressure with the lions as sup- 
porters. 

Sir Robert was justiciary in the reign of Robert I. ; Alexander, 
Bishop of Dunkeld, died 141 1 ; Thomas, Bishop of Dunkeld, died 1481 ; 
William was Bishop of Glasgow and Chancellor of Scotland, and died 
1425 ; Robert was Bishop of Dunblane 1447 ; and George, Bishop of 
Argyle 1427-62. 

Mr Henry Lauder of St Germains, King's Advocate and Senator of 
the College of Justice, who died in 1561, was son of Gilbert, an Edin- 
burgh burgess. 

The Landers of the Bass long held that rocky island and great estates 
in East-Lothian, including Tynynghame, Balgone, Pencaitland, &c. 
They seem to have been in financial difficulties early in the seventeenth 
century, and parted with most of their property; a branch retained 
Bielmouth. Sir Robert of that place was knighted, and Robert of Biel- 
mouth, who died there 1768, seems to have been the last of his line. 

From 1 47 1 till 1600 the barons of Bass sat in almost every parlia- 
ment. 

Alexander, Provost of Edinburgh, sat in parliament 1503-5. 

Crawfurd of Hanyng. L. ; the arms here differ, being — gules, a 
fess ermine between two mullets in chief argent, and a stag's head in base 
couped or attired sable ; the motto, " Christus vita" is added. 

Of this family was Archibald, Abbot of Holyrood 1457, Lord High 
Treasurer 1474, who died before i486. His seals are apparently 
indistinct, as Mr Laing describes one of 1465 as having only a fess 
checquy, (?) ermine; another engraved in the Chartulary of Holyrood, shows 
three charges (perhaps ermine spots) on the fess, one mullet in dexter and 
a charge in sinister chief. In. the " Lives of the Officers of State," a fess 
ermine and a mullet in dexter chief are the arms assigned to the abbot. 
Sir William possessed the lands of Haining and barony of Manuel, c. 
1400. Agnes, Lady of Haining 1546, daughter and coheir of William 
Crawfurd of that place, married Thomas, son of Alexander Lord 
Livingstone. 

Mynteith of Kerss. L. ; the second and third quarters, azure, 
three buckles or. The seal of John Menteith has the Stewart fess 
checquy surmounted of a bend, and these bearings were afterwards 
simplified by conversion into a bend checquy. William of Kerse in 1496 
uses the bend checquy quartering a bend charged with three buckles for 
Stirling, and for crest, a swan's head and neck. In 1517 William of 
Kerse has the same arrangement, but the Stirling bend is engrailed and 
the crest issues from a coronet. 

About 1673 George Monteith, merchant in Edinburgh, representer 
of Kerse, registered the arms given in this MS.; and James of Auldcathie, 
a cadet, dropped the Stirling quarter and adopted a canton sable charged 
with a lion's head erased or. 

John, son of Sir Walter de Menteith, married, in 1357, Mary, daughter 
and heir of Sir John Stirling of Kerse and Alva; their descendants long held 



176 WORKMAN'S MS. 

these baronies with the offices of sheriff and forester of Clackmannan. 
Sir William sat in parliament 1484-88 ; and another Sir William in the 
general council held after Flodden. Robert of Kerse sat in parliament 1560. 
Sir William sold Kerse in 1631 ; his descendants and those of his 
brothers having failed, Sir Robert Dalyell of Binns (paternally, Menteith 
of Auldcathie) was, in 1772, recognised in the Lyon Court as heir male of 
this ancient family. 

Sir James Stuart-Menteth represents the next branch. 

72. Hepburne of Beinstoune. Hepburn with a mullet argent in 
base for difference ; crest — a dexter arm vested issuing from clouds, the 
hand grasping the bridle of a horse's head, which issues from the wreath ; 
motto — " Gratus esto ;" a lion gardant gules on the dexter side as sup- 
porter. The arms, with a mullet in base, are on the seal of John of Bean- 
ston 1538. Nisbet says this family descends from a second son of 
Hepburn of Smeaton. Sir Patrick of Whitecastle, bailie of the nunnery 
of Haddington, who was charged with treason 1567, was grandfather of 
Patrick of Beanston, from whom descended Robert of that place, living in 

1725- 

73. Logan of Restalrig. L.; there are added : crest— a demi-eagle 

rising ; motto — " Luif ane God, under ane King ; " supporters — a horse 
and a man dressed in a short tunic, head bare with a band round it, and 
hair long and flowing. Porteus, and some other authorities, give the 
piles meeting in point and piercing a man's heart. 

The quartering of the eagle has generally been said to be for Ramsay, 
but no intermarriage with that family is proved ; Mr Riddell, while re- 
marking this, adds, " the bearing of the eagle is not properly explained." 

Thomas de Lestalric was Sheriff of Edinburgh in the beginning of 
thirteenth century, and in 1225 was proprietor of Hailes, which descended 
to the Logans. 

In 1296 Johan de Lastalirik, of the county of Edinburgh, did homage 
to Edward I. In the Record Office there is a detached seal of Simon de 
Lasalric with an eagle displayed, so there is hardly room to doubt that the 
Logans acquired Restalrig or Lestarrick, in the fourteenth century, by 
marriage with the heiress of the old family, who took their name from it. 
1382 is the last notice of the Lestalrics, and in 1398 Sir Robert Logan 
is lord of Lestalric. 

In 1296 Wautier Logan, Thurbrand de Logan, of the county of 
Dumfries, and Wautier Logan of Lanarkshire, did homage to Edward I. 

A detached seal of Walter Logan in the Record Office, probably 
appended to the deed of homage, has three piles in point. 

Hutton gives a seal of Robert Logan of Restalrik, 1279 (?), with the 
same bearings, which were also used in 1440 by Robert of Restalrig, and 
1504-10 by Sir John of Restalrig. 

In 1565 John, a cadet, uses the same with a mullet in base. In 
1513 John Logan's seal is — first and fourth, three piles; second and 
third, a boar's head erased. In 1542 the bearings on the seal of Robert, 
son and apparent heir of Sir Robert of Restalrig, were — first and fourth, 



WORKMAN'S MS. 177 

three piles in point ; second, an eagle displayed ; third, three papingoes 
for Pepdie. 

The same bearings are carved at Restalrig on the tombstone of 
Janet Ker, Lady Restalrig, who died in 1526, impaled with Ker of 
Ancrum. 

It thus seems established that the piles should be in point ; that the 
heart is a seventeenth century addition, although Nisbet seems to say 
that it was on a seal of 1398 ; lastly, that the eagle is for Restalrig. 

The only entry in the Lyon Register is, Mr George Logan of that 
Ilk, CO. Ayr, 1672-78 — or, three passion nails meeting at the points and 
piercing through a man's heart gules. At a very early period the Logans 
held lands in Ayrshire ; James was Sheriff-depute 1539, but George, in 
1600, is the first met with designed of that Ilk. Hugh, the last of the 
family, the well-known witty laird of Logan, sold the estate and died 
unmarried in 1802. His sister, Mrs Goodlet-Campbell, inherited the pro- 
perties of Burnhead and Hillar. 

Adam de Logan witnessed a charter of Alexander II., c. 1235, to the 
church of Scone. His descendants possessed Malles in Gowrie, and made 
grants to the monastery of Scone. 

Sir Robert is said to have married a daughter of Robert II., and 
to have had a charter, in 1395, of the barony of Grougar in Ayrshire from 
Robert III., dilecto fratri nostra. " Nisbet's Heraldry." 

The Logans held lands in that county as well as in the Carse of 
Gowrie, in addition to their chief seat of Restalrig, for many generations. 
Restalrig sat in parliament 1543-60. 

Fast Castle, with Gunsgreen, Nether Ayton, &c., was acquired by 
marriage with a coheiress of Home, and her descent from the heiress of 
the Pepdies accounts for the arms of the latter family being quartered by 
Logan of Restalrig. 

Sir Robert of Restalrig, Admiral of Scotland, founded the monastery 
of St Anthony at Leith, and died 6th March 1439, on which day mass 
was sung there for the souls of himself, dame Katherine, his spouse, their 
predecessors and successors. 

Robert Logan of Restalrig was, by correspondence, implicated in the 
Gowrie plot, but died before July 1607, and the discovery was only made by 
the confession of Sprott, the votary, in 1608 ; upon this Logan's body was 
exhumed, and, after a trial, at which his eldest son Robert, then a minor, 
was summoned but did not appear, sentence of forfeiture for treason was 
pronounced ; his " name, memory, and dignitie " were declared to be 
" extinct and abolisheit, and his armes cancellat, rivine, and deleitt furth 
of the buikis of armes and nobilitie ; " his goods and lands were forfeited 
and escheat, and his posterity pronounced unable to possess or enjoy 
any offices, lands, &c. He had, between 1597 and 1605, sold nearly all 
his lands. 

Nisbet says that the baron of Restalrig left two sons, George and 
John, who went abroad, that the elder died, the younger returned, pos- 
sessed part of Restalrig, and was ancestor of the Logans of Burncastle in 

2 Y 



178 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Lauderdale. His pedigree seems far wrong ; in the first place, Robert 
was the name of the son and heir. A family in the United States claimed 
descent from a Patrick Logan, said to be son of the traitor. 

On the 2nd of April 1616, the forfeiture of Robert of Restalrig was 
reversed in favour of his lawful children, Alexander, Janet, and Ann, 
except as regards their claim to the succession of their late father, which 
seems to show that the eldest son was dead, and that these were the only 
survivors. 

The ancestor of Burncastle was certainly a John Logan, portioner of 
Restalrig, who in 16 13 was dilated for hearing mass in Edinburgh in 
1609, the date at which his alleged elder brother was under age. Then 
this John, the portioner, had a brother Archibald who, in 1645, was 
served tutor to the three young daughters of George Logan of Burn- 
castle, son of John. As George married in 1640, it seems impossible that 
he. could be son of a younger son of Robert of Restalrig. Nisbet farther 
makes George, above named, acquire Burncastle by marriage with Isobel, 
daughter of Ludovick Fowler of that place. The Fowlers do not appear 
to have owned Burncastle at all ; George Logan of Burncastle married the 
only child who left issue of Captain Ludovick Fowler, " portioner of 
Restalrig." 

When John was in difficulties in 16 13, his cautioner was Andrew 
Logan of Coitfield, son and successor of John of Coitfield, proprietor of 
lands in the barony of Restalrig, who may have been his brother. The 
Coitfield family seem to have been an old branch of Restalrig, and 
among the persons for whom the monks of St Anthony said mass were 
William of Coitfield and Annabel, his wife, and Patrick of Coitfield and 
his wife Janet. In 1520 Robert of Coitfield was Provost of Edinburgh. 
Andrew of Coitfield was, in 1609, found free from all concern in the plot, 
and from all prejudice that he might suffer by the forfeiture of his chief 
and superior. 

Ramsay of Dahovse. L. ; an eagle displayed is the bearing on a 
detached seal of William de Rameseye, probably appended to his deed of 
homage to Edward L in 1296. 

In 1 40 1 James de Ramsay uses the same, with a unicorn's head for 
crest, and two griffins as supporters. 

There are instances of the eagle being two headed. William, Earl of 
Fife, in 1358 has the eagle surmounted of a bendlet engrailed. 

In 1296 no less than eleven persons of the name swore fealty to the 
King of England — two from the county of Edinburgh, five from Fife, two 
from Berwick, one from Angus, and one from Argyll. 

Simon de Ramsay witnessed charters in the reigns of Malcolm and 
William the Lyon, and from that time the name is often met with. 

Sir Alexander of Dalhousie, Sheriff of Teviotdale and keeper of Rox- 
burghe Castle, was starved to death in Hermitage Castle by the knight of 
Liddesdale. In 1359 Robert was Sheriff of Forfar, and William Sheriff 
of Edinburgh. Alexander of Dalhousie sat in the general council 1440, 
and his grandson. Sir Alexander, in parliament 1471-81. In the begin- 



WORKMAN'S MS. 179 

ning of the seventeenth century the family consisted of three brothers, — 
Sir George of Dalhousie, who was created Lord Ramsay 1618 ; Sir John, 
who took a prominent part in the rescue of James VI. from the Gowrie 
conspirators, and was created, in 1606, Viscount of Haddington, and in 
1620 Earl of Holderness in England ; and James, who went to Sweden 
in 1614, with recommendations from James Baron Spens, Swedish Am- 
bassador in London, whose daughter he afterwards married. There was 
also a daughter, Alice, a legatee under the will of her brother the Earl. 

The arms, crest, and supporters, which are on the seal of James 
Ramsay 1401, continue the bearing of the Earl of Dalhousie. Cuthbert 
Ramsay, Captain of Crichton Castle, younger son of Nicholas of Dalhousie, 
married, c. 1552, Agnes Stewart, Countess of Bothwell. 

Herring of Gilmerton. F. ; Walter de Hayeroun was clericus 
regis 1178-80. 

John Heryng fought with distinction for David H. The " Memorie 
of the Somervilles " contains a notice of his descendants, and of a domes- 
tic tragedy which brought the family nearly to ruin. He had a Crown 
charter, forty-first David H., of the barony of Glasclune in Perthshire, and 
other grants from that king and from Robert H. 

Patrick was a hostage in England 1340. Paton was taken prisoner 
at Neville's Cross. Patrick and John were both of the household of 
Queen Joan. Giles, daughter of Sir John Herring, is stated to have 
married Sir Walter Somerville in 1372, bringing him half the lands of 
Gilmerton. 

The other half remained with the male line of the Herrings till the 
seventeenth century, and they also held Glasclune, Lethendy, Cluny, Tul- 
liebole, Little Blair, Callie, &c., intermarrying with the Earls of Athole, 
Lords Gray, Crichton of Cairnes, and other families. 

David of Lethendy sat in parliament 1607, but soon after this the 
family declined. 

In Northumberland the Herons of Hadston, Bokenfield, Ford, and 
Chipchase, long held a considerable position ; barons by tenure from the 
reign of John till 1296, barons by writ of summons 137 1 and 1393, 
baronets 1662. Their bearing — three herons, or a chevron between thrfee 
herons — differs entirely from that of the Herrings of Scotland, but it is 
from the English family that the Herons in the stewartry of Kirkcud- 
bright claim descent. The coat they carry, however, seems rather to 
indicate a community of origin with the northern family ; it is argent, 
two lions rampant affrontde, supporting between their forepaws a rose 
gules stalked and leaved vert. Two herons proper were allowed as sup- 
porters, in 1767, to Patrick Heron, styled of that Ilk. 

Various and contradictory accounts are given of the origin of the 
Herons in Scotland, but it is at least certain that their family property of 
Kirouchtree has been in their possession for upwards of three centuries. 
About 1700 the designation was changed to, of that Ilk. Stuart Mary, 
daughter and heir of Patrick of Heron, M.P. for the Stewartry, by Lady 
Elizabeth Cochrane, his wife, married, in 1802, Sir John Maxwell of 



^8o WORKMAN'S MS. 

Springkell, Bart., who assumed the additional surname and arms of 
Heron. Her ladyship, in 1851, executed an entail, under which her 
second surviving son inherited the estates and took the name and arms of 

Heron. 

A quasi recognition of the alleged English origin of the Kirouchtree 
line took place early in the last century. William, said to be a son of 
Ford, settled in Lincolnshire, and was father of Sir John of Cressy Hall, 
Treasurer of the Chamber to Henry VHI., whose descendant, Sir 
Edward, K.B. 1603, left a son and two daughters, Henry Heron of 
Cressy, M.P. for the county of Lincoln, who d.s.p. 1730 ; Anne Lady 
Eraser of Durris, co. Kincardine, who d.s.p. 1769 ; and Dorothy, married 
Erancis Fane of Fulbeck, and had one son, who d.s.p. 

Mr Henry Heron, having no near relatives of his own name, settled 
his estates, failing issue of his sister and nephew, on Patrick Heron of 
Kirouchtree, M.P. for Kirkcudbright, whose grandson, Patrick of Heron 
above named, succeeded on the death of Lady Eraser. 

It was a condition in the will of Mr Henry Heron that his arms 
should be quartered, and this was repeated in the entail made by the late 
Lady Heron-Maxwell, but the arms recorded by the Rev. Michael Max- 
well-Heron are those of Heron of Heron alone. The Cressy estates are 
not now in possession of this family. 

Sinclair of Roslin. L., no mullet. A cross engrailed is the only 
charge on the seal of Sir William de Sancto Claro 1292, and the same 
was recorded by James Sinclair of Roslin 1672-78. 

Henry de Sancto Clero was present in the court of William the Lyon 
at Edinburgh, a.d. i 180. Henry and Alan de Sainclair are witnesses to a 
charter of William de Morville a few years later. Five persons of the 
name swore fealty to Edward L Sir Henry of Roslin was one of the 
barons of Scotland who, in 1320, addressed a letter to the Pope. 

Many fables have sprung up in connection with the history of this 
great and ancient race, such as their possession of Roslin in the reign of 
David L, their being Dukes of Oldenburgh, and Hereditary Grand Master 
Masons of Scotland from the reign of James H. 

See Father Hay's " Genealogie of the Sainteclaires of Rosslyn," 
edited by James Maidment, advocate. 

The original charter, 14th September, thirty-first Alexander HL, of 
the lands of Roskelyn and Cattekon to Sir William de St Clair, on the 
resignation of Henry de Roskelyn, is printed in the chartulary of New- 
bottle. 

Sir William was justiciary of Galloway and sheriff of four counties. 

Sir Henry of Roslin survived his sons. Sir William and John, who 
both lost their lives in Spain on the expedition with the heart of Robert 
Bruce. 

His grandson and successor, William, was Earl of Orkney. William, 
Earl of Orkney and Caithness, founder in 1446 of the Collegiate Church 
of Roslin, resigned the former earldom to the Crown in 1470, and had 
several sons, of whom the eldest was ancestor of the Lords Sinclair, the 



WORKMAN'S MS. 



i8i 



second was Earl of Caithness, and the third Sir Oliver of Roslin, Pent- 
land, and Herbertshire sat in parliament 1485-87. It has been said 
that Sir Oliver was elder brother of the Earl of Caithness, but the mullet 
long borne is the mark of cadency of the third son. 

Oliver of Roslin sat in parliament 1505, William in 1560, and Sir 
William in 1584. 

A younger son of Roslin was Oliver Sinclair of Pitcarnis and 
Whytekirk, Captain of Tantallon Castle, the favourite of James V., who, 
in 1542, gave him a tack of the Crown property in Orkney and Shetland. 

Henry of Whytekirk married Eupheme, daughter and coheir of 
Eupheme Makcalzean, Lady of Cliftonhall, who was burnt for witchcraft 
in 1 59 1. The heiress of this branch married Captain Ramsay, and was 
mother of the sixth Earl of Dalhousie. 

John of Roslin defended his castle against General Monk, and after 
it was much damaged and taken, was kept a prisoner at Tynemouth for a 
considerable time, and the family was nearly ruined. 

Jean Spottiswoode, Lady Roslin, in various petitions to parliament 
and to the Crown, pathetically sets forth the sales of extensive estates, that 
the remaining small part of the estate is heavily burdened, that the crops 
and wood had been cut, and that with her large family she had hardly a 
bed to lie on. 

William, last of Roslin, sold the last fragment of his inheritance, and 
died in January 1778, leaving an only child, Sarah, who died unmarried. 

As the representation has been a matter in dispute, it will be con- 
venient to show the last generations in a tabular form ; the statement of the 
Cavaliere Ciccopieri is printed in italics. Mr Bower, in 1854, obtained 
the Royal licence to assume the additional surname of St Clair, and in 
1852 registered the arms of St Clair and Bower quarterly. 

JAMES SINCLAIR of Roslin, m. JEAN, daughter of Sir Henry Spottiswoode. 



Alexander of Ros- 
lin, m. Jean, daugh. of 
Robert, Lord SempilL 



Thomas Sinclair, m. Elizabeth, daugh. of Captain Francis Wauchope, younger 
son of Niddrie Marischal. 



William of Roslin, 

««.CORDELIA,daugh. 

and coheir of Col. Sir 
George Wishart of 
Cliftonhall, Bart 

Sarah, died un- 
married. 



James, an officer in the French 
army. 



Francis, an officer in the Spanish 
army, d.s.p. Entered the Spanish 
service c. 17 lo, was Colonel of a 
regiment at Naples. 

Antonio St Clair. 



Thomas, 
died unmar. 



Lt.-Colonel James 
Sinclair, 87th Re- 
ment of Foot, was 
served heir special 
of his cousin, Wil- 
liam, last of Roslin, 
in 1786 ; d.s.p. at 
Madeira, 23rd Sep- 
tember 1817. 



Francesco St 
Clair, d.s.p. 
1778. 



Margaret, m. 
Alex. Bower of 
Meathie and Kincal- 
drum. 

I 
Alex. Bower of 

I Meathie and Kincal- 

I drum. 

Gabriela Maria St \ 

Clair, m. Niccolo Graham Bower, 
Ciccopieri of sold his estates. 

Naples. \ 

Alexander BowER- 
St Clair, resident 
in Lithuania, was 
served heir of line 
and in general to 
William, last of Ros- 
lin, 1 7th March 1 852. 
Cavaliere Enrico Ciccopieri, Major in the Italian 
Army, assumed the additional surname of St Clair, and 
was, 15th June 1865, served heir of hne general of Lieut.- 
Colonel James Sinclair, the last heir male of Roslin. 
This service is incompatible with the former one by Mr 
Bower. 



No supporters have been registered, but the barons of Roslin long 
bore a mermaid holding a trident and a griffin. 



2 z 



182 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Pennycuik OF YT Ilk. L.; Hughe, Huwe, and Margaret de Peni- 
cok, of the county of Edinburgh, swore fealty to Edward I. in 1296. 

The same bearings are on a seal of George Pennycuik 1473. As 
registered, 1672-78, by Alexander of Newhall, the field is or and the 
horns are stringed and garnished gules. Argent appears thus to have 
been the original field, as Porteus, in 1662, blazons " argent aliter or." 

The barony from which this family took its name was in their 
possession in the reign of Alexander II., when W. de Penycook is one of 
the persons directed to fix the extent of the lands of Lethenhope, and 
soon after Sir David de Penicoke is named. 

Alexander, named above, sold the estate about 1646, and settled at 
Newhall, which, on his death at the age of ninety, descended to his son 
Alexander, who had acquired Romanno in Peeblesshire by marriage with 
Margaret Murray in 1676. He was author of a " Description of 
Tweeddale," and of Poems, and died in 1722, leaving two daughters, 
married to Oliphant of Lanton and Farquharson of Aboyne. 

Wardlaw of yt Ilk. L., as Wardlaw of Richartoune. 

There are in Scotland several places named Wardlaw, from which 
this surname may have been derived, but there is no evidence of the 
existence of Wardlaws of that Ilk. 

Henry Wardlaw had a charter from Robert I. of half the barony of 
Wilton, CO. Roxburgh, which remained in possession of the family for 
several generations. 

Walter was Bishop of Glasgow 1368, a Cardinal in 1385, and died 
in 1387. His seal, 1368, has a fess between three mascles and charged 
with three crosses ; supporters — two lions. His nephew, Henry, Bishop 
of St Andrews 1404-40, had on his seal, 1419, two shields, the one 
charged with three mascles, the other having a fess between three cross 
crosslets fitch6e, and charged with three mascles, Lochore, co. Fife, was 
acquired by marriage with the heiress of Valange, and on the seal of Sir 
Henry of Torry, 1444, are three mascles for Wardlaw quartering three 
water bougets for Valange ; crest — a boar's head couped. 

Thomas de Wardlaw sat in parliament 1369, Henry of Torry in 
1560, and James was Justice-depute in 1589. 

Henry, last of Torry, was dead in 1619, leaving two daughters, 
Elizabeth and Janet. 

The heads of the Wardlaw family styled themselves baron of 
Inchgaw, otherwise Lochorshire. 

The principal cadet in Fife is the existing family of Wardlaw of 
Pitreavie, the published accounts of which are not correct. Henry 
Wardlaw, Chamberlain to Queen Anne, married Elizabeth Wilson, 
daughter of a merchant in Edinburgh. They had charters of mill of 
Balmule 1596, tenandry of Balmule 1603. He was knighted before 1614, 
when he had a charter of Pitreavie and a gift of a pension of ;^iooo ; was 
created a baronet 1631, with a charter of the barony of Ward- 
law in Nova Scotia ; died 5th April 1637. Sir Henry, second baronet, 
married, first, Margaret Bethune, a daughter of the Balfour family, and 
died 2nd March 1653. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 183 

Pitreavie was sold early in last century, but Balmule remained for 
some time longer in the possession of the family. 

The arms registered, 1672-78, by Sir Henry of Pitreavie, baronet, 
were — first and fourth, azure, three mascles or ; second and third, azure, 
three water bougets or ; crest — ^an estoile or ; motto — " Familias firmat 
pietasT 

Sir Archibald died, unmarried, 29th January 1874, and it is under- 
stood that the title has devolved on the grandson of his uncle Henry, 
now Sir Henry Wardlaw, baronet. 

The next branch of the family, formerly seated at Abden, co. Fife, 
descended from John, younger son of the first baronet, is represented by 
Robert Balfour Wardlaw- Ramsay of Whitehill, co. Edinburgh, who, in 
1849, registered the arms of Ramsay, quartering Wardlaw as Pitreavie, 
with a crescent argent for difference. 

The Wardlaws of West Reston, co. Berwick, descended of Torry, 
bore the mascles within a bordure engrailed or ; the coheiresses, about 
the middle of the seventeenth century, were Alison, wife of Andrew 
Burnett, advocate ; Magdalene, wife of Robert Hamilton, merchant, 
Edinburgh ; and Joanna. 

Robert HI., in the second year of his reign, granted a charter of 
Riccarton and Warriston, in the barony of Currie, to Marion Wardlaw, 
widow of Gilbert Wardlaw, and to Andrew, their son. The male line of 
this branch ended on the death of Richard of Warriston in 1595, leaving 
a daughter, Agnes Wardlaw of Warriston, living 1607. 

Stacie says Warriston bore the fess argent and charged with one rose. 

To this line probably belonged the Wardlaws of Kilbaberton, near 
Currie; the seal of Henry of Kilbaberton, 1530, has the fess between three 
mascles and charged with a mullet between two crescents. 

74. Fairle of Braid. L. ; instead of a ribbon engrailed there is a 
ribbon sinister ; in dexter chief a mullet gules ; added in ink, crest — a 
unicorn's head erased ; motto — " I am redde ; " supporter — on the dexter 
a hound collared. The coat recorded, 1672-78, by Richard of Braid is — 
or, a lion rampant gules holding a star azure between his forepaws, over all 
a bendlet gules; crest — a unicorn's head couped; motto — " I am readie;" 
no supporters entered, but Stacie, about the same date, gives two spaniels. 
Braid, as early as 1639, was held by Sir William Dick, so this Richard 
was only representer of the Fairlies. 

It has been said that this family descends from a natural son of 
Robert H., and the arms favour this theory. William Fairlie, who had 
been one of the custumars of Edinburgh in 1342, had a grant as a reward 
for his share in taking the Castle of Edinburgh, and is named in the 
Exchequer Rolls as early as 1329. 

William Fairlie had a charter of Innerleith from Robert I., and 
Braid was held by William Fairlie in the reign of Robert H., when he 
resigned Bavelaw to his son John upon his marriage. It is plain, there- 
fore, that the royal origin, if true at all, must be thrown back to an earlier 
date. 



1 84 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Robert of Braid sat in convention 1567, and Alexander in parliament 
1597. The Fairlies retained the barony of Braid till the reign of Charles 
I., when the head of the family was Sir Robert. Alexander, son and 
apparent heir of Robert of Braid, was contracted in marriage, 7th April 
1584, with Martha, daughter of John Knox, the reformer, and had several 
children. 

About the time that the family of Braid declined, an Edinburgh 
burgess, John Fairlie, probably a descendant, appears as owner of 
Bruntsfield and of lands in Restalrig ; his son William was knighted. 

William of Bruntsfield registered arms, 1672-78, resembling those of 
Braid — or, a lion rampant and in chief three stars gules ; crest — a lion's 
head couped or ; motto — " Paratus sum^ 

He acquired Little Dreghorn, co. Ayr, and Bruntsfield was sold. 
His son William executed an entail in 1703 of the Ayrshire estate, and 
had a Crown charter erecting his lands into the barony of Fairlie. 

The male line of this family ended in 1803, on the death of Alex- 
ander Fairlie of Fairlie, when the estate passed to his sister Margaret, 
wife of Sir William Cunningham of Robertland, Bart., by whose descend- 
ant it has lately been sold. 

In the parish of Largs there was another family of Fairlie, taking 
their surname from their lands, and bearing an entirely different coat — 
argent, or or, a chevron between three water bougets sable. Rauf Faireye 
(? Fairleye) of the county of Ayr, who signed the Ragman Roll in 1296, 
was probably ancestor of this line, which retained its estate till the begin- 
ning of last century. 

Falckner. An addition in ink, a chevron between three falcons' heads 
erased. 

75. Crechtoun of Brounstoun. L.; ermine, a lion rampant azure, 
which agrees with Forman and Balfour. Porteus gives both coats. 

William de Crichton had the lands of Braidwood in Mid-Lothian 
from David de Pennycuk, and obtained a Crown charter of confirmation 
fifth Robert H. Margaret, his widow, had a charter of Gilbertoun, in 
the same county, 14 10. After the middle of the fifteenth century these 
lands were possessed by John of Brunston. Alexander of Brunston was 
forfeited for treason 1548, but after his death the decree was reduced 1558, 
at the instance of his son and successor, John of Brunston. 

In 1592 John of Brunston, with consent of his spouse, Margaret 
Adamson of the Craigcrook family, and of his son James, and Jean 
Fairlie his spouse, sold Gilbertoun for 40,000 merks to Jean Fleming, 
Lady Thirlestane. James was served heir of his father in 1608, and had 
sold Brunston before his death. In 1637 his son David, then resident in 
Ireland, was served heir to him in annual-rents over the mills of Mussel- 
burgh. 

In 1609 Abraham Crichton, brother of the laird of Brunston, had a 
grant of two thousand acres of land in Ulster, Thomas of Brunston being 
cautioner for him. 

Thomas was certainly not the head of the family at that date, but may 



WORKMAN'S MS. 185 

have been a son of the last laird. The Earl of Erne appears to be the 
descendant o/ the settler in Ireland. He carries argent, a lion rampant 
azure, but the arms in the Funeral Entry in Ulster's Office, 1669, of 
Mary, eldest daughter and coheir of George Creighton, wife of Randall 
Adams of Ledwichstown, co. West Meath, are those given for Brunston 
in L. 

MouBRAY OF Barnbougall. L. ; the crown is an antique one. 

The seals of Geoffrey in 1292, and Sir Roger in the reign of Robert 
I., are a lion rampant with a label in chief, and in 1564 that of John of 
Barnbougall is a lion rampant uncrowned. The crown, however, is on 
those of John 151 1 and Barbara 1534, both of Barnbougall; the first 
has a stork's head as crest. 

Philippa, heiress of the family, married Sir Bartholomew de Loen, 
and they had a charter from David II. of the barony of Dalmeny. A seal 
of Philippa, in 1395, gives her own arms — a lion rampant, impaled with her 
husband's, three eagles' heads erased ; supporters — two lions sejant 
gardant. 

Robert Barton, who married Barbara Moubray, lady of Barnbougal, 
and assumed her surname and arms, quartered three bars wavy with the 
crowned lion of Moubray on his seal 1534. Latterly, the Moubray coat 
has been alone borne by the family and its cadets, and Nisbet gives as 
supporters a man and woman. 

Cockairny, in Fife, has been the seat of an existing branch, now 
probably heir male of the marriage of Philippa and Sir Bartholomew de 
Loen, for nearly four hundred years. 

Philip de Moubray sat in curia regis 1208, and there seems no doubt 
that he was a younger son of the great English house of Mowbray, after- 
wards Dukes of Norfolk. In Charles' Roll of English Arms, the coat of 
Roger de Mowbray, in the latter half of the thirteenth century, is gules, a 
lion rampant argent, which is quartered by the Howards, and agrees with 
the earliest seal of the Moubrays in Scotland. 

Roger sat in council c. 1255, and was Sheriff of Edinburgh, Linlith- 
gow, and Haddington. Sir Geoffrey, in 1294, was Justiciary of Lothian, 
and owned the manor of Bolton in Northumberland. 

For their adherence to the Baliols, a large part of their lands were 
forfeited. 

Moubray of Barnbougall sat in parliament 1484-88. 

The elder line parted with their estates early in the seventeenth 
century, having suffered in various ways. Francis was accused of a plot 
against James VI., and of counterfeiting Cecil's writing ; in trying to escape 
from Edinburgh Castle he lost his life in 1603, and his body was exposed 
on the gibbet. Several ladies of the family belonged to the household of 
Queen Mary, one of them becoming wife of Gilbert Curie, and she and 
her sister were in receipt of pensions from the King of Spain. Walter 
had gone to Spain in 1600. Philip was forced to leave Scotland in 1601, 
and at that time James had been for ten years a prisoner at Westminster. 

Fawsyde of that Ilk. L. ; seal of Roger de Fausyde, 1326 — a 

3 A 



1 86 WORKMAN'S MS. 

crane within a bordure engrailed. The surname is taken from Fawsyde, 
CO. Haddington, and Alan de Fawsyde is named in the chartulary of 
Soltre c. 1 200. John of Fawsyde sat in parliament 1467. 

The heiress of the chief line married Sir William Douglas of 
Kelhead ; George Fawsyde of Cowthropple left three coheiresses in 1624, 
of whom Janet married John Ker of Lochtour. 

Murray of Darnhall. Blackbarony is added. F. 

GiFFORD OF Sheriffhall. L. ; ermine, three bars gules, a bordure 
of the second. 

Stewart of Craigiehall. L. 

76. Lawson. Sable, on a chevron between three garbs argent a 
crescent. 

*Orrok of that Ilk. Arms registered 1672-78 by Alexander of 
that Ilk, CO. Fife — sable, on a chevron or between three mullets argent as 
many chess rooks of the field. 

Symon de Oroc witnessed a charter in 1248; in 1296 Symund and 
Robert de Orrok of the county of Fife swore fealty to Edward I. . 

The original estate in Fife, which was erected into a barony in the seven- 
teenth century, was sold and lands in Aberdeenshire acquired, to which the 
name of Orrok was given ; they are still in the possession of the family. 

M'CuLLOCH OF Cardiness, added in ink. L. 

Balfour of Montquhanie. L. ; a saltire couped sable in base. 

77. Hepburn of Rikertoun. Hepburn with a buckle in base. 
Lyddell. L, ; the stars are not pierced. 

Bynning of that Ilk. L. ; seal of Simon de Beny 1399 — a bend 
engrailed between a star of six points in chief and a crescent in base. 

James Binning of Carlowriehaugh, advocate, registered arms 1672-78 
— argent, on a bend engrailed sable a waggon of the first ; crest — a horse's 
head furnished with furniture for a waggon ; motto — " Virtute dologue." 

The arms entered in 1675 by Sir William of Walliford, Provost of 
Edinburgh, have the waggon or and a bordure sable. 

William de Binin was prior of Newbottle, and afterwards abbot of 
Cupar. 

Wawane of Steinston. L. 

Balfour of Carristoun. L. ; the heiress Isabel married John, 
second son of George Lord Seton, p. 27. 

Seton of Touch. The name is in a later hand, and the first entry is 
obliterated. Arms — vert, a lion rampant with a plumed helmet on his head 
This may be a variation of the coat given in L. for Touch of that Ilk. 

78. Ramsay of Eastbarns. Arms nearly obliterated. 

Lindsay of Dowhill. L. ; the base, instead of having two bars 
wavy or, is nearly covered with a representation of water with waves, and 
in base a crescent argent ; this nearly agrees with the entry in the Lyon 
Register for John of Dowhill, 1673. 

One of the oldest branches of the house of Lindsay, being descended 
from Sir William of Rossie, Crambeth, and Logic, younger brother of 
David, first Earl of Crawford ; now represented by David Baird Lindsay, 
Esq. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 187 

Sleich of Sleichis Houses (?) Or, three piles sable, and in base 
two serpents gliding proper. 

Seal of Richard Sleich, 1431 — a bend, and in sinister chief a buckle ; 
Patrick, in 1473, uses a bend sinister between two fleurs-de-lis, and 
charged with as many buckles. 

Sleichis Houses is in Berwickshire. Sleich of Cumledge, in that 
county, ended in an heiress in the latter part of the sixteenth century, Jean, 
wife of Archibald Auchinleck. 

John Sleich of Glengelt, Provost of Haddington, who long sat in 
parliament, left a son, Mr John of Glengelt, who d.s.p., and two daughters, 
Agnes, who married Mr Henry Cockburn, and her son, in 1695, was 
served heir of his uncle and grandfather ; and Christian, wife of Mr John 
Robertson. 

In 1329 Christian Sleich had a gift from the King, 

*M'MoRRAN OF Glaspane. This, with a bordure for difference and 
the hand a dexter one, was registered 1672-78 by John, late bailie of 
Edinburgh, whose great-grand father was a son of the above family. 

Porteus has two mullets instead of the mullet and crescent 

James of Newhall in Fife died about 1645, leaving a daughter and 
heir, Anne, who married in 1661 Sir George Campbell of Cessnock, and 
was mother of Margaret, wife of Alexander, Earl of Marchmont. 

In the Funeral Escutcheons of this family the charges in flank are 
spur rowels, and there is sometimes a plain bordure. 

Ninian was a commissioner on the coinage 1599. 

John, Bailie of Edinburgh, was killed in 1595 by William Sinclair, 
afterwards Sir William of Mey, then a boy at the High School of Edin- 
burgh, when trying to suppress a riot there. 

Glaspane in Lanarkshire was the property of the family for several 
generations, and the name occurs in that county in the fifteenth century. 

Ker of Samuelston. L. 

79. Maknaught of that Ilk. L. ; this coat, without the mullet, 
was registered by John M' Naught of Kilquharitie 1672-78. 

Fergus M'Nauch of Culconnady, and John M'Nauch of Craigow, 
were on an assize 1448; in 1643 Nicolas, wife of Robert Lennox of 
Dursdow, was heir of line and of provision of her brother, Roger 
M'Naucht of Kilquhanitie, but the estate remained in the male line of the 
family for nearly a hundred years longer ; there was another sister, Sarah, 
wife of Samuel Lockhart, merchant burgess of Edinburgh. 

Gilberd Makenaght, of the county of Dumfries, swore fealty to 
Edward I, in 1296. 

Roger sat in parliament for Edinburgh 1593-98. 

In the seventeenth century a family of merchant- burgesses of the 
name of Macmath flourished in Edinburgh, and the arms assigned to 
them in Funeral Escutcheons — sable, a chevron checquy argent and azure- 
between three lions' heads erased of the second — are certainly founded on 
M' Naught. They intermarried with the Kinlochs, Trotters, Dicks, and 
other families of rich merchants in Edinburgh. 



1 88 WORKMAN'S MS, 

Some of the Kilquhanitie family were merchant burgesses and bailies 
of Edinburgh about the same time. 

In 1593 James Makmath graduated at the University there. 

Ogston of that Ilk. F. 

Ballandene. There is added, of Auchnoule. L. ; the seal of Sir 
James of Broughton, 1604, has a thistle as crest ; supporters — two female 
figures emblematical of peace and justice. 

To his son William, who was created Lord Bellenden, the arms were 
confirmed in 1668, with the addition of the Royal tressure; crest — a hart's 
head couped with a cross between his tynes or; motto — ^' Sic itur ad 
astra;" another motto is added in W., " Ditat servata fides'' 

Ballantyne of that Ilk, otherwise Bannatyne — azure, a cross be- 
tween a crescent in the first quarter, and three mullets, one in each of the 
other quarters, or. On the seal of James, burgess of Edinburgh 1549, 
the crescent is in the fourth quarter. See L. 

John of Corhouse, co. Lanark, registered arms 1672-78 — argent, a 
cross between four mullets azure. 

Ninian of Kames, in Bute, at the same time recorded — gules, a 
chevron argent between three mullets or ; supporters ; two angels proper 
winged or. 

This family, latterly designed of that Ilk, ended in an heiress, Isabella, 
who married Roderick M'Leod of Sunbank, and was mother of William 
M'Leod Bannatyne of Bannatyne, who, in 1795, was allowed to quarter 
the arms and bear the supporters ; he was afterwards a Senator of the 
College of Justice and was knighted, sold Kames and d.s.p. 1833. 

Corhouse was in the possession of John de Bennachtyne about 1360 ; 
it was sold by Sir John Ballantyne of Crookdike, in Cumberland, son of 
John, whose arms are recorded. 

Jane, heiress of Crookdike, married Lawson Dykes, Esq., and is 
represented by L. F. Ballantine-Dykes of Dovenby Hall in Cumberland. 

Thomas Bannatyne of Newtyle 1577, and James of Newhall 1626, 
were Senators of the College of Justice ; George Bannatyne was of their 
family. 

Park of that Ilk. L. ; the stags' heads are cabossed. George 
of Foulfurdlees, descended of the family of Parkswells, registered arms 
1672-78 — or, a fess checquy gules and argent between three bucks' heads 
cabossed, within a bordure of the second. Arms entered at the same 
time for James Park, are composed with Eraser seemingly, as the field is 
azure and three fraises take the place of the bucks' heads. He is probably 
the Mr James Park alias Eraser of Clocharbie, who, in 167 1, was served 
heir general of his daughter Barbara. In a birthbrief granted by Sir 
Alexander Erskine, Lyon, one of the quarters is — Park, or, a chevron 
checquy azure and argent between three bucks' heads erased gules. 

Sir John de Park was Deputy-Constable in 1264. Robert II., in the 
fourth year of his reign, confirmed a charter of John, Earl of Carrick, to 
John de Park, of various lands in the barony of Kilbride. In 1296 Sir 
John de Park, of the county of Berwick, swore fealty to Edward I. 



WORKMAN'S MS, 189 

■ Sprewll of Coldoun. L. ; before 1308 Walter Spreuil witnessed 
a charter by Malcolm, Earl of Lennox; 1366 Walter Sprovll pays the 
contribution of the barony of Glasgow. 

Walter was steward of Malcolm, Earl of Lennox, from whom he had 
charters of Dalchorne and Dalmore, which remained in possession of his 
descendants till about 1620. 

John sat in parliament for Renfrew 1579. 

80. Leslie of Balquhane. Argent, on a fess azure three buckles 
or, in base a crescent gules. This coat without the crescent was registered, 
1672-78, by Alexander of Balquhain ; there are no supporters, but two 
griffins were borne by the Counts Leslie. 

It is remarkable in the Leslie family that the Earls of Rothes, Lords 
Lindores, and Lords Newark also bore griffins as supporters. The 
Leslies of Wardes assumed the same, and two griffins appear as sup- 
porters on a monument of Leslie of Findrassie, c. 1600. 

Porteus gives the arms of Balquhain — Leslie between two fleurs-de- 
lis azure; and for the Lord of Leslie — Leslie within a double tressure 
gules. Stacie gives the same for Leslie of that Ilk, with two griffins 
proper as supporters. 

The seal of Sir Norman de Lecelin, 1292, is three buckles on a bend, 

CONGELTOUN OF YATT IlK. L. 

Forbes of Fetterquharne, Azure, a fess or between three bears' 
(?) heads couped. 

81. *CoRSEiR OF YT Ilk. Nicol Cosour of Berwickshire, 1296, swore 
fealty to Edward I. Adam Cosour was, in 1360, one of the collectors of 
contributions from that shire. 

Adam Cosour sat in parliament 1467-69. 

Robert I. granted charters to Henry Cosur, or Henry called Cosure, 
of lands in Bondington and Lamberton, co. Berwick ; David II., in the 
thirty- second year of his reign, confirmed to his Macer, Adam Cossour,, 
lands in Eyemouth. Robert II., in the third year of his reign, granted to 
Henry, son of John Cossour, the lands of Otterburn, on his father's 
resignation. 

*Laing of yt Ilk. These bearings supported by two angels are on 
the seal of John, Bishop of Glasgow 1477. 

On the tombstone to Mr John, Keeper of the Signet, who died 1614, 
in the Greyfriars' Churchyard, Edinburgh, is cut this quartered coat, but 
the piles are in point. Niel was Keeper of the Signet 1581. See Plate 
98 for the coat registered, 1672-78, by James, portioner of Morisland. A 
grant of the present century is — argent, three piles in point sable, , 

Porteus gives for the name — parted per pale argent and sable a chief 
indented counterchanged. 

1296, William Lang, of the county of Berwick, swore fealty to 
Edward I. 

In 1357 Thomas Laing engages that Dumfries shall pay part of the 
ransom of David II. Thomas sat in parliament 1463, and Mr John, 

3 B 



I90 WORKMAN'S MS. 

rector of Southwick, in 1471 ; the last was the Bishop, who was also Lord 
High Treasurer 1470-74. 

John, Keeper of the Signet, was proprietor of Spittells or Reid- 
spittell, afterwards called Reidhouse ; he married Robert Dennistoun, and 
had an only child, Jean, who married, c. 1609, Sir Andrew Hamilton, a 
Senator of the College of Justice ; her lands were erected in his favour 
into the barony of Reidhouse. 

Arms on monument at Cairn in Aberdeenshire, of " Jhone Laing, 
baron of Noth, who died in March 1624, he vas sonne to Jhone Laing in 
Barflett." Three battle-axes. 

*Laitties of yt Ilk, This name generally takes the form of Lautie 
or Lawtie in the MSS. 

Another blazon makes the fess gules surmounting the piles and 
charged with three crescents or. 

The burgh of Cullen was represented in parliament by James Lawtie 
1633, and by George 1646. 

Adam Lautie, writer to the signet, was proprietor of the tenandry of 
Sauchtonhall, in which he was succeeded by his son, Mr James, advocate, 
father of Mr Adam, portioner of Sauchtonhall 1633. Mr James Lautie, 
advocate in Edinburgh, appears a few years later as heir to his cousin in 
property there. 

The lands of Laithis in Ayrshire, from which the surname was taken, 
were granted to the Fullartons on the resignation of Thomas Laithis of 
that Ilk, c. 1350. 

Strang of yt Ilk. L. ; the chevron is ensigned with a cross patde 
sable, and this is the bearing on a seal of Robert Strang 1579. 

Sir David Lindsay's coat is for Pitcorthy, and has three mascles ; 
between mascles and lozenges there is constant confusion in the MSS., 
but it would seem that the cross patde was borne by the Balcaskie family, 
and not by the Strangs of Pitcorthy. 

The only early entry in the Lyon Register is, c. 1680, David Strang, 
merchant in London, descended of Balcaskie — argent, a chevron wavy 
sable, ensigned with a cross patde azure between three lozenges of the 
second ; crest — a cluster of vine grapes proper ; motto — " Duke quod 
utile." 

The next is, 1791, Sir Robert Strange, the eminent engraver, repre- 
sentative of Balcaskie, descended from a family seated in South Ronald- 
shay, Orkney — argent, a chevron between three lozenges sable ; same 
crest and motto. In 1798 his eldest son James, banker in London, recorded 
the same coat, with crest, a castle proper masoned sable ; motto above 
it — "Stet fortuna domus;'' below the shield — '' Fortes fortuna juvat T and 
had a grant of supporters — on the dexter side an ancient Caledonian 
warrior, and on the sinister an ancient Danish warrior. This gentleman 
died in 1840, leaving three coheiresses, who married James Wolfe 
Murray of Cringletie, a Senator of the College of Justice ; William Pitt 
Dundas, C.B., Deputy-Clerk Register ; and Archibald Trotter of Dreg- 
horn. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 191 

His younger brother, Sir Thomas Andrew Strange, Chief-Justice of 
Madras, was father of the present Lumisden Strange, Madras Civil 
Service, who represents this family. 

Robert II, granted to William Strang the right to pasture sixty oxen 
and cows, three hundred sheep, and four horses, belonging to his lands of 
Kynaldy and Petardy on the moor of Crail, and to cut there forty cart- 
loads of turf and ten cart-loads of broom. 

Richard de Anstruther granted a charter of lands in Anstruther to 
John Strang and Cecilia, his spouse, sister of the granter, which was con- 
firmed by David II. 1362. 

William Strang possessed Balcaskie 1438 ; John of Balcaskie was 
killed at Pinkie 1547 ; the estate was sold, c. 1615, by John elder, and 
John younger, his son ; John, son of the latter, was a Lieutenant in 
Colonel Cochrane's regiment in Germany, and father of Thomas, repre- 
senter of the family in 1642. 

The coheiresses of the line seated at Pitcorthy for several genera- 
tions, married Andrew Clephane, David Grundistoun, and Melville of 
Carnbee. 

Alexander, Provost of Forfar, sat in parliament for the burgh 
1645-48. His sons, William and Robert, merchants in Stockholm, were 
benefactors to their native town. 

Cadets of the family went to France 1552, to Lewes 1605, to Ireland 
about the same time, where a funeral entry, 1619, makes the chevron 
wavy, the lozenges and cross patde azure ; to Shetland, where James of 
Urisgirthe left coheiresses in 1642, one of whom married Mr Thomas 
Henry. 

Younger sons were much connected with Pittenweem. Peter had a 
salt-house there ; Nicholas represented the burgh in parliament 1593. 
It seems to have been one of this branch that went to Orkney, as in 1670 
William was served heir of his father, Andrew Strang, in South Ronald- 
shay, in a tenement in Pittenweem. 

In Lanarkshire there were several families of the name. Dr John was 
principal of the University of Glasgow 1626, and left a daughter and he^r, 
who married William Ferguson of Caitloch. 

Burnhouse was for five generations the property of a family of 
Strang, now Strange, and was sold by Alexander, an officer in the 
Thirteenth Light Dragoons at Waterloo. His son Thomas, Captain R.N., 
left issue. 

Stronge, of Tynan Abbey, co. Armagh, baronet, descended from an 
emigrant from Scotland, carries the chevron wavy sable between " three 
lozenges azure, and in middle chief an estoile gules ; the crest and motto 
of Balcaskie, along with another crest and motto. 

*WiNDEGAiTis OF YT Ilk. Windygates is in Fifeshire. 

Nairne of yt Ilk. L. ; John de Name in 141 4, and Laurence de - 
Nairn 14 16, seal with a chaplet, while in 141 7 Laurence Narn, bailie of 
St Andrews, uses three cinquefoils. 

The arms registered 1672-78 for Alexander Nairne of Sandfoord are — 



1 92 WORKMAN'S MS. 

parted per pale argent and sable, on a chaplet four mullets all counter- 
changed. Sir Robert, afterwards Lord Nairne, registered at the same 
time the coat given in L. and W,, with the tinctures reversed. 

The estate of Sandfoord and the representation of the family were at 
this time separated, as Thomas, afterwards of Baldovan, son of William,- 
grandson and only representative of David of Sandfoord, records — parted 
per pale sable and argent, on a chaplet four cinquefoils counterchanged. 
This would appear then to have been considered the chief coat, but it is 
rendered doubtful by the matriculation of the coat with the four mullets 
with differences by five cadets, while John Nairne of Seggieden, descended 
of the house of Sandfoord, has assigned to him — parted per pale sable and 
argent, on a chaplet four quatrefoils all counterchanged, a martlet for 
difference. 

In 1870 the late John Berry of Tay field, co. Fife, advocate, who pos- 
sessed part of the old family estate of Sandfoord, was allowed to quarter 
the coat recorded by Alexander Nairne of Sandfoord, who was son of Sir 
Thomas of Sandfoord, fourth son of Alexander of Sandfoord, whose 
lands of Innerdovat were erected into a barony by charter 1627. 

Alexander, 1672-78, died about 1705, when the estate was sold; he 
left two daughters, the elder of whom Mr Berry represented, the younger 
married Colin Campbell of Smiddiegreen. Alexander had a younger 
brother, Mr David, resident in France in 1687, when he had a birth- 
brief. 

Sir Thomas, who was a lieut.-colonel of horse, and was fined ;^i8oo 
after the Restoration, acquired the most of the estate from his elder 
brother William, father of Thomas, who was of Baldovan, co. Forfar; 
William of Baldovan, son of Thomas, died 1716, leaving a son, Thomas 
of Baldovan. 

Mr Samuel Nairne, immediate elder brother of Sir Thomas, married 
Margaret, daughter of Andrew Bruce of Earlshall, and their grand- 
daughter, Margaret Nairne, wife of John Cunningham of Fittarthie, be- 
came heir of that branch of the Bruces. 

Among the cadets were Nairne of Langsyd, Nairne of Craigtoun, of 
whom the last was Thomas, who died in 1708, leaving an heiress, Ann, 
Mrs Duncan ; Nairne of Seggieden, whose heiress married Patrick Hay, 
and was ancestress of the present owner. The surname is no doubt taken 
from the burgh of Nairn; in 1361 Adam de Narryn was chaplain of the 
altar of the Blessed Virgin at Inverness ; Michael de Nairne witnesses 
charters of the Duke of Albany 1406-11, being designed successively 
armiger, scutifer, and scutifer noster ; 1448, David is a witness at Stir- 
ling, and 1458 Robert sat in parliament for that burgh ; Duncan, bailie of 
Stirling 1649, sat in parliament after the Restoration, was provost of the 
burgh and d.s.p., his nephew and heir in 1673 being Sir John Paul, 
H. M. resident at Copenhagen. 

Alexander Name or Nairne was of Sandfoord 1445, sat in parliament 
1449, held the offices of Comptroller, Keeper of the Rolls, Lyon King of 



WORKMAN'S MS. 193 

Arms, and married one of the four coheiresses of Walter de Fenton of 
Beaufort and Baky. 

Their son, David of Sandfoord, in 1490, was one of the heirs of his 
aunt, Janet Fenton, widow of William Hacket. Alexander of Sandfoord 
was Sheriff of Fife 1535. 

Adam Nairne was sub-chanter of Elgin 1450 ; Nairnes of Cromdell, 
in Inverness-shire, figure 1567-1660; in 1649 Thomas sat in parliament 
for Forres, and in 1662 Patrick of Alchrosse, in Morayshire, was fined 

;^I200. 

Lord Nairne's ancestors were seated at Muckersie, co. Perth, of 
which Mr John had a charter 151 1. The Dowager-Marchioness of Lans- 
downe inherits the barony of Nairne as heir of Margaret, only child of 
Robert, first lord, a senator of the College of Justice. His brother, Mr 
Alexander of Greenyards, co. Stirling, left descendants, of whom John 
sold Greenyards, and died in 1752 ; and another succeeded to Drumkilbo 
on the death of Agnes Nairne, wife of William Blair of Torsappie. She 
had acquired that estate, which was not long ago sold by the descendant 
of her heir. Sir David was Secretary of the Order of the Thistle 1704, 
Under Secretary of State at the time of the Union, and died in 1734. 

A baronetcy was conferred in 1704 on Thomas Nairne of Dunsin- 
nane, co. Perth, which became dormant in 181 1, on the death of Sir 
William, fifth baronet, a senator of the College of Justice ; the estate is 
in the possession of the heir of entail, paternally Mellis, who takes the 
surname of Nairne. 

Simon Nairne, portioner of Newton-Rires, co. Fife, 1526, left 
numerous descendants. 

82. Balfour of Burle. L. ; there are added in ink : supporters — 
an otter and a swan both issuing from water; crest — the half-length 
figure of a female issuing from a tower with her arms extended, holding 
in each hand the head of some animal ; motto — " Nichal teinere." 

83. Blair of Angus. L. 
Allardice of yt Ilk. L. 

Gressone of Lage. Of old, is added. L. 

Fairlie of yat Ilk. L. 

Lecke of yat Ilk, or Lecre. L. ; the charges are rather cinquefoils 
than roses. 

Malcolm dominus de Leky was father of Murdoch, who had various 
charters 1390 and later; James of that Ilk 1493; John of that Ilk fell at 
Pinkie, leaving a son, Walter of that Ilk 1555-77 ; Alexander of that Ilk 
died in 1605, leaving a son of his own name, father of John Leckie of 
that Ilk 1646-63, who seems to have been the last baron of Leckie; the 
lands were a barony before the middle of the sixteenth century. 

There were Leckies of Kipdarroch, of whom Robert, in 1605, was 
tutor of the young laird of Leckie as next of kin ; Leckies of Deshers, for 
four descents, c, 1620 to 1704 ; Leckies of Mye, of whom the last, Walter, 
died in 1736, leaving three grand-daughters his coheirs; Leckies of 
Greenside ; of Croy Leckie, of whom John left his property to his grand- 

3c 



194 WORKMAN'S MS. 

son, James Buchanan, merchant in Glasgow 1731 ; Margaret, daughter 
and heir of Archibald Napier of Ardmore, married a gentleman of the 
name, and her son, Archibald, inherited Ardmore ; William, merchant in 
Glasgow, was father of Mr Thomas, minister of Kilmaronock 1703-23, 
whose son, William of Broich, married Janet, daughter of John Buchanan, 
W.S., and died in 1799; John of Broich died 1814. 

*Annand of yat Ilk. In 181 2 Alexander, merchant in London, as 
representative of the ancient family of Auchterellon, in Aberdeenshire, 
registered — argent, a saltire gules cantonned with two mascles in chief 
and base azure and two ermine spots in flank, a chief of the second ; 
crest — a griffin segreant proper; motto — "Sperabo;" supporters— two 
griffins proper. 

An early seal of William de Anant is a boar's head ; seal of David, 
son of Sir David Anand — a saltire and chief with a label of three points ; 
seal of John 1421 — the saltire and chief; an entirely different coat is used 
by John 1526 — on a fess three mullets, and in base a garb. 

Pont gives the coat as in W., with crest, a bull's head sable, and the 
motto, " Sperabo." There are variations as to the tincture and number 
of the minor charges, the mascles being sometimes gules, and sometimes 
the field ermine and the mascles or. 

This surname would seem to be taken from Annan or Annandale, 
and the saltire and chief are the arms of the Lords of that valley, but it 
is not in that quarter that we meet with the name. Adam de Anand, 
rector of Monimail, and canon of Dunkeld, 1254-66. William de Anaund, 
of the county of Forfar, swore fealty to Edward I. in 1296. 

John de Anand was vicar of Aboyne 1300, and had been chaplain to 
Alexander III. ; 1335, Walter, rector of Dornock. Henry was Sheriff of 
Clackmannan 1328-42, and had charters of Sauchie, Balquharn, and 
Auchendrane from Robert I. David was taken prisoner at Neville's 
Cross ; Sir David had many gifts and charters from David II., sat in 
council 1357 and 1364, and did homage to Robert II. in 1371. 

He or another of the same name, in 1375 resigned the lands of 
Fothnevyn and the office of forester of the Royal Forest of Plater. 

Sir David, Lord of Myles 1380, had a son Alexander, and a daughter 
Christina, to whom he gave lands in the barony of Onele in free marriage, 
her husband being Alexander Strachan of Carmyle. 

In the fortieth year of his reign David II. granted a life annuity from 
the fermes of Aberdeen, to his " cousin," Robert de Anand. 

Auchter Ellon was the property of John de Annand, designed 
dominus 1424; David of Auchter Ellon 1457-27; Henry, 1491, married 
Marjory Cullen, and died 1505; Alexander, 1505-27; Thomas, 1537-48; 
Alexander, 1574- 1602, married Margaret, daughter of Alexander Eraser 
of Philorth; Alexander, his son, sold the estate before 1619, married 
Margaret, daughter of Cheyne of Essilmont, and was grandfather of 
Robert, who in 1659 is designed sometime in Artrochie; this is perhaps 
the Robert, whose son, Alexander, merchant in Aberdeen, left issue — 
Alexander of Haddo, who d.s.p. 1792; William of Haddo, merchant 



WORKMAN'S MS. 195 

in London, d.s.p. 1802 ; and John, father of Alexander of Sutton, co. 
Surrey, who in 181 2 was recognised as head of the family ; he left issue. 

Henry of Orchard ton 1603, was a brother of the last laird ; there 
were Annands of Collihill, of Murrestoun, of Kincary, and of Melgund. 
The last, a considerable family, intermarried with Lord Gray, Cossins of 
that Ilk, &c., and ended in Janet, who in 1542, with consent of her 
husband, Balfour of Baledmonth, sold the estate. 

The burgh of Elgin was represented in parliament by John Annand 
1579-84, and by Alexander 1593. 

William, dean of Edinburgh 1675-89, is said to have been of the 
Auchter Ellon family. 

84. Andersoun of yat Ilk. Pont and Porteus give the saltire 
sable with four mullets gules. Sir J. Balfour's blazon is — argent, a saltire 
engrailed, a crescent with a mullet in each corner. 

The saltire or St Andrew's cross, evidently allusive to the name, is 
the principal charge in eighteen out of the twenty-one entries for the 
name in the Lyon Register. Of the remaining three one indicates 
Spanish descent, another personal distinction, the third is the coat of 
Anderson of Westerton, co. Banff, latterly of Newbigging, Kingask, and 
Montrave, in Fife, and is as old as the sixteenth century. It is — argent, 
a chevron gules between three stars in chief and a crescent in base 
azure. 

The estates were sold after Captain Alexander John Anderson was 
killed at Lucknow, in March 1857 ; his son, Charles Henry, died un- 
married 1876, but there are other descendants. 

The following arms, granted in 1669 to William, sometime Provost 
of Glasgow, and its representative in parliament 1665-73, were not 
registered — argent, a saltire engrailed between two mullets in chief and 
base, and as many escallops in flank gules ; crest — an elephant's head 
couped argent. 

Anderson of Chapletown (Funeral Escutcheon) — argent, a saltire sable 
between four mullets gules. 

In 1479 Thomas Anderson was elected for the burghs on the com- 
mittee of causes, and in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries several 
burghs were represented in parliament by persons of the name ; John was 
doomster 1524-40. 

1424, John de Andirston, prior of Fyvie. 1479, John of Balmaddy ; 
1490, John of Pitfour; 1576, John of Struthers ; 1577, Herbert of 
Terraughty — are among the earliest landowners of the name. 

The Andersons of Dowhill can be traced to 1540 ; two of them, named 
John, were provosts of Glasgow, and the younger also represented the 
city in parliament ; coheiresses married Leckie and Moore. The Ander- 
sons of Stobcross 1611-1755; Andersons of Linkwood, near Elgin; 
Andersons of Finzeauch, coheiresses married Gregory and Wilson ; 
Andersons of Bourtie 1663- 1825, Mary, only sister of Alexander, last of 
Bourtie, married William Young of Sheddocksley, provost of Aberdeen, 
and left five coheiresses, who sold the estate ; Anderson of Windygoul 



196 WORKMAN'S MS. 

and Winterfield ; Anderson of Balram ; Anderson of Burnemouth ; 
Anderson of Tushielaw ; Anderson of Tillilum — are among the principal 
families of the name. 

Anderson of Mill Hill, co. Middlesex, and of Fermoy, co. Cork, 
extinct baronets, were both of Scotch descent. 

Colonel Anderson, a Scot in the Swedish service, maternally 
descended from Sinclair of Murtle, was ennobled there in 1668. 

Candacraig in Strathdon was sold in 1865, after having been, it is 
said, for ten generations, the seat of a family of Anderson. 

There never were Andersons of that Ilk, and certainly the surname 
does not imply descent from a common ancestor. 

Douglas of Quhitinghame. L. ; an addition in ink. 

GouRLAWBANKS (?). Argent, a tree issuing from a mount in base vert, 
on the upper part of the foliage a besant (?) charged with a mullet gules ; 
in the background low hills of a blue colour. 

85. COCKBURN OF NeWHALL. L. 
COCKBURN OF OrMISTOUN. L. 

CocKBURN OF Henderland. L. ; argent, a crescent sable between 
three cocks' gules. 

CoCKBURN OF SkIRLING. L. 

FouLis OF CoLiNTOUN. L. ; both here and in L. the leaves are broad 
and resemble edock leaves ; a note in W. says, edock or bay leaves. In 
the chartulary of Cambuskenneth are illuminated the arms of Mr James 
Foulis, Clerk Register 1535, with the motto, "■ Ne quid nimis;" the leaves 
are shorter and rounder, not in the least like bay or laurel leaves. Bal- 
four says laurel leaves vert, and Porteus laurel leaves proper. Pont, on 
the other hand, gives edock leaves vert ; crest— a crescent ; and the above 
motto. This is probably the original bearing of the family ; the Lord 
Clerk Register, who acquired Colinton and founded the existing family, 
was son of James Foulis, skinner, burgess of Edinburgh, and may have 
taken the \t2i\ts,feuilles, as allusive to his name. 

There are seals, 1429, of William Foulis, a wheat sheaf, and Philip 
Foulis a mullet pierced but neither is on a shield ; in 1450 Henry Foulis, 
a priest, uses a chevron between two mascles and a mullet. 

The coat confirmed, 167 1, to Sir John of Ravelston, baronet, is — 
argent, on a fess between three bay leaves vert a primrose or ; the prim- 
rose indicates his connection with the family of Primrose. A little later 
Mr Alexander Foulis of Ratho recorded — argent, on a chevron between 
three laurel leaves vert as many plates ; the plates allusive to the office 
of General of the Mint, held by the first of this branch. John, merchant 
in Edinburgh, 1672-78, has a holly branch between three bay leaves 
slipped vert. 

It was not till 1790 that the coat of the Colinton family was recorded 
— argent, three laurel leaves slipped vert. 

In 1818 the Ratho coat was recorded as a quartering by the heir 
general of the family, Archibald, afterwards Sir Archibald Christie of 
Riddry. The Hopes of Hopetoun added a bay leaf slipped vert on the 



WORKMAN'S MS, 197 

chevron in their paternal shield, to indicate descent from the heiress of a 
younger branch of Colinton, which was seated at Leadhills, co. Lanark, 
and bore a bordure gules for difference. Ravelstoun, before the inter- 
marriage with Primrose, bore a bordure indented vert, and Woodhall, 
whose representative succeeded to the Colinton baronetcy, had a bordure 
ermine. 

The surname is doubtless taken from a locality, and may have arisen 
in the neighbourhood of any or each of the half dozen places in Scotland 
called Foulis or Fowlis. 

Thor de Foules witnessed a charter of William Maule of Foulis 
ante 1260. 

Mr William Foulis, a churchman, c. 1290; Mr William, Archdeacon 
of St Andrews, was Keeper of the Privy Seal, c. 1430 ; Patrick, bailie of 
Edinburgh 1432 ; Alexander, a lord auditor 1471-89, and sat in parlia- 
ment for Linlithgow. Henry was depute-marischal 1545-48, The last 
of the Ratho family was Alexander, advocate, who died 1772. 

Sir Archibald Foulis-Primrose of Dunipace, baronet, sold Ravelston 
1726, was executed for treason at Carlisle 1746 ; left a son Archibald, who 
died in 1747, and several daughters, of whom Elphinstone married 
James Rollo of Powhouse, and another was wife of Robert Peek, silk- 
mercer in London. The surviving children had a pension from the Crown 
of ;^200 per annum, and the estate of Dunipace was claimed unsuccess- 
fully by John, brother and heir male of Sir Archibald 1751. 

Two of the descendants of James, first of Colinton, Lord Clerk 
Register 1531-48, were Senators of the College of Justice ; Sir James of 
Colinton 1661, Lord Justice-Clerk 1684, and his son Sir James of Reid- 
furd 1674. 

Colinton was sold by Sir James, the last baronet of the elder line. 

TuLLAS. L. ; or, on a fess between three cross crosslets fitchde gules 
as many mullets argent ; this was recorded, c. 1750, by Alexander Tulloch 
of Tanachie, heir male of William, Bishop of Moray, 1481 ; crest — ^a mitre 
proper ; motto — ' ' Pietate parentum. ' ' 

The Bishop's seal, 1480, has the same bearings ; that of Thomas, 
Bishop of Orkney 1422, has no shield, but the cross crosslet appears 'on 
it, perhaps as a device, and the complete coat is cut on his monument at 
Kirkwall, but without date ; he probably died in 1460. 

In 1 54 1 Arthur Tulloch uses a boar's head erased, and in chief two 
mullets. 

In 1360 Alexander de Tullech was connected with Forfarshire. 
Walter had a charter of Bonnington from Robert II. Dorothea, heiress 
of Bonnington in 1491 was wife of Walter Wood, and on the monument 
of their son, William Wood of Bonnington, the cross crosslets of Tulloch 
are added to the coat of his paternal family. 

In 1399 Robert III. granted to John, son of William Toullocht, the 
keepership of Montrewmonth Moor, and this remained with his descend- 
ants, the TuUochs of Hillcairnie, for nearly two centuries. 

3D 



198 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Tannochy was the property of Robert Tulloch 1578, and descended to 
Alexander, who sold it in 1772. 

86. Ker (?). Azure, on a chevron argent three mullets gules. 
Mackenzie. Gules, a stag's head cabossed or, between the attires a 

mullet. 

Hamilton of Fingaltoun and Hamilton of Prestoun. 

The former as L. ; the latter gules, three cinquefoils argent within a 
bordure compony sable and of the second. The coat recorded, 1672, by 
Sir Thomas of Preston, " the eldest cadet of the faniilie of Hamiltone," is 
—gules, three cinquefoils within a bordure argent ; no supporters. 

David of Fingalton sat in parliament 1560. These lands had been 
the property of his ancestors early in the fourteenth century. Preston, in 
East-Lothian, a later acquisition, was erected into a burgh of barony 1552. 

87. *LocH. Arms registered, 1672-78, by James of Drylaw — or, a 
saltire engrailed sable between two swans naiant in fess undde or in a 
loch proper. 

Drylaw, co. Edinburgh, was acquired in 1641 by his father, James, 
merchant in Edinburgh, and sold in 1786 by their descendant, George 
Loch of Drylaw. 

Symsoun. L. ; argent, on a chief vert three crescents of the field. 

The coat with the chief azure, as in L., occurs in 1508. 

Seal of George, 1561 — a fess between three crescents. 

George Simpson of Udoch, co. Aberdeen, 1672-78, was allowed the 
coat as in W. 

1593, William represented Pittenweem in parliament. 

*LowRiE. Pont and Porteus give — sable, an orle or garland, on the 
top thereof a drinking bowl, bottle, or cup argent. 

The arms of Laurie of Maxwellton are not registered, but in 1722 
Mr Walter of Redcastle, minister of Stranraer, entered — sable, a cup 
argent with a garland between two laurel branches issuing out of the 
same vert, a bordure argent charged with eight boars' heads erased 
gules ; the bordure is probably indicative of his marriage to Margaret 
Gordon. 

Redcastle, which was acquired by Stephen, first of Maxwellton, has 
passed through female descent to the present owner. 

In 1857 the arms were registered, quartered with his paternal coat, 
by Rowland Craig-Laurie, then of Redcastle. 

The oldest matriculation for the name is 1674, Francis Lowrie of 
Plainstones, bailie of Portsburgh— parted per fess gules and sable, a cup, 
&c., as in 1722. 

Mr William was Archdean of Brechin 1488; there were landowners 
of the name in Coldingham 1490 ; Hector belonged to the King's House- 
hold 1494; Matthew of Cairnhill 1577; a burgess family in Edinburgh, 
to which Francis above-named belonged, was from Dumfriesshire; 
David was, in i^d^^^ judicator parliamenti ; William married, about 1650, 
Marion Weir, heiress of Blackwood, and was ancestor of the Weirs of 
that place, baronets. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 199 

Stephen Lawrie, merchant burgess of Dumfries, and a bailie of the 
burgh, acquired Redcastle and] Maxwellton, married about 1605 Marion 
Corsan, daughter of John, Provost of Dumfries, and died in 1638 ; the 
Funeral Escutcheon, conform to Lyon's Warrant 26th April 1698, of Sir 
Robert Laurie, shows that Stephen's mother's name was Ferguson. Sir 
Robert was created a baronet 1685 ; on the death, in 1848, of Sir Robert 
Laurie, the title became dormant or extinct, and his nephew, John Minet 
Fector, succeeded to Maxwellton, and assumed the surname of Laurie. 

*AcHESOUN. There is added, " Knight barronet 1631." 

The seal of Mark, portioner of Ballencrieff 1606, is an eagle displayed." 
Sir J. Balfour gives for Achesone — argent, an eagle displayed sable 
between a crescent and a mullet in chief gules ; the coat of the Gosford 
family is given by him and Pont, and has a chief vert charged with two 
mullets or spur rowels or. 

Sir Archibald of Glencairny, in Ulster, Secretary of State in Scot- 
land, the same within a bordure azure charged with three cinquefoils and 
as many mullets argent or or; crest — a cock standing on a trumpet; 
motto — " Vigilantibusr The Earls of Gosford have ceased to carry the 
bordure. 

This family belonged to Edinburgh, and were long connected with 
the Mint. 1483, Henry in Edinburgh; 1526, James, goldsmith, master 
coiner and burgess of the Canongate ; 1536, William, chaplain of St 
Giles'. John, burgess of Edinburgh, and one of the collectors of taxes, 
married Janet Fisher, was killed at Pinkie 1547, and left a son and heir, 
John; 1553, James, master coiner; 1565, John, master coiner; 1585, 
John, master of the Mint, was ruined by making advances for the Earl 
of Gowrie, and died soon after, leaving a son and heir, John, designed 
portioner of Inveresk; Thomas, master of the Mint 1587 ; John, general 
of the Mint 1632; 1592, Mark, of Acheson's Haven. 

