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Full text of "Scrimshaw : [yearbook]"







M 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/scrimshawyearboo1998sout 




Tabic of Contents 

Introduction 

Letter from President Bulger 

Letter from Chancellor Cressy 

Dedication 

Senior Class Officers 

Memorial Ayuko Ito 

Seniors 

Faculty 

Clubs & Organizations 

Sports 

World Events 

Campus Events 

Candids 

Senior Week 

Commencement 

Special Thanks 

Bibliography 

Baby Ads 

Advertisements 

Editorials 



4- 7 

8 

9 

10- 11 

12-13 

14- 15 

16-69 

70- 77 

78-85 

86- 105 

106-111 

112- 131 

132- 159 

160- 167 

168 - 185 

186 

187 

188- 195 

196- 197 

198- 199 







yjkaliKt Ik New 



'Bedford 



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he concept behind this book was brought 

upon by its name Scrimshaw . As the editor and I 
were exploring what theme would encompass this 
year's publication we investigated many ideas; from 
using quotes with a scrapbook type theme to using 
art. Then we suddenly realized something was miss- 
ing. "What exactly does scrimshaw mean?" we 
wondered. Now I do realize that a large majority of 
you know what the word means, especially if you 
grew up in New Bedford and the surrounding areas. 
We, having no prior, in-depth knowledge of whal- 
ing, had not one clue. 

We then realized the importance of the 
whaling industry to the region. This affected us 
because it shaped what eventually became UMass 
Dartmouth by supplying New Bedford with money 
to prosper and allowing for educational facilities to 
emerge from the city's wealth, like New Bedford 
Textile School and Bradford-Durfee Textile School 
in Fall River. 

The importance of Scrimshaw within this is 
the idea that it was treasured by the sailors and 
sailor's wives. It was one of their only pasttimes 
while they were on the ships. It became a symbol of 
their voyage through the sea, just as this book will 
become a symbol of your voyage through UMass 
Dartmouth. 

- Jill Anne Delahanty 
Layout Editor 



In 1755NewEngland'swhalingindustrywas spreading 
to ports including New bedford, a place which was to 
become the leading whaling port in the country. 
Joseph Russell, founder of the town, first engaged in 
the trade. By 1774 the American fleet had 360 
vessels in total & 4700 men employed. Of these 
ships 300 sailed out of Massachusetts. 

These ships returned with 30,000 barrels of 
oil which earned around $267,200. The prospering 
of whaling in America was soon brought to a halt by 
the start of the revolutionary war. 

The war caused the fleet to fall prey to the British 
by capturing, burning or sinking nearly all the ships. New 
Bedford had 40-50 whalers at the outbreak of the war and 
lost 34 of them in one raid in 1 778. This happened all 
along the coast at all the major ports. 

This caused the American whaling industry to be 
virtually nonexistent until 1815 when Nantucket des- 
patched 48 whale ships and New Bedford 1 9. Because 
these examples survived and prospered so rapidly it 
encouraged other towns to enter whaling again. 

Whaling became of large importance to New 
England's economy. In 1833, 392 American vessels were 
at sea, 1 ,000 men employed, and a $4,500,000 annual 
incomewasbroughtin.Manypeopleowedtheirlivelyhood 
to the trade profit. Thus, began the Golden Age of whaling 
which lasted25 years. 






fomsxTkme 









In 1 842 the American fleet accounted for 652 
of the world's total of 882 ships engaged in whaling. 
It was at a high and in 1846 the number began to 
decline, even though there were still a great many 
occupied in pouring wealth into New England ports. 
Whale products reached their highest of value 
$10,730,637 in 1853. 

Because of the improvements in whaling, fewer 
whales could escape. The whaling grounds were being 
overfished, resulting in a decline in numbers of whales and 
so forcing the ships to sail longer voyages in search of their 
prey or return home with nothing. This caused whaling to 
become so uneconomical that a capital investment in the 
trade was considered too great a risk. New Bedford, the 
greatest whaling port in the world, whose existence was 
owed to the whale, witnessed the beginning of a cotton 
industry in 1 846. This, in time, wouldusurp the whaling 
trade's prime position in the town's economic structure. 

Another problem was the opening of the West. 
Many young men would rather earn their fortune and have 
their adventure in the wild west than on the lonely sea. And 
who could forget the Gold Rush in 1 849. Many whaling 
ships turned passenger liners to the shores of California. 
Complete crews were lost to the smell of gold when they 
arrived. 

Somehow whaling survived the gold rush and 
even began off the coast of California. It also was not 
greatly effected by the financial sump of 1 85 7, but it did 
face a major crisis with the beginning of the Civil War, as 
it did with the Revolutionary War. 

Confederate ships loved to create havoc among 
the American whaling fleet. Many merchants abandoned 



their ships in port, put them into the merchant trade service 
or sold them . The US government bought 46 whalers known 
as the "stone fleet". They were sunk in ports and harbor 
entrances in South Carolina and Georgia to deny the ports 
to the Confederates. 

About 90 ships were destroyed in all, but the 
effects were worse than that from the war. The fleet 
was reduced from 514 ships to 263 by the beginning 
of 1866. By 1893 San Francisco was the leading port 
in the country because of its use by other countries. In 
1 906 it was one of the only three ports left in the whaling 
trade; New Bedfordhad24 vessels, San Francisco 14, and 
Provincetown3. 

After WWI America tried to bring back whal- 
ing by redoing sone of the old ships. These ships could 
not compete with modern whaling catchers. On 25 
August 1 924 the "Wanderer" of New Bedford set sail on a 
voyage and anchored off Mishaum Point for the night. 
During the early hours of August 26 she was driven ashore 
and wrecked on the island. "Wanderer" was the last of the 
American square-riggers. She was also the last whaling ship 
to leave the port of New Bedford. 

America reentered the whaling industry in the 
1930's, operating shore stations along the Pacific 
Coast. They were all small operations that never grew 
into anything as large as its predecessor. 






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"William, "hnlttr - ^raidad 
Vjifvmibj vjJ\iasscickxsd±r 




Dear Class of 1998: 

Please accept my congratulations on your graduation from the University. You have reached a truly important 
milestone deserving of our respect and admiration. 

Courage, commitment, creativity, and ability are the attributes that carried you, the class of 1998, to graduation, and they are 
the attributes we all trust you to use in continuing a life of education and citizenship. 

The University has accomplished great things but continuously strives to make major contributions to the commonwealth, 
nation and world. You now have an opportunity to build on your personal success by using your knowledge and experience 
to benefit those around you. 

Your future will be a testament to the sacrifices that your parents, professors, and friends made for you during your years at 
the University, sacrifices that allowed you to receive a valuable degree. 

I am confident that you leave with limitless potential and a hunger for even greater knowledge, and I am happy the University 
was able to play a role in your life. 

I wish you all the best on your endeavors 



8 



Sincerely, 
William M. Bulger 
President 




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"Pder Crcmf - CLmcelldr 

djJvtajscickxsttts 
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Dear Class of 1998: 

Congratulations to each of you for completing your degree. Graduation marks an important milestone in your life. 
The world in front of you is filled with both promise and challenge. Your education obtained here makes you ready to take 
advantage of both. Never in the history of humankind has knowledge been expanding at such a rapid rate. I encourage you 
to use that knowledge to make the world a better place in which to live. By doing well in whatever your chosen field and by 
participating as a good citizen, you will contribute to your community, to your country, and to the world. I urge you to 
remember that both diversity and civility are the cornerstones of our democracy. 

Congratulations to each of you for achieving this major milestone in your life. You graduate this year ready to face 
a world of great promise and of great challenge. More than at any time in recent memory the world's economy is prospering. 
Medicine, science, and technology are advancing at a rapid rate and there is a new spirit of optimism. On the other hand, 
around the world violence, tragedy, and bigotry are everyday occurrences. You, therefore, are faced with the challenge of 
extending peace, prosperity, and civility to every corner of the world and to every level of society. 

Although many individuals such as your parents, friends, faculty, and staff have supported you as you moved toward 
graduation, in the end you did it yourself. In the journey toward graduation you learned important skills and understanding: 
communication, teamwork, discipline, persistence, and humanity. Perhaps most importantly, however, you learned how to 
learn. The world is changing so rapidly that the capacity to learn is the most critical attribute you take with you from your 
time at UMass Dartmouth. 

Your University is proud of you. Each of us who stays behind wishes you well and hopes you will continue to be a 
part of your alma mater. 

Sincerely, 




Peter H. Cressy 
Chancellor 



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for. Naiter $i. Slmr, 



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As students of this University, especially as 
students who have reached their senior year, we know 
that the quality of our learning experience has, in a very 
real way, been defined by the quality of the faculty who 
have taught us. We have been blessed, for the most part, 
with teachers whose knowledge, skills, and ability to 
inspire have raised our levels of understanding. Such are 
the qualities that characterize the person to whom, we 
the 1998 University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Year- 
book staff and the officers of the Senior Class, proudly, 
though sadly, dedicate this book - Dr. Naseer H. Aruri. 
We say sadly, because Dr. Aruri's announced retirement 
this past spring left many students, past and present as 
well as colleagues sensing a certain melancholy over this 
faculty icon's departure. 

On June 5, 1998 at the annual Graduation - 
Honors Recognition Dinner, the 1997-1998 University 
Student Senate presented their prestigious Distinguished 
Service to University Award to Dr. Aruri. We, the Edito- 
rial Board have chosen the eloquent words of the Award 
Citation to express our feelings in this dedication. 



Dr. Naseer H. Aruri, our loss in the coming years will 
be cut to the shape of your gentle personality, to the 
size of your magnificent intellect, and to the depth of 
your profound wisdom. 

Born in Jerusalem, Palestine, you are a Middle East 
specialist with an intense devotion to your homeland 
and a native's intimate understanding of the complex 
and volatile issues that affect this vital region. You 
have spent three years on the board of directors of 
Amnesty International, are a founding member of the 
Arab Organization for Human Rights, and hold a 
membership on the boards of many more of the 
world's most influential organizations. Globally rec- 
ognized as an advisor on geopolitical affairs, you are 
called upon for your views by the national and inter- 
national press and have appeared on many television 
programs. You have also written and edited numerous 
articles and books on the Middle East and on human 
rights. This extensive background has made you the 
perfect transmitter and translator of Arab thought and 
perspective to the generations of students who have 
filled your classroom and been fascinated not only by 
what you taught them, but by how you taught them. 
Chancellor Professor since 1996, you have graced the 
faculty of this institution for thirty-three years, serv- 
ing for eight of those years as chair of the political 
science department. Charismatic and extraordinarily 
accessible, you have communicated to your students, 
along with a wealth of information and unique in- 
sights, a respect for them as valuable human beings 
and a genuine interest in their personal and academic 
evolution. 

We are proud to have been your students and honored 
to have been your friends, and it is with great regret 
that we say farewell. Know that your influence will 
continue to ripple out in the way we understand the 
people of your homeland and perceive the workings of 
the world, and in our strivings to treat others with the 
same kindness, courtesy, and concern with which you 
have treated us. Wishing you Godspeed in your retire- 
ment, we the students of the University of Massachu- 
setts Dartmouth pay you tribute. 



10 



jbr. ^HasctrtH. Sirnri 





for. Slruri w/mJvt/KA&il (^rmckev, former 
President vftkt Sm'iti VjiidK . 



11 



Senior Class Officers 

"President 

CkadCahral 
"Vict "President 

^JoiK Cf^earder 
Treasurer 

Lisa Coffey 
"Treasurer 





To the Class of 1998: 

Our years here at UMASS Dartmouth have come to an end. 
The hard work and dedication over the past few years have left us 
with a degree in hand and a world unknown to conquer. However, 
the knowledge we have gained, both in and out of the classroom, will 
help to give us direction for the rest of our lives. 

Over these years we have made the friends of a lifetime. With 
these friends we can look back and reminisce about UMD and the 
memories it has given us to cherish. 

When thinking back on your years at UMASS Dartmouth, 
remember all the Ratts, the Blast Off, Bus trip to Newport, Second 
Semester Kick Off, 100 and 50 Days till Graduation, Spring Break, 
Senior Week, the Sunset Room, and the many gatherings in Cedar 
Dell. 

Thank you for giving me and my fellow class officers Chad 
Cabral, Jennifer Reardon, and Lisa Coffey the opportunity to serve 
you this past year. Thank you for the support you have given us. I 
hope we have succeeded in making your senior year a memorable 
one. 

I wish you all the best of luck and happiness in all your future 
endeavors. Congratulations, Class of 1998! 



Sincerely, 

Beth Murphy 

Senior Class President 



12 






13 






JvtonjDrictL 

Shjula) "Cvvkit 3td 
Ceramics Major 




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: 



In Japan, May 5th is known as Children's Day. In a 
strange twist of fate my lovely daughter, Ayuko Ito, went on 
a trip to a place very far away on the day in 1 997. She was 
driving to Boston when her inexperienced driving skills 
caused a serious accident. She left us instantly. 

Ayuko was a healthy child, she never suffered from 
a serious illness. She grew into a lady with a beautiful smile 
and a shiningcharacter. Her dream was to become a ceramics 
artist. As her mother, I still feel the shock when she went 
away. I sometimes feel as though my life ended on the day as 
well. 

The United States is a land where people form 
around the worldmeet. Ayuko visited the UnitedStates when 
she was in Junior High School. She was impressed by the 
nature of North America. She was shocked to see homeless 
people living in the streets of New York City. 

In Japan students have tochoosetheirmajorsatvery 
early ages, and Ayuko had a hard time deciding her future. 
The more open university systems in America inspired her 
decision to study there, and we supported her with all our 
hearts. ItoldhertobecarefuIofdrugs,guns,anddisease...but 
the cause ofherdeath was unpredictable. 



Ayuko gave us so much, her letters brought great happi- 
ness. She would write, "How are you mother, father?" andask 
about her two brothers Ryuta and Ryuma, her bird Pippi , and her 
poodle Aster. These words alone made us smile. Her grades were 
excellent, she always made the Dean's List and the Chancellor's 
List. She made us very proud. Now, we keep her achievements 
beside her picture. 

Ayuko gave all of her friends in Japan a new reason to 
live; she gave us all an indescribable power. I want to thank 
everyone that brought her happiness. I am happy to have her good 
friends Julian, Anthony, and Trai... we appreciate the support we 
found in all her American friends. 

She left Japan to find herself, and she is still on her 
journey. She used to say, "Cheerup!",andtoalwayslookforward. 



April 10,1998 



Mother, Kazuko Ito 



14 








From Julian to Ayuko, 

Each day in her life was full of joy and excitement. I never 
saw a day without a smile on her face. All of a sudden, onMay 5th, 
she left us without a note. Loosing someone very special to you is 
such atremendous pain. She was brilliant. She was so talented, as 
a ceramics and flower artist. She was only 2 1 years old. 

The moment I saw Ayuko I knew we were going to be 
good friends. We shared a lot of time together, supported each 
other as artist, talkedabout our homes thatwe missed, understood 
each other's thoughts and enjoyed life in a foreign country. I didn't 
know she would leave us this soon, so 

regret that I did not fully uterlize the time to know her better. There 
were so many things for me to find out after her death; how good 
her school grades were, the fact that whe wanted to be a flower 
artist before changing her mind to be a ceramics artist, how kind 
she was toherparentsandhandicapped people, andsoon. I didn't 
want to find out these things in this way. 



Capared to the loss felt by her family, mine should be 
very little. It is enough for me and other close friends of hers to 
suffer the pain for a long time. I think about her every day, and 
talktoherinmyheart.Imisshersomuch.Herpermanentabsence 
squeezes my heart brutally. Her death made me reconsider the 
true meaningof life. She made me reappreciate the beauty of 
nature andof human beings. "One life is not enough , " that's what 
she used to tell me. She couldn't even finish one entire life; hers 
was just too short. 

One single mistake, like hers, can not replay your life 
from the beginning. I want to dedicate my life to what she 
accomplished. I promised her I would live strong and enjoy the 
life I have. I hope everybody learns something from her mistake 
and takes good care of themselves , and their loved ones. 



March 98, Julian Kan 



15 



Tkt 'WLztotuiK 



a 



whaleman strong am I, 
I rove the briny deep - 
And whether the sky 
Be dark or bright 
A steady watch I keep. 

For the whale's a clever prey, 
And moves from sea to sea 
And many's the day 
We raise no "blows" 
To "weather" or to "lee." 






I love the whaler's life 

And the oceans which I sail - 

It's a medley of strife 

And glorious sights 

That make a land life pale. 

But when my "cruise" is o'ver, 

And the "Master" figures my "lay," 

I'll ask no more 

Than He thinks right, 

And log - "So ends the day." 

Anonymous 










Seniors 














Ajibike A. Adekemi 

Marketing 




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-^' 8 




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Multidisciplinary Studies 





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Social Services 





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Nursing 




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Business Administration 




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Biology 



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Professional Writing 



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Psychology 



19 




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2 

Darren S. Baldwin 

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£20 




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English 





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21 




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22 




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23 




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MFG. MGT. Fiber & Textiles 





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24 





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25 




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m 



26 




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27 




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-#r 28 




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29 




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31 




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pr 



32 




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i 



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33, 



■ 




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VpC 



Sister Mary A. Gorelczenko 

Nursing 

34 




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Melissa D. Gravel 

Marketing 




Theresa M. Guinen 

Criminal Justice 




Mark T. Hall 

Mechanical Engineering 




Lauren P. Harman 

Painting 




John C. Greenwood 

Management 




Sean J. Hagan 

Visual Design/Illustration 




Jaime M. Hanson 

Business Information Systems 




Stacy L. Harney 

Social Services 




Edward P. Guilherme 

Accounting 




Juliana K. Hai 

Accounting 




Lindsey Harden 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Benjamin J. Harrower 

Biology 



35 -^- 







Megan C. Harvey 

Psychology 




James W. Hemenway 

Computer & Info. Science 




Susannah R. Hindes 

Biology 




Janell A. Holmes 

Human/Social Sciences 




Stephanie Hauser 

Business Administration 




Frank J. Hernandez 

Liberal Arts 




Carol A. Hoaglund 

English 




Robin A. Holzer 

Biology 




Ryan R. Hazel 

Finance 




Jeanine M. Hills 

Nursing 




Sandra L. Hogan 

Psychology 




Alicia A. Hostetler 

English 




36 




Soufiane Houri 

Management 




Christine A. Hunt 

Psychology 




Richard L. Ionelli 

Civil Engineering 




Jeffrey J. Johnson 

Psychology 




John C. Howard 

Marketing 




Katie L. 


