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Southeastern Massachusetts University 




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Southeastern 

Massachusetts 

University 

North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 



1991 



Our School Over the Years 



New Bedford 
Textile School 


New Bedford 
Textile Institute 


New Bedford 
Institute of Technology 




1895 


1944 1957 






Southeastern Massacusetts Southeastern Massacusetts University 

Technology Institute 



1960 



1970 



1988 



1991 




Dr. John H. Twomey Jr. 



Whatever the subject is - how to form the past tense of an 
irregular verb, build a bridge, understand the circulatory 
system, or order ice cream in Paris — good teachers help 
their students to learn it. Great teachers do that too, but, by 
the way they way they live their lives, they add another 
layer of instruction, subtler, more complex and longer- 
lasting: great teachers help their students learn how to be 
better human beings. You, Dr. John Twomey, are one of 
those great teachers. 

An educator of the heart and soul, as well as of the mind, 
you are a man of enormous compassion. By your example 
you have taught us how to treat one another, how to answer 
the plea for help that is disguised or mute, how to listen in 
an unjudging way to those who need to speak, how to speak 
in a caring way to those who need to hear. You have done 
these things for your students over and over again, putting 
your love of people and your commitment to their welfare 
into daily practice. 

You have a teaching style that is unique and engaging as 
well. Many of us consider you the most effective and enjoy- . 
able instructor of our entire school experience. A man of 
keen intellect, diverse interests, and ready humor, you 
translate the small events of your everyday life — the amus- 
ing, the the touching, the curious — into the vocabulary of 
your classroom. Instead of conducting mere academic exer- 
cises, you involve your students in anecdotes and discus- 
sions that make foreign languages less foreign and more 
naturally connected to our lives. 

You are a man of myriad gifts — creative, intellectual, ath- 
letic and spiritual — and with delight you have shared them 
all with us. It is with the fullest measure of our love and 
gratitude that we, the class of 1991, dedicate our book to 
you. May you always see it as a symbol of what you have 
meat to us: accessible goodness and an open heart in a world 
too many closed doors and too many constricted spirits. 




President John R. Brazil 




To the Class of 1991: 

As I write this, it is unclear what your soon-to-be alma mater will be 
like in years to come. Not only have the Commonwealth's fiscal problems 
enveloped SMU in a miasma of reduced support and increasing costs, but 
Governor Weld has proposed sweeping changes in the governance structure 
of all public education. The future, of course, is never knowable or 
secure, but today's uncertainty towers above the norm. 

Amidst the confusions there are, however, several fixed points of 
assurance. First, assuredly each of you has had the opportunity to 
study with an outstanding faculty and if you have taken advantage of the 
resources available, you graduate well prepared for the next stage in 
your lives. 

Beyond that I am confident you will, as you get further from your 
undergraduate career, look back with increasing gratitude and admiration 
for the educational opportunity SMU afforded you and your classmates. 
Undoubtedly, you will want to see succeeding generations of students 
have the same opportunity, and as a consequence of that desire you will 
support the University directly with your time, energy, advice, money, 
and at the ballot box. 

Rest assured: the more SMU changes, the more it will be the same. 

Sincerely, 



Jaflm R. Brafa.1 
/resident 




Faculty & Administration 



I ; . 






Celestino D. Macedo 

Vice President for Student Services 



Robert C. Dagleish 

Provost and Interim Vice President 
for Academic Affairs 



Lawrence Logan 

Vice President for Administrative and 
Fiscal Services 




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Thomas M. Mulvey Donald C. Howard 

Associate Vice President for Student Services Dean of Students 






James Dorris 

Dean of Continuing Studies 



Janet Freedman 

Dean of Library Services 





Gerald S. Coutinho 

Director or Financial Aid 



Norman L. Barber 

Director of New Student Programs 




Barrie Phelps 

Admissions Director 












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Linus Travers 

Director, Development 



Paul D. Fistori 

Director of University Records 



Kevin W. Hill 

Director, Housing and Residential Life 





Joyce Ames 

Director of Student Health Services 



Roger P. Tache 

Business Manager 




1 







John E. Rich 

Director of Career Services 



Richard C. Waring 

Director, Campus Center 



Greg Stone 

Office of Publication and Media Productions 





William Traubel 

Director, Facilities/Physical Plant 



Raymond McKearney 
Chief of Safety and Security 




Susan Costa 

Director, Student Activities 





Robert A. Dowd 

Director, Athletics 



College of Nursing 



|1 Pf 1 







Dr. Joyce Passos 

Dean, College of Nursing 



Mary Ann Dillon 

Nursing Institutional Studies 



Maureen Hull 

Community Nursing 



College of Engineering 




f * i ■ ■ 1 1 « 





L. Bryce Anderson 

Dean, College of Engineering 



Dr. Frederick Law 

Chair, Civil Engineering 



Lee Estes 

Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering 





Lenine Gonsalves 

Chair, Electrical Engineering 
Technology 



Dr. Ronald DiPippo 

Chair, Mechanical Engineering 





College of Arts and Sciences 






Dr. Joseph Deck 

Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 



Dr. Lewis Kamm 

Assistant to the Dean 



Dr. Jan Bergandy 

Chair, Computer and 
Information Science 





L it * * 




William V. Hogan 

Chair, Economics 



Dr. Armand Desmarais 

Chair, Education 



Gerald M . Koot 

Chair, History 





' 





Dr. Louise Habicht 

Chair, English 



Lebaron C. Colt, Jr. 

Chair, Biology 



Dr. Giulio Massano 

Chair, Foreign Literature and 
Language 



R. Penn Reeve 

Chair, Sociology, Anthropology 






Diane Barense Robert N. Leamonson 

Chair, Humanities and Social Sciences Chair, Multidisciplinary Studies 




Ronald Tannenwald 

Chair, Mathematics 






James Griffith 

Chair, Medical Technology 



Dr. Jean Doyle 

Chair, Political Science 



John J. Fitzgerald 

Chair, Philosophy 






James dePagter 

Chair, Physics 



Dr. Barry Haimson 

Chair, Psychology 



Donald J. Smith 

Chair, Chemistry 




College of Visual and Performing Arts 




Michael J. Taylor 

Dean, College of Visual 
and Performing Arts 



I, |f Jill ' 




Dr. Dante Vena 

Chair, Art Education 




Dr. Magali Carrera 

Chair, Art History 




Howard Windham 

Chair, Design 




Anthony Miraglia 

Chair, Fine Arts 




Dr. Eleanor Carlson 

Chair, Music 




College of Business and Industry 





Michael Griffin 

Assistant to the Dean 




Raymond Jackson 

Chair, Accounting and Finance 



Dr. Moustafa Abdelsamad 

Dean, College of Business 
and Industry 





Dr. William Silveira 

Chair, Textile Sciences 







Dr. Merritt LaPlante 

Chair, Marketing 



Richard Golen 

Chair, Management 




The Graduating Class of 1991 






Catherine M. A'Vant 

Psychology 




Michael E. Acker 

Textile Chemistry 




Judith L. Aguiar 

Electrical Engineering 



Scott M. Aguiar 

Political Science 



Michelle A. Albernaz 

Accounting 







Lisa M. Alberque 

English / Communications 



Michael Aldine 



Ana I. Alexandre 

Management 



Donna M. Alexander 

Accounting 







Delia M. Almeida 

Portuguese 



Bradford Alves 

Accouting 



Claudette M. Alves 

Humanities/Social Sciences 



Denise L. Alves 

Nursing 







Jay C. Amicangelo 

Chemistry 



Lisa Amonte 

Political Science 



Kristen M. Anderson 

Marketing 



Eric R. Anderson 

English/Communications 







Cindy Lou Andrade 

History- 



Emily Andrews 

Visual Design 



Janet Andrews 

Accounting 



Christine M. Andruski 

Human Resource Management 







John A. Angelo 

Marketing 



Elizabeth Applebee 

Visual Design 



Marilyn L. Archer 

Visual Design/Illustration 



Maria C. Arruda 

Management 




Susan R. Arvedon 

Sociology 




Lauren E. Avanzino 

Humanities /Social Sciences 




Steven A. Baddour 

Political Science 




Robert L. Barnwell 

Business Information Systems 




Jon H. Astle 

Biology 



James D. Aveni 

Mathematics 



Michael R. Baldani 

Marketing 



Mark A. Barrera 

Management 




Paul Audet 

Management 





Gregory B. Baacke 

Economics 





Maria L. Baptista 

Medical Laboratory Science 





Heidi E. Barry 

Humanities/Social Sciences 




Kathleen S. Audette 

Sociology 




Newie Babbitt 

Psychology 




Daniel T. Baptiste 

Management 




Charles J. Barton 

Physics 







Roland A. Bauer 

Finance 



Richard C. Beaudry 

Computer Engineering 



Douglas M. Beaulieu 

History 



Meredith E. Beck 

Political Science 






Elizabeth A. Beebe 

Biology 



Jennifer Beecher 

Accounting 



John E. Belmore 

Accounting 




Susan Bender-Hart 

Nursing 




Karen A. Benetti 

Chemistry 



Remember all the times you read through the Torch ? 

Well, we brought back the biggest stories of the year for one last issue. 





Volume 37 Issue 30 



Southeastern Massachusetts University 



September 1991 




Question 3 jeopardizes SMU s future 



Sean Connolly, News Editor 



On November 6, 1990 voters will 
choose whether or not to pass the 
Citizens for Limited Taxation (CLT) 
petition. Referendum Question 3, 
as it is called, proposes to roll back 
the state income tax level equi- 
table to fiscal year 1988. If passed, 
the referendum could force the 
Massachusetts legislature to re- 
duce public higher education by 
as much as $120 to $130 million, 
according to State Representative 
Stanley Rosenberg (Amherst). 

According to the Campaign for 
Massachusetts' Future, a group 
that opposes the petition, most of 



the money would come from com- 
plete "elimination of all Chapter 70 
education to cities and towns, all 
funding for public higher educa- 
tion, all general local aid to cities 
and towns, the firing of some 
50,000 to 75,000 state workers, 
(and) the elimination of funding for 
day care." 

Closer to home, University Presi- 
dent John R. Brazil estimates as 
much as $7 - $7.5 million - or 25 
percent - could be slashed from 
SMU's fiscal budget if the referen- 
dum passes. Currently, the uni- 
versity is reeling over the two most 
recent four percent reversions 
which bring the total number of 



Faculty layoffs in effect 

Budget woes decimate part-timers 



Lisa M. DiCarlo, News Editor 



President Brazil was forced to in- 
form the Deans of the five colleges 
that all part-time faculty will not 
be returning in January. 

The decision came down early last 
week when President Brazil called 
an urgent meeting with the Deans 
to tell them that all part-time fac- 
ulty contracts could not be re- 
newed next semester. All part-tim- 
ers, who take on nine or less cred- 
its each term, work strictly on a 
semester by semester basis. 

Dean of Arts and Sciences, Joseph 
Deck says that his instructions 
were that SMU is to have no part- 
time faculty whatsoever. He says 
there are two reasons for this ac- 
tion: (1) the frequency of rever- 
sions (cuts) has left SMU falling 
short of meeting the needs of the 
students, and (2) union contracts 
specify that no full-time faculty 
may be laid off if part-timers are 
still employed. 

Dean ofVisual and Performing Arts, 
Michael Taylor, says some part- 
time faculty have been here for a 
decade or more. He says 16 sec- 




President Brazil discusses the 
recent budget problems. 

tions have been cut within the 
college and that most of them are 
foundation classes. "We didn't drop 
any classes that a senior needs," 
Taylor said. 

With part-timers gone, Taylor says 
teachers will end up instructing 
classes in areas that are not their 
specialty. "We're hard-pressed by 
that," he said. "Some courses in 
music and music history that tra- 
ditionally enrolled students from 
the entire university won't be 
available anymore," said Taylor. 



reductions since fiscal year 1988 
to eight. 

"Question 3 is the most serious 
threat to the university and the 
institution's existence," Brazil said. 

However CLT Associate Director 
Chip Faulkner disagrees. 'There 
isn't a shred of evidence ... that 
Question 3 would severely cut state 
college and university budgets," 
Faulkner said, blaming a "bloated 
state college bureaucracy" for the 
current budget problems. 

But President Brazil offered a dif- 
ferent perspective. Should Ques- 
tion 3 pass, full-time faculty - al- 



ready in the midst of a hiring freeze 
- would experience "severe lay- 
offs," part-time faculty would be 
virtually eliminated, course sec- 
tions would be further reduced, 
and student fees would invariably 
increase. 

"We'd have to raise fees for the 
second semester alone something 
in the order of $1500 to $1600." 
Brazil said. "We're talking major 
surgery here." 

In addition, a recent memo from 
the SMU Board of Trustees states, 
"SMU will be devastated and un- 
able to function if the CLT initia- 
tive is passed and implemented." 



Reactions to war 

Draft unlikely at present 



Kenneth J. Souza, Editor 



Probably one of the biggest fears 
for college students following the 
recent outbreak of war in the 
Persian Gulf is the potential for 
being drafted into military serv- 
ice. 

Though he doesn't rule out the 
potential for a draft reinstate- 
ment if the war escalates, SMU 
political science professor Clyde 
Barrow feels that the chances of a 
draft in the near future are "slim." 

"I would say there is still a very 
remote possibility," Barrow ex- 
plained. "If I had to give odds, I'd 
say they're about 4 to 1." 

Professor Barrow went on to say 
that these odds would change 
due to any one of several factors, 
including the duration of the war. 

"It's very clear that it's not going 
to be a five day war as we were led 
to believe," Barrow said. 'This is 
probably going to drag out for at 
least a couple of months, (maybe) 
longer." 



A longer war would, of course, 
increase the need for a replace- 
ment military force once casual- 
ties begin to take their toll. 

Another issue which Professor 
Barrow feels could increase the 
draft possibility is the post-war 
scenario, which would also re- 
quire military reinforcements. 
"It's not at all clear, really, what 
our objective is over there. Clearly, 
a number of troops are going to 
be asked to stay behind in Saudi 
Arabia. There will also be troops 
that will stay in Kuwait, without 
question," Barrow said. 

If and when a draft does take 
place, Barrow feels it will not take 
the form of the Selective Service 
policy that became the scourge of 
the Vietnam War. "One of the 
legacies of Vietnam was that we 
will never again see a draft of 
(that) sort," said Barrow. "If a 
draft is reinstated, I don't think it 
will simply be a military draft, 
but the imposition of a national 



Weekend library hours slashed 



Lisa M. DiCarlo, Ncius Editor 



The state's fiscal axe came down on 
SMU's jugular vein once again this 
semester as students and faculty 
learned that the library will no longer 
be open on Saturdays with a cut in 
operating hours on Sundays. 

Associate Vice President Robert 
Dalgleish said that the decision to 
close the library on Saturday was 
made last semester. 'The closing of 
the library is part of the reversions 
that came down earlier in the year," 
Dalgleish said. "The decision was 
made along with the part-time 
teacher's contracts' not being re- 
newed." 

Dalgleish said that the state appro- 
priates money for the library and 
that the funds asked to be returned 
to the state have to be state allocated 
in the first place. "Given the enor- 
mity of the reductions, no one area 
can provide the monies we need to 
send back to the state," Dalgleish 
said. 

Keeping that in mind, Dalgleish said 
there are several other "less appar- 
ent" cuts, such as the heat being 
lowered and every other lightbulb 



on campus being unscrewed. 

Dalgleish said he realizes the li- 
brary is a necessary resource to 
information, but insists the cut was 
necessary because the reversions 
to the state were "immediate." 

Dean of Library Services Janet 
Freedman said she was told by 
Dalgleish to cut a certain amount of 
operation hours in order to save 
money. The hours to be eliminated 
were left to her discretion, although 
she worked with a Public Service 
Staff to decide what hours would 
affect the least amount of people. 

"After endless meetings, we decided 
that Saturday and Sunday would 
be the best days to close because 
that's simply when the library is 
least used," Freedman said. The 
library staff also had to cut hours of 
operation on Sunday as well. They 
will now be open from 2:00 pm to 
9:30 pm, instead of 8:30 am to 
1 1:00 pm, the previous hours. 

Freedman said the library has not 
had to deal with the added injury of 
having to lay off employees, al- 
though three full-timers have re- 
signed to pursue other opportuni- 



ties. 

"The outcome of this can't be good , " 
Freedman said. 'These are hard- 
ships necessitated by hard times. 
That's the reason I'm here, be- 
cause I care so deeply about the 
students' access to information." 

The library's book budget has also 
been considerably diminished. 
"The book budget is far less than in 
previous years. In a typical year we 
buy 14,000 books but this year 
we're almost buying no books. 
We're trying to maintain as many 
journal titles as we can, but this 
reduction will result in incomplete 
research for many students," said 
Freedman. 

When this academic year is com- 
plete, and over 15 Saturdays of a 
closed library have passed, the 
school will send $13,000 back to 
the state. 

Although it seems the library's fu- 
ture is dim, Freedman said she is 
trying to keep a positive outlook. 

"Maybe we'll be able to restore 
hours as the semester unfolds." 



President, Trustees consider 
plan to join UMass system 



Kenneth J. Souza, Editor 



Governor William Weld's recent 
proposal to replace the Board of 
Regents with an education secre- 
teriat that would have unlimited 
authority to set statewide tuition 
levels, close campuses, and merge 
programs has created serious con- 
cern over equitable funding for the 
five state universities in Massachu- 
setts. 

In response to this, University 
President John Brazil and the SMU 
Board of Trustees have consented 
to the creation of a new centralized 
University of Massachusetts 
(UMass) system into which SMU 
and the University of Lowell would 
be integrated. 

According to President Brazil, 'The 
proposal is to create a separate 
university sector - a new university 
system - where all five campuses 
work together so they can use their 
political and institutional strength 
to make the whole better. There are 
things that were discussed in the 
past that have raised some concern 
for us and we're very interested in 



U.MASS. 



Sign of the times: one of the many changes that will have to be 
made if the UMass proposal is passed. 



finding answers before we decide 
for or against this (new) proposal." 

Student Trustee Steven A. Bad- 
dour, who originally opposed the 
1988 merger with UMass, sup- 
ports the new university system. "I 
think it's a great idea ... it will only 
benefit the students here at SMU." 

Benefits of the proposed UMass 
system include a built-in board 



comprised of the five university 
presidents and at least one trustee 
from each campus, though details 
are still pending. Funding for the 
system would then be determined 
by the UMass Board of Trustees 
and the higher education board. 

President Brazil likened the in- 
creased potential of each of the five 
UMass campuses to "a boat rising 
with the tide." 



Outbreak of 
phone crime 



Dave Levesque, /Vcirs Sla['f 



A recent on-campus crime wave 
has spawned in an unlikely place 
- residents' phone bills. 

The mysterious appearance of " 1 - 
900" calls on several bills has 
caused uneasiness among some 
resident students. The method in 
which the calls were place hasn't 
been determined, but the results 
have been an expensive burden for 
some SMU students. 

Three known cases have combined 
charges of $830, which were accu- 
mulated throughout the month of 
December. Calls were predomi- 
nantly made to sports informa- 
tional services. All calls are also 
similar in time and cost - each 
being made in two-minute inter- 
vals, costing $30 per call. 

One incident involved an apart- 
ment in the Cedar Dell complex, 
where members of one apartment 
were the victims of a $200 bill. The 
calls were made on December 26, 
when all members of the suite 
were home for Christmas break. 
"It makes you wonder who you can 
trust," said Ken Webb, one of the 
apartment's residents. 

Since there was no apparent evi- 
dence of a break-in, Webb sur- 
mised that the perpetrators must 
have had access to the apartment's 
keys. Student workers, mainte- 
nance, and security all have ac- 
cess to the keys. 

Kevin Hill, Director of Housing, 
didn't deny the possibility of break- 
ins, but thought it would be very 
unusual, especially when the 
phone was the only item disturbed. 

Hill said he feels the incidents are 
a matter of indirect charges, where 
the use of outside lines is em- 
ployed. Hill's theory of indirect 
charging is supported by one case 
in which a student was present in 
her room when the call was 
charged. 

Hill's theory, however, faces oppo- 
sition from New England Tele- 
phone. "The '900' phone system 
was designed to prevent (indirect 
calls) from happening and we al- 
low no margin of error through 
this system," said a service repre- 
sentative of the company. 

Then who is responsible for the 
phone bills? "The student phone 
numbers are private ... so it's the 
student's responsibility," Hill said. 



Brazil criticizes governor's plan 

Weld proposes 33% tuition hike 



OH SAY CAN YOU SEE.. 



Kenneth J. Souza, Editor 



In an effort to offset the $850 mil- 
lion state deficit for fiscal year 1991, 
Governor William Weld proposed a 
budget package last week that 
would raise $2.6 billion and imple- 
ment a 33 percent increase in col- 
lege tuitions across the state for 
fiscal year 1992. 

This increase, which would begin 
to effect SMU students in Septem- 
ber of this year, is another in a 
series of budget-related setbacks 
for the university. In addition to 
the tuition hike, the Governor's 
plans also include the disbanding 
of the Board of Regents, convert- 
ing state scholarships and grants 
into low-interest loans, and re- 
quiring all state employees (in- 
cluding SMU faculty) to take an 
upaid two-week furlough before 
the end of the fiscal year (June 30) . 

SMU President John Brazil had 
mixed feelings about the governor's 
budget package - especially the 
33-percent tuition increase. "I'm 
an advocate of low tuitions," Brazil 
said. "Clearly, there may be room 
for some (students) to pay more ... 
but many of our students cannot 
afford a tuition increase, and I will 



make that very clear to the legisla- 
ture" when asked to defend the vari- 
ous items on the governor's agenda. 

At this stage, President Brazil is 
unsure how the proposed measures 
will take effect. "It's very hard to 
estimate whether or not it will go 
through . . . the governor doesn't have 
the authority to set tuition levels (at 
present) , " Brazil said . "If tuition does 
go up, I will do everything in my 
power to make sure that they equally 
expand financial aid so that those 
who cannot afford (tuition) will still 
have the opportunity to attend SMU . " 

Most of Weld's budget package is 
still in its infancy stages, and Presi- 
dent Brazil was quick to point out 
that many of the proposals are based 
merely on conjecture without hav- 
ing done any financial research. 

"(The state's) philosophical end is to 
say that students should pay 35 
percent of the total cost of tuition" 
Brazil said. 

"(SMU students) already pay more 
than 35 percent if you add up the 
cost of the buildings, tax and abate- 
ment, fringe benefits paid to em- 
ployees, and other expenses." 




One of the many demonstrations that took place in response 
to the Persian Gulf war. This one was staged at an intersec- 
tion on Route 6 close to the SMU campus. 



Faculty Federation votes in favor of furlough 



Dave Levesque, Nars Staff 



On Tuesday March 26, the SMU 
Faculty Federation took their ar- 
dent "No pay, no work" stance a 
step closer toward a two-week 
university shutdown. Upon the 
conclusion of the Federation 
meeting, an April 16 starting date 
for the proposed unified furlough 
implementation was approved. 

The faculty's 58 to 4 vote in favor of 
the April date was an added facet 
to the group's March 19 proposal 
which would shutdown the school 
during the academic year. The 
faculty's action is in response to 
Governor William Weld's furlough 
bill for state employees , where Weld 
hopes to raise $60 million to aid in 
the reduction of the state's finan- 
cial deficit. 

Many faculty members feel it is a 
personal attack on the state em- 
ployee and one that should be met 
with opposition. 

