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Full text of "A Second Two Hundred Pattern Glass Pitchers"

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748.2 K15t2 
v.2 

Kamrn, Minnie Elizabeth 
(Watson 

hundred pattern 



Of 





o utanoreo 
Pattern Cflass 
Pttck&is 



MINNIE WATSON KAMM 

Drawings by the author 



MOTSCHALL COMPANY 



Copyright 1940 
Minnie Watson Kamm 

First Edition 



Additional copies of this book may 

be obtained from 
MRS. OLIVER KAMM 

365 Lakeshore Road 
Gross e Pointe Farms. Michigan 

PRICE: One Dollar 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 
INTRODUCTION 1 

GROUP ONE 

Creamers of foreign origin and dating probably from the 
Sixties 3 

GROUP TWO 

Pieces of early American origin with crimped applied 
handles, two of them hollowed as well 7 

GROUP THREE 

Creamers of early date with high to moderate standards 
and plain flat circular bases. Patterns generally geometric 
and in relief; handles mostly pressed and fancy, a few of 
the early applied type 11 

GROUP FOUR 

Creamers with high to moderate stands but with the bases 
hollowed to the waist 23 

GROUP FIVE 

Patterns with stands reduced to thickened or thin waists 
only and bases sloping and hollowed beneath to the waists; 
handles pressed or of the later applied type 51 

GROUP SIX 

Bases lower than in Group Five, with very little hollowed 

space beneath 59 

GROUP SEVEN 

Creamers with no artificial bases, resting on the bottoms 

of their bowls 98 

GROUP EIGHT 

A group including cylinders and tankards 105 

GROUP NINE 

Creamers with bowls resting on uneven scalloped bases 
increasing in height to separate feet -109 

GROUP TEN 

Water pitchers of various types and periods 121 

INDEX 133 



All drawings were made full size and reduced to one-third of 
their acutal height except the following: 

Ruby Bar and Flute Giant Bull's Eye, W. P. 

Torpedo Noonday Sun 

The Kitchen Stove The Town Pump 

Kaleidoscope Group Ten (except the 

Swirl and Ball, Variant last one which has had 

Swirl and Diamond one-third reduction. 



INTRODUCTION 

This booklet is a continuation of the writer's first one on the subject and 
includes ^ two hundred more patterns, mostly American and covering various 
periods in our glass manufacture; obviously, however, most of the designs are 
fairly late ones and very few of them are included in the glass literature or have 
generally recognized names. 

The chronological order used in the former booklet is followed here and, 
while an attempt has been made to arrange patterns in order of their age, this 
process is far from satisfactory because some patterns included a creamer having 
a high standard and flat circular foot and another resting flat on the bottom of 
the bowl It may be true, however, that the latter piece was added to the trade 
list at a later period, many patterns often being carried in stock for many years. 

It is well known that some of the old-time patterns were revived at much 
later periods; the United States Glass Company, for instance, which was formed 
around ^1890, absorbed some thirteen older firms, some of them dating from the 
early Fifties George Duncan and Sons, Adams and Company, and Bryce Broth- 
ers, all of Pittsburgh; Richards and Hartley and Challinor, Taylor and Company, 
both of Tarenturn, Pa.; Giliinder Bros, of Port Jervis, N. Y. 7 and many others, 
several of these companies later starting out afresh under slightly different names 
and often at different places. 

In 1898^ many of the old iron molds of the parent companies were discovered 
and reconditioned, and some of the older patterns were thus revived but they 
never attained the popularity of earlier years for the taste of the public had 
changed, due to ^ the advent of brilliantly colored blown glass and later of cut 
glass. These revived patterns were soon dropped but when these later pieces are 
found today they add to the confusion of the collector although they can be 
detected sometimes by inferiority of quality and a slight blurring of the pattern, 

There is considerable variation in a single piece in a pattern, the creamer 
one may have in hand differing considerably from the author's drawing in shape, 
size, and placement of the pattern. This is due to the fact that, when copyrights 
were nonexistent, a pattern once having become popular was reproduced by sev- 
eral factories, with slight unavoidable or purposefully made variations. 

One is often puzzled by finding water pitchers with covers or ledges inside 
the rim for missing covers and by the fact that creamers in a given pattern may 
exist both with and without ledges for covers; this is explained by the fact that 
factories made covered hollow wares such as compotes, pitchers, bowls, etc. with 
covers for the southern market, omitting the separate covers for their northern 
customers, for fifty years ago screening was not as generally used as at present. 

Pitcher covers differ considerably; some were separate glass pieces carrying 
patterns similar to those on the bodies; other lids were made of britannia metal, 
pewter, or gutta percha and fitted by two pins into a socket on top of the handle". 
In earlier days metal collars were fitted around the neck of the piece, irremovable" 
save by breaking the piece. The tops were often bee-hive-shaped with raised con- 
centric circles rising to a central cone, and with a long flat backward-slanting flap 
for a lift. 

Many of the delightful little opaque white and colored creamers which are 
still rather abundant and inexpensive were containers for prepared mustard and 
sold in the early Eighties for a dime; they were still popular in village and countrv 
stores as late as 1895. 

In some trade catalogs the "compote" was called a "stemmed bowP or a 
u comport".^ while a low bowl was often labelled a '"compote' 7 . 4 *Nappies" were 
many and included bowls from punch size down to little honey dishes. 

Few of the old trade catalogs are still extant in the hands of the manufac- 
turers and practically none can be found in the great libraries of the country for 
they were jiot generally used. Most plants, including the Sandwich one, were able 
to sell their output as rapidly as it was made without the need of a printed pic- 
ture. In most extant catalogs, the patterns went by numbers only, thus justify- 
ing present-day nomenclature; however, when an original name' is found, and 
when it does not clash with a name in use today, the writer believes it should 
be Recorded, not for the purpose of changing present-day usage but for the his- 
torical record alone: this has been done a few times in this booklet. 



Color tints differ considerably in the clear glass patterns, an amethystine 
tint due to long exposure to strong light; one manufacturer told the writer that 
in years gone by his company had sent Its glass to Arizona where it was exposed 
to "sunlight on the sands for' five years before being brought back east for sale, 
for this tint was considered highly desirable and not to be obtained otherwise. 
A greenish tint is due to iron in the sand, and a dull, dingy blackish hue to too 
much manganese in the mixture, various batches of the mix giving slightly 
different tints. 

Potassium gives glass its brilliance and lead its resonance. 

It is obvious that most of the patterns shown here are late ones, dating from 
the Nineties and later; however, one should not disparage such a piece but respect 
a householder who has kept intact a piece of perishable glass for nearly half a, 
century! A collection of dated pieces, ranging generally from 1890 to 1905, will 
be of historic value in years to come. 

The many plain patterns are confusing to collectors; they were made thus 
to be variously decorated later, sometimes by the makers and often they were 
sold to minor concerns, who gave them ruby tops or ruby blocks or stars or who 
added gilt rims and scrolls or etched or engraved ferny sprays or even painted 
or enamelled flowers. 

Today these basic patterns, thus variously decorated, add to the confusion 
of collectors but also add to his curiosity. Glass as a hobby does not grow stale 
for different variations constantly crop up; the same ferny foliage may appear 
on a host of patterns, the same crude applications of paint presupposing a like 
origin; to a collector with a little experience, newly acquired pieces fit into one's 
jig-saw puzzle as though their places were pre-arranged, a pitcher, for instance, 
which carries a motif like that on another having a second motif like that of a 
third, thus forming a connecting link between the two. 

Sunbursts and stars are identical on many patterns, lips or handles are often 
identical although there are no other resemblances, a tiny motif down the mold- 
line may be used on several patterns, etc., so that one is enabled fairly well to 
arrive at conclusions as to makers and periods even though the original knowledge 
generally is lost for all time. 

This pamphlet obviously is not meant for creamer collectors alone, but should 
be useful to collectors of all individual pieces as well as sets, for the various motifs 
appear in sufficient detail to aid in identification of other pieces in the sets. 

The writer is glad to have used pieces owned by collectors in many parts of 
the country in order to indicate the distribution of patterns, for it is well known 
that patterns rather common in some sections are rarely found in others. Fac- 
tories were often rather small and transportation was difficult and the entire out- 
put could be sold near at home: the early plants were located on the eastern 
seaboard, the next group in Pennsylvania, and others followed straight westward 
as far as Indiana following the natural gas route. 

For instance, as the ice went out of the Wabash River, the "glass boats 
crude flat boats steered by a stern oar and surmounted by a cabin stocked with 
glass and chmaware* 7 * left from its northern reaches, near which several factories 
were located, touching at numerous river ports all the way down to New Orleans, 
restocking the small general stores or the peddlers who carried the ware on their 
backs, on a pack horse or in wagons into the hinterlands, trading it piece by 
piece for butter or eggs or, more rarely, for cash. 

It is interesting to note today the light which appears in the eyes even of a 
middle-aged man as he looks over someone's glass collection and picks out pieces 
or patterns he knew as a boy on the farm, so accurately were youthful memories 
etched on the brain. 

The writer expresses her thanks to the several manufacturers who have aided 
in identifications at various places throughout this work; she is also indebted to 
Mr. E. P. O'Reilly, Jr. of the Plaza Galleries, New York, Mr. W. L. Emmons, 
of Jacksonville, Illinois, Mrs. George Dillenborger. of Ypsilanti, Michigan and 
Mr. George Jones of Cambridge, Mass, for the loan of glass and for information 
concerning patterns. 

* William E. Wilson. 'The Wabash' 1 , Xew York. 1940. 



GROUP ONE 

Included here are five creamers differing radically from con- 
temporary American glass patterns; all are adjudged of British 
origin because of similarities to pieces of known origin and date. 
All have pressed handles rather than applied, and all have con- 
stricted waists and thick flaring bases with scalloped or panelled 
margins. The patterns are geometric, based on the diamond or 
bull's eye motifs deeply depressed and in high relief. 




ENGLISH POINTED THUMBPRINT, VARIANT 

The beautiful creamer shown here is ex- 
ceptionally fine in quality, of thick brilliant 
glass which is crystal-clear and possesses a 
high sharp tone when struck. 

The body is small and compact, heavy 
and thick for its size, weighing eighteen 
ounces. It is ovoidal in shape, with a shal- 
low waist and a flaring petal-like base with 
six large, thick scallops. The under side is 
domed up to the waist and is plain. 

The rim is very uneven, with a high 
back, inverted V's and curves, and the lip is 
also high arched and narrow at the tip. 

The handle is pressed, arches high at the top and has a long tab at 
the base; the side panels are narrower than the front and back ones and 
all margins are rounded off. 

The upper inch (more or less) of the body is divided vertically into 
flat panels of uneven width, each panel arched at its base and this panelled 
section is separated from the rest of the body by a deep bevelled groove. 
The main part of the body is covered with a depressed, horizontal thumb- 
print design, each print scored down its middle by a deeper line and end- 
ing top and bottom in sharp points. There is a short vertical bar on the 
side of each print, the rows fitting into each other at this bar. The lowest 
row of prints is much the smaller, every alternate lower point reaching 
down to the waist and continuing to the margin of the base as flat 
panelling. 

3-part mold, 4 in. high. 

This creamer is adjudged an early English piece, dating from the 1850's 
or thereabouts, because of its similarity to another of known date described 
as "English Thurnbprint" (See Kamm*, p. 3). 

The general shape, thick scalloped base, pressed handle, pattern and 
quality are similar although the present piece is of much finer quality. 
The writer recently found the sugar to match the "English Thumbprint" 
creamer, and found it about twice the size of the creamer, with a fine 
high domed cover with knobbed finial. 



Minnie Watson Kamm, "Two Hundred Pattern Glass Pitchers", 1939. 

3 




INVERTED PRISM AND DIAMOND BAND 

This creamer is thick, clear and brilliant 
but not heavy, and possesses a fine bell tone 
when struck. The body is practically cylin- 
drical, tapering to a narrow waist and out 
again to form the flaring, scalloped base 
which is very thick. There is a shelf just 
above the waist. 

The rim has two large even scallops on 
each side, with a sharp rise in front to the 
high narrow lip. There is a half scallop on 
this slope and the back rises sharply with a 
nub on the top, a point characteristic of 
many of these foreign pieces. 

The handle, like that of the other pieces 

in this group, is pressed, with a tab under the upper and lower attach- 
ments. It is curved sharply upward and has four flat panels, all the 
margins softly rounded. 

The base is edged with twelve scallops and is domed beneath to the 
waist; it is decorated beneath with an eighteen-rayed star which appears 
from above as fluting. 

The body is covered with pattern in fairly high relief, all the margins 
softly blurred; through the middle is a wide horizontal band made up of 
short vertical sunk prisms pointed at both ends; fitting into these niches 
both above and below is a row of diamonds in good relief with plain flat 
tops. Above the upper row the surface is indented and arched save the 
front portion under the lip, where the sunk prism effect continues up to 
the rim. 

Below the lower row of diamonds another series of sunk prisms extends 
to the waist, ending just above in little v's. 

3-part mold, 5 in. high. 

The writer believes this to be an English piece dating from around 
1855 for, while the antecedents are lost, the pitcher is very similar to the 
series shown by Kamm (pp. 3-5); the present piece has identical resonance 
with that of the "English Herringbone" shown there; it is equally as thick 
as that piece and both are equally light in weight; the bases are nearly 
identical in crenulation and the underbase star; the two handles are com- 
parable and the long scoop-like lips similar. Decoration, too, is heavy in 
both and similar. 

This piece is not quite as heavy, nor does it have as fine a resonance, 
as "English Pointed Thumbprint" or "Irish Bull's Eye and Star", but the 
lips, handles, and heavy geometrical decoration are all very much alike. 




ENGLISH QUILTING 

This beautiful piece is thick and 
heavy; it is fairly clear and free from 
crazing, but has a slightly dingy aspect 
and lacks the fine mirror polish of the 
pitcher shown just before. However, it 
has a fine, clear bell resonance with over- 
tones, a finer sound than that given out 
by any other in this group, although all 
are superior to the general tone of Ameri- 
can glass. 

The creamer is one-fourth inch thick 
at some places on the rim, like the first 
one of this group and, while considerably 
larger than that piece, is not quite as 
heavy. The body is nearly cylindrical, curving in sharply just above the 
shallow waist. The base is rather small for the body, is very thick and 
octagonal in shape, eight flat panels beginning at the shelf above the waist 
and continuing through to the margin of the base. The under side of the 
latter is domed and decorated with a plain sixteen-rayed star, appearing 
from above as fluting. 

The pressed handle, like others in this group, is sharply angled upward 
affording a good grip with the hand; it is panelled with flat sides, remain- 
ing of even width from top to bottom. The basal attachment is unique in 
curling into a scroll, possibly in imitation of the Waterford type of applied 
handles (See Kamm, p. 6). 

The rim is unevenly scalloped, like most of these foreign pieces, with 
a sharp rise at the back slanting backward, to which the handle is attached; 
there are four flat panels on each side of uneven width, ending below at 
a deep bevelled groove an inch or more below the rim, the lower angles of 
the panelling cut off sharply, appearing as notches. 

Below the groove is a massive ring in nearly half relief, and below this 
a wide band extending around the body and reaching the shelf above the 
waist in a uniform pattern of quilting or diaper work, placed diagonally 
and consisting of square raised blocks separated from each other by- 
slender bars in raised relief with their ends sliced off at an angle. At their 
crossing are formed raised four-faceted diamonds. Each of the square 
blocks Is depressed in the center, and all the bevelled margins are softened 
Into flowing lines, quite unlike much of our harsh-edged domestic glass. 

4-part mold, 4^ in. high. 

There is undoubtedly a sugar bowl to match, which may be open or 
covered, both types prevalent among these wares. 

Patterns not unlike this one are found in American glass of a later date, 
but none has the depressed center or the softened margins. 

5 



BULL'S EYE AND DRAPE 

This pitcher has the same fine quality 
crystal-clear glass as most of the contem- 
porary pieces shown here and in Kamm, pp. 
3-6. It is rather light in weight, but has a 
beautiful bell-like resonance. 

It is a small piece shaped like most of the 
others with a thick waist and short flaring 
base with six thick scallops. The body is 
di\ r ided vertically into six broad flat panels 
extending from the rim to margin of the 
base, each topped with a scallop, the rear 
ones broken by the sharp rise at the back of 
the rim. The lip rises sharply from the front 
with a narrow tip. Each panel of the body has a large oval bull's eye near 
the top, with sloping sides and deep sunk center. Below the bull's eyes is 
a continuous drape or herringbone pattern in high relief extending to the 
shelf above the waist. 

The base is undecorated beneath and the handle is pressed, nearly 
round in cross-section at the top, and slants sharply upward with a tab 
beneath each contact point with the body. 

3-part mold, 4^$ in. high. 

This little pitcher closely resembles in quality, form and design "Moon- 
print" and "Irish Bull's Eye and Star" already described by the writer 
(Kamm, pp. 4, S). 





ENGLISH DIAMOND BLOCK 

This little creamer is similar to the other 
British pieces shown here and in Kamm ( (pp. 
3-5). In quality, it is inferior to most pieces of 
its type, rather light in weight and, while fairly 
brilliant, is somewhat wavy and has a lower 
toned resonance than most of them. 

The small compact egg-shaped body rests 
on a thick base which is scalloped like a daisy. 
The rim is fine scalloped also in high somewhat 
uneven little curves and there is a sharp rise 
at the back, to which the handle is attached. 
The lip is unique and most unattractive, especially from the side, where 
it curves out like the beak of a duck-billed platypus. 

The plain, high-arched handle is pressed and round in cross-section. 
The base has sixteen rather deep little scallops and, while plain on the top, 
has underneath a deep-scored, sixteen-rayed star which fades out at the 
high, domed center. 

The decorative motif consists solely of flat-topped, bevel-margined dia- 
monds arranged diagonally from rim nearly to the waist, all the margins 
softened. 

4-part mold, 3% in. high. 




GROUP TWO 

The four pitchers shown here are all very old, antedating the 
Civil War period; two of them are three-mold blown pieces, and 
the others pressed and heavy. All have applied handles with 
crimped bases, two of the handles very large and hollow. 



THREE-MOLD CHAIN 

Pitchers similar to the one shown here 
seldom come on the market and are gen- 
erally priced beyond the collector's reach; 
this one is shown as typical of the very 
early three-mold ware in use before pressed 
glass was made. It differs from the latter 
in that the pattern is reproduced on the 
inside as well as on the outside but in re- 
verse, while on pressed pieces the inside is 
smooth; it was blown into a mold instead 
of pressed with a plunger and always 
shows a large, rough, sharp pontil mark 
on the base. 

The creamer shown here is a large one, 
thick and heavy and weighing twenty-four 
ounces. It has no resonance, but has some 

sound when struck. The urn-shaped body has a bulbous midriff, narrow 
constricted neck, wide, thick waist, and flat circular base. The rim flares 
considerably and the deep depression at the lip is somewhat constricted at 
the sides. There is a wide band of molding just below the margin in plain, 
smooth, rounded relief. 

The base is thick and solid and is impressed beneath with a large hexa- 
gon composed of plain, deep-sunk sun-rays blurred at the center where 
the large pontil mark covers the pattern. The mold marks extend around 
the margin of the base showing that the base was not a separate mold, a 
common usage on such pieces at the time. 

Decoration is simple but very effective and consists of /a wide band of 
nine uniform interlocked circular links of a continuous chain, each wide 
link in nearly half-rounded relief, two links nearly touching in the middle 
of a central third. The pattern appears in reverse on the inside of the 
body. 

The applied handle is an inch wide at the top and tapers to small 
diameter below for so massive a body; it is crimped in the usual early 
style. It is not nearly as large as on later patterns, such as "Sawtooth", 
"Cable with Ring", "Excelsior", "Hourglass", etc. 
3-part mold (blown), Sj4 in. high. 

Pieces similar to this one were made in considerable numbers at Sand- 
wich and also in South Jersey, in New York State factories, in Ohio, 
and New Hampshire, and perhaps also elsewhere. They date from 1820 to 
1850 and were a domestic attempt at substitution for the expensive Water- 
ford and other foreign glass of the period. 



Creamers similar to this one are generally heavy although some are 
very light in weight; they come in clear flint glass, and in such colors as a 
bright yellow-green, light green, red-amber, sapphire, aquamarine and 
purple-blue. 

Patterns were geometric (ribbed, quilted and sunbursts) and baroque 
(patterns with curves similar to the present one). 

Practically all the creamer bodies of the three-mold blown glass were 
similar to the one shown here, bulbous, urn-shaped bodies with constricted 
necks, depressed lip on a flaring margin; but the bases were often missing, 
the body resting on the bowl itself. 

While the three-mold glass is the better known, early blown pieces were 
also made in two- and four-mold types. 

Handles are always solid, never hollow. 

HOURGLASS 

Here is a fine old creamer typical 
of the Civil War period, and one which 
has escaped mention in modern books 
on glass. It is very thick and heavy, 
weighing twenty - six ounces. While 
smaller than the creamer of "Excel- 
sior", it is heavier. The glass is clear 
and brilliant, with no trace of discol- 
oration and also with no resonance. 

The body is urn-shaped, widest at 
a shoulder near the collar, tapering 
downward to a narrow waist and flar- 
ing to the thick, solid, nearly flat base. 
A horizontal line above the shoulder 
demarks the base of the deep plain 
collar which flares to the rim. A single 
deep scallop on each side near the back 

decorates the otherwise plain rim, with a high rise at the back to which 
the upper arm of the handle is attached. The lip arches high and is broad 
at the tip. 

The waist is shelved above and below the middle and is faintly panelled 
between the two shelves into six broad, flat areas with blurred margins. 
The panels are slightly twisted, as on other early patterns such as "Grape 
and Festoon with Shield", "Star Band", "Arabesque", etc. There is no 
pattern on the base, which shows a rough pontil mark. 

The applied handle is one and one-eighth inch wide at the top and very 
thick, and three-fourths inch wide at the base; it is heavier than on any 
other early pattern known to the writer except for that of "Sawtooth" 
(Kamm, p. 7). For so small a body this massive handle is out of place, 
weakening rather than strengthening the pitcher. The base is crimped and 
stamped with two deep horizontal bars. 

The pattern, like that on most old pieces, is rather severe, depending 
on strong, deep lines and large, curved areas for its effect rather than on 




intricacies of surface design. Six long, hour-glass figures extend around the 
body from the shoulder to the shelf above the waist, each broad-arched 
across the top and flat at the base and deeply scored on the sides with 
highest relief through the middle. The inclosed surfaces above and below 
are nearly flat, curving out only slightly at the outer margins. 

Between each hour-glass figure is a large diamond with deep bevelled 
margins and deep-sunk center with a small flat inside diamond. 
3-part mold, 5^ in. high. 

The three mold sections are of uneven width, one at the back, one in 
front and a third on one side near the front. The handle is not affixed at 
a mold line. 

Since this pattern does not appear in the literature, the above name is 
given by the writer, who knows no other pieces in the pattern. However, 
it is sufficiently attractive to have been made in considerable quantity. 

The creamer is similar to that of "Cable with Ring" (Kamm ? p. 8), of 
the same massive type with the same broad, shovel-like lip, irregular, two- 
scalloped rim, deep, plain collar, broad, shallow waist and thick, abbre- 
viated base. It also resembles "Excelsior" and "Pillar". 

SANDWICH STAR AND BUCKLE 

This pattern has not been de- 
scribed in the modern glass literature, 
hence the name applied above for the 
pattern is similar to others of known 
origin. The creamer is a very early 
piece with a hollow, applied handle 
and a body which is very thick and 
heavy, weighing twenty-five ounces. 
The quality is superlative in clarity 
and mirror polish. The modelling is 
perfect and the margins are softly 
rounded, with no knife-sharp edges 
or corners. There is no resonance 
whatever, only a dead sound when 
struck. 

The body is unusual in shape in 

that it rests flat on the base of the bowl. The sides are straight and prac- 
tically vertical, with a broad rim which flares out widely from the massive 
shoulder, especially at the back which is slightly higher than the sides. 
The lip is long, low and broad. 

Like many of the early creamers, the body is hexagonal in cross-section 
on the outside but circular within, with six broad, flat vertical panels of 
equal width through their length. A massive moulding of architectural 
designs surrounds the shoulder and another, with slightly less detail, the 
base. 

The panels are decorated In high relief, each alternate panel with a 
beautiful eight-pointed star, the rays adapted to fit the space. The other 
three panels contain each a long, rectangular "buckle" in well-rounded 
relief with the corners curved off and the central space a long, narrow, 
depressed ellipse. 




The handle is of the early applied type crimped at the base and stamp- 
ed with two short cross bars; however it is very unusual in being hollow 
from top to bottom and much larger than the usual early applied type, 
such blown handles being rare today. The long crimp is carefully applied 
down the depression in the buckle at the back of the body and does not 
spread beyond this space. 

The base is thick and plain and only slightly depressed beneath, where 
there is a small, rough pontil mark. 

3-part mold, 5^4 in. high. 

There is a spooner or spill-cup to match the creamer and hexagonal 
cologne bottles are sometimes seen in clear and in vaseline but the writer 
knows of no other pieces. 

This pattern is similar to the "Star and Punty" and "Punty", shards of 
both found by Professor Norton at the Sandwich site; both are massive 
early patterns with broad, flat panels and raised designs. It also resembles 
the old "Harp", "Washington" and "Pillar" patterns. 

REVERSED OVAL THUMBPRINT, 

THREE-MOLD, SYRUP 

This is a three-mold piece with the 
pattern in reverse on the inside of the 
body. It is shown here as typical of the 
many syrup pitchers seen in shops which 
do not seem to have counterparts in other 
pieces. It is very light in weight in spite 
of its massive appearance and the glass 
is wavy and somewhat greenish but well 
polished. There is no resonance. 

The body rests flat on its broad base 
and tapers thence to the neck, to which is 
firmly affixed a tin lid with long scoop- 
like Hp, the upper half of the lid being 
missing, indicated by a bit of solder near 
the back. The pattern consists of a wide 
band around the middle of the body made 
up of long adjacent O's in high relief, with 
deep, bevelled margins top and bottom 

forming a series of arches. Inside the "O" is a long, narrow, ellipsoid 
figure also in high, raised relief. 

The very large handle is an inch wide at the top where it is affixed to 
the neck with a space at the deepest point on the neck; it bends in an 
ungainly angle and tapers only slightly toward the base, being hollow for 
its entire length even into the crimp of the base. It is exceedingly fragile 
in appearance although the pitcher is light in weight to correspond. 

The base appears to have been blown in one piece with the body, which 
is not always true of blown pieces, and is stamped beneath with a beau- 
tiful large ten-pointed star, each ray ridged down the middle. 
6 in. high. 
See discussion under "Three-Mold Chain". 




10 



GROUP THREE 

Included here are creamers with high to moderate standards, 
all with plain flat bases. Handles are mostly pressed and fancy, 
a few pitchers having applied handles with bulbous bases and one 
having a crimped, applied handle. 

In general, the patterns are geometric and in good relief, but 
one piece is plain, two have etched floral designs, and another is 
a "fancy" with much detail in low relief. 

They date from the Seventies to the Nineties. 



ETCHED IVY SPRAY 

This creamer comes in good quality clear 
glass of average weight and thickness and it 
has a hollow sound \vhen struck. The body 
is inverted bell-shaped, broadest at the top 
and tapering down to a square shoulder, 
below which the fine tall standard tapers to 
the flat circular base. The stem has six 
broad, flat panels arched over the top and 
curved at the base atop a shelf on the plain 
base. 

The body is saddled on each side of the 
rim with a high broad lip in front; the handle 
is pressed, panelled with narrow side panels 
and with a trace of thumb-grasp at the top 
and a sharp angle at the base. 

There Is no raised decoration on the 
body, a continuous reeded vine being etched 

across the top from which are suspended three long delicate sprays of "ivy" 
foliage with tendrils. 

2-part mold, 6^ in. high. 

In spite of the two-mold glass, this piece has the earmarks of a ware 
of the Seventies, the high, panelled, bulbous stand, the flat circular base, 
the bell-shaped body with saddled rim, and the plain high-arched handle. 
It is infrequently seen in shops, but can be found in a good range of pieces, 
including goblets. 

The slight bulge at the base of the stem is also found in "Star Band" 
(Kamm, p. 16), "Cat's Eye and Fan" (p. 27), "Centennial" (p. 27), etc., 
and the handle is similar in shape to that on the creamer of "Jasper", 
"Jacob's Ladder" "Cat's Eye and Fan", "Panelled Star and Button", 
(Kamm, p. 17), "Fan with Diamond", "Drapery", etc. 

11 





SWIRL BAND 

The tall graceful creamer shown here comes 
in clear, brilliant glass of average weight and 
thickness; it has little resonance. This particu- 
lar piece has a beautiful amethystine tint, prob- 
ably from long exposure to light. 

The body is cylindrical, of even diameter 
throughout with a slight curve in the rim and a 
short blunt lip. It rests on a fine tall standard 
with a plain, flat, circular base. In the middle 
of the slender stem is a large melon-shaped ball 
with slightly swirled vertical ribbing in good 
relief; there is a slight shelf just above and just 
below the ball and another shelf atop the base. 
Near the base of the bowl is another narrow 
shelf and below this the body bulges to form a 
band of swirling about an inch deep, extending 
around the edge and under the base of the 
bowl. 

Each swirl in good rounded relief ends above and below in an arch and 
is graduated to fit the space. 

The mold lines, obliterated above the swirl band, run through the swirl- 
ing and stem in unusually twisted fashion. The dainty little handle is of 
the later applied type. 

3-part mold, 6^/2 in. high. 

The writer knows no other piece in this pattern, but there is no doubt 

it was made in the usual wide range typical of its period, the mid-Eighties. 

The creamer is similar in all respects to that of "Etched Fern and 

Waffle" (Kamm, p. 19), "Cathedral" (p. 21), "Atlas" (this book, p. 15), 

etc. 

DIAGONAL BAR BAND 

A fine pattern with a minimum of decor- 
ation is represented by the creamer shown 
here*, a good-sized piece with cylindrical 
body set on a high slender stand and a flat 
circular base. The glass is of good quality, 
clear, and without discoloration. It has a 
good resonance. 

The rim is arched, with a slight rise at 
the handle and a higher one at the lip. The 
handle is placed on a thick shield, a long, 
slender bar running from top to base. The 
handle is pressed, oval in outline, round in 
cross-section, and the only decoration con- 
sists of a corrugated spread at the base, the 
shield shaped to fit the uneven margin. 

The standard is high and cylindrical, with 
a wide band of swirl in good relief between the two shelves top and bottom. 

Decoration of the body consists of a wide band around the base of the 
body above the slanting shoulder, made up of half-round bars arched over 




* Courtesy of Mrs. J. G. Garnett, Monroe, Louisiana. 

12 



the tops and sliced off diagonally at the base, and placed diagonally. 
Between each wide bar is a narrow one, ridged down the center and pointed 
at the top. 

3-part mold, 6% in. high. 

This pattern is scarce, being made probably in a single plant over a 
short period. It comes in the average number of pieces of wares of the 
Eighties. 

The long narrow shield at the handle is not common, but is used on 
"Lion", "Maine", "Ruby Star", etc. 

A very similar pattern, but with the bars reversed, the narrow ones 
sawtooth ed, and called "Louisiana" was made by the United States Glass 
Company, appearing in their 1898 (circa) catalog. 




JASPER 

The above is the original name for this 
beautiful pattern, which was made by Bryce 
Brothers, of Pittsburgh, during the early 
Eighties and is shown in their catalog of 
early date (trade catalogs do not bear dates) 
in several pieces. It may have been made 
later in other factories, for the pattern is 
found In many pieces and is not scarce even 
today. A foote'd salt, several high open and 
covered compotes, several cake plates, etc. 
are often found, all in the clear, although 
pieces in a lovely "Eleanor" blue are some- 
times seen also. 

Every piece in this pattern is delightful, 
and a set of it is to be envied; delicate and 
lacy, the tiny facets shimmer with the light 
while the shapes are airy and graceful besides. 

The creamer is a tall piece, the bowl fairly large for so slender a stem, 
and the base practically flat and circular. The stem is ringed in the middle 
and there is a narrow shelf at its top and bottom. 

The handle is large and oval in outline, flattened, and plain on the 
sides; there is a smart up-curved nub at the top for thumb-grasp and a 
down-curving bracket below. 

The rim is saddled and the lip low. Decoration consists of six long 
ellipses, side by side, and reaching from the rim nearly to the shelf at the 
top of stem, those under the lip much longer than the others. Each ellipse 
contains a much narrower one inside which is plain and raised in rounded 
relief; this is surrounded by a wide band composed of faceted triangles, 
etc. forming a lovely star inside a square; this motif repeated around the 
band. 

3-part mold, 6 in. high. 

This pattern has been re-named, but when the original name of a pat- 
tern can be found all too often the old designs carried numbers only 
the writer believes it should be retained even if not descriptive and hence 
less easy to remember, also provided it does not overlap the name of some 
other pattern. 

13 



The creamer is very similar to that of other contemporary designs, 
such as "Jacob's Ladder", "Buckle and Star", etc. The last-named pattern 
was made by the same company as this one, during the Eighties, the 
original name being "Orient". 

The handle is similar to that of "Beaded Oval and Scroll", "Grated 
Ribbon" (Kamm, p. 54), "Spiral and Maltese Cross" (p. 30), "Chain", 
"Late Crystal", etc. 



THUMBPRINT WINDOWS 







A most unusual piece, this creamer has 
two lips, broad and slanting, only slightly in- 
dented at the ends and neither very efficient 
for pouring. The pitcher had a cover which 
was placed on top of the upper flange. It is 
further unusual in its extreme height and 
slenderness. 

The glass is fine, clear and well polished, 
and this particular piece has a clear amethy- 
stine tint, but has little resonance. 

The tall, slender, vase-like body tapers 
down to a fine tall standard placed on a 
plain, flat, circular base. The mold marks 
are exceptionally twisted through the stem, 
having a 120 turn. The stem is plain and 
terete and there is a ring around its top. 

The pattern on the body is rather coarse 
for so graceful a piece, and consists of a w r ide 
band around the bowl made up of nine long 

adjacent hexagons with deep bevelled sides, each with a square placed 
diamond-wise at the apex both top and bottom. These diamonds are also 
bevelled and contain each four bits of raised diamond-point. Each third 
apical diamond is elongated, the upper one reaching the flange below the 
rim and the lower opposite it reaching the ring above the stem. There are 
three sets of elongated diamonds around the body. 

The long central hexagons contain patterns, that between the two long, 
tapering end-diamonds being a deep-pressed star with the vertical rays 
much the longer and extending to the margins. The two adjacent hexagons 
having shorter apical diamonds contain each a long, vertically-placed deep- 
ly pressed thumbprint w r ith sharp margins. 

The handle is pressed, flattened back and front, gracefully curved with 
a nub top and bottom and a curve at the top for thumb-grasp. 

3-part mold, &/2 in. high. 

While not often seen, this pattern exists in several pieces in the clear, 
and it also comes in a caramel slag. The tall sugar is covered. It probably 
dates from around 1890. 

The perfection of pressing of the long oval thumbprints is like that of 
"Panelled Thumbprint" (Kamm, p. Ill), very few patterns being so per- 
fectly executed. The much-twisted stem is similar to that on "Swirl Band" 
(this book, p. 12), and to "Arabesque" (Kamm, p. 14), "Grape and Fes- 
toon with Shield" (p. 13), etc. 

14 




The graceful handle with two nubs is similar to that used on the 
creamers of "Fan with Diamond", "Spiralled Ivy", "Cobb" (this book, 
p. 19), "Grated Ribboii" (Kamm, p. 54), "Spiral and Maltese Cross" 
(p. 30), etc. 

The tall slender creamer of "Panelled Agave" often called "Cactus" 
bears some resemblance to this piece. 

ATLAS 

Two creamers in 
"A 1 1 a s" pattern are 
shown here, the stand- 
ard pitcher and one of 
the tankard type, the 
latter rather rare in 
creamers but more 
common in water 
pitchers. 

This is a beautiful 
pattern, coming in 
glass of fine quality 
clear, with no discol- 
oration, well polished, 
and of good weight. 
There is some reson- 
ance. 

The stemmed creamer is exceptionally tall and 
slender, with a cylindrical body set on a tall terete 
stem with a broad, flat, circular foot. The rim is 
slightly curved and the lip rather low and small. 
Around the base of the bowl is a single row of large 
bullets nearly in the round, and below this row the 
body tapers in sharply to a wide shelf above the 
standard, with deep tapered slashes extending up- 
ward to the bullets above. 

Below this shelf the stem is plain and unpanelled, 
ending in a small shelf atop the flat foot. The under- 
side of the base is slightly indented in the middle but otherwise practically 
flat with no decoration whatever. 

The handle is of the later applied type, small and dainty and placed 
high on the back. 

2-part mold, the mold marks twisted through the stem; 6 J /> in. high. 

In spite of its tall standard, typical of an earlier era, this pattern dates 
no earlier than 1889; it was made by Bryce Brothers, Mt. Pleasant, Pa. 
and the above is the original name. It was also made by Adams and Com- 
pany, of Pittsburgh, who put out no less than eighty-four pieces in the 
design; the same pattern appears on the base of an unnamed goblet made 
by the Portland Glass Company*. 

"Atlas" was made in clear glass and also in clear with ruby, the upper 
plain portion of the pitchers being ruby, often engraved with a name, place 




* F. H. Swan, The Portland Glass Company, Providence, R. I., 1939. 

15 



and date for this was souvenir ware, like its better known counterpart, 
"Ruby Thurnbprint". The writer has seen pieces dated as late as 1894. 
The pattern comes in many pieces, goblets, sugar, butter dish, bowls of 
various sizes, water pitcher, etc. It is a popular pattern today but not 
found in any great quantity. 

The pattern generally goes by the name "Bullet" but is also known as 
"Cannon Ball", both obvious and perhaps better than the original name. 

The tankard form of creamer shows an interesting base more typical 
of the pattern than that on the tall creamer, a wheel with deep-pressed 
spokes radiating from a central hub, the piece resting on tiny flat circles 
on the base. It is a four-part mold piece, Sj4 in. high. 

The standard creamer resembles this piece in "Cathedral", "Etched 
Fern and Waffle", "Swirl Band" (this book, p. 12), etc. 




JAPANESE 

The exotic motif of this pattern 
reaches the nadir of our American glass, 
the bad drawing of the figure only equal- 
led by that of "Cupid and Venus". How- 
ever the pattern \vas justified and no 
doubt popular because every community 
in the land was supporting missionaries 
to the heathen in the Orient 

The quality of the glass is good, clear, 
without discoloration and the creamer is 
light in weight and without resonance. 
The body is inverted bell-shaped on a 
high standard with a broad, flat, plain 
base. The stem is also inverted bell- 
shaped, with a small shelf and a ring 
above and a deep wide groove beneath, 
with a shelf atop the base. 

The plain horizontal rim is slightly thickened and the lip rises sharply 
from the front with a deep v-cut in the body extending half way down. 
A wide band of fine pattern surrounds the rim and lip, composed of con- 
tinuous zig-zagging outlined in two slightly raised lines, with raised cross- 
bars between them. 

A similar band of zig-zagging surrounds the base of the bowl, which 
bulges sharply then turns in to the stem, the under slope decorated with 
fine ribbing. The underside of the zig-zag band carries a pattern of small 
acanthus foliage standing erect, the upper angles devoid of pattern. 

Running diagonally across the body from the upper to the lower band 
on each side of the body is a broad band also filled with zig-zagging with 
cross-ribbing between the double lines. The little patterns filling the v- 
spaces are acanthus leaves on the upper sides and tiny clusters of three 
berries with four slender lanceolate leaves on the under. 

Crossing this wide diagonal band above the middle and nearly at right 
angles is a bamboo cane with foliage at the nodes in slight relief. A large 
arc of a circle fills the space below this crossing, outlined in a fancy border, 

16 



an ^interesting composite of the tiny patterns in the zig-zagging bands. 
Inside this large arc in low outline relief is the retreating figure of a Jap- 
anese peasant in smock with a parasol hiding the head. The arm is abbre- 
viated but the four digits of the hand are enormous; the shoulders are 
wide but the match-like legs are short and inclosed in knee-length pants. 

The pressed handle is sharply acute-angled upward, terete in cross- 
section, and decorated with double rings at intervals. 

2-part mold, 6 in. high. 

This pattern in the clear comes in creamer, sugar, goblet and stemmed 
covered compote, and no doubt other pieces as well. 

While the creamer bears resemblance to patterns of the Seventies, it 
probably dates from the end of the Eighties or the early Nineties. The 
high stand is almost identical with that of "Conventional Band" (Kamrn, 
p. 19), the shovel-like lip like that of "Minerva", "Scroll with Flowers", 
etc. 

Similar fussy bands filled with tiny motifs are used on the last-named 
pattern and on "Horseshoe", "Minerva", "Parthenon", "Cupid and Venus", 
etc. The handle resembles that of "Wildflower", "Minerva", "Wheat and 
Barley", "Fish Scale", etc., many of these patterns of authentic Sandwich 
origin. 

A pattern very similar to this one, with leafy bamboo shoots, was made 
by Richards and Hartley, of Tarentum, Pa. In 1888. 

CORDATE LEAF 

Dealers tell the writer that 
there are some forty etched or 
engraved leaf patterns, all very 
similar and possibly done by a 
single artist over a comparative- 
ly short period. 

The leaf on this pattern is 
an especially fine one, a broad, 
heart-shaped leaf with long ter- 
minal point and serrate margins 
on a long stem and flanked on 
both sides below by long, sinu- 
ous, grass-like foliage. 

The creamer is a fine tall 
piece with a cylindrical body on 
a many-shelved base with ringed 
and shelved stem and a broad 
flat plain base. The rim is sad- 
dled on each side, the saddle 
flat-based, and the lip is short 
and blunt, rising only slightly 
above the rim. 

The handle is especially fine, 
pressed, oval in outline, with flat 

17 





panelled sides, and with a fine ogee-scrolled 
bracket at the top for a thumb-grasp and a 
similar but smaller bracket at the base. The 
space between bracket and body is a thin 
film of glass. 

Decoration is alike on both sides of the 
body. 

3-part mold, 6^ in. high. 

The beautiful water pitcher is also shown 
here because of the similarity in shape, dec- 
oration and handle. It is a two-mold piece, 
8J/2 inches high. 

The writer knows no other pieces in the 
pattern although there is no doubt they exist, 
probably in sugar, butter, goblet, tumbler, 
water tray, etc. The pattern dates from 
around 1890, possibly a little before. 

Both pieces are drawn through the cour- 
tesy of the owner, Mrs. Viola B. Dailey, of Plymouth, Michigan. 

PLAIN, TWO MOLD, (PANELLED, RINGED STEM) 

The beautiful stem saves this pattern 
from mediocrity, and these two character- 
istics will be found in other pieces which 
belong to the pattern, although perfectly 
plain pieces, compotes, pitchers, etc. are 
legion and difficult to differentiate. 

The glass of this creamer is rather thick 
and heavy, clear but somewhat discolored 
and non-resonant. The body is cylindrical 
and stouter than that of the patterns de- 
scribed just previous to this one, and it 
rests on a graceful high standard with eight 
flat panels, ringed at the narrowest point. 
The panels are arched top and bottom and 
the base is broad, flat and undecorated. 

The rim is slightly curved, with a high 
narrow lip and a slight rise at the handle. 

The latter is pressed, rather large in cross-section, terete, and oval in out- 
line, with no decoration whatever. 

The body is plain but may be engraved on some pieces, although this 
is doubtful. 

2-part mold, 6 in. high. 

There is^a covered sugar to match this creamer, and many other pieces 
no doubt exist. While plain, such pieces are practical and stout enough for 
hard, every-day, farmhouse usage. It dates from the middle Eighties, al- 
though plain patterns were made from the Seventies through the Nineties. 