Hutchinson 


Visual Design/Graphic 


W 




K vM 


|. % £ 




t "^ ^^F ■ '■'^b 




\ 



Maurine A. Jennings 

Human/Social Sciences 




Maya K. Johnson 

Computer & Inf.. Science 




Tina M. Hunnefeld 

Sociology 




Uchenne Ikonne 

English 




Glenn M. Johnson 

Marketing 




James J. Johnston 

Political Science 



37, 




Alissa A. Joslin 

Psychology 




Erik J. Kaarla 

Professional Writing 




Patricia S. Keliinui 

English/Writing 




Kary A. Kicltyka 

English 




Robert J. Josti 

Human/Social Sciences 




Michelle A. Kaczynski 

Spanish 




Jennifer L. Keller 

Psychology 




John T. Kieser 

Biology 




Mark A. Judson 

Accounting 




Julian W. Kan 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Susan J. Kennedy 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Jens Koch 

MBA 




38 




Eric W. Kostecki 

Psychology 




Tracie A. Laboa 

Psychology 




Heather L. LaMothe 

Psychology 





Andreas Kraeuzl 

Physics 




Mayank Lalani 

Business Administration 




Kerri M. Lamoureux 

Psychology 





Hsu-Je Kuo 

Business Administration 




Marc Lalosh 

Philosophy 




Chris Landrum 

Electrical Engineering 




Ann E. Lapienski 

English 



Kristie L. LaPlante 

Criminal Justice 



Dawn M. Laurianno 

Nursing 



39. 




Bruce S. Lavoie 

Electrical Engineering 




Tania P. Leal 

Accounting 




Amie L. LeBlanc 

Psychology 




Lisa K. Lemieux 

Criminal Justice 




An T. Le 

Nursing 




Justin M. LeBart 

Sculpture 




Anne C. Lehman 

Art Education 




Alison M. Lemoine 

Sociology 




Laurie M. Leal 

EnglislVWriting 




Aaron P. LeBeau 

Computer Engineering 




Matthew T. Lehman 

Visual Design/Illustration 




Stephanie T. Leon 

Med. Lab Science/Cytotech 



-^ 40 




Jennifer Leonardo 

Computer & Inf.. Science 




Frederick Lopes 

Sociology 




Dawn L. Lusby 

Sociology 





Suyu Leong 

Business Information Systems 




Rolando A. Lopes 

Electrical Engineering 




Adam M. Lynch 

Management 





Claudine K. L'Heureux 

Human/Social Sciences 




Martha J. Love 

Human/Social Sciences 




Eamon C. Lyons 

Mechanical Engineering 




Suzanne J. Lyons 

Sociology 



Heather M. MacConnell 

Nursing 



Kristie M. Madonna 

Finance 



41 




Jason W. Maki 

Accounting 




Maureen M. Maloney 

English/Writing 




Joseph A. Manzone 

Multidisciplinary Studies 




Kimberley A. Martins 

jMultidisciplinary Studies 



¥ 



42 




Derek Maksy 

Electrical Engineering 




Lisa Mandell 

Humanities/Social Sciences 




Jennifer J. Marciante 

Human/Social Sciences 




Michelle D. Masse 

Social Services 




Matthew D. Maloney 

Finance 




Sarah A. Mangrum 

Visual Design/Graphics 



I^Kit" 


Hi 




_^M 







John G. Mardo 

Multidisciplinary Studies 




Suzanna M. Mateus 

Biology 



. 




Kerri A. McGahey 

Psychology 




Maureen M. Mclsaac 

Psychology 




Amy M. Medeiros 

Management 




Jodi-Ann Medeiros 

Med. Lab Science/Cytotech 




Kirsten McGarvey 

Psychology 




Scott K. McLaren 

Computer Engineering 




Carla Medeiros 

Management 




Kevin P. Medeiros 

Economics 




Daniel W. McGowan 

Biology 




Stacie L. Meacham 

Psychology 




Crystal-Lynn Medeiros 

English/Writing 




Lisa A. Medeiros 

Nursing 



43 




Bernie Mejia 

History 




Melissa B. Mendelson 

Sociology 





Frederick M. Mello 

Psychology 




Nathan R. Mendes 

Criminal Justice 





Carlos Melon 

Spanish 




Judith E. Menz 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Lynne S. Mercier 

Mathematics 



Sonya A. Merkman 

Social Services 



Stacey A. Merkman 

Social Services 




^.44 



Lori A. Messenger 

Psychology 




Jocelyn A. Messier 

Management 




KM 



Nadia M. Metras 

Biology 




Michelle R. Miguel 

Nursing 




Christopher M. Moniz 

Biology 




Darci Moran 

Biology 




Heather E. Mulry 

Marketing 




Susanne M. Miranda 

Textile Chemistry 




Melissa A. Monopoli 

Social Services 




Gabriel Moreno 

Nursing 




Bethany L. Murphy 

English/Writing 




Manuel Miroglio 

Marketing 




Jennifer S. Montgomery 

Biology 




Mark T. Mortimer 

Human/Social Sciences 




Elizabeth A. Murphy 

Accounting 



45, 



TT 









; 






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,. i 








l 




HS$k~.~**s*ms>' 






£ 


' 







Kathleen E. Murphy 

Accounting 




Trai V. Nguyen 

Management 




Rebecca Nunes 

Sociology 




Bruce Oliveira 

Business Management 




Timothy G. Murphy 

Professional Writing 




Ryan M. Noonan 

Visual Design/Graphics 




Caitlin O'Brien 

Psychology 




Jessicca Ortiz 

Psychology 




Rahul R. Mutha 

Electrical Engineering 




Lisa M. Nunes 

Human/Social Sciences 




Arlette M. Oliveira 

Social Services 




Jennifer J. Ouellette 

EnglishAVriting 




46 




Crystall A. Pacheco 

Nursing 




Stephanie Pacheco 

Sociology 




Rebecca C. Panek 

Biology 





Diane M. Pacheco 

Sociology 




Robert Paiva 

Economics 




Andrea M. Panell 

Nursing 





Joseph Pacheco 

Electrical Engineering 




Rebecca J. Paiva 

English/Drama & Film Studies 




Jennifer L. Paquette 

Marketing 




Kristen E. Parsons 

Human/Social Sciences 



John L. Patz 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 



Eric C. Paul 

Electrical Engineering 



47. 




Alexander F. Paulo 

Accounting 




Angela D. Pereira 

Management 




Nicole J. Perona 

Civil Engineering 




Raymond A. Picard 

Accounting 




Soraia E. Paz 

Computer Engineering 




Joshua L. Pereira 

Business Information Systems 




Melissa M. Perry 

Business Information Systems 




Annie I. Pickert 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Cora Peirce 

Sociology 




Dorine A. Perez-Toole 

Sociology 




Sheila B. Petrarca 

Business Information Systems 




Samuel R. Pierre 

Marketing 




48 




Bradford R. Pineault 

Finance 




Christopher G. Poirier 

Mechanical Engineering 




David W. Putney 

Computer Engineering 




James B. Radcliffe 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Linda M. Pinheiro 

Management 




Elizabeth B. Polochick 

Sociology 




Heidi R. Puyana 

Textile Design/Fiber Arts 




Lisa M. Raney 

Management 




Brenda R. Pinkney 

Visual Design/Graphics 




Mui I. Pong 

Mathematics 




Lori A. Quigley 

Human/Social Sciences 




Elizabeth M. Raposa 

Nursing 



49 




Meagan M. Raposo 

Painting 




Jennifer A. Reardon 

Management 




James M. Reiley 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Carlos S. Resendes 

Sociology 




Scott Ratcliffe 

Marketing 




Linda M. Rebello 

Visual Design/Textile 




Amanda L. Reilly 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




David M. Reynolds 

Management 




Jennifer L. Raxter 

Psychology 



& 




Dora M. Rego 

Human/Social Sciences 




Carmen D. Rene 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Julie Rezendes 

Nursing 



5?r 



50 




Kathryn P. Ricci 

Psychology 




Camelia Rivera 

Sociology 




Sean B. Rocha 

Biology 





Lisa M. Richard 

Nursing 




Kristen M. Robbat 

Psychology 




Maureen A. Rocha-Andrews 

Human/Social Sciences 





Michael E. Ring 

Accounting 




Rebecca L. Robitaille 

Psychology 




Jesse P. Rodrigues 

Electrical Engineering 




Maria F. Rodrigues 

Nursing 



Amy E. Ronco 

Biology/Marine Biology 



Carmen C. Rosa 

History 



51 




Susan Ross 

Psychology 




Kelly A. Roy 

Psychology 




Sharon L. Rymarczyk 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 














^.52 



Clemencc Saint-Cyr 

Biology/Marine Biology 




Lisa R. Rountree 

Human/Social Sciences 




Fueling Rui 

Computer Science 




Christina L. Saad 

English 




Antoine Saliba 

MBA 




Emily J. Rowe 

Political Science 




Kristen M. Russell 

Biology 




Saowalak Saeteng 

Biology 




Karyn L. Saunders 

Sociology 




Caroline Savery 

Chemistry/Biology 




Michele S. Scott 

Nursing 




David P. Sellins 

Computer Engineering 




Rieko Shibata 

Visual Design/Graphics 




Katie A. Schneider 

Nursing 




Peggy A. Scott 

English/Writing 




Jennifer M. Shea 

Nursing 




Tang Shouping 

Physics 




Rebecca L. Schwartz 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




David H. Scully 

Finance 




Joanne M. Shea 

English/Writing 




Jennifer L. Silva 

Psychology 



53 




Mark Silveira 

Electrical Engineering 




Cherie L. Simmons 

Nursing 




Rebecca S. Simonin 

Visual Design/Graphics 





Lindsay A. Skirven 

MFG. MGT. Fiber & Textiles 

54 




Justin J. Silvia 

Chemistry 




Sandra Simoes 

Accounting 




Cora Simons 

Marketing 




Beatrice I. Smith 

Human/Social Sciences 



Andrew B. Simino 

Marketing 




Susan Simoes 

Accounting 




John B. Skabeikis 

Criminal Justice 




Frank M. Sniezek 

Management 




Sherry L. Soares 

Psychology 




Derek A. Souza 

Marketing 




Andree D. St-Cyr 

French/Spanish 





Amy P. Souza 

Art Education 




Autilio A. Spencer 

Electrical Engineering 




Jennifer A. St. Laurent 

Political Science 





Bonnie Souza 

Psychology 




Adam J. Spreyer 

Finance 




Lauren M. Stentiford 

Philosophy 




Christine M. Stewart 

Social Services 



Uleike Suhr 

MBA 



Timothy D. Sullivan 

Biology 



55 




Marcel Suter 

Computer & Info. Science 




Alison D. Sylvia 

Med. Lab Science/Cytotech 




Stephen J. Szymanski 

Psychology 




Richard H. Taylor 

Human/Social Sciences 




Tammy Sweeney 

Med. Lab Science/Cytotech 




Douglas J. Sylvia 

Management 




Sandra I. Tan 

Medical Lab. Science 




David Terreault 

Political Science 




Christine D. Swinimer 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Viviana M. Sylvia 

Social Services 




Maki Tanaka 

Sculpture 




Paul J. Texeira 

Finance 




?r 



56 




Jeremy T. Theerman 

History 




Karen K. Tilli 

History 




Susan L. Tobin 

Human/Social Sciences 




Joseph C. Travassos 

Business Information Systems 




Jonathan Thibault 

Sociology 




Andrew Timo 

Management 




Michelle A. Toupin 

Business Information Systems 




Geraldine V. Tronca 

Psychology 




Kimberly B. Thielman 

Biology 




Maura K. Tobin 

Psychology 




Mark R. Trabucco 

Finance 




Matthew N. Trudeau 

Sociology/Anthropology 



57 




Steven J. Tucker 

Sociology 




Roger P. Ventura 

Electrical Engineering 




Kilricanos Vieira 

Liberal Arts 




Jason M. Vining 

Management 







4B% i 


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Carla P. Valentim 

Business Information Systems 




Robert F. Verzone 

Sculpture 




Andrew J. Viera 

English 




Barbara A. Wackowski 

Human/Social Sciences 




John R. VanHook 

Computer & Info. Science 




Jennifer M. Vieira 

Finance 




Beth M. Vincent 

Visual Design/Illustration 




Amanda M. Walker 

Sociology 




58 




Michelle L. Walker 

Marketing 




Daniel J. Walsh 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Nadine Walter 

Business 




Mark J. Warecki 

Mechanical Engineering 




Erika M. Walleston 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Jennifer L. Walsh 

English/Writing 




Kathryn A. Warden 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




James W. Welch 

Computer & Inf.. Science 




Christopher J. Walsh 

Accounting 




Nancy A. Walsh-Sayles 

Biology 




Gabriel Ware 

Music 




Kristin Wells 

Psycholkogy 



59 




Michelle C. Wenck 

Biology 




Andrew Wheadon 

MBA 




Donna J. Willard 

Human/Social Sciences 




Jason D. Wong 

Photo/Electronic Imaging 




Jennifer Wetherbee 

Marketing 




Gregory R. White 

Finance 




Carrie E. Withers 

Psychology 




Siu Ting Wong 

Computer Oriented Math 




Colleen M. Wetterland 

Human/Social Sciences 













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m 



William C. Whiting 

Psychology 




Scott M. Wojtunik 

Management 




Siu Yin Wong 

Computer Oriented Math 



ypc 



60 




Cynthia Wood 

English 




Chad B. Woolf 

Computer & Inf.. Science 




Nancy Wright 

Psychology 




Meghan F. Young 

English 




Jayda E. Woodman 

Accounting 




Robert W. Woollam 

Business Information Systems 




Heather A. Yellig 

Visual Design/Graphic 




Thelma M. Zettel 

Sociology 




Elizabeth D. Woods 

Accounting 




Gregory J. Workman 

Finance 




Hilina D. Yesihak 

English 




Jian Ming Zang 

Business Administration 



61 





Yan Zhang 

Computer & Info. Science 



Brad P. Ziegler 

English/Drama & Film Studies 



^Kpjtd majors 



Act 


- Accounting 


Fin 


- Finance 


Prt 


- Printmaking 


Etu 


- Engineering 


Fou 


- Art Unspecified 


Psy 


- Printmaking 


Enl 


- English 


Frn 


- French 


Psyc 


- Psychology/Clinical 


Aed 


- Art Education 


Ger 


- German 


Psyg 


- Psychology/General 


Arh 


- Artisanry 


Hst 


- History 


Scl 


- Sculpture 


Bio 


- Biology 


Hrm 


- Human Resource Mgt. 


Soc 


- Sociology 


Biom 


- Biology/Marine Biology 


Hss 


- Human/Social Sciences 


Soca 


- Sociology/Anthropology 


Bad 


- Business Administration 


Lau 


- Liberl Arts 


Socj 


- Criminal Justice 


Bis 


- Business Info System 


Mat 


- Master of Arts in Teaching 


Spa 


- Spanish 


Chm 


- Chemistry 


Mgt 


- Management 


Str 


- Start Program 


Chmb 


- Chemistry/Biology 


Mkt 


- Marketing 


Tec 


- Textile Chemistry 


Chmp 


- Chemistry/Pre-Medical 


Mth 


- Mathematics 


Tde 


- Textile Design 


Chmm 


- Chemistry/BS-MS 


Mthc 


- Computer Oriented Math 


Tdf 


- Textile Design/Fiber Arts 


Cen 


- Civil Engineering 


Mlsc 


- Med. Lab. Science/Cytotech 


Tet 


- Textile Technology 


Cpe 


- Computer Engineering 


Mds 


- Multidisciplinary Studies 


Tetd 


- Textile Tech. /Dyeing/Fin. 


Cis 


- Computer & Info Science 


Mmt 


- Mfg Mgt: Fiber & Textiles 


Tets 


- Textile Tech. /Structural Sci. 