Dunbar was represented in parliament by John 1584, and Mr John 
1612-17; Mr John, advocate, was portioner of Newtonlees, and died in 
1662 ; he was son of Thomas, burgess of Edinburgh, and Margaret 
Eraser, his wife. 

Gosford, in East-Lothian, was the property of Alexander in 1577, and 
was sold in 1629, by Alexander, who married Elizabeth Douglas of the 
Bonjedward family, and left three sons. 

In 1577 an act was passed to enable Captains Henry and Patrick to 
levy troops for service in the low countries; Patrick died in 1584, leaving 
two sons, Henry and Archibald, the latter a minor, to whom Alexander 
of Gosford was served tutor as next of kin. These brothers both acquired 
property in Ulster, and Henry d.s.p. Sir Archibald was a Senator of the 
College of Justice, Secretary of State, and was created a baronet of Nova 
Scotia, which title has descended to the present Earl of Gosford. 

When Sir Archibald was created a peer in 1776, he took his title, 
from the estate in Scotland, which had formerly belonged to the family. 

John, bailie of Edinburgh 1576, was father of John, M.D., who 
acquired Sydserf, in Haddingtonshire, and d.s.p. ; his brother and heir, 



200 WORKMAN'S MS, 

Robert of Sydserf, merchant burgess of Edinburgh, left, with other issue, 
Robert of Sydserf, who registered arms 1672-78 as Gosford, with a 
bordure invecked sable for difference. 

Rochsolloch, CO. Lanark, belonged for several generations to 
Aitchisons, of whom John, then proprietor, recorded arms 1771, with a 
crescent between the two spur rowels on the chief. 

*FiN OF YT Ilk. This coat was registered by James Phine of 
Whytehill, 1672-78; William Finnie of Hillbrae, co. Aberdeen, in 1765 
had a grant of — gules, a crane without a head argent, and in 1692 a grant 
to Robert Fennison, merchant in Edinburgh, is founded on the same ; 
the blazon is — ^gules, a fess between three besants in chief and a crane in 
base. 

Soon after the Reformation several persons of the name of Fin or 
Phin became possessed of parts of the lands of the Abbey of Dunferm- 
line ; Mr John of Whitehill, co. Fife, 1634 ; Mr George, last of Whitehill, 
minister of St Laurence, died in 1689, leaving a daughter and heir, 
Henrietta. 

In 1296 William Fin of Lanarkshire swore fealty to Edward I. 

♦Fynwyk or Fynweck. This is given by Pont for Finnie, with the 
motto, " Ex igne resurgit virtus ^ 

Reginald de Fynwyk was bailie of Ayr 1387. 

Fenwick or Finnick is the name of a parish in Ayrshire. 

A phoenix is the crest of the Northumbrian family of Fenwick. 

88. *Trotter. Sir James Balfour gives — argent, a chevron gules 
charged with a mullet of the first, in base a boar's head of the second. 
Porteus says the chevron is sometimes between three boars' heads. 

Stacie supplies the arms of " Master George Trotter of Charterhall 
in the Merse " — ^argent, a chevron gules between three boars' heads sable, 
armed and langued of the second, the chevron charged with a mullet of 
the field for difference ; crest — a star gules ; motto — " Deo dante floreo." 
There is added, in a different hand, " he dyed without heires 167 1." He 
gives also Trotter of old — argent, a horse trotting sable bridled and 
saddled gules, and in chief three stars of the third. 

In 1676 Henry Trotter of Mortonhall, co. Edinburgh, had a 
certificate of arms, but it was not entered in the register ; a few years 
later, when he is described as " heretor also of the baronie of Charterhall, 
whereof Foggohill, Foggomill, and Chatterraw are parts and pendicles," 
he registered — quarterly, first and fourth, argent, a fess gules between 
three mullets in chief sable, and a crescent in base azure, as his own 
paternal coat for Trotter of Mortonhall ; second and third, argent, a 
chevron gules between three boars' heads couped sable, for Trotter of 
Charterhall {see F. E.) ; crest — a groom holding a horse proper furnished 
gules; motto — '^ In promptur In 1792 his descendant, John of 
Mortonhall, had a grant of supporters as " representative of the families 
of Catchelraw and Charterhall, and chief of the sirname of Trotter in 
Scotland " — z. lion gules armed and langued azure, and a horse argent 



WORKMAN'S MS. 201 

maned and hoofed or. The crest was altered to a knight in armour 
proper holding his courser argent caparisoned gules. 

In Douglas's Baronage there is a genealogy of this family which 
contains many errors. 

Thomas Trotter is stated to have married in 1490. His son and 
heir Robert, born twenty-eight years after, is made father of Thomas, 
who had a Crown charter in 1553, at which date he could hardly be more 
than twelve years of age. William, brother of this Thomas, is identified 
with a William Trotter, treasurer of the city of Edinburgh 1640-41. 
John, the purchaser of Mortonhall, born in 1553, is placed in the pedigree 
as nephew of the treasurer, that is to say, the nephew was born ninety 
years before the period when the uncle was in office. 

Sir Robert Douglas calls John, founder of Mortonhall, son of 
Thomas of Catchelraw, but the Funeral Escutcheons make his father's 
name John, and call his mother Ferguson. 

The Lyon Register, about 1672, gives the arms of William Trotter, 
representer of Catchelraw, who does not appear in the Mortonhall gene- 
alogy at all ; the coat is that quartered by Mortonhall, and the crest — a 
horse passant argent furnished gules. At the same time are entered the 
arms of a cadet of Catchelraw, David, Captain of one of His Majesty's 
frigates. 

Robert Trotar appears in Winton Domesday, 1148, as holding land 
at Winchester. In the north of England, particularly in the county of 
Durham, the name is common. Johan Trot, burgess of Montrose, signed 
the Ragman Roll 1296. 

In 1413 William Trottar, capellanus, witnesses a charter. 1479, 
John, Alexander, and Adam Trotter are summoned, along with Patrick 
Home of Polwarth, as rebels. 1494, George held lands in Dunse. 1512, 
charter of Waringzesland, in Coldingham, to John, son and heir of the 
late Ninian Trotter and Alison Lumsden, on the resignation of John 
Lumsden. 1523, Sir William Bulmer writes to the Earl of Surrey, that 
Sandy Trotter and another Trotter, who are coming to him, are spies of 
the Duke, and not to be trusted. In 1570 William Trotter was Captain of 
Home Castle, and had to surrender to the English. Prentonan, in the 
parish of Eccles, was the seat of the principal family of the name from the 
middle of the sixteenth century till nearly the end of the seventeenth. 

Nisbet gives their arms — argent, a crescent gules, on a chief azure 
three stars of the first. About the time when the Prentonan family 
failed, a cadet, Alexander Trotter, was, 167 1, proprietor of Kettleshiel in 
the same part of the Merse ; the arms of this line are recorded with the 
chief indented for difference, and the same crest and motto — a horse 
trotting proper, " Festina lente." 

From Kettleshiel descended the Trotters of Horton, Shudy Camps, 
Dyrham, The Bush and Castlelaw, Dreghorn, and Sir Coutts Trotter, 
baronet, to whom supporters were granted — ^a white horse proper and a 
lion argent, which are borne by his heir, Sir Coutts Lindsay, baronet. 

The family formed a small clan in Berwickshire, their various pro- 



202 WORKMAN'S MS. 

perties all lying near one another. In January 1573-74, Cuthbert in 
Fogo, Thomas in the Hill, Thomas in Netherhall, William in Foulsched- 
law, Thomas of Prentonen, and Charles in Catchelraw, subscribed a bond, 
as principals and representatives of the whole surname of Trotter, oblig- 
ing themselves and all of their name, under penalty of ;^5ooo, to behave 
as dutiful subjects to the king and obey the warden. 

Turner. An addition in ink — a baton (?) in pale between a sword in 
pale point downwards on the dexter, and a dexter hand couped at the wrist 
on the sinister side, on a chief a mullet on the dexter side, and a crescent 
on the sinister. 

89. *Craig. L. Cragye ; seal of Margaret Cragy of that Ilk 1377 — 
ermine, on a fess three crescents ; seal of Mr John 1584 has a fleur-de- 
lis between two crescents on the fess. 

At Tarves, in Aberdeenshire, are monuments of Thomas Craig, 
pursuivant, who died 1584, and Marjory Riddell, his wife ; and of William 
Craig, Rothesay Herald, and Marjory Reith, his spouse, built by them- 
selves 161 7 ; the Craig arms are as in W. The herald d.s.p. ; his nephew, 
Mr Alexander Randell, being his heir 1632. 

Arms of W. Craige, on a panel at Kirkwall 1620— impaling a lion 
rampant on a mount in base, a chief charged with three mullets (?) ; the 
initials of the wife are M. H. The coat is rudely cut, the fess between 
very broad, the boar's head large, and the crescents very small ; there are 
only six ermine spots, three in chief and three in base, disposed in fess. 
Another carving there, 1694, of D. Craige has no fess at all, but the head 
and crescents are in fess, and there is a fourth ermine spot in middle base; 
this impales Graham, J. G., a lion rampant between three roses, and in 
chief three escallops. 

The coat registered 1672-78 for William Craigge of Gairsay, in 
Orkney, was simplified to — ermine, a boar's head couped gules armed or. 

Ludovick Craig of Riccarton, in Mid-Lothian, at the same time has 
the original coat — ermine on a fess sable three crescents argent— as 
quartered by the Stewarts of Craigie Hall and Newhalls, and given in L. 

Laurence Craigie of Kilgraston, co. Perth, 1672-78, recorded a coat 
greatly differenced from Craig — parted per pale azure and sable, a chevron 
argent between three crescents or. 

Porteus gives Craig of Craigfintray, the original coat, otherwise — 
ermine, on a fess sable two crescents and a boar's head or. 

The surname has been taken from some of the numerous places called 
Craig or Craigie. 

In the Chartulary of Glasgow Robert de Crag and John del Crag 
witness charters in the reign of William the Lion ; 1232, Robert de Crag, 
canon of Glasgow; in 1296 fealty was sworn to Edward I. by Johan de 
Cragyn of the county of Linlithgow, Johan Cragi of the same shire, 
Agneys del Crag and Johan de Crak of the county of Edinburgh, Johan 
de la Cragg of Lanarkshire, Thomas de Cregayn of the county of Ayr, 
Henry Crake of the county of Dumfries, and James de Crake of Selkirk- 
shire. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 203 

Alexander de Cragy was forfeited in 1334, and pardoned the follow- 
ing year. 

John de Craigie, 1371, did homage to Robert II. ; married Margaret 
Montfode, Lady of Skirling, and had two (or three) sons, who d.s.p., and 
a daughter Margaret, heiress of Craigie, co. Linlithgow, who married, first, 
Sir John Stewart, second. Sir Herbert Maxwell ; in or before the tenth 
year of Robert II. she resigned her rights over the barony of Skirling 
and her mother's Lanarkshire lands to her half-brother, William de 
Cockburn. 

In Aberdeenshire we find Bryce de Craig, burgess of Aberdeen ante 
1317 ; John de Crage in the reign of David II. ; and there were Craigs of 
Craigsfintry or Craigston who figured for several generations, 1 500-1620. 

In Dumfries and Kirkcudbright shires the name took the form of 
Craik, and a coat, also given from W., was borne entirely differing from 
that of Craig. 

In 1422 the Lawman of Orkney and others grant an attestation in 
favour of James of Cragy, dominus de Hupe, husband of Margaret Sin- 
clair, daughter of Henry, Earl of Orkney, by Elizabeth, daughter of 
Malise, Earl of Orkney, Caithness, and Strathern. Several families in 
Orkney, probably descended from this marriage, were seated at Brugh, 
Banks, Skaill, Weaton, &c. ; John was lawman in 1497 ; George repre- 
sented the county in parliament 1652. 

William of Gairsay (whose mother's name was Paplay) married a 
natural daughter of John Stewart, Earl of Carrick, and died in 1657, 
leaving, with a younger son, David of Over Sanday, who is probably 
the David who represented Kirkwall in parliament 1681-86, Hugh of 
Gairsay, who married a Crichton of the Cluny family, was member 
for the shire 1661-61, and died in 1663. 

His eldest son Sir William also represented the county for many 
years till 1703 ; was steward of Orkney, and tacksman of the Crown rents, 
customs, and excise ; registered arms ; married Anne, daughter of Sir 
Robert Hamilton of Silvertonhill ; died in Edinburgh 9th April 17 12, and 
was buried in the Greyfriars' Churchyard, sixteen quarters being displayed 
at his funeral. 

His son, David of Gairsay, was succeeded by William Honyman, 
who took the surname of Craigie ; he was son of James, younger son of 
Robert Honyman of Graemsay. 

Alexander Craigie, in Kilgrastoun, was dead in 1610, leaving issue ; 
among his descendants were Hugh of Dumbarnie, who sat in parliament 
1 698- 1 70 1 ; Robert of Glendoick, Lord President of the Court of Session 
1754-60; Robert, a senator of the College of Justice 1776; George Clerk 
Craigie of Dumbarnie, Lyon Depute 1823-45. 

In 1763 John Craigie of Hallhill in Fife, but also designed of Duni- 
barnie, registered a different coat — ermine, on a fess gules three crescents 
or; his father had acquired Hallhill or Lawhill e. 1700, and it passed by 
marriage into the family of Halkett. 

The Craigs of Dalnair, co. Dumbarton, intermarried with Colquhoun 



204 WORKMAN'S MS, 

of Camstroddan, Govane of Drumquhassel, Chaplin of ColHston, &c., 
and expired in 1812, on the death of General Sir James Henry Craig, 
K.B., Governor of the Cape and of British North America ; his cousins 
and heirs were Tytler of Woodhouselee and Ker of Blackshiels. Arms — 
erminois, on a fess per fess embattled gules and azure three crescents 
argent. 

Robert Craig, burgess of Edinburgh, said to be of the Craigfintry 
family, married Katherine Bellenden, of the family of Auchinoule, and 
had, with other issue, Mr Thomas, advocate, the great feudal lawyer, who 
acquired Riccarton, and died in 1608; of his sons, Sir James went to 
England in 1603, had grants of the reversion of the clerkship of the 
Wardrobe, and of the office of assistant-clerk in the King's Great Ward- 
robe, 161 1 of the manor of Magheryentrim in Ulster, and also of the 
manor of Castle Craig, d.s.p. ; Robert, advocate, was father of John, 
advocate, who having, in 1667, married Janet Heriot, heiress of 
Ramornie, co. Fife, assumed her surname, and left descendants ; Sir 
Lewis was a senator of the College of Justice, as Lord Wrightslands, 
1604-22. Robert of Riccarton, advocate, the last of the family, died in 
1823, having settled his estate on James Gibson, writer to His Majesty's 
Signet, descended from the marriage in 1709 of Helen, only child of 
Thomas Craig of Riccarton, and Hon, William Carmichael of Skirling. 
Mr Gibson assumed the surname of Craig, and was allowed the arms as 
a quartering, with a grant of supporters the same year; he was afterwards 
created a baronet. 

His cousin, Sir Thomas Gibson-Carmichael of Skirling, baronet, 
registered arms, at the same time quartering Craig of Riccarton as heir 
general of the family. It is curious that Skirling, which was brought by 
marriage with Margaret Montfode to the Craigies of that Ilk in the four- 
teenth century, should now be the property of the representative of Craig 
of Riccarton, whose residence is called Castle Craig. 

In the fifteenth century there were Craigs of East Craig or of that 
Ilk in East Lothian, of Craigsland or of that Ilk in Ayrshire, and appar- 
ently a fourth family of that Ilk in Angusshire. (?) 

*Waddell. Pont makes the saltire checquy or and gules, and says 
the buckles are sometimes or. 

On this was founded the composed coat granted, in 1858, to Captain 
James Waddell, on his assumption of the additional surname of Boyd, at 
the desire of his cousin-german, Mrs Catherine Waddell Boyd of Nellfield, 
CO. Fife — azure, a fess checquy argent and gules (Boyd) between two 
buckles of the second in chief, and a saltire couped in base checquy or 
and of the third. 1296, Laurence de Wedale, of the county of Roxburgh, 
swore fealty to Edward I. ; 1329, John de Wedal, bursar, connected with 
Melrose; 1343, John, a mctfik there; 1416, Nicholas of Edinburgh seals 
with his own seal an indenture with the Abbot of Melrose. Mr John, 
parson of Flisk, was a senator of the College of Justice 1534. Burgess 
families of the name were long connected with Edinburgh and Jedburgh ; 
a family, for at least four generations, were portioners of Thorniedykes in 



WORKMAN'S MS. 205 

the barony of Crichton, viz.: Captain William, who was dead 1607; 
Archibald, who was dead 1647 ; Major Archibald, father of Archibald, 
writer in Edinburgh 1676. 

Dr Richard, Archdeacon of St Andrews, was deprived 1689. 

There were Waddells of Crawhill, Hillhead, Muirhouse, Balquhatston, 
&c. In 1789 George of Balquhatston was heir of his uncle, Robert Colt 
of Garturk, co. Lanark, 

The heiress of Balquhatston, co, Stirling, married Alexander Peddie, 
Writer to the Signet, who has assumed her surname, and her cousin 
Christian Margaret, daughter and heir of William Waddell of Easter 
Moffat, CO. Lanark, married Thomas Fenton-Livingstone of Westquarter 
and Bedlormie. 

*HucHESOUN. This coat is given variously, sometimes with three 
boars' heads, sometimes three pheons' on the fess, instead of the arrows ; 
it does not appear at all in the Lyon Register till 1856. 

The name is met with chiefly in the shires of Lanark, Renfrew, and 
Ayr ; John represented Arbroath in the last parliament of Scotland. 

George and Thomas Hutcheson, brothers, founded the Hospital in 
Glasgow which bears their name 1639-41 ; they were sons of Thomas of 
Lambhill, co. Lanark, and both writers in Glasgow. 

Hutchison of Scotstoun, co. Renfrew, whose heiress married a 
younger son of Stewart of Blackhall, bore as in W., but with the fess 
azure and the boar's head erased. 

*OusTiN. The name appears as Ostiane, Oustiane, Austiane, 
Austin, and is probably son of Augustine. 1368, Andrew and Walter 
Augustine, burgesses of Edinburgh ; 1503-15, Dominus David Ostian, 
prebendary of Trinity College Church, Edinburgh; 1574-85, Thomas 
Austiane, vicar of Advie and Cromdale; 1586-96, Alexander Oustean 
represented Edinburgh in parliament. 

Thomas Austin, who is said to have been a native of Kent, came to 
Scotland with Oliver Cromwell, settled in Perth, and became a prosperous 
trader there ; several of his descendants were magistrates of the burgh, 
William being provost in 1722. 

Joseph acquired the estate of Kilspindie towards the close of the 
seventeenth century ; Captain Joseph of Kilspindie left with sons, who 
died unmarried, Cecilia, who married John Gloag of Greenhill, co. 
Perth, and was mother of William Gloag of Greenhill, whose eldest son, 
John Austin Lake-Gloag, Esq., in 1866 assumed the additional surname 
of Lake, on his marriage to Elizabeth Georgiana, daughter and coheir of 
Warwick, last Viscount Lake; on this occasion the following coat for 
Austin was confirmed to him as a quartering — or, a chevron gules between 
three lions' gambs erect and erased azure armed of the second. Mr Lake- 
Gloag's younger brother is William Ellis Gloag of Kincairney, co. Perth, 
Sheriff of Stirling and Dumbarton shires. 

Adam Austin, M.D., uncle of Mrs Cecilia Gloag, married in 1754 
Anne, daughter of Hugh Lord Sempill, and left issue. 

The Irish coat of Austin was entered in the Register as a quartering 

3F 



2o6 WORKMAN'S MS. 

in 1865, by the Rev. William Austin-Gourlay of Kincraig. The coat in 
the MS. is not recorded. 

•Sanks of yt Ilk. In 1732 Alexander Schank of Castleriggs, co. 
Fife, registered — ^gules, on a fess argent between a cinquefoil in chief and 
a falcon's leg jessed and belled in base of the second, a hawk's lure of the 
first. Critical notices of the published pedigrees of Shank of Castlerig, 
are to be found in Jervise's " Epitaphs and Inscriptions," and in the 
" Genealogist," Vol. I. 

The Castlerig family are descended from burgesses of Kinghorn, of 
the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries ; Henry represented the burgh in 
parliament 1643; they held part of the land adjacent to the castle, as 
tenants of the family of Lyon, Earls of Strathmore and Kinghorn, and 
afterwards acquired the property which remains in their possession. 

Ninian Shank was Provincial of the Dominicans in Scotland 1497. 
About the arms there is some confusion. Pont gives them for Sauchie ; 
they are carved in stone on a house at Kinghorn, with the date 1638, and 
the initials H.S., B. B. The pedigree calls the wife of Henry Shank, then 
living, Janet Cunningham, and Mr Jervise is of opinion, that the style of 
the work rather belongs to the time of Henry Shank and Agnes Balfour, 
say 1683. 

*CowPER. Another coat is given for this name farther on. 

This was registered in 1737 for David Cowper of Balleny, writer in; 
Edinburgh, who d.s.p. before 1749. 

90. Cheine of Essilmont. L. 

BuTLAR. L. ; azure, a bar engrailed argent, or or, between three 
covered cups or. 

91. Menteith OF Carss. L. 

Settoun of Tulibody. L. ^ 

DOWGLAS OF LaNGNUDRYE. L. 
( DoWGLAS OF MoFFETH. L. 

Crechtoun of Brounstoune. L. ; the lion is sable. 

CoRSBE of yat Ilk. L. This coat was quartered by the Lords 
Carlyle, and in 1766 was registered for Andrew Crosbie of Holm,' 
advocate; he was son of Andrew of Holm, Provost of Dumfries, and 
grandson of John of Holm, merchant, also provost of that burgh 1708, 
and afterwards. 

In the shires of Ayr, Kirkcudbright, and Berwick are places called 
Crosbie or Corsbie, from which the surname may have been taken. 

1296, Sir Reginald de Crosbie; 1298, John de Crosseby, clerk, was 
presented to the church of St Mary, in the Forest, and is named in the 
" Rotuli Scotie" 1319; 1358, protection from the King of England, in 
favour of John de Crosbie of the parish of Ligertwood; 1330, Stephen, 
son of Symon de Crosby of Ayrshire ; 1409, Crown charter of the barony 
of Bowne, co. Berwick, to Thomas, on the resignation of his father, 
Thomas. 

John Corsbie, in 1644, represented Kirkcudbright in parliament. 

92. 'Wakar. This very remarkable coat seems to have been dis- 



WORKMAN'S MS, 207 

used, or at least to have been greatly modified. Pont blazons for the 
name — or, three pallets gules surmounted of a saltire argent, on a chief 
azure a crescent of the third between two spur rowels of the first. This 
is also given by Porteus. 

Another given by Pont, but seemingly added after his time, is — 
argent, a saltire between a mullet and a martlet azure. 

See G. 

The Lyon Register contains nine entries of arms for the name of 
which six closely resemble the bearing given by Pont and Porteus ; 
another, a modern grant, has the saltire and chief without the pallets. 

About 1680 a coat allusive to the office of Keeper of His Majesty's 
Buckhounds, then held by him, was granted to Robert Walker — argent, 
an oak-tree growing out of the base vert, betwixt a stag on the dexter and 
a buckhound on the sinister side, both in fall course gules ; crest — a stag 
standing at gaze under a nut-tree proper ; motto — "/« omnes casus" 

About the same time Mr William, minister of the English church in 
Barbadoes, was granted — vert, on a canton argent an eye proper; crest — a 
rock in the sea the waves beating on it ; motto — " Per varios casus''' 

The surname is derived from the occupation of fuller or walker, but 
may also in some instances be indicative of pedestrian power. 

The Chartulary of Dunfermline affords an instance of the name and 
occupation going together as late as c. 1560 ; charter of feu-farm of the 
fuller's mill in Burnemouth in favour of Alexander Walker, About the 
same time John had sasine of a house and land in Dunfermline. 

Between 1644 and 1673 that burgh was several times represented in' 
parliament by William and Peter Walker. 

Persons of the name held land at Dron, in Fife, for several genera- 
tions. From the family of St Fort, in the same county, whose represen- 
tative registered arms in 1759, descends William Stuart Walker of Bow-' 
land, CO. Edinburgh, C.B. 

1341, Adam Walker, bailie of Inverness; 1365, English safe-conduct^ 
for Thomas Walkare, merchant of Scotland- 

*TULLUS OF THAT Ilk. This name is added at the side in a differ- 
ent hand ; the name originally above the shield, and much obliterated, 
seems to begin with A and end in one. 

A coat, closely resembling this, is given in K. for Pere, 
. *HiSLOP. Archibald Hyslop, stationer, burgess of Edinburgh, 
recorded arms 1672-78, when the chief is made vert and charged with a 
book bound or between two stars argent. 

In the arms granted, 1813, to General Sir Thomas Hislop, baronet, 
G.C.B., the chief is omitted altogether, but is vert and charged with three 
mullets argent in the grant to a member of the family of Hyslop of Lotus 
or Lochend, co. Kirkcudbright, where they have been seated for two 
hundred years. 

The surname is to be met with in that quarter in the fifteenth cen- 
tury. William Heslop was a canon of Holyrood at the Reformation. 

93. *Skeine. See L. II. and F. E. for two other representations. 



2o8 WORKMAN'S MS. 

The arms as entered, 1672-78, by John Skene of that Ilk are — ^gnles, 
three dirks paleways argent hefted and pommelled or, surmounted of as 
many wolves' heads couped of the third ; his supporters are — on the 
dexter a highlandman in his proper garb, holding a skene with his right 
hand in a guarding posture, and on the sinister another in a servile habit, 
a target on his left arm and the darlach at his side. 

Skene, in Aberdeenshire, was erected into a barony by Crown charter 
131 7, in favour of Robert de Skene, and remained with his descendants 
in the male line till the death of Alexander of that Ilk in 1827, when his 
nephew, James Earl Fife, succeeded ; it was sold in 1880. 

Sir John of Curriehill, co. Edinburgh, Lord Clerk Register and 
Senator of the College of Justice, author of the " Regiam Majestatem," 
was father of Sir James, baronet. Lord President of the Court of Session 
1626-33. His son, Sir John, d.s.p., and the present heir male of the 
family is William Forbes Skene, LL.D., author of " Celtic Scotland," and 
other works. 

The coat of the Curriehill line, with the two skenes in sal tire, is not 
registered, but is cut on the monument, in the Greyfriars' Churchyard, 
Edinburgh, of Sir James, who died in 1633. 

Gladure. The coat given in K. for Gulane— parted per fess argent 
and sable, a dexter hand holding a flaming sword erect, parted per fess 
gules and of the first. 

Rate or Raet. Quarterly, sable and azure, a crescent argent. 

♦QuHiTE. Porteus blazons this with the martlet displayed between 
three quatrefoils, and reverses the tinctures. Stacie has the same, and has 
another entry, which is one of the icv^ authorities which show that visita- 
tions of arms really took place in Scotland, so I quote it in full : — " Quhit 
or Whyt of Kirckaldie, the Whytes above writen, coUor altered ; done 
after Mr Skene his visitatione — 1670, lyon-deput then." 

There are four matriculations for the name 1672-80 ; John of Ben- 
nochy having exactly the coat given by Porteus. In two the bird is described 
as an eagle, and the other. Major Andrew Whyte, representer of Whyte of 
Markle, has an eagle volant. 

The subsequent grants all found on the old arms, but the coat of 
James of Stockbrigs, co. Lanark, 1754, is rather peculiar — ^argent, a 
lymphad her oars in saltire sable, in the sinister chief point a martlet 
volant of the second with a small chain about its neck azure, to which is 
appended a plain cross gules. 

In 1770 Janet White, wife of Cosimo Count Conti, registered her 
pedigree and arms, when the chief was altered to purpure and charged 
with three garbs or; she was only child of Robert White, Consul at 
Tripoli, and maternally her descent is stated from Mackenzie of Sandyland, 
Ross of Easter Fearn, and Gordon of Embo. On the father's side there 
seems little to be said ; he was a native of Fife, and vaguely said to be of 
the Bennochy family. 

Robert I. granted to Adam Quhyt a charter of the lands of Stayhar, 



WORKMAN'S MS, 209 

afterwards called Stairquhit or Barskimming, co. Ayr. There are English 
safe-conducts 1363-68 for John Whit, a Scottish merchant. 

Gilbert Qwhyt was bailie of Rutherglen 1375 ; George White of 
Bankhead, who matriculated arms in 1786, was provost of that burgh, and 
died soon after, leaving a son and heir, Walter. 

In the reign of Robert II. Adam Albus held lands in Kincardine- 
shire. 

In 1479 William was forfeited for holding out the Castle of Dum- 
barton against the King. 

Henry Whyte, Dean of Brechin, sat in parliament 1535; Sir John 
was long deputy-director of Chancery about this time. 

Between 1605 and 1641 James, Andrew, and John White were 
doomsters of parliament. Robert sat in parliament for Kirkcaldy 
1645-65, and John 1669-73. Robert Whyte was the first provost of 
Kirkcaldy 1658, and died in August 1666; in the pedigree of Whyte of 
Bennochy, in Douglas' " Baronage," he seems to be identified with Robert 
of Powran, who died in 1667, aged sixty-eight, leaving a widow, Janet 
Tennant, so that the statement that he married, secondly, a daughter of 
Law of Dunikier, must be a mistake. 

In 1799 John White of Bennochy having inherited the property of 
his kinsman, General Robert Melville of Strathkinness, was allowed to 
quarter the arms of that family, and to carry as supporters two eagles 
with wings expanded sable, beaked, membered, collared, and chained or, 
the collars charged with three quatrefoils sable. 

There is a funeral escutcheon of Major Andrew above named, who 
was Governor of Edinburgh Castle, married Katherine Skene of the 
Halyards family, widow of Sir James Anstruther of Airdrie, and died in 
1686, leaving issue; Markle is in Haddingtonshire, and his family inter- 
married with Hepburn of Alderston, Crichton of Hill, &c. 

Martha Whyte, Countess of Elgin and Kincardine, governess to the 
Princess Charlotte, descended from a family of merchants in Kirkcaldy ; 
her ladyship inherited the estate of Kingsmill, co. Fife, acquired by the 
marriage of John Whyte, bailie of Kirkcaldy, with Janet Boswell^ the 
heiress. 

*Alschoner. Alexander, Lord of Sterling, is added. 

Dr Rogers, in 1877, published two very interesting volumes on the 
family of Alexander and the first Earl of Stirling, showing the various 
claims that have been unsuccessfully made to the titles. The early 
genealogy, however, seems not yet satisfactorily proved ; it is hardly 
possible that the Earl, who is considered by Dr Rogers to have been born 
about 1567, was y?/"/^ in descent from Thomas Alexander of Menstrie, 

1505- _ - 

In all the funeral escutcheons of Lord Stirling's descendants his 
mother is called Marjory or Margaret Campbell of the Glenorchy family, 
while Dr Rogers calls her Marion Coutts ; the Earl's father, Alexander 
Alschinder of Menstrie, made his will 5th February 1580, and appoints as 

3G 



2 1 o WORKMAN'S MS. 

oversmen his "gude lord and maister, Colin, Earl of Argyl, &c., and 
Alain Cutis, his gudescyr," i.e., grandfather, not father-in-law. 

But the will of this Alexander shows that he had another wife, 
Marion, sister of William Graham of Gartavertan. 

In 1625 the Earl sealed with the coat here represented, but after his 
rise in the world he laid claim to descent from the MacAlisters or Mac- 
Alexanders of Kintyre, and in 1631 Archibald of Tarbert, then the head 
of that family, resigned to him the chiefship, and a letter was written by 
the King in March 1632, directing Sir James Balfour, Lord Lyon, to 
exemplify to him the Alexander coat, " quartered with the armes of clan 
Allaster, who hath acknowledged him for chief of their familie." This 
was accordingly done, the blazon being— or, a lymphad her oars in saltire 
sable between three cross crosslets fitch^e gules ; and his lordship also 
bore — in an escutcheon over all, the arms of Nova Scotia. 

In Wood's " East Neuk of Fife " there is a pedigree of the family of 
Alexander of Skeddoway and Drumeldrie, who are traced back to 1457, 
and it seems more probable that the Menstrie Alexanders were of this 
stock than that they came from Kintyre to Clackmannanshire. 

Robert sat in parliament for Stirling 1579-94, and the burgh of 
Easter-Anstruther was several times represented by persons of the name 
1612-45. 

All the arms recorded are variations of those in W., and none of them 
quarter Macalister. 

Several of the MSS. give three crescents instead of one, two being 
in chief, and all counterchanged. 

*Gledstainis of yt Ilk. The seal of George Gladstanes, Arch- 
bishop of St Andrews 1606-15, is a saltire with a rose in chief; an early 
seal of Herbert de Gledstan is not heraldic, having a flower ornament ; 
that of John of Cocklaw, 1509, is a lion rampant. 

James Gladstains of that Ilk registered arms 1672-78 — argent, a 
savage's head couped distilling drops of blood, and thereupon a bonnet 
composed of bay and holly leaves all proper, within an orle of eight 
martlets sable. Two cadets entered arms at the same time ; Francis of 
Whytlaw has the head full faced and without the bonnet. 

The arms as borne by James of that Ilk were registered as a quarter- 
ing in 1720, by William Hairstons of Craigs, co. Dumfries. 

Arms borne by the Right Honourable William Ewart Gladstone — 
argent, a savage's head affront^e distilling drops of blood, about the temples 
a wreath of holly vert, within an orle flory gules, all within eight martlets 
sable ; his father, Sir John Gladstone, originally Gladstones, descended 
from a family resident in Lanarkshire, in the neighbourhood of the lands, 
in the barony of Carnwath, from which the surname was taken. 

In 1296 Herbert de Gledestan of Lanarkshire swore fealty to Edward 
I.; Sir William was a prisoner in England 1357, when his wife, Alice, 
had a safe-conduct to visit him ; he was released soon after, and died 
about 1364; a protection was granted in 1363 to his wife and children, 
and in 1365 his son and heir, William, had a Crown charter of lands near 



WORKMAN'S MS. 211 

Peebles. John of Gledstains had a charter of Hundleshope, Peebles, from 
Robert III., on the resignation of his mother, Margaret, and this property- 
was still in the possession of John of Cocklaw in 15 19, when his grandson 
John was contracted in marriage to Janet, daughter of Sir Walter Scott 
of Branxholm. 

The Cocklaw family retained the designation of that Ilk after their 
Lanarkshire estate passed from them in the sixteenth century, and some- 
times are designed barons of Gledstaines. 

They figure in the history of the Borders, sometimes as disturbers of 
the peace, sometimes as consulted by the privy council as to the preserva- 
tion of order; in the ballad of the Raid of Reidswire is mentioned 
" Gledstone good at need." 

Cocklaw was besieged, without success, by the English in 1403. 

In 1561 Mr John, who possessed land in Quothquan, was a member 
of the privy council ; the end of his nephew and heir, John, Ormond 
Pursuivant, happened thus in 1596; " Four heraldis sitting drinking, twa 
of them fell in words, viz., John Purdie and John Glaidstainis, the said 
John Glaidstainis stikit John Purdie at the table ; and the said Glaid- 
stainis being apprehendit, he was beheidit upone the 25th day of the same 
moneth of November, for the same slauchter." He left a son, George, 
living 162 1, and then in possession of his patrimony in Lanarkshire. 

Craigs was in 1440 the property of John Gledstanes; his descendant, 
John, was dead in 1619, leaving two coheiresses, of whom Elizabeth 
married Matthew Hairstons. 

From this branch came Herbert, a colonel in the Swedish service, 
who was recognised as noble in that country in 1647 ; ^^s son married 
Brita Natt ach Dag, a maid of honour; Adam, the last male of the family, 
was taken prisoner at Pultowa, and died in Siberia. Herbert sat in 
parliament for Kirkcudbright 1579. 

94. *VlLLMURE. 

*Seres. 

95. *Halyday. There is an official entry of the funeral of Sir John 
Halliday of Tulliebole, advocate, 8th March 1619, when four quarters «nly 
were displayed ; crest — a boar's head argent. He married Helen 
Oliphant, and their initials are cut over the entrance door of Tulliebole 
Castle, with the date, 2nd April 1608, and the motto (?) — " The Lord is 
my defence ; " his arms are a chevron between three cinquefoils, and on it 
a crescent. 

In 1775 Robert Douglas Halliday of Coldbrook, in the island of St 
Croix, was recognised as heir male of the family, and registered arms — 
argent, a sword erect proper hilted and pommelled or, the pommel within 
a crescent gules, on a canton azure a saltire of the field; motto — " Virtute 
part a." 

This motto is given by Stacie, and he adds the canton with the 
saltire is " for ane reward ;" Porteus gives the sword and crescent for the 
name, and mentions the canton as an addition for the Tulliebole family ; 



212 WORKMAN'S MS. 

it must then have been granted after 1608, and at the same time probably 
the arms altered. 

In the churchyard of Canonbie there is a Halliday coat cut in stone — 
a sword erect and in chief three crescents. 

*Makbeth. In 1678 arms founded on this coat were allowed to 
Abraham M'Beth, merchant in Lx)ndon. 

*Makduf. See Mackay. 

*Eleis. Seal of Robert Ellous 1359 — a lion rampant debruised of a 
bend, in sinister chief a mullet ; these bearings are nearly identical with 
those of Fairlie. 

Another coat is given in F. E. Mr James Ellis of Sauchton Mills, 
near Edinburgh, registered 1672-78 — ^gules, a sword in bend argent 
between two helmets or. At the same time James Ellies of Southside 
registered — or, three helmets beavers open proper, with a crest which 
rather belongs to the other coat, a hand gauntleted grasping an adder 
(? eel) proper. 

Mr John Ellies of Ellistoune, advocate, 1672-78 — azure, three eels 
naiant fessways in pale argent ; Ellistoune is in West Lothian, and this 
family is said to be of English origin. 

Bakaske, or Balcaskie of that Ilk, co. Fife. Vert, on a chevron 
argent three treefoils slipped of the field. 

*FiSHER. Porteus has — azure, a chevron between three salmon 
argent, and this is the coat quartered by Forman for Fisher, it is said. 

Seal of William Fisher, burgess of Edinburgh 1567 — three fishes 
naiant in pale. 

Arms granted, c. 1740, to Robert of Newhall — azure, on a chevron 
argent between two otters' heads erased in chief and a salmon naiant 
in base proper, three stars gules. 

Thomas represented Edinburgh in parliament 1600. 

John Fisher in Drygrange acquired Housebyres 1642 ; Marion, 
daughter and heir of Andrew of Housebyres, married, in 1783, Archibald 
Dickson, and left issue. 

96. *CocHRAN. See A. 

Tempiltoun. Gules, a temple or church argent, on a chief sable 
a mullet or. 

Name illegible — gules, a bird wings expanded drinking out of a 
well, in dexter chief a garb or. 

CuMYNG. Azure, three garbs or. 

*Lethe. See G. 

Harcas of yt Ilk. See A. ; sable, a chevron between three fleurs- 
de-lis or. 

Mychell. See F. Seal, 1455, of Thomas Mychal, bailie of St 
Andrews — an eagle displayed. 

The coat here and in F. is one of the bearings of the old family of St 
Michael, whose heiress seems to have married Henry Kerr, Sheriff of 
Roxburghshire 1359, and secondly. Sir John Maxwell of Pollok. The 
Kerrs have since borne the mascles as a quartering or composed with 



Out***"* 

WORKMAN'S MS. 213 

their own arms. Porteus gives for Mitchael — sable, a fess between three 
mascles or; and also — parted per pale or and gules, a fess and three 
mascles counterchanged. 

In the various matriculations for Mitchell the coat is almost always 
sable, a fess between three mascles or, with additions or variations ; one 
has a chevron in place of the. fess. 

The baronetcy, which was conferred in 1724 on John Mitchell of 
Westshore, in Shetland, is claimed by James William Mitchell, Rothesay 
Herald, as descended from his youngest son, John Charles. To this 
family belonged Sir Charles, Commander in the Naval Service of the 
East India Company, who died in 1808, and his brother Sir Andrew, 
K.B., who died in 1806, Admiral of the Blue. 

David Mitchell was Bishop of Aberdeen 1662-63; Sir Andrew of 
Thainston, co. Aberdeen, K.B., was Envoy at the Court of Frederick the 
Great of Prussia. 

John Mitchell of Craigend, co. Stirling, who died in 171 1, left a son, 
Alexander, Writer to the Signet, designed of Mitchell, when he recorded 
arms 17 19; his son by Alison, daughter and coheir of Alexander Living- 
stone of Parkhall, assumed his mother's surname and arms, and is rei 
corded, 1766, as William Livingstone of Parkhall. 

St Michael, the archangel, is the crest of some branches of the 
Mitchells. 

Spittell. L. ; seal of Alexander, parson of Liberton 1598 — a fess 
between two boars' heads erased in chief and an eagle displayed in base, a 
crescent in the honour point. 

Arms in Balfour's MS. for the old family of Spittal of Leuchat, in 
Fife — argent, an eagle displayed sable in chief three crescents gules. 

Edward sat in parliament 1503-25. 

Leuchat was erected into a barony in 1695 for Alexander Spittal ; his 
descendant, James, died in 1796, leaving a daughter and heir, Elizabeth, 
who married Robert Bruce Dundas of Blair. Leuchat was the seat of 
William Spetell in 1457, and John de Spitale held lands in Kinross-shire 
1395, granted by David II. to Walter de Spittall in the thirty-sixth year 
of his reign. 

Robert Spittel, tailor to Margaret, Queen consort of James IV., 
founded the bridge at Doune, co. Perth, in 1585, and placed on it a stone 
with an inscription, and his arms — an eagle displayed between two (per- 
haps three, the stone being much worn) crescents in chief and a pair of 
tailor's shears open in base. 

QuHiTFURDE. L. ; ouc garb in chief only. 

In 1704 Sir Adam Whytefoord of Blairquhan registered — argent, a 
bend cottised sable between two garbs gules, that in base being added for 
difference. 

Colonel Walter had recorded the same 1672-78, three crosses pat^e 
of the field on the bend "being added at his Majesties speciall command;" 
his father had been Bishop of Brechin. 

The surname is taken from lands near Paisley. Walter witnessed a 

3H 



214 ' WORKMAN'S MS. 

charter of Alexander III. in 1263 ; the elder line failed in Sir John of that 
Ilk and Milton c. 1688. 

Robert was Abbot of Crossraguel 1491, which led to the settlement 
of some of his kinsfolk in Ayrshire ; John sat in parliament for Irvine 
1586. John, son of David in Balloch, acquired the barony of Blairquhan 
1622, which descended to Sir Adam above named, who was created a 
baronet 1701 ; Sir John, third baronet, sold all the estates, and died 
before November 1803, leaving coheirs, who married Henry Cranstoun, 
Esq., Henry Lord Vernon, David Kennedy of Kirkmichael, and Colonel 
Francis Cunynghame. He and his father were styled of Whytefoord. 

98. BoRNETT in Lidesdale (?). Added in ink — argent, a naked man 
cutting a tree growing from a mount in base vert with a long sword, on a 
chief azure a crescent between two mullets argent. 

NicoLSONE. Sir John has been added, then scored out, and of 
Carnock written. 

Gules, a lion's head erased between three hawks' heads erased, a 
bordure engrailed or. 

99. *Barraman. There seems to be some confusion between this 
name, which is sometimes spelt Barram (? Balram) and Baron. 

Sir J. Balfour gives, Barrame — sable, a cross between four fleurs-de- 
lis or ; Barrone — or, three martlets sable ; Barone — ^gules, a chevron azure 
fretty argent between three garbs or ; Barrone of Kynaird, in Fyfeshire, 
1559 — or, a chevron sable degoutted argent between three merles gules. 
Porteus adds a double tressure and omits " degoutted." 

In 1788 Alexander Baron of Preston, co. Linlithgow, registered arms 
— ^argent, a chevron gules between three martlets sable ; evidently taken 
from the coat here represented, although he is said to be descended from 
Jean Baron, who accompanied Mary of Guise to Scotland. 

There are in France several families of Baron, le Baron, Baronnie, 
&c., but their arms do not resemble the Scotch coat at all. The Barons 
of Preston are represented in the male line by Alexander Seton of 
Preston, and of Ekolsund in Sweden. 

John Borrowman or Barrowman of Nether Stewartoun left a daughter 
and heir, Margaret, 1687. 

In 1296 Matheu de Balran of Fife swore fealty to Edward I.; 
Patrick Barroun, burgess of Edinburgh, and Margaret Liddale, his 
spouse, had a charter of Spittalfield, co. Fife, 1477 ; he was Provost of 
Edinburgh, long sat in parliament, was knighted, and died c. 1488 ; 
Patrick of Spittalfield represented Edinburgh, and was depute-constable 
1526-48; John of Spittalfield c. 1560; James was Provost of Edinburgh, 
and sat in parliament 1567-68 ; others of the name held the offices of 
depute-constable and depute-marischal. James of Pitteuchar left two 
coheirs in 161 o. 

James Baron, merchant in Edinburgh, married Elizabeth, grand- 
daughter of Mr Robert Leslie of Innerpeffer, advocate, who had acquired 
Kinnaird about 1535; their son, George of Kinnaird 1587-1606, sold the 
estate to Sir Michael Balfour. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 215 

Sir Patrick, in 1478, founded a chaplainry in the church of St Giles', 
Edinburgh, reserving the patronage to himself and his heirs, and provid- 
ing quod cum fuerit capellanus ydoneus parentele tnee vel hoc cognomen 
Baroun gerens ante alias presentetur. 

Lyntoun. L. There was a family of Linton of Pittendreich, co; 
Perth. 

Porteus gives for Linton of Drumcreich this and another coat — 
gules, a cross crosslet argent, two stars of the same under each of the 
upper nooks, and a crescent under each nook thereof or (?). 

Balfour has a blazon nearly the same, but in his drawing the stars 
are omitted altogether, and the cross is between four crescents. 

Hannay, Argent, a cross crosslet fitchde sable issuing from a 
crescent gules, between three stags' heads cabossed. This is much 
defaced, and the name originally was Livingston of East Wemyss. 

Cader. Given in L. for Kedzo. 

1255, William de Cadyow was removed from the King's Council. 
1296, Adam de Cadiou, of Lanarkshire, swore fealty to Edward L John 
sat in parliament 1440. 

*EwiNG. A chevron between three stars are the arms on a tomb- 
stone in Bonhill churchyard, with the date 1600. 

Nisbet gives as W. for Ewing of Keppoch and Craigtoun, with the 
sun in base. 

Robert, last of Craigtoun, was dead in 1781, when his heirs were his 
sisters — Elizabeth, wife of Rev. John Bell, and Agnes, wife of Edward 
Inglis, Edinburgh. 

James Ewing of Keppoch sold the estate, and d.s.p. 1824 ; his 
nephew and heir, Alexander, merchant in Glasgow, registered arms 1869, 
quartering Bontine of Ardoch as heir general of that family. The blazon is 
— argent, a chevron embattled azure ensigned with a banner gules, charged 
with a canton of the second, thereon a saltire of the first, all between two 
mullets in chief and the sun in his splendour in base of the third, a bor- 
dure of the second. 

Young. L. ; see also B. Seal of William, 152 1 — three piles each 
charged with an annulet, in base an escallop. John, bailie of Edinburgh 
1578, seals with three piles ; and Sir Peter of Seaton, tutor to James VL, 
has an annulet on each pile, and a crescent for crest. 

His descendant. Young of Auldbar, bore argent, three piles sable, as 
many annulets of the first in chief ; crest — a lion rampant gules holding a 
sword in his paw proper ; motto — "Great God governe." This was 
altered at the matriculation by Peter of Auldbar, 1672-78 — three- annulets 
or being placed on a chief; moiio-^" Robore prudentia pnsst at." A note 
is appended, " Which coat is declared to be ye paternall of ye name of 
Young," apparently making him head of the family. 

Young of Leny first bore the three piles in point, each charged with 
an annulet, on a chief argent three martlets sable ; crest — a dolphin naiant 
proper ; motto — " In every poynt," or " Thus in every point." At the 
general registration this was altered to — argent, on three piles sable as 



2i6 WORKMAN'S MS. 

many annulets or ; crest — a dexter arm holding a lance in bend proper ; 
motto — " Press through." 

The Auldbar family ended on the death, by drowning, of Robert of 
that place, in or before 1753, when his sisters became coheirs. They 
were, in 1767, Ann, widow of Robert Ochterlony, merchant in Montrose ; 
Clementina ; Margaret, wife of John Smith, merchant in Brechin ; and 
Mary. 

Sir Peter, who acquired Seaton c. 1580, was knighted 1605, and 
died in 1628, aged eighty-four. His son, Sir James, was father of Peter 
who sold Seaton 1670, and Auldbar was acquired. Parts of Leny, in the 
county of Edinburgh, were acquired 1610-23 by two brothers and a sister; 
Thomas Young, writer to the signet ; John, also writer to the signet, and 
town-clerk of Edinburgh ; and Isobel, wife of Robert Peirson, flesher in 
the Canongate. Thomas eventually became proprietor of these separate 
parts, and left a son, John, farmer of excise and customs, who acquired 
the rest of Leny, and was knighted. He died in 1690, and his son, 
Major Thomas, sold Leny 1695. 

1327, Ralph Yong, Provost of Crail ; John Yonge of Dingwall 1342 ; 
Walter represented Edinburgh in parliament 1468-71 ; George, Arch- 
deacon of St Andrews and Ambassador to Denmark 1585-97 ; James, 
depute-constable 1534; Alexander, Bishop of Edinburgh 167 1, of Ross 
1679-84 ; John, Bishop of Argyll 1661 ; Sir Thomas of Rosebank died 
in 17 1 2, leaving issue. 

Arms granted 1773 to a family of Youngson in Ireland, of Scottish 
descent, were founded on the Young coat, and some MSS. give the bear- 
ings of Younger of Hopperston or Harperden, which are very similar. 

100. *MuDiE. Porteus gives this with the hair of the mermaid 
sable ; also, azure — a chevron ermine between three pheons argent, which 
is given farther on. The latter coat, with a bordure indented argent for 
difference, was registered 1672-78, by James Muidie of Arbeckie, co. 
Forfar ; to this family belonged Sir Thomas Mudie, Provost of Dundee, 
and James, who represented Montrose in parliament 1689- 1702. 

The name appears in Forfarshire early in the fifteenth century, and 
the direct line ended on the death of John Mudie of Pitmuies in 1876. 

William Moodie or Mudy, Bishop of Caithness, died 1460; he and 
Gilbert Mudy were among the benefactors to the monastery of St Anthony 
at Leith, where mass was sung for the repose of their souls. 

Mr William Mudie was appointed Chamberlain to the Queen in 
Orkney 1561, and acquired the estate of Breckness. His grandson, 
James, designed of Melsetter, was ancestor of James Moodie, who sold 
Melsetter in 1818. It was purchased by Robert Heddle, who married a 
daughter of Major James Moodie, and their grandson, John George 
Moodie Heddle, is now of Melsetter. 

The arms of this family of Moodie are — azure, a chevron ermine 
between three pheons pointing upwards argent, a bugle in chief 
or. To this a second son of Melsetter, James, Captain in the Royal 
Navy, was, in 1720, allowed to add as a coat of augmentation in the first 



WORKMAN'S MS. 217 

and fourth quarters, gules, a castle argent ensigned with a ducal crown, 
between three ships of war with sails furled or, for his signal service in 
relieving Denia in Spain, when besieged by the French in 1707. 

Ronald. Argent, a lion passant gardant gules chained to a tree 
proper, on a chief azure a crescent argent. Arms slightly differenced 
were registered 1672-78, by Robert, Provost of Montrose ; John sat for 
that burgh in the first parliament after the Restoration. 

loi. Carros. Argent, on a bend azure three fish of the field ; given 
in K. for Glaides. 

*Calderwood. Arms closely resembling these were registered 
1672-78, by Alexander, bailie of Dalkeith, and by William of Pittedie, in 
Fife; in 1736 Thomas of Polton, co. Edinburgh, grandson of the 
Dalkeith bailie, had his arms altered to— ermine, on a saltire gules 
between four palm branches slipped proper five mascles or. The ermine 
is no doubt to commemorate his father, Sir William, who was a judge, 
with the title Lord Polton, 171 1-33, and the mascles are taken from the 
bearing of the family of his mother, Margaret, daughter of Thomas 
Leirmont, advocate. The Calderwoods were settled at Dalkeith 1566; 
Anne, heiress of Polton, married in 1753 James Durham of Largo, co. 
Fife, and the estate now belongs to Mrs Dundas Calderwood Durham. 

Sir Archibald was steward of the Household to James IV. 1490; 
Isobele de Calrewode of Lanarkshire swore fealty to Edward L 1296. 

Graham of Fantre. On a chief indented sable three escallops or. 
Mr Laing described the seal of Robert of Fyntre, 1478, as having the chief 
engrailed ; crest — an eagle's head and wings. 

The indentation became afterwards three piles. 

*Veitch of Dawick. Seal of Andrew of Stewarton 1605 — three 
cows' heads erased ; sometimes one head only was borne. William le 
Vache of Peeblesshire in 1296 swore fealty to Edward L ; Nisbet quotes 
a charter of Archibald, Earl of Douglas, to Barnabe le Vach de Dawyk 
1407 ; Sir John of Dawick was Master of His Majesty's Works, repre- 
sented the county of Peebles in parliament, and had a charter of the 
barony of Dawick 1635; he was ruined by advancing money to the king, 
and his son and grandson had, as some compensation, the office of 
presenter of signatures. 

William of Elliock, co. Dumfries, writer to the signet, died in 1747 ; 
his son, James, a Senator of the College of Justice, d.s.p. 1793, and was 
succeeded by his cousin, Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Veitch. 

*CuRE. These are the charges on the seal of Clement Cor, bailie of 
Edinburgh 1560 ; gules, a stag trippant or, is given in MSS. and 
Funeral Escutcheons for the name, which is said to be French. Clemens 
Cor sat in parliament for Edinburgh 1593-96; in -one MS. he is styled 
Knight of the Golden Spurs, and had a daughter who married into the 
family of Lumsden of Blanerne. 

*WlLSON. 

102. *Craik. John, merchant burgess of Fraserburgh, registered 

31 



2 1 8 WORKMAN'S MS. 

arms 1672-78 — per fess azure and sable, a ship under sail or, masts, sails, 
and tackling proper. 

In 1296 Henry Crak of Dumfriesshire, James de Crak of Selkirkshire, 
and John of the county of Edinburgh, swore fealty to Edward I. 

1329, John de Crake ; charter of confirmation of a charter of 
Matthew de Crake, Ayrshire, first year of the reign of Robert II. ; 1365, 
English safe-conduct to John de Crake and others, envoys to the Pope 
and King of France ; in the sixteenth century the name occurs frequently 
in Dumfriesshire. 

William, merchant burgess of Dumfries, was repeatedly Provost, 
and sat in parliament for the burgh 1678-81, acquired Duchrae 1676, and 
Arbigland 1678; he died in 1697. His elder son, Adam of Arbigland, 
was father of William of Arbigland, an eminent agriculturist, who died 
in 1798; his sister's son, Douglas Hamilton-Craik of Arbigland, left a 
son, John, who sold the estate, and died 1877. 

Adam of Duchrae, second son of the Provost, left a son, Adam of 
Duchrae, who left two daughters, but the estate went to his sister, Jean, 
who married John Stewart of Castle Stewart, and died in 1762, leaving 
issue. 

Another family of Dumfries merchants were of Stewartoun, and ended 
in three coheiresses, 1698. 

*HoRN. Motto added, " Holde fayst Nydsdale" Stacie has, 
Home, of ould — argent, a chevron between three tyres of a stag's head 
sable ; also. Home of Colfadock, in Nithsdale — argent, a chevron between 
three tyres of harts' horns barways sable ; crest — a hart's head couped or 
attired sable ; motto — " Hold fast." 

Mr James Home of Westerhall, co. Aberdeen, minister at Elgin, 
registered arms c. 1680 — argent, a fess waved and cottised azure between 
two unicorns' heads couped in chief, and a bugle in base gules, garnished 
of the first and stringed of the third ; crest — a bugle azure garnished and 
stringed as the former ; motto — " Monitus munitus." 

In 1725 his son, Mr John Horn of Westerhall, advocate, had these 
arms altered to — or, three hunting-horns gules ; crest — two horns con- 
joined parted per fess or and sable counterchanged ; motto — '' Moneo 
et muneo." 

A pompous notice, nearly six pages long, of the surname of Horn, 
appeared in the Appendix to Nisbet's " Heraldry." It mentions Jupiter, 
Bacchus, Pyrrhus, the Cornuti of Rome, the Cornari of Venice, the de 
Comu of France, the Horns of Brabant and Sweden, Robert Horn, 
Bishop of Winchester, and Andrew Horn, author of the " Mirror of 
Justice." 

In Scotland John a'Horn, a cadet of the Counts of Horn of Brabant, 
is said to have made his appearance to congratulate David II. on his 
release from captivity in England ; to have married Janet, cousin of that 
king, and supposed daughter of Sir William Eraser of Cowie ; and to have 
had a Crown charter of the lands of Glenlyon, which were held by his 
descendants till after James I.'s return from England. 



WORKMAN'S MS, 219 

This is a good example of " a lie with a circumstance." The charter, 
which is in the Great Seal Register, and has been printed, is dated 12th 
March, thirty-ninth year of the reign of David II. ; it is in favour of 
John de Loorne, and Janet, his wife, and no Horn ever possessed 
Glenlyon. 

If we ask for a reason for the change of arms and pretension to high 
descent, it may be answered that " something had happened " since the 
clergyman had a grant of arms. 

In 1722 Lady Mary Bruce married the Prince of Horn, whose arms 
were — or, three hunting-horns gules garnished argent, the mouthpieces 
turned to the sinister side. 

This distinguished family took their surname from their lordship of 
Horn, near Ruremonde, a fief of the Duchy of Brabant ; can be traced to 
the twelfth century ; were hereditary grand huntsmen of the empire, counts 
of the empire 1450, and princes 1677. 

The last of the elder branch, James, Count of Horn, adopted his 
stepsons, who were Montmorency-Nivelles, and took the name ; they were 
both beheaded — Philip, Count of Horn, at Brussels in 1568, and the 
Baron of Montigny at Simancas in 1570. 

The second Prince of Horn, a grandee of Spain of the first class, had 
two sons ; the younger, Antony, Count of Horn, was broken on the 
wheel on the Place de la Gr6ve, in 1720, for robbery and murder com- 
mitted in Paris ; the elder, Maximilian Emmanuel, Prince and Knight of 
the Golden Fleece, married, as already stated, a daughter of the Earl of 
Elgin and Aylesbury, and left two coheirs ; the elder married, in 1742, 
the Prince of Salm-Kyrbourg, the younger became Princess of Stolberg- 
Guedern, and her daughter married Prince Charles Edward Stuart. 

In Scotland the name is uncommon. In 1578 John Horn was 
settled at Thomanean, in Kinross-shire, which is now the property of 
John Horn, Esq. Mr James Horn bought Westerhall 1674 ; his son 
John, in 1733, entailed his estate, taking the designation of Horn of 
Horn, married Anne, daughter of Viscount Arbuthnott, and left an heiress, 
Anne, who married Hew Dalrymple, a senator of the College of Justice as 
Lord Drummore ; her eldest son, Hew Horn of Horn, was succeeded by his 
brother, Robert Horn of Horn, who married Mary Elphinstone, heiress 
of Logic, and assumed her surname in addition. 

Their eldest son, James, registered arms, quartering Horn, and with the 
crest and motto of that family only, 1790 ; his brother and heir. Sir Robert 
Dalrymple Horn- Elphinstone of Horn and Logic Elphinstone, baronet, 
registered arms 1828, also quartering Horn, and with the crests- of the 
three families ; he was allowed supporters — a bull sable armed and un- 
guled or, and an eagle with wings expanded sable armed or. 

*Spottiswoode of that Ilk ; another coat given from this MS. 
This, however, was used by John, Archbishop of St Andrews 1615-39; 
Mr Laing describes the trees as "growing from a mount;" Porteus 
blazons them broken boughs. 

Mr Alexander, advocate, of Crumstain, 1672-78, registered — argent, 



220 WORKMAN'S MS. 

on a chevron gules between three oak trees vert a boar's head couped of 
the field ; crest — a wolf's head couped proper ; motto — " Patior ut 
Potiarr 

In 1814 his representative, John of that Ilk, registered these arms, 
making the boar's head or ; crest — an eagle rising proper looking at the 
sun in his splendour ; same motto ; supporters — two naked savages 
wreathed about the head and middle with laurel, each holding a club over 
his shoulder proper. 

Pont and Balfour give the coat with the three garbs, which appears to 
be the old bearing ; that with the branches or trees in W. has rather the 
appearance of being a later addition, and on the margin is written " oak 
trees branches," and below the shield, "Bishop Spotswood of St Andrews — 
three stoags or three branchs of an oak tree, or scrogs." 

The family is an old one, taking its surname from Spottiswoode, co. 
Berwick, which was erected into a barony early in last century; in 1296 
Robert de Spotteswod swore fealty to Edward I. 

The printed accounts of the Spottiswoodes are incorrect.; the follow- 
ing is an attempt to clear up the confusion. 

David of that Ilk died in September 1570 ; appointed Mr John, parson 
of Calder, one of his executors, not specifying his relationship ; married 

Tane Brounfield 

! ^ 

I I I I 

NiNiANof that Ilk died George was murdered William and Alex- Mr John, parson of 
in or before 1 588. in June 1588, married ander both alive 1602. Longformacus 1588. 

Christian Thomson. 

I 
Agnes living 1603. 



William of that Ilk d.s.p. John sold Spottiswoodebe- Elizabeth died unmarried, 

about 1603. fore 1624 ; nothing further 

known of him. 

It is stated that he was succeeded in the estate by his cousin, the 
Archbishop, who sold it ; the prelate never held Spottiswoode, which was 
purchased in 1700 by his great-grandson. 

Mr John Spottiswoode, parson of Calder, and superintendent of 
Lothian, born 1510, entered at Glasgow University 1534 as servus 
Domini Rectoris, not as son of the laird of Spottiswoode, which he 
certainly would have been styled if he had been so ; he is stated to have 
been son of William of that Ilk, and uncle of Ninian above named; in his 
will he appoints Ninian of that Ilk oversman without calling him his 
nephew, and, as David of that Ilk, appoints Mr John one of his executors; 
it seems certain that he was related to the heads of the family, but not so 
closely as has been alleged. 

Father Hay, who was his descendant, and was also descended from 
Jean, daughter of William of that Ilk, does not call him a son of that 
family. 

The superintendent's offspring rose to distinction ; the Archbishop 
was Chancellor of Scotland, and James, the younger son, was Bishop of 
Clogher, and founded a family in Ireland. 



WORKMAN'S MS, 221 

Sir John of Dairsie and New Abbey, eldest son of the archbishop, 
had besides his son, Captain John, who was executed in 1650, two other 
sons, both military officers. Sir Robert of New Abbey and Dunipace, 
brother of Sir John, was forfeited and executed ; his son, Mr Alexander, 
is, by Nisbet, said to be heir male of Spottiswoode of that Ilk, but the 
Lyon Register does not so style him. His son, John, was the purchaser 
of Spottiswoode, which is now the property of Lady John Scott, nde 
Spottiswoode, but this family is represented by her niece, Helen Spottis- 
woode, wife of Captain Charles Herbert, as heir general, and by her 
cousin, William Spottiswoode of Coombe Bank, Sevenoaks, as heir 
male. 

Dunipace was acquired by a family of the name, who are in the Lyon 
Register called descendants of Spottiswoode of that Ilk. 

In Ayrshire, John of Quhitele held lands 1483; William was con- 
cerned in the murder of the Earl of Cassilis 1527 ; Fowler, in the parish 
of Mauchline, was the seat of Spottiswoodes for several generations. 

*Clan Chattan, or M'feerson's coat, or Gillespie. 

Pont has this for M'Phearson, but gives M'Intosh, as the chief of 
Clan Chattan — or, a lymphad oars erect in saltire sable, in chief a dexter 
hand couped fessways, holding a man's heart (some say a fleur-de-lis) 
paleways. 

On I2th March 1672, Sir Charles Erskine, Lyon, confirmed to " the 
antient Baron the Laird of Clunie, M'Phersone, the only and true repre- 
senter of the antient and honourable familie of the Clan Chattone," the 
arms here depicted ; crest — a cat sejant proper ; motto — " Tutch not the 
Catt, but a Glove ;" supporters — two highlandmen in short tartan jackets 
and hose, with helmets on their heads, dirks at their left sides, and 
targets on their exterior arms, their thighs bare and shirts tied between 
them. 

The laird of Macintosh objected to this, as he claimed the chief- 
ship, and the Privy Council decided in his favour ; on 26th November, 
accordingly, the same arms, without supporters, were matriculated for 
" Duncan M'Phersone of Clunie." 

The present Cluny Macpherson, in 1873, obtained the sanction of 
Lyon to carry the supporters of which his ancestor had been unneces- 
sarily deprived, as, if his chiefship of the whole Clan Chattan was disput- 
able, he was certainly chief of the Macphersons. 

They held their lands of the house of Huntly, and in 1609 had 
signed a bond of manrent acknowledging Macintosh as chief, but Mr 
Skene is of opinion that this honour belongs to the Macphersons, Mack- 
intosh being only captain of the clan. 

Among the families said to be branches of Clan Chattan are : — 

Gillespie ; c. 1680, Sir James Oswald was allowed to impale for his 
wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Mr George Gillespie, one of the ministers of 
Edinburgh — ^azure, in base a ship under sail argent, in the sinister canton 
a hand gauntleted grasping a sword proper; about the same time a differ- 
ent coat — a chevron between three roses — was granted to Alexander 

3 K 



222 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Gillespie of Newtoun, skipper in Elie, ancestor of the existing family of 
Gillespie of Mountquhanie, co. Fife. 

Macgillivray of Dunmaglass ; in 1626 Farquhar, son of Alister, son 
of Farquhar, son of Duncan, son of Anckyl, had a feu-charter of these 
lands which his predecessors had held from the Cawdor family ; they 
descended to the late John Lachlan Macgillivray, on whose death a 
curious litigation ensued as to the succession. 

No arms are registered for the head of the family, but in 1801 
William of Montreal, a cadet, was allowed — azure, a lymphad sails furled 
and oars in action or, flagged gules, a bordure argent ; on a chief of the 
second a buck's head cabossed sable attired of the third, between two 
cross crosslets fitchde of the last ; the buck's head and motto, " Be mind- 
ful," seem indicative of vassalage to the Thanes of Cawdor. 

The seal of Duncan Makfercheir (?) Duncanson Ferchard, 1535, has 
the attires of a stag with a mullet between them ; that of Alexander 
MacFarquhar, 1535, is a stag's head contournde, in base two roses; both 
are appended to deeds in connection with Dunmaglass and the Campbells 
of Cawdor. Donald of Cawdor had acquired half of Dunmaglass, in 1419, 
from William Menzies, being previously owner of the other half. 

Smith ; of the thirty-five coats known in Scotland for this name, 
only three point to descent from this Highland clan, and those are of no 
great antiquity. In 1765 John Smyth of Balhary quarters — azure, a cat 
salient argent, and has a Gaelic motto. In 1768 James Smith of Camno, 
and his cousin, Henry of Smithfield, had as a quartering — ^azure, a cat 
sejant in a watching posture, her dexter paw extended argent. 

Fersen ; this surname is met with in Pomerania at the beginning of 
the fourteenth century. Some of its bearers rose to distinction in the 
Swedish service during the Thirty Years' War, and in 17 12 Reinhold was 
created Count of Granhammer. Count Fersen, le beau, who commanded 
the Royal SuWois regiment in the French service, and drove the carriage 
in which the royal family travelled to Varennes, was murdered by the 
populace of Stockholm during a riot in 1810, and the family, who bore 
the cat in their shield, is extinct. 

Gillies ; David Giilis, alias MacPherson, descended of the Invereshie 
family, registered, 1672-78, the Macpherson coat with marks of difference. 

In 1800 it was the basis of a grant made to Maclaurin Gillies, a 
merchant at Montego Bay, Jamaica ; both have as crest a cat courant 
proper, with the motto, " Touch not the cat, but a glove." 

The arms registered, 1672-78, by John Macpherson of Inveressie are 
those here represented within a bordure gules, but in one of Fraser's 
F. E., the difference is that the shield is parted per chevron, and the hand 
holding the dagger is turned the other way. 

No name ; (?) Langlands. Argent, on a chevron gules two mullets 
of the field. 

Alison. Already given from page 61 ; here it is parted per bend 
gules and argent, instead of azure and or. 

103. No name ; (?) Hamilton. Gules, a crescent between three 
cinquefoils argent. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 223 

No name ; (?) Seton, Unfinished, something like a garb uncoloured 
between three crescents gules within the Royal tressure. 

*Clark of Balbirny. This seems a mistake, as the proper coat of 
the Balbirny family is given on page 124 for Clarke; this is an addition 
made at a later date. 

Seal, 1593, of Bathia Clerk, wife of Mr John Provand, burgess of 
Edinburgh, and proprietor of Caldhame — a chevron between two crescents 
in chief and a boar's head erased in base. 

Arms on a brass chandelier in the parish church of Montrose, pre- 
sented in 1623 by Richard Clark, Vice- Admiral of Sweden, a native of 
Montrose — quarterly, first and fourth, on a mount a tree; second and 
third, checquy ; also the arms of his wife, Christina Lamb — on a mount a 
paschal lamb bearing a flag. 

Several families of the name figured in Sweden. William went there 
in 1607 as a captain in a Scotch regiment, son of Andrew Clerck of the 
county of Caithness, said to be descended from the Sheriffs of Forfarshire ; 
his sons were ennobled, and Hans Clerck, an admiral, was created a baron 
1687, a title which expired on the death, in 1748, of General Baron 
Clerck. 

The existing Barons Klerck descend from a goldsmith in Stockholm. 

Arms on the monument of Mr George Clerk, parson of Aberdour, 
who died in 1644 — a fess counter-compony, in chief a crescent between 
two mullets, in base a boar's head erased. 

In 15 14 John Clerk had a charter of Braleccan, co. Argyll, from the 
Earl of Argyll, which remained with his descendants for nine or ten 
generations; arms registered 1754 — or, a fess checquy azure and argent 
between three bears' heads sable. 

John Clerk, merchant in Paris, said to be from Kincardineshire, 
bought Pennicuik in Mid-Lothian, and registered arms 1672-74 — or, a fess 
checquy azure and argent between two crescents in chief gules and a boar's 
head couped in base sable ; crest — ^a demi-man winding a horn proper ; 
motto — " Amat victoria curam'' 

His son was created a baronet, and in 1807 Sir George Clerk was 
allowed to use a second motto — " Free for a blast," and had a grant of 
supporters — a savage and a druid priest. 

Clerk or Clark appears to have become rather a common surname 
about the middle of the fourteenth century ; we meet with Provosts of 
Lanark, Dumbarton, Ayr, and Rutherglen. 

David n. granted Schenyllis, co. Ayr, to Robert Clerk of Dumbarton ; 
and in 1376 Lawrence de Haya, of Eskyndy, gave the lands of Lonyanys, 
in Inverness-shire, to John Clerk, in tocher with his daughter, Margaret. 
Nine persons called le Clerk, in 1296 swore fealty to Edward I. 

John Clerk of Lanark settled in Edinburgh as a burgess, and was 
bailie in 1413; William sat in parliament for Haddington 1467; Walter 
is in 1484 designed armiger ; John was prior of Scone 1524-44. 

Alexander, first of Balbirny, sat in parliament for Edinburgh 1567-81, 
and was provost 1579-84 ; had issue, James of Balbirny, Sir Alexander, 



224 WORKMAN'S MS, 

and Magdalene (who married, first, Edward Lord Bruce of Kinloss ; 
secondly, Sir James Fullerton.) 

Sir Alexander of Pittencreiff, Stenton, and Pitteuchar, long Provost of 
Edinburgh, sat in parliament 1621-33; married, 1598, Marion, daughter 
of Alexander Primrose; and died 1643, leaving issue: i. Mr Alexander of 
Pittencrieff, who died in 1653, leaving an only child, Marion ; 2. James 
of Balbirny, who had a son, James, who inherited Pittencrieff, married, 
1659, Isobel, daughter of Thomas Alexander of Skeddoway, and had two 
sons, Alexander of Pittencrieff, who d.s.p., and James of Pittencrieff, 1690; 
3. Mr Gilbert of Pitteuchar, married, 1637, Agnes, daughter of David 
Brown of Finmount, and was dead in 1683, leaving with a younger son, 
Major David Clerk, father of Henry, who married in 1728 Lady Ceres, 
Alexander of Pitteuchar, who had a large family born between 1684 
and 1706. 

No name; (?) Hamilton. A crescent between three cinquefoils, 
uncoloured. 

Stewart. A partly obliterated and uncoloured shield, apparently 
Stewart, within a bordure charged with (?) buckles. 

An obliterated uncoloured shield. 

104. Campbell of Loudoun. 

Wallace of Craigie. L. ; two savages as supporters, added 
in ink. 

