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Full text of "Scrimshaw : [yearbook]"

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Southeastern Massachusetts University 



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SCRIMSHAW 1981 
Southeastern Massachusetts University 

Old Westport Road 
North Dartmouth, Massachusetts, 02747 







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SMU is a university born in the sixties. 

Its university status and organizational style were formed 
between the founding of SMTI in 1960 and the creation of SMU 
in 1969. A visiting architectural historian would reach the same 
conclusion: this building complex, despite its recent classroom 
additions, could have been designed in no other decade. When 
our visiting historian approaches campus, he senses that he is 
stepping back into the past. It is as if he is seeing some mis- 
placed space station stuck in a time-warp: the year is 1966. 

In that year, Paul Rudolph, then Chairman of the School of 
Art and Architecture at Yale University and a well-known and 
outspoken architect of national stature, oversaw the comple- 
tion of the first phase of his master plan for Southeastern 
Massachusetts Technological Institute. He would later, in a talk 
delivered in 1979, compare this campus design with such ar- 
chetypal urban plans as Sienna, Italy. The compelling integrity 



of its medieval town square is caused by the tower of the 
Palazzo Pubblico which throws an invisible enveloping canopy 
over the entire space below. The tower organizes and controls 
the focus of the streets which empty into the square. In the 
same way, he insists, the SMU campus is controlled by the 
campanile, around which the corridor between Croup I and 
Group II pivots on its way to the pond below. Its greenspace is 
carefully, systematically, removed from service accesses. This, 
Rudolph declares, is nothing less than the prototype for town 
planning of the future. 

This is quite an ambitious role for a jumble of cement col- 
umns and overhanging ledges we often see as the unavoidable 
reminder of our collective discomfort. Why should these 
buildings, which to some are invested with the sensitivity of a 
Devil's Island Mess Hall, warrant such notoriety? 

(Continued on next page) 




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(Continued from previous page) 

Ada Louise Huxtable, architectural critic for the New York 
Times, has observed that architectural styles flash by our con- 
sciousness with the rapidity of changes in hemlines in the 
fashion world. Fashion in building has gone from the Brutalism 
of the sixties, to the high-tech reflective skin of the seventies, 
to today's idiosyncratic "contextualism." The avant-garde 
makes its statement, and, having left its most visible mark, 
moves on. It is difficult, she says, to dump an unwanted 
building in a flea market. It is with us. SMU, we find, is part of 
the evident remains of Brutalism, an architectural style 
characterized by rough, even threatening, surfaces on 
buildings made of unadorned cement. It is the architect's primal 
scream. 

Paul Rudolph's most impressive building complex remains 
the SMU campus. Its plan and its "look" have influenced 



dozens of university buildings since its initial design in 1963. 
These imitators declare at once the appropriateness of our 
campus to communal design, and by their thin packaging, the 
poverty of imitation by the unimaginative. What was Rudolph 
trying to do here that makes SMU a topic of discussion in the 
eighties, that generates such imitation, and at the same time, 
makes the "look" of SMU so indisputably of the sixties? What 
makes this place a current topic of discussion is the undeniable 
"here-ness" of SMU. Upon arriving on campus, one feels that 
this is a place unlike any other. A completeness is felt. SMU is 
total. From any angle its silhouette changes, yet it remains the 
same place. Its "look" is inescapable. This, of course, can also 
be discomforting. But authors, egged on by some scholarly 
compulsion to write about SMU have seen the drama present 
here. In 1970, the giant, three story interior spaces which so 

(Continued on next page) 




I 



(Continued from previous page) 

dominate our memory of every building were called "spiralling 
malls" or "sky lobbies" by Sibyl Moholy-Nagy, Rudolph's biog- 
rapher. She noted the thrusting horizontals which dramatically 
violate the plate glass and seem to open every space to the 
outdoors. This, she said, is a constant reminder of Rudolph's 
vision of a building which intentionally contrasts "the vast void 
of the open landscape and the measured ratios of instructional 
spaces." SMU is "a centrifugal environment maker" and the 
place where Rudolph's work achieves "harmonious totality." 

This is strong stuff for a school whose heating system never 
seems to correspond to the seasons and whose narrow and 
sometimes dark corridors exude the heavy air of cement 
blocks. And this is said about these same interior spaces which 
so often draw our criticism. What of the exterior? 

First, the circular plan of the campus and its parking lot 



mounds lend a touch of Stonehengian fundamentality. We are 
reminded in our approach that Rudolph doesn't really like to 
have automobiles intrude upon a non-mechanistic environ- 
ment. Another author, Robert Spade, suggests "the pedestrian 
status of the campus centre is . . . the only means of controlling 
the scale of an . . . institution intended for rapid growth", he is 
telling us the campus is intended to remain exclusively an envi- 
ronment for humans, no matter how large it gets. This oddly 
contradictory statement hits home to those of us who inhabit 
this place. We are, at various times, struck by the harshness of 
our surroundings, the uncompromising severity of the surfaces, 
and at other times compelled to admire a set of buildings which 
when seen by night or in the dramatic light of sunset becomes a 
sculptural statement in its most heroic form. 

(Continued on next page) 




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(Continued from previous page) 

The view between Group I and Group II is inviting, the cam- 
panile a focal point. As one slowly navigates the ring road, one 
instinctively knows the master plan: a circle, cut by an axis 
between buildings and anchored at a pivotal point by a tower. 
It is simple, yet lacks the stiff symmetry and repetition rehension 
of the organizing principle of an architectural space is what the 
ancient Greeks desired in their buildings. This is the stuff by 
which human reason, instinctively stimulated and confirmed, is 
determined. Do we confront here architecture systematically 
allied with our own innate humanity? Perhaps that is too much 
to swallow. 

But this is the contradiction we all feel. We are challenged by 
the innate logic of our surroundings, which is something we 
instinctively admire. Some would say that we even find beauty 
in this system of order once it is recognized. At the same time, 
we see the highly structured classroom spaces (frozen chairs for 



frozen stares?), the day-to-day dreariness of the cement sur- 
face, and we despair at the challenge to our sense of comfort 
which it represents. We are often glad we are transients here 
and we "live" elsewhere. 

The images each of us associates with the buildings to which 
we are so closely related are not always so harsh. Nor are they 
so often charged with lofty reminders that we are standing in 
the mainstream of modern architectural history. Whatever our 
feelings about SMU, its buildings cannot be ignored and one 
cannot but be aware of the complex responses generated by 
them. So Paul Rudolph has succeeded, for he once said, "a 
school building that does not provide for its students concep- 
tual images unknown to the human majority, sells the future of 
society short of its environmental aspirations." 

To this, our collective criticism stands witness. 

— Thomas Puryear 



Thomas Puryear is the Chairperson of the Art 
History Department at SMU. 




• I 



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Naseer Aruri 
Political Science 




Yukio Asato 
Biology 



Hamilton Brush 
Education 



N 

8 



Joseph Bronstad 
Modern Languages 



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Robert Barry 
Visual Design 



10 




John Bush 
Sociology 




Josef Cobert 
Music 



Eleanor Carlson 
Music Chairperson 



Paul Caron 
Electrical Engineering 




Lester Cory 
Electrical Engineering 



John Carroll 
Political Science 



11 




Alden Counsell 
Mechanical Engineering 



Leah Curran 
Biology 



Earl Dias 
English Chairperson 




James Costa 
Comptroller 



Maureen Daniels 
University Designer 




David Creamer 
Mechanical Engineering 



Ronald DiPippo 
Mechanical Engineering 



12 




Gilbert Fain 
Electrical Engineering 



Elaine Fisher 
Visual Design 



Rub\ Dottin 
Upw ard Bound Director 



13 



I I f 




Richard Fontera 
Dean of Faculty 



Walter Frost 
Audio/Visual Director 



14 




Lenine Consalves 
Electrical Engineering 



Barry Haimson 
Psychology 



Elaine Hatch 
Nursing 




Fred Gorczyca 
Mechanical Engineering 



Louise Habicht 
English 



Robert Griffith 
Biology 





)ohn Hart 
Technician 



Francis Gordon 
Auxiliary Services 



15 



See page 266 for Dean Howard's message to the 
seniors. 




R. J. Hooper 
Chemistry 



Thomas Higginson (R) and Donald Wetmore (L) 
Management 



16 




Theo Kalikow 
Assistant to President 



Laurie Kaplowitz 
Fine Arts 




Tom Jackivicz 
Civil Engineering 



J. P. Hsu 
Physics 



Martha Johnson 
Nursing 



17 




John M. Lannon 
English 



Frederick Kazama 
Biology 




Peter London 
Art Education 



John Lewis 
Service Systems 



18 




Robert McCabe 
Mathematics 



Barton Matsumoto 
Biology 



Rita Moniz 
Political Science 



19 




William Nicolet 
English 



James Nee 
English 



20 




Paul Nolin 
Assistant Registrar 



Rita O'Neill 
Nursing 



John Ohly 
Economics 




Margaret Panos 
English 



Henry Parker 
Biology 



21 




George Pierce (L) and Raul Perreira (R) 
Mail Room 



Peter Rizzi 
Electrical Engineering 



Robert Saltzman 
Alumni Office 



22 




Greg Stone 
President's Office 



Gene Sharp 
Sociology 




Samuel Stone 
Mathematics 



James Sears 
Biology 




z 



lack Stauder 
Sociology 



Michelle Scullane 
Chemistry 



Norma Thomas 
Nursing 



23 




Jeffrey Turner 
Biology 



Ralph Tykodi 
Chemistry 



Mrs. Tucker 
Poli. Sci. Secretary 




Edward Togneri 
Fine Arts 



John Twomey 
Modern Languages 




Paul Ukleja 
Physics 



Claude Wagner 
Chemistry 



Tony 



24 




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Mary Louise Walsh 
Associate Dean of Students 



Donald E. Walker 
THE PRESIDENT 




Robert Waxier 
English 



Richard Ward 
Dean of Business and Industry 



Richard Walder 
Electrical Engineering 



25 




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Marge Zeller 




Howard Windham 
Visual Design 




Robert Wilson 
Biology 



C. N. Wu 
Chemistry 



Milton Young 
Education 




lames Wiley 
Public Relations 



William Wild 
Administration 



Dietmar Winkler 
Dean of Group 6 



26 




KEKH 



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It is the staunch belief of the SMU His- 
tory Association that the past indeed 
continues to influence the present 
actions of humanity. Through historical 
discussion and a series of public lectures, 
this organization attempts to enhance 
historical knowledge in what has some- 
times been labelled an "ahistorical" age. 
Field trips also shall not be ignored as a 
means of increasing individuals' aware- 
ness of the past. In summation, it is the 
principle of this association that Santaya- 
na's words never be forgotten: namely, 
that those who do not take heed of the 
past are doomed to repeat its errors. 



. "^ - - j 



The History 
Association 




28 



The Political Science Association is 
open to any student interested in poli- 
tics, from intra-campus to international. 
The P.S.A. is a very active organization 
which is widely known throughout cam- 
pus. In the past year the P.S.A. spon- 
sored a voter awareness table and 
factsheet for the 1980 presidential elec- 
tion, participated in the Silver-Haired 
Legislature, sponsored speakers, and 
held luncheon discussions on current 



The Political Science Association 



events. The year's activities are con- 
cluded with an annual day-trip to some 
place of interest to the membership, 
and an annual faculty forum for students 
and department faculty to discuss the 
year's activities . . . There is no member- 
ship fee, however regular attendance at 
scheduled meetings is required to vote 
in the elections for the following year's 
Executive Board, held in April. 




TRIPPt 



29 



The SMU Women's Center is a 
feminist collective in its 10th year of ser- 
vice to women on campus. As we are a 
collective, there are no officers, 
although there are two co-directors 
who facilitate continuity, and also a staff 
of volunteers. Counselor training is of- 
fered each semester to anyone who 
would like to join us as a counselor. We 
also offer such services as pregnancy 
testing, referrals, and have an excellent 
feminist lending library. 



The Women's Center 





During the past year, the Center has 
developed programs about sexuality, 
nutrition, rape, birth control, Interna- 
tional Women's Day, displaced 
homemakers, and co-sponsored 
feminist artist Judy Chicago's lecture. A 
support group was begun for women 
interested in discussing women's issues 
and concerns. The Radio show "She's 
on Top" on WUSM presented inter- 
views with women on campus and has 
promoted women's music, along with 
presenting special interest stories from a 
feminist perspective. We welcome and 
support new members, and our ser- 
vices are available to the entire 
community. 




PHOTOS: METZCER 



31 



Ceramics Club of SMU 
President: Tina Sheridan 
Vice-President: Gary Crabb 
Secretary-Treasurer: Chris Urban 



The Ceramics Club of SMU is open to 
any and all members of the school com- 
munity. Through lectures, discussions, 
field trips, slide and film presentations, 
ceramic exhibits, and more, students 
can broaden their perspective and ap- 
preciation of the ceramic arts. 



Ceramics Club 




■"■■' ■■■■■■ '■■ . 




ow: Nancy Mulick, Harvey Goldman, Michelle McClean, Kathy Montigny; Steve 



anne Moore. Back Row: Dave Cravenho, Becca Perry, Gary Crabb, Tina Sheridan, jack Blackburn. 



. Second Row: Dan McCluer, Chris Urban, 





1981 Officers: 


Dan McCluer 
Sue Messner 
Randall Schultz 




1982 Officers: 


Paul Nichols 


These times call out for a response, 




Sid 


the A.S.U. has risen to that cry. This year 




Carol Balquist 


has begun to look better for those rare 




Clint Pollett 


efforts. 




Eddy Lark 



Art Student Union 





33 



President: Brenda Farwell 
Vice Pres.: Stephen Olsen 
Secretary: Ann Upjohn 
Treasurer: Anne-Marie Duvall 



A student-run, interdenominational 
group of students who believe that 
)esus Christ is more than just a man who 
lived long ago, but believe that He is a 
personal friend and saviour today to all 
who ask him. 

The fellowship meets weekly to infor- 
mally talk and pray for each other and 
study the Bible. The group exists as a 
service to the campus, and during 
1980-1981 we had two guest speakers 
talking on the subjects, "The Bible and 



SMU Christian Fellowship 



the Mideast crisis," and "How to 
Recognize Cults." We have also spon- 
sored a concert, a weekly Bible Study 
hour, and produced a radio show, "The 
Rock that doesn't Roll," that was heard 
weekly on VVUSM. We have also had 
numerous literature tables in the Cam- 
pus Center and a Valentine's Day 
dessert give-away. We invite you to 
read some excellent books that we have 
donated to the library's paperbook 
browse section. 




Clockwise, from top left: Nancy Burgess, Chuck Calder, Ann Upjohn, Cheryl Zinkargue, Patty Crowley, Anne-Marie Duvall, Brenda Farwell, and 
Stephen Olsen. 



34 



The Jewish Student Center is an 
organization devoted to understanding 
what it means to be Jewish. The Center 
sponsors social, cultural and religious 
events in an attempt to gain an 
awareness of the significance of Jewish 
identity. All members of the SMU com- 
munity are invited to join. 