Eco 


- Economics 


Mmts 


- Mfg Mgt: Fiber & Textiles 


Vid 


- Visual Design 


Ele 


- Electrical Engineering 


Mus 


- Music 


Vidg 


- Visual Design/Graphic 


Eet 


- Electrical Engineering Tech 


Nur 


- Nursing 


Vide 


- Visual Design/Ceramics 


Egr 


- Pre-Engineering 


Pan 


- Painting 


Vidf 


- Photo/Electronic Imaging 


Egr 


- Engineering 


Phi 


- Philosophy 


Vidi 


- Visual Design/Illustration 


Etu 


- Engineering Technology 


Phy 


- Physics 


Vidm 


- Visual Design/Metals 


Enl 


- English 


Por 


- Portuguese 






Enlw 


- EnglishAVriting 


Prw 


- Professional Writing 






Enid 


- English/Drama &Film 


Psc 


- Political Science 







i# 62 



1 



Smi-m mot ikjotomakcd 






Peter C. Abreu 


Act 


Susan Barrett 


Biom 


Joseph P. Bouret 


Nur 


Christine E. Adamski 


Nur 


Suzanne M. Baskinger 


Biom 


Leonard A. Bourgeois 


Phy 


Rebecca M. Adler 


Vid 


Amy T. Bauer 


Nur 


Paula C. Branco 


Nur 


Melody A. Affonce 


Mne 


David A. Beard 


Bio 


Susan E. Brayton 


Psy 


Michelle E. Agostinho 


Act 


Daniel J. Beaudry 


Act 


John J. Breault 


Hst 


Michelle Aguiar 


Act 


Kayne M. Beaudry 


Mgt 


Peter R. Breault 


Psc 


Kevin D. Akin 


Bad 


Michael Beaulieu 


Hst 


Kevin D. Brennan 


Tec 


William H. Alexander 


Ele 


Lori E. Bechner 


Psyc 


Judith A. Bright 


Nur 


Adam S. Alfred 


Tdf 


Ann-Marie D. Belanger 


Mth 


Kerry A. Britland 


Bad 


Ana C. Almeida 


Soc 


Wayne Belanger 


Ele 


Michael J. Brito 


Mis 


Carol A. Almeida 


Nur 


Christopher R. Bell 


Psy 


Dana L. Brown 


Scl 


David Almeida 


Ele 


Thomas M. Bell 


Mne 


Kevin J. Brown 


Mne 


Jennifer A. Almeida 


Mth 


Tove E. Bendiksen 


Hst 


Laureen Brown 


Socj 


Lorene M. Almeida 


Hss 


Scott J. Bentley 


Vidg 


Mark J. Brown 


Mth 


Tracie L. Almeida 


Psyg 


Richard A. Berggren 


Eet 


Colleen Bruce 


Socs 


Jocelyn Almy 


Vid 


Jill M. Berkman 


Hss 


Kathleen M. Brunelle 


Mat 


Elisa M. Alves 


Fin 


James A. Bernard 


Bio 


Laura A. Brunette 


Hss 


Diane J. Amaral 


Vidi 


Kenneth M. Berryman Jr 


Act 


Steven S. Bshara 


Hss 


Kathy Amaral 


Por 


Richard M. Bertone 


Hss 


Rama R. Buddhineni 


Ele 


Victoria S. Amaral 


Act 


Susan L. Bertrand 


Nur 


Joseph P. Bunevith 


Cen 


Hamilton C. Andrade 


Elet 


Janet L. Berube 


Act 


Keith W. Burden 


Fin 


Scott E. Andrade 


Hss 


Sean M. Bessette 


Chmb 


Shawn Burgo 


Hst 


Phillip J. Andrews 


Vidi 


Catherine A. Bettencourt 


Nur 


Britt D. Burton 


Phy 


Lisa M. Angelo 


Vidi 


Joyce A. Bettencourt 


Vidi 


Donald P. Burton 


Enl 


Carmen F. Anglero 


Soc 


Eric M. Bichao 


Cpe 


Jill L. Byam 


Hss 


Alyssa A. Arcanti 


Bis 


Daniel M. Bigelow 


Vidi 


Brent W. Byers 


Mne 


Tara Arcikowski 


Act 


Kari A. Binning 


Mis 


Jennifer A. Cabeca 


Psy 


Francine Arruda 


Nur 


Sarah Bishop- Valentejn 


Soca 


Alberto M. Cabeza 


Cis 


Lisa M. Arruda 


Bad 


Eric M. Bizarro 


Psy 


Kathleen Cabral 


Nurn 


Christopher P. Arthmann 


Mkt 


Coral M. Blake 


Psy 


Lisa Cabral 


Psy 


Eric A. Asquino 


Mkt 


Adam B. Blanchard 


Cen 


Tanya M. Cabral 


Mgt 


Margaret M. Attar 


Nur 


Ryan D. Bland 


Soc 


Shuowei Cai 


Chm 


Lori A. Augustine 


Hst 


Greg N. Blaney 


Bis 


Alexander J. Camlin 


Vid 


Roxann Auteri-Pereira 


Nur 


Jeffrey M. Blaney 


Cen 


Richard K. Campion 


Soc 


Rebecca Avila 


Scl 


Lori D. Bobek 


Nur 


Molly J. Cannon 


Act 


Filiz Avsar 


Tet 


Nelia C. Bolarinho 


Act 


Trung N. Cao 


Tec 


Brian J. Azer 


Vidg 


Mark Botelho 


Eco 


Yiqun Cao 


Phy 


Kevin M. Baldwin 


Cen 


Ramsey P. Botelho 


Bio 


Michael B. Capeto 


Mth 


Matthew Bancroft 


Cpe 


Carol A. Boucher 


Nur 


Ana M. Cardoso 


Act 


Warren R. Bank 


Cis 


Melanie M. Boucher 


Aed 


Neil F. Cardoso 


Bio 


Frances E. Barbero 


Nur 


Jamie L. Boulay 


Cen 


Jeffrey T. Carey 


Mgt 




63 



Joseph D. Carey 


Fin 


Martha M. Connor 


Bad 


William P. Delorey 


Prw 


June M. Carlsen 


Bad 


Ronald W. Conrad 


Mgt 


Noemia Demelo 


Spa 


Laurie D. Carlson 


Atr 


Casey Conry 


Ele 


Stephanie A. Demelo 


Enl 


Cheryl E. Carlson-Perrow 


Aed 


Allen J. Constant 


Enl 


Cheriann E. Demeo 


Psy 


Christopher J. Carreiro 


Nur 


Lynn M. Corbett 


Psyc 


Rita M. Deoliveira 


Psyg 


Glenn J. Casey 


Phy 


Steven Cordeiro 


Mne 


Heidi E. Desmarais 


Mis 


Jennifer M. Casey 


Mgt 


Charlene A. Correia 


Nur 


Christopher J. Desrocher 


Cpe 


Joao C. Castro 


Ele 


Kevin M. Costa 


Ele 


Lawrence G. Devaux 


Act 


Michael V. Cerbone 


Pan 


Melissa M. Costa 


Soc 


Lucia R. Dias 


Psy 


Robert P. Charest 


Vidi 


Natasha L. Costa 


Nurn 


Thomas E. Diaz 


Prw 


Deanna C. Charpentier 


Hss 


John Costanzo 


Act 


Jane E. Dibiasio 


Mth 


Nancy L. Chartier 


Psy 


Peter R. Cote 


Prw 


Scott Diesenhaus 


Mat 


Barry D. Chase 


Mne 


Sean A. Cote 


Bio 


Shawn P. Diffley 


Mne 


Heidi L. Chasse 


Psy 


Julie M. Couture 


Bad 


Gregory R. Digiorgio 


Mkt 


Dina F. Chaves 


Psy 


Heather D. Cozby 


Act 


Karen A. Digiovanni 


Tde 


Fredy B. Chavez 


Mne 


Danny S. Crandall 


Enl 


James F. Dillon 


Psyc 


Jifeng Chen 


Ele 


Lauren A. Crest 


Psyc 


Holger A. Dippel 


Ele 


Yiwen Chen 


Ele 


Faith A. Cripps 


Nur 


Kevin Dixon 


Aed 


Lan Cheng 


Phy 


Eric J. Crone 


Mth 


Carl J. Dobbins 


Ele 


Bette S. Chew 


Socs 


Sherri J. Crook 


Bio 


Michael S. Doherty 


Mkt 


Henry Chin 


Ele 


Susan J. Crosby 


Act 


Rachel L. Doherty 


Psyc : 


Jennifer L. Christy 


Aed 


Sandra C. Cunha 


Cis 


Mary L. Dolan 


Nurn 


John L. Churchill 


Cen 


Patricia I. Cura 


Mgt 


Kevin J. Donohue 


Psc 


James M. Cichon 


Chm 


Sarah P. Curley 


Mmt 


Corinne A. Dooley 


Nur 


Gina A. Ciprari 


Vidf 


Robert W. Curran 


Vid 


Joanne E. Dorothy 


Aed 


Adam J. Clark 


Mkt 


Maria T. D'Errico 


Act 


Arlindo N. Dos Reis 


Psc 


Rico V. Cleffi 


Soc 


Joseph R. Dafonseca 


Mus 


Mark R. Doucette 


Mat 


Theodore B. Clement 


Cis 


William J. Dahlene 


Cis 


Melissa M. Dudley 


Vidm 


Kevin E. Clifford 


Bio 


Jesse C. Dahlquist 


Vidi 


John V. Dufresne 


Cis 


Alan T. Cloutier 


Cen 


Judy J. Dandison 


Prw 


Janet J. Dugas 


Nun- 


Michelle J. Coelho 


Cis 


Louis Daponte 


Mne 


Shawn G. Dugas 


Bio 


Daniel J. Coffey 


Hss 


David Dasilva 


Bis 


John C. Dulin 


Bad 


Erin A. Coffey 


Bio 


Clinton R. Davis 


Cis 


April-Lee N. Duncan 


Mkt 


Edward Colbeth III 


Vidm 


Melynda J. Davis 


Mus 


Bradford C. Duncan 


Cen 


Garrett M. Coleman 


Biom 


Jorge M. Deabreu 


Spa 


Charles W. Dunham JR. 


Vid 


Cathleen Colleran-Santos 


Nur 


Daniel Dealmeida 


Chm 


Shawn P. Dunton 


Act 


Carline A. Collins 


Cis 


Lynda V. Dealmeida 


Nur 


Eric J. Duphily 


Cen 


Matthew W. Compton 


Hst 


Jennifer A. Deane 


Vide 


Diane Dutra 


Vidg 


Mary D. Comstock 


Psy 


Nora Dearborn 


Aed 


Erin L. Eastwood 


Chm 


Karen Concepcion 


Aed 


Lana Debettencourt 


Vidm 


Holly S. Edwards 


Bio 


Mary E. Conley 


Nur 


Gary A. Deblois 


Vidf 


Edward Egan 


Bio 


Lynne A. Conlon 


Nur 


Dana L. Degen 


Hss 


Colin E. Elliott 


Vidf 


Barbara R. Connolly 


Nur 


Mark Delisle 


Prt 


Susan M. Ellis 


Nur 


„ * 




Stephen P. Delmastro 


Fin 


Robert A. Epstein 


Prw 



Sarhan Erel 
Gregory P. Eschuk 
Lisa M. Estrela 
Tammy A. Estrella 
Kimberly A. Fanning 
Patricia Faria 
Christopher M. Farrell 
Joanna C. Farrell 
Raisa Fedyuk 
Robin M. Ferguson 
Nancy S. Fernandes 
Robin M. Fernandes 
Robert D. Ferrari 
Constance M. Ferreira 
Elvio Ferreira 
Ruth A. Ferreira 
Kenneth S. Ferus 
Daniela M. Fidalgo 
Nancy E. Finneran 
Erin C. Flanagan 
Kathy L. Fleming 
Heather E. Fletcher 
Seija Floderus 
Robbin T. Florent 
Trevor J. Florent 
Mark A. Foley 
Richard F. Fonseca 
Bella M. Fontes 
Tracey M. Forgue 
Janet S. Fortes 
Kathleen D. Fortier 
Douglas J. Fortunato 
Edison Foster-Schwartz 
Derek J. Foulds 
Helena M. Fragoso 
Jaryn L. Fredericks 
Russell A. Fredette 
Matthew J. Fredricks 
Litao Fu 
Cheryl Furtado 
Lorraine A. Gagne 
Sharon P. Gagne 
Jason M. Galego 
Liza Gammons 



Tet 


Debra A. Garand 


Psyc 


Zlata A. Gutman 


Psc 


Socj 


Erin P. Garvey 


Fin 


Mary Hagerty 


Act 


Cen 


Walter T. Gebski 


Fin 


Marcia L. Halm 


Arh 


Mne 


Robert S. Geleney 


Aed 


Emily A. Hale 


Act 


Vidf 


Christine Gelinas 


Mkt 


Allison R. Hall 


Vide 


Enl 


Aaron Gendreau 


Nur 


Tracy L. Hall 


Scl 


Vid 


Janet E. Gendreau 


Aed 


Amanda J. Hallbergh 


Biom 


Bio 


Jonah D. Gerber 


Hss 


Judith A. Hambleton 


Aed 


Act 


Debra J. Gere 


Prw 


Julie Hamel 


Bad 


Nur 


Nicholas F. Gianferante 


Cen 


Eric M. Hamilton 


Psy 


Bad 


Frances L. Giblin 


Mkt 


Charlotte Hamlin 


Atr 


Psy 


Richard J. Gilcoine 


Hst 


Timothy S. Hanscom 


Hss 


Hst 


Christine A. Gillespie 


Nurn 


Kevin R. Hanson 


Cen 


Hss 


Ahmed Y. Ginawi 


Ele 


Jeffrey W. Hardacker 


Vidi 


Mgt 


Daniel S. Gioiosa 


Cen 


Peter B. Hardwick 


Cis 


Bad 


Kevin Giuliano 


Psy 


Warren Harrington 


Hss 


Psy 


Derica Gobeil 


Bad 


Cheyenne G. Harris 


Atr 


Mth 


Bonnie C. Gobeil 


Bad 


Emmett E. Harris 


Eco 


Pan 


Deana L. Golini 


Aed 


Joseph D. Harris 


Ele 


Enl 


Sally S. Gomaa 


Prw 


Bart H. Harrison 


Biom 


Cis 


Walter J. Gomes III 


Ele 


Judith M. Harrison 


Nur 


Psy 


Milton N. Goncalves 


Hst 


Lauri A. Harrison 


Frn 


Atr 


Natalia M. Goncalves 


Por 


Linda L. Harrop 


Nurn 


Psy 


David P. Gonville 


Vidg 


Matthew D. Hartling 


Cis 


Mth 


Ariella S. Goodman 


Psyc 


Matthew K. Hartnett 


Bis 


Psy 


Amy-Lynn Goodrow 


Nur 


Justin P. Hathaway 


Cis 


Vidi 


Steven H. Gordon 


Mkt 


Erin P. Hayes 


Pan 


Fin 


Michelle E. Gorman 


Nur 


Ziqiang He 


Ele 


Bis 


Amanda J. Goyette 


Enl 


Sean P. Healey 


Vidf 


Mis 


Frank C. Grace 


Tec 


Cheryl M. Hebert 


Enl 


Psy 


Allison K. Graham 


Atr 


Bill Hekking 


Prt 


Phi 


Christine R. Gram 


Atr 


John J. Hickey 


Cen 


Ele 


Demetrius T. Grandel 


Mds 


Peter Higgins 


Act 


Psyc 


Jennifer J. Greenwood 


Mne 


John 0. Hill 


Biom 


Soc 


Amanda S. Gregg 


Biom 


Lisa G. Hird 


Nurn 


Pan 


Lyn Gregoriadis 


Hst 


Stefanie F. Hoffer 


Spa 


Bad 


Mary E. Greim 


Aed 


Beatrice G. Holler 


Hss 


Soc 


Michael J. Grimley 


Cis 


Mark M. Holmes 


Vidg 


Chm 


Christopher A. Guerra 


Hss 


Baoming Hong 


Ele 


Bio 


Timothy J. Guertin 


Scl 


Irene M. Honnors 


Hss 


Hss 


Ann C. Guiliani 


Vid 


Masami Horikawa 


Fin 


Soc 


Shaun E. Guillotte 


Hss 


Christopher T. Horta 


Hss 


Bis 


Kate E. Guimond 


Bio 


Marilyn J. Howcroft 


Arh 


Mmt 


Debra S. Guittard 


Prw 








65 



Xinqun Huang 
Erik S. Huchel 
Rebecca L. Hutchins 
Lori A. Iacobbo 
Janice L. Iacono 
Risa E. Indeck 
Christy A. Irick 
Shannon M. Irish 
Shigeaki Ishikawa 
Linda I. Jacobs 
Fernando Jacome 
Phillip N. Jagoda 
Peter M. Jaillet 
Aki-Tia K. James 
Robert B. Janelle 
Mathew E. Janus 
Jeffrey S. Jenkins 
Yunwei Jia 
Darrin L. Johnson 
Sheila Johnson 
Nancy C. Johnston 
Rachel M. Jupin 
Robert D. Kaiser 
Barbara E. Kalbach 
Yijay V. Kannan 
Christopher E. Karbott 
Kristin Kearney 
Brian P. Keaveney 
Devon B. Keeney 
Melanie V. Kellum 
Amy L. Kennedy 
Ashley F. Kennedy 
Kellie J. Kennedy 
Robin E. Ketchen 
Diane E. Kilduff 
Bethany A. King 
Susan R. Kinslow 
Alison M. Kirohn 
Jane T. Kitchen 
Jacob A. Knowles 
Siobhan R. Knuttel 
lerry J. Konopnicki 
Jill Kowalewski 