"Weld is after us and he has four 
years to get us," said Federation 
Treasurer Daniel Georgianna. "He's 
going to keep coming until we ei- 




Prqfessor John Carroll addresses the SMU Student Senate. 



ther develop support or give him so 
much trouble that he decides to 
pick on someone else." 

The Federation has established a 
University Action Committee 
(UAC), which will be comprised of 
25 members - including 5 stu- 
dents - to oversee the specifics of 
the cause, such as strategy, pub- 



licity, and student awareness. 
University President John Brazil 
feels that the issue is "totally up in 
the air" at this point and awaits 
further details concerning the 
governor's proposal. 

Some faculty members feel that 
protesting the furlough is a pre- 
mature action and one based solely 



on anger that should be avoided 
for the sake of the students. 
Professor Gilbert Fain of the Elec- 
trical/Computer Engineering de- 
partments said "I feel we're being 
abused by the furlough plan, but I 
don't feel that give us the right to 
therefore abuse the students. I 
think when push comes to shove, 
the faculty won't do it." 

"I think it will be ill-advised for 
anybody to do anything here that 
will interrupt the education proc- 
ess," agreed Professor Lee E. Estes, 
alos of the Electrical /Computer 
Engineering department. "In terms 
of brash actions like this, which 
will conceivably (hurt) the students, 
it seems to me that it's in nobody's 
(best) interest." 

Georgianna hopes to have total 
faculty support in this proposal 
and said "We would like a united 
action in drawing attention to the 
situation, but obviously we can't 
force people to do anything." 

One very vocal faculty member is 
Political Science professor John 
Carroll, who hopes the furlough 
plan will "raise holy hell - that's 
what needs to be done." 



Fire ravages dorm suite; students avoid injury 



Susan Harkins 
Melonie Whalon 

News Staff 

At approximately 3:58 am on Sat- 
urday, February 2, a fire in the 
SMU Residence Halls broke out, 
damaging suite 325 in Phase 3B, 
forcing two students to evacuate 
their rooms. 

SMU students Timothy Coe and 
Robert Abbadessa were forced to 
crawl through the smoky suite in 
order to escape the flames. Both 
were unharmed, but suffered mild 
smoke inhalation and received 
oxygen treatment from the North 
Dartmouth Fire Department. 

The Fire Department responded to 
the call at 4:00 am with six ve- 
hicles and remained at the scene 
until after 6:00 am. 

The flames were confined to the 
suite area, completely destroying 
the couch and damaging the car- 
pet. Smoke damage also occurred 
throughout the kitchen, corridor, 
and one of the end bedrooms. 

Controversy has been brewing over 
the cause of the fire. While the 
Massachusetts Fire Incident re- 
port states that the form of heat 
ignition was a cigarette, SMU Di- 



rector of Housing, Kevin Hill, feels 
that arson may have been the cause 
of the fire and has questioned the 
residents of the suite. 

When asked about criminal 
charges being filed, Hill said "Ob- 
viously if we have evidence there 
will be charges. No charges, to my 
knowledge, have been filed yet by 
the police or the school." 

Hill seems convinced that charges 
will be brought against someone, 
but not necessarily those who live 
in the suite. 

Questions are also surfacing 
whether the students living in the 
damaged suite will be charged with 
the expenses. Hill said, "Now at 
this point, technically, what you 
might have heard is if something 
takes place in your suite or apart- 
ment (according to certain con- 
tracts) you will be charged for it. If 
it's a hole in the wall, you can be 
charged for it. In this case, it's a 
fire and if we don't find out who 
caused it, (the students from the 
suite) will be charged (for the dam- 
age)." 

The University, carries an insur- 
ance deductible of $5,000, the 
approximate cost of the damage 
according to Hill. 




A damaged couch from the suspicious fire in Suite 325. 






Fire Chief John McNamara sup- 
ported the Fire Incident Report, 
saying that although the investi- 
gation is still in progress, he also 
believes a cigarette was the cause 
of the fire. 

When Hill was informed that the 
report cited a cigarette as the cause 
of the fire, he laughed, saying "It is 
possible - I suppose it was a ciga- 
rette . . . there was a poster burned 
on the second floor that same night. 
Maybe (it's) unrelated ... it could 
have been a cigarette, (but) I'd be 
surprised." 



Even though a cigarette is listed as 
the cause of the fire, had it been 
intentionally flicked onto the 
couch, arson could be ruled as the 
cause. But without any real proof, 
arson can only be suspected. 

Despite the contention over the 
cause of the fire, all parties agreed 
that the safety of the students was 
top priority and thankfully no one 
was serously injured. 



Cost Reduction Committee files report 

Controversy, criticism surrounds proposed program cuts 



Bruce R. O'Brien, Contributor 



The SMU administration's estab- 
lishment of a Cost Reduction 
Committee (CRC) recently sparked 
a wave of emotion and controversy 
by requiring all academic depart- 
ments to submit a written justifi- 
cation for their continued exis- 
tence. 

The administration's questionnaire 
was designed to provide informa- 
tion as the university prepares a 
cost-reducing strategy to deal with 
the recent round of cuts proposed 
by Governor Weld. 

Criticism of the five-part question- 
naire includes an assertion that 
the questions lack relevance to 
many departments, an objection 
to its philosophical implications 
considering SMU is a Liberal Arts 
institution, and the contention that 
it is being used to portray imparti- 
ality despite the fact that less 
popular programs have already 
been targeted for elimination alto- 
gether. 

The questions demonstrate a "fun- 
damental misconception," accord- 




Cost Reduction Committee members during a recent meeting. 



ing to John Fitzgerald, chair of the 
Philosophy department. All de- 
partments are being asked how 
the contribute to SMU's general 
education, which has the whole 
idea of "general education" wrong 
Fitzgerald argued. 

"So, you've got people in Textiles 
saying 'well, you know, if we can 
get people to appreciate colors and 
so forth , ' it doesn't make any sense . 
Everyone here simply isn't a gen- 
eral educator," said Fitzgerald. 



But according to CRC member John 
Carroll, every department was in- 
vited to meet with the committee 
and offer suggestions prior to the 
questionnaire's formulation. More- 
over, Carroll said the questions re- 
ally serve as "an open invitation for 
all departments to tell (the commit- 
tee) what it is they do best." 

In expressing his concern over the 
questionnaire, Richard Larschan of 
the English department showed a 
stronger reaction. 



"I was resentful," Larschan said. 
"Assumptions I hold dear were be- 
ing challenged." He contended that 
as soon as he agreed to this sort of 
justification, "I had already lost 
something." The value of most of 
the departments "should be self- 
evident" within the context of a 
Liberal Arts institution," Larschan 
argued. 

Carroll pointed out that SMU is 
more than a Liberal Arts institu- 
tion. "It is officially classified as a 
Comprehensive University" con- 
sisting of a Liberal Arts core and 
numerous professional programs, 
he said. Given this broader defini- 
tion, Carroll asserted that the com- 
mittee could not consider any pro- 
gram to be above "careful examina- 
tion." 

While controversy remains heated, 
even those not disputing the neces- 
sity of the committee's question- 
naire acknowledge its emotional 
impact. James dePagter, chair of 
the Physics department, said "Af- 
ter all, you're essentially being 
asked of what value you are (to the 
university), and that can be very 
threatening." 



TORCH 



September 1991 Volume 37 Issue 30 



Editor-in-Chief 

Kenneth J. Souza 

Managing Editor 

Jonathan Maxwell 

News Editors 

Sean Connolly 
Lisa M. DiCarlo 

News Staff 
Stephanie Fitzgerald 
Susan Harkins 
Lisa Kvaracein 
David Levesque 
Michelle Lemkin 
Christine Regan 
Melonie Whalon 

Sports Editor 

Joshua "Tree" Neimand 

Sports Staff 
Frank Corey 
Laurie Lafave 
Sheila Edwards 

Arts & Entertainment Editors 
Rob Gonsalves 
Regina Thornton 

A&E Staff 
Carolyn Bertrand 
Penny Piva 
Scott Tarulli 
Jennifer Wellington 

Announcements Editor 
Heidi MacKinnon 

Photo Editors 

Cheryl Adams 
Jamie Quinn 

Photo Staff 
Karl M. Dietzler 
Christine Murphy 
Francisco Samuel 
Cathy Shea 
Steve Scaplen 
Campus Voices 
Heather Heebner 

Business Manager 

Susie Narciso 

Advertising Manager 

Jonathan Maxwell 




Advedrtising Re 
Marc Cobery 
Christine DiPietro 
Jen Parks 
Kim Rose 
Sean Flaherty 
Billing Assistan 
Megan Whittlesey 



Representatives 



Ad Design Director 
Greg Gonyea 

Ad Designers 
Brian Carroll 
Mark Field 
Melissa Koseski 
Glenn Soulia 
Siobhan Reese 
Kristina Bloemink 

Proofreader 

Christine Regan 

Layout Director 

Melissa Koseski 

Layout Staff 
Elizabether Barrows 
Brian Carroll 
Kevin Gawthrope 
Renee Melancon 

Faculty Advisor 

Catherine Houser 

Newspaper Design 
Laura Daly 



t« 



Only a Memory... 



t> 




Kenneth J. Souza, Editor 



Needless to 
say, 1991 has 
been quite a 
year for us 
here at the 
TORCH. Not 
only did we 
earn the re- 
spect and 
recognition of students, faculty and 
staff on campus, but we were hon- 
ored with a First Class award from 
the Associated Collegiate Press. 
On behalf of the whole staff who 
worked throughout the past year, 
let me say how proud I am of the 
work we've accomplished. 

And how proud I am to have been 
a part of SMU. 

But now it's time to move on, as 
they say. And no longer will we be 
living the college experience . . . now 
we will have only our fond memo- 
ries to rely upon. In an effort to 
help rekindle some of the more 
important memories of your ten- 
ure at SMU, we are bringing you 



this special edition of the TORCH, 
through the courtesy of Paul Lopes 
and his staff at the 1991 Yearbook. 

Hopefully this issue will help you 
remember some of the fun times 
you had at SMU - along with some 
of the more trying and difficult 
situations that many of us fought 
to avoid. Things like the threat of 
Question 3, repeated higher edu- 
cation budget cuts, the near-shut- 
down of classes for two weeks dur- 
ing the faculty furlough, cuts in 
courses and services, and the 
milestone decision to integrate our 
university with a new five-campus 
UMass system. 

Though no one could readily say 
it's been an easy year, I don't think 
you could argue that it hasn't been 
a memorable one. But as the old 
cliche goes, nothing lasts forever. 

We leave the good times and friends 
we've made at SMU and part our 
separate ways hoping that we've 
not only learned academics but 
also something about life. 
Yes, I know it sounds corny, but 



next to marriage and finding a 
career, the years a person spends 
in college are probably the most 
important of their life. It marks the 
end of dependence on family and 
the beginning of an independence 
that will make or break you in "the 
real world." 

I can only hope "the real world" is 
as comfortable and enjoyable as 
SMU. 

It has been truly a pleasure to 
share and serve this campus com- 
munity through the pages of the 
TORCH, and I will surely miss the 
countless friends I've made along 
the way. 

So, hopefully you can look back at 
the pages here a few years from 
now and remember that special 
place we call SMU - or is it UMass- 
Dartmouth? 

Regardless of the name, the 
memories printed here are bound 
to last a lifetime . . . which is more 
than I can say for Governor Wil- 
liam Weld and his education policy. 



Put a hat on your head 
before you go to bed. 




Without safety, how can you get a good night sleep? 





RTS & ENTERTAINMENT 

Campus bookstore bans American Psycho 

Sale of novel decried by Women's Center 




A curious reader investigates the condemned novel. 

Wait Until Dark i s 
SMUTCo s best 



Ernest Lijoi, A&E Staff 



On the weekend of November 3 
and 4, the SMU Theatre Company 
(SMUTCo), under the direction of 
Angus Bailey, revived Fredrick 
Knott's Wait Until Dark, a thriller 
that chilled Broadway with Lee 
Remick and frightened movie-goers 
with Audrey Hepburn. 

The plot centers around Susie 
Hendrix (Marianne DiMascio), a 
recently blinded woman, coming 
to grips with her handicap while 
three thugs (Arthur Medeiros, 
Nathan Byrnes, John A. Cosmos) 
usurp her apartment and put her 
through hell. 

Ms. DiMascio portrayed Susie 
brilliantly. Her blindness was con- 
vincing and never faltering. She 
possessed a strength that carried 
her through the predicament. She 
never reduced herself to self pity, a 
choice that would have demeaned 
her character. She played Suzie as 
headstrong and clever and there- 
fore was very likeable. 

Arthur Medeiros brought a sensi- 
tivity to thug Mike Tallman that 



humanized the character. He car- 
ried himself with a professional 
confidence rarely found on the 
amateur stage. His counterpart, 
portrayed by Nathan Byrnes, sup- 
plied comic relief to break up the 
the suspensful plot. He moved 
about neurotically and weakly at- 
tempted to act tough. 

John A. Cosmos displayed psy- 
chosis as Harry Roat Jr. Unpre- 
dictable and frightening , he ex- 
pressed versatility through char- 
acter disguises and sudden mood 
swings. The last scene between 
him and Ms. DiMascio kept the 
audience on the edge of their seats. 

Other noteable performances be- 
longed to Holly Guteman as the 
Hendrix's bratty neighbor Gloria, 
and Susie's husband who was 
played by Joe Patracullo. 

Theatre is a collaborative art, and 
when volunteers work together to 
bring such a fine polished produc- 
tion such as this to the stage, we 
should not only congratulate them 
- we should thank them for provid- 
ing good, affordable, cultural en- 
tertainment at SMU. 



Lisa M. DiCarlo, News Editor 



When SMU Campus Store man- 
ager Michael Cram decided to sell 
Bret Easton Ellis' latest novel, 
American Psycho, he probably 
never thought he'd be pulling it off 
the shelves less than one month 
later. But'the SMU Women's Cen- 
ter was outraged by the book's 
content and wrote to Cram, asking 
him to "rethink" his decision to sell 
the book. 

Ellis' latest novel and most shock- 
ing story deals with a yuppie named 
Patrick Bateman, who has violent 
sex with dozens of women then 
mutilates most of them in the most 
nauseating ways. 



The letter from the Women's Cen- 
ter did not ask Cram to take the 
book off the shelf, but only to re- 
think his decision to sell it. "I didn't 
expect it to (happen so soon)," said 
Christine DeMoranville of the 
Women's Center and the Coalition 
for a Bias-Free Society. "But we're 
very happy about it." 

DeMoranville explained the Cen- 
ter was concerned with the book's 
connection to sexuality and vio- 
lence. "We take issue with things 
that suggest women like to be hurt, " 
she said. 

Cram claimed pulling Psycho was 
in response to faculty and student 
concern, saying "The book has no 
social redeeming value." 



ROCK & ROLL ALL NIGHT 




Two of the biggest concert events to take place on campus 
this year were The Smithereens (top) and The Machine 
(bottom), a tribute to the music of Pink Floyd. 



Women's B-Ball 
team advances 
to LEC tourney 



Tree Neimand, Sports Editor 



The SMU women's basketball team, 
seeded fifth in the Little East Con- 
ference tournament, upset 4th 
seeded Rhode Island College on 
the road by a 61-57 margin. 

The game, marred by 47 fouls and 
four foul-outs, was a tough victory 
for the Corsairs, who had lost to 
RIC twice this season. 

SMU took a 36-28 lead into the 
locker room at half time, but with 
12:34 left in the contest, RIC's 
Kristen DelBonis hit two free 
throws to give the Anchorwomen a 
44-43 lead. 

But SMU's Beth Brooks made two 
free throws of her own, giving the 
Corsairs the lead, 50-49. But RIC 
wouldn't give up, and Robin 
Gobeille, who led all scorers with 
18 points, hit a 3-pornter to tie the 
score at 53. 

However, Corsair Kelly Brady went 
to the foul line and sank two free 
throws, giving SMU a lead they 
would not relinquish. 

"Our women did a great job on the 
boards and hung tough in a very 
physical contest," remarked head 
coach Judy Sullivan. 

"I told them if they stayed under 
control, and just played their game, 
we'd beat this team." 

Leading Corsair scorers were 
Marybeth Callahan, Amy Harvey, 
and Sue Quinn who all had 13 
points. Top rebouders for SMU 
were Quinn with 14, Michelle Eaton 
with 1 1 , and Michelle Bullock, who 
pulled down 9 boards in only 16 
minutes of play. 

SMU's next contest will be at 8:00 
pm, Friday February 22, at East- 
ern Connecticut State University. 

The Corsairs take on number one 
seed Eastern Connecticut, and the 
winner of that game plays the Ply- 
mouth State/USM winner for the 
LEC championship the next day at 
2:00 pm. 



All-American firsts for SMU 

Junior Tom Egan and Senior Val Sender 



Senior Val Sender (with basketball) and junior 
Tom Egan recently made SMU history as both 
became All -Americans in their respective sports. 

Val became the first basketball All-American for 
the Corsairs when he was named to the third 
team. Val is the all-time leading scorer in SMU 
basketball history. His finished with over 2,000 
career points. 

Tom became the first Corsair to become an All- 
American for the diving squad. In the Division 
III National Championships, he finished in eighth 
place in both the one- and three-meter diving 
competitions to earn the All-American honors. 

Both Tom and Val have made significant contri- 
butions to the SMU community. Although Val 
will be graduating this year, we wish him the 
best of luck in his future endeavors. We also 
wish Tom good luck in next year's diving com- 
petitions with a possible National Champion- 
ship just around the corner. 





■• ■ *\ w- 



Cross Country teams win Little East 



Tree Neimand, Sports Editor 



During a cold, misty, muggy au- 
tumn day, Little East champions 
were crowned. On a golf course in 
Gorham, Maine, the SMU men's 
cross country team dominated the 
field in the Little East cross coun- 
try championships. 

The event, hosted by the Univer- 
sity of Southern Maine, was basi- 
cally a showcase for the SMU run- 
ners. Despite the miserable 
weather conditions, the slick run- 
ning surface, and the moronic 
golfers who refused to stop play- 
ing, the Corsairs came through as 
absolute winners. 

The men's squad ran all over the 
other teams, having the 2nd 
through 9th place finishers. Sen- 
ior Dave Krall finished in a time of 
25:49 to lead the Corsairs, coming 
in 6 seconds behind individual 
Kevin O'Neill of Rhode Island Col- 
lege. Krall's fantastic kick at the 
end helped propel him to his sec- 
ond place finish, as he finished a 
scant 5 second ahead of fellow 



Corsair, senior Bill Weschrob. 

Weschrob's performance put him 
in 3 second ahead of fellow senior 
Jim Callaghan whose 25:57 out- 
paced sophomore Tony Flanagan, 
who finished 5th with a time of 
26:48. Rounding out the top eight 
for the Corsairs were junior Mike 
Sansoucy (26:58) in 6th, fresh- 
man Steve O'Leary (27:13) and 
sophomore John Centeio (27: 13) 
who tied for 7th, and fresman Bob 
Peterson (27:14) in 9th. 

Another victory was attained by 
the SMU women's cross country 
team who became the first Corsair 
team of the season to win a confer- 
ence title. 

Led by junior Hilaria Rocha's first 
place time of 19:45.14, the cross 
country team claimed the title over 
runner-up Southern Maine. SMU 
finished with 28 points, 3 better 
than Southern Maine. 

Other top finishers for SMU were 
junior Laurie MacDonald, who 
came in fourth with a time of 20 : 1 4 



and senior Chris Vadeboncoeur, 
whose time of 20: 1 7 gave her a fifth 
place finish. Also finishing in the 
top 12 were senior Kate Ottaviani 
(21:19) and senior Christa Pin- 
hancos (21:33). 

The race was close throughout, 
and had it not been for Rocha's 
first place finish, and several other 
key positions by Corsairs, SMU 
would probably have not won the 
Little East. 

At about the 1 mile mark, Vade- 
boncoeur and Rocha were on top 
for the Corsairs. The pack after 
them included seniors Jenn Clark, 
Ottaviani, and Pinhancos. After 
them were sophomore Melissa 
Hurley and freshman Jessica Ma- 
son. 

The excellent efforts put forth by 
several members of the Corsair 
cross country teams - both men 
and women - helped them to nail 
down their respective Little East 
Conference championships. Con- 
gratulations goes out to both 
teams. 




front row (1 to r): Greg Gonyea, Chandra Dewing, Sue Narciso 

second row: Sean Connolly, Rob Gonsalves, Jamie Quinn, Gina Thornton, Josh Neimand, Jon Maxwell 

back row: Catherine Houser, Lisa DeCarlo, Cheryl Adams, Kevin Gawthrope, Bart Simpson, Ken Sousa 







Peter Benoit 

Management 




Kara Bettencourt 

Visual Design 




Laura Bettencourt 

Visual Design 



Deborah Betts 

Psychology 



Lawrence R. Bevens 

Civil Engineering 







Laurie Bishop 

Psychology 



Erik Bjerre 

Psychology 



Harris A. Bloomwald 

Management 



Andrea L. Boisvert 

Marketing 







Carl R. Boren 

English / Communications 



Rose Mary A. Borges 

Psychology 



Tina Borges 

Portuguese 



Leonard L. Bouchard 

Electrical Engineering 







Sharon A. Bouchard 

Sociology 



Jennifer A. Boucher 

Marketing 



Marisha E. Boyer 

Psychology 



Erin Boylen 

Humanities /Social Sciences 







Thomas R. Branchaud 

Mechanical Engineering 



Patricia Brefeld 

Biology 



Karen Brewster 

Management 



Holly Brodeur 

Marketing 







Michele Bullock 

Psychology 



Lisa A. Brum 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Kelly A. Burke 

Mathematics 



Michael J. Bushell 

Accounting 




Dara J. Bussiere 

Computer Information Science 





James E. Butler 

Finance 




Lisa A. Bzdula 

Accounting 




Kim M. Cabral 

Nursing 





Noel J. Cabral 

Electrical Engineering 



Renelle A. Cabrera 

Marketing 



Matthew G. Cadorette 

History 



Craig Caesar 

Visual Design 







Meredith E. Cahoon 

Visual Design/Illustration 



James P. Callaghan 

English / Communications 



Steven W. Camara 

Management 



Michelle J. Camiel 

English/Communications 







Rui Campos 

Business Information Systems 



Glenn D. Cannon 

Civil Engineering 



Wilfred M. Canto 

Electrical Engineering 



Nicole M. Canuel 

Nursing 




*~L 






Patricia A. Cardoza 

Medical Laboratory Science 



David E. Carey 

Accounting 



Ellen M. Carleton 

Psychology 



Christy Carlson 

Nursing 




Janet Carlson 

Humanities/Social Sciences 




Stephen Carreiro 

Electrical Engineering 




Jeffrey Carlson 

Visual Design 




William R. Caron 

Political Science 




Tracy A. Carroll 

English/Communications 




4 .*. 



jk. 






■■■c^_ • * 



■» . 





William B. Carter 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 




- 



*>%*"•-. 
■':*-%*,■ 



Fall 
Athletics 




Women's Soccer 



After a stellar 14-4 season, in- 
cluding a 10-game winning 
streak, the women's soccer 
squad tumbled in the post- 
season, losing at Williams 
College by a 3-0 margin. 

One of the season's highlights 
was a 5-0 thrashing of Wheaton 
College, in which freshman 
Nicole Hayde scored 2 goals. 