This pkce differs from "Plain, Two Mold" (Kamm, p. 47) in that the 
standard Is panelled, arched, and ringed rather than terete and shelved 
above and below. Handles are similar and qualities comparable. 

18 





BEVELLED DIAGONAL BLOCK 

The above name, it Is true, might de- 
scribe any number of similar patterns, popu- 
lar from the 1885 period to the present. 
This one comes in glass above the average 
in quality, clear, brilliant, with no discolora- 
tion but also with little resonance. The glass 
is rather thick and heavy. 

The generous cylindrical body rests on a 
high standard and a plain flat circular base. 
The stem consists of a large round ball 
shelved slightly below, and perfectly plain. 
There is a slight twist in the mold marks 
through the stem. 

The rim is horizontal, with a slight rise 
at the handle and a small, rather low lip. 
The handle is applied, of the later type with 
turned-under tab above and a bulbous base 

affixed roughly to the high-sided blocks, with grooves in which dirt easily 
collects. 

The upper third of the body is clear, the rest covered with a band of 
coarse block pattern arranged diagonally, each block a square with very 
high bevelled sides, the top and bottom of the band pointed and bevelled. 

3-part mold, S^ in. high. 

This pattern comes in goblets and no doubt many other pieces, prob- 
ably in the clear only. It was made by Challinor, Taylor and Company, 
of Tarentum, Pa. in 1888, and called their No. 311. It was made in twenty- 
seven pieces, one creamer being spherical, with no stem, the other as shown 
here. 

COBB 

This little-known pattern comes in 
good quality glass, clear, brilliant, of 
good weight, not discolored although 
the present creamer has an amethy- 
stine tint probably from years of ex- 
posure to strong light and it has some 
resonance. 

The creamer is a fine tall, graceful 
piece with a high standard and a plain 
circular base which is nearly flat, cone- 
shaped in the center only. The body is 
long-cylindrical, slightly wider at the 
rirn and stepped down at the base to 
the high stem; the latter has six broad 
flat panels ending below on a shelf 
atop the base, and arched top and 
bottom. Through the middle of the 

stem is a wide band without panelling, scalloped on each side, however, 
to match the panels, and carrying through its middle a narrow band of the 
zipper or double-comb pattern of the body. 

19 




The rim is horizontal, with no rise at the handle and with a long scoop- 
like lip cut out in front one-fourth the way down the body. The lip is 
ribbed on the outside in a fan pattern emanating from the lip. 

The pressed handle is large and oval on its inner margin, with flat 
panels and is angled and curved on the outer side, with a bracket attach- 
ment to the body at the top and a curve for thumb-grasp. Two scallops 
extend out from the handle top and bottom. 

The top three-fourth inch of the body is plain, with a line demarking 
the beginning of the pattern; below this line the body is divided vertically 
into alternately wide and narrow panels, each in low rounded relief. The 
narrow panels are plain but the wider carry down the middle a half-inch 
wide band of double combing, back to back, with a deep central spine; 
the teeth are deep but blunt. 

3-part mold, 6^4 i n - high. 

This pattern was made by Richards and Hartley, appearing in their 
catalog dated 1888; however, it may have been reproduced by them or 
others at a later date, many old patterns being used later. The above is 
the original name. 

It came in water pitcher, high creamer, a lower creamer, butter dish, 
spooner, etc. 

A few dealers call it "Sawtooth" and "Late Sawtooth", or simply refer 
to it as one of the sawtooth variations. 

The general shape of the creamer resembles that of other patterns of 
the 1 875-1885 period. The over-generous handle is typical of this period 
and is similar to that of "Late Crystal" (Kamm, p. 21), "Grated Ribbon", 
"Spiral and Maltese Cross" (Kamm, p. 30), "Cat's Eye and Fan" (p. 27), 
"Chain", etc. 

The plain band around the rim is not common, but is used on "Double 
Ribbon" and a few other patterns, while vertical panelling beginning be- 
low a rim-band appears on this pattern, "Grated Ribbon" (Kamm, p. 54), 
"Panelled Star and Button" (p. 17), etc. 

The lip rising from the front of the rim and cut into the body with 
fan-ribbing on the outside appears also on "Double Ribbon", "Grated 
Ribbon", etc. 

ARCHAIC GOTHIC 

Here is an unusual piece, with odd 
curves and too elaborate a pattern for 
beauty. The glass is very light in weight, 
very fragile, chipping easily; it is only 
fair in clarity, but has a good bell-tone in 
every part which appears with the light- 
est touch, quite unlike that of most glass. 

The body is inverted bell-shaped, wid- 
est at the rim, with straight sides which 
slope to the narrower squared base and 
then slant sharply in to meet the stem, 
the base of the bowl being cone-shaped. 
The standard is short but stout, shelved 
above and below, the upper shelf scallop- 
edged to match the vertical ribbing on the 
stem. The foot is larger and flatter than 

20 




usual, plain on top but decorated beneath with a large fancy wide-rayed 
twelve-pointed star outlined in high, sharp beads, alternate rays stippled 
in raised beads. The whole is protected by a slight flange around the rim 
of the base. 

The evenly scalloped rim is horizontal, with a slight rise at the back 
and a rather high arched lip pinched in at the sides. The end of the lip is 
ridged on the outside as though added to the mold after the depressed 
portion was found inadequate for pouring. 

Just below the rim is a wide flat band with slightly raised lines as 
margins, and containing a single row through the center of large well- 
rounded beads on a hit-or-rniss stippled background. The band extends 
under the lip and rising near the front on each side is a smaller band of 
beading on stippled background outlining the lip arch and depression. 

Below r the horizontal rim band, and extending around the body to the 
shoulder of the base are nine contiguous, narrow, vertical panels with 
pointed arches at the top reaching nearly to the rim band, the lowest 
portion of each arch sliced off on a curve. Each of these gothic arches is 
flush with the body background and merely outlined by a double raised 
line with a row of separated beads on a stippled background between. 
Near the apex of the space inside each arch is a single large bead. 

The cone-shaped base of the bowl above the stem is ribbed in raised 
graduated bars running vertically, alternately wide and narrow bars, the 
narrower ridged down the center, and the standard itself has twelve bars 
in slight rounded relief. 

The highly aberrent pressed handle carries many unusual curves; both 
horizontal attachment bars and the long vertical one project at the ends, 
with two large raised beads on the back end and another on each side. 
The vertical bar ends both at the top and bottom in a single high-domed 
"hobnail". The handle is panelled, the wide flat side panels outlined in 
raised marginal lines and decorated with a row T of beads down the middle. 
The thumb-grasp, while comfortable in the hand, is ungainly in appearance. 

3-part mold, 5 l / 2 in. high. 

The writer knows of no other piece in this pattern. 

A rectangular handle with projecting ends, like the frame of a "Currier 
and Ives" print, is used also on "Two Band" (Karnm, p. 64), "Scroll with 
Flowers", "Horseshoe", "Ribbed Forgetmenot", "Old Man of the Woods" 
(Karnm, p. 89), and many others. 




INFERTED PRISM 

This little piece shines like cut glass and 
the margins are nearly as sharp as on that 
ware; the egg-shaped bowl rests on a rather 
low six-panelled standard shelved above and 
ending abruptly below. The broad, thick, 
flat base has six large scallops with sharp 
points between, and underneath the base is 
an elaborate six-pointed star with many tiny 
faceted figures, each large scallop filled with 
a fan motif. 

The handle Is of the later applied type, 
larger than usual. The body is divided ver- 

21 



tically into fifteen panels, each deep sunk down a line through its middle, 
arched above with a blunt scallop on the margin, and V-shaped below 
ending in a faceted triangle. The lip is low and panelled to the tip. 

The lower third of the body is decorated with a high relief band com- 
posed of two horizontal rows of hexagonal buttons with bevelled sides, 
and with faceted triangles in the interstices. 

3-part mold, 4^ in. high. 

Nothing further is known of this design to the writer than this one 
piece. It appears to be of the 1890 period. 



22 



GROUP FOUR 

Included here are creamers having high or moderate standards, 
with bases hollowed to the waist; handles are pressed (or molded) 
and of the later applied type. Decoration is geometric, floral, and 
etched. 

These pieces date from 1870 to 1900. 




GLOBE AND STAR 

An unusual pattern is shown by this 
creamer, a large globe set on a high slender 

stand with lacy bands and engraved leafy 
sprays to enhance its beauty. The glass is 
flawless and brilliant, but there is little 
resonance. 

The large globular body, nearly four 
inches in diameter, rests on a tiny terete 
waist with many ledges above and below, 
placed on a deep, sloping, hollowed, base. 
The rim is evenly scalloped and the low lip 
very broad, slightly depressed at the tip. 
There is a wide band just below the rim 
which flares outward, demarked below by 
a slight groove, and decorated in high relief 
with dime-sized circles each with a radiant 
daisy with high facets. 

A similar wide band in high relief surrounds the base of the bowl, filled 
with sunbursts in triangles and kite-shaped fans. Another lacy band sur- 
rounds the sloping base, filled with daisies in circles, and the "fan motif is 
again reproduced on the underside of the base. 

The base is squared, a large scallop on each corner with projecting 
double scallops between. 

The bowl is further decorated with a delicate, continuous, hand- 
engraved spray of vine and foliage. 

The handle is unique in this book, a late applied type threaded with 
three twisted hollow strands. 

3-part mold, 5j/2 in. high. 

The open sugar and creamer are seen in shops, but are by no means 
common, and I believe these complete the pattern. Colors also occur, a 
light canary yellow and no doubt a light blue and possibly green as well. 
The pattern dates from the 1895-1905 period. 

23 




HEAVY PANELLED FINE CUT 

A good, sturdy type of pattern is illus- 
trated by this creamer*., rather severe and 
massive in spite of its curves and fine 
cut panels. It comes in good clear rather 
thick glass and has a fine, rather high 
resonance. 

The body is long-rectangular in shape, 
square in cross-section, with the corners 
well rounded off and with no sharp mar- 
gins. Handle and lip appear at opposite 
corners instead of, as often used, in the 
center of the sides. The body rests on a 
high complicated standard which is prob- 
ably uniue in being supported by four 
broad, flat, bevelled buttresses extending 
from above the stem to the margin of the 
squared base. 

Each flat side of the body forms a panel which is decorated from near 
the top to the shoulder above the standard, where it is broadly arched, 
the curve extending around the body in sinuous fashion, reversed on the 
four corners. All four of the long body panels are alike and are made up 
of a single motif of geometric, eight-pointed, faceted stars inter-locked in 
two vertical rows. 

2-part mold, 6 in. high. 

This pattern is sometimes called "Fine Cut Four Panel" and comes in 
many pieces including cake stands and compotes. The writer has seen it 
in the clear only although similar patterns generally come in a range of 
colors as well. It was made by Duncan, Miller and Co., of Washington, 
Pa. around 1890, and called their "No. 800" pattern. 

It differs considerably from "Fine Cut and Panel" and resembles in 
shape "Derby" although that creamer is triangular in cross-section. 
Creamers square in cross-section with handle and lip at opposite corners 
are few in number, but include "Picket", "Marsh Pink" (this book, p. 30), 
and "Panelled Thousand Eye" (this book, p. 66). 

The fine cut on this pattern is identical with that on "Flattened Fine 
Cut" (Kamm,p. 85). 

DERBY 

The above is the original name for this pattern, which was made by 
Bryce., Walker and Co. of Pittsburgh, Pa.,f during the Seventies and pos- 
sibly reproduced later by other factories, for slight variations exist. It 
comes in a number of pieces, creamer, butter dish, sugar, spooner, low 

* Drawn through the courtesy of the owner, Mr. W. L. Emmons, 

f All "Bryce" patterns antedating 1882 were made by Bryce, Walker and 
Company, the firm being reorganized under the name "Bryce Brothers" 
during that year. The writer is indebted to the present Bryce Brothers 
for information concerning their early patterns and for an insight into 
the complexities of glass manufacture. 

24 




pickle dish, bread plate, goblets, covered 
compotes, etc. all in the clear, a few pieces 
being also made in colors. 

The pattern is one of the aristocrats 
among our early ones, the severe designs 
and decoration a far cry from many of the 
later fussy ones. The creamer is a tall 
piece, the long straight-sided body resting 
on a much constricted waist above a deep, 
sloping base. The bowl is unique, in cross- 
section showing two wide flat sides in front 
and two short rear ones, all with well 
rounded corners, Hp and handle placed at 
opposite corners, the corner at the back 
sharper than the others. 

The body curves in sharply below the 
flat panels, the waist, shelved above and 

below, being plain and terete, while the base is again flat-panelled into 
eight identical sections arched at the top, plain above and beneath. 

The corners of the body are fine-ribbed vertically from rim to the slope 
above the waist, the front corner, however, being ribbed horizontally in- 
stead with a central vertical rib. There is a deep band of vertical ribbing 
just below the rim broken at the corners, a similar band encircling the base 
of the panels. 

The rim is saddled and the lip very low and small, with a petalloid 
pattern underneath, with a bead at the base. The handle is very large and 
rather clumsy for the fine body, consisting of two cross-beams sloping 
sharply upward, each decorated down the sides with a deeply sunk row of 
small squares. The vertical bar, attached half an inch inside the ends of 
the horizontals, is a large, round column with ten flat vertical narrow 
panels, each stippled, with sunk lines between. 

Each of the large flat panels on the body is outlined in a fine line and 
stippled, being plain outside the line. At the handle attachments is a half- 
daisy. 

2-part mold, 6J4 *& high. 

"Derby" is known as "Pleat and Panel" (Ruth Webb Lee ; "Early 
American Pressed Glass", Pittsford, N. Y., 1933). With no desire to 
upset common usage of this name, the original designation is given here 
for its historical value only. 

This fine pattern harmonizes with modern furniture and decorations, 
as many patterns do not. It has resemblances to other known patterns; 
the play of light through the corners is similar to that on "Rose Sprig" and 
'Marsh Pink" (this book, p. 30) ; it resembles "Clear Diagonal Band" 
in rim and stippled panelling; the vertical ribbing on the rim band also 
appears on "Ribbed Forgetmenot", etc. The wide vertical band of ribbing 
on the^ front appears also on "Classic Medallion" (Kamm, p. 24). The 
petalloid lip appears on many patterns, including "Wildflower". 

A set of this pattern, consisting of creamer, spooner, covered sugar, and 
butter dish were purchased in Toledo, Ohio, in 1882, and presented to the 
mother of the present owner, Mrs. C. E. Dalrymple, of Fostoria, Michigan, 
for officiating at the birth of twins. 

25 




OVAL THUMBPRINT 

An attractive pattern because of its good 
lines and in spite of the severity of decoration, 
this piece is better than average in clarity and 
is of good weight, with a slight greenish tinge 
and with a fair bell-tone. 

The creamer is long-ovate in shape curving 
In to a waist which is shelved above the middle. 
The base is long and sloping, the upper cone- 
shaped portion decorated on the outside with 
vertical, raised, rounded ribbing curved over 
the ends. The underside is devoid of pattern. 
The handle is unique, a pressed terete oval 
indented slightly in the middle, with a little 
cubical box at the upper join to the body, with 
a deep rounded socket in each side for the 
attachment of a pewter top, which is missing. 
The rim of the body is lowest at the back, 
curving up gently to the lip in even scallops, 

and the lip is high and small, with a depression at the tip. There is a ledge 
just inside for the cover, which rests barely inside the rim at the back, 
which is also the case with "Double Donut" (this book, p. 32). 

The body is severely plain save for a horizontal row of long depressed 
oval thumbprints just above the shelf above the waist. Each print is so 
perfect on the margin as to appear cut rather than pressed. 
2-part mold, 6 in. high. 

This pattern comes in goblets and no doubt many more pieces. It 
would appear to date from the 1S7S-1880 period. 

A similar indented handle is used on "Thousand Eye" but on no other 
patterns with which the writer is familiar. 

GIBSON GIRL 

While this pattern is said by at least 
one dealer to be called "Cameo Actress", 
it is obviously a copy of the popular pen- 
and-ink sketches appearing in the old 
"Life" magazine from around 1899 to 
1905 and known the world over as "The 
Gibson Girl". The high pompadour with 
velvet bow at top and on the shoulder 
and the poise of the head make any 
other appellation a misnomer. 

This creamer is a lovely one, coming 
in a beautifully clear shimmering glass of 
good weight but with an amethystine tint 
(on this particular piece), and also with- 
out any resonance whatever. 

The shape is graceful, as befits so 

lovely a portrait, ovoid, tapering to an extremely slender corseted waist 
and out again to a twelve-panelled base. 

The body is divided into twelve wide fiat panels extending from the 
rim to the margin of the base, obliterated through the waist, however, by 

26 




the high vertical ribbing. Appearing four times around the upper part of 
the body are identical large roughly round medallions in very high relief, 
and outlined in waving strands of hair also in good relief. Enclosed within 
is the head of a young woman with sharp features, prominent pointed chin 
and a high full pompadour with a bow knot of ribbon on top of her hair 
and another on the shoulder, a black velvet bow being the height of fashion 
at the time. 

4-part mold, S 1 /^ in. high. 

This piece was loaned the writer by Mr. W. L. Emmons, of Jackson- 
ville, Illinois, and neither oxvner or the writer has ever seen a companion 
piece, although the latter knows of several creamers. 

TREE OF LIFE, WITH SPRIG 

The beautiful creamer shown here is a 
variant of the well-known "Tree of Life'* 
pattern, with a band of the pattern above 
the waist. The creamer is a rather tall one 
with a long cylindrical body, a short stand 
and a large nearly flat circular base. 

The glass is clear and brilliant, this piece 
having a well-defined amethystine tint, and 
there is a good tone when struck. 

The body is slightly narrower through 
the middle than at the ends, the rim slightly 
flaring but plain and horizontal, the lip ris- 
ing abruptly from the front. There is a wide 
well-rounded ring around the base of the 
body, below which it curves in with a slight 
bulge to the waist, the body tapering inside 
to a deep cone. 

The waist is plain and terete and the base plain on both sides, with a 
shelf near the rim above. 

The large handle is pressed, oval in outline, round in cross-section, with 
a flat circular slightly depressed disc at the top for a thumb-grasp and two 
unique flat thick circular discs below the basal attachment, the upper much 
larger than the lower. Each is spoked and stippled in depressed circles. 

The body is di\ r ided vertically into flutes of varying widths, three inch- 
wide nearly flat panels alternating with a group of eight narrower ones, 
arranged thus: narrow, two wider, two narrow, two wider, one narrow, all 
curved or v-notched top and bottom. The wide panels are decorated alike, 
with a long slender spray in slight relief made up of two types of foliage 
with two small "lily-of-the-valley" flowers in the middle. 
3-part mold, 6 in. high. 

The first "Tree of Life" patterns antedate 1864 and the motif was used 
for many years thereafter, put out by many factories, including the Port- 
land Glass Company of Portland, Maine and George Duncan and Sons, of 
Pittsburgh, the latter calling their pattern with the mottled, bubbly effect 
"Soda", which is a much better name than the original. 

Shards do not seem to exist among those found at the site of the Sand- 
wich plant but the little sprig on this piece is like that on some of the 
authentic Sandwich patterns. 

The writer knows no other pieces in this particular version. 

This creamer was loaned by Mrs. R. F. Burch, of Eastman, Georgia. 

27 





CAROLINA 

A sturdy pattern, fairly heavy and 
thick, this piece comes in glass of only 
average quality with considerable discolor- 
ation but with a good resonance. 

The bell-shaped body rests on a deep 
sloping base hollowed to the waist. The 
base is plain above and beneath the terete 
waist, with a shelf above. Around the base 
of the bowl is a bulging area with a deep 
bevelled line separating it from the upper 
part of the body; this bulge is decorated 
on the inside with a horizontal row of 
twelve large Inverted thumbprints convex- 
ed on the inside. The plain body is some- 
times decorated with enamelled flowers, or 
stained ruby red or left clear and colorless. 

The rim flares out slightly and carries on the thickened top a row of 
half-round beads facing upward, smaller near the front and absent from 
the broad low lip. The pressed handle is plain, oval in outline and round 
in cross-section; there is a slightly depressed area at the top for a thumb- 
grasp, outlined in a slightly raised line. 
2-part mold, 5J4 in. high. 

The above is the original name for this pattern, which was made by 
the U. S. Glass Company, and dates from the 1890-1900 period. It comes 
in a good range of pieces but is seldom seen today. 

The beaded rim is found in a number of patterns, such as "Jewel and 
Festoon" (Kamm, p. 66} , "Pansy, Moss Rose and Lily of the Valley 37 
(p. 61), "Tear Drop and Tassel", "Panelled Hobnail" (p.' 67), and "Grape 
with Vine" (this book, p. 61). 

COARSE ZIG-ZAG 

This pattern comes in a hard brilliant 
glass, light in weight but with resonance, 
the sharp edges of the pattern well rounded 
off. The body is inverted bell-shaped, taper- 
ing from the shoulder at the base of the body 
to a narrow terete waist, below which tfie 
deep sloping base is hollowed to the waist 
and decorated beneath with a large fluted 
star. 

The rim flares slightly and is evenly and 
finely scalloped, the lip rising very little from 
the rim. The pressed handle is subtly curved 
to fit the hand, and is panelled, with the side 
panels narrow and the margins blurred, and 
decorated down the length with a row of small beads. 

The main body motif consists of a large zig-zag band around the 
body just above the middle, made up of two elements, sharp bevelled dia- 
monds in the angles and diamond point between. Each diamond is further 
divided into four by deep-scored lines. 

28 




The space above the zig-zag Is left clear, arched faintly across the top 
just below the rim and slightly depressed, while the lower spaces carry 
similar plain areas alternating with spaces vertically ribbed,, alternate ribs 
sawtoothed down the central spine. 

3-part mold, 4% in. high. 

This pattern comes in many pieces, m and is not scarce. It may come in 
color, but the writer has seen only the clear. 

The pattern dates no earlier than the 1890 period, betrayed by the 
vertical rows of sawtoothing down sharp ridges, a motif frequently used 
on late patterns (See Kamm, pp. 96-98). The sections of diamond point, 
too, denote late origin, imitating that on cut glass. 

The handle is similar to that of "Silver Sheen" (this book, p. 126) and 
resembles that of "Minerva" with the row of beading down Its length. 

SCALLOPED TAPE 

A creamer very similar to many others 
of Its period In quality and shape, this one 
comes in clear, average-weight glass with 
some resonance. The body is inverted bell- 
shaped, tapering to the waist and spread- 
ing out below to form the deep, sloping 
base. The rim Is saddled, higher at the 
back, and considerably higher at the rather 
blunt lip. The rim is doubly scalloped, a 
large curve alternating with a high sharp 
Inverted V, the scalloping not extending 
over the lip. 

The handle is pressed and rises sharply 
at the top, with a slanting broken bar at 
the base; It is panelled, the side panels flat 
and rather narrow, decorated down the 
length with a band of the main body motif. 

The simple narrow tape pattern is charmingly used to form a dainty 
ensemble, quite in contrast to the numerous over-loaded designs of the 
Eighties. The band resembles the narrow embroidered strips used on 
feminine lingerie of a past era, the eyelets replaced by good sized beads. 
This doubly scalloped tape appears In a horizontal band around the body 
below the rim, a second strip around the shoulder above the waist, a third 
on the shelf above the waist, with a fourth strip on the underside of the 
base just within the margin. The background of the beading Is stippling 
in the form of depressed beads. 

Down each of the three mold lines a narrow strip of the tape appears 
again, this time devoid of the beading. 
3-part mold, 5^ In. high. 

This pattern comes in amber, canary, blue and apple green as well as 
In the clear, and is collectable In sets. It is not infrequent in shops. 

The creamer is similar in shape to "Minerva", the handles almost iden- 
tical, the beading here Inclosed Inside scallops. 

The pattern would seem to date from the 1 875-1 SS5 period. 
The strip of pattern down the mold lines Is unusual, but appears on 
such patterns as "Bearded Head" (Kamm, p. 81), "Dogwood" (p. 69), 
"Beaded Fan and Bar Medallion" (p. 60), "Dewdrops and Flowers" 
(p. SO), "Tree Bark" (p. 49) , etc. 

29 





RIBBED SAWTOOTH 

The creamer illustrated here is unus- 
ual in shape, only an inch in diameter at 
the waist but 3^2 in. at the rirn; it is 
sharply constricted horizontally through 
the middle, bulging on both sides of this. 
All the hollow pieces in the pattern show 
similar characteristics. 

The pitcher is of good weight and 
thickness, clear and brilliant, with no dis- 
coloration and with a good resonance. 
The body tapers from the rim to the 
narrow waist, flaring out again to the 
hollow circular foot. 

The handle is pressed and shaped to 
fit the hand, curved above with a nearly 

horizontal bar below. It is ribbed down each of the narrow flat side panels. 
The rim is scalloped to match the vertical waling and the lip rises 
abruptly from the front of the body. Across the middle of the body is a 
narrow ring composed of high sharp pyramids with a similar but smaller 
row around the waist. 

The body is divided vertically into narrow wales running from rim to 
margin of the base, with high bevelled sides and graduated in width to fit 
the body. Each is finely cross-ribbed, this ribbing forming the chief motif 
of the whole. 

4-part mold, $%& in. high. 

This pattern in the clear comes in many pieces, including sugar, cream- 
er, butter dish, spooner, water pitcher, nearly flat cake plate, vases of 
several sizes, etc. It may occur in color although the writer has seen 
numerous pieces in the clear only. The pattern dates from the 1 895-1905 
period. 

MARSH PINK 

The creamer shown here is an unusual 
one, square in shape with handle and lip 
on opposite corners. It comes in a beau- 
tiful quality glass, clear, polished, with a 
hollow resonance, but is tinged decidedly 
brownish,, and has the same peculiar play 
of light through the corners and margins 
as its counterpart, "Rose Sprig". In all 
the above qualities, the two patterns are 
identical. 

The creamer is a tall rectangular one, 
square in cross-section, with the corners 
nicely fluted and rounded, tapering to the 
squared waist which is shelved both above 
and below. The base also is square and 
hollow, and is devoid of decoration on 
either side. 

The rim is horizontal, with a very slight rise at the front for the lip, 
which is cut from the corner of the body and extends well down on the 

30 




body; it is decorated on the outside with fluting spread fan-wise from its 
base. 

The handle is pressed, rectangular in outline and panelled, the narrow- 
er panels on the sides, all the margins rather sharp. The vertical rod pro- 
jects at both ends and the horizontals are doubly curved, making the 
handle most uncomfortable to hold in the hand. 

Each flat rectangular side of the body forms a panel, which is patterned 
with a large floral spray from the base, consisting of several broad basal 
leaves with scalloped edges and depressed-bead stippling. Five partially 
opened buds are long and tapering, and the spray terminates at the top in 
a large full-blown flower with six large stippled petals and four more 
partially hidden behind the rest. 

2-part mold, 5% in. high. 

Without doubt this charming ware was designed by the same artist 
who drew "Rose Sprig" for the two patterns are comparable in more ways 
than one. 

This pattern is often seen in shops but in creamer and sugar only; 
however, it probably exists in other pieces. It comes in color as well as 
clear. 

Naming the pattern has been a problem for, as with many other pat- 
terns, botanical accuracy was of minor importance. The only comparable 
native flower with ten identical petals with this pattern is the seashore 
Large Marsh Pink or Rose Pink, Sabbatia dodecandra (L.) B.S.P., found 
from Massachusetts to North Carolina, near the coast. The foliage of this 
plant while not identical is comparable to that on the pattern. 

"Rose Sprig" is late, dating from around 1890, and this one is a con- 
temporary. 

BANDED RAINDROP* 

This is a lovely pattern, lacy and deli- 
cate, and coming in a fine, clear, shining 
glass of rather light weight, some pieces with 
a violet tint, and with a good, rather deep 
resonance. 

The body of the creamer is cylindrical, 
of nearly equal diameter throughout, and 
resting on a good base with a narrow waist 
shelved both above and below. The foot is 
plain and nearly flat, with a slight indenta- 
tion beneath, and no decoration underneath. 
The handle is pressed, rectangular in out- 
line, with a slight curve at the top for better 
thumb-grasp. Down each side is a row of 
large raindrops somewhat crowded into their 
spaces, with a single raindrop in the round 
at the top and bottom corners. 

The rim is flat on each side, with a rise at the handle and a lip of aver- 
age height in front. 




* Drawn through the courtesy of the owner, Mr. W. L. Emmons, who 
named the pattern. 

31 



The decoration consists of horizontal bands running completely around 
the body, of two alternating types; at the top is a band of three rows of 
small depressed squares, which might be called screening or grating, and 
below this a band of a single row of raindrops in less than half round 
relief, the pattern alternating to the base above the waist. 

3-part mold, 5^4 in. high. 

This fine pattern comes in many pieces, some, like the flat sauce dishes, 
plates, etc. having a row of raindrops around the edge in whole round 
relief. On the base is a pattern of squares, each with a single centered 
raindrop on a mesh background. 

This pattern dates no doubt from the 1875-1885 period. It has been 
called "Candlewkk". 

The large raindrops resemble the pattern of "Thousand Eye" but the 
high sharp diamonds between are lacking here. The screen bands are 
duplicated on "Parthenon", "Grated Ribbon" (Kamm, p. 54), "Horse- 
shoe", etc. 

DOUBLE DONUT 

The stout-bodied creamer illustrated here 
is similar to many others, early and late, and 
is saved from mediocrity by the unusual 
double-ringed handle with a socket at the 
top for the attachment of a pewter top, 
which is missing. 

The writer possesses two creamers in this 
pattern, one obviously a close copy of the 
other; one comes in good, clear glass, with 
considerable brilliance, is of good weight, has 
no discoloration and possesses a good reson- 
ance, while the other, which is slightly the 
larger in all dimensions, is somewhat wavy, 
is less glowing and much heavier; it has con- 
siderable dinginess and less resonance. 

The body is a tall straight-sided cylinder 

tapering in to the waist on three slopes with a shelf; the waist is ringed 
and there Is a shelf atop the plain circular hollowed base. 

The rim is wavy and the high lip rises abruptly from the front; the 
cover rested on a flange just inside the rim. 

Decoration of the body consists of fourteen flat, shallow panels of even 
width and length around the upper two-thirds of the bowl, each panel 
arched top and bottom and barely demarked by sunken lines. 

Obviously the striking feature of the pitcher is its large massive double- 
ringed handle resting on a curved bracket at the base. 
2-part mold, 5J4 * n - high and 5^ in. high, respectively. 
A facetious name like that given above obviously may not apply to 
certain pieces in a pattern, but since this is the distinctive feature of the 
pattern it is probable that very few pieces exist. The pewter top indicates 
the period, the mid-Eighties. 

The socket for a top appears on a few patterns, such as "Oval Thumb- 
print" (this book, p. 26) and on some creamers of "Late Crystal" (Kamm, 
p. 21) although not on the individual piece there illustrated. 

32 





A similar pattern, with a single "doughnut" handle, was made by the 
U. S. Glass Co., appearing in their 1898 (circa) catalog; the panelling is 
identical and the lid was made of britannia metal. A covered compote was 
included. 

MITRED BARS 

An ornate pitcher of fine quality is 
shown here, clear, brilliant, of good weight 
and resonance. The body is a long cylin- 
drical one, rather clumsy to be sure, on a 
good stand. The sides are straight, with no 
rim flare and the base tapers in to the wide 
thick waist which is shelved and bulged, 
the base being rather small and spreading. 
The latter is plain on the outside but cov- 
ered with pattern on the inside, ribbed 
rays crossing from side to side with a 
central daisy. 

The handle is of the later applied type, 
with a turned -under tab at the top and a 
bulbous base. The rim is doubly scalloped 
and the lip low and narrow. 

The upper one and one-half inch of the 

body is clear, a deep bevelled groove demarking it from the main portion, 
which is covered with a band of decoration extending down to the shelf 
above the waist. This band is composed of vertical bars in rounded relief 
each broken up into short bars mitred together in zig-zag fashion and 
separated from each other by wider vertical spaces, each space further 
broken up into diamonds which are decorated alternately with small de- 
pressed diamond-point and slightly bevelled rather high relief plain sur- 
faces, the upper row around the body with diamond-point, the next plain 
and so on down to the base. 
3 -part mold, 6 in. high. 

This pattern was made by Bryce Brothers, of Pittsburgh, during the 
Eighties, and was revived by their successors, the U. S. Glass Company, 
appearing in their 1898 (circa) catalog. It comes in goblets and many 
other pieces. 

MARY JANE 

Plain patterns like the present one are 
legion and difficult to differentiate unless 
one has numerous varied pieces at a time, 
when qualities, tinting, and the general shap- 
ing might aid in separating them, such spe- 
cial things as handles and lips aiding very 
litde for they appear on but few pieces. 

The present pitcher has an inverted bell- 
shaped body much wider at the lip than at 
the shoulder above the waist; the latter has 
a shelf above and another just below the 
middle and the plain circular base spreads 
out very widely and is nearly flat. 

The handle is pressed and rests on a long shallow shield or bar reach- 
ing from rim to shoulder; it is four-square in cross-section and roughly 

33 




rectangular in outline with a sharp slant upward, the arms have wide flat 
sides, the horizontals straight and the vertical, with two projecting ends, 
slightly curved. 

The rim is horizontal with a slight rise at the very front, where the 
broad lip is cut out of the front of the body trough-wise; it is decorated on 
the outside with a fan-motif spreading from the lip and ending on a slight- 
ly raised shelf on the body. The rim is slightly thickened, with a shallow 
flange just inside for a cover, which is missing. The cover bulged in front 
to fit over the lip. 

There is no decoration whatever on the body although this does not 
preclude the possibility that other pieces may bear color or etching. 

2-part mold, 4J4 in. high. 

This piece is typical of glass made in the clear only (possibly with 
ruby) ; the writer has seen no other pieces, but they must exist in variety, 
perhaps unrecognizable because of an attractive fmial on covered pieces. 

It dates from 1885-1895. 

LACY VALANCE* 

The distinguishing characteristic 
of this creamer is its unusual shape 
its broad flat sides and narrower 
ends, both bending in to a rectangu- 
lar waist and set on a sweeping rec- 
tangular base. 

It is an ungainly piece, more 
curious than beautiful, but the glass 
is fine, clear and brilliant, with a 
slightly brownish tinge and good 
resonance. The body is rather thick 
and heavy. 

The pattern is well executed, and 

the shelving and pedestal base are exceptionally fine. The rim is plain and 
horizontal, not thickened, and the long, clumsy spout emerges from the 
front section, commencing well down the side; there is a narrow fiat panel 
down the center of the spout, which is squared off at the bottom. 

The plain pressed handle is oval in shape with an upward slant, and is 
round in cross-section, with no bulbous portion at the base and devoid of 
decoration. 

The flat-sided body rests on a thick, rectangular waist with a fine ledge 
just above, the corners being cut off with nicely softened margins. The 
base sweeps out from the waist and is thick and undecorated, being hol- 
lowed beneath to the waist. 

Decoration is confined to the corners, where there is a narrow wash- 
board effect with zig-zag edges down each corner from rim to the shelf 
atop the waist, and to the front and back panel, where there appears in 
low relief a fancy roughly triangular medallion with a broad flat base and 
long minaret-shaped upper portion similar to a valance over a window but 
in reverse; it is made up of four pairs of scrolls on a background of de- 
pressed-bead stippling. The outer margin of the figure is a narrow band 
of cross-barring between two slightly raised hair-lines. 




* Name given by Mr. W. L. Emmons, who owns the piece. 

34- 



4-part mold, 4fy in. high. 

This pattern comes in a sugar bowl and creamer, and a low oblong, 
flat-sided, honey-dish is known, with undoubtedly other pieces still to be 
found, probably including square compotes on fine pedestals. 

Flat-sided pieces bent in to the waist are not common for obvious rea- 
sons; "Feather" in milk glass is one (Kamm, p. 92), and the creamer of 
the "Elephant" pattern is very similar to the present one. 

The low-relief pattern front and back is similar to the long oval figure 
used on "Bead and Bar Medallion" (Kamm, p. 60), with similar narrow 
cross-barred border and inside scrolling. 

The pattern is late, dating from the 1890-1900 period. 

LION WITH CABLE 

This "Lion" pattern is not as well known 
as most of the others. An unusual combina- 
tion of motifs is used, consisting of the little 

lion atop the handle, a cable band around 
the base and a delicate etched fern pattern 
on the body. The glass is of good quality, 
clear, fairly heavy, with little brilliance but 
with some resonance. 

The creamer is a tall, graceful cylinder 
on a high domed base. The body curves in 
sharply below the "shoulder" to meet the 
rather thick waist and the base carries a 
wide band of raised cable below a narrow 
shelf. 

The rim Is unevenly scalloped and the 
low lip curves downward at the narrow tip. 
The handle is unique; of average oval out- 
line, flat on all four sides, it has a curve at the top with a projecting nub 
for a thumb-grasp and a matching nub near the base. Perched on top of 
the thumb-grasp is a tiny crouching lion facing backward. The little animal 
is well-sculptured in the round but it is devoid of hair-lining or stippling, 
the mane raised in mats. 

The body is only slightly wider at the rim than at the shoulder above 
the waist and is devoid of pattern save for a machine-etched spray of ferny 
foliage with a central six-petalled flower. Motifs on the two sides are 
alike, and not connected at the front. 
3 -part mold, 6% i* 1 * high. 

This pattern, in the clear only, comes in many pieces, covered sugar, 
spooner, a small compote with lion finial, etc. The lion is sometimes clear 
and sometimes frosted, the sugar having lions for the two side handles. 
There are undoubtedly many more pieces, and the pattern is often seen 
in the shops. 

Cable edge is used on many patterns, such as "Cable" itself, "Cable 
with Ring" (Sandwich), "Cable with Ring and Star'; and "Cable with 
Shell Edge", the last two patterns undescribed in the literature but found 
among the shards collected at the site of the Sandwich plant by Professor 
F. H. Norton, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. There is also 
a cable border on a pattern among these shards, named "Panelled Prism"* 
Some pieces of a Sandwich honeycomb pattern, in many colors, also show 
cable borders. 








Enos shows two still different patterns with rope designs, which he calls 
simply "Cable" (Charts 2 and 3).* 

Another pattern with a conspicuous cable band is "Strigil" (this book, 
p. 83). 

The handle is very much like that of others., including "Late Crystal 53 
(Kamm, p. 21), the little lion in place of the two nubs on top of the 
thumb-grasp. It also resembles the handle of the creamers of "Chain", 
"Spiral and Maltese Cross" (Kamm, p. 30), "Etched Daisy" (this book, 
p. 41), etc. 

LENS AND STAR 

This rather clumsy barrel-shaped piece 
has a great deal of charm withal, for the two 
wide bands of pattern are delicate and lacy 
and the middle band beautifully etched; the 
handle is lovely, and so is the fluted base. 

Moreover, the quality of the glass is of 
the finest, crystal-clear, brilliant, shimmer- 
ing in the light, of good weight and with a 
hollow resonance. 

The pitcher is rather large for a creamer, 
barrel-shaped, on a deeply skirted base; the 
waist is wide and shelved' above and below, 

...,^ !. anc ^ t ^ ie ^ ee P s lpi n f ot is "accordion- 

pleated" around the outer margin on the 
underside. 

The rim is plain and horizontal, with a 

curve up at the front for the low abrupt lip which is depressed slightly at 
the tip. The corrugated applied handle has a star-spread at the base in 
which dirt readily collects and is irremovable; there is a turned-under tab 
at the top. 

Decoration covers the body and consists of two identical wide bands, 
top and bottom, made up of four large high-relief ellipses or lenses, with 
large faceted stars between, the interstices filled with bits triangles, pleat- 
ing, etc. in high relief. 

The wide central area is sometimes left clear, and on other pieces is 
covered in soft acid-finish like "Westward Ho!", on the background of 
which is engraved in sweeping slashes a horizontal spray of flowers and 
foliage. 

4-part mold, 5^4 in. high. 

This pattern comes in an open sugar to match the creamer, but these 
two may complete the set. They belong to the 1890-1900 period, and may 
come also in color. These two pieces are by no means common in shops. 

The barrel shape is not often used, appearing in "Barrelled Thumb- 
print" (Karnm, p. 101), "Barrelled Block" (this book, p. 83), etc. 

The pleating on the inside of the base is an uncommon motif, shown 
also on "Double Ribbon", and the mirror-like ovals in the two bands are 
almost unique, not known elsewhere to the writer. The faceted stars appear 
on many other rather late patterns. 

*Earl Enos, Manual of Old Pattern Glass, St. Louis, Mo., 1936. 

36 




BEADED DIAMOND BAND 

The creamer shown here is similar to 
many others in general shape and handle 
which date from the mid-Eighties; it comes 
in a glass of average quality, being fairly 

clear and brilliant and of good weight, and it 
has some resonance. This particular piece is 
slightly dingy. 

The body is rather clumsy, the bowl a 
good-sized cylinder shelving down to a broad 
shallow waist. The base is doubly-shelved 
and is hollowed to the waist. The rim is 
arched and the lip rather low and blunt. 

The upper two-thirds of the body is clear, 
with a flat ring dividing it from the lower 
third which carries a wide horizontal band 
composed of long slender four-faceted high- 
relief diamonds and half-diamonds separated from each other by a row of 
tiny beading. 

A ring below this band demarks the base of the band from the waist- 
section, the latter terete in cross-section with a slight shelf above and two 
below. There is a deep sloping band at the bottom of the base, made up 
of coarse rounded ribbing arched over the top and slightly bevelled below. 
The pressed handle is practically rectangular, with a slight upward 
slant and slightly projecting ends, and it is square in cross-section. Each 
wide flat side has a slightly raised line on the edge and carries a pattern 
of scalloping on each edge outlined in a faint line. 
3-part mold, 5j4 in. high. 

This pattern probably comes in the usual wide range typical of wares 
of the mid-Eighties but being less attractive than others enjoyed a briefer 
popularity. It is seldom seen today. It appears to be a Sandwich ware. 

^ A similar flat rectangular handle with projecting ends and slight decor- 
ation appears on the creamers of "Two Band" (Kamm, p. 64), "Old Man 
of the Woods'^ (p. 89), "Scroll with Flowers", etc. and similar handles 
without projecting ends appear on "Cupid and Venus", "Picket", "Par- 
thenon", "Wildflower", "Minerva", etc. 

The deep fluted base is not often used, but appears on "Wildflower", 
"Fluted Diamond Point" (Kamm, p. 38), and on "Lens and Star". 

WHIRLED SUNBURST IN CIRCLE 

This creamer is fairly large and heavy, 
coming in average quality glass, fairly bright 
and glowing, but almost devoid of resonance. 
The cylindrical body curves in rapidly to the 
waist, which consists of a narrow flat fillet 
decorated with short vertical bars in rounded 
relief, tops and bottoms of the bars curved. 

The base is plain, quite thick, hollowed 
beneath to the waist, and plain on both sides. 
The pressed handle is sturdy and plain, with 
a faint semblance of a thumb-grasp at the 
top, slightly raised from the surface. 

Decoration is continuous around the 

37 




body and consists of four large circles reaching almost from rim to waist, 
each touching the next at the mid-side. Each circle is slightly indented 
below the general body surface, fan rays extending above and below the 
points of contact also indented rather than raised, as usual. 

On each side of each large circle a long ellipse is cut out, this figure 
being in rather high rounded relief and plain on the surface. Between each 
two ellipses in each circle, is a smaller octagonal figure, with bevelled mar- 
gins and a raised octagonal button at the center, plain and flat on top. 
Around this central button are whirled vanes, depressed, with a deep ridge 
down the center of each and a sharp v at the end. 

Other geometric figures fill the interstices between the octagon and its 
containing circle, each filled with raised diamond point or short sawtoothed 
ribs. 

3 -part mold, 4% in. high. 