66 




Chm 


Surendra M. Krishnan 


Ele 


Chen Lin 


Ele 


Mgt 


Lisa M. Kuczewski 


Nurn 


Jean A. Lincoln 


Bio 


Act 


Allegra Kuhn 


Scl 


Catherine A. Linhares 


Soc 


Psyc 


Linda J. Kuntz 


Psy 


Hannah Lloyd 


Psy 


Aed 


Tricia L. Kursewicz 


Atr 


Edward J. Loiselle 


Hst 


Nur 


Heather Kyle 


Psy 


Jorge M. Lopes 


Bad 


Atr 


David G. Labreche 


Soc 


Christie Lowrance 


Prw 


Mkt 


Danielle M. Labrecque 


Psyc 


Christine M. Lowrie 


Cis 


Bis 


Cheri L. Lafrance 


Psy 


Yan Lu 


Chm 


Nur 


Andrew Lafrance-Bedard 


Cis 


Charlene R. Luciano 


Act 


Soca 


Cynthia J. Lagerval 


Nur 


Katherine Lukas 


Nur 


Cen 


Patrica G. Laidler 


Prw 


Christopher R. Lyons 


Cis 


Cen 


Joan Lamarre 


Nurn 


Heather J. MacDonald 


Psyc 


Psy 


Marc P. Landry 


Act 


Keith J. MacDonald 


Cen 


Hst 


Mary K. Langevin 


Mis 


Meridith MacKnight 


Chm 


Ele 


Kristen E. Langhans 


Act 


Gilbert S. MacVaugh III 


Psyc 


Cis 


David R. Langlais 


Nurn 


David G. Madeira 


Por 


Ele 


Craig R. Laperriere 


Chm 


Natalie A. Mailloux 


Nur 


Bad 


Kerri L. Lapointe 


Psy 


Randy A. Manchester 


Bad 


Phi 


Nicole J. Lapointe 


Vidg 


Alyson L. Mandel 


Nurn 


Aed 


Patricia J. Lapre 


Psy 


Iana Mandravel 


Chm 


Mat 


Giovanna C. Larson 


Lau 


Giulio Manfredonia 


Mus 


Mgt 


Debra A. Lavelle 


Soc 


Joni M. Maniatis 


Aed 


Aed 


Dawn J. Lavendier 


Bio 


Elise H. Mankes 


Atr 


Ele 


Nicole L. Lavoie 


Psy 


John D. Manning 


Enl 


Bio 


Barbara I. Lawrence 


Nur 


Sallie A. Marcantonio 


Psy 


Mds 


Thomas D. Lawrence 


Mkt 


Felipe J. Marcelino 


Cis 


Act 


Kurt A. Lawson 


Act 


Michael J. Marchand 


Biom 


Biom 


Domingos S. Leal 


Cis 


Brian S. Marobella 


Bis 


Mat 


Jason P. Leary 


Prw 


Brian D. Marrotte 


Mth 


Hss 


Jody Leaver 


Psy 


Catherine L. Martin 


Act 


Soc 


Robert Leblanc 


Soc 


Michael J. Martin 


Cpe 


Mmt 


Robert Ledo 


Mmt 


Denise A. Marzilli 


Nur 


Nur 


Nadine Ledoux 


Socj 


Malcolm M. Matheson 


Eet 


Nur 


Scott M. Leeman 


Mth 


Lauren A. Mathews 


Ele 


Hss 


Carole A. Lees 


Nur 


Neil R. Matias 


Psc 


Socs 


Daniel R. Lehane 


Eco 


Satoshi Matsuzaki 


Chm 


Nur 


Elizabeth R. Lehr 


Prw 


Robert M. Mauro 


Psc 


Mgt 


Carl J. Leidhold 


Chm 


Jason D. Maxwell 


Bio 


Tec 


Paul L. Leoncavallo 


Mth 


Erica J. May 


Bio 


Prw 


Peter C. Levasseur 


Scl 


Phyllis Mayer 


Hss 


Psyg 


Patrick W. Levoshko 


Cis 


Mark D. Maynard 


Atr 


Nur 


Patrick D. Libonate 


Hst 


Kristan Mazaka 


Psc 




Ellen C. Lima 


Nur 


Angela C. McBride 


Bio 



Elaine D. McBride 
Stacy A. McBride 
Charles McCarrick 
Daniel O. McCarron 
Michael G. McCarthy 
Nicole M. McCulloch 
Christopher K. McDonald 
Maura E. McDonald 
John T. McEvoy 
Kiley McGarry 
Jeffrey McGee 
Arlene K. McGonagle 
Rachel J. McGourthy 
Melissa M. McGrath 
Nancy J. McHugh 
Matthew R. Mcllvin 
Janis McKernan-Markoff 
Erin A. McManus 
Gail R. McNamara 
Ronald B. McNeil 
Shawn K. McNutt 
Amy E. Medeiros 
Earl Medeiros 
Paula Medeiros 
Shawn A. Medina 
Daryl E. Meehan 
Jamie L. Meehan 
Stephen B. Meehan 
Christopher M. Mello 
Bridget F. Meredith 
Rhonda K. Messier 
Tara A. Michalewich 
Gayle Milla 
Harold M. Miller 
Kelly A. Millington 
Alan L. Minkin 
Brian Miranda 
Kerri L. Mitchell 
Patrick J. Modic 
Tom D. Moitoso 
Jose Monteiro 
Valdemar O. Monteiro 
Patricia A. Montgomery 
Matthew R. Montoya 



Atr 


Sarah J. Moran 


Prw 


Kristie L. Pacheco 


Act 


Bio 


Cory A. Moreira 


Bis 


Michael A. Pacheco 


Enlw 


Ele 


Samantha L. Morris 


Mkt 


George T. Palmer 


Vidf 


Phy 


Michael S. Morss 


Biom 


Lisa M. Panek 


Vidg 


Mds 


Shiva D. Mottahed 


Mgt 


Melissa C. Pankow 


Mgt 


Aed 


M T. Mozaz 


Spa 


Dorothy Papadopoulou 


Cis 


Mne 


Denis Mukhin 


Ele 


Margarita Pappas 


Psyc 


Soc 


Diane Mulcahy 


Nur 


Matthew P. Pappas 


Phy 


Act 


Erin J. Mulligan 


Vidp 


Cynthia M. Paradise 


Bio 


Nur 


Jennifer S. Mullin 


Mne 


Kelly L. Parent 


Enl 


Hst 


Eli A. Munkholm 


Mkt 


Sweta Parikh 


Chm 


Atr 


Brian D. Murphy 


Vidf 


Margaret T. Parkin-Gonsalves 


Chm 


Nur 


Sally Namari 


Mne 


Carlos M. Pavao 


Mne 


Atr 


Michael J. Neely 


Psy 


Matthew J. Peck 


Soc 


Biom 


Anh H. Nguyen 


Bis 


Nicole Pellerin 


Nur 


Chm 


Hang B. Nguyen 


Chm 


Philip A. Pelletier 


Nur 


Nur 


Sherri L. Nichols 


Hss 


Aysha W. Peltz 


Atr 


Bad 


Susan Nichols 


Prw 


Catherine M. Pereira 


Nur 


Socs 


Dennis M. Nolan 


Cis 


Stacy L. Pereira 


Nur 


Mmt 


Louise M. Norko 


Nur 


Dylan L. Perosino 


Vidi 


Bis 


Heather R. Noyes 


Nur 


Christine A. Perrault 


Nur 


Hss 


Daniel E. Nunes 


Psy 


Lawrence A. Perrault 


Bad 


Ele 


Eurosina A. O'Brien 


Mis 


Erika L. Perry 


Act 


Socs 


Neil O'Brien 


Cen 


Jeffrey J. Perry 


Bis 


Mgt 


Heather J. O'Connor 


Hss 


Stacey L. Perry 


Act 


Chm 


Eileen C. O'Gara 


Prw 


Jennifer L. Peterman 


Act 


Psy 


Michael F. O'Leary 


Mgt 


Caitlin B. Peters 


Psy 


Vid 


Carol L. O'Malia 


Vid 


Jeremy C. Petravicz 


Bio 


Socj 


Stephen P. O'Malley 


Cen 


Peter M. Petrillo 


Enl 


Bio 


Sean M. O'Neil 


Psc 


Joanna L. Pettey 


Nur 


Nur 


Lee A. O'Neill 


Nur 


Ann M. Pettine 


Aed 


Nur 


Melissa A. Oddi 


Aed 


Elizabeth A. Phaneuf 


Vidf 


Nur 


Othieno Okong'O 


Eet 


Michael P. Phenix 


Bad 


Hst 


Koji Okugami 


Cis 


Aimee L. Phillippi 


Biom 


Aed 


Wendy J. Olend 


Ele 


Edward A. Picard 


Vidf 


Psyc 


John K. Oles 


Aed 


Brendan S. Piccolo 


Mne 


Cis 


Stephen A. Oliveira 


Cis 


Lisa M. Piela 


Nurn 


Fin 


William J. Oliver 


Bad 


Andre Pimentel 


Cen 


Bad 


Brian D. Olson 


Cen 


Jeffrey Pimentel 


Bis 


Cpe 


Audrey Oster 


Atr 


Louis K. Pimentel 


Vidi 


Mne 


Amy Ostiguy 


Nur 


Michael C. Pimentel 


Cen 


Mmt 


Matthew D. Ouellette 


Psc 


Karen A. Pincins 


Cis 


Nur 


Renee T. Ouellette 


Aed 






Psyg 


Elton C. Pacheco 


Hst 







67 



Maria L. Pinheiro 


Nur 


Rachina A. Rodrigues 


Bio 


Lori A. Silva 


Hss 


Michael W. Pinnetti 


Bio 


Isaac Rodriguez 


Enlw 


Pamela M. Silva 


Bio 


Dianne L. Pipher 


Psy 


Matthew A. Rose 


Mkt 


Nancy J. Smigel 


Act 


Craig Pisani 


Bio 


Scott R. Roskelley 


Biom 


Kathryn A. Smith 


Cpe 


Brenda S. Pledger 


Vidg 


Norman R. Rousseau 


Bad 


Paul M. Smith 


Mgt 


Ebenezer W. Plettner 


Ele 


Thomas C. Roux 


Bis 


Scott J. Smith 


Ele 


Judith K. Pointer 


Atr 


Michelle A. Rowley 


Psyc 


Rick A. Snizek 


Enlw 


James C. Poirier 


Cpe 


Shukla Roy 


Bad 


Dale S. Soares 


Nur 


Mark E. Poirier 


Bad 


Stephen R. Roy 


Biom 


Laura R. Soares 


Bio 


Cynthia L. Polak 


Enlw 


Joan Ruel 


Psy 


Paul B. Sobreiro 


Scl 


Amy K. Pontes 


Mis 


Fuding Rui 


Cis 


John T. Softcheck 


Prw 


Michael Porrazzo 


Act 


Michelle Russillo 


Bad 


Erik S. Sojka 


Mne 


Rebecca J. Pottle 


Psy 


Carrie L. Ryba 


Aed 


Sathyashankar Somasekar 


Phy 


Michael J. Prisco 


Mgt 


Daniel J. Salerno 


Biom 


Paul D. Soodsma 


Atr 


Jason L. Quental 


Cen 


Bethany A. Salvon 


Vidf 


Christopher Sousa 


Nur 


Ashok Ramasubramanian 


Ele 


Masanori Samizo 


Psc 


Fernando L. Sousa 


Mus 


Jaime R. Ramos 


Bis 


Richard M. Sanders 


Tdf 


Gorett M. Sousa 


Spa 


Leonard G. Ramos 


Spu 


Amy Santos 


Nur 


Heather J. Sousa 


Tdf 


William M. Ramsay 


Phy 


Sandra C. Santos 


Aed 


Luisa R. Sousa 


Mds 


John Raposa 


Cen 


Susan D. Sargent 


Nur 


Paulo N. Sousa 


Psy 


Laura F. Raposo 


Aed 


David A. Sarro 


Prw 


Sandra R. Sousa 


Mgt 


Paulo Raposo 


Por 


Jon S. Schackmuth 


Atr 


John C. Souza 


Prw 


Thomas J. Rapoza 


Soc 


John S. Schaefer 


Hst 


Timothy S. Souza 


Bio 


Lisa Rapoza Williams 


Bio 


Katherine F. Schaefer 


Soca 


Kenneth L. Springhetti 


Cis 


Christina M. Reale 


Act 


Christopher A. Scheer 


Mus 


Daniel C. Sprout 


Psyc 


Mark S. Rebello 


Psy 


Jeffrey A. Schoonover 


Phy 


Andree D. St-Cyr 


Spa 


Karen M. Regan 


Nur 


Joseph R. Schorge 


Ele 


Christine E. St. Laurent 


Nur 


Danielle K. Renaud 


Vidg 


Juergen Schulze-Doebold 


Cis 


Nicole St. Pierre 


Atr 


Jennifer Reppucci 


Psy 


Andrew L. Schwarzmann 


Mis 


Thomas B. Steele 


Bis 


Dino Resendes 


Spu 


Jennifer F. Scola 


Hss 


Scott R. Stets 


Mus 


Jonathan Reuss 


Mne 


Ronald J. Scopelliti 


Prw 


Scott J. Stoddard 


Act 


Brent Reynolds 


Cen 


Robert M. Scott 


Chm 


Jerold A. Stokes 


Mds 


Cynthia C. Rickard 


Atr 


Arlene V. Selmonosky 


Atr 


Donald A. Stolmeier 


Soc 


Cathleen A. Riley 


Mth 


Linda A. Senechal 


Atr 


Eric R. Stone 


Biom 


Danielle C. Riley 


Arh 


Renee F. Setzer 


Enl 


Sheldon I. Straker 


Bad 


Christopher J. Rizy 


Cen 


Laurette A. Shabshelowitz 


Mgt 


Traci L. Strohl 


Ele 


Steven E. Roberts 


Atr 


Matthew P. Shannon 


Hss 


Brian M. Sullivan 


Mgt 


Brian VV. Robertson 


Mgt 


Deanne G. Shaw 


Mmt 


Helen M. Sullivan 


Nur 


Paula J. Robidoux 


Psy 


Steven D. Shaw 


Mne 


Kirsten B. Sullivan 


Bad 


Paul Robinson 


Bad 


Reginald Sheffield 


Enl 


Virginia M. Sullivan 


Prw 


Daniel M. Roderick 


Enlw 


Mark P. Sheldon 


Vidf 


YiSun 


Chm 


Antonio A. Rodrigues 


Psy 


Jian Shi 


Ele 


Thomas A. Swaida 


Enid 


Maria R. Rodrigues 


Eet 


Brian T. Shilale 


Cis 


Jill Swartzendruber 


Bio 






Corey S. Shumaker 


Vidi 


Charles M. Sykes 


Cis 



68 



£r 



Jeffery P. Sylvia 


Hst 


Jason P. Valcourt 


Mgt 


Hong Yin 


Chm 


Michael F. Sypek 


Bio 


Karen M. Valcourt 


Hss 


Dawn A. Young 


Bad 


Ioanna Syrimi 


Cis 


Brian D. Van Buskirk 


Cen 


Sung-Hae Yun 


Atr 


Sandra I. Tan 


Mlsc 


Joanne M. VanDal 


Nur 


Vinu T. Zachariah 


Chmb 


Shouping Tang 


Phy 


Gerald P. Ventre 


Bio 


Michael f. Zekus 


Fin 


John S. Tassinari 


Phy 


Katherine J. Vezina 


Nurn 


Sihua (. Zhang 


Bad 


Alexandra T. Tattersall 


Aed 


Dolores L. Vieira 


Nur 


Baosen Zhou 


Ele 


Debbie Tavares 


Act 


Iria E. Vieira 


Nur 


Yujie Zhu 


Ele 


Jennifer A. Tavares 


Hss 


Susan C. Vieira 


Nurn 


Adam D. Ziegner 


Mds 


Matthew A. Tavares 


Cis 


Joan Vien 


Nur 


Scott M. Zitano 


Mus 


Michael E. Taylor 


Ele 


Linda A. Viveiros 


Aed 


Timur N. Zubaidullin 


Eco 


John L. Teixeira 


Chm 


Joseph L. Wagner 


Psc 


Maureen E. Zukowski 


Socs 


Michelle E. Teixeira 


Mus 


Daniel M. Wallace JR. 


Act 






Victor J. Teixeira 


Vidf 


Keith A. Wallace 


Nur 






Theresa A. Tellier 


Spa 


Kenneth E. Wallace 


Psc 






Eric M. Terceiro 


Mgt 


David J. Walsh 


Cen 






Jeffrey S. Testa 


Vidf 


Derek W. Walsh 


Mgt 






lames A. Tetreault 


Chm 


Lynne M. Walsh 


Lau 






Despina Theodorou 


Cis 


Wanda K. Watson 


Nur 






Marcee J. Therrien 


Hss 


Mary A. Waygan 


Nur 






Megan Thomas 


Mds 


Gerald T. Weckesser 


Atr 






Nicole Thomas 


Mkt 


Diane M. Wheeler 


Nur 






Wayne L. Thornton 


Enl 


Jessica A. Whitcher 


Nur 






Jun Tian 


Ele 


Glynelle E. White 


Nurn 






Mary E. Timberlake 


Soc 


Sarah R. White 


Mus 






Beth M. Tkacs 


Bad 


Thomas J. Whitfield 


Prw 






Jennifer K. Tobbe 


Bad 


Estyn J. Williams 


Vid 






Robert F. Tobin 


Mne 


Tara A. Williamson 


Bio 






Patricia A. Tomkiewicz 


Soc 


Kimberly J. Wilson 


Mkt 






Matthew Tooker 


Nur 


Margo L. Wilson 


Enl 






Christine Toolin 


Enl 


Michael L. Winderlick 


Psy 






Carolina Tovar 


Spa 


Mary-Elizabeth Winsper 


Nur 






Katherine P. Towle 


Aed 


Laurra C. Winters 


Mmt 






Minh T. Tran 


Cis 


Jennifer A. Wong 


Enl 






Stephanie V. Travers 


Psy 


Lawrence K. Wong 


Atr 






Joseph I. Trottier 


Mgt 


Mei C. Wong 


Cis 






Nitaya Tubtimthai 


Tet 


Rebecca H. Woods 


Vidi 






Paul Tucker 


Psy 


John L. Woolley 


Cen 






Matt C. Tudor 


Enl 


J M. Wreh 


Cen 






Garry J. Turgiss 


Socj 


David C. Wright 


Soc 






Job P. Turini 


Fin 


Bernadette Wyman 


Bad 






Kelly A. Tyson 


Nurn 


Masanori Yamaki 


Atr 






Stacie L. Uhlman 


Mis 


Liming Yang 


Ele 






Sarey Uon 


Cpe 


Yibin Yang 


Ele 







69 



Enochs Voyage 

Life ok a yjkciitSkpj 

1851-1854 

Entrees from, Enoch, Carter Clouds 'fciscry 

\ / KsKtHst13 
Wednesday 

This book will contain a true narrative of all that I 
see during the voyage. If I intended to prepare a 
work for the public, a more exact conformity to the 
laws of rhetoric grammar, punctuation, etc. would 
be observed, but as a familiar family companion, I 
trust it will serve to amuse each and every member 
of the social family circle at home. Many, I doubt 
not, will be grammatical blunders, perversions of 
the laws of rhetoric, etc. to be found in its pages, but 
one consideration I think deserves notice: this first 
attempt to keep a regular journal demands a due 
share of generous criticism; and every allowance 
from those qualified to detect and point our errors 
in composition. So, relying on this version of the 
matter, I will go on, and endeavor to write a 
palpable, amusing, and instructive "log." 




SiuMit 14 
Thursday 






m 



Well, here I am, in New Bedford! And why? To go on 
a Whaling Voyage around the world! I met a stranger 
today on one of the wharves, who accosted me in a 
friendly manner and inquired "If I was bound a Whal- 
ing." I replied in the affirmative. "Take my advice 
young man," said he, "and don't go." He then turned 
away and left me. I may possibly have cause to think 
of this when it is too late! Time will show! 

Simnst 16 
Saturday 

On board the ship! Well, let's have a peek in the little 
world in which I am to live, probably for years! The 
forecastle . . . Now, did not the particular nature of the 
case demand from me an answer, I would most hum- 
bly beg to be excused from publishing my opinion 
concerning the said Forecastle. Well, what is it, and 
what is it not? Is is not home! ! It is a hole in the forward 
between deck of the ship, Hy. Kneeland; about 9 feet 
by 16 in which 21 men are to live for 30 or 36 months. 
A thick dark cloud of tobacco smoke pervades this 
"castle" and an occasional "growl" indicates another 
party's presence. Ah! a low red-haired freckled-faced, 
uneasy sort of man, answering to "Tom," whaling from 
"away down East!" More Anon. 



