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Full text of "The Serpentine .."

SERPFNTINE 



MRS. CHARLES S. SWOPE 





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JAMES A. MORROW 

Editor-in-Chief 

JAMES C. MATHERS 

Business Manager 



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Volume 26 

Published by the 

Senior Class 

State Teachers College 

West Chester 

Pennsylvania 




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DEDICATION 



As a measure of appreciation for their continued inspira- 
tion and guidance to the staff we dedicate this volume to 
the faculty advisers of the Serpentine, Miss Mary Clark, 
Miss Marion Farnham, and Mr. Clarence McKelvie. 

For a number of years these three people have helped 
the Serpentine Staff to produce a book which each year has 
been a more complete record of the events cherished by 
every student while at college. 

Mr. McKelvie has assisted with the entire book, but 
more specifically with the financial end. Every member of 
the editorial staff has sought the aid of Miss Clark, while 
valuable criticisms and suggestions for the art work have 
come from Miss Farnham. As a group these individuals have 
assisted in every phase of the planning and organizing of 
each year's Serpentine. 




Miss Marion Farnham, Miss Mary E. Clark, Mr, Clarence L. McKelvie 



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IN RECOGNITION 



No more familiar person can be found on campus than 
Dr. Robert F. Anderson, who has been connected with this 
school for a period of twenty-nine years. His able teaching 
in the Mathematics Department has played a large part in 
its fine achievements, and since he assumed the post of head, 
a fine tradition has been established. 

If Dr. Anderson's service to the college were limited 
to his work as teacher of mathematics, that in itself would 
be noteworthy; but during these years spent here he also 
has contributed both his time and ability on many occasions. 
The Moore Literary Society has been one of the campus 
groups that has profited by his leadership. When the Philips 
Memorial Chapel was erected, he gave his loyal support in 
getting contributions,- and it was he who was instrumental in 
starting the publication of the first yearbook. 

In recognition of his faithful and farsighted services to 
this institution and as a symbol of sincere respect and affection, 
we take this opportunity to express our deepest appreciation 
to Dr. Robert F. Anderson. 



Six 




DR. ROBERT ANDERSON 

Dr. Robert Anderson was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, April 11, 1866. Most of his early 
life was spent in tfiis vicinity. He attended this institution, which at that time was the State Norma! School; he 
was graduated in the class of 1890. Villanova College was the next institution of higher learning where Dr. 
Anderson studied. From this college he received his Bachelor of Arts Degree and two honorary degrees, 
Master of Arts and Doctor of Science. 

From 1886 to 1888 he was teacher in the public schools of Pennsylvania. In 1890 he was in charge of 
the Department of English at the College of Commerce in Philadelphia. The following year Dr. Anderson 
was mode principal of the public schools at Longford, Pennsylvania. In the fall of 1907 the State Normal 
here at West Chester secured Dr. Anderson as professor of mathematics. The next year he was mode head of 
this department and has continued in this position until the present time. 

Besides being a teacher Dr. Anderson is author and co-author of numerous books and pamphlets on 
mathematical subjects. 

Seven 




FOREWORD 



Four years at college have not been just a period of preparation. They have 
been a definite port of our life. Each of these years has surpassed the preceding one 
in what it has meant to us in the way of experiences, appreciations, and friendships. 

We hove attempted to reconstruct all in the past year that will linger longest in 
our memories. The most realistic and interesting way in which to do this was to 
reproduce in pictures the activities as they occurred, to supplement the stories told 
by these scenes with written narrative that links past and present activities, and to 
complete the set-up by including the pictures of those individuals and groups who 
have contributed most to campus life. 

The degree of success of our efforts will be measured by the amount of pleasure 
derived from the memories which this volume calls to mind. 



Eight 




CONTENTS 



HISTORICAL ABSTRACTS- INTERIOR VIEWS 

ADMINISTRATORS and FACULTY 

GRADUATES UNDERGRADUATES 

STUDENT ASSOCIATIONS 

MEN'S ATHLETICS WOMEN'S ATHLETICS 

CAMPUS LIFE 
PATRONS AND ADVERTISERS 



Nin€ 



HISTORICAL ABSTRACTS 



To most of us it seems a for cry from tfie time wlien no 
excuse was accepted for missing breakfast to Dr. Anderson s 
popular morning "Kaffeeklatch" at tfie P. and G. But as 
times change, we find certain improvements necessary. Tiiis 
fias been true ever since West Cfiester began its existence. 

Tfie college did not spring to its present status imme- 
diately. Contrarily, it traces its beginnings to tfie West 
Cfiester Academy in 1812. Wfien students came here to 
prepare for teaching, the State began to grant money for 
part of their training. 

In the Normal School days, a two-year course was 
offered. Before Dr. Philips became president, the only 
building — what is now the central portion of the women s 
dormitory — embodied everything. The first class was gradu- 
ated in 1874. It totalled ten. Since that time the size of the 
graduating classes has increased remarkably until now more 
than two hundred students receive degrees each year. 





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The Old Normal School 



Ten 




A PAUSE AFTER A BUSY DAY 
There is a lot to talk about and many people to see after dinner in the lobby. 



HISTORICAL ABSTRACTS 



Dr. Philips, principal from 1881 to 1920, was a famous, 
well-liked educator. Most of the buildings were erected 
during his administration and much additional land was 
bought. Today we are rather surprised at some of his 
regulations. Smoking, dancing, and card playing were for- 
bidden to all. No Sunday newspapers were permitted on 
the campus. 

Were the men allowed to walk their ladies uptown? 
Indeed not! On Saturday the women could walk uptown in 
the morning and the men in the afternoon. The order was 
reversed each week. The limit for the women at most times 
was Union Street and the Episcopal Church. This beautiful 
building must have loomed like a prison wall before the 
ladies' eyes. 

You understand — there were times when "the opposite 
sexes were privileged to mingle ". These two times were 
marked by the Moore Anniversary in the fall and the Aryan 
Reunion in the spring. In each case there was a social hour 
after the entertainment, and this was the only time to speck 
to that "heart's desire". 




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THE CENTER OF KNOWLEDGE 
Sooner or later everyone becomes acquainted with the hbrory. 



Thirteen 



HISTORICAL ABSTRACTS 



However, we cannot pity our predecessors, because 
they did have an ice skating pond. The fair maiden in 
distress was assisted around the pond one time and only one 
time by a member of the stronger sex. There was always a 
scorekeeper at hand. (hHow about the timekeeper, you 
ask?) No matter. Miss McCarthy still maintains that these 
were the "good old days . 



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Wayne hdall was built in 1913 and took its name from 
Camp Wayne, which was used for recruiting purposes during 
the Civil War. Both men and women faculty members as well 
as students lived here. 

The Library, Old Gymnasium, and Recitation hHall were 
built earlier. The principal made his home in Green Gables, 
which was located at the corner of hligh Street and College 
Avenue. It was not until nineteen hundred and thirty that 
the president's residence was changed to its present location 
on Rosedale Avenue. 



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Green Gables 



Fourteen 




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THE PROFESSOR'S DREAM 
Nothing more to be desired — attention, interest, end enthusiasr 



Fifteen 



HISTORICAL ABSTRACTS 



Dr. Philips was succeeded by a man who served West 
Chester in more different capacities than anyone before or 
after his day. Dr. Smith was a student, teacher, vice-principal, 
principal, and the first president of West Chester. During 
his popular administration we became a Teachers College. 
The state's control became more centralized and the curricu- 
lum was made more uniform. The Philips Memorial Building 
was erected during his presidency on the former site of 
Green Gables. 



Dr. Cameron became president in 1928 after the death 
of Dr. Smith. Under his guidance the College advanced 
rapidly in prestige. The Ehinger Gymnasium and the new 
athletic fields were mere outward manifestations of improve- 
ments. 

Today, led by President Swope, who succeeded Dr. 
Cameron in the fall of 1935, we are striving for first class 
honors by using the past as a catalogue of successes and 
records to be surpassed. 




Philips Memorial Chapel 



Sixteen 




READY I BEGIN! 
The gym is the scene of physical activity from morning until evening. 



Seventeen 




THE SONG IS ENDED 
After the morning hymn — most paths lead from the Chapel to the campus post office. 



Eighteen 



ADMINISTRATORS 
AND FACULTY 



It requires a keen imagination to visualize those past 
days when the duty of every faculty member was to see that 
the boys did not converse with any of the fairer sex,- yet some 
of the instructors here remember those times of proctoring. 

Many are our jokes at their expense, and many are the 
times when our sense of humor tries their patience to be good 
sports. But when we realize that they are human beings as 
well as educators, when we discover their human, fun-loving 
qualities, we learn to like and admire them as men and 
women. Even their titles and degrees fail to awe us com- 
pletely. 

It is the faculty members who instil in each student that 
desire to live a fuller life,- it is they who help direct the 
ambition and thinking of each individual so that education 
may be more worthwhile. Through the efforts of all who 
have served here, there have developed many of the finest 
characters, friendships, and traditions which are written 
indelibly into the history of this college. 




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Nineteen 




COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
WEST CHESTER. PENNSYLVANIA 



April 30, 1935 



IM 



To the Members of the Graduating Class: 

"What is the best education?" was asked of Plato centu- 
ries ago. His reply was significant; "It is that which gives 
to the body and the soul all the beauty and all the perfection of 
which they are capable." 

Pat beauty into your lives at every opportunity. Search 
for the secret charms of the sunset, the mountain, and the tree; 
train the eye to see beauty in every leaf and flower; listen for 
the melody in forest, field, and stream. Remember "the vision 
that you hold in your minds, the ideal that is enthroned in your 
hearts— this you will build your lives by; this you will become." 

My wish is that "you will help to make the world a bit 
better and more beautiful because you have lived in it." 

Cordially yours. 



^^^/..^.U^ /f ^^^--/^— 



Charles S. Swope 
President 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Mr. Merrill B. Conn President 

Dr. John A. Farrell Vice-President 

Mrs. Howard Mellor Secretary-Treasurer 

Mr. Thomas L. Hoskins Dr. Joseph Scattergood, Jr. 

Mrs. Jean Kane Fouike Mr. Fred S. Wood 

Mrs. A. M. h^olding Mr. Gordon Cilley 



Twenty 




PRESIDENT CHARLES S. SWOPE 

President Swope was born thirty-six years ago in Huntingdon County where he spent his childhood and 
early youth. After receiving his elementary education there, he matriculated at West Chester Normal School 
and then at Dickinson, from which institution he was graduated in 1925 with on A.B. degree. 

He was supervisor of the grade work and head of the history department at the Pennington School for 
t5oys. After serving as superintendent of schools at Everett, Pennsylvania, he accepted the call to join the 
faculty of the State Teachers College at West Chester. About eight years ago Mr. Swope married a former 
classmate. The following year he received his M.A. degree from the University of Pennsylvania, where he is 
now completing the requirements for his doctorate. His elevation to the Presidency of our College is just 
recognition of faithful work. 



Twenty-one 




Winfield W. Menhennett, B.S., M.A. 
Dean of Instruction 



Greetings to the Class of 1936: 

Today, as never before in the world's history, vital 
challenges are conning not only to the youth of our own 
nation but also to those of the world. Your training, your 
hopes and aspirations, your idealism and your courage are 
factors that will spur you on in the struggle for success. 

As the last act in your college life draws to a close 
and you receive the rewards of graduation, you pass over to 
that great and worthy group of alumni of West Chester, 
hdere you will find your name written among the names of 
the many who have achieved fame. Some day others may 
look back and find your name surrounded by the glory that 
comes to great and noble souls. Your college needs you 
in the future even more than she needed you in the past. 
You are a part of West Chester, and whatever West Chester 
becomes in the future will be, in part, due to you. We give 
you our blessings and good wishes. May your success be 
reflected in a greater West Chester. 

Sincerely yours. 



Twenty-tvv'o 



Dean of Instruction 




Evelyn J. Strohecker 
Decn of Women 

B.S., Susquehanna University 

M A., Teachers College, 
Columbia University 



r' 

Margaret M. Burnet ,- 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University 





George S. Roberts 
Registrar 




SnK 



Ermon M. Postles 



J. Herbert Chambers 
Stevi/ord 



Jessica M. Dyer 
Dietitian 



Rebecca 1. Dissinger 
Matron 

Twenty-three 




EDUCATION 
DEPARTMENT 



Psychology in practice 

There have been no comprehensive changes in the organization of work in the 
Education Department during the past year, hlowever, three elective courses have 
been approved by the State Department and have been added to the curriculum,- these 
are elementary education, character education, and clinical and abnormal psychology. 

The college student receives his training in psychology, child study, and educational 
theory from a diverse group of well-trained instructors. Dr. Selzer, the head of this 
department, has been certified by the state as a public school psychologist with in- 
structions to conduct a clinic here at the college and to render clinical aid to its service 
area. West Chester is one of the six teachers colleges in the state thus accredited. 

For a number of years there have been no additions to the Education staff, but 
this year it is with a feeling of great sorrow that we omit from this page the name and 
picture of our beloved friend. Professor Arthur D. Cromwell, who passed away during 
this last summer. 




tDUCATION DEPARTMENT 
Vr. McKelvie, Mr. Light, Miss Clark, Dr. 
Miss Burnet, Miss Connell, Miss Smi 



Tvi/enty-four 



ENGLISH 
DEPARTMENT 




Our autographed collection 

Twenty-five years ago there were only four teacfiers in tfie Englisfi Department; 
today tfiere are ten. The number of courses has grown correspondingly, although the 
number which could be offered with advantage has not yet been reached. 

Many of us have been guided by the English instructors, following the golden 
thread of literature down through the ages for the past four years. We have developed 
skill in the use of the mother tongue and have discovered on appreciation for hterature 
that should open up the rich experiences which great books so freely offer. 

In the day-by-day struggle with grammar, composition, and literature the benefits 
of English instruction are not always appreciated, hlowever, true appreciation must 
be a matter of time and growth. The teaching staff, the curriculum, and the size of the 
student body, all have changed as the years have slipped away, but the hearty desire 
to do faithful, scholarly work remains unchanged. A true joy comes from the mastery of 
even a small part of our great English heritage. 




ENGLISH DEPARTMENT 
Miss Tyson, Miss J. Wilson, Miss Rcjmsey, Miss Nelson, Mrs. Ne 
Dr. Stoley, Miss Geyer, Miss McCarthy, Miss M. E. Clark, Miss Barrer, Miss Lamey. 



Twenty-five 




FRENCH 
AND LATIN 



Sound your vowel 

Although courses in Latin and French hove been included for a long time in the 
general curriculum of the college, within the last six years, under the direction of Dr. 
Staley and Miss Geyer, they have been developed so that they offer both specialization 
for teaching and rich content. 

With this aim West Chester has increased her content courses to tv^enty-four semester 
hours of French and eighteen hours of Latin, exclusive of the required student teaching 
and beyond the high school preparation upon v^hich these courses are built. 

Both Dr. Staley and Miss Geyer have planned activities in this department so that 
the students may have additional experiences. From a shelf of a few text books the 
library facilities have grown until now they enable the students to prepare special 
projects, to correlate their work with English courses, to investigate modern trends in 
teaching, and to enrich their literary experiences by reading masterpieces not always 
included in class room discussion. 




FRLNCH AND LATIN 
Dr. Staley, Miss Geyer. 



Tv^enty-six 



SOCIAL STUDIES 
DEPARTMENT 




A European map study 

A cheery "Good morning, everybody" introduces the West Chester student to 
the Department of Social Studies. Soon after this introduction the student realizes 
that this department is endeavoring to help him discover the meaning of history by inter- 
preting for him the influence of historical events. 

Whether it be in sociology, economics, or American government, the student feels 
that the instructors are sincere in their efforts to make the Social Studies work on this 
campus of some direct and immediate value. Present day events are linked repeatedly 
to past occurrences which hove influenced them. Opinions are freely exchanged by 
pupils and instructors. Both groups derive benefits. 

This department not only provides interesting classes for those students who have 
adopted Social Studies as their major field, but it also sponsors active club work in which 
modern social problems are discussed very informally. Thus this department attempts 
not only to depict the historical past but also to make present history a vital problem. 




SOCIAL STUDIES DEPAklMtNF 
Mr. Swope, Dr. Healhcote, Mr Ande 



Tv^enty-seven 







MATHEMATICS 
DEPARTMENT 



No flare of bugles or startling announcement ever brings the Mathematics Depart- 
ment to our attention, and yet we are always aware of its presence and influence on 
campus. Compasses, protractors, transits, yardsticks, and graph paper as well as other 
mathematical tools beckon to the students in the secondary curriculum who adopt mathe- 
matics as one of their fields. 

A complete study in mathematics is offered to these individuals. Introductory 
college courses in algebra form a basis for higher mathematics. Study progresses into 
trigonometry, solid and analytical geometry, surveying, and several teaching methods 
courses. All students of the elementary curriculum take several courses in this department. 
The purpose of these courses is to help develop successful teachers who have a keen 
knowledge of subject matter. Such preparation changes the teaching of arithmetic 
from a difficult, dreaded task to a pleasant, stimulating part of their work. 

Under the guidance of the "group of three" who are teachers in this department, 
students develop skill both in teaching the various phases of this subject and in applying 
the acquired knowledge to their own needs. 



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MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT 
Dr. R. Anderson, Miss Bull, Miss Holland. 



Twenty-eight 



ART AND VISUAL 
EDUCATION 







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Another meoium of expressi 



No other classroom or laboratory in Recitation Hall is more attractive than the art 
studio. hHere students draw, paint, and engage in many activities related to the appre- 
ciation of art. 

There is no need to wonder about the work of the Art Department, for its activities 
are apparent in the posters which are always found on campus, in the decorations for 
important social events, and in the various exhibits which it sponsors. 

Although the Visual Education Department is the most recent on campus, it is at 
the same time perhaps the most progressive. Each year its activity has increased until 
this year students are busy developing and enlarging snapshots, making lantern and 
photographic slides, and operating motion picture machines. Another added activity 
this year has consisted of photography work to be included in the 1936 Serpentine. 
A selected group of students carried out this project. 

Mr. Sherman also attempts in his handwriting course to produce legible writers 
and students capable of teaching others how to write. 




ART AND VISUAL EDUCATION 
; Mellien, Miss Farnham, Miss Lamborn, Mr. She 



Twenty-nine 




MUSIC 
EDUCATION 



Vesper Choir tryouts 



The Music Department wishes us to experience the gladness of music, and we do 
if the daily enthusiasm in Chapel is any test. The faculty concerts and student recitals 
represent its finished products. The Band, Orchestra, Vesper Choir, Junior Chorus, 
and Glee Club practices represent some of the development that is continually taking 
place. 

To broaden the horizon of the entire student body, the department encourages 
and heartily supports musical events of high calibre and artists of national reputation. 
In addition to the Music Education Course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, 
courses in music are offered for students in the elementary, intermediate, and rural 
groups preparing for the teaching of music in the grades. 

The studio teachers contribute in no small measure to the service which is rendered 
by preparing students to give worthwhile programs in the community. 

in our treasure chest of memories is a gilt-edged moving picture of music in all of 
its inspiring forms, headed by the never-to-be-forgotten Christmas Carol service. 




Miss Blair, Miss Slarkey, Miss Low, M 



MUSIC EDUCATION 
s Schmidt, Miss Morlock, Miss Lee, Mis 



Miss Herelorth, Mr. Middle 
Miss Cropsey, Miss Kreisher, Mr. Hauskne 



, Mr. Parry, Miss Biser, 



Thirty 




SCIENCE 
DEPARTMENT 



Conference time 

The progressive spirit of our Science Department has secured for it a prominent 
place among all State Teachers Colleges of the East. The equipment for chemistry, 
physics, and the biological sciences encourages experimentation. To keep the more 
important discoveries secret, a portion of the janitor's domain in the basement was 
annexed for a laboratory. hHere students and faculty members make slides, cultures, 
mounts, and other materials to be used in the classroom. 

The required courses attempt to instil in every student the habit of scientific approach 
to every problem. Science is correlated with other phases of life so that we can under- 
stand and talk intelligently about scientific matters. Important scientific advancement is 
followed by keeping abreast with the latest literature. Some of our own faculty members 
are producing this new literature,- others are translating foreign works and doing 
valuable research work,- all ore advancing the cause of science at the numerous edu- 
cational conventions. 

The increase in the number of students taking the free elective courses in the various 
sciences amply justifies the efforts put forth by the instructors of this department. 




SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 
Dr. McCorkle, Mr. Lewis, 
enwood. Dr. J. Anderson, Misi 



Broadhead, Miss Ellioll. 



Thirty- 




HEALTH AND 

PHYSICAL 

EDUCATION 



Upside down on the parallels 



Every student benefits from tfie Health and Physical Education Department. The 
courses offered under the direction of capable and efficient instructors old the students 
to keep in good health and give them a thorough training in physical skills. The depart- 
ment is mainly responsible for the training of teachers in the special field of health and 
physical education. The increased number of graduates who obtained teaching positions 
at the close of last year demonstrates somewhat the progress being made. 

The coaching of the athletic teams is conducted by the men members of the depart- 
ment, while the women conduct extra-curricular activities and intramural athletic tourna- 
ments for the women students. Tournaments in hockey, tennis, basketball, and baseball 
were successfully carried out by the Women's Athletic Association. This year the 
results of men's athletic contests hove shown a marked progress. 

Although participation in these various activities is purely voluntary, plans are 
being made by the instructors for the expansion of these groups until they involve the 
entire student body. 




HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Mr. MacLean, Mr. Killinger. 
Mr. Waters, Miss Wade, Mr. Allen, Miss Schaub, Miss Leach. 



Thirty-two 



SUPERVISORS 
OF STUDENT 
TEACHING 




iiuueiit teachers keep_fit 



Few people realize that the groups of students whom they notice traveling doily 
between the college and the schools in West Chester, as well as the rural schools in 
the vicinity, are really teachers. hHowever, they would soon understand this to be the 
case if they could overhear their conversation. 

At least one semester of every student's senior year consists of student teaching. 
In recent years this has come to involve more than the mere teaching of one class a 
day. Today supervisors and cooperative teachers assign units of work in which the 
students assume entire responsibility for the class. hHowever, at the same time, the 
students take part in the extra-curricular activities, prepare case studies of the children 
whom they are teaching, and meet in conferences to discuss their work and to make 
future plans with the supervisors. 

It is during the time of student teaching that college students become aware of the 
joys to be derived from the profession and the difficulties which they must be prepared 
to meet in the school program. 





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SUPERVISORS OF STUDENT TEACHING 
Miss Schaub, Miss L. Clark, Miss Hobbs, Miss Kreishor, Miss Sipple, Mrs. Stabler, Dr. Daily 



Thirty-three 




THE 
LIBRARY 



Call number, please 

Only those who hove been connected vv'ith our college for a number of years 
can visualize the progress made by the library. The first library was merely a room in 
the main dormitory,- the number of books was scant. In 1906 the present building was 
erected and the books were moved. 

The library has kept pace with the other developments of the college. The increase 
in the number of books, the enlargement of the staff, the development of the pamphlet 
and picture collections, and the improvement in the binding and shelving of periodicals 
ore but a few of the results. 

The efficiency of the librarians has made possible most of these changes. Aside 
from her duties at the college. Miss Russell is a member of the Chester County Library 
Commission, while Miss Sauer is librarian for the Chester County Historical Society. 
The juvenile department, which serves both the college and the Demonstration School, 
has the special guidance of Miss Collicott. 




THE LIBRARY 
Miss Russell, Miss Collicott, Miss Sou 



Thirty-four 



HEALTH 
SERVICE 




The doctor is in 



One of the most familiar campus paths is that leading to the infirmary, in spite of 
the fact that most students attempt to evade it. It is only as they find it necessary to 
become acquainted with this part of the college administration that they become aware 
of the efficiency of the doctor and nurses whose duty it is to guard the health of the 
students. 

It is almost impossible to compare the small unattractive infirmary of three years ago 
with the well-equipped, cheerful one of today. hHowever, it is evident that this im- 
proved service is appreciated by the increased number of both day and dormitory stu- 
dents who willingly seek the advice of either Miss Glance or Miss Reese and the aid 
of Doctor Scattergood rather than avoid such help until it becomes absolutely necessary. 

Not only is this department efficient in the aid which it renders, but also it is con- 
stant, for its service is always available. 




HEALTH SERVICE 
; Glance, Dr. Scattergood, Miss Re 



Thirty-fiv 




DEMONSTRATION 
SCHOOL 



About twenty-five years ago a philosophy of education began to develop which 
has greatly modified our conception of what a school should be. 

Today, school is a place where the child comes, not with reluctance, but with 
joy. Nowadays, school is a place where he finds on atmosphere of freedom and friend- 
liness, not of suppression and coercion. It is a place where he learns through doing 
things suited to his individual taste and needs, not through cut and dried tasks required 
of everyone alike,- where his creative abilities are encouraged, not ignored,- where 
personality and character grow side by side with intellect. Most important, he finds 
a teacher who is a guide, not a task-master. In such a school the most gifted child 
can find a challenge, and the least gifted gains confidence and courage. 

It is the purpose of the Demonstration School to give expression to this new con- 
ception of the nature of education, which is today so profoundly modifying all teaching 
procedures. 




DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL 
Dr. Daily, Miss Woodruff, Miss Knopp, Mr. Silverthorn, Miss L. Wilson, Miss Talbot, Mess Mel 
Mr. Jacobs, Miss Wolfangle, Miss Smith, Mrs. Baldwin, Miss Meredith, Mr. Humphreys. 



Thirty-s 



BUSINESS 
OFFICE 




The money receiving end 

The Business Office acts as the coordinating unit of all divisions of the college. 
Its work of analyzing and dealing with student financial problems and bringing these 
before the Administration draws all three of these groups into close and friendly contact 
with one another. 

Besides executing a uniform accounting system prescribed for all state institutions, 
the Business Office is responsible for collection of all state money. Under the newly 
established fiscal policy all finances are reported to this center for administrative control. 

Not only does the business staff deal with student finances, but it prepares a budget 
aimed to keep all types of expenditures at an efficient minimum and yet retain high 
standards. The state appropriates a certain sum of money each year for the maintenance 
of the college, but the greater part of the money required is collected from the students. 
This fact in itself makes any attempt at budgeting a difficult one. A staff of four people 
under the direction of the Bursar and Revenue Agent carries out these business functions. 




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Miss Young, Miss Abel, Mr 



BUSINESS STAFF 
McCauley, Mrs. A. Clayton. Mr. Postles, Miss Finegan 
. M, Clayton, Mrss Swayne, Mrs. Thomson, Mr. Roberts- 



Thirty-seven 




MAIN DORM'S "OPEN SESAME' 
The crossroads of ca,npus life. 



Thirty-eight 



GRADUATES 



Every year a group of Seniors leave West Chester 
realizing that their campus life has been crammed with 
enjoyment and companionship. Not until their college days 
are really over do they recognize the extent to which their 
lives have centered about campus activities. To them each 
event has been a tempting promise for the future,- each diffi- 
culty, a test of their courage and enthusiasm. 

No class history can portray the march of events, for 
each Senior cherishes his own college "march of time." 
For one, the Senior Week-end has been the culmination of 
the hopes of four years, and for another, the actual receiving 
of the degree. But to all, the knowledge that they are almost 
prepared and free to commence a new life makes the Senior 
year one of thrilling expectations. 

Perhaps the Seniors have always observed the under- 
classmen with dignified amusement, but only because of a 
strange intermingling of regret and joy — regret, because 
four years have passed so quickly,- joy, because many adven- 
turous explorations challenge them. This anticipation and 
eagerness for new experiences cause campus life to become 
a background of vivid memories and impressions which future 
years will not destroy. 




Thirty-nine 



CLASS OFFICERS 



W 




Gifford Hale 
President 



Mae Grammes 
Secretary 



Ammon Apple 
Vice-President 




James Morrow 
Serpentine Editor 



Louise Malkames 
Treasurer 



James Mathers 
Serpentine Business Manager 



Forty 



CLASS ADVISERS 




Dr. Charles A. Selzer 



From Freshman days of four years ago 
to Senior days of nineteen hundred 
thirty-six, Miss Kiess has shared in the 
joys and troubles of the graduating class. 
She has helped to solve class problems 
not as a person bearing the title "Ad- 
viser" but rather as an invaluable friend 
of the class. Miss Kiess has willingly co- 
operated with class officers and com- 
mittees in planning all class functions, 
and the success of these activities has 
been largely due to her guidance. 



Four years ago Dr. Selzer entered into 
all class plans and organizations with 
such enthusiasm that he immediately made 
the entire class aware of his sincere 
desire and ability to help. The class is 
especially grateful for the constant guid- 
ance which Dr. Selzer has given in the 
past year. FHowever, no stilted written 
phrase will suffice in expressing the 
appreciation of the Senior Class in having 
Dr. Selzer as an adviser for four years. 




Miss Emma Kiess 



ler 



Forty-one 







HELEN CLAIRE ALBER 

Penny 

321 N. Lansdowne Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Psychology Club 2, 3, 4, President 4, Vice- 
president 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Delaware County Club 1, 2; 
Elementary Club 4. 

INTERESTS: Nature study, elocution, music, interior decorating. 

FEATURE: Delving into psychology. 



K]^ m^ '' 



-a|^^s> 




ROBERT L. ANDERSON 
"Bob" 

563 Buttonwood Street, Norristovi/n, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. M. C A. 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Little 
Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4; Male Quartette 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; 
Dance Band 3, 4,- Glee Club 1; Moore Society, Vice- 
president 3. 

INTERESTS: Scrapbooks, music, modern authors and their 
books, photos. 

FEATURE: FHis appetite. 



\C "^^ 




AMMON ALAN APPLE 
"App" 

Thirteenth Street and Oak Lone Avenue, Oak Lane, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Little Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 4; 
Male Quartette 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C A. 3, 4; Glee Club 4; 
Class Vice-president 4; Moore Society, President 3, Vice- 
president 4; Chairman, Senior Week-end Committee. 

INTERESTS: Singing, dramatics, history, managing ring com- 
mittee. 

FEATURE: Actor, executor, musician. 




DOROTHY ELIZABETH AUBREY 
"Dot" 

579 Alter Street, FHazleton, Pa. 
COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Hostess Club 3, 4,- Rural Club 1,- Y. W. C A. 3; 

Elementary Club 4; Luzerne County Club 1,- Fire Brigade 2; 

Aryan Society. 
INTERESTS: Blondes, Glen Gray's Orchestra, nature study. 
FEATURE: Chattering. 



Forty-two 



BURTINA MAY AUMACK 

"Burt" 

Florence Avenue, Keyport, N. J. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 2, 3, 4; Psychology 
Club 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Herodotus Club 3, A, Glee 
Club 3, 4; Hockey 1, 2; W. A. A. 1; Hostess Club A, 
Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: English, history, dancing, swimming. 

FEATURE: Chief finger-waver. 




MARY ELIZABETH BAREFORD 

135 E. Lancaster Avenue, Downingtown, Pa. 
COURSE: Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Student Council 3, 4, Vice-president 4; Advisory 
Board 4; Glee Club 1, 3, 4, Treasurer A; Music Club 2; 
Library Club 1; Book Club 1; Elementary Club A; Aryan 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Collecting poetry, music, tennis, knitting, pretty 
handkerchiefs. 

FEATURE: Fine publicity agent. 



I 



MERLIN E. BECK 

"Take It Easy ' 

51 N. Fourteenth Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Band 4; Secondary Education Club 4,- Science 
Club 4; Bible Study Club 4,- Intramural Basketball 4. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, traveling, education courses, awakening 
Groff, pulling puns. 

FEATURE: Lecturing on trans-continental travels. 




SYLVIA KATHRYN BECKER 
"Sib" 

26 W. Main Street, Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 2, 3, 4,- Basketball 1, 
3; Hostess Club 4; Hockey 1; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Horseback riding, swimming, dancing, English, 
history. 

FEATURE: One of our style experts. 




Forty-three 




CONSTANCE EVELLYN BEECHER 

"Connie 

89 N. Eighteenth Street, hiarrisburg, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C. A.^ 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 4; 
hHostess Club 3, 4,- Girls' Band 2, 3; hierodotus Club 3; 
Quad Angles 4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Peace work, music, sewing, swimming, reading, 
collecting jewelry. 

FEATURE: Well-known pacifist. 