The team was led in the goal- 
scoring department by Hayde 
and Julie Smalley, who had 15 
and 14 goals respectively. 
Smalley was also the co-leader 
in assists, who along with Lisa 
Gomes, had 9 for the season. 
Paula Grey was the leading 
netminder, having a Goals- 
Against average of 1 .00. 




Men's Soccer 




**■*.. 



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' 



The men's soccer team also had an 
impressive season, finishing with a 13- 
3-3 record, and claiming the Little East 
Conference Championship. However, 
the season came to a end when the team 
lost a thrilling double overtime match 
1 -0, at the hands of Middlebury College. 

During the season, the team put to- 
gether an 11 -game unbeaten streak. 
Some of the season's most exciting 
games included a scoreless tie against 
nationally-ranked Salem State and a 1- 
victory over Division II powerhouse 
Stonehill College. Senior Glen Markey 
scored the only goal of the contest, and 
freshman John Semedo was brilliant in 
net, recording 8 saves. 

The leading scorer on the team was 
Markey, who put in 9 goals. He was 
followed by senior Paul Sousa who 
added 6, and senior Don Yucius, who 
totaled 5 goals. The assist leaders were 
Sousa and Markey, who had 5 apiece. 
Semedo led the team in the net, finishing 
the season with a 0.73 goals against 
average over 19 games. 





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Women's Cross Country 

The women's cross country team fared as well as their male 
counterparts, also winning the Little East Championships. Because 
the women ran before the men, they became the first SMU team of 
the year to win a conference title. The team narrowly defeated host 
Southern Maine, winning by only 3 points. 

Junior Hilaria Rocha paced the team, with her time of 19:45 to 
achieve the individual title. Junior Laurie MacDonald came in 
fourth with a time of 20:14, and senior Chris Vadeboncoeur finished 
in fifth with a 20:17 mark. Other top 12 finishers for the Corsairs 
were senior Kate Ottaviani (21:19) and senior Christa Pinhancos 
(21:33). 

The team struggled in the All-New England Championships, but 
was once-again led by Rocha, whose time of 20:30 was good enough 
for a 93rd place finish. Vadeboncoeur finished with the same time, 
but was none-the-less credited with coming in 94th place. 







Men's Cross Country 




The men's cross country squad had a spectacular season, 
eventually going on to win the Little East cross country 
Championship. On a rain-soaked, muddy day, individuals 
nabbed the 2nd through 9th place spots, securing the 
team's victory. 

Senior Dave Krall led the way, finishing the course in a 
time of 25:49, coming in a scant 6 seconds behind individual 
winner Kevin O'Neill of Rhode Island College. Senior Bill 
Weschrob ended up a mere 5 seconds behind Krall. Other 
top finishers for the Corsairs were senior Jim Callaghan 
(25:57), sophomore Tony Flannagan (26:48), junior Mike 
Sansoucy (26:58), freshman Steve O'Leary (27:13), 
sophomore John Centeio (27:13), and freshman Bob 
Peterson (27:14). 

The team also had a respectable finish in the All-New 
England Championships. Weschrob was SMU's top fin- 
isher, coming in 33rd with a time of 26:44. The team 
finished 13th overall. 





F * 





Football 




The football team struggled all season long, 
losing their first 7 games before beating the 
Westfield State Owls 14-13. As he had been all 
season, freshman Billy "White Shoes" Johnson 
was the catalyst of the team, romping for an 85- 
yard kickoff return. Chris Lyons helped to 
preserve the one-point Corsair victory by 
blocking an extra-point attempt in the game's 
waning moments. 

Johnson led the team in rushing, totaling 501 
yards. He ended the season with a stellar 147- 
yard performance against Massachusetts 
Maritime. Senior Mike Gleason caught 1 1 passes 
for 219 yards to lead in the receiving department, 
while Johnson also led in scoring, hammering 
in 6 touchdowns for 36 points. 

Leading defensive players included seniors 
Marc Roberge and Roger Ward, and junior Ted 
Greenblott. Roberge led the the team with 3 
interceptions, Ward led with 2 fumble recoveries 
and also had 2 interceptions, while Greenblott 
led the squad with 5 sacks. 





Volleyball 



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The volleyball team had a record-setting season, completing 
the year with a 33-12 record. That mark set the school record 
for most wins in a season by an SMU volleyball squad. 

The season's big event was the SMU Invitational that the team 
hosted. Although the team lost to the University of New 
England in the finals, it was a spectacular meet that provided 
fans with a whopping 11 hours of volleyball action. 

Standouts on the team included freshmen Donna Willey and 
Meredith Swierzbin, and sophomore Natasha Buben. 




Women's Tennis 



The women's tennis team had a disappointing season, 
finishing off with a 3-11 mark. 

However, the team ended the year on a high note, knocking 
off Worcester State College by a 6-3 margin. Singles 
winners were senior Heidi Higgins, sophomores Kerri 
Rouhan and Tig Simmons, and freshman Beth Ciolino. 
The doubles tandems of Higgins and sophomore Ruth 
Liponis, and senior Sheila Walther and freshman Carolyn 
Busby also won their matches. 

The team's other wins were against Salem State College 
and Roger Williams College. 



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Field Hockey 






The SMU field hockey team had 
an extremely successful season, 
finishing 11-4-2. The team went 
into the ECAC field hockey team 
as the number one seed, only to 
be upset in the first round by 
Middlebury (VT) College, 1-0. 

Some of the highlights from the 
field hockey squad included a 2-1 
victory over 1989 Massachusetts 
state champions, Salem State. The 
team came from behind in this 
win, with the team's leading goal- 
scorer, Becky Hart, scoring both 
goals. 

Another big win came against 
Plymouth State. The Corsairs also 
won this match in come-back 
style, defeating the visitors 2-1. 
Temple Pettway scored the tying 
goal, and Hart knocked in the 
game-winner in overtime. 

This season, Hart led the team 
with 11 goals, while Robin Berk 
led with 7 assists. Beth Brooks 
was the team's main goalie, and 
in 16 games had a 0.68 Goals- 
Against average. 




. „ . . * »--. 










Mary Cass-Conlon 

Humanities /Social Sciences 





Stacy Casperowitz 

Finance/History 




Cheryl Chagnon 

Ecconomics 




Meredith S. Charest 

Accounting 



Jody Chase Laura J. Chiampa 

Mechanical Engineering Technology Finance 







Kelly K. Chippas 

Management 



Kim Chouinard 

Sociology 



Rochelle M. Chouinard 

Marketing 



Marlisa Clapp 

Visual Design 




Dawn M. Clark 

Textile Design 





Joanna B. dayman 

Humaniies/Social Sciences 





Marc J. Cobery 

Marketing 





Aline J. Coite 

Marketing 



Cynthia J. Coleman 

Human Resource Management 



Richard G. Coleman 

Ppysics 



Claire P. Collard 

Accouting 




Jennifer M. Collins 

Marketing 




Wj ^L 






Mark W. Collins 

Mechanical Engineering 




Alcina B. Conceicao 

Textile Technology 




Christopher M. Conley 

Biology 







Kevin M. Connaughton 

Finance 



Dorothy K. Connor 

Psychology 



John M. Conroy 

Accounting 



Lisa D. Coolbrith 

Humanities/Social Sciences 




k Jm 

Patricia L. Copeland 

Management 




Tracey M. Cormier 

Political Science 




Elisabete M. Costa 

Computer Science 





Kelly S. Copley 

Computer Engineering 




Carolyn Correia 

Humanities/Social Sciences 




Jimmy S. Costa 

Portuguese 





Elizabeth Cormier 

Sociology 




Linda J. Correia 

Biology 




Colette A. Cote 

Computer Engineering 





Stacey M. Cormier 

Psychology 




Carolyn Costa 

Sociology 




Linda A. Cotter 

Nursing 




Richard C. Couse 

English 



Dara L. Couto 

Finance 



Marc O. Couture 

Electrical Engineering 



Christopher J. Cruz 

Economics 




Michelle Cusolito 




Lisa M. Dacunha 

Spanish 




Anna I. das Neves 
Nursing 





David Cyr 

Humanities /Social Sciences 





Christopher D'Arcy 

Political Science 



Andrea Dacruz 

Music 




Residence Life 




Phase 1 

Residence Life Staff 

Front Row (left to right): 
Clarence Baker, Peter 
Racine, Mr. Potato Head, 
Dave Lawton, John Whelan 
Back Row: Kim Seaberg (head 
resident), Deb Betts, Britt 
Ericsson, Barney Rubble, 
Melissa Longfellow 




Phase 2 j§ 

Residence Life Staff 



Front Row (left to right): 
Kristi Gilman, Lisa 
Annunziata, David 
Krull, Kristi Schabacker 
Back Row: Chris Conley, 
Sean Griffin (head 
resident), Dave Palmer 





Everyone looks on while Phase 2 mascot, Oscar the Fish takes a break for dinner 




Phase 3A 

Residence Life Staff 

■an Ml Front Row (left to right): 

David Hack, Kathy Haase, 
™ ' Michal Gajewski 

4 Back Row: Jennifer Rapoza, 
Kelly Long (head resi- 
dent), Donna Chapman, 
Steve Baddour 





4 




Phase 3B 

Residence Life Staff 

Front Row (left to right): 
Cheryl Seymour, Trish 
Daley (head resident), 
Carla Lester, Erin O'Brien 
Back Row: Joe Schorge, 
Andrew Chagnon, Tom 
Branchaud 










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Cedar Dell South 

Residence Life Staff 

Front Row (left to right): Nora Branchaud, Pam 

Giffels, Lisa McKee (head resident), Heidi 

Higgins 

Back Row: Paull Connolly, Brian Sullivan, 

Mark Barrera 
















Cedar Dell West 

Residence Life Staff 

Front Row (left to right): Mike 
Riley (head resident) 
Second Row: Arnold Jennot, 
John Lyons, Kevin Kilcoyne 
Back Row: Sandy Murley, 
Amy Charron, Tara Nye 










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Swain School of Design 



In the fall of 1988,. the Swain School of Design 
became a new addition to SMU. This merger 
brought programs that were once hard to 
come by in a state university. With the 
combined faculty, SMU now offers an art 
curriculum ranked as one of the best in the 
nation. The Purchase Street buildings, with 
their state of the art facilities, have drawn 
graduate and under graduate students from 
across the country. 

This will be the last year that the handful of 
original Swain students will receive a Swain 
diploma. The grace period is over, but a new 
generation of SMU graduates will benefit from 
the union of the schools. A sense of vitality 
and rebirth has come to SMU from the quality 
education and expertise that originated at the 
Swain School of Design. 















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Cecila N. DeCastro 

Management 




Amy DeLibero 

History 






Julie E. Davis 

English / Communications 




Kimberly M. Davoren 

Marketing 




David DelNegro 

Computer Engineering 




Lucia F. Demelo 

Textile Technology 



Nancy M. deMello 

Management 



Marc D. Demoura 

Accounting 



Christine P. Dempsey 

Humanities /Social Sciences 







Catalina M. Desa 

Management 



Kristine Desmond 

English / Communications 



Paul V. Destefanis 

Electrical Engineering 



Elizabeth Deveney 

Humanities /Social Sciences 







Kelly Dexter 

Visual Design 



LolitaDias 

Medical Laboratory Science 



Lisa M. DiCarlo 

English / Communications 



Carla T. Digregorio 

Humanities/Social Sciences 







John Diliddo 

Management 



Marianne Dimascio 

Spanish 



Cynthia C. Dinsmore 

Visual Design 



Michael P. Dion 

Acounting 







Allison M. Disalvo 

Accounting 



Clifford Dobbyn 

Management 



Susan M. Doody 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Steven J. Dorian 

Management 







Heather J. Douchette 

Psychology 



Ignatios Doukakis 

Textile Chemistry 



Laura M. Duarte 

Management 



Suzanne M. Duhamel 

Humanities/Social Sciences 







David M. Dumas 

Marketing 



Patrick T. Dunford 

Civil Engineering 



Scott C. Dunlop 

Marketing 



Eiileen A. Dunn 

Mechanical Engineering 







Natalie A. Duteau 

Business Information Systems 



Alan A. Edwards 

Textile Technology 



Christopher T. Ellis 

Accounting 



Tara E. Engstrom 

Nursing 







Brian J. Espinola 

Computer Science 



Katherine Evers 

Illustration /Art Education 



Christine Faria 

Psychology 



Marie L. Feeney 

Management 







Peggy Fellouris 

Psychology 



Gene R. Ferioli 

Management 



Carla M. Ferreira 

Medical Laboratory Science 



David A. Ferreira 

Computer Engineering 




Sheryl Ferreira 

Marketing 



Patrick J. Fitzgerald 

Marketing 





Erin Finn 

Visual Design 




Debra A. Fitzgibbons 

Accounting 



Kevin Fitzgerald 

Economics 






The Institute of Electronic and 
Electrical Engineers 

Back Row (left to right): Derek Hong, 
Robert Cabral, George Godffrey, Jessica 
S. White (chairperson), Joseph Gozzo, 
Geoffrey Saucier. 
Front Row: David Law, Derek Lee, 
Leonard Bouchard, Lisa Olivire, Mark 
Lopes, Micheal Morhy, Judith Aguiar, 
Paul Schmidt 



■■■:■■ :. 



The Literary Society 

Back Row (left to right): Catherine Toini, Sean 
Connolly, Jenifer Wong, Joey Hacking, Nels 
Lindolom, James Marlow 

Front Row: Carolyn Bertrand, Penny Piva, Debbra 
Lewis, Laura Hite, Kim Amaral. 





The Physics Club 

(left to right) Mark Martin, Timothy Olden, Charles 
Barton, Sung Yul Yi, Prof. Alan Hirshfeld, Roger Roy 




Ceramics Club 

Front Row (left to right): Julie Nunn, Julie Peck, 
Karon Doherty, Chris Gustev, Mary Sanguinet. 
Second Row: Kathleen Tweedy, Mel Gaskin, Kathleen 
Schnaist, Susan Arruda, Wendy Duben, Sheileigh Flynn, 
Rich Bonner, Suzie Naaco, Kim Guidi, Jenny Oday. 
Third Row: Jay Roche, La Donna John, Mercy 
Murrolo, Laura Taft, Craig Caesar, Nancy Clay, Karan 
Targonski, Michelle Hefele. 




Student Activities Board 

Front Row (left to right): Rebecca Morley, Alex 
Mann, Matt Fuller, Brain Johnson, Tim Coe. 
Second Row: Holly Rendell, Margaret Silvia, Mike 
Nailor (President), Karen Burrows, Dawn Landers, 
Andrew Flanagan, Tree Neimand, Todd Kagno, Pam 
De Young, Kim Allen, Amy Doe. 
Third Row: Audra Stefanik, Liz Fernandes, Sheila 
O'Connor, Christine Murphy, Sandy Payson, Matt 
Morrisey, Sharyn Keeney, Jeanne Martin, Robin Penny. 
Fourth Row: Stacey Witherall, Michelle McGrath, 
Michelle Hannon, Amy Dehibero, Sharon Hoffman, 
Kristen La Valley, Jen Munis, Stephanie Rosenberg, 
Dena MacNeil, Angie Federiche, Jen Jones, Christine 
Yeaton, Stephanie Arzigian. 

Fifth Row: Kathleen Kelliher, Joanna Clayman, Kim 
Kalio, Kim Sullivan, Craig Rousseau, Mike Josh, Steve 
Troppoli, Phil Friar, Jody Koenig, Holly Brodeur. 




Returning Students Organization 

Left to Right: Jean Britto, 
Marie Feeney (President), 
Charlene Priest, Suzanne Porter 
(Vice President), Kathleen 
Audette, Dr. Virginia Hadley 
(Advisor), Becky St. Pierre. 




Women's Center 



Left to Right: Marie Feeney, Tracy 
Pierce, Suzanne Porter, Patricia 
Spellman, Sue Mitchell, Demetria 
Bridges, Jennifer Burlingame. 





B.A.C.C.H.U.S. 

Front Row (left to right): Donna Alexander, Dawn 

Margolin. 

Second Row: Jenn Sears, Kim Sullivan, Kelly McGuire, 

Lisa Rizzo, Jolene Giacobbe, Doreen Desment. 




Campus Design 

Left to Right: Lynn Rousseau, Heather 
Mohan, Cuong Phu, Robin Hall, Dawn 
Landers, Craig Rousseau, Steve Saures, 
Debbie Langlois, Steve Gressak. 
Not Pictured: Jeremy Spiegal, Renee 
Melancon, Kim Morrow, Sangeeta Sreenivas. 





Outing Club 

Front Row (left to right): Chris Piccone, Karl Dietzler. 

Second Row: Ron Kief, Meredith Cahoon (President), 

Paul Cesarini, & Alan . 

Third Row: Sean Connolly, Sibohan Reese, Samantha 

Baker, Aaron Darling, Don Walker. 

Fourth Row: Tom Medeiros, Stacy Casperowitz, Kim 

Goote. 





SMU Gay and Lesbian Alliance 

(left to right) Todd Rego, Dave St. Pierre, 
Paul Souza 






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Society of Women Engineers 

(left to right): Veronica Lee, Jessica White, Judith 
Aguiar, Michelle O'Donnell, Lisa Oliveira, Sally 
Taylor 









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Kathryn M. Flanagan 

Visual Design/Illustration 





Brian M. Fleming 

Political Science 





Kevin C. Flynn 

Finance 




Michelle Fontaine 

Sociology 



Annette C. Fonteneau 

Medical Laboratory Science 



Jennifer Forman 

Psychology 




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Carl A. Fortin 

Textile Technology 






Catherine Foster 

Biology 



Ann M. Fottler 

Visual Design/Illustration 



Arlen J. Fox 

Finance 




Raymond L. Francisco 

Civil Engineering 




Janet L. Freeman 

Management 





Todd Fugman 

Accounting 





Cynthia L. Fuller 

Accounting 





Mark Fuller 

Finance 



Mark Furtado 

Mechanical Engineering 



Gina Gagliardi 

Psychology 



Dorothea Lorraine Gallagher 

Computer Oriented Mathematics 







Sheila M. Gallagher 

Political Science 



Timothy J. Gallagher 

Psychology 



Mark T. Gallant 

Accounting 



Andrea J. Gandolfo 

Metals 







Rachael S. Garnett 

Biology 



Seamus P. Garrett 

Political Science 



Julie L. Gaudette 

Marketing 



Michael Gentile 

Management 




Katherine Gibson 

Accounting 




Pamela Giffels 

Computer Engineering 




Patrick J. Gilman 

Computer Engineering 



Jayme A. Glick 

Sociology 







Kristine A. Glynn 

Psychology 



Jennifer F. Godek 

Accounting 



George J. Godfrey 

Electrical Engineering 



June D. Goguen 

Management 







Beth A. Goldman 

Humanities/Social Sciences 



Julie M. Goldman 

Psychology 



Cindy A. Goldstein 

Management 



Walter J. Gomes III 

Computer Engineering 






Ana Paula Goncalves 

Finance 



Dora M. Goncalves 

Spanish 



Tracy A. Gonsalves 

History 




Gregory Gonyea 

Visual Design 







Neil T. Gorman 

Finance 



Kimberly Gosson 

Accounting 



Linda S. Gould 

Accounting 



Nancy F. Gould 

Marketing 







Joseph Gozzo 

Electrical Engineering 



Manuel Gracia 

Sociology 



Matthew S. Gravel 

English 



Nicole J. Gray 

Marketing 




Steve Gressak 

Visual Design/Illustration 

Nelson Mandela World Tour 

Massive crowds turned out for African National 
Congress leader Nelson Mandela at every stop on his 
six-week tour of three continents. Mandela visited 14 
nations in Europe, North America and Africa, 
achieving his goals: urging foreign governments to 
maintain sanctions against South Africa, raising funds 
for the ANC and explaining the goals of his move- 
ment. 

The ANC says it aims to create a non-racial 
democracy and to distribute the nation's wealth more 
equally. Mandela, the ANC's deputy president, has 
said he favors a mixed economy. 

Nelson Mandela, one of the world's most 
celebrated political prisoners, was freed by the South 
African government in February after 27 years in 
prison. He was serving a life sentence for allegedly 
plotting to overthrow the white government. 






Madonna 

Madonna kicked off her 1990 world tour, "Blonde 
Ambition," with a seven-concert tour of Japan beginning 
in April, then came back to perform in the U.S. and on to 
more shows in Europe. 

In each of her two-hour performances, the singer 
ran through a series of accent and costume changes, 
reinventing herself with each change. 

"Express Yourself" is just what Madonna does. 
Although her performance is "Causing a Commotion," 
the "Blonde Ambition" tour is nothing less than a 
satisfying show. 



Chamorro Victory 

Violeta Barrios de Chamorro, publisher of 
Nicaragua's opposition newspaper, led a 14-part 
coalition to victory over Sandinista rule despite political 
inexperience. 

"The Nicaraguan people have shown that they want 
to live in democracy, in peace and in freedom," Mrs. 
Chamorro told more than 1,000 cheering supporters at 
her election headquarters on February 26, 1990. 

The general election was monitored by more than 
3,000 international observers, including the United 
Nations, the Organization of American States and a 
delegation led by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter. 
They all pronounced the voting free and fair and the 
count clean. 





Earth Day 

On April 22, an estimated 200 million people all 
over the planet celebrated the 20th anniversary of Earth 
Day as activists pleaded for the rise of a new "conserva- 
tion generation" to care for the fragile environment. 

In Washington, Earth Day founder Gaylord Nelson 
urged more than 100,000 people massed at the foot of the 
Capitol to work to motivate politicians and corporate 
leaders to environmental action. 

"I don't want to come back here 20 years from mow 
and have to tell sons and daughters that you didn't do 
your duty," said Nelson, 74, who originated Earth Day 
when he was a Senator from Wisconsin. "We've got to 
raise a conservation generation." 

Earth Day was celebrated in more than 3,600 U.S. 
communities and in 140 other nations, according to 
organizers. 




Southern Floods 

The Southern U.S. spent much of the Spring 
wringing itself out after weeks of flooding turned entire 
towns into muddy lakes where buildings poked up like 
knotty tree stumps, and the toll of shattered lives was 
tremendous. 

While parts of the Mid-West dealt with heavy 
rainfall and floods, those states suffering the most 
damage were Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana and Missis- 
sippi. 

In Texas alone, agricultural damage was estimated 
at $700 million and at least $60 million to residences. 




4 




David Souter Joins Supreme Court 

David H. Souter, a mild-mannered, well-read and 
previously little-known judge from New Hampshire, 
became history's 105th Supreme Court justice in October 
of 1990, after pledging to "do equal right to the poor and 
to the rich." 

In a brief ceremony in the crowded courtroom, 
Souter, 51, was administered the judicial oath of office by 
Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and almost immedi- 
ately got to work hearing high court arguments with his 
eight new colleagues. 

Souter joined the court at a pivotal time in its 
history. 



Free Elections in Romania 

Excited Romanians voted on May 20, 1990 in their 
first free elections in 53 years. Interim President Ion 
Iliescu won in a landslide victory, but the two opposition 
candidates alleged numerous instances of election fraud. 

The main issues of the campaign included moving 
Romania's centralized socialist system to a free-market 
economy and dismantling the Communist system. 






U.S. Troops Leave for Middle East 

The United States sent more that 500,000 troops to 
the mid-east to head the coalition forces in the struggle 
against Saddam Hussein, and the Iraqi forces. 