Dr. Robert P. Waxier, Advisor 



The Jewish Students Center 





35 



Dr. William D. Bygrave, Advisor 
Dr. Robert J. Witherell, Advisor 

The purpose of the Management 
Club is to provide an informal at- 
mosphere where students with com- 
mon interests can get together for 
various educational and social functions. 
The Club provides guest speakers from 
all walks of business whose real life 
situations give the student a sense of 
direction and a feel for life after gradua- 
tion. The Club works for the SMU com- 



munity with the planning of Career Ex- 
po, held each year, which gives all 
students a chance to get firsthand infor- 
mation about future employment 
trends and job market possibilities from 
local company representatives. Plant 
tours are also organized to allow the 
student to actually witness what is 
discussed in the classroom. Finally, the 
Club provides an excellent opportunity 
to develop leadership skills through the 
planning of these social and educational 
events. 



The Management Club 




36 



For six months, I pestered Paul Tykodi 
to write a paragraph - that's right, just 
one little paragraph - about his 
organization, the International Study 
and Travel Office. I'd see the guy every 
day in his comfortable little office on the 
second floor of the campus center. And 
every day I'd say, "Paul, do you have 
that for me yet?" And he'd say, "I'll get 
it to you in a couple of days." 

And, do you know, he never gave it 
to me? 

So I can only guess what the Interna- 
tional Study and Travel Office does. If 
you look closely at the picture below, 
you'll see what Mr. Tykodi spent his 
time doing — homework. 

— Bill Trippe 



The International Study and Travel Office 




Viil Ite^ 
IH 




KLEIN 



Paul Tykodi, Director of the International Study and Travel 
Office. 




The Student Advisor Program 



Co-Directors: Chris King 
Lisa Pappas 

Chairpeople: Phil Butta 

Sue Darbyshire 
Becky Goss 
Lisa Leavitt 
Carol McElhinney 
Howie Orel 
Deb Scibilia 




Mccormick 



38 



■ ■ ' ■ .'■■■ 



The Student Advisor Program is part 
of the outreach activities of the Univer- 
sity Counseling Center. It is a 
paraprofessional training program for 
peer academic and social advising. 

After careful screening and selection, 
each student advisor undergoes training 
in group dynamics, helping skills, and in 
learning the resources of the University. 
The training is designed to equip the stu- 
dent with interpersonal skills and 
knowledge to fulfill the role of academic 
advisor, peer counselor, and informa- 
tion source. 



At the Student Advisor drop-in 
center, 2nd floor of the Campus 
Center, student advisors provide easily 
accessible academic information, an op- 
portunity for students to express their 
concerns about their SMU experience, 
and to learn more about the University, 
its resources, people, programs, and 
opportunities. 

A student-run organization, SAP 
members are actively involved in stu- 
dent life, contributing creative energy to 
a wide variety of community projects 
and programs. 




Mccormick 




39 



This is WUSM, FM 91 . . . 




WUSM General Manager Mike Woodson 



" H&9EK 
Program Director Paul Santos on the air. 



40 




PHOTOS: METZCER 



Music Director Dave Potter 




The Nuclear Physics Society 



The Nuclear Physics Society exists to 
provide a sensible forum in which the 
complex issues of nuclear physics can 
be discussed. Regular field trips, to 
Hiroshima and Seabrook, also shall not 
be ignored. 







Standing, left to right: Izzy Newton, |oe Kepler, Leo Da Vinci, Tom Edison, Percy Lowell, Betty Euclid, Gil Galileo, Jim 
C Maxwell, Jack Copernicus, Manny Kant, Gus Marconi, and Chris Doppler Sitting, left to right: Advisor Adams R. 
Neat, Captain Cranston Snord, Advisor Al Einstein, and Dean or the School of Nuclear Physics, I. M. Glowing. 



42 



The fifth installation of new members 
into the Mu Phi Chapter of Sigma Delta 
Pi took place in the Ante-chamber of 
the Sunset Room in SMU on June 6, 
1981. Dr. Joseph Vinci, flanked by Drs. 
Giulio Massano. John Twomey and W. 
J. Weeks of the Spanish Division, presid- 
ed at the colorful medieval ceremony. 
The candidates, Idalecia Andre, Dorothy 
Kallevik, Lydia Cornier, Anna Moitoso, 
Edward Pereira, Jose L. Vieira, and Joyce 
R. Weston in the presence of their 
sponsors, were dubbed into the Spanish 



Honor Society according to the 
prescribed ritual. After the ceremony, 
the new members recited a favorite 
passage from Spanish literature. 

A dinner in the Sunset Room follow- 
ed, after which Dr. C. Massano praised 
the academic ideals of excellence 
fostered by the Society. Mrs. Lydia Cor- 
nier in a stirring speech pleaded for the 
return of the island of Vieques to the 
civilian control of the Puerto Rican 
people. 



Sigma Delta Pi 




MMMMgMMj 



Left to Right: Rosa Saltao, Nancy Medeiros, Jose Vieira. Joseph Spooner, Dorothy Kallevik, Anna Moitoso, Paul Souza, Dr. Joseph Vinci, Lydia Cornier, Dr. 
Twomey, Idalecia Andre. Denise Despres, Joyce Weston, Dr. Massano. Edward Pereira, and Dr. Weeks. 



E 



43 



The Program Council is a volunteer, 
student-run organization dedicated to 
furthering the involvement of students 
in campus activities, under the advise- 
ment of Jane Babbitt, Programming 
Coordinator. 

The purpose of the Council is to in- 
itiate and plan social, recreational, 
educational, and cultural programs for 
the Southeastern Massachusetts Univer- 
sity Community. The Council also co- 
sponsors events with other campus 
organizations. 



The Program Council 




44 



COORDINATOR: Jane Babbitt 
President: Ann Twohig 
Vice-President: Nancy Hikosey 
COMMITTEE CHAIRPEOPLE 
Gadabout Club: Joe Ordog 
Rathskellar: Paul Crawford 
Lightwaves: Scott Swanson 
Social Functions: Jon Schmidt 
Special Events: Laura Karkus 
Film Series: Linda Sanders 




45 



The Student Senate 



PRESIDENT: Bill McGowan 
VICE PRESIDENT: Diane Ebbeling 
TREASURER: Stephanie Hesselton 
CORRESPONDING SECRETARY: Priscilla 

Bates 
RECORDING SECRETARY: Christine 

Harrington 



The student senate is the governing 
organization concerning all student af- 
fairs. The Senate is open to all members 
of the student body, with elections for 
the following academic year held each 
April. The Senate is responsible for the 
allocation of money to student clubs 
and organizations, authorizing new 
clubs and organizations, and formula- 
tion of new policy recommendations on 
issues of concern to the student body. 




CRUZ 




'■. :■ • ■ '■: "'■ . "■'•'. 



...... ..... . .... 



Student Senate President Bill McGowan pres< 
Distinguished Service Award. 




rch Editor Dan MacAlpine with the Student Senate 



Manuel Kyriakakis, Chairperson 
Paul McCawley, Vice Chairperson 
Claire Carney, Secretary 
Donald A. Bogle, Treasurer 
Bernard Baker 
Julien Paul 
George Ripley 
Mary M. Sullivan 



The Board of Trustees 




METZCER 



47 



Mr. Anthony J. Miraglia, Advisor 

The Fine Arts Committee is made up 
of students from the Fine Arts Depart- 
ment. They organize and hang exhibits 
of students' work on campus, as well as 
in galleries in the surrounding 
communities. 



Fine Arts Committee 




KLEIN" 



48 



Activities in the Biology Association 
have included faculty and visitor 
seminars, trips to the New Alchemy In- 
stitute in East Falmouth and to the New 
Bedford Whaling Museum, excursions 
(on SMU's research vessel The Corsair, 
and pot-luck dinners and social gather- 
ings. In addition, the Biology Association 
holds plant sales and other fundraising 
. events to support its own activities and 
; to benefit the Botanical Garden Fund. 



Biology Association 








♦ ■ ^ 





PHOTOS: CRUZ 



Dr Dorothy Freitelder. Biologv Association Advisor 



4y 



Veterans' Club 



The goal of the Veterans' Club is to 
represent veterans and students in the 
SMU community. The membership is 
comprised of both veterans and non- 
veterans. The club has many continuous 
activities, including counseling and 
academic services, and a bi-monthly 
newsletter. 





veterans of Vietnam 
and dedicate 
this special place 
to the preservation 
ofpeace 

may6,-0j8 



-:' ' ■ ■., ■ 






The Residence Halls Congress is the 
student-run government body of the 
Residence Halls. RHC has the power to 
act, when deemed necessary, upon any 
issue confronting resident students and 
residence life. It works, in conjunction 
with the Residence Life Office, to for- 
mulate dorm policy and programming. 

The Congress consists of the Ex- 
ecutive Officers, 12 House Represen- 
tatives, and six Representatives at large. 



Residence Halls Congress 




51 



Siren 



Siren, a woman's journal, is a monthly 
publication dedicated to reporting news 
and information relevant to the 
women's experience, and serving as a 
forum for the various voices of women. 
The Goal of Siren is to create a com- 
munications network and sense of com- 
munity among area women, awakening 
women to the various alternatives open 
to them. 







KLEIN 



52 



Mr. Angus Bailey, Director 

The SMU Theatre Company offers an 
opportunity for students who are in- 
terested in all aspects of drama. Each 
year the club produces seven plays, 
two of which are musicals. (And all of 
which you will see pictures of 
throughout this book.) 



SMU Theatre Company 







Royal Hunt of the Sun 



54 




PHOTOS: McCORMICK 



55 



^IJ&nvpetr 




56 




PHOTOS: KLEIN 



57 



Editor-in-Chief: Kathleen Cosgrove 
Poetry Editor: Stephen Thorley 
Fiction Editor: Alyson E. Brault 
Visual Arts Editor: Gayle Giroux 
Designer: Bruce Colthart 
Typesetter: Eugenia Michaelides 




58 



PRODUCTION STAFF 
Tom Benoit 
Alyson Brault 
Bruce Colthart 
Kathleen Cosgrove 
Cayle Giroux 
Nancy Klein 
Stephen Thorley 
Bill Trippe 

PROOFREADERS 
Charlotte Craven 
Richard Miller 




PHOTOS: KLEIN 






59 



For four years you read the Torch, 
and it probably never struck you just 
what went in to putting the paper out 
week after week, or the importance of 
their perpetual boast, "All editing and 
writing is in the hands of students." But 
a few years from now, you'll be reading 
the Smalltown Gazette or the Bingville 
Bugle, with all the announcements 
about the Emblem Club and the Little 
League. And then, and only then, you 
just might miss the Torch. 



The SMU Torch 





METZCER 




60 




61 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Brian Cartier 

ART AND LAYOUT EDITOR: Nancy J. Klein 

PHOTO EDITOR: Phil M. McCormick 

COPY EDITOR: Bill Trippe 

BUSINESS MANAGER: William Bussiere 

ADVISER: Dean Donald C. Howard 



By the time you get this book, in the 
mail or at school, it will be close to the 
holidays, hopefully prior to Thanksgiv- 
ing. A tremendous amount of time and 
effort went into putting this book 
together, though that may seem hard to 
believe when you notice that there 
were only five of us on the staff. We 
are a tired quintet, I can assure you. I 
can also assure you that we didn't do it 
alone. 

A special thank you has to go to Will 
Novak, our representative from Taylor 
Publishing Company, whose advice and 
wit were a constant help. 



Scrimshaw . . . (yearbook) 




KLEIN 



Nancy Jane Klein 



62 



Nick Cruz and Rudy De Cruz from 
Rudolf/Craig Photography were a great 
help, especially near the end of the 
book's production, when there was a 
crisis a day. We'd like to particularly 
thank Rudy for the faculty photographs, 
and Nick for the fine job he did cover- 
ing Honors Convocation and Com- 
mencement. It was no small accomplish- 
ment that Rudolf/Craig produced the 
best turnout ever for senior portraits. 

Also in the area of photography, 
which is essential to a yearbook's suc- 
cess, we'd like to thank John Gilmore 
and Ron Metzger from The Torch, 
Sports Information Director Bill 
Gathnght, Manny Perreira from Audio/ 
Visual, and Nancy Lane for her photo 
which appears on the title page. And 



Scott Dobihal, for the entire Biology 
Department Faculty. 

And thanks to everyone who wrote 
for us, particularly Professor Tom 
Puryear, who wrote the introductory 
essay, and Mike Hardman, who was a 
big help with sports. 

Paul Nolin from the Registrar's office 
was also very cooperative and helpful 
when it came time to sort out who was 
a senior and who wasn't. 

Dan Vasconcellos contributed four 
excellent illustrations. 

And, finally, thanks to Dean Donald 
C. Howard, whose advice, guidance, 
and harassment were a constant 



motivation. 



— Bill Trippe 




I and Nancy - THANKS! - The Ed. 



I Trippe 








M* 




- m 






II!!!! 





,-. *? 









- \ *i»Vv - s*'V 





ML* 




PHOTOS: METZGER 




68 







• • 




^4 ^^~~ — ~ 


■^' 


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inii- 


, ! -i 


#. 


#* L - 




-T ' 



PHOTOS METZCER 



69 



70 




PRIVATE LIGHTNING STRIKES SMU 





Mccormick 
The appearance of Private Lightning at 
the SMU auditorium in October showed us 
just another phase of the important Boston 
music scene — a band that is well 
rehearsed and holds a good rapport with 
its audience. The subtlety of communica- 
tion between Paul Van Ness on guitar and 
his sister Patti reveals a band with serious 
intentions. Coming off the release of a 
debut album on A&M records, the music 
of Private Lightning comes across as 
refreshing. With its strange combination of 
classical, new-wave, and pop styles, this 
band and its music (even for all its serious- 
ness) can be enjoyed. 

The people of Private Lightning are as 
diversified as their music. Guitarist Paul Van 



Ness is a serious-minded musician who still 
can't pass up a good time. His sister Patti is 
another important facet of the band. 
Besides being an attractive and talented 
musician (and classically trained), she can 
shed her facade of gracefulness and stomp 
her foot to the backbeat with the rest of 
the band. 

Yes — they convinced me all right. Pri- 
vate Lightning is a strong factor in Boston's 
commercial rock scene. Strong song-writ- 
ing, strong stage presence, serious-minded; 
they have all that. But Private Lightning can 
turn hard work into fun rock and roll. And 
that's what convinced me. 

- Robert Harwood 



71 



Judy Chicago sets things straight 
on "The Dinner Table" 




72 



. 




Editor-in-Chief 
Poetry Editor 
Fiction Editor 
Art Editor 



Kathleen Cosgrove 

Stephen Thorley 

Richard Miller 

Gayle Giroux 



Gidley Town Road 
(for Bill Montigny) 
By Stephen Thorley 

a battered Chevy 
scrapes its sparking muffler 
down this road I pedal on, 
then dies into silence . . . 

the houses are stark, 
dark wood or white 
to match the grim winters 
that weather them 

an escort of cowbirds 

flutters the herd 

toward home — 

now a screaming red-tail 

spins toward earth 

with the leaves; 

a field-mouse flashes 

beneath a rusting thresher, 

discarded weapon 

in the most ancient of struggles 

the sun 

makes webthread of the wires 

that fence this sprawling land, 

and turns the churning water 

into butter 

as I wheel across this river bridge 

dogs howl across distances, 

crows scold me for my halting pace; 

gripping the cold handlebars 

with bare fingers 

I sense woodsmoke; 

I ride with a wind 

that blows the last heat 

from the retreating sun - 

winter chases me down 

Gidley Town Road . . . 



