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Full text of "Scrimshaw : [yearbook]"

SCRIMSHAW 



1974 -1978 



^"ir 




SCRIMSHAW 



1974 -1978 



£s'_;^ ^^m 



Southeastern Massachusetts University^ North Dartmouth^ Massachusetts 





The campus complex of SMU was 
designed by architect Paul Rudolph in 
the early 1960's for the firm of Desmond 
and Lord, Inc. The muscular structure of 
the campus was conceived as a master 
plan for an expansion of ordered 
growth over the years to come. At 
present, the campus consists of six main 
building complexes — massive, 
projecting concrete forms of which the 
Science Technology Building (including 
the university library and lecture halls) 
constitutes the largest unit. The Liberal 
Arts Building, Student Union and 




Auditorium, Administration Building, 
and the recently completed Visual and 
Performing Arts Building comprise the 
remainder of the core of SMU. 

Outlying buildings include athletic 
and dormitory facilities, and other 
outstanding features of visual impact 
are the campanile and the outdoor 
amphitheatre. Indeed, to those who see 
it for the first time, SMU seems to arise 
from virtually nowhere, appearing 
dramatically as a series of immense 
modern sculptures, or as a great "space 
station." 






The Yearbook Staff 

Trisha Hanlon 

Co-editor in Chief 
Steve Panicci 

Co-editor in Chief 
Audrey Witt 
Chris Hebert 
Bryon Kass 
Paul Sorii 



Special Thanks to 

Arnie Lohmann 

Joe Geoffroy of Dodge-Murphy Studios 

Bernice Goldstein 

Sharon Manchester 

Carol Ginsberg 

The Commencement Committee 

The Student Life Office 

Ted Mead 

Elaine Fisher 

Christine Hanlon 

Howard Glasser 

Henry Beckwith 

Nina Ponte 



BillGathright 

The Student Activities Office 

The A.V. Department 

Reggie Dosset 

Chukwemeka Onyenekporoh 

The Torch 

Mike Krigman 

Greg Garber 

all contributing photographers 

Cathy Sullivan 

The Custodians 

all contributing writers 

JoeSpooner 

and to the Class Council of 1978 

Joanne Kuliga 
Louis Berard 
Frank Penacho 
Alan Wolfe 
Mark T. Partridge 
Paul SorIi 



All the President's People 



14 



What We Do Best 



18 



40 



Clubs and Organizations 
Breakfast of Champions 



66 



Events 



106 



Moments Preserved 



128 



The Last Hurrah 



138 



Seniors 



192 



'The rest is silence' 






All the President's People 






President Donald E. Walker 

If past studies are correct, most of you 
will soon forget most of the details of 
what you have just learned. Unless you 
follow a specific subject professionally, 
you will probably forget, for example, 
the relationship between current, 
resistance and electrical potential. 
Historical dates and names will give way 
to a more general memory of basic 
trends, you will confuse one 
philosopher with another, formulas for 
balancing budgets will drift beyond 
your reach, and authors and their works 
will slowly melt together in a vague 
tapestry. 

I would not blame you if you then 
ask, "What was it all for? What have I 
accomplished during the past four 
years?" The answer, as Dr. Howard R. 



Bowen points out in his new book, 
"Investment in Learning: The Individual 
and Social Value of American Higher 
Education," lies in the "residues." 

Dr. Bowen defines these residues as 
"the general knowledge and 
perspectives that enable students to 
participate in the general culture — for 
example, to read significant literature, 
to understand and appreciate the arts, 
to converse with educated people 
about matters of importance, to 
comprehend the news in historical, 
geographic, and social perspectives, to 
have some basic understanding of 
science and technology, and to be at 
home with religious and philosophical 
issues." 

Such "residues" are what make it 



possible for college students to better 
cope with an ever-changing world. This 
is why, as recent studies have shown, 
college graduates are less likely to be 
unemployed, less likely to have nervous 
breakdowns, more likely to enjoy their 
work, spend more time with their 
children, and generally live up to their 
full potential as human beings. 

This, of course, is not to say the 
process of education is completed. 
Quite the contrary. I hope that what this 
university has done for you is to help 
you better understand the process of 
learning so that you may continue to 
grow throughout your lifetime in all 
those diverse ways which make 
existence meaningful and satisfying. 




10 



Celestino D. Macedo 
Dean of Students 

Now that your undergraduate career 
has concluded, I would like to reflect 
with you on your education and its 
implications. At Commencement the 
President welcomed you into the 
society of educated men and women, 
with all of its benefits and 
responsibilities. What exactly are these 
benefits and responsibilities pertaining 
to the educated society of which you 
are a member? Your preparation for 
entrance into this society took at least 
four years and a substantial amount of 
money. You have studied professional 
disciplines or liberal arts, or both, and 
have been judged and certified by f he 



Faculty and Trustees of this University 
to possess knowledge of the basic 
principles of these areas of study. 

Before long, most of the specific 
knowledge gained from your individual 
courses will be outmoded or forgotten, 
the former due to the accelerated rate 
of progress, and the other due to normal 
physical limitations. What, th.en, have 
you gained by your collegiate 
experience? I know that some of you 
will facetiously say that the society of 
educated men and women is composed 
of individuals who memorize material 
soon to be outdated, and then forget 
what they have memorized. May I 
suggest to you, however, that what you 
have gained from your days of 
scholarship is the increased ability to 
analyze a wide range of factors, to 
synthesize a plan of action based on 
critical analysis and to act in accordance 
with that plan. 

The major benefit for you as a 
member of the educated society, then, 
is your ability for self-direction, based 
on critical analysis and synthesization. 
As you set forth from academia, you 
possess a force which knows no 
bounds. This force of self-direction 
applies to all aspects of your life — 
personal, social and occupational. 

In your personal life, self-direction is 
rooted in knowing yourself as a person. 
With this knowledge of self, you can 
seek and accept truth and be 
accountable for your own actions. Self- 
direction is not merely for your personal 
life, but for society as well. Use it to 
foster justice, peace and charity. Your 
career choices are expanded, and 
advancement enhanced, by your self- 
direction. With self-direction you are 



not limited to a career in your major. 
You can be what you want to be, 
providing you know your goals and are 
willing to persevere toward those ends. 

With self-direction comes the major 
responsibility to continuously develop 
and utilize it. On a formal basis, further 
development will take the form of 
graduate school, or at least further 
course work. For most, however, 
development will be accomplished on 
their own initiative, such as reading, 
conferences and the media. 

Finally, I would suggest to you that to 
believe that this vital intellectual force 
— self-direction — is ever fully 
developed, is to deny oneself the 
challenge and excitement of 
exploration. Of equal concern is the 
individual who does not utilize his or 
her self-direction and requisite skills to 
improve himself or herself and society; 
they represent a most tragic waste of 
talent, promise and human energy. On 
the other hand, if our society does not 
promise opportunity for the utilization 
of the skills you have gained here, then 
we will all be immeasurably affected. 

Basically, I am an optimist and I 
believe that society awaits you with 
great anticipation. They anticipate the 
force within you. The responsibility is 
yours as to how you will develop and 
utilize this force and its requisite skills. 
You not only have my best wishes for 
your success, but I do hope that you 
experience with me the exciting 
anticipation of the contribution that 
you will make. 




Kevin O'Neill, Student Trustee 

Education today is not what it used to 
be. Higher education is not above 
attack by a large segment of 
contemporary society which 
increasingly emphasizes the technical 
or vocational training of its citizenry. 
Public universities in the future will rely 
more than ever before on the support of 
the educated for their survival. 

Traditionally, students have had little 
involvement in the development and 
operations of the university other than 
the routine classroom experience. This 
is clearly not the case today. 

Students are actively involved on all 
levels of the decision-making process 



and increase their influence yearly. 
During our four years at SMU we 
managed to affect policy on the state 
and university level to an 
unprecedented degree. Various sorties 
to the steps of the State House enable 
us to open the eyes of legislators to the 
neglected needs of SMU. Our repeated 
forays into Board of Trustees meetings, 
Administrative offices and assorted 
enclaves of Deans, faculty, and staff 
succeeded in shaping the direction of 
the University on both personal and 
policy related matters. 

The Campus Center takeover, the 
Keep SMU Independent campaign, 
increased Library funding, Spring 
Weekend, the Bob Dylan concert, and 
countless other activities all happened 
because we did. In one way or another, 
we directed the course of SMU for four 
years. We can continue to do so long 
after graduation. 

SMU is a young institution and needs 
our help to reach its full potential. 
Legislators still need to be lobbied for 
adequate financial support. The 
technical needs of society still need to 
be balanced with its liberal 
underpinnings. Both young and old still 
need to be assured of quality education 
on all levels to become better people 
and therefore better citizens. 

Our efforts in the past have allowed 
SMU to defend successfully its ground 
in shaping a progressive regional model 
of quality higher education. Its future 
will depend largely on your continued 
support. The education that you needed 
is the education that will need you. 
Don't let graduation take the "you" out 
of SMU. 



Tiny Fernandez 

Student Government President 

Upon graduation, many of us will 
secure lucrative positions in 
employment while others will begin 
post-graduate studies. Still yet, some of 
us might be confronted with large 
unemployment lines. The crucial 
question that must be considered is, 
how many of us will return to our 
communities to aid those not as skilled 
and as educated as we are? 

We live in a highly technological 
society where our government officials 
pay lip service to the cause of "Human 
Rights." While in our own country, 
thousands know the realities of poverty 



and discrimination. The young, the old, 
the poor, and minorities are thought to 
be a burden instead of a responsibility, 
and are consistently exploited. 

We have been advantageous enough 
to attain many skills that can be utilized 
in the quest for human rights for all the 
citizens of this nation. Unfortunately, 
many of us will use these skills only for 
our personal advancement. 

We are the leaders of the next 
generation and hopefully we have been 
taught to be better persons and not just 
better talkers like some of our 
predecessors. (Remember the educated 




Watergaters?) 

I strongly urge the class of 1978 to 
break this trend of personal gratification 
and.the exploitation that affects all of us 
but consistently oppresses the people 
of this nation. Go back to your 
communities and get involved in the 
struggle. I would contend that if we 
don't work consistently for change, this 
nation is going to erupt and there may 
be nothing to change. 

I wish all of you the best of luck and 
much success in the struggle to free the 
masses. 



12 



Joanne Morrison Kuliga 
President, Class of 1978 

SMU, like all universities, is a multi- 
faceted institution, providing each of us 
with a variety of opportunities for 
learning and growth. SMU, however, is 
special for two reasons, aside from its 
unique architecture. First, it is a very 
young university, still reaching out in its 
growth to serve the community in 
which it lies. SMU is vital to the 
Southeastern Massachusetts community 
because for so many it holds out the 



only affordable opportunity for higher 
learning. That is why there is such 
strong sentiment to keep this university 
autonomous, despite legislative 
attempts at statewide reorganizational 
plans. 

SMU is unique also in its democratic 
approach to policy-making at all levels. I 
know of no other university where 
students play such an important role in 
shaping the pattern of growth, from 
academic issues like grade appeal and 
curriculum, to social issues like health 
services and child care. The 
participative atmosphere here has 
fostered some of the most responsible 
student leadership of any university 
anywhere. 




And I am proud to attest that some of 
our finest student leaders are members 
of the Class of 1978. Since our freshman 
year there have been emerging from our 
ranks so many bright, enthusiastic, 
hard-working people with such 
enormous potential, I feel proud to be a 
member of this graduating class. 

In the way of final parting remarks, I 
just want to say: SMU — You're special! 
Class of 78 — You're great! 




What We Do Best 





15 




,._- -SMS* 






17 






Clubs and Organizations 




Mass PIRG 

Mass PIRG is a student directed and 
supported consumer/environmental 
group working to effect social change 
in Massachusetts. However, few 
students fully comprehend the key role 
they play in the organization. There are 
significant opportunities for 
participation in organizational policy 
making, in local board projects, and in 
statewide activities. Several new 
programs were developed this spring to 
provide students more comprehensive 
experience in all these areas. 



Organizational opportunities focus on a 
series of regional meetings designed to 
provide students throughout the state 
with a forum to exchange and debate 
opinions and ideas. Local board 
projects serve to integrate on-campus 
activities with community service 
projects. Ideas for projects this spring 
included asbestos health hazard 
investigations, water conservation, 
nutrition awareness programs, student 
discounts, TELCAG, bottle bill, and 
Mass. sales tax on meals. The major 
statewide effort was the TELCAG 
campaign, which entered the second 
phase of the initiative petition process. 
A legislative lobbying network on 
college campuses across the state was 
set up for the purpose of creating a 
telephone tree capable of mobilizing 
hundreds of phone calls or letters to 
legislators at critical moments of the 
campaign. Grass roots lobbying 
activities include organizing media 
events, sponsoring voter registration 
drives on campus, coordinating 
community meetings with state 
representatives, and outreach to 
community groups for endorsements. 

Other PIRG sponsored legislation for 
the 1978 session includes the nuclear 
waste transport controls, energy 
conservation, solar promotion, and 
student rights. Mass PIRG at SMU has 
been a very effective chapter. It 
provides contract learning possibilities 
for those students wishing to get 
involved. Mass PIRG's first year at SMU 
has been a year of growth, both for the 
organization and for the many seniors 
that had the opportunity to work with 
PIRG. 



19 



Torch 
GregGarber, Editor 

The 1977-78 Torch staff has been 
concerned about the familiar statement, 
"If a newspaper is informative and 
accurate, it's not entertaining and if it's 
entertaining, it's not informative and 
accurate." Not willing to believe or be 
influenced by this cliche, the Torch staff 
attempts to put out a weekly newspaper 
that is informative, accurate, and 
entertaining. Divided into three 
sections — news, sports, and lifestyles 
— the Torch has something for every 
student on campus, whether it is 
information concerning a new 
university policy, a movie review, or the 







X - 




scores to Corsair athletic events. 

In the past, the Torch has been 
plagued by typographical errors and 
poor design, but giant steps have been 
made in the direction of 
professionalism with the employment 
of a proof-reading team and the 
creation of a new look. The staff does 
not feel a college newspaper necessarily 
has to look and read like a "college 
newspaper." 

It is the goal of the Torch staff to 
produce a thoroughly readable, 
enjoyable newspaper — free from errors 
and completely accurate. As a major 
part of the campus media, the Torch 
recognizes its commitment to the 
students of Southeastern Massachusetts 
University and is dedicated to that 
commitment. 



The Women's Center 



The Women's Center exists to meet the 
individual needs of S.M.U. students. 
The staff counsels and disseminates 
information on birth control, 
pregnancy, gynecological problems, 
VD, etc., and informs people of other 
availal:)le resources in the area. The 
Center offers a resource library dealing 
with issues particularly related to 
women, and sponsors such activities as 
workshops, films, speakers, and 
educational programs. The Women's 
Center is also actively involved in 
campus issues such as child care and 
health services. 



20 





International Study and Travel 

The International Study and Travel 
Office, better known as ISTO, is a 
student service organization whose 
primary goal is to aid students who 
want to study or work abroad. The 
office has been in existence for 
approximately four years and during 
that time has proven itself a valuable 
part of the SMU Community. 

The main function of the ISTO is to 
gather information on study and work 
programs offered by other universities 
and private organizations. The office 
has a large amount of information on 
file so that the staff can aid a 
prospective traveller quickly, saving 
valuable time. The ISTO is not only an 
information gathering agency, however; 
it can call consulates or the advisors of 
certain study programs to gain answers 
to any particular questions a student 
may have. 

The office is entirely student-run. 
Many of the staff have travelled 
extensively and can offer valuable 
advice based on experiences they have 
had. They may suggest that the 
prospective traveller purchase an 
International Student Identity Card or 
International Youth Hostel Card to 
qualify for student discounts. Also, they 
can suggest people to be contacted for 
further information. 

Looking to the future, the ISTO hopes 
to initiate an international study 
program for SMU at a foreign university. 
A program such as this lends prestige to 
the sponsoring universities, and helps 
create beneficial contacts with other 
universities. Overall, the ISTO has been 
an active and growing office since its 
inception and hopes to add more 
programs and services as the years roll 
on. 



The SMU Gallery Committee 
Robert Barry, Coordinator 

Much of the energy of the Gallery 
Committee this year was directed 
toward the relocation of the art gallery 
from the lobby area of the library to the 
spaces in the new Arts and Humanities 
Building. With this new, flexible 
exhibition space — actually two 
adjoining galleries that can be opened 
to make one large space — the 
committee installed ten student shows 
and six outside exhibitions during the 
course of the year. 