Mr 




MAURICE JOSEPH BERTOLINi 

■■Bert" 

Jenners, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Varsity Club 2, 3, A, Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4 
Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 2, 3,- Y. M. C A. 3, 4 
Secondary Education Club 4,- Science Club 4; Football 1 
Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: FHistoricol research, hunting, baseball. 

FEATURE: Yodeling his cowboy songs. 




MARGARET ELIZABETH BISHOP 

■Peggy^ 

513 Gay Street, Phoenixville, Pa. 

COURSE: Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4,- 
Elementary Club 4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Roller skating, dancing, horseback riding, collect- 
ing books, poetry. 

FEATURE: Traveling on the ■'Phoenixville Special." 




RAY CHARLES BITTERLICH 

3834 Albemarle Avenue. Drexel Hill ,Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Psychology Club 1 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 3, 4; 

Ouad Angles 2, 3, 4, Associate Editor A, Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 

Publicity Manager 3; Swimming Team 1, 2; Science Club 2; 

Aryan Society, Vice-president 4. 
INTERESTS: Newspaper writing, swimming, classical music, 

collecting metaphysical publications. 
FEATURE: Psychologist, psychoanalyst, and psychiatrist. 



Forty-four 



HAROLD RAYMOND BLACKSTONE 

■•Hal" 

121 Walnut Avenue, Wayne, Pc. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 1, 2, 3,- Travelers 
Club 3. 

INTERESTS: Chinese music, interesting people, camping, 
traveling, psychology. 

FEATURE: Amateur radio operator of station W3DLF. 




MARGUERITE LAURA BLEY 

"Nellie" 

25 Centre Street, Tamaqua, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Psychology Club 2, 3, President 3; Science 
Club 2; Glee Club 2; Travelers Club 2; Secondary Educa- 
tion Club 4; Serpentine 4,- EHostess Club 4. 

INTERESTS: Psychology, reading, dancing, getting in Mor- 
row's hair by being different. 

FEATURE: Mixing up "Cooky." 



HARRIET MARIE BORG 

102 Canton Street, Warren, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C A. 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Class Treasurer 
1; W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Symphony Orchestra 2, 3, 4,- Hostess 
3; Student Council 2,- Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Rare collections, physical activity, photography, 
concerts. 

FEATURE: Jack-of-all-trades. 



ETHEL LOUISE BOTTKE 

"Effie" 

809 Prospect Avenue, Prospect Park, Pa. 

COURSE: Kindergarten-Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4,- Glee Club 1, 2, 3, A, 
Hostess Club 2, A; Elementary Club A-. World Fellowship 
Committee 2; Archery Club 1,- Bible Study Club 1. 

INTERESTS: Dramatics, horseback riding, swimming. 

FEATURE: In constant pursuit of the fine arts. 




I 




Forty- five 




A A 



BESSIE PAULINE BOYCE 

"Betty" 

26 N. New Street, West Chester, Pa. 

COURSE: Primary-Elementary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Book Club 3, 4; Elementary Education Club 4,- 
Music Club 3; Travelers Club 2. 

INTERESTS: Studying children, traveling, music, art, dancing. 

FEATURE: Seldom worries. 



CARL WILSON BOYER 

"Ox" 

20 N. West Street, York, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3, 4,- Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- 
y. M. C A. 1, 2, 3; Student Council 1, 2,- Lower Court 2, 
3; Assistant Basketball Manager 3. 

INTERESTS: Sports, reading, camping, 

FEATURE: A cheery word and contagious smile. 



BERTHA VIRGINIA BOYLE 

"Bert" 
484 Hope Street, Providence, Rhode Island 
COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Valkyrie Club 3, 4,- Fire Brigade 3, 4. 
INTERESTS: Tap dancing, sports. 
FEATURE: Life of the party. 




MARY TERESA BRENNAN 
"M. T." 

HON. Tomoqua Street, McAdoo, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. 2, 3; 

Secondary Education Club 3, 4; Hostess Club 3, 4,- W. A. A. 

1; Moore Society. 
INTERESTS: Reading, dancing. 
FEATURE: Expert in finding shortest distance between two 

points. 



Forty-six 



CHARLES F. BRUSCH 

"Fuller" 

R. F. D. No. 3, Norristown, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. M. C. A. Cabinet 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3,- 
Secondary Education Club 1, 2; Student Council 3, 4, 
President 4; College Government Association 4, Treasurer 
4; Varsity Club 3, 4; Cross Country Manager 1 ,- Baseball 
Manager 2,- Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Gardening, horseback riding, sports, photo- 
graphy, mechanics, traveling. 

FEATURE: Socks of brilliant colors. 



CHARLES SEWARD BUTTON 

"Zipper" 
55 W. Eighth Street, Wyoming, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 
ACTIVITIES: Transfer. 

INTERESTS: F^iking, accompanying, theatre, music. 
FEATURE: A yellow turtle-neck sweater. 




LOIS AILEEN CARNEY 

"Loyce" 

Robertsdole, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 4,- Orchestra 2, 
3, 4; Band 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. 2, 3, 4,- Herodotus Club 3, 4,- 
Bible Study Club 3, 4,- FHostess Club 4,- Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Collecting snapshots, hiking, knitting, dancing, 
archery, reading. 

FEATURE: Music, dance, and song. 




FLORENCE HARRIETTE CARTER 
"Flo" 

115 E. Montgomery Avenue, Ardmore, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 
ACTIVITIES: W. A. A. 3, 4,- Valkyrie Club 4. 
INTERESTS: Knitting, dancing, singing, sports. 
FEATURE: Sociable and high-spirited. 




Forty-seven 




"m 



MAY MARTIN CARTER 

"May" 

5528 Willows Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

COURSE: Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 4; Poster Club 3; Travelers Club 3,- 
Music Club 1; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Music, art. 

FEATURE: Being very quiet. 



MARY GERTRUDE CASTNER 

"Gertie" 

567 Seneca Avenue, Norwood, Pa. 

COURSE: Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Student Council 2, 3; Lower Court 4,- Elemen- 
tary Education Club 4; Day Student Club 1; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Collecting dolls, dancing, art, tennis, travel. 

FEATURE: Smiling at troubles. 




BETTY HOLIDAY CLARK 

"Bets" 
Broomall, Po. 
COURSE: Elementary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Little Theatre 2, 3, 4; Book Club 1, 2, Student 
Council 1 , 2; Elementary Club 4,- Day Student Club 1 ; Moore 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Camping, reading, collecting pictures, poetry. 

FEATURE: Going or about to go. 




JOSEPH D. CLOUSER 

"Joe" 
25 S. Walnut Street, West Chester, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Symphony Band 1, 2, 3, 4,- 
Music Club 1, 2, 3, President 3; Symphony Orchestra 3, 4,- 
Varsity Club 4. 
INTERESTS: Music, athletics, reading. 
FEATURE: Classical and modern trumpeting. 



Forty-eight 



RITA LUCILLE COAKLEY 

"Patsy" 

EllengoNA'an, Shenandoah, Pa. 

COURSE: Elementary-Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Elementary Club A, 
Schuylkill County Club 3,- Travelers Club 2; Book Club 1 ,• 
Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, reading. 

FEATURE: Acting — especially as the villainess. 



CHARLES SHOEMAKER CONARD 

"Chic" 

55 E. Stewart Avenue, Lansdowne, Pa. 

COURSE- Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Gym Team 1 , 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Soccer 1 , 2, 3, 4,- 
Olympic Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4,- Swimming Team 2, 
3, 4, Captain 4,- Track Team 2, 3, 4,- Y. M. C A. 1, 2; 
Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Woodwork, archery, science, sports. 

FEATURE: Found: one all-round athlete. 



WILLIAM R. COURSEN 
"Bill" 

224 E. Poplar Street, Plymouth, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 3, A, President 4; 

Science Club 1, 2,- Luzerne County Club 1, 2, President 2; 

Little Theatre 3, 4,- Class Treasurer 2; Y. M. C. A. 3; Glee 

Club 1; Aryan Society. 
INTERESTS: Traveling, dancing, swimming, reading other 

people. 
FEATURE: Popularizing the latest dance steps. 




MARION LOUISE CRAGG 

"Craggie" 
219 E. Oakdale Avenue, Glenside, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretory 3; Fire Brigade 
2, 3; Girls' Drum Corps 4,- Y. W. C A. A, Montgomery 
County Club 1; Student Council 4,- Hostess Club 3, 4,- Moore 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Operas, sports, swimming. 

FEATURE: Life is her song. 




Forty-nine 




Ik ^ 




MARGUERITE WALLACE CRAMER 

"Peg" 

60 S. Green Street, East Stroudsburg, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Girl Trumoeters 1, 2, 3; 
Girls' Band 1, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. 3, 4; Drum Corps 3,- Moore 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Scrapbooks, hiking, reading, art. 

FEATURE: "Have you heard the latest?" 



EMMA KATHERINE CROSLEY 

"Emma Kay 

3639 Brisban Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C 
A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 4; Science Club 2, 3, 4; Student 
Council 3, hdigher Court 3,- Hostess Club 2, 3,- Herodotus 
Club 4; Bible Study Club 1; Moore Socie.ty. 

INTERESTS: Horseback riding, puns, learning to grin and bear 
It. 

FEATURE: Punning sportswoman. 



MARGARET GERTRUDE CUNKELMAN 

Brownie 

200 N. Fifth Street, Jeannette, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Y. W. C A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 3, 4,- Social 
Service Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, President 3, 4; Hostess 
Club 2, 3, 4; Herodotus Club 4; Music Club 1; Moore 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Sewing, reading. 

FEATURE: One and one moke two. 



ANN E. CUNNINGHAM 

1716 Main Street, Aliquippa, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Hockey Team 
1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Valkyrie Club 2, 3, A, 
Publicity Manager 3; Student Council 4,- Hostess Club 4; 
Bible Study Club 1. 

INTERESTS: Hockey, basketball. 

FEATURE: "A darn good sport." 



Fifty 



JACK DOYLE CURRAN 

"Champ" 

814 N. Washington Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Y. M. C. A. 3, 4; 
Quad Angles 4,- Secondary Education Club 4; Science 
Club 4; Psychology Club 3,- Cross Country 3; Football 1; 
Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Fishing, hunting, hiking, basketball, historical 
research. 

FEATURE: "Don't worry — I'll have it done." 



ALICE ELIZABETH CUTAIAR 

"Cutie " 
R. D. No. 2, Baltimore Pike, Kennett Square, Pa. 
COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Student Council 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Advisory 
Board 3, 4, Secretary 4,- French Club 1, 2, Secretary 2; 
Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, hiking, music, teaching. 

FEATURE: "My pal. Gal." 



EVANS B. DAGUE 

"Daguey" 

Parkesburg, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Science Club 3, 4,- Soccer 1, 2; Track 1, 2; 
Quad Angles 4,- Day Student Council 4; Lower Court 4,- 
Day Student Club 1; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Bridge, reading, sports, science, puns. 

FEATURE: Arriving late to classes. 



ESTHER DANEHOWER 

Colmar, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 
ACTIVITIES: Science Club 4; Secondary Education Club 4,- 



Aryan Society, Vice-president 3, Rush Con 
aub2;Y. W. C. A. 1. 

INTERESTS: Swimming, reading, sports. 

FEATURE: Taking her time. 



ittee 3; Library 







Fifty-one 






i.^ 



GERTRUDE DAVIS 

"Trudy" 

238 N. SixtyTirst Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C. A. 2, 4; Science Club 1; Book Club 1; 
Elementary Club 4,- Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Reading, dancing, watching sports, attending cur- 
rent shows. 
FEATURE: Well worth knowing. 



JOSEPH GEORGE DEMANCZYK 

Demon 

514 W. Atlantic Street, Shenandoah, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 3,- Secondary 
Education Club 3, 4, Newman Club 1, 2; V. M. C A. 4; 
Bond 1; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Mounting leaves, flowers, and algae,- science 
teaching; sports. 

FEATURE: Charter member of the Anderson "Kaffeeklatsch." 



ALICE WILES DENNIS 

Do^/ningtown, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 4; Library Club 1; 
Music Club 2,- Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Reading, playing pipe organ, contemporary poet- 
ry, football. 

FEATURE: Discovering more books to read. 



HARRY G. DETWILER 

"Detty" 

Spring City, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 2, 3, 4; Serpentine 
4; Day Student Club 1; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, art of all forms, jerking sodas. 

FEATURE: Getting the latest bit of scandal. 



Fifty-two 



ANDREW HOWARD DILLMAN 

"Dutch" 

8115 Hennig Street, Fox Chase, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Symphony Band 1, 2, 3, 4, Librarian 3, 4,- 
Symphony Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4,- Vesper Choir 1, 2, 3, 4,- 
College String Trio 1, 2, 3, 4; Music Club 1, 2; Y. M. C. A. 
1, 2; Glee Club 2, Soloist 2,- Travelers Club 3; Aryan 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Tennis, hunting, swimming, orchestra and band 
work. 

FEATURE: "Big Brother Andy." 



ELEANOR M. DIVINE 

121 Magnolia Street, West Chester, Pa. 
COURSE: Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Herodotus Club 3, 4, Book Club 1, 2; Delaware 
County Club 2. 

INTERESTS: Swimming, taking long walks, colonial architec- 
ture. 

FEATURE: Always doing home work. 




A A 



HESTER EMMA DOAN 

407 E. Lincoln Highway, Coatesville, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Little Theatre 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C A. 1, 2, 4,- 
Symphony Band 3, 4; Symphony Orchestra 3, 4; Music Club 
1; Hostess Club 2,- Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Knitting, reading, dancing, swimming. 

FEATURE: Whose Gettysburg address? 



FRANCIS DONNON 

"Frank" 

Gwynedd, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3, 4,- Track 1, 2, 3, A; Varsity 
Club 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2,- Y. M. C. A. 2,- Serpentine 4,- 
Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Football, basketball. 

FEATURE: Snooping for Men's Athletics. 




Fifty-three 



JOSEPHINE M. EASTBURN 

"Joey" 

R. D. No. 3, Coatesville, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Hostess Club 4; Y. W. C. A- 
1; Fire Brigade 3. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, knitting. 

FEATURE: Silent but full of fun. 




ALICE FREDERICKA EGGERT 

"Eggie" 

254 W. Douglass Street, Reading, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Valkyrie Club 2, 3, A, President 4, Treasurer 3; 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, A, Council 2, 3,- Berks County Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Basketball 2, 3, A, Hockey 2, 3, 4; Quad Angles 3, 4,7. 
W. C. A. 1, A; Moore Society,- Women's Student Govern- 
ment Association 3; Hostess Club 3. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, swimming, scrapbooks, reading, eating. 

FEATURE: "For she's a jolly good fellow!" 




HARVEY THOMAS EGGLESTON 

Harve 

76 Carlisle Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. M, C. A. Cabinet 1, 2, 3, 4,- Secondary 
Education Club 1, 2,3,4,- Newman Club 1, 2,- Football Man- 
ager 3; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Geography, science, stage work, English, danc- 
ing, travel, directing musicals. 

FEATURE: An up-state tapper. 



"SW^P^ ^Ik 




LEROY JAMES ELLIS 

"Le" 

Ridley Park, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 2, 3, 4,- Little Theatre 
1, 4; Class Treasurer 2,- Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Dramatics, politics, history, travel, antiques; col- 
lecting pictures, stamps, and coins; baseball. 

FEATURE: Taking the opposite view. 



Fifty-four 



ROBERT B. ELRICK 

"Bob" 

Avondale, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Day Student Council A, 
Treasurer 4,- Student Government Association 4; Secondary 
Education Club 4; Tennis Manager 4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Tennis, golf, swimming, dancing, reeding, science, 

mathematics. 
FEATURE: Mischiefs lurking near. 



WILLIAM E. ELRICK 
"Bill" 

Avondale, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Track 1, 2, 3, 4, Manager 4; Soccer 1, 2; 
Olympic Club 3, 4; Science Club 4; Gym Teom 3, 4. 

INTERESTS: Sports, reading, sketching. 

FEATURE: Grinning and bearing it. 



DORCAS MAE ERB 

"Smokie ' 

411 Franklin Street, East Pittsburgh, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Little Theatre 3, 4; Bible Study Club 3, 4; 
Vesper Choir 4,- Oucd Angles 4; Symphony Orchestra 3,- 
Symphony Bond 3, 4; Y. W. C A. 3, 4; Moore Society, 

INTERESTS: Dancing, tennis, finger waving. 

FEATURE: A "smoky-city" lass. 



ELIZABETH WEIDMAN EVANS 

"Betty" 

Sinking Spring, Pa. 

COURSE: Elementary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Berks County Club 1, 2,- 
Secondary Education Club 1; Psychology Club 2, 3,- Fire 
Brigade 4, Lieutenant 4,- Elementary Education Club 4,- 
Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Recreational work, reading, talking, collecting 
autographs. 

FEATURE: "I tell you, it was marvelous!" 





IM 




Fifty-fi\ 




i^ 




EMILY ANN EVANS 

113 E. Hancock Street, St. Clair, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1,2 3, 4,- Girls' Trumpet Corps 2, 3, 
4; y. W. C. A. 1, 4; Fire Brigade 2; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, swimming, dramatics, music, literature. 

FEATURE: What the well-dressed woman wears. 



AMY ELIZABETH FABIAN 

"Famie' 

405 West Avenue, Jenkintown, Pa. 

COURSE: Elementary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Travelers Club 1 2, 3; Elementary Club 4; 
Bible Study Club 1. 

INTERESTS: Collecting pictures, clippings, and books for 
children; sports. 

FEATURE: Ouietness reigns. 





ARLENE ELMA FEHNEL 

' Arleeny 

224 Belvidere Street, Nazareth, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 2, 3, 4; Quad 
Angles 4; Basketball 1, 3; Little Theatre 4,- Hockey 1; 
W. A. A. 1; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Swimming, horseback riding, dancing, biographies. 

FEATURE: "Where is Sylvia?" 



EDITH FEED 
"Edie" 

5731 Broomall Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Day Student Council 3, 4, Secretary 3, President 
4; French Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 1, 2; Quad Angles 3, 4; 
Senior Class Tree-Planting Committee 4; Secondary Edu- 
cation Club 3; Psychology Club 2; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Handicraft, tap dancing, social service work, 
waiting for the train at 6:20 a.m. 

FEATURE: Standing in the rain, hoping to grow one inch. 



Fifty-six 



ELIZABETH MICKLEY FOGEL 

"Betty" 

40 N. Jefferson Street, Allentown, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 3, A; 
Student Council 3, Lower Court 3,- Secondary Education 
Club 3; fHostess Club 3. 

INTERESTS: Reading, designing houses, knitting tennis, swim- 
ming, collecting letters. 

FEATURE: FHarmonizing with roomie. 



CATHARINE MARCELLA FOLEY 

"Kitty" 

246 E. Bacon Street, Polo Alto, Pa. 

COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Elementary Club 4,- Rural Club 3; Travelers 
Club 2; Bulletin Board Club 1. 

INTERESTS: Collecting children's poems and pictures, reading, 
dramatics, hiking. 

FEATURE: Visiting the library. 



EARL JACKSON FRICK 

Tricky" 

296 River Street, Forty Fort, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Bond 1, 2, 3, 4; Symphony Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; 
y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Purple and Gold Criterions 3, A, 
Cass Treasurer 1,- Music Club 3,- Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Mechanics. 

FEATURE: The Ford that goes forty for Forty Fort. 



EARL LESTER FUOSS 

722 Fifth Avenue, Juniata, Altoona, Pa. 
COURSE: FHealth Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3, 4,- Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, A, 
Lower Court 2, 3, 4,- Y. M. C A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3; 
Junior Prom Committee 3,- Bible Study Club 1, 2,- Aryan 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Target shooting, dancing, sports, collecting pic- 
tures. 

FEATURE: A successful pilot in time of need. 




I 



J 




iL 



Fifty-s 





RALPH ALBERT FUOSS 

722 Fifth Avenue, Juniata, Altoona, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 2, 3, 4,- Varsity Club 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 
4; Olympic Club 3, 4, Treasurer 4; Gym Team 2, 3, 4; Track 
2, 3, 4; Bible Study Club 1, 2. 

INTERESTS: Stamp collecting, art, sports of all kinds. 

FEATURE: The quiet one of the Fuoss brothers. 





'; -^ 




BETTY ROSE GALLAGHER 

"Betts" 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Science Club 1; Elementary Club 4,- Glee Club 
2, Treasurer 2,- Hostess Club 4,- French Club 2, Secretary 2; 
Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Reading, dancing, soccer, football. 

FEATURE: "There's a smile that makes us happy." 



DONALD YETTER GARDNER 

"Don" 

Portland, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Little Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Bond 1, 2, 
3, 4; Symphony Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4; Class President 2; 
Class Vice-President 1; Y. M. C A. 1, Cabinet 1; Quod 
Angles 4; Serpentine 4; Senior Week-end Committee 4; 
Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Tennis, golf, music. 

FEATURE: Knighthood is still in flower. 





FLORENCE B. GEHMAN 

Ginkie 

29 Harvey Avenue, Doylestown, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, President A, Valkyrie Club 
2, 3, 4; Student Council 2; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3; 
Basketball 1, 3,- Science Club 1, 2,- Bible Study Club 1, 2, 3,- 
Fire Brigade 3; W. A, A. Council 2, 3, 4,- Moore Society, 
Secretary 4. 

INTERESTS: Sports, dancing, eating. 

FEATURE: "Eat, drink, and be merry." 



Fifty-eight 



MADELINE ESTHER GENDALL 

"Madge" 

241 S. Sixth Street, Reading, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Berks County Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Music Club 3, Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Music, crocheting, movies, dancing, sports. 

FEATURE: "Ach, du liebe, Reading is here." 



JAMES CLIFFORD GERMAN 

"Jim" 

Boyertown, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Cross Country 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Captain 4; Track 2, 3, 4,- Basketball 2; Swimming 3, 4; 
Intramural Basketball Champions 3,- Y. M. C. A. 1 . 

INTERESTS: Teaching, coaching, tennis, swimming, bowling, 
reading. 

FEATURE: First class distance man. 



ALICE LYDIA GILBERT 

"The Mill", Westchester, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Serpentine 4; Quad Angles 3, 4,- Travelers 
Club 1, 2, 3, President 3, Secretary 2,- W. A. A. 1; Rural 
Club 4, Reporter 4,- Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Writing, sewing, cooking, painting, hiking. 

FEATURE: Conscientiousness and domesticity. 



ELIZABETH ADAIRE GILLINDER 

"Betty" 

Neshominy Springs, Lonsdale, Pa. 

COURSE: Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C A. 1 , 3, 4,- Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secre- 
tary 4; W. A. A. 3; Montgomery County Club 1, 2, Treas- 
urer 2; Bible Study Club 2, 3, Secretary 2; Elementary Club 
4, Vice-president 4,- Fire Brigade 3; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Swimming, osteopathy (biographies). 

FEATURES: Charter member of "Our Gang." 







Fifty-nine 




BERNARD GOLDBERGER 

' Bernie 

1019 Johnston Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

COURSE: hHeolth Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Varsity Club 3, 4; Serpentine Photo Editor 4; 
Football 2; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Moore Society,- Senior Week- 
end Decorations 2, 3, 4. 

INTERESTS: Sports, sculptoring, opera. 

FEATURE: Chasing senior proofs. 



5%' 




MAE EDNA GRAMMES 

"Mae" 

Egypt, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Women's Student Government Council 4; Y. W. 
C. A. 4; Class Secretary 4; W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, Council 4; 
Girls' Trumpet Corps 1, 2, 3, 4; Hostess Club 2, 3, 4; Fire 
Brigade 1, 2; Music Club 1, 2, 3; Class Treasurer 3; Moore 
Society,- Senior Week-end Committee 4. 

INTERESTS: Music, sports, reading. 

FEATURE: A charming music "supe. " 




FRANK E. GROFF 

"Sonny" 

Berwyn, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Tennis 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball 1, 2,- Travelers Club 1, 2, Vice-president 2; 
Serpentine 4; Quad Angles 3, 4, Business Manager 4; Day 
Student Council 4; Varsity Club 4; Student Government 
Association 4,- Intramural Basketball 3, 4,- Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Trying out all colleges, sports, traveling, bridge. 

FEATURE: Ail-American intercollegiate credit seeker. 



CHARLES ALBERT GRUBER 

"Charley 

518 S. Walnut Street, West Chester, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Vigilance 
Committee 3. 

INTERESTS: The "Phillies " — waiting for next year. 

FEATURF- FHis ten rules of algebra. 



Sixty 



ALBERT GARRETT GWINN 

312 Union Avenue, Swarthmore, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain A, Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Captain 4,- Basketball 1, 3, 4; Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Gym 
Team 2. 

INTERESTS: Fishing, hunting, playing baseball in summer. 

FEATURE: Saving basketball games. 



ELIZABETH VIRGINIA HAINES 

"Betty" 

Mickleton, N. J. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W, C. A. 1, 3, 4; Class Secretary 2,- Student 
Council 2; FHostess Club 3, 4; Lancaster County Club 1 ; 
Little Theatre 2, 3, 4; Music Club 1; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Traveling in U. S., reading, collecting recipes, 
interior decorating. 

FEATURE: An understanding companion. 




GIFFORD GRAHAM HALE 
"Giff" 

710 Pembroke Avenue, E. Lansdowne, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Class President 4; Ouad Angles 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Feature Editor 2, 3, Assistant Editor 4,- Debating 2, 3, 4; 
Little Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 3; Class Vice- 
president 3; Junior Prom Committee 3,- Student Peace Com- 
mittee 3, 4; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Dramatics, journalism, politics, creative writing, 
international relations. 

FEATURE: Pacifist, president, and player. 



-^^ ^p. 



JOHN GROVER HART 

"Jack" 

523 Ninth Avenue, Prospect Park, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 2, 3, 4,- Glee Club 3,- Y. M. C A. 1, 2, 
3, 4; Little Theatre 2; College Government Association 4, 
President 4; Varsity Club 4; Intramural Basketball 2, 3; 
Aryan Society,- Student Council 4. 

INTERESTS: Reading, sleeping, teaching little children. 

FEATURE: Ruddy-faced and smiling. 





Sixty-one 






KATHRYN MAY HARTZELL 

Kay" 

120 Kline Street, Bangor, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Hostess Club 2, 3, 4,- 
W. A. A. 1, 2; y. W. C. A. 1; Student Council 2; Luzerne 
County Club 1; Symphony Orchestra 3, 4; Symphony Band 
3, 4; Girls' Trumpet Corps 2, 3, 4,- Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Music, athletics, literature. 

FEATURE: Constancy is her virtue. 



GENEVA D. HENDERSON 

"Genny-Wenny " 
906 Cedar Avenue, Darby, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1, 2, 3; Girls' Band ^, 2, 3. 
INTERESTS: Singing, crocheting. 
FEATURE: "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot." 



PHYLLIS HENRY 

"Phyl" 
129 President Avenue, Rutledge, Pa. 
COURSE: Elementary Education. 
ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 3, 4. 

INTERESTS: Swimming, reading, dancing, art, theatre, music. 
FEATURE: A ready smile. 




MARGARET EMMA HERMAN 

"Peg" 

Malvern, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4,- Valkyrie Club 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3; Student Council 2, 3; Glee Club 1,- Hockey 1, 
2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Scrap books, sports, horseback riding, music. 

FEATURE: Capability, reliability, and likeability. 



Sixty-two 






BETTYE ROBERTA MILLIARD 

448 Third Street, Pitcairn, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Student Council 3, 4, Secretary 4.- Y. W. C. A. 
1, 2, 3; Basketball 2, 3, A, W. A. A. 2, 3, 4; Hockey 2, 3, 4,- 
Hostess Club 2, 3, 4; College Government Association 
Finance Committee 4,- Valkyrie Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; 
Glee Club 1; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Reading, scrap books, sports, music, zoology 
drawings. 

FEATURE: Vigorous and vital. 




MARY ELIZABETH HILLIBUSH 

"Toots" 
915 W. Center Street, Mahanoy City, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3; Schuylkill County Club 2,- 
Hostess Club 4; Fire Brigade 4; Music Club 2; Girls' Drum 
Corps 4; Moore Society. 
INTERESTS: Poetry, cooking, collecting books, giving character 

sketches. 
FEATURE: Charming little lady. 




V 



GERTRUDE ANNA HIRSCH 

"Gretchen 
226 Penn Boulevard, East Lonsdowne, Pa. 
COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Travelers Club 1, 2,- Glee Club 3, A, Elementary 
Club 4; Student Council 3; Y. W. C. A. 4; Aryan Society; 
Executive Committee 4. 

INTERESTS: Art, athletics, drawing, reading. 

FEATURE: Just taking things easy. 




MIRIAM HOAGLAND 

"Minnie" 

849 Louisa Street, Wilhamsport, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C A. 1, 2, 3, 4,- Music Club 1, 2, 3; 
Lancaster County Club 1, 2,- Glee Club 2, 3; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Music, theatre, literature, sports. 

FEATURE: Activity in music circles. 




Sixty-thr 




BETTY C. HOSACK 

616 Liberty Street, Clarion, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: W. A. A. 3, 4, Publicity Manager 4, Quad 
Angles 3, 4,- Basketball 3, 4; Tennis Finals 3, 4,- Council 4; 
Hostess Club 4; Girls' Sports Reporter 4; V. W. C. A. 4; 
Hockey 3; Baseball 3; Psychology Club 3,- Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Sports of all kinds, journalism. 

FEATURE: Championship tennis calibre. 





JOHN BERNARD HOWLEY 

Deacon " 

33 E. Twenty-sixth Street, Chester, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Varsity Club 2, 3, 4,- Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4; Science 
Club 1, 2, 3; y. M. C A. 1, 2; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Making friendships, teaching sports, salesmanship. 

FEATURE: Earnest and energetic. 



MICHAEL J. HUDICKA 

"Mike" 

24 Rhune Street, Nesquehoning, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; Carbon 
County Club 1, 2; Intramural Basketball 3, 4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: All kinds of sports. 

FEATURE: Slashing through the line. 



ROBERT THOMAS HUGHES 
"Bob" 

722 Wheeler Avenue, Scranton, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Bible Study Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Science 
Club 1, 2; Secondary Education Club 3, 4,- Psychology 

Club 3. 

INTERESTS: Mathematics, science, camping, tinkering with 
machines. 

FEATURE: Efficiency as a student. 



Sixty-four 



SARAH B. HUNN 

■■Sally" 

39 Forest Avenue, Morton, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Delaware County Club 1; 
Girl Scouts 1; Science Club 2; Hockey, Captain 2; Baseball, 
Captain 1; Swimming Manager 4; Day Student Government 
Association 2, 3,- Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Sports, travel, promotion of adult education for 
leisure time, fiandwork and crafts. 

FEATURE: Reserved, but a good friend. 




ELSIE STUEBGEN HUNTER 

2012 Noble Street, Swissvale, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3,- Bible Study Club 4; Vesper 
Qioir 4; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Writing stories, music composition. 

FEATURE: From western Pennsy. 



ELIZABETH DICKEY HUTCHISON 

"Betty" 

West Grove, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Frencfi Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 2, 4; 
Debating 2, 3, 4; Ouad Angles 3, 4, Assistant Editor 4,- 
y. W. C. A. 4. 

INTERESTS: Books, people, horseback riding, dancing. 

FEATURE: Literary addict. 





^ 



%. 




DOROTHY M. ILGENFRITZ 

"Dotty" 

605 Jessop Place, York, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. 1, 2, 3,- Valkyrie 
Club 2, 3, 4. 

INTERESTS: Sports of all kinds. 

FEATURE: Nonchalance personified. 




Sixty-fi\ 






ESTHER MAY JACKSON 

"Jack 

Cochranville, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1, 2, 3, A, Y. W. C. A. 2, 3, 4; 
Hostess Club A; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Music, sports, theatre, picture collecting, reading, 
dancing. 

FEATURE: The country maiden. 



GRACE DOLORES JAMPETERO 

Gracie" 

Pottsville, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1, 2; Symphonic Bond 2, 3, 4; 
Symphony Orchestra 2, 3, 4; Girls' Band 2, 3; Y. W. C A. 
3, 4, Cabinet 4,- Hostess Club 4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Travel, sports, playing the oboe, reading, collect- 
ing books and snapshots. 

FEATURE: Smiling all the time. 



