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Full text of "Second book of reading lessons"

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Canabian Smes ai pairing goohs. 



SECOND BOOK. 



0* 



READING LESSONS. 



$y the Council of public Instyuctioa 




TORONTO: 
JAMES CAMPBELL AND SON. 



Entered according to Act of Provincial Legislature, in the Tear 
One Thousand Eight Hundred and Sixty-seven, by the 
Reverend Egebton Ryerson, LL.D., Chief Superintendent 
of Education for Ontario, in the Office of the Registrar of 
the Province of Canada. 



TO THE TEACHER. 

The Second Reading Book is composed almost 
exclusively of Nursery Rhymes and Tales and 
Fables of a kind likely to prove pleasing to the 
mind of childhood. A principal cause of the very 
frequent want of proper modulation and appro- 
priate inflection of voice, on the part of pupils, in 
reading, is to be found in the fact that heretofore 
our reading books have largely consisted of selec- 
tions that were on subjects more or less above the 
rasy comprehension of the pupil, or that were not 
written in a style sufficiently simple and agreeable. 
A child cannot read with expression that which 
he does not readily understand, or does not readily 
engage his attention ; while, on the other hand — 
provided his eye is familiar with the word-signs — 
he can scarcely fail to read naturally, and, conse- 
quently, with propriety, a rhyme or a story that 
enlists his sympathy and awakens his interest. 

A portion of the First Section of the Second 
Book is devoted to the completion of the scheme 
of lessons on the letter-sounds, which was com- 
menced in Part I. and carried on through Part II. 
of the First Book — the attention being here chiefly 



IV PREFACE. 

directed to certain combinations of letters that 
occur in dissyllables and elsewhere, and are cha- 
racterised by peculiar or irregular sounds. 

The words given at the head of each lesson are 
those with which the pupil has not previously be- 
come acquainted in his Reading Book. They are 
intended to be pronounced and explained by the 
teacher before the lesson is commenced — the pro- 
nunciation and meaning being carefully impressed 
upon the pupil, so that he may be already familiar 
with each word before he meets with it in the 
reading lesson. 

The teacher is recommended to select materials 
for spelling exercises from the portions of the book 
previously read, and to continue the plan, recom- 
mended for adoption in the First Book, of conduct- 
ing the recitation in spelling by giving each pupil 
a short phrase or sentence, so as to ensure the 
words being spelled in their proper connections. 

Education Office, 
Toeonto, December 1869. 



CONTENTS. 



PART I. 

rxor 
Billy and Nanny ; or, The Two Goata ..... 2 

Little Bo-Peep 5 

A Ship a Vailing ......... 6 

Kitty and Mousie .... Susy's Six Birthdays . 7 

Harry and Fanny's Grandpapa ...... 8 

Betty Pringle . . . . . . ' . . .12 

Little Susan's Dream lb 

Pussy Cat .......... 16 

Walter and his Bog ........ 18 

Three Fables 20 

My Little Doll Rose . . . Mrs Follen ... 22 

To Baby 23 

. The Silly Lamb 24 

My Little Cat and Dog 28 

Little Things 30 

Bain-Drops .......... 31 

The Lamb, the Bee, and the Fly ....".. 32 

The Dog and the Shadow 35 

Little Kit 36 

Good King Arthur . , , , , , . . 38 

Little Robin Redbreast . , ' . . . , , .38 

Storv of Joseph .... Campbell's Second Reader 39 

The Lamb's Lullaby , . . Mary Lundie Duncan 43 



vi 



CONTENTS. 



Alfred and his Garden 
Jenny Wren . 
The Young Nestlings 
The Fox and the Goat, 
The Honest Boy 
Two Unkind Goats 
Two Kind Goats . 



PASC 

46 
49 
50 
52 
54 
54 
55 



PART II. 



The Fairy Ring , . . . *•„>•... .57 

The Boy and the Crow . . . . . . . . 59 ■ 

My Little Brother 64 

The Blind Boy 65 

The Crow and the Pitcher 66 

The Cat and the Cream- Jug 68 

Dirty Tim 69 

Sing a Song of Sixpence ....... 70 

Susy's Little Servants .71 

Things to be Kept in Mind ....... 73 

Little Eed Riding-Hood 47 

The Bob o' Link and the Mower . Fagots for the Fireside 81 

Robin Redbreast and Jenny Wren ..... 83 

Susy's Dinner Party . . . Susy's Six Birthdays 84 

The Story of the Three Bears . . . - . . . 87 * 

Who Stole the Bird's Nest? . . 94 

The Children in the Wood 98 

The Child's First Grief . . . Mrs Hemans . . 105 

Love One Another 108 

The Story of Moses 108 

Brave Bobby Ill 

The Sweet Story of Old 113 

Never say Fail . . . , 114 

Christmas ..... Miss "Wetherell . 115 

Little by Little 118 

Evening Hymn ....,.,.. 120 



CONTENTS. Vll 



pakt in. 

FA* 

May Song l^V 

The Lark and her Young Ones 123 

f he Hare and the Tortoise . 125 

Good Night and Good Morning , 127 

Who Taught Them ? 129 

•The Boy and the Starling 130 

Willie and his Pony 131 

My Pony 132 

Mary and her Canary 134 

Meddlesome Matty .... Mrs Gilbert . . 136 

The Bear and the Tomtit 139 

My Mother 142 

Story of David 144 

Autumn .• • Mrs Hautrey . 145 

Bertha and her Dolls 150 

'.The Lost Doll 152 

.rack's Dog Bandy 153 

little Things 156 

Presence of Mind 159 

Ingenious Device Tales that are Trut 160 

The Indian "Woman and the Bear 162 

Story of a Bear 164 

The Young Mouse ......... 166 

The Boy Lost in the Bush 169 

Old Mother Hubbard and her Dog 172 



PAET IV. 

The Dog and the Boat 175 

Try Again 179 

" My Father's at the Helm" 180 

^The Boy and his Dog 181 

The Story of the Birth of our Saviour 183 

The Guardsman and his Horse . . Mrs Balfour . . 187 

The Wind in a Frolic 189 



Vlii CONTENTS. 

PAOI 

The Old Man and his Ass 19] 

The Best Fun ......... 19; 

The Beggar-Man Aikin . . 19< 

Try Again . 19J 

Angry Words 205 

A Little Word 20! 

The Liar and the Truthful Boy 2tt 

Deeds of Kindness 21' 

Humility 21: 

The Bold Boy and the Coward 2L 

By-andBy 21- 

The Fox and the Drake 21i 

Whittiugton and his Cat , 21' 



SECOND BOOK. 



PART I. 




This little book has verses of good old English 

rhyme 
That in your father's father's time, rang out their 

pleasant chimt. 
This little book, dear children, has tales that were 

not new 
When your good and kind old grandmamma was 

such a child as you. 

A 



2 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

Full many a child has prized them, now grown a 
stalwart man, 

And many more, whose lives were o'er before our 
lives began ; 

Then prize you them, dear children, tales told and 
ballads sung 

In times long past — the old, old days, when grand- 
mamma was young. 



BILLY AND NANNY; or, THE TWO GOATS. 


a-ble* 


stub-ble 


baf-fle 


an-kle 


ta-ble 


tum-ble 


ri-fle 


wrin-kle 


sta-ble 


trea-cle 


ruf-fle 


ma-ple 


rab-ble 


un-cle 


ea-gle 


ap-ple 


fee-ble 


i-dle 


gig-gle 


peo-ple 


peb-ble 


bri-dle 


bu-gle 


rip-pie 


nib-ble . 


rid-dle 


wrig-gle 


lit-tle 


no-ble 


sad-die 


an-gle 


this-tle 


Bi-ble 


pud-die 


ti-tle 


tit-tie 


These two goats are named " Billy' 


" and " Nanny," 


and they belong to Ned Baffle's uncle. Billy is a 


noble fellow, with long 


bent horns, 


all rough with 


wrinkles 


; while Nanny 


is smaller, 


and has short 


straight 


horns. 







* Observe that when the consonant is doubled the preceding vowel is 
short. 

g3T These words, and all similarly placed in the book, are intended to be 
pronounced and explained by the pupils before commencing the lesson. 
They are not designed to constitute an exercise in spelling.— (See Preface.) 



SECOND BOOK OS' READING LEbSONS. 




Poor Nanny is lame. When she was a feeble 
little kid, she and her mamma were lying one day 
under an apple-tree, in the stubble-field, behind Mr 
Baffle's barn. Nanny got up and ran through the 
stubble to the little stream at the end of the field. 
She loved to hear the water babble over the pebbles, 
and to watch it ripple in the sun. Then, too, she 
thought she would have a drink, and just nibble for 
a little while at the thistles which grew along its 
banks. As she stood by the water, looking at her 
image, and thinking what a pretty little goat she 
was, she heard a loud scream, and, turning round, 
she saw a great eagle swoop down at her from the 
top of a tall maple-tree. Nanny felt the sharp 
claws in her back, and cried with fright and pain, 
as the cruel bird began to fly off with her. Just 



4 SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 

then a man, who had heard Nanny's cry, came up 
with a rifle and shot at the eagle. He did not kill 
it, but the ball went so close to it as to ruffle its 
feathers, and it was glad to get away safely, and let 
the poor kid drop to the ground. Little Nanny fell 
against the sharp angle of a stone, and thus she 
broke her leg a little way above the ankle. She 
was not able to walk for many weeks, and her leg 
was bound up in splints. While she was thus kept 
in the stable, she had ample time to think of how 
silly she had been to ramble away from her kind 
mamma. 

Billy is a great strong fellow, but he loves to be 
idle. Ned Baffle sometimes puts a bridle into Billy's 
mouth and a saddle on his back, and takes a ride on 
him. One day, he rode Billy to the store for a can 
of treacle. < On their way home, a man began to 
play on a bugle close to them, and Billy, who did 
not like the noise, ran away. Little Ned did his 
best to hold on, but Billy gave a great jump and 
made Ned tumble into a puddle of dirty water. 
Some idle boys who stood by began to giggle and 
to make fun of Ned, as he had upset the treacle all 
over his face and head and neck. , Poor Ned had to 
wriggle out of the mud, as best he could, and then 
run home. The rabble of idle boys ran after him, 
calling him Mud-and-treacle and other names. 
In a short time it was Ned's turn to laugh, for, 
hearing a great noise behind him, he turned and saw 



SECOND BOOK OP BEADING LESSONS. 5 

*hac Billy had got among the idle fellows, and was 
paying them back in their own coin — abuse. He 
threw one great fellow, with dirty hands and face, 
into a deep pit that had been dug for a cellar, and 
where there were many nettles ; he tore one boy's 
^oat with his horns, and he upset four or five of 
them into the gutter. Billy gave them plenty of 
mud without treacle, and they were well pleased to 
get off and leave Ned alone, y 




LITTLE BO-PEEP. 

Little Bo-peep has lost her sheep, 
Arid can't tell where to find them ; 



SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 

Let them alone, and they '11 come home, 
And bring their tails behind them 

Little Bo-peep fell fast asleep, 

And dreamt she heard them bleating ; 

But when she awoke, she found it a joke, 
For still they all were fleeting. 

Then up she took her little crook, 

And off she ran to find them ; 
She found them indeed, but it made her heart 
bleed, 

For they'd left their tails behind tb*m. 



A SHIP A-SAILIN0 

I saw a ship a-sailing, 

A-sailing on the sea ; 
And, oh ! it was all laden 

With pretty things for me. 

There were comfits in the cabin, 
And apples in the hold ; 

The sails were made of silver, 
The masts were made of gold. 

The four-and-twenty sailors, 
That stood between the decks, 

Were four-and-twenty white mice, 
With chains about their necks. 



SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 

The captain was a duck, 
With a packet on his back ; 

And when the ship began to move, 
The captain cried, " Quack, quack." 



KITTY AND MOUSIE. 

Once there was a little Kitty,. 

Whiter than snow ; 
In the barn he used to frolic 

Long time ago. 

In the barn a little Mousie 

Ran to and fro ; 
For she heard the Kitty coming 

Long time ago. 

Two black eyes had little Kitty, 

Black as a sloe ; 
And they spied the little Mousie 

Long time ago. 

Four soft paws had little Kitty, 

Paws soft as dough, 
And they caught the little Mousie 

Long time ago. 

Nine pearl teeth had little Kitty, 

All in a row, 
And they bit the little Mousie 

Long time ago. 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

When the teeth bit little Mousie, 
Mousie cried out, " Oh ! " 

But she got away from Kitty 
Long time ago. 

— Little Susy's Six Birthdays. 



HARRY AND FANNY'S GRANDPAPA. 

an-y Har-ry hur-ry cit-y 

man-y car-ry cur-ry pit-y 

pen-ny tar-ry wor-ry fif-ty 

fun-ny ber-ry bur-ly six-ty 

bun-ny cher-ry cur-ly plen-ty 

mon-ey mer-ry sur-ly twen-ty 

hap-py ver-y sure-ly pret-ty 

Harry and Fanny Black were always glad to go 
for a walk with their grandpapa. He was very 
kind and good to them, and they were very sorry 
when they had done anything to vex or worry him. 
Fanny" was a dear little girl, five years old, with 
lips and cheeks as red as a ripe cherry; while 
Harry was a fine burly little fellow of eight, with 
merry laughing eyes and black curly hair. 

Last year, when the berries were ripe, their 
grandpapa took them some miles from the city. 
They rode a long way in the cars, and then they 
got out to walk to the woods. The children were 
in so great a hurry to get' there, that they would 



SECOND BOOK OF KEADIM LESSONS. 




not tarry for their grandpapa, who did not care to 
walk very fast, as he was fifty or sixty years old. 
It was a sad pity they did not wait for him — for 
they had plenty of time — but, as I said before, they 
were in a hurry to get to the woods to find berries, 
and they did not know what a fright they were 
going to get. . 

Just before tney came to the woods, they saw a 
funny little gray rabbit run under the fence into a 
field by the road-side. They did not think it could 
be any harm, so they got over the fence to have a 
peep at Mr Bunny. They ran about here and there 
through the field looking for bunny, but they could 



10 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

hot find him. They never thought how wrong it 
was of them to trample down the farmer's crop of 
wheat until, all at once, a surly man ran up and 
was about to beat them for walking over the wheat. 
He was very cross, and Fanny and Harry shed 
many, many tears before, to their great joy, they 
saw their kind grandpapa come to save them. He 
gave the farmer some money to pay him for the 
damage the boy and girl had done to his crops, and 
then they all three went into the woods. 

The children could not help crying as they went 
along, and they told their grandpapa, at least twenty 
times, how truly sorry they were that they had 
been in such a hurry to leave him. He said it 
surely would have been better if they had not run 
off, but that it was of no use to cry, and that he 
was quite sure they would not do it again. Then 
he sat down by the root of a great tree, and made 
Fanny sit by him on a block which he had told 
Harry to carry there for her. So they sat down to 
rest for more than an hour, and their grandpapa 
told them many pretty stories and verses ; and 
among others, so as to make them laugh, he told 
them the story of 

THE CLEVER OLD MAN. 

There was an old man who lived in a wood, 
As you may plainly see, 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 11 

He said he could do as much work in a day, 

As his wife could do in three. 
With all my heart, the old woman said, 

If that you. will allow, 
To-morrow you '11 stay at home in my stead, 

And I go drive the plough. 

But you must milk the tidy cow, 

For fear that she go dry ; 
And you must feed the little pigs, 

That are within the sty ; 
And you must mind the speckled hen, 

For fear she lay astray ; 
And you must reel the spool of yarn, 

That I did spin to-day. 

The old woman took a staff in her hand, 

And went to "drive the plough ; 
The old man took a pail in his hand, 

And went to milk the cow. 
But Tidy hinch'd, and Tidy flinch'd, 

And Tidy broke his nose ; 
And Tidy gave him such a blow, 

That the blood ran down his hose. 

High! Tidy! ho! Tidy! high! 

Tidy ! do stand still ; 
If ever I milk you, Tidy, again, 

; Twill be sore against my will I 



12 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

He went to feed the little pigs, 

That were within the sty ; 
He hit his head against the beam,' 

And he made the blood to fly. 

He went to mind the speckled hen 

For fear she 'd lay astray ; 
And he forgot the spool of yarn, 

His wife spun yesterday. 
So he vow'd by the sun, the moon, and the stars. 

And the leaves on every limb, 
If his wife didn't do a day's work in her life, 

She should ne'er be ruled by him. 



BETTY PRINGLE. 

Betty Pringle had a little pig, 
Not very little, and not very big ; 
When he was alive, he lived in clover, 
But now he 's dead, and that 's all over. 
So Billy Pringle he lay down and cried, 
And Betty Pringle she lay down and died ; 
So there was an end of one, two, and three, 

Billy Pringle he, 

Betty Pringle she, 

And the piggy-wiggee. 



SLCOtfD BOOK OF HEADING LESSONS. 13 






LITTLE SUSAN'S DREAM. 


aunt 


haunch 


niece 


light 


e-nough 


jaunt 


launch 


piece 


night 


cough 


daunt 


brief 


fierce 


tight 


trough 


flaunt 


chief 


pierce 


plight 


dough 


gaunt 


grief 


bright 


plough 


though 


haunt 


field 


blight 


bough 


al-though 


taunt 


wield 


fight 


rough 


through 


vaunt 


yield 


flight 


tough 


hic-cough 



Little Susan Daunt had a long spelling lesson 
last week, with many hard words in it, so she went 
into the garden, and sat under the green boughs of 
a spruce-tree to learn it, while there was enough 
light for her to see to read. The day was very 
warm, and she had not been there long before she 



14 SECOND BOOK OP BEADING LESSONS. 

fell fast asleep, and dreamed that she was in a great 
forest, with green trees on all sides of her. She 
thought that she saw many red and white flags, 
whkh seemed to flaunt among the trees, while, on 
the ground, were all sorts of bright flowers — red 
and white and yellow and blue. Far away through 
the woods she saw a field, in which were a man and 
two oxen at work with a plough. She saw the man 
loosen the oxen from the plough, and drive them to- 
wards a trough of water to get a drink. At this 
moment Susan thought, in her dream, that she 
heard a slight noise behind her, and looking round 
ehe saw a noble deer pierce through the shrubs and 
begin to crop the sweet young grass which grew 
among the flowers, y 

The deer was so tame that he came close to her 
and ate some herbs out of her hand, and she thought 
that his black eyes seemed so soft and gentle, that 
she threw her arms around his glossy neck, and told 
him that she loved him dearly. 

All at once the sky, she thought, began to grow 
dark, as though night were coining on. A black 
blight fell on the flowers, and the bright flags were 
all turned into black crape. Susan looked for the 
oxen, and saw that they had been changed into two 
fierce hounds — hungry and gaunt ; while the man, 
who had been at work with the oxen, was now on a 
fleet horse, and seemed to wield a long and sharp 
sword in his hand. 



SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 1 5 

To her great grief they all rushed towards the 
deer, which at once took to flight. For a brief 
space of time Susan thought it would get off; but 
the ground seemed now to be very rough, and the 
deer fell over some logs. The hounds caught up to 
it, and tore it down to the ground. Then the man 
rode up and killed it with his sword. When the 
deer was dead, she saw the man take off the skin, 
and cut away a haunch, which he took with him. 
The two hungry dogs fell to and ate the rest. J/ 

Little Susan felt such grief at the death of the 
deer that she awoke in tears, and was indeed glad to 
find that it was only a dream. She was, it is true, 
in a sad plight about her lesson, for slis was sure 
she did not know it; but her chief fear was that, 
lying on the ground, she had caught a cold, for she 
had a bad cough, and she felt as if something were 
tight about her throat. So she got up and went in- 
doors ; but all through the night her dream seemed 
to haunt her, and she could not forget the noble deer 
and his sad death in the forest. 

Next day Susan was up even before the cook had 
made the dough for the breakfast rolls. She sat 
down to her book ; and although she knew that 
she was about to have a tough fight with some of 
the long words, yet she said that she would not yield 
to them, but would master them all before she went 
to breakfast. She had heard Aunt Mary say, the 
nialit before, that she was going for a little jaunt in 



16 SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 

the fields after breakfast, and that her niece might 
go with her if her lessons were all learned. Besides, 
she did not want her brother Fred to taunt her with 
being a dunce, and to vaunt and boast that he could 
learn his lesson in less time than she took to learn 
hers. 

When breakfast was over, Susan went to the 
school-room to say her lesson to her aunt. She 
just missed two words, launch and hiccough. She 
spelled launch, L-A-N-C-H; and hiccough, H-l-C-c-U-P. 
Her aunt told her this was wrong, and that she 
must learn it better. In a little while she went 
to say it again, and she knew, this time, that 
l-a-u-n-c-h spells launch, and that h-i-c-c-o-u-g-h 
spells hiccough ; and as she knew how to spell all 
the other words too, she and her aunt went for 
their ramble in the green fields. 



I. PUSSY CAT.— II. WALTER AND HIS DOG 

ser-vants Chesh-ire gal-lop 

hard-ly be-cause rogu-ish 

vent-ure Wal-ter naugh-ty 

when-ev-er span-iel good-nat-ured 

noth-ing pup-py sau-cy 

PUSSY CAT. 

Pussy Cat lives in the servants' hall, 
She can set up her back and pur ; 



SECOND BOOK OP BEADING LESSONS. 17 

The little mice live in a crack in the wall, 
But they hardly dare venture to stir. 

For whenever they think of taking the air, 

Or filling their little maws, 
The Pussy Cat says, " Come out if you dare ; 

I will catch you all with my claws." 

Scrabble, scrabble, scrabble, went all the little mice, 

For they smelt the Cheshire cheese ; 
The Pussy Cat said, " It smells very nice, 

Now do come out if you please." 

" Squeak," said the little mouse ; " squeak, squeak, 
squeak," 

Said all the little ones too ; 
" We never creep out when cats are about, 

Because we are afraid of you." 

So the cunning old cat lay down on a mat 

By the fire in the servants' hall ; 
" If the little mice peep, they '11 think I 'm asleep ;" 

So she roll'd herself up like a ball. 

" Squeak," said the little mouse, " we '11 creep out, 

And eat some Cheshire cheese ; 
That silly old cat is asleep on the mat, 

And we may sup at our ease." 

Nibble, nibble, nibble, went the little mice, 

And they lick'd their little paws ; 
Then the cunning old cat sprang up from her mat 

And caught them all with her claws. 



18 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 



WALTER AND HIS DOG. 

There was a little boy 

And he had a piece of bread, 
And he put his little cap 

On his head, head, head. 

Upon his hobby-horse 

Then he went to take a ride, 
With his pretty spaniel Flash 

By his side, side, side. 

little Walter was his name, 
And he said to little Flash, 

" Let us gallop round the house, 
With a dash, dash, dash." 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 19 

So he laid down his bread 

In a snug little place, 
And away "Walter went 

For a race, race, race. 

But Flash had a plan, 

In his little roguish head. 
Of taking to himself 

Walter's bread, bread, bread. 

So he watch'd for a moment 

When. "Walter did not look. 
And his nice piece of bread, 

Slily took, took, took. 

When Walter saw the rogue, 
He cried, " Oh ! naughty Flash ; " 

And he show'd his little whip 
With a lash, lash, lash. 

But Flash look'd so good-natured 
With his tail curl'd up behind, 

That his aunty said to Walter, 
" Never mind, mind, mind. 

" Flash is nothing but a puppy, 

So, Walter, do not worry, 
If he knew that he 'd done wrong, 

He 'd be sorry, sorry, sorry. 

" And don't be angry, Walter, 
That Flash has had a treat, - 



20 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

Here 's another piece of bread 
You may eat, eat, eat." 

So Walter ate his bread, 
And then to Flash he cried, 

" Come, you saucy little dog, 
Let us ride, ride, ride." 



THKEE FABLES, 
fa-ble - use-ful in-jure 

sto-ry mor-al nev-er 

What is a fable? A fable is a story, which, 
though not true, is meant to teach some useful 
truth, or moral lesson. Do you ask how this can 
be ? Here are three fables, or stories, which are not 
true, and yet teach lessons which all boys and girls 
ought to learn : — 

THE FROGS. 

Two or three little boys stood one day at the side 
of a pond, in which there were some frogs. Now, 
though the poor frogs did them no harm, yet as 
soon as a frog put up its head, these bad boys 
would pelt at it with stones. " My dear boys," said 
one of the frogs, " you do not think, that though this 
may be sport to you, it is death to us." 

We should never hurt or injure those who do not 
hurt us; nor should we laugh at what gives them 
pain. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 21 

THE TWO DOGS. 

Two dogs, Tray and Snap, went out to walk. 
Tray was a good dog, and would not hurt the least 
thing in the world ; but Snap was cross, and would 
snarl and bite at all that came in his way. At length 
they came to a town. All the dogs came near them. 
Tray hurt none of them ; but Snap would grin at 
this, snarl at that, and bite a third, till at last they 
all fell on him, and tore him limb from limb ; and, 
as Tray was with him, he met with his death at the 
same time. 

We should not go with bad boys or girls, lest we 
share their fate. 

THE BOY AND THE NUTS. 

A boy once had a jar which was nearly full of 
nuts ; so he went and put in his hand to take some 
out. He took up as many nuts as his hand could 
hold ; but he could not pull them out, for the jar 
had a small neck. 

" Let go half the nuts, my boy," said a man who 
stood near, " and then try." The boy did so, and 
then found he could pull out his hand with ease. 

Do not grasp at too much, or you may lose all. 



22 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 




I. MY LITTLE DOLL ROSE.— II. TO BABY 



flax-en 

la-dy 

cun-ning 



dol-ly 

re-pose 

cour-te-sy 



dar-lmg 
sup-po«<» 
a-lone 



I have a little doll, 

I take care of her clothes, 
She has soft flaxen hair, 

And her name is Rose. 

She has pretty bke eyes, 
And a very small nose, 



BECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 23 

And a cunning little mouth, 
And her name is Kose. 

I have a little sofa, 

Where my dolly may repose, 
Or sit up like a lady, 

And her name is Eose. 

My doll can move her arms, 

And stand upon her toes, 
Or make a pretty courtesy, 

My darling little Rose. 

How old is your dolly ? 

Very young, I suppose, 
For she cannot go alone, 

My pretty little Kose. 

— -Jlfrs Follen. 



TO BABY. 



Come here and sit upon my knee, 
And give me kisses, one, two, three, 
And tell me, dear, if you love me, 

My Baby. 
Of this I 'm sure that I love you, 
And many, many things I do, 
And nurse and dress, and pet you too, 

My Baby. 



24 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 




THE SILLY LAMB. 



moth-er 


o-pen 


los-ing 


a-gain 


out-side 


sil-ly 


a-mong 


with-out 


shep-herd 


a-loud 


foolish 


quick-ly 


oth-er 


sup-per 


bush-es 



A lamb, who lived in a fold with all the lambs 
and sheep on the farm, said to his mother, 
"Mother, may I not go out of the fold into the 
wide field?" 

" No, my child," said the old sheep ; *' there is a 
wolf out there, and he might see you. The field, 



SECOND BOOK OB 1 READING LESSONS. 25 

you see, is large, and you might be lost there, and 
not find your way back." 

" I do not fear the wolf, and I know I should be 
able to find my way back," said the pert lamb; 
" I hate to be shut up in a fold all day and all 
night." 

" Go, go," said his mother, " play with the other 
Iambs, and frisk your long tail. It will be cut off 
one of these days, and then you will have no tail to 
frisk ; then you will wish for it again." 

" Shall I be wise like you when I lose my tail ? " 
said the lamb. 

" Yes, you will," said the mother sheep ; " lambs 
grow wise when that time comes. How can you 
play when you have no tail to play with ? " 

"That is true," said the lamb, and off he ran to 
play. But he did not play long, for he went to the 
side of the fold to look through at the field, and he 
felt sad that he could not get out. At last, one 
night he found the gate open, and when the sheep- 
dog was not near, he ran out and hid among the 
pushes, 

All the sheep and the lambs in the fold went to 
sleep, but the lamb in the field outside ran and 
jumped in the light of the moon. 

" Oh, this is nice ! " said the lamb ; " I am glad I 
came out of the fold. My mother is not so wise as 
I am, although she has not a tail. Ah ! ah ! an 
old sheep is not so wise as a young lamb." 



