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Full text of "Scrimshaw : [yearbook]"

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Scrimshaw 1993 



UMass Dartmouth 




University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 
North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 



Table of Contents 



Introduction 



Dedication 



Faculty and Administration 



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Seniors 



Seniors Not Photographed 



World Events 



Campus Events 



Honors 



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126 



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Athletics 



132 



Clubs and Organizations 



154 



Commencement 



184 



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Advertisements 



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The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 



It's easy to wax nostalgic for the four years 
just passed, but you shouldn't. Instead 
you should congratulate yourself for a job 
well done, and look forward. The romantic 
aura that is forming around your under- 
graduate career might just as soon dissi- 
pate when you remember all the sleepless 
nights, crashed disks and financial aid 
delays that accompanied it. Or if you look 
to the uncertain job market ahead. But you 
did it. You're through. 

You're now part of an elite group. Recent 
statistics suggest at least half of the under- 
graduates in state four-year institutions 
don't make it to graduation. According to 
The Almanac of Higher Education , nation- 
wide, only 20% of all adults have their 
Bachelor's Degree; in Massachusetts, only 
16% do. They also list 110,031 public four- 
year institution undergrads statewide; the 
Registrar's Office lists 5600 at UMass 
Dartmouth; approximately 1300 are in the 
graduating Class of 1993. So you're spe- 
cial. 



If you think the last four years have been a growth 
spurt, just look at what your university has gone 
through since its inception: nearly a century ago the 
Bradford Durfee Textile School was established in 
New Bedford; this became the New Bedford Textile 
Institute in 1944, then the New Bedford Institute of 
Textiles and Technology in 1954 and then simply 
the New Bedford Institute of Technology in 1957. 

The consolidation of the Bradford Durfee College of 
Technology and the New Bedford Institute of 
Technology in 1964 spawned the Southeastern 
Massachusetts Technological Institute. This set the 
stage for architect Paul Rudolph's innovative, 
monolithic campus design and the inception of 
Southeastern Massachusetts University in 1969. In 
1988, SMU continued its forward momentum, 
taking the Swain School of Design on Purchase 
Street in New Bedford under its wing, despite 
increasingly hard economic times. 

The final name change came on August 31, 1991 
when the school we called home for the last four 
4 




years became the University of Massachusetts 
Dartmouth, part of a single, five-branch University 
of Massachusetts system. With the state's support 
for higher education plummeting by 10% in the 
three academic years between 1990 and 1993 (the 
third biggest cut nationwide) it's easy to see that a 
streamlining of the academic bureaucracy was 
necessary at the state level. But would the name 
change help us? Or would we lose some autonomy 
at the state level in exchange for greater visibility 
and a corresponding boost in prestige? Only time 
will tell. 

As you graduate, may you cherish the memories of 
your time here, draw strength from what you have 
learned and from the people you've met, and al- 
ways remember what you accomplished. 

It's your education now. You own it. You paid for 
it. No one can ever take it away. When you visit 
your alma mater again, remember that you support 
every stone-mottled step, every ribbed cement 
pillar through the efforts you make. You are the 
Class of 1993. Welcome to the world. 



Dr. John E. Bush 



A pensive middle-aged black man stoops in the snow, search- 
ing and collecting. His mute morning task on the campus of 
UMass Dartmouth is a rescue mission. One by one, he reaches 
for the half-sunken, scattered silver poles of dozens of flags 
and gently yanks them and their twisted ensigns from the 
freshly-fallen powder. He feels a sense of loss: these interna- 
tional colors, which he was instrumental in displaying, have 
fallen prey to a fierce overnight storm and, once on the 
ground, to theft. Of fifty, forty-six remain. 

A student happens by. His name is Kevin Tobin. He is a 
student trustee at UMass. He helps the older man with his 
solemn task. When they are through, the distinguished- 
looking man of color says "Good day" to his helper, then 
pauses and adds warmly: "I think you're doing a great job." 

This is just one of many "compelling memories" Mr. Tobin 
has of the man he says "is a privilege to know:" Sociology and 
Anthropology Professor and Special Assistant to the Chancel- 
lor John Bush. Dr. Bush's primary job for the last two years 
has been as campus standard bearer for Affirmative Action 
and cultural diversity, a task Tobin says the doctor handles 
with rare insight and compassion: "We're all fighting internal 
prejudices. I'm not as in touch as I could be, being a white 
male (and) being in touch with my (own) reality. But Dr. Bush 
knows we all have our blind spots." Tobin tells how working 
with Dr. Bush broadened his view: "He's all about building 





community and making people feel at home in the univer- 
sity." 

Indeed, the seeds 
that John Bush sows 
as Special Assistant 
to the Chancellor 
have born and 
continue to bear 
abundant fruit: not 
only is he responsible 
for the aforemen- 
tioned international 
flags that, according 
to him, were un- 
furled "to recognize 
our foreign national 
students," but he's 
also the man behind 
the highly successful 
"international culture 
night" (of food, 
music and dancing) 
every October, as 
well as the ongoing student /faculty "men of color" discussion 
groups. Dr. Bush is long-time member of the Cultural Affairs 
Committee (which hosts "international culture night") and a 
booster for the culturally diverse United Brothers and Sisters, 
and Gay and Lesbian Alliance. Fellow Sociology professor 
Donna Huse speaks of the strengths of Bush's convictions: 
"He's an individual in the best sense of the word" and "he's 
dedicated to keeping otherwise unconnected people to- 
gether." 

This community-minded professor also helped form a chapter 
of the Alpha Phi Alphas (his old fraternity) here, and is 
credited by students and faculty alike as being instrumental in 
minority retention. Dr. Bush is a tireless advocate for social 
justice, too, never wavering from his Affirmative Action 
mandate: "We need to have more Black professors because we 
need role models for the increasing number of black stu- 
dents." 

John Bush's accomplishments as a Sociology professor, a job 
he has held full-time for eighteen of the last twenty years at 
UMD, are no less impressive. Susan Costa, Director of Student 
Activities, says that Dr. Bush "is outstanding.. .in and out of 
the classroom." She maintains that his unique role as both an 
administrator and instructor make Bush "an agent of change; 
he's never satisfied with the status quo" and in this respect 
he's "a role model for all of us." 

Bush helped to formulate, along with a committee of Black 
faculty members, a cross-disciplinary African /African- 
American minor program at UMass Dartmouth. Further, Dr. 
Bush is the architect of such popular courses in African- 
American studies as "Black Identity in the Social World" and 
"Survival of the Black Family in the Twenty-first Century." 
With such courses, Bush says that he's "trying to get people of 





olor and whites who come to have an appreciation for the 
African past and the contributions that Black people have 
nade to our society." This two-time Fulbright Scholar and 
'h.D. in Sociology adds with soft-spoken conviction: "We 
telped build America. ..and I want the Black students and the 
Zape Verdean students to feel proud about that. Our families 
nade it; we survived." 

)ean of Students Donald Howard calls John Bush "a con- 
cience for the institution" with his "commitment to social 
ustice." Ms. Costa agrees, adding that Dr. Bush is always 
hallenging students with his model of "guts and courage" to 
tand up for what they believe in and "to think more critically 
ibout their responses (in class) and to the world around 
hem." 

)he recalls how Dr. Bush galvanized a coalition of student 
eaders' meeting: "He told them, 'You are the leaders of this 



campus; you set the tone.' Soon he was leading them in 
cheers, telling them the importance of school spirit, telling 
them that they could change things." According to Costa, 
Bush had succeeded in penetrating that insidious malaise that 
sometimes lingers over our campus like a fog. As usual, his 
message was powerful and direct: "As student leaders, you 
should be doing this (getting fired up for a cause) all the 
time." 

Dr. Bush's advice for the Class of 1993? "It's going to be 
difficult for the graduate today to find a place in society. 
We're in a period of history where we're not at our most 
productive. Jobs are scarce. So the person who is well- 
rounded, well-educated and personable and can present 
himself or herself well will be the person who's going to get 
that scarce position." 

Then the man who many feel has significantly strengthened 
the social fabric of UMass Dartmouth adds: "We have to get 
away from the attitude and the idea that you have a hand- 
some education, a good education and you make good money 
and so you just look out for yourself or your own group." Dr. 
Bush pauses. Behind the far-away look and forlorn half-smile 
come the words of an indomitable humanist: "Some of us 
have to do something for others." 

Indeed. As he begins his twenty-first year of service to UMass 
Dartmouth, we, the Class of 1993, dedicate our yearbook to 
Dr. John E. Bush. May he see this as a gesture of profound 
appreciation for his long and selfless tenure here. 






To the Class of 1 993 



Class of 1993: 



Congratulations! 



You entered Southeastern Massachusetts University. You graduated from the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth! 



And while that name change looms large for this 
University, it quickly pales before the massive changes 
going on in the rest of our world. There is an old 
Chinese curse: "May you live in interesting times." 

Can you think of times more interesting than these? 
Times when after half a century of cold war and 
nuclear nightmare, we are at last shaping anew world 
order that holds some hope for peace? Times when 
we are at last diminishing the threat of a nuclear 
holocaust? Times when each day's news brings us 
word of advances in medicine, computing, and ge- 
netics? 

Is it really a "curse" to live in such interesting times? 
I think not. I think it's the most exciting time imag- 
inable to be human, alive, and well educated. Well 
educated, because with each passing day it is more 
and more clear that our greatest national resource is 
brain power, and your greatest asset as an individual 
is your knowledge. 

Cherish it. Nourish it. Never stop learning. That's the 
way to remove the "curse" of interesting times and 
make them a backdrop for an exciting, fulfilling, and 
successful life. 

Good luck to you all. 




Dr. Joseph C. Deck, Interim Chancellor of UMass Dartmouth 



Joseph C. Deck 
Chancellor 



8 



New Chancellor, Dr. Peter H. Cressy 



Peter H. Cressy became chancellor of the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth on July 1, 1993. He was selected by President 
Michael K. Hooker from a field of four candidates recommended by a special search-and-screen committee, and was appointed by 
the UMass Dartmouth Board of Trustees. He previously served as President of the Massachusetts Maritime Academy, the 
Commonwealth's maritime college. 

Dr. Cressy joined the Massachusetts higher education 
system after a long, distinguished career with the U.S. 
Navy, where he served as Director of Naval Aviation 
Training and Director of Naval Training and Education. 
He retired from the Navy as a rear admiral, after 
serving as commander of Fleet Air Mediterranean in 
1991 during Operation Desert Storm. 

He is a 1963 graduate of Yale University. He holds a 
Master's Degree in International Affairs from George 
Washington University, an MBA from the University of 
Rhode Island, and a Doctorate of Education from the 
University of San Francisco. He also graduated with 
distinction from the Naval War College. Dr. Cressy has 
held a variety of college and university teaching posi- 
tions in management, organizational behavior, and 
international affairs. He had academic and applied 
research experience in adult course development, 
simulation training, oceanography, and marine pollu- 
tion. He has organized and conducted numerous 
international conferences in these fields. 

He has authored a variety of articles on subjects ranging 
from human resource management to decision making 
in complex organizations. 

Dr. Cressy holds numerous awards, including an 
Honorary Doctorate in Psychology from The Pacific 
Graduate School of Psychology, the Distinguished 
Service Medal and three Legions of Merit. He is a 
member of several community and academic boards. 
Dr. Peter H. Cressy, Chancellor of UMass Dartmouth 





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Faculty and Administration 




Thomas M. Mulvey 

Vice Chancellor for Student 
Services 




Lawrence B. Logan 

Vice Chancellor of Administrative 
and Fiscal Services 




Richard J. Panofsky 

Associate Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs 




Robert C. Dagleish 

Provost and Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs 




John Bush 

Special Assistant to the Chancellor 
on Affirmative Action and 
Cultural Diversity 






Donald C. Howard 

Dean of Students 



James Dorris 

Dean of Continuing Studies 



Janet Freedman 

Dean of Library Services 



1 2 




Norman L. Barber 

Director of New Student 
Programs 




Paul D. Fistori 

Director of University Records 




Gerald S. Coutinho 

Director of Financial Aid 




Linus Travers 

Director of Institutional 
Advancement 




Raymond Barrows 

Admissions Director 




Kevin W. Hill 

Director of Housing and 
Residential Life 



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Joyce Ames 

Director of Student Health 
Services 




Roger P. Tache 

Business Manager 




Raymond McKearney 

Chief of Safety and Security 



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Susan Costa 

Director of Student Activities 




Richard C. Waring 

Campus Center Director 




John E. Rich 

Director of Career Services 




Greg Stone 

Director of Publication and Media 
Productions 




William Traubel 

Director of Facilities /Physical Plant 




Robert A. Dowd 

Director of Athletics 





1 4 




Jean Doyle 

Interim Dean, College of Arts and 
Sciences 



College of Arts and Sciences 

I"! 




Robert Green 

Chair, Computer and Information 
Sciences 




Francis Esposito 

Chair, Economics 






Armand Desmarais 

Chair, Education 



Louise Habicht 

Chair, English 



Gerard M. Koot 

Chair, History 




Labaron Colt 

Chair, Biology 



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Giulio Massano 

Chair, Foreign Literature and 
Languages 




Lewis Kamm 

Chair, Humanities and Social 
Sciences 



15 






Robert Leamson 

Chair, MultiDisciplinary Studies 



Robert Tannenwald 

Chair, Math 



James Griffith 

Chair, Medical Labortory Science 



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Clyde Barrow 

Interim Chair, Political Science 



Toby Huff 

Chair, Sociology and Anthropology 



John J. Fitzgerald 

Chair, Philosophy 






James dePagter 

Chair, Physics 



Barry Haimson 

Chair, Psychology 



Donald Smith 

Chair , Chemistry 



16 



College of Visual and Performing Arts 




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Micheal Taylor 

Dean, College of Visual and 
Performing Arts 





Thomas Puryear 

Chair, Art History 



Dante Vena 

Chair, Art Education 





Anthony Miraglia 

Chair, Fine Arts 




Elaine Fisher 

Chair, Design 



Eleanor Carlson 

Chair, Music 



17 



College of Business and Industry 




Ronald D. McNeils 

Dean, College of Business And 
Industry 




Richard Golen 

Chair, Management 






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Raymond Jackson 

Chair, Accounting and Finance 




William A. Silveira 

Chair, Textile Science 



Merritt LaPlante 

Chair, Marketing 





1 8 





L. Bryce Anderson 

Dean, College of Engineering 



College of Engineering 






Frederick Law 

Chair, Civil Engineering 



1 i 





Ronald DiPippo 

Chair, Mechanical Engineering 




Lee Estes 

Chair, Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 




Robert Helgeland 

Chair, Electrical Engineering 
Technology 



College of Nursing 




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Joyce Passos 

Dean, College of Nursing 




Mary Ann Dillon 

Chair, Nursing Institutional Studies 



Sonya Peterson 

Chair, Community Nursing 



19 




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Armando Abarca 

History 



Tabitha Agneta 

Visual Design 



Noreen Albernaz 

Finance 



Kim Alexander 

Human Resource Management 







Kimberly Marie Allen 

Political Science/Sociology 



Lucilia Almeida 

Accounting 



Kimberly Aloisi 

Nursing 



Robert Alves 

Marketing 
















































24 





Tarah Amaral 

Accounting 





Randy Amareila 

Mechanical Engineering 




Denise E. Anderson 

Computer Engineering 



Lisa Andreas 

Nursing 




Vanessa Andrews 

Accounting 





Celia Antonio 

Accounting 





Susan Arciero 

Visual Design-Illustration 



Michael Arguin 

Computer Information Science 



Paul Armas 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 



Denne Arruda 

Mathematics 







Pamela L. Arruda 

Masters of Business Administration 



Suzanna M. Arruda 

English 



Stephanie Arzigian 

Economics 



Heidi Ashworth 

Accounting 




Vasilki Athanasiades 

Management 





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Michael Aubut 

Management 




Elizabeth A. Auger 

Finance 




Raymond C. Avitable 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 



25 
















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Jennifer Azar 

Psychology 




Andrea Bachorowski 

Economics 




Lei Lei Bao 

Computer Engineering 




Bruce R. Bachand 

Anthropology 




Nelson Baeta 

Electrical Engineering 




Anthony Barbaro 

Marketing 




26 



Nelson Barbosa 

Sociology-Criminal Justice 



Paula Barbosa 

Political Science 



Lillian Barresi 

Sociology 



David Barry 

English 







Keith Bartholomew 

Management 



Melissa Bayco 

Visual Design 



Benjamin Beaudion 

Printmaking 



Tiffini Beevers 

Accounting 







David Belanger 

Mechanical Engineering 



Gary A. Benbenek 

Art Education 



Jodi Benedetto 

Elecrical Engineering 



Anthony B. Benevides 

Electrical Engineering 







Theresa Bergeron 

Psychology 



Robin Bernier 

Management 



Paul Bertone 

Music 



Bruce Berube 

Philosophy 




Mark Berube 

Philosophy 




Sheri Bevan 

Art Education 



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27 





Crystal Bickford 

English. 




Cheryl Bigos 

Political Science 





Douglas Bigler 

Political Science 




David Blackburn 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




Robert Blante 

Mechanical Engineering 



Dawn Blaschke 

Visual Design 



Cornells Ijsbrand Blom 

Electrical Engineering 



Heather Boan 

Textile Design 




28 



Patrick Bonner 

Marketing 




Linda Marie Borezo 

Marketing 




Paula Mary Borezo 

Graphic Design 




Hallie Botelho 

Finance 







Aaron Boudreau 

Visual Design-Illustration 



Brian Boudreau 

Mathematics 



Philip Boyko 

Accounting 



Jennifer P. Braley 

Psychology 







Norman J. Breault 

Marketing 



James Breckner 

Accounting 



Karen Bredenfoerder 

Psychology 



Betsy J. Brehaut 

Accounting 




Michael Brilliant 

Accounting 





Maryellen Brocklesby 

Political Science 




William Brownell 

Sociology-Criminal Justice 



Jennifer Brunner 

Psychology 




29 







Robert Bruno 

Computer Engineering 



Natasha Buben 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Paul Burke 

Mechanical Engineering 



Kim Burnap 

Psychology 





Heidi Burns 

Sociology 






N. Chauncey Bun- 
Textile Technology 





Arthur Burton, Jr. 