ANNOUNCING . . . 



INLET 




A mid-year newsprint publication 
of literary and visual arts from 
Temper Magazine 

Editors are no* seeking submissions. 

\n\one Hi*hing to submit nork to be printed in 
ISLET i*» encouraged to do mi. Written material 
should be t\pcd. und 011U copies submitted a* work 
cannot be returned. Please remember Name . 
\ddrew* and Telephone Number on submissions. 

Artwork should be delivered in perwin at the 
Temper office located in the Torch office. 2nd 
floor of the Campus (enter. Office hours are 
M-W-F 10-12 and L3. 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS 
IS NOVEMBER 7 th . 



V 




73 



SMU Awarded Ten Year Accreditation 




74 



SMU was reaccredited for ten years, 
the maximum number of years possible. 
This was officially announced last 
December 4th at a meeting of the New 
England Association of Schools and 
Colleges. 

SMU President Donald Walker ex- 
plained that when diplomas are issued 
from a school that is accredited, they 
have, "full value as seen by colleagues 
in higher education." Walker added 
that the accreditation also plays a role in 
the grants the campus is eligible for and 
the programs it can participate in. 

Concurring with Walker was Victor 
Caliri, Associate Dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences. Caliri, who did much 
of the work on the accreditation self- 
evaluation report, said that SMU has, 
"come of age." He went on to say that 
the excellence of the faculty, ongoing 
revaluation, good programs, and con- 
tinual striving for the "goal of ex- 
cellence" were also recognized by the 
Association. 

Both Caliri and Walker stressed the 
importance of revaluation. Said Caliri, 
"There was no gap between what we 
said and they found." 

The first step in the accreditation pro- 



cess involves the University itself. Ad- 
vance notice is given as to when the ac- 
creditation team is coming, and a self- 
evaluation report must be prepared. 
This report includes chapters on the in- 
stitution, academic programs, the 
make-up of the student body and facul- 
ty, instructional resources, the ad- 
ministration and Board of Trustees, stu- 
dent services, fiscal affairs, physical 
facilities and growth plans, alumni, 
university development, and conclu- 
sions and recommendations. 

When the accreditation team arrives 
for its three day visit, it reviews the 
prepared reports and self-evaluation. 
The team then breaks up into smaller 
groups and goes through everv pro- 
gram. In addition, the team talked with 
students and faculty members to get 
their views about the university. 

"The visiting team referred to SMU as 
very strong, with lots of improvements. 
It's a testimony to the fact that 
everyone's worked hard," said Walker. 
He added that seven years is a much 
more common length of accreditation, 
and that he felt "very fortunate." 

— Maureen McMahon 




75 



A Band That Takes Chances 



When you see a band perform, do 
you go just for the music or do you 
prefer a band that takes some chances? 
Do you like a band that mixes old music 
with new, original with familiar? Well if 
you do, Two Way Street is your type of 
band. 

The two man band, Tom Despres 
and Dave Costa, performed twice this 
year before capacity crowds at SMU, 
once in October and once in February. 
Both shows were sponsored by the 
senior class, and both were big 
successes. 

Despres, a former SMU student, and 
Costa go back a long way. The act has 
changed in several ways since the first 
gig, but this evolution now allows them 
to perform as themselves, with Despres 
being the "crazy" entertainer and Costa 
the consummate musician. 

— George Summers 





photos: Mccormick 



Just a few of the costumes Despres and Costa 
don over the course of an evening. (Above) 
Costa, the consummate musician, dives into a 
song. 



76 



I 



Two Way Street 




Despres shows why critics label him "crazy", as 
he launches into his Kermit the Frog imitation. 
(Above) Some of the capacity crowd at October's 
show. 



77 



WUSM, after years of 
bureaucratic hang-ups, 
hits 300 watts . . . 




78 




. . . and the Real Rock 
of the Eighties is here 




79 



Southside Johnny 
And the Asbury Jukes 




Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes 
brought their version of New Jersey "Rock 
and Soul" to the SMU gym in November. 
When hearing their songs the names and 
music of old Rhythm and Rockers came to 
mind — Sam Cooke, Del Shannon, the 
Shangrillas. This is the fuel that contem- 
porary music was forged with, and the 
Jukes weave their sound around these 
essential roots to produce an original result 
that can stand on its own. 

The band proved a mass ensemble of 
talent. Johnny Lyons, lead vocalist, has the 
delivery of Van Morrison with moves that 
are slightly reminiscent of an early Joe 



Cocker. "Southside" commands the stage 
forcefully, and, between his knee drops 
and acrobatic jumps, maintains a good rap- 
port with the audience. 

Al Berger played an effective bass and 
guitarist Willie Rush proved an excellent 
foil for Lyons when it came to dynamics. 
Both provided clear back-ups to round out 
the vocals. Kevin Kavanaugh, piano, and 
Kenny Pentifalo, drums, were equally 
adept in giving their musical support, and 
finish up the remainder of the basic band 
except for the horn section . . . 

(Continued on next page) 




PHOTOS: McCOR 



80 







(Continued from previous page) 

The horn section. This proved to be the 
essential ingredient in the Southside Johnny 
sound. The trumpets, trombone, and sax 
are the finishing touch to an already 
capable band. They capture the early 
rhythm and blues influences that range 
from Motown, Stax, and, finally, the Phil 
Spectorish "wall of sound" effect that 
made '50's music what it was. The horns 
are the "soul" of Southside Johnny and the 



Asbury Jukes. Richie "La Bamba" 
Rosenberg (trombone), Tony Balligrossi 
(trumpet), Ricky Gazda (trumpet), and 
Carlo Novi (tenor sax) were the moves and 
the light touch — the inspiration — that 
leave the unique stamp on this band. 

Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes 
proved themselves a viable force musical- 
ly. The SMU audience was left with some 
good New Jersey "Rock and Soul." 

— Robert Harwood 




CILMORE 



81 



Oktoberfest 

The Oktoberfest — SMU's annual 
beer blast — gave everyone their an- 
nual excuse to sing, think and drink 
German. 

Complete with knockwurst, 
sauerkraut, and dark beer, this 
Americanized version of the real thing 
(in Munich, that is) has always drawn a 
capacity crowd that fills itself to capaci- 
ty, and polkas the night away . . . 

And it's a night for nostalgia and song 
in one; "In heaven there is no beer, 
that's why we drink it here . . ." And, 
somehow, everyone winds up singing 
that song time after time, all night, until 
no one can sing or dance anymore. 
Then everyone waits for next year, and 
the excuse to do it all one more time. 



82 





Fall Weekend never happened 



LANE 



83 




84 




The SMU Vets Club presented its 5th 
Annual "Boogie & Bash" at the Campus 
Center on Halloween Night, and all the 
weirdos in the world turned out for this 
costumed extravaganza once again. 
Boston New Wave band "Tennie & The 
Silencers" provided the music, and the 
guests, in their crazy attire, provided the 
entertainment. 

In a somewhat more sane fashion, the 
B.O.G. sponsored a pumpkin carving 
contest. Torch Editor Dan MacAlpine 
(bottom right) gave it his all, but couldn't 
produce a winner. 



\uev : Oct, 28^ 
of £:QQvn in 1 1 

Cahpu^ Center O^e. 

l s+ PRIZE :*!5 for "BEST VumpKi 
^PRiZE. - s lO most qnglQai 

5^ UP OM BuMch'a Board next -Ho 
rT-« S CtMTER ticket Sooth 
DbAQuhqg To ENTTeR ; fY\OM. if 




85 



Three who tried: 

Congressman John Anderson of Illinois 
Senator Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts 
and President Jimmy Carter of Georgia 




86 




ILLUSTRATION: VASCONCELLOS 



87 



ELECTION DAY, 1980 
It's Reagan, Coast to Coast 







■ tfy ; e 

1 wr 



.*»4 



: *l 




photos: Mccormick 



88 




VASCANCELLOS 




JOHN LENNON 

The following article appeared in the Torch a few days 
after John Lennon was murdered. 

John Lennon is dead. The fact assaulted us this 
week, and the carrion birds who had barely finished 
digesting Elvis are already vying for the tastier bits. 
One disc jockey, heard narrating a pathetic, hastily 
assembled "Lennon retrospective" Tuesday night, ac- 
tually said, "It's only been a few weeks since we were 
asking who shot J.R.; now the question has shifted to 
who shot John Lennon." Unbelievable. A remark like 
that says a lot; people can't distinguish between T.V. 
and life; that maybe John Lennon's shooting is no 
more shocking than J.R.'s because he was just another 
fictional character who was created and killed for our 
viewing pleasure. What the idiots aren't telling us is 
who John Lennon was. 

The fact is that very few people knew. Lennon, for 
many of us, was first and last a Beatle; his songs helped 
us express a feeling that we were together in the '60's, 
and are part of our personal scrapbooks now. The 
changing faces of Lennon seemed to reflect our own 
— the mophead with the infectious grin who invoked 
"Mr. Moonlight" with such exuberance; the 
philosopher who reminded us that "life is very short 
and there's no time"; the kaleidoscope-eyed member 
of the cartoon crew of the Yellow Submarine; the 
self-effacing jokester who quipped "I hope we passed 
the audition" after a cut on their masterful last album, 
the album which combined both the consummate 
craft and the raw energy that the Beatles were known 
for. 

Lennon knew earlier than most of us that the dream 
was ephemeral and illusory. While we were following 
the Beatles' every move, he knew as early as their first 
U.S. tour they had been packaged for mass consump- 
tion, that they were in some sense facsimiles of 
themselves. 

The dream of the Beatles would die soon, but not 
John Lennon. He looked back at himself and his fellow 
Beatles, asking Paul "How Can You Sleep?"; and 
ahead to a better world in songs like "Imagine." He 
disappeared from view and looked for panaceas — as 
many of us did — at the bottom of a bottle, in a 
Maharishi's eyes, in the cathartic terror of the primal 
scream emitted while curled on Arthur Janov's floor. 
He was tired of being a media messiah, and started 
asking questions for himself and of himself. In some 
sense, many never forgave him for leaving us alone, or 
his wife Yoko Ono for "taking him" from us. 

Like Dylan, Lennon insisted that we find our own 
answers. But as with Dylan, we were sure he could 
give us a sign. That's why it was so upsetting when he 
went off by himself and started a family; so upsetting 
when he refused to consider a Beatles reunion. The 
refusal to see the new day, the insistence on looking 
back, was our problem. With his death it becomes 
shockingly apparent — Lennon can't show us the 
way. He bled and died, a human being, not a guru or a 
god. 

John Lennon did not fear the passing of the dream. 
"I don't believe in Yesterday," he said in a recent inter- 
view; as he was quick to point out, that was Paul's 
song anyway. The horror for Lennon would have 
been in knowing there were so few tomorrows. 

— Stephen Thorley 



89 



They no longer surprise anyone, ex- 
cept for themselves. Year after year, 
the SMU cross country team has an ex- 
cellent regular season, does well in the 
big regional meets, qualifies for the Divi- 
sion III National Championships, and 
finishes in the top 15 in the country. 

Easy, right? No problem? 

All it takes is one brilliant coach, 14 
talented and healthy legs, and about 90 
miles of running per runner per week. 
And you thought two laps around ring 
road was an achievement . . . 

This year, the men's harrier squad put 
it ail together, winning the SMU Invita- 
tional, the Codfish Bowl, and racing to 
fourth place in the Nationals. Junior 
Brian Lockard finished in the top 25 to 
gain Ail-American honors, and, combin- 
ed with junior Keith Coughlin, are runn- 
ing proof why next year's cross country 
squad may be even better than this 
year's. 

Coughlin had a fine year as well, win- 
ning the SMU Invitational and providing 
clutch performances in nearly all the big, 
end of the season meets. 

But seven men made up this talented 
squad and carried it to its most suc- 
cessful season ever. Senior Dan 
MacAlpine served as co-captain and 
provided leadership and strong perfor- 



mances down the stretch, junior Jim 
Kent established himself as the team's 
most dependable runner. Sophomores 
Joe Cooney and Keith Paton developed 
into the top-flight performers they were 
expected to, and freshman Bob 
Cosgrove surprised a few people with a 
continually improving ability to come 
through in the big races. 

The Corsairs finished with an 8-1 
record, the lone loss coming when the 
"second seven" lost to Keene State. 
They stopped rival Springfield 21-34, 
with Coughlin racing to victory. They 
ran away from the competition in the 
prestigious Cod Fish Bowl, putting 
together a great team effort. They plac- 
ed second in the Eastern States Cham- 
pionships to powerful Division I Pro- 
vidence College, and took third in the 
National Qualifying Meet despite 
Coughlin having to drop out because of 
respiratory problems. 

But this team was shooting for the 
Nationals, and that is just where they 
put together their best performance. 

"You know," Coach Bob Dowd said, 
"we have a good shot at the national 
championship next year." 

And with only MacAlpine gone next 
year, Dowd may be right. 

— Bill Trippe 




90 





Harriers finish 
4th in Nation 



1 W. 




The super seven: In front: Bob Cosgrove. Standing, Left 
to Right: Dan Mac Alpine, All American Brian Lockard, |oe 
Cooney, Keith Coughlin, Keith Paton, and Jim Kent. 



GATHRIGHT 




DARBYSHIRE 




Women's Cross Country enjoys best season 




CATHRICHT 



"We did it with mirrors," joked SMU 
coach Bob Dowd as he explained the 
success of the 1980 women's cross 
country team. This year's team faced a 
tougher schedule with only five healthy 
runners, but managed to win the Cod- 
fish Bowl and place 12th at the Eastern 
States Championships in Pennsylvania. 

In each race, the pressure to perform 
well fell on each of the five runners. Five 
runners meant no substitutes. If 
someone caught a cold, no one was 
around to replace them. But the women 
didn't worry about the lack of depth or 
about the great pressure. They just 
went out and ran. And they ran well. 

"The girls ran well under pressure," 
said Dowd. "Think of it. If one girl steps 
in a hole and twists her ankle during the 
race, it doesn't matter how well the 
other four runners place, the team will 
finish at the bottom of the pack. The 
girls were severly tested twice — at the 
Cod Fish Bowl and the Easterns — and 
they met the challenge. 

The result was the best season in the 
history of SMU women's cross country, 
as the team finished with a 6-1 record, 
and fine performances in the Cod Fish 
Bowl and the Easterns. Their lone loss 
came at the hands of Division I power 
Providence College. 

- PNIButta 




LANE 



92 




Left to Right: Christy Baker. Sharon Santamaria, Nancy Lane, Jennifer Nixdorf, Terry Duhamel, and Cheryl Mrozienski. 



93 



"After our loss to Bridgewater, we all 
got together and talked it over. We 
were 2-6 at the time and felt we had no 
place to go but up," noted Women's 
Tennis Coach Bob Gilkey. 

And up they went. The Corsair 
women put it all together, winning their 
final four matches to close out their 
season with an impressive 6-6 record. 