26 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

Then he jumped and ran till he was far away 
from the fold, and could not see it. But for a long 
time he could still hear the sheep-dog say " Bow- 
wow." He was close by the fold to watch the sheep. 
He did not know that one lamb had run off, or he 
would have said " Bow-wow," and run to find him. 
At last the moon did not shine, and it grew very 
dark. The lamb said, " I will go to sleep ; " but 
he was cold, for the old sheep was not there to keep 
him warm, and he could not sleep. 

Then he got up and went on, but it was so dark 
that he did not see a bush full of sharp thorns. 
His wool caught in the thorns, and he could not get 
out. He began to cry aloud, and then the wild 
wolf heard him. 

" Ah ! ah ! " said he, * a stray lamb; that will be 
good for me ; " and he gave such a loud howl that it 
made the lamb shake with fear, for he knew what it 
was. 

" Oh, poor me !" he said, "here is the wild wolf ; 
I shall die, and it will be all my own fault, for I 
would not mind what my mother said. Oh, if I 
were only safe back in the fold, I would never 
leave it again." 

Soon the wolf came near ; his howl was loud, for 
it was close by ; but some one else heard the wolf 
howl as well as the silly lamb. It was the dog who 
took care of the fold ; he gave a loud bark, and it 
brought the shepherd with his gun. He, too, heard 



SECOND BOOK OP HEADING LESSONS. 27 

;he lamb cry and the wolf howl, and he ran quickly 
nto the wood. There he found the lamb stuck fast 
n the bush, and he pulled off the sharp thorns, and 
l?poke kind words to him, and took him up in his 
firms, and bore him back to the fold. You may be 
tjure he was glad to be safe again, and to lie down 
oy the side of his mother. 

" How now," said the old sheep, " where have you 
been, you silly young lamb ? " 

" I was so foolish as to go out into the fields," 
3aid the lamb, " and the wild wolf came up to eat 
me." 

"I said he would come," said the old sheep, 
" and you now see how foolish it was of you to go 
out at night," 

"Yes," said the lamb, who still shook with fear, 
1 1 was foolish, but I shall be wise now, for I have 
bad the half of my fleece torn off, and that must be 
Ithe same as losing your tail." 

" I don't know that," said the old sheep, and then 
they both went to sleep. But the lamb did not run 
out of the fold any more, and the wolf had to do 
without any supper that night, and did not like it 
at all. 



28 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 




MY LITTLE CAT AND DOG. 



MY CAT. 

I like little Pussy, her coat is so warm, 

And if I don't hurt her, she '11 do me no harm ; 

So I '11 not pull her tail, nor drive her away, 

But Pussy and I very gently will play. 

She will sit by my side, and I '11 give her some f oo 

And she'll love me because I 'm gentle and good 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 2D 




MY DOG. 

I will not hurt my little dog, 
But stroke and pat his head ; 

I like to see him wag his tail,, 
I like to see him fed. 

Poor little thing, how very good, 

And very useful too ; 
For don't you know that he will mind 

What he is bid to do ? 

Then I will never hurt my dog, 

Nor ever give him pain ; 
But treat him kindly every day, 

And he '11 love me again. 



JH) SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

LITTLE THINGS. 



ship-yard 


rot- ten 


eat-en 


hew-ing 


look-ed 


cap-tain 


worm-y 


num-ber 


fill-ed 


in-crease 


dis-tant 


e-vil 


voy-age 


tini-bera 


af-ter 



Two men were ac work one day in a ship-yard 
They were hewing a piece of timber to put into a 
ship. It was a small piece, and not worth much. 
As they cut off the chips, they found a worm, a 
little worm, in the wood, about half an inch long. 
■ This wood is wormy," said one ; " shall we put it 
in?" 

" I don't know : yes, I think it may go in : it 
will never be seen, of course." 

" Yes ; but there may be other worms in it, and 
these may increase and injure the ship." 

" No, I think not. To be sure the wood is not 
worth much ; but I do not wish to lose it. Come, 
never mind the worm, we have seen but one ; "put 
it in." So the wormy piece of wood was put in. 
The ship was made, and she looked very noble in- 
deed. She went to sea, and for a number of years 
did well. But it was found, on a distant voyage, 
that she grew weak and rotten. Her timbers were 
found to be much, eaten by the worms. The cap- 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 31 

tain thought he would try to get her home ; but 
she sprang a leak. She filled with water, and soon 
after sank, with all the goods and most of the crew 
on board. 

You see that a fine ship and many lives may be 
lost by a little worm ! And how much evil may a 
man do, when he does a small wrong, as he did 
who put the wormy timber into the ship. 



RAIN-DROPS. 

win-dow lock-ed rain-drops 

play-things naugh-ty noth-ing 

Oh where do you come from, 

You little drops of rain ; 
Pitter patter, pitter patter, 

Down the window pane ? 

They won't let me walk, 

And they won't let me play ; 

And they won't let me go 
Out of doors at all to-day. 

They put away my playthings, 

Because I broke them all, 
And then they lock'd up all my bricks, 

And took away my ball. 



32 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

Tell me, little rain-drops, 
Is that the way you play, 

Pitter patter, pitter patter, 
All the rainy day ? 

They say I 'm very naughty, 
So I 've nothing else to do 

But sit here at the window ; 

I should like to play with you. » 

The little rain-drops cannot speak, 
But, u pitter patter pat," 

Means, " We can play on this side • 
Why can't YOU play on that ? " 



THE LAMB, THE BEE, AtfD THE FLY. 

do-ing but-ter-cup cup-board 

be-fore scam-per ex-cept 

mead-ows thirs-ty hun-ger 

dai-sy riv-er with-in 

cow-slip win-ter eat-ing 

THE MERRY LAMB. 

" Little lamb, come here and say, 
What you 're doing all the day ? " 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 33 




" Long enough before you wake, 
Breakfast I am glad to take, 
In the meadows eating up 
Daisy, cowslip, buttercup. 
Then about the fields I play, 
Frisk and scamper all the day ; 
When I 'm thirsty I can drink 
Water at the river's brink : 
When at night I go to sleep, 
By my mother I must keep : 
I am safe enough from cold 
At her side within the fold." 



34 SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 

THE BUSY BEE. 

" Little bee, come here and say, 
What yon 're doing all the day ? " 

" Oh, every day, and all day long, 
Among the flowers you hear my song, 
I creep in every bud I see, 
And all the honey is for me ; 
I take it to the hive with care, 
And give it to my brothers there : 
That when the winter time comes on, 
And all the flowers are dead and gone, 
And when the wind is cold and rough, 
The busy bees may have enough/' 

THE LAZY FLY. 

" Little fly, come here and say ; 
What you 're doing all the day ? '* 

" Oh, I 'm a gay and merry fly, 

I never do anything, no, not I ; 

I go where I like, and I stay where [ please, 

In the heat of the sun, or the shade of the trees : 

On the window pane, or on the cupboard shelf ; 

And I care for nothing except myself. 

I cannot tell, it is very true, 

When the winter comes, what I mean to do : 

And I very much fear when I 'm getting old, 

I shall starve with hunger, or die of cold." 



SECOND BOOK OP BEADING LESSONS. 35 




THE DOG AND THE SHADOW, 
cross-ing ei-ther con-tent 

fan-cied be-yond shad-ow 

din-ner bot-tom snatch-ed 

get-ting greed-y sub-stance 

A dog, crossing a stream, with a piece of meat 
i* his mouth, saw his own shadow in the water, 
which was so still and clear that he fancied the 
shadow he saw to be another dog. 

" Aha ! " said he, "I am in luck this morning, 
I have my breakfast in my mouth, and now 1 11 



36 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

secure my dinner too." With that he snatched at 
the piece of meat which he saw in the snadow. 
But so far from getting the second piece, he dropt 
his own into the water, and was sadly put out to 
see that the other dog had dropt his too. So he 
had to go home without his breakfast or dinner 
either, for his own piece had at once sunk to the 
bottom, away beyond his reach. 

He who is greedy, and grasps at too much, is very 
apt to lose what he has. Be content with what you 
have, even if it be little, and never give up the sub- 
stance for the shadow. 



LITTLE KIT. 



Pretty kit, little kit, 

Oh ! you 're a lovely pet ! 
With your sleek coat, and your white throat, 

And toes as black as jet. 
It 's true your eye is rather green, 

But then it is so bright 
That you could catch the naughty mouse 

That stole my cake last night. 
Ah kitty, sweet kitty, 

You 're the pet for me ! 
Come now, I '11 rock you in my lap 

And nurse you on my knee. 



SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 37 

Pretty kit, little kit, 

Annie's bird can sing, 
Arthur's dog can carry sticks, 

And Mary's parrot swing : 
But, though you do not carry sticks, 

Or sing, or swing, you are, 
With your low purr and your soft fur, 

The dearest pet by far. 
Yes, kitty, sweet kitty, 

You 're the pet for me ! 
Come now, I '11 rock you in my lap 

And nurse you on my knee, y 

Oh ! you kit, naughty kit, 

What is this I find? 
Annie's little bird is gone, 

And Poll 's scratch'd nearly blind ; 
Carlo's coat is sadly torn : 

Oh dear, what shall I do ? 
You 've feathers hanging round your mouth : 

It 's all been done by you ! 
Fie, kitty; fly, kitty! 

You 're no pet for me ; 
I '11 neither rock you in my lap 

Nor nurse you on my knee. 



38 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

I. GOOD KING ARTHUR— II. LITTLE ROBIN 
REDBREAST. 



Ar-thur 


pud-ding 


Red-breast 


ruled 


stuff-ed 


Rob-in 


good-ly 


no-ble-men 


al-most 


bar-ley 


be-sides 


Me-yow 



GOOD KING ABTHUE. 

When good King Arthur ruled this land, 

He was a goodly king ; 
He bought three pecks of barley meal, 

To make a bag-pudding. 

A bag-pudding the king did make, 
And stuff'd it well with plums ; 

And in it put great lumps of fat, 
As big as my two thumbs. 

The king and queen did eat thereof, 

And noblemen beside ; 
And what they could not eat that night, 

The queen next morning fried. 

LITTLE EOBIN EEDBBEAST. 

Little Robin Redbreast 

Sat upon a tree ; 
Up went Pussy cat, 

And down came he. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 



39 



Down came Pussy cat, 
And away Robin ran ; 

Says little Eobin Redbreast, 
" Catch me if you can." 

Little Robin Redbreast 

Jump'd upon a wall ; 
Pussy cat jump'd after him, 

And almost got a fall. 
Little Robin chirp'd and sang, 

And what did Pussy say ? 
Pussy cat said Meyow, 

And Robin jump'd away. 



STORY OF JOSEPH. 

coun-try cat-tie com-ing 

Jo-seph mean-time them-selves 

Ben-ja-min suf-fer eld-est 

col-ors pris-on E-gypt 

jeal-ous for-got trou-ble 

prom-ise fa-ther wick-ed 

Ja-cob host-age a-fraid 



de-ceive 

be-came 

spo-ken 

young-er 

mer-chants 

short-ly 

fam-ine 



In a country far away from here, there once 
lived an old man who had twelve sons. He loved 
them all very much, but he loved two of them more 
than all the rest. The names of these two were 



40 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 




Joseph and Benjamin. He loved Joseph most, and 
for him he made a coat of many colors. The other 
brothers were angry at this, and were jealous of 
Joseph. In that country, their flocks and herds 
were the chief wealth of the people, and as Jacob, 
the old man, had a great many cattle and sheep, 
the brothers were the shepherds, and had to take 
care of them. 

They were once far away with their flocks, and 
as their father had not heard of them for some 
time, he sent Joseph to see how they were. As 
soon as his brothers saw him coming, they said 
among themselves, " Come, let us kill him." But 
his eldest brother said, " No ; let us put him into 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 41 

a deep pit." So when he came to them, they seized 
the poor lad, stript off his coat of many colors, and 
threw him into the pit. 

Shortly after this, they saw some merchants, who 
were going to a country called Egypt, and they 
thought it would be a figpd plan to sell Joseph to 
these people, who would' take him far away, and 
then he would never trouble them again. Thus these 
wicked brothers sold poor Joseph ; but after they 
had done so they were afraid of their father's 
wrath, and so they made up their minds to deceive 
the old man. They took Joseph's coat and dipped 
it in some blood, and then brought it to their 
father, and said that they had found it so, and that 
some wild beast must have killed him. Jacob did 
not doubt what they told him, and wept many days 
for his son Joseph. 

But Joseph, in the meantime, had been taken off 
to Egypt, and was there sold for a slave. He had 
to suffer a great many trials, and was once put in 
prison ; but in all his troubles he never forgot God, 
but prayed to Him and put his trust in Him. At 
last he was brought before the king, and became 
very useful to him, so that he was made ruler over 
the king's house, and then over all the land. All 
this time he had never heard of his poor father, 
and although, he was the first man in Egypt, yet he 
did not forget his poor father, nor did he wish to 
do his brothers any harm. 



42 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

Now, a great famine arose in all those countries, 
and no one had any corn to eat. But Joseph, who 
had been told by God what was to come to pass, 
had laid up great stores, so that every one came to 
him to buy corn. Amongst others Joseph's own 
brothers came, but they did not know him, although 
he knew them at once. ' \Vhen they had got the 
corn, and had gone home again, they were sadly 
afraid, for they found that their money had been 
put back in their sacks. Joseph also had spoken 
to them as if he were angry, and had asked about 
their father and younger brother, and had made 
them promise to bring Benjamin with them 
when they came again. To make sure that they 
would do so, he had also kept one of them as a 
hostage, at which their father was again much 
grieved. 

They soon had to go back to Egypt for more 
corn. So they took Benjamin and more money 
with them, and came with fear to Joseph, and told 
him how they had found their money in their sacks. 
Joseph did not seem to know them, wishing to try 
them, but after a while he told them who he was. 
At this they were much afraid, but he soon told 
them he was not angry, and sent them away happy. 
How noble it was in ' Joseph to forgive his wicked 
brothers ! 

So Joseph sent wagons for Jacob and all his 
people and his goods, and the king gave him a 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSON8. 43 

large tract of country for himself, and there they 
lived with their flocks and herds in peace and 
plenty. 

When Jacob heard that Joseph was still alive he 
could not believe it; but when the wagons came, and 
he and his people were^ken to Egypt, and Jacob 
had seen Joseph again, he cried out, " Now let me 
die, since I have seen thy face, because thou art yet 
alive." 



THE LAMB'S LULLABY. 



un-til 


sum-mer 


peace-ful 


help-less 


lis-ten 


shel-ter-ed 


re-joice 


sooth-ing 


gath-ers 


chil-ly 


e-ven-ing 


a-larms 



lul-Ia-by bit-ter du-ti-ful 

The pretty little lambs that lie 
And sleep upon the grass, 

Have none to sing them lullaby, 
But the night winds as they pass. 

"While I, a happy little maid, 
Bid dear papa good-night, 

And in my crib so warm am laid, 
And tuck'd up snug and tight. 



44 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 




And then some pretty hymn Ann sings, 

Until to sleep I go ; 
But the young helpless lambs, poor things, 

Have none to lull them so. 

Haste, kind mamma, and call them here, 

Where they *11 be warm as I ; 
For in the chilly fields, I fear, 

Before the morn they '11 die. 



MOTHER. 

The lamb sleeps in the fields, 'tis true, 

Without a lullaby ; 
And yet they are as warm as you, 

Beneath a summer sky 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS- 45 



They choose some dry and grassy spot, 
Beneath the shady trees ; 

fcU- it* 



To other songs they listen not 



Than the soothing evening breeze. 

And when the night is bitter cold, 
The s hepherd comes with care, 

And leads them to his peaceful ft)ld ; 
They 're safe and shelter'd there. 

How happy are the lambs, my love, 
How safe and calm they rest ! 

Bat you, a S hepherd have above, 
Of all kind shepherds best. 

His lambs He gathers in His arms, 

And in His bosom bears ; 
How blest, how safe from all alarms, 

Each child His love who shares 1 

Oh, if you '11 be His gentle child, 

And listen to His voice, 
Be loving, dutiful, and mild, 

How will mamma rejoice ! 

— Mary Lundie Duncan. 



4-6 SECOND BOOK OF AFADING LESSONS. 




ALFKED AND HIS GARDEN. 

Al-fred watch-ed emp-ty 

An-nie rath-er wis-er 

gar-den dan-cing sun-shine 

fall-ing doc-tor wher-ev-er 

plant-ing cro-cus win-ter 

put-ting yel-low sis-ter 

flow-ers drag-ging weath-er 

re-plied blos-soms tu-lips 

Last year, when the leaves were falling off the 
trees, Alfred and Annie went to see their aunt, who 
lives in an old farmhouse, and who has a very large 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 47 

garden. They found her very busy planting roots 
in the garden, and putting them in with much care. 
" Why do you plant those old dead roots, aunt ? " 
said Alfred. " They are not dead, Alfred," his aunt 
replied, " they will bear fine flowers in the spring, if 
the frost does not kill them. I will give you some 
for your garden if you like." " Oh, thank you/ 
aunt/' said Alfred, for he loved new flowers for his 
garden ; and he watched his aunt that he might 
know how to plant them. 

" Would you like some, too, Annie ? " asked the 
kind aunt. " No, thank you," said Annie, who was 
very young — too young to know that roots could 
come to flowers. " I would rather have a bunch of 
those pretty big flowers, and I will plant them when 
I get home." " They will die," said Alfred, " for 
they have no roots." " I don't want roots," said 
Annie ; and so her aunt gave her the flowers. 
* Annie will be wiser next year, Alfred," she said ; 
" ' live and learn,' you know." 

So Alfred and Annie went home, and were busy 
planting till bedtime ; and when Annie called her 
mother to look, there was her garden full of gay 
flowers, but they had stalks and no roots ; Alfred's 
made no show, but the roots were lying under the 
mould, and Alfred could wait. " Come and look 
at my garden in spring, mother," he said. 

When the spring came, and the April winds had 
dried up the wet soil, and. May sunshine came out 



48 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

by fits and starts, Alfred went to see if his toots 
were showing signs of life. The bright green leaves 
were just coming out on the trees, the birds were 
busy with their nests, the wind was soft and 
sweet, and there was a smell of flowers in the air. 
Alfred felt as if his heart were dancing with joy, 
the spring made him so glad ; when he came to his 
little garden he found, wherever he had planted a 
root, a bright green bud was coming up, or else 
there was a bunch of narrow green leaves, or a long 
flower- bud, with a white nightcap on it. The first 
were tulips : the long green leaves were snowdrops ; 
and the flower with a nightcap was a crocus. 
" How gay my garden will be ! " said Alfred ; " and 
there is Annie's without a flower." 

Now, Annie had been so ill in the winter, that she 
had grown quite pale and thin, and the doctor said 
she must not go out till May, for then the weather 
would be mild. When Alfred thought of his poor pale 
little sister, he was sorry her garden looked so empty, 
and he thought to himself, " Suppose I weed it for 
her ;* so he pulled up the weeds and raked it over. 
Then he thought, " Suppose I put some of my roots 
in it;" so he dug up some roots with plenty of 
mould round them, and planted them in Annie's 
garden. And when he had dug up and planted the 
snowdrops, he thought he could spare the cr ocu ses ; 
and when he had planted the crocuses, he said, 
" There is just room for the tulips." So Alfred's 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 49 

garden was soon empty, and Annie's was quite full, 
but Alfred was not sorry ; he felt quite happy to 
think how pleased his little sister would be. It 
was a bright May day when Annie came out, and 
Alfred drew her gently along the paths in a little 
garden-chair. He had never told what he had done 
to any one, but his mother had seen it, and she 
loved her boy for being so kind to his sister. 
" Why, Alfred," said Annie, when they came to his 
garden, " where are your roots that were to turn to 
flowers?" "Here they are, Annie," said Alfred, 
dragging her along to her own garden, "they have all 
»un away from me, and are come to live with you ! " 
Then Annie threw her arms about Alfred's neck 
and said, " Thank you, my dear, dear brother, you 
are very kind. I never saw anything more lovely 
than your flowers." S 



I. JENNY WREN.— II. THE YOUNG 




NESTLINGS. 


nest-lings 


gap-ing prop-er catch-ing 


Jen-ny 


some-thing hop-ped fam-i-ly 


plain-ly 


reck-on know-ing pleased 


down-y 


dain-ty fold-ed some-bod-y 


enug-ly 


re-turns search-ed sel-dom 




JENNY WEEN. 




Jenny Wren fell sick 




Upon a merry time ; 



50 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

In came Robin Redbreast 

And brought her sops of wine. 

Eat well of the sops, Jenny, 
Drink well of the wine : 

Thank you, Robin, kindly, 
You shall be mine. 

Jenny she got well 

And stood upon her feet, 

And told Robin plainly, 
She loved him not a bit. 

Robin, being angry, 

Hopp'd on a twig, 
Saying, Out upon you, 

Fye upon you, bold-faced jig. 



THE YOUNG NESTLINGS. 

Did you ever see the nest 

Of a robin or a linnet, 
When the little downy birds 

Are lying snugly in it, 

Gaping wide their yellow mouths 
For something nice to eat ? 

Snail, or slug, or worm, or grub 
They reckon dainty meat. 



6EC0ND BOOK OF HEADING LESSONS. 



51 




When the mother-bird returns, 
And finds them still and good, 

She will give them, each by turns, 
A proper share of food. 

She has hopp'd from spray to spray, 
And peep'd with knowing eye 

Into all the folded leaves, 
Where worms and grubs do lie. 

She has search'd among the grass, 
And flown from tree to tree, 

Catching gnats and flies, to feed 
Her little familv. 



52 SECOND BOOK OP BEADING LESSONS. 

I have seen the robins chirp 
And shake their downy wings ; 

They are pleased to see her come, 
And pleased with what she brings 

But I never saw them look 
In a hurry for their food ; 

Somebody, at dinner time, 
Is seldom quite so good. 



I. THE FOX AND THE GOAT.— II. THE 
HONEST BOY. 



parch-ed 


hear-ing 


hob-ble 


trem-bled 


craft-y 


pleas-ant 


want-ed 


leav-ing 


trot-ted 


Rey-nard 


an-swer 


chil-dren 


trust-ed 


cun-ning 


rea-son 



THE FOX AND THE GOAT. 

One hot summer day, a fox parched with thirsfc 
tried, in vain, to find some water. At last he came 
to a well, and in trying to get at the water tumbled 
into it. 

He had now more water than he wanted, although 
the water was not very deep ; and when he had 
drunk his fill, he cast about to see how he could 



SECOND BOOK OP EEADING LESSONS. 53 




get out again. But the sides of the well were so 
steep that he could not climb up. 

After he had thus been in the well for some time, 
a goat came to the brink wanting to get some water 
also. So he asked the fox if the water was good. 

" Good ! " said Beynar d, " ay, so good that I am 
afraid I have taken too much of it." 

The goat, upon hearing this, without more ado, 
leaped in ; and the crafty fox jumped on the poor 
goat's back, and so got out, leaving his poor dupe at 
the bottom of the well to shift for himself. 

" Ah," said the goat, " what a pity I did not think 
how sly and cunning the fox is before I trusted his 
lying words, and I might have saved myself from 
this hobble ! " 



o'4 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

THE HONEST BOY. 

At one time lived a little boy 

With curly hair and pleasant eye, 

A boy who always told the truth, 
And never, never told a lie. 

And when he trotted off to school, 

The little children all would cry, 
" There goes the curly-headed boy, 

The boy that never tells a lie." 
And everybody loved him so, 

Because he always told the truth, 
That every day, as he grew up, 

'Twas said, " There goes the honest youth. 
And when the people that stood near 

Would turn to ask the reason why, 
The answer would be always this, 

•'Because he never tells a lie.'' 



I. TWO UNKIND GOATS.— II. TWO KIND 
GOATS, 
mo-ment will-ing safe-ly 

an-oth-er mid-die crouch-ed 

be-tween drown-ed soft-ly 

nei-ther jour-ney un-kind 

TWO UNKIND GOATS. 

Two goats, who had long fed in the same 
meadow, set out to take a journey across the moun- 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 55 

tains. One goat went one way, and the other went 
another way. 

After some time they met again, but a stream of 
water ran between them ; and over the stream was 
laid a plank of wood, so narrow that there was only 
just room for one goat to cross at a time. 

Now these goats were proud, and neither of them 
was willing to let the other cross first. " I have as 
good a right to the bridge as you have," said the 
one. " The bridge was as much made for me as 
for you," said the other. 

Thus they did nothing but dispute for some time, 
until at last one goat set his foot on the plank, and 
the other did the same. They looked very fierce at 
eiach other, as much as to say, " I will go on in spite 
of you." 

And so they did; but when they met in the 
middle, there was no room for them to pass ; so 
they both slipt into the water and were drowned. 

-WO KIND GOATS. 

Two kind goats always lived in peace, and tried 
/o help each other. One goat was ill, and the other 
1 brought him green herbs from a field far off ; the 
sick goat ate the herbs and they cured him. 

The other goat had a pretty little kid, which she 
loved dearly. One day when the goat had gone 
out, a rude boy came to take the kid ; but the goat 
that had been ill, and was cured by the herbs, poked 



56 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 




the boy with his horns until he ran away, and he 
took good care of the kid till its mother came home. 

Once when these two goats were out on a journey 
they met in the middle of a very narrow bridge, 
just as the two unkind goats did, but they did 
not push each other into the water. No ! They 
stood still a moment looking at each other ; then 
one of them crouched down on the bridge, and let 
the other walk over his back. 

You may be sure that the goat wlio had to walk 
on the other, took care to step softly, and not to 
hurt so kind a friend. 

Thus they both got safely over the bridge ; and 
all who knew them loved the two kind goats. 



PART II. 




THE FAIRY RING. 



sport-ing 
aea-sons 



cir-cle 
au-tumn 



tress-es 
fast-er 



Let us laugh aud let us sing, 
Dancing in a merry ring ; 



58 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

We '11 be fairies on the green, 
Sporting round the Fairy Queen. 

Like the seasons of the year, 
Round we circle in a sphere ; 
I '11 be summer, you '11 be spring, 
Dancing in a fairy ring. 

Harry will be winter wild ; 
Little Charlie autumn mild ; 
Summer, autumn, winter, spring, 
Dancing in a fairy ring. 

Spring and summer glide away, 
Autumn comes with tresses gray ; 
Winter, hand in hand with spring 
Dancing in a fairy ring. 

Faster, faster, round we go, 
While our cheeks like roses_glow, 
Free as birds upon the wing, 
Dancing in a fairy ring. 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 



59 




THE BOY AND THE CROW. 

shin-ing flap-ping mas-ter 

sweet-ly loud-er heav-y 

bun-die of-ten un-der 

fel-low clev-er soft-er 

laugh-ing twen-ty turn-ing 

your-self high-est look-ing 

" I will not go to school," said little Tommy ; 
' I will stay in the fields and play all day long." 

It was the first of May, and the sun was shining, 
and the air smelt sweetly as it does in spring ; so 
X'ommy sat down on a soft bank under a tree, and 
Vhrew his books to one side. 

" I will not go to school," he said again ; " this 



60 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

bank is softer than the form at school, and I lik* 
to see the lambs and flowers better than books and 
slates." 

Just as he said this, he looked up into a tree, an! 
saw an old crow sitting there, and close by him a 
nest very much like a bundle of sticks. 

" Here 's a pretty fellow," said the crow ; " h« 
says he won't go to school. Here 's a pretty dunce;* 1 
and all the crows began to say, "Caw S caw I caw!" 
as if they were laughing at Tommy. 

"What! you do not like work?" said the cro\ 
again. " you idle boy ; you are worse than \, 
bird. Do you think I am idle ? Look at my nest ; 
what do you think of it ?" 

" I daresay it is a very nice one," said Tommy 
" but I should not like to live in it." 

"No, because you are only a boy, and not so 
wise as a crow," said his new friend ; and all the 
crows cried, " Caw ! caw ! caw ! " again, as if they 
thought so too. 

" Do you know why a crow is wiser than a silly 
boy?" asked the crow, putting his head on one 
side, and looking down at Tommy with his bright 
black eye. 