Management 



Anthony Cabral 

Physics 







Lisa Cabral 

Finance 



Regel Cabrera 

Mechanical Enginnering Tech. 



Marybeth Callahan 

Marketing 



Emanuel Camara 

Management 



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30 










William Cameron 

Sociology 




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Laura Campbell 

Psychology 





Pamela Campbell 

Textile Technology 







Sonja Carlstrom 

Visual Design 



Alison Caron 

Art Education 



Bridget Carter 

Computer Engineering 



John Castle 

Political Science 




W. Joseph Casula 

Marketing 




Amanda Catlin 

Spanish 




Francesca Cerutti 

Multidisciplinary Studies 




Andrew Chagnon 

Civil Engineering 



31 





Wing-yin Chan 

Textile Technology 



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Kieran Chapman 

Accounting 



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Amy Elizabeth Charron 

Nursing/Psychology 



Kevin Chellman 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 



Sheila Chipman 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Alison Ciccone 

Ceramic Design 







Scott Ciosek 

English 



Amy Coates 

Visual Design 



Ronnie Cobb 

Marketing 



Timothy E. Coe 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



32 





Allison C. Coelho 

Painting 




Tess Coleman 

Humanities-Social Sciences 







Lisa Colomey 

Management 



Christopher Combs 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 



Stacie Compton 

Textile Design 



Daniel Comstock 

Biology 







Perry J. Conchinha 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Heather Conley 

Finance 



Jon Connell 

Civil Engineering 



Celeste C. Connors 

Political Science 




Kara Elizabeth Coombs 

Nursing 





Herman Cook 

Accounting 




Kimberly Coolidge 

History 



Catherine Cooper 

Sociology 




33 




Lynda Corbett 

Marketing 





Derek Cormier 

Management 





Scott Cormier 

Marketing 





M. Avelina Correia 

Management 



Jay Correia 

History 



Jason Correiro 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Christine Costa 

Mathematics 



34 





Christopher Costa 

History 





Claudine Costa 

Nursing 




Steven Costa 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 



Vfctor Costa 

Biology 




Michael Cotter 

Electrical Engineering 





Derek Cotton 

Finance 







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Steven C. Coupal 

Mechanical Engineering 



George Couto 

Marketing 



Danielle Crotty 

Nursing 



Virginia Cruz 

Nursing 







Joanne Cuhna 

Accounting 



Joseph C. DeAngelo 

Political Science 



Nicholas D'Angelo 

Management 



Antonio Dacosta 

Mechanical Engineering 




Kimberly DaCosta 

History 




Francisco Dacunha 

Sociology 




Thomas Daigle 

Masters of Business Administration 




Kristin Daley 

Biology 



35 






Matthew Daniels 

History 



Bruce Dansby 

Business Administration 





Diane M. Dansereau 

Computer Information Science 



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Louis daPonte 

Civil Engineering 





Paula daSilva 

Nursing 



Julie Davis 

Humanities-Social Sciences 







Viana DeAndrade 

Portuguese 



Caroline DeCosta 

Nursing 



Cynthia DeCosta 

Finance 



Dana Decourcy 

Art History 








36 



James Michael Demers 

Mathematics 




Christine Demoranville 

English 





Daniel B. DeOliveira 

Chemistry / Biochemistry 



Maria DeOliveira 

Nursing 



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Julie D'Errico 

Visual Design 



Matthew Desmarais 

History 



Jorge DeSousa 

Civil Engineering 



Lucia DeSousa 

Computer Information Science 







Chandra Dewing 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Ann Marie Dialessi 

Psychology 



Christine Dias 

Accounting 



Fernando Dias 

Management 




Marianne Dias 

English 




Thomas Diaz 

English-Writing 



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Karen Disharoon 

Psychology 





Lina DoCouto 

Economics 




Kimberly Digits 

Finance 




Brian Donlan 

Marketing 





Amy DiGrezio 

Management 




Jill Doucet 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Donna Douglas 

Sociology 



Paul Doyon 

Marketing 



Amy B. Dubowik 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 



38 





Mark Duehring 

Management 




Daniel Dufresne 

Electrical Engineering 







Stacey Duplessis 

Management 



Sheri Durrick 

Biology 



Alexander Durso 

Visual Design 



Julie Duval 

Humanities-Social Sciences 







Joseph A. Duquette, Jr. 

Business Information Systems 



Sherri Eagles 

Management 



Eric Earls 

Sociology 



Michelle Ann Eaton 

Nursing 




Susan Egan 

Psychology 




Tina Ehlers 

Accounting 




39 







Michelle B. Engemann 

Management 



Britt Ericsson 

Psychology 



Joy Eriksen Crowley 

Nursing 



Pete Erwin 

History 






Katia Evariste 

Management 





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Marcus Ewing 

Chemistry 





Ginger Fagundes 

Civil Engineering 





Brenda Fairborn 

English 




Andrew Fallon 

English-Writing 



Kristen Faria 

Psychology 



Christopher Farrer 

Marketing 



Penny Fasano 

Humanities-Soc. Sci./ Philosophy 



40 





Maureen Fay 

Sociology 




Mary Patricia Feitelburg 

Art History 




Susan Fenlon 

Humanities-Social Sciences 





Elizabeth Fernandes 

Sociology 





Kelly Fernandes 

Human Resources Management 



Kevin E. Fernandes 

Management 



Sonya Ferreira 

Finance 



Joan Fielding 

Political Science 







Eileen Finneran 

Multidisciplinary Studies 



Deirdre S. Finnerty 

English-Writing 



Lisa K. Fiorini 

English-Writing 



Sheri Fish 

Nursing 




Stacie Fitzpatrick 

Human Resources Management 




Kirk Fitzsimmons 

Textile Technology 




Bethany Flagg 

Business Administration 




Sean Flaherty 

Finance 



41 





Daniel Flanagan 

Accounting 




Karen Foley 

Human Resources Management 





Michael Fogarty 

Sociology 




Kevin Foley 

Visual Design /Sculpture 




Paul Forrest 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 



P. Brett Fortin 

Political Science 



John Fox 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 



Diane Freeman 

Accounting 




42 



Philip Walton Friar 

Management 




Carrie Frissell 

Art History 




Lisa Fucillo 

Visual Design 




Nancy Fuller 







Amy Gadles 

Criminal Justice 



Christy R. Gagne 

Psychology 



Donna Gagne 

Nursing 



Gerald Gagne 

Accounting 







Jeffrey Gagnon 

Economics 



Robert Gagnon 

Electrical Engineering 



William Gajda 

Mechanical Engineering 



Anne Galarneau 

Visual Design-Illustration 




Sarah Galarneau 

Art Education 





Kelly Gallagher 

Visual Design-Photography 




Christine Galli 

Visual Design 



James Gardiner 

Accounting 




43 







Lisa Gardini 

Sociology-Criminal Justice 



Sheri Gardner 

Psychology /Sociology 



Tricia Garofalo 

Finance 



David Gaspar 

Management 







Sharon Gately 

Management 



David Gauthier 

Marine Biology 



Stephen Gavin 

Finance 



Chris Gibson 

Sociology 







William Gilet 

Accounting 



John Gill 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 



Kristi Gilman 

Nursing 



Patrice Giordano 

Visual Design 



/^ ^ 9 



44 





Frank Glenowicz 

Sociology-Criminal Justice 




A. Joel Glick 

English 




Carrie Glover 

Nursing 





Kristie Glynn 

Finance 







Gordon Goldberg 

Mechanical Engineering 



Jason Goldstein 

Biology 



Lisa Gomes 

Sociology 



Robert Gomes 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




Victoria Goncalves 

Accounting 




Carmen Gonsalves 

Biology/Marine Biology 




Robert G. Gonsalves 

English-Writing 




Charles Goodman 

Sculpture 



45 





Paula Gouveia 

Accounting 





Timothy Grant 

Political Science 




Gregg Greenwood 

Psychology 



Mary Ellen Gregory 

Marketing 



Mary Greim 

Visual Design-Metals 



Jennifer Grimes 

Visual Design 







Tamara Grizey 

Accounting 



Noelle Groh 

Nursing 



Inam Habboosh 

Computer Information Science 



Robin Haddad 

Electrical Engineering 



46 




LtfcrfMI 




Tammy Haley 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




Peter Halle 

Management 







Tamsen Hammond 

English-Writing 



Travis Hamwey 

Political Science 



Karalyn Harland 

Psychology 



Jennifer Hartman 

Accounting 







Jonathan Harris 

Computer Information Science 



Amy Harvey 

Psychology 



Christopher T. Hawley 

Visual Design 



Steve Hayes 

Painting/Art Education 




Lesley Hazeldine 

Political Science 





Noah Hoffenberg 

English-Writing 




Julie Holland 

Art Education 



Sonja Hoover 

Political Science 




47 




William Hubbard 

Physics 




Derek Hughes 

Management 




>^ f m> 




Christopher Hopkins 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 




Linnea Hultgren 

Mathematics 





Kerriann Howland 

Physics 




John Hutchinson 

English 




Erika Ingram 

Visual Design 



Judith L. Jabotte 

Nursing 



Roderick D. Jackson, Jr. 

Civil Engineering 



Christina Jacobs 

Biology 



48 





Becky Jason 

Psychology 




Justin Jeffrey 

Marketing 




Edith Johnson 

Business Information Systems 





Melanie Johnson 

English 







Thomas Johnson 

Business Information Systems 



Suzanne Jorge 

Management 



Laura Landry Joshi Ravindsa S. Joshi 

Masters of Business Administration Masters of Business Administration 




Tammy Jusczak 

Accounting 




Lisa Kahlau 

Marketing 




David Kajari 

Textile Technology 




Meredith Karelia 

English 



49 




Robin Helen Keene 

Art Education 




Emily Kilduf f 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




Shaunna Kelley 

Ceramics 




Youngson Kim 

Chemsitry 




50 



Kevin S. Knight 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 



Francis Koczalka 

Civil Engineering 



Sean Kenny 

Marketing 




Darnyl M. King 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




Gregory Koester 

Computer Information Science 




Eric Kaufman 

History 




Kamile A. M. Khazan 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




Anthony Knight 

Marketing 




Francis Kosky 

Accounting 




Paul Kotch 

Management 





Sofia Kouloungis 

Textile Technology 





Frank Krieger 

Electrical Engineering 





Beth Krumsiek 

Management 




Christopher Kuehn 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 



Joan Lagasse 

Mechanical Engineering 



Victoria LeFrancois 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Melissa Lampinen 

Sociology 




Tammy Larck 

Visual Design 





Taryn Laughlin 

Management 




Dave Lauton 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Melissa Lavoie 

Accounting 




51 





Dayle Lawrence 

Multidisciplinary Studies 





Peter Hoa Le 

Electrical Engineering 




Jonathan Leaver 

Accounting 



Nicole J. LeBlanc 

Medical Laboratory Science 







John Ledwidge 

Mathematics 



Tim Ark Leong 

Accounting 



Manuela R. Lescault 

Nursing 



Mark Letourneau 

Nursing 




52 



Christopher D. Levesque 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 




Melanie A. Levesque 

Textile Technology 




Nicole M. Levesque 

Visual Design 




Debra J. Lewis 

English 







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Denise Lima 

Biology 



Tammy Lima 

Mathematics 



Amy E. Lippo 

Psychology 



Little Joe 

Visual Design 







Christopher D. Lizotte 

Electrical Engineering 



Steven P. Longworth 

Electrical Engineering 



Michelle Lopes 

Nursing 



Scott M. Louder 

Humanities-Social Sciences 







Rachel L. Lowther 

Textile Technology 



Kevin J. Lyons 

Management 



Debra M. MacDonald 

English-Writing 



Vanessa L. MacDonald 

Psychology 



M 




Christopher Machado 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 



53 







Danielle Machado 

Sociology-Criminal Justice 



Michelle Machado 

Management 



Kelley A. MacKay 

Finance 



Linda MacKenzie 

Nursing 




Shelby Mackie 

Visual Design-Photography 




Kirsten Madden 

Management 



54 





Lynn M. Mahoney 

Finance 




Hung Mai 





Hang Mai 

Psychology 




Vincent E. Majewski 

Electrical Engineering 




Jocelyn Malaguti 

Accounting 



Andrew T. Maloney 

Management 





Chris Maloney 

Management 





Dennis W. Maniatis 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




Pamela Maniatis 

History 



John Mankowski 

Civil Engineering 



Michael Manor 

Mechanical Engineering 



Gina P. Manuel 

Computer Information Science 







Lawrence Marino 

Visual Design 



Ana E. Marques 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Lori M. Martin 

Medical Laboratory Science 



Shawn S. Martin 

Management 




Shelley Martin 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




John Martins 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




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55 





Nicole S. Masters 

Textile Design 




David A. Mattson 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 





Tamara L. Matson 

Nursing 




Melissa A. Maziarski 

Accounting 




Jodi A. Mazzarella 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Maria L. McCarron 

Psychology 



Michael W. McDonald 

Finance 



Jennine A. McGlone 

Psychology 




56 



Kelly J. McGuire 

Accounting 




Karen McKenna 

Visual Design 




Janice L. McKenna 

Psychology 




Jay M. McKinnon 

Civil Engineering 







Maura McManus 

Marketing 



Andrew J. McWain 

Music Theory/Composition 



David A. Medeiros 

Accounting 



Norman S. Medeiros 

English-Writing 







Robert Medeiros 

Marketing 



AH Mehmandoost 

Electrical Engineering 



Patrick J. Mello 

Textile Chemistry 



Lisa J. Menard 

Psychology 




Carl D. Mendoza 

Sociology-Criminal Justice 




Mark W. Merten 

Computer Information Science 




Kristen M. Merlini 

Marketing 




Carolyn Merusi 

Accounting 




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57 





Deborah L. Meyers 

Management 





Carmen Michaud 

Masters of Business Administratio 1 




Kevin M. Michalski 

Psychology 



Douglas John Michaud 

Graphic Design 



Sarah Elizabeth Mihalski 

Psychology/ Elementary Ed. 



Marie A. Miscioscia 

Visual Design 







Robin F. Mish 

Marketing 



Michael Misiolek 

Writing 



Susan K. Mitchell 

Psychology 



Paul Molak 

Marketing 






58 




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Denise K. Money 

Marketing 




Daniel Louis Moniz 

Computer Engineering 







Kerri N. Mooney 

Sociology 



Julie M. Moreshead 

Nursing 



Michelle M. Morin 

Biology 



Danielle V. Morneau 

Visual Design 







Scott Morrison 

Computer Information Science 



Brennan Morsette 

Business Administration 



Deborah Moser 

Accounting 



Fatima Mota 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




Christine M. Mott 

Humanities-Social Sciences 





Jennifer J. Mugg 

Biology 




Amy Elizabeth Muir 

Sociology 



John C. Munroe 

Mechanical Engineering 




59 







Brian Murphy 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 



Colleen Murphy 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Daniel P. Murphy 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Maryellen A. Murphy 

History 













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Erica D. Namenson 

Nursing 



Pamela J. Nangle 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Julie L. Napoleon 

Visual Design-Illustration 



Eric B. Nelson 

Accounting 





Jacqueline Nelson 

English 





Kimberly A. Newton 

Textile Technology 




60 



Pamela J. Nicetta 

Accounting 



Julie Niewola 

Accounting 





Cynthia A. Noblet 

Visual Design 







Kevin M. Nolan 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 



James P. Noonan 

Accounting 



Kimberly A. Notargiacomo 

Sociology 



George Obichie 

Accounting/Management 







Amy P. O'Brien 

Management 



Jeane O'Brien 

English 



Robert F. O'Brien 

Marketing 



Tricia Oliveira 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




Karen M. Olsen 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




Megan O'Neill 

Human Resources Management 




61 






Michael C. O'Shea 

Psychology 




Michael S. Okeefe 

Sociology 





Joseph O. Odugbela 

Finance 




Timothy Hanson Olden 

Physics 




Karen Oliveira 

Psychology 



Natalia C. Oliveira 

Business Information Systems 




62 



Christine M. Ordung 

Sociology 




Steven E. Orff 

Management 




Christa J. Osborne 

Nursing 




Steven M. Ottavianelli 

Accounting 







Christine M. Pacheco 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Diana Pacheco 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Jason E. Pacheco 

Accounting 



Paul J. Pacheco 

Electrical Engineering 







Richard A. Pacheco 

Accounting 



Kathleen A. Paiva 

Accounting 



Marc Pardy 

Marketing 



Lisa Jean Parent 

Political Science 







Rachel C. Parent 

Management 



David Parsons 

Biology 



James J. Pateakos 

English-Writing 



Laurie Patterson 

Psychology 




Sandra Marie Payson 

Psychology 




Sharyn A. Peach 

Visual Design-Illustration 





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Chris Pehl 

Civil Engineering 





Claudine Pelletier 

Humanities-Social Sciences 





Jason A. Pepin 

Mechanical Engineering 





Michele L. Pearsall 

Political Science 




Jeffrey Perry 

Sociology-Social Service 



Patricia A. Perry 

Sociology-Criminal Justice 



Warren E. Perry 

Accounting 



Christine N. Pestana 

Accounting 




64 



Laurie C. Phalon 

Human Resources Management 




Kimberly A. Phillipe 

Nursing 




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Christopher L. Phillips 

Visual Design 



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Cuong Phu 

Illustration/Painting 







Dina Pichette 

Business Information Systems 



Melanie B. Pickert 

Marketing 



Ronald J. Pimental 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



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Sandra Pimentel 

History 







Emanuel A. Pinarreta 

Marketing 



Debora C. Pinto 

Biochemistry 



Nancy S. Pires 

Finance 



Karalyn M. Piskadlo 

Humanities-Social Sciences 





Brian A. Poirier 

Mathematics 



Carla Poirier 

Marketing 





Suzanne M. Porter 

Sociology /Philosophy 



Lynn E. Powderly 

Visual Design-Illustration 




65 




Elena M. Proulx 

English-Writing 





James E. Quinn 

Photography 





Jennifer Quinn 

Biology 





Alan Ramos 

Sociology 




Kenneth B. Reardon, Jr. 