This pattern, simulating cut-glass to a mild degree, dates no doubt from 
the 1890-1895 period; its provenience is unknown to the writer. This piece 
was lent the writer by its owner, Mrs. J. Lu Mims, of Hawkinsville, 
Georgia. 

SCALLOP SHELL 

This is a beautiful piece of glass, beau- 
tiful both in quality and in design; it is 
perfectly clear and brilliant, with a high 
resonance, hollow sounding like most 
squared pieces. 

In shape the body is square in cross- 
section and rectangular on each flat side 
with the corners rounded and nicely 
grooved. This piece is unusual in that 
the squared concept ends here, the waist 
and base being circular, the former plain 
and terete, with several shelved below. 
At each of four points a double or open 
shell is applied in good rounded relief to 
the edge of the wide shelf, one open half 

extending upward on the convex surface, the other downward on the 

concaved. 

The rim is plain and horizontal, the lip slightly lower than the rim and 
clumsy in shape, scooped out of the front of the body. It is decorated, 
however, with a beautiful shell in good, raised, relief, with at the base, in 
place of the hinge, a small cross-bar in half-round relief, each diagonal end 
decorated with a tiny scroll. 

The handle is applied. 

As further decoration, which is undoubtedly missing from some pieces 
in the set, is a delicate engraved fern and grass spray applied at the lower 
left corner of three flat side panels, the back panel left clear. 

3-part mold, 5^$ in. high. 

This piece is in clear glass and the writer knows of no others in a set 
although there is no doubt many pieces exist. The shell is that of the sea- 
side scallop mollusk (Pectinidae). 

38 




OVAL MEDALLION 

The creamer shown here is oval in cross- 
section, much longer from lip to handle than 
from side to side; the broad curved sides are 
slightly bulged through the middle, the long 
elliptical panel bulging as well as being 
raised. The body bends in to the thick 
shelved waist and out again to form the 
broad panelled base. 

The rim is slightly waved, the lip low 
and blunt and the small pressed handle 
terete and plain. 

The long medallion on each side is fram- 
ed on all but the top in a wide rounded bar 
arched over the top ends and flanked on 
each side by narrow ridged fluting, ending 
at the top in reversed Y J s. Further'out, and 

following the same inverted horseshoe shape is a wider reverse arch, made 
up of short diagonally plain, raised diamonds, separated from each other 
by a double row of small sunk diamonds. 

2-part mold, 6 in. high. 

This pattern comes in clear, canary, amber, and blue and is collectable 
in sets consisting of compote, spooner, creamer, sugar, and probably the 
whole range typical of the late Eighties and early Nineties. 

The finial on covered pieces is a large flat double ellipse, on each side 
of which appears in slightly raised relief a large patt'ee (often called 
Maltese) cross. 




ROSETTE WITH PIN WHEELS 

A very dainty, lacy pattern for one so 
late is shown in this little creamer, char- 
acterized by much fine, accurate detail. 
The glass is of good average quality, clear, 
without discoloration, and with a good 
resonance, 

The body is inverted bell-shaped with 
a narrow waist and a very much wider top; 
the base flares widely and is rather shallow, 
hollowed to the waist, plain above but 
covered with decoration beneath. 

The handle is pressed, with flat panels, 
the two side ones the narrower, and with a curve and flat-topped area for 
a thumb-grasp. 

The rim is plain and horizontal, with a broad low lip in front with an 
unusual bulge through the middle and a depression at the tip. A quarter- 
inch below the rim begins a narrow band bevelled on both sides and com- 
posed of uniform delicate "rose point" made up of geometric rosettes with 
tiny high faceted petals. 

39 




Down the front, from this band to the waist, extends a large five- 
pointed star, the two lower members being much the longer, reaching the 
center base, the upper three rays much smaller and reaching the band 
under the lip. This irregular star is bevel-edged, with a central daisy and 
button, and with tiny plain buttons and others daisy-centered in various 
sizes scattered about on the rays. There is a similar large star at the back 
of the body, under the handle. 

Centered in the large space remaining on each side, is a large rosette 
composed of eight long, slender, similar bevel-edged petals with a daisy 
center. Each petal contains a central daisy-button with almost microscopic 
diamond point at the ends. At the tip of each petal is a circular pinwheel 
or sunburst of fine depressed rays, and between each two petals is a deeply 
slashed leafy spray. 

4-part mold, 4J4 in. high. 

There is a sugar bowl to match, but the writer knows of no other pieces 
although they undoubtedly exist in considerable variety. Patterns similar 
to this one were generally colored in the deep grooves, green, red, etc. and 
gilded over, but this piece gives no evidences of color in the past. It dates 
from around 1900. 

This pattern carries the same lovely rose point band which is found on 
"Rose Point Band" (this book, p. 116). 

LITTLE BAND 

A fine, sturdy pattern is shown here, a 
creamer designed for practical service per- 
haps on a checkered tablecloth in a farm- 
house rather than to decorate the front shelf 
of a china cabinet and evoke the praise of a 
guest; it is a good clear piece of average 
weight and thickness, and with a good reson- 
ance. 

The body is cylindrical with a plain 
curving rim and rather low lip. The pressed 
handle is round in cross-section and is de- 
void of any decoration whatever. 

The base is high and shelved both above 
and below the ring about the waist. The 
foot is thick, circular, plain above and be- 
neath and hollowed to the waist. 

The body is without decoration, save for a band around the sloping 
portion of the base above the upper shelf. This little band is made up of 
half-daisies, the flat portion on the outside and each filled with tiny pris- 
matic bits In relief; between each four daisy sections is a low-relief 
octagonal button. 

3-part mold, $% in. high. 

This pattern, in the clear, dates probably from the 187S-188S period, 
the narrow decorative band probably a precursor of the "Daisy and 
Button" motif. It is of the type made in a wide range of pieces, although 
this is the only one seen by the writer. 

The plain body may be machine-etched with a fern spray in some 
pieces. 

40 





PLAIN, WITH FLAT RING 

A pattern as severe as this one demanded 
perfection of line and metal or else it was hope- 
lessly mediocre and unsalable; this creamer is 
perfect in clarity, has no discoloration, is rather 
light in weight and has only a fair resonance. 
The pitcher resembles many others in shape 
but the lip and handle are unusual; the body 
is cylindrical, slightly widest at the rim, and 
shelves down below the shoulder with a slight 
bulge above the waist; the latter is terete and 
ringed, while the base slopes down by two 
angles to the thick marginal rim. It is plain 
on both sides, but impressed on the base of 
the body with a small daisy with twelve broad 
petals. 

The pressed handle is roughly rectangular 

in outline with a slight upward slant and diagonal lower horizontal bar; 
it is four-sided, the laterals much the narrower, and there is a long, shallow, 
flat, round-margined bar down the top of the upper horizontal for a thumb- 
grasp. 

The most conspicuous detail from which to derive a name for this plain 
pattern is the rather wide, flat, bevelled ring which runs around the body 
horizontally at the rim, repeated on the margin of the base, while that 
around the waist is only slightly less flattened. 

The lip is unusually high and rises sharply from the front half of the 
rim, depressed at the tip. There is a slight rise in the rim at the handle. 
2-part mold, 5% ia. high. 

Pieces as plain as this one are often machine-engraved with fern sprays 
and they may be in other pieces in this pattern. The writer knows no 
other pieces in the pattern although they should be less difficult to trace 
than with other plain patterns, the flattened ring the single decorative 
motif, cleverly repeated, the flat thumb-grasp a part of the design. 

This piece resembles "Cardinal" in shape (also two mold), "Barley", 
etc. while the thick ring around the rirn appears on "Fluted Diamond 
Point" (Kamm, p. 38), "Festoon", etc.; a lip as high and , vertically faced 
as this one does not occur elsewhere to the writer's knowledge. 

ETCHED DAISY 

A pattern designed for service rather 
than beauty of line is represented by this 
creamer, of quality better than average, and 
of good weight and clarity. The body is a 
large cylinder of practically the same diam- 
eter throughout its rather short height, with 
a wide shallow waist and a plain shelved base 
domed beneath and imprinted on the base 
of the bowl with an inch-wide ten-rayed star. 

The plain horizontal rim is thickened, 
with a slight indentation just inside all 
around which, however, does not seem to 
have been intended for a cover; the lip is 
low and short. The generous pressed handle 

41 




is flattened back and front and bracketed to the body top and bottom. 

The body is severely plain save for a rather crude machine-etched 
spray of indeterminate flowers and foliage, which, to be sure, may be 
missing from some of the pieces. 

2-part mold, 5 in. high. 

This is a rather inactive pattern but while it has no outstanding char- 
acteristics, still it is a good salt-of-the-earth design, practical and useful, 
qualities which, after all, were the raison d'etre of all glass. It was prob- 
ably made in a good range of pieces, in the clear, and at least one of the 
plain compotes so numerous on the market no doubt belongs to it; the 
plain two mold water pitcher shown in Kamm, p. 47, has a doubly shelved 
waist very similar to that of this creamer but the handles differ. 

The pattern dates from the late Seventies or early Eighties when 
standards were still in use and bases were rims only and when handles 
clung to the old tradition of being bracketed to the bodies. 

The body resembles in shape that of "Stars and Bars" and "Two 
Band"; the handle is very like that of "Barley", "Drapery", and "Ribbon" 
and has affinities with many others of its period. 

FEATHER DUSTER 

A pattern coming in glass superior to the 
average of its period is represented by this 
creamer, a beautiful piece, a set of which 
would be a delight to its owner; the glass 
is rather light in weight but is crystal-clear, 
scintillating with the play of light on the 
many facets, and it has considerable reson- 
ance. 

The body of the pitcher is ovoidal, taper- 
ing to a small shelved stem set on a plain 
flaring base hollowed to the waist. The 
small base of the bowl is not flat, as usual, 
but convexed outward and is plain. 

The rim has five shallow scallops on 
each side, with a slight rise at the back, with 

one broad scallop, and the lip is average in height, rising abruptly from 
near the front on each side. 

The body is decorated in high relief with six large rosettes around the 
middle, separated from each other by a single large four-faceted diamond, 
and from the top and bottom of each diamond a fan spreads out round 
across the top, the widest points of adjacent ones touching. Each fan is 
vaned with long, high-relief prisms and the name above refers to their 
general shape. Each rosette has twelve sharp-ridged sections to match. 
Under the lip is an arch formed by six erect "feather dusters". 
3-part mold, 5 in. high. 

This pattern was made by the United States Glass Company, appear- 
ing in their (circa) 1898 catalog, although it was possibly made before this 
time also, earlier catalogs being missing. It was made in many pieces, in- 
cluding high and low covered and open compotes, several low bowls, sugar 
with knob like that on "Fine Cut Medallion", butter, plate, pickle dish, 
water -set including waste bowl and tray, and many other pieces. 

It comes in a brilliant emerald green as well as in the clear, no mention 
of colors being made in the above catalog. 

42 





FINE CUT MEDALLION 

This little creamer, still in the hands of its 
first owner* has a cover which, too, has been 
preserved. The glass is of good clear quality 
with no color imperfections and with a good 
resonance. The body is cylindrical on a good 
stand with a broad waist, and a base which is 
plain and hollowed. 

The bowl has four large round medallions 
touching at their sides, each bevelled top and 
bottom with an arch of ribbing in high relief 
just below and with a large faceted diamond 
at the junction between arches. The medallions 
are filled with rows of small waffles and fine 
cut in good relief, and the body below these 
medallions is divided into four large slightly curved panels, with sawtooth- 
ing down the margins. 

The cover has a finial most difficult to hold in the hand, but like that 
on many contemporary pieces, with four medallions like those on the body 
down the slopes. 

4-part mold, 4% in. high. 

The matching sugar bowl has a similar co\ T er and the pattern probably 
comes in other pieces, possibly also in color. The writer has seen none 
of it in shops. 

It dates from 1885-1890. It is similar to "Cane Medallion" {Kamm, 
p. 91), with similar panels filled with fine cut and with a similar narrow 
raised arch of fine cross-ribbing. Both have covers with small fine cut 
medallions, but the finials differ. The waffles and fine cut here are identical 
with those on "Etched Fern and Waffle" (Kamm, p. 20), only much 
smaller. 

OVERALL LATTICE 

A pattern which is simplicity itself is 
shown in this creamer, but one which lends a 
cool, frosty appearance to the board it graces. 
However, the deep interstices make pieces dif- 
ficult to clean thoroughly, a factor which may 
or may not have influenced housewives in the 
past. 

The creamer is inverted bell-shaped, with 
a well-defined waist and a perfectly plain 
circular base hollowed to the waist. The sides 
are straight, the body slightly the wider at the 
top, and the rim is saddled with a lip rising 
from the mid-side, depressed at the lip and 
rather constricted. 

The handle is pressed and plain, imitating the later applied type, with 
its enlarged base. The pitcher had a cover, which is missing. 

Decoration is confined to a wide band, nearly encompassing the whole 
body, and consisting of narrow vertical bars in good, rounded relief, lying 
adjacent, and crossed at regular intervals by tiny horizontals, eight of the 




* Drawn through the courtesy of Mrs. C. E. Dalrymple, Fostoria, Mich. 

43 




latter rows on the creamer, leaving rather deep wells over the body, similar 
to those made by the modern western farmer in his plowing to conserve his 
water supply. 

3-part mold, 5j4 in. high. 

There is no doubt this pattern comes in many pieces, probably in color 
as well as in the clear, the spooner alone besides the creamer, being known 
to the writer. It dates from the Eighties, with perhaps a reincarnation a 
decade or so later. 

BANDED FLEUR-DE-LIS 

This attractive and unusual pattern 
comes in glass of good average quality, is 
rather light in weight, but has some reson- 
ance. The creamer is ovoid in shape, widest 
at the rim and tapering gently to the wide 
shallow waist. The base spreads broadly, is 
hollowed beneath, with a raised 24-rayed 
star on the base. 

Around the top is a rather wide ring in 
good relief and from the middle of the side 
the lip rises abruptly, high and broad in 
front. Below the rim is a half-inch band of 
egg-and-dart moulding in rounded relief on 
a plain background and below the band are 
six long fluer-de-Iis designs reaching to the waist. Through their middle 
and slightly below the middle of the body is a narrow three-row band of 
sharp diamond point. The upper half of each flower pattern has seven long 
strap-like petals connected to each other by short concentric ribbing. The 
lower half of each flower has five petals only. 

The background of the body is made up of tiny raised rosettes or 
daisies giving the effect of stippling. 

The four-square pressed handle is roughly rectangular in shape, with a 
knob at the top and a corresponding bracket below. Down each side and in 
these end circles is a pattern of the tiny rosettes, outlined on each side 
by a fine cable. 

The pitcher may or may not have had a cover, for there is a ledge in- 
side the rim on the front half but not on the back half. 
3~part mold, 5 in. high. 

This pattern is seldom seen but must have been made in the regulation 
number of pieces typical of patterns of the late Seventies and early Eighties. 
It compares with other patterns of its period, the lip rising from the 
side and the raised ring round the top like those of "Fluted Diamond 
Point" (Kamm, p. 38) but neither motifs met elsewhere, to the writer's 
knowledge. The "Egg and Dart" moulding below the ring is like that used 
on "Tree Bark" (Kamm, p. 49) but not known elsewhere to the writer. 
The band of diamond point through the middle of the bowl is like that 
on "Panel with Diamond Point Band" (Kamm, p. 36). 

The handle is similar to many others and the long fleur-de-lis are 
similar to those on "Frosted Fleur-de-Lis" (Kamm, p. 84). 

The star background, however, is most unusual, and so is the Egg and 
Dart moulding at the top borrowed from ancient Greek architecture; 
neither appears on any other pattern the writer has seen. 
The pattern is a typical Sandwich one. 

44 




PUFFED BANDS 

The creamer shown here is typical of 
many dating from the mid-Eighties, clear, 
without discoloration, rather light in weight, 
and with a good resonance. 

The body is ovoidal in shape, tapering to 
a narrow waist, the base being plain, with a 
small shelf above, and hollowed beneath. 
The rim is slightly arched, the lip short and 
depressed at the tip, with an unusual curve 
just beneath. 

The handle is large and comfortable in 
the hand, oval in outline, four-square in 
cross-section, depressed down the middle of 
each side, and decorated with a pretty wheel 
at the upper outer corner and a small diamond at the lower. 

There is a deep band encircling the body just below the rim, composed 
of vertical ribs in good relief, wide arched bars alternating with narrower, 
pointed, also longer ones. The same type of band encircles the base of the 
bowl just above the waist. 
3-part mold, S J /2 in. high. 

There is no doubt that this pattern comes in the range of pieces typi- 
cal of its period, but none are known to the writer. The creamer is 
very similar in all respects to the one which follows, shape, handle, top 
band, and the little spoked wheels, although the latter are differently 
placed. The last-named motif is rare in glass, appearing again on "Tree 
of Life with Sprig 5 ' (this book, p. 27), and in no other patterns to the 
writer's knowledge. 

The two wide bands resemble those on many patterns of the 1875-1885 
period, the lower appearing on the creamer of "Willow Oak", "Wild 
Flower", "Fine Cut Band" (Kamm, p. 39), etc. 

WHEEL IN BAND 

A pattern not very different from a 
host of others is shown here coming in a 
good, average quality glass with very little 
waviness but with no brilliance; the writer 
has two creamers in the pattern, one with 
no discoloration, the other with a greenish 
tinge; one of them is rather light in weight, 
while the greenish one is slightly heavier; 
the tinted pitcher has a deeper clearer 
resonance than the other. 

The body is a long inverted bell taper- 
ing below to the plain terete stem. The 
circular base is much thicker than usual 
and is hollowed beneath half its thickness. 
It is decorated on the underside with a 
band of the body pattern across the diam- 
eter, with a delicate floral spray twining across it at right angles. 

The handle is pressed, bracketed to the body top and bottom, with flat 
panels, the side ones much the narrower. It is gracefully curved to fit the 
hand and there is a projecting nub at the top to act as thumb-grasp. 

45 




The rim Is gently arched and the lip average in height, with a depres- 
sion at the tip. The rim is somewhat thickened and just below and sus- 
pended from the thickened portion is a vertical row of little spear-points, 
point downward with a bead at each tip. The background of the spears is 
stippling in the form of large slightly depressed beads, this beading ending 
below in a raised line. Suspended at three intervals around the body and 
continuous with this rim band of stippling are similar wide vertical bands 
outlined in raised lines. Each vertical ends below at the shoulder in a long 
curve, one tip reaching nearly to the waist. These verticals are not ar- 
ranged symmetrically, one being placed to the left of the back, one under 
the left side of the lip, the other centered on the opposite side of the 
pitcher. 

On each vertical band there appears near the top and again near the 
bottom a good-sized spoked wheel in raised outline with raised spokes. 
Between the two spokes is a vertical row of spaced beads, the beads of 
the back panel replaced by short raised horizontal bars. 

On one of the creamers, the diagonal band on the base runs at nearly 
right angles to the handle, while on the other it crosses nearly parallel to it. 
Handles, too, differ slightly in the two, and it is apparent that one is a 
most clever copy of the other. 

3-part mold, 5^4 i* 1 * high, and 5% in. high respectively. 

The writer knows no other pieces in this pattern. It is so similar to 
several authentic Sandwich patterns as to indicate a like origin for which- 
ever is the original of the two. 

The body shape resembles that of the creamer of "Minerva", "Horse- 
shoe", "Snakeskin and Dot", etc.; the wide stippled beaded band around 
the rim and extending vertically through the body appears on "Parthenon" 
and "Clear Diagonal Band", and the upper band alone on "Horseshoe". 
The fussy treatment of the design with the delicate floral sprays suggests 
"Cupid and Venus", "Parthenon", "Minerva", "Scroll with Flowers'-', 
"Horseshoe", "Ribbed Forgetmenot", etc. 

The handle closely resembles that of "Clear Diagonal Band" (which 
also has large depressed beads for stippling), "Double Spear", "Barley", 
"Cat's Eye and Fan", (Kamm, p. 27), etc. 

SISTER KATE 

Here is one of the patterns so conveniently 
dated for the future glass collector, inscribed in 
fancy etching on a ruby background "Saratoga 
1890 To Sister K K". "The glass is beautifully 
clear and well polished, as befits so plain a 
piece. The body is a long cylinder bulging 
through the lower third and tapering in sharp- 
ly to the small waist. 

The body is plain over the upper two-thirds, 
with a groove demarking it from the basal 
portion, which bears a high relief band of bev- 
elled diamonds separated from each other by 
narrow threads. 
3-part mold, 5% i* 1 * high. 

Since this was a souvenir piece, the pattern was probably made in few 
pieces; the date indicates that the ruby topped souvenir pieces were in 
vogue at least three years before the Chicago Exposition. 

46 





TREMONT 

A sturdy pattern lacking in the grace and 
beauty of many is represented by the tall cylin- 
drical creamer shown here, the body set on a 
narrow waist and broad nearly flat base. 

The glass is average in quality, fairly thick 
and heavy, and is without resonance. 

The body combines rather unhappily three 
motifs, any one sufficient in itself, a plain upper 
half with rim deep-scalloped over the back half, 
a rnotif often painted ruby red and inscribed 
with a place, name, and date; a wide band 
through the middle made up of raised faceted 
bits forming a large four-pointed star, flat 
octagonal buttons with bevelled margins, etc., 
and as a third motif, the lower portion of the 
body, down to the waist, is fluted rather deeply, two wide grooves alter- 
nating with one narrow one, the former with arched tops and bottoms, 
the latter sharp-pointed at both ends. The narrow flute also is evenly 
notched down both sides, while the ridge between the two wider is plain. 
The waist is surrounded by a raised sharp-ridged ring notched at inter- 
vals, and the base is -plain above but impressed below with a large 27- 
rayed star reaching the margin. 

The pressed handle is four-square in cross-section, rectangular in out- 
line but with an upward thrust, and down each side of the three members 
is a wide deep groove or flute, the three flutes not continuous as one. 
3-part mold, Sj-1 in, high. 

The upper half of the body of this pitcher resembles that of "Ruby 
Thumbprint" and many others of the 1893-1900 period; the star band 
through the middle is identical with that on "Stars and Bars" (Kamm, p. 
64) save that the bar is omitted here; the fluting and notching of the lower 
portion of the body is used on many late patterns. 

This pattern was made by Richards and Hartley, of Tarentum, Pa. 
appearing in their 1888 catalog under the above name, also under "No. 37". 
It was made in seven pieces, including three compotes. However^ it may 
have appeared also in other catalogs of different years, and in more pieces. 

BEAUTIFUL LADY 

Here is a lovely piece, dainty and effemin- 
ate, covered with attractive decoration. The 
glass is beautifully clear and brilliant, with a 
cool, frosty appearance from the play of light 
on the many curves and indentations. 

The bulbous body rests on a good base 
with a rather deep waist, the base hollowed 
and decorated on the outside. The rim Is 
doubly scalloped, the smaller scallops reach- 
ing up on the arch of the low lip. The handle 
is rather large for one of the later applied 
type, with a small base. 

The whole body from rim to margin of 
the base is covered with a continuous complex 

47 




pattern made up of four repeats blended to form a compact whole. Cen- 
tered on each side Is a broad fan in kite-shape with long tapering lower 
tip and deeply bevelled sides. The large, outer vanes are depressed rather 
than convexed. Flanking each of the lower sides is a diagonally placed 
long, sharp, ellipse or "buckle", with a deeply indented elliptical figure in- 
side, the buckle flat and covered with fine screening or faceted squares 
rather than the usual diamond point. 

Placed diagonally on the upper sides with broad end up is a long, tri- 
angular, figure made up of two bevelled bars filled with fine cross-barring, 
the apex filled \vith a large diamond with bevelled edges and unequal sides, 
and filled with screening. 

The pattern extends through the waist to the margin of the base, with 
ellipses, bars, with cross-barring, etc. 

4-part mold, 5 in. high. 

There are many pieces in this lovely pattern, spooner, sugar, butter 
dish, small high covered compote, high flat cake plate, etc. It would seem 
to date from 1885-1890. 

GRAPE WITH OVERLAPPING FOLIAGE, M.G. 

The creamer shown here is fairly 
thick, opaque, chalky-white, milk glass, 
with no bluish tint through thin edges 
nor fireglow by transmitted light. The 
glass is fairly heavy and it has some 
resonance. 

The creamer is long ovoidal in shape 
tapering to a broad plain waist with a 
broad shallow base hollowed to the waist 
and plain beneath and above. 

The handle is pressed, conventional 
in shape with six panels, straight lines 
and sharp angles; those on the side the 
narrower; the attachments to the body 
bear a slight resemblance to those of the 
later applied type. 
The plain rim arches from a saddle near the back and the lip is typical 
of patterns of the period. 

The upper inch of the body is plain, a sinuous woody grape vine run- 
ning crosswise just below, from the lower side of which are suspended by 
capillary stems foliage and fruit, the former in rather low relief, veined 
and fine-stippled, the latter in half-round. All the leaves overlap in the 
same direction although no two are alike, for no part of the pattern is 
repeated. The six clusters of fruit contain in order around the body 9, 23, 
5, 9 y 23, 10 berries each, in two larger upper rows and four smaller rows. 
Below the stippled foliage is a lower row, the tops hidden under the 
upper row, this lower foliage veined but not stippled. 

The background, very little of which is exposed, is clear. 
2-part mold, 5J4 in, high. 

The owner of this beautiful piece* also possesses the spooner, which is 
dated "February, 1870". He also has a spooner of the same pattern, in 
the clear, which is undated and a sugar bowl (clear) dated "February, 




* Mr, W. L. Emmons, 



48 



1870". While the creamer and sugar bowl are two-mold glass, the spooner 
is three-mold. 

Since the grape motif has been one of the most popular of all our 
American patterns since the beginning of pattern glass, and since pattern 
books, catalogs, etc. are practically non-existent now, it is impossible to 
say where this piece was made. Shards of it were not found at the site of 
the Sandwich factory (M. I. T.) but proportions, exact dimensions, are 
like those of many Sandwich patterns. 

There is little doubt that, like "Barberry", the creamer exists also with 
an applied handle, probably a decade earlier. The fruit is so small that 
were it not for the tendrils it might be regarded as that of the currant. 

Other milk glass patterns similar to this one are "Strawberry", 
"Wheat", and "Blackberry", but I believe all are somewhat older. 

FINE CUT BAR 

A tall slender attractive creamer is shown 
here*, rather light In weight but clear, without 
discoloration and with a good resonance. 

The pitcher tapers gently from the rim to the 
waist, which Is lightly threaded and divided Into 
nine panels which end in a shelf just above and 
extend to the margin of the deep sloping hollowed 
base. The panels are curved top and bottom. 

The rim of the piece has three large scallops 
alternating with three little Inverted V's and the 
lip Is average In height and width. The dainty 
little handle is pressed with a tab under the upper 
attachment and a long sloping basal attachment. 
It is four panelled, the back and front panels the 

wider, and down each side Is a row of tiny beads squared at the ends. 
Three long teardrops fill the space below the beads in the lower attachment. 
Decoration in good relief consists of several motifs blended into an 
attractive whole on long slender vertical columns with bevelled sides 
faceted triangles, diamonds, diamond point, four-faceted stars, and sun- 
rays. 

3-part mold, 5j4 In. high. 

This piece probably dates from the decade after 1900. It Is Identical 
in shape and size with "Bull's Eye and Fan" (Karnm, p. 58), the rim, 
handle, and pattern, however, different. It also resembles "Panelled 
Agave", sometimes called "The Cactus Pattern", (Kamm, p. 77). The tear 
drop motif in the handle is unusual, but also used on "Coarse Cut and 
Block" (Karnm, p. 107). No doubt many pieces exist in this pattern. 

WYOMING 

One of a small group of parfalt-glass-shaped creamers on good stand- 
ards, this slender little piece Is fairly heavy* although not weighted with a 
thickened base. Like others, it had a cover, now missing although pieces 
no doubt may be found complete. 

The rim has broad shallow scallops alternating with Inverted V's and 




* Through the courtesy of the owner, Mrs. J. J. Whitfield, of Hawkins- 
ville, Georgia. 

49 




the lip curves up sharply from near the front. The 
handle is plain and pressed. 

The body tapers gently to the waist and is 
divided into six columnar panels in rounded relief 
separated from each other by long slender verti- 
cal feathers. Each is arched over the top, with a 
row of tiny beads over the top with a faintly out- 
lined crescent just below in raised relief. Just 
below this crescent, near the top of each panel, is 
a strange motif not used elsewhere to the writer's 
knowledge, a high dome outlined by a raised line, 
with open base and two spreading points, with 
two bull's eyes side by side between the points. 
The dome is cross-barred. It resembles the war bonnet of a German Junker 
or, inverted, an owl's head with staring eyes; it might even be an aviator's 
head with helmet or a ram's head. 

Some distance below this motif in each panel is a slightly depressed 
ovate thumbprint outlined likewise in tiny beading, and the base of each 
panel is rounded with beading outline. Below the panels are several swags 
of "drapery", ending just above the waist. 
3-part mold, 5 in. high. 

This pattern probably comes in a number of pieces and without doubt 
in color and slag. There is also a standard creamer besides this slender 
one. 

The above is the original name for the pattern, made in Indiana in 
1895. In shape it resembles "Panelled Agave", also called "Cactus", 
(Kamm, p. 77), which comes in caramel slag as well as several colors, 
and in many pieces, including pickle dish and covered cracker bowl. 



SO 




GROUP FIVE 

Patterns included here have standards reduced to mere thick- 
ened to thin waists placed on sloping bases hollowed beneath to 
the body. Handles are pressed and of the later applied type, while 
decorations run the gamut from human head to severely plain. 
They date from 1880-1900. 

CERES, MILK GLASS 

This lovely piece seems to be 
carved out of snow-white marble 
rather than pressed in prosaic glass, 
with a pattern appropriate to such a 
medium. The nicely shaped body has 
a strangely ugly lip and a handle far 
too large for the body. Decoration 
is raised and consists of three oval 
medallions outlined in beading, each 
containing an identical classic head 
with hair arranged in ancient Greek 
fashion, bound at the back with a 
fillet, with a corona or halo in front. 
The medallion under the lip is sur- 
rounded with a leafy wreath, and the 
side ovals have a similar wreath with the back half omitted. 
3 -part mold, 4% i&- high. 

This pattern comes in an open spooner or sugar bowl to match, and 
possibly in other pieces. It comes also in clear and possibly also in tur- 
quoise opaque, in slag, and in a fiery opal opaque. 

The creamer is very similar to that of "Sunflower" in all respects, with 
the same ungainly handle and high clumsy lip, but both are quite differ- 
ent from the common run of patterns of die 1875-1885 period. 

There is a milk glass creamer similar in size with this one coming in 
the form of a woman's head, with red eyes, after the order of the "Owl" 
pitchers. 

DIVIDED BLOCK WITH SUNBURST, VARIANT 

This is a beautiful creamer, brilliant and 
glowing, crystal-clear, of good weight and 
thickness, and with a hollow resonance. It 
is rectangular in shape on a short stand. 
The base of the bowl does not taper in the 
almost universal manner but is squared off 
sharply, the waist tapering sharply below 
this base; the body is square in cross-section 
and waist and base are also square. 

The handle and lip are placed in the 
center of sides rather than on opposite cor- 
ners and the margins are well rounded off 
with a deep groove on each side at the 
corner. The rim has a single large scallop 

51 




centered on three sides, flanked by a smaller, while the high lip rises 
trough-like from the front panel. 

The handle is applied and has an unusual curve in the lower half. 

The base is plain on both sides. 

On each side is a large, nearly square panel raised slightly from the 
background and on this panel is a wide band made up of three squares 
arranged diagonally around the body, each square containing four 
"waffles" with bevelled sides, the corners filled with faceted triangles. 
The angles between blocks are filled with deep sun rays. 

4-part mold, 5^ in. high. 

This pattern is very similar to two others shown in this book, (see pp. 
71 and 73). 

RUBY STAR* 

The above name is not apparent from the 
creamer which comes in a beautifully clear, bril- 
liant ware the upper half in a ruby glaze and the 
lower in crystal-clear, like its counterpart, "Ruby 
Thumbprint". The glass is rather heavy and 
thick with the pattern in exceptionally high 
relief. 

The creamer is practically cylindrical, slight- 
ly the wider on the inside just above the waist. 
It has a broad shallow waist without panelling 
and a plain circular base hollowed to the waist, 
with no pattern beneath. 

The handle is pressed, in imitation of the 

later applied type and Is placed on a long narrow shield, and the rim is cut 
in deep V's with a low plain lip. 

The upper half of the body is devoid of pattern though possibly in 
some pieces engraved with a name, place and date, like its better-known 
counterpart. The lower half has four horizontal rows of interlocked dia- 
monds In very high relief, with sharp margins and apices. The second row 
down Is truncate, with a faceted star impressed into the top. 
4-part mold, 5 in. high. 

This pattern conies In covered butter dish, covered sugar, spooner and 
creamer, and possibly in other pieces. The tops of the covered pieces show 
a large sharp-pointed star in ruby red and in very high relief, and the 
knobs are rounded with a horizontal row through the middle of little red 
diamonds. The top of the sugar bowl fits down over the body with sharp- 
pointed mitred margin. 

The pattern comes also in all clear glass, with no red whatever; It ap- 
pears In the 1898 catalog of the United States Glass Company, although 
this does not preclude its appearing also in earlier catalogs; it was called 
their No. 15001, and was made in many pieces, including the usual ones, 
syrup pitcher, cruet, custard cup and saucer, plate, sugar shaker, a three- 
inch compote, etc. The long shield at the handle is used on a few patterns 
including "Lion", "The Kitchen Stove" (p. 108 this book), etc. 

* Drawn by courtesy of Mrs. George Dillenborger, Ypsilanti, Michigan, by 
whom the name is suggested. 

52 





QUESTION MARK 

The creamer shown here is a lovely 
light green color in opaque glass with a 
fire glow through the edges; it has a high 
resonance. However, the mediocre pat- 
tern rather spoils the effect. 

The body is cylindrical, rounded at 
the base, the waist broad and shallow, 
with a slight shelf above, and the base is 
hollowed to the waist beneath. There is 
a shelf near the rim, carrying a raised 
scroll pattern. 

The rim is uneven to conform to the 
pattern and the lip low and decorated 
underneath. The pressed handle is flat- 
tened back and front with the side edges rounded off. 

Decoration is confined to the rim, with three medallions just below, 
extending to the center. The rest of the bowl is clear save for a deep groove 
below each medallion and extending to the waist. 

Each medallion is ovoid in general outline with a long drop below and 
is made up of eight graduated "question marks" radiating from the flat 
central area with its three large beads. Between these figures are fine 
scrolling and small beads. Around the rim between the larger figures are 
small scrolls, some winged, others containing daisies and leafage. 
3-part mold, 4J4 in. high. 

There is probably a covered sugar to match and possibly other pieces, 
and no doubt it comes also in cream and turquoise opaque, and possibly 
in the clear. 

The writer has derived the name for the pattern from the numerous 
"question marks" which compose the medallions, one curve of the ogee 
scrolls much the larger. The winged scrolls at the rim appear on several 
other patterns, such as "Shell and Scroll" (p. 117), "Winged Scrolls" 
(p. 119), etc. 

The handle is similar to that on the creamer of "Loop with Dewdrop". 
"Dahlia", etc. 

The pattern is late Victorian, around 1885. 

ACANTHUS LEAF 

There is an old "Acanthus" pattern, dat- 
ing before 1864 and made at Pittsburgh, the 
name having been changed more recently to 
"Ribbed Palm", so the above name should 
cause no confusion. 

This pattern comes in marble glass or 
slag, and is a thick, heavy piece for one so 
small, with a bell-toned resonance; it would 
seem to have been cut from a massive piece 
of onyx In deep purple with highlights in 
swirls of many lighter shades, including 
much creamy white. 

The creamer is round in cross-section, 
widest just below the collar, tapering from 

53 




thence to a broad shallow ringed waist; the base is sloping and hollowed 
and the rim bulges sharply and flares outward from the constriction at 
the shoulder, with a large and rather clumsy lip. The handle is pressed, 
round in cross-section, and plain. 

The creamer has a cover, which sets deeply into the body, and has 
a finial in the form of a plain flattened knob; it has the same pattern as 
the body. The body is divided vertically into six broad flat panels, each 
with a raised arch across the top just below the shoulder and carrying 
inside a single row of beads. Down each of the panel margins is the half- 
section of a long pinnate leaf which matches an adjacent half, all in slight 
relief; the foliage and the continuous space between shoulder and the deep 
groove just above are stippled. 

2-part mold, 4^4 i n - high. 

This pattern comes in sugar, creamer, spooner, butter dish, and prob- 
ably more pieces, all in slag devoid of turquoise (which many of the slag 
patterns have). 

FLATTENED DIAMOND AND SUNBURST 

This pattern is one more of the numerous 
variations on the old "Diamond and Sunburst" 
theme popular even before the Civil War. This 
pattern, while differing little from others, Is in 
fairly low relief, the pattern merely outlined in 
fine hair-lines, spaces inside the pattern flush 
with the background. 

This little creamer is light in weight and while 
clear has a slight dinginess and very little reson- 
ance. It Is ovoidal In shape, with a wide shallow waist shelved above and 
below, and a plain hollowed base. The rim is plain and horizontal, the 
lip rising almost imperceptibly from the trough cut into the front, reaching 
a third of the way down. 

The handle Is pressed, panelled, and plain, with a thumbgrasp made 
up of two reverse scallops and a projecting nub at the free end; there Is 
a slight curve at the base. 

The pattern on the body consists of a wide band extending from just 
below the rim nearly to the waist and composed of large interlocked dia- 
monds in outline only on a plain unraised surface. Each diamond is made 
up of four equal ones outlined In raised lines of the same height as those 
on the outside, the vertical diamonds divided further into sixteen small 
ones, outlined in fine hair lines; the horizontally placed secondary diamonds 
are each divided into numerous tiny squares by finer outlines. 

Sun rays extend upward and down from the depressions in the band. 
3 -part mold, 3J4 in. high. 

The pattern comes in many pieces In the clear and possibly also in 
color; the writer has a cylindrical pickle dish in a silver holder which was 
a family wedding present In 1885. 

The pattern Is similar to the old "Sunburst" pattern, antedating 1864 
and to "Diamond and Sunburst" and also to several patterns shown by 
Kamm, pp. 15, 103, 104, and to "Tepee" (this book, p. 78). Comparisons 
of these patterns show their differences. 

54 





GRECIAN 

There are many plain patterns which 
depend on their beauty of line and qual- 
ity of metal rather than on superficial 
decoration for their charm, but it is diffi- 
cult to distinguish between them and to 
assemble sets in one to the exclusion of 
the others. 

This creamer, which may be part of a 
large or of a small set, is a lovely piece, 
of generous size, almost milk pitcher ca- 
pacity, and comes in a beautiful quality 
glass, thick, heavy, and crystal-clear, and 
with a fine polish and resonance. How- 
ever, there is no denying it is a late piece, 
dating after 1890. 

The body is urn-shaped, with a bulge 

below the middle and tapering to a neck, above which the rim flares out 
slightly, with a fine, graceful marginal curve. 

There is a deep sloping shelf above the shallow waist and the plain 
slightly hollowed base is rather narrow for so large a body. 

The handle strikes a jarring note for it is unreasonably large for the 
pitcher and the upper turned-under tab is applied precariously to the 
narrow raised back of the rim. 
2-part mold, 6 in. high. 

SHIMMERING STAR 

A delightful pattern is represented by the 
creamer shown here* the finely beaded back- 
ground covering most of the body affording 
a cool frosted appearance, from the inside 
especially, comparable with the finest lacy 
Sandwich glass. The glass is clear and flaw- 
less, w T ith no discoloration and with a good 
resonance. 

The creamer is a neat compact little 
piece, ovoidal in shape, the waist well de- 
fined and the circular base flaring and 
shallow. It is hollowed to the waist and 
without decoration beneath. 

The rim is horizontal save for the abrupt rise near the front of each 
side, and the lip broad and rather blunt. The pitcher had a cover, which 
is missing, as is usual with pieces of this period. There is a row of good 
sized beads nearly in the round on the edge of the rim. 

The handle is pressed, four panelled, oval in outline, with a row of 
graduated beads down the center of each side. The waist is banded with 
fine vertical pleating, sharp down the center ridges, extending uninterrupt- 
edly from the basal portion of the bowl to the margin of the base, scalloped 
above but plain below. 




* Through the Courtesy of Mr. W. L. Emmons, Jacksonville, Illinois. 

55 



The pattern motif consists of three large flat circles well spaced around 
the middle of the bowl, each with a rather wide slightly raised margin 
carrying a single row of even-sized beads. Inside is a large octagonal star 
of beautiful proportions with a large central octagonal flat-surfaced button. 

The background of the whole body, extending to the margin of the lip, 
is composed of fine beading in horizontal lines extending to the scalloping 
above the pleating below. 

3-part mold, 4J^ in. high. 

This pattern in the clear comes in water pitcher, creamer, tumbler, 
sauce dish, sugar, and probably many more pieces. It is typical of pat- 
terns of the 1875-1885 period. It is a highly desirable pattern. The beau- 
tiful star with bevelled edges is not often used in our glass patterns, but 
appears also on "Bevelled Star" (this book, p. 70), and possibly on a few 
others. 

A beading background is not commonly used, but appears on such 
patterns as "Arabesque" (Kamm, p. 13), "Dahlia" (p. 73), "Flower Pot" 
(p. 86), etc. 

GRAPE WITH SCROLL MEDALLION 

This creamer uses the old Sandwich 
motif of a short horizontal twig with a broad 
grape leaf above and a cluster of tiny fruit 
below, as used on many early patterns, but 
here it differs from the others and seems to 
be an imitation rather than a continuance 
of the motif. 

The pitcher is a commodious piece, low 
and broad, set on a plain hollowed base with 
a broad shallow waist. It is thicker than 
usual but not heavy and while only average 
in clarity has a good resonance when struck. 
The rim is saddled and rises in front over the awkward lip which begins 
half way down the front of the body. The handle is molded and rests on 
a long slender shield; it is four-panelled, with softened margins, and has a 
plain, slightly rounded thumb-grasp at the top. 

A wide band around the body is outlined above and below by a narrow 
band composed of two raised lines with a row of beading between. The 
decoration between these two bands consists of four vertical, scrolled me- 
dallions alternating with three grape motifs cleverly connected with the 
medallions by raised woody vines. 

Each medallion, roughly hexagonal in shape, is formed by raised lines 
with twin scrolls at the corners and is filled with rather coarse diamond 
point. On each side of the medallion, a long curve nearly touches top and 
bottom consisting of a woody vine, a cross-vine reaching from the top of 
one curve to the bottom of the next, thus forming a large sprawly letter 
"H". Curving upward from the middle of the bar of this letter is a small 
slightly raised grape leaf filled with depressed bead stippling. Below this 
cross-bar hangs a cluster of twenty-two little beaded fruits. 
2-part mold, 4% in. high. 

This pattern in the clear comes in goblet, water pitcher, creamer, sugar 
bowl, spooner, butter dish, and no doubt a whole set of pieces. The writer 
has seen none in color. It would seem to date from the 1875-1885 period. 

56 





The long slender shield down the back to which the handle is attached 
appears on a few patterns, mostly of the 1870's and the little grape motif 
appears on such patterns as "Magnet and Grape", "Grape and Festoon", 
"Stippled Grape and Festoon", etc. 

LOCKET ON CHAIN* 

A creamer similar to "Flower Flange" and 
"Frosted Fleur de Lis" is shown here, coming 
in a rather unpleasant shade of yellowish 
greea and probably also in clear, light yellow 
and amber. The creamer is cylindrical in 
shape on a short shelved base. The pressed 
handle is plain, and round in cross-section, 
imitating the applied type. 

The back half of the rim is decorated with 
a horizontal row of beads nearly in the round, 
not quite touching each other, placed on the 
outer corner. The front half of the rirn rises 
to the lip, which is plain. 