" No," said Tommy ; " I thought boys were wiser 
than crows." 

"You thought!" paid the crow; "a great deal 
you know about it. Can you build a house £ 
yourself, pray?" 



3* 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 61 

" No," said Tommy ; " but when I am a man I 
hall be able." 

" And why can't you do it now ?" said the crow, 
turning his head to the other side, and looking at 
Tommy with the other eye. 

" Why, I have not learnt," said the little boy. 

" Ho, ho !" said the crow, flapping his wings 
and hopping round and round. " He must learn 
bo build a house, this wise fellow ! Here 's a pretty 
boy — here 's a wise boy ! " 

All the crows, when they heard this, flapped their 
wings too, and cried " Caw ! caw ! caw ! " louder 
;han before. 

" No one taught me to build my house/' said the 
trow, when they were quiet again. " I knew how 
to do it at once ; and look what a nice house it is. 
I. brought all the sticks that it is made of myself. 
I flew through the air with them in my mouth — 
some of them were very heavy, but I do not mind 
hard work. I am not like a little boy I know." 
And the crow shook his head and looked so hard 
at Tommy, that he felt as if his master were looking 
at him, and was quite afraid. 

" But there are other things in the world besides 
louses," said Tommy. 

" Yes, indeed," said the crow. " I was just think- 
ing so. You want clothes, as well as a house." 

" That we do," said Tommy, " and new ones very 
iften ; but you birds can't wear clothes." 



62 SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 

" Who told you that ? " said the crow, in a very 
sharp tone. " Look at my coat, if you please, and 
tell me if you ever saw a finer suit of black than 
mine. Could you make yourself such a suit ? " 

" No," said Tommy, " but I can learn." 

" Yes, yes, you can learn ; but that is the way 
with you silly boys. You must learn everything, 
and yet you are too idle to set about it." 

Tommy felt that the crow had the best of it. 
" Dear me," he said to himself, " I never thought 
crows were so wise and clever." 

" You may well say that," said the crow, coming 
down on a bough a little nearer to Tommy ; " but 
there is more for you to learn yet. How about 
your food, Master Tom? Who gives you your food ?" 

" Why, mother does, to be sure," said Tommy. 

" You are a baby, then ? " 

" No, indeed, I am not," said Tommy ; "and I will 
throw a stone at you if you say I am." 

" Boys should never throw stones," said the crow, 
gravely. " We never throw stones ; it is a very fool- 
ish trick. I only asked if you were a baby, because 
when a crow can go alone, he finds his own food." 

"I shall do that when I am grown up," said 
Tommy. " I shall then learn how." 

" Dear me," said the crow, " you have a great deal 
to learn before you can be as wise as a orow." 

" That is true," said Tommy, hanging his head ; 
" but there is plenty of time." 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 63 

u I am not so sure of that," said the crow. " You 
are as big as twenty crows, anfl yet you are not as 
wise as one. A pretty fellow to come and lie on 
the grass all day, when you are such a dunce. Go 
to school ! go to school ! go to school ! " All the 
crows took up the cry, and made such a noise, that 
Tommy picked up his books to throw at them ; but 
they flew up into the highest tree, and cried out, 
" Caw ' caw ! caw ! " till Tommy could bear it no 
longer. He put his hands over his ears, and ran 
off to school as hard as he could. He was just in 
time, and did his lessons well, and went home quite 
happy, for his master said that he had been a good 
boy. 

As he passed by the tree, the old crow was sit- 
ting there, but did not look at Tommy. " Come, 
come," said Tommy, " do not be cross, old friend, 
I threw my book at you, because I was cross with 
myself for being idle and foolish." But the crow 
looked as if he had not said a word in his life, and 
had never seen Tommy before. 

So the little boy went home and told his mother ; 
but she said birds did not talk, and he must have 
been to sleep and dreamt it. But Tommy does not 
think so ; and when he feels idle he always says to 
himself, " Come, come, Master Tommy, you must 
work hard, for you are not yet as wise as an old 
black crow." 



64 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 




I. MY LITTLE BROTHER— II. THE BLIND 
BOY. 



smil-ing 

hon-ey 

mead-ow 



for-get-ting 

bless-ings 

won-drous 



a-wake 
al-ways 
de-stroy 



MY LITTLE BROTHER. 

Little brother, darling boy, 
You are very dear to me ; 

I am happy, full of joy, 

When your smiling face I see. 



SECOND BOOK OF EEADING LESSONS. 65 

How I wish that you could speak, 

And could know the words I say I 
Pretty stories I would seek, 
*u*^ To amuse you all the day. 

All about the honey-bees, 

Plying past us in the sun; 
Birds that sing among the trees, 

Lambs that in the meadow run 

I '11 be very kind to you, 

Never strike or make you cry, 

As some naughty children do, 
Quite forgetting God is nigh. 

Shake your rattle — here it is — 

Listen to its merry noise ; 
And when you are tired of this, 

I will bring you other toys. 

— Mary Lundie Duncar, 

THE BLIND BOY. 

O say what is the thing call'd light, 

Which I must ne'er enjoy ? 
"What are the blessings of the sight ? 

tell your poor blind boy. 

You talk of wondrous things you see, 
You say the sun shines bright ; 



66 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

I feel him warm, but how can he 
Or make it day or night ? 

My day or night myself I make, 
Whene'er I sleep or play ; 

And could I always keep awake, 
With me 'twere always day. 

Then let not what I cannot have, 
My cheer of mind destroy ; 

While thus I sing, I am a king, 
Although a poor blind boy. 






I. THE CROW AND THE PITCHER.— II. THE 
CAT AND THE CREAM-JUG. 

pitch-er wis-dom fin-ish-ed 

ef-forts in-clined con-tents 

re-sult jump-ed hearth-rug 

la-bor in-stead man-age 

THE CROW AND THE PITCHER. 
A crow, that was very thirsty, flew to a pitcher, 
hoping to find some water in it. Water there 
was, but so little of it that, with all her efforts, the 
poor crow could not so much as wet the tip of her 
bill. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 



67 




*« Never mind," said the crow to herself, " where 
there's a will there's a way." A bright thought 
came into her little black head : she could not reach 
down to the water, but she might make the water 
rise up to her. 

The crow picked up a pebble, and dropt it into 
the pitcher; another, and then another. And as 
each one sank to the bottom, the water rose 
higher. 

Before the crow had dropt in ten pebbles, she 
began to see the results of her labor, and she soon 



68 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

drank, at her ease, of the water which, but for her 
wisdom, she would never have been able to reach. 

THE CAT AND THE CKEAM-JUG. 

One day, a jug of cream had been left on the 
table, and puss, who had been lying snugly on the 
hearth-rug, was left in the room alone. Now, puss 
was inclined to seize any good thing that she could 
lay her paws on, and although she had often been 
made to suffer for it, yet she never seemed to 
mind. 

This was too good a chance to be lost, so puss 
jumped up on the table ; but what was her distress 
when she found that the neck of the jug was so 
small that she could not manage to get her head 

into it ! 

"Must* I upset it?" said puss. "No, that will 
never do, for I have before now been made to suffer 
for doing such things, and besides I should lose a 
good deal of that fine rich cream." 

At last a bright thought came into her head, and 
instead of trying to get her head in, she dipped her 
paw into the cream, and then licked it, until she had 
finished all the contents of the jug. 

So puss curled herself up on the hearth-rug again 
as nicely as you please, and thought it was quite true; 
that " where there 's a will there 's a way." 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 69 

I. DIRTY TIM.— II. SING A SONG OF 
SIXPENCE. 



re-port-ed 


de-cent 


glad-ly 


dis-grace 


sel-dom 


count-ing-house 


six-pence 


o-pen-ed 


par-lor 


black-birds 


dain-ty 


hon-ey 



DIRTY TIM. 

There was one little Tim. 

'Twas reported of him, 
And 'twill be to his lasting disgrace, 

That he never was seen 

With his hands at all clean, 
Nor ever yet wash'd was his face. 

His friends were much hurt 

To see so much dirt, 
And often they made him quite clean; 

But all was in vain, 

He was dirty again, 
And never was fit to be seen. 

When to wash he was sent, 

Never gladly he went, 
With water he 'd splash himself o'er ; 

But he seldom was seen, 

To wash himself clean, 
And often look'd worse than before. 



SECOND BOOK OF EEADING LESSONS, 

The idle and bad, 

Like this little lad, 
May be dirty and black, to be sure ; 

But good boys are seen 

To be decent and clean, 
Although they are ever so poor. 

SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE. 

Sing a song of sixpence, 

A bag full of rye ; 
Four and twenty blackbirds 

Baked in a pie. 

When the pie was open'd, 
The birds began to sing ; 

Was not that a dainty dish 
To set before the king ? 

The king was in his counting-house. 
Counting out his money ; 

The queen was in the parlor, 
Eating bread and honey ; 

The maid was in the garden, 
Hanging out the clothes, 

Out came a little bird 
And snapt off her nose. 



SECOND BOOK OF EEADING LESSONS. 71 



SUSY'S LITTLE SERVANTS.— II. THINGS 




TO BE KEPT IN MIND. 


per-haps 


rose-leaves shov-el 


use-less 


no-tice din-ner 


cous-ins 


rest-less puz-zled 


as-cent 


use-ful-ly era-ploy-ment 


bo-sonis 


cheer-ful-ly .scrip-ture 



busy's little seevants. 

Little Susy had a kind mother to take care of 
her, so you will perhaps wonder why she had a 
great many servants of her own. I shall tell you 
of only a very few, and then you can ask your 
mother to talk to you about the others. For the 
little servants Susy had you have too. 

When first she was born, she did not know what 
they were for, or where they were. They did not 
know either, and so they were useless. Two of 
them were black, and so much alike, that you could 
not tell the one from the other. Susy kept them 
almost always shut up, so that nobody could see 
them. When her aunts and cousins came to see 
Susy, they would say : " I should think she might 
let us see them !" and would go away quite vexed. 
These black servants were bright little things, and 
they soon learned to amuse Susy a great deal. One 
of the first things they did for her was to let her 
see the fire, and that she thought very pretty. 



72 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

Susy had another pair of twins for her servants, 
who knew so little what they were for, that they 
used to slap and scratch her face. Her mother said 
she should have to tie them up, if they did so. But 
though they did not know how to behave, they were 
very pretty, tiny things, like rose-leaves, or anything 
else soft and pink you can think of. 

Susy had another pair of twins that she took no 
notice of for some months. They did not learn how 
to wait upon her so soon as some of the others did. 
They were restless little fat things, seldom still a 
moment, and almost all they knew was how to kick 
holes in her socks. 

Susy had still another pair of twins that were 
very useful, for without them she would never have 
heard her mother sing, or her father whistle, or the 
shovel and tongs fall down and make such an alarm- 
ing noise, nor the pussy-cat say " mew ! " nor the 
doggie say "bow-wow !" 

She had one more little servant that she kept out 
of sight all the time. All it was good for at first 
was to help her to a good many breakfasts, and 
dinners, and suppers, every day. But it became 
good for a great deal more after a while. 

If I go on in this way, I 'm afraid you will be 
much puzzled. So if you will guess the names of 
these servants of Susy's, I will give you three 
guesses, and if you do not guess right the third 
time, you will have to peep into the glass, where 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 73 

you will see most of your own that I have talked 
about. 

THINGS TO BE KEPT IN MIND. 

Little knees should lowly bend 

At the time of prayer ; 
Little thoughts to heaven ascend , 

To our Father there. 

K ' 

Little hands should usefully 

In_ employment move ; 
Little feet should cheerfully 

Rud on works of love. 

Little tongues should speak the truth,. 

As by Scripture taught ; 
Little lips should ne'er be l oath 

To confess a fault. 

Little ears should listen to 

All the Bible says ; 
Little bosoms throb to do 

What the Lord will plea R p. 

Little infants dying go 

To the world above ; 
And our souis shall join them too, 

If we Jesus loVe. 



74 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 




LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD. 

village woodcutters pil-low mis-take 

grand-ma ciy-il 



vel-vet 

nice-ly 

late-ly 

but-ter 

bas-ket 



sniff-ed 

child-like 

wo-man 

night-cap 

night-gown 



cur-tains 

lick-ing 

wait-ing 

pluck- ing 

po-sey 

hunts-man 



sneez-ed 

grand-child 

tap-ped 

nod-ded 

cress-es 

sip-ped 



Far away in the heart of the country, near a 
pretty village, there once lived a little girl. She 
was one of the sweetest and best children you evei 

saw. 

Her mother loved her dearly, and her grand 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. lh 

mother was very fond of her too. Grandma had 
given her darling a little hood of red velvet, and 
this became her so well, that every one who knew 
her always called her by the name of Little Red 
Riding-Hood. 

Well, one day her mother baked a batch of cakes, 
and she said to Red Riding-Hood : — 

"I hear your poor grandma has not been well 
lately ; so I want you to go, like a good child, to 
see if she is any better. Take this cake and a pot 
of butter with you." 

Little Red Riding-Hood, who was a dear willing 
child, put the things into a basket with great care, 
and off she set. The house in which her grandma 
lived was on the other side of a thick wood. 

On ran little Red Riding-Hood ; but, just as she 
came to the wood, what should she meet but a great 
ugly wolf. The wolf would have liked to have 
eaten her up then and there ; but you must know, 
there were some wood-cutters hard by, and they 
would soon have killed him in turn. 

So the wolf trotted up to the little girl, and said 
as softly as he could, " Good morning, Little Red 
Riding-Hood." 

" Good morning, Master Wolf," said she. 

" And where may you be going so early? " he asked. 

" Oh, I 'm going to grandma's," said Little Red 
Riding-Hood ; for she thought there was no harm 
in being civil. 



76 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

" Indeed ! And what have you got in the bas- 
ket, my pretty maid ? " asked the wolf, as he sniffed 
and sniffed at the lid. 

" Oh/' said she, "only a cake and a pot of butter* 
for my granny is ill, you know." 

" Dear me ! " cried the wolf, " and where does she 
live, pray ? " 

" Down by the mill, through the wood," said she. 

" Well, if that 's the case," said the wolf, " I don't 
mind going and seeing her too. I shall go by the 
road, now, you take the path through the Wood, and 
let us see who will be there first." 

Away went the wolf, and he made all haste, as 
you may guess. Sure enough he stood at granny's 
door in a very short time. 

Thump, thump went the wolf at the door. 

" Who 's there ? " cried out grandma, from within. 

Then the wolf said, in a small, child-like voice, 
" It 's only Little Ked Riding-Hood ; and I 've 
brought you a cake and a pot of butter from 
mother." 

So grandma, who was in bed, cried out, " Pull the 
.string, my dear, and it will lift the latch." 

This the great ugly wolf did, and in he went. As 
soon as he was in, he fell on the poor old woman, 
and ate her up in a trice. Next, he shut the door, 
put on grandma's night-cap and night-gown, and 
got into the bed. Then he drew the curtains quifc^ 
close, and hid his head on the pillow. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 77 

There the ugly wolf lay, how merry you can't 
think, licking his lips, and waiting for Little Ked 
Riding-Hood. 

All this while she toddled on through the wood, 
here plucking a wild flower, there picking some 
nice berries for her grandma. Then down she sat 
on a mossy bank to sort her flowers, red, blue, and 
yellow. 

In a little while a wasp came up to her. He 
buzzed about, and at last dropped on Red Riding- 
Hood's posey of flowers. 

" Sip away, my poor little wasp ; and take as 
much honey as you like," said Little Red Riding- 
Hood. 

The wasp hummed his thanks, as he flew from 
flower to flower ; and when he had sipped enough 
away he sped. 

Soon a little wren hopped up, and he began to 
peck, with his wee bill at a berry. " Peck away, my 
little wren, as much as you like, only leave enough 
for grandma and me," said Riding-Hood. 

" Tweet, tweet," said the wee wren, for " Thank 
you." So he ate his fill, and away he flew. 

Now Little Red Riding-Hood thought it was high 
time for her to get on her way, so she picked up her 
basket and set off. Soon she came to a brook, and 
there she saw an old woman, bent almost double. 

" What are you looking for, Goody ? " said the 
little stirl. 



78 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

" For water- cress es, my pretty chick," said she ; 
" and a poor trade it is, let me tell you/' 

Little Red Riding-Hood gave Goody a bit of 
cake, saying, "Sit down, Goody, and eat. I will 
pick the water-cresses for you." So the old woman 
sat down and ate the cake, while Riding-Hood got 
a heap of cresses. 

" There 's a dear ! " said Goody. " Now, if you 
meet the Green Huntsman on your way, tell him 
there 's game in the wind." 

That she would ; and away went Red Riding- 
Hood, but when she looked round, the old woman 
was gone. 

Little Red Riding-Hood looked everywhere for 
the Green Huntsman, but she could not see him, 
until at last, just as she was passing a still pool, she 
met him. He was all green from top to toe, so that 
she could not mistake him. v 

" Good morning, Master Huntsman/' said little 
Red Riding- Hood. "The old water-cress woman 
bade me tell you that there 's game in the wind." 

The Green Huntsman nodded, but said nothing. 
He bent his ear to the ground, strung his bow and 
fitted an arrow, while Little Red Riding-Hood 
toddled away, trying to think what it could all mean. 

In a short time she got to her grandma's house, 
and she tapped at the door. 

" Who *s there ? " cried the wolf from within, in 
a queer, gruff sort of voice, 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 72 

" It 's only your grandchild, Red Riding-Hood ; 
and I 've brought you a nice cake and a pot of fresh 
butter from mother." 

Then said the wolf more mildly, " Pull the string, 
my dear, and it will lift the latch." So she did as 
she was bid, and in she went. 

Now the wolf hid his head under the bedclothes, 
and said, " Put the cake and pot of butter on the 
shelf, my pet, and then come and help me to get 
up." 

WeL, kittle Red Riding-Hood did so, but when 
she came up to help her grandma, and drew back 
the curtains, she could not m^ke out how her grand- 
ma had got so ugly. So shf? said, 

'• Dear me, grandma, what long arms you 've got !" 

" The better to hug you, ray dear." 

" But, grandma, what great eyes you 've got i " 

" The better to see yow; my child." 

" But, grandma, what big teeth you 've got ! " 

" The better to eat you up," said the wolf, as he 
got ready to make a spring on her. 

But, at that moment, the wasp, who had come 
into the house along with Riding-Hood, stung the 
wolf on the nose, so that he sneezed and sneezed 
again. 

Then the little wren, who was sitting on the 
window-sill, when he heard this, said, " Tweet, 
tweet ! " 

And the Green Huntsman, who was outside, 



80 SECOND BOOK OF HEADING LESSONS. 

hearing the wren, let fly his arrow, and it struck 
the wolf through the heart, and killed him on the 
spot. 

Sweet Little Red Riding-Hood's mother 

Ties on hex scarlet hood, 
And sends her with gifts to her grandam, 

All through the lonely wood. 

The midsummer sun, through the green boughs, 

Sent gleams of dancing light, 
And the child ran hither and thither, 

Gathering the blossoms bright. 

A little wren follows her footsteps ; 

A wolf creeps slyly near ; 
But she hears the axe of the woodman, 

And greets him without fear. 

He wins her to tell him her errand ; 

Then slyly steals away ; 
When Red Riding-Hood lingers longer 

"With butterflies at play. 

To her grandmother's lowly dwelling 

The wolf is gone meanwhile ; 
And the lonely woman has perish'd, 

The victim of his guile. 

The fair child taps at her grandam's door, 
Half wearied now with play ; 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 81' 

* Pull the string and the latch will come up," 
She hears a gruff voice say. 

It 

She enters and lays aside her hood ; 

And cries in wild surprise, ^— -^ <~~o 
" grandam, what long sharp teeth you have ! 

And ah ! what fearful eyes ! " 

The wolf would have kill'd her ; but shrilly 

Her loud cry pierced the wood ; 
And the brave woodman came and slew him, 

And saved Red Riding-Hood. -w^, uj/&. 



i THE BOB 0' LINK AND THE MOWER— 
It ROBIN REDBREAST AND JENNY WREN. 



tin-kle 


mak-ing 


hov-er 


cur-rant 


Mis-ter 


clat-ter 


scent-ed 


gold-finch 


Nink-um 


both-er 


dain-ti-ly 


pea-cock 


Link-um 


clo-ver 


gal-lant 


ap-point 


prith-ee 


un-heed-ing 


re-quest-ing 


blush-ed 


mat-ter 


bloom-ing 


dear-est 


de-clared 



THE BOB 0' LINK AND THE MOWEB 

Tinkle, tinkle, Mister Ninkum, 
I am a merry Bob o' Linkum ; 
Prithee, tell me what 's the matter, 
That you 're making such a clatter ; 



82 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

2* 




Can't you let us honest folks 
Sing our songs and crack our jokes ? 
It is cruel, Mister Ninkum, 
Thus to bother Bob o' Linkum. 
I had thought the meadovTmine, 
With its blossoms all so fine ; 
And I made my little nest 
Near the clover all so blest. 

But you come, naughty Ninkum ! 
All unheeding Bob"b ; Linkumf^' 
And you swing your saucy blade, 
Where my little nest is made ; 
And you cut the bloom ing clover, 
Which did wrap mp young ones ovei 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 83 

Get you gone, naughty Ninkum ! 
Leave the field to Bob o* Linkum ; 
Let him on his light wing hover 
O'er the summer's scented clover : 
Let him sing his merry song, 
And he '11 thank you all day long. 

— Fagots for the Fireside. 
JL 

ROBIN REDBREAST AND JENNY WREN. 

'Twas once upon a time, 

When Jenny Wren was young, 
So daintily she danced, 

And so prettily she sung ; 
Robin Kedbreast lost his heart, 

For he was a gallant bird ; 
He doff'd his hat to Jenny Wren, 

Requesting to be heard. 

dearest Jenny Wren, 

If you will but be mine, 
Then you shall feed on cherry-pie, 
And drink new currant wine ; 

1 '11 dress you like a goldfinch, 

Or any peacock gay ; 
So, dearest Jen, if you 11 be mine, 
Let us appoint the day. 

Jenny blush'd behind her fan, 

And thus declared her mind : 
Since, dearest Bob, I love you wellj 

I take your offer kind ; 



84 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

Cherry-pie is very nice, 

And so is currant wine *, ■/$ *^- 
But I must wear my plain brown gown, 

And never go too fine. 

Kobin Redbreast rose betimes s^, f^-*l 

All at the break of day, 
And he flew to Jenny Wren's house, 

And sung a merry lay. 
He sung of Robin Redbreast 

And little Jenny Wren ; 
And when he came unto the end, 

He then began again. 



J 



SUSY'S DINNER PARTY. 


won-der 


be-haved 


some-thing 


sau-cer 


greed-y 


qui-et-ly 


pud-ding 


comb-ed 


of-fer-ed 


wait-ing 


brush- ed 


ev-e-ry 



Susy thought she would give a dinner party 
among her friends. So, when they had come in 
from their walk, Susy said it was time for their 
party to begin. 

You will wonder who were to join the party, so 
I may as well tell you at once. No less than her 
little brother Robbie and all the Dolls — old and 
young. And a nice little party it was, I can tell you. 



SECOND BOOK OF KEADING LESSONS. 85 




Susy laid out her own table, and set a cup and 
saucer for each ; also a plate and spoon for each. 
Then she brought out of the cupboard such lots of 
nice things that mother had given her. First, there 
were cake and toast, and a nicely cut orange ; then, 
there were apple-pie and plum-pudding and some 
candies. 

Well, they were all waiting — little Robbie and the 
Dolls ; so Susy set to and made the " milk-tea," as 
she called it. After that they all sat down together 
— Susy and the new wax doll at the head of the 
table, and Robbie, with old Peggy without a nose, 
and black Dinah at the foot. 

Oh, what a nice feast, and what a nice party to 
eat it all up. 



86 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

Kobbie behaved like a gentleman. He drank his 
tea and ate his cake and apple-pie without being 
greedy, and then he didn't pull or knock things 
about, you know. 

The Dollies, too, were very good. They did not 
fall over on their faces, as some ill-bred Dollies do ; 
nor slip from their chairs ; nor push each other. 

Well, just as they all began to enjoy themselves, 
who should pop in but Mushy ! Now Mushy was 
a shaggy little dog ; and as he never combed or 
brushed himself, he was not told to come. But, as 
he thought something nice was going on, in he came 
by himself. 

Susy, like a lady, gave him a seat at the table, 
but he would not sit quietly on his hind legs at all, 
Susy offered him a cup of tea, then a bit of cake s 
then some plum-pudding — but no ! Mushy turned 
up his nose at everything. You never saw such an 
ill-behaved little dog. 

But after tea they had romps round the room ; 
and Mushy joined in the fun. He frisked about, 
and barked, and got under the chairs and on the 
table. He scared all the Dolls out of their wits ; 
but Susy and Robbie knew it was all fun, and so 
they played on till it was time to go to bed. 

— Susy's Six Birthdays. 



SECOND BOOK OP BEADING LESSONS. 



87 




THE STORY OF THE THREE BEARS. 



Sil-ver-locks 

neck-lace 

par-lor 

sly-ly 

bold-ly. 

chanced 

Bru-in 

shag-gy 

small-er 

fu-ry 



pierc-ing 

brash-ing 

cool-ed 

steam-ing 

wood-en 

mis-chief 

swell-ing 

Christ-mas 

dream-ing 

med-dled 



cor-rect 

pep-per 

burn-ed 

hap-pen 

wil-ful 

cush-ion 

spoon-ful 

mad-cap 

drop-ped 

se-vere 



bro-ken 

some-times 

break-ing 

thun-der 

grum-bled 

hu-mor 

squeak-ed 

sleep-y 

star-tied 

rum-pled 



A very long time ago, there was a bold, rude 



88 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

little girl, who lived in a far off country, and the 
village people called her Silverlocks, because her 
curly hair was so light and shiny She was a sad 
romp, and so full of her pranks, that her parents 
could never keep her quiet at home. 

One day when she had been told not to go out, 
she trotted off into a wood, to string necklaces of 
blossoms, to chase the bees, and to pull wild roses ; 
and she ran about from place to place, until at last 
she came to a lonely spot, where she saw a pretty- 
looking small house. Finding the door a little way 
open, and the parlor window also, she peeped in, 
but could see no one ; and slyly she laughed to think 
what fine fun she would have before the good folks 
came back : so she made up her mind to go boldly 
into the house and look about her. 

Now it chanced that a family of three bears was 
living in this house ; the first was the great papa, 
called Eough Bruin, from his thick shaggy coat ; 
the second was a smaller bear, called Mrs Bruin, 
and sometimes Mammy Muff, from her soft fur ; 
the third was a little funny brown bear, their own 
dear pet, called Tiny. The house was empty when 
little Silverlocks found it out, because the bears had 
all gone out for a morning walk. Before going from 
home the great bear had told Mrs Bruin to rub down 
Tiny's face, and make him tidy, while he was busy 
in brushing his own hair, that all three might havo 
a pleasant walk in the woods, while the rich rabbit- 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 89 

soup, which they were to have for dinner, cooled 
upon the table in the parlor : when they were all 
ready they went out for their walk, and they left 
both the door and the window a little open. 

In the Bears' house there were only a parlor 
and a bedroom, and when that saucy puss, Silver- 
locks, threw open the door and went in, she found 
there was a pleasant smell, as if something nice 
had just been cooked, and on looking in the par- 
lor, she saw three jars of steaming soup stand- 
ing on the table ; dinner having been got ready for 
the three bears by Mrs Bruin. There was a big 
black jar quite full of soup for Eough Bruin, a 
smaller white jar of soup for Mammy Muff, and a 
little blue jar for Tiny, and with every jar there 
was a deep wooden spoon. The little girl was now 
as hungry as she was full of mischief, and felt quite 
glad when she saw the soup-jars on the table. It 
did not take her long to make up her mind how to 
act — taste the nice-smelling soup she would, happen 
what might. It would, she thought, be such good 
fun ; she would then run home again, and have a 
fine tale to tell old Mike the groom, one that 
would make him laugh till Christmas ; for that 
silly fellow, too, liked mischief, and taught Silver- 
locks all sorts of foolish tricks, and laughed at all her 
naughty ways, which was surely not the best plan 
to correct her faults, and make a good child of her. 