Bush and Gorbachev Summit Agreements 

Celebrating the fruits of their summit diplomacy, 
President George Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S. 
Gorbachev shook hands and signed a sheaf of agree- 
ments, including a conditional trade accord. During the 
June 1990 summit, the two leaders also embraced a 
preliminary deal to cut long-range nuclear arms. 





German Reunification 

World leaders welcomed a united Germany into the 
international community on October 3, 1990, but 
concerns about the balance of power tempered some 
European enthusiasm. 

In a message to governments worldwide, Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl pledged that Germany would never 
again pose the territorial claims that marked Germany 
from its initial unification in 1871 to its defeat in World 
War II. "In the future, only peace will emanate from 
German soil," Kohl said. 

His message came after Germany held a night long 
nation-wide celebration with fireworks and music. 

The nation united at the stroke of Midnight when a 
giant German flag was raised in front of the battle- 
scarred Reichstag building in Berlin. Kohl and other 
leaders joined in singing the national anthem. 

The unification came eleven months after the Berlin 
Wall fell in a peaceful revolt that cast aside Communist 
East German overlords. 




Nolan Ryan Wins 300 

Defeating the Milwaukee Brewers on July 31, Texas 
Rangers pitcher Nolan Ryan won his 300th game. "I feel 
more relieved than anything else after all the buildup," 
Ryan said after joining the 300 club. 

A crowd of 51,533 showed up to cheer Ryan on at 
County Stadium. "A lot of people have come in for this 
game. It's inconvenient for them, but they're friends of 
mine and they want to be a part of it," he said before the 
game. 

Ryan has become one of the ten major league 
pitchers to win 300 games. 





World Cup Soccer 

German Fans chanted and sang and screamed their 
pleasure on July 8, 1990 when west Germany dethroned 
Argentina and won the World Cup. 

"Duetschland ist Weltmeister (Germany is world 
champion)," was the prevalent scream among fans 
packed into Rome's Olympic Stadium as a match that 
had grown ugly with fouls in the second half finally 
ended. 



Douglas Is World Heavyweight Champ 

James "Buster" Douglas wore a world heavyweight 
championship belt after his stunning knockout of Mike 
Tyson in Tokyo earlier this year. At 1:23 of the 10th 
round, Douglas knocked Tyson out with a five-punch 
combination. 

The title was in limbo during the three days of 
bickering over the long count. Two of boxing's governing 

bodies undertook an investigation of whether 
Douglas, the underdog, was knocked out first. The final 
decision was in his favor. 

"He pulled the greatest upset in history," said 
Douglas' father. "Just call it a victory for the small man," 
Tyson said. 






Flag Protection Act 

The U.S. Senate 
rejected a constitutional 
amendment against flag 
burning on June 26 with 
critics arguing that it was 
already dead and being 
debated largely as 
ammunition for use against 
them at election time. 

The Senate voted 58- 
42 in favor, leaving it nine 
short of the required two 
thirds majority needed to 
approve amendments. 

President Bush called 
for approval of the 
measure, which said simply 
that "Congress and the 
states shall have power to 
prohibit the physical 
desecration of the flag of 
the United States." 

But the House rejected 
it with Democratic leaders 
saying that it amounted to 
placing limits on freedom 
of speech. And Speaker 
Thomas Foley said 
lawmakers would not get a 
chance to reconsider this 
year. 




Homeless Count 

A legion of clipboard-toting counters sought out shelters, 
subways and grates on March (1990) in the broadest attempt 
ever to find out the extent of homelessness since it became a 
national disgrace in the 1980s. 

The U.S. Census Bureau is spending $2.7 million to tally 
homeless Americans, but critics fear an undercount will allow 
the government to justify cuts in services. 

The homeless — now estimated to number 250,000 to 3 
million — were asked their name, age, sex, race and marital 
status. 

As Washington, D.C.'s deputy mayor for economic 
development said, the count is important because "only when 
we know how many homeless there are can improvements be 
made in the delivery of services." 



Cincinnati Reds Win World Series 

The Cincinnati Reds, given no chance to beat the Oakland 
Athletics, needed only four quick games to win the World Series 
in one of the biggest upsets in baseball history. 




Military Imposed on 
Lithuania 

The Soviet army 
imposed a curfew and 
declared a general in 
command of the Lithuanian 
capital, Vilnius, on January 
13, 1991, after troops seized 
a television tower in an 
assault that killed 13 and 
injured about 140 people. 

This was the hardest 
measure taken by Soviet 
President Mikhail 
Gorbachev against the 
Baltic republic since it 
declared independence on 
March 11, 1990. 

The European 
Community Condemned 
the attack, and Belgium's 
foreign minister said it 
could jeopardize a planned 
$1 billion emergency 
package to Moscow. 

President Bush said 
the crackdown "threatens 
to set back or perhaps even 
reverse," the new U.S.- 
Soviet relationship. 




The Man Behind Iraq 

Saddam Hussein, the leader of Iraq during the 
Pursian Gulf War. The 53 year old Iraqi president was 
raised as a poor orphan who's anti-West ern views 
were shaped in childhood. 





Minefield Menace 

American tank crewmen in the Saudi Desert on 
January 21, 1991, prepare an M1A1 for the expected 
ground assault against Iraq. The new high-tech tank is 
outfitted with special plow to be used for clearing 
minefields left for advancing allied ground forces. 



Air Attack in Iraq 

A fireworks display of 
anti-aircraft fire follow an air 
attack in Baghdad by allied 
aircraft enforcing the U.N. 
resolutions early in the 
morning of January 17, 1991. 





Walt Disney World opened 
thier MGM Studios Theme 
Park to the public, in May 
of 1990. 




Matthew J. Guernsey 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 





David M. Griffiths 

Political Science 




Aimee E. Guillette 

Human Resource Management 




Jeff Guinee 

Management 



Kathyanne Haase 

Sociology 



David Hack 

Multidisciplinary Studies 







April Haggis 

Accounting 



David S. Hall 

Electrical Engineering 



Michelle L. Hall 

Political Science 



Robin Hall 

Visual Design 







Susan Hammond 

Human Resource Management 



Zhang Wen Han 

Electrical Engineering 



Mark R. Hansen 

Economics 



Martha Hanson 

Psychology 







Kenneth L. Haradon 

Electrical Engineering Technology 



Ann M. Harb 

Marketing 



Elizabeth J. Harley 

Marketing 



Scott R. Hart 

Accouting 







Judy Hashim 

Accounting 



Sean A. Hastings 

Biology 



Christopher M. Hatch 

Psychology 



Kerri L. Hathaway 

Marketing 







Sandra L. Hathaway 

Accounting 



Sharon J. Hathaway 

Visual Design 



Tracy A. Hathaway 

Accounting 



Stephen B. Hayes 

Biology 







Anne K. Healy 

Accounting 



Christine A. Hibbert 

Accounting 



Lara E. Hitchen 

Marketing 



Catherine M. Hodziewich 

Sociology 







Charles P. Holden 

Finance 



Erik P. Holden 

Political Science 



Hillary J. Hordon 

Computer Oriented Mathematics 



Richard W. Horlbeck 

Management 







Jennifer L. Howarth 

Art Education 



Diane M. Hurley 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Marc C. Hymoviz 

Political Science 



Carolyn Hyson 

Art Education 







Diana Jabbour 

Marketing 



Jeanne Jasmin 

Nursing 



Jennifer L. Jensen 

Chemistry / Bioloby 



Zhong Jin 

Physics 






Bonnie S. Johnson 

Finance 



Todd Kagno 

Sociology 



Parris F. Kellennann 

Political Science 




Robert T. Johnson 

Civil Engineering 



Debra Jones 

Art Education 





Ann Marie Kelley 

Visual Design 




Melissa L. Kacian 

Management 




SMU Theatre Company 





Fall Fashion Show 







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Student Senate 

Back Row (left to right): Mohammed 
Suoud, Alex Mann, Mike Winters, 
Melissa Longfellow, Antigone Simmons, 
Demitria Bridges 

Third Row: Christen Langguth, Candace 
Thompson, Bonnie Perchard, Kristen 
La Valley, Jenn Sears, Dan Baressi, Chris 
Hatch, Mark Barrera, Laurie Bishop, 
Kevin Tobin, Doreen Holmberg 
Second Row: Karen Vecere, Paula Grey, 
Janelle Margolin, Terri Saucier, Pauline 
Tavares, Rochelle LeBlanc, Merideth 
Beck 

Front Row: Jennifer Champagne, 
Suzanne Shea, Peter Pacheco, Carlos 
Costa, Davis Pinto 





cso 

Back Row (left to right): Traecey 

Herman, Jen Shay, Glenn Amber, Fr. 

Richard Degagne, Margaret Sylvia, 

Charles Barton 

Second Row: Anne Barton, Andy 

Alphonso, Michael Sansoucy, Lucia 

Piazza, Michael O'Shea 

Front Row: Sr. Madeleine Tacy, 

Karen Leahy 



Board of Governors 

Back Row (left to right): Tracy Langguth, Kristen 
La Valley, Dean Donald Howard, Jen Thibeault, Mike 
Winters, Chuck Holden, Dick Waring 
Front Row: Christen Langguth, Kristen Vitukevich, 
Hathy Murray, Sue Skahan, Lisa Rizzo, Kris Glynn, 
Tayrn Laughlin 







Julie A. Kelley 

Textile Design 




Jennifer A. Kelly 

Visual Design/Illustration 




Jodi A. Kelly 

Business Information Systems 



Diane E. Kilduff 

Nursing 



Carol A. King 

Management 







Deanna J. King 

Accounting 



Tara L. Kiusalas 

Art Education 



James A. Kloch 

Electrical Engineering 



Kelly Knight 

Visual Design 







Melissa L. Koseski 

Visual Design 



Joseph Patrick Kosmas Jr. 

Political Science 



Kevin F. Koss 

Economics 



Daniel Kowalski 

Computer Engineering 







Christine A. Kotlarski 

Sociology 



Holly Katherine Kozak 

Marketing 



Ann Marie Krasky 

Accounting 



Barbara J. Kreiss 

Marketing 







Andrew Krivitsky 

Economocs 



Mark G. Krivitsky 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Lisa Kvaracein 

English 



Dorothy C. Laflamme 

Psychology 







Steven G. Lafrance 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Jef f ery J. Lamothe 

Humanities/Social Sciences 



Tammy S. Lamotte 

Humanities/Social Sciences 



Dawn Landers 

Visual Design 




1 




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Patricia M. Lang 

Humanities/Social Sciences 



Christen A. Langguth 

Management 



Stephen Langille 

Biology 



Laurence W. Langlois 

Electrical Engineering Technology 







Christine L. Larochelle 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Joseph B. Latimer 

Political Science 



Kristen M. Lavalley 

Biology 



Steven Leahy 

Visual Design/Illustration 







Dorrtingos S. Leal 

Computer Engineering 



Lisa M. Lebeau 

Psychology 



Jacqueline B. LeBlanc 

Accounting 



Rochelle M. LeBlanc 

Accounting 







Marc A. LeBlanc 

English / Communications 



Paul K. Leconte 

English / Communications 



David N. Ledoux 

Chemistry / Bioloby 



Michael J. Lee 

Accounting 




Veronica C. Lee 

Electrical Engineering 




Yvette J. Lescano 

Spanish 




Lisa L. Lizotte 

Psychology 




Lawrence E. Leff 

Marketing 



Leo F. Leydoh 

Accounting 



Daniel Lomos 




Richard D. Legault 

Electrical Engineering 








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Michael P. LeRoux 

Computer Science 




Halloween 

The crazies were out 
for the spookiest 
holiday of the year 




Monster Mash Bash 

All sorts of strangely-dressed individuals invaded the Campus Center for the Monster 
Mash Bash on Thursday, October 25. Everyone danced up a storm to the music 
provided by Spectrum Sound. 



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Pumpkin Carving Contest 

Piles of helpless vegetables fell pray to sharp knives Wednes- 
day, October 24, during the Pumpkin Carving contest. The 
third place winner was (from left to right) Lynn Rousseau, 
second place went to Kristin Anderson, and grand prize was 
awarded to Susan Medeiros for her grotesque concoction. 





The Machine 

February 14, 1991 






Darren B. Long 

Marketing 




Helena Lopes 

English 




Mark D. Lopes 

Electrical Engineering 



Maria Lopes 

Sociology 



Martyne Lowman 

Economics 







Dawn M. Luciano 

Medical Laboratory Science 



Anthony M. Luzza 

Marketing 



Mark D. Lynch 

Marketing 



Barbara A. Maccarone 

English 







Heather MacDonald 

Visual Design/Illustration 



Heidi J. Mackinnon 

Management 



Rodena M. MacNeil 

Political Science 



Michael J. Magner 

Management 




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Sandra J. Mahoney 

Sociology 



Aftemia Mallios 

Management 



Beth M. Mamuska 

Marketing 



Dana Lynne Manczurowsky 

Visual Design/Illustration 







Sharon A. Manley 

Management 



Michael J. Marra 

Electrical Engineering 



Richard D. Marsella 

Management 



Julie M. Marsters 

Finance 




Eric A. Martin 

Humanities /Social Sciences 






Mark N. Martin 

Electrical Engineering 



Melissa R. Martin 

Chemistry / Biology 



Susan R. Martin 

Accounting 







Tammy L. Martin 

Textile Technology 



Lisa A. Martucci 

Finance 



Steven Masciarelli 

Humanities/Social Sciences 



Carol A. Maslanka- Abraham 

Sociology 







Maria L. Massa 

Management 



Lori A. Mathews 

Finance 



Milena Matos 

Finance 



Amy L. Mauk 

Finance 







Laura L. Maxim 

Accounting 



Matthew M. Mazzaferro 

Multidisciplinary Studies 



Sheila E. McGann 

English / Communications 



Elizabeth H. McGee 

Management 







Jennifer A. McGinnis 

Management 



Carol McGlynn 

Accounting 



Carol J. McGrath 

Marketing 



Kristen M. McGrath 

Sociology 







Lisa McKee 

Sociology 



Kimberley I. McKeon 

Marketing 



Robert R. McMann 

Management 



John Medeiros 

Visual Design /Illustration 




Renee M. Melancon 

Visual Design 



After a slow start, the hockey squad came back with a vegeanance, 
and with the help of some incredible goal keeping by sophomore 
goalie Sean Sullivan, put together an incredible 12-game winning 
streak that saw the team outscore their oppenants by a 102-23 
margin. 

Some of the victories during the streak were an 11-1 shelling of 
Stonehill College that saw senior Mike Mulvey nab a hat-trick; a 9-0 
drubbing of Curry College that saw senior Matt Driscoll and 
sophomore Bob Keenan pump home a pair of goals apiece; and a 
13-0 destruction of Quinnipiac College. Junior Paul Lambalot had a 
hat trick and an assist, while junior Tim Lus added two goals and 
an assist. 

Perhaps the most unique incident in SMU sports this season 
occured for the hockey team, when, in a 9-0 romp over Amherst 
College, the team started a different goalie in each period. Sullivan 
began the game in net, but he was replaced by junior Tom Brannick 
in the second period, and before the third period, Brannick gave 
way to junior Dave Coughlin. 

However, the season ended on a sour note when the team lost to 
Suffolk University in the EC AC semi-finals by a 6-5 margin. Suffolk 
won the contest when they scored a short-handed goal with 45 
seconds left in the game. 

The team's leader in goal scoring was Mulvey, who put in 28 goals 
in only 27 games. Jim Mirageas was the assist maven for the squad, 
as he was credited with 25 of them. Mulvey also led the squad in 
points with 49. The leading goalie for the team was Sullivan, who 
in 20 games had a goals-against-average of only 2.83. 



Ice Hockey 







-is Basketball 



The men's basketball team rode a wave of emotion from the beginning of their 
season until the end of the season. After winning their first 12 games before 
finally losing to Division II Merrimack College, the squad continued to roll, 
and eventually went on to win the Little East Conference Tournament. From 
there, the Corsairs went to the NCAA Division III Tourney, and made it all the 
way to the Sweet Sixteen before losing to Kean (NJ) College by a 105-80 mar- 
gin. 

The tean got off to a rousing start when the first Annual Midnight Madness 
welcomed the squad into their new season. At midnight on October 14, the first 
day basketball teams can practice, the Corsairs were introduced to a crowd of 
almost 200 people. 

One of the team's highlights was recorded early in the season, when the 
Corsairs won their own SMU Tip-Off Tournament. SMU crushed Anna Maria 
College in the opening match, and then defeated nationally ranked Western 
Connecticut 87-79. SMU senior Val Sender was named the Tourney MVP, 
averaging 26 points, including a 37-point outburst in the finale. 

Other highlights included a 99-98 double overtime victory at arch-rival South- 
ern Maine, an 86-83 LEC Championship Win over Southern Maine, and a 87-76 
victory over that same Southern Maine squad in the first round of the NCAA 
Tournament. The wins came in consecutive weeks, and were a great testament 
to the team's strength. 

Individual leaders for the team were Sender, with 20.9 points and 8.8 rebounds 
a game, and senior Robert "Boat" Williams, who averaged 6.3 assists per 
contest. Senior Greg McCann shot 42% from 3-point range to lead the team. 
Sender also became SMU's all-time leading scorer when he scored his 2057th 
career point in a 109-76 victory over Nichols College. 






After starting the season with 3 consecutive wins, the 
women's basketball team looked as if it might enjoy a 
marked improvement over the previous season's 
disappointing season. However, the team lost two 
crucial players during the winter vacation, and 
suffered through a 9-15 season. 

One of the highlights for the team were a 65-54 victory 
over Plymouth State College. PSC was the number 
two team in the Little East Conference and had lost 
only one previous Conference contest. The shocking 
victory was a jewel in the crown of senior Michelle 
Bullock, who was presented with a rose in her last 
regular season home game. The Corsairs were led by 
sophomore Michelle Eaton, who tossed in 22 points, 
and junior Sue Quinn, who added 13 tallies of her 
own. 

Another Corsair highlight included an opening round 
victory in the Little East Conference Tournament. 
Playing at Rhode Island College, SMU upset the 
Anchorwomen by a 61-57 margin. The 5th seeded 
Corsairs had lost twice to RIC in the regular-season, so 
this win was especially sweet. The team was led by 
Quinn, Marybeth Callahan, and Amy Harvey who 
each put in 13 points. Quinn dominated the boards 
with 14 rebounds, while Eaton added 11 and Bullock 9 
in only 16 minutes of play. 

The team's leading scorer was Quinn, who averaged 
14.0 points a game. Harvey led the squad with 8.5 
rebounds a game and Kelly Brady gave up the rock 
more than anyone else, nabbing 3.7 assists per contest. 



Women's Basketball 





men's Swimming and Diving 



The women's swim squad put up respectable 
numbers, beginning the season with two close 
wins. The year began with a 119-118 victory 
over the Bridgewater State Bears. In this meet, 
sophomores Sheila Chipman and Kim 
Jagiello, along with senior Cathy Foster, were 
double winners. 

The team continued their tight- winning ways 
by defeating Trinity College in their next 
meet by a narrow 94-92 margin. The team 
was again led by Foster and Jagiello, who 
were each triple- winners for the club. 

Twice during the season the team had a 
quadruple winner. The first time this was 
accomplished was by Foster, who won as an 
individual in the 50 butterfly, the 100 butter- 
fly, and the 100 medley. She was also on the 
winning 200 freestyle relay squad. She tallied 
these four wins in a 151-132 loss to MIT. 
Jagiello accomplished the feat a week later, 
winning in the 50 freestyle, the 100 freestyle, 
and the 200 freestyle. She also was a member 
of the victorious 400 freestyle relay team. 
However, he four wins were not enough 
either, as the team lost to Clark University by 
a 131.5-112.5 margin. 

Jagiello also qualified for the Division III 
National Championships, and placed 16th in 
the 50 freestyle with a time of 25.21. The 
placed 17th in the 100 freestyle with a time of 
54.24, but failed to qualify for the finals in the 
200 freestyle. 






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Men's Swimming and Diving 




Although the team started out with a 
strong 126-93 thumping of Bridgewater 
State College, they struggled most of the 
season, with accolades reserved mostly for 
individual performances. The win over 
Bridgewater was highlighted by double- 
winners Chris White and Tom Egan. 

Only a week later, despite a loss to the 
University of Rhode Island, Egan qualified 
for the Division III Nationals in both the 1- 
meter and 3-meter diving events. He 
tallied 324.90 and 410.90 points respec- 
tively. In a loss to Clark University, the 
team once again had a few double-win- 
ners. Andy Flynn captured the 1 -meter and 
3-meter diving events, while White and 
Steve Benjamin won two as well. 

At the Nationals, Egan became the first 
diver from the men's team to earn All- 
American status as he placed in the top 
eight in both the 1 and 3-meter diving 
events. 







Kelly A. Mello 

Biology 






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Julie Mertzlufft 

Management 




Lisa Messina 

Accounting 






Claudine A. Michaud 

Nursing 



Katherine A. Miller 

Biology 



Linda A. Miller 

Finance 







Rebecca E. Miller 

Psychology 



Jeffrey A. Mitchelson 

Economics 



Dawn M. Monast 

Political Science 



Cheryl Mongeon 

Management 







Michael J. Morhy 

Electrical Engineering 



Michelle Morin 

Marketing 



Alice D. Morse 

Painting 



Michael Wallace Muniz 

Finance 







Margaret Muir 

Textile Design 



Jennifer L. Munnis 

English / Communications 



Sandra Murley 

Biology 



Shirley Murphy 

English / Communications 







Jane E. Murray 

Nursing 



Kathleen M. Murray 

Marketing 



Marc P. Nadeau 

Management 



Christine Marie Naff 

Visual Design 







Gary R. Napolitano 

Management 



Michael R. Naughton 

Management 



Jesse B. Neagley 

Psychology 



Kin Nga Nguyen 

Accounting 





Cathleen F. Nicoletti 

Nursing 



Bi BUi 

Linwood A. Noddin 

Biology 





Christina M. Nogueira 

Portuguese 



Mike Noltie 

Marketing 







Ronald E. Norman 

Management 



Marlene Nunes 

Psychology 



Tara L. Nye 

Biology / Photography 




Erin L. O'Brien 

Humanities /Social Sciences 







Richard P. O'Brien 

Management 



Sheila M. O'Connor 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Megan A. O'Donnell 

Human Resource Management 



Michelle O'Donnell 

Electrical Engineering 







Paul R. O'Donnell 

Electrical Engineering 



Monica L. O'Malley 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Mark M. O' Sullivan 

Political Science 



Erin K. Obrien 

Nursing 







Kimberly L. Okeefe 

Accounting 



John Oliveira 

Computer Science 



Lisa Oliveira 

Electrical Engineering 



Nancy F. Oliveira 

Management 




Kevin F. Oloughlin 

Marketing 




Kathleen E. Ottaviani 

Humanities /Social Sciences 





Corine A. Ormerod 

Marketing 




Renee T. Ouellette 

Art Education 




John R. Ottaviani 

Humanities/Social Sciences 








The Boxershort Run 

To raise money, in the Fall of 1990, the Outing Club 
decided to put a twist into the classic walk-a-thon and 
created the Boxershort Run. 





1990 Elections 

In the start of the new decade, an entire 
nation felt the impacts of our injured economic 
situation. But closer to home, the future of 
S.M.U. hung in the balance. Due to thel990 
elections, many felt this was an opportunity to 
heal the wounded economy. Not in years has 
the political interest at S.M.U. been so strong 
and involved. From plastering cars with 
bumper stickers to picketing windy street 
corners, students and faculty showed their 
involvement prior to flicking levers at the polls. 