Management 



Kenneth J. Rebello 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 



David G. Reeves 

Visual Design 



Kathleen M. Regan 

Management 







Virginia L. Reilly 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Arlene L. Resendes 

" Sociology 



Jennifer S. Ricci 

Psychology 



Ann Margaret Richard 

Sociology 



66 





Joanne V. Richardson 

Accounting 




Kerrie A. Richardson 

History 




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Kelly M. Riddle 

English- Writing 














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Scott Rigney 

Business Information Systems 



Cheri L. Rinko 

Sociology 



Richard S. Risotti 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 



Elizabeth J. Ritchie 

Sociology 




Julee M. Rivard 

Textile Design 




Heidi M. Robinson 

Humanities-Social Sciences 




Brent A. Robischeau 

Management 




Jason M. Roche 

Visual Design-Metals 



67 





Suzanne E. Rochon 

Marketing 





Armando Rodrigues 

Physics 




Gina M. Rodrigues 

Accounting 



Natalie M. Rodrigues 

Accounting 



Kerry S. Rouhan 

Finance 



Tiffany E. Rourke 

Humanities-Social Sciences 







Craig Rousseau 

Visual Design-Illustration 



Cheryl M. Roy 

Psychology 



Rachel F. Rubitsky 

Visual Design-Illustration 



Suzanne C. Rupp 

Accounting 



68 





Elaine M. Ryan 

Textile Technology 




Kara Ryan 

Human Resources Management 




Patricia J. Selentnik 

Accounting 





Melissa A. Salluce 

Marketing 





Tara L. Santoro 

Finance 





Charleen A. Santos 

Nursing 




Dennis P. Santos 

Accounting 



Michael W. Sarcia 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 



William M. Satkevich 

Finance 



Peter Sawyer 

English-Writing 




Suzanne Schwartz 

Marketing 




Michael A. Sciaraffa 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 




David M. Schwind 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 




Goncalo N. Seabra 

Sociology 





69 








Steven M. Seaver 

History 




Robert J. Sellers 

Computer Information Science 







Anthony Paul Senecal 

Visual Design-Photography 



Donna M. Sexton 

Psychology 



Stephanie Shaw 

Art History 



Catherine E. Shea 

Textile Design 




70 



Tara Ann Sheehan 

Nursing 




Paul G. Simas 

Management 




Kathrine R. Simbro 

Management 




Antigone Zoe Simmons 

History 







Andrea L. Skirven 

Finance 



Sharon I. Slevin 

Psychology 



Chris C. Smith 

Management 



Jennifer Snay 

Biology 







Scott J. Soares 

Marine Biology 



Daniel P. Solov 

Marketing 



Inez Soto 

Marketing 



Darin S. Souza 

Accounting 







Melissa Souza 

luman Resources Management 



Brendan Sowersby 

Sculpture 



Gregory M. Sparrow 

Electrical Engineering 



Charles Spencer 

Computer Information Science 




Andrew W. Sroczynski 

Psychology 




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Jeffrey D. Stagnone 

Management 




71 







Jennifer M. Starbird 

Economics 



Jon D. Stevenson 

Civil Engineering 



Heather Stober 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Anita M. Strunk 

Accounting 







Lionel W. Stewart 

Mechanical Engineering 



Darren M. Suarez 

Political Science 



Deidre Sullivan 

Illustration / Painting 



Sean M. Sullivan 

Political Science 






Fawn P. Sun 

Accounting 



Aimee Surprenant 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Linda A. Swain 

Nursing 





David Sylvia 

Psychology 



72 





Daniel G. Szecskas 

Sociology 




Garrett M. Tardie 

Psychology 




Jessica M. Tassone 

Art Education 





Alberto M. Tavares 

Computer Engineering 





Duarte Tavares 

Finance 



Kenneth Tavares 

Music 



Laura J. Taylor 

Art Education 



Victor R. Teves 

Portuguese 







Alpha C. Therrien 

Management 



Erik A. Thompson 

Music 



Heidi M. Thompson 

Visual Design-Illustration 



Jodi L. Thompson 

Political Science 




Alicia M. Thorns 

Multidisciplinary Studies 




Bao-Uyen N. Ton 

Finance 




Jennifer L. Toney 

Marketing 




Kelly- Ann Torrans 

Finance 



73 




Van X. Tran 

Management 




Catharine Traubel 

Psychology 




Steven M. Troppoli 

Computer Information Science 





Mary C. Tracey 

Accounting 




Kelly A. Tyson 

English-Writing 




Michael D. Uftring 

Computer Information Science 



Nathan D. Uliano 

Economics 



Kerri A. Vachon 

Management 



Aurelio M. Valente 

Civil Engineering 




74 



Christopher J. Vaness 

History 




Jennifer L. Vargas 

History 




Jeffery Vautour 

Accounting 




Lisa A. Vecchio 

Nursing 







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Nina E. Vedovelli 

Medical Laboratory Science 



Patrick J. Vena 

Economics 



Stacie A. Vienneau 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Goncalo Vilamarim 

Finance 







Maria E. Villamariona 

Mechanical Engineering 



Bradford L. Wach 

Computer Information Science 



Kristin Welchman 

Visual Design-Illustration 



John W. Whelan 

History 




Sherry L. Willis 

Political Science 




William F. White 

Marketing 




75 





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Janet Lee Williams 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



Heidi J. Wilson 

Marketing 







Erin E. Winn 

Finance 



Stephen J. Wiseman 

Marketing 



Melanie Wong 

Electrical Engineering 



Susan Wood 

Business Information Systems 







Angela L. Yee 

Marketing 



Christine A. Yeaton 

Nursing 



Steven E. Yergeau 

Biology 



Bonnie A. Young 

Nursing 



76 





Ashley Yu 

Accounting 




Jui-Lin Yu 

Masters of Business Administratici 




Shuxiang Yu 

Computer Engineering 








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Physics 







Wendy Zides 

Psychology 



Denise Ziegler 

Biology 



Barbara A. Zina 

Psychology 



Matthew A. Zito 

Humanities-Social Sciences 



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77 



Seniors Not Photographed 



Scott Abbott 
Surendran Abraham 
Genevieve Ackerman 
Yolanda Adames 
Kathryn Adams 
Christopher Adejumo 
Nikhil Agrawal 
Daniel Aguiar 
Sandra Aguiar 
Todd Allain 
James Allan 
Robert Allcock III 
Heather Allen 
John Allen 
Kristin Almeida 
Joseph Amaral III 
Mario Amaral 
Julie-Lynn Anderson 
Stanley Anderson 
Nicole Andrade 
JoAnn Andrews 
Andrzej Arasimowicz 
Denise Arias 
Donald Armfield, Jr. 
Patricia Arruda 
Wayne Arruda 
Kymberly Ashley 
Michael Ashworth 
William Ashworth II 
David Audet 
Jeffrey Autote 
Rodney Avery 
Jennifer Azar 
Glen Bacus 
Karylee Bailey 
Michael Baird 
Robert Balkind 
Jacqueline Ballard 
Joseph Balmain 
Jeffrey Baptista 
Theresa Barbo 
Dennis Bardan 
Miki Barton 
Jean Bastien 
Ioannis Batjakas 
John Beausoleil 
Bryan Becotte 
Scott Beloli 
Gary Benbenek 
Walter Benjamin 
Jeffrey Bennett 
David Bennett 
Mark Benoit 
Michael Bento 
Georgia Bey 

Susan Bisaillon-Medeiros 
Liza Blackledge 
Robert Blanchette 
Thomas Bleakney 
Lisa Blood 
Rachel Blumlo 
Kristen Boben 
Christopher Boggiatto 
Maria Bonczyk 
Cheryl Borges 

78 



Mechanical Engineering 

Computer Information Science 

Sculpture 

Humanities-Social Sciences 

Accounting 

Visual Design 

Textile Chemistry 

Civil Engineering 

Human Resources Management 

Textile Technology 

Economics 

Sociology-Criminal Justice 

Art History 

Painting 

Humanities-Social Sciences 

History 

Medical Laboratory Science 

English-Writing 

Mechanical Engineering 

English-Writing 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

English-Writing 

Computer Information Science 

Political Science 

Accounting 

Music 

Visual Design-Illustration 

Civil Engineering 

Marketing 

Psychology 

Humanities-Social Sciences 

Psychology 

Visual Design-Illustration 

Photography 

Marine Biology 

Civil Engineering 

Humanities-Social Sciences 

History 

History 

Professional Writing 

Accounting 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 

Marine Biology 

English-Writing 

Sociology-Criminal Justice 

Chemistry 

Art Education 

Sociology-Criminal Justice 

Business Information Systems 

Painting 

Management 

Psychology 

Sociology 

English-Writing/Music 

Accounting 

Sociology 

English-Writing 

Accounting 

Biology 

Accounting 

Sociology 

Photography 

Accounting 



David Borkman 
Joan Borowicz 
John Botelho 
Tammy Boulds 
Scott Bousquet 
Ward Bowman 
Maureen Boyd 
Christopher Boyle 
Corrado Brancato 
Ofelia Bretal 
Steven Brightman 
Barrie Brissette 
Rose Brisson 
Jacqueline Brodeur 
Jean Brouillard 
Leonora Brown 
Paula Brown 
Grace Bruning 
Roxanne Buccos 
Shawn Buckley 
Charles Bumpus 
Deborah Burdock 
Susan Burns 
Erie Cabral 
Kristin Callahan 
Natalie Camara 
Bonny Campbell-Runyon 
Anthony Caravaggio 
Patricia Carey 
Sherri Carola 
Edward Carreiro, Jr. 
Jason Carreiro 
Kevin Carson 
Angela Carter 
Doris Carvalho 
Herbert Carvalho 
Maria Castro 
Amy Cayon 
Kellie Cayton-Gouveia 
Melissa Centofante 
Christopher Cerrone 
Karen Chace 
Deborah Chadbourne 
John Chamberlain 
Donna Chapman 
Constance Charette 
Christian Cheetham 
Buh-Charng Chen 
Michelle Chen 
Xiaohe Chen 
Peiwen Cheng 
Chien Chin 
Kristen Clark 
Sharon Clark 
Rindy Clemmey 
Charlene Cloney 
Rachel Cloutier 
Pamela Cole 
Aaron Coleman 
Jennifer Coleman 
Andrew Collari 
Mike Collins 
Lauren Comer 
Matthew Comery 
Carolyn Comtois 



Marine Biology 

Sculpture 

Medical Laboratory Science 

Humanities-Social Sciences 

Political Science 

Computer Engineering 

Political Science 

Mechanical Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering 

Spanish 

Electrical Engineering 

Marine Biology 

Nursing 

Accounting 

Civil Engineering 

Psychology 

Psychology 

Business Administration 

English 

Civil Engineering 

Textile Technology 

Nursing 

Visual Design-Ceramics 

Sociology 

Sociology 

Accounting 

Art Education 

Mechanical Engineering Tech. 

Psychology 

English 

Accounting 

Visual Design 

Visual Design-Illustration 

Nursing 

Electrical Engineering 

Computer Information Science 

Mechanical Engineering 

Textile Technology 

Nursing 

Art History 

Management 

English 

Nursing 

Political Science 

Marketing 

English 

Political Science 

Textile Technology 

Management 

Chemistry 

Chemistry 

Electrical Engineering Tech. 

Visual Design-Illustration 

Visual Design-Illustration 

Economics 

Professional Writing 

Biology 

Nursing 

Electrical Engineering 

Visual Design 

Political Science 

Marine Biology 

English-Writing 

Humanities-Social Sciences 

Marketing 



itrina Conaway 

ivid Concannon 
Jseph Conery 
liichael Conroy 
] r nda Cook 
];eidi Copeland 
loin Corbett 
(iristine Cordeiro 
Ipidi Cornaglia 
i|-aig Correia 
] lie Correia 

lis Correia 
'pristine Costa 
', jbert Costa 

ictor Costa 

itherine Couet 

avid Coughanowr 

erald Coulombe 

athleen Courcy 

ancy Courtney 

iwardo Couto 

arc Couture 

hn Cox 

irbara Cronin 

atthew Crowley 

llliam Cudlitz 

ichael Cyr 

ntonio da Costa 

arlos DaLomba 

arlotta Danzante 

arlos DaSilva 

:even Davies 

jcilia Davies 

ussell Davis 

ennis Dayton 

sul De Almeida 

die D'Errico 

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79 



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81 



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82 



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83 



World Events 




H. ROSS PEROT 

In May, Ross Perot was a potential president. 
Now, he's likely no more than potential 
spoiler, but nonetheless a wild card who could 
reshuffle the deck. The Perot Factor was 
reintroduced to presidential politics 11 weeks 
to the day after the Texas billionaire aban- 
doned plans to run, saying he had concluded 
he could not win. Many analysts view his re- 
entry as a selfish attempt at redemption by a 
political novice who failed to realize what he 
was getting into months ago and now wants to 
heal a wounded ego. 

It may take a while to assess Perot's impact, 
but there are obvious things to watch and both 
campaigns have reason to worry. "Anything 
that tosses his race up in the air and is an 
unknown is a good thing for Bush" said 
Republican pollster Bill Mclnturff . 

And despite his comfortable lead, even 
Clinton predicts a natural tightening of the 
race as the election draws closer. With a 
personal fortune and no spending limits to 
worry about, Perot could easily affect the race 
if he decided to attack one candidate and leave 
the other alone. 

As he rejoined the race, Perot said he was 
running to win. Whatever his motivation - or 
chances - Perot is back, and he has the poten- 
tial to affect the race even if he never leaves 
third place. 



REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CONVENTION 



President Bush appeared on large video screens as he 
accepted the presidential nomination during the 
Republican National Convention at the Houston 
Astrodome on August 20, 1992. Bush struck a new 
defiant tone in his acceptance speech - a marked 
contrast to the 1988 oration in which he promised a 
"kinder and gentler nation." 

Selling his vision for the next four years, President 
Bush said he would propose an across-the-board tax 
cut to the new Congress that convenes in January if 
given a second term. He said the cuts would have to be 
offset by spending reductions, which he did not 
specify, to keep from swelling the deficit. 

Bush and Vice President Dan Quay le roused the GOP 
delegates to cheers as they accepted their party's 
nominations for a second term. Bush vowed to go to 
"every corner of this nation" in the political fight of his 
life to beat Bill Clinton and "clear out the deadwood" 
in Congress. 




y l i 1 71 



84 



DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL CONVENTION 

Presidential candidate Bill Clinton and his running mate, 
Senator Al Gore, held arms aloft and stood before a 
convention hall brimming with euphoria and confidence 
on July 17,1992, in New York's Madison Square Garden. 
Exhilaration swept through the convention hall. 

In an emotional address to the convention, Clinton told 
delegates he accepted the nomination "in the name of all 
the people who do the work, pay the taxes, raise the kids 
and play by the rules - the hard-working Americans 
who make up our forgotten middle class." 

The speech brought to a festive, footstomping close a 
four-day Democratic convention that adopted a moder- 
ate platform reflecting the message of its baby-boomer 
ticket. "Jobs. Health care. Education. These commit- 
ments aren't just promises from my lips," Clinton said. 
'They are the work of my life." 




PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON INAUGURATED 

The air filled with cheers as William Jefferson Clinton 
was sworn into office as the 42nd president of the 
United States on January 20, 1993. 

As he turned to wave to the crowd of hundred of 
thousands gathered below him, his 12-year-old daugh- 
ter, Chelsea, bounced over to his side and waved, 
grinning. 

For the oath-taking, Clinton chose a King James Bible 
given to him by his grandmother, opened to the Epistle 
of Paul The Apostle to the Galatians, Chapter 6, Verse 8. 
It read: "For he that soweth to his flesh shall of the flesh 
reap corruption; but he that soweth to the Spirit shall of 
the Spirit reap life everlasting." 

During the inaugural ceremony, two of Clinton's 
favorite performers, Michael Bolton and Kenny G, were 
ushered into seats above the podium. 




85 



1992 SUMMER OLYMPICS 

An era of amateurism passed into an age of 
professionalism, and the Olympics were 
transformed forever, when professional 
athletes were allowed to compete in the 1992 
Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain. 

Countering the attacks of commercialism, 
coach Chuck Daly argued that the presence of 
pros could do nothing but enhance the event. 
"There's 183 countries and 3 billion people 
watching these games," Daly said. "And 
somewhere out there now is a 13-year-old who 
wants to be a Michael or a Magic, a Larry or a 
Patrick. That's the role of these games," he 
said. "That's what happens in all of these 
sports. It gives people a dream." 

The United States emerged from its two- 
decade Olympic funk, finishing only four 
behind in the closest medals race since 
America won in 1964 in Tokyo. Now it stands 
poised to rule the sports world in Atlanta in 
1996 after arguably its greatest Summer 
Games. 

America's 108 medals surpassed by one the 
total in 1968 and trailed only the inflated totals 
of the Soviet-boycotted 1984 Los Angeles 
Games and the 1904 St. Louis Games, attended 
by just 12 nations. 

Pictured here are the "Dream Team" during 
the first half of their semifinal game with 
Lithuania; U.S. volleyball player Bob Samuels 
celebrating victory against Canada; and 
Shannon Miller performing her floor exercises. 