Blair of Adamton. L. ; argent, on a saltire engrailed sable nine 
mascles of the first. 

MuiRHEAD OF Lauchop. L. ; argent, on a bend azure a mullet 
between two acorns of the first. The seal of Andrew, Bishop of Glasgow 
1465, has three acorns on the bend; and James of Bredisholm, co. Lanark, 
registered 1672-78 — argent, on a bend azure three acorns or, a crescent 
for difference. 

Cleland or Kneland of that Ilk. L. ; this coat was registered, 
1672-78, by James of that Ilk; crest — a falcon upon a sinister 
glove proper ; motto — " For sport." The estate was sold by Alexander 
of that Ilk, to , a cadet, and in 17 17 Major William, a commissioner of 
customs in Scotland, as lineal representative of the elder line, recorded 
the arms; crest — a falcon; motto — "■ Non sibi;" supporters — two grey- 
hounds proper. Branches of this family settled in the West Indies, and 
had certificates of arms and descent 1692 and 1733. 

Nisbet mentions a seal 1498, of Alexander of that Ilk, who was killed 
at Flodden, as showing the same bearings. 

Osbern de Cliveland, of the county of Lanark, swore fealty to Edward 
I. in 1296. 

Grierson OF Lag. F. ; the fess azure, crescent argent. 

105. •DoBiE. Porteus blazons the coat of Dobie of Stonihill, near 
Musselburgh — ^argent, three cross crosslets fitchde gules, an esquire's 
helmet in fess azure. 

This surname is met with in Edinburgh in the fifteenth century. 
Richard and Marion Weir, his wife, had a charter of Stonyhill in 1600; 



WORKMAN'S MS. 225 

his nephew and heir, Sir Robert, died in 1623, leaving a son and heir, 
Robert Dobie of Stonyhill ; Robert of Stonyhill, J. P. 1661, sold the 
estate soon after to Sir William Sharp. 

PuRVES. A mistake; it is, Lindsay, the fess between three 
mascles or. 

*Kein. Pont and other MSS. have three mullets or on the chief. 

Sir John Kene, a priest in Edinburgh 1513; his nephew and heir 
was Patrick, burgess of Selkirk ; James was bailie of Selkirk 1618 ; Mr 
Thomas, writer in Edinburgh, was father of Mr John, W.S., who was 
dead in 1619, leaving to his son, Mr Richard, a great estate in Selkirk- 
shire and six other counties. 

Name illegible, like Erblmein — azure, a saltire couped surmounted 
of a key paleways wards downwards and turned to the sinister, in chief 
a key fessways wards downwards and to the sinister, in sinister base a 
mullet, all argent. 

*West. 

* Hunter. Another coat is given from this MS. 

As this surname makes its appearance in different parts of the king- 
dom, and there is no reason to think that all bearing it can be traced to a 
common ancestor, it is to be expected, as is the case, that the armorial 
bearings differ greatly. 

Sir James Balfour has for Hunter of Huntersland — or, three cuirasses 
vert girdled gules ; this coat is not borne by any family known to me, and 
is to be found in no other MS. 

Hunter of Polmood, in Tweeddale, bore — argent, three hunting- 
horns sable, according to Balfour, but Pont and Porteus make them vert 
garnished and stringed gules ; in 1738 David, a descendant of this family, 
recorded — argent, a chevron wavy azure between three hunting-horns vert 
garnished gules. 

John, merchant in Ayr, descended of Hunterston, recorded c. 1685 — 
vert, three collars or, on a chief indented argent as many bugles of the 
first stringed and garnished gules ; this was registered in 1824 by the 
descendant of his brother and heir, Adam Hunter, with a bordure for 
difference, William Francis Hunter of Barjarg, advocate. In '1773 
Robert Hunter of Thurston, co. Haddington, although said to be de- 
scended from a brother of John and Adam, recorded a different coat — 
three hunting-horns and a chief charged with two boars' heads. 

To this branch belong the Hunter-Blairs, baronets, who have also 
abandoned the collars, and bear a chevron between three hunting-horns. 

But the principal family of the name is Hunter of Hunterston, co. 
Ayr, of which a notice is given elsewhere. 

Andrew Hunter, Abbot of Melrose, was Lord High Treasurer of 
Scotland 1449-57 ; his arms are cut on a stone at the' abbey, and are sup- 
ported by two female figures, which have been described as mermaids or 
angels ; they are — two croziers in saltire between two hunting-horns in 
flank, a rose in chief and a mallet in base. The rose and mallet or mell 
are the ensigns of Melrose. 

31- 



226 WORKMAN'S MS, 

A fabulous antiquity has been claimed for the Polmood Hunters; 
John Venator witnessed charters of lands in Peeblesshire in the reign of 
Alexander 11. ; Walter of Polmood 1439 > Robert, last of the direct line, 
died in 1689, leaving the estate to his natural son, whose heir, in 1765, 
disponed it on his death-bed to Alexander Hunter, merchant in Edin- 
burgh, a stranger in blood, whose eventual heir was Elizabeth Lady 
Forbes. Polmood was unsuccessfully claimed by Adam Hunter as heir 
male of the old family. 

Another family possessed Ballagan, co. Dumfries; their arms are 
variously given in the MSS. as — argent, three hunting-horns sable, with 
a crescent azure for difference ; or the horns vert garnished and stringed 
gules. Duncan of Ballagan 1554; Duncan, his grand-nephew, married 
Margaret, daughter of Sir Walter Lindsay of Balgavies, and was grand- 
father of James of Ballagan, J. P. 1661. 

In Forfarshire the surname appears in the middle of the fifteenth 
century; Thomas of Reswallie was grandfather of David of Restennet, 
who registered arms 1672-78, when he is said to be descended of the 
family of Hunterston — ^vert, three greyhounds courant argent collared or, 
on a chief engrailed of the second as many hunting-horns of the first 
garnished gules. 

David Hunter acquired Burnside and the barony of Dod, and sat in 
parliament, 1643, for the burgh of Forfar ; his descendants intermarried 
with Graham of Fintry, Gordon of Abergeldie, Douglas of Brigton, &c., 
and only in 1876 acquired a legal right to arms, when the present William 
George Hunter of Burnside recorded — argent, a man's heart proper 
between three hunting-horns vert stringed gules. 

106. *CuK. 

Studman or Steidman; see K. The snails are proper, and the 
leaves are those of the holly. 

107. Edgare of Tywidale, F. 

Lawen of Quaherelwod. Or, six mascles, three, two, and one. 

L. gives for Lorene of Hairwode — argent, three laurel leaves vert. 

In 1774 arms were granted to James Lorain of Angelraw, said to be 
descended from Simon Lorain, who came from the province of Lorain to 
Dunse — or, on a bend gules between two lions rampant vert, three 
alerions in bend argent. 

The surname appears very early in Scotland ; in 1 233 Roger Loren 
witnessed an agreement between the chapter of Moray and Sir Alan 
Durward; Eustache de Lorreyne and others were, in 1333, directed by 
Edward III. to survey the Castle of Berwick; in 1368 he surrendered 
Roxburgh Castle to the English ; in 1358 the King of England granted 
the barony of Caverton to James de Loreyns, a Scotchman. 

The grantee of arms was Sheriff-Clerk of Berwickshire, and died 1785, 
leaving a son, Alexander of Angelraw, an officer in the 42nd Regiment. 

ViPONT OF Carriden. Azurc, six mascles, three, two, and one or ; 
the heiress married Cockburn, and her descendants quarter the coat. 

Seal of William de Veteriponte — a star of eight points between three 
lions rampant ; that of John Wipond, c. 1350, is six annulets, three, two. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 227 

and one ; and Glover's Roll of Arms has John de Vipount — ^gules, six 
annulets or. 

Arms granted, c. 1750, to Harry Vipont of Hampstead, of Scottish 
descent — gules, six mascles, three, two, and one or. 

RiDDELL OF THAT IlK. F. 

Forsyth of that Ilk. Argent, a chevronel engrailed gules be- 
tween three griffins segreant azure. 

LocKHART OF Bar. L. ; the field or (?). 

108. Murehead. Azure, on a bend argent a mullet gules between 
two acorns vert seeded or. 

AccoN OF AiCKiNSYE. Argent, a chevron sable between two cocks 
in chief sitting respectant, and a buckle in base gules. 

Mackdoual or Makdougall of yt Ilke. Argent, a lion rampant 
argent crowned with an antique crown or. 

*Pettendreich of yt Ilke. A family taking their surname from 
lands in Banffshire. John de Petyndrech had an English safe-conduct 
1396; William of that Ilk 1472; Andrew of that Ilk 1507; his brother 
James, Abbot of Deer 150 1-9; Robert of that Ilk, father of John of that 
Ilk, 1547 ; Robert of that Ilk 1587 ; John of that Ilk 1604-18. 

*C0WPER. 

109. Balbirny of yt Ilk. L. 
Makcullo of Cardiness. L. 

Makcullo of Mertoun. Azure, three wolves' heads erased argent. 

Mure of Caldwell. L. ; the mullets are argent. 

Weir of yt Ilk. As Weir of Blackwood in L,, i.e. — argent, on a 
fess azure three mullets of the field, but " or " is added as the tincture of 
the field and mullets. The arms in L. were registered by George of 
Blackwood 1672-78, in 1734 by the Hon. Charles Hope- Weir, who had 
married the heiress, in 18 15 by their grandson, James Joseph Hope-Vere 
of Craigiehall and Blackwood, the Vere crest being — a demi-horse argent 
furnished gules; motto — '' Vero nihil verius" His son was in 1846 
allowed the crest of the Earls of Oxford instead of the horse — on a chapeau 
gules turned up ermine a boar statant azure armed or. 

Porteus has for Weir of Stonebyres, 1682, the field or the stars 
argent, with the same motto ; this was recorded 1777, with a boar passant 
or, for crest, by John Weir-Vere, commissary general in the Island of 
Dominica, heir presumptive to Captain John Vere of Stonebyres ; on their 
joint petition John Weir had obtained the Royal licence, 7th December 
1 776, to take the additional surname of Vere, and bear the arms of the 
Stonebyres family. 

In England we find in Charles' Roll, Simon de Ver — ^gules, three 
cinquefoils pierced argent ; Glover's Roll, Simon de Veer — ^gules, three 
cinquefoils ermine, and Robert — quarterly, argent and gules ; at the siege 
of Caerlaverock, Hugh, son of the Earl Oxford, bore — quarterly, or and 
gules, in front a white star, a bordure indented sable. The star is the 
charge also in the coat of Vere in Scotland, which is nearly identical with 
that of Mure. 

The first appearance of the surname in Scotland is c. 1180, when 



228 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Radulph de Veir, Ueir, or Uair, granted land in Sprouston, co. Roxburgh, 
to the monks of Kelso, his brother Robert being a witness to the charter; 
Thomas dictus Were 1266; the Weirs held extensive lands in Lesmaha- 
gow, CO. Lanark, as vassals of the Abbots of Kelso, and this Thomas 
witnessed a resignation by Philip de Grenerig, of his lands there. Rotald 
Wer had a charter of part of Blackwood in 1400, from the Abbot of 
Kelso. Marion, heiress of Blackwood, married William Laurie ; their 
son assumed the surname of Weir, and was father of Sir George, created 
a baronet 1694, whose son and heir, Sir William, was father of Mrs 
Hope-Weir. 

Stonebyres, also in Lesmahagow, was the seat of William Weir, who, 
in 1525, was murdered by Lindsay of Covington ; William of Stonebyres, 
in 1587, gave a bond of manrent to James of Blackwood, acknowledging 
him as his chief; Sir William of Stonebyres 1660-70; Daniel Vera, 
advocate, sold the estate 1842, and d.s.p. 1852. 

Lewinsoun of yt Ilk. Azure, three cinquefoils argent. 

1 10. Wellands. Azure, a dexter hand issuing from a cloud on the 
sinister side argent, holding a human heart proper winged of the second 
between the thumb and the open palm. 

David Weland was Sheriff-Depute of Fife 1582. 

*DoN OF Teith. There is added a sketch in ink, with no crescents 
or mullets, for Sir Alexander of Newton 1673; knight baronet, 1667, is 
above the coat given in colour. 

The arms as registered are without the crescents and mullets ; Pont 
has three crescents. The coat is, of course, an addition to the MS. 

*Walch. Pont and Porteus give for Welch — argent, on a saltire 
sable five annulets or, which was registered in 1771 by Dr James Welsh 
of Cornlee, co. Dumfries, representer of an old family there. The burgh 
of Dumfries was represented in parliament, 1471, by Welch; Nicol 
Welch was Abbot of Holywood 1488. There were Welshes of Colliston, 
Skarr, Collin, Burnfoot, &c., in the county. 

Meikel or MuKEL. Added in ink — gules, a chevron between three 
crosses pat6e fitch6e argent. 

•Halliburton of Pitcur. Arms registered, 1672-78, by David of 
Pitcur— or, on a bend azure between three boars' heads erased sable as 
many lozenges of the first ; crest — a negro's head couped at the shoulders 
armed with a helmet proper ; supporters — two cats proper. 

The boars' heads are for Chisholm, Walter having married Catherine 
Chisholm, with whom he had Pitcur, of which they had a charter 1432. 

George of Pitcur sat in parliament 1560; Sir James is on Sir 
William Alexander's list, as having had sasine of lands in Nova Scotia 
1628, but no baronetcy seems to have been created ; the direct line of the 
family ended on the death of Colonel James of Pitcur 1765 ; his daughter, 
Agatha, Countess of Morton, predeceased him, and her descendants are 
extinct. 

To this family belonged Sir George of Fodderance, Lord President 
of the Court of Session 1642; George, Bishop of Dunkeld 1662-64; and 



WORKMAN'S MS. 2 2 9 

George, Bishop of Brechin 1678, of Aberdeen 1682-88 ; probably, also, 
Andrew, Conservator of the Scots Privileges in the Low Countries ante 
1500, believed to have been the first who held that office. 

111. Chalmer of Gaitgairth. L. ; the field of the second and third 
quarters is or. ' 

Wauchop of Nythre. L.; motto — " God gee vs graes." 

Heriott of Trabrvon. L. 

Murray of Phillophaugh. L. 

Kennedy of Blawquhan. L. ; the lion is not crowned. 

HousTouN OF YT Ilke. L. ; the martlets are without bills. An 
old family in Renfrewshire taking their surname from their free barony 
of Houstoun. 

Sir John sat in parliament 1463, and Patrick in 1560; Patrick was 
director of Chancery and member of the Privy Council 1526. Sir John 
was created a baronet 1668 ; his great-grandson. Sir John, fourth baronet, 
d.s.p. 1751, having sold the estate of Houstoun; his sisters were, Helen, 
Lady Stewart of Blackhall, and Anne, wife of Colonel Cuninghame of 
Euterkine. The baronetcy was assumed by his cousin (?) George, 
resident in Georgia, who died there in 1795, without male issue. 

From George of Johnstone, co. Renfrew, younger brother of the first 
baronet, descends George Ludovick Houstoun of Johnstone, who in 1869 
registered the arms; crest— a sandglass proper; motto — "In time;" 
supporters — two hinds proper, anciently borne by the Houstouns of that 
Ilk, as chiefs of their name and free barons. 

112. *Collace of Balnamone. There are added in ink, crest — ^an 
eagle's head ; motto — " In uelith bewar ; " supporters — ^a horse at liberty 
and a greyhound collared. 

Seal of John de Culas, c. 1340 — a bend lozengy, in sinister chief a 
roundle; seal of Robert Collaise of Balnamoon 1574 — three mascles in 
bend sinister between two saltires couped ; that of his son John, at the 
same time, bears a bend between two saltires couped and charged with 
three mascles. The blazons in the MSS. vary, and the coat has never 
been registered. 

The surname is probably taken from CoUace in Perthshire ; John de 
CuUas was joint lord of the barony of Menmuir and owner of Balnamoon 
before 1360 ; John sat in parliament for Forfarshire 161 2 ; his son John 
sold the estate c. 1632 ; the family intermarried with Lord Gray, Moncur 
of Slaines, Bruce, Rollo of Duncrub, Reid, abbot of Kinloss, &c. 

* Duncan of Mote. Gilbert Duncan, in Colpnay, was father of 
James, tailor to Queen Anne, who acquired Ratho and Bonnytoun, co. 
Edinburgh ; his son, James of Ratho, was dead s.p. 1641, when his second 
cousin John was his heir of line; his cousins, Robert, late in Mote of Erroll, 
and James in Leith, servitor to James of Ratho, were his heirs of entail 
and provision ; Robert left a son, George, in Mote of Erroll, who suc- 
ceeded him in Bonnytoun. 

The coat is given by Pont and Porteus. That registered for William 

3M 



230 WORKMAN'S MS. 

of Seaside, 1672-78, ancestor of the Earl of Camperdown, is nearly the 
same without buckles. 

A monument at Essie, in Aberdeenshire, to " ane honorabill man," 
James Duncan of Mairdrum, who died 2nd November 1601, leaving three 
coheirs, Elizabeth, Marjory, and Janet, has his arms — a boar's head erased 
— impaled with those of his wife, Janet Lumsden — two wolfs' heads couped 
in chief and an escallop in base. 

113. Ross OF MOUNTGRENAN. L. 

Buchanan of that Ilk. L. ; there is added, " lyon no claws nor 
tonge but degraded." 

Douglas of Nythisdale. L. ; the ribbon sable. 

COLQUHOUN of LuSS. L. 
AUCHINLECK OF YT IlK. L. 

Blair of Adamton. Much defaced, but apparently a saltire sable 
charged with nine mascles, in base a bird's head (?). 

1 14. *Jaksone. On the monument in the Greyfriars' Churchyard, 
1606, of John Jackson, treasurer of the burgh 1594- 1605, is a shield with 
three holly leaves. 

Sir James Balfour gives the coat here reproduced ; Pont gives it also, 
and blazons the other — vert, three holly leaves couped argent. Porteus 
has — argent, three holly leaves proper or sable. 

There were Jacksons of Waterybutts and Carsegrange, co. Perth, in 
the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. John sat in parliament for Ren- 
frew 1593. 

*Moncoure. Sir David Lindsay gives two coats for the name ; two 
are given here. Farther variations are to be found among the written 
blazons. 

In 1296 Andreu de Montcour, chivalier, swore fealty to Edward I. 
Moncur of that Ilk, co. Perth, and Moncur of Slaines, co. Forfar, flourished 
for many generations. 

115. *Alane. The Homes of Ren ton, co. Berwick, baronets, 
quartered for Ellem — gules, a pelican feeding her young argent valved 
proper. 

This was an old family in that shire, taking its surname from its 
lands ; Henry de Ellom, in 1296, swore fealty to Edward I. 

*Moncure of yt Ilk. 

Hardy. See C. ; the dagger is in pale and surmounts the spur rowel 
in base. 

Kemp of Comestoun. L. ; the broken fragment of the sword is 
falling to the dexter. 

*Wedderburn. See B. for an older coat. 

Pont and Porteus both give the arms as in W., but Alexander of 
East Powrie registered 1672-78 — argent, a chevron between three roses 
gules. 

His descendants changed the name of their estate to Wedderburn, 
and the direct male line ended on the death of David of that Ilk, 1761 ; 



WORKMAN'S MS. 231 

Mr Scrymgeour-Wedderburn of Wedderburn and Birkhill, is heir of line, 
and Sir David Wedderburn, Bart, heir male. 

The surname is probably taken from Wedderburn, co. Berwick ; 
Wautier de Wederburn, of the county of Edinburgh, swore fealty to 
Edward L 1296; the name appears in Forfarshire in 1476; James was 
bailie of Dundee 1532, several of his descendants held the office of clerk 
of that burgh, and it was represented in parliament by James 1540, and 
by Alexander 1 585- 1 62 1. 

James was Bishop of Dunblane 1636-38; Alexander, Earl of Rosslyn, 
was Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain 1793-1801. 

Methven. See C. 

116, Dog of Dunrobein's arms. An addition in ink, with the 
initials W. D. — 27. A sword in bend sinister between two cinquefoils. 

Sir J. Balfour has — gules, a chevron argent between two cinquefoils 
ermine and a naked sword argent. 

The Ballingrew family had the cinquefoils argent, and the sword hilted 
and pommelled or. 

There were Dogs, Dougs, or Doigs of Dunroben, Ballingrew, Coldoch, 
Cookston, Reswallie, &c. 

1372, Mr Alexander Doge, vicar of Dunichen ; 1468, John Dog, 
armiger; 1478, Dene Thomas Dog, Inchmahome ; James Dog, 1488-98, 
keeper of the King's wardrobe; 1523, James Dogge, messenger from the 
Queen of Scotland, afterwards called Jamie Dog, or Captain Dogg. 

In 1552 James of Dunroben, co. Perth, was raising men in Menteith 
for service in France; Paul of Coldoch and Dunroben 1581-84; James 
of Dunroben, father of Paul of Dunroben, 1613. 

James of Ballengrew was father of James of that place, who d.s.p., 
and David of Ballengrew 1634, whose son Paul married the sister and 
coheir of David Drummond of Invermay, and left a son, David of Ballen- 
grew, who d.s.p., and Elizabeth of Ballengrew, 1703, married Hugh Mac- 
farlane of Kirkton, and had issue. 

In Brechin there was a burgess family at the beginning of the 
sixteenth century. John Doig, Provost of Brechin, was father of David'of 
Cookston, who married Magdalene, daughter and heir of George Symmer 
of Balzordie, and had a son George, who d.s.p., and four daughters — 
Christian of Balzordie, married, 1752 , Sir James Carnegie, Bart., and 
had issue ; Anne, married her cousin-german, William Henry Doig, who 
died 1768, and had one child, Anne of Cookston, who married Walter 
Riddell, and was dead in 1791, when James Doig, of the island of 
Antigua, was served heir ; Magdalene ; Elizabeth, married Alexander 
Scott, merchant in Edinburgh. 

Cookston eventually passed to David Blair, son of David, minister of 
Brechin, and Christian, sister of David Doig of Cookston. 

*PiTCAiRN OF FoRTHER. The initials R. P. are added, and this 
corresponds with the seal used in 1578 by Robert, Commendator of Dun- 
fermline, Archdean of St Andrews, Secretary of State, &c 

Sir James Balfour gives for Pitcairn of that Ilk, now of Forther — 



232 WORKMAN'S MS. 

first and fourth, Ramsay ; second and third, azure, three mascles or, for 

Pitcairn. 

About this time the tinctures of the paternal coat were changed. 
Pont puts it in the first and fourth quarters as — argent, three mascles 
gules ; and William of Forther, or of that Ilk, 1672-78, recorded this, but 
made the mascles lozenges. 

At the same time this, with a bordure engrailed gules, was registered 
by Alexander of that Ilk, but a correction adds, "of Pitcairn, whose 
father was a son of Pitcairn," thus guarding against the assumption of 
the style " that Ilk " by a cadet, although in possession of the old family 
property. 

The surname is taken from lands in Fife. William de Petkaran 
was on an assize at Dunfermline ante 1249. Peres de Petcarne swore 
fealty to Edward I. 1296. Henry married, c. 1460, Elizabeth Ramsay, 
heiress of Forthar, and the family have since quartered her arms. Pit- 
cairn was sold in 1650 to John, a younger son. Forther descended to 
David, physician in London, 1795. 

Archibald Pitcairn of Pitcairn, M.D., died in 17 13. His only son 
took part in the rising of 17 15, and died young, leaving several sisters 
coheiresses, of whom the only one who married was Janet, Countess of 
Kellie. 

There were lands in Perthshire called Petcames or Pitcairns, which 
were acquired by John Pitcairn, descended from an old family of Perth 
burgesses; he had a grant of arms 1808 — argent, an anchor azure between 
three lozenges gules. His only son d.s.p., and the property has been 
sold. 

1 17. Keres of yt Ilk. Argent, a cross engrailed sable between four 
roses gules. This is given elsewhere for Keir of Carse or Carsegrange, 
CO. Perth, and modern grants of arms have been founded on it. 

Karkettell. Argent, on a bend gules three crescents or, in chief a 
mullet of the second. 

DuREHAME. Argent, on a fess azure three mullets of the first, in 
base a crescent gules. See F. 

In 1249 Robert de Durham was one of the commissioners to settle 
the laws of the marches. Seal of Sir William de Dureme 1305 — three 
mullets on a bend. Robert I. granted to " William Aula Dunolm " the 
lands of Monifieth with the mill, co. Forfar. 

Grange of Monifieth was long the seat of the Durhams, the account 
of whom, in Douglas' " Baronage," is incorrect; he says that William sold 
Grange, and that his male line having failed the representation devolved 
on Durham of Ardounie. 

In 1676 William of Grange was served heir special of his father, and 
Ochterlony says that, in his day, Grange and Ardounie both belonged to 
Durham, chief of the name ; he registered the arms as in W., but making 
the field or, 1672-78. Grange was sold c. 1702. 

Mr James of Pitkerrow, clerk of Exchequer, was father of Sir James 
of Luffness and Pitkerrow, whose son James was of Luffness and Pit- 



WORKMAN'S MS. ^ 233 

kerrow 1689. Jean of this family married Sir James Balfour, Lyon 
King of Arms; and Grizel, in 1639, married, for her third husband, John, 
Earl of Middleton, High Commissioner in Scotland after the restoration, 
and died in 1666. Her influence procured for her brother, Captain Alex- 
ander Durham, the office of Lyon King of Arms, August 1660. He was 
knighted, acquired Largo 1662, and died in 1663, unmarried. 

The arms registered for Lady Middleton are — or, a fess azure between 
three mullets in chief and as many crescents in base gules. The Lord 
Lyon altered his bearings to — or, a crescent gules, on a chief azure three 
mullets argent, which was registered by Alexander of Largo, and by 
Adolphus, merchant in Edinburgh, natural son of Sir Alexander, with a 
bendlet engrailed gules as a difference, 1672-78. 

James, fourth of Largo, registered arms, altering the field to argent 
and quartering Rutherford of Hunthill ; his son, James Calderwood- 
Durham of Largo and Pol ton, in 1792 again recorded arms — first and 
fourth, Durham, the field argent ; second, Calderwood ; third, Rutherford 
of that Ilk ; he was allowed to place a baron's coronet below his crest, and 
to carry the supporters of the Rutherfords — two horses argent saddled and 
bridled gules. 

♦LuNDYE OF THAT Ilk. See the altered coat in F. E., and another 
coat in L., which was that usually borne by the family. 

The head of the Lundins sat in parliament 1488, and Walter and his 
son, William, from 1560 till 1590. 

William the Lyon had a natural son, Robert of London or de 
Londoniis. Sir James Balfour has left a drawing of a seal of Sir Walter 
de London ante 1289 — two piles issuing from a chief charged with three 
pallets, over all in fess a label of three points. 

In the reign of Charles II. the laird of Lundin claimed to be de- 
scended from Robert of London, and obtained a Royal warrant 27th 
October 1679 to drop his paternal bearings and carry the Royal arms of 
Scotland within a bordure compony argent and azure ; crest — a lion gules 
issuing from an antique crown or, holding a sword erect in his dexter paw 
and a thistle slipped in the sinister, both proper ; motto — " Dei dono ?um 
quod sum ; " supporters — two lions gardant gules, each having a collar or 
charged with three thistles vert. 

In 1698 John Lundin of Baldester was allowed to quarter the above 
with the older coat, but the Lundins of Auchtermairnie, represented by 
Richard Lundin-Brown, Esq., and the other cadets, never bore the Royal 
coat. 

John Lundin of that Ilk, who had the Royal warrant, was John 
Drummond, afterwards Earl and Duke of Melfort ; he had married 
Sophia, heiress of Lundin, daughter of Robert Maitland, brother of the 
Duke of Lauderdale, by Margaret Lundin of Lundin. 

It is probable that his influential connections, rather than any proved 
pedigree, procured for him such a signal mark of favour as the armorial 
concession. 

Robert de Londoniis is repeatedly called in Crown chaster Jilius by 

3N 



234 WORKMAN'S MS, 

King William, and y^^/^^ by Alexander II.; there were several persons 
about the same time called de Lundin, Lundyn, Lundris, Londen, &c., 
evidently taking their surname from Lundie, co. Forfar, or from Lundin 
in Fife. 

The Baroness Willoughby de Eresby is senior coheir of Lundin of 
that Ilk. 

*BoDWELL. See L. II. for another coat. 

The seal of Adam Bothwell, 1557, afterwards Bishop of Orkney and 
Commendator of Holyrood, has a mullet on the chevron ; his son was 
created Lord Holyrood-house, and bore the arms without any mark of 
cadency. 

Roger de Bodevill sat on an inquest at Peebles 1259. 

It is not the case that Richard Bothwell was Provost of Edinburgh in 
the reign of James III. 

Thomas Hepburn of the Smeaton family went to Tangier, in the 
reign of Charles II., along with the Earl of Teviot, and changed his name 
to Bothwell ; a certificate to this effect was issued in 1773 by Lyon King 
of Arms to Captain Thomas Hepburn Bothwell, resident in Spain. 

DiKESOUN. L. ; Dicksone. 

1 18. Waddie. An addition in ink — argent, on a fess azure between 
two mullets in chief and a boar's head couped in base gules, three crescents 
of the field. 

Pringill of Burnhouse. L. 

Watson. An addition in ink — 2l tree eradicated surmounted of a 
fess charged with a crescent between two mullets. 

119. Straton. L. ; the inescutcheon is in the centre of the shield, 
and the vair is more regular. 

In the matriculation of the arms of Andrew Straiton, a cadet of the 
Craigie family, 1672-78, the vair is altered to — argent, three bars em- 
battled azure. In 1698 Captain Charles Straton, whose father, a third 
son of the Baron of Lauriston, was deputy-governor of Edinburgh Castle, 
has the field vair and the inescutcheon charged with a fess in the form of 
a wall crenellde of three pieces argent, masonde de sable, rather a well- 
selected mark of difference. 

In 1783 his grandson, John, having become heir male of the Stratons 
of that Ilk, near Edinburgh, and of Lauriston, co. Forfar, registered as 
the chief coat — argent, three bars counter-embattled azure ; crest — a falcon 
rising proper; motto — " Surgere tento ;" supporters — a lion or and a 
bloodhound sable. 

Alexander, James, and Thomas de Straton, of the county of Edin- 
burgh, swore fealty to Edward I. 1296. 

Alexander de Straton signed the Barons' letter 1320; David II., in 
the thirty-ninth year of his reign, granted a charter, Alexandra de Straton 
consanguineo nostro, of property at Inverbervie ; Alexander of Lauriston 
sat in parliament 1463-81, and Andrew in 1560; Sir Alexander was a 
commissioner to treat for union with England 1604. 

Straton was sold about 1670, and Lauriston in 1695 ; the younger 



WORKMAN'S MS. 235 

branch called an estate purchased by them, near Montrose, Lauriston. 
Kirkside was acquired late in the sixteenth century by a younger son, and 
has descended to Miss Janet Graham-Straton, niece of General Sir 
Joseph Straton of Kirkside, C.B. and K.H., paternally Muter, who d.s.p. 
in 1840. Sir Joseph was nephew of Joseph Straton of Kirkside, who 
d.s.p, 18 16. 

Sir James Balfour notes the seal of Sir Richard Straton 1292 — an 
orle voided vair and a canton ; Porteus gives this for Straton of Lauris- 
ton — or, an orle vair, a canton gules. 

Rentoun of (Billie ?), L. ; the lion charged on the shoulder with a 
buckle or. 

See another coat in this MS. 

*KiNLOCH. Sir James Balfour makes the mascles or. Pont gives 
another coat— azure, a shakefork or bishop's pall between three edock 
leaves or. Nisbet has these composed into one coat for Kinloch of 
Conland, representer of Kinloch of that Ilk — azure, on a shakefork 
between two mascles in flank or and a boar's head erased in base, three 
leaves; crest — a mermaid; motto — '' Ut olhn" supporters — two otters. 
A seal of David, son of Sir Henry Kynlouch, 141 8, bears — a chevron 
between two mascles in chief and a boar's head erased in base, a mullet 
in middle chief. 

Those of Mr David Kinloch, one of the ministers of Edinburgh, and 
Henry, his son, 1550, show a boar's head between two mascles and a 
mullet. 

Nisbet describes the arms cut in stone at Lithrie, with the date 1591, 
as a boar's head erased between two mascles ; the latter charge he con- 
jectures to have been taken as part of the bearing of their overlords, the 
de Quincys, Earls of Winton, from whom there are early charters in 
favour of John de Kindeloch. Murinus de Kindelouch witnessed a charter 
of Seyer de Quincy, Earl of Winton, ante 12 19. The bishop's pall seems 
to be taken in consequence of a fancied connection with Kellach, Bishop 
of St Andrews c, 900. 

Azure, a boar's head erased between three mascles or, is the coat 
registered, 1672-78, by David Kinloch of Aberbothrie, co. Perth, whose 
descendants were afterwards designed of Kinloch, and enjoyed a baronetcy 
1 685- 1 746. 

The heir male is Colonel John Grant-Kinloch of Logic and Kilrie ; 
in 1764 John of Kilrie registered arms — azure, on a chevron argent 
between two mascles in chief of the second and a boar's head erased in 
base or, a mullet gules, a crescent for difference. 

Sir George Kinloch of Kinloch, baronet, descends from a younger 
son of Kilrie. The surname is taken from Kinloch,' co. Fife ; William 
de Kindellogh in 1296 swore fealty to Edward L; the pedigree of the 
family has never been satisfactorily investigated. Cruvie, which was in 
their possession in the thirteenth century, descended to John Kinloch, who 
seems to have left two or more daughters at his death, between 1479 ^"d 
1491 ; one married John Ramsay of Colluthie, who was dead in 1491. 



236 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Sir David Lindsay gives the arms of this branch of the Ramsays, with 
Kinloch as a quartering, viz. — azure, a boar's head erased argent armed 
gules between three lozenges or. Elizabeth Ramsay carried half of 
Cnivie to her husband, David Carnegie. Janet Kinloch, daughter and 
one of the heirs of John, married Alexander Stratoun of the Knock, but 
they were divorced before 1491 ; Margaret, another coheir, is said to 
have married into the family of Sandilands, who possessed half of 
Cruvie. 

Heirs male were John Kinloch of Weddersbie (?), Andrew in Luthrie, 
who in 1529 acquired Little Kinnear, and d.s.p., m. ; in 1580 his 
nephew, George, portioner of Luthrie, was served heir male of entail to 
him, and was ancestor of David of Conland, who is mentioned by Sir 
Robert Sibbald and Nisbet as heir male ; his son, David of Conland, 
Lieutenant in Lord Strathmore's regiment, and afterwards Lieutenant of 
the Castle of Edinburgh, married, c. 1707, Martha, widow of John 
Steuart, younger son of Sir Thomas of Coltness, baronet, daughter 
and heir of Alexander Wright, merchant in Edinburgh ; John, late of 
Conland, officer of customs at Alloa, when Sir Robert Douglas wrote, 
was probably their son. 

The printed accounts of the Aberbothrie, latterly called Kinloch, 
family are not accurate; the founder, was David, who was appointed 
physician to James VL 21st March 1596, acquired the barony of Aber- 
bothrie and other lands, and died loth September 16 17, in the fifty-seventh 
year of his age ; he was son of John Kinloch, who married a daughter of 
Ramsay of Balnabreich, by Janet, daughter of Sir David Lindsay of 
Edzell ; John was son of William Kinloch, who married a lady of the 
name of Hay, and died in 1588 ; they are said to descend from a younger 
son of Kinloch of Cruvie. The Kinlochs of Gilmerton are from a family 
of Edinburgh burgesses, and seem to be of the same family as the minister 
there, whose seal has been noticed. 

*Spotswood. 

Flechour. Argent, on a fess azure between three mullets in chief 
and a martlet in base gules, a boar's head erased or. See C. and G. 

*HoMMYLL. Mr Laing gives a seal of unknown date of Gilbert 
Hanmel — a lion rampant. 

Another coat is — argent, a bend between a crescent gules and a fleur- 
de-lys azure, or sometimes between two crescents gules. 

William of Hammyll was falconer to the King 1264. 

Robert Hommyle had a charter of Roughwood, co. Ayr, 1452 ; these 
lands were sold in 17 13, by Hugh Hammill. Mr Dobie describes a 
shield there as — quarterly, first, a mullet ; second, a crescent ; third, a 
shakefork ; fourth, a fleur-de-lis ; crest, apparently a fleur-de-lis. Another, 
much defaced, has apparently the same arms with the date 14 — . It is 
said that there is a carving showing two serpents as supporters. 

The heiress married Montgomery of Craighouse. 

In 1413 John Homyl acted as bailie for Sir John Montgomery, and 
the family were closely connected with that house; Hugh Hammill of 



WORKMAN'S MS. 237 

Roughwood went to Ireland with Hugh, first Viscount Montgomery of 
Ards, and the name is still represented in that kingdom. 

120. WoD OF YE Craig. Azure, a tree eradicated proper, with a 
hunting-horn sable stringed gules pendent from the branches, a bordure 
engrailed or. . 

*WiLKiE. An added coat, with the letters I.M.W. 

Arms on the monument at St Andrews of Mr James, Principal of St 
Leonard's College, who died in 1590, aged seventy-eight, and on that of 
his nephew, Mr Robert, Rector of the University of St Andrews, who 
died in 161 1 — a fess wreathed between a mullet in chief and a crescent 
in base. They descended from a family seated at Rathobyres, in Mid- 
Lothian, from the beginning of the fourteenth century till the present day ; 
in 1540 the property was held by George, Walter, and Margaret Wilkie, 
the latter being relict of James Winram, and mother of John Winram, 
prior of the Augustines at St Andrews, and superintendent of Fife, who 
patronised his cousin, Robert Wilkie above named. 

One line of the Wilkies of Rathobyres ended on the death of Robert, 
whose heirs, in 1643, were his sisters, Agnes, wife of William Fairholm, 
and Sarah, wife of James Granger. 

The other line was represented in the beginning of last century by 
David of Rathobyres, who sold the estate to his younger son, the Rev. 
Patrick; the eldest son was great-grandfather of Sir David Wilkie, 
painter in ordinary to their Majesties George IV., William IV., and 
Victoria, who died unmarried 1841 ; the family is represented by his 
nephew. 

The Rev. Patrick of Rathobyres, and of Gilchriston, co. Haddington, 
was succeeded in these estates by his eldest son, James, who settled 
Rathobyres on his third son, the Rev. Daniel Wilkie, one of the ministers 
of Edinburgh, whose son is the present proprietor; William of Tyne 
House, CO. Haddington, eldest son of James, left three sons — Captain 
William, who died in 1875, leaving issue; George, M.D., who married 
Maria, daughter of Edward Viscount St Vincent ; and James, C.A., who 
died in 187 1, leaving issue. 

Captain Patrick Wilkie of Ratho Mill, in the Island of St Vindent, 
married in 1767 Jean, daughter of John Napier of Culcreuch; four years 
afterwards he, although a Scotchman descended from a family which had 
borne arms certainly for upwards of two hundred years, took the rather 
singular step of obtaining a grant of arms in favour of himself and the 
other descendants of his father, the Reverend Patrick of Rathobyres, from 
the College of Arms of England ; they are — quarterly, or and argent, a 
fess wreathed azure and gules, in the first and fourth quarters a camel's 
head couped sable bridled of the fourth, in the second quarter a crescent, 
and in the third a cinquefoil, both of the last. The crest is a demi-negro 
holding a bill and a sugar cane, &c., certainly not an improvement on the 
simple old bearing. 

William, merchant in Edinburgh, acquired Cammo, near Cramond, 
in 1637 ; his son had a daughter and heir, Rachel, who married John 

30 



2 38 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Menzies, advocate, of Culterallers, co. Lanark, by whom Cammo was sold 
in 1710. 

A branch of the Rathobyres family settled, in the seventeenth cen- 
tury, at Echlin, in the parish of Dalmeny, and is now represented by 
Archibald Wilkie of Ormiston and Bonington, co. Edinburgh, who 
married Grace, daughter of George Napier of Dales, in West Lothian, and 
has issue ; his grandmother, Janet Liston, was cousin of the Right Hon. 
Sir Robert Liston, G.C.B., Ambassador at Constantinople. 1540, John 
Wilkie attended parliament as judicator ; and in 1542 William held the 
same office. The burgh of Lanark was represented by William Wilkie 
1581-93, and by William 1681 ; John sat in parliament for Haddington 
1587, and Gabriel for Selkirk in 1594. 

Mr Archibald of Halrawmure, co. Peebles, was nephew and one of 
the heirs of Andrew, Earl of Teviot, and Lord Rutherford, who died in 
1664. 

William, burgess of Lanark, was father of Mr Robert, one of the 
ministers of Glasgow, Rector and Vice-Chancellor of the University there, 
and a member of the High Court of Commission 1634 ; his sons acquired 
Haghill, Camlachie, and Broomhouse ; James, son of Mr John of Broom- 
house, acquired Foulden, co. Berwick, which has descended to the present 
John Wilkie of Foulden. 

Foulden had previously belonged to another branch of the family, of 
whom was Sir John, knighted 1648, who married Agnes, daughter of 
James Lord Carmichael, by Agnes Wilkie, and had a daughter and heir, 
Agnes, who married in 1676 William Lord Ross, and had issue. Arms 
cut on a stone at Stonebyres, co. Lanark, with the initials V. V., and date 
1589 — a fess wreathed between two stars of six points in chief and a 
crescent in base. 

The Foulden Wilkies have intermarried with M'Morran of Glospen, 
Galbraith of the Kilcroich family, Arnot of Granton (an heiress), Dalyell 
of Binns, Bruce of Arnot, &c. 

121. *Steill. Sir James Balfour's blazon is — azure, three furisons 
(the steel used for striking fire from a flint) or. 

In 1259 Henry Stel was on an inquest at Peebles; Alexander Stel 
was a prisoner in England 1346; William Stele was dempster of parlia- 
ment 1545 ; George represented the burgh of Brechin 1 646-8-61 ; the 
name occurs in the chartulary of Brechin from 1434 onwards. 

Arms registered, 1866, by Gavin Steel of Carfin, co. Lanark — or, three 
furisons azure ; crest — a dexter-arm grasping a broadsword proper ; 
motto — " Steel to the back." He descends from a brother of Mr William, 
minister of Dalserf, who inherited Waygateshaw in 1722, on the death of 
his maternal uncle, William Weir, and d.s.p. 1760. 

*Bell. The detached seals in H.M. Record Office of Adam and 
Alan Bel bear respectively — a wheel ornament and a duck ; Robert Bell, 
1427 — a chevron between three mullets; Robert, 1430 — three bells; Adam, 
1434 — a chevron between three birds ; Adam, 1555 — three bells. 

Bernard was Abbot of Melrose 1490. Andrew was prior of New- 
botle 1455. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 239 

The seal, 15 lo, of Bernard, monk of Melrose, has two bells in chief 
and a stag's head erased in base. 

Sir James Balfour and Porteus have azure, three bells or, for Bell of 
Kirkonnel or Knockinwall. Balfour has another blazon for the name — 
sable, a chevron between three bells argent. All the entries in the Lyon 
Register have Bells ; the earliest is James of Provesthaugh, 1672-78 — 
azure, a fess between three bells or. 

The Bells are on the list of unruly clans in the West Marches 1587, 
and Bell's Tower is mentioned in the acts of parliament 1481. 

William represented Stirling in parliament 1545-6, and James sat for 
Glasgow 1596. Sir John Bell of Hamilton's Farm was Provost of 
Glasgow, and its representative in parliament, in the reign of Charles II. 

Ferra. Azure, an anchor argent, cross-bar or. 

*KiLTRA or KiLCRA. Portcus has another blazon — azure, a star or 
between three crescents argent. 

*Makell. The name is Maben in some MSS. 

TuLLO. Argent, on a fess gules between three cross crosslets fitchde 
azure as many mullets or. 

122. *DuMBRECK OF THAT Ilk. Sir Jamcs Balfour and Porteus 
have — argent, a dagger azure hilted gules, thrust downwards through a 
wolf passant sable. 

An old Aberdeenshire family ; in 1348 Philip de Dunbrek was deputy 
of the sheriff. 

Meldrum, Sir William, of that Ilk. Drawn in ink and partly 
coloured — a demi-otter crowned with an antique crown issuing from waves 
proper; crest — ^a unicorn's head; motto — "Love causid ; " supporters — 
a horse and a griffin. 

123. *Blackwood. 

Spittell. Argent, an eagle displayed sable between three crescents 
gules. 

*RoBERTON. This surname is frequently confused with Robertson, 
and the arms of the one family assigned to the other. 

The coat here reproduced is certainly the genuine bearing. 

It is recorded for Archibald of Bedlay 1672-78, with different tinc- 
tures, and a crescent for difference ; first and fourth, gules, a close helmet 
argent ; second and third, argent, a cross crosslet fitchde sable. Porteus 
makes the cross gules. 

In 1730 George Robton or Roberton obtained from the Lord Lyon 
a certificate of his descent and arms, when the cross was made gules. 

Roberton, co. Lanark, was founded before the middle of the twelfth 
century by Robert, brother of Lambin, and a family, who may have been 
his descendants, took their surname from it. Robert jde Robardiston, c. 
1185 ; Robert, 1228-37; Steuene de Roberton of Lanarkshire swore 
fealty to Edward I. ; and Roberton was granted by Robert I. to John de 
Monfode : great part of the lands and the barony belonged to Logan, 
Cresswell, Ramsay, and finally to the Douglases of Dalkeith, who long 
held them. 



240 WORKMAN'S MS, 

The original family, however, remained seated at Earnock, which 
they held till far on in the eighteenth century ; see Appendix to Nisbet's 
" Heraldry." 

John de Robardston, 1365 ; John de Robertoun of Ernoksabufoy, 
1390; Stephen of Roberton, 1408; John of Robertoun, 1474, still has the 
designation " of that Ilk," 

Captain John Roberton, last of Earnock, d.s.p. 1786, when the estate 
was sold ; his brother William had, with others who died unmarried — 
I. Archibald, Captain R.A., married Jane, daughter of Admiral Sir 
William Parker of Harburn, baronet, and left one surviving daughter, Mary, 
resident at Dawlish ; 2. Peter Taylor, Lieut-Colonel Eighth Regiment 
of Foot, married Mary Parker, sister of his brother's wife ; their son, 
Peter Archibald Roberton, Lieut.-Colonel late Bengal Army, now repre- 
sents the family as heir male. James, son of a younger son of Earnock, 
was Justice-Depute of Scotland, and on the restoration was elevated to 
the bench with the title of Lord Bedlay ; his descendants were seated at 
Bedlay, co. Lanark, for three generations ; his granddaughter, Janet 
Roberton, Countess of Kincardine, died in 1772. 

Three younger sons of Roberton of Earnock went abroad about 1630. 
Matthew, who had a certificate of the gentility of his birth from the 
Marquess of Hamilton, was grandfather of John Robton or Robeton, 
councillor of the parliament of Paris ; his son John was successively 
secretary to William, Prince of Orange (William HL), and to the Elector 
of Hanover (George L), was naturalized in England 1693, and left a son 
who, in 1730, as already stated, entered his pedigree and arms in Scot-' 
land. One of this branch was long Lady of the Bedchamber to the 
Princess Amelia, and died in 1762. 

The other emigrants went to Sweden, where they prospered and left 
descendants, who were ennobled as Robsalm and of Robson ; they bore 
the helmet with the addition of a large plume of feathers, and for crest, 
an anchor, the same as the Robertons in Scotland. 

The arms of the Earnock family have not been registered, but on an 
old family seal in the possession of Colonel Roberton, they are — first and 
fourth, a helmet ; second and third, a cross crosslet fitchde ; crest — an 
anchor; motto — "For security;" supporters — two savages wreathed 
about the head and middle with leaves. 

*Lawson. Seal of Mr Robert 1509 — a saltire, and on a chief a 
horse's head bridled between two garbs. 

Seal of James 1586, son of Mr James, minister of St Giles', Edin- 
burgh — two crescents and a mullet. See F. 

The bearings and tinctures of the arms vary greatly. Sir J. Balfour 
gives as W, and F. Porteus has as W. Lawson of Humbie — azure, 
two crescents argent, a star in chief or in base ; Lawson of Boghall — or, 
a saltire and chief azure, the chief charged with two garbs of the field. 

Another authority has — argent, a saltire sable, on a chief of the second 
two garbs or. 

No arms are registered except a recent grant to the Right Hon. Sir 



WORKMAN'S MS. 241 

Charles of Halheriot, Lord Provost of Edinburgh. Sir William Lawson 
of Boghall, in West Lothian, and Cairnmuir, co. Peebles, d.s.p. May 1628, 
and was succeeded by his brother John ; their grandfather, Mr Richard, 
Justice-Clerk, had acquired Cairnmuir, and other lands, 1491-1508, and 
his seal, in 1507, described by Nisbet, was a saltire and a chief 
charged with three garbs, which certainly affords no evidence in favour of 
the theory that he was a younger son of Humbie. 

Cairnmuir descended to William Lawson, who sold it and died in 
Canada 1837 ; his brother James, now in New Zealand, represents the 
family. 

Richard, above named, sat in parliament 1481-1505, and was a 
member of the Secret Council. 

James Lawson was Provost of Edinburgh 1534, Senator of the 
College of Justice 1532, and sat in parliament. 

•Hunter. 

*Stenhop. a surname probably assumed from Stanhope in Tweed- 
dale, but it does not appear that those lands ever were possessed by 
persons of the name. Thomas of Stanehope was resident in that neigh- 
bourhood 147 1. A family of Stenhope possessed Stenhope's Mylne, near 
Edinburgh, at the commencement of the seventeenth century. John of 
Stanehope appears in that quarter 1479-88-93. 

124. *Clarke. 

Hallamot (?). Argent, a bend gules, in sinister chief a flower like a 
tulip slipped and leaved ; impaling, vert, an eagle displayed with two 
heads gules dimidiated, crowned with an antique crown argent. 

125. Cant. L. ; arms registered, 1672-78, by Ludovick Cant of 
Dryburnefoord — argent, a bend engrailed between a crescent and a star 
of eight rays in chief and a mullet in base sable. 

Henry Cant, burgess of Edinburgh, sat in parliament 1473-93. 

Ahannay of Sorbe. L. ; argent, three (? goats') heads erased 
sable, collared argent, campaned azure. 

Sir James Balfour has — or, a saltire between four martens' heads 
couped sable ; some of the MSS. makes the charges three roebucks' 
heads. 

The only registration is in 1784, by Sir Samuel Hannay of Mochrum 
and Kirkdale, baronet, heir male of the Sorbie family — argent, three 
bucks' heads couped azure, collared or, with bells thereto pendant gules ; 
he was allowed supporters — two roebucks proper. 

Gilbert de Hannethe, co. Wigton, signed the Ragman Roll. Sorbie 
was the seat of the family till the middle of the seventeenth century. 

Sir Robert of Mochrum was created a baronet 1630, with remainder 
to his heirs male whomsoever. Mr Patrick was cterk of the Privy 
Council in Ireland. The Funeral Entry in Ulster's Registers for Lady 
Hannay, who was buried at Christ Church, Dublin, 27th March 1662, 
gives the arms — first and fourth, argent, three (? goats') heads erased 
azure horned or ; second and third, argent, three cross crosslets fitchde 
issuing from as many crescents sable. 

3P 



242 WORKMAN'S MS. 

A similar crosslet and crescent form the crest of Sir Samuel, with 
the motto, " Per ardua ad altar He was, in 1783, served heir male, and 
assumed the long dormant title. His son, Sir Samuel, d.s.p. 1841, and 
there are now two claimants to the honour. 

Kirkdale, acquired in 1532, is the seat of Sir Samuel's heir of line. 

Dryesdaill. That name is scored out and Boyss written below in 
a different hand. Argent, a saltire and chief azure. Arms of Thomas 
Drysdaill, Islay Herald, who died in 1636, the same, with the addition of 
four crosses moline gules in the cantons ; motto — " Constancie with dis- 
cretion." 

*Watsoun. Seal of James Watsoun, Archdeacon of Teviotdale, 
1415 — a stag's head cabossed. 

Sir James Balfour gives — argent, an oak-tree proper, on a fess 
azure a star argent. Porteus makes the fess or charged with three stars 
gules. 

John Watson held lands in Edinburgh 1392 ; in 1494 Walter, 
burgess of Dumbarton, and Eupheme Logan his spouse, were landowners 
there ; a long succession of bailies, provosts, burgh-clerks of Dumbarton 
descended from them, and two of the name sat in parliament for the 
burgh in the reign of Charles H. 

Arms registered, 1672-78, by David of Craslatt, Provost of Dumbar- 
ton — ^argent, an oak-tree eradicated proper, surmounted of a fess sable. 

John sat in parliament for Selkirk 1587, and David for St Andrews 
1593-98 ; James, Provost of St Andrews, acquired Pitcruvie, and died in 
1657 ; his descendants were of Aitherny, Denbrae, and Glentarkie. 
Alexander of Glentarkie registered arms 1672-78 — the tree growing out 
of a mount in base proper, surmounted of a fess wavy azure, charged with 
a sail argent. 

The chief family of the name was of Saughton, near Edinburgh, 
which was the property of Richard Watson in 1537 ; Mr David of Saugh- 
ton, writer to the signet, registered arms 1673 — argent, an oak-tree growing 
out of a mount in base proper, surmounted of a fess azure ; in 18 18 sup- 
porters, two griffins proper gorged with ducal coronets or, were allowed 
to his descendant, James of Saughton. The family ended in an heiress, 
Helen, first wife of Sholto John, Earl of Morton. 

Robert H., in the thirteenth year of his reign, regranted to William 
Watson his lands of Cranstonriddel, and failing heirs male of his body to 
Alexander de Moravia, &c. 

Robert HI., early in his reign, confirmed to William Mautalent, 
son and heir of Thomas Mautalent of Halsington, and Elizabeth his 
wife, daughter of William called Watson, the lands of Shillinglaw, 
Traquair, and Innerleithen, settled on them by Thomas on their marriage. 

In 1407, William Watson of Cranston, having purchased Traquair 
and Shillinglaw from the Maitlands above named, had a Crown charter ; 
in 1409 the Maitlands granted annual-rents from the lands of Griestoun, 
&€., in Peeblesshire, to Marion de Craigie and William Watson her son ; 
the same year there is another Crown charter of Traquair and Shilling- 



WORKMAN'S MS, 243 

law to William, son of William Watson of Cranston, and Janet his wife, 
daughter of John of Caverhill ; failing heirs of their bodies, to Alexander, 
son of the late John de Moravia of Blackbarony, and others. 

The Murrays afterwards came into possession ; in 1489-90 David 
Boswell, son and heir of Marion Watson, having died without heirs, the 
Crown granted his lands of Griestoun to John, son of Patrick Murray of 
Falahill, but John Auchinleck seems to have obtained possession as 
nearest heir of Marion Watson. 

*Ryind. Seal of Alexander Rind 151 2 — ermine, a cross engrailed, 
in sinister chief a mullet. 

The coat here reproduced is cut on a stone at Wright's Houses, near 
Edinburgh, with the date 1450, for I. Rynd, wife of Alan Napier. 

The Rynds were an opulent burgess family in Edinburgh, inter- 
married with the Otterburns, Cants, Levingtons, &c., and produced 
several magistrates, donors to the Church of St Giles', &c. 

LiTTiLL, " of Mekeledaill " is added. See C. ; here the charge in 
chief is a mullet, and it is so on the seal of Elizabeth, wife of Alexander 
Napier, 1566, and in Sir James Balfour's blazon. 

Porteus has for Little of Mekildale — sable, a saltire (engrailed ?) 
argent. 

Stacie has the following valuable entry: — "Litle of Meikledale of old, 
David Litle being now chiefe 1670, servant to King Charles the Second 
in England, bears the former coat — sable, a saltire argent ; crest — a demi- 
lyon issuing furth of a wreath of his collours Sa., powldered with saltier 
crosses as the other armed G., in his dexter paw a cutless proper, and in his 
sinister a saltier cross Ar. ; motto — ' Concedo nulli ;' 1670, extract." Along 
with the other entry of the old arms he gives the motto, '' Fidei coticula 
crux" adding, " sent to London i6']2" David was son of Thomas Little, 
who was son of Simon of Meikledale. 

In 1673 William of Over Liberton, near Edinburgh, registered — 
sable, a St Andrew's cross argent, a crescent for difference ; crest — ^a 
leopard's head or, evidently allusive to Liberton or Leperton, forrnerly 
the property of a family taking their surname from the lands, and bear- 
ing that animal's head on their shield ; motto — " Magnum in parvo." 

An older bearing of the Littles of Liberton has the saltire with three 
cross crosslets fitch6e in chief. The crescent is gules and placed on the 
centre of the saltire in the arms registered 181 1 by Walter James Little- 
Gilmour of Liberton and Craigmiller. His ancestor's arms, cut on the 
monument in the Greyfriars' Churchyard, with the date 1667, are — a 
saltire engrailed with no other charge ; no crest ; motto — " Multum in 
'darvo." 

The Littles were one of the unruly clans in the West March 1587. 

Edward sat in parliament 1526-28, and was depute-marischal. Mr 
Clement, commissary of Edinburgh, died 1580; his younger brother, 
William of Over Liberton, was Provost of Edinburgh, and sat in parlia- 
ment 1587-92, 

Huchtred Litel witnessed a charter of Richard Morvill, Constable of 



244 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Scotland ; and in 1351 Martin Li till witnessed one of William Douglas, 
Lord of Liddesdale ; in 1398 Nichol Litil was one of the sureties for the 
Earl of Douglas, warden of the West Marches. 

James L, on 30th April 1426, confirmed a grant made by Robert, 
Duke of Albany, Regent of Scotland, in favour of Simon Lytil, of the 
lands of Senbigil, Mikkildale, Kirktoun, Sourbie, the Malnarlande, and 
the Pullis, Dumfriesshire. Simon Litill of Kirktoun occurs as a witness 
in 1469; and in 1585 Simon of Meikledale, and many others of the name, 
were pardoned for intercommuning with the Earl of Morton, 

Mr R. B. Armstrong has given me a valuable notice of a stone in 
the Churchyard of Ewes, to the memory of " Thomas Li tie, son to the 

d Laird of Meikldail, ain honest gentleman, wel beloved of al the 

country, who dyed in April 27, 1627. His age sixty-seven." There are 
also inscriptions referring to his descendants, resident for four generations 
in Wrea and Terrona, the last date being 1808. 

The arms are rudely cut ; on the sinister side is a lion sejant con- 
tournde, holding in his dexter paw a broadsword in bend sinister, and in 
his sinister paw a saltire below the sword ; on the dexter side there is a 
mullet between two crescents irregularly placed. 

Mr Armstrong has also kindly placed at my disposal the following 
memoranda, showing the period at which the estates were sold. Disposi- 
tion, 24th September 1606, by Thomas Lytill of Meikledaill, of the six and 
a half merk lands of Sorbie to William Armstrang and Alexander his son. 
Charter, 21st June 1615, by Thomas Littell of Meikledaill, in favour of 
William Armstrang, of the four merk land of Kirktoun. 

Obligation, i8th August 1623, by David Lytill of Ormestonehill, for 
Thomas Lytill, sometime of Mekilldaill, and Masie Batie his spouse, by 
which he became bound to subscribe and deliver all charters, precepts of 
sasines, &c., to secure Robert, Earl of Nithsdale, in the twenty-three 
pound lands of Mekilldale. 

126. *Denskyne. This coat is given in various MSS., and was 
recorded, with alterations, 1766, by James Danskine, merchant in 
Stirling — gules, a goshawk or standing on the back of a hare courant 
argent. 

Smyth (?). Or, a saltire and in chief a crescent azure. 

•MVCHELL. 

127. Newtoun. L. ; "of Dolcoaff" is added. Seal, 1508, of John, 
son and heir of James Newton of Moffatslands — ^a buckle between three 
roses; in 1520 William Newton of Newton seals with a lion rampant; 
George, in 1562, has the same with a rose in sinister chief ; William of 
that Ilk, 1570, uses a lion rampant holding a cross patde between his 
paws. 

Pont and Sir James Balfour give for Newton of that Ilk — azure, 
three boars' heads couped argent ; and for Dalcoiff— gules, a lion passant 
or rampant argent, on a chief azure three mullets or roses of the second. 

The arms registered 1673 by Richard of that Ilk are — vert, a lion 
rampant or, on a chief of the second three roses gules. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 245 

Some English families of the name have borne a lion rampant 
charged on the shoulder with a cross patde. 

Adam Newton, Dean of Durham, tutor to Henry, Prince of Wales, 
and treasurer to H.R.H., had a grant of the Manor of Charlton in Kent, 
and was created a baronet 1620 ; he bore — azure, two ostrich feathers in 
saltire between three boars' heads couped argent armed or, as a cadet of 
Newton of that Ilk. 

John de Neuton, c. 1200 ; James and Hugh de Neuton, of the county 
of Edinburgh, swore fealty to Edward I. in 1296; William de Newton 
had a charter of the barony of Newton, co. Haddington, 4th February, 
sixth of Robert H., on the resignation of Robert de Swynton and Margaret 
his wife, in whose right he held it, their liferent being reserved ; Archi- 
bald sat in parliament 1463 ; Richard of that Ilk was created a baronet 
1697, but d.s.p. about 1726, leaving his estate in liferent to his wife, Helen 
Livingstone, heiress of Westquarter, and entailed on his kinsman, Richard 
Hay, who assumed the surname and arms of Newton. The present 
family of Hay-Newton, his descendants, inherit no Newton blood. 

Dalcoiff, or Dalcove, belonged to Archibald Newton 1445, James 
1481 ; James, who was dead in 1533, leaving a daughter and heir, 
Janet, wife of Adam Ker of Shaw, mother of Thomas Ker of Shaw and 
Dalcove. 

Stacie gives the following : Newton of Dalcorff in England — ^gules, a 
lion rampant argent, on a chief of the second three roses of the first 
barbed vert ; crest — a boar's head couped argent ; motto — " Virtute 
cresco." ,. 

Hamiltoun of Sanquhare. L. 

Dunbar of Connoch. L. 

Makmakane. L. 

GoRDONE OF Stradoun. As Lochinvar in L. The name is written 
below in a different hand, and the one that had been above the shield has 
been obliterated. 

Myretoun of yt Ilk. L. 

128. *Eliott. See K. There is a note referring to the charge, on 
the bend, or perhaps rather between the bendlets, " a batton ; some says it 
is an flutt instrument betwext two bendeletts wreathed." 

Murray of ye Toneis. L. 

*Arnut. The original coat had three mullets. In all the entries for 
the name in the register the chevron is sable. The surname is taken 
from the lands of Arnot in Kinross-shire, which, in 1284, belonged to 
Michael de Arnoth. 

David Arnot took the oaths to Edward I. ; Sir Henry 1395; Walter 
had a charter of the barony of Arnot 1506; Michael, fiar of Arnot, was 
created a baronet 1629 ; his arms, cut in stone at Arnot 1622, impaled 
with those of his wife, Anne, eldest daughter and coheir of Robert Brown 
of Balquharn and Finderlie — a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis — are as 
here reproduced. 

3Q 



246 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Arnot of Balbarton ended in two coheiresses, who married Dundas 
of Fingask and Brown of Fordell. 

Peter, younger son of Robert Arnot of Woodmill, married early in 
the sixteenth century Helen Abercromby, heiress of Balcormo, co. Fife ; 
Hugo Arnot of Balcormo had a daughter and heir, Christian, who 
married, in 1745, Duncan Pollock, merchant in Leith ; their son, Hugo 
Arnot of Balcormo, advocate, author of a " History of Edinburgh," 
and other works, was grandfather of the present Hugo Arnot of 
Balcormo. 

Sir John of Birswick was Treasurer-Depute of Scotland, Provost of 
Edinburgh, sat in parliament 1586-90, and acquired a great estate. 

Robert Arnot, younger of Newton, assumed the surname of Balfour 
on his marriage, 1606, with Margaret, only child of Michael Lord 
Balfour of Burleigh, and, on the death of his father-in-law, succeeded to 
that peerage. 

*Law. Pont has — or, a bend between two cocks gules. Porteus 
says — ermine, or argent, a bend gules two cocks proper. 

The seal of James, Bishop of Orkney 1607, bears a bend sinister 
between a mullet in chief and a cock in base ; he was afterwards Arch- 
bishop of Glasgow. The arms registered, 1672-78, by his grandson. 
Major James of Brunton, are — ermine, a bend between two cocks gules ; 
crest — a unicorn's head erased proper ; motto — " Nee obseura nee ima.'' 

Nisbet calls Law of Lawbridge, in Galloway, the principal family of 
the name, and says they bore — argent, a bend and in chief a cock gules ; 
crest — 2i cock crowing ; motto — " Sat amieo, mikifelix." 

All I find of them is, that George Law, portioner of Lawisbrig, in 
Ayrshire, was dead 1638, leaving two daughters his coheirs — Janet, d.s.p., 
and Margaret, mother of George Reid of Auchincloich and Lawisbrig, 
1677. 

He goes on to say that he had seen a charter of the year 1398 (?), of 
Bogness, and other lands in the shire of Elgin, to Robert, second son of 
Robert of Lawbridge. Of this family there seems nothing known. 
Nisbet says, Mr James Law of Bogis (? Bogness), Keeper of the Signet 
in the reign of Charles L, was grandfather of John Law of Netherurd, 
CO. Peebles, only representer of the Lawbridge family. John was son of 
James of Netherurd, writer in Edinburgh, and had a brother James, who 
d.s.p. 1670, and a sister Marion. 

In 1646 William Law, in Edistoun, had a Crown charter of a third 
of Bonington, co. Peebles, and died soon after, leaving a son, William, 
Clerk of the Treasury and Exchequer. 

The surname is probably taken from one of the ten or more places in 
Scotland called Law, one of them being in Ayrshire; in 1428 Robert de 
Lawe had a safe-conduct to pass through England on his return from 
Spain; 1476, Andrew in Galloway; 1513, William on a jury at Dumfries; 
1478, John held lands in Edinburgh; 1494, Alexander, burgess of Edin- 
burgh ; 1496-9, Alexander, falconer to the King. 

In Fife, John in Dunbulg 1494; David and John in Dysart 1491, 



WORKMAN'S MS. 247 

and a family long resident there ; there was also a burgess family of good 
standing at Kirkcaldy, which was represented in parliament by James 
Law 1644-52. 

George Law of Lithrie, Fife, had a Crown charter 1542 ; Thomas had 
a charter of confirmation of Nether Stenton, c. 1570, from the Commen- 
dator of Dunfermline. 

To the same family probably belonged John Law, in Spittal, some- 
times designed portioner of Lathrisk, who, with his wife, Margaret 
Strang, had a sasine 1575 ; their son, James, was Bishop of Orkney 1605, 
Archbishop of Glasgow 16 15, and died in 1632 ; he acquired Brunton, in 
Fife, in which he was succeeded by his eldest son, James of Brunton, 
father of George of Brunton, who left a son, James of Brunton, who 
d.s.p. 1668, and a daughter, Agnes, married, 1660, John Lundin of 
Auchtermairnie, and is represented by Richard Lundin-Brown, Esq., 
paternally descended from the Browns of Fordell and Finmount, heir- 
general of Archbishop Law. 

Major James Law succeeded his nephew 1668, and was grandfather 
of James of Brunton, living 1725. 

Walter, younger brother of Major Law, was of Easter Kinevie and 
Condland, and registered arms 1672-78. 

Mr Thomas Law, minister of Inchinnan, second son of the Arch- 
bishop, married Jean, daughter of Sir Robert Hamilton of Silvertonhill, 
and had, with other issue, Mr James of Ballornock, d.s.p. ; Mr Robert of 
Ballornock, author of the " Memorials," father of Mr John of Ballornock, 
1690; Mr John, one of the ministers of Edinburgh, Almoner to Queen 
Anne 1708, whose son, William, Professor of Moral Philosophy in the 
University of Edinburgh, acquired the estate of Livingstone, in East 
Lothian, which was sold by his great-grandson, William Law, who d.s.p. 
James Law, Writer to the Signet, younger brother of the last named, left 
a son, , who is probably now heir male of the Archbishop. 

Francis Law or Lauw, a naval officer in the Swedish service, was 
ennobled, in 1680, for bravery in a fight with the Danes in Calmar Sound, 
and had a ship in flames added to his arms as an augmentation. 

From a family of " statesmen " at Askham, in Westmoreland, 
descended Edmund Law, Bishop of Carlisle 1768, father of Edward 
Lord Ellenborough, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench ; this family 
have no arms registered, but bear — ermine, on a bend engrailed between 
two cocks gules three mullets pierced or. The Bishop used — argent, on 
a bend between two cocks gules three mullets of the field. 

Of the Laws of Newton, co. Banff, said in the Lyon Register to be 
of the same family as Archbishop Law, was William of Newton, who had 
issue, Thomas of Newton, d.s.p. ; Mr William of Newton, d.s.p. ; Mar- 
garet, married William Anderson of Newton ; Jean, died unmarried ; 
Isobel, married Robert Stewart of Towiemore. 

The descent of John Law, the financier, has been a subject of much 
discussion ; his father, William, a goldsmith in Edinburgh, bought 
Lauriston, in the parish of Cramond, 1683, married Jean Campbell, and 



248 WORKMAN'S MS. 

had a large family, born between 1666 and 1682; in a pedigree issued in 
1760 to John Law of Lauriston, then in India, known in France as the 
Baron de Lauriston, William the goldsmith is said to be younger son 
of Major James of Brunton, which is impossible from the dates. Dr 
Scott, in his " Fasti Ecclesiae Scoticanae," calls the goldsmith son of Mr 
John Law, minister of Neilston, nephew of the Archbishop, which may 
be the case. Mr Riddell mentions that there were other goldsmiths of 
the name in Edinburgh before William. 

John Law was naturalised in France 17 16, was Comptroller-General 
of Finances, bought the office of Secretaire du Roi, and died in 1729, 
leaving, by Katherine, daughter of Nicholas Knollys, titular Earl of 
Banbury, a son and daughter, who were not recognised as legitimate, and 
both d.s.p. His brother, William of Lauriston, Director-General of the 
French East India Co., was father of John, who entered his incorrect 
pedigree, was knight of St Louis, Mardchal de Camp, and Governor of 
Pondicherry ; his son, Francis John William of Lauriston, died unmarried 
1822, when the estate was sold. 

Jacques Alexander, elder brother of Francis, was Comte de Lauris- 
ton, peer of France 1815, Marquis 181 7, Marshal 1823, Knight of the 
Holy Ghost, Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour, Ambassador at St 
Petersburgh, &c. ; his great-grandson is now Marquis de Lauriston. 
Arms — ermine, a bend invecked between two cocks gules. 

129. TuRYNE. L. ; the boars' heads are argent. 

See the " Genealogist," III., p. 65, for a notice of the claim of the 
Turings, of the family of Foveran, to a baronetcy ; also The Lay of the 
Turings. 

Crawfurd of Drongane. L. 

Hannay (?). Argent — three stags' heads couped azure. The name 
is obliterated. 

Hog. L. ; most of the MSS. make the boars' heads armed or. 

Henry de Hoga held lands in Berwickshire c. 1250; Salomon del 
Hoga left a daughter and heir, Emma, mother of John de Grantham, who 
made a grant from his lands at Berwick to the monks of Kelso c. 1 270 ; 
Adam, son of Henry de Hoga, c. 1280. 

In 1296 Henry Hogge, of the county of Roxburgh, and John Hog, 
burgess of Edinburgh, swore fealty to Edward I. ; Robert, burgess of 
Edinburgh 1332; Roger, burgess of Edinburgh 1359-64, was a con- 
spicuous person, and acted as deputy-accountant 1360; he had several 
charters of lands, tenements, and annual-rents in Edinburgh and Had- 
dington in the reign of David II., married Margaret Hog, who married, 
secondly, John de Peblys, and left a son, John Hog, living 1373. 

1379, November 12, the castle of Berwick was taken by Hog, Lydzet- 
wod, and their companions. 

1406, James Hog, scutifer ; 1425, Gilbert, armiger ; and 1444, 
James of Halyden, armiger, all connected with Roxburghshire. 

William of Vigourshaugh, co. Roxburgh, was a vassal of the Earl 
Marischal for lands in Upper Keith before 1480; he is probably identical 



WORKMAN'S MS. 249 

with William Hog, son of Margaret Turnbull, Lady Hop Pringle, who 
has a suit in 1490; about the same time lived Christian, wife of John 
Craig of that Ilk, and John, Abbot of Culross 1490, who settled lands on 
Isobel Hog, and her husband, Alexander Hamilton of Grange, and was 
dead in 1494. 

The Hogs of Vigourshaugh, latterly styled of Doucott, continued 
closely connected with the Marischal family, and Monan Hog acted as 
Marischal-Depute in 1568; John, last of Vigourshaugh, was dead in 
1647, when his sister, Elizabeth, had inherited that place, Doucott, and 
Braidyards. 

A son of the family is said to have had a grant of Bleridryne, in the 
Mearns, from the Earl Marischal, in the reign of James V. ; Monan of 
Bleridryne married, before 1584, Katherine Carnegie, niece of Sir John 
Carnegie of Kinnaird ; James of Bleridryne registered arms 1693 — ^argent, 
three boars' heads erased azure armed and langued or distilling drops of 
blood gules. 