Question #3 on the ballot, which would 
roll back taxes to the 1989 level, had the power 
to drastically inhibit the life of all state universi- 
ties. Fear of sharply cut courses and resources, 
to rumors of temporarily closing the school, 
caused considerable concern throughout the 
S.M.U. community. Voter registration was 
encouraged, piles of information was distrib- 
uted, and No on 3 buttons became the latest 
fashion accessory. 

During the height of the mania resulting 
from Question 3, S.M.U. was fortunate to 
present a debate on the issue. Roseanne Bacon, 
of the Massachusetts Teacher Association, 
discussed how the state's educational system 
would be greatly inhibited by the passage of 
Question 3. Also in attendance was Chip 
Faulkner, a representive from the Citizens for 
Limited Taxation, who presented the possible 
benefits of C.L.T.'s proposal. Both speakers 
responded to the abundance of inquiries from 
the crowd filling the auditorium on October 25. 

On Monday, October 29, the Campus 
Center was clogged to capacity for the visit of 
Dr. John Silber, the Democratic nominee for 
Governor. Not in decades has such a large 
turnout been witnessed for a political speaker, 
as evident from the sea of campaign posters and 
No on 3 signs held by the crowd. Silber spoke to 
the multitude of students, faculty, and local 
citizens about his political ideology and views 
towards Question 3. 

The following Friday, November 2, 
candidate for U.S. Congress Gerry Studds 
addressed a smaller crowd in the Campus 
Center. Studds' concerns showed much support 
by those who were present. 





Bob Mould 

Bob Mould, pre- 
sented in part by 
WSMU and SAB, 
played an audito- 
rium show on 
Tuesday, October 23. 
The performance was 
opened by Ultra 
Vivid Scene, playing 
songs from their new 
album. Bob Mould 
entertained the 
crowd with his array 
of guitars and 
featured hits from his 
first album, Work- 
book, and cuts from 
his newest album, 
Black Sheets of Rain. 





The Sense 

Thursday, October 18, the Campus Center was awakened 
with the sound of The Sense. After appearing at the 1990 
Spring Ball with rave reviews, The Sense returned to play for 
a much smaller but energetic S.M.U. crowd. The band 
covered favorites from such bands as U2, Midnight Oil, and 
REM, as well as introducing their own new material. When 
asked if the band was disappointed by the small turnout, 
lead singer Dan Conner stated, "It doesn't matter if the 
crowd is small, just as long as they have fun." 




1 

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■ ■■■ - 





Rag Doll 



A rowdy S.M.U. group welcomed Rag Doll to the Campus 
Center on Thursday, September 27. The band rocked the 
house, covering such Aerosmith tunes as Angel and Janie's 
Got a Gun. Even looking rather like the famous rock band, 
Rag Doll put on a show with the sights and sounds of 
authentic rock and roll. 




Diver Down 

As part of SAB's line of Thursday Night concerts, Diver 
Down crashed the Campus Center on November 8. The 
loud, no-nonsense rock band played vintage Van Halen 
tunes to a large crowd. Included in Diver Down's first 
appearance to S.M.U. were Panama, You Really Got Me, and 
Hot For Teacher. 




The Smithereens 

December 1, 1990 






Jodi M. Pacheco 

Mathematics 




Michael M. Papale 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 




David C. Parente 

Textile Technology 



Nicole Pattee 

Marketing 



Marie E. Patterson 

Humanities /Social Sciences 




Barbara J. Paul 

English / Communications 




Steven Pavent 

Humanities /Social Sciences 




Pamela R. Pelletier 

Psychology 




Charlette M. Penlington 

Marketing 







Joseph D. Pereira 

Mathematics 



Bevely R. Pereira 

Computer Engineering 



David T. Perry 

History 



Joanna M. Perry 

English 







Albert R. Petrillo 

Marketing 



Elizabeth A. Picard 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Jonathan J. Pike 

Accounting 



Rose-Marie T. Pimental 

Sociology 







Timothy B. Pimental 

Sociology 



Stephanie A. Pina 

Finance 



Lisa Pinheiro 

Visual Design /Illustration 



David Pinto 

Electrical Engineering 







Frank Pinto 

Mathematics 



Ann Piotrowski 

English /Communications 



Leanne Pisani 

Wood 



Penny Piva 

English 







Elizabeth A. Pohl 

Marketing 



Sarah Poitras 

Textile Engineering 



Donna M. Ponte 

Nursing 



Lori L. Ponte 

Nursing 







Deborah K. Porter 

Computer Oriented Mathmatics 



Nancy Powers 

Psychology 



Cindy Prayzner 

Nursing 



Paula Prayzner 

Chemestry 







Scott B. Prenda 

Political Science 



Dana J. Przybyszewski 

Management 



Meredith A. Quinn 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Paul D. Racine 

Accounting 







Todd L. L. Raimo 

English / Communications 



Marie E. Ramos 

Mathematics 



Heather M. Ramshead 

Nursing 



James Rapoza 

Computer Science 







Paul W. Rapoza 

Computer Science 



Thorn W. Rawson 

Computer Science 



Christine Ready 

TextileTechnology 



Lori A. Rebello 

English / Communications 




Betty Redmiles 

Art Education 



Alda Rego 

Political Science 




Jonathan R. Reed 

Marketing 





John S. Rego 

Marketing 




Marielaina Regan 

Finance 




Ma Bell is a friend of almost every 
student at SMU, until the bill comes. 
Then it's time to find out who called 
Wyoming seventeen times in one day. 
Over the years some students spend 
more time on the phone than in classes 






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Spring Break 

Even in these hard finacial 
times, students seem to find a 
few dollars to enjoy Spring 
Break. Dozens of students 
joined the Senior Class trip to 
Cancun, while others traveled 
to the Bahamas and Florida. 







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Senior Class Officers 




Left to Right: Ka thy- Ann Haase (Secretary /Trea- 
surer), Holly Kozak (Vice-President), and Kristen 
La Valley (President) 

To the graduating class of 1991: 

Congratulations to you all! We certainly have come a long way. We've been tested both in and out 
of the classroom. We have stressed out over exams, papers, labs, and presentations, and we are better 
people because of it. Budget cuts, tuition increases, Barbara Anderson and Question 3, and the fear of SMU 
closing down. Not only did we survive, but as President Brazil has said, we prevailed. 

The 1990-1991 academic year has been one of great change, not only for SMU and Massachusetts, but 
for the world around us. Out with the old and in with the new. Governor Weld is sure to bring drastic 
reforms to the Commonwealth. Operation Desert Storm affected us all. It was our friends and family who 
went to the Gulf to defend our nation, and to the troops we owe a great deal of thanks. 

It is a wonder we could concentrate on studying with so much going on. But besides the academic work, 
we had our fun, too. The friends and memories we have made at SMU will last a lifetime. Our days in the dorms 
and Cedar Dell, afternoons in the Sunset Room, Thursday nights at Cafe Giesta, the Spring Ball, Jim Plunkett, 
Michael's, the party houses (not mentioning any names), Cancun fiestas, and the re-creation of our beloved Rat: 
These are the things we'll never forget. Individually, and as a class, we have made our mark on SMU. Life here 
will still go on as usual after we graduate, but we hope that we have helped to pave the way for future classes 
and a better SMU, or UMass at Dartmouth. Here's to the last graduating class of SMU! I guess they really did 
save the best for last! 

We thank you for giving us your support and the opportunity to represent you this year. Best of luck 
in all your future endeavors. We wish you all the success and happiness in the world ! 



Sincerely, 

Kristen La Valley 
Holly Kozak 




Kathy-Ann Haase 








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Katherine Reimann 

Art Education 




Nancy A. Rezendes 

Accounting 




Steven M. Rezendes 

Accounting 



Amy M. Richard 

Accounting 



Elizabeth Richard 

Visual Design/Illustration 







Jaimy H. Richmond 

Sociology 



Michael Riley 

Psychology 



Jihad A. Rizk 

Computer Engineering 



Cynthia J. Roberge 

Finance 







Marc Roberge 

Management 



Lauren T. Roberts 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Selena R. Robertson 

Psychology 



Anne M. Rodericks 

Medical Laboratory Science 







Dawn M. Roderigues 

Humanities/Social Sciences 



Antonio Rodrigues 

Portuguese 



Sandra Rodrigues 

History 



Melvin Rodriquez 

Accounting 







Clara M. Rosario 

Spanish 



Pamela A. Roseberry 

Economics 



Eric M. Rosenstein 

Political Science 



Jennifer M. Rossi 

Finance 







Lynn Rousseau 

Art Education 



Alan L. Roy 

Economics 



Kristin A. Russell 

Nursing 



Pamela Jean Ryan 

Political Science 







Eric Sabo 

Humanities/Social Sciences 



Gary R. Santerre 

History 



Michael R. Santos 

Mathematics 



Geoffrey D. Saucier 

Electrical Engineering 







Stephen Sauer 

Visual Design/Illustration 



Robert L. Savard 

Electrical Engineering 



Marc E. Schiowitz 

Accounting 



Paul Schneider 

Humanities/Social Sciences 







Jill L. Schwartz 

Biology 



Mark Scibilia 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Anthony M. Scola 

Political Science 



Kimberly N. Seaberg 

Management 







Waldermar L. Sender 

Marketing 



Cheryl L. Seymour 

Sociology 



Jean M. Shapiro 

Humanities/Social Sciences 



Daniel P. Sheahan 

History 







Daniel J. Sheehan 

Civil Engineering 



Susan E. Sherman 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Kimberly D. Silva 

Psychology 



Diana Signorello 

Marketing 




Ruthanne Silva 

Sociology 



Brian J. Simoes 

Electrical Engineering 




Guy S. Silvestro 

Visual Design 






Pamela A. Simmons 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Luis M. Simoes 

Electrical Engineering Technology 





IpWlSf 




Steven A. Baddour 

Student Trustee 



To my fellow seniors, 

The past four years have given me the unique opportunity to learn both in the classroom and through the experience of represent- 
ing you, in positions like Student Senator from the Class of '91, Student Senate President and Student Trustee. 

No future position could ever afford me the same educational experience as my tenure at Southeastern Massachusetts University. 
I am proud of my accomplishments and the support you have given me over the years to maintain the quality, affordability and 
accessibility of higher education. 

Though we have faced many trials and tribulations throughout our stay, we've conquered each through a combination of unity 
and strength, ensuring the future of Massachusetts because education is the future. 

It has been an extreme pleasure to represent you over the years and I wish you all the best of luck in your future endeavors. 

Sincerely, 

Steven A. Baddour 

Student Trustee 

P.S. Always remember: Vote for Baddour. 






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Lacrosse 




The lacrosse team went through a 
disappointing season, but still managed 
to defeat rival Brandeis in the sqaud's 
biggest win of the season. The club 
pulled out a 10-9 victory in a thrilling 
overtime contest. It was the first time in 
SMU LAX history that the Corsairs 
defeated Brandeis. Sophomore Michael 
Robinson led the offensive charge, 
tallying 3 goals, while senior Eric Sabo 
and freshman Michael Jarvis each added 
a pair of scores. 

Senior John Oliveira was instru- 
mental in moving the ball up field for 
goal-scoring opportunities. Sophomore 
goalie Matt Zito rose to the occasion in 
taking the place of injured senior Alan 
Davis, and was crucial in SMU's victory. 
The winning goal was scored by 
Robinson, who finalized the Corsair 
comeback when he nailed the point 
blank shot that won the game. 





Track and Field 



The Track & Field 
team was filled with 
qualifiers for post-season 
action, and in the 
Bridgewater State College 
Bears' Classic Invitational, 
no less than eight Corsairs 
qualified for the ECAC 
Championship, led by 
seniors Kathy Fitzgibbons 
(javelin) and Cindy 
Coleman (100-meter 
hurdles), and juniors Eric 
Lopes (110-meter hurdles) 
and Ron Grigg (200-meter 
dash). Freshman Sandy 
Sprague was a dual- 
qualifier, earning berths for 
both the shot put and the 
discus. 

Fitzgibbons later 
qualified for the NCAA 
Division III National 
Championships when she 
tossed the javelin 139-6 at 
the Tufts Invitational. 
During the Nationals she 
heaved the javelin 136-4, 
finishing third and earning 
All- American status. 

Lopes also participated 
in the Nationals, finishing 
12th in the 110 meter 
hurdles with a time of 14.82. 

Senior Sheila Edwards 
qualified for the All-New 
Englands in the javelin and 
the the long jump, while 
fellow senior Dave Krall 
qualified in the 1,500 
meters. 

At the New England 
Division III Championships, 
senior Bill Weshrob finished 
second in the 10,000 meters 
with a time of 31:58.57, 
senior Marc Hymovitz came 
in sixth in the 110 meter 
hurdles (15.82), and junior 
Cheryl Adams placed third 
in the triple jump with a 
leap of 35-6 1/2. The 
Corsairs turned in over a 
dozen other respectable 
performances in the meet. 




Softball 



The softball team turned in a 
more-than-respectable season 
finishing the year with a 16-10 
record. 

While the team failed to make 
the post-season, there were still 
some very impressive victories, 
including an 8-0 win over Rhode 
Island College that saw junior Jen 
Doyle and senior Sue Smith 
combine for a no-hitter, a 17-3 rout 
of Salve Regina that saw senior 
Linda Miller smash a grand slam 
home run, and a 4-1 no- hit victory 
over Worcester Polytechnic 
Institute that had sophomore Britt 
Chanasyk get the win on the 
mound and senior Kelly Brady 
collect three hits to lead the way 
offensively for the club. 

Junior outfielder Sue Quinn 
showed some defensive style, as 
she threw out several runners 
during the season. 

Junior Beth Brooks was 
selected to the second team All- 
Northeast region squad. Brooks 
finished the season with a .352 
batting average, and added 1 home 
run and 15 RBIs to that. 





Baseball 




The baseball team put together an impressive season, finishing the year with a 22-16 mark. The club made it into the New 
England Regional of the NCAA Division III National Tournament, but that was as far as they would go. 

The first contest of the Tourney saw the team get hammered by eventual National Champion Southern Maine. The Corsairs 
lost 21-4. Freshman Jeff Arruda was the team standout, collecting three of the eight SMU hits. 

The second contest saw the team fall to Eastern Connecticut State University by a 12-8 margin. Sophomores John Graham 
and Ron Andrade led the Corsair attack with three hits apiece, but it was still not enough as SMU was knocked out of the Tour- 
ney. 

Despite these two losses, the season was not without some spectacular wins. Some highlights of the season were a 6-5 come- 
from-behind, bottom-of-the-ninth win over Bryant College and a 14-1 drubbing of UMASS-Boston, in which Graham went 5-for-5 
with two home runs, a single, a double, and a triple, hitting for the cycle. 

During the season the team put together a 13-game winning streak and at one point won 19 of 21 contests. 

Four members of the team earned accolades from the New England Baseball Coaches Association. Senior Chris Wnek and 
Graham were selected first-team New England. Wnek, a defensive specialist, also showed his skills with the bat and on the 
basepaths, as he hit .441 and stole 22 of 23 bases. Graham hit .407 and slugged 4 home runs with 34 RBIs. He also stole 18 bases. 

Freshman Mike Gendreau was selected to the second team, hitting .363 with 30 stolen bases and 32 RBIs. Andrade was 
selected to the third team, hitting .371. 





Men's Tennis 






Sami Y. Sinjab 

Civil Engineering 





Keith P. Sirois 

Humanities/Social Sciences 





Jodi-Anne Sizensky 

Biology 




Susan Skahan 

Marketing 



Holly J. Skillin 

Textile Design 



Linda Sladewski 

Humanities /Social Sciences 







Margaret E. Slinn 

Textile Technology 



Kimberly Slusarski 

Political Science 



Brian K. Smith 

Economics 



Shannon Smith 

Humanities /Social Sciences 







Suzanne D. Smith 

Mathematics 



Nancy A. Soares 

Psychology 



Glenn A. Soulia 

Visual Design 



Ana M. Sousa 

Accounting 





Lydia M. Souza 

Medical Laboratory Science 



L ^ 

Lisa Spinazola 

Business Information Systems 





Susan F. Stakus 

Nursing 



Audra Stefanik 

Textile Technology 





Charles A. Stefanini 

Political Science 



Stasia A. Stetkiewicz 

Textile Technology 





Neville G. Stewart 

Computer Science 



Kristen Elizabeth Stickney 

Art History 







Barry P. Struski 

History 



Brian M. Sullivan 

Accounting 



Erin A. Sullivan 

Psychology 



John Sullivan 

Multidisciplinary Studies 







Christopher S. Sumner 

Finance 



Mahammad Suoud 

Computer Science 



Melissa Sweeney 

Psychology 



Rhonda M. Swire 

Humanities/Social Sciences 







Jane M. Swiszcz 

History 



Erik T. Sylvia 

Electrical Engineering Technology 



Kevin Sylvia 

Electrical Engineering Technology 



Erik Symis 

Visual Design/ Illustration 







Cheryl A. Szargowicz 

Nursing 



Kristin E. Tallman 

English / Communications 



Karin A. Tammi 

Biology 



Eileen Tangney 

Nursing 







Deborah Tavares 

Management 



Pauline Tavares 

Economics / Sociology 



Sally J. Taylor 

Electrical Engineering 



Barbara L. Terrio 

Humanities/Social Sciences 







Patricia Anne Thibodeau 

Human Resource Management 



Regina Thornton 

English/Communications 



Joelle L. Tierney 

Mechanical Engineering 



Danny Tisdelle 

Electrical Engineering 




Yanto Z. Tjahjadi 

Computer Oriented Mathematics 




Filomena Torres 

Sociology 





Lobby Day 

Boston, April 24, 1991 





S^Kam 



Spring Week 

Student Activities Board held 
their annual Spring Week, 
hosting several events from an 
outdoor carnival, with musical 
chairs, a dunking booth, sing-a- 
long and more, to a video 
dance party. The week ended 
with the largest social event of 
the season, the Spring Ball. 




Spring Ball 




Honors Convocation 

April 24, 1991 





Greetings from the Board of Trustees by Robert S. Karam, 
Chairman. 



Welcome by Robert C. Dalgleish, PhD, Interim Provost and Vice 
President for Academic Affairs. 





Highest Scholastic Standing, College of Arts and Sciences to 
Sara Mclntire, perfect 4.0. Presented by Josepk Deck, Dean, 
College of Arts and Sciences. 







Graduation-Honors 
Recognition Banquet 

by David Levesque 

On Friday May 31, tribute was paid to outstanding 
SMU seniors. The Graduation-Honors Recognition 
Banquet was held at White's Restaurant in Westport to 
honor students of the highest academic standing and 
to notice important individuals in the SMU commu- 
nity. The event was free to all seniors and included 
dinner, award presentations, and guest speaker P.J. 
O'Rourke. 

The night started with a welcoming from Mistress of 
Ceremonies and Class President, Kristen M. La Valley, 
followed by greetings from Robert S. Karam, Chair- 
man of the SMU Board of Trustees and Albert W. 
Caron, president of the SMU Alumni Association. 

SMU President, Dr. John R. Brazil made the first 
presentation of the night, when he awarded the top 
academic students of each college. "I had a great 
privilege working with these (students)," Brazil told 
the audience. And before presenting academic awards 
Brazil told all recipients to take pride in their accom- 
plishments. 

Recipients included Sara Mclntire of the College of 
Arts and Sciences who received a 4.0 GPA as a math- 
ematics major. Megan A. O'Donnell of the College of 
Business and Industry who received a 3.8 GPA 
majoring in Human Resource Management. Also from 
the College of Business and Industry was Patrick J. 
Condon (transfer) who received a 3.9 GPA and was 
also a Human Resource Management major. 

From the College of Engineering, Mark N. Martin 
received a 3.9 GPA in the Electrical Engineering major. 
Heather M. Ramshead with a 3.3 GPA and Margaret 
Garvey (transfer) with a 3.9 GPA received the honor 
for the College of Nursing. The College of Visual and 
Performing Arts honored Peter B. Harney who re- 
ceived a 3.6 GPA as a Art Education major, and also 
Nancy R. Falciglia (transfer) who received a 3.9 GPA 
as a Art History major. All award winners received 
Revere bowls with their accomplishment inscribed on 
it. 

The Student Senate took time to acknowledge impor- 
tant members of the senate. The presentations were 
made by Student Senate President Peter Pacheco. 
Pacheco felt the efforts of the honored were invaluable 
to the running of the senate last year. 

Dean of Students Donald C. Howard made the presen- 
tation of Distinguished Student Service 



continued on next page 




Award to Steven A. Baddour. Baddour 
received a standing ovation from the audi- 
ence for his outstanding work to the univer- 
sity. Dean Howard called attention to his 
unyielding effort especially during trying 
times — budget cuts, furloughs — in the 
SMU community. Baddour has held every 
major political office in the University, 
including his present post of Student 
Trustee. 

Who's Who Among Students in American 
Universities and Colleges recipients were also 
acknowledged. Winners of the national 
honor were as follows; Steven A. Baddour, 
Mark A. Barrera, Marianne DiMascio, 
Manuel Gracia, Kathy-Ann Hasse, Christo- 
pher M. Hatch, Charles P. Holden, Holly K. 
Kozak, Kristen La Valley, Jonathan Maxwell, 
Jennifer Munnis, David Pinto, Kenneth J. 
Souza, Joelle L. Tierney, Michael Winters, 
Waldemar "Val" Sender, and Gary 
Napolitano. The presentations were made by 
Dean Howard and Susan T. Costa. 

The Presentation of the Class Gift was made 
by Holly K. Kozak, Vice-President and 
Kathy-Ann Haase, Secretary /Treasurer. The 
class gift consisted of shrubbery and land- 
scaping material, which will be added to the. 
entrance of the campus. 

Patrick Joseph ("P.J.") O'Rourke, Foreign 
Correspondent for Rolling Stone magazine, 
concluded the night with a satirical and very 
entertaining look at the United States gov- 
ernment. Before captivating the audience 
with his witty outlook he first gave the 
seniors a piece of advice," Go out there and 
make a lot of money and live the good life." 





Commencement 

By David Levesque 

Southeastern Massachusetts University's 
class of 1991 bid its final farewell on 
Sunday June 2 as the caps of accomplish- 
ment flew in the air at SMU's 91st 
commencement. For the day it was 
Camelot, blue skies and bright smiles 
proved the journey had finally ended for 
1,364 graduates and undergraduates. 
Unfortunately, like their mortarboards, 
graduates will also come down to earth 
and face a woeful economy and declining 
job market, which was addressed in 
several commencement speeches. 

"Let's just hope that Governor Weld 
know what he is doing," said Class 
President Kristen Marie La Valley during 
the commencement ceremony in the 
Vietnam Veterans' Peace Memorial 
Amphitheater. Kristen offered hope and 
encouragement to her fellow graduates, 
explaining that the recession will not be 
everlasting. "People have said because of 
hard times and the recession, the Ameri- 
can dream has passed us by, but I don't 
believe that, and I hope you don't 
either." 

Kristen also reassured the graduates that 
they are the best of the best. "I guess they 
really did save the best for last," 
LaValley said referring to the very 
possible chance that this class will be the 
last before the UMass name change. Such 
a change is possible by July 1 . 