The body is divided into four sections by upright bands made up of 
two raised hair lines with a row of egg-and-dart figures in relief between. 
Around the top of each of these sections is a swag of beading suspended 
from the rim at the vertical columns and around the base of each section 
is a corresponding swag of fine beading. 

Suspended from each of these upper swags hangs a large oval "locket" 
which takes up the central portion of each section, a locket outlined in 
beading and fine scrolling, with a plain center. The background of the 
sections is fine beading used as stippling. 

Above the upper swags fine doubly pointed ribs extend to the rim ? and 
a band of similar bars encircles the top of the base. 
4-part mold, 4^ in. high. 

This pattern was made by A. H. Heisey and Company and appears m 
their undated catalog, circa 1897, under the number 160. It was made in 
tumbler, goblet, wine, water pitcher, butter, spooner, sugar, celery vase, 
cruet, salt and pepper shakers, toothpick, molasses can, 8-in. plate, several 
bowls, pickle tray, salver (tall cake plate), compote, and pint-sized pitcher. 

SUNK HONEYCOMB 

Little individual creamers similar to this one_ are _ 
popular today, and this one is a fine, brilliant piece, 
the many plane surfaces reflecting the light perfectly. 
The pitcher is of average weight and has no reson- 
ance. 

The body is widest below the middle, where there 
is a horizontal band of rather deeply depressed hexa- 
gonal blocks side by side, with deep wedges reaching 
upward and down from their points of contact 

The rim is plain and so is the small pressed handle. The base is un- 
decorated. 

3-part mold, 3 in. high. 

This piece comes in all clear, as well as with a ruby top down to the 




The name above was suggested by Mr. W. L. Emmons. 

57 




pattern, the handle in the clear. The pattern also comes in a small cylin- 
drical pitcher, with ruby top. No doubt some pieces are inscribed with 
name, place, and date. 

The pattern is very similar to "Portland", and was possibly made at 
the same place and period, which was from 1890 to 1900. 

TEXAS 

. The above is the original name for this pattern, 
which was made by the United States Glass Com- 
paay, of Pittsburgh, and dates from the 1890-1900 
period. It comes in many pieces and is often seen 
in shops. Apparently it was made in the clear 
only, clear with ruby, and clear with gilded top. 

This little individual creamer, on a base higher 
than usual, comes in good, clear, rather heavy 
glass with some resonance. The rim has four wavy scallops on each side, 
with a slight rise at the back and a lip of average proportions. 

The pattern begins nearly an inch below the rim, and the plain upper 
part is gilded and burnished on this piece. Nine long slender loops slightly 
open at the bottom extend upward vertically from the waist, ending at the 
half-way mark, with a loop around each in high rounded relief arched over 
the top. The smaller loops are filled with small diamond point. 

The handle is plain, pressed, and small. On the underside of the base, 
half way out, is a small band of diamond point. 
3 -part mold, 3> in. high. 

This pattern can be found in many pieces, including sugar, spooner, 
goblet, water pitcher, standard creamer, etc. It is fairly plentiful 

CHERRY SPRIG 

This squat little creamer was a container, 
probably for mustard, for there is a screw ledge 
just inside the rim. It is a bright, glowing piece 
of glass, fairly heavy but greenish in tint, with 
some waviness, and without resonance. 

The body^ is nearly spherical in shape, with 
a narrow waist and a broad flat foot which is 
plain on both sides. The neck is wider than the 
waist and both are ringed. The rim flares out 
and curves upward, with a row of even scallops 
beaded on top. The lip_ rises from near the front and is plain. 

The pressed handle is nearly round in outline and also in cross-section. 

The body is divided into eight vertical flat panels separated by raised 
ridges perceptible on the inside as grooves. Suspended from the neck near 
the front of each side is a spray of cherry foliage and fruit, the two leaves 
slightly raised ^and faintly stippled and the three cherries hung by long 
stems from a Dingle twig. Each cherry is in high relief with corresponding 
deep indentation on the inside, indicating that this is a blown piece instead 
of being pressed. 

2-part mold, 3% in. high. 

This piece is very similar to "Quilt and Flute" (Kamm, p. 71) the 
creamer of which pattern was also a screw-top container. That pattern 
comes also in an open sugar, and without doubt this one does also, although 
these two pieces probably complete the set. They date from 1890-1900. 

58 





GROUP SIX 

The bases of the pitchers in this group are lower than in Group 
Five, with very little hollowed space beneath, but still not resting 
flat on the bases of their bowls. Otherwise they differ not at all 
from the pieces in Group Five. 

PANELLED HOLLY* 

Another of the patterns, the like of which 
delighted the eyes of our mothers and grand- 
mothers is shown here, a pattern overloaded 
with decorative motifs, to which is added a 
lovely clear sapphire blue body with an 
opaque turquoise top portion, including the 
top of the handle, blending into the body 
color. As though still lacking in attraction, 
the foliage and berries, the top of the rim. 
and the depressed oval thuinbprints are 
gilded in a bright yellow, a cornflower and 
maize combination. 
The upper part of the body is cylindrical in shape but the lower half 
tapers in rather sharply to the narrow waist, which is set on a thick nearly 
flat circular base. The rim is doubly scalloped, and the lip rises sharply 
from near the front, being deeply depressed at the tip. 

The pressed handle is oval in shape, with simulated tab under the top 
attachment and a long-drawn out piece below; the handle is panelled and 
much wider than thick. 

The upper half of body is divided into eight broad flat panels arched 
over the top and tapering to long sharp points below. Long wedges are 
thus formed, reaching up from below, each with deep bevelled margins, 
and alternate wedges containing two depressed oval thumbprints and a 
section of English thumbprint. 

The wide flat panels above are decorated with holly leaves and berries, 
all in good raised relief, no two panels identical. The foliage is stippled in 
"doughnuts" or depressed beads and both berries and leaves are gilded, 
as well as the thumbprints in the wedges below. 

The margin of the base is evenly scalloped but not gilded, and beneath 
is a very beautiful complex figure reaching almost to the margin; in the 
center on a raised bevelled circle of 2Sc piece size is a sunburst with daisy 
button center, and outside this, slightly depressed on its inner circumfer- 
ence is a figure made up of concentric faceted diamonds, the inner minute, 
the outer fairly large. 

4-part mold, 4^4 In. high. 

The pattern of the sunburst on the base is repeated many times on 
glass of the 1895-1905 period, such as "Checkerboard" (p. 130, this book), 
"Panelled Cane" (Kamm, p. 94), "Buttressed Sunburst" (p. Ill), "Flam- 
beaux" (p. 112), etc., etc., some of these with the "H" inside a diamond on 
the inside base, the trademark of the Heisey Glass Company. 



* Name given by Mr. W. L. Emmons, of Jacksonville, Illinois, who kindly 
lent the pitcher to the writer. 

59 




The "English Thumbprint", appearing in the wedges, is a common 
motif of the period, seen on many patterns, and the high color and gilding 
also aid in dating the pattern. 

There is a sugar bowl to match, and probably a butter dish. There 
may be a few other pieces, but probably not a general line, and the pattern 
was undoubtedly made in the clear, yellow, amber, and possibly green. 

The gilt on pieces of this type is generally removed today, but I believe 
it should be left on for its historical significance; we may abhor it from a 
decorative viewpoint, but future collectors will not thank us for despoiling 
the pieces. 

TWIN CRESCENTS* 

This pattern is one of the numerous 
pressed motifs imitating cut glass, which had 
recently come into fashion and supplanted 

the older ware for all who could afford it. 
The creamer is a thick, heavy piece, in 
better-than-average quality glass with some 
resonance. 

The body is cylindrical and low but wide 
placed on a short shelved base hollowed 

beneath to the broad shallow waist. There is a large plain twenty-rayed 
whirled star beneath. 

The lower portion of the body, through the waist, is ribbed in an at- 
tractive pattern of broad well-rounded vertical bars which raise the pattern 
above the ordinary. The margin of the base is thick and scalloped. 

The handle is pressed but simulates the applied type, the corrugated 
spread at the base similar to that on many applied handles. 

The rim has two broad scallops on each side with a higher one at the 
handle, all five further finely crenulate. The lip is rather low and broad. 

Decoration consists of several well blended motifs on a wide band 
through the middle of the body between two sets of broad bevelled arches. 
Four large bevel-edged circles are spaced around the, body and separated 
from each other by twin crescents back to back with bevelled margins and 
filled with fine diamond point. Between the two adjacent crescents are 
two large bevelled diamonds filled with diamond point. 

4-part mold, 3^. in. high. 

GRAPE WITH FINE 

This pattern is often confused with sev- 
eral other grape designs and is used to fill 
out missing pieces in these patterns. It is 
probably the latest of those using the grape 
motif and was given as a premium with 
baking powder in the Nineties and possibly 
the early Nineteen Hundreds. It was wide- 
ly distributed and is plentiful today. 

The pattern is differentiated from many 
of the others in that there is a continuous 
heavy vine around the top with occasional -,-, -^^^^ 

* Drawn through the courtesy of the owner, Mrs. J. G. Garnett, of Monroe, 

Louisiana. 

60 




vertical drops, the whole pattern continuous, with no independent 
as with many of the others. 

The creamer shown here is much thicker than the average (-f$ in.), 
but it is not a heavy piece; it has a good resonance but is badly discolored 
with amethyst. Other pieces, however, are liable to be free from discolor- 
ation. 

The good-sized ovoidal body rests on a wide shallow waist, the base 
rather shallow and wide-spreading, vertically ribbed on top with a scal- 
loped margin. There is a row of tiny scallops on the minute ledge just 
above the waist, the latter terete. 

The pressed handle is small* oval in outline, four-square, with a rounded 
nub at each outer angle, a faint raised outline around the margins scrolled 
at the nubs and inclosing a single bead at each. There is also a row of 
beading down the center of each side with a small corrugated spread at 
the base. 

The rim is straight with a slight rise at the handle and a broad low lip; 
a row of large well rounded and well spaced beads decorates the thick rim, 
facing upward. 

The body is decorated just below the rim with a continuous woody 
grape vine in relief, with vertical drops di\ r iding the body into three sec- 
tions, each panel identical and carrying grape foliage suspended from the 
vine above with a central cluster of large rather flattened grapes, nineteen 
m number. On many pieces from worn molds the petioles and fruit stems 
are blurred or missing and even most of the veining and stippling of the 
foliage obliterated; this stippling is in the form of depressed beads. 

3 -part mold, 4^4 in. high. 

While late, this pattern is now in good standing with collectors, fitting 
in well with missing pieces in earlier patterns. It comes in many pieces, 
butter dish, water pitcher, several compotes, both low and high, berry dish, 
sauces, goblets, etc., the last named being fairly common. 

The writer has the berry bow! with a large star on the base which is 
colored red and then gilded over but color has in general been removed 
from the pieces. The number of berries in the cluster varies in different 
pieces. 

RISING SUN 

A low creamer with a pattern appropri- 
ate to early morning use is this little piece, 
light in weight but clear and with a good 
bell-tone. It is commodious for its height, 
3 $4 i n - wide at the rim and hemispherical 
in shape, with a small waist and base. 

The pitcher has a cover, indicated by 
the ledge inside the rim. The back half of 
the rim is evenly scalloped, the front half 
plain with a broad low lip. The pressed 
handle is small and uncomfortable in the hand, with knife-edges; it is 
four-square in cross-section, with a deep wide groove down each side and 
a concavity in the upper corner for thumb-grasp. 

A large rising sun appears thrice around the body with a deep-cut 
horizon line just below the middle of the body; the "sun" is deeply con- 
caved and the complex rays are also depressed, with sawtoothing between. 
Below the "horizon" are complex geometric figures, with small sunbursts 

61 





and diamond point. The three "suns" are separated from each other by 
erect, vertical, deeply pressed foliage sprays. 

3-part mold, 3|i in. high. 

The sugar also is covered and there are many pieces in this late pattern, 
including vinegar cruet. It is not difficult to find in shops, nor is it 
expensive. 

The many decorative motifs are used often during the Nineties, the 
deeply cut vertical foliage on "Late Thistle", the sun rays on "Panelled 
Thistle", uneven sawtoothing on such patterns as "Frosted Block" (Kamm, 
p. 96), "Twin Sunbursts' 5 (p. 97), "Buttressed Sunburst" (p. Ill), etc. 

EAR OF CORN 

Patterns with a profusion of gilt do not belong to a 

high period in our pattern glass, but some are illus- 
trated here because in time they will come into good 

standing as collectors 7 items; even now they are fifty 
years old and more, a respectable age for so perishable 
a medium as glass. 

This little corn creamer appeared on the whatnot 
of the writer's family somewhere around 189S, too 
small for anything but a toy or souvenir bit. It is deep 
clear green in color, the half-revealed grains of corn in burnished gold. 
The rim is gilt and the handle green. It is a pretty little piece. 
2-part mold, 3J4 * n * high. 

The writer does not know the origin of this pattern; however, a very 
similar ear of corn creamer was made by Challinor, Taylor and Co. of 
Tarentum, Pa., the body and handle shapes identical, the lip a little higher, 
and two corn leaves crossing the ear of corn on each side; it was made in 
"opal" ware. The U. S. Glass Co. put out a similar creamer in 1898, with 
a bulge in the lower half of the body and with more kernels showing. 

There is a similar but much larger creamer in Majolica ware and salt 
shakers were sometimes made in the same form in yellow and green. 

TEN-POINTED STAR 

A pitcher more interesting than 
beautiful is the one shown here, obvi- 
ously imitating in cheaper medium the 
multi-faceted cut glass popular at the 
turn of the century. This piece is 
pressed much deeper than many pat- 
terns and comes in such brilliant shim- 
mering glass that it would appear at 
first glance to be cut. It is heavy and 
thick for pressed glass, is without dis- 
coloration and has a good tone when 
struck. 

The body is cylindrical with a per- 
ceptible bulge in the lower third and 
it rests on a plain shelved base slightly 
hollowed and decorated on the base of 
the body. 

The rim Is doubly scalloped over 
the back half, the lip rising from the 

62 




front half, rather long and narrowed at the tip. 

The handle is pressed,, oval in shape and simulates the applied type 
with the bulbous base. A shield runs between the upper and lower attach- 
ments continuing into the upper part of the handle. A row of deep thumb- 
prints decorates each side of the handle. 

The whole body is covered with patterns a wide band crossing at about 
the midpoint made up of many geometric figures, trapezoids, triangles, 
hexagons with daisy centers, all in exceptionally high relief. Above this 
band is a large star reaching nearly to the rim and appearing four times 
around the body. The star is unusual in having ten points, the lower one 
truncated, centered by a large deeply pressed daisy inside a raised bevelled 
decagon. The points are filled with diamond point and outside them ap- 
pear numerous sun rays. A similar row of four stars appears below the 
central band. 

A similar but less deeply imprinted star with eight points appears on 
the base of the body. 

4-part mold, 7^ in. high. 

PALM LEAF FAN 

Designs similar to this one are legion and 
characteristic of the era of I 895-1905 after 
cut-glass had set the style but was still too 
expensive for most people. 

This one comes in a light weight metal 
of clarity and brilliance typical of its period 
and it has some resonance. The creamer is 
of good usable size and stability, slightly 
bulging near the base, which is set on a 
collar slightly higher than most, raising the 
elaborate star beneath from the board be- 
neath. 

The rim is doubly and evenly scalloped 
and the lip high arched and narrow. The 

handle is pressed and four-panelled, flattened back and front, and each 
side panel carries a row of raised flat-topped diamonds. 

On each side of the pitcher is a large spreading and stemless "palm- 
leaf fan" emanating from the base and composed of arched rays of two 
types, a narrower one of flat-topped diamonds like that down the handle 
and an alternating wider motif concaved in the center and margined on 
each side with a raised spine of fine sawtoothing. 

The front and back of the pitcher bear a similar motif, the upper half 
a spreading fan the lower of two narrow vertical bars with bevelled mar- 
gins, each bar filled with fine cross-ribbing. 
4-part mold, Sj^ in. high. 

The daisy-centered star on the base is Identical with that of numerous 
other patterns, and is described under "Checkerboard" (this book). The 
doubly scalloped rim is like that of "Panelled Thistle" (Kamm, p. 82) and 
the row of diamonds down the sides of the handle are also like those of 
this pattern. The sawtoothing down a raised spine is often used on late 
patterns. 

63 





PLUME 

"Plume 3 * Is the original name for this love- 
ly pattern, which was made by the Adams 
Glass Company, of Pittsburgh, and found in 
an old catalog of theirs without date, 

The pattern comes engraved and plain, in 
many pieces, including water set with tray 
and waste bowl, butter, sugar, spooner, cream- 
er, berry bowl with sauces, many compotes, 
some with crimped edges, others with plain, 
some covered, others open, some high and 
others low. There are tumblers and goblets 
and many nappies. 

The creamer is a beautifully shaped piece, 
jug-shaped, with a curved rim and low lip. 

The handle is applied but much more slender than is usual, especially 
through the middle. 

Decoration is confined to the lower part of the body and consists of a 
continuous horizontal plume, the individual sections in fairly high rounded 
relief. 

4-part mold, 5 in. high. 

WILD ROSE WITH BOW-KNOT 

It would be an interesting hobby to col- 
lect pieces In all the grotesque patterns of 
our American glass patterns which raise a 
smile or a laugh when shown; this pattern 
would find a high place in such a collection. 

A more absurd piece could scarcely be 
found save those with stubby scrolled feet 
but still it is more interesting than many a 
pattern built on beautiful lines. 

The body is cylindrical with a barely 
perceptible bulge through the middle and it 
rests on a shelved base hollowed and plain beneath. The rim is unevenly 
scalloped, following the scrolling just beneath and the lip is high and 
awkward in shape, 

The little handle is difficult to grasp with more than two fingers, and 
even then uncomfortable because of the sharp spine below. It is pressed, 
flat on both sides, with a curved thumbgrasp above and a corresponding 
bracket below. 

Raised scrolling is scattered over the body, the scrolls generally in re- 
verse pairs and three spaces between the scroll framework In close identi- 
cal sprays composed of a five-petalled wild rose with surrounding foliage. 
Down the mold lines and flanking each sides of the front rose spray is a 
beribboned staff with forked lower end and a large ribbon bow at the top. 

The outside base is decorated with a zigzag line below which fine 
vertical fluting extends nearly to the rim. 

The pitcher had a cover, missing as usual. It may have been a condi- 
ment container with a thin metal cover meant to be promptly thrown 
away, but I doubt it, 

3-part mold, 4J4 i* 1 - high. 





This particular pitcher comes in camphor glass, every part in the soft 
satin finish; the foliage is colored green and the rose in rose color, the 
whole then thinly bronzed over. The ribbon staves are gilded and the 
thick edge of the rim is also gilded. In some pieces seen in shops the color 
has been removed. 

The pitcher also comes in clear, and probably in light yellow and blue 
as well. There is undoubtedly an open sugar to match, but other pieces 
are doubtful. The pattern probably dates from 1890-1900. 

WHITE OAK 

A small individual creamer* with a pretty 
over-all oak pattern, this little piece comes in a 
good quality light weight glass with no discolora- 
tion and with considerable frosty shimmer, and it 
has some resonance. 

It is a straight-sided piece, narrowest at the 
waist, widest at the top, where the rim is evenly 
scalloped save over the plain wide low lip. The 
base flares from the waist and is hollowed and 
plain beneath. The pitcher had a cover, which unfortunately is missing; 
one wonders if the finial is not an acom. 

The pressed handle simulates a tree twig, with a little knob below. 
The decoration is very effective, the background simulating a section of 
a tree trunk with three panels containing identical motifs so nicely placed 
as to appear one continuous motif. Each section has one long oak leaf 
with short stern at the top and bent tip at the base, the lobes rounded and 
sinuate; from the side a smaller leaf springs out, and two clusters of twin 
acorns complete the picture, 
3-part mold, 3J4 in. high. 

This pattern appears among the shards from the site of the Sandwich 
factory and preserved at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the 
name above that used by the Ceramics Department of that institution. 

The pattern must have been made in many pieces, but the writer has 
seen none but this single little piece. 

Other "Oak" patterns include "Acorn", which antedates 1864, and the 
many acorn variants, some with cable rims. "Ribbed Acorn" is of the 
"Bellflower" type, with ribbed body and meandering vine running cross- 
wise, with occasional leaves and acorns ; it is to be found among the M.I.T. 
Sandwich shards. 

"Ribbed Palm", also called "Oak Leaf", is another old-time Sandwich 
pattern dating from 1 830-1 840f. "Oak Leaf and Acorn" is another early 
Sandwich pattern (See Chipman), having a narrow acid-finish band around 
the body and a pair of doves on covers as finials, while "Pressed Leaf" 
is really a red oak leaf. 

"Beaded Acorn" has a stippled surface with panels containing a small 
beaded medallion with a small oak leaf and nut inside. 

Simulated bark is seldom used on glass patterns, but appears on "Tree 
Bark" which pattern is also called "Fish Eye", on the handles of "West- 
ward Ho!", etc., while a similar background is used on c Wooden Pail". 



* Owned by Mrs. Jack Bagwell, of West Monroe, Louisiana. 
f Frank Chipman, The Romance of Old Sandwich Glass, Sandwich, Mass., 
1932. Rhea Mansfield Knittle, Early American Glass, New York, 1927. 

65 




PANELLED THOUSAND EYE 

The creamer shown here is a lovely ame- 
thystine piece, tinted from long exposure 
to strong light; some glass changes to a light 
tan, some becomes dingy-blackish, some 
greenish, depending on the content and im- 
purities in the mix. One authority says glass 
becomes slightly discolored after a year's 
exposure, the tint deepening for ten years 
or more. However the deep amethyst color 
was regarded as highly desirable to early 
collectors who exposed their glass on the 
lawn during the summer. 

This creamer is a clear brilliant piece of 
average weight and with a hollow resonance. 

The body is long-rectangular in shape, handle and lip on opposite 
corners; it is square in cross-section with the corners well rounded off. 
The base of the body bends in slightly to the waist and the base is square 
and sloping, with straight sides, and the corners sliced off angularly. 

The rim is saddled through the middle, rising gently to the lip. The 
generous pressed handle is very slender and terete; there is a raised ring 
an Inch or so out from each horizontal, simulating the ivory or ebony in- 
sulating ring on silver teapots; the space between is plain but the attach- 
ments are decorated on their under-halves with three long slender adjacent 
stippled leaves spread upon the body with long points, the upper half of 
each arm left plain and terete. This is a very unusual character. 

Each flattened side of the body forms a panel which is decorated from 
rim to waist with uniform "eyes" arranged in three vertical rows and ten 
horizontal, each eye a large flattened one with a sharp high faceted dia- 
mond between each group of four, as with the true "Thousand Eye" 
pattern. 

Each rounded corner carries two wide vertical flutes, grooved and 
shallow; the square base is decorated beneath with a plain ray pattern. 
2-part mold, 5 in. high. 

This pattern was made by Richards and Hartley, of Tarenturn, Pa. in 
1888, in sugar bowl, creamer, butter dish, spooner, etc. The sugar bowl 
is square also in cross-section, having the face of a woman in good relief 
placed prostrate on the broad nearly flat cover, a pretty conceit but a poor 
finial with which to lift the heavy lid. 

The original name was "Daisy Square", but, since the word "Daisy- 
in-the-Square" is used in connection with many patterns today, the writer 
believes it too confusing to be used here, hence the name above. 

Rectangular pitchers, square in cross-section, are not common, some 
having handle and lip at opposite corners, others with these in the middle 
of opposite sides. "Picket", "Marsh Pink" (this book, p. 30). and "Heavy 
Panelled Fine Cut" (p. 24) belong to the former category. 

Ringed handles appear on a few patterns, such as "Grasshopper" 
(Kamm, p. 88), "Ribbon Candy 7 ' (p. 33), "Fish Scale", "Fine Cut and 
Block", "Sunflower", etc., the ring with stippled petals spreading down 
into the body of the pitcher appearing on such patterns as "'Loganberry 
and Grape", "Cherry and Fig", "Cornucopia" (this book, p. 124), etc. 

66 




SINGING BIRDS 

This creamer is unusual in depicting a 
charming genre picture in good relief, each 
side a different scene but so closely connect- 
ed as to seem continuous. On the side shown 
here are two singing birds, one starting to 
fly, the other in repose, both standing on a 
thorny meandering limb. Although the 
branch is defoliated, it is set with many 
flowers (possibly Dogwood, some with five 
and others with six petals) striped and 
stippled in depressed beads, and also with 
short sharp spikes set with berries, possibly meant for the Northern Holly. 
The birds are beautifully executed, the fine feathers and quills carefully 
drawn, but are ornithologically inaccurate; one with crow-like beak, the 
other with beak like that of a sparrow, one with a very long scissors tail, 
the tail of the other much shorter. 

On the obverse side are two more similar birds, both with long tails 
and open bills, one erect and the other bending low on the bough. The 
flowers and berries are similarly distributed. 

The body of the creamer is low and melon-shaped (3^4 in. in diam.) 
and rests on a thick rather deep shelf slightly hollowed beneath and im- 
pressed with a large uneven 42-rayed star. 

The back half of the rim is coarsely scalloped and the lip is rather high 
and narrow at the tip. The handle is pressed, with tabs above and below, 
and is much wider than deep. The flat side panels are decorated on the 
margins with tiny square beads. 

The glass is of fine clear quality, fairly thick and heavy, and there is 
some resonance. 

4-part mold, 4 in. high. 

This pattern comes in the clear with a burnished gold top to the arches 
and possibly also with a ruby top. There is an open sugar to match but 
the writer has seen no other pieces. 

The pattern obviously is late, of the 1895-1905 period and was prob- 
ably a product of the same factory which turned out the bird salts in 
quantity, some with closed bills, others with a cherry in the beak, occur- 
ring in colors as well as in the clear. 

There is an "N" with a line under it on the inside of the base. 

SLABSIDES 

This unusual creamer, more of a 
novelty than a utility, comes in a reddish 
brown, turquoise, and cream slag or mar- 
ble glass, the colors swirled over the flat 
body, twisted and feathered, forming an 
artificial agate closely paralleling the nat- 
ural stone. The body is opaque, the glass 
thick, and the resonance high and sharp. 

The body is very thin, not over two 
inches wide, but the two flat sides are 
nearly circular, flattened somewhat along 
the rim. The sides project beyond the 

67 




ends, giving to the creamer the appearance of holding considerably more 
liquid than it really does. 

The base is rectangular and plain and the body is very unstable, over- 
turned very easily. The lip is small and projects from the center-front. 
The pressed handle is long-oval in shape and terete in cross-section. 

There is no pattern in the molding, the large flat smooth surface with 
its beautifully mottled pattern being sufficient unto itself. 

3-part mold, 4J4 ' m - high. 

This pattern comes in open sugar bowl and creamer and probably in 
only these two pieces; the writer has seen several of these sets, all of the 
same clouded slag but they may come also in slag having a different color 
combination. 

Slag patterns are said to have been made by a single factory, Challinor, 
Taylor and Company, of Tarentum, Pa. during the Seventies and include 
"Oval Panel" (this book, p. 120) and "Flying Swan" (p. 81), both shown 
in their old undated catalog now owned by the U. S. Glass Company. 

"Slabsides", and "Acanthus Leaf (p. 53) identical in coloring, were 
no doubt also made there, and two patterns familiar to collectors in clear 
and transparent colored glass were also made in identically colored opaque 
slag, "Sunflower" (see Karnm, p. 55), and "Primrose". There are still 
several slag patterns undescribed in modern glass literature. 

Slag patterns were never a practical product, being fragile and difficult 
to execute. They are relatively very scarce today, bringing astonishingly 
high prices. 

DIAMOND BAR AND BLOCK 

An exceptionally pleasing pitcher is the 
large melon-shaped one shown here a fine 
glowing piece in clear transparent glass 
which scintillates with the play of light on 
its many facets. 

The body is larger than usual for squat 
creamers, and rests on a shelf which is in- 
dented to the base of the body and impress- 
ed with a large plain eighteen-rayed star. 

The rim is a straight collar with large 
even scallops and a smaller one on the slope 

to the low lip. The handle stands out from the body and is oval in outline; 
while pressed it closely imitates the fine twisted rope-like handles of the 
applied type, such as used on "Moon and Star", "Centennial", etc. The 
handle is placed on a long uneven-sided shield with high bevelled sides. 

The whole body surface is covered with a simple pattern on diagonal 
lines curving slightly from top to bottom and consisting of square blocks 
in high relief with large flat surfaces, each block separated from its neigh- 
bor by a long narrow rectangular bar with a sharp central spine. At the 
crossing of these bars is a square with pyramidal top. 
4-part mold, 4 in. high. 

This piece dates from the 19'OG period or even later but is a highly 
desirable pattern. The writer knows no other piece in the pattern. 

The bevelled block pattern 5s similar to many others, such as "Waffle 
and Bar" (Kamm, p. 115), "Late Block" (p. 115), "Reeded Waffle" (p. 
96), "Diamond Block" (p. 107), etc. 

68 





SNAIL 

A set of four pieces of this charming pattern 

was given as a wedding present at an Amish 
wedding in Pennsylvania in 1888. The name 

is most appropriate and unusual. The pitcher 
is a lovely crystal-clear piece of good weight 
and it also has a good resonance. 

The cylindrical body is rather tall and 
bulges on the outside on the lower third to 
conform to the deeply pressed pattern. The 
upper portion is devoid of pattern save for an 

engraved spray running crosswise and nearly 
meeting at the back. 

The highly embossed pattern on the lower 
part of the body consists of a continuous band 

made up of uniform tight spirals running counterclockwise. On the base is 
a large plain 20-rayed star. 

The handle is of the later applied type, bulbous at the base and slightly 
thicker than, average above. The rim is slightly saddled on each side and 
the lip low and short. 

4-part moldj 5j/g in. high. 

The covered sugar is most attractive, larger than the creamer, with 
high, domed cover. 

DIAMOND LACE 

A little creamer which seems to bridge 
the gap between "Lacy Daisy" and "Blue- 
bird" is this charming one, of clear, spark- 
ling glass, with design as fine and intricate 
as a piece of rose-point lace.* In shape it 
lies between these two, not as straight-sided 
as the latter nor as bulbous as the former. 

The pattern covers the body, with a half- 
inch band around the top just below the 
doubly scalloped rim, and none at the base. 
This band is made up of large hexagonal 
buttons in higher relief than the similar blocks in the band of "Blue- 
bird". Each block is impressed with a stylized star almost identical 
with that on the blocks of "Lacy Daisy", although there the blocks are 
octagonal in high relief rather than hexagonal 

Through the middle of the body is a horizontal row of eight large 
diamonds touching at their sides, with bevelled margins, the lower sides 
of the figure shorter than the upper, and the apex truncate, as though 
the tip were turned down and stamped with fine diamond point. 

Each diamond is impressed with a large daisy or sunburst, similar 
to that which fills the blocks on the upper band. Filling the interstices 
between the diamonds are several geometrical figures, fans, triangles, etc., 
each containing fine diamond point, English thumbprint, etc. 




* Drawn through the courtesy of the owner, Mrs. Duane Sugden, Mayville, 

Michigan. 



69 




On the nearly flat base Is a large sunburst with raised ^central button. 
The oval, pressed handle is decorated down each side with diamond thumb- 
prints with softened margins. 

4-part mold, 4 in. high. 

The sunbursts used on the hexagonal blocks and inside the large dia- 
monds are repeated many times on contemporary patterns, such as "Mary 
Jane", "Checkerboard"/ "Palm Leaf Fan" (this book, p. 63), and in 
"Twin Sunbursts", "Buttressed Sunburst", "Flambeaux", etc. (Kamm, pp. 
97, 111, 112). The pattern on the handle Is similar to that used on several 
of the above named patterns. 

This pattern was made by the Heisey Glass Company, around 1905. 

STARS AND STRIPES 

The present creamer* is thicker and heav- 
ier than the average and has a dark amethys- 
tine tint; the glass is clear and brilliant and 
scintillates in the light; it also has some 
resonance. 

It is a short broad cylinder on a broadly 
shelved base slightly hollowed beneath and 
plain on the base of the bowl. The pressed 
handle is a plain terete oval bulbous at the 
base. 

The rim has six coarse wavy scallops over 

the back half and the lip is plain and low, the tip lower than the rim. 
The body is divided vertically into twenty-four long slender bars extend- 
ing all around the body, alternate bars plain and decorated and blending 
into the rim at the top. The plain bars are rounded on the edges in good 
relief but the decorated are flat with flat bevelled rectangles top and 
bottom. 

3-part mold, 4 in. high. 

This pattern conies in covered sugar, goblet, tall slender vase, etc., some 
pieces with gold tops; it also comes in milk glass. 

Several very similar patterns utilizing narrow faceted vertical bars al- 
ternating with plain ones are to be found, all dating from the 1890-1905 
period. 

BEVELLED STAR 

Not many patterns come in as brilliant 
a glass as this, a deep, clear emerald green, 
glowing with light, similar in tone to "Em- 
erald Green Herringbone", The pattern also 
comes in a brilliant clear glass and without 
doubt in amber and possibly a light yellow 
as well. 

The creamer is a large globular piece on 
an abbreviated base and with a high collar 
vertically ribbed in good relief, with a scal- 
loped rim and a wide ring around the base 
where it joins the body. The rim is slightly 




* Drawn through the courtesy of Mrs. J. J. Whitfidd, Hawkinsville, 

Georgia. 

70 



saddled and the lip rather low, scalloped o\ r er the edge. 

The handle is small, green in color, and applied, with a turned-under 
tab at the top and a bulbous base. 

The body is covered with decoration in a continuous pattern, made up 
of three motifs, siz large well-spaced circles through the middle, each with 
bevelled outline and containing a large star in good relief. Each alternate 
star has a large flat octagonal central button surrounded by faceted figures, 
the adjacent star being radically different, a plain one with raised rays, 
eight long alternating with eight shorter. 

Between the large stars is a long vertical geometric figure with pointed 
ends and deeply incurved sides, bevel-edged and filled with high sharp 
diamond-point. Between the depressions outside this figure and the ring 
at the base of the collar are inverted Y-shaped spaces filled with deep 
vertical ribbing. Similar ribbing fills the interstices at the base of the 
diamond-point figures. 

The small base is plain on both sides. 

3 -part mold, 454 ' m > high. 

This pattern comes in creamer, sugar bowl, sauce dishes, berry bowl, 
spooney and no doubt many other pieces, and is often seen in shops in the 
clear, colors being rarer. 

It is a late pattern, dating after 1890. The large bevelled star appears 
also on "Shimmering Star" (this book, p. 55), although without the bead- 
ing edge. 

Several very similar patterns showing the identical large star-in-circle 
are illustrated in an undated catalog of Duncan, Miller and Company, of 
Washington, Pa. and this is with little doubt also one of their patterns, 
other old catalogs being lost. 

DIVIDED BLOCK WITH SUNBURST 

A creamer similar to several others in shape, 
quality and pattern, this one comes in better 
than average glass, rather thick, clear, brilliant, 
and with a little resonance. 

The body is urn-shaped, narrowest at a 
"neck" just below the slightly flaring scalloped 
rlrn, and bulging below the middle; it rests on 
a narrow shelved base which is flat beneath and 
imprinted with a plain large 18-rayed star, the 
points almost touching the margin. 

The rim has six good sized scallops on each 
side and a large one at the back, of the same 
height; the lip is low and plain; the handle applied. 

A band of large square blocks set diamond-wise with side points touch- 
ing surrounds the body just below the middle and slightly above the widest 
point; each diamond is made up of four square blocks set cross-wise to 
the large blocks, each small block with deeply bevelled sides and large flat 
top; the Interstices between the larger and smaller blocks is filled with 
faceted triangles, the upper and lower pair each with tiny flat tip, the 
side pairs sharp pointed. 

Above and below s between the large diamond blocks are sun-rays which 
extend upward nearly to the neck and down nearly to the base. 

71 




3-part mold, 4J4 In, high. 

This pattern comes in several pieces in the clear and also in clear with 
the flat tops of the little blocks and the upper part of the body in ruby red. 
The red color dates it as of the 1890-19(30 period. 

It is similar to two other patterns in this book, on pp. 51 and 73, and 
is similar in quality, shape, and decoration to '"Diamond and Sunburst, 
Variant" (Kamm, p. 104), 4fc Tepee 73 (this book, p. 78). 

FLUTE AND CANE 

Two pitchers in this design are 
shown, the milk size and the small tank- 
ard-shaped water pitcher to indicate that 
pieces may differ considerably in shape, 
quality, and details, due probably to the 
fact that very many patterns were cop- 
ied by several other plants. 

One often discovers a creamer very 
similar to a known piece but slightly 
different in proportions, in thickness, in 
tint, and in design. 

The milk pitcher shown here is a 
stout rather awkward piece, a large 
cylindrical body on a small base, the 
handle far too large and clumsy for 
beauty, albeit practical for use. The 
body bulges slightly in its lower third, 
and is decorated with four horizontal 
rows of cane pattern, tiny octagonal 
buttons in good relief on a fine cut back- 
ground, with very narrow bars between 
filled with minute faceted bits. 

The upper two-thirds of the body is 
decorated with narrow vertical flutes 
barely indented, widely arched over the 
top just below the rim and V-shaped at 
the base where they join the cane bands. 
The glass is fairly thick and heavy 
and has a good, deep-toned resonance. 
4-part mold, 5^ in. high. 
The slender pitcher in what is known 
as "tankard" shape, is a much more 
graceful piece, coming in fairly thick 
heavy glass, glowing with light, tinged 
decidedly yellowish, and with a good resonance. The body tapers from 
rim to waist, the latter only half the diameter of the rim, and rests on a 
deep flaring base plain on the outside but covered with decoration beneath. 
The handle is similar to that of the milk pitcher above, and the four hori- 
zontal rows of cane forming the band just above the waist are identical. 

The large complex sunburst on the base is identical in both, appearing 
on many patterns of the 1890-1900 period, such as "Buttressed Sunburst" 
(Kamm, p. Ill), "Flambeaux" (p. 112), "Checkerboard" (this book, p. 
130), etc., "Flambeaux" alone being stamped on the inner base with the 
"H" in diamond, the trade-mark of the Heisey Glass Company. 

72 





DIVIDED BLOCK WITH SUNBURST, VARIANT 

The present pattern is very similar to the 
previous one, and is probably an approxima- 
tion of that pattern made in a different fac- 
tory. As a whole it is less refined than that 
pattern,, with grosser details. The quality of 
the glass is inferior, the creamer is thicker 
and heavier and it has a different sound when 
struck. While the former creamer is beauti- 
fully clear and scintillating, the present one 
is less high in quality although bri!liant ? and 
has a slight greenish tinge, which, however, 
may be absent from other pieces from a different mix. 

The present creamer is much larger than the one described just before, 
with a larger base which is slightly indented and impressed with a large 
20-rayed star reaching the shelf, whereas in the smaller piece the base is 
flat underneath, slightly indented only in the center, and is impressed with 
a similar 18- rayed star which reaches the margin. 

The rirn of the present piece is little more than waved, in broad shallow 
scallops, whereas in the former piece the scallops are deep with deep in- 
dentations between, six to a side in each piece. 

The handle of this piece is pressed, round in cross-section, with an up- 
ward slant, whereas in the former piece it is dainty in shape and applied. 
The pattern of the present creamer consists of a wide band around the 
body save at the handle, where a long vertical area on each side of the 
handle is left bare. The band extends nearly from rirn to base and consists 
as in the former pattern, of squares set diamond-fashion, side by side 
through the middle, with rays extending upward and down from their 
points of contact. Each of these large diamond-set squares contains a 
smaller square, set at right angles to it, the interstices between filled at the 
top and bottom with flat-topped bevelled triangles and at the sides with 
three-faced triangles coming to sharp central points. 

This square, in turn, is broken up into four smaller ones, each with 
bevelled sides and flat tops. 
3-part moldj 4J^ in. high. 

The present pattern comes in all clear and in clear with the four small 
squares colored ruby on their flat-tops; the upper part of the body from 
rim to blocks, between the rays, is also ruby-colored, the base left clear. 
It can be found in sugar, spooner, creamer, tumbler, butter dish, etc. 

LACY DAISY 

This pattern, also known as simply 
"Daisy", Is generally called among dealers 
by the double name in order to avoid con- 
fusion with the many other patterns bearing 
the "Daisy" name alone or in combination. 

It is a very lovely pattern, scintillating, 
lacy, and the pieces graceful in shape. The 
plate looks like a beautifully crocheted doily. 
The creamer is a good sized piece of the 
same diameter as height, globular in shape 
on a shelved base hollowed enough to protect the pattern beneath. 

73 




The upper part has a collar which curves outward slightly at the rim 
with coarse even scalloping to correspond with the collar panels. The lip 
is very low and dips downward sharply. 

The simple little pressed handle is oval in shape, nearly round in cross- 
section, and is decorated down the sides with a row of daisies in relief, each 
with a sharp raised center which makes the piece uncomfortable to hold. 
The pattern does not reach the two extremities. 

The whole body is uniformly covered with the pattern, which consists 
of four horizontal rows of "daisies" in high relief smaller toward the base, 
the rows separated from each other by three lines, the spaces filled with 
tiny faceted triangles, etc. Similar vertical lines separate the pattern into 
squares. The "daisies" are conventional figures octagonal in shape, with 
steep bevelled margins and large flat tops, in the center of each a still 
smaller, further raised daisy, also bevelled and flat on top. The inner sur- 
face of the latter is plain but of the larger is filled with minute triangles, 
etc. in high relief. On the base is a section of the main pattern, with nine 
of the formalized daisies in squares. 

4-part mold, 3^8 in. high. 

This pattern comes in the clear in many pieces, several sizes of plates, 
a large cake plate, berry bowl, sauce, sugar, spooner, and In a child's doll- 
house set. There are undoubtedly many other pieces. 

The formalized daisies are similar to those used on such patterns as 
"Checkerboard" (this book, p. 130), on the base of "Flambeaux" (Kamm, 
p. 113), "Buttressed Sunburst" (p. Ill), etc. 

The collared panelled rim is used on such patterns as "Swirled Block" 
(Kamm, p. 115), "Waffle and Bar", (p. 115), etc. The very narrow bars 
between the squares is used on many late patterns, such as "Heavy Dia- 
mond" (Karnm, p. 97), "Frosted Block", p. 96), "Diamond Bar and Block" 
(this book, p. 68), etc. 

BEVELLED DIAMOND AND STAR 

Pieces in this thick heavy glowing ware of 
exceptional clarity seem to be practically un- 
known in spite of its beauty and charm. The 
creamer is much heavier than the average 
piece and while the shape is good and prac- 
tical, it is not as graceful as "Plume" (p. 64) 
for instance, which otherwise resembles it. 

It is practically cylindrical in shape, the 
lower half slightly larger on the outside be- 
cause of the great thickness of the glass here. 
The base is flat in spite of the shelf on the 
outside and there is a large four-pointed star 
sunk deeply into the bottom of the bowl. 

The handle is applied, with a large bulbous 
base, pointed at the bottom, to fit over the high relief diamond there. 

The upper part of the body (a little less than half) is plain, with an 
evenly scalloped rim save over the plain low lip. The pattern, on the lower 
part of the bowl, is in very high relief and consists of four large plain sur- 
faced diamonds with slightly curved sweeping sides and deep bevelled 
margins, and between them large four-pointed stars with diamond centers 
and tapering logs sliced off diagonally at this diamond. 

74 





Around the top and bottom of the pattern is a row of low-relief scallop- 
ing to match that on the rim. 

4-part mold, 5^4 in. high. 

The writer knows no other pieces in this pattern, although they must 
exist in considerable variety, without doubt in the clear and in clear with 
ruby top, some pieces no doubt inscribed. 