Of this family were the Hogs who possessed Raemoir for several 
generations, 1690- 1800. 

Mr William Hog, minister of Ayton 1 601-16, was father of Mr 
William of Bogend, advocate 1641, whose eldest son, Roger of Harcarse 
and Bogend, advocate, registered arms 1672 — argent, three boars' heads 
erased azure armed or; represented Berwickshire in parliament, was 
Senator of the College of Justice 1677, was knighted, had his lands united 
and erected into a barony 1681, and died in 1700; his son, William 
of Harcarse, was father of Andrew of Harcarse, who died in 1772. 

Captain William Hog, merchant in Edinburgh, brother of Lord 
Harcarse, was father of John of Cammo and Ladykirk, who registered 
arms 1736, with a crescent for difference; his elder son, John, sold the 
estates, married Barbara, daughter of Sir Christopher Musgrave, Bart, 
and died in 1744, leaving four daughters ; in 1783 his brother, Roger of 
Newliston, registered arms without difference, and was allowed sup- 
porters, two boars proper. 

John Hog was appointed Bute Pursuivant 1675, and died 1704. 

Pettigrew. L. In 1296 Thomas Petikreu of Lanarkshire swore 
fealty to Edward I., and there were small landowners of the name in that 
county long after. 

Bannatyne of Corhouse. L. ; much obliterated. 

130. *Watt. Seal of Martin Watt, Chancellor of Glasgow 1496, 
three roses on a bend. 

John Watt represented Edinburgh in parliament 1596. 

Adam, writer to the signet, was father of Mr John of Rosehill, co. 
Edinburgh, 1661, whose son, Adam of Rosehill, 1692-1722, was Town 
Clerk of Edinburgh. Crown charter of Fulshiels, in West Lothian, 1667, 
to Hugh Watt and his son, Mr Robert. 

*Peirsone. Arms registered, 1672-78, 'by James Pearson of Kip- 
penross, with the field argent, daggers azure, heart proper, cinquefoil 
sable ; crest — a tower proper ; motto — " Rather die than disloyal." these 

3R 



2 50 WORKMAN'S MS. 

arms are cut on a stone at Dunblane of an earlier date. At the same time 
James of Balmadies, Forfarshire, registered a similar coat, but the sword 
points are upward, the heart in chief, and the cinquefoil, which is azure, 
is in base. These arms are cut on a tombstone at Arbroath, with the 
date 1589. The coat registered for Pierson of Westhall, is as the last, 
with the addition of two crescents azure in chief, and the cinquefoil is also 
of that tincture. 

David Perisone, merchant, had an English safe-conduct 1369; 
Thomas held lands at Blackness c. 1450; in 1506 the Abbot of Arbroath 
granted lands to his servitor, Thomas Peirson, and the family have ever 
since been landowners in Forfarshire. 

John was a monk of Arbroath 1544, and David represented the 
burgh in parliament 1579. 

Alexander was of Balmadies 1614, and a charter of the barony, in 
favour of himself and his wife, Isobel Beaton, is dated 1624; their 
descendants intermarried with Pierson of Westhall, Murray of Lintrose, 
Lindsay of Evelick, Fraser of Kirkton, Trompowsky of Livonia, and 
Ochterlony of the Guynd ; the late representative, James Alexander 
Pierson, succeeded to the estates and representation of the Ochterlony 
family, on the death of his maternal uncle, in 1843, and d.s.p. 1873. 

Archibald of Westhall left three daughters, coheirs, 17 14. The 
barony of Kippenross, co. Perth, which had belonged to his ancestors 
early in the seventeenth century, was sold in 1778, by William Pearson; 
he married, in 1775, Jane, daughter of Sir James Campbell of Aberuchill, 
baronet, and left descendants. To a family of wealthy burgesses of 
Edinburgh belonged Alexander of South Hall, a Senator of the College 
of Justice 1650-56, who left issue ; this line intermarried with Burnett of 
Leys and Burnett of Kemnay. 

Thomas Pierson had a charter of Lochlands, co. Forfar, 1599, and 
founded a family seated there for nearly two centuries. 

*Christison. Seal, c. 1480, of Thomas Cristison, Aberlady — ^an arm 
holding a heart paleways. 

The arms of Sir Robert Christison, baronet — or, a chevron sable 
between three laurel leaves proper — are allusive to his eminence as a toxi- 
cologist. The surname means, of course, the son of Christian or Chris- 
topher, and here are two instances of its origin : in 1360 an annuity of 
four merks was granted yohanni filio Cristiani janitori castri de Strieue- 
lyne, — he is also called Kytysoun ; in 1473 a remission was granted to 
John Kennedy Cristisone, and he is subsequently mentioned simply as 
John Cristisone. 

In 1414, William Cristison, sergeant of Malles, and Michael Cristison, 
are witnesses to a sasine granted by Sir Robert Logan of Restalrig, to 
the Abbot of Scone at Malles, in Perthshire. 

The name was common in the shires of Aberdeen, Kincardine, and 
Forfar, and was borne by many churchmen. Richard was Canon of 
Abernethy 1471 ; John, Provincial of the Carmelites in Scotland in the 
reign of James V. ; John, sub-prior of Elgin about the same time ; 



WORKMAN'S MS, 251 

William, minister of Dundee 156097, was a leading Reformer, member 
of the first, and of thirty-eight subsequent General Assemblies of the 
Church of Scotland, and Moderator 1569. In Perth there was a burgess 
family of long standing, and John was Provost and Sheriff 1535-42. 

Christisons were landowners at Cornton, co. Stirling, West Condland, 
CO. Fife, and Ardgilzean, in Perthshire. 

Margaret White, wife of James Guthrie of that Ilk, 1763, was heiress 
of her mother, Margaret Christison, whose mother was one of the two 
coheiresses of John Malcolm of Foxton, and Jean Oliphant, his wife. 
131. Aytoun. L. ; gules, a cross engrailed between four roses. 
Nisbet describes a seal of (Andrew ?) of Dunmure, co. Fife, Captain 
of Stirling Castle in the reign of James V. — quarterly, first and fourth, a 
chevron between two stars in chief and a crescent in base; second, Aytoun; 
third, an anchor. The surname is taken from Ayton, co. Berwick, and 
the early seals of persons of the name bear an eagle displayed, an eight- 
leaved flower, a fleur-de-lis, and in 1327 a man's head affrontde. In 1276 
Alicia, wife of Patrick, formerly wife of Robert, son of Maurice de Ayton, 
seals with a crescent between two mullets, which may account for the 
quartering used in the sixteenth century. 

Dunmure was afterwards called Ayton, and on the failure of the 
direct line the male representation passed to the branch seated at Inch- 
dairnie, co. Fife. 

In 1667, Sir John Aytoun of Kippo, Gentleman Usher to His Majesty 
and Knight of the Black Rod, had a charter of the lands and barony of 
Kippo, in Fife, to himself and his heirs of entail, " bearing the sirname 
and armes of Aytoun, with the addition of the black rod ;" his arms are 
registered with a black baton, ensigned on the top with a lion passant 
gardant or placed upon the cross, being an addition granted by 
Charles II. 

DuDiNGSTOUN OF YT Ilk. As Haldinstoune in L., with a mullet 
upon the cross. 

Arms of Adinston of that Ilk in the Lyon Register — argent, a cross 
engrailed sable between four cross crosslets fitch^e gules. 

*Sandarsoun. 

Meldrum of yt Ilk. Argent, a demi-otter sable crowned with an 
antique crown or, in sinister flank a mullet gules. 

♦Williamson. Thomas Williamson, an archer in the Scots Guard 
in France 1495, acquired property there, and married, in 1506, Mar- 
guerite, daughter and heir of Guillaume Rault or Raoult, seigneur of 
Mesnil Hermey ; his descendants flourished in the country of their 
adoption, and Guillaume Comte d'Oilliamson desired to be presented at 
Court, but failed to make the necessary proofs. He then had recourse to 
the Scottish Heralds, who first furnished him with a pedigree, making 
Thomas settle in France in 1410, which does not seem to have been 
satisfactory, as a second was issued in 1774; and in December of the 
following year the Count attained his desire, " the honours of the Court." 

His pedigree traces Thomas the archer from Duncan Williamson 



252 WORKMAN'S MS. 

who, in 1 38 1, married Alice Mackenzie of Kintail, and the other alliances 
are Farquhar, Graham, and des Essarts. 

The family exists, and the Comte d'Oilliamson lately married a 
Mademoiselle de Macmahon, grand-niece of the President of the Republic. 
The arms do not at all resemble the Scottish bearings, being azure, an 
eagle displayed with two heads argent, beaked and membered or, standing 
on a barrel also or, hooped argent ; motto — " Venture and win." 

In 1317 John Williamson held land in Peebles; in 1343 Adam, son 
of William, renders the accounts of the burgh of Peebles, and in 1365 
John, son of William, was a bailie there. Between 1620 and 1680 the 
burgh was frequently represented in parliament by members of the family 
of Williamson ; James, Provost of Peebles, signed the covenant 1638 ; 
he acquired lands still possessed by his heirs, and in 1685 James of 
Hutcheonfield purchased Cardrona, from which the family take their 
designation. Arms registered, 1672-78, by James, last named — ^argent, a 
saltire between three mullets in chief and flank sable, and a boar's head 
erased in base gules. 

Mr Laing gives a seal, 1610, of Mr Robert of Murieston — a thistle 
stalked and leaved, impaling a saltire between two mullets in flank and as 
many boars' heads in chief and base ; in 1599 this gentleman, who was a 
writer in Edinburgh, acquired from Lord Torphichen the half of the 
Temple-lands, except Torphichen and other parts retained by his lord- 
ship ; in 1604 Williamson became proprietor of the other half, and had a 
Crown charter erecting these properties into the tenandry of the Temple- 
lands. 

The thistle was borne by the old Lords of St John, and must have 
been taken by Williamson as in a manner representing them. A later 
seal of the same person has a mullet in chief in place of a boar's head ; he 
sold all the Temple property, and d.s.p. 

Seal of John Williamson, Provost of Seton 1536 — 2l fess, and in 
chief a mullet. 

Leonard sat in parliament for St Andrews 1568 ; Thomas for Cupar 
1586; John for Stirling 1600-17; ^'^d John for Kirkcaldy 1630, and 
later. 

The "Herald and Genealogist " contains a notice, by the writer, of Mr 
David Williamson, minister of St Cuthbert's, his wives, and descendants. 

Denistoun (?). Duntreathe is added, and there is in the MSS. a 
constant confusion between Edmonstone and Dennistoun. Argent, on a 
bend azure three annulets gemmed or, in sinister chief a unicorn's head 
erased sable. 

132. Sir Richard Cockburn of Clarkintoun. Arms added and 
unfinished — argent, a crescent azure between three cocks gules ; crest — a 
lion's head erased crowned with an antique crown ; supporters — a swan 
and a lion gardant gules collared. 

Stacie calls the dexter supporter a stork or heron proper, and gives 
the motto, " Peradventure." There is an official entry of the funeral of 
Richard of Clarkintoun, who was buried at Haddington 23rd October 



WORKMAN'S MS. 253 

1627; the crest — an otter's head proper; motto — "■ Vigili aucta ;'' sup- 
porters — " a foule lyke unto a cran " and an otter. 

134. *FoRREST. Seal of Mr Alexander Forest, rector of Logy, and 
provost of Foulis 1555 — a saltire couped between four roses. Arms 
granted 1838 to Sir James Forrest of Comiston, baronet, Lord Provost of 
the city of Edinburgh — argent, three oak trees issuing out of the ground 
vert, on a chief gules as many ears of rye slipped and barbed or (to 
indicate maternal descent from the family of Riddell), all within a bordure 
ermine. 

Comiston was acquired by his ancestor in 1715 ; Catherine, daughter 
and heir of James of Comiston, married, 1776, James Forrest, Writer to 
the Signet, no relative. 

Finlay of Forest 1380; in 147 1 a person of the name sat in parlia- 
ment for the burgh of Linlithgow, and it was represented by Henry Forest 
1540-45; John was provost, and sat in parliament 1583-85. 

The estate of Pardovan, co. Linlithgow, belonged to the Forests, and 
in 1502, Margaret, daughter of Thomas, burgess of Linlithgow, married 
John Cornwall of Bonhard, who was killed at Flodden. 

David was general of the Cunzie House 1565-67. 

Mr Alexander, minister of Hassindean 161 3, acquired the lands of 
Huntlaw in that parish, which were the property of his descendants for 
five generations. 

Gammelshiels, in East Lothian, belonged to persons of the name in 
the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and Archerfield in the seventeenth. 
George, burgess of Haddington, was owner of Gimmersmilnes early in 
the seventeenth century; his descendant, George Forrest, M.D., Professor 
of Physiology in the University of St Andrews, d.s.p. 1795, and was 
succeeded by his nephew, Alexander Maitland of Gimmersmilnes. 

Thomas of Forest was comptroller of the Royal Household before 
1491. 

♦Akinhead. These arms, without the leaf, were registered, 1672-78, 
by James Aikenhead, advocate, one of the commissaries of Edinburgh, 
representer of the family of Aikenhead of that Ilk; but there is added, 
" Nota. — He is found not to be the Representer." 

Gilbert del Akenheued, of the county of Lanark, swore fealty to 
Edward L ; 1373, Conual de Akinhead witnessed a charter of Walter de 
Fosselane, Lord of Lennox ; 1376, William was bailie of Ruglen, and two 
years later Finlay held the same office at Linlithgow; John, dean of 
Lennox 1473; in 1489 Stephen, William, and Andrew Akynhed, and 
others, had a remission for holding Dumbarton Castle against the King ; 
1492, John of Aikenhead and Violet Elphinstone, his wife. 

Mr William, 1453-94, seems to have been connected with the Lords 
of St John and persons of his name held lands at Strathbrock. 

John was burgess of Edinburgh 1572 ; Thomas, dean of Guild 1576 ; . 
David was several times provost 1620 to 1637, and sat in parliament ; in 
the notices of the family he is designed of that Ilk, but his monument in 
the Greyfriar's Churchyard gives his name only ; Nisbet, author of the 

3s 



2 54 WORKMAN'S MS. 

" Heraldry," was grandson of one of the Provost's sons ; another was pro- 
bably James, advocate and commissary above named. 

Mr Thomas, one of the commissaries of Edinburgh, son of the 
provost, was father of David of Byrecleuch, who married Anne, daughter 
of Sir John Hay of Lands, Lord Clerk Register, and left a son, Sir 
Patrick, commissary clerk, M.P. for Dunfermline; he died in 1698, leav- 
ing a large family. The arms displayed at his funeral are — an acorn 
between three oak leaves. 

♦MULTRAY OF YT IlK. 

*WiGHOUM OR WiGUM. John Wighame had a charter of Over 
Liberton, from David H. 

Early in the fifteenth century there were burgesses, a bailie, and a 
dean of guild of Edinburgh called Bigholme. 

♦Armstrong, called Aykman by mistake, but the coat of that family, 
which somewhat resembles this, is given elsewhere. 

Mr R. B. Armstrong, Junior Carlton Club, London, has given me 
the following interesting notes on the arms and pedigree of the family, 
thus very liberally allowing my readers the benefit of his long researches 
on the borders and among the records. 

Mr Gilbert Armstrong, a priest, was steward of the household of 
David n., and ambassador to England. 

The changes and variety of the arms are illustrated by a separate 
plate. 



The earliest shield of arms appears on a seal attached to a bond of 
Manrent from John Armstrong (" Gilnockie ") to Robert Lord Maxwell, 
Warden of the West Marches of Scotland, dated November 2nd, 1525, 
illustrated in the Book of Carlaverock. 

John Armstrong resided at the Hollows, near the old fort called 
" Gilnockie's Garden," Canonbie. He had a gift of the lands of Lang- 
holm, Stapilgorton, and many others, from Lord Maxwell. The former 
he resigned, but he was styled of Stapilgorton. After his execution in 
1530, Lord Maxwell obtained a grant of all his lands, &c. John is then 
mentioned as brother to Thomas of Mangerton. 

The next shield is that represented on a stone which was formerly 
built into the Tower of Whithaugh, Liddesdale, when that building was 
repaired by Lancelot Armstrong. His name is sculptured on the stone, 
together with one Roman and three Arabic numerals, supposed to repre- 
sent the date 1559. The stone is still at Whithaugh. 

According to the Register Lyon Office, the lairds of Whithaugh were 
descended from Mangerton. They were probably the first cadets of that 
house. The first member of this branch, of whom we have notice, is 
Simon ("Sym the lard"), 1510-1525 to 1535-36, in which latter year he 
was executed. The arms of the family, as registered in 1672 by Francis 
of Whithaugh, are here given — crest, an arm from the shoulder gules 
issuing from the wreath ; motto — " Iwvictus maneo." 



Armstrong 



John ta2led''(fdfwcA:ip'lS2{; Lancelot ofWuihaugh /SSB .' Fmitcis of Whii/ntiufh W2 





SiTnon^ of Mancferlon fS8S 





MunffertoTt 7603 -72 




aixf 



Man^rlon rrom Slacies MS c 7674' 



Wmiti-m ofSar7y76S8 



J^rancis o^Ihnt/iou^ 7622 






WORKMAN'S MS. 255 

In Mr Kerr's MS., from which quotations are made farther on, 
Armstrong occurs as — paly of six argent and azure, which is also given 
by Stacie. 

The next shield is that here reproduced, which is also given in K. as 
the arms of Armstrong of Maingertoun ; but there is no doubt the word 
Maingertoun is an addition in the same or a co-temporary hand. These 
arms are those of either Thomas, laird of Mangerton, or his son, Archi- 
bald, who succeeded to the lands. In K. there is no cloud. 

These arms are described in the Harleian MSS., Vol. 2120, p. 138, 
as those of Armstrong of Maingertone. The same arms were borne by 
the family which formerly possessed the property of Sorbie in Ewesdale 
(supposed to be the same as the well-known branch of the Gingles). They 
appear on a monument in Ewes Churchyard to John Armstrong of Sorbie, 
who died in 1685. Similar arms occur on a much defaced stone, dated 
1733, which, till lately, was to be seen in Canonbie Churchyard, and of 
which this drawing is a representation. 

The next shield to be noticed bears the arms of Simon, laird of 
Mangerton, son or grandson of Archibald, and occurs on a stone still pre- 
served at that place, and on which his initials, with the date 1583, are 
also sculptured. 

The Mangerton arms, as given in Lord Crawford's MS. (from 1603 
to 1612), supposing them to be accurate, would be those of Archibald 
Armstrong of Mangerton, who was denounced rebel and put to the horn 
in 1610. 

These arms are also given in the Harleian MSS., Vol. 3740, p. 350, 
and same MSS., Vol. 2120, p. 140. 

The arms described in Stacie's MS., Lyon Office, for Armstrong of 
Mangerton, perhaps belong to the period when somewhat similar arms 
were registered by the laird of Whithaugh, and in this case a change 
occurs in the tincture of the field. His MS. dates about 1674, at which 
period there was no Armstrong of Mangerton. Sir James Balfour gives 
— argent, three pales azure for Mangerton ; also for the name — gules, 
three dexter arms vambraced proper ; and — ^argent, an arm holding the 
trunk of an oak proper. 

The Armstrongs who lived at Morton Tower (Tower of Sark), who, 
according to Satchell, were descended from " Gilnockie," appear to have 
borne similar arms to those last given. They occur on the remarkable 
monumental stone in Morton Churchyard to William Armstrong of Sark, 
who died in 1658. 

Morton Tower was the residence of the celebrated "Kinmont Willie," 
at one time the head of this branch.. 

The arms of Francis, son of John Armstrong of Parknow, were 
registered about 1672. The lands of Parknow may have been those of 
Park in Ewesdale, granted by James V., in 1535, to David, son of 
Herbert Armstrong. Crest — an arm issuing from a cloud, the hand hold- 
ing a Hercules club proper ; motto — " Invicta labore" 

Alexander Armystrand appears as early as 1378, in possession or 



256 WORKMAN'S MS, 

occupation of Mangerton. On the 12th November 1482, Thomas 
Armystrang resigned the lands of Mangerton into the hands of his 
superior, Archibald, Earl of Angus. 

Thomas Armstrong of Mangerton is called "Thomas the Larde" in 
1528, and is mentioned during the Wars of the Minority of Mary, as " the 
old laird " 1547, and as " Thome the lord " in 1548. This gentleman had 
three brothers, John, Alexander, and George. 

John called " Gilnockie," whose arms have been given, is only 
mentioned from 1525 to 1530. During the former year his son, 
Christopher, known as " John's Christie," being of full age, joined his 
father in a Bond of Manrent to Lord Maxwell, and received a grant of 
lands from that nobleman. He was afterwards known as " Christie of 
Barnagleis," at one period had charge of Langholm Castle, and was a 
man of considerable importance in his district. He had three sons, the 
eldest being John, lived at the Hollows, the Tower his grandfather had 
built. The other two being Christopher, " the younger of Barnagleis," 
and Robert. 

Thomas Armstrong of Mangerton had at least three sons, Archibald, 
known during the Wars of the Minority of Mary, as " the young laird " 
1 547- 1 548, Thomas, and Simon. Of the date of the death of this laird 
of Mangerton we have no record. His son, 

Archibald, first appears as laird in 1569, although he may have 
succeeded long before that period. He had three sons, Simon, Ninian, 
and Rowe. The arms already given from the MS. of 1566 or 1567, were 
those borne by this laird, and probably by his father also. The date of 
the death of Archibald of Mangerton has not been ascertained, but his 
eldest son Simon, was proprietor of Mangerton as early as January 1578-79, 
after which period there is some difficulty in carrying on the line. In 
1 58 1 we hear of Sym Armstrong of Mangertoun, and also " Rinzane and 
Robe Armstrangis, father brether to the lard of Mangertoun," and we 
have to decide whether Rinzane and Robe were sons of Thomas, 
or were the Ninian, and Rowe, sons of Archibald. Of course if we 
accept the latter we must acknowledge a second Simon, also laird of 
Mangerton. The laird of Mangerton is mentioned by his Christian 
name Simon, in 1582-83, 1589, 1590, 1591, and 1597. He was probably 
the laird who was alive in 1603, and who was so actively engaged 
during that year in the destructive raids undertaken to prevent the union 
of the Crowns, and is then occasionally called " the old laird." It has not 
been satisfactorily ascertained what family Simon of Mangerton had. In 
1591-92, immediately following his name, we find that of Sym Armstrong, 
younger of Rinch or Runchbank, but this would be an unusual way for 
the eldest son of a laird of Mangerton to be mentioned. We hear of 
" Sym Armstrong of Mangertoun," and also of " Sym, the young laird of 
Mangertoun," in 1596, but as they are mentioned in an English State 
Paper the territorial title of the latter is very probably a mistake for 
Whithaugh, as Sym the young laird of that place, and his father, are both 
frequently mentioned during the latter part of the sixteenth century. 



WORKMAN'S MS, 257 

Whereas at the frequent forays during the same period of which we have 
record, the laird of Mangerton almost always rode alone. We certainly 
hear of a son of the laird of Mangerton, and also the young laird of 
Mangerton in 1603, at which period the old laird is also mentioned. On 
July 23rd, the same year, the young laird was proclaimed an outlaw at 
Carlisle, but his Christian name is not given, nor do we find his father 
amongst those outlaws, he being probably either dead or a prisoner. 

In 1607 we hear of Archibald, brother to Umqle the laird of 
Mangertoun. And in 1610 there was undoubtedly an Archibald Arm- 
strong of Mangerton, who in that year was denounced rebel and put to 
the horn. His arms were probably those given in Lord Crawford's MS. 
He was supposed to have been the last of the surname of Armstrong, who 
was proprietor of those lands. The town and estate were at a subsequent 
period granted by Buccleuch, Lord of Liddesdale, to one of his natural 
sons. 

*CUDBERTSOUN. 

134. *Fraserof Philorth. Lord Saltoun, the present representa- 
tive of this family, printed for private circulation in 1879, " The Erasers 
of Philorth," 3 vols. 4to, which contains interesting illustrations of the 
heraldry of the family, and remarks on the variation of the bearings, 
Philorth was erected into a free barony by Crown charter, 9th February 
1455-6, in favour of Alexander Eraser, and his descendants carried two 
angels or cherubim as supporters before they inherited the peerage of the 
Abernethys of Saltoun. 

Sir Alexander Fraser and his spouse, Johanna Ross, had a charter of 
Philorth, 1375, from her brother-in-law, Sir Walter de Leslie, Lord of 
Ross, and the lion rampant is quartered to indicate descent from that 
lady, who was daughter and coheir of William Earl of Ross. The field 
is gules and the lion argent as recorded, and these are the tinctures of 
the bearings of the Earls of Ross. 

Alexander Eraser had a charter, 4th September 1369, of the thanage of 
Durris, co. Kincardine, as a free barony. Sir Alexander of Cowie, Durris, 
and Philorth, granted the barony of Durris by charter, 20th Septen)ber 
1400, Alexandro Fraser filio meo dilecto, failing issue of his own second 
marriage. 

The Durris family, descendants of the said Alexander, bore Eraser 
alone with a mullet in chief for difference ; motto — " Constant." Durris 
was sold about 1620, and Thomas Eraser, apparent of Durris, left two 
coheiresses, Mary, and Helen, wife of Michael Fraser in Kynnardie 1625. 

His cousin, Alexander, first physician to Charles H., repurchased 
the estate, had a Crown charter 1665, and was created a baronet of Scot- 
land 2nd August 1673, with remainder cuicunque ejus-filiorum baronidm 
de Dores providebit et heredibus masculis de corpore dicti filii. Sir 
Alexander married — first, Elizabeth Doughty, and had Alexander, to 
whom he left ^^50 only, Charles, and Elizabeth ; secondly, Mary, daughter 
of Sir Ferdinand Cary, widow of Dudley Wylde, Esq., and had Peter, 
Cary (married Charles Earl of Peterborough and Monmouth, K.G.), 

3 T 



258 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Katherine married Charles Scarsburgh, and had issue. Sir Alexander 
executed an entail in 1669, preferring his son of the second marriage, 
who succeeded him in 1681 as Sir Peter Fraser second baronet of Durris. 

Sir Peter's seal, 1705, has the arms of Fraser undifferenced ; crest — 
a stag's head ; supporters — two stags. He married Anne, daughter, and 
eventually heir of Sir Edward Heron, K.B., of Cressy, co. Lincoln, and 
d.s.p. 1729, when the title expired and Durris passed to his grandnephew, 
Lord Mordaunt, and descended to the Duke of Gordon in 1819. It has 
been sold, and the representation as senior coheir general vests in the 
Duke of Richmond. 

John Fraser, fourth son of Thomas of Durris, and Anne Lorymar 
his wife, had sasine of Ferryhill 1597 ; their descendant, Francis Garden 
Fraser of Findrack, in 1864 established his right to the arms and support- 
ers as heir male of the Frasers of Durris. 

135. Lauder of ye Bass. L. ; supporter added on the sinister side 
a lion sejant gardant. 

Hepburn of Waughton. F.; supporter, added in ink on the dexter 
side, a stag. 

CocKBURN OF Langtoun. L. ; argent, three cocks gules ; supporter 
— added in ink on the dexter side, a lion ; motto—" Peradvent'vrr 

Scott of Bewcleuch. L. ; or, on a bend azure a mullet in the 
upper and two crescents in the lower part ; there are added in ink, crest 
— a buck's head ; motto — " Amo ; " supporters — a lady holding a branch 
or flower and a buck. 

Kar of Ferniharst. F. ; three mullets gules on the chevron ; a 
naked savage is added in ink as supporter on the sinister side ; motto — 
" Fordwart in ye name of God." 

Jhonstoun of Lochwood. L. ; the cushions are pendant by the 
corner. 

136. On this leaf are sketched in ink the coats of — 

Dundas of Arniston ; a lion rampant gules charged on the 
shoulder with a crescent ; Dundas of Newliston, a lion rampant holding 
in his sinister forepaw a fleur-de-lis ; Dundas of Dudingstoun, a lion 
rampant gules, a heart between his forepaws. There are two mottoes — 
" Dat incrementum Deus " and " Essayez ; " also the supporters of 
Cranstoun, with the initials P. C. — a buck and a lady holding a branch. 

Sinclair of Hermistone. L. ; crest, added in ink — a demi-eagle 
displayed ; motto — " Entandtoy" 

*Urrie of Petfighie. This is the coat on the seal of John Urrie of 
Pitfiechie 1597, and was registered 1672-78 by Colonel William Urrie, Major 
of the King's Regiment of Guards ; crest — a lion's paw erased gules, 
armed or ; motto — " Sans tache." 

Hugo de Urre, in 1296, swore fealty to Edward L ; he certainly took 
his surname from Urr in Galloway, and in 1289 was on an assize as to 
marches there ; his son Thomas witnessed a charter of Michael son of 
Durand. The writer of the remarks on the Ragman Roll suggests, that 
Urry of Pitfichie descends from Hugo. Sir George Mackenzie thinks 



WORKMAN'S MS. 259 

them a branch of the Lords Eure of England, and the crest of Colonel 
Urrie has some resemblance to that of Eure, but there is nothing more to 
found on. 

In 1296 Duncan Urri, a Scot, was a prisoner in Gloucester Castle; 
David II. granted the lands of Salloch Hill and serjeantry of the county 
of Stirling to Hew Urrye on the forfeiture of Osbert Stirling; Sir John 
de Monymusk of Monymusk, co. Aberdeen, had a daughter and heir, 
Marjory, Lady of Forglen, who married John Eraser, and was dead s.p. 
3rd August 1387, on which day her heir, Johanna, spouse of Gilbert 
Urry, resigned Forglen, which was held of the Abbot of Arbroath, and 
was by him granted to the said John Eraser. 

The Urrys were long seated at Pitfichy, in the parish of Monymusk, 
and in 1460 Andrew Urry asked the lands of Eorglen to borch from the 
Abbot of Arbroath. 

The most conspicuous of the name was General Sir John Urry or 
Hurry, son of John of Pitfichy, and Marjory, daughter of Alexander 
Chalmers of Cults ; he had served on the continent, and is described by 
Spalding as a soldier of fortune, and very changeable, which he certainly 
was. He was knighted by Charles I. in 1643, and suffered death at the 
Market Cross of Edinburgh 29th May 1650. 

Sir John, when abroad, married Maria Magdalene, daughter of 
Christopher Sebastian van Jaxheim of Erlabrun, and left three daughters, 
— Elizabeth, married John Hamilton, Bishop of Dunkeld, and d.s.p. 
1694; Joanna died unmarried before 17 15; Maria Margaret married 
Archibald Lament of that Ilk s.p. She was alive 1715, when she was 
served heir of her cousin, John Urrie, fellow of Oxford. 

After her father's death Maria Margaret lived with her mother's 
relations, and obtained from Sir Charles Erskine, Lyon, a pedigree, 26th 
January 1669, tracing her descent for nine generations, and showing inter- 
marriages with Eorbes, Lauder, Crichton, Eraser, Leslie, Erskine, &c. ; 
this was embodied in a Litera ProsapicB under the great seal, 17th June 
following. 

137. *Kelle. There are several coats for this surname, which is orie 
of locality — azure, a saltire between four cinquefoils or, a chief checquy of 
the second and sable ; or, a saltire sable between four fleurs-de-lis azure 
for Kellie of Newton Leys; or, a fleur-de-lis in chief azure, below it a 
fillet or demi-chief and saltire sable. 

A family of the name was long resident at Dunbar, which was repre- 
sented in parliament by James Kellie 1678, and by Robert 1703-7. 
William, Writer to the Signet, acquired Eastbarnes, Newton Leys, and 
other lands from John Viscount Haddington before 1621, and left a son. 
Sir Thomas of Myreside, captain in the army, and gentleman of the privy 
chamber, who d.s.p., and eight daughters coheiresses, of whom Margaret 
married John Seton of St Germains, son of the Earl of Winton, who 
composed her arms with his own, and bore — or, a fess between three 
crescents in chief and as many fleurs-de-lis in base barways gules. 

*KiNNERE. Seal of Robert Kinneir, c. 1566 — a bend sinister charged 
with three eagles displayed. 



26o WORKMAN'S MS, 

Pont gives for Kinneir of that Ilk, co. Fife — sable on a bend or three 
martlets or papingoes vert. 

Arms registered, 1672-78, by David of that Ilk — sable, on a bend or 
three martlets, or Kinnerie birds, vert. 

Symon de Kyner, and Amy, his wife, lived in the reign of William 
the Lyon ; Simon, son of Simon, made a grant to the church of St 
Andrew, which was confirmed by Alexander II. 1216; Sir John de 
Kynnere 1286; Robert II., on 15th August, in the seventh year of his 
reign, granted a charter to John de Kynneir of the lands of Kynneir as a 
free barony; John of that Ilk sat in parliament 1560. 

Henry Kinneir was Commendator of Balmerino 1574-1600, and a 
Lord of Session. 

David Kinneir of that Ilk, last of the direct male line, died about 
1682, when a remarkably rapid succession followed ; in forty years the 
estate was held by ten persons, of whom seven were heiresses ; three 
of them married into the families of Anstruther of Balcaskie, Mackenzie 
of Cromarty, and Bayne. 

Cecilia Bayne Kinneir of Kinneir married, 1751, William Douglas of 
the Tilwhilly family, elder brother of Bishop of Salisbury ; their daughter, 
Cecilia Maria Douglas Kinneir of Kinneir married, 1776, John Mac- 
donald of Sanda, and sold the estate in 1795. Their son, Sir John 
Kinneir Macdonald, C.B., Envoy to the Shah of Persia, d.s.p. ; his 
brother, William, Archdeacon of Wilts, was grandfather of the present re- 
presentative, Douglas J. Kinnear-Macdonald of Sanda. 

Kinnear is now the property of John Boyd Kinnear of Kinloch. 

Neilsoune. Gules, a dexter and a sinister hand in chief and a 
dexter hand in base couped at the wrist argent. 

*Taw. 

*MuLLiKiNE. David II., in the thirty-second year of his reign, 
granted to James Mulekyne, a Florentine, the office of monetarius for 
life, and he had also, along with Adam Tor, the privilege of exchanging 
all money in Scotland; in 1364 Donatus Mulekyn is paid for ornaments 
made for the King. 

The surname as Mullikene, Mulligane, Amuligane, &c., appears 
during the fifteenth century in Galloway; in 1492 Fergus Muligane was 
proprietor of Blackmyre, which remained with his descendants for about 
two hundred years. 

In January 1741 the arms were allowed to Major James Milliken of 
Milliken, co. Renfrew, with a demi-lion for crest, and the motto, " Regarde 
bien^ He died the following month, at the age of seventy-one, and the 
Funeral Escutcheon gives as his mother one of the daughters and 
co-heirs of Alexander Eraser of Knock, Ayrshire; his grandmother, a 
Hamilton of Inchgotrick; and his great-grandmother, a Ferguson of 
Auchinsoul. 

Major Milliken had purchased Johnstone in 1733, and altered the 
name to Milliken ; his son, James Milliken of Milliken, had two sons, 
who predeceased him, and two daughters — ^Jean married, 1764, Lieu- 



WORKMAN'S MS, 261 

tenant-Colonel William Napier of Culcreuch, Mary married Nathaniel 
Spens of Craigsanquhar, M.D. 

*MoWTRAY. 

139. Squire. L. ; the mullet is or, and a note is added, "hath two 
molletts in chief." 

Galbraith. L. ; the bears' heads are not muzzled. Mr Laing de- 
scribes the charges on the seal of Malcolm Galbrathe, 1409, as three boars' 
heads couped contourn6, and those in 1542 on that of Walter as three 
boars' heads erased. 

Sir James Balfour says greyhounds' heads, while Porteus makes the 
heads those of the wolf. 

Nisbet appears to be right in saying bears' heads. 

Maknawth. Argent, a chevron between two mullets in chief and a 
crescent in base sable, 

WiGMOiR. L. ; this curious coat, impaled with Scott, is cut on a 
stone on a house at Jedburgh, probably as old as the middle of the six- 
teenth century. 

John Wigmer, alderman of Edinburgh, 1344 ; John Wigmor, lord 
of Over-Liberton, 1362, is probably the John Wigmer who sat in the gene- 
ral council at Perth two years later, and in parliament 1369 ; Sir Roger 
Wygmor, 1392, had a grant of land from the common good of the town 
of Edinburgh. The name is met with later there but seems to be extinct 

Hair of yt Ilk. Argent, a chief sable ; so in Porteus' MS. 

Patrick Hayre, burgess of Ayr, 1428 ; Thomas, doomster of parlia- 
ment 1546 ; James represented Lanark in parliament 1686. 

From a family which possessed Rankinstone in Ayrshire for several 
generations, descended James Hair, a physician in India, who acquired 
Calderhall in Mid-Lothian, c. 1802, and d.s.p. 

His heirs spell the name Hare ; no arms registered. 

Strang. L. 

140. Cairnis. Or, three martlets azure, within a bordure engrailed 
gules. 

*Valtertoun. Porteus gives Waterton — azure, a sea pellok sqjant 
(a naked man playing) a harp on his back argent. 

Seal of Mr Robert Valterston, provost of Bothans, 1537, a lion 
statant, in chief a crescent between two mullets. 

Galfrid de Waterville witnessed the charter of foundation of the 
Abbey of Lindores 1 202-6 ; James de Walterston, 1 296 ; William de 
Walteristoun, 1329; Thomas de Wateriston, confessor to the king, 1343; 
David de Walteristoun, 1359-63, had an annualrent from the thanage of 
Tannadice ; John de Walteryston was father of David, who, in 1407, had 
a crown charter of the lands of Walteryston, co. Forfar, and the said 
annualrent; David of that Ilk, 1447-50; Hugh of that Ilk, 1488-1519; 
the family seems to have begun to decline soon after, as in 1535 David 
is designed portioner of Waterstoun. 

Crawfurd says there was a family of Waterstoun of that Ilk in Ren- 
frewshire, and that James sold the lands in 1384. 

3U 



262 WORKMAN'S MS, 

*ScHAN. Schand or Shand, a surname which is met with in Aber- 
deenshire from the beginning of the sixteenth century. 

Arms on the tombstone of William, merchant, burgess of Aberdeen, 
who died 1660 — a boar's head couped and a chief charged with three 
mullets. His son, William of Craig, left descendants. The arms were 
registered 1672-78 by Thomas, late treasurer in Aberdeen — azure, a boar's 
head couped argent, on a chief of the second three mullets gules. 

141. WoD OF YE (name obliterated, and Bonnington written 
below), L. 

Chamer of Gitgerth. Argent, a triple branch vert, on a chief 
gules a crescent between two mullets of the first. (?) Quhippo, see K. 

*ScROGE ; Bishop 1673. These arms were registered by William 
Scrogie, Bishop of Argyle, 1666-75, with the heart argent. 

"William Scrougie, commissary of Argyle, representer of Scrougie of 
Inveri, a few years later entered — or, a chevron azure between two scrougs 
(or branches wanting leaves) in chief and a man's heart in base proper. 

Robert de Scrogges having lost his life in the service of David de Line, 
the latter granted, c. 1200, to his son, Simon de Scrogges, a charter of his 
lands of Scrogges in Lyne, co. Peebles, which was confirmed before 12 13 
by Robert de Line, son of David. Soon after Simon, with consent of his 
brothers William and Hucting, sold Scrogges to the Bishop of Glasgow. 

In 1296 Adam del Skrogges, burgess of Haddington, and William 
del Skrogges of Peeblesshire swore fealty to Edward L David de 
Scrogges in 1413 owned land in Aberdeen ; John of Scrogis or Skrogs, 
elder, burgess of Aberdeen 1440-50; John, probably his son, sat in parlia- 
ment for the burgh 1445, and was provost ; William Scrogs, vicar of Nig 
1453. The bishop was son of Alexander, D.D., minister of Old Machar, 
who died 1659, at a great age. 

LiBBERTOUN. L. 

Abercroome, A. 
*Barclay. 

142. Wyntoun of yat Ilk, L. 

143. Anan of Aucherallan ; now his brother's soun of yt hous, 
minester in Edenr 1664. Arms as before. 

*Fanzis. At the very beginning of the thirteenth century, Richard de 
Faunes, brother of David de Grahame, held lands in Mellerstaing, their 
mother being Amable; Adam, son of Richard was dead c. 1250, his 
nephew and heir being Philip de Haliburton. 

Faunis belonged also to persons of the name, benefactors to the 
monks of Dryburgh, Adam de Faunis, Nicholas, father of Richard and 
of Eda. 

*Cader. The stag's head is cabossed on all the seals of the Thanes 
of Cawdor and their descendants given in Mr Laing's volumes from 1431 
to 1573. 

See " The Thanes of Cawdor " by Cosmo Innes, Esq. 

*Prymross of Auld. Another MS. makes the crescent gules, and 
adds three mullets of the field on the fess. 



WORKMAN'S MS. 263 

In 1613 the seal of James of Burnbrae, is — on a chevron between 
three primroses as many mullets, in middle chief a crescent. 

A seal, without date, of James Primrose bears three mullets and a 
chief charged with as many primroses. 

Sir James Balfour's blazon is — azure, a chevron argent between three 
primrose slips proper. 

Stacie gives as " an old coatt " — argent, on a fess azure between three 
primrose flowers gules as many mullets or, and this is given in G., and 
another MS. has it as the arms of Burnbrae family. Jenkins has 
Prymrois ; azure, a chevron argent between three primrose flowers or. 

" Sir Archibald Primrose of Dalmenie, knight and baronet, be his 
Majestic Charles ye ii. 1667, create ; vert, three primroses within a double 
tressure flowered counter-flowered or. His creast — a demi-lyon gules 
holding in his right paw a primross or; motto — 'Fide et fiducia.' 
Altered again 1672." 

Next he has inserted an engraving of arms — or, a lion rampant vert 
surmounted of a fess " pourpre or blew," charged with three primroses of 
the field ; below, " For Sir Archibald Primrose 1672 ;" above, "now the 
lion must be over and above the fess." 

The first entry in the register is for Sir Archibald of Carrington, 
baronet. Clerk to His Majesty's Council Register and Rolls — or, a lion 
rampant vert armed and langued gules, over all on a fess purpure three 
primroses of the field ; crest and motto as before, except that the primrose 
is proper. " Nota, sometymes he gives the fess next to the field, 
and over all the lyon, and 'tis presum'd the last extract bears so." 
Next comes 1693, his eldest son, by his second wife, Giels, daughter of 
Sir William Gray of Pittendrum, Archibald of Dalmeny ; first and fourth 
—or, a lion rampant vert armed and langued gules, as the coat of 
augmentation given by his sacred Majestic, Charles the second, of ever 
blessed memory to his said father, as a mark of favour for his services to 
the crown during the late troubles ; second and third — argent, on a fess 
azure between three primroses gules as many mullets or, as the paternal 
coat; crest as before ; motto — " Munus et muniinen." 

A Royal warrant, 12th March 1702, authorised Lyon to give and; 
assign to Archibald Viscount Rosebery "a double tressure counter- 
flowered as in the Royall arms of Scotland ; his lordship was created 
Earl of Rosebery, and his patent of arms i6th November 1703, blazons 
thus ; vert, three primroses or within a double tressure flowered counter- 
flowered of fleur-de-lis gules (sic); crest as before; motto — "Portent 
dementia decet ;'' supporters — two horses at liberty argent. 

In 1823 Archibald, Earl of Rosebery, matriculated the above, making 
the tressure or, and quartering Cressy of Birkin. The original motto 
was resumed and the supporters were two lions or; they had sometimes 
been carried vert. 

The Viscounts Primrose carried as supporters two leopards regardant 
proper collared and chained or, the collars charged with three primroses 
vert, but of this there is no registration. 



264 WORKMAN'S MS. 

In the Funeral Escutcheons are Prymrose of Burnbrae —argent, on 
a fess purpure three primrose flowers or. Primrose of Whitehous— or, a 
lion rampant vert surmounted of a fess azure charged with three primroses 
of the field, in dexter chief a crescent. 

The surname is probably taken from the lands of Primrose near 
Dunfermline. 

In 1387 an agreement was made between the Provost of the burgh of 
Edinburgh and the community on the one part, and Jonne Prymros and 
two others masons on the other, they undertaking to build five chapels on 
the south side of the parish church of Edinburgh. Prymros having no 
seal of his own, uses that of James of Fulforde. 

There are in the chartulary of St Giles, notes of payments, 1399-1402, 
to John de Prymros, dictus Johannes Prymros, for that work. 

Archibald Primrose, clericus mineralium, acquired Burnbrae, co. 
Perth, which descended to John, who left two daughters, Jane and 
Rachel, the former of whom sold the estate 1836, and acquired other 
lands in the county of Edinburgh, which were called Burnbrae, and held 
under the entail executed in 1770 by Edward Primrose. 

James, clerk of the Privy Council, younger son of Burnbrae, founded 
the ennobled branch. 

Primrose of Whitehouse ended in an heiress, who married David 
Heriot, advocate. 

John Primrose, merchant in Stockholm, was recognised as noble in 
Sweden 1650. 

*Knox of Ramfarly. Seal of Matthew Knok 1547, a fess checquy 
between two roundles in chief and a lozenge in base. Arms registered, 
1693, by Thomas Knox, then in Ireland, son of Thomas, a descendant of 
the family of Ramforly, co. Renfrew — ^gules, a falcon volant or, within an 
orle waved on the outer and engrailed on the inner side argent ; crest — a 
falcon perching proper ; motto — " Moveo et prqficiory 

The Knoxes of Renfrewshire probably adopted the fess checquy, as 
vassals of the High Stewards, as the Flemings of Barochan did, while 
the Sempills and Houstons, for the same reason, bore a chevron checquy; 
perhaps the " roundles " may be the roses, the bearing of the name of 
Knolles, Knowes, or Knox, elsewhere treated of. 

John of Knok was falconer to James IV., and the falcon is perhaps 
allusive to his office in the Royal Household. The blazon given by Pont, 
Porteus, Stacie, and Hamilton is — ^gules, within an orle engrailed argent 
a falcon volant or. Nisbet represents the orle as plain on the outer, and 
engrailed on the inner side. Porteous has another — vert, a martlet and 
a bordure argent. 

There are in Renfrewshire two places called Knock. One in the 
parish of Renfrew, was sold c. 1234 by Dugald, son of Christinus 
dempster of Lennox, to the Abbot of Paisley his overlord. The other is 
in the parish of Kilbarchan. 

John of Knok witnesses charters c. 1250; William, 1273; John, 
1284 ; Alan del Knoc or Knokis 1328-30 ; Robert Knock of that Ilk had 



WORKMAN'S MS. 265 

a charter of his lands from Robert III. William was Prior of the Friars 
Predicant, Glasgow, 1470. 

The printed pedigrees of this family are incorrect. In the account of 
Ranfurlie, John of that place, his wife Eupheme Galbraith, and their son 
Patrick, who survived in 161 1, are all omitted. 

Selviland, in the parish of Kilbarchan, is said to have been acquired 
by William, a younger son of Uchter Knox of Ranfurlie, by marriage with 
the heiress of the same name ; no such family had existed for more than 
two centuries, as about 1300 Adam, son and heir of the deceased Patrick 
de Selvinisland, resigned that property which was granted to the ancestor 
of the Halls of Fulbar. 

The " History of Glasgow," 1872, contains notices by the editor, 
and by Mr J. Bain, F.S.A. Scot., showing the true succession of the 
Knoxes of Selviland, and of the burgesses of Glasgow, their alleged 
descendants. 

Mark, merchant burgess, married, before 1594, Margaret Greynleis, 
and was alive in 161 1. His younger son, Thomas, merchant in Glasgow, 
married Elizabeth Spang, of a burgess family there, and left three sons : 
I. Thomas of Dungannon, a member of the Privy Council of Ireland, who 
had the certificate of arms 1693 ; 2. John, father of Thomas of Belliecreilly, 
in Ireland, who, in 1734, was served heir general of his uncle William, 
merchant in Glasgow ; 3. William, just named. 

Thomas of Belliecreilly was father of Thomas Viscount Northland ; 
Thomas, second Viscount, on being created an Earl, took the title of 
Ranfurly, from the seat of the Knoxes in Renfrewshire. 

Of the Renfrewshire family were Andrew, Bishop of the Isles and 
afterwards of Raphoe, who died in 1632, and his son Thomas, Bishop of 
the Isles. 

John Knox, the Reformer, has been said to be of the Renfrewshire 
family ; of this there is no proof, as all that is known is, that his father 
William was a native of, and resident at Haddington ; and Knox told the 
Earl of Bothwell that he had " borne a good mynd " to his family, " for, 
my lord, my grandfather, goodsher, and father, have served your lord- 
shipis predecessors, and some of thame have died under their standardis." 

*HuNNYMAN. Porteus has — argent, five bendlets gules ; aliter^ three 
bendlets with cottises engrailed on the outside, a crescent or. 

There is a remarkable seal of Andrew Honyman, Bishop of Orkney, 
1664 — quarterly, first, on a bend three mullets ; second and third, a fess 
countercompony ; fourth, a burning heart encircled by a wreath ; over all 
a fess charged with a crescent between two crescents inverted. 

The Bishop, who was son of David in Pitairchney, co. Fife, a man 
of no family, seems thus not to have used the Honyman coat at all ; the 
fess is probably for Stewart of Graemsay in Orkney, he having married 
the heiress of that family. None of his descendants registered arms till - 
1788, when William of Graemsay, advocate, afterwards Sir William of 
Armadale, baronet, and Senator of the College of Justice, was allowed — 
argent, a bend engrailed gules voided of the field. 

3x 



266 WORKMAN'S MS. 

The name occurs among burgesses and merchants at St Andrews ; 
about 1 570 Thomas had a charter of part of the lands of Balcrystie, in the 
east of Fife. 

144. *Craufurd. The initials D. C. are added. 

In January 1675, John Crawfurd of Camlarg registered — argent, a 
hart's head erased sable armed or distilling drops of blood proper. 

In 1789 John of Auchinames, as representing the families of Kerse, 
Camlarg, &c., recorded — quarterly, first and fourth, gules a fess ermine ; 
second and third, argent, a stag's head erased gules, between his attires a 
cross crosslet fitchde sable ; and was allowed supporters — two bulls sable 
armed and unguled or. 

Ten years before Patrick George Craufurd, a cadet, had entered arms, 
the stag's head being in the first and fourth quarters and without the 
crosslet. 

The present Edward Henry John Craufurd of Auchenames and 
Crosbie, again recorded arms and supporters as in 1789, but without the 
cross ; crest — a stag's head erased gules, between the attires a cross 
crosslet fitchde sable ; motto — " Tutum te robore reddam." 

There were cut in stone over the gateway at Kerse, in Ayrshire, as 
supporters, a greyhound and a bull both gorged with coronets and 
chained. 

At the funeral, in 1751, of the Hon. Mrs Sarah Craufurd of Auchen- 
ames, a daughter of Lord Sempill, a bull sable was the dexter supporter, 
the sinister being a talbot argent. 

HowisouNE. Argent, a man's heart proper, on a chief azure a fleur- 
de-lis or. 

Cathkeine. a comparatively modern addition — argent, a chevron 
azure between two roses in chief gules and a dagger point downwards in 
base of the second. 

A seal in 1550 bears a sal tire with a mullet in chief. 

145. Wardlaw of Torry. Much obliterated, but apparently azure, 
three mascles or. 

Bruce of Clackmannan. L. 

Tennand of yt Ilk. F. 

♦Barclay of Collairnie. Most of the Barclays in Scotland, 
including a cadet of this family, have a chevron between the crosses 
pat^e. 

In 1725 Robert Barclay of Urie, as representing Barclay of Mathers, 
registered — azure, three crosses patde in chief argent ; crest — a dove with 
an olive branch in its mouth proper ; mottoes — " Cedant arma " and " /u 
hac vince." 

The direct line having ended in an heiress, Mrs Margaret Barclay- 
Allardice, the heir male, Arthur Kett Barclay of Bury Hill, co. Surrey, 
in 1858 recorded arms with alterations, and was allowed the supporters 
which had been previously borne by the Barclay of Urie, but not 
registered— azure, a chevron, and in chief three crosses patde argent ; 
crest — a bishop's mitre affrontee with tassels flottant upwards or ; motto 



WORKMAN'S MS. 267 

— " In cruce s^ero ;'" supporters — two savages wreathed round the loins 
with oak leaves, holding in their exterior hands clubs erect proper. 

Walter de Berkeley was chamberlain of Scotland 1 165, and the family, 
in several branches, maintained a high position. 

John of Collairnie died in 1709, leaving a daughter and heir, 
Antonia, who married, in 17 17, Henry Steuart, advocate, second son of 
Sir James of Goodtrees, Lord Advocate. 

Stacie has for Collairnie — azure, a chevron or between three crosses 
pat6e argent ; crest — a bear's head argent, muzzled gules ; motto — 
" Honus est onus." 

The original arms of Berkeley in England, as given in Glover's and 
Charles' Rolls, were — ^gules, a chevron argent. At the siege of Caerla- 
verock, Maurice de Berkeley bore — ^gules, crusilly a chevron argent, a 
label of three points azure. In a Roll of the time of Edward II. are given 
the arms of Sir Maurice — ^gules, sem6e of crosses patde a chevron argent ; 
and of Sir John of Gloucestershire — gules, a chevron argent between three 
crosses pat^e or. 

A mitre is the crest of the Earls of Berkeley, who bear — ^gules, a 
chevron between the crosses patde, six in chief and four in base. 

Trumbill. Argent, a bull's head erased sable. 

Broun of Colstoun. L. 

Streueling. As Cadder, L. 

146. *Mastourstoun. An old family taking their surname from 
the lands of Masterton, near Dunfermline. The writer, in 1878, commu- 
nicated a notice of them to the " Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica," 
which was also printed for private circulation. 

Hugo de Villa Magistri is witness to a charter, c. 1250; his son, 
William de Meistreton, of the county of Fife, swore fealty to Edward I. 
1296, and sealed with a lion rampant. Their descendants held Master- 
ton till the sixteenth century. 

Soon after the Reformation, Alexander, probably a descendant of 
Masterton of that Ilk, had a feu-charter of part of Grange; in 1673 
Adam Masterton of Grange registered — argent, a chevron between two 
crescents in chief and a mullet in base gules, on a chief azure an eagle 
displayed or. 

Alexander Masterton acquired Parkmill, co. Clackmannan, 1547, and 
his representative, Francis of that place, registered arms 1 672-78-— argent, 
a chevron gules and a chief azure. 

The seal of Robert Masterton of Bad, 1588, is an eagle displayed 
impaling a chevron with a crescent in chief or on a chief. 

Other variations occur in the MSS. 

*Heart of yt Ilk. See before in this MS. 

147. *Hawdeinstoun of Southhouse. In L. for Dudingstoun. 
Greinlaw of yt Ilk. L. ; seal of Gilbert, Bishop of Aberdeen, 

1422 — a chevron between three water bougets. 

Arms registered by Robert Greenlies, M.D., c. 1750 — argent, a fleur- 
de-lis vert between three mullets gules, a bordure engrailed of the second. 



268 WORKMAN'S MS. 

The surname is taken from Greenlaw, co. Berwick. William de 
Grenlaw, c. 1190; Roland de Grenelawe entered into an agreement, c. 
1200, with the Abbot of Kelso, as to the church of Greenlaw, and, in 
1208, was /// atria Regis at Selkirk. In 1296 William de Grenlawe, and 
Matthew his son, swore fealty to Edward I. ; George of Greenlaw sat in 
parliament 1464-73. 

There is a very close resemblance between this coat and that of 
Glass. 

Reid of Colistoun. F. ; the eagle is sable and the inescutcheon 
gules. 

Duns of yt Ilk. F. 

*Stevinsounne of Hermandshiels, in Mid-Lothian ; Stevenson 
of that Ilk, CO. Lanark, was an old family ; Johan de Steuenston and 
Esteuene de Steuenston swore fealty to Edward I. in 1296 ; John of that 
Ilk lived after the restoration, and seems to have been the last of the 
family seated there. 

Hermandshiels was the property of the Stevensons during the six- 
teenth and seventeenth centuries ; in 1693 Alexander of Chesters, grand- 
son of a younger son, registered arms — argent, on a chevron between 
three fleurs-de-lis azure a cross moline of the first, on a chief gules three 
mullets or. 

In 1674, Archibald, M.D., who was afterwards knighted, recorded — 
argent, a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis azure, on a chief of the 
second three mullets of the first. 

Sir James Balfour gives Stevinstone of that Ilk — or, three falcons' 
heads erased proper. 

John Stevenson represented Peebles in parliament 1593. 

Sinclair of Blanss. F. ; the second and third quarters, argent, 
three martlets gules, 

148. *Carkatill of yt Ilk. The arms of Marion, wife of Walter 
Chepman, cut on a stone, c. 15 15, in the Chepman aisle, St Giles' Church, 
Edinburgh, have the addition of a mullet in base. 

The seal of John of Fynglen, 1555, has the heads couped. 
There were branches seated at Markle, Over-Liberton, Monkrig, and 
Nunland, and a family of Edinburgh burgesses of importance. 
John sat in parliament for Haddington 1584. 

*DUKET. 

*Gede. Arms registered, 1672-78, by Robert Ged of that Ilk — azure, 
three geds, or pykes, haurient argent. 

The family was seated at Baldrig, near Dunfermline ; James Geddie 
sat in parliament for Grail 1587, and John for St Andrews 1667-78 ; 
William Gedd represented Burntisland 1670-72, and Alexander 1689- 
1700. 

149. Spottiswood of yt Ilk. The coat with three garbs as before. 
•Makclelland of yt Ilk. 

*Geddes of Glenquholm. Arms registered, 1672-78, by John 
Geddes of Rachan, co. Peebles, " descended of the familie of Geddes, 



WORKMAN'S MS. 269 

of that Ilk, which is now extinct" — gules, an inescutcheon argent between 
three pike heads couped or. 

Pont has another blazon — argent, on a fess gules between two spur 
rowels in chief and a hunting-horn in base sable garnished of the second, 
three pikes naiant or. 

John of Geddes, bailie of Peebles, 1398 ; John possessed half of 
Ladyurd 1406; Kirkurd and Rachan were also their property soon after; 
John Geddes was a benefactor to the parish church of Peebles, one of the 
aisles of which was named after him ; James sold Rachan, &c., 1752, and 
died in two years; the family was represented, in 1779, by James, 
merchant in Edinburgh, son of James of Rachan by Helen, daughter 
and coheir of Hugh Somerville of Inverteil, W.S. 

Reidpeth of yt Ilk. L. 

Lawson of Humbe. Azure, two crescents in chief and a mullet in 
base argent. 

Wallace of Ellerslie. F. ; this coat was recorded in 1808 as a 
quartering by Sir Hay Campbell of Succoth, baronet, Lord President of 
the College of Justice, when the bordure was altered to counter compony. 

150. *Steuart of Trachquair. First, Stewart ; second, Buchan ; 
third, Rutherford, as descended from the heiress of Rutherford of that Ilk; 
fourth, the star has been said to be for the title of Traquair, or to indicate 
the maternal descent of James Stewart first of Traquair. He was natural 
son of James, Earl of Buchan, by Margaret Murray; the Earl acquired 
Traquair in 1478, and in 1491 granted it by charter to his son. 

The arms here have added to them as crest a bird ; motto — " Juge 
nocht ; " supporter — on the dexter side a stork, the supporter of the Earls 
of Buchan in this MS. 

The Earls of Traquair for a time bore Stewart and Gumming 
quarterly, with a crescent gules in chief for difference. 

The arms registered by Earl Charles, c. 1672, have the mullet in the 
third, and Rutherford in the fourth quarter ; crest— on a garb a crow 
proper; motto — " Judge nought;" supporters — two bears proper, armed 
argent. 

In 1742 arms — sable, a mullet argent — were granted to the 5-ev. 
Thomas Troughear, descended from the Rev. Mr Troughear alias 
Traquair, vicar of Till-crux, in Cumberland, in the reign of James VI. 

151. TouRis of Innerleith. Or, on a bend azure three crescents of 
the field. 

Kellieof(?Wauchtoun). Or, a fleur-de-lis in chief azure debruised 
of a bar sable, below the bar a saltire sable. The saltire and bar seem to 
have been gules and then painted over. 

Maitland of Lethinton. L. ; the lion is not armed and langued 
azure. 

Edmistoun of yt Ilk. L.; there are sketched in ink for supporters 
— two camels ; crest — a camel's head campaned ; another crest on the 
margin — a mound. 

Prestoun of Cragmiler. L. ; a wyvern as crest is sketched in ink. 

3 Y 



2 70 WORKMAN'S MS. 

Naper of Marchinstoun. L. ; Napier only. 

152. Arms of Henry, third Lord Cardross, c 1680. First, Buchan ; 
second and third, Mar and Erskine quarterly ; fourth, Douglas of Loch- 
leven ; in an escutcheon of pretence Stewart within a bordure gules 
charged with eight buckles or. 

Arms of his son David, afterwards fourth Lord Cardross and Earl 
of Buchan. 

First, Buchan ; second. Mar and Erskine, in the centre of the 
quarters a crescent sable for difference ; third, Stewart as before ; fourth, 
Douglas of Lochleven. 

153. Cunningham. Twelve shields in ink without names or mark- 
ing of tinctures, but each with differences. 



VII. 



KINGS' AND NOBILITY'S ARMS, 



C, A.D. 1566. 



»» I" 



KINGS' AND NOBILITY'S ARMS. 



It has not been thought necessary to give a list of the coats comprised 
in this collection, as nearly all of them are contained in W., or the other 
MSS. noticed. 

*Vdwart. The coat registered, 1672-78, by Thomas Edward of 
Longcroft, co. Linlithgow, is — azure, a fess argent, over all a marble 
pillar gules issuing out of the nombrill wavy. 

He belonged to a family of merchant burgesses of Linlithgow, who 
flourished for several generations. 

Nicol Udwart was Dean of Guild of Edinburgh 1584, Provost 1592, 
sat in parliament, and was tacksman of the mint. 

Isobella Edwards inherited the barony of Persie, co. Forfar, from 
her grandfather John, married Robert, younger son of Sir Alexander 
Wedderburn, baronet, and left issue. 

The seal of George Edward, 1441, is a chevron charged with a rose, 
two mullets in chief and a holly leaf and a buckle in base. 

*GiLBERT. Porteus blazons this coat argent, three trefoils proper, 
on a chevron azure three fleurs-de-lis or; but the seal, 1588, of Michael 
Gilbert, a bailie of Edinburgh, has the charges the same as here given. 

This Michael, a rich jeweller, sat in parliament for Edinburgh, and 
one of his daughters married the Lord President, John Preston of Fen- 
tonbarns ; in the funeral escutcheons of their children, Gilbert is designed 
of that Ilk or of Liberton. 

The family held securities over the lands of Drum and Gutters in 
the parish of Liberton. 

It is remarkable that when Sir Andrew Gilmour, advocate, whose 
brother possessed the estate of Craigmiller, in Liberton, and bore for 
arms — azure, three writing pens feathered argent, was created a baronet 
1661, he had a confirmation of arms, closely resembling those of Gilbert, 
from Sir Alexander Durham, Lyon — argent, on a chevron between three 
trefoils vert, as many fleurs-de-lis or. 

In 1733, Sir Charles Gilmour, third baronet of the second creation, 
1678, registered arms and obtained a coat, which gives charges from both 
the earlier ones — azure, a chevron between two fleurs-de-lis in chief or, 
and a writing pen full feathered argent in base. 

In January 161 1 the following coat was confirmed to James 
Gullimore, resident in London — gules, nine billets argent. Stacie. 

Faa. The coat in L. for Haldinstoun, and in some MSS. called 
Dudingston. It nearly resembles that given by Nisbet for Balderston, 
and for which he refers to the Lyon Register, but the arms are not 
recorded. The modern coat of Fall is a fess checquy between three 

3z 



2 72 KINGS AND NOBILITY'S ARMS. 

boars' heads ; Dudingston is a chevron between three cross crosslets 
fitchde. 

♦Stuidman. Porteus gives two other varieties of this — argent, 
three shell snails vert ; and, a fess vert between three house snails azure. 

This never was a family of much position, and no arms have been 
recorded. 

In the Exchequer Rolls, 1369, there is a payment to Patrick Sted- 
man. In the sixteenth century the name appears in connection with 
lands in Kinross-shire, and at a later period parts of the lands of Bal- 
lingall, Coldrain, and Wester Baldridge were possessed by persons of 
the name. 

Chalmers' " History of Dunfermline" contains a genealogy of the 
Stedmans of Baldridge, represented, when that work was published, by 
Charles von Barton alias Stedman, a landed proprietor in Rhenish 
Prussia, whose ancestors, for three generations, had been officers of the 
Scots Brigade in the service of the States General of the United Pro- 
vinces. 

A family of Barton, in the seventeenth century, bore a similar coat — 
gules, three shell snails or, but there seems no reason to identify the sur- 
names. 

Captaine Donaldsone. This name is in a different hand, appar- 
ently more modern, and the arms do not in the least resemble those of 
Donaldson. They are barry of six gules and argent, six martlets sable, 
three and three, on the two upper bars argent. 

*Brokas. Pont blazons this coat — argent, a demi-lion sable issuing 
from the sea proper, a bordure engrailed of the second. Porteus gives — 
argent, a lion rampant sable within a bordure azure. 

The name is a very rare one ; in 1489 Thomas Brokas had a pardon 
for having held the castle of Dumbarton against the king. 

*TuRNOUR. This surname, derived from an occupation, appears as 
early as 1382, in the Register of the Great Seal, when Thomas dictus 
Tumour, is named in a charter of John Crab, burgess of Aberdeen. Mr 
Hector, 1572-75, was in the service of the Earl of Errol. 

Early in the sixteenth century the lands of Kinminity, in the parish 
of Birse, were in the possession of John Turner, from whom they 
descended to his namesake, a merchant in Dantzic. This gentleman, by 
will 17th July 1688, confirmed 23rd September 1690, left legacies for 
educational and charitable purposes, and the residue of his fortune to buy 
land, " to be held blench from the Crown," to be entailed on his cousin, 
Robert Turner, then under age, son of Andrew in Kinminity, deceased, 
and others, obliging heirs female and their husbands to bear the surname 
and arms of Turner. The executors, in 1693-94, acquired the barony of 
Rosehill, formerly Hilltown, and the lands of Newark and others, in 
Aberdeenshire, all of which were united into the barony of Turnerhall, 
now held by the representative of the family. Major John Turner. Mr 
John Turner's heir-at-law, John, son of Andrew Turner, succeeded him 
in the Kinminity property, died in 1699, and his heir in 1742 was his 
nephew, John Turner of Kinminity, then sergeant in Major-General 
Otway's regiment in Ireland. 

The Turners of Kindrocht and Tillinaught, whose heiress married 
an Ogilvie, were probably of the same stock. 

A family of Turner flourished in the parish of New Abbey, and held 



KINGS' AND NOBILITYS ARMS, 273 

the estate of Ardwell for many generations. In 1585 John of Ardwell, 
John of the Hill, and several other persons of the name, were pardoned 
for intercommuning with the Earl of Morton. John sat in parliament 
for the burgh of Wigtown 161 2-21, and at the same time John was 
Sheriff-Clerk of Wigtownshire. 

William, last of Ardwell, was dead in 1800, when his heirs were his 
nephew, Martin Black, and his grand-nephew, Robert Rigg. 

The most conspicuous person of the name in Scotland was Sir James 
Turner, who, after serving with distinction abroad, was employed by 
Charles II. and James II. in military commands in Scotland. His 
"Memoirs," written by himself, were printed at Edinburgh 1829. After 
what has been said, it seems like a bull to state that his name was not 
properly Turner at all, but Turnett. Sir James was born in 1614, at 
Borthwick, of which his father, Mr Patrick Turnett, was then minister, 
his mother being Margaret Law, daughter of James, Archbishop of 
Glasgow. His younger brother, Archibald, D.D., one of the ministers of 
Edinburgh, Almoner to the King, and Subdean of the Chapel Royal, 
although generally known by the name of Turner, like his brother, 
appears in the list of graduates of the University of Edinburgh as Archi- 
baldus Turnetus ; he d.s.p. 1681, when Sir James was served heir to him 
in Brunton and other properties. 

Both brothers registered arms 1672-78, the coat of the younger being 
differenced by a crescent — quarterly, first and fourth, sable, a Katherine 
wheel argent; second and third — argent, three guttes de sang proper; 
crest — a heart flaming ; motto — " Tm ne cede malis" 

Some MSS. call the guttes de sang guzes. 

CoLQUHOUN OF Luss. Argent, a saltire engrailed between four 
crescents sable. 

Atoun. Gules (or azure ?, the colour stained and faded), a cross 
engrailed between four crescents argent. 

Frizell. Argent, three furisons azure. This is given in other 
MSS. for Steill, with the tinctures altered ; in some blazons the charges 
are called frizells. 

. Argent, three branches conjoined in base vert, on a chief 

gules a crescent between two mullets of the field. This is given in W. 
for Chalmers of Gadgirth, but seems to be the arms of Quhippo. Po;it 
has for that name — argent, a tree in pale issuing out of the base, the 
middlemost grains {sic, ? branch) half couped vert, on a chief azure a 
mullet between two crescents of the field. 

Porteus' blazon for Quhippo is — vert, an oak tree growing or, on a 
chief argent three stars gules. 

Sir Robert Quhippo or Quhippup, chaplain, had a suit in 1495 as to 
the ferry at Clydesholm. Leyhouses, Kidlaw, and other lands in East 
Lothian belonged to a family who figure frequently in the criminal trials ; 
William had been killed near Kidlaw by Hamilton of Samuelston ; his 
brother, Robert, a burgess of Edinburgh, killed the brother of the laird of 
Spottiswoode, and having been found guilty of various thefts, was hanged 
at the market cross of Edinburgh 1598; in June 1595 Thomas of Ley- - 
houses was killed by John Spottiswoode of that Ilk, who, ten years after, 
was denounced rebel for not surrendering to be tried. 

In 1614 David of Leyhouses was served heir of his father, Thomas, 
and soon after they disappear from the district. 



2 74 KINGS AND NOBILITTS ARMS. 

*Neilsoun of Kilcawfe or Craigcaffie. This coat was altered 
before the registration, 1672-78, by Gilbert Neilsone of Craigcaffie to — 
parted per chevron argent and or, in chief two sinister hands erect couped 
gules and in base a dagger point downwards azure. John, son of Niel, 
had several charters of lands, including Kellechaffe, from Robert I. Craig- 
caffie, which was erected into a barony in the sixteenth century, remained 
in possession of the Neilsons till far on in the eighteenth. 

Nisbet gives a notice of the Neilsons of Corsock, who bore different 
arms. 

*Elwat of Reidheuch ; see W. for another coat. Eliott, added to 
Porteus' MS. — gules, on a bend or between two pheons argent a baton 
of the first ; and Elliott of Lairistoun — gules, on a bend or a baton of the 
first. 

The coat registered in 1673 by Sir Gilbert Elliot of Stobs, baronet, 
is — gules, on a bend engrailed or a baton azure ; crest — an arm holding a 
cutlass ; but Stacie mentions that the ancient crest was a basket full of 
fruits or eiles. 

In 1859 Sir William Francis Eliott of Stobs and Wells was allowed 
to add the augmentation and supporters granted to Lord Heathfield. 
The charge on the bend would seem to have been a club, and is here re- 
presented as strengthened with rings of metal ; afterwards it is called a 
baton, and made plain and symmetrical ; in other blazons the baton 
becomes a flute, with holes for the mouth and fingers. 

In Colonel Williams' patent the flute is more like a horn or flageolet, 
with a small mouthpiece at one end and wider at the other end. 

Mr Robert Bruce Armstrong has very kindly allowed me to make 
use of the result of his investigations into the early history of the Elliots, 
and I am thus enabled to give a correct notice of the Redheuch family, 
and of the origin of the Larriston and Braidley branches. 

Elwald, a personal name, became a surname, and was gradually 
altered to Elwood, Eliot, or Allot, finally to Elliot or Eliot. 

In 1587 the Ellottis are mentioned as a clan on the middle march, 
having a chief. 

In 1488 Robert Elwald of Thorleshope, and his brother Patrick, 
occur, and that place long remained the seat of a branch of the Elliots. 

During the sixteenth century the heads of the house of Redheuch 
were recognised as chiefs of the clan. 

I. Robert El wold, who was alive in 1491, and at that time an aged 
man, is supposed to have been chief of his clan. He was probably born 
between 1420 and 1430. His son, 

II. Robert El wold, who had been Captain of the Hermitage, died 
shortly before November 1491. 

III. Robert Elwold, his son, at that period was a person of the first 
consequence in Liddesdale ; he was probably the Robert * known as early 
as 1508 as of Redheuch, and who is again mentioned in 1510. If he was 
the Master Eliot who was killed at Flodden, he must have left besides 
Robert, his successor, two sons, William of Larriston, and Archibald. 

IV. Robert Elliot, supposed to have been the eldest son of the last 
mentioned, was of Redheuch in 1515-1516, and was Captain of the 

* In the list of 1494-1495 there are five Elwalds bearing the Christian name of Robert. One 
"called King," another "of Langhalch," another "senior," another "the Earl," and another "young 
ridar." 