Chairman of the Board of Trustees 
Robert S. Karam also addressed the 
SMU/UMass merger. "1991 is a pivotal 
year for SMU. We don't know yet 
whether we will experience greater 
financial distress or whether we can 
begin rebuilding the world class institu- 
tion the Commonwealth deserves," 
explained Karam, who was a recipient of 
an honorary doctor of humane letters 
during the ceremony. He urged the 
audience to contact their legislators to 
support immediate adoption of Governor 
Weld's proposed restructuring of state 
public universities into a single Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts system. Karam said 
SMU — or the University of Massachu- 
setts Dartmouth — is the "catalyst to the 








region's permanent economic recovery." 

Along with Mr. Karam five other honor- 
ary degrees were granted, one of which 
was given to commencement speaker 
Eric Sevareid. Sevareid, a retired CBS 
newsman, was described by SMU 
President John R. Brazil as a "pioneering 
genius" of broadcast news and said he 
"is not merely a reporter of history ... 
Yours has not been an ordinary life," but 
one that has moved "to the rhythm of the 
world's heartbeat." 

Sevareid sympathized with the graduat- 
ing class' situation, saying "I escaped 
from college in the depths of the Great 
Depression, when any job was a miracle 
... but we survived." Sevareid stressed 
the importance of altruism in the better- 
ment of society. "America has been 



called the best hope of the Earth," he 
continued. "Other philosophies — 
scientific socialism, Marxism, have 
failed. Perhaps in America what could 
exist is altruism. There are certainly the 
seeds for it here." Sevareid added, "You 
must look to yourselves for a new 
definition of what has been called the 
American way . " 

"The Greeks were right," explained 
Sevareid. "A man's character is his fate. 
So, surely, shall the character of its 
people be America's fate. Knowledge is 
power and nations that can manage 
well will ride into the 21st century at 
the top of the world." 

The idea of national and international 
success for the graduates was ad- 
dressed by Albert Caron Jr., a 1969 




graduate and current president of the 
SMU Alumni Association. "Like Colum- 
bus, be bold. Like Columbus, be brave. 
Show the world what you can do with the 
degree. In the 21st century, make the 
world remember you and the university 
you graduated from in 1991." 

One aspect of the ceremony notable to 
mention was the use of an invocation and 
benediction, which high schools across the 
area have abandoned due to a U.S. District 
Court of Appeals decision. The decision 
said that the invocation was too closely 
aligned to prayer in the classroom and is 
unconstitutional. The issue is being 
appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court in the 
fall. 

SMU continued the traditional invocation 
after speaking with attorney Walter R. 



Smith, who referred to the use of invoca- 
tion by the Nebraska Legislature. Mr. 
Smith felt SMU had a greater link to the 
adult legislature than to the Rhode Island 
junior high school case, whose parents 
waged the original court action. 

Results were the invocation and benedic- 
tion by a Jesuit priest and a Rabbi as 
planned. Rabbi Barry D. Hartman of New 
Bedford's Adavath Achim Synagogue 
gave the benediction, which included a 
passage from the Micah. The passage 
advised graduates to "Be kind, be just and 
be humble." Rev. Thomas A. Wassmer, a 
Jesuit priest and SMU philosophy profes- 
sor, offered the invocation. Rev. Wassmer 
said, "Thank you, Lord, for this beautiful, 
fantastic day. And, Lord, do please keep 
the American Civil Liberties Union at a 
distance." 












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■■ 





Michael F. Tracht 

Management 




Patricia A. Tremblay 

Accounting 




James K. Tripp 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 




Kevin F. Troy 

Civil Engineering 



Stephanie L. Tsinzo 

Accounting 



Joseph B. Turcketta 

Marketing 



Julie L. Townsend 

Mulidisciplinary Studies 







Susan Turner 

Psychology 



Wayne H. Turner 

Biology 



Sharri Tyas-Rauner 

Biology 



Nancy Van Tassel 

Visual Design 







Laura M. Vanasse 

History 



JoAnne Vandal 

Nursing 



Bruce F. Vaness 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Mary D. Varao 

Psychology 







Karen S. Vecere 

Finance 



Chris J. Veneto 

Electrical Engineering 



Joe F. Verga 

Computer Science 



Joanne M. Vicente 

Accounting 







John J. Vicino 

Management 



Lubelia M. Vieira 

Marketing 



Kristin Vitukevich 

Marketing 



Elaine P. Viveiros 

Accounting 







Linda M. Viveiros 

Management 



Suzanna Viveiros 

Management 



Jodi A. Waldron 

Human Resource Management 



Sheila K. Walther 

English/Communications 







Jeffrey P. Ward 

Chemistry 



Thomas R. Ward 

Visual Design 



Wanda K. Watson 

Nursing 



Jennifer Wellington 

English/Communications 







William S. Weschrob 

Finance 



Colleen L. Westgate 

Chemistry /Biology 



Jessica S. White 

Electrical Engineering 



Teri White 

Biology 




James F. Wilcox 

Civil Engineering 



)M^M 






Dennis J. Wilkinson 

Computer Science 



Chris T. Williams 

Humanities /Social Sciences 



Laurie A. Williams 

Nursing 







Janie Y. Wilson 

Humanities/Social Sciences 






Yvonne C. Wilson 

Accounting 



Jennifer L. Yelle 

Visual Design /Illustration 



Edward H. Yeomans 

Management 




Donald P. Yucius 

Management 




Lin Zhou 

Computer Science 





Mark Zajac 

Visual Design /Illustration 




Lisa A. Ziccardi 

Humanities/Social Sciences 




Carole L Zeida 

Psychology 






©1939, Warner Bro; 

Bugs Bunny Celebrated his 50th 
birthday in 1989. 




Kenneth J. Souza 

English / Communications 



Jonathan Maxwell 

Visual Design/Illustration 



©1991, Warner Bros. 

In 1990 Warner Brothers introduced the TinyToons, which 
included Buster Bunny and Babs Bunny, of ACME Looniversity. 



Seniors Not Photographed 



College of Visual and 
Performing Arts 

Art History 

Nancy Regina Falciglia 
Abigail Marsch Grotke 
Melissa Helena Longfellow 
Erika A. Miller 
Tina P. Peterman 
Susan Gail Sheren 

Art Education 

Suzette D. Calvin 
Heidi D. Darley 
Patrice Marie Ferrara 
P. Brendan Harney 
Paul Glen Mendes 
Michaele Jean Millette 
Mary Rose 

Karen Lynn Sturtevant 
Glenn Bryan Suchon 
Diana Marie Tierney 

Painting 

Judith A. Araujo 
Ann Marie Cawley 
Marsha Elaine Hanby 
Jean Ann McCallum 
James Medeiros 
Brian Joseph Millar 
David Paul Rickson 

Sculpture 

Jose Beltran ■ 
Paul Anthony Cesarini 
Christopher Alan Jacobsen 
Jodiann Marie Rose 

Textile Design 

Mark Charles Denecour 
Carolyn Jean Harris 
Debra Edith Jenkins 
Ann Marie Jones 
Peter Jon Ripley 
Denise Marie Theroux 

Visual Design 

Steven Paul Anziano 
Brian Andrew Carroll 
Leslie A. Coyle 
Cheryl Marie Duclos 
Christine Regis Ingellis 
Keith Roderick Malone 
Catherine Patricia Markt 
Kimberly Ethel Morrow 
Melissa Elizabeth Niederhelman 
Patrick John Piazza 
Joseph Douglas Saulnier 
Christine Lynne Silva 

Visual Design-Ceramics 

Susan J. Arruda 
Mercedes May Murolo 
Mary Ann Sanguinet 



Visual Design-Illustration 

Andrea Louise Bernier 
Steven Bryant Chausse 
Stephanie Ann Eifert 
Kathleen Veronica Manning 
Sabine H. Rutkovskis 
Scott William Wells 

Visual Design-Photography 

Jacqueline Byrnes Chamberlain 
John J. Long 

Gregg Andrew Maydoney 
Kevin Franklin Samson 
Saun T. Sawyer 

Visual Design-Typography 

Beth Danna Breen 
Robert Brian Dugan 
John Adam Hickey 
Kelley R. Simons 

Visual Design-Illustration/ 
Visual Design-Photography 

Dean Frederick Robinson 

Bachelor of Music 

Bernadette Maria Boutin 
Deborah A. Gordon 
David Alan Gries 
Robert Arthur Silvia 

Swain-Bachelor of Fine Arts 
Visual Design 

Donna Jean Gaudette 

Bronwyn Elizabeth Bennett Hixson 

Steven R. Kelly 

Wendy Ann Meehan 

James Bradley Ottenstein 



Calvin and Hobbes 



Jon M. Steienmetz 
Paul Szabo 

Ceramics 

Kimberly Anne Guidi 
LaDonna Susan Johns 

Painting 

Rebecca M. Broadbent 
John Paul Cummings 
Sophia Polydoros Petrou 
Carl Berrien Smith 
Dawn Lorraine Stafford 

Sculpture 

David Darien Flamburis 
Steven Louis Sedman 



College of Nursing 

Nursing 

Patrick Russell Adams 
Lori Lynne Alexandre 
Paula Anne Assad 
June A. Comeau 
Charlene Ann Correia 
Michelle P. Errasti-Martins 
Joanne Julie Fernandes 
Frances Denise Fuller 
Margaret Roberta Garvey 
Marylou Goncalo 
Darlene Marie Goulet 
Liza Jeanne Harnish 
Maureen Kennedy Hoye 
Janette Beverley Johnson 
Lucille Elaine Knight 
Carol Ann Larkin 



I'VE BEEN READING 
UP ON PALEONTOLOGY 

^*N ,,)\ IT'S AMAZING 

H <#\^ STUFV 



SCIENTISTS CAN TEH UOW 
OLD SOMETHING IS -MST 
BY ANALYZING THE LASERS 
OF DIRT ITS IN. 




I THINK PEOPLE WORRY TOO 
MUCH ABOUT LITTLE TUINGS. 



ALL THEY DO IS MAKE 
THEMSELVES UNUAPPV 
THAT WAY. ,_ 



by Bill Watterson 






mi, YOU MUST 
BE SIX YEARS 
OLD. 




ft 



___ mi GET AN 

■>E« <A THAT DONT REALLY 
% v . .$> MATTER' 




HUE THE BOOK. 
REPORT YOU'RE 
SUPPOSED TO 8E 
WRITING NDY4 ON 
THE bOKYOO 
HAVEN'T READ ? 



EXACTLY. 

CASE IN 

POINT. 




1990 Universal Press Syndicate 




Mother Goose & Grimm 



by Mike Peters 




© 1991 Grimmy Inc. 



Diane Muriel Leclair 

Carol Beatrice Mackenzie 

Linda Jeanne Mello 

Susan P. Moniz 

Cheryl Ann Okuniewicz 

Keith Pinheiro 

Diane L. Rioux 

Kathleen Anne Lynch Rodrigues 

Kathleen Patricia Selfe 

Kerrie Marie Sheperd 

Lucy Marie Stephanian 

Lynne Ann Sullivan 

David Joseph Teixeira 

Carleen Helen Tracey 

Deborah Ann Vaillancourt 

Sylvia Marie Vasconcellos 

Nancy Ann Ziccardi 



College of Engineering 

Civil Engineering 

Michael William Bessette 
John Charles Cavanaro 
David Andrew Clark 
Todd Michael Clark 
David Mathew Davignon 
John Anthony Deloia 
John L. Dickinson 
Camil Majid Farhat 
Robert Mark Fitzgerald 
Ghassan Khader Ghrear 
Matthew Thomas Grady 
Jeffrey Louis Leonard 
Angus Mak 
Peter Joseph Martins 
Steven J. Miller 
Norman Lee Neves 
Carmelo Nicolosi 
John Francis Raposo 
Robert Michael Sanda 
Christopher Sheedy 




Lloyd David Simpson 
Brendan Patrick Sullivan 
Bruce John Sylvia 
Keith Michael Tornifoglio 

Construction Engineering 

Matthew David Murphy 
Stephen John Pagliuca 
Edward Paul Sjostedt 
Bachelor of Science 

Computer Engineering 

David Stephen English 
Jonathan Jannetti 
Scott A. Laverdiere 
Boon Kin Law 
Kenneth Machado 
Walid Shawkat Petrus 
Hung Phan 
Sergio Luis Silva 
Saad Hatem Souleiman 
Alan David Speakman 
Richard Anson Thomas, Jr. 
Jeffrey Louis Zeichick 

Electrical Engineering 

Rabih Abounaia 
Darren Almeida 
Michael daCruz Baptista 
Paul Joseph Barry, Jr. 
Edward E. Bouchard 
Henry S. Chin 
Joseph K. Chu 
Minn Quoc Chuong 
Manuel Vieira Coelho 
Jevon Keith deSena 
Paul A. Dias 
C. Ray Dutton 
Dave Fernandes 
Kenneth J. Frade 
George James Godfrey 
Joseph L. Goncalves 
Kwan Heng Hong 
Daniel Matthew Kane 
Stephen Sanghtun Kim 



Linh Tu La 

Normand Paul Lavoie 
Sin Guan Lee 
Robert Daniel Lima 
Charles Patrick Manion 
Douglas C. Medeiros 
Chong Man Ng 
Kwok Hin Ng 
Kwok Leong Ng 
Stephen J. Oakley 
Kay Leong Ong 
Chai Panayakul 
Robert Leo Savard 
Robert Theodore Shanks 
Peter Scott Stacey 
Khoi Trantuan 
Eduard Albert Van Lingen 
Khaled Ahmed Wazzan 

Electrical Engineering Technology 

Paul Anselmo 
Christopher Barboza 
Peter Michael Barbuto 
Patrick Bowen 
Paul Joseph Capuano 
Timothy Steven Champagne 
Paul R. Chretien 
James Mason Costa 
Michael Joseph Courville 
Alan S. Davis 
James Foster Derrickson 
Jared Llewelluyn Dowdle 
Bradley Kent Dunkelberger 
James William Gauthier 
Rafael Gutierrez, Jr. 
Jeffrey Jason Jerome 
Bernard Jeffery Lamarre 
David Edward Lambert 
James A. Lusignan 
Paul Joseph McWhinnie 
John Joseph O'Leary 
Timothy Sean O'Malley 
Anthony Previti 
Fred L. Resendes 
Soth Samreth 
Robert W. Santos 
David Joseph Walach 

Mechanical Engineering 

Mark V. Chester 
James Steven Danielson 
Joseph Anthony DiNola 
Eileen A. Dunn 
Lois A. Gallant 
John David Lamb 
Ricardo D. Medeiros 
John Usher, Jr. 
David Ricci Vrane 
Sandra Jean Wood 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 

Sally Ellen Barkley 
Jacinto Michael d Almeida 
Edward DeLaTorre 
Daniel L. Desrochers 
Michael Ryan Jones 
Karl F. Krueger 
David M. Laurila 
Matthew Craig Maillet 
Kenneth George Peterson, Jr. 
Michael J. Rosano 
Thomas Edward Villandry 
Joseph Michael Walsh 



College of 

Business and Industry 

Accounting 

Donna Marie Alexander 
Gregory Todd Ames 
Lisa-Marie Ardita 
Estelle M. Banks 
Ellen Marie Bragg 
Stephen Paul Brown, Jr. 
Edward Alan Bruce 
Susan Elizabeth Cabral 
Antonio Rodriguez Caldera 
Donald Wayne Cofer 
Louise Diane Croteau 
Edward Brian Dempsey 
Kevin Patrick Doherty 
Brian Paul Emond 
Raitt Paul Erickson 
Timothy James Harrington 
Michelle D. Jussaume 
Jacqueline Blanche LeBlanc 
Dawn Marie Lussier 
Sharon Lynn Mello 
Cynthia J. Pond 
Debra Ann Pulkkinen 
John F. Reilly 
Cheryl Ann Roberts 
Bernard P. Roderick, Jr. 
Debbie Ann Silveira 
Elisa Lynn Smith 
Donald Spirlet 
Charles August St.George 
Teresa Julie Stewart 
Edward Francis Strazik 
Susan K. Vigliano 
Yvonne Lynn Wilson 
Daniel Thomas Zucco 

Business Information 
Systems 

Matthew John Cooper 
Sandra M. Ferreira 
QueeLian Lay 
Herbert Martin 
Gary Thomas O'Shea 

Finance 

Karen Elizabeth Torres Alexander 

Patricia Mary Anne Congdon 

Patrick Allen Cote 

Paul Alexandre DeMatos 

Wayne Brian Hemenway 

Robert Thomas Jackson 

John G. Machado 

Michael David Martin 

Daniel J. Martin, Jr. 

Roberta Colette Oliveira 

Joseph John Patracuollo 

Michael J. Permatteo 

James Douglas Reposa 

Kathy Ann Therrien 

Human Resources Management 

Tresa Michelle Busby 
Patrick James Condon 
Michelle Ann Furtado 
Margaret Alice Sylvia 

Management 

James Kai Alieu 

Janet L. Bragg Anderson 



Andrzej J. Arasimowicz 
Steven James Araujo 
Louise Alice Athaide 
Sharon Anne Ayoub 
William A. Bernardi 
Masah Lynn Beysolow 
John Joseph Cannistraro 
Pamela Jeanne Cox 
Holly Michelle Crocker 
David M. DeTerra 
Pauline J. Dube 
Christopher John Dusio 
Gene Robert Ferioli 
Mary Agnes Galipeau 
Jeffrey Scott Genander 
Nancy Michelle Gibeau 
Christopher Thomas Green 
Lisa Irene Gregory 
Joseph Edward Guilbeault 
Thomas Harkin 
Sarah Januszkiewicz 
Laura Anne Joshi 
Ida Hilda Katzoff 
Brian Thomas Kavanaugh II 
Andrew James Kelley 
Sinan Kobu 
Mark Lasch 

Ronald Albert Loranger 
Ron Drew Maciel 
Tracey Marie Mann 
Thomas William McNamara 
Drew Gordon Mullert 
Barbara J. Oswalt 
Anita B. Pandiscio 
Linda Ann Pellegrino 
Steven James Pine 
Michelle Marie Rodrigues 
Scott Daniel Roman 
Eduardo Machado Saraiva 
Deborah Kate Shultz 
Manuel E. Soares 
Bridgit Marie Souza 
Stephen Michael Souza 
Brian Charles Studley 
Davis Lawrence Sullivan 



Shoe 



Linda Kay Tessier 
Alan Mark Therrien 
Gregory Alan Traghella 
Catherine Tveit 
Zora Aleace Gale Valentine 
Brenden Doyle Wallace 
Diane Robillard Watts 
Joseph Patrick Whalen 
Joan Adelle Youngblood 
William Thomas zink 

Marketing 

Stephen Andre Almeida 
Andrew Keith Caspe 
Rochelle Marie Chouinard 
Jeffrey Scott Commeau 
Michael H. Connor 
Robert Winthrop Constantin 
Deborah Ann D'Amore 
John Joseph Danahey, Jr. 
Brian David Denham 
Douglas Roger Fortier 
David Paul Handleman 
Kenneth Edward Kawa, Jr. 
Nancy Sarah Kitchen 
John Lima 

Michael Victor LoFrumento 
Peter James MacNeil III 
Janice Ruth Mattson 
Michael McGuire 
Douglas A. Mello 
Debra Ann Murphy 
Yvonne Murphy 
Patrick Joseph Quinn 
Caryl A. Reynolds 
David Richard Santos 
Christopher Tory Smith 
Kevin Joseph Terra 
George Michael Thomas 
Christopher Larry White 

Textile Technology 

Susan Courtney English 
Thomas Anthony Ferraz 
Amy Kathleen Haslip 



by Jeff MacNelly 




1991 by Tribune Media Services, Inc. 




No Photo Please!!! 

During the year as we roamed the campus taking photos, there 
were always those who didn't want their photo taken. Well we 
told you we were going to put them in the yearbook anyways, so 
here they are. 




Ann M. Hubbard 
Susan Ann Kuriothowski 
Angelo Manna 
Carmelo Manna 
Catherine Ann Mulherin 
Thomas Robert Tracy, Jr. 
David Ricci Vrane 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Biology 

Michael James Corkery 
Peter J. DiBenedetto 
Aleel Katherine Grennan 
Veronica Satvedi Marrochello 
Rebeka Jane Rand 
Lorena Duarte Soares 
Donna Mae Straight 
David Raymond Terf era 
Richard Hart Uva 

Marine Biology 

Robert Michael Ficociello 
Paul Robert O'Donnell, Jr. 
Daniel Charles Weaver 

Biology/Marine Biology 

James William Anderson 
Victor Adrian Nordahl Jr. 

Chemistry 

Sean Thomas Riley 

Computer Science 

Elaine Ann Ackley 
Michelle Jane Berthiaume 
Ronald F. Cabucio, Jr. 
Christopher Michael Casciano 
Robert Paul Coakley 
Robert Alan Costa 
Robert Allan Costa 
Lurdes O. Cunha 



The Far Side 



In the 1980's Gary Larson 
hit the charts with a new 
comic strip entitled, 
The Far Side. 

This comic took humor to 
places it's never been, 
stretching our imagination 
every chance it got. 
Larson took ordinary, 
everyday things and made 
us look at them in ways 
that no one had thought 
of before. 



Jean Pierre DeBurgo 
David Hassel 
Kimberley Anne Heap 
Richard Paul Jussaume 
David Michael Proudman 
Danhua Zheng So 
Christopher James Sundstrom 
Richard Loring West 

Computer Science/Mathematics 

Teresa Elaine Fast 

Economics 

David William Collins 
Brian G. Conway 
Barry Edward Ferreira 
Brett E. O'Connor 
William James Peterson, Jr. 
Jon N. Roth 
James Alan Silveira 

Economics-Honors 

Kimberly Rebecca Dane 
Norman Joseph Dumont 

Economics/Political Science 

Cheryl Chagnon 

English 

Paull Welby Connolly 
John E. Cox III 
Marie Constance Desrosiers 
Jacqueline Faith Dupuis 
Raquel Ann Kellermann 
Arthur S. Medeiros 
Michelle L. Ouellette 
Denise Marie Porche 
David Edward Wojnar 
Elizabeth Wooster 

English-Writing option 

Karen Patricia Alves 
Christopher Brook Biddle 



by Gary Larson 




'Hey, bucko . . . I'm through begging." 