The evenly scalloped rim is typical of wares of the "Ruby Thumb- 
print" period and the deep piain collar with nearly straight vertical sides 
and the dainty applied handle, too, are typical of this pattern and its 
period. The large-blocked pattern in very high relief is used also in such 
patterns as "Hexagonal Bull's Eye" (Karnm, p. Ill), "Pointed Jewel" and 
''Double Prism" (Kamm, p. 95)', etc. 

BEAD SWAG 

A little pitcher of late vintage, this attractive 
and sensible piece comes in good clear quality 
glass without resonance but fairly heavy and 
thick. It is a gracefully urn-shaped piece, wid- 
est near the base and gradually narrower to 
the top, the doubly scalloped rim extending 
only over the back half only the high arched 
lip rising from the middle of the sides. The 
little handle is applied. 

Decoration consists of a single swag of little 
beads through the widest part of the body. On 
the upper part was gold lettering, now obliter- 
ated, and the top of the rim was also gilded. 

The small shelved base is nearly flat, with a large plain 20-rayed star 
beneath. 

4-part mold, 4J4 *& high. 

This pattern was made by A. H. Heisey and Company, appearing in 
their catalog of around 1897, under the trade number 1295. It came in 
many pieces, including custard cup, spoon tray, salt and pepper shakers, 
tall cake plate, molasses can, pickle dish, etc., to the number of thirty-two 
pieces. 

This type of pattern often comes with ruby top (above the swag) as 
well as In all clear. A beaded swag similar to the one used here appears on 
"Jewel and Festoon" (Kamm, p. 66) and lines of beads form the pattern 
also on "Cord Drapery". 

BUCKLE WITH ENGLISH HOBNAIL 

This pattern is a variant of the well-known 
"English Hobnail", the creamer a small nearly 
spherical piece on a low base not hollowed 
beneath and on which there appears a large 
indented twenty-two rayed star y protected by 
a shallow ring around the edge. 

The glass is clear, with no discoloration and 
with a cool, frosty sheen from the many fine 
facets. The creamer has a good tone when 
struck. 

The handle is pressed, four-panelled, and arched sharply at the top 
outer corner, otherwise plain. The rim is cut into many sharp little in- 

75 





verted V's, to correspond with the man}' diamonds just beneath. 

Around the middle of the body is a wide band of eight vertically ar- 
ranged long, sharp ellipses, with sides touching and with deep, bevelled 
margins. In the center of each is a long rounded elliptical thumbprint sur- 
rounded by fine diamond point. The spaces above and below the large 
ellipses reaching to rim and base are filled with small diamonds, each with 
four high bevelled sides and a small flat top, the top stamped with four 
tiny diamonds, thus forming the so-cailed "English" type of hobnail. 

3-part mold, 3}^ in. high. 

This dainty little piece is part of a pattern which is not difficult to find; 
for it is late, dating from the 1890-1900 period. It comes in sugar, creamer, 
spooner, butter dish, pickle dish, and no doubt many more pieces. 

SQUAT PINEAPPLE 

This "fancy" is similar to the many 
others of its late period but it introduces 
many details not found in others. It is a 
generous-sized creamer, coming in crystal- 
clear glass, of good weight, and thickness, 
and with a good resonance. 

The short cylindrical body rests on a 
small base barely protecting the pattern 
on the base of the bowl, and it bulges 
slightly just above the base. The rim is 
doubly scalloped, the two on the middle 
sides and at the back the lower. 
The pressed handle is oval in outline, square in cross-section, and is 
decorated down each side with a series of indentations giving it a wash- 
board effect; the broad, flattened top carries three long rows of raised 
buttons softened on the margins, which forms a good thumbgrasp. 

Decoration covers the body and consists of four large "pineapples", 
with broad flat base at the waist, tapering to a point just below the rim, 
all interlocked with the adjacent figure at the middle of each side. Each is 
oulined in a band with deeply bevelled margins and containing two long 
rows of tiny raised squares, the tops well rounded off. 

The upper half of the "pineapple" figure contains a diamond with 
bevelled sides, filled with coarse vertical ribbing. Below this figure is a 
deep a V", with similar ribbing and stars, and flanked on each side, inside 
the pineapple, with a diaper pattern of small raised squares separated from 
each other by a double line. 

The spaces between the arches and just below the rim are filled with 
rosettes, the lower third of each modified to form a diamond stamped with 
a sunburst. 

On the base of the body is a square similar to the diamond last men- 
tioned, at each corner of which is a half sunburst of plain rays. 
4-part mold, 4J4 in. high. 

While this pattern resembles many others, neither the vertical ribbing 
nor the diaper pattern of squares stamped with a cross appear elsewhere 
in this book. 

There are other pieces to match this creamer, including a sugar bowl, 
spooner, and butter dish, and no doubt berry bowl, sauces, etc. besides, 
all in the clear only. Patterns imitating cut glass did not generally come 
in color. 

76 




DIAMOND LATTICE 

This little creamer comes in glass of aver- 
age quality and weight, rather thicker than 
the average, with a better resonance than 
one would expect. The body is cylindrical, 
tapering in to the narrow waist, with a small 
nearly flat base with a large plain 24-rayed 
star beneath. 

The handle is rectangular In outline, with 
the outer corners sliced off on curves; it is 
four-square in cross-section, with plain flat 
sides. The rim is horizontal, but curves In 
slightly above the straight line, the margin evenly scalloped In shallow 
litde curves. The lip extends trough-like from the front of the rim, and 
rises but little over the horizontal; scallops are omitted here. 

A uniform pattern covers the body from rim to waist, consisting of even 
lattice work of rather wide rounded bars arranged diagonally from top to 
bottom; each Inside space is filled with uniform, rather coarse diamond 
point. 

4-part mold, 4 In. high. 

This pattern is known among dealers by the above name. It comes in 
many pieces, plates, sugar bowl, butter dish, spooner, sauce dishes, berry 
bowl, etc. in the clear. The writer knows of none in color. It is still inex- 
pensive, being rather inactive. 

The pattern is similar to "Star in Diamond" (Kamm, p. 62), handle, 
lip and pattern being much alike; it also resembles "Beaded Fan" (Kamm, 
p. 65), and "Diamond Point with Fan" (p. 99), and dates no doubt from 
the 1875-1885 period. 

The pattern Is similar to one of the very old heavy Sandwich patterns. 

PILLOW BANDS 

The decoration on this pattern* resembles 
that on the red satin puckered window shades 
held up by vertical bands of tape, popular in 
the mid-Eighties and duplicated in the satin 
glass lamp shades and table pieces set In sil- 
vered containers. 

The creamer shown here comes in clear 
glass, although It may possibly occur In color 
as well, and Is a rather heavy piece but not 
especially thick, and glows in the light from the 
numerous puckers. It has taken on an am- 
ethystine tint from exposure to light and has some resonance, 

The body Is cylindrical with a slight bulge below the middle, and rests 
on a shelved base slightly wider than usual; the base Is somewhat hollowed 
beneath but there Is no decoration. 

The handle is pressed, oval in shape, and while plain on the sides is 
decorated down the back with a row of little puckers and brackets, without 
the beading. 




* Drawn through the courtesy of Mrs. J. J. Whitfield, of Hawkins ville, 

Georgia. 

77 




The rim of the pitcher is not arched save over the lip which is short and 
stubby, and rises abruptly from near the front on each side. The body is 
divided vertically into nine wide panels separated from each other by a 
row of beads progressively larger toward the bottom. 

Each panel has several horizontally placed brackets pointed upward in 
the middle, the upper row forming the rim. Between these crown-shaped 
raised lines the glass bulges realistically on the outside but is smooth 
within. 

3-part mold, 4^ in. high. 

The pattern probably occurs in many pieces typical of the late Eighties 
and early Nineties. 

TEPEE 

This pattern is very similar to the two shown 
in Kamm*, pp. 103, 104, but sufficiently different 
to command attention. The creamer comes in a 
fine clear thick metal without resonance; it is 
most gracefully shaped, practically an ideal piece 
from both utility and beauty. Urn-shaped, it is 
widest an inch above the base and tapers gently 
to the rim, which is slightly flared. The bowl 
rests flat on its base, with only a ledge below. 

The rim is curved, lowest on the side, and the 
curves are evenly and finely scalloped. The whole 
body is patterned, with long swags suspended 
from just below the rim and reaching to the base, crossing below the middle. 
The upper part of the pattern is in rather shallow relief, which deepens 
toward the middle, becoming lessened again toward the base in a long 
diamond made up of four in good relief, each of these in turn composed of 
four little nearly flat bits. Below the diamond are long bars filled with 
diamond point and at the crossings of the swags below are three rows of 
three diamonds each, in high relief. 

The lower arch of the swags is composed of three curved bars, the two 
outer cross-ribbed, the central with a row of tiny diamonds. Interstices 
between the pattern contain spreading rays at the rim and base and a fan 
in the middle. 

The base carries a large plain 24-rayed star. The handle is applied. 
There was no cover. 

4-part mold, 4% in. high. 

This pattern comes in the clear only, in goblet, sugar bowl, spooner, 
and probably many more pieces, and is riot difficult to find, being late. 
Patterns almost identical with this one are shown in the 1897 catalog of 
the United States Glass Company. 

Pieces of this vintage with a multiplicity of motifs repeated over and 
over again are difficult to name descriptively. While the above name may 
seem far-fetched, the pattern from certain angles takes on the appearance 
of an Indian wigwam with crossed poles at the top. 

While the two are very similar, the pattern differs from "Grated Dia- 
mond and Sunburst" (Kamm, p. 103) in that the latter has a plain rim 
and no swags, but large contiguous diamonds through the mid-portion of 
the body. However, the central "filling" of the latter is the same tiny high 

* Kamm, M. W. Two Hundred Pattern Glass Pitchers. 

78 



faceted diamonds as In the former and the long narrow bars In high relief 
filled with cross-ribbing are similar, as are the spreading rays top and 
bottom. The basal stars are identical in both. 

The present pattern also compares with "Diamond and Sunburst, 
Variant" (Kamm, p. 104) in the same general body shape, the same type 
of long swags crossing below the middle, the scalloped rims and the spread- 
ing rays top and bottom and the tiny-diamond filled spaces, 

However, on the latter the swags are made up of plain smooth curving 
bars in the half-round, or half logs, sliced diagonally at the ends instead 
of flat bars cross-ribbed on the top. Patterns on the bases differ, that of 
the smaller pitcher having eight deep rays, the rest in much shallower 
relief. 

APPLE BLOSSOM, MILK GLASS 

The dainty little white opaque creamer 
shown here might, like the last piece, be mis- 
taken for fine china, but the three-part mold 
lines betray its silicious origin. 

The pitcher is tall and slender, light in 
weight, with a good resonance. It is barrel- 
shaped, with a low straight collar just below the 
rim and a small shelved base barely hollowed 
beneath. 

The handle is applied. There is a narrow 
black line below the neck constriction, above 
which the body is colored, with another narrow 

^J" ~T__^ '"^ black line just above the base. The body be- 

tween these lines is uncolored, 

There is a large spray of foliage and flowers on the front of the body 
under the lip spreading half way back on the sides, probably applied by 
the decalcomania process. While known as a branch from an apple tree, 
the leaf is not that of an apple but rather of a wild crabapple (Mains 
glaucescens) y the foliage in a soft apple green, the twigs in brown, and the 
large five-petalled flower a full blown pink blossom, surrounded by clusters 
of half-opened buds. 
5 in. high, blown. 

This pattern dates from the mid-Eighties and is often seen in shops, 
coming in such pieces as a flat cake plate, a high compote with open lacy 
edge, tali cake stand, spooner, sugar bowl, etc. 

On the creamer shown here the upper part of the body above the black 
line at the shoulder is a soft underglaze yellow; it also comes with the band 
in a very soft blue and a corresponding pink. 

The identical apple blossom spray is shown on various pieces including 
a molasses can in the 1897 catalog of the United States Glass Company, 
with, however, two narrow light red lines instead of the black at the 
shoulder. 

Several floral motifs were used on identical pieces, none, however, as 
charming as the soft coloring of this one. 

This creamer was lent the writer by Mr. W. L. Enimons, of Jackson- 
ville, Illinois. 

79 





FAN WITH SPLIT DIAMOND 

The creamer shown here is a dainty little piece 
in fine glistening metal, with a good resonance. 
The barrel-shaped body has a plain wide, hori- 
zontal flaring rim and a shelved base barely con- 
caved beneath. 

The small lip rises abruptly from the front and 
the oval pressed handle is well rounded on the 
margins, simulating the later applied type. The 
w r hole body is covered with design in high relief, 
especially through the mid-portion. Through the 
middle is a horizontal row of large contiguous 
diamonds in high relief and above and below them and fitting into their 
interstices a row of diamonds of equal size each filled with a fan with the 
flare toward the center of the body, while above and below these the space 
to the rim and base is filled with uniform sunk diamond point. 

Each of the large central diamonds is divided into four smaller raised 
diamonds with flat faces and each of these small areas scored off into four 
flat diamonds. 

On the base is a large plain 20-rayed star. The pjtcher had a cover 
which rested on a ledge at the constriction below the rim. 
4-part mold, 4 in. high. 

This pattern occurs in the matching covered sugar and no doubt in 
many other pieces, in the clear only. In shape it is identical with "Barrelled 
Thumbprint" (Kamm, p. 102) and the pattern carries motifs found else- 
where. The tiny depressed diamonds top and bottom are not used else- 
where to the writer's knowledge although their reverse, small raised ones, 
are often used, on "Pillow and Sunburst" (Kamm, p. 100), "Loop and 
Diamond" (Kamm, p. 60), etc. The fan motif inside a diamond is often 
used, although seldom completely inside a diamond. 

Patterns such as this date from the mid-Eighties to the early Nineties. 

TRIPLE BAR AND LOOP 

A white opaque glass creamer of the finest 
quality, this little piece shows opalescence and 
fire glow through the thinner portions; it is 
heavy for its size and has a high bell-like reson- 
ance. It appears to be a piece of fine china 
rather than glass. 

The cylindrical body is swollen slightly on 
the outside through the middle and rests on a 
rimmed base with slight concavity beneath but 
no pattern. 

The rim flares considerably from the con- 
striction Just below, with a sharp rise at the 

back to which the handle is partially attached and a rather long low lip 
rising from the front of the rim. 

Decoration is simple and effective, consisting only of narrow vertical 
bars in rounded relief alternating with groups of three very slender bars 
sharp ridged down their middles and inverted V-shaped at the tops, the 
middle one even with the curved apes of the wider bars, the two flanking 
it slightly depressed. 

80 




The creamer had a cover, which is missing. 
2-part mold, 4 in. high. 

This pattern is possibly contemporary with the Bakewell, Pears and 
Company's "Icicle", which dates from the Seventies and also comes in 
fine white opaque glass. The slender upright bars are similar to those on 
"Stedman" and "Blaze", which patterns, however, do not appear to come 
in opaque glass. 

There is a creamer very similar to this one with uniform rounded bars 
arched over the tops, the small bars missing, which comes in opaque white 
glass of less fine quality and probably much later date. The creamer is 
covered as is also the matching sugar bowl. There is a set of two pieces 
similar to latter, in clear also, probably a modification. 

FLYING SWAN 

This pattern comes in a thick opaque dark 
brown slag with \vhite streaks and turquoise 
shadings on the upper part and also in a slag 
of mahogany red, turquoise, and cream. This 
slag or marble glass or onyx or agate ware 
seems to have been made by one factory only, 
so few are the patterns and so scarce the ware. 
This piece comes in thick opaque glass with 
an unusually fine bell-tone when struck. The 
creamer is cylindrical, of nearly the same diam- 
eter throughout, on a thickened rim slightly 
hollowed and plain beneath. 

The rim has a series of small scallops 
around the back half only and the smooth front half arches gently to the 
lip. The molded handle is set high to accommodate the swan beneath and 
has a high curve upward with tiny thumbprint at the top and a smaller 
nub to correspond on the base. It is stippled over the lower half. 

Decoration, even that in high relief, is practically obliterated on the 
deeply colored marbelized background, three bold projections standing out 
like small handles an inch from the body. It is not until close inspection 
that one discovers these knobs are the bodies of swans, the front half of 
the bird with arched head at right angles to the bowl with wings spread 
out on both sides flat against the surface. 

In the background, in very low relief is the semblance of a swamp, with 
cat-tails and ferns. 

3-part mold, 4% in. high. 

This pattern comes in covered butter dish with swan finial, low wide 
spooner, open sugar and creamer, sauce dish, and possibly other pieces. 
All the above pieces come in the mahogany-red with turquoise and cream, 
and in the dark brown with turquoise and white slag or marble glass. 
All the pieces are astonishingly high in price. 

The swan finial on the covered dishes is identical with that on "Late 
Swan" (Kamm, p. 92), and the whole pattern indicates the same designer 
and time, which was the 1 875- 1885 period. 

This piece and several others in this booklet were drawn through the 
courtesy of the Plaza Galleries, New York City. 

81 





ARCH AND FORGET-ME-NOT BANDS 

The sturdy practical creamer illustrated 
here comes in a glass of average quality, not 
brilliant, rather light in weight, and with a fair 
resonance. 

The body is cylindrical, the base practically 
as broad as the rim; the former is slightly hol- 
lowed beneath and plain on both sides. The 
rim has three even scallops on each side with 
a slightly higher one at the back; the lip rises 
abruptly from the front half of the rim and is 
narrow and depressed at the tip. 

Just below the rim is a ring in rounded re- 
lief, with another, smaller one adjacent below, 
and under these rings is a wide band around the body made up of over- 
lapping arches, point uppermost, each in raised outline only, on a raised 
stippled background. In the apex of each arch is a bead and there is an- 
other almost at the base of each arm of an arch. Below this arch band is 
a faint raised line. 

Around the base of the body is another horizontal pattern, composed 

of well-raised, six-petalled forget-me-nots (?), each alternate flower whirled 

slightly and separated from the next by a slightly raised vertical "sliver". 

Down each of the mold lines is a delicate pattern of connected raised 

four-pointed stars. 

The handle is easy to grasp, a good-sized long-oval one, terete in cross- 
section, with a raised ring near the base, below which the width increases 
greatly and is decorated with three large stippled, flattened pointed leaves. 
3 -part mold, 4^4 i n - high. 

This fine pattern would appear to date from 1875-188$, having the 
characteristics of patterns of this period. The writer knows of no other 
pieces in the pattern. The piece was purchased in a village in mid-Penn- 
sylvania, where many little known patterns can still be found. 

The creamer has affinities with other known patterns, viz: the body is 
shaped like that of "Jewel with Dewdrop", "Tear Drop and Tassel", 
"Festoon", etc.; the handle is similar in shape and decoration to that of 
"Tear Drop and Tassel", "Flower Flange", etc. and the ring with petals 
are identical with those of "Swag with Brackets", "Cherry and Fig", 
"Loganberry and Grape" and somewhat like that of "Sunflower", the 
stippled foliage smaller in the last-named. 

CROSSED BLOCK 

A cleverly designed block pattern is used 
on this pitcher, a simple pattern of straight 
lines but so united as to be unusual and 
effective. 

The glass is thick to take the deep cutting, 
but this particular piece Is dingy, with a mud- 
dy tint, although there is some resonance. 
The melon-shaped body rests on a shelf which 
is nearly flat underneath, and impressed with 
a large plain 24-rayed star. 

82 





The handle Is pressed and round in outline with narrow flat side panels. 
The rim is broken up into broad shallow scallops separated by small in- 
verted V 3 s, one V on each rising side of the lip in front. 

The pattern of the body consists of two horizontal rows of large blocks 
separated from each other by rectangular bars with a sharp central ridge. 
Similar bars divide the body from top to bottom, with sharp faceted squares 
at the crossings. The square blocks have steep bevelled sides and are 
crossed from corner to corner by diagonals, also with bevelled sides, the 
resulting triangles corrugated in wash-board effect. 

3-part mold, 3^ in. high. 

The pattern dates after 1890 and probably comes in a number of pieces, 
none of which has been seen by the writer. 

BARRELLED BLOCK 

The creamer shown here is another version 
of the well known "Red Block", a pattern which 
comes in all clear as well as with the flat block 
surfaced in red. 

This creamer is barrel-shaped, very similar 
to that of "Barrelled Thumbprint" (Kamm, p. 
102), with a nearly cylindrical body and plain 
rim with a diminutive lip. The handle is pressed 
but simulates the later applied type and is set in 
the middle of the back, the upper attachment 
much lower than usual Unusual in shape and 
set out from the body, on a simulated "shield" 
like that used on "Lion", etc., the sharp curve makes it uncomfortable to 
hold in the hand. There is a small wedge-shaped web between the body 
and handle at the upper attachment. 

The base is hollowed beneath, with a deep-pressed six-pointed star with 
a large hexagonal block as center. 

The pattern covers the body and consists of three horizontal rows of 
large flat-topped hexagonal blocks with bevelled sides, and with faceted 
triangles between the blocks. 
4-part mold, 4J4 i n - high. 

This barrelled version of "Red Block 35 comes in several pieces,, spooner, 
sugar, etc. The pattern is shown in the 1898 catalog of the United States 
Glass Company, but this does not preclude its earlier appearance in this 
company's lists, as well as in those of other plants. 

STRIGIL 

This pattern is named for the little figure 
in the middle of the body which resembles the 
body scraper used in Roman baths*, which also 
resembles a thick, short nail. 

The creamer is light in weight, the glass 
clear, fairly brilliant, without discoloration, and 
with a good resonance. 

The body is nearly spherical, resting on a 
shallow waist and short hollowed base. The 
collar is deep and plain, flaring from the body, 




* The name was suggested by Mr. George Jones, Cambridge, Mass. 

83 



and the rim is doubly scalloped, with no rise at the back. The lip is low 
and broad. 

Just below the plain collar, the body carries a wide band demarked on 
each side by a narrow horizontal band with a row of the sliced out notches, 
all alike. Between these two narrow fillets, is a wide cable motif. 

Below this horizontal band, the body is divided vertically into many 
parallel panels in good, rounded relief, each one sliced off on a slant at the 
top and curved at the base. Down the middle of each of these bars is an 
identical pattern of vertical notching to match that on the handle and in 
the fillets above, all the notches alike save the three central ones, two 
larger plain flanking a middle strigil-shaped depression pointing downward. 
These three middle notchings tend to form three conspicuous horizontal 
bands around the body, picking up the light and giving an air of delicacy 
to the whole piece. There is a pattern in cut-glass very similar to this one, 
lacking, of course, the cable band. 

3-part mold, 3% in. high. 

This pattern comes in many pieces, in the dear, covered sugar, butter 
dish, waste bowl, cruet, spooner, celery vase, berry bowl. etc. The pattern 
dates from around 1890-1900. 

The cable motif is used not infrequently on domestic glass, appearing 
on "Cable", "Cable with Ring", "Cable with Ring and Star", all of which 
date from the 1850-1865 period, the last-named appearing among the 
M. I. T. shards. 

Other patterns using the cable motif include "Currant", "English Hob- 
nail and Thumbprint", "Lion with Cable" (this book ? p. 35), "Swirl and 
Cable" (this book., p. 85), and a cable with shell edge, a cable with flat 
panel, and a scalloped line with cable top, all of which also appear as 
broken pieces only in the Sandivich collection at the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology. 

HOBNAIL, CLEAR WITH MILK GLASS HOBS, 
FLUTED RIM 

A heavy piece with a fine bell tone, the 
creamer which represents this pattern is of a 
popular type much sought today, the hobs 
high and dome-shaped but not sharp. 

The glass is clear with a distinctly bluish 
cast, especially around the rim where there is 
a fire glow as well. The hobs, the fluted rim, 
the handle, and the base are of opaque white 
milk glass. 

The creamer is barrel-shaped with an erect 
collar, not flaring., and is wider at the top 
than at the broad shallow waist. The rim is fluted and also fine-scalloped 
on the top, the little scallops resembling beads. The lip is flush with the 
rim. 

The handle is pressed and four-panelled but the edges are well rounded 
off, not sharp. There is a hob on the top for thumb-grasp, one to corre- 
spond under the base, and a hob besides on each side top and bottom. 
The base is hollowed beneath with seven hobs on the bottom of the bowl. 
4-part mold, 4J4 * n - high. 
The pattern comes In a number of pieces. 

84 





SWIRL AND CABLE 

The pitcher shown here* is a creamer in 

spite of its resemblance to a milk container; 
it is of better than average quality, clear, 
glowing, with a good sound when struck. 

It is cylindrical in shape, with straight ver- 
tical sides and rests on a small base barely 
protecting the figure on the base of the bowl. 
At the base, just above this shelf, is a wide 
band of cable in good rounded relief, and pro- 
jecting beyond the circumference of the body. 
The main pattern, which covers the rest 
of the body, consists of wide rounded bars 
placed diagonally and swirled. These larger 
swirls run in an opposite direction from those 
in the band below. 
The handle is pressed and four-panelled, and is composed of two units 
joined by a ring on the lower half, the upper portion having a row of large 
beads down each side and the lower portion swollen on each side of the 
ring and plain panelled below. 

On the base of the body is an unusual figure composed of four well- 
spaced concentric circles, with flame-tongues spreading beyond. 
3-part mold, 6 in. high. 

Other pieces in this pattern are unknown to the writer. 
The pattern differs considerably from "SwirF 7 , and from the swirl pat- 
terns shown by Kamm. on pages 106, 107 and 109, none of these having 
the swirl band at the base. This band resembles the band of cable used 
on many other patterns, such as "Cable", "Cable with Ring", etc. For 
discussion of this point, see "Lion with Cable" (this book, p. 35). 

BLUEBIRD 

This dainty piece is shaped like a milk 
pitcher but is smaller in size; it is a clear, 
glistening, light weight piece with a good 
resonance. 

The body is cylindrical, of practically 
even diameter throughout, and rests flat on 
the base of the bowl in spite of the simulated 
shelf. The rim is unevenly scalloped, with 
a slight rise at the back and an arched lip 
plain on the sides and narrow at the top. 

The molded handle is flattened back and 
front and curves upward, with a flat piece 
at the top. 

On the body just below the rim and again at the base is an inch-wide 
band made up of flat hexagons filled with cross-hatching and separated 
from each other by various fine-cut patterns. Between the two bands the 
body is divided into twelve shallow vertical panels arched above and below 
and slightly indented. The panels are practically covered with figures in 

* Drawn through the courtesy of the owner, Mrs. Maude C. Gilbert, of 

Helena, Montana. 

85 




good relief consisting of a group on each side of two robins with wings and 
tail outspread flying toward a cluster of three strawberries suspended from 
a section of grape vine with characteristic grape foliage. 

Under the lip is a shorter sprig of four leaves and one berry. 

On the base is a large complex star centered by a tiny raised daisy, 

4-part mold, 4% in. high. 

The pattern is generally known among dealers by the narne "Bluebird" 
and it comes in many^ pieces, goblet, sugar, tumbler, low frilly open com- 
pote, covered butter dish, beny bowl, on three short feet, sauces, etc. It is 
generally seen colorless, but the original is crudely painted, the birds a true 
bluebird color and the fruit strawberry red and the foliage green. The rest 
is clear. 

The pattern is late, dating from around 1895-1900. It resembles "Rose 
Point Band" (this book, p. 116), the handle like that on "Grape and 
Gothic Arches" (Kamm, p. 99), "Arched Panel" (p. 105), and other late 
patterns. The bands around the body are similar to those on "Old Man 
of the Woods" (Kamm, p. 89), and to "Two Band" (p. 64). 

CHESTNUT OAK 

The little creamer shown here is narrow 
and oval in cross-section, the long axis from, 
front to back. It is clear and without dis- 
coloration and of average weight and thickness. 
^The body rests oa a small hollowed base 
which is plain on. top and beneath, with no 
decoration on the base of the body. There is 
a thick shelf above the base with a pattern of 
fine ogee bracketing on the top rather than on 
the side, as is usually the case. 

A similar band of bracketing decorates the 
thickened rim, the bracketing pointing down- 
ward rather than outward. The body between 
the two sets of brackets is depressed, the high-relief acorns flush with them. 
The pattern consists of a wide band reaching from top to bottom, made 
up of six sprays of foliaged fruit connected with each other by sinuous 
woody twigs near the top. 

The sprays are alike save that that under the handle has no acorns 
super-imposed on the leaves, as on the other five motifs. Each is made up 
of three long oval leaves with scalloped margins, in slight relief, which over- 
lap slightly. Each shows veining and a background of depressed bead 
stippling. A fourth leaf curves upward scimitar-like showing only its edge. 
On each cluster of leaves rests a group of four small acorns, in good 
relief, with long slender nuts and burry cups, with a fifth cup which is 
empty. 

The pressed handle is four-square in cross-section and rectangular in 
outline, with an upturned thumb-grasp and no corresponding bracket 
below. 

^ There is a shelf inside the front half of the rim for a cover, which is 
missing* 

3-part mold, 4J4 in. high. 

t This Is a fairly early pattern, dating, no doubt, from the early Seven- 
ties, as Indicated by the long, crimped, applied handle on the water pitcher. 

86 





It comes in a number of pieces but is seldom seen in shops. It is most 

attractive and very desirable. 

The oak depicted is the Chestnut Oak (Quercus prinus L.)> with long, 
evenly-scalloped foliage and long slender nuts in a moderately burry cup. 
The foliage on the pitcher, however, is drawn a little too slenderly. 

There is considerable confusion concerning the many so-called "Acorn" 
patterns, some of which antedate 1864 and that is the reason the writer 
is placing this one under a different name. See the discussion of the various 
oak and acorn patterns under "White Gak 5> , this book, p. 65. 

LATE COLONIAL, VARIANT 

Patterns of graceful shapes and fine quality 
need little decoration to enhance their beauty, 
and the creamer shown here is no exception. 
A rather heavy piece for its size* of beautiful 
clear brilliant glass but with no resonance, this 
creamer is practical in size and shape for its 
specific purpose and no piece in this whole col- 
lection is more delightful to the eye. 

The body is jug-shaped, widest at the 
shoulder below the collar and the latter flares 
out slightly to the plain, gracefully curved rim. 
The lip is low. The dainty handle is applied. 
The body tapers from the shoulder to the bevelling just above the 
slightly constricted waist, and the base is small and nearly flat below, 
where there is imprinted a large hexagon made up of fine sun-rays. Sis 
wide flat vertical panels decorate the body, arched just below the shoulder 
and straight across the bases, the arches meeting at the mid-point of the 
body. 

2-part mold, 4 in. high. 

This is a late piece, dating around 1900. It resembles the old "Flute" 
pattern but the panels here are flat and not concaved. 

NAIL 

Dated patterns are valuable to the student 
of old glass in that they give to it some exacti- 
tude which is generally lacking save as old trade 
catalogs turn up or a piece is found in the orig- 
inal owner's hands s the story of its age reliably 
told. Unfortunately, however, there are few 
dated pieces going much further back than the 
Chicago World's Fair. 

The present creamer is engraved on the front 
ruby-red elliptical panel "To My Wife, 1892". 
It comes in good clear glass with no discolora- 
tion but with little resonance. The body is un- 
usual in shape for, while the deep vertical collar is round in cross-section, 
the main body is square with rounded corners, the base again circular. 

The deep collar has nine vertical panels, each convexed outward slight- 
ly, with deep grooves between the panels. On each panel is deeply im- 
printed a large-headed "nail". The rim is scalloped to correspond to the 
broad panels and the lip is slightly lower than the rim. 

87 





The handle is applied, in the clear, the lower attachment made to the 
flat ruby-red surface. The base is abbreviated and plain on both sides. 

There is a slight shelf just below the collar, and the body bulges rapidly 
from thence, widest a half-inch above the base. The four sides are flat- 
tened by large ellipses colored red. 

2-part mold, 4J4 in. high. 

This pattern is sometimes seen in shops, and conies in berry bowl, sauce 
dishes, sugar, creamer, butter dish, etc. The latter is a striking piece, a 
plain red upright band encircling the base of the cover, sometimes etched 
with fern sprays like those on "Etched Fern and Waffle"; a corona of 
nails surrounds the domed cover, heads at the circumference, points at the 
center, the background ruby. 

The pattern comes in all clear as well as clear engraved and with ruby. 

PANELLED SMOCKING 

A super abundance of decoration charac- 
terizes many pieces during the last decade of 
the Nineteenth Century, and this creamer 
typifies this ornate period. The creamer is a 
beautiful piece of glass, thick, heavy, clear, 
with a good bell tone when struck. 

In shape and pressing it is above the aver- 
age, of good practical shape and with a handle 
which fits the hand perfectly. But the bur- 
nished rim and flat diamonds (indicated by 
stippling) and the amateurish splashes of 
garish paint detract much from the whole. 

The body is cylindrical, with straight sides save on the lower fourth, 
which bulges to accommodate the deep pressed pattern. The rim arches 
gracefully from the handle to the lip and the body rests on a small shelf 
flat on the base and decorated with a large plain 20-rayed star depressed 
into the base. 

There are eight broad flat panels around the body, each arched at the 
top following the line of the rirn and ending below in a pressed pattern 
which surrounds the bowl. This pattern is deeply pressed and consists of 
long trapezoids with bevelled sides alternating with smaller diamonds with 
small flat tops and steep bevelled sides, the whole pattern resembling the 
smocking on a little girl's dress. 

Three groups of painted or enamelled sprays decorate the upper body, 
each spray emanating from the panel ridges and spreading to both adjoin- 
ing panels and made up of coarse apple green foliage with two flower buds 
suspended on long stems, each bud encircled in green and filled with flat 
dark magenta color. 

The large pressed handle is panelled, narrower on the sides, with no 
decoration save for the graceful arching and large thumb-grasp at the top. 
4-part mold, 4|4 in. high. 

There are a spooner and covered sugar to match, and probably a few 
other pieces although not a complete set as common in other patterns. 
While those the writer has seen, all carry the same crude painted sprays, 
other pieces In the pattern may carry a different floral motif. The burnish- 
ed gold is easily removed but the color is fired and cannot be eradicated. 
Glass companies often turned over their wares to smaller concerns who 
added the color and gilt. 




PORTLAND WITH DIAMOND POINT BAND 

A small pitcher probably very Inexpensive when 
purchased, this one conies in ordinary quality glass, 
fairly thick for Its size and with some resonance. 

It is cylindrical, flared considerably near the base, 
and rests on a shelf depressed beneath and stamped 
with a plain 21 -rayed star. The pressed handle is 
oval and plain and round In cross-section. 

The rim Is scalloped and the body divided into 
eight broad flat vertical panels of practically even 
width throughout, each one arched over the top just 
below the rim. The panel dividing lines are grooved 
from near the top to the shelf of the base, the split emphasized below by 
the thickened flare of the body. At this widest point, each panel Is slashed 
deeply by an ellipse flanked on each side by smaller depressed ellipse. 

Around the body just above the middle Is a fy& inch wide band of good- 
sized diamond point. The lower half of each panel, from the band to the 
widest point of the pitcher Is colored apple green (indicated on the drawing 
by stippling), the lowest half-inch of the panels left clear. The thick rim 
and the lip are likewise stained green on the top. On other pieces, the 
green Is probably replaced by ruby red and possibly yellow. 
4-part mold, 4 in. high. 

This little piece Is probably half of a set and dates from around 1900. 
It closely resembles the creamer of "Portland'* (Kamm, p. 105), with the 
same thickened body just above the base and long vertical slashes. It 
differs In having small elliptical slashes at the widest point, In the diamond 
point band and In the color touches. 

PEERLESS 

Patterns such as this one were very popular 
at the turn of the century, but, as styles chang- 
ed, they fell into disrepute. However, now, as 
the older pressed wares are rapidly being re- 
moved from the market Into collectors* display 
shelves. Interest In patterns of forty-five years 
ago Is being revived. 

Many of them like the present one, corne in 
a glass, the quality of which Is Just about per- 
fect, thick, heavy, with a brilliant mirror-polish, 
and In designs which are far more pleasing than 
many of those dating a decade and more ear- 
lier. Here s line takes the place of surface decoration Intended to hide rather 
than to reveal quality, and- the gilt which detracts from many pieces of the 
I895-19G5 period can easily be removed If desired. However, the amateur- 
ishly applied splashes of garish color and bad line are irremovable. 

The body of this little creamer Is cylindrical, circular In cross-section 
on the Inside bet flaring slightly at the top and considerably on the out- 
side just above the base, turning In sharply below to the shelved base below. 
The base is flat underneath. Impressed with a fine 18-pointed star. 

There are six broad vertical panels on the outside of the body, of nearly 
equal width throughout, and each Is Irregularly arched over tie top and 
slightly Indented below the surface just under the rim, the margins of the 

89 




arches and sides of the panels all soft and smooth to the hand and not 
knife-edged, as often the case. The panels flare out at the base and are 
bevelled on the margins, turning in sharply to the waist, the underside, 
below the bevelled line grooved in short vertical flutes. The rim is doubly 
scalloped and the lip plain and very narrow at the tip. The handle, seem- 
ingly applied, is cleverly pressed with a large bulbous base. 

As though the beautiful quality and the good lines were insufficient 
merit in themselves, this particular piece is further embellished with a 
broad horizontal band of burnished gold just above the middle of the body, 
ending on each back panel and not extending around the body, a line deep- 
ly engraved around the margin and a crude flower motif cut through the 
center. 

3-part mold, 3^ in. high. 

This pattern is included in the catalog circa 1897 (no date) of the A. H. 
Heisey Company, Newark, Ohio, and is called their "Number 300" pat- 
tern; it comes in no less than one hundred and ten different pieces, four- 
teen of them also with deep gilt rims. Included are no less than twenty-six 
nappies and low bowls, four pitchers (water, cream, hotel cream, and in- 
dividual), five cruets, six high compotes, eleven stemmed wines, cordials, 
etc., molasses can, syrups, decanters, claret jug, bitters bottle, brandy 
bottle, water bottle, candle stick, and a fourteen-inch punch bowl. It is 
called "The Pattern Without a Peer" on one page of the catalog, hence 
the name given it by the writer, above. 

Their "300J4" pattern, in fewer pieces, was identical save for the fact 
that none of the pieces had scalloped edges, all being plain. 

The crude gold band appears on none of the above in the catalog, having 
been added later by someone else. 

QUARTERED BLOCK 

A little creamer of pleasing pattern of blocks 
in groups of four is shown here, coming in fine 
quality fairly heavy, clear glass with brilliant 
polish and good resonance. 

The creamer is widest at the base, which is 
flat in spite of the appearance on the outside of 
a shelf, but is cylindrical on the inside, of even 
diameter throughout its length, the lower portion 
flaring out to greater thickness to support the 
deep cutting. 

The body is divided into eight flat vertical panels of equal width 
throughout their length, each panel topped at the rim by a wide shallow 
scallop with an indentation on each side. The lip is low. 

The body panels spread out in their lower portion, curving in again at 

the base, each cut into four blocks, each block with sloping bevelled sides 

and plain flat top. The grooves between each two panels are fV * nc b deep. 

The handle is pressed and plain oval, nearly round in cross-section and 

enlarged at the base. 

4-part mold, 3j4 in. high. 

There is a sugar bowl to match, both in the clear, probably constitut- 
ing the set, which is undeniably late, probably of the 1900-1905 period. 
This pattern is similar to the last two, and also to "Divided Block with 
Sunburst" (p. 71, this book and its variants, pp. 51 and 73). 

90 





SCROLLED SPRAY, MILK GLASS 

There was a widespread vogue for opaque, 

covered creamers and sugar bowls at one 
period, many of them turned out by a single 
factory and bearing inside the covers or on the 
outer bases single small plain figures, 1, 2, or 3, 
some of the pieces without figures while the 
cover or matching piece bears them. 

As stated elsewhere in this book, many of 
them are known to have been mustard con- 
tainers., sold in grocery stores during the early 
Eighties, the tops gummed down. 

Most of them seem to come in white or 
cream opaque glass, although turquoise ones 
are found, as well as an occasional one in clear 
or sapphire (non opaque). Most of them are 
low, squat oval pieces wider than high, with 
fancy handles and with ornate finials on the covers, the domed covers with 
patterns to match the bodies. 

This one, however, is tall and rather unsteady, oval in cross-section and 
wider from front to back than from side to side. There is a figure "2" on 
the underside of the base. It is deep cream in color, not opalescent. 

Decoration on the body consists of a long fragile scrolled leafy spray 
slightly raised in relief, emanating from the center-base and trailing up 
each side, with a similar pattern on the other side. The domed cover is 
stamped beneath with a raised "3" and carries a different pattern, a raised 
tear-drop corona flat down the central spine, from which there stands erect 
a similar flattened arrangement of tear-drops in a spreading fan. 
2-part mold., 5 in. high. 

This pattern is often seen in shops, in covered sugar and the creamer, 
in a range of colors including clear, opaque sapphire, clear sapphire, opaque 
opalescent cream (as well as the present one, without the fire-glow), and 
in clear amber. 

The leafy scroll is similar to that on "Feather, Milk Glass" (Kamm, 
p. 92), and the numbers on the bases are like those on C Late Swan" (p. 
92), "Grape and Cherry", etc. 

The finial is like that on "Powder and Shot". 

SCROLL MEDALLION, MILK GLASS 

An ornate pattern in dead-white milk 
glass, this pretty low creamer is long- 
ovoidal in shape from front to back, with 
a plain slightly hollowed base. The 
charming handle is flattened, with a neat 
scroll at the base of the vertical section, 
each side of which is cross-ribbed inside 
a hair-line raised border. The horizontals 
carry short raised bars, with a nub at the 
basal attach meat to the body. 

The rim is uneven, with a broad shal- 
low shell in the middle of each side, scal- 
loped on the edge and each section de- 
pressed. Back of this shell, the rim is 

91 




scalloped In unev v en outline, while the lip rises from the front of the shell, 
with low smooth sides. 

Centered on each side of the body, Is a large circular medallion curved 
with the body but not raised inside, outlined In delicate slightly raised 
scrolling and foliage. Flanking it on each side Is a group of three vertical 
ribs, in rounded relief with curved tops, and carried through the waist. 
They are progressively higher at the tops away from the medallion and 
between each two is a row of beading. 

The front and back portions of the body are left plain. 

The domed cover Is decorated with upright sections of rounded bars 
like those on the body with beading between, while the finial is a spiny 
crown, or, more fancifully, two nereid marine worms rearing their heads 
from the low-tide flats, tossing a ball between them. 

2-part mold, 3% In. high (without cover). 

This creamer and Its matching covered sugar bowl are not infrequently 
seen in shops at a still modest price. The pattern comes also in a mustard 
pot. The writer has seen none but the white, opaque color although some 
pieces are crudely splashed with red and green painted flowers Inside the 
medallion or gilded on the raised portions. 

The white glass takes on an orchid tint when left for long in bright 
sunlight. 

There are no numbers on the inside cover or underside of the base, as 
with other similar patterns In milk glass. The handle is Identical with that 
of "Primula, M. G. J? , (this book, p. 113). 

FLICKERING FLAME, MILK GLASS 

A beautiful compact little milk glass 
creamer with a cover, this one is similar 
to the other squat covered pieces, all 
probably made by a single company at 
about the same time. 

The oval body, longest from lip to 
handle rests on a thin shelved base which 
Is plain and nearly flat beneath. The 
handle Is pressed, oval in shape, and four- 
square In cross-section, with a point curv- 
ing away from the base. A row of beads 
decorates each side. 

The rim is doubly scalloped and the 

lip low. The cover sets well down Inside the rim and Is domed, with a fine 
scalloped knob at the top. It is decorated to match the body of the 
pitcher. 

The pattern, which surrounds the body, consists of broad sweeping 
panels In rounded relief, side by side, with a deep groove between each two 
on an ogee curve. Each panel Is vertically grooved Into many fine ridges, 
with a row of small beads between each three small ridges. The central of 
each triad of ridges is slightly higher at the top than the others, the pattern 
ending slightly below the rim, and slightly above the base. 