MARGARET JANE JONES 

Jonesy 

100 S. Second Street, St. Clair, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Herodotus 
Club 2, 3, A; Y. W. C A. 2, 3,- Fire Brigade 2; Psychology 
Club 3; W. A. A. 1; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: English, history, swimming, reading, dancing. 

FEATURE: Bothered by nothing. 




RUTH ELIZABETH JONES 

"Jonesy " 

Thorndale, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Social Committee of Day Student Association 
3, By-Laws Committee 4,- Secondary Education Club 4. 

INTERESTS: Music, literature, theatre. 

FEATURE: Driving her "V-S." 



Sixty-six 



FRANCES ANNA KALBACH 

Frannie 

517 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

COURSE: Kindergarten-Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: W, A. A. 1 , 2,- Y. W. C. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4; Psychology 
Club 2, 3; Elementary Club 4; Poster Club 1, 2,- Book Club 
4; Fire Brigade 3; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Music, books, week-ends, bridge, swimming, 
dancing. 

FEATURE: A tiny mite. 




HOWARD CLARENCE KEELEY 

"Bucky 

Spring City, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Day Student Club 1; Secondary Education Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Science Club 4. 

INTERESTS: Mathematics, science. 

FEATURE: Falling asleep in class. 



CHARLES IMBRIE KENT 
"Bud" 

9 N. Thirteenth Street, FHarrisburg, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Little Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, 3; 
Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4,- Glee Club 1; Class President 1; Bible 
Study Club 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 3; Junior Prom Committee 
3; Serpentine 1, 2, 3; Poster Club 1, 2, President 2; Senior 
^X^eek-end Committee 4; Aryan Society,- Lower Court 2, 3, 
President 4. 

INTERESTS: Dramatics, literature, athletics. 

FEATURE: A classroom artist. 



SHERMAN VAN NESS KENT 

"Sherm" 

R. D. No. 2, West Chester, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Quad Angles 2, 3, 4, Editor 4,- Little Theatre 
1, 2, 3, Vice-president 3,- Psychology Club 2, 3, President 2; 
Aryan Society, President 3,- Secondary Education Club 2, 3; 
Elementary Club 4; FHerodotus Club 4; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee 3; y. M. C. A. 4. 

INTERESTS: Literature, journalism, science, philosophy. 

FEATURE: Living, learning, and laughing. 





Sixty-seven 




SARA CATHERINE KESSLER 

Pottsville, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 
4, Herodotus Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Quad Angles 3, 4, Associate 
Editor 4; W. A. A. 1 ; Serpentine 4; Y. W. C. A. 4; Newman 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Senior Week-end Committee. 

INTERESTS: Music, books. 

FEATURE: Not another laugh like hers. 




CLARA ELINOR KIRK 

"Kirkie ' 

33 Jackson Street, Port Carbon, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1, 2, 3, Y. W. C A. 1; W. A. A. 1, 
3; Schuylkill County Club 1 , 2,- Junior Chorus 1 , 2, 3; Vesper 
Choir 4; Day Student Lower Court 4; Ouod Angles 3; 
Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Swimming, horseback riding, dancing. 

FEATURE: Maintaining justice. 




JULIA GARDNER LANDIS 

"Judy" 

124 Ardmore Avenue, Ardmore, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 1, 4,- Basketball 2; 
Valkyrie Club 2, 3, 4,- W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4. 

INTERESTS: Hockey, tennis, swimming. 

FEATURE: Day-Dorm Student. 



GRACE HARRIET LANGFORD 

26 Washington Street, West Pittston, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 
4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 4; Serpentine 4; Hero- 
dotus Club 1, 2, 3; Hostess Club 4,- Bible Study Club 1, 2,- 
Book Club 1; Debating 2; Fire Brigade 3; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Reading, hiking, movies, eating. 

FEATURE: Day-dreaming all around. 



Sixty-eight 



ZELMA PUSEY LARKIN 

R. F. D. No. 1, Kennett Square, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Library Club ^ ; Secondary Education Club 2,- 
Travelers Club 3; Day Students' By-Laws Committee 3; 
Herodotus Club 4; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, swimming, music, mathematics. 

FEATURE: "There's no sense to worry." 



DOROTHY MAE LaROSE 
"Dot" 

Lionville, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 3, 4, Library Club 3,- Day Student 
Welfare Committee 4. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, music, languages, theatre, writing. 

FEATURE: Always working on assignments. 



EDITH LOUELLA LEAMAN 

"Red" 

116 S. Oueen Street, Lancaster, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Little Theatre 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Y. W. C A. 
1, 2, 3, 4; Lancaster County Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2,- 
Music Club 1; Moore Society, Secretary 3. 

INTERESTS: Athletics, science, music, dancing, fishing. 

FEATURE: "Peppy" and dazzling. 



ALBERT ANTHONY LEGNINI 

"Leg" 

60 Boulevard, Brookline, Po, 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 2, 3, 4; Day Student Orchestra 3, A; 
Vesper Choir 3, 4. 

INTERESTS: Sports, women. 

FEATURE: Making pianos talk. 








Sixty-nine 




SAMUEL HENRY LENGEL 

Sam 

Prick's, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education, 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 
3, 4; Basketball Manager 4; Intramural Basketball 3; Aryan 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Athletics, science. 

FEATURE: The perfect roommate. 



WILLIAM T. LEWIS 

"Doc" 

223 W. Catawissa Street, Nesquehoning, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Little Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4,- Secondary Education 
Club 1, 2, 3; Tennis Manager 2, 3,- Football Trainer 3; 
Carbon County Club 1, 2,- Quad Angles 4; Varsity Club 4. 

INTERESTS: Biological research, medical research writings. 

FEATURE: FHere and there — mostly there. 




WYNN HUNTER LEWIS 

Longfellow" 

Newtown Square, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1, 2, 3; Golf Team 3, 4; Aryan 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Golf, tennis, being sociable with everyone. 

FEATURE: Beck's most frequent visitor. 




HELEN ELIZABETH LICHTFUSS 

"Perky ' 
519 Walnut Street, Perkosie, Pa. 
COURSE: Elementary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3; FHockey 1, 2, 3, Captain 1; Fire Brigade, Cap- 
tain 3, 4; W. A. A. 4; FHostess Club 4, Music Club 4; 
Elementary Education Club 4,- Student Council 4; Aryan 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Letter writing, story telling, singing. 

FEATURE: The nickname Pits. 



Seventy 



ANNA MAE LIPKA 

"Ann" 

Spruce Street, Coatesville, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Travelers Club 2, 4, Secretary 4; Secondary 
Education Club 2, 4; Newman Club 4; W. A. A. 1; Moore 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Hiking, swimming, tennis. 

FEATURE: Knitting and waving. 



JOHN T. LONG 

"Longie" 

5431 Pine Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1 , 2, 3, A, Varsity Ouartette 1 , 2, 3; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Bible Study Club 1 . 

INTERESTS: Clock repairing, sports. 

FEATURE: An unexcitable commuter. 




GLENN SANFORD LUNGER 

FHughesville, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Soccer 2, 3; Basketball 1, 2; Track 3; Intramural 
Basketball Champions 3; Football 1. 

INTERESTS: Physics, chemistry. 

FEATURE: One of the senior "Champions." 



f ^t 



l&f 




J 




MILES D. McCarthy 

"Mac" 

700 E. Ridley Avenue, Ridley Park, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Day Student Club 1. 

INTERESTS: Auto-mechanics, fishing, traveling, science, foot- 
ball. 

FEATURE: McCorkle's understudy. 




Seventy-one 



GEORGE GRANT McGINNESS 

"Mac" 

486 Manor Street, Columbia, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 4; Varsity Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Sports, camping, target shooting. 

FEATURE: Animal hunter. "Look out, skunks!" 




SARAH ELLEN McKAY 

"Sally" 

Muhlenberg, Reading, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Berks County Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Music Club 2, 3; 
y. W. C. A. 4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Books, listening to radio orchestral programs. 

FEATURE: A jolly musician. 




STELLA VERLE McKEEMAN 

2427 Darby Road, Oakmont, Pa. 
COURSE: Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Day Student Lower Court 4; Day Student Pub- 
licity Committee 2, 3; Swimming 1; Book Club 2; Travelers 
Club 2. 

INTERESTS: Sketching, music, teaching. 

FEATURE: Being natural. 




<^Pv ^ 



DONALD JOHN McNALLY 

"Don" 

7035 West Chester Pike, Upper Darby, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 4,- Award 
Committee 4, Chairman 4. 

INTERESTS: Science, mathematics, homing pigeons. 

FEATURE: Mathematical genius. 



Seventy-two 



ROBERT H. McNELLY 
■■Bob" 

111 Second Avenue, Coatesville, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3, 4,- Baseball 1, 2, 3; Basketbol 
2; Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Council 4. 

INTERESTS: Sports, travel. 

FEATURE: "Coatesville, here I come!" 




LOUISE PATTERSON MALKAMES 

383 Wright Avenue, Kingston, Pa. 
COURSE: Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Class Treasurer 4; Student Council 3, Treasurer 
3; Elementary Club 4, Secretary 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Hostess Club 3; y. W. C. A. 1, 4,- W. A. A. 3; Bible Study 
Club 3. 

INTERESTS: Roller skating, sports, knitting. 

FEATURE: One of "Our Gang." 




ROSS COLLINS MANIFOLD 

Manny 

Woodbine, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4,- Soccer 
1, 2; Football 3; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4,- Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3; 
Herodotus Club 1,- Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Sports, nature, camping. 

FEATURE: The practical joker. 




LEWIS FRANK MARAFFI 

"Looie" 
Avonmore, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Science Club 1, 2, 4,- Y. M. C. A. 1 ,- Basketball 

1, 2, 4. 
INTERESTS: Being a successful coach, traveling, dancing. 
FEATURE: "When I was at Kiske — ." 



^ J ^ ^ 



Seventy-three 




FRANK MASCHINSKY 

"Shinse" 

254 Inman Park, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 4; Student 
Council 4, Vice-president 4; Basketball 1,2, 3, 4, Captain 
4; Football 1, 2; Baseball 2, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 4; Secondary 
Education Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Travelers 
Club 1; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, riding, swimming, photography. 

FEATURE: Vice-president, president, and captain. 



I 




JAMES CRESSON MATHERS 

Jim 

2027 Belvedere Avenue, Oakmont, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Serpentine Business Manager 4; FHerodotus 
Club 2, 3, 4; Tennis 3,- Quad Angles 3; Debating 2, 3; 
Psychology Club 3,- Science Club 1; Host 3, 4,- Moore 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Bowling, banking, chess, tennis, stamp collecting. 

FEATURE: Counting the days til Saturday. 





JANET ELIZABETH MEREDITH 

"Jan" 

525 Market Street, Newport, Pa. 

COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Poster Club 1, 2, 3, President 2; Y. W. C A. 3, 
4, Cabinet 3,- EHostess Club 3, 4,- Elementary Club 4, Presi- 
dent 4; Student Council 4,- Bible Study Club 1. 

INTERESTS: Art, Elementary Education. 

FEATURE: Bulletin board decorator. 




ALAN PARKER MEWHA 

Boothwyn, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Herodotus Club 1, 2, 3, Secretary 3; Quad 
Angles 1, 2, 3; Little Theatre 3, 4,- Serpentine 4; Psychology 
Club 2; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Amateur dramatics, collecting rocks, raising 
turkeys. 

FEATURE: "The Country Gentleman." 



Seventy-four 






HELEN MARY MICHAEL 

7001 Hazle Avenue, Bywood, Upper Darby, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Newman Club 1 , 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4; Secondary 
Education Club 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 4; Library Club 1, 2; 
Secondary Education Play 3; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Driving, hiking, library work. 

FEATURE: Defending foreign languages. 



MARGUERITE MARIE MILLER 



572 Second Street, Pitcairn, Pa. 

COURSE: Kindergarten-Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Bible Study 
Club 2, 3, 4; Hostess Club 3, 4; Music Club 3; Quad Angles 
3, 4; y. W. C A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 3; Arcfiery 
1; Girl Scouts 2; Moors Society; Women's Student Co- 
operative Association 4; Advisory Board, Treasurer 4,- 
Symphonic Band 3, 4; Elementary Club 4. 

INTERESTS: Collecting poetry and children's stories,- drama- 
tics,- music. 

FEATURE: In everything. 



MARGARET ELIZABETH MILTER 

615 S. Walnut Street, West Chester, Po. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: French Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, President 
3, 4,- Bible Study Club 2,- Ouod Angles 3, 4,- Open Forum 
Committee 4; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Writing, music, French. 

FEATURE: French, French, and more French. 



ALBERT MOORE 
"Al" 

1015 Coates Street, Sharon H\\\, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4,- Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4,- Basketball 
1; Intramural Basketball Champions 3; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4,- 
Little Theatre 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. 3, 4,- Quod Angles, Assistant 
Business Manager 4,- Bible Study Club 2,- Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Camping, dancing, music, sports. 

FEATURE: "Egi! Oogi! Haccar! Hi, Turk!" 





Mr 




Seventy-five 




ALFONSO MORRICONI 

"Marc" 

2412 S. Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Book Club 1, 2; Baseball Manager 4; hHerodotus 
Club 3; Secondary Education Club 4, Secondary Education 
Ploy 3; Moore Ploy 4; Christmas Ploy 4; Peace Action Com- 
mittee 3, 4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Ping-pong, tennis, theatre, music, literature. 

FEATURE: Fascism, Communism, Nazi-ism — which? 




JAMES ALLISON MORROW 

"Jimmie" 

102 N. State Road, Upper Darby, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Serpentine Editor 4; FHerodotus Club 1, 2, 3, 
Vice-president 2, President 3; Cheerleading 2, 3, 4; 
Debating 2, 3, 4, Coach 2; Ouad Angles 2, 3, Sports 
Editor 3; Lower Court 3,- Freshman Class President, first 
semester; Y. M. C. A. 3; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Temple, sports. 

FEATURE: Diplomatic, creative, and fun-loving. 




ALETHIA VIRGINIA MYERS 

"Lee" 

145 Otter Street, Bristol, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: French Club 3, 4, Treasurer 3; Hostess Club 2, 
Secretary 2; Y. W. C A. 1,- W. A. A. 1; Fire Brigade 2; 
Secondary Education Club 3; Student Council 4, Treasurer 4; 
Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Baking, skating, swimming, dancing, driving. 

FEATURE: One of the Staley stars. 




MARY CAROLINE PATEE 

"Pat" 

1039 Duncan Avenue, Yeadon, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Hostess Club 3, 4, President 3; W. A. A. 3, 4,- 
Little Theatre 3, 4,- Student Council 3,- Music Club 1, 2; 
Girls' Band 3; Vesper Choir 4; Bible Study Club 3; Open 
Forum 4; Y. W. C A. 1 . 

INTERESTS: Sports, music, roller skating, camping. 

FEATURE: Another of "Our Gang." 



Seventy-six 



RUTH PEIRCE 

Paoli, Pa. 
COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Travelers Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 3,- 
Delaware County Club 1; Social Committee of Women s 
Student Cooperative Association 4. 

INTERESTS: Christian Endeavor work, scouting, sports. 

FEATURE: Extremely dependable. 




ROBERT BLOOMER POLLOCK 

Colonel" 

371 First Avenue, Phoenixville, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Day Student Lower Court 4, President 4,- 
Football 1, 2; Soccer 3; Vigilance Committee 3; Moore 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Blackjack, radio, model" railroads. 

FEATURE: "Crack-a-minute" Pollock. 



HARRY CLEMETH PORTER 
■Dick" 

238 W. Summit Avenue, West Grove, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Track 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 3, 4, Science Club 1, 2; 

Varsity Club 3, 4. 
INTERESTS: Chemical engineering, oriental literature, coin 

collecting. 

FEATURE: FHurdle and dash man. 



DORA LEVISEE PRESTON 

Nottingham, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Lancaster County Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; 
Music Club 1 , 2; y. W. C. A. 2, 3; Social Service Club 2, 3, 
Treasurer 3,- Basketball 3; FHockey 3; FHostess Club 4,- 
Christmas Play 3,- Day Student Council 1. 

INTERESTS: Athletics, music, history. 

FEATURE: Happy-go-lucky. 




Seventy-seven 




R. HELEN PRETZMAN 

"Pretz" 

225 N. George Street, Millersville, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Basketball 3, A, Lancaster County Club 3, 4; 
y. W. C. A. 3; Hockey 3; Baseball 3,- Volley Ball 3,- Aryan 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Sports, playing piano. 

FEATURE: Clarion contributed. 





DORIS PRISCILLA PROUSE 

"Prooze" 

Jorrettown, Pa. 

COURSE: Kindergarten-Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4,- Glee Club 2, 3, 4; 
Montgomery County Club 1, 2; Elementary Club 4; Music 
Club 3; Moore Society,- Bible Study Club 1. 

INTERESTS: Music, tennis. 

FEATURE: A loyal "y worker. 



TELISPORT W. PUTSAVAGE 

"Putz" 

Minersville, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3, 4,- Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 

INTERESTS: Nature study, sports, social studies, biological 
sciences. 

FEATURE: "The General Store-Keeper." 




ROBERT M. REES 

"Bob" 

2022 Sixty-Sixth Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Bible Study 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4, President 3; Little Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Business Manager 3; y. M. C. A. 1 , 2, 3, 4,- Soccer 1 , 2, 3, 4; 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Ouad Angles 2, 3, 4, Assistant Sports 
Editor 4; Editor, Football Publication 3; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Amateur photography, camp work, sports writing. 

FEATURE: Work is a joy. 



Seventy-eight 






DONALD ELMER REPP 

"Don" 
Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 
ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Science 

Club 1, 2, 3, 4; y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Moore Society. 
INTERESTS: Horseback riding, hiking, historical research. 
FEATURE: Enemies — noise and Don. 




CHRISTINE REWUCKY 

"Chris" 

Hale Eddy, N. Y. 

COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Bible Study Club 3, 4; Lackawanna County 
Club 1, 2; Elementary Club 4; W. A. A, 1; Basketball 1; 
Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Collecting poetry, reading, concerts, plays. 

FEATURE: A true blonde. 




I 



EDWARD TIMOTHY RINEY 

Cap" 

906 W. Park Square, Prospect Park, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Science Club 2, 3, 4; Secondary Education 
Club 4; Book Club 1; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Collecting mathematical puzzles, sports. 

FEATURE: "Taxi to Prospect Park?" 



18^ 



t^- 



ENRICO CARMEN RITROVATO 

"Ray" 
346 Prospect Street, Bridgeport, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Orchestra, Concert-Meister 2, 3, 4; Music 

Club 2, 3, 4. 
INTERESTS: Movies, dramatics, sports. 
FEATURE: His violm speaks. 




Seventy-nine 





Iljk M 



MILLARD PEARSON ROBINSON 

"Robbie" 

90 S. Clinton Street, Doylestown, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3, 4,- Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Class 
President 3; Class Vice-president 2; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3; Little Theatre 3, 4; Baseball 1, 2, 3; Student 
3; Dormitory Student Council 2, 4, President 4; Government 
Junior Prom Committee 3,- Aryan Society, Treasurer 3. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, sports, plays. 

FEATURE: FHard-fighting athlete. 



IRENE LOUISE ROBISON 

"Renie" 

29 State Street, York, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Little Theatre 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, President 
3, Dormitory Student Council 2, 4, President 4,- Govern- 
ment Association 4, Vice-president 4,- Bible Study Club 
1, 2, 3, Vice-president 3,- Hockey 3, 4,- Y. W. C A. 3,- 
Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Sev^ing, cooking, dramatics, dancing, sports, 
music. 

FEATURE: Roommate tamer of A-28. 



JOHN A. ROCKWELL 

"Rocky" 

5225 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Soccer 2, 3, 4; Freshman Basketball Manager 1, 
2, 3; Varsity Basketball Manager 4; Varsity Club 2, 3, 4; 
Herodotus Club 1 . 

INTERESTS: Sports, traveling, social studies. 

FEATURE: Speed king. 



ELIZABETH CUTHBERT RUE 

"Betsy" 
301 Maryland Avenue, Aldan, Pa. 
COURSE: Kindergarten-Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1, 2, 4, Treasury Committee, Doy 

Student Council 3. 
INTERESTS: Photography, stamp collecting, cooking, dancing. 
FEATURE: Being in the library. 



Eighty 



DANIEL RUPERT 

Danny 

7027 Hegerman Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Soccer 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain 3, 4; Quad Angles 
2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4; Baseball 3, Science Club 1; 
Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Poetry, sports, stuff. 

FEATURE: Lounging everywhere. 



RUTH ELINOR SAMPSON 

"Sammy" 
421 S. Second Street, Bangor, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 
ACTIVITIES: y. W. C A. 4,- W. A. A. 3. 
INTERESTS: Sports, music. 

FEATURE: Full of fun. 




NELLIE IRENE SAND 

Sandy 

132 Powell Lane, Upper Darby, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Student Council 3, 4; Advisory Board President 
4; Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4,- W. A. A. 1, 2, 4; 
Hostess Club 2,3, 4; Social Service Club 1; Y. W. C. A. 1,- 
Moore Society,- Senior Week-end Committee. 

INTERESTS: Athletics, sewing, traveling, reading, Ws Ford 
Coupe. 

FEATURE: A fair judge. 




ESTELLE HELENE SAPIEHA 

"Stell" 

532 New Elm Street, Conshohocken, Pa. 

COURSE: Elementary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Hostess Club 2, 4,- Y. W. C A. 1, 2; Newman 
Club 1, 2; Montgomery County Club 1, 2; Elementary Club 
4; Psychology Club 3,- Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Swimming. 

FEATURE: Improving paople's speach. 




Eighty-one 




CLAIRE ELIZABETH SAUSSAMAN 

"Betty" 

23 N. Thirteenth Street, Harrisburg, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, A, Science Club 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary 3, 4; Secondary Education Club 2, 3, 4, Vice- 
president A; Hostess Club 4,- Laurel Blossom Princess 3,- 
Bible Study Club 1; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Science, mathematics, poetry. 

FEATURE: Laurel Blossom Princess, 1935. 



ZENAS SAVAGE, JR. 

"Zac" 

Pottstown, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Cross Country 2, 3, 4; Gym Team 3, 4,- Track 
3, 4; Olympic Club 3, 4,- Science Club 3; Football 1. 

INTERESTS: Sports, Health Education work. 

FEATURE: Avowed woman-hater. 




JANE ELIZABETH SCHAFER 

"Betty" 

227 Main Street, White Haven, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Secondary Education 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Science Club 2, 3; 
Library Club 1; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Spending money, arguing with numerous "coal 
crackers." 

FEATURE: After dinner coffee. "Cream and sugar?" 



DOROTHY L. SCHOTT 

"Dottie" 

Parkesburg, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Travelers 
Club 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3; Library Club 1, 2, Vice- president 
2; Day Student Club 1; Serpentine 4,- Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Poetry, auto riding, waiting in the evenings to go 
home. 

FEATURE: Willing to help. 



Eighty-two 



EMMA MAE SHOTZBERGER 

Emmy 

201 E. Clay Street, Lancaster, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1,- Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3,- Social 
Service Club 3; Lancaster County Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer 
2, 3; Hostess Club 4; Christmas Play 3; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Geography, tennis, salting peanuts. 

FEATURE: Saving pennies. 



EMMA SCARBOROUGH SIDDALL 

R. D. No. 1, North Wales, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: y. W. C A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Secondary Education 
Club 2, 3, 4; Psychology Club 2; Science Club 3, 4,- Bible 
Study Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Book Club 1; Library Club 1,- Mont- 
gomery County Club 1; Fire Brigade 2; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Reading, sv^imming, hiking, music. 

FEATURE: Reserved scientist. 




ik A 



JAMES B. SINGER 

Jimmy 

212 Alvin Street, Freeland, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Olympic Club 3, 4,- Gym Team 3, 4; Soccer 3, 4,- 
Intramural Basketball 2, 3, 4; Freshman Basketball,- J.V. 
Football 1, 2; Luzerne County Club 1, 2; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Collecting match boxes, aviation, sports. 

FEATURE: Apprentice telephone operator. 



ELIZABETH H. SMITH 

"Betty" 

1205 Lincoln Avenue, Tyrone, Pa. 

COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Psychology Club 2; Y. W. C A. 1 , 3,- Elementary 
Club 4; Art Club 1,- Fire Brigade 3. 

INTERESTS: Children's books, handicraft, poetry, windov^/ 
shopping. 

FEATURE: Rhyming and unrhyming words. 




Eighty-thr 




JAMES P. SMITH 

"Jim" 

Hughesville, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Student Council 4; Track 3,- Baseball Manager 3,- 
J.V. Soccer 2, 3,- Football 1,- Basketball 1; Intramural 
Basketball 2, 3, 4. 

INTERESTS: Science, traveling. 

FEATURE: Always sleeping. 




t 



RUTH CHANNING SPENCER 

"Spence" 
West Grove, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Science Club 1, 2; Social Committee of Day 
Student Division 3; Secondary Education Club 4,- FHockey 1; 
Basketball 1, Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Sneezing, athletics, movies, traveling. 

FEATURE: Looking for fun. 




't^ 




A A 



JOHN STOHLER STECKBECK 

"Steck" 
500 Canal Street, Lebanon, Pa. 
COURSE: FHeolth Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 4; 
Football 1, 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3, Captain 4,- Y. M. C A. 1; 
Varsity Quartette 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Class Treas- 
urer 3; Aryan Society, President 3. 
INTERESTS: Collecting elephants and stamps, singing. 
FEATURE: The musical Heath-Ed. 



THELMA MYRTLE STONEBURNER 

"Stoney ' 
1813 Lincoln Avenue, Northampton, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES- College Instrumental Trio 2, 3, 4,- Music Club 1 ,- 
Hostess Club 2; Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 3, 4; Fire 
Brigade 2; Moore Society. 
INTERESTS: Knitting, remodeling clothes, drama, reading. 
FEATURE: Arranging musical programs. 



Eighty-four 






IDA ELIZABETH STOUGHTON 
■■Tib" 

3 Argyle Street, Petrolia, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Bible Study Club 3, 4; Hostess Club 4; Music 
Club 4; y. W. C. A. 3, 4; Vesper Choir 4,- Orchestra 3, A; 
Bond 3, 4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, swimming. 

FEATURE: Singer of note. 




BURD DANIEL STOVER, JR. 

'■Major^' 

204 Center Street, Tamaqua, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Symphonic and Marching Bands 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Drum Major 3, 4; Symphonic Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4,- Dance 
Band 2, 4; Luzerne County Club 2; Travelers Club 3, 4, 
Treasurer 4,- Science Club 4, Treasurer 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 
4; Ouad Angles 4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Photography, science, music, sports. 

FEATURE: B. Brown, B. Brown. 



WILLIAM HENRY STREETT 
■■BilL' 

422 Spruce Street, Steelton, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Symphony Orchestra 1, 2, 3, 4,- Symphonic and 
Marching Bands 3, A, Music Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Y. M. C A. 
1, 2, 4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Swimming, old songs. 

FEATURE: Strumming along. 



MARY E. STROHM 
■■Pat^' 

819 W. Eighth Street, Chester, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-president A, Class 
Secretary 3,- College Government Association 4; Valkyrie 
Club 2, 3, 4; W. A. A. Council A, Little Theatre 3, 4, 
Treasurer 4; Student Council 2, 4; Lower Court 2,- Hockey 
1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 1, 2, Captain 1, Manager 2; Bible 
Study Club 3; Fire Brigade 3,- Social Service Club 1 ,- Moore 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Knitting, eating, sleeping, sports. 

FEATURE: '■Hello! 1360 speaking." 



( '^ ^ 




Eighty-five 




HELEN MAY SUTER 

"Jerry" 

320 W. Front Street, Media, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Delaware County Club 1; Book Club 1, 2, 
Secretary 2,- Y. W. C. A. 3,- Day Student Financial Com- 
mittee 3; Secondary Education Club 4; Senior Tree-Planting 
Committee 4,- Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Collecting souvenirs, sports, reading, theatre. 

FEATURE: Media, Berwyn, West Chester. 



ALVIN HARKLESS SWIGGETT 

"Swig" 
924 Central Avenue, Chester, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 
ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3; Track ^, 2, 3. 
INTERESTS: Analyzing football plays, sports. 
FEATURE: Smallest heath-ed. 




ELEANOR GARSED TAGERT 

"Togert" 

613 Maryland Avenue, Aldan, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Uttle Symphony ^, % 
Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; Junior Ensemble 3. 

INTERESTS: Knitting, music. 

FEATURE: FHurrying to catch the train. 




RETA BETH TAYLOR 

Springville, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 3, 4, Cabinet 3, 4, President 
4; Secondary Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Bible Study Club 
3, 4; Hiking Club 1, Book Club 3; French Club 3,- Aryan 
Society; Hostess Club 3, 4. 

INTERESTS: Reading, hiking, dashing here and there. 

FEATURE: Excellent management. 



Eighty-six 






EDWARD VERNON TOPPING 

"Ted" 

Westhampton Beach, N. Y. 

COURSE: Health Education, 

ACTIVITIES: Olympic Club 3, 4, Vice-president 4, Football 1; 
Soccer 2, 3, 4; Varsity Club 3, 4,- Gym Team 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Intramural Basketball 2, 3. 

INTERESTS: Photography, sports, travel. 

FEATURE: All kinds of athletics. 



MATILDA ALINE TURRI 

"Tillie" 
409 Park Street, Freeland, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 
ACTIVITIES: Travelers Club 2, 3, 4,- Luzerne County Club 1; 

y. W, C. A. 1; W. A. A. 1. 

INTERESTS: Collecting poems and photographs, hiking, swim- 
ming. 

FEATURE: Tuning in on Waring and Lombordo. 



^Mfl 




ANNA ROBERTA WALLING 

"Ann" 

39 Hill Street, Rockaway, N. J. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: College Government Association 4, Secretary 
4; W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, Council 3,- Dormitory Council 3, 4, 
Vice-president 4; Y. W. C. A. 1, 4; Archery 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball 1, 2; Secondary Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Hostess 
Club 3, 4; Bible Study Club 3; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Reading, sports, dramatics. 

FEATURE: Lov^/er court sessions. 



JOHN EARLEY WARVEL 

"Johnnie 

383 New Grant Street, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3, A, Varsity Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- 
Track 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2, 4; Y. M. C. A. 1, 2, 4,- 
Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Collecting old coins, athletics, travel. 

FEATURE: Waiting at the fire escape. 






\ 



Eighty-seven 




ELIZABETH GERTRUDE WASLEY 

"Bee" 
37 N. Jardin Street, Shenandoah, Pa. 
COURSE; Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Book Club 2, 3, President 3,- Y. W. C. A. 1, 2, 
3, 4, Cabinet 4; Secondary Education Club 1, 2, 4, Fire 
Brigade 3, 4,- Hostess Club 4,- Quad Angles 4; Science Club 
4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Riding, tennis, reading, stage shows. 

FEATURE: Missing telephone calls. 



JAMES EMMETT WELCH 

'Jimmie " 
North Wales, Pa. 
COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3, A, Bosketball 1, 2; Varsity 
Club 2, 3, 4; Track 1, 2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 4; Little Theatre 
2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A, 3, 4,- Intramural Basketball Champions 
3; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Amateur theatricals, athletics, listening to the 
radio. 

FEATURE: Carefree and happy. 



m 




JOSEPH SHEPARD WEST 

"Shep" 
1622 W. Eleventh Street, Chester, Pa. 

COURSE: Health Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2, 3,- Baseball 1, 2,- Track 3, 4. 
INTERESTS: Tinkering with machinery, experimenting with 
electricity. 

FEATURE: Working with active boys. 



JANET WHITE 

153 Stoneway Lane, Bala, Pa. 
COURSE: Primary Education. 
ACTIVITIES: Transfer from Miss lllman's. 
INTERESTS: People, puns, theatre. 
FEATURE: Her friendship. 



Eighty-eight 



MARGARET HOLMES WILLIAMS 

"Whimsy" 
410 E. Patterson Street, LansFord, Pa. 

COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Glee Club ^, 2, 3, 4; Travelers Club 1, 2,- 
y. W. C A. 1, 2; Hockey 1, 2; Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: Collecting postcards, music, reading, theatre, 
dancing. 

FEATURE: An ambitious student. 



ROBERT L. WILSON 
"Bob" 

3919 N. Eighth Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Soccer 3; Herodotus Club 3; Secondary Edu- 
cation Club 4. 