"When we were 2-6, I told the 
women not to quit, to believe in 
themselves, and to be sincere," said 
Gilkey. "As the season went on they 
began to believe more and more and 
just gained the confidence necessary to 
win." 

"I saw a big improvement in this team 
over the year, which is unusual in tennis. 
To see this much improvement is rare, 
being such a short season," added 
Gilkey. 

The Corsairs 6-6 team topped last 
year's record of 5-7. All ten members of 
this year's team (five juniors and five 
freshmen) will be returning next year, 
which should make the 1981 campaign 
most enjoyable. 

— Mike Greene 




PHOTOS: GATHRIGHT 



Sitting, Left to Right: Sue Offner, Heidi 
Schweighardt, Carol Whitney, Amy Trafton, and 
Michelle Holbert. Standing, Left to Right: Patti 



Piowtrowicz, Mary McCinness, Coach Bob Gilkey, 
Debby Arsenian, and Patty Perna. Missing from 
photo: Holly Heyner and Ann Marie Kurgan. 



94 




PHOTOS CATHKICHT 




95 



Women Play Rough: The Juniors Meet the Seniors 




"If you want to know the scoop, the 
junior girls are much nicer looking 
than the seniors." — Brian Foley, 
Class of '81 

At first, it seemed as if the flag 
football game between the Class of 
'81's and the Class of '82's women in 
November would be one large 
fiasco. The juniors charged onto the 
field with warpaint on their faces, 
and players, coaches, referees and 
spectators alike acted as if the whole 
matter was to be taken lightly. 

Not so. From the opening kickoff 
to the final play, both teams played a 
deadly serious, enthusiastic, and sur- 
prisingly brutal game of football. 

Running back Pam Hagberg led the 
juniors to a 12-6 victory by rushing 
for over 100 yards, sweeping for 
touchdowns of over 50 yards in each 
half. Asked if the plays were design- 
ed to be long gainers, Hagberg 
replied, "I don't know. I just ran. Ask 
the coach." 

Intramural Sports Director Bill 
Gathright, who attended the contest, 
wasn't convinced the event was 
such a good idea. "The Women's 
Football League has too much of a 
destructive potential," Gathright said 
solemnly. "With the size and 
strength of these women, their next 
opponent should be the Pittsburgh 
Steelers." 

— RodSilva 




** "- ■ - 








BflraSIHH 






iIBHbHb 























Clockwise from the top: Senior Center Sandy 
Bemis hikes; Senior Class President Bob Blanchette 
( in sunglasses) and his troops celebrate their lone 
TD; Junior Class President Jim Hoffman (standing, 
right) offers some advice during halftime; Pam 
Hagberg breaks away for one of two scores. 



PHOTOS M<( OKMK.k 



% 



Intramural Football: 
69ers Crowned New 
Champs 





This year's intramural football 
champion was the 69ers, as they 
defeated Schmeg, 21-20 in the 
playoff final last October. 

Schmeg and the Bong Squad were 
the regular season divisional champs, 
as both finished with undefeated 
records. 

Ten teams comprised the two divi- 
sions, including The Force, 
Clockwork, The Warriors, the 
England Miners, the Power Hitters, 
the SMU Smoothies, and P.W.C.H.V, 
whatever that stands for. 

The season was highlighted by ag- 
gressive and spirited play 
throughout. 69ers' rookie Ralph 
Baristano was named the team's 
M. V.P. in the championship game. 



97 



Booters make play-offs 





t will take about three years 

before quality soccer returns, and 

we are in the playoffs." said SMU 

coach Ken Fonseca. in the fail of 

979. 

Fonseca's prediction was one year 
off, as the Corsairs finished at 1 1-4-2, 
and returned to the ECAC playoffs in 
1980, along with Wesleyan, Coast 
Guard and Fitchburg State. 

n the playoff semifinal, the Cor- 
sairs defeated Fitchburg in five over- 
times, 1-0, on an Abel DaSilva goal. 
Throughout the year. DaSilva was 
the man the Corsairs counted on 
when a goal was needed, as the 
freshmen led the club in scoring. 

After returning from the two hour 
drive to Fitchburg Saturday, the Cor- 
sairs had to get up the next morning 
at seven, and make the three and 
one half hour journey to Connecticut 
to face Wesleyan. 

Wesleyan was well rested after 
defeating Coast Guard, 4-0, on the 
previous day. 

'This is the best team we have fac- 
ed this year," said Fonseca, and, 
combining that fact with the Corsairs' 
tiredness, nobody would have blam- 
ed SMU if they had stayed in the 
locker-room. 

When it was all over, Wesleyan 
could only manage one goal, as a 
tired, undermanned SMU club battl- 
ed every minute, never giving in. 

As the Corsairs headed across the 
dirt field towards the bus the season 
had come to a dose. For Senior Ron 
Caliri it meant the end of a career. 
"Old #22 is now retired," said Caliri, 
but for the returning players it was a 
different message. 

"Next year, we are going to win 
the NCAA's," said DaSilva. 

Only time will tell. 

— Mike Hardman 



9M 



Field Hockey team eyes next season 




The 1980 edition of the SMU field 
hockey team ended their season with 
three straight, tough 1-0 losses. The 
latest was to Division I Bridgewater 
State at home. 

The team's final tally stood at 3-9-2. 
The Corsairs will be losing Co-Captains 
Joan Trudel in goal and Katie Barrera up 
front, but the rest of the team will be 
back next year. 

Coach Mary McCarthy is looking for- 
ward to a better year in 1981. 'This is a 
young team and they have more ex- 
perience playing with each other, 
especially on defense. Rosemarie Pa- 
quet has more confidence and will be a 
definite factor in goal. This gives us 
hope for next year." 

— Rick Rosenfeld 



CILMORE 



100 



&&-&£ ■. ■.;-■-, ." I'.ttSi, 




PHOTOS GATHKlGHT 



First Row, Left to Right: Karen Bernier, Paula Reale, Loretta 
Arsenault, Co-Captain Katie Barrera, Co-Captain loan Trudel, lane 
Hickey. Peggy Edwards, Mary Beauregard, and Siobhan Kelly. Se- 
cond Row, Left to Right: Coach Mary McCarthy, Michelle Thibault, 



Eleanor Saverine, Jamie Duggan, Joyce Laughltn, Lynne Pachico, 
Cheryl Barczak, Cathy McQuinn, Rosemarie Paquet, Gail Cotty, 
Manager Alyson Molignano. 



101 



Women's Volleyball 




102 




First row, Left to Right: Co-Captain Kerry Cook, Co-Captain Kathy Dooley, 
and Rosemarie Nappa. Second row: Julie Hodsdon, Liz Wiikens, Pam 
Messer, and Judy Boyce. Third row: Marguerite Levangie, Coach Tom 
Stein, and Gail DeBettencourt. 









> '" 0& 



y 



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iUw. 



... 






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. «ar^ 



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r-'^-aSfc, 




Cat on a Hot Tin Roof 



106 




photos: Mccormick 



107 



The Student Senate 
Senior Citizens' 
Christmas Party 




PHOTOS: METZGER 



109 



110 




RHC 
Christmas Party 





112 




photos: Mccormick 



113 




114 




PHOTOS M< ( ! >RV,l(.k 



115 



WBCN's Crazy Jock Charles Laquidara 

Elvis Costello isn't the only one "taking liberties" 



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116 







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117 




Ceremonies in Dark Old Men 



118 











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PHOTOS: METZCER 



119 



Senior Night 
in the Rat 




120 




photos: Mccormick 



121 




Oliver! 



122 




PHOTOS VkCORMICk 



123 




124 




photos: Mccormick 



125 



Dallas Night 




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126 



SMU Goes West 




PHOTOS McCORMICk 



127 



128 




Human Sexual Response 




129 




iried Child 



130 




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131 




Mccormick 



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Mccormick 



132 



Hockey team reaches playoffs! 



It was the greatest season in the history 
of SMU hockey. 

After years of frustration the playoffs 
had become a reality. 

"When the selection committee told 
me, i was delighted, to say the least," said 
SMU hockey coach joe Prenda, "then I 
thought about the kids on last year's team 
that didn't make the playoffs, and all of a 
sudden all of the happiness was replaced 
by a brief period of sadness." 

The next brief period of sadness 
occurred at the end of the ECAC Cham- 
pionship game, after Bentley — behind a 
super 57 save performance by Barrett 
Davison in goal — defeated SMU 6-2. 

This was one game where the score 
didn't tell the story. 

SMU controlled the puck, and constant- 
ly bombarded Davison, but the man in 
goal just wouldn't give in. With Bentley 
ahead 3-1, Mark Tallent fired a wrist shot 
past Davison. The Corsairs were knocking 
on the door, but no one answered. 
Before a hometown crowd, Bentley had 
its second straight ECAC Championship. 

But, before that last day in February, 21 
games had been played. 

From the first practice session in Oc- 



tober, the past haunted SMU. Those last 
words of the year before lingered loud 
and clear in the minds of all those 
surrounding the team. Those words: 
"What they told me," said Prenda, "is that 
next year my team must go undefeated, 
and then they still might not make the 
playoffs." 

But the hopes of an undefeated season 
fell in the first game, as they lost in over- 
time, 7-6, to Bridgewater State. 

For the next nineteen games, over 
periods of erratic play, and, at other times, 
brilliant play, every post-game interview 
began with the question: How does this 
affect the playoffs? 

Finally, it was playoff time. Wesleyan 
University, a team that had made the 
playoffs three straight years, was the op- 
ponent in a five p.m. showdown. 

After two periods of play, Wesleyan 
led 3-0, and even the most faithful Corsair 
fan was gloomy. Three goals in the next 
twenty minutes would take a miracle. 

A miracle is what happened. 

Five goals: one on a penalty shot. And 
the Corsairs earned a trip to the finals. But 
then Bentley and Barrett Davison got in 
the way. 

— Mike Hardman 




TRIPPE 




Seated, left to right: Student Manager Dave Moran, Bob Allen, Denis Biglin, Bobfcylor, Rick Silva, John Findley, Bob Fitzsimmons, Sam Teevens, lack Walsh, Peter 
McCabe, Mike Picard, and Trainer Bill Simpson. Standing: Assistant Coach James Costa, Equipment Manager Reggie Hickey, Bob Laviolette, Mike Robie, Tom 
Findley, Bob Curley, Ray Nolan, Ronnie McDonald, Paul Fitzgerald, Scott MacLellan, Bob Cusack, Bob Curran, Mark Tallent, Paul Clifford, Dave Morris, Tom Len- 
non, )im Laing, loel Hagan, Dave Mazzarella, and Head Coach Joe Prenda. 



CATHRIGHT 




133 




I 




Mccormick 



Mccormick 



134 



McCluskey First Woman All- American at SMU 




Freshman Sandy McCluskey became the 
first woman Ail-American at SMU, making 
the consolation finals in the 200 yard 
freestyle at the National Championships held 
at Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, the 
weekend of March 13th, 14th, and 15th. 

McCluskey was timed in a school record 
clocking of 2:00.06, finishing 16th out of 30 
women entered in the event. 

"If she had done that time in the New 
England Championships she would have 
won it," said Coach Filippo. "The girl that 
beat Sandy in the N.E. Championships finish- 
ed 20th at the Nationals." 

Freshman Kathy Dite and two relay teams 
were also selected to compete in the Na- 
tionals, having qualified during the regular 
season. 

Dite finished a disappointing 23rd in the 
50 yard butterfly. The 200 yard freestyle 
team finished 19th out of 24 teams, while 
the 800 yard freestyle team finished 24th of 
25 teams. It should be noted, however, that 
simply qualifying for the Nationals is a great 
accomplishment. 



— Rick Rosenfeld 



PHOTOS: McCORMICk 




135 



Men's Fencing Team 



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136 



Women's Fencing Team 




MFTZGER 




137 




Mccormick 



138 



Women's Basketball 




CATHRiCHT 



139 




Mccormick 



CATHRIGHT 



140 



Front row, left to right: Coach Bruce Wheeler, Paul Leon, Mark Pockora, Bill Gertner, Paul Lund 
berg, Bob Conet, and Assistant Coach Mark Champagne. Back row, left to right: Doug Gret 
chfield, Bob Kelly, Stan Benson, Art Goyette, Ed Higgins, Dave Daniels, Annesio Silvia, and Jim 
Ragan. 



Youth and inexperience plague cagers 



Young and inexperienced best describes the 
1980-81 men's basketball team. As a result, the 
team experienced a dismal season, winning 
seven games while losing 18. 

Head Coach Bruce Wheeler's squad was com- 
prised of five freshmen, two sophomores, two 
juniors, and a senior. Captain Dave Daniels, the 
lone senior, closed out a four year career at 
SMU. 

Although this team's record was disappoin- 
ting, there were some bright spots during the 
course of the season. 

Junior guard Paul Leon and sophomore guard 



Bob Conet were the steadiest of the Corsairs. 
Leon paced the team with a 17.9 scoring 
average, while Gonet averaged 15.4 points per 
contest and topped the club in rebounding. 
Freshman forward Stan Benson and freshman 
center Ed Higgins also showed promise in their 
initial seasons. 

Coach Wheeler feels his team made great 
progress despite its record. With nine of 10 
players returning next season, SMU stands a 
good chance of turning its record around. 

Mike Greene 




141 





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145 




146 




PHOTOS METZCER 



A Doll's House 



147 



Iranian captive tells 444 day story 




148 







Victor Tomseth, an Iranian captive for 
444 days, called the United States Em- 
bassy in Iran an "easy target for exter- 
nalizing internal Iranian frustrations." 
Tomseth made the comments about 
the Iranian takeover of the embassy and 
the subsequent hostage situation at a 
news conference held at SMU in April. 

Later, in a speech to about 400 peo- 
ple, Tomseth clarified the statement by 
dividing the reasons for the hostage 
crisis into two categories: 1) internal 
Iranian political turmoil, and 2) the 
history of U.S. Iranian relations. 

Tomseth added that we were "vic- 
tims of our own past" in Iran. Pointing 
to the extensive trade and security rela- 
tionship we had with Iran under the 
Shah, Tomseth said, "to that extent we 
have to take responsibility for what 
happened November 4, 1979." 

— Dan MacAlpine 



PHOTOS METZGER 



149 



Temper's Annual Poetry Reading 







150 






PHOTOS KLEIN 



151 




152 




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153 



College for a Day 




photos: Mccormick 



154 



Spring Fest 



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157 




Mccormick 



158 




photos: Mccormick 



159 



It's Senior Weekend! 



II 



160 





PHOTOS: CILMORE 



161 



3-D experiments escape 
from Group VI 




Honors Convocation Banquet 




164 




PHOTOS: CRUZ 



165 







166 




PHOTOS CRUZ 



167 




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PHOTOS: CRUZ 



169 



The Atlantics take SMU by Storm 




170 



The 
Golf 
Team 




Clockwise, from top: Co-Captain Dan Donovan, 
Dennis Freeman, John Connors, and Co-Captain 
Mark Consalves. 



PHOTOS CILMORE 



171 



Women's Softball 



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173 



The Baseball Team 




METZCER 



174 




PHOTOS: CILMORE 




175 



Men's Track Team races to 
(another) undefeated season 




176 



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Women's Track Team 
has winning season 




For a good high-jump photo that we 
accidentally put with the women's 
cross-country team, please see page 92. 
Sorry . . . 