Lyn A. Dooling 
Nancy Jane Fazzina 
Sheryl Denise Hoover 
Christopher Clark Johnson 
Lyn J. Levesque 
Donald Leonard Michaels 
Christopher Joseph Piccone 
Christine Vadeboncoeur 

English/English- Writing option 

Paula Ann Charbonneau 
Dwight Albert Cheetham 
Thondra Lanese 
Suzanne Marie Letendre 
Jimmy Douglas McRoy 

French/Portuguese 

Carlos A. Almeida 

Portuguese 

Octavia M. Batista 
Dawn Marie Escobar 

Spanish 

Rosa Celeste Almeida 
Rosinda Celeste Almeida 
Catherine Kohl Hiler 
Stephen Tavares 

Spanish/Political Science 

Antonio Rocha Lima 

History 

Thomas Francis Aubin 
Douglas Chester Brown 
Franklin Sebastain Canosa 
Christopher Alan Chasse 
Joseph Allen Fish 
Lisa Ann Gronblom 
Lauren Ann Hill 
Jay C. Kivowitz 
Anna M. C. Maciel 
Diane M. Nadeau 
Michael Pacheco, Jr. 
Michael Gordon Riggin 
Leonard Mario Rose, Jr. 
Charles Parker White 

Humanities and Social Sciences 

Michelle Anne Adams 
Christopher Scott Arbogast 
Mark F. Brittain 
Mark Robert Correia 
David Mark Domingo 
Christine Anne Donovan 
Michael Patrick Doyle 
Catherine Ann Duarte 
Ellen Elizabeth Dunn 
Dimitria Flamburis 
Kevin Andrew Galizio 
Manuella J. Ganeto 
Thomas Joseph Guard 
Dina Theresa Guarino 
Marie Canery- Hemmitt 
Peter Jeffrey Henderson 
Diane Marie Hurley 
John Joseph Ierardo 
Christine Louise LaRochelle 
Alisa Marie Landry 
Jennifer Lassige 
Daniel Lemos 
Lisa Ann Mariotti 




Robert Brian Matheny 
Horacio Guillermo Milla 
Adam Michael Newman 
Debra Lynn Powers 
Julie Ann Rioux 
Christine Ellen Rosebrock 
Donna Marie Silva 
Jeffrey Robert Tippins 
Rebecca Ann Weston 
Wayne Wright 
Randall Douglas Zeppenfeld 

Humanities and Social 
Sciences/Psychology 

Jennifer Lynn Swanson 

Mathematics 

Jayme Elizabeth Barrett 
Brian David Egan 
Holly Elizabeth Leach 
James Edward MacDougall 
Sara Evans Mclntire 
Susan Elizabeth Mills 
Stephen Floyd Smith 
Alison Julie Swift 
Joelle Lyn Tierney 
Cheryl Anne Vasconcellos 

Medical Laboratory Science 

David Kenneth Leanues 
Zahra Mehrzad Zahedi 

Multidisciplinary Studies 

Constance Laurel-Heym Michnay 
Sylvie Marie Margot Picquendar 
Musa Abdul Rassac, Jr. 
John Michael Sullivan, Jr. 

Multidisciplinary Studies 

Joanne Dion 
Ernest David Lijoi 
Jayne Marie Macedo 

Philosophy 

Christine Gabrielle Nielsen-Nardo 

Physics 

Thomas Joseph Medeiros 
Roger G. Roy 

Political Science 

Robert G. Avery III 
James Howard Brackett 
Thomas Malcolm Cayer 
Jeffrey T. Collins 
Timothy James Dermody 
Michael James Gleason 
Kambiz Hashemi 
Maria C. Igrejas 
Charles P. Mosley 
Paul Daniel O'Neil 
Tina Marie Pimentle 
Peter Amaral Piteira 
Daniel Gordon Short 
Thomas Edward Tanner, Jr. 
Richard Vincent Troy 
Michael James Winters 

Psychology 

Scott Manuel Aguiar 
Gail Aubin-Fischer 
Rachelle Lynette Boucher 



Bloom County 



by Berke Breathed 




OUTLAND by Berke Breathed. © 1990, Washington Post Writers Group. 

Reprinted with permission. 



Melissa Anne Bozek 
Colleen Cabral 
Barbara Ann Cadieux 
Patricia Ann Chace Dawson 
Terence William Flood 
Alice Mary Francke 
Deborah Ann Gagnon 
Susan J. Hayes 
Karen Jardin 
Nancy A. Jennings 
Valerie Patricia Johnson 
Monique Anne Kilby 
Marie Angela Kneizys 
Anne-Marie Ladino 
Heather Lynn LeBrun 
Kristine Marie Mason 
Robb Lawton McCabe 
Jill Ann McGough 
Kevin Ward Medeiros 
John R. Mitchell 
Lori I. Olander 
Scott Timothy Pearsons 
Kathleen Michelle Phillips 
Shirley Jean Pryor 
Merlene Joy Rangulong 
Christopher J. Rizzuto 
Kristine Marie Rocha 
Debra Marie Sabino 
Margaret G. Scott-Taylor 
Judith Ann Sumner Sorell 
Nancy Tavares 
Sharri Tyas Rauner 



Sociology 

Paul J. Afanasiw, Jr. 
Nancy Amaral 
Kathleen Susan Audette 
Philip Michael Bagley 
Loretta A. Bieu 
Jennifer Lee Brown 
Laurie Lee Bruno 
Nancy Anne Carreau 
Irene Gloria Casey 
Ira Stuart Cohen 
George A. J. Collard 
Sheree Lynn Eldredge 
Matthew Joseph Merolla 
Patricia Pina 
Michelle Frances Qui£ 
Robert Anthony Sivil 
Anne Lillian Spirlet 

Sociology - Criminal Justice Option 

Brian Timothy Leonard 
Michael J. Michno 
Deborah Roberts 
Gregg Steven Rutch 
Terri-Ann Soares 
Richard Robert Stagg 
Matthew Avery Tavares 



Due to early publicatiion of this list, some 
inaccuracies may occure. 




In Memory 



Sean Robert Christopher O'Connell 



On April 17, 1990, Sean Robert Christopher 
O'Connell, Class of '91, drowned in a scuba 
diving accident off Green Bridge, Twelve Mile 
Drive, Newport, Rhode Island. Those individu- 
als fortunate to have known Sean - the members 
of the Biology Association (87/88-89/90), Student 
Judiciary Board (88/89), and the Woods Hole 
Oceanographic Research Crew (winter 1990), 
together with his suitemates in Green 218 and 
Cedar Dell 509, the Biology Department, admin- 
istration, faculty, students and friends - have 
since felt a void in their lives, but will preserve a 
graphic memory of Sean's personality. 

Sean continually made his presence felt, project- 
ing an ambiance of jocularity. Above all, he 
enjoyed life exactly as he wanted to, adhering to 
the dictates of spontaneity, procrastination, and a 
carefree attitude. Myriad fragments - fierce Irish 
pride. . .guilty grin. . .uninhibited 
remarks... booming voice... refusing to wear 
socks... clicking ankles as he walked - are revived 
at the sight of a bandana, an SMU baseball cap, a 
cup of tea, a bagel with cream cheese, or a famil- 
iar phrase from the past. They are embodied by 
the nickname "Pudd." 




Pieces, though, are all we have, and these we 
mold into ourselves, and they become, once 
again, breathing tissue, animated memorials. 
Sean passionately immersed himself in the sea 
just as we who knew him passionately immerse 
ourselves in our best memories of him. 



Steve Soucy 
Class of '92 




In Memory 



Meredith Anne Quinn 



In the early morning hours of June 29, 1991, a 
fatal automobile accident too the life of Meredith 
Anne Quinn, a 1991 SMU graduate. 

Miss Quinn was born in Boston and moved to 
Cape Cod in 1974, Where she graduated from 
Dennis- Yarmouth Regional High School in 1987 
and Cape Cod Community College in 1989. Miss 
Quinn earned her BA from SMU in 1991. 





tt.a*. 



In Memory 



Jacqueline C. Bazinet Cobert 




What though the radiance which was once so bright 

Be now forever taken from my sight ... 

We will grieve not, rather find 

Strength in what remains behind ... 

— William Wordsworth 

"Ode: Intimations of Immortality 

In the world of music and in the great extended family of 
SMU, a radiance was indeed taken from our sight this past 
year. When Jacqueline Cobert died on March 7, 1991, after a 
long and valiant battle with cancer, we who had been 
dazzled and inspired by that radiance experienced her death 
as the quenching of a glorious light. 

Jacqueline Cobert was born in Fall River but lived 50 years 
of her life in New Bedford, a city that, from its mayor to its 
newspaper editor to its citizenry, cherishes the memory of all 
she brought to it i grace and beauty. A renowned soprano 
and voice professor at SMU, she made her singing debut in 
New York in 1948. Boris Goldovsky, for whose Opera 
Theatre she was lead soprano during eight national tours, 
characterizes her career as a "continuous round of superberb 
performances in vocal, musical and dramatic terms." Both 
solo and in concert, she sang her way from the New Bedford 
Symphony to the Boston Symphony ,from Tanglewood to 
Carnegie Hall, from the United States to Europe. In speaking 
of Madame Cobert, those fortunate enough to have been her 
students repeatedly used the word "generous." It is a 
particularly appropriate adjective since it applies to her in all 
its nuances. It certainly describes the unstinting way she 
poured out her time and expertise in their behalf, but it also 
describes her great talent, her abundant vitality, her embrac- 
ing sense of humor, her fine-tuned soul and her people- 
loving nature. She recognized the possibilities in the indi- 
viduals she taught and, full of enthusiasm and encourage- 
ment, made them see and believe in them as well. As one 
student observed, "If she told me I could hit high C, I could 

— don't ask me how." Almost to the end of her life, she 
conducted her voice classes and gave individual instruction, 
unintentionally teaching along with the music, advanced 
lessons in gallantry. 

It goes without saying that we — her family, friends, stu- 
dents, the world of music she served with such joy and elan 

— will miss her. Perhaps, though, we will be able to join the 
poet and find strength in what remains behind. When told of 
her death, a former SMU trustee said, "It was always my 
impression that she sang like one of God's songbirds." If, 
through the years, we listen with our hearts, we may con- 
tinue to hear the lovely echo of her celestial song. 




Norman M. Zalkind 




These remarks were given by Vice President, Celestino 
D. Macedo, at the funeral of his close friend, M. Norman 
Zalkind, September 1990: 

We are here this morning to celebrate life. The particu- 
lar — the unique life of Norman Zalkind. A life of 
exuberance, vitality, love and selflessness. We are also 
here to acknowledge the end of that life — We celebrate 
one and merely acknowledge the other. 

Often in the early morning Norman came into my office, 
sat and shared with me his thoughts and feelings about 
people, events and the uncertain future. He loved the 
morning; the pristine beauty of the campus, the vitality 
of the students walking, talking, running to classes, or 
wherever students go at that time of the morning. He 
also looked forward to greeting colleagues. He appreci- 
ated and lived the University life — Since 1994, we were 
friends and colleagues. 

He was a gentle and unselfish man. "No" was a word 
he seldom used — as a result he was sought after for 
service on boards, committees, task forces. He also held 
directorships, memberships and commissions, chair- 
manships and trusteeships. 

On June 7, 1981, Norman Zalkind received the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Humane Letters — the citation 
accompanying the degree sums up the extent of this 
man's accomplishments. 

M. Norman Zalkind as a business man, naval officer, cham- 
pion of the arts and public official, your willing dedication of 
yourself to community affairs has earned you the gratitude of 
your fellow citizens. Your lifelong concern with higher 

education and the promotion thereof has been exemplified by your years of service both as a member and chairman of the Board of Trustees of 
this University. That concern is equally evident at the present time by your presence on the Board of Regents of the colleges and universi- 
ties of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Beyond this you have become an integral part of the richness and texture of academic life by your unexampled involvement and participa- 
tion in the broad stream of campus activities. Your devotion to the arts and to the improvement of the quality of life led to your acceptance 
of membership on the Massachusetts Commission on the Arts and Humanities, and later, to serve as President of the Massachusetts 
Foundation for the Arts. In these activities, as well as in all the manifold endeavors of your incessantly active life, you have done honor to 
your own college, Brown University, whose charter states its aim is, "to send forth into the community a succession of men duly qualified 
for discharging the offices of life with usefulness and reputation." As an able representative of that ideal, a distinguished citizen of this State 
and as a beloved friend to all of us here, Southeastern Massachusetts University is pleased to confer upon you the degree of Doctor of 
Humane Letters, honoris causa. 




EQRBES 

M. & c o m p a n yJL/ 



Morton Gorden 

Executive Vice-President 

Merrill's Wharf 
New Bedford, MA 02740 
Tel: 508-993-9970 
TLX 296688 Forbes 
FAX 508-992-7409 



S 
M 

U 
CAMPUS 
CENTER 

Old Westport Road 
North Dartmouth, MA 

999-8137 



Telephone 1-508-672-8652 
1-508-678-8330 



ROBERT J. MARCHAND 



Law Offices 
of 

Driscoll, Marchand & Boyer 

206 Winter Street, RO. Box 2527 
Fall River, Mass. 02722 



i 



ST. MICHAELS (FALL RIVER) 

FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 

60 GARSIDE ST. 

FALL RIVER, MASS. 02720 

Tel. (508) 674-3861 




MACH 7 

ONE HOUR PHOTO 

MELINDA PAINE 
PRESIDENT 

RIVERVIEW MARKETPLACE 4171 NORTH MAIN ST. 

FALL RIVER MA 02720 
508»679»9400 



992-5448 



Kinyon-Campbcll 
Business School 

59 Linden St., New Bedford 



Clairmont Corp. 

Car Barn / Clarkwood Apt.'s 

997-5484 



JOHN F. STAFFORD INSURANCE AGENCY, INC 



164 Durfee Street 

RO. Box 1391 

Fall River, Mass. 02722 



Tel. 508-673-5893 



BORDEN 

& 

REMINGTON 



106 Ferry Street 
Fall River, MA 02722 



675-0181 






JOHN K. BULLARD 

MAYOR 
City of New Bedford 

508 979 • 1400 
CITY HALL FAX 508 991 • 6148 

NEW BEDFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 02740 



DURO 
INDUSTRIES INC. 

HO Chace St. 

Fall River, MA 02724 

675-0101 



s 



wan 



FINISHING CO., INC. 



372 Stevens St., Fall River, MA 02720 
674-4611 



JIMMY CONNORS 
IRISH PUB 

143 UNION STREET 

NEW BEDFORD 

997-2808 



HARBORVIEW TOWERS 

280 ACUSHNET AVENUE 

NEW BEDFORD 

999-4566 



JOAN FABRICS 

1822 NO. MAIN STREET 

FALL RIVER 

678-2941 



NORBUT 
MANUFACTURING CO., INC. 

RO. BOX 1949 

FALL RIVER 

678-5159 



SHOWTIME 
SOUND SERVICES 

PINEHILL & HORSENECK 

WESTPORT 

636-6040 



PROFESSOR 
BOB HELGELAND 

SMU VIOLET BLDG./RM. 220A 

N. DARTMOUTH 

994-8257 



FALL RIVER GAS CO. 

155 N. MAIN STREET 

FALL RIVER 

675-7811 



WALTER GORDON 

56 N. MAIN STREET 

FALL RIVER 

674-3114 



WHITE'S 
OF WESTPORT 

66 STATE ROAD 

FALL RIVER 

675-7185 



HARTFORD TRANSMISSION 
SALES / SERVICE 

2096 PLEASANT STREET 

FALL RIVER 

674-7771 



In Memory 

of 

Charles V. Sutton 

All My Love!!! 
All rty Life!!! 

'Thank you for all 

you have given to us." 



Love, 



Your Family 



VENTURA'S PHARMACY 

699 Bedford St / Fall River / 674-4659 

JACKS HAIR SALON 

2631 So. Main St. / Fall River / 672-0850 

ESPIRITO SANTO FEDERAL CREDIT UNION 

1645 Pleasant St. / Fall River / 672-8592 

CHASE COLLECTIONS LTD. 

115 Anawan St. / Fall River / 676-3636 

SUPREME REALTY 

17 End St. / Fall River / 678-3770 

COMPLIMENTS OF A FRIEND 

Fall River 

McGOVERN'S FAMILY RESTAURANT 

310 Shove St. / Fall River / 679-5010 

K MART — HARBOUR MALL 

Route 81 & 24 Canning Blvd. / Fall River / 679-2111 

ISLAND DENTAL PROSTHETICS 

540 So. Main St. / Fall River / 672-5151 

GIN AS RESTAURANT 

950 Wilson Rd. / Fall River / 679-4311 

APEX SHADE CO. — FACTORY SHOWROOM 

21 Lindsey St. / Fall River / 675-7458 

SMITH OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

191 Bedford St. / Fall River / 679-2323 

NEW ENGLAND SNACKS INC. 

973 Reed Rd. / N. Dartmouth / 992-2547 

G & K CRAFT INDUSTRIES 

P.O. Box 38 / Somerset / 676-3838 

ENERCON MANUFACTURING 

640 American Legion Hwy. / Westport / 678-8822 

THE COLOR HOUSE 

337 Pleasant St. / Fall River / 679-9222 

BURNS, INC. 

350 Mariano S. Bishop Blvd. / Fall River / 675-0381 

MAP PRINTING 

63B North Court St. / Fall River / 676-5177 

BAY STATE DOVER CORP. 

427 Plymouth Ave. / Fall River / 679-6456 

BEST WISHES 

From a Friend 



Best Wishes to tfte Graduating Class of 1991 

Special Thanks to Paul Lopes 
and all the yearbook Staff! 



COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 



155 Maple Street • Springfield, MA 01105 
655 Jefferson Bouelvard • Warwick, Rl 02886 



"Our major is your school publication 



// 



"Where the tradition continues ... 
...of making you look good since 1925' 






Creative 
Graphics Inc. 



655 Jefferson Boulevard / Warwick, Rl 02886 



401 738-1004 



NISSEN BAKING COMPANY 

2406 Cranberry Highway 
Wareham, MA 02571 

295-2337 



COLONIAL 




WHOLESALE 



BEVERAGE 



P.O. BOX 1430 
FALL RIVER, MA 02722 



MEDEIROS BUS LINES 
Division of 

0£J£J£MJ£JM 

LAIDLAW TRANSIT 

72 Sycamore Street 
Fairhaven, Massachusetts 02719 



Dias & Lapalme 



Certified Public Accountants 

Professional Services: 

— Financial Statements & Audits 

— Estate Tax Planning 

— Corporate & Individual Tax Planning 

— Computerized Bookkeeping Services 

Albino Dias, C.P.A. 
David Lapalme, C.P.A. 

9984116 

13 Welby Road, New Bedford, MA 



( PEARLE 

X^vision center 

FRANCHISE OPERATED 

JIM NEHER 

R.D.O. # 1927 



341 State Rd. 

North Dartmouth, MA 02747 

Tel. (508) 997-6591 




Bankers are taking HFC's 

Personal Credit Line, 
a little too 
personally. 

FindOut Why. (fifis 

Household Finance Corporation. V *%M 



"BetterThanABank 

Name of lending institution may vary in some states. 




(508) 993-3222 

FAX NO. (508) 999-1856 



ALL TYPES OF METALS 
ALL TYPES OF WELDING 



dVoxxli cJj. ^Jxififi Co., Una. 

HEATING, VENTILATING & AIR CONDITIONING 

SHEET METAL WORK AND 

STEEL WORK 



RON TESER 



253 CEDAR STREET 
NEW BEDFORD, MA 02740 



Little Chopsticks 
of Providence Opens 

LITTLE CHOPTICKS III 

IN FALL RIVER 

NOW 4171 No - Main st - 

(Next Door To Super Shaws) 
Exit 8 off Rte. 24 North 

rei 679-9610 or 679-0930 



We Service Authentic Hunan and 

Szechuan Cuisines You Always Want to 

Explore and Enjoy! Now Featuring Chow Mein 

The Way You Like It ... 





KSUUMCI 

MU1 



OSENFELD 



1345 Purchase Street 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 02740 

Telephone: 508-994-9727 



Rick Rosenfeld 
President 



GES3 



TOM RICCI'S ACTION NISSAN 

483 STATE ROAD • NORTH DARTMOUTH, MA 02747 



■508-996-3200 



Comfort 
Inn 



Robert A. Shute 

General Manager 

171 Faunce Corner Road 
North Dartmouth, MA 02747 
Phone (508) 996-0800 
Fax # (508) 996-0800 



Law Offices 
Fernandes, Fraze & Finnerly 

Armand Fernandes, Jr. 
Attorney at Law 



345 N. MAIN STREET 
P.O. BOX 829 
FALL RIVER, MA 02720 
TEL: 508-675-1104 



442 COUNTY STREET 

NEW BEDFORD, MA 02740 

TEL: 508-997-3375 



ANDERSON-LITTLE 

Were the perfect fit. 



North Dartmouth Mall, North Dartmouth, MA 
PHONE 992-5530 FAX 675-5150 



** recycled paper 

A.W. MARTIN, INC. 

Dealer in All Recyclables 

1080 & 1200 SHAMUT AVENUE 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 



Kenneth A. Martin 

Vice President 
Kenneth A. Martin, Jr. 

Sales 



Tel. (508) 993-4359 
Fax (508) 997-2987 



FURNITURE CITY 

127 W. RODNEY FRENCH BLVD. 

NEW BEDFORD, MA 

999-4414 

40 COUNTY STREET 

FALL RIVER, MA 

879-1334 



ALLIEDf, 



We employ technicians certified by the 
National Institute for 



BARRY D. LANG, M.D. 



DAVID E. ADELBERG, M.D. 



Brake 
& Wheel 

Centers ^i 



AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE EXCELLENCE 

COMPLETE BRAKE SERVICE 




OTRTHOPEDIC ASSOCIATES 

BONE & JOINT SURGERY 

ARTHRITIS 

SPORTS MEDICINE 

PHYSICAL THERAPY 



TELEPHONE 996-3954 



536 HAWTHORN ST. 
NO. DARTMOUTH, MA 02747 



(508) 679-5966 



SCHENKER AND SCHENKER 



MINUTEMANI 
PRESS 7 



wetJfied . 



©2rccoim6&n/&' 



SIDNEY SCHENKER, C.P.A. TO PLEASANT STREET 

JEFFREY M. SCHENKER, C.P.A. FALL RIVER, MA 02721 



Carol Verrochi 

(508) 999-4501 
466 North Street New Bedford, MA 



HAWTHORN PHYSICAL THERAPY 
AND SPORTS MEDICINE 



536 HAWTHORN ST. 

NO. DARTMOUTH, MA 02747 



TEL: (508) 990-1114 
FAX: (508) 991-4216 



(508) 675-1708 



MANNING 




Fish & Supplies 
AKC Puppies 




Birds 
Small Animals 



AUTO PARTS 



Manning Auto Parts, Inc. 



Thomas B. Manning 
President 



483 Rodman Street 
Fall River, Mass. 02721 



Jeffrey S. Entin 

Attorney At Law 

Sahady, Entin & Entin, P.C 
399 North Main Street 
Tel. (508) 674-3501 Fall River, Massachusetts 02720 



DON'S PET CARE CENTER 

"Complete Pet Supplies" 



343-345 State Rd. 
No. Dartmouth, MA 
(508) 999-4441 



453 E. Washington St. 

No. Attleboro, MA 

(508) 695-4684 



3E 



GILBERT J. COSTA 

INSURANCE AGENCY 

Patricia A. Costa 

811 Ashley Boulevard 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 

02745-2401 

508-995-6492 



FAX 508-999-1656 



Tel. 508-999-2868 



JT Sea Products, Inc. 

Fresh & Frozen Sea Scallops 
Fresh Fillet 



GRUNDY'S LUMBER 

(616) 636-8853 



P.O. Box 147 

North Dartmouth, MA 02747 



JIM THOMPSON 

PRESIDENT 



• OFFSET / SHEET & WEB 

• LETTERPRESS 

• FULL COLOR PROCESS 

• WHILE YOU WAIT COPY SERVICE 

• COLOR COPIES 

MODERN PRINTING Co.. inc. 



TEL. 508--673-9421 
FAX 508-673-2515 



798 PLYMOUTH AVE. 
FALL RIVER, MA 02721 



ALMEIDA ELECTRIC, INC. 