INTERESTS: Dancing, sports, traveling. 

FEATURE: Familiar in the book-room. 




JANICE SEBA WOLFE 

1203 E. Lincoln Highway, Coatesville, Pa. 
COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Library Club 1, 2, 3, President 2; Elementary 
Club 4. 

INTERESTS: Handicrafts, music, art. 

FEATURE: Driving her car. 



I 




DOROTHY WOOLLENS 

"Dottie" 
131 Myrtle Avenue, Cheltenham, Pa. 
COURSE: Primary Education. 
ACTIVITIES: Transfer from Miss lilman's. 
INTERESTS: Knitting, reading. 
FEATURE: Knitting "Woollens," 




Eighty-nine 




^,3* 



WILLIAM T. WYNNE 

"Tex" 

230 Fifth Avenue, Phoenixville, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Science Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Football 1, 2, Soccer 3,- 
Day Student Council 4; Student Government Association 4. 

INTERESTS: Anything profitable, cards, camping, cooking. 

FEATURE: Pollock and Wynne. 




STANLEY ALVIN YASK 

Stan 

183 Boland Avenue, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Secondary Education Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Luzerne 
County Club 1, 2; Y. M. C A. 1,- Science Club 3,- Football 1; 
Basketball 1; Baseball 1,- Aryan Society. 

INTERESTS: FHunting, fishing, swimming, physics, chemistry. 

FEATURE: "The Unholy Corner." 




<<•«%■ •*;.■ 




OLIVE HOPE YEAGER 

221 Urban Avenue, Norwood, Pa. 
COURSE: Primary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1; Girls' Trumpet Corps 2, 3, 4,- 
Girls' Band 2, 3; Y. W. C A. 1 , 2, 4,- Bible Study Club 2, 3; 
FHostess Club 2, 4,- Glee Club 3, 4; Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Music, dancing, aviation, swimming. 

FEATURE: Music a hobby. 




DORIS HELEN YODER 

"DeeY " 

243 White Oak Street, Kutztown, Pa. 

COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Hostess Club 3, 4, President 4; Music Club 
1,2, 3; y. W. C A. 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls' Trumpet Corps 2, 3, 4; 
Berks County Club 1, 2, 3, 4,- Student Council 3, 4; Moore 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Dancing to good orchestras, designing clothes. 

FEATURE: Planning parties for the dining room. 



Ninety 



SHAKIE ARMENOUHY YORGANJIAN 

Xhic" 
654 Drexel Avenue, Drexel Hill, Pa. 
COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: French Club 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-president 2, Sec- 
retary 3; Student Council 3, Secretary of Lower Court 4; 
Junior Prom Committee 3; Senior Class Ring Committee,- 
Quad Angles 3; Secondary Education Club 3; Aryan 
Society. 

INTERESTS: Dogs, designing, piano, interior decoration. 

FEATURE: Active in day-student affairs. 



MARY ELIZABETH YOST 

"Yostie" 
Brownstovv'n, Pa. 
COURSE: Music Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Music Club 1, 2, 3,- Y. W. C A. 4. 
INTERESTS: Making scrap-books, collecting poetry, canoeing. 
FEATURE: Seeking poetry sources. 



RUTH ZENSEN 

"Ruthie" 

236 Sylvan Avenue, Rutledge, Pa. 

COURSE: Intermediate Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Psychology Club 2, Secretary 2; Music Club 1, 
2, 3; Glee Club 1, 2, 3,- Y. W. C. A. 1, 2; Elementary 
Club 4; Delaware County Club 1. 

INTERESTS: Bird-study, theatre, children, scrap-books. 

FEATURE; Practicing for opera. 




Ninety-one 



EXTENSION STUDENTS 



m 




HELEN BULL 

Kennett Square, Pa. 

COURSE: Elementary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Elementary Club. 

INTERESTS: Professional reading and training. 

FEATURE: Teaching,- present position: High Street School, 
West Chester. 



JAMES R. FOCHT 

"Jim" 

Danboro, Pa. 

COURSE: Rural-Elementary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Rural Club, President; Football; Track; Glee 
Club. 

INTERESTS: Baseball, football, reading. 

FEATURE: Teaching; present position: Principal, Westtown- 
Thornbury School. 



MARTHA ELIZABETH HARLEY 

1026 Olive Street, Coatesville, Pa. 
COURSE: Intermediate Education. 
ACTIVITIES: Tennis, Aryan Society. 
INTERESTS: Music, books, travel, photography. 
FEATURE: Teaching; present position: Columbia Avenue 
School, Coatesville. 



Ninety-two 



EXTENSION STUDENTS 



ELIZABETH M. HAYES 

"Betty" 
203 W. Miner Street, West Chester, Pa. 
COURSE: Elementary Education. 
ACTIVITIES: Moore Society. 

INTERESTS: Traveling, reading, watching athletic events. 
FEATURE: Teaching,- present position: hHigh Street School, 
West Chester. 



WILLIAM WALTER McELROY 

Chester Springs, Pa. 

COURSE: Secondary Education. 

ACTIVITIES: Dramatic Club; English Club. 

INTERESTS: Travel, art, literature. 

FEATURE: Teaching,- present position: Principal, West Pike- 
land School. 




I 



During the past year the college has oFfered courses for the benefit of teachers who 
desire to continue their professional studies toward their Bachelor of Science degree in 
Education. These courses can also be taken by other people and are often pursued 
by those who wish to change their Standard, Permanent, or Normal School certiRcate 
to the College certificate. 

No regularly employed teacher is allowed to include more than six semester hours 
of credit on his schedule. The program offered to teachers able to attend night or 
Saturday morning classes included such subjects as United States History II, History of 
Music, Principles of Education, and several other important courses. 

The Adult Education course has proved to be very valuable. This course is not 
limited in interest to teachers but also concerns students and parent leaders. It is 
unique in that it has been presented by a group of ten capable speakers and discussion 
leaders with Miss Lois Clark and Mr. McKelvie in charge. 



Ninety-three 







LEARNING OUTSIDE FOR A CHANGE 

In the spring students use the library steps as a study hall — they seem to furnish the necessory 

inspiration. 



Ninety-four 



UNDERGRADUATES 



Paddles, picnics, proms have symbolized the campus life 
of underclassmen in the last few years. Each class adopts 
the customs of the preceding ones until it is very apparent 
that Freshmen profit by the wealth of Sophomore experience, 
Sophomores by the wisdom of Juniors, and Juniors by the 
calm assurance of Seniors. 

To the underclassman each college day appears to be 
part of an experience which is to be terminated in his Senior 
year. The new students may hesitate at first, but soon there 
is nothing like college life." The Sophomores have forgotten 
they were ever "green cappers" and certainly do not wish 
to be reminded, especially by the Juniors. 

The difficulties of the underclassmen are seldom mention- 
ed except for an occasional remark about a mere examina- 
tion." They clamor for fun and usually find it waiting wherever 
they seek it. 

No longer is there a feeling of rivalry among classes, 
but rather a sense of unity which enables them to accomplish 
greater things'and to secure[their prestige on campus. 



/C?^, 




Ninety-five 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Three years at West Chester passed, and one more to go according to the Junior 
Class. But not one of the three years seemed to speed by so rapidly as the third, because 
it was crammed with more fun and work than was ever thought possible. 

No other class was so fortunate as the Junior in 1935-36, for it succeeded in 
enhsting the aid of a good and just king early in November. This patriarch was none 
other than King Neptune from the noble land of the Deep Sea. hHe it was who con- 
sented to reign over its formal debut, the Junior Prom, and so with his royal court of 
frolics he ushered in with great pomp and ceremony its year of campus gaieties. 

Jolly Juniors may be a trite expression, but in what better way can they be 
described? For whether in gym, practice room, class, dormitory room, or lobby, the 
merriest and most numerous laughs and chuckles — yes, and giggles too- come from the 
Juniors. To their clan belong many of the famous musicians, daring acrobats, spectacular 

athletes, and collegiate wits. 

The Juniors have within their young college lives built a reputation of being notice- 
ably united in all work and play activities, and together they look forward to their 
Senior year with its features of fun and responsibility. Now, while still filled with 
thoughts of laughing, joking Junior days, they are passing from under the guardianship 
of royal King Neptune and are beginning to plan a Senior republic. 




Ninety-six 




1 



JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS AND ADVISERS 

Leo Gorman, Treosurer; Earl Baker, Vice-President,- Phyllis Andrews, Secretory,- Owen jMcColl, 

President. 
Miss Gertrude Sipple and Mr. Edward Zimmer, faculty advisers. 




Ninety-seven 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



The Sophomores have traveled through the choppy waters of the Freshman year 
into a calmer sea. No group on campus is complete without some representatives of 
this class. 

The hHealth Education students have sought and won innumerable rewards, such 
as a berth on the All-Eastern Football Team last fall and several track championships 
in the spring. Whether the activity is a small one or a campus highlight, the Sophomores 
are certain to be in the lead or trailing close behind the other classes. Each deck of 
the great ship Sophomore has sent its delegates to the college government associations. 
There are recruits for Quad Angles; many of these have got their first taste of rowing 
the ship through a becalmed sea and of knowing the joy which comes when the sails 
begin to catch the breeze. 

On the fourteenth of March the ship was decorated for the gala occasion of the 
year -the Sophomore Dance. This annual event took the form of a St. Patrick's Day 
party. Nor did the social life stop then - the picnic meant another day of entertainment. 

One big journey with every day bringing sight of a new land — this is the Sopho- 
more's experience. Everywhere on the horizon, from the east to the west, from the 
north to the south, are indications of the future success of this class. 




Ninety-eight 




1 



SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS AND ADVISERS 

tary; Levin Hanigan, Treasurer; George Lott, Vice-Pres 

President. 

Mr. Glenn Killinger and Miss Anna Smith, faculty advisers. 



Franklin Sharpe, Secretary,- Levin Hanigan, Treasurer; George Lott, Vice-President; Joseph Carney, 

President. 




Ninety-nine 



i^ 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



The Freshmen have taken the year with a stride. They have made themselves the 
pride of the student body and the hope of the faculty and alumni. 

The nev^comers passed through an orientation course in the form of teas, dances, 
banquets, lectures, and conferences. Each girl had o big sister, who was not only 
counsellor and friend, but who became a little girl with pigtails for the occasion of the 
"kids' party.' 

These good times were supplemented by classroom activities and freshman regu- 
lations. Participles and gerunds were brought from remote recesses, lower court 
collected many nickels, and name cards were enlarged to be worn about the neck. 
The men's pajama parade climaxed the regulations, and we no longer had to listen to 
'You're Driving Me Crazy" or watch the 'poor old Quad " be measured with a frank- 
furter. 

More serious matters arose, and hloward Davies acted as president protem. He 
took charge of several meetings and conducted the elections for the class. The officers 
were Thomas Middleton, president,- William Birchall, vice-president; Marjorie Bruder, 
secretary,- and Margaret Patton, treasurer. Plans for an active sophomore program 
were worked out with the aid of Miss Lois Clark and Mr. Andes, the class advisers. 

This past year of progress has certainly revealed many of the vast mysteries that 
surround a freshman's soul. 








One hundred 




1 



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS AND ADVISERS 

Thomas Middleton, President; William Birchall, Vice-President. 

Marjore Bruder, Secretary; Mr. James Andes and Miss Lois Clerk, faculty advisers; Margaret 

Patton, Treasurer. 




One hundred one 




ALMOST TIME FOR THE BELL 

This campus walk between the Library and Recitation Hall witnesses many last minute 

dashes to class. 



One hundred two 



STUDENT 
ASSOCIATIONS 



The pioneer days of campus organizations hove passed, 
and in their place has arisen the period of numerous clubs, 
representative of practically every phase of college life. Not 
until recent years, hov/ever, have they assumed such a 
dominant position and increased so rapidly in number. 

Nearly every year sees the dawn of some new campus 
group, which in time sets its pace with that of the other groups 
and sometimes surpasses them in popularity. 

Whether a student's hobby is in the field of science, 
education, or history; whether his particular interest is in art, 
music, or dramatics, there is opportunity for self-expression in 
the many extra-curricular groups. 

A great part of the social activity of the school hinges on 
the functioning of these various organizations. They repre- 
sent the accomplishment of something other than academic 
work; they instil in each individual an earnest desire to aim 
for personal and group satisfaction; they are the acme of 
undergraduate life. 




One hundred three 



COLLEGE GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 




WEST CHESTER COLLEGE GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 

Feld, Wheaton, Bachman, Rex, Allen, Groff, McCall, Milliard, Kohn, Alden. 

Lott, Shepherd, Brusch, Hart, Pyle, Wynne. 



Each year brings the students closer to 
the actual governing of a major part of 
the college activities. The most recent 
organization for this purpose is the Col- 
lege Government Association, which re- 
ceives and disperses the student activity 
fund and plans for entertainments. 

Twenty people representing each of 
the three upper classes and holding posi- 
tions in various clubs are elected by the 
students themselves to head and direct 
this important organization. Three com- 
mittees plan the work. Priscilla Alden, 
as chairman of the Activities Committee, 
supervises the program of entertainments 
during the year. Members of the Budget 



Committee with Florence Shepherd as 
chairman are responsible for making the 
budget, deciding the activities, and ap- 
propriating money to each of these activ- 
ities. The Finance Committee headed by 
Bettye hHilliard approves bills and their 
payment and collects the money. The 
plans of these groups are submitted to 
the Executive Committee composed of the 
four officers and the chairmen of the 
other three groups. 

During this year a budget was prepared 
and presented to the student body after 
a thorough study of existing situations had 
been made. In the proposed budget for 
the second semester there was an item- 




Working on the budget 
One hundred four 



Officers 

President: John G. Hart 
Vice-President: Irene Robison 
Secretary: Ann Walling 
Treasurer: Charles Brusch 



COLLEGE GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 




EXECUTIVE COMMIHEE 

Alden, Shepherd, hiilliard. 

Hart, Robison, Walling, Brusch. 



ized account of both the expenditures 
and the receipts together with the amount 
of reduction in the expenses. 

For what is the activity fee used? The 
report submitted by the faculty committee 
composed of Mr. McKelvie, Miss Tyson, 
and Mr. Waters lists the functions under 
seven large divisions. In the administra- 
tive part are included salary, postage, 
and office equipment. All forms of 
athletics for both men and women come 
under one heading. In the entertainment 
accounts only professional types of enter- 
tainment are included, while the student 
welfare includes entertainment or social 



work conducted by the students themselves 
— such as student publications and pub- 
licity. A certain amount of the money is 
given toward the upkeep of the several 
cars used. The purchasing of books, 
supplies, and candy is listed under the 
bookroom account. Profits of the book- 
room are turned into the association. A 
small amount of expenses is so varied that 
it is necessary to group it as miscellaneous. 

Although this group has no faculty 
advisers, the Board of Trustees appointed 
a committee of three in December to 
direct the policies and help make plans 
for the future. 



Committee Chairmen 

Priscilla Alden — Activities Committee 
Florence Shepherd — Budget Committee 
Bettye FHiliiard — Finance Committee 




Signing activities checks 

One hundred five 



WOMEN'S COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 




WOMEN'S STUDENT COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION 
Bachman, Lloyd, Ressel, Houseworth, Allen, Weir, Pyle, Alden, Voder, Bechtel, E. Dovies. 

Grater, Pereira, Longnecker, Cunningham, Grammes, Shepherd, Cragg, Davis, Wheaton. 
Myers, Bareford, Cutaiar, Miller, Feld, Sand, Robison, Strohm, Milliard, Meredith, Detwiler. 



"A student voice in all college affairs" 
is the boast of every West Cfiesterite, for 
in all phases of campus life we find various 
groups of students setting forth their 
views, ideas, and ideals. Cooperation 
between faculty and students seems to be 
growing, and within recent months it has 
been manifested in the organization of 
diverse committees which delve into all 
types of problems involved in the set-up 
of our college. 

Of these organizations, the student 
councils, the governing bodies of the 
college, are probably most important 
and most vital to the individual. The 
women's division was established several 



years ago when the women of the college 
saw a definite need for student participa- 
tion in collegiate governmental affairs. 
Since that time the functions of this group 
hove increased rapidly until it is now one 
of the leading groups in the social life on 
the campus. 

Under its present system of administra- 
tion this body is organized into three 
separate units: Advisory Board, Dormitory 
Council, and Day Student Council. The 
latter two deal with problems involving 
their individual divisions, while the former, 
represented by both dormitory and day- 
students, is concerned with problems 
which affect all women students. 



Dormitory Council 

President: Irene Robison 
Vice-President: Ann Walling 
Secretary: Bettye Hilliard 
Treasurer: Mary Strohm 

Day Student Council 

President: Edith Feld 
Vice-President: Mary Bareford 
Secretary: Esther Gast 
Treasurer: Alethic Myers 



Advisory Board 

President: Nellie Sand 
Secretary: Alice Cutaiar 
Treasurer: Marguerite Miller 



One hundred si: 



MEN'S STUDENT COUNCIL 

n 




MEN'S STUDENT COUNCIL 

Nye, J. E. Baker, Lott, Smith, Hart, McNelly. 

Garman, Maschinsky, Brusch, McCall. 



The official governing body of thie men 
is tfie Men's Student Council. The mem- 
bers of this body ore elected by the men 
of Wayne hiall, and the former in turn 
elect their own officers. Through this 
branch of the student government or- 
ganization many activities related to the 
general welfare of the residents of 
Wayne h^all are promoted and regulated. 

It is the duty of this group to represent 
student interests to the college authorities, 
to direct matters of student policy, and to 
exemplify and maintain high standards of 
conduct among the men at West Chester. 

In addition to the governing functions 



of the Council, which include appointment 
of a Lower Court and imposition of fresh- 
man regulations, its members join with the 
other student government organizations 
in sponsoring the hiallowe'en dance, the 
Christmas dance, and the Mid Winter 
Formal. 

The Council has been most successful 
in creating a better feeling of fellowship 
among the men living in Wayne fHall. A 
higher standard of conduct has been 
maintained, and more of the men are be- 
ginning to realize the goals which they 
had set before themselves in attending 
college. 



Officers 

President: Charles Brusch 
Vice-President: Frank Maschinsky 
Secretary: Owen McCall 
Treasurer: Leo Carman 



One hundred seven 



MEN'S DAY STUDENT COUNCIL 




MEN'S DAY STUDENT COUNCIL 

Birchall, Wynne, Groff, Barnes. 

Kelly, Davis, Kohn. 



Day students make up a large part of 
the student body^ but not until this year 
have the men day students had their own 
form of government. The Men s Day 
Student Council, which is composed of 
representatives of the four classes, is a 
part of the Cooperative Student Govern- 
ment. 

In the Council, the twelve members who 
are elected by the respective classes 
try to look after the interests of the men 
day students by encouraging a feeling of 
cooperation between the dormitory and 
day student men. This group has as 
advisers Dean Light and Director Allen. 



Already this division is making plans 
for next year's activities. The freshman 
regulations for day student men will be 
entirely controlled by this group. This 
past year, members of this governing 
body helped to moke the Mid Winter 
Formal a success, and it is their desire to 
be able to sponsor some of their own so- 
cial activities next year. 

Every school term brings some addition- 
al student activity to the campus, and this 
organization represents not only one of 
the most recent but probably one of the 
most important to be added in the inter- 
ests of day student men. 




A day student pastime 
One hundred eight 



Officers 

President: William Davis 

Secretary: hiarry Kelly 

Treasurer: Robert EIrick 



BIBLE STUDY CLUB 




BIBLE STUDY CLUB 

Sitler, Rarich, Worstall, Brooks, Monroe, McAuley, Guers, Jordan, Whitebread. 

Taylor, Davit, Siddall, Wornick, Werley, Fluck, Becker, Lovell, Button, Miller, Naylor. 

Hughes, Rewucky, Lowman, Forrest, Dean Menhennett, Rees, Clifton, W. Menhennett. 



Few of US remember the fact thiat the 
Bible Study Club was originally founded 
by Dr. hHeathcote a number of years ago. 
The club has grown steadily until it now 
has more than one hundred members. In 
nineteen twenty-seven Dean Menhennett 
assumed the leadership. Under his inspir- 
ing guidance the group assembles every 
Sunday morning in the Faculty Lounge of 
the Philips Memorial Chapel from nine 
until ten o'clock. Attendance is always 
good, and a feeling of friendship has 
developed among many of the members 
that carries over into other campus activi- 
ties. 

OFFicers — First Semester 

President: Robert M. Rees 
Vice-President: Leo Gorman 
Secretary: Filmore Clifton 
Treasurer: Betty Forrest 
Reporter: Ruth FHughes 

Officers — Second Semester 

President: Robert M. Rees 
Vice-President: Filmore Clifton 
Secretary-Treasurer: Betty Forrest 
Reporter: Galen Lov^man 



The Bible is carefully studied, and 
explanations and interpretations are made 
by Dean Menhennett. The discussion 
usually finds its way to modern topics of 
interest. Good fellowship is the byword 
of the group. 

Two yearly entertainments are planned. 
An informal social gothering is held 
during the first semester, and a trip to 
Valley Forge is scheduled for the warmer 
days of May. This affords the much 
awaited opportunity to enjoy Mrs. Men- 
hennett's excellent cooking and to see 
the Dean, with his sleeves rolled up, 
performing chef duties. 




S< 



A small group meeting 

One hundred nine 



SERPENTINE 




Miss Clark 




SERPENTINE STAFF 

Goldberger. 

Gilbert, Longford, Bley, Morrow, Schott. 



Journalism, photography, and high- 
powered salesmanship are only a few of 
the occupations which the members of 
the Serpentine staff have found themselves 
engaged in while preparing the 1936 
Serpentine for publication. The Senior 
year has proved to be on extremely busy 
one for these students, but in attempting 
to create an extraordinarily fine yearbook 
they have also derived a great deal of 
enjoyment. 

Everyone on 
campus has prob- 
ably observed 
the editor rush- 
ing about with a 
portfolio filled to 
its capacity under 
his arm. EH is 




days have been crammed with interviews, 
giving out and gathering in assign- 
ments, making appointments, proof- 
reading, and making innumerable trips 
from campus to printer and back again. 

And then the business men of West 
Chester have no doubt become acquaint- 
ed with the business manager either in 
person or through postal service, for he 
and members of the staff have been seen 
making frequent visits up town in search 
of "ads." 

The literary staff worked together 
criticizing and improving one another s 
work with the aid of Miss Clark s many 
helpful suggestions. Although they were 
always thoroughly familiar with each 
article before it went to the printer s. 



Mr. McKelvi 



EDITORIAL STAFF 
James A. Morrow, Editor-in-Chief Barnard Goldberger, Photo Editor 

Marguerite L. Bley, Dorothy Schott, Grace Longford, Literary Editors 

FHarry Detwiler, Alice Gilbert, FHarriet Borg, Janet Meredith, Art Editors 

Mary Strohm, Women's Athletic Editor 

Francis Donnon, Men's Athletic Editor 



One hundred ten 



SERPENTINE 





Miss Farnhan 



SERPENTINE STAFF 

Gardner. 

Donnon, Mathars, Kessler, Groff, Detwiler. 



they were nevertheless eager to see 
and read the some articles in actual print. 
The art, athletics, and photography staffs 
were more individual in character, but 
their contributions played an extremely 
valuable part in the production of the 
annual. 

The business staff labored steadily and 
efficiently with the result that more "ads 
were secured for this issue of the Serpen- 
tine than had been obtained for the past 
four years. The "pep" sales talks and 
publicity for Serpentine began early in 
the year and were continued effectively. 

Miss Clark, Miss Lamborn,and Mr. Mc- 
Kelvie gave much of their time and advice 
in helping make the 1936 Serpentine as 
nearly perfect as possible. Miss Lomborn 



assisted in place of Miss Farnham, who 
was on leave of absence to study at 
Columbia University during the second 
semester. 

Campus snapshots were acquired frcm 
many students, while others were token 
by the Visual Education Department. A 
great effort was put forth to make the 
photography as flawless as possible. 

The staff's dominating goal was 
of making the 
contents of this 
year's Serpentine 
as informal, nat- 
ural, and enter- 
tainingly interest- 
ing as possible to 
every student. 



that 



BUSINESS STAFF 

James C. Mathers, Business Manager 

Frank Groff, Soles 

Alon Mewho, Sara Kessler, Donald Gardner, Advertising 




1936 Serpentine 
One hundred eleven 



QUAD ANGLES 




She man Kent 
Editor 



QUAD ANGLES STAFF 
Schrage, Feld, Pereira, Lloyd, Childs, Barbour, T. Williams, Litvin. 
Matt, Formon, Snyder, R. Brennan, Greenberg, Sotter, Galey, Jacobs, Lowman. 
Harris, Weir, Hagemans, Hutchison, Kent, Kessler, Alden, Hale. 



After the new-born child has success- 
fully passed through the first crucial year 
or two, and its fond parents and relatives 
have gradually ceased marveling at its 
great potentialities, the child suddenly 
and without warning gets up on its feet 
and starts going places, growing by 
leaps and bounds, and progressing far 
too rapidly 
for parents 
or friends to 
do anything 
but hold 
their breaths 
and hope for 
the best. 

Quad Ar- 
gles, official 




student newspaper of the college, in its 
fourth year, is in the midst of this period 
of startling growth. According to the 
editor it has passed through all the con- 
tagious diseases, including bad attacks of 
whooping cough and scarlet fever. Fac- 
ulty, administration, and student body hove 
been skillful doctors, sympathetic nurses — 
and supremely patient. 

This year Quad Angles has maintained 
the firm foundational policies of past 
years. In addition it has grown from 
four to six pages. A cut fund has been 
provided, making the paper more pictorial. 
Concordantly, a systematized cut file or 
"morgue" has been organized. System, 
in fact, has invaded the entire paper, 
providing the first complete index to all 



QUAD ANGLES QFFICERS 

Editor-in-Chief, Sherman V. N. Kent Faculty Adviser, Miss Dorothy Ramsey 

Associate Editors, Ray Bitterlich, Elizabeth Hutchison, William Lewis 

Assistant Editors, Gifford Hale, Sara Kessler, Lucinda Jacobs 

News Editor, Priscilla Alden Feature Editor, Earl Mohn 

Sports Editor, LeRoy Booth Staff Secretary, Mae Forman 

Assistant News Editors, Mary Weir, Philio Snyder, Ted Williams 

Assistant Feature Editors, Sonia Gale/, Fred Hallo, Marguerite Hagemans 

Assistant Sports Editors, Edward Otwell, Betty Hosack, Robert Rees 

Business Manager, Frank Groff Circulation Manager, Evans Dague 

Assistant Circulation Manager, Frank Beardsley 

Assistant Business Manager, Leon Schrage Business Sec, Kathryn Harmstad 



One hundred twelve 



QUAD ANGLES 




Frank Groff 
usiness Manager 



QUAD ANGLES 

Etchells, Hitchcock, Hess, Ryan, R. Rees, Sehl, Friedman. 

E. Rees, Hosack, Gilbert, Milter, Wose, Pennypacker, M. Miller, M. Smith, Gardner. 

Harmstead, Dague, Groff, Beardsley, Boyle, Stover, Holla, Reickey. 



published articles, the first complete record 
of all meetings, policies, and papers,- the 
first use of printed assignment blanks, 
press cards, and headline schedules; the 
first exclusive style sheet; and the first 
independent business department to regu- 
late these growing systems. 

This year a paid subscription list has 
been inaugurated and served with the 
aid of a newly granted second class 
mailing permit. As a result, our exchange 
list has been greatly enlarged. The first 
Quod Angles Constitution has been 
framed and adopted. The first annual 
editor s recommendations and report hove 
been instituted, and the first annual 
banquet inaugurated. In admitting Quad 



Angles to its organization, the Associated 
Collegiate Press has provided Collegiate 
Digest, the eight page rotogravure supple- 
ment which has been appearing weekly 
with Quad Angles. Finally, these innova- 
tions are but a few of the advances 
achieved. Timely news surveys have 
been made; editorial campaigns have 



had more 
than aver- 
age success; 
and a year 
full of strik- 
ing events 
has been 
faithfully re- 
corded. 



(Jlttob %n^t9 m^ 



QUAD ANGLES REPORTERS 
Harold Barbour, Esther Barnard, Constance Beecher, Thaddeus Bettly, Elizabeth 
Boyle, Rosamond Brennan, Elizabeth Burns, Kathr/n Childs, Faye Daubert, Earl 
Davis, Alice Eggert, Dorcas Erb, John Eubank, Edith Feld, Elsie Fitzsimons, 
Charles Friedman, Donald Gardner, Alice Gilbert, Isabel Greenberg, Robert 
Haines, Nelson Harris, Jean Hershey, Grace Hess, Ellwood Hitchcock, Milton 
Litvin, Mary Lloyd, Galen Lowman, Anna Mary MacNeal, Marguerite Miller, 
Margaret Milter, Joseph Matt, Fred Mowlds, Walter Nickerson, Margaret 
Pennypacker, Alda Price, Eleanor Pyle, Edna Rees, Daniel Reichey, Irene 
Robison, Kathryn Ryan, Marie Saalbach, Erma Schneider, Robert Sehl, Franklin 
Sharpe, Kenneth Shotts, Elizabeth Smith, Madeline Smith, Helen Mae Sotter, 
Burd Stover, Ella Sutliff, Sue Sutliff, Josephine Unger, Mary Walsh, Sophia 
Wase, Shakie yorganjian. 




Quod Angles 
One hundred thirteen 



VARSITY CLUB 




Frank Ma:c!iinsky 
President 





The Varsity Club was organized at 
West Chester in September of nineteen 
thirty-one at the suggestion of Coach 
Howard Wescott and the members of 
the varsity teams who had won letters 
in the major sports. Football, soccer, 
basketball, and track are included in the 
category of major sports. 

Several 
definite pur- 
poses have 
guided the 
work of the 
Varsity Club 
since its be- 
ginning. It 
aims to pro- 
mote good 




VARSITV CLUB 

McNelly, McCall, Lott, Brusch, Beda, Clifton. 

Welch, Bertolini, M. Robinson, Warvel, Moore, Gwinn. 

Singer, Donnon, German, R. Fuoss, Maschinsky. 

fellowship among the athletes of the 
college, to stimulate interest in the ath- 
letic program, and to present awards to 
those members of the club who hove ful- 
filled all the requirements governing the 
receipt of these awards. 

A member of the club who has won 
his letter twice in the same major sport is 
eligible for a sweater award in his junior 
year. Seniors are eligible to receive gold 
insignias upon satisfactorily meeting the 
requirements. The sweater that is given 
to the varsity men is a standard one of 
white with a purple W on the front 
and purple service stripes on the left 
sleeve. 

Regular meetings of the club are held 



Robert Rees 
Secretary 

One hundred fourteen 



W 



VARSITY CLUB 




John Steckbeck 
Vice-President 



VARSITY CLUB 

Ramsdell, K. Robinson, King, Conard, Rogo. 

Manifold, Rupert, Goldberger, Rineer, Hart. 

Steckbecl<, Rees, E. Fuoss, Topping, Boyer. 



twice a month, usually on the first and 
third Tuesdays, in the Y. M. C. A. room 
of Wayne \-\a\\. The members of the club 
take an interest in these meetings and the 
attendance is good. 

At the time of its founding the club took 
over the duties of conducting the college 
pep rallies. It also assumed responsibility 
for two yearly entertainments for the 
benefit of the general student body. This 
year the entertainments of the club con- 
sisted of a combination dance and moving 
picture show in the fall and a dance in 
the winter. Novel themes were used for 
both affairs. The members also sponsored 
the official football programs for all the 
home games. 



W 



The officers for each year are elected 
at the close of the previous school year. 
Frank Maschinsky, basketball captain, was 
president this year. John Steckbeck, foot- 
ball veteran and track captain, acted as 
vice-president. Robert Rees, soccer and 
baseball man, and Ralph Fuoss, varsity 
football 
player, 
were secre- 
t a r y and 
treasurer re- 
spectively. 




Ralph Fuoss 
Treasurer 

One hundred fifteen 



y. w. c. A. 




y. W. C. A. CABINET 

Wasley, Stoneburner, Jampetro, Cunkelman, Borg, E. Smith, Longford. 

Naylor, Crosley, Beecher, R. Taylor, Marshall, L. Carney. 