After looking outside to see that no one waa 



90 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

coming, she began first to taste the soup in Rough 
Bruin's great jar, but it was so very hot with pepper 
that it burned her mouth and throat; then she 
tried Mammy Muff's jar, but the soup was too salt 
— there was no bread in it either, and she did not 
like it at all ; then she tried Tiny's soup, and she 
found it was just to her taste, and had nice bits of 
white bread in it, so that she would have it and run 
all risks. Now, before the little wilful child sat 
down to eat Master Tiny's soup, as she was tired 
she looked for a seat, and she saw there were three 
chairs in the room ; one, a very large oak chair, was 
the great bear's seat ; another of a smaller size, 
with a velvet cushion, was Mrs Bruin's chair ; and 
a little chair with a rush bottom belonged to the 
little bear Tiny. These chairs Silverlocks tried all 
in turn. She could not sit in the very large chair, 
it was so hard ; she did not like the smaller chair, 
it was too soft ; but the little chair with the rush 
bottom, she found to be very nice, indeed, it was 
just the thing; and so she sat down in it with the 
jar upon her knees, and began to enjoy herself. 
She dipped and dipped again, eating away till she 
had eaten up all the soup in the little blue jar ; not 
leaving one bit or drop of either bread, meat, or 
soup for the poor little bear, who at that very 
minute was begging the old folks to go home to their 
dinner — for indeed all three were hungry enough 
after their walk. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. \)l 

Just as Silverloeks had taken the last spoonful of 
<soup and had got up on the chair, to put back the 
jar upon the table, the bottom of the chair fell out, 
and she tumbled on the floor ; but she was not hurt, 
and the little mad-cap jumped up and danced round 
the broken chair, thinking it all fine fun. Silver- 
locks then began to wonder where the stairs could lead 
to, so up she went into the bedroom, where the bears 
used to sleep, and there she saw three beds side by- 
side. Now one of these was a large bed for the big 
bear, there was also a smaller bed for Mrs Bruin, 
and a nice little bed for master Tiny. Being sleepy, 
she thought she would lie down and have a bit of a 
nap ; so, after taking off her shoes, she first jumped 
on to the largest bed, but it was made so high at 
the top that she could not lie on it ; she then tried 
tbe next bed, but that was too high at the foot ; but 
she found the little bear's bed to be just right, so 
she got snugly into it. She let her cheek rest gently 
on the soft pillow, and watched the vine nodding in 
at a broken window pane, and the blue-fly buzzing 
about in the fold of the curtain, till she fell fast 
asleep, and dreamed about the same thing over and 
over again, often laughing in her sleep too, because 
the dream was all about her breaking the little chair. 

While she was dreaming away, the bears came 
home very tired and hungry, and went to, look after 
their soup. The big bear cried out in a loud, angry 
voice : 



92 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

"WHO HAS MEDDLED WITH MY SOUP?* 
Mammy Muff next said in a loud voice too, but 

not so gruffly as Kough Bruin : 

" Who has meddled with my soup ? " 

But when the little bear saw his jar lying empt) 

on the table, he bit his paws for grief, and asked 

over and over again, with his shrill little voice : 
" Who has meddled with my soup ? " 
Soon after the big bear, with a voice of thunder, 

said : 

"WHO HAS BEEN IN MY CHAIR, AND 

PUT IT OUT OF ITS PLACE?" 
And Mrs Bruin grumbled out : 
" Who has been sitting in my chaib, and put 

IT OUT OF ITS PLACE ? " 

But poor Tiny was more angry than either cf 
them, and sadly sobbed as ho cried : 

" Who has been sitting in my little chair, and 
broken it ? " 

They now looked about below-stairs, feeling sure 
there was some one in the house, and then up-stairs 
they all went, snuffing and grunting in a very bad 
humor. 

Said the great bear in a fury : 

"SOME ONE HAS BEEN ON MY BED, 
AND RUMPLED IT!" 

Then said Mammy Muff: 

" Some one has been on my bed, and bumple]> 
it!" 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 93 

Tiny next mounted a stool, and jumped on to the 
foot of his own small bed. In a moment he 
squeaked out : 

" Some one has been to my bed — and here she is ; 
oh, here she is." And he opened his mouth, and 
looked as fierce and as wicked as could be at Sii- 
verlocks. 

The little girl had not been roused from her 
sleep by the loud voices of Mr and Mrs Bruin, but 
the shrill piercing tones of Tiny's voice waked her 
right up, and she was startled enough, to find her- 
stelf nose to nose with the angry little bear ; and she 
Was still more afraid, when she also saw two great 
bears in the room. Now the great bear had, very 
well for her, opened the window. So she quickly 
slid off the bed, and flew across the room, took one 
jump at the open sash, and dropped upon the turf 
below ; she rolled over and over on coming to the 
ground, but up again she soon got, for, on looking 
at the open window, she sr.w the three bears staring 
wildly at her, and making n great noise. When the 
little busy-body safely reached home, she got a severe 
scolding for her pains. She never forgot the fright 
which the sight of the three bears had given her, 
and so she took good care, ever after, to keep away 
from places where she had no right to go, and also 
to avoid meddling with things that did not belong 
to her. 



& 



SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 




WHO STOLE THE BIRD'S NEST? 



lis-ten 
plum-tree 

a-gain 



feath-er 

to-geth-er 

an-y-thing 



won-der 
in-trude 
be-hind 



To-whit ! to-whit ! to-whee ! 
Will you listen to me ? 
Who stole four eggs I laid, 
And the nice nest I made ? 

Not I, said the cow, moo-oo ! 
Such a thing I 'd never do ; 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 95 

I gave you a wisp of hay, 

But didn't take your nest away, 

Not I, said the cow, moo-oo 1 

To-whit ! to-whit ! to-whee ! 
Will you listen to me ? 
Who stole four eggs I laid, 
And the nice nest I made ? 

Bob-o-link! Bob-o-link! 
Now what do you think ? 
Who stole a nest away 
From the plum-tree to-day? 

Not I, said the dog, bow-wow! 
I wouldn't be so mean, I vow ; 
I gave hairs the nest to make, 
But the nest I did not take. 
Not I, said the dog, bow-wow! 
I wouldn't be so mean, I vow. 

To-whit ! to-whit ! to-whee ! 
Will you listen to me ? 
Who stole four eggs I laid, 
And the nice nest I made i 

Bob-o-link! Bob-o-link! 
Now what do you think ? 
Who stole a nest away 
From the plum-tree to-day ? 



96 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

Coo, coo ! coo, coo ! coo, coo ! 
Let me speak a word too. 
Who stole that pretty nest 
From little Robin Redbreast ? 

Not I, said the sheep ; oh, no ! 
I wouldn't treat a poor bird so ; 
I gave the wool the nest to line, 
But the nest was none of mine. 
Baa, baa, said the sheep ; oh, no I 
I wouldn't treat a poor bird so. 

To-whit ! to-whit ! to-whee ! 
Will you listen to me ? 
Who stole four eggs I laid, 
And the nice nest I made ? 

Bob-o-link ! Bob-o-link ! 
Now, what do you think ? 
Who stole a nest away 
From the plum-tree to-day ? 

Coo, coo 1 coo, coo ! coo, coo ! 
Let me speak a word too. 
Who stole that pretty nest 
From little Robin Redbreast? 

Caw ! caw ! cried the crow, 
I should like to know 
What thief took away 
A. bird's nest to-day ? 



SECOND BOOK OF HEADING LESSONS. 97 

Chuck, chuck! said the hei , 
Don't ask me again ; 
Why, I haven't a chick 
Would do such a trick. 
We all gave her a feather, 
And she wove them together ; 
I 'd scorn to intrude 
On her and her brood. 
Chuck, chuck ! said the hen, 
Don't ask me again. 

Chur-a- whirr ! chur-a- whirr ! 
We will make a great stir ! 
Let us find out his name, 
And all cry, for shame ! 

" I would not rob a bird," 

Said little Mary Green ; 
" I think I never heard 

Of anything so mean." 
" Tis very cruel, too," 

Said little Alice Neal ; 
" I wonder if he knew 

How sad the bird would feel ! " 

A little boy hung down his head, 
And went and hid behind the bed : 
For he stole that pretty nest 
From little Robin Redbreast ; 
And he felt so full of shame 
He did not like to tell hi.^ name. 



93 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 




THE CHILDKEN IN THE WOOD. 



coun-ty 


re-ceive 


prat-tle 


cow-ard 


Nor-folk 


ne-glect 


chat-ted 


to-geth-er 


Eng-land 


orphans 


re-pent 


sen-tenced 


de-sire 


pros-per 


Wal-ter 


pris-on 


rag-ing 


speech-es 


gai-ly 


aw-ful 


grieved 


re-mains 


gau-dy 


light-ning 


dread-ful 


know-ing 


pain-ful 


bar-ren 


help-less 


in-side 


Ko-land 


val-ue 


A long time ago, there 


lived in the county of Nor- 


folk in Eng 


land, two little children, 


whose names 


were Willie 


and Jane. 


Their parents were very 



SECOND BOOK OP BEADING LESSONS. 99 

good and kind to them, and loved them dearly. 
They lived in a fine house, had plenty of servants to 
wait on them, and, in fact, had everything they could 
desire to make them happy. 

When they were both quite young, "Willie being 
only six and Jane four years old, their mamma was 
taken ill, and two days after their papa fell ill also. 
They had caught a dreadful fever which was rag- 
itig at that time, and the doctors said that there 
vras no hope for them. It would not have grieved 
the parents to have died and left all their riches 
behind them, for they had been taught to love God 
& efore all things ; but they were much grieved to 
I save behind them their two sweet helpless child ren. 
ilt last, one evening, the children were called to 
ftiieir parents' bedside to hear their last words, and 
to receive their dying blessing. It was a sad sight, 
and the children wept many tears, although the poor 
things could not know what a loss they were about 
to suffer. Their uncle, a brother of their mother's, 
was there too. Their father's will was read, by 
which all his riches were left to the children ; but 
in case they died first their uncle was then to have 
all. The good mother kissed her little ones, then 
took them by the hand, and said to her brother : — 

"Brother, take these dear little children. Be 
good to my poor boy Willie, and to my darling 
Jane. They have no friends now but you. I 
leave them to God and to you. If you are kind to 



100 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

them, God will repay you ; but if you neglect then\ 
you may be sure that God will not fail to mart 
your neglect.' 

The uncle said, " My dear sister, I will take car(\ 
of them as long as I live, and they shall be to me 
like my own children. If I do harm to these p^oe 
orphans, I pray that God may never prosper me or 
mine,'' 

After these sad speeches, the parents kissed then 
dear children again, and as they pressed their cold 
lips to the warm rosy lips of their little ones, they 
said gently, " God bless our little Willie— God blesw 
our darling Jane," and soon after God took theu 
to Himself. 

As soon as the remains of their dear parents wero 
laid in the grave, their uncle took the children to his 
own home. For a while he was very kind to them, 
and did everything he could to please and amuse 
them. But he was a wicked man, and soon f orgGt; 
all that he had said to his dying sister, for he 
thought how all their riches might be his, if the 
poor little ones were only dead. He soon found out 
two bad men, who would do anything for money, 
and he agreed with them to take the little or- 
phans away into a lonely wood, and there to kill 
them, where no one could hear their cries. So this 
wicked uncle went home and told a lie to his wife, 
who loved the little ones, and said that a friend in 
London, who had lost his own children, wanted to 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 101 

take Willie and Jane to live with him, as he was so 
lonely. His wife, not knowing that this was a lie, 
agreed to let the children go, as she had some of 
her own, who needed all her care. 

Next morning, a coach drove up to the door of 
their uncle's house, and the dear orphans, thinking 
they were going to London, kissed their aunt and 
ancle, and got into the coach with one of the bad 
men who had agreed with their uncle, while the 
other got up on the box to drive. 

The man who rode inside the coach tried to 
i.muse them with all sorts of prattle, for he had two 
little babes of his own about the same age. They 
(hatted to him about London and all the pretty 
sights they were to see, and were so good that their 
pretty speeches melted his hard heart, and he began 
to repent that he had ever agreed to harm such 
sweet little darlings. 

At last they came to the wood where the wicked 
deed was to be done, and the man who drove got 
down, and told the man Walter, who rode inside, 
that he had better get out, and let the children 
have a walk while the horses rested. The children 
jumped gaily out, and Walter, taking a hand of 
each in his own, led them along a pretty path in- 

the wood. There they played about, and picked 

y^ihe pretty flowers and the nice berries, and chased 

the gaudy butterflies, until they were tired, and all 

«at down to rest on a mossy bank. Walter was 



102 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

seated, full of painful thoughts, when Roland, the 
other bad man, came up, and bade him take the 
girl while he took the boy. 

But Walter said, " Let us rather think what we 
are about to do, and do not let us be so wicked t 
but let us take the poor little ones home to some of 
our friends." 

At this Roland got into a dreadful rage, and said 
that he would have his share of the money if Wal- 
ter would not, and called him a coward to be afraid 
of a child. With that he tried to seize Willie, but 
Walter drew his sword and stood before the chile i 
and the two men began to fight, while the twf 
timid children clung to each other, not knowing 
what it meant. At last Roland was killed, and 
as he fell dead Walter turned to the children, 
and told them how that wicked man wanted to 
kill them. At this they cried, but Walter told 
them not to fear now, and he led them away 
further into the wood. The poor things began to 
feel very hungry and tired, but Walter had nothing 
to give them, and was much puzzled to know what 
to do with them. So they walked on and on till 
they saw a church-spire and heard the bells, al- 
though they were still far away from them. Then 
Walter told the children to rest while he went J 
get them some food, and he went off to the to\*n r 
but never came back to the little darlings. They 
played about, and watched the fishes in the brook j 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 103 

they picked the pretty flowers, and ate the berries ; 
but although they looked and looked, yet no Walter 
could be seen. Their clothes were torn by the 
thorns, and their faces were smeared with crying 
and with the berries, and surely no such lonely, sad 
little things were ever seen. They held fast to each 
other, for it began to grow dark and cold. They 
had no house to go to now, no nice warm bed to 
creep into, and no supper to eat, and they were so 
cold and tired and hungry. They heard the bells 
ringing far away, and as they used to do at home, 
they knelt down on the grass, and put their tiny 
1 lands together to pray to God ; and God heard them 
too, for He soon took them away from all wicked 
lien, and brought them to their own dear mamma 
and papa again. 

" Let us lie down under this bush," said little Jane, 
"for I am,*o tired." 

" I am very tired, too," said poor Willie, " and so 
cold. We will lie down close together until Walter 
comes with the food." 

So they lay down under the bush, and Jane put 
her arms round Willie, and the little orphans cried 
themselves to sleep. 

The night was cold, and the wind was bleak, and 

their blood was so chilled with hunger that the little 

\vrlings died, and God took them as little angels up 

heaven, away from all wicked things. 

To show how God made these wicked men suffer 



104 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

for their crimes, nothing ever went well "frith their 
uncle after this. The thought of his crimes took 
such a hold on his mind, that he could not rest in 
his bed. His barns were set on fire by lightning ; 
his corn and all his goods were burnt ; his lands be- 
came barren ; his cattle died ; and having sent his 
two sons abroad in a ship laden with goods of value, 
their ship went down, and they, with all their goods, 
were lost. When his wife heard this, she fell down 
dead at the awful news ; and the uncle was soon 
after thrown into prison for some other wicked 
thing he had done. 

About this time "Walter was tried for a theft, and 
was sentenced to be hanged for it. Before his death, 
he told all about the wicked uncle and the poor 
little babes, and when the wicked uncle heard of it, 
he died in the prison raving mad. From what 
the robber had said, those who had known the 
children went in crowds to search the woods, but 
could not find the little ones for a long time, for 
the robin redbreasts, out of pity, had covered them 
over with the dead leaves. When they did find 
them, the sweet babee were locked in each other's 
arms, just as they had laid themselves down to 
sleep. 



The / 

"10* 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 105 

I. THE CHILD'S FIRST GRIEF.— II. LOVE 
ONE ANOTHER. 

but-ter-fly heav-en beau-ti-ful 

glan-cing wan-der-ings Ho-ly 

sun-beams pon-der-ous pray-er 

droop-irig vel-vet sur-prise 

spring-time pon-der dove-like 

THE CHILD'S FIRST GRIEF. 

" Oh ! call my brother back to me, 

I cannot play alone ; 
The summer comes with flower and bee— 
Where is my brother gone ? 

* The butterfly is glancing bright 
Across the sunbeam's track ; 
I care not now to chase its flight- 
On ! call my brother back. 

" The flowers run wild — the flowers we sow'd 

Around our garden tree ; 
Our vine is drooping with its load — 
Oh ! call him back to me." 

" He would not hear my voice, fair child ! 
He may not come to thee ; 
The face that once, like spring-time, smiled, 
i On earth no more thou 'It see ! 



106 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

" A rose's brief, bright life of joy, 

Such unto him was given ; 
Go — thou must play alone, my boy — 
Thy brother is in heaven ! " 

" And has he left the buds and flowers, 

And must I call in vain ; 
And through the long, long summer's hours, 
Will he not come again ? 

" And by the brook, and in the glade; 
Are all our wanderings o'er ? 
Oh ! while my brother with me play'd 
Would I had loved him more ! " 

— Mrs Hemans. 

LOVE ONE ANOTHER. 

A little girl, with a happy look. 

Sat slowly reading a ponderous book — 

All bound with velvet, and edged with gold, 

And its weight was more than the child could hold; 

Yet dearly she loved to ponder it o'er, 

And every day she prized it more ; 

For it said — and she look'd at her smiling- mother— * 

It said, " Little children, love one another." 

She thought it was beautiful in the book, 
And the lesson home to her heart she took ; 
She walk'd on her way with a trusting grace, -> 
And a dove-like look in her meek young face, 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 



107 




Which said, just as plain as words could say, 
The Holy Bible I must obey ; 
So, mamma, I '11 be kind to my darling brother, 
For " Little children must love each other." 



I 'm sorry he 's naughty, and will not play, 
But I '11 love him still, for I think the way 
To make him gentle and kind to me, 
Will be better shown if I let him see 
I strive to do what I think is right ; 
And thus, when we kneel in prayer to-night, 
I will clasp my arms about my brother, 
And say, " Little children, love one another." 



108 SECOND BOOK OF KEAtu-tfG LESSONS. 

The little girl did as her Bible taught, 

And pleasant indeed was the change it wrought ; 

For the boy look'd up in glad surprise, 

To meet the light of her loving eyes : 

His heart was full — he could not speak, 

But he press'd a kiss on his sister's cheek, 

And God look'd down on the happy mother, 

Whose " Little children loved one another." 





THE STORY OF MOSES. 


sor-row 


He-brew 


Aa-ron moun-tains 


dis-tress 


con-ceive 


pow-er di-vide 


might-y 

man-aged 

bul-rush-es 


prin-cess 

Mo-ses 
i treat-ed 


griev-ous writ-ten 
al-low-ed com-mand-ments 
gath-er-ed des-ert 


cov-er-ed 
daugh-ter 


Is-ra-el 
lead-er 


arm-y fruit-ful 
fol-low-ed pro-mised 



Many years after Joseph and his brethren were 
dead, their children's children still lived in the land 
which the king of Egypt had given them. But 
there arose a king who did not know Joseph, and 
this king was a bad man. Seeing that the people 
were so many, he was afraid that they would rise, 
and take away his goods and his kingdom from 
him. On this account he made a wicked law, that 
all the little children who were boys should be killed, 
so that after a while there should only be womei? 
and old men, who would not be able to fight him. 



SECOND BOOK 0? READING LESSONS. 109 




You may be sure this caused great sorrow and 
distress among all these poor people, but the king 
was mighty, and they could not help themselves. 
One poor mother managed to hide her little son for 
three months, but at last, when she could do it no 
longer, she laid him in a small basket made of bul- 
rushes covered with pitch, and put it among the 
rushes by the river side, trusting in God to take 
Care of her little child. 

Soon after this, the daughter of the king came 
down to the river to bathe ; and seeing the basket, 
she caused it to be brought to her. As she opened 
it, the babe began to cry, and she took pity on it, 
saying, " This is one of the Hebrew children." So 
she called for a nurse, and the mother of the little 



110 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

boy was brought to her, although she did not know 
it was his mother. You may conceive the poor 
mother's joy when the princess told her that she 
would adopt the little one as her own, and that, in 
the meantime, she would give him to her to nurse. 
Ah ! she was indeed glad that the life of her dear 
little one was spared, and she blessed the kind 
princess in her hea rt for being so good. 

The little boy was called Moses. Be grew up to 
be a fine young man, and was in every way treated 
as if he were the son of the king's daughter. But 
God had need of him for His own work, and when 
the time was come when He wanted the " children 
of Israel," as they were called, to leave the land of 
Egypt, He chose Moses as their leader. But the 
king did not want to let them go, for he had made 
them slaves, so " God gave Moses and his brother 
Aaron the power to do many wonders, and to smite 
the land and people of Egypt with many grievous 
plagues," so that at last the people were allowed to go. 

As soon as they had gone, the king gathered 
together a great army, and followed them to de- 
stroy them. The people were in great trouble, for 
they had the sea in front of them, the king and his 
army behind them, and great mountains on either 
side. But God caused the waters of the sea to 
divide, and they were all able to cross it on dry 
land ; but when the people of Egypt tried to do the 
same they were all drowned. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. Ill 

Moses was the leader of the children of Israel in 
all their wanderings through the desert to the pro- 
mised land ; and at last he died just before they 
reached the rich and fruitful country which had 
been promised to them by God. 

It was Moses who received from God the two 
tables of stone, on which were written the ten 
commandments, which I trust you all know well. 





BRAVE BOBBY. 




Bob-by 


strug-glir 


wag-ging 


fa-vor-ite 


no-bly 


num-ber 


run-ning 


howl-ing 


an-y-thing 


dan-ger 


flan-nels 


con-stant 


scream-ed 


ap-plied 


pre-serv-er 


plung-ed 


ar-rived 


an-i-mals 



A little girl, named Lucy, the daughter of a rich 
gentleman, was playing one day by the edge of a 
pond near her father's house. Bobby, a favorite 
dog, was playing about with her too. Running too 
near the edge of the pond she fell in, and was in 
great danger of being drowned, for it was quite 
deep. Her mother, who was at the window and 
saw her fall, screamed out to the servants, and all 
rushed down to the pond. 

Brave Bobby, as soon as he saw Lucy fall, 
plunged into the water, and, when the servants 



112 



SECOND BOOK OF HEADING LESSONS. 










came down, he was struggling nobly to hold her up, 
and to keep her head above water, howling all the 
time for help. 

Little Lucy was soon seized and carried into the 
house, where she was put to bed, and warm flannels 
applied to her body. When the doctor arrived, he 
felt her pulse, and said she would soon be well. 
Tears of joy were in every one's eyes when they 
heard this, for Lucy was a favorite with old and 
young. When her parents came down stairs, who 
should be there but Bobby, wagging his tail and 
iooking up, as much as to say, " How is my little 
charge ? " He got pats and kind words without 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 113 

number, and what he liked as much as anything, 

a much better supper than usual. 

Bobby was now the constant friend of Lucy, and 

she called him her peeseevee. One day as Lucy 

was sitting in the garden with Bobby by her side, 

her mother came up and said, " What makes you 

love Bobby so much, my dear ? " 

" mother, because he saved me from death." 
" Right, my child. I wish you to love him, and 

to be good and kind to all dumb animals." 



I. THE SWEET STORY OF OLD.— 
II. NEVER SAY FAIL. 



Sav-iour 


king-dom 


man-hood 


ear-nest-ly 


bat-tie 


foot-steps 


pre-pare 


pre-vail 


as-sail 


for-giv-en 


on-ward 


con-quer 



THE sweet stoby op old. 
I think when I read the sweet story of old, 

How, when Jesus was here among men, 
He call'd little children as lambs to His fold, 

I should like to have been with Him then. 
I wish that His hands had been placed on my head, 

That His arms had been laid around me ; 
And that I might have seen His kind look when 
He said, 

"Let the little ones come unto Me." 

H 



114 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

Yet still to my Saviour in prayer I may go, 

And ask for a share in His love ; 
I know if I earnestly seek Him below, 

I shall see Him and hear Him above, — 
In that beautiful place He is gone to prepare, 

For all those who are wash'd and forgiven ; 
And many dear children are gathering there, 

" For of such is the kingdom of heaven." 

NEVEB SAY FAIL. 

Keep pushing — 'tis wiser 

Than sitting aside, 
And dreaming and sighing, 

And waiting the tide. 
In life's earnest battle, 

They only prevail 
Who daily march onward, 

And never say fail. 

In life's rosy morning, 

In manhood's firm pride, 
Let this be your motto 

Your footsteps to guide ; 
In storm and in sunshine, 

Whatever assail, 
We '11 onward and conquer, 

And never say fail.. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 115 

CHEISTMAS. 

im-por-tant al-nionds hud-dling 

stock-ings car-ra-way muff-ler 

neigh-bor won-der-ed i-vo-ry 

par-a-sol wrig-gle pret-ti-ly 

chess-men ex-pres-sive quan-ti-ty 

mu-sic non-sense glo-ri-ous 

x Two little girls had just gone to bed on that very 
important night-. Christmas Eve. They had been 
busy making presents for all their friends, but what 
had pleased them most of all, was that they had 
helped to knit some stockings for some poor neigh- 
bor's children. So as they tried to go to sleep they 
chatted away. 

" What would you like to find in your stocking 
to-morrow," said Mary, u if you could choose ? " 

" Oh, I don't know," said Edith. " I think my 
stocking would be rather funny if I had to fill it. 
Let me see — first I should put in a pretty white 
kitty." 

" No, you wouldn't," said Mary. 

"Yes, I should. A cat, and a bunch of flowers, 
and a book — no, two books or three — and a new 
parasol, because mine has not been very good since 
it was run over." 

" Well, I think you would have a queer stocking !" 
said Mary. " It wouldn't he half so good as mine. 
I should put in books too — a great many ; but then 



116 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

they should be large, splendid books, with fine 
pictures, full of them, and very beautiful, and bound 
in all sorts of different ways. And then, let me 
think — I might, if there was any room after I had 
books enough — yes, I would put in a box of chess- 
men, and some new music, and a watch." 

" Then, you wouldn't have any sugar-plums ? " said 
Edith. 

"Yes; I would shake tnem down among the 
other things — burnt almonds and carraway comfits 
and rose-drops. 

And so they both fell asleep and dreamt of this 
very grand stocking. 

Christmas morning is always very late in coming, 
and this one was no exception to the rule. Thou- 
sands of young people thought the sun never would 
rise, and wondered if ever it would be light again. 

" Merry Christmas, Mary ! " came out of the dark 
ness on one side of the bed. 

And " Merry Christmas, Edith ! " from the dark- 
ness on the other. 

" Is it almost time to get up ? " said Edith. 

" Why, no ; you can't see your hand yet." 

"It looks quite light out of the window," said 
Edith. 

" I think it looks quite dark," said Mary. " I can 
see the stars. Now, Edith, I '11 tell you what we 
will do. You know the stockings are on the bed- 
posts just here by our heads." 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 117 

Edith gave a little wriggle under the blankets, 
expressive of her belief in the fact. 

" Well," said Mary, "I '11 stretch out my hand and 
feel my stocking, and you stretch out your hand and 
feel yours; and then we'll try and guess what we have 
touched. Now, Edith, you must just take one feel." 

" Take care, or you will fall out of bed — I have 
felt mine ! " 

" So have I ! " said Edith, huddling down out of 
the cold air. " I felt the cat ! " 

" Nonsense !" said Mary. "How long do you think 
a cat would remain still in your stocking and never 
mew nor move ? It could not be a cat, but it might 
Ire something else. I felt something sharp in my 
stocking." 

" What did it feel like ? " said Edith. 

"I don't know," said Mary; "that's the very 
thing. It was perhaps a book, or a box, or some- 
thing of the kind." 