The installation and opening of an 
exhibit involves lots of background 
work, usually done during the quiet of a 
Saturday morning. The committee will 
remove a current exhibition, re-arrange 
display panels, paint display stands, 
hang the new show and adjust it until 
each wall looks right, type and attach 
labels, fill out insurance forms, set up 
tables for the opening, design and 
distribute posters and invitations, and 
help out during the hours of the 
opening. 

Two hold-overs from last year's 
committee were the nucleus of this 
year's group — Kathy Curtis and David 
Bryan. Janice Sousa and Peter Carlin 
pitched in frequently to help with 




installation of exhibits. Cindy 
Burlingame volunteered much of her 
free time as a gallery attendant, and 
there was invaluable help from many 
other students. 

Posters for this year's exhibits were 
designed by Lloyd Mendes and Glenn 
Cook. Some of the posters, however, 
proved to be "too successful" and 
disappeared from the university walls 
shortly after they were pinned up. 

The Gallery Committee was 
coordinated this year by Professor 
Robert Barry of the Design Department 
and Professor Tony Miraglia of the 
Painting Department. 



22 



Black Student Union 
Kevin J. Rice, President 

The B.S.U. during the past year has 
dedicated its efforts toward cultivating 
a new crop of students to assume the 
leadership responsibilities of the 
organization. We also felt it necessary 
to expand our services in the New 
Bedford area in an effort to raise the 
consciousness, and to sustain 
collaborative communications within 
the community. We have taken an 
active step in the greater community by 
participating in various community 
organizations, and sitting on local 
boards and commissions. 

During the struggle of the last nine 
months we have experienced many 



problems within the BSU 
administration, and a lack of 
participation within the committee 
system. We faced further difficulties 
when the "great blizzard of 78" struck; 
we had to cancel many of our Black 
Emphasis Programs. On a more positive 
note, we produced many programs that 
were successful (Ronald Ingraham 
Concert Choir, Fashion Show, Cultural 
Seminars, Lectures, etc.). 

The goals that we accomplished were 
the training and educating of potential 
leaders and workers of the B.S.U. Also, 
we expanded our media services to 
include a B.S.U. newspaper named the 




"Word," whose Editor is freshman Allen 
Lopes. In addition we have a newly 
established radio program named the 
"Black Side," whose host is sophomore 
Richard Ifill. 

We have extended ourselves more 
toward the external communities with 
services such as research on housing, 
participation in local agencies 
(M.C.A.D., RTP, NAACP, Aide Center, 
etc.), and contracting students out to 
two major areas of concern. Within the 
organization we have made an attempt 
to educate the new blood as to the 
political clout the B.S.U. has as an 
agency. Further, we have concentrated 
our efforts toward the retention of 
minority faculty, trustees, 
administrators, and students. We are 
also trying to make sure the University 
recruits new minority faculty, 
administrators, and students. Secondly, 
we have taken interest in the external 
political arena; we have actively 
participated in the re-election of local 
school committee members, councilors, 
etc. We also have made contact with 
local minority agencies in an effort to 
upgrade the total S.M.U. area. Finally, 
we feel that the political consciousness 
of the minority community over the 
past months has been increased. 

In the future, with the new seeds that 
have been cultivated and with the 
expansion of services, we will continue 
to raise the consciousness and level of 
education within the minority 
community and, as the issues arise, we 
can march on to victory as a collective 
entity. We as a group express optimism 
toward a brighter day. 



23 



WUSM 

WUSM is a student-owned and 
operated ten watt educational stereo 
FM radio broadcasting facility. The 
signal is transmitted on a frequency of 
90.5MHz. 

During the academic year, the station 
operates at least eighteen hours daily. 
The broadcast day is usually reduced to 
evening and weekend broadcasting 
during vacation periods. 

Established in September of 1973 by a 
grant of the Federal Communications 
Commission, the station, in a relatively 
short period of time, has risen from total 
obscurity to a level of competence 
usually not found in such a college 
broadcasting outlet. Forty percent of all 
broadcast time is devoted to 
educational material. The remaining 
sixty percent of air time is devoted to 
musical entertainment. Though the 
format is primarily rock music, virtually 
all types of music are aired on a 
regularly scheduled weekly basis. 




WUSM maintains a qualified and 
dedicated news and sports department. 
The news room has the services of 
United Press International and several 
alternative news services and 
broadcasts hourly throughout the day. 
The sports department broadcasts daily 
but also airs all major varsity home and 
away games. The play by play is done 
live in all instances. 

All members of the student body may 
participate in the club activities, but to 
broadcast station members must meet 
specified station criteria and F.C.C. 
license requirements. 



SMU Ski Club 

This past year the SMU Ski Club was 
responsible for sending many students 
skiing. Among the areas visited were 
North Conway (Attitash, Bretton 
Woods, Tyrol, Cranmore, Cannon, and 
Wildcat Mountains), jay Peak (Sutton, 
Owl's FHead, Orford, and Bromont 
Mountains), and Mount Stowe. In the 
planning stages is a trip to Tuckerman's 
Ravine, the ultimate in New England 

The Ski Club also held a raffle in 
which a car stereo system was given 
away as the grand prize. A party was 
sponsored by the club during the first 
semester that turned out to be a big 
success. 

We plan to have even better times in 
the future. 



24 



Mass Senate of Student Nurses 
Jeanne Malicia, President 

MSSN-SMU is the university chapter of 
the Massachusetts Senate of Student 
Nurses. It is a professional organization 
for students which enables them to 
keep in touch with the ever-changing 
role of nursing. This chapter has been in 
existence for five years and has grown 
to play a large role in the College of 
Nursing. It is also a service organization 
with functions serving students of the 
college and all members of the SMU 
community. Under the guidance of the 
advisor, Peggy Greaves, this year's club 
has accomplished many projects. The 
largest and most successful of these was 
the health fair held on April 12, 1978 
outside the auditorium. Approximately 
300 students, faculty, and staff were 
screened at this event for hypertension, 
diabetes, and anemia. Another major 
project which served the College of 
Nursing was a job fair held in the gym in 
January. The club was also involved in a 
uniform change for nursing students. 




25 





The Sailing Club 

Paul McGarr, President 

The Sailing Club was established in the 
fall semester of 1975. Greg Freitas was 
our first Commodore. He focused on a 
canoe raffle and organized an extensive 
two-week cruise on a 36ft. Islander. 
Greg also instituted intercollegiate 
racing with Mass Maritime. 

Paul McGarr, our present 
Commodore, took the tiller in the fall of 
1976. His activities have centered 
around expanding our fleet to three 
sunfishes, one 19ft. lightning, and a 25ft. 
schooner (under construction). 

Activities since 1976 have included 
extensive partying, crusiing, skiing trips, 
bingo (thanks to Maureen Lynch), and 
canoe raffles. There have been five 
organized sunfish races and four races 
against Mass Maritime. In addition 
there has been weekly racing in the East 



Branch Racing Association, in which 
several of our members have achieved 
distinction. We have also sailed with 
the Low Tide Yacht Club. 

Proceeds from some activities and 
senate allocations enabled us to acquire 
and build a 25ft. schooner. Members 
active in the construction were Paul 
McGarr, Rick Hurd, Debbie Slowe, 
Glenn Cook, our advisor Kevin 
Hargreaves, Gary Alexander, and 
Quentin Kampf. 

The club's future holds the promise of 
the continued expansion of the fleet, 
greater involvement with intercollegiate 
racing, and extended cruises in our new 
schooner. We look forward to greater 
involvement by the student body, 
sailors and non-sailors alike. 



Program Council 

The program council is a volunteer 
based, somewhat professional 
committee of the Board of Govern 
that plans, programs, and coordinates 
most of the major events on campus. 
The council is comprised of five 
committes: Functions (Balls, 
Oktoberfest, Ritz's, etc.). Major Events 
(concerts). Special Events (ballets, bus 
trips, guest speakers). Coffee House, 
and Rat and Sunset room. The purpose 
of the council is to initiate and plan 
social, recreational, educational, and 
cultural programs for the entire SMU 
community. This programming 
organization is open to all SMU 
students. 



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The Vets Club 

Brad Burns, President 

This academic year the club literally 
changed the face of the University. On 
May 6, T978, the nameless amphitheatre 
was given an identity. It was dedicated 
the Vietnam Veterans' Peace Memorial 
Amphitheatre in memory of those 
57,000 people who lost their lives in 
Vietnam. 

The goal was not to memorialize war, 
but rather to symbolize a feeling of 
peace and tranquility. Too many people 
are willing to forget this devastating era 
of our time. This was assurance that at 
least an educational institution was 
willing to remember those who gave 
their ultimate sacrifice. We are all 
veterans of Vietnam. 

The organization, with a membership 
of 1100 people, has representation 
throughout all aspects of the SMU 
Community. It is open to both veterans 
and non-veterans. 

Programs include such events as the 
Halloween Boogie anr) Rash, snowed- 



out Mardi Gras, with its replaceme,. 
the Spring Heyday, the Gong Show, anu 
the annual Screw Contest for fund 
raising. 

Community activities include our 
annual Flea Market, Christmas Food 
Drive, Party for Underprivileged 
Children, and the radio program "Vets 
Club Focus: THE VIETNAM ERA." Its 
newly initiated outreach program 
continues to help veterans get a new 
start. 

The Vets of SMU have also organized 
the state-wide organization entitled 
Massachusetts Vietnam Era Veterans 
Association that picks up where the 
traditional veterans groups have lacked 
in their responsibliity to the Vietnam 
Veteran. 

Besides counselling, tutoring, and 
providing a job bank, the organization 
has an emergency loan program for 
those whose V. A. Educational Benefits 
somehow have discrepancies. 

The organization's greatest asset is to 
utilize the tools available for a 
continuous progressive vanguarrl. 



27 




Art History Association 

The AHA has been established to 
further the educational experience of 
the SMU student body and the general 
public. This is accomplished during the 
academic year through a series of 
lectures, symposiums, films, and 
museum /gallery visits. In striving for 
this goal, the association provides 
services which arrange transportation 
for members of the student body and 
the Southeastern Massachusetts public 
to the cultural centers of the 




northeastern area of the nation. 
Lectures and films are funded by 
student activity fees and granted to the 
association by the Student Senate. 

The AHA membership is presently 
over four hundred and is headed by a 
joint faculty-student committee. The 
faculty advisors, Dr. Magali Carreira, Dr. 
Pearlee Freiberg, Dr. Giorgio Galansino, 
and, with a special thanks concerning 
the survival of the association, the 
chairperson of the Art History 
Department, Dr. Thomas Puryear. All 
assist and guide the student members 
unselfishly and with little or no 
recognition. The newly elected student 
members, Terry Dunphy — Chairperson 
and Cathy Reynolds — Treasurer/ 
Secretary thank, and wish the best of 
luck to the outgoing chairperson Cort 
Ferreira (class of 78) for his time and 
assistance toward the betterment of the 



organization. 

The future of the AHA hopefully wil 
luring l)us trips extending to the 
Washington D.C. area and other 
fundraising activities in an attempt to 
re-open the Lyman House on campus. 



28 



Film Series 

Ed Hazell, Co-ordinator 

Running the S.M.U. Film Series has 
had both its pleasures and its problems. 
The pleasures, of course, lie in the films 
themselves. There is also a great deal of 
satisfaction in knowing that you were 
responsible for bringing a certain 
amount of enjoyment to the audience. 
Finding that audience is the major 
problem. Many films which should have 
packed the house flopped. Other films 
litracted bigger audiences that I 

pected. None, however, did as well as 
iney should have. The fault lies partially 
in the fact that the Film Series is 
basically a one person operation and 

^re is a limit to the amount of 



publicity you can do on your own, no 
matter how dedicated you are. But it is 
also true that most students just aren't 
interested in silent, foreign, or 
experimental films. Most students have 
very narrow concepts of what a film 
should or should not be, and they just 
don't want to change those concepts I 
don't know what accounts for that kind 
of uninquisitive attitude. It's a pity that 
it exists, especially in college students, 
because a university is the place for you 
to change your mind about a few 
things, even if it's something as trivial as 
what a film should look like or do or say. 
Despite the frustrations, I've enjoyed 
running the Film Series. I hope those 
students who did support the programs 
enjoyed themselves, too. 




Foreign Language Club 

The main objective of the Foreign 
Language Club is to make the SMU 
community and, to some extent, the 
communities of New Bedford and Fall 
River aware of the various aspects of 
French, German, Portuguese, and 
Spanish life. We concentrate on these 
four because they are the languages 
taught here. For the most part, our 
members are language majors. 
FHowever, anyone interested in 
promoting world peace through the 
understanding of other cultures is 
welcome to join. 

In the past we have tried to achieve 
our goal by sponsoring lectures, films, a 
play put on by our members, the 
Bostom Flamenco Ballet, and an 
International Christmas Festival. We 
provide tutoring for anyone who needs 
it, as well as translating services for any 
non-profit organization. 

We have also helped to raise funds 
for the library and, in the near future, 
we hope to raise money for the 
language lab. 



29 



SAP 



The Student Advisory Program is an 
organization of selected and trained 
students. The progrann's main function 
is to serve the SMU community — 
primarily students, but also faculty, 
staff, and administration. Student 
advisors are trained in academic and 
social advisement, and receive 
additional training in career planning, 
leadership development, and other 
areas of student concern. 



A student drop-in center is located on 
the second floor of the campus center. 
At this office students will find 
information on academic requirements, 
receive answers to questions about 
student life and SMU, obtain referrals to 
appropriate persons or campus offices, 
and find a sympathetic ear. Potentially, 
the program serves 100% of the SMU 
population. It is designed for and run by 
the students. 




30 



Siren 




In 1974, one woman acutely felt the lack 
of creative outlets for the women of 
SMU. Recognizing the need for a forum 
that would allow for the self-expression 
of women, Marcelle Mavidis conceived 
Siren. Working out of the office she 
occupied as secretary for the art 
department, she recruited women who 
shared her goal of creating both a 
communications network, and a sense 
of community among women, and 
gradually organized a core of writers 



and artists that would help make Siren 
the first publication of this sort at SMU. 
Although Marcelle's concerns have 
since taken her to a Master's program at 
Boston University, the Siren has not 
become extinct. In fact, the women 
now responsible for Siren have made 
further progress. The publication is now 
a recognized 'organization' on campus, 
and as such receives student funding. 
This has allowed the present staff to 
develop an extended format which 



offers not only a medium of better 
visual quality, but also a greater 
opportunity for women to express their 
views, and to display their varied literary 
and artistic talents. The magazine has 
also been able to increase circulation, 
and therefore to reach more of those it 
was intended to serve. The 1977-78 staff, 
Fran Hutchinson, Nina J. Ponte, Carole 
Farrell, Claudia Comstock, and Audrey 
Witt, truly hope that this progress will 
continue so long as the need exists. 



Accounting Club 

The S.M.U. Accounting Club has been 
quite active during the 1977-78 
academic year. Arthur Anderson, which 
is one of the "Big Eight" Accounting 
firms, visited the club and brought back 
tv^o former SMU students, who are now 
under their employ. They were 
impressed with the university and, as a 
result of this, two more S.M.U. students 
were selected to work with the firm. We 
have established good public relations 
with them and will continue to do so for 
this and any other company interested 
in S.M.U. In 1977 two representatives 
from the Becker CPA Review Course 
came here to discuss opportunities in 
the accounting field. They returned 



again in January and talked more 
specifically about the Review Course 
and a slide presentation. During the 
course of the year, students interested 
in attending the NAA meeting signed 
up for this opportunity. These meetings 
are a source of information to students 
and allow them at the same time to 
meet various people in the accounting 
profession. Students were also 
sponsored to attend the Mass. C.P.A. 
meetings, which is another accounting 
organization. 




The Chinese Student Association 
T. C. Hsia, President 

The Chinese Student Association is 
united in the attempt to solve the 
various cultural and educational 
problems which confront foreign 
students. The Association, headed by 
Clement Chan, meets to exchange 
pertinent experiences and informatior . 
In this way they hope to preserve the 
spirit of Chinese culture and ethics, as 
well as improve relations with their 
fellow students through mutual 
understanding and, cooperation. 

As part of this attempt, the Chinese 
Student Association has presented films 
and sponsored mixers. This fall there are 
plans to exhibit Chinese painting and 
calligraphy to acquaint the S.M.U. 
Community with the richness of the 
Chinese culture. 