PHOTOS: McCORMIO 



178 








GIL MORE 



179 



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1280 Receive Degrees at 81st SMU Graduation 




CIVIL EM. 
TECHNOLOGY 




PHOTOS: CRUZ 




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PHOTOS: CRUZ 



Nadia Jane Abgrab 
Marketing 

George Abou-Mourad 
Civil Engineering 



Francis Adebayo Adekemi 
Civil Engineering 

Roxanne Ahlijanian 
Textile Design 

Eugene Aiello 
Finance 



David Alderman 
Electrical Engineering Tech. 

Gilbert Lavinio Alegi 
Mechanical Engineering 

Richard D. Alfonso 
Civil Engineering 



Ronald Almeida 
Management 

Robert lames Amoruso 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 

Judith Susan Andrade 
Psychology 



190 





Idalecia Marie Andre 
Portugese 


Patricia L. Andrews 
Nursing 


Maureen V. Andrade 
Sociology 


Eduardo R. Andre 
Electrical Engineering 


Susan D. Araujo 
Nursing 


Gregory W. Archambault 
Accounting 


Michael E. Annunziato 
Biology 


Ana Araujo 
Management 






Steven E. Archambault 
Management 


Paul Norman Arguin 
Industrial Relations 






191 



Donald J. Arruda 
Sociology 


Sheri Arvedon 




Daniel Babka 
Accounting 


Donna Marie Baieta 
Sociology 


Mitchell David August 
Management 


Kathleen Barrera 
Nursing 


John Andrew Barry 
Accounting 


Michael T. Barnes 
Management 



llidio M. Azinheira 
Civil Engineering 

David Barney 
Accounting 




McCOR' 



192 




Patricia Ann Barry 
Nursing 

Scott E. Bartolomei 
Textiles 

James E. Basque 
Accounting 



Barbara Anne Bauer 
Fine Arts 

Jodi Lynn Baum 
Psychology 

Karen R. Bean 
Industrial Relations 



Audrey B. Beaudoin 
Psychology 

Denis Beaudion 

Suzette P. Bedard 
Medical Technology 



Angelo A. Belli 
English 

Susan A. Bellotti 
Multidisciplinary Studies 



193 



Sandra Leigh Bemis 
Industrial Relations 

Susan Bennett 
Nursing 

Alice Marie Benoit 
Nursing 



Denise Marie Benoit 
Sociology 

Thomas A. Benoit 
Accounting 

William F. Benoit II 
Accounting 



Donald A. Berard 
Electrical Engineering Tech. 

Scott Bergstrom 

Paul A. Bernier 
Management 



Laura ). Bertolon 
Nursing 

Barbara A. Bessen 
Mechanical Engineering 




194 







Karyn Bicker 
Sociology 


Pamila Binder 
Textiles 


Luis R. Bettencourt 
Management 


Thomas Bettencourt 
Textiles 


Robert R. Blanchette 
Management 


Christopher Bolen 
Political Science 


Christopher R. Blackburn 
Political Science 


E. Clyde Blackburn 
Humanities 


Susan }. Blecharczyk 

Nursing 


Harry J. Booth 
Industrial Relations 




Mccormick 



195 




Wayne C. Booth 
Political Science 


Paula S. Boothman 
Nursing 


Anne Bosi 
Sociology 


Michael Botieri 
Sociology 


Russell M. Borden 
Management 


Kenneth P. Borowy 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 


Maureen P. Bourque 
Psychology 


Jeannine T. Boutin 
Accounting 


loan Marie Bouffard 
Accounting 


Walid M. Boulos 
Mechanical Engineering 







196 




Judith Ann Boyce 
Psychology 

Bruce F. Braga 
Electrical Engineering 



Nelson J. Braga 
Management 

Robert E. Brand 
Electrical Engineering Tech. 

Dawn M. Brennan 
Biology 



Kevin J. Brewer 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 

Kevin David Brown 
Medical Technology 

Lisa M. Brown 
Nursing 



Joseph Brulotte, Jr. 
Electrical Engineering Tech. 

Peter J. Brunette 
Electrical Engineering 

Joseph R. Bucchanio 
Textiles 



197 



lames Francis Buckley 
Chemistry 

K. Louise Buckley 
English 



Brian K. Budwey 
Electrical Engineering 

Stephen John Burke 
Electrical Engineering 

William ). Bussiere 
Management 



Analia Cabral 

Donna Marie Cabral 
Management 

Francis Gordon Cabral, jr. 
Mathematics 



lean Carole Cafarelli 
Marketing 

)ohn Michael Caffrey 
Industrial Relations 

Stephen loseph Cameron 
History 




198 




Claire Elizabeth Canuel 
Marketing 


Dennis Canulla 
Industrial Relations 


Elizabeth Rose Campbell 
Psychology 


Ann Marie Canavan 
Sociology 


leffrey Keith Carignan 
Mechanical Engineering 


James Joseph Carey 
Political Science 


Thomas James Cardillo 
Design 


Augusto Ramiro Cardoso 
Mathematics 






Elizabeth ). Carlier 
Textile Technology 


Donald Robert Caron 
Electrical Engineering 



199 



John Carpenter 
Accounting 


Julie Ann Carpenter 
Nursing 






David Thomas Cass 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 


Cynthia Ann Castanho 
Accounting 


Jeffrey Paul Carr 
Management 


Antonio M. Carreiro 
Civil Engineering 


John Edward Cavacas 
Civil Engineering Tech. 


Susan Marie Chaisson 
Psychology 


Francis John Castanho 
Electrical Engineering 


David William Catten, Jr 
History 



200 





Robert fames Chambers 
Chemistry 

lames A. Charette 
Marketing 

David E. Chase 
Accounting 



Jonathan Davenport Chace 
Economics 

William Allen Chace 
Accounting 

Saade Michel Chibani 
Civil Engineering 



Paul William Chicoine 
Electrical Engineering Tech. 

Regina Marie Chicoine 
Industrial Relations 

Alan Robert Clunie 
Civil Engineering 



Maurice E. P. Coates 
Psychology/Sociology 

Sharon lean Coates 
Nursing 



201 



Gerald Steven Cohen 
Accounting 

Wayne B. Coleman 
Psychology 

Jane Marie Collett 
Accounting 



Pamela Ann Comstock 
Medical Technology 

Victor M. Contente 
English 

Stephanie Cook 
English 



Frank Cooper 
Management 

Joseph F. Corinha III 
Textile Technology 

Richard A. Cormier 
Multidisciplinary Studies 



Elizabeth G. Correira 
Accounting 

Kathleen M. Cosgrove 
Multidisciplinary Studies 




202 







Joann E. Costa 
Sociology 


Robert L. Couto 
Economics 


Mien ). Costa 
Sociology 


Elizabeth A. Costa 
Textile Technology 


Russell Coyne 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 


Eileen T. Crafts 
Political Science 


Annette 1. Couture 
Cursing 


Kathleen ). Coyne 
Marketing 


Anna M. Craveiro 
Economics 


Charlotte A. Craven 
English 




TRIPPf 



203 




Janet E. Crispin 
Nursing 


Mary V. Cronin 
Psychology 


Joanne P. Crowley 
Accounting 


Patricia J. Crowley 
Electrical Engineering 


Richard S. Crosby 
Psychology 


Mary E. Crowe 
English 


Richard R. Cullivan 
Electrical Engineering Tech. 


Robert M. Cusack 
Management 


Harold W. Crowther III 
English 


Barry G. Cullen 
Management 







204 




Virginia Ann D'Adamo 
Marketing 

Thomas J. Daigle 
Mathematics 



William S. Dailey 
Psychology 

Stephen M. Dalbec 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 

David M. Daniels 
Marketing 



Robert A. Danielson 
Economics 

Gearge H. Daou 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 

NajibY. Daou 
Mechanical Engineering 



Susan E. Darbyshire 
Design 

Jose Dasilva 

Tena J. Davies 
Marine Biology 



205 



Fernando T. DeAraujo 
Management 

Jane-Ellen Dee 
English 



|ohn P. Delaney 
History 

Patrice B. DeLorenzo 
Fine Arts 

Elizabeth deMelo 
Psychology 



lanice Diane Dempsey 
Nursing 

Suzanne Marie Deneault 
Chemistry 

Brian Michael Dendy 
Accounting 



Sandra Ann Densmore 
Design 

Cheryl Depina 

Susan F. Derbesy 
Nursing 



206 





iteven Arthur Deschenes 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 



Robert Paul Desjardins 
Marketing 



Emily Deramus 



Gregory Alan Derosier 
Multidisciplinary Studies 







Eleanor Ann Desmarais 




ames Richard Dever 


lames Paul DiFrancesco 


Multidisciplinary Studies 


Denise Marcelle Despres 


Civil Engineering Tech. 


History 


Joann Marie DeVerdi 


Spanish 






Design 


Kim A. Dlouhy 
Psychology 



207 



Scott Andrew Dobihal 
Biology 

Eileen D'Oliveira 
Medical Technology 

Bradley J. Donnellan 
Biology 



Kathleen Dobija 
Nursing 

Daniel Paul Donaghy 
Management 

Kathryn Louise Dooley 
Industrial Relations 



Theresa Denise Doherty 
Art History 

Nancy Elizabeth Donahue 
Sociology 



Kathleen Mary Dolan 
Psychology 

Paul A. Donndellinger 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 




208 




Marianne Dorgan 
Nursing 

Daren lean Doughty 
Accounting 

Karen E. Doyle 
Multidisciplinary Studies 



Carolyn K. Drew 
Nursing 

Elizabeth Duarte 

Michael Joseph Duarte 
Civil Engineering 



Carolyn E. Dunford 
Design 

Gayle Marie Dunn 
Textile Design 

Barbara L. Eagen 
Textile Design 



Karen Marie Eagleston 
Industrial Relations 

Karin Lisa Eckert 
Accounting 



209 



Valerie Edmunds 
Mathematics 

Susan P. Edwards 
Chemistry 

Deborah E. Ekholm 
Textile Design 



Assad El-Haddad 
Civil Engineering 

Marcia F. Ellis 
Psychology 

Jonathan M. Emery 
Chemistry 



Susan E. England 
Psychology 

)anet R. Ertel 
Textile Technology 

Donna Ethier 
Psychology 



Steven E. Fafard 
Management 

Scott Fahle 
Biology 




210 







Michael Fallon 
Marketing 


Carole Ann Faria 
Textile Technology 


Peter Faidell, Jr. 

Psychology 


Carol Falcone 


Cynthia Feliciano 
Psychology 


Bruce E. Fernandes 
Accounting 


Brenda J. Farwell 
Nursing 


Virginia M. Fay 
Marine Biology 


|ohn M. Ferreira 
Civil Engineering Tech. 


Mary Ferreira 
Psychology 




TRIPPE 



211 




Vicki ). Firing 
Nursing 


Brad ). Fischer 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 


Bernadette Florek 
Multidisciplinary Studies 


Michael W. Florek 
Marketing 


David A. Flanagan 
Management 


Lynn L. Fletcher 
Nursing 


Gayle S. Forbes 
Psychology 


Doreen M. Forczyk 
History 


Christopher Foley 
Political Science 


Sandra Folsom 







212 




)oan Forte 

Theresa Fortes 
Biology 



Linda L. Franciose 
Nursing/Psychology 

Carol Francis 
Industrial Relations 

Lynne Francis-Lunn 
Textile Design 



Walter A. Francis 
Management 

John A. Franco 
Sociology 

Christopher E. Frank 
Management 



Stella Frascotti 
Psychology 

Michael A. Frates 
Finance 

Thomas F. Frazier 
Management 



213 



Russell Andre Fredette 
Economics 

Monica Annette Fuchs 
Nursing 



Joanne Marie Furtado 
Psychology 

Stephen Lawrence Furtado 
Psychology 

Wayne |ohn Furtado 
Accounting 



Donald Armand Gagnon 
Biology 

Paul R. Gagnon 
Psychology 

Kenneth ). Gallant 
Accounting 



Edward Charles Gaiuska 
Psychology 

Robert ). Ganson 
Biology 

Robert Maurice Garceau 
Mechanical Engineering 




214 




A/ayne Michael Garrod 
xjciology 

.inda Ann Caudette 
Marketing 



Kathryn Garrity 
Mathematics 


)ose Fernandes Garcia 
Mechanical Engineering 


Tech. 


Luis A. C. Garcia 
Mathematics 


Raymond Gary Gauvin III 
Management 


Andrew Isaac Garte 
Marine Biology 




Jeffrey Paul Gaspar 
Political Science 




Robert Alan German 
Psychology 




Carl Getman 
Managment 



215 



Mansour Chalibaf 
Accounting 

Bonny Lynn Gifford 
Accounting 

Richard Alan Oilman 
Electrical Engineering 



Seyed M. H. Gheirat 
Textile Technology 

Stephen Vincent Gill 
Art History 

]ohn David Gilmore 
Design 



Gaby Ghibani 

Jeffrey Gillette 
Mechanical Engineering 



Linda Jean Gibson 
Management 

Donna Marie Gillis 
Psychology 




Mccormick 



216 




Mark Philip Cilmore 
Electrical Engineering 

David Michael Cleason 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 

Barbara Horvitz Clicksman 
Mechanical Engineering 



Teresa A. Glynn 
Multidisciplinary Studies 

Randall Scott Goldman 
Marketing 

Maria Cesarina Gomes 
Sociology 



Antonio Manuel Goncalves 
Biology 

Michael )ohn Gonet 
Sociology 

Mary-Ann Gonsalves 
Marketing 



Paul Marshall Goodwin 
Electrical Engineering 

Mary Ann Gorelczenko 
Nursing 



217 



Rebecca Lynn Coss 
Psychology 

Vicki J. Gosselin 
Chemistry 

Andreas A. Counaris 
Design 



John Antonios Gounaris 
Political Sci/Economics 

Allen Grace, Jr. 
Marketing 

Roberta Granfield 
Marketing 



Marianna ). Graviano 
Psychology 

Randall Alan Gravlin 
Electrical Engineering 

Christopher George Green 
Design 



Stephen A. Greene 
Accounting 

Richard Anthony Greenwood 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 




218 







Mary Helena Grochmal 
Psychology 


Pamela Karen Grumney 
Psychology 


Robin Michelle Greisdoff 
Textile Design 


Ellen Elizabeth Grenham 

Nursing 


Daniel Peter Haddad 
Electrical Engineering 


Pamela )oy Hadley 
Nursing 


Robert ). Cuay, Jr. 
Civil Engineering 


Ellen Jane Gurley 
Mathematics 


Maureen Patricia Hagen 
Psychology 


Stephen Anthony Hall 
Electrical Engineering Tech 




TKIPPt 



219 




Lawrence Harbour 
Electrical Engineering 

Jayne Tara Hart 
Political Science 



Nancy J. Hamel 
Marketing 

Christine Harrington 
English 

Robert Harwood 
English 



Alfred Harrison 



Majid Hasheim-Pour 
Textile Technology 



Edward A. Hart 
Textile Technology 

Mary Hassell 
Fine Arts 



220 




Deborah Marie Hatch 
Industrial Relations 

Louise Ann Hayes 
Textile Technology 



Matthew Hayward 
Art History 

Catherine Heim 
Mathematics 

Daniel Henry 



Stephanie Hesselton 
Management 

Donna M. Hession 
Design 

Gregory C. Hill 
Management 



Jeffrey N. Hill 
Industrial Relations 

Kathleen Hinchcliffe 
Psychology 

Deborah Hines 
Nursing 



221 



Harriet J. Hodkinson 
Nursing 

James G. Hoff 
Biology 



Mark S. Homer 
Management 

Donna Horan 

Karen L. Hornby 
Textile Technology 



Donna M. Home 
Nursing 

Thomas G. Horta 
Management 

Pamela J. House 
Textile Technology 



George Howayeck 
Biology 

Lorna Howker 

Civil Engineering Technology 

James Howland 
Physics 




222 




Rosamond H. Hurley 
English 


Benjamin Husted, Jr. 
Accounting 


Robert Hubbard 
Marketing 




lanice Hurd 
English 


Valdemar lacob 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 


Rick lacobsen 
Finance 


Edward A. Hynes 
Humanities 




John E. lablonski 
Accounting 






)ay ). lakubasz 
Mechanical Engineering 


Tech. 