Then they both jumped up, and going softly on 
tiptoe into their aunt's room, Edith laid a pin- 
cushion on the table, and set the little basket of sugar- 
plums close by; and Mary placed there a guard-chain 
ehe had made for her uncle, and a pretty silk bag 
for her aunt, and then they ran back again. 

It would be too much to describe all that the 
stockings held ; Edith's cat turned out to be a 
pretty little fur muffler, and Mary had one like it. 
The box was the very box of chessmen which Mary 



118 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 



said she would put in her stocking ; and the men 
themselves were prettily carved out of red ivory 
and white. 

It would take too long to tell of all that happy 
Christmas-day, and how pleased the little girls were 
at giving away their Christmas boxes to the poor 
people. Their aunt had procured a quantity of 
warm clothes besides the stockings, and every one 
was made as happy as they ought to be on that 
glorious day when Jesus Christ was born into ib« 
world. — Miss Weilierdl 



I. LITTLE BY LITTLE.- 


-II. EVENING 




HYMN. 




a-corn 


cease-less-ly 


spend-ing 


im-prov-ing 


build-ing 


trea-sured 


hid-den 


rear-ing 


per-haps 


down-ward 


balm-y 


cer-tain 


thread-like 


verd-ure 


judg-ment 


ap-pear 


cor-al 


glo-ri-ous 


slen-der 


thought-ful 


eye-lids 


for-ests 


em-ploy 


vig-or-ous 


in-sect 


learn-ing 


dis-turb 


sup-ply 


mo-lest 


dark-ness 



LITTLE BY LITTLE. 
" Little by little," an acorn said, 
As it slowly sank in its mossy bed, 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING UESSONS. 119 

* I am improving every day, 
Hidden deep in the earth away." 
Little by little each day it grew ; 
Little by little it sipp'd the dew ; 
Downward it sent out a thread-like root ; 
Up in the air sprang a tiny shoot. 

Day after day, and year after year, 

Little by little the leaves appear ; 

And the slender branches spread far and wide. 

Till the mighty oak is the forest's pride. 

Far down in the depths of the dark blue sea 
An insect train work ceaselessly ; 
Grain by grain they are building well, 
Each one alone in its little cell ; 
Moment by moment, and day by day, 
Never stopping to rest or to play. 
Eocks upon rocks they are rearing high, 
Till the top looks out on the sunny sky ; 
The gentle wind and the balmy air, 
Little by little, bring verdure there ; 
Till the summer sunbeams gaily smile 
On the buds and flowers of the coral isle. 

" Little by little," said a thoughtful boy, 
" Moment by moment I '11 well employ, 
Learning a little every day, 
And not spending all my time in play ; 
And still this rule in my mind shall dwell, 

* Whatever I do, I will do it well.' 



12v> SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

Little by little I '11 learn to know 
The treasured wisdom of long ago ', 
And one of these days perhaps we'll see, 
That the world will be the better for me.' 
And certain it is that this simple plan, 
Made him a wise and a useful man. 

EVENING HYMN. 
Glory to Thee, my God, this night, 
For all the blessings of the light, 
Keep me, oh keep me, King of kings, 
Beneath Thine own almighty wings. 

Forgive me, Lord, for Thy dear Son, 
The ill that I this day have done ; 
That with the world, myself, and Thee, 
I, ere I sleep, at peace may be. 

Teach me to live, that I may dread 
The grave as little as my bed ; 
Teach me to die, that so I may 
Kise glorious at the judgment day. 

Oh may my soul on Thee repose, 
And may sweet sleep mine eyelids close ; 
Sleep that may me more vigorous make 
To serve my God when I awake. 

If in the night I sleepless lie, 
My soul with heavenly thoughts supply ; 
Let no ill dreams disturb my rest 
Nor powers of darkness me molest. 



TART III. 




MAY SONG. 



A merry little maiden, 

In the merry month of May, 
Came tripping o'er the meadow, 

As she sang this merry lay : 



122 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS, 

" I 'm a merry little maiden, 
My heart is light and gay, 

And I love the sunny weather 
In the merry month of May. 

" I love the pretty lambkins, 
That so gaily sport and play, 

And make such frolic gambols 
In the merry month of May. 

" I love the little birdies, 
That sit upon the spray, 

And sing me such a blithe song 
In the merry month of May. 

" I love my little sisters, 
And my brothers every day, 

But I seem to love them better 
In the merry month of May. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 123 




I. THE LAEK AND HEK YOUNG ONES.— 
II. THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE. 

ea-si-ly no-tice ab-sence tor-toise 

to-mor-row chirp-ing re-move to-geth-er 

cau-tion cous-ins anx-ious stead-i-ly 

fledged talk-ed suc-ceed la-zi-ness 

trem-ble hap-pen-ed per-se-vere dif-fi-cult 

ex-pect-ing searce-ly se-ri-ous re-quire 

THE LAEK AND HER YOUNG ONES. 

A lark, who had young ones in a field of corn 



124 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

which was almost ripe, was very much afraid lesli 
the reapers should come to cut it before her young- 
ones were fledged and able to fly away from the 
place. So whenever she left them to go in search 
of food, she charged them to take notice of what 
they heard talked of in her absence, and to tell her 
of it when she came back. 

Well, one day when she had gone, they heard 
the farmer call to his son, " John, I think this corn 
is ripe enough ; you had better go early to-morrow 
and desire our friends and neighbors to come and 
help us to reap it." 

When the old lark came home, the young ones 
were all in a tremble, and chirping round about 
her, told her what had happened, and begged hei 
to remove them as fast as she could. " Never 
heed, my little pets," said the mother, " make youi 
minds easy, for if the farmer depends on his friends 
and neighbors, I am pretty sure the corn will not 
be reaped to-morrow." 

Next day, off she went again, still giving her 
little ones the same caution. Ey and by the far- 
mer came, and waited a while, expecting those he 
had sent for ; but the sun grew hot, and nothing 
was done, for no one came at all " John," said he 
to his son, " I perceive that these friends of ours 
are not to be depended upon, so you must go to your 
uncles and cousins, and ask them to come early to- 
morrow to help us to reap." 



SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 125 

With this the young ones were in a great fright 
again, and when their mother came home, they 
could scarcely tell her what had happened for 
trembling. " Oh, if that be all," said she, " do not 
alarm yourselves, my dears, for uncles and cous- 
ins are much the same as friends and neighbors, 
and are not often very anxious to help one another ; 
but," she added, " be very careful to note what you 
hear the next time." 

The next day came, and off she went as usual ; 
for even little birds, small as they are, cannot do 
without food. The farmer came too, and still find- 
ing no one ready to help him, said to his son, 
" John, we must even depend upon ourselves ; so 
get a couple of good sickles ready for the morning, 
and we two will reap the corn." 

When the young ones told this to their mother, 
she became quite serious as she said, " Well, my 
pets, we must now leave our snug home, for when a 
man says he will do a thing himself, it is not likely 
that he will fail in it." So she removed her young 
ones at once, and none too soon, for the next d.ty 
the farmer and his son reaped the corn. 

When you want anything doije do it yourself, 
and never depend on others. 

THE HARE AND THE TORTOISE. 

A hare and a tortoise once set out together for a 
fine spring a few miles off. The hare frisked in 



126 'SECOND EOOK OF READING LESSONS. 




and out of the road, sometimes running across a 
field and back again. The tortoise, however, moved 
slowly but steadily along the road. 

Presently the hare got tired of waiting for his 
slow friend the tortoise, so he said, " Good-bye, my 
friend, I really cannot manage to go at so slow a 
pace as you do. I will run on before, and will wait 
for you at the spring ; " and away tripped the 
hare. 

But after a little time he came to a nice shady 
place, so he thought he would lie down and have a 
short nap. "1 can easily run in a few minute? 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 127 

the distance the tortoise will require hours to crawl 
over ; so I shall have plenty of time for a snooze, 
and yet be there first." 

When he awoke, he looked about to see if the 
tortoise were coming. But, alas for laziness ! the 
tortoise had passed him long ago, and had already 
reached the spring. " Slow and sure " will often 
win the day against speed and laziness, and no one 
ought to be afraid of any difficult task ; for if he 
steadily perseveres, he will be sure to succeed. 



I. GOOD NIGHT AND GOOD MORNING, 
II. WHO TAUGHT THEM. 



cur-i-ous 


vi-o-let 


pro-vid-ing 


fox-glove 


soft-est 


heav-en-ly 


cour-te-sy-ed 


sweet-est 


gath-er 


nar-row 


seem-ing 


ris-ing 



GOOD NIGHT AND GOOD MOKNING. 

A fair little girl sat under a tree, 

Sewing as long as her eyes could see; 

Then smooth'd her work, and folded it right, 

And said, " Dear work, good night ! good night !' 

Such a number of crows came over her head, 
Crying " Caw ! caw ! " on their way to bed ; 



128 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 




She said, as she watch'd their curious flight, 
" Little black things, good night ! good night !" 

The horses neigh 'd, and the oxen low'd ; 

The sheep's " Bleat ! bleat !" came over the road 

All seeming to say, with a quiet delight, 

" Good little girl, good night? good night !" 

She did not say to the sun, " Good night ! " 
Though she saw him there, like a ball of light ; 
For she knew he had God's time to keep 
All over the world, and never could sleep. 

The tall pink fox-glove bow'd his head ; 
The violets courtesy'd and went to bed ; 
And good little Lucy tied up her hair, 
And said, on her knees, her evening prayer. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 129 

And while on her pillow she softly lay, 
She knew nothing more till again it was day ; 
And all things said to the bright rising sun, 
" Good morning ! good morning ! our work is 
bejrun. / 



WHO TAUGHT THEM ? 

Who taught the bird to build her nest 
Of softest wool, and hay, and moss ? 

Who taught her how to weave it best, 
And lay the tiny twigs across ? 

Who taught the busy bee to fly 

Among the sweetest herbs and flowers, 

And lay her store of honey by, 
Providing food for winter hours ? 

Who taught the little ant the way 
Her narrow cell so well to bore, 

And through the pleasant summer day 
To gather up her winter store ? 

'Twas God who taught them all the way, 
And gave the little creatures skill ; 

And teaches children, when they pray, 
To know and do His heavenly will. 

— Jane Taylor. 



] 30 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

I. THE BOY AND THE STARLING— 
II. WILLIE AND HIS PONY.— III. MY PONY 



game-keep-er 


neigh-bor 


sharp-ly 


star-ling 


us-u-al 


luck-y 


in-stance 


pock-et 


hal-ter 


an-swer 


a-sham-ed 


emp-ty 


pleas-ure 


whith-er 


cheat-ing 


fre-quent-ly 


qui-et-ly 


re-plied 


be-lieve 


can-ter-ing 


stum-ble 


com-mon 


ston-y 


grum-ble 



THE BOY AND THE STABLING. 

An old gamekeeper had a starling in his room, 
that could utter a few sentences. For instance, 
when his master said, " Starling, where are you?" 
the bird never failed to answer, " Here I am." 

Little Charles, the son of one of his neighbors, 
always took great pleasure in seeing and hearing 
the bird, and came frequently to pay it a visit. 

One day he came in while the gamekeeper was 
absent. Charles quickly seized the bird, not think, 
ing of the wrong he was doing ; put it in his pocket, 
and was going off with it. 

But that very moment the gamekeeper came 
back. Finding Charles in the room, and wishing 
to amuse his little neighbor, he called to the bird 
as usual, " Starling, where are you ? " 



SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 131 

" Here I am," sung out the bird, with all its 
might, from the little. thief's pocket. 

Charlie was very much ashamed, and well he 
might be. Those who do"wrong are always sure 
to be found out. 

WILLIE AND HIS PONY. 

Willie went one day to see a friend, and tied his 
pony to a tree, while he went into the house. When 
he came out again, he found that Coco had got 
loose, and had gone prancing away he knew not 
whither. 

After hunting about for some time, he saw him 
at a distance, quietly feeding on the grass. He 
ran up to him, but just as he put out his hand to 
catch hold of the bridle, Coco, who wished to enjoy 
his freedom a little longer, turned sharply round, 
kicked up his hind legs, and galloped away. 

Willie thought himself lucky not to have been 
within reach of his heels when he kicked up ; how- 
ever, he was quite at a loss what to do. At last, he 
called to mind how the groom caught the pony 
when he was out at grass in the meadow ; and that 
he put a little corn into a sieve, and held it out to. 
the pony till he could put a halter over his neck. 

Now, it is true that Willie had neither sieve, 
«'crn, nor halter. " But then," he said, " the pony 
will eat grass as well as corn ; my hat will serve for 
a sieve ; and as for a halter I shall not want one 



132 SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 

for the pony has his bridle on, and I can catch hold 
of that." So he picked a few handfuls of grass, and 
put them into his hat. 

A man, who was digging in the common asked 
him what he was going to do with the grass. Wil- 
lie told him, it was to catch the pony. 

" Oh, then," cried the man, " you need not take 
so much trouble ; if you hold out your hat empty, 
it will do just as well, for the pony cannot see that 
the hat is empty till he comes close up to it ; and 
then you may catch hold of the bridle while he is 
looking into the hat." 

" But that would be cheating him," cried Willie ; 
" and I will not cheat anybody, no, not even a beast." 

" Well said, my good boy," replied the man. 

" Besides," added Willie, " if I cheated him once, 
he would not believe me another time." 

He then went up to his pony, and held out his 
hat ; the pony came quietly up to him, and Willie 
seized hold of his bridle, and was soon cantering 
home on his back. —Mrs Marcet. 

MY PONY. 

Hop, hop, hop ! 

Go and never stop, 
Where 'tis smooth and where 'tis stony, 
Trudge along, my little pony, 

Go and never stop, 

Hop, hop, hop, hop, hop 1 



SECOND BOOK OF HEADING LESfcONS. 



V6'3 




Hey, hey, hey ! 

Go along, I say ; 
Don't you kick and don't you stumble, 
Don't you tire and don't you grumble ; 

Go along, I say ; 

Hey, hey, hey, hey, hey ! 

Jump, jump, jump ! 

Don't you hit that stump ! 
For I will not cease to ride you 
Till I further yet have tried you ; 

Don't you hit that stump, 

Jump, jump, jump, jump, jump I 

Tramp, tramp, tramp ! 
Make your feet now stamp, 



134 SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 

On the highway no one faster ; 

But take care ! don't throw your master. 

Make your feet now stamp ! 

Tramp, tramp, tramp, tramp, tramp ! 



I. MARY AND HER CANARY.— 
II. MEDDLESOME MATTY. 

long-ed re-mem-ber spec-ta-cles 

wist-ful Ma-til-da forth-with 

feath-ers pos-sess-ed snuff-box 

touch-ing ket-Ue stub-born 

med-dle-some pres-ent-ly pre-sent-ed 

fu-ture qual-i-ties tin-gling 

MARY AND HER CANARY. 

Mary saw a tame canary which sang finely, and 
she longed to have one like it. 

" I will give you one some day," said her mother, 
"if you are a good child, and do as you are told." 

One day, when Mary came home from school, she 
found her mother had gone out for a walk. Mary 
looked into her room, and on the table she spied a 
box she had never seen before. She had been 
often told by her mother never to touch anything 
that did not belong to her, but Mary had a bad 
habit of touching all that she saw ; and bad habitt 
are not easily broken. Mary had given way to it 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 135 




so often that her mother would say, " Mary, Mary, 
shall I never be able to trust you?" 

Now you will see how Mary was punished for not 
doing as her mother told her. 

She knew the box on the table was not her 
box, and that she had no right to touch it ; but she 
stood by the table looking at it with wistful eyes. 

" I wonder what is in it ! " she said to herself, and 
then she began to finger it, and at length took it up 
in her hand. " It is very pretty ; I think it must 
be empty though, it is so light. Why, here are 
little holes in the lid, but they are so small, I cannot 
see into the inside. If I were just to open it, I 
could do no harm." 



136 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

As Mary said this she lifted up the lid, and out 
flew a fine canary. The little girl ran after it to 
catch it ; but it flew on to the frame of a picture 
out of her reach. There it sat, looking so pretty 
with its soft yellow feathers, and singing so sweetly, 
that Mary wanted it sadly for her own. " Ah ! " 
she said, " if I had only left the box alone ! I knew 
I was doing wron^." 

At this moment her mother came in ; the noise of 
the door opening frightened the little bird, and he 
flew straight out of the window ; while Mary ran 
crying to her mother, to tell her how naughty she 
had been. » 

"I bought the bird for you, Mary," said her 
mother ; " but you have lost it by your own fault. 
I am sorry for you, but I hope this will teach my 
little girl a lesson, not to be so meddlesome in 
future." 

" I shall never forget my little bird," said Mary, 
" never, I am quite sure." And she never did ; but 
when she felt a wish to meddle with anything that 
did not belong to her, she always said to herself, 
" Mary, Mary, remember your canary." 

MEDDLESOME MATTY. 

Oh, how one ugly trick has spoii'd 

The sweetest and the best ! 
Matilda, though a pleasant child, 

One ugly trick possess'd, 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 137 

Which like a cloud before the skies, 
Hid all her better qualities. 

Sometimes she 'd lift the tea-pot lid, 

To peep at what was in it ; 
Or tilt the kettle, if you did 

But turn your back a minute. 
In vain you told her not to touch, 
Her trick of meddling grew so much. 

Her grandmamma went out one day, 

And, by mistake, she laid 
Her spectacles and snuff-box gay 

Too near the little maid. 
" Ah ! well," thought she, " I '11 try them on, 
As soon as grandmamma is gone." 

Forthwith she placed upon her nose 

The glasses large and wide ; 
And looking round, as I suppose, 

The snuff-box, too, she spied ; 
" Oh, what a pretty box is this i 
I '11 open it," said little miss. 

" I know that grandmamma would say, 

' Don't meddle with it, dear ; ' 
But then she 's far enough away, 

And no one else is near ; 
Besides, what can there be amiss 
In opening such a box as this ? " 



138 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

So thumb and finger went to work- 
To move the stubborn lid ; 

And presently a mighty jerk 
The mighty mischief did ; 

For all at once — ah ! woful case ! — 

The snuff came puffing in her face. 

Poor eyes, and nose, and mouth, and chin, 

A dismal sight presented ; 
And as the snuff got further in, 

Sincerely she repented. 
In vain she ran about for ease, 
She could do nothing else but sneeze. 

She dash'd the spectacles away, 

To wipe her tingling eyes, 
And as in twenty bits they lay, 

Her grandmamma she spies : 
" Heyday ! and what 's the matter now ? 
Cried grandmamma, with lifted brow. 

Matilda smarting with the pain, 

And tingling still, and sore, 
Made many a promise to refrain 

From meddling evermore. 
And 'tis a fact, as I have heard. 
She ever since has kept her word. 

— Mrs QilbsrK 



SECOND BOOK OF READIJSG LESSONS. 



139 



THE BEAR AND THE TOMTIT. 



en-e-mies 

pleas-ant-ly 

back-ward 

scram-bled 

ty-rant 

at-tract-ed 

es-cape 



fright-en-ing 

trou-ble-some 

ter-ror 

sti-fled 

ter-ri-bly 

flut-ter 

pru-dent 



prowl-ing 

pun-ish-ment 

fa-mous 

sur-round-ed 

dis-may 

pres-ent-ly 

hap-pen-ed 



I will tell yon, my dear children, an old fable 
rbout making enemies. It is called, "The Bear 
&nd the Tomtit." 

Now, you must know that a tomtit is a kind of a 
Mrd, a very little bird ; but he sings pleasantly. 
Well, one pleasant summer's day, a wolf and a bear 
were taking a walk together in a lonely wood. 
They heard something singing. 

" Brother," said the bear, " that is good singing ; 
w T hat sort of a bird do you think that may be V 

" That 's a tomtit," said the wolf. 

"I should like to see his nest," said the bear; 
" where do you think it is V 

" If we wait a little time, till his mate comes 
home, we shall see," said the wolf. 

The bear and the wolf walked backward and for- 
ward for some time, till his mate came home with 
some food in her mouth for her children. The 
wolf and the bear watched her. She went to the 



140 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

tree where the bird was singing, and they togethet 
flew to a little grove just by, and went to their nest 

" Now," said the bear, " let us go and see." 

" No," said the wolf, " we must wait till the old 
birds have gone away again." 

So they noticed the place, and walked away. 

They did not stay long, for the bear was in a 
hurry to see the nest. They returned, and the bear 
scrambled up the tree, expecting to amuse himself 
finely by frightening the tomtits. 

" Take care," said the wolf ; " you had better be 
careful. The tomtits are little ; but little enemies 
are sometimes very troublesome." 

" Who is afraid of a tomtit ?" said the bear. So 
saying, he poked his great black nose into the nest. 

"Who is here ?" said he ; " what are you?" 

The poor birds screamed out with terror. " Go 
away ! go away!" said they. 

"What do you mean by making such a noise, 
and talking so to me ? I will teach you better," 
said he. So he put his great paw on the nest, 
and pressed it down until the poor little birds 
were almost stifled. Presently he left them and 
went away. 

The young tomtits were terribly frightened, and 
some of them were hurt. As soon as the bear was 
gone, their fright gave way to anger ; and soon 
after the old birds came home, and were very angry 
too. They used to see the bear sometimes prowling 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 141 

about the woods, but did not know what they could 
do to bring him to punishment. 

Now, there was a famous glen, surrounded by 
high rocks, where the bear used to go and sleep, 
because it was a wild, lonely place. The tomtits 
often saw him there. One day the bear was 
prowling around, and he saw, at a great distance, 
two huntsmen with guns, coming towards the wood. 
He fled to his glen in dismay, though he thought 
he should be safe there. 

The tomtits were flying about there, and pres- 
ently they saw the huntsmen. "Now," said one 
»f them to the other, " is the time to get rid of the 
tyrant. You go and see if he is in his glen, and 
'.hen come back to where you see me singing." 

So he flew about from tree to tree, keeping in 
Sight of the huntsmen, and singing all the time ; 
while the other went and found that the bear 
was in his glen, crouched down in terror behind a 
rock. 

The tomtits then began to flutter around the hunts- 
men, and fly a little way towards the glen, and then 
back again. This attracted the notice of the men, and 
they followed them to see what could be the matter. 

By and by the bear saw the terrible huntsmen 
coming, led on by his little enemies, the tomtits. 
He sprang forward, and ran from one- side of the 
glen to the other ; but he could not escape. They 
shot him with two bullets through his head. 



142 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

The wolf happened to be near by, at that time, 
upon the rocks that were around the glen ; ani 
hearing all this noise, he came and peeped over. As 
soon as he saw how the case stood, he thought it 
would be most prudent for him to walk away ; 
which he did, saying as he went, " Well, the bear 
has found out that it is better to have a person a 
friend than an enemy." 





MY MOTHER 




wis-dom 


cra-dle 


fee-ble 


for-sook 


af-fec-tion 


health-y 


re-ward 


sick-ness 


af-fec-tion-ate 



Who fed me from her gentle breast, 
And hush'd me in her arms to rest, 
And on my cheek sweet kisses prest 1 
My Mother. 

When sleep forsook my open eye, 
Who was it sung sweet lullaby, 
And rock'd me that I should not cry ? 
My Mother. 

Who sat and watch'd my infant head, 
When sleeping in my cradle bed, 
And tears of sweet affection shed ? 

My Mother. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 143 

When pain and sickness made me cry, 
Who gazed upon my heavy eye 
And wept for fear that I should die ? 
My Mother. 

Who ran to help me when I fell, 
And would some pretty story tell, 
Or kiss the part to make it well ? 

My Mother. 




Who taught my infant lips to pray, 
To love God's holy word and day, 
Aud walk in wisdom's pleasant way? 
My Mother. 



144 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

And can I ever cease to be 
Affectionate and kind to thee, 
Who wast so very kind to me ? 

My Mother. 

Oh no ! the thought I cannot bear : 
And, if God please my life to spare, 
I hope I shall reward thy care, 

My Mother. 

When thou art feeble, old and gray, 
My healthy arm shall be thy stay, 
And I will soothe thy pains away, 

My Mother. 

And when I see thee hang thy head, 
'Twill be my turn to watch thy bed, 
And tears of sweet affection shed, 

My Mother. 



STORY OF DAVID. 


de-scend-ants 


en-camp-ed 


pro-vi-sions 


sing-er 


com-plete 


al-low 


Da-vid 


re-peat-ed 


re-fused 


gi-ant 


chal-lenge 


ad-vanced 


Go-li-ath 


re-main-ed 


cursed 


de-fied 


how-ev-er 


fore-head 


car-cass 


pur-sued 


praised 


A short time ago we read how God had brought 


the children of Israel out of the land of Egypt by 



8JaOt;ND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 145 




the hand of Moses, and how Moses led them through 
the wilderness to the promised land. Now we shall 
read of one of their descendants in that beautiful <*£■ 
country. 

David was the youngest son of Jesse. He was 
a shepherd, and took charge of his father's flocks^ij^ 
He was a_j^erybraveJ s ad;.for once, while he was$W-» 
tending the sheep, there came a lion and a bear and 
took a lamb out of the flock ; but David ran after 
them and killed them both. He was a very sweet 
singer, and played on the harp also ; and many of 

K 



146 SECOND BOOK OP BEADING LESSONS. 

his songs have come down to us as the "Psalms of 
David." 

Now some wicked people made war on the chil- 
dren of Israel, and came up to fight them, and 
among them was a great giant, named Goliath. 
This giant defied all the men of Israel, and wanted 
one of them to come out and fight with him ; but 
they were all afraid. So the two armies were en- 
camped opposite each other, and every day this 
lb***** huge giant, clothed in complete armor, "and with a 
great sword and spear, came out to the front and 
repeated his challenge, defying the men of Israel 
-^^and their God. 

Three of David's brothers had gone to join the 
army ; but David himself remained at home, tend- 
ing his flocks. One day, however, his father wanted 
to send some provisions to his brothers, and so 
he told David to take them. . David did' so, and 
while he was in the camp this giant Goliath came 
out as usual, crying, " Who will come out and fight 
with me ?" When David saw that all the men ran 
away from this giant, he was angry, and said, '*. Who 
( , is this man that he should defy the armies of the liv- 
'""i ' i ng God V So he went to t he king and asked him 
to allow him to go and fight the giant. The king 
at first refused, as David was but a mere lad ; but at 
length he agreed, and gave David a complete suit 
of armor. But David put off the armor, and took 
his staff in his hand, and a few smooth stones in 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 147 

his shepherd's bag;, and his sling in the other hand. 
In this way he advanced to meet Goliath. When 
the giant saw him, he laughed at him, and said, 
"Am I a dog, that thou comest to me with staves?" 
And he cursed David. 

But David said, " Thou comest to me with a sword, 
and with a spear, and with a shield ; but I come to 
thee in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of 
the armies of Israel, whom thou hast defied." And 
David put a stone in his sling, and smote the giant 
on the forehead and killed him. Then, as he had no 
sword, he leapt upon the huge carcass of the giant, 
and drew his sword out of the sheath and cut off 
his head. \ 

At this the men of Israel took heart, and the ! 
wic ked me n were afraid and fled ; but the men of >. 
Israel pursued them, and killed a great number 01 
them. And all the people were glad, and sang songs 
fn honor of David ; but he knew who it was had 
given him strength, and he praised God for it. 
After some time, David became the king of Israel, ht*r* 
and he wrote and sang so many beautiful psalms, ^^ 
that he was called "the sweet singer of Israel.".' ^e^ 



148 SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 




AUTUMN 



har-vest 
beau-ty 
gold-en 
au-tumn 



lus-cious 
pre-cious 
ri-pen-ing 
clus-ter-ing 

Golden autumn conies again, 
With its storms of wind and rain, 
With its fields of yelLow grain. 

Gifts for man and bird and brute, 
In its wealth of luscious fruit, 
In its store of precious root. 



burst-ing 
gar-ners 
flaunt-ing 
fox-glove 



SECOND BOOK OP HEADING LESSONS. 149 

Trees bend down with plum and pear, 
Rosy apples scent the air, 
Nuts are ripening everywhere. 

Through the lanes where " bird- weed " weaves 
Graceful wreaths of clustering leaves, 
Hence the reapers bear the sheaves, 

Binging loud their harvest song, 
In their hearty, rustic tongue — 
Singing gaily, old and young ; 

Singing loud beside the wain, 
With its load of bursting grain, 
Dropping all along the lane. 