32 




J0- 
4m- " 




Physics Club 

Professor Robert Bento, Advisor 

The purpose of the Physics Club is to 
supply information to the academic 
community about a wide variety of 
topics relating to physics. The club 
invites guest speakers to the campus, 
shoves films, sponsors equipment 
demonstrations, conducts field trips to 
research facilities, and schedules visits 
to the campus for area high school 
students and faculty to inspect the 
facilities of the Physics Department. 



Inner Space Society 

Despite losing most of our senior 
members and our office space, the 
Inner Space Society of S.M.U. has made 
some remarkable progress this year. 

The Student Senate allocated enough 
funds to enable the club to purchase 
some much needed equipment. We 



were finally able to conduct SCUBA 
diving lessons through the club, despite 
some problems with insurance. Club 
advisor Dr. James Sears has greatly 
helped the club this year. 

VVe gained over thirty new members 
this year, and club participation has 
risen remarkably. Several guest speakers 
lectured on subjects ranging from deep 
diving in Maine to "The Effects of Drugs 
and Alcohol on Diving." 

Besides weekly dives, the club 
sponsored a trip to the New England 
Aquarium. ISS also helped out during 
the "Blizzard of 78" by donating 
equipment to rescue units in Hull, 
Revere, and Scituate. 

The club hopes to continue turning 
out new divers and offering diving 
opportunities to the SMU community. 




33 



student Psychology Association 

The Student Psychology Association has 
been organized for the purpose of 
bringing together the large number of 
psychology majors. Students thereby 
become involved in decision-making 
processes by attending departmental, 
committee, and curriculum meetings. 

We have sponsored trips to lectures 
and workshops relating to psychology, 
Christmas and Spring parties with 
faculty attending, and career and 
graduate information workshops. 

Since three of the four present 
officers will be graduating in June of 
1978, the future of the Psychology 
Association will rest in the hands of 
those students who feel it is important 
to become involved in student issues, 
and provide extra-curricular 
opportunities such as field trips, career 
planning, films, guest speakers and 
conferences. 



Industrial Relations Club 

The Industrial Relations Club is in its 
fourth year of existence. It is comprised 
mainly of students majoring in the 
Industrial Relations option of the 
department of Business Administration. 

We are affiliated with A.S.P.A. 
(American Society of Personnel 
Administration) student chapter #55. 
The highlight of the club activities 



during the year was a successful dinner 
with over one hundred personnel 
directors from the Southeastern 
Massachusetts area attending. 

The club also sponsored a seminar at 
the Harvard Business School with 
Boston area students attending. Among 
its other various activities, the club had 
many speakers during the year 
concerning Industrial Relations. 

This year the president was Jim 
French, the vice-president was Diane 
Fitzgerald, and the treasurer was Betsy 
Finch. Our faculty advisor was Dr. 
Donald C. Wetmore, to whom we are ali 
grateful. 




34 



Art Student Union 

This year students involved in the arts at 
this university have formulated a 
constitution for a student-managed 
organization called the Art Student 
Union. 

The goals of the union are: to 
encourage communication among 
creative people in the university 
regardless of medium of expression, to 
elaborate goals and potentialities, 
identify resources and facilitate access 
to them, and to ensure representation in 
matters of funding and student 
government. 

As a manifestation of the desire to 
encourage communication in the 
creative community, the students of the 
College of Visual and Performing Arts 
staged their first open house on 
February 28, 1978. This open house 
atmosphere has been continued 
ihrough the "Expose Yourself" lecture 
series which was kicked off by faculty 
member George Mellor. Other 
participants were Dean of college 
Dietmar Winkler, Professor Herb 
Cummings, Peter London, and Terry 
Sladen, an exchange artist from England. 

The most exciting part of this newly- 
organized creative energy lies in the 
prospects for future years. Requested 
funding will provide an increased 
number of outside artists to visit while 
students will have reliable 
transportation to areas of creative 
activity. Within the college a resource 
room of contemporary art objects and 
information, along with work programs 
to improve the atmosphere within 
Group Six, will begin to take shape. 

Newly elected officers include Jan 
Read as chairperson, Kirk Jaskoviak, vice 
chairperson, Judy Rush, treasurer, and 
Suzanne Moore, secretary. 





The Pre-Med Association 

The Pre-Med Association exists to help 
those people who are planning to apply 
to medical, veterinary, or dental schools 
gain more information about their 
intended professions. Through 
feedback received from SMU graduates 
now attending medical schools, the 
association members also receive 
valuable information about admission 
requirements and application 
procedures. The club plans trips to area 
medical schools and has also sponsored 
guest speakers on campus. 



J5 



American Indian Society 

Gary Running Bear Martin, Director 

The American Indian Society was 
started in the fall of 1977. Its purpose is 
to assist American Indians in every 
possible area. The American Indian 
Society also strives to bring a better 
understanding of the Indian to the non- 
Indian community. 

In the field of education, we have 
gone into the Indian community to help 
American Indians apply to SMU and 
other colleges; we have also assisted 
Indians at SMU in obtaining financial 
aid. 

The American Indian Society has 
supplied SMU with speakers who were 
present at such events as the 1966 Poor 
People's March, Alcatraz '69, Trail of 
Broken Treaties, Wounded Knee '73, 
Ganienkeh, and the International 
Conference of Indian People in Geneva, 
Switzerland. We have invited Indian 
people from the surrounding area to 
share their knowledge and culture with 
the SMU community. 



We have assisted American Indian 
students in finding jobs and, through 
our representative on the Affirmative 
Action Committee of SMU, we have 
assured the Indian community of 
consideration during all search and 
screening procedures. 

The American Indian Society is the 
main coordinating body for all of New 
England's participation in "The Longest 
March," a cross-country march in 
support of Indian rights that originates 
in California and ends in Washington, 
D.C 



The Senate 




36 




American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers 



IEEE, William R. Hawe, President 

The IEEE isthe International Society for 
Electrical and Electronics Engineers. The 
student branch at SMU has many 
members from both the Colleges of 
Electrical Engineering and Electrical 
Engineering Technology, as well as 
alumni in the field. 

This year the officers were William R. 
Hawe, Pres., Ronald Lambalot, VP, 
Robert Collet, Treasurer, and Thomas j. 
Deane, Secretary. Numerous meetings 
and events were held, such as a party in 
September to acquaint new members 
with present members. In November, a 
"student night" was held for both 
prospective and regular members. Job 
opportunities were discussed by Mr. 
Eastwick from Multi Processing, Inc. 
during another IEEE sponsored event. In 
addition, trips to a microprocessor 
seminar in Hartford, CT were arranged. 
The academic year ended with a gala 
celebration for both members and 
faculty. 




37 




Civil Engineering Technology Club 

The Civil Engineering Technology Club 
(CT Club) was organized five years ago 
for the improvennent of the 
construction engineering program. Civil 
Engineering Technology Program is a 
construction-oriented curriculum, and 
the students participating in the 
program are, for the most part, also 
active members of the CT Club. 

Each year the club members have 
tried to accomplish several construction 
— related activities. For example, four 
years ago a footbridge was designed 
and constructed as a team effort 
between Civil Engineering 
Technologists and Civil Engineers 
attending SMU. The bridge crosses the 
drainage stream adjacent to the power 



Outing Club 

Glenn Merrill, President 

The Outing Club enjoyed an exciting 
year with a wide range of activities and 
trips. Because of this diversity, club 
events were not devoted to a few 
special members. Many members 
learned and experienced new and 
different skills and eventually became 
better acquainted with the advantages 
of the outdoors. 

During the fall, backpacking trips 
were made to Mount Garfield in New 
Hampshire and to the Majoosuc Ridge 
on the Maine-New Hampshire border. 
Another trip was made to Jackson, N.H. 
to scale Mount Washington. The fall 
also offered the club some rock 
climbing excursions, a canoeing trip. 



and a bicycling trip. 

Activity for the winter was centered 
around renting cabins in New 
Hampshire for cross-country skiing, 
snowshoeing, ice skating, and down hill 
skiing. This winter proved to be an 
excellent one for us due to the 
enormous amount of snow. 

When the warmer weather came, 
however, the club's activities did not 
end. Canoeing trips to Vermont and 
Rhode Island, and bicycling trips to 
Cape Cod kept all members from being 
bored on weekends. Rock climbing and 
backpacking trips also helped to keep 
the activity going right through the 
spring and into the summer. 



38 



plant and allows dormitory students to 
save some time walking to class. Two 
years ago, three CT's designed and 
constructed the billboard which now 
exists at the entrance to SMU. SMU's 
bcnetit is the now aesthetically pleasing 
means to advertise events on campus. 
C' MTently under construction are two 
^ )all field dugouts to replace the 
(1: pidated, screened sheds that were 
tS: lormer dugouts. 

in the CT Club are constantly 
5 : i! ig opportunities to provide 
{ iruction activities on campus. In 

ion, we are always looking to learn 
(i about construction through 
,r : lation with professionals. We are 

ntly affiliated as a student chapter 
- she American Institute of 
C ; iructors (AlC), and we are in the 
s of affiliating with the 

lated General Constructors (AGC) 

11, Such connections are important 
t( (iie professional development of 
graduating construction engineers. In 
turn, the seminars and meetings that are 
organized for the exchange of ideas are 
( -sential to a fulfilling education. 

We are proud to have acquired the 
nickname "Dirty Boots Engineers" (the 
mark of a good constructor), for this is a 
true assessment of the need for the 
practical engineer who works by 
implementing the designs on paper into 
lasting structures. 



Eta-Kappa-Nu, Zeta Xi Chapter 
President, Thomas James Deane 

Eta-Kappa-Nu is the National Electrical 
Engineering EHonor Society. Members 
are chosen for their leadership 
potential, quality of performance in 
scholastic pursuits, service to school 
and profession, and maintenance of 
harmonious associations with their 
fellow men. The members are chosen 
from both the senior and junior classes 
in the Colleges of Electrical Engineering 
and Electrical Engineering Technology. 
While one purpose is the stimulation 
and reward of scholarship, Eta-Kappa- 
Nu has a more expansive purpose than 
merely toaward a badge of distinction 
to scholars. As conceived by its 



founders and carried forward by its 
membership during more than two 
generations, another aim is to assist its 
members throughout their lives in 
becoming better workers in their 
chosen profession, as well as better 
citizens. 

On April 5, 1978, the Zeta Xi Chapter 
of Eta-Kappa-Nu here at SMU officially 
received 22 new members into the 
chapter. Dr. H. Wetzstein was on hand 
to give a lecture on Laser Fusion and its 
impact on future society. The officers of 
the chapter, Thomas J. Deane, Pres., 
William EHawe, VP, Glenn Merrill, 
Treasurer, and Earle Stewart and David 
Rowe, Secretaries, were responsible for 
organizingthe event and making it a 
success. 





Breakfast of Champions 






Soccer 

Phil Fortin, Coach 









I ly II . ■ r ,- ^"jmtKi'' 




42 



/* 






4i 





Field Hockey 

Chris Lasagna, Coach 




44 




Cross Country 

Bob Dowd, Coach 





45 






46 




47 





Volleyball 

Nancy Paulhus, Coach 





48 





Swimming 

Jim Filippo, Coach 
Joan Moehring, Coach 




49 






50 



mis 

^k Kepinski, Coach 







Hockey 

Joe Prenda, Coach 




52 



Women's Basketball 

udy Sullivan, Coach 




53 




54 




55 



Fencing 

Ralph Tykodi, Coach 





57 




58 





S') 









Baseball 

I ikm^ <3 Bruce Wheeler, Coach 




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^ Women's Softball 

Nancy Paulhus, Coach 




^^iSA«i^ 



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63 



Golf 

Jim Filippo, Coach 




64 



Tennis 

Yurek Kepinski, Coach 




65 




Events 






Eisteddfod's Howard Glasser 

My first memory of Howard Glasser 
— an admittedly superficial one — 
stems from my experience four 
years ago as an incoming design 
student at SMU. Since then, 
however, I have become aware of 
the many interesting facets which 
make up this extraordinary 
individual. 

Howard Glasser is a man of vast 
experience. A designer in New York 
for ten years, he established a 
studio there and also taught at the 
Cooper Union Art School. He has 
acquired an international 
reputation as an outstanding 
calligrapher, and has travelled quite 
extensively in Scotland. In turn, his 
musical interests have had a major 
influence on the SMU community; 
as co-ordinator of the monthly 
Ceilidh folk music get-togethers, 
Howard owns one of the largest 
folk music collections in the 
country. Moreover, he organizes 
the three day folk festival held 
annually at SMU, affectionately 
known as the Eisteddfod. 

According to Howard, "The SMU 
Eisteddfod Traditional Music and 
Crafts Festival, held each 
September since 1972, has attracted 
national and international attention 
to our campus. Compared to other 
music festivals, it is relatively small; 
it only draws about 3-4000 for the 
three days of workshops, 
demonstrations, and concerts. 
Attendance from the campus and 
nearby communities is excellent, 



67 




but about half the audience come 
from vast distances — California, 
Chicago, Pittsburgh, and Canada. 
Most often tickets are purchased 
even though only a few have ever 
heard of the names of the 
performers. The performers are not 
the big names, but they are the big 
talents." A wide range of musical 
subjects, from light animal songs to 
sea chanteys in the predominantly 
Anglo-American tradition, are 
performed, along with an array of 
instruments (from fiddles and 
dulcimers to elbow pipes and 
banios). 



It was in 1960 that Howard 
Glasser gave up his job as a graphic 
designer in New York and took "a 
three month unplanned trip to 
Scotland" because he "liked the 
sound of the language, the feeling 
of the whole thing . . .very poetic 
to my ear and eye. It also reflected 
many basic things in life — from 
the humor, whimsical, romantic, 
and downright bawdy. The way 
things were expressed was very 
exciting to me." 

Howard would stay at least a 
week in every town which 
interested him, and so became 



involved with the people — their 
lives and celebrations. In quite 
remote areas. Ceilidhs (informal 
musical gatherings) were held, 
wherein all who came would 
perform — recite, sing, play 
instruments, and tell jokes. He 
heard a variety of musical styles, 
from traditional to Negro spirituals. 
Upon his return three months later, 
Howard had accumulated a great 
amount of this music on tape, as 
well as numerous friends. 

In 1961, after the first trip, 
Howard took a teaching job at 




68 



Carnegie-Mellon in Pittsburgh. It 
war- there that he began organizing 
a t!! ne and place for musicians/ 



ents to meet weekly and make 
ic. The type of music varied, as 
he audiences and performers. 
,et-together was introduced as 
dh, from the Scottish-Gaelic 
i meaning "party" or 
lering." 

ward stayed in Pittsburgh for 
1 years before moving on to 
and finally to SMU in 1970. He 
inued the Ceilidh tradition 
ighout this time, and many of 
jfiginal Pittsburgh performers 
eturn for the events. 
e Eisteddfod, a Welsh word 
ling "a coming together of 
£ and minstrels," began at SMU 
n several students asked 
ard to help organize a folk 
v'al. Since that time, the SMU 
estival has been an annual 
nn event, involving growing 
jers of student co-ordinators 
performers. 

:^ Eisteddfod does not flow as 
jthly as some might think, 
however. Audiences do not 
generally see the backstage crises 
which confront and flavor any 
campus event. Workshops 
sometimes disturb class schedules; 
visitors find fault with the 
restrooms; performers nearly starve 
waiting for a meal that is delayed 
because of a meatcutter's accident; 
rain is a constant threat, as is 
university red tape, sound systems 
fail and performers disappear; 
performer accommodations and 



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sleeping arrangements are usually 
delicate situations . . . "a 
tremendous amount of details." 

These "details" begin around 
January and increase heavily during 
the year until the final festival 
wrap-up in October. Performers are 
notified and schedules are planned, 
but most important, some sort of 
staff must be organized early in the 
year so that the festival will run 
fairly smoothly. The paperwork 
alone has become increasingly 
demanding. 

Despite all this, however, the 
Eisteddfod has never failed us. It 




69 




has always managed to entertain an 
audience of diverse interests simply 
by combining warmth and revelry 
with good humor and 
overwhelming enthusiasm. Indeed, 
it is this spirit of intimacy and 
spontaneity which forms the 
special charm of the festival. 
Howard Glasser, who wants "the 
Eisteddfod to live, and live here/' is 
to be applauded for his efforts in 
preservingthis spirit. We too hope 
the Traditional Music and Crafts 
Festival will be a permanent 
tradition on the SMU campus. 