86 




U S. OPEN 

It was a new, improved Stefan Edberg 
who walked off the court in September 
with his second straight U.S. Open title, 
the world's No. 1 ranking and $500,000. 
This Stefan Edberg kissed the net cord in 
his quarterfinal match, kicked a ball, 
smacked the net and threw a towel. 
This Stefan Edberg even hurled the net 
after Pete Sampras buried a backhand 
service return into the net on match 
point, then fled to the side of the court to 
embrace his wife of five months, 
Annette. 

"I feel very good about myself at the 
moment. I am playing good tennis and I 
am fighting for my life out there, but I 
am coming through. I really earned it 
this year because I have worked very 
hard and I have had some unbelievably 
tough matches," Edberg said. 

Top-seeded Monica Seles also won her 
second straight U.S. Open women's 
singles title in September, defeating No. 
5 Arantxa Sanchez Vicario of Spain 6-3, 
6-3. It was the 13th Grand Slam tourna- 
ment Seles has played and her seventh 
victory. Seles, like Edberg, earned 
$500,000 for her second straight U.S. 
Open title and won her third Grand 
Slam tournament crown of 1992. 




•* /IS. 



1992 WORLD SERIES 

There's a new flag flying over Canada - the World Series 
pennant. The Toronto Blue Jays took baseball's champi- 
onship outside the United States for the first time ever, 
beating the Atlanta Braves 4-3 in 1 1 innings in Game 6. 

After surviving more ninth inning magic from the 
Braves, the Blue Jays won it all - and lost their loser's 
label forever - when Dave Winfield's first World Series 
extra base hit scored two runs with two out. "It's been a 
long, hard battle," Toronto manager Cito Gaston said. 
"But I said from opening day, these guys have been 
focusing on this very thing." 

The Braves, meanwhile, became the first team to lose 
consecutive World Series since the 1977-78 Los Angeles 
Dodgers. 



87 



COLUMBUS ANNIVERSARY 

Escorted by more than 1,000 private boats, replicas of Christopher Columbus' ships arrived in the 
United States on February 15,1992, as part of the 500th anniversary celebration of his voyage to the 
New World. 



Miami, Florida was the first stop in a 20-city U.S. tour where more than 5,000 people cheered from 
docks and waterfront roads as the wooden reproductions of the Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria sailed 
into its harbor. Having toured Spain, France, Italy and Portugal, the ships crossed the Atlantic Ocean 
and visited the Dominican Republic and the Bahamas. 

The ships, christened in Spain in 1990, were built with the same materials carpenters used to build the 
original ships. Hand-forged nails were modeled after some recovered from a 16th century shipwreck. 
The sails are made of linen, the closest natural fiber to the original hemp canvas. 

From October through December, 1992, the ships are scheduled to stop in the California cities of San 
Francisco, San Luis Obispo, Los Angeles, San Juan de Capistrano and San Diego. 





SOMALIA 

Three months after the world woke up to one of the worst famines in history, 
food started to reach hundreds of thousands of Somalis. Estimates of the dead 
range from 100,000 to half a million, but no one knows just how many have 
perished in the Horn of Africa nation. 

The central Bay region of the country has been most affected. It served as the 
main battleground for clans fighting for supremacy after Siad Barre's ouster. 
Consequently, its harvests were most disrupted and its people most uprooted 
and displaced and left in great jeopardy. 

More than a million Somalis have fled their homeland for refugee camps in 
neighboring countries, with the wealthier ones seeking safe haven in Europe, the 
United States, Canada and elsewhere. 

Many have died in the factional fighting that has driven the nation since former 
leader Siad Barre's ouster. Casualty estimates range from conservative figures of 
10,000 to the 60,000 estimated by the human rights group Africa Watch. 

U.S. Marines arrived in Somalia on December 9, 1992, to assist in curtailing the 
wanton, widespread violence and prevent looting of relief shipments. The 
troops are patrolling the meanest streets of Mogadishu with a soft touch. Chil- 
dren wave as they pass or run to shake hands with those who have come to help. 
Providing safe passage for food delivery to starving Somalis is the goal. 



IRAQ 



U.S. warplanes swept over southern Iraq on January 13, 
1993, bombing selected military targets. The goal of the 
attack was to take out the radar and missile sites in south- 
ern Iraq that have threatened the planes patrolling the area. 

Even if the attack did not make an impression on Saddarn 
Hussein, "it will certainly make an impression on his 
ability to obstruct what we are doing here," said Rear 
Adrn. Philip J. Coady. 

Servicemen chalked "to Saddarn with love" on a warplane 
aboard USS Kitty Hawk just before the air strike. 




88 




WORLD TRADE CENTER BOMBING 

Shortly after noon on February 26, 1993, an 
explosion rocked the World Trade Center in 
New York City, leaving several dead and 
hundreds injured. The bomb is believed to have 
been carried in a rented yellow Ford van which 
was parked in the garage below the twin towers. 
Islamic fundamentalist Mohammed A. Salameh 
has been arrested but is thought to have acted 
with others. This was the first terrorist act 
committed on U.S. soil. 



HURRICANE ANDREW 

Hurricane Andrew struck southern Florida on 
August 24, 1992, with wind gusting to 164 mph 
and a 12-foot tidal surge that flattened many 
homes, uprooted trees, flung boats into the 
streets and wrecked an entire Air Force base. 

The hurricane continued on, carving its way 
through the plantation country of Louisiana, 
throwing tornadoes like darts at a 100 mile-wide 
target and pumping torrents of rain at storm- 
weary Louisianians. 

Fifty five deaths were directly or indirectly 
linked to the hurricane - 41 in Florida, 10 in 
Louisiana and four in the Bahamas. The 
hurricane's 54 hour U.S. rampage, the most 
expensive natural disaster ever in the country, 
caused an estimated $20 billion in Florida, $1.5 
billion in Louisiana and $250 million in the 
Bahamas. 

"It's like a bomb hit," said one Florida City 
resident, looking at the remains of the trailer 
park where he and his wife had lived. Tent 
cities were set up in Florida with room for 3,800 
people. 




89 



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Welcome Back Week 

To help ease students back into the swing of things, the 
Student Activities Board sponsored Welcome Back Week 
'92. The week kicked off with a welcome back BBQ Bash 
on Monday, September 14 with live music by "Signs of 
Life." Tuesday night proved to be a real crowd-pleaser 
with the first Comedy Nite of the semester. Clubs and 
organizations had the opportunity to show their stuff at 
Wednesday's Club Fest, and everybody had an "excellent" 
time at Thursday's drive-in presentation of "Wayne's 
World." SAB wrapped up the week on Friday, September 
18 with an Outdoor Block Video Dance Party. 



»"»«5 











Cultural Diversify Week 

From October 1-9 UMass Dartmouth worked to improve its 
relations between the campus's different cultures and lifestyles 
through Cultural Diversity Week. Dr. John Bush, chairman of the 
committee on cultural diversity, explains "Culture is different to 
everyone. Cultural Diversity Week is the recognition and appre- 
ciation of people from all over the world." The main objective of 
the event is to educate students and faculty about different 
lifestyles, ethnic groups and religions. This year 24 organizations 
donated time, money and support. Several free lectures, films, 
and workshops were offered throughout the week on topics such 
as Native American perspective, African American life, and 
Learning Disabilities Training. The Women's Center sponsored a 
discussion entitled "Cultural Survival: Beyond the Melting Pot." 
BiGala sponsored a game night exploring attitudes towards 
discrimination, racism and homophobia. The week was culmi- 
nated with "International Culture Night," food and music from 
Hispanic, Afro-American, Cape Verdean, Portuguese, Indian, 
Chinese, and other cultures. Unfortunately, most of the events 
were not very well attended, except "International Culture Night" 
which sold out to mostly faculty and administrators that realized 
the opportunity that events such as this offer. 



Boo, It's a Halloween Dance 

On Wednesday, October 28, 
there was a Halloween 
dance. There was a small 
turnout, so the members of 
SAB dressed up in fun 
costumes and treating 
themselves to a party. 



/ 






Physical Graffiti 

In November, Physical Graffiti, the well-known 
Led Zeppelin cover band, performed to an 
exited and energetic audience. Physical Graffiti 
dazzled the audience with many of Led 
Zeppelin's well known songs, such as "Tanger- 
ine", "Good Times, Bad Times", "Babe I'm 
Gonna Leave You", and "Going to California," 
among others. The crowd, although smaller 
than previous years, proved that Zeppelin's 
music is timeless. 




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Nov. 1 9 

9 pm 

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Auditorium 



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cover 

band 



$4Students with a school ID 
$7 General Public 



94 






Riders on the Storm 

A rowdy crowd was brought back to the 1960's and the 
days of Jim Morrison through the music of Riders on 
the Storm. It seems that cover bands are quite a fad, 
but Riders call themselves a tribute to The Doors. It was 
obvious from their performace that the band knew, 
studied and loved the music of the original Doors. The 
lead singer not only played the part, drinking on stage, 
singing while rolling around on the floor, and generaly 
acting like he was on something funky, he was actually 
able to do a good imatation of the haunting Morrison 
voice. What was interesting was their choice to do 
several little known songs. Having the Greatest Hits 
album was not enough for these guys. They asked for 
Morrison believers to be in the audience and twenty 
years after his death they were there. Most of the 
crowd wasn't even born before 1970, yet he gathered 
people at the stage, taken in by the aura of the band. 
Riders on the Storm performed some classics such as 
"Love Me Two Times," "Light My Fire," and a rendi- 
tion of "The End" which carried the audience away at 
the end of the set. All in all, Riders on the Storm was 
the next best thing to seeing the real thing. 

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Blizzard of Bucks 

In October, the crazy and zany game show "Blizzard of Bucks" 
came to UMass Dartmouth. The game show made the partici- 
pants do unthinkable and sometimes silly stunts which left the 
audience laughing. At the end of the night, Thomas Becker 
emerged as the show's big winner, walking away with $115 after 
his venture into the "Blizzard of Bucks" chamber. 



95 



I^I^H 



omecoming Weekend 

lis year's Homecoming festivities were bigger and better than 
ever. October 23-25 marked the weekend when over 19,000 gradu- 
ates were invited back for a weekend filled with reunion activities. 
Christina Bruen, the Alumni Affairs Coordinator, explained her 
goals to make Homecoming "a strong tradition on this campus." 
The two major social events were Jimmy Plunkett in the Ratt on 
Friday, and Livingston Taylor on Saturday. 

The doors to the campus center opened at 9:00 on Friday, and even 
with a $5 cover the place was filled to capacity, with a waiting line 
out the door and around the corner. Plunkett gave the packed 
energetic crowd music to dance, sweat, and sing to. 

Saturday brought the infamous homecoming Football game. The 
Corsairs beat Fitchburg State while a lot of the crowd moved 
between the stadium and parking lot 9 with the tailgaters. 

After the game the happy alumni were herded toward the Campus 
Center for a more calm gathering, and then to the Livingston 
Taylor concert. The auditorium was filled to hear the mellow- 
sounds of Taylor on piano, guitar, and banjo. 

The weekend was definitely a success. The activities, although 
almost a little too planned, brought people together in a celebration 
of college days. 






De La Soul 

October brought the hip-hop sound of De La Soul 
to the University, with local band Code Blue and 
TMP opening. De La Soul put on a lively perfor- 
mance for an energetic crowd, playing songs 
from their latest album De La Soul is Dead, as well 
as material from their debut album 3 Feet High 
and Rising. Their original mellow, jazz-style rap 
was enjoyed by the crowd as they played "Ring 
Ring Ring (Ha Hey Hey)," "Potholes in my 
Lawn," "Keepin' the Faith," and finally "Me, 
Myself and I" with 30 audience members joining 
them on stage to dance. The Soul left the crowd 
of about 350 people wanting more. 





John Cafferty & The Beaver Brown Band 



UMass had its first concert on the year on September 24 - 
John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band. The band gave 
the crowd, which filled the bottom of the auditorium, a 
jumping show. "On the Dark Side" (from the Eddie and the 
Crusiers soundtrack) got the people up to the stage and 
they stayed there for other hits such as "C.I.T.Y.," "Tender 
Years" and "Things are Tough all Over." The band's classic 
rock 'n roll style let people dance and sing along to music 
they remembered from the growing up in the eighties. 
Hey, it was fun. 




98 




Frank Santos 



In November UMnss Dartmouth was once again 
visited by the R-rated hypnotist Frank Santos, and 
again performed before a large and enthusiastic 
crowd. After bringing his "victims" on stage and 
weeding out those who weren't affected by hypno- 
tism, the fun began. Frank had those on stage 
seeing, smelling, and feeling things that kept the 
crowd constantly laughing. Some people were told 
they were Madonna, Mick Jagger, Jr., and even a 
pantyhose-wearing Batman, while the rest of the 
hypnotized group really believed it and tried to get 
to the "celebrities." Everyone enjoyed the hilarious 
show, and except for some embarrassment on the 
part of the participants (after being told what they 
did on stage), no harm was done. 









"^gfc** 



58 Days to Graduation 



Seniors began the official countdown to 
graduation at the Fifty-Eight Days to Gradua- 
tion party. The Campus Center event was 
sponsored by the Senior Class and attended 
by both excited and anxiety-stricken gradu- 
ates celebrating their final semester at UMass 
Dartmouth. 




Major Fest 

All majors, ranging from Accounting to Textiles, 
came out to inform the UMD student body of the 
many opportunities open to them. This was a 
great opportunity for many students to get an 
idea on what major they want to become in- 
volved in and what kind of career would suit 
them best for their future. 



100 





Dress for Success 



Once again fashion shows held in the 
Commuter Cafe suggested to students how 
to Dress for Success. Students modeled the 
latest in business attire and casual wear 
provided by local stores as people watched 
and listened. 






Shared Visions 

Shared Visions, an art show orchestrated by 
UMass Dartmouth student Deidre Sullivan, was 
held at Gallery 244 in the Visual and Performing 
Arts Building at Purchase Street, New Bedford. 
The art work compiled by the students ad- 
dressed women and women's issues in celebra- 
tion of International Women's Month. The 
faculty advisor was Janet Freedman, and the 
student curators were Lana Lima and Kevin 
Foley. 

At left (from left to right): Mary Greim, Aaron 
Boudreau, Deidre Sullivan, Catherine Texeira, 
Alison Farina, Robert Lembo, Allison Coelho, 
Cuong Phu, Benjamin Boudoin, Sarina 
Saperstein, Melissa Dillon, Lana Lima, Anne 
O'Sullivan, Shelby Mackey, and Mary Kenny. 




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shared 
visions 



an art show addressing women and women's issues 

with works by over twenty art students of the 

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 

for International Women's Month 



March 1 - 12, 1993 

9-5 Monday - Friday 

Gallery 244 

UMass Visual and Performing Arts Building 
1213 Purchase Street 
New Bedford, MA 

Opening Night Celebration 

Thursday, March 4 
7-9 pm 

Dddrc Sullivan, show oij^anlzer 



101 



Winter Ball 



On Friday December 4, the Student Activities 
Board held the Winter Ball at the Allendale 
Country Club. This semi-formal event featured a 
DJ spinning tunes and a superb buffet. Everyone 
had a good time dancing the night away. 




102 



- 




Aimee Mann & O Positive 

A few years back when most of us were still in junior high school, 
there was a voice in a song. The song was "Voices Carry/' by 
Bostonians Til' Tuesday, the voice was that of Aimee Mann. On 
December 3, the voice was back, frail and strong as ever, giving 
the audience a taste of the old and a hint of the new. If you closed 
your eyes, you might have even caught images from V66. Mann's 
clear folky sound left an indelible impression on the audience. 

O-Positive, also from Boston, provided a heavy louder sound to 
finish off the evening. Their music based less in folk, featured 
multiple guitar layering and a heavy drum beat. It also featured a 
telelphone, used as a microphone in the cutting commentary of 
pop culture, "Rolling Stone." 

It was a showcase of great local music, both from yesterday and 
today all at once. 




103 



New to this past year were the 
Coffeehouses held every other 
Wednesday Night. The atmo- 
sphere was meant to be a relaxing 
evening out (usually from 8-1 Opm) 
in the Sunset Room Lounge. Also 
featured was live music ranging 
from acoustic to jazz to blues. It 
was a great place to unwind with a 
large cup of joe and some pastry 
or even a few cheese curls. 








small factory 

On Friday Febraury 26, local Providence rockers 
small factory brought their acoustic noise stick to 
the Rat. Cambridge rockers Twig opened the 
evening with a duo of harmonizing female 
vocals, small factory also harmonized on songs 
like "Suggestions," "Scared of Love," "Come 
Back Down," and "Lose Your Way" which have 
proceeded to make small factory a recognizable 
force in the area. Also keeping the crowd inter- 
ested where the games of small factory and their 
fun rambling between songs or the occasional 
broken string. "Sacremento ...California," yeah! 





105 



Flashback Week 

SAB sponsored Flashback Week during the first 
week in February, giving the traditional break- 
the-winter-blues activities a retro theme. It got 
started on Sunday with everyone's favorite middle 
school field trip, Roller Skating! -at the Carousal 
Skating Center in Fairhaven. Monday brought 
dance lessons where would-be Disco heads learned 
the Hustle to the music that made John Travolta a 
magazine pin-up. Tuesday was the much antici- 
pated Brady Bunch Murder Mystery Night. The 
best part of the evening was the TV. show themes 
the actors played during their many breaks. And 
of course the male Alice was cute. Wednesday 
night was a free showing of the movies "Grease", 
"The Breakfast Club", and "Singles" . It started out 
slow, but by "Singles" Room 153 of Group VI was 
packed. The Thursday Commuter cafe lunch crowd 
was entertained with impersonators of Cher and 
Bruce Springsteen. The culmination of the week 
was Friday with a sold out show of the Village 
People followed by a 70's rat in the campus center. 
Lime green polyester abounded in the auditorium 
as people got into the 70' s disco spirit. Elvis opened 
the show with his twisting hips and white bell 
bottoms. Then the eight track memories were 
resurrected when the construction worker, police- 
man, Indian, biker and sailor hit the stage-the 
original Village People! The choreography was 
exciting and energizing and made up for their tape 
recorded music. The classics like, "Macho Man" 
and "In the Navy" made the crowd roar. The 
encore "YMC A" had everyone making those crazy 
arm letters without shame. 