Mice and ant and squirrel fill 
Now their garners at their will, 
Only drones need hunger still. 

Though the summer flowers are dead. 
Still the poppy rears its head, 
Flaunting gaily all in red. 

Still the foxglove's crimson bell, 
And the fern-leaves in the dell, 
Autumn's parting beauty tell. 

Purple sunsets, crimson leaves, 
Fruit and flowers and golden sheaves, 
Autumn gives us ere she leaves. 

— Mrs H cm trey. 



150 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

I. BERTHA AND HER DOLLS.— II. THE 
LOST DOLL. 
pret-ti-er ob-serve charm-ing-ly 

Ber-tha sew-ing-room trod-den 

scis-sors mer-ri-ly en-gaged 

BERTHA AND HER DOLLS. 

Bertha was a dear little girl, with brown eyes, 
curly hair, and merry ways ; but she was very 
thoughtless, and this often brought her into trouble, 
and grieved her kind mother very much. 

Like all little girls, she was fond of dolls, and she 
had a number of them. She also thought the name 
of Lucy prettier than any other name, and gave it 
to her whole family of dolls. 

There was Mamma Lucy, which was the largest 
of them all ; Baby Lucy, not bigger than your 
little finger ; Mary Lucy, named in honor of Bertha's 
mother ; Lucy Bell, Black-eyed Lucy, and Pet 
Lucy. 

Bertha was just learning to sew ; for her mother 
thought all children should learn to be useful, and 
the little girl talked a great deal about the nice 
frocks, and hats, and aprons she would soon make 
for her dolls. 

One day, when Bertha was alone in the parlor, 
playing with Tiny, her kitten, a new bonnet for her 
mother was sent home, and placed on the table. The 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 151 

«>over of the box was not on very tightly ; so the 
little girl got up on a chair and peeped in. 

Oh, what a lovely ribbon ! — pink, and just the 
color for her Black-eyed Lucy ! She must make 
her an apron of it. So she ran up to the sewing- 
room for her mother's scissors, and then snipped off 
ribbon enough to make Miss Lucy an apron. 

She did not know very much about sewing, so 
she just ran a thread through the top, and tied it 
round her dolly's waist, and thought she had never 
seen her look so pretty before. 

"While she was thus engaged, the kitten began to 
play with the bonnet ; but Bertha was so intent 
on making the apron for her doll, that she did not 
observe it. 

She was just holding up the doll to see once more 
how the apron looked, when she heard her mother 
call her. Bertha did not think she had done any- 
thing wrong, so she ran to her mother with the doll 
in her arms. 

"See, mamma!" she cried, "doesn't Lucy look 
pretty? I cut off just a little bit of your ribbon to 
make this apron ! Is it not nice to have dolly's 
apron and your bonnet just alike?" And she 
laughed merrily. 

But when Bertha saw how grave her mother 
looked, and that she held in her hand the bonnet 
which Tiny, the kitten, had been playing with, all 
torn and crushed, the dimples and the smile died 



152 second book: op reading lessons. 

out from her face, and her brown eyes grew very 
large at first, then the long lashes closed over them, 
and she burst into tears. 

" I have been very naughty, mother, have I not ? " 
she sobbed. 

Then her mother took Bertha into her lap and 
talked to her a long time; and Bertha said she 
would never touch anything again without asking 
her dear mother, who was so good and kind to her, 
and who loved her so dearly, and whom she loved so 
very dearly too. 

THE LOST DOLL. 

I once had a sweet little doll, 

The prettiest doll in the world ; 
Her cheeks were so red and so white, 

And her hair was so charmingly cuil'd. 
But I lost my poor little doll, 

As I play'd on the heath one day * 
And I cried for her more than a week, 

But I never could find where she lay. 

I found my poor little doll, 

As I play'd on the heath one day ; 
Folks say she is terribly changed, 

For her paint is all wash'd away ; 
And her arm trodden off by the cows, 

And her hair not the least bit curl'd : 
Yet for old sake's sake she is still 

The prettiest doll in the world. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 153 




JACK'S DOG BANDY. 



fag-ots 


tow-ards 


up-lift-ed 


Jean-nette 


mean-time 


faith -ful 


Ban-dy 


or-der-ed 


bu-ried 


e-ven-ing 


al-read-y 


school-mas-t 


out-side 


for-got-ten 


fol-low-ing 


hus-band 


an-swer-ed 


e-pi-taph 



In a large forest in France there lived a poor 
woodman, whose name was Jack. He made little 
money by the sale of his fagots, but enough to 
support himself, his wife Jenny, and their two chil- 



154 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

dren. The oldest child was a boy, with dark hair, 
seven years old, called Jean, and the second was 
a fair-haired girl, called Jeannette. They had also 
a curly dog, with a white nose, the best dog in all 
the country, because he loved his master so much, 
and this dog was called Bandy. 

When the snow lies deep in the forest, the wolves 
that live in its depths grow very hungry and fierce, 
wid come out to look for food. The poor people 
also suffer much in the time of deep snow, for they 
cannot get work. 

Jack did not fear the wolves when he had his 
good axe in hand, and went every day to his work. 
In the morning he said to Jenny : " Wife, pray 
do not let Jean and Jeanette run out to play until 
the wolves have been hunted. It would not be 
safe. Keep Bandy in too." 

Every morning Jack said the same thing to 
Jenny, and all went well till one evening he did 
not come home at the usual time. Jenny went to 
the door, looked out, came in, then went back, and 
looked out again. " How very late he is ! " she said 
to herself. 

Then she went outside, and called her husband 
— " Jack, Jack ! " — no answer. Bandy leaped on 
ker, as if to say : " Shall I go and look for him ? " 

" Down, good dog," said Jenny : " here, my little 
Jeannette, run to the gate, and see if your father 
is coming. You, Jean, go along the road to t£<: 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 15"; 

end of the garden-paling, and cry aloud, ' Father, 
father!'" The children went as their mother told 
them, but could not see their father. " I will go 
and find him," said little Jean ; " even if the wolves 
should eat me." 

" So will I," said his little sister, and off they 
set towards the forest. 

In the meantime their father had come home 
by another road, leaving a bundle of fagots with 
a neighbor who had ordered them. 

" Did you meet the children ? " said Jenny, as he 
came in. 

"The children!" said Jack; "no, indeed; are 
they out ? " 

" I sent them to the end of the paling, but you 
have come by another road." 

Jack did not put down his axe, but he ran as 
fast as he could to the spot. 

" Take Bandy with you," cried Jenny ; but Bandy 
was off already, and gone so far before, that his 
master could not see him. In vain the poor father 
called " Jean, Jeanette : " no one answered, and his 
tears began to fall, for he feared his children were lost. 

After running on a long, long way, he thought 
he heard Bandy bark. He went straight into the 
wood towards the sound, his axe uplifted in his hand. 

Bandy had come up to the two children just as 
a large wolf was going to seize them. He sprang 
at the wolf, barking loudly, to call his master. 



156 



SECOND BOOK OF EEADING LESSONS. 



Jack, with one blow of his good axe, killed the 
great fierce beast ; but it was too late to save poor 
Bandy — he was dead already, the wolf had killed him. 

The father and two children went back to Jenny, 
full of joy that they were all safe, and yet they 
could not help crying, they were so sorry that good 
faithful Bandy was dead. They buried him at the 
bottom of the garden, and put a large stone over 
him, on which the schoolmaster wrote the following 
epitaph : 

" Beneath this stone there lies at rest 
Bandy — of all good dogs the best." 

Bandy is not forgotten in that part of the coun- 
try, for when any one is very true, and brave, and 
faithful, the people always say of him : — He is as 
brave and faithful as Jack's dog Bandy. 



LITTLE THINGS. 

Ed-win beau-te-ous o-cean great-est 

build-ing hum-ble at-tempt di-vid-ed 

op-po-site prop-er e-ter-ni-ty yon-der 

work-men brick-lay- ers er-rors vir-tue 

mor-tar no-tion count-less kind-ness 

there-fore put-ting de-spise moun-tain 

BEICK UPON BRICK. 

Edwin was one day looking at a large building, 



SECOND BOrtK OF BEADING LESSONS. 157 

which was being put up just opposite his father's 
house. He watched the workmen from day to day, 
as they carried up the bricks and mort ar, and then 
placed them in their proper order. His father said 
to him, — 

" Edwin, you seem to be very much taken up with 
the bricklayers ; pray, what may you be thinking 
about? Have you any n otion of learning the 
trade V 

" No," said Edwin, smiling ; " but I was just 
thinking what a little thing a brick is, and yet that 
this great house is built by laying one brick upon 
another." 

" Very true, my boy ; never forget it. Just so is 
it with all great works. All your learning is only 
one little lesson added to another. If a man could 
walk round the world, it would just be by putting 
one foot before the other many times. Your whole 
life will be made up of one little moment after 
another. The ocean itself is made up of countless 
little drops of water." 

Learn from this not to despise little things- 
Learn, also, not to be afraid of great labor. The 
greatest labor becomes easy if divided into parts. 
You cannot jump over a mountain ; but step by 
step will take you to the other side. Do not fear, 
therefore, to attempt great things. Always remem- 
ber that the whole of yonder building is only one 
brick upon another. 



158 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 
LITTLE DEOPS OF WATEB. 

Little drops of water, 
Little grains of sand, 

Make the mighty ocean, 
And the beauteous land. 

Thus the little minutes, 
Humble though they be, 

Make the mighty ages 
Of eternity. 

Thus our little errors 
Lead t_ie soul away, 

From the path of virtue, 
Oft in sin to stray. 

Little deeds of kindness, 
Little words of love, 

Make on earth an Eden, 
Like the heaven above 




SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 159 




I. PRESENCE OF MIND.— II. INGENIOUS 
DEVICE. 



ceil-ing 
hand-i-work 

per-ceiv-ed 

ut-ter-ly 

spoil-ing 



un-a-ble 

pas-sion 

chim-ney 

fac-to-ry 

de-scend-ing 

PEESENCE OF MIND. 



scaf-fold 

stock-ing 

keep-sake 

dead-ly 

in-ge-ni-ous 



Two men were engaged in painting the ceiling of 
a grand church. A platform of wood was slung up 
for them to stand on, at a great height from the floor 
below. 

One of them had just finished a portion of his 
work, and his mind was so bent on it, that 



160 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

forgetting where he was, he began to move away 
from the picture to see his han diwor k in the best light. 

Step by step, he walked slowly backwards, until 
his foot rested almost on the edge of the platform. 
His friend, at that instant, perceived the danger; 
but how could he prevent it ? To speak was in vain, 
and not to speak seemed only to make death more 
sure ; for one more step would send the man dash- 
ing on a stone floor beneath. 

Quick as thought, the friend snatched up a paint- 
brush, and daubed it over the fine picture, utterly 
spoiling it. With an angry speech, the painter 
made a rush forward to check his friend, and to 
ward off the cruel stroke ; but he met a face that 
was deadly pale. In his turn he paused and stood 
looking at his friend, who, unable to speak, pointed 
out the reason of his strange action. 

The storm of passion was over at once, and the 
painter wept, while he blessed the hand that had 
robbed him for a time of fame, pride, and joy, but 
had saved his life. 

INGENIOUS DEVICE. 

After hard toil for many weeks, the tall chimney 
of a new factory was built up. The men put the 
last stroke to their work, and came down as quickly 
as they could. In his haste the last but one drew 
the rope out of the pulley. This want of care turned 
their joy to fear. 

There stood one man at the top with no means 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 161 

of descending . What could be' done ? There was 
no scaffold ; and no ladder would reach half the 
height. The men had come down by the pulley ; 
and there it was still, fixed and firm, at the top of the 
chimney ; but the rope lay in a coil on the ground. 

They all stood in silence, looking up at their 
lonely friend on the top, while he saw no way of 
help from their hands below. Just then his wife 
came up, and with quick thought and good sense 
she was able to save her husband. "John," she 
called out ; but what did she say ? What did she 
bid him do ? Those who cannot find out must be told. 

With all her strength she shouted : * John, rive 
your stocking ; begin at the toe." He knew at once 
what she meant, and drawing off his stocking, — no 
doubt knit by his wife, — cut off the end, and soon 
set free the thread. He rove a long piece, and to 
this he tied a little piece of brick, and gently let it 
down for eager hands to reach. 

Meantime his wife had managed to get a ball 
of thin twine, and it was soon made fast to the 
worsted. With a shout, they told John to pull up 
again. He did so, and they soon heard the words, 
" I have it," The pulley-rope was then made fast to 
the twine. 

With a glad heart John drew it up, and put it 
over the pulley. Then snatching up the rest of 
the stocking, which was to him a keepsake for life, 
he let himself down as the other men had done, till he 
reached the ground in safety. — Tales that are True, 



162 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 




I. THE INDIAN WOMAN AND THE BEAR— 
II. STOEY OF A BEAR. 

Ind-ian gen-er-al-ly heav-i-er 

qual-i-ties pow-er-ful dread-ful-ly 

a-wa-ken-ed at-tempt-ed pos-si-ble 

ap-proach-ing com-mit-ted sat-is-fied 

fort-u-nate ex-cit-ing ac-count-ed 

en-e-my pup-pies quar-ters 

THE INDIAN WOMAN AND THE BEAR. 

Courage and presence of mind are qualities that 
every one ought to try and possess. 

An Indian woman was once returning home 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 163 

through the woods. She was all alone, and was 
anxious to get home before it grew dark, for there 
were wolves and bears in the woods ; and, as it was 
spring-time, when the bears had awakened from 
their long winter sleep, she knew that they were 
very fierce. But soon a rustling in the leaves and 
a crashing of branches told her that some animal 
was approaching. 

She drew out a long knife, which she was fortu- 
nate enough to have with her, and watched for the 
expected enemy. He soon appeared, in the shape 
of a huge black bear, and, seeing the woman, came 
forward to seize her. She, with great presence of 
mind, put her back against a tree, so that the bear 
could not easily hug her and squeeze her to death, 
as bears generally do, and, holding her knife in front 
of her, waited Bruin's approach. 

The bear came slowly on, and when he got near 
the woman, raised himself on his hind legs to seize 
her in his powerful fore-paws. The brave woman 
never lost her presence of mind, even when she saw 
the glaring eyes of the bear before her face, and felt 
his hot breath, but calmly stood, and watching her 
chance, she plunged the knife right into his heart 
and killed him at once. 

If she had attempted to run away, the bear would 
aoon have caught her, and had she not behaved as 
bravely as she did, there is little doubt but that she 
would have lost her life. 



164 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 
STORY OF A BEAR. 

In one of the new settlements in the back country 
some hunters went out in chase of some bears that 
had committed great havoc among their fields. 
After an exciting chase, they killed two bears. 
With one of these bears were two young cubs. 
They were quite small, just like fat young puppies, 
with black hair and thick, clumsy-looking paws. 
The hunters caught the little cubs when their 
mother was shot, and brought them home. 

One of these cubs was a very playful little fel- 
low, and was called Jack by the son of one of the 
hunters. He soon became quite tame, and followed 
his master about. He was very fond of sugar and 
fruit, and got into many a scrape trying to get them 
when he ought not to have done so, just as some 
naughty boys do. 

Jack followed his master to school, and used to 
play about in the woods till school was over, and 
then he was always sure of a good supply of apples, 
and cakes, and maple sugar. Some of the chil- 
dren were afraid of Jack at first, but as he was a 
playful fellow, never hurting any of them, they 
soon began to like him, and he became a general 
favorite. 

He knew as well as any of them where the good 
things were, and if he was not helped, he sometimes 
helped himself. He enjoyed a gambol and frolic 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 165 

with the dogs too, but as he was heavier than they 
were, though not so active, they liked to keep away 
from too close quarters with Jack. 

One day poor Jack was missed, and great was the 
sorrow of the whole school. Search was made for 
him everywhere, but without success, and it was 
supposed that he had met some of his friends in the 
woods, and had gone away with them. 

Well, by and by the boys and girls grew up to 
be men and women, and the old schoolmaster 
died, and poor Jack was quite forgotten, until one 
day, when a new set of children and a new master 
were in the same school-house, in walked a great 
black bear. 

Such a scrambling was never seen. Every one 
tried to run away, out of the windows, out of the 
doors, under the desks ; and all were dreadfully 
frightened. But the bear marched coolly in and 
seated himself before the fire, looking round as 
pleased as possible. 

Seeing the bags and baskets hanging on the pegs, 
he started up, raised himself on his hind-legs, and 
helped himself to all that was good in them, apples 
and maple sugar, but did not attempt to harm any 
person. 

Having satisfied himself, he walked out again 
quite leisurely. By this time a general alarm had 
been raised, and all the young men started in pur- 
suit. As the bear did not attempt to run, he was 



166 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

soon come up with and shot. But what was the 
sorrow and surprise when it was found that the 
bear was no other than their old friend Jack, who 
had come back to pay them a visit. 

They knew it was Jack by some marks on his 
skin, and that accounted for his being so quiet. He 
also had known the old school-house again, but the 
poor fellow did not know that his old playmates 
were gone. 



THE YOUNG MOUSE. 

dain-ties se-date ex-act-ly 

pro-vid-ed ex-press-ed re-quires 

se-cure-ly con-vinced kit-tens 

en-vied con-struct cran-nies 

ex-cur-sion dwell-ing ex-qui-site 

re-turn-ed en-ter-ed be-lieve 

In a crack near the cupboard, with dainties pro- 
vided, 
A certain young mouse with her mother resided ; 
So securely they lived in that snug quiet spot, 
Any mouse in the land might have envied their lot. 

But, one day, the young mouse, who was given to 

roam, 
Having made an excursion some way from her 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 167 




On a sudden return'd, with such joy in her eyes, 
That her gray, sedate parent express'd some sur- 

" mother," said she, " the good folks of this house, 
I 'ni convinced, have not any ill will to a mouse ; 
And those tales can't be true you always are telling, 
For they 've been at such pains to construct us a 
dwelling. 

" The floor is of wood, and the walls are of wires, 

Exactly the size that one's comfort requires ; 

And I 'm sure that we there should have nothing to 

fear, 
If ten cats, with their kittens, at once should 

appear. 



168 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

" And then they have made such nice holes in the 

wall, 
One could slip in and out, with no trouble at all ; 
But forcing one through such rough crannies as 

these, 
Always gives one's poor ribs a most terrible squeeze. 

" But the best of all is, they 've provided us well 
With a large piece of cheese, of most exquisite 

smell ; 
Twas so nice, I had put in my head to go through, 
When I thought it my duty to come and fetch you." 

" Ah, child," said her mother, " believe, I entreat, 
Both the cage and the cheese are a terrible cheat ; 
Do not think all that trouble they take for our 

good; 
They would catch us, and kill us all there, if they 

could, 

" As they 've caught and kill'd scores — and I never 

could learn 
That a mouse who once enter'd did ever return ! " 
Let the young people mind what the old people say 
And when danger is near them, keep out of tka 

way. 






SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 169 

THE BOY LOST IN THE BUSH. 

back-woods re-fresh-ed nu-mer-ous 

shan-ty mur-mur-ing brush-wood 

shout-ed lis-ten-ing foot-sore 

re-ply care-ful-ly en-er-gies 

path-less di-rec-tion dis-tract-ed 

swal-low cau-tious-ly ob-sta-cles 

" C- : 

Far away in the backwoods there lived a young 
lad, named Willie Wilson, in an old log-shanty, with 
his father and mother. They were very poor, and 
had hard work on their rough bush farm to make 
both ends meet. 

Willie often went into the woods with his father, 
and while his father was at work, Willie would pick 
berries or go fishing in the stream. One day, how- 
ever, Willie had wandered away, not thinking of 
what he was doing, until it began to grow dark, and 
he thought it was time to get home. He shouted 
to his father, but was surprised at not hearing any 
reply. Louder and louder he called, until he could 
cry no more, but in the deep thick woods he heard no 
answering voice. Poor Willie was lost — lost in the 
pathless forest. 

He was not a big boy, but he had a brave heart. 
He was hungry, and tried to eat some of the berries 
he had picked, but he could scarcely swallow them, 
for he felt as if he had a big lump in his throat 



170 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

He felt inclined to cry, but, thought he, "it's nc 
use crying; I must try and find my way out/ 
Poor fellow ! he wandered on and on, and still the 
woods looked the same, and still no one answered 
his cries. It now became so dark that he could see 
no longer, and as he was quite worn out he laid 
himself down under a tree, and cried himself to 
sleep. 

Next morning he awoke refreshed, but had to rub 
his eyes a long time before he could remember 
where he was. He sat up and looked around, ate a 
few of his berries, and tried to think of what his 
father would do if he were there. As he sat there, 
he thought he heard the murmuring of a stream in 
the distance. He listened carefully to know the 
exact direction, then looking straight towards it, off 
he set to try and reach it. He had seen his father 
guide himself by always keeping three trees in 
the same line, and he did so now, and found, to 
his great delight, that the sound of the water in- 
creased. Cautiously looking forward from one tree 
in front to one still further on, so as not to go 
either to the right or left out of the straight line, 
he soon reached the banks of the stream. 

He knew now that by keeping along the edge of 
the stream he would in time come to some clearing. 
But the wood was dense, the fallen trees numerous, 
and the brushwood so thick that he had hard work 
to make any progress. Little by little the berries 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 171 

went, and still the brave little fellow plodded on, 
until the second night came on. Weary and foot- 
sore he again lay down to rest, and again cried him- 
self to sleep, after praying to God to help him and 
bring him to his parents once more. 

Next mqjnjng he was very hungry. No berries 
were to be found, but his brave spirit kept him up, 
and still he pushed on down the bank of the stream. 
At last, when almost worn out, his clothes all torn 
and himself cut and bruised, he spied a little clear- 
ing. Gathering all his energies together he managed 
to reach it, and soon came to a small log-shanty, 
where he was taken care of. Upon inquiring, it 
was found that he was now twenty miles from his 
home, but the kind people, who had taken him in, 
managed to send word to his distracted father, who 
joyfully came and took him home. His mother, 
when she saw him, wept with joy again, after having 
wept and mourned for her poor lost boy, whom she 
never expected to see again. Nor, indeed, would 
Willie have ever reached home, if he had not been 
brave and determined in spite of all obstacles. 

— Campbell's Second Reader. 



172 SECOND BOOK OF KEADTNO LESSONS. 




OLD MOTHER HUBBARD AND HER DOG. 



cup-board 
ba-ker 
join-er 
cof-fin 



laugh-ing 
smok-ing 
hat-ter 
tail-or 



cob-bler 
read-ing 
ho-sier 
dain-ties 



Old mother Hubbard 
Went to the cupboard, 

To get her poor dog a bone 
But when she came there 
The cupboard was bare, 

And so the poor dog got none. 

She went to the baker's 
To buy him some bread, 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LEsSONS. 173 

But when she came back 
The poor dog was dead. 

She went to the joiner's 

To buy him a coffin, 
But when she came back 

The poor dog was laughing. 

She took a clean dish 

To get him some tripe, 
But when she came back 
He was smoking a pipe 

She went to the hatter's 

To buy him a hat, 
But when she came back 

He was feeding the cat 

She went to the tailor's 

To buy him a coat, 
But when she came back 

He was riding a goat. 

She went to the cobbler's 

To buy him some shoes, 
But when she came back 

He was reading the news. 

She went to the hosier's 

To buy him some hose, 
But when she came back 

He was dressed in his clothes 



174 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

The dame made a courtesy 
The dog made a bow ; 

The dame said, " Your servant, 
The dog said, " Bow-wow." 

This wonderful dog 

Was dame Hubbard's delight ; 
He could sing, he could dance, 

He could read, he could write 

She gave him rich dainties, 

Whenever he fed ; 
And built him a tomb-stone^ 

When he was dead. 




PART IV. 




THE DOG AtfD THE BOAT. 



grand-fa-ther 

ac-count 

fi-nal-ly 

u-su-al-ly 

bit-ter-ly 

at-ten-tion 

gen-tle-man 

be-liev-ing 

o-pin-ion 

thor-ough-ly 

Master Tom had 
little boat which 



gen-er-ous thith-er 

pros-pect sev-er-al 

re-gain-ing pow-er-ful 

treas-ure swim-ming 

ad-van-cing sup-port-ed 

whin-ing re-straint 

slight-est ex-am-ple 

prog-resa lus-ti-ly 

con-tra-ry com-plet-ed 

as-sist-ancc has-ti-ly 

come down to the river to sail 
his grandfather had given him. 



176 SECOND ROOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

It was all very pleasant, until the string which held 
the little craft broke, and away it went for a cruise 
on its own account, and finally stuck fast on a buoy, 
to which a boat was usually moored. 

Poor Tom was sadly put out at this mishap, and 
like many boys who ought to know better, he began 
to cry bitterly. His cries attracted the attention of 
a gentleman passing, who had a fine dog with 
him. 

" Why, what 's the matter, my little man ? Don't 
cry so, and we '11 see if we can't find a way of getting 
the boat again. You must ask my dog to get it for 
you. Come here, Faust," and he whistled to the 
dog. " Now, say to him, ' Please, Mr Faust, go and 
get my boat for me.' " 

Tommy did so, half laughing and half crying, but 
fully believing in the powers of the dog. And the 
gentleman, jerking a stone into the water just beyond 
where the boat lay, drew Faust's attention to it. 

With a bound the noble dog dashed into the 
water, swam out to the boat, seized it in his jaws, 
and turned his head towards the bank again, Tommy 
screaming with delight at the prospect of regaining 
his lost treasure. 

Instead, however, of advancing at once towards 
the shore, the dog seemed to remain in the same 
place, beating the water with his paws to keep 
himself afloat, and whining gently, as if he was in 
trouble. 



SECOND BOOK OF EEADING LESSONS. 177 

The gentleman called him, but that only seemed 
to make him struggle harder, without making the 
slightest progress. A knot of people- soon gathered 
round the spot, each one giving his own opinion as 
to what was wrong. 

At last the gentleman, by raising himself up by 
a branch of a tree, was able to perceive the cause 
of his poor dog's danger. The string had become 
twisted round the buoy, and poor Faust was caught 
by it too. 

He now became very anxious, as .Faust was a great 
favorite, and sent hither and thither for a boat, but 
there was none to be had. The poor dog's struggles 
seemed to grow weaker and weaker ; and at last the 
gentleman could bear it no longer, and, throwing 
off his coat, vest, and neckcloth, said, " He shall not 
perish, if I can help it, my noble Faust. Who will 
lend me a knife?" 

Several were at once offered, and seizing one, he 
dashed into the water, and swam out with powerful 
strokes to the struggling animal. As soon as the 
poor dog perceived his master coming, he ceased 
howling, and re dou bled his efforts to keep himself 
afloat. 

The gentleman soon reached the buoy, and swim- 
ming round the dog to avoid the stroke of his paws, 
he supported himself by resting one hand on the 
buoy, and, grasping the knife with the other, severed 
the string at one stroke. 

M 



178- SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

The dog, freed from restraint, at once rose higher 
in the water ; and, as if to thank his master, he swam 
to him with the little boat in his mouth, quite forget- 
ting in his affection his own struggles and danger. 

Merely waiting to assure himself that the noble 
animal had strength enough to regain the bank, his 
master set him the example by quitting the buoy 
and striking out lustily for the shore. . But now the 
weight of his clothes, thoroughly soaked as they had 
become, began to tell on him, and his strokes bd~ 
came v .^er, while his breath came short and 
tlick. Faust, on the contrary, swam bravely or, 
and reached the shore before his master had com 
pleted half the distance. 

The dog dropped the boat on the bank, and 
merely stopping to shake the water from his ears, 
the generous animal plunged in again to meet his 
master. It was well he did so, for his master's 
strength was fast failing him; but availing him- 
self of the dog's assistance, he placed one arm 
across his back, and paddling with the other, he 
half swam and was half dragged to the bank in 
safety. 