Many people on campus believe that 
the y. W. C. A. is responsible for only 
Thursday night meetings with their ex- 
cellent speakers and discussions and are 
entirely unaware of the numerous other 
activities engaged in by this organization. 

Sunday afternoons would be very dull 
if it were not for the frequent teas and 
vesper services sponsored by the Y. W. 
C. A. Visitors as well as students are 
grateful for their lobby cup of tea and 
the soft music which usually accompanies 
it. The Vesper Services in the chapel on 
rainy and sunny Sundays offer opportuni- 



ties for meditation and enjoyment of 
worth while speakers and musicales. 

Not only does the Y. W. C. A. sponsor 
functions of a religious nature, although 
that is its predominant aim, but it also 
plans such social affairs as dances and 
movies. 

Miss Florence Lee performs many more 
duties than those of a usual club adviser, 
for she is at the same time adviser to each 
officer and cabinet member, hlowever, 
every committee headed by a member of 
the cabinet has its own faculty sponsor. 





i 



In the women s Y room 
One hundred sixteen 



Officers 

President: Reta B. Taylor 
Vice-President: Constance Beecher 
Secretary: Virginia Marshall 
Treasurer: Emma Katherine Crosley 



y. M. C. A. 




y. M. C. A. CABINET 

J. Williams, K. Robinson, R. Anderson, Reichey, T. Williams, A. Walter, Beaver, Herr, McCall. 

Apple, Snyder, Lowman, Garman, Eggleston. 



The Young Men's Christian Association 
looks bock on almost fifty years of service 
to the men of the college. Dr. Francis 
hiarvey Green organized the group for 
Bible study, prayer meetings, mission 
work, and publication of the students 
handbook. These functions were perform- 
ed in an excellent fashion for many years. 

Today the Y. M. C. A. has expanded 
its work so that it now participates in 
every type of college activity. In con- 
junction with the Y. W. C. A. such 
prominent persons as Dr. hHenry Crone, 
Dr. Francis h^arvey Green, and Christian 
Sanderson hove been brought to the 
campus to speak to the student body. A 
feature of the meetings this year has been 
the weekly discussion group, composed 
entirely of students. Virtues, religious 

Officers — First Semester 

President: Robert Anderson 
Secretary: Leo Gorman 
Treasurer: Philip Snyder 

Officers — Second Semester 

President: Galen Lowman 
Secretary: Leo Gorman 
Treasurer: Philip Snyder 



books, and moral duties have been inter- 
esting topics for vigorous discussion. 

The "Y" Room in the basement of 
Wayne FHoll is the center of much of the 
college life for the dormitory men. It is 
equipped for recreation and pastime of 
all types. Keenly contested tournaments 
in chess, checkers, and ping-pong have 
engaged a large number of the men. 

Such social functions as movies, dances, 
and dining room parties have received 
enthusiastic support from the Y. M. C. A. 
and Y. W. C. A. Members are frequently 
in attendance at collegiate conferences 
of "Y" groups. 



I 



IQ 70 




Wayne h^al^s "Y" roon 



One hundred seventeen 



NEWMAN CLUB 







I 



NEWMAN CLUB 

Fenol, Curran, Taronis, Doran, Bertolini, Frace, Romano, Pello. 

Molnar, Nederoski, Storti, Megin, Sopieha, McCool, Doherty, M. Smith. 

G. Brennan, Gorman, Vuotto, Michael, Boyle, Monaghan, Sullivan, Krupnik. 



A local chapter of the Newman Club, 
a national organization of Catholic stu- 
dents in attendance at colleges and 
universities in the United States, holds 
regular meetings throughout the college 
year. 

The aim of this organization is partly 
social and partly religious. An effort is 
being made to have this local chapter 
keep in touch with the one at the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania and also to affili- 
ate itself with the Eastern Province of 
Newman Clubs. The Province meeting 
this year was held in Philadelphia from 



February twenty -first to twenty - third. 

Sometime during the first few weeks of 
the college year, Reverend hHenry C. 
Schuyler, pastor of the St. Agnes Catholic 
Church in West Chester, assisted by the 
Ladies' Auxiliary of the Knights of Colum- 
bus, plans a reception and dance which 
is held in the St. Agnes School for all the 
college students. At this time the students 
become acquainted with Reverend Schuy- 
ler and his assistants. The affair also 
affords them an opportunity to meet 
other Catholic students. 

Later in the term a Communion Break- 



Officers 

President: Joseph Vuotto 
Vice-President: Thomas Boyle 
Secretary: Helen Michael 
Treasurer: Margaret O'Connor 



cH 



G 



One hundred eighteen 



NEWMAN CLUB 




itWM-: , ■ , - 'FFICERS 
Michael, Vuotto, Boyle 



fast is planned. At this time the students 
receive Communion in a body at the 
Sunday morning Mass. From the Church 
they retire to one of the town s hotels or 
tec rooms where a breakfast is served. 
There are always some members of the 
college faculty present on this occasion 
and usually a guest speaker. 

A Retreat, lasting one week, is held 
sometime during the year. At present, 
plans are being made to hold one each 
semester. It is conducted by either the 
local priests or a priest from nearby. 



The regular Thursday evening meetings 
are held on the campus and are conducted 
by the students with the assistance of 
Reverend Joseph O'Connor, who is the 
present chaplain. The club chaplain is 
usually one of the assistant priests and is 
named by the pastor. Miss Mary Connell 
and Mr. J. Arthur Lewis are the present 
faculty advisers to the club. One of the 
chief features of these meetings is a 
discussion of Catholic doctrine,- another 
is a talk by some outstanding person from 
West Chester or the vicinity. This speaker 
is usually a layman. 



cY 



e 



Faculty Advisers 

Mr. J. Arthur Lewis 
Miss Mary Connell 

Chaplain 

Reverend Father Joseph O'Connor 



One hundred nineteen 



MOORE LITERARY SOCIETY 




MOORE OFFICERS 
Ammon Apple, jVice-President; Florence Gehman, Secretary, J. Earl Baker, President. 



"To know is to rule" has always served 
as the keynote for the Moore Literary 
Society, the oldest organization on the 
campus. Nearly sixty-five years ago this 
society was formed and named in honor 
of Reverend William E. Moore, who was 
then President of the Board of Trustees 
and pastor of the First Presbyterian Church 
of West Chester. 

Alternating each week with the Aryan 
Society, which was organized in eighteen 
seventy-nine, the Moores held regular bi- 
weekly meetings. These were continued 
until about nineteen twenty. Each of 
these public meetings was preceded by 
a private business meeting. Both of 
these gatherings were well attended by 
the students and townspeople. The pro- 



grams which the Moore Society sponsored 
were literary and musical in nature. Like- 
wise, both Moores and Aryans supported 
excellent orchestras. 

It is interesting to note that many of 
the books in the library still bear a label 
"Property of the Moore Literary Society." 
For many years after the establishment of 
the societies there was no school library,- 
however, each group bought many books 
to which members of the school had 
access. When the library was erected, 
these collections were donated to the 
school. 

Since eighteen seventy-one the Moores 
have provided, without exception, an 
outstanding anniversary each year and 




lar 



One hundred twenty 



From the Moore Rush Show 



MOORE LITERARY SOCIETY 




MOORE RUSH COMMITTEE 

Malale, Giersch, Apple, Charles, Baker 

Hall, Neubert, Pierantozzi, Gehman. 



have brought to the college some of the 
best talent available. Among those who 
hove come on these occasions are Ma- 
dame Louise hlomer, David Bispham, and 
James Whitcomb Riley. This year the 
Moores brought the world famous Spanish 
dancers, Escuedero and Carmita, to the 
campus. 

Records of accomplishments of the 
Moore Literary Society show that when 
the Philips Memorial Chapel was erected, 
this society contributed more than two 
thousand dollars to the fund for its con- 
struction. Nor con one overlook the fact 
that graduates of the school who were 
active in the Moore Society can be 



found in practically every profession. 

In addition to the anniversary celebra- 
tion there is a Rush Program, the big 
student production. This year the Moores 
presented an original operetta entitled 
"Collegiate Grandpa", written by two 
members of the Junior Music Education 
group. Bertha Neubert wrote the story 
and the melodies while hHerman Giersch 
composed the orchestra numbers. 

The various activities of this organiza- 
tion give students an excellent opportu- 
nity to participate and, for those who are 
interested, make membership very worth- 
while. 



:S:.^.jdiimmm„,h^ . ^^Mi^g! 




The annual Moore publication 



One hundred twenty-one 



ARYAN LITERARY SOCIETY 




ARYAN OFFICERS 
Mary Lloyd, Secretary, Ray Bitterllch, Vice-president; Earl Davis, President 



More than half a century ago the Aryan 
Literary Society was started, and since 
then it has stood with the Moore Society 
as one of the two oldest campus organiza- 
tions. Each year this society has an 
Anniversary Program early in the fall and 
a Rush Program in the winter. "A Bold 
Front", which was entirely a student 
production, was given for the winter 
program this year. 

In order that West Chester students 
should have access to books, the Aryans 
bought many volumes before there was a 
library. Later these were presented to 
the college library when it was begun. 

During the past year there has been a 



reorganization of the society. Every two 
weeks there are meetings with prominent 
speakers from the faculty and the commu- 
nity. Late in the winter the constitution 
was revised, and the membership was 
increased by a hundred pledges. 

Besides routine matters, the society 
sponsored a short story contest and an 
oratorical contest this year. The formation 
of a debating team for intercollegiate 
work has helped bring this organization 
to the eyes of the public. For next year's 
programs the Aryans are planning some 
special features, among which will be 
the production of "The Rivals" early in 
the fall. 




One hundred tv^enty-two 



Aryan literary project 



PURPLE AND GOLD CRITERIONS 




PURPLE AND GOLD CRITERIONS 

Middleton, Hochstetter. 

Stover, Baker, Neubert, Streett, R. Anderson. 

Williams, Sargent, Necgley, Frick. 



To speak of dancing at West Chester 
is to think of dancing to the smart rhythms 
of the Purple and Gold Criterions. Favor- 
ite tunes are played in modernistic style 
at tempos that compel vibrant response. 
The orchestra, a distinctive West Chester 
feature, is one of the best to be found in 
any eastern college. 

Organized as an official school project 
in nineteen twenty-six, it soon rose to 
undisputed recognition. The hHotel Am- 
bassador and Convention Hall in Atlantic 
City; Rehobeth Beach, Delaware,- and 
the University of Delaware have been 



prominent hosts. Last fall the young men 
mode a name for themselves at Penn 
State with their special arrangements 
and novelty numbers. 

It is no wonder that they are so popu- 
lar,- not many eleven piece orchestras 
offer violin trios, wood wind ensembles, 
trombone trios, brass choir, glee club, 
and novelty selections. Credit must go to 
the individuals, as all of them are instru- 
mental artists. Instead of enjoying vaca- 
tion time at home, they are usually playing 
— earning their college education. Work 
is play to them, and they all enjoy it. 



Orchestra Members 

Phil Sargent — saxophone, clarinet 

Jack Williams — saxophone, clarinet 

Clinton Neagley — saxophone, clarinet 

Earl Frick — saxophone, violin, flute, trombone 

Earl Baker — trumpet 

Henry Neubert — trumpet, violin 

Burd Stover — trombone 

William Streett — violin, guitar, trumpet, piano 

Robert Anderson — piano, trombone 

Elwood Hochstetter — drums 

Thomas Middleton — boss violin, vocal soloist 



One hundred twenty-three 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 




GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 
Nagle, Hagemans, Knudsen, Brennan, Evans, Ortlip, Forrest, Bareford, Gerbron, Malkames, Hobbs, Benner, Kuhns, 

Hench, Wood, Meli, Saurman. 
Jacoby, Jordan, Bottke, Prouse, Hall, Williams, Weir, Odenheimer, Hirsch, Clayton, Rex, M^lkm, E. Becker, Flaherty, 

Colder, Biggard, Christman, Alber. 
F. Erb, Sturdevont, Fisher, Cooper, Softer, Clayton, Davis, Simon, MacLean, Richards, Pester, Saalboch, Harmstad, 

Yeager, Godsholk, Krezanowsky, Evans, Centrella, Fame, Netherwood, Finkenbinder, Bosworth. 
Berger, Brock, Houseworth, Bechtel, Artz, Slack, Bishop, Price, Miss Heinemann, Miller, Smith, Murphy, Williams, 

Schafer, Metz, Gillinder, Canniff, Peeler. 



Have you ever listened to the harmonious 
musical sounds coming from the general direc- 
tions of Philips Memorial Chapel on Wednes- 
day evenings? They signify that one hundred 
selected sopranos and altos of the Girls' Glee 
Club are rehearsing for coming programs. 
Miss hleinemann, who directs the group, and 
her girls meet every week from 6:45 to 8:00 
P. M. in the Band and Orchestra Room. 

Preparation is made by the Glee Club for 
two definite occasions: the Christmas Carol 
Service and the Spring Concert. Every West 
Chesterite carries the treasured memory of 
those beautiful girls with their lighted candles, 
shining white dresses, and joyful reverence at 
the Christmas Carol Service. 

Officers — First Semester 

President: Rita Murphy. 
Vice-President: Louise Malkames 
Secretary: Betty Gillinder 
Treasurer: Mary Bareford 
I- . r~ ■ • Ruth Green 

Executive Committee: ^Qg^j^^jg Hirsch 

Officers — Second Semester 

President: Burtina Aumack 

Vice-President: Anna Pester 

Secretary: Adele Gerberon 

Treasurer: Mary Bareford 

I- . -.. . I Frances hHouseworth 

Executive Committee:|LQ|5 Smith 

One hundred twenty-four 



THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



WEST CHESTER, ?.\. 



THE COLLEGE GIRLS GLEE CLUB 



Friday Evening, March 20, 1936 



Dear L,ind of Home (Finlandia) Sibelius 

The Gahvay Piper (Irish Air) FltUhrr 

The Glee Club 



Ruth Zensen, sohiit 



Doris Thompson, accompanist 



Dark Eyes (Russian Folk Song) Trehamc 

C2ecko-Sla%'akian Dance Song , Mavney 

The Glee Club 



Anna Ma 



■ Wii 






Peggy Cox 

Mah Lindy Lou Stricklatid 

Koosheeo Ferris 

Edith Nagle, Ruth Clayton. Marjorie Christman 
Frances Erb, accompanist 



Dai 



of the Reed Flutes - . . Tchaikovsky-Bornschein 

My Garden Firestone-Riegger 

Marguerite Hagemans, schist 
The Glee Club 



April, My April 

Singing Baby's Toes to SIm 

A Little China Figure 

Mary Medve, soloist 



Mil 



1 HoA. 



Cfiattauyiv 

Uoni 

, accompanist 



CANTATA 

The Last Tea of Tsuki Blu 

This concerns an old legend of Japan. A famous poet and tea 
master who had aroused the Emperor's suspicion was forced to 
hara-kiri. .\ farewell party at an early hour before dawn at the 
season of Tsuki (the waning moon) was arranged by the poet 
for his pupils. Some of the guests recite their latest poems and 
all expect to hear a poem from their master. Instead, there is 
heard the song of a nightingale. In the legend she expressed for 
the poet an almost unutterable farewell. 

Those who recite their poems; 



VESPER CHOIR 




VESPER CHOIR 
Long, Button, J. Walter, A. Walter, Clouser, Gardner, Middleton, Lewis, Dlllman, Sargent, Zerbe, R. Anderson, Lamb, 
Baker, E. Giersch, Neubert. 

Rarich, Will, Charles, Warren, Kelley, Mowlds, Ingram, Herr, Streett, Krieble, Apple, H. Giersch. 
Shoemaker, Ritrovato, Haines, Grammes, Beecher, Cragg, Shotzberger, Cunkelman, Yost, Leaman, Patee, Clearwater, 

Stoneburner. 
Davies, Hoagland, Travaglini, Marshall, Cox, Hartzell, Jampetero, Brock, D. Erb, Preston, Kirk, Gendcll, Frace, Legnini. 
Stoughton, Jackson, Cramer, Tagert, Carney, Hausknecht, Voder, Hillibush, Henderson, E. Evans, McKay. 



LENTEN VESPER SERVICE 

Sponsored by the Y. W. C. A. 

PHILIPS MEMORIAL CHAPEL 

Sunday Afternoon March 29, 1936 

2 45 o'clo.l 



VESPER CHOIR 
C. Edward Hausknecht. Director 
Amnion Apple, Baritone 
Marion Cragg. Soprano 
Andrew Oitlman. Baritone 
Paul Kelley. Tenor 
John Long. Tenor 
John Steckbeck. Baas 
John Walter. Tenor 
Elwood Arnold, at the Organ 
John Leachey, at the Piano 

Organ Berceuse — "Jocelyn" Godard 

Gott, du frommerCott Karg-Elert 

Cavatine Raff 

Gloria Patri Palestrina 

Keep me. Lord; The Shadows falline Matthews 

Hymn - 69 

Peace which passeth understanding Lester 



Through the Day Thy Love has Spared us Abt 

Prayer Reverend Hewlett 

Lord Most Holy Bruckner 

Organ — Adagio — Organ Sonata Mendelssohn 

Thus saith God the Lord Hosmer 

The Resurrection Curran 

The Light of the World Matthews 

The Saving Victim Matthews 

Hymn — 40 

Doxology — Benediction Dresden Amen 



At Vesper services on quiet SundoY afternoons, at 
the Christmas Carol service, and at the Spring Concert 
the students enjoY the music of the Vesper Choir. 

Under the direction of Mr. hiausknecht, approxi- 
mately sixty-five members participate in this choral 
work with the result that the organization has become 
the most prominent choral society on campus. 

Unlike many other organizations the membership of 
the choir is specified, for it consists of all Senior music 
students and a selected group of underclassmen. 
Consequently, it is on honor to become a member of 
the Vesper Choir while one is an underclassman, 
since this group receives entrants only according to 
ability. The blend of excellent voices has resulted in 
fine choral work that adequately explains the fine 
reputation which this group holds. 

The Vesper Choir prepares programs for two 
Vesper services each year. Probably no other Sun- 
day afternoons ore more enjoyed on campus than ore 
these, during which one has an opportunity to spend 
an hour in the chapel at sunset time listening to sacred 
music sung by the Vesper Choir. On March twenty- 
ninth the y. W. C. A. sponsored the Lenten Vesper 
Service. 

One hundred twenty-five 



JUNIOR CHORUS 




JUNIOR CHORUS 

Schubert, Martin, Nissly, Shepherd, Nordstrom, Bolton, Schwclb, Leib, H. Baker, F. Erb, C. Clark, Marks, King. 

Hargrove, Neubert, Detwiler, Clark, Rothenberger, Levy, Jones, hievener, Wagner, Fite, Kistler, Whltebrecd, Becker. 

FHartnan, Egolf, Duianey, DeHaven, Gamble, L. Baker, Hoppes, Hoffman, Coolbaugh, Murray, Karp, E. Bair, Price, 

E. Herb. 
Kyle, Dormer, Gerhard, A. Bair, Wheaton, F. Anderson, Porretta, Miss Schmidt, Logan, Buchholz, D. Thompson, Breisch, 
Bcchmon, Shoub, Fluck. 



The Junior Chorus is another group on 
this campus which serves so faithfully and 
creditably the Muse Euterpe. Three times 
a year the student body is given on 
opportunity to see and hear a public per- 
formance of the rites performed twice 
each week in room C-5 to the great 
muse of harmony. 

Each year the Christmas Carol service 
is enriched by a splendid contribution 
from this group, which consists of the 
freshman, sophomore, and junior girls of 
the Music Education Department. 

This year the feature number of the 
Vesper Service conducted annually by 



the chorus was the stirring "Miriam's Song 
of Triumph" by Franz Schubert, performed 
for the first time on this campus. The 
chorus was ably assisted by Miss Mary 
Travaglini and Miss hielen Price as 
soloists. 

The selections sung by the chorus at 
the Spring Concert ranged from the 
fantastical "Dream Song ' by Stringham to 
to the gay and blithesome "The Wind's 
in the South' by John Scott. The program 
showed the ability of the girls to interpret 
music with a fine understanding and skill 
under the excellent leadership of their 
conductor, Miss Gertrude Schmidt. 




One hundred twenty-six 



C-5 — Junior Chorus practice room 



COLLEGE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 




COLLEGE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Ist Violin — Baderak, Bair, Hartman, Menken, Ingram, MacDonald, Nagle, Neubert, Pugh; Ritrovato, Concertmaster; 
Santoro, Sutler. 2nd Violin — Borg, Brock, Coniff, Cox, Erb, Herr, Hevener, Krieble, Nagelburg, Streett, Sobo, latum, 
Thomspon, Yost. Viola — Detwiler, Dillmon, Logan, Palmer, Taggert. Cello — Bachman, Boir, Clark, Hartzell, King, 
Lewis, Neubert, Price, Stoneburner, Mr. Zimmer. Bass — Buchholtz, Gardner, Maiale, Middleton. Woodwind, Flute — 
Frick, Fluck, Nissly. Oboe — Jampetero, Auman. Clarinet — Sargent, Williams. Bassoon — Leamon, Carney. Bass 
Clarinet — Giersch. Horns — Walter, Charles, Doan, Anderson. Trumpet — Lamb, Baker, Clouser, Hoffman. Trom- 
bone -Stover, Liglit, Bickel. Tuba Middleton. Percussion — Wlieaton, Apple, Frace, Hocfistetter, Giersch. Harp — 
Harnly, Director — Mr. Powell Middleton. 



Every spring the student body becomes 
suddenly aware of the excellent campus 
Symphony Orchestra which West Chester 
possesses. hHowever, few people realize 
the tremendous amount of work which 
the members of the orchestra do through- 
out the year. The orchestra is composed 
chiefly of music students, although its mem- 
bership of approximately sixty includes 
several students from other groups. 

This year the orchestra is under the 
direction of Mr. Powell Middleton, who, 
because of his wide experience, is able 



to make rehearsals interesting and lively. 
His numerous anecdotes involve his ex- 
periences with the Reading Symphony 
Orchestra and with the Victor Reading 
Company. Recently the director has made 
it possible for members of the orchestra 
to hear recordings by well known or- 
chestras, led by renowned conductors, 
of the same selections which they are 
striving to play well. Consequently, the 
orchestra rehearsals hove increased from 
one to two a week with the aim of 
achieving more nearly perfect results. 




Leaving for a short trip 



One hundred twenty-seven 



LITTLE THEATRE PLAYERS 




LITTLE THEATRE PLAYERS 

Apple, Sharpe, Hale, Barbour, Schwalb, Sehl, Rob i son, Beardsley, Cox, Fite, Hickman, Wheaton, Litvin, Harris, C- 

Kent, Coursen. 

Stiles, Storti, Friedman, Turner, Godshalk, Haines, Holla, Davit, Shook, Lloyd, Brewer, Becker. 
Britten, McNeal, Alden, Krauter, Hopkins, D. Erb, Lovell, Bolton, Leaman, B. Clark, Soalbach, Greenberg, Hagemans. 

Welch, Snyder, Williams, Himmelsbach, E. Davis, Miss Barrer, Wallace, Herr, Rees, Garber, E. M. Davis. 



"All the world's a stage, and all the 
men and women merely players." In the 
Little Theatre Players each member has 
his chance to demonstrate his acting 
ability. The light and glamorous person 
or the gloomy and melancholy character 
— each requires a definite art in portrayal. 

Eight years ago, at the request of the 
students, the Little Theatre Club was 
started. The group sought the assistance 
of Miss Ramsey. At first, Shakespearian 
plays were read in the meetings,- but the 



members were not content with this single 
activity, and in the spring of nineteen 
twenty-eight they produced their first play. 

Two years later Miss Barrer was ap- 
pointed to coach dramatics on the campus, 
and under her excellent direction the 
Little Theatre Players have won great 
acclaim. Every year this group, which is 
selected by tryouts, produces two plays — 
one in the fall and another in the spring. 
"The Bishop Misbehaves" and "Another 
Language" were this year's results of 
the fine work of the organization. 




Setting scenery for the spring play 
One hundred twenty-eight 



Officers — First Semester 

President: Donald Gardner 
Vice-President; Earl Davis 
Secretary: Franklin Sharpe 
Business Manager: Robert Rees 

Officers — Second Semester 

President: Earl Davis 
Vice-President: Dorothy Wallace 
Secretary: Hanna hHimmeisbach 
Business Manager: Galen FHerr 



SECONDARY EDUCATION CLUB 




SECONDARY EDUCATION CLUB 
Garman, McCall, Snyder, Postals, Lowman, Beaver, Repp, Lovell, Taylor, Tress, Michael, S. Kent, Haldeman, Detwiler, 
M. Smith, Boeshore, Keeley. 

Southard, Weiler, Pello, Seese, Algard, Ellis, Aumack, M. Brennen, Greenberg, Buckley, Dennis, Kosazik. 

Nesbit, Clayton, Schnea, Beemer, Schott, Siddall, Wasley, Crosley, Meli, Currens, Davis, Nickerson. 

Williams, Demanczyk, Longford, Saussaman, Coursen, Kessler, Miss Sipple, Schafer, Hughes. 



There are not many types of campus 
activities which the Secondary Education 
Club does not sponsor at some time during 
the college year. For the past several 
years, in addition to other functions, this 
club has held two dances to which the 
entire college is always invited. The 
students attend, knowing that a novel 
program will be presented. 

Few outside speakers take part at the 
regular meetings, for the majority of 
programs are not only planned by the club 
members but are also carried on by 
students interested in secondary educa- 
tion. The programs involve reports of 
conferences attended by students, re- 
views of articles from magazines, and 
panel discussions concerning recent trends 
in education. 



Officers 

President: William Coursen 
Vice-President: Claire Saussaman 
Secretary: Sara Kessler 
Treasurer: Grace Langford 



The annual Secondary Education play 
is anticipated for many weeks before it is 
presented. For the past two years mystery 
plays have won the praise of those who 
hove attended. Its cast is always chosen 
from the entireSecondaryEducation group. 

This year the club's production, "A 
Murder hias Been Arranged," held the 
audience in tense suspense by its terri- 
fying plot. 

The club is very fortunate in having 
Miss Gertrude Sipple, supervisor of stu- 
dent teaching in the secondary schools, 
as its adviser. 




hHome of the practice teachers 

One hundred twenty-nin€ 



RURAL CLUB 




RURAL CLUB 

Deibler, Redheffer, Hummer, Hughes, McMonigal, Strawbridge, Schwanbeck, Worstell, Ely, Wiley, Leike, Jefferis, Barlow. 

Kline, Baily, Stallard, Windolph, Cook, Brown, Jordan, Anderson, Wasser, Haefner. 

Lumis, Snyder, Wilson, Rodney, Birchall, Miss Clark, Twaddell, Cope, Rees, Fryer. 



The present Rural Club was organized 
in nineteen twenty-nine because of the 
desire on the part of the rural group mem- 
bers to further their interest in rural life 
and education and a wish to form closer 
bonds of friendship. It has developed into 
a well organized and enthusiastic group 
who, under the direction of Miss Lois 
Clark, seek to determine how they may 
best help young people in rural commu- 
nities. 

At the regular club meetings valuable 
information is presented by speakers, and 
discussions follow. Picnics and parties 
are arranged by the committees. The 



outstanding feature of the year was the 
celebration of Rural Day on April the 
eighteenth to which all members and 
alumni were invited. The program for the 
day centered around the theme, the teach- 
er s responsibility for helping to enrich 
the life of the rural community. In the 
morning, reports from teachers in service 
indicated how teachers are enriching the 
life of the school child. The remainder 
of the day was given to a consideration of 
how teachers can help to make possible 
a more satisfying life for people of rural 
communities. A banquet and social hour 
in the evening ended an enjoyable d 




,■ .J, :.,,,•_' in a rural scl" 
One hundred thirty 



Officers — First Semester 

President: Mary Rodney 
Vice-President: William Fryer 
Secretary: Helen Dreger 
Treasurer: Helen Rees 

Officers — Second Semester 

President: Mary Rodney 
Vice-President: William Blrcfiall 
Secretary: Sarah Twaddell 
Treasurer: Ralph Cope 



ELEMENTARY CLUB 




ELEMENTARY CLUB 
McGinn, Steciev, Caiola, Stolder, Freese, Forman, Evans, Neiman, Aubrey, Tolan, Wolfe, Davis, Foley, Walker, Fabian, 

Coyne, Clark, Dempsey, Powers, F. Erb. 
Bottke, Prouse, E. Smith, Luby, H. Anderson, Nagle, Lichtfuss, Gallagher, FHart, Anders, Federkeil, Peeler, Softer, 

Pester, O'Brien, Jack. 
Kuhns, M. Smith, Mclkin, Metz, Fulton, Connor, L. Anderson, Scatchard, Cipolla, Miller, Bareford, Yeager, Craver, 

Krezanowsky, Alber. 
Malkames, FHopkins, Chorba, Pennypacker, FHirsch, Kalbach, Meredith, Miss FHobbs, Gillinder, Bishop, McKeemon, 

Peirce, Miller, Williams. 



The Elementary Club, one of the newly 
formed campus groups, was organized in 
November of 1935. It meets the need 
felt by student teachers in the primary 
and intermediate groups to merge their 
interests and become better acquainted 
with one another and with their co- 
operative teachers. 

The opportunity to meet informally is 
given members by means of occasional 
teas and other social functions. Speakers 
who have had actual experience in the 
field of education are brought before the 
club. In this way the group gains constant 
insight into modern educational methods. 

Officers — First Semester 

President: Janet Meredith 
Vice-President: Elizabeth Gillinder 
Secretary: Louise Malkames 
Treasurer: Ruth Pierce 

Officers — Second Semester 

President: Mary Bareford 
Vice-President: Martha Gingery 
Secretary: Margaret Smith 
Treasurer: Mary Anders 



Membership and participation are lim- 
ited to student teachers of the primary 
and intermediate groups, their coopera- 
tive teachers, and the supervisors of the 
groups — Miss hHobbs and Mrs. Stabler. 
At the time of organization membership 
consisted of forty-eight students. This 
number will be increased with each 
semester's group of student teachers. 

It is hoped that the friendship among 
members will continue after graduation 
and that these future teachers will find 
that participation in this club has been 
profitable. 




Before the bell rings 

One hundred thirty-one 



SCIENCE CLUB 



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SCIENCE CLUB 

Magogan, De Fabio, Shenk, Postels, Goulding, Godsby, Downes, Newcomer, Royer, Henderson. 

McKee, McLaughlin, Taylor, Siddall, Wasley, Donehower, Crosley, Currens, Brandt, Davis. 

Dr. Anderson, Wynne, Sehl, Stover, Gruber, Soussaman, Groff, Demanczyk, Dr. Johnson. 



One of the oldest and at the same time 
one of the youngest clubs to be found on 
campus is the Science Club. It is old in 
the historical sense, for it was organized 
by Dr. S. C. Schmucker in the eighteen 
nineties; it is young in the sense that the 
club attempts to prevent any new item 
of scientific interest from escaping its 
notice. 

This year the club was divided into 
two sections. One section included 
freshman and sophomore members while 
the second was composed of upperclass- 




men. Thus each group could discuss 
more freely those topics most closely 
related to its interests. hHowever, neither 
division became selfish and entirely sep- 
arated from the other, for the most 
importantdiscoveriesand conclusions were 
always presented to the entire club. 

The scientist is usually characterized 
by his research in the laboratory. This 
club went a step further in realizing that 
a tremendous amount of research can 
also be accomplished through reading 
and club "bull sessions." 



Officers 

President: Charles Gruber 

Vice-President: Frank Groff 

Secretary: Claire Saussaman 

-r : Donald McNaily 

Treasurer: g^^jgjQ^g^ 



Experimenting in the science lab 
One hundred thirty-two 



FRENCH CLUB 




FRENCH CLUB 

D'Orazio, Heiser, White, Gray, Dr. Staley, Woollens, Ortlip, Graham, hlughes. 

Myers, Collier, Milter, Childs, Taylor, Yorganjion, Feld. 



The French Club is noted for being 
very versatile, for its meetings are French 
bridge parties, puppet shows, treasure 
hunts, and teas. Thus it is very evident 
that members of this club cannot complain 
of unvaried programs or formal routine 
meetings. 