Groups of fellow-sailors are standing around deck, all 
engaged in animated conversation. If I were allowed to 
make my own thoughts & feelings a standard for others 
I could very easily tell the main topic of conversation. 
That one mighty thought, which despite excitement, 
adventure, novelty, and incident, will be uppermost 
HOME!!! 

(8 AM) Pilot on board. Each quick turn of the windlass; each 
hearty "yeo ho," loosens the anchor from its firm bed, and 
now, ( 1 2 N) with both anchors at the "Cat-heads" & swelling 
sails in, are fast leaving our native land! Will we ever see it 
again? Why does each countenance of the lovedhome circle 
appear as in reality before me? Why this bitter felling of 
regret: why this longing for one hour with the loved ones at 
home? Alas! Time has fled! It has been a voluntary launch 
and I must patiently abid the bitter, bitter gale! 




3~ajCHl£\t 



8 Bells (4 PM) Crew called aft and listened toa brief address 
fromCapt.Vinall — mainly consisting of a desire on his part 
that we perform our duty faithfully, and properly respect the 
Officers. He assured us that we should be treated well, care 
taken for our comfort, and that we wouldhave enough to eat. 
(The latter, a very mighty consideration.) Time will show, how 
far these promises are complied with. 

The Crew are divided into two watches, the Starboard 
and Larboard. I am chosen in the Larboard. 

Friday 

Gale abated. The sea is still very rough, however, but will 
soon calm. A great spirit of petty tyranny begins to 
manifest itself on the part of the Officers. They certainly 
do not embrace Leigh Hunts' celebrated maxims. 

Power itself, hath not 

Half the might of gentleness! 

but, I of all others, have a poor reason for complaining. 
Read the 1 39th Psalm, this morning with peculiar feeling 
of delight! The attributes of God are duly appreciated by 
the Psalmist. Dreamed of being home last & "eating a 
good breakfast," somewhat different from the fare here, 
which consists of something they see fit to call "Coffee," 
sweetened with "long-tailed sugar," salt junk & hard- 
bread! 

8 Bells. PM crew called aft, and the Capt. &m Officers 
proceeded to select their boat's crew. I am chosen in the 
Capt's (Starboard quarter) boat and stationed at the mid- 
ship oar. I was then ordered to the wheel to learn the 
compass. 

Slrwtft 26 

Tuesday 

Employed this morning in "cutting in" the blubber I 
thought that I had a pretty good idea of the size and 
appearance of a Whale. But when I first saw this one 
(which is the largest size), I was struck dumb with 
astonishment! I could but look, and admire the power 
and glory of God! Myriads of ravenous shark surround 
the ship, each one seemingly very anxious to get a cut at 
the "King of the Deep." 4 Bells. (2 PM) Blubber all cut in. 
Preparing for "trying-out." 









Wednesday 

Up and at it, fittle & fat to the eyes! If this is not enough 
to warrant the "blues", I don't know what is! But Hark 
to the Skipper! "Man that fish-tackle over the blubber- 
room!" "Aye, aye Sir!" — but what next — thought we 
all! "Hoist out that blubber and cast it over-board, it's 
worthless!" So much for inexperienced Officers, sulky 
on account of this disappointment. 

&K£Klt29 

Friday 

Quite sick today. Unable to stand my watch. Symptoms 
of bilious fever. Got some pills from the Medicine chest 
& came below. Oh how I miss the kind attention of a 
Dear Mother! Truly, this is not Home!! 





Joyce Ames 

Director of Student Health Services 




Richard Burke 

Assistant Chancellor for 
Resource/Development 




Lewis Dars 

Vice Chancellor of 
Administrative/Fiscal Services 




William Gathright 

Sports Information 




Lasse Antonsen 

Gallery Director 




Susan Costa 

Vice Chancellor of Student 
Affairs 





Robert Dowd 

Director of Athletics 




Diana Hackney 

Vice Chancellor for 
Student Services 




Norman Barber 

Director of Multicultural/ 
Retention Services 




Gerald Coutinho 

Director of Financial Aid 



;.:; ■■^S^i^^S^NS 




*W 



fW> 



T 



•*t*km I.*t 



\ 



Robert Fortes 

Assistant Dean for Student 
Affairs/Outreach 




Sandra Hathaway 

Associate Dean, Division of 
Continuing Education 






*v 



72 




Maeve Hickok 

Executive Director Information, 
News/Publications 




Jfcjfe- 



William Kehoe 

Associate Director of 
Housing; /Residential Life 




^fr^ T 



Kevin Hill 

Director of 
Housing/Residential Life 




Carroll McCloud 

Director of Fredrick 
Douglass Unity House 




Donald Howard 

Dean of Students 



■ 



'''Hi 






Thomas Mulvey 

Vice Chancellor for Enrollment 
Management 




Richard Panofsky 

Associate Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs 




Donald Sweet 

Dean Library Services 






Mark Porter 

Director of Public Safety 




Roger Tache 

Executive Director of Administrative 
Support/Auxiliary Services 




Carol Rose 

Director of College Now 




Benjamin Taggie 

Provost/Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs 

73 A 



\v« 



® 




KTSPK 



K 6 






•f 




r 



Elisabeth Pennington 

Dean 



College of Visual and ^erjvrmm SlHr 




Michael Taylor 

Dean 




Peter London 

Art Education 




Magali Carrera 

Art History 






<*• X 



\ 

Harvey Goldman 

Design 



74 




Thomas Curry 

Dean 




Sat Dev Khanna 

Civil/Environmental 
Engineering 



College vj KminteriKt 




Gilbert Fain 

Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 




Boleslaw Mikolajczak 

Computer/Information Science 




Robert Helgeland 

Electrical Engineering 
Technology 




Ronald McNeil 

Dean 



Colli 



etc oj'&Hftmfs a. 




John Chopoorian 

Marketing/Business 
Information Systems 





m.k. 

Steve Warner 

Textile Sciences 



75 & 



Collate of Sirtr axd ScitHctr 









Joseph Deck 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 



Donald Douglas 

Biology 





Cynthia Kruger 

Education 



Gerald Koot 

History 



SldwSKistrcLUon. wtMtmrabktd 



>** 



Robert Archer 

Director of Television Services 

Jeffrey S. Augustine 
Operations Manager of 
Campus Center 

Mary Elisabeth Bulter 
Coordinator Student Activities 

Ann T. Carey 
Executive Assistant 
to the Chancellor 

Thomas J. Daigle 
Director of 
CLC/Math/Business Center 

Margaret Dias 
Interim Director of 
Academic Computing 

76 



Kathleen L. Eubanks 
Bursar 

James S. Filippo 
Director of Aquatics 

Walter A. Frost 

Director of Audio Visual Services 

Susan Glassman 
Director of Cooperative 
Learning Center 

Robert W. Green 
Interim Associate Provost 

Steven A Griffith 
Director of Upward Bound 

Kim E. Harrison 

Executive Director, Northeastern 

Regional Aquaculture Center 




James Griffith 

Medical Laboratory Science 





James Place 

Philosophy 



Carole J. Johnson 
Disabled Student 
Services Coordinator 

Martha M. Kempe 

Director of Grants/ Contracts 

Laurajane LeClair 
Alcohol / Drug 
Education Coordinator 

Angeline Lopes 
Coordinator of 
Housing/Residential Life 

Areta K. Masi 

Director of Institutional Research 

Donna R. Massano 

Interim Director of Administrative 

Computing Services 



Johny K. Newkirk 
Coordinator of 
Housing/Residential Life 

\my B. Parelman 

Director oi CLCAVriting/Reading 

Carol J. Pimental 

Budget Director, Administrative 

/Fiscal Services 

Brian I. Rothschild 
Director of Marine Science 

Amanda D. Sansoucy 
Teacher/Director of the 
Child Care Center 

lose A. Soler 

Director of Human Resources 

Judith Sullivan 

Associate Director of Athletics 

Richard C. Waring 

Director of the Campus Center 

Bruce E. Wheeler 

Assistant Director of Athletics 

College of Arts/Sciences 

Donald Corriveau 
Co-chair Pychology 

Morton Elfenbein 
Co-chair Pychology 

William Hogan 
Economics 

Philip Melanson 
Political Science 

Larry Miller 
Sociology/Anthropology 

ludy Schaff 
Dean 

Ronald Tannenwald 
Mathematics 



College of Business /Industry 

Fredrick Jones 
Accounting/Finance 

Kathleen Suchon 
Management/Human Resourses 



College of Engineering 

Paul Ukleja 
Physics 

College of Visual/ 
Performing Arts 

Eleanor Carlson 
Music 



Anthony Miraglia 
Fine Arts 

College of Nursing 

Mary Ann Dillon 
Instiutional 

Joan Pisarczyk 
Community Nursing 



Edwin Thompson 
English 



77 



"Tkis Ijokc OKce in a s^erm. w kale's jaw did rat. 
{How 'tis intended for a womans breast 
Tkis my lore 3 do intend 
Tor yon td wear and not to lend'' 

"£A.cceht, dear Gfirl, tkis busk from, me; 

Carved by my knw.bleM.Kd 

3 took it from a sperm, wkate'sjaw 

One tkonsand miles from Und. 

{Jn many a tale kad been tke'Wka.le 

3n wkick tkis boKe did rest. 

{His time is bast, kls boKe at last, 

Jvtnst kow snuort thy breast! " 

- Scrimshaw and Sudden Death 
Brian O'Brien 




i^he 




he folk art of scrimshaw was developed as a 
pastime by the crews of early whaling vessels. 
Crewmen's' time at sea was often filled with many 
uneventful hours. Making use of materials found 
readily at hand, the crewmen began to etch designs, 
usually relevant to their lives at sea, into ivory. Whale 
teeth and bones as well as walrus tusks were most 
available to the scrimshanders. The etched designs 
were rubbed with lampblack to highlight the design. 

As an art form, scrimshaw exists in many forms. The 
most common form of scrimshaw was that created on 
a polished ivory tooth or tusk. Carved and decorated 
ivory was also turned into common tools and acces- 
sories such as walking cane handles and kitchen 
implements. To satisfy the needs of a growing con- 
sumer market, whalebone (baleen) was manufac- 
tured into component parts of consumer products 
such as the busses in a woman's corset. Scrimshaw 
also found it's way into wooden furniture and art 
objects as an attractive inlay material. 

Scrimshaw is an art form that truly reflects and records 
the cultural, economic and social history of this unique 
region of our country, southeastern New England. 

The yearbook of the University of Massachusetts 
Dartmouth is and has been accordingly named the 
Scrimshaw. This name is indeed appropriate for our 
publication as we too, like the scrimshanders of the 
past, endeavor to record and share the history and 
accomplishments of our educational community - the 
University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. 



CUbs <fjr VmwztctioHf 













4* 



Board of (jwemers 

The Board of Governers works with the Director of the Campus 
Center on all matters concerning the Campus Center. Comprised 
of fifteen students and two administrators, the Board of Governers 
is the policy maker of the Campus Center. Each student member 
represents one of the following UMass Dartmouth constituences: 
four residents, five Commuters one Graduate Student, one 
Alumnus, one Continuing Studies, President of Student Senate, 
President of Residence Halls Congress. Election to the BOG is for 
a two year term and is held in conjuction with Student Senate 
elections in the spring. 





Senior Cum Officers 

Senior Class President - Beth Murphy 
Vice President - Chad Cabral 
Secertary - Jennifer Reardon 
Treasurer - Lisa Coffey 



S-bicLad Sawtt 



Student Government functions on the UMass Dartmouth campus 
through the Student Senate which represents all students by popular 
election. The Student Senate must approve the formation of new 
organizations. This body is the voice of the students in school affairs, 
as members are appointed by the Vice-President of the Senate to 
serve on various faculty and administrative committees. The Senate 
consists of 32 senators: three from each of the four classes, one from 
Continuing Studies, one from any graduate school and eighteen 
from five colleges based on proportions. 









Student - \PLctfYiUtr 'Board 



The Student Activities Board is a volunteer, student run organizatic 
dedicated to furthering the involvement of students in campi 
activities. Its purpose is to provide social, recreational, education, 
and cultural programs for the community. The Student Activity 
Board consists of several committees: Afternoon Programs, Seci 
rity, Novelty and Variety, Major Events, Recreation, Social Fun 
tions and Sunset Room. 



80 




1/bvttd \LaMm Society 

The purpose of the United Latino Society shall be to provide 
cultural, social and academic activities for the students of 
Latin descent. The United Latino Society is a central meeting 
and informational gathering place for students with common 
goals in order to form a cohesive student group. This society 
will encourage the recruitment, retention, promotion and 
participation for Latino students in the area of education. The 
organization strives to create strong programs of networking 
and professional developments for the Latino members. 



Vjip-tcd^ro-tktrs ^Sisters 



The United Brothers and Sisters defines itself as an organization to 
help ensure the successful matriculation and representation of 
African-American, Latino, Native American, Asian/Pacific Islander, 
and Cape Verdean students through this institution. The United 
Brothers and Sisters sponsor lectures, banquets, dances and other 
exciting activities involving the members, the university and the 
surrounding communities. Through the organization, members are 
also informed of activities at other campuses in New England 
concerning them. 





'PorbtgHtre Max* 




ate 



cut 



The Portuguese Language Club at UMass Dartmouth is an organiza- 
tion created to stimulate interest in the language and cultures of 
Portuguese speaking countries for both the Portuguese community 
and the community at large. It is the goal of the club to provide both 
activities and a forum where members and non-members may come 
together to learn about these cultures. 



Frederick fcomUss Vimty sHvnse 

In the Fall of 1995 the Frederick Douglass Unity House opened as 
part of the University's effort to recognize the special needs of its 
diverse student body. The center seeks to establish a cultural 
environment focused on the unique social, cultural and academic 
concerns of students of color. It is also a space within which the 
entire student body can experience, participate in, and initiate 
activities that foster an enriched and balanced cultural campus life. 
On a day -to-day basis students use the space for study, access to 
computer facilities, hold organizational meetings, plan activities 
and events, meet with members of faculty for meetings. A growing 
library boasts an impressive collection of books which concentrate 
on a broad range of topics related to people of color. 




81 



*f 



Senior tylwtym&lw fykikition. Club 

The Photography Exhibition Club was created to stimulate the 
interest and extend the understanding of Professional Photography 
to graduating seniors. The club shows its members the in's and out's 
of hanging a gallery show, organizing the art work, designing an 
invitation and dealing with the gallery director. The Photography 
Exhibition Club also encourages the entering of contests and private 
shows bv its members. 





fJndiciK Sbidtnts Simcitctim 



Indian Students Association, one of the most active foreign stuc 
associations on campus, organizes cultural programs, lecture si 
and food festivals throughout the academic year. It consis 
Indian students, professors and the Indian families in the vici 
It's goal is to promote the well being of Indian students on can 
and to popularize cultural diversity by interacting with all 
nationalities on campus. The programs organized are generally [■ 
for all the students on campus. 



'Torek (SclwdlNtwsba&eTj 



The Torch is the university's student newspaper. Published weekly, 
it reports on activities and matters of particular interest to students. 
All editing, reporting, photography, and managing of business is 
done by students. 





CaMk-Hf 'jberi&t 



rm 



Campus Design is the studio responsible for the advertisin 
Student Activities Board events and programs sponsored by c 
student run organizations. Along with providing publicity to 
university community, Campus Design enables its member 
further their educational and career efforts by providing valu 
work experience in an environment in which to produce port 
quality work. Basically, the staff is responsible for designing, lay 
and production of advertising materials ranging from t-shirts tc 
Torch ads. 



82 




'lifom.oif ZR^aoKTct Coder 



Founded in 1970, the UMass Dartmouth Women's Resource 
Center provides resources that help to create an educational 
atmosphere rich in visible role models and free of sexual bias and 
inequities, where women can grow to their full potential. The center 
provides cultural opportunities that further women's personal and 
professional development and promotes a broader understanding 
of the diverse experiences of all women. 



Circled 



In association with the New Bedford Kiwanis, the Circle K Club 
works with young people. We tutor in local schools and fund raise 
for the Pediatric Trauma Center in Boston. We are the college level 

Key Club. 





VnUnz Club 

The Outing Club offers the UMass Dartmouth community all forms 
of outdoor activities ranging from backpacking and cross country 
skiing to canoeing and bicycling. Many trips are planned and 
usually occur during weekends and school vacations. Emphasis 
within the club is placed upon safety in experiencing new and 
different activities. 



IdASMK (OladwSfatwK) 911 fm 



WSMU-FM is the student operated radio station of the univer- 
sity. The station operates to provide the campus and surround- 
ing communities with varieties of musical programming which 
are not widely available on other radio stations. The station 
also serves as a continuing source of information for students 
and the community concerning current events, campus & area 
news, and general announcements. Help is needed from the 
student body to staff & operate the station, WSMU offers 
training classes 3 times per year. 




83 



« 



Jvtassurt 

The Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group is a state-wide, 
student run organization that works with environment, consumer 
:s and democracy issues. Every two years , the student body votes 
to re-affirm MASSPIRG'S funding through an optional $5 per stu- 
fee. MASSPIRG has proven itself to be one of the 
most effective advocate organizations for postive social change and 
citizen involovement in public issues. 




«a 







n - n 






^Kcircite Club - Skotd &$k 



The purpose of the club is to offer karate instruction and completion 
to the student. Memebership is open to the UMAss Dartmouth < 
community. The club participates in at least one competition per 
semester and is a member of the NECKC. 



ei 



Tker\%WK C&v Club 



Tae Kwon Do is a Korean martial art similar to all martial arts; 
the themes of physical technique applicable in self defense and 
mental discipline needed to become the best person one can be 
are the central focuses. 



' ^ 




*^^ 







fW* " 






- . . « 




SmHJC 7^CH GrOMWJl 



Sigma Tau Gamma is a non-discriminatory, academic and social 
Greek letter fraternity. Sigma Tau Gamma believes that all men are 
social creatures. In this belief it strives to create a fraternal brother- 
hood of lifelong friends, who, through their thoughts and acts, will 
endeavor to improve self, and country. The Dartmouth colony of 
Sigma Tau Gamma was founded in the Fall of 1 995 to meet the needs 
of interested students on this campus. 