After wringing the water from his hair, he hastily 
resumed his coat and vest, while the crowd around 
cheered him lustily. And truly a fine sight it was 
to see the noble dog and his brave master walk off* 
together. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 179 

TRY AUATN. -II. "MY FATHER'S AT 
THE HELM." 

pa-ti-ence threat-en-ing 

as-sail-ed o-ver-whelm 

dis-tract-ing an-chor 

stead-fast re-mem-ber-ing 

com.-po-sure fear-less 

TEY AGAIN. 

'Tis a lesson you should heed, — 

Try again ; 
If at first you don't succeed, 

Try again. 
Let your courage then appear, 
For, if you will persevere, 
You will conquer , never fear ; 

Try again. 

Once orJjwke_though you should fail, 

Try again ; 
' If you would at last p revai l, f- 

Try again. 
If we strive, 'tis no disgrace 
Though we may not win the race. 
What should you do in that case ? 

Try again. 

If you find your task is hard, 

Try again ; 
Time will bring you your reward, 

Try again. 



? 180 



SECOND BOOK OF HEADING LESSONS. 



e^c^ All that other folks can do, 

Why, with patience, should not you ? 
Only keep this rule in view, — 
Try again. 




"MY FATHER S AT THE HELM. 

The curling waves with awful roar 

A little boat assail'd ; 
And pallid fear's distracting power 

O'er all on board prevail'd. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 181 

Save one, the captain's darling child, 

Who steadfast view'd the storm, 
And cheerful, with com posu re smiled 

At danger's threatening form. 

" Why sport^s t thou thus," a seaman cried, 

" While terrors overwhelm ? " - 
" Why should I fear ? " the boy replied, 

" My father 's at the helm ! " 

So when our world by all is reft, 

Our earthly helper gone, 
We still have one true anchor left, 

God helps, and He alone. 

Then turn to Him, 'mid sorrows wild, 
When wants and woes o'erwhelm ; 

Remembering, like the fearless child, 
Our Father 's at the helm. < 



THE BOY AND HIS DOG. 

sev-er-al sin-gu-lar mourn-ing 

re-main-ed dole-ful-ly re-fus-ed 

A little boy, of the name of Darwin, had a beau- 
tiful spaniel dog, which was called Argus. 

The boy was taken ill, and after a few days' 
sickness, died, and the dog, who seemed to mourn 



182 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSORS. 



S r C red 

i 1 3 M c 




for him as much as any one, followed the family to 
the grave. 

For several days the dog was missed from the 
house ; but at length he returned, and after looking 
around as if m search of something, he went away. 

Again he returned and went as before ; and what 
is very singular, the family missed several things 
that belonged to little Darwin. 

One day they watched the dog when he came 
back, and saw him take his young master's top, and 
run off with it towards the grave-yard. 

On following the dog they found, in a hole whicl 
he had scraped in the grave, a cap, a pair of shoes 
and several toys. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 183 

They took poor Argus away, and shut him up at 
home ; but he refused to eat, and moaned so dole- 
fully that they let him go. As soon as he was free, 
he again ran off to the grave, and there the kind 
little animal remained till he died, mourning for 
his lost master. 



THE STORY OF THE BIRTH OF OUR 
SAVIOUR. 

east-ern pro-phe-c y reign-ing 

re-mot-es t s ub-jec-tio n Gal-i-lee 

won-der-ful im-a-gine gov-ern-ed 

pro-phet s la-ment-in g di-rec-tion 

Beth-le-hem joy-ful-ly - Naz-a-reth 

ex-pect-ed friend-ship hence-forth 

Many of the Eastern nations, and among others 
the Jews, had been taught from the r emotes t ages 
to expect the birth *oi a great and wonderful King, 
who should reign over all the people of the earth. 
One of the prophe ts of Israel had spoken of Him 
as a Star rising out of Jacob ; and, owing to this, 
the appearance of a bright star had been looked 
for to show the time of His birth. 

Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem , wise 
men, living in a distant country of the East, saw a 
beautiful star in the heavens, which seemed to 



184 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

point out the way to t he chief city of the_ Jews. 
So they came there and asked where He was who 
was born King of the Jews, for they had seen His 
star in the East, and were come to worship Him. 
The people of the city, together with Herod their 
king, were greatly troubled when they heard these 
words. So Herod called together the chief priests, 
and the most learned men in the city, anc asked 
them where it was that the Christ was expected to 
be born. They told him in Bethlehem of Judea ; 
for there was an old prophecy that out of that city 
should come one who was to rule over Israel.-/ 

Then Herod sent for the wise men, and after he 
had asked them about the star, which they had seen, 
he bade them go to Bethlehem, find out the young 
child, and bring him word that he might, go and 
worship Him. So they went to Bethlehem, which was 
only a few miles off. And as they went, the star, 
which they had seen in their own far-off country in the 
East, moved on before them till it stood over where 
the young child was. And when they came to Him, 
they kneeled down before Him, and gave Him rich 
gifts of gold and silver, and other precious things, 
in token of their duty and subjection to Him. 

Now, when Herod had desired the wise men to 
bring him word where the young child was, that he 
might go and worship Him, he had deceived them. 
He did not want to worship Him, but to kill Him ; 
for as Jesus was called King of the Jews. Herod 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 185 

iv<ared that He might some day take his kingdom 
from him. God, who knows everything, even the 
very thoughts that men imagine they are hiding 
in their hearts, knew how wickedly Herod was in- 
tending to act. So, in a dream, God told the wise 
men not to return to him, and they therefore went 
back again to their own country by another way. v 

Herod waited anxiously for the return of the 
wise men. But when he found they had gone home 
again without coming to him as he had told them, 
he was in a furious rage ; and, in order to make sure 
that the child Jesus should not escape him, he sent 
out his soldiers to kill all the young children under 
two years old, not only in Bethlehem itself, but in all 
the country round about it. §>h, what weeping and 
lamenting were there, when the cruel king killed all 
their little children ! 

But God had provided for the safety of Him who 
was indeed the Son of G«d, though He was 
thought to be the son of Joseph, Mary's husband. 
After the wise men had left Bethlehem, God sent an 
angel to Joseph, to bid him take the young child 
and his mother, and escape with them into the land 
of Egypt, because Herod sought Jesus on purpose 
to kill Him. ., The angel told him this in a drearn. 
But Joseph knew that God had sent him ; so they 
at once fled for their lives into Egypt. Nor did 
they return to their own country till the angel, as he 
had said he would, again came to Joseph in a dream* 



1 86 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

and told him that as the wicked king was dead, 
they might now go back to their own home. Then 
they joyfully set out on their journey to the land of 
Israel. But when they got there and found that 
one of Herod's sons, who was as wicked and cruel 
as his father, reigned over Judea in his place, Joseph 
was afraid of going thither. God, however, directed 
him, in a dream, to go to another part of the country 
of the Jews, called Galilee, which was many miles 
from the chief city where the king that Joseph 
feared was reigning. Galilee also was governed 
by a milder ruler than Judea was. His name was 
Antipas ; and though these two kings were brothers, 
there was no friendship between them. So there 
was everything to make it safe for the holy family 
to go and live there. 

When Joseph and Mary, with their child, whom 
they named Jesus, came by God's direction into 
Galilee, they took up their abode in a city called 
Nazareth, which was henceforth the home of our 
blessed Lord. 

And the child Jesus grew up in health and 
strength, with wisdom far above that of a common 
child. And God, His Father, blessed Him, so that 
He grew in favor with both God and man. 



t 



SECOND BOOK OF READING" LESSONS. 187 



THE GUARDSMAN AND HIS HORSE. 

guards-man c ar-e^-j pf head-gear 

b e-long-m g a-gajnst mean-w hile 

sud-den-ly a f-fect- ed whin-ny 

shout-ed cab^rjian goc^^a-tur-ed 

e-mo-tio n for -aged in-qui-ry 

rc^gjuwKess mut-ter-ing four-foot-ed 

Val-i-ant corn-chand-ler light-en-ed 

A soldier belonging to the Life Guards was 
v/alking along the street one day, when he was 
seen to stop suddenly, look across the street, and 
th,gn rush over to a horse standing with an empty 
cab on the other side of the way. 

" I know him, I know him," he shouted, in a 



188 SECOND BOOK OF EEADJNG LESSONS. 

voice of emotion, regardless of the passers-by , " it '3 
my own old Valknt, my dear old fellow." 

The poor horse seemed to know his caressing 
hand and voice, for he laid back his ears and pushed 
his nose against the soldier, who was very much 
affected at meeting his old friend again. 

The cabman, too, who came up at that moment, 
was touched at the sjcene. After a few moments, 
the guardsman foraged in his pocket, muttering, 
as he did so, 

" He shall have It, if it was the last, the dear old 
boy. Yes; it isn't much, but it's enough for a 
feed of corn, and I '11 treat him to it, that I will." 

There was a corn-chandler's near, and off the sol- 
dier ran with the nosebag for a feed of corn ; and to 
see him undo the headgear and put on the bag, the 
horse meanwhile seeming to whinny and paw with 
pleasure, made so hearty a picture that it was no 
wonder some little boys cried " Hurrah ! " and the 
cabman shook hands with the good-natured soldier. 

"Be good to him," said the poor fellow, "use 
him well. He 's as good a bit of stuff as ever was 
in harness ; " and then he made inquiry as to where 
the present stable of his four-footed friend was. 

He then went on his way, his pocket lightened 
perhaps of his last coin, but his heart warmed ; and 
I have no doubt, from the look of the man's kind 
face, that as often from that time as he could he 
looked in to see old Valiant. s — Mrs Balfour. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 



THE WIND IN A FROLIC. 



189 



com-mo-tion 

scat-ter-ing 

shut-ters 

whisk-ing 

mer-ci-less 

bon-nets 

gin-ger-bread 

l us-ti-e r 

trim-died 

ur-chins 

thiev-ish 



blus-ter-ing 

mon-ster 

makron : ly 

of-fend-ed 

sa-lute 

ca-per-ing 

whist-liiig 

trav-el-ler 

stur-dy 

dwell-ers 

mid-sum-mer 



ker-chiefs 

poul-try 

gob-bled 

threat-en-ed 

ho-li-day 

bjMow-y 

stag-ger-ing 

gleam-ing 

fro-lic-some 

tur-keys 

sea-bird 



the wind one morning sprang up from sleep, 
Saying, " Now for a frolic ! now for a leap ! 
Now for a mad-cap galloping chase ! 
I '11 make a commotion in every place ! " 

Bo it swept with a bustle right through a great town, 
Cracking the signs and scattering down 
Shutters ; and whisking, with merciless squalls, 
Old women's bonnets and gingerbread stalls. 
There never was heard a much lustier shout, 
As the apples and oranges trundled about ; 
And the urchins that stand with their thievish eyes, 
For ever on watch, ran off each with a prize. 
Then away to the field it went, blust'ring and hum- 
ming, 
And the cattle all wonder'd what monster was coming ; 



1 90 SECOND BOOK OF HEADING LESSONS. 

It pluck'd by the tails the grave matronly cows, 
And toss'd the colts' manes all over their brows ; 
Till, offended at such an unusual salute, 
They all turn'd their backs, and stood sulky and mut 






So on it went capering and playing its pranks, — 
Whistling with reeds on the broad river's banks, 
Puffing the birds as they sat on the spray, 
Or the traveller grave on the king's highway. 
It was not too nice to hustle the bags 
Of the beggar, and flutter his dirty rags ; 
'Twas so bold, that it fear'd not to play its joke 
With the doctor's wig or the gentleman's cloak. 
Through the forest it roar'd, and cried, gaily, "Now, 
You sturdy old oaks, I '11 make you bow ! " 
And it made them bow without more ado, 
Or it crack'd their great branches through and 
through. 

Then it rush'd like a monster on cottage and farm, 
Striking their dwellers with sudden alarm ; 
And they ran out like bees in a midsummer swarm : 
There were dames with their 'kerchiefs tied over theii 

caps, 
To see if their poultry were free from mishaps ; U 
The turkeys they gobbled, the geese scream'd aloud, * 
And the hens crept to roost in a terrified crowd ; 
There was rearing of ladders, and logs were laid on. 
Where tb£ thatch from the roof threaten'd soon to 

be gone. 



SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 191 

^>ut the wind had swept on, and had met in a lane 
With a school-boy, who panted and struggled in vain ; 
For it toss'd him and twirl'd him, then pass'd, and 

he stood 
With his hat in a pool and his shoes in the mud. 

Then away went the wind in its holiday glee, 
And now it was far on the billowy sea ; 
And the lordly ships felt its staggering blow, 
And the little boats darted to and fro. 

But lo ! it was night and it sunk to rest, 
On the sea-bird's rock in the gleaming west, 
Laughing to think in its frolicsome fun, 
How little of mischief it had done. 






THE OLD MAN AND HIS ASS. 

dis-mount-ing cqm-plais-ance trudg-ing 
shoul-ders whist-ling crip-pled 

An old man and his little boy were driving an 
is to the market to sell. "What a fool is this 
fellow," says a man upon the road, " to be trudging 
on foot with his son, that his ass may go light ! " 
The old man, hearing this, set his boy upon the ass, 
and went whistling by his side. " Why, sirrah," 
cries a second man to the boy, " is it fit for you to 



192 SECOND BOOF OF BEADING LESSONS. 

be riding:, while your poor aged father is walking on 
foot?" The father, upon this rebuke, took down 
his boy from the ass and mounted himself. " D» 
you see," says a third, " how the lazy old knave ride.4 
along upon his beast, while his poor little boy is 
almost crippled with walking ? " The old man no 
sooner heard this, than he took up his son behind 
him. " Pray, honest friend," says a fourth, " is that 
ass your own ? " " Yes," says the man. " One would 
not have thought so," replies the other, " by your 
loading him as you do without mercy. You and 
your son are better able to carry the poor beast than 
he is to carry you." 

" Anything to please," says the owner ; and dis- 
mounting with his son, they tied the legs of the ass 
together, and by the help of a pole tried to carry 
him upon their shoulders over the bridge that led 
to the town. 

This was so amusing a sight, that the people came 
in crowds to laugh at it ; till the ass, not liking the 
too great complaisance of his master, burst asunder 
the cords which tied him, slipped from the pole, and 
tumbled into the river. The poor old man made 
the best of his way home, ashamed and vexed, that, 
by trying to please everybody, he had pleased no- 
body, and lost his ass into the bargain. 



SECOND BOOK OF EEADING LESSONS. 193 

THE BEST FUN. 

com-pan-ions e-ven-ing wear-i-some 

as-sem-bled un-ob-serv-ed pro-po-sal 

sep-ar-a-ted a-bun-dant ac-ced-ed 

im-pa-tient re-si-dence af-ter-wards 

sat-is-fac-tion de-mur-red in-vo-ca-tion 

car-pen-ters ma-jor-i-ty de-lib-er-ate 

" Now, boys, I '11 tell you how we can have some 
fun," said Freddie to his companions, who had as- 
sembled on a beautiful moonlight evening, for slid- 
ing, snow-balling, and fun in general. 

"How?" "Where?" "What is it?" asked 
several eager voices all at once. 

" I heard Widow M'Kay tell a man a little while 
ago," replied Freddie, "that she would go over and 
sit up with a sick child to-night. She said she 
would be over about eight o'clock. Now, as soon 
as she is gone, let us go and make a big snow man 
on her door-step, so that when she comes back in 
the morning, she cannot get into her house without 
first knocking it out of the way." 

" Capital," " First-rate," "Hurrah," shouted some 
of the boys. 

" See here," said Charlie, " I '11 tell you the best 
fun." 

"What is it?" again inquired several voices at once. 

" Wait a while," said Charlie. " Who has a 
wood saw?" 

N 



194 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

* I have," " So have I," " And I," answered three 
of the boys. " But what in the world do you want 
a wood saw for ? " 

" You shall see," replied Charlie. " It is almost 
eight o'clock now, so go and get your saws. You, 
Freddie and Nathan, get each an axe, and I will get 
a shovel. Let us all be back here in fifteen minutes, 
and then I '11 show you the fun." 

The boys separated to go on their several errands, 
each wondering what the fun would be, and what 
possible use could be made of wood saws and axes 
in their play. But Charlie was not only a great 
favorite with them all, but also a leader, and they 
fully believed in him and in his promise. They all 
ran quickly, and they were soon again assembled. 

" Now," said Charlie, " Mrs M'Kay is gone, for I 
met her when I was coming back, so let us be off at 
once." 

"But what are you going to do?" inquired several 
impatient members of the party. 

" You shall see directly," replied the leader, as 
they approached the humble residence of Mrs 
M'Kay. 

" Now, boys," said Charlie, " you see that pile of 
wood ; a man hauled it here this afternoon, and I 
heard Mrs M'Kay tell him that unless she got some 
one to saw it to-night, she would have hardly anything 
to make a fire of in the morning. Now we can saw 
and split that pile of wood just about as easy as we 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 195 

could build a great snow-man, and when Mrs M'Kay 
comes home from her watching, she will be fully as 
much surprised to find her wood sawed, as she would 
to find a snow man on her door step, and a great 
deal more pleasantly surprised too. What say you ? 
Will you do it?" 

One or two of the boys rather demurred at first. 
They didn't like to saw wood, they said. But the 
majority were in favor of Charlie's project, so they 
finally joined in and went to work with a will. 

" I '11 go round to the back of the shed," .said 
Charlie, " and crawl through the window and un- 
fasten the door. Then we will take turns in sawing, 
splitting, and carrying in the wood ; and I Want to 
pile it up nicely, and to shovel all the snow away 
from the door ; and a good wide path, too, from the 
door to the street — won't it be fun, when she comes 
home and sees it ? " 

The boys began to ehjoy the fun, for they felt 
that they were doing a good deed, and each one 
felt that pleasure and joy which always result from 
well-doing. 

It was not a long or wearisome job for seven 
robust and healthy boys, to saw, split, and pile up 
the poor widow's half-cord of wood, and to shovel 
a good path. And when it was done, so great was 
their pleasure and satisfaction, that one of the boys 
who objected to the work at first, proposed that they 
should go to a neighboring carpenter's shop, (where 



196 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

plenty of shavings could be had for the carrying 
away,) and each bring an armful of kindling wood. 
The proposal was readily accede d to, and this done, 
they repaire d to their several homes, all of them 
more than satisfied with the " fun " of the evening. 
And next morning, when the weary widow returned 
from watching by the sick-bed, and saw what was 
done, she was pleasantly surprised ; and afterwards, 
when a neighbor (who had, unobserv ed, witnessed 
the labors of the boys) told how it was done, her 
fervent invocation, " God bless the boys," was of it- 
self, if they could but have heard it, an abundant 
reward for their labors. 

Ah ! boys and girls ! the best fun is always found 
in doing something that is kind and useful. This 
is the deliberate opinion of a gray-headed old man ; 
but if you doubt it in the least, just try it for your- 
selves, and you will be convinced. 



THE BEGGAK-MAN. 

in-clem-ent com-fort-a-ble beg-gar-man 
tot-ter-ing wrin-kled stiff-en-ing 

toil-some hos-pit-a-ble droop-ing 

Around the fire, one wintry night, 
The farmer's rosy children sat ; 



SECOND BOOK OF HEADING LESSONS. 197 




The fagot lent its blazing light, 

And jokes went round and careless chat. 



fC - 



When, hark ! a gentle hand they hear ^^^JtSTA^ \ 

Low tapping at the boltedjdoor ; 
And thus, to gain their willing ear, 

A feeble voice was heard t' implore : — 

" Cold blows the blast across the moor ; 

The sleet drives hissing in the wind ; 
The toilsome mountain lies before ; 

A dreary treeless waste behind. 






1 98 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

" My eyes are weak and dim with age ; 

No road, no path, can I descr y ; 
And these poor rags ill stand the rage 

Of such a keen i ncleme nt sky. 

" So faint I am — these tottering feet 
No more my feeble frame can bear , 

My sinking heart f orgets to bea t, 

And drifting snows my tomb prepare. 

" Open your hospitable door, 

And shield me from the biting blast ; 

Cold, cold it blows across the moor, 
The weary moor that I have pass'd ! " 

With hasty steps the farmer ran, 
And close beside the fire they place 

The poor half-frozen beggar-man, 
With shaking limbs and pallid face 

The little children flocking came 

And warm'd his stiffening hands in the 

And busily the good old dame 
A comfortable mess prepares. ' 

Their kindness cheer'd his drooping soul ; 

And slowly down his wrinkled cheek 

The big round tear was seen to roll, 

And told the thanks he could not speak. 
A 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 199 

The children, too, began to sigh, 
And all their merry chat was o'er, 

And yet they felt, they knew not why, 

More glad than they had been before. f£* 

— Aikin. 



TRY AGAIN. 

ne-glect-ing dig-ni-ty dis-coui-age 

en-tan-gled per-se-ver-ance pro-ceed-ed 

as-sist-ance fa-vor-a-ble ob-jec-tion 

loos-en-ed fail-ures pro-per-ly 

"Will you give my kite a lift?" said my little 
ne phew to his sister, after trying in vain tp make 
it fly by dragging it along the ground. 

Lucy very kindly took it up, and threw it into 
the air ; but her brother neglecting to run off at 
the same momen t, the kite fell down again. 

" Ah, now, how awkward you are ! " said the little 
fellow. 

" It was your fault entirely," answered his sister. 

"Try again, children," said I; and Lucy once 
more took up the kite ; but now John was in too 
great a hurry, he ran off so suddenly that he twitched 
it out of her hand; .and the kite fell flat as before. 

" Well, who is to blame now V asked Lucy. 

" Try again," said I. 

They did, and with more care; but a side-wind 



200 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

coming suddenly, as Lucy let go the kite, it was 
blown among some shrubs, and the tail got en- 
tangled in a moment, leaving the poor kite hanging 
with its head downwards. 

" There, there," exclaimed John ; "" that comes of 
your throwing it all to one side." 

" As if I could make the wind blow straight ! r ' 
said Lucy. 

In the meantime I went to the kite's assistance, 
and having loosened the long tail, I rolled it up, say- 
ing, " Come, children, there are too many trees here ; 
let us find a more open space, and then try again." 

We presently found a nice grass-plot, at one side 
of which I took my stand; and all things being 
prepared, I tossed the kite up, just as little John 
ran off. It rose with all the di gnity of. a balloon, 
and promised a lofty flight ; but John, deligh ted to 
find it pulling so hard at the string, stopped short 
to look upwards and admire. — The string slackened, 
and the wind not being very favorable, down came 
the kite to the grass. 

" O John, you should not have stopped," said I. 
" However, try again." 

1 1 won't try any more," replied he, rather sul- 
lenly. " It is of no use, you see. The kite won't fly, 
and I don't want to be plagued with it any longer." 

" Oh fie, my little man ! would you give up the 
sport after all the pains we have taken both to 
make and to fly the kite ! A few failures ought not 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 201 

to discourag e us. Come, I have wound up your 
string ; and now, Try again." 

And he did try, and succeeded, for the kite was 
carried up on the breeze as lightly as a feather ; 
and when the string was all out, John stood in great 
delight, holding fast the stick, and gazing on the 
kite, which now seemed as a little white speck in 
the blue sky. " Look, look, aunt, how high it flies ; 
and it pulls like a team of horses, so that I can 
tiardly hold it. I wish I had a mile of string — I 
am sure it would go to the end of it." 

After enjoying the sight as long as he pleased, 
little John proceede d to roll up the string slowly ; 
and when the kite fell, he took it up with great glee, 
saying that it was not at all hurt, and that it had 
behaved very well. " Shall we come out to-morrow, 
iiunt, after lessons, and Try again ? " 

" I have no o_bjection, my dear, if the weather be 
fine. And now, as we walk home, tell me what you 
have learned from your morning's sport." 

" I have learned to fly my kite properly." 

" You may thank aunt for it, brother," said Lucy ; 
" for you would have given it up long ago, if she had 
not persuaded ygu to Try again." 

" Yes, my dear children, I wish to teach you the 
value of perseverance, even when nothing more de- 
pends upon it than the flying of a kite. Whenever 
you fail in your attempts to do any good thing, let 
your motto be — Try again," 



202 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

I. ANGRY WORDS.— II. A LITTLE WORD 

wear-ing im-pulse de-so-late 

sad-dest friend-ship bit-ter-est 

un-bri-dled reck-less kind-ness 

sin-cere mem-o-ries per-son 

ANGEY WOEDS. 
Poison-drops of care and sorrow, 

Bitter poison-drops are they, 
Weaving for the coming morrow 

Saddest memories of to-day. 

Angry words ! oh let them never 
From the tongue unbridled slip ; 

May the heart's best impulse ever 
Check them, ere they soil the lip. 

Love is much too pure and holy, 

Friendship is too sacred far, 
For a moments reckless folly 

Thus to desolate and mar. 

Angry words are lightly spoken, 
Bitterest thoughts are rashly stirr'd, 

Brightest links of life are broken 
By a single angry word. 

A LITTLE WOED. 

A little word in kindness spoken, 
A motion or a tear, 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 208 

Has often heal'd the heart that 's broken, 
And made a friend sincere. 

A word, a look, has crush'd to earth 

Full many a budding flower, 
Which, had a smile but own'd its birth, 

Would bless life's darkest hour. 

Then deem it not an idle thing 

A pleasant word to speak ; 
The face you wear, the thought you bring, 

A heart may heal or break. 



THE LIAR AND THE TRUTHFUL BOY. 

pun-ish-ed i-ron-ing neigh-bor-hood 

con-fess-ed de-ter-mined bra-zier 

af-ter-wards per-suade neigh-bors 

fright-en- ed hes-i-ta-ting dif-fer-ence 

di-rect-ly hap-pen-ed sig-ni-fy 

Frank and Robert were two little boys about 
eight years of age. Whenever Frank did anything 
wrong he always told his father and mother of it ; 
and when anybody asked about anything which he 
had done or said, he always told the truth, so that 
everybody who knew him believed him. 

But nobody who knew his brother Robert be- 
lieved a word he said, because he used to tell lies. 



204 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 




Whenever he did anything wrong, he did not tud 
to Kis father and mother to tell them of it; but 
when they asked hinTIEbout it, he denied it, and 
said he had not done the things which ne had done 

The reason that Kobert told lies was, because he 
was afraid of being punished for his faults, if hi 
confessed them. He was a coward, and could nol 
bear""the least pain ; but Frank was a brave boy. 
and could bear to be punished for his little faults : 
his mother never punished him so much for such 
little faults, as she did Kobert for the lies which he 
told, and which she found out afterwards. 

One evening, these two little boys were playing 
together in a room by themselves ; their mot* a* 



SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 205 

was ironing in a room next to them, and their 
father was out at work in the fields, so there was 
nobody in the room with Robert and Frank; but 
there was a little dog, Trusty, lying by the fireside. 

Trusty was a pretty, playful little dog, and the 
children were very fond of him. 

"Come," said Robert to Frank, "there is Trusty 
lying beside the fire asleep : let us go and waken 
him, and he will play with us." 

" Oh, yes, do let us ! " said Frank ; so they both 
ran together towards the hearth to waken the dog. 

Now, there was a basin of milk standing upon 
the hearth ; and the little boys did not see where- 
abouts it stood, for it was behind them. As they 
were both playing with the dog, they kicked it with 
their feet, and threw it down ; and the basin broke, 
and all the milk ran out of it over the hearth and 
about the floor. And when the little boys saw 
what they had done, they were very sorry and 
frightened; but they did not know what to do. 
They stood for some time looking at the broken 
basin and the milk without speaking. 

Robert spoke first. " So we shall have no milk 
for supper to-night," said he, and he sighed. 

" No milk for supper ! — why not ? " said Frank 
" Is there no more milk in the house ? " 

" Yes, but we shall have none of it ; for do you 
not remember last Monday, when we threw down 
the milk, my mother said we were very careless, 



206 SECOND BOOK OF KEADING LESSONS. 

and that the next time we did so, we should have 
no more ? And this is the next time ; so we shall 
have no milk for supper to-night." 

" Well, then," said Frank, " we must do without 
it, that's all; we will take care another time; there's 
no great harm done ; come, let us run and tell our 
mother. You know she bids us always tell her 
directly when we break anything; so come," said 
he, taking hold of his brother's hand. 