Interview by Audrey Witt 





70 





The J. Ceils Band 
December 1,1974 




Richie Havens 
April 4, 1974 



72 




Jonathan Edwards and Lynnie Dahl 
1974-1975 



73 




The^ Rolling Thunder Revue 
Bob Dylan and Joan Baez 
November 10, 1975 



74 




Lonnie Listen Smith 
April 25, 1976 



Aztec Two-Step 
March 26, 1977 




Tom Rush 
March 26, 1977 




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Logginsand Messina 
May 14, 1976 




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Pi(>r((' Arrow 
()(l()l)(>r27, 1977 






Poucette D'An Band and Trent 

Artebury 

November 10, 1977 



Summer audiences are entertained 
annually by Arthur Fiedler 




79 




Dick Gregory 





Henry Steele Commanger 



Cicely Tyson. 



80 



Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis, 



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Yitzhak Rabin, Former Prime 
Minister of Israel 




Jimmy who? 

Jimmy Carter actually came to SMU 
in 1975, a product of the much 
divided Democratic party opposing 
incumbent Jerry Ford, who was 
backed bya very solid Republican 
party. The most remarkable aspect 
of his candidacy, however, was his 
slow, steady rise from total 
obscurity to the Presidency. SMU 
may not yet be on the map, but it 
does attract the important people 
that may someday bring much 
needed recognition to the 
Southeastern Massachusetts area. 
SMYew, Ah luv yew! 



82 



V' en Governor Michael S. Dukakis 

c ipaigned at SMU in 1974 he 

p mised the University increased 

fi ncial support. He took office in 1975 

v\ en the state was on the verge of 

b. kruptcy. Promises made became 

pi nises delayed, creating 

C( imunication problems. In 1976, 

D akis insisted that the state had no 

m jey with which to purchase the 

cc 'roversial Campus Center, which 

h escalating debt service costs. A $120 

C er fee on each student was a 

ri )red reality. This situation. 

It ever, was avoided by an effective 

p (C campaign by students and 

n( )tiations by the SMU 

a', iinistration. The Governor 

ar junced to a tense student audience 

th the state would take over the cost 
e Campus Center. 
: 1978 Dukakis eased another 




campus dilemma with $1 million for the 
library and a $1.3 million increase in the 
University budget. SMU will also 
receive a $7.7 million Science and 
Engineering building. Clearly, things are 
looking up! 





83 



Oktoberfest 





84 




The Vets Club Boogie and Bash 



85 






86 



Senior Citizens Christmas Party 




The Blarney Stone Pub 



87 




Little People's 
Weekend 




90 




9i 





Spring Weekend 1978 



Albatross 



94 




James Montgomery Band 




95 




Jonathan Edwards and Eric Lillequist 




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97 




May 6, 1978 was a day of history for 
SMU. 

It was the day the only university in 
the nation put itself forward to 
remembering the Vietnam Veterans 
through the dedication of the Vietnam 
Peace Memorial Amphitheater. 

The struggle was constant and the day 
became a reality with Rep. Margaret 
Heckler, Gold Star Mother Pat Simon, 
and many others bringing forth the 
message that although many have 
wanted to forget Vietnam and the 
Veterans, there are those who care and 
are willing, through education, to 
ensure that another Vietnam does not 
happen again. 





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Peter Pan 1975-1976 



The class of 1978 will take with it many 
memories of the productions presented 
by the SMU Theatre Company in the 
last four years. Many members of the 
class participated in the productions of 
the Theatre Company, either on stage, 
back stage or in the box office. The 
company has constant need of a wide 
variety of talents, and the Class of 78 
included a considerable number of 
persons who made a notable 
contribution to theatre at SMU. 

By the time the Class of 78 arrived, 
the Theatre Company had settled into 



100 



its permanent season of six full-scale 
productions, three a semester. But it 
was while the class was still here that 
the company first began to sell season 
subscriptions both to students and 
members of the community. 

This was a notable step forward, and 
one that evoked an immediate 
response. The subscription sales have 
increased steadily, beginning with 300 
the first season and now numbering 
660. Not only does the subscription 
season ensure a revenue for the Theatre 

ompany; it also ensures a sizeable 
..jdience. It is in fact a mainstay of 
fheatre everywhere these days, and the 
\\J Theatre Company, using business 
pertise largely provided by members 
the Class of 78 has been fortunate 
ough to inaugurate it successfully on 
ic campus. 

The subscription season was a major 
step forward for the Theatre Company 
during these four years; so was a 
summer season of three productions. 
Major players from the Trinity Square 
Repertory Company, such as Richard 
Kneeland and William Cain, have 
appeared with our students in summer 
productions, including "Moby Dick in 
Rehearsal" and "That Championship 
Season." 

During these summer seasons the 
Theatre Company always includes a 
cabaret production in the cafeteria, 
with capacity audiences sipping their 
drinks while enjoying "Jacques Brel," 
"Oh, Coward!" or last year's "Decline 
and Fall of the Entire World as Seen 
through the Eyes of Cole Porter." 

Furthermore, last summer the Theatre 
Company inaugurated the use of the 




Lysistrata 1975-1976 




The Miracle Worker 1976-1977 



101 





..Ji 



melodrama was followed by the farce, 
"Scapin," with Paul Graham especially 
effective in the title role. 

The next year the company presented 
its most spectacular production to date, 
Barrie's "Peter Pan," complete with the 
Never Never Land, the forest and the 
pirate's ship, to say nothing of the 
flying. It has been said that several 



The Three Muskateers 1976-1977 



members of the company never fully 
recovered from "Peter Pan," but it is 
also said that children in area schools 
still talk about it. A magical experience 
for everyone who shared in it. 

If "Peter Pan" was for children of all 
ages, "Lysistrata," which followed it, 
emphatically was not. Nevertheless, the 
Aristophanes classic remains delightful 
entertainment of another sort, and the 
happiest kind of sophisticated 
playgoing. If it proved nothing else, 
"Lysistrata" certainly proved that the 
classics can be fun. 

A year ago the Theatre Company's 
season began with "The Miracle 
Worker," and Sally Jones's luminous 
portrayal of Annie Sullivan. The 
company proceeded to swash and 
buckle through "The Three 
Musketeers," and ended the year with a 
musical version of "Zorba" complete 
with its first revolving stage. 

And this year? Well, at this writing the 
season is by no means over, but its 
outstanding moments to date have 
come with its production of the deeply 
moving play, "A Raisin In The Sun," and 



102 



the off-beat humor of "Rosencrantz and 
Cuildenstern Are Dead." 

The Theatre Company is an SMU 
institution, which, with its constant 
productions, is a major cultural force on 
the North Dartmouth campus. Theatre 
is always changing; the fashions in the 
plays — the musicals — vary almost as 
much as the fashions in clothes. But the 
theatre itself remains, amusing, exciting, 
speaking always to the spirit of the 
times, whatever the times happen to be. 
n these four years the class of 1978, 
[h by participating and by attending, 
s immensely added to the 
velopment of the SMU Theatre 
mpany, and in return has received 
ne first-hand experience of how 
lulating theatre can be. 



Zorba 1976-1977 




103 





o Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead 1977-1978 



104 



How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying 1977-1978 




105 




Moments Preserved 




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113 




Chukwuemeka Onyenokporoh 

Chukwuemeka "Godwin" 
Onyenokporoh is a personable young 
man from Nigeria, currently studying for 
his Master's Degree in Medical 
Technology at S.M.U. He received his 
Bachelor's Degree, also in Medical 
Technology, from S.M.U. in June 1977, 
after transferring here from Worcester 
Junior College two years earlier. 

While he allows himself to be called 
"Godwin" by his American friends, 
since they have difficulty pronouncing 
his first name, Chukwuemeka is 
intensely proud of his name and the 
heritage which it represents: "My name 
is a summary of my parents' experience 
from time of pregnancy to time of 



delivery. It represents the good, the bad, 
the difficulties, the problems, they went 
through." The name itself means "God 
has done well," or "thanks to God," and 
reflects his parents' joy at the birth of 
their first male child. His older sister had 
been named Chinyere, which means 
"God gives," expressing their resigned 
acceptance of a female child. Godwin 
explained that the great desire for sons, 
rather than daughters, was based on a 
need for male heirs to help control the 
large amount of land owned by the 
family. So when a second male child 
was not born soon after Godwin, his 
father married a second wife. About 
that time, Godwin's mother became 
pregnant and gave birth to another son, 
whom she chose to name Ejikeemeuwa, 
meaning "take the world easy" or 
"don't rush." However, during the 
naming ceremony, his father 
counteracted it and named the boy 
Onyemaechi, ("who knows 
tomorrow"). 

Although he has made many friends 
during his five years in the United States 
and enjoys being in this country ("If I 



114 



didn't like America, I wouldn't still be 
here"), Godwin is eagerly looking 
forward to going home next December 
to see his family again. "Home" for 
Godwin is the village of Obiangwu in 
Nigeria: "I would not count myself as 
being home until I reach my village." 
The attraction of Obiangwu for him is 
the sense of closeness which mirrors the 
personal closeness of his family 
relationship. Godwin asserts that this 
sense of community is typical of most 
African societies. In the villages all the 
members have a responsibility to each 
other and a role to perform within the 
community depending on the 



individual's ability and skills, just as 
within the family each member 
contributes in what way they are 
capable, whether it be babysitting the 
younger children or helping around the 
house in other ways. "There is no time 
to be idle. The society does not tolerate 
idleness." 

Godwin was careful to add, however, 
that despite the responsibility expected 
of children, they are still very much 
allowed to be children and are given 
plenty of time to play, both at school 
and at home. Godwin, himself, ran the 
100 yard dash and the '220' for his 
school's track team, and also played 



soccer. He regrets that, because his lab 
periods conflicted with scheduled 
practice times, he could not play soccer 
forS.M.U. 

Godwin's plans for the future are still 
somewhat indefinite. When he returns 
to Nigeria in December he must make a 
critical decision whether to complete 
his formal education with his Master's 
Degree, or to return to school for his 
Ph.D. Whichever he decides, Godwin 
hopes to use his knowledge to help 
improve the quality of medical services 
and to further the relatively new field of 
medical technology in his country. 

In concluding, Godwin commented: 
"I really enjoyed my stay at S.M.U. It's 
unfortunate that I couldn't demonstrate 
my talents, because of the type of study 
(mostly lab work) I was doing. It didn't 
give me the time to get more into the 
school society — to contribute what I 
am, like soccer, tennis, and so on. But, 
no matter where I am, I don't think I'll 
forget S.M.U. I like the teachers. I like 
the relationship among students and 
faculty. Already I have so many friends 
here. If they wouldn't mind, I'd ask 
them to escape the winter sometime 
and come enjoy the fresh air in 
Nigeria." 



115 




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Reggie Dossett 

When confronted in the nether regions 
of the Foster Administration Building 
(i.e. the basement of said building), Mr. 
Dossett greeted his interviewers with a 
resounding, "Oh, no!" However, in 
contrast to his initial reaction, Reggie 
soon revealed himself as an engaging 
and sensitive man. 

Born and raised in New Bedford, 



Reggie has lived in this area most of his 
life. He considers growing up in New 
Bedford as being both good and bad. At 
the age of seventeen he lost his mother, 
and shortly thereafter he joined the 
Navy, where he spent the next four 
years. When he came out of the service, 
Reggie returned to the area and got 
married. Today, he lives with his wife of 
thirty-one years. 

Reggie's main sources of recreation 
are reading and travel. "I like to read all 
about Black history, because there's so 
much I don't know about my Black 
ancestors that I'd like to read up on, and 
I figure that when I read about Black 
history I will get the truth. If I read the 
history they have in schools, at least 



ninety percent of it is lies. That's why I 
like to read anything I can about my 
Black ancestors." 

Together with his wife, he has done 
quite a bit of traveling. "We haven't 
been blessed with children, so we've 
been able to travel. We've been all 
along the West Coast — "Frisco", L.A., 
anywhere in California. I've also been to 
Montana and Oregon. Several years ago 
my wife and I went to Casablanca, 
Tangiers, and Gibraltar." Reggie 
admitted that he liked the physical 
country of Casablanca, particularly the 
capital city of Rabat, but was taken 
aback by the immense poverty: "There 
were so many people with their hands 
out, especially if they know that you're 
an American. They think that you're a 
millionaireand that you have a million 
dollars to give them. The sickness, the 
starvation, it's too much. I couldn't 
stand it. In Tangiers it was the same 
thing. We don't realize how lucky we 
are until we go to a foreign country. I 
enjoyed Gibraltar because there wasn't 
so much poverty. That's why we stayed 
in Gibraltar most of the time." 

About his future travel plans, he 
confided: "In September I think my 
wife and I will go to Barbados. We love 
the West Indies. My people are 
originally from there. My father was 
born in Martinique in the French West 
Indies. We've been going back there 
every three or four years. This past year 
we didn't go back, so possibly we'll go 
there this year." 

Reggie has other interests as well. "I 
go skating. I play a little tennis. I play at 
golf. I do all those things everybody 
does. I try to be a fun-loving guy." 



126 



His 'fun-loving' nature exhibited itself 
throughout the conversation, as he 
repeatedly turned the tables on his 
interviewers, befuddling them with his 
astute questions. 

Asked about his experience working 
at S.M.U. as a janitor in the 
Administration Building for the past 
eight years, Reggie comnnented: "I have 
no complaints. It's been wonderful with 
the administration as well as with the 
students. It has enlightened me. I've 
learned a lot since I've been here. I've 
worked with a lot of people. I've had a 
chance to meet a lot of different 



students and, by conversing with them, 
I must say I've developed a different 
outlook on life." 

"One thing about this college that I 
like is it's a home away from home. You 
get to know each other. You get to love 
each other. Naturally we all have our 
faults. We get angry at each other 
sometimes, but we mend our 
arguments." Concerning the students 
he added: "They're all my children. I 
love them all, and I think they all love 
me, at least ninety-nine percent of 
them." 

That's my make-up; I like people. I 



always will and I always have. Maybe 
they don't like me, but I love them." I 
figure this way, we haven't long to live 
on this earth and if I can help anyone, I 
will do it. I don't care who it is. It's my 
philosophy of life. I like to help people. 

And I love the ladies. I always will 
love the ladies. I've never met a lady I 
didn't like. Dean Walsh —she's a 
beautiful lady. 

As for myself, I'm the same. I'll never 
change. At least I hope I won't change. 

In closing, just say: Reggie sends love 
to everybody. That's all that's necessary. 
I love you all madly." 



127 




The Last Hurrah 



Senior Banquet at the Venus de Milo, 
Swansea, MA., 
June 2, 1978 





Tom Brokaw, host of 
NBC's TODAY show 





129 




130 




Commencement Speaker, Hugh Sidey, 
Contributing Editor, TIME magazine 





Commencement activities, June 4, 1978 



All commencement photos 
by Panicci and Kass 



131 






132 






133 







134 







135 







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136 




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137 




Seniors 



HollieHalliwell 
Medical Technology 



College of Arts 
and Sciences 




Mark C. Abelson 
History 




Rebecca R. Adams 
English 




Delia Aguiar 
Psychology 




Kristine L. Ainsley 
Sociology 




lulieta O. Alicea 
Psychology 




Joyce M. Almeida 
Portuguese 




Judith Ann Almeida 

Multidisciplinary 

Studies 




Marian P. Amaral 
English 




Lynn Anderson 
Medical Technology 




Ermelinda P. Antunes 
Mathematics 




Carmen Arena 
English 




Margaret Ariagno 
Psychology 




Christine A. Aronis 
Bilingual/Bicultural 
Education 




Margaret Arruda 
Spanish 




Patrice Babineau 
Medical Technology 



1.59 




Stephanie M. Baker 
Psychology 




Margaret M. Ball 
History 




Pamela J. Barao 
Sociology 





Victor P. Barbato 
English 



Nancy L. Barboza 
English 




Pamela A. Barros 
Sociology 




Sandra A. Beaton 
Biology 




Steven M. 

Beauchamp 

History 




Paula M. Bennet 
Medical Technology 




Jannine L. Bertrand 
Sociology 








Bonnie ), Bliss 
Sociology 



Robert ). Borders 
Biology 



Erancine M. Bouska 
Medical Technology 



Janice Braga 
Sociology 



Kevin A. Breen 
English 



140 




Karen F. Breitbord 
Psychology 




Nancy S. Brody 
Sociology 




Colleen M. Brown 
Biology 




Michael ). Bucko 
Philosophy 




•^'*^ft¥tlittt^%t*fM«<*t»^ilt^.^ 



Bradford R. Burns 
Sociology 





Brian C. Burns 
Political Science 



Catherine E. Butler 
History 





Ronald E. Butt 
Marine Biology 



Lorrie A. Cabral 
Psychology 




Christine M. Calvetti 
Psychology 




Wayne ). Camara 
Psychology 




Donald R. 