107 



^^^^^^■B 



Spring Week 

April 12-16 was the annual Spring Week full 
of activities to celebrate the end of winter. 
Monday was a Scavenger Hunt where teams 
ran around Dartmouth looking for Burger 
King crowns and other stupid items. Tues- 
dav was a Comedy Nite with Ronnie Romm, i 
who did tricks of ESP and hypnosis. Wednes- ; 
day was the Sunsplash in the Quad. The 
overcast day did not dampen the spirits of 
students eating barbecue and cotton candy, 
getting "old time" photos taken or jumping in 
the giant monkey bouncy thing. That night 
SAB revived the old custom of watching 
movies in the poo; while floating on rafts the 
movie "Jaws" played on the wall of the 
indoor pool at the gym. Thursday was a bus 
trip into Boston to see the then first place Red 
Sox play the Cleveland Indians. Also on 
Thursday was a presentation by Billy West, 
the voice of Stimpy in the Ken and Stimpy 
Show. The week culminated with the Spring 
Ball on Friday evening. 




08 





109 



Spring Break 

Spring Break 1993 brought New England one of 
the worst snowstorms in years. While many 
headed for warmer climates (after finally 
getting on their delayed flights), some who 
remained behind took advantage of the situa- 
tion and enjoyed skiing, hiking, and other 
"northern" sports. 

However, the majority of New England- 
escapees went south - Florida and Cancun, 
especially - to soak up the sun and enjoy the 
beach, while the rest were left to shovel drive- 
ways back home. Unfortunately, many experi- 
enced cooler than normal temperatures and 
didn't get the full "spring" break effect, but 
(obviously) still made the most of their time off, 




110 





1 1 1 




12 




113 



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^^^^^^^^^m 



Denis Leary 

Denis Leary is an ass and proud of it. 
Leary and his band from MTV's Un- 
plugged entertained a full gymnasium on 
April 27th with his strong Irish mixture of 
comedy and song, blended with his 
patented chain smoking and beer drink- 
ing. His show consisted of material from 
his "No Cure For Cancer" show, plus 
many new material, too. Much like his 
MTV spots, Leary' s comedy was filled 
with all the tidbits of nostalgia and 
morbid humor that only Denis Leary, 
originally from Worcester, could bring. 




114 





115 



They Might Be Giants 

April 24 brought a free outdoor concert featuring four 
bands: Raise, Blue World, Irration, and They Might Be 
Giants. The weather was beautiful, and around 1,700 
people came out for the show. Some spent the day lying in 
the sun or playing volleyball nearby, while most were in 
the amphitheater dancing and enjoying the music. 

They Might Be Giants headlined the show and fired up the crowd with 
their brand of original, quirky alternative music. Most of the songs they 
played were from their last two albums, including their more well- 
known songs like "Particle Man," "I Palindrome I," "Istanbul (Not 
Constantinople)," and "The Guitar." They also performed several new 
songs from their upcoming album. TMBG did somethng a little differ- 
ent, too: they played Spin the Dial, where they searched for a song on the 
radio to cover, and ended up doing a great version of "American 
Woman" by The Guess Who. Everyone enjoyed what was one of the 
most successful UMass concerts in recent years. 





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117 



Spring Ball 

The annual and much-anticipated Spring 
Ball was held April 16 once again at 
Hawthorne Country Club. The Ball is 
always one of SAB's largest and most 
successful events, and this year was no 
different. Everyone enjoyed dancing to 
live music provided by the band The 
Bicycle Thieves. 




1 18 



Outing Club Expeditions 




Nursing Honor Society Awards Banquet 




Last Day of Classes/Pancake Breakfast 




The 1993 school year ended 
with one last senior bash at the 
Rat, getting together once again. 
For many, it would be their last 
time together as a class. And 
many closed out the week by 
attending Saturday morning's 
senior pancake breakfast, which 
was served by the faculty. 




123 



^^^^^^^ 




24 




125 



Honors Convocation 

The Eighth Annual Honors Convocation was an oppor- 
tunity for members of the university to recognize the 
achievements of honor students and the recipients of 
various scholarships. The award for Achievement of 
Honors is given to undergraduate students who have 
earned a cumulative grade point average between 3.20 
and 3.79, and the award for Achievement of Highest 
Honors is given to students with a final GPA of 3.8 or 
higher. Graduating students who earned the Highest 
Scholastic Standing from each of the five colleges were 
also honored. As UMass Dartmouth Commonwealth 
Scholars, Anthony Cabral and Lisa Woike were pre- 
sented with special honor cords to wear during the 
graduation exercises to signify their completion of the 
university's honor program. The keynote speaker was 
Professor Steven Burg of Brandeis University, who 
spoke on the topic "After the Cold War: Old Dangers, 
New Opportunities." 



Christin DeMoranville, recipient of the Honors Essay Award; the theme was 
"Changed Realities/Changing Possibilities." 



126 





Highest Scholastic Standing for the College of Arts and 
Sciences: Michelle A. Poirier 




Highest Scholastic Standing for the College of Business and 
Industry: Melissa A. Maziarski 





Highest Scholastic Standing for the College of Arts and 
Sciences: David A. Malone (Transfer) 




Highest Scholastic Standing for the College of Engineering: 
Steven P. Longworth 




Highest Scholastic Standing for the College of Nursing: Joyce 
Parsons 



Highest Scholastic Standing for the College of Visual and 
Performing Arts: Erik A. Thompson , ~ 7 



Honors Recongnition Dinner 

"We want the students to remember the University. Your 
accomplishments during the future will show our efforts/' 
said Joseph deck, Interim Chancellor. Deck was one of the 
presenters and speakers at the Annual Graduation — Honors 
Recognition Dinner on Friday, June 4, 1993. 

The night consisted of the presentation of awards to students 
recognized for skills such as academic achievement, leader- 
ship, student service, participation and involvement in the 
Universities programs. 

The Academic awards, presented by Chancellor Deck, were 
given to Michelle Poirier, Steven P. Longworth, Sheri Fish, 
Joyce Parsons, Erik Thompson, Bonny A. Campbell-Runyon, 
Melissa A. Maziarski and David A. Malone. 

The Student Leadership awards were presented to students of 
the Student Senate and the Board of Governors. Billy Valente, 
Rob Bruno, Marc Pardy, Heidi Robinson, Eileen Finneran. 
Angela Yee, Sean Flaherty, Eric Nelson, Jodi Benedetto, Kirk 
Fitzsimmons, Nicole Packard and Melanie Picard received the 
awards from Joseph DeAngelo, President of Student Senate 
and Taryn Laughlin, Chairperson of the Board of Governors. 
DeAngelo and Laughlin were also recognized for their leader- 
ship skills and generous involvement in the University's 
student government. 

Also recognized were students receiving the Who's Who 
Among Students in American Universities and Colleges 
Award. "These awards go to special people with extraordi- 
nary leadership and generosity," said Dean Donald Howard. 
Kimberly Allen, Kieran Chapman, Timothy Coe, Joseph 
DeAngelo, Elizabeth Fernandes, Eileen Finneran, Taryn 
Laughlin, David Lawton, Carla Lester, Kelly L. Long, Christine 
Mott, Robin Penny, James Quinn, Craig Rousseau, Antigone 
Simmons and Angela Yee were all awarded. 

The senior class gift was announced by Class Vice President 
Daniel Flanagan and Secretary /Treasurer Julie D'Errico. The 
seniors gave seasonal decorations for the campus center to 
"add color and life," said D'Errico. 

This years dinner speaker was Bob Lobel, Sports Anchor of 
WBZ-TV's Eyewitness News. Lobel has received many 
awards including two Emmy's for Sports coverage and one 
Emmy for outstanding News Reporting. His wit and style 
entertained the audience of the dinner as he made the closing 
speech of the evening. 

Lobel felt that he had the unique power of the evening be- 
cause, "I'm the only one that's keeping you (students) between 
here and the Rat." 

He had many words of advice to the graduates. "Realize the 
importance of a sense of humor. Do not take yourselves too 
seriously," said Lobel. He wanted the graduates to "be proud 
of how far you've come but realize that this is just your 
foundation. You will come across many more questions and 
less answers." 

128 





130 




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Women's Soccer 



The women's soccer team had an incred- 
ible season with a 17-3-2 record. They 
went into the Division II Nationals 
unranked and came home proud with a 
second place trophy. No other UMass 
team has ever done that well in an NCAA 
tournament. The team will be inducted 
into the UMass Dartmouth Hall of Fame in 
1997. 

Seniors that contributed to the team's great 
season included Lisa Gomes, who was All- 
Little East, as was Marybeth Callagan, who 
was also the team's leading scorer. Kathy 
Regan was voted the MVP for defense in 
the Final Four and New England All-Star 
first team. Kim Surikea was Little East 
Rookie of the Year, Rachel Barbenosa was 
the team's #1 goalie and was also Final 
Four All-Tournament and All-New En- 
gland. 

Women's soccer has only been an 
intercollegiate sport at UMass Dartmouth 
for four years. Coach Cabral said "It was a 
great experience coaching this team." 





A* 




Front row (left to right): Annemarie Gagnon, Mary Ellen Gregory, Beth Krumsiek, Marybeth Callahan, Kathy 
Regan, Lisa Gomes, Michelle Eaton, Rachael Barbarossa. Back row: Assistant Coach Tony Neves, Beth Kelly, 
Kim Serrecchia, Amy Melville, Kristen Kyle, Head Coach Ray Cabral, Kim Gamache, Melissa Mandracchia, 
Kim Taylor, Julie Smalley, Scorer Laura Sherman. Missing from photo: Leanne Morris, Heather Egan 

134 




Men's Soccer 

The men's soccer team had a winning 
season of 9-4-3, finishing third in the Little 
East Conference this year. One of the 
most exciting games was against New 
England champions Western Connecticut. 
UMass was leading 1-0 until the last two 
minutes of the game when their opponent 
scored to tie it up. They also tied with 
Division II Stonehill College 3-3 for 
another close game. 

Senior Michael Dias led the team in 
scoring with 16 goals. He was also All- 
Conference and New England 
Intercollegiate Soccer League All-Star. 
Senior Tim Lussier received Honorable 
Mention in the conference. 

Coach Mlodzinski felt that seniors Dias, 
Lussier, Peter Susa, Bret Reis, and Frank 
Koczalka contributed a lot to the success 
of their year. 



Front row (left to right): John Maneikis, Tom McDonald, Glenn Nathan, Tim Lussier, Tony 
Capela, Manosinh Srenvanjan, Frank Koczalka. Back row: Brian Dailey, Mike Dias, Adelino 
Jacob, Chris Garcia, Bryan Guimar, Jackson Caneiro, Head Coach Jarek Mlodzinski. Missing 
from photo Bret Reis, Peter Sousa, Roger Fonseca, Assistant Coach Eric Lacroix' 



135 



^m 



Volleyball 



The women's Volleyball team started the season 
strong with a 10-1 record, but struggled a little in the 
end to finish with a respectable 18-13. The team 
played sensational at the Salem Invitational to finish 
2nd. In the past 10 years UMass Dartmouth has 
never finished in the top three. Junior Vicki Philibert 
had a successful season individually by being named 
to the All-Tournament Team 2 out of 3 times. 

Coach Duarte said "this team has been the most fun 
to coach out of my 7 years because of their great 
attitudes and determination." The team will miss the 
presence of Assistant Coach Lisa Proc who had to 
leave mid-season. She played on the volleyball team 
for her 4 years here and then she became assistant 
coach; she had a great impact on the team's success 
and attitude. 




Front row (left to right): Jen Roberts, Heidi Ashworth, Vickie Philibut, Cheryl Digits, 
Sherri-Lee Marchond. Back row: Nathalee Black, Jennifer Kearns, Paula Forte, Nadine 
Marrier, Sarah Drewicz, Head Coach Ken Duante. Missing from photo: Assistant Coach 
Lisa Proc. 






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136 





Football 




The football team had a successful season with a record 
of 5 - 4. Their most exciting game was against Westfield 
State College, when the game went into triple overtime 
with UMass Dartmouth coming out on top 21 - 14. 

Sophomore Billy Johnson and teammate Jamie Chase led 
the team in rushing with about 500 yards each. Sensa- 
tional Billy Johnson also led the team in scoring with 9 
touchdowns. James Santucci caught 23 passes for 380 
yards with 6 touchdowns to lead the team in receiving. 

Leading defensive players included Bobby O'Brien, 
Kevin Nolan, Steve Roberge, Mike Jarvis, Peter Crane, 
Nassar Shabo, and Ronny Scott. 





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137 



Field Hockey 

The Women's Field Hockey team had an 
excellent season with a 9-5-1 record. Coach 
Ritz said "I am very pleased with our 
record; we were ranked 9th in the Northeast 
Region during Mid-October." 



Their most exciting win came on October 
27th agianst Clark University, who was the 
#4 ranked team in the NCAA Northeast 
Regional Poll. Natalia Giant scored the 
only goal of the game to put UMass 



Dartmouth on top, and goalkeeper Nancy 
Courtney had an incredible 11 saves to 
secure the 1-0 win. 

Natalie Gioni led the team in scoring with 
8 goals and senior Nancy Courtney was 
the #1 goalie for the team. Margy 
Wintermyer and Veronica Froio had 
excellent skills at the midfield while 
Michelle Sullivan helped Natalie Gioni on 
the offense. 




ml 




138 



Front row (left to right): Allison Marsden, Shelley Albanese, Joanna Rudalevige, 
Nancy Courtney (Captain), Alicia Thoms (Captain), Veronica Froio, Allison Connell, 
Natalia Gioni. Back Row: Jennifer Connery, Margy Wintermyer, Cynthia Vrusho, 
Michelle Sullivan, Aimee Sabourin, Lisa Hermenegildo, Colleen Clifford 




Front row (left to right): Julie D'Errico, Liz Ciolino, Lisa Norman, 
Jocelyn Hilliaret. Back row: Angela Yee, Erin Kennedy, Kristen 
Olmstead. Missing from photo: Captain Kerry Rouhan, Christen 
Moak, Lee Norcott 



Women's Tennis 

The Women's Tennis team had a great season with a record of 8 - 4, 
which is more wins than any women's team since 1983. 

The team finished second out of four teams at the UMass Dartmouth 
Invitational, only three points behind Rhode Island College. Their best 
win came at the end of the season against Assumption College. The 
team won 4 of 6 matches and they needed one of the three doubles to 
win the match. The doubles matches were shortened because of dark- 
ness and while losing #2 and #3 doubles, Captain Kerry Rouhan and 
Lisa Norman rallied for the win to help the team clinch the match. 

The MVP was senior Kerry Rouhan, Rookie of the Year went to fresh- 
man Kristen Olmstead, who had an individual record of 8 - 3. The 
player with the most wins, 9-3, was French Exchange Student, 
Jocylyne Hiliarret. 




139 



Women's Swimming and Diving 



The women started off their season with a win over 
Bridgewater State College 135-106, and then lost by 
only one point to Trinity College. "The team is very 
young and the future looks very bright for them," 
says Coach Filipo. The Women had six members 
make it to the New England Championships. Senior 
Sheila Chipman finished seventh in the 1 -meter 
diving competition which made her All-New En- 
gland. Chipman went on to compete in the NCAA 
Division III Nationals placing 19th in the 1 -meter and 
25th in the 3-meter diving competition. 



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Front Row (left to right): Andrea Skirven, Sheila Chipman, Lisa Fiorini, Becky Lussier, 
Amy Perkins, and Michelle Duquette. Back Row: Doreen Nyman, Courtenay Dold, Sue 
Sculley, Amy Miller, Julia Saunders, Kerrie Parkinson, Lisa Wiggins, Debbie Halligan, Erin 
O'Donnnell. 



140 



Men's Swimming and Diving 





The men's team started off their season 
winning their first three meets and went on 
to have a 5-2 record. Ten of the men went 
to the New England Championships they 
finished eighth out of 24 teams. Sopho- 
more Brett Ramming made it to the 50- 
yard freestyle finals and finished seventh 
with a time of 21.70, making him All-New 
England. Freshman Jason Hamel finished 
seventh in the 100-yard breast stroke with 
a time of 101.30, making him All-New 
England, too. Andy Flynn also had a 
strong performance by finishing third in 
both the 1 -meter and 3-meter diving 
competition, and later going on to the 
NCAA Division III Nationals where he 
finished 21st in the 1 -meter and 19th in the 
3-meter diving competition. 








*; 



Front Row (left to right): Steve Benjamin, Steve 
Scaplen, Gary Collins, Andy Flynn, Joseph Makhoul. 
Back Row: Doug Michaud, Brett Ramming, Sam 
Barrett, Josh Hoaglund, Jason Hamel. 



141 



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Men's Basketball 

The men's basketball team started off their 
season winning the Hartwick College Tourna- 
ment, and from there they went on to have a 
fantastic 25-6 overall record. The team played 
two overtime games against Salem State and 
Hartwick College and won both games. They 
also defended their Little East Conference Title 
successfully and went all the way to the Final 
Four at the NCAA Division III Nationals. The 
team placed a very respectable fourth in the 
finals, losing by only one point to Ohio North- 
ern University. 

Senior Steven Haynes was the leading scorer 
and rebounder with 676 and 301, respectively; 
he averaged 22.5 points and 10 rebounds per 
game. Sophomore Stefan Pagios lead the team 
in assists with 160, and sophomore Aaron Lee 
led the team with 96 3-pointers. This team 
outscored their opponents 2773 to 2432 points in 
the season. 




Front row (left to right): Tom Moran, Paul Brewer, Matt McConnell, Stefan Paigos, R. J. 
Migliaccio, Byron Andrews, Jason Correiro. Back row: Coach Baptiste, Jason Youngquist, Eric 
Eaton, Aaron Lee, Ted Sisson, Darius Modestow, Steven Haynes, Jon Dunlap, Mark Holmes. 