)ohn R lamieson 
Electrical Engineering Tech 



223 



Charles K. January 
Design 


Kathy Jarvis 
Sociology 






Richard Jenkins 
Textile Chemistry 


Idalina S. Jeronimo 
Portugese/Spanish 


Janet Jason 
Humanities 


Helen Jenkins 
Sociology 


Mark A. Johnson 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 


Charles Jones 

Civil Engineering Tech. 


Mary Anne Jeronimo 
Psychology 


Elsa Johnson 
Psychology 




224 




Marion )ones 

Kathleen M. Joseph 
Spanish 

Louise M. Kaczynski 
French 



Annmarie Kane 
History 

Ahad Katebi-Benissi 

Kenneth E. Keay 
Biology 



David N. Kelly 
Management 

Kris E. Kelly 
Nursing 

Deborah Kennedy 
Sociology 



Gail Kennedy 
Design 

Timothy Kennefick 
Marketing 



225 



Deborah F. Kent 
Civil Engineering Tech. 

Kevin P. Kern 
Marketing 

George S. Khoury 

Mechanical Engineering 



Christina L. King 
Chemistry 

Louis F.Klein III 
Management 

Andreas R. Knapp 
Electrical Engineering 



loyce Kopelman 
Management 

loseph H. Krab 
Civil Engineering 

Karen Krawczyk 
Psychology 



Kichael N. Krigman 
Multidisciplinary Studies 

Donna Marie Lafontaine 
Medical Technology 



226 











Alan |. Lacasse 
Finance 


Robert Lanpher 
Electrical Engineering 


«rre LaPerriere 
Political Science 


Robert E. LaBonte 
Management/Accounting 


Sandra K. Laurie 
Textile Technology 


Lorraine Lawrence 
Multidisciplinary Studies 


Lynn Lapierre 
Jiology /Chemistry 


William M. Lapointe 
Management 


Margaret Lawrence 
Marketing 


Raymond Lawrence 
Accounting 




DECRUZ 



227 




Brian Leary 
Electrical Engineering 


Henry J. LeBreux 
Textile Chemistry 


Matthew Lenhart 
History 


Thomas Lennox 
Marketing 


Evelyn Lederer 
Multidisciplinary Studies 


Kathleen Lemaire 
Multidisciplinary Studies 


)oanne Levesque 
Textile Design 


Richard Levesque 
Management 


Herve E. Letourneau 
Accounting 


Diane Levesque 
Psychology 







228 




Robert Levine 
Marketing 

lean L'Heureux 
Medical Technology 



David Lima 
Psychology 

Patricia Lincoln 
Marketing 

Richard Lindsay 
Civil Engineering Tech. 



Mark Litos 
Visual Design 

Terry LoChiatto 
Psychology 

Robert Long 
Management 



Donna Looney 
Industrial Relations 

Cheryl Ann Loranger 
Chemistry 

Kathleen Love 
Management 



229 



John Lovell 
Management 

]ane Lucek 
Textile Technology 



Susan Jane Lurie 
Nursing 

Mary Lyons 
Psychology 

Daniel MacAlpine 
English /German 



Marny McBride 
Nursing 

Edward Machado 
Textile Chemistry 

Mary Machado 
History 



Sybil ). Madden 
Nursing 

Terrence Mahoney 
Civil Engineering 

Maria Malesta 
Textile Chemistry 




230 




lames Manton 
Accounting 


Elaine Mara 

Industrial Relations/Management 


Vincent Malkoski 
Marine Biology 


Edward Manley 
Management/Industrial Relations 


<athleen Martin 
Accounting 


Igemenia Martins 
Sociology 


Paul Marshall 
Biology 


Candida Martin 
Mathematics 






James A. Masterson 
Accounting 


lames William Masterson 
Management 



231 



Antoinette Mastroberti 
Art History 

Daniel McCarthy 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 

Shaune McCarthy 
English 



Isaura Matos 
Portugese/Spanish 

Daniel P. McCarthy 
Electrical Engineering Tech. 

Susan McCarthy 
Nursing 



Raymond Matthews 
Chemistry 

Kevin B. McCarthy 
Civil Engineering 



Peter McCabe 
Accounting 

Kevin J. McCarthy 
Textile Chemistry 




232 




Lisa E. McCue 
Design 

Robbin McDonald 
Accounting 

Stephen ). McDonald 
Design 



Carol McElhinney 
Nursing 

Michael E. McGinn 
Mathematics 

Martin F. McGrath 
Finance 



Timothy McGrath 
Management 

Stephen McGuire 
Management 

Thomas McHenry 
Political Science 



Daniel McKieman 
Biology 

Christopher McLaughlin 
Humanities 



233 



James McLoughlin 
Sociology 

Sharon McNamara 
Marketing 

Anne McPherson 
Marketing 



Anna Medeiros 
Portuguese/French 

Carlos Medina 
Mechanical Engineering 

David Mello 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 



Norine Mello 

Thomas Mello 

Civil Engineering Tech. 

Victor Mello 



Cindy Mendel 
Marketing 

Yvonne Mendes 
Sociology 




234 









Joseph Merola 


Pamela Messer 








Management 


Marketing 


Deborah Mendonca 


Anthony Mercadante 




Donna Metcalf 


David Michaud 


Sociology 


Textile Chemistry 




Nursing 


Management 


Susan L. Messner 


lames R. Meszaros 




Eugenia Michaelides 


Elizabeth Michaud 


Fine Arts 


Mechanical Engineering 


Tech. 


Fine Arts 


Marine Biology 




CILMORE 



235 




Darlene Mikolajczyk 


Wendy Miller 


Solomon Moibi 


Anna Moitoso 


Electrical Engineering 


Psychology 


Treg Monty 


Spanish 


Kazem Moazami 


loan Mogavero 


Marketing 


Lynne A. Moran 


Electrical Engineering Tech. 


Sociology 




English 


John Montanez 


Joseph Monti 






Nursing 


Marine Biology 







236 




lames Moriarty 
Psychology 

Beverly Morin 
Accounting 



David Morin 
Fine Arts 

John Mortarelli 
Management 

Richard Moylan 
Management 



Joseph Mroczka 
Civil Engineering Tech. 

Paula Mueller 
Biology 

Stephen Mueller 
Biology 



Steven Mullen 
Marketing 

)ohn ). Mungo 
Mechanical Engineering 

Donna Murphy 
Textile Design 



237 



Kevin Murphy 
Electrical Engineering 

Kevin J. Murphy 
Management 



William ). Murphy 
Electrical Engineering 

Kevin A. Murray 
Finance/Management 

Peter Murray 
Management 



Edward M. Musmon 
Management 

Rhonda Myers 
Medical Technology 

Gregory Nader 
Political Science 



Carminda Nascimento 
Spanish 

Amy Nelson 
Management 

LouAnn P. Neri 
Nursing 



238 





Nancy Norton 
History 

Bob O'Hare 

Marketing 



Richard Norton 
Marketing 


Susan L. Newth 
Sociology 


Richard Nordlund 
Political Science 


Judith L. Ohrenberger 
Nursing 


Peter O'Connell 
Marine Biology 


Kathy O'Connor 
Multidisciplinary Studies 




Paul C. Ohrenberger 
Management 


Teresa O'Leary 
Marketing 



239 



John A. Oliveira 


William J. Oliver 






Electrical Engineering 


Mathematics 






Patrick O'Neale 


Lisa O'Neil 


Susan T. Olivier 


Robert Olshaw 


Civil Engineering 


Nursing 


Biology 


Accounting 


Maggie O'Toole 


Alfred Ouellette 


Betsy Orcutt 


Robert Orlando 


Nursing 


Accounting 


History 


Marketing 




MCCORMh 



240 




David Pacheco 
Economics 

Michael Paglierani 
Electrical Engineering 

Michael Palazzi 
Marine Biology 



Diane Palermo 
Biology 

Gail Palmeri 
Nursing 

Elaine Paniocco 
Psychology 



Ronald Parent 
Management 

Paul Parente 
Civil Engineering 

Lauren Parker 
Textile Design 



PaulPatykula 
Civil Engineering Tech. 

Paul P^vao 
Management 



241 



Paula Pedroso 
Chemistry 

David Peixoto 
Accounting 

John A. Pelletier 
Humanities 



Suzanne Marie Pelletier 
Accounting 

John D. Penacho 
Accounting 

Kenneth Guy Pentheny, Jr. 
Marine Biology 



Brian Pepin 
Management 

Cynthia A. Pereira 
Management 

Joseph Pereira 
Management 



Anne C. Perry 
Psychology 

Bryan L. Perry 
Economics 




242 







Susan ). Perry 
Nursing 


Dorothy M. Pezold 
Nursing 


Christopher Perry 
Textile Chemistry 


David Perry 
Management 


Julia Picard 

Visual Design/Photography 


David A. Pierce 
Accounting 


•\nne Phalen 
Design 


Barbara Phillips 
Industrial Relations 


Maria Pimentel 
English 


Mariline R. Pinto 
English 




Mccormick 



243 




Pamela Ann Pinto 


Susan C. Pires 


Deborah Ann Polak 


Yuen-Shin Ponj 


Management 


Marketing 


Psychology 


Textiles 


Pamela Plasse 


Susan M. Plummer 


Beverly Powell 


Rene P. Poyant 




Nursing 


Management 


Management 


Cindy Pope 








Design 


Diane R. Post 
Accounting 







244 




Robert Poulin 
Accounting 

Stephen M. Puscizna 
Industrial Relations 



Karl A. Rasche 
Accounting 

Richard Radovsky 
English 

Benvinda F. Ramos 
Nursing 



Gustavo O. Raposo 
Civil Engineering 

Peter E. Read 
Biology 

Carol Ann Reed 
Textiles 



Alan W. Rego 
Electrical Eng. Tech. 

Robert Reid 
Electrical Engineering 

Deborah M. Reis 
Sociology 



245 



Dulce Reis 
Spanish 

Carlos Rezendes 
Management 



Michael Rezendes 
Accounting 

Mary Roach 
Medical Technology 

David Robb 
Fine Arts 



Muriel Robbins 
Accounting 

Diane P. Robinson 
History 

Michael Robinson 
Sociology 



Brenda Rocha 
Mathematics 

William Rochford 
Marketing 

(esse Rodrigues 
Accounting 




246 




Anthony Rose 


Stephen Rose 


loanne Rodngues 


Pamela Rodngues 


Political Science 


Management 


Visual Design 


Sociology 


leftrey Ross 


Debora Roszkiewicz 


Frederick Rosenteld 


Bruce Rosenthal 


Management 


Nursing 


History 

Scott Rudio 
Accounting 


Accounting 



247 



David Ryan 
Management 

lane Sanborn 
English 

|ohn Schmidt 
Marine Biology 



Linda Ryan 
Marketing 






Cerda Sano 
German 


Stephen Saari 
English 


Howard Sacks 
Industrial Relations 


George F. Schramm 
Finance 


Charles Sardonini 
Biology/Chemistry -.. 


Sandra L. Scales 
Nursing 




McCORMIC 



248 




Steven Schwartz 
English 

Debra Scibilia 
Marketing 

Stephen Senter 
Accounting 



Scott Setters 
Accounting 

Chris Seufert 
Political Science 

Diane Sgourakes 
Marketing 



Shailesh Shah 
Electrical Engineering Tech. 

Lynne Shane 
History 

Richard J. Shank 
Electrical Engineering 



Stephen Shellman 
Multidisciplinary Studies 

Barbara Sher 
Sociology 



249 



Cheryl Shepard 
English 

Albert Silva 
Psychology 

David Silva 
Accounting 



Debra Silva 
Multidisciplinary Studies 

)orge Silva 
Electrical Engineering 

Stephen Silva 
Management 



Wayne Silva 
Management 

Susan Silvestri 
Visual Design 

Octavio Simoes 
Mechanical Engineering 



Brett Singer 
Psychology 

Suzanne Sisson 
Civil Engineering 




250 



jndy Smith 
Cursing 

tegina Souza 
'olitical Science 



Erick Snellman 
Biology 

David Spagnolo 
Biology 



Lourdes Soto 
Multidisciplinary Studies 


Pamela Souza 
Accounting 


Paul Spooner 
Sociology 


Leslie Spring 
Nursing 


Rose Marie St. Denis 
Medical Technology 


David Stafford 
Mechanical Engineerin 




Mc C( )RMICK 



25 




Sally Staib 
Psychology 


Marilyn Stanton 
Sociology 


Charles Stengl 
Accounting 


Warren Steinmetz 
Chemistry/Biology 


Charles Stellberger 
Electrical Engineering 


Edward Sullivan 
Accounting 


Leonard Stewart 
Management 


Christine Sugrue 
Marketing 





Cheryl Stenson 
Marketing 

Kathleen Sullivan 
Marketing 



252 




Marie Sullivan 
Political Science 

Paul Sullivan 
Civil Engineering Tech. 



George Summers 
Visual Design 

Anna Suppappola 
Management 

David Surette 
Accounting 



Michael Sweeney 
History 

Paul Swiszcz 
Textile Chemistry 

Donna Sykes 
Electrical Engineering Tech. 