" I will come just now," said Eobert ; " don't be 
in such a hurry, Frank. Can't you stay a minute ?" 
So Frank stayed ; and then he said, " Come now, 
Eobert." But Robert answered, " Stay a little 
longer ; for I dare not go yet. I am afraid." 

Little boys, I advise you never to be afraid to tell 
the truth ; never say, " Stay a minute," and " Stay 
a little longer," but run directly and tell of what 
you have done that is wrong. 

Frank said no more ; but as his brother would 
not come, he went without him. He opened the 
door of the next room, where he thought his mother 
was ironing ; but whei> he went in, he found that 
she was out, and he thought she was gone to fetch 
more clothes to iron. The clothes, he knew, were 
hanging on the bushes in the garden ; and he ran 
after her to tell her what had happened. 

Now, whilst Frank was gone, Robert was left in 
the room by himself; and all the while he was 
alone, he was thinking of some excuses to make to 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 207 

I;is mother, and he was sorry that Frank was gone 
to tell her the truth. He said to himself, " If Frank 
und I both were to say that we did not throw down 
the basin, she would believe us, and we should have 
milk for supper. I am sorry Frank would go to 
tell her about it." 

Just as he said this to himself, he heard his 
mother coming down stairs ; and then this naughty, 
cowardly boy determined to tell his mother a lie. 
So when she came into the room, and asked, " Who 
did this?" Robert said, "I don't know." 

" You don't know, Robert ! Tell me the truth. 
I shall not be angry with you, child. You will 
only lose the milk at supper ; and as for the basin, 
I would rather have you break all the basins I have 
than tell me a lie. I ask you, Robert, did you 
break the basin ? " 

"No, mother, I did not," said Robert, and he 
colored like fire. 

" Then where is Frank ? Did he do it ?" 

" No, mother, he did not," said Robert ; " for he 
.vas in hopes that when Frank came in he should 
persuade him to say that he did not do it." 

"How do you know," said the mother, "that 
Frank did not do it?" 

" Because — because — because, mother," said 
Robert, hesitating, as liars do for an excuse, " be- 
cause I was in the room all the time, and I did not 
see him do it." 



'208 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

" Then how was the hasin thrown down ? If yoi, 
have been in the room all the time, you can tell.'-' 

Then Robert, going on from one lie to another 
answered, " I suppose the dog must have done it." 
"Did you see him do it?" said his mother. 
" Yes," said this wicked boy. 
" Trusty, Trusty," said she, turning round ; and 
Trusty, who was lying before the fire drying his 
legs, which were wet with milk, jumped up and 
came to her. Then she said, "Fie! fie! Trusty," 
pointing to the milk. « Get me a switch out of the 
garden, Robert ; Trusty must be beat for this." 

Robert ran for the switch, and in the garden he 
met his brother. He stopped him, and told him in 
a great hurry all that he had said to his mother, and 
begged of him not to tell the truth, but to say the 
same as he had done. 

" No, I will not tell a lie," said Frank. « What ! 
is Trusty to be beat ? He did not throw down the 
milk, and he shall not be beat for it. Let me go to 
my mother." 

They both ran towards the house. Robert got 
home first, and he locked the house-door, that Frank 
might not come in. He gave the switch to his 
mother. 

Poor Trusty! he looked up as the switch was 
lifted over his head ; but he could not speak to tell 
the truth. Just as the blow was falling upon him, 
Frank's voice was heard at the window. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 209 

"Stop, stop! dear mother, stop!" cried he, as 
loud as ever he could call. " Trusty did not do it ; 
let me in. Robert and I did it, but do not beat 
Robert." 

• Let us in, let us in !" cried another voice, which 
Robe/t knew to be his father's. " I am just come 
from work, and here is the door locked." 

Robert turned as pale as ashes when he heard his 
father's voice; for his father always whipped him 
when he told a lie. 

His mother went to the door, and unlocked it. 

"What is all this?" cried his father, as he came 
In ; so his mother told him all that had happened. 

" Where is the switch with which you were going 
to beat Trusty ?" said he. 

Then Robert, who saw by his father's looks that 
he was going to beat him, fell upon his knees and 
cried for mercy, saying, " Forgive me this time, and 
I wili never tell a lie again." 

Buii his father caught hold of him by the arm ; 
" I will whip you now," said he, " and then I hope 
you -will not." So Robert was whipped till he cried 
so loud with pain that the whole neighborhood 
could hear him. 

"There," said his father, when he had done, 
" now go without supper. You are to have no 
milk to-night, and you have been whipped. See 
how liars are served ! " Then turning to Frank : 
" Come here and shake hands with me, Frank. You 



210 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

will have no milk for supper, but that does not sig- 
nify ; you have told the truth, and have not been, 
whipped, and everybody is pleased with you. And 
now I will tell you what I will do for you. I wi 1 !. 
give you the little dog Trusty, to be your own dog. 
You shall feed him, and take care of him, and he 
shall be your dog. You have saved him from a 
beating, and I will answer for it you will be a good 
master to him. Trusty, Trusty, come here." 

Trusty came. Then Frank's father took oft 
Trusty's collar. " To-morrow I will go to the 
brazier's," added he, " and get a new collar made 
for your dog. From this day forward he shall al- 
ways be called after you, Frank ! And, wife, when- 
ever any of the neighbors' children ask why th^ 
dog Trusty is to be called Frank, tell them thlb 
story of our two boys : let them know the differ- 
ence between a liar and a boy of truth." 

A MORAL. 

The finest cloth that men can sell 
"Wears out when years are past ; 

The pitcher oft goes to the well, 
But it is broke at last : 

And both alike this moral tell, 
Virtue alone stands fast 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 211 



I. DEEDS OF KINDNESS.— II. HUMILITY. 

trav-el-ler moist-en a-dor-a-tion 

fra-grant night-in-gale oot-stool 

dew-drop hu-mil-i-ty near-est 

DEEDS OP KINDNESS. 

Suppose the little cowslip 

Should hang its golden cup, 
And say, " I 'm such a tiny flower, 

I 'd better not grow up ; " 
How many a weary traveller 

Would miss its fragrant smell, 
How many a little child would grieve 

To lose it from the dell. 

Suppose the glistening dew-drop 

Upon the grass should say, 
" What can a little dew-drop" do ? 

I 'd better roll away \" 
The blade on which it rested, 

Before the day was done, 
Without a drop to moisten it, 

Would wither in the sun. 

Suppose the little breezes, 

Upon a summer's day, 
Should think themselves too small to coo 1 

The traveller on his way ; 



21 2 SECOND BOOK OP BEADING LESSONS. 

Who would not miss the smallest 

And softest ones that blow, 
And think they made a great mistake 

If they were talking so. 

How many deeds of kindness 

A little child may do, 
Although it has so little strength, 

And little wisdom too. 
It wants a loving spirit, 

Much more than strength, to prove 
How many things a child may do 

For others by his love. 

HUMILITY. 

The bird that soars on highest wing, 
Builds on the ground her lowly nest ; 
And she that doth most sweetly sing, 
Sings in the shade when all things rest ; 
In lark and nightingale we see 
What honor hath humility. 

The saint that wears heaven's brightest croi 

In deepest adoration bends ; 

The weight of glory bows him down 

Then most, when most his soul ascends ; 

Nearest the throne itself must be 

The footstool of humility. 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 



213 



I. THE BOLD BOY AND THE COWARD. 
—II. BY-AND-BY.— III. THE POX AND 
THE DRAKE. 



quar-rel 

mis-chief 

de-served 



girid-ance 
moon-light 
thwart- ing 



pis-tol 

en-deav-or 

un-der-tak-intj 




THE BOLD BOY AND THE COWAED. 

Two boys were one day going home from school, 
when, on turning the corner of a street, the bigger 
of the two called out, " A fight ! a fight ! let us go 
and see." " No," said the other, " let us go home ; 
we have nothing to do with the quarrel, and may 
get into mischief." " You are a coward, and afraid 
to go," said the other, and off he ran. 



214 SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 

The younger went straight home, and next day 
as he was going to school some of the other boy;? 
met him, and laughed at him a great deal for not 
going to the fight. But he did not mind them 
much, as he had no reason to be ashamed of what 
he had done, and he knew that true courage wafl 
shown most in bearing blame when it is not deserve 

A few days after, these boys were all bathing, 
when one of them got into deep water, and began 
to drown. The boys were all afraid to go near him, 
and got out of the water as fast as they could. 

The lad would very soon have been lost, had not 
the boy who would not go to the fight, and who 
had been laughed at by them as a coward, just then 
come up. He at once threw off his clothes, and 
jumping into the water, just reached the boy in 
time, and by great effort brought him to shore. 

The other boys were now all much ashamed, and 
confessed he had more courage than any of them. 

BY-AND-BY. 

There 's a little mischief-making 

Elfin, who is ever nigh, 
Thwarting every undertaking, 

And his name is By-and-By. 

" What we ought to do this minute, 
Will be better done," he '11 cry, 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 215 

" If to-morrow we begin it — 
Put it off," says By-and-By. 

Those who heed his treacherous wooing 
Will his faithless guidance rue — ■ 

What we always put off doing, 
Clearly we shall never do. 

We shall reach what we endeavor 

If on " Now " we more rely ; 
But unto the realms of " Never," 

Leads the pilot " By-and-By." 



THE FOX AND THE DKAKE. 

The fox jump'd up on a moonlight night, 
The stars were shiniug, and all things bright ; 
O ho ! said the fox, it 's a very fine night 
For me to go through the town, e-oh 

The fox, when he came to yonder stile, 
He lifted his ears, and he listen'd a while ; 

ho I said the fox, it 's but a short mile 
From this unto yonder town, e-oh ! 

The fox, when he came to the farmer s gate, 
Whom should he see but the farmer's drake? 

1 love you so well for your master's sake, 
And long to be picking your bones, e-oh 



216 



SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 




The gray goose she ran round the hay-stack : 
O ho ! said the fox, you are very fat ; 
You '11 do very well to ride on my back 
From this unto yonder town, e-oh ! 

The farmer's wife, she jump'd out of bed, 
And out of the window she popp'd her head : 
Oh, husband ! oh, husband ! the geese are all dead. 
For the fox has been through the town, e-oh ! 

The farmer he loaded his pistol with lead, 
And shot the old rogue of a fox through the head : 
Ah, ah ! said the farmer, I think you 're quite dead, 
And no more you '11 trouble the town, e-oh ! 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 



217 



WHITTINGTON AND HIS CAT. 



Whit-ting-ton 

four-teen 

know-ledge 

ig-no-rance 

vex-a-tion 

wag-on-er 

ad-dress-ed 

un-i-corn 

in-tro-duce 

en-coun-ter-ed 

mo-des-ty 

knight-ed 

loy-al-ly 

*e-al-i-ty 



ex-haust-ed 

fa-tigue 

Fitz-war-ren 

dis-turb-ed 

o-ver-heard 

tor-ment^or 

May-or 

dis-con-tent-ed 

val-u-able 

be-fall-en 

lib-er-al 

sus-pect-ed 

ful-fill-ing 

bor-row-ed 



in-fect-ed 

cap-it-al 

di-vert-ing 

bar-bar-ous 

am-i-able 

com-pan-ion 

spe-ci-al 

re-solv-ed 

dis-tinct-ly 

at-tach-ment 

grat-i-tude 

com-pa-ny 

cit-i-zen 

par-li-a-ment 



Jn the reign of King Edward the Third, there 
llwd in a small country village a poor couple, 
named Whittington, who had a son called Dick. 
His parents dying when he was very young, he 
could scarcely remember them at all ; and as he 
was not old enough to work, he was for a long 
time badly off, until a kind but poor old woman 
took pity on him, and made her little cottage his 
home. 

She always gave him good advice ; and as he was 
hard»workitfg and well-behaved, he became quite a 
favorite in the village. When he was fourteen 



218 SEC0N1> BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 




years old, and had grown up to be a stout, good- 
looking lad, the good old woman died, and he had 
to look out how to earn his living by his own 
efforts. Now Dick was a boy of quick parts, and 
fond of gaining knowledge by asking questions of 
everybody who could tell him something useful. 
In this way he had heard much about the wonder- 
ful city of London ; more, indeed, than was true, 
for the country-folks were fond of talking of it as a 
place where the streets were paved with gold. This 
arose from their ignorance, for very few indeed 
amongst them had ever seen it. Although Did? 
was not such a ninny as to believe this nonsense, 



• SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 219 

yet he felt very curious to go to London and see it 
with his own eyes, hoping in so great and wealthy 
i place he should get on better than he could in a 
poor country village. 

One fine summer morning, therefore, he boldly 
started on his journey, with but a trifle of money in 
his pocket, yet full of good spirits and hope. When 
lie had walked on for some hours, he felt very tired, 
and was rather alarmed at the thought of how he 
was to get over the ground. While he was thinking 
about this, he heard the wheels of a heavy wagon 
on its way to London, slowly coming along the road 
behind him. This rough sound was like music to 
his ears, weary as he then was. As soon as the 
wagoner came up, Dick without much ado told him 
his plan, and begged that he might have a lift until 
his legs were rested enough to let him walk again. 
This the man agreed to, and so, partly by riding, 
and partly by walking side by side with the wag- 
oner, Dick managed to reach the great city he was 
so anxious to behold. 

Though Dick's heart beat with joy on finding 
himself really in London, he was not quite pleased 
with the look of the streets and houses. He had 
fancied to himself a grander and richer sort of place 
than the city seemed to him at first sight to be. 
But this is a very common kind of mistake — indeed, 
we all of us make it sometimes; in our fancy, every- 
thing we have yet to see appears only on its bright 



220 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. ■ 

side, but in reality everything has its dark side as; 
well. Dick soon found out this truth for himself, 
as we shall see presently. 

After Dick had parted with the friendly wagoner, 
he had only a groat left out of his little store of 
money ; a night's lodging, and a scanty meal or two 
soon exhausted this, and after wandering about for 
a whole day, he felt so weary and faint from fatigue 
and hunger, that he threw himself down on the 
steps of a doorway, and resting his head on this 
hard pillow, slept soundly until morning. Not 
knowing what to do, he walked on further, and 
looking about him, his eye fell on a strange-look- 
ing knocker on the door of a large house, just like 
the face of a black monkey grinning. He could 
not help grinning too, and then he began to think 
there could be no great harm if he lifted the knockei 
and waited to see who should appear. Now, the 
house stood in a busy part of London, and belonged 
to a worthy merchant of the name of Fitz warren, 
who had a daughter called Alice, of about the same 
age as Dick. It was the cook, a sour-looking, ill- 
tempered woman, who opened the door. When she 
saw it was a poor, ill-dressed, country lad who had 
disturbed her at breakfast, she began to abuse him 
roughly and to order him away. Luckily for Dick, 
Mr Fitzwarren, who was a kind, polite gentleman, 
came up to the door at this moment, and listened 
carefully to the poor lad's story ; and so much struck 



' SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 221 

was he with his truthful aspect and simple language 
that he kindly ordered Dick to be taken into the 
house and cared for, until he should be able to get 
his living in some decent way. 

Alice, the merchant's daughter, who had over- 
heard all this, and well knowing the unfeeling nature 
of the cook, did all she could to save Dick from the 
cook's ill will and harsh treatment. Her own kind- 
ness of heart made her feel for the distress of the 
/poor orphan boy, and she tried her best to make her 
parents take some interest in his welfare. She suc- 
ceeded so far, that they agreed Dick should remain 
in the house if -he could make himself useful by 
assisting the cook, and in other ways. • This, how- 
ever, was not a very easy matter, for the cook never 
liked the boy from the first, and did all she could to 
spite him. Amongst her other acts of cruelty, she 
made him sleep on a wretched hard bed placed in 
an old loft, sadly infested with rats and mice. Dick 
dared not to complain ; and besides, he did not like 
to make mischief ; so he bore with his trouble as 
long as he could, and resolved at length, when 
>he should have money enough, to buy himself a 
cat. Now, it happened that, within a very few 
days from this, a poor woman, passing by the door 
while he was cleaning it, offered to sell him a cat, 
and when she heard his story, let him have it for 
a penny. 

,Dick took his prize up to his loft, and there kept 



222 SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 

. pussy in an old wicker basket, with a cover to it, to 
be out of the cook's sight, as he feared she would 
do the cat a mischief if she found her straying 
about. Now and then he would take pussy with 
him when he went out on errands, so that they soon 
became great friends. Not only was pussy a capital 
mouser, and very soon got rid of his nightly visitors, 
the rats and mice, but she was very clever and quick 
in learning many diverting tricks that her master 
tried to make her perform. One day when Dick 
was amusing himself with her antics, he was sur- 
prised by his young mistress, Alice, who became 
afterwards almost as fond of the cat as Dick was 
himself. 

This young lady always remained the poor lad's 
friend, and this cheered him up under the barbarous 
usage he received from the cook, who sometimes 
beat him severely. Alice was not beautiful in per- 
son, but what was of greater real value to her, she 
was truly amiable in temper, and had the most 
pleasing manners. It was no wonder, then, that 
Whittington, smarting under the ill treatment of 
the coarse cookmaid, should regard his kind young 
mistress as nothing less than an angel ; whilst the 
modesty of the youth, his correct conduct, his re- 
spectful bearing, and his love of truth interested 
Alice so much in his behalf, that she persuaded her 
father to let one of the young men teach him to 
write, for he could already read very well ; and tbr 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 223 

progress he made In this, and in acquiring further 
)tnowledge, was a matter of surprise to all. 

Mr Fitzwarren, as we have said, was a merchant ; 
and it was his custom, whenever one of his ships 
frent out, to call his family and servants around 
him, and ask them all in turn to make a little 
venture, according to their wishes or power, under 
the special charge of the captain. Poor Whittington 
was the only one absent when this next happened ; 
he, poor fellow, felt ashamed that he possessed 
nothing of value to send as his venture. But he 
was called for, and told that he must produce some- 
thing — no matter what — to try his luck. The poor 
youth then burst into tears, from very vexation and 
shame, when his kind friend Alice whispered in his 
?ar, " Send your cat, Dick;" and forthwith he was 
ordered to take Pussy, his faithful friend and com- 
panion, on board, and place her in the hands of the 
captain. His young mistress, however, took good 
care to make the mouser's good qualities known to 
the captain, so that he might make the most of her 
for Dick's benefit. 

After the loss of his cat Dick felt rather sorrow- 
ful, and this was not made less by the taunts and 
jeers of his old enemy, the cook, who used to tease 
him constantly about his " fine venture," and the 
great fortune he was to make by it. Poor fellow ! 
she led him a wretched life; and as his young 
mistress, besides, was soon after absent from home 



224 SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 

on a visit, he lost heart entirely, and could no longei 
bear to live in the same house with his tormentor. 

In this gloomy state of mind, he resolved to quit 
Mr Fitzwarren's house, and he started off one morn- 
ing very early, unnoticed by any one, and wandered 
some distance out of town. Tired and wretched, 
he flung himself upon a large stone by the roadside, 
which, from his having rested himself upon it, is called 
Whittington's Stone to this day. He presently sank 
into a sort of doze, from which he was roused by 
the sound of Bow Bells, that began to ring a peal, 
as it was All-souls' day. As he listened to them, 
ie fancied he could make out the following words, 
addressed to himself, and the more he listened, the 
plainer the bells seemed to chant them to his ear : 

" Turn again, Whittington, 
Lord Mayor of London." 

A new spirit of hope was awakened within him, 
as he kept repeating these words after the bells, for 
they inspired him with great thoughts. So dis- 
tinctly did they appear to be addressed to him, that 
he was resolved to bear any hardships rather than 
check his way to fortune by idle repining. So he 
made the best of his way home again, and, late in 
the morning as it was, he luckily got into the house 
without his absence having been noticed. Like a 
brave-hearted boy, he exerted himself now more 
than ever to make himself useful, above all to his 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 225 

worthy master and his kind young mistress, and he 
'jucceeded beyond his hopes ; almost everybody saw 
that he was desirous to do his duty, and to excel in 
*,11 he tried to do. Alice was more and more satis- 
fied with his conduct, and heard with pleasure of 
the great progress he was making in his studies. 
But the cook continued as surly as ever, although 
she must have seen he no longer minded her ill- 
temper as he used to do. 

While matters were thus going on at home, Mr 
Fitzwarren's ship, the Unicorn, was slowly pursu- 
ing her voyage to a distant part of Africa. In those 
days the art of sailing was but little known, and 
much greater dangers were incurred through igno- 
rance in steering vessels than is now the case. The 
Unicorn was unlucky enough to meet with much 
foul weather, and was so tossed about that she lost 
her latitude; but what was worse, owing to her 
being so long away from any port, her provisions 
were nearly all gone, and every one on board began 
to despair of their ever returning to England. It 
was wonderful that, all through this dreadful period 
of suffering, Whittington's cat should have been 
kept alive and well ; but so it was, and this no 
doubt was owing to the great care taken of her by 
the captain himself, who had not forgotten the 
interest Alice had expressed to him about the cat. 
Not only was pussy by this means kept alive, but 
she contrived to bring up a little family of kittens 



226 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

that she had during the voyage ; their funny tricks 
greatly diverted the sailors, and helped to keep 
them in good humor when they began to feel dis- 
contented. 

At length, when the last biscuit bad been eaten, 
and nothing but death seemed to be in store for the 
poor sailors, they were rejoiced to find that their 
prayers to Heaven for aid had been heard : for when 
day broke, land was seen. This proved to be a 
kingdom on the African coast, abounding with 
wealth. The people who lived there were black, 
but they were kind, and much pleased to be visited 
by the ships of white men, for the cruel slave-trade 
had not then been heard of among them. The 
king, as soon as he was told of the arrival of the 
Unicorn, sent some of his great men to invite the 
captain and a few of his companions to visit his 
court, and to have the honor of dining with him 
and his queen. 

A grand dinner, in the fashion of the country, 
was provided for the occasion ; and great good 
humor prevailed until the dishes were placed on 
the table, when the white visitors were astonished at 
the appearance of rats and mice in vast numbers, 
which came from their hiding-places, and devoured 
nearly all the viands in a very short time. The 
king and queen seemed to regard this as no uncom- 
mon event, although they felt ashamed it should 
occur on this occasion. 



SECOND BOOK OF BEADING LESSONS. 227 

When the captain found, on making inquiry, that 
there was no such animal as a cat known in the 
country, he all at once thought of asking leave to 
introduce Whittington's cat at court, feeling con- 
vinced that pussy would soon get rid of the abom- 
inable rats and mice that infested it. The royal pair 
and the whole court listened to the captain's account 
of the cat's good qualities as a mouser with wonder 
and delight, and were eager to see her talents put to 
the proof. Puss was taken ashore in her wicker 
basket, and a fresh repast having been prepared, 
which, on being served up, was about to be attacked 
in a similar way to the previous one, when she 
sprung in a moment among the crowd of rats and 
mice, killing several, and putting the rest to flight 
in less than the space of a minute. 

Nothing could exceed the joy caused by this event. 
The king and queen and all their people knew not 
how to make enough of pussy, and they became 
more and more fond of her when they found how 
gentle and playful she could be with them, although 
so fierce in battling with rats and mice. As might 
be expected, the captain was much pressed to, leave 
this valuable cat with his black friends, and he, 
thinking that they would no doubt make a right 
royal return for so precious a gift, readily acceded 
to the request. The queen's attachment to puss 
seemed to know no bounds, and she felt great alarm 
lest any accident should befall her, fearing that, in 



228 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 



that case, the odious rats and mice would return, 
more savage than ever. The captain comforted her 
greatly, however, by telling her that pussy had a 
young family of kittens on board, which should also 
be duly presented at court. 

Now the queen had a tender heart, and when she 
had heard from the captain all the particulars of 
Whittington's story, and of the poor lad's great 
regret at parting with his cat, she feit quite loath 
to deprive him of his favorite ; the more so that 
pussy's kittens were found to be quite able to 




frighten away the rats and mice. So the cat was 
replaced in her wicker basket and taken on board 
again. The gratitude of the king and queen for the 



SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 229 

.mportant services rendered by pussy and her family 
was shown by the rich treasures they sent to Whit- 
tington, as the owner of the wonderful cat. 

The captain, having at last completed his business, 
and got ready his ship as well as he could, took 
leave of his African friends, and set sail for England ; 
and after a very long absence, during which Mr 
Fitzwarren had given up the ship for lost, she safely 
arrived in the port of London. When the captain 
called upon the merchant, the latter was much 
affected at again seeing so valued a friend restored 
to him, whom he regarded as lost. The ladies also, 
who were present, wept for joy, and were very 
curious to hear of the perils encountered and the 
strange sights witnessed by the captain. Alice, in 
particular, wanted to know without delay what had 
befallen Dick's cat, and what was the success of his 
venture. When the captain had explained all that 
had happened, he added that Whittington ought to 
be told of the result of his venture very carefully, 
otherwise his good luck might make him lose his 
wits. But Mr Fitzwarren would hear of no delay, 
and had him sent for at once. 

Poor Dick at that moment had just been basted 
by the cook with a ladle of dripping, and was quite 
ashamed to appear in such a plight before company. 
But all his woes were soon forgotten when the 
worthy merchant told him of his good fortune, and 
added that it was a just reward granted by Heaven 



230 SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 

for his patience under hard trials, and for his gocx / 
conduct and industry. When the boxes and bales 
containing the treasures given by the African king 
and queen to the owner ot the cat, and marked out- 
side with a large W, were displayed before the aston- 
ished youth, he burst into tears, and implored his 
master to take all, if he would but continue to be 
his friend. But the merchant would touch none cf 
it, declaring it to belong to Whittington, and to him 
alone. Before the captain took his leave, he said to 
Dick playfully, "I have another present for you 
from the African queen," and calling to a sailor be- 
low, ordered him to bring up the wicker-basket, out 
of which leaped Mrs Puss, to the great joy of her 
former master ; and right happy was she to see him 
again, purring round him, and rubbing her head 
against his face when he took her up in his arms. 
For the rest of her days she continued to live with 
her grateful master. 

Dick made a liberal and proper use of his wealth, 
rewarding all who had been in any way kind to 
him ; nor did he even omit his old enemy, the 
cook, when bestowing his bounty, although she could 
never after look at him full in the face, from a sense 
of shame. Mr Fitzwarren constantly refused Whit- 
tington's earnest wishes that he would accept at 
least some of his great wealth, but he agreed to 
become his guardian and the manager of his property 
until he should be of age. Under his prudent 



SECOND BOOK OP READING LESSONS. 231 

, unsel, Whittington grew up to be a thriving mer- 
.*nant, and a wise and good citizen. 

With all his success, he never lost his old modesty 
of bearing, and deeply as he loved Alice, he for a 
long time delayed to make his secret known to her 
father, lest he should be thought ungrateful; but 
the kind merchant had long suspected the fact, and 
at last taxed Richard with it. He could not deny 
it, but found he had no cause to regret having 
opened his heart to Mr Fitzwarren. That worthy 
tnan, on Whittington's coming of age, rewarded him 
with the hand of his daughter, who fully shared his 
.love, having long in secret regarded him with favor. 

Whittington rose in importance every year, and 
vras much esteemed by all persons. He served in 
Parliament, was knighted also, and was thrice Lord 
Mayor of London — thus fulfilling the prophecy 
uttered, as he had fancied, by Bow Bells. When 
be served that office for the third time, it was 
during the reign of Harry the Fifth, just after that 
great king had conquered France. Sir Richard 
gave a feast to him and his queen in such great 
style, that the king was pleased to say, "Never 
prince had such a subject ! " to which it has been 
iaid the Lord Mayor loyally replied, "Never sub- 
feet had such a prince ! " At this feast the king 
was much pleased with a fire made from choice 
woods and fragrant spices, upon which Sir Richard 
said that he would add something that would make 



232 SECOND BOOK OF READING LESSONS. 

the fire burn more brightly, for the pleasure of his 
king ; when he threw into the flames many bonds 
given by the king for money borrowed of the citi- 
zens to carry on the war with France, and which 
Sir Richard had called in and paid to the amount 
of sixty thousand pounds. 

After a long life, this good man, who made him- 
self much loved by his noble public works and acts 
of charity, for many of which he is still kept in 
memory, died, greatly to the sorrow of every one, 
having survived Alice, his wife, about twenty 
years. 




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