Cappadona 

Chemistry 




Susan M. Caron 

Multidisciplinary 

Studies 




Martha R. Carter 
Biology 




Arthur Carvalho 
Psychology 



141 




Susan Carvalho 
Psychology 



)o-Ellen Casey 
Psychology 




Kathryn A. Cassidy 
Psychology 




James R. Castleberry 
Mathematics 




Barbara ). Gate 
English 




Dianne Coleman 
Political Science 




lames F. Cook 
Psychology 




Paul R. Cordeiro 
English 





Paul I.Costa 
Psychology 




Susanne E. Costa 
English 








Diane Coughlin 
Medical Technology 



Rita M, Coutu 
English 



Luis G. Da Rosa 
Political Science 



RuthT. Davis 
English 



Doloretta D. Dawicki 
Chemistry 



142 




Lucia Demelo 
Psychology 







Truzell Deramus 
Political Science 



Caroline H. Derouin 
English 



Robert W. Dias 
Psychology 



Patricia Dillon 
Biology 




Barbara E. Donnellan 
Psychology 




Paula M. Ducharme 
Psychology 




Thomas W. Dunse 
Sociology 




Vincent G. Durso 
Biology 



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Joseph P. Dyer 
Biology 








Susan L. Edelstein 
Marine Bidiogy 



Dorothy G. Egbert 
Psychology 



CarolJ. English 
Psychology 



Richard A. Entel 
History 



Carol A. Falcon 
Psychology 



143 








Ann Marie Faria 
Medical Technology 



Susan M. Faria 
Marine Biology 



Deborah W. Farnum 
Psychology 



Arlene M. Fernandes 
Sociology 



Manuel ). Fernandes 
Sociology 




)ohn T. Fitzgerald 
Biology 




David A. Flechsij 
Psychology 




ihh 



Mario A. Fortuna 
Economics 




Deborah A. Foss 
Psychology 




Kyriaki Fotiadis 
German 







William Freitas 


Wendy Friedman 


Paul G. Gaboriault 


Michelle D 


Mathematics 


Multidisciplinary 


Multidisciplinary 


Gamache 




Studies 


Studies 


English 




Paul FH. Gamache 
Biology 



144 




George D. Gardener 
History 




Paul Geoghegan 
Biology 




Sandra G. Giger 
Sociology 




Carol F. Ginsberg 
English 




Kathleen Gleason 
Multidisciplinary 
Studies 




Bernice A. Goldstein 
Psychology 




Arlene Gomes 
Psychology 




William A. Goodman 
Psychology 




Kenneth O. 

Goranson 

English 




Ann M. Gouveia 
Portuguese 





Rosemary Gracia 
Mathematics 



Wayne R. Grenier 
English 




Anne E. Grenon 
English 




Robert R. Hall 
English 




i 



Sean P. Hargraves 
Sociology 



145 




Teresa L. Hawes 
Psychology 







Jeffrey A. Heroux 
Biology 



Dorothy Hodge 
Psychology 



Michael P. 
Hodkinson 
Economics 



Karen M. Holmes 
French 




Kathleen M. Holmes 
Mathematics 







Wayne R. Hoover 
Psychology 



John Hurley 
History 



George Itz 
Mathematics 



Sally Janis 
Psychology 








David H. Jennings 


Nancy L. Johnson 


David B.Jolivet 


Keith Jones 


Isabel A. Jorge 


Marine Biology 


Psychology 


English 


Sociology 


Multidisciplinary 
Studies 



146 




Ilene Karlsberg 
Sociology 




Jacqueline V. King 

Multidisciplinary 

Studies 




Edith S. Kleger 
Sociology 




Peter N. Kosta 
Psychology 







Sharon A. Labonte 
Spanish 








Elizabeth A. Lacey 
Philosophy 



Nanette Lavoie 
Psychology 



Theresa L. Leahy 
Education 



Drew R. Leblanc 
Political Science 



Lori |. Levesque 
Psychology 




)oyce Levias 
Sociology 




Ray Levias 
Biology 




Christina D. 
Littlefield 
Political Science 




Janet E. Long 
Marine Biology 




Sheila D. Lopes 
Sociology 



147 






Sherry-Ann Lopes 
Spanish 



David R. Lussier 
English 



Steven Lynch 
English 





Suzan F. Lynch 
English 



lean M. Mac Barron 
Sociology 







Edmundo A. Macedo 


Karen L. Machado 


Sharon Mainguy 


Everett T. 


Spanish 


Psychology 


Psychology 


Manchester 
Sociology 




Patricia A. Marshal 
Psychology 




Gary W. Martin 
Psychology 






Janet M. Martin 
Marine Biology 



Anne C. Masaitis 
Sociology 



William K. Mason 
Biology 




Nancy E. Mattila 
Biology 




Edward ). McAloon 
Mathematics 




Gerard V. McCarthey 

Multidisciplinary 

Studies 




Paul McCoy 
History 




Paul L. McGarr 
English 




Frances A. McGowen 
Psychology 







Lisa D. McGrady 


Apdrew J. McKnight 


Deborah L. Medeiros 


Elizabeth A 


English 


Marine Biology 


Psychology 


Medeiros 
English 




Patricia A. Medeiros 
Medical Technology 






Dales. Mello 
Sociology 



Nancy Mileon 
English 



Lynne Miller 
English 




Maryanne Monahan 
Political Science 




Ann Morey 
English 



149 




Debra L. Morgan 
Psychology 







Dermot P. Moriarty 
Sociology 



Karin F. Morse 
Psychology 



George F. Moses 
Economics 



Michael D. Murphy 
Marine Biology 








leanne R. Napolitano 
Psychology 



Stephen A. Neron 
Sociology 



Peter F. Nevins 
Psychology 



John G. New 
Marine Biology 



Joan M. Newman 
Mathematics 








Eileen A. Nickerson 
Marine Biology 



janite L. Norton 
Sociology 



Liduina Noverca 
Spanish 



Donna M. O'Connor 
English 



Jane A. Offringer 
Biology 



150 




Karen C. 

Ohrenberger 

Psychology 




Kathleen G. 

O'Malley 

Sociology 




Cathy L. O'Neal 
Psychology 









J 


1^ 1 ^^ll^' '..^^^1 



Anne F. O'Neil 
Psychology 




Pauline A. Ouellette 
English 








Christopher Ouimet 


Robin D. Paiva 


Gerald N. Paquette 


)ohn W. Parks 


Sid Paula 


English 


Political Science 


Marine Biology 


Chemistry 


Biology 








Denise A. Pelletier 
Political Science 



Susan M. Pereira 
Mathematics 



Robert O. Perkins 
Mathematics 



Robert L. Perreira 
Biology 



Daniel F. Pires 
FHistory 



151 




Arleen M. Polchopek 
Sociology ■ 




Nina J. Ponte 
English 




Joanne Poulos 
History 




Victoria A. Redwood 
Sociology 



Carol A. Rego 
French 




Linda Rego 
Psychology 




Carl G. Rehbein 
Mathematics 




Catherine H. Reid 
Medical Technology 




Donna Rego 

Rezendes 

Sociology 




Kevin ). Rice 
Political Science 




Carol A. Richards 
Biology 




Amy P. Richmond 
Sociology 




Robert I. Riley 
Marine Biology 




Donna M. Rondeau 
Psychology 




Janice M. Rose 

Multidisciplinary 

Studies 



152 




iv \ 



Jean Rose 

Multidisciplinary 

Studies 




Howard jay 

Rosenfeld 

Biology 




Richard P. Rousseau 
Mathematics 




David B. Rowland 
Political Science 




Dale L. Saad 
Marine Biology 





David T. Sarna 
Medical Technology 



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Marshall S. Sawyer 
Spanish 



Neil D. Scheer 
Psychology 





Mary-Ellen Schofield 
Psychology 



Judith Sciabarrasi 
Mathematics 







Elaine L. Scott 
Medical Technology 



Vicki A. Sederholm 
Sociology 



Gary R. Shepherd 
Biology 



David R.Smith 
Marine Biology 




Judith A. Soares 
Biology 



153 




Maria H. Sousa 
Portuguese 




David A. Souza 
Marine Biology 




Gary F. Souza 
Economics 





Karen A. Sowa 
Sociology 



Joseph A. Spooner 
Spanish 








Claudette R.St. 


Roger Staves 


Timothy B. Stephens 


Gary R. Stern 


Joyce D. Stiles 


Germain 


Marine Biology 


Multidisciplinary 


Psychology 


Sociology 


History 




Studies 








Linwood G. Straight 
History 







Laura J. Strauss 
Psychology 



Sharon J. Stringer 
Psychology 



Elaine J. Struzziero 
Psychology 



Christina M. Sullivan 
Sociology 



154 




Kathleen M. Sullivan 
Medical Technology 




Margaret E. Sullivan 

Multidisciplinary 

Studies 




David A. Surprenant 
Mathematics 




David K. Sykes 
English 




Antonio A. Teixeira 
Portuguese 








Williann J. Tocci 


Joseph Toomey, )r. 


Susan B. Travassos 


Lynne A. Tuskey 


Barbara A. Urban 


Multidisciplinary 


Philosophy 


Sociology 


Sociology 


English 


Studies 
















Allen R. Valcourt 


Ann Vasconcellos 


Ernestina D. 


Monica A. Ventura 


Susan A. Viera 


History 


Psychology 


Vasconcelos 
English 


Mathematics 


Sociology 



155 




Sandra A. Viveiros 
Mathematics 




Ernest A. Vohnoutka 

Multidisciplinary 

Studies 




Laurice |. Waclawik 
Medical Technology 




Kathleen A. Wade 
Sociology 




Alan Walmsley 
Political Science 




Christine E.Walsh 
Sociology 




Maureen S. Walsh 
Psychology 




Lorna A. Weldinj 
Sociology 





Chad L.Weston 
Biology 



Rachel P.White 
Medical Technology 




Christopher 

Wiernicki 

Biology 




Elizabeth A. Wilding 
Medical Technology 




Edward K. Wojnar 
History 




Susan C. York 
Psychology 




Sandra M. 
Youngblood 
Marine Biology 



156 




Melanie C. Ysaguirre 
Medical Technology 



College of 

Business and 

Industry 




Melake Adhanom 
Accounting 





Jane E. Almeida 
Accounting 



Nina M. Alves 
Management 



Bruce |. Amaral 
Accounting 








Jeffrey L. Andrade 
Accounting 



William ). Angelini 
Accounting 



John D. Arsenaul 
Accounting 



David ). Baker 
Management 



Kenneth ). Barber 
Management 




)ohn R. Baudreau, Jr. 
Textile Chemistry 




Joseph V. Benevides, 



Finance 




Louis Berard 
Management 




Robert Berche 
Management 




Richard C. Berman 
Marketing 



157 




Richard M. Bird 
Finance 




Michael ). Bishop 
Accounting 




Andrew C. Bjornson 
Textile Technology 




Stephen H. 
Boothman 
Management 




Arnold C. Boucher 
Textile Technology 






David A. Bridgwood 
Accounting 



James R. Brown 
Marketing 



Lindsey A. Bshara 
Finance 





Steven ). Camara 
Management 



Roger |. Cardinal 
Accounting 




Richard A. Carlson 
Management 






Thomas F. Casey 
Management 



John S. Caswell 
Management 



Marilyn E. Caswell 
Management 




Arthur ). Chaves 
Accounting 



158 




DavidJ.Chiulli 
Management 







Robert J. Christie 
Management 



Noreen A. Collins 
Management 



Thomas M. Connelly 
Management 



Cheryl M. Cook 
Accounting 








Robert J. Corcoran 
Textile Technology 



Edward A. Cormier 
Management 



David B. Costa 
Management 



Stephen W. Costa 
Textile Technology 



Louis J. Cuddy 
Textile Technology 






Michael J. Cuoco 
Management 



Cynthia M. Curley 
Accounting 



John J. Czyzewski 
Accounting 




Ramiro Dafonseca 
Accounting 




Randolph H. Dagley 
Management 



159 






David M. Darsch 
Finance 



Stephen G. Decastro 
Managennent 



Sharron A. Demille 
Marketing 





M. Luisa C. Demorais 
Textile Chemistry 



Robin L. Demoura 
Textile Technology 




Maryellen Dervan 
Marketing 







Ronald |. Desrosiers 
Management 



Wayne Doel 
Accounting 



Stephen B. Dolan 
Accounting 



Robert E. Driscoll 
Accounting 








Chester E. Dufrane 
Accounting 



Robert A. Dumais 
Accounting 



Joyce Dupere 
Accounting 



Francis J. Dwyer 
Management 



Diane Dziura 
Accounting 



160 






Michael W. Ellen 
Accounting 



Raymond M. England 
Accounting 



Kenneth ). Facchiano 
Accounting 





Rose M. Figueira 
Accounting 



Elisabeth Finch 
Marketing 





Diane Fitzgerald 
Industrial Relations 



Shaun Fitzpatrick 
Managennent 





Nancy J. Forand 
Accounting 



James E. French 
Industrial Relations 




Donna M. Gagnon 
Management 







John J. Gannon 
Industrial Relations 



David C. Gifford 
Textile Technology 



James Gorman 
Textile Technology 



Roger W. Goyette 
Management 




Philip R. Graham 
Accounting 



161 




Leonard M. 
Grandfield ■ 
Mangement 




Janice M. Gwozdz 
Management 




Paul J. Hamilton 
Management 




Robert S. Harlow 
Management 



Carolyn Hart 
Accounting 




Marianne A. Haskel 
Marketing 




y' 



Cleveland A. Heath 
Textile Technology 




Nancy). Heffernan 
Accounting 




Stephen Hilario 
Management 




Anthony A. Hirsh 
Marketing 




jbBf ^^B^ 


" 


^^m '^ '■ ''^^l 


1 


vvl 


L 










Peter E. Holden 
Management 



Beverly E. Hole 
Marketing 



Waldo Howland 
Management 



Peter J. Iwuc 
Management 



Lenea M. Jeronimo 
Accounting 



162 






Barry G. Karlson 
Management 



Christine M. Kelleher 
Management 



Richard M.Kelley 
Accounting 





Charles R. Kresser 
Management 



Ellen T. Kreutler 
Textile Technology 




loanne E. Kuliga 
Management 




Edmond Lacombe 
Management 




Jacqueline D. 

Lafrance 

Accounting 




Michael E. Laliberte 
Accounting 




lames |. Lally 
Accounting 




Robert Larochelle 
Accounting 




John ), Lee 
Management 




Karen R. Lerner 
Accounting 







S?^>"5 



Marc H. Levasseur 
Management 




Melvin Lightford 
Marketing 



163 








DavicJ Liimalainen 
Managomont ' 



Dobra A. Lubker 
Accounting 



lames P. Mahaney 
Management 



Brian A. Mahoney 
Accounting 



Paul C. Martins 
Accounting 




David ). Mathias 
A( counting 




Frank M. Mattos 
Management 




Nancy M. Mazewski 
Textile Technology 




imm 



Kevin G. McAlarney 
Accounting 




loseph A. McCabe 
Accounting 




Stephen P. McCarthy 
Textile Chemistry 








Donald McKeton 
Management 



Lincia |. Medeiros 
Management 




William A. Mendes 
Management 




Michael |. Mikina 
Textile Technology 



164 




Eric A. Miller 
Accounting 






Raymond Miner 
Management 



Anne Marie Moore 
Management 



Patricia M. Moore 
Marketing 




Stephen F. Morgan 
Marketing 




John E. Moylan, )r. 
Management 





Michael P. 
Mulrooney 
Textile Technology 





Laura T. Murray 
Marketing 





Ronald W. Nunes 
Textile Chemistry 




Gary F. O'Grady 
Marketing 



Donna M. Oliveira 
Accounting 



Thomas Pacheco 
Accounting 



Robert Paleczka 
Management 




Joseph A. Oflley 
Management 




Mark T. Partridge 
Management 



16S 








Mary G. Patricio 
Textile Chemistry 



lane E. Pavao 
Management 



Peter L. Pederzani 
Finance 



Frank D. Penacho 
Accounting 



FHelena M. Pilsmaker 
Management 





Lucie M. Plant 
Marketing 



Duane Polselli 
Accounting 






Paula M. Polselli 
Accounting 



Mark S. Pomes 
Accounting 



Robert A. Ponath 
Management 





Kevin T. Pratt 
Finance 



Stephen |. Prone 
Management 






Brian W. Rankin 
Accounting 



Jane M. Riley 
Marketing 



Raymond B. Roberts 
Industrial Relations 



166 




Charlene M. 