Each member has an opportunity during 
the semester to conduct the business 
portion of the meeting and, of course, the 
language spoken is French. French songs 
are frequently sung, French jokes told, 
and French cartoons interpreted. 

Recently the club transformed its class- 



room into a "make believe' restaurant 
with French waitresses and food. With 
paper discs for money, many orders were 
given and satisfactorily filled by means of 
marshmallows and ginger cakes. 

The club has often spent a pleasant 
hour looking at and commenting on postal 
views of France and her people. As 
club projects members collect and bring 
into the club various materials dealing 
with French civilization. 

Dr. Staley, the sponsor of French Club, 
upon being asked what part she plays in 
these activities, answered that she "tries 
to make the wheels go around. 



Officers — First Semester 

President: Margaret Milter 
Vice-President: Elizabeth FHutchison 
Secretary: Kathryn Childs 
Treasurer: Yvonne Gaillard 



-Second Semester 

Jent: Kathryn Childs 



Officers- 

Presic 

Vice-President: Reto Taylor 
Secretary: Margaret Collier 
Treasurer: Yvonne Gaillard 




A French resturant scene 

One hundred thirty-three 



HERODOTUS CLUB 




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HERODOTUS CLUB 

Bairstow, Clinch, Neagley, Lindecamp, Pyle, Somers. 

Van Sise, Thompson, Dennis, M. Evans, Kirk, M. Jones, Morrell. 

L. Carney, Wase, Tress, R. Williams, Nederoski, Fehnel, Becker. 



Several years ago certain members of 
our faculty and student body^ realizing 
the need of discussing vital problems 
whicfi confronted them in their daily 
activities, organized the Herodotus Club. 
Since that time the successive club mem- 
bers have broadened their general know- 
ledge and have developed a more vital 
interest in history by providing for directed 
group discussion. 

Many short but very interesting talks 
are given by the members of the society 
at their bi-weekly meetings. President 
Swope, Dr. h^eathcote, Dr. Pleasants, 
and Mr. Andes are scheduled every year 
in addition to other prominent speakers 
in the community. 



Officers are elected for each semester 
of the school year by the members of the 
club who are in good standing. An 
executive committee is appointed by the 
president to meet with the officers and 
prepare vital and extremely interesting 
programs for the coming meetings. 

Once each semester Dr. Heathcote, 
the faculty sponsor for the society, directs 
the club on a tour to note the very inter- 
esting historical sights of West Chester. 
Included in these trips ore the under- 
ground railroad" station, the former lo- 
cation of our college on Gay Street, and 
the site of the first home in West 
Chester. 




One hundred thirty-four 



Officers — First Semester 

President: Matthew Tress 
Vice-President: Thomas Boyle 
Secretary: Mary Lloyd 
Treasurer: Donald Will 

Officers — Second Semester 

President: Robert Williams 
Vice-President: Virginia Moclntyre 
Secretary: Sophia Wase 
Treasurer: Anne Supplee 



TRAVELERS CLUB 



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TRAVELERS CLUB 

Bender, R. Brennan, Murdock, Herkness, Hess, Stauffer, Wittig. 

Conard, Buck, Woodside, Faraday, Palmer, Shur, Galey, Rusanovich. 

Reynolds, Stork, Sigmond, Speer, Peirce, C. Anderson, McGrory. 



Ship ahoy! The S. S. Travelers will sail 
for a world cruise. Miss Elliott is pilot 
while Miss Broadhead acts as captain on 
board the boat. We sail from the icy 
lands of the north to the hot islands of 
the tropics and then south to frozen Little 
America; from the blue waters of the 
Mediterranean to the calm and peaceful 
Pacific. 

Frequently the boat docks so that the 
passengers may glimpse the beauties of 
the land. There is the Grand Canyon 
with its multiferous colors and physio- 
graphical features! The Orient with its 
old customs and numerous types of work 
seems vast and overwhelming,- the raising 
of tropical fruits and the manufacture of 

Officers — First Semester 

President: Anna Speer 
Vice-President: Walter Fuller 
Secretary: Anna Lipko 
Treasurer: Mary Thompson 

Officers — Second Semester 

President: Florence McDowell 
Vice-President: Ruth Sigmond 
Secretary: Barbara Faraday 
Treasurer: Virginia Conard 



various products, as well as fishing off the 
shores of Cape Cod, inform these tourists 
of the many occupations existing through- 
out the world. The burning sands of the 
deserts and the towering peaks of the 
mountains are not unusual sights. 

The members of the Travelers Club are 
able to take such vivid imaginary cruises 
by means of slides and moving pictures. 
In this organization, which is nearly ten 
years old, the students have an opportu- 
nity not only to see how other peoples 
live, but to hear about existing customs 
through the medium of reports and lectures 
given by people who have traveled 
extensively. 




A symbol of geography 

One hundred thirty-five 



PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 




PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 
Achenbach, Pentecost, Oupkin, Geiger, Waldie, Gilmour, R. Brennan, Dr. Selzer, Bitterllch, Southard, Lightfoot, 
Etchells, Tursky. 

D. Smith, Forman, Zaratin, Eashng, Bobby Burns, Betty Burns, Connell, Alber, Seele. 



Probably no other college subject 
offers more interesting material for club 
work than psychology. A group of stu- 
dents on the campus has realized this fact 
with the result that a very active club, 
under the guidance of Dr. Selzer, exists 
end is steadily increasing in membership 
and popularity. 

Worthwhile outside speakers are fre- 
quently brought to the college by this 
club, which is always glad to have non- 
members attend its meetings. 




At regular meetings members have the 
opportunity to observe and to come in 
contact with problem children who are 
under the supervision of the college. They 
become familiar with many psychological 
tests and understand the value of their 
application. 

No doubt the most interesting aspects 
of this club are the trips made to various 
institutions such as Sleighton Farms and 
Glen Mills. These trips have been taken 
for several years. They have been of the 
utmost educational value in revealing 
some of the socio! conditions which exist 
and which will be faced by the graduat- 
ing teacher. 

Officers — First Semester 

President: Helen Alber 
Vice-President; Ray Bitterllch 
Secretary: Barbora Burns 
Treasurer: Mary Connell 

Officers — Second Semester 

President: Barbara Burns 
Vice-President: Miranda Zaratin 
Secretary: Geraldine Easling 
Treasurer; Betty Burns 



Testing lung power 
One hundred thirty-six 



POSTER CLUB 




POSTER CLUB 

Dandridge, Boyd, Brennan, Miss Lamborn, Johnson. 

Turner, Gilmour, Easling, Milne, Waldie. 



Did you ever wonder where the signs 
you see about campus ore made? They 
are the work of the Poster Club. This 
group meets every Wednesday at four 
o'clock in the Art Studio to plan novel 
posters to advertise campus events. The 
materials are bought by charging the 
small fee of twenty-five cents for six 
posters. Designs are made individually 
through the initiative and ingenuity of 
the members. 

For several years the club has been 
ably directed by Miss Lamborn. All of 
its meetings are informal. The main 
object is to produce posters, but the 
privilege of exchanging views with Miss 
Lamborn affords an even greater pleasure. 
Members continually attempt to produce 



Officers — First Semester 

President: Mary Connell 
Secretary: Kathleen Curley 
Curator: Betty Smith 

Officers — Second Semester 

President: Mary Steele 
Secretary: Betty Gilmour 
Curator: Geraldine Easling 



new and different posters to beautify the 
campus. 

Although most of the activity is actual 
work, there is one main social event each 
semester. This year there was a studio 
supper in January,- a theatre party was 
planned for May. 

The experience gained through work 
in making posters has'proved to be very 
practical for the'active members of the 
club. An excellent opportunity is afforded 
for the^development'of talent and imagina- 
tion. 




-'reporing posters for the campus 

One hundred thirty-seven 



LIBRARY CLUB 

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LIBRARY CLUB 

Schutz, Frank, Lester, Ostrowski. 

Etchells, Doherty, Miss Russell, Boyd, McGrath. 



The Library Club serves as one of the 
most practical and useful groups on the 
campus. It was organized in nineteen 
hundred and twenty-seven by Miss Alice 
Cochran, former librarian at West Ches- 
ter. Its members become acquainted with 
the work of the library both as a possible 
vocation and as a practical aid for the 
teacher. They also serve the college by 
assisting the regular librarians in their 
routine work. 

Discussions, reports, and interesting talks 
by guest speakers comprise the usual pro- 
cedure of the meetings. The club members 




are expected to give two hours a week 
to the work of the library, and all 
who faithfully fulfill this requirement are 
entitled to a special credit point in 
recognition of their service. 

Some of the special activities are taking 
charge of the periodical room, mounting 
pictures for the file, discharging books at 
the circulation desk, putting the shelves 
in order, and filing cards. 

In addition to the many other benefits, 
the club members have the privilege of 
free access to the stacks. 



Officers 

President: Elizabeth Doherty 
Vice-President: William Houpt 
Secretary-Treasurer: Ruth Boyd 



Work in the periodical room 
One hundred thirty-eight 



HOSTESS CLUB 




HOSTESS CLUB 

Cunningham, Hilliard, Pretzman, Eastburn, Allen, Lichtfuss, Galleghar, Aumack, Becker, Rodney, Detwiler. 

Hosack, Saalbach, Robison, Saussaman, Thompson, Lloyd, Rex, Bachmon, hlouseworth, Bechtel, Davies. 

Wasley, Longnecker, Knudsen, Haines, Hartzell, Ressel, Davis, Softer, Bottke, Grammes, Wheaton. 

Longford, Stoughton, Pereira, Grater, Yoder, Veager, Miller, Ncylor, Sand, Walling, 



Some people ore never absent from 
the dining room; these ore the hostesses. 
Contrary to common campus behef, their 
one and only duty is not merely to sit at 
the end of the dinner table and carefully 
estimate the amount of dessert which 
they can safely give to each of the ten 
waiting people. No, they are responsible 
for the general conduct of the dining 
room and for suggestions for improvement 
in service and menu. 

h^allowe'en, Christmas, Valentine's 
Day, and the "Coming of Spring' are 



recognized by the h^ostess Club as party 
nights "in the college dining room. Elab- 
orate decorations are planned which 
transform our daily restaurant into a 
setting fit for the occasion. No other 
programs ore enjoyed in such an informal, 
carefree attitude as those presented at 
these parties. 

This year, under the chairmanship of 
Doris Yoder, the club has successfully 
attempted to make eating less of a " hurry 
up" affair and more of a social part of 
campus life. 



Chairman — Doris Yoder 




Dinner is served 

One hundred thirty-nine 




STARS-INSIDE AND OUTSIDE 

basketball nights on campus witness bright lights and merry crowds in the 
Ehinger Gymnasium. 



One hundred forty 



MENS 
ATHLETICS 



The Purple and Gold clad men of our athletic teams 
have faced stronger competition throughout every passing 
year. The improvement that is so evident in every department 
of the college has not lost step here. We need only contrast 
our schedules and results of the past with those of this year 
to see how much more keen the competition has grown. 

It is true that our teams have not won all of their games, 
but in every contest they have displayed a fighting spirit 
that is distinctly a heritage of West Chester athletic teams. 

Excellent coaching plus a fine cooperative spirit on the 
part of the men have been the predominating factors in 
attaining this success. West Chester has also been fortunate 
in that it has the most favorable facilities for athletics. The 
equipment is the best type obtainable. In addition, the 
athletic fields have been so remodeled in the past three 
years that they are now equal to those of any other college. 



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One hundred forty-one 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 




VARSITY FOOTBALL 

Garman, Quinn, Rogo, W. Davis, Burton, Phillips, King, Taronis, Glebus, Asnes, M. Robinson, E. Fuoss. 

Krupnik, Putsavage, Sturzebecker, Lott, Schwonbeck, Soyer, Forwood, McNelly, Hart, Warvel. 

The football schedule for nineteen thirty-five was the most difficult one any team 
representing the Purple and Gold has yet faced. During a ten day practice session 
before classes there were practice games with the Philadelphia Eagles, Ursinus, and 
Franklin and Marshall that did much toward preparing the team for the regular schedule. 

On September twenty-eighth a hopeful West Chester team led by Captain George 
McGinness journeyed to New Brunswick to oppose a highly-rated Rutgers team. West 
Chester's gridders satisfied a grim determination to win, and that evening the score- 
board on the New York Times Building flashed out the score — West Chester 19, 
Rutgers 7. The second opponent on the locals' schedule was Elon College. The Souther- 
ners offered unexpected opposition and the Killingerites only managed to eke out a nine 
to six victory. The following week P. M. C. furnished the opposition on their home 
field at Chester. West Chester, perhaps a bit too confident, held on for fifty minutes 
and then went down to defeat before two quick Cadet touchdowns. 

On October nineteenth the University of Baltimore came to West Chester to be 
overwhelmed by an avalanche of five Purple and Gold touchdowns. The third home 
game of the season was played the following week against the LaSalle gridmen. As 
usual this combination of teams furnished a thrilling game, but it was not a West Chester 




One hundred forty-two 



A tackle, but it's too late. Waynesburg scores. 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 




VARSITY FOOTBALL 

Angelo, Doyle, Clifton, Nye, Remcho, DeVecco, Peltz, K. Robinson, Hanigan, Donnon, Williams, Snyder. 

Rineer, Beswick, Bixler, Hudicka, Steckbeck, McGinness, R. Fuoss, Lengel, Bruno, Downin, Welch. 

day. LaSalle pushed over a touchdown early in the second half for the only score of 
the afternoon. A week later the hitherto untied and undefeated Lock hHaven Teachers 
College team found themselves on the short end of an eighteen to nothing reverse at the 
hands of an aroused opponent. The most exciting game of the season was played on No- 
vember ninth at Reading with Albright College. Rising to new heights, Glenn Killinger's 
West Chester Rams snatched a seven to six victory from the fire to repeat their thrilling 
conquest of two years previous. At Chestertown, Maryland the following week 
Washington College held a three point lead for three quarters. In the last quarter 
the Purple and Gold machine began to click and ground out nineteen points to crush 
its game opponents. 

The Western State Teachers College outfit paid a visit to West Chester on No- 
vember twenty-third. Both teams played spectacular ball, but the verdict went to the 
Westerners by a seven to six margin. On Thanksgiving Day West Chester played host 
to Woynesburg College, a fine team from western Pennsylvania. The day was rainy, 
and the cards spelled victory for the team tetting the breaks. This time the Purple 
and Gold team managed to come through, fifteen to six, ending a brilliant season and 
bringing to a close the college football career of fourteen Seniors. 




In the locker room — the team dresses for practice 



One hundred forty-three 



FOOTBALL SENIORS 




Top row: Robinson, Steckbeck. Middle row: R. Fuoss, McGinness, Boyer. Bottom row: Lengel, E. Fuoss. 

MILLARD ROBINSON: One of West Chester's greatest backs. He ran hard and 

fast. A real loss will be suffered by West Chester when "Robbie" leaves. 
JOHN STECKBECK: The most durable player during the past four years. Never 

shirked, always willing to play any position, and never injured. 
RALPH FUOSS: A splendid offensive guard, never stopping his offensive drive,- a 

fine spirit even though of the quiet type. 
CAPTAIN GEORGE McGINNESS: Proved an excellent leader in the Rutgers game. 

A shoulder injury in the P. M. C. game incapacitated George for the season. 
CARL BOYER: Played as a guard. Although not a regular, saw consistent service 

and played a good game. 
SAMUEL LENGEL: A guard who learned the rudiments here at West Chester. Ouiet 

and unassuming, but a fighter. 
EARL FUOSS: The finest fighting spirit on the squad. Handicapped with bad legs 

and a small body; a grand center and an inspiration to the squad. 




One fiundred forty-four 



Out toward the end — but it s no gain 



FOOTBALL SENIORS 




Top row: Hudicka, Hart. Middle row: Donnon, Warvel, Welch. Bottom row: McNelly, Putsavage. 

MIKE HUDICKA: Didn't like to practice, but when he played he was the Fifth man in 

many opponent backfields. 
JOhHN hIART: Plenty of courage and endurance wrapped up in a small body. A fine 

boy who came through in the twilight of his college career. 
FRANCIS DONNON: Although not a regular he never quit. Another Senior who 

developed under Coach Killinger. 
JOhHN WARVEL: Played center and tackle equally well. One of the finest physique's 

any football player would desire,- a tireless player. 
JAMES WELChH: The best end on the field in the Rutgers game. Another year and 

Jimmie would have made history at West Chester. 
ROBERT McNELLY: "Bob", too, came along with his pal, John FHart. One of the 

smartest players on the squad. 
TELISPORT PUTSAVAGE: Remembered for his great play against P. M. C. in 1934. 

Was one of the best tackles on the squad. 







Coach Killinger 



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Results of 1935 Grid Season 

Rutgers University 7 

Elon (N. Carolina) 6 

Pen no. Military College 12 

Baltimore University 

LaSalle College 7 

Lock FHaven 

Albright College 6 

Washington College 3 

Western State (Michigan) 7 

Waynesburg College 6 



127 



Wc 



54 



Lost— 3 Tied— Pet.— .700 



One hundred forty-five 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 







FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 
Kozik, Coach MacLean, Smith, Biddle, Casselberry, Luckenbill, Metzgar, Rice, Donahey, Romig, R. Nye, Windish, 
Crisman, Kershaw, Brennan. 

Shello, Blackburn, Price, Will, Clinch, Clark, So-Tibellecka, Polinski, Gray, Barr/, Cave, Patrick. 



The first Freshman football team to represent West Chester played a short but 
difficult schedule. Although failing to win any of their four games, the yearlings did 
manage to score against each of their opponents. 

In the opening game of the season Pennington School, the New Jersey preparatory 
school champions, nosed out the visiting West Chester Freshmen by a last minute touch- 
down on a long forward pass. 

The University of Pennsylvania Freshmen handed the yearlings from West Chester 
their second defeat in the only home game for the locals. The score was only seven to 
six at half time in favor of the visitors, but the Red and Blue team was too strong, and 
the MacLean proteges went down to defeat after a gallant stand by a score of nineteen 
to six. 

One of the most exciting games on the schedule was played at Perkiomen Prepara- 
tory School. The Purple and Gold men outscored their opponents in first downs and 
in ground gained, but in spite of the fact they kept in the shadow of the Perkiomen goal 
line, they were unable to score more than one touchdown. This was not enough to 
overcome the nine point total garnered by Perkiomen on a safety and touchdown. 

In the final game the Purple and Gold outfit gained the distinction of being the only 
team to score on the Albright Freshmen, but their opponents had a big edge in scoring 
power and smothered them twenty-six to six. 



W.C 12 

W. C 6 

W. C 6 

W. C 6 



Scores 

Pennington 13 

U. of Pennsylvania Freshmen 19 

Perkiomen 9 

Albright Freshmen 26 



One hundred forty-six 



CROSS COUNTRY 




CROSS COUNTRY 
Hallo, German, Brown, Hoopes, Beardsley, Turner, Savage, Molnar. 

West Chester's harriers, by winning the Junior Middle Atlantic championship 
meet, turned what would probably have been an unsuccessful season into quite a 
brilliant one. Handicapped by the graduation of Al Knabb, the best distance man in 
West Chester history, the cross country men settled down to consistent practice and 
hard work early in the season and accomplished the unexpected. 

In November they had outclassed most of their competitors by becoming the Junior 
Middle Atlantic champions. In competing for this title the team defeated squads from 
LaSalle, University of Pennsylvania, and St. Joseph's. During the remainder of the 
season the team ran against the University of Pennsylvania and the Germantown Boys 
Club in dual meets. 

Individual members of the team competed in several open A. A. U. meets and street 
runs with fair success. The meets with Germantown and Pennsylvania were unsuccessful 
for the Purple and Gold harriers from a victory standpoint but the underclassmen gained 
some experience that will prove valuable in their later meets. The Freshmen also ran 
against Williamson Trade School and lost. 

Captain James German and Zenas Savage were the Seniors who sow active 
service on the team during the past four years. Their presence will be greatly missed 
next year. 

A completely new schedule is being arranged for the harriers for the nineteen 
thirty-six season. New teams are to be added to face the Purple and Gold men. 
The Teachers ore out to conquer new fields and rise to new heights in their own class. 

Team Record 

M, A. A. A. Championship 



West Chester 


113 


Penn 


114 


LaSalle 


119 


St. Joseph's 


124 


U. of Pennsylvania . 


..24 


U. of Pennsylvania . 


..22 


Germantown B. C. . 


..24 


Williamson Trade . . 


..22 



West Chester 34 

West Chester 30 

West Chester 32 

West Chester Freshmen 34 

One hundred forty-seven 



VARSITY SOCCER 




VARSITY SOCCER 
Anderson, McCall, Gwinn, Silknetter, Clouser, MDore, Howley, Conard, Rockwell. 

West Chester's varsity soccer team added more fame to its already enviable repu- 
tation by completing another highly successful season. The final summary shows eight 
wins against one loss for the locals. This lone reverse was the first that the Purple and 
Gold booters have met in college competition in the past four years. Coach Waters' 
soccer teams have set a record that cannot be matched by any other eastern college team. 

The Alumni provided the opposition for West Chester s undergraduates in the first 
game of the season, and, as usual, the latter won. The count was three to nothing. 
A highly rated Penn A. C. team came next into the path of the Purple and Gold avalanche. 
The Pennacs went bock to Philadelphia smarting under the sting of a six to nothing 
setback. 

Ursinus College furnished plenty of opposition for three quarters of their game 
but weakened, and again West Chester came through to capture its third successive 
victory of the season. A feature of the schedule was the five day trip made by the 
team to New York State. In the course of this tour the locals played three games. 

The first contest of this series was played with Courtland Teachers College at 
Courtland. The opposition proved to be much stronger than any the Watersmen had 




■."e ;rrds for a 



One hundred forty-eight 



VARSITY SOCCER 




VARSITY SOCCER 

Singer, Carney, Groff, Rees, Rupert, Topping, MacNab, Romsdell, Coach Waters. 

previously met, but West Chester's long winning streak was kept intact when the Rams 
talhed the lone goal of the game. 

It remained for Syracuse University to accomplish what was beginning to seem 
impossible; namely, to defeat the Purple and Gold soccer representatives. A battered 
Teachers team lowered its emblem for the first time in four years when Syracuse took 
a rough and tumble contest by a three to two score. 

The defeat seemed to lift a great responsibility from the shoulders of the Watersmen. 
Six tallies were rolled up against Bard College on the following day. After a two 
week layoff the team then journeyed to Western Maryland and opposed the strong 
and stubborn Green Terrors. With only minutes to play the score was tied at three 
all. The Purple and Gold team then proved its greatness with a last minute rush for 
the Western Maryland goal that netted a score and the victory. 

To complete a strenuous season the team breezed through with victories over 
Penn Mutual and Delaware by four to one margins. With one long streak ended, the 
Rams left a new three game run of victories to be carried over to next season. 




iome tait action in West i^hester territory 



One hundred forty-nine 



SOCCER SENIORS 




Singer, Howley, Moore. 
Topping, Gwinn, Rockwell. 

JAMES SINGER: Regular goalie for three years. A "bear" on defense and a goalie 

whom any team would be proud to have. 
JACK EHOWLEY: Although lacking in weight, Jack made his presence felt in all 

games at his inside right position. 
ALBERT MOORE: A halfback whose fine playing on defense saved many games for 

the team. 
EDWARD TQPPING: A senior who never played soccer before coming to West 

Chester,- earned a right fullback position in his Junior and Senior years. 
CAPTAIN ALBERT GWINN: A great player in a pinch. Played right wing. Was 

one of the hardest shots in college soccer 
JACK ROCKWELL: A substitute goalie who deserves praise for the fine way in which 

he fought his way to a varsity position 




.^i^' 



Migh in the air ror a brilliant save 



One fiundred fifty 



SOCCER SENIORS 




Porter, Groff, Rees- 
Clouser, Conard, Rupert. 

HARRY PORTER: Another Senior who worked his way to o varsity berth hiad the 
misfortune to break his leg in the Penn Mutual game 

FRANK GROFF: Worked up from the junior varsity to a regular position on the varsity 
in his Senior year. 

ROBERT REES: Received All-American recognition in '34 and '35. A regular full- 
back, Bob was one of the most valuable of the Seniors. 

JOSEPFH CLOUSER: A "music supe" who deserves a great deal of credit for his fine 
playing at all times. 

CHARLES CONARD: A steady, dependable player, always doing his best. "Chic" 
played right halfback during his four years at West Chester. 

DANIEL RUPERT: One of the best soccer players on the Purple and Gold squad. 
Played center forward and was the team's leading scorer. 




Teem 

West Chester 3 

West Chester 6 

West Chester 4 

West Chester 1 

West Chester 2 

West Chester 6 

West Chester 4 

West Chester 4 

West Chester 4 



Record 

Alumni 

Penn A. C 

Ursinus 

Courtland 

Syracuse 3 

Bard 

Western Maryland 3 

Penn Mutual 1 

Delaware 1 



Coach Waters 



One hundred fifty-one 



FRESHMAN SOCCER 




i 



FRESHMAN SOCCER 

Matt, Smedley, Lawrence, Sitler, Wigoff, Ward, Haines, Lawson, Moynihan, Coach Robinson. 

Lefkowitz, Storti, Bairstow, Souillard, Haines. 



The Freshman soccer team followed in the footsteps of the varsity outfit and com- 
pleted o difficult season with much success. The Freshmen did not win so many games 
as the varsity, but they ended the season with six victories, three ties, and four losses. 

The first two games resulted in ties with Cootesville and Kennett Square. After 
losing a close one to Avon Grove, the yearlings journeyed to Hill School to capture 
their first win. 

Kennett Square came next on the schedule and was defeated, but Philadelphia 
Normal School overcame the Freshmen the next week. The locals avenged all previous 
defeats by romping over the Germantown Boys Club by the lopsided score of seven to 
two. This victory was followed by victories overhHarrington and LansdowneFHigh Schools. 
Girard College furnished the opposition in the last game of the season. The contest 
resulted in a victory for Girard College, which continued its winning streak to fifty- 
five consecutive games. 



W. C 1 

W. C 2 

W. C 

W. C 5 

W. C 

W. C 2 

W. C 5 

W. C 3 

W. C 1 

W. C 7 

W. C 6 

W. C 3 

W. C 



Schedule 

Cootesville 1 

Kennett Square 2 

Avon Grove 1 

Hill School 1 

Philadelphia Normal 1 

Avon Grove 2 

Westtown 1 

Kennett Square 2 

Philadelphia Normal 2 

Germantown Boys' Club 2 

Harrington, Delaware 3 

Lonsdowne 

Girard College 3 



One hundred fifty-two 



SWIMMING TEAM 




SWIMMING TEAM 

Stuber, Lefkowltz, Williamson, Coach MacLean, Kent, Bickel. 

Conord, Burton, Shellenberger, Gray. 



Swimming is one of the infant sports at West Chester. Nineteen hundred thirty-six 
marks only the third year of serious competition for the splashers. In this time the team 
has won no major meets. On the other hand, considerable improvement has been made 
since swimming first came into its own at the college. 

This year's outfit was captained by the versatile Charles Conard. Coach MacLean 
doubled up on his work and coached the swimmers as well as the freshman basketballers. 

The swimming team met Osteopathy and Swarthmore once each and Villanova 
twice in the course of the season and lost meets to all of these teams. Individual per- 
formances on the part of the members were the only highlights for the locals. Conard 
participated in both diving and swimming events. Charles Kent, another Senior, was 
a diving specialist. 

Jock MacNab, a sophomore, was the best of the backstrokers. Burton, Shellen- 
berger, Doyle, and Stuber were other upperclassmen on the team. This latter group 
will act as the nucleus for the coming season. Gray and Bickel, Freshmen, also offer 
much promise of developing into winners for West Chester. 

At the end of the season George Burton was elected captain for next year. Burton, 
a distance and relay man, will prove a capable leader. Already an attractive schedule 
is being arranged. 



Team Record 

West Chester 24 Osteopathy 42 



West Chester 22 

West Chester 18 

West Chester 28 



Villanova 46 

Swarthmore 48 

Villanova 44 



One hundred fifty-three 



VARSITY BASKETBALL 




VARSITY BASKETBALL 
Coach Killinger, Rockwell, M. Robinson, Phillips, Manifold, Dotli, Maschmslcy. 



At the beginning of the nineteen thirty-Five season the prospects of a successful 
court year seemed rather dulL The graduation of May, nineteen thirty-five left only 
tv\/o regulars as a nucleus for this year's team. They were captain-elect Frank Maschin- 
sky and Millard Robinson. 

hHowever, by the time the first three games had been played, the entire Philadelphia 
district realized that West Chester was to have a powerful and consistently victorious 
team. The reason for this astounding reversal of expected form was the brilliant team 
work displayed by the hold-overs from last year and the three underclassmen, Jack 
hHinchey, "Vince " Phillips, and Clevio Rogo. 

As the season progressed, the quintet set up a record which has not been equalled 
by any other West Chester team against such competition. Fifteen victories were 
garnered by a fighting Purple and Gold team that lost only four games. The high spots 
of the season were marked by victories over LaSalle, St. Thomas, and Pennsylvania 
Military College. Against St. Thomas in the game at West Chester the Rams reached 
the peak of perfection; they clicked as a unit in every department. 

Glenn Killinger took over the coaching of the basketball team early in the season. 




Two more points for West Chester s toto 



One hundred fifty-four 



VARSITY BASKETBALL 




VARSITY BASKETBALL 
Beda, Hinchey, Clifton, Goldberger, Maraffi, Rogo, Lengel. 



t' 



extending his duties from football and baseball to this third major sport. Under his 
guidance the team progressed and developed into an aggressive, fighting boll club — 
one which has played hard, clean basketball and continually stepped on the court 
determined to win. 

Undoubtedly it was the most aggressive five ever to play for West Chester. As a 
team these men rolled up more points than any previous squad to represent the college. 
The individual high scoring mark of one hundred seventeen points was completely 
smashed by Vince' Phillips with a new record of one hundred sixty. Clevio Rogo 
and Captain Frank Maschinsky also surpassed the old mark with scores of one hundred 
fifty-six and one hundred twenty-four points respectively. Millard Robinson was one 
of the best defensive players on the team,- he holds a record which will be hard to 
surpass. 

The defeat of Pennsylvania Military College at the Arena in Philadelphia 
brought to a close a very successful season. The Cadets were defeated three 
different times on three different floors. 




Almost ready to go 



One hundred fifty-Five 



BASKETBALL SENIORS 




Top row: Manifold. Middle row: Robinson, Goldberger. Bottom row: Maschinsky. 

ROSS MANIFOLD: Another center — "Mannie" stands six feet four inches in his 
basketball uniform. His ploy under the basket was outstanding. Ross recovered 
the ball from the opponent's backboard continually. 
MILLARD ROBINSON: Millard alternated with Maschinsky at center for three years. 
During his Senior year he filled the varsity center berth and did a fine job. He was 
known for his aggressiveness and fighting spirit. 
BERNARD GOLDBERGER: "Bemie" played two years of varsity ball at West Chester. 
hHe was especially good on the offense and, although not a regular, could be 
counted on to come through with some points when they were most needed. 
CAPTAIN FRANK MASCHINSKY: One of the best all-round players ever to repre- 
sent the Purple and Gold on the court. Frank played center for three years and 
guard his Senior year. He was among the team s three leading scorers. 

Team Record 
' " " * ^■^ W. C. Opponents 

r^< * i?S Western Maryland 36 27 

:5-i' ' "- -•" Lebanon Valley 33 12 

-jaiH,' Washington 29 19 

I /^^mk - Westminster 24 43 

Kutztown 57 31 

La Salle 39 20 

— Susquehanna 36 29 

<i,j,fM Delaware 45 31 

jl^^^ I^^^^H' '«^>~- - Pennsylvania Military College. . 32 24 

"* ' ' ' J^,,' St. Thomas 30 53 

^ Albright 33 24 

Alumni 32 19 

Lo Salle 36 30 

Pennsylvania Military College. . 50 30 

St. Thomas 49 28 

Delaware 59 24 

Albright 32 44 

Kutztown 31 37 

Loach Killmger Pennsylvania Military College . . 41 34 

One hundred fifty-six 




FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 




IH'.HMAN BASKETBALL 

Shellenberger, Will, McSparran, Coach MacLean, Moynihan, Souillard, Cave. 

Shello, Pickel, N. Bruno, Opdyke, Metzgor, Daub, Donahey, Blitz. 