Women's Basketball 

The women's basketball team was on fire with a 9-1 start on 
their season and ended with much improvement from last 
year with a record of 13-12. "The team had a great attitude 
and we got a lot accomplished/' says Judy Sullivan who is 
retiring after 16 years of coaching. Sullivan ends her career 
with a 200-167 record. 

The team won all 3 of their overtime games. Junior Kim 
Ferdella put in a 3-pointer at the buzzer to help beat Salem 
State 70-67; she also helped beat Wheaton College with her 
3-point perfection 71-67. 

Senior Marybeth Callahan led the team in assists. Captain 
and senior Amy Harvey reached her 1000th point in 
scoring, making her the third UMass Dartmouth woman to 
accomplish such a goal. Harvey also led the team in 
scoring and rebounding, and was selected for the Little 
East All-Conference First Team. 





Front row (left to right): Amy Courcy, Nicole Dube, Amy Harvey, 
Marybeth Callahan, Kristie Glynn, Christine Sullivan, Kimberly Ferdella. 
Back row: Coach Sullivan, Kathryn Kelly, Tracy Anderson, Lori Sulham, 
Jennifer Connery, Eve Marani, Kathy Houtman, Sue Quinn. 




143 



Hockey 



The Ice Hockey team could not have asked 
for a better season with a 21-3-1 record and 
another first place in the ECAC Champion- 
ships. They had four shutout games, two 
of which were played in the finals. The 
team also outscored their opponents 19-2 
in the championships. 

The leading scorers on the team were 
seniors Chris Smith, Jim Gardiner, and P.J. 
Schneider, all with 17 goals. Senior Paul 
Lambalot led the team in assists and points 
with 30 and 40, respectively. Seniors Chris 
Smith and Bob Carroll made it into the 
"100 Game Club" with 103 and 102. 
Lambalot and Smith made it into the "100 
Point Club" for their careers with 102 and 
121. 

The team's leading goalie was Kevin Kelly 
who had a 2.33 goals-against-average 
which ranks him in UMD history. Out of 
the 444 shots taken on Kelly, he saved 403 
of them. 

Kelly, Gardiner and Carroll were New 
England Writer All-Stars. Carroll was also 
ECAC Player of the Year, ECAC All-Star, 
and was awarded the Thorn Lawler 
Division II /III Player of the Year which is 
chosen by Eastern Massachusetts Hockey 
Officials. Gardiner was also an ECAC All- 
Star, and Paul Olenik was ECAC Champi- 
onship Game MVP. Coach John Rolli was 
New England Writers Coach of the Year. 
Other awards given were Jim Gardiner 
and P.J. Schneider winning the "Seventh 
Player" award, and MVP went to Bob 
Carroll. The Corsair's Award, which is 
chosen by the coaches, went to Derek 
Cormier, Bob Keenan, and Chris Smith. 






144 



Lacrosse 




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145 



Cross Country 



Men's Cross Country 

The men's cross country team turned in another 
super season this year, winning the Little East 
Cross Country Championships for the fifth year 
in a row. Sophomore Deon Barrett led the team 
all year and won the championships by a full 
minute with a time of 26.38. Second went to 
sophomore Ryan Hunt, with freshman Peter 
Wefers taking fifth, sophomore Chris Elgar 
ninth, junior Todd Deely tenth, sophomore Eriks 
Licus 12th, and freshman Samuel Calomo 18th. 
The team also placed well in the Union College 
Invitational; they placed sixth out of 13 teams 
with Barrett finishing ninth with a time of 25.45 
to pace the team. 




Front row (left to right): Mark Johnson, Eriks Licus, Bob Peterson, Matt Crean, Deon Barrett 
(Captain), Ryan Hunt, Tdd Deely, Sam Calomo. Back row: Joe McCarthy (Assistant Coach), Jon 
Hird (Head Coach). Missing from photo: Jeff Mahoney, Peter Wefers. 




Women's Cross Country 

The women's cross country team also had a successful season 
winning the Little East Cross Country Championships for the 
second year in a row. Senior Rebecca Nichols, who led the team all 
year, placed second with a time of 18.58. Her teammates finished 
the job with freshman Michelle Doane, sophomores Sue St. Laurent 
and Jennifer Bougie, and freshmen Eve Marani and Sara Colello 
placing fifth through ninth, respectively. The team also raced to a 
second place finish at the Union College Invitational in Saratoga 
Springs, NY. Nichols finished second overall, with St. Laurent 
13th, Doane 17th, Colello 18th, and Bougie 27th. 



Front row (left to right): Michelle Doane, Sara 
Colello, Sue St. Laurent, Eve Marani, Jennifer 
Bougie. Back row: Joe McCarthy (Assistant 
Coach), Jon Hird (Head Coach). Missing from 
photo: Rebecca Nichols, Stephanie Bowden. 

146 




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Men's Track and Field 

The men's indoor track and field team had a fine season 
finishing ninth out of 20 teams at the ECAC meet. Senior 
Eric Lopes was second in the 55 hurdles, and freshman 
Isaac Rodriguez was third with a time 7.80, a personal best. 
Sophomore Matt Crean was third in the 3000 with a time of 
8:52.43, and Deon Barrett was right behind him placing 
fourth. In the 55-yard dash junior Jay Gracia placed sixth 
with a time of 6.74. Lopes, Rodriguez, Crean, Barrett and 
Gracia were All-ECAC. Lopes also made his first trip to 
the NCAA Division III Nationals in the 55 hurdles, where 
he ran a personal best of 7.71. 



147 



Softball 




148 




■ 







Baseball 

The baseball team enjoyed an- 
other successful season in 1993. 
After compiling a 27-11 record, 
the Corsairs qualified to compete 
in their third straight NCAA 
Regional Tournament. Coached 
by Bruce Wheeler, the team was 
ranked #1 in New England for 
most of the season and pro- 
gressed to #12 in the nation in 
Division III by tournament time. 
This ranking was due in part 
from the contributions of seniors 
John Graham, Dennis Santos, 
Obed Core, Kurt Dreher, and 
Chris Gibson. 
















Front row (left to right): Mark Pavao, Fred Conley, Sean Wheeler, Jeff Arruda, Dan 
Delcore, Pat Gallagher, Dennis Santos, Gregg Harrison, Ed Morais. Back row: Mike 
Hayes, Jeff Coppetta, John Graham (Captain), Kurt Dreher (Captain), Joe Galvin, Andy 
Boyko, David Cleary, Derek Hast, Jason Spreyer, Andy Rowley, Mike Casey, Chris Igo, 
Chris Gibson, Obed Core (Captain). 



149 




150 




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Senior Class Officers 




(Left to right) Angela Yee (President), Daniel Flanagan (Vice-President), Julie D'Errico 
(Secretary / Treasurer) . 



To our fellow graduates of the class of 1993: 

We the Senior Class Officers would like to extend our sincerest congratulations on 
completing your personal as well as academic education here at the University of Massa- 
chusetts Dartmouth. 

There are several senior events that contributed to our enjoyment as well as our success 
here at the University. Our freshman and sophomore years we participated in the Cow 
Casino while our junior year was filled with bake sales and lip synch contests. Senior year 
got started with the Senior Blast Off and was filled with events such as 93 days 'til 
graduation, 58 days 'til graduation, Spring Break-Cancun, Playoffs, The Tent, Graduation 
Dinner with Bob Lobel, Last Ratt with Gordie Mill, and finally Commencement with John 
Ashe and Terry Anderson. These senior events will forever be unique to the Class of 1993 
in a special way. 

Along with the many events we participated in and subjects studied, there were many 
lessons learned throughout these four years. Some of these easily learned while others 
were realized through much pain. However learned these are lessons that will never be 
forgotten. 

Throughout these four years there have been many faculty and classmates that have 
touched our lives in special ways and through this have formed friendships that will last a 
lifetime. It has been our pleasure to serve all of you, but most importantly it's been our 
pleasure to get to know all of you. We thank all of you who have touched our lives in any 
way and hope that the friendships we have developed through the Class of 1993 will stay 
strong through the times. 



Good luck! 

Angela Yee 
President 



Daniel J. Flanagan 
Vice-President 



Julie D'Errico 
Secretary/Treasurer 



56 



Student Senate 




Front row (left to right): John Coutinho, Nora Grady, Matt Morrisey, Joe DeAngelo, Jodi Benedetto, John Gill, Billy Valente, Eileen 
Finneran, Kevin Tobin (lying down). Middle row: Christine Perryman, Vicky Mangus, Patricia Arruda, Janet Osborne, Martha 
Reeves, Angela Yee, John Duggan, Joseph Obeng-Boampong, Bill Bonneville, Nancy Finneran, Gerry Ventura. Back row: Carlos 
Arruda, Andreas Balogh, Jennifer Sanchez, Amy Valente, Paul Burnett, Sean Flaherty, Marc Pardy, Marty Fisher, Rob Bruno, Tom 
Sangermano, Heidi Robinson. Missing from photo: Eric Nelson, Derek Roberts. 



Physics Club 




Front row (lefto right): Paul Eugenio, Kerri Howland, He Lei, Andreas Balogh, Guo 
Dewei. Back row: Bill Hubbard, Timothy Olden, Martin Bosch, Glenn Volkema, 
Huang Xiao. 



157 



Residence Hall Congress 




Front row (left to right): Eric Rahnan, Tricia Garofalo, Adrian Guzekowski. Middle row: 
Steve Seaver, Jon Stephenson, Joe Skees, Derek Cotton, Nicole Elias, Anthony Barbaro. 
Back row: Jeff Coco, Mike Murray, Katie O'Malley, Andy Alphonso, Rob Nichols, 
Christina DiLorenzo, Mike Gefteas, Christina MacLellan, Todd Zoly, Kathleen Griffin, 
Paul Dacey, M.P. Feitelberg. 




RHC Executive Board 

Front row (left to right): Tricia Garofalo (Vice-presidei 
of Cedar Dell), Adrian Guzekowski (President), Eric 
Rahnan (Recording Secretary). Back row: Anthony 
Barbaro (Corresponding Secretary), Joe Skees (Treasur 




Board of Governors 




158 



Front row (left to right): Nicole Packard (Secretary), Taryn Laughlin (Chairperson), Kirk 
Fitzsimmons (Treasurer), Christina Braga (Vice-chairperson). Middle row: Angela Yee, Ki 
Braily, Vicky Mangus, Melanie Pickert, Melissa Salluce, Jen Toney. Back row: Mike Murra 
Rich Cole, Dick Waring, John Lewis. 



Senior Committee 




Front row (left to right): Bill Valente, Jennifer Toney, Pam Nicetta, Tiffini Beevers, Emily Kilduff, Julie D'Errico, 
Maura McManus, Tricia Garafalo, Paul Doyon. Back row: Taryn Laughlin, Angela Yee, Tabitha Agneta, Kalen Mace, 
Dan Flanagan, Amy Coates, Julie Napoleon. 




Pre-Law Society 




Front row (left to right): Paula Barbosa, Viana DeAndrade, Nicole Weeden, Amy Valente, Wayne 
Serra (Vice-president). Middle row: Michael Silvia (Treasurer), Darin Souza, Tina Skerritt, Lisa 
Lombardi, Aaron Shields, James Goes (President). Back row: John Lyons, Joseph Skees, Cecelia 
Weeks, Antigone Simmons, Michelle Santello, Jamie Ramos. 



159 



Phase I 



(Left to right) Britt Ericsson, Kevin 
Tobin, Jill Thibault, Dave Lawton, Dave 
Andrews, Steve McDowell, Christine 
Mott 




Phase II 



Phase 3A 




Front row (left to right): Rick Kotch, Shadi Awwad, Ronda Trychon. Back row: 
Kate Faria, Mike Nailor, Kim Fleck, Scott Johnson 




(Top to bottom): Chris Gouveia, Brian Herlihy, Kristine 
Thurston, Sheryl Harney, Robin Keegan 



160 



Phase 3B 




Cedar Dell West 



Front row (left to right): Melissa Gilbert, Sharon Hoerup, Kate Tolini. Back row: Kevin 
Rollend, Jon Zivan, Liz Fernandes 



(Top to bottom) Anne McCoy, Kim Knowles, Lisa 
Gardini, Eric Page, Sean Killeen, Mark Williams, 
Donna Chapman 




Cedar Dell South 




(Left to right) Billy Valentine, Kellie 
McCabe, Janet Pergola, Anne Morris, 
Kelly Long, Andrew Chagnon, Chris K. 



161 



Student Activities Board 




Front row (left to right): Celeste Connors, Stephanie Sears, Jill Pickard, Faye Weiner, Leslie Gorman, Patricia Faria, Ed 
Irizarry, Matt Fuller. Middle row: Jodi Koenig, Mike Josti, Jeanne Martin, Tim Coe, Pam DeYoung, Sandy Payson, Tom 
Becker, Maria Krashin, Craig Rousseau, Kim Allen. Back row: Heather Mohan, Tina Skerritt, Jen Chelli, Robin Penny, 
Elisa Duda, John Corcoran, Kim Coolidge, Brian Johnson. 




SAB Executive Board 

Front row (left to right): Craig Rousseau, Stephenie Sears, Michael Josti, John Corcoran, 
Tim Coe. Back row: Kim Allen, Sue Costa (Director), Robin Penny, Sandy Payson, Kim 
Coolidge, Pam DeYoung, Tom Becker, Jeanne Martin, Elizabeth Fernandes 



162 




Outing Club 




Front row (left to right): Karen Leahy, Bill Conklin, Andy Flanagan (lying down). Back row: 
Dan Shuman, Mike Mello, Mike Chiarello, Holly Curcio, Steve Anderson, Melanie Salerno, Ali 
Juttelstad, Neil Overberg, Bob Dubois. 



BiGaLA 





(Left to right) David Beals (Co-chair), David St. 
Pierre (Treasurer), Jeff Palmer 



163 



Psychology Association 




Front row (left to right): Laura Campbell, Michelle A. Robinson, Stephanie Wahl, Kevin Michalski, Janice 
McKenna, Cynthia Hults. Back row: Susan Egan, Sheri Gerdner, Anne Marie Dialessi, Katie O'Malley, Sarah 
Mihalski, Richard Costa, Anna Medeiros. 



History Association 




Front row (left to right): Janice Maniatis, Susan Leigh Connors, D. Dickson Corcoran. 
Back row: Nathaniel Naughton, Prof. Frederick Gifun, Stephen Hordy (President), John- 
Peter Hession, Robert Ledo (Secretary). 




164 



Tae Kwon Do Club 




Front row (left to right): Bill Cowklin, Joe Czapiga, 
Bunthoeun Chea, Karen Keahy, Mike Dunham. Back 
row: Chris Coffin, Dave Sansone, Rick Thivault, 
Hilario Pinheiro (Treasurer), Montana Eang, Bill 
Wandeloski, Craig Santos, Brandon Berry. Missing 
from photo: Brian McDonaugh, Peter Cannon, Dan 
Shuman, Alex Jouklaris, Tim Doyle, Carrie Schorge, 
Neil Goodchild, Tommy Francis, Shawn Crawford, 
Nelson Alves, John Simmons, Brandon Berry, Nash 
Shabo, David Goncalves. 



Karate Club 



Front row (left to right): Bunthoeun 
Chea, Chris Lizotte, Joel Gailes, Eric 
Nazmeey, Jared Gailes, Chris Campeau. 
Back row: Mike Savage (Instructor 
sensei), Himonshue Trivedi, Adam 
Ziegev, Mary LePresti, Steve Brown, Don 
King, Kyle Spear (Vice-president), Dave 
Goncalves (Treasurer), Tony Benevides 
(President). Missing from photo: Brian 
Gonsalves, Sky Amaral. 






165 



Women's Center 




Front row (left to right): Kristeen Porter, Jeanine Porter, Amy Muir, Rev. Eletha Buote-Greig. Back 
row: Nancy Flaherty, Suzanne Porter, Suzan J. Mitchell, Darnyl King, Tracy Tortora, Lisa Medlowitz. 




ASCE 




American Society of Civil Engineers 

Front row (left to right): Jon D. Stephenson (Secretary), Barry Lorion, Tod Velsor (Vice-President), Jeff S. Perry (President), Wayne 
Nicardle, Rod Jackson. Middle row: Michael Louro, Jamie Antonio, Ted DeSantos, Anne Piekarski, Kerry Campbell, Patty Federico, 
Rui Bohtello, David Cabral. Back row: Bill Valentine, Dan Dwayne, Ginger Fagundes, Mike Brides, Grant Simpson, Rick Alves, Dana 
Miele, John Nihill. 



66 



Eta Kappa Nu 




Front row (left to right): Kimberly M. Duff (Corresponding 
Secretary), David R. Fitzpatrick (Vice-President), Paul J. Pacheco 
(President), Thomas R. Gomes (Recording Secretary), Melanie 
Wong (Treasurer). Middle row: Lei Lei Bao, Jian Wen, Yaode Xu, 
Robert A. Bruno, Gary L. Priest, Koksiong, Robert R. Caverly 
(Advisor). Back row: Wei Ben Huang, Daniel Wilson, Mak 
Karching, Suzanne M. Bancroft, Steven P. Longworth, William C. 
Zurawski, Christopher D. Lizotte. Missing from photo: Robert 
M. Gagnon. 



IEEE 




Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 
Front row (left to right): Brian Murphy (Vice- 
President EET), Glenn Whittaker (President), Tony 
Benevides (Vice-President EE), Richard Risotti 
(Treasurer), Ward Bowman (Vice-President CPE), Dr. 
Karen Pay ton (Advisor). Back row: Dave Goyette, 
Robert Bruno, John Gill, Joe Santamauro, Mike Sarcia, 
Denise Medeiros, Chris Meeks. Missing from photo: 
Alberto Tavares (Secretary). 