Robillard 

Accounting 




Bryant K. Robinson 
Finance 




Jeffrey A. Rubino 
Accounting 




Karen A. Ryan 
Accounting 




Albert M. Santos 
Textile Technology 








Antonio |. Santos 
Accounting 



Guy C. Savino 
Management 



Bruce Seich 
Accounting 



Anthony Simmons 
Marketing 



Susan F. Singer 
Management 






Patricia Sinkiewicz 
Management 



Kathleen Sitarz 
Accounting 



Carl E. Sjoquist 
Marketing 




Paul D. Sorii 
Management 




Michael D. Souza 
Textile Technology 



167 




^«: _ 

Philip P. Spivack 
Accounting 




Sharon L. Stacey 
Textile Chemistry 




Kenneth E. Steen 
Textile Technology 




Donald M. 
Stewardson 
Textile Technology 




Brian ). Sullivan 
Accounting 




Elaine M. Sylvain 
Accounting 




David Sylvia 
Textile Technology 




Rose M. Talisman 
Textile Technology 




John |. Tavares 
Accounting 




Michael Tavares 
Marketing 




Robert ). Toole 
Management 






Janet A. Tremblay 
Accounting 



Paul H. Turgeon 
Management 



Kenneth L. Vieira 
Marketing 




Rita Watson 
Finance 



168 








lames H. Weathers 
Accounting 



Douglas F. Weeden 
Textile Technology 



Terry W. Welch 
Management 



I.Charles West 
Marketing 



Dennis G. Wilson 
Marketing 




Malcolm D. 
Woodward 
Marketing 




College of 
Engineering 




Satoji Yoshida 
Management 



Abilio I. Almeida 
Civil Engineering 
Technology 











% 





Alan A. Benevides 
Civil Engineering 



Peter W. Bergstrom 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Technology 



Paul D. Blanchard 
Electrical 
Engineering 
Technology 



Charles Boulay 
Civil Engineering 





Wayne F. Beauregard 
Civil Engineering 
Technology 



Wayne R. Bender 

Mechanical 

Engineering 




Bruce E. Buckland 

Mechanical 

Engineering 



169 




Paul T. Cabral 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Technology 





170 



Donald E. Derouin 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Technology 







Robert Campbell 
Civil Engineering 



Matt A. Card 
Civil Engineering 



Dennis N. Carreiro 
Civil Engineering 









Anthony F. Dietzler 

Electrical 

Engineering 



Daniel P. Dougherty 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Technology 



Daryll C. Dowty 
Electrical 
Engineering 
Technology 



Robert D. Collet 
Electrical 
Engineering 




Scott W. Costa 


Martin J. Cuddy 


Mark R. Curry 


Thomas ). Deane 


Robert P. Delisle 


Civil Engineering 


Mechanical 


Electrical 


Electrical 


Mechanical 




Engineering 
Technology 


Engineering 
Technology 


Engineering 


Engineering 




Robert M. Dubinsky 
Civil Engineering 




James A. Dulude 

Mechanical 

Engineering 




Javad Golchini 
Electrical 
Engineering 
Technology 




Hossein 
Haghanizadeh 
Civil Engineering 







Charles M. Ely 
Electrical 
Engineering 
Technology 



Steven M. Ferreira 

Electrical 

Engineering 





Michael ). Gonet 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Technology 



Robert C. Greska 

Mechanical 

Engineering 




Paul V. Hancy 
Electrical 
Engineering 
Technology 




William R. Hawe 

Electrical 

Engineering 



David Fletcher 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Technology 



David Fredette 
Civil Engineering 
Technology 




Mark E. Guillemette 
Textile Technology 




C.Geoffrey FHeckler 

Mechanical 

Engineering 




Shovi/-poGuo 

Electrical 

Engineering 




Kevin F. FHunt 

Mechanical 

Engineering 



171 





Victor J. lannuzzi 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Technology 



Steven E. Johnson 

Mechanical 

Engineering 





Tommy W. Kwan 

Electrical 

Engineering 



wll W 

Kin Lai 

Civil Engineering 









Samuel W, Kabbash 
Electrical 
Engineering 
Technology 



Eric J. Kessler 

Mechanical 

Engineering 





Ronald P. Lambalot 

Electrical 

Engineering 



Robert F. Leduc 

Mechanical 

Engineering 





AlanW. Kotfila 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Technology 




Thomas R. Lincoln 
Electrical 
Engineering 
Technology 




172 



David Lowe 


Alan W. Martel 


Daniel J. McCarthy 


Paul M. McDonald 


David F. Mello 


Electrical 


Electrical 


Mechanical 


Mechanical 


Civil Engineerin 


Engineering 


Engineering 


Engineering 
Technology 


Engineering 
Technology 


Technology 





Glenn R, Merrill 

Electrical 

Engineering 



Weld S. Morse 
Civil Engineering 
Technology 




Robert E. Mulligan 
Civil Engineering 
Technology 




Hugh ). Neenan 
Civil Engineering 




Thomas Ollila 

Mechanical 

Engineering 





John M. Pereira 
Civil Engineering 



Athanasios Pitliangas 

Electrical 

Engineering 






John F. Poirier 

Electrical 

Engineering 





Ronald K. Purdy 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Technology 





Robert A. Rankin 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Technology 




Mark R. Ronan 
Mechanical 


Francesco Salamone 
Mechanical 


John T. Salisbury 
Mechanical 


Rand T. Santos 
Civil Engineering 


David S. Sargent 
Mechanical 


Engineering 
Technology 


Engineering 
Technology 


Engineering 
Technology 


Technology 


Engineering 
Technology 



173 




Attila Senear 
Civil Engineering 





Alexander j. 

Stevenson 

Electrical Engineering 

Technology 




Richard A. White 

Electrical 

Engineering 



JafarM. Shafigh 
Civil engineerin£ 




Earle T. Stewart 

Electrical 

Engineering 




174 



Kenneth R. Wilson 
Mechanical 
Engineering 
Technology 




Stephen E. Silva 

Mechanical 

Engineering 




John P. Tarpey 
Civil Engineering 
Technology 






Peter J. Wilson 
Electrical 
Engineering 
Technology 





Robert C. Soderberg 

Electrical 

Engineering 




Charles E. Todd 
Electrical 
Engineering 
Technology 



Si 




Frank Woodfall 
Civil Engineering 
Technology 



Thomas F. Starkey 
Electrical 
Engineering 
Technology 




Christopher Turek 
Civil Engineering 




Robert D. Zanrucha 
Civil Engineering 
Technology 



College of 
Nursing 




Barbara L. Bell 
Nursing 




Amy L. Blanchard 
Nursing 




Sharon M. Cambra 
Nursing 




Cynthia ). Centola 
Nursing 




Richard P. Colwell 
Nursing 




Nancy J. Congdon 
Nursing 





Kathleen Cooper 
Nursing 



Doreen A. Correia 
Nursing 




Paulene j. Deluca 
Nursing 




Denise M. Doherty 
Nursing 






Ann M. Donaghue 
Nursing 



Sheila M. Dorgan 
Nursing 



Susan L. Duffy 
Nursing 




Monica Ferraro 
Nursing 




Martha B. Flanigan 
Nursing 



175 




Ann D. Gibbons 
Nursing 




Patricia A. Criva 
Nursing 




Patricia M. 
Grzybinski 
Nursing 





Ardys N. Hennemuth 
Nursing 



KathyA. Hesford 
Nursing 








Debra Hurwitz 
Nursing 



Christine F. Johnson 
Nursing 



Cathy F. Korn 
Nursing 



Maryann Kulpa 
Nursing 



Ellen A. Mahoney 
Nursing 







Jeanne M. Malicia 
Nursing 



Patricia A. Maynard 
Nursing 



Sheila A. McCormack 
Nursing 



Cynthia T. Mitton 
Nursing 




Janet M. Monast 
Nursing 



176 






Pamela ). Neil 
Nursing 



Cynthia ). Ness 
Nursing 



Christine A. O'Brien 
Nursing 





Marian J. Rose 
Nursing 



Donna ). Sherman 
Nursing 




Brenda M. Splitz 
Nursing 




Ann M. Zarek 
Nursing 



College of Visual 
and Performing 
Arts 




Priscilla W. Beck 
Textile Design 




Hubert Bridgeforth, 

Jr. 

Visual Design 




Catherine L. Cacho 
Visual Design 




Deborah A. Camara 
Visual Design 




Brian W. Casey 
Painting 




1 Ss^i-J 




Glenn R. Cook 
Visual Design 



X 



Ann D. Coulson 
Visual Design 




Diane Davison 
Visual Design 



177 








Daniel G. Doherty 
Visual Design 



Thonnas M. Dowd 
Visual Design 



Loretta Gatto 
Textile Design 



Debra A. Graczyk 
Art Education 



Mary C.Hall 
Visual Design 





Patricia M. Hanlon 
Visual Design 



Susan M. Hansen 
Visual Design 






Richard J. Helvvij 
Art Education 



Richard C. Hurd 
Visual Design 



Kim S. Jennings 
Painting 



f^^ ^. 




William H. Lane 
Visual Design 




Richard C. Lincoln 
Visual Design 




William F. Lindsay 
Visual Design 




Robin W. Louis 
Textile Design 




Marilyn M. Lynds 
Art History 



178 







Elizabeth A. Morris 
Art Education 



Karen A. O'Brien 
Visual Design 



Eileen A. O'Connor 
Art Education 



Mark L. Ouellette 
Painting 




Sheila ). Provazza 
Painting 






Valerie J. Pugatch 
Painting 



Carol H. Ras 
Visual Design 



Peter C. Richey 
Art Education 




Michael P. Roy 
Visual Design 




Clifford L.Stoltze 
Visual Design 





Robert E. Taylor 
Visual Design 



Janet B. Terban 
Textile Design 




David A, Vozar 
Visual Design 




Jeanne A. Whalon 
Textile Design 




Marianna R. Williams 
Painting 



179 




Audrey ). Witt 
Visual Design 




Nancy M. Wojnar 
Art Education 



^f*^ 



^V^^ 




Garry A. Wolfe 
Visual Design 



Karen L. Wyks 
Textile Design 




Marcia A. Younj 
Art Education 




Karen A. Zahorskey 
Visual Design 



180 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Dean Joseph P. Sauro 

Biology 

Sandra Ann Beaton 

Robert ). Borders 

Colleen Mary Brown 

Timothy Joseph Donovan 

Joseph Patrick Dyer 

Joseph Thomas Fitzgerald 

Robert V. Frates 

Paul F^, Gamache 

Margaret Ceist 

Jeffrey Alan FHeroux 

Katharine Verne Jackson 

Ray Levias 
William K. Mason 

Barbara Carol Matson 

Nancy E. Mattila 

Kathleen Anne Moran 
Jane Alice Offringa 
Maryann Theresa O'Melia 
Robert Lee Perreira 
John F. Quinn 
Carol A. Richards 
Howard Jay Rosenfeld 
Gary Robert Sheperd 
William H. Sierra 
Joanne LeMay Smith 
David A. Souza 
Joseph L. Viana 
Chad L. Weston 
Christopher Wiernicki 



Marine Biology 

James Latimer Buckley 
Ronald E. Butt 
Martha Rose Carter 
Susan Lynne Edelstein 
Susan Mary Faria 
Donald Raymond Flynn 
Kenneth G. Gaudette 



Paul Geoghegan 

David H. Jennings 

Hildegard Reynolds Livingstone 

Janet E. Long 

Janet M. Martin 

Andrew J. McKnight 

Frank J. Mello 

Michael D. Murphy 

John Gerard New 

Eileen Antoinette Nickerson 

Bruce W. Nowinowski 

Gerald N. Paquette 

Robert Ingalls Riley, Jr. 

Dale Laura Saad 

David R. Smith 

Roger Peter Staves 

Sandra M. Voungblood 



Chemistry 

Donald Robert Cappadona 
Doloretta D. Dawicki 
Michael Anthony Macedo 
William Richard Moore, |r. 
John Wentworth Parks 
Joanne V. Taddei 
Kenneth L. Vieira 



Economics 

David M. Demers 
Mario Jose Amaral Fortuna 
Michael P. Heywood 
Michael P. FHodkinson 
George Moses 
Gary F. Souza 
John M. Sullivan 
lames F. Williamson 



English 



Rebecca Robin Adams 
Marian Amaral 



Carmen Marc Arena 
Patricia Sayward August 
David A. Augustinho 
Victor Barbato 
Nancy Lee Silvia Barboza 
Ernest Belli 
Vincent John Berube 
Kevin Anthony Breen 
Alice Castro 
Barbara Jeanne Gate 
Claudia Louise Comstock 
Paul Richard Cordiero 
Susanne E. Costa 
Rita M. Coutu 
Ruth Therese Davis 
Caroline FHarlow Derouin 
Grace Jane Dostou 
Marc J. Gamache 
James P. Gauthier 
Mary Lou Gidley 
Carol F. Ginsberg 
Kenneth Otto Goranson 
Wayne G. Gregory 
Anne Elizabeth Grenon 
David R. Guenette 
Robert Raymond FHall 
Patricia E. FHendrickx 
David B. Jolivet 
Richard A. Kershaw 
Donna Lynn Laferriere 
Thomas A. LeClerc 
David R. Lussier 
Steven F. Lynch 
Suzan Mary Lynch 
Paul L. McGarr 
Lisa Morrissette McGrady 
Elizabeth Ann Medeiros 
Nancy Ann Mileon 
Lynne Nolan Miller 
Jane Lynn Mogayzel 
Ann Morey 
Brian James Moriarty 
Donna M. O'Connor 
Pauline A. Ouellette 
Christopher Paul Ouimet 



181 



Norma D. Perry 
Nina ). Ponte 
Bonnie Carol Radin 
Ann Marie Vieira Robert 
Susan York Simonsis 
Deborah L. Smith 
Kerry Sullivan 
David Kenneth Sykes 
David P. Tidwell 
Diana H. Tsouprake 
Barbara Ann Urban 
Ernestina D. Vasconcelos 
Lynn A. Watson 
William Henry Whalen IV 



French 

Clarisse C. Amaral 
Karen Marlene Holmes 
Dana Larrivee 
Carol Rego 



German 

Kyriaki Fotiadis 

Portuguese 

)oyce Maria de Almeida 
Idalia Amaral 
Antonio F. D. Cabral 
Gabriel T. Cabral 
LuisG. da Rosa 
Anna-Paula Ferreira 
John M. Gonsalves 
Ann Marie Gouveia 
Joseph F. Reis 
Helen Sallum 
Maria Helena Sousa 
Alda M. Souza 
Gary Roy Tavares 
Antonio A. Teixeira 
Rozaria Fatima Vieira 



Spanish 

Margaret Arruda 
William I.Cole 
Rita Elizabeth Donovan 
Sharon Ann Labonte 
Sherry-Ann Lopes 
Edmundo Andrade Macedo 
lames Mulrooney 
Liduina Noverc^a 
Robert E. Ratigan, |r. 
Marshall S. Sawyer 
loseph Allan Spooner 

History 

Mark Gregory Abelson 

Edward Karl Anderson 

Margaret M. Ball 

Steven M. Beauchamp 

Catherine Elizabeth Butler 

Beatrice Eleanor Duffy Chaves 

Daniel A. Clarke 

Robert L. Cooper 

Richard A. Entel 

George Dwight Gardner 

Glenn D. Gardner 

Thomas E. Gomes 

Raymond |ohn Houtman 

lohn Hurley 

Steven E. Kocur 

lane E. Onges Little 

Paul McCoy 

Terrence Peter Meredith 

Alfred C. Mierzejewski 

Daniel F. Pires 

loanne Poulos 

Dorothy Rae Kimble Rhodes 

Ronald F. Riley 

Linwood George Straight 

Timothy V. Sullivan 

Pearl R. Szatek 

Allen Robert Valcourt 

Cheryl A. Mahon Viveiros 

Edward K. Wojnar 



FHumanities/Social Sciences 

Alfred Paul Arruda 
Mildred A. Frances Barry 
Sean G. Dooley 
George Russell Duarte 
Sarah Havener 
Sandra Hayward 
loan Braga Kelly 
Steven Brad Lamarche 
Theresa L. Leahy 
Denise jo Marsico 
Walter |. Mitchell 
Elizabeth |. Sauro 
Elaine Smagacz 
Claudette R. St. Germain 
Mary-Ellen Tunney Whittle 

Mathematics 

Ermelinda Pereira Antunes 
lohn Michael Laffan 
Carl G. Rehbein 



Mathematics 

joel S. Avila 

lames A. Banks 

Theresa M. Belli 

lames Russell Castleberry 

William loseph Freitas 

Michelle Doris Gamache 

Rosemary Gracia 

Kathleen Marie Holmes 

lohn lames Horseman 

George Itz 

Teresa Margaret Mary Kennedy 

Louise T. Lemaire 

Edward |. McAloon, |r. 

loan Maureen Newman 

Su^san Marie Pereira 

Robert O. Pekins, |r. 