^/u'S/tmt Smaji 



Phi Sigma Sigma is a non-discriminatory, nonsectarian Greek letter 
society aimed at helping its members reach their fullest potential, 
academically and socially. Founded in 1913 at Hunter College in 
New York, Phi Sigma Sigma now exists on over 150 campuses 
nationwide and internationally. The Theta Sigma cahpter at UMD 
began as a colony in April 1996 and was installed on Nov. 26, 1996. 
Our motto is "Aim High" and that is what exactly we plan to do. 



Scrimskxw yearbook 



e university yearbook highlights all the interesting events which 
:ur on campus during the school year. Although it naturally 
v/otes most of its space to the graduating seniors, students from all 
sses work on the production of the book. 








85 



4* 



Uhe 



the hunt. It all started with three 

here she blows!" sounding out from 

the look out. The whale boats were then launched, 

small boats holding six or seven men; a few to row, 

one to steer and one to harpoon the wail. 

They row the whale boats into position 
and the harpooner gets situated to throw his 
harpoon. Once the whale was hit, if the opportu- 
nity arose another harpoon would be thrown in 
case the first was dislodged. If the second was not 
used it would be thrown over board so the lines 
would not be fouled up. 

"All stern" would be yelled at once and 
the oars men would reverse their rowing to move 
the boar away from the whale. This was done as 
quickly as possible as to avoid any damage from 
the whale's immediate reaction of being stabbed. 
It was also an extremely crucial point because 
many boats were destroyed or overturned in these 
early moments as the whale's usual reaction to 
being hit was violent convulsions. 

Following the harpooning the whale would 
either "ran" on the water or "sound" under it. If it 
ran the men would pull themselves closer to their 
victim. It is sounded the line would be pulled until 
it ran out, then another line would be "bent-on". If 




the line was pulled to the end before another line could 
be bent-on, the line would be cut to prevent the boat 
from being damaged. 

Once they were cut close enough to the whale 
the "boat-header" moved to the front and used the 
lance. The lance was used to make the final kill. The 
boat-header struck the whale in its vital parts until he 
felt the whale was dead. 

The oars men would then move the boat away 
why the whale "went into its flurry"- the death struggle. 
The whale thrashes his flukes, lists to one side, and 
swims in a circle in a last try to escape. Finally there is 
a convulsion, he spouts blood and floats, fins out. This 
is the sign the whale is dead. At this point the body is 
attached to the ship by ropes and a chain and the 
cutting begins. 











vrts 




















yjvmzKT S&cccr 

Second-year coach Alex Silva's Corsairs finished with a 
4-13 overall record for the 1997 season and a 2-5 mark 
in the Little East Conference. UMass Dartmouth fin- 
ished sixth in the eight-team conference, the same spot 
the pre-season coaches poll had predicted. Three of the 
Corsairs' four victories came at home against Roger 
ns (2-0) , Bridgewater State College (2- 1 ) and Rhode 
Island College (4-0). 




V 



^0 




rfl^^^T 




i 



4 


I £ i 




' ' 4 








■ »Jfe 




Jvtoif Soccer 



Nial O'Donnell got his rookie year as head coach off to a 
great start as UMass Dartmouth rewarded the first-year 
coach with three victories in its first five games. The 
Corsairs got O'Donnell his first victory in a 4-1 season- 
opening victory over Wentworth Institute and added a 3-2 
win against Salve Regina and a 6-3 win against Worcester 
State College. Senior forward Erik Reis topped all UMass 
Dartmouth scorers with a four goals and four assists for 1 2 
points. The Corsairs finished 4-11-2 overall and 0-6- 1 in the 
Little East Conference. 








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For a second straight year, the Corsairs posted an 8-2 record 
but fell one game short of winning the New England Football 
Conference (NEFC). A season-ending 44-28 loss to Bridgewater 
State closed out UMass Dartmouth title hopes but did not 
diminish an outstanding season for Coach Bill Kavanaugh's 
Corsairs. At season's end, UMass Dartmouth was ranked #7 
in the final ECAC Division III Football Poll. Senior tri-captain 
and linebacker Rob was the NEFC Defensive Player of the 
Year and a New England Football Writers Division III selec- 
tion. Senior tri-captain and wide receiver Ryan Bland com- 
bined with quarterback Jay Furtado as one of the top pass- 
catch combinations in the region. 




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lAfdwmi Basketball 

Heading into the final week of January, the Corsairs had 
a 5-7 record following a 79-53 victory over UMass 
Boston and a 66-61 win over Worcester Polytech. But 
losing streaks of six and five games stalled any hopes of 

) mark as Coach Cathy Houtman's squad finished 
the season with a 6-18 overall record and 2-12 in the 

East Conference. Senior guard Lakoyla London 
rounded out UMass Dartmouth scorers in double- 
igures with an 11.3 points per game average plus 2.3 
steals per game. The Corsairs will enter the 1998-99 
season with a new head coach, following Coach 
Houtman's resignation which was announced in May. 






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Picked to finish fourth by the Little East Conference 
coaches in their pre-season poll, UMass Dartmouth 
surprised everyone but themselves by posting a 12-2 
conference record for the Corsairs' ninth champion- 
ship in the 12-year history of the LEC. UMass 
Dartmouth's season finally ended in the tournament's 
first round with an 86-78 loss in overtime at the 
O'Keefe Center, home of the #3 seed Salem State. 
Coach Brian Baptiste's Corsairs (20-8), seeded sixth in 
the tournament, gave the Vikings, champions of the 
MASCAC, all they could handle before falling short in 
the extra period. 



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93 



J-i-eU (Hockey 



Coach Marilyn Ritz's field hockey team posted a 9-9 record 
during the 1997 season in part due to a 3-2 record in overtime 
games. Senior forward Kelly finished second in scoring with 
five goals and three assists for 13 points and senior-tri- 
captain Maureen was third with five goals and an assist for 1 1 
points. Maloney capped her final season with the Corsairs as 
team's first player selected to appear in the annual 
National Field Hockey Coaches Association (NFHCA) Divi- 
sion III North/South All Star game. 





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Three first-period goals in a six-minute span blew open a tight 
ECAC North/Central/South championship game and lifted the 
fourth-seeded Corsairs (22-5, 12-3 ECAC Central) to a 4-2 
victory over second-seeded St. Michael's College (20-7) and 
UMass Dartmouth's second consecutive ECAC North/Cen- 
tral/South title. The title-clinching victory at St. Michael's was 
also UMass Dartmouth's fifth consecutive road victory in the 
ECAC North/Central/South tournament in the last two years. 
The Corsairs' 1997-98 ECAC North/Central/South champion- 
ship will be the last under that division makeup. The ECAC 
Division III ice hockey structure has been reorganized for the 
1998-99 season. 





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For the second straight year, senior Mike Lane com- 
peted in the NCAA Division III Men's Swimming and 
Diving Championships. Last year , Lane had captured 
Division III All-America honors, but this season he lost 
out on his chance to repeat as an All-America selection 
by a margin of one second. 

, Coach Jerry Jennings' Corsairs posted a 4-6 
i victories over Trinity College, Worcester 
Polytech, Clark University and Wheaton College. 





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Despite a 1-10 overall record as a team, UMass Dartmouth 
had five athletes qualify for the New England Division III 
swimming and diving championships at Wesleyan Univer- 
sity and one qualifier for nationals. 

When senior Lynn Defonzo scored 252.55 points in the one 
meter diving competition against Babson College, she quali- 
fied for the NCAA Division III national championships. 
Although she did not participate in the nationals, her accom- 
plishments capped a career of hard work and dedication to 
her sport. 



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Coming off a season in which the Corsairs had not won a 
single volleyball match, first-year coach Rick Quintin made 
what seemed to be a bold prediction before the season. 
Quintin predicted his team could reach the .500 mark in his 
rookie season. The Corsairs made the end of their of season 
exciting by winning three straight matches to reach the .500 
mark. Victories over Roger Williams University, Keene State 
nd Framingham State set the stage for the final dual match 
of the season and a chance to reach the .500 mark. Losses to 
Eastern Nazarene and Assumption left Quintin's Corsairs two 



games short at 14-16 overall. 



/ 












Cross Country 



The injury bug which depleted the Corsairs' cross country 
roster never affected sophomore Gary Mello. Coach Jon 
Hird's UMass Dartmouth squad did not compete as a team at 
most events during the Fall season, but that never stopped 
Mello from a series of impressive finishes, capped by an 
appearance in the NCAA Division III National Cross Country 
championships. Although the Corsairs' women's cross coun- 
try could not defend their Little East Conference champion- 
ship in 1997, there were still several individual highlights 
during the season. Senior co-captain Laura Caselden 32nd 
overall (21st LEC). The Corsairs finished third in the LEC 
team competition. 




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Coach Susan Yacubian's UMass Dartmouth equestrian team 
hosted its second annual Intercollegiate Horse in October 
and its first as a the newest varsity team on campus. Five 
riders earned first place honors in their respective events with 
12 riders overall placing in their events. Sarah Roberts took 
first place in Intermediate Fences and fifth in Intermediate 
Flat while Cara David took first in Novice Fences and second 
in Novice Flats. Mary-Ellen Blombach qualified for Regionals 
with a first place finish in Intermediate Flat and a fourth in 
Intermediate Fences. Andrea Dodge took first in Intermedi- 
ate Fences and third in Intermediate Flat and Melissa Sherlin 
was first in Beginner Walk-Trot-Canter. 




99 



lAfomms Mttcrvsst 

ach Gerry Jennings' first-year Corsairs finished their 

season with a 23-6 loss to Eastern Connecticut State 

University in the quarter finals of the New England 

Women's Lacrosse Association playoffs. UMass 

7 overall) finished fourth in the South- 

1 Division of the NE WLA with a 3-5 record. Several 
Corsairs distinguished themselves during the season, 
including a team of high-scorers, senior Lisa Haynes, and 
senior tri-captain Emily Rowe. Haynes was the Corsairs' 
ling scorer with a team-high 3 1 goals plus 7 assists for 38 
points. Rowe finished second in goals and goal scoring with 
1 8goals and5 assists for 23 points. 



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A 15-8 Pilgrim League loss to Plymouth State College in the 
final game of the regular season knocked UMass Dartmouth 
out of the playoff picture and brought to an end the 
Corsairs' first varsity lacrosse season. Despite not making 
the Pilgrim League playoffs, Coach Jeff Feroce's Corsairs 
had an outstanding season, posting a 10-3 record with 
three players earning Pilgrim League Northwest Division 
First Team honors. Prior to the loss to Plymouth State in 
their final game, the Corsairs had put together a solid first 
season. UMass Dartmouth posted its first varsity win with 
a 2 1-8 victory over New York Maritime. UMass Dartmouth 
averaged 14.4 goals per game while allowing 8.9 per game 



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UMass Dartmouth's women's tennis team successfully de- 
fended its Little East Conference tournament championship 
for a second straight season, posting an 11-2 record for the 
1997 season. Senior co-captain Olivia Cunha was UMass 
Dartmouth's second repeat winner at the LEC champion- 
ship tournament. Exchange student Stephanie Hauser cap- 
tured her first LEC championship when she cruised to a 6- 1 , 
6-2 victory for the #4 singles crown. The Corsairs' second 
doubles crown belonged to the team of Cunha and senior co- 
captain Ashley. UMass Dartmouth compiled a 56- 1 5 record 
in singles and a 21-12 mark in doubles competition. 






. 




102 




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UMass Dartmouth put together a perfect 1 1-0 season, 
the first undefeated Corsair men's tennis team since 
Coach Gerry Aillery's 1972 team went 8-0. The 1998 
season brought the Corsairs not only a perfect record, 
but also extended their streak of consecutive Little 
East Conference men's tennis championships to three 
straight. UMass Dartmouth clinched the LEC cham- 
pionships held at Plymouth State College to success- 
fully defended their LEC title for a second time. The 
Corsairs won all six singles matches and two of the 
three doubles matches for a total of 26 points, finishing 
ahead of second-place Southern Maine. 



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103 



Softball 



Coach Marilyn Ritz headed into the 1998 season with a 
young and inexperienced team but when the season 
finally ended, the Corsairs owned one of the biggest 
surprise victories of the season. UMass Dartmouth fin- 
ished with a 6-28 overall record and a 3-1 1 mark in the 
ular season of the Little East Conference. Seeded 
seventh for the LEC post-season tournament, the Cor- 
sairs faced a trip to second-seeded Western Connecticut 
i quarterfinal round. Instead of an early exit, the 
Corsairs pulled the upset of the tournament, scoring a 7- 
1 victory to eliminate Western Connecticut from the 
eight-team tournament. The victory lifted the Corsairs 
into the LEC double-elimination championships. 







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104 




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For Coach Bruce Wheeler's Corsairs the 31 victories 
against 12 losses were the most in a season since 
UMass Dartmouth participated in the NCAA Regionals 
back in 1992 with a 32-1 1 record. With an offensive 
attack among the top in Division III nationally, the 
Corsairs put together one of the most productive sea- 
sons in UMass Dartmouth baseball history. The 
Corsairs team batting average of .358, the highest in 
the 27 years since 





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The WNBA — Women's National Basketball Association — 
completed its inaugural season with the Houston Comets defeat- 
ing the New York Liberty for the championship. And as the season 
came to a close, the WNBA announced the eight-team league 
would grow to 1 teams in 1 998. If it all works out, the Comets will 
jump to the Western Conference with Los Angeles, Phoenix, 
Sacramento and Utah. The new teams, Detroit and Washington, 
DC, will join the East with Charlotte, Cleveland and New York. 





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In one of the most competitive games in Super Bowl history, John 
Elway and Terrell Davis led the Denver Broncos to a 3 1-24 upset 
of the Green Bay Packers in Super Bowl XXXII. The Broncos' 
first National Football League championship ended the American 
conference's 13-year losing streak in the Super Bowl. 



1997 14/ortd Series 

The Florida Marlins became major league baseball's world champ- 
ions in 1997, beating the Cleveland Indians in the World Series. 
Just five years old, the Marlins tied the Indians in the ninth inning 
of the seventh game and went on to win it all in the eleventh inning 
with a score of 3-2. Indians last won the series in 1948. 





SoHKy ^VKS 

Sonny Bono was born on Feb. 16, 1935 and died on Jan. 5, 1998. He 
was 62. He survived by his wife, Mary, and his children Chasity, 
Christy, Chesare and Chianna. He first achieved fame as half of the 
pop music duo "Sonny & Cher" in the mid 1960's. Their first hit was 
"Baby Please Don't Go" in 1964. Later hits included " I Got You 
Babe" and "The Beat Goes On". The "Sonny & Cher Show" first aired 
in 1971 and was a hit until it ended in 1974. He entered politics in 
1 988 when he was elected mayor of Palm Springs, CA. He was elected 
to the 104th Congress as a Republican in 1994. He was re-elcted in 
1996. His wife now holds the congressional seat that he once held. 



108 




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President Bill Clinton was the first Democratic president in 60 years 
to be elected to a second term. A centrist New Democrat, he 
transformed his once beleaguered party. Under his presidency, the 
United States enjoyed the lowest rate of inflation since the early 
1 960s, and he was the first president in 1 7 years to submit a balanced 
budget to Congress. His vice president, Al Gore, was considered a 
very powerful vice president and was the president's closet advisor. 
The 49-year-old Gore was considered a favorite for the Democratic 
presidential nomination in year 2000. However, a year after their 
re — election, both men were under close scrutiny for campaign 
finance violations. 




The roving vehicle Sojourner, the first mobile explorer to land 
on another planet, landed on Mars in 1997 and gathered soil 
and rocks. Overcoming communications trouble and other set 
backs, the Sojourner left the Mars Pathfinder landing craft. The 
robotics rover's six metal wheels rolled slowly down a ramp and 
came to a stop on the surface. The Sojourner, which was about 
the size of a microwave oven, began crawling around the 
surface of Mars, transmitting a flood of information to scientists 
back on Earth. 





yasser Simfcd 



Yasser Arafat was chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organi- 
zation and president of the Palestinian National Authority. He was 
one of the keys leaders in trying to maintain peace in the Middle 
East. His 1993 handshake of peace with Yitzhak Rabin promised 
mutual recognition between the Palestinians and the state of 
Israel. Under the agreement, Arafat assumed leadership of Arabs 
within Israel's occupied territories. The 68-year-old leader played 
a very important role in keeping peace in the Middle East. 



■Jvilr SftcLct StaiwK 

rhe first component of Mir space station was launched in 1986. And 
except for two brief gaps, the space station has been manned 
continuously ever since. It has made more than 60,000 trips around 
the Earth. In 1994 the U.S. and Russia agreed to conduct joint 
missions aboard the station. A docking module was attached to Mir, 
allowing American space shuttles to link up with the Russian station, 
rhe main Mir module — which provides living quarters for up to six 
people — has been orbiting for nearly 1 2 years, which is seven years 
longer than planned. These joint U.S. - Russian missions are the first 
phase of a program to build an International Space Station. This 
station is scheduled to be in orbit by the year 2002. 




109 







r Pnnca's ^iana. 







Britain and the world bid farewell to Diana, Princess of Wales, on a sparkling 
September morning with a grand tribute rich in pageantry. Since her death in a 
car in Paris a week before, the country had witnessed an astonishing outpouring 
of grief that forced a repentant monarchy to join in the kind of full celebration of 
Diana's life that the millions of people who flooded into London demanded. Her 
sons, William, 15, and Harry, 12, stood in attendance, joined by their father, 
Prince Charles and her brother, Earl Spencer, as her body was taken into 
Westminster Abbey. Millions packed the city for the funeral of Diana. It was a 
crowd unmatched since the end of World War II. More than a million bouquets 
by official count were stacked outside the royal palaces. 



Jvioirker r Ierse& 



Mother Teresa was among the most well-known and highly respected women in 
the world in the later half of the twentieth century . In 1 948 she founded a religious 
order of Roman Catholic nuns in Calcutta, India, called the Missionaries of Charity. 
Through this order, she dedicated her life to helping the poor ,the sick and the dying 
around the world, particalarly those in India. Her selfless work with the needy 
brought her much acclaim and many awards .including the Nobel Peace Prize in 
1 979. She died at the age of 87 on September 5 , 1 997 of heart failure at her convent 
in Calcutta. 