KINGS' AND NOBILITY'S ARMS. 275 

Hermitage in 1531.* He also appears in 1546, 1546- 1547, and 1548. In 
1 548- 1 549 he is again mentioned as Captain of the Hermitage, and must 
have died before 1557. He had at least two sons — Robert, and Martin of 
Braidlie. 

V. Robert Elliot, the eldest son, appears in 1546, 1547, 1548, and 
1553- He succeeded his father before 1557, during which year he is 
mentioned as eldest, when Martin, his brother, is also referred to. In 
1561 he is called of Redheuch, and in 1563 was appointed Captain of the 
Hermitage. He married " Maiorie Hamiltoun," and had four sons — Robert, 
Gibbie or Gilbert, William in Hartscharth (who married Jane Rutherford, 
one of the coheiresses of Gawen Elliot of Stobbs), and Archie. Robert 
Elliot of Redheuch died before 1566. 

From 1563 down to 1573 we do not hear of an Elliot of Redheuch, 
the probability being that the Robert who first appears in the latter year 
had, during that period, been a minor. During these ten years Martin 
Elliot of Braidlie, the uncle of the minor, led the clan, and under his 
leadership it became one of the most important on the border. 

VI. Robert Elliot of Redheuch, first mentioned in 1573. In 1580- 
1581 he was directed to give up the Hermitage, of which castle he had been 
captain. He also appears during the years 1582 to 1608 inclusive, and is 
believed to have married a daughter of Thomas Carlton of Carlton Hall. 
Besides Redheuch, Robert Elliot was also in possession or occupation of 
Larriston.f The date of his death is uncertain ; he was succeeded by his 
son. 

VII. Robert Elliot, who was served heir to his father April 20th, 
1619, and who married Lady Jane Stewart, daughter of Francis, Earl of 
Bothwell. By a charter of January 27th, 1637, he settled Lariston on his 
daughter, Mary, and her husband, James Elliot. 

In 1624 Robert was accused of conspiring to murder the Earl of 
Buccleuch. 

Larriston. The first offshoot from the parent stock was — 

William Elliot of Larriston, supposed to have been the son of Robert 
Elwold of 1 591, who was grandson of the chief, and who was of Redheuch 
in 1508-1510. He is mentioned in 1515-16 as of Larriston, and brother 
to Robert of Redheuch; he is also mentioned in 1516. The descent of 
this branch cannot be satisfactorily given. In the rent-roll of 1541, the 
lands are not even mentioned. In 1547 we hear of a William of Larriston, 
and during the same year William of Larriston younger. William of 
Larriston again appears in 1548. The probability is, that the first William 
was dead in 1556, and the 

William of Larriston alive, during that and the following year, was 
his son. In 1565 we again hear of William of Larriston. In 1592 the 
chief Elliot was of Cariston, but his Christian name was Robert, and he 
was of Redheuch also. 

In 1593 there was a William of Larriston, who again appears in 
15974 The pedigree of this branch is most confusing. They do not appear 

* He was probably the Robert Elwald mentioned in the Rent Roll of 1541 as " Officer," and 
to whom the lands of Bluntwood were said to belong heritably. Redheuch is not given in the Rent Roll 
of 1541. 

t In the account of the Borders of 1592, the chief Elliot is mentioned as of Canston, and m the map 
of the same period the name Robert Elliot is given as the occupier of that place. 

X Could this person not have been the William in Hartscharth, son of Redheuch, and brother to the 
Redheuch of 1593 and 1597 ? 

4A 



276 KINGS AND NOBILITY'S ARMS. 

to have had charters except from Buccleuch. Robert of Redheuch and 
Larriston, who married Lady Jane Stewart, by a charter, dated January 
27th, 1637, settled Larriston on his daughter and her husband. 

In 1672 there was a Robert Elliot of Larriston ; his son Robert was 
served heir in 17 12, sold the estate, and left a son Gilbert, father of 
William, Colonel in the service of the East India Company, who repur- 
chased the family estate, and registered arms 1793 — ^gules, on a bend or 
a flute of the first, in sinister chief point a mortar proper ; crest — a dexter 
arm grasping a spear proper ; motto — " Apto cum lare." 

Jane, sister and heir of William of Larriston, married John Williams, 
Esq. of Kensington Gore. 

Braidlie. The next offshoot from Redheuch was the branch of 
Braidlie, founded by Martin Elliot, second son of Robert of Redheuch. 
Martin first appears in 1556, then in 1556-57, and during the same year 
is referred to as brother of Robert of Redheuch. In 1561 he is called of 
Redheuch. In 1563 he is mentioned as of Braidlie, by which designation 
he was afterwards generally known. In 1569 he was pledge for 
the branch of Redheuch. In 1580 we hear of his sons, Sym, 
Gawin, Arche, and Hob, and at an earlier period, 1578, of another, 
William. Martin's son Gawin does not afterwards appear ; Arche and 
Hob are again mentioned. In 1586 Martin Elliot and his eldest son, 
Simon, had a lease of lands from the Earl of Bothwell ; in 1591 they had 
a Crown charter of Phillop in Selkirkshire, and Braidlie and Phillop 
were in the possession of the descendants of Martin about the time of the 
Restoration. 

In 1580 we hear of Archie, Gib, and Dandie, sons of Martin's brother. 

Stobs. Gawen Elliot of Stobbis is mentioned from 1584 to i6oo. 
He married Jane Scott, and was dead in 1607, leaving three coheiresses 
— Esther, married Gilbert Ker of Lochtour, and had issue ; Dorothy, 

married George Halyburton of Pinnakill ; and (Jean ?), married ■ 

Rutherford, and left a daughter, Jean, who married William Elliot, 
brother of Robert of Redheuch. 

She was dead in 162 1, when her son Robert was served heir to her ; 
he d.s.p., and was succeeded by his brother Francis 1642, ancestor of the 
Elliots of Dunlabyre. The succession of the Stobbs family is not clear ; 
Gilbert was of that place in 1622, and in 1628 purchased Middlesteid, 
Shaws, &c., from Gilbert Ker and Esther Elliot above named. William 
of Stobbs, and Gilbert, fiar of Stobbs, figure together 1646-54; Gilbert 
was knighted, and was direct ancestor of the present baronet. 

The Earls of Minto descend from a younger son of Stobbs. 

Gawen of Stobbs, in 1592, was tutor to his grandnephew, being pre- 
ferred to William Elliot, uncle of the boy, till the said William, who was 
then over twenty-two, should attain the age of twenty-five. A William 
Elliot represented the burgh of Selkirk in parliament in 162 1 and sub- 
sequently. 

HoRSLiEHiLL was a separate branch before the middle of the sixteenth 
century, and from it descends the family of Bewlie and Borthwickbrae, repre- 
sented by William Eliott-Lockhart of Borthwickbrae and Cleghorn, Esq. 

In 1603 William, burgess of Peebles, was served heir of his father, 
William of Horsliehill ; there can hardly be a doubt that he is the 
William who was Provost of Peebles a few years later, and has been said 
to be a younger son of Stobbs ; his great-grandson, Sir John, M.D., 



KINGS AND NOBILITY'S ARMS. 277 

physician to the Prince of Wales, was created a baronet 1778, and had a 
grant of supporters — a bay-horse and a sea-horse, both proper. He died 
in 1786, leaving an only child, Ann of Peebles, who left issue bearing her 
surname. 

In 1541 Archibald Ellott was designed "in Gorrenberrie ; " in 
1556 he acquired Falnesche, and had a Crown charter; in 161 1 William 
Ellott of Falnesche having acquired Arkleton, had a Crown charter. 
Falnesche remained with his descendants till the time of Archibald, 1675, 

Adam of Meikledale, a cadet of the Unthank family, acquired Arkle- 
ton, which was entailed in 1694 by Walter Elliot, who had registered 
arms 1676, with the bend indented for difference. The present William 
Scott-Elliot of Arkleton, W.S., is heir of entail. Scott of Satchels states, 
that Adam of Meikledale was descended from the former owners of Arkle- 
ton of the same name. 



I 



VIII. 

ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPT, 

A. D. 1603-5, 



ASCRIBED TO 



SIR DAVID LINDSAY, 

LYON KING OF ARMS. 



4B 



Sir David Lindesay of the Movnt, Knicht, Lord Lyon King of 
Armes. L. ; no mullets in chief, no crest or motto ; a crown, intended 
for that of his office, rests on the wreath ; supporters — a female and a 
male figure vested and winged. 

Arms of Scotland. L. ; the banner held by the dexter supporter 
is fringed azure, and has the arms of Scotland ; that held by the sinister 
supporter is fringed argent and azure, and a coronet or surmounts the cross 
of St Andrews. The lion of the crest holds a sceptre in his sinister paw. 

Anna Regina. Scotland impaling Denmark. 

Achievement of James L of England, — first and fourth, France 
quartering England ; second, Scotland ; third, Ireland. Crest of Scotland 
as before ; mottoes on either side of it — " Die est mon droyt" " In 
defence;" supporters — the lion of England crowned, gorged, and chained, 
and the unicorn of Scotland gorged and chained. The shield encircled 
with the garter, with the motto of the order thereon, and pendant there- 
from an oval badge argent, a cross gules, and with the collar of the thistle, 
and pendant therefrom an oval badge azure a saltire argent. On either 
side of the crest a banner — that on the dexter, azure, a portcullis crowned ; 
that on the sinister, argent, a rose crowned. 

Henry Frederick, Prince. Scotland with a label of three points 
azure. 

DvKE OF Lenoxe. Opposite the achievement is a shield of 
Stewart, and below it 

Followis the names of the present King oure Soverane Lord, and the 
Nobles of the name of Steuart w'in Scotland. After the King and Duke, 
are the Earls of Athole, Orkney, and Murray, Lords Innermeath and 
Ochiltree, Sheriff of Bute, Lairds of Rossyth, Garlics, Traquair, Grand- 
tully, Ballechin,, Minto, Prior of Blantyre, Lairds of Craigiehall, Castle- 
milk, Fintilloch, Bastoun, ArnetuUie. 

Lord Marqves of Hammiltovn. The list gives Sir James of 
Evindale, Laird of Innerwick, Abbot of Paisley, Lairds of Silvertonhill, 
Preston, Dunry, Sorn, Samuelston, Bathgate, Pardovan, Kynnaldie, 
Peill of Livingstone. 

Lord Marqves OF HuNTLiE. No tressure in the Seton coat. The 
lairds are Lochinvar, Stradoun, Auchindown, Gight, Pitlurg, Largmoir, 
Carnburro, Newton, Buckie, Cluny, Abergeldie, Craig of Auchindoir, 
Troquhane, Barskeoch, Airds, Schirmes, the Cule. 

Earle of Angusse. The Douglas heart is uncrowned ; the piles 
in the third quarter are vert, and five in number. The cross embattled 
of Auchinleck in base. The list of Douglases is divided into three : first, 
those " quha are come of the hous of Angus," being the lairds of Glen- 
bervie, Maynes, Spot, Pendreich, and Kilspindie ; secohd, " descendet of 
the Erie of Mortonnis hous," lairds of Lochleven, Whittingham, Grange, 
Melrose, Kirkness, and Douglas of Kennestoun ; third, those " quha are 
come of the verie hous of Douglas," being the lairds of Drumlanrig, 
Pumpherston, Coshogill, Provost of Lincluden, lairds of Pennieland, 
Tulliquhillie, Dalvene. 



282 LINDSA Y II. 

Earle of Argyle. The Campbell coat is gyronny of eight or and 
sable ; crest — a boar's head couped sable, with blood gushing from the 
neck proper. 

His cadets are the Lord of Loudoun, lairds of Lundie, Glenorchy, 
Ardkinglas, Caddell, Auchin (breck), Lochhow (?), Lawers, Glenlyon, 
Schankistoun. 

Earle of Mar. The younger branches are Lord of Somervell, 
laird of Dun, Abbots of Dryburgh and Cambuskenneth, laird of Balgony. 

The Lord of Somervell was his lordship's son James, afterwards 
Earl of Buchan, who was contracted in marriage to Mary, eldest daughter 
and coheir of Gilbert Lord Somerville, who agreed to resign to them the 
title and estate, retaining his own liferent. The marriage did not take 
place, but the Somerville estates, which were heavily burdened, were sold 
to the Earl of Mar. 

Earle of Atholl. 

Earle of Crawfurde. The Abernethy coat, without the ribbon, 
occupies the first and fourth quarters. Names of the noblemen and 
barones of the surname of Lyndsay within Scotland : — 

Erie of Crawfurd. 

Lord Lyndsay. 

Lord Spyne. 

Lairds of Edzell, Covingtoun, Kinfaunis, Dunrod, Month, Dowhill, 
Vaine, Kirkforther, Balcarres, Barcloy, Barnyaird, Wodvray, Cuilier. 

Earle of Erroll ; the supporters are two ox-yokes resting on the 
shield. 

Lord of Yester, lairds of Delgaty, Leys, Urie, Meginch, Muchals, 
Futhie, Gourdie, Smithfield, Talay, and Sandford. 

Earle Marshal. The chief is paly of six or and gules. 

Lairds of Benholm, Canterland, Craig, Ackelgill, Scheill, Troup, 
Harthill. 

Earle of Orkney. 

Earle of Murray. First, Scotland ; second, Randolph, Earl of 
Moray ; third, Stewart, with a label of three points gules ; fourth, gules, a 
lion rampant or. 

Earle of Rothess. The second and third quarters — argent, a lion 
rampant sable armed and langued gules ; crest — the head and bust of an 
angel full-faced vested azure. 

Lord Lindores, lairds of Leslie, Balquhain, Pitcaple, Parkhill, Inner- 
dovat, Otterstoun. 

Earle of Morton. Douglas of Morton quartering Douglas of 
Lochleven. 

Earle of Montrose. The paternal coat in the second and third 
quarters. 

Lairds of Fintrie, Morphy, Inchbracky, Balgowan, Braco, Orchill, 
Knockdolian, Claverhouse. 

Earle of Cassills. The chevron azure. 

Lairds of Bargany, Blaquhan, the Cove, Girvanmains, Skeldon, 
Knockdaw, Branestoun, Tornagannoch. 

Earle of Glencairne. 

Lairds of Cunynghamhead, Glengarnock, Caprington, Drumquhassill, 
Barns, Aiket, Robertland, Tourlands, Polmaise, Lagland, Cesnok, Kirk- 
shaw. 



LINDSAY 11. 283 

■Earle of Eglington. L. ; with a double tressure flowered counter- 
flowered argent. 

Lairds of Langschaw, Skelmorlie, Braidstane, Clonbeith. 

Earle of Cathnes. 

Lord of Sinclare, lairds of Roslin, May, Herdmanstoun, Blanse^ 
Auchinfrank. 

Follouis the Lordis of Parliament. 

Lord Hoome. Crest — a lion's head gules issuing from the wreath. 

Lairds of Coldingknowes, Wedderburn, Aytoun, Blacader, Hutton- 
hall, Polwarth, Manderston, Greenlaw, Broxmouth, North Berwick. 

Lord Fleming, First and fourth, or, a chevron within a double 
tressure gules ; second and third, azure, six fraises argent. 

Lairds of Boghall and Blaklaw. 

Lord Maxwell. Argent, a saltire sable, three pellets in chief and 
flank. 

Lord Herries, lairds of Newark, Nether Pollock, Tealing, Cowhill, 
the Hill, the Logane, Drumcoltrane, Portrack, Tinwald, Conheath, the 
Isle, Carnsalloch. 

Lord Lindesay. 

Lord Innermeth. 

Lord Yester. Supporters — two savages surrounded by trees and 
foliage, so that their bodies above the waist only are visible. 

Lord Drummond. Crest — a dog's head sable issuing from the 
wreath. The dexter supporter holds a hound in leish, and another is 
couchant behind the legs of the sinister supporter. 

Abbot of Inchafiray, lairds of Carnock, Bordland, Blair, Innerpeffry, 
Abernethie, Balloch, Colquhalzie, Pitkellony. 

Lord Olyphant. 

Lairds of Berridale, Gagie (? Gask), Newton, WilHamston, Bachilton. 

Lord Ogilvy. The lion placed on a mount vert and charged on the 
breast with an escutcheon ; azure, a star of six points or ; but the family 
shield on the opposite leaf has the lion alone ; crest — a portcullis. 

Lairds of Powrie, Finlater, Banff", Boyne, Innerquharitie, Balfour, 
Inchmartine, Clova, Craig, Westcraigie, Innerkelour, Lawtoun. 

Lord Glammes. The tressure is sable in the shield opposite. Crest — 
the bust of a lady placed on what looks like an oval mirror, with a frame 
x^^xt's>tr\\\xv<g\&2Xz.<gt, '■'■ In Domino confido." 

Lairds of Auldbar, Kingoldrum, Cossines. 

Lord Boyd. 

Lairds of Banheath, Kippis, Bonschaw, Penkill, the Throchrig. 

Lord Sanquhair. 

Lairds of Frendraught, Brunstoun, Innernytie, Ruthven, Cluny, 
Carse, Liberie, Camnay, Nauchtane. 

Lord Vcheltrie. First, Scotland ; second, Stewart, with a label of 
three points gules ; third, Lennox, the saltire engrailed ; fourth, or, a lion 
rampant gules for the Earldom of Fife ; crest — a wyvern's head. 

It is to be observed that there is no bordure compony here, and in an 
illuminated MS., of about 1570, in the Lyon Office, although the arms of 
Lord Ouchiltre have the bordure compony, this is corrected on the 
opposite side in a pen and ink sketch of the " sigillum Andrese Steuart, 
Lord Ocheltry, the armes without ye bordure." In a very interesting 
volume, printed for private circulation 1854 by the Hon. and Rev. Andrew 

4C 



284 LINDSAY 11 . 

Godfrey Stuart, he argues and makes a strong case for the descent of the 
families of Evandale, Ochiltree, and Castlestuart from a legitimate son of 
Walter, eldest surviving son of Murdoch, Duke of Albany, and not from 
an illegitimate son of James the gross, youngest son of the Duke, which 
is the account usually given. 

Lord Forbes. Supporters — a savage and a hound. 

Lairds of Tolquhoun, Brux, Pitsligo, Rires, Towie, Corsindae, 
Monymusk, Balfliug, Auchinhofe, Cushnie. 

Lord Herries. 

Lord Elphinston. 

Lairds of Henderstoun, Barntoun, Sellem (Selmys), Schank. 

Lord Synclair. Motto — " Faith." 

Lord Salton. Opposite are the arms of " Abernethie of auld " 
without the ribbon. 

Lord Sempill. Field or. 

Lairds of Beltrees and Cathcart. 

Lord Gray. 

Lairds of Duninald, Grange, Ballegarno. 

Lord Somervell. Motto — " Feir God in love." 

Lairds of Cambusnethan and Plane. 

Lord of Ross. Melville in the first and fourth quarters. 

Lairds of Kilravock, Craigie, Balnagowan. 

Lord Borthvik. 

Lairds of Balhouffie and Newbyres. 

Lord Lovat. 

Lairds of Philorth, Durris, Overtoun. 

Lord Cathcart. Crest — a parrot perched on a round ball ; motto — 
" Humilitate." 

Laird of Carleton. 

Mackcloyde, Lord of the Lewys. W. ; the mount issues from the 
base. 

*Macleane. Gilleon ni tuoidh, who] is said to have fought at the 
battle of Largs, is supposed to have been father of Gillemoie Makilyn, 
who in 1296 swore fealty to Edward L 

Some authentic notices of the Macleans are given in the " Origines 
Parochiales," and a genealogy of the clan Maclean, published in 1838, 
contains a detailed account of many of its branches ; the early part of the 
genealogy seems hardly reconcilable with the dates. 

Several branches held their lands in free barony of the Crown, and 
contested the chiefship, but the unfortunate neglect of the registration of 
arms by the members of this family, leaves us without a decision as to 
their armorial rights. 

In 1803 Alexander Maclean of Coll, registered arms nearly resembling 
those here given, without any mark of cadency, and with supporters — a 
greyhound proper collared and leashed gules, and an ostrich proper with 
a horse-shoe in its beak azure. Nisbet gives the supporters of Sir Hector 
Maclean, baronet, chief of his clan, as two seals proper standing on a 
compartment representing green land and sea. 

Lachlan M'Leane of Morvaren had a precept for a patent of baron- 
etcy, 3rd September 1631, and a grant of land in Nova Scotia on the 
same day from Sir William Alexander, but no patent is entered in the 
Great Seal Register. The supporters latterly borne by the baronets are 



LINDSAY 11. 285 

two ostriches as already blazoned. John, younger brother of the first 
baronet, went to Sweden 1639, was employed in a diplomatic capacity by 
Charles II., who is said to have conferred a baronetcy on him in 1650; 
he was recognized as noble in his adopted country under the name of 
Makeleer, with an alteration of arms. In 1708 his son, General David 
Maclean, was created a baron ; this title expired 1816, on the death of 
Baron Roger Maclean, minister of state to Charles XIII. 

Maitland, as L. ; Lord Thirlestane, lairds of Lethingtoun, Auchin- 
cassill. 

*Mackoneil, laird of Dunnivege and Glennes. 

The arms of the Lord of the Isles are in L., and the armorial of le 
Bouvier gives those of one of the later lords. 

The seals of Ranald, son of Somerled, and of Angus, son of Donald, 
a.d. 1292, have a ship filled with armed men; that of Alexander, son of 
Angus, has the lymphad only, and another the lymphad with two men. 
The arms of Randal, first Earl of Antrim, cut on a stone in a wall built 
by him in 1625, to enclose the well of St Bridget, co. Roscommon, are a 
lymphad quartering a dolphin (? salmon) naiant. 

In 1677 Ronald, Marquess of Antrim, registered in the books of the 
Lyon Court the following — first, argent, a lion rampant gules holding in 
his dexter paw a thistle slipped or ; second, azure, a dexter hand couped 
at the wrist fessways argent, holding a cross crosslet fitchde paleways 
gules ; third, or, in the sea proper a lymphad oars in saltire sable ; fourth, 
parted per fess wavy argent and vert, a salmon naiant proper ; crest — a 
hand erect closed proper ; motto — "Vis conjuncta fortior ;" supporters — 
a savage wreathed about the head and middle with laurel, and a falcon 
proper armed jessed and belled or. In 1873 the Rev. George Hill 
published, at Belfast, "An Historical Account of the Macdonnells of 
Antrim." 

The arms of Macdonald of Moydart, Captain of Clanranald, are given 
among the coats taken from the Lyon Register. In Mr Laing's collection 
are two interesting seals appended to a deed in 1572, by John Murdodach 
M'Allister, Captain of Clanronald, and his eldest son Allan — a tree 
eradicated between a sinister hand fessways couped at the wrist turned 
towards the tree on the dexter, and a lymphad with no sails or oars, a flag 
at the masthead, on the sinister. 

In 1810 Reginald George Macdonald of Clanranald, Captain and 
Chief of Clanranald, obtained a grant of supporters — two bears, each 
pierced through the body with two arrows in saltire points downwards 
proper; the arms were those recorded by his ancestor, 1672-78, but the 
crest, a castle proper, is altered to a triple towered castle argent masoned 
sable, and issuing from the centre tower a dexter arm in armour embowed 
grasping a sword, all proper. In addition to the old motto, " My hope is 
constant in thee," another is placed below the shield — " Dhandeon co 
heiragha." 

The pretentions of this gentleman led to the well-known controversy - 
in which Mr John Riddell took part on the side of Glengarry. In 1797 
Alexander M'Donell of Glengarry, had registered the older coat, nearly as 
given from Workman, borne by the Lords of the Isles, and by yEneas 
Lord M'Donell and Arross — or, an eagle displayed gules surmounted of 
a lymphad sable, sails furled and rigging proper, in dexter chief a dexter 
hand couped in fess of the second, and in sinister chief a cross crosslet 



2 86 LINDSAY I L 

fitch^e of the third ; crest — a raven proper perched on a rock azure '; 
motto above the crest — " Cragan an fhithich ;" supporters — two bears 
each pierced through the body by an arrow proper; motto below the 
shield — ''Per mare per terras!' In 1870 these bearings were again 
recorded by the present representative of the family, ^neas Ranald 
Westrop M'Donell, Esq. In an old representation of the arms the bears 
are white and blood flows from the wounds, the hand is erect, and there 
is no cross crosslet. 

The coat of Macdonald of Slate, now Lord Macdonald, is given iri 
the MS. of Stacie, Ross Herald 1663-87: first, argent, a lion rampant 
gules armed or ; second, azure, a hand proper holding a cross patde of 
calvary sable ; third, vert, a ship ermine her oars in saltire sable in water 
proper ; fourth, parted per fess wavy vert and argent, a salmon naiant ; 
crest — a hand holding a dagger proper; supporters — two leopards proper-, 
motto — " My hope is constant in thee." 

The Lord of Ceremonies, Sir James Bellenden, Baron of 
Brochton. L. ; the buck's head is erased ; crest — a buck's head erased 
or, with a pheon azure between the attires ; motto — " Justice, peace," 
supported by two female figures representing peace and justice. In 1668 
these arms were confirmed by Lyon to William Lord Bellenden of 
Broughton, the buck's head being couped, the Royal tressure being 
added, and the motto — " Sic itur ad astral The seal, 1604, of James of 
Broughton, gives the arms as L. ; crest — a thistle, and the supporters. 
The Earl of Buchan represents the family. 

ScRiMGEOUR OF DuDHOPE. Arms of John with supporters, and again 
impaling those of his wife, Magdalene Livingstone. 

Campbell of Glenorchy. Gyronny of eight argent and sable in 
the first and fourth quarters. 

Gordon of Lochinvar. A bend or surmounts the three boars' 
heads. 

Charteris of Kinfauns, has the tressure. 
Carnegie of Kinnaird, has the cup on the breast of the eagle. 
Irvine of Drum. Three holly leaves. 

*Craufurd of Lefnoreis. The seal, 1587, of William of L., has 
three stags' heads erased. George of L. sat in parliament 1560-72. The 
estate was sold about 1630, after being for many generations in this 
family. 

*Hepburn of Waughton. a curious variation of the arms of this 
line, the heiress of which married Sir Andrew Ramsay of Abbotshall, 
baronet. He recorded his own and his wife's arms in 1672, the latter 
being Hepburn quartered with argent, three martlets gules, probably for 
Gourlay. 

Hepburn of Smeaton at one time bore the chevron of his paternal 
coat between three martlets argent. Mr Laing gives a seal of Patrick of 
Waughton without date — first and fourth, Hepburn ; second, a (cross ?) 
engrailed ; third, Rutherford (?) ; the description does not seem exact ; 
crest — an antelope's head. The barons of Waughton and Luffness were 
a powerful family, and have been said to be older than the house of 
Bothwell. The successive heads sat in parliament from 1483 almost 
regularly till 1651. Sir Patrick was a Privy Councillor to Charles I. 

Cunvnghame of Cunynghamehead. a pall sable between a mullet 
in chief gules and two garbs in flank azure. 



LINDSAY 11. 287 

*HOME OF WeDDERBURN. 

*Erskene of Gogar. He was afterwards Viscount Fenton, and the 
crown and tressure refer to his services to James VI. at the time of the 
Gowrie plot. 

LuNDiE OF THAT Ilk. Gules, fivc pallets or a bend, &c. 

Douglas of Drumlanrig. The heart is not crowned. 

KiRKPATRiCK OF Closeburn. The field is or. 

Ker of Fernihirst. The three mullets on the chevron are azure, 
a stag's head erased or in base. 

Menzies of Weem. Field ermine. 

*Blair of Balthayock. The seals of James de Blair, Provost of 
Dundee, 1462, and of Alexander Blar of Balthayock, 1491, have a chevron 
between three roundles. 

Stephen de Blar, son of Vallenus, granted a charter of the lands of 
Letcassy to the monks of Cupar in the reign of William the Lyon. 

In 1296 David de Blare, of the county of Perth, did homage to 
Edward I. Balthayock was in the possession of the family from 1370 
till its recent sale. Thomas of Balthayock sat in parliament 1471-84, and 
another Thomas 1560. Persons of the name represented the burgh of Perth 
1513 and 1597, ^"^^ many cadets of Balthayock formed separate families. 

Sir Alexander of Balthayock registered arms, 1672-78 — argent, a 
chevron sable between three torteaux. 

David II. grants Ardlere and Baldowry, in the fortieth year of his 
reign, to John de Ardlere and the heirs of his body on his own resigna- 
tion, whom failing to his brother Patrick de Blare ; also a charter of East 
Maler to Hew Blair. 

Dalzell of that Ilk. The man is not entirely naked in this 
representation, but wears a pair of short white drawers ; his body is guttd 
de sang, his hair stands on end, the arms are elevated, and the whole 
attitude and expression denote fear. 

Haldane of Gleneagles. The Lennox saltire is engrailed. 

Stirling of Keir. Argent, on a bend engrailed sable three 
buckles or. 

TuRNBULL of Bedrule. Argent, a bull's head erased sable horned 
azure, blood flowing from the neck. 

Grant of that Ilk. Azure, three antique crowns or lined gules. 

Logan of Restalrig. First and fourth, argent, an eagle displayed 
sable ; second and third, or, three piles sable. 

Innes of that Ilk. First and fourth, gules, three bears' heads 
couped or ; second and third, argent, three mullets azure. 

Dunbar of Mochrum. The lion and bordure with eight roses. 

Patrick of Dunbar, Earl of March (ninth Earl), appears first on the 
list of the six " Magnates of Scotland " who sealed the guarantee for the 
ransom of King David II. The document, dated Berwick-on-Tweed, 
5th October 1357, has appended to it an impression of the Earl's seal. 
Couchd, a lion rampant within a bordure charged with eleven roses ; 
crest — on a helmet, a horse's head bridled issuing from a coronet showing 
three long and two short points ; supporters — two men vested, visible to 
the waist, each having a long feather in his cs.-^.— Communicated by A. 
H. Dunbar, Esq. 

*Mackenzie of Kintayle. The seals of Colin of Kintail 1585, 

4D 



288 LINDSAY II. 

Kenneth of Kintail 1597, and Sir Roderick of Coigeach 1624, all have 
the stag's head cabossed, with a mullet between the attires. 

When Kenneth above named was created a peer in 1609, the arms 
were — azure, a stag's head cabossed or attired with ten tynes argent ; 
crest — a mount azure with fire issuing therefrom proper ; motto — " Luceo 
non uro ; " supporters — two deerhounds argent collared gules. Kenneth, 
third Earl of Seaforth, registered arms 1672-78, when the supporters 
were — two savages wreathed about the head and middle, holding in their 
exterior hands batons burning at the end and resting on their shoulders, 
their hair likewise inflamed all proper. 

In 181 7 these arms and supporters were allowed to George Falconer 
Mackenzie of Allangrange, the heir-male; and the Hon. Lady Hood- 
Mackenzie of Seaforth, 18 15, registered arms, her supporters being a grey- 
hound proper collared gules, pendant from the collar a badge or charged 
with a buck's head cabossed, and a savage as above. 

The history of the family has recently been illustrated in " The Earls 
of Cromartie," by William Eraser, printed for private circulation, 1876; 
" Genealogical Tables of the Clan Mackenzie," by Major Mackenzie of 
Findon, 1879 ; and " History of the Clan Mackenzie," by Alexander 
Mackenzie, 1879. 

Conflicting accounts have been given of the origin of the family, and 
there is little evidence of their early pedigree ; the oldest Crown charter 
recorded is dated 1509, and confirms Kintail and other lands to John Mak- 
kenzie, erecting them into the barony of Eleandonan. 

Kenneth of Kintail sat in parliament 1596-98. 

*Ross OF Balnagowan. Balnagowan was granted by William, 
Earl of Ross, before 1370, to his brother Hugh, with whose descendants 
it remained till the death s.p., in 171 1, of David Ross. This gentleman 
left the estate, which had been erected into a barony in 161 5, away from 
his right heirs. He seems to have had a passion for executing legal 
documents, as he not only made three different deeds of entail, but 
arranged to execute a resignation of his pretensions to the Earldom of 
Ross in favour of William Lord Ross of Hawkhead, who hoped to obtain 
a re-grant from the Crown. Balnagowan had two sisters— Isabel, who 
married Innes of Lightnet, and Katherine, wife of John Mackenzie of 
Inverlawell; Malcolm Ross of Pitcalnie became heir male, and his 
descendant is the present representative. Two savages were borne as 
supporters. The seal of Hugh of Rarichies, afterwards of Balnagowan, in 
1351, at which time his elder brother was alive, has a mullet in base as a 
mark of difference, and what Mr Laing describes as a bordure charged 
with eleven escallops or ermine spots ; perhaps this is the tressure which 
was borne by several of the Earls of Ross. 

MoNCUR OF THAT Ilk. Argent, a rose proper, on a chief azure three 
escutcheons or. 

Barclay of Cullernie. Azure, a chevron or between three 
crosses patde argent. 

Fotheringham of Powrie. Barry of eight argent and vert, a 
bordure gules. 

Halkett of Pitfirrane. The three piles sable issue from the 
base. 

*Vaus of Barnbarroch. The seal of Sir William de Waus, c. 
1240, is ermine, a bend; that of Robert Vaus, in 1500, a bend, and in 



LINDSAY IL 289 

sinister chief a lozenge; Janet Vaus, in 1569, uses the three stars as here 
given. 

John de Vallibus lived in the reign of William the Lyon. 

Sir John de Vaus swore fealty to Edward I. 1 291, as did John de 
Vaus, of the county of Edinburgh, five years later. 

Alexander was Bishop of Galloway 1422-44, and George held the 
same see 1489- 1505. Robert Vaus had a charter of Barnbarroch in 1451 
from William, Earl of Douglas ; the lands were erected into a barony 
1 59 1, and remain in the possession of the family, who have latterly borne 
the plain coat — argent, a bend gules, with two savages as supporters, but 
have never registered arms. 

The coat cut in stone c. 1500 at Whithorn is said to be a bend with 
no other charge (?). 

Sir Patrick of Barnbarroch was a senator of the College of Justice 
1576, a member of the Secret Council, and ambassador to Denmark. 

Kyninmonth of Craighall. The chevron is or. 

Dunbar of Cumnock. The cushions and tressure. 

*Arbuthnott of that Ilk. These would appear to be the bearings 
of Sir Robert, composed with the three passion nails of Wishart, his first 
wife being a daughter of that family. 

Douglas of Glenbervie. The plain coat with no crown. 

* Ramsay of Kirknewton. 

*Herries of Cousland. This and the preceding, with their showy 
augmentations, date from the period of the Gowrie plot. 

*Edmonstone of Duntreath. The seal of Sir William, in 1470, 
has these bearings within the Royal tressure ; at a later period the 
annulet was dropped. Two lions are the supporters, and a horse's (?) head 
issuing from a coronet the crest, on the seal above-mentioned. The crest 
now borne is a swan's head issuing from a coronet, with the former sup- 
porters, but these arms are not registered ; they appear as early as 1507, 
on the seal of Sir William of Duntreath. 

A genealogical account of the family was printed for private circula- 
tion in 1875, and there was also published, at Berwick 1790, and again in 
Edinburgh 1834, a short notice of the Edmonstones of Ednam, &c. 

The Ednam family bore — or, three crescents gules ; crest — a camel's 
head ; supporters — two camels ; a later crest was a globe surmounted of a 
cross. 

John Edmonstone of that Ilk, co. Edinburgh, had a charter of 
Ednam 1390; his representative. Sir John, sold Edmonstone 1626; 
Ednam remained with his descendants for four generations, and the repre- 
sentation passed, in 1826, to the descendants of the marriage, in 1766, of 
Isobel Edmonstone to William, younger son of Aytoun of Inchdairnie. 

Henry de Edmonstone, c. 1250, was probably son of Edmund, who 
gave his name to his lands ; William of that Ilk sat in parliament 1483, 
and John in 1560; the family were heritable coroners of Lothian. 

Sir William of a younger branch married Mary, daughter of Robert 
III., and had the lands of Duntreath, which were erected into a barony in 
his favour 1452. William of Duntreath sat in parliament 1478, and 
Archibald 1488. 

Both well of Furd. A mullet gules on the chevron. 

MouBRAY OF Barnbougal. A bordurc engrailed argent. 

Hamilton of Innerwick. Gules, a fess checquy argent and azure 



290 LINDSA Y IL 

fracted, between three cinquefoils of the second, in middle chief point a 
round buckle proper. 

•Monro of Foules. The eagle's head is erased on the seal of 
Robert Munro, vicar of Urquhart 1579. Sir James Balfour gives for 
Monro of Balkney — vert, an eagle displayed argent armed gules. Porteus 
gives for Monro of Foulis — gules, a lion's (? eagle's) head erased or ; 
aliter, or, an eagle's head erased gules. Stacie has for Sir George Monro 
(of Culrain) — gules, an eagle sitting on a helmet proper ; but Sir George 
Mackenzie gives the arms of Foulis as — or, an eagle perching on a helmet 
gules, and adds a bordure embattled of the second for Sir George, who 
was a younger son. 

The Lyon Register, 1672-78, shows that or, an eagle's head erased 
gules, had at that time become the settled arms of the name ; that coat is 
recorded with differences for several cadets, and for the chief, with two 
eagles proper as supporters, 

Robert of Monro had a charter from Robert I., of Counetis, in 
Strathspey, and of the lands of Capermakcultis. 

Robert of Monro lived about the middle of the fourteenth century, 
and in 1437 George first has the designation of Foulis. The family 
were vassals of the Earls of Ross at first. Robert of Foulis sat in 
parliament 1560-72. 

Urquhart of Cromarty. Azure, a chevron argent between three 
boars' heads erased or. 

Forman of Priorletham. First and fourth, sable, a camel's head 
erased or campaned argent ; second and third, azure, a chevron between 
three fishes haurient argent. 

MoNCUR (?). Name not given ; argent, a rose gules, on a chief azure 
three escutcheons of the field. 

OcHTERLONY (?). Name not given ; azure, a lion rampant argent 
within a bordure of the second charged with eight buckles of the first. 

Makeleun of that Ilk. Gules, a lion rampant between three 
mullets argent. 

Lyle of Stanypeth. Azure, fretty or. 

Otterburn of Redhall. The chevron is vert and the chief gules. 

Rutherford of Hundeley. The principal charge is rather an 
inescutcheon gules charged with another or than an orle. 

KiRKALDY OF Grange. Or, two mullets in chief gules, and a 
crescent azure in base. 

Hoppringle of Galashiels. Argent, on a bend azure three 
escallops or. 

•Burnett of Leys. This singular coat has already been noticed 
under W., where it is given with different tinctures for Burnett in 
Tweeddale. 

Mr William Burnett of Barns, of old of Burnetland in that county, 
registered, 1672-78 — argent, three holly leaves vert, a chief azure ; and at 
the same time Sir Thomas of Leys, baronet, recorded — ^argent, three 
holly leaves in chief vert and a hunting-horn in base sable, garnished 
and stringed gules. These bearings are cut in stone at Crathes, c. 1550; 
and at Muchals, built by Andrew Burnett of Leys, and his son Sir 
Thomas, the first baronet, 1619-27, the same appear, with supporters — a 
man in a hunting garb, and a greyhound. The supporters were not 
recorded by Sir Thomas, but in 1838 another entry was made by Sir 



LINDSAY IL 291 

Thomas, then of Leys, when they were blazoned a Highlander in a hunt- 
ing-garb holding in his exterior hand a bow, and a greyhound, all proper. 

Sir James Balfour gives the arms of Leys, putting the horn between 
the three holly leaves, and Porteus gives the coat registered by Barns for 
Burnet of Burnettsland of old ; also for Burnett of old — argent, three 
holly leaves vert. 

In Domesday Book, Burnard is named as holding lands in Alriceseie 
in Bedfordshire, and elsewhere, as a mesne tenant of William de Ow. 
A seal of Odo Burnard, attached to a charter relating to Arlesey, c. 1200, 
has a leaf, or perhaps rather a flower composed of seven leaves, on a short 
stalk ; another seal of the same person, a little later, has three leaves on a 
shield. The leaves have been called burnet (pimpernel) leaves, but all the 
Scottish blazons have holly. One leaf appears on the seal, 1252, of 
Richard Burnard of Faringdon, in Roxburghshire. Faringdon remained 
in the possession of the Burnards for several generations. 

Alexander Burnard had charters, from Robert L, of lands in the 
forest of Drum and the barony of Tulliboyll, and thus founded the family 
in the north of which Sir Robert Burnett of Leys, baronet, is heir male. 
Leys was erected into a barony in 1607. 

Gilbert, Bishop of Salisbury 1689-17 15, and Robert of Crimond, a 
Senator of the College of Justice 1661, belonged to a younger branch of 
this line. 

Alexander Burnett of Craigour and Tillihackie, an early cadet of 
Leys, about the middle of the sixteenth century acquired the estate of 
Craigmyle, by marriage with the heiress of Craigmyle of that Ilk. Their 
grand-daughter and heir married James Burnett, immediate younger 
brother of the first baronet of Leys ; and the descendants of this marriage, 
the Burnetts of Kenmay (of which family the present Lyon King of 
Arms is a younger brother) have since quartered — azure, two garbs in 
chief and a crescent in base or, for Craigmyle. 

The crest borne by the families of Leys and Barns may, perhaps, be 
founded on the bearing of the man hewing the tree ; it is a dexter hand 
with a knife pruning a vine-tree proper; motto — " Virescit vulnere 
virtus y 

There can be no doubt, from the identity of name and arms, that the 
Burnards, lords of Faringdon, or Farningdon, now Fairnington, co. Rox- 
burgh, were founded by an immigrant from England. In the reigri of 
William the Lyon, c. 1200, Roger made two grants to the monks of Mel- 
rose from his lands of Faringdon, one of them being witnessed by his four 
sons, Gaufrid, Ralph, Walter, and Richard. About 1200 Gaufridus Bur- 
nald is named ; a little later Ralph, designed son and heir of Roger 
Burnard of Faringdon, makes a grant to the church of Glasgow ; Walter 
Burnett, in the reign of William, witnessed a charter of Stephen de Blar 
to the monks of Cupar; Richard of Faringdon, 1252. About 1250 
Patrick Burnard held lands near Gordon, in Berwickshire ; and in 
1264 Henry Burnet is called a servant of the Justiciary. In 1292 Roger 
Burnard was dead, leaving a son and heir a minor ; John Burnart in the 
reign of Robert I. ; John Burnard of Faringdon, c. 1335-1360. In 1296 
Williame de Farningdon of Roxburghshire swore fealty to Edward I.', 
perhaps a member of the Burnard family. 

In 1368 John Burnard was wounded at Lyddell, and died in Rox- 
burgh Castle, when his lands of Ardross in Fife, and Currie in Mid- 

4E 



292 LINDSA Y II. 

Lothian, were forfeited, but after a time were restored to his cousin and 
heir, William Dishington. 

The early settlers in the north certainly were Burnards ; besides the 
direct line, seated at or near Leys, there were, in the reign of David IL, 
John Burnard, macer to the king, and William Burnard ; the former had 
an interest in the lands of Carnousie in Banffshire, the latter in those of 
Kinnaber in Forfarshire. 

The Burnetts of Barns have claimed descent from the de Burneville, 
but this claim hardly seems proved. From 1116, when John de Burne- 
ville was on an inquest as to lands belonging to the see of Glasgow, there 
are frequent notices of persons of the name, and to a charter of David, 
son of King Malcolm, to the monks of Kelso, Robert de Burnetuilla was 
a witness, 11 19-24; this is the only instance in which the letter / is 
inserted. 

On the other hand, the Burnetts in Tweeddale certainly sometimes 
appear as Burnards, and as late as 1585 we find " William Brenarde of 
the Barnis." 

It seems not unlikely that from the Burnevilles may have derived 
the Burnefields, who, in the fifteenth century, were vassals of the Bishops 
of Glasgow, and in the sixteenth were a numerous clan in the Merse. 

Rodbert de Burneville, 1 124-53 ; Robert de Burneville was a hostage 
1 174; John de B. was dead c. 1230, when there was a suit as to his widow's 
terce from the lands of Kerinton, co. Edinburgh ; Robert de B., and his 
son Robert, witnessed a charter of Patrick, Earl of Dunbar, before 1233; 
1296, lands in the shires of Edinburgh, Berwick, and Roxburgh were 
restored to Agnes, widow of John de B., who had died about twenty 
years before ; in 1324 James Burnart held lands near Berwick-on-Tweed, 
and William de Burneton (? Burnevilla) was mayor of the burgh 1333-6. 

Nisbet quotes a mortification by John Burnett of that Ilk, 1400, to 
the chaplainry of the altar of the Holy Rood in the church of St Gordian 
at Manor, close to Barns ; John of Burnetland had a charter 1405 ; John 
of Burnetland was on an assize 1484, and was dead in 1500, when his 
widow had terce from Barns and half of Burnetland ; his grandson and 
heir, John, then in minority, was afterwards designed of Barns. 

Burnetland is in the parish of Broughton, about six miles from 
Barns. William of Barns, nicknamed " the Howlet," was a conspicuous 
member of the family, lived to a great age, and by his wife, Margaret, 
daughter of James Stewart of Traquair, aunt of John, Earl of Traquair, 
Lord High Commissioner and Treasurer, left a numerous family at his 
death in 1645. 

Among his junior descendants were the Burnetts of Carlops, of 
whom Archibald took part in the rising of 17 15, and was executed ; the 
Burnetts of Little Ormiston ; the Burnetts of Cringaltie ; and Alexander, 
Bishop of Aberdeen 1663, Archbishop of Glasgow 1664, died 1684. 
His Grace registered arms, adding a cross patde gules in the centre of 
the shield, and taking for motto — " Non est mortale quod optoT His 
daughters and coheirs were : Anne, married, first, Alexander Lord Elphin- 
stone, who died 1669 s.p.; secondly, Patrick Lord Elibank, and had issue. 
Mary, married Roderick Mackenzie of Prestonhall, a Senator of the 
College of Justice, brother of the first Earl of Cromartie; her son, Alex- 
ander, married ^Emilia, daughter and heir of Hugh Lord Lovat, and took 
the designation of Eraser of Fraserdale. 



LINDSAY I L 293 

Captain James Burnett of Barns sold the estates, and died in 1855 ; 
his eldest son, William, resident at Hay Lodge, Peebles, now represents 
the family. 

The intermarriages of the Barns family have been Caverhill of that 
Ilk, Naesmith of Posso, Inglis of Murdostoun, Veitch of Dawick, Scott 
of Bonington (an heiress). Chancellor of Shieldhill, &c. 

In Funeral Escutcheons, the arms, as borne before 1672, are given 
without the chief for Burnett of Barns. 

Maxwell of Tealing. Ermine, a saltire sable. 

Wallace of Ellerslie. Azure, a lion rampant argent 

Galbraith of Culcreuch. Gules, three bears' head couped or 
muzzled vert. 

FuLLERTON OF Dreghorn. Of, a fess azure between three otters' 
heads couped gules. 

•LicHTOUN OF Ullisheaven. Arms registered 1672-78 by Robert 
Lyghtone, colonel in the service of the King of Sweden, son of the 
deceased John of Ulissishaven, lieutenant-colonel in the same service — 
argent, a lion rampant gules armed and langued azure ; crest — a palm tree 
vert ; motto — " Per adversa virtus T 

Another crest was a lion's head, with the motto, " Light on." 

Seal of John Lichton of Ullsheiven, 1572 — a lion rampant ; the same 
charge is on the seal of Sir Robert Leghtoun 1536. 

The seals, 1666 and 1673, of Robert Leigh ton. Bishop of Dunblane, 
afterwards Archbishop of Glasgow, are — a lion rampant, with a lion's 
head erased as crest. 

The lion appears to have been sometimes salient, if not passant. 

Sir James Balfour has — ^gules, a lion salient argent ; Pont has two 
blazons : argent, a lion rampant gules armed or ; argent, a lion passant 
gardant gules. 

Porteus has — argent, a lion rampant vert armed and langued gules. 
Sir Patrick Hume gives — ^gules, a lion passant argent. 

Colonel Robert, who registered arms, was left an orphan in infancy 
by the death of his father in action before Witstock in 1633 ; he rose to 
be general in the service of the King of Sweden, Governor of Esthonia, a^ 
Privy Councillor, and was created Count of UUishaven 1687. 

Count Lyghtone d.s.p. October 1691, In the country of his adoption 
the simple paternal coat received additions, and he bore — first and fourth', a 
lion rampant ; second and third, a palm tree encircled by a coronet grow- 
ing from a mount in base ; over all an escutcheon of pretence quarterly — 
first and fourth, quarterly; second and third, a lion rampant. Three 
crests — a demi-lion between two wings holding a sword in his paws; a 
palm tree encircled by a coronet ; a demi-lion between two probosces 
holding a forked pennon. 

William de Lechton witnessed a charter to Walter de Ro'ssy of 
Rossy, CO. Forfar, c. 1260; Sir William de Legheton, in 1291, and 
William de Lecton, of the county of Fife, in 1296, swore allegiance to 
Edward I.; Thomas, Canon of Moray, was Deputy-Chamberlain 1340; 
Henry had a charter from John de Moravia, of Lochflat and other lands in 
Inverdovat, Fifeshire, which was confirmed by David II. in the thirty- 
fourth year of his reign. 

Duncan was Sheriff-Depute of Forfarshire 1391 ; Walter was killed 
1392 ; Henry was Bishop of Moray 1414, of Aberdeen 1422. 



294 LINDSAY 11. 

Sir Alexander was Prior of Torphichen 1424; David, Abbot of 
Arbroath 1483- 1502. 

Usan or Ullishaven, long the seat of the family, was erected into a 
barony by James IV., and was sold early in the seventeenth century by 
John, who went to Sweden. The Leightons intermarried with Burnett 
of Leys, Johnston of Caskieben, Rossy of that Ilk, Lord Ogilvy of 
Airlie, Sandilands Lord Abercromby, Maule of Panmure, &c. 

Robert sat in parliament for Montrose 1578-87, and Patrick 
1612-30. 

Alexander, M.D. of Leyden, a cadet of Usan, is celebrated for the 
severity of the treatment he received from the court of the Star Chamber ; 
he left issue, Sir Elisha, secretary to the Duke of York ; Robert, who 
was Principal of the University of Edinburgh 1653, Bishop of Dunblane 
1 66 1, Archbishop of Glasgow 167 1-4, died unmarried in London 1684; 
Saphira, who was mother of Edward Lightmaker, of Broadhurst in Essex 
— she survived the archbishop, and was, along with her son who died in 
1709, his executrix. 

*Haitlie of Mellerstaine. On an early seal of Robert Hately, 
called I'Porte, there is a bird passant ; on that of John de Hetlyn, in 1292, 
a flower of nine leaves ; and in the same year Alexander de Hatley uses a 
boar's head couped, thus originating what became the hereditary bearing. 
The family was long seated at Mellerstain, in the parish of Earlston, co. 
Berwick; Sir Robert dictus de Hatteley, and Matilda, his wife, were 
parents of William de Hatteley who, with consent of his wife Emma, 
about 1230 granted to the monks of Kelso a right of way through his 
lands of Meloustan, and permission to build a bridge. About 1270 
Robert de Hateley and William de Hatteley witness charters; in 1296 
Alisaundre de Hateleye did homage to Edward I. 

About 1560 a feud began between the Haitlies and their neighbours 
the Burnfields, in which Steven Burnfield, younger of Greenlawdene, was 
killed, and there were repeated bonds to keep the peace, outlawries and 
other proceedings, for twenty years. 

Henry, younger of Mellerstain, was accused of treason in 1567, and 
predeceased his father John, who, in his old age, made over to Walter 
Ker of Littledean, his liferent of the tower, and to several persons of his 
own name most of the estate. This led to a violent quarrel between these 
parties, and the Haitlies twice, in 1579 and 1583, broke into the castle 
and took forcible possession. 

Ker also claimed the marriage of John Haitlie, the young heir ; this 
John was dead before 1623, leaving a son, James, and an encumbered 
inheritance ; two years later James was served heir, and finally parted 
with the lands of his ancestors. 

Younger branches possessed Lambden, Sneip, Brumehill, &c., but 
the name has almost died out. 

The blazons of the arms vary a little ; Pont, Porteus, and Stacie all 
have— or, on a bend azure three boars' heads erased argent. Sir James 
Balfour gives — azure, three boars' heads erased argent ; and Porteus has 
a second blazon — azure, three boars' heads erased, or couped, argent. 

Guthrie of that Ilk. The lion quartering Cuming. 

Rynd of Carse. a mill rind sable in chief. 

KiNNAiRD of that Ilk. Argent, three mullets azure, quartering, 
gules, three crescents or. 



LINDSAY IL 295 

Chalmer of Gadgirth, and Chalmer of Segyden. Or, a fess 
checquy gules and argent, quartering, azure, a mullet argent. 

Armstrang of Mangertoun. Argent, a saltire azure. 

Arnot of that Ilk. Sable, a chevron between three mullets 
argent. 

Neilson of Carcathie. Argent, three sinister hands couped below 
the wrist gules. 

SwiNTON OF THAT Ilk. Gules, three boars' heads erased or. 

Vallange of Lochend. Or, three water bougets sable. 

Broun of Colstoun. Gules, a chevron between three fleurs-de- 
lis or. 

Scot of Abbotshall. The arms of Balwearie, with a pheon azure 
in the centre. 

Inglis of Tarvit. As Lochend L. 

Aytoun of Dunmure. L. ; that Ilk. The surname is taken from 
lands in Berwickshire, but the early seals of members of the family there 
have devices which do not resemble the coat here given. They are — an 
eagle displayed, a flower with eight leaves, a fleur-de-lis, a crescent 
between two mullets in 1276, a man's head affronts 1327, and a hare or 
rabbit sejant. In 1296 Henry de Ayton, burgess of Haddington, and 
John Ayr de Ayton (?) of the county of Berwick, signed the Ragman 
Roll. Persons of the name were bailies of Haddington in the fourteenth 
century, and John represented the burgh in parliament 1645. John of 
Aytoun, in 1482, sat in parliament as a commissioner from the burghs. 

It is said that Ayton was carried by the marriage of the heiress to 
George, younger son of the first Lord Home, and his descendants bore a 
rose in the centre of their quartered coat as a mark of difference. 

John Aytoune had a charter of the lands of Over Pittedie, in Fife, 
from David II. 

In 1496 Andrew makes payment of the tax of spears for that county, 
and was probably identical with the master of works at Stirling Castle 
1497. Nisbet describes a seal of Andrew Ayton, Captain of Stirling 
Castle, who, in 1507, had a charter of the lands of Wester Dinmure, in 
Fife, which, a hundred years later, were erected into the barony of Ayton; 
it is — first and fourth, a chevron between two stars and a crescent (? arms 
of Arnot) ; second, Aytoun ; third, an anchor. 

The arms of Sir John Aytoun of that Ilk were registered 1672-78,' as 
given by Sir David Lindsay. Mr Sinclair-Aytoun of Inchdairnie is heir 
male ; the estate he takes his designation from was acquired in 1539. 

There was printed for private circulation at Hamilton, in 1830, a 
genealogical account of the family, a work of small value. 

*Paterson of Luthrie. The Patersons are said to have taken the 
chief as vassals of the Douglases, Lords of Dalkeith, but there is no 
evidence to support this theory, and the bearing of that branch of the 
house of Douglas was a chief gules charged with two mullets. Easter 
Dinmure, in Fife, after being for several generations in the family, was 
sold in 1669 to Andrew Paterson, bailie of Cupar, and his descendants 
held it for more than a hundred years. 

Several Patersons registered arms 1672 and later, all carrying the 
pelicans, and several also the chief with mullets, differenced for the cadets. 
The bearing of Captain Andrew of Dinmoore, whom I conclude to be the 
head of the elder line, and seller of the estate, is— argent, in three nests 

4F 



2 96 LINDSAY II. 

vert, as many pelicans feeding their young or. Hugh Paterson, writer 
in Edinburgh, who consented to the sale, was ancestor of the Patersons 
of Bannockburn, co. Stirling, baronets, 1686, now represented by Hugh 
James Rollo, W.S., who is heir male of the family of Rollo of Powhouse. 

Mr Alexander Paterson, minister of Logie Durno, in Aberdeenshire, 
was the first of a family to which belonged John, Bishop of Ross ; John, 
Archbishop of Glasgow ; and Sir William of Granton, Clerk of the Privy 
Council, who was created a baronet 1687, a title which became dormant 
on the death of Sir John Paterson of Eccles, 1782. 

Colonel John Anstruther-Thomson of Charleton, co. Fife, represents 
the Archbishop and the elder line of this family. The burgh of Cupar 
was represented in parliament 1574, 1617-21, 1662-67, by persons of the 
name, probably of the Dinmoore family. 

BoNAR OF RossiE. L., the field is or. William Bonar was master 
of the artillery 1458 ; the arms of William Bonar, who was present at 
the Council of Munster, were the saltire and crescent, with a bomb fired 
as crest. The saltire and crescent are the bearings of William Bonar 
1461, and of William of Rossie 1549. In 1509, however, John of Rossie 
used a chevron between two crescents in chief and a star of six points in 
base; and in 1586 the seal of William of Keltic, co. Perth, shows two 
swords in point surmounted of a chevron. William of Rossie, in 1579, 
quartered a fess charged with a mullet for Charteris. The only early 
registration is by a doctor of medicine, 1672-78, who adds a mullet in 
chief. 

William Boner was constable of Kinghorn 1328 ; William was 
comptroller 1454; and in 1471 William sat in parliament for St Andrews. 

Sandilands of St Monans. First and fourth, Douglas, the heart 
uncrowned ; second and third, or, a bend azure. 

Wemyss of Pittencreiff. First and fourth, or, a Hon rampant 
gules ; second and third, argent, a bend azure. 

Lindsay of Dowhill. One bar wavy in base, no mullet. 

* Rollo of Duncrub. A chevron between three heads are the bear- 
ings on an early seal ; the heads are more like those of a lion than a boar. 
Sir James Balfour's blazon is — argent, a chevron engrailed sable between 
three tigers' heads erased gules, for Rollo of Duncrub ; he gives later for 
Lord Rollo — argent, on a chevron azure between three boars' heads erased 
sable, a mullet or. 

The arms registered, 1672-78, by Robert Rollo of Powhouse, a cadet 
of Duncrub, are — or, a chevron between three boars' heads erased azure, a 
bordure engrailed of the second for difference. 

Robert H., in the eleventh year of his reign, confirms a charter of 
Duncrub and other lands, granted to John Rollo by David, Earl Palatine 
of Strathern, and Earl of Caithness, son of the king, 1380. Duncrub 
was erected into a barony 151 1. In 1361 John Rollo was bailie of Perth. 
John Rollo was clerk of the cocket of Edinburgh, and a little later 
Dotninus yohannes Rollo, master of the house of St Germains, was clerk 
of the wardrobe and chamberlain to Queen Euphemia. The burgh of 
Dundee was represented in parliament by David Rollo 1481, James 
1503-24, David 1535-40; and burgess families of good standing con- 
tinued there for many generations. Peter Rollo, Bishop of Dunkeld 
1 585-1606, and Senator of the College of Justice, was younger son of 
Andrew of Duncrub. His seal, in 1600, is a chevron between three boars' 
heads erased. 



LINDSAY 11. 297 

The lands of Powhouse, co. Stirling, were granted by the Provost of 
Trinity College Church, Edinburgh, by charter, 4th June 1556, to Mr 
David Rollo and Marion Livingstone, his spouse ; to this branch, now 
represented by Hugh James Rollo, writer to H. M. Signet, belonged Mr 
Robert Rollo or Rollock, first principal of the University of Edinburgh 

1585. 

John Rollo, second son of the first Lord Rollo, acquired Bannock- 
burn in 1636, which was the same year erected into a barony in his favour; 
he married Isobel Cockburn, also Annabella, daughter of George 
Buchanan of that Ilk, and died in March 1666, having had a son, 
Laurence, and three daughters — Anne, married David Drummond of 
Invermay; Jean, married Alexander Innes of Cockstoune; and Isobel, who 
died unmarried. John Rollo is styled baronet in the service of his 
nephew, Lord Rollo, as heir male special of conquest 1672; no patent of 
creation is recorded, but as he is styled Sir in 1658, the honour may have 
been conferred by Charles 11. abroad. Sir Henry Rollo, baronet (?), 
Supervisor General of Salt Duties in Scotland, died 1733. Captain 
Rollo married the Countess of Athole before 1634; this must have been 
Lady Mary Stewart, widow of James, Earl of Athole. 

The patent conferring the barony of Rollo on Sir Andrew Rollock of 
Duncrub, 165 1, mentions the corruption in the form of the name, and 
expressly restores the original spelling, Rollo. 

Wood of Largo. L. ; the tree growing from a mount in base or. 

Strang of Balcaskie. As L. ; Petcorthy, the chevron ensigned with 
a cross. 

Abercrombie of that Ilk. L. ; the boars' heads gules. 

Forsyth of Nydie, Or, three grifiins segreant azure armed gules. 
In 1296 William Frisith, of the county of Peebles, did homage to 
Edward I. 

The seal of David Forsith of Dykes, 1488, is a fess between three 
cross crosslets fitchde, and charged with as many lozenges. 

Sir James Balfour gives for Nydie in 1492 — gules, a chevron en- 
grailed argent between three griffins segreant or, and also the coat in L. 

The only entry in the Lyon Register in the seventeenth century is 
for Mr James Forsyth of Tailzertoune, minister of Stirling, descended of 
the family of Dykes, commonly designed Hallhill— the arms as L. ; crest 
— a demi-griffin vert ; motto — " Instaurator ruinceT 

Nisbet quotes from Lord Haddington's collections, a charter of 
Robert I. to Osbert, son of Robert de Forsyth, of part of the lands of 
Salekill, in the sheriffdom of Stirling. William de Fersith was bailie of 
Edinburgh 1365. Robert II. granted one hundred per annum out 
of the lands of Polmaise-Marischal, in the same county, to Forsyth or 
Fersith, clerk, who, in 1364, renders accounts of the custumars of 
Stirling ; Fersith was Constable of Stirling Castle before 1368. Thomas 
de Forsith, Canon of Glasgow 1487, sealed with two buckles on a bend. 

In the fifteenth century John Forsyth held lands in Aberdeenshire, 
and branches of the family settled at Millegue, in Banffshire, and at 
F"orres, for which burgh William sat in parliament 162 1 ; John, in 1652, 
was deputy from the burgh of Cullen to treat with the English ; Captain 
Forsyth was one of the prisoners who escaped when detained by the 
English in the vault below the Parliament House, 17th May 1654. Dykes 
was in Lanarkshire, where David Forsyth held lands in 1494, and he or a 



298 LINDSAY 11. 

namesake designed scutifer is a witness there in 147 1. Robert de Forsyth 
witnessed a charter of Robert Keith, Marischal of Scotland 1426; David 
of Gilcamstoun, co. Aberdeen, 1490, was probably direct ancestor of John 
of Dykes who, in 1541, sold Gilkemstoun to Gordon of Pitlurg. 

Henry was rector of Monymusk 1543. David of Dykes 1488 ; David 
of Dykes 1507; John of Hallhill 1540-56; David of Dykes 1571 ; James 
of Dykes, commissary of Glasgow, 1608-13, and his son, Matthew of 
Auchengray, advocate; William of Dykes 1615; William of Dykes 1640; 
and Barbara, heiress of the family, wife, in 1656, of Patrick Kello, are in 
the line of this family. William of Nydie 1434, and Alexander of Nydie 
1604, are the first and last we find of the Fifeshire branch. Mr James, 
who registered arms, married Marion Elphinstone, and d.s.p. 1675, 
leaving his property of Polmaise-Tailzertoune to his nephew, James 
Bruce of Garvell, descended from the Airth family. This gentleman 
assumed the surname of his mother's family, and was dead in 1699, 
leaving a daughter, Rebecca Forsyth or Bruce of Polmaise-Tailzertoune. 

Martine of Cardoun. Sable, a lion rampant argent armed and 
langued gules. 

Makgill of Rankeillour. a bordure engrailed argent. 

EcHLiN OF PiTTADRO. First, argent, on a mount vert a stag 
courant gules attired sable ; second, argent, on a mount vert a hound 
courant azure ; third, or, a lymphad sable ; fourth, Stewart. 

MuLTRAY OF Seafield. L. ; gules, on a chevron argent between 
two escallops in chief or and a boar's head erased in base (? proper), three 
mullets azure. 

DuNLOP OF THAT Ilk. A mistake, the arms being those of Reid of 
Collistoun. 

*CouTTS OF AucHTERCouL. Richard de Cotis was a landowner in 
Moray 1343; Donald and John de Gouts were put to the horn in 1392, 
for being concerned in the slaughter of Sir Walter de Ogilvy, Walter de 
Lichtoun, and others. The lands o^ Auchtercoul, which formed part of the 
earldom of Mar, were granted by the King, in 1433, to Mr William 
Coutts and his heirs. They were held by the family, who intermarried 
with Irvine of Drum, Forbes of Towie, Ross of Auchlossen, Burnett 
of Leys, &c., till 1635, when the Earl of Mar recovered them from 
William Coutts. 

Captain Alexander Coutts held out the castle of Brechin for the Earl 
of Huntly against the Regent, and after its capture was hanged, in 
August 1570. 

A younger son of Auchtercoul is said to have settled at Montrose 
about the end of the sixteenth century ; several of his descendants were 
provosts of the burgh, and John of Fullerton, provost of Montrose, 
registered arms 1672-78, being the coat here represented, with a bordure 
engrailed gules. Members of this family settled in London about that 
date. Alexander of Redfield, merchant in London in 1758, acquired by 
purchase the heritable office of Usher to the King in Scotland, and the 
same year registered arms, when he was allowed to carry the official baton 
of usher quarterly with the coat of Coutts. In 1759 he entailed the 
ushership, which was sold by his nieces, Agatha, wife of Captain John 
Taylor, who d.s.p., and Concordia, who married, first, Thomas Marshall, 
secondly, Gotlieb Gotz, both merchants at Dantzic, and had an only child, 
Frederica Juliana Marshall, who married Gotthilf Doebler of Dantzic. 



LINDSAY I L 299 

Patrick, a younger son of Alexander Coutts, Provost of Montrose, 
settled in Edinburgh about 1695, and founded the banking business 
still carried on in London ; his son, John, Lord Provost of Edinburgh 
1742-44, was father of Patrick Coutts, merchant and banker in Edin- 
burgh and London, who registered arms in 1761, being the original coat 
within a bordure embattled azure charged with four buckles or, and these 
are the bearings of his grand-niece, Angela Baroness Burdett-Coutts, but 
the stag's head seems by some error to be now represented as cabossed. 

A family of some position in Fife bore the same arms as the Coutts 
of Auchtercoul. 

Alexander Coutts, 1483, was on the assize of service of James Bonar 
of Rossie; Alan Coutts, in Spittell, had, with others, a daughter, who 
married William Alexander of Menstrie, and was grandmother of the 
Earl of Stirling, and Allan, chamberlain of the Abbey of Dunfermline 
1552, who acquired Pitteuchar, Balbougie, Grange, &c. ; his descendants 
intermarried with Boswell of Balmuto, Brown of Finmount, Bruce of 
Blairhall, &c. 

KiNLOCH OF THAT Ilk. L. ; the boar's head is couped, and all the 
charges or, 

*BOTHWELL OF HaLBANK. 

*RoBERTSON OF Strowan. The arms are Fergusson. 

Kilkerran, in Ayrshire, was the seat of the Fergussons in the fifteenth 
century, if not earlier ; Mr John of that place, a royalist, was knighted, and 
died, not as generally stated after the Restoration, but before April 1650. 
His son, Alexander of Kilkerran, an officer in the army, was a prisoner 
for debt in the Tolbooth of Edinburgh 1661, and left a son, Alexander, 
who sold Kilkerran in 1700, and is represented as heir general by Patrick 
Charles Douglas-Boswell of Garrallan, Esq. 

Mr John Fergusson, advocate, who acquired Kilkerran, is said to 
have been son of a younger son of Sir John, which is confirmed by his 
funeral entry February 1729 ; he had been created a baronet in 1703, and 
registered the arms of the family, the buckle being argent. 

A recently published volume on " Inverurie and the Earldom of 
Garioch," by the Rev. Dr Davidson, contains a full account of a family in 
that district, to which belonged William, who represented Inverurie in 
parliament 1661-63, Robert " the plotter," James of Pitfour, a Senator of 
the College of Justice 1764-77, and the Fergusons of Kinmundy, now Re- 
presented by William Ferguson, Esq., of that place. These all bear the 
buckle and boars' heads ; the name appears in the north in the reign of 
David II., who confirmed a charter of Thomas, Earl of Mar, of the lands 
of Huchtirerne, Egoni filio Fergusii, 1364 ; his descendants took their sur- 
name from these lands, and as late as 1507, in the service of John 
Ouchtirarne, as heir male of his uncle John, in the lands of Ouchtirarne, 
it is expressly stated that he linealiter descendit de legitimis masculis 
quondam Egonis Fergousone domini de Vchtirarne. 

Several of the Inverurie family have registered arms, and one of 
them, Peter of Warsaw, obtained the Royal licence, 1779, to assume the 
surname and arms of Tepper of Poland, being those of his mother's 
family, in addition to his own ; the connection of the Fergusons with ' 
Poland began before 1660. 

*SkENE OF THAT IlK. 

Lockhart of Lee. Sable, three boars' heads couped or. 

4G 



300 LINDSA Y IL 

Mortimer of Flemingtoun. Or, a lion rampant sable armed and 
langued azure, gutt6 de sang. 

Reid of Barskimming. W. ; the field is gules. 

Fraser of Philorth. Sable, five fraises in saltire argent. 

Cleland of that Ilk. L.; the hare or and the hunting-horn sable. 

MuREHEAD of Lauchop. A mullet argent between two acorns or on 
the bend. 

Makdougal of Makairstoun. Azure, a lion rampant argent 
armed and langued gules, gorged with an antique crown or. In 1698 
Thomas, then head of this family, registered the arms, the lion being 
crowned not gorged, and with the addition of a bordure of the second 
charged with six fraises of the field, to indicate descent from Margaret 
Fraser, heiress of Mackerston, Yetholm, and Clifton. Her son, Fergus 
Macdowylle, had a charter of confirmation of these three baronies 1374. 

Sir Archibald of Mackerston married Euphemia, daughter and coheir 
of Sir Hew Gififord of Yester; his seal, 1398, is a lion rampant crowned 
and double queued. 

Fergus, first of Mackerston, had a younger son Uchtred, to whom he 
granted an annual-rent ; and there are repeated transactions, 1469, 1479, 
1542, of the M'Doualls of Logan as to this burden on Mackerston, which 
the late John Riddell, advocate, considered "conclusive" as to the 
descent of Logan from the above Uchtred. 

Thomas of Mackerston sat in parliament 1560, and his grandsou, of 
the same name, represented the shire of Roxburgh 1596. 

Sir William Makdowel, the king's resident in the Low Countries, in 
1653 uses on his seal — parted per pale a lion rampant contournd, in chief 
a fraise (?), on the dexter ; the sinister, parted per fess in chief a stag's 
head cabossed, and in base a heart. 

Nisbet says the arms of M'Dowall of Stodrig, co. Roxburgh, cut in 
stone there in 1593, were a lion rampant gorged with a crown and hold- 
ing in his forepaws a man's heart. 

Font's Manuscript contains a singular blazon for M'Dewal — argent, 
the shape of a man in wrath sable, holding in his dexter hand a dart and 
in his sinister a firebrand gules, on a chief azure a cockatrice of the 
second ; crest — a serpent ; motto — " Take all they mak ; " supporters — 
two dragons vert, spouting out fire before and behind proper. 

A descendant of the Mackerston family went to Sweden 1594, 
became steward to Queen Christina, obtained a birthbrief setting forth 
his descent and sixteen quarters in 1656, lived to the age of a hundred, 
and left nine sons, all of whom served in the Thirty Years' War. 
Colonel Jacob suffered imprisonment in Russia, and was, in 1674, forty 
years after his death, created a baron along with his son, Colonel Gustaf, 
who, in 1658, was sent on a mission to the English Government. The 
arms borne by the ennobled branch of this family, which became extinct 
in the time of Charles XII., quarter a galley, an arm holding a crosslet, 
and a rock and two salmon, from which it would seem that they had been 
taken for Macdonalds. 

The direct male line of Mackerston ended in 1723, on the death of 
Henry Macdougall, whose daughter and heir, Barbara, wife of Sir George 
Hay of Alderston, Bart., is represented by John Scott of Gala, and the 
estate is held by Miss Maria Scott-Makdougall of Makerstoun. 

Fairlie of that Ilk. Or, a lion rampant gules langued azure, in 
dexter chief a mullet azure. 



LINDSAY IL 301 

LiDDELL OF Halkertoun. L. ; the spur rowels are azure, and in 
dexter chief a horse's head couped argent is added. 

Seal of Sir James Liddel, 1482 — a bend charged with three mullets 
quartering a lion rampant. Seal of Janet, Lady of Halkerston, 1554 — 
three stars of six points pierced on a bend. Seal of John of Halkerston, 
1594 — on a bend between an eagle's (?) head erased in chief and an otter's 
head (?) erased in base, a mullet. 

Arms of Liddell of Hammer in Orkney, cut in stone, 168 1 — ^a bend 
charged with three mullets between a bird's head erased in chief and a 
horse's head couped in base, impaling Traill. 