■ 



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167 



Front row (left to right): Rachel Parent (Treasurer), Tara 
Santoro (Secretary), Richard Pacheco (Secretary), Erin 
Winn (Vice-President), Tina Ehlers (President). Back 
row: Prof. William R. Allen, William Satkevich, Melissa 
Maziarski, Judy Stark, William Cudlitz, Anita Strunk, 
Prof. Richard Legault. 



Delta Mu Delta 

_uji._ 






Accounting Association 



Front row (left to right): Robert Goguen, 
Phil Boyko, Frank Kosky, James Goes. 
Back row: Melissa Maziarski, Tina Ehlers, 
Suzanne Rupp, Jocelyn Malaguti, Mary 
Tracey, Lucy Almeida, Fawn Sun, Diane 
Freeman, Joanne Richardson. Missing 
from photo: Dennis Santos, Kieran 
Chapman. 



68 




Iota Phi Theta 



Front row (left to right): Arthur Burton, Charles Williams, Craig L. Santos. Middle 
row: Mark Turner, Tony Derosier. Back row: Eric Gomes, Warren "Varnie" 
Harrington 111, Jay Andrade, Rich Whilby, Scott Pires. 




Sweethearts of Iota Phi Theta 

(Left to right) Kristin Monterio, Jeanna Monterio, Tanya James, Raquel Barbosa, 

Kamile Khazan, Karla Walker. 



United Brothers and Sisters 




Front row (left to right): Edith Faial, Alice Colon, Kelli 
McCarthy. Second row: Nicole Weeden, Sherry Avila, 
Jesuina Nunes, Melissa Gardner. Third row: Liz Andrade, 
Jaime Ramos, Dory Vega. Fourth row: David Ortiz, Sissy, 
Frank Kriegar, Kamile Khazan. Back row: Dave Rawlins, 
Mark Williams, Arthur Burton, Mark Turner, Carol 
McCloud. 



169 



Returning Students Organization 




(Left to right) Lynda Jordan, Deken Schmidt, Robin Napokitan (Vice-president), Suzanne Porter (President), Katie 
Milholo, Bonnie Gobell (Treasurer). 



Student Alumni Association 




i 



i 



Front row (left to right): Todd Rego, Denise Money, Don DiFusco. Back row: Taryn Laughlin, 
Warren Perry, Jen Snay (President). Missing from photo: Karen Dishroon, Robert Marshel, Tracy 
Herman, Chris Pare, Christian Alves, Christin Marrison, Bill Giarraputo, Tony Mahan. 





70 




Amnesty International 




(Left to right) Todd Lander, Maya Robertson, Cheryl Bigos, Jen Gillis, Dr. Aurory, Mason 
Bliss. 



Catholic Student Organization 




Front row (left to right): Jeff Cabral, Michael O'Shea, Jodi Koenig, Timothy Booker. Back row: Anne Marie 
Barton, Fr. Richard Degagne, Margaret Barton, Sr. Madeleine Tacy, Dr. Donald Mulcare. 



171 



Equestrian Team 




A i >J 

Front row (left to right): Barbara Kreiss, Sarah Mellor, Suzanne Baskinger, Megan 
Whittlesey, Dara Gallaghere, Shelley Turcotte, Sue D'Entremont. Back row: Vicky 
Sandstrom, Jenn Wall, Liz Newell, Tammy Haley, Lauren Heim, Ean Connell. 



Disabled Student Services 




Front row (left to right): Kerri Mooney, Emily Kilduff, Chris Ainsworth, Karen Mayo, Elisa Barbosa. 
Back row: Diev Nguyen, Sherri Gardner, Ann Pacheco, Goncalo Seabra. Missing from photo: Kim 
Conlon, Holly Binda, Ana DaCruz, Carole Johnson (Supervisor). 



172 





I i 




Omniad 



Front row (left to right): Nicole Packard, 
Cynthia Noblet, Lou Perry, Jennifer Keenan, 
Lynda Corbett (Vice-President of Sales), Daniel 
Solov (President), Denise Money (Vice- 
President of Accounts). Middle row: John 
Maneikis, Michael Soaresm Tom McDonald, 
Christine Turner, Melissa Bayko, Heather 
Harriman, Julie Blasenak, Julie D'Errico 
(Creative Director), Julie Napoleon, Patrice 
Giordano, Christine Galli, Kerri Vachon (Vice- 
President of Operations), Robert Medeiros. 
Back row: Carrie Hampl, Robin Mish 
(Recruitment), Mike Brilliant (Financial 
Controller), Ryan Love, Michael Hickey, Pat 
Mulligan, Ted Sisson, Jamie Roberts. 




Student Advisory Program 




Front row (left to right): Joe Skees, Jen Brunner, 
Lisa Kun (Co-Director). Middle row: Christine 
MacLellan, Kathleen Griffin, Vanessa 
MacDonald (Co-Director), Deborah Myers. Back 
row: Katie O'Malley, Jennifer Spring, Heidi 
Adams, Dave Klemer, Carrie Wheeler, AnnMarie 
Dialessi, Jennifer Hurley, Joan O'Connor. 



173 



Theatre Company 




Front row (left to right): Steve Burtoft, Kerry Gillon, Heidi O'Donnell, Michana Bigonahy, Jodi Koenig, Aaron Viera, Tom 
Becker, Vanessa San Juan, Lisa Allendorf, Heather O'Donnell. Middle row: Carl Martin, Matt Viera Tom Giammalvo, Brad 
Blake, Billy Sullivan, Garrett LaFrance, Joni Maniatis, Karen Gaviglia, Dierdre Finnerty, Alison Farina. Back row: Darren 
King, Jack Collins, Doug Nelson, Deidre Sullivan (Secretary), Steve Hayes, Anita Baily (President), Angus Baily (Director), 
Ken Reardon (Vice-president), Tom Waters (Box office), Chris Lyndon, Martha Powers, Brian Hallas, Jeremy Yetman. 




74 



Campus Design 




(Clockwise from midnight) Aaron Boudreau, Craig Rousseau (Coordinator), Allison Coelho, Deidre 
Sullivan, Genevieve Ackerman (Deidre's friend), C.J. Phu, Daren Capirchio, Heather Mohan, Ryan 
Gillespie, Jamie Quinn. Missing from photo: Deon Barrett, Ben Beaudoin, Jennifer Czernicki, Kevin 
Foley, Eric Guerin, Lucinda Mattson. 



The Torch 





Front row (left to right): Kim Allen, Kate Silva, Alex Mann, Julie Napoleon, Brian McDermott, 
Tara Santoro. Back row: Christine DiPietro, Michael Wood, Tania Sikora, Kevin Gawthrope, 
Francesca Cerutti. 



175 



Writing and Reading Center 




Left to right: Heidi O'Donnell, Deb Lewis, Elisa Barbosa, Lisa Fiorini, Tom Diaz, Ken Ritchie, 
Melissa Upham, Eddie Pires, Jennifer Camp, Jen Batchelder, Peter Sawyer. 



Concert Band 





176 


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Front row (left to right): Lori Mullin, Niki Heath, Jay Quinn, Tom Bednarz. Second 
row: Natalie Cabral, Anne-Marie Caouette, Alan Savage, Matt O'Connor. Third 
row: John Hutchinson, Jay DeLucca, Laurie Andrews, Jeff Perry. Fourth row: Jim 
Oliveira, Scott MacKinnon, Tim Coleman, Dave Lawton. Back row: Jason Kent, 
Rico Cleffi. 



Scrimshaw 




Left to right: Jamie Quinn (Layout Editor), Kieran Chapman (Editor-in-Chief), Francesca 
Cerutti (Photo Editor). 



Publications Manager: Jill Peavey 

Photo Contributions: Edwin Enrique Irizarry, Brian McDermott, Scott Bobrick, Sean Ellis, 
Bill Maniatis, Stephanie Sears, Sabine Selvais, Jill Peavey, Jamie Quinn, Val Vinton, Heather 
Harriman, and George Rodrigues. Special thanks to Bill Gathright, Manny Pereira, K. Ellis, 
Maeve Hickok, and Joe Geoffroy. 

Writing Contributions: Peter Sawyer (Introduction, Dedication, Architecture), Kate Silva 
(Commencement, Honors), Rebecca Nichols (Sports), Craig Rousseau, Edwin Elias Irizarry, 
Mike Josti, Dennis Santos, and Kevin Gawthrope. 

Tower Illustrations: Craig Rousseau, Cuong "C.J." Phu, Jamie Quinn, and Kieran Chapman. 




To the class of 1993: 



I'm not too good at writing these kinds of things, so bear with me. A lot 
of work has gone into the production of this book, but not nearly as 
much as the amount we've all spent over the past four years. (Has it 
been four years already?!) Hopefully you'll be able to look back at your 
experiences here at UMass Dartmouth in a favorable light, and I hope 
this book is able to preserve some of those memories for you. 

I really have to thank everyone for their help with the 1993 yearbook. 
First and foremost, to Jamie and Francie. Without you guys this 
would've been impossible, not to mention not much fun. Thanks for 
putting up with "that nice Chapman boy" around deadline time. And to 
everyone else: Dean Donald Howard, Norval Garnett, all the Scrimshaw 
contributors, Jostens, Chestnut Hill studios, College Publications, Karen 
and Paul for the training, Campus Design, All pop-punk bands, and the 
Torch. Thank you. And good luck to Eric and next year's staff. 

I hope you enjoy this book, and I wish you success and happiness in the 
coming years. 



Kieran Chapman 
Editor-in-Chief 



177 



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The Architecture of UMass Dartmouth 



Daylight works wonders at UMass 
Dartmouth. Harsh towers of sunwashed 
gray are transformed into something 
sublime when set against a powder-blue 
sky. One is instinctively drawn inside, 
beckoned by these curious monstrosities of 
cement and glass to something at their 
center, something significant. Once there, 
we find ourselves agape before a sleek stone 
spire — a belltower — which serves as the 
campus's centerpiece. As the sun arches 
westward, the tower casts its long, lazy 
shadow across interconnecting sidewalks, 
staggered steps and a lush green quad- 
rangle. From here our sight is drawn 
elsewhere again, this time down across the 
land to the school's real dramatic axis: a 
wide sward which severs the stone circle 
westward, revealing rolling banks of trees 
and a serene, wildflower-flanked pond. 





180 



But beauty is in the eye of the beholder. While the architecti 2 
of UMass Dartmouth can sometimes evoke such a wistful, 
romantic response, it has also been called "cold" or "mono- 
lithic." One professor here sees its gray, skeletal forms as 
"reminiscent of the ruined choirs of British abbeys." Anothe 
fancies its construction as "the work of various Adobe cliff 
dwellers." A student in our College of Visual and Performir 
Arts has called it "a spaceship ready to leave the pad." 
Whatever the view, our university certainly evokes a strong 
reaction. 

While everyone has an opinion about the "look" of UMD, til 
man behind the mystique does not come readily to mind 
Who was architect Paul Rudolph? What was his "vision" fo: 
our institution? To what extent did he succeed or fail? And 
what plans, if any, are in the works to vamp up his creation' 

Angela Yee, president of the Class of 1993, has an answer to 
the last one: she says that a $500 senior class gift is earmarks 
to dress the ubiquitous gray: "The money is being donated i 
the UMD Foundation account for hangings or banners to 
decorate the campus center." Yee sees a gift that fits the "thi 
seasons" of the academic year or a motif of "countries all 
around the world with cultural diversity themes." Whateve 
the Board of Governors and the Alumni Representative 
decide, Yee hopes the outgoing class can give "something tc 
make the school more alive." 

Although you may not think so from all that dingy concrete 
campus designer Paul Rudolph meant to inspire, or at the 
very least, "force you to realize you are in a unique place, tb 
there is no place like it anywhere." So says UMD Art Histor 
Professor Tom Puryear. He ought to know. Twelve years ag 
Puryear wrote a comprehensive essay for the UMD 
Scrimshaw about the outspoken former chairman of the 
School of Art and Architecture at Yale. In it, he quoted 
Rudolph's creedo for the architecture of higher education: " 

i 



school building that does not provide for its students concep- 
tual images unknown to the human majority, sells the future 
of society short of its environmental aspirations." 

Puryear translates this "archi-speak:" "Rudolph said a place 
that provides a student with an education should challenge 
their beliefs. That includes challenging their architectural 
beliefs. If you don't challenge (a student's) belief systems on 
campus, where are they going to be challenged?" 

Rudolph first began to challenge our idea of what a university 
should look like with his blueprints for Southeastern Massa- 
chusetts University back in 1963. Many of his bold, angular 
clusters of buildings were up by 1966, and in 1969 Southeast- 
ern Massachusetts Technological Institute (founded in 1960) 
formally became SMU, forever changing the skyline of sedate 
North Dartmouth. 

According to Puryear, Rudolph's design for UMD is "nothing 
less than the prototype for town planning of the future." To 
go forward, Rudolph looked at classical models. He patterned 
our campus after the hub of medieval Sienna, Italy, whose 
central tower, the Palazzo Pubblico, draws a visitor in and 
"organizes and controls the focus of the streets which empty 
into the square." Puryear says UMD's bell tower (actually 
called the campanile) acts as a focal point "like the Palazzo 
Pubblico, signaling from afar that there's something very 
important here." 

With its circle of upright stones topped by horizontals, UMass 
Dartmouth may seem like a new-age Stonehenge, but Puryear 
says Rudolph had much more in mind: "It's true; this campus 
is one of the first (modern) buildings to reintroduce the notion 
of ruin. ..the irregular silhouette against the sky.. .the graceful, 
romantic evocations of ruin. ..but 
UMD is also meant to be an 
organic part of the landscape, like 
the Greek Parthenon." 




That the imposing edifice of 
UMass Dartmouth is "part of the 
landscape" may — excuse the 
allusion — hit you like a cinder 
block. Says Puryear, "Rudolph 
wants us to not think of the 
buildings (oncampus) as having 
fronts or backs, but as having an 
organic quality (like the 
Parthenon.) You don't think of a 
bush or a tree as having a front or 
back. Rudolph was trying to get at 
the idea of buildings as not just 
something you walk up to and 
admire but walk around and 
admire," explains the Art History 
Professor. 

But the Parthenon wasn't made of 
cement, so why is UMD? Puryear 




IfnSDinir 



181 



maintains this is Rudolph's brntalist aesthetic: "It's is a notion 
of the 1960's, to use pure, unadorned materials and not draw 
pretty pictures on them." According to Puryear, the rough 
edges of brutalism give UMD the desired "handmade" or 
"organic" effect, particularly the ever-present "ribbed" walls 
and striated ceilings (which Puryear explains as coming from 
a "cast effect" — the after-image of the boards the cement was 
poured on.) 

Furthermore, Puryear believes that UMass Dartmouth is not 
the uncomfortable environment some make it out to be 
"because of the amount of window space and the view of 
trees and landscape; you can see right through the buildings." 
Puryear thinks this transparent quality is the architect's 
redemption: "it takes away the effect of the (outer) harsh 
surfaces, of the heavyweight, imposing effect," making this 
loose aggregation of buildings "look great under great light." 
Anyone who has caught the campus's spectacular profile at 
sunset will concur. 






One professor who was initially impressed then somewhat 
oppressed by the Stonehengian environs of UMass Dartmouth 
is Sociology instructor Donna Huse. "The campus has a 
dramatic quality that is wonderful." In her first visits here in 
the late '60s, Huse was intrigued by the "design of contrasts" 
of the university's insides: "I loved the huge interior 
spaces. ..multiple ceiling heights... different stones jutting 
out.. .it was like a cave dwelling; then you had these set-back, 
monastic spaces for offices." 

When she returned as a professor, though, Huse began to 
notice the "psychological effect" of all that gray. "The major- 
ity of people are put off by the complete lack of color," Huse 
maintains, adding that Rudolph "never intended the campus 
to be this gray, but more of a soft, earth-toned pink." Appar- 
ently the simple addition of color to the cement mixture was 
not in the budget, so we got gray. "We could have gotten a 
campus evocative of a warm, flesh-colored adobe, which has 
nothing to do with New England, but it (the current color and 
design) doesn't now, so why not?" 

Huse thinks Rudolph is great at "dramatic vistas" but "less 
sympathetic about the greenery and external color we thirst 
for." Huse, who for years has been studying and teaching 
about the effects of habitat on all aspects of life (including 




learning) argues that the concrete walls and unreliable heat 
much of the year "make many students feel depressed and 
cold. They retreat into themselves. They're not as open to 
ideas; ideas don't percolate as easily through their minds." 
While she finds the campus a "special place" with a "mys- 
tique" all its own, Huse maintains that it's "not conducive to 
good learning." This Sociology Prof, opts instead to hold 
many of her classes in the Sunset Room or at home. 




182 





Huse believes that the many mini-amphitheater classrooms of 
UMD "build and reinforce a certain model: the teacher 
authority delivering knowledge to passive students" — the 
"sage on stage," as she calls it. English Professor Peter Owens 
agrees: "the campus is not education-friendly; the amphithe- 
aters freeze you into a lecture format. You're stuck in your 
chairs; you can't break into groups. There's no interaction." 
Huse feels the future of our society belongs to those who have 
been taught to problem-solve, analyze and work within a 
team, and that comes from letting the teacher — at any level — 
function as "coach or facilitator, bringing out the energy and 
insight of the group, and letting them break into smaller 
groups for discussion." 

While all agree there's little that can be done about Rudolph's 

poor amphitheater design, Huse, who's taught Gardening and 

served on the UMD landscape 

committee, feels a lot could be 

done to make the campus cheerier: 

"we could add more groves of trees 

and put in permanent outdoor 

furniture to attract people. We 

could start up an outdoor cafe in 

front of the (campus center) 

cafeteria. We have beautiful vistas 

here — land, air, pine trees; we 

should make it as pleasant as 

possible to be outside." 