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Attorney General Janet Reno was the first woman attorney general of the 
United States. She was first nominated by President Clinton in 1993, and she 
was appointed again in 1 997. A graduate of Harvard Law School, Ms. Reno, 59, 
focused on the prevention of crime among the youth of the country and stressed 
early intervention to keep children away from gangs, drugs and violence. Late in 
1 997 she unveiled an advertising campaign urging the nation's youth to become 
involved in neighborhood crime prevention and community service. 



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John Denver, whose optimistic songs catapulted him to fame during the 1970s, 
died instantly when his experimental plane crashed into Monterey Bay in 
California on October 12, 1997. The 53-year old singer had eight platinum 
records to his credit when his homebuilt plane crashed. "Rocky Mountain High" 
and "Sunshine on My Shoulders" were two of his trademark songs. "His music 
sprang from his feelings of love," said Hal Than, his longtime manager. 



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The Dave Matthews Band has demonstrated over the course of three albums 
and several years of extensive touring that it has staying power on the records 
charts. Combining elements of rock, jazz, funk, folk and world beat, the group is 
soulful and subtle in its harmonies and rhythms. Dave Matthews was born in 
Johannesburg, South Africa, and moved to Virginia about 10 years ago. He 
formed the group in 1990. They had intended to come up with a "power" name 
for the group, but the name stuck before they had time to change it. 



Js/LoKtrtrmt 





The 1 1 ,000 residents of the Caribbean island of Montserrat witnessed first hand 
the devastation that a very active volcano can cause. The volcano belched ash 
and small rocks over several days in September and forced more than two-thirds 
of the biggest problems, especially for those evacuating the central communities 
of the island. The volcano on the British protectorate island became active about 
two years ago, and the latest eruptions caused most the population to flee to 
Britain or other Caribbean islands. 



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The U.S. Women's Olympic Hockey team won the Gold Metal in Nagaano, 
Japan, on Frebruary 1 7, 1 998, defeating Canada 3- 1 . This was the first gold Metal 
awarded in Women's Hockey. 




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Phish has established an impressive reputation of tireless touring, dazzling 
improvisation and innovative rock and roll. And the Vermont-based quartet is 
the reigning "Jam" bad in the land, boasting one of the most devoted followings 
in all of rock. The group was assembled at the University of Vermont by guitarists 
Trey Anastasio III and Jeff Holdsworth. One of their claims to fame was to have 
the ice cream mavens Ben & Jerry honor the group with its own flavor — Phish 
Food, a tantalizing combination of milk-chocolate ice cream, caramel, marsh- 
mallow swirls and fish — shaped chocolate chips. 



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'odern commercial whaling, especially be- 
fore whaling became internationally regulated and 
banned, has been concentrated on the use of whales 
for their oil and their meat. The oil gained from the 
thick blubber layers of all whales and the head of 
sperm whales was commonly used all over the world 
as a burning oil to fuel lamps, as specialized lubri- 
cants, as bases for margerines and cosmetics, and to 
make crayons, pencils, and candles. The meat 
became, and still is, highly desired by the Japanese 
and other nations, as well as aboriginal peoples. But 
since whaling became internationally regulated, 
many suitable substitutes for whale oil have become 
commonly used and have all but replaced the use of 
whale oil. The meat, however, continues to be used 
in Japan and possibly Norway. 










Campus 'Events 




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October 16, 1997 



Friday evening featured a "Battle of 
the Bands" that was won by the group 
"Sub Vibe". 




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October 16, 1997 



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After the Homecoming Parade UJVIass 
Students gathered around a huge bonfire. 
It was a much more relaxed atmosphere, 
from the events that surrounded the pa- 
rade and it gave students a chance to 
regroup and get ready for the Homecom- 
ing Ratt. 




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^HvmccomJM "Parade 

October 16, 1997 

Once again Fraternities, Sororities and various other 
UMass clubs and organizations competed to design 
the best float for the parade. It is the foremost event of 
the school year and it is a day of fun and a way to show 
off school spirit for UMass Dartmouth Students. 







115 



October 17, 1997 

Homecoming Weekend was one of the 
premier activities of the year. Alumni 
returned to the school to relive their 
"campus days" and to reunite with old 
friends. 






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V^vckv ^Horror "Picture S Low 



October 17, 1997 



For someone who has never seen the 
Rocky Horror Picture Show, hopefully 
they did not pass up this opportunity 
when it was playing at the UMass 
Dartmouth Auditorium. Students who 
went were entertained and amused by 
the film/play, which had a two week show- 
ing at the campus. 





Pumpkin Carvim Contat 

October 17, 1997 

In the spirit of Halloween students gathered 
to compete and show off their pumpkin 
carving abilities. Students were creative 
and original in their pursuits of carving the 
perfect pumkin. 




117 



Octdberfcrt 

October 18, 1997 



Saturday's Octoberfest and Home- 
coming football game were excep- 
tionally pleasurable. There was a 
large turnout to enjoy the beautiful 
weather and a variety of activities. 






, 




WELCOME 
UMD HOMECOMING 
OCTOBERFEST 



118 




October 31, 1997 

In the Sunset Room of the campus center, UMass 
students got together and dressed in their Hal- 
loween costumes, where they celebrated the 
"sprited" holiday. 








119 



Vtotatt ^atims am 'Toasters 

y^tfyemhtr 17; 1997 

Who can't remember going through high school, a time 
when listening to The Violent Femmes was all you did on 
a really cool weekend? This concert gave students an 
opportunity to see the band up close and personal while 



reliving old times. 



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February 3, 1998 

A University tradition, Jimmy Spinnato 
entertained his audience with hypnotic 
demonstrations. "Listen to the music and 
my voice. You are getting sleepy." 





Xcmta Skntpc {Jndkn ^ance 

February 25, 1998 

On February 25, 1998, the Lakota Sioux Dance The- 
ater presented a program of traditional native dance. 
Sponsored by the University's Cultural Affairs Com- 
mittee, the Lakota Sioux Dancers performance brought 
grace, style and a sense of spirituality to the campus. 
The dancers provided the audience a glimpse of the 
Native Americans' world and traditions. 




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frbmary 28, 1998 



Seniors count down the days to graduation, but not only do they 
like to count to show off all they have learned in their many years 
of schooling, but they like to celebrate and party all along the 
This was one of the senior events that will long be 
remembered. 












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tjimwj buffet O^ctt 

Mecrck 5, 1998 

For all you Jimmy Buffet fans, this Ratt 
gave UMass Students a chance to sing 
along to all of their favorite Jimmy Buffet 
songs. These parrot heads got a chance to 
get "wasted away again" while sing 
"Margarittaville". 




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Sprint ^rmk - ^akamas 

Ma.rcklO-30,1998 

This year UMass students spent their spring break 
in the beautiful Bahamas, where they could lounge 
in the sun during the day, and party all night. 










1 24 





Senior Class O^aUs 

Have you ever told a friend from another school you were 
going to a Ratt and had them ask "What the hell is a Ratt?" 
You then proceed to fumble through an explanation of "Uh, 
well, it's this big party type thing on campus where everyone 
drinks a lot," trying to pretend you know exactly what one is. 
By this point you come to the realization that you have not 
a clue as to what the term Ratt exactly means or stands for. 
You think R.A.T.T. could be an acronym for something such 
as Really Awesome Teenage Torture or Rejected Adults Tear- 
up the Town or maybe it was named 
after something that has long been 
forgotten. 

Ratt actually is a shortening of the 
German word for beer hall, rathskel- 
ler. Rathskeller was the name of the 
original bar on campus. It was lo- 
cated on the bottom floor of the cam- 
pus center in what is now the game 
room. It was the Sunset Room of 20 
years ago. At some points it was just 
a beer and wine bar and at other 
times it was a full liquor bar depend- 
ing on the political climate of the 
state and its drinking age law. 





125 



SO "hcojs Tit GmamtioK O^jctt 

ajnln,i99S 

Only 50 days left until graduation and once again 
seniors are celebrating and are in a very high spirits 




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. 







This was the jam of all jams this year. Iota 
Phi Theta sponsored this Ratt and students 
partied to the hottest Rapp, Club and Dance 



music. 






127 4 



Sprint 'fecuL 

May 1, 1998 

This years spring ball was held at Belcourt 
Castle, a mansion built in medieval style. 
Students were dressed like royalty as they 
viewed the splendid grounds, enjoyed the 
delicious buffet and danced with their dates. 




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128 



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May 4, 199$ 



This concert was held during the spring semester. Stu- 
dents were body surfing and slam dancing to the Bostones 
powerful horn lines and incredible rhythm section. 











i29 4 



Senior r ~PaKcaK£ ^raikfcut 



Well who would think that UMass faculty would 
be serving students breakfast? Yes indeed they 
did! It was a nice way for seniors to be with their 
professors out of the classroom before the whole 
college experince would end; at least the students 
thought it was a good idea! 




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130 



^Frederick ^vmUss 1/inlbj {House 

Zhd^lnKmL Students of Color 
(jrcidncdioK ^^m^tet 




The FDUH Graduation Ban- 
quet continues a tradition 
begun over 25 years ago. Its 
purpose is to celebrate the 
academic achievements of 
students whose heritage is 
rooted in Africa. The celebra- 
tion is also a cultural and com- 
munal sharing of our student's 
accomplishments. Awards 
were presented to 5 students, 
one in each of the colleges, for 
academic achievement and 5 
for service to the university 
community and especially to 
Disapora Students. 




Carl^trKbtiK 

"Where is the leadership in journalism to- 
day?" was the question posed by Carl 
Bernstein at his November 5, 1997 lecture. 
Mr. Bernstein, one of the reporters who broke 
the "Watergate" story, presented an eye-open- 
ing insider's view of journalism today. 





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haling has been practiced by humans for 
hundreds of years. The Basques seem to have 
initiated it around the XI Century and it was ex- 
panded andperfected by fishermen from other na- 
tions, including the U.S. from the XVII Century on. 

Today the basic technique consists in the use of a 
harpoon launched from a whaling ship using explo- 
sives. The harpoon head itself usually has an 
explosive that detonates once it hits the whale. 
Some artisanal whaling is still practiced using hand- 
held harpoons. 

In recent years most nations that are members of the 
International Whaling Commission have complied 
with its resolutions to ban commercial whaling. Still 
nations like Japan, Norway, and Iceland continue 
whaling and kill several hundreds of these aniamls 
every year, somtimes under the excuse that they do 
it for scientific reasons (although the whale meat 
finds it way to supermaket in some counties). There 



is even an increased tendency by other nations to 
soften their stance against whaling based on several 
premises: a) that the populations of some species 
such as the minke whale are abundant enough that 
they allow the resumption of their capture; b) that 
whaling by "aboriginal" people who used to kill whales 
in the past is part of their "cultural heritage" and, thus, 
should be allowed even if that capture will not change 
substantially the living conditions of those peoples; c) 
that coastal whaling should be permitted since it will 
benefit local fishermen. Many nations from small 
islands in the Antilles to the U.S. itself, have been 
leaning in favor of the above-mentioned arguments. 
On top of that there is "pirate whaling," i.e., whaling 
being conducted by ships whose registration and port 
of origin and/or destination is unclear and for which 
statistics are difficult to obtain. Since the Interna- 
tional Whaling Commission lacks enforcement power, 
there is little what they can do. Only a handful of non- 
profit organizations such as Sea Shepherd are acting 
against such activities. 







Senior "Week 






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"Booze Cruise 

fa}ie3, 1998 

The sun was going down over New 
Bedford as the class of 1998 left 
the Bay. The music played over 
the water and the students danced, 
sang and talked to friends about 
old times. 






V 



62 




O^mSopC GrOMt - Fenway 7>ark 




$hh£4, 1998 

The class of 1998 traveled to 
relive their childhood at Fenway 
Park college style. They did the 
wave, ate a zillion hot dogs and 
remembered the first time they 
saw the Green Monster. 











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June A, 1998 

The evening began with a terrific win by 
the Red Sox at Fenway Park. The game 
was followed by a trip to Landowns Street 
where the crew of students visited Jillians, 
Mama Kins, Jake Ivory's, Cask and Flagon 
and danced the night away. 



V 





Seniors &mchid:wvi 



^ioywrs dinner 

3kkcS ; 1998 



The awards that were 

bestowed on so many 

deserving students were 

warmly appreciated by graduates, 

faculty and family members attending the 

dinner. Adam Werbach, Sierra Club President 

at the age of 23 gave an inspiring message. Essentially 

he said to let your gifts and your own unique vision guide 

you in your career choices and also in your journey through life 







165 



J^ast ZRjctt 

JuneS, 1998 

"Those were the days, my friend, 
we thousht they'd never end." 




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JvLtcLnkyd r B ark cent 

Jhkc6, 1998 

Cedar Dell has never seen a party like this: 
the roofs were climbed, furniture moved 
outside, a large bar set up and a terrific 
band. The class of 1998 was definitely out 
of control the night before graduation. 




167 



■:r,ieys 
ComMmcem£Kt 1998 
\Betk Jvinnhj 
Sauor CUss 'Prmdod 



& 



ood afternoon... faculty, administrators, 



friends, family, distinguished guests, and you, the 
Class of 1998. 

Over the past few weeks I came across 
many quotes and sayings that I could use to 
express my feelings with you today, but it was this 
Chinese proverb that said it best, "A journey of a 
thousand miles begins with a single step. " UMASS 
Dartmouth has served as a single step in our 
journey of life. 

Today is the celebration of that single 
step. When we took that step most of us didn't 
know where our feet were going to land. But, today 
we know that we have landed and with both feet 
on the ground. Our goals and aspirations may 
have changed but we are here, and that means 
that we have taken that single step, and what a 
step it has been. 

Through these years we have gained an 
enormous amount of knowledge. But this knowl- 
edge is only the beginning or a base of what we will 
learn in the world after college. Yes, this university 
has made its best attempts to prepare us for that 




outside world, but their attempts will never be enough. 
Each and everyone of us has had a different and unique 
experience here at UMASS and will continue to do so in 
the future. 

The educational segment will remain with us, or 
at least most of us hope it will. If not, we will still have 
old notebooks, exams, and of course, those books that 
the campus store wouldn't take back! This education is 
what we or our families put thousands of dollars toward, 
but it is not how most of us will remember UMASS 
Dartmouth. Each graduate will remember UMASS 
Dartmouth in their own way. Not necessarily by the 
degree we will receive today, but by the journeys we 
have traveled and the journeys we will travel. 

A close friend of mine gave me a poem that I 
thought was appropriate for this occasion and I would 
like to share it with you... 



In your mind, in your heart, in your soul, in the very 
center of who you are, is a vision. You are on a long trip; 
it spans all the territory familiar to you. You look out the 
window and distractedly take in the passing scenes of 
farms and people, of children waving and grandparents 
on front porches, of flowers and fields and hills and lakes, of 
city skylines and village steeples. 

But what is foremost in your mind, your heart, 
your soul? Your destination. On a certain day, at a 
certain hour, you imagine that you will pull into that 
station. Bands will be playing, flags will be waving. You 
will have arrived!!! And when you get there, all of your 
wonderful dreams will have come true. The puzzle 
pieces of your life will magically fit together; the picture 
will be all you've wanted it to be. And until the station 
arrives, you look out the window some more. You pace 
the aisle, you watch the clock, and curse time that 
passes, time that keeps you from getting there. 

"When I get there - that'll be it!" you say 
confidently. "When I'm 21." "When I get my new 
Miata." "When I get a job and make my first $100,000." 
"When I'm finally on my own." "When I meet the Right 
One. Then everything will be okay and I'll live happily 
ever after." 




CvTHTittKCtTttCyit 



Sooner or later it will hit you, though. You'll 
realize that there is no station, no one place to arrive 
at once and for all. The whole point of the trip was the 
journey itself; that is where the joy is to be found. That 
is where the fulfillment is. The station is only a dream; 
it will constantly outdistance you. 

Relish the moment; above all, carpe diem . 
Rejoice and be glad in this day. In the end, it won't be 
the stresses of today that will drive you to madness 
and sadness; it will be the regrets over yesterdays and 
the fears of tomorrows. Regret and fear; be on guard. 
These demons will rob you of today. 

So stop pacing the aisles and watching your 
watch and counting the miles. Go out and plant more 
seeds. Smell more roses. Eat more ice cream. Even 
get up for a sunrise and take in all of the colors. Laugh 
lots, cry little. Your life is extraordinary; live it that 
way! 

And above all, carpe diem. Life must be 
lived as we go along. Your station will come soon 
enough. 

-based on Robert J. Hastings 

In our journey here at UMASS we have all 
had close friends and family whom we are grateful to. 
Being the tenth of eleven children, I have often 
wondered how I got this far and how I was able to 
make this step and the ones before today. And I 
realize that it is because of them. ..my family, that I am 
here today. Especially my mother and father who I 
will be forever grateful to. Their love and support has 
carried me through the best and worst of times. And 
I know that they will be there for me in all of my future 
steps in life. 

Could you please join me, the Class of 1998, 
in a round of applause in appreciation of our friends 
and families who have supported us through these 
years. 

A special thanks to our fine leadership this 
past year; Sean Carpenter, Student Trustee; Terrence 
Dolan, Student Senate President; and especially my 



fellow class officers Chad Cabral, Lisa Coffey, and 
Jennifer Reardon. I would also like to give a special 
thanks to Dean Donald C. Howard. His time and 
dedication to the Class of 1998 has proven to be an 
inspiration to us all. My eternal love and gratitude 
to Dan and Amy. Thank you for all your love and 
support, I couldn't have done it without you. 

In closing, remember, we may have been 
sent here to learn from the faculty, but it can be 
considered that we learned the most from our 
peers. 

Congratulations Class of 1998! 