The arms registered, 1672-78, by John Liddell, merchant in Edin- 
burgh, a descendant of Halkerston, are — gules, on a bend between a cross 
crosslet fitchde in chief and a fleur-de-lis in base argent, three spur rowels 
of the first. 

Galfrid Liddell 1266, Alan of Lydel 1327, Nicholas, Provost of 
Aberdeen 1327, Sir William, Sheriff of Aberdeenshire 1358-61, Sir 
William 1402, are members of the family who are connected with land in 
three charters of David H., one of them confirming to William the lands 
of Lochullike (Lochtillow) in the barony of Bathgate, granted him by 
Robert the Steward. 

Robert sat in parliament 1467, and Sir James of Halkerston 1478-81 ; 
in 1483 he and his eldest son, John, were forfeited for treason in corre- 
sponding with England. 

Ninian of Halkerstoun was killed by Captain Pentland before 
August 1573; John of Halkerston and Beatrix Lauder, his spouse, have 
a charter in 1592. 

Later, there were Liddells of Nether Toksyd, and Liddells portioners 
of Barns. 

In 161 7 James Liddell represented the burgh of Rutherglen in 
parliament. 

In 1453 William, son of John de Ledale of Lochtillow, had, on his 
own resignation, a Crown charter of these lands to himself, his brother 
David, Gilbert his uncle, Robert Ledale of Balmure, and the heirs male 
of their bodies. 

John had, the year before, sold his lands of Roughwood in Ayrshire, 
but retained Braidstane. 

The daughter and heir of John Liddell of Westshield, co. Lanark, 
descended from Braidstane, married, about 1490, Andrew Denham, and 
thus founded the family of Denham of Westshield. 

Rentoun of Billie. The chevron and three towers. 

Meldrum of Segie. Argent, an otter sable crowned or issuing 
from water in base. 

Sydserf of that Ilk. The field or. 

KiNCAiD of that Ilk. Field azure, three mullets or in chief. 



IX. 



ARMORIAL MANUSCRIPTS 



BY 



SIR JAMES BALFOUR, Baronet, 

Lyon King at Arms 1630-54, 
And another Herald. 



4H 



*Agnew. 

Blair of that Ilk, anno 1402. As Blair of Adamtown in L. 

*Balmackyne. 

Balfour. As might be expected, Sir James gives the arms of 
many branches of his own family, — Monquhaney, Burlie, that Ilk of old, 
Cariston, Kirkton, Denmill, Kynaird, Ballowe. 

Two entries in his MS. of blazons are interesting : — 

Balfour of Lalethin — sable, on a chevron argent between three roses 
of the second, an otter's head erased proper. " This coat I confirmed to 
Doctor David Balfour of Lalethin in Ao. 1638." 

Balfour of Balbirney — sable, a chevron argent charged with an 
otter's head erased of the first, with the distinction of a third brother in 
eminentiore parte clypei, between three pairs of talzeours shyers of the 
second. 

Robert of Balbirnie registered arms 1672-78, when the bearings 
were altered to — argent, on a chevron engrailed between three mullets 
sable, a selch's head erased of the first. In 1843, William Balfour of 
Trenaby, in Orkney, having proved his pedigree as heir male of the 
family, seated at Monwhanny in Fife, free barons prior to 1587, was 
allowed the chief coat — argent, on a chevron sable an otter's head erased 
of the field ; crest — a dexter arm in armour erect, the hand holding a 
baton in bend gules tipped argent ; motto— " Fordward ; " supporters — 
two otters proper. 

These arms, as a quartering, with the supporters, had been long 
borne by the Bethunes of Balfour, as heirs of line of the original family 
of Balfour of that Ilk, and were registered, 1672-78, by James Bethune 
of Balfour. 

The Monwhanny family formerly bore the arms with the addition of 
a saltire couped sable in base. Balfour of Denmill is given in F. Sir 
James makes the field or, and adds, as his own distinction, a label of three 
points gules. 

When Sir Patrick of Denmill, baronet, registered arms, 1773, he 
dropped the label ; crest — a crescent or ; motto — " God gives increase." 

James, younger son of Balfour of Balgarvie, had a feu-charter of 
Denmill 1452. Sir Michael of Denmill, Comptroller of the Household 
to Charles I., was knighted 1630, and left a large family, of whom were 
the Lyon King of Arms ; Sir Alexander, third baronet of Kinnaird and 
Denmill ; Sir David of Forret, a Senator of the College of Justice ; 
Michael of Randerston ; and Sir Andrew, M.D., an eminent botanist, 
knighted in 1682. 

Denmill was sold about 1750, and the baronetcy is dormant. 

♦Barclay of Gairtlay. 

*Batwoode. Sir James, in his MS., writes the name Balwoode 
(? Blacwoode). 

* Black. 

*Blunseill. 



3o6 BALFOURS MS. 

Charters of Empsfield ; argent, a fess azure. Charters of Lone- 
fenan ; the fess charged with a mullet of the first, and within the Royal 
tressure. 

*Cantelupe, In 1291 John de Cantelou, and in 1297 Sir John de 
Cantelu, probably the same person, swore fealty to Edward I. At the 
same time William de Cantilupe served in Scotland under Edward, and 
had summons to parliament in England as a baron, 1299-1308. His 
arms bear no resemblance to this quaint canting coat (? a singing wolf), 
but were — gules, three leopards' heads inverted jessant fleurs-de-lis or. 
William de Cantilupe, at the siege of Caerlaverock, bore — ^gules, a fess 
vair between three fleurs-de-lis issuant from leopards' heads or. 

*Carric. 

*Crail. Surname taken from a locality in Fife. Adam de Carail 
was Bishop of Aberdeen 1 207-28. 

*Cullane. 

*Davidsone. 

*Glendoning. 

*Grant. L. ; Sir D. Lindsay has — azure, three golden circlets 
adorned with fleurs-de-lis or leaves. Balfour's blazon is — Grante of 
Freuchey, azur, three coronetts rad. or. W. has — azure, three antique 
crowns or. 

Seals of Alexander Grant 1524 — a fess between three crowns and 
charged with a star ; of John Graunt of Culcaboch 1529 — a fess between 
three crowns ; John of Freuchy 1572 — three crowns. Arms registered, 
1672-78, by Ludovick Grant of Freuchie, or of that Ilk — gules, three an- 
tique crowns or; crest — a burning hill; motto — " Stand sure;" supporters 
— two savages proper. The tincture of the field seems to have been changed 
at this time, or not long before, as Porteus and Stacie both have azure, 
but the latter adds a note, " of ould it was, az. feild, now gules." 

A curious armorial transaction took place in February 1777 ; Neil 
Grant, describing himself as " oldest lawful son of the deceast John Grant 
in Linearne, and nephew of Duncan Grant last of Auchernack " (who died 
in the preceding October without male issue), " and therefore undoubted 
representative of the said family of Grant of Auchernack, chieftain or 
head of the Clan Allan," did " upon certain grave and weighty considera- 
tions and just and onerous causes, renounce, overgive and convey to and 
in favours of Doctor Gregory Grant, physician in Edinburgh," his " near 
relation and beloved cousine, and his heirs my right and title to the coat 
of arms and ensign armoriall belonging to the said family." He made 
over at the same time all his lands, heritages, titles, and honours. 

Upon this the arms registered, 1677, by James of Auchernack, were 
allowed to Dr Grant, then President of the Royal College of Physicians, 
great-great-grandson of James Grant of Burnside, a younger son of Allan 
of Auchernack. 

There were published in 1796, " Memoires historiques, gdn6alogiques, 
politiques, militaires, &c., de la Maison de Grant, divisde en plusieurs 
branches tant en Ecosse qu'en Normandie, en Allemagne, en Suede en 
Danemarc, &c. Par Charles Grant, Vicomte de Vaux des anciens barons 
de Grant, chef de nom, titres et armes de cette famille en Normandie, 
officier-gdn^ral au service de Sa Majestd Tr^s Chrdtienne, chevalier de 
rOrdre Royal et Militaire de Saint Louis," &c. 

This gentleman had, in 1793, married a lady whom, by a curious 



BALFOURS MS. 307 

anticipation of a change made in our own day, he calls Mary, daughter of 
Philip Jones Herbert of Llanarth and Sarah Lovenberry, his wife. His 
statement is, that in 1359 William and Tassain, sons of Thomas Grant, 
who was younger son of the chief of the clan, and Bigla Cuming his wife, 
went to France, founded families which flourished as Vicomtes de Caen, 
Seigneurs de Quetteville, de Plainville, de Souchey, de Vaux, Barons de 
Catelet, Barons Grant de Vaux, and finally, in 1777, Vicomte de Vaux. 

His assumed armorial bearings are of a splendour quite in accord- 
ance with this lineage. First, the Royal arms of Scotland as descended 
in the male line from the Macgregors, themselves of Royal origin; second, 
ermine, on a chevron gules three antique crowns or, for Quetteville ; 
third, argent, a fess azure between three cocks gules crowned with 
antique crowns or, for Grant, as sometimes borne in Normandy; fourth, 
or, a fess checquy azure and argent, surmounted of a bend gules for 
Stuart, impaling England (?) ; over all, in an escutcheon of pretence, the 
arms of Grant of Grant ; crest and motto of that family ; the supporters 
are wreathed about the head and middle, and rest their exterior hands on 
clubs. Below the shield is placed as a compartment, a king's head couped 
gules crowned ii l antique, and there is a second motto — " Cuinich bas 
Alpiny The " Armorial de Berry " may be searched in vain for a 
foundation for this structure ; if we turn to the " Nobiliaire de Nor- 
mandie," we find a good family of the name of Grente, said to be 
ancestors of, or descended from, the Grants of Great Britain ; present 
representative, F61ix Edmond, Vicomte de Grente ; arms — ^argent, a fess 
azure surmounted of a cross moline gules. 

There are given no fewer than nine families of the name of le Grand. 
One of these possessed Questeville and Souchey, and bore — ermine, on a 
chevron gules three spur rowels (not crowns) or. Another, Seigneur de 
Mouleri, bore — argent, a fess azure between three cocks one in chief and 
two in base gules, that in chief holding an olive branch purpure ; this is 
evidently what the third quarter is borrowed from or founded on. 

The family of Questeville had for arms — or, a saltire azure indented 
sable. 

These facts make it pretty evident that the genealogy has been much 
misrepresented ; but, on the other hand, it is certain that the Viscount 
had a good pedigree, as on the list of gentlemen who had made the 
necessary proofs just before the Revolution, but not been admitted to 'the 
honours of the Court, is le Vicomte Grant de Vaux, Colonel de Cavalerie. 

In 1778, John Charles Adolphus Grant of Blairfindy, Colonel in the 
French service, and styled Baron, obtained from the Lord Lyon a certi- 
ficate of his descent and seize quartiers ; he was nephew of the Abbd 
Grant, President of the Scots College, Paris. Few families are so 
carefully entered in the books of the Lyon Office as the Grants : sup- 
porters were granted to Sir Francis, baronet, Lord Cullen, by Royal 
Warrant 1720; to Sir Alexander of Dalvey, baronet, by Royal Warrant 
1761 ; and to Captain Charles of the Royal Navy, C.B., representative of 
the Elchies family, by the Lyon King of Arms 18 16. There are thirty-two 
entries of arms. 

In 1258, Laurence and Robert, called Grant, appear in Morayshire'; 
it seems prolaable, as suggested by Mr Chisholm-Batten, in his " History 
of Beauly Priory," that they came north with their kinsmen the Bysets. 

In 1246, Henry HI. granted Lowdham, co. Notts, to Walter Byset, 

41 



3o8 BALFOURS MS. 

till he should recover his lands in Scotland. The adjacent manor of East 
Bridgeford was then held by William le Grant, husband of Alfreda 
Byset, the heiress. Walter did return to Scotland, and there was a second 
marriage of a Grant to a Byset heiress. 

Laurence was Sheriff of Inverness-shire 1263; Robert had a charter 
from Sir John Prat c. 1268; William, as a Crusader, had an English 
protection 1270; William, 1292, in Scotland, and at the same time 
William le Graunt of East Bridgeford ; Patrick, castellan of Cluny, co. 
Perth, 1 29 1-2 ; David, Sheriff of Stirling 1295 ; Robert de (? le) Graunt, 
of the county of Fife, swore fealty to Edward I. ; John and Robert were 
prisoners in Gloucester Castle 1296; John and Ralph (?) were liberated 
the following year; in 1302 William was in Ireland; John was on an 
assize at Logic 1320 ; David and William Graunte in Ireland 1335 ; John 
le Grant had a pension from David II. ; Maurice, Sheriff of Inverness 
1340; Patrick, 1345; English safe-conduct in favour of Sir John 1357 ; 
Thomas, 1363; Malcolm, 1380-94. 

The surname remains preceded by le or the in the fifteenth and even 
in the sixteenth centuries. John Grant of Freuchie had his lands erected 
into a barony 1493; John of Freuchie sat in parliament 1560; in 1694 
Ludovick of Freuchie had a charter erecting his estates into the regality 
of Grant, but the chiefs of the family had long before been known as 
lairds of Grant, or of that Ilk. 

The present representative is the Earl of Seafield, who, through 
the marriage of James Grant of Pluscarden, in 1702, to Anne, daughter 
and heir of Sir Humphrey Colquhoun, inherits the baronetcy of Colquhoun 
of Luss, and succeeds to the earldom in consequence of the alliance of 
Sir Ludovick Grant, baronet, and Lady Margaret Ogilvie, daughter of 
James, Earl of Findlater and Seafield. 

Henderson of Fordell. Parted per pale indented, or dancettee, 
sable and or, on a chief argent a crescent gules between two ermine spots. 

*Hannay of Sourby. 

•Hay of Tillebothill. Sir James Balfour's blazon makes the 
bordure checquy argent and azure, the bendlet sable charged with four 
mullets or. 

Mr Laing gives a seal, 1368, of John de Heia, Lord of Tolibothel, 
evidently the same ; three inescutcheons surmounted of a bend indented, 
the shield ornamented with lines forming a lozenge pattern (?). 

Law of Jaruestoun. Sable, a crescent argent. 

* Irvine (?). 

*Ladylye. Laidley or Laidlaw, a border family. Laidlaw of Mos- 
fennan, co. Peebles, was seated there during part of the seventeenth and 
eighteenth centuries. 

Lidderdale of the Isle. Gules, a chevron ermine. Arms regis- 
tered, 1672-78, by Thomas of St Mary's Isle, co. Kirkcudbright — azure, a 
chevron ermine; crest — an eagle's head erased proper; motto — " Fore- 
sight is all." 

Thomas Lidderdale acquired the estate by marriage with the niece 
and coheir of Mr Robert Richardson, Prior and afterwards Commendator 
of St Mary's Isle, and it remained the seat of their descendants till the 
early part of last century. 

In 1558 Richardson granted a charter of part of the lands of the 
priory to Stephen Lidderdail, probably of the same family; in 1572, 



BALFOURS MS, 309 

another of the Isle to James, and Thomas his son, probably on the 
marriage of the latter to his own niece. Andrew Lidderdale was Abbot 
of Dryburgh 1489- 1506. 

Lawson. Seal of Mr Robert, 1540 — a saltire and chief, the latter 
charged with three saltires couped ; seal of Thomas, 1497 — a saltire and 
in chief a mullet. 

*Macckulloch of Torhouse. 

*Macky of Large. 

Mackculloch of Marton. Founder of Marton Church, anno . 

Lozengy or and vert. 

Menzies, anno 1510. Ermine, on a chief gules a rose argent. 

Otterburn, quondam de Reidhall. Argent, a saltire between four (?) 
otters' heads couped sable, a chief vert. charged with a crescent of the field 
on the dexter side. 

*Plafair. 

*RouLAND, anno 1548 or 1528 ; arms registered, 1672-78, by James 
Rolland of Disblair — argent, a fess checquy sable and or between three 
ships rigged of the second ; crest — a fleur-de-lis argent. 

Arms granted, 1788, to Adam Rolland of Gask, advocate — argent, a 
fess checquy sable and or between two ships in chief, their sails furled of 
the second, and a fleur-de-lis in base azure. 

Mr James Rolland was prior of Balquhidder 1546 ; William was 
Sheriff" of Aberdeen 1540 ; and in 1526 William sat in parliament. 

William Rolland acquired Gask by marriage, in 1600, with the 
daughter and coheir of Adam Cunningham of Gask, and it is now the 
property of their representative, Adam Rolland, Esq. The Rollands 
held lands of the Commendator of Dunfermline soon after the Refor- 
mation. 

RuTHVEN, Culbertus, miles anno 1441. Gules, on a pale between 
four pallets or three crescents of the first. Balfour blazons Ruthven of 
Lownam 1 527 — paly of six gules and or, the middlemost charged with a 
heart of the first. 

Sterling of Keir and Ardoche. Argent, on a bend vert three 
buckles of the first. 

. *Somervaile of Camnethane. Seal of William de Somerville 
1180-89 — 3- lio^ rampant. There was at Drum an old coat — three 
leopards' heads. 

The Lords Somerville have always borne — azure, three mullets, two 
and one, between seven cross crosslets fitchde, three, one, two, and one or. 
In the register, 1672, it is blazoned for James of Drum, the head of the 
family — crusilly of seven cross, &c. 

The appearance here of the original bearing — the lion rampant — is 
interesting, as it has no place in the coat recorded by James, Usher to 
His Majesty's Exchequer, representer of the family of Cambusnethan 
1672-78 — argent, three mullets gules within an orle of six cross crosslets 
fitchee sable. 

In an illuminated MS. in the Lyon Office, probably 1570-80, there is 
a curious representation of the arms of Lord Somerville — the crosses are 
argent ; supporters — two frogs, each seated on a small piece of turf ; 
crest — a frog surmounted of three ostrich feathers ; motto — " Feir God 
in Ivf." Pont also gives the motto " Fear God in love ; " it has been 
altered to in life, which is not an improvement. 



3IO BALFOUR S MS. 

The well-known " Memorie of the Somervilles " contains a quaint 
account of the origin, prosperity, and misfortunes of this old family, at 
present so unhappily without a known representative, although the barony 
cannot be extinct. 

William de Somerville witnessed charters of David I. ; Carnwath 
and Linton were the property, c. i i6o, of his son (?) of the same name. 
These were held as free baronies in the fourteenth century, and several of 
the family sat in parliament before they attained, c. 1429, the rank of lord 
of the parliament. 

Gilbert Lord Somerville sold the estates and died in 1618 ; the 
usual accounts of his family do not agree with the services of Joseph 
Douglas, afterwards Sir Joseph of Pompherston, in 1622, to his mother 
and his uncle, William Somerville. 

In the " Memorie," 1679, the next heir after Drum is said to be 
Robert, who was living " in good condition " in Tiviotdale, on lands pur- 
chased by his father, Mr John, minister of Ednam. 

There were at this time two younger sons of Drum — ^John, an officer 
in the military service of the States General of the United Provinces, who 
married Anna Maria Susanna Hasill, a Dutch lady ; and George, who 
also married. 

Cambusnethan was granted as a free barony to a younger son, by 
charter, in the second year of Robert IIL, and was sold by Sir James in 
1647; from his second son, but heir male, James, descended the Somer- 
villes of Corehouse ; George of Corehouse was dead in 1768, his heirs 
being his sister Violet, wife of Captain James Johnston, Seventy-second 
Regiment, and his niece Violet Inglis, widow of William Lockhart of 
Birkhill. 

The heir male is said to have been Thomas, D.D., minister of Jed- 
burgh, whose son was the late William, M.D., Deputy Inspector-General 
of Army Hospitals, husband of the authoress of " The Connection of the 
Physical Sciences." Among the branches of the family of Somerville of 
which no printed notice has appeared, is that represented by George 
Adair Somerville, Esq., late of Airhouse, co. Berwick, where his ances- 
tors were seated for a hundred and fifty years, intermarrying with 
Watherston of Howden, Adinston of Carcant, Cochrane of Ashkirk, the 
heiress of Adair of Altoun, &c. 

*Smith. 

Stewart, Sheriff of Perth. First and fourth, Stewart with a label 
of three points gules in chief; second and third, a fess charged with three 
mullets sable. 

TiNDAiLL, anno 1489. Azure, two mascles in fess or. 

*Wadderburn. 

*WiSEMAN. Balfour's blazon is — sable, a crescent between three 
blazing stars or. 

Andrew and William Wysman occur as witnesses in the chartulary of 
Moray 1226; Sir Andrew, 1244; Sir Thomas, Sheriff of Elgin 1248; 
Thomas, Provost of Elgin 1261 ; in 1296 William dictiis Wiseman, and 
William Wisman, of the county of Elgin, swore fealty to Edward 1. ; 
the following year John was a prisoner in Fotheringay Castle ; in 1305 
Alexander was Sheriff of Forres and Invernarn, and William Sheriff of 
Elgin for Edward I., both being called de (? le) Wyseman. Gilbert Wys- 
man had a charter, from Robert I., of Rothes, Mulben, &c.; and William 



BALFOURS MS, 311 

Wiseman obtained from David II. the barony of Dun, forfeited by David 
de Strabolgi. 

*YouNG. One of these interesting coats, probably taken from seals, 
shows the origin of what became the usual bearing — three piles and as 
many annulets. The other — a green sapling — is, of course, allusive to 
youth. 

Douglas of Pumferstoun. See Sundries. 

Hunter. Parted per fess, in chief a greyhound courant and in base 
three hunting-horns stringed sable. 



4 K 



X. 



THE PUBLIC REGISTER 



OF ALL ARMS AND BEARINGS 



IN 



SCOTLAND 

A.D. 1672-78. 



JEdie of Moneaght. An old family of Aberdeen burgesses. In 1670 
Alexander Aidy, then and for thirty-three years resident at Dantzick, 
had a birth-brief, showing his paternal descent from burgesses in Aber- 
deen, and that he was in the female line descended from Burnett of 
Brathniss and Irvine of Lenturk. There were also Aedies of Newark in 
Aberdeenshire, and James Adie sat in parliament for Perth 1596. 

Dalrymple of Stair. 

EccLES OF KiLDONAN. There is an inaccurate account of this family 
in Douglas's " Baronage." There seem to have been two separate 
families, the one taking their surname from Eccles, co. Berwick, the other 
from Eccles in Dumfriesshire. 

Of the former was John de Eccles, who swore fealty to Edward I. in 
1296. In the thirty-first year of David II. the lands of Garmilton Dunyng 
fell to the Crown on the decease of John de Echylls, a bastard ; Ralf de 
Eklys was dead two years after, when his lands of Corsgate, in Colding- 
ham, were forfeited, on account of his traitorous dealings with the 
English ; in or before the ninth year of the reign of Robert II., Margaret, 
grand-daughter and heir of the late Thomas de Eklys, resigned parts of 
Woodhall and Thurston. 

In 137 1 Matthew, son of the late William de Eychles and Beatrix 
de Carletoun, his spouse, resigned half the barony of Oures in Kincar- 
dineshire. 

The Eccles of that Ilk, co. Dumfries, were seated there till the 
Restoration. A younger branch possessed Kildonan in Ayrshire, which 
was erected into a barony by charter in favour of Mr William Eccles, 
2nd December 1671 ; Douglas says Robert of Kildonan died without 
issue; he was alive in 1726, and died before April 1730, leaving three 
coheiresses — Grizel, wife of Anthony M'Kie of Glencaird ; Helen, wife 
of Thomas Kennedy, surgeon in Wigton ; and Lilias, wife of David 
Kennedy of Bellymore. 

Mr Hugh, minister of Straiton, younger son of John of Kildonan, 
died in 1662, leaving a son, William, physician in Edinburgh, who became 
heir male. His son Martin, also a physician in Edinburgh, left two 
coheirs — Margaret, married Henry Lindsay, merchant in Edinburgh, who 
succeeded to Kilconquhar, and took the surname of Bethune ; and Eliza- 
beth, married Major Basil Alves. 

Fairholme of Craigiehall. Sophia, daughter and heir of this 
John, married William, Marquess of Annandale, and her descendant, Mr 
Hope-Vere of Craigiehall, quarters the arms. To the same, family 
belonged the Fairholmes of Pilton, Baberton, Greenhill (acquired by 
marriage with the daughter and heir of Adam Gairden), Greenknowe, 
Chapel, and Ravenswood. Ferme, Ferrie, and Farie are variations of 
this name, and bore similar arms. 

Pont gives for Ferrie — azure, a ship's anchor argent ; Stacie the 
same, adding, " some sayes it is Farames coat, but I doubt its not." 

Fairne of Tarlogie. Seal of Finlay Mackfaid, Abbot of Fearn, co. 
Ross, 1442 — a stag behind a tree and three stars ; he died 1485, and these 

4L 



3 1 6 THE L YON REGIS TER. 

arms, the stars being in chief, are on his monument at Fearn. This 
family took the surname of Fearn. David of Tarlogie died in 1704, and 
was succeeded by his nephew, David Ross or Macgillendrish of Tarlogie. 

In 1 58 1 Alexander Fearn had a Crown charter of confirmation of 
his lands of Nigg and Pitcalzean ; in February 1600 his son Finlay was 
hanged, at the Cross of Edinburgh, for forging the signature of his said 
father to a charter in favour of his son Alexander, dated 1575. 

Andrew of Pitcalzean left a widow, Christian Ross, and twelve 
children, who were driven from their lands and persecuted in the reign of 
James II. ; in 1690 she got a decree for 5000 merks damages. 

A family took the same name from Fearn in Forfarshire. In 1267 
Peter de Feme witnessed the charter of foundation of the Messyndew at 
Brechin, granted by William de Brechin ; George Feme, Archdeacon of 
Dunkeld, was nephew of George Brown, of the Midmar family. Bishop of 
the See 1484-15 14. 

Gair of Nigg. This coat is cut on several monuments of members 
of the family, the oldest that can be deciphered having the date 1567 ; it 
was registered, in 1864, with the chief engrailed for difference, by Captain 
William Gair, of the Second (Queen's Royal) Regiment of Foot. 

The Gayers of Berkshire and Cornwall bore — argent (or ermine), a 
fleur-de-lis sable. 

Sir John Gair or Gaer was Sheriff of London 1633, Lord Mayor 
1646; Sir Robert Gayre of Stoke, co. Bucks, K.B., 1661, left issue. 

J AFFRAY OF KiNGSWELLS. The bearings are on the seal of Alexan- 
der, bailie of Aberdeen, c. 1613. Two of the family represented that 
burgh in parliament in the reign of Charles I. ; Alexander was chosen 
provost in January 1636, on which Spalding remarks, that neither the 
man nor the election was much thought of, he " not being of the old 
blood of the toun, bot the oy of ane baxter, and thairfoir wes set doun in 
the prouestis deas before his incuming (ane bakin pye) to sermon." 

Two others of the Aberdeen family registered arms at the same time, 
and it is understood that the late Francis Jeffrey, Senator of the College 
of Justice, was one of its descendants. 

Keith of Tilliegonie. 

Langlands of that Ilk. The surname is taken from the estate, 
but as the Langlands were lords of half the barony of Wilton, co. Rox- 
burgh, they sometimes took their designation from that property. 

David II., in the thirty-fourth year of his reign, granted to Marion 
Cumyne, widow of John de Langlands, the lands of Milsallystoun and 
Ochterhuyd, then in his hands by recognition. The former property, 
afterwards called Milsington, was, in 1453, exchanged for Hepe, then 
belonging to Sir Walter Scott. In 1431 the head of the family is 
nobilis homo yacobtis de Langlandis dominus ejusdem, James off Lang- 
landis, lord of that Ylk ; James of that Ilk, 1451-55; John, fiar, 1455; 
Robert of that Ilk, 1494; James of Wilton, 1500; Roger of Wilton, 1508; 
James of that Ilk, 1569-76; Robert of that Ilk; George, his son and 
successor, 1612 ; Robert of that Ilk, 1643 ; the laird was fined ;^i8oo in 
1662 ; Robert of that Ilk, 1704 ; George of that Ilk, 1738, died in 1752; 
Robert of that Ilk, his son was, in 1758, served heir in half the barony 
of Wilton, &c. ; Miss Langlands, said to be last of the family, died at 
Hawick 1814, and was buried in Wilton Church. 

Laing of Morisland. 



THE LYON REGISTER. 317 

Macdonald of Clanranald. 

M'Aben of Knockdolian. Knockdolian, co. Ayr, came into the 
possession of Fergus M'Cubbin and Margaret Kennedy, his wife, about 
1660 ; Fergus, last of Knockdolian, died about 1713, leaving two coheirs — 
Margaret, married Robert Cathcart of Genoch; and Catherine married, Lin 
of Little Larg. 

The estate remained with Mrs Cathcart's descendants till lately. 

Tredennock was the property of Thomas M'Cubbin 151 1 ; Archibald 
of Tredennock left a son, John of that place, 1602 ; it is stated in Paterson's 
"Ayrshire" that Fergus of Knockdolian was of this family. 

Martin M'Cubyne held lands in Garvald, under the Douglases of 
Dalkeith, 1378. 

There were M'Cubbins of M'Cubbinstone, co. Dumfries, in the 
seventeenth century ; M'Cubbin of Balhamie ended in coheiresses on the 
death of John, in or before 1691. 

Fergusia was wife of Sir George Wishart of Cliftonhall, baronet. 

Naesmith of Posso. There is a " tradition " that the first of the 
name got the name and arms in the reign of James IIL, 1460-88, by doing 
good service to his sovereign against the Douglases, and disguising 
himself as a smith to escape capture. The name appears considerably 
earlier; Adam Nasmith, owner of lands at Brechin, died before 1420. 
The Nasmiths were an old family of burgesses at Hamilton, and one of 
them was minister of the parish 1645-62 ; the Nasmiths of Auchingray- 
mont, near Hamilton, ended in Arthur, who left three coheiresses 1765; 
Naismith of Drumloch, an existing family; Nasmyth of Middlemiln, 
otherwise Nasmyth Lodge, co. Fife, were all of the Hamilton family, 
which intermarried with Roberton of Whistleberry, Hamilton of West- 
burn, Young of Killiecantie, Moncrieff of Culfargie, Stewart of Newmains, 
Campbell of Orchard, &c. 

Michael, at first servitor, and afterwards chamberlain to John 
Hamilton, Archbishop of St Andrews, acquired half of Posso by marriage 
with Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of John Baird of Posso ; he was 
never knighted, and died about 1607. Their grandson, James, acquired 
the other half of Posso, and represented the county of Peebles in parlia- 
ment 1630-39. 

The elder line ended on the death, unmarried, about 1712, of Robert 
of Posso ; his cousin-german and heir male, James, advocate, had acquired 
Dawick about 1690, and been created a baronet in 1706. The printed 
pedigrees of the family are incorrect. 

The oldest authority for arms is Font's MS. — gules, a dexter hand 
proper holding a sword argent between two broken smith's hammers ; 
no crest ; motto — "Marie non arte." James, first of Dawick, during his 
cousin's lifetime, carried the arms as registered within a bordure argent 
charged with four boars' heads couped gules and as many hunting-horns 
sable, the latter to indicate maternal descent, his mother having been 
Isabella, daughter of Sir James Murray of Philiphaugh, wife of John, 
younger brother of Sir Michael of Posso. 

Thomson of Maynes. This George, a younger son of the Faich- 
field family, d.s.p., and was succeeded by his nephew, Thomas of Faich- 
field, CO. Aberdeen. 



XL 
HERALDIC MANUSCRIPT 

COMPILED DURING THE REIGN OF JAMES VI. 

THE PROPERTY OF THE 

EARL OF CRAWFORD AND BALCARRES. 



4M 



Titles of Emperors, Kings, and Princes a.d. 1612. 

The manner of the funeral of the Earl of Salisbury (Richard Neville). 
Arms of some of the Scotch nobility, and arms of Scottish gentlemen ; 
shields only. 

*Claresoune. (?) Clarkeson. 

•Hardy. Sir George Mackenzie tells a story as to the supposed 
origin of the surname and arms. 

William was unicorn pursuivant 1554-67. 

*Methven. 

Steill. Argent, three furisons shaped like ducal coronets azure. 

*LlTTELL. 

BucHAN. Argent, three boys' heads and busts erased sable. 

Spottiswood. Three covered cups in place of garbs. 

*Fleschour. 

Buchanan of that Ilk. L. ; the lion guttd or. 

Sir James Steward. Stewart within a bordure compon^e argent 
and azure. 

Sir David Dunbar. Gules, a lion rampant argent, on his shoulder 
a cinquefoil gules, a bordure argent sem6e of cinquefoils of the first. 

*Erskine of Kinnoull. 

Lesly. Azure, on a bend engrailed argent three buckles gules. 

AucHiNLEK OF YT Ilke. Argent, a cross raguly sable. 

BoswELL OF Belmont. First and fourth, Boswell ; second and 
third, argent, a saltire and chief gules, the latter charged with three 
mullets of the field. 

Stirling of Cader and of Keir. There is here the usual con- 
fusion as to the bearings of these families. Cader, argent, on a bend ' 
engrailed sable three buckles or ; ah'as azure has been interlined as the 
tincture of the bend, but struck out again. Keir, argent, on a bend azure 
three buckles or ; alias or has been added for the field and scored out ; 
then argent struck out and or substituted ; the bend has been made sable, 
but azure restored, and finally the buckles changed to argent and back 
again to or. 

Lord St Michell. Sable, a fess between six lozenges voided or ; 
in F. for Michell. 

Seton of Penbrige (? Parbroth). Each crescent is charged with an 
annulet or. 

Hamylton of Anderwell (? Innerwick). First and fourth, 
Hamilton ; second, Abernethy ; third, Stewart of Bonkle. 

*Rate of that Ilk. 

Hepburn of Wauchton. Hepburn with a cross patde argent in 
dexter chief. 

*R0WELL. 

•Rowle. Richard Reuel 1178-1211; Henry Reuel 1188-1214; in 
1365 Barnard of Rowle, lord of Foleroule, resigned his lands in the hands 
of Hugh Ross of Fylorthe. 

•Lewynton. The coat is in L., somewhat different, for Levyngtoun 



32 2 HERALDIC MS. 

of Saltcottis — the bend plain and the head that of a bear. Nisbet describes 
the seal of Patrick Livingtoun of Saltcoat, 1593, as a bend with an otter's 
or boar's head couped in chief; another seal, 1482, has the head of a 
wolf (?). The arms are not registered, but Stacie has the following entry — 
argent, a bend engrailed gules and in chief a bear's head erased azure 
muzzled of the second, "to Alexander Livington 1673, but not payd." 
In another place in his MS., there is added in a later hand for crest, a 
whitrik ; motto — " Whitrik green." 

In 1363 John de Levynton had an English safe-conduct; in 1425 
John belonged to the Royal household ; in 1467 George Lord Halyburton 
granted predilecto scuHfero Willehno Levinton de Saltcottis right of 
namculum in mare to fish at Gulane. 

George Livingtoune of Saltcoats d.s.p. before 1705, when his niece, 
Margaret Menzies, was served heir of entail and of provision ; his 
nephew, Gilbert Livingtoune, was at the same time served heir male 
general. The Livingtouns of Midfield claimed to be heirs male, and 
ended in two coheiresses 1768. 

Margaret Menzies of Saltcoats married, first, John Hamilton of 
Pencaitland; second, Hon. William Carmichael of Skirling. Her mother, 
Mary Livingtoune, after the death of her first husband, Alexander Menzies 
of Culterallers, married Sir William Binning of Walliford ; Ann Living- 
toune, the other coheir, married James Baillie, W.S. 

Sir David Hom. Vert, a lion rampant within a bordure engrailed 
argent. 

*Seras. 

*SiR William St Clair. The Sinclairs of Longformacus, co. 
Berwick, bore — argent, a cross engrailed gules, but there is no Sir 
William. Robert of Longformacus, advocate, had his lands erected into 
a barony 1663, and was created a baronet the following year. Sir John, 
sixth baronet, a writer in Edinburgh, died in 1798, and the title seems to 
be extinct. 

John Sinclair, burgess of Edinburgh, bailie and dean of guild, 
acquired Stevenson, in East Lothian, and was created a baronet 1636 ; 
Sir Robert, third baronet, registered arms 1672-78, as given from a 
Funeral Escutcheon. In another funeral entry the saltire is changed into 
a cross. 

Sir John, sixth baronet, having, in 1765, inherited Murkle and other 
estates in Caithness, under an entail executed by Alexander, ninth Earl 
of Caithness, in 1761 (his lordship having disinherited his daughter, 
Dorothea, Countess Fife), was allowed, in terms of that deed, to bear the 
quartered coat of the Earl, with a crescent argent for diflference, and 
supporters, two griffins parted per fess or and gules, armed and langued 
azure. 

Father Hay notices the origin of the Sinclairs of Stevenson, who 
claim descent in the male line from the Longformacus family ; according 
to their Funeral Escutcheon, the paternal grandmother of the first 
baronet was a Sinclair of Longformacus. Mr James, younger son of Sir 
John of Stevenson, married Jean, daughter of Sir James Durham of 
Pitkerrow and Luffness, who married, secondly, Sir James Balfour, 
Lyon King of Arms ; their son, James Sinclair of Auldbar, co. Forfar, 
was created a baronet, married Isobel Balfour, daughter of his stepfather, 
sold Auldbar 1670-78, and acquired Kinnaird from Sir Michael Balfour, 



OF JAMES Vr.S REIGN. 323 

baronet, in 1675 ; his arms, given by Stacie, were — argent, a plain cross 
parted per cross engrailed sable and gules (? a cross engrailed quarterly 
sable and gules); crest — an otter issuant, evidently allusive to his Balfour 
connection ; motto — " Quo cunque ferrar.'' 

Sir George, his son, sold Kinnaird, married Margaret Crawford, and 
died in 1726, leaving a son, Sir John, third baronet. 

SuARD. See Sundries. The coat borne at the siege of Caerlaverock 
by Richard Siward, who was governor of Dumfries, Wigton, and Kirk- 
cudbright for Edward I. in 1292. His daughter, Helen, married Isaac 
Maxwell, and in 1326 made an agreement with Randolph, Earl of Moray, 
as to her lands of Kellie in Fife. In 1360, being then a widow, she 
resigned Kellie in favour of her cousin, Walter Olifaunt. 

Edward, son of Seward, witnessed a charter of David I.; Sir Richard, 
called Syward, in 1291, swore fealty to Edward I., also Richard Syward ; 
William Siward had a charter of Kellie from Robert I. ; Sir Richard, in 
1292, was prisoner in England, and his estates, partly in Northumber- 
land, were seized by the King of England ; his wife, Maria, had been 
previously married to Simon Fresel, and had four children by her second 
husband, of whom Richard was married and a prisoner in Gloucester 
Castle; he was still a prisoner in 1298, when the severity of his treatment 
was mitigated in consideration of his father's services in Flanders. 
Richard, the father, was, in 1299, appointed warden of Nithsdale. 

Ker of Fernihirst. Field gules, stag's head argent. 

Ker of Cessford. Field vert, mullets gules, one unicorn's head in 
base argent. 

Macklenand of Bumbe. As Maclelland of that Ilk in W. 

Irvyn of Drum. Argent, three holly leaves vert, stalks uppermost. 

Campbell. Gyronny argent and sable. 

*Haldane of that Ilk, co. Roxburgh. Porteous has — ^gules, two 
leopards argent. In 1861 the coat was allowed as a quartering to 
Richard Haldane-Oswald of Auchencruive, co. Ayr, being blazoned gules, 
two leopards in pale passant gardant argent. 

Bernard, son of Brien, made a grant to the Church of St Mary and 
monks of Kelso of a carucate of his land of Haudene 1 165-71 ; his son 
Bernard took his surname from his lands. 

In 1296 Bernard de Haudene, of the county of Roxburgh, swore 
fealty to Edward I. Broughton, in Peeblesshire, belonged to Edward of 
Haudene about 1350. Both Haldane and Broughton were held ' as 
baronies by William Haldane of that Ilk, who died in 1533 ; John sold 
Haldane 1625, died in 1648, leaving two sons ; Andrew Haldane, the last 
survivor, died childless in March 1673. His cousin-german, George, 
writer to the signet, left two daughters, of whom Agnes married, in 1675, 
Patrick Haldane of Lanrick, co. Perth, a younger son of Haldane of 
Gleneagles, who died in 1686, and his widow married James Stewart of 
Christwell, advocate. Her son and heir, John Haldane of Lanrick, died 
in 1765, leaving six daughters: Anne, married Thomas Forrester of 
Denovan, and had one son, who d.s.p. ; Agnes, married John Dundas of 
Manor, and had an only child, Margaret, who married Alexander Oswald 
of Shieldhall ; Lilias, married William Wilsone of Sands, and had issue ; 
Isobel, married Charles Stewart of Ardsheal, and had issue; Janet, married 
John Murray, merchant in Glasgow ; and Margaret, married William 
Pontine of Ardoch. 

4N 



324 HERALDIC MS. OF JAMES FES REIGN, 

Arms of the nobility of Ireland. 

Arms of foreign kings, princes, minor states, free cities, &c. 

List of knights of the carpet, made at the marriage of Prince Arthur ; 
several lists of nobility; list of barons, bannerets, and knights of the Bath 
made at the coronation of Henry VII. and of his consort; knights made 
by Henry VIII. at his marriage to Anne Boleyn, &c. 



(/litlaiiu 
On- 



XII. 



GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 



COLLECTED DURING THE REIGN OF CHARLES L 



*Black of Comiston, CO. Edinburgh. 

BoNAR OF RossiE has the saltire engrailed. Bonar of Keltie — 
argent, a saltire sable, in base a mascle azure. 

BoAGE. Argent, a chevron sable between two annulets in chief and 
a boar's head erased in base gules. 

BoAG OF BuRNHOusE. Argent, a chevron gules between two 
cinquefoils in chief azure and a boar's head erased in base sable. 

*BoNNYMAN. David II. confirmed a charter of the Abbot of Kinloss. 
to Donald Bonnyman of a tenement in Aberdeen. In the sixteenth and 
seventeenth centuries there were merchant burgesses of Edinburgh, and a 
writer to the signet of this name. .-w; '* 

*Brodie of that Ilk. The seal of David Bi-odie, burgess of Nairn, 
1544, has two mullets in chief and a man's heart in base. When 
Alexander Brodie of Brodie was appointed Lord Lyon in 1727, he regis- 
tered his own arms and those of six cadets of his family. The chief coat 
is — argent, a chevron gules, between three mullets azure ; crest — a right 
hand holding a bunch of arrows proper; motto — "Unite;" supporters 
— two savages wreathed about the head and middle with laurel. 

This family were thanes of Brodie in the fifteenth century, and, it is 
said, at a very early period. Thomas dominus de Brode was killed at 
Pinkie. Their estate was erected into a barony 1597. Alexander of that 
Ilk was a Senator of the College of Justice 1649- 1658, and left a Diary, 
which has been published in part in 1740, and printed in full, with that 
of his son, 1863, for the Spalding Club. 

A " Genealogy of the Brodie Family," printed for private circulation 
in 1862, begins with Malcolm Thane of Brodie, in the reign of Alexander 
III., but does not supply proofs; but in 1337, the lands de Brothy 
domini are mentioned in the Exchequer Rolls. 

In the arms granted in England to the family of Sir Benjamin 
Brodie, the eminent physican, who was of Scottish descent, the field is 
altered to azure, and the chevron and mullets made argent. 

*Brand. Alexander of Baberton, 1672-78, registered arms as he;-e, 
only putting three spur rowels or on a chief sable, instead of two in chief. 
In 1 72 1 Sir Thomas, Usher of the Green Rod, registered the same coat, 
varied by making the field or and the stars or spur rowels argent, quartered 
with two rods in saltire as the badge of his office ; he died in 1761. 

Redhall was acquired by the laird of Baberton, son of the founder of 
the family who was a merchant burgess of Edinburgh, in 1680, and after- 
wards was called Castle Brand. The family ended in George Brand of 
Castle Brand, by whose creditors the estate was sold in 1749. 

Sir Alexander Brand, of Brandfield, was knighted before the Union, 
and left descendants. All the estates named are in Mid-Lothian. 

Broune of Colstowne. Azure, a lion rampant argent. 

*Brounhill. Thomas of Brounhill was a bailie of Edinburgh 1361,. 
and several other persons of the name in the county of Edinburgh appear 
soon afterwards ; two of them made donations to the Cathedral Church of 
St Giles. 

40 



328 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

BucHAN OF Dyce. Argent, three lions' heads erased gules, a chief 
azure. 

•Butter of Gormack. Two other coats are given ; one this with- 
out the hearts, the other has the cross azure and a crescent gules in 
dexter chief. Arms were registered, 1672-78, by James of Gormack, co. 
Perth— argent, a cross sable between four men's hearts proper. 

William Butter had a charter of Gormack from Robert III. ; the 
lands were erected into a barony before 1636. Adam Butter held lands in 
the stewartry of Kirkcudbright, which were escheat to the king 1331. In 
1360 William and Patrick Butter were collectors of contributions for the 
king's ransom in Gowrie. 

Andrew Butter, bailie of Perth, sat in parliament for the burgh 1652. 
John of Gormack died before 1786, leaving a daughter and heir, Agnes. 

William Butter, physician in London, descended from the Gormack 
family, registered arms in 1767, on his marriage to Catherine, daughter of 
Sir John Douglas of Kelhead, baronet ; in consequence of this alliance an 
imperial crown was placed above the heart in the first quarter. About 
1770 Faskally was purchased by Henry Butter, by whose descendant it 
is still possessed. 

Butler. Two coats, the one as L., the other azure, a fess between 
three covered cups or, in chief a crescent for difference. 

Early seals of Alexander Botile with a fleur-de-lis, and John de 
Buteler with a rose or wheel ornament, are preserved in H. M. Record 
Office, detached. The seal of Sir John le Botilier, who swore fealty to 
Edward I. in 1291, is a chief charged with three covered cups. In 1296 
Johan le Botiler of Cramond, Johan le Botiler of Perthshire, and Sir John 
called le Botillier, all took the oaths to that sovereign. 

The Dispensation, in 1347, for the marriage of Robert II., then 
designed Sir Robert, lord of Strathgrif, and Elizabeth Mure, mentions 
that he carnaliter cognovit a noble lady, Ysabella Boutellier, who was 
related to the said Elizabeth. 

In 1470 John de Butlar seals with a fess engrailed between three 
covered cups, the shield being borne on the breast of an eagle. 

In 1677 George Butler of Kirkland, in East Lothian, registered — 
parted per fess engrailed azure and gules, three covered cups or. 

David II. confirmed a charter of Robert the Steward to Michael 
Butler of the barony of Kinboyscher. 

Thomas Butler was in parliament 1496 ; perhaps the person for 
whose soul mass is to be said in the Church of St Giles, in terms of a 
charter of mortification 1512. John Butler was a bailie of Edinburgh 
1429, and another John held the same office 1470. 

Mr George of Blans had a son, Mr John of Kirkland and Blans, a 
J. P. 1663, whose son George died in 1682, leaving John of Kirkland, who 
in 1690 was served heir to his grandfather, in the barony of Thornydikes, 
CO. Berwick. 

BoswELL of Auchinleck. Boswell quartering argent, two bars 
sable (?) for Auchinleck. 

*Belshes of Tofts. In 1674 Mr John of Tofts, co. Berwick, regis- 
tered — or, three pallets gules, a chief vair ; and John of that Ilk at the 
same time — paly of six or and gules, a chief vair. This family takes its 
name from lands near Ancrum, in Roxburghshire, and the direct line 
ended in John Belshes of that Ilk, who left four daughters and coheirs 



OF CHARLES LS REIGN. 329 

1721. John, a younger son, was an advocate, and acquired Tofts ; his 
eldest son, Sir Alexander, a Senator of the College of Justice 1646-56, 
represented the county in parliament. His great-grand-nephew and heir, 
John, inherited the baronetcy conferred in 1706 on Colonel George 
Wishart of Cliftonhall, and in 1778 registered arms, with supporters, as 
Sir John Belsches-Wisheart, baronet, heir male of Belshes of that Ilk. 

In 1804 John Hepburn-Belshes of Invermay and Balmanno, co. 
Perth, and of Blackcastle, in Mid-Lothian, entered arms, when he was also 
allowed supporters ; in 1864 this branch became extinct, and the repre- 
sentation and estates passed to Sir John Hepburn - Stuart - Forbes, 
baronet, heir general of the elder line, who then recorded arms quarter- 
ing Belshes. 

The representation and the right to the Wishart baronetcy now vest 
in the eldest son of Lord Clinton, and the family of Belshes seems to be 
extinct in the male line. 

*Byres. Arms on the monument, in the Greyfriars' Churchyard, to 
John Byres of Coittes, bailie, dean of guild, and treasurer of the city of 
Edinburgh, who died in 1639. In 1755 arms were. registered by Patrick 
of Tonley, in Aberdeenshire, stated to be representative of " the family of 
Coatts" — azure, a chevron argent between three martlets volant or. 
Why the bees were changed to martlets it is difficult to see, as they are 
distinctly drawn and described in several verbal blazons. 

Porteus gives for Byres of Strathaven- -azure, a chevron between 
three bees volant arrierde or ; and the same for Sir John of Coates, with 
the motto — " Rule be one." Sir John was son of the bailie of Edin- 
burgh, and died in 1647, leaving issue. Coates was sold by John Byres 
in 1702. 

A few years after Tonley was acquired by Robert Byres, merchant, 
burgess of Aberdeen ; his descendants in the male line failed on the 
death of Major-General Robert Byres of Tonley ; his cousin and heir, 
Patrick Moir, assumed the surname, and, dying in 1863, was succeeded by 
his brother, the present James Gregory Moir-Byres of Tonley. 

*Brunton. Walter Burntoun held part of Luffness in the reign of 
Robert III. 

*BoNTiNE. Thomas Buntyng, del counte de Pebles, in 1296 swore 
fealty to Edward I. ' . 

Findlay Bunting had a charter from Robert III. of Mylnetelame and 

Eart of Cardross ; in 1424 Sir Finlaw Buntyn was arbiter in a dispute 
etween the burghs of Renfrew and Dumbarton. In 1489 Robert and 
William Buntine were, with other men of Lennox, pardoned for holding 
Dumbarton Castle against the King. 

Ardoch was the property of John Bontine early in the sixteenth 
century ; Nicol of Ardoch sat in parliament for Dumbartonshire 
1685. Nicol of Ardoch registered arms — argent, a bend gules between 
three bunting birds proper. He died in 1760, leaving an only child, 
Jane, who, five years before, had married Thomas Ewing of Keppoch ; 
her grandson and heir, Alexander Ewing, merchant in Glasgow, in 1869 
registered arms quartering Bontine. William Bontine of Ardoch and 
Auchendinnan, brother and heir male of Nicol, was dead, without issue, 
in 1770, when his niece, Mrs Ewing, was served heir to him. 

The next branch of the family was Bontein of Milndovan, also in 
Dumbartonshire, where they were seated in the reign of Charles I. 



330 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

Robert of Milndovan married his kinswoman Margaret, daughter and heir 
of Archibald Bontein of Balglass ; their son, Archibald of Balglass, died 
about 1770, leaving a son, Sir James Bontein, Lieutenant-Colonel and 
Gentleman of the Privy Chamber, knighted in 1798, registered arms 
181 3, as heir male of Ardoch, as above; the crest was altered from a 
bunting bird standing on a garb proper, to a demi-eagle issuing from a 
ducal coronet proper, and he was allowed supporters — two lions proper; 
motto — '' Copiose et opportune." Sir James died in 1820 at Hanover, 
leaving issue. 

The estate of Ardoch, which had been erected into a barony in 1707, 
was by entail, in 1757, settled by Nicol Bontine, failing descendants of 
his brother, on the families of Grahame of Gartmore, and Cuningham, 
Earl of Glencairn, the heir in possession being obliged to use the sur- 
name and arms of Bontine only; Mrs Ewing and her descendants are 
excluded absolutely, and Ardoch has remained in the possession of the 
Grahames. James, third son of William of Ardoch, married Agnes, 
eldest daughter and coheir of Robert Barr of Trehorn, Ayrshire; the 
descendant of their son, Robert Buntine-Barr of Treehorn, claims the 
representation of the Ardoch family. Younger branches possessed the 
estates of Kirkton and Succoth. 

Major Hugh Buntine in 1670 had a Crown charter of the barony of 
Kilbryde, Ayrshire, for which county he was elected M.P. 1690; he regis- 
tered arms, 1672-78 — argent, three buntine birds proper, on a chief azure 
a sword fessways of the first hilted and pommelled or. He was succeeded' 
in 1 7 14 by his nephew, William Baillie of Monkton, whose son sold 
Kilbryde. 

Thomas Bountine of Bountinehall, about 1680, registered— argent, a 
chevron sable between three buntine birds proper. 

*BoYLE. This coat bears no resemblance to that of Boyle of Kel- 
burne, co, Ayr, represented by the Earl of Glasgow. 

*Bennet. Porteus gives for Bennet in Nithsdale — gules, a cross 
set on three degrees argent, on a chief of the second a crescent between 
two stars of the first. 

The Grubbet family expired on the death of Sir John, fifth baronet, 
about 1760, and the estate passed to Nisbet of Dirleton. 

Chesters belonged to the principal family of the name about 1580, 
and descended to Robert of Chesters, whose sisters and coheirs, Agnes, 
Helen (wife of Archibald Douglas of Tympendean), and Isobel (wife of 
Archibald Hope, collector of excise), sold it towards the end of the 
eighteenth century. 

In Fife the name is found about 1450. Sir Richard Bennat, 
chaplain to James, Archbishop of St Andrews, was presented to the 
vicarage of Arbroath 1459 J Nichole Bennate has a suit with Spens of 
Kilspindy 1489 ; Bennets of Busses, in Fife, are met with in the seven- 
teenth century, and ended in an heiress, Christian, who married John 
Scotland, and died in 1702, leaving issue. 

*Blensheil. See B. for another coat, i486, Robert Bleyndshelys 
went to England in the suite of the Scottish Ambassadors. 1482, Robert 
Blindsell, alderman of Aberdeen, was elected on the articles ; the name 
is borne by residents in that burgh as early as 1396, and long afterwards. 
John Blindsele, Islay Herald 1596, died before 1614, leaving two 
daughters. 



OF CHA RLES US REIGN. 3 3 1 

♦Burnett of Leys. 

*BiRNiE. These arms were registered, 1672-78, by Sir Andrew, 
advocate, afterwards a Senator of the College of Justice, with the title of Lord 
Saline, 1679-88 ; his younger brother, Alexander, also an advocate, entered 
arms at the same time with a crescent for difference ; and in 1690 those 
of Mr John Birnie of Broomhill, co. Lanark, are recorded: he has no lion's 
head on the fess, but that is his crest. In 1728 John Birnie of Broom- 
hill compiled an account of his family, which was printed for private 
circulation, in 1838, by W. B. D. D. Turnbull, advocate. It commences 
with Birnie and two of his sons, who, in the year 838, signalised themselves 
fighting under Kenneth, King of Scots, against the Picts ; being taken 
prisoners and confined by one leg in the stocks, they each amputated that 
member, so escaped, and " at the next battle fatal to the Picts they were 
observed to behave themselves with a new courage wherewith the loss of 
their legs had animated them."— An important contribution to the early 
history of surgery. The reward of this exploit was a grant of the 
barony of Birnie in Morayshire, which remained in the family till sold by 
William of that Ilk in the minority of James VI. Unfortunately for this 
bold fiction, the facts are that Birnie was held by the bishops and then by 
the Earls of Moray ; that Birnie, as a surname, does not occur once in 
the chartulary of the bishopric, and is hardly to be met with at all till the 
seventeenth century. Henry Birney was a notary public 1551 ; James 
Birnie was killed before 1575, of which Thomas Meldrum was accused ; 
in 1619 James Birnie of Browbrie sat as a juror. 

William " of that Ilk " may probably be identified with William, 
burgess of Edinburgh, who, in 1568, was employed to take down the 
lead from the roofs of the Cathedrals of Aberdeen and Elgin. He is said 
to have married Margaret Eraser, who, in the genealogy, is called a 
daughter of Philorth, maid to Queen Mary, who appointed her mistress 
of the Mint in her widowhood, after the death of her second husband, 
Thomas Aitchison, goldsmith and assay master of the Mint. This 
seems all wrong. William Birnie, burgess of Edinburgh, and Helen 
Acheson, his spouse, acquire a tenement in Leith 1567 ; eight years later, 
Helen, with consent of her then husband, Archibald Stewart, burgess of 
Edinburgh, resigns this, and a charter is granted in favour of Thomas 
Acheson, burgess of Edinburgh, and Margaret Fraser, his spouse, who 
had been previously married to James Henderson, also a burgess, of 
Edinburgh. 

Mr William Birnie, only son of the Edinburgh burgess, who was 
minister of Lanark 1597, of Ayr 161 1, and Dean of the Chapel Royal, is 
an authentic personage at any rate, and the genealogy gives a minute 
account of his descendants, in the male and female lines, which is 
valuable. 

Mr John, minister of Carluke, married Jean, daughter ancj even- 
tually coheir of James Hamilton of Broomhill, Bishop of Galloway, and 
in 1685 acquired Broomhill, Floors, and Almornes. His son was the 
writer of the pedigree. 

Captain James Birnie of Broomhill married Margaret Hamilton of 
Dalserf, and assumed her name ; he died without issue in 1796, when his 
niece, Mrs Katherine Birnie or Mitchelson, succeeded him in the entailed 
estate. The book plate of this family shows supporters, described by Mr 

4P 



332 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

Turnbull as — two priests precant sable in reading desks proper, an 
assumption in keeping with their other pretensions. 

•Blackwood. The seal, in 1584, of Mr William Blackwood, vicar 
of Duddingston, has these bearings, the mullet being on the dexter and 
the crescent on the sinister side. 

About the middle of the sixteenth century three brothers, Adam, 
Henry, and George Blackwood, said to be from Dunfermline, settled in 
France, and were distinguished in the learned professions, the first 
named being the most eminent ; his son was a judge at Poitiers, where 
the father had settled as a conseiller. They bore — azure, a fess or 
between a lozenge argent in dexter chief, a mullet or in sinister chief, and 
a crescent of the second in base, and quartered gules, a stag's head 
couped argent (? for Crawfurd). 

The Earl of Dufferin is head of a family settled in Ireland since the 
middle of the seventeenth century, descended from John Blackwood, born 
in Scotland ; they long bore — argent, a saltire sable, on a chief of the 
second three olive leaves of the field. 

This closely resembles the only coat registered, that of Robert, dean 
of guild of Edinburgh 1704, afterwards Sir Robert of Pitreavie, co. Fife 
— argent, a saltire sable, on a chief of the second three oak leaves proper, 
a mascle gules for difference. See W. Pitreavie remains the property of 
Sir Robert's representative. 

Lord Dufferin has lately discontinued the use of these arms, and 
adopted a coat founded on the older bearings. 

1490, Gilbert Blackwood in Knockintinny, co. Fife ; several genera- 
tions of Blackwoods can be traced at Dunblane, where, in 1563, James 
held land of the Commendator of Inchaffray ; Sir William, in 1569, pro- 
duces the register book of Dunblane; Henry, son of William, bailie of 
Dunblane, was clerk of the commissariat of Dunblane 1638, and had a 
ratification of the office 1661. 

Andrew was bailie of Perth 1522, and several times afterwards ; and 
Adam held the same ofiice 1545. 

A family of Blackwoods, portioners of Coldrain in the seventeenth 
century, produced two who bore the name of Adam. 

In Edinburgh, Peter, 1560; William, a burgess, 1642; Robert, a 
merchant, and George, who were both fined in 1662, may have been of 
the dean of guild's branch. 

Campbell of Strachur. Gyronny of eight sable and or, a martlet 
gules on the last gyron. 

•Caddell of Asloun, or rather, Calder of Aswanlie. This coat was 
registered, 1677, by Laurence Calder of Lyniger in Caithness, with the 
addition of four stars and as many crescents, alternately disposed orle- 
ways azure. 

Mr Cosmo Innes, in " The Thanes of Cawdor," printed for the 
Spalding Club, traces the main line of that great family from Donald, 
thane of Cawdor, 1295, to its extinction about 1530; Muriel, heiress of 
Cawdor, married a younger son of the second Earl of Argyll, and was 
ancestress of the Earl of Cawdor. 

Seal of Donald, thane of Cawdor and Sheriff of Nairn 1 431 -40-— a 
hart's head cabossed, and a chief charged with a buckle on the dexter side. 

William, thane, in 1449 seals with a hart's head cabossed and two 
mullets in chief. 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. 333 

Muriel, Lady of Cawdor, 151 1 — a hart's head cabossed with a buckle 
between the attires. 

Her descendants quartered — or, a hart's cabossed sable attired gules, 
and the buckle developed into another quarter — or, on a fess azure three 
buckles of the first, but this was dropped when John Campbell of Calder 
entered his arms in 1722. 

The Calders of Aswanlie held lands in Aberdeenshire for many 
generations, and may perhaps have a representative in America, as the 
last trace of them I have met with is the service, in 1809, of William in 
Hertford, Connecticut, to his uncle, Alexander of Aswanlie. 

James Calder, merchant in Elgin, said to descend from Aswanlie, 
acquired the barony of Muirtown in 1674, and in 1685 had a Crown 
charter of all his lands de novo erected into the barony of Muirtown ; a 
baronetcy, conferred on him the following year, has descended to the 
present Sir William Henry Calder ; arms registered — or, a hart's head 
cabossed sable attired gules. In the county of Caithness the Calders of 
Lynegar, Ackingale, and Strath can be traced from the beginning of the 
sixteenth century to the early part of the nineteenth. John Calder was 
Bute Pursuivant 1560-70. 

See W. for two Cader coats. 

*Chrystie of Whythouse. William Christie had a feu charter of 
part of the lands of Stenton, in Fife, from the commendator of Dunferm- 
line in 1565 ; his descendant, James of Whythouse, co. Edinburgh, 
writer to the signet, was grandfather of James of Whythouse and Stenton, 
whose descendants possessed the estates of Newhall in Haddington, 
Ratho and Baberton in Mid-Lothian, and Riddry in Lanarkshire, and 
intermarried with Dick of Grange, Foulis of Ratho, Gordon of Lesmoir, 
&c. Although the tinctures here are or and sable, are so given by 
Porteus 1660, and in three entries of Christie arms in the Lyon Register 
1672-78 they were altered when Sir Archibald of Riddry registered arms 
in 1818 as heir male of Stenton— or, a saltire engrailed gules between 
four mullets azure, quartering Foulis of Ratho, and with supporters — two 
griffins proper. His son represents the family. 

David Christie sat in parliament, 1685-1703, for the burgh of Dysart, 
and was of the same branch. 

*Clarksone. Porteus blazons the coat — argent, a saltire vert^ two 
crescents gules, a cross fitchde sable. 

An Edinburgh burgess family of the sixteenth and seventeenth cen- 
turies, who for a time held the lands of Cousland. 

•Copland of Udoch. Seal of Thomas Copland 1524 — two garbs 
in chief and a boar's head contournd in base. Porteus gives the arms as 
in G., but with the mullets or, and calls the quartering Cunningham. 

Udoch, in Aberdeenshire, was in the possession of Alexander Cop- 
land about 1490, and seems to have been sold early in the seventeenth 
century by Alexander, who, after engaging to serve in Germany with 
Captain Ogilvy in 1627, deserted with his son William and his son-in- 
law Patrick Mowat of Balquholly. Alexander served in Russia and 
Poland, and is probably the Captain Alexander Copland who, in 1640, 
was excommunicated by the presbytery of Strathbogie, for receiving James 
Con, an excommunicated papist. 

William de Copland witnessed the charter of Waldeve, son of Cos- 
patric, to Helias, son of Huctred, of the lands of Dundas, c. 1160. 



334 : GENTLEMEN'S ARMS , 

Robert de Copland is one of the witnesses of a charter of Robert de 
Quinci to Holyrood. • 

In 1249 Sampson de Coupeland is one of the English envoys to 
settle the laws of the marches. 

David II. granted, to Allan of Fawsyde, the forfeiture of "ane 
Coupland herald " in the time of Edward I. and Edward Baliol. That 
king was taken at Neville's Cross by John de Coupeland, who was created 
a knight banneret, with a pension of ;^5oo, was warden of Berwick, 
Sheriff of Northumberland and Roxburgh, and died in 1362. 

In 1310 William de Coupeland, and nine other prisoners in Scotland, 
were exchanged for Mary de Brus, sister of Robert I. 

1338, John de Coupeland has a pension in place of the lands of 
Ormiston, co. Roxburgh, restored to their former owner William 
Dalmahoy. 

The surname is local, taken from Copeland in Cumberland or 
Northumberland, and it seems probable that some persons of the name 
settled on the north side of the border. It is to be met with in Dum- 
friesshire early in the sixteenth century, and in the seventeenth there 
were many Coplands burgesses of Dumfries. 

John, Provost of the burgh 1680-83, was father of William, Provost 
1702-8, who acquired Collision and Blackwood. 

William of CoUiston registered arms 1731 as in Porteus' MS., 
although what he had to do with the Cunningham quartering it might be 
difficult to show ; crest — a horseman in armour brandishing a sword ; 
motto — " Vicir In 1773 Alexander of Collision recorded arms, when 
the quartering was dropped ; two tigers proper were granted as sup- 
porters, and the crest was altered to a knight in armour issuing from the 
wreath, looking to the dexter, brandishing a sword in his right hand, and 
bearing in his left an imperial crown, all proper. 

This looks like an allusion to the claim to descend from the captor of 
David II., set forth in the appendix to Nisbet's " Heraldry," where the 
motto is given as " Regie viciy 

*CURRIE OF NeWBIE. 

CuRRiE OF Kelwood. The same with a chief argent. See B. for 
another coat. 

-: : On the seal of Peter de Currie, c. 1180, there is a dragon ; that of 
Simon Currie, 1588, is a saltire with a mullet in chief (? a rose). 

Hugh de Currie was present in the curia regis of William the Lyon 
at Edinburgh; 1243, Robert de Currie witnessed a charter, and died 
1245 ; Sir Walter de Corry, and Nicol de Corry of Dumfriesshire, signed 
the Ragman Roll ; Sir Walter, in 1292, was keeper of the Castles of 
Wigtown, Kirkcudbright, and Dumfries. Sir John, in 1297, was a 
prisoner in England till April 1299, when he was exchanged. 

David II., in the thirty-fourth year of his reign, granted the 
lands of Coulyn and Ruchane in Dumfriesshire to Robert de Corry and 
Susanna his wife, daughter and heir of Thomas de Torthorwald, who 
was killed at Durham ; the lady having died childless, these lands 
reverted to the Crown. Walter Curry, in 1342, has a gift of money for 
his share in the taking of Edinburgh Castle, from Edward Baliol's 
party, and was afterwards one of the custumars of Edinburgh. 

George Corry of Kelwood sat in parliament 1572 ; that place had 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. 335 

long been the seat of the family, and Corries of ^Newbie and of Knock 
figure in the fifteenth century. Sir George, last of Kelwood, was dead in 
1675, leaving a son George Corrie. 

The surname, taken from the lands and parish of Corrie in Dum- 
friesshire, is common in the district. James Corrie was several times 
Provost of Dumfries, 17 18 to 1734, and left descendants landowners in 
the county. 

In Scotland no arms are registered by any person of the name, but 
in England Sir Frederick Currie, baronet, date of creation 1846, whose 
family was settled in Berwickshire for several generations, was allowed — 
gules, a saltire couped argent in chief a rose of the last barbed and seeded 
proper. 

The Earl of Belmore in Ireland descended from John Corry, a native 
of Scotland who settled at Belfast early in the seventeenth century, bears 
— gules, a saltire argent, in chief a rose or. 

Douglas. Sixteen coats, of which only one has the heart crowned, 
viz., Douglas of Halloway (?) — ermine, a man's heart crowned with an 
antique crown gules ; on a chief of the second three mullets argent. 
Douglas, argent, three piles sable issuing from a chief gules charged 
with a heart between two mullets of the field. 

*Davidsone of old. See W. Adam fiz Dauid of Forfarshire, and 
Johan le fiz Dauid of Berwickshire in 1296, swore fealty to Edward I. 
1340 William, son of David, was Provost of Aberdeen ; 1360 John, son 
of David, bailie of Peebles; 1379 John, son of David, bailie of Perth; 
these are merely quoted without any belief that the surname became 
hereditary in the families of their descendants. In 1360 Adam Davyson 
merchant and burgess of Edinburgh has an English safe-conduct. 

Auchinhamper, co. Aberdeen, was the property of a family of the 
name in the fifteenth century, and in the same shire were Davidsons of 
Newton, Tillimorgan, Carnbrogie, &c. 

Alexander Davidson of Newton assumed the surname and arms of 
Gordon of Gight, and this line ended in an heiress, mother of Lord 
Byron ; arms — azure, on a fess engrailed between three pheons argent a 
buck's head erased of the field. 

Mr Alexander of Carnbrogie, advocate, registered — azure, on a fess 
couped argent between three pheons or a buck couchant gules ; George of 
Carnbrogie d.s.p. 1722, and his sister and heir, Marjory of Carnbrogie, 
married — first, William Thain of Blackball ; secondly, Alexander Gordon 
of Auchreddy. 

Sir William Davidson of Curriehill, in Mid-Lothian, Conservator of 
the Scottish privileges in the Low Countries, was created a baronet, and 
registered arms, 1672-78 — azure, on a fess argent between three pheons 
or a buck couchant gules attired sable. Sir William, who belonged to a 
family of Edinburgh merchants, died before 1685 ; his daughter and heir, 
Anne of Curriehill, married Mynheer Francis Vanderburgh of Dort. 

Walter Davidson was prior of Pittenweem 1480, Patrick represented 
Linlithgow in parliament 1488, Laurence sat for Sanquhar 1643-49, and 
Robert for Dundee 1644-49. Robert of Balgay, near Dundee, registered 
arms 1672-78 ; Robert, a bailie of Dundee, lost his life in the defence of 
the town against the English 1651 ; the Davidsons were for several 
generations a leading burgess family there. 

The Rev. Thomas Davidson of Dundee, had a son William, 

4Q 



336 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

merchant in Rotterdam, who purchased Muirhouse, co. Edinburgh, 1776, 
and had a grant of arms 1786— azure, on a chevron or between two stars 
in chief and a pheon in base, argent a fleur-de-lis gules ; the last allusive 
to a traditional descent from a Frenchman, who came to Scotland in the 
retinue of Queen Magdalene. There are in France several noble families 
of the name of David and Davy, and if similarity of arms can be founded 
on, the Davy de Cussd, in the Isle of France, may be the line to which 
this Scottish branch belongs ; they bear azure, a chevron between two 
stars in chief and an ear of grain in base or. Mr Davidson had a Royal 
warrant, in 1786, for supporters — two griffins proper, and he died without 
issue in September 1794; he had two brothers and one sister, Mary, who 
married — first, Thomas Eliot of Chapelhill, co. Peebles, solicitor to 
Frederick Prince of Wales, and had one son, Sir John Eliot, baronet, 
M.D. ; secondly, Rev, Thomas Randall of Stirling, and had, with other 
issue. Rev. Thomas, D.D., one of the ministers of Edinburgh, who in 
compliance with the terms of his uncle's entail, assumed the surname and 
arms of Davidson only, and had the supporters confirmed to him in 1795. 
Muirhouse remains the property of his representative. 

The Davidsons in Roxburghshire seem to have formed a small clan 
in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries ; the chief family was seated 
at Samieston, and became extinct on the death of James Davidson of that 
place, whose four nieces were his coheirs 1670. 

*Denham. Gwy de Denum of Roxburghshire, and Huwe Dounum, 
parson of Liberton, co. Lanark, signed the Ragman Roll in 1296. In 
1299 Alan de Denvme has an obligation from John, lord of Dunsyer, in 
Lanarkshire. Denholm is a parish in Dumfriesshire, in which county 
there were landowners of the name in the fifteenth century. 

Porteus gives the blazon — gules, a chevron between three cranes' 
heads couped argent, but the arms registered, 1672-78, by William of 
Westshield, co. Lanark, correspond in tincture with those here given. 

Symon Denham inherited Westshield from his maternal grand- 
father, John Liddaill, in or shortly before 1506; his last descendant in 
the direct male line, William, added to the estate, and acquired the supe- 
riority, was forfeited 1685 and restored 1690 ; he was appointed Master of 
the Mint, and represented the county of Lanark in parliament. A 
baronetcy was conferred on him in 1693, with remainder to his heirs 
male and assignees, and in 171 1 Sir William executed two deeds of entail 
of his estate of Westshield, with the title of baronet, and of all his other 
means and estate heritable and moveable, on certain of the descendants of 
his sisters. The title descended, in conformity with this arrangement, to 
members of the families of Baillie of Hardington and Lockhart of Way- 
gateshaw, and probably became extinct on the death of Sir William Lock- 
hart-Denham of Westshield in 1776. This gentleman left the estate to 
Sir James Steuart of Coltness, who assumed the additional surname and 
arms of Denham, and in 18 10 his son, Sir James Steuart Denham, baronet, 
was allowed two cranes proper as supporters. 

*DuNNiNG OF Miller. Robert Donyng was seven times provost of 
Perth 1472-92, Robert of Dunning sat in parliament 1471-82. John 
Donyng, burgess of Glasgow, was a member of a committee of parliament 
1644. 