Further, Huse believes Rudolph 
didn't mean for the interior cam- 
pus to be as devoid of color as it is. 
"Rudolph's vision was of cozy 
halls, colorful hangings, decorative 
fireplaces — an environment 



reminiscent of medieval 
castles." Dean Howard, 
who was present "at the 
creation" (Rudolph's, 
that is) says that in the 
campus's first year 
Rudolph's intent was, 
in fact, reality. "Huge 
banners of gorgeous 
color were hung," 
Howard says, "and 
soon after were stolen." 

What to do? We know 
the long-closed fire- 
places won't help 
revitalize the indoor 
lounges; they're feared 
to be a fire hazard and, 
according to Puryear, 
even if they were 
opened, "they invite 
abuse." 

So that leaves the 
aforementioned Senior 
Class gift, which both 
Huse and Howard describe as a "wonderful idea." Huse takes 
Yee and company's drapery/banner concept a step further: 
"the senior class could commission one of our own skilled 
artists to produce a hanging; and if one class couldn't pay for 
it all, it could be a cumulative gift of many classes." UMass 
Dartmouth certainly has enough talented artists — textile and 
otherwise — to produce an attractive hanging. And if we're 
worried about theft, why not work up some kind of display 
case (as we do with art exhibits in Group VI)? 

Dean Howard, who for his twenty-seven-year tenure is as 
much a part of the "fabric" of UMD as any proposed wall 
hanging, may have the last word about enjoying Paul 
Rudolph with or without adornment: "I resonate with this 
architecture." 




183 



Commencement 

At 11:45 am on June 6, the UMass Dartmouth tower chimed as the 1993 
graduates began the procession to the Vietnam Veterans Peace Memorial 
Amphitheater. Once seated, the sea of graduates performed their own 
version of the wave, flashing their blue name cards and waving their arms 
in the air. And as the gray clouds rushed overhead, a brightly colored 
beach ball tumbled over black mortar boards as champagne corks burst in 
the air. Dark rain clouds and a smattering of raindrops did not affect the 
morale of the 1,388 students who received their degrees. 

Interim Chancellor Joseph C. Deck addressed the 5,000 member audience, 
saying "our education to date prepares us for a continued period of 
lifelong learning." He also touted the accomplishments of Westport 
resident Herbert Howe Stevens, Jr., the oldest 1993 graduate. Stevens 
received a masters of arts degree in professional writing (his third masters 
degree). 

Former hostage Terry Anderson was the keynote speaker for the cer- 
emony. Student Trustee Kevin Tobin presented Anderson with an 
honorary doctoral hood from UMass. Anderson, a former member of the 
Associated Press, was kidnapped in 1985 and was held captive for seven 
years in Beirut. Speaking of his experiences, he told graduates to have 
faith and believe in American democracy. "There are lots of worse ways 
to conduct our political life. I've seen them. I'll take democratic life any 
day," he said. 

Beginning his speech with a soft smile, Anderson looked out at the 
graduates an said, "I'm so pleased to able to look at the future, in the form 
of the class of '93, and to see the future looking so good. I'd like to con- 
gratulate you all on an achievement to be proud of. You have worked 
hard for the past four years, and have a right to be satisfied with your- 
self." 

Anderson spoke about learning an the value of curiosity and knowledge. 
During his captivity he spent much of his time gaining knowledge and 
information from his fellow cellmates. "As valuable and as necessary to 
us that teaching and learning was, even more valuable was that I learned 
to enjoy once again simply learning, felt again the pleasure of studying 
without goal or purpose other than satisfaction of my curiosity and the 
stretching of my mind," he stated. 

Anderson concluded with a little advice for the graduates, saying "A new 
world is forming out there, and you're going to be helping to form it. Do 
so, please, with some sense of how important the task is; with faith, 
respect for others, especially for those without money or power, and most 
importantly, with a vision of how wonderful this new world can be." 

Johnnie Ashe, brother of the late tennis hero Arthur Ashe, was on hand to 
receive an honorary doctorate degree given posthumously to Arthur who 
died of AIDS earlier this year. "I think Arthur's life spoke for Arthur. He 
was a fighter for equality, parity, fairness for all men," Johnnie said prior 
to the commencement. 

A $5,000 check was presented to the Arthur Ashe Foundation in the name 
of the 1993 UMass Dartmouth graduates. UMass Trustee Heriberto Flores 
of the New England Farm Workers Council surprised the audience, 
matching the $5,000 donation. 

Of the 1,388 graduates, 10 graduated with the distinction of summa cum 
laude and 33 graduated with magna cum laude. 

184 









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191 



Best Wishes to 
The Graduating Class 

of 
University of Massachusetts 

at Dartmouth 



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997-7448 

508 - 994-8257 




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RADAR - SSB - VHF-FM RADIO TELEPHONES 

LORAN - PLOTTERS - AUTOPILOTS 

ECHO SOUNDERS - WEATHER FAX RECEIVERS 



16 SQ. WATER ST. NEW BEDFORD, MA 02740 



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REGGINS ASSOCIATES 

4 Welby Road, 2nd Floor 
New Bedford, MA 02745 

Telephone 995-1810 



199 



Earl's Marina Inc. 

36 Goulart Memorial Dr. 
Fairhaven 
993-8600 


WNBH/WCTK 

737 County Street 

New Bedford 

996-3371 


CVS 

1 CVS Drive 

Woonsocket 

765-1500 


Showtime Sound Services 

Pine Hill & Horseneck 

North Dartmouth 

636-6040 


Vera J. Almgren 

40 School Street 

South Dartmouth 

994-5622 


Poyant Signs, Inc. 

2812 Acushnet Avenue 

New Bedford 

995-1777 


Smith Mills Nursery 

1 1 Anderson Way 

North Dartmouth 

992-2472 


New Bedford Women's Ctr. 

252 County Street 

New Bedford 

996-3343 


Davis Sheet Metal, Inc. 

51 Chancery Street 

New Bedford 

993-6906 


Jose S. Castelo 
Real Estate & Insurance Agency 

1815 Acushnet Avenue 

New Bedford 

995-6291 


Paragon Tours 

680 Purchase Street 

New Bedford 

997-6501 


Newport Creamery 

1071 Kempton Street 

New Bedford 

997-8383 


Borden & Remington Corp. 

106 Ferry Street 
Fall River 
675-0181 


H. J. Saulnier Oil Company 

567 Collins Cor. Road 

North Dartmouth 

995-1632 


Aurelle Machine Company 

2415 Purchase Street 

New Bedford 

996-8221 


Bourassa Hardware Company 

1837 Acushnet Avenue 

New Bedford 

995-6366 


St. Michael's (Fall River) 
Federal Credit Union 

60 Garside St., Fall River 
674-3861 


Dartmouth Medical Walk-In 

39 A Faunce Corner Road 

North Dartmouth 

996-3311 


Le Beau Electric 

671 Summer Street 

New Bedford 

997-7555 


General Supply & Metals 

47 Nauset Street 

New Bedford 

999-6257 


Meineke Discount Mufflers 

1451 South Main Street 
Fall River 
676-3023 


Peckham Power Equipment 

144 Dartmouth Street 

New Bedford 

997-9356 


Hector Machine Company 

P.O. Box 63067 

New Bedford 

992-9151 


Hawthorn Medical 
Assoc. Inc. 

570 Hawthorn Street 

North Dartmouth 

996-3991 


Fall River Gas Company 

155 North Main Street 
Fall River 
675-7811 


Westport Travel & Cruise 
Center 

764 Main Road 
Westport 
636-4048 


Mattapoisett Inn 

1 3 Water Street 

Mattapoisett 

758-4922 


Judi's Unisex Beauty Shop 

676 Dartmouth 

South Dartmouth 

999-3333 


Robitaille Electric 

1 088 Tobey Street 

New Bedford 

998-7105 


Allendale Country Club 

1047 Allen Street 

North Dartmouth 

992-8682 


New Bedford Credit Union 

1150 Purchase Street 

New Bedford 

994-6546 


Hawthorn Florist & Greenhouse 

508 Hawthorn Street 

North Dartmouth 

999-5122 



200 



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BARRY D. LANG, M.D. 


DAVID E. ADELBERG, M.D. 


ORTHOPEDIC ASSOCIATES 


BONE & JOINT SURGERY 


ARTHRITIS 


SPORTS MEDICINE 


PHYSICAL THERAPY 


TELEPHONE 996-3954 536 HAWTHORN STREET 
FAX 991-4216 NORTH DARTMOUTH, MA 02747-3787 


EXECUTIVE AUTO SALES 

2359 Purchase Street, New Bedford, 993-1233 


JAMES T. HUGHES SHEET METAL 

P.O. Box 4207, Fall River, 678-3311 


DARTMOUTH FLORISTS 

96 State Road, North Dartmouth, 992-0884 


DAVID GONSLAVES 

15 Robert Street, North Dartmouth, 997-2185 


ORIENTAL PEARL 

576 State Road, Westport, 675-1501 


DARTMOUTH MOTORS 

26 State Road, North Dartmouth, 992-9551 


FAIRHAVEN LUMBER 

120 Alden Road, Fairhaven, 993-2611 


FRIENDLY PIZZA 

216 Russells Mills Rd., S. Dartmouth, 996-5511 


CARMINO ARENA MASON & TILE CONT. 

41 Weaver Street, New Bedford, 996-0150 


COUNTRY WOOLENS 

842 Main Road, Westport, 636-5661 


USED EQUIPMENT SALES 

799 State Road, North Dartmouth, 997-6105 


BECK'S FISH MARKET 

657 Dartmouth Street, S. Dartmouth, 996-6724 


WAYNE G. TESSIER, Ph.D. 

. 345 Union, New Bedford, 993-8332 


VESSEL DOCUMENTATION SERVICE 

136 Jordan Road, Plymouth, 997-6210 


PEOPLE'S LIQUORS 

1401 Douglas Avenue, Providence, 997-4343 


J. S. CALLAHAN 

10 Purchase Street, Fall River, 676-8543 


THOMAS DEPARTMENT STORE 

418 Rivet Street, New Bedford, 992-5907 


FULL FASHION FRINGE 

115 Coggeshall Street, New Bedford, 993-2735 


MARTIN AUTO SCHOOL 

487 Belleville Avenue, New Bedford, 999-3832 


LABORS LOCAL 385 

115 Alden Road, Fairhaven, 992-1089 



202 



A. W. MARTIN, INC. 

1080 Shawmut Avenue, New Bedford, 992-7828 

SHERWIN-WILLIAMS COMPANY 

643 State Road, North Dartmouth, 993-2698 

A & A REDEMPTION CENTER 

741 Ashley Boulevard, New Bedford, 995-3361 

DR. GEORGE ). POLOCHICK 

2090 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, 995-3428 

STAR PLATE & WINDOW GLASS 

1625 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, 995-0166 

BEAUMONT SIGN COMPANY, INC. 

200 North Street, New Bedford, 990-1701 

OLIVIER & SONS INC. 

479 Mt. Pleasant Street, New Bedford, 994-4323 

GLASER GLASS COMPANY 

1265 Purchase Street, New Bedford, 999-6497 

MY LADY'S 

1622 Gar. Highway, Somerset, 678-0236 

TREMBLAYS BUS COMPANY 

284 Myrtle Street, New Bedford, 999-6436 

HEGARTY PRINTING CENTER 

535 Ashley Boulevard, New Bedford, 999-2020 

CHARPENTIER CENTRAL PHARMACY 

1833 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, 995-5755 

HORNER - WINDOWS, DOORS, KITCHENS & STAIRS 

1255 G.A.R. Highway, Somerset, 679-6479 

NORMAND'S MEAT SPECIALTIES, INC. 

331 Ashley Boulevard, New Bedford, 993-3983 

DURACLEAN CRAFTSMEN 

31 Ryan Street, New Bedford, 999-2900 

BAYLIES SQUARE PLATE GLASS INC. 

1800 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, 995-6332 

MINDY'S HAIR CREATIONS 

464 Sawyer Street, New Bedford, 992-8723 

CROWN TRAVEL CENTER INC. 

1114 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, 997-3124 

MOBILE STATION 

285 State Road, North Dartmouth, 996-9338 

PRIDE CUSTOM INTERIORS 

48 State Road, North Dartmouth, 993-7977 



SYMPHONY MUSIC SHOP 

94 State Road, North Dartmouth, 996-3301 

ERNIE ROSS JEWELERS 

92 State Road, North Dartmouth, 992-3933 

ECONO LODGE 

571 State Road, North Dartmouth, 997-0008 

DOVER PARKERSBURG 

P.O. Box 271, Fall River, 679-6456 

SAPATARIA PORTUGUESA 

1703 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, 997-7780 

LIMA'S GARAGE / AUTO BODY 

374 Myrtle Street, New Bedford, 999-1480 

ASHLEY FORD SALES, INC. 

395 Mt. Pleasant Street, New Bedford, 996-5611 

STAN & PAUL'S ATLANTIC APPLIANCE SERV., INC. 

215 State Road, North Dartmouth, 994-6060 

JIM CANVAS COMPANY 

453 Stafford Road, Fall River, 673-6703 

CASANOVA 

1494 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, 997-7766 

INDEPENDENT BUSINESS MACHINE SERVICE 

1857 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, 998-3753 

GOLDSTEINS ANNEX 

813 State Road, North Dartmouth, 994-4718 

MCBRIDES RENTALS 

P.O Box A2020, New Bedford, 993-3811 

DARTMOUTH GIFTS & ENGRAVING 

22 Center Street, South Dartmouth, 997-1936 

ATTY. J. LOUIS LE BLANC 

342 Union Street, New Bedford, 993-2100 

HAWTHORNE COUNTRY CLUB 

970 Tucker Road, North Dartmouth, 997-3377 

AARON POOLS & SPAS 

597 State Road, North Dartmouth, 996-3320 

BAKER TRACTOR CORP. 

2283 Gar. Hwy./Rte. 6, Swansea, 379-3673 

WESTPORT MARKET 

291 American Legion Hwy., Westport, 636-5252 

GOLDSTEIN'S LAWN AND FARM EQUIPMENT 

287 Gifford Road, Westport, 678-0381 



203 



FIRE SYSTEMS INC. 

4 Arsene Way, Fair Haven, 999-4444 

NORBUT MANUFACTURING CO., INC. 

56 11th Street, Fall River, 678-5159 

VENTURAS PHARMACY 

699 Bedford Street, Fall River, 674-4659 

RAYMOND V. PICARD 

716 Bedford Street, Fall River, 673-5822 

POTVIN AUTO BODY SHOP 

958 County Street, Fall River, 674-9092 

ROLAND'S TIRE SERVICE INC. 

11 Howland Road, Fairhaven, 997-4501 

BRIDGE STREET CAFE 

10 A Bridge, South Dartmouth, 994-7200 

MEE HONG RESTAURANT 

120 Cove, New Bedford, 992-8541 

DARTMOUTH DAIRY CHIEF 

532 Russells Mills Rd., S. Dartmouth, 997-6418 

SMITH OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

191 Bedford Street, Fall River, 679-2323 

KENNEDY COIFFURES 

296 Chase Road, North Dartmouth, 993-6526 

ISLAND DENTAL PROSTHETICS 

540 S. Main Street, Fall River, 672-5151 

PRO CHEMICAL & DYE INC. 

P.O. Box 14, Somerset, 676-3838 

MCGOVERN'S FAMILY RESTAURANT 

310 Shove Street, Fall River, 679-5010 

HARTFORD TRANSMISSION SALES/SERVICE 

2096 Pleasant Street, Fall River, 674-7771 

MANNY'S MARKET 

61 County Street, New Bedford, 994-3742 

LESCO TOBACCO & CANDY CO. 

1011 JFK Mem. Hwy., New Bedford, 999-5205 

CHARLES S. ASHLEY & SONS 

11 N. Sixth Street, New Bedford, 997-9411 

LOU KALIFE BUILDING PRODUCTS 

4 Fish Island, New Bedford, 994-4444 

GUIDO'S PLATE GLASS SERVICE, INC. 

P.O. Box A-2096, New Bedford, 997-7388 



PERRY FUNERAL HOME 

111 Dartmouth Street, New Bedford, 993-2921 

ADVANCE AIR & HEAT INC. 

177 Bullock Road, East Freetown, 992-2870 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE RM 

755 Purchase Street, New Bedford, 992-5902 

MOORE & ISHERWOOD, INC. 

156 Eighth Street, New Bedford, 996-3946 

NORTHWESTERN MUTUAL LIFE 

42 Water Street, Fairhaven, 996-5642 

PURITY SERVICE 

405 Myrtle Street, New Bedford, 993-0473 

ALLIED BRAKE & AUTO SUPPLY CO., INC. 

1000 Kempton Street, New Bedford, 997-4548 

ME & ED'S PIZZERIA INC. 

30 Brock Avenue, New Bedford, 993-9922 

BRUNO'S BUSINESS SUPPLY CO. 

1913 Purchase Street, New Bedford, 999-6300 

A.B. SENNA BOOKKEEPING SERVICES 

127 Chestnut Street, New Bedford, 997-4400 

DR. JOHN J. MCGONIGLE 

345 Union Street, New Bedford, 993-0900 

FALL RIVER ANIMAL HOSPITAL 

33 Eighteenth Street, Fall River, 675-6374 

CORDEIRO'S FISH MARKET, INC. 

60 Madeira Avenue, New Bedford, 992-6519 

PAUL & DIXON 

388 County Street, New Bedford, 996-8593 

SERVICE RUBBER STAMP & PRINTING CO. 

86 15th Street, Fall River, 673-9171 

FERNANDES FRAZE & FINNERTY 

442 County Street, New Bedford, 997-3375 

AMERICAN DRYER CORP. 

88 Currant Road, Fall River, 678-9000 

FLINT FLOOR COVERING, INC. 

1042 Pleasant Street, Fall River, 676-8701 

SILVA PHARMACY INC. 

133 County Street, New Bedford, 992-4741 

NU-TEX INDUSTRIES INC. 

127 W. Rodney French Blvd., New Bedford, 993-2501 



205 




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