ICMB 



IstxfversLty oj-JvLajscLckystts IbartmKtk 

CommaiccmjtKt 

$HK£ 7, 1998 



Order of Exercises 

Processional 

National Anthem 

Welcome 
Peter H. Cressy 
BA, MS, MBA, EdD 
Chancellor 

Greetings from the 
President's Office 

Greetings from the Alumni 
William McGowen, 82' BA, MA 
Presidents of the Alumni Association 

President of the Senior Class 
Beth Murphy 

Commencement Address 
Jill Ker Conway 






$ 



170 




Marshals 

Lester Cory 

Chief Marshal 

Joseph Scionti 

Faculty Marshal 

Russell Bessette 
Louise Habicht 

Graduate School 

Barry Haimson 

Kevin Hargreaves 

Cynthia Kruger 

Donald Mulcare 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Helen LaFrancois 
Alton Wilson 

College of Business and Industry 

John Dowd 
Thomas Shen 

College of Engineering 

Kerry Fater 
Ann Marie Hedquist 

College of Nursing 

Dante Vena 

College of Visual and Performing Arts 




171 



& 



Board of Trustees 

Robert S. Karam, '67 BS 
Chairperson 

Micheal T. Foley, 72 BA, 76 MD 
Vice Chairperson 

Robert J. Haynes, BS, '86 MBA 
Vice Chairperson 

Peter J. Berlandi, BA 

Daine E. Bogan, '59 BS 

Sean Carpentar, '98 

Edward A. Dubilo, 71 BA 

Grace K. Fey, BA, CFA 

Heriberto Flores, 73 BA, '91 MED 

William E. Giblin, BS 

Charles J. Hoff, BS, MS 

Myra H, Kraft, BA 

Peter J. Lewenberg, '69 BS 

Robert M. Mahoney, 70 BS, MBA 

Christy Peter Mihos, BS, OPM 

Michael Murray 

John M. Naughton, BS CLU 

James F. O'Leary, 70' BA, JD 

Kerri E. Osterhaus 

Brian Tirrell 
Keith M. Tremblay 




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172 



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182 







There sits on the bookshelf, behind my office desk 
at the University, a framed statement, anony- 
mously written, entitled My Creed. It was given 
to me by a dear friend, Barbara Bell-Nay, SJV1U 
Class of 78, because she felt it not only expressed 
something of her own personal life view but mine 
as well. She was right. It does. I pass it along to 
you for whatever saner, more sensible under- 
standing of life's mystery that its simple insights 
and recognitions may evoke in you as does in me. 

Donald C. Howard 
Dean of Students 



My Creed 

In some way, however small or secret, each of us is 
a little mad... Everyone is lonely at bottom and cries 
to be understood; but we can never entirely under- 
stand someone else, and each of us remains part 
stranger even to those who love us... It is the weak 
who are cruel, gentleness can only be expected 
from the strong... Those who do not know fear are 
not really brave, for courage is the capacity to 
confront what can be imagined... You can under- 
stand people better if you look at them, no matter 
how old or impressive they may be, as if they are 
children. For most of us never mature; we simply 
grow taller... Happiness only comes when we push 
our brains and hearts to the farthest reaches which 
we are capable... The purpose of life is to matter, to 
count, to stand for something, to have it make some 
difference that we lived at all... 

183 



* 



vUwLdim terms 






Duff: pudding made out of flour and water. 

Dyspepsia: indigestion. 

Fast: to attach securely to a whale. 

Fiqurehead: an ornamental fiqure on the front of a ship 

Finback: variety of whale. 

Fluke: whale's tail. 

Forecastle: living quarters for crew. 

Fox: twisted rope fibers. 

Furl: to roll up and secure. 

Gale: continuous wind. 

Galley: kitchen. 

Gam: to exchange news. 

Junk: salt meat that has become hard; a Chinese or Japanese boat. 

Lagerhead: a variety of whale. 

Lance: spear with razor-sharp blade. 

Laying off: anchored offshore. 

Mizzen: the third mast of a boat. 



184 



Mother Carey's Chickens: a little seabird which follows ships. 

Nettles: twisted rope yarns. 

Raise: to come within visibility of something. 

Reef: to shorten sail area. 

Rigging: ropes. 

Royal: top-most mast on the ship. 

Scupper: drains from the waterways of the deck. 

Sound: to sink below the water. 

Speak: to communicte with another boat. 

Standing away: to sail away from. 

Starboard: right side of the boat. 

Stay: rigging used to support mast. 

Stern: the rear of the boat. 

Studding sail: light sails. 

Tarring: to apply tar to masts, etc. for protection from weather. 



185 



SftcpcdTkaxh 



1 



The University of Massachusetts Yearbook Staff would like to thank the 
following people for their cooperation, hard work, and dedication to the 
student body by helping us produce the 1998 yearbook. 



Dean Donald C. Howard 

Barbara Costa 

Dr. Susan Costa 

Norval Garnett 

Jostens Printing and Publishing 

Caren Orlick 

DaVor Photography 

RM Photo Service 

Melissa Eagen -Illustrations 

John Pereira 



Vice Chancellor Dr. Diana Hackney 

Torch 

Anthony Baldman 

Campus Design 

Bill Gathright 

Maeve Hickock 

Chris Kaylor 

Jim Mullens 

Manny Pereira 

Ann Valentino 

UMAss AV Department 

New Bedford Whaling Musuem 

UMass Student Life Office 

CITS Service 



186 



Qiblidrrcakj 



Cloud, Enoch Carter, Enoch's Voyage. 
Moyer Bell, London. 1994. 

H.R. 3898, New Bedford Whaling NHP 
Lowell NHP Act and Amendment. 
Washington D.C., June 14, 1994. 

Lawrence, Martha. Scrimshaw The 
Whaler's Legacy. Schiffer Publish 
ing, Ltd, Atgleni, Pa. 1993. 

Simpson, Mackinnon. Whale Song. 
Beyond Words Publishing, Hono 
lulu, Hawaii. 1986. 

Spencer, Bill. The Story of Whaling. 
Cresent Book, New York. 1980. 



Back photograph provided by New 
Bedford Whaling Museum. 



187 



Joy Bose Baboyide 

We are sure you know how so special 

you really are to us . . . 

Your birth, your growth, your 

understanding, your position in the 

family, your education and now 

your graduation. 

You are just UNIQUE in all 

We love you. 

Remember, greater heights are ahead 

of you. Be confident of the fact that HE 

who had helped you thus far, will not 

leave nor forsake you. He will continue 

to help you till you have fully 

accomplished his purpose in you life. 

CONGRATULATIONS 

MOM & DAD 



Suyu Leong 
Congratulations! ! ! 

You did it. 

Pm so proud of you. 

All my love and best 

wishes for a happy 

and bright future. 

Thank you for coming 

into my life 

and for being my wife. 

Love always Tim. 



Heather L. Lamothe 

Great job, Heather! 

You did it, and we're very proud of you! 

You set your sights high, and you're 

reached your goal! 

From lowly freshman to 

Housing Commitee to 

Resident Assistant to Hall Director. 

Besides classes and working and 

being a friend! 

And you haven't stopped yet! 

Anything you choose to do, 

you will succeed because you have 

the power and the desire and the 

determination within you. 

We all love you and are very proud of you! 

Mom, Dad, Jason, Grandma Mae, 

Joann, Micheal, Sarah. 

Grandma Flo and Alexis are 

smiling down on you, too! 



Lisa A. Medeiros 
Congratulations 

on your graduation. 
We are proud of you 
dedication and accomplish- 
ment. Though your hard work 
you have become the first 
person in our family to 
receive a college degree. 
We wish you continued 
success in the rest of 
your life's endeavors. 
With Love, Mom & Dad 



1HH 



Lori Ann Messenger 

March 12, 1973 




Little Lor to Lois Panois 

'Tomorrow! Tomorrow! 

lust look what you've done 

We Love you! 

God Bless you! 

Mom & Dad 



Elisabeth Polochick 

You are who you are, 

who you are you are, 

You are where you are, 

where you are you are, 

You did what you did, 

what you did was great, 

Loving you has been 

the adventure 

of a lifetime, 

I'm so proud of all 

you've accomplished 



Heather Jude O'Connor 

Well walk in the rain 

by your side -well 

cling to the warmth 

of your tiny hand 

well do anything to 

make you under- 
stand, we'll love you 
more than 
anybody can. 
Mom & Dad 



Jason M. Vining 

Our most sincere 

Congratulations 

and best wishes 

for you success!! 

You have been nothing less 

than much joy in our lives, you 

certainly know how to 

make us proud. 

Our best wishes, 

Love and support 

will be with you always, 

Mr. Vice-President 

We love You, 

Dad, Jo, Stacy, Sammy /Zack 



189 



KRISTEN M. RUSSELL, b.s 




YouVe traveled far 
to get to this lofty 



new place of yours... 

How do you like the view 

from the High Road? 

We love you, baby girl 

You make us very proud. 

Mom & Dad 



190 



Lisa A. Balboni 

Great Job! 
The future is Yours! 
Love, Mom and Dad 



Shannon M. Belloni 

We're very proud of our "honor 

student". You've worked hard and you 

deserve it. Good luck in the grata 

school. Keep up the good work and 

good things will come your way! Love, 

Mom,"Dad, Cheryl, DJ, Alysha, 

Zacharv and Trevor. 



Sarah A. Mangrum 

Congratulations and thanks 

for another happy memory. 

We are so proud of you. 

All our love. 

Mom, Dad & Spanky 



Lynne S. Mercier 

Best of Luck to a great 
math teacher. We're so 

proud of you. 

Congratulations, Lynne! 

Love, Mom and Dad 



Heather E. Mulry 

We are all so proud of you! 

With all our love forever - 
Mom, Dad and "Chauncey" 



Elizabeth B. Polochick 

"Miss Liz of America" 

You did it and a thousand words could not leave so deep 
an impression as one deed. Although I was 1 ,(100 miles 
away if feels like we did it together. You're my mom, 

my best friend, and my main source of 

high quality mail. I love you and an so proud of you. 

God Bless. Dr. Brian M. Polochick. 



David H. Scully 

Congratulations! 

We are very proud of you. 

Love Mom and Dad 

Anna and David Scully 



Lauren M. Stentiford 

To be successful, 

you must love what you do. 

Laurie, you are on your way. 

We are proud of you. 
Love, Mom, Dad & Michelle 



Amy Ronco 

Amos, A new 4 year record to out 
do the brothers Ronx! Congrats - 
May all your dreams come true - 
Time to sail the oceans and find 
the sharks! Much Love, Mom, BJ, 
Paul & Kev 





Dear Becky, 

Surprise! Just wanted to let you know how extremely 
proud of you we are. You're a terrific daughter! With your 
talent, education and determination you can accomplish 
anything you set out to do. Wishing you much success in 
your future and many congratulations on your graduation. 

Lots of Love, Mom & Dad 



191 



Anthony A. Baldman 

"Y Done Good, Son!" 
- Maw and Paw 




7 




-Cove, 
gndScottt^ 




Michelle D- Cameron 

For all your achievements both in 

academics and sports, Dad and I 

congratulate you. We wish you much 

success and happiness in the 

next chapter of you life. We love you , 

and are so proud of you. 

Mom and Dad Cameron 



Audrey A. Drewett 

Hope is the thing with feathers 

That perches in the soul- 

And sings the tune without words 

And never stops- at all. 

Emily Dickinson 
You make us very proud 
Love you. Mom and Dad 



Dawn M- Laurianno 

We have and always will be so 

very proud of who you are, and 

what you have accomplished* 

Love Always Mom & Dad 



Melissa ML Perry 

Congratulations Melissa! 

We are all very proud of you 

and love you very much. 

Dad, Joyce, Todd, and Tom 



Karen K. Tilli 

Through "truth, work and 

struggle" you have triumphed! 

We are extremely proud of you ! 

Love, Mom, Dad, Gram, 

Jeremy, Becky and Missy 



Gregory J. Workman 

GREG, YOU HAVE BROKEN 

THE MOLD.. .LIVE YOUR 

DREAMS, BE HAPPY 

LOVE MOM, DAD, KRISTINA 



192 



Kerrie L. Chase 

I am so proud of you! "Stay true to you dreams and they'll stay true to you!" 
You will always be my precious daughter, I will always love you! Ma 

Patricia J. Cochran 

We love you and we're proud of you. Reach for the stars. 

John Costanzo 

We are proud of you and LOVE YOU VERY MUCH 
LOVE MOMMA, SUZIE, MOM, GRAMPA 

Amy E. Ferris 

There are two things to aim at in life: first to get what you want, 
and after that to enjoy it. Congratulations Love, Mom and Dad. 

Allison R. Hall 

To our creative daughter Congratulations 

and may all you dreams come true! "With all our love" Mom & Dad 

Christine Ann Hunt 

You have accomplished a great deed and have made 
me proud beyond words. I Love You, Mom 

Kristie LaPlante 

"They can conquer who believe they can" We are proud of you. 
CONGRATULATIONS Love Mom, Dad and Kim 

Michelle D. Masse 

Congratulations, Michelle! 
We love you and are so proud of you? Mom and Dad 

Jason W. Maki 

Jason William Maki you will succeed in 
whatever you aspire to do in life. Love Mom and Dad. 

Elizabeth Polochick 

Through the years it has been tough, but you stayed with it. 
I am very proud of you. You did it. Love, Justin 

Lindsay A. Skirven 

The family of Lindsay Skirven wishes her the best in the world. 
We love her and are very proud of her. Congratulations! 

Shouping Tang 

I love you - to my parents, wife and daughter. I'm proud of you! 



193 



Iffl 



Rebecca Lynn Schwartz 



What do you say to someone you have nurtured and watched grow 
for a quarter of a century? Is there anything else left to say? I think 
that there is. 

In the eyes of Carl Sandburg in Man the Moon Shooter , we 
humans are moon shooters: restless, roving, inquisitive creatures, 
ever striving for unknown futures. There is no real stopping place, 
no status quo always the next set of challenges and the winds of 
change yet to come. 

I know that wherever your journey leads you that it will be a 
challenging and exciting one. A parent always wishes for their child 
the greatest success, good health and above all true happiness. 
Finding a meaningful purpose and path in life allows you to realize 
those other possibilities. 

I want you to know how proud I am of you and your 
accomplishments and I know you will experience a bright future. 
With all the love and support possible - go out into the world and 
be your own moon shooter. 

Love, Mom 



Rebecca entered my life about five years ago, and has added her 
enthusiasm to make it more exciting. She has boundless energy, 
which sometimes is difficult to channel. She demands much of 
herself and expects the same from others. As she enters "the real 
world", I feel certain that she will learn its lessons well and will 
make her mark in the field of her choice. Best of luck, health and 
happiness now and in the future. 

Love, Tony 




Dear Rebecca, 

Congratulations on Graduating College. It 
was a lot of hard work, but I new you could 
do it. But now it's over and there will be no 
more phone calls at 2:00 AM from you. Now 
that it's all over we can get on with the rest 
of our lives, together. I really mean that, just 
bare with me and give me time. 

Love Ya, Ross 




Rebecca, 

Your journey as a student has taken different trails and 
these parents have felt the bumps you've made on your road to 
success. Marion and I are very proud of you, your perserverance 
as well as your talent. When you asked for a 35mm camera, 
many years ago, we had no idea that your eye, behind a used 
Minolta SRT 101 would "develop" such artistic results. 

Your Future is now. Graduation from college affords 
you the opportunity to test the many lessons you have learned. 

As your new journey unfolds, please, continue to re- 
member your roots, for it will surely give your branches 
strength. 

Love, Dad and Marion 

I take this chance to congratulate you on your graduation from 
UMass. I am very proud of you and the work you have done. I 
pray that you will find happiness and a great sense of worth of 
who you are. May you find meaningful work in your field, 
always be surrounded by family, friends and relationships that 
bring out the love within each of us. Savor the moments each 
day. I love you and wish only the very best for you always. 

Love Always, Aunt Alice 



194 



Annie Irene Pickert 



You shall pass through this world but once, 
If, therfore, there be any kindness you can 
show, or any good thing you can do, do it now. 



Do no defer it or neglect it, 

for you shall not pass this way again. 

We are so proud of you 

Love Mom, Dad, Melanie, 

Jennifer and Gramma 




Jill Anne Delahanty 



We can't believe what a beautiful 
grown woman you have become - 
inside and out. We are so proud 
of you and for all you have accomplished. 

Go into the world and enjoy yourself, 
work hard, be kind and generous and 
you will succeed in everything you do. 
If you can dream it, you can make it so ... 

We love You, 
Mom & Russ 



195 



We 

contemn this benefit 

of carriage by waters 

& live 

like so many boars in a sty 

for want of vent 

& 

utterance. 

- Robert Burton. 




196 




Mdicrjrvm tkt 'Editor- in- Ckitf 




Congratulations to the Class of 1 998. i appreciate 

the opportunity I had to attend school in New England. It is truly 
a beautiful place. My favortie past time was watching the sunset 
over Horseneck Beach and I sure will miss those magneficnet 
skies. It seems like yesterday we were freshmen or transfers, 
trying to fit in, dealing with finanical aid or wondering how all 
our credits would be fillfulled by graduation. Now our college 
years are over and it is time to continue along our journey in lfe. 
We all have been through a great deal and all of us should be 
proud of what we have accomplihed. Sometimes it seemed like 
it was impossible, but we all made it. 

UMass Dartmouth has brought all of us many fond 
memories to look upon as well as this yearbook. A lot of hard 
work, stress and tremendous effort has been put into this book 
so I hope all of you will enjoy it. It has been a pleasure producing 
it. We don't know where our lives will lead us, live each day and 
savor the moments becaue that's what really matters in life. 

I would like to thank my parents (Mom, Dad, Marion and Tony) because without their love 
and support I would of never made it . . . Thank you and I Love You. To my friends Nicole, Ross, 
Becky, Katie, Steve, Jill, Annie, Ernie, Allison and Melissa who always supported me, Thank you 
for all you've given me as a person. Ross, my love, I love you and 
I am looking forward to a bright life together and I will be forever grateful. 

I would like to thank Dean Howard for his dedication and his perservance for the 
completion of the yearbook. Noravl Garnett and Caren Orlick gave me great guidance 
along the way. 

In conculsion I came upon this quote that inspired me. 



Rebecca L. Schwartz 

Scrimshaw 1998 

Editor-in-Chief 



¥ 



¥ 



Take one day at atime and string all those days together like precious things they are... 
instead of trying too hard and promising yourself toomuch. I can't promise you today with the 
hope and belief that there is a beautiful tomorrow in store for you. 

- Dean Walley 

Good luck and happiness in all of your future endeavors. 



197 





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199 



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3 2922 00508 698 5 




SCrim • Shaw, (skrim'sho) n.,pl. -shaw or 

-shaws. 1 . The art of carving on whalebone or 

whale ivory. 2. An article made by in this way. 

3. To decorate (shells etc.) by carving.