Dunning, in Perthshire, was a thanage at a very early period ; 
Anechol, Bryce, and Gilmech, thanes of Dunning, are repeatedly named 



OF CHARLES US REIGN, Z2>7 

in the Cartulary of Inchafifray, and there were ecclesiastics of the name in 
Perthshire afterwards ; Mr John was vicar of Perth in the reign of James 
II. Miller probably stands for Mailer in that county. 

Alexander Dunning of Corrie Wester, co. Perth, was grandfather of 
Mr Alexander Dunning of Corrie Wester, minister of Abernethy 1691- 
1719, several of whose descendants held the estate in succession. 

Thomas Dunning, of Castle Sprutings, was dead without issue in 
1780, when his cousin, John Campbell of Saffronhall in Lanarkshire, was 
his heir. 

*Dawson. The accounts of the Lord High Treasurer contain notices 
of James Dawson, his wife, and his son James, who was godson of James 
IV., 1494-98. At that time, and on to the end of the following century, 
persons of the name held land in the barony of Restalrig. 

DuDiNGSTONE OF Sandford, Fife. Gules, a chevron between three 
cross crosslets fitchee argent. L. gives Dudingstone of South House, 
near Edinburgh. 

The seal of Andrew of South House, 1579, is a chevron between 
three mascles, on a chief as many mullets. 

The crosses are or in the entry in the Lyon Register 1672-78, by 
James of Sandford ; latterly this family assumed as supporters two 
greyhounds. 

The name is that of a locality near Edinburgh, and Eleyne de Dud- 
dynggeston, of that county, swore fealty to Edward I. in 1296. John 
Dodingstoun had a charter, from Robert I., of the lands of Pitcorthie in 
Fife, near Sandford. Richard and Thomas de Dodingston occur in some 
of the earliest of the Newbotle charters. 

In May 1290 Edward I. grants a protection against proceedings for 
debts to William de Dodingstone, burgess of Edinburgh. 

Dalrymple of Laclaid. Argent, on a cross engrailed sable nine 
mascles of the first ; also, or, a saltire engrailed sable charged with nine 
mascles argent, for Stairs. 

*Dalgarno of Garniestoune. William of Dalgarnock, Abbot of 
Kelso 1329, was preceptor of David II. at Chateau Gaillard. John of 
Dalgarnock was customar of Arbroath 1359 ; in 13 12 Thomas of Dalger- 
noc is named in the Cartulary of Arbroath. Mr William of Dalgarnock, 
Canon of Brechin, Provost of St Andrews, and Envoy to France and 
England, lived in the latter part of the fourteenth century. 1417, Jdhn 
de Dalgarnowch, lord of Fyntrie ; these lands came to be called Dal- 
garno-Fintray, and the family took the designation of Dalgarno of that 
Ilk. 

In 1400 and 1402 William Dalgarno of Fintray acquired Black- 
water, from the heirs of Adam Pyngyl. John de Dalgarnock resigned 
Wester Essintoley, co. Kincardine, which was granted by Robert II. in 
the third year of his reign, to John Eraser. In 1390 Patrick de Dalgar- 
nok is one of the heirs named in a charter of some lands of Innerdovat in 
Fife, to his brother Patrick Forrester. 

William was of that Ilk 1603, and John of Auchmunil, William of 
Blackwater, and William of Garniston figure in the Aberdeenshire lists 
1643-61. 

The list of Pollable Persons in Aberdeenshire, 1696, contains four 
landowners of the name ; one of them left descendants who still possessed 
the estate of Millhill nearly to the close of last century. 



338 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

♦Dalgleish. This surname is taken from Dalgleish in the parish 
of Rankilburn, co. Selkirk. 

Symon of Dalgleish witnessed a charter of the Duke of Albany 
1407; John of Dalgleish had a remission 1494; John, son and heir of 
the late John of Dalgleish, 1495. 

A younger branch possessed Deuchar in the same county, for several 
generations, till about 1620. 

The Dalgleishes figure constantly in the records as disturbers of the 
peace; John was hanged in 1510 for being concerned in the burning of 
Branxholm and other offences; in 1567 George, a servant of the Earl of 
Bothwell, suffered the same death, as being accessory to the murder of 
King Henry. 

Dalgleish seems to have ceased to belong to the family before 1630, 
but a branch had previously acquired lands in the west of Fife. The 
arms here represented are allowed in Funeral Escutcheons to Robert 
Dalgleish designed of that Ilk (?), who married Margaret Clark of the 
Pittencrieff family ; their son James, by Ann, daughter of Alexander 
Meiklejohn of Parkhill, was father of Mr Robert Dalgleish, advocate. 
Clerk to the General Assembly 1638, agent for the Church of Scotland, 
and solicitor to Charles II. He married Jean, daughter of Douglas of 
Pompherston, and their arms impaled are cut in stone at Lauriston, co. 
Edinburgh, an estate acquired by him c. 1655. Mr Robert Dalgleish 
died in 1662, leaving an only child Margaret, wife of Ludovick Craig of 
Riccarton ; in 1683 she and her son Thomas Craig of Riccarton sold 
Lauriston. 

Mr William Dalgleish, brother of Mr Robert, was minister of 
Cramond, the parish in which the estate of Lauriston is situated, married 
Elizabeth, sister of the first Lord Colville of Ochiltree, and left descend- 
ants, several of whom, were clergymen. They intermarried with Camp- 
bell of Auchlyne, Stewart of Nevvhalls, Ogilvie of Inchmartine, Makgill 
of Kemback, &c., and possessed the estates of Scotscraig in Fife, and 
Riddoch in Stirlingshire. 

In 1748 Rev. William of Scotscraig, registered arms as borne by 
Dalgleish of Lauriston ; William Ogilvy Dalgleish, Esq., is head of the 
family, and the Riddoch branch is represented by George Kellie-M'Callum 
of Braco. 

On a stone on a house at Dunfermline is a shield, with the date 
1624, May 25th, and initials M. R. D. ; the date is that of the destruction 
by fire of an old house, on the site of which another was built soon after, 
and this stone formed part of the latter building. The arms are a tree 
eradicated in pale between three pheons fessways, one on the dexter and 
two on the sinister side, their points to the dexter. A stone, with the 
date 1609 and initials S. D., on a house in the High Street, Dunfermline, 
has a shield — a bendlet between six pheons or arrows, two, three, and one 
in chief, points upwards, and a bird in base, a star in chief, perhaps as a 
mark of cadency. 

The author of the " Annals of Dunfermline " supposes these to be 
the arms of Dury, to which they bear no resemblance ; there can be no 
doubt that they were put up by members of the family of Dalgleish, to 
which the solicitor to the king belonged. 

Dawlyne. Gules, three crosses argent. 

*Dempster of Muiresk. Also Dempster of old as the first quarter. 



OF CHARLES L'S REIGN. 339 

Seal of William Dempster of Caraldstone 1561, a lion rampant. 
Seal in 1592 of Thomas of Auchterless, first and fourth, a lion rampant; 
second and third, a bar surmounted of a sword paleways, point 
downwards. Seal of John Dempster of Balrowny 1607, first and fourth, 
a sword bendways, point downwards surmounted of a fess ; second and 
third, a lion rampant contournd. The arms here shown were registered 
in 1673 by John Dempster of Pitliver, co. Fife, as " representer of the 
familie of Muiresk." He was knighted, married Jean, daughter of 
Erskine of Balgownie, and died 2nd May 1704; had two children, 
Captain John Dempster, fiar of Pitliver, who d.s.p., and Jean, who married 
Sir James Campbell, second baronet of Aberuchill, and died in April 1703; 
her eldest son sold Pitliver. 

In Douglas' "Baronage" there is a pedigree of Dempster which is 
inaccurate, and entirely differs from the account given in the Funeral 
Entry of Mrs Jean Campbell ; Sir John's mother is there stated to have 
been daughter of Sir John Preston of Valleyfield and Grizel Colville, and 
his father's mother to have been a daughter of James Henderson of 
Fordell and Jean Murray. 

The whole pedigree in the " Baronage " is grounded on the mistake 
of making Caraldstone and Auchterless one family, they being quite dis- 
tinct ; in the cartulary of Brechin the heads of the two families are 
several times named in the same deed, 

1362, Robert Demstar, bailie of Forfar; 1360, Andrew Dempster 
makes a gift from his lands of Menmuir to the priory of Restennot. 
Robert H., in the ninth year of his reign, grants the office of dempster of 
parliament and in justice aires, &c., to Andrew Dempster, /^^(/i?;^ nosier, 
and his heirs. 

1370, charter of the office of dempster by the Abbot of Arbroath to 
Andrew Dempster dominus de Caraldstone; 1460, David of Caraldstone 
and David, his eldest son, resign that office into the hands of the Abbot 
of Arbroath ; Robert of Caraldstone dempster of parliament 1469. 

Robert of Caraldstone sat in parliament 1491 ; Alexander, in 1476, 
was dempster of parliament ; John of Caraldstone and Margaret Scrym- 
geour, his spouse, 1476-84; Peter of Caraldstone, his son, married Janet 
Ochterlony in or before 1500; William of Caraldstone, his son, 1544. 
William of Caraldstone, 1574, seems to have been the last of the family, 
and in 1606 his grandsons, William Ochterlony and Charles Lin, wfere 
served heirs-portioners general to him. 

Of the Auchterless and Muiresk line were Walter, 1429-34 ; David, 
1443-57; Walter, 1461 ; John, 1469-97; John, 1530-53, and Margaret 
Stewart, his spouse; their son James, 1564-83; his son Thomas, 1589, 
was beheaded at Edinburgh for forgery in April 1620; he married Jean 
Leslie, and had issue, Robert, Thomas, and George, all named in a 
charter of the barony of Auchterless-Dempster, 1592, the heirs next in 
succession being John of Knockleith, Archibald of Halsewallis, and 
Charles of Barrane (? Balrowny). 

Mr John of Logic Altoun, advocate, acquired lands in the west of 
Fife, and was ancestor of Pitliver; he was dead in 1622, leaving issue; 
Margaret, heiress of Logic, married in 1704 David Carnegie of Craigo. 

Mr John Dempster, minister of Monifieth 1676-1708, who had been 
previously schoolmaster at Brechin, registered arms, c. 1680, the same as 

4R 



340 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

Sir John — within a bordure, parted per pale argent and sable ; he was 
ancestor of the Dempsters of Dunnichen and Skibo. 

Thomas Dempster, the historian, who was born 1579, and died 1625 
at Bologna, where he was a professor, belonged to the Muiresk family. 

*DuGUiD OF AucHiNHUiF. Francis of Auchinhuif registered 1672-78 
— azure, three crosses patee argent. Porteus gives — argent, three crosses 
patee azure. 

John Dogod, 1365; John Dogude, bailie of Perth, 1379; Robert 
Duguid, 1406. 

Elizabeth of Balcarne, heiress of Balcarne, Auchinhuif, Warthill, 
&c., was mother of Robert Duguid of Auchinhuif 1470-1500. 

The estate was erected into a barony by Crown charter 1643, in 
favour of William Duguid. Robert of Auchinhuif married in 1699 
Theresa, daughter of Patrick Leslie of Balquhain, and their son succeeded 
to the estates of his mother's family. 

•Donaldson. The Lyon Register contains ten entries of arms for 
this name from 1672 onwards, all but one bearing the eagle and lymphad 
of Macdonald, and in some cases a descent from the Glencoe family being 
stated. 

The exception is a dean of guild of Brechin — argent, a galley with 
her oars in saltire within a bordure wavy azure. He is probably the 
David Donaldson who sat in parliament for that burgh 1644-52, 1678-81. 

Porteus' MS. gives — argent, a lymphad oars in saltire sable ; there 
is added in a later hand, surmounted of an eagle displayed, and in the 
dexter (chief?) a hand couped at the wrist gules. In the Lyon Register 
the field is or, and the eagle, which has two heads, is sable or proper. 

In 1642 a Litera Prosapice, under the Great Seal, was issued Alex- 
ander Donaldson, M.D., son of Walter, Professor of Philosophy at 
Sedan, tracing his descent through five generations from Donald Donald- 
son of Essilmond, designed baron, and Isabella Hay, his wife, of the 
noble family of Errol. 

*Fythie of Boysack. About 1680 Henry Fithie, heir- male of that 
family, late provost of Arbroath, registered — ^azure, a crane proper. 
Porteus gives this, making the crane argent ; and another blazon — ^gules, 
a crane passant, a cross coupd fitch6e in his tail, and a chief argent 
charged with three stars of the first. 

Henry of Fithie, one of the commissioners sent by Robert I. to 
inquire into the privileges of Arbroath. David of Fothy, custumar of 
Aberdeen 1332, Eustace of Futhes, a collector of contributions in Aber- 
deenshire 1373, William de Fethy in 1365, had an English safe-conduct. 

1413, Laurence of Fithy; 1450, Henry Fethy of Boysack; 1510, 
Henry of Boysack; 1527, Henry of Boysack and Helen Straton, his 
spouse ; their sons, Alexander and David ; Elizabeth, daughter and heir 
of John, representative of Boysack, married John Elliot of Peebles; 1527, 
David of Inchcok ; 1514, David of Cookston ; 1531, Duncan of Cookston. 

John Fithie, merchant burgess of Dundee, and Margaret Strachan, 
his spouse, had a charter of the lands of Benvie and Balruddery 1654 ; 
and in 1665 he presented a communion bread plate to the church of 
Dundee, on which his arms are engraved — a crane pierced by a sword 
and three stars in (? on a) chief. 

Henry Fithie represented the burgh of Arbroath in parliament 
1667-73. 



OF CHARLES LS REIGN. 341 

*Fletcher. Porteus gives this for Fletcher of Innerpeffer ; it was 
registered 1672-78 by Andrew of Salton, with two griffins proper as sup- 

Corters ; at the same time by his uncle, Sir Andrew of Aberlady, with a 
ordure engrailed argent; and in 1763 by Robert of Balinshoe, a cadet, 
with a crescent gules for difference. 

Sir Andrew of Innerpeffer was a senator of the College of Justice 
1623-50, represented the shire of Angus in parliament, and acquired the 
barony of Salton from Lord Abernethy of Salton. 

Robert Fletcher represented the burgh of Dundee in parliament 
1596, and James sat for the same place 1639-41 ; another James repre- 
sented the burgh 1 685-1 701. 

The same arms are cut on the monument in Melrose Abbey of David 
Fletcher, Bishop of Argyle, who died in 1665 ; his brother, Sir John was 
Lord Advocate 1661, acquired New Cranston, co. Edinburgh. They were 
sons of Andrew, merchant in Dundee. William of New Cranston, 
advocate, died in June 1685, and his eldest daughter, Elizabeth, wife of 
Sir John Dalrymple of Cousland, baronet, left a son who inherited the 
estate, and in 1720 registered arms, quartering Fletcher without any 
mark of cadency. 

Andrew, last of Aberlady, died 1710, when his three aunts succeeded 
to the estates ; Margaret, wife of John Lamb, merchant in Haddington, 
was the only one who left issue ; her daughter married Alexander Hep- 
burn of the Monkrig family. Robert first of the Balinshoe line, married 
the daughter and co-heir of Sir Thomas Ogilvy, who was killed at 
Inverlochy in 1645, by Patricia, his wife, daughter, and co-heir of Patrick 
Ruthven, Earl of Forth and Brentford ; their descendants possessed the 
barony of Woodwrae, Craignathro, Lindertis, &c., in Forfarshire, and 
became extinct about 18 10. 

The Saltoun family, to which belonged Andrew the patriot, who died 
in 17 16, and Andrew Lord Milton, Lord Justice Clerk, who died 1766, is 
still represented there. 

The arms differ from the coat which is given in W. and other MSS., 
and seems to have been founded on that of an English family, from 
which descent has been asserted. 

It does not seem necessary to go to Cumberland, or elsewhere in 
England, for accounts differ, for an ancestor, as the name is met with in 
Forfarshire from an early period ; in Funeral Entries the mother of Lord 
Innerpeffer is given as Anna Finlasoune, which at that time was the 
name of a leading burgess family in Dundee. 

1374, Hugh Flesher, burgess of Forfar; 1482, Malcolm Fleschar, 
citizen of Brechin ; 1497, Robert Flescher, chaplain there; 1500, Mr John 
Flescheour, vicar of Kirriemuir; 1527, tack of half Baldovie to John 
Fleschar and Elizabeth Ogilvy, his spouse, and his son, Alexander; 1566, 
Robert Flescher in Brechin. The name is said to mean a maker of 
arrows, and a pheon is the bearing of several families of the name in 
England. 

In the arms granted in 1777 to Angus Fletcher of Dunans, Argyll- 
shire, whose ancestors had long been resident in Glenorchy, two quivers 
filled with arrows are substituted for the second and third escallops borne 
with the cross flory, and the crest is two arms shooting an arrow from 
a bow. 

Fairbairne; argent, on a chevron sable between three boars' heads 



342 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

couped gules are increscent between two mullets of the first, on a chief of 
the third two spurs of the first. 

Fairbairn of West Gordon in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

Robert Frebern witnessed a charter of Serlo, clericus Regis Scocie to 
the Abbey of Kelso, c. 1 170. Roger, son of Robert Frebern, is a witness 
c. 1280, to a grant to the same house. 

The arms granted to Sir William and Sir Peter Fairbairn, 
descendants of a Roxburghshire family are founded on the above. 

Frier. Or, a garb between three morions azure, between two 
flaunches gules each charged with a garb of the first. This is also given 
in Porteus' MS. 

*Farquharson. Another coat is given — first, argent, a rose gules 
barbed vert ; second, argent, a cinquefoil gules ; third, argent, a cross 
crosslet fitchee sable; fourth, argent, a tree proper. Alexander of Inver- 
cauld registered 1672-78 — first, or, a lion rampant gules ; second, argent, 
a sinister hand in pale couped at the wrist gules ; third, or, a galley sable; 
fourth, argent, a fir tree slipped vert ; crest — a lion holding a dagger in 
his dexter hand proper; motto — " I force no friend, I fear no foe." 

These arms were altered in 1697 by patent in favour of John of 
Invercauld ; first and fourth, or, a lion rampant gules armed and langued 
azure ; second and third, argent, a fir tree seeded growing out of a mount 
in base proper, on a chief gules a banner of Scotland displayed or, a 
canton of the first charged with a dexter hand couped at the wrist fess- 
ways holding a dagger point downwards of the second. The lion in the 
crest is made gules and the motto altered to " Fide et fortitudiney 
Nisbet adds as supporters two wild cats proper, which were allowed in 
1815 to Mrs Catherine Farquharson of Invercauld. 

Foord of Old. Argent, a fess gules, in chief a crescent azure 
between two mullets of the second and in base a martlet of the third. 

Gordon of Gight. The quartered coat of Huntly with an inescut- 
cheon gules in the centre. Porteus gives for this family the Huntly coat 
within a bordure quarterly or and gules. When George Gordon of Gight, 
paternally Davidson, registered arms 1775 he dropped the quarterings 
and bore azure, a star argent between three boars heads couped or, 
quarterly with Davidson. 

*Grahame of Morphie. Seal of John de Grame 1370, a chevron 
between three escallops. Seal of Henry Grehem of Comieston, i486, the 
same with a mullet on the chevron. 

Sir James Balfour gives for Morphie — sable, a chevron argent 
charged with a mullet voided of the same and bordered as the first 
between three escallops of the second. The arms registered, 1733, by 
Captain Francis Graham, heir-male of Morphie, are as here represented — 
with supporters, two savages wreathed about the head and middle 
proper. In 1680 Robert Grahame, citizen of London and tailor to His 
Majesty, " lineally and lawfully descended of the house and family of 
Morphie," recorded the coat with a rose gules, barbed vert on the 
chevron, probably allusive to his prosperity as a tailor in England ; while 
the crest, a blade of thistle and a fig leaf in saltire proper, and motto, 
" Hinc decus inde tegmen,^' have also an unmistakable meaning. 

A seal of Alexander Graham, 1537, has a chevron with one escallop 
in base and two on a chief. 

Nisbet says the Morphie branch of the Grahams dates from the 



OF CHARLES L'S REIGN. 343 

reign of Robert I. ; Gilbert Graham of Morphie 1398 ; Robert of Morphia 
sat in parliament 1560, and Sir Robert of Morphie represented the shire 
of Kincardine 1617. 

This old knightly and baronial family, after intermarrying with the 
Earl of Angus, Arbuthnott of that Ilk, Burnett of Leys, Irvine of Drum, 
Earl of Southesk, Viscount Dundee, &c., ended in Captain Francis 
Graham of Morphie, who died without issue, leaving the estate by entail 
1743, in which no persons of his own name are mentioned, to his relative, 
ex parte matris, William Barclay of Balmakewan, who assumed the 
surname of Grahame, and was great-grandfather of the present Francis 
James Barclay Grahame of Morphie. 

*Gairdine of Barrowfield. The next coat is Gairdine of Leyis — 
argent, a boar's head erased sable between three cross crosslets fitchde azure 
— then Gairden of that Ilk — sable, a boar's head erased argent langued gules. 

Seal of Walter Gardyn 1534 — on a chevron between three boars' 
heads erased a mullet between two crosses patde ; seal of David Gardyn 
1565 — parted per fess, in chief a boar's head erased between two mullets, 
in base two cross crosslets fitchde. 

See F. for a different coat ; Sir James Balfour makes this argent, a 
chevron surmounted of another engrailed gules. 

Arms were registered, 1672-78, by John Gairden of that Ilk, argent, 
a boar's head erased sable armed or; Mr William, representer of Burrow- 
field as here represented, his motto being " yive le Roy f Alexander of 
Troup — or, a boar's head erased sable armed gules ; crest — a boar passant 
argent; motto — '^ Vires animat virtus;'^ no supporters, although a 
boar argent and a lion proper have latterly been assumed by his descend- 
ants ; and Mr James, minister at Balmerino, descended of the family of 
Lees — argent, a boar's head erased sable between three cross crosslets 
fitchde gules, a bordure counter compony of the second and first. He was 
afterwards Professor of Divinity at St Andrews and King's College, 
Aberdeen, and died 1726 in his eightieth year, having had nine children 
alive in 1696, so representatives of this family may exist. On the monu- 
ment of his father, Mr Alexander, erected by his widow Isobel Middleton 
1674, the arms are — a boar's head in chief and three cross crosslets 
fitchde in base. David of Leys 1528-50; David of Leys 1558-69; David 
of Leys, in 1600, had a son. 

The Ragman Roll, 1296, was signed by William de Gardyn, Willia'm 
Gardeyn of the county of Forfar, and William du Gardyn of the county 
of Edinburgh. 

David in 1407 had a crown charter of Kyninmouth and other lands 
in Banffshire ; in the elder line were Patrick of that Ilk 1434 ; Patrick of 
that Ilk 1457-78; John of that Ilk 1488; Patrick of that Ilk 1531 ; 
Patrick of that Ilk was shot by William Guthrie of Ravensbie 1578 ; his 
son, Mr David of that Ilk, was served heir to him 1588. About this time 
the lands, from which the family took their name, passed from their pos- 
session, and in 1604 were, Mr Jervise says, held by the Rollos. 

In 1607 Mr Robert Gardyne, younger of Blairtoun, prosecutes the 
murderer of his chief, so it is probable that Mr David was then dead, 
leaving a son under age, who may be the Robert Gardyne, oye to the 
defunct, who prosecutes in 1610. In 1587 Alexander Guthrie of that Ilk 
was killed by Thomas Gardyne of Bandoch, afterwards of Leggatston, 
against whom proceedings were taken in 1596 and 1610 ; he was dead in 

4s 



344 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

1619, when his son Thomas was served heir to him in parts of the 
barony of Gardyne, including Middleton. Middleton, and these other 
lands, now belong to the senior coheir-general of the Gardynes of 
Latoun, who however acquired them by purchase at a much later date. 

At Gardyne there is a stone with the date 1568 — arms, a boar's head 
erased ; motto — " Speravi in te Domine ;'' at Middleton on a stone, with 
the initials D. G., 1692, is the motto, " My hoip is only in the Lord." 
" Jervise's Epitaphs." 

A difficult question is, who was the John of that Ilk who registered 
the arms 1672-78 ; his motto is " Cruciata cruce junguntur" Could he 
be a landless representative of the direct line, or John of Latoun or Law- 
ton, who is so designed in the Acts of Parliament 1661-90, but who had 
acquired in 1682 a part of Gardyne, to which other parts were added by 
purchase sixty years later ? 

George of Latoun, 1600, is the first of this branch I have met with ; 
James of Latoun took the designation of Middleton about the middle of 
last century; Thomas, last of Middleton, died unm. in 1841, and was 
succeeded by his nephew, William Bruce, who assumed the surname of 
his mother's family. A very irregular entry was made in the Lyon 
Register, about 1804, of the arms of Gardyne of Middleton without 
Christian name, crest, or motto — or, two chevrons engrailed gules between 
three boars' heads erased sable. 

Alexander de Gardyne had a charter of Barrowfield, co. Forfar, 1408; 
John is styled dominus de Barowfeld 1434 ; the laird fell at the battle of 
Arbroath 1442; William of Barrowfield 1483; John of Barrowfield 
1508; William of Barrowfield, grandfather of Alexander, who sold 
the estate 1615 ; Mr William representer c. 1672 (?) the Mr William 
Gardyne, licensed by the presbytery of Arbroath, who was minister of the 
Tolbooth Church, Edinburgh 1668 till 1689, when he was deprived; he 
married, in 1671, Barbara Guthrie and died 1708, leaving issue. In 1733 
the same coat, with the motto " Vires Animat virtus,'' and quartering 
Guthrie, was recorded by Captain John Gardyne descended of Burrowfield. 

In the sixteenth century there were Gardynes of Cononsyth and Gar- 
dynes of Blackford, the latter ending in an heiress, Marjory Gardyne 
1662 ; Gardynes of Tilliefroskie in the seventeenth century, and Gardynes 
of Midstrath, of whom descendants are said to exist in Norfolk. 

In Edinburgh a burgess family of good position in the sixteenth and 
seventeenth centuries, ended in John of Greenhill and Nether Luggate, 
who d.s.p. 1707 ; his nephew and heir, Adam Fairholme of Greenhill, 
near Edinburgh, was, in 1751, allowed to quarter — argent, a boar's head 
erased sable armed or. 

The principal family of the name existing is represented in the male 
line by Francis William Garden-Campbell of Troup, co. Banff, and Glen- 
lyon, CO. Perth. 

John of Laithers or Durlaithers 1505; Alexander of Laithers 1533 ; 
George of Durlaithers bought Banchory c. 1555, married Isabel, daughter 
of Keith of Troup ; Arthur of Banchory married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Gordon of Gight, and was dead in 1606 ; Alexander of Banchory 1606, 
sold it in 1624, and was dead in 1639 ; his son Captain George, then in 
Germany, obtained a birthbrief 25th October 1639. 

Major Alexander Garden, of the Swedish service, bought Troup c. 
1655, and was dead in 1662, when his son, who registered arms, was 
served heir to him. 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. 345 

In the " Landed Gentry," the Major is called son of the last laird of 
Banchory ; Mr Marryat, in his valuable notices of Scottish Families 
settled in Sweden, mentions only a Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Gairden 
of the Leys family, who was recognised as noble in 1650, married and 
had issue. 

Francis Garden of Delgaty, inherited Troup in 1793, on the death of 
his uncle, Francis Lord Gardenstone, and Glenlyon 1806, from his grand- 
uncle David Campbell, whose surname he assumed. 

*GovANE. These arms were allowed, in 1747, to Alexander Gavine, 
merchant in Montrose, a man of obscure origin — notices of his family are 
contained in " Jervise's Epitaphs." His son, David of Langton, married 
— first, Christina Maria Hearsay, and had a daughter, who died in 1765 ; 
secondly. Lady Elizabeth Maitland, and had Mary Turner Gavin of 
Langton, Marchioness of Breadalbane, Christina Maria Hearsay Gavin 
of Easter Brakie, Mrs Baird of Newbyth, and two others who died unm. 

The seal of Alexander Gawensone, 1536, has a saltire between a 
mullet in chief and a spear head in base. 

Govane is a surname taken from a parish near Glasgow, where, in 
1283, Christian, widow of Symon de Govane, held lands. 

About 1325 John de Govane, burgess of Glasgow, made a gift to the 
Preaching Friars there, and John de Govane was prior of their house in 
Glasgow 1447-56, as was Patrick de Govane 1471-76. 

Lawrence of Govane was sheriff of Peebles 1359, and of Roxburgh 
1373 ; held part of Easter Hope Kailzie, near Peebles ; David H., in the 
forty-first year of his reign, confirms a charter of William Earl of 
Douglas to Lawrence de Govane of the lands of Pollynfeych in Lanark- 
shire ; 1393, he has a pension of ;^ioo from Robert II. ; 1365-69-72, 
English safe-conducts are granted to John Goven, a merchant, James de 
Govane, clerk, and John de Govane, also clerk, who was about to study 
at Oxford. 

Persons of the name long held land near Glasgow, and figure as 
notaries, burgesses, writers, &c., there. 

In Peeblesshire also they flourished for centuries; in 1476 John held 
part of Hope Kailzie, probably as heir of the sheriff. In 1491 John had 
promised to pay for masses at the altar of St Bride for five years, for the 
soul of William Myddilmast, slain by him, probably one of the family of 
Myddilmast of Grieston, near Peebles. William had a charter of Car- 
drona, which marches with Hope Kailzie, in 1534; John of Cardrona 
was killed before September 1601, by John Scott, brother of Scott of 
Tushilaw ; John of Cardrona 1616-24, was father of Mr John, whose son, 
William, served heir in 1667, and sold the estate in 1685, with consent 
of his son John. 

John sat in parliament 1685-86, for the burgh of Peebles, and in 
Chambers' " Peeblesshire," William Govane of Hawkshaw, who died in 
1819, is said to have been the last of. the family in that county. 

There was Govanes of Boquhapple, of Cameron, of Drumquhassel, 
but none of these families entered arms. 

Gavine or Gavin was a common name among gypsies in Scotland, 
and in the " Criminal Trials " a letter is printed, written in 1506, by 
James IV. to the King of Denmark, in favour of Anthony Gavin, Earl of 
Little Egypt. 

Home of Fast Castle. Home quartering Pepdie, over all on an 



346 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

escutcheon of pretence, argent, a castle triple towered. Porteus blazons 
the castle gules. 

*HoppER. Porteus gives this coat and also — argent, three roses 
gules. This is the name of a burgess family of good standing in Edin- 
burgh, from the beginning of the fifteenth century ; they intermarried 
with Murray of Blackbarony, Bellenden of Auchinoule, Rigg of Carberry, 
&c. In 1502 Richard, burgess of Edinburgh, founds a chaplainry in the 
church of St Giles, masses to be sung for the souls of himself, Elizabeth 
Hiltsoun his wife, his children, and ancestors; and in 1527 his son. Sir 
Robert, prebendary of St Giles, makes a similar foundation for the souls 
of his late father and mother. Richard's descendants possessed the estate 
of Bourhouse, near Dunbar, for several generations, the last notice of 
them I have met with being in 1682. 

Hadine of that Ilk. Or, two lions passant gardant gules. 

HoMELL. Argent, a bend gules between a crescent in chief of the 
second and a fleur-de-lis azure in base. 

*Hervey of Alick, or Elrick. Arms registered 1672-78, by James 
Hervey of Broadley — azure, on a bend or three trefoils vert. Porteus 
gives Hervie of Alrik — gules, a fess or between two stars in chief and a 
mascle of the second ; Hervie — azure, a fess and in chief two martlets 
argent ; also — gules, on a bend argent three trefoils proper ; also — azure, 
a fess between two martlets in chief and a Catherine wheel in base argent. 
Arms in Kintore church 1653 — a fess countercompony between three 
cinquefoils in chief and a mascle in base. 

A family much connected with the church in the Diocese of Aberdeen ; 
1406, Mr Henry Hervy, precentor of the Cathedral Church ; he made 
gifts of rings, &:c., to the church ; another Mr Henry Hervy, precentor 
1453-82 ; 1427, Duncan, prebendary of Forres ; Duncan was at the battle 
of Harlaw ; before 1412 Duncan Hervie had married the daughter of 
Patrick Baxter, with whom he acquired lands in Futye ; 1487, Duncan 
held lands; 1546, Sir David held lands in Futye; 1438, Henry, arch- 
deacon of Moray. 

Mr John was rector of the University of Paris, rector of Benholm, 
and made gifts to the University of Aberdeen before 1542. 

Mr James of Boyndis married about 1540, Agnes, daughter of John 
Leslie of Balquhain. 

Mr James of Elrick was dead 1613; Andrew 1613 ; James in Elrick 
1619, heir to his grandfather, Mr James of Boyndis ; Gilbert of Elrick, 
merchant burgess of Aberdeen, was dead in 1657, leaving Thomas of 
Elrick. 

In 1 57 1 the Bishop of Aberdeen granted a feu-charter of the lands of 
Mamewlach, to Mr Henry Hervy of Boyndis ; Mr James of Mamewlach 
1663; Mr Robert of Mamewlach 1679, died 1696; William of Mamew- 
lach 1706. 

There were other landowners of the name in Aberdeenshire, and a 
branch long settled at Inverurie, of whom, Alexander represented that 
burgh in parliament 1617. 

In Edinburgh Thomas was a baillie 1492 ; Mr Thomas, an advocate 
about the end of the sixteenth century; William represented Edinburgh 
in parliament 1584 ; James, surgeon to Queen Anne, died in 1614. 

HoRSEBURCH OF THAT Ilk. Symone de Horsbroc witnessed a 
charter of William Purves to the monks of Melrose c. 1245 ; William de 



OF CHARLES L'S REIGN. 347 

Horsebroch, clerk of the Dean and Chapter of Glasgow, 1283; William 
Ostherebure (?), of the county of Roxburgh, signed the Ragman Roll 
1296 ; William de Horsbrok was bailie of Peebles 1326 ; Mr Michael of 
Horsbrok, about the same time, witnesses a charter ; William de Orse- 
burg held lands at Berwick in the reign of David II. In the fifteenth 
century, Robert Horsbruk was sub-prior of St Andrews. 

The lands of Horsbrugh on the Tweed, three miles below Peebles, 
have remained in the possession of a family of the same name certainly 
for upwards of six centuries. Alexander of that Ilk, married Jean, eldest 
daughter and coheir of William Lord Hay of Yester, and their son, 
Alexander, inherited part of the property of his mother's family. 

Alexander of that Ilk, married Margaret Tait, heiress of Pirn, which 
estate belongs to the present Alexander Horsbrugh of Horsbrugh, who is, 
however, not a descendant of that marriage. 

Nisbet gives the arms as azure, a horse's head couped argent ; crest 
— a horse's head ; motto — " y^gre de tramite recto" 

A branch, long settled in Fife, is represented by Bethune Horsburgh, 
late of Lochmalony. 

*Halcro. Sir James Balfour gives the arms quartered with a fess 
sable charged with three crescents, probably for Craig. 

The family was seated in Orkney, and formed several branches, the 
chief of which possessed property in South Ronaldshay, and their resi- 
dence being called the House of Halcro, the head of the race was, in the 
sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, designed Halcro of that Ilk. 

Duncan Stewart says that a daughter of Robert Earl of Orkney 
married Halcro of Halcro ; Hugh of that Ilk married Esther Thomson, 
an heiress, and had Hugh of that Ilk, who died in 1637 ; his son Hugh 
of Halcro was dead in 1670, when his sisters, Joan and Sibil, were served 
heirs-portioners special. 

Christian, heiress of the Halcros of Houton, seated there for several 
generations, married before 1624 Alexander Moncrieff, and had issue. 

The Halcros of Cava and Cowbister, traceable to the beginning of 
the seventeenth century, ended in William, who died before 1789, leaving 
his property to his cousin Thomas Sands. 

In 1567 Mr Magnus Halcro of Burgh, was charged with treason, 
along with the Earl of Bothwell and others. Patrick, in 1614, was con- 
cerned in the rebellion of the Earl of Orkney and his son Robert, but 
having been instrumental in bringing about the surrender of Kirkwall 
Castle (Sir Robert Gordon treats him as a traitor), his life was spared. 

Hamilton of Bargenie ; first and fourth, gules, a bend argent 
between a cinquefoil in chief and two in base ; second and third, Arran. 
W. mentions the knighting, in 1602, of Sir John of Kincleven, natural 
son of John Marquess of Hamilton, but gives him the coat of his father 
undifferenced. His son, Sir John, was created Lord Bargeny, and bore 
Hamilton and Arran quarterly within a bordure compony argent and 
azure, the first charged with hearts gules, the second with mullets argent, 
to indicate his marriage to Jane, daughter of William Marquess of 
Douglas. 

Hope ; azure, a chevron or between three bezants in chief and one 
in base, the arms of Nova Scotia in a canton. See L., where the field is 
gules, and there are only three besants ; but this is certainly an addition 
made to the original MS. 

4T 



348 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

Porteus gives the arms as afterwards borne azure, a chevron or 
between three besants ; a chevron between three besants are on the seal of 
Sir Thomas 1631, and the present motto — " At spes non fracta" is on a 
monument with the date 1628. He built a house in 1616 at the Cowgate- 
head, Edinburgh, and on it was cut, ''At hospes humo" being the anagram 
of Thomas Houpe. 

The accounts of the origin of this now numerous and important family 
vary, and are probably all incorrect. Sir Thomas, the King's advocate, 
who is the real founder, is generally called grandson of Edward Hope, 
Commissioner to the General Assembly 1560, which is certainly a mis- 
take, as Sir Thomas, in his Diary, calls his grandfather John, but gives 
little information as to his descent. 

He mentions his brothers William and James, neither of whom 
appear in his published pedigrees ; he had another brother, who married 
Mary Neall, and left a son Henry, who went to France in 1636, and to 
Amsterdam in 1641. 

Sir Thomas' own wife, Elizabeth, daughter of John Bennet, some- 
times called Binning, portioner of Musselburgh, is styled of Wallingford 
in England, the truth being that her grandfather, Thomas Bennet, lived 
at Walliford, close to Musselburgh, and the arms given to her in the 
Funeral Escutcheon are those of the Bennets in Scotland. 

Sir Thomas' mother is Jacqueline deTot, or Janet Juitot, or Juvitot, 
the arms in the Funeral Escutcheon being — Or, a fess gules fretty of the 
field between a fleur-de-lis of the second and a torteau ; in a pedigree 
compiled in 1767 for Oliver Hope, then resident in France, her nephew is 
stated to have been killed at the siege of Bar le Due in 1652, being then 
Lieutenant-General in the French service. It was perhaps this French 
connection that gave rise to the idea of the Hopes being of that country ; 
John is said to have come over in the retinue of Queen Magdalene, to 
have settled as a merchant in Edinburgh, and to have married Elizabeth 
Gumming, but a funeral entry names his wife Mary Napier. 

Sir Thomas had an elder brother Henry, whose mother was, if a 
Funeral Escutcheon of her granddaughter may be depended on, a lady of 
the name of Morrison ; Henry married Katherine, daughter and coheir of 
Robert Galbraith, merchant burgess of Edinburgh, and had a son, Mr 
William Houpe, advocate, living 1627, and three daughters, eventually 
coheirs, who married Sir James Stewart of Coltness ; James Wylie, 
merchant in Edinburgh ; and Hume, merchant there. 

Mr Riddell mentions that Sir Thomas at first bore a mark of cadency, 
and was in 1600 designed servitor to Mr John Nicolson ; he graduated 
at the University of Edinburgh, 12th August 1592, as Thomas Hoppeaus. 
It is hardly necessary to cross the Ghannel to find ancestors for the 
Hopes, as the name is to be met with in Scotland at least as early as 1296, 
when Johan Hope of Peeblesshire swore fealty to Edward I. at Berwick- 
on-Tweed ; the name occurs among residents in Tweeddale long after, 

1437, Robert Hope, serjeant in Edinburgh ; 1494, John Hop had a 
remission at Selkirk; 1529, David Hope was hanged for treason in 
aiding Archibald Earl of Angus ; 1552, Edward Houpe, councillor in 
Edinburgh ; 1557, John Houp held land in Midlem, eo. Roxburgh. In 
1585, six persons of the name of Hoip or Hope, are on the list of his 
friends in Dumfriesshire, given in by John Earl of Morton. 

A baronetcy of Nova Scotia was conferred, 19th February 1628, on 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. 349 

Mr Thomas Hope of Craighall, co. Fife, King's advocate, the same 
honour was bestowed on two of his descendants, and in 1703 Charles 
Hope of Hopetoun was created an Earl. 

Sir Thomas of Craighall, baronet, registered arms 1672-78, and in 
1780 his descendant, Sir Archibald, was allowed as supporters — two young 
ladies, the emblems of Hope, as borne by the ennobled younger branch of 
his family. 

Harper ; argent, a lion rampant sable in chief a crescent gules. 
Arms registered 1673 by Sir John Harper of Camnethan, advocate — 
argent, a lion rampant sable, holding in his dexter paw a harp azure, a 
bordure engrailed of the second. The arms of Harper and Harpur in 
England resemble the Scotch coat. 

In 1296, Rogier le Harpur of Hom in Berwickshire, Johan le Harpur 
of the same county, Witing le Harpur of Lanarkshire, Robert le Harpur 
of Ayrshire, and William le Harpur of the Lawe, in the county of Edin- 
burgh, did homage to Edward I. ; that king the same year directed the 
restoration of their lands to several persons named Harper. 

Robert I. granted charters of lands in East Lothian to Thomas 
Harper, of lands in Carrick to Patrick Harper, of lands in the thanedom 
of Aberlemno to Adam Harper, and of lands in Linlithgowshire to 
Nicholas Harper. 

David H., in the thirty-fourth year of his reign, confirmed a charter 
of the lands in Dunse and in Hume, forfeited by the late John Harper, 
to Alexander de Reclynton. 

*JoHNSTONE OF Caskieben. Seal of John Johnstone of that Ilk 
1595 — parted per bend, in chief a buck's head and in base a cross crosslet 
fitchde, a chief charged with three cushions. 

Seal of Robert Johnstone, bailie of Aberdeen, 1617, a bend between 
a boar's (? stag's) head erased in chief and three cross crosslets fitch^e in 
base. 

Porteus gives for Caskiben — azure, a bend between three buck's 
heads, and as many cross crosslets fitchde argent. 

In 1695 the arms of Sir George Johnstoun of Caskieben, baronet, 
deceased, were recorded — first and fourth, argent, a saltire sable, on a 
chief gules three cushions or; second and third, azure, a bend or between 
three harts' heads erased argent attired of the second, and as many cross 
crosslets fitchee of the second, as the coats of Mar and Garioch of Caskie- 
ben compounded. His supporters are two Indians wreathed about the 
middle with laurel. 

There seems no reason to think that this Aberdeenshire family is a 
branch of the Annandale Johnstones. 

In or before 1380 Andrew Garviach, lord of Caskyben, gave a 
charter of Kinbruyn and Badechash to his son-in-law, Stephen Cherie 
and Margaret his wife ; Johnstone, near Aberdeen, being part of the great 
estate brought to her husband by this lady, a coheir of the Earldom of 
Mar, her descendants took their surname from it, apparently about 1428. 
The only mention of the name of Cherie in Scotland I have met with is 
in the " Rotuli Scotiae " 1342, Thomas Chery and a grant of the forfeiture 
of the late Adam Chery, in the county of Ayr, by David II., in the thirty- 
ninth year of his reign. 

It will be observed that the coat compounded of Mar and Garioch 
sometimes is alone borne, sometimes with the Johnstone chief, and lastly 



3 so GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

the full coat of Johnstone of Annandale is quartered with the composed 
coat from which the chief is dropped. 

Johnstone was erected into a barony in 1548, but the lands were sold 
in 1595. John of that Ilk sat in parliament 1609 ; his son, George of 
Caskieben, was created a baronet 1626, with a grant of the barony of 
Johnstoun in Nova Scotia. Sir George, second baronet, sold Caskieben 
1660, and left a son, Sir John, who was hanged at Tyburn 1690, for 
taking part in the abduction of Miss Wharton. His cousin and heir- 
male did not assume the title for ten years, till he had repurchased part 
of the family property, which he had called Caskieben, and had a Crown 
charter in March 1700, as Sir John Johnstone of Caskieben, baronet. 

The late Mr Alexander Johnstone, W.S., in his privately printed 
account of his family, and in his notice of the descendants of James 
Young, has thrown much light on the history of the Aberdeenshire 
Johnstones. 

An old crest of the Johnstones of Annandale was a star, with the 
motto — " Light theives all." 

Johnstone of Elphinstone. First, Seton, said to be borne as hold- 
ing of that family ; second and third Johnstone ; fourth, Elphinstone. 
Several authorities give the arms of this line as — argent, a saltire and chief 
sable, the saltire charged with a rose of the field. Gilbert Johnstone married 
Agnes Elphinstone, heiress of Elphinstone, in East Lothian, in or before 
1472 : Samuel of Elphinstone had a grant of the barony of New Elphin- 
stone, in Nova Scotia, and was created a baronet with remainder to his 
heirs-male whomsoever in 1628, and was dead in 1664. His son, Sir John, 
died about 1665, leaving a son, Sir James, living 1673, with whom the 
direct line seems to have failed. 

There were cadets settled in Edinburgh as merchant burgesses who, 
to distinguish them from the many persons of their name, were styled 
" of Elphinstone," so an heir to this title may exist. 

*KiNTORE. Another coat — azure, a chevron between three castles 
argent. The seal of John de Kenontoir appended to a deed of homage to 
the king of England in 1292, is oval with awheel ornament. That of 
John de Kintor 1449, is a chevron between three charges, described by 
Mr Laing as towers embattled, a chief charged with three mullets ; 
crest — an eagle devouring its prey. 

Porteus mentions both the garbs and the castles. 

In 1296 John and Walter de Kyntowar, both of Peeblesshire, signed 
the Ragman Roll. 

Richard de Kyntor was provost of Aberdeen 1462, and during the 
fifteenth century the name was that of a family of leading burgesses 
there; William Kyntor, in 1492, styles himself dominus de Auchgwyok 
et Ardnabo. Richard de Kintor sat in parliament 1471, and David was 
sergeant in 1567. 

Christian and Margaret Kintore, coheirs of lands at Kintore, married 
into the families of Udny and Chalmers, after the middle of the fifteenth 
century. 

*Kennedy of Kilmuck. Constable of Aberdeen. 

Keith. The arms of eight branches of this family with differences, 
in three instances the chief is paly of six argent and sable. 

*KiRKWOOD. Porteus blazons it — gules, on a chevron between three 
fetter-locks or as many pheons of the first. 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. 351 

James Kirkwood represented Haddington in parliament 1596, and 
James of Pilrig sat for Edinburgh in 1633 ; 1610, John, Albany Herald. 

*Leith of Harthill. Porteus gives — or, a cross crosslet fitchde 
azure between two crescents and a fusil gules. 

George Leith of Craighall descended of Harthill, registered 1672-78 
— or, a cross crosslet fitchde sable between two crescents in chief gules, 
and three fusils, two and one, in base azure, a bordure indented of the 
third for difference ; Elizabeth, daughter of Patrick of Craighall, advocate, 
was dead in 1787, when her cousins. Turner of Turnerhall and Hay of 
Cocklaw were her heirs. 

The arms of Leith cut on a stone at Auchindoir 1580, are described 
by Mr Jervise as a cross crosslet fitchde and a buckle between three 
fusils. In the " Donean Tourist " Leith of Harthill is said to have 
carried supporters, two horse gorged and chained ; crest — a hart, and after- 
wards a cross crosslet fitchee, with the motto — "True to the end ;" the 
coat is composed with Mar, but the arrangement is confused. 

Spalding, in his " Memorials," described the imprisonment and cruel 
treatment of John of Harthill, an ardent royalist, " ane gentleman, chief 
of ane clan, of good rent." His son. Colonel Patrick, was executed in 
1647; the family estate seems to have been ruined by quarrels and 
lawsuits, of which details are to be found in the Acts of Parliament, and 
what remained of it w^as sold to Erskine of Pittodrie early in the 
eighteenth century. In the " View of the Diocese of Aberdeen," Harthill 
is called chief of his name. 

The simpler coat given in W. was confirmed in 1688 to John Leith 
of Montgarie or Whitehaugh— argent, a fess fusild sable, or fusils in fess; 
crest — a dove with an olive branch in its beak ; motto — " Fidus ad 
extremumy Mr Forbes-Leith of Whitehaugh is heir of line of this 
branch, of which no account is given in print as yet. Alexander of 
Montgarie, and Patrick, his eldest son, 1588; William of Montgarie had 
died before 1599; John, his brother and heir, married Jean Mortimer, 
and was alive 1619; their son, Patrick of Montgarie, married in 1599, 
Jean, daughter of Mr Thomas Nicolson, commissary of Aberdeen, and 
was dead 1641 ; his son, John of Whitehaugh was dead 1672, leaving 
John of Whitehaugh, father of Anna and Margaret ; the elder married 
William Forbes of Tolquhoun. 

The coat nearest to this is that recorded, c. 1672, by Robert Leith -of 
Over Barns — or, a chevron between three fusils azure ; crest — a turtle 
dove proper ; motto — " Semper fidus." 

The pedigree of this family in Douglas " Baronage " seems, in the 
earlier generations, altogether wrong ; George of Overhall possessed part 
of Kirktown of Premnay, granted by John, commendator of Lindores, to 
his grandfather, William Leith of Barnes ; he had a son, John, and a 
grandson, George, who registered arms and was succeeded before 1672, 
by his son, Robert of Overhall. 

Dr Davidson, in his " Inverurie," states that George, last of Overhall, 
died in 181 7 without issue. Overhall and Over Barnes' are the same. 

James of Leith Hall registered 1672-78 — or, a cross crosslet fitchde 
sable between three crescents in chief, and as many fusils in base gules ; ' 
crest — a cross as in the arms; motto — "Trustie to the end;" no sup- 
porters in the Lyon Register, Nisbet's " Heraldry," or Douglas' 
" Baronage." This Mr James Leith was originally of New Leslie, built 

4U 



352 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

a. mansion-house, which he called Leith Hall, and obtained a Crown 
charter erecting his various lands into the barony of Leith Hall, which 
was, in 1705, ratified by parliament in favour of his son and successor, 
John of Leith Hall. 

This family, represented by Colonel Leith-Hay of Leith Hall and 
Rannes, C.B., claims to be heir-male of the Leiths of Barnes. 

There are three fables in circulation as to the history of the Leiths. 
First, that they held the barony of Restalrig, in which is situated the port 
of Leith, and that that property was carried by an heiress to the ancestor 
of the Logans of Restalrig. Restalrig gave a surname to its early 
owners, and it is not till the fifteenth century that Leiths are to be found 
holding some lands there; they were burgesses of Edinburgh, and gave 
their name to Leith Wynd. Second, that Elizabeth Leith, heiress of 
Edingarrock, married Sir Norman Leslie in the reign of Alexander HL 
Last, that William Leith of Barnes married a daughter of Donald, Earl of 
Mar, and in consequence added a cross crosslet fitchde, the bearing of the 
house of Mar to his own arms. It is not unlikely that the crosslet indi- 
cates that the Leiths held lands of the Earls of Mar in the district of 
Garioch. 

The founder of the family was William de Lethe, merchant burgess 
of Aberdeen, which he represented in parliament 1367, who acted for 
some time as Deputy-Chamberlain ; was steward of the household to 
Queen Joan ; had in 1359 a charter of Rotheneyk, Harebogge, and 
Blakeboggys; in 1369, a charter of Drumrossy ; and also possessed 
Capronstoun, all in Aberdeenshire. William died in 1380, and in 1388 
his son Laurence, who was alderman of Aberdeen, had a charter of con- 
firmation of Capronstoun. 

John de Lethe, also said to have been son of William, had English 
safe-conducts, 1362-3, as a burgess of Aberdeen, and a Crown charter of 
Ruthrieston, near Aberdeen. John de Lethe, armiger and scutifer, has 
repeatedly safe-conducts 1396- 1423 ; in 1406, was a commissioner to 
renew the alliance with France; and in 141 2, was sent to the Court of 
England, along with Sir Walter Stewart of Raylston, by the Duke of 
Albany, as ambassador. 

Thomas Lethe of Linlithgow sat in parliament 1366. 

In 1481-88 Mr Patrick Leith was a lord auditor, and was official of 
Glasgow. The lands in Aberdeenshire, acquired by William and John in 
the fourteenth century, long remained in the family, but the published 
pedigrees are not to be trusted. 

William is, in 1469, designed dominus de Barnes. 

Henry of Barnes possessed Ruthrieston, had a charter of Auchlevin, 
Ardoyne, and Harelaw in 1490, was dead in 1493, leaving Elizabeth 
Gordon, widow, and three sons — George; William, tutor of his nephew 
1509, had a charter in 1493 of half Badycaiss ; and Patrick. George of 
Barnes, the eldest, died in September 1506, and was succeeded by his son, 
John of Barnes, who did not live long, and the next laird was his brother, 
William of Barnes. 

William Leith of Edingarrick was great-grandfather of John of 
Edingarrick 1588, who left a daughter and heir, Isabella, 1613. 

Patrick of Lickliehead, 1620-25, was son and heir of Patrick of that 
place, living 1598-1605, and grandson of William of Lickliehead. 

The pedigrees inthe" Baronage" donot agree with the above statements. 



OF CHARLES US REIGN, 353 

*Lamb. Seal of John Lamb, bailie of Edinburgh 1451 — the Agnus 
Dei between two mullets pierced in chief and a mascle in base. 

Andrew Lamb, Bishop of Brechin in 1612, used a seal with the 
Paschal Lamb, but in 1619 he had a different coat — on a fess between 
three cinquefoils a dog (?) courant between two mullets ; crest— a demi- 
lion rampant holding a mullet in his dexter paw. 

Porteus gives for Lambe of Tarrie — azure, a lamb passant regardant 
carrying the Scottish pennoncelle, the saltire thereof gules. He also gives 
a blazon of the other coat of Lammie, now L'Amy of Dunkenny — azure, 
three fencing swords pendant or a saltorel in base argent Sir James 
Balfour gives a curious coat for this family — parted per fess sable and 
gules, a fess argent between three figures like the letter Y in chief or, and 
a saltire couped in base argent. 

In a birthbrief issued to Robert Arbuthnott, banker in Paris, the 
arms of his mother, Margaret, daughter of John Lamy, dean of Brechin, 
are those here represented, except that there is no glory. 

Mr John Lammie of Dunkennie registered, 1672-78 — azure, 
three croziers paleways in fess or and a saltire couped in base argent ; 
crest — a hand proper holding a crozier; motto — ''Per varios casusT 
In 18 1 3 his descendant and heir-general, John Ramsay L'Amy of Dun- 
kenny, was allowed supporters — two savages wreathed about the head and 
middle with laurel, holding clubs over their shoulders proper. In 1296 
Nicol Lamb, of the county of Berwick, and Adam Lamb, parson of 
Foulesworth there, swore fealty to Edward I. 

Liolph and Nigel Lamby were custumars of Montrose 1372-79. 
Robert II., by charter in the eleventh year of his reign, granted the office 
of sergeant to Thomas Lambe. 

Liulf Lambie, in 1401, witnessed a wadset in favour of Duthac 
Carnegy ; in 1410 James Lamby was sheriff-clerk of Forfarshire, and in 
1454 Alexander Lamby of Duncane, was on an assize at Forfar. 

Captain Andrew Lamby was, in 1571, appointed Keeper of the 
Palace of Linlithgow for life. In 1527 Alexander Lame, in Leith, had a 
lease for nineteen years of part of the lands of South Tarrie, which after- 
wards became the property of the family. 

Thomas Lamb sat in parliament for Kirkcaldy 161 2-21. 

LuNDY. Or, three cushions pendant azure. 

*Leask of that Ilk. Arms registered, 1672-78, by Mr Alexander 
Leask of that Ilk, co. Aberdeen ; crest — a crescent argent ; motto — 
" Virtute crescoT 

In 1380, Willelmus de Lask pater dominus ej'tisdem, made a grant 
to the church of Ellon of wax and money, that candles might be burnt on 
Sundays and feast-days for ever on the place of sepulture of himself and 
his two wives, Alice de Rath and Marion de St Michael. Mascles were 
the bearing of the St Michael family. 

He had a charter of confirmation from David II. of his lands of 
Leskgaronne. In 1696 Mr Alexander was resident at Leask with his 
son Gilbert, and his two brothers, but the estate was sold sometime after. 

LowRiE. There are two representations of the coat — argent, a gar- 
land vert meeting in a fruit gules in base, within it a cup or with the 
cover raised and resting on the upper part of the garland. Gules, a pedes- 
tal with five feathers (?) issuing from the top, and on them a garland vert 
with a branch or on either side. 



354 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

*LiTTLEjOHN. So is Portcus' MS. In 1761 these arms were 
allowed to Alexander Littlejohn of Woodston, and in 1815, as a quarter- 
ing to his heir of entail, the Right Hon. William Adam of Blairadam. 

Andrew, son of Andrew, burgess of Edinburgh, was Unicorn Pursui- 
vant 1636, Ross Herald 1646-63. 

LovELL OF Balumbie ; argent, three piles issuing from the chief 
sable, impaling or, three crosses patee azure. 

*MoFFAT ; also Moffat of Wachagilie (?) — argent, a lion rampant 
sable ; this is the bearing on a seal, apparently of the seventeenth century, 
in the possession of the family of Moffat formerly of Sundaywell. 

*MossMAN. Porteus gives this, and also azure, a chevron between 
three oak trees or, which latter coat was allowed in 1786 to Hugh Mos- 
man of Auchtyfardle, in Lanarkshire, seventh in descent from Allan 
Mosman, a landowner in the county of Roxburgh in 1532. In the six- 
teenth century, burgesses, notaries, and goldsmiths of the name are 
found settled in Edinburgh. In 1532 William Mosman was beheaded 
for the slaughter of Ralph Weir. James, goldsmith in Edinburgh, pos- 
sessed Longhermiston, Currie, and Wrae; in 1570 he granted a charter 
of Wrae in liferent to his wife, Janet, daughter of Alexander King, 
advocate, and although he was forfeited, his widow had a ratification of 
her right in 1581. The same year John, burgess of Edinburgh, had the 
benefit of the pacification, and was served heir to his father, but failed to 
recover Longhermiston and Currie, which fell to the Crown. Auchty- 
fardle was purchased by the gentleman who registered arms, he being 
heir of his father Hugh, writer to the signet, and of his uncle John, 
merchant in Edinburgh ; it remains the property of his descendant. 

MoRiESONE OF LiTTLE AucHREY ; argent, a fess azure, in chief a 
mullet gules between a garb vert and a fox's head couped sable, in base 
four ermine spots. 

Marjoribanks of Ratho ; argent, on a fess between a mullet in 
chief and a cushion in base gules three cushions of the first. 

*Maxtone of Cultoquhey. Sir James Balfour and Porteus give 
cross crosslets fitchee instead of patee fitchde, and the arms were so regis- 
tered in 1861, by James Maxtone-Graham of Cultoquhey and Redgorton, 
CO. Perth. 

Nisbet describes the seal of Robert Maxton of Cultoquhey 1410 — a 
bend engrailed between three cross crosslets. 

In 1296 Alexandre de Maxtoun, of the county of Roxburgh, did 
homage to Edward I. ; he was Constable of the Castle of Roxburgh in 
1285 and 1290. 

In the reign of William the Lyon, Philip de Maccustun witnessed a 
charter of Hugh de Normanville to the monks of Melrose, and in the 
time of Alexander II. John, son of Philip de Mackestun, releases to them 
certain rights over the lands from which he took his name. 

Adam de Maxton was Abbot of Newbotle 1259, and of Melrose 
1261-67. 

Robert de Macestun, c. 1 190, witnessed a charter of Anselm de Molle 
to the monks of Kelso. 

The name disappears in Roxburghshire before the time when the 
first owner of Cultoquhey was settled in the county of Perth. 

Mackenzie of Kintail ; argent, a stag's head cabossed gules attired 
or between two mullets in fess azure. 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. ^ 355 

M'Maken. L. gives argent, three dexter hands couped at the 
wrist paleways gules. Here there is or, a mullet azure between three 
sinister hands fessways couped at the wrist, and turned to the sinister 
gules. 

In 1 84 1 arms were allowed to Alexander Matheson, or MacMathon, 
of Ardintoul, now of Ardross and Lochalsh, in the county of Ross, founded 
on this coat ; argent, three dexter hands couped within a bordure gules ; 
crest — a dexter hand holding a scymetar in fess proper ; motto — " Fac et 
spera." 

The following year an entirely different coat was assigned to his 
uncle, said to be paternally descended from the same family, James 
Matheson of Achany, afterwards Sir James of Lews, baronet ; gyronny of 
eight sable and gules, a lion rampant or armed and langued azure ; a bordure 
of the third charged with three bears' heads, two in chief and one in base 
couped azure muzzled argent, and two hands fessways in fess holding 
daggers erect gules ; crest — a dexter arm in armour erect holding a 
scymetar in fess proper ; motto — " Heart and hand." The bordure is to 
indicate maternal descent from the family of Mackay. 

Sir James Balfour gives for Mathesone — gyronny of eight sable and 
g^les, a lion rampant or armed and langued argent, a bordure or charged 
with crosses fitchee gules ; he adds a note, " This coate I ratified under 
my hand and scale to Colonell George Mathesone, 5 Octob. 1639," with 
crest — an armed hand holding a naked sword; motto — " Hearte in 
hand." 

The Mathesons of Bennetsfield, co. Ross, said to be chief of the 
clan, and to be represented by Eric Grant Matheson, son of the late 
Colonel James Brooke Matheson, H.E.I.C.S., apparently bore yet another 
coat, for which I find no authority ; argent, two Lx)chaber axes in saltire 
between a cock in chief and a rose in base. 

James Matheson was dempster of parliament 1585, and sat in parlia- 
ment 1592 ; in 1593 John represented the burgh of Grail in parliament. 
In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries a burgess family in Edinburgh, 
of good position, held lands in Broughton and Restalrig, and as early as 
1477 one of them was a canon of St Giles. 

The seal of Margaret Matheson appended, in 1601, to a charter of 
lands near Restalrig, is three boars' heads erased. 

In 1264, Kermac Macmaghan had a grant of twenty cows of fine pf 
the Earl of Ross. 

*MoNCUR OF Slaines, really Nevay. This coat, with slight varia- 
tions, is by several authorities assigned to the above family, but is that 
of Nevay of that Ilk, co. Forfar. 

Sir David, a Senator of the College of Justice, registered 1672-78 — 
sable, a chevalier armed cap-a-pie brandishing a scymetar aloft, mounted 
on horseback argent within a bordure gules (? of the second). 

Pont gives for Neaffe, baron of Methie — azure, a man armed of on a 
horse argent advancing his sword, a sinister hand of the third in the 
sinister ; also Nevay of that Ilk, as Sir David, man and horse, &c., proper 
and without the bordure. 

The surname is taken from Nevay; in 1 219 Adam de Neveth was 
present at a perambulation of the boundary between the lands of the 
Abbey of Arbroath aud the barony of Kinblethmont ; in 1422 Alexander 
de Neve, then a prisoner in England, in the hands of Galfrid Lowther, 

4X 



356 GENTLEMEN S ARMS 

had a safe-conduct to visit Scotland with the object of raising ransom 
money. 

David of that Ilk died in 1664, leaving five children in minority, to 
whom their granduncle, Sir David of Reidie, a Senator of the College of 
Justice, was tutor. 

John of that Ilk, the eldest son, was father of David of that Ilk, who 
d.s.p. before 17 14, when his sister Elizabeth, wife of Sir James Kinloch 
of Kinloch, Baronet, who took the additional name of Nevay, was heir of 
line, and his cousin Alexander, farmer in Dunnichen, was heir-male. 
Although the elder line had retained the designation of that Ilk and part 
of the estate of Nevay, the barony of Nevay was held by the judge and 
his descendants. David Nevay of Reidie, advocate, younger son of John 
of that Ilk, who died in May 161 4, was raised to the bench and knighted 
on the Restoration, being at first styled Lord Reidie, but after he had got 
possession of Nevay, he took his title from that property ; he married, 
1653, Margaret, daughter of Sir Patrick Hay of Pitfour, and died in 1683, 
leaving a son David of Nevay, who d.s.p. and three daughters — Eliza- 
beth, married Sir John Hay of Murie ; Isabella, married Henry Craw- 
furd of Monorgan, and had issue ; and Margaret married Thomas Miln 
of Milnfield, s.p. 

Ochterlony in his " Account of Forfarshire," calls Nevay of that Ilk 
" an ancient gentleman chief of his name," and says of Sir David, that he 
*' also assumes the title of Nevay." 

Sir George Mackenzie also gives Nevay of that Ilk with the plain 
coat, and to " Neavy now designed of Neavy, one of the Senators of the 
College of Justice," the arms within a bordure gules. 

The " baron " of Methie, above mentioned, was James Nevay, who 
went to Sweden in 1579, with certificates of gentle birth and high charac- 
ter. He rose to be governor of Westmanland and Dalarne, was killed by 
the peasantry, and on the monument erected to his memory by his son-in- 
law, Johan Skytte, the eight quarters are Nevay, Gray, Leslie, Lindsay of 
Crawford, Wishart of Pittarrow, Lindsay of the Byres, Ogilvy, and 
Ramsay of Auchterhouse. 

Maculloch of Merton ; argent, three wolves' heads erased azure. 
The usual coat of the name is ermine, a fret gules ; or ermine, fretty 
gules. Porteus gives for Merton — ermine, a fret gules ; and for Car- 
doness the same, with a moyen, azure, three boars' or wolves' heads 
erased argent. The heads in G. certainly rather resemble those of the 
wolf than of the boar. 

This double coat was allowed in 181 4 to John M'Culloch of Barholm, 
the fret being engrailed, and the escutcheon azure, threewolves' heads erased 
argent ; supporters, as heir-male of the families of Muile, Myretown, and 
Cardoness — two men in armour, each holding a spear in his hand proper. 
The engrailing of the fret is not very intelligible. Sir Godfrey of 
Myrtoune, baronet, registered 1672-78 — ermine, fretty gules, and James 
of Muile the same, within a bordure indented of the second. The fret 
engrailed was registered about the same time by Sir Hugh of Pilton, 
near Edinburgh, descended from the Macullochs of Cadboll in Ross-shire ; 
crest — an ermine proper; motto — ^^ Sine macuid;" this coat impaled 
with the bearing of his wife, Jean Gibson, three keys fessways in pale 
with a mullet for difference, is cut on his monument in the churchyard 
of the Greyfriars, Edinburgh, with the date 1688 ; he had no issue, and 
his widow married Lord Lindores. 



OF CHARLES F.S REIGN. 357 

The seal of Alexander Macculach, 1431, has ermine fretty; he was 
on an assize as to the tenure of Kilravock and Geddes. In 1477 John 
M'Culloch had a charter of the lands of CadboU from William, Bishop of 
Moray. In the seventeenth century the burgh of Tain was frequently 
represented in parliament by Thomas, James, and Andrew Maculloch. 

In Galloway the family was of importance from an early period ; in 
1296 the Ragman Roll was signed by Thomas Maculagh, William 
MacUlagh, and Michel MacUlagh, all of the county of Wigton. In 
1305 Thomas Mackhulagh was sheriff of Wigton; in 1363 Sir Patrick 
M'Owlache had restoration of his lands ; Sir Alexander M'Culloch was 
sheriff of Wigton c. 1490. 

Although the antiquity and rank of this family are beyond doubt, no 
satisfactory pedigree exists ; Myrtoun was the property of Sir Thomas at 
the end of the fourteenth century ; Sir Alexander was Master Falconer to 
James IV., and in 1504 had a charter erecting Myrtoun into a burgh of 
barony. Sir Alexander of Myrtoun was created a baronet loth August 
1664, but the patent is not recorded, and the limitation is unknown ; his 
son, Sir Godfrey, wasted his estate, and had a dispute with William 
Gordon, one of his creditors, whom he shot and mortally wounded in 
1696, for which he was executed at Edinburgh ; in his dying speech he 
mentions his " wife and poor children." 

The chief remaining family of the name is seated at Ardwall, which 
has been in their possession since 1488 at any rate. 

MiDDLETON OF KiLHiLL. Shortly before the general registration of 
arms in Scotland began in 1672, John, Earl of Middleton, had been at 
the head of affairs as Lord High Commissioner to Parliament, Com- 
mander-in-Chief, Governor of Edinburgh Castle, and an Extraordinary 
Lord of Session. His brother-in-law. Sir Alexander Durham, had been 
Lord Lyon, and these circumstances, no doubt, led to the matriculation of 
arms by no less than six persons of this family, and four more entered 
arms between 1731 and 1768, two of the earlier entries being by cadets of 
Kilhill. 

The Earl was allowed to augment his arms by the addition of the 
double tressure, borne like the lion counterchanged. 

It may seem presumptuous, in the face of such authority, to ask 
" were these the proper arms of Middleton ?" but the facts are as follows. 

No authority is known to me for any coat for the name in Scotland 
earlier than Sir James Balfour, who gives four all differing from one 
another, and except the first, not at all resembling the registered bearings. 
First, vert, a lion salient regardant or ; second, gules, a cross engrailed 
argent ; third, ermine, on a canton or an escutcheon gules ; fourth, azure, 
three cinquefoils within a bordure argent. 

Pont, a contemporary of Sir James, assigns to Middleton of Kil- 
hill and Middleton of Greiston, the arms as in G. The next authority is 
Porteus, appointed Snowdon Herald at the Restoration, the very time 
when Middleton's rise to power occurred ; he gives, of course, the Earl's 
arms with the tressure among the peers, but in his alphabetical list of 
the gentry there is only " Midilton of Greston partie per fess or and g. a 
lyon rampant interchanged." 

Now there never was, that I can discover, a family of Middleton pos- 
sessed of Greiston, or of any estate whose name resembles that ; there 
was in Peeblesshire, in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, an old family 



358 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

of Middlemast of Greiston, a younger branch of which possessed Chapel, 
of whose arms we have no record, if these Middleton of Greiston entries 
do not refer to them. 

In 1876, Miss Biscoe, who is descended from the family, published 
" The Earls of Middleton," with genealogical details, and Mr James Mid- 
dleton Paton has printed for private circulation " Memoranda," and a 
genealogical sketch of the branch from which he descends. 

The surname is taken from lands in Kincardineshire, which were 
alienated in 1540; Humphrey de Middleton witnessed two charters in the 
reign of Alexander II. ; Humphrey de Midleton, of that county, did 
homage to Edward I. 1296. 

Robert, Abbot of Arbroath 1261-67, gave a certificate of the death, in 
his monastery, of Constance de Middleton and her son Adam ; she is 
called daughter of the late Robert Tybald and Mary his wife. 

Gilbert Middleton of that Ilk was sheriff of Angus 1516. 

The first earl had several brothers ; Alexander, Principal of King's 
College, Aberdeen, is represented, if no descendants in the male line 
exist of Major-General Patrick Middleton of the Polish service, who had 
two sons alive in 1779, by Charles John Middleton, Principal Registrar 
of H.M. Court of Probate ; James was in the army of the King of Spain 
in the Netherlands, and in 1731 his great-grandson, James Francis 
Edward Middleton, obtained from the Lyon Office a certificate of his 
pedigree and arms, with a thistle in the paw of the lion ; Andrew of Pit- 
garvie and Balbegno, whose descendants in the male line are extinct ; 
Lieutenant-Colonel William, who is believed to have been father of John 
Middleton, burgess of Aberdeen, who bought Shiels, in that county, in 
1735, and is represented by John Middleton, merchant in Glasgow, who 
registered arms in 1864 ; there were at least two other brothers of the earl. 

Charles Lord Barham was a descendant of the Principal, and the 
peerage conferred on him in 1805 is vested in his great-grandson the Earl 
of Gainsborough ; he was allowed the tressure. 

Methven, C. These arms were registered 1672-78 by Mr John 
Methven of Craigton, co. Fife, with crest — a cross patde or within a cres- 
cent argent ; motto — " Marie et clypeo." 

In 1725 Sir Paul Methven, K.B., Treasurer of H.M. Household, was 
allowed a different coat — argent, three wolves' heads erased proper — no 
crest or motto. He is stated to descend from Paul Methven, a zealous 
promoter of the Reformation, who settled in England in the reign of 
Queen Elizabeth. The cause of his leaving Scotland is mentioned in a 
letter, 22nd January 1563, of Thomas Randolph to Sir William Cecil ; he 
had been convicted of adultery with his servant, excommunicated, and 
failing to perform public penance, as ordained by the General Assembly, 
fled to England in the autumn of 1566. Methven was a native of Dun- 
dee, and had been a baker there. 

Sir Paul's cousin and heir was ancestor of Lord Methuen, who now 
places his shield " on the breast of an imperial eagle." This assumption 
had not taken place when Douglas' " Baronage," which contains an 
account of the family, appeared ; perhaps it followed on the discovery of 
a seal of John de Methvyn, appended to an indenture of truce between 
England and Scotland, signed in 1451, now in the Record Office; Mr 
Laing describes the bearings as three eagles' heads on a shield in front of 
an eagle. 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. 359 

There are other instances of this arrangement, which has no imperial 
significance, although said to have been " granted as a mark of honour to 
the family by Albert I., Emperor of Germany, 1304." In the '* Herald 
and Genealogist," vol. vii., there is a critical examination of the Methven 
pedigree by an experienced hand ; and another article has lately appeared 
in the " Genealogist " on the same subject, contributed by the writer. 