Right in the path of the fast stepping varsity basketball team come the Freshman team. 
This o'jtfit set up a record that will stand as a challenge to all Freshman teams playing 
at West Chester. Under the tutelage of Coach Munroe MacLean the team won 
fourteen out of seventeen contests, eleven of them in succession. Some of the victories 
were scored over Triangle A. C, Smith-Piefry, and Pennington and Perkiomen Prepara- 
tory Schools. These teams are some of the finest in this section. 

Milton Blitz played no small part in the success of the team. FHis playing was 
superb, both on offense and defense. "Milt" was the high scorer, and very few field 
goals were made against him. "Mike" Shello, "Jack" Metzgar, "Chic" Donahey, 
"Bob" Will, "Joe" Ca^e, and "Nick" Bruno were among the other players aiding in 
the success of the squad. 

Team Record 

W. C. Opponents 

Triangle A. C 36 27 

United States Marines 27 23 

wt tm Perkiomen Preparatory 24 21 

^B Star Printing Five (Coatesville). . 28 19 

■■ Smith-Piefry (Allentown) 32 26 

Bcnks Business College 34 13 

Pennington Preparatory 30 27 

Penn Military College J. V 21 14 

Albright Freshmen 34 21 

West Chester y. M. C. A 32 30 

Lincoln Preparatory School 28 19 

Villonovo Freshmen 22 35 

Brown Preparatory 14 23 

Albright Freshmen 45 41 

Huntington Valley CC 36 22 

Pennington Preparatory 45 41 

Perkiomen Preparatory 28 35 

Coach MacLean 

One hundred fifty-seven 




VARSITY BASEBALL 




VARSITY BASEBALL 
Morriconi, Rogo, Erwin, McNelly, Taronis, Gwinn, Silknetter, Clifton, Barnes. 



The opening of the nineteen thirty-five baseball season marked the debut of Coach 
Glenn KiHinger's first baseball team. The coach was confronted by a two-fold problem 
— a difficult schedule and lack of experienced players. As the season progressed the 
team was on the upgrade, and defeats suffered in the early spring were avenged in 
return gomes played as the season drew to a close. 

The defeat of the Washington University team was one which helped put the 
Purple and Gold diamond men in the winning class. Washington did not lose a gome 
until it met the Rams on the West Chester hHigh School field. The superb pitching of 
"Lefty" Barnes, sophomore ace of the Teachers' staff, put the Purple and Gold on top 
nine to eight when Emil Messikomer clouted a homer in the closing moments of the gome. 

A well-balanced Delaware nine administered an eight to four trimming to Coach 
KiHinger's nine. Then the Teachers staged a comeback by defeating Susquehanna for 
the second time. Pennsylvania Military College split a two game series with the West 
Chester Rams. 

The Purple and Gold team was definitely on the upgrade by the time it met the 




A bit of friendly batting practice 



One hundred fifty-eight 



VARSITY BASEBALL 




VARSITY BASEBALL 
Forbes, Hanigan, Moore, Rees, K. Robinson, Romsdell, Maschinsky, Phillips, Coach Killinger 



Indiana State Teachers College team in the Final game of the season. The game was 
close and exciting, but the West Chester men came through to complete the season 
with a ten to nine victory. 

As the team swings into action this year it is expected that Captain "Al" Gwinn 
will be holding down the shortstop position,- "Al" Moore, second base,- "Bucky" 
Forbes, first base,- and "Phil" Clifton, tfiird base. "Johnny" Taronis will be first string 
catcher. The pitching staff will consist of "Lefty" Barnes, "Bill" Rineer, Karl Robinson, 
and Alden Romsdell. 

Coach Killinger has been confronted with the problem of developing pitchers. 

Barnes is the only man on the squad who sow continuous service last year. "Sarge" 

Clark and 'Ed" Remorenko, regulars on last year's squad, are missed greatly. Both of 
these men left college to ploy professional baseball. 

The season was opened on April eighteenth with Washington College at Chester- 
town, Maryland. Penn State, Delaware University, Kutztown, and Pennsylvania 
Military College were other opponents faced during the season. 




A stolen base — he's safe 



One hundred fifty-nine 



BASEBALL SENIORS 




McNelly, Moore. 

Gwinn. 
Maschinsky, Rees. 

ROBERT McNELLY: A valuable man to any diamond squad. "Bob" really knows base- 
ball. Played a very important part coaching base runners during games. Also 
played as a pinch-hitter. 

ALBERT MOORE: The second "Al" among the Senior baseball men. An infielder 
who has played as a regular for four years. Played first base for two years,- was 
changed to a third-sacker last season. 

CAPTAIN ALBERT GWINN: One of the best shortstops to don a Purple and Gold 
baseball uniform. Holds one of the best batting and fielding records of any 
player on the squad. When it came time to elect a captain for the nineteen thirty- 
six season, there was no man better fitted for the position than Al. 

FRANK MASChHINSKY: Frank stuck to basketball his first three years at West Chester. 
This year, however, he turned his fancy to baseball as well. Is expected to hold 
down a regular outfield berth and to strengthen the batting average of the team. 

ROBERT REES: "Bob" played in the outfield for two years. When Coach Killinger 
came to West Chester, he shifted Rees to second base where he made more than 
a commendable showing. 



Schedule 

April 18 — Washington College Away 

April 24 — Pennsylvania Military College Away 

April 30 — Washington College Home 

May 1 2— Kutztown S. T. C Home 

May 13 — Pennsylvania Military College Home 

May 23 — University of Delaware Home 



One hundred sixty 



TENNIS TEAM 




TENNIS TEAM 
Coach Andes, Groff, Mathers, Reynolds, Anderson, Bentz, Towner, EIrick. 

Last year's tennis team, coached by Captain Lawson Earle, completed its schedule 
with only a single defeat. Under the leadership of Captain Frank Groff, a three-year 
letterman at West Chester, the team hopes to duplicate or better lost year's record. 
The team will be further strengthened by three outstanding performers from last year,- 
namely, Ralph Bentz, the present holder of the college tennis championship,- William 
Reynolds, recognized as one of the leading players in Chester County; and Fred 
Anderson, a consistent winner. The group that has tried for the two remaining berths 
includes John McFarland, LeRoy Booth, John Leackey, James Mathers, and Paul 
Towner. This year the team is being coached by Professor James Andes. 

A few changes have been made in the schedule from last year. Robert EIrick as 
manager has succeeded in arranging twelve matches for the Purple and Gold courtmen. 
The season opened on April the eighth with the University of Pennsylvania courtmen 
furnishing the opposition. St. Joseph's, Pennsylvania Military College, and Villanova 
were scheduled on a home and home match basis, while Penn, Lutheran Theological 
Seminary, Temple, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, Millersville State 
Teachers College, and Albright were scheduled once each. 



i 



Tennis Schedule 

April 8 — University of Pennsylvania Away 

April 22 — Lutheran Theological Seminary Home 

April 25 — Pennsylvania Military College Home 

April 28 — Temple University Home 

April 29 — Phila. College of Pharmacy & Science Home 

May 1 — St. Joseph's Away 

May 2 — Villanova Home 

May 6 — Millersville State Teachers College. . .Home 

May 13 — Pennsylvania Military College Away 

May 1 5 — St. Joseph's Home 

May 16 — Villanova Away 

May 21 —Albright Away 

One hundred sixty-one 



VARSITY TRACK 




VARSIiy IkACK 
Coach Waters, Beck, Hoopes, Krupnik, Welch, Rockwell, MacNab, Bedo, Stroup, Lott, Donnon, Dotti, Monifo 



It has been the repeated aim of Coach Earle Waters to have an undefeated track 
season at West Chester. For four successive years this hope was almost realized, 
but there was always one defeat to mar a perfect record, hlowever, in nineteen 
thirty-five the track team completed one of the most difficult schedules it has ever faced 
and came through with a clean slate. 

Victories were scored over Villanova and Albright in dual meets. An invitation 
meet held at West Chester brought the Watersmen into competition with Osteopathy, 
Penn Military College, and LaSalle. The final result was another victory for the 
Teachers. Two of the most difficult meets of the season were with Delaware University 
and Washington College. Neither team was defeated until it met West Chester. 
The Purple and Gold cindermen kept their winning streak intact by nosing out both of 
these teams. 

The State Teachers College Championships were held at the William Penn hdigh 




Over the high hurdles in early work-outs 



One hundred sixty-two 



VARSITY TRACK 




VARSITY TRACK 
Savage, Miller, Kohn, Bertolini, Vuotto, Conord, King, W. Davis, Steckbeck, R. Fuoss, McGinness, Robinson, Snyder. 

School in Harrisburg. West Chester came through with flying colors. Twenty-four 
places were taken by Coach Waters' proteges,- sixteen of these were medal winners. 
It was the fifth consecutive year that the West Chester team has won this title. It gave 
this institution permanent possession of the Shenk and Tittle trophy. 

This year the schedule has been rearranged, and although many of the opponents 
faced last season again appear in the schedule, the Susquehanna relays have been 
added. This is a step in an advance toward greater heights. The team is expecting 
to make a fine showing in this meet which will bring it into competition with the leading 
colleges of the East. Under the captaincy of John Steckbeck the Purple and Gold 
track and fieldmen ore aiming toward another undefeated season and another State 
Teachers College Championship. Villanova, Albright, Washington College, and 
Delaware University are the teams appearing on the schedule. 

There are a good number of promising candidates for all varsity berths. Eight 
Senior lettermen are spending their last season in competition. In addition there are 
other Seniors as well as underclassmen making strong bids for positions on the team. 




Track season is in full swing in tfie locker roon 



One hundred sixty-three 



TRACK SENIORS 




R. Fuoss, German. 
Conard, Steckbeck. 

RALPH FUOSS: Ralph has developed considerably as a discus thrower during the 

past three years and hopes to be in the best of form this season. With consistent 

practice he hopes to set a new school record. 
JAMES GERMAN: When it comes to endurance, "Jimmy" certainly has it. Runs the 

mile and two mile distance every meet and usually comes in first. EHos developed 

greatly since he entered West Chester. 
ChJARLES CONARD: "Chic" picked the higher things of life and devoted himself to 

pole vaulting. Won first place in the State Teachers College championship meet 

lost spring and is seeking higher levels this year. 
CAPTAIN JOHN STECKBECK: A record holder for three years. "Johnny" throws 

the javelin one hundred eighty-two feet, five inches. A real fieldmon and an 

outstanding leader. 




Coach Waters sets the boys off 



One hundred sixty-four 



TRACK SENIORS 




ManiFold, Donnon. 
Robinson, Bertolini. 

ROSS MANIFOLD: The "little man" on our track team. Stands six feet, four inches 
and can high jump six feet. Ross holds the school record. hHe also puts the shot 
and throws the discus. 

FRANCIS DONNON: Another high jumper. During his Junior year he tied with 
Manifold for the best record in high jumping for the year. Is hoping he can come 
through in fine style this year. 

MILLARD ROBINSON: "Robbie" played baseball for two seasons and then turned 
his interest to track. In the Washington meet last year he completely shattered the 
school shot put record by a heave of forty-three feet, two inches 

MAURICE BERTOLINI: A broad jumper of note. Holds the State Teachers College 
championship record of twenty-one feet, six and one-half inches. Also a sprinter 
and quarter-miler. FHas been a member of the relay team for four years. 



Schedule 

April 24-25— Penn Relays Away 

April 29 — Villanova Away 

May 2 — Invitation Meet Home 

May 6— Albrigfit Home 

May 9 — State Teachers Championships. . . .Harrisburg 

May 16 — Susquehanna Relays Away 

May 20 — Washington College Away 

May 23 — University of Delaware Home 




SSSSS=sr»-:i||Hh- 

Coach Waters 



One hundred sixty-five 



FRESHMAN TRACK 




FRESHMAN TRACK 
Matt, Carney, Lawson, Barrie, Jack, Rice, Lowmax, Litvin, Shotts, Ward, Doran, Birchall, Eubank, Halla. 



This is the first year West Chester has had an organized Freshman track team. 
Much interest has been shown by the Freshmen of the college. They have turned out 
in large numbers for this sport. It is to be another of Coach Waters' duties to develop 
the yearling track men into champions for later varsity membership. 

Among the best known prospects for the team is James Ward. Jimmy comes from 
Altoona FHigh School with a very commendable record as a dash man. Will, Eubank, 
Smedley, and Lawson are others who will doubtless aid in scoring points for the Freshmen. 

Although the schedule is not a large one, the Purple and Gold men will find difficult 
opposition when they meet the University of Pennsylvania Freshmen and the yearlings 
from Temple. These teams have set up enviable records in the past and are not likely 
to be easy marks for the West Chester men. 

On April twenty-fourth and twenty-fifth the first year men entered in the Penn 
Relays. FHere Coach Waters hod his first opportunity to get a really good glimpse of 
the potentialities of the squad. 



Freshman Track Schedule 

''IBPF April 24-25— Penn Relays Away 

f May 1 — University of Pennsylvania Home 

May 15 — Temple University Av^ay 



One hundred sixty-six 



INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS 




INTRAMURAL BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS 
M. Robinson, Lunger, Rees, Groff. 
German, Singer, Welch, Donnon. 

The "Senior Champions" won the intramural title by winning thirteen gomes without 
a defeat from a group of fighting opponents. One explanation of this remarkable 
record was the fact that four of the "Champions" were among the leading scorers of 
the league. These were Glen Lunger, James G9rman, James Welch, and Francis 
Donnon. Lunger led the league in scoring throughout the season. "Bob" Rees, 
"Jimmy" Singer, and Frank Grol^ contributed much to the defensive work of the team. 

Much of the credit for the team's success goes to Millard Robinson, who coached 
the players throughout the past two seasons. An interesting fact about this team is 
that its members have played together for four years — the first two years as members of 
the Purple and Gold Junior Varsity. This court team has won the Intramural Champion- 
ship for two successive years,- m this time it lost only one game. 

The committee taking charge of the intramural program was composed of Glenn 
Lunger, Robert Rees, and Earl Fuoss as Senior representatives, and Clevio Rogo and 
Stanley Krupnik as Junior members. This program offered activity to almost a hundred 
men on Saturday afternoons during the season. Twelve teams entered the circuit at 
the beginning of the season. Although only eight of these teams managed to finish 
their schedules, the competition was keen throughout. 



Final Ratings 

Team Won 

Champions (Seniors) . . .' 13 

Fish Peddlers (Sophomores). . . 11 

^fSf All Bums (Juniors) 8 

^^^ Flashes (Juniors) 9 

^^P Dead FHorses (Seniors) 7 

Wildcats (Sophomores) 6 

Whippets (Sophomores) 5 

Newman Club (Freshmen) ... 5 



Lost 


Pet. 





1.000 


2 


.846 


3 


.727 


4 


.692 


4 


.636 


5 


.545 


6 


.454 


6 


.454 



One hundred sixty-seven 



GYM TEAM 



w: # 






GYM TEAM 

Forward, Doyle, Remcho, Coach Waters, Downin, Gwinn, W. EIrick. 

McGinness, R. Fuoss, Topping, Conard, Singer, Shellenberger. 



There was a question whether or not there was to be a gym team at West Chester 
this year^ but Coach Waters uncovered some talent from the physical education classes 
and turned it into on excellent athletic group to give exhibitions at various schools as 
well OS in the Ehinger Gymnasium. 

Captain "Chic" Conard was among the outstanding men on the team. hHis special- 
ties were the rings, parallel bars, and the horse. Chic also had the honor of holding 
the office of president of the Olympic Club. Other Senior members of the team were 
James Singer, who performed on the rings and danced; George McGinness, a specialist 
on the parallel bars,- John Steckbeck, dancing and clowning,- Edward Topping, mats 
and horse; Bill EIrick, mats; Ralph Fuoss, mots; and "Zoc ' Savage, parallel bars. 

The team made several trips, including journeys to Prospect Pork hHigh School, New 
EHollond, and Mahanoy City, and gave fine exhibitions at these schools. 

The Olympic Club presented "Chet ' Phillips and ' Joe ' Hewlett of Temple Uni- 
versity as added attractions at its spring ex- 
hibition. The annual trip to Philadelphia to 
witness the National Amateur Athletic Union 
Championships was one of the rewards given 
the gym team for its splendid v^ork and co- 
\"^j^^ operation. ^^i^ 

Senior members in the Olympic Club are ^^F 

Conard, Singer, Topping, Savage, W. EIrick and 
R. Fuoss. These members will be awarded gym 
team jackets at the close of the year. 



One hundred sixty-eight 



J 



GOLF TEAM 




GOLF TEAM 
Coach Maclean, Storti, Farscino, Pickel, McPherson, Shelley, M. Robinson, Moynihan, Lewis. 

For the third year the golf team is starting out to compile a record for itself. Last 
year the team showed marked improvement. As a result, when the season ended, the 
team found it had won one match, tied one, and lost two. 

hHaverford, Penn Military College, Swarthmore, and Villanova will furnish oppo- 
sition for the Purple and Gold golfers this spring. Millard Robinson and Wynn Lewis 
are the seniors on the team. "Robbie" has played for three years and is captain for 
this season. George Shelley and hHugo Maiale ore other upperclossmen who will be 
called upon to represent West Chester on the golf links. 

Carmen Storti, a freshman, is expected to bolster the team this year. Carmen comes 
to West Chester from Bridgeport hHigh School. hHe shoots consistently in the seventies 
and will moke his presence felt before the season is over. Donald McPherson, another 
freshman, is also expected to assist the team in getting its shore of victories. 

Golf, along with swimming, is one of West Chester's newer sports. hHowever, 
increased interest has been evident each year. In the afternoons the golfers may be 
seen practicing in the various corners of Wayne Field. Munroe MacLean, coach of 
the golfers, aids whenever possible and supervises practice on the nearby West Chester 
golf links. 



W 



Go\i Schedule 

April 7 — Haverford Away 

April 21 — Pennsylvania Military College hHome 

April 27 — Swarthmore Away 

May 14 — Villanova Away 



One hundred sixty-nine 



W-MEN 



FOOTBALL 



Albert Angelo 
Samuel Asnes 
William Beswick 
Donald Bixler 
Carl Beyer 
Paul Bruno 
Filmore Clifton 
William Davis 
Pasco DeVecco 
Frances Donnon 
Earl Fuoss 
Ralph Fuoss 
Leo Gorman, Co- 
Levin FHanigan 
John FHart 
Michael FHudicko 
Samuel Lengel 



manager 



BASKETBALL 

Edward Beda 

Bernard Goldberger 

Ross Manifold 

Samuel Lengel, Co-manager 

Frank Maschinsky, Captain 

Vincent Phillips 

Millard Robinson 

John Rockwell, Co-manager 

Clevio Rogo 



SOCCER 

Fred Anderson, Manager 

Joseph Carney 

Joseph Clouser 

Charles Conord 

Frank Groff 

Walter FHickman 

Jack FHowley 

Owen McCall 

Albert Moore 

FHarry Porter 

Alden Ramsdell 

Albert Gwinn, Captain 

Robert M. Rees 

Norman Robinson 

Jack Rockwell 

Dan Rupert 

George Silknetter 

James Singer 

Edward Topping 



George McGinness, Captain 

Robert McNelly 

Richard Nye 

Raymond Peltz 

Vincent Phillips 

Telisport Putsovage 

Vincent Remcho 

William Rineer 

Millard Robinson 

Clevio Rogo 

Phillip Snyder, Co-mancger 

John Steckbeck 

Russell Sturzebecker 

John Taronis 

John Worvel 

James Welch 



GOLF 

Wynn Lewis 

FHugo Maiale 

Millard Robinson, Captain 

George Shelly 

SWIMMING 

Graham Bickel 
George Burton 
Charles Conard, Captain 
French Gray 
Charles Kent 
Jock MacNob 
Laverne Shellenberger 
John Stuber 
John Williamson 



TRACK 

Edward Beda 

Maurice Bertolini 

Charles Conard 

William Davis 

Francis Donnon 

William EIrick, Manager 

Ralph Fuoss 

James German 

Cecil King 

Owen McCall 

Jack MacNab 

Ross Manifold 

hHarry Porter 

Millard Robinson 

John Steckbeck, Captain 

Glenn Wagner 




BASEBALL 

Sherwood Barnes 

Filmore Clifton 

Charles Forbes 

Albert Gwinn, Captain 

Frank Maschinsky 

Albert Moore 

AlfonsoMorriconi, Manager 

Vincent Phillips 

Alden Ramsdell 

Robert Rees 

Karl Robinson 

Clevio Rogo 

John Taronis 



CROSS COUNTRY 

Frank Beordsley 
Robert Brown 
James German, Captain 
Wilson F^oopes 
John Molnar 
Edvv^ord Otwell 
Zenas Savage 
Fred Turner 



TENNIS 

Fred Anderson 

Ralph Bentz 

Leroy Booth 

Frank Groff, Captain 

James Mathers 

William Reynolds 

Paul Towner 

Robert EIrick, Manager 



One hundred seventy 



1. The intramural moguls — 
Krupnik, Rogo, Director 
Allen, Lunger, and Rees. 



2. Some bockField dynamite 
— Rogo and Angelo. Ro- 
go is 1936 captain. 



3. W. C. downs a Waynes- 
burg back. The Purple 
and Gold went on to 
win. 



Along the bench in 
soccer game, hiere s 
study in expression. 



5. The Ram booters, on their 
trip to New York, stop 
at the airport. 



6. Donnon, Manifold, and 
Robinson — third floor 
trackmen. 



7. The Demonstration School 
courtmen and coaches. 



8. Here's a bit of fast action 
as the Ram basketeers 
took P. M. C. at the 
Arena. 




JtuJliHitmtinuMt' 




PLAYTIME IN THE AFTERNOON 
Spring brings renewed life to the women's athletic field. 



One hundred seventy-two 



WOMENS 
ATHLETICS 



Although women do not win glory as football heroes 
and baseball stars, they are active in more fields of athletics 
than we usually imagine. On summer days the tennis courts 
are scenes of thrilling matches while the athletic fields are 
the meeting place of rival class hockey, baseball, and volley 
ball teams. 

Not only are there splendid opportunities on campus for 
outdoor sports but girls can be seen entering the gyms at all 
times during the day, for there they play basketball, dance, 
and bowl. In recent years provision has been made for all 
students to participate in such activities as roller-skating, 
ping-pong, badminton, and shuffle board in the evenings. 
Girls walking rapidly to campus from town with wet hair on 
both chilly and balmy days signify that swimming is another 
activity included in West Chester's physical education course. 

During week days we can see "health ed women stu- 
dent teachers on the public playgrounds guiding children in 
their recess games and in the class rooms teaching the rules 
and stories of wholesome living. 

Thus, it is the modern as well as the ancient demand for 
"a sound mind in a sound body " that has supplied the impetus 
to women's athletics and games at West Chester. 




One hundred seventy-three 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



\ 




W, A. A. 
Carter, M. Albert, Hosack, Kallenbach, Murdock, Leathers, Collen, Griscom, Gelger. 
Yerger, Flaville, Eggert, Lord, Stough, A. Jackson, Replogle, Brandt, Romig. 
Emmert, E. Schafer, Krick, Grammes, C. Davis, Rubright, Pork, Landis, Longnecker, Casson, Herr. 
Herman, Hllliord, D'Orozio, Pereira, Naylor, Ressel, Cunningham, Gehmon, Strohm. 



The Women's Athletic Association is the largest organization of its type on the 
campus at West Chester. The W. A. A. was originated in nineteen thirty through 
the efforts of Miss Myra Wade and has steadily gained in membership until at the 
present time it consists of one hundred seventy members. The Club has been ably 
directed by Miss Myra Wade and Miss Muriel Leach. 

One of the main purposes of W. A. A. is to sponsor sports and activities which every 
girl of the college will enjoy. During the past year the following sports were capably 
directed by W. A. A.: hockey, tennis, archery, swimming, volley ball, basketball, hiking, 
tap and clog dancing, modern dancing, and various indoor activities, such as ping-pong, 
dart throwing, bowling, shuffle board, hand tennis, and handball. Tennis, archery, 
volley ball, hockey, and basketball tournaments are sponsored during their respective 
seasons. In addition to these activities, W. A. A. offers to all college students re- 
creational games, roller skating, and dancing on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday 
nights of each week. 

Another purpose of the association is to provide interesting and varied entertain- 
ment at the club meetings which are held once a month. The various holidays are 
appropriately celebrated, and problems of interest to the sports-loving girl are brought 
before the club. 

The organization of the club consists of a president, vice-president, treasurer, and 
secretary with a manager for each of the various sports,- each of the above serves as a 



One hundred seventy-four 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 




W. A. A. 

Lindaman, Tursky, Spldle, D. Davis, Jamison, Baldwin, Somers, Weik, Gill, Johnson. 

Sturzebecker, Kline, Burkhardt, Quandel, Forman, latum, Potton, Bruder, White, Car 

Dorner, Lutz, Turner, Pello, Hunn, Guers, Stiles, Richter, Sheldon. 

Moore, Currens, Etter, Christman, Wilson, Wesley, Britten, D. Smith, Morgan. 



member of the executive council, which has full charge of the organization. W. A. A. 
is a member of the Women's Division of the National Amateur Athletic Federation. 

The aim of the association has been strictly observed since its founding: "A sport 
for every girl, and every girl a true sportswoman." 

When the W. A. A. was first organized seven years ago, its membership consisted 
of twenty-five girls. These young NA/omen formed the Association as a result of a meet- 
ing of all the college girls interested in sports and recreational activities. 

Since it was founded, the Women s Athletic Association has grown in membership 
from the original twenty-five to one hundred seventy at present. This group is directly 
controlled by the W. A. A. Council composed of the officers, ten managers of the 
various sports, Miss Wade, and Miss Leach. 

The sports represented by managers in the Council are hockey, tennis, archery, 
swimming, volley ball, basketball, dancing, and hiking. Publicity managers and managers 
of winter sports complete the group. These individuals sponsor and plan the various 
activities carried on throughout the year by the W. A. A. 

All girls in the college are permitted and urged to participate in the club regard- 
less of membership. hHowever, to receive extra-curricular credit it is necessary to belong 
to the organization. Awards are made to women students fulfilling certain require- 



One fiundred seventy-five 



W. A. A. COUNCIL 




W. A. A. COUNCIL 

Stough, C. Davis, Leathers, Griscom, Carl, Hunn. 

Grammes, Pereira, Ressel, Gehmon, Strohm, Cunningham, Hosack. 



merits. Anyone earning one thousand points in four years is entitled to an attractive 
blazer. These points are based on participation in W. A. A. activities. Individuals 
getting eight hundred points in four years receive a pin. A letter is given to all girls 
on a championship team in two sports,- numerals are given for playing on a championship 
team once. 

The W. A. A. Council furthers the purpose of the entire W. A. A. organization. 
It aids in providing social and physical activities for all women students at West Chester. 



ler 



Officers 

President: Florence Gehman 
Vice-President: Mary Strohm 
Secretary: Mildred Ressel 
Treasurer: Ann Cunningham 
Publicity Manager: Betty hi osack 




The latest in gym suits 
One hundred seventy-six 



East side — West side 



Is this hockey? 



HOCKEY CHAMPIONS 




HOCKEY CHAMPIONS 
Kallenbach, Carl, Leathers, Murdock, Bogan, Sheldon, Unger, Pollock, Schafer, Replogle. 

The women's sport season at West Chester opened in the fall with a series of hockey 
games in the form of a consolation tournament. Both academic and health education 
teams competed in the scramble for a title that was not decided until the final contest. 

The games were played with an unusual amount of spirit that made them much more 
interesting than they otherwise would have been. The contests between the Sopho- 
more and Junior health education teams were the most strenuously fought, and it was 
only the extra speed of the Sophomores that enabled them to outplay and defeat the 
Juniors. The Sophomores won the title for the second successive year. They are to 
be congratulated on their display of good hockey during the two seasons. 

The Senior-Junior health education game resulted in a tie after a fast and well- 
played game; this made necessary a second game between the two teams. This contest 
was almost equal to the final game in the amount of tension which was present through- 
out the period of play. It resulted in a close victory for the Juniors. 

An unusual feature of the hockey season this year was the series of matches played 
between the men and women of the Senior health education group. The stick work 
of the men greatly resembled golf, baseball, and lacrosse, but the friendly spi:it cf 
good sportsmanship that dominated the games added much to the fun and zest of the 
contests. 




Jump in and get it over 



Whc n the battle is over 

One hundred seventy-seven 



ACADEMIC BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS 




'!mm!gmmm:7w^^iwgmmm^Fm 



ACADEMIC BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS 
Tatum, Nesbit, Young, Gnscom, Heater, Emmert, Weller. 



The basketball tournament for academic women was played separately from that 
of the health education teams for the second successive year. Four teams comprised 
the league. Each one of these outfits met all the others once in order to determine the 
championship. 

This year the general ability of the teams was far above that of other years. The 
accuracy, technique, and general playing \Nere much improved. This made the games 
more enjoyable for both players and spectators. 

•■"<»' The Junioraxes captured the title by going through their season undefeated. 
They gained victories over the Saultitorians, Lutzenjammer Kids, and Lynchers. 

The Junior health education men, following the example of the Senior men, chal- 
lenged the Junioraxe team to a game at the end of the season. The challenge was 
accepted and a game ensued that found the men again victorious over the women. 
The same spirit of fun and good sportsmanship was present at this game that had been 
noticed at all of the other contests between the men and the women of the college. 

All of the women's sports and activities are sponsored by the Women s Athletic 
Association under the direct control of the Athletic Council. The season of 1935-1936 
has been one of the most successful that the club has had since its organization. Each 
year sports and other physical activities have been improved and better organized by 
the work of the W. A. A. 




All in a row 
One hundred seventy-eight 



Yas sah! 



Congregation on tl^e fire-escape 



HEALTH ED. BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS 




HEALTH EDUCATION BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS 

Schafer, Sheldon, Leathers, Pollock, Replogle. 

Bogan, Kallenboch, Carl, Murdock. 

Showing the same team play and cooperation that gained them the hockey champ- 
ionship, the Sophomore health education girls crushed each of the other three class 
teams to win their division of the women's fall basketball tournament. The Sopho- 
mores met bitter resistance from the Freshmen, Juniors, and Seniors but managed to 
weather all storms to gain the crown. 

The season opened with the Seniors facing the Junior health education team. 
Battling for every point, the Seniors managed to eke out a close 25-24 victory. The 
Sophomores next moved into the picture by defeating both the Junior, Freshmen, and 
Seniors successively. Large crowds witnessed every contest and added to the tension 
that prevailed throughout all the contests. 

At the close of the tournament the Senior health education men challenged the 
Senior girls to a trio of games. The girls, determined to avenge the defeat the men 
had handed them in hockey, made valiant efforts to attain victory, hlowever, once 
again the superior speed and strength of the men enabled them to emerge the winners 
in keenly fought contests. Both coaching and officiating of the classes and basketball 
games were again done by Miss Schaub, Miss Aldworth, Miss Leach, and the Junior 
health education women. The tournament was a success in all its features. Basket- 
ball has been one of the most popular of the women's sports in the past few years 
and interest has been increasing rapidly. 



,^wmfi. 



•m^m,': 




-de-dc 



Get thee befiind me, Satan 

One fiundred seventy-nine 



VALKYRIE CLUB 




vALKykit i^lUd 

Carter, C. Davis, Gearhart, Kollenbach, Leathers, StroSn, Morgan. 

C. Robinson, Stough, E. Schafer, A. Jackson, Replogle, Brandt, Carl. 

J. Linger, Verger, Flaville, Rubright, Park, Casson, Landis, GeSman, Grater. 

Cunningham, Herman, Pereira, hiilliard, Eggert, D'Orazio, Longnecker, Naylor, Ressel. 



The Valkyrie Club is a distinctive body in that it is primarily a dance club. The 
membership consists of girls from the Sophomore, Junior, and Senior classes of the hiealth 
Education Department who are interested in the modern dance. Miss Anne Schaub 
has been the faculty adviser, and it has been due largely to her untiring efforts and 
interest that the club has attained the degree of success that it has. 