On some pieces, the deep grooves are filled with flame color, In paint 
which easily nibs off, both on the body and cover, which color, together 
with the upward sweep of the pattern and the ragged upper margin give 
It a semblance of flames sweeping through low grass. 

92 





4-part mold, 3 in. high (without cover), 4>4 in. high (with cover). 

In shape this piece resembles "Late Swan, M. G." (Kamrn, p. 92), and 
"'Scroll Medallion" (this book, p. 91), and is similar in other respects to 
many other milk glass patterns (See Kamm, p. 92), "Primula", M. G., 

"Scrolled Spray" (this book, pp. 113 and 91), etc. 

There is a covered sugar to match, and possibly a few other pieces 
exist, and patterns like this often come in clear glass and turquoise opaque 
as well. 

RUBY DIAMOND 

Another of the ruby-topped patterns character- 
istic of the Chicago World's Fair period, this one 
has very deep pressing in imitation of cut glass in 
a geometric design. The little creamer was un- 
doubtedly a souvenir piece although this particular 
one was not inscribed with name, place, or date. 

The glass is mediocre in quality, only fairly 
clear, and lacks the crystal clarity which contrasts 
so well with the colored top in other patterns of 
the same period. 

The pitcher is small and cylindrical, with low 
lip and pressed handle almost round in cross-section, in imitation of the 
type of applied handle used on many contemporary ruby patterns. 

The upper half is devoid of pattern but the lower is decorated with 
adjacent diamonds with the two upper sides shorter than the lower, which 
distorts the four geometric figures inside; each of these sections has high 
bevelled sides and flat top which is covered with fairly sharp raised dia- 
mond point. 

The base is flat in spite of the simulated shelf, and there is a large plain 
24-rayed star pressed into the underside. 
5-part mold, 4 in. high. 

This pattern is often seen in shops, both with ruby and in all clear; 
it occurs in many pieces. 

PINEAPPLE AND FAN 

It is unusual to find a piece as dark in color 
as this one, a clear deep bottle green which 
appears black except in good light or on a light 
background. 

The squat little creamer is thick and heavy 
for its size, and comes in a clear, well polished 
ware. It is circular in cross-section and rests 
flat on the base of the bowl in spite of the outer 
flange. On the base is a pretty rosette of four broad petals with three deep 
plain rays between each two, and the larger are filled with sunk diamond 
point. 

The rim arches front and back from the middle of the side, crenulate 
at the back and plain over the low lip. The upper half inch of the body 
is clear, with four deep slashed arches demarking the pattern. Radiating 
up into these arches from the base are deep cut fans with uneven saw- 
toothed vanes with spreading tops. Between each two fans at the base 
(except at the back) are "pineapples" with bevelled margins and filled 
with raised diamond point. 

93 




The pattern Impressed into the base consists of a star with four wide 
sunk "pineapple 73 rays, the Interstices filled with plain rays. 

4-part mold, 2% in. high. 

The various motifs on this piece appear on many other patterns of the 
1890 period, the pattern on the base similar to that on "Panelled Thumb- 
print" (Kamm, p. 111). 

It comes in a squat open sugar bowl to match, In the deep green as well 
as in canary and clear, and possibly In amber and blue as well. The pat- 
tern Impressed Into the base consists of a star with four wide, sunk "pine- 
apple" rays, the interstices filled with plain spreading rays. 

4-part mold, 2J/& in. high. 

This pattern was made by the A. H. Heisey and Company, Newark, 
Ohio, and appears in their catalog dating around 1897 (no date marked). 
It came In no less than seventy pieces, including many bowls, nappies, a 
footed jelly dish, toothpick holder., tumbler, custard cup, celery and pickle 
trays, tall celery holder, tall open compotes, salver (high stand cake plate), 
four cracker jars, eight pitchers, four tall vases, six sizes of rose bowls, etc. 
The squat creamer shown here Is the "Hotel Cream". 

Twenty-one of the above seventy pieces come also heavily gilded, rims 
and fans in gilt. It was their No. 1255 pattern. Colors are not mentioned. 

BEADED ELLIPSE AND FAN 

The creamer shown here comes In fairly 
clear glass with little discoloration, of aver- 
age weight and with a good resonance. The 
body Is a good-sized one, cylindrical In 
shape, slightly the wider at the top, with a 
short slightly hollowed base. 

The sides are straight, and the rim dec- 
orated with coarse, even scalloping, the lip 
broad and plain. The pitcher had a cover. 
The pressed handle is oval in outline and 
round In cross-section, with no decoration 
save for an unusual thumb-grasp consisting 
Q | a rec tangular plate slightly sunk at the 
top attachment, and then decorated with an 
embossed pattern of acanthus foliage. 

The whole body Is covered with a pattern consisting of a horizontal 
row through the middle of long, sharp-pointed embossed ellipses reaching 
from near the rim to an inch above the base, the margins beaded In small 
uniform raised dots touching the adjacent figure at the center sides. 

The space above and between the ellipses is filled with a beautiful fan 
design emanating from a large raised pointed jewel In the deep V of the 
ellipses, the outer edge of the vanes fitting into the rim scalloping. There 
is a similar fan and Jewel pattern below the ellipses, reaching nearly to the 
base, with a band of reverse raised scalloping at Its base. 

On the base of the body is a complex star with six beaded ellipses for 
rays, the spaces between filled with fan-vanes extending beyond the tips 
of the rays. 

3-part mold, 4JH$ in. high. 

This pattern Is fairly early, of the 1875-1885 period, having character- 
istics of other patterns of this period. It no doubt comes In a large variety 
of pieces, probably In the clear only. 

94 




The creamer is so much like that of "Beaded Loop" as to leave no 

doubt of a similar contemporary origin. A comparison of the two, side by 
side, reveals similar quality, resonance,, weight, and pattern. Handles are 
almost identical, each with the curious set-in embossed plate for thumb- 
grasp, decorated, however, with slightly different patterns. 

The sharp ellipses beaded around the margins are very similar, although 
the patterns between are different. Both had covers. Patterns on the bases 
differ. The fine cut between the ellipses on "Beaded Loop" is identical 
with that on "Flattened Fine Cut" (Kamm, p. 85), and on other patterns, 
while large raised beaded jewels are used on u Jewel with Dewdrop", "Pea- 
cock Feather" (Kamm, p. 76), "Jewel with Moon and Star" (p. 99), etc. 

Similar beaded ellipses but depressed rather than raised are used on 
"Loop and Diamond" (p. 60), and "Sharp Oval and Diamond" (p. 59). 
Similar unusual thumb-grasps are used on "Peacock Feather", etc. Almost 
a3! the above creamers had covers, and the character of the rather heavy 
draped scallops are similar. 

The creamer is drawn through the courtesy of the owner, Mrs. R. F. 
Burch, of Eastman, Georgia. 

KAYAK 

This piece carries an unusual pattern and, 
while ornate, it is most effective. The creamer 
comes in better than average quality for its 
period, is crystal-clear, without discoloration, 
is rather light in weight, and has a good 
resonance. 

The body is cylindrical, of nearly even 
diameter throughout, on a short wide slightly 
flaring base hollowed below, where there is a 
large plain 22-rayed star. The outside of the 
base is ribbed in short vertical bars rounded 
off top and bottom. 

The rim is horizontal and there is a round- 
ed ring around the back half, flattened over the front, above which portion 
rises the broad high lip. Just below this ring is a horizontal band of the 
same short vertical rounded bars which decorates the base, and between 
this band and the waist the main pattern consists of six large sharp-pointed 
ellipses reaching from top to bottom, the center-sides touching. 

Each ellipse has a wide rounded horizontal inner bar widest at the 
middle and tapering to a point at each apex. A wide rounded bar crosses 
the mid-point between the thickened sides, sliced off diagonally at each 
side. Above and below this bar, reaching to the apex, the middle space is 
filled with five long pointed bars in relief with the free end rounded off. 
Above and below, between the ellipses, is a diamond-shaped figure 
filled with raised diamond point. 

The pitcher had a cover, which is missing. 
3-part mold, 5 in. high. 

The writer knows of no other pieces in this unusual pattern, the name 
being given from the resemblance of the long cushioned ovals to the cov- 
ered canoe used by the Esquimaux. 

It is drawn through the courtesy of the owner, Mrs. J. L. Mims, of 
Hawkinsville, Georgia. 

95 




PILLOWS 

An attractive pattern is shown here, depending 
on a single decorative motif for its effect. The 

creamer is clear, brilliant, fairly thick, and without 
discoloration. It is jug-shaped, with a slightly flar- 
ing rim which has three broad scallops across the 
back half, each further fine-scalloped. The high lip 
rises from the front half, and is plain. 
The handle is applied. 

The body is covered with a wide band bevel- 
arched across the top at the neck, plain at the base, 
and consisting of diagonally arranged blocks, of 

good size and uniform in size and pattern. Each is sliced off diagonally at 
the side, the upper margins softened and rounded. 

This picture is taken from the A. H. Heisey Company's catalog of about 
1897 (no date), their number 325*. The pattern comes in no less than 
forty-five pieces, but no mention is made of colors. 

The pattern was also made by The Duncan and Miller Glass Company. 




*The writer is indebted to Mr. E. Wright Heisey, President of this com- 
pany for the use of this catalog, filled with beautiful old wood-cuts. 




PUNT7 BAND 

This fine pattern, also, appears in the catalog of 

the A. H. Heisey and Company, and is character- 
ized by a single row around the widest part of the 
body of small oval puntys with their long axes 
vertical. 

The creamer is unusual in shape, the upper two- 
thirds cylindrical and the lower third bulging and 
resting on a short rimmed base. The upper part 
flares slightly at the top and the rim is horizontal, 
decorated with a row of beading except over the 
high lip, which is left plain. At the top and bottom 
of the bulged area is a narrow band of fine vertical 
ribbing. 

The handle is applied. 

The plain cylindrical portion is left plain al- 
though in some pieces it may possibly be ruby- 
stained and engraved with souvenir name and date. 

In the second figure shown here the pattern is 
profusely decorated with flower and scroll engrav- 
ing, which practically covers the upper part of the 
body. The rim here differs in being evenly scal- 
loped rather than beaded and the lip, too, differs 
slightly in shape. 

Both variants carry the same catalog number, 1220, and the first named 
comes in many more pieces than the second, some seventy-five in number 
as compared with only six engraved pieces. The former includes pint. 




quart and half-gallon tankards, half-gallon water jug, spoon tray, spoon 
holder, celery vase, celery tray, pickle dish, numerous bowls, nappies, 

sauces, bonbon dishes, eight high open compotes (then called comports) 
with plain margins and four more with crimped edges, four high covered 
compotes, salt dip, salt and pepper shakers, hotel cream and sugar, a cake 
basket with upturned sides, etc. 



PUNTT AND DIAMOND POINT 

The creamer shown here carries a bold, effective 
pattern consisting of vertical rows of thumbprints 
or puntys alternating with bars of fine diamond 
point inside erect deeply scored troughs. The 
puntys are elliptical in shape, with their long axes 
horizontal, deeply depressed inside, while the dia- 
mond point is arranged in four contiguous vertical 
rows. 

The little pitcher is jug-shaped with an abbre- 
viated collar at the base and a doubly scalloped 
rim, the low lip devoid of scalloping. 
The handle is applied. 

This pattern appears in the A. H. Heisey and Company catalog also, 
as Xo. 3 05, and was made in no less than forty-seven pieces, such as hotel 
cream and sugar as well as the standard shapes, custard cup, pickle tray, 
molasses can, bar syrup, mustard pot,, salt and pepper shakers, toothpick 
holder, oil and vinegar cruets, tall celery vase, etc. 

Thirteen of the above pieces were also made with burnished gold in all 
the puntys but none on the rim. 




FANCY LOOP 

This is another of the Heisey patterns, taken 
from their 1897 (circa) catalog, and designated as 
Xo. !20S. It, too, was made in many pieces, some 
of them, like those of the last-named pattern, rather 
unusual. It came in a heavy tall, cylindrical vase, 
hotel creamer and sugar as well as the standard of 
which the creamer is shown here, bar tumbler, 
champagne, claret, sherry glass, punch bowl and 
glass, toothpick holder, individual sugar, creamer 
and butter dish, individual and master salts, many 
square berry bowls and nappies, with doubly scal- 
loped and plain edges, some of the margins flared, a handled jelly dish, 
large and medium sized cracker jars, tankard water pitcher, etc. 

While overloaded with decoration by present-day standards, the pattern 
is interesting from this complexity of motif, and Mr. E. Wright Heisey 
says it was a most difficult pattern to execute in the glass plant. 




97 




GROUP SEVEN 

This group includes pitchers without artificial bases, resting flat on the base 
of the bowl in spite of the apparent support on one. All post-date the 1890 
period, some having patterns in imitation of cut glass. 

ROSE AND SUNBURSTS 

A late pattern combining the deep-slashed imita- 
tion cut glass motif with a raised floral pattern is 
shown here; the glass is heavy, thick and brilliantly 
clear. The body is inverted-bell-shaped, resting on a 
flat shelved base thickened for safety; the sides slope 
from the rim to the base with a barely perceptible 
bulge through the middle, and the rim is doubly scal- 
loped in alternately wide and narrow scallops, all fine 
scalloped alike. 

The rim rises abruptly at the front to the high lip, 
which, however is much depressed at the tip. The 
handle is pressed but simulates the applied type with 
turned-under tab at the top; it is sis-panelled, the 
panels ending at the lower attachment in curved lines. 

Decoration consists of four wide shallow deep-slashed arches just below the rim, ex- 
tending less than half way down the body, with a small, elaborately slashed arch pattern 
at their crossing. Beneath this small, arched pattern is suspended a long uneven deep-cut 
star extending almost to the base. 

The clear space under the apex of each large arch (save that under the handle) is filled 
with a large sketchily drawn rose with foliage arid thorny twig, all in fairly high rounded 
relief. This flora! motif may have been painted in red and green and gilded, as were many 
similar ones of the 1895-1905 period, but many of them appear clear now, the color having 
been removed. 

On the base is cut a large complex open eight-pointed star, with a large raised sun- 
burst in the middle, smaller ones near the margin, with sun rays around the outer edge. 
3-part mold, 3^4 in. high. 

The writer knows no other pieces in the pattern, although patterns of this type were 
generally made in a good number of pieces, plates, goblets, sugar, spooner, pickle dish, etc, 

ARCHED PANEL, VARIANT 

When this piece was produced, the art of making glass 
had reached just about perfection because it is beautifully 
clear, fairly heavy, brilliant, with a smooth, waxy feeling, 
the mold marks smoothed out, and it has a good resonance. 

However, it is late, after 1900 without doubt, hence 
today not in the best standing among collectors. 

The handle arches up sharply, has a flat thumb-grasp 
and then curves down gradually to an attachment at the 
very base of the body, a feature which is almost unique. 
The rim is curved to correspond to the panels of the body 
and bevel-edged, the lip rising sharply over the front two 
panels only. 

The body is divided into six broad panels of approxi- 
mately equal width throughout except at the base where 
they flare smartly; the panels are bevelled at the base and 
the pitcher rests squarely on the base of its bowl, with a beautiful, rather small star beneatfi 
with sis broad rays made up of many small ones. 

2-part mold, 4^ in. high. 

This is the individual size perhaps of an odd pattern coming only in it and the sugar. 
Patterns with plain panels are many, especially in the late period and it is similar to those 
shown on Kamm, pp. 104 and 105. The handle is like that of a Grape and Gothic Arches" 
(Kamm, p. 99), "Arched Panel" and Stepped Arched Panel" (Kamm, p. 105), "Bluebird" 
(this book), etc. 

The long shovel-like lip is unusual but Eke that of 'Wide and Narrow Panel" (p. 108). 
The broad, fiat panels of beautiful quality glass are like those on '"Plain Scalloped PaneP 
(p. 80), "Portland" (p. 105), etc. 

98 





SQUARED DAISY AND DIAMOND 

A fine lacy pattern is shown on this creamer, which, 

while late, has much charm from its dainty shape and 
the play of light on its shining facets. The glass is fairly 
thick and heavy, with a crystal clarity and purity of color, 

and it has a ringing resonance. 

The creamer rests flat on the base of the body, and 
tapers thence upward to the rim, with no bulges en route. 
The rim is unevenly scalloped, to correspond with the 
pattern, and the lip is abbreviated and indented at the 
tip. 

The handle is of the later applied type, and is placed 
directly on top of the pattern; it has a large bulbous base 
and a deep tumed-under tab at the top. 

The pattern covers the body from lip to base and 
consists of blocks more or less squared, arranged in hori- 
zontal and vertical lines. Each alternate block is alike, 
the two patterns consisting of forma! daisies with bevelled sides and a raised button in the 
middle and square blocks placed diagonally inside the larger blocks, each with bevelled 
edges, the comers filled with raised five-pointed figures. 

A large section of the pattern appears on the base, the raised portions protected by a 
slightly raised rim around the underside of the base. 

4-part mold, 4$ in. high. 

The writer knows nothing of the provenience or date of this pattern; however, it prob- 
ably dates after 1895; it is similar to the u Daisy" pattern, better known among dealers as 
"Lacy Daisy" (See p. 73, this book). It also resembles ''Checkerboard 3 ' (p. 130). 

WAFFLE AND FINE CUT 

A cane or waffle and fine cut pattern in unusual shape 
is this squat little creamer of late vintage; it is character- 
ized by five rows of the pattern, in good relief, around 
the base of the otherwise plain bowl, which may be en- 
graved or even colored ruby in other pieces. 

The glass is flawless in quality and of good weight, 
with a clear, applied handle having large bulbous lower 
attachment, on top of the cane, leaving grooves into 
which dirt collects easily. 

The base has a large, slightly indented square figure, 
made up of alternate tiny squares of cane and squared 
ftars like those on the body, not arranged in similar rows, 
as there. Around the edge of the underside of the base 
is a row of the little blocks. 

3 -part, mold, 3^2 in., high. 

Patterns similar to this one but not the identical piece, appear in the 1898 catalog of 
the United States Glass Company although the pattern was also made earlier. It comes in 
clear, amber, blue, and probably canary. 

ROANOKE 

The above is the original name for this attractive 
pattern, made by the United States Glass Company* 
and appearing in their 1898 catalog; it may have ap- 
peared in earlier catalogs also. 

The pattern is characterized by the several pump- 
kin-shaped pieces having lids with curved, pumpkin- 
stem handles. It comes in clear, canary, amber, and a 
deep emerald green. The pattern curves under the 
bases instead of ending at the outside basal margin, 
ending beneath at a plain quarter-sized central disc. 

The over-all pattern consists of square blocks 
arranged diagonally and slightly swirled around the pitcher, each block seemingly a dia- 

* The writer wishes to thank Mr. F. L. Bryant, of this Company, for the use of many old 

catalogs in its possession, as well as for information conceraing many early patterns. 

99 





mond, with four high faceted sides. The Hp is low and plain, and the handle unusual in 
being slightly the wider in its lower half. There is a slight thumb-grasp at the top with 
projecting end. 

3-part mold, 354 m - high. 

"Roanoke" comes in many pieces, butter with pumpkin-stem for finial, sugar, covered, 
with the same handle, a tall salver (cake plate), half-gallon tankard (water pitcher), tall 
covered compote with curved handle, berry bowls, sauces, etc. 




ENGLISH HOBNAIL CROSS 

The creamer shown here is a highly ornate piece, 
and it comes in a thick heavy glass of good clarity 
and resonance. It is square in cross-section and rests 
flat on the thickened base of the body and the glass 
is thickest at the middle to take the deep cutting. 
It is widest at the middle and curves gently upward 
and downward from this point, the rim with a large 
shallow curve through the middle of each side and 
other curve through the middle of each side and 
other curves over the back corners and at the handle. 
The handle is oval in outline, six panelled, widest 
front and back, and has a line of English hobnail pat- 
tern down each side in good relief. 

A wide band crosses the body horizontally above the middle, with deeply bevelled 
edges, and another band crosses the body vertically down the middle of each side, front 
and back, forming a large cross on each large plane surface. Each band contains two rows 
of large English hobnail pattern set individually in raised squares, a large bevelled square 
at each crossing filled with diamond point. The panel down the back of the pitcher is 
plain except below the lower handle attachment, where it is patterned with hobs. 

The cross thus formed leaves in the corners of each large plane surface a good sized 
square, which is patterned with lightly painted scrolling in imitation of etching in a pale 
lilac color. Each square in the upper half of the pitcher is further colored on the inside 
in a burnished gold effect. 

As though the pitcher still needed decoration, the central square at the crossing of the 
two wide hobnail bands is colored amber as well as the hobnails on each side of this square. 
In some pieces, the whole hobnail bands are colored amber and possibly other colors. 
3-part mold, 3$4 in. high. 

This pattern is often seen in shops in open sugar, creamer, spooner, etc. with consider- 
able variation in coloring of the bands and with the painted scrolling often omitted or done 
in other colors. The pattern is late, dating from the 1890-1905 period. 



HOBNAIL WITH COLORED BAND 

This is one of the much desired patterns, coming 
in frosted (satin finish) or plain hobnail in colors and 
in the clear, with the collar-band in amber or other 
color. Sometimes the piece is dipped in acid half way 
up, the upper half left clear; again the upper half of 
the body is rose while the lower is clear. 

The color on the fluted collar is a thin glaze which 
easily peels off. The lip is abbreviated and depressed. 

The handle is applied, often half etched, half clear. 

Six horizontal rows of good-sized hobs decorate 
the body below the collar, well-spaced in both direc- 
tions- The hobs are well rounded at the apex but of 
good depth, and do not extend to the inside of the 
body, as they would if the piece were blown. 

4-part mold, 4 in. high, 4 in. in diam. 

This late pattern comes in many pieces, including tumbler, water pitcher, sauces and 
berry bowl. 

100 




GIANT BULL'S EYE 

This fine old pattern is found in the United States 
Glass Company's 1898 catalog under the number 157; 
however Mr. Brothers shows* that it was made nearly 
a decade earlier by another company, the U. S. Glass 
Company being organized about 1890 as a sort of trust 
embodying thirteen companies situated from New York 
to Indiana. 

Mr. Brothers suggests for it the name "Concave 
Circle", but, since a circle is a plane surface, the writer 
is using the name above, for the pattern is a reminder 
of older patterns of similar name. 

The creamer and tankard-size water pitcher are 
shown here to depict the considerable variation that 
exists between different pieces in the same pattern. 
Tankard pitchers date from around 1890 and not much 
before, a new style having arisen probably from their greater 
convenience on a tray with tumblers. 

The glass is beautifully clear, rather thick and heavy, and 
has a pleasing tone when struck. The creamer is cylindrical, of 
even width throughout the length, with five deep even scallops 
around the back half of the rim. 

The body is plain save for a single horizontal row at the 
base consisting of six very large circular "puntys" or thumbprints 
considerably depressed below the bevelled rim. There is a fine 
large faceted figure between each two. 

On the pitcher are two horizontal rows of thumbprints, the 
lower row placed in interesting uneven fashion, with fine large 
geometric figures between. 

The handle of each is applied. 

3-part mold, 434 in- high (creamer); and 4-part mold, 9f^ 
in. high (tankard). 

This pattern, apparently in the clear only, conies in sugar, 
spooner. tumbler, and no doubt other pieces. 

FORMAL DAISY 

Albeit a late pattern, that represented by this 
creamer comes in a beautiful quality of glass; the 
creamer is thick, heavy, and glowing, and it has some 
resonance. The outstanding characteristic of the piece 
is its very thick base, through which the very deeply 
pressed rays of the star on the underside stand up like 
high, sharp curved claws or fins. 

While the base is square, the rim is circular, even- 
ly crenulate except over the plain high lip. lip and 
handle being placed at opposite corners. The handle 
is pressed and notched down the back to form a 
coarse diamond pattern. 

Four broad panels are slashed out of the sides 

extending upward from the base, their tops arched over above the middle of the side. They 
curve outward inside the arches, and there is a narrow vertical space between each two 
arches, which is decorated with a long raised diamond which is split into four smaller, 
each flat top still further divided into four parts. Below the largest diamond and flanking 
it are two triangles, each filled with tiny diamond nubs. 

Above the lar^e diamond and reaching from thence to the rim is a beautiful large 
stylized daisy or sunburst filled with tiny faceted figures and centered in a raised button. 

The base is over one-half inch in thickness, with a large, plain 16-rayed star beneath. 

4-part mold, 3^4 in. high. 

The writer knows nothing more of the pattern than the creamer. The sunbursts are 
identical with those on several known Heisey patterns. The coarsely-slashed handle appears 
on the creamer of "Cord Drapery", 'Twin Sunbursts" (Kamm, p. 97), "Buttressed Sun- 
bursts'* (p. Ill), etc. 

*J. Stanley Brothers, Thumbnail Sketches, Kalamazoo, Mich., 1940. 

101 







WILD ROSE, MILK GLASS 

This little piece is a miniature, part of a set consisting 
of covered butter dish, open sugar and creamer which may 
be a toy set or a set for individual use on a tray. 

It comes in a white milk glass, with a deep bluish tint 
through the thin portions, around the rim. The pieces are 
thick and surprisingly heavy and the creamer so small inside 
that it could scarce hold over three teaspoons of liquid. A 
cover which is missing fitted down into the body resting on 
a ledge deep within the rim. The cover of the butter dish 
is a cone with spiral corrugations. 

The handle of the creamer is very large and clumsy, pressed, roughly round in diameter, 
with thumb-grasp at the top, bark-like in texture, with splayed feet at top and bottom 
attachments. 

The whole body is rough to the hand and the pattern considerably blurred; it consists, 
however, of two wild roses in bloom, in high relief, with scrolling. 
2-part mold, 2 in. high without cover (2 in. diam.). 
The pattern dates from the mid-Eighties. 

HEART WITH THUMBPRINT 

This little individual creamer is no doubt part of a large set, 
but its counterparts, save for the matching open sugar, are un- 
known to the writer. It is a dainty little bit of glass, brilliant 
and of good weight. 

The bowl rests flat on its base, with a large complex star 
beneath. The rim is uneven, with three sharp inverted V ? s higher 
than the rest, a long shallow arch extending from the V near the 
front to the back, again fine-scalloped. The lip is low and plain. 
The handle is pressed and plain. 

The whole body is covered with decoration, the chief motif being a heart, repeated 
thrice, extending right-side-up from near the rim to the base, each plain and flat inside 
with a deeply bevelled outline. Centered in the heart is a large circular punty or thumb- 
print sunk rather deeply in the body. 

Between each two hearts is a large triangle, the tip forming the V in the rim, the base 
at the bottom of the body; reaching up from the base is a low triangle with bevelled sides 
and plain interior save for a smaller circular punty. The remainder of the triangular figure 
Is filled with high-relief plain-topped little hexagonal buttons. 

The rim is gilded but gilt appears nowhere else on the body. 

3-pait mold, 2^ In. high. 

The character of this design and the high-relief cane are similar to those of "Button 
Arches" (Kamm, p. 108). a pattern which was made by The Duncan and Miller Glass Co.; 
and the faceted star on the base is Identical with that of "Flambeaux" (Karam, p. 112), 

A similar large heart, but divided down the middle and without the thurnbprint center 
appears among the Sandwich shards at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 

EGG AND DART 

This Individual creamer Is similar to many others, most of 
which are a part of large sets; this piece Is brilliant and clear, 
tinted a lovely amethyst from exposure to light and chemical 
reaction on the manganese content. There is no resonance. 

The melon-shaped body rests flat on the base of the bowl; 
there Is a deep, straight-sided collar with four wide, flat panels, 
the rim scalloped to match. The lip is low and plain. The handle 
Is pressed, and likewise plain. 

Below the shoulder of the body, there are two horizontal 
rows of "eggs" In good, rounded relief, the upper row broad- 
arched across the top, but the lower almost perfect ovoidal figures. Between the two rows 
are diamond-shaped spaces with softened, bevelled margins and high flat tops. The lower 
ends of the diamonds extend to the base, the u eggs" not quite touching. 

On the slightly Indented base Is a 20-rayed star, the rays slightly whirled. 
3~part mold, 2$^ In. high. 

This piece Is similar to "Swirled Block" (Kamm, p. 115), "Cat's Eye and Block" 
(same p.); it Is superior In quality to all which follow In this group. 

The creamer is used here through the courtesy of the owner, Mrs. J. L. MIms, 

102 






FANCY CUT 

This pattern has all the motifs used in cut glass the sun- 
burst, the long fans, and cross-ribbing, and the minute diamond- 
point,, all with deeply bevelled margins. The piece shown here is 
something of an anomaly; it may be a hotel-sized individual 
creamer, a creamer for home use, or a child's toy, for many of 
the late patterns included a toy set of four pieces. In quality, it 
is mediocre. 

It is unusual in shape, cylindrical, rather unstable, with a 
flaring base and slightly flaring rim. The latter is saddled, with 
a rather ugly lip. The handle is pressed, and longer than usual, 
with a row of rather blurred notches down each side of the back. 
The body is covered with pattern in high relief, long fluted 
fans, sunbursts with minute faceted bits, wedges filled with diamond point, cross ribbed 
lances, etc. On the base is a large sunburst. 
3-part mold, 3^i in. high. 

The sunbursts are identical with those on many other late patterns, "Flambeaux" 
(Karnm, p. 112), (dated 1902), ^Checkerboard" (this book, p. 130), "Whirligig" (p. 103), 
etc. The notched handle is similar to that on "Buttressed Sunburst" (Kamm, p. Ill), 
"Forma! Daisy" (this book, p. 101), etc. 

WHIRLIGIG 

This is another miniature pitcher, the like of which is eagerly 
sought today for small cabinets; it was part of a doll-house set, 
made around 1898, the catalog of the United States Glass Com- 
pany for that year showing many similar toy pieces among stand- 
ard patterns. 

This one has no artificial base, the underside of the bowl be- 
ing pressed with a whirl with long outer rays in clusters and a 
small button center. 

The thick, wavy rim is gilded on the top and down the sides 

as far as the pattern. The main motif of the design consists of three large pear-shaped 
figures with deeply bevelled sides, each containing an identical whirled figure with button- 
center. Between these pear- or tear-drop-shaped figures is an array of complex geometric 
figures, with stars and diamond point centers. 

3-part mold, 2^4 in. high. 

The covered sugar to match this little piece has a finial like that on the lid of "Fine 
Cut Medallion" (this book, p. 43). The whirligig or "buzz-saw" appears on other late 
patterns. 

SWEETHEART 

Another miniature creamer from a doIPs set is shown here, 
a rather mediocre little piece with little to commend it save the 
pretty heart on each side with whirled rays on all sides, similar to 
those on the past pattern. 

Inside, the heart is split down the middle and each half shows 
two patterns, an upper raised button and daisy pattern, six buttons 
surrounding a daisy, and a lower made up of a long wedge cross- 
ribbed in washboard fashion. 

On the flat base is a sunburst identical with that on many 
other late patterns "Checkerboard", '"Whirligig", etc. 
4-part mold, 2% in. high. 
This pattern comes in full-sized pieces, including pitchers, berry bowl, sauces, etc. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

The above is the original name for this pattern, which ap- 
pears in the 1898 catalog of the United States Glass Company; 
however, it may also have been made at a considerably earlier 
date as well. 

The piece shown here is the creamer from a doll-house set 
or the individual bed-side creamer. It is rather mediocre in 
quality, as are many of the imitation cut-glass patterns. The 
body is slightly bulbous, with a waist and a short base, and 
with a large plain 20-rayed star impressed beneath. 

103 





The body carries a fancy over-all pattern, the chief motif of which consists of four 
large bevelled diamonds, containing a fine-cut pattern, not the regulation diamond point. 
Between the large diamonds is a large complex splayed figure made up ol four long pointed 
arms not meeting at a center, with two vertical "pmeappks" between, each with diamond 
point. 

The rim is irregular, to fit the pattern, and is gilded on top and down the sides to 
the pattern. 

4-part mold, 2$& in. high. 

This pattern comes in many pieces, including besides the^ usual ones, a large salt, salt 
dip, shaker salt and pepper, cruets, molasses jug with britannia metal top, lemonade glass, 
claret, custard cup, half-gallon tankard, syrup jug with metal cap, olive dish, decanter, ice 
tub, punch bowl and cups, whiskey tumbler, and champagne. 

SNOWFLAKE 

Like "Pennsylvania" and other patterns named for states, 
this pattern would seem to be a United States Glass Company 
design of late date, but the writer does not know its origin. The 
toy creamer is without doubt a part of a very large set, and is 
rather mediocre in quality and pattern. 

There is a row of tiny beads standing up on the rim, over 
the lip as well, not gilded. The handle is pressed and four-square, 
with a smart in-curve at the top for a thumb-grasp. 

The pattern consists of three large roughly hexagonal medal- 
lions with deeply bevelled sides, separated from each other by three long "pineapples" 
broken up into four sections; the upper and lower blocks are filled with diamond point, 
the side panels left plain. The large hexagons have slightly incurved sides and contain 
each a beautiful "snowflake" pattern, with a sunburst center and radiating points. 
3-part mold, 2J^ in. high. 




104 



GROUP EIGHT 

This group includes a few tall, cylindrical creamers, pitchers of the tankard 
type and "fancies". Most of the patterns were made in standard creamers, indi- 
vidual creamers, and often toy pieces, as well, but the last two in the list were 
probably made only in sugar and cream, intended as curiosities rather than for 
practical use. 

What good purpose a tankard cream pitcher serves that is not better served 
by the standard type is a puzzle, for the tall pieces are decidedly unstable, es- 
pecially when filled with liquid. They were not intended for syrup or molasses, 
for a covered molasses jug was included in many standard patterns. One dealer 
suggests that they were used for dessert sauces of various sorts, and placed on 
the table in addition to the regulation creamer. 

A tankard half-gallon pitcher was standard equipment in many a home, for 
it took less room on the water-set tray than the jug-type pitcher; the small 
tankards were perhaps imitations of the larger type, for they were made in quart, 
pint, and even individual sizes. 




SHEPHERD'S PLAID 

One of the tankard-type, this piece comes in better than 
average clear, rather brilliant glass of good weight and some 
resonance. 

The tall slender body rests on a wide shelved base hollowed 
beneath to a considerable depth, and the base of the bowl above 
this is one-half inch thick, for better stability. There is no pat- 
tern on the base. 

The pressed handle is plain, terete, oval in outline. It simu- 
lates the applied type. Decoration is simple, consisting of a wide 
band of uniform small square blocks arranged diagonally from 
top to bottom, each block with bevelled sides. The top and 
bottom of the band are cut in deep V\ above and below which 
the interstices are filled with sun-rays. 

3-part mold, $fy in. high. 

This little creamer is sometimes seen in shops, and the equal- 
ly tall open sugar is said to exist; the writer has seen no other 
pieces. It dates around 1890-1900. 



KALEIDOSCOPE 



The beautiful perfectly plain tankard creamer shown here is 
fairly stable for its shape for the base is weighted with thickened 
glass. It is perfectly clear, brilliant, and resonant, as befits so severe 
a piece. 

The handle is applied. 

The only distinguishing characteristic of the piece and the rea- 
son it is shown here is the unique triangle on the base of the body, 
protected by a deep rim. It is composed of twenty-five separate 
little triangles, fifteen tiny right-angled bits, each with low facets, 
which form the unusual boundary, and ten high equilateral ones, 
forming high, sharp pyramids, in the middle. The name above ap- 
plies to the base. 

2-part mold, 754 in. high. 

105 




SWIRL AND BALL, VARIANT 

Here is a pitcher which possibly was a container for pickles 
or mustard or other condiment for it comes in thick heavy glass of 
the bottle type although fairly clear and with no discoloration. 
The deeply inset ledge is too narrow to have supported a glass 
cover and was possibly capped with a thin piece of metal instead. 
The tall cylindrical body bulges slightly through the middle and 
the upper half is plain, the lower covered with a spiral pattern in 
raised bars with a row of balls around the top, the balls in less 
than half round relief. The spirals end on a shelf above the thick 
waist. 

The base is rather small but thick and hollowed beneath, plain 
on both sides. 

The rim is plain and arches slightly to the broad blunt lip, 
which is depressed at the tip. The handle is pressed and oval in 
outline, with a pattern of rings which extend around the terete core. 
3-part mold, 6 in. high. 

The writer has seen no other pieces in this pattern but they 

probably exist. The pattern is very similar to "Swirl and Ball" (Kamm, p. 107), the balls 
In the middle of the body rather than at the broad flat base. The quality of the present 
piece is inferior. 

None of the slender cylindrical pitchers shown by Kamm on pp. 106-109 inc. or In this 
book have the narrow ledge inside the body near the top, as this one does. 




SWIRL AND DIAMOND 

The beautiful creamer shown here Is of the tankard type but 
so decorated as to lose the sternness and clumsiness of pieces of the 
type. The glass is crystal-clear, polished, and resonant. The lower 
half is much thickened to take the high-relief pattern, the upper of 
average weight. The rim is doubly scalloped and the lip long. The 
handle Is applied. 

The upper half of the body Is devoid of pressing, but carries 
a delicate etched fern spray running horizontally. A bevelled line 
separates upper from lower halves, and below this the body bulges 
slightly and carries a beautiful swirled pattern made up of two 
alternate bands of parallel ribs and diamonds. There are six of 
the former and eight of diamonds running up-and-down on the 
body, the ribs having a sharp spine down the middle and the dia- 
monds being equally high and sharp-pointed. 

The base is plain. 

4-part mold, 6 1 /* In. high. 

There is a sugar bowl to match this creamer, and also a vase- 
celery, but the writer knows of no other pieces." All three make 
excellent flower-containers. 





RUBY BAR AND FLUTE 

While ruby glass was not new, it received a sudden spurt in 
popularity just previous to the Chicago World's Fair, and countless 
souvenirs In ruby glass went back to the stay-at-homes to be cher- 
ished and loved for a whole generation. 

The present lovely pitcher is one of these pieces. Inscribed In 
flowing script, ''World's Fair, 1893, Mrs. I. S. Loer". It Is a tall, 
cylindrical piece, the basal portion billowing out like a hoop-skirt, 
with a short hollow base plain beneath. 

The handle Is applied and Instead of the large bulbous base 
which is usual in late patterns, this one has a slight bulge just 
above the base instead. 

The upper terete portion of the body Is left plain and colored 
ruby, while the lower carries a vertical design in rather wide para- 
llel bars In good, rounded relief, arched over the tops and bases. 

106 




Above them is an unusual pattern which joins the two body-portions of widely different 
diameters on a slope, consisting of half puntys or thumbprmts, the tops sliced off diagon- 
ally, the rounded lower sides not quite touching the vertical bars. 

'The quality of this piece leaves nothing to be desired, the crystal clarity a beautiful 
contrast to the glowing ruby color. 

4-part mold, 6 in. high. 

This pattern did not receive the acclaim given "Ruby Thumbprint" and other con- 
temporary patterns, and the writer knows of this single piece although a few others no 
doubt exist. 

TORPEDO 

This beautiful tankard-shaped creamer comes in a fine, clear, 
heavy glass with no discoloration and also practically devoid of 
resonance. It rests on a rather deep flared base hollowed beneath 
to the waist and decorated on the outside slopes and also under- 
neath. 

The body tapers gradually from base to rim, wjth massive 
decoration on the lower part. The rim is saddled, the lip high, and 
the beautiful handle applied. 

Decoration consists of a horizontal row around the body just 
above the waist consisting of uniform "torpedoes" standing erect 
on their points in very high relief. Each one is split horizontally 
across the middle by a deep "punty" or thumbprint; above this is 
a still higher octagonal button with plain flat top and surrounded 
on the margin with tiny faceted triangles. Below the punty is a 
smaller erect ellipse, both ends pointed, containing two faceted diamonds. 

Around the outside of the collared base is a row of half-torpedoes, sliced off diagonally. 
On the underside of the base is a small raised 12~pointed star, with torpedoes in the outer 
interstices, forming a much larger circle, each figure filled with the same motifs as the band 
on the body. 

4-part mold, 6 in. high. 

This piece is part of a set consisting of sugar } spooner and creamer, which has been 
in the family of the owner, Mrs. Oofty Owens, of Mansfield, Ohio, since the early Eighties. 
No other pieces are known to the writer. 

NOONDAY SUN 

Here is an unusual pitcher* built on bold lines with its almost 
unique decoration confined entirely to the base. The glass is fine, 
perfectly clear, and without any discoloration and with some 
resonance. 

The cylindrical body tapers slightly from the base to the rim, 
and rests on a large cart-wheel base with a wide ledge below the 
thick weighted body, the ledge standing out a quarter-inch from 
the body. 

In the center of the base, is a penny-sized plain disc nearly 
flush with the table, support beneath surrounded by a sunburst 
slightly more depressed, made up of plain fluted bars, which, half 
way out to the margin are broken up into three rows of interlocked 
diamonds with shallow bevelling between and plain- flat tops. Around 
the margin of the base is a row of large pointed hobnails, upon which 
trie pitcher rests. The central disc and rays emanating therefrom 
look like the hot noonday sun blazing down on the Kansas prairies, or, perhaps, like the 
emblem of the Japanese flag. 

The rim of the pitcher is saddled near the back, with a smart upward sweep to the 
high narrow lip. The handle is applied. 

There is no decoration whatever on this pitcher, although this does not preclude the 
possibility that other pitchers, or other pieces in the pattern, may not be engraved. 

Mold marks are completely obliterated both on the body and base; 6 in. high. 

Neither the owner nor the writer has seen counterparts of this piece. It is similar to 
the tankard creamer of "Atlas" (p. IS), and would seem to have originated in the same 
plant. 

* Drawn tnrough the courtesy of Mr. W. L. Emmons. 

107 





THE KITCHEN STOVE 

Not all the pieces in this pattern may bear the out-curved legs 
like the wood-burning kitchen stove of our grandmothers but the 
motif is unique enough to deserve mention. Highly impractical and 
unusable if one leg is chipped or broken off, this design must have 
been intended rather for show than for use on the checkerboard 
tablecloth. 

The quality of the glass is of the finest for its period, but there 
is no resonance. 

The body is of the tankard shape, the base of the body thick- 
ened to take the deep cutting, the base of the bowl deeply concaved 
and enlarged. At three places on this fancy basal border, three feet 
project, outwardly curved at the ends ? and considerably thickened. 
Each is decorated on the outside with a large bevelled diamond 
with a square star inside, the design fitting into that of the rest of 
this border, composed of sawtoothing, bevelled fans, smaller diamonds, etc. 

The rim is unevenly curved, and the plain terete pressed handle rests on a long thick 
shield affixed to the body. 
3-part mold, 6 in. high. 
There is a tall open sugar to match this piece, and there may be still other pieces. 

THE TOWN PUMP 

Here is an amusing piece meant for the parlor whatnot rather 
than for use on the table; it represents a log with corrugated bark 
sprinkled generously with hobnail breathing pores set upright on 
four splayed branches at the base. It is slightly narrower at the 
rim and the glass at the base is considerably thickened for stability. 

The twigs at the base are sliced off diagonally, each showing 
five annular rings on the end. The handle is a round twig curving 
out sharply on the lower free end and knobbed but not corrugated. 

The pitcher has no lip save for a depression off center like the 
others on the rim. A spigot about half way up on the front obvi- 
ously is closed. 

The upper inch of the body and handle are of white milk glass, 
indicated on the drawing by stippling. 

4-part mold, 7 in. high. 

A novelty which is said to have been fairly common a few years ago but which is now 
seldom seen, this pattern comes in the creamer and a sugar trough to complement it in the 
form of a long prostrate log sliced off at the ends and showing growth rings, with the whole 
top open. It had no cover. 

The set was made in the clear with white top, blue with the same top, green with 
white, and also in vaseline and white. It simulates blown glass but is pressed and dates 
from the period of maximum production, about 1890. 