288 Plymouth Ave. 

Fall River, MA 02722 

679-5991 



St. Luke's Hospitaf 
Nursing Recruitment 



101 Page Street 

New Bedford, MA 02740 



997-1515 X2552 



Best Wishes From: 
SEAFARERS INTERNATIONAL UNION OF NORTH AMERICA, AFL-CIO 

Michael Assco, President HSk Joseph Sacco, Vice President 

Henry Franchois, New Bedford Port Agent 



SULLIVAN AUCTIONEERS 

780 STATE ROAD 

NORTH DARTMOUTH 

999-3790 



DARTMOUTH MOTORS 

26 STATE ROAD 

NORTH DARTMOUTH 

996-6800 



MEE HONG RESTAURANT 

120 COVE STREET 

NEW BEDFORD 

997-4210 



COMMUNITY NURSING 
ASSOCIATION 

40 CENTER STREET 

FAIRHAVEN 

992-6278 



FALL RIVER PAPER 
& SUPPLY COMPANY 

200 RIGGENBACK ROAD 

FALL RIVER 

679-6425 



FRAMEMAKER 

331 STATE ROAD 

NORTH DARTMOUTH 

993-1443 



HAWTHORN FLORIST 
& GREENHOUSE 

508 HAWTHORN STREET 

NORTH DARTMOUTH 

999-5122 



ERNIE ROSS JEWELERS 

92 STATE ROAD 

NORTH DARTMOUTH 

992-3933 



HAWTHORN MEDICAL 
ASSOCIATES INC. 

570 HAWTHORN STREET 
NORTH DARTMOUTH 



PAPA GINO'S 

329 STATE ROAD 

NORTH DARTMOUTH 

997-5800 



DARTMOUTH GIFT 
& ENGRAVING 

22 CENTER STREET 

SOUTH DARTMOUTH 

997-1936 



FRADE'S DISPOSAL INC 

477 BELLEVILLE AVENUE 

NEW BEDFORD 

995-9121 



THE FERREIRA GROUP, LTD 

99 CLARA STREET 

NEW BEDFORD 

996-2500 



WESTPORT 
TRAVEL AGENCY 

764 MAIN ROAD 

WESTPORT 

636-4048 



NEW BEDFORD 
OFFICE MACHINES 

358 COURT STREET 

NEW BEDFORD 

992-9098 



FALL RIVER GAS COMPANY 

155 NORTH MAIN STREET 

FALL RIVER 

675-7811 



VIERIA INSURANCE AGENCY 

410 Alden Road / Fairhaven / 997-8515 

CHACE GRAIN & GARDEN 

104 State Road / North Westport / 673-3695 

ORIENTAL PEARL 

576 State Road / Westport / 675-1501 

ASHLEY FORD SALES, INC. 

395 Mt. Pleasant Street/ New Bedford / 996-5611 

COUNTRY WOOLENS 

842 Main Road / Westport / 636-5661 

SMITH HILLS NURSERY 

II Anderson Way / North Dartmouth / 992-2472 

CODY & TOBIN 

516 Belleville Avenue / New Bedford / 999-6711 

AURELE MACHINE COMPANY 

2415 Purchase Street / New Bedford / 996-8221 

FRED'S CUSTOM AUTO ACCESSORIES 

1709-A Acushnet Avenue / New Bedford / 991-3432 

HORACIO'S WELDING & SHEET METAL, INC. 

136 River Road / New Bedford / 995-9112 

STAR PLATE & WINDOW GLASS SERVICE 

1625 Acushnet Avenue / New Bedford / 995-0166 

CARMINO ARENA & SONS 

41 Weaver Street / New Bedford / 996-0150 

HATHAWAY-BRALEY WHARF CO., INC. 

12-14 Main Street / Fairhaven / 999-2903 

SHIP SIDE RESTAURANT 

36 Water Street / Fall River / 676-3100 

CHUMACK AUTO REPAIRS 

175 Ash Street / New Bedford / 993-6705 

McBRIDES RENTALS 

143 Parker Street / New Bedford / 993-3811 

LOU KALIFE'S BULDING PRODUCTS 

4 Fish Island / New Bedford / 994-4444 

DIPPER CAFE 

1367 Purchase Street / New Bedford / 992-8641 

POTVIN AUTO BODY SHOP 

958 County Street / Fall River / 674-9092 

EDWARD J. PETTINE, CPA 

10 North Main Street / Fall River / 675-2552 

SILVA PHARMACY, INC. 

133 County Street / New Bedford / 992-4741 

PERRY FUNERAL HOME 

III Dartmouth Street / New Bedford / 993-2921 

PARAGON TOURS 

680 Purhcase Street / New Bedford / 997-6511 



ATTY. J. LOUIS LEBLANC 

342 Union Street / New Bedford / 993-2100 

WAYNE'S ELECTRIC 

76 Main Street / Fairhaven / 997-1365 

FAIRHAVEN HONEYWAGON 

i 30 Bay Street / Fairhaven / 999-4781 

BRUNO'S BUSINESS SUPPLY CO. 

; 1913 Purchase Street / New Bedford / 999-6058 

A.J. TURNER INC. 

1052 State Road /Westport / 675-7008 

ROSA'S BRIDAL 

94 Allen Street / New Bedford / 997-7475 

GUIDO'S PLATE GLASS SERVICE, INC. 

686 Cottage Street / New Bedford / 997-7388 

D. FERUS COMPANY 

I 3 Watuppa Boulevard / Westport / 676-9839 

CARLOS SEAFOOD, INC. 

46 Middle Street / Fairhaven / 997-8971 


MARTIN AUTO SCHOOL, INC. 

487 Belleville Avenue / New Bedford / 999-3832 

TANABODY TANNING SALON 
848 State Road / Westport / 678-8212 

GOLDSTEIN LAWN & GARDEN 

287 Gifford Road / Westport / 678-0381 

LO-JO INDUSTRIAL CONTAINERS 

120 Alden Road / Fairhaven / 993-2611 

SKEWERS 

142 Huttleston Avenue / Fairhaven / 996-3303 

GLASSER GLASS COMPANY 

1265 Purchase Street / New Bedford / 999-6497 

REGGINS ASSOCIATES 

4 Welbry Road / New Bedford / 995-1810 

BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE COMPANY 

762 Purchase Street / New Bedford / 997-7806 

ADVANCE & HEAT CO., INC. 

177 Bullock Road / East Freetown / 992-2870 


CAPTAIN FRANK'S 
SEAFOOD 

360 HATHAWAY ROAD 

NEW BEDFORD 

999-3335 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

STUDEBAKER SALES 

EVC & ASSOCIATES 

'CSCTNP' 


Best wishes 

from all of us at 

BayBank. 

Ba/Bank 


TRAVELER'S EXPRESS 
CORPORATION 

2170 ACUSHNET AVE. 

NEW BEDFORD 

995-9871 


JOSE CASTELO 
REAL ESTATE 

1813 ACUSHNET AVENUE 

NEW BEDFORD 

997-3399 


A. WALECKA & SON, INC. 

2375 CRANBERRY HWY 

WEST WAREHAM 

295-5952 


NUTEX INDUSTRIES INC. 

127 W.RODNEY FRENCH BLVD 

NEW BEDFORD 

993-2501 


DARTMOUTH MEDICAL 
WALK-IN 

39-A FAUNCE CORNER RD. 

NORTH DARTMOUTH 

996-3311 


MEINEKE DISCOUNT 
MUFFLERS 

1451 S. MAIN STREET 

FALL RIVER 

676-3023 


GENERAL SUPPLY 
& METALS, INC. 

47 NAUSET STREET 

NEW BEDFORD 

993-9212 


CAPE CODE 
HOMEWORKS INC. 

848 MT. PLEASANT ST. 

NEW BEDFORD 

998-8888 


Member FDIC 



POOL & CHRISTMAS VILLAGE 

650 GAR Highway / Swansea / 676-3850 

MARLEES SEAFOOD 

110 Herman Melville Blvd. / New Bedford / 991-6026 

HARTLEY TOURS 

927 South Main St. / Fall River / 677-0122 

FULLER'S 

184 Arnold Street / New Bedford / 999-6475 

AUGUSTA WHITE IMAGES 

605 Darthmouth St. / South Dartmouth / 999-4121 

WESTPORT APOTHECAR, INC. 

784 Main Road / Westport / 636-5957 

DR. JOHN J. McGONIGLE 

345 Union Street / New Bedford / 993-0900 

PURITY SERVICE 

405 Myrtle Street / New Bedford / 993-0473 

MANUEL CAMARA JR. INSURANCE AGENCY INC. 

333 Union Street / New Bedford / 992-4773 

BRISTOL COUNTY BLUE PRINT CO. 

98 Spring Street / New Bedford / 993-4770 

LIMA'S GARAGE & AUTO BODY INC. 

374 Myrtle Street / New Bedford / 999-1480 

BAYLIES SQUARE PLATE GLASS 

1800 Acushnet Avenue / New Bedford / 995-6332 

TRUE VALUE HARDWARE 

1756 South Main Street / Fall River / 674-3514 

BRAZ MARKET 

291 American Legion Hwy/ Westport/ 636-5252 

H. LOEB CORPORATION 

274 Belleville Avenue / New Bedford / 996-3745 

NWD INCORPORATED 

150 Herman Melville Blvd. / New Bedford / 997-1254 

PECKHAM AUTO BODY 

367 Dartmouth Street/ New Bedford / 993-0093 

TONY JEROME JR. 

980 Faunce Corrner Rd. / N. Dartmouth / 995-9745 

CENTRAL PHARMACY 

1833 Acushnet Avenue / New Bedford / 995-5755 

IMPRESSIONS HAIR DESIGNERS 

331 State Road / North Dartmouth / 990-1992 

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS COMPANY 

643 State Road / North Dartmouth / 993-2698 

CONVERSE PHOTO SUPPLY COMPANY 

12 North 6th Street / New Bedford / 992-3910 



CHARLES S. ASHLEY & SONS 

11 North 6th Street / New Bedford / 997-9411 

STAR VIDEO 

839 State Road / North Dartmouth / 997-7233 

GASPAR'S SAUSAGE CO., INC. 

384 Faunce Corner Rd. / N. Dartmouth / 998-2012 

AARON POOL'S & SPAS 

597 State Road / North Dartmouth / 996-3320 

GROVELAND MOTEL 

571 State Road / North Dartmouth / 997-0008 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ROOM 

755 Purchase Street / New Bedford / 992-5902 

NORMAND'S MEAT SPECIALTIES, INC. 

331 Ashley Boulevard / New Bedford / 993-3983 

DURACLEAN CRAFTSMEN 

31 Ryan Street / New Bedford / 999-2900 

ATTORNEY DONNA W. SOWA 

26 Seventh Street / New Bedford / 999-6414 

BAKER TRACTOR CORPORATION 

2283 GAR Hwy / Swansea / 379-3673 

BOURASSA HARDWARE COMPANY 

1837 Acushnet Avenue / New Bedford / 995-6366 

BECK'S FISH MARKET 

657 Dartmouth Street /South Dartmouth / 996-6724 

DAVID GONSALVES ELECTRIC INC. 

15 Robert Street / North Dartmouth / 997-2185 

DARTMOUTH FLORISTS 

96 State Road / North Dartmouth / 992-0884 

DARTMOUTH DRUG 

319 State Road / North Dartmouth / 994-5858 

MOBILE STATION 

285 State Road / North Dartmouth / 996-9338 

MY LADY'S HAIRSTYLIST 

1622 GAR Hwy / Somerset / 678-0236 

STYLE MAKERS FAMILY STYLING SALON 

238 Russells Mills Rd./ South Dartmouth / 992-4725 

THE SYMPHONY MUSIC SHOP 

94 State Road / North Dartmouth / 996-3301 

WAITER KALISZ, JR. - ATTORNEY AT LAW 

595 State Road / North Dartmouth / 999-6405 

A & A REDEMPTION CENTER 

741 Ashley Road / New Bedford / 995-3361 

ROLAND'S TIRE SERVICE, INC. 

11 Howland Road / Fairhaven / 997-4501 



Index of the 80's and 90's 

A listing of the major events and awards of 
the late 80's and early 90's 



Grammy Awards 

1986 

Best Single: Steve Winwood, Higher love 

Best Album: Paul Simon, Graceland 

1987 

Best Single: Paul Simon, Graceland 

Best Album: U2, The Joshua Tree 

1988 

Best Single: Bobby McFerrin, 

Don't Worry, Be Happy 
Best Album: George Michael, Faith 

1989 

Best Single: Bette Midler, 

Wind Beneath my Wings 
Best Album: Bonnie Raitt, Nick of Time 

1990-not available at press time 



Billboards Top Picks (June 1991) 

Top 50 Albums 

1 R.E.M., Out of Time 

2 Mariah Carey, Mariah Carey 

3 C&C Music Factory, 

Gonna Make You Sweat 

4 Wilson Phillips, Wilson Phillips 

5 The Black Crows, 
Shake Your Money Maker 

6 New Jack City, soundtrack 

7 Enigma, MCMXC A.D. 

8 Michael Bolton, 

Time, hove and Tenderness 

9 Another Bad Creation, 

Coolin' at the Playground Ya' Know 

10 Rod Stewart, Vagabond Heart 

1 1 Amy Grant, Heart in Motion 

12 Queensryche, Empire 

13 Chris Isaak, Heart Shaped World 

14 Roxette, Joy ride 

15 Whitney Houston, 
I'm Your Baby Tonight 

16 Garth Brooks, No Fences 

17 Divinyls, Divinyls 

18 L.L. Cool J, Mama Said Knock You Out 

19 Gloria Estefan, Into the Light 

20 Tesla, Five Man Acoustical Jam 

21 Londonbeat, In The Blood 

22 Sting, The Soul Cages 

23 Rolling Stones, Flashpoint 

24 Deadicated, Various Artists 

25 The Doors, soundtrack 

26 Extreme, Extreme II Pornograffiti 

27 Vanilla Ice, To the Extreme 

28 M.C. Hammer, Please Hammer Don't 
Hurt 'Em 

29 Jesus Jones, Doubt 

30 Nelson, After the Rain 



31 


Rich Astley, Free 


32 


AC/ AD, The Razors Edge 


33 


Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II, 




soundtrack 


34 


Madonna, The Immaculate Collection 


35 


Yes, Union 


36 


The Kentucky Headhunters, 




Electric Barnyard 


37 


Pat Benatar, True Love 


38 


Hi-Five, Hi-Five 


39 


Great White, Hooked 


40 


Garth Brooks, Garth Brooks 


41 


Luther Vandross, Power of Love 


42 


Warrant, Cherry Pie 


43 


Bette Midler, Some People's Lives 


44 


Gerardo, Mo' Ritmo 


45 


Oleta Adams, Circle of One 


46 


DJ Quik, Quik is the Name 


47 


Lenny Kravitz, Mama Said, 


48 


. Guy, The Future 


49 


Fishbone, 




The Reality of My Surroundings 


50 


Clint Black, Put Yourself in My Shoes 



Top Ten U.S. Singles 

1 Roxette, Joyride 

2 Rod Stewart, Rhythm of My Heart 

3 Mariah Carey, I Don't Wanna Cry 

4 Amy Grant, Baby Burn 

5 Cathy Dennis, 

Touch Me (All Night Long) 

6 Extreme, More Than Words 

7 C&C Music Factory, Here We Go 

8 Michael Bolton, 

Love is a Wonderful Thing 

9 Divinyls, I Touch Myself 

10 Hi-Five, 

J Like the Way (The Kissing Game) 



Miss America Winners 

1986 Susan Akin, Meridian, Mississippi 

1987 Kelly e Cash, Memphis Tennessee 

1988 Kaye Lani Rae Rafko, 

Monroe, Michigan 

1989 Gretchen Carlson, Anoka, Minnesota 

1990 Debbye Turner, Columbia, Missouri 



The Pulitzer Prize 

Fiction 

1986 Larry McMurtry, Lonesome Dove 

1987 Peter Taylor, A Summons to Memphis 

1988 Toni Morrison, Beloved 

1989 Anne Tyler, Breathing Lessons 

1990 Oscar Hijueios, The Mambo Kings Play 
Songs Of Love 

Drama 

1986 Stephen Sondheim, James Lapine, 

Sunday in the Park with George 

1987 August Wilson, Fences 

1988 Alfred Uhry, Driving Miss Daisy 

1989 Wendy Wasserstein, The Heidi Chronicles 

1990 August Wilson, The Piano Lesson 



The Nobel Peace Prize x 

1986 Elie Wiesel, Romania-USA 

1987 Oscar Arias Sanchez, Costa Rican 

1988 United Nations Peace Keeping Forces 

1989 Dalai Lama, Tibet 

1990 Mikhail Gorbachev, USSR 



Academy Awards 

1986 

Best Actor: Paul Newman, The Color of Money 

Best Actress: Marlee Matlin, 

Children of a Lessor God 
Best Supporting Actor: Michael Caine, 

Hannah and her Sisters 
Best Supporting Actress: Diane Wiest, 

Hannah and her Sisters 
Best Director: Oliver Stone, Platoon 
Best Motion Picture: Platoon 

1987 

Best Actor: Michael Douglas, Wall Street 

Best Actress: Cher, Moonstruck 

Best Supporting Actor: Sean Connery, 

The Untouchables 
Best Supporting Actress: Olympia Dukakis, 

Moonstruck 
Best Director: Bernardo Betolucci, 

The Last Emperor 
Best Motion Picture: The Last Emperor 

1988 

Best Actor: Dustin Hoffman, Rain Man 
Best Actress: Jodie Foster, The Accused 
Best Supporting Actor: Kevin Kline, 

A Fish Called Wanda 
Best Supporting Actress: Geena Davis, 

The Accidental Tourist 
Best Director: Barry Levinson, Rain Man 
Best Motion Picture: Rain Man 

1989 

Best Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis, My Left Foot 

Best Actress: Jessica Tandy, 

Driving Miss Daisy 
Best Supporting Actor: Denzel Washington, 

Glory 
Best Supporting Actress: Brenda Flicker, 

My Left Foot 
Best Director: Oliver Stone, 

Born on the Fourth of July 
Best Motion Picture: Driving Miss Daisy 

1990 

Best Actor: Jeremy Irons, Reversal of Fortune 

Best Actress: Kathy Bates, Misery 

Best Supporting Actor: Joe Pesci, Goodfellas 

Best Supporting Actress: Whoopi Goldberg, 

Ghost 
Best Director: Kevin Costner, 

Dances With Wolves 
Best Motion Picture: Dances With Wolves 




90's Cinema 

There was the annual flood of movies for the 
summer of 1991, here's a look at the movies 
that were around in the early 90's. 

Ambition, staring Lou Diamond Phillips 

Backdraft, directed by Ron Howard, and 

staring Kurt Russell, William Baldwin, Scott 

Glenn, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Rebecca 

DeMornay, Donald Sutherland and Robert 

DeNiro 

The Butchers Wife, staring Demi Moore and 

Jeff Daniels 

City Slickers, staring Billy Crystal, Daniel 

Stern and Bruno Kirby 

Dice Rules, staring Andrew "Dice" Clay 

Drop Dead Fred 

Dying Young, staring Julia Roberts and 

Campbell Scott 

FX2, The Deadly Art of Illusion, staring Brian 

Delainy 

Home Alone, a John Hughes film 

Hudson Hawk, staring Bruce Willis 

Jungle Fever, produced and staring Spike Lee 

Madonna: Truth or Dare, staring Madonna 

Mortal Thoughts, staring Demi Moore and 

Glenne Headly 

The Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Fear of Smell, 

staring Leslie Nielsen and Priscilla Presley 

One Good Cop, staring Michael Keaton 

Only the Lonely, a John Hughes and Chris 

Columbus film, staring John Candy, Maureen 

O'Hara, Ally Sheedy, Anthony Quinn and 

James Belushi 

Point Break, staring Patrick Swayze and 

Keanu Reeves 

Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves, staring Kevin 

Costner, Christian Slater and Mary Elizabeth 

Mastrantonio 

Silence of the Lambs, staring Jodi Foster and 

Anthony Perkins 

Soapdish, staring Sally Field, Kevin Kline, 

Robert Downey Jr. and Whoopi Goldberg 

Sleeping with the Enemy, staring Julia Roberts 

and Patrick Bergin 

Stone Cold 

Switch, staring Ellen Barkin 

The Terminator II, staring Arnold 

Schwarzenegger 

Thelma & Louise, staring Susan Sarandon 

and Geena Davis 

What about Bob?, staring Bill Murray and 

Richard Dreyfuss 

Wild Hearts Can't Be Broken, a Disney Film 



Television 

The late 80' s saw the birth of a new television 
network, known as FOX (WFXT), which 
immediately challenged the big three, ABC, 
CBS and NBC. Here's a list of some of the 
television programs running in the spring of 
1991. 

Amen 

American Story 
America's Funniest People 
America's Funniest Videos 



America's Most Wanted 

The Antagonists 

Anything But Love 

Beverly Hills 90210 

Blossom 

Cheers 

Coach 

Cops 

Cosby Show 

Designing Women 

Different World 

Doogie Howser, M.D. 

Eddie Dodd 

Empty Nest 

Evening Shade 

Expose 

Family Matters 

Father Dowling Mysteries 

48 Hours 

Fresh Prince of Bel-Air 

Full House 

Get A Life 

Going Places 

Golden Girls 

Good Sports 

Growing Pains 

Guns of Paradise 

Head of the Class 

Hunter 

In Living Color 

Jake and the Fatman 

L.A. Law 

Life Goes On 

MacGyver 

Major Dad 

Married, with Children 

Matlock 

Midnight Caller 

Murphy Brown 

My Life and Times 

Mystery 

Night Court 

Nova 

Parker Lewis Can't Loose 

Perfect Strangers 

Primetime Live 

Quanum Leap 

Rescue 911 

Roseanne 

Seinfeld 

The Simpsons 

Sisters 

60 Minutes 

Star Trek: The Next Generation 

Thirthsomething 

Top Cops 

Top of the Heap 

Totally Hiddend Video 

20120 

Twun Peaks 

Unsolved Mysteries 

Who's the Boss? 

Wonder Years 

Young Riders 

And let us not forget, 

Late Night, with David Letterman 



The Yearbook Staff 

Editor-in-Chief 
Paul R. Lopes 

Copy Editor 
Karen Burrows 

Photo Editor 
Francesca Cerruti 

Business Manager (fall) 
Sue Narciso 

Business Manager (spring) 
Kieran Chapman 

Photographers 
Cheryl Adams 
Jamie Quinn 

Card Shark 
Christine Murphy 



Writer 
Josh "Tree' 



Neimand 



Staff 

Dina Bettencourt 
Kevin Gawthrope 
Edie Hardy 
Kellie Kirker 
Cynthia Lermond 
Janelle Marqulin 
Christine Peloquin 
Erin O'Brien 
Cheryl Seymour 
Laura Squilante 

Advisor 

Donald C. Howard, 

Dean of Students 

Printing Representative 
Norval E. Garnet, Jr. 

Production Representative 

Karen Stariha, 

Jostens Printing and Publishing 

Photo Representative 
Joseph P. Geoff roy, 
Chestnut Hill Studios 

Advertising Representative 
Wayne Sutton, 
College Publications 

Special Thanks to Thelma Baxter and 
Susan Costa for putting up with 
all the problems. 




From the Editor 





'- 



j 



Well, that's it, the last page. 



I never did like long winded editorials, so ... I hope you enjoyed the 
book, and I hope it brings you many years of enjoyment. Good luck to 
the graduates of 1991, and to the Yearbook Staff of 1992. 

Have a nice life. 



(jkU 61 



Paul R. Lopes 

Editor-in-Chief, 1991 








































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