David Sylvain 
Marine Biology 

Barry Tagen 
Management 

Granger Tarn 
Mechanical Engineering 



253 



Deirdre Taracevicz 
Fine Arts 

Hasan Tavakoli 
Textile Tecnology 



Durval Tavares 
Electrical Engineering 

Geral Teixeira 
Marketing 

Joel Teller 

Electrical Eng./Comp. Science 



Toni Thatcher 
Multidisciplinary Studies 

Debra Theg 
Nursing 

Elizabeth Thomas 
Art History 



Beth Thompson 
Political Science 

Mary Thomson 
Sociology 

Stephen Thorley 
English 



254 





Shirley Tobol 
Multidisciplinary Studies 

loanTrudel 
Management 



Nancy Toland 
Marketing 

Stephen ). Turner 
Psychology 



David Tipping 
Finance 

Asa Trainer 
Mechanical Engineering 

William Turner 
Multidisciplinary Studies 



Kit To 
Management 

William L. Trippe 
English 

Ann Twohig 
Industrial Relations 



Maureen Ty 
Psychology 


Paul Tykodi 
Civil Engineering 






Jeffrey Vandam 
Management 


Daniel Vasconcellos 
Visual Design 


Ahmad Vafaei 


Michelle VanHeest 
Psychology 


Alan |. Vezina 
Management 


Philip Viall 

Electrical Engineering 


Maria Vasques 
Sociology 


Brian ). Vautrin 
Accounting 




256 




Luis Viana 
Electrical Engineering 

Dennis I. Vieira 
History 

lohn Viens 
Fine Arts 



lames Vigeant 
Textile Chemistry 

Gary W. Vincent 
Accounting 

Cheryl Vuolo 



Kimberly Walecka 
Sociology 

Karen Walega 
Biology 

Richard Wallace 
Economics 



Kevin Walsh 
Civil Engineering 

Maryann |. Walsh 
Visual Design 



257 



Susan M. Walsh 
Marketing 

Richard Warhall 

Civil Engineering Tech. 

Aaron Wasserman 



Elizabeth Waters 
Textile Design 

Kenneth Wheeler 
English 

Mary Anne Whewell 
Textile Design 



Philip Widuch 
Finance 

Maurice Wiernicki 
Mechanical Engineering 

Charles Wilkinson 
Marketing 



lames Wilkinson 
Electrical Engineering Tech. 

Doona M. William 
Psychology 




258 










Allen Wong 
Visual Design 


Deborah Wood 
Psychology 


Archibald Williams 
Mechanical Engineering 


Alan Willson 
Marketing 


David Wooler 
Accounting 


Nancy Woolf 
Multidisciplinary Studies 


Steven Woods 
Psychology 


Francis Woodward 
History 


Lynne Yacavone 
Nursing 


Siamak Yahaghi 
Civil Engineering 




259 



Edmund Yarusites 
Mechanical Engineering Tech. 

LauriYoung 
Mathematics 



Ryan Young 
Fine Arts 

Ann Marie Zaleski 
Management 

Mohammad Zarrineghbal 
Civil Engineering 




SENIORS NOT PICTURED 

Mahmoud Abdolrahim — Civil Engineering 

|il Beverlee Abel — Nursing 

Toni Georges Aboudib — Biology 

Bruce Adams — Marketing 

Pedro Africano — Political Science 

Mehrnaz Aghvami — Textile Technology 

Kimberly J. Ainsley — Psychology 

Lucille E. Allaire — Nursing 

Paul Almeida — Sociology 

Brian J. Alves - Textile Technology 

Joseph Amaral — Accounting 

Kathy Lynne Amaral — Psychology 

Manuel Amaral, Jr. — Political Science 

Anne P. Anderson — Nursing 

Deborah Anderson — Political Science 

Philip Anderson - Civil Engineering Tech. 

lohn Anderson, III - Electrical Eng. 

Mary Andrade — Sociology 

Joyce Andrew — Multidisciplinary Studies 

Gregory J. Aronis — Fine Arts 

Ellen C. Arruda — Nursing 

Patricia Arruda — Electrical Engineering 

Gary Ashworth — Accounting 

Victor Augusto — Portuguese 

Mark Axile — Textile Technology 

Mary Ayotte — Nursing 

Glen Babola — Management 

Elizabeth Bachtel - English 

Robert Bagana — Management 

Elaine Baglione — Design 

James Baillargeon - Electrical Eng. 

Peter Baillargeon - Accounting 

Kim Baldwin — Sociology 

Donna Balliro — Nursing 

Richard S. Banys - Mechanical Engineering 

Charles Barboza — Humanities /Soc. Sci. 

David Barclay — Business Administration 

Sharon Barreiro — Sociology 



Susan Barreyy — Industrial Relations 

Donald M. Barrette - Mechanical Eng. Tech. 

Daniel Barry — Humanities /Soc. Sci. 

Mildred Francis Barry — Business Admin. 

Fayek Barsoom — Mechanical Engineering 

Michael Beaton — Civil Eng. Tech. 

Patricia Ruth Beaulieu — Sociology 

Constance Joan Beben — Nursing 

George Bebis — Management 

Richard Bednarz — Business Admin. 

Homayoun Behboodi — Civil Engineering 

Richard Bellefeuille — Management 

Manuel Benevides — Management 

Frederick Benoit — Management 

Annette Bent — Multidisciplinary Studies 

Brenda Rocha Berard — Mathematics 

Robert Berche — Business Administration 

Michael Bernacchio — Management 

Diane Berube — Fine Arts 

Elizabeth Beshara — Electrical Engineering 

Michael Bianchini — Electrical Engineering 

Joseph Biron — Nursing 

Thomas Bissonnette — Electrical Engineering 

Andrew Blais — Philosophy 

Carole Bolton- German 

Joseph Bonanca — Management 

Stephen Bonarrigo — Electrical Eng. Tech. 

Marsha Hood Borden — Psychology 

Eduardo Borges — Portuguese 

Jeanne Borges — Nursing 

Barry Botelho — History 

John Botelho — Mechanical Eng. Tech. 

John A. Botelho — Electrical Engineering 

Mary Botelho — Portuguese 

Paul Boucher — Accounting 

Elizabeth Bourdon — Medical Technology 

Maura L. Borshell — Nursing 

Caesar Braga — Sociology 

Gileno Braga — Mechanical Eng. Tech. 

George J. P. Breault — Management 



Leo Breault — Accounting 

Mark Brenahan — Finance 

Eleanor Brewster — Multidisciplinary Stud. 

Donald Brighenti — Electrical Eng. Tech. 

Paul Broadmeadow - Electrical Engineering 

William Brough — Economics 

Donna Brown — Psychology 

Lorraine Brown - Psychology 

Richard Brown — History 

Martha Browning — Textile Technology 

Diane Buckley — Fine Arts 

John Bucley — Civil Engineering 

Lynne Sirois-Butterworth — Accounting 

Leonard Cabeceiras — Electrical Eng. 

Elizabeth Baxter Cain — Nursing 

Keith Caldwell - English 

Maryjane Callahan - Nursing 

Manuel Camara - Accounting 

Louise Campbell — Psychology 

Victoria Canto — German 

Rose Cardoso — Multidisciplinary Studies 

Phillip Cardoza — Sociology 

Nancy Cardozo - Textile Design 

Gustin Cariglia — History 

Wayne M. Carlson - Mechanical Eng. Tech. 

Joan Carmody — Spanish/Political Science 

Dwight Caron — Business Administration 

Tammy Carpenter — Textile Design 

Yucel O. Carr — Multidisciplinary Studies 

Marie Carrier — Textile Chemistry 

Joanne Carroll - English 

Anthony M. Casilli - Business Admin. 

Maria Castro - Nursing 

John I. D. Caswell - Political Science 

Lee Cetrano - Nursing 

Dale M. Chadwick - Civil Engineering 

Janice Lee Chadwick — Psychology 

Dale R. Chapman — Management 

Deborah Charette - Psychology 

Sheila P. Charpentier - Business Admin. 



260 



More Seniors Not Pictured . . . 



Lori jean Cheney — Multidisciplinary Stud. 

Gaby Chibani — Management 

Edward Choiniere — Electrical Engineering 

Neil T. Churchill — Marine Biology 

Elliott I. Clemence — Biology 

Robert Coady — Management 

Arthur P. Coelho — Psychology 

Frank L. Cole — Nursing 

Thomas Coles — Mechanical Eng. Tech. 

Kevin C. Coley — Management 

Robert Collet — Management 

Brian Collis — Mathematics 

Marianne Conlon — English 

Pamela A. Conti — Textile Design 

MaryLou Conway — Multidisciplinary Studies 

Wayne M. Cordeira — Accounting 

►Catherine Corey — Accounting 

Dianne Correia — Sociology 

Mary Costello — Business Administration 

Edward Cote — Psychology 

Patrice Cournoyer — Design 

Gail Ann Couto — Management 

Paula Couto — Management 

John Coyne III — Business Administration 

CaryCrabb — Fine Arts 

Ray Crabb — Humanities/Social Sciences 

Virginia Creamer — Sociology 

lohn Creel — Civil Engineering 

lohn Crider — Management 

loseph Crimmins — Management 

James Crook — Business Administration 

Peter Crowley — Marketing 

Robert Cyr — Management 

Jose DaSilva — Political Science 

Patricia Daley — Nursing 

Darlene Daltorio — Marketing 

Bonita Daly — Business Administration 

loseph Davey — Mechanical Engineering 

Joann David — Sociology 

Peter David — Psychology 

Frances Davis — Psychology 

Geraldine Cook Davis — English 

Jeffrey Davis - Sociology 

Joan DeCollibus — Multidisciplinary Stud. 

Raymond DeConto — Mechanical Eng. 

Patrice DeLorenzo — Fine Arts 

Frank DeMello — Finance 

Steven DeMenzes - Sociology 

Emily DeRamus — Sociology 

Norman DeSilva — Management 

Paulo Soares DeSousa - Electrical Eng. 

Manuel Del Lima, Jr. — Business Admin. 

John P. Dempsey - Marketing 

Marilyn Dennis — Business Admin. 

Mark J. Desmond - Industrial Relations 

John Desses — Business Admin. 

Theresa Dever — Nursing 

Michael A. DiCarlo — Marketing 

Kevin Doherty — Management 

Marian Donnelly — Multidisciplinary Stud. 

Brian W. Donovan — Humanities/Soc. Sci. 

Jeannie M. Donovan — Visual Design 

Susan L. Donovan — Textile Design 

Thomas Donovan — Electrical Engineering 

William Donovan — Accounting 

Catherine Dowd — Nursing 

Edward Dowdall - Civil Engineering Tech. 

Claire Doyle — Art Education 

Scott Doyle - Electrical Engineering 

Ellen Dragunas - Nursing 

Joan Driscoll — Nursing 

Michele DuBois — Nursing 

Paul Dumais — Business Administration 



Terrence Dunphy — Art History 

Peter Dupre — Political Science 

Nelson Depuis — Civil Eng. Tech. 

Donna Dusseault — Fine Arts 

Peter Dziel — Electrical Engineering 

Anne Dziura — Biology 

Allan Edwards — History 

John Edwards — Humanities/Social Sciences 

Cheryl Egan — Psychology 

Brian Ellis — Political Science 

Claie Emond — Modern Languages 

Michael Evans — Nursing 

Amos Fakulujo — Civil Engineering 

Sandra Farese — Fine Arts 

Diane Fay — Sociology 

Charles Fears — Business Administration 

Rosa Fenn — Electrical Engineering 

Beverly Fernandes — Nursing 

Ronald Fernandez - Psychology 

Maria Ferreira — Portuguese 

Carol Firth — Art History 

Elizabeth Fisher — Art Education 

Thomas Flanigan — English 

Stephen Flieder — Biology 

Elizabeth Flinn — Humanities/Soc. Sci. 

Bonnie Foley — Psychology 

Richard Fontaine — Nursing 

Paul Fortier — Electrical Engineering 

Roger Fortin — Modern Languages 

Louise Foster — Accounting 

David Founier — Management 

Norman Franz — Management 

Diane Fredricks — Nursing 

Diane French — Nursing 

Michael Freyermuth — Textile Technology 

Ronald Friar — Business Administration 

Joanne Furtado — Nursing 

lane Gagne — Fine Arts 

Richard Gagne - Management 

Arthur Gagnon — Management 

Debra Gagnon — English 



Karen Galib — Accounting 
Mark Gallagher - Business Administration 
Kevin Galligan - Business Administration 
Mary Ellen Gardner — Psychology 
Richard Gardner - Management 
Monica Garrison — Psychology 
Russell Garrity — Civil Engineering 
Patricia Gasior — Art History 
Richard Geary — Finance 
Richard Gemma — Business Admin. 
John Germano — Accounting 
Patricia Gerrior - Marine Biology 
David Gibbs — Business Administration 
Damaris Gibson - English 
Gayle Giroux — Fine Arts 
Wayne Glover - Mechanical Engineering 
Marc Goldstein — Mechanical Eng. Tech. 
Antone Gomes — Accounting , 
Mary Good — Design 
Michael Good — Management 
Anastasio Gounaris — Economics 
Donna Gouveia — Accounting 
Antonio Gravel — Mechanical Eng. Tech. 
Hildegarde Grindrod - History 
Bertrand Gruwell — Management 
Alice Guay — Nursing 
Anilkumar Gupte — Visual Design 
David B. Gustafson - Mathematics 
Dale L. Guthro — Accounting 
Terence Haaland — Management 
Robert B. Hagberg - History 
Carol Lee Hall — Management 
Rory Lee Hammond — Marine Biology 
David William Hamnquist — Art History 
Lydia Margaret Hamnquist - Art History 
Azar Youssef Hanna — Electrical Eng. 
Lisa Hanoyan - Sociology 
Chadia Hashway - Psychology 
Suzanne Hautau - Multidisciplinary Stud. 
William Hawkins — Sociology 
Brian Hayes - Political Science 




CRUZ 



261 



More Seniors . 



George Hebard - Marketing 

'.Edward Helger — Accounting 

Crisanto Henriques - Accounting 

David Heroux - Textile Technology 

Nancy Hickman — Textile Technology 

kimberlv Higgins — Fine Arts 

Maureen Hill - Psychology 

Kimberlv Stewart Hills - Elec. Eng. Tech. 

Stanley Hinds — Business Administration 

Pei-Cee Ho - Electrical Engineering 

Anne Hochman - Business Administration 

Katherine Hodges — Modern Languages 

Cindy Hottman — Psychology 

Ceraiciine Holewiak - Accounting 

Paula Holman — Nursing 

Judith Holmes — Nursing 

Elizabeth Horan — Art History ,, 

Kenneth Horan — Psychology 

Barbara Hovagimian — Nursing 

Daniel Howard — Management 

Anne lacobucci - Multidisciplinary Stud. 

Lesle\ iamele — Chemistry 

Jeffrey lllsies - Management 

Daniel lankms — Electrical Engineering 

Roxanne Jar\ is — Management 

Rebecca lenness — Art Education 

Nanc\ lennev — Sociology 

lohn iohannessen - English 

Richard Johnson - Accounting 

Chang Whan loo - Textile Technology 

Sarah Joseph — Electrical Engineering 



Dorothy Kallevik - Electrical Eng. 

Juliet Kalms — Marketing 

Bruce Kane — Mathematics. Chemistry 

kimberiy Kane-Weber - Psychology 

Kenneth Karsten, Jr. - Electrical Eng. 

Brian Kashner - Accounting 

Kathleen Kasmer — Biology 

Stephen Kasper - History 

Ahad Katebi, Benissi — Civil Engineering 

Janet Kawa — Business Administration 

James Keete — Nursing 

James Keicourse — Civil Engineering 

Philip Kelley — Electrical Engineering 

Maureen Kelman - Visual Design 

James Kenney - Business Administration 

Kevin Kenyon — Accounting 

David Kilpatrick - Business >dmn. 

Susan Kirby - Biology 

Anna Kirkpatnck — Management 

Kim Knight - Psychology 

Christine Knights - Psychology 

Neil Kollios — Civil Engineering 

Lawrence Koor - Sociology 

Steve Kovacs — Civil Engineering Tech 

Konstantinos Ktistakis — Mech. Eng. Tech. 