Together they give an account of the old family of Methven of Methven, 
in Perthshire, of various persons bearing the name, and show the inac- 
curacy of the modern statements. 

Sir James Balfour's blazon is — or, three peacocks' heads erased 
proper ; while Porteus makes it — argent, three wolfs' heads erased sable, 
the shield of John, in 1451, being on the breast of a two-headed eagle 
gules. 

Mr John Methven was official of Lothian and vicar of Edinburgh, 
and I feel inclined to think that one of the armorial shields in the Cathe- 
dral of St Giles, Edinburgh, is his. It has been supposed to be Nicolson, 
three hawks' heads. Mr David Laing, in his " Historical Notices of St 
Giles," prefixed to the chartulary, says this is an error, and indeed there 
were no Nicolsons of note connected with Edinburgh, or bearing arms, in 
the middle of the fifteenth century. The heads are erased, and might be 
those of an animal, and he gives them for Otterburn ; Mr John Otter- 
burn bore three otters' heads couped, while the Methven heads, be they 
eagles' or wolfs', are always erased. 

Melville. Several coats of different branches with marks of cadency. 

*Maine. This coat is cut in stone at Kirkwall, with the date 1592, 
the bend being a sinister one. Arms were registered, in 1673, by Mr 
Robert Maine of Loch wood, co. Lanark ; in 1730 by Edward Mayne of 
Powis, merchant in Lisbon ; and c. 1700, by George Main, jeweller in 
Edinburgh ; in all the bend is changed to a chevron voided gules in a 
field argent, but the pheon, unicorn's head, and fleur-de-lis are retained as 
charges. 

Robert of Lochwood married Margaret Cleland of the Gartness 
family, and was dead in 1692, leaving three daughters. 

Edward of Powis and Logic died unm., and the estate remained in 
possession of the descendants of his brother for three generations ; one of 
his nephews was William, Viscount Newhaven. 

The jeweller's only son was dead, without issue, in 1744, so that there 
is no one of the name now in Scotland with a legal right to arms. 

* Marshall. 

*MiTCHELSONE. Another coat is given— gules, two rolls of paper in 
saltire argent, three plates in flank and base. 

The one represented somewhat resembles that given in W. for 
Mitchell, and borne but not registered by the Mitchelsons of Middleton 
in Mid-Lothian. 

MACLEOD OF THAT Ilk. Quarterly — first, azure, a castle with three 
towers argent ; second, or, a lion rampant gules ; third, or, lymphad sails 
furled and oars in saltire sable ; fourth azure. 

NoRVELL OF Gargunnock. Argent, four bendlets gules and three 
martlets azure in bend. 

Newtoune. Azure, three boars' heads erased argent. 

* Noble. An added coat of later date in Porteus' MS., is— argent, 
three olive or bay leaves vert. 

4Y 



36o . GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

Arms registered, 1827, by the representative of the farriily of Noble of 
Ardmore and Ardardan, co. Dumbarton, John Noble, C.B., Lieutenant- 
Colonel of Horse Artillery H.E.I.C.S. — gules, a chevron ermine between 
three bay leaves slipped or. 

In 1296 Thomas and Patrick le Noble, of the county of Edinburgh, 
did homage to Edward I. ; in 1314 a safe-conduct to Mr John Lindsay, 
includes among his retinue Patrick le Noble. John Noble was provost 
and custumar of Linlithgow 1329; David was custumar of that burgh 
1340 ; and Godfrey was bailie in 1365. 

Henry de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, before a.d 1200, granted parts 
of Kinpont, Illeston, and Ratho to William Noble ; his son Sir Ralph, 
and Thomas and Ralph sons of Sir Ralph, alienated Kinpont and Illes- 
ton to David de Graham 1245-55, In 1294 King John granted to 
Patrick Noble on the resignation of his father Thomas, probably the two 
persons whose names are on the Ragman Roll, a charter of confirmation 
of Westhall of Ratho. 

There is an account, in Irving's " Dumbartonshire," of the family of 
Noble. It is said that Walter had a charter of Ferme in 1467, and that 
it was sold by James in 1537, who then acquired Ardardan. Both the 
latter statements are erroneous. Robert Noble possessed Ardardan (u. 
1500, and Nobles of Ferme, or of Noble-Ferme, occur frequently in the 
Criminal Trials, Acts of Parliament, Retours, &c., down to 1783, being 
also possessed of Ardardan. 

The seal of Robert Noble, bailie of Dumbarton, 1490, is stated to 
bear three holly or burdock leaves. The estates were sold, in 1798, by 
William, father of Colonel Noble, who registered arms. The family is 
represented by Captain Andrew Noble, Royal Artillery. 

A younger branch possessed Kipperminshock for several genera- 
tions. 

William of Dalnottar sat in parliament for Dumbartonshire 1681. 

Margaret Noble, Lady Cathcart, is not mentioned in the pedigree. 
She was, in 1580, widow of William Sempill of Cathcart, and died in 
April 1608. Her grandson, Robert Livingstone, was served heir to her 
in 1615. 

Neilsone. Argent, a dexter hand couped at the wrist fessways, 
holding a knife in pale point downwards, in sinister base a man's heart 
proper. Another coat — argent, three sinister hands couped at the wrist 
gules, two and one bend sinisterways. 

*NicoLSONE. Seal of William Necolsoun of Park, 1527 — a saltire 
couped. 

Porteus gives the coat here represented, but with the tinctures reversed, 
and Font's blazon is — or, a lion's head erased between three eagles' heads 
within a bordure gules. Arms registered, in February 1676, by Sir John 
of that Ilk, baronet — or, three falcons' heads erased gules armed argent ; 
crest — a lion issuant or armed and langued gules ; motto — " Genero- 
sitate ;'' supporters — two eagles or armed gules. These arms, including 
the supporters, were allowed, in March 1826, to Arthur Nicolson of Loch- 
end, in Shetland, Esquire, who had, in the preceding August, been served 
heir-male of Sir James Nicolson of Nicolson and Lasswade, baronet of 
Nova Scotia, which title he afterwards assumed. The patent, of date, 
1629, is in favour of Mr John Nicolson of Lasswade and his heirs-male, 
and contains a grant of the barony of Lasswade in Nova Scotia. 



OF CHARLES F.S REIGN, 361 

Mr George Nicolson of Clunie registered arms 1672-78 — or, three 
eagles' heads erased gules ; crest — a lion's head erased or ; motto^-" Nil 
sistere contra ; " this gentleman was afterwards a Senator of the College 
of Justice, and as there is no satisfactory account of his family one may be 
here attempted. George, burgess of Aberdeen, sat in parliament for the 

city 1617, married Howison. His son, Thomas of Pitmedden, 

bailie and burgess of Aberdeen, married an Abercromby, said to be of the 
Pitmedden family, and had, with a younger son, Thomas, the first Vicar 
Apostolic appointed in Scotland, 1694, and Bishop of Peristachium, died 
1718, aged seventy-six; a son and heir. Sir George, Lord Kemnay, 1682, 
first designed of Clunie, then, 1682-88, of Kemnay, latterly of Balcaskie 
in Fife, married Margaret Halliburton, and died 171 1. 

His eldest son, Thomas, had been created a baronet 15th April 1700,' 
married Margaret, daughter of Sir Thomas Nicolson of Carnock, and 
died in 1728, leaving three daughters. Isabella married Thomas, younger 
son of John Brisbane of that Ilk ; Margaret married William, Marquess 
of Lothian ; and Eleanor married — first, Hon. Thomas Boyd ; secondly ,- 
John Crawfurd of Crawfurdland. 

William Nicolson of Mergy, brother of Sir Thomas, succeeded him 
in some property in Berwickshire, and assumed the title ; bought Glen- 
bervie, 1721 ; married four times, his last wife being Agnes, daughter 
and co-heir of Robert Burnett of Muchalls, widow of Thomas Burnett of 
Glenbervie, died in 1766, in his ninety-third year. 

Sir James, his son, married — first. Miss Smith, niece of Sir Thomas 
Burnett, Bart. ; secondly, in 1779, a daughter of Major Wharton, and 
died without issue 1782, when the title was assumed by his cousin Sir 
James, captain in the service of the King of Portugal, and Glenbervie 
passed to his eldest sister, Helen; who married — first, in 1791, Henry 
Ivie of Mount Alto, in Ireland ; secondly, in 1793, George Mill, brother 
of Mill of Fearn ; third, in 1813, James Mitchell, Collector of Customs 
at Dundee, all of whom assumed the surname of Nicolson, but had no 
issue. 

Her sister, John or Joan, married, 1797, Rev. James Wilson, 
minister of Farnell, and had (with another daughter, who married David 
Smith) Ann, who sue. to Glenbervie, married Dr Badenach of Arthur- 
house, died 1878, and was sue. by her son James Badenach-Nicolson q{ 
Glenbervie, advocate. 

To return to the family designed of that Ilk; they seem appa- 
rently much connected with Brechin ; Mr James, Parson of Farnell was 
appointed Dean of Brechin in November 1577, and died before Novem- 
ber 1581. 

In 1577 Mr Paul Fraser, chantor of Brechin, made a gift to his cousin 
James Nicolson, writer, burgess of Edinburgh, of a life annuity of ;;^63, 
6s. 8d., charged on lands in Forfarshire. The same year, Mr John, son 
of James, had a gift from the king of certain sums payable from the 
revenue of the bishopric of Brechin for five years, to enable him to study 
on the Continent. In 1580 Thomas, also son of James, had a grant from 
the Crown, payable from the same source, towards the expense of his 
education : this Thomas was afterwards Commissary of Aberdeen, and 
in 162 1, acquired Cockburnspath, co. Berwick. His sons. Sir James, 
of Cockburnspath, and Sir Thomas, King's Advocate and Privy Coun- 
cillor 1649, both died without male issue to survive. 



o 



62 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 



Mr John, above named, was a successful advocate, acquired Lass- 
wade in 1607, and other lands ; married Elizabeth, daughter of Edward 
Henrysoun, Senator of the College of Justice, and Commissary of Edin- 
burgh. Their son was Sir John, first baronet of Lasswade, grandfather 
of Sir John, who had the barony of Clerkington erected into the barony 
of Nicolson by charter in 1669, containing many privileges. The direct 
line ended on the death of Sir James in May 1743, when the title became 
dormant, till assumed by Arthur of Lochend. He claimed to descend 
from James, Bishop of Dunkeld, 1607, a son of James, the Edinburgh 
writer. A male heir exists, but there seems to be some doubt as to the 
case, as the family are not to be found in all the peerages, &c. 

Another claim was made by an alleged descendant of George Nicol- 
son, said to be brother of the first baronet. 

There is a third baronetcy, conferred in 1637 on Thomas Nicolson of 
Carnock, advocate, who must, according to Funeral Escutcheons, have 
been a younger brother of the first baronet of Lasswade (?). The Carnock 
estate, on the death, in 1686, of Sir Thomas Nicolson, Lord Napier, passed 
to his aunts; was entailed in 171 1 by Eleanor Nicolson, Lady Shaw of 
Greenock ; and in 1792 her descendant and heir of entail, Michael Stewart 
Nicolson of Carnock, registered arms — or, three falcons' heads erased 
gules beaked sable within a bordure azure, quartering Stewart ; crest, a: 
lion's head erased gules ; motto, '■' Nil sistere contra.''' In 1807 he again 
recorded arms, dropping the surname and coat of Stewart, and was 
allowed supporters, two eagles regardant proper with wings expanded. 
Carnock remains with this family, and the baronetcy with the heir-male. 

*OuDNY OF THAT Ilk. The writer contributed to the " Genealo- 
gist," in 1877, an account of the old Aberdeenshire family of Udny. 

Patrick Udny of that Ilk, c. 1350, is the first that has been traced. 
Udny is styled a lordship in the sixteenth century, and was erected into 
a barony. There has been much variation in the bearings — gules, two 
hounds climbing to a hart mounted on a tree proper ; gules, three fleurs- 
de-lis or, and two greyhounds leaping at a hart's head argent ; gules, a 
fleur-de-lis held up by two greyhounds sejant argent ; argent, a tree proper 
growing out of the base between two greyhounds counter salient azure. 

Alexander Udny of that Ilk, obtained a warrant from Sir Charles 
Erskine, Lyon, dated 21st June 1665, for the following — gules, a stag's 
head couped and cabossed or, in honour point two greyhounds argent 
countersalient of the first and second, with three fleurs-de-lis, two in chief 
and one in base ; crest — a fleur-de-lis gules ; supporters, as representer 
of a family of Free Barons holding directly of the Crown — two naked 
savages wreathed about the head and middle with green branches resting 
their interior hands on the shield, and supporting in the other hand a 
gigantic baton proper. This confused blazon was modified, when Alex- 
ander registered arms 1672-78, to — gules, two greyhounds countersalient 
argent collared of the field, in the honour point a stag's head couped, 
attired with ten tynes all between three fleurs-de-lis or ; motto — " All my 
hope is in God ; " no supporters. 

His brothers, Robert of Auchterellon, John of Cultercallen, and 
Arthur, merchant burgess of Edinburgh, entered arms at the same time 
with differences. 

Peter Udny, a cadet, entered the military service of Sweden, and was 
recognised as noble in 1647. 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. 363 

Another registration was made in 1789 by Robert Udny, otherwise 
Robert Fullarton-Udny of Udny and Dudwick — ^gules, a stag's head 
cabossed or between two greyhounds salient affrontee argent collared of 
the field between three fleurs-de-lis two and one of the second. The 
supporters are described as wreathed with oak-leaves, and with batons 
resting on their shoulders. 

*OswALD. This is the only authority found for what seems to be 
the older coat of the name. It was altered to a naked man or savage 
pointing to a star or comet in dexter chief, which is evidently founded on 
the hand pointing up towards two stars. 

In 1670 arms were allowed to Mr Andrew Oswald of Dalderse, clerk 
of Exchequer — azure, a savage proper wreathed with bay leaves, holding 
in his sinister hand a baton erect on his shoulder vert, and pointing with 
the other hand to a comet in dexter chief or ; crest — a comet ; motto — • 
" Monstrant astra viam." 

A few years later James Oswald, skipper in Kirkcaldy, had a grant, 
the only difference in the arms being that the savage points to the star 
with a cross staff held in his dexter hand. 

James Oswald of Fingaltoun, co. Renfrew, soon after entered similar 
arms, the savage holding a bow in his sinister hand, and having a sheaf 
of arrows by his side. This gentleman, who was receiver-general of taxes, 
was afterwards knighted ; an account of his family was contributed by me 
to the " Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica." 

The skipper in Kirkcaldy belonged to an old burgess family there, 
represented the burgh in parliament 1703-7, and acquired Dunnikier, 
which remains the seat of his representative ; to this family belonged the 
Right Hon. James Oswald of Dunnikier ; John, Bishop of Raphoe, who 
died in 1780 ; and General Sir John of Dunnikier, G.C.B. 

Mr Andrew, son of Alexander Oswald, portioner of Falkirk, acquired 
Dalderse before the Restoration ; it was erected into a barony by Crown 
charter in his favour, 1666, and remained with his descendants for three 
generations. 

Arms were granted in 1764 to Richard Oswald of Scotstoun, and 
in 1770 to his cousin, Richard of Auchencruive, both merchants, sons of 
parish ministers in the county of Caithness. 

*Orchardtoune of that Ilk. No such family ever existed, and 
the Litera prosapice under the Great Seal, issued in 1663 in favour of John 
Orchardton, Major of the Guards of the King of Sweden, is one of the 
best examples of a genealogical fable sanctioned by the highest authority, 
of which there were many in the seventeenth century. 

Mr Marryat, who, by the way, describes the gentleman as major of 
a regiment of foot, says that the Swedes at last became so suspicious of 
the universality of high birth among the Scottish soldiers of fortune who 
joined their army, that in some cases, as that of Lieutenant7Colonel 
Patrick Ogilvy of the family of Balgay, they insisted not on a mere certi- 
ficate, but exacted a formal genealogy on parchment, with the arms of his 
ancestors painted at the top and his own portrait at the foot (? to prevent 
personation), before receiving him a member of the Ridderhus. Major 
Orchardton attained the rank of Colonel, and died in 1679. 

The birthbrief gives him sixteen quarters, including Allardyce, 
Strachan, Ramsay, Rait, &c., on the father's side ; his mother, Elizabeth 
Robertson, is traced back through a line of hereditary owners of part of 

4z 



364 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

the barony of Easter Auchtermuchty (there was no such barony), directly 
descended from Clarissima Robertsonortim Struance barommt familia. 
Her quarters were Pringle, Ramsay, Gibb, Mure, &c. 

Here at least there was a slight foundation of fact; in 1601 Mr James 
Robertson was served heir of his father Patrick, burgess of Edinburgh, 
in a part of Jerresland of Auchtermuchty. 

The inquirer into the pedigree of Orchardton will look in vain 
through the Spalding Club volumes for notices of the family of that Ilk 
in the shire of Aberdeen, and its honourable alliances ; but in the parish 
of Udny there is a place called Orchardtown, which, in 1625, was the 
property of Seton of Schethen, having previously belonged to Tullidaff of 
that Ilk. 

Paxton. Argent, two chevronels sable and three mullets gules in 
pale ; another coat — azure, on a chevron argent five garbs of the field. 

Sir James Balfour gives— argent, two chevrons sable and three mullets 
in chief gules. 

Porteus says two mullets in chief, and gives both the coats in G., 
making the garbs in the second one sable. An early seal of David de 
Paxton bears an eagle displayed ; that of William de Paxton, a.d. 1250, 
is a pelican in her piety in a nest ; John de Paxton, in 1430, uses a cross 
between four charges like ermine spots, and the following year he or a 
namesake seals with a lion rampant. 

The name is taken from Paxton, a territorimn in Berwickshire, where 
the family long owned land. 

Mr Robert de Paxton occurs as a witness in cartulary of Kelso, c. 
1250, and may be the Mr Robert who was Prior of St John of Jerusalem 
in Scotland, and Sheriff of Berwick 1296. In that year Nicol and Robert 
de Paxton of Berwickshire did homage to Edward I., while the lands of 
Abberwyke, in Northumberland, were taken possession of by the king, 
their owner, William de Paxton, being then in Scotland. In 1334 the lands 
of Aldincraw in Paxton, formerly belonging to William de Paxton, were 
restored to Lucy, wife of Roger de Paxton. 

Adam de Paxton held one-third of Paxton in the reign of Alexander 
III., had a charter of mill of Edrington from Robert I. ; he left a widow, 
Mary, who married Ralph de Rok, and a son in minority ; in 1337 his 
forfeiture was granted by Robert II. to John de Roos and John Lyoun, 
but the Paxtons seem to have retained some of their lands. 

1397 Alexander, 1428 Nicol and John, 1455 Patrick de Paxton ; in 
1494 John was charged with being accessory to the slaughter of Thomas 
Hogert in Stitchill ; William died before 1597, possessed of Auchincraw, 
formerly Auldincraw, and parts of Paxton, in which his son Nicol Paxton 
was served heir to him. These lands were soon afterwards in the hands 
of a branch of the Nisbets. 

Porteus of Hawkshaw. Azure, three stags* heads cabossed or. 
They should be couped. 

Seal of William Pertus of the county of Peebles 1439 — ^ saltire 
engrailed between four roses. 

Arms registered, 1674-78, by George, Marchmont Herald — azure, a 
thistle between three bucks' heads erased or ; crest — a turtle dove with 
an olive branch in her beak proper ; motto — " I wait my tyme." He was 
also herald painter and an industrious collector ; his commission as 
Herald, 31st March 1674, designs him painter burgess of Edinburgh, 



OF CHARLES L'S REIGN. 365 

and he may have been a son of Robert, merchant burgess of Edinburgh, 
who was appointed Snowdon Herald 12th January 1661, compiled a valu- 
able heraldic MS., frequently quoted in this work, and died in 1664, leav- 
ing a widow, whose name was Alan, and a son and heir, James. 

George acquired the estate of Craiglockhart, near Edinburgh, and 
died in 1698, leaving three sons — William of Craiglockhart, d.s.p. 1718; 
Robert of Craiglockhart, d.s.p. in or before 1739; Andrew of Burnfoot, 
writer in Edinburgh, heir of his elder brother. 

Porteus of Hawkshaw, was an old family in Peeblesshire, and their 
arms, given by the Snowdon Herald, are — azure, three harts' heads 
erased argent, to which is added, " attired with ten tynes and or, herald 
1662," being probably the coat as he bore it himself. In 1732, Michael 
Anderson of Tushilaw, was allowed to quarter in right of his mother, 
Henrietta Porteus, heiress of Hawkshaw — azure, three bucks' heads 
couped argent attired or. Hawkshaw had been in the possession of the 
family from about the middle of the fifteenth century. A branch seated 
at Glenkirk ended in John Porteus of Glenkirk, to whom his grand- 
nephew, John Aitken, was served heir-special in 1797. 

*Payet of Auchinheapeir. Blazoned by Porteous — argent, a pay^ 
yot (magpie) sitting on a tree proper. 

In 1707 William Pyet, a trader, presented a petition to Parliament 
praying that he and his kinsmen and relations might be permitted to dis- 
charge the ignominious nick-name of Pyet, and assume and use their 
ancient surname of Graham, which was that of their ancestors ; and 
after some unhappy difference between clans had been dropped, they being 
forced to leave their native residence, and obliged to cover themselves 
under the surname of Pyet. This desire was granted. 

Bryce Pyot was custumar of Inverness 1361 : the name occurs in the 
cartularies of Brechin, Arbroath, and Aberdeen in the fifteenth and six- 
teenth centuries, and persons of the name were owners of land at Balmyle 
in the seventeenth. Mr Laurence was archdeacon of Aberdeen 1440-65 ; 
Patrick and Thomas were Masters of the House of St Germains of the 
order of St John of Jerusalem a little later ; 1466, Henry of Pyotstoun, 
CO. Fife. Another rather wholesale change of the name took place under 
the following circumstances: — William Maitland, F.R.S., author of the 
" History of London," " History of Edinburgh," and other works, died in 
1757? leaving a fortune to his sister and heir, Lilias, widow of Robert 
Ramsay, merchant and bailie of Montrose ; her daughter, Katherine 
Ramsay, wife of James Pyott junior, merchant and bailie of Montrose, 
left a family of six sons and five daughters, who all, in 1772, as heirs to 
the Maitland property, assumed that surname. 

*Rainie. Arms granted 1760 to Alexander Renny, merchant in 
Montrose — argent, a tree growing out of the base vert, on a chief gules 
two wings conjoined ermine. A previous grant had been made in- 1731 
to Mrs Mary Raining, eldest daughter of Thomas, merchant in Norwich, 
— argent, an oak tree growing out of a mount in base proper, on a chief 
azure three mullets of the first. 

Herbert Rainie or Rayning sat in Parliament for Dumfries 1572 ; was 
provost of the burgh then and several times afterwards till 1592 ; Robert 
Rayning was provost in 1578. In 1623 Agnes, heiress of this family, 
daughter of Thomas, merchant burgess of Dumfries, was wife of John 
Williamson, merchant burgess there. 



366 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

Symon Renny was bailie of Inverkeithing in 1362. 

The Ranys or Rennys were owners of land in Forfarshire from the 
middle of the fifteenth century. Alexander, to whom arms were granted, 
was of the family of Renny of Usan. Elizabeth, daughter and heir of 
Robert of Usan, advocate, married Archibald Scott, younger of Duninald. 
and died in 1761, leaving issue. Elizabeth Jean Tailyour, heiress of 
Barrowfield, married a cadet of the Usan family, and her grandson is the 
present Colonel Thomas Renny-Tailyour of Barrowfield. 

Thomas, merchant in Montrose, also a cadet of Usan, married Jean 
Strachan, heiress of Tarrie, and their son, Thomas Renny-Strachan 
of Tarrie and Seaton, W.S., died in 1823, having executed an entail 
under which the estates passed to John Renny-Strachan Carnegie, who is 
not descended from the Rennys. 

Rattray of that Ilk. Azure, a fess argent, in dexter chief a star of 
five points pierced, in sinister chief and in base a cross crosslet fitchde all 
of the second. 

Reidheugh. Azure, three pelicans vulning themselves or. Sir 
James Balfour gives the same, which has also the authority of Porteus, 
but the arms recorded in 1678, by John Reidheugh of Cultibragan, co. 
Perth, representative of James of Cultibragan, comptroller to James IV., 
are, or, in a nest vert and pelican vulned and feeding her young proper; 
crest — two turtle doves respecting each other azure ; motto — '' Nil nequit 
amor." The seal of James of Cultibragan in 1599 has one pelican. 

The family possessed besides the estate near Comrie, from which they 
took their designation, the barony of Tullychettel, and cadets owned 
Meyour, Aberlednoch, Tomparran, &c. 

Hugh de Redhuche, 1388; 1462, Andrew Reidheuch of Quarrel, co. 
Stirling; 1485, Richard was elected for the burghs on the articles ; 1495, 
Agnes, widow of David Bruce of Kennett ; James of Tullychettel, 1509; 
Edward of Cultibragan married, about 1560, Christian, daughter and 
co-heir of Sir John Campbell of Glenorchy. Cultibragan remained the 
seat of the family till after the middle of the eighteenth century. 

Henry possessed Wester Aberlednoch and Tomparran ; his eldest 
son, Peter, left a daughter, Isobel, who, in 1561, had a suit with her uncle, 
William, as to the succession. 

William of Aberlednoch married Sibilla, daughter of John Drum- 
mond of Colqualzie ; his eldest son, Henry, left a daughter and heir, 
Janet, married, before 1657, James, brother of Oliphant of Cask ; his 
second son, David of Aberlednoch, was father of Mr Alexander and 
James, West India merchants, who, in October 1644, were taken at sea 
and carried to Algiers, where they were kept in prison. Alexander was 
ransomed, negotiated for the freedom of his fellow captives, and had the 
misfortune to lose his wife and children by the plague 1647. 

In the stewartry of Kirkcudbright, of which, in 1618, George Redick 
was sheriff-depute, there were Reriks, Riddicks, Rediks, or Redocks of 
Barnhowrie, Dalbeattie, Corbietoun, &c. The name which appears in 
the fifteenth century is still represented. 

Mr M'Kerlie, in " Lands and their Owners in Galloway," gives the 
arms of John Redik of Dalbeattie, from a stone with the date 1600 — a 
sinister hand couped between three billets, one and two. 

•Reid of Pitfoddels. Sir James Balfour gives this coat, but with 
three mullets gules in the first and fourth quarters. 



OF CHARLES F.S REIGN. 367 

Mr Robert of Birnes registered arms, 1672-78, as a descendant, with- 
out difference. The arms, are on the monument at Aberdeen, of Marion 
Reid, Lady of Pitfoddels, and Thomas Menzies her husband. 

In 1335, Patrick dictus Rede, was on an assize at Rayne ; in 1389 
William Rede had Wester Pitfoddels in wadset from his cousin Alexander 
de Moravia of Culbyne ; his grandson, Andrew of Pitfoddels, was father 
of Alexander of that place, who married — first, Marion Cullen ; second, 
Margaret Crawford, and left an heiress, Marion, as above. 

Robert, who, in 1488, was brother and heir apparent of Alexander, 
was probably grandfather of Mr James, minister of Banchory-Ternan 
1567, who died about 1601 ; his sons were Thomas, Greek and Latin 
secretary to James VL, who d.s.p. ; Alexander, physician to Charles L ; 
John, the translator of Buchanan's " History of Scotland ; " Mr Adam, 
minister of Methlick ; and the eldest was Mr Robert, minister of 
Banchory-Ternan, grandfather of Mr Robert of Birnes and Balnakettle, 
also minister of Banchory-Ternan, whose eldest son was Mr Robert of 
Balnakettle, co. Kincardine. His second son, Mr Thomas, had a 
son, Mr Lewis, minister of Strachan, father of Dr Thomas, the meta- 
physician, who died in 1796. 

The Reids of Colliston, also in Aberdeenshire, whose arms are given 
in F., are paternally Ramsays, and bear the eagle displayed with an 
escutcheon gules, sometimes or, on his breast. 

In 1408 Archibald, Earl of Douglas, granted Little Drumwhindle 
dilecto scutifero Patricio Reedie Ramsay; these lands descended to 
William of Colliston 1441-62; Patrick of Colliston 1482-1509; Thomas 
of Colliston 1538; Gilbert of Colliston, who had a Crown charter, 1539, 
to him and Jean his spouse, daughter of Sir Robert Carnegie of Kinnaird, 
and was alive 1567; William of Colliston 1574; Gilbert of Colliston, 
father of Andrew of Colliston, who was served heir in 1600, and had issue 
William, who d.s.p., and Margaret, and Violet, heirs-portioners of their 
brother, 1636. 

About 1730, arms with a crescent in chief for difference, were regis- 
tered by Andrew Reid, of St Martin's-in-the-Fields, Westminster ; the 
eagle is armed and membered or. 

In 1764 Alexander Reid of Strathloch, paternally descended from 
Alexander Rua, i.e., red or Reid, a younger son of Patrick, founder of the 
Robertsons of Lude, registered arms — first and fourth, argent, an eagle 
displayed gules beaked and membered azure, apparently an imitation of 
the Colliston coat, with which he had nothing to do ; second and third, 
Robertson. 

Strathloch was acquired by Alexander Rua's marriage to Matilda, 
daughter and heir of Thomas de Atholia or Duncanson, to whom it was 
granted by Robert III., c. 1402, and remained in the family till about 
1780. General Reid, the last of the direct line, having an only child, 
Susannah, wife of John Stark Robertson, M.D., of Ballindean, who d.s.p. 
1838, left the bulk of his fortune to endow a chair of music in the Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh. The family were known as barons Rua or Reid, 
although Strathloch was not a barony, and was held of the Earls of 
Athole ; for several generations they used the surname of Robertson. 

In 1767 William Reid of Blegbie, in East Lothian, had a grant of a 
coat, which is a typical example of bad heraldry, being compounded of 
the entirely different bearings of three families who have no common 



368 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

origin — argent, on a chevron between two eagles in chief sable beaked 
and membered gules, and a buck's head erased in base of the last a cross 
crosslet fitchde between two mullets or. 

*Rae. Major Adam Rae registered 1672-78 — argent, three roe- 
bucks in full course gules ; crest, a roebuck standing at gaze proper ; 
motto — " In omnia prompt us. 

Sir James Balfour gives — argent, three roes trippant gules. Pont 
has the coat as recorded, while Porteus makes the roebucks proper. 

Adam Rae, proprietor of lands in the shires of Perth, Stirling, and 
Forfar, which were united into the barony of Pitsindie, bore the three 
roebucks, and was dead in 16 18, leaving three daughters. 

Colonel James of Goldenhuife, co. Stirling, a member of the Com- 
mittee of Estates in 1644, died in 1650, leaving a son, James of Golden- 
huife. 

Archibald, merchant, burgess of Glasgow, married Christian, daughter 
and heir of John Jack of Tannochside, co. Lanark, who was dead in 1678, 
On the death of Archibald Rae of Tannochside, he was succeeded by his 
cousin John Rae of Little Govane, to whom arms were granted 1758 — 
vert, a chevron argent between three roebucks in full course proper. 

Stacie gives this coat for Rae with the roebucks or, about 1680. 

His brother and successor, Colin of Little Govane, married Margaret, 
daughter of Sir John Stuart of Castlemilk, Baronet. On the death of 
her brother Francis Stuart Crawford of Milton, in 1793, she inherited his 
estate, but had no issue. Mr Rae was succeeded by his nephew, Robert 
Houstoun, who assumed the surname of Rae. 

Thomas Ra occurs as a witness in or about 1290 ; William Raa had 
a pension 1329; Robert Raa was yeoman of the King's wardrobe 1474; 
Hugh Rea, sub-dean of Glasgow, died 1481. In 1758 David Rae, advo- 
cate, had a grant of arms — vert, three roebucks in full course argent ; he 
became a Senator of the College of Justice as Lord Eskgrove, and was 
created a baronet. 

Rutherford of Hunthill. Argent, within an orle gules three 
piles sable, on a chief of the second three martlets of the first. 

*Ralston. Arms registered 1672-78 by William of that Ilk — argent, 
on a bend azure three acorns in the seed or two and one (?) — crest, a falcon 
looking to the sinister — motto, '■'Fide et marte.'" When these arms were 
allowed as a quartering in 1861 to William Ralston Patrick of Rough- 
wood, CO. Ayr, descended from Jean, daughter of Gavin Ralston of that 
Ilk, the acorns are on the bend, in the usual way, not two and one, and 
seem never to have been so borne. The arms of Ralston and Muirhead 
are the same. The bearings of William of that Ilk, three acorns on a 
bend, are cut on stone at Woodside, along with those of his wife, Ursula, 
daughter of William Mure of Glanderston. 

The name is taken from Ralston in Renfrewshire, and is to be met 
with early in the thirteenth century. Thomas Raulfeston of the county 
of Lanark, swore fealty to Edward I. in 1296. Mr John of Railstone or 
Raulston was secretary to the King, and sat in Parliament 1445, was 
Bishop of Dunkeld 1447-51, and Lord High Treasurer. 

Hew of that Ilk, in 1551, acquired Woodside, co. Ayr, which became 
the residence of his descendants. Ralston was sold in 1704 by Gavin of 
that Ilk, grandfather of Gavin, last of the direct line. He sold Woodside 
in 1 77 1, became barrack-master at Piershill, married Annabella, daughter 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. 369 

and heir of James Pollock of Arthurlie, and died 1819, leaving two co- 
heiresses, who married Hugh Crawfurd of Kilblain and Colonel Studdert. 

A younger branch became seated at Warrickhill in Ayrshire 1790. 

The family, who were not of baronial rank, latterly assumed sup- 
porters, a man in armour and a horse. 

*Rankine. Pont gives — azure, across pat6e or between four mullets 
argent ; crest, a star issuing from a crescent or ; but the three boars' 
heads are the principal charges in the arms recorded by Walter of Orchard- 
head, CO. Stirling, and by Alexander, merchant in Perth, 1672-78. Also 
in 1679 for Henry, merchant in Rochelle, descended from the Rankens of 
Shiells, Ayrshire. 

There were small landed proprietors of the name in Ayrshire before 
the end of the fifteenth century. 

Mr Gabriel, portioner of Bothkennar, was father of Walter of Orchard- 
head, who married Sarah Little, and their son, succeeding his uncle 
William Little of Over Liberton, near Edinburgh, assumed the surname 
of his mother, and was ancestor of Walter James Little-Gilmour of 
Liberton, &c., who quarters Ranken. 

The Campbells of Skerrington also quarter Ranken by descent from 
Abigail, daughter and heir of William of Bankhead, in Ayrshire. A 
pedigree in Paterson's " History of Ayrshire " traces her and the Rankens 
of Whitehill from Peter of Sheill, living in 1508, but it is shown to be 
incorrect by an inquisitio de tutela, 1679, and the coat they quarter differs 
both in tinctures and charges from that of Henry in 1679, 

*Sharp. This is given by Pont and Porteus, and was registered by 
James, Archbishop of St Andrews, with the mullet sable ; motto — 
" Ferio sed sano." He was son of James, sheriff-clerk of Banffshire, and 
had two brothers, Robert, sheriff-clerk of Banffshire, who purchased the 
Castlehill and other lands at Banff, and Sir William of Stoniehill, Keeper of 
the Signet, cashkeeper to His Majesty, and tacksman of customs, both of 
whom d.s.p. Sir William registered the arms with a bordure gules as his 
mark of cadency ; crest — a pheon proper ; motto — '■'■ Progredere ne regredere." 

William of Scotscraig, co. Fife, and of Stoniehill, son of the primate, 
was knighted, and in 1683 created a baronet, with a grant of an augmen- 
tation to be borne in the first and fourth quarters — azure, on a saltire 
argent (the arms of the See of St Andrews), a bleeding heart transfixed l^y 
two swords in saltire, points downwards proper, the heart having over it 
a mitre of gold tasselled gules placed on the field, all within a bordure or 
charged with the Royal tressure ; crest — a celestial or martyr's crown or ; 
motto — " Pro mitra coronam." It is expressly mentioned that his father 
" was horridly murthered by certaine persons of hellish and bloody prin- 
ciples." 

Sir William died in January 171 2, leaving by his wife Margaret, 
daughter of Sir Charles Erskine, Lord Lyon, a son. Sir James, who sold 
Scotscraig and Stoniehill, and was designed of Strathtyrum ; he left a son, 
Sir James of Strathtyrum, third and last(?) baronet, who di^d without issue; 
and a daughter, Mary Lilias, who married, in 1739, James Lumsdaine of 
Rennyhill, co. Fife, and had issue. 

There are few early notices of this name ; 1433 Robert Sharp, 
notary public ; 1454 Alexander of Strathy, co. Perth ; 1535 William, pre- 
ceptor of Traileou. 

In Dumfries a family of merchant burgesses flourished in the seven- 



370 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

teenth century ; John sat in parliament for the burgh 1686, and John of 
Hoddam represented the county in the last Scottish parliament, and pro- 
tested against the Union. Arms were granted to Matthew of Hoddam 
1756 — argent, on a fess azure between two cross crosslets fitchde sable, 
and a dexter hand couped grasping a sword in pale proper three mullets of 
the first, a bordure engrailed of the second. His great-grandnephew and 
heir, 1769, Charles Kirkpatrick, assumed the surname of Sharp ; his last 
surviving son, William of Hoddam, d.s.p. in 1875, when the property 
passed to Sir Thomas Kirkpatrick, and the Rev. William Bedford, who 
sold it. 

The chief family of the name was founded by Mr John Shairp, 
advocate, who acquired Houstoun, co. Linlithgow, and Ballindoch and 
other lands in Forfarshire, was knighted, sat in parliament, was a com- 
missioner for the Union in 1604, and died soon after. He married twice, 
and had by the first marriage Mr John of Houstoun, and by the second 
Mr Alexander of Milton of Craigie, co. Forfar, who d.s.p., and Sir 
William of Ballindoch. Sir William had one son, John of Ballindoch, 
who d.s.p. 1628, and two daughters — Isabella, who married Robert 

Dunbar of Burgie, and , married Robert Bruce^ of the Earlshall 

family. 

Mr A. H. Dunbar has kindly sent me a drawing of a stone at Burgie, 
162 1, R. D. and I. S., with the three cushions of Dunbar impaled with 
the arms of Isobel Sharp, which are merely a dexter hand couped holding 
a dagger erect. 

In 1630 the laird of Houstoun and his nieces had a suit as to the 
succession under a mutual entail made by the former and his brother Sir 
William. 

Major William Shairp of Houstoun represented Linlithgowshire in 
parliament 1678, married Elizabeth Nicholson, and registered arms 
1672-78 — argent, on a fess azure between two cross crosslets fitchde sable, 
and a dexter hand couped grasping a sword in pale gules three mullets of 
the field ; crest — a steel cap with a plume of feathers proper ; motto — 
" Vivit post funera virtus. 

He had four sons, John of Houstoun, d.s.p. ; Thomas of Houstoun, 
M.P. for the county, 1 700-1 707, married Anne, daughter and coheir of 
John Scott of Harden, and had a daughter Janet; Lieut.-Colonel William 
of Kettleston, d.s.p. ; and Colonel William of Blance, in East Lothian, 
who married Janet, daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas Dalyell of 
Binns, baronet, and had a son, Thomas, who sue. to Houstoun as heir- 
male, and married his cousin Janet. Their eldest son Thomas of Hous- 
toun, was great-grandfather of the present Lieut.-Colonel Thomas Shairp 
of Houstoun ; their second son, Walter, consul-general in Russia, was 
father of Sir Stephen Shairp, also consul-general in Russia, one of 
whose daughters married Captain Marryat, R.N,, the novelist. 

Strade. Gules, in dexter chief a mullet, in sinister chief a cross 
patde, and in base a crescent, all argent. 

*Symyne. Probably the old form of the coat of Syme, given in 
Pont as gules, a chevron between two spur rowels in chief and a halbert 
in base or ; this was one of the sixteen quarters of the Stair family for a 
time, as the mother of Margaret Ross, Lady Stair, was Sarah, daughter 
of Alexander Syme, advocate, son of Mr Alexander Syme of Hollybush, 
advocate, commissary of Edinburgh. 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. 371 

The seal of Adam Sime, chaplain of St Ninians, Leith, 1545 — is two 
wolves' heads erased contourn^, in chief a mullet and in base a chalice ; 
William Sym, bailie of Edinburgh 1527, uses a chevron between three stars 
of six points and a Lochaber axe, 

*Spalding. This is also given with the addition of three crescents 
gules, and another entirely different coat, argent, on a cross azure five 
crescents or. The seal of John Spaildine, 1484, has a cross charged with 
a crescent ; that of David de Spalding, burgess of Dundee, 1445, is across 
charged with a cross crosslet fitch^e, or perhaps a sword as here repre- 
sented, but with the point downwards. In the Lyon Register, 1672-78, 
are Mr John Spalding, or, on a cross azure five cross crosslets of the 
field, and a little later Andrew of Ashintully, co. Perth, or, a two- 
handed sword paleways azure ; no crest and motto are entered, but those 
represented on an old flag in the possession of the present representative 
of this the chief family of the name, are a gateway proper, with the port- 
cullis half raised gules — " Mobile sermtium." These commemorate Peter 
de Spaldyng, burgess of Berwick-on-Tweed, who being on watch aided 
the Scotch to enter when the town was taken in 1318. He had a charter 
from Robert I., ist May 1319, in exchange for his possessions at Berwick, 
of the lands of Ballourthy and Pitmethy, with the keepership of the royal 
forest of Kylgerry, and is said to have been murdered near Menmuir. 
He certainly was not the first of the name in Scotland, for Mr John was 
rector of Ochiltree, co. Ayr, and was succeeded there by his brother Mr 
Symund de Spalding, who in 1296 swore fealty to Edward I. Mr John 
had got promotion in the diocese of Aberdeen, and seems to have brought 
some of his kinsfolk north with him as in 1398, William Spaldyng is 
mentioned in the burgh records of Aberdeen, and Mr Patrick was Dean 
of Aberdeen soon after. Richard was custumar of Dundee 1342-79, and 
bailie of the burgh. Thomas was provost, 1499. David sat in Parlia- 
ment for the burgh 1456, and William in 1543, and in 1584 William 
represented Forfar. Mr John was dean of Brechin 1456-84, and the 
King asked the see of Dunkeld from the Pope for him, " his counsellor, 
confessor, and master of his chapel." The Spaldings held lands in Fife 
and Forfarshire, but Spalding of Ashintully, co. Perth, was chief of the 
name, the first I have found with that designation being Andrew in 1581. 
In 1587 the Spaldings figure in an Act of Parliament among the " unruly 
clans," and in 1594 are characterised as "wicked thieves." In 1615 
David of Ashintully obtained a Crown charter erecting his lands into a 
barony and free forestry with a weekly market at his burgh of barony of 
Kirkhillock, the patronage of the church of Kirkmichael, &c. He was 
taken prisoner by Argyll, and kept at Dunstaffnage till a payment of 
4000 merks and his signature of the Covenant procured his release. On 
his death his cousin and successor William, who had also signed the 
Covenant, suffered from the other party, as Montrose burnt his house of 
Ashintully, and laid waste his lands. His son Andrew had the barony of 
Ashintully ratified to him 1677-81, and left, with other issue, David of 
Ashintully, who died in 1744. His son Daniel joined the rising the fol- 
lowing year, was excepted from the general act of pardon, and in 1766 
Ashintully was sold. His younger brother Patrick, then apprenticed to 
a jeweller in Edinburgh, was one of the persons wounded when Captain 
Porteous fired on the populace. He became a goldsmith in the Canon- 

5 B 



372 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

gate, married Joan Fulton, heiress of a merchant burgess of Edinburgh, 
and left a daughter Catherine. 

His uncle Andrew of Glenkilry left a son, George of Glenkilry, who 
became heir-male of the family, married Bethia, daughter and co-heir of 
Sir Thomas Nairne of Dunsinnane, baronet, and left a son, William of 
Glenkilry. This gentleman married his cousin Wilhelmina Nairne 
Mellis of Newhall, and was father of the late William Mellis Spalding, 
W.S., during whose minority Glenkilry was sold. He married Mary, 
daughter of William Gordon of Halmyre, co. Peebles, and left a son, who 
represents the family. 

In 1577 Captain David was empowered to raise men to serve in the 
Low Countries. Several brothers of the name of Spalding settled in 
Sweden, and in 1675 a birthbrief was issued in favour of Gabriel, son of 
George of Milhaugh and Helen, daughter of William Ogilvie of Keillor, 
grandson of George of Grange of Airlie, by Isabel, daughter of Walter 
Ogilvy of Clova, great-grandson of Spalding of that Ilk, chief of his 
very ancient and noble race by a daughter of Garden of Latoun. 

His brother John held an official position at Gothenburg, and was 
recognised as noble in 1678 under the name of Spaldencreutz. Branches 
of the family also bore the surnames of Adlersparre and Hjelmberg. 

In Prussia the Spaldings bear parted per fess sable and azure, in 
chief a cross couped argent and in base two crescents with human faces, 
the lower one supporting three daggers, two in saltire and one in pale 
points downwards or. 

The Spada in Italy carry swords. A branch of Spalding of Ashin- 
tully settled in Jamaica. 

*ScouGAL OF THAT Ilk. This is givcu by Porteus, with the motto 
- — " Constanter ;" but the arms registered, 1672-78, by David, writer, in 
Edinburgh, descended from the family of that Ilk, are — argent, two grey- 
hounds courant fessways, in chief a hunting-horn sable, stringed and 
garnished gules, all within a bordure of the third ; crest — ^a writing pen ; 
motto — " HcBC ornant." The family of Scougal of Leith and Edinburgh, 
who claim to represent the painter, bear this with a crescent for crest, and 
the motto — " Tandem implebiturr 

The lands of Scougal are in East Lothian, north of Dunbar, in the 
parish of Whitekirk, and gave a surname to their owners, who inter- 
married with Congalton of that Ilk, Wauchope of Niddrie, Herring of 
TuUiebole, &c. 

Patrick Scougal was a Knight of St John 1465 ; one of the charges 
made, in 1479, against the Duke of Albany was the cruel slaughter of 
John of Scougal ; John of that Ilk, 1587, is the last I have found in pos- 
session of the old family estate. 

The inscription on the monument erected at Aberdeen, by his son 
James, to Patrick, Bishop of Aberdeen, describes him as son of Sir John 
of that Ilk, which is a mistake, but it is not unlikely that he represented 
the family. 

John Scougal, writer in Edinburgh, was father of Alexander, who 
d.s.p., and Mr John, who acquired Whitekirk, adjoining Scougal ; his 
eldest son. Sir John of Whitekirk, first designed of Humbie, was a judge, 
and after the Restoration a Senator of the College of Justice, and d.s.p. 
in January 1672. 

Patrick, his younger brother and heir, after holding several livings. 



OF CHARLES I.'S REIGN. m 

was consecrated Bishop of Aberdeen in 1664, was Chancellor of the 
University, married Anne Congalton, and died 1682, leaving issue — 

1. Mr John, commissary of Aberdeen, had a son Patrick, who d.s.p., 
and a daughter Margaret of Whitekirk, Dreghorn, &c„ who married 
William Bennet, afterwards Sir William Bennet of Grubbet, co. Rox- 
burgh, baronet, s.p. 

2. Rev. Henry, Professor of Divinity in King's College, Aberdeen, 
author of " The Life of God in the Soul of Man," died unmarried 1678. 

3. Sir James, Professor of Civil Law in King's College, Rector of 
the University, Commissary of Aberdeen and afterwards of Edinburgh, 
bought Whitehill and Boddam, co. Aberdeen, Senator of the College of 
Justice, 1696, as Lord Whitehill, sat in parliament for Kintore 1693- 
1702, succeeded to Whitekirk on the death of his niece, d.s.p. in December 
1702. 

1. Katherine married — first, William Scroggie, Bishop of Argyle, 
and had issue ; she married, secondly, a gentleman of the name of Mac- 
kenzie, and on the death of her brother, Sir James, succeeded to his 
estates. 

2. Joanna, married Patrick Sibbald, D.D., Professor of Divinity in 
King's College. 

Captain Richard Scougal was mortally wounded at the siege of Mer- 
chiston Castle, in May 1572, and James was Lieutenant-Colonel of the 
Earl of Annandale's Regiment in the reign of Charles L 

John Scougal, elder, the portrait painter, is said to have been a 
relative of the bishop ; his son, the younger John Scougal, also a portrait 
painter, married a daughter of John Gordon of Seaton, co. Aberdeen, and 
died in 1730, aged eighty-five, leaving four daughters. 

*Smyth {bis). In " Notes and Queries" for 1873, will be found an 
account of the Heraldry of Smith in Scotland, by the late Francis Montagu 
Smith, Captain Royal Artillery, so exhaustive that there is only one coat 
to be added to it, that given in the Funeral Escutcheons of the Don family, 

for Smith, portioner of Dunse, father of Isabel Lady Don — 

azure, on a chevron or between three flames of fire proper, a mullet pierced 
of the field. 

The family from which Captain Smith descended possessed landed 
property at Inveresk from the fifteenth century; Thomas, portioner of 
Inveresk, J. P. 1656, married Isobel, sister and coheir of Colonel 
Archibald Strachan ; William, notary public, 1662, married Margaret, 
daughter and coheir of John Carse of Monktounhall, by his wife 
Christian, sister and coheir of Sir Thomas Kellie of Myreside ; James, of 
Whitehill in Inveresk, was Master of the King's work, married Janet, 
daughter of Robert Mylne of Balfarg, master mason to His Majesty, and 
registered arms — azure, three flames of fire or, on a chief argent, a thistle 
vert; crest — Minerva's head; motto — '' Non invitdr Rev. William of 
Cranston, married Jane, daughter and coheir of James Baird of Chester- 
hall. Captain Smith edited, in 1870, the Baird " Genealogical Collec- 
tions " of the last laird of Auchmedden. 

Sir John Smith of Grothill, Provost of Edinburgh, and its represen- 
tative in parliament, was an influential personage 1638-63 ; his arms are 
given in Funeral Escutcheons, and cut in stone on the house of Sir 
William Gray of Pittendrum, who married his sister Egidia — azure, a 
saltire couped between four flames of fire within a bordure argent. 



374 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

Or, a saltire azure between four crescents gules, is given by Pont, 
Porteus, and Stacie, and was borne by the family of Smith of Inver- 
ramsay, co. Aberdeen, with a martlet on the saltire. In 1697 John of 
Inverramsay testifies to the descent of George Smith, who had gone to 
Dantzick in 1687, and was probably his kinsman. 

Peter Smith, an officer in the Swedish army of Scottish birth, was 
ennobled in 1640 under the surname of Rosenschmit. A cat salient or 
sejant is borne by the families of Balharry, Camno, and Smithfield, pro- 
bably to indicate a claim to descent from a member of the Clan Chattan, 
but when John Smith, merchant in Gothenburg, whose ancestors resi- 
dent at Banchory in Aberdeenshire, " are said to be descended from the 
ancient family of Mackintosh of that Ilk," had a grant of arms in 1790, 
the cat is not permitted to appear. The coat is azure, three flames of fire 
or, a bordure argent charged with six chess rooks sable. 

In 1763 a singular grant was made to William Smith, Clerk of 
Chancery, said to be descended from the Smiths of Braco, parted per 
fess, in chief the arms of that family, and in base those given in Pont's 
M.S. This gentleman, who was son of Alexander Smith, surgeon, and 
grandson of Alexander Smith, merchant and dean of guild in Linlithgow, 
acquired the estate of Bonsyde, near Linlithgow. He married Anne, 
daughter and heir of Major William Drummond of Boreland, and some 
of his descendants assumed the surname of Drummond. James Smith 
of Bonsyde married Janet, daughter and coheir of the Honourable James 
Home of Ayton. Sarah Anne Drummond Smith was mother of the 
present Sir Charles Wyville Thomson of Bonsyde. 

In 1673 Patrick Smith of Braco, descended from Thomas Smith, 
apothecary to James III., registered arms — azure, a burning cup between 
two chess rooks or. He acquired Methven, now the seat of his descen- 
dant, the name being latterly altered to Smythe. 

Patrick of Braco, father of Patrick first of Methven, had property in 
Orkney, where he resided and married Catherine, daughter of George 
Graham of the Inchbrakie family. Bishop of Orkney. On the monument 
of two of their daughters, who died in 1662-66, the arms are a cup on a 
tall stand with three flames issuing from it, on the dexter side a charge 
more resembling a candlestick than a chess rook, and on the sinister an 
escallop (the Graham bearing) pendent from a ribbon issuing from the chief. 

The family of Smith alias Lindsay, hereditary smiths and armourers 
of the lordship of Brechin, bear or, an eagle displayed gules charged on 
the breast with a horse-shoe or. In 1802 John Smith of Craigend, co. 
Stirling, an estate acquired by an ancestor about the time of the Restor- 
ation, obtained a grant of arms — gules, a chevron ermine, between two 
crescents in chief and a garb in base or. Agnes Graham Smith, heiress 
of Craigend, married David, Earl of Buchan. 

Robert Smyth, son of Robert, clerk of the burgh of Pittenweem, was 
appointed clerk of the Lyon Court in 1663, purchased Giblistoun in 
Fife, and died in 1707, leaving issue. He had a grant in 1672 of the 
arms with the saltire given from G. ; crest — a writing pen and an ear 
of wheat in saltire proper ; motto — " His Deus ditat." He was after- 
wards allowed to drop the two crescents, to use as crest a crescent, with 
the motto, " Cum plena magis.'" The last of his descendants left the 
estate to Robert Gillespie, no relative, who assumed the surname of 
Smyth. 



OF CHARLES US REIGN, 375 

*Spott. Porteus gives for Spot or Sprot, parted per bend dan- 
cett6 argent and sable two annulets counterchanged. 

In 1296 Eliz de Spott of the county of Edinburgh, and Hugh, son 
of Moyses de Spott of Berwickshire did homage to Edward I. Elias 
was falconer to Patrick, Earl of Dunbar. William was at the same time 
vicar of Tyningham. In 1396 Duncan, a merchant in Edinburgh, had 
an English safe-conduct. Adam, James, and John of Spot occur early 
in the fourteenth century as landowners in Tweeddale. Ninian of Spot, 
canon of Dunkeld, was comptroller, and sat in Parliament 1458. 

In 1 40 1 Adam was dean of guild of Edinburgh, where a tenement 
had been granted by Robert III. to Laurence Spott. 

Stenhop. Or, a stag's head erased sable, agyron gules issuing from 
the dexter, and on a chief azure three mullets argent ; another coat-argent, 
a stag's head erased azure on a chief dancettd embattled gules three 
mullets of the first. 

*Symmer of Balzordie, CO. Forfar. Porteus blazons the coat, 
argent, an oak-tree in bend sinister vert, or proper, surmounted of a bend 
charged with three crosses humett6 or. Pont makes the bend gules. 
This family possessed Balzordie in 1450. George represented the county 
in Parliament 1649 ; Colin, the last laird, was dead in 1737, being suc- 
ceeded by his sister Magdalene, wife of David Doig of Cookston. 

In 1362 David II. granted to William Somyr for life an annual rent 
of forty shillings. Nisbet engraves the arms of John Symmer, accountant 
to the Equivalent Office, with a bordure gules for difference ; crest — a 
stag couchant ; motto—" Tandem Tranquillus." He left issue. 

*Sprottie. Sir James Balfour gives the same. Hugh Sprot, bur- 
gess of Urr, witnessed a charter of Eustace Baliol in the reign of Alex- 
ander III. 

ScROGGiE. See W. Azure, a chevron between two branches in chief 
and a crescent in base argent ; in middle chief a mullet or. 

ScRiMGER, of old called Carron, gules, three sickles argent handles 
or fessways in pale, the handles to the sinister, in base two curved 
blades (?) in saltire of the third, perhaps intended for a fer-de-mouline. 

*Smetone. Or, two martlets in chief and a lion's head erased in 
base gules. Balfour and Pont give or, a lion's head erased gules between 
three papingoes vert. 

In 1296 Henry de Smytheton, of the county of Edinburgh swore 
fealty to Edward I. 

He belonged to a family taking their surname from the lands of 
Smytheton or Smythetun, now Smeaton, near Musselburgh. Gilbert de 
Smythetun left a son, Nicholas, and a daughter and heir, Emma, who, in 
1253, was a widow. She married William de Smytheton, probably the 
William to whom his brother Gilbert granted a charter of the lands of 
Witker ; they were sons of Robert de Smytheton. Henry, 1296. Henry 
was on an assize at Musselburgh in 1359. 

Mr Thomas a Jesuit priest, and- a man of learning, became a Protes- 
tant, was Principal of the University of Glasgow 1580, and died in 1583.- 

One of the name was hanged in 1593 for breaking ward out of Edin- 
burgh Castle along with Mr George Ker. In the seventeenth century 
Smeatons were landowners in Perthshire. 

SwiNTON. Sable, a chevron or between three boars' heads erased 

argent. 

5c 



376 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

Stevenson. Argent, a chevron gules between three cocks' heads 
erased sable ; another coat, argent, on a chevron azure between three cocks' 
heads erased gules a fleur-de-lis or. 

Smert. Or, a fleur-de-lis sable between three boars' heads erased 
azure. Balfour gives argent, a chevron between three pheons sable. In 
1362 John Smert of Haddington, merchant, obtained a safe conduct to 
visit England. In 1422 Henry Smert was prisoner of Galfrid Lowther 
in England, and was allowed to visit Scotland to arrange for payment of 
ransom. 

In Edinburgh there was a burgess family in the seventeenth century; 
Alexander Smart of Wester, co. Caithness, had one son, Alexander, who 
d. s. p. before 1697, and a daughter, Janet, wife of Alexander Stewart, 
writer in Edinburgh, who had one daughter, Christina, heir of her uncle. 

*Sands. This resembles one of the coats of Sandys in England, a 
fess dancett6e or indented between three cross crosslets fitchde. 

The other English coat, argent, a cross raguly sable, is given by 
Porteus, the cross, however, being described as regrailed or trunked. 
Stacie has argent a cross raguly sable for " Sands, English, the same for 
Scotsmen ; " and gives another " Sands, az, an hand fesswayes holding 
a winge volant in paile argt. for Scottmen ; an ould armes 1617 ; " as he 
also gives the coat with the fess and crosslets as English, it would appear 
that he was anxious to make it clear which of the different coats were 
Scotch. 

The family took their surname from the lands of Sands, near Culross, 
which, in 1494, were in the possession of Thomas Sands and his mother, 
Isobel Hudson. In 1638 John Sands was served heir of his father, John 
of that Ilk, in half of Sands and Kelliewood. 

Several branches of the family were resident in the neighbourhood, 
as the Sands of Langside, which was in the possession of John early in the 
seventeenth century. William Sands of Langside, W.S., d. s. p. in 1783, 
leaving two sisters, Agnes and Catherine, who married James Harrower 
of Inzievar. 

William Sands of Birkenhead, which had belonged to his ancestors 
for several generations, died in 1675, and was succeeded by his sisters. 
Mr Patrick Sands was a regent in the University of Edinburgh 1589, and 
Principal 1620. He married Margaret Aikenhead, sister of David, Pro- 
vost of Edinburgh, without issue. 

*Vernour. Another coat — azure, a fess argent between three boars' 
heads couped or. Porteus and Pont make the boars' heads sable and the 
latter says couped. 

In 1 291 Thomas le Venour, burgess of Berwick, swore fealty to 
Edward I. In 1450, William Vernour, and other merchants, obtained 
an English safe-conduct; 1478, William claimed lands in Edinburgh, as 
heir of his brother John Vernour. 

In the sixteenth century, Auchindinny, near Edinburgh, was the 
property of the Vernours ; William was bailie of Edinburgh 1456 ; a 
family held lands in Inveresk of the Abbots and Lords of Dunfermline. 

The Verners, baronets of Ireland, claim descent from this stock. 

Umfrestoune. W. — argent, three trefoils slipped, one and two, on 
a chief gules three wolves' (?) heads erased or. 

Vans of Menie. Gules, on a bend between two cinquefoils argent, 
three mullets of the field. 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. iTj 

'Winchester. The seal of Thomas, appended to his deed of 
homage to Edward I., bears a Hon rampant. 

Thomas, Thomas tenant of the King in the county of Ayr, and Henry 
and John de Wincestre of the county of Lanark, all did homage 1296. 

The curious seals of David Vynchester, bailie of St Andrews 1524, 
and of George, also connected with that city, give — a griffin as a supporter 
on the sinister side of a shield, a tree fructed growing from the base, on 
either side of it a bird pecking at the fruit, over all a chevron charged with 
three mullets. 

John Winchester was Bishop of Moray 1437-60. 

The blazon of the arms registered, 1672-78, by Captain Peter 
Winchester is — argent, a vine tree growing out of the base leaved and 
fructed between two papingoes endorsed, feeding upon the clusters 
proper ; crest — a hand holding a cluster of grapes ; motto — " Hoc ardua 
vincere docet." 

To the St Andrews family, probably, belonged Ann Winchester, 
one of Queen Anne's household, who in 1593 married John, eldest son of 
Andrew Wemyss of Myrecairnie, Senator of the College of Justice, on 
which occasion the lands of his family, in the county of Fife, were erected 
into a free barony. 

Alexander, owner of lands near St Andrews, was father of Alexander 
of Kinglassie and Polduff, whose son. Captain James of Kinglassie and 
Polduff, died about 1648, leaving two daughters, and the estates were 
sold. 

In the north, 1569 Peter of Ardtrailzie; 1555 Tyberius, chaplain in 
the diocese of Moray ; Florence, minister and vicar of Aberchirder, 
1567-95; Alexander, bailie of Banff, 1646-59; a Roman Catholic bishop 
who resided in the house of the Duke of Gordon, in the end of the seven- 
teenth century ; Ensign James Winchester was with his Grace when he 
held out in Edinburgh Castle 1689 ; Mr James, from Morayshire, 
minister of Jedburgh, married Mary Dunbar, heiress of the Dunphail 
family, who died in 1750, leaving issue. 

Williamson. Argent, a saltire between two mullets in flank sable, 
and two boars' heads erased in chief and base gules. 

*VoLUM. Seal of Alexander Wolleme, 1525, two bars dancettde. 

John de Velham was on an assize at Brechin 1364 ; Robert II., in the 
fourth year of his reign, grants lands in Alyth, resigned by John de 
Welhame, to Sir James Lindsay; George Wellem of Woodwrae, co. 
Forfar, 1454; David of Woodwrae 1488, Alexander of Woodwrae 1514-19. 
Woodwrae passed into the hands of the Lindsay family, but persons of the 
name of Vollum were resident in the district long after. 

Walker. Azure, on a fess or two crescents gules, in chief the sun 
in his splendour, and in base a bird azure emerging from water. 

Another coat — paly of six or and gules, on a chief azure a crescent of 
the first between two mullets argent. 

Irvine of Drum. Lindsay, Balfour, Porteus, &c., all give argent, 
three holly leaves vert Here there are three small bundles of holly, each 
consisting of as many leaves slipped vert banded gules ; so registered, 
1672-78, with crest— a bundle of nine holly leaves ; motto—" Sub sole sub 
umbra virens ;'" and two savages wreathed about the head and middle 
with holly, each holding a baton in his hand all proper, as supporters. 

The seal of Alexander Irvine of Belties, 1483, is described by Mr 



378 GENTLEMEN'S ARMS 

Laing as, two cross crosslets fitchde, surmounted of a fess between three 
bunches of holly leaves. 

Porteus gives for Drum " aliter of Bonshaw," and Stacie gives for 
Bonshaw — argent, three holly leaves proper or vert, with three or five 
drops of blood at each of them ; the coat recorded, 1672-78, by William 
of Bonshaw is— argent, three holly leaves proper. In the Lyon Register 
the numerous matriculations of cadets all carry out this distinction, those 
descended from Bonshaw having three leaves, and those from Drum three 
bunches of leaves. 

The surname is probably taken from the locality ; Robert de 
Hirewine witnessed a charter of Alexander II. in 1226, and one of 
Gameline, Bishop of St Andrews, is witnessed by Robert de Iruwyn 
about 1260. Reginald de Irewin was Archdeacon of Teviotdale 1242. 

Robert I., in 1323, granted to William de Irwin part of the Royal 
forest of Drum in free forestry, and the following year granted him a 
second charter of the same lands as a free barony. In 1388, Alexander of 
Irwyne, lord of the Droum, purchased the park of Drum from John 
Moigne. The family suffered heavily during the civil war, and in 1684, 
as a recompense, the tenure of the lands they held ward, was changed from 
simple ward to taxed ward. 

William of Irwyn was clerk of the register 1329, and about the same 
time Roger of Irwyn was clerk of the King's wardrobe. Thomas de 
Irvine was on committees of parliament 1368-69. Alexander of Drum 
sat in the general council 1441, and the heads of the family were very 
frequently afterwards in parliament. John Irvine sat as depute-marischal 
in 1584. 

The male line of Bonshaw has remained unbroken, and the present 
Alexander Forbes-Irvine of Drum is understood to be the heir-male of 
the Aberdeenshire line, although the estates, under an entail executed 
in 1687 by Alexander of Drum, passed for a time to younger branches, 
to the exclusion of the Irvines of Saphock. 

Alexander, the last of this line, married Barbara Dundas of that Ilk, 
and had Margaret, who " died young at the scools in Ed"", and lyes in 
Dundass's Isle." At the funeral (? in 1742) of this young lady, her eight 
quarters were duly represented, and the undifferenced coat in a lozenge 
with the supporters was allowed as her own arms, her father being " heir- 
meal of Irvine of Drum." Her sister Mary inherited Saphock, married, 
in 1744, Sir Alexander Ramsay, baronet, of Balmain, and d. s. p. Her 
husband assumed the surname of Irvine in addition to and after Ramsay. 
From the Irvings of Saba in Orkney, seated there from 1440, descended 
Washington Irving. George Irving, designed of Tullich, went to 
Sweden as a military officer, and was recognised as noble in 1647. His 
son Alexander of Irvingsholm rose to high rank in the army, and married 
Agnes Patkull, maid of honour to Queen Christina. 

*Wellwood. Arms registered by Henry Welwood of Garvock, co. 
Fife, who died in 1758, argent, an oak-tree acorned growing out of a well 
in base proper ; crest — the trunk of an oak sprouting out branches proper ; 
motto — "■ Reviresco." In 1769 two eagles as supporters were granted to 
Robert of Garvock, advocate. 

In 1437 Willyhame of Walwod was one of the judges compositors 
of a dispute as to boundaries between the Abbot of Dunfermline and 
David Halkett of Lumfennan and Pitfirrane. 



OF CHARLES US REIGN. 379 

1490, Alan of Walwode, bailie of Dunfermline. John Wallud was 
on an assize there, c. 1494. 

In 1576 Mr William was Professor of Civil Law at St Andrews, and 
in 1578 Thomas represented the city in parliament. 

Part of Touch, near Dunfermline, was in the possession of John 
Wellwood 1566. Garvock was acquired in 1704 by Robert of Touch, and 
his son Henry bought Pitliver in 1736. 

The male line became extinct on the death of Andrew Moffat Well- 
wood of Garvock and Pitliver in 1847. Mr Clarke-Preston of Valley- 
field is heir of line, but the estates have passed under an entail to the 
family of Maconochie. 

WiLKiE. Sable, a fess tortillde or and azure between three crescents 
argent. 

*WoRDiE. The blazon of this rather remarkable coat as registered 
1672-78 by John of Torbrecks, co. Stirling, is argent, a hand issuing from 
the dexter side of the shield grasping a garland ensigned with an imperial 
crown all proper, on a chief gules two thistles argent; motto — ''Nil 
indigney 

Torbrecks was in the possession of this family for several genera- 
tions. Dene Thomas Wordye, in 1557, was a monk of Cambuskenneth, 
and William Wordye was the same year procurator for the commendator, 
David, Bishop of Ross. 

*ZowLLE. Arms were registered 1 676 by William Yule of Leyhouses, 
CO. Haddington, argent, on a fess sable between two crescents in chief and 
a saltire couped in base gules a garb or ; and the same year by John Yule 
of Darleith, co. Dumbarton, argent, on a fess between three crescents 
sable a garb or banded gules. Darleith was acquired in 1670 by John, 
son of Thomas Zuill, and remains the property of his descendant. 

John sat in parliament for Inveraray 1661. 

The family to which Sir George Udny Yule, K.C.S.I. belongs claims 
descent from a younger brother of Leyhouses, and in 1824 Colonel Udny 
Yule, C.B., registered the coat of that family with the addition of two 
water-bougets or on the fess, to indicate maternal descent from Rose of 
Kilravock. 

In 1825 Captain Patrick Yule, Royal Engineers, claimed to be 
chief of the name, as representative of the Leyhouses family. 

157 1 — John Yule of Garmiltoune ; the name occurs in East Lothian 
in the fifteenth century. 



5D 



\ 



XIII. 



FUNERAL ESCUTCHEONS. 



i 



I 



BoE OF Stain. John of Staine, near Biggar, left two coheirs, Agnes 
of Staine, married John Dickson, and was mother of John Dickson of 
Hartree, Senator of the College of Justice 1649 ; and Janet, who married, 
in 1619, Patrick Tweedie of Oliver, and had issue. The name of Bo, 
Boe, Bowie, or Bullo, is an old one in Tweeddale. Part of Bonnington. 
near Peebles, was held by the Bullos of Bonnington-Bullo, during nearly 
the whole of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 

Ellies of Elliestoun. See W. 

Scott of Harden. Seal of William of Harden, 1540 — abend charged 
with a crescent between two mullets ; of Walter of Sinton, 1550 — a bend 
charged with a mullet in the upper part, and two crescents in the lower. 
The coat reproduced is that registered, 1672-78, by Sir William of 
Harden, with a stag trippant for crest, and the motto — " Pacem amo^ 

Mr George of Boonraw, representer of the old family of Sintoune, 
at the same time recorded — or, two mullets in chief and a crescent in 
base azure ; crest — a nymph, in her dexter hand the sun, and in her 
sinister the moon, all proper ; motto — " Repay abit cornua Phcebe!' On 
27th November 1700, Archibald of Boonraw executed a renunciation and 
conveyance of his right to these bearings in favour of Sir William Scott 
of Harden, who then matriculated the coat, and was allowed supporters 
— two mermaids, each holding in her exterior hand a mirror all proper, 
" as having right and title to represent the said ancient family of Syntoune 
in manner above sett downe." 

Archibald is said to have died unmarried in 1720, but the Scotts of 
Whitslaid claimed to be next heirs-male of Sinton ; they became extinct 
in 1757. 

Thomas of Whitslaid and Thomas of Todrick, both registered arms, 
1672-78 — or, on a bend azure a star between two crescents of the field, 
and in chief a broken lance gules, with a difference for Todrick as a cadet. 

Gladstains of Whitelaw, who was descended in the female line from 
the Scotts of Synton, says in his MS. genealogy, that the arms were 
represented at Whitslaid with two mermaids as supporters. 

The coat of Todrick, as cut in wood on their pew in the church of 
Ashkirk, with the date 1622, had a buck's head in base and no lance; 
this was a younger branch of Harden, and its representative, William, 
M.D., of Stokoe, in Northumberland, in 1783, published a pedigree of 
his family, in which he claimed to be senior to Harden ; this was 
reprinted in 1852 by his grandson, William Robson Scott, M.D., of St 
Leonards', Exeter. 

Craw of Gunsgreen. In Berwickshire there were also Craws of 
Swinewood, Reston, Netherbyres, Haughhead, &c. 

George, of Easter Reston, registered arms, 1672-7&; his family were 
seated there in the beginning of the sixteenth century ; George, having 
taken part in the rising of 17 15, his forfeited estate was sold. 

Alexander Craw sold Haughhead before 1755;, the Netherbyres family 
retained their estate till the present century. 

Janet, daughter of James Craw, a merchant burgess of Edinburgh, 

5E 



384 FUNERAL ESCUTCHEONS. 

having married Sir Andrew Ramsay of Abbotshall, Provost of Edinburgh, 
and Senator of the College of Justice, is allowed eight quarters in her 
funeral entry as a descendant of Gunsgreen. 

Nisbet calls Craw of Auchincraw, chief of the name, and says they 
bore these arms with the chevron plain ; that family was Auchincraw or 
Adincraw of that Ilk, and the Craws were formerly as often called Auch- 
incraw. In 1489 John Stephen Craw had a respite, for holding Dumbar- 
ton Castle against the King. 

Skene of Curriehill. 

LUNDIE OF THAT IlK. 

Marshall. See G. The coat here reproduced is from the Funeral 
Escutcheon, with sixteen quarters, sanctioned by Sir Alexander Erskine, 
Lyon, for Andrew Marshall, 1695, who was born 1643, son of John of 
Clothoderick, in the parish of Kilbarchan, and Helen Napier his wife, of 
the Kilmahew family Crest — a trefoil slipped proper ; motto — " Semper 
virescit virtus." These arms are registered, 1672-78, for him under the 
designation of merchant in Queensbrugh.