108 



GROUP NINE 

Included in this group are designs of creamers which do not rest on a flat 
base but on scallops, scrolls ? short feet or longer sprawled ones, all more or less 
insecure footing and impractical as soon as a piece is chipped off or a leg broken. 

A few have a well-defined stem or broad shallow waist, but most of them 
are shorter, with egg-shaped, spherical or short cylindrical bodies with from two 
to four supports beneath. 

The creamers date from the Seventies to the Nineteen-Hundreds and run the 
whole gamut in character of their decoration. Many come in opaque glass only 
and formerly had covers, and many of them are more curious than beautiful 




DIAMOND WITH DIAMOND POINT 

An attractive little piece is shown here, coming in flaw- 
less glowing glass of good weight, with no discoloration and 
some resonance. 

The creamer is cylindrical but flares slightly top and 
bottom; the base and rim are coarsely and shallowly scalloped 
alike, the body resting on the center of the basal scallops. 
The lip is very low and rather broad. There is a wide ledge 
inside the rim for the missing cover. 

The base is hollowed to the top of the scallops, with a 
large plain 24-rayed star on the bottom of the bowl. The 
handle is pressed, small, oval, and plain. 

A continuous pattern surrounds the body in a wide band 
reaching from top to bottom, six long slender diamonds side 

by side extending from rim to base, each with bevelled sides and each sharp-depressed down 
its middle. Each diamond is broken up into four smaller irregular figures with bevelled 
sides. The diamond at the handle is split by a long plain panel to which the handle is 
attached. Top and bottom, between the diamonds, the background is filled with uniform 
diamond point pattern in fairly large size. 
2-part mold, 3 54 in. high, 

There is a small covered sugar to match this creamer, and without doubt other pieces 
exist. The pattern comes also in white milk glass, these two pieces not scarce in shops. 
The pattern is on the inside of the knobbed sugar lid. 

This creamer is used through the courtesy of the owner, Mrs. M. R. Thompson, of 
Hawkinsville, Georgia. 

HEAVY GOTHIC 

A rather massive Gothic pattern, this one comes 
in fairly thick but not heavy glass of good but not 
superfine clarity and polish; there is no discoloration 
and but little resonance. 

The creamer is a good sized piece, cylindrical and 
flaring somewhat top and bottom. The base is but- 
tressed with long tapering wedges broadly scalloped 
below and bevelled on all edges. The scallops are thick 
underneath with only a slight hollowed space, where 
there is a good sized plain twenty-rayed daisy or star. 

The rim is V-scalloped to correspond to the pat- 
tern and the lip rises only moderately in front. The 
pressed handle is a good sized rather thick plain terete 
rod with large round base, simulating the applied type. 
A thumb-grasp is faintly traceable along the top. The 

body is divided vertically into ten adjacent inch-wide "Gothic windows" with pointed bev- 
elled arches above which curve outward with the flare of the body. Above and between 
each two windows is a graceful curving fan composed of trapezoids and triangles in high 
sharp relief. The plain "windows" are not flat surfaced, for a deep line down the middle 
divides each into two oblique planes. 

2-part mold, 4J^ in. high. 

The pattern is not well known but comes at least in goblets as well as the creamer, 
and without doubt in many other pieces. It is similar to "Heavy Diamond" (Kamm, p. 97) . 

109 




DIAMOND HORSESHOE 

This pitcher has considerable charm in spite of its 
multiplicity of pattern; it is clear and brilliant, of aver- 
age weight, and has a fair resonance, 

The body is cylindrical, with, straight vertical sides, 
on a broad waist shelved above and with a wide scal- 
loped and fluted base. The base has four large out- 
wardly curved scallops, each in turn scalloped, and four 
alternating smaller Y J s which do not reach the support 
below. These scallops and V's are fluted beneath and 
in the center, on a plain background, is a large 12- 
rayed star with very sharp points, its center nearly as 
large as a cent left plain but surrounded by tiny faceted 
triangles. The rays of the star are split and faceted. 

Around the lower fourth of the body just above 
the waist is a wide flat band outlined by two narrow 
heavy raised sharp-ridged bands, with through the cen- 
ter a horizontal row of eight large diamond blocks in 
high relief. 

Above this band, the body is divided into four sections by four long vertical arched 

bands open at the bottom, each outlined on each side by a sharp raised line and containing 

a row of raised faceted diamonds largest over the arch and graduated smaller to the base. 

The arches form large scallops on the rim, with deep interstices filled with high sharp 

inverted V's with fan decoration. The lip is low and forms the arch over the front panel. 

Each panel save the back one is further decorated with a spray of several kinds of 

foliage. 

The handle is applied and fitted below over the ridges in the body. 
4-part mold, 5^4 i**- high. 

The writer knows of no other pieces in this attractive pattern, similar ones often com- 
ing in color as well and dating from the mid-Eighties. They generally come in a whole 
range of pieces. 




FLOWER SPRAY WITH SCROLLS 

The design shown on this creamer consists of 
a flower spray suspended from near the top center 
side flanked on both sides and the top by compli- 
cated scrolling in the form of sea weed (Irish moss, 
Chondrus crispus L.). 

The body is highly ornate, this particular 
creamer coming in a rather dark but unpleasant 
shade of blue with a milk white top (shown by 
stippling), the top of the handle also whitened. 
The flowers and scrolling are gilded. 

The bowl tapers from the rim to a rather 
narrow waist, below which the base slopes widely, 
the lower rim cut into four wide shallow scallops. 
The flat ring around the waist carries a single band 
of rather large beads. 

The rim is unevenly cut and the lip is low. 

The handle is pressed, terete in cross-section and oval in outline, grooved to imitate roping 
and complicated at the base by a ragged spread on the body, with a ring above this spread, 
a band of deep grooving above the ring. 

The body is panelled vertically from rim to waist into eight broad, shallow convexed 
sections, smooth on the inside of the bowl. Spread cross-wise across the top of each side 
is a scroll, with an uneven double scroll hanging downward from each corner. 

4-part mold, 5 in. high. 

This piece, of which counterparts are not known to the writer, dates from the 1885- 
1890 period. It probably comes in other colors besides the blue. It resembles in color, 
decoration and gilding '"Panelled Holly" (this book, p. 59). 

110 




CELTIC CROSS 

A pattern which is very interesting but scarcely 
beautiful is represented by the creamer shown here, 
which perches precariously on its diminutive waist and 
unsteady base. From present-day standards it is bad- 
ly designed, but pieces such as this one are far more 
intriguing to the collector than ones which harmonize 
perfectly with present-day surroundings. 

This creamer is based in cross-section on the 
square, but a square with each wide side well bowed 
or convexed outward, and each corner sliced off in a 
neat concave arc, a unique form seldom met in old 
glass. Hence the name given above, which is similar 
in shape. 

From the side, the pitcher appears to be rectangu- 
lar, the sides straight vertically, with no flare, the 
base of the bowl tapering in sharply to the small plain 
terete waist. The base is unusually deep, domed, and 
roughly square at the bottom. There is a square 
standing erect on a diagonal at each corner, and be- 
tween each two squares a curved block, the body resting on the corner blocks only. Each 
of the latter is filled with sunk diamond point, while the bevelled bowed bars between 
remain plain. 

The body is devoid of surface decoration save for a delicate engraved fern spray hang- 
ing point downward from the center top on each side. 

The handle is pressed, four-square in cross-section, long-rectangular in outline with 
each outer corner cut off diagonally and a slightly raised wedge "inserted". 

The lip is scarcely higher than the plain horizontal rim and rises like a trough out of 
the front section, commencing half way down, ending at the lip in a down-curved spout. 
3-part mold, 5^ in. high. 

There is a covered sugar bowl to match, in the clear, and perhaps other pieces; the 
pattern may also occur in color. The pattern was made by The Duncan and Miller Glass 
Co. and dates from the 1885-1890 period.* The cover of the pitcher is an exceptionally 
high dome. 




DIAMOND POINT LOOP 

A very ornate pattern is that represented by the 
creamer shown heret; it is a tall piece, roughly square 
in cross-section, the handle and lip placed on opposite 
corners. The base of the body tapers gradually to the 
shallow waist which is shelved just above and below. 
The fancy base is made up of short bowed sections of 
half-round bars, some with rounded ends, others sliced 
off diagonally; in two places a half-sphere is inserted, 
in three, the rounded tips meet, and in one they over- 
lap, these extensions forming the points of contact with 
a support beneath. Just above these arches are six 
broad shallow diamonds, and above them shallow scal- 
lops. The under side of the base is hollowed to the 
waist, with a plain center, and three concentric circles 
of small waffles, the outer row the largest. 

The ornate handle is plain and round in cross- 
section through the vertical section, with ribbed at- 
tachments to the body, a ring separating the two sec- 
tions below. Above, a high nub forms a thumb-grasp, 

* This company is one of the oldest in the country, having had a continuous existence from 
the Fifties, although the parent company, George E. Duncan and Sons, of Pittsburgh, 
was one of the thirteen absorbed by the U. S. Glass Company in the early Nineties. The 
writer is indebted to the President, Mr. James E. Duncan, III, for information concerning 
their early patterns and for an insight into the processes of making glassware. 

t Through the courtesy of the owner, Mrs. Jack Bagwell, of West Monroe, Louisiana. 

Ill 





with three-fourths of a ring underneath, and on the broad flat top next the body is a fan- 
shaped arrangement of tiny petals. 

The body is equally ornate; on each flat side is a wide flat panel curved below and 
flanked on each side by a long thin wedge of coarse diamond point widest at the top. 
On each flattened corner of the body is a wide slightly depressed flute grooved on each 
side with a fan-arrangement below fitting into the curve of the wide surface panels. 

The rim is uneven, depressed most at the corners and the lip is low and nearly flat 
on the sides. 

4-part mold, 554 ui- high. 

This pattern, which dates from 1890-1900, is often seen in shops, coming in the clear, 
light yellow, amber, pale green, and blue, in many pieces, including sugar, sauces, berry 
tall celery, plates, etc., some pieces with an engraved fern spray in the panels. 

BEAD AND SCROLL 

A simple but effective blending of a single decora- 
tive motif lends itself charmingly in this piece, which 
comes in glass of average clarity and weight for its 
period; there is a slight yellowish discoloration, on this 
particular creamer but there is a good, hollow reson- 
ance. 

The body is cylindrical, flaring slightly both bot- 
tom and top, the rim uneven, with five high points, 
but evenly scalloped throughout save over the lip. 

The handle is pressed, terete in cross-section and 
plain oval in outline save at the basal attachment, 
which has a corrugated spread. 

The base is unusual, the body resting on three 
broad sweeping scallops thick through the middle por- 
tion, the ends curved in a circular scroll, a double 
scroll at each junction. These circles are in good re- 
lief and carry inside a large raised bead. Just above the deepest part of each wide basal 
scroll is a large raised bead, flanked on each side by four smaller ones, graduated in size, 
the smallest at the end. 

The body is devoid of decoration save for a vertical row of twelve even-sized raised 
beads down each moid line, each connected with its neighbor by a short raised bar. 
On the underside of the convexed base is a large, plain 24-rayed star. 
3-part mold, 4^ in. high. 

This piece was loaned by the owner, Mrs. J. L. Mlms, of Hawkinsville, Georgia. Other 
pieces in the pattern are not known to the writer. 

The creamer resembles In shape and decoration "Jewel with Dewdrop", "Teardrop and 
Tassel", etc., the spreading base of the handle being similar to that of the latter, as well as 
to several patterns shown in this book. 

FORGET-ME-NOT, MILK GLASS 

Here is another of the delightful little mustard 
pots so popular in a by-gone day, this one _ having a 
browned and torn label on the base reading "Pre- 
pared Mustard, W. S. & Co." The contents included 

<4 Mustard Seed, Brown and Yellow - total 

10G%. 9 ' Specialty Co." The small missing 

portion of the label would scarcely account for the 
missing portion of the total. Adulterants are not 
mentioned in this early era. 

The creamer is dead white opaque glass, bluish 
through the thin edges; it has a fine sharp resonance. 
The body is hexagonal in cross-section and has six 
long flat vertical panels extending from rim to mar- 
gin of the base. Both top and bottom flare consid- 
erably and both are unevenly scalloped to conform 
to the pattern. A cover fits deeply Into the top, 
correspondingly sk panelled tapering to a ^truncate 
cone above, with a beautiful sphere as a finlal. The latter has a depressed bead at the top 
and four vertical rows of graduated beads from top to base. 

The rim scalloping is further crenulated with pleating extending down into the separate 
small raised scrolls which form the main pattern. At each panel junction on the sides is 
an open raised forget-me-not, plain Inside. 

112 




The main part of the body is plain, with more scrolling at the base similar but not 
identical with that above. Centered on four of the panels at the base is a small raised 
fleur-de-Hs, while on the other two, one on each side, is a small "shell" with large bead in 
its center below. 

The base of the bowl is half an inch above the basal rim and is without pattern but 
has a raised figure "1", which is not repeated on the inside of the lid. 

The fancy handle is pressed, four-square, panelled, with a pretty forget-me-not at the 
outer upper corner; the margins down the vertical bar are raised and the space between 
margins stippled. 

2-part mold, 3% in. high. 

The open forget-me-not, with raised outline, is repeated many times in pur old glass 
patterns, many of them known Sandwich patterns; it appears on "Scroll with Flowers", 
"Ribbed Forget-me-not", "Sunflower", '"Dewdrops and Flowers" (Kamm, p. SO), "Dahlia", 

The little beaded finial on the lid is almost identical with that on a similar milk glass 
mustard pot, "Flute and Crown", etc. (p. 118), and the scrolling and handle are very 
similar to those on "Scrolled Spray", '"Scroll Medallion", (this book, p. 91), etc. 

PALM LEAF WITH SCROLL 

This creamer is characterized by five tall upright palm 
leaves reaching from base of the bowl nearly to the band 
below the rim. They are in good relief, each with a sharp 
ridge down the middle and blunt at the ends. The glass 
is of better-than-average clarity and brilliance, and the 
pitcher is fairly heavy and has a good resonance. 

The body is cylindrical but wider at the top than 
at the base; the bowl rests on a base made up of six thick 
spreading scallops, the ends curled up into a ball, the 
palm leaf emerging from the union of each two ball-ends. 
Inside the high-relief scroll is a fluted fan. 

The rim is evenly scalloped, the plain lip rising from, 
the front half with partial scallops at its base. There is 
a narrow band below the rim made up of the same cres- 
cent-scrolls which form the base, each with open end 
downward, the sides touching. Each is filled with a small 
fluted fan. 

On the underside of the base is a raised penny-sized circle, depressed in the center, with 
a whirl of truncate-tipped ridges like those of the palm foliage. 

The handle is pressed, four-square in cross-section, the margins softened; it is oval in 
inner outline, with a nub standing erect at the upper outer corner and two small brackets 
at the lower join to the body. 

The pitcher formerly had a cover. 
3-part mold, 4$4 in. high. 

The writer knows no counterparts of this interesting creamer, which was loaned by 
the owner, Mrs. J. L. Mims. The pattern is typically southern, probably made expressly 
for this area. 

PRIMULA, MILK GLASS 

One of the several charming little covered opaque 
pieces all of the same era and possibly all the product of 
a single factory, this one is similar to "Late Swan, m. g.", 
"Feather, m. g.'*, "Grape and Cherry, m. g." (Kamm, p. 

92 >> etc .- 

This pitcher is hexagonal in shape, slightly longer 

than wide and rests on eight little wavy feet. The six 
sides are flat, curving outward slightly top and bottom 
and the four sides at the ends are slightly the narrower. 

The base is undulating and the little feet flare out- 
ward at the base. The pressed handle is four-panelled, 
flat sided, with a line of decoration down each side termi- 
nating below in a tiny scroll. 

The rim is wavy with a low lip. The six sides are plain except for a spray of flowers and 
foliage on each corner save for "that on the front and back, which are left plain. Each spray 
consists of broad grass-like masses of foliage at the base, ^ from which spring stems with 
smaller leaves, each with a single opened flower on each side of the corner, a six-petalled 

113 






flower which most resembles that of an English primrose (Primula sp.). Just below the 
rim, directly on each corner is a large bud in high relief, which resembles that of a clematis 
or fuchsia. 

The domed cover is hexagonal, fitting deeply into the rim, and is plain save for the 
broad low handle which carries the same motif as the handle of the pitcher itself. 

2-part mold, 2fy$ in. high. 

This attractive little pattern comes in covered sugar to match, but probably in no 
other pieces. Like other similar patterns, these two pieces were sold as containers for 
mustard in the early Eighties. Patterns similar to this one often come in a creamy milk 
glass and turquoise, rarely in green. Sometimes they come in the clear and in clear colored 
as well. 

The raised numbers often found on the bases of covers or bodies are missing here. 
The handle on this piece is repeated on 'Scroll Medallion" (this book, p. 91). 

BUTTRESSED LOOP 

A rather amusingly clumsy creamer is this one, the 
base of the body ovoidal and truncated, and overlain 
with a massive structure having four squared buttresses 
ending below in four stubby feet. 

The glass is clear, slightly wavy (in some pieces) 
rather brilliant, and has a high resonance. 

The buttresses are looped or arched over their tops 
and the body is depressed, with a bevelled line for out- 
line. Down the center of each buttress is a deep flute 
arched across the top but not below. 

The rirn is plain and horizontal but has a consider- 
able flare to accommodate a cover, which is missing. 
The lip is low and broad and is decorated on the lower 
side with a fan-spread emanating from a large ovoid 
jewel just under the tip, each ray of the spread well 

rounded and fine-cross-barred; there is a row of tiny dots or beads between each two ribs. 
Just below the rim is a fancy horizontal band composed at the top of very large beads 
in less than half round, and below them a row of drapery in low relief. 

The rather awkward little handle is pressed; it is rectangular in outline with the top 
outer corner sliced off on a curve, the lower horizontal attached by a long bracket to the 
body. 

The dollar-sized circle on the base of the bowl carries a pattern of uniform fine cut 
unrelated to any motif on the body. 
2-part mold, 4% in. high. 

This pattern is often seen in shops in creamer, sugar, and butter dish and there may 
be more pieces; it comes in the clear, light yellow, amber, and in a medium blue, and some- 
times in green as well. 

The buttressed feet are not unlike those of "Panelled Thistle", the jewel under the lip 
is often used, and the circle of fine cut on the base is similar to that on many other 
patterns although not identical. 

CHANDELIER 

A fine old pattern which goes by the appropriate name 
''"Chandelier" is shown by this creamer, a pattern many 
pieces of which have been held in a single family since they 
were a wedding present in 1880. 

The clear, fairly brilliant creamer is without discolora- 
tion and has some resonance. The body is cylindrical., with 
no flare at the top or bottom (save in the pattern itself), 
the rirn being practically straight across save for a slight 
rise at the handle. The lip is low and narrow, and consid- 
erably depressed at the end, 

The rope-like pressed handle has a semblance of thumb- 
grasp at the top, plain and slightly depressed in the middle, 
and the basal attachment is splayed on the body. 

The only decoration on the piece consists of a deep 
band around the base which resembles the prisms which 
hung suspended from an old-time hanging lamp; one can 
almost hear them, jingle. At the top of each "prism" is the 

114 





square which was attached by bent wires, here decorated with a depressed double-line cross. 
The base is cut out to enhance the prism bases, the body resting on these tips and the 
sharp fins which run back to a central disc of quarter-size, convexed and also touching the 
support beneath. 

4-part mold, 5 in. high. _ , 

This pattern, in the clear only, comes with the upper part of the body engraved with 
a fern spray as well as clear. It comes in many pieces but is seldom seen several Jiigh 
round covered compotes, the finial a corona of erect prisms and the stem a circle of prisms, 
several square high covered and open compotes, three low open compotes, open sugar, 
creamer, butter dish, spooner, celery vase, berry bowl, sauces, etc. There is also a good- 
sized ink-well like the base of the creamer, with a gutta-percha lid and a metal inner ring 
stamped "Davis, pat. 1889", indicating a long period of production or a rebirth. 

TRIPLE BAR WITH CABLE 

Obviously <; pattern closely allied to "Double 
Ribbon" and ''Grated Ribbon", is the one repre- 
sented by this creamer which is built on too gen- 
erous lines, an inverted bell with straight sides, 
widest at the rim and tapering to a broad shallow 
waist with a wide sloping base. 

The rim is straight across the top, with a 
high-arched lip decorated outside with long fan- 
shaped raised ribs spreading from the tip of the 
lip. There is a plain semi-circular ringed area at 
the end of the lip. 

The generous molded handle is smartly arch- 
ed and most convenient to the hand. The base 
is broadly domed and plain beneath. However 
three broad shallow cuts up from the base give 
it a tripod support, outlined on its margin by a 
raised cable. Each leg also carries a fan motif of 
raised tongues with an indented dot in the end 
of each. 

The rim and lip carry the raised cable of the base and an inch below the top is a 
bevelled line. The whole body is severally plain, with three groups of straight bars down 
each mold-line, each group consisting of three bars sharp down the center ridge and pointed 
at each end. 

The metal is beautifully clear and polished, as befits a piece so nearly devoid of 
decoration. 

3-part mold, S l /2 in. high. 

This pattern is made no doubt in many pieces in the clear only. The lip is practically 
identical with that of "Double Ribbon" and the handle, too, is similar; the piece resembles 
"Grated Ribbon" (Kamm, p. 54) also in its general characteristics; and its shape, quality, 
bevelled band across the top, the sharp-ridged vertical bars and the tripod base all recall 
also "Bearded Head" (Kamm, p. 81). 

^The too-generous handle is similar to that of the creamer of ''Cardinal", "J ac *>b's Lad- 
der", "Fan with Diamond", etc. although this pattern is no doubt a decade later than most 
of these. 

The cable motif appears on such patterns as "Lion with Cable" (this book, p. 35), 
etc.; see that page for discussion of the '"cable" patterns. 

COLORADO 

The above is the original name for this pattern, which 
was put out by the United States Glass Company during the 
early Nineteen-Hundreds, and even as late as the date on the 
little piece shown here. 

This little creamer, of spherical shape on three absurd 
out-curving feet is decorated only on the base and rim. The 
deep vertical collar is plain save for a row of beading on the 
rim extending part way up on the otherwise plain low lip. 
The handle is applied. 

The base has a band of beading and scrolling, below 
which the rather thick feet protrude, each with a large ovoid- 
al jewel near the top surrounded with scrolling. The jewel 

115 





may be in a different color than the body, and the embossing on the base is gilded. 

Engraved on the body in gilt is this phrase, '*Emma Birely, August 22, 1908". 

There is a plain, deep 14-rayed star on the base of the bowl. 

3-part mold, 3J4 in. fog n - 

This pattern comes in the clear and also in a deep, bottle green, both with a^ profusion 
of gilt. There are many pieces, typical of the late era, most of them with the tripod base. 

RED SUNFLOWER 

While not in good standing with dealers at 
present, pitchers of this type will no doubt become 
collector's pieces after a few more years have pass- 
ed. This one dates from around 1900 or even later, 
after the ruby-red era introduced during the Chi- 
cago World's Fair in 1893 had set the pace. The 
background of this piece has been painted with a 
ruby glaze and then refired. 

The glass is clear and scintillating like much of 
the late ware and it is thick and heavy to permit 
deep cutting. 

The creamer is bulbous above the middle, 
curves in slightly at the uneven crenulate rim and 
tapers to the base of the bowl, again spreading 
slightly as four short feet an inch wide at the base. 
The lip is low and the handle like many others of its period, difficult to grasp. 

The body is too highly ornate for present-day taste, with its deep sunk pattern and 
its profusion of red and gilt. 

Decoration consists of a large sunflower plant repeated thrice around the body, the 
head, stem and foliage all deep cut to imitate cut glass. Flanking each plant are two long 
sharp ovals with deep bevelled edges, each centered with a large sunburst, with faceted 
figures above and below, some filled with fine grating. The base carries a large deep-cut 
four-pointed star with a sunburst in the outer half of each and fine-cut in the center, 

The rim is gilded on the top and so are the sunbursts on the sides. The background is 
ruby-glazed save for the back, around the handle, which is left clear. The handle, too, is 
clear. 

4-part mold, 4JX| in. high. 

This pattern comes in a set consisting of sugar, creamer, spooner, and butter dish, with 
other possible dishes as well It is stamped on the inside-base "Near Cut", a word appear- 
ing also on the base of "Late Thistle" indicating a like origin, which is unknown to the 
writer. 

ROSE POINT BAND 

This lovely if late pattern is frequently seen in shops 
in several pieces, including a large serving plate, a flat 
cake plate in a silver holder, spooner, covered butter dish, 
etc. Some dealers call it "Clematis" but this name is pre- 
empted by a much older pattern. 

The little kettle-shaped creamer rests on four absurd 
little boot-shaped legs; the glass is of fine quality, clear, 
without imperfections or discolorations, and it has some 
resonance. 

The little bowl is hemispherical, widest below the 
horizontal band below the rim, where it is slightly con- 
stricted. The rim is edged with alternately high and 
lower scallops and the lip is high and plain, narrow at the tip. 

The small handle is pressed, four-square, and plain. 

The little legs are plain. The most outstanding feature of the pattern is the lovely 
band composed of almost microscopic faceted figures, forming tiny rosettes and half-rosettes 
like a band of fine old rose-point lace. 

Below this band there is a sprawling, deeply-cut floral spray composed of half-opened 
"tulip" flowers on bent-over stems, with long, spatulate foliage. 

The deeply **cut" grooves of stems, flowers, and leaves are often colored and then gilded 
over, much of the ware found being devoid of color however, for it has been removed. 

4-part mold, 3^ in. high. 

There are many late patterns with color applied to the deep grooves, such as "Carna- 
tion* 51 (this book, p. 131), I'Dogwood" (Kamm, p. 69), etc. This piece is drawn through 
the courtesy of the owner, Mrs. J. J. Whitfield, of Hawkinsville, Georgia. 

116 





HONEYCOMB WITH FLOWER RIM 

A highly ornate pattern is shown by this creamer, 
one with many decorative motifs which blend into an 
interesting if not pleasing whole. 

The bowl has a rounded base which is supported 
by three stout feet with swan's neck brackets extend- 
ing high up on the body. The rim flares outward and 
is decorated with a band of large five-petalled flowers 
which overlap slightly, each with a beaded center and 
stippled petals. 

The handle is pressed, and is placed on a thin 
wide shield with a row of tiny beads down each side 
which blend above with the wide band of feather- 
vaning which extends down the back of the handle 
gradually widening below and into the broad outward- 
ly curved foot beneath. 

The other two supports of the tripod base stand 

out at the top half an inch from the body, double back on themselves, and spread out in a 
flaring curve, with feather-vaning extending nearly to the top, and with a row of small 
beads on each side above. 

On the rounded base of the bowl is a large daisy in well rounded relief. 
The creamer had a cover, which is missing. 

As though insufficiently decorated, the whole inside of the bowl is pressed in a honey- 
comb pattern, each hexagon standing out in convexed relief, so that the play of light through 
the glass is very pleasing. 

The glass is beautifully clear, of good weight but has no resonance. 
3-part mold, 4J4- in. high. 

The creamer shown here is a beautiful emerald green color with gilding on the but- 
tresses and handle. No doubt the pattern comes also in the clear, with or without the 
gilding. There is a covered sugar to match, and undoubtedly a butter dish and spooner, 
with other possible pieces. It may come in light yellow and amber as well. 

The pitcher resembles "Flower Flange" (Kamm, p. 83) in the rim floral band, in the 
massive bracketing, and in the brilliant shade of green. 

QUADRUPED 

A quaint little pitcher built on unusual lines is shown 
here, an ovoidal body resting on four short spreading legs. 
It comes in glass of good quality, very thick (54 in- at 
the rim), clear, well polished, but slightly greenish in tint 
and without sound when struck. 

The little bowl is egg-shaped at the base and the 
short feet set well up on the body; they are four panelled 
on the outside and smooth on the under side. The body 
is divided into eight wide flat vertical panels with fairly 
sharp margins, and the rim is scalloped to correspond to 
the panels over the back half, a small V-scallop on each 
side of the larger middle one. The lip rises over the front 
half in an ungainly curve, and there is a deep V at the 
tip. There is a plain 21-rayed star on the base. 

The pressed handle is rectangular in outline, slanting upward, with an in-curve at the 
top for thumb-grasp and a thickened base. There is a narrow panel on each side. 

This piece is sometimes seen in shops, with a matching sugar bowl. There are un- 
doubtedly a few other pieces. It dates from around 1900. This or a very similar pattern 
was made by the A. H. Heisey Glass Company. 

SHELL AND SCROLL 

Pieces in this pattern come in a thick heavy milk glass in a dull finish creamy opaque 
ware quite unlike much of the milk glass on the market. It also comes in a caramel slag 
and possibly in glass of other texture. There is a fine high sharp resonance. 

The creamer is a straight sided cylinder resting on three sprawling scrolled feet, the 
base of the bowl nearly touching the support beneath. The rim is unevenly scalloped and 
the lip much lower. The molded handle is placed high on the body; it is four-square, 
rounded in outline, and has a double scroll for thumbgrasp and another below for balance. 

117 





Under the top attachment is half a daisy of five petals 
and the lower attachment has three tiny scallops on each 
side. Down each side of the handle is a delice spray of 
foliage and clusters of berries. 

From each of the scroll feet there radiates upward a 
low-relief pattern of ragged foliage with the tip in high 
relief, and spreading upward and out from each of these 
leafy figures is a large shell in low relief reaching nearly 
to the top of the bowl. Each shell is made up of long 
beaded straps arranged fan-wise. The shell does not ex- 
tend under the handle. 

In the center top of each side is a high-relief leafy 
scroll with another similar one near the base. 

The creamer had a top which unfortunately is miss- 
ing. Tops of other similar scrolled patterns have an ar- 
rangement of scrolls as finial. 



3-part mold, 4^4 io high. 



The particular pitcher shown here is further embellished with amateurish daubs of red 
and green paint splashed in horseshoe shape on the middle of each side, with further colored 
bits on other parts of the body, but the pattern comes also without these disfigurations. 
Such daubs were often added by a minor company to whom the original pieces were sold, 
who further decorated them for its particular trade. 

The pattern comes in covered sugar with four scrolls for a knob, covered butter with 
similar finial, open spooner. oval flat open salts on four scrolled feet, salt dips, long oval 
pickle dish on four feet, and probably other pieces. 

All the scroll patterns shown in this group are very similar. 



FLUTE AND CROWN 

Mr. Lee, antique dealer, of Allen, Michigan tells me 
that covered milk glass creamers of this type were con- 
tainers for prepared mustard, with the covers glued to the 
bodies,, and that as a young clerk in a grocery store he re- 
members selling them during the Early Eighties, 1880-1884. 
Covered sugar bowls to match could generally be purchased, 
as an inducement to use more mustard. 

All pieces of this type which the writer has seen are 
charming little pieces, worthy of collecting, and a far cry 
from some of the grotesque patterns overloaded with dec- 
oration to catch the housewife's eye. 

This pitcher is a sturdy piece, thick and dead white 
opaque, with no fire glow. It rests on four scrolled feet 
growing out of four stout buttresses extending down the 
sides from the rim. 

The rim has a large scallop on each side and at the 

back, which is further fine-scalloped. The lip is low and wide and underneath, spreading 
from the middle front of the body is a raised fan with a round jewel as a center. 

The small oval handle is pressed but is corrugated and spread at the base like many 
of the ribbed applied handles. 

The body is round in cross-section and is without decoration save for the ribbed but- 
tresses and a band of fluting around the base. 

The base is plain. 

The high domed cover is fluted around the shoulder and has a crown for finial with 
cross-bands with raised beads like jewels, with a larger one on the top. 

The single decorative motif of this pattern, save for the jewels b the crown consists 
of fluting or the reverse, ribbing, and is effectively handled throughout. 

4-part mold, 4 in. high.. 

This piece lacks the figure inside the lid or on the base, which many similar ones have. 

118 





WINGED SCROLLS 

The creamer shown here Is a fine yellowish- 
cream-colored milk glass piece with a high, sharp 
bell-like resonance. It appears to be a fine piece 
of china rather than of glass. It is fairly thick 
and heavy, but not massive, and is not opales- 
cent. The writer has seen numerous pieces, but 
always in the same deep cream color, with, 
however, variations in the surface color. Some 
pieces are gilded on the raised parts, and on the 
feet and handle (indicated by stippling) ; others 
come without the gilt but with the upper part 
heavily splashed with dark green paint like stip- 
pling, and pieces are found devoid of any color 
save that of the glass itself. 

Patterns like this one delighted the hearts 
of our grandmothers, into whose rococo homes 
they fitted admirably, but today our Interest in 
them is more historic than utilitarian. 

The body of this creamer is a deep bowl with rounded base, to which are fixed three 
short scrolled feet bracketed to the body with curved leafy foliage In very high relief. 

The rim is uneven, a large deep scallop on each side further fine-scalloped and the high 
lip scalloped part way up. The handle is pressed, and elaborate, having a double ring near 
the upper and again near the lower attachments, with a leafy spread on the body. The 
vertical section Is terete and plain save for an acanthus leaf embossed on the lower part. 
Decoration on the body is profuse, consisting of long, complicated winged scrolls scat- 
tered without harmonious placing over the side, a large nearly circular highly embossed 
one being placed just above the foot leafage, and flanked above and at the side by longer 
sections, with a low-relief sawtoothed figure at the top, just under the rim. Centered in 
the area thus partially inscribed is a sunflower with foliage, in low relief. 

The front of the pitcher, under the lip, is decorated with a vertical spray of many- 
ribbed foliage in high relief. Around the basal third of the body between the scrolling are 
thin, low relief wavering motifs like tongues of flame. 
4-part mold, 4^4 In. high. 

This pattern, which is fascinating In spite of its overload of designs, comes in many 
pieces, a deep oval berry bowl on four feet with sauce dishes to match, covered sugar with 
scroll for knob, spooner, butter dish, etc. 



FLUTED SCROLLS 

This is another of the rather massive scroll de- 
signs, similar to the last three, this one less profusely 
decorated; this particular piece is a canary color with 
rim and top of the handle milky white. 

It Is a thick, heavy piece, ovoidal In shape, the 
base resting on three massive scrolled and corrugated 
feet, with handle ribbed to match. There is a dime- 
sized raised circle on the base with corrugated edge, 
which apparently simulates a pontil mark. 

The rim Is doubly scalloped, with a pretty pattern 
of erect shells or acanthus foliage in seven sections, 
the pattern not continued over the high, plain lip. 

The body Is panelled vertically on the inside, each 
bar con vexed slightly inward; on the outside there is 
an inch-wide horizontal band around the body just 
below the rim shell-band consisting of fine reeding, 
with a similar band below the half-way mark. 

Near the front, on each side, Is a long, wavy, corrugated bracket or buttress, standing 
out in very high relief, ending at the top in a small scroll. 

3-part mold, SJ4 in. high. 

There Is a covered sugar to match this creamer, with a scroll as finial on the cover; 
the pattern comes also in amber and a sapphire blue, the latter having sometimes an em- 
bossed band through the middle with flowers In burnished gold. 

119 




The general character of this piece is very similar to the two following patterns, and 
no doubt all were designed by the same hand: "Lion's Leg" (Kamm, p. 82) and "'Flower 
Flange" (p. 83), having the same fine cross-ribbing and convexed bars inside the body. 




OVAL PANEL 

This unique pattern was made by Challinor, 
Taylor and Company, of Tarentum, Pennsylvania, 
appearing in an old undated catalog probably of 
the Seventies. This company, with many others, 
was absorbed by the United States Glass Com- 
pany around 1890. 

The pattern is illustrated and named "No. 28 
Oval Sett". It comes In creamer, sugar and but- 
ter dish, no other pieces being shown. It was 
made in slag also called agate and marble glass, 
and also in **opal" and in dead white milk glass, 
the latter two sometimes decorated with enamel- 
led flowers in two different designs, one practical- 
ly covering the side, the other more compact. 

This particular piece is made of the slag ware 
in a beautiful shade of deep purple, lavender, tur- 
quoise and dead white, the lower parts in general 
in darker tones, and it appears to be a piece of 
Italian marble rather than glass. 

It is rather heavy but not thick and, like other slag pieces, has 
a beautiful high resonance. The body is rectangular in cross-section 
with the ends bowed outward } the sides flat. The comers are barely 
rounded off, nearly sharp. The sides curve inward below and then 
out again to form the unusual base, the end-view quite different from 
the side, the latter showing out-curved bracketed feet. 

On each side is a large flat oval, equally as wide in the lower half 
as in the upper, outlined in a narrow slightly raised band of cross- 
ribbing. There is no decoration on the side, the onyx-like stripes of the 
colors blending to form sufficient decoration in themselves. 

The rim is uneven, to conform to the large oval, and the lip is 
rather clumsy and high. Under the lip, in front, two narrow parallel 
bars extend to the margin of the base, each one composed of short em- 
bossed ribs side by side with ends rounded off. There is a similar pat- 
tern of ribbing at the back, under the handle. 

The handle is pressed, nearly terete in cross-section through the 
middle, a ring near each outer comer, and a splayed petalloid pattern 
between the ring and the body. 
2-part mold, 5^4 in. high. 

Other slag patterns appearing in this book are "Flying Swan" (p. 81), and "Stylized 
Flower" {p. 127). There are still a few unrecorded patterns, all probably the product of 
the single factory named above. All slag pieces command seemingly unreasonably high 
prices. They are very fragile and fairly scarce. 




120 




GROUP TEN 

Like compotes. large water pitchers seem to exist in patterns many of which ' 
are seldom found in creamers, sugar bowls, butter dishes, etc., for these pieces 
were not put to such hard use and were preserved. Many of the pitchers shown 
here are seldom seen in other pieces, although, of course, each was only a part 

These pitchers grade from those on fine high stands to those with no artificial 
bases, and the handles from the massive early applied to the fancy pressed type. 

Decoration runs the gamut from the early colonial type, through geometric 
and imitation cut-glass types, through the floral, fruit and insect pieces to one 
historical pitcher, and the dates vary from 1870 to 1905 and thereabouts. 

LOOP WITH PRISM BAND 

An exceptionally fine pitcher is shown here, a grace- 
ful urn on a high pedestal with a massive early applied 
handle. 

It is a fine example of the glass maker's art, thick, 
heavy, and clear save for a few scattered hair lines; the 
glass has a brownish cast like some of the fine Irish glass, 
and there is a deep hollow resonance. Margins are not 
sharp but while distinct are smooth to the hand. 

The long tapering body rests on a stand with a thick 
flattened ring through the middle. The deep flaring base 
is plain and hollowed to the waist. 

The rim is deeply saddled on both sides, with a slight 
rise at the back for handle attachment and a long curved 
rise to the lip in front. 

There is a wide band around the body below the 
upper handle attachment, above which the pitcher is 
plain. This band is made up of fine vertical sharp-edged 
pleating. 

Below this band are long narrow vertical panels tap- 
ering to the waist and broad arched over their tops; they are slightly indented just under 
the arches but otherwise flat. 

The exceptionally massive applied handle is 1^ inches wide at the top and remains 
wide and flat throughout its length, being an inch wide at the top of the lower attachment. 
The turned-under tab at the top is thick but triangular in shape, while the lower is two 
inches long and \Y^ inch wide, stamped with four cross-bars. 
3-part mold, 9 in. high. 

This pattern appears to date from the Seventies because of the massive applied handle 
and the general character of the design; it comes in sugar, creamer, spooner, water pitcher, 
and no doubt many other pieces. 

^The loop resembles that of the old "Loop" pattern and the band that of "Prism"; 
a similar prism band occurs on several rather late patterns, in light weight glass, often 
engraved as well. 

PATTEE CROSS 

The milk pitcher illustrated here is a beautifully 
shaped piece for one so late, dating from a period when 
form and decoration were at their nadir. The glass is of 
good quality, better than average, with a brilliance^ and 
good deep resonance but slightly bubbly and faintly tinged 
with green. 

The bowl is long-cvoidal in shape on a fine high, 
hexagonal stand with a broad hexagonal base. The lower 
third of the bowl has six wide flat panels broadly arched 
across the top and tapering to the waist, through which 
they extend to the margin of the base. Through the mid- 
dle of the waist is a thickened hexagonal shelf with rather 
sharp edges and corners. 

The upper two-thirds of the body is decorated with 
a continuous pattern extending from rim to the arched 
panels, and consisting of three interlocked motifs, one a 
large figure with four long sharp-pointed ellipses in high 
raised relief and outlined on all sides with a rib of saw- 

121 




toothing. Centered In this large "flower" is the second motif, from which the pattern is 
named above, a smaller four-armed cross with wedge-shaped arms bowed on the outer 
margin, bevelled on the sides, and filled with raised diamond point. This figure is called a 
"PatteV* cross. Above its arc-like upper and lower arms is a section of sunburst. 

Between this double figure and the next similar adjoining one remains a pillow-shaped 
space with bevelled margins and filled with good-sized diamonds, each with an English 
hobnail figure on its flattened top. The sides of this diamond-shaped pillow are altered by 
the incursion of the two arms of the adjoining pattee crosses. 

The rim of the pitcher is saddled, high at the back, and higher in front. The mid- 
portion of each, side is evenly scalloped. The handle is pressed, panelled, and plain save for 
the outline, the upper arm arched outward and up, the vertical curving from the outer 
corner to the attachment below. 

3-part mold, 8J4 in- high. 

Individual motifs on this complicated pattern appear on many other patterns of the 
1895-1905 period. There are many pieces in this pattern, the provenience of which is un- 
known to the writer. Many pieces arc heavily gilded. 

ETCHED GRAPE 

This is the milk or small water pitcher size of a pat- 
tern coming in an unusually clear brilliant pattern, every 
part of the pitcher glowing with reflected light. It is 
without discoloration and has a deep bell tone when 
struck. 

The pitcher has a well defined waist and a plain cir- 
cular base deeply hollowed beneath and undecorated. 

The handle is long rectangular with a thumbgrasp at 
the top and a corresponding nub at the base. It is press- 
ed, with nice bracketing to the body and is four-panelled. 
The rim is beaded on the corner edge, even up to the lip. 
The lower third of the body is divided into wide well- 
rounded sections each outlined in sharp raised lines. The 
upper portion is plain save for a rather sprawled continu- 
ous spray of grape vine, foliage and fruit, with fourteen 
berries in each group. The pattern is etched with acid, 
the delicate tendrils apparently added afterward by 
machine. 
3-part mold, 8 in. high. 

This pattern comes in the clear and in a beautiful emerald green; it was made from 
about 1900 to 1905 by the United States Glass Company. It occurs with and without the 
etched grape pattern, although the name above refers to the grape motif as being the more 
definitive. 

The pattern obviously differs from the numerous other grape patterns in being surface 
decorated here rather than pressed as in the others. 

STAR IN HONEYCOMB 

While heavy and thick and of good, sturdy con- 
struction, this pitcher has an effeminate grace lacking 
in many of these large pieces; the body is taller than 
and not as bulbous as many similar pitchers, and thfc 
pattern resembles an old piece of embroidery so popu- 
lar on lingerie of the Eighties. 

The upper half of the body is devoid of decora- 
tion but the arched rim is evenly scalloped even nearly 
to the lip, which is high and broad and slightly de- 
pressed at the tip. The old-type applied handle is 
crimped at the base, the tumed-up end stamped with 
two plain cross-bars. The upper tab is long and tri- 
angular, with a long slender tip pointing downward. 

The wide decorative band which covers the lower 
half of the body is made up of several motifs; there 
is a double row of inverted scalloping around the top, 
with vertical cross-bars between the two raised out- 
lines, with a wide band below it of large diamonds 
side by side, outlined in a thick raised line, the middle 
not in relief. Across these diamonds are two hori- 

122 






zontals, which form large inner hexagons, the most prominent part of the whole decorative 
band each centered by a pretty six-pointed flower in line-relief on a background of small 
sunk diamonds. 