Richard P. Rousseau 

ludith Sciabarrasi 



182 



David A. Surprenant 
Monica Ann Ventura 
Sandra Ann Viveiros 



Medical Technology 

Lynn Marie Anderson 
Patrice Babineau 
Paula M. Bennett 
Francine Freitas Bouska 
Diane Coughlin 
Ann Marie Faria 
Paul Fontaine 
FHollie Susan Hailiwell 
Patricia Ann Medeiros 
Edward S. Pinkoski 
Catherine Helen Reid 
David Thomas Sarna 
Elaine Louise Scott 
Kathleen Marie Sullivan 
Laurice Jean Waclawik 
Rachel Plagenza White 
Elizabeth Ann Wilding 
Melanie Ysaguirre 



Multidisciplinary Studies 

Judith A. Ainneida 
William Begley 
Susan M. Caron 
Kathleen B. Curtis 
Phyllis A. Davenport 
Wendy G. Friedman 
Paul G. Gaboriault 
Stephanie Eileen Gibson 
Kathleen A. Gleason 
lames ). Harris 
Isabel Alves Jorge 
Karen Ann Kagan 
Jacqueline V. King 
Kathleen Maloney 
Elaine M. Miller 
Joseph Mills 
Elaine C. Oliveira 



Janice Marie Rose 
Jean Pell Rose 
Deborah Lynn Ruggieri 
Helen D. Saulino 
Eileen Shields 
Jane Lea Simons 
Manuel Souza 
Karol Spear 
Timothy B. Stephens 
Patricia Texeira 
William J. Tocci 
Judith Taber Tolley 
Ernest A. Vohnoutka, jr. 



Multidisciplinary Studies 
Margaret Elizabeth Roberts Sullivan 



Philosophy 

Elizabeth A. Lacey 
Martie F. McDonald 
Paul M. Rezendes 



Physics 

Michael Joseph Bucko 
Marianne McCaffrey 
Joseph Edmund Toomey, Jr. 



Political Science 

Richard Van Allyn Aspen 
Peter Rainer Bargende 
Alan J. Bellefeuille 
Susan J. Belliveau 
Brian C. Burns 
Steven M. Cadieux 
Dianne Irene Coleman 
Truzell DeRamus 
James Bradford Gilmore 
Margaret Riley Gollub 



Denise M. Haywood 
William L. Herbert 
Wayne Robert Hoover 
Jeffrey B. Janson 
Stephen E. Laurie 
Drew R. LeBlanc 
Christina Denise Littlefield 
Carl Loria 

Maryanne Monahan 
William S. Napolitano 
Robin Dee Paiva 
Denise Ann Pelletier 
Kevin J. Rice 
Steven Michael Rogers 
David Bruce Rowland 
John C. Ryan 
John E. Sweeney 
John F. Tullie 
Paul Anthony Ventura 
Alan Walmsley 
Stephen A, Wood 

Psychology 

Cynthia L. Ambroseno 
Margaret Vieira Ariagno 
Barbara Groncki Audino 
James Richard Ayotte 
Janice Anna Backman 
Sharon Anne Bacon 
Stephanie M. Baker 
Brian J. Barros 
Karen F. Breitbord 
Robert H. Briggs, Jr. 
Jane Ellen Burnell 
Cynthia A. Bzdula 
Lorrie Ann Cabral 
Christine Marie Calvetti 
Wayne Joseph Camara 
Diane Elizabeth Campbell 
Thomas D. Cann 
Lorrie Jane Cardoza 
Arthur Carvalhojr. 
Susan Carvalho 
Jo-Ellen Casey 



183 



Kathryn Ann Cassidy 
Oliver Patrick Cipollini, jr. 
lames Forrest Cook 
Paul James Costa 
Lucia Demelo 
Constance DeTerra 
Roger Gerard Dextradeur 
Robert Wayne Dias 
Barbara Esther Donnellan 
Renee Donnelly 
Paula Marie Ducharme 
Joyce R. Dutra 
Dorothy Gail Egbert 
Carol Jeanne English 
Frances Correia Fairbanks 
Carol Ann Falcon 
Deborah W. Farnum 
David A. Flechsig 
Deborah Anne Foss 
Geraldine D. Frates 
Ronald A. Gagne 
Marcelle Gauvin 
Bernice Ann Goldstein 
Arlene Gomes 
William Alfred Goodman 
Joseph FH. Gracia 
Richard E. Guillemette 
Teresa Leona FHav\/es 
Janice M. FHeaney 
Dorothy Hodge 
Sally E. lanis 
Nancy L. Johnson 
Debra A. Kavanaugh 
Lorraine Frances Khazan 
Peter Nicholas Kosta 
Daniel Earle Lamond 
Nanette Jeanne Lavoie 
Lori Jane Levesque 
Kathy Jean Long 
John B. Lopes 
Patricia J. Lyons 
Karen Lee Machado 
Sharon Patrice Mainguy 
Karen L. Marchand 
Marie Marcotte 



Patricia Anne Marshall 

Elizabeth A. Martin 

Gary Running Bear Martin 

Brian K. McCaffrey 

Edward F. McCormick 

Frances Ann McGowen 

Barbara Medeiros 

Deborah Lynne Medeiros 

Michael Medeiros 

Norma E. Meehan 

Beverly Marie Mendonca 

James Moore 

Debra Lee Morgan 

Karin F. Morse 

Jeanne R. Napolitano 

Lisa B. NataN 

Peter F. Nevins 

Joanne Noble 

Mary Ruth Noble 

Gail Novo 

Karen C. Ohrenberger 

Cathy L. O'Neal 

Anne F. O'Neill 

Paul Gerard Ouellette 

Daune Wentworth Peckham 

Linda R. Peckham 

Jean C. Pegg 

Maria Manuela Pereira 

Donna L. Petitjean 

Carol Ann Raposa 

Ana C. Rego 

Linda Marie Rego 

Joseph Robillard 

Donna M. Rondeau 

Pauline j. Rousseau 

LuAnn Irene Saunders 

Neil Douglas Scheer 

Mary-Ellen Schofield 

Debra L. Shaw 

Robert Leonard Shaw 

Nancy L. Silva 

Pamela G. Singleton 

Debra Lee Smith 

James Souza 

Gary R. Stern 



Brenda FH. Stone 

Laura Jean Strauss 

Sharon Jane Stringer 

Elaine Julie Struzziero 

Barbara Diana Sylvia 

Tracey Lee Sylvia 

Stephen Francis Theberge, Jr. 

Joan M. Tripp 

Ann Vasconcellos 

Desiree Vincent 

Joseph F. Walkden 

Richard Alan Walmsley, Sr. 

Maureen S. Walsh 

Elizabeth A. Ward 

Sandra L. Watling 

James ). Weeden 

Lee A. Weir 

Susan C York 

Mark Wellwood Yuille 



Sociology 

Krisline Lois Ainsley 

John Winston Ball 

Pamela Joan Barao 

Pamela Ann Barros 

Cheryl A. Beaucage 

Maurice Bernique 

Jannine L. Bertrand 

Bonnie J. Bliss 

David A. Bonaparte 

Raymond Maurice Boulanger, Jr. 

John Edward Bouley 

Janice Braga 

Charles M. Briody 

Nancy Susan Brody 

Bradford R. Burns 

Douglas G. Cabral 

Carol Ann Caron 

Marc Charette 

Lisa C. Coburn 

Daniel John Correia 

Carol Davis 

Joseph L. Dias 

Nancy A. Dias 



184 



Mary Ann Duffy 
Thomas W. Dunse 
Debra Ann Faria 
Arlene May Fernandes 
Manuel James Fernandez 
Debra Ann Foley 
Ellen Dunbar Ford 
Bennet B. Fuller, )r. 
Charles A. Gaspardi 
Sandra C. Giger 
Sean P. FHargraves 
Ernest Joseph Houle, Jr. 
Emily FHoutman 
George Paine FHussey 
Keith Jones 
llene S. Karlsberg 
Edith Altman Kleger 
Charles J. Kosinski 
Joyce FH. Levias 
Sheila D. Lopes 
Karen Leslie Lyons 
Jean M. MacBarron 
Everett E. Manchester 
John Marshall, Jr. 
Anne Constance Masaitis 
Dale Stephen Mello 
Dermot Paul Moriarty 
Stephen A. Neron 
Janice L. Norton 
Elaine L. O'Keefe 
Kathleen Grace O'Malley 
Gail Anne Pacheco 
Janice M. Payton 
M. Suzanne Perry 
Carin E. Peterson 
Linda Pimentel 
ArJeen Mary Polchlopek 
Ronald Raymond 
Victoria A. Redwood 
Donna Rego Rezendes 
Amy Richmond 
Thomas R. Santos 
Vicki Ann Sederholm 
Christine Mary Scares 
Michael David Souza 



Karen A. Sowa 
Joyce D. Stiles 
Christina Mary Sullivan 
Gloria ). Thurlow 
Susan B. Travassos 
Christopher C. Trundy 
Lynne Anne Tuskey 
Gary Charles Veign 
Susan Anne Vieira 
Kathleen A. Wade 
Christine Edith Walsh 
Lorna Ann Welding 
.Anne K. White 

College of Business and Industry 

Dean Richard j. Ward, B.S., Ph.D. 

Accounting 

Robert Michael Abisia 

Melake Adhanom 

Jane E. Almeida 

Bruce Jude Amaral 

Jeffrey Lawrence Andrade 

David Walter Andrew 

William J. Angelini 

John David Arsenault 

James A. Barrows 

William E. Berry 

Michael J. Bishop 

Paul J. Bradley 

David Armond Bridgwood, Jr. 

Roger J. Cardinal 

Raymond P. Charette 

Arthur Joseph Chaves 

Cheryl Marie Cook 

Russell James Correia 

Susan C. Cote 

Cynthia Mary Curley 

John I. Czyzewski 

Ramiro A. R. da Fonseca 

Michael James Davies 

Wayne Russell Doel 

Stephen B. Dolan 

David A. Downing 



Robert Edward Driscoll 
Chester G. Dufrane 
Robert Albert Dumais 
Joyce M. Dupere 
Diane Dziura 
Michael W. Ellen 
Raymond Maurice England 
Kenneth James Facchiano 
Rose M. Figueira 
Nancy J. Forand 
William David Founds 
Garrett Kenan Gavitt 
Philip Richard Graham 
Joan M. Greaves 
Carolyn FHart 

Nancy Jeannette Heffernan 
Geraldine FHolden 
Richard William FHopps 
Lenea M. Jeronimo 
Richard Michael Kelley 
Evelyne M. LaFlamme 
Jacqueline Diane LaFrance 
Michael Edmund Laliberte 
James Joseph Lally 
Robert lohn La Rochelle, Sr. 
FHoward Jay Lazerowich 
David John Leite 
Karen R. Lerner 
Paul A. Levesque 
Debra Ann Lubker 
Brian A. Mahoney 
Paul George Martins 
David Joseph Mathias 
Kevin Gerard McAlarney 
Joseph A. McCabe, Jr. 
Laurence M. McLucas 
Judith Medeiros 
Eric A. Miller 
Donna Marie Oliveira 
Michelle Adams Oyenuga 
Thomas Pacheco 
John Leonard Patricio 
Frank D. Penacho 
Michelle Rita Phenix 
Duane Kurt Polselli 



185 



Paula M. Polselli 
Mark S. Pomes 
Brian W. Rankin 
David Patrick Read 
Richard Ward Reuss 
Charlene M. Robillard 
Jeffrey Alan Rubino 
Karen Ann Ryan 
Antonio J. Santos 
Katherine Ann Santos 

Stephen J. Sears 

Bruce Seich 

James Silva 

Terrance L. Silvernail 

Kathleen Sitarz 

Philip D. Spivack 

Melissa Ann Stimpson 

David A. St. Yves 

Brian J. Sullivan 

Paul E.Surette 

Elaine M. Sylvain 

Kenneth E. Szelag 

)ohn j. Tavares 

Janet A. Tremblay 

James H. Weathers, Jr. 

Walter Ziobro 



Finance 

Joseph V. Benevides, Jr. 
Richard Merrill Bird 
Lindsey A. Bshara 
David Michael Darsch 
Charles Jackson 
Gerald P. Montigny 
Gregg T.Paige 
Robert L. Pedder, Jr. 
Peter Louis Pederzani 
Kevin T. Pratt 
Bryant Keith Robinson 
David A. Rosa 
Richard J. Trexel 
Rita L. Zuber Watson 



Industrial Relations 

Gary W. Felix 
Janet M. Fernandez 
Diane Fitzgerald 
James E. French 
John Joseph Gannon 
Thomas Neal Jordan 
Joseph McCarthy 
Charles E. Moss 
David Alvin Purdy 
Earl Warren Rezendes 
Raymond Barry Roberts 
Robert T. Silvia 



Management 

Louis E. Adam 
Nina M. Alves 
Robert Edward Arsenault 
David Joseph Baker 
Kenneth John Barber 
W. Thomas Barlow 
Louis Berard 
Robert J. Berche 
Michael Bettencourt 
Paul O. Bonenfant 
Stephen H. Boothman 
Thomas L. Bowcock 
Joyce C. Butts 
Steven J. Camara 
Robert Canuel 
Richard A. Carlson 
Thomas F. Casey 
Marilyn E. Caswell 
David Joseph Chiulli 
Robert j. Christie 
Noreen A. Collins 
Thomas M. Connelly 
Edward Arthur Cormier, Jr. 
David Brian Costa 
Scott A, Coulter 
Donna P. Couto 
John Crider 



Michael Joseph Cuoco 
Randolph FHaig Dagley 
David Roger Daigle 
Stephen Gerard De Castro 
Ronald J. Desrosiers 
Joan L. DeTerra 
Francis Joseph Dwyer 
John Ellis 

Antoinette M. Estrella 
Robert Faillace 
Shaun Fitzpatrick, Jr. 
Mark Fornaciari 
Roger F^enry Fortier 
Norman F. Franz 
Donna Marie Gagnon 
Lawrence J. Giammalvo 
Roger Wilfred Goyette 
Leonard Michael Grandfield 
Janice Marie Gwozdz 
Paul J. FHamilton 
Robert Stephen Harlow 
James C. FHarriman 
William FH. FHarrison 
Joseph Noel F^ayes 
Stephen Manuel Hilario 
Peter E. Holden 
Waldo FHowland, Jr. 
Peter J. Iwuc 
Barry G. Karlson 
Mary E. Keegan 
Christine Mary Kelleher 
Charles R. Kresser 
Joanne Morrison Kuliga 
John Joseph Lee, Jr. 
Mark Lefebvre 
Marc Levasseur 
Christine Sophie Liebgott 
David R. Liimatainen 
Kevin hiarley Littlefield 
F. William MacQueen 
James Patrick Mahaney 
Frank Michael Mattos 
Richard Alan McCormack 
Ronald V. McKay 
Donald McKeton 



186 



Karen Theresa McNally 
Linda )oan Medeiros 
William Antone Mendes 
Halina Mierzejewska 
Robert David Miller 
Raymond E. Miner, |r. 
Anne Marie Moore 
)ohn Edward Moylan, )r. 
Charles D. Moynihan 
lames ). Mulvey, )r. 
Brian Douglas Nobrega 
Joseph A. Offley 
Douglas Edwin Oliveira 
Raymond L. Ouellette 
Robert T. Paleczka 
Mark T. Partridge 
Normand Patnaude 
Jane Elizabeth Pavao 
Helena G. Pilsmaker 
Robert Arthur Ponath 
Stephen )ohn Prone 
Thomas F. Qualter 
Rolen R, Rabipour 
Charles P. Read 
Albert Raymond Richard 
David W. Roberts 
Guy Christopher Savino 
David Sequeira 
Mark D. Sheehy 
Jeffrey L. Shing 
Gerald G. Shuck 
John J. Simas 
Susan F. Singer 
Patricia Sinkiewicz 
Donna R. Smolenski 
Gary P. Soares 
Paul David Sorii 
Dennis Sylvia 
Stanley J. Szklany 
Gilbert Teotonio 
Robert j. Toole 
Paul Henry Turgeon 
Alan Edward Voll 
Carl R.Waal 
Ronald E.Webb 