This year Valkyrie has sponsored several activities. As has been the custom in 
the past few years, the club held modern dancing classes two hours each week end 
also gave a dance recital. Besides these two main features, the club sponsored the 
sale of Christmas Seals on the campus and provided a dance demonstration for the 
hiealth and Physical Education convention that was held here. The club also provides 
for other interests in the sport field through trips into Philadelphia to see ice hcckey 
gomes and interpretations of the rules of hockey and basketball. 

Valkyrie has done much for its members in helping them 
to get better acquainted with students having thesame interests 
and in providing an activity, "modern dancing", that would 
otherwise probably not be offered on the campus. 



Officers 

President: Alice Eggert 

Secretary: Bettye Hilliard 

Treasurer: Dine D'Orazio 




Miss Schaut 
Adviser 

One hundred eighty 



1 . Perfect form. 



2. Wlien do we eat? 



3. May the best woman 



4. Naughty, naughty, Gink! 



5. Athletes all. 



6. They II all be down in a 
minute. 



7. Where'stheship'sdeck? 



8. Appealing';' 



9. This is how it's done. 



10. A close-up of those 
snow maidens — and it's 
anybody's battle. 



1 1 . Double, two, three, four. 





THE QUAD IN ALL ITS GLORY 
The Quad is never lonely, for here students joke and argue, lough and worry together. 



One hundred eighty-two 



FEATURES 



As we passed through four years of college life, hurdling 
the barriers before us with varied success, we have shared 
innumerable experiences of every type. When Freshmen, we 
viewed most of them through wide-open, serious eyes. Then 
we became Sophomores and prided ourselves on our non- 
chalant acceptance of life as a whole. Our Junior year 
found us in a jovial mood, eager to undertake any adventure 
promising enjoyment of a profitable type. Finally, we became 
Seniors, and college life reached its peak of happiness and 
attainment for us, despite the fact that it was drawing to a 
close. 

Many of these experiences are only a hazy background 
in our minds, while others hold a distinct place in our thoughts. 
The latter undoubtedly should be preserved here where we 
may turn to them at any time. Thus they will provide a 
permanent treasure chest of memories, some humorous some 
serious, that will enable us to live again our college years 
as we take a rapid retrospective glance. Once again we 
may be frightened Freshmen, sophisticated Sophomores, jovial 
Juniors, or successful Seniors — just as we prefer. 



M^ i I 



I ^ Lj^^'"^-'^'^*®^^^^ 




%. .-ii 



X 



'^"^M 



One hundred eighty-three 



LAUREL BLOSSOM PRINCESS 




MISS DOROTHY WALLACE 



One hundred eighty-four 



MAY QUEEN 




MISS IRENE ROBISON 



One hundred eighty-five 



PERSONAGES AND EVENTS 




M^le^i^^ imL 




WiMmjiiiWMiiXrtiiiiriiiiitn^'T— m 




1. Carmita and Escudero 
spoke with castanets at 
the Moore Renuion. 



2. Time out for the Fresh- 
men — but Penn's Yearl- 
ings still won. 



3. Displaying the home tal- 
ent as Baltimore bows 
to the Ram gridders on 
hHomecoming Day. 



4. All set to "bully-off." 



5. My deah — it's John 
Goss and his London 
Singers. 



6. Miss Elliott soys, "Geo- 
graphy in the raw is 
seldom mild. 



'^^'- -^iJ 7. Elmer objects to his 
- ., . "^ weekly (?) bath. 



Hera's "Col ' Lilly, a 
busy man in any sport 
season. 



9. Dr. hHenry Crane again 
challanged West Ches- 
ter's youth at the joint 
"Y" meeting. 



10. In this corner we have 
— Mr. McKelvie verbal- 
izing his concepts. 



11. David Cook lectured at 
a joint ' Y meeting. 



PERSONAGES AND EVENTS 



1. Rear Admiral Sims ad- 
vocated the adoption of 
international peace. 



2. Geneva Henderson 
thrilled all with her 
rendition of "O Holy 
Night" at the Christmas 
Carol Service. 



3. The girls visited the 
Mediterranean with J. 
Carroll Hayes as he 
lectured. 



4. Did you dress for the 
Varsity Club's Mardi 
Gros? 



5. The old gym certainl 
looks deserted. 



6. Libby spells "peace' 
to West Chesrites. 



7. Snow does not hinder 
the annual art trip to 
Philadelphia. 



8. The Aryan cast smile 
and look at the birdie. 



9 Here are the Moores 
after their 'Raz - ma - 
taz." 



10. Any boy scout could 
tell you, Gee, that s 
Paul Siple. " 




PERSONAGES AND EVENTS 




1 . We found that even a 
Halliburton can be fool- 
ed by a Persian princess. 



Good food, good speak- 
ers, and lots of fun fea- 
tured tfie football ban- 
quet. 



Just look at all tfie facul- 
ty watching the basket- 
ball game. 



Who knows that "A 
Murder Has Been Ar- 
ranged ' by the Second- 
ary Eds? Back row: 
Coursen, Gore, Lloyd, 
Booth. Front row: Wall- 
ing, Waslsy, Saussaman. 



No vacation this time; 
just the orchestra off on 
a trip to Norristown. 



6. This night "Another 
Language" was spoken. 



7. Harmony is the keynote 
of our Campus Trio. 



PERSONAGES AND EVENTS 



1. Every corner of the Cha- 
pel resounded with the 
fine voice of John Charles 
Thomas. 



2. This group planned an 
excellent Senior Week- 
end: Williams, Eggleston, 
Detwiler, R. Fuoss, Gard- 
ner, C. Kent — bock row, 
Gehman, hiirsch, Mere- 
dith, Potee, Miller, 
Cragg, Kessler — front 
row. 



3. Exponents of true art — 
the College Instrumental 

Trio. 



4. Meet the man behind the 
baseball scenes — Glenn 
Killinger. 



5. It is a pleasure merely to 
mention the name of Cor- 
nelius Otis Skinner. 



6. On your mark — get set- 
go. 



7. These Seniors planned 
the invitations and book- 
lets for graduation: Lang- 
ford, Clark, S. Kent. 



8. The Class Day activities 
were arranged by these 
five: Coursen, Warvel — 
back row,- Mewha, Gal- 
lagher, Clouser — front 
row. With this program 
our college days drew to 
a close. 




\m 



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How did this happen? 




Where's your "Twice 55"? 




FROM THE CLANG 
OF THE ALARM 



Time for the watchmen. 




One hundred ninety 



Room for two more. 




WhatI No letter'? 




Gangway for lunch. 



UNTIL THE BELL 
RINGS "LIGHTS OUT" 



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Class is over for todov 




Day students dine also. "1 




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Those things called term papers! 



Just 



One hundred ninety-one 



A 

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B 

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T 
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C 

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A 
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W 
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CAMPUS HISTORY IN THE HEADLINES 

1932-33 

REV. ROSS STOVER PLEAf ^D. Qj^^^"^,^\l^n*' '?k#\\u^<S> 



Prominent 



%%,-^S^^ THRONGED ASSEMBLY ^^^^'-.^llf ^^f 
\^ % «»«'**] THRILLEDBY POWEU f^^ ^O^ v^-'Sij^;:;^^- 

RURAI, CLUB TO ».u{^V t»^;. t-^ViW^^^ ^ "<lffea(od Play 

, CONFliKKNXK DA ^\^^^\r;:^^i'^>f \'' «»';- ^™"- li™ k:^" 

' . \.\c*'^ . 'YVvo^*- /'Vai'v^ •Streak Tn it- 

1 Graduate Students And ThaseNow _,,..„^v\^^^'. .^O^ ^^.., ^i *-^^ ^« \ __ ^'^ *'"»'• 

1933-34 
TENNIS TEAM WINS .-0^^%^,. ft, ™^" ■"^"^''^''i CAMPUS PLAYERS SEE '""■ i 

WABAN WARRIORS >%54 t^Zp^sf^^^^^" ^m^^ 
WORK WONDERS;v>>^.S^\.^^^^^^^^ 

'}$?^!^^ v^L^^ t.^^^.ifl^L: 




"DOVER ROAD" GIVEN -■'' *i*ft ^«^r«l#^ .-^^^^ "^ ,! ^^^^ f 0* 

BEFORE RECORD CROWD i,^V^i*l ^^^ ^> ,-"^""" %^%>?.. ^^^PaTEhL. 



Little Theatre IMayers I'roduoc Milne -^/l;.,. ,c<^'>''' '^l>x^^^ ^ Ao^* vv-X * "i-A ""^* . ^4a " ^^ ^'"^ su„ 

IMa, Under Miss Barrer's Direction .g- ^^^ .^^^^, Co^^^ ^ <^^'^^-t oi ^'''l-V "'%. _^'....H ^'n^ .. i^^ *e d^,^"*'"'aQ- ,„. 



CAMPUS HISTORY IN THE HEADLINES 



JUNIOR PROM TO ^■^^^"^ -'ib^^^^ '""i<»^e'"«- ^medle* b™. 
PRESENT FAMOUi- -' Af'/>..'*?^/.r . ■..«cu,^p^c. 




Teachers Conquer ^ _ ^ 

CIRCUS OPENS HERE TONIGHT l^'^^^M,^ ono'^^^^'y 
^■£w Y.'^'l W; ADVM--"*^^«^^ ^ ^»*0 ^ 



UNDEFEATED VAU^V DEFENDS oM SS ' />■ 



INSIDE STORIES 



M7ZW 




1. This doubledecker was a 
West Chester one. 



2. Turner sets the scenery,- 
a play is ready. 



3. Here s a corner of the 
art room and someone 
hard at work. 



4. It's deadline time in the 
Quad Angles office. 



'^ 5. No music "supes" adorn 

this hallway scene. 



6. Mr. Sherman is putting 
his Vis. Ed. " class to 
work. 



7. The women's dorm rooms 
differ little from those of 

Wayne Hall. 



If it isn't a pair of 
students at v^^ork! 



O. He must be speaking 
"Another Language. 



OUTDOOR STORIES 

ss 

1 1 



1. Aha! another fire drill 



2. Soccer, Football, track- 
what season is this? 



3. Tony just wasn t taking 
a picture at this time. 



4. Philips Memorial seems 
ready to be snowed 
under. 



5. Up the driveway — end 
we're heading for class. 



6. Miss Ramsey found the 
footing icy on this morn- 



7. Look out, Booth, or 
you'll take that picture. 



No help with that "flat" 
from these "friends.' 



9. These lassies might be 
looking for four - leaf 
clovers. 



10. It's only March — but 
that doesn't stop the 
tennis team. 




MORE REAL LIFE STORIES 




1, There's Wolfe at work 
in the darkroom. 



2. Dra A/ your own con- 
^^% elusions. 



3, Deep in nature s text. 



4 It looks to be a pre-class 
bull - session" in the 

quad- 



5, Four in the net but the 
score is tied. 



6. Climbing up those gold- 
en stairs. " 



7. Stover, our genial drum 
major is built up! 



8. Continued story — ye 
goldfishes, this fellow 
hasn t gotten any help 
yet! 



9. It must be the day after 
Lower Court met. 



WINTER REIGNS ON CAMPUS 



1. A bit of assistance need- 
ed here. 




2. Lights on! Richard \-\a\- i 
liburton is here. 



3. North Door's guiding 
star shines out. 



4. Only a fire drill inter- 
rupts classes. 



5. A snow battle rages. 
Score 1-0. 



6. Men working! Go slow! 



7. 10:30 A.M. and Chapel 'y^i.f 



The snow doesn't seem V 
to bother these health 
eds. 




9. Lights on! But nobody's 
home. 



10. hHiberroting until spring. 







FAVORITE HAUNTS 




Main dorm's veranda. 



The campus furnishing store. 




11 see you at the P. and G. 




Pre-chapel "bull-session. 



A rendezvous in the park. 



FAVORITE HAUNTS 




South Campus — a beauty spot in sf 



Let's sit in the balconv 




In training on Wayne Field. 




Here for an after-movie hamburger. 



Westchester's "Old Ox Road. 




Together we have traveled over the campus seeing every building and its port 
in college life. We have paused to get the history of our college and to see the faculty 
members who have given their time to the teaching profession. Then we met the 
graduating class — those who are realizing for the first time the significance of the word 
"Commencement". We hove seen the fine spirit of the underclassmen The innumerable 

Two hundred 




extra-curricular groups attracted our attention, and we hurried on to the many athletic 
activities. In the past few pages are pictured experiences which will long hold a 
cherished place in our memories. 

From the air we get this view of the campus which paints a comprehensive picture 
that will live indelibly in our thoughts of West Chester. 

Two hundred one 




WHERE A MAN'S A MAN 

Wayne Hall serves as a resting place, a dressing room, a recreation center, and as a 
study hall for West Chester's mole youth. 



Two hundred two 



ADVERTISING 



Many readers completely overlook the section of a 
college yearbook which is devoted to the advertisers and 
patrons. They forget that much of any success that is gained 
has been made possible by the support of those who aid us 
here. To the latter is due our most sincere appreciation for 
their help and our greater cognizance of the important part 
they have played in our Annual. 

Some of these friends have been with us ever since the 
first Serpentine was published twenty-five years ago,- others 
have joined our ranks in comparatively recent years,- and a 
few more names are appearing in this section for the first 
time. The Serpentine has come to mean much to many of 
them. They are loyal — extremely so. One need talk only 
a few minutes to any of the individuals represented to 
discover this. 

The Serpentine staff is proud to have such persons as 
backers. It is they who help assure a year-by-year improve- 
ment in the quality of every yearbook published at West 
Chester. 






' a„. 









,»«»-, ..^ 



S^^^i 



Two fiundred three 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT 



THE STAFF OF THE 



1936 SERPENTINE 



express their thanks to all those who have in any way aided in the 
construction of this yearbook. We especially wish to acknowledge 
our indebtedness to the following individuals for their continued help: 



Mr. George A. Temple Printer 

Mr. hierbert D. Lachman Photographer 

Mr. Anthony Foderaro Photographer 

Mr. hHarry C. Firth Engraver 

Miss Hazel L. Lomborn Art Instructor 



Tv>/o hundred Four 



PATRONS OF THE 1936 SERPENTINE 

Atlantic and Pacific Tea Co Philadelphia, Pa. 

American Stores Co Philadelphia, Pa. 

Benson's West Chester, Pa. 

Boston Shoe Store West Chester, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Brewer Kennett Square, Pa. 

Mrs. C. S. Chrisman West Chester, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Cloud West Chester, Pa. 

Mrs. Ida M. Dick West Chester, Pa. 

Dr. Edward Doran West Chester, Pa. 

Dr. R. K. Eldridge Upper Darby, Pa. 

Mrs. Frank Evans West Chester, Pa. 

Mr. J. Carroll hHayes West Chester, Pa. 

Mr. Lewis hHickman, Jr West Chester, Pa. 

hiilyard's West Chester, Pa. 

Mr. H. G. Hutt West Chester, Pa. 

Mr. Jay H. Jefferis West Chester, Pa. 

Katy-Did Beauty Salon West Chester, Pa. 

King hHardware Co West Chester, Pa. 

Dr. Kramer West Chester, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Kreemer West Chester, Pa. 

Marakos Candy Kitchen West Chester, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Menhennett West Chester, Pa. 

Oriole Tea Room West Chester, Pa. 

Edith Passmore West Chester, Pa. 

Mr. S. C. Schmucker West Chester, Pa. 

Rev. H. C. Schuyler West Chester, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Shields West Chester, Pa. 

Mrs. Andrew Thomas Smith West Chester, Pa. 

Standard Brands, Inc East Lansdowne, Pa. 

Mr. G. Clancy Wilson West Chester, Pa. 



Two hundred five 




There Is Something About Good 
Printing That Everybody Likes 



Intelligently planned printing is our chief interest 
in life. We are producing it everyday for 
many customers to wfiom we will gladly refer 
you. We sfiall appreciate the opportunity to 
offer suggestions regarding ways in which 
printing will profit your business. 



Horace F Temple, 



NC 



PRINTER and DESIGNER 

235 East Gay Street 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 



1--^ 



'Uti i 



t- 1 T 



;t 



i H' 






'S^ *\ ."^ 



' '-^ w^ ^^ (7p|f" 



Two hundred six 



ST. AGNES CHURCH 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 

Rector, Rev. H. C, Schuyler, LL.D. 

Assistants 

Rev. J. M. O'Connor, (Chaplain, Newman Club) 

Rev. J. M. Farreii 

Hours of Masses. Sundays 6.30, 7.30, 8.30, 9.30, 11.00 
Holydays: 5.30, 7.00, 9.00 
First Fridays 6.00, 7.00 
Weekdoys, except Saturdays, 6 30, 
Saturdays, 7 15 



CALVARY EVANGELICAL 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

WEST CHESTER, PA. 

Rev. CAROLUS P HARRY, D.D., Pastor 

Sunday School, 9.45 

Student Class, 10:00 
Church Service, 11.00 



Pastor's Study 
624 S. High St. 



.in the 
New Century Club 
High and Lacey Sts. 





ST 


PAUL'S BAPTIST CHURCH 

Rev, J. C CLARK, Minister 




Su 


nday Servi 
B. 


:es Morning Worship 
y. P. U 6 45 7.45 E 


10 45, Bible Schc 
vening Worship 


ol 1.00, 


Weekly Sen 


/ices: Wednesday Even 
Friday, Jr Chur 


ng Prayer Meetir 
ch 7 30 


g 8.00, 


Pas! 


or's Sludv, 


252 E. Gay Si. 


Church, E 


Miner St. 



NEARBY CLEANERS & DYERS 




"Our Service 


Will 


Please You" 




128 N. High St. 




West Chester, 


Pa. 



Compliments of 

THE 

MANSION HOUSE 
HOTEL 

West Chester, Penna. 



Compliments 


of 

Dime Savinss Bank of 
Chester County 

The First National Bank of 
West Chester 

National Bank of Chester County 
and Trust Company 





Two hundred seven 



Compliments 
...of... 



Purple & Gold 
Tea Room 



H. 


R. AIKEN CO. 


Butter - 


Eggs - Cheese - Poultry 


128 


N. Delaware Avenue 
Philadelphia 



DRESS — SPORT — EVENING 
FOOTWEAR 

CLICK'S SHOE SHOP 

OFFICIAL HEALTH ED STORE 
38 W. GAY ST. WEST CHESTER, PA 



Standard Zoological Products Co. 

11 WEST 42nd ST, NEW YORK, N V 

Originators and Distributors of EMBALMED 
Bullfrogs, Turtles, Pigeons, Rats, Etc. 



SPEARE 


BROTHERS 


Women's W 


earing Apparel 


43 WEST GAY ST. 


WEST CHESTER - 


- - PENNSYLVANIA 

1 



Compliments 
of 



Fruit Growers of Chester County, Inc. 



Call the. 




Bradley Market Co. 


2106 


and 2108 Market Streetj 




Philadelphia, Pa. 


for 


QUALITY MEATS 




RIT. 7070 



USE SCHOOL TICKETS 
and SAVE 



5c School Tickets May be Purchased 
at College Book Room 

Good Until Used on 
Eleclric Cars and Motor Buses 



FREE TRANSFER AT 
69th ST. TERMINAL 



Aronomink Transportation Co. 
Philadelphia & West Chester Traction Co. 



Two hundred eight 



BLACK-DEATH Vapo Spray 
Equipmentand BLACK-DEATH 
Vaporizing Fluid used by Penn- 
sylvania State Institutions for 
positive extermination of all 
kinds of household pests. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Clarkson Chemical 
& Supply Co. 

INCORPORATED 

Williamsport, 
Penna. 



Every th in g Musical 




13 th and Arch Sts. 



Compliments 
of 

HELEN Z. STONE, Inc. 

NEW yORK CITY 



1 


Compliments 
of 




J. 


S. IVINS SON, 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 


Inc. 




PENNANTS 


- BANNERS - 


PILLOWS 


Add dignity, c 
the use of Fe 
Caps, Tarns, 


olor, and sprrit to your scho 
I Pennants, Banners, Pillow 
and Chenille Letters. No 
ve our attention. Catalogue 


ol work by 
, Emblems, 
order too 




STANDARD PENNANT CO. 


Big Run, 


Pa. 



REAM'S 

INCORPORATED 

Educational Materials and Bool<$ 

LANCASTER, PENNA. 



Compliments 
of 

JACOB H. SMITH & CO 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Compliments 
of 



GULF REFINING CO, 



SHENK & 


TITLE 


• 




Everything 


for 


SPORT 


• 




313 Market 


Street 


Harrisburg, 


Pa. 



Two hundred nine 



Covers 

for the 

1936 Serpentine 

Manufactured by 

National Publishing Co. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



GAY 


-DEL 


MARKET 


Fresh Meats 


- Groceries 


124 W. 


Gay St, 


West Chester, Pa. 


PHONE 1766 


Delivery ^ 


ervice Open Eveninss 




"CATALOG FREE" 

518-516 MARKET STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 



WILLIAMS 


BROWN & EARLE 


Inc. 




PROJECTION EQUIPMENT 






Lanlern Slide, Motio 


n Picture, Strip Film for Visua 


lEduc 


ation 


Microscopes, Engineeri 


Tg, Photosraphic Apparatu 


s and 


Supplies 


918 Ch 


stnul St., Philadelphia, Pa. 







THE PARISAN 



HIGH GRADE 
SHOE REPAIRING 



4 East Maiket Street 



West Chester, Pa. 



CENTRAL TEACHERS AGENCY 

202 Walnut St., Harrisburg, Pa. 

MEMBER NATIONAL ASSOCIATION TEACHERS AGENCIES 

For Information, address 

C. H. GORDINIER, Manager 

(Ex. President Millersville State Teachers College) 



Complimenis 
...of. . 



DeHaven's Drug Stores 

of 

West Chester 

106 West Gay Street 
Branch Store, Hish and Dean Streets 



"Jewelry of the Better 
Sort Since 1893» 



J. F. Apple Co., Inc. 

Manufacturing 

JEWELERS 



Lancaster/ Pennsylvania 



Quality Jewelry 
Fully Guaranteed 



Manufacturers of Pins and Rings for 
West Chester State Teachers College 



Two hundred ten 



HIGHLAND DAIRY 
PRODUCTS CO. 

West Chester, Pa. 
Dairy Products 

PHONE 767 



10-14 W. Ba 


E. EARL GIBSON 

rnard St. 

ATWATER KENT RADIO 


Pho 


ne 983 


Auto Repciin 


g 


Aulomot 


«e Elec 


tricions 


Deico 


Klaxo 


n Remy Northeast Auto Lite 







PURE 


FOOD 






Sc.entificc 


lly Cooked 






LORRAINE DINING ROOM 




135 


E. Gay Street 


West Chester 


Pa. 



The Printing House of 
Charles H. Andress 

Court House Annex 
Phone— West Chester 1940 

We are experts in helping 
you design a letter-head that 
will fit your exact business 
requirements. Consult us re- 
garding your business printing 
problems. 



Compliments of 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



1939 



Two hundred eleven 



NOT 



^^Just photographs** but portraits 
- - faithful in likeness - - truthful 
in character - - attractive in 
finish - - and reasonable in price. 



PHILLIPS STUDIO 

1507 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia 



Otficial Photographer to the State Teachers College 



Two hundred twelve 



When you're uptown 






and hungry 






PREFTAK S 


1 
1 




guarantees to 


you 




satisfaction 




Cor. 


hiigh and Gay Sts. Phone 


2274 



Willie 


m B. Sm 


th 
J 


B. 


SMITH & SON 


n B. 


T. Smith 


115-117 E. G 
Phone 630.J 


ay Si 


eel Wes 

Directors of Funerals 


Chs 


iter, Pa. 

j 
Chapel j 



c 


Dinp 


liments of.. 






' 






DAILY 


LOCAL 


NEWS 




s. 


Hi 


ghSt. 


w 


est Chester 


Po. 



"BEST for LESS" 
BEN'S FRUIT MARKET 

West Chester, Pa. 



VISIT 

SIl^p pnt anil Kettle iCnn 

WILMINGTON PIKE 



MISS HELEN PACKARD 



West Chester 
Lions Club 



Compliments of 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



1938 



Two hundred thirteen 



Compliments of 



EACHUS" DAIRIES 



Manufacturers of the Ice Cream whose 

"FLAVOR finds F A V O R » 



Phone 1271 



WEST CHESTER, PA. 





Every Wish for Success from 






Your 


"riend 






C. G. 


SCOTT 


of West 


Chester 


The 


American Crayon 


Company 


SANDUSKY, 


OHIO 




NEW YORK 






1835 


- 1935 




«Shar 


ng With 


you Ou 


100 Years of Progress" 





Compliments 




of 


A 


FRIEND 



Keystone, Main 7647 
Bell, Market 4612 
Bell, Market 4613 



G. G. GEIKLER 
A. K. GEIKLER 
D. G. GEIKLER 



ESTABLISHED 1850 



GEIKLER BROTHERS 

Meats and 
Provisions 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL 



405-407 NORTH SECOND STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Two hundred fourteen 



Garrett's Flower Shop 

Funeral and Wedding 

Decorations 

16E. Goy St. 

Phone 258 West Chester, Pa. 



Kift' Greenhouses 

Full Line of Pottery and 

Glassware 

316 S. High St. 

Phone 743 West Chester, Pa. 



TyPEWRITERS, FOUNTAIN PENS, STATIONERY 
AND GREETING CARDS 

J. J. MADEIRA 



13 W. GAY ST. 



WEST CHESTER, PA. 




ASK YOUR GROCER 



A Delicacy .... 

for every table I 

Hot cakes, muffins or waffles 

are only at their best wfien 

served witfi 

TURKEY TABLE SYRUP 

A luscious, economical syrup 

Manufactured by 

J. STROMEYER CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 





Compliments 






...of 






s. 


Goldstein 


Company 




120 N 


8th Ave. 


Coatesville, 


Pa. 



Compliments of 










West Chester Soroptim 


St CI 


Jb 






A SERVICE CLUB 










for Business and Pro 


essionc 


1 Won 


nen 



ZORIC DRY CLEANING 

IS ODORLESS 

Clothes are Cleoner Colors Brighter A New Modern Method 

WEST CHESTER LAUNDRY 

Office, 22 S. Cfiutch St. 



Compliments of 



JUNIOR CLASS 



1937 



Two fiundred fifteen 



U-£L 





J^^ eacL 

In working with the Serpentine StaFf for the past year it has 
been our aim to help produce an annual which is 
in its class. We hope that we have been successfu 
that, year after year, the advice of each retiring 
Staff will be 

"Repeat a'ith Lotz" 

ENGRAVERS AND DESIGNERS OF 
NEARLY 100 YEAR BOOKS ANNUALLY 



PHOTO tncRfivinc compftnY 



COLLtCt fJnnUftL D€PfiRTm€nT 
lam and C+iERRY STRtETS 
P«IL-ftD€LPfflA 



Two hundred sixteen 



ROOMS FOR STUDENTS 

Three Doors from the Campus College Approved 

FAMILIES ACCOMMODATED 

Reservations Taken Core Of 

MRS. F. L. GRANT'S TOURIST HOME 

624 S. High St., West Chester, Pa. Phone West Chester 701 









OLD GOLD 


SILVER 
STAMPS 




Exc 


hange 


ami 


V heirlooms foroneducot 


on— which CO 


not be stolen 


Re 


iable 


H 


ghest prices paid for scro 


pgoldorsilve 
omount 


Confidential 


624 S, High 5 


MRS. FRANCES G 

, West Chester, Pa. 


GRANT ! 
Phone West Chester 701 1 



The Ice Cream with the Flavor 

that always wins 

Favor 

West Chester Ice Cream Co. 

Phone 771 

243 West Gay Street 



THE 


MOSTELLER 


! STORE 


A department store 

for all the people 


West Chester, Pa. 



CHARTER BUS SERVICE 

for All Occasions 
Finest TV CP ^l—f- Reasonable 

CnVLmCU3UrW Rates 



Equipment 



Phone West Chester 170 



THE COFFEE HOUSE. 



Extends gracious hosoitality to guests at Sunday 
and Holiday Dinners, Weekdoy Luncheons and 
Dinners. 

87 SOUTH HIGH STREET WEST CHESTER, PA. 

Telephone 2276 



McMINN'S ICE CREAM 

Gay and Walnul Sts. West Chester, Pa. 



Compliments of . 



A FRIEND 



Comphments of 



WEST CHESTER 
ROTARY CLUB 



WEST CHESTER 
BOARD of TRADE 



I'f are proud oj our col/t-i/e mi,/ all 
it mcan.v lo JFcl C/ws/cr 



OfFicers 

HENRY V. DeHAVEN, President 
CLINTON R. MOSTELLER, Secreio 
J. HARRY THOMAS, Treasurer 



Compliments of 

SCATTERGOOD MOTORS, Inc. 

Authorized Service ond Soles 

BUICK 

325 East Gay Street West Chester, Pa. 





WHEN IN NEED OF ANYTHING IN 




CANVAS 




See or Coll 




The HOWARD EHMKE CO., Inc. 


j 8th and So 


nerset Streets Philadelphia, Pa. 




PHONES: Rod. 8282 and Park 3068 



Two hundred seventeen 



THE 

NATIONAL ACADEMIC 
CAP & GOWN CO. 

821-823 ARCH STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Manufacturers and Outfitters of 

ACADEMIC CAPS 

GOWNS and HOODS 

CHOIR and PULPIT VESTMENTS 
and 
JUDICIAL ROBES 



Compliments of 


i 


WEST CHESTER HARDWARE CO. ' 




11 No. Church St 




West Chester, Pa. 



Wood's Cut-Rate Drug Store 
36 West Gay St. 
West Chester, Pa. 



Say It With FLOWERS— Through 

LORGUS FLOWER SHOP 

Flower Phone 81 
WEST CHEST ERS TELEGRAPH FLORIST 



Dance to the Fragrance of a Corsage — from 

KIFT'S 

Enjoy the beauty of Fresh Cut Flowers 
316 SOUTH HIGH STREET 

JOHN S. GARREn, Prop. 

















EDWARD 


H. JACOB 


Inc. 






MUSHROOMS 








Fresh 


and Canned 




WEST 


CHESTER 






PENNSYLVANIA 



HOFFMAN & BALDWIN 



LUMBER 



WEST CHESTER, PA. 



Phone: West Chester 745 





Compliments 
of 




' c. 

! 
1 


C. Hipp e & 

West Chester, 
Penna. 


Son 



Two hundred eighteen 



AUTOGRAPHS 



Two hundred nineteen 




Two hundred twenty 




Two hundred twenty-one 



IN APPRECIATION 



The Senior Class wishes to express the sincere regret 
felt by faculty and students alike when it became known 
that Miss Isadore E. Cropsey, the senior member of the music 
faculty, had resigned. 

Miss Cropsey came to the College, then the Normal 
School, in 1906 and for the past thirty years has served the 
school as a teacher of outstanding merit. A woman of fine 
musical training, endowed with a genuine taste for the best, 
she added to these qualities a rare teaching skill and an 
earnest desire to establish high musical standards at West 
Chester. In this aim she has not been disappointed, and 
hosts of successful graduates declare that in the development 
of their appreciation and skill Miss Cropsey played no small 
port. 

Although we regret Miss Cropsey's going, we congrat- 
ulate her on the fine reputation as teacher and musician 
which she has built up for herself, and we wish for her many 
happy years relieved from the burden of teaching, which 
she has so gallantly born, and made bright by the affection- 
ate remembrance of a host of devoted students and friends. 



The members of the Serpentine Staff regret very much that they 
did not know of Miss Cropsey's resignation until it v/as too late to 
place the acknowledgment of her services to the College in the first 
part of the book. 



Two hundred twenty-two 




MIbb IbADORE E. CROPSEY 

Miss Isadora E. Cropsey was born in Oswego, New York. Here she received her elementary and high 
school training. After graduation Miss Cropsey enrolled in the Leefson-Hille Conservatory of Music in Phila- 
delphia, where she studied under Mauritz Leefson. Upon the completion of her work at this conservatory she 
received a diploma and a certificate for teaching. She also studied the Leschetizsky Method of Piano under 
hHorold Nason in Philadelphia. Miss Cropsey has confined her teaching activities to music. Before coming to 
West Chester in 1906, M:ss Cropsey taught at the Wilmington Conference Academy and at the Abington Friends 
School, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania. 



Two hundred twenty-three 



CYcarbookl '^' v: ;•..-*' ) Member) 





3 







->T\tr^'tt, -