The lower horizontal row of motifs consists of ''pineapples" standing erect, in two 
widths, the narrower filled with cross-ribbing and the wider with diamonds with inner sunk 
figures of small "XV. 

In spite of its crimped, applied handle, this piece dates no earlier than the 1885-1895 
period, for the various motifs are typical of late patterns. This design comes in clear glass 
and in many pieces, including creamer, sugar, butter dish, spooner, etc. 

BUTTERFLY 

This pattern is known to dealers by the above obvi- 
ous name although absent from the literature. This is the 
milk or small water pitcher size of a most attractive pat- 
tern, coming in beautiful glowing glass fairly thick and 
heavy, with the corners nicely softened, and with a good, 
hollow resonance. 

In shape it follows the general character of the 
period, a long cylindrical body of even width down to the 
curve in to meet the waist; the latter is shelved above 
and below and is plain and round in cross-section resting 
on a rather deep domed base plain both outside and in. 
The rim is horizontal over the back half, with small 
even scalloping, the lip rising from the front half with a 
plain margin. The handle is pressed but resembles the 
late type of applied handle, terete in cross-section, with 
an enlarged base and a slight thumb-grasp at the top. 

The whole body is covered with pattern in several 
blended motifs, a massive band around the top slightly 

below the rim consisting of ^doughnuts'* or bull's-eyes with bevelled drapes suspended from 
them below. There is a similar row of hollowed circles, without the drapery, around the 
base of the body above the incurve to the waist, with deep ribbing just below reaching to 
the shelf above the waist, each rib in good, rounded relief and arched across the top. 

Through the body slightly below the middle is a row of four beautiful large butter- 
flies, wing-tips not quite touching, each in soft, rounded relief, glowing with light. 
4-part mold, 8 in. high. 

4 *Butterfly" is sometimes seen in shops in a few pieces, and is a ware of the 1895-1905 
period. The pattern resembles "Stippled Leaf, Flower and Moth" (Kamm, p. 48), with 
the same handle and same indented stippling. The ribbed "corsetting" around the body is 
similar to that on many patterns, such as "Wildflower", *'Tree Bark" (Karnm, p. 49), etc. 
The band around the top of the body resembles that on "Jewel and Shell" (Kamm, p. 68), 
etc., and indented beading is also used on many patterns, including "Leaf and Dart", "Clear 
Diagonal Band", etc. 

SPANISH -AMERICAN 

This is obviously the "Dewey" pitcher, but that 
name having been pre-empted by another pattern, the 
above is used instead. The date is apparent, and 
the piece carries many motifs typical of that era, mak- 
ing it a most interesting historical piece, albeit rather 
late. In time there is no doubt it will be a most 
cherished item. 

While this pitcher is often seen in shops, the 
writer knows no other pieces in the pattern although 
"Dewey" boats are rather common, especially a milk- 
white battleship "Maine" with a large bust of the 
General on the cover, and another without the bust, 
but with regular warship fittings on the cover. 

This pitcher comes in the clear and possibly in 
colors, and in glass of good average weight and clarity. 
It is tall and cylindrical in shape, constricted at the 
doubly shelved waist, the base below being plain and 
hollowed. 

The plain pressed handle simulates the applied 
type. The rim is gracefully curved with a low lip de- 

121 




pressed at the tip and a rather heavy strand of cable around the margin, over the lip as 
well. 

The whole body is covered with heterogeneous decoration, very unbalanced, on a back- 
ground of fine indented beading arranged in horizontal rows. Around the base of the body, 
in very high relief, are four massive pyramidal piles of cannon-balls topped by an empty 
shell upside down. Between the piles are various motifs, two guns crossed; two swords 
crossedj with rope and tassels; an anchor with stars: and a large pattee cross, all in good 
relief. 

Near the front, under the lip, but not centered, is a large medallion outlined in a laurel 
wreath in slight relief, and containing in very high relief a bust of Admiral Dewey. From 
one side of the wreath projects the Admiral's flag with two stars. In the middle of one 
side in good relief is the flagship "Olympia", a box-like ship with two high masts and a 
full set of flying sails, and with men in the crow's nest half-way up the mast, firing off 
small cannon. 

Crossed at the back, under the handle, are the United States and Cuban flags, the 
former with forty-four stars and a streaming ribbon labelled "In God We Trust". 

Under the Cuban flag is a large cannon reposing on its wheeled transport in the tall 
grass and above it and to one side is a group composed of two signal flags and a short 
cannon, crossing each other at acute angles. 

Under the lip, in front of the body two cannons are crossed, with a large screaming 
eagle just beneath, bearing a ribbon insignia with the words U E Pluribus Unum". 

In the frosted sky over the back of the battleship is a constellation, the Northern 
Cross. 

Each motif of the many on the body of this pitcher played its part in the conflict, and 
the whole ensemble forms an interesting document on the Spanish-American War. 

4-part mold, 12^4 in. high. 

CHAIN WITH DIAMONDS 

A fine old pitcher is this one, similar in shape, old- 
type applied handle, and pattern to several others of the 
1870-1880 period; the glass is beautifully clear, glowing, 
free from discoloration, but without any resonance what- 
ever. 

The urn-shaped body called '"half-gallon jug" in old 
trade catalogs is large and bulbous with a pronounced 
neck and a flaring rim and rests on a deep shelved, hol- 
lowed base. The rim is nicely arched, and the lip is very 
broad and slightly depressed at the tip. The waist is 
shelved above and below 3 and the base is plain on both 
sides with no pattern on the base of the bowl. 

The massive handle, over an inch wide at the top, 
tapers slightly and is decidedly flattened down its whole 
length; it is turned up at the base and stamped with a 
large raised acanthus leaf. 

The pattern is confined to the widest portion of the 
body and consists of six large bold overlapping circular 
links of a chain, with deep bevelled outlines, and in the 
center of each link is a vertical arrangement of three dia- 
monds with especially deep bevelled margins and high flat-topped diamonds. The narrow 
vertical ellipses between the overlapped links are filled with almost microscopic raised 
diamond point. 

3-part mold, 8 in. high. 

The writer knows of no other pieces in this sturdy pattern although they undoubtedly 
exist. 

CORNUCOPIA 

This is the water pitcher of a pattern very similar to several others in the Late Fruit 
Series and almost identical in shape with several tall cylindrical creamers in the series. The 
whole group is most attractive in shape, details and decoration and comes in a fine quality 

fairly heavy and thick glass, brilliant and resonant. 

124 





The handles are especially attractive and distinctive, 
bent sharply up at the top, ringed both top and bottom 
near the body, with a spread of stippled foliage between 
the rings and the body. 

The standard is wide and plain with a slight shelf 
above and below and the large base is plain on both sides. 
The base of the body bulges with a petal-arrangement, 
each petal in rounded relief, here rather blurred as it 
descends. 

Centered on each side of the body is a fine fruit 
group in high relief, on one side a beautiful spray of 
cherries with foliage suspended from a sturdy twig reach- 
ing from bottom nearly to the top. Crossing this twig 
near the bottom is another, with a cluster of blossoms 
and buds at the top and a smaller one half way up. 

On the reverse side is a long basket-weave cornu- 
copia filled to overflowing with a variety of fruits in high 
relief, peach, apple, fig, blackberry, strawberry, a cluster 
of currants and another of grapes, with one pointed object like a sweet- 
potato. Appropriate ioliage surrounds the fruit, all rather blurred. 

2-part mold, 8^4 in. high. 

This beautiful fruit series dates from the 1885-1890 period and 
while not common is sometimes seen in shops in several pieces, butter 
dish, sauces, berry bowl, goblet, two pitchers, etc. 

"Loganberry and Grape", "Strawberry and Currant", "Cherry and 
Fig 1 ' (Kamm, p. 46) are known and there may be still others. 



LONG FAN WITH ACANTHUS LEAF 

The water pitcher shown here is heavy and thick, 
brilliant and clear, and it has a good rather high 
resonance. The body is practically cylindrical on a 
good stand with a large domed base. 

The body is slightly narrower at the shoulder just 
above the waist than at the rim, sloping sharply from 
this shoulder band to the plain terete waist. The band 
is patterned with close-placed vertical ribs sharp at 
the upper end, blunt below. There "S a small shelf 
just below the waist, the base below plain on the out- 
side but decorated beneath with a similar ribbed band 
on the underside. 

The rim curves slightly upward to the lip, which 
is depressed at the tip. The handle is long and slender, 
rectangular in outline and four-square in crosb-section. 
The upper corner is rounded off and stamped with a 
six-petalled daisy, each petal a raised triangular figure. 
The lower horizontal is curved on the outside, and just 
above the middle of the long vertical bar there are 
six raised rings side by side. 

The whole body is covered with a uniform pattern composed of eight long slender 
fluted fans in relief higher than usual and reaching from the rim to the ribbed band above 
the waist. Each fan has five vanes, each one sharp-ridged down the center. 

The plain spaces between the fans are long Gothic arches with deep, bevelled margins 
and at the base of each one is a large t acanthus 15 leaf, made up of seven leaflets graduated 
in size, the central one very long and deeply impressed. 

4-part mold, 9 in. high. 

The writer knows no other pieces in this attractive pattern, but this pitcher alone 
indicates a wide variance in pieces, probably in the clear only, and dating from the 1885- 
1895 period. 

125 





SUNK DIAMOND AND LATTICE 

Here is a fine, sturdy pitcher representative of a 
pattern worthy of high regard because of its bold geo- 
metric design. This, the water pitcher, is a good heavy, 
rather thick but not massive piece, coming in average 
clarity, with no discoloration and with a hollow resonance. 
The body is a tall cylinder slightly the widest at the 
top, tapering by three steps to the plain terete waist, the 
base below being without shelving, plain, circular, with no 
pattern either above or beneath. 

The rim arches gently with a high broad lip and a 
slight rise at the back. The upper half inch or so below 
the rim is plain, below this a plain band encircling the 
body with a slightly raised line outlining it above and 
below. Inside each raised line are tiny figures set close 
together and pointing inward, like icicles or sharp little 
teeth. A similar wide band surrounds the lower part of 
the body, slanting slightly inward at the base. 

Below this band the body slants inward more sharp- 
ly with another still more sloping portion reaching to the 
waist. 

Between the two wide toothed bands a continuous design surrounds the body, com- 
posed of large diamonds reaching from band to band, and lying side by side, six diamonds 
around the body. Each diamond is split down the middle with two bevelled surfaces, and 
each half is filled with uniform large-size sunk diamonds, larger than diamond point. 

Between each two large diamonds at their points of contact, is a good-sized diamond 
with four high faceted surfaces, and top and bottom, between the large diamonds is a tri- 
angular space with deep, bevelled sides, and filled with a coarse lattice outlined in narrow 
raised lines. 

The pitcher formerly had a cover, which is missing on this particular piece. 
The handle is oval in outline, four-panelled, and has an interesting pattern down each 
side panel with a row of tiny diamonds down the vertical bar with a circle at each end, 
the horizontals with wedge-shaped insets filled with cross-ribbing. 
3-part mold, 8^4 *&* high. 

This pattern comes in the clear in spooner, sugar, butter dish, celery vase, plate, 
pitcher, creamer, and no doubt other pieces. It dates from the 1885-1890 period and its 
provenience is not known to the writer. 

SILVER SHEEN 

No lovelier pattern appears in this whole list than 
this one, dainty, lacy, silvery, with an airy grace in line 
and pattern. However, this pattern seems just about 
gone for it is almost never seen in shops. Like large com- 
potes, large water pitchers seem to have been preserved 
for this generation in many more designs than can be 
found in goblets, tumblers, creamers, and butter dishes, 
pieces put to practical use and destroyed long ago. No 
dealer to whom this pitcher has been shown has ever 
seen a piece save a rare goblet or two, although a few 
friends remember the pattern from their youthful days. 

In spite of the above, It is so beautiful a pattern that 
the writer believes it should be Included here. The pitcher 
comes in glass thicker than average, clear, with a cool, 
frosty, bluish cast, and with a deep, hollow resonance. 

The body Is tall, nearly cylindrical, rather wider In 
the upper half than in the lower, resting on deep nollowed 
base, with a plain terete waist between. There Is a shelf 
above and below the waist ? each one with beading on the 
side, and another band of somewhat wider beading sur- 
rounds the bowl just above the upper shelf, with another band around the margin of the 
base. 

The rim is evenly scalloped with a higher scallop over the Up and depressed at the tip y 
this scalloping conforming to an intricate braiding of bands just below the rim. In the 
inside of each closed figure of this braided pattern is a horizontal row of five graduated 
beads, the central bead the largest. 

126 




A ledge inside the rim indicates a lid, which is missing, water pitchers, according to 
Mr. Bry ant ^ tne United States Glass Company, having had covers made for the southern 
customers. 

The handle is graceful and decorative, with a thumb-grasp and a balancing outcurved 
bracket at the base with two small nubs on the inner margin of the base. On the base of 
the body is a pattern of fifty-cent piece size consisting of a nearly flat daisy with petals 
consisting of interlaced straps similar to those on the body, on a background of fine con- 
centric circles. 

The body decoration consists of narrow flat slightly raised straps or bands interlaced 
in complicated fashion to form a lattice-work with overlapping loops top and bottom. Each 
diamond within the lattices is centered with a bead. The name above refers to the silvery 
appearance given the whole piece because of the background, which consists of fine, close- 
set parallel lines slightly raised and running horizontally from rim to beaded band above 
the waist. 

3-part mold, 8J4 in. high. 

The pattern is similar to that of "Double Loop", the latter having slightly different 
looping on a stippled background; the handle is similar to that of "Cupid and Venus", 
4i Minerva", "Fan with Diamond", "Medallion", etc. 

The pattern dates from the 1875-1885 period 

STYLIZED FLOWER 

This particular small water pitcher comes in a deep 
chocolate brown slag with opaque white which was 
made by Challinor, Taylor and Company, of Tarentum, 
Pennsylvania, during the Seventies and early Eighties. 
It was called "Ware No. 23", "made in colors and mosaic" 
in six pieces, quart pitcher, creamer, spooner, sugar bowl 
and butter dish, no other pieces being illustrated in their 
catalog. It was also made in "opal" in the same six 
pieces. 

The pitcher shown here is thick and heavy and 
sharply resonant, like all marbelized glass The body is 
3 long cylinder with broad shallow waist and abbreviated 
circular hollowed base with a large 24-rayed figure on the 
base of the bowl. 

The rim flares somewhat and is evenly scalloped ex- 
cept over the high arched lip, which is plain and narrow 
at the tip. There is a rounded ring just below the rim 
and below this the body is covered with pattern down to 
the shelf above the waist. This pattern consists of six 
vertical panels separated from each other by a double 
narrower vertical bar in good, rounded relief. These double bars are separated from each 
other by a narrow fillet with a high sharp spine down the middle. 

Each of the wide panels carries two large flowers, one near the top and the other near 
the bottom, forming two horizontal rows of six flowers each. Each flower is longer than 
wide, with a central bead, two wide, long vertical petals, two short horizontals, and four 
diagonal ones between these two in length. The background of these stylized flowers is 
made up of fairly large diamond point. 

The handle is long-rectangular in outline with a nub on the upper outer corner and 
none below; it is four-square in cross-section and decorated on the sides with fine beading 
in rows between two raised marginal lines. 
3-part mold, 8*/2 in. high. 

The same elongated flower occurs on "Panelled Star and Button" (Kamm, p. 17), 
where it also occurs on a background of diamond point. 

WASHBOARD 

Here is a striking pattern developed in bold strokes combined with delicate lacy curves 
and beading, rather overdone and heavy en masse, but good in a single piece. The above 
name is obvious from the main pattern. 

The water pitcher shown here is thick and heavy, clear, but slightly discolored, and it 
has a fine hollow resonance. The body is practically cylindrical, slightly the wider at the 
rim, with a pronounced waist which is plain and terete, and a circular hollowed base with 
a shelf above and another below the waist, the latter beaded. There is a fine large pattern 
on the base of the bowl, a circle composed of the motifs on the body. 

127 





The large handle is pressed and four-panelled, oval in 
outline on the inside with a long, flat top for a better 
grasp; down each side is a pattern of short cross waling 
to match that on the body. 

The rim of the pitcher has eleven wide, even, scallops, 
the lip rising abruptly from the front part of the body; 
there is a row of rather small beading around the side- 
edge of the scalloping, extending a short distance up the 
Hp curve as well. 

The pitcher had a cover, which is missing. Large 
covered pitchers were made for the southern trade in a 
day before screening was common. 

Just below the rim is a narrow, horizontal sloping 
band carrying a very fine vertical rib pattern, and below 
this a wider band in well rounded relief, with a pattern 
of deeply pressed puntys or thumbprints side by side and 
not quite touching. 

Below this band, and extending to the shelf atop the 
waist is a uniform pattern composed of very long slender 
triangles, half pointing up and half down, all with bevelled 
margins, all those with points downward filled with vertical flutes with sharp central 
ridges, all those pointing upward filled with horizontal bars of similar nature. 
3 -part mold, 8^ in. high. 

This pattern comes in many pieces, including a covered compote higher than the 
average. It dates from the 1875-1885 period. The pitcher is somewhat similar to that of 
"Silver Sheen" (this book, p. 126). 

HUNDRED-LEAFED ROSE 

The full-leaved rose used on this pattern is very close 
to but not identical with that used on u Rose Sprig", and 
differs considerably from the flower on the other rose 
patterns with similar names. Here the many-petalled 
flower is not roughened or stippled but left clear and 
glowing; the deep depression near the top center is pen- 
tagonal and upright, while on ''Rose Sprig" it is diamond- 
shaped cross-wise and not as deep; the foliage is similar 
in shape and veining in the two patterns, but here it is 
not stippled, and no rosebuds appear. The background 
is heavily stippled, whereas in u Rose Sprig" it is clear. 

The beautiful water pitcher shown here is a clear, 
brilliant piece of glass with a cool, frosty appearance as 
though just removed from the ice-box on a hot day. It 
is not thick and is light in weight for its size, and it has 
a fine ringing resonance. 

The long cylindrical body rests on a good stand with 
a shallow waist shelved above and below the middle and 
panelled through the middle with eighteen flat, arched 
sections. Below the lower shelf the sloping base carries 
a pattern of tassels with a drape between each two having a rope border and cross-barring 
surface. 

The handle is pressed, oval in outline, nearly round in cross-section, roughly corrugated 
down the length, with four rings around the base, the lower three affixed to the body 
kself. 

Down each of the three mold-lines is a pattern of ribbed petalling, and centered in 
each of the three sections between is a large rose sprig consisting of a well-rounded tightly 
packed open rose surrounded by corrugated foliage resembling elm leaves and a far cry 
from true rose foliage. This whole sprig is clear save for the ribbing and the veining on 
the stem, and the whole background of each of the three large panels is heavily stippled 
in depressed beading. 

3-part mold, 8% in- high. 

The name being given this pattern is that of the ancient shrub (Rosa centifoKa) which 
Is often found in country gardens, with globular heads of tight compact bloom in a soft 
shell-pink color and with unsurpassed fragrance; the buds often ball and turn brown and 
fall to open in hot muggy weather. 

128 




FUNNEL ROSETTE 

The small water pitcher shown here is a stout sturdy 
piece, not especially well shaped but carrying a most unusual 
pattern consisting of large hexagonal rosettes wider than high, 
interlocked to cover the main part of the body, each hexa- 
gonal containing ten little "funnels" in good to high relief, 
varying in size according to their position and each one sliced 
off diagonally at the end. It makes a striking pattern which 
is most effective with the play of light on the many surfaces. 

The body is cylindrical, no wider at the rim, which is 
plain and horizontal save for a sharp rise at the back, the 
lip rising slightly from the front. The handle is massive and 
clumsy, a plain thick terete oval with enlarged base placed 
on a long slender thickened "shield" applied as a long narrow 
bar to the back of the pitcher, this shield forming the rise 
in the rim at the back. 

The waist is wide and shallow and the base small for 
the size of the body, with a shelf atop and plain beneath. 
A deep groove separates the plain upper part of the body 
from the pattern, which begins one-fourth way down. 
3-part mold, 7^ in. high. 

This pattern dates from the 1890-1900 period; some pieces may have a ruby top but 
this one is clear. The pattern is not unlike that on "Heavy Diamond" (Kamm, p. 97), 
"Double Prism" (p. 95), etc. 




PILLOW ENCIRCLED 

The unusually tall "tankard" type pitcher illustrated 
here is a lovely piece, in crystal-clear glass, thick and heavy, 
with a good resonance. It is nearly cylindrical m shape, 
slightly the narrower at the "neck" just below the rirn. The 
latter is slightly curved and the lip is high and narrow. 

The massive handle is applied, with a large enlarged base 
two and one-half inches long and two inches across, the -tab 
turned under at the top long and plain. The base is wide, 
the waist shallow, with no shelving, and there is no pattern 
on the under side of the base. 

The pattern in very high relief is confined to a rather 
narrow horizontal band around the base of the body above 
the waist, and consists of eight large contiguous circles, each 
with a pillow in the middle, the central flat- topped portion in 
very high relief, the corners cut off in a sweeping concaved 
margin. Between each pillow arm and the surrounding circle 
is an elliptical space filled with a high raised figure with a 
sharp spine down the middle, the cluster of four of these ellip- 
soidal figures forming a large four-petalled flower. 

The upper part of the body is engraved with a large 
spray of various types of foliage which is placed directly 
under the lip, in the front, extending well around the sides. 
The central leaf is a large heart-shaped one with long sinu- 
ous tip and a long slender stem touching the deep grooved 
line above the band below. This cordate leaf is flanked below by grassy foliage and on each 
side a large "fern" spray reaching nearly to the tip of the central leaf; further out, at the 
base, are more ferny sprays. 

4-part mold, 11 in. high. 

The pillow block pattern resembles that used on 'Tillow and Sunburst" (Kamm, p. 
100), but here the pattern is in much higher relief. The large heart-shaped leaf engraved 
on the surface of this pitcher appears also on "Cordate Leaf" (this book, p. 17). 

The provenience of this beautiful piece is not known to the writer, nor have other 
pieces been seen; it is the pitcher of a water set tumblers, tray, and pitcher, and without 
doubt there are goblets, berry bowls, and the usual four-piece creamer-sugar set. 

129 





CHECKERBOARD 

The pitcher shown here is the quart- or milk-size and 
is a thick, heavy piece coming in good glowing glass not 
especially clear but without discoloration and with a good 
resonance. 

The body is cylindrical, barely perceptibly wider at the 
rim than at the waist, the base being fairly wide and spread- 
ing, plain above and decorated on the base of the body with 
a beautiful, large sunburst, centered with a quarter-sized 
daisy with numerous small corrugated rays. 

The rim is uneven, raised in front to the medium lip, 
narrow at the tip, and it rises again at the handle; the rim 
is broadly scalloped to conform to the blocks on the pattern, 
each large scallop again finely crenulate. 

The handle is long, four-square, panelled on each side, 
with a horizontal upper bar smartly incurved and then flat- 
tened for a better grasp, the vertical bar curving in at the 
base to the body, a lower horizontal being omitted. Down each outer margin of the handle 
the comer is sliced off t and on this flattened edge is substituted a long row of fine cross- 
ribbing, making for a better grasp. 

The decorative motif of the body is simple, but repeated to cover the entire surface 
from rim to waist; it consists of squares, placed diagonally, repeated to form a checker- 
board pattern, with quarter-inch wide fiat spaces between the blocks. 

Each square is broken down into another large square placed at right angles leaving 
triangular bits in the corners, each of these with three high facets, the large central block 
bevelled in high relief, and filled with a sunburst like that on the base of the bowl, all the 
sunbursts alike. 

4-part mold, 7 in. high. 

This is an active pattern, to be found in many pieces, ^including water pitcher, milk 
pitcher, creamer (like the one shown save for its smaller size), square open compote on 
a low stand, high round open compote, bowls, plate, wine glass, goblet, etc. The writer 
has seen none In color. 

The pattern is late, around 1895-1900. It seems to have always been nameless in spite 
of the obvious checkerboard pattern. 

The beautiful sunburst on the base appears on "Flambeaux" (Kanam, p. Ill), which 
is stamped on the inner base with the "H" in a diamond, but Mr. E. W. Heisey, President 
of the A. H, Heisey Company, does not remember this pattern. 



CARNATION 

"Carnation" is one of the impressed patterns of 
the 1895 period, the grooves filled with color and 
gilded or silvered over. This s the water-pitcher size, 
is a very thick heavy piece (over J4 in. thick), of 
superior quality glass, beautifully clear and polished, 
with a soft satiny sheen, but it is considerably dark- 
ened with too much manganese so that the shadows 
are practically black. 

The pitcher is roughly cylindrical on a flat base, 
pinched in a little above the base and bulging slightly 
two Inches below the rim. The sides are divided into 
eight long broad shallow panels arched top and bottom. 
The rim is unevenly notched and flares outward from 
two inches below the top. The lip is high-arched and 
plain. 

The molded handle is undecorated but is very 
sharply bent at the top. The base is very thick and 
slightly hollowed out beneath. 

Decoration consists of four leafy sprays of carna- 
tions reaching upward from near the base on the edge 
of each alternate panel. A single small carnation is 

130 





placed erect at the top on this panel-edge and just _ beneath the rim. At each side of this 
flower a side stem arches over the top of the two adjacent panels with a much larger carna- 
tion flower bend over and facing downward. The petals of each flower consist of deep 
parallel grooves and the 'head' of the flower is sunk still deeper. 

A wreath of four flowers and foliage encircles the underside of the base. The pattern 
was filled with red and green color and gilt, but as usually the case, the color has been 
removed with strong alkali. 

4-part mold, 9% m - 

This piece is a part of a considerable set and not being very old probably exists in 
some quantity, colored or with the color removed. 

HOBNAIL BAND 

The small-sized water pitcher shown here belongs to 
the Hobnail group with its wide band around the base of 
high sharp conical hobs arranged in five horizontal rows. 
The base is covered also with large high hobs in four 
concentric rings, the outer slightly longer to protect the 
inner rows, each outer hob flat-topped. 

The body is cylindrical, slightly flared at the top, 
the rim curved and the lip low. The handle is pressed 
but corrugated down its length like applied handles, with 
a splayed star at the base. 

2-part mold, 8 in. high. 

This pattern, in the clear, comes in numerous pieces, 
including tumblers, water pitcher, creamer, butter dish, 
goblet, etc. It dates from around 1890, or possibly a 
little earlier. 

CANE VARIANT 

This unique piece is shown as a curiosity; it is a 
pitcher of sorts, and is called a "Rum Jug"; it is a 
heavy blown piece with a very thick base and a 
rough pontil mark underneath. The glass is beauti- 
fully clear and glistening, and it has a good resonance. 

The circular cover with a slippery knob is made 
in the same piece as the body and is irremovable. The 
spout is unique in that apparently the original length 
was found inadequate and the mold was pieced out 
with another inch, more or less, to effect more success- 
ful pouring. The margins of the addition are rough 
and the corrugations do not meet. 

The body is fat and pear-shaped, narrowest at the 
rim, widest slightly above the base. The rim is hori- 
zontal except over the old spout, the new addition to 
the spout plain and horizontal across its mouth. 

The handle is shaped like many of the 1890-1900 
period, oval, four-panelled, with a notched pattern down each outer edge. 

The body is covered with a pattern consisting of four sharp-pointed arches reaching 
from near the base to slightly below the rim, each arch outlined in a wide bevelled bar 
which carries a cross-ribbing pattern in relief. At the apex of each arch is a bevelled dia- 
mond with a diamond point top, and connecting the apical diamonds of adjacent arches 
is a curved bar with bevelled sides and the same sawtoothed raised pattern. 

Below this bowed arch is a square "jewelled" pattern with many faceted bits and a 
larger oval central "stone". This jewel is surrounded by sun-rays of various lengths. 

The large arches are filled alike with a uniform pattern consisting of small hexagonal 
buttons with steep, bevelled sides and small flat plain tops. They are arranged in rows 
diagonally and the lower rows gradually change to faceted diamonds of the same sized out- 
line, the last two rows around the bottom composed of diamonds instead of buttoned cane. 

5 in. high. 

This piece was loaned the writer by Mrs. Jack Bagwell, of Monroe, Louisiana who 
says it formerly belonged to a colored woman whose grandmother had received it from 
"the family". It probably dates, however, from the 1885-1895 period. Its provenience is 
not known to the writer, but identical pieces have been seen by a few dealers in the north. 

131 




INDEX 



NAME 



:= 



NAME 
CROSS, ENGLISH HOBNAIL.. 

CROSS, PATTEE 

CROSSED BLOCK. 



ARCHAIC GOTHIC --- ....... . ..... - .......... - ---- 20 

4RCHED PANEL, VARIANT ...~ ................................. 

ATLAS ...................................................................... 15 



BALL AND SWIRL, VAKM.NT ------ ....... -------------- 106 



DIAMOND, BEADED ----- ........ 

.^VD, HOBNAIL ----- ....... - ....... -- ...... - ........ 



Si vS' PRISM, 7rFi56p" :^_._i2i 
Xvz), PZWTT ~_ - % 

-f A r D <9S POINT 
BAND, SWIRL 




BAR, 

BAR, TKlfLJi, Wlin 

BARRELLED BLOCK. 

BARS, MITRED 

BEAD AND SCROLL 

BEAD SWAG.... 



.... 19 



BLOCK AND DIAMOND BAR 
J8L0CK:, BARRELLED 

III 

f ioci; DIVIDED: WITH SUNBURST, 

BWC^ENGUSH'DIJlM 
BLOCK, QUARTERED 



...51, 73 

- 6 

."!._ 90 




BULL'S EYE, GIANT ... 

BULL'S EYE AND DRAPE 

BUTTERFLY 

BUTTRESSED LOOP 

CABLE AND SWIRL _ 

CABLE WITH LION 

CABLE WITH TRIPLE BAR 

CANE, VARIANT 

CANE AND FLUTE 

CARNATION 

CAROLINA 

CELTIC CROSS 

CERES, M.G 




2 > 



. 85 

. 35 

115 

__m 

72 
130 



CHAIN, THREE-MOLD .... 

CRAW WITH DIAMONDS 
CHAIN, WITH LOCKET 
CHANDELIER ................... 

CHECKERBOARD 
CHERRY SPRIG 
CHESTNUT 



_ 7 
,124 

_ 57 

Il3Q 



COARSE ZIG-ZAG, 

COBB ,..- - 

COLONIAL, LATE, VARIANT... 
COLORADO 



| 



CORN, EAR OF... 
CORNUCOPIA 



:, CELTIC . 




.. 62 
..124 
_60 
-III 



CROWN AND FLUTE 118 



DAISY, ETCHED - 41 

DA IS Y, FORMAL- ........ 101 

DAISY, LACY 73 

DAISY, SQUARED, AND DIAMOND 99 

DERBY 24 

DIAGONAL BAR BAND _ 12 

DIAGONAL BLOCK, BEVELLED. 19 

DIAMOND, BEVELLED, AND STAR...- 74 

DIAMOND, FLATTENED, AND SUNBURST.. 54 

DIAMOND RUBY _ 93 

DIAMOND, SPLIT, WITH FAN 80 

-DIAMOND, SUNK, AND LATTICE - 126 

DIAMOND AND SQUARED DAISY 99 

DIAMOND AND SWIRL _ ,. .106 

DIAMOND BAND, BEADED 37 

DIAMOND BAND AND INVERTED PRISM.... 4 

DIAMOND BAR AND BLOCK ___ 68 

DIAMOND BLOCK, ENGLISH 6 

DIAMOND HORSESHOE 1 10 

DIAMOND LACE _ 69 

DIAMOND LATTICE 77 

DIAMOND POINT AND PUNTY <*? 

DIAMOND POINT BAND WITH PORTLAND 89 

DIAMOND POINT LOOP ~ ~ -Ill 

DIAMOND POINT WITH DIAMOND 109 

DIAMOND WITH DIAMOND POINT 109 

DIAMONDS, CHAIN, WITH 124 

DIVIDED BLOCK WITH SUNBURST 71 

DIVIDED BLOCK WITH SUNBURST, 

VARIANT 5 1 , 73 

DOUBLE DONUT ~~ ~ 32 

DRAPE AND BULL'S EYE 6 

EAR OF CORN.. 62 

EGG AND DART _ 102 

ENCIRCLED PILLOW....- ~.~ 129 

ENGLISH DIAMOND BLOCK _ 6 

ENGLISH HOBNAIL CROSS 100 

ENGLISH HOBNAIL WITH BUCKLE 75 

E'NGLISH POINTED THUMBPRINT, VARIANT 3 
ENGLISH QUILTING ~ 5 

ETCHED DAISY - 41 

ETCHED GRAPE 122 

ETCHED IVY SPRAY 11 



FAN, LONG, WITH ACANTHUS LEAF. 

FAN, PALM LEAF. 

FAN AND BEADED ELLIPSE 

FAN AND PINEAPPLE -... 

FAN WITH SPLIT DIAMOND _. 

FANCY CUT . 

FANCY LOOP 

FEATHER DUSTER 

FINE CUT, HEAVY PANELLED 

FINE CUT AND WAFFLE 

FINE CUT BAR 

FINE CUT MEDALLION. 

FLAME, FLICKERING, M.G -._ 

FLATTENED DIAMOND AND SUNBURST.. 

FLEUR-DE-LIS, BANDED 

FLICKERING FLAME, M .G. .... 

FLOWER, STYLIZED 

FLOWER RIM WITH HONEYCOMB 

FLOWER SPRAY WITH SCROLLS... 

FLUTE AND CANE ~ 

FLUTE AND CROWN 

FLUTE AND RUBY BAR 

FLUTED SCROLLS . 

FLYING SWAN.... - 

FORGET-ME-NOT, M.G _ 

FORGET-ME-NOT BANDS AND ARCH 

FORMAL DAISY. 

FUNNEL ROSETTE-. 

GIANT BULL'S EYE 

GIBSON GIRL.. 



GLOBE AND STAR 



.125 

. 63 
.. 94 
. 93 
. 80 
-103 

97 
. 42 
.. 24 
. 99 
49 
.. 43 
. 92 

54 

.. 44 
- 92 

"117 
. 110 
.. 72 
..118 
J06 
..119 
_ 81 
.112 
.. 82 
,.101 
,.129 

..101 
26 
23 



133 



INDEX 



XAME PAGE 

GOTHIC. ARCHAIC....,., _ _ _ 20 

GOTHIC, HEAVY . _ _ [Qq 

GRAPE, ETCHED *_ I 122 

GRAPE WITH OVERLAPPING FOLIAGE, 

M.G _ _ _ 48 

GRAPE WITH SCROLL MEDALLION 56 

GRAPE WITH VINE _ _.. _ 60 

GRECIAN __ _ __ 55 



HEART WITH THUMBPRINT , _.. _ 

HEAVY GOTHIC ... 

HEAVY PANELLED FINE CUT 

HOBNAIL, CLEAR WITH M.G. HOBS 

HOBNAIL, ENGLISH, WITH BUCKLE 

HOBNAIL BAND 

HOBNAIL CROSS, ENGLISH. _ ._ 

HOBNAIL WITH COLORED SANDS 

HOLLY, PANELLED _ 

HONEYCOMB, STAR 7V . _ 

HONEYCOMB, SUNK . 

HONEYCOMB WITH FLOWER RIM 

HORSESHOE, DIAMOND 

HOURGLASS _ _ 

HUNDRED-LEAFED ROSE 

INSERTED PRISM __ _ 

INVERTED PRISM AND DIAMOND BAND,.. 
IVY SPRAY, ETCHED.. 



JAPANESE .... 

JASPER 



KALEIDOSCOPE 

KAYAK 

KITCHEN STOVE, THE.. 

LACE, DIAMOND 

LACY DAISY 

LACY VALANCE 

LATE COLONIAL* VARIANT..... 

LATTICE, DIAMOND 

LATTICE, OVERALL... 

LATTICE AND SUNK DIAMOND- 

LEAF, ACANTHUS 

LEAF, CORDATE 

LENS AND STAR 

LION WITH CABLE 

LITTLE BAND .... 



LOCKET ON CHAI \ r 

LONG FAN WITH ACANTHUS LEAfl 
LOOP, BUTTRESSED. 
LOOP, DIAMOND POINT .... 

LOOP, FANCY . 

LOOP AND TRIPLE BAR 

LOOP WITH PRISM BAND- 



MARSH PINK _ 

MARY JANE 

MEDALLION, FINE CUT ..._ 

MEDALLION, OVAL 

MEDALLION, SCROLL, 
MITRED B.4RS 

"NAIL 

NOONDA Y SUN 

OAR, CHES TNU T 

OAK, WHITE 

OfAL MEDALLION 

OfAL P4NEL _ _ 

OVAL THUMBPRINT...^ 

OVAL THUMBPRINT, REVERSED. 

OVERALL LATTICE 



PALM LEAF FAN 

PALM LEAF WITH SCROLL 

PANEL, ARCHED, VARIANT 

PANEL, OVAL _ . 

PANELLED FINE CUT, HEAVY 

PANELLED HOLLY... _ 

PANELLED SMOCKING _ 

PANELLED THOUSAND-EYE _ 

PATTEE CROSS . 



102 
109 
24 

- 8 i 

75 
151 
100 
100 
. 59 
122 
, 57 
117 
110 
S 
.128 

21 
4 
11 

16 

13 

_105 

95 

_108 

. 69 

. 73 

. 34 

. 87 

. 77 

. 43 

-126 

S3 

, 17 

36 

35 

. 40 

57 

..125 

..114 

-III 

. 97 

_ 80 

-121 

. 30 
. 33 
. 43 
39 
. 91 
. 33 

.. 87 
..107 

- S6 
. 65 
, 39 
..120 

26 

_ 10 
_ 43 

~ 63 
..113 

- 98 
-.120 
_ 24 
... 59 
.. 88 
_ 66 
..121 



NAME PAGE 

PEERLESS ...~ - 59 

PENNSYLVANIA 103 

PILLOW BANDS . _ _ 77 

PILLOW ENCIRCLED _ _ _ ., ..129 

PILLOWS _ 96 

PINEAPPLE, SQUAT _ 76 

PINEAPPLE AND FAN _ _ 9 3 

PIN WHEELS WITH ROSETTE 39 

PLAID, SHEPHERD'S , - 105 

PLAIN, TWO .MOLD 18 

PLAIN, WITH FLAT RING.- __ 41 

PLUME 64 

POINTED THUMBPRINT, VARIANT, _ .. 

ENGLISH , __ 3 

PORTLAND WITH DIAMOND POINT BAND 89 

PRIMULA, M.G _ 1 1 3 

PRISM, INVERTED _ 21 

PRISM, INVERTED AND DIAMOND BAND.. 4 

PRISM BAND WITH LOOP _... 121 

PUFFED BANDS...^.- _ 45 

PUMP THE TOWN. __ 108 

PUNT'Y AND DIAMOND POINT _ 97 

PUNTY BAND - 96 

QUADRUPED ... 

QUARTERED BLOCK 

QUESTION MARK _ __ _ 53 

QUILTING, ENGLISH 5 

RAINDROP, BANDED... 

RED SUNFLOWER 

REVERSED OVAL THUMBPRINT 

RIBBED SAWTOOTH ___ 

RISING SUN - 6! 

ROANOKE ' 99 

ROSE, HUNDRED-LEAFED __ 128 

ROSE, WILD, M.G 102 

ROSE, WILD, WITH BOW-KNOT 64 

ROSE AND SUNBURSTS _ 9S 

ROSE POINT BAND . , _ 116 

ROSETTE, FUNNEL _ 1 29 

ROSETTE WITH PINWHEELS 39 

RUBY BAR AND FLUTE.. ... 106 

RUBY DIAMOND - -. 93 

RUBY STAR 52 

SANDWICH STAR AND BUCKLE.... 
SAWTOOTH, RIBBED 

SCALLOP SHELL _ 

SCALLOPED TAPE _.. 

SCROLL AND BEAD 

SCROLL AND SHELL.... 

SCROLL MEDALLION, M.G 

SCROLL MEDALLION WITH GRAPE .... 
SCROLL WITH PALM LEAF-- 
SCROLLED SPRAY, M.G. 

SCROLLS, FLUTED... 
SCROLLS, WINGED. 

SCROLLS WITH FLOWER SPRAY.... 

SHELL, SCALLOP 

SHELL AND SCROLL . 

SHEPHERD'S PLAID 

SHIMMERING STAR 

SILVER SHEEN...-. 

SINGING BIRDS _ 

SrSTER KATE _ 

SLABSIDES _ 

SMOCKING, PANELLED 

SNAIL 

SXOWFLAKE 

SPANISH-AMERICAN 

SPLIT DIAMOND WITH FAN 

SPRAY, FLOWER. WITH SCROLLS 

SPRAY, IVY, ETCHED 

SPRAY, SCROLLED, M.G 

SPRIG, CHERRY 

SQUARED DAISY AND DIAMOND^ 

SQUAT PINEAPPLE 

STAR, BEVELLED 

STAR, RUBY. 

STAR, SANDWICH, AND BUCKLE 

STAR, SHIMMERING..^ 
STAR, TEN-POINTED ... 




134 



INDEX 



NAME PAGE 

STAR JND BEVELLED DIAMOND 74 

STAR 4ND GLOBE ...-..- 23 

ST4R AND LENS 36 

STAR IN HONEYCOMB _ _ 122 

STARS JND STRIPES ~ ~~ 70 

STOVE, THE KITCHEN __ 108 

STRIGIL ___ __..., 83 

STYLIZED FLOWER _ __ 127 

SUV NOONDAY _. __ __ 107 

SUN RISING .. , .- .61 

SUNBURST, WHIRLED, IN CIRCLE _ 37 

SUNBURST JND FLATTENED DIAMOND.... 54 

SUN BURST WITH DIVIDED BLOCK 71 

SUNBURST WITH DIVIDED BLOCK, 

VARIANT . .. 51, 73 

SUNBURSTS JND ROSE _ 98 

SUNFLOWER RED _ 116 

SUNK DIAMOND AND LATTICE 126 

SUNK HONEYCOMB _. . 57 

SWAG, BEAD.. _ _ _. 75 

SIP AN, FLYING JJZ _Z.... _.. 81 

SWEETHEART . .. . 103 

SWIRL AND BALL, VARIANT ...- 106 

SWIRL AND CABLE , _ 85 

SWIRL AND DIAMOND...'. '. 106 

SWIRL BAND _ __ _. 12 

TAPE, SCALLOPED 29 

TEN-POINTED STAR _ _ 62 

TEPEE . _ . . ~ 78 

TEXAS . . .._ .... 58 
THE KITCHEN STOVE .. _, 108 



NAME PAGE 

THE TOWN PUMP .. 108 

THOUSAND-EYE, PANELLED 66 

THREE-MOLD CHAIN - 7 

THUMBPRINT OVAL .. _ 26 

THUMBPRINT, POINTED ENGLISH, 

THUMBPRlNTrREVERSED "~OVAL'"HI~i '. 1 

THUMBPRINT WINDOWS H 

THUMBPRINT WITH HEART 102 

TORPEDO . - . 107 

TOWN PUMP THE ~ J08 

TREE OF LIFE, WITH SPRIG 27 

TREMONT 47 

TRIPLE BAR AND LOOP 80 

TRIPLE BAR WITH CABLE 115 

TWIN CRESCENTS. 60 

TWO MOLD, PLAIN IS 

VALANCE, LACY 34 

WAFFLE AND FINE CUT , 99 

WASHBOARD ...... . .127 

WHEEL IN BAND . 45 

WHIRLED SUNBURST IN CIRCLE. 37 

WHIRLIGIG . 1 03 

WHITE OAK 65 

WILD ROSE, M.G __ 102 

WILD ROSE WITH BOW-KNOT 64 

WINDOWS, THUMBPRINT 14 

WINGED SCROLLS .....119 

WYOMING 49 

ZIG-ZAG, COARSE 28 



1.15 




Z 



124216