Cecelia Ann Kut - Psychology 

Paul LaCava — Management 

Steven LaCava - Management 

Pamela LaV allee - Management 

Robert LaV allee - Multidisciplinary Stud. 

James Laliy — Psychology 



Edward Lambert — Psychology 

Paul Lamoureux — Business Administration 

Philip Landry — Management 

Sherri Lareau — Design 

Marion Large-Jones — Sociology 

Siu Yin Lau - Accounting 

Christine LeBlanc - Civil Engineering 

Marc LeBlanc — Management 

Ronald LeBlanc — Electrical Engineering 

Marc A. LeClair - Electrical Eng. Tech. 

Danielle LeMeur - Chemistry 

Michael Leahy — Management 

Susan Lefever — Multidisciplinary Stud. 

Sherry Lee Letter - Psychology 

Estelle Leger — Multidisciplinary Stud. 

Denise Leone - Visual Design 

Arthur Levesque — History 

John Lewinski — Design 

John Lewis — Business Administration 

Yinglin Li — Chemistry 

Steven Lieber — Management 

Armindo Lima - Accounting 

David Lima — Political Science 

Michael Lincoln — Accounting 

Beverly A. Lindelof — Management 

David Liu - Chemistry 

Judith Liu — Marketing 

Antonio Livramento - Management 

Diana Lizotte - Nursing 

Don Lloyd - Psychology 

Alan Longstreet - Psychology 




Victor Low — History 

Brian Lowney — Multidisciplinary Studies 

Robert Lutkraft - 7exf//e Technology 

Christopher Ludwig - Design 

Kate Lunt — Multidisciplinary Studies 

Louis Lussier - History 

Paul Lutkevich - Electrical Eng. Tech. 

Patrick Lyman — Marine Biology 

Elizabeth Fitch MacAlpine - English 

Michael MacDonald - Accounting 

Theima MacDonald — Multidisciplinary Stud. 

Warren MacKensen — Business Administration 

Peter Maccaferri — Management 

Brenda Macedo - Nursing 

Nancy Macedo - English 

Albert Madden — Management 

Luis Madureira - French/Spanish 

Michael Mahany - Political Science 

Bijan Mahnoori — Civil Engineering 

Sharon Maillet — Psychology 

Denise Maloney - Nursing 

Helen S, Maravell — Humanities/Soc. Sci. 

Elise Marien — Mathematics 

John Marland — Business Administration 

Laurie Anne Martel — Nursing 

joAnne Martin — Sociology 

Sidney Martin — Electrical Engineering 

Maria Martins — Multidisciplinary Studies 

William Martins — Management 

Phoebe Massoud — Accounting 

James Masterson - Management 

Lauren Mathews - English 

Lynn Maxwell — English 

Timothy F. McCarthy - Electrical Eng. 

Betty McClerkin — Nursing 

Brian McClory — Business Administration 

Daniel McCluer — Fine Arts 

Steven McDonough - Mechanical Eng. 

James McGee - Accounting 



262 



I Matthew McGuill — Finance 
I Kathleen McLaughlin — Fine Arts 
I Michelle McLean — Multidisciplinary Stu. 

John McManus — Mech. Eng. Tech. 
1 Linda McMurray — Humanities/Social Sci. 

Stephen McPheters — Fine Arts 

Gregory Medeiros — Business Administration. 

Guido Medeiros — Fine Arts 

Louis Medeiros — Accounting 

Manuel Medeiros — Management 

lose Medina — Mechanical Engineering 

Dolores Mello — Multidisciplinary Stu. 

Marye Mello — Multidisciplinary Studies 

Patricia Mello — Bus. Admin. 

Paul Mello - Biology 

Susan Mello — Biology 

Cindy Mendel — Marketing 

Esther Mendes — Management 

RuiMendes — Political Science 

Elaine Meredith — Accounting 

Robert Michaud — Business Admin. 

Evelyn Midura — Accounting 

Frances T. Miller — English 

Nancy Miller — Psychology 

Robert Miller — Business Administration 

Frank Ming — Elec. Eng. Tech. 

Albert Miranda — Elec. Eng. 
\ jose Miranda — Elec. Engineering 

Michael Mitera — Art History 

Donald Mofford — Elec. Engineering 

Margaret Monsour — Design 

Richard Monte — Accounting 

Catherine Montigny — Multidisciplinary Stu. 

William Montigny — Art History 

Theresa Monteaux — Sociology 

Kathleen Moore — Nursing 

Marjorie Moore — Visual Design 

Suzanne Moore — Design 

Judith Ann Morris — Textile Technology 

James Mosher — Accounting 

Nancy Mulick — Visual Design 

John Murphy — Business Administration 

Thomas Murphy - Elec. Eng. Tech. 

William Murray — History 

Scott Muzzy — Biology 

Alphonse Nash — Accounting 

Julie Nichols — Sociology 

Laura Nissen — Management 

Matthew Niziolek - Management 

Mark Nooth — Marine Biology 

Philip Normand — Sociology 

Elizabeth Novia Duarte — Design 

Robert O'Brien - English 

Elizabeth O'Connell - Psychology 

Judy O'Connell - Psychology 

James M. O'Malley — Marketing 

Vincent O'Reilly - Civil Engineering 

Elizabeth Oliver - Accounting 

David Olson - Mechanical Engineering 

William Ostis — Accounting 

Raymond Ouellette - Management 

Roger Ouellette - Medical Technology 

Albert Ouimet - Business Admin. 

Kathleen Owens - Nursing 

Linda Paiva - Mathematics 

Gregory Paquette - Modern Languages 

Rocco Pardi — Elec. Eng. Tech. 

Young Park — Textile Chemistry 

Carol Paul - Psychology 

lanice Payton — Sociology 

Linda Peck - Psychology 

Emily Peel — Biology 

Gilbert Peel - Mech. Eng. Tech. 

Susan Peloquin - Nursing 

John Penacho — Accounting 

William Perron - Textile Technology 

Brian Perry - Design 



Glenn Perry - Marketing 

Patricia Perry - Modern Languages 

Susan Perry - Marketing 

Cheryl Perry-Vuolo - Mechanical Eng. 

Alan Peterson — Sociology 

lerri Philla - Accounting 

Joel Philla — Accounting 

Peter Phillips — Mathematics 

Diane Pierce — Modern Languages 

Cheryl Pina — Nursing 

Daniel Pingley - Multidisciplinary Stu. 

Barry Pinto — Sociology 

Walter Piatt - Political Science 

Susan Pollard — Design 

Yuen-Shin Pong — Textile Technology 

Richard Pontbriand — History 

Cynthia Ponte — Art Education 

Joy Ann Potter — Biology 

Pamela Potthoff — Multidisciplinary Stu. 

Robert Poulin — Accounting 

Gary Price — Mech. Eng. Tech. 

Brian Puopolo — French 

Robert Rak — Biology 

Joseph Ramos — English 

Susan Ramos — Political Science 

Wayne Ramos — Multidisciplinary Studies 

Mohan Rao — Textile Chemistry 

JoAnnRapoza - Nursing 

Karl Rasche — Accounting 

Paul Reardon — Civil Eng. Tech. 

Joy Redick — Design 

Susan Reed — Nursing 

Ellen Reilly — Marketing 

Robert Renzi — Political Science 

F.Reynolds — Mechanical Eng. Tech. 

Priscilla Richardson — Nursing 

Janice Riley — Sociology 

Michael Riordan — Political Science 

Paul Robillard — Business Admin. 

Mary Rockett — Design 

Anna Maria Roda — Psychology 

Paul Roderigues — Multidisciplinary Stu. 

Debra Rogers - Nursing 

John Rogers - Sociology 

Mary Rogers — Nursing 



John Rood - Fine Arts 

Maureen Ross — Nursing 

Cathieen Roughan — Biology 

Yvonne Rousseau — Multidisciplinary Stu. 

Roy Rowe - Civil Engineering 

Robert Roy — Civil Engineering 

Jih Roza - Civil Engineering 

Nancy Ruest - Nursing 

William Rumbei - Mech. Eng. Tech. 

Donna Russek — Nursing 

Sanford Russell - Marketing 

David Sadowski - Civil Engineering 

Dennis Santoro — Multidisciplinary Stu. 

Gary Santos — Textile Chemistry 

Joao Dos Santos - Multidisciplinary Stu. 

Kevin Santos — Accounting 

Sally Scanlon — Nursing 

Pamela Schulter - Multidisciplinary Stu. 

Marsha Schofield - Psychology 

David Schuler — Management 

Harriet Schultz - Humanities-Soc. Sci. 

Stephen Sciscento - Economics 

Melvin Scott — Business Administration 

Susanna Seifer - Psychology 

David Sequeira - Business Administration 

Bruce Serra — Humanities/Social Sciences 

Girard Sharkey — Management 

William Shelley, Jr. - Mech. Eng. Tech. 

Tina Sheridan — Art Education 

Paul Shiner — Sociology 

David Shore — Biology 

Albert Silva - Psychology 

lames Silva — Accounting 

Noel Simpson — Physics 

Virginia C. Skinder — Political Science 

Clifford Slaiding - English 

Eleanor Smith — Art Education 

Mark Smith — Economics 

Lonnie Smith — Mechanical Eng. Tech. 

Cranston Snord — Nuclear Physics 

Mary Soares — Business Administration 

Michael Solak - Biology 

Jean Sotberg - Management 

Jaime Soque — Management 

Denise Souza — Psychology 





And more seniors 



Donna Sowa — English 

Catherine Sparling — English 

Mimi Speight — Biology 

Lois Spirlet — Nursing 

Bette Fogg Spivey - Psychology 

Andrew Springer — Management 

Carol St. Amand — Sociology 

Diane St. Clair — Nursing 

Michelle St. Pierre — industrial Rei. 

Mary St. Sing — Sociology 

John Stafford — Sociology 

Elizabeth Stefaney — Nursing 

Sandra Strand — [Design 

Colleen Sullivan — Psychology 

Deborah Sullivan — Political Science 

Douglas Sullivan — Management 

Michael Sullivan — Humanities/Soc. Sci. 

Michaela Sullivan — Design 

Rosemary Sullivan — Nursing 

Thomas Sullivan — Political Science 

William Sullivan — Chemistry 

Ethan Sunderland — Mechanical Engineering 

Peter Suneson — Political Science 

David Swanson - Business Administration 

Patrice Sweeney — Nursing 

Robert Sweeney — Mechanical Engineering 

Beverly Sykes — Accounting 

Antone Sylvia — Accounting 

Glenn Sylvia — Textile Technology 

Michael Sylvia — Business Administration 

Betsy Szel - Visual Design 

Richard Taber — Business Administration 

loan Taylor — Fine Arts 

lames Texeira — Business Administration 

Gilbert Teotonio — Management 

Robert Thatcher — Biology 

Albert Thibault — Sociology 

Isaac Thomas — English 

Stephen Thompson — Biology 

lames Thorpe — Management 

Kathy Tickle — Humanities/Social Sciences 

Deborah Tinay - English 

Jeanne Torpey — Marketing 

Patricia Treckman - English 

George Trinidade — Humanities/Soc. Sci. 

Linda Tripp — Sociology 

Suzanne Tripp — Biology 

Judith Tucker — Nursing 

JeanTurcotte - Psychology 

Lorenda Turillo - Industrial Relations 



Steven Twarog — Sociology 
Christine Urban - Textile Design 
Janice Vaillancourt — Accounting 
Jeanne VanDale — Nursing 
Edward VanSickle - Industrial Relations 
Peter VanZandt — Management 
Marybrigid Vanaria - Humanities/Soc. Sci. 
Lynn Vartanian — Medical Technology 
Daniel Vaz — Business Administration 
Joseph Veiga - Design 
Linda Velazquez — Nursing 
loseph Verdi — Sociology 
loseVieira - Spanish 
Richard Vieira — Fine Arts 
Michael Vienneau — Fine Arts 
Ralph Viera — Electrical Engineering 
Kathleen Viles — Textile Design 
Diana Violeta — English /Sociology 
Beverly Wagenbach — Humanities/Soc. Sci. 
Madeline Wagner — Psychology 
Grayton Waite - Art Education 
Christina Walker — Textile Technology 
Kathryn Walsh - Multidisciplinary Stu. 
Lingjun Wang - Physics 
Stephen Warburton - Biology 
Edward Ward — Business Administration 
Michael Ward — Elec. Eng. Tech. 
Frances Warren — Modem Languages 
Richard Waryas — Textile Technology 
Deborah Washburn — Psychology 
Mariette Watkinson — Medical Technology 
Susan Watson — Elec. Eng. Tech. 
Michael Weber - Psychology 
Walter Weeks — Biology 
Stephen Westgate — Accounting 
Dana Wheeler — Elec. Eng. Tech. 
Timothy Wheeler — Civil Engineering 
Cynthia White — Accounting 
Nancy White — Multidisciplinary Studies 
Stephanie White — Fine Arts 
Mechile Williams — Sociology 
Philip Wilson — Management 
Harry Witte — Multidisciplinary Studies 
Wtnfield Wright — Business Administration 
Rong-Hwang Wu — Electrical Engineering 
Susan Zabriskie — Textile Design 
Carolyn Zuber-Laine — Textile Tech. 
Judith Zwirblis — Visual Design 
Michelle Lamoureux-daSilva — History 



264 




- 











There sits on the bookshelf, behind my office desk at the University, a framei 
statement, anonymously written, entitled MY CREED.|t was given to me by a dear 
friend - Barbara Bell, SMU Class of 78 because she felt that it not only ex- 
pressed something of her ownipersonal life view but mine as well. She was right, 
it does. I pass it along to you for whatever saner, more sensible understanding 
of life's mystery that its simple insights and recognitions may evoke in you 

as it does in me. 

— Dean Donald Howard 



&'■ 



I : 







m 

mm 



r 



5 frb 



* • 




'■ it 

In some way, ho' 'er small and secret, each of 
is is a little mad . . . Everyone is lonely at 
bottom and cries to be understood; but we can 
never entirely understand someone else, and eac 
of us remains part stranger even to those who 
love us ... it is the weak who are cruel — 
itleness is to be expected only from the 
trong . . . Those who do not know fear are 
not really brave, for courage is the capacity to 
:t can be imagined . . . You can 

as If they are children. For most of us never 
mature; we simply grow taller . . . Happiness 
ies only when we push our brains and hearts 
le farthest reaches of which we are capable. 
The purpose of life is to matter — to count, 
land for something, to have it make some 
iif ference that we lived at all . . . $. 














KLEIN 




267 



268 






TR1PPE 



KLEIN 



269 




270 





271 



Publishing Company: Taylor Publishing Company, Dallas, Texas 

Publisher's Representative: Mr. William Novak 

Number of pages: 272 

Number of copies: 1300 

Cover s/ze: 8 1 /2X11" 

Cover and endsheet design: Nancy J. Klein, Silkscreen on base material 

Paper stock: 80 pound enamel coated 

Typeface: Optima 

Senior Portrait Photography: Rudolf /Craig Photography, Bridgewater 

77'f/e Page Photograph: Nancy Lane 





272 



Southeastern Massachusetts University