Terry W.Welch 
Mark E. Wellington 
Frederick Wilson 
William A. Winters 
Alan A. Wolfe 
Satoji Yoshida 



Marketing 

Adebayo Titus Adeniyi 
Richard C. Berman 
James R. Brown 
Sharron Anne DeMille 
Mary-Ellen Dervan 
Elisabeth Jane Finch 
Jeffrey A. Freelove 
Allen M. Grace, Jr. 
Marianne Alice Haskell 
Anthony Albert Hirsch 
Beverly F. Hole 
Gary Roy Kurtis 
Melvin Lightford 
Richard D. Manchester 
Nicholas George Maravell 
Patricia Marie Moore 
Stephen F. Morgan 
Laura Theo Murray 
John C. Newcomb 
Gary Francis O'Grady 
Lucie Mariette Plant 
Jane Motta Riley 
Paul I. Schwartz 
James O. Scott, jr. 
Anthony Simmons 
Carl Edmond Sjoquist 
Dennis M. Tangney 
Michael Tavares 
Tuija M. Torniainen 
Stephen Charles Vierra 
I.Charles West 
Dennis G. Wilson 
Malcolm D.Woodward III 



Textile Chemistry 

John Robert Baudreau, jr. 
Marie Luisa C. De Morais 
Robert Green 
Alan leffrey LaBrode 
James Magellan 
Stephan Paul McCarthy 
Ronald Nunes 
Mary G. Patricio 
Randall j. Santos 
Paul W. Souza 
Sharon L. Stacey 
Theodore Rene Steliga 

Textile Technology 

Lynn Ann Barch 
Rene L. Berger 
Andrew C. Bjornson. 
Arnold Corey Boucher 
David M. Butts 
Walter Carter 
Robert j. Corcoran, jr. 
Michael J. Correia 
Carlos Alberto Costa 
Stephen W. Costa 
Louis J. Cuddy 
Robin Lincoln DeMoura 
Michael Duclos 
Ellen Caryn Feibel 
Deborah L. Fields 
David Carlton Gifford 
Joan A. Gonnella 
James Ralph Gorman, Jr. 
Mark Edgar Guillemette 
Virginia A. Harwood 
Cleveland A. Heath 
Ellen T. Kreutler 
Suzanne j. Leshner 
Nancy Marie Mazewski 
Michael Joseph Mikina 
Michael Patrick Mulrooney 
Eric John Oberg 
Scott David Quigley 
Wayne Stanley Romanowicz 



187 



A, Michael Santos 
Michael M. Souza 
Kenneth Edwin Steen 
Donald M. Stewardson, )r. 
David Sylvia 
Rose Marya Talisman 
Denise M. Tolliver 
Wayne Turcotte 
Douglas F. Weeden 

College of Engineering 

Dean Gordon F. Anderson, Sc.B., Sc.M. 
Ph.D. 

Civil Engineering 

Hamid-'Ahadian 
Dana William Anderson 
Cholamhosein S. Askari 
Alan A. Benevides 
Charles F. Boulay 
Roy V. Bousquet 
Matt Alan Card 
Robert James Carey 
Dennis N. Carreiro 
John E. Cauley, )r. 
Alan C. Cavacas 
Scott W.Costa 
Raymond R. Dumas 
Charles F. Eckert 
Robert |. Grota 
FHossein Haghanizadeh 
David T. FHickox 
Andrew Kin-Kau Lai 
Brian Andrew Lawton 
William M. Mahoney 
Esfandiar Motameni 
Gary S. Munroe 
Hugh |. Neenan 
Arthur A. Nelson, )r. 
)ohn M. Pereira 
Atilla Senear 

Mohammad Jafar Shafigh 
Russell FH. Smith 
Christopher Turek 



Paul D.Wilkinson 



Civil Engineering Technology 

Abilio Almeida 

Michael Anthony Auriemma 

Wayne E. Beauregard 

John F. Dempsey 

Kevin M. Foley 

David Joseph Fredette 

Alan Hughes 

Mark Layne Husnander 

Arthur Paul Laferriere 

David Francis Mello 

Weld Sawyer Morse 

Robert E. Mulligan 

Gordon E. Ramsbottom, )r. 

Bradford S. Rea 

Rand Thomas Santos 

Thomas Silva 

William T. Southworth 

R. Philip Swanson, jr. 

John P. Tarpey 

Michael R.Todd 

Frank C.Woodfall 

Robert David Zanrucha 



Electrical Engineering 

Frederick E, Brown 
Harold F. Campbell 
Paul ). Chrupcala 
Robert Dennis Collet 
Brian W. Coulombe 
Thomas James Deane 
Steven Michael Ferreira 
Hak Yung Fung 
Felix S. Gregorian 
William R. Hawe 
Ronald P. Lambalot 
David Lowe 
Alan William Martel 
Abel Massa 
David C. May 



Glenn Robert Merrill 
Alan Richard Otico 
Athanasios N. Pitliangas 
John F. Poirier 
Bradford M, Raymond 
Paul Rebello 
Anastasios Simopoulos 
Peter ). Sliwa 
Robert Carl Soderberg 
Earle Tyler Stewart, )r. 
Paul E. Tripp 
Chuck-Wai Wan 
Richard A. White, |r. 

Electrical Engineering Technology 

Carlos Avelino Amado 
Paul David Blanchard 
Richard A. Breed III 
Mark Richard Curry 
Daryll C. Dowty 
Charles M. Ely 
lavad-Golchini 
Paul Vincent Haney 
Garry jarjoura 
Samuel W. Kabbash 
Peter D. Lavallee 
Thomas R. Lincoln 
Kenneth Dale Morris 
Thomas Joseph Principe, )r. 
Gerald F. Schuster 
Thomas F. Starkey 
Alexander J. Stevenson 
Charles Edward Todd 
Douglas P. Wilder 
Peter Jeffrey Wilson 

Mechanical Engineering 

Wayne Roy Bender 
William H. Bogins 
Bruce E. Buckland 
Marvin W. Clements 
David Eugene Curran 



Robert Paul Delisle 
)ames Andre Dulude 
Robert A. Fushi 
Robert Charles Greska 
G. Geoffrey Heckler 
Kevin Francis FHunt 
Steven E. Johnson 
Eric ). Kessler 
Michael Kirkman 
Robert L. Leduc 
Norman Carl Lehberger 
Steven C. Mazurek 
Thomas Alan Ollila 
Thomas ). Schillinger 
Stephen Edward Silva 
Andrew FH, Twombly 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 

FHarry M. Alkire 
Peter Warren Bergstrom 
Armand P. Boillat 
Paul Thomas Cabral 
Mark S. Carter 
Leslie F. Costa, Jr. 
Martin John Cuddy 
Donald E. Derouin 
Denis E. Desautels 
Daniel P. Dougherty 
David R. Fletcher 
Michael Joseph Gonet 
Victor J. lannuzzi 
AlanW. Kotfila 
James Manning Lewis 
Roger W. Masson 
Daniel J. McCarthy 
Paul M. McDonald 
Ronald Keith Purdy 
Robert A. Rankin 
Fred FH. Reynolds 
Mark R. Ronan 
Francesco Salamone 
John Thomas Salisbury 
David Scott Sargent 
Kenneth Robert Wilson 



College of Nursing 

Dean Joyce Y. Passos, R.N., Ph.D. 

Nursing 

Eileen M. Angelo 
Doreen E. Artiano 
Louise Racine Bastarache 
Karen Batti 
Barbara L. Bell 
Amy Lorraine Blanchard 
Mary Louise Botelho 
Sharon Marie Cambra 
Cynthia Jean Centola 
Richard Paul Colwell 
Nancy jean Congdon 
Kathleen Cooper 
Doreen Ann Correia 
Kathryn A. Cullen 
Charlene Mary Dallmann 
Paulene Jay DeLuca 
Melanie J. Denison 
Eleanora Gracia DiTocco 
Nancy Lynn Dizer 
Denise M. Doherty 
Ann M. Donaghue 
Sheila Mary Dorgan 
Susan Leiia Duffy 
Melvin William Farnsworth 
Monica Ferraro 
Martha Beatrice Flanigan 
Arlene Foman 
Elizabeth ). Fournier 
Dinah Garant 
Ann Denise Gibbons 
Patricia A. Griva 
Patricia Marie Grzybinski 
Ardys N. FHennemuth 
Kathy Ann FHesford 
Judity Moore FHolland 
Debra FHurwitz 
Christine Frances Johnson 
Susan Kenney 
Janice Kathleen Kimmel 
Cathy F. Korn 



Najwa Paris Ksaifi 

Maryann Kulpa 

Cynthia jean Lord 

Ellen A. Mahoney 

Jeanne Marie Malicia 

Paulette Manssuer 

Ruth Ann Martin 

Patricia A. Maynarci 

Sheila Ann McCormack 

Rose F. Medeiros 

Cynthia T. Mitton 

Janet Marie Monast 

Pamela June Neil 

Cynthia jane Ness 

Mary L. Neves 

Christine Ann O'Brien 

jumoke Olufunmilayo Osobu 

Catherine Nancy Parker 

Jenny Richard 

Larry D. Robbins 

Marian June Rose 

Susan Saraiva 

Donna Lee Seagrave 

Donna j. Sherman 

Patricia A. Snell 

Brenda M. Splitz 

Cahterine A, R. Sullivan 

Carol A. Swift 

Catherine A. Syby 

Robert Michael Tobojka 

Richard James Torraco 

Joan M. Vitello 

Cheryl A. Whalley 

Ann Marie Zarek 

College of Visual and Performing Arts 

Dean Dietmar R. Winkler 

Art Education 

Sharon Lee Carloni 
Pamela Anne Chase 
Shelley L. Cronin 
Mary Ethier 
William J. Etter 



189 



Richard James Helwig, Jr. 
Timothy C. Jarvis 
Peter C. Richey 
Sandra Salzillo Shields 
Diane Marie Stundze 
Nancy Marie Wojnar 
Marcia A. Young 



Art History 

Dan A. Angell 
Cort Paul Ferreira 
Marilyn M. Lynds 
Rosemary Rapp 
Paula C. Soares 



Painting 

Donna Marie Brunyak 
Brian William Casey 
Robyn Grace Filliman 
Ronald E. Gustavson 
Thelma Hayward 
Kim S. Jennings 
Isabel Kunz 

Pamela Jean Moynahan 
Mary Elizabeth Natalizia 
Stephen R. Oliver 
Mark Laurence Ouellette 
Sheila J. Provazza 
Valeria June Pugatch 
Mark D. Sherwin 
Maryanna Robin Williams 

Printmaking 

Ann Marie DeCollibus 
Carol Manchester 
James Mullaney 
Laurie Wisner Nicholson 



Sculpture 



Steven R. Campopiano 
Stephen R. McPheters 
Richard W. Neal 
Ralph H. Paquin, Jr. 
Janice Read 



Textile Design 

Priscilla Winn Beck 
Laurie W. Crowe 
Jennifer M. Cullen 
Loretta Gatto 
Mark A. Grigalunas 
Robin Wynne Louis 
Holly L. Parker 
Janet Terban 
Christine Thompson 
Jeanne Alix F. Whalon 
Karen L. Wyks 



Visual Design 

Sharon A. Blagdon 
Stephen Borghi 
Hubert Bridgeforth, Jr. 
Catherine Lynn Cacho 
Patricia Anne Caddick 
Deborah Ann Camara 
Dianne Carter 
Glenn Riddell Cook 
Diane Davison 
Daniel G. Doherty 
Carol Jane Donkin 
Linda Enrico 
Glen Francis Foster 
Mary Cecilia Hall 
Patricia Mary Hanlon 
Susan Marie Hansen 
Richard C. Hurd 
Gail C. Johnson 
Walter D. Koenig 
William H. Lane 
Richard C. Lincoln 



William F. Lindsay 

Richard C. McCleary 

Karen Ann O'Brien 

Robert Allan Packert 

Christine Marie Therese Parulis 

Mary Kathleen Phelan 

Carol H. Ras 

Michael P. Roy 

Clifford Leon Stoltze 

Robert E. Taylor 

David Anthony Vozar 

Susan J. W'aterman 

Audrey Jane Witt 

Garry Alan Wolfe 

Karen A. Zahorsky 

Graduate Degrees 

Dean Richard M. Fontera, A.B., A.M. 
Ph.D. 

Art Education 

Stanley J. De Voyd 
Linda L. Hebert 
Robert A. Huff 
Charles V. A. January 
Robert D. Millette 
Susan Marie Moe 
Richard A. Pacheco 



Bilingual/Bicultural Education 

Luis F. Aguiar 
Cristina C. Ajemian 
Christine A. Aronis 
Patricia A. Arruda 
Bertrand A. Bouffard 
Gisele L. Cabral 
Cassandra B. Fitzgerald 
Paul Stephen Grillo 
Martha Ellen Kay 
lean Miriam Lantz 
Marie Gloria Marcelino 
Maria F. Pacheco 



190 



Edward P. Silva, )r. 
Noreen E. Sullivan 



Biology 

Allen David Williams 

Marine Biology 

Vincent Durso 
William Ernest Hearn 
David E. Pierce 

Business Administration 

John David EHaddin Barr 
Normand E. Berube, Jr. 
)ohn M. Bissonnette 
Michael J. Boden 
Mary B. Botelho 
Ronald A. Breault 
Maurice F. Burke, Jr. 
James Comperchio 
Raymond Michael Cote 
Stephen Joseph De Cesare 
Paul Francis Xavier Doherty 
Kathleen Zanotta Driscoll 
Donald A. Dufresne 
Bradford G. FHammel 
Eli FHeimberg 
Harry FHodgson, Jr. 
Donald L. FHowarth 
Anne Marie Kearney 
Thomas E. Kelly 
John P. King 



Richard Claude King 
David James Lentz 
William FHorace Losch 
Elizabeth A. McKinley 
Irwin J. Nebelkopf 
Robert J. Phillips 
Dennis |. Pontes 
Otis L. Sampson 
John M. Scanlon 
Donald Stuart Schoenfisch 
Nita I. Shah 
Wayne Roy Sjolund 
Theodore M. Small, jr. 
Bruce F4arold Walter 
Margaret D. Xifaras 
Donald Yousif 



Chemistry 
Frank P. Barcelos 

Electrical Engineering 

Che Chang Chen 
Show-Po Guo 
Wayne M. King 
Tommy Wai Fung Kwan 
Claire B. Messier 
Paul Robert Messier 
Daniel M. Modzelewski 
George N. Moussa 
Joseph j. Perruzzi 
Paul B. Talewsky 

Mathematics 



Audrey B. DeMello 
Marco P. Sanguinetti 



Medical Laboratory Science 

Sandra Gail Campos 

Janice G. Dimeo 

Geraldine C. Dolan 

George L. Grunwald 

Cassandra A. Lima 

Nancy FHarbison MacSwan 

Beverly E. Coppolino McKenna 

Kathleen A. Nickerson 

Diane Penttila 

Andrew Joseph Sherry 



Physics 
Gerald ). Lemay 

Textile Chemistry 

Martin Thomas DeCunha 
Choong S. Lee 



Visual Design 

Nancy Cornaglia Callahan 
Catherine Ann Chokola 
John Eric FHovermale 
Norma Louise Smayda 
Joanne M. Vascovitch 



191 




The rest is 
silence." 



lean MacBarron 





Beth Morris 



•^■W^BBBHIWBBBi^ 




Garry Wolfe 



Carry Kashuk 




Trisha Hanlon 




Steven Panicci 












• ':vV<' 









Bill Lindsay 



S*:^^;-^ 




Meg Coughlin 





Sandy Youngblood 




Garry Wolfe 



Carol Ras 





Bob Castro 



Jean MacBarron 





Garry Kashuk 



Linda Stewart 'inilll, i 




Mary Phelan 





Trisha Hanlon 




Sandy Youngblood 



The 1978 Scrimshaw was printed by the 
Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, 

Texas 
Cover design by Steven Panicci 
Cover — embossed and silkscreened on 
mission grained base white 008 
Endsheet — gray spectrum 002 
Paper — 80 pound enamel coated 
Typestyle — 8, 10, 12 and 36 point 

Optima 
selected photographs are printed in 
black or silver duotone 
T.P.C. Representative — Arnie Lohmann 
an edition of 1250 
Bound by the Ellis Bindery, Dallas, Texas 



UMASS Dartmouth 



3 2922 00509 347 8